WorldWideScience

Sample records for fermilab run ii

  1. Database usage and performance for the Fermilab Run II experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonham, D.; Box, D.; Gallas, E.; Guo, Y.; Jetton, R.; Kovich, S.; Kowalkowski, J.; Kumar, A.; Litvintsev, D.; Lueking, L.; Stanfield, N.; Trumbo, J.; Vittone-Wiersma, M.; White, S.P.; Wicklund, E.; Yasuda, T.; Maksimovic, P.

    2004-01-01

    The Run II experiments at Fermilab, CDF and D0, have extensive database needs covering many areas of their online and offline operations. Delivering data to users and processing farms worldwide has represented major challenges to both experiments. The range of applications employing databases includes, calibration (conditions), trigger information, run configuration, run quality, luminosity, data management, and others. Oracle is the primary database product being used for these applications at Fermilab and some of its advanced features have been employed, such as table partitioning and replication. There is also experience with open source database products such as MySQL for secondary databases used, for example, in monitoring. Tools employed for monitoring the operation and diagnosing problems are also described

  2. Instrument Front-Ends at Fermilab During Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Thomas; Slimmer, David; Voy, Duane; /Fermilab

    2011-07-13

    The optimization of an accelerator relies on the ability to monitor the behavior of the beam in an intelligent and timely fashion. The use of processor-driven front-ends allowed for the deployment of smart systems in the field for improved data collection and analysis during Run II. This paper describes the implementation of the two main systems used: National Instruments LabVIEW running on PCs, and WindRiver's VxWorks real-time operating system running in a VME crate processor.

  3. Instrument front-ends at Fermilab during Run II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, T; Slimmer, D; Voy, D

    2011-01-01

    The optimization of an accelerator relies on the ability to monitor the behavior of the beam in an intelligent and timely fashion. The use of processor-driven front-ends allowed for the deployment of smart systems in the field for improved data collection and analysis during Run II. This paper describes the implementation of the two main systems used: National Instruments LabVIEW running on PCs, and WindRiver's VxWorks real-time operating system running in a VME crate processor.

  4. Instrument Front-Ends at Fermilab During Run II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Thomas; Slimmer, David; Voy, Duane

    2011-01-01

    The optimization of an accelerator relies on the ability to monitor the behavior of the beam in an intelligent and timely fashion. The use of processor-driven front-ends allowed for the deployment of smart systems in the field for improved data collection and analysis during Run II. This paper describes the implementation of the two main systems used: National Instruments LabVIEW running on PCs, and WindRiver's VxWorks real-time operating system running in a VME crate processor.

  5. Instrument front-ends at Fermilab during Run II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, T.; Slimmer, D.; Voy, D.

    2011-11-01

    The optimization of an accelerator relies on the ability to monitor the behavior of the beam in an intelligent and timely fashion. The use of processor-driven front-ends allowed for the deployment of smart systems in the field for improved data collection and analysis during Run II. This paper describes the implementation of the two main systems used: National Instruments LabVIEW running on PCs, and WindRiver's VxWorks real-time operating system running in a VME crate processor. Work supported by Fermi Research Alliance, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11359 with the United States Department of Energy.

  6. Fermilab DART run control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oleynik, G.; Engelfried, J.; Mengel, L.

    1996-01-01

    DART is the high speed, Unix based data acquisition system being developed by Fermilab in collaboration with seven High Energy Physics Experiments. This paper describes DART run control, which has been developed over the past year and is a flexible, distributed, extensible system for the control and monitoring of the data acquisition systems. The authors discuss the unique and interesting concepts of the run control and some of the experiences in developing it. They also give a brief update and status of the whole DART system

  7. Fermilab DART run control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oleynik, G.; Engelfried, J.; Mengel, L.

    1995-05-01

    DART is the high speed, Unix based data acquisition system being developed by Fermilab in collaboration with seven High Energy Physics Experiments. This paper describes DART run control, which has been developed over the past year and is a flexible, distributed, extensible system for the, control and monitoring of the data acquisition systems. We discuss the unique and interesting concepts of the run control and some of our experiences in developing it. We also give a brief update and status of the whole DART system

  8. LCLS-II Cryomodules Production at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arkan, Tug [Fermilab; Grimm, Chuck [Fermilab; Kaluzny, Joshua [Fermilab; Orlov, Yuriy [Fermilab; Peterson, Thomas [Fermilab; Premo, Ken [Fermilab

    2017-05-01

    LCLS-II is an upgrade project for the linear coherent light source (LCLS) at SLAC. The LCLS-II linac will consist of thirty-five 1.3 GHz and two 3.9 GHz superconducting RF continuous wave (CW) cryomodules that Fermilab and Jefferson Lab (JLab) will assemble in collaboration with SLAC. The LCLS-II 1.3 GHz cryomodule design is based on the European XFEL pulsed-mode cryomodule design with modifications needed for CW operation. Fermilab and JLab will each assemble and test a prototype 1.3 GHz cryomodule to assess the results of the CW modifications, in advance of 16 and 17 production 1.3 GHz cryomodules, respectively. Fermilab is solely responsible for the 3.9 GHz cryomodules. After the prototype cryomodule tests are complete and lessons learned incorporated, both laboratories will increase their cryomodule production rates to meet the challenging LCLS-II project requirement of approximately one cryomodule per month per laboratory. This paper presents the Fermilab Cryomodule Assembly Facility (CAF) infrastructure for LCLS-II cryomodule production, the Fermilab prototype 1.3 GHz CW cryomodule (pCM) assembly and readiness for production assembly.

  9. Run control techniques for the Fermilab DART data acquisition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oleynik, G.; Engelfried, J.; Mengel, L.; Moore, C.; Pordes, R.; Udumula, L.; Votava, M.; Drunen, E. van; Zioulas, G.

    1996-01-01

    DART is the high speed, Unix based data acquisition system being developed by the Fermilab Computing Division in collaboration with eight High Energy Physics Experiments. This paper describes DART run-control which implements flexible, distributed, extensible and portable paradigms for the control monitoring of a data acquisition systems. We discuss the unique and interesting aspects of the run-control - why we chose the concepts we did, the benefits we have seen from the choices we made, as well as our experiences in deploying and supporting it for experiments during their commissioning and sub-system testing phases. We emphasize the software and techniques we believe are extensible to future use, and potential future modifications and extensions for those we feel are not. (author)

  10. Run control techniques for the Fermilab DART data acquisition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oleynik, G.; Engelfried, J.; Mengel, L.

    1995-10-01

    DART is the high speed, Unix based data acquisition system being developed by the Fermilab Computing Division in collaboration with eight High Energy Physics Experiments. This paper describes DART run-control which implements flexible, distributed, extensible and portable paradigms for the control and monitoring of data acquisition systems. We discuss the unique and interesting aspects of the run-control - why we chose the concepts we did, the benefits we have seen from the choices we made, as well as our experiences in deploying and supporting it for experiments during their commissioning and sub-system testing phases. We emphasize the software and techniques we believe are extensible to future use, and potential future modifications and extensions for those we feel are not

  11. Computing Models of CDF and D0 in Run II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lammel, S.

    1997-05-01

    The next collider run of the Fermilab Tevatron, Run II, is scheduled for autumn of 1999. Both experiments, the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) and the D0 experiment are being modified to cope with the higher luminosity and shorter bunchspacing of the Tevatron. New detector components, higher event complexity, and an increased data volume require changes from the data acquisition systems up to the analysis systems. In this paper we present a summary of the computing models of the two experiments for Run II

  12. Computing Models of CDF and D0 in Run II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lammel, S.

    1997-01-01

    The next collider run of the Fermilab Tevatron, Run II, is scheduled for autumn of 1999. Both experiments, the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) and the D0 experiment are being modified to cope with the higher luminosity and shorter bunch spacing of the Tevatron. New detector components, higher event complexity, and an increased data volume require changes from the data acquisition systems up to the analysis systems. In this paper we present a summary of the computing models of the two experiments for Run II

  13. The CDF Run II disk inventory manager

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbard, Paul; Lammel, Stephan

    2001-01-01

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) experiment records and analyses proton-antiproton interactions at a center-of-mass energy of 2 TeV. Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron started in April of this year. The duration of the run is expected to be over two years. One of the main data handling strategies of CDF for Run II is to hide all tape access from the user and to facilitate sharing of data and thus disk space. A disk inventory manager was designed and developed over the past years to keep track of the data on disk, to coordinate user access to the data, and to stage data back from tape to disk as needed. The CDF Run II disk inventory manager consists of a server process, a user and administrator command line interfaces, and a library with the routines of the client API. Data are managed in filesets which are groups of one or more files. The system keeps track of user access to the filesets and attempts to keep frequently accessed data on disk. Data that are not on disk are automatically staged back from tape as needed. For CDF the main staging method is based on the mt-tools package as tapes are written according to the ANSI standard

  14. D-Zero run II data management and access

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lueking, L.

    1997-03-01

    During the Run II data taking period at Fermilab, scheduled to begin in 1999, D0 plans to accumulate at least 200 TB of raw and reconstructed data per year. Data access patterns observed in the Run I experience have been examined in an attempt to establish an efficient data access environment. The needs and models for storing and processing the upcoming data are discussed

  15. The D0 run II trigger system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Michigan State U.

    2004-01-01

    The D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron was upgraded for Run II. This upgrade included improvements to the trigger system in order to be able to handle the increased Tevatron luminosity and higher bunch crossing rates compared to Run I. The D0 Run II trigger is a highly exible system to select events to be written to tape from an initial interaction rate of about 2.5 MHz. This is done in a three-tier pipelined, buffered system. The first tier (level 1) processes fast detector pick-off signals in a hardware/firmware based system to reduce the event rate to about 1. 5kHz. The second tier (level 2) uses information from level 1 and forms simple Physics objects to reduce the rate to about 850 Hz. The third tier (level 3) uses full detector readout and event reconstruction on a filter farm to reduce the rate to 20-30 Hz. The D0 trigger menu contains a wide variety of triggers. While the emphasis is on triggering on generic lepton and jet final states, there are also trigger terms for specific final state signatures. In this document we describe the D0 trigger system as it was implemented and is currently operating in Run II

  16. First paper from Tevatron Run II submitted by CDF collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Scientists of the Collider Detector at Fermilab submitted today (March 19) the first scientific publication of Collider Run II to the science journal Physical Review D. The paper titled "Measurement of the Mass Difference m(Ds+)-m(D+) at CDF II" summarizes the results of an analysis carried out by CDF scientists Christoph Paus and Ivan Furic, MIT, describing the mass measurement of particles containing charm quarks" (1 page).

  17. FERMILAB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Neutrino experimentation at higher energies was among the justifications for the construction of Fermilab and the earliest studies utilized these new beams produced with 350-400 GeV protons. This pre-Tevatron period used both electronic counters and the new 15-foot cryogenic bubble chamber. The counter experimental programme was basically divided into two generations. The first covered the discovery of new phenomena and confirmation of the parton model using high rate wide-band and the first dichromatic narrow-band neutrino beams. The second concentrated on precision measurements with dichromatic beams. One flagship experiment, designated ''E1 A'', was originally a collaboration of Harvard, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin, and was the prototype of large neutrino calorimeters: a target/ calorimeter followed by a large set of iron toroidal magnets. E1A and its successor, E310 (which included Rutgers), ran for a total of 6,650 hours from 1972 through 1978. Contemporary with these experiments was another large counter experiment by CalTech and Fermilab, designated originally as E21 A. Along with its successors, E262, E320, and E356 (which collected data* over some 4,600h) it took part in the first generation programme, and subsequently spearheaded the second generation with precision measurements of both charged current structure functions and the weak mixing angle. Finally, this latter collaboration extended its participation into the early Tevatron era, and will continue through the 1990s

  18. The Muon system of the run II D0 detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazov, V.M.; Acharya, B.S.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Anosov, V.A.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bardon, O.; Bartlett, J.F.; Baturitsky, M.A.; Beutel, D.; Bezzubov,; Bodyagin, V.; Butler, J.M.; Cease, H.; Chi, E.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S.P.; Diehl, H.T.; Doulas, S.; Dugad, S.R.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Charles U. /Prague, Tech.

    2005-03-01

    The authors describe the design, construction and performance of the upgraded D0 muon system for Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. Significant improvements have been made to the major subsystems of the D0 muon detector: trigger scintillation counters, tracking detectors, and electronics. The Run II central muon detector has a new scintillation counter system inside the iron toroid and an improved scintillation counter system outside the iron toroid. In the forward region, new scintillation counter and tracking systems have been installed. Extensive shielding has been added in the forward region. A large fraction of the muon system electronics is also new.

  19. Fermilab | About | Organization | Fermilab Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Industry Students and teachers Media Organization Fermilab Organization Organization Fermilab Org Chart Accelerator Division Accelerator Physics Center CMS Center Core Computing Division ESH&Q FESS Finance Section LBNF Project Line Organization LBNF Project Director LCLS-II

  20. Muon reconstruction and identification with the Run II D0 detector

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B.S.; Kupčo, Alexander; Lokajíček, Miloš

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 737, Feb (2014), s. 281-294 ISSN 0168-9002 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG12006 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Fermilab * D0 * Tevatron Run II * muon identification * muon reconstruction Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 1.216, year: 2014

  1. Search for supersymmetric particles decaying into tri-leptons through R-parity violation, with D0 Run-II experiment at Fermilab; Recherche de particules supersymetriques se desintegrant en R-parite violee (couplage {lambda}(121)) dans un etat final a trois leptons, avec les donnees du Run-II de l'experience D0 au TeVatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnan, A.M

    2005-07-15

    This thesis is dedicated to the study of the first data taken by the D0 detector during the Run II of the Tevatron. Supersymmetric particles have been search for in proton-antiproton collisions, with a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. In the framework of supersymmetry with R-parity violation, I have studied the pair production of Gauginos, leading to a pair of LSP (0,{chi}{sub 1}), each one decaying into ee{nu}{sub {mu}} or e{mu}{nu}{sub e} with a {lambda}(121) coupling. The final state contains at least two electrons: I have thus paid special attention in this work to the methods concerning identification and mis-identification of electromagnetic particles, as well as reconstruction, triggering, and correction (of the reconstructed energy). In a selection of tri-leptons, with at least two electrons, and some transverse missing energy, we observed 0 event in the 350 pb{sup -1} of analyzed data, for 0.4 + 0.35 - 0.05 (sta) {+-} 0.16 (sys) expected from the Standard Model contributions. In the signal considered in this analysis, the selection efficiency is around 12 per cent. Results have been studied in two models: mSUGRA and MSSM. In mSUGRA model, limits on m(1/2) and lightest gauginos's masses have been obtained, with tan({beta}) = 5, A{sub 0} = 0, m{sub 0} = 100 and 1000 GeV.c{sup -2} and both signs of {mu}. In MSSM, with the hypothesis of massive sfermions (1000 GeV.c{sup -2}), we can exclude, at 95% Confidence Level, the region m({chi}{sub 1}{sup {+-}}) < 200 GeV.c{sup -2} for all masses of {chi}{sub 1}{sup 0} LSP. (author)

  2. CDF run II run control and online monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arisawa, T.; Ikado, K.; Badgett, W.; Chlebana, F.; Maeshima, K.; McCrory, E.; Meyer, A.; Patrick, J.; Wenzel, H.; Stadie, H.; Wagner, W.; Veramendi, G.

    2001-01-01

    The authors discuss the CDF Run II Run Control and online event monitoring system. Run Control is the top level application that controls the data acquisition activities across 150 front end VME crates and related service processes. Run Control is a real-time multi-threaded application implemented in Java with flexible state machines, using JDBC database connections to configure clients, and including a user friendly and powerful graphical user interface. The CDF online event monitoring system consists of several parts: the event monitoring programs, the display to browse their results, the server program which communicates with the display via socket connections, the error receiver which displays error messages and communicates with Run Control, and the state manager which monitors the state of the monitor programs

  3. Dedicated OO expertise applied to Run II software projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amidei, D.

    2000-01-01

    The change in software language and methodology by CDF and D0 to object-oriented from procedural Fortran is significant. Both experiments requested dedicated expertise that could be applied to software design, coding, advice and review. The Fermilab Run II offline computing outside review panel agreed strongly with the request and recommended that the Fermilab Computing Division hire dedicated OO expertise for the CDF/D0/Computing Division joint project effort. This was done and the two experts have been an invaluable addition to the CDF and D0 upgrade software projects and to the Computing Division in general. These experts have encouraged common approaches and increased the overall quality of the upgrade software. Advice on OO techniques and specific advice on C++ coding has been used. Recently a set of software reviews has been accomplished. This has been a very successful instance of a targeted application of computing expertise, and constitutes a very interesting study of how to move toward modern computing methodologies in HEP

  4. Jet physics at CDF Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safonov, A.; /UC, Davis

    2004-12-01

    The latest results on jet physics at CDF are presented and discussed. Particular attention is paid to studies of the inclusive jet cross section using 177 pb{sup -1} of Run II data. Also discussed is a study of gluon and quark jet fragmentation.

  5. Luminosity Measurements at LHCb for Run II

    CERN Multimedia

    Coombs, George

    2018-01-01

    A precise measurement of the luminosity is a necessary component of many physics analyses, especially cross-section measurements. At LHCb two different direct measurement methods are used to determine the luminosity: the “van der Meer scan” (VDM) and the “Beam Gas Imaging” (BGI) methods. A combined result from these two methods gave a precision of less than 2% for Run I and efforts are ongoing to provide a similar result for Run II. Fixed target luminosity is determined with an indirect method based on the single electron scattering cross-section.

  6. First measurement of the W-boson mass in run II of the Tevatron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Abulencia, A; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carrillo, S; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Cilijak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Almenar, C Cuenca; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Daronco, S; Datta, M; D'Auria, S; Davies, T; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'orso, M; Delli Paoli, F; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Forrester, S; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garberson, F; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kraan, A C; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M; Fernandez, P Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; Denis, R St; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuno, S; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vazquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, J; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2007-10-12

    We present a measurement of the W-boson mass using 200 pb{-1} of data collected in pp[over ] collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV by the CDF II detector at run II of the Fermilab Tevatron. With a sample of 63 964 W-->enu candidates and 51 128 W-->munu candidates, we measure M_{W}=80 413+/-34{stat}+/-34{syst}=80,413+/-48 MeV/c;{2}. This is the most precise single measurement of the W-boson mass to date.

  7. Preliminary Modelling of Radiation Levels at the Fermilab PIP-II Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lari, L. [CERN; Cerutti, F. [CERN; Esposito, L. S. [CERN; Baffes, C. [Fermilab; Dixon, S. J. [Fermilab; Mokhov, N. V. [Fermilab; Rakhno, I. [Fermilab; Tropin, I. S. [Fermilab

    2018-04-01

    PIP-II is the Fermilab's flagship project for providing powerful, high-intensity proton beams to the laboratory's experiments. The heart of PIP-II is an 800-MeV superconducting linac accelerator. It will be located in a new tunnel with new service buildings and connected to the present Booster through a new transfer line. To support the design of civil engineering and mechanical integration, this paper provides preliminary estimation of radiation level in the gallery at an operational beam loss limit of 0.1 W/m, by means of Monte Carlo calculations with FLUKA and MARS15 codes.

  8. Preliminary Modeling Of Radiation Levels At The Fermilab PIP-II Linac arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Lari, L.; Esposito, L.S.; Baffes, C.; Dixon, S.J.; Mokhov, N.V.; Rakhno, I.; Tropin, I.S.

    PIP-II is the Fermilab's flagship project for providing powerful, high-intensity proton beams to the laboratory's experiments. The heart of PIP-II is an 800-MeV superconducting linac accelerator. It will be located in a new tunnel with new service buildings and connected to the present Booster through a new transfer line. To support the design of civil engineering and mechanical integration, this paper provides preliminary estimation of radiation level in the gallery at an operational beam loss limit of 0.1 W/m, by means of Monte Carlo calculations with FLUKA and MARS15 codes.

  9. FERMILAB: Call for physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Several hundred physicists attended a special Fermilab 'All Experimenter's Meeting' on November 20 to hear Director John Peoples call for new Tevatron Collider proposals for the years 2000-2005, when the new Main Injector will be complete. At the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider, the CDF and DO experiments are currently completing improvements for Run II to use the Tevatron when the Main Injector is complete later in this decade. New proposals would be aimed at a Collider Run III to follow these CDF and DO efforts

  10. CERN scientists take part in the Tevatron Run II performance review committee

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Tevatron Run II is under way at Fermilab, exploring the high-energy frontier with upgraded detectors that will address some of the biggest questions in particle physics.Until CERN's LHC switches on, the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider is the world's only source of top quarks. It is the only place where we can search for supersymmetry, for the Higgs boson, and for signatures of additional dimensions of space-time. The US Department of Energy (DOE) recently convened a high-level international review committee to examine Fermilab experts' first-phase plans for the accelerator complex. Pictured here with a dipole magnet in CERN's LHC magnet test facility are the four CERN scientists who took part in the DOE's Tevatron review. Left to right: Francesco Ruggiero, Massimo Placidi, Flemming Pedersen, and Karlheinz Schindl. Further information: CERN Courier 43 (1)

  11. SAMGrid experiences with the Condor technology in Run II computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranovski, A.; Loebel-Carpenter, L.; Garzoglio, G.; Herber, R.; Illingworth, R.; Kennedy, R.; Kreymer, A.; Kumar, A.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A.; Merritt, W.; Terekhov, I.; Trumbo, J.; Veseli, S.; White, S.; St. Denis, R.; Jain, S.; Nishandar, A.

    2004-01-01

    SAMGrid is a globally distributed system for data handling and job management, developed at Fermilab for the D0 and CDF experiments in Run II. The Condor system is being developed at the University of Wisconsin for management of distributed resources, computational and otherwise. We briefly review the SAMGrid architecture and its interaction with Condor, which was presented earlier. We then present our experiences using the system in production, which have two distinct aspects. At the global level, we deployed Condor-G, the Grid-extended Condor, for the resource brokering and global scheduling of our jobs. At the heart of the system is Condor's Matchmaking Service. As a more recent work at the computing element level, we have been benefiting from the large computing cluster at the University of Wisconsin campus. The architecture of the computing facility and the philosophy of Condor's resource management have prompted us to improve the application infrastructure for D0 and CDF, in aspects such as parting with the shared file system or reliance on resources being dedicated. As a result, we have increased productivity and made our applications more portable and Grid-ready. Our fruitful collaboration with the Condor team has been made possible by the Particle Physics Data Grid

  12. The CDF SVX II upgrade for the Tevatron Run II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bortoletto, Daniela

    1997-01-01

    A microstrip silicon detector SVX II has been proposed for the upgrade of CDF to be installed in 1999 for Run II of the Tevatron. Three barrels of five layers of double-sided silicon microstrip detectors will cover the interaction region. A description of the project status will be presented. Emphasis will be given to the R and D program for silicon sensors which includes capacitance minimization, the study of coupling capacitor integrity, the operation of the detectors in conjunction with the SVXH and SVX2 readout chips in two beam tests and the determination of the detectors performance deterioration due to radiation damage

  13. Run II jet physics: Proceedings of the Run II QCD and weak boson physics workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerald C. Blazey

    2000-01-01

    The Run II jet physics group includes the Jet Algorithms, Jet Shape/Energy Flow, and Jet Measurements/Correlations subgroups. The main goal of the jet algorithm subgroup was to explore and define standard Run II jet finding procedures for CDF and D0. The focus of the jet shape/energy flow group was the study of jets as objects and the energy flows around these objects. The jet measurements/correlations subgroup discussed measurements at different beam energies; α S measurements; and LO, NLO, NNLO, and threshold jet calculations. As a practical matter the algorithm and shape/energy flow groups merged to concentrate on the development of Run II jet algorithms that are both free of theoretical and experimental difficulties and able to reproduce Run I measurements. Starting from a review of the experience gained during Run I, the group considered a variety of cone algorithms, and K T algorithms. The current understanding of both types of algorithms, including calibration issues, are discussed in this report along with some preliminary experimental results. The jet algorithms group recommends that CDF and D0 employ the same version of both a cone algorithm and a K T algorithm during Run II. Proposed versions of each type of algorithm are discussed. The group also recommends the use of full 4-vector kinematic variables whenever possible. The recommended algorithms attempt to minimize the impact of seeds in the case of the cone algorithm and preclustering in the case of the K T algorithm. Issues regarding precluster definitions and merge/split criteria require further study

  14. Operational Experience, Improvements, and Performance of the CDF Run II Silicon Vertex Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, T; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Calancha, C; Carron, S.; Cihangir, S.; Corbo, M.; Clark, D.; Di Ruzza, B.; Eusebi, R.; Fernandez, J.P.; Freeman, J.C.; Garcia, J.E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gonzalez, O.; Grinstein, S.; Hartz, M.; Herndon, M.; Hill, C.; Hocker, A.; Husemann, U.; Incandela, J.; Issever, C.; Jindariani, S.; Junk, T.R.; Knoepfel, K.; Lewis, J.D.; Martinez-Ballarin, R.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M.; Merkel, P; Mondragon, M.N.; Moore, R.; Mumford, J.R.; Nahn, S.; Nielsen, J.; Nelson, T.K.; Pavlicek, V.; Pursley, J.; Redondo, I.; Roser, R.; Schultz, K.; Spalding, J.; Stancari, M.; Stanitzki, M.; Stuart, D.; Sukhanov, A.; Tesarek, R.; Treptow, K.; Wallny, R.; Worm, S.

    2013-01-01

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) pursues a broad physics program at Fermilab's Tevatron collider. Between Run II commissioning in early 2001 and the end of operations in September 2011, the Tevatron delivered 12 fb-1 of integrated luminosity of p-pbar collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV. Many physics analyses undertaken by CDF require heavy flavor tagging with large charged particle tracking acceptance. To realize these goals, in 2001 CDF installed eight layers of silicon microstrip detectors around its interaction region. These detectors were designed for 2--5 years of operation, radiation doses up to 2 Mrad (0.02 Gy), and were expected to be replaced in 2004. The sensors were not replaced, and the Tevatron run was extended for several years beyond its design, exposing the sensors and electronics to much higher radiation doses than anticipated. In this paper we describe the operational challenges encountered over the past 10 years of running the CDF silicon detectors, the preventive measures undertaken, an...

  15. Installation Progress at the PIP-II Injector Test at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baffes, C. [Fermilab; Alvarez, M. [Fermilab; Andrews, R. [Fermilab; Chen, A. [Fermilab; Czajkowski, J. [Fermilab; Derwent, P. [Fermilab; Edelen, J. [Fermilab; Hanna, B. [Fermilab; Hartsell, B. [Fermilab; Kendziora, K. [Fermilab; Mitchell, D. [Fermilab; Prost, L. [Fermilab; Scarpine, V. [Fermilab; Shemyakin, A. [Fermilab; Steimel, J. [Fermilab; Zuchnik, T. [Fermilab; Edelen, A. [Colorado State U.

    2016-10-04

    A CW-compatible, pulsed H- superconducting linac “PIP-II” is being planned to upgrade Fermilab's injection complex. To validate the front-end concept, a test acceler-ator (The PIP-II Injector Test, formerly known as "PXIE") is under construction. The warm part of this accelerator comprises a 10 mA DC, 30 keV H- ion source, a 2 m-long Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT), a 2.1 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) capable of operation in Con-tinuous Wave (CW) mode, and a 10 m-long Medium En-ergy Beam Transport (MEBT). The paper will report on the installation of the RFQ and the first sections of the MEBT and related mechanical design considerations.

  16. Fermilab | Contact Fermilab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Education Safety Sustainability and Environment Contact Related Links DOE FRA UChicago URA Newsroom -840-3000 Fax: 630-840-4343 Shipping address Fermilab Receiving Wilson Street and Kirk Road Batavia IL 60510-5011 Phone: 630-840-3000 Visiting address Fermilab entrance Kirk Road and Pine Street Batavia IL

  17. FERMILAB: Preparing to collide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Against the background of stringent Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) regulations mandated by the US Department of Energy for all national Labs, Fermilab prepared to mount the next major Tevatron proton-antiproton collider run

  18. LCLS-II 1.3 GHz cryomodule design - lessons learned from testing at Fermilab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaluzny, J.; Hurd, J.; Orlov, Y.; He, Y.; Bossert, R.; Grimm, C.; Schappert, W.; Atassi, O. Al; Wang, R.; Arkan, T.; Theilacker, J.; Klebaner, A.; White, M.; Wu, G.; Makara, J.; Ginsburg, C.; Pei, L.; Holzbauer, J.; Hansen, B.; Stanek, R.; Peterson, T.; Harms, E.

    2017-12-01

    Fermilab’s 1.3 GHz prototype cryomodule for the Linac Coherent Light Source Upgrade (LCLS-II) has been tested at Fermilab’s Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF). Aspects of the cryomodule design have been studied and tested. The cooldown circuit was used to quickly cool the cavities through the transition temperature, and a heater on the circuit was used to heat incoming helium for warmup. Due to the 0.5% slope of the cryomodule, the liquid level is not constant along the length of the cryomodule. This slope as well as the pressure profile caused liquid level management to be a challenge. The microphonics levels in the cryomodule were studied and efforts were made to reduce them throughout testing. Some of the design approaches and studies performed on these aspects will be presented. Fermilab is operated by Fermi Research Alliance, LLC under Contract No. De-AC02-07CH11359 with the United States Department of Energy. This work was supported, in part, by the LCLS-II Project.

  19. Fermilab Future

    CERN Multimedia

    Kathryn Grim

    2011-01-01

    The closure of Fermilab’s Tevatron this autumn will mark the end of an historic era in particle physics. But as physicists continue to comb through data from the Tevatron detectors, the laboratory will continue to pursue a greater understanding of the make-up of the Universe on multiple experimental frontiers.   In August 2010, construction crews began installing the roof over the enclosure that will house the NOvA detector. Photo by Dan Traska of Einarson Flying Service. “We plan to extract every bit of physics we can from this final Tevatron running period,” Fermilab Director Pier Oddone wrote in a column for Fermilab Today. “The Tevatron has already exceeded all expectations and, given the large data sets, we will continue to find new results and discoveries in the Tevatron data for years to come.” This spring, particle astrophysicists at Fermilab will ship to Chile components of a 570-megapixel camera scientists will install on the Blanco tele...

  20. A Final Review of the Performance of the CDF Run II Data Acquisition System

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    The CDF Collider Detector at Fermilab ceased data collection on September 30, 2011 after over twenty five years of operation. We review the performance of the CDF Run II data acquisition systems over the last ten of these years while recording nearly 10 fb-1 of proton-antiproton collisions with a high degree of efficiency. Technology choices in the online control and configuration systems and front-end embedded processing have impacted the efficiency and quality of the data accumulated by CDF, and have had to perform over a large range of instantaneous luminosity values and trigger rates. We identify significant sources of problems and successes. In particular, we present our experience computing and acquiring data in a radiation environment, and attempt to correlate system technical faults with radiation dose rate and technology choices.

  1. A Final Review of the Performance of the CDF Run II Data Acquisition System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badgett, W

    2012-01-01

    The CDF Collider Detector at Fermilab ceased data collection on September 30, 2011 after over twenty-five years of operation. We review the performance of the CDF Run II data acquisition systems over the last ten of these years while recording nearly 10 inverse femtobarns of proton-antiproton collisions with a high degree of efficiency - exceeding 83%. Technology choices in the online control and configuration systems and front-end embedded processing have impacted the efficiency and quality of the data accumulated by CDF, and have had to perform over a large range of instantaneous luminosity values and trigger rates. We identify significant sources of problems and successes. In particular, we present our experience computing and acquiring data in a radiation environment, and attempt to correlate system technical faults with radiation dose rate and technology choices.

  2. Review of recent LHCb results and prospects for Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Hicheur, A

    2015-01-01

    As first Run II data acquisition has begun, it is useful to expose the pending questions by reviewing some of the most recent results obtained with Run I data analyses. Early results of the current data taking and middle-term prospects are also shown to illustrate the efficiency of the acquisition and analysis chain.

  3. Review of recent LHCb results and expectations for Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Hicheur, Adlene

    2016-01-01

    As first Run II data acquisition has begun, it is useful to expose the pending questions by reviewing some of the most recent results obtained with Run I data analyses. Early results of the current data taking and middle-term prospects are also shown to illustrate the efficiency of the acquisition and analysis chain.

  4. Fermilab | About Fermilab

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015. thumb Vanessa Peoples, Chief Financial Officer Vanessa Peoples is Fermilab's chief financial oversees the research program of the laboratory as the chief research officer and works with the Department and an advisor to the laboratory director. thumb Sergey Belomestnykh, Chief Technology Officer As CTO

  5. Parton distributions for the LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Ball, Richard D.; Carrazza, Stefano; Deans, Christopher S.; Del Debbio, Luigi; Forte, Stefano; Guffanti, Alberto; Hartland, Nathan P.; Latorre, José I.; Rojo, Juan; Ubiali, Maria

    2015-01-01

    We present NNPDF3.0, the first set of parton distribution functions (PDFs) determined with a methodology validated by a closure test. NNPDF3.0 uses a global dataset including HERA-II deep-inelastic inclusive cross-sections, the combined HERA charm data, jet production from ATLAS and CMS, vector boson rapidity and transverse momentum distributions from ATLAS, CMS and LHCb, W+c data from CMS and top quark pair production total cross sections from ATLAS and CMS. Results are based on LO, NLO and NNLO QCD theory and also include electroweak corrections. To validate our methodology, we show that PDFs determined from pseudo-data generated from a known underlying law correctly reproduce the statistical distributions expected on the basis of the assumed experimental uncertainties. This closure test ensures that our methodological uncertainties are negligible in comparison to the generic theoretical and experimental uncertainties of PDF determination. This enables us to determine with confidence PDFs at different pertu...

  6. Fermilab Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argentine Tango thru April 28 - Student Discount Available Calling all softball players Fermilab Management Management class offered May 5, 12, & 19 Performance Review class offered May 26 Fermilab Functions class

  7. Preparations for Muon Experiments at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syphers, M.J.; Popovic, M.; Prebys, E.; /Fermilab; Ankenbrandt, C.; /Muons Inc., Batavia

    2009-05-01

    The use of existing Fermilab facilities to provide beams for two muon experiments--the Muon to Electron Conversion Experiment (Mu2e) and the New g-2 Experiment--is under consideration. Plans are being pursued to perform these experiments following the completion of the Tevatron Collider Run II, utilizing the beam lines and storage rings used today for antiproton accumulation without considerable reconfiguration.

  8. PDF4LHC recommendations for LHC Run II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butterworth, Jon; Carrazza, Stefano; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Roeck, Albert de; Feltesse, Joel; Forte, Stefano; Gao, Jun; Glazov, Sasha; Huston, Joey; Kassabov, Zahari; McNulty, Ronan; Morsch, Andreas; Nadolsky, Pavel; Radescu, Voica; Rojo, Juan; Thorne, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    We provide an updated recommendation for the usage of sets of parton distribution functions (PDFs) and the assessment of PDF and PDF+$\\alpha_s$ uncertainties suitable for applications at the LHC Run II. We review developments since the previous PDF4LHC recommendation, and discuss and compare the new

  9. Strategic directions of computing at Fermilab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolbers, Stephen

    1998-05-01

    Fermilab computing has changed a great deal over the years, driven by the demands of the Fermilab experimental community to record and analyze larger and larger datasets, by the desire to take advantage of advances in computing hardware and software, and by the advances coming from the R&D efforts of the Fermilab Computing Division. The strategic directions of Fermilab Computing continue to be driven by the needs of the experimental program. The current fixed-target run will produce over 100 TBytes of raw data and systems must be in place to allow the timely analysis of the data. The collider run II, beginning in 1999, is projected to produce of order 1 PByte of data per year. There will be a major change in methodology and software language as the experiments move away from FORTRAN and into object-oriented languages. Increased use of automation and the reduction of operator-assisted tape mounts will be required to meet the needs of the large experiments and large data sets. Work will continue on higher-rate data acquisition systems for future experiments and projects. R&D projects will be pursued as necessary to provide software, tools, or systems which cannot be purchased or acquired elsewhere. A closer working relation with other high energy laboratories will be pursued to reduce duplication of effort and to allow effective collaboration on many aspects of HEP computing.

  10. Strategic directions of computing at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolbers, S.

    1997-04-01

    Fermilab computing has changed a great deal over the years, driven by the demands of the Fermilab experimental community to record and analyze larger and larger datasets, by the desire to take advantage of advances in computing hardware and software, and by the advances coming from the R ampersand D efforts of the Fermilab Computing Division. The strategic directions of Fermilab Computing continue to be driven by the needs of the experimental program. The current fixed-target run will produce over 100 TBytes of raw data and systems must be in place to allow the timely analysis of the data. The collider run II, beginning in 1999, is projected to produce of order 1 PByte of data per year. There will be a major change in methodology and software language as the experiments move away from FORTRAN and into object- oriented languages. Increased use of automation and the reduction of operator-assisted tape mounts will be required to meet the needs of the large experiments and large data sets. Work will continue on higher-rate data acquisition systems for future experiments and project. R ampersand D projects will be pursued as necessary to provide software, tools, or systems which cannot be purchased or acquired elsewhere. A closer working relation with other high energy laboratories will be pursued to reduce duplication of effort and to allow effective collaboration on many aspects of HEP computing

  11. LHCb detector and trigger performance in Run II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francesca, Dordei

    2017-12-01

    The LHCb detector is a forward spectrometer at the LHC, designed to perform high precision studies of b- and c- hadrons. In Run II of the LHC, a new scheme for the software trigger at LHCb allows splitting the triggering of events into two stages, giving room to perform the alignment and calibration in real time. In the novel detector alignment and calibration strategy for Run II, data collected at the start of the fill are processed in a few minutes and used to update the alignment, while the calibration constants are evaluated for each run. This allows identical constants to be used in the online and offline reconstruction, thus improving the correlation between triggered and offline selected events. The required computing time constraints are met thanks to a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the trigger. The larger timing budget, available in the trigger, allows to perform the same track reconstruction online and offline. This enables LHCb to achieve the best reconstruction performance already in the trigger, and allows physics analyses to be performed directly on the data produced by the trigger reconstruction. The novel real-time processing strategy at LHCb is discussed from both the technical and operational point of view. The overall performance of the LHCb detector on the data of Run II is presented as well.

  12. Run II of the LHC: The Accelerator Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redaelli, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    In 2015 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) starts its Run II operation. After the successful Run I at 3.5 TeV and 4 TeV in the 2010-2013 period, a first long shutdown (LS1) was mainly dedicated to the consolidation of the LHC magnet interconnections, to allow the LHC to operate at its design beam energy of 7 TeV. Other key accelerator systems have also been improved to optimize the performance reach at higher beam energies. After a review of the LS1 activities, the status of the LHC start-up progress is reported, addressing in particular the status of the LHC hardware commissioning and of the training campaign of superconducting magnets that will determine the operation beam energy in 2015. Then, the plans for the Run II operation are reviewed in detail, covering choice of initial machine parameters and strategy to improve the Run II performance. Future prospects of the LHC and its upgrade plans are also presented.

  13. Electroweak physics prospects for CDF in Run II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eric James

    2003-01-01

    The CDF collaboration will vigorously pursue a comprehensive program of electroweak physics during Run II at the Tevatron based strongly on the successful Run I program. The Run IIa integrated luminosity goal of 2 fb -1 will lead to a CDF dataset twenty times larger than that collected in Run I. In addition, an increase in the energy of the colliding beams from √s = 1.80 TeV to √s = 1.96 TeV for Run II provides a 10% increase in the W and Z boson production cross sections and a corresponding enlargement of the electroweak event samples. In the near term, CDF expects to collect a dataset with 2-3 times the integrated luminosity of Run I by September of 2003. Utilizing these new datasets CDF will be able to make improved, precision measurements of Standard Model electroweak parameters including M W , M top , Λ W , and sin 2 θ W eff . The goal of these measurements will be to improve our understanding of the self-consistency of the Standard Model and knowledge of the Higgs boson mass within the model. The top plot in Fig. 1 illustrates our current knowledge of the Standard Model Higgs mass based on measurements of M W and M top . The constraints imposed by combined CDF and D0 Run I measurements of M W (80.456 ± 0.059GeV/c 2 ) and M top (174.3 ± 5.1GeV/c 2 ) are illustrated by the shaded oval region on the plot. The hatched rectangle shows the additional constraint imposed by the recent LEP2 measurement of M W . The bottom plot in Fig. 1 illustrates the expected improvement in these constraints based on Run II CDF measurements utilizing a 2 fb -1 dataset. The shaded oval region in this plot is based on current estimates of a 40 MeV/c 2 uncertainty for measuring M W and a 2-3 GeV/c 2 uncertainty for measuring M top

  14. Fermilab: Linac upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The Fermilab linear accelerator (Linac) was conceived 20 years ago, produced its first 200 MeV proton beam on 30 November 1970 and has run without major interruption ever since. Demands have steadily increased through the added complexity of the downstream chain of accelerators and by the increased patient load of the Neutron Therapy Facility

  15. Higgs Boson Measurements in CMS with Run II Data

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Ashok

    2017-01-01

    Latest results from the CMS experiment on studies of Higgs boson production are presented. Studies involving the 125 GeV Higgs boson using various Standard Model production and decay modes have been performed using proton proton collisions from data accumulated during the LHC Run II with center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. Similar datasets have also been used to place constraints on physics beyond the Standard Model involving extended Higgs boson sectors.

  16. Fermilab Tevatron and CERN LEP II probes of minimal and string-motivated supergravity models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, H.; Gunion, J.F.; Kao, C.; Pois, H.

    1995-01-01

    We explore the ability of the Fermilab Tevatron to probe minimal supersymmetry with high-energy-scale boundary conditions motivated by supersymmetry breaking in the context of minimal and string-motivated supergravity theory. A number of boundary condition possibilities are considered: dilatonlike string boundary conditions applied at the standard GUT unification scale or alternatively at the string scale; and extreme (''no-scale'') minimal supergravity boundary conditions imposed at the GUT scale or string scale. For numerous specific cases within each scenario the sparticle spectra are computed and then fed into ISAGET 7.07 so that explicit signatures can be examined in detail. We find that, for some of the boundary condition choices, large regions of parameter space can be explored via same-sign dilepton and isolated trilepton signals. For other choices, the mass reach of Tevatron collider experiments is much more limited. We also compare the mass reach of Tevatron experiments with the corresponding reach at CERN LEP 200

  17. PDF4LHC recommendations for LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Butterworth, Jon; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; De Roeck, Albert; Feltesse, Joel; Forte, Stefano; Gao, Jun; Glazov, Sasha; Huston, Joey; Kassabov, Zahari; McNulty, Ronan; Morsch, Andreas; Nadolsky, Pavel; Radescu, Voica; Rojo, Juan; Thorne, Robert

    2016-01-01

    We provide an updated recommendation for the usage of sets of parton distribution functions (PDFs) and the assessment of PDF and PDF+$\\alpha_s$ uncertainties suitable for applications at the LHC Run II. We review developments since the previous PDF4LHC recommendation, and discuss and compare the new generation of PDFs, which include substantial information from experimental data from the Run I of the LHC. We then propose a new prescription for the combination of a suitable subset of the available PDF sets, which is presented in terms of a single combined PDF set. We finally discuss tools which allow for the delivery of this combined set in terms of optimized sets of Hessian eigenvectors or Monte Carlo replicas, and their usage, and provide some examples of their application to LHC phenomenology.

  18. Measurement of the t (bar t) cross section at the Run II Tevatron using Support Vector Machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitehouse, Benjamin Eric

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation measures the t(bar t) production cross section at the Run II CDF detector using data from early 2001 through March 2007. The Tevatron at Fermilab is a p(bar p) collider with center of mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV. This data composes a sample with a time-integrated luminosity measured at 2.2 ± 0.1 fb -1 . A system of learning machines is developed to recognize t(bar t) events in the 'lepton plus jets' decay channel. Support Vector Machines are described, and their ability to cope with a multi-class discrimination problem is provided. The t(bar t) production cross section is then measured in this framework, and found to be σ t# bar t# = 7.14 ± 0.25 (stat) -0.86 +0.61 (sys) pb.

  19. VeloTT tracking for LHCb Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Bowen, Espen Eie; Tresch, Marco

    2016-01-01

    This note describes track reconstruction in the LHCb tracking system upstream of the magnet, combining VELO tracks with hits in the TT sub-detector. The implementation of the VeloTT algorithm and its performance in terms of track reconstruction efficiency, ghost rate and execution time are presented. The algorithm has been rewritten for use in the first software trigger level for LHCb Run II. The momentum and charge information obtained for the VeloTT tracks (due to a fringe magnetic field between the VELO and TT sub-detectors) can reduce the total execution time for the full tracking sequence.

  20. The CMS Level-1 trigger for LHC Run II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapper, A.

    2018-02-01

    During LHC Run II the centre-of-mass energy of pp collisions has increased from 8 TeV up to 13 TeV and the instantaneous luminosity has progressed towards 2 × 1034 cm-2s-1. In order to guarantee a successful and ambitious physics programme under these conditions, the CMS trigger system has been upgraded. The upgraded CMS Level-1 trigger is designed to improve performance at high luminosity and large number of simultaneous inelastic collisions per crossing. The trigger design, implementation and commissioning are summarised, and performance results are described.

  1. Improvements to ATLAS Track Reconstruction for Run-II

    CERN Document Server

    Cairo, Valentina Maria; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Run-II of the LHC will provide new challenges to track and vertex reconstruction with higher energies, denser jets and higher rates. In addition, the Insertable B-layer (IBL) is a fourth pixel layer, which has been inserted at the centre of ATLAS during the shutdown of the LHC. We will discuss improvements to track reconstruction developed during the two year shutdown of the LHC. These include novel techniques developed to improve the performance in the dense cores of jets, optimisation for the expected conditions, and a big software campaign which lead to more than a factor of three decrease in the CPU time needed to process each recorded event.

  2. Fermilab III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The total ongoing plans for Fermilab are wrapped up in the Fermilab III scheme, centrepiece of which is the proposal for a new Main Injector. The Laboratory has been awarded a $200,000 Illinois grant which will be used to initiate environmental assessment and engineering design of the Main Injector, while a state review panel recommended that the project should also benefit from $2 million of funding

  3. Fermilab III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1990-09-15

    The total ongoing plans for Fermilab are wrapped up in the Fermilab III scheme, centrepiece of which is the proposal for a new Main Injector. The Laboratory has been awarded a $200,000 Illinois grant which will be used to initiate environmental assessment and engineering design of the Main Injector, while a state review panel recommended that the project should also benefit from $2 million of funding.

  4. The Fermilab physics class library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischler, M.; Brown, W.; Gaines, I.; Kennedy, R.D.; Marraffino, J.; Michelotti, L.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Yoh, J.; Adams, D.; Paterno, M.

    1997-02-01

    The Fermilab Physics Class Library Task Force has been formed to supply classes and utilities, primarily in support of efforts by CDF and D0 toward using C++. A collection of libraries and tools will be assembled via development by the task force, collaboration with other HEP developers, and acquisition of existing modules. The main emphasis is on a kit of resources which physics coders can incorporate into their programs, with confidence in robustness and correct behavior. The task force is drawn from CDF, DO and the FNAL Computing and Beams Divisions. Modules-containers, linear algebra, histograms, etc.-have been assigned priority, based on immediate Run II coding activity, and will be available at times ranging from now to late May

  5. SVX II a silicon vertex detector for run II of the tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bortoletto, D.

    1994-11-01

    A microstrip silicon detector SVX II has been proposed for the upgrade of the vertex detector of the CDF experiment to be installed for run II of the Tevatron in 1998. Three barrels of four layers of double sided detectors will cover the interaction region. The requirement of the silicon tracker and the specification of the sensors are discussed together with the proposed R ampersand D to verify the performance of the prototypes detectors produced by Sintef, Micron and Hamamatsu

  6. CMS detector tracking performance in Run-II

    CERN Document Server

    Brondolin, Erica

    2017-01-01

    Since the start of Run-II in June 2015, LHC has delivered pp collisions at a center of mass energy of 13TeV and with a bunch time separation of 25 ns. On avarage, more than 25 inelastic collisions are superimposed on the event of interest. Under these new conditions, the CMS collaboration has re-calibrated and verified the performance of the whole detector. In particular, the CMS tracking performance has been measured both directly and indirectly. Direct measurements are, among others, the beam spot determination, the vertex resolution and the muon reconstruction efficiency with the tag and probe technique. An indirect assessment can be given by the pion reconstruction efficiency and the low-mass resonance parameters as a function of different single track kinematics.

  7. LHCb-The LHCb trigger in Run II

    CERN Multimedia

    Michielin, Emanuele

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb trigger system has been upgraded to exploit the real-time alignment, calibration and analysis capabilities of LHCb in Run-II. An increase in the CPU and disk capacity of the event filter farm, combined with improvements to the reconstruction software, mean that efficient, exclusive selections can be made in the first stage of the High Level Trigger (HLT1). The output of HLT1 is buffered to the 5 PB of disk on the event filter farm, while the detector is aligned and calibrated in real time. The second stage, HLT2, performs complete, offline quality, event reconstruction. Physics analyses can be performed directly on this information, and for the majority of charm physics selections, a reduced event format can be written out, which permits higher event rates.

  8. Improvements to ATLAS track reconstruction for Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cairo, Valentina Maria Martina, E-mail: valentina.maria.cairo@cern.ch [University of Calabria, Arcavacata di Rende (Italy); CERN, Meyrin (Switzerland)

    2016-07-11

    Run II of the LHC will provide new challenges to track and vertex reconstruction with higher energies, denser jets and higher rates. A major change to the Inner Detector layout during the shutdown period has been the installation of the Insertable B-Layer, a fourth pixel layer located at a radius of 33 mm. This contribution discusses improvements to track reconstruction developed during the two year shutdown of the LHC. These include novel techniques developed to improve the performance in the dense cores of jets, optimisation for the expected conditions, and a big software campaign which lead to more than a factor of three decrease in the CPU time needed to process each recorded event.

