WorldWideScience

Sample records for femtosecond x-ray spectroscopy

  1. Mapping chemical bonding of reaction intermediates with femtosecond X-ray laser spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wernet, P.; Beye, M.; de Groot, F.; Düsterer, S.; Grübel, S.; Gaffney, K.; Hartsock, R.; Hennies, F.; Josefsson, I.; Kennedy, B.; Kunnus, K.; Leitner, T.; Mazza, T.; Meyer, M.; Nordlund, D.; Odelius, M.; Quevedo, W.; Radcliffe, P.; Rajkovic, I.; Schlotter, B.; Scholz, M.; Schreck, S.; Suljoti, E.; Techert, S.; Turner, J.; Weniger, C.; Zhang, W.; Föhlisch, A.

    2013-01-01

    We determine the pathways in the photo-dissociation reactions of Fe(CO)5 both in the gas phase and in solution by mapping the valence electronic structure of the reaction intermediates with femtosecond X-ray laser spectroscopy.

  2. Probing spin-vibronic dynamics using femtosecond X-ray spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penfold, T. J.; Pápai, Mátyás Imre; Rozgonyi, T.;

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy within the X-ray regime is now possible owing to the development of X-ray Free Electrons Lasers (X-FELs) and is opening new opportunities for the direct probing of femtosecond evolution of the nuclei, the electronic and spin degrees of freedom. In this contributi...

  3. Femtosecond X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy at a Hard X-ray Free Electron Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemke, Henrik T.; Bressler, Christian; Chen, Lin X.

    2013-01-01

    X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) deliver short (<100 fs) and intense (similar to 10(12) photons) pulses of hard X-rays, making them excellent sources for time-resolved studies. Here we show that, despite the inherent instabilities of current (SASE based) XFELs, they can be used for measuring hi...

  4. Femtosecond X-ray magnetic circular dichroism absorption spectroscopy at an X-ray free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higley, Daniel J., E-mail: dhigley@stanford.edu; Yuan, Edwin [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Hirsch, Konstantin; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Jal, Emmanuelle; Lutman, Alberto A.; Coslovich, Giacomo; Hart, Philip; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Mitra, Ankush; Moeller, Stefan; Ohldag, Hendrik; Seaberg, Matthew; Stöhr, Joachim; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Reid, Alex H.; Dürr, Hermann A.; Schlotter, William F. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Liu, Tianmin; MacArthur, James P. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); and others

    2016-03-15

    X-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy using an X-ray free electron laser is demonstrated with spectra over the Fe L{sub 3,2}-edges. The high brightness of the X-ray free electron laser combined with high accuracy detection of incident and transmitted X-rays enables ultrafast X-ray magnetic circular dichroism studies of unprecedented sensitivity. This new capability is applied to a study of all-optical magnetic switching dynamics of Fe and Gd magnetic sublattices in a GdFeCo thin film above its magnetization compensation temperature.

  5. Toward Femtosecond X-ray Spectroscopy at the Advanced Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chong, Henry Herng Wei

    2004-04-16

    The realization of tunable, ultrashort pulse x-ray sources promises to open new venues of science and to shed new light on long-standing problems in condensed matter physics and chemistry. Fundamentally new information can now be accessed. Used in a pump-probe spectroscopy, ultrashort x-ray pulses provide a means to monitor atomic rearrangement and changes in electronic structure in condensed-matter and chemical systems on the physically-limiting time-scales of atomic motion. This opens the way for the study of fast structural dynamics and the role they play in phase transitions, chemical reactions and the emergence of exotic properties in materials with strongly interacting degrees of freedom. The ultrashort pulse x-ray source developed at the Advanced Light Source at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is based on electron slicing in storage rings, and generates {approx}100 femtosecond pulses of synchrotron radiation spanning wavelengths from the far-infrared to the hard x-ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum. The tunability of the source allows for the adaptation of a broad range of static x-ray spectroscopies to useful pump-probe measurements. Initial experiments are attempted on transition metal complexes that exhibit relatively large structural changes upon photo-excitation and which have excited-state evolution determined by strongly interacting structural, electronic and magnetic degrees of freedom. Specifically, iron(II) complexes undergo a spin-crossover transition upon optical irradiation. The dynamics of the transition involve a metal-to-ligand charge transfer, a {Delta}S=2 change in magnetic moment and 10% bond dilation in the first coordination shell of the iron. Studies of the electronic dynamics are studied with time-resolved optical absorption measurements. The current progress of time-resolved structural studies to complete the picture of the spin-crossover transition is presented.

