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Sample records for ferritic alloy 14ywt

  1. Tensile deformation and fracture properties of a 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, M.E., E-mail: alam@engineering.ucsb.edu [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Pal, S.; Fields, K. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Maloy, S.A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Hoelzer, D.T. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Odette, G.R. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2016-10-15

    A new larger heat of a 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy (NFA), FCRD NFA-1, was synthesized by ball milling FeO and argon atomized Fe-14Cr-3W-0.4Ti-0.2Y (wt%) powders, followed by hot extrusion, annealing and cross rolling to produce an ≈10 mm-thick plate. NFA-1 contains a bimodal size distribution of pancake-shaped, mostly very fine scale, grains. The as-processed plate also contains a large population of microcracks running parallel to its broad surfaces. The small grains and large concentration of Y–Ti–O nano-oxides (NOs) result in high strength up to 800 °C. The uniform and total elongations range from ≈1–8%, and ≈10–24%, respectively. The strength decreases more rapidly above ≈400 °C and deformation transitions to largely viscoplastic creep by ≈600 °C. While the local fracture mechanism is generally ductile-dimple microvoid nucleation, growth and coalescence, perhaps the most notable feature of tensile deformation behavior of NFA-1 is the occurrence of periodic delamination, manifested as fissures on the fracture surfaces.

  2. The role of processing route on the microstructure of 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy

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    Mazumder, B., E-mail: mazumderb@ornl.gov [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Parish, C.M.; Bei, H. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Miller, M.K. [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys have outstanding high temperature creep properties and enhanced tolerance to radiation damage over conventional ferritic alloys. To achieve these properties, NFAs are fabricated by mechanical alloying of metallic and yttria powders. Atom probe tomography has demonstrated that milling times of at least 40 h are required to produce a uniform distribution of solutes in the flakes. After milling and hot extrusion, the microstructure consists of α-Fe, high number densities of Ti–Y–O-vacancy-enriched nanoclusters, and coarse Y{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} and Ti(O,C,N) precipitates on the grain boundaries. In contrast, the as-cast condition consists of α-Fe with 50–100 μm irregularly-shaped Y{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} pyrochlore precipitates with smaller embedded precipitates with the Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} (yttrium–aluminum garnet) crystal structure indicating that this traditional processing route is not a viable approach to achieve the desired microstructure. The nano-hardnesses were also substantially different, i.e., 4 and 8 GPa for the as-cast and as-extruded conditions, respectively. These variances can be explained by the microstructural differences and the effects of the high vacancy content introduced by mechanical alloying, and the strong binding energy of vacancies with O, Ti, and Y atoms that retard diffusion. - Highlights: • Mechanical alloying produces nanostructured ferritic alloy with excellent properties. • Short milling time wastes solutes in low number densities of coarse precipitates. • Milling for 40 h yields UFG alloy with optimum distribution of ultrafine precipitates. • Longer milling times increase cost and increases impurities from attritor mill. • Casting produces undesirable course grain microstructure of α-Fe, YAG and pyrochlore.

  3. Status of Joining Thin Sheet and Thin Wall Tubes of 14YWT

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    Hoelzer, David T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Unocic, Kinga A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tang, Wei [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Feng, Zhili [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-18

    Beginning this fiscal year, the FCRD research project initiated an investigation on joining thin sections of the advanced ODS 14YWT ferritic alloy. Friction stir welding (FSW) was investigated as a method to join thin plate and tubing of 14YWT since it is a solid state joining method that has been shown in past studies to be a promising method for joining plates of ODS alloys, such as 14YWT. However, this study will attempt to be the first to demonstrate if FSW can successfully join thin plates and thin wall tubing of 14YWT. In the first FSW attempt, a 1.06 cm thick plate of 14YWT (SM13 heat) was successfully rolled at 1000ºC to the target thickness of 0.1 cm with no edge cracking. This achievement is a highlight since previous attempts to roll 14YWT plates have resulted in extensive cracking. For the FSW run, a pin tool being developed by the ORNL FSW Process Development effort was used. The first FSW run successfully produced a bead-on-plate weld in the 0.1 cm thick plate. The quality of the weld zone appears very good with no evidence of large defects such as cavities. The microstructural characterization study of the bead-on-plate weld zone has been initiated to compare the results of the microstructure analysis with those obtained in the reference microstructural analysis of the 14YWT (SM13 heat) that showed ultra-fine grain size of 0.43 μm and a high number density of ~2-5 nm sizes oxygen-enriched nanoclusters.

  4. Energetic Study of Helium Cluster Nucleation and Growth in 14YWT through First Principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingye Gan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available First principles calculations have been performed to energetically investigate the helium cluster nucleation, formation and growth behavior in the nano-structured ferritic alloy 14YWT. The helium displays strong affinity to the oxygen:vacancy (O:Vac pair. By investigating various local environments of the vacancy, we find that the energy cost for He cluster growth increases with the appearance of solutes in the reference unit. He atom tends to join the He cluster in the directions away from the solute atoms. Meanwhile, the He cluster tends to expand in the directions away from the solute atoms. A growth criterion is proposed based on the elastic instability strain of the perfect iron lattice in order to determine the maximum number of He atoms at the vacancy site. We find that up to seven He atoms can be trapped at a single vacancy. However, it is reduced to five if the vacancy is pre-occupied by an oxygen atom. Furthermore, the solute atoms within nanoclusters, such as Ti and Y, will greatly limit the growth of the He cluster. A migration energy barrier study is performed to discuss the reduced mobility of the He atom/He cluster in 14YWT.

  5. Characterization of BOR-60 Irradiated 14YWT-NFA1 Tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleh, Tarik A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Maloy, Stuart Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Aydogan, Eda [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Quintana, Matthew Estevan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Romero, Tobias J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-15

    Tubes of FCRD 14YWT-NFA1 Alloy were placed in the BOR-60 reactor and irradiated under a fast flux neutron environment to two conditions: 7 dpa at 360-370 °C and 6 dpa at 385-430 °C. Small sections of the tube were cut and sent to UC Berkeley for nanohardness testing and focused ion beam (FIB) milling of TEM specimens. FIB specimens were sent back to LANL for final FIB milling and TEM imaging. Hardness data and TEM images are presented in this report. This is the first fast reactor neutron irradiated information on the 14YWT-NFA1 alloy.

  6. Optimized Compositional Design and Processing-Fabrication Paths for Larger Heats of Nanostructured Ferritic Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odette, G. Robert [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    2017-02-06

    The objective of this work was to characterize the alloy 14YWT-PM2, which is an extruded and cross-rolled precursor alloy to a large heat of 14YWT being produced using an alternative processing path that incorporates Y during gas atomization process.

  7. Spherical Nanoindentation Stress-Strain Measurements of BOR-60 14YWT-NFA1 Irradiated Tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, Jordan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Carvajal Nunez, Ursula [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Krumwiede, David [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Saleh, Tarik A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hosemann, Peter [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Nelson, Andrew Thomas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Maloy, Stuart Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mara, Nathan Allan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-28

    Spherical nanoindentation stress-strain protocols were applied to characterize unirradiated and fast neutron irradiated nanostructured ferritic alloy (NFA) 14YWT and compared against Berkovich nanohardness and available tensile data. The predicted uniaxial yield strength from spherical, 100 and 5 micron radii, indentation yield strength measurements was 1100-1400 MPa which compares well with the predictions from Berkovich nanohardness, 1200 MPa, and available tensile data, ~1100 MPa. However, spherical indentation measurements predict an increase in the uniaxial yield strength of ~1 GPa while Berkovich nanohardness measurements predict an increase of only ~250 MPa. No tensile data exists on the irradiated condition. It is believed the difference in the predicted uniaxial yield strength between spherical and Berkovich nanoindentation are due to a low number of tests on the irradiated sample combined with the significant heterogeneity in the microstructure, the differences in sensitivity to sample preparation on the irradiated sample between the two indentation protocols , and/or in how strain localizes under the indenter with the possibility of dislocation channeling under Berkovich hardness indents leading to strain softening. Nanoindentation capabilities to test neutron irradiated samples in a radiological area were realized.

  8. Complete Status Report Documenting Development of Friction Stir Welding for Joining Thin Wall Tubing of ODS Alloys

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    Hoelzer, David T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bunn, Jeffrey R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gussev, Maxim N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The development of friction stir welding (FSW) for joining thin sections of the advanced oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) 14YWT ferritic alloy was initiated in Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD), now the Nuclear Technology Research and Development (NTRD), in 2015. The first FSW experiment was conducted in late FY15 and successfully produced a bead-on-plate stir zone (SZ) on a 1 mm thick plate of 14YWT (SM13 heat). The goal of this research task is to ultimately demonstrate that FSW is a feasible method for joining thin wall (0.5 mm thick) tubing of 14YWT.

  9. Detection and quantification of solute clusters in a nanostructured ferritic alloy

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    Miller, M.K., E-mail: millermk@ornl.gov [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6139 (United States); Reinhard, D., E-mail: David.Reinhard@ametek.com [CAMECA Instruments, Inc., 5500 Nobel Drive, Madison, WI 53711 (United States); Larson, D.J., E-mail: David.Larson@ametek.com [CAMECA Instruments, Inc., 5500 Nobel Drive, Madison, WI 53711 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Simulated APT data indicate that solute clusters can be resolved at 80% detection efficiency. • Solute clusters containing 2–9 atoms were detected in a prototype ∼80% detection efficiency LEAP. • High densities, 1.8 × 10{sup 24} m{sup −3}, of solute clusters were detected in as-milled flakes of 14YWT. • Lower densities, 1.2 × 10{sup 24} m{sup −3}, were detected in the stir zone of a FSW. • Vacancies stabilize the clusters, which retard diffusion and confers excellent stability. - Abstract: A series of simulated atom probe datasets were examined with a friends-of-friends method to establish the detection efficiency required to resolve solute clusters in the ferrite phase of a 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy. The size and number densities of solute clusters in the ferrite of the as-milled mechanically-alloyed condition and the stir zone of a friction stir weld were estimated with a prototype high-detection-efficiency (∼80%) local electrode atom probe. High number densities, 1.8 × 10{sup 24} m{sup −3} and 1.2 × 10{sup 24} m{sup −3}, respectively of solute clusters containing between 2 and 9 solute atoms of Ti, Y and O and were detected for these two conditions. These results support first principle calculations that predicted that vacancies stabilize these Ti–Y–O– clusters, which retard diffusion and contribute to the excellent high temperature stability of the microstructure and radiation tolerance of nanostructured ferritic alloys.

  10. Low activation ferritic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelles, David S.; Ghoniem, Nasr M.; Powell, Roger W.

    1986-01-01

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  11. High strength ferritic alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A high strength ferritic steel is specified in which the major alloying elements are chromium and molybdenum, with smaller quantities of niobium, vanadium, silicon, manganese and carbon. The maximum swelling is specified for various irradiation conditions. Rupture strength is also specified. (U.K.)

  12. Toughness testing and high-temperature oxidation evaluations of advanced alloys for core internals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Lizhen [ORNL; Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; Chen, Xiang [ORNL

    2016-09-16

    Alloy X-750 was procured from Carpenter Technology and Bodycote in this year. An appropriate TMT was developed on Alloy 439 to obtain materials with refined grain size for property screening tests. Charpy V-notch impact tests were completed for the three ferritic steels Grade 92, Alloy 439, and 14YWT. Fracture toughness tests at elevated temperatures were completed for 14YWT. The tests will be completed for the other alloys in next fiscal year. Steam oxidation tests of the three ferritic steels, 316L, and Zr–2.5Nb have been completed. The steam tests of the Ni-based superalloys and the other austenitic stainless steels will be continued and finished in next fiscal year. Performance ranking in terms of steam oxidation resistance and impact/fracture toughness of the alloys will be deduced.

  13. Effect of friction stir welding and post-weld heat treatment on a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazumder, B.; Yu, X.; Edmondson, P.D.; Parish, C.M.; Miller, M.K.; Meyer, H.M.; Feng, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) are new generation materials for use in high temperature energy systems, such as nuclear fission or fusion reactors. However, joining these materials is a concern, as their unique microstructure is destroyed by traditional liquid-state welding methods. The microstructural evolution of a friction stir welded 14YWT NFA was investigated by atom probe tomography, before and after a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 1123K. The particle size, number density, elemental composition, and morphology of the titanium-yttrium-oxygen-enriched nanoclusters (NCs) in the stir and thermally-affected zones were studied and compared with the base metal. No statistical difference in the size of the NCs was observed in any of these conditions. After the PWHT, increases in the number density and the oxygen enrichment in the NCs were observed. Therefore, these new results provide additional supporting evidence that friction stir welding appears to be a viable joining technique for NFAs, as the microstructural parameters of the NCs are not strongly affected, in contrast to traditional welding techniques.

  14. Effect of friction stir welding and post-weld heat treatment on a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazumder, B., E-mail: mazumderb@ornl.gov [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Yu, X.; Edmondson, P.D.; Parish, C.M. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Miller, M.K. [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Meyer, H.M.; Feng, Z. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) are new generation materials for use in high temperature energy systems, such as nuclear fission or fusion reactors. However, joining these materials is a concern, as their unique microstructure is destroyed by traditional liquid-state welding methods. The microstructural evolution of a friction stir welded 14YWT NFA was investigated by atom probe tomography, before and after a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 1123K. The particle size, number density, elemental composition, and morphology of the titanium-yttrium-oxygen-enriched nanoclusters (NCs) in the stir and thermally-affected zones were studied and compared with the base metal. No statistical difference in the size of the NCs was observed in any of these conditions. After the PWHT, increases in the number density and the oxygen enrichment in the NCs were observed. Therefore, these new results provide additional supporting evidence that friction stir welding appears to be a viable joining technique for NFAs, as the microstructural parameters of the NCs are not strongly affected, in contrast to traditional welding techniques.

  15. Lower Length Scale Characterization and Validation of Formation and Stability of Helium Bubbles in Nano-structured Ferritic Alloys under Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Huijuan [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Yun, Di [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hoelzer, David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). BioEnergy Science Center (BESC)

    2018-01-30

    In order to extend the operating license of current light water reactors (LWRs) in the United States and other countries to as many as 80 years or longer, it is demanding to identify potential materials for many of the internal structural components and fasteners. We proposed that 14YWT iron alloy can be adopted in such applications with its excellent material properties, such as high-temperature strength, low creep rate, and high irradiation resistance. Application with 14YWT would improve the void/helium swelling characteristics of the LWR fuels, extend the burn-up limits with the tolerant temperature up to 800oC and reduce the hydrogen production. One key feature of 14YWT material property enhancement is the ultrafine high density of 2-4nm Y-Ti-O enriched nanoclusters (NCs) within the 14YWT iron matrix. The NCs can effectively pin the ultra-fine grain boundaries and dislocations, which significantly enhance mechanical properties of the alloy. Moreover, these nanoclusters remain stable with no coarsening after a large dose of ion irradiation. After ion irradiation, the helium bubbles are observed extremely uniform in size (1nm) and quite homogeneously distributed within the 14YWT matrix, which indicates that the microstructure of 14YWT remains remarkably tolerance to radiation damage. However, there is a lack of understanding of 14YWT both theoretically and experimentally in order to understand the mechanism behind the material property enhancement and to further develop and design a new generation of advanced structural material for current LWR applications and future fusion applications.

  16. Process development for 9Cr nanostructured ferritic alloy (NFA) with high fracture toughness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Yoon, Ji Hyun; Hoelzer, David T.; Lee, Yong Bok; Kang, Suk Hoon; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2014-01-01

    This article is to summarize the process development and key characterization results for the newly-developed Fe–9Cr based nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) with high fracture toughness. One of the major drawbacks from pursuing ultra-high strength in the past development of NFAs is poor fracture toughness at high temperatures although a high fracture toughness is essential to prevent cracking during manufacturing and to mitigate or delay irradiation-induced embrittlement in irradiation environments. A study on fracture mechanism using the NFA 14YWT found that the low-energy grain boundary decohesion in fracture process at a high temperature (>200 °C) resulted in low fracture toughness. Lately, efforts have been devoted to explore an integrated process to enhance grain bonding. Two base materials were produced through mechanical milling and hot extrusion and designated as 9YWTV-PM1 and 9YWTV-PM2. Isothermal annealing (IA) and controlled rolling (CR) treatments in two phase region were used to enhance diffusion across the interfaces and boundaries. The PM2 alloy after CR treatments showed high fracture toughness (K JQ ) at represented temperatures: 240–280 MPa √m at room temperature and 160–220 MPa √m at 500 °C, which indicates that the goal of 100 MPa √m over possible nuclear application temperature range has been well achieved. Furthermore, it is also confirmed by comparison that the CR treatments on 9YWTV-PM2 result in high fracture toughness similar to or higher than those of the conventional ferritic–martensitic steels such as HT9 and NF616

  17. Oxide dispersion-strengthened ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asbroeck, P. van.

    1976-10-01

    The publication gives the available data on the DTO2 dispersion-strengthened ferritic alloy developed at C.E.N./S.C.K. Mol, Belgium. DTO2 is a Fe-Cr-Mo ferritic alloy, strengthened by addition of titanium oxide and of titanium leading to the formation of Chi phase. It was developed for use as canning material for fast breeder reactors. (author)

  18. Titanium oxide dispersion-strengthened ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrix, W.; Vandermeulen, W.

    1980-04-01

    The available data on the DT02 and DT3911 ferritic dispersion strengthened alloys, developed at SCK/CEN, Mol, Belgium, are presented. Both alloys consist of Fe - 13% Cr - 1.5% Mo to which 2% TiO 2 and about 3.5% Ti are added (wt.%). Their main use is for the fabrication of fast breeder reactor cladding tubes but their application as turbine blade material is also envisaged for cases where high damping is important. (auth.)

  19. Plasticity of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakine, C.; Prioul, C.; Alamo, A.; Francois, D.

    1993-01-01

    Two 13%Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic alloys, DT and DY, exhibiting different oxide particle size distribution and a χ phase precipitation were studied. Their tensile properties have been tested from 20 to 700 C. Experimental observations during room temperature tensile tests performed in a scanning electronic microscope have shown that the main damage mechanism consists in microcracking of the χ phase precipitates on grain boundaries. These alloys are high tensile and creep resistant between 500 and 700 C. Their strongly stress-sensitive creep behaviour can be described by usual creep laws and incorporating a threshold stress below which the creep rate is negligible. (orig.)

  20. Positron annihilation characterization of nanostructured ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alinger, M.J.; Glade, S.C.; Wirth, B.D.; Odette, G.R.; Toyama, T.; Nagai, Y.; Hasegawa, M.

    2009-01-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) were produced by mechanically alloying Fe-14Cr-3W-0.4Ti and 0.25Y 2 O 3 (wt%) powders followed by hot isostatic pressing consolidation at 850, 1000 and 1150 deg. C. Positron annihilation lifetime and orbital momentum spectroscopy measurements are in qualitative agreement with small angle neutron scattering, transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography observations, indicating that up to 50% of the annihilations occur at high densities of Y-Ti-O enriched nm-scale features (NFs). Some annihilations may also occur in small cavities. In Y-free control alloys, that do not contain NFs, positrons primarily annihilate in the Fe-Cr matrix and at features such as dislocations, while a small fraction annihilate in large cavities or Ar bubbles.

  1. Effect of alloying element partitioning on ferrite hardening in a low alloy ferrite-martensite dual phase steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebrahimian, A., E-mail: ebrahimiana@yahoo.com; Ghasemi Banadkouki, S.S.

    2016-11-20

    In this paper, the effect of carbon and other alloying elements partitioning on ferrite hardening behavior were studied in details using a low alloy AISI4340 ferrite-martensite dual phase (DP) steel. To do so, various re-austenitised samples at 860 °C for 60 min were isothermally heated at 650 °C from 3 to 60 min and then water–quenched to obtain the final ferrite-martensite DP microstructures containing different ferrite and martensite volume fractions. Light and electron microscopic observations were supplemented with electron dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and nanoindentation tests to explore the localized compositional and hardening variations within ferrite grains in DP samples. The experimental results showed that the ferrite hardness was varied with progress of austenite to ferrite phase transformation in DP samples. In the case of a particular ferrite grain in a particular DP sample, despite a homogeneous distribution of carbon concentration, the ferrite hardness was significantly increased by increasing distance from the central location toward the interfacial α/γ areas. Beside a considerable influence of martensitic phase transformation on adjacent ferrite hardness, these results were rationalized in part to the significant level of Cr and Mo pile-up at α/γ interfaces leading to higher solid solution hardening effect of these regions. The reduction of potential energy developed by attractive interaction between C-Cr and C-Mo couples toward the carbon enriched prior austenite areas were the dominating driving force for pile-up segregation.

  2. Microstructural examination of commercial ferritic alloys at 299 DPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1995-11-01

    Microstructures and density change measurements are reported for Martensitic commercial steels HT-9 and Modified 9Cr-lMo (T9) and oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloys MA956 and NU957 following irradiation in the FFTF/MOTA at 420 degrees C to 200 DPA. Swelling as determined by density change remains below 2% for all conditions. Microstructures are found to be stable except in recrystallized grains of MA957, which are fabrication artifacts, with only minor swelling in the Martensitic steels and α' precipitation in alloys with 12% or more chromium. These results further demonstrate the high swelling resistance and microstructural stability of the ferritic alloy class

  3. Fracture toughness evaluation of select advanced replacement alloys for LWR core internals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Lizhen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chen, Xiang [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Life extension of the existing nuclear reactors imposes irradiation of high fluences to structural materials, resulting in significant challenges to the traditional reactor materials such as type 304 and 316 stainless steels. Advanced alloys with superior radiation resistance will increase safety margins, design flexibility, and economics for not only the life extension of the existing fleet but also new builds with advanced reactor designs. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) teamed up with Department of Energy (DOE) to initiate the Advanced Radiation Resistant Materials (ARRM) program, aiming to develop and test degradation resistant alloys from current commercial alloy specifications by 2021 to a new advanced alloy with superior degradation resistance in light water reactor (LWR)-relevant environments by 2024. Fracture toughness is one of the key engineering properties required for core internal materials. Together with other properties, which are being examined such as high-temperature steam oxidation resistance, radiation hardening, and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking resistance, the alloys will be down-selected for neutron irradiation study and comprehensive post-irradiation examinations. According to the candidate alloys selected under the ARRM program, ductile fracture toughness of eight alloys was evaluated at room temperature and the LWR-relevant temperatures. The tested alloys include two ferritic alloys (Grade 92 and an oxide-dispersion-strengthened alloy 14YWT), two austenitic stainless steels (316L and 310), four Ni-base superalloys (718A, 725, 690, and X750). Alloy 316L and X750 are included as reference alloys for low- and high-strength alloys, respectively. Compact tension specimens in 0.25T and 0.2T were machined from the alloys in the T-L and R-L orientations according to the product forms of the alloys. This report summarizes the final results of the specimens tested and analyzed per ASTM Standard E1820. Unlike the

  4. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N; Huang, Shenyan; Teng, Zhenke; Liu, Chain T; Asta, Mark D; Gao, Yanfei; Dunand, David C; Ghosh, Gautam; Chen, Mingwei; Fine, Morris E; Liaw, Peter K

    2015-11-09

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones. These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. The present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures.

  5. Establishing a Scientific Basis for Optimizing Compositions, Process Paths and Fabrication Methods for Nanostructured Ferritic Alloys for Use in Advanced Fission Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odette, G Robert; Cunningham, Nicholas J., Wu, Yuan; Etienne, Auriane; Stergar, Erich; Yamamoto, Takuya

    2012-02-21

    The broad objective of this NEUP was to further develop a class of 12-15Cr ferritic alloys that are dispersion strengthened and made radiation tolerant by an ultrahigh density of Y-Ti-O nanofeatures (NFs) in the size range of less than 5 nm. We call these potentially transformable materials nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs). NFAs are typically processed by ball milling pre-alloyed rapidly solidified powders and yttria (Y2O3) powders. Proper milling effectively dissolves the Ti, Y and O solutes that precipitate as NFs during hot consolidation. The tasks in the present study included examining alternative processing paths, characterizing and optimizing the NFs and investigating solid state joining. Alternative processing paths involved rapid solidification by gas atomization of Fe, 14% Cr, 3% W, and 0.4% Ti powders that are also pre-alloyed with 0.2% Y (14YWT), where the compositions are in wt.%. The focus is on exploring the possibility of minimizing, or even eliminating, the milling time, as well as producing alloys with more homogeneous distributions of NFs and a more uniform, fine grain size. Three atomization environments were explored: Ar, Ar plus O (Ar/O) and He. The characterization of powders and alloys occurred through each processing step: powder production by gas atomization; powder milling; and powder annealing or hot consolidation by hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) or hot extrusion. The characterization studies of the materials described here include various combinations of: a) bulk chemistry; b) electron probe microanalysis (EPMA); c) atom probe tomography (APT); d) small angle neutron scattering (SANS); e) various types of scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM); and f) microhardness testing. The bulk chemistry measurements show that preliminary batches of gas-atomized powders could be produced within specified composition ranges. However, EPMA and TEM showed that the Y is heterogeneously distributed and phase separated, but

  6. Radiation induced phosphorus segregation in austenitic and ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brimhall, J.L.; Baer, D.R.; Jones, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    The radiation induced surface segregation (RIS) of phosphorus in stainless steel attained a maximum at a dose of 0.8 dpa then decreased continually with dose. This decrease in the surface segregation of phosphorus at high dose levels has been attributed to removal of the phosphorus layer by ion sputtering. Phosphorus is not replenished since essentially all of the phosphorus within the irradiation zone has been segregated to the surface. Sputter removal can explain the previously reported absence of phosphorus segregation in ferritic alloys irradiated at high dosessup(1,2) (>1 dpa) since irradiation of ferritic alloys to low doses has shown measurable RIS. This sputtering phenomenon places an inherent limitation to the heavy ion irradiation technique for the study of surface segregation of impurity elements. The magnitude of the segregation in ferritics is still much less than in stainless steel which can be related to the low damage accumulation in these alloys. (orig.)

  7. Design and screening of nanoprecipitates-strengthened advanced ferritic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Lizhen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yang, Ying [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chen, Tianyi [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sridharan, K. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); He, Li [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-12-30

    Advanced nuclear reactors as well as the life extension of light water reactors require advanced alloys capable of satisfactory operation up to neutron damage levels approaching 200 displacements per atom (dpa). Extensive studies, including fundamental theories, have demonstrated the superior resistance to radiation-induced swelling in ferritic steels, primarily inherited from their body-centered cubic (bcc) structure. This study aims at developing nanoprecipitates strengthened advanced ferritic alloys for advanced nuclear reactor applications. To be more specific, this study aims at enhancing the amorphization ability of some precipitates, such as Laves phase and other types of intermetallic phases, through smart alloying strategy, and thereby promote the crystalline®amorphous transformation of these precipitates under irradiation.

  8. Characterization of Tubing from Advanced ODS alloy (FCRD-NFA1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maloy, Stuart Andrew; Aydogan, Eda; Anderoglu, Osman; Lavender, Curt; Anderson, Iver; Rieken, Joel; Lewandowski, John; Hoelzer, Dave; Odette, George R.

    2016-01-01

    Fabrication methods are being developed and tested for producing fuel clad tubing of the advanced ODS 14YWT and FCRD-NFA1 ferritic alloys. Three fabrication methods were based on plastically deforming a machined thick-wall tube sample of the ODS alloys by pilgering, hydrostatic extrusion or drawing to decrease the outer diameter and wall thickness and increase the length of the final tube. The fourth fabrication method consisted of the additive manufacturing approach involving solid-state spray deposition (SSSD) of ball milled and annealed powder of 14YWT for producing thin-wall tubes. Of the four fabrication methods, two methods were successful at producing tubing for further characterization: production of tubing by high-velocity oxy-fuel spray forming and production of tubing using high-temperature hydrostatic extrusion. The characterization described shows through neutron diffraction the texture produced during extrusion while maintaining the beneficial oxide dispersion. In this research, the parameters for innovative thermal spray deposition and hot extrusion processing methods have been developed to produce the final nanostructured ferritic alloy (NFA) tubes having approximately 0.5 mm wall thickness. Effect of different processing routes on texture and grain boundary characteristics has been investigated. It was found that hydrostatic extrusion results in combination of plane strain and shear deformations which generate rolling textures of ?- and ?-fibers on and together with a shear texture of ?-fiber on and . On the other hand, multi-step plane strain deformation in cross directions leads to a strong rolling textures of ?- and ?-fiber on together with weak ?-fiber on . Even though the amount of the equivalent strain is similar, shear deformation leads to much lower texture indexes compared to the plane strain deformations. Moreover, while 50% of hot rolling brings about a large number of high-angle grain boundaries (HAB), 44% of shear deformation results

  9. Path E alloys: ferritic material development for magnetic fusion energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, J.J.

    1980-09-01

    The application of ferritic materials in irradiation environments has received greatly expanded attention in the last few years, both internationally and in the United States. Ferritic materials are found to be resistant to irradiation damage and have in many cases superior properties to those of AISI 316. It has been shown that for magnetic fusion energy applications the low thermal expansion behavior of the ferritic alloy class will result in lower thermal stresses during reactor operation, leading to significantly longer ETF operating lifetimes. The Magnetic Fusion Energy Program therefore now includes a ferritic alloy option for alloy selection and this option has been designated Path E

  10. Fracture toughness of ferritic alloys irradiated at FFTF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, F.H.

    1986-05-01

    Ferritic compact tension specimens loaded in the Material Open Test Assembly (MOTA) for irradiation during FFTF Cycle 4 were tested at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 428/degree/C. The electrical potential single specimen method was used to measure the fracture toughness of the specimens. Results showed that the fracture toughness of both HT-9 and 9Cr-1Mo decreases with increasing test temperature and that the toughness of HT-9 was about 30% higher than that of 9Cr-1Mo. In addition, increasing irradiation temperature resulted in an increase in tearing modulus for both alloys. 4 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  11. High-temperature steam oxidation testing of select advanced replacement alloys for potential core internals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Lizhen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pint, Bruce A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-05-19

    Coupons from a total of fourteen commercial and custom fabricated alloys were exposed to 1 bar full steam with ~10 ppb oxygen content at 600 and 650°C. The coupons were weighed at 500-h intervals with a total exposure time of 5,000 h. The fourteen alloys are candidate alloys selected under the ARRM program, which include three ferritic steels (Grade 92, 439, and 14YWT), three austenitic stainless steels (316L, 310, and 800), seven Ni-base superalloys (X750, 725, C22, 690, 625, 625 direct-aging, and 625- plus), and one Zr-alloy (Zr–2.5Nb). Among the alloys, 316L and X750 are served as reference alloys for low- and high-strength alloys, respectively. The candidate Ni-base superalloy 718 was procured too late to be included in the tests. The corrosion rates of the candidate alloys can be approximately interpreted by their Cr, Ni and Fe content. The corrosion rate was significantly reduced with increasing Cr content and when Ni content is above ~15 wt%, but not much further reduced when Fe content is less than ~55 wt%. Simplified thermodynamics analyses of the alloy oxidation provided reasonable indications for the constituents of oxide scales formed on the alloys and explanations for the porosity and exfoliation phenomena because of the nature of specific types of oxides.

  12. Development of New Heats of Advanced Ferritic/Martensitic Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloy, Stuart Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pestovich, Kimberly Shay [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Anderoglu, Osman [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Aydogan, Eda [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-06-23

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program is investigating methods of transmuting minor actinides in various fuel cycle options. To achieve this goal, new fuels and cladding materials must be developed and tested to high burnup levels (e.g. >20%) requiring cladding to withstand very high doses (greater than 200 dpa) while in contact with the coolant and the fuel. To develop and qualify materials to a total fluence greater than 200 dpa requires development of advanced alloys and irradiations in fast reactors to test these alloys. Recent results from testing numerous ferritic/martensitic steels at low temperatures suggest that improvements in low temperature radiation tolerance can be achieved through carefully controlling the nitrogen content in these alloys. Thus, four new heats of HT-9 were produced with controlled nitrogen content: two by Metalwerks and two by Sophisticated Alloys. Initial results on these new alloys are presented including microstructural analysis and hardness testing. Future testing will include irradiation testing with ions and in reactor.

  13. Effects of neutron irradiation on microstructure in experimental and commercial ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.; Thomas, L.E.

    1983-05-01

    A series of microstructural studies have been undertaken on fast-reactor-irradiated specimens of experimental ferritic alloys and ferritic/martensitic commercial alloys covering a broad range of compositions and starting microstructures. It is found that voids do indeed form in ferritic alloys and that dislocation loops and tangles are created during irradiation at temperatures below 500 0 C. Swelling rates as high as 0.25% per 10 22 n/cm 2 have been measured. However, the major effect of irradiation is precipitation and precipitation can suppress void swelling completely and/or be responsible for degradation of mechanical properties

  14. Fatigue and fracture behavior of low alloy ferritic forged steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhry, V.; Sharma, A.K.; Muktibodh, U.C.; Borwankar, Neeraj; Singh, D.K.; Srinivasan, K.N.; Kulkarni, R.G.

    2016-01-01

    Low alloy ferritic steels are widely used in nuclear industry for the construction of pressure vessels. Pressure vessel forged low alloy steels 20MnMoNi55 (modified) have been developed indigenously. Experiments have been carried out to study the Low Cycle Fatigue (LCF) and fracture behavior of these forged steels. Fully reversed strain controlled LCF testing at room temperature and at 350 °C has been carried out at a constant strain rate, and for different axial strain amplitude levels. LCF material behavior has been studied from cyclic stress-strain responses and the strain-life relationships. Fracture behavior of the steel has been studied based on tests carried out for crack growth rate and fracture toughness (J-R curve). Further, responses of fatigue crack growth rate tests have been compared with the rate evaluated from fatigue precracking carried out for fracture toughness (J-R) tests. Fractography of the samples have been carried out to reveal dominant damage mechanisms in crack propagation and fracture. The fatigue and fracture properties of indigenously developed low alloy steel 20MnMoNi55 (modified) steels are comparable with similar class of steels. (author)

  15. Dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy for use in liquid-metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, J.J.

    1978-01-01

    A dispersion-strengthened ferritic alloy is provided which has high-temperature strength and is readily fabricable at ambient temperatures, and which is useful as structural elements of liquid-metal fast breeder reactors. 4 tables

  16. Complete Status Report Documenting Weld Development for Thin Wall Tubing of ODS Ferritic Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoelzer, David T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Edmondson, Philip D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gussev, Maxim N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tang, Wei [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Feng, Zhili [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-16

    Beginning in 2015, research in the FCRD program began the development of FSW for joining thin sections of 14YWT in the form of thin (0.5 mm) plate and ultimately thin wall tubing. In the previous fiscal year, a ~1 mm thick plate, or sheet, of 14YWT was produced by hot rolling with no edge cracking. The initial FSW experiment was performed on the 1 mm thick plate and involved a bead-on-plate weld in which the spinning pin tool is plunged into the plate surface, but does not penetrate the thickness of the plate, and then travels the length of the plate. The FSW run successfully produced a bead-on-plate stir zone on the 1 mm thick plate of 14YWT, but no characterization studies of the stir zone were performed by the end of FY15. Therefore, the results presented in this report cover the microstructural analysis of the bead-on-plate stir zone and the initial research task on obtaining tensile properties of the stir zone using the digital image correlation (DIC) approach during testing of miniature tensile specimens to assess the quality of the FSW parameters used in the initial experiment. The results of the microstructural characterization study using optical, scanning electron and scanning transmission electron microscopies showed the grain structure in the SZ to have isotropic and irregular shape but very similar size compared to the highly elongated grains oriented horizontally with the plane of the plate that were observed in the unaffected zone of 14YWT. Several cracks oriented horizontally were observed mostly on the retreating side of the SZ in both the SZ and TMAZ. These cracks may have formed due to insufficient pressure being exerted on the top surface of the plate by the shoulder and pin tool during the FSW run. High resolution STEM-EDS analysis showed the presence of the Y-Ti-O particles in the SZ, but that some particles exhibited coarsening. Overall, the FSW parameters used to produce the bead-on-plate SZ in the 0.1 cm thick plate of 14YWT were nearly

  17. A novel sandwich Fe-Mn damping alloy with ferrite shell prepared by vacuum annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Bingnan; Peng, Huabei; Wen, Yuhua

    2018-04-01

    To improve the corrosion resistance of high strength Fe-Mn damping alloys, we fabricated a novel sandwich Fe-17.5Mn damping alloy with Mn-depleted ferrite shell by vacuum annealing at 1100 °C. The formation behavior of the ferrite shell obeys the parabolic law for the vacuum annealed Fe-17.5Mn alloy at 1100 °C. The sandwich Fe-17.5Mn alloy with ferrite shell exhibits not only better corrosion resistance but also higher damping capacity than the conventional annealed Fe-17.5Mn alloy under argon atmosphere. The existence of only ferrite shell on the surface accounts for the better corrosion in the sandwich Fe-17.5Mn alloy. The better damping capacity in the sandwich Fe-17.5Mn alloy is owed to more stacking faults inside both ɛ martensite and γ austenite induced by the stress from ferrite shell. Vacuum annealing is a new way to improve the corrosion resistance and damping capacity of Fe-Mn damping alloys.

  18. Alloys influence in ferritic steels with hydrogen attack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moro, L; Rey Saravia, D; Lombardich, J; Saggio, M; Juan, A; Blanco, J

    2003-01-01

    Materials exposed to a corrosive environment and high temperatures, are associated with a decrease of their mechanical properties and embitterment.At room temperatures atomic hydrogen diffuses easily through metals structure, it accumulates in lattice defects forming molecular hydrogen and generating cracking due to internal stresses.Under high temperatures the phenomenon is more complex.The steels in these conditions present different structures of precipitates, that the change under creep conditions period.In this work it is determined the influence of Cr and V alloys, the changes of ferritic steel resistance in a corrosive environment and high temperatures.1.25 Cr 1 Mo 0.25 V and 2.25Cr 1 Mo under different loads and temperatures previously attacked by hydrogen environment.The hydrogen is induced by the electrolytic technique, optimizing the choice of temperatures, current density, electrolyte, etc. In order to control an adequate cathode charge, a follow up procedure is carried out by electronic barrier microscopy.After the attack, the material is settled at room temperatures for certain period of time, to allow the hydrogen to leave and evaluate the residual damage.Creep by torsion assays, under constant load and temperature is used as an experimental technique.With the outcome data curves are drawn in order to study the secondary creep rate, with the applied load and temperature, determining the value of stress exponent n and the activation energy Q.Comparing to equal assays to the same ferritic steels but non attacked by hydrogen, these values allows the prediction of microstructure changes present during these tests

  19. Effects of consolidation temperature, strength and microstructure on fracture toughness of nanostructured ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao, P.; Odette, G.R.; Yamamoto, T.; Alinger, M.; Hoelzer, D.; Gragg, D.

    2007-01-01

    Fully consolidated nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) were prepared by attritor milling pre-alloyed Fe-14Cr-3W-0.4Ti and 0.3 wt% Y 2 O 3 powders, followed by hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) at 1000 o C or 1150 o C at 200 MPa for 4 h. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed similar bimodal distributions of fine and coarse ferrite grains in both cases. However, as expected, the alloy microhardness decreased with increasing in HIPing temperature. Three point bend tests on single edge notched specimens, with a nominal root radius ρ = 0.15 mm, were used to measure the notch fracture toughness, K ρ , as a function of test temperature. The K ρ curves were found to be similar for both processing conditions. It appears that the coarser ferrite grains control cleavage fracture, in a way that is independent of alloy strength and HIPing temperature

  20. Synergistic alloying effect on microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of Cu precipitation-strengthened ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, Y.R.; Li, Y.P.; Hirata, A.; Zhang, Y.; Fujita, T.; Furuhara, T.; Liu, C.T.; Chiba, A.; Chen, M.W.

    2013-01-01

    We report the influence of alloying elements (Ni, Al and Mn) on the microstructural evolution of Cu-rich nanoprecipitates and the mechanical properties of Fe–Cu-based ferritic alloys. It was found that individual additions of Ni and Al do not give rise to an obvious strengthening effect, compared with the binary Fe–Cu parent alloy, although Ni segregates at the precipitate/matrix interface and Al partitions into Cu-rich precipitates. In contrast, the co-addition of Ni and Al results in the formation of core–shell nanoprecipitates with a Cu-rich core and a B2 Ni–Al shell, leading to a dramatic improvement in strength. The coarsening rate of the core–shell precipitates is about two orders of magnitude lower than that of monolithic Cu-rich precipitates in the binary and ternary Fe–Cu alloys. Reinforcement of the B2 Ni–Al shells by Mn partitioning further improves the strength of the precipitation-strengthened alloys by forming ultrastable and high number density core–shell nanoprecipitates

  1. Effects of irradiation on ferritic alloys and implications for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1986-07-01

    This paper reviews the ADIP irradiation effects data base on ferritic (martensitic) alloys to provide reactor teams with an understanding of how such alloys will behave for fusion reactor first wall applications. Irradiation affects dimensional stability, strength and toughness. Dimensional stability is altered by precipitation and void swelling. Swelling as high as 25% may occur in some ferritic alloys at 500 dpa. Irradiation alters strength both during and following irradiation. Irradiation at low temperatures leads to hardening whereas at higher temperatures and high exposures, precipitate coarsening can result in softening. Toughness can also be adversely affected by irradiation. Failure can occur in ferritic in a brittle manner and irradiation induced hardening causes brittle failure at higher temperatures. Even at high test temperatures, toughness is reduced due to reduced failure initiation stresses. 39 refs

  2. Oxidation Kinetics of Ferritic Alloys in High-Temperature Steam Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Stephen S.; White, Josh; Hosemann, Peter; Nelson, Andrew

    2018-02-01

    High-temperature isothermal steam oxidation kinetic parameters of several ferritic alloys were determined by thermogravimetric analysis. The oxidation kinetic constant ( k) was measured as a function of temperature from 900°C to 1200°C. The results show a marked increase in oxidation resistance compared to reference Zircaloy-2, with kinetic constants 3-5 orders of magnitude lower across the experimental temperature range. The results of this investigation supplement previous findings on the properties of ferritic alloys for use as candidate cladding materials and extend kinetic parameter measurements to high-temperature steam environments suitable for assessing accident tolerance for light water reactor applications.

  3. Characterization of Tubing from Advanced ODS alloy (FCRD-NFA1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloy, Stuart Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Aydogan, Eda [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Anderoglu, Osman [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lavender, Curt [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Anderson, Iver [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Rieken, Joel [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Lewandowski, John [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Hoelzer, Dave [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Odette, George R. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    2016-09-20

    Fabrication methods are being developed and tested for producing fuel clad tubing of the advanced ODS 14YWT and FCRD-NFA1 ferritic alloys. Three fabrication methods were based on plastically deforming a machined thick-wall tube sample of the ODS alloys by pilgering, hydrostatic extrusion or drawing to decrease the outer diameter and wall thickness and increase the length of the final tube. The fourth fabrication method consisted of the additive manufacturing approach involving solid-state spray deposition (SSSD) of ball milled and annealed powder of 14YWT for producing thin-wall tubes. Of the four fabrication methods, two methods were successful at producing tubing for further characterization: production of tubing by high-velocity oxy-fuel spray forming and production of tubing using high-temperature hydrostatic extrusion. The characterization described shows through neutron diffraction the texture produced during extrusion while maintaining the beneficial oxide dispersion. In this research, the parameters for innovative thermal spray deposition and hot extrusion processing methods have been developed to produce the final nanostructured ferritic alloy (NFA) tubes having approximately 0.5 mm wall thickness. Effect of different processing routes on texture and grain boundary characteristics has been investigated. It was found that hydrostatic extrusion results in combination of plane strain and shear deformations which generate rolling textures of α- and γ-fibers on {001}<110> and {111}<110> together with a shear texture of ζ-fiber on {011}<211> and {011}<011>. On the other hand, multi-step plane strain deformation in cross directions leads to a strong rolling textures of θ- and ε-fiber on {001}<110> together with weak γ-fiber on {111}<112>. Even though the amount of the equivalent strain is similar, shear deformation leads to much lower texture indexes compared to the plane strain deformations. Moreover, while 50% of hot rolling brings about a large number of

  4. A comparative assessment of the fracture toughness behavior of ferritic-martensitic steels and nanostructured ferritic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Thak Sang, E-mail: thaksang.byun@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Hoelzer, David T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Kim, Jeoung Han [Hanbat National University, Daejeon 305-719 (Korea, Republic of); Maloy, Stuart A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2017-02-15

    The Fe-Cr alloys with ultrafine microstructures are primary candidate materials for advanced nuclear reactor components because of their excellent high temperature strength and high resistance to radiation-induced damage such as embrittlement and swelling. Mainly two types of Fe-Cr alloys have been developed for the high temperature reactor applications: the quenched and tempered ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels hardened primarily by ultrafine laths and carbonitrides and the powder metallurgy-based nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) by nanograin structure and nanoclusters. This study aims at elucidating the differences and similarities in the temperature and strength dependences of fracture toughness in the Fe-Cr alloys to provide a comparative assessment of their high-temperature structural performance. The K{sub JQ} versus yield stress plots confirmed that the fracture toughness was inversely proportional to yield strength. It was found, however, that the toughness data for some NFAs were outside the band of the integrated dataset at given strength level, which indicates either a significant improvement or deterioration in mechanical properties due to fundamental changes in deformation and fracture mechanisms. When compared to the behavior of NFAs, the FM steels have shown much less strength dependence and formed narrow fracture toughness data bands at a significantly lower strength region. It appeared that at high temperatures ≥600 °C the NFAs cannot retain the nanostructure advantage of high strength and high toughness either by high-temperature embrittlement or by excessive loss of strength. Irradiation studies have revealed, however, that the NFAs have much stronger radiation resistance than tempered martensitic steels, such as lower radiation-induced swelling, finer helium bubble formation, lower irradiation creep rate and reduced low temperature embrittlement.

  5. A comparison study of polymer/cobalt ferrite nano-composites synthesized by mechanical alloying route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Rashidi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the effect of different biopolymers such as polyethylene glycol (PEG and polyvinylalcohol (PVA on synthesis and characterization of polymer/cobalt ferrite (CF nano-composites bymechanical alloying method has been systematically investigated. The structural, morphological andmagnetic properties changes during mechanical milling were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD,Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, fieldemission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, and vibrating sample magnetometer techniques(VSM, respectively. The polymeric cobalt ferrite nano-composites were obtained by employing atwo-step procedure: the cobalt ferrite of 20 nm mean particle size was first synthesized by mechanicalalloying route and then was embedded in PEG or PVA biopolymer matrix by milling process. Theresults revealed that PEG melted due to the local temperature raise during milling. Despite thisphenomenon, cobalt ferrite nano-particles were entirely embedded in PEG matrix. It seems, PAV is anappropriate candidate for producing nano-composite samples due to its high melting point. InPVA/CF nano-composites, the mean crystallite size and milling induced strain decreased to 13 nm and0.48, respectively. Moreover, milling process resulted in well distribution of CF in PVA matrix eventhough the mean particle size of cobalt ferrite has not been significantly affecetd. FTIR resultconfirmed the attachment of PVA to the surface of nano-particles. Magnetic properties evaluationshowed that saturation magnetization and coercivity values decreased in nano-composite samplecomparing the pure cobalt ferrite.

  6. Stress corrosion cracking studies on ferritic low alloy pressure vessel steel - water chemistry and modelling aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tipping, P.; Ineichen, U.; Cripps, R.

    1994-01-01

    The susceptibility of low alloy ferritic pressure vessel steels (A533-B type) to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) degradation has been examined using various BWR type coolant chemistries. Fatigue pre-cracked wedge-loaded double cantilever beams and also constantly loaded 25 mm thick compact tension specimens have shown classical SCC attack. The influence of parameters such as dissolved oxygen content, water impurity level and conductivity, material chemical composition (sulphur content) and stress intensity level are discussed. The relevance of SCC as a life-limiting degradation mechanism for low alloy ferritic nuclear power plant PV steel is examined. Some parameters, thought to be relevant for modelling SCC processes in low alloy steels in simulated BWR-type coolant, are discussed. 8 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  7. The creep properties of a low alloy ferritic steel containing an intermetallic precipitate dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batte, A.D.; Murphy, M.C.; Edmonds, D.V.

    1976-01-01

    A good combination of creep rupture ductility and strength together with excellent long term thermal stability, has been obtained from a dispersion of intermetallic Laves phase precipitate in a non-transforming ferritic low alloy steel. The steel is without many of the problems currently associated with the heat affected zone microstructures of low alloy transformable ferritic steels, and can be used as a weld metal. Following suitable development to optimize the composition and heat treatment, such alloys may provide a useful range of weldable creep resistant steels for steam turbine and other high temperature applications. They would offer the unique possibility of easily achievable microstructural uniformity, giving good long term strength and ductility across the entire welded joint

  8. The Effect of H and He on Irradiation Performance of Fe and Ferritic Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stubbins, James F.

    2010-01-01

    This research program was designed to look at basic radiation damage and effects and mechanical properties in Fe and ferritic alloys. The program scope included a number of materials ranging from pure single crystal Fe to more complex Fe-Cr-C alloys. The range of materials was designed to examine materials response and performance on ideal/model systems and gradually move to more complex systems. The experimental program was coordinated with a modeling effort. The use of pure and model alloys also facilitated the ability to develop and employ atomistic-scale modeling techniques to understand the inherent physics underlying materials performance.

  9. Computational Design of Creep-Resistant Alloys and Experimental Validation in Ferritic Superalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liaw, Peter

    2014-12-31

    A new class of ferritic superalloys containing B2-type zones inside parent L21-type precipitates in a disordered solid-solution matrix, also known as a hierarchical-precipitate strengthened ferritic alloy (HPSFA), has been developed for high-temperature structural applications in fossil-energy power plants. These alloys were designed by the addition of the Ti element into a previously-studied NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy (denoted as FBB8 in this study). In the present research, systematic investigations, including advanced experimental techniques, first-principles calculations, and numerical simulations, have been integrated and conducted to characterize the complex microstructures and excellent creep resistance of HPSFAs. The experimental techniques include transmission-electron microscopy, scanningtransmission- electron microscopy, neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography, which provide detailed microstructural information of HPSFAs. Systematic tension/compression creep tests revealed that HPSFAs exhibit the superior creep resistance, compared with the FBB8 and conventional ferritic steels (i.e., the creep rates of HPSFAs are about 4 orders of magnitude slower than the FBB8 and conventional ferritic steels.) First-principles calculations include interfacial free energies, anti-phase boundary (APB) free energies, elastic constants, and impurity diffusivities in Fe. Combined with kinetic Monte- Carlo simulations of interdiffusion coefficients, and the integration of computational thermodynamics and kinetics, these calculations provide great understanding of thermodynamic and mechanical properties of HPSFAs. In addition to the systematic experimental approach and first-principles calculations, a series of numerical tools and algorithms, which assist in the optimization of creep properties of ferritic superalloys, are utilized and developed. These numerical simulation results are compared with the available experimental data and previous first

  10. Helium sequestration at nanoparticle-matrix interfaces in helium + heavy ion irradiated nanostructured ferritic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parish, C.M., E-mail: parishcm@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Unocic, K.A.; Tan, L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Kondo, S. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto, 611-0011 (Japan); Snead, L.L. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Hoelzer, D.T.; Katoh, Y. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2017-01-15

    We irradiated four ferritic alloys with energetic Fe and He ions: one castable nanostructured alloy (CNA) containing Ti-W-Ta-carbides, and three nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs). The NFAs were: 9Cr containing Y-Ti-O nanoclusters, and two Fe-12Cr-5Al NFAs containing Y-Zr-O or Y-Hf-O clusters. All four were subjected to simultaneous dual-beam Fe + He ion implantation (650 °C, ∼50 dpa, ∼15 appm He/dpa), simulating fusion-reactor conditions. Examination using scanning/transmission electron microscopy (STEM) revealed high-number-density helium bubbles of ∼8 nm, ∼10{sup 21} m{sup −3} (CNA), and of ∼3 nm, 10{sup 23} m{sup −3} (NFAs). STEM combined with multivariate statistical analysis data mining suggests that the precipitate-matrix interfaces in all alloys survived ∼50 dpa at 650 °C and serve as effective helium trapping sites. All alloys appear viable structural material candidates for fusion or advanced fission energy systems. Among these developmental alloys the NFAs appear to sequester the helium into smaller bubbles and away from the grain boundaries more effectively than the early-generation CNA.

  11. Corrosion studies on Cu-Ni alloys and ferritic steel in salt water for desalination service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibad, P.R.; Balachandra, J.

    1975-01-01

    Corrosion studies on In 838 and In 848 alloys in 3% NaCl solution, synthetic sea water and in 3% NaCl at pH3 and pH10 indicate that the latter alloy is more corrosion resistant than the former at room (28 0 C), and boiling temperature (101 0 C) and at 125 0 C. Ferritic steel is unaffected in boiling synthetic sea water. In boiling 3% NaCl solution at pH3 and pH10, (the pH values adjusted at room temperature) increase in the rate of corrosion of ferritic steel compared to that at room temperature has been observed. A fair correlation between polarization characteristics and dissolution rates in these solutions is seen for all these materials. (author)

  12. Impurity content of reduced-activation ferritic steels and a vanadium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Bloom, E.E.

    1997-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to analyze a reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel and a vanadium alloy for low-level impurities that would compromise the reduced-activation characteristics of these materials. The ferritic steel was from the 5-ton IEA heat of modified F82H, and the vanadium alloy was from a 500-kg heat of V-4Cr-4Ti. To compare techniques for analysis of low concentrations of impurities, the vanadium alloy was also examined by glow discharge mass spectrometry. Two other reduced-activation steels and two commercial ferritic steels were also analyzed to determine the difference in the level of the detrimental impurities in the IEA heat and steels for which no extra effort was made to restrict some of the tramp impurities. Silver, cobalt, molybdenum, and niobium proved to be the tramp impurities of most importance. The levels observed in these two materials produced with present technology exceeded the limits for low activation for either shallow land burial or recycling. The chemical analyses provide a benchmark for the improvement in production technology required to achieve reduced activation; they also provide a set of concentrations for calculating decay characteristics for reduced-activation materials. The results indicate the progress that has been made and give an indication of what must still be done before the reduced-activation criteria can be achieved

  13. Effects of irradiation on low-activation ferritic alloys to 45 dpa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.; Hamilton, M.L.

    1986-06-01

    Nine low activation ferritic alloys covering the range 2 to 12Cr with alloying additions of tungsten and/or vanadium have been irradiated to intermediate fluences of 30 to 45 dpa and tensile tested or examined by transmission electron microscopy in order to determine the effect of increasing neutron dose on properties and microstructure. Changes in properties and microstructure are for the most part completed within 10 dpa but swelling and dislocation evolution continue with increasing dose at 420/degree/C and subgrain coarsening occurs at 600/degree/C. 9 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Effect of Mechanical Alloying Atmospheres and Oxygen Concentration on Mechanical Properties of ODS Ferritic Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, Sanghoon; Choi, Byoungkwon; Han, Changhee; Kim, Kibaik; Kang, Sukhoon; Chun, Youngbum; Kim, Taekyu

    2013-01-01

    Finely dispersed nano-oxide particles with a high number density in the homogeneous grain matrix are essential to achieve superior mechanical properties at high temperatures, and these unique microstructures can be obtained through the mechanical alloying (MA) and hot consolidation process. The microstructure and mechanical property of ODS steel significantly depends on its powder property and the purity after the MA process. These contents should be carefully controlled to improve the mechanical property at elevated temperature. In particular, appropriate the control of oxygen concentration improves the mechanical property of ODS steel at high temperature. An effective method is to control the mechanical alloying atmosphere by high purity inert gas. In the present study, the effects of mechanical alloying atmospheres and oxygen concentration on the mechanical property of ODS steel were investigated. ODS ferritic alloys were fabricated in various atmospheres, and the HIP process was used to investigate the effects of MA atmospheres and oxygen concentration on the microstructure and mechanical property. ODS ferritic alloys milled in an Ar-H 2 mixture, and He is effective to reduce the excess oxygen concentration. The YH 2 addition made an extremely reduced oxygen concentration by the internal oxygen reduction reaction and resulted in a homogeneous microstructure and superior creep strength

  15. Tensile and fracture toughness properties of MA957: implications to the development of nanocomposited ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alinger, M.J.; Odette, G.R.; Lucas, G.E.

    2002-01-01

    A study to explore approaches to optimizing nanocomposited ferritic alloys was carried out on dispersion strengthened mechanically alloyed (MA) MA957, in the form of extruded bar stock. Previous studies had indicated that this alloy manifested superior high temperature strength and radiation stability, but was extremely brittle in notch impact tests. Thus our objective was to develop a combination of tensile, fracture toughness and microstructural data to clarify the basis for this brittle behavior. To this end, tensile properties and fracture toughness were characterized as a function of temperature in various orientations relative to the grain and inclusion structures. This database along with extensive fractography suggests that brittleness is due to the presence of a large volume fraction of impurity alumina stringers. In orientations where the effects of the stringers are reduced, much higher toughness was observed. These results provide a path for alloy development approach to achieve high strength and toughness

  16. Tensile and fracture toughness properties of MA957: implications to the development of nanocomposited ferritic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alinger, M. J.; Odette, G. R.; Lucas, G. E.

    2002-12-01

    A study to explore approaches to optimizing nanocomposited ferritic alloys was carried out on dispersion strengthened mechanically alloyed (MA) MA957, in the form of extruded bar stock. Previous studies had indicated that this alloy manifested superior high temperature strength and radiation stability, but was extremely brittle in notch impact tests. Thus our objective was to develop a combination of tensile, fracture toughness and microstructural data to clarify the basis for this brittle behavior. To this end, tensile properties and fracture toughness were characterized as a function of temperature in various orientations relative to the grain and inclusion structures. This database along with extensive fractography suggests that brittleness is due to the presence of a large volume fraction of impurity alumina stringers. In orientations where the effects of the stringers are reduced, much higher toughness was observed. These results provide a path for alloy development approach to achieve high strength and toughness.

  17. Ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened alloys by spark plasma sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allahar, Kerry N., E-mail: KerryAllahar@boisestate.edu [Materials and Science Engineering Department, Boise State University, 1910 University Blvd., Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, 995 University Blvd., Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States); Burns, Jatuporn [Materials and Science Engineering Department, Boise State University, 1910 University Blvd., Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, 995 University Blvd., Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States); Jaques, Brian [Materials and Science Engineering Department, Boise State University, 1910 University Blvd., Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Wu, Y.Q. [Materials and Science Engineering Department, Boise State University, 1910 University Blvd., Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, 995 University Blvd., Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States); Charit, Indrajit [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Idaho, McClure Hall Room 405D, Moscow, ID 83844 (United States); Cole, James [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States); Butt, Darryl P. [Materials and Science Engineering Department, Boise State University, 1910 University Blvd., Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, 995 University Blvd., Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Spark plasma sintering (SPS) was used to consolidate a Fe–16Cr–3Al (wt.%) powder that was mechanically alloyed with Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Ti powders to produce 0.5 Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 0.5 Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}–1Ti powders. The effects of mechanical alloying and sintering conditions on the microstructure, relative density and hardness of the sintered oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys are presented. Scanning electron microscopy indicated a mixed fine-grain and coarse-grain microstructure that was attributed to recrystallization and grain growth during sintering. Analysis of the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atom probe tomography (APT) data identified Y–O and Y–O–Ti nanoclusters. Elemental ratios of these nanoclusters were consistent with that observed in hot-extruded ODS alloys. The influence of Ti was to refine the grains as well as the nanoclusters with there being greater number density and smaller sizes of the Y–O–Ti nanoclusters as compared to the Y–O nanoclusters. This resulted in the Ti-containing samples being harder than the Ti-free alloys. The hardness of the alloys with the Y–O–Ti nanoclusters was insensitive to sintering time while smaller hardness values were associated with longer sintering times for the alloys with the Y–O nanoclusters. Pressures greater than 80 MPa are recommended for improved densification as higher sintering temperatures and longer sintering times at 80 MPa did not improve the relative density beyond 97.5%.

  18. Development of new ferritic alloys reinforced by nano titanium nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathon, M.H.; Perrut, M.; Poirier, L.; Ratti, M.; Hervé, N.; Carlan, Y. de

    2015-01-01

    Nano-reinforced steels are considered for future nuclear reactors or for application at high temperature like the heat exchangers tubes or plates. Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) alloys are the most known of the nano-reinforced alloys. They exhibit high creep strength as well as high resistance to radiation damage. This article deals with the development of new nano reinforced alloys called Nitride Dispersed Strengthened (NDS). Those are also considered for nuclear applications and could exhibit higher ductility with a simplest fabrication way. Two main fabrication routes were studied: the co-milling of Fe–18Cr1W0.008N and TiH 2 powders and the plasma nitration at low temperature of a Fe–18Cr1W0.8Ti powder. The materials were studied mainly by Small Angle Neutron Scattering. The feasibility of the reinforcement by nano-nitride particles is demonstrated. The final size of the nitrides can be similar (few nanometers) to the nano-oxides observed in ODS alloys. The mechanical properties of the new NDS show an amazing ductility at high temperature for a nano-reinforced alloy

  19. Development of new ferritic alloys reinforced by nano titanium nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathon, M.H., E-mail: marie-helene.mathon@cea.fr [Laboratoire Léon Brillouin, CEA-CNRS, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Perrut, M., E-mail: mikael.perrut@onera.fr [Laboratoire Léon Brillouin, CEA-CNRS, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Poirier, L., E-mail: poirier@nitruvid.com [Bodycote France and Belgium, 9 r Jean Poulmarch, 95100 Argenteuil (France); Ratti, M., E-mail: mathieu.ratti@snecma.fr [CEA, DEN, Service de Recherches Métallurgiques Appliquées, F91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Hervé, N., E-mail: nicolas.herve@cea.fr [CEA, DRT, LITEN, F38054 Grenoble (France); Carlan, Y. de, E-mail: yann.decarlan@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, Service de Recherches Métallurgiques Appliquées, F91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2015-01-15

    Nano-reinforced steels are considered for future nuclear reactors or for application at high temperature like the heat exchangers tubes or plates. Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) alloys are the most known of the nano-reinforced alloys. They exhibit high creep strength as well as high resistance to radiation damage. This article deals with the development of new nano reinforced alloys called Nitride Dispersed Strengthened (NDS). Those are also considered for nuclear applications and could exhibit higher ductility with a simplest fabrication way. Two main fabrication routes were studied: the co-milling of Fe–18Cr1W0.008N and TiH{sub 2} powders and the plasma nitration at low temperature of a Fe–18Cr1W0.8Ti powder. The materials were studied mainly by Small Angle Neutron Scattering. The feasibility of the reinforcement by nano-nitride particles is demonstrated. The final size of the nitrides can be similar (few nanometers) to the nano-oxides observed in ODS alloys. The mechanical properties of the new NDS show an amazing ductility at high temperature for a nano-reinforced alloy.

  20. Postirradiation deformation behavior in ferritic Fe-Cr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S.; Gardner, P.L.

    1992-06-01

    It has been demonstrated that fast-neutron irradiation produces significant hardening in simple Fe-(3-18)Cr binary alloys irradiated to about 35 dpa in the temperature range 365 to 420 degrees C, whereas irradiation at 574 degrees C produces hardening only for 15% or more chromium. The irradiation-induced changes in tensile properties are discussed in terms of changes in the power law work-hardening exponent. The work-hardening exponent of the lower chromium alloys decreased significantly after low-temperature irradiation (≤ 420 degrees C) but increased after irradiation at 574 degrees C. The higher chromium alloys failed either in cleavage or in a mixed ductile/brittle fashion. Deformation microstructures are presented to support the tensile behavior

  1. Strain hardening of cold-rolled lean-alloyed metastable ferritic-austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papula, Suvi [Aalto University School of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, P.O. Box 14200, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Anttila, Severi [Centre for Advanced Steels Research, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 4200, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Talonen, Juho [Outokumpu Oyj, P.O. Box 245, FI-00181 Helsinki (Finland); Sarikka, Teemu; Virkkunen, Iikka; Hänninen, Hannu [Aalto University School of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, P.O. Box 14200, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland)

    2016-11-20

    Mechanical properties and strain hardening of two pilot-scale lean-alloyed ferritic-austenitic stainless steels having metastable austenite phase, present at 0.50 and 0.30 volume fractions, have been studied by means of tensile testing and nanoindentation. These ferritic-austenitic stainless steels have high strain-hardening capacity, due to the metastable austenite phase, which leads to an improved uniform elongation and higher tensile strength in comparison with most commercial lean duplex stainless steels. According to the results, even as low as 0.30 volume fraction of austenite seems efficient for achieving nearly 40% elongation. The austenite phase is initially the harder phase, and exhibits more strain hardening than the ferrite phase. The rate of strain hardening and the evolution of the martensite phase were found to depend on the loading direction: both are higher when strained in the rolling direction as compared to the transverse direction. Based on the mechanical testing, characterization of the microstructure by optical/electron microscopy, magnetic balance measurements and EBSD texture analysis, this anisotropy in mechanical properties of the cold-rolled metastable ferritic-austenitic stainless steels can be explained by the elongated dual-phase microstructure, fiber reinforcement effect of the harder austenite phase and the presence and interplay of rolling textures in the two phases.