  9. Boosted H­->bb Tagger In Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Sahinsoy, Merve; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Several searches for Higgs bosons decaying to b­quark pairs benefit from the increased Run II centre­of­mass energy by exploiting the large transvers­momentum (boosted) Higgs boson regime, where the two b­jets are merged into one large­radius jet. ATLAS uses a boosted H­>bb tagger algorithm to separate the Higgs signal from the background processes (QCD, W and Z bosons, top quarks). The tagger takes as input a large­R=1.0 jet calibrating the pseudorapidity, energy and mass scale. The tagger employs b­tagging, Higgs candidate mass, and substructure information. The performance of several operating points in Higgs boson signal and QCD and ttbar all­hadronic backgrounds are presented. Systematic uncertainties are evaluated so that this tagger can be used in analyses.

  10. LUCID Upgrade for ATLAS Luminosity Measurement in Run II

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00444244; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The main ATLAS luminosity monitor, LUCID, and its read-out electronics have been completely rebuilt for the LHC Run II in order to cope with a higher center of mass energy ($\\sqrt{s}$=13 TeV) and the 25 ns bunch-spacing. The LUCID detector is measuring Cherenkov light produced in photomultiplier quartz windows and in quartz optical fibers. It has a novel calibration system that uses radioactive $^{207}$Bi sources that produce internal-conversion electrons with energy above the Cherenkov threshold in quartz. The new electronics can count signals with amplitude above a predefined threshold (hits) as well as the integrated pulseheight of the signals, which makes it possible to measure luminosity with complementary methods. The new detector, calibration system and electronics will be described, together with the results of the 2015 luminosity measurement.

  11. The CMS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger for LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Zabi, Alexandre; Cadamuro, Luca; Davignon, Olivier; Romanteau, Thierry; Strebler, Thomas; Cepeda, Maria Luisa; Sauvan, Jean-baptiste; Wardle, Nicholas; Aggleton, Robin Cameron; Ball, Fionn Amhairghen; Brooke, James John; Newbold, David; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Smith, D; Taylor, Joseph Ross; Fountas, Konstantinos; Baber, Mark David John; Bundock, Aaron; Breeze, Shane Davy; Citron, Matthew; Elwood, Adam Christopher; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory Michiel; Laner Ogilvy, Christian; Penning, Bjorn; Rose, A; Shtipliyski, Antoni; Tapper, Alexander; Durkin, Timothy John; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Williams, Thomas Stephen; Dasu, Sridhara Rao; Dodd, Laura Margaret; Klabbers, Pamela Renee; Levine, Aaron; Ojalvo, Isabel Rose; Ruggles, Tyler Henry; Smith, Nicholas Charles; Smith, Wesley; Svetek, Ales; Forbes, R; Tikalsky, Jesra Lilah; Vicente, Marcelo

    2017-01-01

    Results from the completed Phase 1 Upgrade of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger are presented. The upgrade was completed in two stages, with the first running in 2015 for proton and Heavy Ion collisions and the final stage for 2016 data taking. The Level-1 trigger has been fully commissioned and has been used by CMS to collect over 43 fb-1 of data since the start of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Run II. The new trigger has been designed to improve the performance at high luminosity and large number of simultaneous inelastic collisions per crossing (pile-up). For this purpose it uses a novel design, the Time Multiplexed Trigger (TMT), which enables the data from an event to be processed by a single trigger processor at full granularity over several bunch crossings. The TMT design is a modular design based on the uTCA standard. The trigger processors are instrumented with Xilinx Virtex-7 690 FPGAs and 10 Gbps optical links. The TMT architecture is flexible and the number of trigger p...

  12. LHCb Run II tracking performance and prospects for the Upgrade

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb tracking system consists of a Vertex Locator around the interaction point, a tracking station with four layers of silicon strip detectors in front of the magnet, and three tracking stations, using either straw-tubes or silicon strip detectors, behind the magnet. This system allows to reconstruct charged particles with a high efficiency (typically > 95% for particles with momentum > 5 GeV) and an excellent momentum resolution (0.5% for particles with momentum < 20 GeV). The high momentum resolution results in very narrow mass peaks, leading to a very good signal-to-background ratio in such key channels as $B_s\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$. Furthermore an optimal decay time resolution is an essential element in the studies of time dependent CP violation. For Run II a novel reconstruction strategy was adopted, allowing to run the same track reconstruction in the software trigger as offline. This convergence was possible due to a staged approach in the track reconstruction and a large reduction in the processing tim...

  13. Electroweak production of the top quark in the Run II of the D0 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clement, Benoit [Louis Pasteur Univ., Strasbourg (France)

    2006-04-28

    The work exposed in this thesis deals with the search for electroweak production of top quark (single top) in proton-antiproton collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV. This production mode has not been observed yet. Analyzed data have been collected during the Run II of the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. These data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 370 pb-1. In the Standard Model, the decay of a top quark always produce a high momentum bottom quark. Therefore bottom quark jets identification plays a major role in this analysis. The large lifetime of b hadrons and the subsequent large impact parameters relative to the interaction vertex of charged particle tracks are used to tag bottom quark jets. Impact parameters of tracks attached to a jet are converted into the probability for the jet to originate from the primary vertex. This algorithm has a 45% tagging efficiency for a 0.5% mistag rate. Two processes (s and t channels) dominate single top production with slightly different final states. The searched signature consists in 2 to 4 jets with at least one bottom quark jet, one charged lepton (electron or muon) and missing energy accounting for a neutrino. This final state is background dominated and multivariate techniques are needed to separate the signal from the two main backgrounds: associated production of a W boson and jets and top quarks pair production. The achieved sensitivity is not enough to reach observation and we computed upper limits at the 95% confidence level at 5 pb (s-channel) and 4.3 pb (t-channel) on single top production cross-sections.

  14. Accelerator Preparations for Muon Physics Experiments at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syphers, M.J.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    The use of existing Fermilab facilities to provide beams for two muon experiments - the Muon to Electron Conversion Experiment (Mu2e) and the New g-2 Experiment - is under consideration. Plans are being pursued to perform these experiments following the completion of the Tevatron Collider Run II, utilizing the beam lines and storage rings used today for antiproton accumulation without considerable reconfiguration. Operating scenarios being investigated and anticipated accelerator improvements or reconfigurations will be presented.

  15. Fermilab | Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Industry Students and teachers Media ... Five (more) fascinating facts about DUNE Engineering the Mathematics in Music June 2 10 a.m. Get to Know the Lederman Science Center June 3 1 p.m. Ask a Scientist Security, Privacy, Legal Use of Cookies Quick Links Home Contact Phone Book Fermilab at Work For Industry

  16. Vertically Integrated Circuits at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deptuch, Grzegorz; Demarteau, Marcel; Hoff, James; Lipton, Ronald; Shenai, Alpana; Trimpl, Marcel; Yarema, Raymond; Zimmerman, Tom

    2009-01-01

    The exploration of the vertically integrated circuits, also commonly known as 3D-IC technology, for applications in radiation detection started at Fermilab in 2006. This paper examines the opportunities that vertical integration offers by looking at various 3D designs that have been completed by Fermilab. The emphasis is on opportunities that are presented by through silicon vias (TSV), wafer and circuit thinning and finally fusion bonding techniques to replace conventional bump bonding. Early work by Fermilab has led to an international consortium for the development of 3D-IC circuits for High Energy Physics. The consortium has submitted over 25 different designs for the Fermilab organized MPW run organized for the first time.

  17. Direct Searches for Scalar Leptoquarks at the Run II Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, Daniel Edward [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

    2004-08-01

    This dissertation sets new limits on the mass of the scalar leptoquark from direct searches carried out at the Run II CDF detector using data from March 2001 to October 2003. The data analyzed has a total time-integrated measured luminosity of 198 pb-1 of p$\\bar{p}$ collisions with √s = 1.96 TeV. Leptoquarks are assumed to be pair-produced and to decay into a lepton and a quark of the same generation. They consider two possible leptoquark decays: (1) β = BR(LQ → μq) = 1.0, and (2) β = BR(LQ → μq) = 0.5. For the β = 1 channel, they focus on the signature represented by two isolated high-pT muons and two isolated high-pT jets. For the β = 1/2 channel, they focus on the signature represented by one isolated high-pT muon, large missing transverse energy, and two isolated high-pT jets. No leptoquark signal is experimentally detected for either signature. Using the next to leading order theoretical cross section for scalar leptoquark production in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions [1], they set new mass limits on second generation scalar leptoquarks. They exclude the existence of second generation scalar leptoquarks with masses below 221(175) GeV/c2 for the β = 1(1/2) channels.

  18. The Higgs and Supersymmetry at Run II of the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shih, David [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2016-04-14

    Prof. David Shih was supported by DOE grant DE-SC0013678 from April 2015 to April 2016. His research during this year focused on the phenomenology of super-symmetry (SUSY) and maximizing its future discovery potential at Run II of the LHC. SUSY is one of the most well-motivated frameworks for physics beyond the Standard Model. It solves the "naturalness" or "hierarchy" problem by stabilizing the Higgs mass against otherwise uncontrolled quantum corrections, predicts "grand unification" of the fundamental forces, and provides many potential candidates for dark matter. However, after decades of null results from direct and indirect searches, the viable parameter space for SUSY is increasingly constrained. Also, the discovery of a Standard Model-like Higgs with a mass at 125 GeV places a stringent constraint on SUSY models. In the work supported on this grant, Shih has worked on four different projects motivated by these issues. He has built natural SUSY models that explain the Higgs mass and provide viable dark matter; he has studied the parameter space of "gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking" (GMSB) that satisfies the Higgs mass constraint; he has developed new tools for the precision calculation of flavor and CP observables in general SUSY models; and he has studied new techniques for discovery of supersymmetric partners of the top quark.

  19. The Higgs and Supersymmetry at Run II of the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih, David

    2016-01-01

    Prof. David Shih was supported by DOE grant DE-SC0013678 from April 2015 to April 2016. His research during this year focused on the phenomenology of super-symmetry (SUSY) and maximizing its future discovery potential at Run II of the LHC. SUSY is one of the most well-motivated frameworks for physics beyond the Standard Model. It solves the 'naturalness' or 'hierarchy' problem by stabilizing the Higgs mass against otherwise uncontrolled quantum corrections, predicts 'grand unification' of the fundamental forces, and provides many potential candidates for dark matter. However, after decades of null results from direct and indirect searches, the viable parameter space for SUSY is increasingly constrained. Also, the discovery of a Standard Model-like Higgs with a mass at 125 GeV places a stringent constraint on SUSY models. In the work supported on this grant, Shih has worked on four different projects motivated by these issues. He has built natural SUSY models that explain the Higgs mass and provide viable dark matter; he has studied the parameter space of 'gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking' (GMSB) that satisfies the Higgs mass constraint; he has developed new tools for the precision calculation of flavor and CP observables in general SUSY models; and he has studied new techniques for discovery of supersymmetric partners of the top quark.

  20. The CMS calorimeter trigger upgrade for the LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Zabi, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    The CMS experiment implements a sophisticated two-level online selection system that achieves a rejection factor of nearly 10e5. The first level (L1) is based on coarse information coming from the calorimeters and the muon detectors while the High-Level Trigger combines fine-grain information from all sub-detectors. During Run II, the LHC will increase its centre of mass energy up to 13 TeV and progressively reach an instantaneous luminosity of 2e34 cm-2s-1. In order to guarantee a successful and ambitious physics program under this intense environment, the CMS Trigger and Data acquisition system must be consolidated. In particular the L1 calorimeter Trigger hardware and architecture will be modified. The goal is to maintain the current thresholds (e.g., for electrons and photons) and improve the performance for the selection of tau leptons. This can only be achieved by designing an updated trigger architecture based on the recent microTCA technology. Racks can be equipped with fast optical links and latest...

  1. Charm and beauty measurements at Fermilab fixed target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, C.S.

    1993-10-01

    Eighteen months after a successful run of the Fermilab fixed target program, interesting results from several experiments are available. This is the first time that more than one Fermilab fixed target experiment has reported the observation of beauty mesons. In this paper we review recent results from charm and beauty fixed target experiments at Fermilab

  2. Charm and beauty measurements at Fermilab fixed target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, C.S.

    1993-01-01

    Eighteen months after a successful run of the Fermilab fixed target program, interesting results from several experiments are available. This is the first time that more than one Fermilab fixed target experiment has reported the observation of beauty mesons. In this paper the author reviews recent results from charm and beauty fixed target experiments at Fermilab

  3. Fermilab Antiproton source, Recycler ring and Main Injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagaitsev, Sergei [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2013-03-22

    The antiproton source for a proton-antiproton collider at Fermilab was proposed in 1976 [1]. The proposal argued that the requisite luminosity (~1029 cm-2sec-1) could be achieved with a facility that would produce and cool approximately 1011 antiprotons per day. Funding for the Tevatron I project (to construct the Antiproton source) was initiated in 1981 and the Tevatron ring itself was completed, as a fixed target accelerator, in the summer of 1983 and the Antiproton Source was completed in 1985. At the end of its operations in 2011, the Fermilab antiproton production complex consisted of a sophisticated target system, three 8-GeV storage rings (namely the Debuncher, Accumulator and Recycler), 25 independent multi-GHz stochastic cooling systems, the world’s only relativistic electron cooling system and a team of technical experts equal to none. Sustained accumulation of antiprotons was possible at the rate of greater than 2.5×1011 per hour. Record-size stacks of antiprotons in excess of 3×1012 were accumulated in the Accumulator ring and 6×1012 in the Recycler. In some special cases, the antiprotons were stored in rings for more than 50 days. Note, that over the years, some 1016 antiprotons were produced and accumulated at Fermilab, which is about 17 nanograms and more than 90% of the world’s total man-made quantity of nuclear antimatter. The accelerator complex at Fermilab supported a broad physics program including the Tevatron Collider Run II [2], neutrino experiments using 8 GeV and 120 GeV proton beams, as well as a test beam facility and other fixed target experiments using 120 GeV primary proton beams. The following sections provide a brief description of Fermilab accelerators as they operated at the end of the Collider Run II (2011).

  4. The PDF4LHC report on PDFs and LHC data: results from Run I and preparation for Run II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojo, Juan; Accardi, Alberto; Ball, Richard D; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Gwenlan, Claire; Roeck, Albert de; Mangano, Michelangelo; Farry, Stephen; Ferrando, James; Forte, Stefano; Gao, Jun; Harland-Lang, Lucian; Huston, Joey; Glazov, Alexander; Lipka, Katerina; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Nadolsky, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    The accurate determination of the parton distribution functions (PDFs) of the proton is an essential ingredient of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) program. PDF uncertainties impact a wide range of processes, from Higgs boson characterization and precision Standard Model measurements to new physics searches. A major recent development in modern PDF analyses has been to exploit the wealth of new information contained in precision measurements from the LHC Run I, as well as progress in tools and methods to include these data in PDF fits. In this report we summarize the information that PDF-sensitive measurements at the LHC have provided so far, and review the prospects for further constraining PDFs with data from the recently started Run II. This document aims to provide useful input to the LHC collaborations to prioritize their PDF-sensitive measurements at Run II, as well as a comprehensive reference for the PDF-fitting collaborations. (topical review)

  5. The PDF4LHC report on PDFs and LHC data. Results from Run I and preparation for Run II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojo, Juan; Ball, Richard D.; CERN, Geneva

    2015-07-01

    The accurate determination of the Parton Distribution Functions (PDFs) of the proton is an essential ingredient of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) program. PDF uncertainties impact a wide range of processes, from Higgs boson characterisation and precision Standard Model measurements to New Physics searches. A major recent development in modern PDF analyses has been to exploit the wealth of new information contained in precision measurements from the LHC Run I, as well as progress in tools and methods to include these data in PDF fits. In this report we summarise the information that PDF-sensitive measurements at the LHC have provided so far, and review the prospects for further constraining PDFs with data from the recently started Run II. This document aims to provide useful input to the LHC collaborations to prioritise their PDF-sensitive measurements at Run II, as well as a comprehensive reference for the PDF-fitting collaborations.

  6. The PDF4LHC report on PDFs and LHC data: Results from Run I and preparation for Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Rojo, Juan; Ball, Richard D; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; de Roeck, Albert; Farry, Stephen; Ferrando, James; Forte, Stefano; Gao, Jun; Harland-Lang, Lucian; Huston, Joey; Glazov, Alexander; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Gwenlan, Claire; Lipka, Katerina; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Mangano, Michelangelo; Nadolsky, Pavel; Perrozzi, Luca; Placakyte, Ringaile; Radescu, Voica; Salam, Gavin P; Thorne, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The accurate determination of the Parton Distribution Functions (PDFs) of the proton is an essential ingredient of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) program. PDF uncertainties impact a wide range of processes, from Higgs boson characterisation and precision Standard Model measurements to New Physics searches. A major recent development in modern PDF analyses has been to exploit the wealth of new information contained in precision measurements from the LHC Run I, as well as progress in tools and methods to include these data in PDF fits. In this report we summarise the information that PDF-sensitive measurements at the LHC have provided so far, and review the prospects for further constraining PDFs with data from the recently started Run II. This document aims to provide useful input to the LHC collaborations to prioritise their PDF-sensitive measurements at Run II, as well as a comprehensive reference for the PDF-fitting collaborations.

  7. B physics with the CDF Run II upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeJongh, F.

    1996-01-01

    During the Run 1 data taking period, from 1992 through 1995, CDF has acquired 110 pb -1 of p anti p collisions at a center of mass energy of 1,800 GeV. This data has provided many results on B physics, and provides a basis for extrapolating to Run 2, which is scheduled to start in 1999 after major upgrades to both the accelerator and detector. The authors present herein a summary of Run 1 results relevant to an analysis of the CP asymmetry in B → J/ψK s , the CDF upgrade plans for Run 2, and some of the main B physics goals related to the exploration of the origin of CP violation

  8. The CDF SVX II detector upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skarha, J.E.

    1993-10-01

    The proposed CDF SVX II detector upgrade for secondary vertex detection during the Fermilab Tevatron Run II collider run is described. The general design and important features of this silicon vertex detector are presented. The CDF physics goals which are addressed by this detector are also given

  9. LHCb computing in Run II and its evolution towards Run III

    CERN Document Server

    Falabella, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    his contribution reports on the experience of the LHCb computing team during LHC Run 2 and its preparation for Run 3. Furthermore a brief introduction on LHCbDIRAC, i.e. the tool to interface to the experiment distributed computing resources for its data processing and data management operations, is given. Run 2, which started in 2015, has already seen several changes in the data processing workflows of the experiment. Most notably the ability to align and calibrate the detector between two different stages of the data processing in the high level trigger farm, eliminating the need for a second pass processing of the data offline. In addition a fraction of the data is immediately reconstructed to its final physics format in the high level trigger and only this format is exported from the experiment site to the physics analysis. This concept have successfully been tested and will continue to be used for the rest of Run 2. Furthermore the distributed data processing has been improved with new concepts and techn...

  10. A Measurement of the Bs Lifetime at CDF Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrington, Sinead [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This thesis describes a measurement of the proper lifetime of the B$0\\atop{s}$ mesons produced in proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV, collected by the CDF experiment at Fermilab. The B$0\\atop{s}$ meson lifetime is measured in its semileptonic decay mode, B$0\\atop{s}$ → ℓ+vD$-\\atop{s}$. The D$-\\atop{s}$ meson candidates are reconstructed in the decay mode D$-\\atop{s}$ → Φπ, with Φ → K+K-, in a trigger sample which requires a muon or an electron and another track which has a large impact parameters. The large impact parameter track is required by the silicon vertex trigger which is an innovative triggering device which has not previously been used in lifetime measurements. A total of 905 ± B$0\\atop{s}$ candidates are reconstructed in a sample which has an integrated luminosity of 140 pb-1 using data gathered between February 2002 and August 2003. The pseudo-proper lifetime distribution of these candidates is fitted with an unbinned maximum likelihood fit. This fit takes into account the missing momentum carried by the neutrino and the bias caused by requiring a track with large impact parameter by modeling these effects in simulations. The fit yields the result for the B$0\\atop{s}$ proper lifetime: cτ(B$0\\atop{s}$) = 419 ± 28$+16\\atop{-13}$ μm and τ(B$0\\atop{s}$) = 1.397 ± 0.093$+0.053\\atop{-0.043}$ ps where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic.

  11. Measurement of the t$\\bar{t}$ cross section at the Run II Tevatron using Support Vector Machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehouse, Benjamin Eric [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

    2010-08-01

    This dissertation measures the t$\\bar{t}$ production cross section at the Run II CDF detector using data from early 2001 through March 2007. The Tevatron at Fermilab is a p$\\bar{p}$ collider with center of mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV. This data composes a sample with a time-integrated luminosity measured at 2.2 ± 0.1 fb-1. A system of learning machines is developed to recognize t$\\bar{t}$ events in the 'lepton plus jets' decay channel. Support Vector Machines are described, and their ability to cope with a multi-class discrimination problem is provided. The t$\\bar{t}$ production cross section is then measured in this framework, and found to be σt$\\bar{t}$ = 7.14 ± 0.25 (stat)-0.86+0.61(sys) pb.

  12. Top-quark mass measurement in the tt-bar-dilepton channel using the full CDF Run II data set

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budagov, J.; Glagolev, V.; Suslov, I.; Velev, G.

    2014-01-01

    We present a measurement of the top-quark mass with tt-bar-dilepton events using the full CDF Run II data set, which corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 9.1 fb -1 collected from √s = 1.96 TeV pp-bar collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron. A sample of 520 events is obtained after all selection requirements. The top-quark mass is estimated by a fit of the distribution of some variable to a sum of signal and background contributions. This variable is defined using special approach to reduce the systematic error due to the jet energy scale uncertainty. Templates are built from simulated tt-bar and background events, and parameterized in order to provide probability distribution functions. A likelihood fit of the data returns the top-quark mass of (170.80∓1.83 (stat.)∓2.69 (syst.)) GeV/c 2 (or (170.80∓3.25) GeV/c 2 ).

  13. Fermilab | Science | Particle Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    perhaps most widely felt in the development of the World Wide Web and in the superconducting wire and Fermilab Search Toggle Fermilab Navbar Toggle Search Search Home About Science Jobs Contact Phone public events Fermilab Public Events Lederman Science Center Fermilab Natural Areas Folk and Barn Dancing

  14. Measurement of B(t→Wb)/B(t→Wq) in top-quark-pair decays using dilepton events and the full CDF Run II data set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; D'Errico, M; Devoto, F; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Farrington, S; Fernández Ramos, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Funakoshi, Y; Galloni, C; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González López, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hocker, A; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, S B; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lucà, A; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Marchese, L; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Martínez, M; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parker, W; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Pranko, A; Prokoshin, F; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Ranjan, N; Redondo Fernández, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Song, H; Sorin, V; St Denis, R; Stancari, M; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vernieri, C; Vidal, M; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2014-06-06

    We present a measurement of the ratio of the top-quark branching fractions R=B(t→Wb)/B(t→Wq), where q represents any quark flavor, in events with two charged leptons, imbalance in total transverse energy, and at least two jets. The measurement uses proton-antiproton collision data at center-of-mass energy 1.96 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7  fb^{-1} collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab during Run II of the Tevatron. We measure R to be 0.87±0.07, and extract the magnitude of the top-bottom quark coupling to be |V_{tb}|=0.93±0.04, assuming three generations of quarks. Under these assumptions, a lower limit of |V_{tb}|>0.85(0.87) at 95% (90%) credibility level is set.

  15. LHCb's Time-Real Alignment in RunII

    CERN Multimedia

    Batozskaya, Varvara

    2015-01-01

    LHCb has introduced a novel real-time detector alignment and calibration strategy for LHC Run 2. Data collected at the start of the fill will be processed in a few minutes and used to update the alignment, while the calibration constants will be evaluated for each run. This procedure will improve the quality of the online alignment. Critically, this new real-time alignment and calibration procedure allows identical constants to be used in the online and offline reconstruction, thus improving the correlation between triggered and offline selected events. This offers the opportunity to optimise the event selection in the trigger by applying stronger constraints. The required computing time constraints are met thanks to a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the trigger. The motivation for a real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector is discussed from both the operational and physics performance points of view. Specific challenges of this novel configur...

  16. The ATLAS Muon Trigger Performance in Run I and Initial Run II Performance

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00437899; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Events with muons in the final state are an important signature for many physics topics at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). An efficient trigger on muons and a detailed understanding of its performance are required. In 2012, the last year of Run I, the instantaneous luminosity of the LHC reached 7.7x1033 cm-2s-1 and the average number of events that occur in a same bunch crossing was 25. The ATLAS Muon trigger has successfully adapted to this changing environment by making use of isolation requirements, combined trigger signatures with electron and jet trigger objects, and by using so-called full-scan triggers, which make use of the full event information to search for di-lepton signatures, seeded by single lepton objects. A stable and highly efficient muon trigger was vital in the discovery of Higgs boson in 2012 and for many searches for new physics. The performance of muon triggers during the LHC Run 1 data-taking campaigns is presented, together with an overview and preliminary results of the new muon str...

  17. The ATLAS Muon Trigger Performance in Run I and Initial Run II Performance

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00437899; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Events with muons in the final state are an important signature for many physics topics at the Large Hadron Collider. An efficient trigger on muons and a detailed understanding of its performance are required. In 2012, the last year of Run I, the instantaneous luminosity reached $7.7\\times10^{33}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ and the average number of interactions that occur in the same bunch crossing was 25. The ATLAS muon trigger has successfully adapted to this challenging environment by making use of isolation requirements, combined trigger signatures with electron and jet trigger objects, and by using so-called full-scan triggers, which make use of the full event information to search for di-lepton signatures, seeded by single lepton objects. A stable and highly efficient muon trigger was vital in the discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012 and for many searches for new physics. The performance of muon triggers during the Large Hadron Collider Run I data-taking campaigns is presented, together with an overview and pre...

  18. The ATLAS Trigger System: Ready for Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Czodrowski, Patrick; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS trigger system has been used successfully for data collection in the 2009-2013 Run 1 operation cycle of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at center-of-mass energies of up to 8 TeV. With the restart of the LHC for the new Run 2 data-taking period at 13 TeV, the trigger rates are expected to rise by approximately a factor of 5. The trigger system consists of a hardware-based first level (L1) and a software-based high-level trigger (HLT) that reduces the event rate from the design bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz to an average recording rate of ~ 1kHz. This presentation will give an overview of the upgrades to the ATLAS trigger system that have been implemented during the LHC shutdown period in order to deal with the increased trigger rates while efficiently selecting the physics processes of interest. These upgrades include changes to the L1 calorimeter trigger, the introduction of a new L1 topological trigger module, improvements in the L1 muon system, and the merging of the previously two-level HLT ...

  19. LHCb : LHCbVELO: Performance and Radiation Damage in LHC Run I and Preparationfor Run II

    CERN Multimedia

    Szumlak, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    LHCb is a dedicated experiment to study New Physics in the decays of heavy hadrons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Heavy hadrons are identified through their flight distance in the Vertex Locator (VELO). The VELO comprises 42 modules made of two n+-on-n 300 um thick half-disc silicon sensors with R-measuring and Phi-measuring micro-strips. In order to allow retracting the detector, the VELO is installed as two movable halves containing 21 modules each. The detectors are operated in a secondary vacuum and are cooled by a bi-phase CO2 cooling system. During data taking in LHC Run 1 the LHCb VELO has operated with an extremely high efficiency and excellent performance. The track finding efficiency is typically greater than 98%. An impact parameter resolution of less than 35 um is achieved for particles with transverse momentum greater than 1 GeV/c. An overview of all important performance parameters will be given. The VELO sensors have received a large and non-uniform radiation dose of up to 1.2 x 10...

  20. CDF silicon vertex tracker: tevatron run II preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashmanskas, W.; Belforte, S.; Budagov, Yu.

    2002-01-01

    The Online Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT) is the unique new trigger processor dedicated to the 2-D reconstruction of charged particle trajectories at Level 2 of the CDF trigger. The SVT has been successfully built, installed and operated during the 2000 and 20001 CDF data taking runs. The performance of the SVT is already very close to the design. The SVT is able to find tracks and calculate their impact parameter with high precision (σ d = 35 μm). It is possible to correct the beam position offset and give the beam position feedback to accelerator in real time. In fact, the beam position is calculated online every few seconds with an accuracy of 1 to 5 μm. The beam position is continuously sent to the accelerator control. By using trigger tracks, parent particles such as K S 's and D 0 's are reconstructed, proving that the SVT is ready to be used for physics studies

  1. LUCID Upgrade for ATLAS Luminosity Measurement in Run II.

    CERN Document Server

    Ucchielli, Giulia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The main ATLAS luminosity monitor LUCID and its read-out electronics has been completely rebuilt for the 2015 LHC run in order to cope with a higher center of mass energy (13 TeV) and with 25 ns bunch-spacing. The LUCID detector is measuring Cherenkov light produced in photomultiplier quartz windows and in quartz optical fibers. It has a novel calibration system that uses radioactive Bi$^{207}$ sources that produces internal conversion electrons above the Cherenkov threshold in quartz. The new electronics can count particle hits above a threshold but also the integrated pulseheight of the signals from the particles which makes it possible to measure luminosity with new methods. The new detector, calibration system and electronics will be covered by the contribution as well as the results of the luminosity measurements with the detector in 2015.

  2. Vector resonances at LHC Run II in composite 2HDM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiara, Stefano Di [National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics,Rävala 10, 10143 Tallinn (Estonia); Heikinheimo, Matti; Tuominen, Kimmo [Helsinki Institute of Physics, University of Helsinki,P.O. Box 64, FI-000140, Helsinki (Finland); Department of Physics, University of Helsinki,P.O. Box 64, FI-000140, Helsinki (Finland)

    2017-03-02

    We consider a model where the electroweak symmetry breaking is driven by strong dynamics, resulting in an electroweak doublet scalar condensate, and transmitted to the standard model matter fields via another electroweak doublet scalar. At low energies the effective theory therefore shares features with a type-I two Higgs doublet model. However, important differences arise due to the rich composite spectrum expected to contain new vector resonances accessible at the LHC. We carry out a systematic analysis of the vector resonance signals at LHC and find that the model remains viable, but will be tightly constrained by direct searches as the projected integrated luminosity, around 200 fb{sup −1}, of the current run becomes available.

  3. The updated ATLAS Jet Trigger for the LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00359694; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    After the current shutdown, the LHC is about to resume operation for a new data-taking period, when it will operate with increased luminosity, event rate and center of mass energy. The new conditions will impose more demanding constraints on the ATLAS online trigger reconstruction and selection system. To cope with such increased constraints, the ATLAS High-Level Trigger, placed after a first hardware-based Level~1 trigger, has been redesigned by merging two previously separated software-based processing levels. In the new joint processing level, the algorithms run in the same computing nodes, thus sharing resources, minimizing the data transfer from the detector buffers and increasing the algorithm flexibility. The jet trigger software selects events containing high transverse momentum hadronic jets. It needs optimal jet energy resolution to help rejecting an overwhelming background while retaining good efficiency for interesting jets. In particular, this requires the CPU-intensive reconstruction of tridimen...

  4. ATLAS Jet Trigger Update for the LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Prince, Sebastien; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    After the current shutdown, the LHC is about to resume operation for a new data-taking period, when it will operate with increased luminosity, event rate and centre of mass energy. The new conditions will impose more demanding constraints on the ATLAS online trigger reconstruction and selection system. To cope with such increased constraints, the ATLAS High Level Trigger, placed after a first hardware-based Level-1 trigger, has been redesigned by merging two previously separated software-based processing levels. In the new joint processing level, the algorithms run in the same computing nodes, thus sharing resources, minimizing the data transfer from the detector buffers and increasing the algorithm flexibility. The Jet trigger software selects events containing high transverse momentum hadronic jets. It needs optimal jet energy resolution to help rejecting an overwhelming background while retaining good efficiency for interesting jets. In particular, this requires the CPU-intensive reconstruction of tridimen...

  5. Using Drell-Yan to probe the underlying event in Run II at Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kar, Deepak [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2008-12-01

    We study the behavior of charged particles produced in association with Drell-Yan lepton-pairs in the region of the Z-boson in proton-antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV. We use the direction of the Z-boson in each event to define 'toward', 'away', and 'transverse' regions. For Drell-Yan production (excluding the leptons) both the 'toward' and 'transverse' regions are very sensitive to the 'underlying event', which is defined as everything except the two hard scattered components. The data are corrected to the particle level and are then compared with several PYTHIA models (with multiple parton interactions) and HERWIG (without multiple parton interactions) at the particle level (i.e. generator level). The data are also compared with a previous analysis on the behavior of the 'underlying event' in high transverse momentum jet production. The goal is to produce data that can be used by the theorists to tune and improve the QCD Monte-Carlo models of the 'underlying event' that are used to simulate hadron-hadron collisions.

  6. Fermilab Education Office - Physicists

    Science.gov (United States)

    on Education Server, but to take full advantage of all of this site's features, you should turn Custom Search Connect with the Fermilab Education Office! Facebook Fermilab Education Office Join these groups: Science Adventures Group Teacher Resource Center Group Twitter Fermilab Education Office For more

  7. A development plan for the Fermilab proton source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, S. D.

    1997-01-01

    The present Fermilab Proton Source is composed of a 750 KV ion source, a 400 MeV Linac, and an 8 GeV Booster synchrotron. This facility currently provides proton beams at intensities up to 5 x 10 10 protons/bunch for injection into the Main Ring in support of the current Tevatron fixed target run. Following completion of the Main Injector project in 1999, the Proton Source is expected to provide protons to the Main Injector at an intensity of 6 x 10 10 protons/bunch as required to meet established performance goals for Tevatron Collider Run II. With the advent of the Main Injector the demand for protons in support of a diverse physics research program at Fermilab will grow. This is because the Main Injector creates a new capability for simultaneous operation of the collider and fixed target programs at 120 GeV. It has also been recently appreciated that a physics program based on the utilization of unallocated 8 GeV Booster cycles is potentially very attractive. A variety of experiments are either approved or under consideration including the Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NUMI) project, Kaons at the Main Injector (KAMI), and an rf separated K + beam for CPT tests, all utilizing 120 GeV protons, and a low energy neutrino (MiniBooNe) or muon program based on 8 GeV protons from the Booster. In addition significant effort is now being invested in defining paths to a factor of five improvement in Tevatron collider luminosity beyond those expected in Run II and in understanding the possible future siting of either a very large hadron collider or a modest energy ''First Muon Collider'' (FMC) at Fermilab. Support for these varied activities is beyond the capabilities of the current Proton Source--in the case of the FMC by about a factor of ten as measured in delivered protons per second. The purpose of this document is to describe a possible evolution of the Fermilab Proton Source over the next ten years. The goal is to outline a staged plan, with significant

  8. Technical design report for the upgrade of the ICD for D-Zero Run II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawyer, L.; De, K.; Draper, P.; Gallas, E.; Li, J.; Sosebee, M.; Stephens, R.W.; White, A.

    1998-01-01

    The Inter Cryostat Detector (ICD) used in Run I of the D0 Experiment will be inoperable in the central, high magnetic field planned for Run II. In Run I, the ICD enhanced the hermeticity and uniformity of the D0 calorimeter system, improving both missing transverse energy and jet energy resolution. The goals for the Run II ICD are the same. In this document, the physics arguments for maintaining the ICD are presented, followed by a detailed description of the planned design changes, prototype tests, construction, installation, and commissioning of the device for the Run II D0 detector. Estimates of costs and schedule can be found on //DOSERVER2/Operations/Upgrade Project/ subareas available via DZERO's WinFrame Program Manager. This detector is not intended to provide any ''L0'' capabilities (for luminosity monitoring), or to provide any EM coverage in the intermediate region, or to provide additional coverage in the intermediate regions, unlike previous upgrades proposed in this detector region. The ICD upgrade described here maintains most of the Run I capabilities in a high magnetic field environment

  9. Fermilab turns 50! Congratulations!

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    This year Fermilab turns 50 and the celebrations are ongoing. The ties between CERN and Fermilab are numerous and have been ranging from competition between two labs at the forefront of their field, e.g. with the chase of the top quark, finally discovered by Fermilab, to outright collaboration, e.g. on LHC low-beta quadrupole magnet development and production and in the CMS collaboration. In June, in the name of the CERN staff and scientific community, the CERN Staff Association sent a message to the Fermilab staff and scientific community, through Dr. Nigel Lockyer, Fermilab Director. The letter, and the assurance from Nigel Lockyer that the message has been passed onto the Fermilab community can be found on our website. Congratulations to Fermilab on its fiftieth Anniversary, and to the staff and collaborators who made this laboratory through their hard work, dedication and vision!

  10. Fermilab Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    florentine - BBQ pork sandwich - Smart cuisine: Kielbasa & sauerkraut - Smart cuisine: Chicken marsala 1924, Charpak moved to Paris at the age of 7. He joined the French resistance during World War II, was remained until the camp was liberated in 1945. Charpak become a French citizen in 1946. He attended the

  11. The Fermilab ACNET upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briegel, C.; Johnson, G.; Winterowd, L.

    1990-01-01

    The Fermilab Accelerator Controls Network (ACNET) upgrade consists of a new physical medium (IEEE 802.5 token ring), additions to the calling sequence and added processor support. ACNET is the accelerator control backbone network for all data communication. A proprietary network was replaced by an IEEE standard enabling an open network with excellent characteristics for the control system. The calling sequence was enhanced for the added capabilities of the token-ring interface such as 'gather-read' and 'scatter-write'. In addition to prior support of DEC PDP11s under RS11M and VAXs under VMS, the ACNET calling sequence was implemented in the language C for the IBM PC with MS-DOS and Motorola 680x0 with MTOS using VME bus. Additional support is in progress for Intel 80x86 with MTOS using Multibus II. (orig.)

  12. Operation of the DC current transformer intensity monitors at FNAL during run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crisp, J.; Fellenz, B.; Heikkinen, D.; Ibrahim, M.A.; Meyer, T.; Vogel, G.; /Fermilab

    2012-01-01

    Circulating beam intensity measurements at FNAL are provided by five DC current transformers (DCCT), one per machine. With the exception of the DCCT in the Recycler, all DCCT systems were designed and built at FNAL. This paper presents an overview of both DCCT systems, including the sensor, the electronics, and the front-end instrumentation software, as well as their performance during Run II.

  13. The discovery of the b quark at Fermilab in 1977: The experiment coordinator`s story

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoh, J.

    1997-12-01

    I present the history of the discovery of the Upsilon ({Upsilon}) particle (the first member of the b-quark family to be observed) at Fermilab in 1977 by the CFS (Columbia-Fermilab-Stony Brook collaboration) E288 experiment headed by Leon Lederman. We found the first evidence of the {Upsilon} in November 1976 in an early phase of E288. The subsequent discovery in the spring of 1977 resulted from an upgraded E288 the {mu}{mu}II phase, optimized for dimuons, with about 100 times the sensitivity of the previous investigatory dimuon phase (which had been optimized for dielectrons). The events leading to the discovery, the planning of {mu}{mu}II and the running, including a misadventure (the infamous Shunt Fire of May 1977), are described. Some discussions of the aftermath, a summary, and an acknowledgement list end this brief historical note.

  14. The Discovery of the b Quark at Fermilab in 1977: The Experiment Coordinator's Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoh, J.

    1997-12-01

    I present the history of the discovery of the Upsilon ({Upsilon}) particle (the first member of the b-quark family to be observed) at Fermilab in 1977 by the CFS (Columbia-Fermilab-Stony Brook collaboration) E288 experiment headed by Leon Lederman. We found the first evidence of the {Upsilon} in November 1976 in an early phase of E288. The subsequent discovery in the spring of 1977 resulted from an upgraded E288 the {mu}{mu}II phase, optimized for dimuons, with about 100 times the sensitivity of the previous investigatory dimuon phase (which had been optimized for dielectrons). The events leading to the discovery, the planning of {mu}{mu}II and the running, including a misadventure (the infamous Shunt Fire of May 1977), are described. Some discussions of the aftermath, a summary, and an acknowledgement list end this brief historical note.

  15. The discovery of the b quark at Fermilab in 1977: The experiment coordinator's story

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoh, J.

    1997-12-01

    I present the history of the discovery of the Upsilon (Υ) particle (the first member of the b-quark family to be observed) at Fermilab in 1977 by the CFS (Columbia-Fermilab-Stony Brook collaboration) E288 experiment headed by Leon Lederman. We found the first evidence of the Υ in November 1976 in an early phase of E288. The subsequent discovery in the spring of 1977 resulted from an upgraded E288 the μμII phase, optimized for dimuons, with about 100 times the sensitivity of the previous investigatory dimuon phase (which had been optimized for dielectrons). The events leading to the discovery, the planning of μμII and the running, including a misadventure (the infamous Shunt Fire of May 1977), are described. Some discussions of the aftermath, a summary, and an acknowledgement list end this brief historical note

  16. Results on Fermilab main injector dipole measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, B.C.; Baiod, R.; DiMarco, J.; Glass, H.D.; Harding, D.J.; Martin, P.S.; Mishra, S.; Mokhtarani, A.; Orris, D.F.; russell, O.A.; Tompkins, J.C.; Walbridge, D.G.C.

    1995-06-01

    Measurements of the Productions run of Fermilab Main Injector Dipole magnets is underway. Redundant strength measurements provide a set of data which one can fit to mechanical and magnetic properties of the assembly. Plots of the field contribution from the steel supplement the usual plots of transfer function (B/I) vs. I in providing insight into the measured results

  17. Next generation farms at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cudzewicz, R., Giacchetti, L., Leininger, M., Levshina, T., Pasetes, R., Schweitzer, M., Wolbers, S.

    1997-01-01

    The current generation of UNIX farms at Fermilab are rapidly approaching the end of their useful life. The workstations were purchased during the years 1991-1992 and represented the most cost-effective computing available at that time. Acquisition of new workstations is being made to upgrade the UNIX farms for the purpose of providing large amounts of computing for reconstruction of data being collected at the 1996-1997 fixed-target run, as well as to provide simulation computing for CMS, the Auger project, accelerator calculations and other projects that require massive amounts of CPU. 4 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  18. The Fermilab Farms in 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    The farms in 1996 began a period of transition. The old farms continue to be used but do not provide sufficient CPU power, memory, or network bandwidth for all of the tasks which are required. Therefore we have purchased and installed a substantial increment of new farms and are working on adding another increment during 1997. The purpose of all this activity is to provide computing for the fixed target run and for the other large computing users who cannot be accommodated on the other systems that are available at Fermilab

  19. Fermilab Education Office - Volunteer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Search Opportunities for Education and Outreach for Employees and Users Fermilab employees, users, and contribute and let us know. If you have ideas for education and outreach that are not listed here, email presents the Director's Award for exceptional support to Fermilab's K–12 Education programs. Visit schools

  20. FERMILAB: Bob Wilson 80

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1994-06-15

    On March 4, an international symposium and tribute was held at Fermilab in honour of the Laboratory's founding director Robert Rathbun Wilson on the occasion of his 80th birthday. The symposium - 'Celebrating an Era of Courage and Creativity' - featured talks and reflections by many of Wilson's colleagues and friends including Fermilab Director John Peoples and Director Emeritus Leon Lederman.

  1. Alignment of the ATLAS Inner Detector in the LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Barranco Navarro, Laura; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ATLAS physics goals require excellent resolution, unbiased measurement of all charged particle kinematic parameters. These critically depend on the layout and performance of the tracking system and on the quality of its offline alignment. ATLAS is equipped with a tracking system built using different technologies, silicon planar sensors (pixel and micro-strip) and gaseous drift- tubes, all embedded in a 2T solenoidal magnetic field. For the Run II of the LHC, the system was upgraded with the installation of a new pixel layer, the Insertable B-layer (IBL). An outline of the track based alignment approach and its implementation within the ATLAS software will be presented. Special attention will be paid to integration of the IBL into the alignment framework, techniques allowing to identify and eliminate tracking systematics as well as strategies to deal with time-dependent alignment. Performance from the commissioning of Cosmic data and potentially early LHC Run II proton-proton collisions will be discussed.

  2. FERMILAB: More antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visnjic, Vladimir

    1993-01-01

    The excellent performance of the Fermilab antiproton complex during the recent Collider run and its future potential are the cumulative result of many improvements over the past few years, ranging from major projects like upgrading the stack-tail stochastic cooling system in the Accumulator to minor improvements like automating tuning procedures. The antiprotons are created when the 120 GeV proton beam from the Main Ring hits the target. A good target should have high yield of antiprotons, should not melt, and should not crack due to shock waves. The old copper target has been replaced by a new one made of nickel. The yield into the Debuncher is 2 x 10 -5 antiprotons/proton. While this is only marginally better than for copper, the nickel target has high melting point energy (1070 J/g) and a low rate of increase in pressure with deposited energy, making it the target of choice for the proton intensities expected in the Main Injector era (June, page 10). Of the broad spectrum of all kinds of secondaries, only a tiny fraction are 8 GeV antiprotons. The 8 GeV negative charge secondaries are bent through 3° by a new pulsed magnet. Instead of a 200-turn magnet with coils separated by epoxy as in the past, the new magnet has one turn carrying 45.5 kA of current. This single turn pulsed magnet uses radiation hard ceramic and is much more robust

  3. Achieving the optimal performance of the CMS ECAL in Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Menglei

    2016-01-01

    Many physics analyses using the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector at the LHC require accurate, high resolution electron and photon energy measurements. Particularly important are decays of the Higgs boson resulting in electromagnetic particles in the final state. Di-photon events in CMS are also a very important channel in the search for Higgs boson production in association with other particles or in the search for possible new resonances of higher mass. The requirement for high performance electromagnetic calorimetry therefore remains high during LHC Run II. Following the excellent performance achieved in Run~I at a center of mass energy of 7 and 8 TeV, the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) started operating at the LHC in Spring 2015 with proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV center-of-mass energy. The instantaneous luminosity delivered by the LHC during Run~II is expected to exceed the levels achieved in Run I, using 25 ns bunch spacing. The average number of concurrent proton-proton collisions per bu...

  4. Beauty and charm rare decays at the LHC: prospects for Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Fiorendi, Sara; De Sanctis, Umberto

    2016-01-01

    The main results on the searches for rare decays of B and D mesons from ATLAS, CMS and LHCb experiments are summarised in this report. Particular attention will be given to the measurements performed by at least two of the three experiments, where common aspects and differences are highlighted. Detector improvements and perspectives of the three experiments for Run II ongoing data campaign are also discussed.

  5. The 1994 Fermilab Fixed Target Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrad, J.

    1994-11-01

    This paper highlights the results of the Fermilab Fixed Target Program that were announced between October, 1993 and October, 1994. These results are drawn from 18 experiments that took data in the 1985, 1987 and 1990/91 fixed target running periods. For this discussion, the Fermilab Fixed Target Program is divided into 5 major topics: hadron structure, precision electroweak measurements, heavy quark production, polarization and magnetic moments, and searches for new phenomena. However, it should be noted that most experiments span several subtopics. Also, measurements within each subtopic often affect the results in other subtopics. For example, parton distributions from hadron structure measurements are used in the studies of heavy quark production

  6. Evaluation of CCTF Core-II second acceptance Test C2-AC2 (Run 052)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okubo, Tsutomu; Murao, Yoshio

    1984-03-01

    In order to investigate the thermo-hydrodynamic behavior in a PWR during the reflood phase of the LOCA, large scale reflooding tests have been conducted at JAERI using the CCTF Core-I and Core-II facilities. This report presents the investigation on the difference in the thermo-hydrodynamic behavior observed between in the CCTF Core-I and Core-II facilities. For this purpose the test data of the second CCTF Core-II acceptance test C2-AC2 (Run 052) were evaluated by using the data of the Test CL-21 (Run 040) in the Core-I test series. The experimental conditions for these two tests were almost identical. Comparing the data of those two tests, the following is obtained. 1. The system behavior observed in the Core-II facility was nearly identical to that observed in the Core-I facility. 2. The core behavior observed in the Core-II facility was also nearly identical to that observed in the Core-I facility except for the top quenching behavior. 3. The differences in the top quenching behavior between the two facilities were as follows: (1) The selective occurrence of top quenching below the open holes of the upper core support plate observed in the Core-I facility was not observed in the Core-II facility. (2) Top quenching tended to occur less in the Core-II facility in the region where the initial average linear power density was over 1.69 kW/m. (author)

  7. Cloud services for the Fermilab scientific stakeholders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timm, S; Garzoglio, G; Mhashilkar, P

    2015-01-01

    As part of the Fermilab/KISTI cooperative research project, Fermilab has successfully run an experimental simulation workflow at scale on a federation of Amazon Web Services (AWS), FermiCloud, and local FermiGrid resources. We used the CernVM-FS (CVMFS) file system to deliver the application software. We established Squid caching servers in AWS as well, using the Shoal system to let each individual virtual machine find the closest squid server. We also developed an automatic virtual machine conversion system so that we could transition virtual machines made on FermiCloud to Amazon Web Services. We used this system to successfully run a cosmic ray simulation of the NOvA detector at Fermilab, making use of both AWS spot pricing and network bandwidth discounts to minimize the cost. On FermiCloud we also were able to run the workflow at the scale of 1000 virtual machines, using a private network routable inside of Fermilab. We present in detail the technological improvements that were used to make this work a reality. (paper)

  8. CPS and the Fermilab farms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fausey, M.R.

    1992-06-01

    Cooperative Processes Software (CPS) is a parallel programming toolkit developed at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. It is the most recent product in an evolution of systems aimed at finding a cost-effective solution to the enormous computing requirements in experimental high energy physics. Parallel programs written with CPS are large-grained, which means that the parallelism occurs at the subroutine level, rather than at the traditional single line of code level. This fits the requirements of high energy physics applications, such as event reconstruction, or detector simulations, quite well. It also satisfies the requirements of applications in many other fields. One example is in the pharmaceutical industry. In the field of computational chemistry, the process of drug design may be accelerated with this approach. CPS programs run as a collection of processes distributed over many computers. CPS currently supports a mixture of heterogeneous UNIX-based workstations which communicate over networks with TCP/IR CPS is most suited for jobs with relatively low I/O requirements compared to CPU. The CPS toolkit supports message passing remote subroutine calls, process synchronization, bulk data transfers, and a mechanism called process queues, by which one process can find another which has reached a particular state. The CPS software supports both batch processing and computer center operations. The system is currently running in production mode on two farms of processors at Fermilab. One farm consists of approximately 90 IBM RS/6000 model 320 workstations, and the other has 85 Silicon Graphics 4D/35 workstations. This paper first briefly describes the history of parallel processing at Fermilab which lead to the development of CPS. Then the CPS software and the CPS Batch queueing system are described. Finally, the experiences of using CPS in production on the Fermilab processor farms are described

  9. CPS and the Fermilab farms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fausey, M.R.

    1992-06-01

    Cooperative Processes Software (CPS) is a parallel programming toolkit developed at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. It is the most recent product in an evolution of systems aimed at finding a cost-effective solution to the enormous computing requirements in experimental high energy physics. Parallel programs written with CPS are large-grained, which means that the parallelism occurs at the subroutine level, rather than at the traditional single line of code level. This fits the requirements of high energy physics applications, such as event reconstruction, or detector simulations, quite well. It also satisfies the requirements of applications in many other fields. One example is in the pharmaceutical industry. In the field of computational chemistry, the process of drug design may be accelerated with this approach. CPS programs run as a collection of processes distributed over many computers. CPS currently supports a mixture of heterogeneous UNIX-based workstations which communicate over networks with TCP/IR CPS is most suited for jobs with relatively low I/O requirements compared to CPU. The CPS toolkit supports message passing remote subroutine calls, process synchronization, bulk data transfers, and a mechanism called process queues, by which one process can find another which has reached a particular state. The CPS software supports both batch processing and computer center operations. The system is currently running in production mode on two farms of processors at Fermilab. One farm consists of approximately 90 IBM RS/6000 model 320 workstations, and the other has 85 Silicon Graphics 4D/35 workstations. This paper first briefly describes the history of parallel processing at Fermilab which lead to the development of CPS. Then the CPS software and the CPS Batch queueing system are described. Finally, the experiences of using CPS in production on the Fermilab processor farms are described.