  6. Toward Femtosecond X-ray Spectroscopy at the Advanced Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chong, Henry Herng Wei [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The realization of tunable, ultrashort pulse x-ray sources promises to open new venues of science and to shed new light on long-standing problems in condensed matter physics and chemistry. Fundamentally new information can now be accessed. Used in a pump-probe spectroscopy, ultrashort x-ray pulses provide a means to monitor atomic rearrangement and changes in electronic structure in condensed-matter and chemical systems on the physically-limiting time-scales of atomic motion. This opens the way for the study of fast structural dynamics and the role they play in phase transitions, chemical reactions and the emergence of exotic properties in materials with strongly interacting degrees of freedom. The ultrashort pulse x-ray source developed at the Advanced Light Source at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is based on electron slicing in storage rings, and generates ~100 femtosecond pulses of synchrotron radiation spanning wavelengths from the far-infrared to the hard x-ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum. The tunability of the source allows for the adaptation of a broad range of static x-ray spectroscopies to useful pump-probe measurements. Initial experiments are attempted on transition metal complexes that exhibit relatively large structural changes upon photo-excitation and which have excited-state evolution determined by strongly interacting structural, electronic and magnetic degrees of freedom. Specifically, iron(II) complexes undergo a spin-crossover transition upon optical irradiation. The dynamics of the transition involve a metal-to-ligand charge transfer, a ΔS=2 change in magnetic moment and 10% bond dilation in the first coordination shell of the iron. Studies of the electronic dynamics are studied with time-resolved optical absorption measurements. The current progress of time-resolved structural studies to complete the picture of the spin-crossover transition is presented.

  7. Femtosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy of liquid using a hard X-ray free electron laser in a dual-beam dispersive detection method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, Yuki; Katayama, Tetsuo; Ogi, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Takayuki; Kurahashi, Naoya; Karashima, Shutaro; Chiba, Yuhei; Isokawa, Yusuke; Togashi, Tadashi; Inubushi, Yuichi; Yabashi, Makina; Suzuki, Toshinori; Misawa, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-13

    We present femtosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy of aqueous solution using a hard x-ray free electron laser (SACLA) and a synchronized Ti:sapphire laser. The instrumental response time is 200 fs, and the repetition rate of measurement is 10 Hz. A cylindrical liquid beam 100 μm in diameter of aqueous ammonium iron(III) oxalate solution is photoexcited at 400 nm, and the transient X-ray absorption spectra are measured in the K-edge region of iron, 7.10 - 7.26 keV, using a dual X-ray beam dispersive detection method. Each of the dual beams has the pulse energy of 1.4 μJ, and pump-induced absorbance change on the order of 10(-3) is successfully detected. The photoexcited iron complex exhibits a red shifted iron K-edge with the appearance time constant of 260 fs. The X-ray absorption difference spectra, with and without the pump pulses, are independent of time delay after 1.5 ps up to 100 ps, indicating that the photoexcited species is long-lived.

  8. Femtosecond Soft X-ray Spectroscopy of Solvated Transition-Metal Complexes: Deciphering the Interplay of Electronic and Structural Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huse, Nils; Cho, Hana; Hong, Kiryong; Jamula, Lindsey; de Groot, Frank M. F.; Kim, Tae Kyu; McCusker, James K.; Schoenlein, Robert W.

    2011-04-21

    We present the first implementation of femtosecond soft X-ray spectroscopy as an ultrafast direct probe of the excited-state valence orbitals in solution-phase molecules. This method is applied to photoinduced spin crossover of [Fe(tren(py)3)]2+, where the ultrafast spinstate conversion of the metal ion, initiated by metal-to-ligand charge-transfer excitation, is directly measured using the intrinsic spin-state selectivity of the soft X-ray L-edge transitions. Our results provide important experimental data concerning the mechanism of ultrafast spin-state conversion and subsequent electronic and structural dynamics, highlighting the potential of this technique to study ultrafast phenomena in the solution phase.

  9. Observing heme doming in myoglobin with femtosecond X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Levantino

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We report time-resolved X-ray absorption measurements after photolysis of carbonmonoxy myoglobin performed at the LCLS X-ray free electron laser with nearly 100 fs (FWHM time resolution. Data at the Fe K-edge reveal that the photoinduced structural changes at the heme occur in two steps, with a faster (∼70 fs relaxation preceding a slower (∼400 fs one. We tentatively attribute the first relaxation to a structural rearrangement induced by photolysis involving essentially only the heme chromophore and the second relaxation to a residual Fe motion out of the heme plane that is coupled to the displacement of myoglobin F-helix.