  2. The microstructure and mechanical properties of Al-containing 9Cr ODS ferritic alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guangming [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801 (United States); Zhou, Zhangjian, E-mail: zhouzhj@mater.ustb.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Mo, Kun [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Wang, Pinghuai [Fusion Reactor & Materials Division, Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Miao, Yinbin [Department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801 (United States); Li, Shaofu; Wang, Man [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Liu, Xiang [Department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801 (United States); Gong, Mengqiang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Almer, Jonathan [X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Stubbins, James F. [Department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801 (United States)

    2015-11-05

    In this study, a 9Cr oxide-dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloy with additional corrosion resistant element Al was fabricated by mechanical alloying (MA) and hot pressing (HP) to explore the impact of Al on the microstructure and mechanical property of a 9Cr ODS alloy. It is found that the Al completely dissolved into the Fe–Cr matrix after milling for 30 h. The minor phases in the Al-containing 9Cr ODS ferritic alloy were investigated by a high-energy X-ray, and were identified to be orthorhombic-YAlO{sub 3} (YAP), bcc-Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} (YAG), monoclinic-Al{sub 2}Y{sub 4}O{sub 9} (YAM), and hexagonal-YAlO{sub 3} (YAH). These phases were further confirmed by selected area diffraction pattern (SADP), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). In addition, their volume fractions were also calculated from the integrated intensities. According to the analysis of the particles and their formation sequences, the larger particles (greater than 100 nm) are identified as mainly YAG and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles, while the particles with small size (less than 30 nm) are likely primarily YAM, YAH, and YAP particles. The yielding strength (YS) and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) at RT are 563 MPa and 744 MPa, respectively, while the YS and UTS at 700 °C are 245 MPa and 276 MPa, respectively. Although the addition Al in ODS alloys decreases the strength at RT, the values at high temperature are similar to those obtained for 9Cr ODS alloys strengthened by fine Y–Ti–O particles. - Graphical abstract: Synchrotron X-ray diffraction line profile of the 9CrAl ODS alloy; (Ferrite matrix phases, along with minor phases, orthorhombic YAlO{sub 3} (yttrium aluminum perovskite, YAP), bcc Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} (yttrium aluminum garnet, YAG), monoclinic Al{sub 2}Y{sub 4}O{sub 9} (yttrium aluminum monoclinic, YAM), and hexagonal YAlO{sub 3} (yttium aluminum hexagonal, YAH) were recognized.). - Highlights: • The

  3. Ion-induced swelling of ODS ferritic alloy MA957 tubing to 500 dpa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toloczko, M.B., E-mail: mychailo.toloczko@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Garner, F.A. [Radiation Effects Consulting, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Voyevodin, V.N.; Bryk, V.V.; Borodin, O.V.; Mel’nychenko, V.V.; Kalchenko, A.S. [Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2014-10-15

    In order to study the potential swelling behavior of the ODS ferritic alloy MA957 at very high dpa levels, specimens were prepared from pressurized tubes that were unirradiated archives of tubes previously irradiated in FFTF to doses as high as 110 dpa. These unirradiated specimens were irradiated with 1.8 MeV Cr{sup +} ions to doses ranging from 100 to 500 dpa and examined by transmission electron microscopy. No co-injection of helium or hydrogen was employed. It was shown that compared to several tempered ferritic/martensitic steels irradiated in the same facility, these tubes were rather resistant to void swelling, reaching a maximum value of only 4.5% at 500 dpa and 450 °C. In this fine-grained material, the distribution of swelling was strongly influenced by the presence of void denuded zones along the grain boundaries.

  4. Charpy impact test results of four low activation ferritic alloys irradiated at 370{degrees}C to 15 DPA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubert, L.E.; Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Miniature CVN specimens of four low activation ferritic alloys have been impact tested following irradiation at 370{degrees}C to 15 dpa. Comparison of the results with those of control specimens indicates that degradation in the impact behavior occurs in each of these four alloys. The 9Cr-2W alloy referred to as GA3X and the similar alloy F82H with 7.8Cr-2W appear most promising for further consideration as candidate structural materials in fusion energy system applications. These two alloys exhibit a small DBTT shift to higher temperatures but show increased absorbed energy on the upper shelf.

  5. Microstructural evolution of ferritic steel powder during mechanical alloying with iron oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Yuren; Liu, Yong; Liu, Donghua; Tang, Bei [Central South Univ., State Key Lab. of Powder Metallurgy, Changsha (China); Liu, C.T. [The Hong Kong Polytechnic Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Hong Kong (China)

    2011-02-15

    Mechanical alloying of mixed powders is of great importance for preparing oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels. In this study, the microstructural evolution of ferritic steel powder mixed with TiH{sub x}, YH{sub 2} and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the process of mechanical alloying is systematically investigated by using X-ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and microhardness tests. It is found that titanium, yttrium hydrides and iron oxide are completely dissolved during milling, and homogeneous element distribution can be achieved after milling for 12 h. The disintegration of the composite powder particles occurs at 24 h and reaches the balance of welding and fracturing after 36 h. The oxygen content increases sharply with the disintegration of powder particles due to the absorption of oxygen at the solid/gas interface from the milling atmosphere, which is the main source of extra oxygen in the milled powder. Grain refinement down to nanometer level occurs due to the severe plastic deformation of particles; however, the grain size does not change much with further disintegration of particles. The hardness increases with milling time and then becomes stable during further milling. The study indicates that the addition of iron oxide and hydrides may be more beneficial for the dispersion and homogenization of chemical compositions in the powder mixture, thus shortening the mechanical alloying process. (orig.)

  6. Microstructural examination of several commercial ferritic alloys irradiated to high fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1981-01-01

    Microstructural observations are reported for a series of five commercial ferritic alloys, 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo, H-11, EM-12, 416, and 430F, covering the composition range 2.25 to 17% chromium, following EBR-II irradiation over the temperature range 400 to 650 0 C and to a maximum fluence of 17.6 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV). These materials were confirmed to be low void swelling with maximum swelling of 0.63% measured in EM-12 following irradiation at 400 0 C to 14.0 x 10 22 n/cm 2 . A wide range of precipitation response was found both as a function of alloy and irradiation temperature. Precipitates observed included M 6 C, Mo 2 C, Chi, Laves, M 23 C 6 , α' and a low temperature phase as yet unidentified. It is predicted, based on these results, that the major impact of irradiation on the ferritic alloy class will be changes in postirradiation mechanical properties due to precipitation

  7. Microstructural examination of several commercial ferritic alloys irradiated to high fluence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelles, D. S.

    Microstructural observations are reported for a series of five commercial ferritic alloys, 2 {1}/{4}Cr-1Mo , H-11, EM-12, 416, and 430F, covering the composition range 2.25 to 17% chromium, following EBR-II irradiation over the temperature range 400 to 650°C and to a maximum fluence of 1.76 × 10 23 n/cm 2 (E >0.1 MeV). These materials were confirmed to be low void swelling with maximum swelling of 0.63% measured in EM-12 following irradiation at 400°C to 1.40 × 10 23 n/cm 2. A wide range of precipitation response was found both as a function of alloy and irradiation temperature. Precipitates observed included M 6C, Mo 2C, Chi, Laves, M 23C 6, α' and a low temperature phase as yet unidentified. It is predicted, based on these results, that the major impact of irradiation on the ferritic alloy class will be changes in postirradiation mechanical properties due to precipitation.

  8. The structural changes of Y2O3 in ferritic ODS alloys during milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilger, I.; Tegel, M.; Gorley, M.J.; Grant, P.S.; Weißgärber, T.; Kieback, B.

    2014-01-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels are usually fabricated via mechanical alloying and subsequent consolidation via hot extrusion or hot isostatic pressing. During the individual process steps, a complex evolution of the nanoparticle structure is taking place. Powders with different Y 2 O 3 contents were milled and examined by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atom probe tomography (APT). It has been observed that the Y 2 O 3 is fragmented and becomes partially amorphous upon milling due to the grain refinement of Y 2 O 3 during the milling process. There was no compelling evidence for Y 2 O 3 dissociation and dissolution into the steel matrix

  9. Some microstructural characterisations in a friction stir welded oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legendre, F.; Poissonnet, S.; Bonnaillie, P.; Boulanger, L.; Forest, L.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this study is to characterize microstructure of a friction stir welded oxide dispersion strengthened alloy. The welded material is constituted by two sheets of an yttria-dispersion-strengthened PM 2000 ferritic steel. Different areas of the friction stir welded product were analyzed using field emission gun secondary electron microscopy (FEG-SEM) and electron microprobe whereas nanoindentation was used to evaluate mechanical properties. The observed microstructural evolution, including distribution of the yttria dispersoids, after friction stir welding process is discussed and a correlation between the microstructure and the results of nanoindentation tests is established.

  10. Radiation damage simulation studies of selected austenitic and ferritic/martensitic alloys for fusion reactor structural applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazey, D.J.; Walters, G.P.; Buckley, S.N.; Bullough, R.; Hanks, W.; Bolster, D.E.J.; Sowden, B.C.; Lurcook, D.; Murphy, S.M.

    1985-03-01

    Results are given of an investigation of the radiation damage stability of selected austenitic and ferritic alloys following ion bombardment in the Harwell VEC to simulate fusion-reactor exposures up to 110 dpa at temperatures from 425 deg to 625 deg C. Gas production rates appropriate to CTR conditions were simulated using a mixed beam of (4 MeV He + 2 MeV H 2 ) in the ratio 1:4 He:H. A beam of 46 MeV Ni or 20 MeV Cr ions was used in sequence with the mixed gas beam to provide a gas/damage ratio of 13 appm He/dpa at a damage rate of approx. 1 dpa/hr. The materials were investigated using TEM and comprised three austenitic alloys: European reference 316L, 316-Ti, 316-Nb; four high-nickel alloys: Fe/25 Ni/8Cr, Inconel 625, Inconel 706 and Nimonic PE16, and four ferritic/martensitic alloys: FV 448, FV 607, CRM 12 and FI. Some data were obtained for a non-magnetic structural alloy Nonmagne-30. The swelling behaviour is reported. The overall results of the study indicate that on a comparative basis the ferritic alloys are the most swelling-resistant, whilst the high-nickel alloys have an acceptable low swelling response up to 110 dpa. The 316 alloys tested have shown an unfavourable swelling response. (author)

  11. Irradiation creep of various ferritic alloys irradiated at {approximately}400{degrees}C in the PFR and FFTF reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toloczko, M.B.; Garner, F.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Eiholzer, C.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Three ferritic alloys were irradiated in two fast reactors to doses of 50 dpa or more at temperatures near 400{degrees}C. One martensitic alloy, HT9, was irradiated in both the FFTF and PFR reactors. PFR is the Prototype Fast Reactor in Dourneay, Scotland, and FFTF is the Fast Flux Test Facility in Richland, WA. D57 is a developmental alloy that was irradiated in PFR only, and MA957 is a Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion-hardened ferritic alloy that was irradiated only in FFTF. These alloys exhibited little or no void swelling at {approximately}400{degrees}C. Depending on the alloy starting condition, these steels develop a variety of non-creep strains early in the irradiation that are associated with phase changes. Each of these alloys creeps at a rate that is significantly lower than that of austenitic steels irradiated in the same experiments. The creep compliance for ferritic alloys in general appears to be {approximately}0.5 x 10{sup {minus}6} MPa{sup {minus}1} dpa{sup {minus}1}, independent of both composition and starting state. The addition of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a dispersoid does not appear to change the creep behavior.

  12. The role of minor alloying elements on the stability and dispersion of yttria nanoclusters in nanostructured ferritic alloys: An ab initio study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murali, D.; Panigrahi, B.K.; Valsakumar, M.C.; Chandra, Sharat; Sundar, C.S.; Raj, Baldev

    2010-01-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys derive their strength from the dispersion of oxide nanoclusters in the ferritic matrix. We have explored the relative role of minor alloying elements like Ti and Zr on the stability of nanoclusters of vacancy-Y-Ti-O by density functional theory calculations and shown that the binding energy of these clusters increases when we replace Ti with Zr. This could imply faster nucleation of the nanoclusters which, in turn, may lead to finer dispersion of nanoclusters resulting in improved performance of ferritic alloys. Further, we show a core/shell structure for these nanoclusters in which the core is enriched in Y, O, Ti while the shell is enriched in Cr.

  13. Optimization of mechanical alloying parameters in 12YWT ferritic steel nanocomposite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahmanifard, R., E-mail: rahmanifrd@ut.ac.ir [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Advanced Materials Group, School of Materials Research, NSTRC, P.O. Box 31585-4395 Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Farhangi, H. [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Novinrooz, A.J. [Advanced Materials Group, School of Materials Research, NSTRC, P.O. Box 31585-4395 Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Detailed studies of microstructural properties of ODS steels. {yields} Investigation of effects of different mechanical alloying parameters such as milling time; milling speed; ball-to-powder weight ratio and ball diameter on the microstructural characteristics. {yields} Interpretation of the experimental data using theoretical model by X-ray diffraction line profile analysis. - Abstract: The effects of different mechanical alloying parameters on the microstructural characteristics and morphology of ODS-ferritic steel nanocomposite powders were investigated. The steady state between the welding and fracturing of the particles was obtained within about 30 h using 8 mm ball diameter and 420 rpm milling speed with the ball-to-powder weight ratio of 10:1. However, for perfect dissolution of the used alloying elements, the mechanical alloying process must be continued up to 80 h of milling. Evaluation of the microstructural characteristics calculated by X-ray diffraction profile analysis revealed that although the average crystallite size reduced more sharply at the initial milling stages under the above conditions, with further milling, it eventually reached nearly the same value in all specimens. The distribution changes of crystallite size also showed a similar behavior of crystallite size. Among the investigated mechanical alloying parameters, milling speed had a considerable effect on the dislocation density so that it was reduced by about one order of magnitude when the milling speed decreased from 420 to 300 rpm.

  14. TEM examination of microstructural evolution during processing of 14CrYWTi nanostructured ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, H.; Alinger, M.J.; Odette, G.R.; Yamamoto, T.

    2004-01-01

    A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study was carried out on the co-evolution of the coarser-scale microstructural features in mechanically alloyed (MA) powders and hot isostatic press (HIP) consolidated Fe-14Cr-3W-0 and 0.4Ti-0.25Y 2 O 3 nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs). The pancake shaped nanoscale grains in the as-MA powders are textured and elongated parallel to the particle surface. Powder annealing results in re-crystallization at 850 deg. C and grain growth at 1150 deg. C. The grains also recrystallize and may grow in the alloys HIPed at 850 deg. C, but appear to retain a polygonized sub-grain structure. The grains are larger and more distinct in the alloys HIPed at 1000 and 1150 deg. C. However, annealing resulted in bi-modal grain size distribution. Finer grains retained a significant dislocation density and populations of small precipitates with crystal structures distinct form the matrix. The grains and precipitates were much larger in alloys without Ti

  15. The effect of fusion-relevant helium levels on the mechanical properties of isotopically tailored ferritic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hankin, G.L. [Loughborough Univ. (United Kingdom); Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The yield and maximum strengths of an irradiated series of isotopically tailored ferritic alloys were evaluated using the shear punch test. The composition of three of the alloys was Fe-12Cr-1.5Ni. Different balances of nickel isotopes were used in each alloy in order to produce different helium levels. A fourth alloy, which contained no nickel, was also irradiated. The addition of nickel at any isotopic balance to the Fe-12Cr base alloy significantly increased the shear yield and maximum strengths of the alloys, and as expected, the strength of the alloys decreased with increasing irradiation temperature. Helium itself, up to 75 appm over 7 dpa appears to have little effect on the mechanical properties of the alloys.

  16. Nanocluster irradiation evolution in Fe-9%Cr ODS and ferritic-martensitic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, M. J.; Wharry, J. P.

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the influence of dose rate and cascade morphology on nanocluster evolution in a model Fe-9%Cr oxide dispersion strengthened steel and the commercial ferritic/martensitic (F/M) alloys HCM12A and HT9. We present a large, systematic data set spanning the three alloys, three irradiating particle types, four orders of magnitude in dose rate, and doses ranging 1-100 displacements per atom over 400-500 °C. Nanoclusters are characterized using atom probe tomography. ODS oxide nanoclusters experience partial dissolution after irradiation due to inverse Ostwald ripening, while F/M nanoclusters undergo Ostwald ripening. Damage cascade morphology is indicative of nanocluster number density evolution. Finally, the effects of dose rate on nanocluster morphology provide evidence for a temperature dilation theory, which purports that a negative temperature shift is necessary for higher dose rate irradiations to emulate nanocluster evolution in lower dose rate irradiations.

  17. Structural and chemical evolution in neutron irradiated and helium-injected ferritic ODS PM2000 alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hee Joon [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Edwards, Dan J., E-mail: dan.edwards@pnnl.gov [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Kurtz, Richard J. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Yamamoto, Takuya; Wu, Yuan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Odette, G. Robert [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2017-02-15

    An investigation of the influence of helium on damage evolution under neutron irradiation of an 11 at% Al, 19 at% Cr ODS ferritic PM2000 alloy was carried out in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) using a novel in situ helium injection (ISHI) technique. Helium was injected into adjacent TEM discs from thermal neutron {sup 58}Ni(n{sub th},γ) {sup 59}Ni(n{sub th},α) reactions in a thin NiAl layer. The PM2000 undergoes concurrent displacement damage from the high-energy neutrons. The ISHI technique allows direct comparisons of regions with and without high concentrations of helium since only the side coated with the NiAl experiences helium injection. The corresponding microstructural and microchemical evolutions were characterized using both conventional and scanning transmission electron microscopy techniques. The evolutions observed include formation of dislocation loops and associated helium bubbles, precipitation of a variety of phases, amorphization of the Al{sub 2}YO{sub 3} oxides (which also variously contained internal voids), and several manifestations of solute segregation. Notably, high concentrations of helium had a significant effect on many of these diverse phenomena. These results on PM2000 are compared and contrasted to the evolution of so-called nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFA).

  18. Oxide nanoparticles in an Al-alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened steel: crystallographic structure and interface with ferrite matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhenbo; Pantleon, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Oxide nanoparticles are quintessential for ensuring the extraordinary properties of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels. In this study, the crystallographic structure of oxide nanoparticles, and their interface with the ferritic steel matrix in an Al-alloyed ODS steel, i.e. PM2000, were...

  19. The consequences of helium production on microstructural development in isotopically tailored ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1996-01-01

    A series of alloys have been made adding various isotopes of nickel in order to vary the production of helium during irradiation by a two step nuclear reaction in a mixed spectrum reactor. The alloys use a base composition of Fe-12Cr with an addition of 1.5% nickel, either in the form of 60 Ni which produces no helium, 59 Ni which produces helium at a rate of about 10 appm He/dpa, or natural nickel ( Nat Ni) which provides an intermediate level of helium due to delayed development of 59 Ni. Specimens were irradiated in the HFIR at Oak Ridge, TN to ∼7 dpa at 300 and 400 degrees C. Microstructural examinations indicated that nickel additions promote precipitation in all alloys, but the effect appears to be much stronger at 400 degrees C than at 300 degrees C. There is sufficient dose by 7 dpa (and with 2 appm He) to initiate void swelling in ferritic/martensitic alloys. Little difference was found between response from 59 Ni and Nat Ni. Also, helium bubble development for high helium generation conditions appeared to be very different at 300 and 400 degrees C. At 300 degrees C, it appeared that high densities of bubbles formed whereas at 400 degrees C, bubbles could not be identified, possibly because of the complexity of the microstructure, but more likely because helium accumulated at precipitate interfaces

  20. The consequences of helium production on microstructural development in isotopically tailored ferritic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    A series of alloys have been made adding various isotopes of nickel in order to vary the production of helium during irradiation by a two step nuclear reaction in a mixed spectrum reactor. The alloys use a base composition of Fe-12Cr with an addition of 1.5% nickel, either in the form of {sup 60}Ni which produces no helium, {sup 59}Ni which produces helium at a rate of about 10 appm He/dpa, or natural nickel ({sup Nat}Ni) which provides an intermediate level of helium due to delayed development of {sup 59}Ni. Specimens were irradiated in the HFIR at Oak Ridge, TN to {approx}7 dpa at 300 and 400{degrees}C. Microstructural examinations indicated that nickel additions promote precipitation in all alloys, but the effect appears to be much stronger at 400{degrees}C than at 300{degrees}C. There is sufficient dose by 7 dpa (and with 2 appm He) to initiate void swelling in ferritic/martensitic alloys. Little difference was found between response from {sup 59}Ni and {sup Nat}Ni. Also, helium bubble development for high helium generation conditions appeared to be very different at 300 and 400{degrees}C. At 300{degrees}C, it appeared that high densities of bubbles formed whereas at 400{degrees}C, bubbles could not be identified, possibly because of the complexity of the microstructure, but more likely because helium accumulated at precipitate interfaces.

  1. Study of behaviour during a quench treatment of ferrite delta of binary and pseudo-binary alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champin, B.

    1970-01-01

    Focusing of Fe-Cr and Fe-Mo alloys (and extending results to different binary alloys like Fe-W, Fe-Al and Fe-Si, and even to some ternary systems such as Fe-Cr-Ni and Fe-Mo-Ni), and after having recalled some previous results and presented experimental materials and processes, this research thesis describes the behaviour of the considered alloys, reports a detailed study of Fe-Mo alloys (influence of carbon content), a bibliographical study of the gamma-to-delta transformation, the study of hybrid alloys (behaviour, partial transformations, diffusion), the study of other types of alloys (hyper-quench of delta ferrite of Fe-Mo alloys, adsorption and diffusion). It discusses the case of two-phase structures, and the mechanism and kinetics of the delta-to-gamma transformation

  2. Radiation damage simulation studies in the Harwell VEC of selected austenitic and ferritic alloys for fusion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazey, D J; Walters, G P; Buckley, S N; Hanks, W; Bolster, D E.J.; Murphy, S M

    1988-07-01

    Three austenitic (316 L, 316-Ti, 316-Nb); four high-nickel (IN 625, IN 706, PE 16, Fe-25Ni-8Cr) and four ferritic (CRM 12, FV 448, FV 607, FI) alloys have been irradiated with 46 MeV Ni or 20 MeV Cr ions in the Harwell VEC to simulated fusion-reactor doses up to 110 dpa (proportional to 10 MW-yr m/sup -2/) at temperatures from 425 to 625/sup 0/C. Gas production rates appropriate to fusion were obtained from a mixed beam of He+H/sub 2/ in the ratio 1:4 He:H with gas/dpa ratios of 13 appm He/dpa and 52 appm H/dpa. The 316 alloys showed irradiation-induced precipitation and swelling as high as 40% in ST 316-Ti after 110 dpa at 625/sup 0/C. Low swelling (e.g. <2% at 110 dpa) was observed in the high-nickel alloys. The ferritic/martensitic alloys showed negligible swelling (e.g. <0.2% in FV 607 after 100 dpa at 475/sup 0/C). The results demonstrate the high swelling behaviour of 316 alloys and the better swelling resistance of high-nickel and ferritic alloys under simulated fusion conditions.

  3. The potential for using high chromium ferritic alloys for hydroprocessing reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antalffy, Leslie P.; Chaku, Pran N.; Canonico, Domenic A.; Pfeifer, Jeff A.; Alcorn, Douglas G.

    2002-01-01

    This paper outlines the development of hydroprocessing reactors and the parallel development of applicable steels for their high temperature and high pressure process environments. Trends in the development of newer processes for severe hydroprocessing applications have been increasing in operating hydrogen partial pressures and operating temperatures that require the development of new alloys to meet these more severe process environments. The paper outlines the properties of conventional hydroprocessing reactor materials and discusses the advantages of the advanced high chromium ferritic steel alloy Grade 91 (9Cr-1Mo-V) for high temperature hydroprocessing applications. Additionally, the alloys permitted for ASME Section I and Section VIII Division I construction, Grade 92 (Code Case 2179), and what will probably be called Grade 122 (Code Case 2180) are briefly introduced as possible future choices for hydroprocessing reactor construction. These three alloys contain 9-12% Cr and have time independent allowable stress values above 566 deg. C. These high, time independent, strength values provide materials that will in some cases permit extending hydroprocessing temperature limits by 112 deg. C. The paper provides room temperature and elevated temperature mechanical and toughness properties for the low chrome and Grade 91 materials and discusses the effects of hydrogen attack, and hydrogen and isothermal embrittlement. Fabrication aspects, including forming and welding are addressed. The paper discusses the environmental resistance of these alloys and investigates the possibility of utilizing excess wall metal thickness in these materials in less severe applications in lieu of the deposition of a higher chromium alloy weld overlay to overcome the corrosive effects of the process environment

  4. Ferritic Alloys as Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding Material for Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebak, Raul B.

    2014-01-01

    provide hermetic seal. The replacement of a zirconium alloy using a ferritic material containing chromium and aluminum appears to be the most near term implementation for accident tolerant nuclear fuels.

  5. Ferritic Alloys as Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding Material for Light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebak, Raul B. [General Electric Global Research, Schnectady, NY (United States)

    2014-09-30

    provide hermetic seal. The replacement of a zirconium alloy using a ferritic material containing chromium and aluminum appears to be the most near term implementation for accident tolerant nuclear fuels.

  6. Comparison of ferritic and austenitic plasma nitriding and nitrocarburizing behavior of AISI 4140 low alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fattah, M.; Mahboubi, F.

    2010-01-01

    This paper compares the ferritic and austenitic plasma nitriding and nitrocarburizing behavior of AISI 4140 low alloy steel carried out to improve the surface corrosion resistance. The gas composition for plasma nitriding was 85% N 2 -15% H 2 and that for plasma nitrocarburizing was 85% N 2 -12% H 2 -3% CO 2 . Both treatments were performed for 5 h, for different process temperatures of 570 and 620 o C for ferritic and austenitic plasma treatment, respectively. Optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction and potentiodynamic polarization technique in 3.5% NaCl solution, were used to study the treated surfaces. The results of X-ray analysis revealed that with increasing the treatment temperature from 570 to 620 o C for both treatments, the amount of ε phase decreased and γ' phase increased. Nitrocarburizing treatment resulted in formation of a more amount of ε phase with respect to nitriding treatment. However, the highest amount of ε phase was observed in the ferritic nitrocarburized sample at 570 o C. The sample nitrided at 620 o C exhibited the thickest layer. The potentiodynamic polarization results revealed that after plasma nitriding and nitrocarburizing at 570 o C, corrosion potential increased with respect to the untreated sample due to the noble nitride and carbonitride phases formed on the surface. After increasing the treatment temperature from 570 to 620 o C, corrosion potential decreased due to the less ε phase development in the compound layer and more porous compound layer formed at 620 o C with respect to the treated samples at 570 o C.

  7. Effect of mechanical alloying atmosphere on the microstructure and Charpy impact properties of an ODS ferritic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oksiuta, Z.; Baluc, N.

    2009-01-01

    Two types of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels, with the composition of Fe-14Cr-2W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2 O 3 (in weight percent), have been produced by mechanically alloying elemental powders of Fe, Cr, W, and Ti with Y 2 O 3 particles either in argon atmosphere or in hydrogen atmosphere, degassing at various temperatures, and compacting the mechanically alloyed powders by hot isostatic pressing. It was found in particular that mechanical alloying in hydrogen yields a significant reduction in oxygen content in the materials, a lower dislocation density, and a strong improvement in the fast fracture properties of the ODS ferritic steels, as measured by Charpy impact tests.

  8. High Temperature Deformation Mechanism in Hierarchical and Single Precipitate Strengthened Ferritic Alloys by In Situ Neutron Diffraction Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Clausen, Bjørn; Zhang, Shu Yan; Gao, Yanfei; Liaw, Peter K

    2017-04-07

    The ferritic Fe-Cr-Ni-Al-Ti alloys strengthened by hierarchical-Ni 2 TiAl/NiAl or single-Ni 2 TiAl precipitates have been developed and received great attentions due to their superior creep resistance, as compared to conventional ferritic steels. Although the significant improvement of the creep resistance is achieved in the hierarchical-precipitate-strengthened ferritic alloy, the in-depth understanding of its high-temperature deformation mechanisms is essential to further optimize the microstructure and mechanical properties, and advance the development of the creep resistant materials. In the present study, in-situ neutron diffraction has been used to investigate the evolution of elastic strain of constitutive phases and their interactions, such as load-transfer/load-relaxation behavior between the precipitate and matrix, during tensile deformation and stress relaxation at 973 K, which provide the key features in understanding the governing deformation mechanisms. Crystal-plasticity finite-element simulations were employed to qualitatively compare the experimental evolution of the elastic strain during tensile deformation at 973 K. It was found that the coherent elastic strain field in the matrix, created by the lattice misfit between the matrix and precipitate phases for the hierarchical-precipitate-strengthened ferritic alloy, is effective in reducing the diffusional relaxation along the interface between the precipitate and matrix phases, which leads to the strong load-transfer capability from the matrix to precipitate.

  9. Previsions of the microstructural evolution of ferritic alloys under irradiation by numerical atomic scale simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngayam Happy, R.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we have improved a diffusion model for point defects (vacancies and self-interstitials) by introducing hetero-interstitials. The model has been used to simulate by Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) the formation of solute rich clusters that are observed experimentally in irradiated ferritic model alloys of type Fe - CuMnNiSiP - C.Electronic structure calculations have been used to characterize the interactions between self-interstitials and all solute atoms, and also carbon. P interacts with vacancies and strongly with self-interstitials. Mn also interacts with self-interstitials to form mixed dumbbells. C, with occupies octahedral sites, interacts strongly with vacancies and less with self-interstitials. Binding and migration energies, as well as others atomic scale properties, obtained by ab initio calculations, have been used as parameters for the KMC code. Firstly, these parameters have been optimized over isochronal annealing experiments, in the literature, of binary alloys that have been electron-irradiated. Isochronal annealing simulations, by reproducing experimental results, have allowed us to link each mechanism to a single evolution of the resistivity during annealing. Moreover, solubility limits of all the elements have been determined by Metropolis Monte Carlo. Secondly, we have simulated the evolution at 300 C of the microstructure under irradiation of different alloys of increasing complexity: pure Fe, binary alloys, ternaries, quaternaries, and finally complex alloys which compositions are close to those of pressure vessel steels. The results show that the model globally reproduces all the experimental tendencies, what has led us to propose mechanisms to explain the behaviours observed. (author)

  10. Role of grain boundary engineering in the SCC behavior of ferritic-martensitic alloy HT-9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, G.; Ampornrat, P.; Ren, X.; Sridharan, K.; Allen, T.R.; Was, G.S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper focuses on the role of grain boundary engineering (GBE) in stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of ferritic-martensitic (F-M) alloy HT-9 in supercritical water (SCW) at 400 deg. C and 500 deg. C. Constant extension rate tensile (CERT) tests were conducted on HT-9 in as-received (AR) and coincident site lattice enhanced (CSLE) condition. Both unirradiated and irradiated specimens (irradiated with 2 MeV protons at 400 deg. C and 500 deg. C to a dose of 7 dpa) were tested. Ferritic-martensitic steel HT-9 exhibited intergranular stress corrosion cracking when subjected to CERT tests in an environment of supercritical water at 400 deg. C and 500 deg. C and also in an inert environment of argon at 500 deg. C. CSL-enhancement reduces grain boundary carbide coarsening and cracking susceptibility in both the unirradiated and irradiated condition. Irradiation enhanced coarsening of grain boundary carbides and cracking susceptibility of HT-9 for both the AR and CSLE conditions. Intergranular (IG) cracking of HT-9 results likely from fracture of IG carbides and seems consistent with the mechanism that coarser carbides worsen cracking susceptibility. Oxidation in combination with wedging stresses is the likely cause of the observed environmental enhancement of high temperature IG cracking in HT-9

  11. Electrochemical and passive behaviour of tin alloyed ferritic stainless steel in concrete environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hong; Su, Huaizhi; Li, Baosong; Ying, Guobing

    2018-05-01

    In the present work, the electrochemical behavior and semiconducting properties of a tin alloyed ferritic stainless steel in simulated concrete solution in presence of NaCl were estimated by conventional electrochemical methods such as potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and capacitance measurement (Mott-Schottky approach). The surface passive film was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results revealed a good agreement between pitting corrosion, electrochemical behaviour, and electronic properties. The p and n-type bilayer structure passive film were observed. The increase of Sn4+ oxide species in the passive film shows no beneficial effects on the pitting corrosion. In addition, the dehydration of the passive film was further discussed.

  12. Radiation-induced segregation and phase stability in ferritic-martensitic alloy T 91

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wharry, Janelle P.; Jiao Zhijie; Shankar, Vani [University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Blvd, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2104 (United States); Busby, Jeremy T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Was, Gary S., E-mail: gsw@umich.edu [University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Blvd, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2104 (United States)

    2011-10-01

    Radiation-induced segregation in ferritic-martensitic alloy T 91 was studied to understand the behavior of solutes as a function of dose and temperature. Irradiations were conducted using 2 MeV protons to doses of 1, 3, 7 and 10 dpa at 400 deg. C. Radiation-induced segregation at prior austenite grain boundaries was measured, and various features of the irradiated microstructure were characterized, including grain boundary carbide coverage, the dislocation microstructure, radiation-induced precipitation and irradiation hardening. Results showed that Cr, Ni and Si segregate to prior austenite grain boundaries at low dose, but segregation ceases and redistribution occurs above 3 dpa. Grain boundary carbide coverage mirrors radiation-induced segregation. Irradiation induces formation of Ni-Si-Mn and Cu-rich precipitates that account for the majority of irradiation hardening. Radiation-induced segregation behavior is likely linked to the evolution of the precipitate and dislocation microstructures.

  13. Carburization of austenitic and ferritic alloys in hydrocarbon environments at high temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serna, A.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The technical and industrial aspects of high temperature corrosion of materials exposed to a variety of aggressive environments have significant importance. These environments include combustion product gases and hydrocarbon gases with low oxygen potentials and high carbon potentials. In the refinery and petrochemical industries, austenitic and ferritic alloys are usually used for tubes in fired furnaces. The temperature range for exposure of austenitic alloys is 800-1100 °C, and for ferritic alloys 500-700 °C, with carbon activities ac > 1 in many cases. In both applications, the carburization process involves carbon (coke deposition on the inner diameter, carbon absorption at the metal surface, diffusion of carbon inside the alloy, and precipitation and transformation of carbides to a depth increasing with service. The overall kinetics of the internal carburization are approximately parabolic, controlled by carbon diffusion and carbide precipitation. Ferritic alloys exhibit gross but uniform carburization while non-uniform intragranular and grain-boundary carburization is observed in austenitic alloys.

    La corrosión a alta temperatura, tal como la carburación de materiales expuestos a una amplia variedad de ambientes agresivos, tiene especial importancia desde el punto de vista técnico e industrial. Estos ambientes incluyen productos de combustión, gases e hidrocarburos con bajo potencial de oxígeno y alto potencial de carbono. En las industrias de refinación y petroquímica, las aleaciones austeníticas y ferríticas se utilizan en tuberías de hornos. El rango de temperatura de exposición para aleaciones austeníticas está entre 800-1.100°C y para aleaciones ferríticas está entre 500-700°C, con actividades de carbono ac>1 en algunos casos. En tuberías con ambas aleaciones, el proceso de carburación incluye deposición de carbón (coque en el diámetro interno, absorción de carbono en la superficie

  14. EBSD as a tool to identify and quantify bainite and ferrite in low-alloyed Al-TRIP steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaefferer, S; Romano, P; Friedel, F

    2008-06-01

    Bainite is thought to play an important role for the chemical and mechanical stabilization of metastable austenite in low-alloyed TRIP steels. Therefore, in order to understand and improve the material properties, it is important to locate and quantify the bainitic phase. To this aim, electron backscatter diffraction-based orientation microscopy has been employed. The main difficulty herewith is to distinguish bainitic ferrite from ferrite because both have bcc crystal structure. The most important difference between them is the occurrence of transformation induced geometrically necessary dislocations in the bainitic phase. To determine the areas with larger geometrically necessary dislocation density, the following orientation microscopy maps were explored: pattern quality maps, grain reference orientation deviation maps and kernel average misorientation maps. We show that only the latter allow a reliable separation of the bainitic and ferritic phase. The kernel average misorientation threshold value that separates both constituents is determined by an algorithm that searches for the smoothness of the boundaries between them.

  15. Statistical study to determine the effect of carbon, silicon, nickel and other alloying elements on the mechanical properties of as-cast ferritic ductile irons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacaze, J.; Sertucha, J.; Larranaga, P.; Suarez, R.

    2016-01-01

    There is a great interest in fully ferritic ductile irons due to their structural homogeneity, remarkable ductility and good response when machining. On the other hand the wide variety of raw materials available in foundry plants becomes a problem when controlling the chemical composition of the manufactured alloys. The present work shows a statistical study about the effect of different C, Si, Ni contents and other minor elements on structural and mechanical properties of a group of ferritic ductile iron alloys. A set of equations are finally presented to predict room temperature mechanical properties of ferritic ductile irons by means of their chemical composition and pearlite content. (Author)

  16. Statistical study to determine the effect of carbon, silicon, nickel and other alloying elements on the mechanical properties of as-cast ferritic ductile irons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacaze, J.; Sertucha, J.; Larranaga, P.; Suarez, R.

    2016-10-01

    There is a great interest in fully ferritic ductile irons due to their structural homogeneity, remarkable ductility and good response when machining. On the other hand the wide variety of raw materials available in foundry plants becomes a problem when controlling the chemical composition of the manufactured alloys. The present work shows a statistical study about the effect of different C, Si, Ni contents and other minor elements on structural and mechanical properties of a group of ferritic ductile iron alloys. A set of equations are finally presented to predict room temperature mechanical properties of ferritic ductile irons by means of their chemical composition and pearlite content. (Author)

  17. Microstructure and Mechanical Property of ODS Ferritic Steels Using Commercial Alloy Powders for High Temperature Service Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Sanghoon; Choi, Byoung-Kwon; Kang, Suk Hoon; Kim, Tae Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Oxide dispersion strengthening (ODS) is one of the promising ways to improve the mechanical property at high temperatures. This is mainly attributed to uniformly distributed nano-oxide particle with a high density, which is extremely stable at the high temperature and acts as effective obstacles when the dislocations are moving. In this study, as a preliminary examination to develop the advanced structural materials for high temperature service applications, ODS ferritic steels were fabricated using commercial alloy powders and their microstructural and mechanical properties were investigated. In this study, ODS ferritic steels were fabricated using commercial stainless steel 430L powder and their microstructures and mechanical properties were investigated. Morphology of micro-grains and oxide particles were significantly changed by the addition of minor alloying elements such as Ti, Zr, and Hf. The ODS ferritic steel with Zr and Hf additions showed ultra-fine grains with fine complex oxide particles. The oxide particles were uniformly located in grains and on the grain boundaries. This led to higher hardness than ODS ferritic steel with Ti addition.

  18. TEM characterization of irradiated microstructure of Fe-9%Cr ODS and ferritic-martensitic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, M. J.; Wharry, J. P.

    2018-04-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the effects of irradiation dose and dose rate on defect cluster (i.e. dislocation loops and voids) evolution in a model Fe-9%Cr oxide dispersion strengthened steel and commercial ferritic-martensitic steels HCM12A and HT9. Complimentary irradiations using Fe2+ ions, protons, or neutrons to doses ranging from 1 to 100 displacements per atom (dpa) at 500 °C are conducted on each alloy. The irradiated microstructures are characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Dislocation loops exhibit limited growth after 1 dpa upon Fe2+ and proton irradiation, while any voids observed are small and sparse. The average size and number density of loops are statistically invariant between Fe2+, proton, and neutron irradiated specimens at otherwise fixed irradiation conditions of ∼3 dpa, 500 °C. Therefore, we conclude that higher dose rate charged particle irradiations can reproduce the neutron irradiated loop microstructure with temperature shift governed by the invariance theory; this temperature shift is ∼0 °C for the high sink strength alloys studied herein.

  19. Behavior of the elements in the mechanically alloyed and cast ferritic steels and a type 316 stainless steel in a flowing sodium environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, T.; Mutoh, I.

    1988-01-01

    Sodium corrosion behavior of a mechanically alloyed ferritic steel, dispersion-strengthened with addition of Y 2 0 3 and Ti, two kinds of melted/cast ferritic steels and a Type 316 stainless steel was examined by using a non-isothermal sodium loop system, constructed of another Type 316 stainless steel, with a direct resistance electrical heater. The sodium conditions were 675 0 C, 4.0 m/s in velocity and 1-2 ppm oxygen concentration and a cumulative exposure time of the specimens was about 3000 h. The absorption of Ni and selective dissolution of Cr played an important role in the corrosion of the mechanically alloyed ferritic steel as in the case of the cast ferritic steels. However, the region of Ni absorption and Cr diminution was deeper than that of the cast ferritic steels. Peculiar finding for the mechanically alloyed ferritic steel was the corroded surface with irregularly shaped protuberance, that might be related with formation of sodium titanate, and the absorption of carbon and nitrogen to form carbide and nitride of titanium. It seems that these facts resulted in the irregular weight loss of the specimens, which depended on the downstream position and the cumulative exposure time. However, the tensile properties of the mechanically alloyed ferritic steel did not noticeably change by the sodium exposure

  20. Oxide nanoparticles in an Al-alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened steel: crystallographic structure and interface with ferrite matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenbo; Pantleon, Wolfgang

    2017-07-01

    Oxide nanoparticles are quintessential for ensuring the extraordinary properties of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels. In this study, the crystallographic structure of oxide nanoparticles, and their interface with the ferritic steel matrix in an Al-alloyed ODS steel, i.e. PM2000, were systematically investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The majority of oxide nanoparticles were identified to be orthorhombic YAlO3. During hot consolidation and extrusion, they develop a coherent interface and a near cuboid-on-cube orientation relationship with the ferrite matrix in the material. After annealing at 1200 °C for 1 h, however, the orientation relationship between the oxide nanoparticles and the matrix becomes arbitrary, and their interface mostly incoherent. Annealing at 1300 °C leads to considerable coarsening of oxide nanoparticles, and a new orientation relationship of pseudo-cube-on-cube between oxide nanoparticles and ferrite matrix develops. The reason for the developing interfaces and orientation relationships between oxide nanoparticles and ferrite matrix under different conditions is discussed.

  1. Interdiffusion behavior of Al-rich oxidation resistant coatings on ferritic-martensitic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velraj, S.; Zhang, Y.; Hawkins, E.W. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, TN 38505-0001 (United States); Pint, B.A. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6156 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Interdiffusion of thin Al-rich coatings synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and pack cementation on 9Cr ferritic-martensitic alloys was investigated in the temperature range of 650-700 C. The compositional changes after long-term exposures in laboratory air and air + 10 vol% H{sub 2}O were examined experimentally. Interdiffusion was modeled by a modified coating oxidation and substrate interdiffusion model (COSIM) program. The modification enabled the program to directly input the concentration profiles of the as-deposited coating determined by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). Reasonable agreement was achieved between the simulated and experimental Al profiles after exposures. The model was also applied to predict coating lifetime at 650-700 C based on a minimum Al content (C{sub b}) required at the coating surface to re-form protective oxide scale. In addition to a C{sub b} value established from the failure of a thin CVD coating at 700 C, values reported for slurry aluminide coatings were also included in lifetime predictions. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Effects of alloying elements on sticking occurring during hot rolling of ferritic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Dae Jin; Kim, Yong Jin; Lee, Yong Deuk; Lee, Sung Hak; Lee, Jong Seog

    2008-01-01

    In this study, effects of alloying elements on the sticking occurring during hot rolling of five kinds of ferritic STS430J1L stainless steels were investigated by analyzing high-temperature hardness and oxidation behavior of the rolled steels. Hot-rolling simulation tests were conducted by a high-temperature wear tester which could simulate actual hot rolling. The simulation test results revealed that the sticking process proceeded with three stages, i.e., nucleation, growth, and saturation. Since the hardness continuously decreased as the test temperature increased, whereas the formation of Fe-Cr oxides in the rolled steel surface region increased, the sticking of five stainless steels was evaluated by considering both the high-temperature hardness and oxidation effects. The addition of Zr, Cu, or Si had a beneficial effect on the sticking resistance, while the Ni addition did not show any difference in the sticking. Particularly in the case of the Si addition, Si oxides formed first in the initial stage of high-temperature oxidation, worked as initiation sites for Fe-Cr oxides, accelerated the formation of Fe-Cr oxides, and thus raised the sticking resistance by about 10 times in comparison with the steel without Si content

  3. Diffusion Couple Alloying of Refractory Metals in Austenitic and Ferritic/Martensitic Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    stainless steel and ferritic/ martensitic steel can vary from structural and support components in the reactor core to reactor fuel...of ferritic/ martensitic steels compared to type 316 stainless steel after irradiation in Experimental Breeder Reactor-II at 420 ºC to ~80dpa (From...ferritic martensitic steel at Sandia National Laboratories. The 316 stainless steel had a certified composition of:

  4. Further Charpy impact test results of low activation ferritic alloys, irradiated at 430{degrees}C to 67 dpa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubert, L.E.; Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Miniature CVN specimens of four ferritic alloys, GA3X, F82H, GA4X and HT9, have been impact tested following irradiation at 430{degrees}C to 67 dpa. Comparison of the results with those of the previously tested lower dose irradiation condition indicates that the GA3X and F82H alloys, two primary candidate low activation alloys, exhibit virtually identical behavior following irradiation at 430{degrees}C to {approximately}67 dpa and at 370{degrees}C to {approximately}15 dpa. Very little shift is observed in either DBTT or USE relative to the unirradiated condition. The shifts in DBTT and USE observed in both GA4X and HT9 were smaller after irradiation at 430{degrees}C to {approximately}67 dpa than after irradiation at 370{degrees}C to {approximately}15 dpa.

  5. Further Charpy impact test results of low activation ferritic alloys, irradiated at 430 degrees C to 67 dpa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, L.E.; Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S.

    1997-01-01

    Miniature CVN specimens of four ferritic alloys, GA3X, F82H, GA4X and HT9, have been impact tested following irradiation at 430 degrees C to 67 dpa. Comparison of the results with those of the previously tested lower dose irradiation condition indicates that the GA3X and F82H alloys, two primary candidate low activation alloys, exhibit virtually identical behavior following irradiation at 430 degrees C to ∼67 dpa and at 370 degrees C to ∼15 dpa. Very little shift is observed in either DBTT or USE relative to the unirradiated condition. The shifts in DBTT and USE observed in both GA4X and HT9 were smaller after irradiation at 430 degrees C to ∼67 dpa than after irradiation at 370 degrees C to ∼15 dpa

  6. Multi-scale modeling of interaction between vacancies and alloying elements in ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barouh, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    This PhD thesis is devoted to the study of interaction between vacancies and alloying elements in Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) steels, which are promising candidate materials for future nuclear reactors. This work is based on multi-scale modeling of a simplified system composed by oxygen, yttrium and titanium atoms and vacancies in an α-iron lattice. We particularly focused on the role of vacancies which are created in excess during the fabrication of these steels. The stability and mobility of vacancy-solute clusters have been examined using ab initio calculations for oxygen, on one hand, which has been systematically compared to carbon and nitrogen, interstitial solutes frequently present in iron-based materials, and, on the other hand, for substitutional solutes: titanium and yttrium. The three interstitial solutes show very similar energetic and kinetic behaviors. The impact of small mobile vacancy-solute clusters has been verified using a cluster dynamics model based on our ab initio results. It has been thus demonstrated that with over-saturation of vacancies, diffusion of interstitial solutes may be accelerated, while substitutional solutes do not become necessarily faster. These conclusions are consistent with existing experimental observations. All these results have been then used to complete our understanding of nano-clusters formation mechanisms. It appeared that the relative mobility of yttrium and titanium, as well as the number of potential nuclei to form nanoparticles strongly depend on the total vacancy concentration in the system. (author) [fr

  7. Oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloys. 14/20% chromium: effects of processing on deformation texture, recrystallization and tensile properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regle, H.

    1994-01-01

    The ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened alloys are promising candidates for high temperature application materials, in particular for long life core components of advanced nuclear reactors. The aim of this work is to control the microstructure, in order to optimise the mechanical properties. The two ferritic alloys examined here, MA956 and MA957, are obtained by Mechanical Alloying techniques. They are characterised by quite anisotropic microstructure and mechanical properties. We have investigated the influence of hot and cold working processes (hot extrusion, swaging and cold-drawing) and recrystallization heat treatments on deformation textures, microstructures and tensile properties. The aim was to control the size of the grains and their anisotropic shape, using recrystallization heat treatments. After consolidation and hot extrusion, as-received materials present a extremely fine microstructure with elongated grains and a very strong (110) deformation texture with single-crystal character. At that stage of processing, recrystallization temperature are very high (1450 degrees C for MA957 alloy and 1350 degrees C for MA956 alloy) and materials develop millimetric recrystallized grains. Additional hot extrusion induce a fibre texture. Cold-drawing maintains a fibre texture, but the intensity decreases with increasing cold-work level. For both materials, the decrease of texture intensities correspond to a decrease of the recrystallization temperatures (from 1350 degrees C for a low cold-work level to 750 degrees C for 60 % cold-deformation, case of MA956 alloy) and a refinement of the grain size (from a millimetric size to less than an hundred of micrometer). Swaging develop a cyclic component where the intensity increases with increasing deformation in this case, the recrystallization temperature remains always very high and the millimetric grain size is slightly modified, even though cold-work level increases. Technologically, cold-drawing is the only way

  8. Influence of displacement damage on deuterium and helium retention in austenitic and ferritic-martensitic alloys considered for ADS service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyevodin, V.N.; Karpov, S.A.; Kopanets, I.E.; Ruzhytskyi, V.V. [National Science Center “Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology” Kharkov, 1, Akademicheskaya St., Kharkov, 61108 (Ukraine); Tolstolutskaya, G.D., E-mail: g.d.t@kipt.kharkov.ua [National Science Center “Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology” Kharkov, 1, Akademicheskaya St., Kharkov, 61108 (Ukraine); Garner, F.A. [Radiation Effects Consulting, Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-01-15

    The behavior of ion-implanted hydrogen (deuterium) and helium in austenitic 18Cr10NiTi stainless steel, EI-852 ferritic steel and ferritic/martensitic steel EP-450 and their interaction with displacement damage were investigated. Energetic argon irradiation was used to produce displacement damage and bubble formation to simulate nuclear power environments. The influence of damage morphology and the features of radiation-induced defects on deuterium and helium trapping in structural alloys was studied using ion implantation, the nuclear reaction D({sup 3}He,p){sup 4}He, thermal desorption spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy. It was found in the case of helium irradiation that various kinds of helium-radiation defect complexes are formed in the implanted layer that lead to a more complicated spectra of thermal desorption. Additional small changes in the helium spectra after irradiation with argon ions to a dose of ≤25 dpa show that the binding energy of helium with these traps is weakly dependent on the displacement damage. It was established that retention of deuterium in ferritic and ferritic-martensitic alloys is three times less than in austenitic steel at damage of ∼1 dpa. The retention of deuterium in steels is strongly enhanced by presence of radiation damages created by argon ion irradiation, with a shift in the hydrogen release temperature interval of 200 K to higher temperature. At elevated temperatures of irradiation the efficiency of deuterium trapping is reduced by two orders of magnitude.

  9. Gas atomized precursor alloy powder for oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieken, Joel [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2011-12-13

    Gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) was employed as a simplified method for producing precursor powders for oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic stainless steels (e.g., Fe-Cr-Y-(Ti,Hf)-O), departing from the conventional mechanical alloying (MA) process. During GARS processing a reactive atomization gas (i.e., Ar-O2) was used to oxidize the powder surfaces during primary break-up and rapid solidification of the molten alloy. This resulted in envelopment of the powders by an ultra-thin (t < 150 nm) metastable Cr-enriched oxide layer that was used as a vehicle for solid-state transport of O into the consolidated microstructure. In an attempt to better understand the kinetics of this GARS reaction, theoretical cooling curves for the atomized droplets were calculated and used to establish an oxidation model for this process. Subsequent elevated temperature heat treatments, which were derived from Rhines pack measurements using an internal oxidation model, were used to promote thermodynamically driven O exchange reactions between trapped films of the initial Cr-enriched surface oxide and internal Y-enriched intermetallic precipitates. This novel microstructural evolution process resulted in the successful formation of nano-metric Y-enriched dispersoids, as confirmed using high energy X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), equivalent to conventional ODS alloys from MA powders. The thermal stability of these Y-enriched dispersoids was evaluated using high temperature (1200°C) annealing treatments ranging from 2.5 to 1,000 hrs of exposure. In a further departure from current ODS practice, replacing Ti with additions of Hf appeared to improve the Y-enriched dispersoid thermal stability by means of crystal structure modification. Additionally, the spatial distribution of the dispersoids was found to depend strongly on the original rapidly solidified microstructure. To exploit this, ODS microstructures were engineered from

  10. Evaluation of mechanically alloyed Cu-based powders as filler alloy for brazing tungsten to a reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prado, J. de, E-mail: javier.deprado@urjc.es; Sánchez, M.; Ureña, A.

    2017-07-15

    80Cu-20Ti powders were evaluated for their use as filler alloy for high temperature brazing of tungsten to a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel (Eurofer), and its application for the first wall of the DEMO fusion reactor. The use of alloyed powders has not been widely considered for brazing purposes and could improve the operational brazeability of the studied system due to its narrower melting range, determined by DTA analysis, which enhances the spreading capabilities of the filler. Ti contained in the filler composition acts as an activator element, reacting and forming several interfacial layers at the Eurofer-braze, which enhances the wettability properties and chemical interaction at the brazing interface. Brazing thermal cycle also activated the diffusion phenomena, which mainly affected to the Eurofer alloying elements causing in it a softening band of approximately 400 μm of thickness. However, this softening effect did not degrade the shear strength of the brazed joints (94 ± 23 MPa), because failure during testing was always located at the tungsten-braze interface. - Highlights: •W-Eurofer brazed joints, manufactured using Cu-based mechanically alloyed powders as filler is proposed. •The benefits derivate from the alloyed composition could improve the operational brazeability of the studied system. •Tested pre-alloyed fillers have a more homogeneous melting stage which enhances its spreading and flowing capabilities. •This behaviour could lead to work with higher heating rates and lower brazing temperatures.

  11. Fe-Cr-V ternary alloy-based ferritic steels for high- and low-temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieth, M.; Materna-Morris, E.; Dudarev, S.L.; Boutard, J.-L.; Keppler, H.; Mayor, J.

    2009-01-01

    The phase stability of alloys and steels developed for application in nuclear fission and fusion technology is one of the decisive factors determining the potential range of operating temperatures and radiation conditions that the core elements of a power plant can tolerate. In the case of ferritic and ferritic-martensitic steels, the choice of the chemical composition is dictated by the phase diagram for binary FeCr alloys where in the 0-9% range of Cr composition the alloy remains in the solid solution phase at and below the room temperature. For Cr concentrations exceeding 9% the steels operating at relatively low temperatures are therefore expected to exhibit the formation of α' Cr-rich precipitates. These precipitates form obstacles for the propagation of dislocations, impeding plastic deformation and embrittling the material. This sets the low temperature limit for the use of of high (14% to 20%) Cr steels, which for the 20% Cr steels is at approximately 600 deg. C. On the other hand, steels containing 12% or less Cr cannot be used at temperatures exceeding ∼600 deg. C due to the occurrence of the α-γ transition (912 deg. C in pure iron and 830 deg. C in 7% Cr alloy), which weakens the steel in the high temperature limit. In this study, we investigate the physical properties of a concentrated ternary alloy system that attracted relatively little attention so far. The phase diagram of ternary Fe-Cr-V alloy shows no phase boundaries within a certain broad range of Cr and V concentrations. This makes the alloy sufficiently resistant to corrosion and suggests that steels and dispersion strengthened materials based on this alloy composition may have better strength and stability at high temperatures. Experimental heats were produced on a laboratory scale by arc melting the material components to pellets, then by melting the pellets in an induction furnace and casting the melt into copper moulds. The compositions in weight percent (iron base) are 10Cr5V, 10Cr

  12. Evaluation of mechanical properties in stainless alloy ferritic with 5 % molybdenum; Avaliacao das propriedades mecanicas em ligas inoxidaveis ferriticas com 5% de molibdenio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima Filho, V.X.; Gomes, F.H.F.; Guimaraes, R.F.; Saboia, F.H.C.; Abreu, H.F.G. de [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia do Ceara (IFCE). Campus Maracanau, CE (Brazil)], e-mail: venceslau@ifce.edu.br

    2010-07-01

    The deterioration of equipment in the oil industry is caused by high aggressiveness in processing the same. One solution to this problem would increase the content of molybdenum (Mo) alloys, since this improves the corrosion resistance. As the increase of Mo content causes changes in mechanical properties, we sought to evaluate the mechanical properties of alloys with 5% Mo and different levels of chromium (Cr). Were performed metallography and hardness measurement of the alloys in the annealed condition. Subsequent tests were performed tensile and Charpy-V, both at room temperature. The results showed that 2% difference in the content of Cr did not significantly alter the mechanical properties of alloys. The alloys studied had higher values in measured properties when compared to commercial ferritic alloys with similar percentages of Cr. The high content of Mo resulted in a brittle at room temperature but ductile at temperatures above 70 degree C. (author)

  13. Atom probe study of the microstructural evolution induced by irradiation in Fe-Cu ferritic alloys and pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pareige, P.

    1996-04-01

    Pressure vessel steels used in pressurized water reactors are low alloyed ferritic steels. They may be prone to hardening and embrittlement under neutron irradiation. The changes in mechanical properties are generally supposed to result from the formation of point defects, dislocation loops, voids and/or copper rich clusters. However, the real nature of the irradiation induced-damage in these steels has not been clearly identified yet. In order to improve our vision of this damage, we have characterized the microstructure of several steels and model alloys irradiated with electrons and neutrons. The study was performed with conventional and tomographic atom probes. The well known importance of the effects of copper upon pressure vessel steel embrittlement has led us to study Fe-Cu binary alloys. We have considered chemical aging as well as aging under electron and neutron irradiations. The resulting effects depend on whether electron or neutron irradiations ar used for thus. We carried out both kinds of irradiation concurrently so as to compare their effects. We have more particularly considered alloys with a low copper supersaturation representative of that met with the French vessel alloys (0.1% Cu). Then, we have examined steels used on French nuclear reactor pressure vessels. To characterize the microstructure of CHOOZ A steel and its evolution when exposed to neutrons, we have studied samples from the reactor surveillance program. The results achieved, especially the characterization of neutron-induced defects have been compared with those for another steel from the surveillance program of Dampierre 2. All the experiment results obtained on model and industrial steels have allowed us to consider an explanation of the way how the defects appear and grow, and to propose reasons for their influence upon steel embrittlement. (author). 3 appends

  14. Plasticity of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloys; Plasticite des alliages ferritiques renforces par dispersion d`oxydes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakine, C

    1994-07-05

    The object of this work is to study the plasticity mechanisms of two oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloys, DT and DY. Microstructural characterisation has been performed on DT and DY alloys by optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. These materials, strengthened by an oxide dispersion, contain an intermetallic {chi} phase precipitated on grain boundaries. The {chi} phase, stable up to 900 deg, can be dissolved into the matrix by heat treatment beyond 1 000 deg. Between 20 and 700 deg, according to tensile tests, the DY alloy which is strengthened by a fine dispersion of yttria particles is more resistant and less ductile than DT alloy, strengthened by titanium oxides. Tensile tests performed at room temperature, in the chamber of a SEM, have shown that micro-cracking of the {chi} phase coincides with the first stage of the macroscopic yielding. The cavities initiated by the {chi} phase micro-cracking induce a ductile fracture of the matrix. A dynamic strain ageing mechanism has been observed around 400 deg, which is attributed to the Mo contribution. Between 20 and 700 deg, comparison of tensile properties of alloys with or without {chi} phase has shown that the intermetallic phase has a detrimental effect on the ductility, but has no influence on the mechanical strength. Creep tests have been performed between 500 and 700 deg. Thermally activated plasticity mechanisms are observed in this temperature range. The {chi} phase, which is always micro-cracked after tensile testing, is not damaged after creep testing below a critical stress. This behaviour is explained by the influence of strain rate through the competition between strain hardening and relaxation of the matrix. (author).

  15. Overload effects on a ferritic-baintic steel and a cast aluminium alloy: two very different behaviours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saintier, N. [Arts et Metiers Paris Tech, I2M, UMR CNRS, Universite Bordeaux 1, Talene Cedex (France); El Dsoki, C.; Kaufmann, H.; Sonsino, C.M. [Fraunhofer-Institute for Structural Durability and System Reliability LBF, Darmstadt (Germany); Dumas, C. [RENAULT, Technocentre, Guyancourt Cedex (France); Voellmecke, F.J. [BORBET GmbH, Hallenberg-Hesborn (Germany); Palin-Luc, T.; Bidonard, H.

    2011-10-15

    Load controlled fatigue tests were performed up to 10{sup 7} cycles on flat notched specimens (K{sub t} = 2.5) under constant amplitude and variable amplitude loadings with and without periodical overloads. Two materials are studied: a ferritic-bainitic steel (HE400M steel) and a cast aluminium alloy (AlSi7Mg0.3). These materials have a very different cyclic behaviour: the steel exhibits cyclic strain softening whereas the Al alloy shows cyclic strain hardening. The fatigue tests show that, for the steel, periodical overload applications reduce significantly the fatigue life for fully reversed load ratio (R{sub {sigma}} = -1), while they have no influence under pulsating loading (R{sub {sigma}} = 0). For the Al alloy overloads have an effect (fatigue life decreasing) only for variable amplitude loadings. The detrimental effect of overloads on the steel is due to ratcheting at the notch root which evolution is overload's dependent. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Influence of scandium addition on the high-temperature grain size stabilization of oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) ferritic alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lulu, E-mail: lli18@ncsu.edu; Xu, Weizong; Saber, Mostafa; Zhu, Yuntian; Koch, Carl C.; Scattergood, Ronald O.

    2015-06-11

    The influence of 1–4 at% Sc addition on the thermal stability of mechanically alloyed ODS ferritic alloy was studied in this work. Sc addition was found to significantly stabilize grain size and microhardness at high temperatures. Grain sizes of samples with 1 and 4 at% Sc was found maintained in the nanoscale range at temperatures up to 1000 °C with hardness maintained at 5.6 and 6.7 GPa, respectively. The detailed microstructure was also investigated from EDS elemental mapping, where nanofeatures [ScTiO] were observed, while nanosized [YTiO] particles were rarely seen. This is probably due to the concentration difference between Sc and Y, leading to the formation of [ScTiO] favoring that of [YTiO]. Precipitation was considered as the major source for the observed high temperature stabilization. In addition, 14YT–Sc alloys without large second phases such as Ti-oxide can exhibit better performance compared to conventional ODS materials.

  17. Hydrogen-Induced Delayed Cracking in TRIP-Aided Lean-Alloyed Ferritic-Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvi Papula

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Susceptibility of three lean-alloyed ferritic-austenitic stainless steels to hydrogen-induced delayed cracking was examined, concentrating on internal hydrogen contained in the materials after production operations. The aim was to study the role of strain-induced austenite to martensite transformation in the delayed cracking susceptibility. According to the conducted deep drawing tests and constant load tensile testing, the studied materials seem not to be particularly susceptible to delayed cracking. Delayed cracks were only occasionally initiated in two of the materials at high local stress levels. However, if a delayed crack initiated in a highly stressed location, strain-induced martensite transformation decreased the crack arrest tendency of the austenite phase in a duplex microstructure. According to electron microscopy examination and electron backscattering diffraction analysis, the fracture mode was predominantly cleavage, and cracks propagated along the body-centered cubic (BCC phases ferrite and α’-martensite. The BCC crystal structure enables fast diffusion of hydrogen to the crack tip area. No delayed cracking was observed in the stainless steel that had high austenite stability. Thus, it can be concluded that the presence of α’-martensite increases the hydrogen-induced cracking susceptibility.

  18. The influence of fabrication procedure on the void swelling of an oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy in a HVEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snykers, M.; Biermans, F.; Cornelis, J.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of changes in the fabrication procedure of ferritic alloys with compositions Fe-13Cr-Ti-Mo-TiO 2 on the swelling behaviour are investigated. The fabrication procedures are: casting, powder metallurgy; milling in air and powder metallurgy; milling in argon. No difference is found for the results obtained for the materials fabricated by casting and by powder metallurgy; milling in air. Slightly different results are obtained for the material fabricated by powder metallurgy; milling in argon. This material contains argon in solution in the matrix, which causes a small shift of the peak swelling temperature and of the peak swelling helium concentration for tests carried out at 450 0 C. The overall swelling of this material is the lowest due to the small grain size and to the high density of inclusions. (orig.)