  10. MAX: an expert system for running the modular transport code APOLLO II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loussouarn, O.; Ferraris, C.; Boivineau, A.

    1990-01-01

    MAX is an expert system built to help users of the APOLLO II code to prepare the input data deck to run a job. APOLLO II is a modular transport-theory code for calculating the neutron flux in various geometries. The associated GIBIANE command language allows the user to specify the physical structure and the computational method to be used in the calculation. The purpose of MAX is to bring into play expertise in both neutronic and computing aspects of the code, as well as various computational schemes, in order to generate automatically a batch data set corresponding to the APOLLO II calculation desired by the user. MAX is implemented on the SUN 3/60 workstation with the S1 tool and graphic interface external functions

  11. Rare KL decays at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnetzer, St.

    1997-01-01

    Recent results and the future prospects for rare K L decay at Fermilab are described. A summary of all rare decay results from E799 Phase I (the 1991 run) are presented. Three new results: K L → e + e - μ + μ - , K L → π 0 μe, and π 0 → e + e - e + e - are discussed in detail. Improvements for KTeV (the 1996-1997 run) are discussed and the expected sensitivities listed. Finally, the KAMI program for rare decays with the Main Injector (2000 and beyond) is presented with emphasis on a search for the decay K L → π 0 νν-bar at O(10 -12 ) single-event-sensitivity. (author)

  12. Fermilab back in business

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    The implementation of the energy saver into the Fermilab accelerator is described by which protons can be accelerated to 500 GeV. Furthermore the new experimental areas and the extraction system are described. (HSI).

  13. Hadron physics at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferbel, T.

    1976-01-01

    Recent experimental results from studies of hadron interactions at Fermilab are surveyed. Elastic, total and charge-exchange cross section measurements, diffractive phenomena, and inclusive production, using nuclear as well as hydrogen targets, are discussed in these lectures

  14. Experimental program at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanovic, D.

    1974-01-01

    The experimental program at Fermilab is briefly surveyed: accelerators and experimental areas, current experiments such as elastic scattering of π +- , K +- , p +- , on proton and deuteron total cross sections, neutrino physics, high transverse momentum [fr

  15. Stochastic cooling at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marriner, J.

    1986-08-01

    The topics discussed are the stochastic cooling systems in use at Fermilab and some of the techniques that have been employed to meet the particular requirements of the anti-proton source. Stochastic cooling at Fermilab became of paramount importance about 5 years ago when the anti-proton source group at Fermilab abandoned the electron cooling ring in favor of a high flux anti-proton source which relied solely on stochastic cooling to achieve the phase space densities necessary for colliding proton and anti-proton beams. The Fermilab systems have constituted a substantial advance in the techniques of cooling including: large pickup arrays operating at microwave frequencies, extensive use of cryogenic techniques to reduce thermal noise, super-conducting notch filters, and the development of tools for controlling and for accurately phasing the system

  16. Novel Real-time Calibration and Alignment Procedure for LHCb Run II

    CERN Multimedia

    Prouve, Claire

    2016-01-01

    In order to achieve optimal detector performance the LHCb experiment has introduced a novel real-time detector alignment and calibration strategy for Run II of the LHC. For the alignment tasks, data is collected and processed at the beginning of each fill while the calibrations are performed for each run. This real time alignment and calibration allows the same constants being used in both the online and offline reconstruction, thus improving the correlation between triggered and offline selected events. Additionally the newly computed alignment and calibration constants can be instantly used in the trigger, making it more efficient. The online alignment and calibration of the RICH detectors also enable the use of hadronic particle identification in the trigger. The computing time constraints are met through the use of a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the LHCb trigger. An overview of all alignment and calibration tasks is presented and their performance is shown.

  17. The CMS Level-1 tau lepton and Vector Boson Fusion triggers for the LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Amendola, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    The CMS experiment implements a sophisticated two-level triggering system composed of Level-1, instrumented by custom-design hardware boards, and a software High-Level-Trigger. A new Level-1 trigger architecture with improved performance is now being used to maintain the thresholds that were used in LHC Run I for the more challenging luminosity conditions experienced during Run II. The upgrades to the calorimetry trigger will be described along with performance data. The algorithms for the selection of final states with tau leptons, both for precision measurements and for searches of new physics beyond the Standard Model, will be described in detail. The implementation of the first dedicated Vector Boson Fusion trigger algorithm will be presented as well, along with its performance on benchmark physics signals.

  18. Electrons and photons at High Level Trigger in CMS for Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Bin Anuar, Afiq Aizuddin

    2015-01-01

    The CMS experiment has been designed with a 2-level trigger system. The first level is implemented using custom-designed electronics. The second level is the so-called High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. For Run II of the Large Hadron Collider, the increase in center-of-mass energy and luminosity will raise the event rate to a level challenging for the HLT algorithms. New approaches have been studied to keep the HLT output rate manageable while maintaining thresholds low enough to cover physics analyses. The strategy mainly relies on porting online the ingredients that have been successfully applied in the offline reconstruction, thus allowing to move HLT selection closer to offline cuts. Improvements in HLT electron and photon definitions will be presented, focusing in particular on updated clustering algorithm and the energy calibration procedure, new Particle-Flow-based isolation approach and pileup mitigation techniques, a...

  19. FERMILAB: Bob Wilson 80

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    On March 4, an international symposium and tribute was held at Fermilab in honour of the Laboratory's founding director Robert Rathbun Wilson on the occasion of his 80th birthday. The symposium - 'Celebrating an Era of Courage and Creativity' - featured talks and reflections by many of Wilson's colleagues and friends including Fermilab Director John Peoples and Director Emeritus Leon Lederman

  20. Fermilab Main Injector plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1990-07-15

    The Fermilab Main Injector is the centrepiece of the 'Fermilab III' scheme to significantly upgrade the Laboratory's existing accelerator complex. The new accelerator is designed to provide increased particle beam levels to boost the collision rate in the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider (luminosity in excess of 5 x 10{sup 31} per sq cm per s) and, if approved, would provide increased flexibility in all areas of high energy physics research.

  1. Fermilab Research Program Workbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubinstein, R.

    1984-05-01

    The Fermilab Research Program Workbook has been published annually for the past several years to assist the Physics Advisory Committee in the yearly program review conducted during its summer meeting. While this is still a major aim, it is hoped that the Workbook will also prove useful to others seeking information on the current status of Fermilab experiments and the properties of beams at the Laboratory. In addition, short summaries of approved experiments are also included

  2. Fermilab Main Injector plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The Fermilab Main Injector is the centrepiece of the 'Fermilab III' scheme to significantly upgrade the Laboratory's existing accelerator complex. The new accelerator is designed to provide increased particle beam levels to boost the collision rate in the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider (luminosity in excess of 5 x 10 31 per sq cm per s) and, if approved, would provide increased flexibility in all areas of high energy physics research

  3. Constraining top quark effective theory in the LHC Run II era

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, Andy; Englert, Christoph; Ferrando, James; Miller, David J.; Moore, Liam; Russell, Michael; White, Chris D. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, University of Glasgow,Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Collaboration: The TopFitter collaboration

    2016-04-04

    We perform an up-to-date global fit of top quark effective theory to experimental data from the Tevatron, and from LHC Runs I and II. Experimental data includes total cross-sections up to 13 TeV, as well as differential distributions, for both single top and pair production. We also include the top quark width, charge asymmetries, and polarisation information from top decay products. We present bounds on the coefficients of dimension six operators, and examine the interplay between inclusive and differential measurements, and Tevatron/LHC data. All results are currently in good agreement with the Standard Model.

  4. Measurement of the inclusive jet cross section using the midpoint algorithm in Run II at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Group, Robert Craig [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2006-01-01

    A measurement is presented of the inclusive jet cross section using the Midpoint jet clustering algorithm in five different rapidity regions. This is the first analysis which measures the inclusive jet cross section using the Midpoint algorithm in the forward region of the detector. The measurement is based on more than 1 fb-1 of integrated luminosity of Run II data taken by the CDF experiment at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The results are consistent with the predictions of perturbative quantum chromodynamics.

  5. Novel real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector in Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Z., E-mail: zhirui.xu@epfl.ch; Tobin, M.

    2016-07-11

    An automatic real-time alignment and calibration strategy of the LHCb detector was developed for the Run II. Thanks to the online calibration, tighter event selection criteria can be used in the trigger. Furthermore, the online calibration facilitates the use of hadronic particle identification using the Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors at the trigger level. The motivation for a real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector is discussed from both the operational and physics performance points of view. Specific challenges of this novel configuration are discussed, as well as the working procedures of the framework and its performance.

  6. Novel real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector in Run II

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2086132; Tobin, Mark

    2016-01-01

    An automatic real-time alignment and calibration strategy of the LHCb detector was developed for the Run II. Thanks to the online calibration, tighter event selection criteria can be used in the trigger. Furthermore, the online calibration facilitates the use of hadronic particle identification using the Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors at the trigger level. The motivation for a real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector is discussed from both the operational and physics performance points of view. Specific challenges of this novel configuration are discussed, as well as the working procedures of the framework and its performance.

  7. Performance of the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter in Run II and its role in the measurement of the Higgs boson properties

    CERN Document Server

    Organtini, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    The characterisation of the Higgs boson discovered in 2012 around 125 GeV, and confirmed with the data collected in Run II, requires the precise determination of its mass, width and couplings. The electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) of the Compact Muon Solenoid Experiment (CMS) is crucial for measurements in the highest resolution channels, $H\\to \\gamma \\gamma$ and $H\\to 4$ leptons. In particular the energy resolution, the scale uncertainty and the position resolution for electrons and photons are required to be as good as possible.During Run II the LHC is continuously operating with 25 ns bunch spacing and increasing instantaneous luminosity. The calorimeter reconstruction algorithm has been adapted to cope with increasing levels of pile-up and the calibration and monitoring strategy have been optimised to maintain the excellent performance of the CMS ECAL throughout Run II. We show first performance results from the Run II data taking periods, achieved through energy calibrations using physics events, with...

  8. $t\\bar{t}$ Production in Multijet Events at CDF (RunII)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gresele, Ambra Alessia [Univ. of Bologna (Italy)

    2003-03-14

    This thesis describes the all hadronic $t\\bar{t}$ analysis on the ~100 pb-1 of data collected so far by the CDF experiment (chapter 2 and chapter 3) in the $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 2 TeV of Tevatron (Fermilab).

  9. Run II performance of luminosity and beam condition monitors at CMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, Jessica Lynn [DESY, Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The BRIL (Beam Radiation Instrumentation and Luminosity) system of CMS consists of instrumentation to measure the luminosity online and offline, and to monitor the LHC beam conditions inside CMS. An accurate luminosity measurement is essential to the CMS physics program, and measurement of the beam background is necessary to ensure safe operation of CMS. Many of the BRIL subsystems have been upgraded and others have been added for LHC Run II to complement the existing measurements. The beam condition monitor (BCM) consists of several sets of diamond sensors used to measure online luminosity and beam background with a single-bunch-crossing resolution. The BCM also detects when beam conditions become unfavorable for CMS running and may trigger a beam abort to protect the detector. The beam halo monitor (BHM) uses quartz bars to measure the background of the incoming beams at larger radii. The pixel luminosity telescope (PLT) consists of telescopes of silicon sensors designed to provide a CMS online and offline luminosity measurement. In addition, the forward hadronic calorimeter (HF) delivers an independent luminosity measurement, making the whole system robust and allowing for cross-checks of the systematics. An overview of the performance during 2015 LHC running for the new/updated BRIL subsystems will be given, including the uncertainties of the luminosity measurements.

  10. Identifying a light charged Higgs boson at the LHC Run II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdesslam Arhrib

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We analyse the phenomenological implications of a light Higgs boson, h, within the CP-conserving 2-Higgs Doublet Model (2HDM Type-I, for the detection prospects of the charged H± state at Run II of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC, assuming s=13 TeV as energy and O(100 fb−1 as luminosity. When sufficiently light, this h state can open up the bosonic decay channel H±→W±(⁎h, which may have a branching ratio significantly exceeding those of the H±→τν and H±→cs channels. We perform a broad scan of the 2HDM Type-I parameter space, assuming the heavier of the two CP-even Higgs bosons, H, to be the observed SM-like state with a mass near 125 GeV. Through these scans we highlight regions in which mH±Run II.

  11. The discovery of the b quark at Fermilab in 1977: The experiment coordinator close-quote s story

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoh, J.

    1998-01-01

    I present the history of the discovery of the Upsilon (Υ) particle (the first member of the b-quark family to be observed) at Fermilab in 1977 by the CFS (Columbia-Fermilab-Stony Brook collaboration) E288 experiment headed by Leon Lederman. We found the first evidence of the Υ in November 1976 in an early phase of E288. The subsequent discovery in the spring of 1977 resulted from an upgraded E288 emdash the μμII phase, optimized for dimuons, with about 100 times the sensitivity of the previous investigatory dimuon phase (which had been optimized for dielectrons). The events leading to the discovery, the planning of μμII and the running, including a misadventure (the infamous Shunt Fire of May 1977), are described. Some discussions of the aftermath, a summary, and an acknowledgment list end this brief historical note. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  12. Data acquisition systems at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Votava, M.

    1999-01-01

    Experiments at Fermilab require an ongoing program of development for high speed, distributed data acquisition systems. The physics program at the lab has recently started the operation of a Fixed Target run in which experiments are running the DART[1] data acquisition system. The CDF and D experiments are preparing for the start of the next Collider run in mid 2000. Each will read out on the order of 1 million detector channels. In parallel, future experiments such as BTeV R ampersand D and Minos have already started prototype and test beam work. BTeV in particular has challenging data acquisition system requirements with an input rate of 1500 Gbytes/sec into Level 1 buffers and a logging rate of 200 Mbytes/sec. This paper will present a general overview of these data acquisition systems on three fronts those currently in use, those to be deployed for the Collider Run in 2000, and those proposed for future experiments. It will primarily focus on the CDF and D architectures and tools

  13. Measurement of the cross section for prompt isolated diphoton production using the full CDF run II data sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; De Barbaro, P; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Eusebi, R; Farrington, S; Fernández Ramos, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Funakoshi, Y; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González López, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hocker, A; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kim, Y J; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lipeles, E; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Martínez, M; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parker, W; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Prokoshin, F; Pranko, A; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Ranjan, N; Redondo Fernández, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Riddick, T; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Sorin, V; Song, H; Stancari, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vernieri, C; Vidal, M; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2013-03-08

    This Letter reports a measurement of the cross section for producing pairs of central prompt isolated photons in proton-antiproton collisions at a total energy sqrt[s] = 1.96 TeV using data corresponding to 9.5 fb(-1) integrated luminosity collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The measured differential cross section is compared to three calculations derived from the theory of strong interactions. These include a prediction based on a leading order matrix element calculation merged with a parton shower model, a next-to-leading order calculation, and a next-to-next-to-leading order calculation. The first and last calculations reproduce most aspects of the data, thus showing the importance of higher-order contributions for understanding the theory of strong interaction and improving measurements of the Higgs boson and searches for new phenomena in diphoton final states.

  14. Fermilab's quest to keep power

    CERN Multimedia

    Kunz, Tona

    2005-01-01

    Fermilab wants to build a new collider, but first it must secure federal funding. Fermilab officials have set an ambitious goal of research and development paired with politicking for the next few years (3 pages)

  15. Recent results from Fermilab E769

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, C.

    1990-01-01

    Fermilab Experiment E769 obtained a data sample of 400M events during the 1987-88 Fixed Target run using a 250 GeV hadron beam incident on a target consisting of thin foils of W, Cu, Al and Be. Preliminary results on the atomic number, Feynman x and p t 2 dependence of D + production based on 25% of the total data sample are presented

  16. Hadroproduction of charm at Fermilab E769

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, G.A.; Anjos, J.C.; de Mello Neto, J.R.T.; de Miranda, J.M.; da Motta, H.; dos Reis, A.C.; Santoro, A.F.S.; Souza, M.H.G.; Appel, J.A.; Dixon, R.L.; Fenker, H.C.; Green, D.R.; Kwan, S.; Lueking, L.H.; Mantsch, P.M.; Spalding, W.J.; Stoughton, C.; Streetman, M.E.; Bracker, S.B.; Gay, C.; Jedicke, R.; Luste, G.J.; Cremaldi, L.M.; Summers, D.J.; Errede, D.; Sheaff, M.; Kaplan, D.; Leedom, I.; Reucroft, S.; Karchin, P.E.; Ross, W.R.; Wu, Z.; Metheny, J.; Milburn, R.H.; Napier, A.; de Oliveira, A.B.

    1990-01-01

    Experiment E769 at Fermilab obtained charm hadroproduction data during the 1987-88 Fixed Target running period with a 250 GeV hadron beam incident on thin target foils of Be, Al, Cu, and W. From an analysis of 25% of the recorded 400M trigger sample we have explored the Feynman x, p t 2 and the atomic number dependence of charm quark production using samples of D + and D 0 mesons. 7 refs., 4 figs

  17. First events and prospects at the Fermilab collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binkley, M.

    1986-03-01

    A brief description of the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is given including the detector components and the data acquisition system. The first test run, the first events, and the performance of the detector are discussed. Finally the prospects for future running are reviewed

  18. Fermilab at 50

    CERN Document Server

    Lykken, Joseph David

    2018-01-01

    Fermilab — originally called the National Accelerator Laboratory — began operations in Illinois on June 15, 1967. Operated and managed by The University of Chicago and Universities Research Association, LLC for the US Department of Energy, it has the distinction of being the only US national laboratory solely dedicated to the advancement of high-energy particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. It has been the site of major discoveries and observations: the top and bottom quarks; the tau neutrino; direct CP violation in kaon decays; a quasar 27 billion light years away from us; origin of high-energy cosmic rays; and confirmation of the evidence of dark energy, among others. For 25 years it operated the world's highest energy particle collider, the Tevatron. Fermilab contributed collaboratively to the Tevatron's successor, the Large Hadron Collider, which discovered the Higgs boson in 2012. Fermilab's core competencies in accelerators, superconducting technologies, detectors and computing have positione...

  19. Message from Fermilab Director

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    With this issue’s message, Fermilab Director Pier Oddone opens a new series of occasional exchanges between CERN and other laboratories world-wide. As part of this exchange, CERN Director-General Rolf Heuer, wrote a message in Tuesday’s edition of Fermilab TodayPerspectivesNothing is more important for our worldwide particle physics community than successfully turning on the LHC later this year. The promise for great discoveries is huge, and many of the plans for our future depend on LHC results. Those of us planning national programmes in anticipation of data from the LHC face formidable challenges to develop future facilities that are complementary to the LHC, whatever the physics discoveries may be. At Fermilab, this has led us to move forcefully with a programme at the intensity frontier, where experiments with neutrinos and rare decays open a complementary window into nature. Our ultimate goal for a unified picture of nat...

  20. The Fermilab antihydrogen program

    CERN Document Server

    Mandelkern, M A

    1999-01-01

    The antihydrogen atom, the bound state of an antiproton and a positron, is the antiparticle of the hydrogen stem. Until very recently no antimatter atoms had been observed. Experiments at CERN and Fermilab have reported observations of small amounts of antihydrogen but are in sharp disagreement. At Fermilab we have produced a background-free sample of 66 atoms. CPT invariance predicts that the spectrum and the lifetimes of antihydrogen states are identical to those of hydrogen. This fundamental symmetry has not been tested in atoms. Experiments for the further study of antihydrogen are planned for both laboratories. At CERN a new antiproton accumulator is expected to facilitate the trapping of cold antihydrogen, followed by high precision spectroscopic measurements. At Fermilab an interferometric technique analogous to measurement of the K/sub S/K/sub L/ mass difference will be used to determine the n =2 antihydrogen spectrum using a beam of high momentum antihydrogen atoms. (11 refs).

  1. ASIC design at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarema, R.

    1991-06-01

    In the past few years, ASIC (Application Specific Integrated Circuit) design has become important at Fermilab. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the in-house ASIC design activity which has taken place. This design effort has added much value to the high energy physics program and physics capability at Fermilab. The two approaches to ASIC development being pursued at Fermilab are examined by looking at some of the types of projects where ASICs are being used or contemplated. To help estimate the cost of future designs, a cost comparison is given to show the relative development and production expenses for these two ASIC approaches. 5 refs., 14 figs., 7 tabs

  2. Fermilab and Latin America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lederman, Leon M.

    2006-01-01

    As Director of Fermilab, starting in 1979, I began a series of meetings with scientists in Latin America. The motivation was to stir collaboration in the field of high energy particle physics, the central focus of Fermilab. In the next 13 years, these Pan American Symposia stirred much discussion of the use of modern physics, created several groups to do collaborative research at Fermilab, and often centralized facilities and, today, still provides the possibility for much more productive North-South collaboration in research and education. In 1992, I handed these activities over to the AAAS, as President. This would, I hoped, broaden areas of collaboration. Such collaboration is unfortunately very sensitive to political events. In a rational world, it would be the rewards, cultural and economic, of collaboration that would modulate political relations. We are not there yet

  3. QA at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodnarczuk, M.

    1988-01-01

    This paper opens with a brief overview of the purpose of Fermilab and historical synopsis of the development and current status of quality assurance (QA) at the Laboratory. The paper subsequently addresses some of the more important aspects of interpreting the national standard ANSI/ASME NQA-1 in pure research environments like Fermilab. Highlights of this discussion include, (1) what is hermeneutics and why are hermeneutical considerations relevant for QA, (2) a critical analysis of NQA-1 focussing on teleological aspects of the standard, (3) a description of the hermeneutical approach to NQA-1 used at Fermilab which attempts to capture the true intents of the document without violating the deeply ingrained traditions of quality standards and peer review that have been foundational to the overall success of the paradigms of high-energy physics.

  4. Evaluation report on CCTF Core-II reflood test C2-4 (Run 62)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okubo, Tsutomu; Iguchi, Tadashi; Sugimoto, Jun; Akimoto, Hajime; Murao, Yoshio; Okabe, Kazuharu.

    1985-03-01

    This report presents a data evaluation of the CCTF Core-II test C2-4 (Run 62), which was conducted on May 12, 1983. This test was conducted to investigate the reproducibility of tests in the CCTF Core-II test series. Therefore, the initial and boundary conditions of the present test were determined to be the same as those for the previously performed base case test (Test C2-SH1). Comparing the data of the present test with those of Test C2-SH1, the following results are obtained. (1) The initial and boundary conditions for the two tests were nearly identical except the temperature of the core barrel and the lower plenum fluid. The difference in the latter is considered to result in the difference in the core inlet subcooling of about 6 K at most. (2) The system behavior was almost identical. (3) The core cooling behavior was also nearly identical except a little difference in the rod surface temperature in the upper part of the high power region. (4) Taking account that the difference mentioned above in item (3) is small and can be explained qualitatively to be caused by the difference in the core inlet subcooling mentioned above in item (1), it is considered practically that there is the reproducibility of the thermo-hydrodynamic behavior in the CCTF Core-II tests. (author)

  5. Observation of Exclusive Dijet Production at the Fermilab Tevatron p-pbar Collider

    OpenAIRE

    CDF Collaboration; Aaltonen, T.

    2007-01-01

    We present the first observation and cross section measurement of exclusive dijet production in pbar-p interactions, pbar + p --> pbar + dijet + p. Using a data sample of 310 pb-1 collected by the Run II Collider Detector at Fermilab at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV, exclusive cross sections for events with two jets of transverse energy ET >= 10 GeV have been measured as a function of minimum ET(jet). The exclusive signal is extracted from fits to data distributions based on Monte Carlo simulations of exp...

  6. Measurement of B(t --> Wb)/B(t--> Wq) at the collider detector at fermilab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Arguin, J-F; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barker, G J; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Casarsa, M; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chapman, J; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chuang, S; Chung, K; Chung, W-H; Chung, Y S; Cijliak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A G; Clark, D; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cranshaw, J; Cuevas, J; Cruz, A; Culbertson, R; Currat, C; Cyr, D; Dagenhart, D; Da Ronco, S; D'Auria, S; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; de Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; DiTuro, P; Dörr, C; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Donega, M; Donini, J; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Ebina, K; Efron, J; Ehlers, J; Erbacher, R; Erdmann, M; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H-C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R D; Flanagan, G; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Fujii, Y; Furic, I; Gajjar, A; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D W; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, D; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Hayward, H; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hoffman, K D; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M A; Huffman, B T; Huang, Y; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Ikado, K; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Issever, C; Ivanov, A; Iwata, Y; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Unel, M Karagoz; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, M S; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Kong, D J; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Kordas, K; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreymer, A; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecci, C; Lecompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McGivern, D; McIntyre, P M; McNamara, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, L; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Mills, C; Miquel, R; Miscetti, S; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Fernandez, P A Movilla; Muelmenstaedt, J; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Muller, T; Mumford, R; Munar, A; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Napora, R; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohsugi, T; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Orejudos, W; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K T; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, M A; Rakitine, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Ray, H; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Rinnert, K; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Ruiz, A; Ryan, D; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; St Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Semeria, F; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smirnov, D; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S V; Spalding, J; Spezziga, M; Spinella, F; Squillacioti, P; Stadie, H; Stanitzki, M; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Takano, H; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tanimoto, N; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tesarek, R J; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vacavant, L; Vaiciulis, A; Varganov, A; Vejcik, S; Velev, G; Veszpremi, V; Veramendi, G; Vickey, T; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; von der Mey, M; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Wan, Z; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wolter, M; Worcester, M; Worm, S; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wyatt, A; Yagil, A; Yamashita, T; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yao, W; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2005-09-02

    We present a measurement of the ratio of top-quark branching fractions R = B(t --> Wb)/B(t --> Wq), where q can be a b, s, or a d quark, using lepton-plus-jets and dilepton data sets with an integrated luminosity of approximately 162 pb(-1) collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab during Run II of the Tevatron. The measurement is derived from the relative numbers of tt events with different multiplicity of identified secondary vertices. We set a lower limit of R > 0.61 at 95% confidence level.

  7. Measurement of B(t→ b)/B(t→Wq) at the collider detector at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acosta, D.

    2005-01-01

    We present a measurement of the ratio of top-quark branching fractions R = Β(t → Wb)/Β(t → Wq) using lepton-plus-jets and dilepton data sets with integrated luminosity of ∼162 pb -1 collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab during Run II of the Tevatron. The measurement is derived from the relative numbers of t(bar t) events with different multiplicity of identified secondary vertices. We set a lower limit of R > 0.61 at 95% confidence level

  8. Control system for Fermilab`s low temperature upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, B.L.

    1996-09-01

    Fermilab recently upgraded the Tevatron Cryogenic Systems to allow for lower temperature operation. This Lower Temperature Upgrade grew out of a desire to increase the Colliding Beam Physics energy from 900 GeV to 1000 GeV. A key element in achieving this goal is the new cryogenic control system designed at Fermilab and installed in 24 satellite refrigerators and 8 compressor buildings. The cryogenic improvements and addition hardware like cold compressors exceeded the capability of the original distributed controls package. The new distributed controls package uses a Multibus II platform and Intel`s 80386 microprocessor. Token Ring is used as the link to the systems 6 primary crate locations with Arcnet used as the connection to the systems numerous I/O crates. I/0 capabilities are double the capabilities of the original system. Software has also been upgraded with the introduction of more flexible control loop strategies and Finite State Machines used for automatic sequential control, like quench recovery or cold compressor pump down.

  9. Fermilab's DART DA system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pordes, R.; Anderson, J.; Berg, D.; Black, D.; Forster, R.; Franzen, J.; Kent, S.; Kwarciany, R.; Meadows, J.; Moore, C.

    1994-04-01

    DART is the new data acquisition system designed and implemented for six Fermilab experiments by the Fermilab Computing Division and the experiments themselves. The complexity of the experiments varies greatly. Their data taking throughput and event filtering requirements range from a few (2-5) to tens (80) of CAMAC, FASTBUS and home built front end crates; from a few 100 KByte/sec to 160 MByte/sec front end data collection rates; and from 0-3000 Mips of level 3 processing. The authors report on the architecture and implementation of DART to this date, and the hardware and software components that are being developed and supported

  10. Fermilab Education Office - Director's Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Search The Director's Award Exceptional Service To Fermilab's K-12 Education Programs The many successes of Fermilab's K-12 education programs depend on the talents of the over 200 employees, users, and $1,000, made possible by an anonymous donor to Fermilab Friends for Science Education, recognizes one

  11. Novel methods and expected run II performance of ATLAS track reconstruction in dense environments

    CERN Document Server

    Jansky, Roland Wolfgang; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Detailed understanding and optimal track reconstruction performance of ATLAS in the core of high pT objects is paramount for a number of techniques such as jet energy and mass calibration, jet flavour tagging, and hadronic tau identification as well as measurements of physics quantities like jet fragmentation functions. These dense environments are characterized by charged particle separations on the order of the granularity of ATLAS’s inner detector. With the insertion of a new innermost layer in this tracking detector, which allows measurements closer to the interaction point, and an increase in the centre of mass energy, these difficult environments will become even more relevant in Run II, such as in searches for heavy resonances. Novel algorithmic developments to the ATLAS track reconstruction software targeting these topologies as well as the expected improved performance will be presented.

  12. Boosted $H\\rightarrow b \\bar{b}$ Tagger in Run II

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00394595; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Many searches for Higgs bosons decaying to b quark pairs benefit from the increased Run II centre of mass energy by exploiting the large transverse momentum (boosted) Higgs boson regime, where the two b-jets are merged into one large radius jet. ATLAS uses a boosted $H \\rightarrow b\\bar{b}$ tagger algorithm to separate Higgs signal from background processes (QCD, W and Z bosons, top quarks). The tagger takes as input a large R=1.0 jet with calibrated pseudorapidity, energy and mass scale. It employs b-tagging, Higgs candidate mass, and substructure information. The performance of several operating points in Higgs boson signal, QCD and $t\\bar{t}$ all-hadronic backgrounds are presented. Systematic uncertainties are evaluated so that this tagger can be used in analyses.

  13. B-Physics at CMS with LHC Run-II and Beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Kai-Feng

    2015-01-01

    The LHC is entering into operation with an increased centre-of-mass energy of 13~TeV, and within the next 3 years of operations (Run-II) the foreseen integrated luminosity delivered to CMS will be about 100 fb$^{-1}$. The B hadron production cross section is expected to nearly double at this energy, thus potentially increasing by almost one order of magnitude the collected statistics relative to the previous operation period. This will enable CMS to perform enhanced measurements in the B-physics sector. A further increase in integrated luminosity is expected to occur in two more steps after the second LHC long shutdown (LS) in 2018 and the third LS in 2021, thus enabling to significantly improve the precision of several B-physics measurements, including $B_s(B_d)\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$, and search for rarer decays. This proceeding reports on the prospects for B-physics measurements with high statistics data at CMS.

  14. Search for the neutral MSSM Higgs bosons in the ditau decay channels at CDF Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almenar, Cristobal Cuenca [Univ. of Valencia (Spain)

    2008-04-01

    This thesis presents the results on a search for the neutral MSSM Higgs bosons decaying to tau pairs, with least one of these taus decays leptonically. The search was performed with a sample of 1.8 fb-1 of proton-antiproton collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV provided by the Tevatron and collected by CDF Run II. No significant excess over the Standard Model prediction was found and a 95% confidence level exclusion limit have been set on the cross section times branching ratio as a function of the Higgs boson mass. This limit has been translated into the MSSM Higgs sector parameter plane, tanβ vs. MA, for the four different benchmark scenarios.

  15. CMS operations for Run II preparation and commissioning of the offline infrastructure

    CERN Document Server

    Cerminara, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    The restart of the LHC coincided with an intense activity for the CMS experiment. Both at the beginning of Run II in 2015 and the restart of operations in 2016, the collaboration was engaged in an extensive re-commissioning of the CMS data-taking operations. After the long stop, the detector was fully aligned and calibrated. Data streams were redesigned, to fit the priorities dictated by the physics program for 2015 and 2016. A new reconstruction software (both online and offline) was commissioned with early collisions and further developed during the year. A massive campaign of Monte Carlo production was launched, to assist physics analyses. This presentation reviews the main event of this commissioning journey and describes the status of CMS physics performances for 2016.

  16. Scintillator manufacture at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellott, K.; Bross, A.; Pla-Dalmau, A.

    1998-08-01

    A decade of research into plastic scintillation materials at Fermilab is reviewed. Early work with plastic optical fiber fabrication is revisited and recent experiments with large-scale commercial methods for production of bulk scintillator are discussed. Costs for various forms of scintillator are examined and new development goals including cost reduction methods and quality improvement techniques are suggested.

  17. Production Farms at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischler, M.; Rinaldo, F.; Wolbers, S.

    1994-05-01

    UNIX Farms at Fermilab have been used for more than than three years to solve the problem of providing massive amounts of CPU processing power for event reconstruction. System configurations, parallel processing software, administration and allocation issues, production issues and other experiences and plans are discussed

  18. Fermilab | Publications and Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    collection of particle physics books and journals. The Library also offers a range of services including Benefits Milestones Photos and videos Latest news For the media Particle Physics Neutrinos Fermilab and the computing Quantum initiatives Research and development Key discoveries Benefits of particle physics Particle

  19. Fermilab Education Office - Contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Search The Office of Education and Public Outreach: Contacts All telephone numbers require area code Presentations for Presenters 840-3094 Office of Education and Public Outreach Spencer Pasero spasero@fnal.gov Education Office 840-3076 Fermilab Friends for Science Education General Questions Susan Dahl sdahl@fnal.gov

  20. Fermilab Education: Physicists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Search Education and Outreach: Resources and Opportunties for Fermilab employees and Users A variety of resources and opportunities are available for physicists interested in education and outreach (For general Data (6–12) Physical Science/Physics Instructional Resources (K–12) US Particle Physics Education and

  1. Fermilab | Science | Particle Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Photos and videos Latest news For the media Particle Physics Neutrinos Fermilab and the LHC Dark matter initiatives Research and development Key discoveries Benefits of particle physics Particle Accelerators society Particle Physics 101 Science of matter, energy, space and time How particle physics discovery

  2. A precise measurement of the top quark mass in dilepton final states using 9.7 fb$^{-1}$ of D{Ø} Run II data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Huanzhao [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States)

    2015-05-16

    The top quark is a very special fundamental particle in the Standard Model (SM) mainly due to its heavy mass. The top quark has extremely short lifetime and decays before hadronization. This reduces the complexity for the measurement of its mass. The top quark couples very strongly to the Higgs boson since the fermion-Higgs Yukawa coupling linearly depends on the fermion’s mass. Therefore, the top quark is also heavily involved in Higgs production and related study. A precise measurement of the top quark mass is very important, as it allows for self-consistency check of the SM, and also gives a insight about the stability of our universe in the SM context. This dissertation presents my work on the measurement of the top quark mass in dilepton final states of t$\\bar{t}$ events in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV, using the full DØ Run II data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.7 fb-1 at the Fermilab Tevatron. I extracted the top quark mass by reconstructing event kinematics, and integrating over expected neutrino rapidity distributions to obtain solutions over a scanned range of top quark mass hypotheses. The analysis features a comprehensive optimization that I made to minimize the expected statistical uncertainty. I also improve the calibration of jets in dilepton events by using the calibration determined in t$\\bar{t}$ → lepton+jets events, which reduces the otherwise limiting systematic uncertainty from the jet energy scale. The measured mass is 173.11 ± 1.34(stat)+0.83 -0.72(sys) GeV .

  3. Measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry of top-quark and antiquark pairs using the full CDF Run II data set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucà, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    We measure the forward-backward asymmetry of the production of top-quark and antiquark pairs in proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energy √{s }=1.96 TeV using the full data set collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) in Tevatron Run II corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.1 fb-1 . The asymmetry is characterized by the rapidity difference between top quarks and antiquarks (Δ y ) and measured in the final state with two charged leptons (electrons and muons). The inclusive asymmetry, corrected to the entire phase space at parton level, is measured to be AFBt t ¯=0.12 ±0.13 , consistent with the expectations from the standard model (SM) and previous CDF results in the final state with a single charged lepton. The combination of the CDF measurements of the inclusive AFBt t ¯ in both final states yields AFBt t ¯=0.160 ±0.045 , which is consistent with the SM predictions. We also measure the differential asymmetry as a function of Δ y . A linear fit to AFBt t ¯(|Δ y |), assuming zero asymmetry at Δ y =0 , yields a slope of α =0.14 ±0.15 , consistent with the SM prediction and the previous CDF determination in the final state with a single charged lepton. The combined slope of AFBt t ¯(|Δ y |) in the two final states is α =0.227 ±0.057 , which is 2.0 σ larger than the SM prediction.

  4. Breached fuel pin contamination from Run Beyond Cladding Breach (RBCB) tests in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colburn, R.P.; Strain, R.V.; Lambert, J.D.B.; Ukai, S.; Shibahara, I.

    1988-09-01

    Studies indicate there may be a large economic incentive to permit some continued reactor operation with breached fuel pin cladding. A major concern for this type of operation is the potential spread of contamination in the primary coolant system and its impact on plant maintenance. A study of the release and transport of contamination from naturally breached mixed oxide Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) fuel pins was performed as part of the US Department of Energy/Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (DOE/PNC) Run Beyond Cladding Breach (RBCB) Program at EBR-II. The measurements were made using the Breached Fuel Test Facility (BFTF) at EBR-II with replaceable deposition samplers located approximately 1.5 meters from the breached fuel test assemblies. The effluent from the test assemblies containing the breached fuel pins was routed up through the samplers and past dedicated instrumentation in the BFTF before mixing with the main coolant flow stream. This paper discusses the first three contamination tests in this program. 2 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Commissioning and First Results from the Fermilab Cryomodule Test Stand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harms, Elvin; et al.

    2017-05-01

    A new test stand dedicated to SRF cryomodule testing, CMTS1, has been commissioned and is now in operation at Fermilab. The first device to be cooled down and powered in this facility is the prototype 1.3 GHz cryomodule assembled at Fermilab for LCLS-II. We describe the demonstrated capabilities of CMTS1, report on steps taken during commissioning, provide an overview of first test results, and survey future plans.

  6. Fermilab Steering Group Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beier, Eugene; /Pennsylvania U.; Butler, Joel; /Fermilab; Dawson, Sally; /Brookhaven; Edwards, Helen; /Fermilab; Himel, Thomas; /SLAC; Holmes, Stephen; /Fermilab; Kim, Young-Kee; /Fermilab /Chicago U.; Lankford, Andrew; /UC, Irvine; McGinnis, David; /Fermilab; Nagaitsev, Sergei; /Fermilab; Raubenheimer, Tor; /SLAC /Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    The Fermilab Steering Group has developed a plan to keep U.S. accelerator-based particle physics on the pathway to discovery, both at the Terascale with the LHC and the ILC and in the domain of neutrinos and precision physics with a high-intensity accelerator. The plan puts discovering Terascale physics with the LHC and the ILC as Fermilab's highest priority. While supporting ILC development, the plan creates opportunities for exciting science at the intensity frontier. If the ILC remains near the Global Design Effort's technically driven timeline, Fermilab would continue neutrino science with the NOVA experiment, using the NuMI (Neutrinos at the Main Injector) proton plan, scheduled to begin operating in 2011. If ILC construction must wait somewhat longer, Fermilab's plan proposes SNuMI, an upgrade of NuMI to create a more powerful neutrino beam. If the ILC start is postponed significantly, a central feature of the proposed Fermilab plan calls for building an intense proton facility, Project X, consisting of a linear accelerator with the currently planned characteristics of the ILC combined with Fermilab's existing Recycler Ring and the Main Injector accelerator. The major component of Project X is the linac. Cryomodules, radio-frequency distribution, cryogenics and instrumentation for the linac are the same as or similar to those used in the ILC at a scale of about one percent of a full ILC linac. Project X's intense proton beams would open a path to discovery in neutrino science and in precision physics with charged leptons and quarks. World-leading experiments would allow physicists to address key questions of the Quantum Universe: How did the universe come to be? Are there undiscovered principles of nature: new symmetries, new physical laws? Do all the particles and forces become one? What happened to the antimatter? Building Project X's ILC-like linac would offer substantial support for ILC development by accelerating the

  7. Search for non-standard model signatures in the WZ/ZZ final state at CDF run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norman, Matthew [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    This thesis discusses a search for non-Standard Model physics in heavy diboson production in the dilepton-dijet final state, using 1.9 fb -1 of data from the CDF Run II detector. New limits are set on the anomalous coupling parameters for ZZ and WZ production based on limiting the production cross-section at high š. Additionally limits are set on the direct decay of new physics to ZZ andWZ diboson pairs. The nature and parameters of the CDF Run II detector are discussed, as are the influences that it has on the methods of our analysis.

  8. Search for non-standard model signatures in the WZ/ZZ final state at CDF Run II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    This thesis discusses a search for non-Standard Model physics in heavy diboson production in the dilepton-dijet final state, using 1.9 fb -1 of data from the CDF Run II detector. New limits are set on the anomalous coupling parameters for ZZ and WZ production based on limiting the production cross-section at high (cflx s). Additionally limits are set on the direct decay of new physics to ZZ andWZ diboson pairs. The nature and parameters of the CDF Run II detector are discussed, as are the influences that it has on the methods of our analysis.

  9. Measurement of the W Plus N Inclusive Jets Cross-Section at CDF Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stentz, Dale James [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis we present the study of the production of the W boson in association with hadronic jets at the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). Along with the electroweak properties the W boson, we examine jet kinematic variables with the aim of studying predictions of perturbative quantum chromodynamics. We derive several di erential crosssections as a function of the inclusive jet multiplicity and the transverse momenta of each jet. In this analysis, we are using 2.8 fb-1 of data and consider both the electron and muon lepton nal states for the W boson decay.

  10. PC Farms for Offline Event Reconstruction at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beretvas, A.

    1997-03-01

    Fermilab is investigating the use of PC's for HEP computing. As a first step we have built a full offline environment under Linux on a set of Pentium (P5) and Pentium Pro (P6) machines (the ''PC Farm''). The Pythia simulation has been ported to run serially and in parallel (using CPS) on the PC Farm. Fermilab software products and CDF offline packages have also been ported to Linux. Run 1 CDF data has been analyzed on both Linux and SGI (Irix) with essentially identical results. The performance of the system is compared to results with commercial UNIX systems

  11. Prospects for antiproton experiments at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, Daniel M.

    2012-01-01

    Fermilab operates the world’s most intense antiproton source. Newly proposed experiments can use those antiprotons either parasitically during Tevatron Collider running or after the end of the Tevatron Collider program. For example, the annihilation of 5 to 8 GeV antiprotons is expected to yield world-leading sensitivities to hyperon rare decays and CP violation. It could also provide the world’s most intense source of tagged D 0 mesons, and thus the best near-term opportunity to study charm mixing and, via CP violation, to search for new physics. Other measurements that could be made include properties of the X(3872) and the charmonium system. An experiment using a Penning trap and an atom interferometer could make the world’s most precise measurement of the gravitational force on antimatter. These and other potential measurements using antiprotons offer a great opportunity for a broad and exciting physics program at Fermilab in the post-Tevatron era.

  12. Online modeling of the Fermilab accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCrory, Elliott S.; Michelotti, Leo; Ostiguy, Jean-Francois

    2001-01-01

    We have implemented access to beam physics models of the Fermilab accelerators and beamlines through the Fermilab control system. The models run on Unix workstations, communicating with legacy controls software through a front end redirection mechanism (the open access server), a relational database and a simple text-based protocol over TCP/IP. The clients and the server are implemented in object-oriented C++. We discuss limitations of our approach and the difficulties that arise from it. Some of the obstacles may be overcome by introducing a new layer of abstraction. To maintain compatibility with the next generation of accelerator control software currently under development at the laboratory, this layer would be implemented in Java. We discuss the implications of that choice

  13. Dedicating Fermilab's Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1986-01-15

    It was a bold move to have a fullscale dedication ceremony for the new proton-antiproton Collider at the Fermilab Tevatron on 13 October, two days before the first collisions were seen. However the particles dutifully behaved as required, and over the following weekend the Collider delivered its goods at a total energy of 1600 GeV, significantly boosting the world record for laboratory collisions.

  14. FERMILAB: Collider detectors -2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Last month's edition (April, page 12) included a status report on data collection and preliminary physics results from the 'newcomer' DO detector at Fermilab's Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. This time the spotlight falls in the Veteran' CDF detector, in action since 1985 and meanwhile significantly upgraded. Meanwhile the Tevatron collider continues to improve, with record collision rates

  15. Performances of the ATLAS Level-1 Muon barrel trigger during the Run-II data taking

    CERN Document Server

    Sessa, Marco; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Level-1 Muon Barrel Trigger is one of the main elements of the event selection of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. It exploits the Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) detectors to generate the trigger signal. The RPCs are placed in the barrel region of the ATLAS experiment: they are arranged in three concentric double layers and operate in a strong magnetic toroidal field. RPC detectors cover the pseudo-rapidity range $|\\eta|<1.05$ for a total surface of more than $4000\\ m^2$ and about 3600 gas volumes. The Level-1 Muon Trigger in the barrel region allows to select muon candidates with respect to their transverse momentum and associates them with the correct bunch-crossing number. The trigger system is able to take a decision within a latency of about 2 $\\mu s$. The detailed measurement of the RPC detector efficiencies and of the trigger performance during the ATLAS Run-II data taking is here presented.

  16. Searching for R-parity violation at run-II of the tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allanach, B.; Banerjee, S.; Berger, E. L.; Chertok, M.; Diaz, M. A.; Dreiner, H.; Eboli, O. J. P.; Harris, B. W.; Hewett, J.; Magro, M. B.; Mondal, N. K.; Narasimham, V. S.; Navarro, L.; Parua, N.; Porod, W.; Restrepo, D. A.; Richardson, P.; Rizzo, T.; Seymour, M. H.; Sullivan, Z.; Valle, J. W. F.; Campos, F. de

    1999-01-01

    The authors present an outlook for possible discovery of supersymmetry with broken R-parity at Run II of the Tevatron. They first present a review of the literature and an update of the experimental bounds. In turn they then discuss the following processes: (1) resonant slepton production followed by R P decay, (a) via LQD c and (b) via LLE c ; (2) how to distinguish resonant slepton production from Zprime or Wprime production; (3) resonant slepton production followed by the decay to neutralino LSP, which decays via LQD c ; (4) resonant stop production followed by the decay to a chargino, which cascades to the neutralino LSP; (5) gluino pair production followed by the cascade decay to charm squarks which decay directly via L 1 Q 2 D 1 c ; (6) squark pair production followed by the cascade decay to the neutralino LSP which decays via L 1 Q 2 D 1 c ; (7) MSSM pair production followed by the cascade decay to the LSP which decays (a) via LLE c , (b) via LQD c , and (c) via U c D c D c , respectively; and (8) top quark and top squark decays in spontaneous R P

  17. Alignment of the ATLAS Inner Detector upgraded for the LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00386283; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ATLAS is a multipurpose experiment at the LHC proton-proton collider. Its physics goals require high resolution, unbiased measurement of all charged particle kinematic parameters. These critically depend on the layout and performance of the tracking system, notably quality of its offline alignment. ATLAS is equipped with a tracking system built using different technologies, silicon planar sensors (pixel and micro-strip) and gaseous drift- tubes, all embedded in a 2T solenoidal magnetic field. For the LHC Run II, the system has been upgraded with the installation of a new pixel layer, the Insertable B-layer (IBL). Offline track alignment of the ATLAS tracking system has to deal with about 700,000 degrees of freedom (DoF) defining its geometrical parameters. The task requires using very large data sets and represents a considerable numerical challenge in terms of both CPU time and precision. The adopted strategy uses a hierarchical approach to alignment, combining local and global least squares techniques. An o...