  10. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  11. Ultraviolet photochemical reaction of [Fe(III)(C2O4)3](3-) in aqueous solutions studied by femtosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy using an X-ray free electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogi, Y; Obara, Y; Katayama, T; Suzuki, Y-I; Liu, S Y; Bartlett, N C-M; Kurahashi, N; Karashima, S; Togashi, T; Inubushi, Y; Ogawa, K; Owada, S; Rubešová, M; Yabashi, M; Misawa, K; Slavíček, P; Suzuki, T

    2015-05-01

    Time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy was performed for aqueous ammonium iron(III) oxalate trihydrate solutions using an X-ray free electron laser and a synchronized ultraviolet laser. The spectral and time resolutions of the experiment were 1.3 eV and 200 fs, respectively. A femtosecond 268 nm pulse was employed to excite [Fe(III)(C2O4)3](3-) in solution from the high-spin ground electronic state to ligand-to-metal charge transfer state(s), and the subsequent dynamics were studied by observing the time-evolution of the X-ray absorption spectrum near the Fe K-edge. Upon 268 nm photoexcitation, the Fe K-edge underwent a red-shift by more than 4 eV within 140 fs; however, the magnitude of the redshift subsequently diminished within 3 ps. The Fe K-edge of the photoproduct remained lower in energy than that of [Fe(III)(C2O4)3](3-). The observed red-shift of the Fe K-edge and the spectral feature of the product indicate that Fe(III) is upon excitation immediately photoreduced to Fe(II), followed by ligand dissociation from Fe(II). Based on a comparison of the X-ray absorption spectra with density functional theory calculations, we propose that the dissociation proceeds in two steps, forming first [(CO2 (•))Fe(II)(C2O4)2](3-) and subsequently [Fe(II)(C2O4)2](2-).

  12. Ultraviolet photochemical reaction of [Fe(III(C2O43]3− in aqueous solutions studied by femtosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy using an X-ray free electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Ogi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy was performed for aqueous ammonium iron(III oxalate trihydrate solutions using an X-ray free electron laser and a synchronized ultraviolet laser. The spectral and time resolutions of the experiment were 1.3 eV and 200 fs, respectively. A femtosecond 268 nm pulse was employed to excite [Fe(III(C2O43]3− in solution from the high-spin ground electronic state to ligand-to-metal charge transfer state(s, and the subsequent dynamics were studied by observing the time-evolution of the X-ray absorption spectrum near the Fe K-edge. Upon 268 nm photoexcitation, the Fe K-edge underwent a red-shift by more than 4 eV within 140 fs; however, the magnitude of the redshift subsequently diminished within 3 ps. The Fe K-edge of the photoproduct remained lower in energy than that of [Fe(III(C2O43]3−. The observed red-shift of the Fe K-edge and the spectral feature of the product indicate that Fe(III is upon excitation immediately photoreduced to Fe(II, followed by ligand dissociation from Fe(II. Based on a comparison of the X-ray absorption spectra with density functional theory calculations, we propose that the dissociation proceeds in two steps, forming first [(CO2•Fe(II(C2O42]3− and subsequently [Fe(II(C2O42]2−.

  13. X-ray Echo Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-02-01

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a pointlike x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-0.02 meV ultrahigh-resolution IXS applications (resolving power >108 ) with broadband ≃5 - 13 meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than 103 signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains.

  14. X-ray echo spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin-echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a point-like x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x-rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1--0.02-meV ultra-high-resolution IXS applications (resolving power $> 10^8$) with broadband $\\simeq$~5--13~meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than $10^3$ signal e...

  15. X-ray Echo Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-02-26

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a pointlike x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-0.02 meV ultrahigh-resolution IXS applications (resolving power >10^{8}) with broadband ≃5-13  meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than 10^{3} signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains.

  16. Femtosecond laser-induced modification of potassium-magnesium silicate glasses: An analysis of structural changes by near edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seuthe, T.; Höfner, M.; Reinhardt, F.; Tsai, W. J.; Bonse, J.; Eberstein, M.; Eichler, H. J.; Grehn, M.

    2012-05-01

    The effects of femtosecond laser pulse irradiation on the glass structure of alkaline silicate glasses were investigated by x-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy using the beamline of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt at the electron synchrotron BESSY II in Berlin (Germany) by analyzing the magnesium K-edge absorption peak for different laser fluences. The application of fluences above the material modification threshold (2.1 J/cm2) leads to a characteristic shift of ˜1.0 eV in the K-edge revealing a reduced (˜3%) mean magnesium bond length to the ligated oxygen ions (Mg-O) along with a reduced average coordination number of the Mg ions.