  19. Evaluation of mechanically alloyed Cu-based powders as filler alloy for brazing tungsten to a reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Prado, J.; Sánchez, M.; Ureña, A.

    2017-07-01

    80Cu-20Ti powders were evaluated for their use as filler alloy for high temperature brazing of tungsten to a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel (Eurofer), and its application for the first wall of the DEMO fusion reactor. The use of alloyed powders has not been widely considered for brazing purposes and could improve the operational brazeability of the studied system due to its narrower melting range, determined by DTA analysis, which enhances the spreading capabilities of the filler. Ti contained in the filler composition acts as an activator element, reacting and forming several interfacial layers at the Eurofer-braze, which enhances the wettability properties and chemical interaction at the brazing interface. Brazing thermal cycle also activated the diffusion phenomena, which mainly affected to the Eurofer alloying elements causing in it a softening band of approximately 400 μm of thickness. However, this softening effect did not degrade the shear strength of the brazed joints (94 ± 23 MPa), because failure during testing was always located at the tungsten-braze interface.

  20. Past research and fabrication conducted at SCK•CEN on ferritic ODS alloys used as cladding for FBR's fuel pins

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bremaecker, Anne

    2012-09-01

    In the 1960s in the frame of the sodium-cooled fast breeders, SCK•CEN decided to develop claddings made with ferritic stainless materials because of their specific properties, namely a higher thermal conductivity, a lower thermal expansion, a lower tendency to He-embrittlement, and a lower swelling than the austenitic stainless steels. To enhance their lower creep resistance at 650-700 °C arose the idea to strengthen the microstructure by oxide dispersions. This was the starting point of an ambitious programme where both the matrix and the dispersions were optimized. A purely ferritic 13 wt% Cr matrix was selected and its mechanical strength was improved through addition of ferritizing elements. Results of tensile and stress-rupture tests showed that Ti and Mo were the most beneficial elements, partly because of the chi-phase precipitation. In 1973 the optimized matrix composition was Fe-13Cr-3.5Ti-2Mo. To reach creep properties similar to those of AISI 316, different dispersions and methods were tested: internal oxidation (that was not conclusive), and the direct mixing of metallic and oxide powders (Al2O3, MgO, ZrO2, TiO2, ZrSiO4) followed by pressing, sintering, and extrusion. The compression and extrusion parameters were determined: extrusion as hollow at 1050 °C, solution annealing at 1050 °C/15 min, cleaning, cold drawing to the final dimensions with intermediate annealings at 1050 °C, final annealing at 1050 °C, straightening and final aging at 800 °C. The choice of titania and yttria powders and their concentrations were finalized on the basis of their out-of-pile and in-pile creep and tensile strength. As soon as a resistance butt welding machine was developed and installed in a glove-box, fuel segments with PuO2 were loaded in the Belgian MTR BR2. The fabrication parameters were continuously optimized: milling and beating, lubrication, cold drawing (partial and final reduction rates, temperature, duration, atmosphere and furnace). Specific non

  1. Radiation-induced strengthening and absorption of dislocation loops in ferritic Fe–Cr alloys: the role of Cr segregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terentyev, D; Bakaev, A

    2013-01-01

    The understanding of radiation-induced strengthening in ferritic FeCr-based steels remains an essential issue in the assessment of materials for fusion and fission reactors. Both early and recent experimental works on Fe–Cr alloys reveal Cr segregation on radiation-induced nanostructural features (mainly dislocation loops), whose impact on the modification of the mechanical response of the material might be key for explaining quantitatively the radiation-induced strengthening in these alloys. In this work, we use molecular dynamics to study systematically the interaction of dislocations with 1/2〈111〉 and 〈100〉 loops in all possible orientations, both enriched by Cr atoms and undecorated, for different temperatures, loop sizes and dislocation velocities. The configurations of the enriched loops have been obtained using a non-rigid lattice Monte Carlo method. The study reveals that Cr segregation influences the interaction mechanisms with both 1/2〈111〉 and 〈100〉 loops. The overall effect of Cr enrichment is to penalize the mobility of intrinsically glissile 1/2〈111〉 loops, modifying the reaction mechanisms as a result. The following three most important effects associated with Cr enrichment have been revealed: (i) absence of dynamic drag; (ii) suppression of complete absorption; (iii) enhanced strength of small dislocation loops (2 nm and smaller). Overall the effect of the Cr enrichment is therefore to increase the unpinning stress, so experimentally ‘invisible’ nanostructural features may also contribute to radiation-induced strengthening. The reasons for the modification of the mechanisms are explained and the impact of the loading conditions is discussed. (paper)

  2. Charpy impact test results of ferritic alloys at a fluence of 6 x 1022n/cm2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    Charpy impact tests on specimens in the AD-2 reconstitution experiment were completed. One hundred ten specimens made of HT-9 base metal, 9Cr-1Mo base metal and 9Cr-1Mo weldment at various heat treatment conditions were tested in temperature range from -73 0 C to 260 0 C. The specimens were irradiated from 390 0 C to 550 0 C and the fluence of the specimens reached 6 x 10 22 n/cm 2 . This is the first time that the transition behavior of ferritic alloys at high fluence was obtained. This is also the first time that comprehensive results on the irradiated 9Cr-1Mo weldment are available. The test results show a small additional shift in transition temperature for HT-9 base metal irradiated at 390 0 C and 450 0 C as the fluence was raised to 6 x 10 22 n/cm 2 . At higher irradiation temperatures, however, the shift in transition temperature is less conclusive. Further reduction in USE was observed at higher fluence for all the irradiation temperatures. There is no apparent fluence effect for 9Cr-1Mo base metal at all the irradiation temperatures studied. Contrary to the previous finding on HT-9 base metal and weldment, the 9Cr-1Mo weldment shows a higher transition temperature ( + 60 0 C) and a higher USE ( + 100%) as compared to the 9Cr-1MO base metal for the same irradiation conditions. 6 references, 7 figures, 7 tables

  3. Development of High-Temperature Ferritic Alloys and Performance Prediction Methods for Advanced Fission Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. RObert Odette; Takuya Yamamoto

    2009-08-14

    Reports the results of a comprehensive development and analysis of a database on irradiation hardening and embrittlement of tempered martensitic steels (TMS). Alloy specific quantitative semi-empirical models were derived for the dpa dose, irradiation temperature (ti) and test (Tt) temperature of yield stress hardening (or softening) .

  4. Comparison of Ductile-to-Brittle Transition Behavior in Two Similar Ferritic Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Jesus; Rementeria, Rosalia; Aranda, Maria; Capdevila, Carlos; Gonzalez-Carrasco, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    The ductile-to-brittle transition (DBT) behavior of two similar Fe-Cr-Al oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) stainless steels was analyzed following the Cottrell–Petch model. Both alloys were manufactured by mechanical alloying (MA) but by different forming routes. One was manufactured as hot rolled tube, and the other in the form of hot extruded bar. The two hot forming routes considered do not significantly influence the microstructure, but cause differences in the texture and the distribution of oxide particles. These have little influence on tensile properties; however, the DBT temperature and the upper shelf energy (USE) are significantly affected because of delamination orientation with regard to the notch plane. Whereas in hot rolled material the delaminations are parallel to the rolling surface, in the hot extruded material, they are randomly oriented because the material is transversally isotropic. PMID:28773764

  5. Comparison of Ductile-to-Brittle Transition Behavior in Two Similar Ferritic Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Jesus; Rementeria, Rosalia; Aranda, Maria; Capdevila, Carlos; Gonzalez-Carrasco, Jose Luis

    2016-07-29

    The ductile-to-brittle transition (DBT) behavior of two similar Fe-Cr-Al oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) stainless steels was analyzed following the Cottrell-Petch model. Both alloys were manufactured by mechanical alloying (MA) but by different forming routes. One was manufactured as hot rolled tube, and the other in the form of hot extruded bar. The two hot forming routes considered do not significantly influence the microstructure, but cause differences in the texture and the distribution of oxide particles. These have little influence on tensile properties; however, the DBT temperature and the upper shelf energy (USE) are significantly affected because of delamination orientation with regard to the notch plane. Whereas in hot rolled material the delaminations are parallel to the rolling surface, in the hot extruded material, they are randomly oriented because the material is transversally isotropic.

  6. Numerical atomic scale simulations of the microstructural evolution of ferritic alloys under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincent, E.

    2006-12-01

    In this work, we have developed a model of point defect (vacancies and interstitials) diffusion whose aim is to simulate by kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) the formation of solute rich clusters observed experimentally in irradiated FeCuNiMnSi model alloys and in pressure vessel steels. Electronic structure calculations have been used to characterize the interactions between point defects and the different solute atoms. Each of these solute atoms establishes an attractive bond with the vacancy. As for Mn, which is the element which has the weakest bond with the vacancy, it establishes more favourable bonds with interstitials. Binding energies, migration energies as well as other atomic scale properties, determined by ab initio calculations, have led to a parameter set for the KMC code. Firstly, these parameters have been optimised on thermal ageing experiments realised on the FeCu binary alloy and on complex alloys, described in the literature. The vacancy diffusion thermal annealing simulations show that when a vacancy is available, all the solutes migrate and form clusters, in agreement with the observed experimental tendencies. Secondly, to simulate the microstructural evolution under irradiation, we have introduced interstitials in the KMC code. Their presence leads to a more efficient transport of Mn. The first simulations of electron and neutron irradiations show that the model results are globally qualitatively coherent with the experimentally observed tendencies. (author)

  7. Comparison of fracture behavior for low-swelling ferritic and austenitic alloys irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) to 180 DPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, F.H.

    1992-02-01

    Fracture toughness testing was conducted to investigate the radiation embrittlement of high-nickel superalloys, modified austenitic steels and ferritic steels. These materials have been experimentally proven to possess excellent resistance to void swelling after high neutron exposures. In addition to swelling resistance, post-irradiation fracture resistance is another important criterion for reactor material selection. By means of fracture mechanics techniques the fracture behavior of those highly irradiated alloys was characterized in terms of irradiation and test conditions. Precipitation-strengthened alloys failed by channel fracture with very low postirradiation ductility. The fracture toughness of titanium-modified austenitic stainless steel D9 deteriorates with increasing fluence to about 100 displacement per atom (dpa), the fluence level at which brittle fracture appears to occur. Ferritic steels such as HT9 are the most promising candidate materials for fast and fusion reactor applications. The upper-shelf fracture toughness of alloy HT9 remained adequate after irradiation to 180 dpa although its ductile- brittle transition temperature (DBTT) shift by low temperature irradiation rendered the material susceptible to brittle fracture at room temperature. Understanding the fracture characteristics under various irradiation and test conditions helps reduce the potential for brittle fracture by permitting appropriate measure to be taken

  8. Effects of alloying and processing modifications on precipitation and strength in 9%Cr ferritic/martensitic steels for fast reactor cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippey, Kristin E.

    P92 was modified with respect to alloying and processing in the attempt to enhance high-temperature microstructural stability and mechanical properties. Alloying effects were modeled in ThermoCalcRTM and analyzed with reference to literature. ThermoCalcRTM modeling was conducted to design two low-carbon P92-like low-carbon alloys with austenite stabilized by alternative alloying; full conversion to austenite allows for a fully martensitic structure. Goals included avoidance of Z-phase, decrease of M23C6 phase fraction and maintained or increased MX phase fraction. Fine carbonitride precipitation was optimized by selecting alloying compositions such that all V and Nb could be solutionized at temperatures outside the delta-ferrite phase field. A low-carbon alloy (LC) and a low-carbon-zero-niobium alloy (0Nb) were identified and fabricated. This low-carbon approach stems from the increased creep resistance reported in several low-carbon alloys, presumably from reduced M23C6 precipitation and maintained MX precipitation [1], although these low-carbon alloys also contained additional tungsten (W) and cobalt (Co) compared to the base P92 alloy. The synergistic effect of Co and W on the microstructure and mechanical properties are difficult to deconvolute. Higher solutionizing temperatures allow more V and Nb into solution and increase prior austenite grain size; however, at sufficiently high temperatures delta-ferrite forms. Optimal solutionizing temperatures to maximize V and Nb in solution, while avoiding the onset of the delta ferrite phase field, were analyzed in ThermoCalcRTM. Optical microscopy showed ThermoCalc RTM predicted higher delta-ferrite onset temperatures of 20 °C in P92 alloys to nearly 50 °C in the designed alloys of the critical temperature. Identifying the balance where maximum fine precipitation is achieved and delta-ferrite avoided is a key factor in the design of an acceptable P92-like alloy for Generation IV reactor cladding. Processing was

  9. Irradiation-Induced Solute Clustering in a Low Nickel FeMnNi Ferritic Alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meslin, E.; Barbu, A.; Radiguet, B.; Pareige, P.; Toffolon, C.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the radiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is required to be able to operate safely a nuclear power plant or to extend its lifetime. The mechanical properties degradation is partly due to the clustering of solute under irradiation. To gain knowledge about the clustering process, a Fe-1.1 Mn-0.7 Ni (at.%) alloy was irradiated in a test reactor at two fluxes of 0.15 and 9 *10 17 n E≥1MeV . m -2 .s -1 and at increasing doses from 0.18 to 1.3 *10 24 n E≥1MeV ) . m -2 at 300 degrees C. Atom probe tomography (APT) experiments revealed that the irradiation promotes the formation in the α iron matrix of Mn/Mn and/or Ni/Ni pair correlations at low dose and Mn-Ni enriched clusters at high dose. These clusters dissolve partially after a thermal treatment at 400 degrees C. Based on a comparison with thermodynamic calculations, we show that the solute clustering under irradiation can just result from an induced mechanism. (authors)

  10. Compatibility of graphite with a martensitic-ferritic steel, an austenitic stainless steel and a Ni-base alloy up to 1250 C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, P.

    1994-08-01

    To study the chemical interactions between graphite and a martensitic-ferritic steel (1.4914), an austenitic stainless steel (1.4919; AISI 316), and a Ni-base alloy (Hastelloy X) isothermal reaction experiments were performed in the temperature range between 900 and 1250 C. At higher temperatures a rapid and complete liquefaction of the components occurred as a result of eutectic interactions. The chemical interactions are diffusion-controlled processes and can be described by parabolic rate laws. The reaction behavior of the two steels is very similar. The chemical interactions of the steels with graphite are much faster above 1100 C than those for the Ni-base alloy. Below 1000 C the effect is opposite. (orig.) [de

  11. Tensile and fracture toughness properties of the nanostructured oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy 13Cr-1W-0.3Ti-0.3Y2O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eiselt, Ch.Ch.; Klimenkov, M.; Lindau, R.; Moeslang, A.; Odette, G.R.; Yamamoto, T.; Gragg, D.

    2011-01-01

    The realization of fusion power as an attractive energy source requires advanced structural materials that can cope with ultra-severe thermo-mechanical loads and high neutron fluxes experienced by fusion power plant components, such as the first wall, divertor and blanket structures. Towards this end, two variants of a 13Cr-1W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2 O 3 reduced activation ferritic (RAF-) ODS steel were produced by ball milling phase blended Fe-13Cr-1W, 0.3Y 2 0 3 and 0.3Ti powders in both argon and hydrogen atmospheres. The milled powders were consolidated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). The as-HIPed alloys were then hot rolled into 6 mm plates. Microstructural, tensile and fracture toughness characterization of the hot rolled alloys are summarized here and compared to results previously reported for the as-HIPed condition.

  12. TEM and HRTEM study of oxide particles in an Al-alloyed high-Cr oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel with Hf addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dou, Peng, E-mail: doup@tsinghua.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Kimura, Akihiko, E-mail: kimura@iae.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Kasada, Ryuta, E-mail: r-kasada@iae.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Okuda, Takanari, E-mail: okuda.takanari@kki.kobelco.com [Kobelco Research Institute, 1-5-5 Takatsukadai, Nishi-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 651-2271 (Japan); Inoue, Masaki, E-mail: inoue.masaki@jaea.go.jp [Advanced Nuclear System R& D Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita, O-arai, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Ukai, Shigeharu, E-mail: s-ukai@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N13, W8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Ohnuki, Somei, E-mail: ohnuki@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N13, W8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Fujisawa, Toshiharu, E-mail: fujisawa@esi.nagoya-u.ac.jp [EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, Furo, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Abe, Fujio, E-mail: ABE.Fujio@nims.go.jp [Structural Metals Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Jiang, Shan, E-mail: js93518@gmail.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Yang, Zhigang, E-mail: zgyang@tsinghua.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials (MOE), School of Materials Sciences and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2017-03-15

    The nanoparticles in an Al-alloyed high-Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel with Hf addition, i.e., SOC-16 (Fe-15Cr-2W-0.1Ti-4Al-0.62Hf-0.35Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}), have been examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Relative to an Al-alloyed high-Cr ODS ferritic steel without Hf addition, i.e., SOC-9 (Fe-15.5Cr-2W-0.1Ti-4Al-0.35Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}), the dispersion morphology and coherency of the oxide nanoparticles in SOC-16 were significantly improved. Almost all the small nanoparticles (diameter <10 nm) in SOC-16 were found to be consistent with cubic Y{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} oxides with the anion-deficient fluorite structure and coherent with the bcc steel matrix. The larger particles (diameter >10 nm) were also mainly identified as cubic Y{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} oxides with the anion-deficient fluorite structure. The results presented here are compared with those of SOC-9 with a brief discussion of the underlying mechanisms of the unusual thermal and irradiation stabilities of the oxides as well as the superior strength, excellent irradiation tolerance and extraordinary corrosion resistance of SOC-16.

  13. TEM and HRTEM study of oxide particles in an Al-alloyed high-Cr oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel with Hf addition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dou, Peng; Kimura, Akihiko; Kasada, Ryuta; Okuda, Takanari; Inoue, Masaki; Ukai, Shigeharu; Ohnuki, Somei; Fujisawa, Toshiharu; Abe, Fujio; Jiang, Shan; Yang, Zhigang

    2017-01-01

    The nanoparticles in an Al-alloyed high-Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel with Hf addition, i.e., SOC-16 (Fe-15Cr-2W-0.1Ti-4Al-0.62Hf-0.35Y 2 O 3 ), have been examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Relative to an Al-alloyed high-Cr ODS ferritic steel without Hf addition, i.e., SOC-9 (Fe-15.5Cr-2W-0.1Ti-4Al-0.35Y 2 O 3 ), the dispersion morphology and coherency of the oxide nanoparticles in SOC-16 were significantly improved. Almost all the small nanoparticles (diameter <10 nm) in SOC-16 were found to be consistent with cubic Y 2 Hf 2 O 7 oxides with the anion-deficient fluorite structure and coherent with the bcc steel matrix. The larger particles (diameter >10 nm) were also mainly identified as cubic Y 2 Hf 2 O 7 oxides with the anion-deficient fluorite structure. The results presented here are compared with those of SOC-9 with a brief discussion of the underlying mechanisms of the unusual thermal and irradiation stabilities of the oxides as well as the superior strength, excellent irradiation tolerance and extraordinary corrosion resistance of SOC-16.

  14. HIGH TEMPERATURE BRAZING ALLOY FOR JOINT Fe-Cr-Al MATERIALS AND AUSTENITIC AND FERRITIC STAINLESS STEELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cost, R.C.

    1958-07-15

    A new high temperature brazing alloy is described that is particularly suitable for brazing iron-chromiumaluminum alloys. It consists of approximately 20% Cr, 6% Al, 10% Si, and from 1.5 to 5% phosphorus, the balance being iron.

  15. TEM Study of the Orientation Relationship Between Cementite and Ferrite in a Bainitic Low Carbon High Strength Low Alloy Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Illescas Fernandez, Silvia; Brown, A.P.; He, K.; Fernández, Javier; Guilemany Casadamon, Josep Maria

    2005-01-01

    Two different bainitic structures are observed in a steel depending on the sample heat treatment. The different types of bainitic structures exhibit different orientation relationships between cementite and the ferrite matrix. Upper bainite presents a Pitsch orientation relationship and lower bainite presents a Bagaryatski orientation relationship. Different heat treatments of low carbon HSLA steel samples have been studied using TEM in order to find the orientation relationshi...

  16. Characterization of low alloy ferritic steel–Ni base alloy dissimilar metal weld interface by SPM techniques, SEM/EDS, TEM/EDS and SVET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Siyan; Ding, Jie; Ming, Hongliang; Zhang, Zhiming; Wang, Jianqiu, E-mail: wangjianqiu@imr.ac.cn

    2015-02-15

    The interface region of welded A508–Alloy 52 M is characterized by scanning probe microscope (SPM) techniques, scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM)/Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and scanning vibrate electrode technique (SVET). The regions along the welded A508–Alloy 52 M interface can be categorized into two types according to their different microstructures. In the type-I interface region, A508 and Alloy 52 M are separated by the fusion boundary, while in the type-II interface region, A508 and Alloy 52 M are separated by a martensite zone. A508, martensite zone and grain boundaries in Alloy 52 M are ferromagnetic while the Alloy 52 M matrix is paramagnetic. The Volta potentials measured by scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy (SKPFM) of A508, martensite zone and Alloy 52 M follow the order: V{sub 52} {sub M} > V{sub A508} > V{sub martensite}. The corrosion behavior of A508–Alloy 52 M interface region is galvanic corrosion, in which Alloy 52 M is cathode while A508 is anode. The martensite dissolves faster than Alloy 52 M, but slower than A508 in the test solution. - Highlights: • The A508–Alloy 52 M interface regions can be categorized into two types. • The chromium depleted region is observed along the Alloy 52 M grain boundary. • The Alloy 52 M grain boundaries which are close to the interface are ferromagnetic. • Martensite zone has lower Volta potential but higher corrosion resistance than A508.

  17. Delta ferrite in the weld metal of reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sam, Shiju, E-mail: shiju@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382 428 (India); Das, C.R.; Ramasubbu, V.; Albert, S.K.; Bhaduri, A.K.; Jayakumar, T. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Rajendra Kumar, E. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382 428 (India)

    2014-12-15

    Formation of delta(δ)-ferrite in the weld metal, during autogenous bead-on-plate welding of Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel using Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) process, has been studied. Composition of the alloy is such that delta-ferrite is not expected in the alloy; but examination of the weld metal revealed presence of delta-ferrite in the weld metal. Volume fraction of delta-ferrite is found to be higher in the weld interface than in the rest of the fusion zone. Decrease in the volume fraction of delta-ferrite, with an increase in preheat temperature or with an increase in heat input, is observed. Results indicate that the cooling rate experienced during welding affects the volume fraction of delta-ferrite retained in the weld metal and variation in the delta-ferrite content with cooling rate is explained with variation in the time that the weld metal spends in various temperature regimes in which delta-ferrite is stable for the alloy during its cooling from the liquid metal to the ambient temperature. This manuscript will discuss the effect of welding parameters on formation of delta-ferrite and its retention in the weld metal of RAFM steel.

  18. Influence of Mn-Co Spinel Coating on Oxidation Behavior of Ferritic SS Alloys for SOFC Interconnect Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venkatachalam, Vinothini; Molin, Sebastian; Kiebach, Wolff-Ragnar

    2014-01-01

    Chromia forming ferritic stainless steels (SS) are being considered for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell interconnect applications. However, protective coatings are in general needed to avoid chromium volatilization and poisoning of cathodes from chromium species. Mn-Co spinel is one...... of the promising candidates to prevent chromium outward diffusion, improve oxidation resistance and ensure high electrical conductivity over the lifetime of interconnects. In the present study, uniform and well adherent Mn-Co spinel coatings were produced on Crofer 22APU using electrophoretic deposition (EPD...

  19. Characterization of TiN, TiC and Ti(C,N) in titanium-alloyed ferritic chromium steels focusing on the significance of different particle morphologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelic, S.K., E-mail: susanne.michelic@unileoben.ac.at [Chair of Ferrous Metallurgy, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Straße 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Loder, D. [Chair of Ferrous Metallurgy, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Straße 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Reip, T.; Ardehali Barani, A. [Outokumpu Nirosta GmbH, Essener Straße 244, 44793 Bochum (Germany); Bernhard, C. [Chair of Ferrous Metallurgy, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Straße 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria)

    2015-02-15

    Titanium-alloyed ferritic chromium steels are a competitive option to classical austenitic stainless steels owing to their similar corrosion resistance. The addition of titanium significantly influences their final steel cleanliness. The present contribution focuses on the detailed metallographic characterization of titanium nitrides, titanium carbides and titanium carbonitrides with regard to their size, morphology and composition. The methods used are manual and automated Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy as well as optical microscopy. Additional thermodynamic calculations are performed to explain the precipitation procedure of the analyzed titanium nitrides. The analyses showed that homogeneous nucleation is decisive at an early process stage after the addition of titanium. Heterogeneous nucleation gets crucial with ongoing process time and essentially influences the final inclusion size of titanium nitrides. A detailed investigation of the nuclei for heterogeneous nucleation with automated Scanning Electron Microscopy proved to be difficult due to their small size. Manual Scanning Electron Microscopy and optical microscopy have to be applied. Furthermore, it was found that during solidification an additional layer around an existing titanium nitride can be formed which changes the final inclusion morphology significantly. These layers are also characterized in detail. Based on these different inclusion morphologies, in combination with thermodynamic results, tendencies regarding the formation and modification time of titanium containing inclusions in ferritic chromium steels are derived. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • The formation and modification of TiN in the steel 1.4520 was examined. • Heterogeneous nucleation essentially influences the final steel cleanliness. • In most cases heterogeneous nuclei in TiN inclusions are magnesium based. • Particle morphology provides important information

  20. Past research and fabrication conducted at SCK-CEN on ferritic ODS alloys used as cladding for FBR's fuel pins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Bremaecker, Anne, E-mail: adbremae@sckcen.be [Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie-Centre d' Etude de l' Energie Nucleaire (SCK-CEN), NMS, Mol (Belgium)

    2012-09-15

    In the 1960s in the frame of the sodium-cooled fast breeders, SCK-CEN decided to develop claddings made with ferritic stainless materials because of their specific properties, namely a higher thermal conductivity, a lower thermal expansion, a lower tendency to He-embrittlement, and a lower swelling than the austenitic stainless steels. To enhance their lower creep resistance at 650-700 Degree-Sign C arose the idea to strengthen the microstructure by oxide dispersions. This was the starting point of an ambitious programme where both the matrix and the dispersions were optimized. A purely ferritic 13 wt% Cr matrix was selected and its mechanical strength was improved through addition of ferritizing elements. Results of tensile and stress-rupture tests showed that Ti and Mo were the most beneficial elements, partly because of the chi-phase precipitation. In 1973 the optimized matrix composition was Fe-13Cr-3.5Ti-2Mo. To reach creep properties similar to those of AISI 316, different dispersions and methods were tested: internal oxidation (that was not conclusive), and the direct mixing of metallic and oxide powders (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgO, ZrO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}, ZrSiO{sub 4}) followed by pressing, sintering, and extrusion. The compression and extrusion parameters were determined: extrusion as hollow at 1050 Degree-Sign C, solution annealing at 1050 Degree-Sign C/15 min, cleaning, cold drawing to the final dimensions with intermediate annealings at 1050 Degree-Sign C, final annealing at 1050 Degree-Sign C, straightening and final aging at 800 Degree-Sign C. The choice of titania and yttria powders and their concentrations were finalized on the basis of their out-of-pile and in-pile creep and tensile strength. As soon as a resistance butt welding machine was developed and installed in a glove-box, fuel segments with PuO{sub 2} were loaded in Belgian MTR BR2. The fabrication parameters were continuously optimized: milling and beating, lubrication, cold drawing (partial

  1. Compliance variations in the fatigue thresold regime of a low alloy ferritic steel under closure-free testing conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaidya, W.V.

    1991-01-01

    Compliance variations in the threshold regime of a high strength ferritic steel tested under closure-free conditions at room temperature and in air are reported. In contrast to the Paris regime, and irrespective of whether the data during load shedding, at threshold or after postthreshold load increase are considered, it is found that comparatively compliance varies inconsistently in the threshold regime. Therefore, a 1:1 correlation between the averaged optical crack length and that inferred from compliance was not observed. This discrepancy is analyzed. The variations in compliance are utilized to infer the crack front behavior, and the results are discussed in terms of the microstructural impedance. (orig.) With 22 figs., 2 appendices [de

  2. Effect of aluminizing of Cr-containing ferritic alloys on the seal strength of a novel high-temperature solid oxide fuel cell sealing glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yeong-Shyung; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

    A novel high-temperature alkaline earth silicate sealing glass was developed for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. The glass was used to join two metallic coupons of Cr-containing ferritic stainless steel for seal strength evaluation. In previous work, SrCrO 4 was found to form along the glass/steel interface, which led to severe strength degradation. In the present study, aluminization of the steel surface was investigated as a remedy to minimize or prevent the strontium chromate formation. Three different processes for aluminization were evaluated with Crofer22APU stainless steel: pack cementation, vapor-phase deposition, and aerosol spraying. It was found that pack cementation resulted in a rough surface with occasional cracks in the Al-diffused region. Vapor-phase deposition yielded a smoother surface, but the resulting high Al content increased the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), resulting in the failure of joined coupons. Aerosol spraying of an Al-containing salt resulted in the formation of a thin aluminum oxide layer without any surface damage. The room temperature seal strength was evaluated in the as-fired state and in environmentally aged conditions. In contrast to earlier results with uncoated Crofer22APU, the aluminized samples showed no strength degradation even for samples aged in air. Interfacial and chemical compatibility was also investigated. The results showed aluminization to be a viable candidate approach to minimize undesirable chromate formation between alkaline earth silicate sealing glass and Cr-containing interconnect alloys for SOFC applications.

  3. Size effect of primary Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} additions on the characteristics of the nanostructured ferritic ODS alloys: Comparing as-milled and as-milled/annealed alloys using S/TEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saber, Mostafa, E-mail: msaber@ncsu.edu; Xu, Weizong; Li, Lulu; Zhu, Yuntian; Koch, Carl C.; Scattergood, Ronald O.

    2014-09-15

    The need for providing S/TEM evidence to clarify the mechanisms of nano-scale precipitate formation was the motivation of this investigation. In this study, an Fe–14Cr–0.4Ti alloy was ball-milled with different amounts of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} content up to 10 wt.%, and then annealed at temperatures up to 1100 °C. Micron-size Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles were substituted for the nano-size counterpart to elucidate the mechanism of oxide precipitate formation. The S/TEM studies revealed that the microstructure of the alloy with 10 wt.% yttria contained amorphous undissolved Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} after ball milling, while a small part of the initial oxide particles were dissolved into the solid solution. Consequently, when the amount of yttria was reduced to 1 wt.%, the amorphous phase of the yttria vanished and the whole content of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} was dissolved into the BCC solid solution. Defect analysis of precipitates on the annealed samples via S/TEM and micro-hardness studies revealed that the use of micron-size primary oxide particles can produce nano-size precipitates, stable up to temperatures as high as 1100 °C, and uniformly distributed throughout the microstructure. This study indicates that the use of high energy ball milling along with micron-size primary oxide particles can lead to nanostructured ferritic ODS alloys without the use of nano-size primary oxide additions.

  4. Modeling the long-term evolution of the primary damage in ferritic alloys using coarse-grained methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becquart, C.S.; Barbu, A.; Bocquet, J.L.; Caturla, M.J.; Domain, C.; Fu, C.-C.; Golubov, S.I.; Hou, M.; Malerba, L.; Ortiz, C.J.; Souidi, A.; Stoller, R.E.

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of the long-term evolution of the microstructure after introduction of primary damage is an essential ingredient in understanding mechanical property changes that occur during irradiation. Within the European integrated project 'PERFECT,' different techniques have been developed or improved to model microstructure evolution of Fe alloys under irradiation. This review paper aims to present the current state of the art of these techniques, as developed in the project, as well as the main results obtained.

  5. Evaluation of ferritic alloy Fe-2 1/4Cr-1Mo after neutron irradiation: Microstructural development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1986-10-01

    As part of a program to provide a data base on the bainitic alloy Fe-2-1/4-1Mo for fusion energy applications, microstructural examinations are reported for nine specimen conditions for 2-1/4Cr-1Mo steel which had been irradiated by fast neutrons over the temperature range 390 to 510 0 C. Void swelling is found following irradiation at 400 0 C to 480 0 C. Concurrently dislocation structure and precipitation developed. Peak void swelling, void density, dislocation density and precipitate number density formed at the lowest temperature, approximately 400 0 C, whereas mean void size, and mean precipitate size increased with increasing irradiation temperature. The examination results are used to provide interpretation of in-reactor creep, density change and post irradiation tensile behavior

  6. Influence of Zr and nano-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} additions on thermal stability and improved hardness in mechanically alloyed Fe base ferritic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotan, Hasan, E-mail: hkotan@konya.edu.tr [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Necmettin Erbakan University, Dere Aşıklar Mah. Demet Sokak, Meram, Konya 42140 (Turkey); Darling, Kris A. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, RDRL-WMM-F, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5069 (United States); Scattergood, Ronald O.; Koch, Carl C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, NC State University, 911 Partners Way, Room 3078, Raleigh, NC 27695-7907 (United States)

    2014-12-05

    The motivation of this work was driven to improve the thermal stability in systems where polymorphic transformations can result in an additional driving force, upsetting the expected thermodynamic stability. In this study, Fe{sub 92}Ni{sub 8} alloys with Zr and nano-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} additions were produced by ball milling and then annealed at high temperatures. Emphasis was placed on understanding the effects of dispersed nano-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} particle additions and their effect on microstructural stability at and above the bcc-to-fcc transformation occurring at 700 °C in Fe–Ni systems. Results reveal that microstructural stability and hardness can be promoted by a combination of Zr and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} additions, that being mostly effective for stability before and after phase transition, respectively. The mechanical strength of these alloys is achieved by a unique microstructure comprised a ultra-fine grain Fe base matrix, which contains dispersions of both nano-scale in-situ formed Zr base intermetallics and ex-situ added Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} secondary oxide phases. Both of these were found to be essential for a combination of high thermal stability and high mechanical strength properties. - Highlights: • Polymorphic transformations can limit the processing of nanostructured powders. • It causes a rapid grain growth and impairs the improved mechanical properties. • We aim to improve the hardness and thermal stability above the phase transformation. • Thermal stability is achieved by a combination of Zr and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} additions. • Hardness is promoted by in-situ formed and ex-situ added secondary nano phases.

  7. Ferritic steels for French LMFBR steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubert, M.; Mathieu, B.; Petrequin, P.

    1983-06-01

    Austenitic stainless steels have been widely used in many components of the French LMFBR. Up to now, ferritic steels have not been considered for these components, mainly due to their relatively low creep properties. Some ferritic steels are usable when the maximum temperatures in service do not exceed about 530 0 C. It is the case of the steam generators of the Phenix plant, where the exchange tubes of the evaporator are made of 2,25% Cr-1% Mo steel, stabilized or not by addition of niobium. These ferritic alloys have worked successfully since the first steam production in October 1973. For the SuperPhenix power plant, an ''all austenitic stainless alloy'' apparatus has been chosen. However, for the future, ferritic alloys offer potential for use as alternative materials in the evaporators: low alloys steels type 2,25% Cr-1% Mo (exchange tubes, tube-sheets, shells), or at higher chromium content type 9% Cr-2% Mo NbV (exchange tubes) or 12M Cr-1% Mo-V (tube-sheets). Most of these steels have already an industrial background, and are widely used in similar applications. The various potential applications of these steels are reviewed with regards to the French LMFBR steam generators, indicating that some points need an effort of clarification, for instance the properties of the heterogeneous ferritic/austenitic weldments

  8. Ferrite re-crystallization kinetics on a C-Mn steel and on two micro alloyed steels after dual-phase strain; Cinetica de recristalizacao da ferrita em um aco C-Mn e dois acos microligados apos deformacao na regiao bifasica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simieli, Eider A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Tecnologicas (IPT), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    1991-12-31

    Ferrite recrystallization was investigated in two micro alloyed steels deformed in the inter critical range. A reference steel was also used, which had a composition of 0,06% C and 1,31% Mn. (author). 15 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Alloy Design and Development of Cast Cr-W-V Ferritic Steels for Improved High-Temperature Strength for Power Generation Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R L; Maziasz, P J; Vitek, J M; Evans, N D; Hashimoto, N

    2006-09-23

    Economic and environmental concerns demand that the power-generation industry seek increased efficiency for gas turbines. Higher efficiency requires higher operating temperatures, with the objective temperature for the hottest sections of new systems {approx} 593 C, and increasing to {approx} 650 C. Because of their good thermal properties, Cr-Mo-V cast ferritic steels are currently used for components such as rotors, casings, pipes, etc., but new steels are required for the new operating conditions. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed new wrought Cr-W-V steels with 3-9% Cr, 2-3% W, 0.25% V (compositions are in wt.%), and minor amounts of additional elements. These steels have the strength and toughness required for turbine applications. Since cast alloys are expected to behave differently from wrought material, work was pursued to develop new cast steels based on the ORNL wrought compositions. Nine casting test blocks with 3, 9, and 11% Cr were obtained. Eight were Cr-W-V-Ta-type steels based on the ORNL wrought steels; the ninth was COST CB2, a 9Cr-Mo-Co-V-Nb cast steel, which was the most promising cast steel developed in a European alloy-development program. The COST CB2 was used as a control to which the new compositions were compared, and this also provided a comparison between Cr-W-V-Ta and Cr-Mo-V-Nb compositions. Heat treatment studies were carried out on the nine castings to determine normalizing-and-tempering treatments. Microstructures were characterized by both optical and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Tensile, impact, and creep tests were conducted. Test results on the first nine cast steel compositions indicated that properties of the 9Cr-Mo-Co-V-Nb composition of COST CB2 were better than those of the 3Cr-, 9Cr-, and 11Cr-W-V-Ta steels. Analysis of the results of this first iteration using computational thermodynamics raised the question of the effectiveness in cast steels of the Cr-W-V-Ta combination versus the Cr

  10. The study of Widmanstätten ferrite in Fe–C alloys by a phase field model coupled with anisotropic elasticity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Li [China State Key Lab of Metal Matrix Composites, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Shen, Yao, E-mail: yaoshen@sjtu.edu.cn [China State Key Lab of Metal Matrix Composites, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Wan, Haibo [China State Key Lab of Metal Matrix Composites, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Shanghai Power Equipment Research Institute, Shanghai 200240 (China); Xiong, Xiaochuan [General Motors Global Research & Development, China Science Laboratory, Shanghai 201206 (China); Zhang, Lanting [China State Key Lab of Metal Matrix Composites, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2015-11-25

    A phase field model accounting for anisotropic elastic energy has been formulated to investigate the morphology and growth kinetics of a Widmanstätten microstructure during the isothermal austenite to ferrite transformation in binary Fe–C. Physically realistic parameters are employed, for which the thermodynamic functions and the diffusional mobilities are from the literatures that were assessed via the Calphad technique and from experimental results respectively. The simulation results suggest that the anisotropy of elastic energy, resulting from the lattice distortion between the ferrite precipitate and the austenite matrix in the phase transformation, is sufficient to generate a plate-like Widmanstätten structure. The growth of the ferrite precipitate follows completely different dynamic laws in different directions, i.e., parabolic thickening in the direction of the plate thickness and linear lengthening in the direction toward the plate tip. The chief reason for the former is that the moving of the plate broad sides may be regarded as a migration of straight interfaces in the diffusion-controlled phase transformation; the latter is because that the plate tip can maintain a constant radius of curvature during the phase transition after a transient initial stage. Furthermore, the aspect ratio and the lengthening rate of the Widmanstätten ferrite plate simulated by our analyses are in good agreement with the experimental observations. - Highlights: • A model assuming elastic anisotropy for the growth of ferrites is formulated. • The elastic anisotropy is sufficient to generate acicular Widmanstätten ferrites. • The direction of the plate thickness features a parabolic thickening. • The direction of the plate tip characterizes a linear lengthening. • The calculated aspect ratio and growth rate are in good agreement with experiments.

  11. The effect of cooling rate and austenite grain size on the austenite to ferrite transformation temperature and different ferrite morphologies in microalloyed steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esmailian, M.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of different austenite grain size and different cooling rates on the austenite to ferrite transformation temperature and different ferrite morphologies in one Nb-microalloyed high strength low alloy steel has been investigated. Three different austenite grain sizes were selected and cooled at two different cooling rates for obtaining austenite to ferrite transformation temperature. Moreover, samples with specific austenite grain size have been quenched, partially, for investigation on the microstructural evolution. In order to assess the influence of austenite grain size on the ferrite transformation temperature, a temperature differences method is established and found to be a good way for detection of austenite to ferrite, pearlite and sometimes other ferrite morphologies transformation temperatures. The results obtained in this way show that increasing of austenite grain size and cooling rate has a significant influence on decreasing of the ferrite transformation temperature. Micrographs of different ferrite morphologies show that at high temperatures, where diffusion rates are higher, grain boundary ferrite nucleates. As the temperature is lowered and the driving force for ferrite formation increases, intragranular sites inside the austenite grains become operative as nucleation sites and suppress the grain boundary ferrite growth. The results indicate that increasing the austenite grain size increases the rate and volume fraction of intragranular ferrite in two different cooling rates. Moreover, by increasing of cooling rate, the austenite to ferrite transformation temperature decreases and volume fraction of intragranular ferrite increases.

  12. Assessment of the integrity of ferritic-austenitic dissimilar weld joints of different grades of Cr-Mo ferritic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laha, K.; Chandravathi, K.S.; Parameswaran, P.; Goyal, Sunil; Mathew, M.D. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Metallurgy and Materials Group

    2010-07-01

    Integrity of the 2.25 Cr-1Mo / Alloy 800, 9Cr-1Mo / Alloy 800 and 9Cr-1Mo-VNb / Alloy 800 ferritic-austenitic dissimilar joints, fusion welded employing Inconel 182 electrode, has been assessed under creep conditions at 823 K. The dissimilar weld joints displayed lower creep rupture strength than their respective ferritic steel base metals. The strength reduction was more for 2.25Cr-1Mo steel joint and least for 9Cr-1Mo steel joint. The failure location in the joints was found to shift from the ferritic steel base metal to the intercritical region of heat-affected zone (HAZ) in ferritic steel (type IV cracking) with decrease in stress. At still lower stresses the failure occurred at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface. Localized creep deformation and cavitation in the soft intercritical HAZ induced type IV failure whereas creep cavitation at the weld interface particles induced ferritic / austenitic interface cracking due to high creep strength mismatch across it. Micromechanisms of type IV failure and interface cracking in the ferritic / austenitic joints and different susceptibility to failure for different grades of ferritic steels are discussed based on microstructural investigation, mechanical testing and finite element analysis. (Note from indexer: paper contains many typographical errors.)

  13. Ferrites and ceramic composites

    CERN Document Server

    Jotania, Rajshree B

    2013-01-01

    The Ferrite term is used to refer to all magnetic oxides containing iron as major metallic component. Ferrites are very attractive materials because they simultaneously show high resistivity and high saturation magnetization, and attract now considerable attention, because of the interesting physics involved. Typical ferrite material possesses excellent chemical stability, high corrosion resistivity, magneto-crystalline anisotropy, magneto-striction, and magneto-optical properties. Ferrites belong to the group of ferrimagnetic oxides, and include rare-earth garnets and ortho-ferrites. Several

  14. CHARACTERIZING AND MODELING FERRITE-CORE PROBES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabbagh, Harold A.; Murphy, R. Kim; Sabbagh, Elias H.; Aldrin, John C.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we accurately and carefully characterize a ferrite-core probe that is widely used for aircraft inspections. The characterization starts with the development of a model that can be executed using the proprietary volume-integral code, VIC-3D(c), and then the model is fitted to measured multifrequency impedance data taken with the probe in freespace and over samples of a titanium alloy and aluminum. Excellent results are achieved, and will be discussed.

  15. Formation mechanism of solute clusters under neutron irradiation in ferritic model alloys and in a reactor pressure vessel steel: clusters of defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meslin-Chiffon, E.

    2007-11-01

    The embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) under irradiation is partly due to the formation of point defects (PD) and solute clusters. The aim of this work was to gain more insight into the formation mechanisms of solute clusters in low copper ([Cu] = 0.1 wt%) FeCu and FeCuMnNi model alloys, in a copper free FeMnNi model alloy and in a low copper French RPV steel (16MND5). These materials were neutron-irradiated around 300 C in a test reactor. Solute clusters were characterized by tomographic atom probe whereas PD clusters were simulated with a rate theory numerical code calibrated under cascade damage conditions using transmission electron microscopy analysis. The confrontation between experiments and simulation reveals that a heterogeneous irradiation-induced solute precipitation/segregation probably occurs on PD clusters. (author)

  16. XXIst Century Ferrites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazaleyrat, F; Zehani, K; Pasko, A; Loyau, V; LoBue, M

    2012-01-01

    Ferrites have always been a subject of great interest from point of view of magnetic application, since the fist compass to present date. In contrast, the scientific interest for iron based magnetic oxides decreased after Oersted discovery as they where replaced by coil as magnetizing sources. Neel discovery of ferrimagnetism boosted again interest and leads to strong developments during two decades before being of less interest. Recently, the evolution of power electronics toward higher frequency, the down sizing of ceramics microstructure to nanometer scale, the increasing price of rare-earth elements and the development of magnetocaloric materials put light again on ferrites. A review on three ferrite families is given herein: harder nanostructured Ba 2+ Fe 12 O 19 magnet processed by spark plasma sintering, magnetocaloric effect associated to the spin transition reorientation of W-ferrite and low temperature spark plasma sintered Ni-Zn-Cu ferrites for high frequency power applications.

  17. Oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloys. 14/20% chromium: effects of processing on deformation texture, recrystallization and tensile properties; Alliages ferritiques 14/20% de chrome renforces par dispersion d`oxydes. Effets des procedes de mise en forme sur les textures de deformation, la recristallisation et les proprietes de traction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regle, H

    1994-12-31

    The ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened alloys are promising candidates for high temperature application materials, in particular for long life core components of advanced nuclear reactors. The aim of this work is to control the microstructure, in order to optimise the mechanical properties. The two ferritic alloys examined here, MA956 and MA957, are obtained by Mechanical Alloying techniques. They are characterised by quite anisotropic microstructure and mechanical properties. We have investigated the influence of hot and cold working processes (hot extrusion, swaging and cold-drawing) and recrystallization heat treatments on deformation textures, microstructures and tensile properties. The aim was to control the size of the grains and their anisotropic shape, using recrystallization heat treatments. After consolidation and hot extrusion, as-received materials present a extremely fine microstructure with elongated grains and a very strong (110) deformation texture with single-crystal character. At that stage of processing, recrystallization temperature are very high (1450 degrees C for MA957 alloy and 1350 degrees C for MA956 alloy) and materials develop millimetric recrystallized grains. Additional hot extrusion induce a fibre texture. Cold-drawing maintains a fibre texture, but the intensity decreases with increasing cold-work level. For both materials, the decrease of texture intensities correspond to a decrease of the recrystallization temperatures (from 1350 degrees C for a low cold-work level to 750 degrees C for 60 % cold-deformation, case of MA956 alloy) and a refinement of the grain size (from a millimetric size to less than an hundred of micrometer). Swaging develop a cyclic component where the intensity increases with increasing deformation in this case, the recrystallization temperature remains always very high and the millimetric grain size is slightly modified, even though cold-work level increases. (Abstract Truncated)

  18. Localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking behavior of austenitic stainless steel weldments containing retained ferrite. Annual progress report, June 1, 1978--March 31, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savage, W.F.; Duquette, D.J.

    1979-03-01

    Localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking experiments have been performed on single phase 304 stainless steel alloys and autogeneous weldments containing retained delta ferrite as a second phase. The results of the pitting experiments show that the pressure of delta ferrite decreases localized corrosion resistance with pits initiating preferentially at delta ferrite--gamma austenite interphase boundaries. This increased susceptibility is reversible with elevated temperature heat treatments which revert the metastable ferrite phase to the equilibrium austenite phase

  19. Alloy development for cladding and duct applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straalsund, J.L.; Johnson, G.D.

    1981-01-01

    Three general classes of materials under development for cladding and ducts are listed. Solid solution strengthened, or austenitic, alloys are Type 316 stainless steel and D9. Precipitation hardened (also austenitic) alloys consist of D21, D66 and D68. These alloys are similar to such commercial alloys as M-813, Inconel 706, Inconel 718 and Nimonic PE-16. The third general class of alloys is composed of ferritic alloys, with current emphasis being placed on HT-9, a tempered martensitic alloy, and D67, a delta-ferritic steel. The program is comprised of three parallel paths. The current reference, or first generation alloy, is 20% cold worked Type 316 stainless steel. Second generation alloys for near-term applications include D9 and HT-9. Third generation materials consist of the precipitation strengthened steels and ferritic alloys, and are being considered for implementation at a later time than the first and second generation alloys. The development of second and third generation materials was initiated in 1974 with the selection of 35 alloys. This program has proceeded to today where there are six advanced alloys being evaluated. These alloys are the developmental alloys D9, D21, D57, D66 and D68, together with the commerical alloy, HT-9. The status of development of these alloys is summarized

  20. Alloy development for irradiation performance. Quarterly progress report for period ending December 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-04-01

    Progress is reported in eight sections: analysis and evaluation studies, test matrices and test methods development, Path A Alloy Development (austenitic stainless steels), Path C Alloy Development (Ti and V alloys), Path D Alloy Development (Fe alloys), Path E Alloy Development (ferritic steels), irradiation experiments and materials inventory, and materials compatibility and hydrogen permeation studies. (DLC)

  1. Alloy development for irradiation performance. Quarterly progress report for period ending December 31, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-04-01

    Progress is reported in eight sections: analysis and evaluation studies, test matrices and test methods development, Path A Alloy Development (austenitic stainless steels), Path C Alloy Development (Ti and V alloys), Path D Alloy Development (Fe alloys), Path E Alloy Development (ferritic steels), irradiation experiments and materials inventory, and materials compatibility and hydrogen permeation studies

  2. Intragranular ferrite morphologies in medium carbon vanadium-microalloyed steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadel A.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to determine TTT diagram of medium carbon V-N micro-alloyed steel with emphasis on the development of intragranular ferrite morphologies. The isothermal treatment was carried out at 350, 400, 450, 500, 550 and 600°C. These treatments were interrupted at different times in order to analyze the evolution of the microstructure. Metallographic evaluation was done using optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The results show that at high temperatures (≥ 500°C polygonal intragranulary nucleated ferrite idiomorphs, combined with grain boundary ferrite and pearlite were produced and followed by an incomplete transformation phenomenon. At intermediate temperatures (450, 500°C an interloced acicular ferrite (AF microstructure is produced, and at low temperatures (400, 350°C the sheave of parallel acicular ferrite plates, similar to bainitic sheaves but intragranularly nucleated were observed. In addition to sheaf type acicular ferrite, the grain boundary nucleated bainitic sheaves are observed. [Projekat Ministartsva nauke Republike Srbije, br. OI174004

  3. Ferrite materials for memory applications

    CERN Document Server

    Saravanan, R

    2017-01-01

    The book discusses the synthesis and characterization of various ferrite materials used for memory applications. The distinct feature of the book is the construction of charge density of ferrites by deploying the maximum entropy method (MEM). This charge density gives the distribution of charges in the ferrite unit cell, which is analyzed for charge related properties.

  4. CASS Ferrite and Grain Structure Relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruud, Clayton O. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Meyer, Ryan M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Diaz, Aaron A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Anderson, Michael T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-07-13

    This document summarizes the results of research conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine whether, based on experimental measurements, a correlation existed between grain structure in cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) piping and ferrite content of the casting alloy. The motivation for this research lies in the fact that ultrasonic testing (UT) is strongly influenced by CASS grain structure; knowledge of this grain structure may help improve the ability to interpret UT responses, thereby improving the overall reliability of UT inspections of CASS components.

  5. Evaluation of welds on a ferritic-austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pleva, J.; Johansson, B.

    1984-01-01

    Five different welding methods for the ferritic-austenitic steel 22Cr6Ni3MoN have been evaluated on mill welded heavy wall pipes. The corrosion resistance of the weld joints has been tested both in standard tests and in special environments, related to certain oil and gas wells. The tests were conclusive in that a welding procedure with the addition of sufficient amounts of filler metal should be employed. TIG welds without or with marginal filler addition showed poor resistance to pitting, and to boiling nitric acid. Contents of main alloying elements in ferrite and austenite phases have been measured and causes of corrosion attack in welds are discussed

  6. Methods of acicular ferrite forming in the weld bead metal (Brief analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Володимир Олександрович Лебедєв

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A brief analysis of the methods of acicular ferrite formation as the most preferable structural component in the weld metal has been presented. The term «acicular ferrite» is meant as a structure that forms during pearlite and martensite transformation and austenite decomposition. Acicular ferrite is a packet structure consisting of battens of bainitic ferrite, there being no cementite particles inside these battens at all. The chemical elements most effectively influencing on the formation of acicular ferrite have been considered and their combined effect as well. It has been shown in particular, that the most effective chemical element in terms of impact toughness and cost relation is manganese. Besides, the results of multipass surfacing with impulse and constant feed of low-alloy steel wire electrode have been considered. According to these results acicular ferrite forms in both cases. However, at impulse feed of the electrode wire high mechanical properties of surfacing layer were got in the first passes, the form of the acicular ferrite crystallite has been improved and volume shares of polygonal and lamellar ferrite have been reduced. An assumption has been made, according to which acicular ferrite in the surfacing layer may be obtained through superposition of mechanical low-frequency oscillation on the welding torch or on the welding pool instead of periodic thermal effect due to electrode wire periodic feed

  7. Manufacturing Experience for Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, Wendy D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Doherty, Ann L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Henager, Charles H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Montgomery, Robert O. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Omberg, Ronald P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Smith, Mark T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Webster, Ryan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-09-22

    This report documents the results of the development and the manufacturing experience gained at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) while working with the oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) materials MA 956, 14YWT, and 9YWT. The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program of the Office of Nuclear Energy has implemented a program to develop a Uranium-Molybdenum metal fuel for light water reactors. ODS materials have the potential to provide improved performance for the U-Mo concept.

  8. Regularities of ferritic-pearlitic structure formation during subcooled austenite decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shkatov, V.V.; Frantsenyuk, L.I.; Bogomolov, I.V.

    1997-01-01

    Relationships of ferrite-pearlite structure parameters to austenite grain size and cooling conditions during γ -> α transformation are studied for steel 3 sp. A mathematical description has been proposed for grain evolution in carbon and low alloy steel cooling after hot rolling. It is shown that ferrite grain size can be controlled by changing temperature range of water spraying when the temperatures of rolling completion and strip coiling are the same

  9. The effects of laser welding parameters on the microstructure of ferritic and duplex stainless steels welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekkarinen, J.; Kujanpää, V.

    This study is focused to determine empirically, which microstructural changes occur in ferritic and duplex stainless steels when heat input is controlled by welding parameters. Test welds were done autogenously bead-on-plate without shielding gas using 5 kW fiber laser. For comparison, some gas tungsten arc welds were made. Used test material were 1.4016 (AISI 430) and 1.4003 (low-carbon ferritic) type steels in ferritic steels group and 1.4162 (low-alloyed duplex, LDX2101) and 1.4462 (AISI 2205) type steels in duplex steels group. Microstructural changes in welds were identified and examined using optical metallographic methods.

  10. Atom probe study of the microstructural evolution induced by irradiation in Fe-Cu ferritic alloys and pressure vessel steels; Etude a la sonde atomique de l`evolution microstructurale sous irradiation d`alliages ferritiques Fe-Cu et d`aciers de cuve REP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pareige, P

    1996-04-01

    Pressure vessel steels used in pressurized water reactors are low alloyed ferritic steels. They may be prone to hardening and embrittlement under neutron irradiation. The changes in mechanical properties are generally supposed to result from the formation of point defects, dislocation loops, voids and/or copper rich clusters. However, the real nature of the irradiation induced-damage in these steels has not been clearly identified yet. In order to improve our vision of this damage, we have characterized the microstructure of several steels and model alloys irradiated with electrons and neutrons. The study was performed with conventional and tomographic atom probes. The well known importance of the effects of copper upon pressure vessel steel embrittlement has led us to study Fe-Cu binary alloys. We have considered chemical aging as well as aging under electron and neutron irradiations. The resulting effects depend on whether electron or neutron irradiations ar used for thus. We carried out both kinds of irradiation concurrently so as to compare their effects. We have more particularly considered alloys with a low copper supersaturation representative of that met with the French vessel alloys (0.1% Cu). Then, we have examined steels used on French nuclear reactor pressure vessels. To characterize the microstructure of CHOOZ A steel and its evolution when exposed to neutrons, we have studied samples from the reactor surveillance program. The results achieved, especially the characterization of neutron-induced defects have been compared with those for another steel from the surveillance program of Dampierre 2. All the experiment results obtained on model and industrial steels have allowed us to consider an explanation of the way how the defects appear and grow, and to propose reasons for their influence upon steel embrittlement. (author). 3 appends.

  11. Heating temperature effect on ferritic grain size of rotor steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheremnykh, V.G.; Derevyankin, E.V.; Sakulin, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    The heating temperature effect on ferritic grain size of two steels 13Kh1M1FA and 25Kh1M1FA is evaluated. It is shown that exposure time increase at heating temperatures below 1000 deg C up to 10h changes but slightly the size of the Cr-Mo-V ferritic grain of rotor steel cooled with 25 deg C/h rate. Heating up to 1000 deg C and above leads to substantial ferritic grain growth. The kinetics of ferritic grain growth is determined by the behaviour of phases controlling the austenitic grain growth, such as carbonitrides VCsub(0.14)Nsub(0.78) in 13Kh1M1FA steel and VCsub(0.18)Nsub(0.72) in 25Kh1M1FA steel. Reduction of carbon and alloying elements content in steel composition observed at the liquation over rotor length leads to a certain decrease of ferritic grain resistance to super heating

  12. Progress in development of iron base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zackay, V.V.; Parker, E.R.

    1980-01-01

    The ways of development of new iron base high-strength alloys are considered. Perspectiveness of ferritic steel strengthening with intermetallides (TaFe 2 , for instance) is shown. Favourable combination of plasticity, strength and fracture toughness in nickel-free iron-manganese alloys (16-20%) is also pointed out. A strength level of alloyed maraging steels can be achieved by changes in chemical composition and by proper heat treatments of low- and medium-alloyed steels

  13. Contributions from research on irradiated ferritic/martensitic steels to materials science and engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelles, D. S.

    1990-05-01

    Ferritic and martensitic steels are finding increased application for structural components in several reactor systems. Low-alloy steels have long been used for pressure vessels in light water fission reactors. Martensitic stainless steels are finding increasing usage in liquid metal fast breeder reactors and are being considered for fusion reactor applications when such systems become commercially viable. Recent efforts have evaluated the applicability of oxide dispersion-strengthened ferritic steels. Experiments on the effect of irradiation on these steels provide several examples where contributions are being made to materials science and engineering. Examples are given demonstrating improvements in basic understanding, small specimen test procedure development, and alloy development.

  14. Microstructural characterization of ODS ferritic steels at different processing stages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil, E., E-mail: egil@ceit.es; Ordás, N.; García-Rosales, C.; Iturriza, I., E-mail: iiturriza@ceit.es

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • ODS ferritic stainless steel produced by new route without mechanical alloying. • Fully dense ferritic stainless steels containing Y and Ti were obtained by HIPping. • Y and Ti-rich precipitates prevent grain growth during heat treatment up to 1320 °C. • HIPping at 1220 °C dissolves the metastable oxides on PPBs. - Abstract: Nanostructured Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Reduced Activation Ferritic Stainless Steels (ODS RAF) are promising structural materials for fusion reactors, due to their ultrafine microstructure and the presence of a dispersion of Y–Ti–O nanoclusters that provide excellent creep strength at high temperatures (up to 750 °C). The traditional powder metallurgical route to produce these steels is based on Gas Atomization (GA) + Mechanical Alloying (MA) + HIP + ThermoMechanical Treatments (TMTs). Recently, alternative methods have arisen to avoid the MA step. In line with this new approach, ferritic stainless steel powders were produced by gas atomization and HIPped, after adjusting their oxygen, Y and Ti contents to form Y–Ti–O nanoclusters during subsequent heat treatments. The microstructure of as-HIPped steels mainly consists of ferrite grains, Y–Ti precipitates, carbides and oxides on Prior Particle Boundaries (PPBs). Post-HIP heat treatments performed at high temperatures (1270 and 1300 °C) evaluated the feasibility of achieving a complete dissolution of the oxides on PPBs and a precipitation of ultrafine Ti- and Y-rich oxides in the Fe14Cr2W matrix. FEG-SEM with extensive EDS analysis was used to characterize the microstructure of the atomized powders and the ODS-RAF specimens after HIP consolidation and post-HIP heat treatments. A deeper characterization of atomized powder was carried out by TEM.

  15. C-Curves for Lengthening of Widmanstätten and Bainitic Ferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jiaqing; Leach, Lindsay; Hillert, Mats; Borgenstam, Annika

    2017-09-01

    Widmanstätten ferrite and bainitic ferrite are both acicular and their lengthening rate in binary Fe-C alloys and low-alloyed steels under isothermal conditions is studied by searching the literature and through new measurements. As a function of temperature, the lengthening rate can be represented by a common curve for both kinds of acicular ferrite in contrast to the separate C-curves often presented in time-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagrams. The curves for Fe-C alloys with low carbon content show no obvious decrease in rate at low temperatures down to 623 K (350 °C). For alloys with higher carbon content, the expected decrease of rate as a function of temperature below a nose was observed. An attempt to explain the absence of a nose for low carbon contents by an increasing deviation from local equilibrium at high growth rates is presented. This explanation is based on a simple kinetic model, which predicts that the growth rates for Fe-C alloys with less than 0.3 mass pct carbon are high enough at low temperatures to make the carbon pileup, in front of the advancing tip of a ferrite plate, shrink below atomic dimensions, starting at about 600 K (323 °C).

  16. Development of high performance ODS alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Lin [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Gao, Fei [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Garner, Frank [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2018-01-29

    This project aims to capitalize on insights developed from recent high-dose self-ion irradiation experiments in order to develop and test the next generation of optimized ODS alloys needed to meet the nuclear community's need for high strength, radiation-tolerant cladding and core components, especially with enhanced resistance to void swelling. Two of these insights are that ferrite grains swell earlier than tempered martensite grains, and oxide dispersions currently produced only in ferrite grains require a high level of uniformity and stability to be successful. An additional insight is that ODS particle stability is dependent on as-yet unidentified compositional combinations of dispersoid and alloy matrix, such as dispersoids are stable in MA957 to doses greater than 200 dpa but dissolve in MA956 at doses less than 200 dpa. These findings focus attention on candidate next-generation alloys which address these concerns. Collaboration with two Japanese groups provides this project with two sets of first-round candidate alloys that have already undergone extensive development and testing for unirradiated properties, but have not yet been evaluated for their irradiation performance. The first set of candidate alloys are dual phase (ferrite + martensite) ODS alloys with oxide particles uniformly distributed in both ferrite and martensite phases. The second set of candidate alloys are ODS alloys containing non-standard dispersoid compositions with controllable oxide particle sizes, phases and interfaces.

  17. A correlative approach to segmenting phases and ferrite morphologies in transformation-induced plasticity steel using electron back-scattering diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gazder, Azdiar A., E-mail: azdiar@uow.edu.au [Electron Microscopy Centre, University of Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); Al-Harbi, Fayez; Spanke, Hendrik Th. [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia); Mitchell, David R.G. [Electron Microscopy Centre, University of Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); Pereloma, Elena V. [Electron Microscopy Centre, University of Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia)

    2014-12-15

    Using a combination of electron back-scattering diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy data, a segmentation procedure was developed to comprehensively distinguish austenite, martensite, polygonal ferrite, ferrite in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite laths in a thermo-mechanically processed low-Si, high-Al transformation-induced plasticity steel. The efficacy of the ferrite morphologies segmentation procedure was verified by transmission electron microscopy. The variation in carbon content between the ferrite in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite laths was explained on the basis of carbon partitioning during their growth. - Highlights: • Multi-condition segmentation of austenite, martensite, polygonal ferrite and ferrite in bainite. • Ferrites in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite segmented by variation in relative carbon counts. • Carbon partitioning during growth explains variation in carbon content of ferrites in bainites. • Developed EBSD image processing tools can be applied to the microstructures of a variety of alloys. • EBSD-based segmentation procedure verified by correlative TEM results.

  18. Formation of oxides particles in ferritic steel by using gas-atomized powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yong; Fang Jinghua; Liu Donghua; Lu Zhi; Liu Feng; Chen Shiqi; Liu, C.T.