  18. Alignment of the ATLAS inner detector for the LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Butti, Pierfrancesco; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ATLAS a multipurpose experiment at the LHC proton-proton collider. Its physics goals require high resolution, unbiased measurement of all charged particle kinematic parameters. These critically depend on the layout and performance of the tracking system, notably quality of its offline alignment. ATLAS is equipped with a tracking system built using different technologies, silicon planar sensors (pixel and micro-strip) and gaseous drift- tubes, all embedded in a 2T solenoidal magnetic field. For the LHC Run II, the system has been upgraded with the installation of a new pixel layer, the Insertable B-layer (IBL). Offline track alignment of the ATLAS tracking system has to deal with about 700,000 degrees of freedom (DoF) defining its geometrical parameters. The task requires using very large data sets and represents a considerable numerical challenge in terms of both CPU time and precision. The adopted strategy uses a hierarchical approach to alignment, combining local and global least squares techniques. An outl...

  19. Alignment of the ATLAS Inner Detector Upgraded for the LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Butti, Pierfrancesco; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ATLAS is a multipurpose experiment at the LHC proton-proton collider. Its physics goals require high resolution, unbiased measurement of all charged particle kinematic parameters. These critically depend on the layout and performance of the tracking system, notably quality of its offline alignment. ATLAS is equipped with a tracking system built using different technologies, silicon planar sensors (pixel and micro-strip) and gaseous drift- tubes, all embedded in a 2T solenoidal magnetic field. For the LHC Run II, the system has been upgraded with the installation of a new pixel layer, the Insertable B-layer (IBL). Offline track alignment of the ATLAS tracking system has to deal with about 700,000 degrees of freedom (DoF) defining its geometrical parameters. The task requires using very large data sets and represents a considerable numerical challenge in terms of both CPU time and precision. The adopted strategy uses a hierarchical approach to alignment, combining local and global least squares techniques. An o...

  20. Level-1 trigger selection of electrons and photons with CMS for LHC Run-II.

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2088114

    2016-01-01

    The CMS experiment has a sophisticated two-level online selection system that achieves a rejection factor of nearly $10^5$. The first, hardware-level trigger (L1) is based on coarse information coming from the calorimeters and the muon detectors while the High-Level Trigger combines fine-grain information from all subdetectors. During Run II, the LHC will increase its center of mass energy to 13 or 14 TeV, and progressively reach an instantaneous luminosity of $2\\times10^{34} \\mathrm{cm}^{-2}\\mathrm{s}^{-1}$. In order to guarantee a successful and ambitious physics programme in this intense environment, the CMS trigger and data acquisition system must be upgraded. The L1 calorimeter trigger hardware and architecture in particular has been redesigned to maintain the current thresholds even in presence of more demanding conditions (e.g., for electrons and photons) and improve the performance for the selection of $\\tau$ leptons. This design benefits from recent $\\mu$TCA technology, allowing sophisticated algorit...

  1. Optimisation of the level-1 calorimeter trigger at ATLAS for Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suchek, Stanislav [Kirchhoff-Institute for Physics, Im Neuenheimer Feld 227, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Collaboration: ATLAS-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger (L1Calo) is a central part of the ATLAS Level-1 Trigger system, designed to identify jet, electron, photon, and hadronic tau candidates, and to measure their transverse energies, as well total transverse energy and missing transverse energy. The optimisation of the jet energy resolution is an important part of the L1Calo upgrade for Run II. A Look-Up Table (LUT) is used to translate the electronic signal from each trigger tower to its transverse energy. By optimising the LUT calibration we can achieve better jet energy resolution and better performance of the jet transverse energy triggers, which are vital for many physics analyses. In addition, the improved energy calibration leads to significant improvements of the missing transverse energy resolution. A new Multi-Chip Module (MCM), as a part of the L1Calo upgrade, provides two separate LUTs for jets and electrons/photons/taus, allowing to optimise jet transverse energy and missing transverse energy separately from the electromagnetic objects. The optimisation is validated using jet transverse energy and missing transverse energy triggers turn-on curves and rates.

  2. Alignment of the CMS Tracker: Latest results from LHC Run-II

    CERN Document Server

    Mittag, Gregor

    2017-01-01

    The all-silicon design of the tracking system of the CMS experiment provides excellent measurements of charged-particle tracks and an efficient tagging of jets. Conditions of the CMS tracker changed repeatedly during the 2015/2016 shutdown and the 2016 data-taking period. Still the true position and orientation of each of the 15 148 silicon strip and 1440 silicon pixel modules need to be known with high precision for all intervals. The alignment constants also need to be promptly re-adjusted each time the state of the CMS magnet is changed between 0T and 3.8 T. Latest Run-II results of the CMS tracker alignment and resolution performance are presented, which are obtained using several millions of reconstructed tracks from collision and cosmic-ray data of 2016. The geometries and the resulting performance of physics observables are carefully validated. In addition to the offline alignment, an online procedure has been put in place which continuously monitors movements of the pixel high-level structures and tri...

  3. Fermilab research program workbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubinstein, R.

    1983-05-01

    The Fermilab Research Program Workbook has been produced annually for the past several years, with the original motivation of assisting the Physics Advisory Committee in its yearly program review conducted during its summer meeting. While this is still the primary goal, the Workbook is increasingly used by others needing information on the current status of Fermilab experiments, properties of beams, and short summaries of approved experiments. At the present time, considerable changes are taking place in the facilities at Fermilab. We have come to the end of the physics program using the 400 GeV Main Ring, which is now relegated to be just an injector for the soon-to-be commissioned Tevatron. In addition, the experimental areas are in the midst of a several-year program of upgrading to 1000 GeV capability. Several new beam lines will be built in the next few years; some indications can be given of their properties, although with the caveat that designs for some are by no means final. Already there is considerable activity leading to experiments studying anti p p collisions at √s = 2000 GeV

  4. FERMILAB: Main Injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The Fermilab Main Injector (FMI) project is the centerpiece of the Laboratory's Fermilab III programme for the 1990s. Designed to support a luminosity of at least 5x10 31 cm -2 s -1 in the Tevatron collider, it will also provide new capabilities for rare neutral kaon decay and neutrino oscillation studies. The Fermilab Main Injector 8-150 GeV synchrotron is designed to replace the existing Main Ring which seriously limits beam intensities for the Tevatron and the antiproton production target. The project has passed several significant milestones and is now proceeding rapidly towards construction. The project received a $11.65M appropriation in 1992 and has been given $15M for the current fiscal year. Through the Energy Systems Acquisition Advisory Board (ESAAB) process, the US Department of Energy (DoE) has authorized funds for construction of the underground enclosure and service building where the Main Injector will touch the Tevatron, and to the preparation of bids for remaining project construction

  5. FERMILAB: Main Injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1993-06-15

    The Fermilab Main Injector (FMI) project is the centerpiece of the Laboratory's Fermilab III programme for the 1990s. Designed to support a luminosity of at least 5x10{sup 31} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} in the Tevatron collider, it will also provide new capabilities for rare neutral kaon decay and neutrino oscillation studies. The Fermilab Main Injector 8-150 GeV synchrotron is designed to replace the existing Main Ring which seriously limits beam intensities for the Tevatron and the antiproton production target. The project has passed several significant milestones and is now proceeding rapidly towards construction. The project received a $11.65M appropriation in 1992 and has been given $15M for the current fiscal year. Through the Energy Systems Acquisition Advisory Board (ESAAB) process, the US Department of Energy (DoE) has authorized funds for construction of the underground enclosure and service building where the Main Injector will touch the Tevatron, and to the preparation of bids for remaining project construction.

  6. Evaluation report on CCTF Core-II reflood Test C2-15 (Run 75)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okubo, Tsutomu; Iguchi, Tadashi; Akimoto, Hajime; Murao, Yoshio

    1992-01-01

    This report presents an evaluation on the CCTF Core-II Test C2-15 (Run 75). The purpose of the test is to investigate whether the thermo-hydrodynamic behavior is different between the CCTF and the FLECHT-SET reflooding tests. For this purpose, test conditions of the present test were set as close as possible to those of concerned FLECHT-SET 2714B experiment, taking account of differences in facility design. Investigating results of both the tests, the following conclusions are obtained: (1) Some discrepancies were observed in the measured test conditions between the two tests. Out of them, difference in the Acc injection duration was large and affected test results, such as the water accumulation in the downcomer and the core and the core cooling, during the initial period. However, this effect was found to become small with time. (2) Taking account of this difference and the difference in the broken cold leg pressure loss coefficient between the two facilities, the overall reflooding behavior is judged to be similar in the two facilities. (3) The CCTF test results showed the core heat transfer enhancement in the higher power region due to its steep radial power distribution, whereas the FLECHT-SET did not due to its rather flat radial power distribution. This enhancement was observed significantly at 1.83 m but was smaller at the higher elevation. (4) The heat transfer was nearly identical between the two tests and an existing correlation could well predict the heat transfer coefficients of both the tests at the location where the heat transfer enhancement mentioned above (3) were small, during the time period when the effect of the difference in the Acc injection mentioned above (1) were small. (5) Therefore, the core cooling is expected to be almost the same in the CCTF and the FLECHT-SET under the same core boundary conditions and core radial power distribution. (author)

  7. Lattice QCD production on commodity clusters at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmgren, D.

    2003-01-01

    We describe the construction and results to date of Fermilab's three Myrinet-networked lattice QCD production clusters (an 80-node dual Pentium III cluster, a 48-node dual Xeon cluster, and a 128-node dual Xeon cluster). We examine a number of aspects of performance of the MILC lattice QCD code running on these clusters

  8. The VAXONLINE software system at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, V.; Heinicke, P.; Berman, E.

    1987-06-01

    The VAXONLINE software system, started in late 1984, is now in use at 12 experiments at Fermilab, with at least one VAX or MicroVax. Data acquisition features now provide for the collection and combination of data from one or more sources, via a list-driven Event Builder program. Supported sources include CAMAC, FASTBUS, Front-end PDP-11's, Disk, Tape, DECnet, and other processors running VAXONLINE. This paper describes the functionality provided by the VAXONLINE system, gives performance figures, and discusses the ongoing program of enhancements

  9. Performance of the CMS precision electromagnetic calorimeter at LHC Run II and prospects for High-Luminosity LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhicai

    2018-04-01

    Many physics analyses using the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector at the LHC require accurate, high-resolution electron and photon energy measurements. Following the excellent performance achieved during LHC Run I at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV, the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) is operating at the LHC with proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV center-of-mass energy. The instantaneous luminosity delivered by the LHC during Run II has achieved unprecedented levels. The average number of concurrent proton-proton collisions per bunch-crossing (pileup) has reached up to 40 interactions in 2016 and may increase further in 2017. These high pileup levels necessitate a retuning of the ECAL readout and trigger thresholds and reconstruction algorithms. In addition, the energy response of the detector must be precisely calibrated and monitored. We present new reconstruction algorithms and calibration strategies that were implemented to maintain the excellent performance of the CMS ECAL throughout Run II. We will show performance results from the 2015-2016 data taking periods and provide an outlook on the expected Run II performance in the years to come. Beyond the LHC, challenging running conditions for CMS are expected after the High-Luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL-LHC) . We review the design and R&D studies for the CMS ECAL and present first test beam studies. Particular challenges at HL-LHC are the harsh radiation environment, the increasing data rates, and the extreme level of pile-up events, with up to 200 simultaneous proton-proton collisions. We present test beam results of hadron irradiated PbWO crystals up to fluences expected at the HL-LHC . We also report on the R&D for the new readout and trigger electronics, which must be upgraded due to the increased trigger and latency requirements at the HL-LHC.

  10. Towards Commissioning the Fermilab Muon G-2 Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stratakis, D. [Fermilab; Convery, M. E. [Fermilab; Morgan, J. P. [Fermilab; Syphers, M. J. [Northern Illinois U.; Korostelev, M. [Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.; Fiedler, A. [Northern Illinois U.; Kim, S. [Cornell U.; Crnkovic, J. D. [Brookhaven; Morse, W. M. [Brookhaven

    2017-01-01

    Starting this summer, Fermilab will host a key experiment dedicated to the search for signals of new physics: The Fermilab Muon g-2 Experiment. Its aim is to precisely measure the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon. In full operation, in order to avoid contamination, the newly born secondary beam is injected into a 505 m long Delivery Ring (DR) wherein it makes several revolutions before being sent to the experiment. Part of the commissioning scenario will execute a running mode wherein the passage from the DR will be skipped. With the aid of numerical simulations, we provide estimates of the expected performance.

  11. Novel real-time alignment and calibration of LHCb detector for Run II and tracking for the upgrade.

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2091576

    2016-01-01

    LHCb has introduced a novel real-time detector alignment and calibration strategy for LHC Run II. Data collected at the start of the fill is processed in a few minutes and used to update the alignment, while the calibration constants are evaluated for each run. The procedure aims to improve the quality of the online selection and performance stability. The required computing time constraints are met thanks to a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the trigger. A similar scheme is planned to be used for Run III foreseen to start in 2020. At that time LHCb will run at an instantaneous luminosity of $2 \\times 10^{33}$ cm$^2$ s$^1$ and a fully software based trigger strategy will be used. The new running conditions and the tighter timing constraints in the software trigger (only 13 ms per event are available) represent a big challenge for track reconstruction. The new software based trigger strategy implies a full detector read-out at the collision rate of 40 MHz. High performance ...

  12. Fermilab Friends for Science Education | Welcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermilab Friends for Science Education FFSE Home About Us Join Us Support Us Contact Us Fermilab Friends for Science Education photo Fermilab Friends for Science Education supports innovative science education programs at Fermilab. Its mission is to: Enhance the quality of precollege science education in

  13. Fermilab timeline generation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.P.; Knopf, W.R.; Thomas, A.D.

    1985-06-01

    In this paper the technique used to control the relative timing and synchronization of the major accelerator systems at Fermilab is described. The various operating modes of the injector accelerators include fixed target and colliding beam operation in conjunction with simultaneous machine studies. For example, in a 60 second interval the conventional main Ring may be called upon to: (a) load the Tevatron with 12 high intensity Booster batches each containing 82 rf bunches at 150 GeV, (b) transfer a Booster batch at 8 GeV with 8 rf bunches to the Debuncher or Accumulator, (c) accelerate high intensity beam several times to 120 GeV for antiproton production, and (d) accelerate beam to 150 GeV for Main Ring studies. In the case of colliding beam operation, the different tasks can be even more varied. All this requires a simple, flexible means of coordination

  14. The Fermilab computing farms in 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troy Dawson

    2001-01-01

    The year 2000 was a year of evolutionary change for the Fermilab computer farms. Additional compute capacity was acquired by the addition of PCs for the CDF, D0 and CMS farms. This was done in preparation for Run 2 production and for CMS Monte Carlo production. Additional I/O capacity was added for all the farms. This continues the trend to standardize the I/O systems on the SGI O2x00 architecture. Strong authentication was installed on the CDF and D0 farms. The farms continue to provide large CPU resources for experiments and those users whose calculations benefit from large CPU/low IO resources. The user community will change in 2001 now that the 1999 fixed-target experiments have almost finished processing and Run 2, SDSS, miniBooNE, MINOS, BTeV, and other future experiments and projects will be the major users in the future

  15. Status of Fermilab E-710

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubinstein, R.

    1993-08-01

    This report give the current status of E-710, an experiment at the Fermilab bar pp Tevatron Collider to measure elastic scattering, total cross sections and diffraction dissociation up to √s = 1.8 TeV

  16. The KAMI experiment at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, T.

    2001-01-01

    The KAMI experiment at Fermilab is planning to measure the CP violation parameter, η, by observing more than 100 K L → π 0 νν-bar events. Basic studies performed for the new experiment are presented

  17. Stochastic cooling technology at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquinelli, R.J. E-mail: pasquin@fnal.gov

    2004-10-11

    The first antiproton cooling systems were installed and commissioned at Fermilab in 1984-1985. In the interim period, there have been several major upgrades, system improvements, and complete reincarnation of cooling systems. This paper will present some of the technology that was pioneered at Fermilab to implement stochastic cooling systems in both the Antiproton Source and Recycler accelerators. Current performance data will also be presented.

  18. Stochastic cooling technology at Fermilab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquinelli, Ralph J.

    2004-10-01

    The first antiproton cooling systems were installed and commissioned at Fermilab in 1984-1985. In the interim period, there have been several major upgrades, system improvements, and complete reincarnation of cooling systems. This paper will present some of the technology that was pioneered at Fermilab to implement stochastic cooling systems in both the Antiproton Source and Recycler accelerators. Current performance data will also be presented.

  19. Stochastic cooling technology at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasquinelli, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    The first antiproton cooling systems were installed and commissioned at Fermilab in 1984-1985. In the interim period, there have been several major upgrades, system improvements, and complete reincarnation of cooling systems. This paper will present some of the technology that was pioneered at Fermilab to implement stochastic cooling systems in both the Antiproton Source and Recycler accelerators. Current performance data will also be presented

  20. Differential satellite cell density of type I and II fibres with lifelong endurance running in old men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackey, Abigail; Karlsen, A; Couppé, C

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the influence of lifelong endurance running on the satellite cell pool of type I and type II fibres in healthy human skeletal muscle. METHODS: Muscle biopsies were collected from 15 healthy old trained men (O-Tr) who had been running 43 ± 16 (mean ± SD) kilometres a week for 28...... ± 9 years. Twelve age-matched untrained men (O-Un) and a group of young trained and young untrained men were recruited for comparison. Frozen sections were immunohistochemically stained for Pax7, type I myosin and laminin, from which fibre area, the number of satellite cells, and the relationship......-Un. A strong positive relationship between fibre size and satellite cell content was detected in trained individuals. In line with a history of myofibre repair, a greater number of fibres with centrally located myonuclei were detected in O-Tr. CONCLUSION: Lifelong endurance training (i) does not deplete...

  1. Operational experience with the CMS pixel detector in LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Karancsi, Janos

    2016-01-01

    The CMS pixel detector was repaired successfully, calibrated and commissioned for the second run of Large Hadron Collider during the first long shutdown between 2013 and 2015. The replaced pixel modules were calibrated separately and show the expected behavior of an un-irradiated detector. In 2015, the system performed very well with an even improved spatial resolution compared to 2012. During this time, the operational team faced various challenges including the loss of a sector in one half shell which was only partially recovered. In 2016, the detector is expected to withstand instantaneous luminosities beyond the design limits and will need a combined effort of both online and offline teams in order to provide the high quality data that is required to reach the physics goals of CMS. We present the operational experience gained during the second run of the LHC and show the latest performance results of the CMS pixel detector.

  2. Silicon strip detector system for Fermilab E706

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engels, E Jr; Mani, S; Plants, D; Shepard, P F; Wilkins, R [Pittsburgh Univ., PA (USA); Hossain, S [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (USA)

    1984-09-15

    Fermilab Experiment E706 is an experiment to study direct photon production in hadron-hadron collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron II. A part of the charged particle spectrometer is a silicon strip detector system used to determine the position of interaction vertices in the production target and to provide angular formation about the secondary hadrons produced in a collision. We present some design criteria, as well as the results of tests of a wafer similar to those to be used in the experiment.

  3. Review of calorimetry in Fermilab fixed-target experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crisler, M.B.

    1995-04-01

    The fixed-target program at Fermilab comprises as many as thirteen simultaneous experiments in ten separate beamlines using beams of primary protons, pions, kaons, electrons, neutrinos, and muons. The fixed target beamlines were last in operation in the latter half of 1991, shutting down in 1992. The next fixed target run is scheduled for early 1996. This article describes some of the wide variety of calorimetric devices that were in use in the past run or to be used in the coming run. Special attention is devoted to the new devices currently under construction

  4. Extending DART to meet the data acquisition needs of future experiments at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oleynik, Gene; Pordes, Ruth; Barsotti, Ed

    1996-01-01

    The DART project at Fermilab is a major collaboration to develop a data acquisition system for multiple experiments. The initial implementation of DART has concentrated on providing working data acquisition systems for the (now eight) collaborating experiments in the next Fixed Target Run. In this paper we discuss aspects of the architecture of DART and how these will allow it to be extended to meet the expected needs of future experiments at Fermilab. We also discuss some ongoing developments within the Fermilab Computing Division towards these new implementations. (author)

  5. Extending DART to meet the data acquisition needs of future experiments at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oleynik, G.; Pordes, R.; Barsotti, E.

    1995-10-01

    The DART project at Fermilab is a major collaboration to develop a data acquisition system for multiple experiments. The initial implementation of DART has concentrated on providing working data acquisition systems for the (now eight) collaborating experiments in the next Fixed Target Run. In this paper we discuss aspects of the architecture of DART and how these will allow it to be extended to meet the expected needs of future experiments at Fermilab. We also discuss some ongoing developments within the Fermilab Computing Division towards these new implementations

  6. Performance of the CMS precision electromagnetic calorimeter at LHC Run II and prospects for High-Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zhicai

    2017-01-01

    Many physics analyses using the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector at the LHC require accurate, high-resolution electron and photon energy measurements. Following the excellent performance achieved during LHC Run I at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV, the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) is operating at the LHC with proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV center-of-mass energy. The instantaneous luminosity delivered by the LHC during Run II has achieved unprecedented levels. The average number of concurrent proton-proton collisions per bunch-crossing (pileup) has reached up to 40 interactions in 2016 and may increase further in 2017. These high pileup levels necessitate a retuning of the ECAL readout and trigger thresholds and reconstruction algorithms. In addition, the energy response of the detector must be precisely calibrated and monitored. We present new reconstruction algorithms and calibration strategies that were implemented to maintain the excellent performance of the CMS ECAL throughout Run...

  7. Search for squarks and gluinos in the D0 experiment of the Run-II-a at the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdier, P.

    2007-11-01

    The D0 experiment is recording pp-bar collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV since the beginning of the Run II-a of the Tevatron in 2001. The design of processor boards for the D0 level 2 trigger system is first presented. Those boards were installed in 2003, and they have been working perfectly since that date. Performances of missing transverse energy (/ ET ) reconstruction are then described. This quantity is important at hadron colliders especially for new particles searches. Finally, squarks and gluinos, supersymmetric partners of quarks and gluons, could be the most copiously produced supersymmetric particles at the Tevatron, if they are sufficiently light. Those particles were searched for in 0.96 fb -1 of data recorded by D0 during the Run II-a. The final state consists of jets and missing transverse energy. The numbers of observed events are in good agreement with the Standard Model predictions. Lower mass limits at 95 % confidence level are obtained on the squark and gluino masses in the framework of the mSUGRA model. Contributions to other D0 data analyses are also shortly described. Those analyses are the search for first generation leptoquarks and the search for squarks in jets+τ(s)+E T events. The possibility to constrain a 'Little Higgs' model using the results of the jets+E T searches is then discussed. (author)

  8. Modelling Energy Loss Mechanisms and a Determination of the Electron Energy Scale for the CDF Run II W Mass Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riddick, Thomas [Univ. College London, Bloomsbury (United Kingdom)

    2012-06-15

    The calibration of the calorimeter energy scale is vital to measuring the mass of the W boson at CDF Run II. For the second measurement of the W boson mass at CDF Run II, two independent simulations were developed. This thesis presents a detailed description of the modification and validation of Bremsstrahlung and pair production modelling in one of these simulations, UCL Fast Simulation, comparing to both geant4 and real data where appropriate. The total systematic uncertainty on the measurement of the W boson mass in the W → eve channel from residual inaccuracies in Bremsstrahlung modelling is estimated as 6.2 ±3.2 MeV/c2 and the total systematic uncertainty from residual inaccuracies in pair production modelling is estimated as 2.8± 2.7 MeV=c2. Two independent methods are used to calibrate the calorimeter energy scale in UCL Fast Simulation; the results of these two methods are compared to produce a measurement of the Z boson mass as a cross-check on the accuracy of the simulation.

  9. Cornering gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking with quasistable sleptons at the Fermilab Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, S.P.; Wells, J.D.

    1999-01-01

    There are many theoretical reasons why heavy quasistable charged particles might exist. Pair production of such particles at the Fermilab Tevatron can produce highly ionizing tracks or fake muons. In gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking, sparticle production can lead to events with a pair of quasistable sleptons, a significant fraction of which will have the same electric charge. Depending on the production mechanism and the decay chain, they may also be accompanied by additional energetic leptons. We study the relative importance of the resulting signals for the Tevatron run II. The relative fraction of same-sign tracks to other background-free signals is an important diagnostic tool in gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking that may provide information about mass splittings, tanβ, and the number of messengers communicating supersymmetry breaking. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  10. Real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb Detector in Run II

    CERN Multimedia

    Dujany, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Stable, precise spatial alignment and PID calibration are necessary to achieve optimal detector performance. During Run2, LHCb has a new real-time detector alignment and calibration to allow equivalent performance in the online and offline reconstruction to be reached. This offers the opportunity to optimise the event selection by applying stronger constraints, and to use hadronic particle identification at the trigger level. The computing time constraints are met through the use of a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the trigger. The motivation for a real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector is discussed from the operative and physics performance point of view. Specific challenges of this configuration are discussed, as well as the designed framework and its performance.

  11. Real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb Detector in Run II

    CERN Multimedia

    Dujany, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    Stable, precise spatial alignment and PID calibration are necessary to achieve optimal detector performance. During Run2, LHCb will have a new real-time detector alignment and calibration to allow equivalent performance in the online and offline reconstruction to be reached. This offers the opportunity to optimise the event selection by applying stronger constraints, and to use hadronic particle identification at the trigger level. The computing time constraints are met through the use of a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the trigger. The motivation for a real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector is discussed from the operative and physics performance point of view. Specific challenges of this configuration are discussed, as well as the designed framework and its performance.

  12. Fermilab History and Archives Project | Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Special Events Early Users Meetings (1979 - 1989) The Tevatron Natural History Discoveries Technology Site Fermilab History and Archives Project Fermilab History and Archives Project Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Home About the Archives History & Archives Online Request Contact Us Site Index

  13. Fermilab Physics Program for the 1990's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanfield, K.C.

    1990-01-01

    Following a brief introduction to Fermilab facilities and a review of the accelerator status and plans, the physics potential for the Fermilab III upgrade program is discussed for both the fixed target and collider modes

  14. Resistive Wall Growth Rate Measurements in the Fermilab Recycler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ainsworth, R. [Fermilab; Adamson, P. [Fermilab; Burov, A. [Fermilab; Kourbanis, I. [Fermilab

    2016-10-05

    Impedance could represent a limitation of running high intensity beams in the Fermilab recycler. With high intensity upgrades foreseen, it is important to quantify the impedance. To do this,studies have been performed measuring the growth rate of presumably the resistive wall instability. The growth rates at varying intensities and chromaticities are shown. The measured growth rates are compared to ones calculated with the resistive wall impedance.

  15. A Search for Supersymmetry via Chargino-Neutralino Production in Low-$p_T$ Dimuon with the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rekovic, Vladimir [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2007-05-01

    We have searched for evidence of supersymmetry with 1 $fb^-1$ with collected with low-$p_T$ dimuon triggers of the Collider Detector on Tevatron Run II, at Fermilab. We looked for trilepton events in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV. In the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) we expect chargino-neutralino pair production, with subsequent decay into three isolated leptons. We observe one event of three isolated muons, a possible hint of supersymmetry.

  16. Search for Supersymmetry in the Dilepton Final State with Taus at CDF Run II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrest, Robert David

    2011-01-01

    This thesis presents the results a search for chargino and neutralino supersymmetric particles yielding same signed dilepton final states including one hadronically decaying tau lepton using 6.0 fb -1 of data collected by the the CDF II detector. This signature is important in SUSY models where, at high tan β, the branching ratio of charginos and neutralinos to tau leptons becomes dominant. We study event acceptance, lepton identification cuts, and efficiencies. We set limits on the production cross section as a function of SUSY particle mass for certain generic models.

  17. Search for Supersymmetry in the Dilepton Final State with Taus at CDF Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forrest, Robert David [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    This thesis presents the results a search for chargino and neutralino supersymmetric particles yielding same signed dilepton final states including one hadronically decaying tau lepton using 6.0 fb-1 of data collected by the the CDF II detector. This signature is important in SUSY models where, at high tan β, the branching ratio of charginos and neutralinos to tau leptons becomes dominant. We study event acceptance, lepton identification cuts, and efficiencies. We set limits on the production cross section as a function of SUSY particle mass for certain generic models.

  18. Operational experience with the Fermilab Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, L.J.; Lennox, A.J.; Schmidt, C.W.

    1992-01-01

    The Fermilab 200-MeV Linac has been in operation for nearly 22 years as a proton injector to the Booster synchrotron. It presently accelerates H - ions to 200 MeV for charge-exchange injection into the Booster and to 66 MeV for the production of neutrons at the Neutron Therapy Facility (NTF). The beam intensity is typically 35 mA with pulse widths of 30 μsec for the Booster for high energy physics and 57 μsec for NTF at a maximum of 15 pulses per sec. During a typical physics run of nine to twelve months, beam is available for greater than 98% of the scheduled time. The Linac history, operation, tuning, stability and reliability will be discussed. (Author) 15 refs., 2 tabs

  19. The Fermilab data storage infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jon A Bakken et al.

    2003-01-01

    Fermilab, in collaboration with the DESY laboratory in Hamburg, Germany, has created a petabyte scale data storage infrastructure to meet the requirements of experiments to store and access large data sets. The Fermilab data storage infrastructure consists of the following major storage and data transfer components: Enstore mass storage system, DCache distributed data cache, ftp and Grid ftp for primarily external data transfers. This infrastructure provides a data throughput sufficient for transferring data from experiments' data acquisition systems. It also allows access to data in the Grid framework

  20. Evaluation report on CCTF Core-II reflood test C2-16 (Run 76)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iguchi, Tadashi; Akimoto, Hajime; Okubo, Tsutomu; Hojo, Tsuneyuki; Murao, Yoshio; Sugimoto, Jun.

    1987-03-01

    This report presents the result of the upper plenum injection (UPI) test C2-16 (Run 76), which was conducted on October 23, 1984, with the Cylindrical Core Test Facility (CCTF) at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The CCTF is a 1/21.4 scale model of a 1,100 MWe PWR with four loop active components to provide information on the system and core thermo-hydrodynamics during reflood. The objectives of the test are to investigate the reflood phenomena with single failure UPI condition and to investigate the effect of the asymmetry of UPI on the reflood phenomena. The test was performed with an asymmetric UPI condition at the injection rate simulating single failure of LPCI pumps. It was observed that, (1) a UPI test simulating no LPCI pump failure gave the slightly lower peak clad temperature than a UPI test simulating single LPCI pump failure, indicating that single LPCI pump failure assumption is conserrative for UPI condition, and (2) an asymmetric UPI lead to a higher core water accumulation and then a higher heat transfer coefficient, resultantly a lower peak clad temperature than a symmetric UPI, indicating that asymmetric UPI does not lead to a poorer core cooling than symmetric UPI. (author)

  1. The ALICE Transition Radiation Detector: status and perspectives for Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    The ALICE Transition Radiation Detector contributes to the tracking, particle identification, and triggering capabilities of the experiment. It is composed of six layers of multi-wire proportional chambers, each of which is preceded by a radiator and a Xe/CO$_2$-filled drift volume. The signal is sampled in timebins of 100~ns over the drift length which allows for the reconstruction of chamber-wise track segments, both online and offline. The particle identification is based on the specific energy loss of charged particles and additional transition radiation photons, the latter being a signature for electrons. The detector is segmented into 18 sectors, of which 13 were installed in Run I. The TRD was included in data taking since the LHC start-up and was successfully used for electron identification and triggering. During the Long Shutdown 1, the detector was completed and now covers the full azimuthal acceptance. Furthermore, the readout and trigger components were upgraded. When data taking was started for ...

  2. Fermilab Friends for Science Education | Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermilab Friends for Science Education FFSE Home About Us Join Us Support Us Contact Us Programs Donors Board of Directors Board Tools Calendar Join Us Donate Now Get FermiGear! Education Office Search photo Fermilab Friends for Science Education, in partnership with Fermilab and area educators, designs

  3. Fermilab Security Site Access Request Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermilab Security Site Access Request Database Use of the online version of the Fermilab Security Site Access Request Database requires that you login into the ESH&Q Web Site. Note: Only Fermilab generated from the ESH&Q Section's Oracle database on May 27, 2018 05:48 AM. If you have a question

  4. Cryomdoule Test Stand Reduced-Magnetic Support Design at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGee, Mike [Fermilab; Chandrasekaran, Saravan Kumar [Fermilab; Crawford, Anthony [Fermilab; Harms, Elvin [Fermilab; Leibfritz, Jerry [Fermilab; Wu, Genfa [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    In a partnership with SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) and Jefferson Lab, Fermilab will assemble and test 17 of the 35 total 1.3 GHz cryomodules for the Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) Project. These devices will be tested at Fermilab's Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF) within the Cryomodule Test Stand (CMTS-1) cave. The problem of magnetic pollution became one of major issues during design stage of the LCLS-II cryomodule as the average quality factor of the accelerating cavities is specified to be 2.7 x 10¹⁰. One of the possible ways to mitigate the effect of stray magnetic fields and to keep it below the goal of 5 mGauss involves the application of low permeable materials. Initial permeability and magnetic measurement studies regarding the use of 316L stainless steel material indicated that cold work (machining) and heat affected zones from welding would be acceptable.

  5. Evaluation report on CCTF core-II reflood test C2-6 (Run 64)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Hajime; Iguchi, Tadashi; Sugimoto, Jun; Okubo, Tsutomu; Murao, Yoshio; Okabe, Kazuharu.

    1985-03-01

    In order to evaluate the effect of the radial power profile on the system behavior and the core thermal hydraulic behavior during the reflood phase of a PWR LOCA, a test was performed using the Cylindrical Core Test Facility(CCTF) with the flat radial power profile. The test was conducted with the same total core power as that of the steep radial power test C2-5(Run 63). Through the comparisons of the results from these two tests, the following conclusions were obtained: (1) The radial power profile in the core has weak effect on the thermal hydraulic behavior in the primary system except the core. (2) Almost the same differential pressure was observed at various elevations in the periphery of the core regardless of different radial power profile. The result suggests that the core differential pressure is determined mainly by the total power and the total stored energy rather than by the local power and the local stored energy. (3) The test results support the single channel core model with the average power rod used in the reactor safety analysis codes such as REFLA-1DS, WREM for the evaluation of the overall system behavior. (4) In the steep radial power test, the heat transfer coefficient in the central(high power) region was higher than that in the peripheral(low power) region. The tendency was not explained by the estimation with the heat transfer correlation developed by Murao and Sugimoto assuming that the void fraction was uniform in a horizontal cross section. It is necessary to study more the dependency of core heat transfer on the radial power profile in the wide core. (author)

  6. Evaluation report on CCTF core-II reflood test C2 - 18 (Run 78)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iguchi, Tadashi; Akimoto, Hajime; Okubo, Tsutomu; Murao, Yoshio; Sugimoto, Jun; Hojo, Tsuneyuki.

    1987-03-01

    This report presents the result of the upper plenum injection (UPI) test C2 - 18 (Run 78), which was conducted on November 13, 1984 with the Cylindrical Core Test Facility (CCTF) at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The CCTF is a 1/21.4 scale model of a 1,100 MWe PWR with four loop active components to provide information on the system and core thermo-hydrodynamics during reflood phase. The objectives of the test are to investigate the refill behavior with UPI condition and to investigate the reflood behavior with UPI Best-Estimate (BE) condition. The test was performed to simulate refill/reflood behavior with UPI and BE conditions (However, the LPCI flow rate was determined based on single failure of LPCI pumps.). The result of the test showed the followings. (1) Little special phenomena were recognized under UPI and BE conditions in comparison with those under UPI and Evaluation-Model (EM) conditions, although certain special phenoma (i.e. significant fluid oscillation) were recognized under Cold-Leg-Injection (CLI) and BE conditions in comparison with those under CLI and EM conditions. (2) Water inventory in lower plenum increased smoothly due to water injected into both upper plenum and cold leg during refill phase, similarly to that in refill-simulation test with CLI condition. Small difference in refill behavior with UPI condition is the existing of steam condensation in upper plenum, resulting in lower steam binding and higher core cooling during early reflood phase. This indicates the conservatism of UPI against CLI during early reflood phase. (3) The good core-cooling capability was confirmed under UPI and BE conditions. (author)

  7. Control system for Fermilab's low temperature upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, B.L.

    1996-09-01

    Fermilab recently upgraded the Tevatron Cryogenic Systems to allow for lower temperature operation. This Lower Temperature Upgrade grew out of a desire to increase the Colliding Beam Physics energy from 900 GeV to 1000 GeV. A key element in achieving this goal is the new cryogenic control system designed at Fermilab and installed in 24 satellite refrigerators and 8 compressor buildings. The cryogenic improvements and addition hardware like cold compressors exceeded the capability of the original distributed controls package. The new distributed controls package uses a Multibus II platform and Intel's 80386 microprocessor. Token Ring is used as the link to the systems 6 primary crate locations with Arcnet used as the connection to the systems numerous I/O crates. I/0 capabilities are double the capabilities of the original system. Software has also been upgraded with the introduction of more flexible control loop strategies and Finite State Machines used for automatic sequential control, like quench recovery or cold compressor pump down

  8. Measurement of the W Boson Mass with the D0 Run II Detector using the Electron P(T) Spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andeen, Jr., Timothy R. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2008-06-01

    This thesis is a description of the measurement of the W boson mass using the D0 Run II detector with 770 pb-1 of p$\\bar{p}$ collision data. These collisions were produced by the Tevatron at √s = 1.96 TeV between 2002 and 2006. We use a sample of W → ev and Z → ee decays to determine the W boson mass with the transverse momentum distribution of the electron and the transverse mass distribution of the boson. We measure MW = 80340 ± 37 (stat.) ± 26 (sys. theo.) ± 51 (sys. exp.) MeV = 80340 ± 68 MeV with the transverse momentum distribution of the electron and MW = 80361 ± 28 (stat.) ± 17 (sys. theo.) ± 51 (sys. exp.) MeV = 80361 ± 61 MeV with the transverse mass distribution.

  9. Angiotensin II receptor blocker telmisartan enhances running endurance of skeletal muscle through activation of the PPAR-δ/AMPK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaoli; Luo, Zhidan; Ma, Liqun; Ma, Shuangtao; Yang, Dachun; Zhao, Zhigang; Yan, Zhencheng; He, Hongbo; Cao, Tingbing; Liu, Daoyan; Zhu, Zhiming

    2011-07-01

    Clinical trials have shown that angiotensin II receptor blockers reduce the new onset of diabetes in hypertensives; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. We investigated the effects of telmisartan on peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPAR-δ) and the adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway in cultured myotubes, as well as on the running endurance of wild-type and PPAR-δ-deficient mice. Administration of telmisartan up-regulated levels of PPAR-δ and phospho-AMPKα in cultured myotubes. However, PPAR-δ gene deficiency completely abolished the telmisartan effect on phospho-AMPKαin vitro. Chronic administration of telmisartan remarkably prevented weight gain, enhanced running endurance and post-exercise oxygen consumption, and increased slow-twitch skeletal muscle fibres in wild-type mice, but these effects were absent in PPAR-δ-deficient mice. The mechanism is involved in PPAR-δ-mediated stimulation of the AMPK pathway. Compared to the control mice, phospho-AMPKα level in skeletal muscle was up-regulated in mice treated with telmisartan. In contrast, phospho-AMPKα expression in skeletal muscle was unchanged in PPAR-δ-deficient mice treated with telmisartan. These findings highlight the ability of telmisartan to improve skeletal muscle function, and they implicate PPAR-δ as a potential therapeutic target for the prevention of type 2 diabetes. © 2011 The Authors Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine © 2011 Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Sparticle mass hierarchies, simplified models from SUGRA unification, and benchmarks for LHC Run-II SUSY searches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francescone, David; Akula, Sujeet; Altunkaynak, Baris; Nath, Pran

    2015-01-01

    Sparticle mass hierarchies contain significant information regarding the origin and nature of supersymmetry breaking. The hierarchical patterns are severely constrained by electroweak symmetry breaking as well as by the astrophysical and particle physics data. They are further constrained by the Higgs boson mass measurement. The sparticle mass hierarchies can be used to generate simplified models consistent with the high scale models. In this work we consider supergravity models with universal boundary conditions for soft parameters at the unification scale as well as supergravity models with nonuniversalities and delineate the list of sparticle mass hierarchies for the five lightest sparticles. Simplified models can be obtained by a truncation of these, retaining a smaller set of lightest particles. The mass hierarchies and their truncated versions enlarge significantly the list of simplified models currently being used in the literature. Benchmarks for a variety of supergravity unified models appropriate for SUSY searches at future colliders are also presented. The signature analysis of two benchmark models has been carried out and a discussion of the searches needed for their discovery at LHC Run-II is given. An analysis of the spin-independent neutralino-proton cross section exhibiting the Higgs boson mass dependence and the hierarchical patterns is also carried out. It is seen that a knowledge of the spin-independent neutralino-proton cross section and the neutralino mass will narrow down the list of the allowed sparticle mass hierarchies. Thus dark matter experiments along with analyses for the LHC Run-II will provide strong clues to the nature of symmetry breaking at the unification scale.

  11. The FIFE Project at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Box, D. [Fermilab; Boyd, J. [Fermilab; Di Benedetto, V. [Fermilab; Ding, P. [Fermilab; Dykstra, D. [Fermilab; Fattoruso, M. [Fermilab; Garzoglio, G. [Fermilab; Herner, K. [Fermilab; Levshina, T. [Fermilab; Kirby, M. [Fermilab; Kreymer, A. [Fermilab; Mazzacane, A. [Fermilab; Mengel, M. [Fermilab; Mhashilkar, P. [Fermilab; Podstavkov, V. [Fermilab; Retzke, K. [Fermilab; Sharma, N. [Fermilab

    2016-01-01

    The FabrIc for Frontier Experiments (FIFE) project is an initiative within the Fermilab Scientific Computing Division designed to steer the computing model for non-LHC Fermilab experiments across multiple physics areas. FIFE is a collaborative effort between experimenters and computing professionals to design and develop integrated computing models for experiments of varying size, needs, and infrastructure. The major focus of the FIFE project is the development, deployment, and integration of solutions for high throughput computing, data management, database access and collaboration management within an experiment. To accomplish this goal, FIFE has developed workflows that utilize Open Science Grid compute sites along with dedicated and commercial cloud resources. The FIFE project has made significant progress integrating into experiment computing operations several services including a common job submission service, software and reference data distribution through CVMFS repositories, flexible and robust data transfer clients, and access to opportunistic resources on the Open Science Grid. The progress with current experiments and plans for expansion with additional projects will be discussed. FIFE has taken the leading role in defining the computing model for Fermilab experiments, aided in the design of experiments beyond those hosted at Fermilab, and will continue to define the future direction of high throughput computing for future physics experiments worldwide.

  12. Fermilab Education Office: Science Adventures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Search The Education Office: Science Adventures Adventure Catalog Search for Adventures Calendar Class Facebook Group. Contact: Science Adventures Registrar, Education Office Fermilab, MS 777, P.O. Box 500 it again." Opportunities for Instructors The Education Office has openings for instructors who

  13. Fermilab-Latin America collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubinstein, R.

    1994-01-01

    Fermilab's program of collaboration with Latin America was initiated by then-Director Leon Lederman about 1980. His goal was to aid Latin American physics, and particularly its particle physics; this latter aim is in keeping with the Laboratory's particle physics mission. The reasons for collaboration between institutions in the US and Latin America are many, including geographic and cultural, together with the existence of many talented scientists and many centers of excellence in the region. There are also broader reasons; for example, it has been stated frequently that physics is the basis of much technology, and advanced technology is a necessity for a country's development. There is nothing unique about Fermilab's program; other US institutions can carry out similar activities, and some have carried out individual items in the past. On the Latin American side, such collaboration enables institutions there to carry out forefront physics research, and also to have the advantages of particle physics spin-offs, both in expertise in related technologies and in scientist training. In addition to particle physics, collaboration is possible in many other related areas. Although particle physics is frequently viewed as open-quotes big scienceclose quotes, all of the large research groups in the field are composed of many small university groups, each of which contributes to the experiment, the analysis and the physics. Fermilab is an international laboratory, open to all users; a research proposal is accepted on scientific merit and technical competence, not on the country of origin of the scientists making the proposal. Currently, of Fermilab's approximately 1400 users, about 30% are from non-US institutions. It should be noted here that Fermilab's funds, which come from the US government, are for particle physics only; however, there is some flexibility in interpretation of this

  14. art: A Framework for New, Small Experiments at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutschke, Robert K

    2011-01-01

    Fermilab is preparing to mount a variety of new experiments at the Intensity Frontier, all of which require infrastructure software including a framework, an event data model, persistency, run-time configuration, management of singleton-like entities such as the geometry and conditions data, integration with Geant4 (G4), build and release management, and integration with GRID based work-flow management systems. In order to maximize the return on both past and future effort invested in supporting CMS, the Fermilab Computing Division (CD) has extracted the core of the CMS framework plus many parts of its associated infrastructure software; CD is supporting this infrastructure for use by the new Intensity Frontier experiments. This talk will present the plans for and status of this infrastructure software including points of view from both the developers and the physicist-clients working on the Mu2e experiment.

  15. Forward-Backward Asymmetry of Top Quark Pair Productionn at the Fermilab Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Ziqing [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2015-12-01

    This dissertation presents the final measurements of the forward-backward asymmetry (AFB) of top quark-antiquark pair events (t t-) at the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) experiment. The t t- events are produced in proton{anti-proton collisions with a center of mass energy of 1:96 TeV during the Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron. The measurements are performed with the full CDF Run II data (9.1 fb-1) in the final state that contain two charged leptons (electrons or muons, the dilepton final state), and are designed to con rm or deny the evidence-level excess in the AFB measurements in the final state with a single lepton and hadronic jets (lepton+jets final state) as well as the excess in the preliminary measurements in the dilepton final state with the first half of the CDF Run II data. New measurements include the leptonic AFB (AlFB), the lepton-pair AFB (All FB) and the reconstructed top AFB (At t FB). Each are combined with the previous results from the lepton+jets final state measured at the CDF experiment. The inclusive Al FB, All FB, and At t FB measured in the dilepton final state are 0.072 ± 0.060, 0.076 ± 0.081, and 0.12 ± 0.13, to be compared with the Standard Model (SM) predictions of 0.038 ± 0.003, 0.048 ± 0.004, and 0.010 ± 0.006, respectively. The CDF combination of AlFB and At t FB are 0.090+0:028 -0.026, and 0.160 ± 0.045, respectively. The overall results are consistent with the SM predictions.

  16. Fermilab D-0 Experimental Facility: Energy conservation report and mechanical systems design optimization and cost analysis study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krstulovich, S.F.

    1987-01-01

    This report is developed as part of the Fermilab D-0 Experimental Facility Project Title II Design Documentation Update. As such, it concentrates primarily on HVAC mechanical systems design optimization and cost analysis

  17. Dedication of Fermilab's LHC Remote Operations Center

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2007-01-01

    Fermilab's Remote Operations Center will be dedicated simultaneously at Fermilab in the U.S. and from CMS (Point 5) in Cessy, France. Speakers will include: from the U.S. DOE Undersecretary for Science Raymond Orbach and Fermilab Director Pier Oddone (U.S.); and from CERN Director General Robert Aymar, CMS Spokesperson Jim Virdee, LHC Project Leader Lyn Evans and US CMS Project Manager Joel Butler.

  18. Summary of the half-day internal review of LHC performance limitations (linked to transverse collective effects) during run II (CERN, 29/11/2016)

    CERN Document Server

    Metral, Elias; Biancacci, Nicolo; Buffat, Xavier; Carver, Lee Robert; Iadarola, Giovanni; Li, Kevin Shing Bruce; Persson, Tobias Hakan Bjorn; Romano, Annalisa; Schenk, Michael; Tambasco, Claudia; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2017-01-01

    In this note the half-day internal review of LHC performance limitations (linked to transverse collective effects) during run II (2015-2016), which took place at CERN on 29/11/2016 (https://indico.cern.ch/event/589625/), is summarised and the next steps are discussed.