  17. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miaja-Avila, L; O'Neil, G C; Uhlig, J; Cromer, C L; Dowell, M L; Jimenez, R; Hoover, A S; Silverman, K L; Ullom, J N

    2015-03-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼10(6) photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >10(7) laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  18. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Miaja-Avila

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  19. Observation of femtosecond X-ray interactions with matter using an X-ray-X-ray pump-probe scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Ichiro; Inubushi, Yuichi; Sato, Takahiro; Tono, Kensuke; Katayama, Tetsuo; Kameshima, Takashi; Ogawa, Kanade; Togashi, Tadashi; Owada, Shigeki; Amemiya, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Takashi; Hara, Toru; Yabashi, Makina

    2016-02-01

    Resolution in the X-ray structure determination of noncrystalline samples has been limited to several tens of nanometers, because deep X-ray irradiation required for enhanced resolution causes radiation damage to samples. However, theoretical studies predict that the femtosecond (fs) durations of X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses make it possible to record scattering signals before the initiation of X-ray damage processes; thus, an ultraintense X-ray beam can be used beyond the conventional limit of radiation dose. Here, we verify this scenario by directly observing femtosecond X-ray damage processes in diamond irradiated with extraordinarily intense (∼10(19) W/cm(2)) XFEL pulses. An X-ray pump-probe diffraction scheme was developed in this study; tightly focused double-5-fs XFEL pulses with time separations ranging from sub-fs to 80 fs were used to excite (i.e., pump) the diamond and characterize (i.e., probe) the temporal changes of the crystalline structures through Bragg reflection. It was found that the pump and probe diffraction intensities remain almost constant for shorter time separations of the double pulse, whereas the probe diffraction intensities decreased after 20 fs following pump pulse irradiation due to the X-ray-induced atomic displacement. This result indicates that sub-10-fs XFEL pulses enable conductions of damageless structural determinations and supports the validity of the theoretical predictions of ultraintense X-ray-matter interactions. The X-ray pump-probe scheme demonstrated here would be effective for understanding ultraintense X-ray-matter interactions, which will greatly stimulate advanced XFEL applications, such as atomic structure determination of a single molecule and generation of exotic matters with high energy densities.

  20. Monitoring of the heavy-metal hyperaccumulation in vegetal tissues by X-ray radiography and by femto-second laser induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, J; Samek, O; Reale, L; Liska, M; Malina, R; Ritucci, A; Poma, A; Tucci, A; Flora, F; Lai, A; Mancini, L; Tromba, G; Zanini, F; Faenov, A; Pikuz, T; Cinque, G

    2007-02-01

    This article reports on the utilization of X-ray microradiography and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) techniques for investigation of the metal accumulation in different part of leaf samples. The potential of the LIBS-analysis for finding the proper plant species for phytoremediation is compared with the results of microradiography measurements at the HERCULES source at ENEA, Rome (Italy) and X-ray microradiography experiments at the ELETTRA Synchrotron, Trieste (Italy).

  1. Fabrication of polycrystalline diamond refractive X-ray lens by femtosecond laser processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kononenko, T.V.; Ralchenko, V.G.; Ashkinazi, E.E.; Konov, V.I. [General Physics Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University ' ' MEPhI' ' , Moscow (Russian Federation); Polikarpov, M.; Ershov, P. [Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University, Functional Nanomaterials, Kaliningrad (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, S.; Yunkin, V. [Institute of Microelectronics Technology RAS, Chernogolovka, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Snigireva, I. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France)

    2016-03-15

    X-ray planar compound refractive lenses were fabricated from a polycrystalline diamond plate grown by chemical vapor deposition, by precise through cutting with femtosecond laser pulses. The lens geometry and the surface morphology were investigated with optical and scanning electron microscopy, while the material structure modification was analyzed by Raman spectroscopy. The results of the preliminary lens test at 9.25-keV X-rays are presented. (orig.)

  2. High-Resolution X-ray Emission and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, F.M.F. de

    2000-01-01

    In this review, high-resolution X-ray emission and X-ray absorption spectroscopy will be discussed. The focus is on the 3d transition-metal systems. To understand high-resolution X-ray emission and reso-nant X-ray emission, it is first necessary to spend some time discussing the X-ray absorption

  3. High-Resolution X-ray Emission and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    de Groot, F. M. F.

    2001-01-01

    In this review, high-resolution X-ray emission and X-ray absorption spectroscopy will be discussed. The focus is on the 3d transition-metal systems. To understand high-resolution X-ray emission and reso-nant X-ray emission, it is first necessary to spend some time discussing the X-ray absorption process. Section II discusses 1s X-ray absorption, i.e., the K edges, and section III deals with 2p X-ray absorption, the L edges. X-ray emission is discussed in, respectively, the L edges. X-ray emis...