    2010-01-01

    Oxides dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel was prepared by using gas-atomized pre-alloyed powder, without the conventional mechanical alloying process. By adjusting the volume content of O 2 in the gas atmosphere Ar, the O level in the ferritic powder can be well controlled. The O dissolves uniformly in the ferritic powder, and a very thin layer of oxides forms on the powder surface. After hot deformation, the primary particle boundaries, which retain after sintering, can be disintegrated and near fully dense materials can be obtained. The oxide layer on the powder surface has a significant effect on the microstructural evolution. It may prevent the diffusion in between the primary particles during sintering, and may dissolve and/or induce the nucleation of new oxides in the ferritic matrix during recrystallization. Two kinds of oxide particles are found in the ferritic steel: large (∼100 nm) Ti-rich and fine (10-20 nm) Y-Ti-rich oxides. The hardness of the ferritic steel increases with increasing annealing temperatures, however, decreases at 1400 deg. C, due to the coarsening of precipitates and the recrystallization microstructure.

  19. Simple Magnetic Device Indicates Thickness Of Alloy 903

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Pin Jeng; Rodriguez, Sergio; Bright, Mark L.

    1995-01-01

    Handheld device called "ferrite indicator" orginally designed for use in determining ferrite content of specimen of steel. Placed in contact with specimen and functions by indicating whether magnet attracted more strongly to specimen or to calibrated reference sample. Relative strength of attraction shows whether alloy overlay thinner than allowable.

  20. Creep lifetime assessements of ferritic pipeline welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainsworth, R.A.; Goodall, I.W.; Miller, D.A.

    1995-01-01

    The low alloy ferritic steam pipework in Advanced Gas Cooled reactor (AGR) power stations operates at temperatures in the creep range. An inspection strategy for continued operation of the pipework has been developed based on estimation of the creep rupture life of pipework weldments and fracture mechanics for demonstrating acceptance of defects. This strategy is described in outline. The estimation of creep rupture life is described in more detail. Validation for the approach is illustrated by comparison with pressure vessel tests and with metallographic examination of components removed from service. The fracture mechanics methods are also described. It is shown that the amount of creep crack growth is dependent on the life fraction at which the assessment is made; crack growth being rapid as the creep rupture life is approached. (author). 3 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  1. The Origin of Acicular Ferrite in Gas Metal Arc and Submerged ARC Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-01

    Ratio vs Acicular Ferrite 45 Figure 2.10 Crack Propagati6n Schematic . . ........... 46 Figure 2.11 CCT Diagram ... .......... ............ 47 Figure 3.1...10𔃾 TIME (S) Figure 2. 11 Continuous cooling transformation ( CCT ) diagram showing the effects of alloying elements, inclusion formers and cooling rate

  2. High purity ferritic Cr-Mo stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoth, J.

    1977-01-01

    In five years, E-BRITE 26-1 ferritic stainless steel has won an important place in the spectrum of materials suitable for use in chemical process equipment. It provides, in stainless steel, performance-capability characteristics comparable to more expensive alloys. It has demonstrated cost-effectiveness in equipment used for caustic, nitric-urea, organic chemicals, pulping liquors, refinery streams, and elsewhere. User confidence in the reliability and integrity of Grade XM 27 has increased to the point where large critical systems are now routinely specified in the alloy. The market acceptance of this material has attracted attempts to produce substitute versions of the alloy. Imitation, should be viewed with caution. Stabilized 26-IS must be examined over a lengthy period of time to determine if its own corrosion resistance, ductility, fabricability and reproducibility properties could ever be likened to those of E-BRITE 26-1. (orig.) [de

  3. Development of ferritic steels for reduced activation: the US program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Gelles, D.S.; Lechtenberg, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    The Cr-Mo ferritic (martensitic) steels are candidates for the structural components of fusion reactors. Irradiation of such steels in a fusion environment produces long-lived radioactive isotopes, which lead to difficult radioactive waste disposal problems once the structure is removed from service. Such problems could be reduced by using steels that contain only elements that produce radioactive isotopes that decay to low levels in a reasonable time (tens of years instead of hundreds or thousands of years). The US Department of Energy has a program to develop steels to meet the criteria for shallow land burial as opposed to deep geologic storage. A review of the alloy development programs indicates that ferritic steels that meet these criteria can be developed

  4. Corrosion of ferrous alloys in eutectic lead-lithium environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Smith, D.L.

    1983-09-01

    Corrosion data have been obtained on austenitic prime candidate alloy (PCA) and Type 316 stainless steel and ferritic HT-9 and Fe-9Cr-1Mo steels in a flowing Pb-17 at. % Li environment at 727 and 700 K (454 and 427 0 C). The results indicate that the dissolution rates for both austenitic and ferritic steels in Pb-17Li are an order of magnitude greater than in flowing lithium. The influence of time, temperature, and alloy composition on the corrosion behavior in Pb-17Li is similar to that in lithium. The weight losses for the austenitic steels are an order of magnitude greater than for the ferritic steels. The rate of weight loss for the ferritic steels is constant, whereas the dissolution rates for the austenitic steels decrease with time. After exposure to Pb-17Li, the austenitic steels develop a very weak and porous ferrite layer which easily spalls from the specimen surface

  5. Crystallization of -type hexagonal ferrites from mechanically

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Crystallization of -type hexagonal ferrites from mechanically activated mixtures of barium carbonate and goethite ... Abstract. -type hexagonal ferrite precursor was prepared by a soft mechanochemical ... Bulletin of Materials Science | News.

  6. Optimization and testing results of Zr-bearing ferritic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Lizhen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yang, Ying [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tyburska-Puschel, Beata [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Sridharan, K. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The mission of the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program is to develop crosscutting technologies for nuclear energy applications. Advanced structural materials with superior performance at elevated temperatures are always desired for nuclear reactors, which can improve reactor economics, safety margins, and design flexibility. They benefit not only new reactors, including advanced light water reactors (LWRs) and fast reactors such as sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) that is primarily designed for management of high-level wastes, but also life extension of the existing fleet when component exchange is needed. Developing and utilizing the modern materials science tools (experimental, theoretical, and computational tools) is an important path to more efficient alloy development and process optimization. Ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels are important structural materials for nuclear reactors due to their advantages over other applicable materials like austenitic stainless steels, notably their resistance to void swelling, low thermal expansion coefficients, and higher thermal conductivity. However, traditional FM steels exhibit a noticeable yield strength reduction at elevated temperatures above ~500°C, which limits their applications in advanced nuclear reactors which target operating temperatures at 650°C or higher. Although oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels have shown excellent high-temperature performance, their extremely high cost, limited size and fabricability of products, as well as the great difficulty with welding and joining, have limited or precluded their commercial applications. Zirconium has shown many benefits to Fe-base alloys such as grain refinement, improved phase stability, and reduced radiation-induced segregation. The ultimate goal of this project is, with the aid of computational modeling tools, to accelerate the development of a new generation of Zr-bearing ferritic alloys to be fabricated using conventional

  7. The influence of Cr content on the mechanical properties of ODS ferritic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shaofu; Zhou, Zhangjian; Jang, Jinsung; Wang, Man; Hu, Helong; Sun, Hongying; Zou, Lei; Zhang, Guangming; Zhang, Liwei

    2014-12-01

    The present investigation aimed at researching the mechanical properties of the oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels with different Cr content, which were fabricated through a consolidation of mechanical alloyed (MA) powders of 0.35 wt.% nano Y2O3 dispersed Fe-12.0Cr-0.5Ti-1.0W (alloy A), Fe-16.0Cr-0.5Ti-1.0W (alloy B), and Fe-18.0Cr-0.5Ti-1.0W (alloy C) alloys (all in wt.%) by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) with 100 MPa pressure at 1150 °C for 3 h. The mechanical properties, including the tensile strength, hardness, and impact fracture toughness were tested by universal testers, while Young's modulus was determined by ultrasonic wave non-destructive tester. It was found that the relationship between Cr content and the strength of ODS ferritic steels was not a proportional relationship. However, too high a Cr content will cause the precipitation of Cr-enriched segregation phase, which is detrimental to the ductility of ODS ferritic steels.

  8. Calcium-assisted reduction of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles for nanostructured iron cobalt with enhanced magnetic performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, B.; Andrew, J. S.; Arnold, D. P.

    2017-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the potential of a calcium-assisted reduction process for synthesizing fine-grain (~100 nm) metal alloys from metal oxide nanoparticles. To demonstrate the process, an iron cobalt alloy (Fe_6_6Co_3_4) is obtained by hydrogen annealing 7-nm cobalt ferrite (CoFe_2O_4) nanoparticles in the presence of calcium granules. The calcium serves as a strong reducing agent, promoting the phase transition from cobalt ferrite to a metallic iron cobalt alloy, while maintaining high crystallinity. Magnetic measurements demonstrate the annealing temperature is the dominant factor of tuning the grain size and magnetic properties. Annealing at 700 °C for 1 h maximizes the magnetic saturation, up to 2.4 T (235 emu/g), which matches that of bulk iron cobalt.

  9. Calcium-assisted reduction of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles for nanostructured iron cobalt with enhanced magnetic performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, B. [University of Florida, Interdisciplinary Microsystems Group, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (United States); Andrew, J. S. [University of Florida, Department of Materials Science and Engineering (United States); Arnold, D. P., E-mail: darnold@ufl.edu [University of Florida, Interdisciplinary Microsystems Group, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (United States)

    2017-03-15

    This paper demonstrates the potential of a calcium-assisted reduction process for synthesizing fine-grain (~100 nm) metal alloys from metal oxide nanoparticles. To demonstrate the process, an iron cobalt alloy (Fe{sub 66}Co{sub 34}) is obtained by hydrogen annealing 7-nm cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles in the presence of calcium granules. The calcium serves as a strong reducing agent, promoting the phase transition from cobalt ferrite to a metallic iron cobalt alloy, while maintaining high crystallinity. Magnetic measurements demonstrate the annealing temperature is the dominant factor of tuning the grain size and magnetic properties. Annealing at 700 °C for 1 h maximizes the magnetic saturation, up to 2.4 T (235 emu/g), which matches that of bulk iron cobalt.

  10. Microwave dielectric properties of nanostructured nickel ferrite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    Abstract. Nickel ferrite is one of the important ferrites used in microwave devices. In the present work, we have synthesized nanoparticles of nickel ferrite using chemical precipitation technique. The crystal structure and grain size of the particles are studied using XRD. The microwave dielectric properties of nanostructured.

  11. Use of microstructure control to toughen ferritic steels for cryogenic use. I. Fe--Ni steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syn, C.K.; Jin, S.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1976-12-01

    Alternation of austenitization and austenite + ferrite two-phase decomposition treatment in a cyclic thermal treatment allows the achievement of ultra-fine grain size in steels containing 8-12% Ni. The grain refinement leads to a substantial improvement in cryogenic mechanical properties. The ductile-brittle transition temperature of a ferritic Fe-12Ni-0.25Ti alloy was suppressed to below liquid helium temperature by this grain refinement procedure; the transition temperature of commercial ''9Ni'' cryogenic steel was similarly reduced by combining the grain refinement with a final temper which introduces a small admixture of retained austenite

  12. Some initial considerations on the suitability of Ferritic/ martensitic stainless steels as first wall and blanket materials in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butterworth, G.J.

    1982-01-01

    The constitution of stainless iron alloys and the characteristic properties of alloys in the main ferritic, martensitic and austenitic groups are discussed. A comparison of published data on the mechanical, thermal and irradiation properties of typical austenitic and martensitic/ferritic steels shows that alloys in the latter groups have certain advantages for fusion applications. The ferromagnetism exhibited by martensitic and ferritic alloys has, however, been identified as a potentially serious obstacle to their utilisation in magnetic confinement devices. The paper describes measurements performed in other laboratories on the magnetic properties of two representative martensitic alloys 12Cr-1Mo and 9Cr-2Mo. These observations show that a modest bias magnetic field of magnitude 1 - 2 tesla induces a state of magnetic saturation in these materials. They would thus behave as essentially paramagnetic materials having a relative permeability close to unity when saturated by the toroidal field of a tokamak reactor. The results of computations by the General Atomic research group to assess the implications of such magnetic behaviour on reactor design and operation are presented. The results so far indicate that the ferromagnetism of martensitic/ferritic steels would not represent a major obstacle to their utilisation as first wall or blanket materials. (author)

  13. Development of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) Ferritic Steel Through Powder Forging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Deepak; Prakash, Ujjwal; Dabhade, Vikram V.; Laha, K.; Sakthivel, T.

    2017-04-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels are candidates for cladding tubes in fast breeder nuclear reactors. In this study, an 18%Cr ODS ferritic steel was prepared through powder forging route. Elemental powders with a nominal composition of Fe-18Cr-2 W-0.2Ti (composition in wt.%) with 0 and 0.35% yttria were prepared by mechanical alloying in a Simoloyer attritor under argon atmosphere. The alloyed powders were heated in a mild steel can to 1473 K under flowing hydrogen atmosphere. The can was then hot forged. Steps of sealing, degassing and evacuation are eliminated by using powder forging. Heating ODS powder in hydrogen atmosphere ensures good bonding between alloy powders. A dense ODS alloy with an attractive combination of strength and ductility was obtained after re-forging. On testing at 973 K, a loss in ductility was observed in yttria-containing alloy. The strength and ductility increased with increase in strain rate at 973 K. Reasons for this are discussed. The ODS alloy exhibited a recrystallized microstructure which is difficult to achieve by extrusion. No prior particle boundaries were observed after forging. The forged compacts exhibited isotropic mechanical properties. It is suggested that powder forging may offer several advantages over the traditional extrusion/HIP routes for fabrication of ODS alloys.

  14. First-principles study on influence of molybdenum on acicular ferrite formation on TiC particles in microallyed steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Guomin; Li, Changsheng; Cheng, Xiaonong; Zhao, Xinluo; Feng, Quan; Li, Zhijie; Li, Dongyang; Szpunar, Jerzy A.

    2018-01-01

    In this study, influences of molybdenum on acicular ferrite formation on precipitated TiC particles are investigated from thermodynamic and kinetic respects. In thermodynamics, Segregation of Mo towards austenite/TiC interface releases the interfacial energy and induces phase transformation from austenite to acicular ferrite on the precipitated TiC particles. The Phase transformation can be achieved by displacive deformation along uniaxial Bain path. In addition, the segregation of Mo atom will also lead to the enhanced stability of ferrite in comparison with austenite no matter at low temperature or at high temperature. In kinetics, the Mo solute in acicular ferrite can effectively suppress the diffusion of carbon atoms, which ensures that orientation relationship between acicular ferrite and austenitized matrix can be satisfied during the diffusionless phase transformation. In contrast to ineffectiveness of TiC particles, the alloying Mo element can facilitate the formation of acicular ferrite on precipitated TiC particles, which is attributed to the above thermodynamic and kinetic reasons. Furthermore, Interfacial toughness and ductility of as-formed acicular ferrite/TiC interface can be improved simultaneously by segregation of Mo atom.

  15. Irradiation creep in ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandermeulen, W.; Bremaecker, A. de; Burbure, S. de; Huet, J.J.; Asbroeck, P. van

    Pressurized and non-pressurized capsules of several ferritic steels have been irradiated in Rapsodie between 400 and 500 0 C up to 3.7 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E>0.1 MeV). Results of the diameter measurements are presented and show that the total in-pile deformation is lower than for austenitic steels

  16. Effect of neutron irradiation on vanadium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braski, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    Neutron-irradiated vanadium alloys were evaluated for their susceptibility to irradiation hardening, helium embrittlement, swelling, and residual radioactivity, and the results were compared with those for the austenitic and ferritic stainless steels. The VANSTAR-7 and V-15Cr-5Ti alloys showed the greatest hardening between 400 and 600 0 C while V-3Ti-1Si and V-20Ti had lower values that were comparable to those of ferritic steels. The V-15Cr-5Ti and VANSTAR-7 alloys were susceptible to helium embrittlement caused by the combination of weakened grain boundaries and irradiation-hardened grain matrices. Specimen fractures were entirely intergranular in the most severe instances of embrittlement. The V-3Ti-1Si and V-20Ti alloys were more resistant to helium embrittlement. Except for VANSTAR-7 irradiated to 40 dpa at 520 0 C, all of the vanadium alloys exhibited low swelling that was similar to the ferritic steels. Swelling was greater in specimens that were preimplanted with helium using the tritium trick. The vanadium alloys clearly exhibit lower residual radioactivity after irradiation than the ferrous alloys

  17. Effect of neutron irradiation on vanadium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braski, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    Neutron-irradiated vanadium alloys were evaluated for their susceptibility to irradiation hardening, helium embrittlement, swelling, and residual radioactivity, and the results were compared with those for the austenitic and ferritic stainless steels. The VANSTAR-7 and V-15Cr-5Ti alloys showed the greatest hardening between 400 and 600/sup 0/C while V-3Ti-1Si and V-20Ti had lower values that were comparable to those of ferritic steels. The V-15Cr-5Ti and VANSTAR-7 alloys were susceptible to helium embrittlement caused by the combination of weakened grain boundaries and irradiation-hardened grain matrices. Specimen fractures were entirely intergranular in the most severe instances of embrittlement. The V-3Ti-1Si and V-20Ti alloys were more resistant to helium embrittlement. Except for VANSTAR-7 irradiated to 40 dpa at 520/sup 0/C, all of the vanadium alloys exhibited low swelling that was similar to the ferritic steels. Swelling was greater in specimens that were preimplanted with helium using the tritium trick. The vanadium alloys clearly exhibit lower residual radioactivity after irradiation than the ferrous alloys.

  18. Review of creep resistant alloys for power plant applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nagode

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A paper describes the most popular alloys for power plant application as well as the most promising alloys for future application in that technology. The components in power plants operate in severe conditions (high temperatures and pressures and they are expected reliable service for 30 years and more. The correct choice of the material is, thus, of a very importance. The paper describes the development as well as advantages and disadvantages of convenient ferritic/martensitic steels, ferritic/bainitic steels, austenitic stainless steels and the new alloys for the application at temperatures of 650°C and more.

  19. Passivation behavior of a ferritic stainless steel in concentrated alkaline solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Fattah-alhosseini

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The passivation behavior of AISI 430 ferritic stainless steel was investigated in concentrated alkaline solutions in relation to several test parameters, using electrochemical techniques. Increasing solution pH (varying from 11.5 to 14.0 leads to an increase in the corrosion rate of the alloy. Mott–Schottky analysis revealed that passive films formed on AISI 430 ferritic stainless steel behave as n-type semiconductor and the donor densities increased with pH. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS results showed that the reciprocal capacitance of the passive film is directly proportional to its thickness, which decreases with pH increase. The results revealed that for this ferritic stainless steel in concentrated alkaline solutions, decreasing the solution pH offers better conditions for forming passive films with higher protection behavior, due to the growth of a much thicker and less defective film.

  20. Synthesis and Characterization of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Ferritic Steel via a Sol-Gel Route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Qinxing; Zhang Tao; Wang Xianping; Fang Qianfeng; Hu Jing; Liu Changsong

    2012-01-01

    Nanocrystalline oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel powders with nominal composition of Fe-14Cr-3W-0.3Ti-0.4Y 2 O 3 are synthesized using sol-gel method and hydrogen reduction. At low reduction temperature the impurity phase of CrO is detected. At higher reduction temperature the impurity phase is Cr 2 O 3 which eventually disappears with increasing reduction time. A pure ODS ferritic steel phase is obtained after reducing the sol-gel resultant products at 1200°C for 3 h. The HRTEM and EDS mapping indicate that the Y 2 O 3 particles with a size of about 15 nm are homogenously dispersed in the alloy matrix. The bulk ODS ferritic steel samples prepared from such powders exhibit good mechanical performance with an ultimate tensile stress of 960 MPa.

  1. Development of oxide dispersion strengthened 9Cr ferritic-martensitic steel clad tube for fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laha, K.; Saroja, S.; Mathew, M.D.; Jayakumar, T.; Vijay, R.; Venugopal Reddy, A.; Lakshminarayana, B.; Kapoor, Komal; Jha, S.K.; Tonpe, S.S.

    2012-01-01

    One of the key issues in the economical operation of FBR is to achieve high burn-up of fuel (200-250 GWd/t) which considerably reduces the fuel cycle cost. This imposes stringent requirements of void swelling resistance upto 200 dpa for the core structural materials. Presently used alloy 09 (a modified austenitic stainless steel, 15Cr-15Ni-Ti) for PFBR has void swelling limit less than 150 dpa. Because of the inherent void swelling resistance, 9-12Cr steels ferritic/martensitic steels are qualified for irradiation upto 200 dpa but their low creep strength at temperatures above 600 deg C restricts their application as a clad material. Oxide dispersion strengthening is found to be promising means of extending the creep resistance of ferritic/martensitic steels beyond 650 deg C without sacrificing the inherent advantages of high thermal conductivity and low swelling of ferritic steels

  2. Computational design and performance prediction of creep-resistant ferritic superalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liaw, Peter K. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Wang, Shao-Yu [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Dunand, David C. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Ghosh, Gautum [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Song, Gian [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Rawlings, Michael [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Baik, Sung Il [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2017-12-04

    Ferritic superalloys containing the B2 phase with the parent L21 phase precipitates in a disordered solid-solution matrix, also known as a hierarchical-precipitate-strengthened ferritic alloy (HPSFA), had been developed for high-temperature structural applications in fossil-energy power plants. These alloys were designed by adding Ti into a previously-studied NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy (denoted as FBB8 in this study). Following with the concept of HPSFAs, in the present research, a systematic investigation on adding other elements, such as Hf and Zr, and optimizing the Ti content within the alloy system, has been conducted, in order to further improve the creep resistance of the model alloys. Studies include advanced experimental techniques, first-principles calculations on thermodynamic and mechanical properties, and numerical simulations on precipitation hardening, have been integrated and conducted to characterize the complex microstructures and excellent creep resistance of alloys. The experimental techniques include transmission-electron microscopy (TEM), scanning-electron microscopy (SEM), neutron diffraction (ND), and atom-probe tomography (APT), which provide the detailed microstructural information of the model alloys. Systematic tension/compression creep tests have also been conducted in order to verify the creep resistance of the potential alloy compositions. The results show that when replacing Ti with Hf and Zr, it does not form the L21 phase. Instead, the hexagonal Laves phase forms and distributes majorly along the grain boundary, or large segregation within grains. Since the Laves phase does not form parent to the B2-phase precipitates, it cannot bring the strengthening effect of HPSFAs. As a result, the FBB8 + 2 wt. % Hf and FBB8 + 2 wt. % Zr alloys have similar mechanical properties to the original FBB8. The FBB8 + Ti series alloys had also been studied, from the creep tests and microstructural characterizations, the FBB8 + 3.5 wt.% Ti

  3. The effect of solution pH on the electrochemical performance of nanocrystalline metal ferrites MFe2O4 (M=Cu, Zn, and Ni) thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayed, E. M.; Rashad, M. M.; Khalil, H. F. Y.; Ibrahim, I. A.; Hussein, M. R.; El-Sabbah, M. M. B.

    2016-04-01

    Nanocrystalline metal ferrite MFe2O4 (M=Cu, Zn, and Ni) thin films have been synthesized via electrodeposition-anodization process. Electrodeposited (M)Fe2 alloys were obtained from aqueous sulfate bath. The formed alloys were electrochemically oxidized (anodized) in aqueous (1 M KOH) solution, at room temperature, to the corresponding hydroxides. The parameters controlling the current efficiency of the electrodeposition of (M)Fe2 alloys such as the bath composition and the current density were studied and optimized. The anodized (M)Fe2 alloy films were annealed in air at 400 °C for 2 h. The results revealed the formation of three ferrite thin films were formed. The crystallite sizes of the produced films were in the range between 45 and 60 nm. The microstructure of the formed film was ferrite type dependent. The corrosion behavior of ferrite thin films in different pH solutions was investigated using open circuit potential (OCP) and potentiodynamic polarization measurements. The open circuit potential indicates that the initial potential E im of ZnFe2O4 thin films remained constant for a short time, then sharply increased in the less negative direction in acidic and alkaline medium compared with Ni and Cu ferrite films. The values of the corrosion current density I corr were higher for the ZnFe2O4 films at pH values of 1 and 12 compared with that of NiFe2O4 and CuFe2O4 which were higher only at pH value 1. The corrosion rate was very low for the three ferrite films when immersion in the neutral medium. The surface morphology recommended that Ni and Cu ferrite films were safely used in neutral and alkaline medium, whereas Zn ferrite film was only used in neutral atmospheres.

  4. Structural characterization of ferrite nanoparticles and composite materials using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albuquerque, A.S.; Macedo, W.A.A.; Plivelic, T.; Torriani, I.L.; Jimenez, J.A.L.; Saitovich, E.B.

    2001-01-01

    During the last decade nanocrystalline magnetic materials have been widely studied due to the multiple technological applications. Amongst the magnetic materials of major technological interest are the soft magnetic ferrites and the granular solids formed by ferrites dispersed in non-magnetic matrices. It is a well known fact that the magnetic properties of these materials, such as coercivity, magnetic saturation and magnetization, depend on the shape, size and size distribution of the nanoparticles. For this reason, the general purpose of this work was to obtain structural information on ferrite nanoparticles (NiFe 2 O 4 and NiZnFe 2 O 4 ) and granular solids obtained by dispersion of these particles in non magnetic matrices, like SiO 2 and SnO 2 . The ferrite samples were prepared by co-precipitation and heat treated between 300 and 600 deg. C at the Applied Physics Laboratory of tile CDTN. The granular solids, with 30% in volume concentration of ferrite, were obtained by mechanical alloying with milling times (t m ) varying between 1.25 and 10 h, at the CBPF

  5. Conversion of MX Nitrides to Modified Z-Phase in 9-12%Cr Ferritic Steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cipolla, Leonardo

    for Z-phase formation was highlighted during the studies. Several 9-12%Cr commercial steels with prolonged high-temperature exposures have been investigated, too. The same mechanism of Z-phase formation observed in 12%Cr model alloys was identified in industrial 9-12%Cr steels after thousands of hours......The 9-12%Cr ferritic steels are extensively used in modern steam power plants at service temperature up to 620°C. Currently the best perform ing ferritic creep resistance steel is the ASTM Grade 92, whose high temperature strength has recently been assessed by European Creep Collaborative Committee...... in 2005 as 600°C/113MPa/10 5h. All previous attempts made in the last twenty years to develop ferritic steels for 650°C applications have failed due to the incapacity to combine the superior oxidation resistance, given by 12%Cr content, with excellent creep resistance of high-alloyed ferritic steels...

  6. Ferrite measurements for SNS accelerating cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bendall, R.G.; Church, R.A.

    1979-03-01

    The RF system for the SNS has six double accelerating cavities each containing seventy ferrite toroids. Difficulties experienced in obtaining toroids to the required specifications are discussed and the two toroid test cavity built to test those supplied is described. Ferrite measurements are reported which were undertaken to measure; (a) μQf as a function of frequency and RF field level and (b) bias current as a function of frequency for different ranges of ferrite permeability μ. (U.K.)

  7. Solubility limit and precipitation kinetics of iron-phosphide in ferritic iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Shigeru

    1992-01-01

    The solubility limit of iron-phosphide in ferritic iron was examined with electrical resistivity measurements by using the relationship between resistivity and the amount of dissolved phosphorous. The temperature dependence of the solubility obtained was in good agreement with previous results. The kinetics of precipitation of the phosphide from a supersaturated Fe-3.75 at.% P alloy was also investigated with changes of the resistivity by isochronal and isothermal annealing. The activation energy for the precipitation process of the phosphide was about 2.6 eV. Diffusivities of phosphorus were estimated from the annealing behaviour and the morphology of the precipitates, which were comparable to those obtained with the tracer method previously. This suggests that the precipitation process of phosphide is rate controlled by diffusion of phosphorus in ferritic iron-phosphorus alloys. (orig.) [de

  8. Hydrogen-assisted fatigue crack growth in ferritic steels – a fractographic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Di

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue crack growth (FCG behavior of a Fe-3wt.%Si ferritic alloy under different environmental conditions using in-situ electrochemical (cathodic hydrogen (H charging has been investigated. Three frequencies have been applied. Results clearly show that the FCG rate increased by a factor spanning from 20 to 1000 times, depending on the loading frequencies, when compared to the reference test in air. Lower frequency leads to higher FCG rate. A comprehensive fractographic analysis was carried out: the area fraction of different fracture surface features was measured and taken into statistical analysis. Based on these investigations, the possible mechanisms of H-enhanced FCG are discussed. Similar tests in high-pressure H gas from other studies were also compared and discussed. These results give a preliminary understanding of H effect in fatigue crack propagation procedure in ferritic alloys.

  9. Epitaxial Garnets and Hexagonal Ferrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-20

    guide growth of the epitaxial YIG films. Aluminum or gallium substitu- tions for iron were used in combination with lanthanum substitutions for yttrium... gallate spinel sub- strates. There was no difficulty with nucleation in the melt and film quality appeared to be similar to that observed previously...hexagonal ferrites. We succeeded in growing the M-type lead hexaferrite (magnetoplumbite) on gallate spinel substrates. We found that the PbO-based

  10. Ferrite-guided cyclotron-resonance maser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerby, Eli; Kesar, A.; Aharony, A.; Breitmeier, G.

    2002-01-01

    The concept of a cyclotron-resonance maser (CRM) with a ferrite loading incorporated in its waveguide is proposed. The CRM interaction occurs between the rotating electron beam and the em wave propagating along a longitudinally magnetized ferrite medium. The ferrite anisotropic permeability resembles the CRM susceptibility in many aspects, and particularly in their similar response to the axial magnetic field (the ferrite susceptibility can be regarded as a passive analog of the active CRM interaction). The ferrite loading slows down the phase velocity of the em wave and thus the axial (Weibel) mechanism of the CRM interaction dominates. The ferrite loading enables also a mechanism of spectral tunability for CRM's. The ferrite loading is proposed, therefore, as a useful ingredient for high-power CRM devices. A linear model of the combined ferrite-guided CRM interaction reveals its useful features. Future schemes may also incorporate ferrite sections functioning as isolators, gyrators, or phase shifters within the CRM device itself for selective suppression of backward waves and spurious oscillations, and for gain and efficiency enhancement

  11. Contribution to the metallurgy of welding processes in stainless ferritic-austenitic (duplex) steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perteneder, E.; Toesch, J.; Rabensteiner, G.

    1989-01-01

    Duplex steels have a ferritic austenitic structure. Therefore, to obtain a successful welding, special metallurgical regulations must be observed. The effect of energy per unit length and plate thickness onto the heat influence zone in case of manual arc welding is examined. Practice-oriented instructions for the welding technique to be applied are deduced from the results. Finally, the effect of the alloy composition onto the welding capacity of duplex steels is examined. (orig.) [de

  12. Some considerations on the toughness properties of ferritic stainless steels - A brief review

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Zwieten, ACTM

    1993-02-01

    Full Text Available . H. Bulloch* Head Office, Electricity Supply Board, Lower Fitzwilliam Street, Dublin 2, Republic of Ireland (Received 14 February 1992; accepted 25 February 1992) A BS TRA C T The present paper has attempted... of molybdenum, niobium or titanium. Recently, very low (C + N) content have been specified; the super-ferritic steels. The higher alloy compositions can also include up to 4% Ni, provided this does not alter their fully...

  13. Corrosion of Ferritic-Martensitic steels in high temperature water: A literature Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, P.; Lapena, J.; Blazquez, F.

    2001-01-01

    Available literature concerning corrosion of high-chromium ferritic/martensitic steel in high temperature water as reviewed. The subjects considered are general corrosion, effect of irradiation on corrosion, environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) including stress corrosion cracking (SCC), corrosion fatigue and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). In addition some investigations about radiation induced segregation (RIS). Are shown in order to know the compositional changes at grain boundaries of these alloys and their influence on corrosion properties. (Author)

  14. Dilution and Ferrite Number Prediction in Pulsed Current Cladding of Super-Duplex Stainless Steel Using RSM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eghlimi, Abbas; Shamanian, Morteza; Raeissi, Keyvan

    2013-12-01

    Super-duplex stainless steels have an excellent combination of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance at relatively low temperatures and can be used as a coating to improve the corrosion and wear resistance of low carbon and low alloy steels. Such coatings can be produced using weld cladding. In this study, pulsed current gas tungsten arc cladding process was utilized to deposit super-duplex stainless steel on high strength low alloy steel substrates. In such claddings, it is essential to understand how the dilution affects the composition and ferrite number of super-duplex stainless steel layer in order to be able to estimate its corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. In the current study, the effect of pulsed current gas tungsten arc cladding process parameters on the dilution and ferrite number of super-duplex stainless steel clad layer was investigated by applying response surface methodology. The validity of the proposed models was investigated by using quadratic regression models and analysis of variance. The results showed an inverse relationship between dilution and ferrite number. They also showed that increasing the heat input decreases the ferrite number. The proposed mathematical models are useful for predicting and controlling the ferrite number within an acceptable range for super-duplex stainless steel cladding.

  15. Ultrahigh Charpy impact toughness (~450J) achieved in high strength ferrite/martensite laminated steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wenquan; Zhang, Mingda; Huang, Chongxiang; Xiao, Shuyang; Dong, Han; Weng, Yuqing

    2017-02-01

    Strength and toughness are a couple of paradox as similar as strength-ductility trade-off in homogenous materials, body-centered-cubic steels in particular. Here we report a simple way to get ultrahigh toughness without sacrificing strength. By simple alloying design and hot rolling the 5Mn3Al steels in ferrite/austenite dual phase temperature region, we obtain a series of ferrite/martensite laminated steels that show up-to 400-450J Charpy V-notch impact energy combined with a tensile strength as high as 1.0-1.2 GPa at room temperature, which is nearly 3-5 times higher than that of conventional low alloy steels at similar strength level. This remarkably enhanced toughness is mainly attributed to the delamination between ferrite and martensite lamellae. The current finding gives us a promising way to produce high strength steel with ultrahigh impact toughness by simple alloying design and hot rolling in industry.

  16. Tensile properties and deformation mechanisms of a 14Cr ODS ferritic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steckmeyer, A., E-mail: antonin.steckmeyer@cea.f [Service de Recherches Metallurgiques Appliquees, CEA Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Praud, M.; Fournier, B.; Malaplate, J.; Garnier, J.; Bechade, J.L.; Tournie, I.; Tancray, A.; Bougault, A. [Service de Recherches Metallurgiques Appliquees, CEA Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bonnaillie, P. [Service de Recherche en Metallurgie Physique, CEA Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2010-10-15

    The search for a new cladding material is part of the research studies carried out at CEA to develop a sodium-cooled fast reactor meeting the expectations of the Generation IV International Forum. In this study, the tensile properties of a ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened steel produced by hot extrusion at CEA have been evaluated. They prove the studied alloy to be as resistant as and more ductile than the other nano-reinforced alloys of literature. The effects of the strain rate and temperature on the total plastic strain of the material remind of diffusion phenomena. Intergranular damage and intergranular decohesion are clearly highlighted.

  17. Effect of acicular ferrite formation on grain refinement in the coarse-grained region of heat-affected zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, X.L.; Wei, R.; Wu, K.M.

    2010-01-01

    The microstructure of acicular ferrite and its formation for the grain refinement of coarse-grained region of heat-affected zone of high strength low-alloy bainite steels were studied using three-dimensional reconstruction technique. Crystallographic grain size was analyzed by means of electron backscatter diffraction. It was revealed that the microstructure in the coarse-grained region of the heat-affected zone consisted of predominantly bainite packets and a small proportion of acicular ferrite. Acicular ferrite was of lath or plate-like rather than needle or rod-like morphology. Tempering of the coarse-grained region of heat-affected zone showed that the acicular ferrite was more stable than the bainite, indicating that the acicular ferrite was formed prior to bainite. The acicular ferrite laths or plates divided the prior austenite grains into smaller and separate regions, and confining the bainite transformed at lower temperatures in the smaller regions and hence leading to the grain refinement in the coarse-grained region of the heat-affected zone.

  18. Effect of acicular ferrite formation on grain refinement in the coarse-grained region of heat-affected zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, X.L.; Wei, R. [Institute of Advanced Steels and Welding Technology, Hubei Provincial Key Laboratory for Systems Science on Metallurgical Processing, Key Laboratory for Ferrous Metallurgy and Resources Utilization of Ministry of Education, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Wu, K.M., E-mail: wukaiming@wust.edu.cn [Institute of Advanced Steels and Welding Technology, Hubei Provincial Key Laboratory for Systems Science on Metallurgical Processing, Key Laboratory for Ferrous Metallurgy and Resources Utilization of Ministry of Education, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China)

    2010-07-15

    The microstructure of acicular ferrite and its formation for the grain refinement of coarse-grained region of heat-affected zone of high strength low-alloy bainite steels were studied using three-dimensional reconstruction technique. Crystallographic grain size was analyzed by means of electron backscatter diffraction. It was revealed that the microstructure in the coarse-grained region of the heat-affected zone consisted of predominantly bainite packets and a small proportion of acicular ferrite. Acicular ferrite was of lath or plate-like rather than needle or rod-like morphology. Tempering of the coarse-grained region of heat-affected zone showed that the acicular ferrite was more stable than the bainite, indicating that the acicular ferrite was formed prior to bainite. The acicular ferrite laths or plates divided the prior austenite grains into smaller and separate regions, and confining the bainite transformed at lower temperatures in the smaller regions and hence leading to the grain refinement in the coarse-grained region of the heat-affected zone.

  19. Vanadium-base alloys for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.; Loomis, B.A.; Diercks, D.R.

    1984-10-01

    Vanadium-base alloys offer potentially significant advantages over other candidate alloys as a structural material for fusion reactor first wall/blanket applications. Although the data base is more limited than that for the other leading candidate structural materials, viz., austenitic and ferritic steels, vanadium-base alloys exhibit several properties that make them particularly attractive for the fusion reactor environment. This paper presents a review of the structural material requirements, a summary of the materials data base for selected vanadium-base alloys, and a comparison of projected performance characteristics compared to other candidate alloys. Also, critical research and development (R and D) needs are defined

  20. Vanadium-base alloys for fusion reactor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.L.; Loomis, B.A.; Diercks, D.R.

    1984-10-01

    Vanadium-base alloys offer potentially significant advantages over other candidate alloys as a structural material for fusion reactor first wall/blanket applications. Although the data base is more limited than that for the other leading candidate structural materials, viz., austenitic and ferritic steels, vanadium-base alloys exhibit several properties that make them particularly attractive for the fusion reactor environment. This paper presents a review of the structural material requirements, a summary of the materials data base for selected vanadium-base alloys, and a comparison of projected performance characteristics compared to other candidate alloys. Also, critical research and development (R and D) needs are defined.

  1. Development of ODS ferritic-martensitic steels for application to high temperature and irradiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambard, V.

    2000-01-01

    Iron oxide dispersion strengthened alloys are candidate for nuclear fuel cladding. Therefore, it is crucial to control their microstructure in order to optimise their mechanical properties at temperatures up to 700 deg C. The industrial candidates, ODS ferritic alloys, present an anisotropic microstructure which induces a weakening of mechanical properties in transversal direction as well as the precipitation of brittle phases under thermal aging and irradiation. For this purpose, we tried to develop a material with isotropic properties. We studied several 9Cr-1Mo ferritic/martensitic alloys, strengthened or not by oxide dispersion. The mechanical alloying was performed by attribution and powders were consolidated by hot extrusion. In this work, different metallurgical characterisation techniques and modelling were used to optimise a new martensitic ODS alloy. Microstructural and chemical characterization of matrix has been done. The effect of austenitizing and isochronal tempering treatments on microstructure and hardness has been studied. Oxide distribution, size and chemical composition have been studied before and after high temperature thermal treatment. The study of phase transformation upon heating has permitted the extrapolation to the equilibrium temperature formation of austenite. Phase transformation diagrams upon cooling have been determined and the transformation kinetics have been linked to austenite grain size by a simple relation. Fine grain size is unfavourable for the targeted application, so a particular thermal treatment inducing a coarser grain structure has been developed. Finally, tensile properties have been determined for the different microstructures. (author)

  2. Swelling in several commercial alloys irradiated to very high neutron fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.; Pintler, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    Swelling values have been obtained from a set of commercial alloys irradiated in EBR-II to a peak fluence of 2.5 x 10 23 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) or approx. 125 dpa covering the range 400 to 650 0 C. The alloys can be ranked for swelling resistance from highest to lowest as follows: the martensitic and ferritic alloys, the niobium based alloys, the precipitation strengthened iron and nickel based alloys, the molybdenum alloys and the austenitic alloys

  3. Pit initiation resistance of ferritic stainless steels in chloride environments from 800 to 2600C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cieslak, W.R.; Duquette, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    The pitting resistance of high-purity ferritic stainless steels has been studied by potentiodynamic anodic polarization, mechanical film-rupture (scratch) testing, and microstructural examination. The purpose has been to determine the ability of the Fe-Cr-Mo alloys to resist pit initiation at temperatures up to 260 0 C in chloride environments. At temperatures exceeding about 200 0 C, Cr is shown to become much more effective than Mo to enhance alloy pitting resistance. In fact, at 260 0 C, 2% Mo does not noticeably affect the pitting resistance of 18% Cr or 28% Cr steels. Also, 5% Mo is more effective for the lower Cr than for the higher Cr alloy, unlike lower temperatures, at which the effect of the two elements is greater than additive. Preferential localized attack at microstructural features, e.g. inclusions, is not observed under any of the experimental conditions, rather the pit-initiation resistance is controlled solely by alloy composition

  4. Application of thermoelectricity to NDE of thermally aged cast duplex stainless steels and neutron irradiated ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coste, J.F.; Leborgne, J.M.; Massoud, J.P.; Grisot, O.; Miloudi, S.

    1997-10-01

    The thermoelectric power (TEP) of an alloy depends mainly on its temperature, its chemical composition and its atomic arrangement. The TEP measurement technique is used in order to study and follow two degradation phenomena affecting some components of the primary loop of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). The first degradation phenomenon is the thermal aging of cast duplex stainless steel components. The de-mixing of the ferritic Fe-Cr-Ni slid solution is responsible for the decreasing of the mechanical characteristics. Laboratory studies have shown the sensitivity of TEP to the de-mixing phenomenon. TEP increases linearly with the ferrite content and with and Arrhenius-type aging parameter depending on time, temperature and activation energy. TEP is also correlated to mechanic characteristics. The second degradation phenomenon is the aging of ferritic steels due to neutron irradiation at about 290 deg C. In this case, the degradation mechanism is the formation of clusters of solute atoms and/or copper rich precipitates that causes the hardening of the material. As a first approach, a study of binary Fe-Cu alloys irradiated by electrons at 288 deg C has revealed the possibility of following the copper depletion of the ferritic matrix. Moreover, the recovery of the mechanical properties of the alloy by annealing can be monitored. Finally, a correlation between Vickers hardness and TEP has been established. (author)

  5. Swelling of Fe-Mn and Fe-Cr-Mn alloys at high neutron fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Brager, H.R.

    1986-06-01

    Swelling data on neutron-irradiated simple Fe-Cr-Mn and Fe-Mn alloys, as well as commercial Fe-Cr-Mn base alloys are now becoming available at exposure levels approaching 50 dpa. The swelling rate decreases from the ∼1%/dpa found at lower exposures, probably due to the extensive formation of ferritic phases. As expected, commercial alloys swell less than the simple alloys

  6. Microwave Measurements of Ferrite Polymer Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastislav Dosoudil

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the microwave measurements performed on the nickel-zinc sintered ferrite with the chemical formula Ni0.3Zn0.7Fe2O4 produced by the ceramic technique and composite materials based on this ferrite and a non-magnetic polymer (polyvinyl chloride matrix. The prepared composite samples had the same particle size distribution 0-250um but different ferrite particle concentrations between 23 vol% and 80 vol%. The apparatus for measurement of the signal proportional to the absolute value of scattering parameter S11 (reflexion coefficient is described and the dependence of measured reflected signal on a bias magnetic field has been studied. By means of experiments, the resonances to be connected with the geometry of microwave experimental set-up were distinguished from ferromagnetic resonance arising in ferrite particles of composite structure. The role of local interaction fields of ferrite particles in composite material has been discussed.

  7. Material science and manufacturing of heat-resistant reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic steels for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioltukhovskiy, A.G.; Blokhin, A.I.; Budylkin, N.I.; Chernov, V.M.; Leont'eva-Smirnova, M.V.; Mironova, E.G.; Medvedeva, E.A.; Solonin, M.I.; Porollo, S.I.; Zavyalsky, L.P.

    2000-01-01

    A number of issues regarding the development and use of 10-12% Cr reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic steels (RAFMS) for fusion are considered. These include: (1) problems of manufacturing and modifying their composition and metallurgical condition; (2) the influence on properties of their composition, purity, δ-ferrite concentration and cooling rates in the final stages of manufacturing; and (3) the effects of neutron irradiation at 320-650 deg. C up to 108 dpa on their mechanical properties. In addition, neutron activation and nuclear accumulation of elements in RAFMS with different initial concentrations of alloying and impurity elements for typical fusion reactor (DEMO) irradiation regimes have been calculated

  8. Structure and radiation induced swelling of steels and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parshin, A.M.

    1983-01-01

    Regularities of vacancy void formation and radiation induced swelling of austenitic chromium-nickel steels and alloyse ferritic steels as well as titanium α-alloys under radiation by light and heavy ions and neutrons are considered. Possible methods for preparation of alloys with increased resistance to radiation swelling are described. Accounting for investigations into ferritic steels and α-alloys of titanium the basic way of weakening vacancy smelling is development of continuous homogeneous decomposition of solid solution using alloying with vividly expressed incubation period at a certain volumetric dilatation as well as decompositions of the type of ordering, K-state, lamination of solid solutions, etc. Additional alloying of solid solutions is also shown to be necessary for increasing recrystallization temperature of cold-deformed steel

  9. Development of ferritic steels for fusion reactor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L.; Maziasz, P.J.; Corwin, W.R.

    1988-08-01

    Chromium-molybdenum ferritic (martensitic) steels are leading candidates for the structural components for future fusion reactors. However, irradiation of such steels in a fusion environment will produce long-lived radioactive isotopes that will lead to difficult waste-disposal problems. Such problems could be reduced by replacing the elements in the steels (i.e., Mo, Nb, Ni, N, and Cu) that lead to long-lived radioactive isotopes. We have proposed the development of ferritic steels analogous to conventional Cr-Mo steels, which contain molybdenum and niobium. It is proposed that molybdenum be replaced by tungsten and niobium be replaced by tantalum. Eight experimental steels were produced. Chromium concentrations of 2.25, 5, 9, and 12% were used (all concentrations are in wt %). Steels with these chromium compositions, each containing 2% W and 0.25% V, were produced. To determine the effect of tungsten and vanadium, 2.25 Cr steels were produced with 2% W and no vanadium and with 0.25% V and O and 1% W. A 9Cr steel containing 2% W, 0.25 V, and 0.07% Ta was also studied. For all alloys, carbon was maintained at 0.1%. Tempering studies on the normalized steels indicated that the tempering behavior of the new Cr-W steels was similar to that of the analogous Cr-Mo steels. Microscopy studies indicated that 2% tungsten was required in the 2.25 Cr steels to produce 100% bainite in 15.9-mm-thick plate during normalization. The 5Cr and 9Cr steels were 100% martensite, but the 12 Cr steel contained about 75% martensite with the balance delta-ferrite. 33 refs., 35 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Development of ferritic steels for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Maziasz, P.J.; Corwin, W.R.

    1988-08-01

    Chromium-molybdenum ferritic (martensitic) steels are leading candidates for the structural components for future fusion reactors. However, irradiation of such steels in a fusion environment will produce long-lived radioactive isotopes that will lead to difficult waste-disposal problems. Such problems could be reduced by replacing the elements in the steels (i.e., Mo, Nb, Ni, N, and Cu) that lead to long-lived radioactive isotopes. We have proposed the development of ferritic steels analogous to conventional Cr-Mo steels, which contain molybdenum and niobium. It is proposed that molybdenum be replaced by tungsten and niobium be replaced by tantalum. Eight experimental steels were produced. Chromium concentrations of 2.25, 5, 9, and 12% were used (all concentrations are in wt %). Steels with these chromium compositions, each containing 2% W and 0.25% V, were produced. To determine the effect of tungsten and vanadium, 2.25 Cr steels were produced with 2% W and no vanadium and with 0.25% V and O and 1% W. A 9Cr steel containing 2% W, 0.25 V, and 0.07% Ta was also studied. For all alloys, carbon was maintained at 0.1%. Tempering studies on the normalized steels indicated that the tempering behavior of the new Cr-W steels was similar to that of the analogous Cr-Mo steels. Microscopy studies indicated that 2% tungsten was required in the 2.25 Cr steels to produce 100% bainite in 15.9-mm-thick plate during normalization. The 5Cr and 9Cr steels were 100% martensite, but the 12 Cr steel contained about 75% martensite with the balance delta-ferrite. 33 refs., 35 figs., 5 tabs

  11. Kinetics of niobium carbide precipitation in ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gendt, D.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a NbC precipitation modelling in ferrite. This theoretical study is motivated by the fact it considers a ternary system and focus on the concurrence of two different diffusion mechanisms. An experimental study with TEP, SANS and Vickers micro-hardening measurements allows a description of the NbC precipitation kinetics. The mean radius of the precipitates is characterized by TEM observations. To focus on the nucleation stage, we use the Tomographic Atom Probe that analyses, at an atomistic scale, the position of the solute atoms in the matrix. A first model based on the classical nucleation theory and the diffusion-limited growth describes the precipitation of spherical precipitates. To solve the set of equations, we use a numerical algorithm that furnishes an evaluation of the precipitated fraction, the mean radius and the whole size distribution of the particles. The parameters that are the interface energy, the solubility product and the diffusion coefficients are fitted with the data available in the literature and our experimental results. It allows a satisfactory agreement as regards to the simplicity of the model. Monte Carlo simulations are used to describe the evolution of a ternary alloy Fe-Nb-C on a cubic centred rigid lattice with vacancy and interstitial mechanisms. This is realized with an atomistic description of the atoms jumps and their related frequencies. The model parameters are fitted with phase diagrams and diffusion coefficients. For the sake of simplicity, we consider that the precipitation of NbC is totally coherent and we neglect any elastic strain effect. We can observe different kinetic paths: for low supersaturations, we find an expected precipitation of NbC but for higher supersaturations, the very fast diffusivity of carbon atoms conducts to the nucleation of iron carbide particles. We establish that the occurrence of this second phenomenon depends on the vacancy arrival kinetics and can be related

  12. Thin slab processing of acicular ferrite steels with high toughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reip, Carl-Peter; Hennig, Wolfgang; Hagmann, Rolf [SMS Demag Aktiengesellschaft, Duesseldorf (Germany); Sabrudin, Bin Mohamad Suren; Susanta, Ghosh; Lee, Weng Lan [Megasteel Sdn Bhd, Banting (Malaysia)

    2005-07-01

    Near-net-shape casting processes today represent an important option in steelmaking. High productivity and low production cost as well as the variety of steel grades that can be produced plus an excellent product quality are key factors for the acceptance of such processes in markets all over the world. Today's research focuses on the production of pipe steel with special requirements in terms of toughness at low temperatures. The subject article describes the production of hot strip made from acicular ferritic / bainitic steel grades using the CSP thin-slab technology. In addition, the resulting strength and toughness levels as a function of the alloying concepts are discussed. Optimal control of the CSP process allows the production of higher-strength hot-rolled steel grades with a fine-grain acicular-ferritic/bainitic microstructure. Hot strip produced in this way is characterized by a high toughness at low temperatures. In a drop weight tear test, transition temperatures of up to -50 deg C can be achieved with a shear-fracture share of 85%. (author)

  13. Microstructure and mechanical properties of unirradiated low activation ferritic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, C.Y.; Lechtenberg, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    Transmission electron micrographs of normalized and tempered 9Cr-2.5W-0.3V-0.15C low activation ferritic steel showed tempered lath-type martensite with precipitation of rod and plate-like carbides at lath and grain boundaries. X-ray diffraction analysis of the extracted replicas revealed nearly 100% M 23 C 6 carbides (a=1.064 nm), with no indication of Fe 2 W-type Laves phase even after thermal aging at 600 0 C/1000 h. Thermal aging increased the number density of rod-like M 23 C 6 along prior austenite grain boundaries and martensite lath boundaries. The elevated-temperature tensile strengths of this steel are about 10% higher than the average strengths of commercial heats of 9Cr-1Mo and modified 9Cr-1Mo steels up to 650 0 C, with equivalent uniform elongation and ∝50% decrease in total elongation. The DBTT was determined to be -25 0 C which is similar to other 9Cr-1Mo steels. Fractographic examination of tensile tested specimens shows a mixed mode of equiaxed and elongated dimples at test temperatures above 400 0 C. Modification of the Ga3X alloy composition for opimization of materials properties is discussed. However, the proposed low activation ferritic steel shows the promise of improved mechanical properties over 9Cr-1Mo steels. (orig.)

  14. Investigation of hydrogen assisted cracking in acicular ferrite using site-specific micro-fracture tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costin, Walter L. [School of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Lavigne, Olivier, E-mail: Olivier.lavigne@adelaide.edu.au [School of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Kotousov, Andrei; Ghomashchi, Reza [School of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Linton, Valerie [Energy Pipelines Cooperative Research Centre, Faculty of Engineering, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2016-01-10

    Hydrogen assisted cracking (HAC) is a common type of failure mechanism that can affect a wide range of metals and alloys. Experimental studies of HAC are cumbersome due to various intrinsic and extrinsic parameters and factors (associated with stress, hydrogen and the materials microstructure) contributing to the hydrogen crack kinetics. The microstructure of many materials consists of diverse constituents with characteristic features and mechanical properties which only occur in very small material volumes. The only way to differentiate the effect of these individual constituents on the hydrogen crack kinetics is to miniaturise the testing procedures. In this paper we present a new experimental approach to investigate hydrogen assisted crack growth in a microstructural constituent, i.e. acicular ferrite. For this purpose, sharply notched micro-cantilevers were fabricated with a Focus Ion Beam within this selected microscopic region. Acicular ferrite can be found in many ferrous alloys including ferritic weld metal and has specific features that control its intrinsic susceptibility to HAC. These features were characterised via Electron Backscatter Diffraction and the specimens were subsequently loaded under uncharged and hydrogen charged conditions with a nano-indenter. The outcomes of the testing, demonstrated that the threshold stress intensity factor, K{sub th}, to initiate crack propagation in acicular ferrite ranges between 1.56 MPa m{sup 1/2} and 4.36 MPa m{sup 1/2}. This range is significantly below the values of K{sub th} reported for various ferrous alloys in standard macro-tests. This finding indicates that the mechanisms and resistance to HAC at micro-scale could be very different than at the macro-scale as not all fracture toughening mechanisms may be activated at this scale level.

  15. SPEED DEPENDENCE OF ACOUSTIC VIBRATION PROPAGATION FROM THE FERRITIC GRAIN SIZE IN LOW-CARBON STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Vakulenko

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. It is determining the nature of the ferrite grain size influence of low-carbon alloy steel on the speed propagation of acoustic vibrations. Methodology. The material for the research served a steel sheet of thickness 1.4 mm. Steel type H18T1 had a content of chemical elements within grade composition: 0, 12 % C, 17, 5 % Cr, 1 % Mn, 1, 1 % Ni, 0, 85 % Si, 0, 9 % Ti. The specified steel belongs to the semiferritic class of the accepted classification. The structural state of the metal for the study was obtained by cold plastic deformation by rolling at a reduction in the size range of 20-30 % and subsequent recrystallization annealing at 740 – 750 ° C. Different degrees of cold plastic deformation was obtained by pre-selection of the initial strip thickness so that after a desired amount of rolling reduction receives the same final thickness. The microstructure was observed under a light microscope, the ferrite grain size was determined using a quantitative metallographic technique. The using of X-ray structural analysis techniques allowed determining the level of second-order distortion of the crystal latitude of the ferrite. The speed propagation of acoustic vibrations was measured using a special device such as an ISP-12 with a working frequency of pulses 1.024 kHz. As the characteristic of strength used the hardness was evaluated by the Brinell’s method. Findings. With increasing of ferrite grain size the hardness of the steel is reduced. In the case of constant structural state of metal, reducing the size of the ferrite grains is accompanied by a natural increasing of the phase distortion. The dependence of the speed propagation of acoustic vibrations up and down the rolling direction of the ferrite grain size remained unchanged and reports directly proportional correlation. Originality. On the basis of studies to determine the direct impact of the proportional nature of the ferrite grain size on the rate of propagation of sound

  16. Growth modes of individual ferrite grains in the austenite to ferrite transformation of low carbon steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, D.Z.; Xiao, N.M.; Lan, Y.J.; Zheng, C.W.; Li, Y.Y.

    2007-01-01

    The mesoscale deterministic cellular automaton (CA) method and probabilistic Q-state Potts-based Monte Carlo (MC) model have been adopted to investigate independently the individual growth behavior of ferrite grain during the austenite (γ)-ferrite (α) transformation. In these models, the γ-α phase transformation and ferrite grain coarsening induced by α/α grain boundary migration could be simulated simultaneously. The simulations demonstrated that both the hard impingement (ferrite grain coarsening) and the soft impingement (overlapping carbon concentration field) have a great influence on the individual ferrite growth behavior. Generally, ferrite grains displayed six modes of growth behavior: parabolic growth, delayed nucleation and growth, temporary shrinkage, partial shrinkage, complete shrinkage and accelerated growth in the transformation. Some modes have been observed before by the synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiment. The mesoscopic simulation provides an alternative tool for investigating both the individual grain growth behavior and the overall transformation behavior simultaneously during transformation

  17. Tem study of thermal ageing of ferrite in cast duplex stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nenonen, P.; Massoud, J.P.; Timofeev, B.T.

    2002-01-01

    The changes in the microstructure and composition of ferrite in two types of cast duplex stainless steels and in an austenitic-ferritic weld metal after long term thermal ageing has been studied using analytical transmission electron microscope (FEGTEM). A cast test steel containing Mo was investigated first as a reference material in three different conditions: as solution annealed, aged at 300 C and aged at 400 C. This investigation was carried out to gain experience of how EDS (X-ray analyser) analyser and TEM (transmission electron microscope) can be used to study elemental inhomogeneity, which is usually investigated with an atom probe (APFIM). The two other materials, an austenitic-ferritic weld metal and a cast duplex Ti-stabilised stainless steel used for long time at NPP operation temperature were investigated using the experience obtained with the test steel. The results showed that analytical TEM can be used to investigate elemental inhomogeneity of ferrite, but there are several important things to be taken into account when the spectra for this purpose are collected. These things are, such as the thickness of the specimen, probe size, contamination rate, 'elemental background' of the spectrum and possible enrichment of certain alloying elements in the surface oxide layer of the TEM-specimens. If minor elements are also analysed, it may increase the scattering of the results. (authors)

  18. Corrosion of austenitic and ferritic-martensitic steels exposed to supercritical carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, L.; Anderson, M.; Taylor, D.; Allen, T.R.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Oxidation is the primary corrosion phenomenon for the steels exposed to S-CO 2 . → The austenitic steels showed significantly better corrosion resistance than the ferritic-martensitic steels. → Alloying elements (e.g., Mo and Al) showed distinct effects on oxidation behavior. - Abstract: Supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO 2 ) is a potential coolant for advanced nuclear reactors. The corrosion behavior of austenitic steels (alloys 800H and AL-6XN) and ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels (F91 and HCM12A) exposed to S-CO 2 at 650 deg. C and 20.7 MPa is presented in this work. Oxidation was identified as the primary corrosion phenomenon. Alloy 800H had oxidation resistance superior to AL-6XN. The FM steels were less corrosion resistant than the austenitic steels, which developed thick oxide scales that tended to exfoliate. Detailed microstructure characterization suggests the effect of alloying elements such as Al, Mo, Cr, and Ni on the oxidation of the steels.

  19. Microstructure feature of friction stir butt-welded ferritic ductile iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Hung-Tu; Wang, Chaur-Jeng; Cheng, Chin-Pao

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Defect-free ferritic ductile iron joints is fabricated by FSW. • The welding nugget is composed of graphite, martensite, and recrystallized ferrite. • The graphite displays a striped pattern in the surface and advancing side. • The ferritic matrix transforms into martensite structure during welding. • High degree of plastic deformation is found on the advancing side. - Abstract: This study conducted friction stir welding (FSW) by using the butt welding process to join ferritic ductile iron plates and investigated the variations of microsturcture in the joined region formed after welding. No defects appeared in the resulting experimental weld, which was formed using a 3-mm thick ductile iron plate and tungsten carbide alloy stir rod to conduct FSW at a rotational speed of 982 rpm and traveling speed of 72 mm/min. The welding region was composed of deformed graphite, martensite phase, and dynamically recrystallized ferrite structures. In the surface region and on the advancing side (AS), the graphite displayed a striped configuration and the ferritic matrix transformed into martensite. On the retreating side (RS), the graphite surrounded by martensite remained as individual granules and the matrix primarily comprised dynamically recrystallized ferrite. After welding, diffusion increased the carbon content of the austenite around the deformed graphite nodules, which transformed into martensite during the subsequent cooling process. A micro Vickers hardness test showed that the maximum hardness value of the martensite structures in the weld was approximately 800 HV. An analysis using an electron probe X-ray microanalyzer (EPMA) indicated that its carbon content was approximately 0.7–1.4%. The peak temperature on the RS, 8 mm from the center of the weld, measured 630 °C by the thermocouple. Overall, increased severity of plastic deformation and process temperature near the upper stir zone (SZ) resulted in distinct phase transformation

  20. Irradiation performance of 9--12 Cr ferritic/martensitic stainless steels and their potential for in-core application in LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1993-08-01

    Ferritic-martensitic stainless steels exhibit radiation stability and stress corrosion resistance that make them attractive replacement materials for austenitic stainless steels for in-core applications. Recent radiation studies have demonstrated that 9% Cr ferritic/martensitic stainless steel had less than a 30C shift in ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) following irradiation at 365C to a dose of 14 dpa. These steels also exhibit very low swelling rates, a result of the microstructural stability of these alloys during radiation. The 9 to 12% Cr alloys to also exhibit excellent corrosion and stress corrosion resistance in out-of-core applications. Demonstration of the applicability of ferritic/martensitic stainless steels for in-core LWR application will require verification of the irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking behavior, measurement of DBTT following irradiation at 288C, and corrosion rates measurements for in-core water chemistry

  1. Technical Letter Report on the Cracking of Irradiated Cast Stainless Steels with Low Ferrite Content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Alexandreanu, B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Natesan, K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Crack growth rate and fracture toughness J-R curve tests were performed on CF-3 and CF-8 cast austenite stainless steels (CASS) with 13-14% of ferrite. The tests were conducted at ~320°C in either high-purity water with low dissolved oxygen or in simulated PWR water. The cyclic crack growth rates of CF-8 were higher than that of CF-3, and the differences between the aged and unaged specimens were small. No elevated SCC susceptibility was observed among these samples, and the SCC CGRs of these materials were comparable to those of CASS alloys with >23% ferrite. The fracture toughness values of unirradiated CF-3 were similar between unaged and aged specimens, and neutron irradiation decreased the fracture toughness significantly. The fracture toughness of CF-8 was reduced after thermal aging, and declined further after irradiation. It appears that while lowering ferrite content may help reduce the tendency of thermal aging embrittlement, it is not very effective to mitigate irradiation-induced embrittlement. Under a combined condition of thermal aging and irradiation, neutron irradiation plays a dominant role in causing embrittlement in CASS alloys.

  2. Creep strength and rupture ductility of creep strength enhanced ferritic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushima, Hideaki; Sawada, Kota; Kimura, Kazuhiro [National Inst. for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2010-07-01

    Creep strength and rupture ductility of Creep Strength Enhanced Ferritic (CSEF) steels were investigated from a viewpoint of stress dependence in comparison with conventional low alloy ferritic creep resistant steels. Inflection of stress vs. time to rupture curve was observed at 50% of 0.2% offset yield stress for both CSEF and conventional ferritic steels. Creep rupture ductility tends to decrease with increase in creep exposure time, however, those of conventional low alloy steels indicate increase in the long-term. Creep rupture ductility of the ASME Grades 92 and 122 steels indicates drastic decrease with decrease in stress at 50% of 0.2% offset yield stress. Stress dependence of creep rupture ductility of the ASME Grades 92 and 122 steels is well described by stress ratio to 0.2% offset yield stress, regardless of temperature. Drop of creep rupture ductility is caused by inhomogeneous recovery at the vicinity of prior austenite grain boundary, and remarkable drop of creep rupture ductility of CSEF steels should be derived from those stabilized microstructure. (orig.)

  3. Experience with the procurement of ferrite and temperature compensator for permanent magnets for accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, W.B.; Brown, B.C.; Volk, J.