  19. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 18 (SHEFTH00410018) on Town Highway 41, crossing Millers Run, Sheffield, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Emily C.; Boehmler, Erick M.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure SHEFTH00410018 on Town Highway 41 crossing Millers Run, Sheffield, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the White Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northeastern Vermont. The 16.2-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is grass upstream and downstream of the bridge while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. In the study area, Millers Run has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.01 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 50 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 50.9 mm (0.167 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 1, 1995, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable, which is evident in the moderate to severe fluvial erosion in the upstream reach. The Town Highway 41 crossing of the Millers Run is a 30-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of a 28-foot steel-stringer span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 28, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 22.2 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 20 degrees to the opening. The computed

  20. FERMILAB: First D0 physics results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Full text: The excitement of observing the first collision in the DO detector at Fermilab's Tevatron protonantiproton collider on May 12 1992 was the payoff for more than eight years of hard work by a large and dedicated group of physicists, students, engineers, technicians and other support staff. The DO detector - an international collaboration of about 370 physicists (including some 65 graduate students) from 36 institutions - had completed the journey from design (1983-1984) to final construction and subsequent rolling in to the collision hall in February 1992. Commissioning the detector with beam lasted from May-July 1992 and went very well. The collaboration showed that the detector was well on the way to achieving design goals including precision measurements of electrons, muons and photons, together with quark and gluon jets, and to be sensitive to missing transverse energy indicative of noninteracting particles such as neutrinos. With the start of the physics run in August 1992, the collaboration turned its attention to extracting the first results in time for the major (DPF) meeting at Fermilab last November (January, page 12). By the mid- January break in the run, DO had accumulated about 7 inverse picobarns of physics data. Large samples of Ws and Zs have been logged in both electron and muon channels. This will allow sensitive studies of the W mass and of the triple WWZ gauge boson coupling. The strengths of the detector will provide a powerful tool to search for the elusive top quark. With the top expected to decay solely to a W boson and a b quark, sensitivity is needed to leptons, jets and missing transverse energy, or combinations of them. The search is underway. The full coverage of the detector, and the ability to trigger on jets at small angles makes it well suited for studies of quark field (QCD) dynamics. In addition, fine segmentation and good energy resolution allow good measurement of direct photons, revealing the gluon content of

  1. Measurements of $\\sigma(V+D^{*})/\\sigma(V)$ in $9.7$ fb$^{-1}$ at CDF Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matera, Keith [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The Standard Model of particle physics has been remarkably successful, but the non-perturbative features of quantum chromodynamics must be tested and modeled with data. There have been many such tests, focused primarily on the use of jet-based probes of heavy flavor (bottom and charm quark) production at hadron colliders. In this thesis, we propose and test a strategy for identifying heavy flavor in events containing a W or Z vector boson (a V boson); this technique probes a much lower energy regime than can be explored by jet-based methods. In a sample of W and Z events skimmed from 9.7 fb-1 of high- pT electron and muon data from CDF Run II p p collisions at center of mass energy √s = 1:96 GeV , we identify charm by fully reconstructing D* (2010) → D0(→ Kπ )π s decays at the track level. Using a binned fit of Δm=m(Kππ s) m(Kπ ) to count reconstructed D* candidates, we then unfold these raw counts with acceptance values derived from Monte Carlo, and present measurements of σ(W + D* )/ σ(W) and σ(Z + D* )/ σ(Z) in the W/Z leptonic decay channels. All measurements are found to be in agreement with the predictions of Pythia 6.2 (PDF set CTEQ5L). These results include the first measurement of W/Z + c production in events with zero jet objects at the Tevatron, and the first measurement of W/Z +c production with pT (c) < 15 GeV at the Tevatron.

  2. The B-Physics Programme of ATLAS in LHC Run-II and in HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Reznicek, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Slides for the talk to be given at Beauty 2014 conference in Edinburgh, 14-18 July 2014. The talk describes the ATLAS B-physics programme planned to future LHC runs: Run 2, 3 and HL-LHC. The relevant ATLAS detector upgrades are dicussed and a results of pilot sensitivity study of $B_{s} \\to J/\\psi \\phi$ measurement in the future runs are shown.

  3. The ACP (Advanced Computer Program) multiprocessor system at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, T.; Areti, H.; Atac, R.; Biel, J.; Case, G.; Cook, A.; Fischler, M.; Gaines, I.; Hance, R.; Husby, D.

    1986-09-01

    The Advanced Computer Program at Fermilab has developed a multiprocessor system which is easy to use and uniquely cost effective for many high energy physics problems. The system is based on single board computers which cost under $2000 each to build including 2 Mbytes of on board memory. These standard VME modules each run experiment reconstruction code in Fortran at speeds approaching that of a VAX 11/780. Two versions have been developed: one uses Motorola's 68020 32 bit microprocessor, the other runs with AT and T's 32100. both include the corresponding floating point coprocessor chip. The first system, when fully configured, uses 70 each of the two types of processors. A 53 processor system has been operated for several months with essentially no down time by computer operators in the Fermilab Computer Center, performing at nearly the capacity of 6 CDC Cyber 175 mainframe computers. The VME crates in which the processing ''nodes'' sit are connected via a high speed ''Branch Bus'' to one or more MicroVAX computers which act as hosts handling system resource management and all I/O in offline applications. An interface from Fastbus to the Branch Bus has been developed for online use which has been tested error free at 20 Mbytes/sec for 48 hours. ACP hardware modules are now available commercially. A major package of software, including a simulator that runs on any VAX, has been developed. It allows easy migration of existing programs to this multiprocessor environment. This paper describes the ACP Multiprocessor System and early experience with it at Fermilab and elsewhere.

  4. The ACP [Advanced Computer Program] multiprocessor system at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, T.; Areti, H.; Atac, R.

    1986-09-01

    The Advanced Computer Program at Fermilab has developed a multiprocessor system which is easy to use and uniquely cost effective for many high energy physics problems. The system is based on single board computers which cost under $2000 each to build including 2 Mbytes of on board memory. These standard VME modules each run experiment reconstruction code in Fortran at speeds approaching that of a VAX 11/780. Two versions have been developed: one uses Motorola's 68020 32 bit microprocessor, the other runs with AT and T's 32100. both include the corresponding floating point coprocessor chip. The first system, when fully configured, uses 70 each of the two types of processors. A 53 processor system has been operated for several months with essentially no down time by computer operators in the Fermilab Computer Center, performing at nearly the capacity of 6 CDC Cyber 175 mainframe computers. The VME crates in which the processing ''nodes'' sit are connected via a high speed ''Branch Bus'' to one or more MicroVAX computers which act as hosts handling system resource management and all I/O in offline applications. An interface from Fastbus to the Branch Bus has been developed for online use which has been tested error free at 20 Mbytes/sec for 48 hours. ACP hardware modules are now available commercially. A major package of software, including a simulator that runs on any VAX, has been developed. It allows easy migration of existing programs to this multiprocessor environment. This paper describes the ACP Multiprocessor System and early experience with it at Fermilab and elsewhere

  5. Running the running

    OpenAIRE

    Cabass, Giovanni; Di Valentino, Eleonora; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Pajer, Enrico; Silk, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    We use the recent observations of Cosmic Microwave Background temperature and polarization anisotropies provided by the Planck satellite experiment to place constraints on the running $\\alpha_\\mathrm{s} = \\mathrm{d}n_{\\mathrm{s}} / \\mathrm{d}\\log k$ and the running of the running $\\beta_{\\mathrm{s}} = \\mathrm{d}\\alpha_{\\mathrm{s}} / \\mathrm{d}\\log k$ of the spectral index $n_{\\mathrm{s}}$ of primordial scalar fluctuations. We find $\\alpha_\\mathrm{s}=0.011\\pm0.010$ and $\\beta_\\mathrm{s}=0.027\\...

  6. Search for the decays B_{(s)};{0} --> e;{+} micro;{-} and B_{(s)};{0} --> e;{+} e;{-} in CDF run II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzurri, P; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burke, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Chwalek, T; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lucchesi, D; Luci, C; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neubauer, S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Griso, S Pagan; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Peiffer, T; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Renz, M; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Rutherford, B; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Trovato, M; Tsai, S-Y; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Weinelt, J; Wenzel, H; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2009-05-22

    We report results from a search for the lepton flavor violating decays B_{s};{0} --> e;{+} micro;{-} and B;{0} --> e;{+} micro;{-}, and the flavor-changing neutral-current decays B_{s};{0} --> e;{+} e;{-} and B;{0} --> e;{+} e;{-}. The analysis uses data corresponding to 2 fb;{-1} of integrated luminosity of pp[over ] collisions at sqrt[s] = 1.96 TeV collected with the upgraded Collider Detector (CDF II) at the Fermilab Tevatron. The observed number of B0 and B_{s};{0} candidates is consistent with background expectations. The resulting Bayesian upper limits on the branching ratios at 90% credibility level are B(B_{s};{0} --> e;{+} micro;{-}) e;{+} micro;{-}) e;{+} e;{-}) e;{+} e;{-}) e;{+} micro;{-}), the following lower bounds on the Pati-Salam leptoquark masses are also derived: M_{LQ}(B_{s};{0} --> e;{+} micro;{-}) > 47.8 TeV/c;{2}, and M_{LQ}(B;{0} --> e;{+} micro;{-}) > 59.3 TeV / c;{2}, at 90% credibility level.

  7. Standard beam PWC for Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenker, H.

    1983-02-01

    As one of its projects the Fermilab Experimental Areas Department has been designed and tested a relatively small proportional wire chamber for use in the secondary beam lines. It is intended to supplement the variety of detectors known in the vernacular as SWICS that are used to obtain profiles for beam tuning. The new detector, described in this report, operates in the limited proportional mode and allows experimenters to use a standard, lab supported device for associating trajectories of individual beam particles with events triggering their own experiment's apparatus. A completed triple plane module is shown

  8. Fermilab enters the Tevatron era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Southworth, B.

    1985-01-01

    The advent of the world's first superconducting accelerator/storage ring has transformed the physics programme at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The primary and secondary beam energies (and the coming colliding beam energies) are double those previously available at Fermilab and at the CERN SPS. There is heavy investment in the fixed target programme to use these beam energies and, at present, even more pressure is driving the preparations for proton-antiproton colliding beam operation at energies up to 1 TeV per beam. Since it is the revitalized machine which is making all this possible, we begin with news on machine performance and development. (orig.).

  9. Physics at an upgraded Fermilab proton driver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geer, S.; /Fermilab

    2005-07-01

    In 2004 the Fermilab Long Range Planning Committee identified a new high intensity Proton Driver as an attractive option for the future, primarily motivated by the recent exciting developments in neutrino physics. Over the last few months a physics study has developed the physics case for the Fermilab Proton Driver. The potential physics opportunities are discussed.

  10. Fermilab Friends for Science Education | Contact Us

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermilab Friends for Science Education FFSE Home About Us Join Us Support Us Contact Us Contact Us Science Education P.O Box 500, MS 777 Batavia, IL 60510-5011 (630) 840-3094 * fax: (630) 840-2500 E-mail : Membership Send all other communications to: Susan Dahl, President Fermilab Friends for Science Education Box

  11. Neutrino SuperBeams at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parke, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    In this talk I will give a brief description of long baseline neutrino physics, the LBNE experiment and Project X at Fermilab. A brief outline of the physics of long baseline neutrino experiments, LBNE and Project X at Fermilab is given in this talk.

  12. Tunneling beyond the Fermilab site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, S.; Elwyn, A.; Lach, J.; Read, A.

    1983-01-01

    An accelerator that crosses the Fermilab site boundary must have a minimum effect on the surrounding environment and the people residing in the area. Unobstructed public access should be allowed above the ring except in relatively few areas such as the injection, dump, and experimental regions. The accelerator should be a benign and unobtrusive neighbor not only when it is completed but also in the construction period. For these reasons underground tunneling for all or most of the ring seems attractive. In this note we look into some questions raised by tunneling beyond the Fermilab site. Most of our discussion is of general applicability. However, we will use as examples two specific ring configurations. The examples have not been optimized from the point of view of physics output or accelerator technology but are just specific examples which allow us to study questions of tunneling. One is a ring of 5 km radius (5 TeV) tangent to the Tevatron and entirely east of the Fox River and fed by a beam from the Tevatron which crosses under the river. We assume that each of these machines will have 100 beam fills per year and we scale the maximum intensities with the accelerator radii. Thus we assume that there will be 1.0 E14 protons in each beam of the 20 TeV machine and 2.5 E13 for the 5 TeV machine

  13. Extruding plastic scintillator at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pla-Dalmau, Anna; Bross, Alain D.; Rykalin, Viktor V.

    2003-01-01

    An understanding of the costs involved in the production of plastic scintillators and the development of a less expensive material have become necessary with the prospects of building very large plastic scintillation detectors. Several factors contribute to the high cost of plastic scintillating sheets, but the principal reason is the labor-intensive nature of the manufacturing process. In order to significantly lower the costs, the current casting procedures had to be abandoned. Since polystyrene is widely used in the consumer industry, the logical path was to investigate the extrusion of commercial-grade polystyrene pellets with dopants to yield high quality plastic scintillator. This concept was tested and high quality extruded plastic scintillator was produced. The D0 and MINOS experiments are already using extruded scintillator strips in their detectors. An extrusion line has recently been installed at Fermilab in collaboration with NICADD (Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development). This new facility will serve to further develop and improve extruded plastic scintillator. This paper will discuss the characteristics of extruded plastic scintillator and its raw materials, the different manufacturing techniques and the current R andD program at Fermilab

  14. Evaluation report on CCTF Core-II reflood tests C2-AC1 (run 51) and C2-4 (run 62)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Jun; Iguchi, Tadashi; Murao, Yoshio

    1984-02-01

    A reflood test program has been conducted at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) using large scale test facilities named Cylindrical Core Test Facility (CCTF) and Slab Core Test Facility (SCTF). The present report describes the effect of the initial clad temperature i.e., the initial stored energy on reflood phenomena observed in CCTF Core-II tests C2-ACl and C2-4. The peak clad temperatures of tests C2-ACl and C2-4 were 863 K and 1069 K, respectively at reflood initiation. With higher initial clad temperature, obtained were lower water accumulation in the core and upper plenum, and higher loop mass flow rate in an early reflood transient due to larger heat release of the stored energy in the core. Core inlet flow conditions were only affected shortly after the reflood initiation, causing the suppressed flooding rate and the larger U-tube flow oscillation between the core and the downcomer. In the core, with higher initial clad temperature, slower quench front propagation and higher turnaround temperature were observed. Responses to a higher initial clad temperature were similar to those observed in CCTF Core-I and FLECHT tests. Thus, the lower temperature rise with higher initial clad temperature was experimentally confirmed. The importance of higher flooding rate at initial period was analytically shown for further decreasing the temperature rise. (author)

  15. The Fermilab proton-antiproton collider upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marriner, J.P.

    1996-10-01

    The plans for increases in the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider luminosity in the near future (Run II) and the more distant future (TeV33) are described. While there are many important issues, the fundamental requirement is to produce more antiprotons and to use them more efficiently

  16. Fermilab Muon g-2 Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorringe, Tim [Kentucky U.

    2017-12-22

    The Fermilab muon g-2 experiment will measure the muon anomalous magnetic moment $a_{\\mu}$ to 140 ppb – a four-fold improvement over the earlier Brookhaven experiment. The measurement of $a_{\\mu}$ is well known as a unique test of the standard model with broad sensitivity to new interactions, particles and phenomena. The goal of 140 ppb is commensurate with ongoing improvements in the SM prediction of the anomalous moment and addresses the longstanding 3.5$\\sigma$ discrepancy between the BNL result and the SM prediction. In this article I discuss the physics motivation and experimental technique for measuring $a_{\\mu}$, and the current status and the future work for the project.

  17. Fermilab muon g-2 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorringe, Tim

    2018-05-01

    The Fermilab muon g-2 experiment will measure the muon anomalous magnetic moment aμ to 140 ppb - a four-fold improvement over the earlier Brookhaven experiment. The measurement of aμ is well known as a unique test of the standard model with broad sensitivity to new interactions, particles and phenomena. The goal of 140 ppb is commensurate with ongoing improvements in the SM prediction of the anomalous moment and addresses the longstanding 3.5σ discrepancy between the BNL result and the SM prediction. In this article I discuss the physics motivation and experimental technique for measuring aμ, and the current status and the future work for the project.

  18. Supporting multiple control systems at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicklaus, Dennis J.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    The Fermilab control system, ACNET, is used for controlling the Tevatron and all of its pre-accelerators. However, other smaller experiments at Fermilab have been using different controls systems, in particular DOOCS and EPICS. This paper reports some of the steps taken at Fermilab to integrate support for these outside systems. We will describe specific tools that we have built or adapted to facilitate interaction between the architectures. We also examine some of the difficulties that arise from managing this heterogeneous environment. Incompatibilities as well as common elements will be described.

  19. The Muon g-2 experiment at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapelain, Antoine [Cornell U., Phys. Dept.

    2017-01-01

    The upcoming Fermilab E989 experiment will measure the muon anomalous magnetic moment aμ. This measurement is motivated by the previous measurement performed in 2001 by the BNL E821 experiment that reported a 3-4 standard deviation discrepancy between the measured value and the Standard Model prediction. The new measurement at Fermilab aims to improve the precision by a factor of four reducing the total uncertainty from 540 parts per billion (BNL E821) to 140 parts per billion (Fermilab E989). This paper gives the status of the experiment.

  20. Physics at a New Fermilab Proton Driver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geer, Steve

    2005-01-01

    In 2004 the Fermilab Long Range Planning Committee identified a new high intensity Proton Driver as an attractive option for the future, primarily motivated by the recent exciting developments in neutrino physics. The Fermilab Director has requested further development of the physics case for a new Fermilab Proton Driver, exploring both its ability to support a World class neutrino program, and the other physics opportunities it would provide. A physics study has been ongoing for the last 6 months. The emerging physics case will be presented.

  1. Search for Excited or Exotic Electron Production Using the Dielectron + Photon Signature at CDF in Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerberich, Heather Kay [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The author presents a search for excited or exotic electrons decaying to an electron and a photon with high transverse momentum. An oppositely charged electron is produced in association with the excited electron, yielding a final state dielectron + photon signature. The discovery of excited electrons would be a first indication of lepton compositeness. They use ~ 202 pb-1 of data collected in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV with the Collider Detector at Fermilab during March 2001 through September 2003. The data are consistent with standard model expectations. Upper limits are set on the experimental cross-section σ($\\bar{p}$p → ee* → eeγ) at the 95% confidence level in a contact-interaction model and a gauge-mediated interaction model. Limits are also presented as exclusion regions in the parameter space of the excited electron mass (Me*) and the compositeness energy scale (Λ). In the contact-interaction model, for which there are no previously published limits, they find Me* < 906 GeV is excluded for Me* = Λ. In the gauge-mediated model, the exclusion region in the Me* versus the phenomenological coupling f/Λ parameter space is extended to M{sub e*} < 430 GeV for f/Λ ~ 10-2 GeV-1. In comparison, other experiments have excluded Me* < 280 GeV for f/Λ ~ 10-2 GeV-1.

  2. New Pulsed Orbit Bump Magnets for the Fermilab Booster Synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    Lackey, James; John, Carson; Kashikhin, Vladimir; Makarov, Alexander; Prebys, Eric

    2005-01-01

    The beam from the Fermilab Linac is injected onto a bump in the closed orbit of the Booster Synchrotron where a carbon foil strips the electrons from the Linac’s negative ion hydrogen beam. Although the Booster itself runs at 15Hz, heat dissipation in the orbit bump magnets has been one limitation to the fraction of the cycles that can be used for beam. New, 0.28T pulsed window frame dipole magnets have been constructed that will fit into the same space as the old ones, run at the full repetition rate of the Booster, and provide a larger bump to allow a cleaner injection orbit. The new magnets use a high saturation flux density Ni-Zn ferrite in the yoke rather than laminated steel. The presented magnetic design includes two and three dimensional magnetic field calculations with eddy currents and ferrite nonlinear effects.

  3. FERMILAB: Tevatron upgrade; Magnetic precession in bent crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1993-01-15

    The Fermilab accelerator complex is in the middle of a major upgrade to increase the luminosity beyond the original design goal. During Phase I of this upgrade, there have been major modifications to the Tevatron. These modifications were commissioned at the start of the latest collider run and include the installation of electrostatic separators to separate the orbits of the stored beams and new low beta insertions to squeeze the colliding proton and antiproton beams at both experiment interaction regions. These modifications have already enabled the Tevatron to achieve a record peak luminosity of 6.93 x 10{sup 30} per sq cm per s and a record weekly integrated luminosity of 10{sup 60} inverse nanobarns. The peak goal for the present run of 5.0 x 10{sup 30} has already been exceeded.

  4. FERMILAB: Tevatron upgrade; Magnetic precession in bent crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The Fermilab accelerator complex is in the middle of a major upgrade to increase the luminosity beyond the original design goal. During Phase I of this upgrade, there have been major modifications to the Tevatron. These modifications were commissioned at the start of the latest collider run and include the installation of electrostatic separators to separate the orbits of the stored beams and new low beta insertions to squeeze the colliding proton and antiproton beams at both experiment interaction regions. These modifications have already enabled the Tevatron to achieve a record peak luminosity of 6.93 x 10 30 per sq cm per s and a record weekly integrated luminosity of 10 60 inverse nanobarns. The peak goal for the present run of 5.0 x 10 30 has already been exceeded

  5. A Study of The Standard Model Higgs, WW and ZZ Production in Dilepton Plus Missing Transverse Energy Final State at CDF Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Shih-Chieh [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    We report on a search for Standard Model (SM) production of Higgs to WW* in the two charged lepton (e, μ) and two neutrino final state in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at a center of mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV. The data were collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 1.9fb-1. The Matrix Element method is developed to calculate the event probability and to construct a likelihood ratio discriminator. There are 522 candidates observed with an expectation of 513 ± 41 background events and 7.8 ± 0.6 signal events for Higgs mass 160GeV/c2 at next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic level calculation. The observed 95% C.L. upper limit is 0.8 pb which is 2.0 times the SM prediction while the median expected limit is 3.1$+1.3\\atop{-0.9}$ with systematics included. Results for 9 other Higgs mass hypotheses ranging from 110GeV/c2 to 200GeV/c2 are also presented. The same dilepton plus large transverse energy imbalance (ET) final state is used in the SM ZZ production search and the WW production study. The observed significance of ZZ → llvv channel is 1.2σ. It adds extra significance to the ZZ → 4l channel and leads to a strong evidence of ZZ production with 4.4 σ significance. The potential improvement of the anomalous triple gauge coupling measurement by using the Matrix Element method in WW production is also studied.

  6. Performance of the CMS precision electromagnetic calorimeter at the LHC Run II and prospects for high-luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Negro, Giulia

    2017-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) is a high-performance calorimeter wich will operate also at the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC). This talk will describe the strategies that have been employed to maintain the excellent performance of the CMS ECAL throughout Run 2. Performance results from the 2015-2016 data taking periods will be shown and an outlook on the expected Run 2 performance in the years to come will be provided. The status and plans for the upgraded ECAL barrel electronics for the HL-LHC will be presented, based on recent results from simulations, laboratory tests, and test beam measurements of prototype devices.

  7. Cryogenic System for the Cryomodule Test Stand at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Michael J. [Fermilab; Hansen, Benjamin [Fermilab; Klebaner, Arkadiy [Fermilab

    2017-10-09

    This paper describes the cryogenic system for the Cryomodule Test Stand (CMTS) at the new Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF) located at Fermilab. CMTS is designed for production testing of the 1.3 GHz and 3.9GHz cryomodules to be used in the Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLSII), which is an upgrade to an existing accelerator at Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC). This paper will focus on the cryogenic system that extends from the helium refrigeration plant to the CMTS cave. Topics covered will include component design, installation and commissioning progress, and operational plans. The paper will conclude with a description of the heat load measurement plan.

  8. Physics History Books in the Fermilab Library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sara Tompson.

    1999-09-17

    Fermilab is a basic research high-energy physics laboratory operated by Universities Research Association, Inc. under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy. Fermilab researchers utilize the Tevatron particle accelerator (currently the worlds most powerful accelerator) to better understand subatomic particles as they exist now and as they existed near the birth of the universe. A collection review of the Fermilab Library monographs was conducted during the summers of 1998 and 1999. While some items were identified for deselection, the review proved most fruitful in highlighting some of the strengths of the Fermilab monograph collection. One of these strengths is history of physics, including biographies and astrophysics. A bibliography of the physics history books in the collection as of Summer, 1999 follows, arranged by author. Note that the call numbers are Library of Congress classification.

  9. Physics History Books in the Fermilab Library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tompson, Sara

    1999-01-01

    Fermilab is a basic research high-energy physics laboratory operated by Universities Research Association, Inc. under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy. Fermilab researchers utilize the Tevatron particle accelerator (currently the worlds most powerful accelerator) to better understand subatomic particles as they exist now and as they existed near the birth of the universe. A collection review of the Fermilab Library monographs was conducted during the summers of 1998 and 1999. While some items were identified for deselection, the review proved most fruitful in highlighting some of the strengths of the Fermilab monograph collection. One of these strengths is history of physics, including biographies and astrophysics. A bibliography of the physics history books in the collection as of Summer, 1999 follows, arranged by author. Note that the call numbers are Library of Congress classification

  10. Wanted: Fermilab director who can build consensus

    CERN Multimedia

    Pierce, G M

    2004-01-01

    "With current Fermilab Director Michael Witherell stepping down in July 2005, an appointed committee has vowed to find a new leader who will keep the Batavia lab at the forefront of the high-energy physics field" (1 page).

  11. City shows gratitude for Fermilab relationship

    CERN Multimedia

    Pierce, Gala

    2006-01-01

    "Part of last week Batavia Chamber of Commerce celebration wasn't just to salute one of Batavia's heroes - Carla Hill - but to commemorate a 40-year relationship between the city and Fermilab" (1 page)

  12. A precise measurement of the $W$-boson mass with the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero; Amidei, Dante E; Anastassov, Anton Iankov; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, Giorgio; Appel, Jeffrey A; Arisawa, Tetsuo; Artikov, Akram Muzafarovich; Asaadi, Jonathan A; Ashmanskas, William Joseph; Auerbach, Benjamin; Aurisano, Adam J; Azfar, Farrukh A; Badgett, William Farris; Bae, Taegil; Barbaro-Galtieri, Angela; Barnes, Virgil E; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Barreiro Guimaraes da Costa, Joao; Barria, Patrizia; Bartos, Pavol; Bauce, Matteo; Bedeschi, Franco; Beecher, Daniel Paul; Behari, Satyajit; Bellettini, Giorgio; Bellinger, James Nugent; Benjamin, Douglas P; Beretvas, Andrew F; Bhatti, Anwar Ahmad; Bizjak, Ilija; Bland, Karen Renee; Blumenfeld, Barry J; Bocci, Andrea; Bodek, Arie; Bortoletto, Daniela; Boudreau, Joseph Francis; Boveia, Antonio; Brigliadori, Luca; Bromberg, Carl Michael; Brucken, Erik; Budagov, Ioulian A; Budd, Howard Scott; Burkett, Kevin Alan; Busetto, Giovanni; Bussey, Peter John; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buzatu, Adrian; Calamba, Aristotle; Camarda, Stefano; Campanelli, Mario; Canelli, Florencia; Carls, Benjamin; Carlsmith, Duncan L; Carosi, Roberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Casal Larana, Bruno; Casarsa, Massimo; Castro, Andrea; Catastini, Pierluigi; Cauz, Diego; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Chen, Yen-Chu; Chertok, Maxwell Benjamin; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chlachidze, Gouram; Cho, Kihyeon; Chokheli, Davit; Clark, Allan Geoffrey; Clarke, Christopher Joseph; Convery, Mary Elizabeth; Conway, John Stephen; Corbo, Matteo; Cordelli, Marco; Cox, Charles Alexander; Cox, David Jeremy; Cremonesi, Matteo; Cruz Alonso, Daniel; Cuevas Maestro, Javier; Culbertson, Raymond Lloyd; D'Ascenzo, Nicola; Datta, Mousumi; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demortier, Luc M; Deninno, Maria Maddalena; D'Errico, Maria; Devoto, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruzza, Benedetto; Dittmann, Jay Richard; Donati, Simone; D'Onofrio, Monica; Dorigo, Mirco; Driutti, Anna; Ebina, Koji; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Elagin, Andrey L; Erbacher, Robin D; Errede, Steven Michael; Esham, Benjamin; Eusebi, Ricardo; Farrington, Sinead Marie; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Field, Richard D; Flanagan, Gene U; Forrest, Robert David; Franklin, Melissa EB; Freeman, John Christian; Frisch, Henry J; Funakoshi, Yujiro; Galloni, Camilla; Garfinkel, Arthur F; Garosi, Paola; Gerberich, Heather Kay; Gerchtein, Elena A; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Gibson, Karen Ruth; Ginsburg, Camille Marie; Giokaris, Nikos D; Giromini, Paolo; Giurgiu, Gavril A; Glagolev, Vladimir; Glenzinski, Douglas Andrew; Gold, Michael S; Goldin, Daniel; Golossanov, Alexander; Gomez, Gervasio; Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim T; González López, Oscar; Gorelov, Igor V; Goshaw, Alfred T; Goulianos, Konstantin A; Gramellini, Elena; Grinstein, Sebastian; Grosso-Pilcher, Carla; Group, Robert Craig; Hahn, Stephen R; Han, Ji-Yeon; Happacher, Fabio; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hare, Matthew Frederick; Harr, Robert Francis; Harrington-Taber, Timothy; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Hays, Christopher Paul; Heinrich, Joel G; Herndon, Matthew Fairbanks; Hocker, James Andrew; Hong, Ziqing; Hopkins, Walter Howard; Hou, Suen Ray; Hughes, Richard Edward; Husemann, Ulrich; Hussein, Mohammad; Huston, Joey Walter; Introzzi, Gianluca; Iori, Maurizio; Ivanov, Andrew Gennadievich; James, Eric B; Jang, Dongwook; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha Anjalike; Jeon, Eun-Ju; Jindariani, Sergo Robert; Jones, Matthew T; Joo, Kyung Kwang; Jun, Soon Yung; Junk, Thomas R; Kambeitz, Manuel; Kamon, Teruki; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kasmi, Azeddine; Kato, Yukihiro; Ketchum, Wesley Robert; Keung, Justin Kien; Kilminster, Benjamin John; Kim, DongHee; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, Jieun; Kim, Min Jeong; Kim, Shin-Hong; Kim, Soo Bong; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kirby, Michael H; Knoepfel, Kyle James; Kondo, Kunitaka; Kong, Dae Jung; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Kotwal, Ashutosh Vijay; Kreps, Michal; Kroll, IJoseph; Kruse, Mark Charles; Kuhr, Thomas; Kurata, Masakazu; Laasanen, Alvin Toivo; Lammel, Stephan; Lancaster, Mark; Lannon, Kevin Patrick; Latino, Giuseppe; Lee, Hyun Su; Lee, Jaison; Leo, Sabato; Leone, Sandra; Lewis, Jonathan D; Limosani, Antonio; Lipeles, Elliot David; Lister, Alison; Liu, Hao; Liu, Qiuguang; Liu, Tiehui Ted; Lockwitz, Sarah E; Loginov, Andrey Borisovich; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucà, Alessandra; Lueck, Jan; Lujan, Paul Joseph; Lukens, Patrick Thomas; Lungu, Gheorghe; Lys, Jeremy E; Lysak, Roman; Madrak, Robyn Leigh; Maestro, Paolo; Malik, Sarah Alam; Manca, Giulia; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Marchese, Luigi; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Marino, Christopher Phillip; Martínez-Perez, Mario; Matera, Keith; Mattson, Mark Edward; Mazzacane, Anna; Mazzanti, Paolo; McNulty, Ronan; Mehta, Andrew; Mehtala, Petteri; Mesropian, Christina; Miao, Ting; Mietlicki, David John; Mitra, Ankush; Miyake, Hideki; Moed, Shulamit; Moggi, Niccolo; Moon, Chang-Seong; Moore, Ronald Scott; Morello, Michael Joseph; Mukherjee, Aseet; Muller, Thomas; Murat, Pavel A; Mussini, Manuel; Nachtman, Jane Marie; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Naganoma, Junji; Nakano, Itsuo; Napier, Austin; Nett, Jason Michael; Neu, Christopher Carl; Nigmanov, Turgun S; Nodulman, Lawrence J; Noh, Seoyoung; Norniella Francisco, Olga; Nurse, Emily L; Oakes, Louise Beth; Oh, Seog Hwan; Oh, Young-do; Oksuzian, Iuri Artur; Okusawa, Toru; Orava, Risto Olavi; Ortolan, Lorenzo; Pagliarone, Carmine Elvezio; Palencia, Jose Enrique; Palni, Prabhakar; Papadimitriou, Vaia; Parker, William Chesluk; Pauletta, Giovanni; Paulini, Manfred; Paus, Christoph Maria Ernst; Phillips, Thomas J; Piacentino, Giovanni M; Pianori, Elisabetta; Pilot, Justin Robert; Pitts, Kevin T; Plager, Charles; Pondrom, Lee G; Poprocki, Stephen; Potamianos, Karolos Jozef; Pranko, Aliaksandr Pavlovich; Prokoshin, Fedor; Ptohos, Fotios K; Punzi, Giovanni; Ranjan, Niharika; Redondo Fernández, Ignacio; Renton, Peter B; Rescigno, Marco; Riddick, Thomas C; Rimondi, Franco; Ristori, Luciano; Robson, Aidan; Rodriguez, Tatiana Isabel; Rolli, Simona; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roser, Robert Martin; Rosner, Jonathan L; Ruffini, Fabrizio; Ruiz Jimeno, Alberto; Russ, James S; Rusu, Vadim Liviu; Sakumoto, Willis Kazuo; Sakurai, Yuki; Santi, Lorenzo; Sato, Koji; Saveliev, Valeri; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Schlabach, Philip; Schmidt, Eugene E; Schwarz, Thomas A; Scodellaro, Luca; Scuri, Fabrizio; Seidel, Sally C; Seiya, Yoshihiro; Semenov, Alexei; Sforza, Federico; Shalhout, Shalhout Zaki; Shears, Tara G; Shekhar, Ravi; Shepard, Paul F; Shimojima, Makoto; Shochet, Melvyn J; Simonenko, Alexander V; Sliwa, Krzysztof Jan; Smith, John Rodgers; Snider, Frederick Douglas; Song, Hao; Sorin, Maria Veronica; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stancari, Michelle Dawn; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stentz, Dale James; Strologas, John; Sudo, Yuji; Sukhanov, Alexander I; Sun, Siyuan; Suslov, Igor M; Takemasa, Ken-ichi; Takeuchi, Yuji; Tang, Jian; Tecchio, Monica; Tecker-Shreyber, Irina; Teng, Ping-Kun; Thom, Julia; Thomson, Evelyn Jean; Thukral, Vaikunth; Toback, David A; Tokar, Stanislav; Tollefson, Kirsten Anne; Tomura, Tomonobu; Tonelli, Diego; Torre, Stefano; Torretta, Donatella; Totaro, Pierluigi; Trovato, Marco; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Uozumi, Satoru; Vázquez-Valencia, Elsa Fabiola; Velev, Gueorgui; Vellidis, Konstantinos; Vernieri, Caterina; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Vizán Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Vogel, Marcelo; Volpi, Guido; Wagner, Peter; Wallny, Rainer S; Wang, Song-Ming; Waters, David S; Wester, William Carl; Whiteson, Daniel O; Wicklund, Arthur Barry; Wilbur, Scott; Williams, Hugh H; Wilson, Jonathan Samuel; Wilson, Peter James; Winer, Brian L; Wittich, Peter; Wolbers, Stephen A; Wolfe, Homer; Wright, Thomas Roland; Wu, Xin; Wu, Zhenbin; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Yamato, Daisuke; Yang, Tingjun; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yu Chul; Yao, Wei-Ming; Yeh, Gong Ping; Yi, Kai; Yoh, John; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Takuo; Yu, Geum Bong; Yu, Intae; Zanetti, Anna Maria; Zeng, Yu; Zhou, Chen; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2014-04-03

    We present a measurement of the $W$-boson mass, $M_W$, using data corresponding to 2.2/fb of integrated luminosity collected in ppbar collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.96 TeV with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The selected sample of 470126 $W\\to e\

  13. Abort kicker power supply systems at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krafczyk, G.; Dugan, G.; Harrison, M.; Koepke, K.; Tilles, E.

    1985-06-01

    Over the past several years, Fermilab has been operating with a single turn proton abort system in both the superconducting Tevatron and the conventional Main Ring. The abort kicker power supply for this system discharges a lumped capacitance into the inductive magnet load, causing the beam to enter the abort channel. The characteristics of this current waveform are defined by the requirements of the machine operation. The standard fixed target running mode calls for 12 booster batches of beam which leaves a rotating gap in the beams of approx.1.8 μs. The current waveform is required to rise to 90% of I/sub max/ in this time to avoid beam loss from partially deflected beam. Aperture limitations in both the accelerator and the abort channel demand that the current in the magnets stays above this 90% I/sub max/ for the 21 μs needed to ensure all the beam has left the machine. The 25 mm displacement needed to cleanly enter the abort channel at 1 TeV corresponds to a maximum current in each of the 4 modules of approx.20 kA. Similar constraints are needed for the Main Ring and Tevatron antiproton abort systems. A unique feature of this design is the high voltage, high current diode assembly used to clip the recharge of the capacitor bank. This allows the current to decay slowly with the L/R time constant of the magnet and diode series combination. Special attention is given to the diode characteristics needed for this passive switching element. Operational experience and proposed upgrades are given for the two operational systems. 2 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  14. Abort kicker power supply systems at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krafczyk, G.; Dugan, G.; Harrison, M.; Koepke, K.; Tilles, E.

    1985-01-01

    Over the past several years, Fermilab has been operating with a single turn proton abort system in both the superconducting Tevatron and the conventional Main Ring. The abort kicker power supply for this system discharges a lumped capacitance into the inductive magnet load, causing the beam to enter the abort channel. The characteristics of this current waveform are defined by the requirements of the machine operation. The standard fixed target running mode calls for 12 booster batches of beam which leaves a rotating gap in the beam of about1.8 μs. The current waveform is required to rise to 90% of I /SUB max/ in this time to avoid beam loss from partially deflected beam. Aperture limitations in both the accelerator and the abort channel demand that the current in the magnets stays above this 90% I for the 21 μs needed to ensure all the beam has /SUP max/ left the machine. The 25 mm displacement needed to cleanly enter the abort channel at 1 TeV corresponds to a maximum current in each of the 4 modules of about20 kA. Similar constraints are needed for the Main Ring and Tevatron antiproton abort systems. A unique feature of this design is the high voltage, high current diode assembly used to clip the recharge of the capacitor bank. This allows the current to decay slowly with the L/R time constant of the magnet and diode series combination. Special attention will be given to the diode characteristics needed for this passive switching element. Operational experience and proposed upgrades will be given for the two operational systems

  15. Dual-use tools and systematics-aware analysis workflows in the ATLAS Run-II analysis model

    CERN Document Server

    FARRELL, Steven; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS analysis model has been overhauled for the upcoming run of data collection in 2015 at 13 TeV. One key component of this upgrade was the Event Data Model (EDM), which now allows for greater flexibility in the choice of analysis software framework and provides powerful new features that can be exploited by analysis software tools. A second key component of the upgrade is the introduction of a dual-use tool technology, which provides abstract interfaces for analysis software tools to run in either the Athena framework or a ROOT-based framework. The tool interfaces, including a new interface for handling systematic uncertainties, have been standardized for the development of improved analysis workflows and consolidation of high-level analysis tools. This presentation will cover the details of the dual-use tool functionality, the systematics interface, and how these features fit into a centrally supported analysis environment.

  16. Fermilab Recycler Collimation System Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, B. C. [Fermilab; Adamson, P. [Fermilab; Ainsworth, R. [Fermilab; Capista, D. [Fermilab; Hazelwood, K. [Fermilab; Kourbanis, I. [Fermilab; Mokhov, N. V. [Fermilab; Morris, D. K. [Fermilab; Murphy, M. [Fermilab; Sidorov, V. [Fermilab; Stern, E. [Fermilab; Tropin, I. [Fermilab; Yang, M-J. [Fermilab

    2016-10-04

    To provide 700 kW proton beams for neutrino production in the NuMI facility, we employ slip stacking in the Recycler with transfer to the Main Injector for recapture and acceleration. Slip stacking with 12 Booster batches per 1.33 sec cycle of the Main Injector has been implemented and briefly tested while extensive operation with 8 batches and 10 batches per MI cycle has been demonstrated. Operation in this mode since 2013 shows that loss localization is an essential component for long term operation. Beam loss in the Recycler will be localized in a collimation region with design capability for absorbing up to 2 kW of lost protons in a pair of 20-Ton collimators (absorbers). This system will employ a two stage collimation with a thin molybdenum scattering foil to define the bottom edge of both the injected and decelerated-for-slipping beams. Optimization and engineering design of the collimator components and radiation shielding are based on comprehensive MARS15 simulations predicting high collimation efficiency as well as tolerable levels of prompt and residual radiation. The system installation during the Fermilab 2016 facility shutdown will permit commissioning in the subsequent operating period.

  17. CP violation experiment at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsiung, Yee B.

    1990-07-01

    The E731 experiment at Fermilab has searched for ''direct'' CP violation in K 0 → ππ, which is parametrized by var-epsilon '/var-epsilon. For the first time, in 20% of the data set, all four modes of the K L,S → π + π - (π 0 π 0 ) were collected simultaneously, providing a great check on the systematic uncertainty. The result is Re(var-epsilon '/var-epsilon) = -0.0004 ± 0.0014 (stat) ± 0.0006(syst), which provides no evidence for ''direct'' CP violation. The CPT symmetry has also been tested by measuring the phase difference Δφ = φ 00 - φ ± between the two CP violating parameters η 00 and η ± . We fine Δφ = -0.3 degrees ± 2.4 degree(stat) ± 1.2 degree(syst). Using this together with the world average φ ± , we fine that the phase of the K 0 -bar K 0 mixing parameter var-epsilon is 44.5 degree ± 1.5 degree. Both of these results agree well with the predictions of CPT symmetry. 17 refs., 10 figs

  18. Observation of exclusive dijet production at the Fermilab Tevatron pp collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Maki, T.; Mehtala, P.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Saarikko, H.; Remortel, N. van; Adelman, J.; Brubaker, E.; Fedorko, W. T.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Kim, Y. K.; Kwang, S.; Levy, S.; Paramonov, A. A.; Schmidt, M. A.; Shochet, M.; Wolfe, C.; Yang, U. K.; Yorita, K.

    2008-01-01

    We present the first observation and cross section measurement of exclusive dijet production in pp interactions, pp→p+dijet+p. Using a data sample of 310 pb -1 collected by the Run II Collider Detector at Fermilab at √(s)=1.96 TeV, exclusive cross sections for events with two jets of transverse energy E T jet ≥10 GeV have been measured as a function of minimum E T jet . The exclusive signal is extracted from fits to data distributions based on Monte Carlo simulations of expected dijet signal and background shapes. The simulated background distribution shapes are checked in a study of a largely independent data sample of 200 pb -1 of b-tagged jet events, where exclusive dijet production is expected to be suppressed by the J z =0 total angular momentum selection rule. Results obtained are compared with theoretical expectations, and implications for exclusive Higgs boson production at the pp Large Hadron Collider at √(s)=14 TeV are discussed.

  19. Observation of Exclusive Dijet Production at the Fermilab Tevatron p-pbar Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Gonzalez, B. Alvarez; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Aoki, M.

    2007-01-01

    The authors present the first observation and cross section measurement of exclusive dijet production in (bar p)p interactions, (bar p)p → (bar p) + dijet + p. Using a data sample of 310 pb -1 collected by the Run II Collider Detector at Fermilab at √s = 1.96 TeV, exclusive cross sections for events with two jets of transverse energy E T jet (ge) 10 GeV have been measured as a function of minimum E T jet . The exclusive signal is extracted from fits to data distributions based on Monte Carlo simulations of expected dijet signal and background shapes. The simulated background distribution shapes are checked in a study of a largely independent data sample of 200 pb -1 of b-tagged jet events, where exclusive dijet production is expected to be suppressed by the J z = 0 total angular momentum selection rule. Results obtained are compared with theoretical expectations, and implications for exclusive Higgs boson production at the pp Large Hadron Collider at √s = 14 TeV are discussed

  20. The D0 detector at Fermilab: Recent results and future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoftun, J.S.

    1995-01-01

    The D0 Collaboration at Fermilab consists of about 400 physicists from institutions in 8 countries. The detector built by this collaboration has three main parts, a Central Detector, a liquid Argon - Uranium calorimeter and an outer muon detector. A very successful run was completed in May of 1993; analyses of this data are nearing completion and several physics results have already been presented. Another run started in January of 1994 and is still continuing. Some of the results from the first run, prospects for forthcoming physics results and plans for detector upgrades will be presented in this paper

  1. The Science Training Program for Young Italian Physicists and Engineers at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barzi, Emanuela [Fermilab; Bellettini, Giorgio [INFN, Pisa; Donati, Simone [INFN, Pisa

    2015-03-12

    Since 1984 Fermilab has been hosting a two-month summer training program for selected undergraduate and graduate Italian students in physics and engineering. Building on the traditional close collaboration between the Italian National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN) and Fermilab, the program is supported by INFN, by the DOE and by the Scuola Superiore di Sant`Anna of Pisa (SSSA), and is run by the Cultural Association of Italians at Fermilab (CAIF). This year the University of Pisa has qualified it as a “University of Pisa Summer School”, and will grant successful students with European Supplementary Credits. Physics students join the Fermilab HEP research groups, while engineers join the Particle Physics, Accelerator, Technical, and Computing Divisions. Some students have also been sent to other U.S. laboratories and universities for special trainings. The programs cover topics of great interest for science and for social applications in general, like advanced computing, distributed data analysis, nanoelectronics, particle detectors for earth and space experiments, high precision mechanics, applied superconductivity. In the years, over 350 students have been trained and are now employed in the most diverse fields in Italy, Europe, and the U.S. In addition, the existing Laurea Program in Fermilab Technical Division was extended to the whole laboratory, with presently two students in Master’s thesis programs on neutrino physics and detectors in the Neutrino Division. And finally, a joint venture with the Italian Scientists and Scholars North-America Foundation (ISSNAF) provided this year 4 professional engineers free of charge for Fermilab. More details on all of the above can be found below.

  2. Fermilab experiment E-687: Recent results on charm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shephard, W.D.

    1990-12-01

    About 10 4 charm decays have been reconstructed from first-run data of Fermilab experiment E687 using the Fermilab Wide-Band Photon Spectrometer with the world's highest energy photon beam. Charm selection strategies and preliminary results are discussed. Lifetime values are (.50 ± .06 ± .03)ps for the D s + and (.20 ± .03 ± .03)ps for the Λ c + . Preliminary D + and D 0 lifetimes are consistent with current world averages. Signals for charm baryon and Cabibbo-suppressed charm meson decays are shown. Preliminary branching ratios are: B(D 0 → π + π - π + π - )/B(D 0 → K - π + π + π - ) = .10 ± .02 ± .02; B(D 0 → bar K 0 K + K - )/B(D 0 → bar K 0 π + π - ) = .20 ± .06(stat); B(D 0 → bar K 0 φ)/B(D 0 → bar K 0 π + π - ) = .16 ± .06(stat). Preliminary results are given on D* ± and D ±,0 photoproduction for photon energies from 100 to 350 GeV. 13 refs., 3 figs

  3. On extracting design principles from biology: II. Case study—the effect of knee direction on bipedal robot running efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haberland, M; Kim, S

    2015-01-01

    Comparing the leg of an ostrich to that of a human suggests an important question to legged robot designers: should a robot's leg joint bend in the direction of running (‘forwards’) or opposite (‘backwards’)? Biological studies cannot answer this question for engineers due to significant differences between the biological and engineering domains. Instead, we investigated the inherent effect of joint bending direction on bipedal robot running efficiency by comparing energetically optimal gaits of a wide variety of robot designs sampled at random from a design space. We found that the great majority of robot designs have several locally optimal gaits with the knee bending backwards that are more efficient than the most efficient gait with the knee bending forwards. The most efficient backwards gaits do not exhibit lower touchdown losses than the most efficient forward gaits; rather, the improved efficiency of backwards gaits stems from lower torque and reduced motion at the hip. The reduced hip use of backwards gaits is enabled by the ability of the backwards knee, acting alone, to (1) propel the robot upwards and forwards simultaneously and (2) lift and protract the foot simultaneously. In the absence of other information, designers interested in building efficient bipedal robots with two-segment legs driven by electric motors should design the knee to bend backwards rather than forwards. Compared to common practices for choosing robot knee direction, application of this principle would have a strong tendency to improve robot efficiency and save design resources. (paper)

  4. The Fermilab Accelerator control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogert, Dixon

    1986-06-01

    With the advent of the Tevatron, considerable upgrades have been made to the controls of all the Fermilab Accelerators. The current system is based on making as large an amount of data as possible available to many operators or end-users. Specifically there are about 100 000 separate readings, settings, and status and control registers in the various machines, all of which can be accessed by seventeen consoles, some in the Main Control Room and others distributed throughout the complex. A "Host" computer network of approximately eighteen PDP-11/34's, seven PDP-11/44's, and three VAX-11/785's supports a distributed data acquisition system including Lockheed MAC-16's left from the original Main Ring and Booster instrumentation and upwards of 1000 Z80, Z8002, and M68000 microprocessors in dozens of configurations. Interaction of the various parts of the system is via a central data base stored on the disk of one of the VAXes. The primary computer-hardware communication is via CAMAC for the new Tevatron and Antiproton Source; certain subsystems, among them vacuum, refrigeration, and quench protection, reside in the distributed microprocessors and communicate via GAS, an in-house protocol. An important hardware feature is an accurate clock system making a large number of encoded "events" in the accelerator supercycle available for both hardware modules and computers. System software features include the ability to save the current state of the machine or any subsystem and later restore it or compare it with the state at another time, a general logging facility to keep track of specific variables over long periods of time, detection of "exception conditions" and the posting of alarms, and a central filesharing capability in which files on VAX disks are available for access by any of the "Host" processors.