    1997-07-01

    The use of permanent magnets for transporting the 8 GeV proton beam from the Fermilab Booster to the new Fermilab Main Injector accelerator has been implemented and the magnets for a new 8 GeV ring to be installed in the Main Injector tunnel for increasing the luminosity of pbar/p collisions in the Tevatron are about to start being produced. Strontium oxide ferrite was selected for the magnets due to it's low cost and satisfactory magnetic properties for the 1.5 kilogauss fields required in the 2-inch gap magnets. Fermilab has received 96,000 pounds of ferrite and by working with the Vendor (HITACHI, Edmore, MI) improved uniformity of Residual Induction (Br) has reached 3905 gauss ± 0.65%. Further details are given in the paper. Overcoming the magnetic field variation when the temperature of the magnets changes is accomplished by incorporation of approximately 30% nickel steel alloy. The ferrite changes approximately -0.2% per degree C, which is compensated for by the 13% by the volume of compensator alloy incorporated in the magnet. Fourteen thousand (14,000) pounds of this material has been received and in order to obtain sufficient uniformity the authors mixed equal amounts from each batch into each magnet. Results of this process are given in the paper

  4. Preliminary evaluation of microstructure and mechanical properties on low activation ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, C.Y.; Lechtenberg, T.A.

    1985-01-01

    Radioactive waste disposal has become a primary concern for the selection of materials for the structural components for fusion reactors. One way to minimize this potential environmental problem is to use structural materials in which the induced radioactivity decays quickly to levels that allow for near-surface disposal under 10CFR61 rules. The primary objective of this work is to develop low activation ferritic steels that exhibit mechanical and physical properties approximately equivalent to the HT-9 and 9Cr-1Mo steels, but which only contain elements that would permit near-surface disposal under 10CFR61 after exposure to fusion neutrons. A preliminary evaluation of the microstructure and mechanical properties of a 9Cr-2.5W-0.3V-0.15C (GA3X) low activation ferritic steel has been performed. An optimum heat treatment condition has been defined for GA3X steel. The properties and microstructure of the quenched and tempered specimens were characterized via hardness measurement and optical metallographic observation. The hot-microhardness and ductility parameter measurements were used to estimate the tensile properties at elevated temperatures. The estimated tensile strengths of GA3X steel at elevated temperatures are comparable to both 9Cr-1Mo and the modified 9Cr-1Mo steels. These preliminary results are encouraging in that they suggest that suitable low activation alloys can be successfully produced in this ferritic alloy class

  5. Design of Radiation-Tolerant Structural Alloys for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, T.R.; Was, G.S.; Bruemmer, S.M.; Gan, J.; Ukai, S.

    2005-12-28

    The objective of this program is to improve the radiation tolerance of both austenitic and ferritic-martensitic (F-M) alloys projected for use in Generation IV systems. The expected materials limitations of Generation IV components include: creep strength, dimensional stability, and corrosion/stress corrosion compatibility. The material design strategies to be tested fall into three main categories: (1) engineering grain boundaries; (2) alloying, by adding oversized elements to the matrix; and (3) microstructural/nanostructural design, such as adding matrix precipitates. These three design strategies were tested across both austenitic and ferritic-martensitic alloy classes

  6. Optimization of production and properties of the nanoscaled ferritic ODS-alloy 13Cr-1W-0,3Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-0,3TiH{sub 2} and characterization of structure and property correlations; Eigenschaftsoptimierung der nanoskaligen ferritischen ODS-Legierung 13Cr-1W-0,3Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-0,3TiH{sub 2}, metallkundliche Charakterisierung und Bestimmung von Struktur-Eigenschaftskorrelationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eiselt, Charles Christopher

    2010-01-15

    Fusion power reactors next to renewable energy sources shall form an important basis for a future energy scenario avoiding damaging emissions due to the lack of fossil primary energy carriers. An efficient operation of such reactors necessitate temperatures >700 C, which require new kinds of structural materials. Today only reduced activated oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS-) materials based on iron, which have high strengths at elevated temperatures, offer the possibility to meet those criterias, which are developed in internationally coordinated programs. Therefore a nearly industrial production process based on the powdermetallurgical route is iteratively and systematically optimized to produce the ferritic ODS-alloy 13Cr-1W-0,3Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-0,3TiH{sub 2}. Through TEM elemental analyses of mechanically alloyed steel powder it is confirmed, that the additives Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiH{sub 2} dissolve completely in the powder and form the ODS-particles during the HIP-cycle. Detailed studies of powder contamination during mechanical alloying reveal correlations between the contamination behaviour of certain elements and the milling parameters. A specially designed procedure of powder encapsulation and sealing leads to a successful powder compaction to the ODS-material 13Cr-1W-0,3Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-0,3TiH{sub 2}. Detailed TEM studies show a bimodal grain size distribution within the material at first. The alloy's recrystallization behaviour is the main reason for this phenomenon and is therefore discussed in detail. A high dispersion of ODS-particles as the decisive material's component with particle sizes von 3-5nm within grains and 12-36nm at the grain boundaries is successfully reached and verified by numerous TEM-Elemental Mappings. By applying hot rolling as an additional step during production a more even grain structure by equally maintaining the fine nanoskaled particle dispersion is set up. The microstructure is highly stable, since no grain- or

  7. Ferrite HOM Absorber for the RHIC ERL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn,H.; Choi, E.M.; Hammons, L.

    2008-10-01

    A superconducting Energy Recovery Linac is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory to serve as test bed for RHIC upgrades. The damping of higher-order modes in the superconducting five-cell cavity for the Energy-Recovery linac at RHIC is performed exclusively by two ferrite absorbers. The ferrite properties have been measured in ferrite-loaded pill box cavities resulting in the permeability values given by a first-order Debye model for the tiled absorber structure and an equivalent permeability value for computer simulations with solid ring dampers. Measured and simulated results for the higher-order modes in the prototype copper cavity are discussed. First room-temperature measurements of the finished niobium cavity are presented which confirm the effective damping of higher-order modes in the ERL. by the ferrite absorbers.

  8. Focused Application Software for Ferrite Patch Antennas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Trott, Keith

    1999-01-01

    ... (brick and tetrahedral elements) are combined by MRC via a graphical user interface (GUI) into a user friendly code capable of modeling conformal antennas with ferrite sub and superstrates recessed in planar surfaces.

  9. Micromagnetic simulations of spinel ferrite particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantas, Christine C.; Gama, Adriana M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the results of simulations of the magnetization field ac response (at 2-12 GHz) of various submicron ferrite particles (cylindrical dots). The ferrites in the present simulations have the spinel structure, expressed here by M 1 - n Zn n Fe 2 O 4 (where M stands for a divalent metal), and the parameters chosen were the following: (a) for n=0: M={Fe, Mn, Co, Ni, Mg, Cu }; (b) for n=0.1: M = {Fe, Mg} (mixed ferrites). These runs represent full 3D micromagnetic (one-particle) ferrite simulations. We find evidences of confined spin waves in all simulations, as well as a complex behavior nearby the main resonance peak in the case of the M = {Mg, Cu} ferrites. A comparison of the n=0 and n=0.1 cases for fixed M reveals a significant change in the spectra in M = Mg ferrites, but only a minor change in the M=Fe case. An additional larger scale simulation of a 3 by 3 particle array was performed using similar conditions of the Fe 3 O 4 (magnetite; n=0, M = Fe) one-particle simulation. We find that the main resonance peak of the Fe 3 O 4 one-particle simulation is disfigured in the corresponding 3 by 3 particle simulation, indicating the extent to which dipolar interactions are able to affect the main resonance peak in that magnetic compound.

  10. Microstructural investigations of fast reactor irradiated austenitic and ferritic-martensitic stainless steel fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agueev, V.S.; Medvedeva, E.A.; Mitrofanova, N.M.; Romanueev, V.V.; Tselishev, A.V.

    1992-01-01

    Electron microscopy has been used to characterize the microstructural changes induced in advanced fast reactor fuel claddings fabricated from Cr16Ni15Mo3NbB and Cr16Ni15Mo2Mn2TiVB austenitic stainless steels in the cold worked condition and Cr13Mo2NbVB ferritic -martensitic steel following irradiation in the BOR-60, BN-350 and BN-600 fast reactors. The data are compared with the results obtained from a typical austenitic commercial cladding material, Cr16Ni15Mo3Nb, in the cold worked condition. The results reveal a beneficial effect of boron and other alloying elements in reducing void swelling in 16Cr-15Ni type austenitic steels. The high resistance of ferritic-martensitic steels to void swelling has been confirmed in the Cr13Mo2NbVB steel. (author)

  11. Corrosion resistance improvement of ferritic steels through hydrogen additions to the BWR coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, B.M.; Jewett, C.W.; Pickett, A.E.; Indig, M.E.

    1984-01-01

    Motivated by the success of oxygen suppression for mitigation of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in weld sensitized austenitic materials used in Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs), oxygen suppression, through hydrogen additions to the feedwater was investigated to determine its affect on the corrosion resistance of ferritic and martensitic BWR structural materials. The results of these investigations are presented in this paper, where particular emphasis is placed on the corrosion performance of BWR pressure vessel low alloy steels, carbon steel piping materials and martensitic pump materials. It is important to note that the corrosion resistance of these materials in the BWR environment is excellent. Consequently this investigation was also motivated to determine whether there were any detrimental effects of hydrogen additions, as well as to identify any additional margin in ferritic/martensitic materials corrosion performance

  12. Strength of "Light" Ferritic and Austenitic Steels Based on the Fe - Mn - Al - C System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaputkina, L. M.; Svyazhin, A. G.; Smarygina, I. V.; Kindop, V. E.

    2017-01-01

    The phase composition, the hardness, the mechanical properties at room temperature, and the resistance to hot (950 - 1000°C) and warm (550°C) deformation are studied for cast deformable "light" ferritic and austenitic steels of the Fe - (12 - 25)% Mn - (0 - 15)% Al - (0 - 2)% C system alloyed additionally with about 5% Ni. The high-aluminum high-manganese low-carbon and carbonless ferritic steels at a temperature of about 0.5 T melt have a specific strength close to that of the austenitic steels and may be used as weldable scale-resistant and wear-resistant materials. The high-carbon Fe - (20 - 24)% Mn - (5 - 9)% Al - 5% Ni - 1.5% C austenitic steels may be applied as light high-strength materials operating at cryogenic temperatures after a solution treatment and as scale- and heat-resistant materials in an aged condition.

  13. Development and Application of High-Cr Ferritic Stainless Steels as Building Exterior Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeong H.; Lee, Yong H.; Lee, Yong D.

    2008-01-01

    Stainless Steels have been widely used as a building exterior materials in Asian countries for the last decade. It is required for the materials in this field to have an aesthetic appearance,a relatively high strength, and an excellent corrosion resistance. Other metallic materials such as copper, aluminum, and carbon steels have been also used as the exterior materials. Considering the cost of maintenance, stainless steel, having the outstanding corrosion resistance, is replacing other materials in the several parts in the building exteriors. Ferritic stainless steel has been applied as the roofing materials because its thermal expansion is much smaller than that of austenitic stainless steel. Therefore, it is suitable for the large-scale construction such as airport terminal, convention center, and football stadium. To improve the corrosion resistance of the ferritic stainless steels, the modification of alloy composition has been studied to develop new grade materials and the progress in the surface technology has been introduced. Corrosion properties, of these materials were evaluated in the laboratory and in the field for longer than two years. High-Cr ferritic stainless steel showed excellent corrosion resistance to the atmospheric environments. In the region close to the sea, the corrosion resistance of high-Cr ferritic stainless steel was much superior to that of other materials, which may prove this steel to be the appropriate materials for the construction around seashore. In some of the large constructions around seashore in South Korea, high-Cr ferritic stainless steels have been used as the building exterior materials for six years

  14. Development and Application of High-Cr Ferritic Stainless Steels as Building Exterior Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeong H.; Lee, Yong H.; Lee, Yong D. [POSCO Technical Reseaarch Lab., Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Stainless Steels have been widely used as a building exterior materials in Asian countries for the last decade. It is required for the materials in this field to have an aesthetic appearance,a relatively high strength, and an excellent corrosion resistance. Other metallic materials such as copper, aluminum, and carbon steels have been also used as the exterior materials. Considering the cost of maintenance, stainless steel, having the outstanding corrosion resistance, is replacing other materials in the several parts in the building exteriors. Ferritic stainless steel has been applied as the roofing materials because its thermal expansion is much smaller than that of austenitic stainless steel. Therefore, it is suitable for the large-scale construction such as airport terminal, convention center, and football stadium. To improve the corrosion resistance of the ferritic stainless steels, the modification of alloy composition has been studied to develop new grade materials and the progress in the surface technology has been introduced. Corrosion properties, of these materials were evaluated in the laboratory and in the field for longer than two years. High-Cr ferritic stainless steel showed excellent corrosion resistance to the atmospheric environments. In the region close to the sea, the corrosion resistance of high-Cr ferritic stainless steel was much superior to that of other materials, which may prove this steel to be the appropriate materials for the construction around seashore. In some of the large constructions around seashore in South Korea, high-Cr ferritic stainless steels have been used as the building exterior materials for six years.

  15. Modelling study on the three-dimensional neutron depolarisation response of the evolving ferrite particle size distribution during the austenite-ferrite phase transformation in steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, H.; van der Zwaag, S.; van Dijk, N. H.

    2018-07-01

    The magnetic configuration of a ferromagnetic system with mono-disperse and poly-disperse distribution of magnetic particles with inter-particle interactions has been computed. The analysis is general in nature and applies to all systems containing magnetically interacting particles in a non-magnetic matrix, but has been applied to steel microstructures, consisting of a paramagnetic austenite phase and a ferromagnetic ferrite phase, as formed during the austenite-to-ferrite phase transformation in low-alloyed steels. The characteristics of the computational microstructures are linked to the correlation function and determinant of depolarisation matrix, which can be experimentally obtained in three-dimensional neutron depolarisation (3DND). By tuning the parameters in the model used to generate the microstructure, we studied the effect of the (magnetic) particle size distribution on the 3DND parameters. It is found that the magnetic particle size derived from 3DND data matches the microstructural grain size over a wide range of volume fractions and grain size distributions. A relationship between the correlation function and the relative width of the particle size distribution was proposed to accurately account for the width of the size distribution. This evaluation shows that 3DND experiments can provide unique in situ information on the austenite-to-ferrite phase transformation in steels.

  16. Fracture toughness testing on ferritic alloys using the electropotential technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, F.H.; Wire, G.L.

    1981-01-01

    Fracture toughness measurements as done conventionally require large specimens (5 x 5 x 2.5 cm) which would be prohibitively expensive to irradiate over the fluence and temperature ranges required for first wall design. To overcome this difficulty a single specimen technique for J intergral fracture toughness measurements on miniature specimens (1.6 cm OD x 0.25 cm thick) was developed. Comparisons with specimens three times as thick show that the derived J/sub 1c/ is constant, validating the specimen for first wall applications. The electropotential technique was used to obtain continuous crack extension measurements, allowing a ductile fracture resistence curve to be constructed from a single specimen. The irradiation test volume required for fracture toughness measurements using both miniature specimens and single specimen J measurements was reduced a factor of 320, making it possible to perform a systematic exploration of irradiation temperature and dose variables as required for qualification of HT-9 and 9Cr-1Mo base metal and welds for first wall application. Fracture toughness test results for HT-9 and 9Cr-1Mo from 25 to 539 0 C are presented to illustrate the single specimen technique

  17. Oxidation Behavior of Some Cr Ferritic Steels for High Temperature Fuel Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, H.E.

    2012-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of three high Cr ferritic steels designated 1Al, RA and 5Al with different levels of Al, Si, Mn and Hf has been investigated in the present work. These steels have been developed as candidates for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) interconnect. Specimens of these alloys have been subjected to isothermal as well as cyclic oxidation in air. Isothermal oxidation tests are conducted in the temperature range 800 - 1000 degree C for time periods up to 1000 h. cyclic oxidation tests were carried out at 800 and 1000 degree C for twenty 25 - h cycles giving a total cyclic exposure time of 500 h. The growth rate of the oxide scales was found to follow a parabolic law over a certain oxidation period which changed with alloy composition and oxidation temperature. The value of the parabolic rate constant increased with increasing oxidation temperature. At 800 and 900 degree C alloy 1Al exhibited higher oxidation resistance compared to the other two alloys. Alloy RA showed spalling behavior when oxidized at 900 degree C and the extent of spalling increased with increasing the oxidation temperature to 1000 degree C. Alloy 5Al oxidized at 1000 degree C showed the highest oxidation resistance among the investigated alloys. Alloy 1Al and RA showed similar scale morphology and composition. X- ray diffraction analysis revealed that the scales developed on these alloys consist of Cr 2 O 3 with an outer layer of MnCr 2 O 4 and a minor amount of FeCr 2 O 4 spinels. Alloy 5Al developed scale consisting of γ- Al 2 O 3 at 800 degree C and γ and α- Al 2 O 3 at 900 degree C. Oxidation of alloy 5Al at 1000 degree C led to formation of a scale consisting mainly of the protective phase α Al 2 O 3 . The presence of 0.84 wt% Al and 0.95 wt % Si in alloy 1Al enhanced its oxidation resistance compared to alloy RA which contains only 0.29 wt% Si and is Al - free. This enhancement was attributed to formation of internal oxidation zone in alloy 1Al just beneath the oxide / alloy

  18. The Cracking Mechanism of Ferritic-Austenitic Cast Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stradomski G.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the high-alloy, ferritic - austenitic (duplex stainless steels high tendency to cracking, mainly hot-is induced by micro segregation processes and change of crystallization mechanism in its final stage. The article is a continuation of the problems presented in earlier papers [1 - 4]. In the range of high temperature cracking appear one mechanism a decohesion - intergranular however, depending on the chemical composition of the steel, various structural factors decide of the occurrence of hot cracking. The low-carbon and low-alloy cast steel casting hot cracking cause are type II sulphide, in high carbon tool cast steel secondary cementite mesh and / or ledeburite segregated at the grain solidified grains boundaries, in the case of Hadfield steel phosphorus - carbide eutectic, which carrier is iron-manganese and low solubility of phosphorus in high manganese matrix. In duplex cast steel the additional factor increasing the risk of cracking it is very “rich” chemical composition and related with it processes of precipitation of many secondary phases.

  19. Effect of alloy content on microstructure and microchemistry of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study on the microstructural evolution in 9Cr reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels during short term thermal exposures. Since the microstructure is strongly influenced by the alloying additions, mainly W, Ta and C contents, the effect of varying W and Ta contents on ...

  20. New Stainless Steel Alloys for Low Temperature Surface Hardening?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Dahl, Kristian Vinter; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2015-01-01

    The present contribution showcases the possibility for developing new surface hardenable stainless steels containing strong nitride/carbide forming elements (SNCFE). Nitriding of the commercial alloys, austenitic A286, and ferritic AISI 409 illustrates the beneficial effect of having SNCFE presen...

  1. Characterization of Austempered Ferritic Ductile Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakre, Vinayak S.; Peshwe, D. R.; Pathak, S. U.; Likhite, A. A.

    2018-04-01

    The ductile iron (DI) has graphite nodules enclose in ferrite envelop in pearlitic matrix. The pearlitic matrix in DI was converted to ferritic matrix through heat treatment. This heat treatment includes austenitization of DI at 900°C for 1h, followed by furnace cooling to 750°C & hold for 1h, then again furnace cooling to 690°C hold for 2h, then samples were allowed to cool in furnace. The new heat treated DI has graphite nodules in ferritic matrix and called as ferritic ductile iron (FDI). Both DIs were austenitized at 900°C for 1h and then quenched into salt bath at 325°C. The samples were soaked in salt bath for 60, 120, 180, 240 and 300 min followed by air cooling. The austempered samples were characterized with help of optical microscopy, SEM and X-ray diffraction analysis. Austempering of ferritic ductile iron resulted in finer ausferrite matrix as compared to ADI. Area fraction of graphite, ferrite and austenite were determining using AXIOVISION-SE64 software. Area fraction of graphite was more in FDI than that of as cast DI. The area fraction of graphite remains unaffected due to austempering heat treatment. Ausferritic matrix coarsened (feathered) with increasing in austempering time for both DI and FDI. Bulk hardness test was carried on Rockwell Hardness Tester with load of 150 kgf and diamond indenter. Hardness obtained in as cast DI is 28 HRC which decreased to 6 HRC in FDI due conversion of pearlitic matrix to ferritic matrix. Hardness is improved by austempering process.

  2. Dielectric properties of Al-substituted Co ferrite nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    The particle size, D, decreases with increase in Al-content. The lattice parameter, a ... a significant saving in time and energy consumption over the traditional methods. ... electrical, and magnetic properties of spinel ferrites. Cobalt ferrite based ...

  3. Cr-W-V bainitic/ferritic steel with improved strength and toughness and method of making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klueh, R.L.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1994-03-08

    This work describes a high strength, high toughness bainitic/ferritic steel alloy comprising about 2.75% to 4.0% chromium, about 2.0% to 3.5% tungsten, about 0.10% to 0.30% vanadium, and about 0.1% to 0.15% carbon with the balance iron, wherein the percentages are by total weight of the composition, wherein the alloy having been heated to an austenitizing temperature and then cooled at a rate sufficient to produce carbide-free acicular bainite. 15 figures.

  4. Effect of neutron irradiation on mechanical properties of ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kass, S.B.; Murty, K.L.

    1995-01-01

    Effect of neutron radiation exposure was investigated in various ferritic steels with the main emphasis being the effects of thermal neutrons on radiation hardening. Pure iron of varied grain sizes was also used for characterizing the grain size effects on the source hardening before and after neutron irradiation. While many steels are considered in the overall study, the results on 1020, A516 and A588 steels are emphasized. Radiation hardening due to fast neutrons was seen to be sensitive to the composition of the steels with A354 being the least resistant and A490 the least sensitive. Majority of the radiation hardening stems from friction hardening, and source hardening term decreased with exposure to neutron radiation apparently due to the interaction of interstitial impurities with radiation produced defects. Inclusion of thermal neutrons along with fast resulted in further decrease in the source hardening with a slight increase in the friction hardening which revealed a critical grain size below which exposure to total (fast and thermal) neutron spectrum resulted in a slight reduction in the yield stress compared to the exposure to only fast neutrons. This is the first time such a grain size effect is reported and this is shown to be consistent with known radiation effects on friction and source hardening terms along with the observation that low energy neutrons have a nonnegligible effect on the mechanical properties of steels. In ferritic steels, however, despite their small grain size, exposure to total neutron spectrum yielded higher strengths than exposure to only fast neutrons. This behavior is consistent with the fact that the source hardening is small in these alloys and radiation effect is due only to friction stress

  5. Precipitates and boundaries interaction in ferritic ODS steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sallez, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.sallez@simap.grenoble-inp.fr [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, SIMAP, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Hatzoglou, Constantinos [Groupe de Physique des Matériaux, Université et INSA de Rouen, UMR CNRS 6634, Normandie Université (France); Delabrouille, Fredéric [EDF–EDF R& D, Les Renardières, 77818 Moret-sur-Loing (France); Sornin, Denis; Chaffron, Laurent [CEA, DEN, Service de Recherches Métallurgiques Appliqué, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Blat-Yrieix, Martine [EDF–EDF R& D, Les Renardières, 77818 Moret-sur-Loing (France); Radiguet, Bertrand; Pareige, Philippe [Groupe de Physique des Matériaux, Université et INSA de Rouen, UMR CNRS 6634, Normandie Université (France); Donnadieu, Patricia; Bréchet, Yves [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, SIMAP, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2016-04-15

    In the course of a recrystallization study of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels during extrusion, particular interest was paid to the (GB) Grain Boundaries interaction with precipitates. Complementary and corresponding characterization experiments using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and Atom Probe Tomography (APT) have been carried out on a voluntarily interrupted extrusion or extruded samples. Microscopic observations of Precipitate Free Zones (PFZ) and precipitates alignments suggest precipitate interaction with migrating GB involving dissolution and Oswald ripening of the precipitates. This is consistent with the local chemical information gathered by EDX and APT. This original mechanism for ODS steels is similar to what had been proposed in the late 80s for similar observation made on Ti alloys reinforced by nanosized yttrium oxides: An interaction mechanism between grain boundaries and precipitates involving a diffusion controlled process of precipitates dissolution at grain boundaries. It is believed that this mechanism can be of primary importance to explain the mechanical behaviour of such steels. - Highlights: • To study the microstructural evolution of a ferritic ODS steel during its extrusion, observations have been carried on samples resulting from a voluntarily interrupted extrusion and extruded materials. • A highly heterogeneous precipitate population have been observed. Nanosized coherent precipitates (2–5 nm) on both sides of the grain boundaries despite grain boundary migration after precipitation due to further thermo-mechanical processing as well as coarse precipitates (10–40 nm) alignments are observed on the grain boundaries and within the grains, parallel to the grain boundaries. • Asymmetrical PFZs can be observed around precipitates alignments and grain boundaries. Using TEM with EDX and APT we have been able to ensure that the PFZs are chemically depleted.

  6. Low activation vanadium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witzenburg, W. van.

    1991-01-01

    The properties and general characteristics of vanadium-base alloys are reviewed in terms of the materials requirements for fusion reactor first wall and blanket structures. In this review attention is focussed on radiation response including induced radioactivity, mechanical properties, compatibility with potential coolants, physical and thermal properties, fabricability and resources. Where possible, properties are compared to those of other leading candidate structural materials, e.g. austenitic and ferritic/martensitic steels. Vanadium alloys appear to offer advantages in the areas of long-term activation, mechanical properties at temperatures above 600 deg C, radiation resistance and thermo-hydraulic design, due to superior physical and thermal properties. They also have a potential for higher temperature operation in liquid lithium systems. Disadvantages are associated with their ability to retain high concentrations of hydrogen isotopes, higher cost, more difficult fabrication and welding. A particular concern regarding use of vanadium alloys relates their reactivity with non-metallic elements, such as oxygen and nitrogen. (author). 33 refs.; 2 figs.; 2 tabs

  7. Behaviour of AISI-SAE 8615 steel in ferritic nitrocarburizing using urea-metanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrena, M.I.; Castro, A.

    1998-01-01

    The present work shows the behaviour of low carbon alloyed steels as AISI-SAE 8615, after a ferritic nitrocarburizing process. Nitrocarburizing takes place at 570 degree centigree for 3 h in an atmosphere by combustion of methanol and urea under different flow rates. Metallographic studies were performed by optical microscopy. Harness profiles were measured and carbon percentages were also analyzed by emission spectrometry in order to determine the extension of the nitrocarburizing process. Optimal flow conditions have been found. The influence of the flow rate on the nitrocarburizing layer thickness has been also studied. (Author) 12 refs

  8. In-situ formation of complex oxide precipitates during processing of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayasankar, K.; Pandey, Abhishek; Mishra, B.K.; Das, Siddhartha

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Use of dual drive planetary ball mill for Bench scale (>1 kg) production. • X-ray diffraction and TEM were used to study transformations during sintering. • HIPped and rolled samples with nearly 99% density successfully produced. - Abstract: In fusion and fission reactor material development, ODS alloys are the most suitable candidate materials due to its high temperature creep properties and irradiation resistance properties. This paper describes the preparation of oxide dispersion strengthened alloy powder in large quantity (>1 kg batch) in dual drive planetary ball mill using pre-alloyed ferrtic steel powder with nano sized Y_2O_3. The consolidation of the powders was carried out in hot isostatic press (HIP) followed by hot rolling. 99% of the theoretical density was achieved by this method. The vickers hardness values of pressed and rolled samples were in the range of 380 ± 2HV and 719 ± 2HV, respectively. Samples were further investigated using X-ray diffraction particle size analyzer and electron microscope. Initial increase in particle size with milling was observed showing flattening of the particle. It was found that 5 h of milling time is sufficient to reduce the particle size to achieve the desired size. Transmission electron microscopy analysis of milled ODS steel powder revealed a uniform distribution of combustion synthesized nano-Y_2O_3 in ferritic steel matrix after a milling time of 5 h. Preliminary results demonstrated suitability of dual drive planetary ball mill for mass production of alloy within a short time due to various kinds of forces acting at a time during milling process. Fine monoclinic Y_2Si_2O_7 precipitates were also observed in the steel. This study explains the particle characteristics of nano Y_2O_3 dispersed ODS powder and formation of nano clusters in ODS ferritic alloy.

  9. Ferritic/martensitic steels: Promises and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Ehrlich, K.; Abe, F.

    1992-01-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steels are candidate structural materials for fusion reactors because of their higher swelling resistance, higher thermal conductivity, lower thermal expansion, and better liquid-metal compatibility than austenitic steels. Irradiation effects will ultimately determine the applicability of these steels, and the effects of irradiation on microstructure and swelling, and on the tensile, fatigue, and impact properties of the ferritic/martensitic steels are discussed. Most irradiation studies have been carried out in fast reactors, where little transmutation helium forms. Helium has been shown to enhance swelling and affect tensile and fracture behavior, making helium a critical issue, since high helium concentrations will be generated in conjunction with displacement damage in a fusion reactor. These issues are reviewed to evaluate the status of ferritic/martensitic steels and to assess the research required to insure that such steels are viable candidates for fusion applications

  10. Ferrite LTCC based phased array antennas

    KAUST Repository

    Ghaffar, Farhan A.

    2016-11-02

    Two phased array antennas realized in multilayer ferrite LTCC technology are presented in this paper. The use of embedded bias windings in these designs allows the negation of external magnets which are conventionally employed with bulk ferrite medium. This reduces the required magnetostatic field strength by 90% as compared to the traditional designs. The phase shifters are implemented using the SIW technology. One of the designs is operated in the half mode waveguide topology while the other design is based on standard full mode waveguide operation. The two phase shifter designs are integrated with two element patch antenna array and slotted SIW array respectively. The array designs demonstrate a beam steering of 30° and ±19° respectively for a current excitation of 200 mA. The designs, due to their small factor can be easily integrated in modern communication systems which is not possible in the case of bulk ferrite based designs.

  11. Corrosion behavior of austenitic and ferritic/martensitic steels in oxygen-saturated liquid Pb-Bi eutectic at 450circC and 550circC

    OpenAIRE

    倉田 有司; 二川 正敏; 斎藤 滋

    2005-01-01

    Static corrosion tests of various austenitic and ferritic/martensitic steels were conducted in oxygen-saturated liquid Pb-Bi at 450circC and 550circC for 3000h to study the effects of temperature and alloying elements on corrosion behavior. Oxidation, grain boundary corrosion, dissolution and penetration were observed. The corrosion depth decreases at 450circC with increasing Cr content in steels regardless of ferritic/martensitic or austenitic steels. Appreciable dissolution of Ni and Cr doe...

  12. Integrity assessment of the ferritic / austenitic dissimilar weld joint between intermediate heat exchanger and steam generator in fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayakumar, T.; Laha, K.; Chandravathi, K. S.; Parameswaran, P.; Goyal, S.; Kumar, J. G.; Mathew, M. D. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam- 603 102 (India)

    2012-07-01

    Integrity of the modified 9Cr-1Mo / alloy 800 dissimilar joint welded with Inconel 182 electrodes has been assessed under creep condition based on the detailed analysis of microstructure and stress distribution across the joint by finite element analysis. A hardness peak at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface and a hardness trough at the inter-critical heat affected zone (HAZ) in ferritic base metal developed. Un-tempered martensite was found at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface to impart high hardness in it; whereas annealing of martensitic structure of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel by inter-critical heating during welding thermal cycle resulted in hardness tough in the inter-critical HAZ. Creep tests were carried out on the joint and ferritic steel base metal at 823 K over a stress range of 160-320 MPa. The joint possessed lower creep rupture strength than its ferritic steel base metal. Failure of the joint at relatively lower stresses occurred at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface; whereas it occurred at inter-critical region of HAZ at moderate stresses. Cavity nucleation associated with the weld interface particles led to premature failure of the joint. Finite element analysis of stress distribution across the weld joint considering the micro-mechanical strength inhomogeneity across it revealed higher von-Mises and principal stresses at the weld interface. These stresses induced preferential creep cavitation at the weld interface. Role of precipitate in enhancing creep cavitation at the weld interface has been elucidated based on the FE analysis of stress distribution across it. (authors)

  13. Recrystallization induced plasticity in austenite and ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Mingxin; Pineau, André; Bouaziz, Olivier; Vu, Trong-Dai

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Plasticity can be induced by recrystallization in austenite and ferrite. ► Strain rate is proportional to recrystallization kinetics. ► Overall atomic flux selects a preferential direction may be the origin. - Abstract: New experimental evidences are provided to demonstrate that plastic strain can be induced by recrystallization in austenite and ferrite under an applied stress much smaller than their yield stresses. Such Recrystallization Induced Plasticity (RIP) phenomenon occurs because the overall atomic flux during recrystallization follows a preferential direction imposed by the applied stress.

  14. Cation distributions on rapidly solidified cobalt ferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Guire, Mark R.; Kalonji, Gretchen; O'Handley, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    The cation distributions in two rapidly solidified cobalt ferrites have been determined using Moessbauer spectroscopy at 4.2 K in an 8-T magnetic field. The samples were obtained by gas atomization of a Co0-Fe2O3-P2O5 melt. The degree of cation disorder in both cases was greater than is obtainable by cooling unmelted cobalt ferrite. The more rapidly cooled sample exhibited a smaller departure from the equilibrium cation distribution than did the more slowly cooled sample. This result is explained on the basis of two competing effects of rapid solidification: high cooling rate of the solid, and large undercooling.

  15. Continuous cooling transformations and microstructures in a low-carbon, high-strength low-alloy plate steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, S. W.; Vin, D. J., Col; Krauss, G.

    1990-06-01

    A continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagram was determined for a high-strength low-alloy plate steel containing (in weight percent) 0.06 C, 1.45 Mn, 1.25 Cu, 0.97 Ni, 0.72 Cr, and 0.42 Mo. Dilatometric measurements were supplemented by microhardness testing, light microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The CCT diagram showed significant suppression of polygonal ferrite formation and a prominent transformation region, normally attributed to bainite formation, at temperatures intermediate to those of polygonal ferrite and martensite formation. In the intermediate region, ferrite formation in groups of similarly oriented crystals about 1 μm in size and containing a high density of dislocations dominated the transformation of austenite during continuous cooling. The ferrite grains assumed two morphologies, elongated or acicular and equiaxed or granular, leading to the terms “acicular ferrite” and “granular ferrite,” respectively, to describe these structures. Austenite regions, some transformed to martensite, were enriched in carbon and retained at interfaces between ferrite grains. Coarse interfacial ledges and the nonacicular morphology of the granular ferrite grains provided evidence for a phase transformation mechanism involving reconstructive diffusion of substitutional atoms. At slow cooling rates, polygonal ferrite and Widmanstätten ferrite formed. These latter structures contained low dislocation densities and e-copper precipitates formed by an interphase transformation mechanism.

  16. Simulation of non-linear coaxial line using ferrite beads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuya, S.; Matsumoto, H.; Tachi, K.; Takano, S.; Irisawa, J.

    2002-01-01

    A ferrite sharpener is a non-linear coaxial line using ferrite beads, which produces high-voltage, high-dV/dt pulses. We have been examining the characteristics of ferrite sharpeners experimentally, varying various parameters. Also we have made the simulation of the ferrite sharpener and compared the predictions with the experimental results in detail to analyze the characteristics of the sharpener. In this report, calculating the magnetization M of the ferrite bead, we divide the bead into n sections radially instead of adopting M at the average radius in the previous report. (author)

  17. Advanced Corrosion-Resistant Zr Alloys for High Burnup and Generation IV Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Y. H.; Park, S. Y.; Lee, M. H.; Choi, B. K.; Baek, J. H.; Park, J. Y.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, H. G.; Jung, Y. H.; Bang, B. G.

    2006-08-01

    The systematic study was performed to develop the advanced corrosion-resistant Zr alloys for high burnup and Gen IV application. The corrosion behavior was significantly changed with the alloy composition and the corrosion environment. In general, the model alloys with a higher alloying elements showed a higher corrosion resistance. Among the model alloys tested in this study, Zr-10Cr-0.2Fe showed the best corrosion resistance regardless of the corrosion condition. The oxide on the higher corrosion-resistant alloy such as Zr-1.0Cr-0.2Fe consisted of mainly columnar grains, and it have a higher tetragonal phase stability. In comparison with other alloys being considered for the SCWR, the Zr alloys showed a lower corrosion rate than ferritic-martensitic steels. The results of this study imply that, at least from a corrosion standpoint, Zr alloys deserve consideration as potential cladding or structural materials in supercritical water cooled reactors

  18. The analysis of bainitic ferrite microstructure in microalloyed plate steels through quantitative characterization of intervariant boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Singon, E-mail: sikang@mines.edu [Advanced Steel Processing and Products Research Center, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Speer, John G.; Regier, Ryan W. [Advanced Steel Processing and Products Research Center, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Nako, Hidenori [Advanced Steel Processing and Products Research Center, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Materials Research Laboratory, Kobe Steel Ltd., Kobe, Hyogo 651-2271 (Japan); Kennett, Shane C. [Advanced Steel Processing and Products Research Center, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Exponent Failure Analysis Associates, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Findley, Kip O. [Advanced Steel Processing and Products Research Center, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States)

    2016-07-04

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measurements were performed to investigate the bainitic ferrite microstructure in low-carbon, microalloyed steels with varying C and Mn contents. Fully austenitized samples were isothermally heat treated at temperatures ranging from 450 to 550 °C to form bainitic ferrite. The bainitic ferrite microstructures and boundary characteristics obtained from the EBSD measurements were analyzed based on an inferred Kurdjumov-Sachs (K-S) orientation relationship. The heat treated samples exhibit a microstructure composed of laths and the lath aspect ratio tends to increase at lower isothermal heat treatment temperatures. High fractions of boundary misorientation angles below 5° are observed, which are due to lath boundaries in the microstructure. Additionally, misorientations of approximately 7°, 53° and 60° are observed, which are related to the sub-block, packet, and block boundaries, respectively. With decreasing isothermal heat treatment temperature, there is an increase of block boundaries; these boundaries are intervariant boundaries between different blocks within a packet, most of which have the misorientation angle of 60°. The specimens with a higher carbon level contained increased length of block boundaries, whereas the addition of Mn moderated the dependence of block boundary length on the heat treatment temperature within the experimental temperature range. Meanwhile, the length of intervariant boundaries of both packet and sub-block character did not vary much with heat treatment temperature and alloy composition.

  19. Irradiation response of delta ferrite in as-cast and thermally aged cast stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhangbo; Lo, Wei-Yang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nuclear Engineering Program, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Chen, Yiren [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Pakarinen, Janne [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Wu, Yaqiao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Boise State University, Boise, ID 83715 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States); Allen, Todd [Engineering Physics Department, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Yang, Yong, E-mail: yongyang@ufl.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nuclear Engineering Program, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    To enable the life extension of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) beyond 60 years, it is critical to gain adequate knowledge for making conclusive predictions to assure the integrity of duplex stainless steel reactor components, e.g. primary pressure boundary and reactor vessel internal. Microstructural changes in the ferrite of thermally aged, neutron irradiated only, and neutron irradiated after being thermally aged cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS) were investigated using atom probe tomography. The thermal aging was performed at 400 °C for 10,000 h and the irradiation was conducted in the Halden reactor at ∼315 °C to 0.08 dpa (5.6 × 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2}, E > 1 MeV). Low dose neutron irradiation at a dose rate of 5 × 10{sup −9} dpa/s was found to induce spinodal decomposition in the ferrite of as-cast microstructure, and further to enhance the spinodal decomposition in the thermally aged cast alloys. Regarding the G-phase precipitates, the neutron irradiation dramatically increases the precipitate size, and alters the composition of the precipitates with increased, Mn, Ni, Si and Mo and reduced Fe and Cr contents. The results have shown that low dose neutron irradiation can further accelerate the degradation of ferrite in a duplex stainless steel at the LWR relevant condition.

  20. Effect of composition and cold work on the ferrite transformation in feroplug materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, J.K.L.; Wong, K.W.; Shek, C.H.; Duggan, B.J.

    1993-01-01

    Feroplug is a newly developed temperature indicator suitable for use in the remaining life assessment of high temperature components in power generating plants. The device has been patented in the US on March 17, 1992 under patent number 5,096,304, by the British Technology Group. The Feroplug uses the phase transformation characteristics of duplex stainless steels for temperature measurement. Duplex stainless steels contain ferrite and austenite. Upon exposure to elevated temperatures, the ferrite transforms into austenite, carbides and intermetallic phases. The transformation can be easily monitored by magnetic measurements using a device called the Feritscope. A number of specially designed duplex stainless steels have been produced and the effects of silicon, carbon, and prior cold work on the phase transformation in these alloys. The ferrite transformation was found to be accelerated by prior cold work and by the addition of silicon. The effect of carbon was complicated. Increase in carbon content resulted in a slight increase in the rate of transformation at the early stage, but at the later stage of the transformation the effect of higher carbon content was to reduce the rate of transformation

  1. Mitigation of sensitisation effects in unstabilised 12%Cr ferritic stainless steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warmelo, Martin van; Nolan, David; Norrish, John

    2007-01-01

    Sensitisation in the heat-affected zones of ferritic stainless steel welds is typically prevented by stabilisation of the parent material with titanium or niobium, and suitable design of the overall composition to produce a suitably high ferrite factor. However, such alloy modification has proven to be economically unviable for thick gauge (>10 mm) plate products and therefore unstabilised 12%Cr (3CR12) material is still currently being used for heavy gauge structural applications in many parts of the world. The aim of the current work was to review the mechanisms responsible for sensitisation in these unstabilised ferritic stainless steels, and to characterise the sensitisation effects arising from multipass welding procedures. The objective was to determine the influence of welding parameters, and thereby to recommend mitigating strategies. Two particular sensitisation modes were found to occur in the current work, although only one was predominant and considered problematic from a practical perspective. It was found that with proper positioning of weld capping runs and control of weld overlap, it is possible to ensure that sensitising isotherms remain buried beneath the parent surface, and so reduce harmful corrosion effects

  2. The relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties of ferritic chromium steel weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayr, Peter; Cerjak, Horst [Graz Univ. of Technology (Austria); Toda, Yoshiaki; Hara, Toru; Abe, Fujio [National Institute for Materials Science (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    Welding as the major joining and repair technology for steels in thermal power plants has a significant influence on the steels microstructure and, therefore, on its properties. Heat-resistant martensitic 9-12% chromium steels show an affinity to the retention of delta ferrite in the heat-affected zone of their weldments. This is related to their high level of ferrite stabilizing alloying elements such as Cr, W or Mo. Retained delta ferrite in martensitic steel grades has a significant negative influence on creep strength, fatigue strength, toughness and oxidation resistance. In the long-term range of creep exposure, many weldments of martensitic heatresistant steels fail by Type IV cracking in the fine-grained region of the heat-affected zone. In this work, the formation of the heat-affected zone microstructures in martensitic chromium steels is studied by in-situ X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation, optical microscopy as well as most advanced electron microscopical methods. The observed microstructure is directly linked to the mechanical properties, i.e. ductility, toughness and creep strength. Characteristic failure modes are discussed in detail. (orig.)

  3. Irradiation response of delta ferrite in as-cast and thermally aged cast stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zhangbo; Lo, Wei-Yang; Chen, Yiren; Pakarinen, Janne; Wu, Yaqiao; Allen, Todd; Yang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    To enable the life extension of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) beyond 60 years, it is critical to gain adequate knowledge for making conclusive predictions to assure the integrity of duplex stainless steel reactor components, e.g. primary pressure boundary and reactor vessel internal. Microstructural changes in the ferrite of thermally aged, neutron irradiated only, and neutron irradiated after being thermally aged cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS) were investigated using atom probe tomography. The thermal aging was performed at 400 °C for 10,000 h and the irradiation was conducted in the Halden reactor at ∼315 °C to 0.08 dpa (5.6 × 10"1"9 n/cm"2, E > 1 MeV). Low dose neutron irradiation at a dose rate of 5 × 10"−"9 dpa/s was found to induce spinodal decomposition in the ferrite of as-cast microstructure, and further to enhance the spinodal decomposition in the thermally aged cast alloys. Regarding the G-phase precipitates, the neutron irradiation dramatically increases the precipitate size, and alters the composition of the precipitates with increased, Mn, Ni, Si and Mo and reduced Fe and Cr contents. The results have shown that low dose neutron irradiation can further accelerate the degradation of ferrite in a duplex stainless steel at the LWR relevant condition.

  4. Elevated-Temperature Ferritic and Martensitic Steels and Their Application to Future Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, RL

    2005-01-31

    In the 1970s, high-chromium (9-12% Cr) ferritic/martensitic steels became candidates for elevated-temperature applications in the core of fast reactors. Steels developed for conventional power plants, such as Sandvik HT9, a nominally Fe-12Cr-1Mo-0.5W-0.5Ni-0.25V-0.2C steel (composition in wt %), were considered in the United States, Europe, and Japan. Now, a new generation of fission reactors is in the planning stage, and ferritic, bainitic, and martensitic steels are again candidates for in-core and out-of-core applications. Since the 1970s, advances have been made in developing steels with 2-12% Cr for conventional power plants that are significant improvements over steels originally considered. This paper will review the development of the new steels to illustrate the advantages they offer for the new reactor concepts. Elevated-temperature mechanical properties will be emphasized. Effects of alloying additions on long-time thermal exposure with and without stress (creep) will be examined. Information on neutron radiation effects will be discussed as it applies to ferritic and martensitic steels.

  5. Accelerated development of Zr-containing new generation ferritic steels for advanced nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Lizhen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yang, Ying [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sridharan, K. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The mission of the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program is to develop crosscutting technologies for nuclear energy applications. Advanced structural materials with superior performance at elevated temperatures are always desired for nuclear reactors, which can improve reactor economics, safety margins, and design flexibility. They benefit not only new reactors, including advanced light water reactors (LWRs) and fast reactors such as the sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) that is primarily designed for management of high-level wastes, but also life extension of the existing fleet when component exchange is needed. Developing and utilizing the modern materials science tools (experimental, theoretical, and computational tools) is an important path to more efficient alloy development and process optimization. The ultimate goal of this project is, with the aid of computational modeling tools, to accelerate the development of Zr-bearing ferritic alloys that can be fabricated using conventional steelmaking methods. The new alloys are expected to have superior high-temperature creep performance and excellent radiation resistance as compared to Grade 91. The designed alloys were fabricated using arc-melting and drop-casting, followed by hot rolling and conventional heat treatments. Comprehensive experimental studies have been conducted on the developed alloys to evaluate their hardness, tensile properties, creep resistance, Charpy impact toughness, and aging resistance, as well as resistance to proton and heavy ion (Fe2+) irradiation.

  6. Nickel-zinc ferrite/permalloy (Ni0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4/Ni-Fe soft magnetic nanocomposites fabricated by electro-infiltration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Wen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetically soft NiZn ferrite (Ni0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 nanoparticles are embedded within a permalloy (Ni-Fe matrix via an electro-infiltration process as thin films intended for use as on-chip inductor cores in the MHz frequency regime. A layer of NiZn ferrite nanoparticles is first deposited, and then permalloy is electroplated through the voids to encapsulate the particles and form three-dimensional ferrite/alloy nanocomposites. The composites are estimated to contain 37% ferrite by volume and exhibit a relative permeability of ∼320, a saturation of ∼1.15 T, and an operational bandwidth of 93 MHz. Compared to a permalloy thin film of similar thickness, the nanocomposite exhibits 39% higher electrical resistivity and 50% higher bandwidth.

  7. Magnetic properties of nanostructured spinel ferrites and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    exchange interaction strength because of an increase in the magnetic ion concentration in the A-site on milling, ... By using a copper wheel, rotating with the ... Zn ferrite with a small applied field of 4 mT for two different grain sizes. The Néel ... By varying the concentration of the oxidant (KNO3) or ferric ions, we could achieve.

  8. Synthesis and Characterization of Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    prepared material. It was observed that surface modification such as with silica coating on the cobalt ferrite will have significant effect on the structural and magnetic properties. It is also observed that, silica coated nanoparticles could be used in biomedical applications (Hong et al., 2013). In this work we have chosen sol-gel ...

  9. Structural properties of Cd–Co ferrites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    36, No. 5, October 2013, pp. 919–922. c Indian Academy of Sciences. Structural properties of Cd–Co ferrites. S P DALAWAIa,∗. , T J SHINDEb, A B GADKARIc and P N VASAMBEKARa. aDepartment of Electronics, Shivaji University, Kolhapur 416 004, India. bDepartment of Physics, KRP Kanya Mahavidyalaya, Islampur ...

  10. Neutron diffraction in a frustrated ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirebeau, I.; Iancu, G.; Gavoille, G.; Hubsch, J.

    1994-01-01

    The competition between a long range ordered ferrimagnetic lattice and small fluctuating clusters have been probed by neutron diffraction in a titanium magnesium frustrated ferrite. The description of the system is then compared to the predictions of several theoretical models for frustrated systems. 3 figs., 8 refs

  11. Modeling of austenite to ferrite transformation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    395–398. c Indian Academy of Sciences. Modeling of austenite to ferrite transformation. MOHSEN KAZEMINEZHAD. ∗. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Azadi Avenue, Tehran, Iran. MS received 17 January 2011; revised 9 July 2011. Abstract. In this research, an algorithm ...

  12. Synthesis of lithium ferrites from polymetallic carboxylates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    STEFANIA STOLERIU

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Lithium ferrite was prepared by the thermal decomposition of three polynuclear complex compounds containing as ligands the anions of malic, tartaric and gluconic acid: (NH42[Fe2.5Li0.5(C4H4O53(OH4(H2O2]×4H2O (I, (NH46[Fe2.5Li0.5(C4H4O63(OH8]×2H2O (II and (NH42[Fe2.5Li0.5(C6H11O73(OH7] (III. The polynuclear complex precursors were characterized by chemical analysis, IR and UV–Vis spectra, magnetic measurements and thermal analysis. The obtained lithium ferrites were characterized by XRD, scanning electron microscopy, IR spectra and magnetic measurements. The single α-Li0.5Fe2.5O4 phase was obtained by thermal decomposition of the tartarate complex annealed at 700 °C for 1 h. The magnetization value ≈ 50 emu g-1 is lower than that obtained for the bulk lithium ferrite due to the nanostructural character of the ferrite. The particle size was smaller than 100 nm.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of nanocrystalline zinc ferrite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, J.S.; Yang, X.L.; Gao, L.

    1999-01-01

    Nanocrystalline zinc ferrite powders with a partially inverted spinel structure were synthesized by high-energy ball milling in a closed container at ambient temperature from a mixture of alpha-Fe2O3 and ZnO crystalline powders in equimolar ratio. From low-temperature and in-field Mossbauer...

  14. Characterization and Modeling of Grain Boundary Chemistry Evolution in Ferritic Steels under Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquis, Emmanuelle [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Wirth, Brian [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Was, Gary [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-03-28

    Ferritic/martensitic (FM) steels such as HT-9, T-91 and NF12 with chromium concentrations in the range of 9-12 at.% Cr and high Cr ferritic steels (oxide dispersion strengthened steels with 12-18% Cr) are receiving increasing attention for advanced nuclear applications, e.g. cladding and duct materials for sodium fast reactors, pressure vessels in Generation IV reactors and first wall structures in fusion reactors, thanks to their advantages over austenitic alloys. Predicting the behavior of these alloys under radiation is an essential step towards the use of these alloys. Several radiation-induced phenomena need to be taken into account, including phase separation, solute clustering, and radiation-induced segregation or depletion (RIS) to point defect sinks. RIS at grain boundaries has raised significant interest because of its role in irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) and corrosion of structural materials. Numerous observations of RIS have been reported on austenitic stainless steels where it is generally found that Cr depletes at grain boundaries, consistently with Cr atoms being oversized in the fcc Fe matrix. While FM and ferritic steels are also subject to RIS at grain boundaries, unlike austenitic steels, the behavior of Cr is less clear with significant scatter and no clear dependency on irradiation condition or alloy type. In addition to the lack of conclusive experimental evidence regarding RIS in F-M alloys, there have been relatively few efforts at modeling RIS behavior in these alloys. The need for predictability of materials behavior and mitigation routes for IASCC requires elucidating the origin of the variable Cr behavior. A systematic detailed high-resolution structural and chemical characterization approach was applied to ion-implanted and neutron-irradiated model Fe-Cr alloys containing from 3 to 18 at.% Cr. Atom probe tomography analyses of the microstructures revealed slight Cr clustering and segregation to dislocations and

  15. Corrosion of High Chromium Ferritic/Martensitic Steels in High Temperature Water. a Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, P.; Lapena, J.; Blazquez, F. [Ciemat, Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    Available literature concerning corrosion of high-chromium ferritic/martensitic steels in high temperature water has been reviewed. The subjects considered are general corrosion, effect of irradiation on corrosion, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). In addition some investigations about radiation induced segregation (RIS) are shown in order to know the compositional changes at grain boundaries of these alloys and their influence on corrosion properties. The data on general corrosion indicate moderate corrosion rates in high temperature water up to 350 degree centigree. Considerably larger corrosion rates were observed under neutron irradiation. The works concerning to the behaviour of these alloys to stress corrosion cracking seem to conclude that in these materials is necessary to optimize the temper temperature and to carry out the post-weld heat treatments properly in order to avoid stress corrosion cracking. (Author) 40 refs.

  16. Corrosion of High Chromium Ferritic/Martensitic Steels in High Temperature Water. a Literature Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, P.; Lapena, J.; Blazquez, F.

    2000-01-01

    Available literature concerning corrosion of high-chromium ferritic/martensitic steels in high temperature water has been reviewed. The subjects considered are general corrosion, effect of irradiation on corrosion, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). In addition some investigations about radiation induced segregation (RIS) are shown in order to know the compositional changes at grain boundaries of these alloys and their influence on corrosion properties. The data on general corrosion indicate moderate corrosion rates in high temperature water up to 350 degree centigrade. Considerably larger corrosion rates were observed under neutron irradiation. The works concerning to the behaviour of these alloys to stress corrosion cracking seem to conclude that in these materials is necessary to optimize the temper temperature and to carry out the post-weld heat treatments properly in order to avoid stress corrosion cracking. (Author) 40 refs

  17. Development of new ferritic / martensitic steels for fuel cladding in fast neutron reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratti, M.

    2009-11-01

    Many studies are directed toward the development of ferritic / martensitic ODS materials for applications in Gen IV programs. In this study, the mechanisms of formation of nano-phases (Y, Ti, O) and the influence of titanium on the precipitation refinement have been analyzed by small angle neutron scattering, X-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction. The obtained results allow developing new materials reinforced by nitrides (NDS which stands for Nitride Dispersion Strengthened). A first CEA patent is now being registered on these NDS materials processed by mechanical alloying. However, microstructural and mechanical characterizations are necessary to improve these new alloys. At last, a tensile and creep database has been acquired on an ODS Fe-18Cr material between room temperature and 650 C. These tests allow a qualitative description of the ODS mechanical behaviour. (author)

  18. Quantitative analysis of tensile deformation behavior by in-situ neutron diffraction for ferrite-martensite type dual-phase steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morooka, Satoshi; Umezawa, Osamu; Harjo, Stefanus; Hasegawa, Kohei; Toji, Yuki

    2012-01-01

    The yielding and work-hardening behavior of ferrite-martensite type dual-phase (DP) alloys were clearly analyzed using the in-situ neutron diffraction technique. We successfully established a new method to estimate the stress and strain partitioning between ferrite and martensite phase during loading. Although these phases exhibit the same lattice structure with similar lattice parameters, their lattice strains on (110), (200) and (211) are obviously different from each other under an applied stress. The misfit strains between those phases were clearly accompanied with the phase-scaled internal stream (phase stress). Thus, the martensite phase yielded by higher applied stress than macro-yield stress, which resulted in high work-hardening rate of the DP steel. We also demonstrated that ferrite phase fraction influenced work-hardening behavior. (author)

  19. Use of double and triple-ion irradiation to study the influence of high levels of helium and hydrogen on void swelling of 8-12% Cr ferritic-martensitic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupriiyanova, Y. E.; Bryk, V. V.; Borodin, O. V.; Kalchenko, A. S.; Voyevodin, V. N.; Tolstolutskaya, G. D.; Garner, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    In accelerator-driven spallation (ADS) devices, some of the structural materials will be exposed to intense fluxes of very high energy protons and neutrons, producing not only displacement damage, but very high levels of helium and hydrogen. Unlike fission flux-spectra where most helium and hydrogen are generated by transmutation in nickel and only secondarily in iron or chromium, gas production in ADS flux-spectra are rather insensitive to alloy composition, such that Fe-Cr base ferritic alloys also generate very large gas levels. While ferritic alloys are known to swell less than austenitic alloys in fission spectra, there is a concern that high gas levels in fusion and especially ADS facilities may strongly accelerate void swelling in ferritic alloys. In this study of void swelling in response to helium and hydrogen generation, irradiation was conducted on three ferritic-martensitic steels using the Electrostatic Accelerator with External Injector (ESUVI) facility that can easily produce any combination of helium to dpa and/or hydrogen to dpa ratios. Irradiation was conducted under single, dual and triple beam modes using 1.8 MeV Cr+3, 40 keV He+, and 20 keV H+. In the first part of this study we investigated the response of dual-phase EP-450 to variations in He/dpa and H/dpa ratio, focusing first on dual ion studies and then triple ion studies, showing that there is a diminishing influence on swelling with increasing total gas content. In the second part we investigated the relative response of three alloys spanning a range of starting microstructure and composition. In addition to observing various synergisms between He and H, the most important conclusion was that the tempered martensite phase, known to lag behind the ferrite phase in swelling in the absence of gases, loses much of its resistance to void nucleation when irradiated at large gas/dpa levels.

  20. Use of double and triple-ion irradiation to study the influence of high levels of helium and hydrogen on void swelling of 8–12% Cr ferritic-martensitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupriiyanova, Y.E., E-mail: fomenkoj@kipt.kharkov.ua [National Science Centre Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, 1, Akademicheskaya St., Kharkov, 61108 (Ukraine); Bryk, V.V.; Borodin, O.V.; Kalchenko, A.S.; Voyevodin, V.N.; Tolstolutskaya, G.D. [National Science Centre Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, 1, Akademicheskaya St., Kharkov, 61108 (Ukraine); Garner, F.A. [Radiation Effects Consulting, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    In accelerator-driven spallation (ADS) devices, some of the structural materials will be exposed to intense fluxes of very high energy protons and neutrons, producing not only displacement damage, but very high levels of helium and hydrogen. Unlike fission flux-spectra where most helium and hydrogen are generated by transmutation in nickel and only secondarily in iron or chromium, gas production in ADS flux-spectra are rather insensitive to alloy composition, such that Fe–Cr base ferritic alloys also generate very large gas levels. While ferritic alloys are known to swell less than austenitic alloys in fission spectra, there is a concern that high gas levels in fusion and especially ADS facilities may strongly accelerate void swelling in ferritic alloys. In this study of void swelling in response to helium and hydrogen generation, irradiation was conducted on three ferritic-martensitic steels using the Electrostatic Accelerator with External Injector (ESUVI) facility that can easily produce any combination of helium to dpa and/or hydrogen to dpa ratios. Irradiation was conducted under single, dual and triple beam modes using 1.8 MeV Cr{sup +3}, 40 keV He{sup +}, and 20 keV H{sup +}. In the first part of this study we investigated the response of dual-phase EP-450 to variations in He/dpa and H/dpa ratio, focusing first on dual ion studies and then triple ion studies, showing that there is a diminishing influence on swelling with increasing total gas content. In the second part we investigated the relative response of three alloys spanning a range of starting microstructure and composition. In addition to observing various synergisms between He and H, the most important conclusion was that the tempered martensite phase, known to lag behind the ferrite phase in swelling in the absence of gases, loses much of its resistance to void nucleation when irradiated at large gas/dpa levels.

  1. Alloy materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hans Thieme, Cornelis Leo (Westborough, MA); Thompson, Elliott D. (Coventry, RI); Fritzemeier, Leslie G. (Acton, MA); Cameron, Robert D. (Franklin, MA); Siegal, Edward J. (Malden, MA)

    2002-01-01

    An alloy that contains at least two metals and can be used as a substrate for a superconductor is disclosed. The alloy can contain an oxide former. The alloy can have a biaxial or cube texture. The substrate can be used in a multilayer superconductor, which can further include one or more buffer layers disposed between the substrate and the superconductor material. The alloys can be made a by process that involves first rolling the alloy then annealing the alloy. A relatively large volume percentage of the alloy can be formed of grains having a biaxial or cube texture.

  2. High-Temperature Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy Studies of Ferrite Formation in Inclusion-Engineered Steels: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Wangzhong; Hedström, Peter; Shibata, Hiroyuki; Jönsson, Pär G.; Nakajima, Keiji

    2018-05-01

    The concepts of oxide metallurgy and inclusion engineering can be utilized to improve the properties of low-alloy steels. These concepts aim at controlling the formation of intragranular ferrite (IGF), often a desirable microstructure providing good mechanical properties without the need for expensive alloying elements. IGF formation is stimulated to occur at non-metallic inclusions and form an arrangement of fine, interlocking ferrite grains. A method that has contributed significantly to investigations in this field lately is high-temperature confocal laser scanning microscopy (HT-CLSM). HT-CLSM is suited for in situ studies of inclusion behavior in liquid steel and phase transformations in solid-state steel, where in particular, displacive phase transformations can be studied, since they provide sufficient topographic contrast. The purpose of the present report is to provide a brief review of the state of the art of HT-CLSM and its application for in situ observations of ferrite formation in inclusion-engineered steels. The scientific literature in this field is surveyed and supplemented by new work to reveal the capability of HT-CLSM as well as to discuss the effect of factors such as cooling rate and parent grain size on IGF formation and growth kinetics. The report concludes with an outlook on the opportunities and challenges of HT-CLSM for applications in oxide metallurgy.

  3. Processing of a new high strength high toughness steel with duplex microstructure (Ferrite + Austenite)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martis, Codrick J.; Putatunda, Susil K.; Boileau, James

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► This new steel has exceptional combination of high strength and fracture toughness. ► Austempering treatment resulted in a very fine scale bainitic ferrite microstructure. ► As the austempering temperature increases yield strength and toughness decreases. ► Maximum fracture toughness of 105 MPa √m is obtained after austempering at 371 °C. ► A relationship between fracture toughness and the parameter σ y (X γ C γ ) 1/2 was observed. - Abstract: In this investigation a new third generation advanced high strength steel (AHSS) has been developed. This steel was synthesized by austempering of a low carbon and low alloy steel with high silicon content. The influence of austempering temperature on the microstructure and the mechanical properties including the fracture toughness of this steel was also examined. Compact tension and cylindrical tensile specimens were prepared from a low carbon low alloy steel and were initially austenitized at 927 °C for 2 h and then austempered in the temperature range between 371 °C and 399 °C to produce different microstructures. The microstructures were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and optical metallography. Test results show that the austempering heat treatment has resulted in a microstructure consisting of very fine scale bainitic ferrite and austenite. A combination of very high tensile strength of 1388 MPa and fracture toughness of 105 MPa √m was obtained after austempering at 371 °C

  4. Investigations of low-temperature neutron embrittlement of ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrell, K.; Mahmood, S.T.; Stoller, R.E.; Mansur, L.K.

    1992-01-01

    Investigations were made into reasons for accelerated embrittlement of surveillance specimens of ferritic steels irradiated at 50C at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) pressure vessel. Major suspects for the precocious embrittlement were a highly thermalized neutron spectrum,a low displacement rate, and the impurities boron and copper. None of these were found guilty. A dosimetry measurement shows that the spectrum at a major surveillance site is not thermalized. A new model of matrix hardening due to point defect clusters indicates little effect of displacement rate at low irradiation temperature. Boron levels are measured at 1 wt ppM or less, inadequate for embrittlement. Copper at 0.3 wt % and nickel at 0.7 wt % are shown to promote radiation strengthening in iron binary alloys irradiated at 50 to 60C, but no dependence on copper and nickel was found in steels with 0.05 to 0.22% Cu and 0.07 to 3.3% Ni. It is argued that copper impurity is not responsible for the accelerated embrittlement of the HFIR surveillance specimens. The dosimetry experiment has revealed the possibility that the fast fluence for the surveillance specimens may be underestimated because the stainless steel monitors in the surveillance packages do not record an unexpected component of neutrons in the spectrum at energies just below their measurement thresholds of 2 to 3 MeV

  5. Optimization of the Fabrication Route of Ferritic/Martensitic ODS Cladding Tubes: Metallurgical Approach and Pilgering Numerical Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logé, R.E.; Vanegas-Marques, E.; Mocellin, K.; Toualbi, L.; Carlan, Y. de

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: • Fabrication route of 9Cr-ODS (martensitic) alloys is well controlled. • Fabrication route of 14Cr-ODS (ferritic) should be further optimized. • The choice between a ferritic or a martensitic grade is not already done, it will depend also on the behaviour under irradiation, the corrosion resistance … • Part of the optimization can rely on numerical simulation of pilgering: • The constitutive behaviour is an essential ingredient for process optimization: appropriate cyclic laws must be used. • The numerical analysis can look at cracking risks, final yield stress, and even residual stress state or surface roughness. • HPTR laboratory approaches can be translated to the (industrial) VMR process provided some additional adjustments in the numerical code

  6. High burnup performance of an advanced oxide fuel assembly in FFTF [Fast Flux Test Facility] with ferritic/martensitic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bridges, A.E.; Saito, G.H.; Lovell, A.J.; Makenas, B.J.

    1986-05-01

    An advanced oxide fuel assembly with ferritic/martensitic materials has successfully completed its sixth cycle of irradiation in the FFTF, reaching a peak pellet burnup greater than 100 MWd/KgM and a peak fast fluence greater than 15 x 10 22 n/cm 2 . The cladding, wire-wrap, and duct material for the ACO-1 test assembly is the ferritic/martensitic alloy, HT9, which was chosen for use in long-lifetime fuel assemblies because of its good nominal temperature creep strength and low swelling rate. Valuable experience on the performance of HT9 materials has been gained from this test, advancing our quest for long-lifetime fuel. Pertinent data, obtained from the ACO-1 test assembly, will support the irradiation of the Core Demonstration Experiment in FFTF

  7. High-Q perpendicular-biased ferrite-tuned cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlini, R.D.; Thiessen, H.A.; Potter, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    Rapid-cycling proton synchrotrons, such as the proposed LAMPF II accelerator, require approximately 10 MV per turn rf with 17% tuning range near 50 MHz. The traditional approach to ferrite-tuned cavities uses a ferrite which is longitudinally biased (rf magnetic field parallel to bias field). This method leads to unacceptably high losses in the ferrite. At Los Alamos, we are developing a cavity with transverse bias (rf magnetic field perpendicular to the bias field) that makes use of the tensor permeability of the ferrite. Modest power tests of a small (10-cm-dia) quarter-wave singly re-entrant cavity tuned by nickel-zinc ferrites and aluminum-doped garnets indicate that the losses in the ferrite can be made negligible compared with the losses due to the surface resistivity of the copper cavity at power levels from 2 to 200 watts

  8. Activation analyses for different fusion structural alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attaya, H.; Smith, D.

    1991-01-01

    The leading candidate structural materials, viz., the vanadium alloys, the nickel or the manganese stabilized austenitic steels, and the ferritic steels, are analysed in terms of their induced activation in the TPSS fusion power reactor. The TPSS reactor has 1950 MW fusion power and inboard and outboard average neutron wall loading of 3.75 and 5.35 MW/m 2 respectively. The results shows that, after one year of continuous operation, the vanadium alloys have the least radioactivity at reactor shutdown. The maximum difference between the induced radioactivity in the vanadium alloys and in the other iron-based alloys occurs at about 10 years after reactor shutdown. At this time, the total reactor radioactivity, using the vanadium alloys, is about two orders of magnitude less than the total reactor radioactivity utilizing any other alloy. The difference is even larger in the first wall, the FW-vanadium activation is 3 orders of magnitude less than other alloys' FW activation. 2 refs., 7 figs

  9. Enhancement of electrical conductivity in gamma irradiated cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nawpute, Asha A.; Raut, A.V.; Babrekar, M.K.; Kale, C.M.; Jadhav, K.M.; Shinde, A.B.

    2014-01-01

    The cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized by sol-gel auto- combustion method, in which L-ascorbic acid was used as a fuel. The effect of gamma irradiation on the electrical resistivity of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles has been studied. The ferrite powder annealed at 550℃ was irradiated by gamma source 137 Cs. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction and DC resistivity. (author)

  10. Plasma spot welding of ferritic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesnjak, A.; Tusek, J.

    2002-01-01

    Plasma spot wedding of ferritic stainless steels studied. The study was focused on welding parameters, plasma and shieldings and the optimum welding equipment. Plasma-spot welded overlap joints on a 0.8 mm thick ferritic stainless steel sheet were subjected to a visual examination and mechanical testing in terms of tension-shear strength. Several macro specimens were prepared Plasma spot welding is suitable to use the same gas as shielding gas and as plasma gas , i. e. a 98% Ar/2% H 2 gas mixture. Tension-shear strength of plasma-spot welded joint was compared to that of resistance sport welded joints. It was found that the resistance welded joints withstand a somewhat stronger load than the plasma welded joints due to a large weld sport diameter of the former. Strength of both types of welded joints is approximately the same. (Author) 32 refs

  11. Microwave firing of MnZn-ferrites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsakaloudi, V.; Papazoglou, E.; Zaspalis, V.T.

    2004-01-01

    Microwave firing is evaluated in comparison to conventional firing for MnZn-ferrites. For otherwise identical conditions, microwave firing results to higher densities and coarser microstructures. Initial magnetic permeability values (25 kHz, 25 deg. C, <0.1 mT) after conventional firing are approximately 5000, but the corresponding values after microwave firing are approximately 6000. Unlike the conventional firing process, the final density after microwave firing is increased by increasing the prefiring temperature. As appears from the results of this study, microwave firing could be in principle a promising MnZn-ferrite firing technology for materials to be used in high magnetic permeability applications. No advantages of microwave firing are evident for materials intended to be used in high field power applications

  12. Cytotoxicity of ferrite particles by MTT and agar diffusion methods for hyperthermic application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Se-Ho; Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Shim, In-Bo; Lee, Yong-Keun

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the cytotoxicity of the prepared various ferrites (Fe-, Li-, Ni/Zn/Cu-, Ba-, Sr-, Co-, Co/Ni-ferrites) using MTT assay as well as agar diffusion method. Their cytotoxicity was compared with that of alginate-encapsulated ferrites. In the MTT assay, Fe 3 O 4 and SrFe 12 O 19 ferrite showed the highest cell viability of 90%. Alginate-encapsulated Ba-ferrite was ranked mildly cytotoxic, whereas their ferrite particles were ranked cytotoxic

  13. Magnetocapacitance effects in MnZn ferrites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. M. Xu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The magnetocapacitance effects of MnZn ferrites with different initial permeabilities have been studied systematically. Both intrinsic effect associated with magnetoelectric coupling and extrinsic effect, which means the combined contribution of magnetoresistance and the Maxwell-Wagner effect, have been observed simultaneously. Analysis shows that the relationship between the origins of both is in competitive equilibrium. Either of both mechanisms plays a dominant role in magnetocapacitance effects under different conditions, respectively, such as permeability and frequency of applied signals.

  14. Ferritic stainless steels: corrosion resistance + economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remus, A.L.

    1976-01-01

    Ferritic stainless steels provide corrosion resistance at lower cost. They include Type 409, Type 439, 18SR, 20-Mo (1.6 Mo), 18-2 (2 Mo), 26-1S, E-Brite 26-1, 29 Cr-4 Mo, and 29 Cr-4 Mo-2 Ni. Their corrosion and mechanical properties are examined. Resistance to stress-corrosion cracking is an advantage compared to austenitic types

  15. A reassessment of the effects of helium on Charpy impact properties of ferritic/martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.; Hamilton, M.L.; Hankin, G.L.

    1998-01-01

    To test the effect of helium on Charpy impact properties of ferritic/martensitic steels, two approaches are reviewed: quantification of results of tests performed on specimens irradiated in reactors with very different neutron spectra, and isotopic tailoring experiments. Data analysis can show that if the differences in reactor response are indeed due to helium effects, then irradiation in a fusion machine at 400 C to 100 dpa and 1000 appm He will result in a ductile to brittle transition temperature shift of over 500 C. However, the response as a function of dose and helium level is unlikely to be simply due to helium based on physical reasoning. Shear punch tests and microstructural examinations also support this conclusion based on irradiated samples of a series of alloys made by adding various isotopes of nickel in order to vary the production of helium during irradiation in HFIR. The addition of nickel at any isotopic balance to the Fe-12Cr base alloy significantly increased the shear yield and maximum strengths of the alloys. However, helium itself, up to 75 appm at over 7 dpa appears to have little effect on the mechanical properties of the alloys. This behavior is instead understood to result from complex precipitation response. The database for effects of helium on embrittlement based on nickel additions is therefore probably misleading and experiments should be redesigned to avoid nickel precipitation

  16. Removal of radioactive materials from waste solutions via magnetic ferrites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, T.E.; Kochen, R.L.; Price, M.Y.

    1982-01-01

    Ferrite waste treatment was found to be effective in removing actinides from simulated Rocky Flats process waste solutions. With a one-stage ferrite treatment, plutonium concentrations were consistently reduced from 10 -4 g/l to less than 10 -8 g/l, and americium concentrations were lowered from 10 -7 g/l to below 10 -10 g/l. In addition, siginficantly less solid was produced as compared with the flocculant precipitation technique now employed at Rocky Flats. Aging of ferrite solids and elevated beryllium and phosphate concentrations were identified as interferences in the ferrite treatment of process waste, but neither appeeared serious enough to prevent implementation in plant operations

  17. Low-Loss Ferrite Components for NASA Missions, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ferrite based isolators and circulators have been successfully demonstrated at microwave, millimeter-wave and submillimeter-wave frequencies. These components are...

  18. Preparation of single-crystal copper ferrite nanorods and nanodisks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Jimin; Liu Zhimin; Wu Weize; Li Zhonghao; Han Buxing; Huang Ying

    2005-01-01

    This article, for the first time, reports the preparation of single-crystal copper ferrite nanorods and nanodisks. Using amorphous copper ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by reverse micelle as reaction precursor, single-crystal copper ferrite nanorods were synthesized via hydrothermal method in the presence of surfactant polyethylene glycol (PEG), however, copper ferrite nanodisks were prepared through the same procedures except the surfactant PEG. The resulting nanomaterials have been characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), selected electron area diffraction (SEAD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The bulk composition of the samples was determined by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)

  19. Surface effects on the magnetic behavior of nanocrystalline nickel ferrites and nickel ferrite-polymer nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nathani, H.; Misra, R.D.K.

    2004-01-01

    The magnetization studies on nanocrystalline nickel ferrite as powder particles, and as diluted dispersion (10 wt.%) in polymer matrix (polymer nanocomposites) are presented. The two polymer-based nanocomposites were prepared via ball-milling and in situ polymerization, respectively. The magnetization measurements provide strong evidence of surface effects to magnetization, which explains the non-saturation of magnetization at high fields. The differences in the magnetization behavior of nickel ferrite as powder particles and in the ball-milled nanocomposite and the nanocomposite prepared via in situ polymerization are attributed to the different extent of interparticle interactions between the particles and the preparation route. The magnetization versus applied field behavior of the three ferrite systems show a similar jump in the initial part of the magnetization curve in all the cases which implies the existence of a core-shell like morphology of the particles over a large temperature range and its dominance over the interparticle interaction effects between the particles

  20. Contribution to the structural study of austeno-ferritic steels. Morphological and analytical definition of the ferritic phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bathily, Alassane.

    1977-07-01

    Conditions of fast and selective austenite dissolution were defined by means of current-voltage curves using AISI 316-type materials (welding beads). The ferritic phase was isolated and identified with X-rays. The percentages of ferrite were compared gravimetrically with those obtained by traditional methods. The ferrite isolated was chemically analysed by atomic absorption, the only doubtful value being carbon. It is shown by this method that a morphological study of the solidification of the ferritic lattice is possible, even for percentages around 1% [fr

  1. Characterisation of As-deformed microstructure of ODS NI-Base superalloy and ODS ferritic steel prior to directional recrystallisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baloch, M.M.; Memon, S.A.

    2007-01-01

    The materials studied are unusual in the sense that they have been prepared from mechanically alloyed procedures, including compaction and hot extrusion. It was felt necessary to characterise the initial microstructure thoroughly prior to directional recrystallisation of the alloys. Following consolidation by hot extrusion, dispersion strengthened superalloys appear to display a very fine sub-micron grain size consisting of both dislocation free recrystallised material and un- recrystallised regions of high dislocation density. It is found that there is a very fine dislocation cell structure in the ODS (Oxide Dispersion Strengthened) Ferritic stainless Steel prior to recrystallisation treatment, which shows that alloy is in old-deformed condition after mechanical alloying, extrusion I hot-working. This is in contrast to the mechanically alloyed Nickel Base Superalloy, which have consistently been found to be in primary recrystallisation state following extrusion. In order to understand the recrystallisation behaviour of the two mechanically illoyed materials with commercial designations MA6000 and MA956, a measurement of the orientation relationship between adjacent grains in the as- deformed ODS alloys has also been carried out using Transmission Electron microscope. (author)

  2. Calcium ferrite formation from the thermolysis of calcium tris (maleato)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    microwave and satellite communication, bubble devices, audio-video, digital recording and as permanent magnets. (Viswanathan and Murthy 1990), ferrites have opened a new vista in the field of chemical physics of materials. Keeping in view these technological applications, ferrites have been regarded as an important ...

  3. on the magnetic properties of ultra-fine zinc ferrites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anantharaman, M.R.; Jagatheesan, S.; Malini, K.A.; Sindhu, S.; Narayanasamy, A.; Chinnasamy, C.N.; Jacobs, J.P.; Reijne, S.; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Smits, R.H.H.; Smits, R.H.H.; Brongersma, H.H.

    1998-01-01

    Zinc ferrite belongs to the class of normal spinels where it is assumed to have a cation distribution of Zn2+(Fe3+)2(O2−)4, and it is purported to be showing zero net magnetisation. However, there have been recent reports suggesting that zinc ferrite exhibits anomaly in its magnetisation. Zinc

  4. A seeded ambient temperature ferrite process for treatment of AMD ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A seeded ambient temperature ferrite process for treatment of AMD waters: magnetite formation in the presence and absence of calcium ions under steady state operation. ... promising for AMD treatment. Keywords: Ferrite process, Magnetite seed, Calcium interference, Acid mine drainage (WaterSA: 2003 29(2): 117-124) ...

  5. Performance Variation of Ferrite Magnet PMBLDC Motor with Temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fasil, Muhammed; Mijatovic, Nenad; Jensen, Bogi Bech

    2015-01-01

    The price fluctuations of rare earth metals and the uncertainty in their availability has generated an increased interest in ferrite magnet machines. The influence of temperature on BH characteristics of the ferrite magnet differ considerably from that of the rare earth magnet and hence, requires...

  6. Magnetic domains in martensite of Ni-Mg-Ga alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokorin, V.V.; Babij, O.M.; Dubinko, S.V.; Prokopov, A.R.

    2006-01-01

    The structural changes attendant on intermartensitic transformation in a Ni-Mg-Ga shape memory alloy are considered using magneto-optical visualization with the help of ferrite-garnet monocrystalline films. It is established that on the intermartensitic transformation the complete reorganization of martensite macrostructure fails. Martensite crystals resulted from the basic transformation change somewhat their sizes on intermartensitic transition. The existence of large-scale labyrinth magnetic domain structure is revealed [ru

  7. Hot Ductility Behaviors in the Weld Heat-Affected Zone of Nitrogen-Alloyed Fe-18Cr-10Mn Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Joonoh; Lee, Tae-Ho; Hong, Hyun-Uk

    2015-04-01

    Hot ductility behaviors in the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) of nitrogen-alloyed Fe-18Cr-10Mn austenitic stainless steels with different nitrogen contents were evaluated through hot tension tests using Gleeble simulator. The results of Gleeble simulations indicated that hot ductility in the HAZs deteriorated due to the formation of δ-ferrite and intergranular Cr2N particles. In addition, the amount of hot ductility degradation was strongly affected by the fraction of δ-ferrite.

  8. Recent advances in processing and applications of microwave ferrites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, Vincent G.; Geiler, Anton; Chen Yajie; Yoon, Soack Dae; Wu Mingzhong; Yang, Aria; Chen Zhaohui; He Peng; Parimi, Patanjali V.; Zuo Xu; Patton, Carl E.; Abe, Manasori; Acher, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    Next generation magnetic microwave devices will be planar, smaller, weigh less, and perform well beyond the present state-of-the-art. For this to become a reality advances in ferrite materials must first be realized. These advances include self-bias magnetization, tunability of the magnetic anisotropy, low microwave loss, and volumetric and weight reduction. To achieve these goals one must turn to novel materials processing methods. Here, we review recent advances in the processing of microwave ferrites. Attention is paid to the processing of ferrite films by pulsed laser deposition, liquid phase epitaxy, spin spray ferrite plating, screen printing, and compaction of quasi-single crystals. Conventional and novel applications of ferrite materials, including microwave non-reciprocal passive devices, microwave signal processing, negative index metamaterial-based electronics, and electromagnetic interference suppression are discussed.

  9. Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles under high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saccone, F. D.; Ferrari, S.; Grinblat, F.; Bilovol, V. [Instituto de Tecnologías y Ciencias de la Ingeniería, “Ing. H. Fernández Long,” Av. Paseo Colón 850 (1063), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Errandonea, D., E-mail: daniel.errandonea@uv.es [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Institut Universitari de Ciència dels Materials, Universitat de Valencia, c/ Doctor Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Agouram, S. [Departamento de Física Aplicada y Electromagnetismo, Universitat de València, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)

    2015-08-21

    We report by the first time a high pressure X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy study of cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles carried out at room temperature up to 17 GPa. In contrast with previous studies of nanoparticles, which proposed the transition pressure to be reduced from 20–27 GPa to 7.5–12.5 GPa (depending on particle size), we found that cobalt ferrite nanoparticles remain in the spinel structure up to the highest pressure covered by our experiments. In addition, we report the pressure dependence of the unit-cell parameter and Raman modes of the studied sample. We found that under quasi-hydrostatic conditions, the bulk modulus of the nanoparticles (B{sub 0} = 204 GPa) is considerably larger than the value previously reported for bulk CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (B{sub 0} = 172 GPa). In addition, when the pressure medium becomes non-hydrostatic and deviatoric stresses affect the experiments, there is a noticeable decrease of the compressibility of the studied sample (B{sub 0} = 284 GPa). After decompression, the cobalt ferrite lattice parameter does not revert to its initial value, evidencing a unit cell contraction after pressure was removed. Finally, Raman spectroscopy provides information on the pressure dependence of all Raman-active modes and evidences that cation inversion is enhanced by pressure under non-hydrostatic conditions, being this effect not fully reversible.

  10. Magnetic behavior of nanocrystalline nickel ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nathani, H.; Gubbala, S.; Misra, R.D.K.

    2005-01-01

    In the previous papers [R.D.K. Misra, A. Kale, R.S. Srivatsava, O. Senkov, Mater. Sci. Technol. 19 (2003) 826; R.D.K. Misra, A. Kale, B. Hooi, J.Th. DeHosson, Mater. Sci. Technol. 19 (2003) 1617; A. Kale, S. Gubbala, R.D.K. Misra, J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 277 (2004) 350; S. Gubbala, H. Nathani, K. Koizol, R.D.K. Misra, Phys. B 348 (2004) 317; R.D.K. Misra, S. Gubbala, A. Kale, W.F. Egelhoff, Mater. Sci. Eng. B. 111 (2004) 164], we reported the synthesis, structural characterization and magnetic behavior of nanocrystalline ferrites of inverse and mixed spinel structure made by reverse micelle technique that enabled a narrow particle size distribution to be obtained. In the present paper, the reverse micelle approach has been extended to synthesize nanocrystalline ferrites with varying surface roughness of 8-18 A (the surface roughness was measured by atomic force microscopy) and the magnetic behavior studied by SQUID magnetometer. Two different kinds of measurement were performed: (a) zero-field cooling (ZFC) and field cooling (FC) magnetization versus temperature measurements and (b) magnetization as a function of applied field. The analysis of magnetic measurement suggests significant influence of surface roughness of particles on the magnetic behavior. While the superparamagnetic behavior is retained by the nanocrystalline ferrites of different surface roughness at 300 K, the hysteresis loop at 2 K becomes non-squared and the coercivity increases with increase in surface roughness. This behavior is discussed in terms of broken bonds and degree of surface spin disorder

  11. Preferential spin canting in nanosize zinc ferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, Brajesh, E-mail: bpandey@gmail.com [Department of Applied Science, Symbiosis Institute of Technology, SIU, Lavale, Pune 411112 (India); Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud 150, 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Litterst, F.J. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud 150, 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Institut für Physik der Kondensierten Materie,Technische Universität Braunschweig, Mendelssohnstr. 3, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Baggio-Saitovitch, E.M. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud 150, 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Zinc ferrite nanoparticles powder with average size of 10.0±0.5 nm was synthesized by the citrate precursor route. We studied the structural and magnetic properties using X-ray diffraction, vibrating sample magnetometry and Mössbauer spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction patterns show that the synthesized zinc ferrite possesses good spinel structure. Both Mössbauer and magnetization data indicate superparamagnetic ferrimagnetic particles at room temperature. The magnetic behavior is determined by a considerable degree of cation inversion with Fe{sup III} in tetrahedral A-sites. Mössbauer spectroscopy at low temperature and in high applied magnetic field reveals that A-site spins are aligned antiparallel to the applied field with some possible angular scatter whereas practically all octahedral B-site spins are canted contrasting some earlier reported partial B-site spin canting in nanosize zinc ferrite. Deviations from the antiferromagnetic arrangement of B-site spins are supposed to be caused by magnetic frustration effects. - Highlights: • Spinel structure ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles in the uniform size range of 10.0±0.5 nm have been synthesized using the citrate precursor route. • Canting of the spins of A- and B-sublattice sites has been studied by low temperature and high magnetic field Mössbauer spectroscopy. • A-site spins are aligned antiparallel to the applied field with only small angular scatter. • B-site spins are strongly canted in contrast to earlier quoted only partial canting. • B site spin structure deviates significantly from a collinear antiferromagnetic arrangement.

  12. Effect of ferrite addition above the base ferrite on the coupling factor of wireless power transfer for vehicle applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batra, Tushar; Schaltz, Erik; Ahn, Seungyoung

    2015-01-01

    and reduce magnetic emissions to the surroundings. Effect of adding extra ferrite above the base ferrite at different physical locations on the self-inductance, mutual inductance and coupling factor is under investigation in this paper. The addition can increase or decrease the mutual inductance depending...

  13. Stability under irradiation of a fine dispersion of oxides in a ferritic matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monnet, I.

    1999-01-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic-martensitic steels are being considered for high temperature, high fluence nuclear applications, like fuel pin cladding in Fast Breeder Reactors. ODS alloys offer improved out of pile strength characteristics at temperature above 550 deg.C and ferritic-martensitic matrix is highly swelling resistant. A clad in an ODS ferritic steel, call DY (Fe-13Cr-1,5Mo+TiO 2 +Y 2 O 3 ) has been irradiated in the experimental reactor Phenix. Under irradiation oxide dissolution occurs. Microstructural observations indicated that oxide evolution is correlated with the dose and consist in four phenomena: the interfaces of oxide particles with the matrix become irregular, the uniform distribution of the finest oxide ( 2 O 3 , Y 2 O 3 , MgO or MgAl 2 O 4 . These materials were irradiated with charged particles in order to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms of dissolution. Irradiation with 1 MeV Helium does not induce any modification, neither in the chemical modification of the particles nor in their spatial and size distribution. Since most of the energy of helium ions is lost by inelastic interaction, this result proves that this kind of interaction does not induce oxide dissolution. Irradiation with 1 MeV or 1.2 MeV electrons leads to a significant dissolution with a radius decrease proportional to the dose. These experiments prove that oxide dissolution can be induced by Frenkel pairs alone, provided that metallic atoms are displaced. The comparison between irradiation with ions (displacements cascades) and electrons (Frenkel pairs only) shows the importance of free point defects in the dissolution phenomena. For all the irradiations (ions or electrons) the spinel MgAl 2 O 4 seems more resistant than Y 2 O 3 to dissolution, and MgO and Al 2 O 3 are even less resistant. This is the order of stability under irradiation of bulk oxides. (author)

  14. Mechanosynthesis of A Ferritic ODS (Oxide Dispersion Strengthened) Steel Containing 14% Chromium and Its Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivai, A. K.; Dimyati, A.; Adi, W. A.

    2017-05-01

    One of the advanced materials for application at high temperatures which is aggressively developed in the world is ODS (Oxide Dispersion strengthened) steel. ODS ferritic steels are one of the candidate materials for future nuclear reactors in the world (Generation IV reactors) because it is able to be used in the reactor above 600 °C. ODS ferritic steels have also been developed for the interconnect material of SOFC (Solid Oxide Fuel Cell) which will be exposed to about 800 °C of temperature. The steel is strengthened by dispersing homogeneously of oxide particles (ceramic) in nano-meter sized in the matrix of the steel. Synthesis of a ferritic ODS steel by dispersion of nano-particles of yttrium oxide (yttria: Y2O3) as the dispersion particles, and containing high-chromium i.e. 14% has been conducted. Synthesis of the ODS steels was done mechanically (mechanosynthesis) using HEM (High Energy ball Milling) technique for 40 and 100 hours. The resulted samples were characterized using SEM-EDS (Scanning Electron Microscope-Energy Dispersive Spectroscope), and XRD (X-ray diffraction) to analyze the microstructure characteristics. The results showed that the crystal grains of the sample with 100 hours milling time was much smaller than the sample with 40 hours milling time, and some amount of alloy was formed during the milling process even for 40 hours milling time. Furthermore, the structure analysis revealed that some amount of iron atom substituted by a slight amount of chromium atom as a solid solution. The quantitative analysis showed that the phase mostly consisted of FeCr solid-solution with the structure was BCC (body-centered cubic).

  15. Three-dimensional characterization of ODS ferritic steel using by FIB-SEM serial sectioning method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, T; Sugino, Y; Ohono, N; Ukai, S; Miyazaki, N; Wang, Y; Ohnuki, S

    2014-11-01

    Considerable attention has been paid to the research of the electron tomography due to determine the three-dimensional (3D) structure of materials [1]. One of the electron tomography techniques, focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) imaging has advantages of high resolutions (10 nm), large area observation (μm order) and simultaneous energy dispersive x- ray microanalysis (EDS)/ electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis. The purpose of this study, three-dimensional EBSD analysis of ODS ferritic steel which carried out cold work using FIB-SEM equipment was conducted, and it aimed at analyzing the microstructure obtained there. The zone annealing tests were conducted for ferritic steel [2,3], which were produced through mechanical alloying and hot-extrusion. After zone annealing, specimens were mechanically polished with #400∼4000 emery paper, 1 µm diamond paste and alumina colloidal silica. The serial sectioning and the 3D-electron backscattering diffraction (3D-EBSD) analysis were carried out. We made the micro pillar (30 x 30 x 15 µm). The EBSD measurements were carried out in each layer after serial sectioning at a step size and milling depth was 80 nm with 30 slices. After EBSD analysis, the series of cross-sectional images were aligned according to arbitrarily specified areas and then stacked up to form a volume. Consequently, we obtained the 3D-IPF maps for ODS ferritic steel. In this specimen, the {111} and {001} grains are layered by turns. In addition, the volume fraction value of both plane are similar. The aspect ratio increases with specimen depth. The 3D-EBSD mapping is useful to analysis of the bulk material since this method obtain many microstructure information, such a shape, volume and orientation of the crystal, grain boundary. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Advances in ferrite microwave materials and devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schloemann, Ernst

    2000-01-01

    The application of ferrites in non-reciprocal components is discussed, with the emphasis on broadband isolators and circulators. The performance of such devices may be characterized by the ratio f max /f min of the frequencies that define the edges of the frequency band, within which satisfactory performance has been achieved. For the best currently available devices this ratio is approx. 3 : 1, but larger values appear feasible according to a detailed analysis of the 'low-field, low-frequency loss' that limits the performance

  17. Structural and magnetic characteristics of PVA/CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nano-composites prepared via mechanical alloying method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashidi, S.; Ataie, A., E-mail: aataie@ut.ac.ir

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Single phase CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nano-particles synthesized in one step by mechanical alloying. • PVA/CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} magnetic nano-composites were fabricated via mechanical milling. • FTIR confirmed the interaction between PVA and magnetic CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} particles. • Increasing in milling time and PVA amount led to well dispersion of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. - Abstract: In this research, polyvinyl alcohol/cobalt ferrite nano-composites were successfully synthesized employing a two-step procedure: the spherical single-phase cobalt ferrite of 20 ± 4 nm mean particle size was synthesized via mechanical alloying method and then embedded into polymer matrix by intensive milling. The results revealed that increase in polyvinyl alcohol content and milling time causes cobalt ferrite particles disperse more homogeneously in polymer matrix, while the mean particle size and shape of cobalt ferrite have not been significantly affected. Transmission electron microscope images indicated that polyvinyl alcohol chains have surrounded the cobalt ferrite nano-particles; also, the interaction between polymer and cobalt ferrite particles in nano-composite samples was confirmed. Magnetic properties evaluation showed that saturation magnetization, coercivity and anisotropy constant values decreased in nano-composite samples compared to pure cobalt ferrite. However, the coercivity values of related nano-composite samples enhanced by increasing PVA amount due to domain wall mechanism.

  18. Influence of tempering on mechanical properties of ferritic martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Y. B.; Han, C. H.; Choi, B. K.; Lee, D. W.; Kim, T. K.; Jeong, Y. H.; Cho, S.

    2012-01-01

    In the mid-1980s research programs for development of low activation materials began. This is based on the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Guidelines (10CFR part 61) that were developed to reduce long-lived radioactive isotopes, which allows nuclear reactor waste to be disposed of by shallow land burial when removed from service. Development of low activation materials is also key issue in nuclear fusion systems, as the structural components can became radioactive due to nuclear transmutation caused by exposure to high dose neutron irradiation. Reduced-activation ferritic martensitic (RAFM) steels have been developed in the leading countries in nuclear fusion technology, and are now being considered as primary candidate material for the test blanket module (TBM) in the international thermonuclear experiment reactor (ITER). RAFM steels developed so far (e.g., EUROFER 97 and F82H) meet the requirement for structural application in the ITER. However, if such alloys are used in the DEMO or commercial fusion reactor is still unclear, as the reactors are designed to operate under much severe conditions (i.e., higher outlet coolant temperature and neutron fluences). Such harsh operating conditions lead to development of RAFM steels with better creep and irradiation resistances. Mechanical properties of RAFM steels are strongly affected by microstructural features including the distribution, size and type of precipitates, dislocation density and grain size. For a given composition, such microstructural characteristics are determined mainly by thermo-mechanical process employed to fabricate the final product, and accordingly a final heat treatment, i.e., tempering is the key step to control the microstructure and mechanical properties. In the present work, we investigated mechanical properties of the RAFM steels with a particular attention being paid to effects of tempering on impact and creep properties

  19. Lanthana-bearing nanostructured ferritic steels via spark plasma sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasebani, Somayeh [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States); Charit, Indrajit, E-mail: icharit@uidaho.edu [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States); Wu, Yaqiao; Burns, Jatuporn; Allahar, Kerry N.; Butt, Darryl P. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Boise State University, Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States); Cole, James I. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States); Alsagabi, Sultan F. [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    A lanthana-containing nanostructured ferritic steel (NFS) was processed via mechanical alloying (MA) of Fe-14Cr-1Ti-0.3Mo-0.5La{sub 2}O{sub 3} (wt.%) and consolidated via spark plasma sintering (SPS). In order to study the consolidation behavior via SPS, sintering temperature and dwell time were correlated with microstructure, density, microhardness and shear yield strength of the sintered specimens. A bimodal grain size distribution including both micron-sized and nano-sized grains was observed in the microstructure of specimens sintered at 850, 950 and1050 °C for 45 min. Significant densification occurred at temperatures greater than 950 °C with a relative density higher than 98%. A variety of nanoparticles, some enriched in Fe and Cr oxides and copious nanoparticles smaller than 10 nm with faceted morphology and enriched in La and Ti oxides were observed. After SPS at 950 °C, the number density of Cr–Ti–La–O-enriched nanoclusters with an average radius of 1.5 nm was estimated to be 1.2 × 10{sup 24} m{sup −3}. The La + Ti:O ratio was close to 1 after SPS at 950 and 1050 °C; however, the number density of nanoclusters decreased at 1050 °C. With SPS above 950 °C, the density improved but the microhardness and shear yield strength decreased due to partial coarsening of the grains and nanoparticles.

  20. Chemical heat treatment of low alloyed maraging steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinov, L S; Korotich, I K [Zhdanovskij Metallurgicheskij Inst. (Ukrainian SSR)

    1979-09-01

    The investigation concerned the nitriding, cementation, chromizing, borating of economically alloyed maraging grade 04Kh2N5MFYu steel. The investigated methods of chemothermal treatment were found to considerably increase the hardness of the surface layer of the maraging steel. The high tempering of the grade 04Kh2N5MFYu cemented and hardened steel was found to produce secondary hardening. On chromizing, the diffusion layer is an alloyed ferrite which strengthens because of the dispersion hardening on ageing. The formation of the plastic low-carbon martensite at relatively small cooling rates greatly decreases the tendency of the boride layer to cracking.

  1. Development of ultrafine ferritic sheaves/plates in SAE 52100 steel for enhancement of strength by controlled thermomechanical processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, J. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, W.B. 721 302 (India); Scientific Services and Research and Development, Tata Steel, Jamshedpur 831 001, Jharkhand (India); Manna, I., E-mail: imanna@metal.iitkgp.ernet.in [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, W.B. 721 302 (India); Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute (CGCRI), Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), 196 Raja S C Mullick Road, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2012-06-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ultrafine bainite + martensite duplex microstructure developed in SAE 52100 steel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermomechanical processing modifies size + morphology of bainitic ferrite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Processing involves hot deformation prior to/during/after austenitizing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significant improvement in mechanical strength achieved. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Similar study on high carbon, low alloy steel not reported in the literature. - Abstract: The present study attempts to tailor the size, morphology and distribution of the ferrite needles/sheaves by thermomechanical processing and develop an ultrafine ferrite + martensite duplex microstructure for enhancement of strength and toughness in SAE 52100 steel. The thermo-mechanical routine included 5% hot deformation before, during or after austenitizing at 950 Degree-Sign C for 15 min followed by austempering at 270 Degree-Sign C for 30 min and subsequent water quenching to room temperature. Optical/electron microscopy along with X-ray diffraction was used to quantitatively monitor the size, morphology and distribution of the phase or phase aggregate. Significant improvement in nanohardness, wear resistance and elastic modulus and was observed in samples subjected to thermomechanical processing, as compared to that following the same austenitizing and austempering routine without hot deformation at any stage. However, improvement in the bulk mechanical property due to the present thermo-mechanical is lower than that obtained in our earlier study comprising cold deformation prior to austenitizing and austempering.

  2. A stress-based fracture criteria validated on mixed microstructures of ferrite and bainite over a range of stress triaxialities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golling, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.golling@ltu.se [Luleå University of Technology, SE 971 87 Luleå (Sweden); Östlund, Rickad [Gestamp HardTech, Ektjärnsvägen 5, SE 973 45 Luleå (Sweden); Oldenburg, Mats [Luleå University of Technology, SE 971 87 Luleå (Sweden)

    2016-09-30

    Hot stamping is a sequential process for formation and heat-treatment of sheet metal components with superior mechanical properties. By applying different cooling rates, the microstructural composition and thus the material properties of steel can be designed. By controlling the cooling rate in different sections of a blank, the material properties can be tailored depending on the desired toughness. Under continuous cooling, various volume fractions of ferrite and bainite are formed depending on the rate of cooling. This paper focuses on the ductile fracture behavior of a thin sheet metal made of low-alloyed boron steel with varying amounts of ferrite and bainite. An experimental setup was applied in order to produce microstructures with different volume fractions of ferrite and bainite. In total, five different test specimen geometries, representing different stress triaxialities, were heat treated and tensile tested. Through full-field measurements, flow curves extending beyond necking and the equivalent plastic strain to fracture were determined. Experimental results were further investigated using a mean-field homogenization scheme combined with local fracture criteria. The mean-field homogenization scheme comprises the influence of microstructure composition and stress triaxiality with usable accuracy, connoting auspicious possibilities for constitutive modeling of hot-stamped components.

  3. High Temperature Oxidation of Ferritic Steels for Solid Oxide Electrolysis Stacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molin, Sebastian; Chen, Ming; Bentzen, Janet Jonna

    2013-01-01

    atmospheres at 800°C. Four commercially available alloys: Crofer 22 APU, Crofer 22 H, AL29-4, E-Brite were characterized in humidified hydrogen. One alloy, Crofer 22 APU was also characterized in pure oxygen both in the as-prepared state and after application of a protective coating. Best corrosion resistance......Oxidation rates of ferritic steels used as interconnector plates in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Stacks are of concern as they may be determining for the life time of the technology. In this study oxidation experiments were carried out for up to 1000 hours in hydrogen-side and oxygen-side simulated...... in humidified hydrogen atmosphere was observed for Crofer 22 APU and Crofer 22 H alloys. Corrosion rates for Crofer 22 APU measured in humidified hydrogen are similar to the corrosion rates measured in air. Both coatings of plasma sprayed LSM and dual layer coatings (Co3O4/LSM-Co3O4) applied by wet spraying...

  4. Microstructural Evolution of Thor™ 115 Creep-Strength Enhanced Ferritic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortolani, Matteo; D'Incau, Mirco; Ciancio, Regina; Scardi, Paolo

    2017-12-01

    A new ferritic steel branded as Thor™ 115 has been developed to enhance high-temperature resistance. The steel design combines an improved oxidation resistance with long-term microstructural stability. The new alloy, cast to different product forms such as plates and tubes, was extensively tested to assess the high-temperature time-dependent mechanical behavior (creep). The main strengthening mechanism is precipitation hardening by finely dispersed carbide and nitride phases. Information on the evolution of secondary phases and time-temperature-precipitation behavior of the alloy, essential to ensure long-term property stability, was obtained by scanning transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy, and by X-ray Powder Diffraction on specimens aged up to 50,000 hours. A thermodynamic modeling supports presentation and evaluation of the experimental results. The evolution of precipitates in the new alloy confirms the retention of the strengthening by secondary phases, even after long-term exposure at high temperature. The deleterious conversion of nitrides into Z phase is shown to be in line with, or even slower than that of the comparable ASME grade 91 steel.

  5. Control of activation levels to simplify waste management of fusion reactor ferritic steel components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiffen, F.W.; Santoro, R.T.

    1983-01-01

    Activation characteristics of a material for service in the neutron flux of a fusion reactor first wall fall into three areas: waste management, reactor maintenance and repair, and safety. Of these, the waste management area is the most likely to impact the public acceptance of fusion reactors for power generation. The decay of the activity in steels within tens of years could lead to simplified waste disposal or possibly even to materials recycle. Whether or not these can be achieved will be controlled by (1) selection of alloying elements, (2) control of critical impurity elements, and (3) control of cross contamination from other reactor components. Several criteria can be used to judge the acceptability of potential alloying elements in iron, and to define the limits on content of critical impurity elements. One approach is to select and limit alloying additions on the basis of the activity. If material recycle is a goal, N, Al, Ni, Cu, Nb, and Mo must be excluded. If simplified waste storage by shallow land burial is the goal, regulations limit the concentration of only a few isotopes. For first-wall material that will be exposed to 9 MW-y/m 2 service, allowable initial concentration limits include (in at. ppM) Ni < 20,000; Mo < 3650; N < 3650, Cu < 2400; and Nb < 1.0. The other constituent elements of ferritic steels will not be limited. Possible substitutes for the molybdenum normally used to strengthen the steels include W, Ta, Ti, and V

  6. Investigations of Ferritic Nodular Cast Iron Containing About 5-6% Aluminium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soiński M.S.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The work presents results of investigations concerning the production of cast iron containing about 5-6% aluminium, with the ferritic matrix in the as-cast state and nodular or vermicular graphite precipitates. The examined cast iron came from six melts produced under the laboratory conditions. It contained aluminium in the amount of 5.15% to 6.02% (carbon in the amount of 2.41% to 2.87%, silicon in the amount of 4.50% to 5.30%, and manganese in the amount of 0.12% to 0.14%. After its treatment with cerium mixture and graphitization with ferrosilicon (75% Si, only nodular and vermicular graphite precipitates were achieved in the examined cast iron. Moreover, it is possible to achieve the alloy of pure ferritic matrix, even after the spheroidizing treatment, when both the aluminium and the silicon occur in cast iron in amounts of about 5.2÷5.3%.

  7. Development of an in situ bake-out method of outgassing reduction of kicker ferrite cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiya, Junichiro; Ogiwara, Norio; Nishikawa, Masaaki; Hikichi, Yusuke; Yanagibashi, Toru; Suganuma, Kazuaki

    2012-01-01

    The usual way for reduce outgassing of a large structure in vacuum is to bake the whole vacuum chamber containing the structure. However, this method needs a huge heater capacity and there are limits caused by the heat expansion of the chamber. The solution is to raise the temperature of the structure inside without heating the vacuum chamber. This is achieved by installing a heat source inside the chamber and by inserting the heat shield between the structure and the chamber walls to direct the heat to the structure. In the particle accelerator field, it is often required to reduce outgassing of structures inside vacuum chambers. One example is a kicker magnet, which is installed in a vacuum chamber and consists mainly of ferrite and aluminum alloy. As known from former experience the main outgassing component from ferrite is water. We applied the above mentioned method to the outgassing reduction of such a kicker. We are able to direct most of the heat flow toward the kicker magnet by inserting the heat shielding plates and thus outgassing was successfully reduced. (author)

  8. Comparison of the mechanical strength properties of several high-chromium ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booker, M.K.; Sikka, V.K.; Booker, B.L.P.

    1981-01-01

    A modified 9 Cr-1 Mo ferritic steel has been selected as an alternative material for breeder reactors. Different 9 Cr-1 Mo steels are already being used commercially in UK and USA and a 9 Cr-2 Mo steel (EM12) is being used commercially in France. The 12% Cr steel alloy HT9 is also often recommended for high-temperature service. Creep-rupture data for all six seels were analyzed to yield rupture life as a function of stress, temperature, and lot-to-lot variations. Yield and tensile strength data for the three 9 Cr-1 Mo materials were also examined. All results were compared with Type 304 stainless steel, and the tensile and creep properties of the modified and British 9 Cr-1 Mo materials were used to calculate allowable stress values S 0 per Section VIII, Division 1 and S/sub m/ per code Case N-47 to section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. these values were compared with code listings for American commercial 9 Cr-1 Mo steel, 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel, and Type 304 stainless steel. The conclusion is made that the modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel displays tensile and creep strengths superior to those of the other ferritic materials examined and is at least comparable to Type 304 stainless steel from room temperature to about 625 0 C. 31 figures

  9. Reduced activation ODS ferritic steel - recent development in high speed hot extrusion processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oksiuta, Zbigniew [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Bialystok Technical University (Poland); Lewandowska, Malgorzata; Kurzydlowski, Krzysztof [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology (Poland); Baluc, Nadine [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association Euratom-Confederation Suisse, Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2010-05-15

    The paper presents the microstructure and mechanical properties of an oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS), reduced activation, ferritic steel, namely the Fe-14Cr-2W-0.3Ti-0.3Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} alloy, which was fabricated by hot isostatic pressing followed by high speed hydrostatic extrusion (HSHE) and heat treatment HT at 1050 C. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations revealed significant differences in the grain size and dislocation density between the as-HIPped and as-HSHE materials. It was also found that the microstructure of the steel is stable after HT. The HSHE process improves significantly the tensile and Charpy impact properties of the as-HIPped steel. The ultimate tensile strength at room temperature increases from 950 up to 1350 MPa, while the upper shelf energy increases from 3.0 up to 6.0 J. However, the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) remains relatively high (about 75 C).These results indicate that HSHE is a promising method for achieving grain refinement and thus improving the mechanical properties of ODS ferritic steels. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  10. Kinetics of niobium carbide precipitation in ferrite; Cinetiques de precipitation du carbure de niobium dans la ferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gendt, D

    2001-07-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a NbC precipitation modelling in ferrite. This theoretical study is motivated by the fact it considers a ternary system and focus on the concurrence of two different diffusion mechanisms. An experimental study with TEP, SANS and Vickers micro-hardening measurements allows a description of the NbC precipitation kinetics. The mean radius of the precipitates is characterized by TEM observations. To focus on the nucleation stage, we use the Tomographic Atom Probe that analyses, at an atomistic scale, the position of the solute atoms in the matrix. A first model based on the classical nucleation theory and the diffusion-limited growth describes the precipitation of spherical precipitates. To solve the set of equations, we use a numerical algorithm that furnishes an evaluation of the precipitated fraction, the mean radius and the whole size distribution of the particles. The parameters that are the interface energy, the solubility product and the diffusion coefficients are fitted with the data available in the literature and our experimental results. It allows a satisfactory agreement as regards to the simplicity of the model. Monte Carlo simulations are used to describe the evolution of a ternary alloy Fe-Nb-C on a cubic centred rigid lattice with vacancy and interstitial mechanisms. This is realized with an atomistic description of the atoms jumps and their related frequencies. The model parameters are fitted with phase diagrams and diffusion coefficients. For the sake of simplicity, we consider that the precipitation of NbC is totally coherent and we neglect any elastic strain effect. We can observe different kinetic paths: for low supersaturations, we find an expected precipitation of NbC but for higher supersaturations, the very fast diffusivity of carbon atoms conducts to the nucleation of iron carbide particles. We establish that the occurrence of this second phenomenon depends on the vacancy arrival kinetics and can be related

  11. Beam impedance of ferrite kicker magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voelker, F.; Lambertson, G.

    1989-03-01

    We have measured the longitudinal beam impedance of a typical pulsed magnet that will be used in the Advanced Light Source. The magnets are of a ferrite window-frame design with a single plate conductor on each side. Two separate power supplies are used to drive current in opposite directions in the two conductors. The continuity of the ferrite yoke is interrupted by two copper plates 1 mm thick in the center of the top and bottom of the window frame. This increases the reluctance of the magnetic path, and thus decreases the flux which couples the beam. The measurements were made by exciting a 1/8'' rod along the beam path through the magnet. This makes a 185 ohm transmission line, and it was terminated in a resistive divider at the exit end. A 3 GHz network analyzer was used to measure S 21 through the magnet, and longitudinal beam impedance was calculated from this data. The impedance is dominated by two low frequency resonances in the magnet winding and drive current. 8 figs

  12. VANADIUM ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K.F.; Van Thyne, R.J.

    1959-05-12

    This patent deals with vanadium based ternary alloys useful as fuel element jackets. According to the invention the ternary vanadium alloys, prepared in an arc furnace, contain from 2.5 to 15% by weight titanium and from 0.5 to 10% by weight niobium. Characteristics of these alloys are good thermal conductivity, low neutron capture cross section, good corrosion resistance, good welding and fabricating properties, low expansion coefficient, and high strength.

  13. Creep deformation of high Cr-Mo ferritic/martensitic steels by material softening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Ho; Song, B. J.; Ryu, Woo Seog

    2005-01-01

    High Cr (9-12%Cr) ferritic/martensitic steels represent a valuable alternative to austenitic stainless steel for high temperature applications up to 600 .deg. C both in power and petrochemical plant, as well as good resistance to oxidation and corrosion. Material softening is the main physical phenomenon observed in the crept material. Thermally-induced change (such as particle coarsening or matrix solute depletion) and strain-induced change (such as dynamic subgrain growth) of microstructure degraded the alloy strength. These microstructural changes during a creep test cause the material softening, so the strength of the materials decreased. Many researches have been performed for the microstructural changes during a creep test, but the strength of crept materials has not been measured. In the present work, we measured the yield and tensile strength of crept materials using Indentationtyped Tensile Test System (AIS 2000). Material softening was quantitatively evaluated with a creep test condition, such as temperature and applied stress

  14. Summary Report of Summer Work: High Purity Single Crystal Growth & Microstructure of Ferritic-Martensitic Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pestovich, Kimberly Shay [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-08-18

    Harnessing the power of the nuclear sciences for national security and to benefit others is one of Los Alamos National Laboratory’s missions. MST-8 focuses on manipulating and studying how the structure, processing, properties, and performance of materials interact at the atomic level under nuclear conditions. Within this group, single crystal scintillators contribute to the safety and reliability of weapons, provide global security safeguards, and build on scientific principles that carry over to medical fields for cancer detection. Improved cladding materials made of ferritic-martensitic alloys support the mission of DOE-NE’s Fuel Cycle Research and Development program to close the nuclear fuel cycle, aiming to solve nuclear waste management challenges and thereby increase the performance and safety of current and future reactors.

  15. Deformation mechanisms in ferritic/martensitic steels and the impact on mechanical design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghoniem, Nasr M.; Po, Giacomo; Sharafat, Shahram

    2013-01-01

    Structural steels for nuclear applications have undergone rapid development during the past few decades, thanks to a combination of trial-and-error, mechanism-based optimization, and multiscale modeling approaches. Deformation mechanisms are shown to be intimately related to mechanical design via dominant plastic deformation modes. Because mechanical design rules are mostly based on failure modes associated with plastic strain damage accumulation, we present here the fundamental deformation mechanisms for Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) steels, and delineate their operational range of temperature and stress. The connection between deformation mechanisms, failure modes, and mechanical design is shown through application of design rules. A specific example is given for the alloy F82H utilized in the design of a Test Blanket Module (TBM) in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), where several constitutive equations are developed for design-related mechanical properties

  16. Deformation mechanisms in ferritic/martensitic steels and the impact on mechanical design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghoniem, Nasr M., E-mail: ghoniem@seas.ucla.edu; Po, Giacomo; Sharafat, Shahram

    2013-10-15

    Structural steels for nuclear applications have undergone rapid development during the past few decades, thanks to a combination of trial-and-error, mechanism-based optimization, and multiscale modeling approaches. Deformation mechanisms are shown to be intimately related to mechanical design via dominant plastic deformation modes. Because mechanical design rules are mostly based on failure modes associated with plastic strain damage accumulation, we present here the fundamental deformation mechanisms for Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) steels, and delineate their operational range of temperature and stress. The connection between deformation mechanisms, failure modes, and mechanical design is shown through application of design rules. A specific example is given for the alloy F82H utilized in the design of a Test Blanket Module (TBM) in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), where several constitutive equations are developed for design-related mechanical properties.

  17. Structure of Oxide Nanoparticles in Fe-16Cr MA/ODS Ferritic Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiung, L; Fluss, M; Kimura, A

    2010-04-06

    Oxide nanoparticles in Fe-16Cr ODS ferritic steel fabricated by mechanical alloying (MA) method have been examined using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques. A partial crystallization of oxide nanoparticles was frequently observed in as-fabricated ODS steel. The crystal structure of crystalline oxide particles is identified to be mainly Y{sub 4}Al{sub 2}O{sub 9} (YAM) with a monoclinic structure. Large nanoparticles with a diameter larger than 20 nm tend to be incoherent and have a nearly spherical shape, whereas small nanoparticles with a diameter smaller than 10 nm tend to be coherent or semi-coherent and have faceted boundaries. The oxide nanoparticles become fully crystallized after prolonged annealing at 900 C. These results lead us to propose a three-stage formation mechanism of oxide nanoparticles in MA/ODS steels.

  18. Cluster dynamics models of irradiation damage accumulation in ferritic iron. I. Trap mediated interstitial cluster diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohnert, Aaron A.; Wirth, Brian D. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-2300 (United States)

    2015-04-21

    The microstructure that develops under low temperature irradiation in ferritic alloys is dominated by a high density of small (2–5 nm) defects. These defects have been widely observed to move via occasional discrete hops during in situ thin film irradiation experiments. Cluster dynamics models are used to describe the formation of these defects as an aggregation process of smaller clusters created as primary damage. Multiple assumptions regarding the mobility of these damage features are tested in the models, both with and without explicit consideration of such irradiation induced hops. Comparison with experimental data regarding the density of these defects demonstrates the importance of including such motions in a valid model. In particular, discrete hops inform the limited dependence of defect density on irradiation temperature observed in experiments, which the model was otherwise incapable of producing.

  19. Dissolution studies on Nickel ferrite in dilute chemical decontamination formulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranganathan, S. [New Brunswick Univ., Fredericton, NB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Srinivasan, M.P. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) (India). Water and Steam Chemistry Laboratory; Raghavan, P.S. [Madras Christian College, Chennai (India); Narasimhan, S.V. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India); Gopalan, R. [Madras Christian College, Chennai (India). Department of Chemistry

    2004-09-01

    Nickel ferrite is one of the important corrosion products in the pipeline surfaces of water-cooled nuclear reactors. The dissolution of the nickel ferrite by chelating agents is very sensitive to the nature of the chelant, the nature of the reductant used in the formulation and the temperature at which the dissolution studies are performed. The dissolution is mainly controlled by the reductive dissolution of the ferrite particles, but complexing agents also play a significant role in the dissolution process. This study deals with the leaching of iron and nickel from nickel ferrite prepared by the solid-state method. The dissolution studies are performed in pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid (PDCA), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) formulations containing organic reductants like ascorbic acid and low oxidation state transition metal ion reductants like Fe(II)-L (where L = PDCA, NTA, EDTA) at 85 C. The dissolution of nickel ferrite in PDCA, NTA and EDTA formulations is influenced by the presence of reductants in the formulations. The addition of Fe(II)-L in the formulation greatly enhances the dissolution of nickel ferrite. The preferential leaching of nickel over iron during the dissolution of nickel ferrite was observed in all the formulations. (orig.)

  20. Dissolution studies on Nickel ferrite in dilute chemical decontamination formulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranganathan, S.; Narasimhan, S.V.; Gopalan, R.

    2004-01-01

    Nickel ferrite is one of the important corrosion products in the pipeline surfaces of water-cooled nuclear reactors. The dissolution of the nickel ferrite by chelating agents is very sensitive to the nature of the chelant, the nature of the reductant used in the formulation and the temperature at which the dissolution studies are performed. The dissolution is mainly controlled by the reductive dissolution of the ferrite particles, but complexing agents also play a significant role in the dissolution process. This study deals with the leaching of iron and nickel from nickel ferrite prepared by the solid-state method. The dissolution studies are performed in pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid (PDCA), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) formulations containing organic reductants like ascorbic acid and low oxidation state transition metal ion reductants like Fe(II)-L (where L = PDCA, NTA, EDTA) at 85 C. The dissolution of nickel ferrite in PDCA, NTA and EDTA formulations is influenced by the presence of reductants in the formulations. The addition of Fe(II)-L in the formulation greatly enhances the dissolution of nickel ferrite. The preferential leaching of nickel over iron during the dissolution of nickel ferrite was observed in all the formulations. (orig.)

  1. Manufacturing of Mn-Zn ferrite transformer cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waqas, H.; Qureshi, A.H.; Hussain, N.; Ahmed, N.

    2012-01-01

    The present work is related to the development of soft ferrite transformer cores, which are extensively used in electronic devices such as switch mode power supplies, electromagnetic devices, computers, amplifiers etc. Mn-Zn Ferrite (soft ferrite) powders were prepared by conventional mixed oxide and auto combustion routes. These powders were calcined and then pressed in toroid shapes. Sintering was done at different temperatures to develop desired magnetic phase. Impedance resistance of sintered toroid cores was measured at different frequencies. Results revealed that Mn-Zn Ferrite cores synthesized by auto combustion route worked more efficiently in a high frequency range i.e. > 2MHz than the cores developed by conventional mixed oxide method. It was noticed that compact size, light weight and high impedance resistance are the prime advantages of auto combustion process which supported the performance of core in MHz frequency range. Furthermore, these compact size cores were successfully tested in linear pulse amplifier circuit of Pakistan Atomic Research Reactor-I. The fabrication of soft ferrite (Mn-Zn Ferrite) cores by different processing routes is an encouraging step towards indigenization of ferrite technology. (Orig./A.B.)

  2. Formation mechanism of solute clusters under neutron irradiation in ferritic model alloys and in a reactor pressure vessel steel: clusters of defects; Mecanismes de fragilisation sous irradiation aux neutrons d'alliages modeles ferritiques et d'un acier de cuve: amas de defauts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meslin-Chiffon, E

    2007-11-15

    The embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) under irradiation is partly due to the formation of point defects (PD) and solute clusters. The aim of this work was to gain more insight into the formation mechanisms of solute clusters in low copper ([Cu] = 0.1 wt%) FeCu and FeCuMnNi model alloys, in a copper free FeMnNi model alloy and in a low copper French RPV steel (16MND5). These materials were neutron-irradiated around 300 C in a test reactor. Solute clusters were characterized by tomographic atom probe whereas PD clusters were simulated with a rate theory numerical code calibrated under cascade damage conditions using transmission electron microscopy analysis. The confrontation between experiments and simulation reveals that a heterogeneous irradiation-induced solute precipitation/segregation probably occurs on PD clusters. (author)

  3. Ferrite Nanoparticles, Films, Single Crystals, and Metamaterials: High Frequency Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, V.

    2006-01-01

    Ferrite materials have long played an important role in power conditioning, conversion, and generation across a wide spectrum of frequencies (up to ten decades). They remain the preferred magnetic materials, having suitably low losses, for most applications above 1 MHz, and are the only viable materials for nonreciprocal magnetic microwave and millimeter-wave devices (including tunable filters, isolators, phase shifters, and circulators). Recently, novel processing techniques have led to a resurgence of research interest in the design and processing of ferrite materials as nanoparticles, films, single crystals, and metamaterials. These latest developments have set the stage for their use in emerging technologies that include cancer remediation therapies such as magnetohyperthermia, magnetic targeted drug delivery, and magneto-rheological fluids, as well as enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. With reduced dimensionality of nanoparticles and films, and the inherent nonequilibrium nature of many processing schemes, changes in local chemistry and structure have profound effects on the functional properties and performance of ferrites. In this lecture, we will explore these effects upon the fundamental magnetic and electronic properties of ferrites. Density functional theory will be applied to predict the properties of these ferrites, with synchrotron radiation techniques used to elucidate the chemical and structural short-range order. This approach will be extended to study the atomic design of ferrites by alternating target laser-ablation deposition. Recently, this approach has been shown to produce ferrites that offer attractive properties not found in conventionally grown ferrites. We will explore the latest research developments involving ferrites as related to microwave and millimeter-wave applications and the attempt to integrate these materials with semiconductor materials platforms

  4. Proceedings of the second milestone meeting of European laboratories on the development of ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daum, E.; Ehrlich, K.; Schirra, M.

    1997-05-01

    In the frame of the European Fusion Technology Program a series of ferritic/martensitic developmental alloys, the composition of which had been optimized towards low long-term activation, was investigated and compared with conventional 9-12%CrMoVNb steels. It could be shown that by these chemical modifications neither the physical metallurgy nor the transformation behavior was changed markedly. Tensile-, creep-rupture- and fatigue properties are somewhat reduced, whereas the fracture toughness and impact data are far superior to conventional materials. This is an important advantage, especially if the expected detrimental effect of neutron irradiation on the latter properties is taken into account. First results of low-fluence irradiations indicate that the new alloys are less prone to irradiation-induced DBTT shifts. (orig./HM) [de

  5. Comparison of the corrosion behavior of austenitic and ferritic/martensitic steels exposed to static liquid Pb Bi at 450 and 550 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurata, Y.; Futakawa, M.; Saito, S.

    2005-08-01

    Static corrosion tests of various steels were conducted in oxygen-saturated liquid Pb-Bi eutectic at 450 °C and 550 °C for 3000 h to study the effects of temperature and alloying elements on corrosion behavior in liquid Pb-Bi. Corrosion depth decreases at 450 °C with increasing Cr content in steels regardless of ferritic/martensitic steels or austenitic steels. Appreciable dissolution of Ni and Cr does not occur in the three austenitic steels at 450 °C. Corrosion depth of ferritic/martensitic steels also decreases at 550 °C with increasing Cr content in steels whereas corrosion depth of austenitic steels, JPCA and 316SS becomes larger due to ferritization caused by dissolution of Ni at 550 °C than that of ferritic/martensitic steels. An austenitic stainless steel containing about 5%Si exhibits fine corrosion resistance at 550 °C because the protective Si oxide film is formed and prevents dissolution of Ni and Cr.

  6. Comparison of the corrosion behavior of austenitic and ferritic/martensitic steels exposed to static liquid Pb-Bi at 450 and 550 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurata, Y.; Futakawa, M.; Saito, S.

    2005-01-01

    Static corrosion tests of various steels were conducted in oxygen-saturated liquid Pb-Bi eutectic at 450 deg. C and 550 deg. C for 3000 h to study the effects of temperature and alloying elements on corrosion behavior in liquid Pb-Bi. Corrosion depth decreases at 450 deg. C with increasing Cr content in steels regardless of ferritic/martensitic steels or austenitic steels. Appreciable dissolution of Ni and Cr does not occur in the three austenitic steels at 450 deg. C. Corrosion depth of ferritic/martensitic steels also decreases at 550 deg. C with increasing Cr content in steels whereas corrosion depth of austenitic steels, JPCA and 316SS becomes larger due to ferritization caused by dissolution of Ni at 550 deg. C than that of ferritic/martensitic steels. An austenitic stainless steel containing about 5%Si exhibits fine corrosion resistance at 550 deg. C because the protective Si oxide film is formed and prevents dissolution of Ni and Cr

  7. Study of the corrosion of metallic coatings and alloys containing aluminum in a mixed atmosphere - sulphur, oxygen - at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fellmann, Daniel

    1982-01-01

    The objective of this research thesis is the development of materials for a sulphur experimental loop allowing the thermodynamic properties of such an energy cycle to be checked. As solutions must comply with industrial methods, rare materials are excluded as they are too expensive or difficult to implement. Iron-based materials have been tested but could not have at the same time a good corrosion resistance and high temperature forming and mechanical toughness properties. Therefore, metallic coatings have been chosen, specifically alumina. After having reported a bibliographical study on corrosion by sulphur vapour and by oxygen and by sulphur-oxygen, the author presents the experimental materials and methods. Then, the author reports the study of mixed corrosion (by sulphur and oxygen together) of metallic alloys (ferritic and austeno-ferritic alloys, aluminium and titanium alloys), and of the corrosion of FeAlx coatings, of AlTix alloys [fr

  8. RF electromagnetic wave absorbing properties of ferrite polymer composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosoudil, Rastislav; Usakova, Marianna; Franek, Jaroslav; Slama, Jozef; Olah, Vladimir

    2006-01-01

    The frequency dispersion of complex initial (relative) permeability (μ * =μ ' -jμ ' ') and the electromagnetic wave absorbing properties of composite materials based on NiZn sintered ferrite and a polyvinylchloride (PVC) polymer matrix have been studied in frequency range from 1MHz to 1GHz. The complex permeability of the composites was found to increase as the ferrite content increased, and was characterized by frequency dispersion localized above 50MHz. The variation of return loss (RL) of single-layer RF absorbers using the prepared composite materials has been investigated as a function of frequency, ferrite content and the thickness of the absorbers

  9. Fast ferrite tuner for the BNL synchrotron light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pivit, E.; Hanna, S.M.; Keane, J.

    1991-01-01

    A new type of ferrite tuner has been tested at the BNL. The ferrite tuner uses garnet slabs partially filling a stripline. One of the important features of the tuner is that the ferrite is perpendicularly biased for operation above FMR, thus reducing the magnetic losses. A unique design was adopted to achieve the efficient cooling. The principle of operation of the tuner as well as our preliminary results on tuning a 52 MHz cavity are reported. Optimized conditions under which we demonstrated linear tunability of 80 KHz are described. The tuner's losses and its effect on higher-order modes in the cavity are discussed. 2 refs., 8 figs

  10. The mechanism of nickel ferrite formation by glow discharge effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolova, L. A.

    2018-04-01

    The influence of various factors on the formation of nickel ferrite by the glow discharge effect has been studied. The ferritization process in the system FeSO4-NiSO4-NaOH-H2O has been studied by the methods of potentiometric titration, measurement of electrical conductivity, residual concentrations and apparent sediment volume. It has been established that the process proceeds in a multistage fashion at pH 11-12 with the formation of polyhydroxo complexes, an intermediate compound and the ferrite formation by its oxidation with active radicals.

  11. Electrochemical approach to corrosion behavior of ferritic steels in Flibe melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, H.; Suzuki, A.; Terai, T.; Kondo, M.; Sagara, A.; Noda, N.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: A mixture of LiF-BeF 2 , Flibe, is considered as a candidate material for tritium breeding in a fusion liquid blanket. Flibe has favorable characteristics such as high chemical stability and low electric conductivity. However, it produces TF with neutron irradiation, which is corrosive to structural materials. Therefore, the compatibility of structural materials with Flibe is a critical issue. Up to the present, the compatibility of some materials with Flibe was examined by carrying out simple immersion tests under limited conditions. By visual observations and analyses such as XRD on the surfaces after washing out Flibe from specimens, it was found that ferritic steels seemed to have good compatibility. However, strictly speaking, surface condition of the specimens should not be same as that during immersion in melt because these specimens were subjected to heat treatments and washing processes in order to remove solidified Flibe. Therefore, we planed electrochemical experiment to observe corrosion behavior during immersion. In this study, by carrying out cyclic voltammetry on specimens to observe alteration of surface condition of specimen in Flibe melt from moment to moment, the compatibility of ferritic steel with Flibe melt was discussed on. JLF-1 JOYO-II heat ferritic steel (Fe-9.000r-1.98W-0.09C-0.49Mn-0.20V-0.083Ta) which is a candidate low activation ferritic steel as a structural material of fusion reactor was chosen as a test specimen. Fe-9Cr and Fe-2W alloys were also chosen for comparison. The size of all specimens was 20 x 10 x 1 mm. A electrochemical cell was assembled using these specimens as working electrodes. Pt was chosen as a material for quasi-reference electrode. A Ni crucible which was the container of electrolyte, Flibe, was used as a counter electrode. 600 grams of Flibe was prepared and purified by HF/H 2 bubbling before being filled in the Ni crucible. Each specimen was dunked into Flibe at 773, 823 and

  12. Moessbauer spectroscopic characterization of ferrite ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Music, S.; Ristic, M.