  5. The Fermilab accelerator control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogert, D.

    1986-01-01

    With the advent of the Tevatron, considerable upgrades have been made to the controls of all the Fermilab Accelerators. The current system is based on making as large an amount of data as possible available to many operators or end-users. Specifically there are about 100000 separate readings, settings, and status and control registers in the various machines, all of which can be accessed by seventeen consoles, some in the Main Control Room and others distributed throughout the complex. A ''Host'' computer network of approximately eighteen PDP-11/34's, seven PDP-11/44's, and three VAX-11/785's supports a distributed data acquisition system including Lockheed MAC-16's left from the original Main Ring and Booster instrumentation and upwards of 1000 Z80, Z8002, and M68000 microprocessors in dozens of configurations. Interaction of the various parts of the system is via a central data base stored on the disk of one of the VAXes. The primary computer-hardware communication is via CAMAC for the new Tevatron and Antiproton Source; certain subsystems, among them vacuum, refrigeration and quench protection, reside in the distributed microprocessors and communicate via GAS, an in-house protocol. An important hardware feature is an accurate clock system making a large number of encoded ''events'' in the accelerator supercycle available for both hardware modules and computers. System software features include the ability to save the current state of the machine or any subsystem and later restore it or compare it with the state at another time, a general logging facility to keep track of specific variables over long periods of time, detection of 'exception conditions' and the posting of alarms, and a central filesharing capability in which files on VAX disks are available for access by any of the ''Host'' processors. (orig.)

  6. A dumbed-down approach to unite Fermilab, its neighbors

    CERN Multimedia

    Constable, B

    2004-01-01

    "...Fermilab is reaching out to its suburban neighbors...With the nation on orange alert, Fermilab scientists no longer can sit on the front porch and invite neighbors in for coffee and quasars" (1 page).

  7. Search for Third Generation Squarks in the Missing Transverse Energy plus Jet Sample at CDF Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marono, Miguel Vidal [Complutense Univ. of Madrid (Spain)

    2010-03-01

    lightest SUSY particle (LSP) which would provide a candidate for cold dark matter, that account for 23% of the universe content, as strongly suggested by recent astrophysical data [1]. The Tevatron is a hadron collider operating at Fermilab, USA. This accelerator provides proton-antiproton (p$\\bar{p}$) collisions with a center of mass energy of √s = 1.96 TeV. CDF and D0 are the detectors built to analyse the products of the collisions provided by the Tevatron. Both experiments have produced a very significant scientific output in the last few years, like the discovery of the top quark or the measurement of the Bs mixing. The Tevatron experiments are also reaching sensitivity to the SM Higgs boson. The scientific program of CDF includes a broad spectrum on searches for physics signatures beyond the Standard Model. Tevatron is still the energy frontier, what means an unique opportunity to produce a discovery in physic beyond the Standard Model. The analyses presented in this thesis focus on the search for third generation squarks in the missing transverse energy plus jets final state. The production of sbottom ($\\tilde{b}$) and stop ($\\tilde{t}$) quarks could be highly enhanced at the Tevatron, giving the possibility of discovering new physics or limiting the parameter space available in the theory. No signal is found over the predicted Standard Model background in both searches. Instead, 95% confidence level limits are set on the production cross section, and then translated into the mass plane of the hypothetical particles. This thesis sketches the basic theory concepts of the Standard Model and the Minimal Supersymmetric Extension in Chapter 2. Chapter 3, describes the Tevatron and CDF. Based on the CDF subsystems information, Chapter 4 and 5 describe the analysis objet reconstruction and the heavy flavor tagging tools. The development of the analyses is shown in Chapter 6 and Chapter 7. Finally, Chapter 8 is devoted to discuss the results and conclusions

  8. Performance characteristics and radiation damage results from the Fermilab E706 silicon microstrip detector system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engels, E Jr; Mani, S; Orris, D; Shepard, P F; Weerasundara, P D; Choudhary, B C; Joshi, U; Kapoor, V; Shivpuri, R; Baker, W

    1989-07-01

    A charged particle spectrometer containing a 7120-channel silicon microstrip detector system, one component of Fermilab experiment E706 to study direct photon production in hadron-hadron collisions, was utilized in a run in which 6 million events were recorded. We describe the silicon system, provide early results of track and vertex reconstruction, and present data on the radiation damage to the silicon wafers resulting from the narrow high intensity beam. (orig.).

  9. A study of tau decays of the W boson at CDF [Collider Detector at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladney, L.D.

    1990-01-01

    A report is given of a search for tau decays of the W boson in p bar p collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV using the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). A description of a hardware trigger specifically designed to enhance the number of events with tau decays is presented along with the results of a preliminary analysis of data taken during the 1988--89 run of CDF. 10 refs., 4 figs

  10. Using the circulating beam in the Fermilab antiproton accumulator for experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacLachlan, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    The Fermilab Accumulator is a storage ring optimized for stacking and stochastic cooling 8 GeV antiprotons for the Tevatron collider. Minor modifications have been made to provide for beam in the energy range 8.0-2.9 GeV of luminosity /approximately/10 31 cm -2 s/sup - 1/ with a hydrogen jet internal target. Experience to date consists of machine studies and detector engineering run with protons. 7 refs

  11. Operational performance of a bunch by bunch digital damper in the Fermilab Main Injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamson, P.; Ashmanskas, W.J.; Foster, G.W.; Hansen, S.; Marchionni, A.; Nicklaus, D.; Semenov, A.; Wildman, D.; Kang, H.

    2005-01-01

    We have implemented a transverse and longitudinal bunch by bunch digital damper system in the Fermilab Main Injector, using a single digital board for all 3 coordinates. The system has been commissioned over the last year, and is now operational in all MI cycles, damping beam bunched at both 53MHz and 2.5MHz. We describe the performance of this system both for collider operations and high-intensity running for the NuMI project

  12. The Fermilab central computing facility architectural model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholls, J.

    1989-01-01

    The goal of the current Central Computing Upgrade at Fermilab is to create a computing environment that maximizes total productivity, particularly for high energy physics analysis. The Computing Department and the Next Computer Acquisition Committee decided upon a model which includes five components: an interactive front-end, a Large-Scale Scientific Computer (LSSC, a mainframe computing engine), a microprocessor farm system, a file server, and workstations. With the exception of the file server, all segments of this model are currently in production: a VAX/VMS cluster interactive front-end, an Amdahl VM Computing engine, ACP farms, and (primarily) VMS workstations. This paper will discuss the implementation of the Fermilab Central Computing Facility Architectural Model. Implications for Code Management in such a heterogeneous environment, including issues such as modularity and centrality, will be considered. Special emphasis will be placed on connectivity and communications between the front-end, LSSC, and workstations, as practiced at Fermilab. (orig.)

  13. The Fermilab Central Computing Facility architectural model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholls, J.

    1989-05-01

    The goal of the current Central Computing Upgrade at Fermilab is to create a computing environment that maximizes total productivity, particularly for high energy physics analysis. The Computing Department and the Next Computer Acquisition Committee decided upon a model which includes five components: an interactive front end, a Large-Scale Scientific Computer (LSSC, a mainframe computing engine), a microprocessor farm system, a file server, and workstations. With the exception of the file server, all segments of this model are currently in production: a VAX/VMS Cluster interactive front end, an Amdahl VM computing engine, ACP farms, and (primarily) VMS workstations. This presentation will discuss the implementation of the Fermilab Central Computing Facility Architectural Model. Implications for Code Management in such a heterogeneous environment, including issues such as modularity and centrality, will be considered. Special emphasis will be placed on connectivity and communications between the front-end, LSSC, and workstations, as practiced at Fermilab. 2 figs

  14. 2015 CERN-Fermilab HCP Summer School

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    CERN and Fermilab are jointly offering a series of "Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools", to prepare young researchers for these exciting times. The school has alternated between CERN and Fermilab, and will return to CERN for the tenth edition, from 24 June to 3 July 2015. The CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School is an advanced school targeted particularly at young postdocs and senior PhD students working towards the completion of their thesis project, in both Experimental High Energy Physics (HEP) and phenomenology. Lecture Topics include: Statistics in HEP, Heavy Flavour, Heavy Ion, Standard Model, Higgs searches and measurements, BSM theory, BSM searches, Top physics, QCD and Monte Carlos, Accelerators, Detectors for the future, Trigger and DAQ, Dark Matter Astroparticle, and two special lectures on Future Colliders, and 20 years after the top discovery. Calendar and Details: Mark your calendar for  24 June - 3 July 2015, when CERN will welcome students to t...

  15. Status of accelerator development at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, C.W.

    1976-01-01

    The Fermilab accelerator is comprised of four major systems: the high-energy beam-extraction and switching system, the main accelerator (main ring), the booster, and the linear accelerator. The Fermilab accelerator produces accelerated beams for a vigorous international high-energy physics program. The basic design features and operation for high-energy physics have been described a number of times in the past. A report is given which, for the most part, discusses in detail only those features that are particularly significant in increasing the usefulness of the accelerator as a tool for high-energy physics

  16. The Fermilab Main Injector Technical Design Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1994-08-01

    This report contains a description of the design, cost estimate, and construction schedule of the Fermilab Main Injector (FMI) Project. The technical, cost, and schedule baselines for the FMI Project have already been established and may be found in the Fermilab Main Injector Title I Design Report, issued in August 1992. This report updates and expands upon the design and schedule for construction of all subsystem components and associated civil construction described in the Title I Design Report. The facilities described have been designed in conformance with DOE 6430.1A, "United States Department of Energy General Design Criteria."

  17. Shielding design at Fermilab: Calculations and measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cossairt, J.D.

    1986-11-01

    The development of the Fermilab accelerator complex during the past two decades from its concept as the ''200 BeV accelerator'' to that of the present tevatron, designed to operate at energies as high as 1 TeV, has required a coincidental refinement and development in methods of shielding design. In this paper I describe these methods as used by the radiation protection staff of Fermilab. This description will review experimental measurements which substantiate these techniques in realistic situations. Along the way, observations will be stated which likely are applicable to other protron accelerators in the multi-hundred GeV energy region, including larger ones yet to be constructed

  18. CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School 2013 open for applications

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Mark your calendar for 28 August - 6 September 2013, when CERN will welcome students to the eighth CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School.   Experiments at hadron colliders will continue to provide our best tools for exploring physics at the TeV scale for some time. With the completion of the 7-8 TeV runs of the LHC, and the final results from the full Tevatron data sample becoming available, a new era in particle physics is beginning, heralded by the Higgs-like particle recently discovered at 125 GeV. To realize the full potential of these developments, CERN and Fermilab are jointly offering a series of "Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools", to prepare young researchers for these exciting times. The school has alternated between CERN and Fermilab, and will return to CERN for the eighth edition, from 28 August to 6 September 2013. The CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School is an advanced school which particularly targets young postdocs in exper...

  19. The upgraded Pixel Detector of the ATLAS Experiment for Run-II at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00407702

    2016-01-01

    The Pixel Detector of the ATLAS experiment has shown excellent performance during the whole Run-1 of the LHC. Taking advantage of the detector development period 2013 – 2014, the detector was extracted from the experiment and brought to surface to equip it with new service panels and to repair modules furthermore this helped with the installation of the Insertable B-Layer (IBL), fourth layer of pixel, installed in between the existing Pixel Detector and a new beam-pipe at a radius of 3.3 cm. To cope with the high radiation and increased pixel occupancy due to the proximity to the interaction point, two different silicon sensor technologies (planar and 3D) have been used. A new readout chip has been designed with CMOS 130nm technology with larger area, smaller pixel size and faster readout capability. Dedicated design features in combination with a new composite material were considered and used in order to reduce the material budget of the support structure while keeping the optimal thermo-mechanical perfor...

  20. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass at D0 Run II with the Matrix Element Method in the Lepton+Jets Final State

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schieferdecker, Philipp [Ludwig Maximilian Univ. of Munich (Germany)

    2005-08-05

    The mass of the top quark is a fundamental parameter of the Standard Model. Its precise knowledge yields valuable insights into unresolved phenomena in and beyond the Standard Model. A measurement of the top quark mass with the matrix element method in the lepton+jets final state in D0 Run II is presented. Events are selected requiring an isolated energetic charged lepton (electron or muon), significant missing transverse energy, and exactly four calorimeter jets. For each event, the probabilities to originate from the signal and background processes are calculated based on the measured kinematics, the object resolutions and the respective matrix elements. The jet energy scale is known to be the dominant source of systematic uncertainty. The reference scale for the mass measurement is derived from Monte Carlo events. The matrix element likelihood is defined as a function of both, m{sub top} and jet energy scale JES, where the latter represents a scale factor with respect to the reference scale. The top mass is obtained from a two-dimensional correlated fit, and the likelihood yields both the statistical and jet energy scale uncertainty. Using a dataset of 320 pb-1 of D0 Run II data, the mass of the top quark is measured to be: m$ℓ+jets\\atop{top}$ = 169.5 ± 4.4(stat. + JES)$+1.7\\atop{-1.6}$(syst.) GeV; m$e+jets\\atop{top}$ = 168.8 ± 6.0(stat. + JES)$+1.9\\atop{-1.9}$(syst.) GeV; m$μ+jets\\atop{top}$ = 172.3 ± 9.6(stat.+JES)$+3.4\\atop{-3.3}$(syst.) GeV. The jet energy scale measurement in the ℓ+jets sample yields JES = 1.034 ± 0.034, suggesting good consistency of the data with the simulation. The measurement forecasts significant improvements to the total top mass uncertainty during Run II before the startup of the LHC, as the data sample will grow by a factor of ten and D0's tracking capabilities will be employed in jet energy reconstruction and flavor identification.

  1. Proton Beam Intensity Upgrades for the Neutrino Program at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, C. M. [Fermilab

    2016-12-15

    Fermilab is committed to upgrading its accelerator complex towards the intensity frontier to pursue HEP research in the neutrino sector and beyond. The upgrade has two steps: 1) the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP), which is underway, has its primary goal to start providing 700 kW beam power on NOvA target by the end of 2017 and 2) the foreseen PIP–II will replace the existing LINAC, a 400 MeV injector to the Booster, by an 800 MeV superconducting LINAC by the middle of next decade, with output beam intensity from the Booster increased significantly and the beam power on the NOvA target increased to <1.2 MW. In any case, the Fermilab Booster is going to play a very significant role for the next two decades. In this context, we have recently developed and commissioned an innovative beam injection scheme for the Booster called "early injection scheme". This scheme is already in operation and has a potential to increase the Booster beam intensity from the PIP design goal by a considerable amount with a reduced beam emittance and beam loss. In this paper, we will present results from our experience from the new scheme in operation, current status and future plans.

  2. THE MATRYOSHKA RUN. II. TIME-DEPENDENT TURBULENCE STATISTICS, STOCHASTIC PARTICLE ACCELERATION, AND MICROPHYSICS IMPACT IN A MASSIVE GALAXY CLUSTER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miniati, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    We use the Matryoshka run to study the time-dependent statistics of structure-formation-driven turbulence in the intracluster medium of a 10 15 M ☉ galaxy cluster. We investigate the turbulent cascade in the inner megaparsec for both compressional and incompressible velocity components. The flow maintains approximate conditions of fully developed turbulence, with departures thereof settling in about an eddy-turnover time. Turbulent velocity dispersion remains above 700 km s –1 even at low mass accretion rate, with the fraction of compressional energy between 10% and 40%. The normalization and the slope of the compressional turbulence are susceptible to large variations on short timescales, unlike the incompressible counterpart. A major merger occurs around redshift z ≅ 0 and is accompanied by a long period of enhanced turbulence, ascribed to temporal clustering of mass accretion related to spatial clustering of matter. We test models of stochastic acceleration by compressional modes for the origin of diffuse radio emission in galaxy clusters. The turbulence simulation model constrains an important unknown of this complex problem and brings forth its dependence on the elusive microphysics of the intracluster plasma. In particular, the specifics of the plasma collisionality and the dissipation physics of weak shocks affect the cascade of compressional modes with strong impact on the acceleration rates. In this context radio halos emerge as complex phenomena in which a hierarchy of processes acting on progressively smaller scales are at work. Stochastic acceleration by compressional modes implies statistical correlation of radio power and spectral index with merging cores distance, both testable in principle with radio surveys

  3. Correction magnets for the Fermilab Recycler Ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James T Volk et al.

    2003-01-01

    In the commissioning of the Fermilab Recycler ring the need for higher order corrector magnets in the regions near beam transfers was discovered. Three types of permanent magnet skew quadrupoles, and two types of permanent magnet sextupoles were designed and built. This paper describes the need for these magnets, the design, assembly, and magnetic measurements

  4. Exabyte helical scan devices at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constanta-Fanourakis, P.; Kaczar, K.; Oleynik, G.; Petravick, D.; Votava, M.; White, V.; Hockney, G.; Bracker, S.; de Miranda, J.M.

    1989-05-01

    Exabyte 8mm helical scan storage devices are in use at Fermilab in a number of applications. These devices have the functionality of magnetic tape, but use media which is much more economical and much more dense than conventional 9 track tape. 6 refs., 3 figs

  5. CDF [Collider Detector at Fermilab] detector simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, J.

    1987-12-01

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) uses several different simulation programs, each tuned for specific applications. The programs rely heavily on the extensive test beam data that CDF has accumulated. Sophisticated shower parameterizations are used, yielding enormous gains in speed over full cascade programs. 3 refs., 5 figs

  6. Fermilab "Dumbfounded" by fiasco that broke magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "In what is being described as a "pratfall on the world stage", the quadrupole magnet that Fermilab built for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) particle accelerator failed high-pressure testing dramatically last week, resulting in a loud "bang" and a cloud of dust in the LHC tunnel." (1,5 page)

  7. Proposed Fermilab upgrade main injector project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to construct and operate a ''Fermilab Main Injector'' (FMI), a 150 GeV proton injector accelerator, at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) in Batavia, Illinois. The purpose and need for this action are given of this Environmental Assessment (EA). A description of the proposed FMI and construction activities are also given. The proposed FMI would be housed in an underground tunnel with a circumference of approximately 2.1 miles (3.4 kilometers), and the construction would affect approximately 135 acres of the 6,800 acre Fermilab site. The purpose of the proposed FMI is to construct and bring into operation a new 150 GeV proton injector accelerator. This addition to Fermilab's Tevatron would enable scientists to penetrate ever more deeply into the subatomic world through the detection of the super massive particles that can be created when a proton and antiproton collide head-on. The conversion of energy into matter in these collisions makes it possible to create particles that existed only an instant after the beginning of time. The proposed FMI would significantly extend the scientific reach of the Tevatron, the world's first superconducting accelerator and highest energy proton-antiproton collider

  8. Fermilab Friends for Science Education | Board Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermilab Friends for Science Education FFSE Home About Us Join Us Support Us Contact Us Board Tools Testimonials Our Donors Board of Directors Board Tools Calendar Join Us Donate Now Get FermiGear! Education FFSE Scholarship Tools Google Drive Join Us/Renew Membership Forms: Online - Print Support Us Donation

  9. Fermilab Friends for Science Education | About Us

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermilab Friends for Science Education FFSE Home About Us Join Us Support Us Contact Us About Us national leader in precollege science education. From the first Summer Institute for Science Teachers held year over 37,000 students, and 2,500 teachers participated in programs through the Education Office

  10. Fermilab Friends for Science Education | Support Us

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermilab Friends for Science Education FFSE Home About Us Join Us Support Us Contact Us Support Us improving science (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) education. Your donation allows us to Testimonials Our Donors Board of Directors Board Tools Calendar Join Us Donate Now Get FermiGear! Education

  11. Fermilab Friends for Science Education | Calendar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermilab Friends for Science Education FFSE Home About Us Join Us Support Us Contact Us Calendar Directors Board Tools Calendar Join Us Donate Now Get FermiGear! Education Office Search Programs Calendar Join Us/Renew Membership Forms: Online - Print Support Us Donation Forms: Online - Print Tree of

  12. Fermilab Friends for Science Education | Join Us

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermilab Friends for Science Education FFSE Home About Us Join Us Support Us Contact Us Join Us improving science (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) education. Your donation allows us to membership dues allow us to create new, innovative science education programs, making the best use of unique

  13. Fermilab Friends for Science Education | Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermilab Friends for Science Education FFSE Home About Us Join Us Support Us Contact Us Mission Directors Board Tools Calendar Join Us Donate Now Get FermiGear! Education Office Search Programs Calendar Join Us/Renew Membership Forms: Online - Print Support Us Donation Forms: Online - Print Tree of

  14. Fermilab ACP multi-microprocessor project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaines, I.; Areti, H.; Biel, J.; Bracker, S.; Case, G.; Fischler, M.; Husby, D.; Nash, T.

    1984-08-01

    We report on the status of the Fermilab Advanced Computer Program's project to provide more cost-effective computing engines for the high energy physics community. The project will exploit the cheap, but powerful, commercial microprocessors now available by constructing modular multi-microprocessor systems. A working test bed system as well as plans for the next stages of the project are described

  15. FERMILAB: Physics in the 1990s

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1989-12-15

    Brainstorming workshops are a regular feature of the high energy physics scene, but a recent Workshop on Physics at Fermilab in the 1990s was one of the most important in the Laboratory's 20-year history, charting the aims of a research centre which will retain the distinction of having the highest energy accelerator in the world well into the next decade.

  16. Fermilab | Science | Inquiring Minds | Questions About Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benefits Milestones Photos and videos Latest news For the media Particle Physics Neutrinos Fermilab and the computing Quantum initiatives Research and development Key discoveries Benefits of particle physics Particle society Particle Physics 101 Science of matter, energy, space and time How particle physics discovery

  17. Fermilab | Physics for Everyone | Lecture Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Industry Students and teachers Media Physics for Everyone Navbar Toggle About Leadership and Organization Benefits Milestones Photos and videos Latest news For the media Particle Physics Neutrinos Fermilab and the computing Quantum initiatives Research and development Key discoveries Benefits of particle physics Particle

  18. Search for singly-produced vector-like quarks in lepton and jets final state with the ATLAS detector in Run-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biedermann, Dustin; Dietrich, Janet; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Lacker, Heiko; Sperlich, Dennis [Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Vector-like quarks are predicted by many extensions of the Standard Model of particle physics. They provide the possibility to solve some long-standing problems such as the hierarchy problem and also might help to explain the b-quark forward-backward asymmetry in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions measured at LEP. Candidates for these vector-like quarks are the top-like T and the Y quark. The Y quarks decay exclusively into a W-boson and a b-quark, which appears also to be the dominant decay channel of the T quarks. We present the search strategy for singly-produced T/Y quarks and the expected sensitivity using the first LHC run-II data recorded by the ATLAS detector in 2015.

  19. Physics performance and fast turn around: the challenge of calibration and alignment at the CMS experiment during the LHC Run-II

    CERN Document Server

    Di Guida, Salvatore; Franzoni, Giovanni; Govi, Giacomo; Musich, Marco; Pfeiffer, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    The CMS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a very complex apparatus with more than 70 million acquisition channels. To exploit its full physics potential, a very careful calibra- tion of the various components, together with an optimal knowledge of their position in space, is essential. The CMS Collaboration has set up a powerful infrastructure to allow for the best knowledge of these conditions at any given moment. The quick turnaround of these workflows was proven crucial both for the algorithms performing the online event selection and for the ul- timate resolution of the offline reconstruction of the physics objects. The contribution will report about the design and performance of these workflows during the operations of the 13TeV LHC RunII.

  20. Search for OB stars running away from young star clusters. II. The NGC 6357 star-forming region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Kniazev, A. Y.; Kroupa, P.; Oh, S.

    2011-11-01

    Dynamical few-body encounters in the dense cores of young massive star clusters are responsible for the loss of a significant fraction of their massive stellar content. Some of the escaping (runaway) stars move through the ambient medium supersonically and can be revealed via detection of their bow shocks (visible in the infrared, optical or radio). In this paper, which is the second of a series of papers devoted to the search for OB stars running away from young ( ≲ several Myr) Galactic clusters and OB associations, we present the results of the search for bow shocks around the star-forming region NGC 6357. Using the archival data of the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) satellite and the Spitzer Space Telescope, and the preliminary data release of the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), we discovered seven bow shocks, whose geometry is consistent with the possibility that they are generated by stars expelled from the young (~1-2 Myr) star clusters, Pismis 24 and AH03 J1725-34.4, associated with NGC 6357. Two of the seven bow shocks are driven by the already known OB stars, HD 319881 and [N78] 34. Follow-up spectroscopy of three other bow-shock-producing stars showed that they are massive (O-type) stars as well, while the 2MASS photometry of the remaining two stars suggests that they could be B0 V stars, provided that both are located at the same distance as NGC 6357. Detection of numerous massive stars ejected from the very young clusters is consistent with the theoretical expectation that star clusters can effectively lose massive stars at the very beginning of their dynamical evolution (long before the second mechanism for production of runaway stars, based on a supernova explosion in a massive tight binary system, begins to operate) and lends strong support to the idea that probably all field OB stars have been dynamically ejected from their birth clusters. A by-product of our search for bow shocks around NGC 6357 is the detection of three circular

  1. A Measurement of the Lifetime of the Λb Baryon with the CDF Detector at the Tevatron Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unverhau, Tatjana Alberta Hanna [Univ. of Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2004-12-01

    In March 2001 the Tevatron accelerator entered its Run II phase, providing colliding proton and anti-proton beams with an unprecedented center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The Tevatron is currently the only accelerator to produce Λb baryons, which provides a unique opportunity to measure the properties of these particles. This thesis presents a measurement of the mean lifetime of the Λb baryon in the semileptonic channel Λ$0\\atop{b}$ → Λ$+\\atop{c}$ μ- $\\bar{v}$μ. In total 186 pb-1 of data were used for this analysis, collected with the CDF detector between February 2002 and September 2003. To select the long-lived events from b-decays, the secondary vertex trigger was utilized. This significant addition to the trigger for Run II allows, for the first time, the selection of events with tracks displaced from the primary interaction vertex at the second trigger level. After the application of selection cuts this trigger sample contains approximately 991 Λb candidates. To extract the mean lifetime of Λb baryons from this sample, they transverse decay length of the candidates is fitted with an unbinned maximum likelihood fit under the consideration of the missing neutrino momentum and the bias introduced by the secondary vertex trigger. The mean lifetime of the Λb is measured to be τ = 1.29 ± 0.11(stat.) ± 0.07(syst.) ps equivalent to a mean decay length of cτ = 387 ± 33(stat.) ± 21 (syst.) μm.

  2. Intensity-Frontier Antiproton Physics with The Antiproton Annihilation Spectrometer (TAPAS) at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apollinari, Giorgio; /Fermilab; Asner, David M.; /PNL, Richland; Baldini, Wander; /INFN, Ferrara; Bartoszek, Larry; Broemmelsiek, Daniel R.; Brown, Charles N.; /Fermilab; Chakravorty, Alak; /St. Xavier U., Chicago; Colas, Paul; /Saclay; Derwent, Paul; /Fermilab; Drutskoy, Alexey; /Moscow, ITEP; Fortner, Michael; /Northern Illinois U. /Saclay /Indian Inst. Tech., Hyderabad

    2011-11-01

    The Fermilab Antiproton Source is the world's most intense source of antimatter. With the Tevatron program now behind us, this unique facility can help make the case for Fermilab's continued accelerator operations. The Antiproton Source can be used for unique, dedicated antimatter studies, including medium-energy {bar p}-annihilation experiments. We propose to assemble a powerful, yet cost-effective, solenoidal magnetic spectrometer for antiproton-annihilation events, and to use it at the Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator to measure the charm production cross section, study rare hyperon decays, search for hyperon CP asymmetry, precisely measure the properties of several charmonium and nearby states, and make the first measurements of the Drell-Yan continuum in medium-energy antiproton annihilation. Should the charm production cross section be as large as some have proposed, we will also be able to measure D{sup 0}-{bar D}{sup 0} mixing with high precision and discover (or sensitively limit) charm CP violation. The observation of charm or hyperon CP violation would be evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model, with possible implications for the origin of the baryon asymmetry of the universe - the question of what happened to all the antimatter that must have been produced in the Big Bang. The experiment will be carried out by an international collaboration and will require some four years of running time. As possibly the sole hadron experiment in progress at Fermilab during that time, it will play an important role in maintaining a broad particle physics program at Fermilab and in the U.S. It will thus help us to continue attracting creative and capable young people into science and technology, and introducing them to the important technologies of accelerators, detectors, and data acquisition and analysis - key roles in society that accelerator-based particle physics has historically played.

  3. Di-J/ψ Studies, Level 3 Tracking and the D0 Run IIb Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vint, Philip John

    2009-01-01

    The D0 detector underwent an upgrade to its silicon vertex detector and triggering systems during the transition from Run IIa to Run IIb to maximize its ability to fully exploit Run II at the Fermilab Tevatron. This thesis describes improvements made to the tracking and vertexing algorithms used by the high level trigger in both Run IIa and Run IIb, as well as a search for resonant di-J/ψ states using both Run IIa and Run IIb data. Improvements made to the tracking and vertexing algorithms during Run IIa included the optimization of the existing tracking software to reduce overall processing time and the certification and testing of a new software release. Upgrades made to the high level trigger for Run IIb included the development of a new tracking algorithm and the inclusion of the new Layer 0 silicon detector into the existing software. The integration of Layer 0 into the high level trigger has led to an improvement in the overall impact parameter resolution for tracks of ∼50%. The development of a new parameterization method for finding the error associated to the impact parameter of tracks returned by the high level tracking algorithm, in association with the inclusion of Layer 0, has led to improvements in vertex resolution of ∼4.5 (micro)m. A previous search in the di-J/ψ channel revealed a unpredicted resonance at ∼13.7 GeV/c 2 . A confirmation analysis is presented using 2.8 fb -1 of data and two different approaches to cuts. No significant excess is seen in the di-J/ψ mass spectrum.

  4. Di-J/Ψ Studies, Level 3 Tracking and the D0 Run IIb Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vint, Philip John [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-01

    The D0 detector underwent an upgrade to its silicon vertex detector and triggering systems during the transition from Run IIa to Run IIb to maximize its ability to fully exploit Run II at the Fermilab Tevatron. This thesis describes improvements made to the tracking and vertexing algorithms used by the high level trigger in both Run IIa and Run IIb, as well as a search for resonant di-J/Ψ states using both Run IIa and Run IIb data. Improvements made to the tracking and vertexing algorithms during Run IIa included the optimization of the existing tracking software to reduce overall processing time and the certification and testing of a new software release. Upgrades made to the high level trigger for Run IIb included the development of a new tracking algorithm and the inclusion of the new Layer 0 silicon detector into the existing software. The integration of Layer 0 into the high level trigger has led to an improvement in the overall impact parameter resolution for tracks of ~50%. The development of a new parameterization method for finding the error associated to the impact parameter of tracks returned by the high level tracking algorithm, in association with the inclusion of Layer 0, has led to improvements in vertex resolution of ~4.5 μm. A previous search in the di-J/Ψ channel revealed a unpredicted resonance at ~13.7 GeV/c2. A confirmation analysis is presented using 2.8 fb-1 of data and two different approaches to cuts. No significant excess is seen in the di-J/Ψ mass spectrum.

  5. Run 2 analysis computing for CDF and D0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuess, S.

    1995-11-01

    Two large experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron collider will use upgraded of running. The associated analysis software is also expected to change, both to account for higher data rates and to embrace new computing paradigms. A discussion is given to the problems facing current and future High Energy Physics (HEP) analysis computing, and several issues explored in detail

  6. Multi-processor network implementations in Multibus II and VME

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briegel, C.

    1992-01-01

    ACNET (Fermilab Accelerator Controls Network), a proprietary network protocol, is implemented in a multi-processor configuration for both Multibus II and VME. The implementations are contrasted by the bus protocol and software design goals. The Multibus II implementation provides for multiple processors running a duplicate set of tasks on each processor. For a network connected task, messages are distributed by a network round-robin scheduler. Further, messages can be stopped, continued, or re-routed for each task by user-callable commands. The VME implementation provides for multiple processors running one task across all processors. The process can either be fixed to a particular processor or dynamically allocated to an available processor depending on the scheduling algorithm of the multi-processing operating system. (author)

  7. Recent results on charm from Fermilab experiment E-687

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchholz, D.; Gourlay, S.; Moroni, L.; Ratti, S.P.; Shephard, W.D.

    1990-12-01

    About 10 4 charm decays have been reconstructed from first-run data of Fermilab experiment E687 using the Fermilab Wide-Band Photon Spectrometer with the world's highest energy photon beam. The success of techniques for isolating and reconstructing charm event samples based on two complementary vertexing strategies is illustrated. Preliminary results are presented. These include lifetime value of (0.50 ± 0.06 ± 0.03)ps for the D s + , and (0.20 ± 0.03 ± 0.03)ps for the Λ c + . Preliminary values for the D + and D 0 lifetimes are consistent with currently accepted world averages. Signals for the Cabibbo-suppressed decays D 0 → π + π - π + π - , D + → K + K - π + , and D + → φπ + are shown; for B(D 0 → π + π - π + π - )/B(D 0 → K - π + π + π - ) our preliminary value is 0.10 ± 0.02 ± 0.02. Preliminary values for ratios B(D 0 → Kstring 0 K + K - )/B(D 0 → Kstring 0 π + π - ) and B(D 0 → Kstring 0 φ)/B(D 0 → Kstring 0 π + π - ) are 0.20 ± 0.06 and 0.16 ± 0.06. Preliminary results are given for cross sections of D* ± and D ± photoproduction on a Be target for the p 2 τ dependence of D minus-plus photoproduction and for the ratios D double-prime/D* + and D* - /D minus-plus . The energy dependence of the total open charm photoproduction cross section is compared with model predictions for photon energies up to 350 GeV. 18 refs., 5 figs

  8. Liquidity Runs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matta, R.; Perotti, E.

    2016-01-01

    Can the risk of losses upon premature liquidation produce bank runs? We show how a unique run equilibrium driven by asset liquidity risk arises even under minimal fundamental risk. To study the role of illiquidity we introduce realistic norms on bank default, such that mandatory stay is triggered

  9. Neutrino results from the Fermilab Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaevitz, M.H.; Arroyo, C.; Bachmann, K.T.; Bazarko, A.O.; Blair, R.E.; Bolton, T.A.; Foudas, C.; King, B.J.; Lefmann, W.C.; Leung, W.C.; Mishra, S.R.; Oltman, E.; Quintas, P.Z.; Rabinowitz, S.A.; Sciulli, F.; Seligman, W.G.; Merritt, F.S.; Oreglia, M.J.; Schumm, B.A.; Bernstein, R.H.; Borcherding, F.; Fisk, H.E.; Lamm, M.J.; Marsh, W.; Merritt, K.W.B.; Schellman, H.; Yovanovitch, D.D.; Bodek, A.; Budd, H.S.; De Barbaro, P.; Salcumoto, W.K.; Kinnel, T.S.; Sandler, P.H.; Smith, W.H.

    1995-01-01

    Results from the high-energy, high-statistics studies of neutrino nucleon interactions by the CCFR collaboration at the Fermilab Tevatron are described. Using a data sample of over 3.7million events with energies up to 600GeV, precision measurements are presented for the weak mixing angle, sin 2 θ w , the structure functions, F 2 (x,Q 2 ) and xF 3 (x,Q 2 ), aud the strange quark distribution, xs(x,Q 2 ). Comparisons of these measurements to those obtained in other processes are made in the context of global electroweak and QCD tests. Prospects for the next generation measurements by the NuTeV collaboration at Fermilab are also presented. ((orig.))

  10. Collider Detector (CDF) at FERMILAB: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theriot, D.

    1984-07-01

    CDF, the Collider Detector at Fermilab, is a collaboration of almost 150 physicists from ten US universities (University of Chicago, Brandeis University, Harvard University, University of Illinois, University of Pennsylvania, Purdue University, Rockefeller University, Rutgers University, Texas A and M University, and University of Wisconsin), three US DOE supported national laboratories (Fermilab, Argonne National Laboratory, and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory), Italy (Frascati Laboratory and University of Pisa), and Japan (KEK National Laboratory and Unversity of Tsukuba). The primary physics goal for CDF is to study the general features of proton-antiproton collisions at 2 TeV center-of-mass energy. On general grounds, we expect that parton subenergies in the range 50 to 500 GeV will provide the most interesting physics at this energy. Work at the present CERN Collider has already demonstrated the richness of the 100 GeV scale in parton subenergies

  11. Collider detector at Fermilab - CDF. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theriot, D.

    1985-06-01

    CDF, the Collider Detector at Fermilab, is a collaboration of almost 180 physicists from ten US universities (University of Chicago, Brandeis University, Harvard University, University of Illinois, University of Pennsylvania, Purdue University, Rockefeller University, Rutgers University, Texas A and M University, and University of Wisconsin), three US DOE supported national laboratories (Fermilab, Argonne National Laboratory, and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory), Italy (Frascati National Laboratory and University of Pisa), and Japan (KEK National Laboratory and University of Tsukuba). The primary physics goal for CDF is to study the general features of proton-antiproton collisions at 2 TeV center-of-mass energy. On general grounds, we expect that parton subenergies in the range 50 to 500 GeV will provide the most interesting physics at this energy. Work at the present CERN Collider has already demonstrated the richness of the 100 GeV scale in parton subenergies. 7 refs., 14 figs

  12. Seismic studies for Fermilab future collider projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauh, J.; Shiltsev, V.

    1997-11-01

    Ground motion can cause significant beam emittance growth and orbit oscillations in large hadron colliders due to a vibration of numerous focusing magnets. Larger accelerator ring circumference leads to smaller revolution frequency and, e.g. for the Fermilab Very Large Hadron Collider(VLHC) 50-150 Hz vibrations are of particular interest as they are resonant with the beam betatron frequency. Seismic measurements at an existing large accelerator under operation can help to estimate the vibrations generated by the technical systems in future machines. Comparison of noisy and quiet microseismic conditions might be useful for proper choice of technical solutions for future colliders. This article presents results of wide-band seismic measurements at the Fermilab site, namely, in the tunnel of the Tevatron and on the surface nearby, and in two deep tunnels in the Illinois dolomite which is though to be a possible geological environment of the future accelerators

  13. Charm production asymmetries at the Fermilab experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, T.

    1997-01-01

    I present asymmetries between the production of charm particles and anti-particles from Fermilab experiments, E687, E769 and E791. The results are shown as a function of x F and p t 2 for D ± and D s ± mesons and for pion, kaon and photon beams and compared against current models. Results are also shown for a recent analysis of correlations between production of charm mesons and an associated pion. 14 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  14. Reliability of the Fermilab Antiproton Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harms, E. Jr.

    1993-05-01

    This paper reports on the reliability of the Fermilab Antiproton source since it began operation in 1985. Reliability of the complex as a whole as well as subsystem performance is summarized. Also discussed is the trending done to determine causes of significant machine downtime and actions taken to reduce the incidence of failure. Finally, results of a study to detect previously unidentified reliability limitations are presented

  15. Status of the Fermilab lattice supercomputer project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackenzie, P.; Eichten, E.; Hockney, G.

    1988-10-01

    Fermilab has completed construction of a sixteen node (320 megaflop peak speed) parallel computer for lattice gauge theory calculations. The architecture was designed to provide the highest possible cost effectiveness while maintaining a high level of programmability and constraining as little as possible the types of lattice problems which can be done on it. The machine is programmed in C. It is a prototype for a 256 node (5 gigaflop peak speed) computer which will be assembled this winter. 6 refs

  16. Upgrading the Fermilab Linac local control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCrory, E.S.; Goodwin, R.W.; Shea, M.F.

    1991-02-01

    A new control system for the Fermilab Linac is being designed, built and implemented. First, the nine-year-old linac control system is being replaced. Second, a control system for the new 805 MHz part of the linac is being built. The two systems are essentially identical, so that when the installations are complete, we will still have a single Linac Control System. 8 refs., 5 figs

  17. Estimates of Fermilab Tevatron collider performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dugan, G.

    1991-09-01

    This paper describes a model which has been used to estimate the average luminosity performance of the Tevatron collider. In the model, the average luminosity is related quantitatively to various performance parameters of the Fermilab Tevatron collider complex. The model is useful in allowing estimates to be developed for the improvements in average collider luminosity to be expected from changes in the fundamental performance parameters as a result of upgrades to various parts of the accelerator complex

  18. FERMILAB Annual Users' Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    In an atmosphere full of promise a record 370 users met at Fermilab in April for the 15th annual Users' Meeting. The gathering took place in the midst of activities to bring beam through one-third of the Energy Saver. Laboratory Director Leon Lederman and his staff reported that the ring was nearing completion and that circulating beam could follow soon

  19. FERMILAB: Physics in the 1990s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Brainstorming workshops are a regular feature of the high energy physics scene, but a recent Workshop on Physics at Fermilab in the 1990s was one of the most important in the Laboratory's 20-year history, charting the aims of a research centre which will retain the distinction of having the highest energy accelerator in the world well into the next decade

  20. Dedicating Fermilab's Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    It was a bold move to have a fullscale dedication ceremony for the new proton-antiproton Collider at the Fermilab Tevatron on 13 October, two days before the first collisions were seen. However the particles dutifully behaved as required, and over the following weekend the Collider delivered its goods at a total energy of 1600 GeV, significantly boosting the world record for laboratory collisions

  1. Analyzing terabytes of data at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolbers, S.

    1994-05-01

    Computing demands of High Energy Physics are increasing steadily due to the demands of larger datasets and increasingly sophisticated detector systems and analysis techniques. Fermilab has been meeting these demands by the use of many different computing techniques. Most of these techniques attempt to utilized the most cost-effective computing resources while providing effective solutions to the problems that are created by multi-Terabyte data samples and large collaborations. New strategies are being developed to allow improved access to the data

  2. Charmed baryons photoproduced in FOCUS at Fermilab

    CERN Document Server

    Ratti, S P

    2001-01-01

    FOCUS collected over 7 * 10/sup 7/ triggers and more than 10/sup 6/ fully reconstructed charm particles in a photoproduction experiment at Fermilab. The experimental setup is an upgraded version of a multiparticle spectrometer used in the previous experiment E687. Data on charmed meson spectroscopy have been presented by F.L Fabbri in this Section. Here data on photoproduction of charmed baryons are presented.

  3. Fermilab tevatron five refrigerator system tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rode, C.; Ferry, R.; Leiniger, M.; Makara, J.; Misek, J.; Mizicko, D.; Richied, D.; Theilacker, J.

    1982-01-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron refrigeration system is described with the layout illustrated. The compressor control loops, the refrigerator control loops, and magnet control loops (two per refrigerator) are described and each illustrated. The mobile purifier is described. A five refrigerator test is presented, using two compressor buildings, satellite refrigerator concept test and the test current to the writing. The configuration of the five refrigerator test is diagramed

  4. The evolution of cryogenic safety at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanek, R.; Kilmer, J.

    1992-12-01

    Over the past twenty-five years, Fermilab has been involved in cryogenic technology as it relates to pursuing experimentation in high energy physics. The Laboratory has instituted a strong cryogenic safety program and has maintained a very positive safety record. The solid commitment of management and the cryogenic community to incorporating safety into the system life cycle has led to policies that set requirements and help establish consistency for the purchase and installation of equipment and the safety analysis and documentation

  5. Grids, virtualization, and clouds at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timm, S; Chadwick, K; Garzoglio, G; Noh, S

    2014-01-01

    Fermilab supports a scientific program that includes experiments and scientists located across the globe. To better serve this community, in 2004, the (then) Computing Division undertook the strategy of placing all of the High Throughput Computing (HTC) resources in a Campus Grid known as FermiGrid, supported by common shared services. In 2007, the FermiGrid Services group deployed a service infrastructure that utilized Xen virtualization, LVS network routing and MySQL circular replication to deliver highly available services that offered significant performance, reliability and serviceability improvements. This deployment was further enhanced through the deployment of a distributed redundant network core architecture and the physical distribution of the systems that host the virtual machines across multiple buildings on the Fermilab Campus. In 2010, building on the experience pioneered by FermiGrid in delivering production services in a virtual infrastructure, the Computing Sector commissioned the FermiCloud, General Physics Computing Facility and Virtual Services projects to serve as platforms for support of scientific computing (FermiCloud 6 GPCF) and core computing (Virtual Services). This work will present the evolution of the Fermilab Campus Grid, Virtualization and Cloud Computing infrastructure together with plans for the future.

  6. Design Considerations for Proposed Fermilab Integrable RCS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldred, Jeffrey [Fermilab; Valishev, Alexander

    2017-03-02

    Integrable optics is an innovation in particle accelerator design that provides strong nonlinear focusing while avoiding parametric resonances. One promising application of integrable optics is to overcome the traditional limits on accelerator intensity imposed by betatron tune-spread and collective instabilities. The efficacy of high-intensity integrable accelerators will be undergo comprehensive testing over the next several years at the Fermilab Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) and the University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER). We propose an integrable Rapid-Cycling Synchrotron (iRCS) as a replacement for the Fermilab Booster to achieve multi-MW beam power for the Fermilab high-energy neutrino program. We provide a overview of the machine parameters and discuss an approach to lattice optimization. Integrable optics requires arcs with integer-pi phase advance followed by drifts with matched beta functions. We provide an example integrable lattice with features of a modern RCS - long dispersion-free drifts, low momentum compaction, superperiodicity, chromaticity correction, separate-function magnets, and bounded beta functions.

  7. Software inspections at Fermilab -- Use and experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, E.F.

    1998-01-01

    Because of the critical nature of DA/Online software it is important to commission software which is correct, usable, reliable, and maintainable, i.e., has the highest quality possible. In order to help meet these goals Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) has begun implementing a formal software inspection process. Formal Inspections are used to reduce the number of defects in software at as early a stage as possible. These Inspections, in use at a wide variety of institutions (e.g., NASA, Motorola), implement a well-defined procedure that can be used to improve the quality of many different types of deliverables. The inspection process, initially designed by Michael Fagan, will be described as it was developed and as it is currently implemented at Fermilab where it has been used to improve the quality of a variety of different experiment DA/Online software. Benefits of applying inspections at many points in the software life-cycle and benefits to the people involved will be investigated. Experience with many different types of Inspections and the lessons learned about the inspection process itself will be detailed. Finally, the future of Inspections at Fermilab will be given

  8. Grids, virtualization, and clouds at Fermilab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, S.; Chadwick, K.; Garzoglio, G.; Noh, S.

    2014-06-01

    Fermilab supports a scientific program that includes experiments and scientists located across the globe. To better serve this community, in 2004, the (then) Computing Division undertook the strategy of placing all of the High Throughput Computing (HTC) resources in a Campus Grid known as FermiGrid, supported by common shared services. In 2007, the FermiGrid Services group deployed a service infrastructure that utilized Xen virtualization, LVS network routing and MySQL circular replication to deliver highly available services that offered significant performance, reliability and serviceability improvements. This deployment was further enhanced through the deployment of a distributed redundant network core architecture and the physical distribution of the systems that host the virtual machines across multiple buildings on the Fermilab Campus. In 2010, building on the experience pioneered by FermiGrid in delivering production services in a virtual infrastructure, the Computing Sector commissioned the FermiCloud, General Physics Computing Facility and Virtual Services projects to serve as platforms for support of scientific computing (FermiCloud 6 GPCF) and core computing (Virtual Services). This work will present the evolution of the Fermilab Campus Grid, Virtualization and Cloud Computing infrastructure together with plans for the future.

  9. Fermilab 1982. Annual report of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The state of Fermilab is reviewed for 1982, and summaries are given in the following areas: fabricating energy saver superconducting magnets; present knowledge and future directions in particle physics; accomplishments of Fermilab in a decade of operation 1972 to 1982; a photo essay on the energy saver installation work in the Main Ring Tunnel; a listing of 1982 Fermilab experimental, general, and theoretical publications; and a listing of the 1982 workshop and seminar series

  10. Dummy run for a phase II study of stereotactic body radiotherapy of T1-T2 N0M0 medical inoperable non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Djärv, Emma; Nyman, Jan; Baumann, Pia

    2006-01-01

    of       SBRT of T1-T2N0M0 inoperable NSCLC in a dummy run oriented on volumes and       doses. Six Scandinavian centres participated. Each centre received       CT-scans covering the whole lung volumes of two patients with instructions       to follow the study protocol when outlining tumour and target volumes......In forthcoming multicentre studies on stereotactic body radiotherapy       (SBRT) compliance with volume and dose prescriptions will be mandatory to       avoid unnecessary heterogeneity bias. To evaluate compliance in a       multicentre setting we used two cases from an ongoing phase II study......,       prescribing doses and creating dose plans. Volumes and doses of the 12       dose plans were evaluated according to the study protocol. For the two       patients the GTV volume range was 24 to 39 cm3 and 26 to 41 cm3,       respectively. The PTV volume range was 90 to 116 cm3, and 112 to 155 cm3...

  11. Report of the Fermilab Committee for Site Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steve Holmes, Vic Kuchler et. al.

    2001-09-10

    Fermilab is the flagship laboratory of the U.S. high-energy physics program. The Fermilab accelerator complex has occupied the energy frontier nearly continuously since its construction in the early 1970s. It will remain at the frontier until the Large Hadron Collider at CERN begins operating in 2006-7. A healthy future for Fermilab will likely require construction of a new accelerator in the post-LHC era. The process of identifying, constructing and operating a future forefront facility will require the support of the world high-energy-physics community, the governments and funding agencies of many nations and the people of surrounding communities. This report explores options for construction of a new facility on or near the existing Fermilab site. We began the study that forms the basis of this report with the idea that Fermilab, and the surrounding area of northeastern Illinois, possesses attributes that make it an attractive candidate for a new accelerator construction project: excellent geology; a Fermilab staff and local contractors who are experienced in subsurface construction; abundant energy supplies; good access to transportation networks; the presence of local universities with strong interest and participation in the Fermilab research program; Fermilab's demonstrated ability to mount large accelerator construction projects and operate complex accelerator facilities; and a surrounding community that is largely supportive of Fermilab's presence. Our report largely confirms these perceptions.