    1999-01-01

    The principle of Moessbauer effect and the nature of hyperfine interactions were presented. The discovery of the Moessbauer effect was the basis of a new spectroscopic technique, called Moessbauer spectroscopy, which has already made important contribution to research in physics, chemistry, metallurgy, mineralogy and biochemistry. In the present work the selected ferrites such as spinel ferrite, NiFe 2 O 4 , and some rare earth orthoferrites and garnets were investigated using Moessbauer spectroscopy. X-ray powder diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used as complementary techniques. The formation of NiFe 2 O 4 was monitored during the thermal decomposition of mixed salt (Ni(NO 3 ) 2 +2Fe(NO 3 ) 3 )nH 2 O. The ferritization of Ni 2+ ions was observed at 500 deg. C and after heating at 1300 deg. C the stoichiometric NiFe 2 O 4 was produced. The Moessbauer parameters obtained for NiFe 2 O 4 , d Fe = 0.36 mm s -1 and HMF = 528 kOe, can be ascribed to Fe 3+ ions in the octahedral sublattice, while parameters d Fe = 0.28 mm s -1 and HMF = 494 kOe can be ascribed to Fe 3+ ions in the tetrahedral lattice. The effect of ball-milling of NiFe 2 O 4 was monitored. The formation of oxide phases and their properties in the systems Nd 2 O 3 -Fe 2 O 3 , Sm 2 O 3 -Fe 2 O 3 , Gd 2 O 3 -Fe 2 O 3 , Eu 2 O 3 -Fe 2 O 3 and Er 2 O 3 -Fe 2 O 3 were also investigated. Quantitative distributions of oxide phases, a-Fe 2 O 3 , R 2 O 3 , R 3 Fe 5 O 12 and RFeO 3 , R = Gd or Eu, were determined for the systems xGd 2 O 3 +(1-x)Fe 2 O 3 and xEu 2 O 3 +(1-x)Fe 2 O 3 . The samples, prepared by chemical coprecipitation in the system xEu 2 O 3 +(1-x)Fe 2 O 3 , 0≤x≤1, were completely amorphous as observed by XRD, even at the relatively high temperature of the sample preparation (600 deg. C). Similar behavior was observed during the formation of Er 3 Fe 5 O 12 . Moessbauer spectroscopy indicated that this 'amorphous' phase is actually composed of very small and/or poor

  13. Effect of zirconium addition on the microstructure and mechanical properties of 15Cr-ODS ferritic Steels consolidated by hot isostatic pressing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Haijian, E-mail: haijianxu@eis.hokudai.ac.jp [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials, Ministry of Education, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Material Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Lu, Zheng; Wang, Dongmei; Liu, Chunming [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials, Ministry of Education, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2017-01-15

    The influence of Zr addition on the microstructure and mechanical properties of mechanically alloyed (MA) ODS ferritic steels were studied in this work. The microstructure characteristics included the grain size, oxide particles number densities, size distributions, crystal structures and compositions. TEM foils measurements were complemented by studies of alloys on carbon extraction replica and focus ion beam (FIB) foils. The tensile properties were carried out at different temperatures. The microstructure and mechanical properties were analyzed and compared with nominal compositions (wt.%): Fe-15Cr-2W-0.3Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe-15Cr −2W-0.3Zr-0.3Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The experimental revealed that the addition of Zr increased the volume fraction of the smallest and equiaxed ferritic grains, number density of nano-oxide particles and decreased the average size of oxide particles within the ferritic matrix, promoting the formation of fine trigonal δ-phase Y{sub 4}Zr{sub 3}O{sub 12} nano-oxides and leading to the enhancement of the mechanical properties of the ODS steels.

  14. Nonswelling alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkness, S.D.

    1975-12-23

    An aluminum alloy containing one weight percent copper has been found to be resistant to void formation and thus is useful in all nuclear applications which currently use aluminum or other aluminum alloys in reactor positions which are subjected to high neutron doses.

  15. Nonswelling alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harkness, S.D.

    1975-01-01

    An aluminum alloy containing one weight percent copper has been found to be resistant to void formation and thus is useful in all nuclear applications which currently use aluminum or other aluminum alloys in reactor positions which are subjected to high neutron doses

  16. Concurrent phase separation and clustering in the ferrite phase during low temperature stress aging of duplex stainless steel weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, J.; Odqvist, J.; Thuvander, M.; Hertzman, S.; Hedström, P.

    2012-01-01

    The concurrent phase separation and clustering of alloying elements in the ferrite phase of duplex stainless steel weldments after stress aging at 325 °C have been investigated by atom probe tomography analysis. Both phase separation, into Fe-rich and Cr-rich ferrite, and solute clustering were observed. Phase separation in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) is most pronounced in the high alloyed SAF 2507, followed by SAF 2205 and SAF 2304. Moreover Cu clustering was observed in the HAZ of SAF 2507. However, decomposition in the weld bead (25.10.4L) was more pronounced than in the HAZs, with both phase separation and clustering of Ni–Mn–Si–Cu. The observed differences in the decomposition behaviors in the HAZ and weld bead can be attributed to the high Ni content and the characteristic microstructure of the weld bead with high internal strains. In addition, an applied tensile stress during aging of weldments has been found to further promote the kinetics of phase separation and clustering.

  17. Interstitial-phase precipitation in iron-base alloys: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelton, A.R.

    1982-06-01

    Recent developments have elucidated the atomistic mechanisms of precipitation of interstitial elements in simple alloy systems. However, in the more technologically important iron base alloys, interstitial phase precipitation is generally not well understood. The present experimental study was therefore designed to test the applicability of these concepts to more complex ferrous alloys. Hence, a comparative study was made of interstitial phase precipitation in ferritic Fe-Si-C and in austenitic phosphorus-containing Fe-Cr-Ni steels. These systems were subjected to a variety of quench-age thermal treatments, and the microstructural development was subsequently characterized by transmission electron microscopy

  18. On the formation and stability of Y-Ti-O nanoparticles in ODS alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundar, C.S.

    2012-01-01

    The thermal and radiation stability of Y-Ti-O nanoparticles in oxide dispersion strengthened steels is a topic of interest, given that these nanoparticles bestow the crucial high temperature creep strength, and these ferritic alloys are candidate materials for cladding and structural materials for fast and fusion reactors. In addition, there is also interest in obtaining a basic understanding of the various issues, such as the role of alloying element Ti, on the formation of uniform sized and small nanoparticles in these alloys that are formed using the powder metallurgy route of ball milling followed by consolidation using hot extrusion

  19. New ferritic steels for advanced steam plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, K.H; Koenig, H. [GEC ALSTHOM Energie GmbH, Nuremberg (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    During the last 15-20 years ferritic-martensitic 9-12 % chromium steels have been developed under international research programmes which permit inlet steam temperatures up to approx. 625 deg C and pressures up to about 300 bars, thus leading to improvements in thermal efficiency of around 8 % and a CO{sub 2} reduction of about 20 % versus conventional steam parameters. These new steels are already being applied in 13 European and 34 Japanese power stations with inlet steam temperature up to 610 deg C. This presentation will give an account of the content, scope and results of the research programmes and of the experience gained during the production of components which have been manufactured from the new steels. (orig.) 13 refs.

  20. New ferritic steels for advanced steam plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, K H; Koenig, H [GEC ALSTHOM Energie GmbH, Nuremberg (Germany)

    1999-12-31

    During the last 15-20 years ferritic-martensitic 9-12 % chromium steels have been developed under international research programmes which permit inlet steam temperatures up to approx. 625 deg C and pressures up to about 300 bars, thus leading to improvements in thermal efficiency of around 8 % and a CO{sub 2} reduction of about 20 % versus conventional steam parameters. These new steels are already being applied in 13 European and 34 Japanese power stations with inlet steam temperature up to 610 deg C. This presentation will give an account of the content, scope and results of the research programmes and of the experience gained during the production of components which have been manufactured from the new steels. (orig.) 13 refs.

  1. Tuning the magnetism of ferrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viñas, S. Liébana [Faculty of Physics and CENIDE, University Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg 47048 (Germany); Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidade de Vigo, Vigo 36310 (Spain); Simeonidis, K. [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece); Li, Z.-A.; Ma, Z. [Faculty of Physics and CENIDE, University Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg 47048 (Germany); Myrovali, E.; Makridis, A.; Sakellari, D. [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece); Angelakeris, M., E-mail: agelaker@auth.gr [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece); Wiedwald, U.; Spasova, M. [Faculty of Physics and CENIDE, University Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg 47048 (Germany); Farle, M., E-mail: michael.farle@uni-due.de [Faculty of Physics and CENIDE, University Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg 47048 (Germany)

    2016-10-01

    The importance of magnetic interactions within an individual nanoparticle or between adjacent ones is crucial not only for the macroscopic collective magnetic behavior but for the AC magnetic heating efficiency as well. On this concept, single-(MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} where M=Fe, Co, Mn) and core–shell ferrite nanoparticles consisting of a magnetically softer (MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) or magnetically harder (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) core and a magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) shell with an overall size in the 10 nm range were synthesized and studied for their magnetic particle hyperthermia efficiency. Magnetic measurements indicate that the coating of the hard magnetic phase (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) by Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} provides a significant enhancement of hysteresis losses over the corresponding single-phase counterpart response, and thus results in a multiplication of the magnetic hyperthermia efficiency opening a novel pathway for high-performance, magnetic hyperthermia agents. At the same time, the existence of a biocompatible Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} outer shell, toxicologically renders these systems similar to iron-oxide ones with significantly milder side-effects. - Highlights: • Magnetic hyperthermia is studied for 10 nm single and core/shell ferrite nanoparticles. • Maximum heating rate is observed for Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-coated CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles. • The increase is attributed to the interaction of phases with different anisotropy. • The presence of biocompatible Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} shell potentially minimizes toxic side-effects.

  2. The role of cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles in medical science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiri, S.; Shokrollahi, H.

    2013-01-01

    The nanotechnology industry is rapidly growing and promises that the substantial changes that will have significant economic and scientific impacts be applicable to a wide range of areas, such as aerospace engineering, nano-electronics, environmental remediation and medical healthcare. In this area, cobalt ferrite nanoparticles have been regarded as one of the competitive candidates because of their suitable physical, chemical and magnetic properties like the high anisotropy constant, high coercivity and high Curie temperature, moderate saturation magnetization and ease of synthesis. This paper introduces the magnetic properties, synthesis methods and some medical applications, including the hyperthermia, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic separation and drug delivery of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles. Highlights: ► Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles are one of the most important materials for nanomedicine. ► They have high coercivity and moderate saturation magnetization. ► Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles are synthesized easily. ► They are a good candidate for hyperthermia and magnetic resonance imaging.

  3. Behavior of ferritic steels irradiated by fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erler, Jean; Maillard, Arlette; Brun, Gilbert; Lehmann, Jeanne; Dupouy, J.-M.

    1979-01-01

    Ferritic steels were irradiated in Rapsodie and Phenix at varying doses. The swelling and irradiation creep characteristics are reported below as are the mechanical characteristics of these materials [fr

  4. The behaviour of ferritic steels under fast neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erler, J.; Maillard, A.; Brun, G.; Lehmann, J.; Dupouy, J.M.

    1979-07-01

    Ferritic steels have been irradiated in Rapsodie and Phenix to doses up to 150 dpa F. The swelling and irradiation creep characteristics and the mechanical properties of these materials are reported. (author)

  5. Antiresonance in (Ni,Zn) ferrite-carbon nanofibres nanocomposites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fernandez-Garcia, L.; Suarez, M.; Menéndez, J.L.; Pecharromán, C.; Torrecillas, R.; Peretyagin, P.Y.; Petzelt, Jan; Savinov, Maxim; Frait, Zdeněk

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 5 (2015), 055003 ISSN 2053-1591 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : ceramic composites * ferromagnetic resonance * ferrite devices Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.968, year: 2015

  6. Initial Ferritic Wall Mode studies on HBT-EP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Paul; Bialek, J.; Boozer, A.; Mauel, M. E.; Levesque, J. P.; Navratil, G. A.

    2013-10-01

    Low-activation ferritic steels are leading material candidates for use in next-generation fusion development experiments such as a prospective US component test facility and DEMO. Understanding the interaction of plasmas with a ferromagnetic wall will provide crucial physics for these experiments. Although the ferritic wall mode (FWM) was seen in a linear machine, the FWM was not observed in JFT-2M, probably due to eddy current stabilization. Using its high-resolution magnetic diagnostics and positionable walls, HBT-EP has begun exploring the dynamics and stability of plasma interacting with high-permeability ferritic materials tiled to reduce eddy currents. We summarize a simple model for plasma-wall interaction in the presence of ferromagnetic material, describe the design of a recently-installed set of ferritic shell segments, and report initial results. Supported by U.S. DOE Grant DE-FG02-86ER53222.

  7. OKMC study of the effect of grain boundaries in martensitic Fe-Cr-C alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiapetto, M.; Becquart, C.S.; Malerba, L.

    2015-01-01

    Fe-Cr-C alloys with chromium concentrations in the range from about 2 wt % to 12 wt % form ferritic-martensitic structures by rapid cooling from the austenite state already in the presence of relatively low carbon concentrations. In this process it is possible to obtain different ratios of ferrite and martensite, as well as formation of carbides, by varying the thermal treatment. The presence of ferrite or martensite might have an influence on the nano-structural evolution under irradiation of these alloys. Here, considering a tempered martensite reference alloy with 9% Cr, we make use of an already validated object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) model in order to study the possible effect of the formation of martensite laths on the material nano-structural evolution under neutron irradiation, assuming that the relevant boundaries act as sinks for radiation defects. The results show that the reduction of the grain size (including in this definition the average size of prior austenite grains, blocks and laths) does not play any relevant role until sizes of the order of about 0.5 μm are reached: for smaller grains the number of defects being absorbed by the boundaries becomes dominant. However, this threshold is lower than the experimentally observed martensite lath dimensions, thereby suggesting that what makes the difference in martensitic Fe-Cr-C alloys with respect to ferrite concerning events and mechanisms taking place during irradiation are not the lath boundaries as sinks. Differences between the nano-structural evolution in ferrite and martensite should therefore be ascribed to other factors. This document is composed of an article and the presentation slides. (authors)

  8. Influences of Mo and W on the precipitation of secondary phases and the associated localized corrosion and embrittlement in 29%Cr ferritic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chan Jin; Ahn, Myung Kyu; Kwon, Hyuk Sang

    2005-01-01

    Influences of molybdenum (Mo) substitution by tungsten (W) on the formation kinetics of secondary phases and the associated localized corrosion and embrittlement of Fe-29Cr-4Mo. Fe-29Cr-4W, and Fe-29Cr-8W ferritic stainless steels were investigated. Fine χ phase formed first in grain boundaries in an early stage of aging and it was gradually substituted by σ phase with further aging. The precipitation rate of σ phase appears to be determined by both the diffusion rates of W and Mo for the formation of the σ phase as well as by the affinity of χ phase, as a competitor, for the elements. Due to the high affinity of χ phase for W with a slow diffusion rate, the nucleation of σ phase was significantly delayed in Fe-29Cr-4W and Fe-29Cr-8W alloys compared with that in Fe-29Cr-4Mo alloy. In addition, the deterioration of ductility and localized corrosion resistance by the precipitation of secondary phases was significantly retarded in Fe-29Cr-4W alloy compared with that in Fe-29Cr-4Mo alloy, due to the delayed precipitation of secondary phases in Fe-29Cr-4W alloy. In particular, retardation of degradation in localized corrosion resistance by the formation of σ phase, which induced significant depletion of Cr and W (or Mo) around the phase, was prominent in the W-containing alloys. The W-containing alloys exhibited effective delay of σ phase formation

  9. Low cycle fatigue behaviors of low alloy steels in 310 .deg. C deoxygenated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Hun

    2008-02-01

    steel - heat A showed ductile striations in ferrite phase. Also, secondary and surface crack of SA508 Gr.1a low alloy steel - heat A grew into ferrite phase and ferrite - pearlite phase boundaries. The increase in stress intensity at the pearlite crack tip by restricted strain may contribute to fatigue crack propagation along ferrite - pearlite phase boundaries. On the other hand, the fatigue surfaces of SA508 Gr.1a - heat B and SA508 Gr.3 low alloy steels showed relatively less striations due to their homogeneous carbides. And the secondary and surface cracks of SA508 Gr.1a low alloy steel - heat B and SA508 Gr.3 low alloy steel grew into ferrite phase between carbides. The homogeneous carbides could more effectively decrease the crack growth rate. Therefore, the fatigue crack growth rate in SA508 Gr.1a low alloy steel - heat A could be higher than those in SA508 Gr.1a low alloy steel - heat B and SA508 Gr.3 low alloy steel. Also, the fatigue crack growth rate of SA508 Gr.3 low alloy steel may be shorter than that SA508 Gr.1a low alloy steel - heat B due to its low ductility and high yield strength

  10. Ferrite bead effect on Class-D amplifier audio quality

    OpenAIRE

    Haddad , Kevin El; Mrad , Roberto; Morel , Florent; Pillonnet , Gael; Vollaire , Christian; Nagari , Angelo

    2014-01-01

    International audience; This paper studies the effect of ferrite beads on the audio quality of Class-D audio amplifiers. This latter is a switch-ing circuit which creates high frequency harmonics. Generally, a filter is used at the amplifier output for the sake of electro-magnetic compatibility (EMC). So often, in integrated solutions, this filter contains ferrite beads which are magnetic components and present nonlinear behavior. Time domain measurements and their equivalence in frequency do...

  11. Chromium Enrichment on P11 Ferritic Steel by Pack Cementation

    OpenAIRE

    Fauzi F. A.; Kurniawan T.; Salwani M. S.; Bin Y. S.; Harun W. S. W.

    2016-01-01

    The future thermal power plant is expected to operate at higher temperature to improve its efficiency and to reduce greenhouse gas emission. This target requires better corrosion properties of ferritic steels, which commonly used as materials for superheater and reheater of boiler tubes. In this work, chromium enrichment on the surface of ferritic steel is studied. The deposited chromium is expected to become a reservoir for the formation of chromia protective layer. Chromium was deposited on...

  12. DARHT-II Injector Transients and the Ferrite Damper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldron, Will; Reginato, Lou; Chow, Ken; Houck, Tim; Henestroza, Enrique; Yu, Simon; Kang, Michael; Briggs, Richard

    2006-08-04

    This report summarizes the transient response of the DARHT-II Injector and the design of the ferrite damper. Initial commissioning of the injector revealed a rise time excited 7.8 MHz oscillation on the diode voltage and stalk current leading to a 7.8 MHz modulation of the beam current, position, and energy. Commissioning also revealed that the use of the crowbar to decrease the voltage fall time excited a spectrum of radio frequency modes which caused concern that there might be significant transient RF electric field stresses imposed on the high voltage column insulators. Based on the experience of damping the induction cell RF modes with ferrite, the concept of a ferrite damper was developed to address the crowbar-excited oscillations as well as the rise-time-excited 7.8 MHz oscillations. After the Project decided to discontinue the use of the crowbar, further development of the concept focused exclusively on damping the oscillations excited by the rise time. The design was completed and the ferrite damper was installed in the DARHT-II Injector in February 2006. The organization of this report is as follows. The suite of injector diagnostics are described in Section 2. The data and modeling of the injector transients excited on the rise-time and also by the crowbar are discussed in Section 3; the objective is a concise summary of the present state of understanding. The design of the ferrite damper, and the small scale circuit simulations used to evaluate the ferrite material options and select the key design parameters like the cross sectional area and the optimum gap width, are presented in Section 4. The details of the mechanical design and the installation of the ferrite damper are covered in Section 5. A brief summary of the performance of the ferrite damper following its installation in the injector is presented in Section 6.

  13. Spin canting phenomenon in cadmium doped cobalt ferrites ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Abstract. Synthesis of non-collinear (spin canted) ferrites having the formula, CoCdFe2−O4 ( = 0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0), has been carried out using the sol–gel auto combustion method. The ferrite samples show an interesting magnetic transition from Neel to Yafet–Kittel configuration, as the Cd2+ ...

  14. MHD Effects of a Ferritic Wall on Tokamak Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Paul E.

    It has been recognized for some time that the very high fluence of fast (14.1MeV) neutrons produced by deuterium-tritium fusion will represent a major materials challenge for the development of next-generation fusion energy projects such as a fusion component test facility and demonstration fusion power reactor. The best-understood and most promising solutions presently available are a family of low-activation steels originally developed for use in fission reactors, but the ferromagnetic properties of these steels represent a danger to plasma confinement through enhancement of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and increased susceptibility to error fields. At present, experimental research into the effects of ferromagnetic materials on MHD stability in toroidal geometry has been confined to demonstrating that it is still possible to operate an advanced tokamak in the presence of ferromagnetic components. In order to better quantify the effects of ferromagnetic materials on tokamak plasma stability, a new ferritic wall has been installated in the High Beta Tokamak---Extended Pulse (HBT-EP) device. The development, assembly, installation, and testing of this wall as a modular upgrade is described, and the effect of the wall on machine performance is characterized. Comparative studies of plasma dynamics with the ferritic wall close-fitting against similar plasmas with the ferritic wall retracted demonstrate substantial effects on plasma stability. Resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) are applied, demonstrating a 50% increase in n = 1 plasma response amplitude when the ferritic wall is near the plasma. Susceptibility of plasmas to disruption events increases by a factor of 2 or more with the ferritic wall inserted, as disruptions are observed earlier with greater frequency. Growth rates of external kink instabilities are observed to be twice as large in the presence of a close-fitting ferritic wall. Initial studies are made of the influence of mode rotation frequency

  15. Structural investigation of chemically synthesized ferrite magnetic nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyanga, E.; Sangaa, D.; Hirazawa, H.; Tsogbadrakh, N.; Jargalan, N.; Bobrikov, I. A.; Balagurov, A. M.

    2018-05-01

    In recent times, interest in ferrite magnetic nanomaterials has considerably grown, mainly due to their highly promising medical and biological applications. Spinel ferrite powder samples, with high heat generation abilities in AC magnetic fields, were studied for their application to the hyperthermia treatment of cancer tumors. These properties of ferrites strongly depend on their chemical composition, ion distribution between crystallographic positions, magnetic structure and method of preparation. In this study, crystal and magnetic structures of several magnetic spinels were investigated by neutron diffraction. The explanation of the mechanism triggering the heat generation ability in the magnetic materials, and the electronic and magnetic states of ferrite-spinel type structures, were theoretically defined by a first-principles method. Ferrites with the composition of CuxMg1-xFe2O4 have been investigated as a heat generating magnetic nanomaterial. Atomic fraction of copper in ferrite was varied between 0 and 100% (that is, x between 0 and 1.0 with 0.2 steps), with the copper dope limit corresponding to appear a tetragonal phase.

  16. Temperature dependent viscosity of cobalt ferrite / ethylene glycol ferrofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharat, Prashant B.; Somvanshi, Sandeep B.; Kounsalye, Jitendra S.; Deshmukh, Suraj S.; Khirade, Pankaj P.; Jadhav, K. M.

    2018-04-01

    In the present work, cobalt ferrite / ethylene glycol ferrofluid is prepared in 0 to 1 (in the step of 0.2) volume fraction of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by co-precipitation method. The XRD results confirmed the formation of single phase spinel structure. The Raman spectra have been deconvoluted into individual Lorentzian peaks. Cobalt ferrite has cubic spinel structure with Fd3m space group. FT-IR spectra consist of two major absorption bands, first at about 586 cm-1 (υ1) and second at about 392 cm-1 (υ2). These absorption bands confirm the formation of spinel-structured cobalt ferrite. Brookfield DV-III viscometer and programmable temperature-controlled bath was used to study the relationship between viscosity and temperature. Viscosity behavior with respect to temperature has been studied and it is revealed that the viscosity of cobalt ferrite / ethylene glycol ferrofluids increases with an increase in volume fraction of cobalt ferrite. The viscosity of the present ferrofluid was found to decrease with increase in temperature.

  17. Specific heat of nano-ferrites modified composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muntenita Cristian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The specific heat of nano-ferrites modified composites was studied using differential scanning calorimeter (DSC method in the temperature range of 30 to 150°C. Initially, nano-ferrites were introduced in epoxy systems in order to improve the electromagnetic properties of formed materials. Together with the changes in electromagnetic properties some modifications occur regarding thermal and mechanical properties. The materials were formed by placing 5g or 10g of ferrite into 250g polymer matrix leading to a very low weight ratio of modifying agent. At so low ratios the effect of ferrite presence should be insignificant according to mixing rule. Anyway there is possible to appear some chelation reaction with effects on thermal properties of materials. Three types of epoxy resins had been used as matrix and barium ferrite and strontium ferrite as modifying agents. The thermal analysis was developed on two heatingcooling cycles and the specific heat was evaluated for each segment of the cycle analysis.

  18. Microstructural characterisation of friction stir welding joints of mild steel to Ni-based alloy 625

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, J. [Brazilian Nanotechnology National Laboratory (LNNano), P.O. Box 6192, Campinas, SP (Brazil); University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil); Ramirez, A.J., E-mail: ramirezlondono.1@osu.edu [Brazilian Nanotechnology National Laboratory (LNNano), P.O. Box 6192, Campinas, SP (Brazil); University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University — OSU, Columbus, OH 43221 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    In this study, 6-mm-thick mild steel and Ni-based alloy 625 plates were friction stir welded using a tool rotational speed of 300 rpm and a travel speed of 100 mm·min{sup −1}. A microstructural characterisation of the dissimilar butt joint was performed using optical microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (XEDS). Six different weld zones were found. In the steel, the heat-affected zone (HAZ) was divided into three zones and was composed of ferrite, pearlite colonies with different morphologies, degenerated regions of pearlite and allotriomorphic and Widmanstätten ferrite. The stir zone (SZ) of the steel showed a coarse microstructure consisting of allotriomorphic and Widmanstätten ferrite, degenerate pearlite and MA constituents. In the Ni-based alloy 625, the thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ) showed deformed grains and redistribution of precipitates. In the SZ, the high deformation and temperature produced a recrystallised microstructure, as well as fracture and redistribution of MC precipitates. The M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitates, present in the base material, were also redistributed in the stir zone of the Ni-based alloy. TMAZ in the steel and HAZ in the Ni-based alloy could not be identified. The main restorative mechanisms were discontinuous dynamic recrystallisation in the steel, and discontinuous and continuous dynamic recrystallisation in the Ni-based alloy. The interface region between the steel and the Ni-based alloy showed a fcc microstructure with NbC carbides and an average length of 2.0 μm. - Highlights: • Comprehensive microstructural characterisation of dissimilar joints of mild steel to Ni-based alloy • Friction stir welding of joints of mild steel to Ni-based alloy 625 produces sound welds. • The interface region showed deformed and recrystallised fcc grains with NbC carbides and a length of 2.0 μm.

  19. Creep property of carbon and nitrogen free high strength new alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muneki, S., E-mail: ABE.Fujio@nims.go.j [Heat Resistant Design Group, Steel Research Center, National Institute for Materials Science (Japan); Okubo, H.; Abe, F. [Heat Resistant Design Group, Steel Research Center, National Institute for Materials Science (Japan)

    2010-06-15

    The carbon and nitrogen free new alloys which were composed of supersaturated martensitic microstructure with high dislocation density before the creep test have been investigated systematically. These alloys were produced from the new approach which raised creep strength by the utilization of the reverse transformed austenite phase as a matrix and intermetallic compounds such as Laves phase and mu-phase as precipitates during heating before the creep test. It is important that these alloys are independent of any carbides and nitrides as strengthening factors. The high temperature creep test over 700 {sup o}C exceeds 50,000 h, and the test is continuous. Creep behavior of the alloys is found to be different from that of the conventional high-Cr ferritic steels. The addition of boron to the alloy pulled the recrystallization temperature up in the high temperature, and it became a creep test in the un-recrystallization condition, and the creep property of high temperature over 700 {sup o}C was drastically improved. The minimum creep rates of Fe-Ni alloys at 700 {sup o}C are found to be much lower than those of the conventional high Cr ferritic heat resistant steels, which is due to fine dispersion strengthening useful even at 700 {sup o}C in these alloys. As a result it became clear that the value for 100,000 h was exceeded at 700 {sup o}C and 100 MPa calculated from the Larson-Miller parameter at C = 20.

  20. Cytotoxicity of ferrite particles by MTT and agar diffusion methods for hyperthermic application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong-Hyun [Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Department and Research Institute of Dental Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Se-Ho [Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Department and Research Institute of Dental Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyoung-Nam [Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Department and Research Institute of Dental Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwang-Mahn [Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Department and Research Institute of Dental Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Shim, In-Bo [Department of Electronic Physics, Kookmin University, Seoul 136-702 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yong-Keun [Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of) and Department and Research Institute of Dental Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: leeyk@yumc.yonsei.ac.kr

    2005-05-15

    We investigated the cytotoxicity of the prepared various ferrites (Fe-, Li-, Ni/Zn/Cu-, Ba-, Sr-, Co-, Co/Ni-ferrites) using MTT assay as well as agar diffusion method. Their cytotoxicity was compared with that of alginate-encapsulated ferrites. In the MTT assay, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and SrFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} ferrite showed the highest cell viability of 90%. Alginate-encapsulated Ba-ferrite was ranked mildly cytotoxic, whereas their ferrite particles were ranked cytotoxic.

  1. Electrical Resistance Alloys and Low-Expansion Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjer, Torben

    1996-01-01

    The article gives an overview of electrical resistance alloys and alloys with low thermal expansion. The electrical resistance alloys comprise resistance alloys, heating alloys and thermostat alloys. The low expansion alloys comprise alloys with very low expansion coefficients, alloys with very low...... thermoelastic coefficients and age hardenable low expansion alloys....

  2. Analytical modeling of demagnetizing effect in magnetoelectric ferrite/PZT/ferrite trilayers taking into account a mechanical coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyau, V.; Aubert, A.; LoBue, M.; Mazaleyrat, F.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the demagnetizing effect in ferrite/PZT/ferrite magnetoelectric (ME) trilayer composites consisting of commercial PZT discs bonded by epoxy layers to Ni-Co-Zn ferrite discs made by a reactive Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) technique. ME voltage coefficients (transversal mode) were measured on ferrite/PZT/ferrite trilayer ME samples with different thicknesses or phase volume ratio in order to highlight the influence of the magnetic field penetration governed by these geometrical parameters. Experimental ME coefficients and voltages were compared to analytical calculations using a quasi-static model. Theoretical demagnetizing factors of two magnetic discs that interact together in parallel magnetic structures were derived from an analytical calculation based on a superposition method. These factors were introduced in ME voltage calculations which take account of the demagnetizing effect. To fit the experimental results, a mechanical coupling factor was also introduced in the theoretical formula. This reflects the differential strain that exists in the ferrite and PZT layers due to shear effects near the edge of the ME samples and within the bonding epoxy layers. From this study, an optimization in magnitude of the ME voltage is obtained. Lastly, an analytical calculation of demagnetizing effect was conducted for layered ME composites containing higher numbers of alternated layers (n ≥ 5). The advantage of such a structure is then discussed.

  3. HRTEM Study of the Role of Nanoparticles in ODS Ferritic Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiung, L; Tumey, S; Fluss, M; Serruys, Y; Willaime, F

    2011-08-30

    Structures of nanoparticles and their role in dual-ion irradiated Fe-16Cr-4.5Al-0.3Ti-2W-0.37Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (K3) ODS ferritic steel produced by mechanical alloying (MA) were studied using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques. The observation of Y{sub 4}Al{sub 2}O{sub 9} complex-oxide nanoparticles in the ODS steel imply that decomposition of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} in association with internal oxidation of Al occurred during mechanical alloying. HRTEM observations of crystalline and partially crystalline nanoparticles larger than {approx}2 nm and amorphous cluster-domains smaller than {approx}2 nm provide an insight into the formation mechanism of nanoparticles/clusters in MA/ODS steels, which we believe involves solid-state amorphization and re-crystallization. The role of nanoparticles/clusters in suppressing radiation-induced swelling is revealed through TEM examinations of cavity distributions in (Fe + He) dual-ion irradiated K3-ODS steel. HRTEM observations of helium-filled cavities (helium bubbles) preferably trapped at nanoparticle/clusters in dual-ion irradiated K3-ODS are presented.

  4. European development of ferritic-martensitic steels for fast reactor wrapper applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagley, K.; Little, E.A.; Levy, V.; Alamo, A.

    1987-01-01

    9-12%Cr ferritic-martensitic stainless steels are under development in Europe for fast reactor sub-assembly wrapper applications. Within this class of alloys, attention is focussed on three key specifications, viz. FV448 and DIN 1.4914 (both 10-12%CrMoVNb steels) and EM10 (an 8-10%Cr-0.15%C steel), which can be optimized to give acceptably low ductile-brittle transition characteristics. The results of studies on these steels, and earlier choices, covering heat treatment and compositional optimization, evolution of wrapper fabrication routes, pre and post-irradiation mechanical property and fracture toughness behaviour, microstructural stability, void swelling and in-reactor creep characteristics are reviewed. The retention of high void swelling to displacement doses in excess of 100 dpa in reactor irradiations reaffirms the selection of 9-12%Cr steels for on-going wrapper development. Moreover, irradiation-induced changes in mechanical properties (e.g. in-reactor creep and impact behaviour), measured to intermediate doses, do not give cause for concern; however, additional data to higher doses and at the lower irradiation temperatures of 370 0 -400 0 C are needed in order to fully endorse these alloys for high burnup applications in advanced reactor systems

  5. Microstructural Evolution of Advanced Radiation-Resistant ODS Steel with Different Lengths of Mechanical Alloying Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Sanghoon; Kim, Ga Eon; Kang, Suk Hoon; Kim, Tae Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Austenitic stainless steel may be one of the candidates because of good strength and corrosion resistance at the high temperatures, however irradiation swelling well occurred to 120dpa at high temperatures and this leads the decrease of the mechanical properties and dimensional stability. Compared to this, ferritic/ martensitic steel is a good solution because of excellent thermal conductivity and good swelling resistance. Unfortunately, the available temperature range of ferritic/martensitic steel is limited up to 650 .deg. C. ODS steel is the most promising structural material because of excellent creep and irradiation resistance by uniformly distributed nano-oxide particles with a high density which is extremely stable at the high temperature in ferritic/martensitic matrix. In this study, powder properties and microstructures of the ODS steel with different length of mechanical alloying time was investigated. The ODS steel milled 5h showed homogeneous grain structure with the highest hardness.

  6. Microstructural Evolution of Advanced Radiation-Resistant ODS Steel with Different Lengths of Mechanical Alloying Time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, Sanghoon; Kim, Ga Eon; Kang, Suk Hoon; Kim, Tae Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steel may be one of the candidates because of good strength and corrosion resistance at the high temperatures, however irradiation swelling well occurred to 120dpa at high temperatures and this leads the decrease of the mechanical properties and dimensional stability. Compared to this, ferritic/ martensitic steel is a good solution because of excellent thermal conductivity and good swelling resistance. Unfortunately, the available temperature range of ferritic/martensitic steel is limited up to 650 .deg. C. ODS steel is the most promising structural material because of excellent creep and irradiation resistance by uniformly distributed nano-oxide particles with a high density which is extremely stable at the high temperature in ferritic/martensitic matrix. In this study, powder properties and microstructures of the ODS steel with different length of mechanical alloying time was investigated. The ODS steel milled 5h showed homogeneous grain structure with the highest hardness

  7. Refinement and fracture mechanisms of as-cast QT700-6 alloy by alloying method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-qiang Gao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The as-cast QT700-6 alloy was synthesized with addition of a certain amount of copper, nickel, niobium and stannum elements by alloying method in a medium frequency induction furnace, aiming at improving its strength and toughness. Microstructures of the as-cast QT700-6 alloy were observed using a scanning-electron microscope (SEM and the mechanical properties were investigated using a universal tensile test machine. Results indicate that the ratio of pearlite/ferrite is about 9:1 and the graphite size is less than 40 μm in diameter in the as-cast QT700-6 alloy. The predominant refinement mechanism is attributed to the formation of niobium carbides, which increases the heterogeneous nucleus and hinders the growth of graphite. Meanwhile, niobium carbides also exist around the grain boundaries, which improve the strength of the ductile iron. The tensile strength and elongation of the as-cast QT700-6 alloy reach over 700 MPa and 6%, respectively, when the addition amount of niobium is 0.8%. The addition of copper and nickel elements contributed to the decrease of eutectoid transformation temperature, resulting in the decrease of pearlite lamellar spacing (about 248 nm, which is also beneficial to enhancing the tensile strength. The main fracture mechanism is cleavage fracture with the appearance of a small amount of dimples.

  8. Plasma spot welding of ferritic stainless steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lešnjak, A.

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma spot welding of ferritic stainless steels is studied. The study was focused on welding parameters, plasma and shielding gases and the optimum welding equipment. Plasma-spot welded overlap joints on a 0.8 mm thick ferritic stainless steel sheet were subjected to a visual examination and mechanical testing in terms of tension-shear strength. Several macro specimens were prepared. Plasma spot welding is suitable to use the same gas as shielding gas and as plasma gas, i.e., a 98 % Ar/2 % H 2 gas mixture. Tension-shear strength of plasma-spot welded joints was compared to that of resistance-spot welded joints. It was found that the resistance welded joints withstand a somewhat stronger load than the plasma welded joints due to a larger weld spot diameter of the former. Strength of both types of welded joints is approximately the same.

    El artículo describe el proceso de soldeo de aceros inoxidables ferríticos por puntos con plasma. La investigación se centró en el establecimiento de los parámetros óptimos de la soldadura, la definición del gas de plasma y de protección más adecuado, así como del equipo óptimo para la realización de la soldadura. Las uniones de láminas de aceros inoxidables ferríticos de 0,8 mm de espesor, soldadas a solape por puntos con plasma, se inspeccionaron visualmente y se ensayaron mecánicamente mediante el ensayo de cizalladura por tracción. Se realizaron macro pulidos. Los resultados de la investigación demostraron que la solución más adecuada para el soldeo por puntos con plasma es elegir el mismo gas de plasma que de protección. Es decir, una mezcla de 98 % de argón y 2 % de hidrógeno. La resistencia a la cizalladura por tracción de las uniones soldadas por puntos con plasma fue comparada con la resistencia de las uniones soldadas por resistencia por puntos. Se llegó a la conclusión de que las uniones soldadas por resistencia soportan una carga algo mayor que la uniones

  9. Water corrosion resistance of ODS ferritic-martensitic steel tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narita, Takeshi; Ukai, Shigeharu; Kaito, Takeji; Ohtsuka, Satoshi; Matsuda, Yasuji

    2008-01-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic-martensitic steels have superior radiation resistance; it is possible to achieve a service temperature of up to around 973 K because of their superior creep strength. These advantages of ODS steels facilities their application to long-life cladding tubes in advanced fast reactor fuel elements. In addition to neutron radiation resistance, sufficient general corrosion resistance to maintain the strength of the cladding, and the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance for spent-fuel-pool cooling systems and high-temperature oxidation for the fuel-clad chemical interaction (FCCI) of ODS ferritic steel are required. Although the addition of Cr to ODS is effective in preventing water corrosion and high-temperature oxidation, an excessively high amount of Cr leads to embrittlement due to the formation of a Cr-rich α' precipitate. The Cr content in 9Cr-ODS martensite and 12Cr-ODS ferrite, the ODS steels developed by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), is controlled. In a previous paper, it has been demonstrated that the resistances of 9Cr- and 12Cr-ODS ferritic-martensitic steels for high-temperature oxidation are superior to those of conventional 12Cr ferritic steel. However, the water corrosion data of ODS ferritic-martensitic steels are very limited. In this study, a water corrosion test was conducted on ODS steels in consideration of the spent-fuel-pool cooling condition, and the results were compared with those of conventional austenitic stainless steel and ferritic-martensitic stainless steel. (author)

  10. Elemental volatility of HT-9 fusion reactor alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henslee, S.P.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The volatility of elemental constituents from HT-9, a ferritic steel, proposed for fusion reactor structures, was investigated. Tests were conducted in flowing air at temperatures from 800 to 1200 0 C for durations of 1 to 20 h. Elemental volatility was calculated in terms of the weight fraction of the element volatilized from the initial alloy; molybdenum, manganese, and nickel were the primary constituents volatilized. Comparisons with elemental volatilities observed for another candidate fusion reactor materials. Primary Candidate Alloy (PCA), an austenitic stainless steel, indicate significant differences between the volatilities of these steels that may impact fusion reactor safety analysis and alloy selection. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometry were used to investigate the oxide layers formed on HT-9 and to measure elemental contents within these layers

  11. Hydrogen formation in metals and alloys during fusion reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimin, S.; Takatsu, Hideyuki; Mori, Seiji

    1994-08-01

    The results of neutron transport calculations of the hydrogen formation based on the JENDL gas-production cross section file are discussed for some metals and alloys, namely 51 V, Cr, Fe, Ni, Mo, austenitic stainless steel (Ti modified 316SS:PCA), ferritic steel (Fe-8Cr-2W:F82H) and the vanadium-base alloy (V-5Cr-5Ti). Impact of the steel fraction in steel/water homogeneous blanket/shield compositions on the hydrogen formation rate in above-mentioned metals and alloys is discussed both for the hydrogen formation in the first wall and the blanket/shield components. The results obtained for the first wall are compared with those for the helium formation obtained at JAERI by the same calculational conditions. Hydrogen formation rates at the first wall having 51 V, Cr, Fe, Ni and Mo are larger than those of helium by 3-8 times. (author)

  12. Theory and design of a half-mode SIW Ferrite LTCC phase shifter

    KAUST Repository

    Ghaffar, Farhan A.; Shamim, Atif

    2015-01-01

    A half mode SIW based Ferrite LTCC phase shifter is presented in this work. A theoretical model to predict the phase shift in the partially magnetized state has been derived. Contrary to the bulky external magnets employed by conventional ferrite

  13. Bismuth ferrite as low-loss switchable material for plasmonic waveguide modulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia; Zhukovsky, Sergei; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    We propose new designs of plasmonic modulators, which can beused for dynamic signal switching in photonic integrated circuits. We studyperformance of a plasmonic waveguide modulator with bismuth ferrite as atunable material. The bismuth ferrite core is sandwiched between metalplates (metal...

  14. Effect of Ferrite Morphology on Sensitization of 316L Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Hun; Lee, Jun Ho; Jang, Changheui [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    The sensitization behaviors of L-grade SSs having predominant austenitic structure with small amount of ferrite have not been well understood. In this regard, the effect of ferrite morphology on sensitization was investigated in this study. The sensitization behaviors of three heats of 316L and 316LN SSs were investigated, Stringer type of ferrite (316L - heat A and B) showed the early sensitization by chromium depletion at ferrite. austenite interface. And, later sensitization is due to GB sensitization. On the other hand, blocky type of ferrite (316L - heat C) showed lower DOS and higher resistance to GB sensitization. It could be due to sufficient supply of chromium from relatively large ferrite phase. As a consequence, the sensitization of 316L SSs could be affected by their ferrite morphology rather than ferrite content. The sensitized region was distinguishable from results of DL-EPR tests. It can be used as an effective method for evaluation of type of sensitization.

  15. A biosensor system using nickel ferrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Prachi, E-mail: prachi.singh@st.niituniversity.in; Rathore, Deepshikha, E-mail: deep.nano@gmail.com [NIIT University, Neemrana, NH-8, Alwar, Rajasthan, India, 301705 (India)

    2016-05-06

    NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical co-precipitation method and the structural characteristics were investigated using X-ray diffraction technique, where single cubic phase formation of nanoparticles was confirmed. The average particle size of NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} was found to be 4.9 nm. Nanoscale magnetic materials are an important source of labels for biosensing due to their strong magnetic properties which are not found in biological systems. This property of the material was exploited and the fabrication of the NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticle based biosensor was done in the form of a capacitor system, with NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} as the dielectric material. The biosensor system was tested towards different biological materials with the help of electrochemical workstation and the same was analysed through Cole-Cole plot of NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. The performance of the sensor was determined based on its sensitivity, response time and recovery time.

  16. Magnetostatic excitations in thin ferrite films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zil'berman, P.E.; Lugovskoi, A.V.

    1987-01-01

    The authors discuss the influence of the exchange interaction and dissipative processes in thin ferrite films on the eigenfrequency spectrum of magnetostatic standing waves and on the dispersion relation and attenuation of magnetostatic traveling waves. For the first time they obtain explicitly the dispersion relation for magnetostatic waves (MSWs) in a tangential saturating magnetic field H 0 to second order (inclusive) in the exchange interaction parameter λ. The authors obtain computer solutions for this equation in the complex frequency (ω) plane (for standing waves) or wave-number (q) plane (for traveling waves). The authors show that the dispersion relation constructed from the standing-wave spectrum is different from that of the traveling waves if λ≠0, even if dissipation is neglected. The traveling waves have auxiliary branches of the dispersion relation with weak damping near the spin-wave-resonance (SWR) frequencies. Dissipation has only a relatively weak effect on the frequency spectrum of the standing waves, shifting it upward. For the traveling waves, however, dissipation leads to qualitative changes in the structure of the dispersion relation, giving rise to new branches, forbidden bands, reentrant and anomalous-dispersion regions

  17. Neutron depolarization in compressed ferrite powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rekveldt, M.Th.; Kraan, W.H.

    1976-01-01

    The polarization change of a polarized neutron beam after transmission through a partly magnetized ferromagnetic material can be described by a (3x3) depolarization matrix. This matrix can be expressed in terms of domain quantities such as the reduced mean magnetization M, the mean domain size delta and the mean square direction cosinus γsub(y) of the inner magnetization within the domain, and can be used for measuring magnetic properties of ferromagnetic materials. In the underlying depolarization theory it is assumed that no correlations exist between the direction of the spontaneous magnetization Bs in neighbouring domains, and between the direction of Bs and the individual domain sizes. In order to extend the measuring method for ferromagnetic materials, measurements have been made with different compressed ferrite powders assuming that the mean domain size is equal to the mean particle size. The neutron depolarization matrix is measured as a function of an alternative external magnetic field and interpreted in terms of m, γsub(y), and delta. The possibilities and limitations of the measuring method are discussed

  18. Microwave left-handed composite material made of slim ferrite rods and metallic wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Xu; Yang, Bai; Li-Jie, Qiao; Hong-Jie, Zhao; Ji, Zhou

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on experimental study of the microwave properties of a composite material consisting of ferrite and copper wires. It finds that the slim ferrite rods can modify the magnetic field distribution through their anisotropy, so that the ferrite's negative influence on the copper wires' plasma will be reduced. Left-handed properties are observed even in the specimen with close stuck ferrite rods and copper wires. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  19. Plasma discharge in ferritic first wall vacuum vessel of the Hitachi Tokamak HT-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Mitsushi; Nakayama, Takeshi; Asano, Katsuhiko; Otsuka, Michio

    1997-01-01

    A tokamak discharge with ferritic material first wall was tried successfully. The Hitachi Tokamak HT-2 had a stainless steel SUS304 vacuum vessel and modified to have a ferritic plate first wall for experiments to investigate the possibility of ferritic material usage in magnetic fusion devices. The achieved vacuum pressure and times used for discharge cleaning was roughly identical with the stainless steel first wall or the original HT-2. We concluded that ferritic material vacuum vessel is possible for tokamaks. (author)

  20. Magnesium ferrite nanoparticles: a rapid gas sensor for alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbole, Rhushikesh; Rao, Pratibha; Bhagwat, Sunita

    2017-02-01

    Highly porous spinel MgFe2O4 nanoparticles with a high specific surface area have been successfully synthesized by a sintering free auto-combustion technique and characterized for their structural and surface morphological properties using XRD, BET, TEM and SEM techniques. Their sensing properties to alcohol vapors viz. ethanol and methanol were investigated. The site occupation of metal ions was investigated by VSM. The as-synthesized sample shows the formation of sponge-like porous material which is necessary for gas adsorption. The gas sensing characteristics were obtained by measuring the gas response as a function of operating temperature, concentration of the gas, and the response-recovery time. The response of magnesium ferrite to ethanol and methanol vapors was compared and it was revealed that magnesium ferrite is more sensitive and selective to ethanol vapor. The sensor operates at a substantially low vapor concentration of about 1 ppm of alcohol vapors, exhibits fantastic response reproducibility, long term reliability and a very fast response and recovery property. Thus the present study explored the possibility of making rapidly responding alcohol vapor sensor based on magnesium ferrite. The sensing mechanism has been discussed in co-relation with magnetic and morphological properties. The role of occupancy of Mg2+ ions in magnesium ferrite on its gas sensing properties has also been studied and is found to influence the response of magnesium ferrite ethanol sensor.

  1. Effect of rare earth substitution in cobalt ferrite bulk materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulai, G.; Diamandescu, L.; Dumitru, I.; Gurlui, S.; Feder, M.; Caltun, O.F.

    2015-01-01

    The study was focused on the influence of small amounts of rare earth (RE=La, Ce, Sm, Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb) addition on the microstructure, phase content and magnetic properties of cobalt ferrite bulk materials. The X-Ray diffraction measurements confirmed the formation of the spinel structure but also the presence of secondary phases of RE oxides or orthoferrite in small percentages (up to 3%). Density measurements obtained by Archimedes method revealed a ~1 g cm −3 decrease for the RE doped cobalt ferrite samples compared with stoichiometric one. Both the Mössbauer and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrocopy analysis results confirmed the formation of the spinel phase. The saturation magnetization and coercive field values of the doped samples obtained by Vibrating Sample Magnetometry were close to those of the pure cobalt ferrite. For magnetostrictive property studies the samples were analyzed using the strain gauge method. Higher maximum magnetostriction coefficients were found for the Ho, Ce, Sm and Yb doped cobalt ferrite bulk materials as related to the stoichiometric CoFe 2 O 4 sample. Moreover, improved strain derivative was observed for these samples but at higher magnetic fields due to the low increase of the coercive field values for doped samples. - Highlights: • Substitution by a large number of rare earth elements was investigated. • First reported results on magnetostriction measurements of RE doped cobalt ferrite. • The doped samples presented an increased porosity and a decreased grain size. • Increased magnetostrctive response was observed for several doped samples

  2. Microstructural evolution in friction stir welding of nanostructured ODS alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.-L.; Tatlock, G.J.; Jones, A.R.

    2010-01-01

    Nanostructured oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-based alloys manufactured by mechanical alloying (MA) are generally considered to be promising candidate materials for high-temperature applications up to at least 1100 o C because of their excellent creep strength and good oxidation resistance. However, a key issue with these alloys is the difficulty in using fusion welding techniques to join components due to oxide particle agglomeration and loss in the weld zone and the disruption and discontinuity in the grain structure introduced at the bond. In this study, the evolution of microstructure has been comprehensively studied in friction stir welds in a ferritic ODS alloy. Initially, electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD) was used to analyze the grain orientation, the grain boundary geometries and recrystallization behaviour. It suggested that deformation heterogeneities were introduced during the friction stirring process which facilitated the onset of recrystallization. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) were used to observe the effects of the friction stir welding (FSW) process on the grain structure and the distribution of Y 2 O 3 and other particles in the metal substrates in the FSW and adjacent regions, after the alloys had been recrystallized at temperatures up to 1380 o C for 1 h in air. The results show that fine-equiaxed grains and a uniform distribution of oxide particles were present in the friction stirred region but that the grain boundaries in the parent metal were pinned by particles. Friction stirring appeared to release these boundaries and allowed secondary recrystallization to occur after further heat treatment. The FSW process appears to be a promising technique for joining ferritic ODS alloys in the form of sheet and tube.

  3. Phase transformation and hardness of SS 316 L steel cast alloy after heat treatment at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidayat, S.; Prayitno, D. H.

    2000-01-01

    Heat treatment Study of SS 316 L cast alloy at high temperature was conducted. The alloy of SS 316 L was melted by arc melting furnace in argon atmosphere. Heat treatment of SS 316 L casting alloy was carried out in tube furnace at 1400 o C for period of 1/2, 1, and 2 hours. The optical microscopic characterization showed that SS 316 L cast has got dendritic micro structure with ferrite as the primary phase. After the heat treatment, the ferrite phase underwent gradual decrease followed by an increase of the austenite phase. The heat treatment process also resulted in the formation of the new grain boundary. The hardness examination revealed that for longer period of the heat treatment, the hardness of SS 316 L increased. (author)

  4. Development of ODS ferritic-martensitic steels for application to high temperature and irradiation environment; Developpement d'une nouvelle nuance martensitique ODS pour utilisation sous rayonnement a haute temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambard, V

    2000-07-01

    Iron oxide dispersion strengthened alloys are candidate for nuclear fuel cladding. Therefore, it is crucial to control their microstructure in order to optimise their mechanical properties at temperatures up to 700 deg C. The industrial candidates, ODS ferritic alloys, present an anisotropic microstructure which induces a weakening of mechanical properties in transversal direction as well as the precipitation of brittle phases under thermal aging and irradiation. For this purpose, we tried to develop a material with isotropic properties. We studied several 9Cr-1Mo ferritic/martensitic alloys, strengthened or not by oxide dispersion. The mechanical alloying was performed by attribution and powders were consolidated by hot extrusion. In this work, different metallurgical characterisation techniques and modelling were used to optimise a new martensitic ODS alloy. Microstructural and chemical characterization of matrix has been done. The effect of austenitizing and isochronal tempering treatments on microstructure and hardness has been studied. Oxide distribution, size and chemical composition have been studied before and after high temperature thermal treatment. The study of phase transformation upon heating has permitted the extrapolation to the equilibrium temperature formation of austenite. Phase transformation diagrams upon cooling have been determined and the transformation kinetics have been linked to austenite grain size by a simple relation. Fine grain size is unfavourable for the targeted application, so a particular thermal treatment inducing a coarser grain structure has been developed. Finally, tensile properties have been determined for the different microstructures. (author)

  5. Annealing of a ferritic stainless steel 409 stabilized with titanium and zirconium additions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zambrano, P.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A ferritic stainless steel 409 stabilized with titanium and zirconium was subject to thermomechanical processing. It was heated at 1210 °C for one hour, followed by a 75 % hot reduction in three passes, this rolling schedule ended at 980 °C. Samples were cooled to 600 °C by water spraying followed by air-cooling. The alloy was pickled, and was reduced 80 % by cold rolling. The alloy was annealed at different temperatures for 105 s. Additional annealing treatments were carried out at temperatures of 800, 850 and 900 °C for different times. Mechanical testing and texture were made to corroborate the degree of annealing and formability. Mechanical properties and Texture analyses showed that the alloy annealed at 850 °C for 14 min was both completely recrystallized and a very good formability.

    Un acero inoxidable ferrítico 409 estabilizado con titanio y zirconio fue sujeto a procesos termomecánicos. El acero fue calentado a 1210 ºC durante una hora, seguido por un laminado en caliente del 75 % en tres pases, el proceso terminó a los 980 ºC. Las muestras fueron enfriadas hasta 600 ºC por agua atomizada seguido de enfriamiento al aire. La aleación fue decapada y laminada en frío un 80 %. Posteriormente de desarrollaron tratamientos térmicos de recocido a diferentes temperaturas por un tiempo de 105 s. Adicionalmente se desarrollaron tratamientos de recocido a temperaturas de 800, 850 y 900 ºC a diferentes tiempos. Pruebas mecánicas y textura fueron realizadas para corroborar el grado de recocido y su formalidad. El análisis de las propiedades mecánicas y la Textura mostraron que la aleación recocida a 850 ºC por 14 min (840 s fue completamente recristalizada obteniendo la mejor formabilidad.

  6. Experimental study and modelling of the high temperature mechanical behavior of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steckmeyer, A.

    2012-01-01

    The strength of metals, and therefore their maximum operating temperature, can be improved by oxide dispersion strengthening (ODS). Numerous research studies are carried out at the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) in order to develop a cladding tube material for Gen IV nuclear power reactors. Oxide dispersion strengthened steels appear to be the most promising candidates for such application, which demands a minimum operating temperature of 650 C. The present dissertation intends to improve the understanding of the mechanical properties of ODS steels, in terms of creep lifetime and mechanical anisotropy. The methodology of this work includes mechanical tests between room temperature and 900 C as well as macroscopic and polycrystalline modelling. These tests are carried out on a Fe-14Cr1W0,26Ti + 0,3 Y 2 O 3 ODS ferritic steel processed at CEA by mechanical alloying and hot extrusion. The as-received material is a bar with a circular section. The mechanical tests reveal the high mechanical strength of this steel at high temperature. A strong influence of the strain rate on the ductility and the mechanical strength is also observed. A macroscopic mechanical model has been developed on the basis of some experimental statements such as the high kinematic contribution to the flow stress. This model has a strong ability to reproduce the mechanical behaviour of the studied material. Two different polycrystalline models have also been developed in order to reproduce the mechanical anisotropy of the material. They are based on its specific grain morphology and crystallographic texture. The discrepancy between the predictions of both models and experimental results reveal the necessity to formulate alternate assumptions on the deformation mechanisms of ODS ferritic steels. (author) [fr

  7. Study of corrosion resistance of AISI 444 ferritic stainless steel for application as a biomaterial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, Rogerio Albuquerque

    2014-01-01

    Ferritic stainless steels are ferromagnetic materials. This property does not allow their use in orthopedic prosthesis. Nevertheless, in some specific applications, this characteristic is very useful, such as, for fixing dental and facial prostheses by using magnetic attachments. In this study, the corrosion resistance and cytotoxicity of the AISI 444 ferritic stainless steel, with low nickel content, extra-low interstitial levels (C and N) and Ti and Nb stabilizers, were investigated for magnetic dental attachments application. The ISO 5832-1 (ASTM F-139) austenitic stainless steel and a commercial universal keeper for dental attachment (Neo-magnet System) were evaluated for comparison reasons. The first stainless steel is the most used metallic material for prostheses, and the second one, is a ferromagnetic keeper for dental prostheses (NeoM). In vitro cytotoxicity analysis was performed by the red neutral incorporation method. The results showed that the AISI 444 stainless steel is non cytotoxic. The corrosion resistance was studied by anodic polarization methods and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), in a saline phosphate buffered solution (PBS) at 37 °C. The electronic properties of the passive film formed on AISI 444 SS were evaluated by the Mott-Schottky approach. All tested materials showed passivity in the PBS medium and the passive oxide film presented a duplex nature. The highest susceptibility to pitting corrosion was associated to the NeoM SS. This steel was also associated to the highest dopant concentration. The comparatively low levels of chromium (nearly 12.5%) and molybdenum (0.3%) of NeoM relatively to the other studied stainless steels are the probable cause of its lower corrosion resistance. The NeoM chemical composition does not match that of the SUS444 standards. The AISI 444 SS pitting resistance was equivalent to the ISO 5832-1 pointing out that it is a potential candidate for replacement of commercial ferromagnetic alloys used

  8. 78 FR 63517 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2012-0231] Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld... Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal.'' This guide (Revision 4) describes a method that the NRC staff considers acceptable for controlling ferrite content in stainless steel weld metal. It updates the...

  9. 77 FR 60478 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [[NRC-2012-0231] Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld... draft regulatory guide (DG), DG-1279, ``Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal.'' This guide describes a method that the NRC staff considers acceptable for controlling ferrite content in...

  10. Reliability/unreliability of mixture rule in a low alloy ferrite–martensite dual phase steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fereiduni, E.; Ghasemi Banadkouki, S.S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •The ferrite hardening response is quite variable in DP microstructures. •Martensite microhardness has not shown a specific manner in DP microstructures. •There is a major difference between experimental and calculated hardness values. •Mixture rule can be applied to predict the hardness if using some assumptions. -- Abstract: The aim of this paper is to investigate in details the relationship between the volume fractions of ferrite and martensite with the variation of hardness in a low alloy ferrite–martensite dual phase (DP) steel. For this purpose, a wide variety of ferrite–martensite DP samples consisting different volume fractions of ferrite and martensite have been developed using step quenching heat treatment cycle involving reheating at 860 °C for 60 min, soaking at 600 °C salt bath for various holding times followed by 70 °C hot oil quenching. Optical microscopy has been supplemented by electron microscopy and hardness measurements to follow microstructural changes and their relation to the variation in hardness. The results showed that there is a non-linear relationship between the hardness of DP samples with the volume fraction of phase constituents indicating that the mixture rule is not reliable in the ferrite–martensite DP microstructures. The unreliability of mixture rule is related to the variation of ferrite and martensite hardening responses developed in the DP samples. The DP microstructure consisting 6–7% volume fraction of continuous grain boundary ferrite in the vicinity of martensite has been associated with a remarkable higher hardness for both ferrite and martensite in comparison with the other DP microstructures. The higher martensite hardness is due to the higher carbon content of the remaining metastable austenite developed in the ferrite–austenite two phase field area, leading to the harder martensite formation on the subsequent 70 °C hot oil quenching. The harder ferrite grains have been developed as a

  11. Superconducting alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowers, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    Reference is made to superconductors having high critical currents. The superconductor described comprises an alloy consisting of a matrix of a Type II superconductor which is a homogeneous mixture of 50 to 95 at.% Pb and 5 to 40 at.%Bi and/or 10 to 50 at.%In. Dispersed in the matrix is a material to provide pinning centres comprising from 0.01% to 20% by volume of the alloy; this material is a stable discontinuous phase of discrete crystalline particles of Cu, Mn, Te, Se, Ni, Ca, Cr, Ce, Ge or La, either in the form of the element or a compound with a component of the matrix. These particles should have an average diameter of not more than 2μ. A method for making this alloy is described. (U.K.)

  12. Tube manufacturing and characterization of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ukai, Shigeharu; Mizuta, Shunji; Yoshitake, Tunemitsu; Okuda, Takanari; Fujiwara, Masayuki; Hagi, Shigeki; Kobayashi, Toshimi

    2000-01-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels have an advantage in radiation resistance and superior creep rupture strength at elevated temperature due to finely distributed Y 2 O 3 particles in the ferritic matrix. Using a basic composition of low activation ferritic steel (Fe-12Cr-2W-0.05C), cladding tube manufacturing by means of pilger mill rolling and subsequent recrystallization heat-treatment was conducted while varying titanium and yttria contents. The recrystallization heat-treatment, to soften the tubes hardened due to cold-rolling and to subsequently improve the degraded mechanical properties, was demonstrated to be effective in the course of tube manufacturing. For a titanium content of 0.3 wt% and yttria of 0.25 wt%, improvement of the creep rupture strength can be attained for the manufactured cladding tubes. The ductility is also adequately maintained

  13. Future directions for ferritic/martensitic steels for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Swindeman, R.W.

    2000-01-01

    High-chromium (7-12% Cr) ferritic/martensitic steels are being considered for nuclear applications for both fission and fusion reactors. Conventional 9-12Cr Cr-Mo steels were the first candidates for these applications. For fusion reactors, reduced-activation steels were developed that were patterned on the conventional steels but with molybdenum replaced by tungsten and niobium replaced by tantalum. Both the conventional and reduced-activation steels are considered to have an upper operating temperature limit of about 550degC. For improved reactor efficiency, higher operating temperatures are required. For ferritic/martensitic steels that could meet such requirements, oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels are being considered. In this paper, the ferritic/martensitic steels that are candidate steels for nuclear applications will be reviewed, the prospect for ODS steel development and the development of steels produced by conventional processes will be discussed. (author)

  14. Antimicrobial Lemongrass Essential Oil-Copper Ferrite Cellulose Acetate Nanocapsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liakos, Ioannis L; Abdellatif, Mohamed H; Innocenti, Claudia; Scarpellini, Alice; Carzino, Riccardo; Brunetti, Virgilio; Marras, Sergio; Brescia, Rosaria; Drago, Filippo; Pompa, Pier Paolo

    2016-04-20

    Cellulose acetate (CA) nanoparticles were combined with two antimicrobial agents, namely lemongrass (LG) essential oil and Cu-ferrite nanoparticles. The preparation method of CA nanocapsules (NCs), with the two antimicrobial agents, was based on the nanoprecipitation method using the solvent/anti-solvent technique. Several physical and chemical analyses were performed to characterize the resulting NCs and to study their formation mechanism. The size of the combined antimicrobial NCs was found to be ca. 220 nm. The presence of Cu-ferrites enhanced the attachment of LG essential oil into the CA matrix. The magnetic properties of the combined construct were weak, due to the shielding of Cu-ferrites from the polymeric matrix, making them available for drug delivery applications where spontaneous magnetization effects should be avoided. The antimicrobial properties of the NCs were significantly enhanced with respect to CA/LG only. This work opens novel routes for the development of organic/inorganic nanoparticles with exceptional antimicrobial activities.