  12. Report of the Fermilab Committee for Site Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steve, Holmes; Vic, Kuchler

    2001-01-01

    Fermilab is the flagship laboratory of the U.S. high-energy physics program. The Fermilab accelerator complex has occupied the energy frontier nearly continuously since its construction in the early 1970s. It will remain at the frontier until the Large Hadron Collider at CERN begins operating in 2006-7. A healthy future for Fermilab will likely require construction of a new accelerator in the post-LHC era. The process of identifying, constructing and operating a future forefront facility will require the support of the world high-energy-physics community, the governments and funding agencies of many nations and the people of surrounding communities. This report explores options for construction of a new facility on or near the existing Fermilab site. We began the study that forms the basis of this report with the idea that Fermilab, and the surrounding area of northeastern Illinois, possesses attributes that make it an attractive candidate for a new accelerator construction project: excellent geology; a Fermilab staff and local contractors who are experienced in subsurface construction; abundant energy supplies; good access to transportation networks; the presence of local universities with strong interest and participation in the Fermilab research program; Fermilab's demonstrated ability to mount large accelerator construction projects and operate complex accelerator facilities; and a surrounding community that is largely supportive of Fermilab's presence. Our report largely confirms these perceptions

  13. CASY: a dynamic simulation of the gas-cooled fast breeder reactor core auxiliary cooling system. Volume II. Example computer run

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-09-01

    A listing of a CASY computer run is presented. It was initiated from a demand terminal and, therefore, contains the identification ST0952. This run also contains an INDEX listing of the subroutine UPDATE. The run includes a simulated scram transient at 30 seconds.

  14. CASY: a dynamic simulation of the gas-cooled fast breeder reactor core auxiliary cooling system. Volume II. Example computer run

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-09-01

    A listing of a CASY computer run is presented. It was initiated from a demand terminal and, therefore, contains the identification ST0952. This run also contains an INDEX listing of the subroutine UPDATE. The run includes a simulated scram transient at 30 seconds

  15. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass using Dilepton Events and a Neutrino Weighting Algorithm with the D0 Experiment at the Tevatron (Run II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Joerg; Bonn U

    2007-01-01

    Elementary particle physics raises questions that are several thousand years old. What are the fundamental components of matter and how do they interact? These questions are linked to the question of what happened in the very first moments after the creation of the universe. Modern physics systematically tests nature to find answers to these and other fundamental questions. Precise theories are developed that describe various phenomena and at the same time are reduced to a few basic principals of nature. Simplification and reduction have always been guiding concepts of physics. The interplay between experimental data and theoretical descriptions led to the Standard Model of elementary particle physics. It summarizes the laws of nature and is one of most precise descriptions of nature achieved by mankind. Despite the great success of the Standard Model it is not the ultimate theory of everything. Models beyond the Standard Model try to unify all interactions in one grand unified theory. The number of free parameters is attempted to be reduced. Gravity is attempted to be incorporated. Extensions to the Standard Model like supersymmetry address the so-called hierarchy problem. Precision measurements are the key for searches of new particles and new physics. A powerful tool of experimental particle physics are particle accelerators. They provide tests of the Standard Model at smallest scales. New particles are produced and their properties are investigated. In 1995 the heaviest known elementary particle, called top quark, has been discovered at Fermilab. It differs from all other lighter quarks due to the high mass and very short lifetime. This makes the top quark special and an interesting object to be studied. A rich program of top physics at Fermilab investigates whether the top quark is really the particle as described by the Standard Model. The top quark mass is a free parameter of the theory that has been measured precisely. This thesis presents a precise

  16. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass using Dilepton Events and a Neutrino Weighting Algorithm with the D0 Experiment at the Tevatron (Run II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Joerg [Univ. of Bonn (Germany)

    2007-01-01

    Elementary particle physics raises questions that are several thousand years old. What are the fundamental components of matter and how do they interact? These questions are linked to the question of what happened in the very first moments after the creation of the universe. Modern physics systematically tests nature to find answers to these and other fundamental questions. Precise theories are developed that describe various phenomena and at the same time are reduced to a few basic principals of nature. Simplification and reduction have always been guiding concepts of physics. The interplay between experimental data and theoretical descriptions led to the Standard Model of elementary particle physics. It summarizes the laws of nature and is one of most precise descriptions of nature achieved by mankind. Despite the great success of the Standard Model it is not the ultimate theory of everything. Models beyond the Standard Model try to unify all interactions in one grand unified theory. The number of free parameters is attempted to be reduced. Gravity is attempted to be incorporated. Extensions to the Standard Model like supersymmetry address the so-called hierarchy problem. Precision measurements are the key for searches of new particles and new physics. A powerful tool of experimental particle physics are particle accelerators. They provide tests of the Standard Model at smallest scales. New particles are produced and their properties are investigated. In 1995 the heaviest known elementary particle, called top quark, has been discovered at Fermilab. It differs from all other lighter quarks due to the high mass and very short lifetime. This makes the top quark special and an interesting object to be studied. A rich program of top physics at Fermilab investigates whether the top quark is really the particle as described by the Standard Model. The top quark mass is a free parameter of the theory that has been measured precisely. This thesis presents a precise

  17. Groundwater migration of radionuclides at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malensek, A.J.; Wehmann, A.A.; Elwyn, A.J.; Moss, K.J.; Kesich, P.M.

    1993-01-01

    The simple Single Resident Well (SRW) Model has been used to calculate groundwater movement since Fermilab's inception. A new Concentration Model is proposed which is more realistic and takes advantage of computer modeling that has been developed for the siting of landfills. Site geologic and hydrologic data were given to a consultant who made the migration calculations from an initial concentration that was based upon the existing knowledge of the radioactivity leached out of the soil. The various components of the new Model are discussed, and numerical examples are given and compared with DOE/EPA limits

  18. Fermilab accelerator control system: Analog monitoring facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seino, K.; Anderson, L.; Smedinghoff, J.

    1987-10-01

    Thousands of analog signals are monitored in different areas of the Fermilab accelerator complex. For general purposes, analog signals are sent over coaxial or twinaxial cables with varying lengths, collected at fan-in boxes and digitized with 12 bit multiplexed ADCs. For higher resolution requirements, analog signals are digitized at sources and are serially sent to the control system. This paper surveys ADC subsystems that are used with the accelerator control systems and discusses practical problems and solutions, and it describes how analog data are presented on the console system

  19. Fermilab linac upgrade. Module conditioning results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroc, T.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.

    1992-01-01

    The 805 MHz side-coupled cavity modules for the Fermilab 400 MeV linac upgrade have been conditioned to accept full power. The sparking rate in the cavities and in the side cells has been reduced to acceptable levels. It required approximately 40 x 10 6 pulses for each module to achieve an adequately low sparking rate. This contribution outlines the commissioning procedure, presents the sparking rate improvements and the radiation level improvements through the commissioning process and discusses the near-on-line commissioning plans for this accelerator. (Author) ref., 4 figs

  20. Fermilab Linac Upgrade: Module conditioning results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroc, T.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.

    1992-12-01

    The 805 MHz Side-coupled cavity modules for the Fermilab 400 MeV linac upgrade have been conditioned to accept full power. The sparking rate in the cavities and in the side-cells has been reduced to acceptable levels. It required approximately 40 x 10 6 pulses for each module to achieve an adequately low sparking rate. This contribution outlines the commissioning procedure, presents the sparking rate improvements and the radiation level improvements through the commissioning process and disc the near-online commissioning plans for this accelerator

  1. Dilepton Production at Fermilab and RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, J.C.; McGaughey, P.L.; Moss, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Some recent results from several fixed-target dimuon production experiments at Fermilab are presented. In particular, we discuss the use of Drell-Yan data to determine the flavor structure of the nucleon sea, as well as to deduce the energy-loss of partons traversing nuclear medium. Future dilepton experiments at RHIC could shed more light on the flavor asymmetry and possible charge-symmetry-violation of the nucleon sea. Clear evidence for scaling violation in the Drell-Yan process could also be revealed at RHIC

  2. Superconducting radiofrequency linac development at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, Stephen D.

    2009-01-01

    As the Fermilab Tevatron Collider program draws to a close, a strategy has emerged of an experimental program built around the high intensity frontier. The centerpiece of this program is a superconducting H- linac that will support world leading programs in long baseline neutrino experimentation and the study of rare processes. Based on technology shared with the International Linear Collider, Project X will provide multi-MW beams at 60-120 GeV from the Main Injector, simultaneous with very high intensity beams at lower energies. Project X also supports development of a Muon Collider as a future facility at the energy frontier.

  3. Bunch coalescing in the Fermilab Main Ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wildman, D.; Martin, P.; Meisner, K.; Miller, H.W.

    1987-01-01

    A new RF system has been installed in the Fermilab Main Ring to coalesce up to 13 individual bunches of protons or antiprotons into a single high-intensity bunch. The coalescing process consists of adiabatically reducing the h=1113 Main Ring RF voltage from 1 MV to less than 1 kV, capturing the debunched beam in a linearized h=53 and h=106 bucket, rotating for a quarter of a synchrotron oscillation period, and then recapturing the beam in a single h=1113 bucket. The new system is described and the results of recent coalescing experiments are compared with computer-generated particle tracking simulations

  4. Tests of cold helium compressors at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, T.J.; Fuerst, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    Fermilab has tested two compressors for possible installation in the satellite refrigerator buildings of the Tevatron cryogenic system. Both Creare Inc. and Cryogenic Consultants Inc. have supplied units for evaluation. The Creare machine, a high speed centrifugal pump/compressor, yielded 60% adiabatic efficiency but had difficulty withstanding two-phase flow. Cryogenic Consultants provided a reciprocating unit which achieved 59% efficiency and, although lacking the operating characteristics of the turbomachine, endured throughout testing and was insensitive to two-phase flow. Test results are discussed

  5. Running Linux

    CERN Document Server

    Dalheimer, Matthias Kalle

    2006-01-01

    The fifth edition of Running Linux is greatly expanded, reflecting the maturity of the operating system and the teeming wealth of software available for it. Hot consumer topics such as audio and video playback applications, groupware functionality, and spam filtering are covered, along with the basics in configuration and management that always made the book popular.

  6. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Delaere

    2013-01-01

    Since the LHC ceased operations in February, a lot has been going on at Point 5, and Run Coordination continues to monitor closely the advance of maintenance and upgrade activities. In the last months, the Pixel detector was extracted and is now stored in the pixel lab in SX5; the beam pipe has been removed and ME1/1 removal has started. We regained access to the vactank and some work on the RBX of HB has started. Since mid-June, electricity and cooling are back in S1 and S2, allowing us to turn equipment back on, at least during the day. 24/7 shifts are not foreseen in the next weeks, and safety tours are mandatory to keep equipment on overnight, but re-commissioning activities are slowly being resumed. Given the (slight) delays accumulated in LS1, it was decided to merge the two global runs initially foreseen into a single exercise during the week of 4 November 2013. The aim of the global run is to check that we can run (parts of) CMS after several months switched off, with the new VME PCs installed, th...

  7. Fermilab a laboratory at the frontier of research

    CERN Document Server

    Gillies, James D

    2002-01-01

    Since its foundation in 1967, creeping urbanization has taken away some of Fermilab's remoteness, but the famous buffalo still roam, and farm buildings evocative of frontier America dot the landscape - appropriately for a laboratory at the high-energy frontier of modern research. Topics discussed are the Tevatron, detector upgrades, the neutrino programme, Fermilab and the LHC and the non-accelerator programme.

  8. 2015 Fermilab Laboratory Directed Research & Development Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wester, W. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2016-05-26

    The Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) is conducting a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program. Fiscal year 2015 represents the first full year of LDRD at Fermilab and includes seven projects approved mid-year in FY14 and six projects approved in FY15. One of the seven original projects has been completed just after the beginning of FY15. The implementation of LDRD at Fermilab is captured in the approved Fermilab 2015 LDRD Annual Program Plan. In FY15, the LDRD program represents 0.64% of Laboratory funding. The scope of the LDRD program at Fermilab will be established over the next couple of years where a portfolio of about 20 on-going projects representing approximately between 1% and 1.5% of the Laboratory funding is anticipated. This Annual Report focuses on the status of the current projects and provides an overview of the current status of LDRD at Fermilab.

  9. Switching the Fermilab Accelerator Control System to a relational database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shtirbu, S.

    1993-01-01

    The accelerator control system (open-quotes ACNETclose quotes) at Fermilab is using a made-in-house, Assembly language, database. The database holds device information, which is mostly used for finding out how to read/set devices and how to interpret alarms. This is a very efficient implementation, but it lacks the needed flexibility and forces applications to store data in private/shared files. This database is being replaced by an off-the-shelf relational database (Sybase 2 ). The major constraints on switching are the necessity to maintain/improve response time and to minimize changes to existing applications. Innovative methods are used to help achieve the required performance, and a layer seven gateway simulates the old database for existing programs. The new database is running on a DEC ALPHA/VMS platform, and provides better performance. The switch is also exposing problems with the data currently stored in the database, and is helping in cleaning up erroneous data. The flexibility of the new relational database is going to facilitate many new applications in the future (e.g. a 3D presentation of device location). The new database is expected to fully replace the old database during this summer's shutdown

  10. Modern operator's consoles for accelerator control at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, P.; Cahill, K.; Peters, R.; Smedinghoff, J.

    1991-01-01

    Since the construction of the Tevatron the Fermilab accelerator complex has been controlled from operator's consoles based on PDP-11 computers and interaction with display hardware via Camac. In addition the Linac has been controllable from microprocessor-based local consoles. The new generation of console devices is based on VAXstation computers, networked by Ethernet and Token Ring, and utilizing the X-windows protocol. Under X the physical display (server) can be driven by any network node, and need not be part of the console computer (client). This allows great flexibility in configuring display devices - with X-terminals, Unix workstations, and Macintoshes all having been utilized. Over half of the 800 application programs on the system have been demonstrated to work properly in the new environment. The modern version of a Linac local console runs in a Macintosh. These are networked via Token Ring to Linac local control stations. They provide color graphics and a hard copy capability which was previously lacking

  11. Running Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Running Club

    2011-01-01

    The cross country running season has started well this autumn with two events: the traditional CERN Road Race organized by the Running Club, which took place on Tuesday 5th October, followed by the ‘Cross Interentreprises’, a team event at the Evaux Sports Center, which took place on Saturday 8th October. The participation at the CERN Road Race was slightly down on last year, with 65 runners, however the participants maintained the tradition of a competitive yet friendly atmosphere. An ample supply of refreshments before the prize giving was appreciated by all after the race. Many thanks to all the runners and volunteers who ensured another successful race. The results can be found here: https://espace.cern.ch/Running-Club/default.aspx CERN participated successfully at the cross interentreprises with very good results. The teams succeeded in obtaining 2nd and 6th place in the Mens category, and 2nd place in the Mixed category. Congratulations to all. See results here: http://www.c...

  12. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    Christophe Delaere

    2013-01-01

    The focus of Run Coordination during LS1 is to monitor closely the advance of maintenance and upgrade activities, to smooth interactions between subsystems and to ensure that all are ready in time to resume operations in 2015 with a fully calibrated and understood detector. After electricity and cooling were restored to all equipment, at about the time of the last CMS week, recommissioning activities were resumed for all subsystems. On 7 October, DCS shifts began 24/7 to allow subsystems to remain on to facilitate operations. That culminated with the Global Run in November (GriN), which   took place as scheduled during the week of 4 November. The GriN has been the first centrally managed operation since the beginning of LS1, and involved all subdetectors but the Pixel Tracker presently in a lab upstairs. All nights were therefore dedicated to long stable runs with as many subdetectors as possible. Among the many achievements in that week, three items may be highlighted. First, the Strip...

  13. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Chamizo

    2012-01-01

      On 17th January, as soon as the services were restored after the technical stop, sub-systems started powering on. Since then, we have been running 24/7 with reduced shift crew — Shift Leader and DCS shifter — to allow sub-detectors to perform calibration, noise studies, test software upgrades, etc. On 15th and 16th February, we had the first Mid-Week Global Run (MWGR) with the participation of most sub-systems. The aim was to bring CMS back to operation and to ensure that we could run after the winter shutdown. All sub-systems participated in the readout and the trigger was provided by a fraction of the muon systems (CSC and the central RPC wheel). The calorimeter triggers were not available due to work on the optical link system. Initial checks of different distributions from Pixels, Strips, and CSC confirmed things look all right (signal/noise, number of tracks, phi distribution…). High-rate tests were done to test the new CSC firmware to cure the low efficiency ...

  14. The CDF-II silicon tracking system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. Palmonari et al.

    2002-01-18

    The CDFII silicon tracking system, SVX, for Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron has up to 8 cylindrical layers with average radii spanning from {approx} (1.5 to 28.7) cm, and lengths ranging from {approx} (90 to 200) cm for a total active-area of {approx} 6 m{sup 2} and {approx} 7.2 x 10{sup 5} readout channels. SVX will improve the CDFII acceptance and efficiency for both B and high-Pt physics dependent upon b-tagging. Along with the description of the SVX we report some alignment survey data from the SVX assembly phase and the actual status of the alignment as it results from the offline data analysis. The problems encountered are also reviewed.

  15. Virtual machine provisioning, code management, and data movement design for the Fermilab HEPCloud Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, S.; Cooper, G.; Fuess, S.; Garzoglio, G.; Holzman, B.; Kennedy, R.; Grassano, D.; Tiradani, A.; Krishnamurthy, R.; Vinayagam, S.; Raicu, I.; Wu, H.; Ren, S.; Noh, S.-Y.

    2017-10-01

    The Fermilab HEPCloud Facility Project has as its goal to extend the current Fermilab facility interface to provide transparent access to disparate resources including commercial and community clouds, grid federations, and HPC centers. This facility enables experiments to perform the full spectrum of computing tasks, including data-intensive simulation and reconstruction. We have evaluated the use of the commercial cloud to provide elasticity to respond to peaks of demand without overprovisioning local resources. Full scale data-intensive workflows have been successfully completed on Amazon Web Services for two High Energy Physics Experiments, CMS and NOνA, at the scale of 58000 simultaneous cores. This paper describes the significant improvements that were made to the virtual machine provisioning system, code caching system, and data movement system to accomplish this work. The virtual image provisioning and contextualization service was extended to multiple AWS regions, and to support experiment-specific data configurations. A prototype Decision Engine was written to determine the optimal availability zone and instance type to run on, minimizing cost and job interruptions. We have deployed a scalable on-demand caching service to deliver code and database information to jobs running on the commercial cloud. It uses the frontiersquid server and CERN VM File System (CVMFS) clients on EC2 instances and utilizes various services provided by AWS to build the infrastructure (stack). We discuss the architecture and load testing benchmarks on the squid servers. We also describe various approaches that were evaluated to transport experimental data to and from the cloud, and the optimal solutions that were used for the bulk of the data transport. Finally, we summarize lessons learned from this scale test, and our future plans to expand and improve the Fermilab HEP Cloud Facility.

  16. Virtual Machine Provisioning, Code Management, and Data Movement Design for the Fermilab HEPCloud Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timm, S. [Fermilab; Cooper, G. [Fermilab; Fuess, S. [Fermilab; Garzoglio, G. [Fermilab; Holzman, B. [Fermilab; Kennedy, R. [Fermilab; Grassano, D. [Fermilab; Tiradani, A. [Fermilab; Krishnamurthy, R. [IIT, Chicago; Vinayagam, S. [IIT, Chicago; Raicu, I. [IIT, Chicago; Wu, H. [IIT, Chicago; Ren, S. [IIT, Chicago; Noh, S. Y. [KISTI, Daejeon

    2017-11-22

    The Fermilab HEPCloud Facility Project has as its goal to extend the current Fermilab facility interface to provide transparent access to disparate resources including commercial and community clouds, grid federations, and HPC centers. This facility enables experiments to perform the full spectrum of computing tasks, including data-intensive simulation and reconstruction. We have evaluated the use of the commercial cloud to provide elasticity to respond to peaks of demand without overprovisioning local resources. Full scale data-intensive workflows have been successfully completed on Amazon Web Services for two High Energy Physics Experiments, CMS and NOνA, at the scale of 58000 simultaneous cores. This paper describes the significant improvements that were made to the virtual machine provisioning system, code caching system, and data movement system to accomplish this work. The virtual image provisioning and contextualization service was extended to multiple AWS regions, and to support experiment-specific data configurations. A prototype Decision Engine was written to determine the optimal availability zone and instance type to run on, minimizing cost and job interruptions. We have deployed a scalable on-demand caching service to deliver code and database information to jobs running on the commercial cloud. It uses the frontiersquid server and CERN VM File System (CVMFS) clients on EC2 instances and utilizes various services provided by AWS to build the infrastructure (stack). We discuss the architecture and load testing benchmarks on the squid servers. We also describe various approaches that were evaluated to transport experimental data to and from the cloud, and the optimal solutions that were used for the bulk of the data transport. Finally, we summarize lessons learned from this scale test, and our future plans to expand and improve the Fermilab HEP Cloud Facility.

  17. Investigation of hadronic matter at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, E.W.

    1985-01-01

    Hadronic matter at very high energy densities is investigated. The present experimental effort is focused on a search for a new quark-gluon plasma phase expected to occur when temperatures of 240 MeV are achieved. Instrumentation for several unique signatures is being developed to exploit the first operation of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider in 1986. The capital projects funded under this contract are a 240-element trigger hodoscope array, and in phase II a segmented photon detector. For these projects $172K are requested for the period 1986 February 1 through 1987 January 31 to complete the trigger hodoscope, and $160K for the period 1987 February 1 through 1988 January 31 to construct a portion of the photon detector. These figures are as presented in the original proposal. Due to budget constraints on the Fermilab experimental support program, we will not be able to receive the full complement of necessary electronics from the Fermilab PREP pool in the required period. Consequently, an additional $35K is requested for the period 1986 February 1 through 1987 January 31 for a portion of the electronics for the 240-channel trigger hodoscope. For the same reasons, Fermilab cannot provide the required magnet on schedule; a one year delay is proposed. As this would seriously impact our physics goals, the collaboration is attempting to fund the magnet without delay through the universities. Efforts to date have concentrated on the design and testing of the hodoscope. Extensive measurements on the radiation levels and effects during the various accelerator cycles have been made. These data are essential to the proper selection of scintillator and design of electronics. These tests are now complete, and final construction is beginning. 11 refs

  18. Measurement of the top quark mass using dilepton events and a neutrino weighting algorithm with the DOe experiment at the Tevatron (Run II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, J.

    2007-07-01

    Several measurements of the top quark mass in the dilepton final states with the DOe experiment are presented. The theoretical and experimental properties of the top quark are described together with a brief introduction of the Standard Model of particle physics and the physics of hadron collisions. An overview over the experimental setup is given. The Tevatron at Fermilab is presently the highest-energy hadron collider in the world with a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. There are two main experiments called CDF and DOe, A description of the components of the multipurpose DOe detector is given. The reconstruction of simulated events and data events is explained and the criteria for the identification of electrons, muons, jets, and missing transverse energy is given. The kinematics in the dilepton final state is underconstraint. Therefore, the top quark mass is extracted by the so-called Neutrino Weighting method. This method is introduced and several different approaches are described, compared, and enhanced. Results for the international summer conferences 2006 and winter 2007 are presented. The top quark mass measurement for the combination of all three dilepton channels with a dataset of 1.05 1/fb yields: mtop=172.5{+-}5.5 (stat.) {+-} 5.8 (syst.) GeV. This result is presently the most precise top quark mass measurement of the DOe experiment in the dilepton chann el. It entered the top quark mass wold average from March 2007. (orig.)

  19. Siberian snakes for the Fermilab Main Injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anferov, V.A.; Baiod, R.; Courant, E.D.

    1993-01-01

    Appropriate Siberian snakes were designed to maintain the proton beam polarization during acceleration in the Fermilab Main Injector from 8 to 150 GeV. Various snake designs were investigated to find one fitting into the 14 m straight section spaces with the required spin rotation axis and the minimum orbit excursion. The authors studied both cold and warm discrete magnet snakes as well as warm snakes with helical magnets. For the warm discrete magnet snake, obtaining small orbit excursions required a nearly longitudinal snake axis, while axes near ±45 degrees are needed when using two snakes in a ring. The authors found acceptable snakes either by using superconducting magnets or by using warm magnets with a helical dipole field

  20. Studies of neutron dissociation at Fermilab energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferbel, T.

    1975-01-01

    The latest results obtained in a continuing investigation of neutron dissociation in (pπ - ) systems in neutron--nucleus collisions between 50 and 300 GeV/c are summarized. The nuclear coherent dissociation data are discussed first; then new measurements of total cross sections of neutrons on nuclei in the Fermilab momentum range are presented; finally, neutron dissociation using a hydrogen target is considered, and the hydrogen data are compared with expectations from simple Deck models. A substantial correlation was observed between the mass and the t of the system produced. The spin structure of the pπ - amplitudes at low mass was described surprisingly well by the simple Deck mechanism. The t-channel helicity amplitudes contained comparable contributions from flip and nonflip terms, and the states produced were not restricted to those expected on the basis of the Morrison rule. (19 figures, 2 tables) (U.S.)

  1. The SeaQuest Spectrometer at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aidala, C.A.; et al.

    2017-06-29

    The SeaQuest spectrometer at Fermilab was designed to detect oppositely-charged pairs of muons (dimuons) produced by interactions between a 120 GeV proton beam and liquid hydrogen, liquid deuterium and solid nuclear targets. The primary physics program uses the Drell-Yan process to probe antiquark distributions in the target nucleon. The spectrometer consists of a target system, two dipole magnets and four detector stations. The upstream magnet is a closed-aperture solid iron magnet which also serves as the beam dump, while the second magnet is an open aperture magnet. Each of the detector stations consists of scintillator hodoscopes and a high-resolution tracking device. The FPGA-based trigger compares the hodoscope signals to a set of pre-programmed roads to determine if the event contains oppositely-signed, high-mass muon pairs.

  2. Some recent experimental results from Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, H.E.

    1994-02-01

    The aim of this talk was to give an impression of the tremendous range and depth of the data being produced by experiments at Fermilab, both fixed target and collider. Despite the generous allotment of time it was not possible to do more than scratch the surface of some subjects. The collider experiments, using the measurements of the W mass and with top search and mass limits, are approaching the situation where a statement about the Higgs mass, or a sensitive test of the consistency of the standard model become a possibility. Subjects discussed were: (1) cross-sections, QCD measurements; (2) decay physics; (3) W/Z physics; (4) searches for new physics; and (5) search for top quark

  3. Abort kicker power supply systems at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krafczyk, G.; Dugan, G.; Harrison, M.; Koepke, K.; Tilles, E.

    1985-01-01

    Over the past several years, Fermilab has been operating with a single turn proton abort system in both the superconducting Tevatron and the conventional Main Ring. The abort kicker power supply for this system discharges a lumped capacitance into the inductive magnet load, causing the beam to enter the abort channel. A unique feature of this design is the high voltage, high current diode assembly used to clip the recharge of the capacitor bank. This allows the current to decay slowly with the L/R time constant of the magnet and diode series combination. Special attention will be given to the diode characteristics needed for this passive switching element. Operational experience and proposed upgrades will be given for the two operational systems

  4. Numerically controlled oscillator for the Fermilab Booster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crisp, J.L.; Ducar, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    In order to improve the stability of the Fermilab Booster low level rf system, a numerically controlled oscillator system is being constructed. Although the system has not been implemented to date, the design is outlined in this paper. The heart of the new system consists of a numerically synthesized frequency generator manufactured by the Sciteq Company. The 3 GHz/sec rate and 30 to 53 MHz range of the Booster frequency program required the design of a CAMAC based, fast-cycling (1 MHz), 65K x 32 bit, digital function generator. A 1 MHz digital adder and 12 bit analog to digital converter will be used to correct small program errors by phase locking the oscillator to the beam. 6 refs., 1 fig

  5. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    G. Rakness.

    2013-01-01

    After three years of running, in February 2013 the era of sub-10-TeV LHC collisions drew to an end. Recall, the 2012 run had been extended by about three months to achieve the full complement of high-energy and heavy-ion physics goals prior to the start of Long Shutdown 1 (LS1), which is now underway. The LHC performance during these exciting years was excellent, delivering a total of 23.3 fb–1 of proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, 6.2 fb–1 at 7 TeV, and 5.5 pb–1 at 2.76 TeV. They also delivered 170 μb–1 lead-lead collisions at 2.76 TeV/nucleon and 32 nb–1 proton-lead collisions at 5 TeV/nucleon. During these years the CMS operations teams and shift crews made tremendous strides to commission the detector, repeatedly stepping up to meet the challenges at every increase of instantaneous luminosity and energy. Although it does not fully cover the achievements of the teams, a way to quantify their success is the fact that that...

  6. Commissioning of polarized-proton and antiproton beams at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokosawa, A.

    1988-01-01

    The author described the polarized-proton and polarized-antiproton beams up to 200 GeV/c at Fermilab. The beam line, called MP, consists of the 400-m long primary and 350-m long secondary beam line followed by 60-m long experimental hall. We discuss the characteristics of the polarized beams. The Fermilab polarization projects are designated at E-581/704 initiated and carried out by an international collaboration, Argonne (US), Fermilab (US), Kyoto-Kyushu-Hiroshima-KEK (Japan), LAPP (France), Northwestern University (US), Los Alamos Laboratory (US), Rice (US), Saclay (France), Serpukhov (USSR), INFN Trieste (Italy), and University of Texas (US)

  7. Results on QCD Physics from the CDF-II Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagliarone, C.; /Cassino U. /INFN, Pisa

    2006-12-01

    In this paper the authors review a selection of recent results obtained, in the area of QCD physics, from the CDF-II experiment that studies p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV provided by the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. All results shown correspond to analysis performed using the Tevatron Run II data samples. In particular they will illustrate the progress achieved and the status of the studies on the following QCD processes: jet inclusive production, using different jet clustering algorithm, W({yields} e{nu}{sub e}) + jets and Z({yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}) + jets production, {gamma} + b-jet production, dijet production in double pomeron exchange and finally exclusive e{sup +}e{sup -} and {gamma}{gamma} production. No deviations from the Standard Model have been observed so far.

  8. Advances in Grid Computing for the Fabric for Frontier Experiments Project at Fermilab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herner, K.; Alba Hernandez, A. F.; Bhat, S.; Box, D.; Boyd, J.; Di Benedetto, V.; Ding, P.; Dykstra, D.; Fattoruso, M.; Garzoglio, G.; Kirby, M.; Kreymer, A.; Levshina, T.; Mazzacane, A.; Mengel, M.; Mhashilkar, P.; Podstavkov, V.; Retzke, K.; Sharma, N.; Teheran, J.

    2017-10-01

    The Fabric for Frontier Experiments (FIFE) project is a major initiative within the Fermilab Scientific Computing Division charged with leading the computing model for Fermilab experiments. Work within the FIFE project creates close collaboration between experimenters and computing professionals to serve high-energy physics experiments of differing size, scope, and physics area. The FIFE project has worked to develop common tools for job submission, certificate management, software and reference data distribution through CVMFS repositories, robust data transfer, job monitoring, and databases for project tracking. Since the projects inception the experiments under the FIFE umbrella have significantly matured, and present an increasingly complex list of requirements to service providers. To meet these requirements, the FIFE project has been involved in transitioning the Fermilab General Purpose Grid cluster to support a partitionable slot model, expanding the resources available to experiments via the Open Science Grid, assisting with commissioning dedicated high-throughput computing resources for individual experiments, supporting the efforts of the HEP Cloud projects to provision a variety of back end resources, including public clouds and high performance computers, and developing rapid onboarding procedures for new experiments and collaborations. The larger demands also require enhanced job monitoring tools, which the project has developed using such tools as ElasticSearch and Grafana. in helping experiments manage their large-scale production workflows. This group in turn requires a structured service to facilitate smooth management of experiment requests, which FIFE provides in the form of the Production Operations Management Service (POMS). POMS is designed to track and manage requests from the FIFE experiments to run particular workflows, and support troubleshooting and triage in case of problems. Recently a new certificate management infrastructure called

  9. Is there really an eccentric action of the hamstrings during the swing phase of high-speed running? Part II: Implications for exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hooren, Bas; Bosch, Frans

    2017-12-01

    We have previously argued that there may actually be no significant eccentric, but rather predominantly an isometric action of the hamstring muscle fibres during the swing phase of high-speed running when the attachment points of the hamstrings are moving apart. Based on this we suggested that isometric rather than eccentric exercises are a more specific way of conditioning the hamstrings for high-speed running. In this review we argue that some of the presumed beneficial adaptations following eccentric training may actually not be related to the eccentric muscle fibre action, but to other factors such as exercise intensity. Furthermore, we discuss several disadvantages associated with commonly used eccentric hamstring exercises. Subsequently, we argue that high-intensity isometric exercises in which the series elastic element stretches and recoils may be equally or even more effective at conditioning the hamstrings for high-speed running, since they also avoid some of the negative side effects associated with eccentric training. We provide several criteria that exercises should fulfil to effectively condition the hamstrings for high-speed running. Adherence to these criteria will guarantee specificity with regards to hamstrings functioning during running. Practical examples of isometric exercises that likely meet several criteria are provided.

  10. Preparing for 1000 GeV physics at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    The superconducting proton beams and the neutrino beams at Fermilab prepared for the research with 1000 GeV colliding proton and antiproton beams are described. Especially a new developed helium transfer line is described. (HSI).

  11. A review of the Fermilab fixed-target program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rameika, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)

    1994-12-01

    All eyes are now on the Fermilab collider program as the intense search for the top quark continues. Nevertheless, Fermilab`s long tradition of operating a strong, diverse physics program depends not only on collider physics but also on effective use of the facilities the Laboratory was founded on, the fixed-target beamlines. In this talk the author presents highlights of the Fermilab fixed-target program from its (not too distant) past, (soon to be) present, and (hopefully, not too distant) future program. The author concentrates on those experiments which are unique to the fixed-target program, in particular hadron structure measurements which use the varied beams and targets available in this mode and the physics results from kaon, hyperon and high statistics charm experiments which are not easily accessible in high p{sub T} hadron collider detectors.

  12. Fermilab's new management looks to land linear collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Feder, Toni

    2007-01-01

    "As of 1 January, the Universities Research Association (URA), which has managed Fermilab since the lab's inception 40 years ago, is sharing the responsibility with the University of Chicago." (1,5 page)

  13. The Fermilab ISDN Pilot Project: Experiences and future plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, D.E.; Lego, A.J.; Clifford, A.E.

    1995-12-31

    Fully operational in June of 1994, the Fermilab ISDN Pilot Project was started to gain insight into the costs and benefits of providing ISDN service to the homes of Fermilab researchers. Fourteen users were chosen from throughout Fermilab, but the number of Fermilab-employed spouses pushed the total user count to 20. Each home was equipped with a basic rate ISDN (BRI) line, a BRI Ethernet half-bridge, and an NT-1. An inter-departmental team coordinated the project. Usage at each home was tracked and frequent surveys were attempted. Lessons learned include: working with Ameritech can be difficult; careful monitoring is essential; and configuration of home computing equipment is very time consuming. Plans include moving entirely to primary rate ISDN hubs, support for different home ISDN equipment and better usage and performance tracking.

  14. The Fermilab ISDN Pilot Project: Experiences and future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, D.E.; Lego, A.J.; Clifford, A.E.

    1995-01-01

    Fully operational in June of 1994, the Fermilab ISDN Pilot Project was started to gain insight into the costs and benefits of providing ISDN service to the homes of Fermilab researchers. Fourteen users were chosen from throughout Fermilab, but the number of Fermilab-employed spouses pushed the total user count to 20. Each home was equipped with a basic rate ISDN (BRI) line, a BRI Ethernet half-bridge, and an NT-1. An inter-departmental team coordinated the project. Usage at each home was tracked and frequent surveys were attempted. Lessons learned include: working with Ameritech can be difficult; careful monitoring is essential; and configuration of home computing equipment is very time consuming. Plans include moving entirely to primary rate ISDN hubs, support for different home ISDN equipment and better usage and performance tracking

  15. The Fermilab ISDN pilot project: experiences and future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, D.E.; Lego, A.J.; Clifford, A.E.

    1996-01-01

    Fully operational in June of 1994, the Fermilab ISDN Pilot Project was started to gain insight into the costs and benefits of providing ISDN service to the homes of Fermilab researchers. Fourteen were chosen from throughout Fermilab, but the number of Fermilab-employed spouses pushed the total user count to 20. each home was equipped with a basic rate ISDN (BRI) Ethernet half-bridge, and an NT-1. An inter-departmental team coordinated the project. Usage at each home was tracked and frequent surveys were attempted. Lessons learned include: working with Ameritech can be difficult; careful monitoring is essential; and configuration of home computing equipment is very time consuming. Plans include moving entirely to primary rate ISDN hubs, support for different home ISDN equipment and better usage and performance tracking. (author)

  16. Exploiting the X-Window environment to expand the number, reach, and usefulness of Fermilab accelerator control consoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahill, K.; Smedinghoff, J.

    1992-01-01

    The Fermilab accelerator operator workstation of choice is now the Digital VAX station running VMS and X-Window software. This new platform provides an easy to learn programming environment while support routines are expanding in number and power. The X-Window environment is exploited to provide remote consoles to users across long haul networks and to support multiple consoles on a single workstation. The integration of imaging systems, local datalogging, commercial and Physics community's software, and development facilities on the operator workstation adds functionality to the system. The locally engineered knob/pointer/keyboard interface solves the multiple keyboard and mouse problems of a multi-screen console. This paper will address these issues of Fermilab's accelerator operator workstations. (author)

  17. Operations aspects of the Fermilab Central Helium Liquefier facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geynisman, M.G.; Makara, J.N.

    1996-09-01

    The Fermilab Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) facility consists of helium and nitrogen reliquefier plants operated 24 hours-a-day to supply LHe at 4.6 K and LN 2 for the Fermilab Tevatron superconducting proton-antiproton collider ring and to recover warm return gases. Operating aspects of CHL, including different equipment and systems reliability, availability, maintenance experience, safety concerns, and economics aspects are discussed

  18. Operations aspects of the Fermilab Central Helium Liquefier Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geynisman, M.G.; Makara, J.N.

    1995-03-01

    The Fermilab Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) facility consists of helium and nitrogen reliquefier plants operated 24 hours-a-day to supply LHe at 4.6 degrees K and LN 2 for the Fermilab Tevatron superconducting proton-antiproton collider ring and to recover warm return gases. Operating aspects of CHL, including different equipment and systems reliability, availability, maintenance experience, safety concerns, and economics aspects are discussed

  19. 3D design activities at Fermilab-Opportunities for physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarema, Raymond; Deptuch, Grezgorz; Hoff, Jim; Shenai, Alpana; Trimpl, Marcel; Zimmerman, Tom; Demarteau, Marcel; Lipton, Ron; Christian, Dave

    2010-01-01

    Fermilab began exploring the technologies for vertically integrated circuits (also commonly known as 3D circuits) in 2006. These technologies include through silicon vias (TSV), circuit thinning, and bonding techniques to replace conventional bump bonds. Since then, the interest within the High Energy Physics community has grown considerably. This paper will present an overview of the activities at Fermilab over the last 3 years which have helped spark this interest.

  20. 3D design activities at Fermilab-Opportunities for physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarema, Raymond, E-mail: yarema@fnal.go [Fermilab, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Deptuch, Grezgorz; Hoff, Jim; Shenai, Alpana; Trimpl, Marcel; Zimmerman, Tom; Demarteau, Marcel; Lipton, Ron; Christian, Dave [Fermilab, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)

    2010-05-21

    Fermilab began exploring the technologies for vertically integrated circuits (also commonly known as 3D circuits) in 2006. These technologies include through silicon vias (TSV), circuit thinning, and bonding techniques to replace conventional bump bonds. Since then, the interest within the High Energy Physics community has grown considerably. This paper will present an overview of the activities at Fermilab over the last 3 years which have helped spark this interest.

  1. Integrated FASTBUS, VME and CAMAC diagnostic software at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.; Forster, R.; Franzen, J.; Wilcer, N.

    1992-10-01

    A fully integrated system for the diagnosis and repair of data acquisition hardware in FASTBUS, VME and CAMAC is described. A short cost/benefit analysis of using a distributed network of personal computers for diagnosis is presented. The SPUDS (Single Platform Uniting Diagnostic Software) software package developed at Fermilab by the authors is introduced. Examples of how SPUDS is currently used in the Fermilab equipment repair facility, as an evaluation tool and for field diagnostics are given

  2. Running Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Running Club

    2010-01-01

    The 2010 edition of the annual CERN Road Race will be held on Wednesday 29th September at 18h. The 5.5km race takes place over 3 laps of a 1.8 km circuit in the West Area of the Meyrin site, and is open to everyone working at CERN and their families. There are runners of all speeds, with times ranging from under 17 to over 34 minutes, and the race is run on a handicap basis, by staggering the starting times so that (in theory) all runners finish together. Children (< 15 years) have their own race over 1 lap of 1.8km. As usual, there will be a “best family” challenge (judged on best parent + best child). Trophies are awarded in the usual men’s, women’s and veterans’ categories, and there is a challenge for the best age/performance. Every adult will receive a souvenir prize, financed by a registration fee of 10 CHF. Children enter free (each child will receive a medal). More information, and the online entry form, can be found at http://cern.ch/club...

  3. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    Christophe Delaere

    2012-01-01

      On Wednesday 14 March, the machine group successfully injected beams into LHC for the first time this year. Within 48 hours they managed to ramp the beams to 4 TeV and proceeded to squeeze to β*=0.6m, settings that are used routinely since then. This brought to an end the CMS Cosmic Run at ~Four Tesla (CRAFT), during which we collected 800k cosmic ray events with a track crossing the central Tracker. That sample has been since then topped up to two million, allowing further refinements of the Tracker Alignment. The LHC started delivering the first collisions on 5 April with two bunches colliding in CMS, giving a pile-up of ~27 interactions per crossing at the beginning of the fill. Since then the machine has increased the number of colliding bunches to reach 1380 bunches and peak instantaneous luminosities around 6.5E33 at the beginning of fills. The average bunch charges reached ~1.5E11 protons per bunch which results in an initial pile-up of ~30 interactions per crossing. During the ...

  4. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Delaere

    2012-01-01

      With the analysis of the first 5 fb–1 culminating in the announcement of the observation of a new particle with mass of around 126 GeV/c2, the CERN directorate decided to extend the LHC run until February 2013. This adds three months to the original schedule. Since then the LHC has continued to perform extremely well, and the total luminosity delivered so far this year is 22 fb–1. CMS also continues to perform excellently, recording data with efficiency higher than 95% for fills with the magnetic field at nominal value. The highest instantaneous luminosity achieved by LHC to date is 7.6x1033 cm–2s–1, which translates into 35 interactions per crossing. On the CMS side there has been a lot of work to handle these extreme conditions, such as a new DAQ computer farm and trigger menus to handle the pile-up, automation of recovery procedures to minimise the lost luminosity, better training for the shift crews, etc. We did suffer from a couple of infrastructure ...

  5. He II Heat Exchanger Test Unit for the LHC Inner Triplet

    CERN Document Server

    Blanco-Viñuela, E; Huang, Y; Nicol, T H; Peterson, T; Van Weelderen, R

    2002-01-01

    The Inner Triplet Heat Exchanger Test Unit (IT-HXTU) is a 30-m long thermal model designed at Fermilab, built in US industry, fully automated and tested at CERN as part of the US LHC program to develop the LHC Interaction Region quadrupole system. The cooling scheme of the IT-HXTU is based on heat exchange between stagnant pressurized He II in the magnet cold mass and saturated He II (two-phase) flowing in a heat exchanger located outside of and parallel to the cold mass. The purposes of this test are, among others, to validate the proposed cooling scheme and to define an optimal control strategy to be implemented in the future LHC accelerator. This paper discusses the results for the heat exchanger test runs and emphasizes the thermal and hydraulic behavior of He II for the inner triplet cooling scheme.

  6. A Linac afterburner to supercharge the Fermilab booster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ankenbrandt M, Charles email = popovic@fnal.gov

    2002-01-01

    A Linac Afterburner is proposed to raise the energy of the beam injected into the Femrilab Booster from 400 MeV to about 600 MeV, thereby alleviating the longitudinal and transverse space-charge effects at low energy that currently limit its performance. The primary motivation is to increase the integrated luminosity of the Tevatron Collider in Run II, but other future programs would also recap substantial benefits. The estimated cost is $23M

  7. Sonic Helium Detectors in the Fermilab Tevatron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossert, R. J.

    2006-04-01

    In the Fermilab Tevatron cryogenic system there are many remotely located low-pressure plate relief valves that must vent large volumes of cold helium gas when magnet quenches occur. These valves can occasionally stick open or not reseat completely, resulting in a large helium loss. As such, the need exists for a detector to monitor the relief valve's discharge area for the presence of helium. Due to the quantity needed, cost is an important factor. A unit has been developed and built for this purpose that is quite inexpensive. Its operating principle is based on the speed of sound, where two closely matched tubes operate at their acoustic resonant frequency. When helium is introduced into one of these tubes, the resulting difference in acoustic time of flight is used to trigger an alarm. At present, there are 39 of these units installed and operating in the Tevatron. They have detected many minor and major helium leaks, and have also been found useful in detecting a rise in the helium background in the enclosed refrigerator buildings. This paper covers the construction, usage and operational experience gained with these units over the last several years.

  8. Sonic helium detectors in the Fermilab Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossert, R.J.; Fermilab

    2006-01-01

    In the Fermilab Tevatron cryogenic system there are many remotely located low-pressure plate relief valves that must vent large volumes of cold helium gas when magnet quenches occur. These valves can occasionally stick open or not reseat completely, resulting in a large helium loss. As such, the need exists for a detector to monitor the relief valve's discharge area for the presence of helium. Due to the quantity needed, cost is an important factor. A unit has been developed and built for this purpose that is quite inexpensive. Its operating principle is based on the speed of sound, where two closely matched tubes operate at their acoustic resonant frequency. When helium is introduced into one of these tubes, the resulting difference in acoustic time of flight is used to trigger an alarm. At present, there are 39 of these units installed and operating in the Tevatron. They have detected many minor and major helium leaks, and have also been found useful in detecting a rise in the helium background in the enclosed refrigerator buildings. This paper covers the construction, usage and operational experience gained with these units over the last several years

  9. Tests of cold helium compressors at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, T.J.; Fuerst, J.D.

    1987-10-01

    Fermilab has tested two cold helium compressors for possible installation in the satellite refrigerator buildings of the Tevatron cryogenic system. Operating conditions required to obtain an overall Tevatron energy upgrade from 900 to 1000 GeV are (for each of 24 machines): 52 g/s mass flow rate, 0.7 atm inlet pressure, 1.4 atm exhaust pressure. Acceptable efficiency is in the 60% range. Both Creare, Inc., and Cryogenic Consultants, Inc. (CCI), have supplied units for evaluation. The Creare machine is a high speed centrifugal pump/compressor which yielded 60% adiabatic efficiency (including an approximately 20 watt heat leak) with a 1.0 atm inlet pressure and 55 g/s flow rate. Certain mechanical difficulties were present, chiefly the device's inability to withstand two-phase flow. CCI supplied a reciprocating unit which, after initial testing and modification, achieved 59% efficiency with an approximate 35 watt heat leak at a 0.7 atm inlet pressure and 48 g/s flow rate. Although the device lacks the smooth, quiet operating characteristics of a turbomachine, it has endured mechanically throughout testing and is entirely insensitive to two-phase flow

  10. Efficiency of the Fermilab Electron Cooler's Collector

    CERN Document Server

    Prost, L R

    2005-01-01

    The newly installed high-energy Recycler Electron Cooling system (REC) at Fermilab will work at an electron energy of 4.34 MeV and a DC beam current of 0.5 A in an energy recovery scheme. For reliable operation of the system, the relative beam current loss must be maintained to levels < 3.e-5. Experiments have shown that the loss is determined by the performance of the electron beam collector, which must retain secondary electrons generated by the primary beam hitting its walls. As a part of the Electron cooling project, the efficiency of the collector for the REC was optimized, both with dedicated test bench experiments and on two versions of the cooler prototype. We find that to achieve the required relative current loss, an axially-symmetric collector must be immersed in a transverse magnetic field with certain strength and gradient prescriptions. Collector efficiencies in various magnetic field configurations, including without a transverse field on the collector, are presented and discussed

  11. Compensation of dogleg effect in Fermilab Booster

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao Biao Huang

    2003-01-01

    The edge focusing of dogleg magnets in Fermilab Booster has been causing severe distortion to the horizontal linear optics. The doglegs are vertical rectangular bends, therefore the vertical edge focusing is canceled by body focusing and the overall effect is focusing in the horizontal plane. The maximum horizontal beta function is changed from 7m to 46.9m and maximum dispersion from 3.19m to 6.14m. Beam size increases accordingly. This is believed to be one of the major reasons of beam loss. In this technote we demonstrate that this effect can be effectively corrected with Booster's quadrupole correctors in short straight sections (QS). There are 24 QS correctors which can alter horizontal linear optics with negligible perturbation to the vertical plane. The currents of correctors are determined by harmonic compensation, i.e., cancellation of dogleg's harmonics that are responsible for the distortion with that of QS correctors. By considering a few leading harmonics, the ideal lattice can be partly restored....