  15. Impedimetric detection of alcohol vapours using nanostructured zinc ferrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Padmanathan Karthick; Saraswathi, Ramiah

    2014-11-01

    A comparative study on the sensing characteristics of nanostructured zinc ferrite to three primary alcohols viz. methanol, ethanol and propanol has been carried out. The zinc ferrite has been prepared by a combustion method and characterized by XRD, FTIR, AFM and SEM. Impedance studies in the alcohol concentration range varying from 100 to 1000 ppm show definite variations in response to both the nature of the alcohol and its concentration. The nanostructured zinc ferrite shows the highest sensor response to methanol and least to propanol. Equivalent circuit modelling and calibration have been made for all the three alcohol sensors. The material shows a better selectivity to the alcohols compared to formaldehyde, ammonia and acetone vapours. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Multifunctional metal ferrite nanoparticles for MR imaging applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Hrushikesh M.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a very powerful non-invasive tool for in vivo imaging and clinical diagnosis. With rapid advancement in nanoscience and nanotechnology, there is rapid growth in nanoparticles-based contrast agents. Progress in synthetic protocols enable synthesis of multifunctional nanoparticles which facilitated efforts toward the development of multimodal contrast agents. In this review, recent developments in metal ferrite-based MR contrast agents have been described. Specifically, effect of size, shape, composition, assembly and surface modification of metal ferrite nanoparticles on their T 2 contrast have been discussed. The review further outlines the effect of leaching on MRI contrast and other various factors which affect the multimodal ability of the (T 1 –T 2 and T 2 -thermal activation) metal ferrite nanoparticles.

  17. The nature of temper brittleness of high-chromium ferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarrak, V.I.; Suvorova, S.O.; Golovin, I.S.; Mishin, V.M.; Kislyuk, I.V. [Central Scientific-Research Institute for Ferrous Metallurgy, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-03-01

    The reasons for development of {open_quotes}475{degrees}C brittleness{close_quotes} of high-chromium ferritic steels are considered from the standpoint of fracture mechanics. It is shown that the general rise in the curve of temperature-dependent local flow stress has the decisive influence on the position of the ductile-to-brittle transformation temperature and the increase in it as the result of a hold at temperatures of development of brittleness. The established effect is related to the change in the parameters determining dislocation mobility, that is, the activation energy of dislocation movement in high-chromium ferrite and the resistance to microplastic deformation, both caused by processes of separation into layers of high-chromium ferrite and decomposition of the interstitial solid solution.

  18. Tri-metallic ferrite oxygen carriers for chemical looping combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V.; Fan, Yueying

    2017-10-25

    The disclosure provides a tri-metallic ferrite oxygen carrier for the chemical looping combustion of carbonaceous fuels. The tri-metallic ferrite oxygen carrier comprises Cu.sub.xFe.sub.yMn.sub.zO.sub.4-.delta., where Cu.sub.xFe.sub.yMn.sub.zO.sub.4-.delta. is a chemical composition. Generally, 0.5.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.2.0, 0.2.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.2.5, and 0.2.ltoreq.z.ltoreq.2.5, and in some embodiments, 0.8.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1.2, y.ltoreq.1.2, and z.gtoreq.0.8. The tri-metallic ferrite oxygen carrier may be used in various applications for the combustion of carbonaceous fuels, including as an oxygen carrier for chemical looping combustion.

  19. Superparamagnetic response of zinc ferrite incrusted nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Maldonado, K.L., E-mail: liliana.lopez.maldonado@gmail.com [Instituto de Ingeniería y Tecnología, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, Av. Del Charro 450 norte, 32310 Ciudad Juárez (Mexico); Presa, P. de la, E-mail: pmpresa@ucm.es [Instituto de Magnetismo Aplicado (UCM-ADIF-CSIC), PO Box 155, 28230 Las Rozas (Spain); Dpto. Física de Materiales, Univ. Complutense de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Betancourt, I., E-mail: israelb@unam.mx [Departamento de Materiales Metálicos y Cerámicos, Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México, D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Farias Mancilla, J.R., E-mail: rurik.farias@uacj.mx [Instituto de Ingeniería y Tecnología, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, Av. Del Charro 450 norte, 32310 Ciudad Juárez (Mexico); Matutes Aquino, J.A., E-mail: jose.matutes@cimav.edu.mx [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados, Miguel de Cervantes 120, 31109 Chihuahua (Mexico); Hernando, A., E-mail: antonio.hernando@externos.adif.es [Instituto de Magnetismo Aplicado (UCM-ADIF-CSIC), PO Box 155, 28230 Las Rozas (Spain); Dpto. Física de Materiales, Univ. Complutense de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); and others

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Incrusted nanoparticles are found at the surface of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} microparticles. • Magnetic contribution of nano and microparticles are analyzed by different models. • Langevin model is used to calculate the nanoparticles-superparamagnetic diameter. • Susceptibility and Langevin analysis and calculations agree with experimental data. - Abstract: Zinc ferrite is synthesized via mechano-activation, followed by thermal treatment. Spinel ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} single phase is confirmed by X-ray diffraction. SEM micrographs show large particles with average particle size 〈D{sub part}〉 = 1 μm, with particles in intimate contact. However, TEM micrographs show incrusted nanocrystallites at the particles surface, with average nanocrystallite size calculated as 〈D{sub inc}〉 ≈ 5 nm. The blocking temperature at 118 K in the ZFC–FC curves indicates the presence of a superparamagnetic response which is attributable to the incrusted nanocrystallites. Moreover, the hysteresis loops show the coexistence of superpara- and paramagnetic responses. The former is observable at the low field region; meanwhile, the second one is responsible of the lack of saturation at high field region. This last behavior is related to a paramagnetic contribution coming from well-ordered crystalline microdomains. The hysteresis loops are analyzed by means of two different models. The first one is the susceptibility model used to examine separately the para- and superparamagnetic contributions. The fittings with the theoretical model confirm the presence of the above mentioned magnetic contributions. Finally, using the Langevin-based model, the average superparamagnetic diameter 〈D{sub SPM}〉 is calculated. The obtained value 〈D{sub SPM}〉 = 4.7 nm (∼5 nm) is consistent with the average nanocrystallite size observed by TEM.

  20. Oxidation rate in ferritic superheater materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, I.

    1992-05-01

    On the steam side of superheater tubes, compact oxide layers are formed which have a tendency to crack and flake off (exfoliate). Oxide particles then travel with the steam and can give rise to erosion damage in valves and on turbine blades. In an evaluation of conditions in superheater tubes from Swedish power boilers, it was found that the exfoliation frequency for one material quality (SS 2218) was greater than for other qualities. Against this background, a literature study has been carried out in order to determine which mechanisms govern the build-up of oxide and the exfoliation phenomenon. The study reveals that the oxide morphology is similar on all ferritic steels with Cr contents up to 5%. and that the oxide properties can therefore be expected to be similar. The reason why the exfoliation frequency is greater for tubes of SS 2218 is probably that the tubes have been exposed to higher temperatures. SS 2218 (2.25 Cr) is normally used in a higher temperature range which is accompanied by improved strength data as compared with SS 2216 (1 Cr). The principal cause of the exfoliation is said to be stresses which arise in the oxide during the cooling-down process associated with shutdowns. The stresses give rise to longitudinal cracks in the oxide, and are formed as a result of differences in thermal expansion between the oxide and the tube material. In addition, accounts are presented of oxidation constants and growth velocities, and thickness and running time. These data constitute a valuable basis for practical estimates of the operating temperature in routine checks and investigations into damage in superheater tubes. (au)

  1. Permanent magnetic ferrite based power-tunable metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guanqiao; Lan, Chuwen; Gao, Rui; Zhou, Ji

    2017-08-01

    Power-tunable metamaterials based on barium permanent magnetic ferrite have been proposed and fabricated in this research. Scattering parameter measurements confirm a shift in resonant frequency in correlation to changes in incident electromagnetic power within microwave frequency band. The tunable phenomenon represented by a blue-shift in transmission spectra in the metamaterials array can be attributed to a decrease in saturation magnetization resulting from FMR-induced temperature elevation upon resonant conditions. This power-dependent behavior offers a simple and practical route towards dynamically fine-tunable ferrite metamaterials.

  2. Modeling ferrite electromagnetic response in the time domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.; DeFord, J.F.; Craig, G.D.

    1989-01-01

    The behavior of ferrite loads commonly found in induction accelertors has important consequences for the performance of these accelerators. Previous work by the authors on modeling the electromagnetic fields in induction cavities has focussed upon use of a simple, phenomenological model for the process of magnetization reversal in these ferrite loads. In this paper we consider a model for magnetization reversal which is more deeply rooted in theory, and present a simulation of the reversal process based upon this model for an idealized set of boundary conditions. 7 refs., 3 figs

  3. Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jha, M.C.; Berggren, M.H.

    1989-05-02

    AMAX Research Development Center (AMAX R D) has been investigating methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For the present program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such As size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation.

  4. Cobalt Ferrite Nanocrystallites for Sustainable Hydrogen Production Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra S. Gaikwad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cobalt ferrite, CoFe2O4, nanocrystalline films were deposited using electrostatic spray method and explored in sustainable hydrogen production application. Reflection planes in X-ray diffraction pattern confirm CoFe2O4 phase. The surface scanning microscopy photoimages reveal an agglomeration of closely-packed CoFe2O4 nanoflakes. Concentrated solar-panel, a two-step water splitting process, measurement technique was preferred for measuring the hydrogen generation rate. For about 5 hr sustainable, 440 mL/hr, hydrogen production activity was achieved, confirming the efficient use of cobalt ferrite nanocrystallites film in hydrogen production application.

  5. Evaluation of cost reduction method for manufacturing ODS ferritic claddings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Masayuki; Mizuta, Shunji; Ukai, Shigeharu

    2000-04-01

    For evaluating the fast reactor system technology, it is important to evaluate the practical feasibility of ODS ferritic claddings, which is the most promising materials to attain the goal of high coolant temperature and more than 150 GWd/t. Based on the results of their technology development, mass production process with highly economically benefit as well as manufacturing cost estimation of ODS ferritic claddings were preliminarily conducted. From the view point of future utility scale, the cost for manufacturing mother tubes has a dominant factor in the total manufacturing cost. The method to reduce the cost of mother tube manufacturing was also preliminarily investigated. (author)

  6. The filler powders laser welding of ODS ferritic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Shenyong, E-mail: s_y_liang@126.com; Lei, Yucheng; Zhu, Qiang

    2015-01-15

    Laser welding was performed on Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel with the self-designed filler powders. The filler powders were added to weld metal to produce nano-particles (Y–M–O and TiC), submicron particles (Y–M–O) and dislocation rings. The generated particles were evenly distributed in the weld metal and their forming mechanism and behavior were analyzed. The results of the tests showed that the nano-particles, submicron particles and dislocation rings were able to improve the micro-hardness and tensile strength of welded joint, and the filler powders laser welding was an effective welding method of ODS ferritic steel.

  7. Fabrication of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic clad fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zirker, L.R.; Bottcher, J.H.; Shikakura, S.; Tsai, C.L.

    1991-01-01

    A resistance butt welding procedure was developed and qualified for joining ferritic fuel pin cladding to end caps. The cladding are INCO MA957 and PNC ODS lots 63DSA and 1DK1, ferritic stainless steels strengthened by oxide dispersion, while the end caps are HT9 a martensitic stainless steel. With adequate parameter control the weld is formed without a residual melt phase and its strength approaches that of the cladding. This welding process required a new design for fuel pin end cap and weld joint. Summaries of the development, characterization, and fabrication processes are given for these fuel pins. 13 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  8. Some design considerations for perpendicular biased ferrite tuners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enchevich, I.B.; Poirier, R.L.

    1994-10-01

    Recently remarkable progress has been achieved in the development of perpendicular biased ferrite tuned rf resonators for fast cycled synchrotrons. Compared with the broadly used parallel biased rf cavities they provide higher resonator quality factor Q. However when designing perpendicular biased cavities, special attention should be paid to the methods to provide eddy current suppression in the resonator walls, the ferrite nonlinearity influence, the generated heat removal, the fast self resonant frequency control. The prospective of a faster additional biasing system are discussed and conclusions are drawn. (author). 8 refs., 6 figs

  9. Study of some Mg-based ferrites as humidity sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezlescu, N; Rezlescu, E; Doroftei, C; Popa, P D

    2005-01-01

    The micostructure and humidity sensitivity of MgFe 2 O 4 + CaO, Mg 0.5 Cu 0.5 Fe 1.8 Ga 0.2 O 4 , Mg 0.5 Zn 0.5 Fe 2 O 4 + KCl and MgMn 0.2 Fe 1.8 O 4 ferrites were investigated. We have found that the humidity sensitivity largely depends on composition, crystallite size, surface area and porosity. The best results concerning humidity sensitivity were obtained for MgMn 0.2 Fe 1.8 O 4 ferrite

  10. Silicon Alloying On Aluminium Based Alloy Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suryanto

    2002-01-01

    Silicon alloying on surface of aluminium based alloy was carried out using electron beam. This is performed in order to enhance tribological properties of the alloy. Silicon is considered most important alloying element in aluminium alloy, particularly for tribological components. Prior to silicon alloying. aluminium substrate were painted with binder and silicon powder and dried in a furnace. Silicon alloying were carried out in a vacuum chamber. The Silicon alloyed materials were assessed using some techniques. The results show that silicon alloying formed a composite metal-non metal system in which silicon particles are dispersed in the alloyed layer. Silicon content in the alloyed layer is about 40% while in other place is only 10.5 %. The hardness of layer changes significantly. The wear properties of the alloying alloys increase. Silicon surface alloying also reduced the coefficient of friction for sliding against a hardened steel counter face, which could otherwise be higher because of the strong adhesion of aluminium to steel. The hardness of the silicon surface alloyed material dropped when it underwent a heating cycle similar to the ion coating process. Hence, silicon alloying is not a suitable choice for use as an intermediate layer for duplex treatment

  11. Creep characteristics of precipitation hardened carbon free martensitic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muneki, S.; Igarashi, M.; Abe, F.

    2000-01-01

    A new attempt has been demonstrated using carbon free Fe-Ni-Co martensitic alloys strengthened by Laves phase such as Fe 2 W or Fe 2 Mo to achieve homogeneous creep deformation at high temperatures under low stress levels. Creep behavior of the alloys is found to be completely different from that of the conventional high-Cr ferritic steels. The alloys exhibit gradual change in the creep rate with strain both in the transient and acceleration creep regions, and give a larger strain for the minimum creep rate. In these alloys the creep deformation takes place very homogeneously and no heterogeneous creep deformation is enhanced even at low stress levels. The minimum creep rates of the Fe-Ni-Co alloys at 700 C are found to be much lower than that of the conventional steel, which is due to fine dispersion strengthening useful even at 700 C in these alloys. It is thus concluded that the Fe-Ni-Co martensite strengthened by Laves phase is very useful to increase the creep resistance at elevated temperatures over 650 C. (orig.)

  12. Temperature change of various ferrite particles with alternating magnetic field for hyperthermic application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Se-Ho; Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Shim, In-Bo; Lee, Yong-Keun

    2005-01-01

    Various ferrites (Fe-, Li-, Ni/Zn/Cu-, Co-, Co/Ni, Ba- and Sr-ferrites) were investigated with respect to their application for hyperthermia. Temperature changes under an alternating magnetic field were observed. The area of hysteresis loop was much larger in the Ba- and Sr-ferrites than for that of the Fe-, Ni/Zn/Cu-, Li-, Co- and Co/Ni-ferrites. Co-ferrite exhibited the most applicable temperature change ΔT=19.25K (29.62W/gs), in distilled water when the field was 110A/m

  13. MnZn-ferrites: Targeted Material Design for New Emerging Application Products

    OpenAIRE

    Zaspalis V. T.; Tsakaloudi V.; Kogias G.

    2014-01-01

    In this article the main characteristics for emerging MnZn-ferrite applications are described on the basis of the new demands they possess on the ferrite material development. A number of recently developed MnZn-ferrite materials is presented together with the main scientific principles lying behind their development. These include: (i) high saturation flux density MnZn-ferrites (i.e. Bsat=550 mT at 10 kHz, 1200 A/m, 100°C), (ii) low power losses MnZn-ferrites (i.e. Pv~210 mW cm-3 at 100 kHz,...

  14. Magnetic Field Emissions for Ferrite and Non-Ferrite Geometries for Wireless Power Transfer to Vehicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batra, Tushar; Schaltz, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Minimizing magnetic field emissions to surroundings is one of the most challenging design criteria for wireless power transfer to vehicles. In this paper, concept of division of the emissions into three zones (primary, secondary, and combined zone) in the vertical direction is introduced. For geo......Minimizing magnetic field emissions to surroundings is one of the most challenging design criteria for wireless power transfer to vehicles. In this paper, concept of division of the emissions into three zones (primary, secondary, and combined zone) in the vertical direction is introduced...... for vertical separation between the coils in range of 100-180 mm. It is observed that lower vertical separation results in higher overlapping of the zones and the coils behave as they are effectively placed close to center of air gap. The analysis in this work provides a better understanding of the space...... profile of magnetic field emissions (with and without ferrite) for wireless power transfer to vehicles....

  15. The Cold Gas-Dynamic Spray and Characterization of Microcrystalline and Nanocrystalline Copper Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    set—the vial itself is constructed of a polycarbonate shell with stainless steel end plugs with a stainless steel impactor contained within the vial...Alloying of Refractory Metals in Austenitic and Ferritic/ Martensitic Steels ,” M.S. Thesis, MAE Dept., Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA, 2012...Process. From [2]. .....................................................5  Figure 3.  Individual Particle after Impact with a Steel Substrate. From [15

  16. Comparison of low cycle fatigue of ductile cast irons with different matrix alloyed with nickel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petrenec, Martin; Tesařová, H.; Beran, Přemysl; Šmíd, Miroslav; Roupcová, Pavla

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 1 (2010), s. 2307-2316 E-ISSN 1877-7058. [ Fatigue 2010. Praha, 06.06.2010-11.06.2010] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/10/2371 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507; CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : Low cycle fatigue * ferritic ductile cast iron * ADI * nickel alloying * neutron diffraction Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue , Friction Mechanics

  17. Synthesis and Characterization of Nano-Crystalline Cu and Pb0.5-Cu0.5- ferrites by Mechanochemical Method and Their Electrical and Gas Sensing Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. GAIKWAD

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In the present communication, we have reported the synthesis of nanocrystalline ferrites of the type CuFe2O4 and Pb0.5Cu0.5Fe2O4 by mechanochemical alloying at 960 0C. The samples prepared were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, VSM, FT-IR, UV-DRS, and SEM. The average particle size was determined by XRD pattern using Scherrer equation and it is 7.295 nm, 4.484 nm for CuFe2O4, and Pb0.5Cu0.5Fe2O4. The surface morphology of the samples is characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Magnetic studies were carried out using vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM and shows very high coercive field for the mixed ferrite. UV-DRS studies were performed to investigate the band gap of synthesized nanocrystalline material. Electrical properties show semiconducting nature of synthesized ferrites. The thick films of the material were prepared by screen printing method. The gas sensing properties were studied towards reducing gases like CO, NH3 and H2S and it was revealed that CuFe2O4 is the most sensitive and selective to H2S gas at relatively lower operating temperature 200 0C. Furthermore Pb0.5Cu0.5Fe2O4 also shows the response to H2S at operating temperature 300 0C.

  18. Microstructural changes and effect of variation of lattice strain on positron annihilation lifetime parameters of zinc ferrite nanocomposites prepared by high enegy ball-milling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit Banerjee

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Zn-ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized at room temperature by mechanical alloying the stoichiometric (1:1 mol% mixture of ZnO and α-Fe2O3 powder under open air. Formation of both normal and inverse spinel ferrite phases was noticed after 30 minutes and 2.5 hours ball milling respectively and the content of inverse spinel phase increased with increasing milling time. The phase transformation kinetics towards formation of ferrite phases and microstructure characterization of ball milled ZnFe2O4 phases was primarily investigated by X-ray powder diffraction pattern analysis. The relative phase abundances of different phases, crystallite size, r.m.s. strain, lattice parameter change etc. were estimated from the Rietveld powder structure refinement analysis of XRD data. Positron annihilation lifetime spectra of all ball milled samples were deconvoluted with three lifetime parameters and their variation with milling time duration was explained with microstructural changes and formation of different phases with increase of milling time duration.

  19. Investigations of the boundary conditions of acicular ferrite formation in fast-quenched welded materials. Final report; Untersuchungen der Randbedingungen fuer die Bildung von 'acicular ferrite' in Schweissguetern bei schneller Abkuehlung. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilthey, U.; Biesenbach, M.

    2000-06-19

    The authors investigated the boundary conditions in which a fine-grained ferritic needle structure with sufficient low-temperature toughness is obtained in conditions of extreme heating and cooling. Alloy compositions and welding boundary conditions were investigated for laser welding, electron beam welding in a vacuum and electron beam welding at atmospheric pressure. [German] Im Rahmen dieser Arbeit soll untersucht werden, welche Randbedingungen erfuellt sein muessen, damit sich unter extremen Aufheiz- und Abkuehlbedingungen, wie sie bei den Strahlschweissverfahren vorliegen, ein feinkoerniges nadelferritisches Gefuege mit ausreichend hoher Tieftemperaturzaehigkeit bildet. Diesbezueglich ist fuer die Strahlschweissverfahren Laserstrahlschweissen, Elektronenstrahlschweissen im Vakuum und Elektronenstrahlschweissen unter Atmosphaerendruck zu ermitteln, welche Legierungszusammensetzungen diese Voraussetzungen erfuellen und wie sie unter realen Schweissbedingungen verwirklicht werden koennen. (orig.)

  20. Resistance to pitting corrosion in ferritic and austenitic/ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Bouvier, O.

    1995-01-01

    Stainless steel tubes carrying raw water are potentially vulnerable to pitting corrosion. With a view to minimizing the corrosion risk in the river-water-cooled condensers at PWR power plant, a study was conducted to determine initiation conditions and incubation durations for pitting corrosion in stagnant water. As a result, condenser tubes in Z2 CI 18 (439) or Z2 CT 18-10 (304L) steels were phased out in favour of Z2 CND 16-32 (316L) stainless steel. The same question can be yield for other applications and especially for all types of exchangers for use in electrical applications. This study sought to assess alternative methods for estimating pitting corrosion, and to check the results of these methods against the actual behaviour of studied steels. The study covered ferritic steels (439, 444, 290Mo), austenitic steel (316L) and austenitic/ferritic steels (Uranus 35N, 45N, 47N, 52N). Two approaches were adopted: laboratory tests to compare pitting corrosion risks on different materials, and tests for characterizing the behaviour of steels exposed to river water. The study begins with a laboratory tests that yield an arbitrary parameter for quantifying pitting corrosion resistance. One method involves measuring the pitting temperature in an aggressive ferric chloride solution. Other methods measure the pitting potential, either statistically (Multipit method) or deterministically (polarization curve). We then go on to discuss tests under simulated life-like conditions, involving repeated immersions in water from the Seine. (author). 9 refs., 13 figs, 9 tabs

  1. Effect of manganese and chromium on microstructure and toughness of Fe-Cr-Mn alloys resulting from solid-solution treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okazaki, Yoshimitsu; Miyahara, Kazuya; Wade, Noboru; Hosoi, Yuzo

    1989-01-01

    This study is aimed at making clear the effect of Mn and Cr on the microstructure and toughness of an Fe-Cr-Mn alloy which is considered as one of the candidate alloys for reduced activation materials for the first wall application of the fusion reactor. The microstructures of Fe-12% Cr-(5∼30)% Mn(mass%) alloys after solution treatment at 1373 K for 3.6 ks are markedly varied with Mn contents; α'(martensite) + δ(ferrite) in 5% Mn alloy, α' + δ + ε(martensite) + γ(austenite) in the 10% Mn alloy, α' + ε + γ in 15% Mn alloy, ε + γ in the 20% Mn alloy, and ε + γ +δ in the 25% Mn alloy, and γ + δ in the 30% Mn alloy. It is to be noted that the δ phase increases with increasing Mn content when the Fe-12% Cr alloy contains more than 25% Mn, which suggests that Mn plays the role of a ferrite former. In Fe-15% Mn-Cr alloy, the δ phase is not observed in the range of Cr contents up to 12%, whereas it is markedly increased with the addition of 16% Cr. C, N and Ni are very helpful in forming the γ phase in these alloys as generally known in Fe-Cr-Ni alloys. The toughness evaluated by the Charpy impact test at 273 K and room temperature is very low in the 5% Mn alloy which consists of the α' and δ phases. It is, however, significantly improved by a small amount of the γ phase and increases with increase of γ phase stability. (author)

  2. A study of NiZnCu-ferrite/SiO2 nanocomposites with different ferrite contents synthesized by sol-gel method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Shifeng; Geng Jianxin; Chen Jianfeng; Yin Li; Zhou Yunchun; Liu Leijing; Zhou Enle

    2005-01-01

    Ni 0.65 Zn 0.35 Cu 0.1 Fe 1.9 O 4 /SiO 2 nanocomposites with different weight percentages of NiZnCu-ferrite dispersed in silica matrix were successfully fabricated by the sol-gel method using tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) as a precursor of silica, and metal nitrates as precursors of NiZnCu ferrite. The thermal decomposition process of the dried gel was studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The obtained Ni 0.65 Zn 0.35 Cu 0.1 Fe 1.9 O 4 /SiO 2 nanocomposites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), Mossbauer spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). The formation of stoichiometric NiZnCu-ferrite dispersed in silica matrix is confirmed when the weight percentage of ferrite is not more than 30%. Samples with higher ferrite content have small amount of α-Fe 2 O 3 . The transition from the paramagnetic to the ferromagnetic state is observed as the ferrite content increases from 20 to 90wt%. The magnetic properties of the nanocomposites are closely related to the ferrite content. The saturation magnetization increases with the ferrite content, while the coercivity reaches a maximum when the ferrite is 80wt% in the silica matrix

  3. Effect of titanium addition on shape memory effect and recovery stress of training-free cast Fe–Mn–Si–Cr–Ni shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Gaixia; Peng, Huabei; Sun, Panpan; Wang, Shanling; Wen, Yuhua

    2016-01-01

    The shape memory effect and recovery stress of cast Fe–17.2Mn–5.28Si–9.8Cr–4.57Ni (18Mn) and Fe–17.5Mn–5.29Si–9.68Cr–4.2Ni–0.09Ti (18Mn–Ti) alloys have been investigated by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD), and resistivity–temperature curves. The cast 18Mn and 18Mn–Ti alloys solidified as the ferritic mode for which liquid phase fully transforms into primary δ ferrite. The role of titanium is to indirectly refine the austenite through refining the primary δ ferrite. In this case, the austenitic grains of the cast 18Mn alloy were much bigger than that of the cast 18Mn–Ti alloy, although the two alloys underwent δ→γ phase transformation. Grain refinement suppresses the stress-induced ε martensitic transformation, and thus the shape memory effect of the cast 18Mn–Ti alloy is worse than that of the cast 18Mn alloy. On the contrary, the maximum recovery stress and the recovery stress at room temperature are higher for the cast 18Mn–Ti alloy annealed at 1073 K for 30 min than for the cast 18Mn alloy annealed at 973 K for 30 min, because grain refinement suppresses the relaxation of recovery stress caused by the plastic deformation and the stress-induced ε martensitic transformation during cooling process. It is difficult to obtain the training-free cast Fe–Mn–Si based shape memory alloys with excellent shape memory effect and high recovery stress only by grain refinement.

  4. Metallurgical characterization of the reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel Eurofer'97 on as-received condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, P.; Lancha, A.M.; Lapena, J.; Hernandez-Mayoral, M.

    2001-01-01

    A new European reduced activation ferrous alloy (denominated Eurofer'97) developed as possible first wall and breeder blanket structural material for fusion applications is being characterized. In this paper, activities specially focussed to investigate the microstructural and mechanical properties of this material on the as-received state (normalized at 980 degree sign C/27' plus tempered at 760 degree sign C/90'/air cooled) are presented. Chemical analyses, a detailed microstructural study, hardness, tensile and Charpy tests have been carried out and are compared to the reduced activation material F-82H modified previously studied. The results show that the Eurofer'97 is a fully martensitic steel free of δ-ferrite with similar tensile and better impact properties than the F-82H modified steel. Two types of carbides have been observed in the Eurofer'97, namely, Cr rich precipitates and Ta/V rich precipitates, tentatively identified as M 23 C 6 type and (Ta,V)C type, respectively

  5. Lithium ferrite: The study on magnetic and complex permittivity characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhavaprasad Dasari

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Lithium ferrite (Li0.5Fe2.5O4 powder was prepared by solid state reaction method, which was finally pressed and sintered at 1150 °C. The spinel structure of the lithium ferrite was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and grain size estimation was obtained from scanning electron microscope (SEM. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR confirmed the presence of primary and secondary absorption bands characteristic for spinel structure. The force constants were estimated using absorption bands for the lithium ferrite. Magnetization and dielectric studies were carried out for the sintered sample. Saturation magnetization (Ms of 59.6 emu/g was achieved and variation of magnetization with temperature was used to identify the Curie temperature. The complex permittivity (ε∗ for the lithium ferrite sample was obtained for wide frequency range up to 3 GHz and discussed based on available models. The Curie temperature was estimated around 480 °C and verified from both magnetization versus temperature and dielectric constant versus temperature measurements.

  6. Analyse des structures planaires multicouches à ferrite par la ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Finite element analysis of multi-layer planar structures with Ferrite. Electromagnetic Analysis of microwave integrated circuits is an attractive subject do to the recent development and use of new materials such as magnetic anisotropic materials (hexaferrite, ...). These materials are used in many microwave components ...

  7. Determination of delta ferrite volumetric fraction in austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida Macedo, W.A. de.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements of delta ferrite volumetric fraction in AISI 304 austenitic stainless steels were done by X-ray diffraction, quantitative metallography (point count) and by means of one specific commercial apparatus whose operational principle is magnetic-inductive: The Ferrite Content Meter 1053 / Institut Dr. Foerster. The results obtained were comparated with point count, the reference method. It was also investigated in these measurements the influence of the martensite induced by mechanical deformation. Determinations by X-ray diffraction, by the ratio between integrated intensities of the ferrite (211) and austenite (311) lines, are in excelent agreement with those taken by point count. One correction curve for the lectures of the commercial equipment in focus was obtained, for the range between zero and 20% of delta ferrite in 18/8 stainless steels. It is demonstrated that, depending on the employed measurement method and surface finishing of the material to be analysed, the presence of martensite produced by mechanical deformation of the austenitic matrix is one problem to be considered. (Author) [pt

  8. The role of cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles in medical science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amiri, S.; Shokrollahi, H., E-mail: Shokrollahi@sutech.ac.ir

    2013-01-01

    The nanotechnology industry is rapidly growing and promises that the substantial changes that will have significant economic and scientific impacts be applicable to a wide range of areas, such as aerospace engineering, nano-electronics, environmental remediation and medical healthcare. In this area, cobalt ferrite nanoparticles have been regarded as one of the competitive candidates because of their suitable physical, chemical and magnetic properties like the high anisotropy constant, high coercivity and high Curie temperature, moderate saturation magnetization and ease of synthesis. This paper introduces the magnetic properties, synthesis methods and some medical applications, including the hyperthermia, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic separation and drug delivery of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles are one of the most important materials for nanomedicine. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They have high coercivity and moderate saturation magnetization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles are synthesized easily. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They are a good candidate for hyperthermia and magnetic resonance imaging.

  9. Magnetoabsorption and magnetic hysteresis in Ni ferrite nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres C.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nickel ferrite nanoparticles were prepared by a modified sol-gel technique employing coconut oil, and then annealed at different temperatures in 400-1200 °C range. This route of preparation has revealed to be one efficient and cheap technique to obtain high quality nickel ferrite nanosized powder. Sample particles sizes obtained with XRD data and Scherrer’s formula lie in 13 nm to 138 nm, with increased size with annealing temperature. Hysteresis loops have been obtained at room temperature with an inductive method. Magnetic field induced microwave absorption in nanoscale ferrites is a recent an active area of research, in order to characterize and explore potential novel applications. In the present work microwave magnetoabsorption data of the annealed nickel ferrite nanoparticles are presented. These data have been obtained with a system based on a network analyzer that operates in the frequency range 0 - 8.5 GHz. At fields up to 400 mT we can observe a peak according to ferromagnetic resonance theory. Sample annealed at higher temperature exhibits different absorption, coercivity and saturation magnetization figures, revealing its multidomain character.

  10. Calcium ferrite formation from the thermolysis of calcium tris (maleato)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    For preparing calcium ferrite, calcium tris (maleato) ferrate(III) precursor was prepared by mixing aqueous solutions of iron(III) maleate, calcium maleate and maleic acid. Various physico-chemical techniques i.e. TG, DTG, DTA, Mössbauer, XRD, IR etc have been used to study the decomposition behaviour from ambient to ...

  11. Determination of delta ferrite volumetric fraction in austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida Macedo, W.A. de.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements of delta ferrite volumetric fraction in AISI 304 austenitic stainless steels were done by X-ray difraction, quantitative metallography (point count) and by means of one specific commercial apparatus whose operational principle is magnetic-inductive: The Ferrite Content Meter 1053 / Institut Dr. Forster. The results obtained were comparated with point count, the reference method. It was also investigated in these measurements the influence of the martensite induced by mechanical deformation. Determinations by X-ray diffraction, by the ratio between integrated intensities of the ferrite (211) and austenite (311) lines, are in excelent agreement with those taken by point count. One correction curve for the lectures of the commercial equipment in focus was obtained, for the range between zero and 20% of delta ferrite in 18/8 stainless steels. It is demonstrated that, depending on the employed measurement method and surface finishing of the material to be analysed, the presence of martensite produced by mechanical deformation of the austenitic matrix is one problem to be considered. (Author) [pt

  12. The evolution of ferrite grain size in structural steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodgson, P.D.

    1999-01-01

    The refinement of the ferrite grain size is the main aim of modern thermomechanical processes for hot rolled steels. The ferrite grain size is determined by the composition, the state of the austenite at the point of transformation and the cooling rate through transformation. By adding microalloying additions of Ti for grain refinement and Nb to retard recrystallisation, it is possible to reduce the ferrite grain size to less than 5μm at moderate to high cooling rates. However, it is not possible under even the most extreme traditional controlled rolling and accelerated cooling conditions to produce an equiaxed ferrite grain size of less than 3μm. More recent work, though, involving rolling with high undercooling and friction conditions that lead to high shear, suggests that it is possible to produce microstructures in a single rolling pass with an average grain size less than 1μm. This appears to involve a dynamic (ie strain induced) transformation process. The current understanding of static and dynamic transformation and the resultant grain size is reviewed and areas requiring further research are highlighted

  13. Tailoring the magnetic properties of cobalt-ferrite nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega, A. Estrada de la; Garza-Navarro, M. A., E-mail: marco.garzanr@uanl.edu.mx; Durán-Guerrero, J. G.; Moreno Cortez, I. E.; Lucio-Porto, R.; González-González, V. [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica (Mexico)

    2016-01-15

    In this contribution, we report on the tuning of magnetic properties of cobalt-ferrite nanoclusters. The cobalt-ferrite nanoclusters were synthesized from a two-step approach that consists of the synthesis of cobalt-ferrite nanoparticles in organic media, followed by their dispersion into aqueous dissolution to form an oil-in-water emulsion. These emulsions were prepared at three different concentrations of the cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), in order to control the size and clustering density of the nanoparticles in the nanoclusters. The synthesized samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and their related techniques, such as bright-field and Z-contrast imaging, electron diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry; as well as static magnetic measures. The experimental evidence indicates that the size, morphology, and nanoparticles clustering density in the nanoclusters is highly dependent of the cobalt-ferrite:CTAB molar ratio that is used in their synthesis. In addition, due to the clustering of the nanoparticles into the nanoclusters, their magnetic moments are blocked to relax cooperatively. Hence, the magnetic response of the nanoclusters can be tailored by controlling the size and nanoparticles clustering density.

  14. Mössbauer and magnetization studies of nanosize chromium ferrite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nanosize chromium ferrite (CrF) powder samples were synthesized by citrate precursor route in the size range of 6 to 35 nm. The structural and magnetic behaviour of these samples were studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and Mössbauer spectroscopic techniques. Synthesized ...

  15. Irradiation proposition of ferritic steels in a russian reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seran, J.L.; Decours, J.; Levy, L.

    1987-04-01

    Using the low temperatures of russian reactors, a sample irradiation is proposed to study mechanical properties and swelling of martensitic steels (EM10, T91, 1.4914, HT9), ferrito-martensitic (EM12) and ferritic (F17), at temperatures lower than 400 0 C [fr

  16. Domain structure in soft ferrites by the longitudinal Kerr effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaczmarek, R.; Dautain, M.; Barradi-Ismail, T.

    1992-01-01

    For the first time, the longitudinal Kerr effect has been used in order to observe magnetic domains and their development in power ferrites. Image subtraction and processing leads to a magnetic contrast being a quasi derivative of the domains. A kind of integration procedure applied to them permits a reconstruction of a local hysteresis which parameters closely approach the global hysteresis data. (orig.)

  17. Nanocrystalline spinel ferrites by solid state reaction route

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    Nanocrystalline spinel ferrites by solid state reaction route. T K KUNDU* and S MISHRA. Department of Physics, Visva-Bharati, Santiniketan 731 235, India. Abstract. Nanostructured NiFe2O4, MnFe2O4 and (NiZn)Fe2O4 were synthesized by aliovalent ion doping using conventional solid-state reaction route. With the ...

  18. Bismuth Ferrite for Active Control of Surface Plasmon Polariton Modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia; Zhukovsky, Sergei; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    We propose and investigate several layouts of m etal-insulator-metal waveguide with active core which can be utilized for dynamic switching in photonic integrated circuits. The active material, bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3), is sandwiched between metal plates and changes i ts refractive index through...

  19. Modified ferrite core-shell nanoparticles magneto-structural characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klekotka, Urszula; Piotrowska, Beata; Satuła, Dariusz; Kalska-Szostko, Beata

    2018-06-01

    In this study, ferrite nanoparticles with core-shell structures and different chemical compositions of both the core and shell were prepared with success. Proposed nanoparticles have in the first and second series magnetite core, and the shell is composed of a mixture of ferrites with Fe3+, Fe2+ and M ions (where M = Co2+, Mn2+ or Ni2+) with a general composition of M0.5Fe2.5O4. In the third series, the composition is inverted, the core is composed of a mixture of ferrites and as a shell magnetite is placed. Morphology and structural characterization of nanoparticles were done using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Infrared spectroscopy (IR). While room temperature magnetic properties were measured using Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS). It is seen from Mössbauer measurements that Co always increases hyperfine magnetic field on Fe atoms at RT, while Ni and Mn have opposite influences in comparison to pure Fe ferrite, regardless of the nanoparticles structure.

  20. Carbon diffusion in carbon-supersaturated ferrite and austenite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čermák, Jiří; Král, Lubomír

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 586, FEB (2014), s. 129-135 ISSN 0925-8388 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/0148; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : carbon diffusion * Carbon supersaturation * Carbon supersaturation * Ferrite * Austenite Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 2.999, year: 2014

  1. Permanent magnetic ferrite based power-tunable metamaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guanqiao; Lan, Chuwen [State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Gao, Rui [High Temperature Thermochemistry Laboratory, Department of Mining and Materials Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 0C5 (Canada); Zhou, Ji, E-mail: zhouji@tsinghua.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2017-08-15

    Highlights: • Power-tunable metamaterials based on barium permanent magnetic ferrite have been proposed and fabricated. • It is observed that resonant frequency of the array shifts upon altering the output power. • This kind of power-tunable behavior is due to the temperature rise as a result of FMR-induced heat buildup. • This work offers a practical idea to tune ferrite metamaterials besides magneto-tunability and thermal-tunability. - Abstract: Power-tunable metamaterials based on barium permanent magnetic ferrite have been proposed and fabricated in this research. Scattering parameter measurements confirm a shift in resonant frequency in correlation to changes in incident electromagnetic power within microwave frequency band. The tunable phenomenon represented by a blue-shift in transmission spectra in the metamaterials array can be attributed to a decrease in saturation magnetization resulting from FMR-induced temperature elevation upon resonant conditions. This power-dependent behavior offers a simple and practical route towards dynamically fine-tunable ferrite metamaterials.

  2. Microwave assisted scalable synthesis of titanium ferrite nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Abhishek; Bhardwaj, Abhishek K.; Singh, S. C.; Uttam, K. N.; Gautam, Nisha; Himanshu, A. K.; Shah, Jyoti; Kotnala, R. K.; Gopal, R.

    2018-04-01

    Titanium ferrite magnetic nanomaterials are synthesized by one-step, one pot, and scalable method assisted by microwave radiation. Effects of titanium content and microwave exposure time on size, shape, morphology, yield, bonding nature, crystalline structure, and magnetic properties of titanium ferrite nanomaterials are studied. As-synthesized nanomaterials are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy (UV-Vis), attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and vibrating sample magnetometer measurements. XRD measurements depict the presence of two phases of titanium ferrite into the same sample, where crystallite size increases from ˜33 nm to 37 nm with the increase in titanium concentration. UV-Vis measurement showed broad spectrum in the spectral range of 250-600 nm which reveals that its characteristic peaks lie between ultraviolet and visible region; ATR-FTIR and Raman measurements predict iron-titanium oxide structures that are consistent with XRD results. The micrographs of TEM and selected area electron diffraction patterns show formation of hexagonal shaped particles with a high degree of crystallinity and presence of multi-phase. Energy dispersive spectroscopy measurements confirm that Ti:Fe compositional mass ratio can be controlled by tuning synthesis conditions. Increase of Ti defects into titanium ferrite lattice, either by increasing titanium precursor or by increasing exposure time, enhances its magnetic properties.

  3. Spin canting phenomenon in cadmium doped cobalt ferrites ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    O4 ( = 0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0), has been carried out using the sol–gel auto combustion method. The ferrite samples show an interesting magnetic transition from Neel to Yafet–Kittel configuration, as the Cd2+ concentration is increased ...

  4. Solid-liquid phase equilibria of Fe-Cr-Al alloys and spinels

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurray, J. W.; Hu, R.; Ushakov, S. V.; Shin, D.; Pint, B. A.; Terrani, K. A.; Navrotsky, A.

    2017-08-01

    Ferritic FeCrAl alloys are candidate accident tolerant cladding materials. There is a paucity of data concerning the melting behavior for FeCrAl and its oxides. Analysis tools have therefore had to utilize assumptions for simulations using FeCrAl cladding. The focus of this study is to examine in some detail the solid-liquid phase equilibria of FeCrAl alloys and spinels with the aim of improving the accuracy of severe accident scenario computational studies.

  5. Deformation Induced Martensitic Transformation and Its Initial Microstructure Dependence in a High Alloyed Duplex Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xie, Lin; Huang, Tian Lin; Wang, Yu Hui

    2017-01-01

    Deformation induced martensitic transformation (DIMT) usually occurs in metastable austenitic stainless steels. Recent studies have shown that DIMT may occur in the austenite phase of low alloyed duplex stainless steels. The present study demonstrates that DIMT can also take place in a high alloyed...... Fe–23Cr–8.5Ni duplex stainless steel, which exhibits an unexpectedly rapid transformation from γ-austenite into α′-martensite. However, an inhibited martensitic transformation has been observed by varying the initial microstructure from a coarse alternating austenite and ferrite band structure...

  6. Thermal Aging Effect on Corrosion Resistance in Fusion Boundary of A533 Gr. B and Alloy 152

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kyoung Joon; Yoo, Seung Chang; Kim, Taeho; Ham, Junhyuk; Kim, Ji Hyun [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Dissimilar metal weldment (DMW) is frequently used for joining low-alloy steel pressure vessel nozzles and steam generator nozzles to nickel-based wrought alloy or austenitic stainless steel components in high energy systems. This feature also significantly hinders C diffusion from the ferrite base metal to the weld metal. Until now, stress corrosion cracking has not occurred in DMWs where a High-Cr weld metal (such as Alloy 152 or Alloy 690), which is Ni-base weld metal including relative high Cr, is used as the weld metal in the weld between the nickel-based alloy and low-alloy steel. To understand the microstructure and corrosion evolution on fusion boundary between low-alloy steel and Ni-base weld metal, microstructural analysis and polarization test were performed with A533 Gr. B/Alloy 152/Alloy 690. Remarkable changes were observed in corrosion resistance and hardness at fusion boundary between low-alloy steel and Ni-base weld metal. The precipitate, which has different potential with peripheral region, can cause galvanic corrosion or pitting corrosion and is the one of hardening methods by disturbing movement of the dislocation. At initial step of heat treatment, the number of precipitates was increased. In fusion boundary between A533 Gr. B and Alloy 152, the corrosion resistance was decreased, and the hardness was increased. Next, at further step, the number of precipitates.

  7. Permeation of deuterium implanted into vanadium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderl, R.A.; Longhurst, G.R.; Struttmann, D.A.

    1986-05-01

    Permeation of deuterium through the vanadium alloy, V-15Cr-5Ti, was investigated using 3-keV, D 3 + ion beams from a small accelerator. The experiments consisted of measurements of the deuterium reemission and permeation rates as a function of implantation fluence for 0.5-mm thick specimens heated to tempertures from 623 to 823 0 K. Implantation-side surface characterization was made by simultaneous measurements of sputtered ions with a secondary ion mass spectrometer (SIMS). Analyses of these measurements indicate that for the experimental conditions used, the steady-state deuterium permeation flux in V-15Cr-5Ti is approximately 18% of the implantation flux. This corresponds to approximately 1000 times that seen in the ferritic steel, HT-9, under comparable conditions. Measurement of deuterium diffusivity in V-15Cr-5Ti using permeation break-through times indicates D = 1.4 x 10 -8 exp(-.11 eV/kT) (m 2 /s)

  8. Development of a Ferrite-Based Electromagnetic Wave Detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Hanish Zakariah

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Direct detection of hydrocarbon by an active source using electromagnetic (EM wave termed Sea Bed Logging (SBL has shown very promising results. However, currently available electromagnetic wave technology has a number of challenges including sensitivity and lapsed time. Our initial response to this issue is to develop a ferrite-based EM wave detector for Sea Bed Logging (SBL. Ferrite bar and copper rings in various diameters were used as detector 1 (D1. For Detector 2 (D2, toroid added with copper wires in different lengths at the centre of it were used. The first experiment is to determine the inductance and resistance for both detectors by using LCR meter. We obtained the highest inductance value of 0.02530 mH at the ferrite bar when it was paired with a 15 cm diameter copper ring and 0.00526 mH for D2 using a 100 cm copper wire placed at the centre of the toroid. The highest resistivity for D1 was measured at ferrite bar paired with a 15 cm diameter  copper ring and 1.099 Ω when using 20 cm length of copper wire. The second interest deals with voltage peak-to-peak (Vp-p value for both detectors by using oscilloscope. The highest voltage value at the ferrite bar of D1 was 25.30 mV. While at D2, the highest voltage measured was 27.70 mV when using a 100 cm copper wire. The third premise is the comparison of sensitivity and lapsed time for both detectors. It was found that D1 was 61% more sensitive than D2 but had higher lapsed time than D2.

  9. Substrate integrated ferrite phase shifters and active frequency selective surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahill, B.M.

    2002-01-01

    There are two distinct parts to this thesis; the first investigates the use of ferrite tiles in the construction of printed phase shifting transmission lines, culminating in the design of two compact electromagnetic controlled beam steered patch and slot antenna arrays. The second part investigates the use of active frequency selective surfaces (AFSS), which are later used to cover a uPVC constructed enclosure. Field intensity measurements are taken from within the enclosure to determine the dynamic screening effectiveness. Trans Tech G-350 Ferrite is investigated to determine its application in printed microstrip and stripline phase shifting transmission lines. 50-Ohm transmission lines are constructed using the ferrite tile and interfaced to Rogers RT Duroid 5870 substrate. Scattering parameter measurements are made under the application of variable magnetic fields to the ferrite. Later, two types of planar microwave beam steering antennas are constructed. The first uses the ferrites integrated into the Duroid as microstrip lines with 3 patch antennas as the radiating elements. The second uses stripline transmission lines, with slot antennas as the radiating sources etched into the ground plane of the triplate. Beam steering is achieved by the application of an external electromagnet. An AFSS is constructed by the interposition of PIN diodes into a dipole FSS array. Transmission response measurements are then made for various angles of electromagnetic wave incidence. Two states of operation exist: when a current is passed through the diodes and when the diodes are switched off. These two states form a high pass and band stop space filter respectively. An enclosure covered with the AFSS is constructed and externally illuminated in the range 2.0 - 2.8GHz. A probe antenna inside the enclosure positioned at various locations through out the volume is used to establish the effective screening action of the AFSS in 3 dimensional space. (author)

  10. The role of yttrium and titanium during the development of ODS ferritic steels obtained through the STARS route: TEM and XAS study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordás, Nerea; Gil, Emma; Cintins, Arturs; de Castro, Vanessa; Leguey, Teresa; Iturriza, Iñigo; Purans, Juris; Anspoks, Andris; Kuzmin, Alexei; Kalinko, Alexandr

    2018-06-01

    Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Ferritic Steels (ODS FS) are candidate materials for structural components in future fusion reactors. Their high strength and creep resistance at elevated temperatures and their good resistance to neutron radiation damage is obtained through extremely fine microstructures containing a high density of nanometric precipitates, generally yttrium and titanium oxides. This work shows transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) characterization of Fe-14Cr-2W-0.3Ti-0.24Y ODS FS obtained by the STARS route (Surface Treatment of gas Atomized powder followed by Reactive Synthesis), an alternative method to obtain ODS alloys that avoids the mechanical alloying to introduce Y2O3 powder particles. In this route, FS powders already containing Ti and Y, precursors of the nanometric oxides, are obtained by gas atomization. Then, a metastable Cr- and Fe-rich oxide layer is formed on the surface of the powder particles. During consolidation by HIP at elevated temperatures, and post-HIP heat treatments above the HIP temperature, this oxide layer at Prior Particle Boundaries (PPBs) dissociates, the oxygen diffuses, and Y-Ti-O nano-oxides precipitate in the ferritic matrix. TEM characterization combined with XAFS and XANES analyses have proven to be suitable tools to follow the evolution of the nature of the different oxides present in the material during the whole processing route and select appropriate HIP and post-HIP parameters to promote profuse and fine Y-Ti-O nanometric precipitates.

  11. Microstructure and mechanical properties of ultrafine-grained Fe-14Cr and ODS Fe-14Cr model alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auger, M.A., E-mail: mauger@fis.uc3m.es [Departamento de Fisica-IAAB, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911-Leganes (Spain); Leguey, T., E-mail: leguey@fis.uc3m.es [Departamento de Fisica-IAAB, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911-Leganes (Spain); Munoz, A., E-mail: amunoz@fis.uc3m.es [Departamento de Fisica-IAAB, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911-Leganes (Spain); Monge, M.A., E-mail: mmonge@fis.uc3m.es [Departamento de Fisica-IAAB, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911-Leganes (Spain); Castro, V. de, E-mail: vanessa.decastro@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Fernandez, P., E-mail: pilar.fernandez@ciemat.es [National Fusion Laboratory-CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Garces, G., E-mail: ggarces@cenim.csic.es [Departamento de Metalurgia Fisica, CENIM (CSIC), Avda. Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Pareja, R., E-mail: rpp@fis.uc3m.es [Departamento de Fisica-IAAB, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911-Leganes (Spain)

    2011-10-01

    Reduced activation ferritic Fe-14 wt%Cr and Fe-14 wt%Cr-0.3 wt%Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} alloys were produced by mechanical alloying and hot isostatic pressing followed by forging and heat treating. The alloy containing Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} developed a submicron-grained structure with homogeneous dispersion of oxide nanoparticles that enhanced the tensile properties in comparison to the Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} free alloy. Strengthening induced by the Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion appears to be effective up to 873 K, at least. A uniform distribution of Cr-rich precipitates, stable upon a heat treatment at 1123 K for 2 h, was also found in both alloys.

  12. Microstructure and mechanical properties of ultrafine-grained Fe-14Cr and ODS Fe-14Cr model alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auger, M.A.; Leguey, T.; Munoz, A.; Monge, M.A.; Castro, V. de; Fernandez, P.; Garces, G.; Pareja, R.

    2011-01-01

    Reduced activation ferritic Fe-14 wt%Cr and Fe-14 wt%Cr-0.3 wt%Y 2 O 3 alloys were produced by mechanical alloying and hot isostatic pressing followed by forging and heat treating. The alloy containing Y 2 O 3 developed a submicron-grained structure with homogeneous dispersion of oxide nanoparticles that enhanced the tensile properties in comparison to the Y 2 O 3 free alloy. Strengthening induced by the Y 2 O 3 dispersion appears to be effective up to 873 K, at least. A uniform distribution of Cr-rich precipitates, stable upon a heat treatment at 1123 K for 2 h, was also found in both alloys.

  13. Preparation and microwave-infrared absorption of reduced graphene oxide/Cu-Ni ferrite/Al2O3 composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    De-yue, Ma; Xiao-xia, Li; Yu-xiang, Guo; Yu-run, Zeng

    2018-01-01

    Reduced graphene oxide (RGO)/Cu-Ni ferrite/Al2O3 composite was prepared by solvothermal method, and its properties were characterized by SEM, x-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and FTIR. The electromagnetic parameters in 2-18 GHz and mid-infrared (IR) spectral transmittance of the composite were measured, respectively. The results show that Cu0.7Ni0.3Fe2O4 nanoparticles with an average size of tens nanometers adsorb on surface of RGO, and meanwhile, Al2O3 nanoparticles adhere to the surface of Cu0.7Ni0.3Fe2O4 nanoparticles and RGO. The composite has both dielectric and magnetic loss mechanism. Its reflection loss is lower than -19 dB in 2-18 GHz, and the maximum of -23.2 dB occurs at 15.6 GHz. With the increasing of Al2O3 amount, its reflection loss becomes lower and the maximum moves towards low frequency slightly. Compared with RGO/Cu-Ni ferrite composites, its magnetic loss and reflection loss slightly reduce with the increasing of Al2O3 amount, and the maximum of reflection loss shifts from a low frequency to a high one. However, its broadband IR absorption is significantly enhanced owing to nano-Al2O3. Therefore, RGO/Cu-Ni ferrite/Al2O3 composites can be used as excellent broadband microwave and IR absorbing materials, and maybe have broad application prospect in electromagnetic shielding, IR absorbing and coating materials.

  14. Chemical looping coal gasification with calcium ferrite and barium ferrite via solid–solid reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siriwardane, Ranjani; Riley, Jarrett; Tian, Hanjing; Richards, George

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • BaFe 2 O 4 and CaFe 2 O 4 are excellent for chemical looping coal gasification. • BaFe 2 O 4 and CaFe 2 O 4 have minimal reactivity with synthesis gas. • Steam enhances the gasification process with these oxygen carriers. • Reaction rates of steam gasification of coal with CaFe 2 O 4 was better than with gaseous oxygen. • Coal gasification appears to be via solid–solid interaction with the oxygen carrier. - Abstract: Coal gasification to produce synthesis gas by chemical looping was investigated with two oxygen carriers, barium ferrite (BaFe 2 O 4 ) and calcium ferrite (CaFe 2 O 4 ). Thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) and fixed-bed flow reactor data indicated that a solid–solid interaction occurred between oxygen carriers and coal to produce synthesis gas. Both thermodynamic analysis and experimental data indicated that BaFe 2 O 4 and CaFe 2 O 4 have high reactivity with coal but have a low reactivity with synthesis gas, which makes them very attractive for the coal gasification process. Adding steam increased the production of hydrogen (H 2 ) and carbon monoxide (CO), but carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) remained low because these oxygen carriers have minimal reactivity with H 2 and CO. Therefore, the combined steam–oxygen carrier produced the highest quantity of synthesis gas. It appeared that neither the water–gas shift reaction nor the water splitting reaction promoted additional H 2 formation with the oxygen carriers when steam was present. Wyodak coal, which is a sub-bituminous coal, had the best gasification yield with oxygen carrier–steam while Illinois #6 coal had the lowest. The rate of gasification and selectivity for synthesis gas production was significantly higher when these oxygen carriers were present during steam gasification of coal. The rates and synthesis gas yields during the temperature ramps of coal–steam with oxygen carriers were better than with gaseous oxygen.

  15. Influence of temperature on a low-cycle fatigue behavior of a ferritic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabir, S. M. Humayun [Chittagong University of Engineering and Technology, Chittagong (Bangladesh); Yeo, Tae in [University of Ulsan, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-15

    The main objective of this study is to reveal the effect of dynamic strain ageing (DSA) on a ferritic stainless steel with detail relation to monotonic and cyclic responses over a wide range of temperatures. For assessing the effect of strain rate on mechanical properties, tensile test results are studied at two different strain rates of 2X10{sup -3} /s and 2X10{sup -4} /s. Typical responses of this material are compared with other alloy in literatures that exhibits DSA. Serrations in monotonic stress-strain curves and anomalous dependence of tensile properties with temperatures are attributed to the DSA effect. The low cycle fatigue curves exhibit prominent hardening and negative temperature dependence of half-life plastic strain amplitude in temperatures between 300 .deg. C - 500 .deg. C which can be explained by DSA phenomenon. The regime for dependence of marked cyclic hardening lies within the DSA regime of anomalous dependence of flow stress and dynamic strain hardening stress with temperature and negative strain rate sensitivity regime of monotonic response. It is believed that shortened fatigue life observed in the intermediate temperature is mainly due to the adverse effect of DSA. An empirical life prediction model is addressed for as-received material to consider the effect of temperature on fatigue life. The numbers of load reversals obtained from experiment and predicted from fatigue parameter are compared and found to be in good agreement.

  16. Comparison of hydrogen gas embrittlement of austenitic and ferritic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perng, T. P.; Altstetter, C. J.

    1987-01-01

    Hydrogen-induced slow crack growth (SCG) was compared in austenitic and ferritic stainless steels at 0 to 125 °Cand 11 to 216 kPa of hydrogen gas. No SCG was observed for AISI 310, while AISI 301 was more susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement and had higher cracking velocity than AL 29-4-2 under the same test conditions. The kinetics of crack propagation was modeled in terms of the hydrogen transport in these alloys. This is a function of temperature, microstructure, and stress state in the embrittlement region. The relatively high cracking velocity of AISI 301 was shown to be controlled by the fast transport of hydrogen through the stress-induced α' martensite at the crack tip and low escape rate of hydrogen through the γ phase in the surrounding region. Faster accumulation rates of hydrogen in the embrittlement region were expected for AISI 301, which led to higher cracking velocities. The mechanism of hydrogen-induced SCG was discussed based upon the concept of hydrogen-enhanced plasticity.

  17. Mechanical Performance of Ferritic Martensitic Steels for High Dose Applications in Advanced Nuclear Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderoglu, Osman; Byun, Thak Sang; Toloczko, Mychailo; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    Ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels are considered for core applications and pressure vessels in Generation IV reactors as well as first walls and blankets for fusion reactors. There are significant scientific data on testing and industrial experience in making this class of alloys worldwide. This experience makes F/M steels an attractive candidate. In this article, tensile behavior, fracture toughness and impact property, and creep behavior of the F/M steels under neutron irradiations to high doses with a focus on high Cr content (8 to 12) are reviewed. Tensile properties are very sensitive to irradiation temperature. Increase in yield and tensile strength (hardening) is accompanied with a loss of ductility and starts at very low doses under irradiation. The degradation of mechanical properties is most pronounced at martensitic steels exhibit a high fracture toughness after irradiation at all temperatures even below 673 K (400 °C), except when tested at room temperature after irradiations below 673 K (400 °C), which shows a significant reduction in fracture toughness. Creep studies showed that for the range of expected stresses in a reactor environment, the stress exponent is expected to be approximately one and the steady state creep rate in the absence of swelling is usually better than austenitic stainless steels both in terms of the creep rate and the temperature sensitivity of creep. In short, F/M steels show excellent promise for high dose applications in nuclear reactors.

  18. Current status and recent research achievements in ferritic/martensitic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavassoli, A.-A. F.; Diegele, E.; Lindau, R.; Luzginova, N.; Tanigawa, H.

    2014-12-01

    When the austenitic stainless steel 316L(N) was selected for ITER, it was well known that it would not be suitable for DEMO and fusion reactors due to its irradiation swelling at high doses. A parallel programme to ITER collaboration already had been put in place, under an IEA fusion materials implementing agreement for the development of a low activation ferritic/martensitic steel, known for their excellent high dose irradiation swelling resistance. After extensive screening tests on different compositions of Fe-Cr alloys, the chromium range was narrowed to 7-9% and the first RAFM was industrially produced in Japan (F82H: Fe-8%Cr-2%W-TaV). All IEA partners tested this steel and contributed to its maturity. In parallel several other RAFM steels were produced in other countries. From those experiences and also for improving neutron efficiency and corrosion resistance, European Union opted for a higher chromium lower tungsten grade, Fe-9%Cr-1%W-TaV steel (Eurofer), and in 1997 ordered the first industrial heats. Other industrial heats have been produced since and characterised in different states, including irradiated up to 80 dpa. China, India, Russia, Korea and US have also produced their grades of RAFM steels, contributing to overall maturity of these steels. This paper reviews the work done on RAFM steels by the fusion materials community over the past 30 years, in particular on the Eurofer steel and its design code qualification for RCC-MRx.

  19. Cyclic oxidation of stainless steel ferritic AISI 409, AISI 439 and AISI 441

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salgado, Maria de Fatima; Santos, Diego Machado dos; Oliveira, Givanilson Brito de; Lins, Vanessa de Freitas Cunha

    2014-01-01

    Stainless steels have many industrial applications. The cyclic oxidation of ferritic stainless steels technical and scientific importance presents, because they are less susceptible to peeling the austenitic alloys. For the purpose of investigating the behavior of these steels under thermal cycling, cyclic oxidation of AISI 409, AISI 441 and AISI 439 was carried out in a tubular furnace under two different conditions: oxidation by dipping the steel in the synthetic condensate for 10h and without oxidation immersion in the condensate, for up to 1500h at 300° C temperature. Using techniques: SEM, EDS and XRD revealed a microstructure with increased oxidation in the samples were immersed in the condensate. The oxide film remained intact during oxidation for steels 439 and 441 409 The Steel immersed in the condensate was rupture of the film after the 20th cycle of oxidation. The chemical characterization of the films allowed the identification of elements: Chromium, Iron, Aluminium and Silicon To a great extent, Cr_2O_3. (author)

  20. Current status and recent research achievements in ferritic/martensitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavassoli, A.-A.F., E-mail: farhad.tavassoli@cea.fr [Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, CEA/DEN/DANS/DMN, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Diegele, E., E-mail: eberhard.diegele@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institut of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Lindau, R., E-mail: rainer.lindau@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institut of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Luzginova, N., E-mail: Natalia.Luzginova@gmail.com [NRG-Petten, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Tanigawa, H., E-mail: tanigawa.hiroyasu@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Authority (JAEA), Tokai, Ibaraki, 319-1195 (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    When the austenitic stainless steel 316L(N) was selected for ITER, it was well known that it would not be suitable for DEMO and fusion reactors due to its irradiation swelling at high doses. A parallel programme to ITER collaboration already had been put in place, under an IEA fusion materials implementing agreement for the development of a low activation ferritic/martensitic steel, known for their excellent high dose irradiation swelling resistance. After extensive screening tests on different compositions of Fe–Cr alloys, the chromium range was narrowed to 7–9% and the first RAFM was industrially produced in Japan (F82H: Fe–8%Cr–2%W–TaV). All IEA partners tested this steel and contributed to its maturity. In parallel several other RAFM steels were produced in other countries. From those experiences and also for improving neutron efficiency and corrosion resistance, European Union opted for a higher chromium lower tungsten grade, Fe–9%Cr–1%W–TaV steel (Eurofer), and in 1997 ordered the first industrial heats. Other industrial heats have been produced since and characterised in different states, including irradiated up to 80 dpa. China, India, Russia, Korea and US have also produced their grades of RAFM steels, contributing to overall maturity of these steels. This paper reviews the work done on RAFM steels by the fusion materials community over the past 30 years, in particular on the Eurofer steel and its design code qualification for RCC-MRx.