  12. Momentum Cogging at the Fermilab Booster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seiya, K.; Drennan, C.C.; Pellico, W.; Triplett, A.K.; Waller, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    The Fermilab Booster has an upgrade plan called the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP). The flux throughput goal is 2E17 protons/hour which, is almost double the present flux, 1.1E17 protons/hour. The beam loss in the machine is going to be an issue. The Booster accelerates beam from 400 MeV to 8 GeV and extracts to the Main Injector (MI). The current cogging process synchronizes the extraction kicker gap to the MI by changing radial position of the beam during the cycle. The gap creation occurs at about 700 MeV, which is about 6 ms into the cycle. The cycle-to-cycle variations of the Booster are larger at lower energy. However, changing the radial position at low energy for cogging is limited because of aperture. Momentum cogging is able to move the gap creation to an earlier time by using dipole correctors and radial position feedback, and is able to control the revolution frequency and radial position at the same time. The new cogging is expected to reduce beam loss and not be limited by aperture. The progress of the momentum cogging system development is going to be discussed in this paper.

  13. 2014 Fermilab Laboratory Directoed Research & Development Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wester, W. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2016-05-26

    After initiation by the Fermilab Laboratory Director, a team from the senior Laboratory leadership and a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Advisory Committee developed an implementation plan for LDRD at Fermilab for the first time. This implementation was captured in the approved Fermilab 2014 LDRD Program Plan and followed directions and guidance from the Department of Energy (DOE) order, DOE O 413.2B, a “Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines, …” document, and examples of best practices at other DOE Office of Science Laboratories. At Fermilab, a FY14 midyear Call for Proposals was issued. A LDRD Selection Committee evaluated those proposals that were received and provided a recommendation to the Laboratory Director who approved seven LDRD projects. This Annual Report focuses on the status of those seven projects and provides an overview of the current status of LDRD at Fermilab. The seven FY14 LDRD approved projects had a date of initiation late in FY14 such that this report reflects approximately six months of effort approximately through January 2015. The progress of these seven projects, the subsequent award of six additional new projects beginning in FY15, and preparations for the issuance of the FY16 Call for Proposals indicates that LDRD is now integrated into the overall annual program at Fermilab. All indications are that LDRD is improving the scientific and technical vitality of the Laboratory and providing new, novel, or cutting edge projects carried out at the forefront of science and technology and aligned with the mission and strategic visions of Fermilab and the Department of Energy.

  14. A search for particle dark matter using cryogenic germanium and silicon detectors in the one- and two- tower runs of CDMS-II at Soudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogburn, Reuben Walter IV

    2008-01-01

    Images of the Bullet Cluster of galaxies in visible light, X-rays, and through gravitational lensing confirm that most of the matter in the universe is not composed of any known form of matter. The combined evidence from the dynamics of galaxies and clusters of galaxies, the cosmic microwave background, big bang nucleosynthesis, and other observations indicates that 80% of the universe's matter is dark, nearly collisionless, and cold. The identify of the dar, matter remains unknown, but weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are a very good candidate. They are a natural part of many supersymmetric extensions to the standard model, and could be produced as a nonrelativistic, thermal relic in the early universe with about the right density to account for the missing mass. The dark matter of a galaxy should exist as a spherical or ellipsoidal cloud, called a 'halo' because it extends well past the edge of the visible galaxy. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) seeks to directly detect interactions between WIMPs in the Milky Way's galactic dark matter halo using crystals of germanium and silicon. Our Z-sensitive ionization and phonon ('ZIP') detectors simultaneously measure both phonons and ionization produced by particle interactions. In order to find very rare, low-energy WIMP interactions, they must identify and reject background events caused by environmental radioactivity, radioactive contaminants on the detector,s and cosmic rays. In particular, sophisticated analysis of the timing of phonon signals is needed to eliminate signals caused by beta decays at the detector surfaces. This thesis presents the firs two dark matter data sets from the deep underground experimental site at the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota. These are known as 'Run 118', with six detectors (1 kg Ge, 65.2 live days before cuts) and 'Run 119', with twelve detectors (1.5 kg Ge, 74.5 live days before cuts). They have analyzed all data from the two runs together in a single

  15. Study of the Effect of Temporal Sampling Frequency on DSCOVR Observations Using the GEOS-5 Nature Run Results. Part II; Cloud Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdaway, Daniel; Yang, Yuekui

    2016-01-01

    This is the second part of a study on how temporal sampling frequency affects satellite retrievals in support of the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) mission. Continuing from Part 1, which looked at Earth's radiation budget, this paper presents the effect of sampling frequency on DSCOVR-derived cloud fraction. The output from NASA's Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) Nature Run is used as the "truth". The effect of temporal resolution on potential DSCOVR observations is assessed by subsampling the full Nature Run data. A set of metrics, including uncertainty and absolute error in the subsampled time series, correlation between the original and the subsamples, and Fourier analysis have been used for this study. Results show that, for a given sampling frequency, the uncertainties in the annual mean cloud fraction of the sunlit half of the Earth are larger over land than over ocean. Analysis of correlation coefficients between the subsamples and the original time series demonstrates that even though sampling at certain longer time intervals may not increase the uncertainty in the mean, the subsampled time series is further and further away from the "truth" as the sampling interval becomes larger and larger. Fourier analysis shows that the simulated DSCOVR cloud fraction has underlying periodical features at certain time intervals, such as 8, 12, and 24 h. If the data is subsampled at these frequencies, the uncertainties in the mean cloud fraction are higher. These results provide helpful insights for the DSCOVR temporal sampling strategy.

  16. Bid for Fermilab an effort to keep U.S. a leader in particle physics

    CERN Multimedia

    Van, Jon

    2006-01-01

    During 20 years, the world's most powerful accelerator, the Tevatron, was in Fermilab, Batavia, Ill.; but next year, Fermilab will lose that title, as in CERN, a new machine will be brought into service. (1,5 pages)

  17. U. of C. to bid for Fermilab School hopes to bring new accelerator to site

    CERN Multimedia

    Van, Jon

    2006-01-01

    For more than 20 years, Fermilab in Batavia is home to the world's most powerful atomic particle accelerator, the Tevatron, but Fermilab will lose that title next year when a new machine in Switzerland and France fires up. (2 pages)

  18. Fermilab Recycler Ring: Technical design report. Revision 1.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, G.

    1996-07-01

    This report describes the technical design of the Fermilab Recycler Ring. The purpose of the Recycler is to augment the luminosity increase anticipated from the implementation of the Fermi III upgrade project, which has as its main component the Fermilab Main Injector construction project. The Recycler is a fixed 8 GeV kinetic energy storage ring. It is located in the Main Injector tunnel directly above the Main Injector beamline, near the ceiling. The construction schedule calls for the installation of the Recycler ring before the installation shutdown of the Main Injector. This aggressive construction schedule is made possible by the exclusive use of permanent magnets in the ring lattice, removing the need for expensive conventional iron/copper magnet construction along with the related power supplies, cooling water system, and electrical safety systems. The location, operating energy, and mode of construction are chosen to minimize operational impacts on both Fermilab's ongoing High Energy Physics program and the Main Injector construction project

  19. Review of programmable systems associated with Fermilab experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, T.

    1981-05-01

    The design and application of programmable systems for Fermilab experiments are reviewed. The high luminosity fixed target environment at Fermilab has been a very fertile ground for the development of sophisticated, powerful triggering systems. A few of these are integrated systems designed to be flexible and to have broad application. Many are dedicated triggers taking advantage of large scale integrated circuits to focus on the specific needs of one experiment. In addition, the data acquisition requirements of large detectors, existing and planned, are being met with programmable systems to process the data. Offline reconstruction of data places a very heavy load on large general purpose computers. This offers a potentially very fruitful area for new developments involving programmable dedicated systems. Some of the present thinking at Fermilab regarding offline reconstruction processors will be described

  20. A review of programmable systems associated with Fermilab experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, T.

    1981-01-01

    In this paper we review the design and application of programmable systems for Fermilab experiments. The high luminosity fixed target environment at Fermilab has been a very fertile ground for the development of sophisticated, powerful triggering systems. A few of these are integrated systems designed to be flexible and to have broad application. Many are dedicated triggers taking advantage of large scale integrated circuits to focus on the specific needs of one experiment. In addition, the data acquisition requirements of large detectors, existing and planned, are being met with programmable systems to process the data. Offline reconstruction of data places a very heavy load on large general purpose computers. This offers a potentially very fruitful area for new developments involving programmable dedicated systems. Some of the present thinking at Fermilab regarding offline reconstruction processors will be described. (orig.)

  1. QA [quality assurance] at Fermilab; the hermeneutics of NQA-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodnarczuk, M.

    1988-06-01

    This paper opens with a brief overview of the purpose of Fermilab and a historical synopsis of the development and current status of quality assurance (QA) at the Laboratory. The paper subsequently addresses some of the more important aspects of interpreting the national standard ANSI/ASME NQA-1 in pure research environments like Fermilab. Highlights of this discussion include, what is hermeneutics and why are hermeneutical considerations relevant for QA, a critical analysis of NQA-1 focussing on teleological aspects of the standard, a description of the hermeneutical approach to NQA-1 used at Fermilab which attempts to capture the true intents of the document without violating the deeply ingrained traditions of quality standards and peer review that have been foundational to the overall success of the paradigms of high-energy physics

  2. QA (quality assurance) at Fermilab; the hermeneutics of NQA-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodnarczuk, M.

    1988-06-01

    This paper opens with a brief overview of the purpose of Fermilab and a historical synopsis of the development and current status of quality assurance (QA) at the Laboratory. The paper subsequently addresses some of the more important aspects of interpreting the national standard ANSI/ASME NQA-1 in pure research environments like Fermilab. Highlights of this discussion include, what is hermeneutics and why are hermeneutical considerations relevant for QA, a critical analysis of NQA-1 focussing on teleological aspects of the standard, a description of the hermeneutical approach to NQA-1 used at Fermilab which attempts to capture the true intents of the document without violating the deeply ingrained traditions of quality standards and peer review that have been foundational to the overall success of the paradigms of high-energy physics.

  3. Report of the Fermilab ILC Citizens' Task Force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2008-06-01

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory convened the ILC Citizens' Task Force to provide guidance and advice to the laboratory to ensure that community concerns and ideas are included in all public aspects of planning and design for a proposed future accelerator, the International Linear Collider. In this report, the members of the Task Force describe the process they used to gather and analyze information on all aspects of the proposed accelerator and its potential location at Fermilab in northern Illinois. They present the conclusions and recommendations they reached as a result of the learning process and their subsequent discussions and deliberations. While the Task Force was charged to provide guidance on the ILC, it became clear during the process that the high cost of the proposed accelerator made a near-term start for the project at Fermilab unlikely. Nevertheless, based on a year of extensive learning and dialogue, the Task Force developed a series of recommendations for Fermilab to consider as the laboratory develops all successor projects to the Tevatron. The Task Force recognizes that bringing a next-generation particle physics project to Fermilab will require both a large international effort and the support of the local community. While the Task Force developed its recommendations in response to the parameters of a future ILC, the principles they set forth apply directly to any large project that may be conceived at Fermilab, or at other laboratories, in the future. With this report, the Task Force fulfills its task of guiding Fermilab from the perspective of the local community on how to move forward with a large-scale project while building positive relationships with surrounding communities. The report summarizes the benefits, concerns and potential impacts of bringing a large-scale scientific project to northern Illinois.

  4. Slip-stacking Dynamics for High-Power Proton Beams at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldred, Jeffrey Scott [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Slip-stacking is a particle accelerator configuration used to store two particle beams with different momenta in the same ring. The two beams are longitudinally focused by two radiofrequency (RF) cavities with a small frequency difference between them. Each beam is synchronized to one RF cavity and perturbed by the other RF cavity. Fermilab uses slip-stacking in the Recycler so as to double the power of the 120 GeV proton beam in the Main Injector. This dissertation investigates the dynamics of slip-stacking beams analytically, numerically and experimentally. In the analytic analysis, I find the general trajectory of stable slip-stacking particles and identify the slip-stacking parametric resonances. In the numerical analysis, I characterize the stable phase-space area and model the particle losses. In particular, I evaluate the impact of upgrading the Fermilab Booster cycle-rate from 15 Hz to 20 Hz as part of the Proton Improvement Plan II (PIP-II). The experimental analysis is used to verify my approach to simulating slip-stacking loss. I design a study for measuring losses from the longitudinal single-particle dynamics of slip-stacking as a function of RF cavity voltage and RF frequency separation. I further propose the installation of a harmonic RF cavity and study the dynamics of this novel slip-stacking configuration. I show the harmonic RF cavity cancels out parametric resonances in slip-stacking, reduces emittance growth during slip-stacking, and dramatically enhances the stable phase-space area. The harmonic cavity is expected to reduce slip-stacking losses to far exceed PIP-II requirements. These results raise the possibility of extending slip-stacking beyond the PIP-II era.

  5. High Transverse Momentum Direct Photon Production at Fermilab Fixed-Target Energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apanasevich, Leonard

    2005-01-01

    This thesis describes a study of the production of high transverse momentum direct photons and π 0 mesons by proton beams at 530 and 800 GeV/c and π - beams at 515 GeV/c incident on beryllium, copper, and liquid hydrogen targets. The data were collected by Fermilab experiment E706 during the 1990 and 1991-92 fixed target runs. The apparatus included a large, finely segmented lead and liquid argon electromagnetic calorimeter and a charged particle spectrometer featuring silicon strip detectors in the target region and proportional wire chambers and drift tubes downstream of a large aperture analysis magnet. The inclusive cross sections are presented as functions of transverse momentum and rapidity. The measurements are compared with next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations and to results from previous experiments

  6. Real-time data reorganizer for the D0 central fiber tracker trigger system at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefano Marco Rapisarda, Jamieson T Olsen and Neal George Wilcer email rapisard@fnal.gov

    2002-01-01

    A custom digital data Mixer system has been designed to reorganize, in real time, the data produced by the Fermilab D0 Scintillating Fiber Detector. The data is used for the Level 1 and Level 2 trigger generation. The Mixer System receives the data from the front-end digitization electronics over 320 Low Voltage Differential Signaling (LVDS) links running at 371 MHz. The input data is de-serialized down to 53 MHz by the LVDS receivers, clock/frame re-synchronized and multiplexed in Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs). The data is then reserialized at 371 MHz by LVDS transmitters over 320 LVDS output links and sent to the electronics responsible for Level 1 and Level 2 trigger decisions. The Mixer System processes 311 Gigabits per second of data with an input to output delay of 200 nanoseconds

  7. Nuevos aspectos en el estudio de la particula D en el experimento FOCUS de Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinones Gonzalez, Jose A.; /Puerto Rico U., Mayaguez

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to improve the reconstruction techniques of the decays of the particles that contain charm in the quark composition using the information of the Target Silicon Detector of the experiment E831 (FOCUS). That experiment runs during 1997 to 1998 in Fermilab National Laboratory. The objective of the experiment was improving the understanding of the particles that contain charm. Adding the Target Silicon Detector information in the reconstruction process of the primary vertex the position error. This reduction produces an improvement in the mass signal and the knowledge of the charm particles properties. This ad to the possibility's that in other analysis will use the techniques developed in this work.

  8. Developing a b-tagging algorithm using soft muons at level-3 for the DO detector at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Mayukh [Louisiana Tech. U.

    2005-01-01

    The current data-taking phase of the DØ detector at Fermilab, called Run II, is designed to aid the search for the Higgs Boson. The neutral Higgs is postulated to have a mass of 117 GeV. One of the channels promising the presence of this hypothetical particle is through the decay of b-quark into a muon. The process of identifying a b-quark in a jet using muon as a reference is b-tagging with a muon tag. At the current data taking and analysis rate, it will take long to reach the process of identifying valid events. The triggering mechanism of the experiment, consisting of 3 levels of combined hardware, firmware and software writes fi physics events at the rate of 50 Hz to data disks, with Level-3 alone accounting for the reduction from 1 kHz to 50 Hz. This large rejection is achieved through algorithms implemented in the search for key physics processes. The work presented in this dissertation is the development of a fast b-tagging algorithm using central-matched muons, called L3FBTagMU. Additional tools such as the impact parameter tracks and calorimeter jets have been used to tag B jets. The dR or the differential increment in cone radius is the most significant variable introduced. Plots within thresholds of dR for both Z → bb Monte Carlo and monitor stream data show similar efficiency trends when checked against other parameters. The differential efficiencies saturate at dR within 0.5 to 0.7 range. Differential bins of 0.1 intervals project an overall efficiency of tagging a b-jet in any event is 17.25 in data. This is in good agreement with the theory. The algorithm is currently running online and offline through the DØ database repository. This work is primarily used by the b-id, B-Physics and Higgs Physics groups for their physics analysis wherein the above b-tagging efficiency serves as a crucial tool. The prospect for optimizing the physics potential using this algorithm is very promising for current and future analyses.

  9. 2015 Fermilab Laboratory Directed Research & Development Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wester, W., editor

    2015-05-26

    Fermilab is executing Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) as outlined by order DOE O 413.2B in order to enhance and realize the mission of the laboratory in a manner that also supports the laboratory’s strategic objectives and the mission of the Department of Energy. LDRD funds enable scientific creativity, allow for exploration of “high risk, high payoff” research, and allow for the demonstration of new ideas, technical concepts, and devices. LDRD also has an objective of maintaining and enhancing the scientific and technical vitality of Fermilab.

  10. 2014 Fermilab Laboratory Directed Research & Development Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wester, W., editor

    2016-05-26

    Fermilab is executing Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) as outlined by order DOE O 413.2B in order to enhance and realize the mission of the laboratory in a manner that also supports the laboratory’s strategic objectives and the mission of the Department of Energy. LDRD funds enable scientific creativity, allow for exploration of “high risk, high payoff” research, and allow for the demonstration of new ideas, technical concepts, and devices. LDRD also has an objective of maintaining and enhancing the scientific and technical vitality of Fermilab.

  11. FASTBUS Standard Routines implementation for Fermilab embedded processor boards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pangburn, J.; Patrick, J.; Kent, S.; Oleynik, G.; Pordes, R.; Votava, M.; Heyes, G.; Watson, W.A. III

    1992-10-01

    In collaboration with CEBAF, Fermilab's Online Support Department and the CDF experiment have produced a new implementation of the IEEE FASTBUS Standard Routines for two embedded processor FASTBUS boards: the Fermilab Smart Crate Controller (FSCC) and the FASTBUS Readout Controller (FRC). Features of this implementation include: portability (to other embedded processor boards), remote source-level debugging, high speed, optional generation of very high-speed code for readout applications, and built-in Sun RPC support for execution of FASTBUS transactions and lists over the network

  12. Integrable RCS as a Proposed Replacement for Fermilab Booster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldred, Jeffrey [Fermilab; Valishev, Alexander [Fermilab

    2017-03-07

    Integrable optics is an innovation in particle accelerator design that potentially enables a greater betatron tune spread and damps collective instabilities. An integrable rapid-cycling synchrotron (RCS) would be an effective replacement for the Fermilab Booster, as part of a plan to reach multi-MW beam power at 120 GeV for the Fermilab high-energy neutrino program. We provide an example integrable lattice with features of a modern RCS - dispersion-free drifts, low momentum compaction factor, superperiodicity, chromaticity correction, bounded beta functions, and separate-function magnets.

  13. Characterising the Decays of High-pt Top Quarks and Addressing Naturalness with Jet Substructure in ATLAS Runs I and II

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00397460

    The coupling of the Standard Model top quark to the Higgs boson is O(1), which leads to large quantum corrections in the perturbative expansion of the Higgs boson mass. Possible solutions to this so-called naturalness problem include supersymmetric models with gluinos and stop squarks whose masses are at the electroweak scale, O(1 TeV). If supersymmetry is realised in nature at this scale, these particles are expected to be accessible with the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. A search for gluino pair production with decays mediated by stop- and sbottom-squark loops in the initial 14.8 ifb of the ATLAS run 2 dataset is presented in terms of a pair of simplified models, which targets extreme regions of phase space using jet substructure techniques. No excess is observed and limits are set which greatly extend the previous exclusion region of this search, up to 1.9 TeV (1.95 TeV) for gluinos decaying through light stop (sbottom) squarks to the lightest neutralinos. A performance study of top tagging algorithms in ...

  14. Simulation of the capture process in the Fermilab Booster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahl, S.; Ankenbrandt, C.

    1987-09-01

    A progress report on efforts to understand and improve adiabatic capture in the Fermilab Booster by experiment and simulation is presented. In particular, a new RF voltage program for capture which ameliorates transverse space-charge effects is described and simulated. 7 refs., 4 figs

  15. CERN-Fermilab summer school is smash hit

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    A new joint CERN-Fermilab summer school is proving more popular than the organizers ever imagined. Interest in the first CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School, to be held at Fermilab on 9-18 August, has proved far greater than anyone anticipated, with 300 applications for the planned 100 places. In response, the Organizing Committee, led by Fermilab's Jeffrey Appel and Bogdan Dobrescu, has had to increase the class size to nearly 150 participants. 'The success of this initiative, with an unexpectedly large number of applications, shows both the great anticipation that exists in the world for the start up of the LHC, and the need for greater educational support to enable the hundreds of young researchers to get ready for a full and prompt exploitation of the LHC data,' explains CERN's Michelangelo Mangano, who is a member of the International Advisory Committee (IAC) for the school. 'Fulfilling the expectations of the students will be a great challenge, which we are all eager to tackle.' Fabiol...

  16. Fermilab Friends for Science Education | Tree of Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermilab Friends for Science Education FFSE Home About Us Join Us Support Us Contact Us Tree of Testimonials Our Donors Board of Directors Board Tools Calendar Join Us Donate Now Get FermiGear! Education precollege science education programs. Prominently displayed at the Lederman Science Center is the lovely

  17. Fermilab Friends for Science Education | Programs | Past Donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermilab Friends for Science Education FFSE Home About Us Join Us Support Us Contact Us Our Donors Testimonials Our Donors Board of Directors Board Tools Calendar Join Us Donate Now Get FermiGear! Education DuPage Area Occupational Education Systems Technology Center DuPage/Kane Educational Service Center Fermi

  18. Fermilab Friends for Science Education | Board of Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermilab Friends for Science Education FFSE Home About Us Join Us Support Us Contact Us Board of Directors Board Tools Calendar Join Us Donate Now Get FermiGear! Education Office Search Programs Calendar , Chicago, IL Join Us/Renew Membership Forms: Online - Print Support Us Donation Forms: Online - Print Tree

  19. Europeans quit, giving Fermilab edge in search for new particle

    CERN Document Server

    Higgin, A G

    2000-01-01

    CERN has announced it will shut down the machine it has been using to find an elusive subatomic particle believed to be the key to understanding the universe. Fermilab has been upgrading its facilities for the last four years. It will start its Higgs bosons experiments in the spring (1/2 page).

  20. Experiments with Fermilab polarized proton and polarized antiproton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokosawa, A.

    1990-01-01

    We summarize activities concerning the Fermilab polarized beams. They include a brief description of the polarized-beam facility, measurements of beam polarization by polarimeters, asymmetry measurements in the π degree production at high p perpendicular and in the Λ (Σ degree), π ± , π degree production at large x F , and Δσ L (pp, bar pp) measurements. 18 refs

  1. Searching for antiproton decay at the Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geer, S.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes an experimental search for antiproton decay at the Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator. The E868 (APEX) experimental setup is described. The APEX data is expected to be sensitive to antiproton decay if the antiproton lifetimes is less than a few times 100,000 years

  2. FERMILAB: operation resumes in meson area; fast neutron therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Improvements and modifications in the Meson Area at Fermilab are described. The target train was rebuilt and energy range of some beams raised to 400 GeV with provisions for Tevatron beams of 1000 GeV in the future. The work of the fast neutron therapy facility is summarised. (W.D.L.).

  3. 2nd CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School

    CERN Document Server

    Gian Giudice; Ellis, Nick; Jakobs, Karl; Mage, Patricia; Seymour, Michael H; Spiropulu, Maria; Wilkinson, Guy; CERN-FNAL Summer School; Hadron Collider Physics Summer School

    2007-01-01

    For the past few years, experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider have once again been exploring uncharted territory at the current energy frontier of particle physics. With CERN's LHC operations to start in 2007, a new era in the exploration of the fundamental laws of nature will begin. In anticipation of this era of discovery, Fermilab and CERN are jointly organizing a series of "Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools", whose main goal is to offer a complete picture of both the theoretical and experimental aspects of hadron collider physics. Preparing young researchers to tackle the current and anticipated challenges at hadron colliders, and spreading the global knowledge required for a timely and competent exploitation of the LHC physics potential, are concerns equally shared by CERN, the LHC host laboratory, and by Fermilab, the home of the Tevatron and host of CMS's LHC Physics Center in the U.S. The CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School is targeted particularly at young postdocs in exp...

  4. ''Econodump'' design for the Fermilab Direct Neutral Lepton Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childress, S.; Brown, C.; Koizumi, G.; Malensek, A.; Morfin, J.G.; Murphy, T.; Stefanski, R.; Wehman, A.; Lu, B.

    1986-08-01

    An extensive effort has been directed toward a major redesign of the Fermilab Direct Neutral Lepton Facility (DNLF). The goal has been a very significant cost reduction of the facility, with minimal sacrifice of physics potential. Hence the name ''Econodump'' applied to the redesign effort

  5. Simulation of the capture process in the Fermilab Booster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahl, S.; Ankenbrandt, C.

    1987-01-01

    A progress report on efforts to understand and improve adiabatic capture in the Fermilab Booster by experiment and simulation is presented. In particular, a new Rf voltage program for capture which ameliorates transverse space-charge effects is described and simulated

  6. Antiproton acceleration in the Fermilab Main Ring and Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.; Dinkel, J.; Ducar, R.

    1987-01-01

    The operation of the Fermilab Main Ring and Tevatron rf systems for colliding beams physics is discussed. The changes in the rf feedback system required for acceleration of antiprotons, and the methods for achieving proper transfer of both protons and antiprotons are described. Data on acceleration and transfer efficiencies are presented

  7. A search for disoriented chiral condensate at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1996-10-01

    A small test/experiment at the Fermilab Collider which measures charged particle and photon multiplicities in the forward direction, η ∼ 4.1, has been carried out, with the primary goal being the search for disoriented chiral condensate (DCC). The author describes the experiment and analysis methods, together with preliminary results

  8. Fermilab Testbeam Facility Annual Report – FY 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrow, M. G. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States). et al.

    2016-11-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the Fermilab Test Beam operations for FY 2015. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the individual experiments that ran at FTBF, which are tabulated. Each experiment section was prepared by the relevant authors, and was edited for inclusion in this summary.

  9. Fermilab Test Beam Facility Annual Report. FY 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States). et al.

    2015-01-01

    Fermilab Test Beam Facility (FTBF) operations are summarized for FY 2014. It is one of a series of publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the individual experiments that ran at FTBF. Each experiment section was prepared by the relevant authors, and was edited for inclusion in this summary.

  10. 12th CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    CERN and Fermilab are jointly offering a series of "Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools", to prepare young researchers for these exciting times. The school has alternated between CERN and Fermilab, and will return to CERN for the twelfth edition, from 28th August to 6th September 2017. The CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School is an advanced school targeted particularly at young postdocs and senior PhD students working towards the completion of their thesis project, in both Experimental High Energy Physics (HEP) and phenomenology. Other schools, such as the CERN European School of High Energy Physics, may provide more appropriate training for students in experimental HEP who are still working towards their PhDs. Mark your calendar for 28 August - 6 September 2017, when CERN will welcome students to the twelfth CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School. The School will include nine days of lectures and discussions, and one free day in the middle of the period. Limited scholarship ...

  11. Fermilab | Science | Particle Physics | Benefits of Particle Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Photos and videos Latest news For the media Particle Physics Neutrinos Fermilab and the LHC Dark matter initiatives Research and development Key discoveries Benefits of particle physics Particle Accelerators society Particle Physics 101 Science of matter, energy, space and time How particle physics discovery

  12. 2016 Fermilab Laboratory Directed Research & Development Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wester, W. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2016-05-25

    Fermilab is executing Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) as outlined by order DOE O 413.2B in order to enhance and realize the mission of the laboratory in a manner that also supports the laboratory’s strategic objectives and the mission of the Department of Energy. LDRD funds enable scientific creativity, allow for exploration of “high risk, high payoff” research, and allow for the demonstration of new ideas, technical concepts, and devices. LDRD also has an objective of maintaining and enhancing the scientific and technical vitality of Fermilab. LDRD is able to fund employee-initiated proposals that address the current strategic objectives and better position Fermilab for future mission needs. The request for such funds is made in consideration of the investment needs, affordability, and directives from DOE and Congress. Review procedures of the proposals will insure that those proposals which most address the strategic goals of the DOE and the Laboratory or which best position Fermilab for the future will be recommended to the Laboratory Director who has responsibility for approval. The execution of each approved project will be the responsibility of the Principal Investigator, PI, who will follow existing Laboratory guidelines to ensure compliance with safety, environmental, and quality assurance practices. A Laboratory Director-appointed LDRD Coordinator will work with Committees, Laboratory Management, other Fermilab Staff, and the PI’s to oversee the implementation of policies and procedures of LDRD and provide the management and execution of this Annual Program Plan. FY16 represents third fiscal year in which LDRD has existed at Fermilab. The number of preliminary proposals (117) submitted in response to the LDRD Call for Proposals indicates very strong interest of the program within the Fermilab community. The first two Calls have resulted in thirteen active LDRD projects – and it is expected that between five and seven new

  13. Two decades of Mexican particle physics at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy Rubinstein

    2002-01-01

    This report is a view from Fermilab of Mexican particle physics at the Laboratory since about 1980; it is not intended to be a history of Mexican particle physics: that topic is outside the expertise of the writer. The period 1980 to the present coincides with the growth of Mexican experimental particle physics from essentially no activity to its current state where Mexican groups take part in experiments at several of the world's major laboratories. Soon after becoming Fermilab director in 1979, Leon Lederman initiated a program to encourage experimental physics, especially experimental particle physics, in Latin America. At the time, Mexico had significant theoretical particle physics activity, but none in experiment. Following a visit by Lederman to UNAM in 1981, a conference ''Panamerican Symposium on Particle Physics and Technology'' was held in January 1982 at Cocoyoc, Mexico, with about 50 attendees from Europe, North America, and Latin America; these included Lederman, M. Moshinsky, J. Flores, S. Glashow, J. Bjorken, and G. Charpak. Among the conference outcomes were four subsequent similar symposia over the next decade, and a formal Fermilab program to aid Latin American physics (particularly particle physics); it also influenced a decision by Mexican physicist Clicerio Avilez to switch from theoretical to experimental particle physics. The first physics collaboration between Fermilab and Mexico was in particle theory. Post-docs Rodrigo Huerta and Jose Luis Lucio spent 1-2 years at Fermilab starting in 1981, and other theorists (including Augusto Garcia, Arnulfo Zepeda, Matias Moreno and Miguel Angel Perez) also spent time at the Laboratory in the 1980s

  14. Review of neutrino physics at Fermilab from the perspective of the Caltech--Fermilab experiment. Lecture 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barish, B.C.

    1976-01-01

    Neutrino-nucleon interactions which yield no final state muons (neutral current reactions) are discussed. The evidence from the Caltech--Fermilab experiment on the existence of neutral currents is detailed and a description is given of the present program to determine more about the nature of the neutral current interaction

  15. Dr. Sheehan on Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, George A.

    This book is both a personal and technical account of the experience of running by a heart specialist who began a running program at the age of 45. In its seventeen chapters, there is information presented on the spiritual, psychological, and physiological results of running; treatment of athletic injuries resulting from running; effects of diet…

  16. The Fermilab computing farms in 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolbers, S.

    1998-01-01

    The farms in 1997 went through a variety of changes. First, the farms expansion, begun in 1996, was completed. This boosted the computing capacity to something like 20,000 MIPS (where a MIP is a unit defined by running a program, TINY, on the machine and comparing the machine performance to a VAX 11/780). In SpecInt92, it would probably rate close to 40,000. The use of the farms was not all that large. The fixed target experiments were not generally in full production in 1997, but spent time tuning up code. Other users processed on the farms, but tended to come and go and not saturate the resource. Some of the old farms were retired, saving the lab money on maintenance and saving the farms support staff effort

  17. Search for WW and WZ production in lepton, neutrino plus jets final states at CDF Run II and Silicon module production and detector control system for the ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sfyrla, Anna [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland)

    2008-03-10

    In the first part of this work, we present a search for WW and WZ production in charged lepton, neutrino plus jets final states produced in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions with √s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron, using 1.2 fb-1 of data accumulated with the CDF II detector. This channel is yet to be observed in hadron colliders due to the large singleWplus jets background. However, this decay mode has a much larger branching fraction than the cleaner fully leptonic mode making it more sensitive to anomalous triple gauge couplings that manifest themselves at higher transverse W momentum. Because the final state is topologically similar to associated production of a Higgs boson with a W, the techniques developed in this analysis are also applicable in that search. An Artificial Neural Network has been used for the event selection optimization. The theoretical prediction for the cross section is σWW/WZtheory x Br(W → ℓv; W/Z → jj) = 2.09 ± 0.14 pb. They measured NSignal = 410 ± 212(stat) ± 102(sys) signal events that correspond to a cross section σWW/WZ x Br(W → ℓv; W/Z → jj) = 1.47 ± 0.77(stat) ± 0.38(sys) pb. The 95% CL upper limit to the cross section is estimated to be σ x Br(W → ℓv; W/Z → jj) < 2.88 pb. The second part of the present work is technical and concerns the ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker (SCT) assembly phase. Although technical, the work in the SCT assembly phase is of prime importance for the good performance of the detector during data taking. The production at the University of Geneva of approximately one third of the silicon microstrip end-cap modules is presented. This collaborative effort of the university of Geneva group that lasted two years, resulted in 655 produced modules, 97% of which were good modules, constructed within the mechanical and electrical specifications and delivered in the SCT collaboration for assembly on the end-cap disks. The SCT end-caps and barrels

  18. Preventing Run-Time Bugs at Compile-Time Using Advanced C++

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neswold, Richard [Fermilab

    2018-01-01

    When writing software, we develop algorithms that tell the computer what to do at run-time. Our solutions are easier to understand and debug when they are properly modeled using class hierarchies, enumerations, and a well-factored API. Unfortunately, even with these design tools, we end up having to debug our programs at run-time. Worse still, debugging an embedded system changes its dynamics, making it tough to find and fix concurrency issues. This paper describes techniques using C++ to detect run-time bugs *at compile time*. A concurrency library, developed at Fermilab, is used for examples in illustrating these techniques.

  19. Remote manipulator experience in target train maintenance at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butala, S.W.

    1984-01-01

    When Fermilab was designed in the late 1960's and early 1970's, it was anticipated that Neutrino target train servicing could be costly in terms of personnel radiation exposure. This was based in part on the expectation that target intensities of at least 1E13 protons/pulse would be required to produce several neutrino interactions in a large bubble chamber detector. This was indeed later proven to be the case and historically the Neutrino beamline has been targeted with about one half of the protons available from the Main Ring. It was believed that much of the occupational radiation dose from the Neutrino Area could be spared by utilization of a remote manipulator system, which was eventually installed. It is the purpose of this report to examine the use of the Fermilab remote manipulator system and evaluate its cost effectiveness and success as an ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) tool. 16 references, 11 figures

  20. Energy Doubler/Saver at Fermilab: a status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, W.B.

    1977-01-01

    Guided, as in the past, by close attention to the developing theoretical and experimental evidence for new phenomena (for example, the discoveries of weak neutral currents, charm, J/psi and the Upsilon) Fermilab has devoted considerable effort to pushing on to higher energies. This seems particularly appropriate since other phenomena is suggested, such as intermediate vector bosons (W + and Z 0 ) etc. The TeV Project at Fermilab pursues both increases in the available energy via doubling the energy of the present accelerator as a fixed target, high intensity proton synchrotron and via colliding beams. These ways are complementary to one another. High energy physics with fixed targets cannot match the energy available in the center of mass system that can be achieved in colliding beams, whereas physics with colliding beams cannot match the intensities or the variety of bombarding particles that can be achieved with fixed targets. Some of the aspects of each technique are given

  1. Testing of the superconducting solenoid for the Fermilab collider detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast, R.W.; Holmes, C.N.; Kephart, R.D.

    1985-07-01

    The 3 m phi x 5 m long x 1.5 T superconducting solenoid for the Fermilab Collider Detector has been installed at Fermilab and was tested in early 1985 with a dedicated refrigeration system. The refrigerator and 5.6-Mg magnet cold mass were cooled to 5 K in 210 hours. After testing at low currents, the magnet was charged to the design current of 5 kA in 5-MJ steps. During a 390 A/min charge a spontaneous quench occurred at 4.5 kA due to insufficient liquid helium flow. Three other quenches occurred during ''slow'' discharges which were nevertheless fast enough to cause high eddy current heating in the outer support cylinder. Quench behavior is well understood and the magnet is now quite reliable

  2. HTS power lead testing at the Fermilab magnet test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabehl, R.; Carcagno, R.; Feher, S.; Huang, Y.; Orris, D.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.; /Fermilab

    2005-08-01

    The Fermilab Magnet Test Facility has tested high-temperature superconductor (HTS) power leads for cryogenic feed boxes to be placed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) interaction regions and at the new BTeV C0 interaction region of the Fermilab Tevatron. A new test facility was designed and operated, successfully testing 20 pairs of HTS power leads for the LHC and 2 pairs of HTS power leads for the BTeV experiment. This paper describes the design and operation of the cryogenics, process controls, data acquisition, and quench management systems. Results from the facility commissioning are included, as is the performance of a new insulation method to prevent frost accumulation on the warm ends of the power leads.

  3. HTS power lead testing at the Fermilab magnet test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabehl, R.; Carcagno, R.; Feher, S.; Huang, Y.; Orris, D.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.

    2005-01-01

    The Fermilab Magnet Test Facility has tested high-temperature superconductor (HTS) power leads for cryogenic feed boxes to be placed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) interaction regions and at the new BTeV CO interaction region of the Fermilab Tevatron. A new test facility was designed and operated, successfully testing 20 pairs of HTS power leads for the LHC and 2 pairs of HTS power leads for the BTeV experiment. This paper describes the design and operation of the cryogenics, process controls, data acquisition, and quench management systems. Results from the facility commissioning are included, as is the performance of a new insulation method to prevent frost accumulation on the warm ends of the power leads

  4. Impedances and beam stability issues of the Fermilab recycler ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, King-Yuen.

    1996-04-01

    The Fermilab Recycler Ring (permanent magnets) will be built on top of the Fermilab Main Injector sharing the same tunnel; its main function is to recycle the anti-protons after a store in the Tevatron and to provide storage for them after after accumulation and cooling in the Accumulator. Estimates of coupling impedances show domination by space charge. Examination of longitudinal instabilities shows that microwave instability will not occur if there are only N = 2.53 x 10 12 anti-protons in the beam. Longitudinal coupling-bunch instability during injection stacking does not appear possible because of long bunch lengths/short bunch gaps and lack of sharp resonances. Transverse instability, on the other hand, cannot be Landau damped by the momentum spread in the beam, but it can be cured by a small spread in the betatron tunes (either from space charge or an octupole)

  5. Status of the Fermilab Energy Doubler/Saver project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The possibility of building a ring of superconducting magnets was considered very early in the design of the Fermilab main accelerator. It was concluded that the technology of superconducting magnets was not at that time, sufficiently advanced. Therefore, the main ring was designed and built with conventional magnets. However, space was left in the main-ring tunnel for a future ring of superconducting magnets. The Energy Doubler/Saver (ED/S) was initiated in 1972 as a project to build a ring of superconducting magnets with the objective of dramatically increasing the research potential of the Fermilab accelerators. This was to be accomplished at a moderate cost and in such a manner as to make possible a significant saving of electrical energy. A description is given of the evolution of this program as well as give a status report of the Ed/S research and development program

  6. CERN stop-over for KEK and Fermilab Directors

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    En route for a meeting of the International Committee for Future Accelerators, ICFA, held at Germany's DESY laboratory, the Directors of Japan's KEK laboratory and Fermilab in the United States had a stop-over at CERN last Wednesday 7 February. Dr Hirotaka Sugawara, Director General of Japan's high energy physics laboratory, KEK, visited the Antiproton Decelerator, AD. From left to right, Masaki Hori, member of the ASACUSA collaboration, John Eades, contact person for ASACUSA, Dr Hirotaka Sugawara, Werner Pirkl, the PS Division engineer responsible for the Radio Frequency Quadrupole decelerator in the foreground, and Kurt Hübner, CERN's Director of Accelerators. Dr Michael S. Witherell, Director of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Fermilab, visited construction sites for the LHC, ATLAS, and CMS. He is seen here with a module of the CMS hadronic calorimeter in building 186.

  7. The Fermilab CMTF cryogenic distribution remote control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, L.; Theilacker, J.; Klebaner, A.; Martinez, A.; Bossert, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Batavia, IL, 60510 (United States)

    2014-01-29

    The Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF) is able to provide the necessary test bed for measuring the performance of Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities in a cryomodule (CM). The CMTF have seven 300 KW screw compressors, two liquid helium refrigerators, and two Cryomodule Test Stands (CMTS). CMTS1 is designed for 1.3 GHz cryomodule operating in a pulsed mode (PM) and CMTS2 is for cryomodule operating in Half-Wave (HW) and Continuous Wave (CW) mode. Based on the design requirement, each subsystem has to be far away from each other and be placed in distant locations. Therefore choosing Siemens Process Control System 7-400, DL205 PLC, Synoptic and Fermilab ACNET are the ideal choices for CMTF cryogenic distribution real-time remote control system. This paper presents a method which has been successfully used by many Fermilab distribution cryogenic real-time remote control systems.

  8. Operating experience with the Fermilab 500-GeV accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, G.S.; Gannon, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    The Fermilab accelerator has been operating for more than four years. It has been improved so that it is now capable of operating at an energy of 500 GeV and an intensity in excess of 2.0 x 10 13 protons per pulse. The accelerator is manned on a 24 hour a day basis by an operating team of five persons. This is possible in part, because almost all of the hardware systems have status monitoring and control through an advanced computer control system. A discussion is given of the operation of the accelerator with emphasis on person to machine interface, operator training techniques used at Fermilab, and the keeping of records and reliability information

  9. Overview of the next generation of Fermilab collider software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, B.; Joshel, R.

    1992-01-01

    Fermilab is entering an era of operating a more complex collider facility. In addition, new operator workstations are available that have increased capabilities. The task of providing updated software in this new environment precipitated a project called Colliding Beam Software (CBS). It was soon evident that a new approach was needed for developing console software. Hence CBS, although a common acronym, is too narrow a description. A new generation of the application program subroutine library has been created to enhance the existing programming environment with a set of value added tools. Several key Collider applications were written that exploit CBS tools. This paper will discuss the new tools and the underlying change in methodology in application program development for accelerator control at Fermilab. (author)

  10. Fermilab turns up the heat on electron cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Riesselmann, K

    2002-01-01

    A technique that was first proposed by Gersh Budker in 1966 is being injected with new life by a team of physicists at Fermilab in the US. Working on an ambitious electron-cooling project, the team set a new world record for DC beam power, they maintained a continuous 3.5 MeV electron beam with a current of more than 500 mA for up to 8 h with only short interruptions. They use an electron beam to cool antiprotons inside Fermilab's 3 km Recycler antiproton storage ring and boost the luminosity of the laboratory's Tevatron collider. When the electron-cooling system is complete, electrons and antiprotons will travel side by side in the Recycler.

  11. Status of the Fermilab Energy Doubler/Saver project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    The possibility of building a ring of superconducting magnets was considered very early in the design of the Fermilab main accelerator. It was concluded that the technology of superconducting magnets was not at that time, sufficiently advanced. Therefore, the main ring was designed and built with conventional magnets. However, space was left in the main-ring tunnel for a future ring of superconducting magnets. The Energy Doubler/Saver (ED/S) was initiated in 1972 as a project to build a ring of superconducting magnets with the objective of dramatically increasing the research potential of the Fermilab accelerators. This was to be accomplished at a moderate cost and in such a manner as to make possible a significant saving of electrical energy. A description is given of the evolution of this program as well as give a status report of the Ed/S research and development program.

  12. A facility for accelerator research and education at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Church, Mike; Nagaitsev, Sergei

    2009-01-01

    Fermilab is currently constructing the 'SRF Test Accelerator at the New Muon Lab' (NML). NML consists of a photo-emitted RF electron gun, followed by a bunch compressor, low energy test beamlines, SCRF accelerating structures, and high energy test beamlines. The initial primary purpose of NML will be to test superconducting RF accelerating modules for the ILC and for Fermilab's 'Project X' - a proposal for a high intensity proton source. The unique capability of NML will be to test these modules under conditions of high intensity electron beams with ILC-like beam parameters. In addition NML incorporates a photoinjector which offers significant tunability and especially the possibility to generate a bright electron beam with brightness comparable to state-of-the-art accelerators. This opens the exciting possibility of also using NML for fundamental beams research and tests of new concepts in beam manipulations and acceleration, instrumentation, and the applications of beams.

  13. FERMILAB SWITCHYARD RESONANT BEAM POSITION MONITOR ELECTRONICS UPGRADE RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, T. [Fermilab; Diamond, J. [Fermilab; Liu, N. [Fermilab; Prieto, P. S. [Fermilab; Slimmer, D. [Fermilab; Watts, A. [Fermilab

    2016-10-12

    The readout electronics for the resonant beam position monitors (BPMs) in the Fermilab Switchyard (SY) have been upgraded, utilizing a low noise amplifier transition board and Fermilab designed digitizer boards. The stripline BPMs are estimated to have an average signal output of between -110 dBm and -80 dBm, with an estimated peak output of -70 dBm. The external resonant circuit is tuned to the SY machine frequency of 53.10348 MHz. Both the digitizer and transition boards have variable gain in order to accommodate the large dynamic range and irregularity of the resonant extraction spill. These BPMs will aid in auto-tuning of the SY beamline as well as enabling operators to monitor beam position through the spill.

  14. A search for CP violation in hyperon decays by the hyper-CP experiment at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmstrom, T.

    2002-01-01

    The Hyper-CP collaboration is performing a precision search for CP violation in hyperon decays, these decays are sensitive to sources of CP violation to which neutral kaon decays are not. The measured CP observable is proportional to the difference between the product of the Ξ and Λ decay α parameters and that of the CP-conjugate decays. About 2.5 billion fully-reconstructed Ξ - → Λπ - → pπ - π - and Ξ-bar + → Λ-barπ + → p-barπ + π + decays were taken in 2 fixed-target runs at Fermilab, allowing a statistical sensitivity of about 2.10 -4 in the CP asymmetry. These 2 runs gave us the largest sample of Ξ and Ω ever collected. An initial study has been done on a fraction of the data and we have obtained: A ΞΛ equals (-7±12(statistical)±6.2(systematic))*10 -4 . Other preliminary results are also presented in this series of slides

  15. Integrating UNIX workstation into existing online data acquisition systems for Fermilab experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oleynik, G.

    1991-03-01

    With the availability of cost effective computing prior from multiple vendors of UNIX workstations, experiments at Fermilab are adding such computers to their VMS based online data acquisition systems. In anticipation of this trend, we have extended the software products available in our widely used VAXONLINE and PANDA data acquisition software systems, to provide support for integrating these workstations into existing distributed online systems. The software packages we are providing pave the way for the smooth migration of applications from the current Data Acquisition Host and Monitoring computers running the VMS operating systems, to UNIX based computers of various flavors. We report on software for Online Event Distribution from VAXONLINE and PANDA, integration of Message Reporting Facilities, and a framework under UNIX for experiments to monitor and view the raw event data produced at any level in their DA system. We have developed software that allows host UNIX computers to communicate with intelligent front-end embedded read-out controllers and processor boards running the pSOS operating system. Both RS-232 and Ethernet control paths are supported. This enables calibration and hardware monitoring applications to be migrated to these platforms. 6 refs., 5 figs

  16. Physics at the Fermilab Tevatron Proton-Antiproton Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geer, S.

    1994-08-01

    These lectures discuss a selection of QCD and Electroweak results from the CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron Proton-Antiproton Collider. Results are presently based on data samples of about 20 pb -1 at a center-of-mass energy of 1.8 TeV. Results discussed include jet production, direct photon production, W mass and width measurements, the triboson coupling, and most exciting of all, evidence for top quark production

  17. Physics prospects of the KTeV experiment at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitmore, J.

    1996-10-01

    KTeV is a new Fermilab fixed target experiment which will search for direct CP violation in the neutral kaon system. In addition, we will make precision measurements of other CP and CPT violating parameters and make high sensitivity studies of rare kaon decays. The detector has been commissioned and is currently taking data. The physics goals and detector performance are presented. 12 refs., 1 fig

  18. Power supply regulation systems installed in the Fermilab accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hays, S.; Wolff, D.; Pfeffer, H.

    1991-11-01

    A variety of current and voltage regulation systems have been installed in the Fermilab large magnet system. The four major systems employ different methods to achieve the desired degree of regulation. The methods include computer control and feedback, adaptive learning, precision (10ppm) current monitoring, and the use of feed-forward signals. This paper will explain each method used and present the measured regulation of the above systems. Also an overview of planned upgrades and improvements will be presented.

  19. A transitionless lattice for the Fermilab Main Injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, K.Y.; Trbojevic, D.; Lee, S.Y.

    1991-05-01

    Medium energy (1 to 30 GeV) accelerators are often confronted with transition crossing during acceleration. A lattice without transition is presented, which is a design for the Fermilab Main Injector. The main properties of this lattice are that the γ t is an imaginary number, the maxima of the dispersion function are small, and two long-straight section with zero dispersion. 7 refs., 5 figs

  20. Model of E-Cloud Instability in the Fermilab Recycler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balbekov, V. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-06-24

    Simple model of electron cloud is developed in the paper to explain e-cloud instability of bunched proton beam in the Fermilab Recycler. The cloud is presented as an immobile snake in strong vertical magnetic field. The instability is treated as an amplification of the bunch injection errors from the batch head to its tail. Nonlinearity of the e-cloud field is taken into account. Results of calculations are compared with experimental data demonstrating good correlation.