  4. Characterization and control of femtosecond electron and X-ray beams at free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrens, Christopher

    2012-11-15

    X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) open up new frontiers in photon science, and in order to take full advantage of these unique accelerator-based light sources, the characterization and control of the femtosecond electron and X-ray beams is essential. Within this cumulative thesis, recent results achieved within the active research field of femtosecond electron and X-ray beams at FELs are reported.The basic principles of X-ray FELs are described, and concepts of longitudinal electron beam diagnostics with femtosecond accuracy are covered. Experimental results obtained with a transverse deflecting structure (TDS) and spectroscopy of coherent terahertz radiation are presented, and the suppression of coherent optical radiation effects, required for diagnostics utilizing a TDS, is demonstrated. Control of the longitudinal phase space by using multiple radio frequencies for longitudinal electron beam tailoring is presented, and a new technique of reversible electron beam heating with two TDSs is described. For the characterization of femtosecond X-ray pulses, a novel method based on dedicated longitudinal phase space diagnostics for electron beams is introduced, and recent measurements with a streaking technique using external terahertz fields are presented.

  5. Femtosecond laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Hannaford, Peter

    2005-01-01

    As concepts and methodologies have evolved over the past two decades, the realm of ultrafast science has become vast and exciting and has impacted many areas of chemistry, biology and physics, and other fields such as materials science, electrical engineering, and optical communication. The field has recently exploded with the announcement of a series of remarkable new developments and advances. This volume surveys this recent growth in eleven chapters written by leading international researchers in the field. It includes sections on femtosecond optical frequency combs, soft x-ray femtosecond laser sources, and attosecond laser sources. In addition, the contributors address real-time spectroscopy of molecular vibrations with sub-5-fs pulses and multidimensional femtosecond coherent spectroscopies for studying molecular and electron dynamics. Novel methods for measuring and characterizing ultrashort laser pulses and ultrashort pulses of light are also described. The topics covered are revolutionizing the field...

  6. Filming Femtosecond Molecular Movies with X-ray Pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Kasper Skov

    This thesis describes the investigation of time-resolved phenomena using X-ray techniques, and in particular the new possibilities and challenges arising from the application of these techniques on the femtosecond time-scale. The thesis will review the processes following laser excitation...... of molecular species in solution, describing the interplay between electronic and structural dynamics, as well as the role of the solvent. This will be followed by an introduction of the three X-ray techniques used in this work, and it will be shown how the application of these techniques in a laser pump / X...... yielded by (and the practical challenges connected to) their simultaneous implementation in a single experiment. Finally, the experimental results of a signicant set of laser pump / X-ray probe experiments will be presented and discussed in order to gauge the applicability of these techniques as tools...

  7. X-ray spectroscopy an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwal, Bipin K

    1979-01-01

    Rontgen's discovery of X-rays in 1895 launched a subject which became central to the development of modern physics. The verification of many of the predic­ tions of quantum theory by X-ray spectroscopy in the early part of the twen­ tieth century stimulated great interest in thi's area, which has subsequently influenced fields as diverse as chemical physics, nuclear physics, and the study of the electronic properties of solids, and led to the development of techniques such as Auger, Raman, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The improvement of the theoretical understanding of the physics underlying X-ray spectroscopy has been accompanied by advances in experimental techniques, and the subject provides an instructive example of how progress on both these fronts can be mutually beneficial. This book strikes a balance between his­ torical description, which illustrates this symbiosis, and the discussion of new developments. The application of X-ray spectroscopic methods to the in­ vestigation of chemical b...

  8. A table-top femtosecond time-resolved soft x-ray transient absorption spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leone, Stephen; Loh, Zhi-Heng; Khalil, Munira; Correa, Raoul E.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2008-05-21

    A laser-based, table-top instrument is constructed to perform femtosecond soft x-ray transient absorption spectroscopy. Ultrashort soft x-ray pulses produced via high-order harmonic generation of the amplified output of a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser system are used to probe atomic core-level transient absorptions in atoms and molecules. The results provide chemically specific, time-resolved dynamics with sub-50-fs time resolution. In this setup, high-order harmonics generated in a Ne-filled capillary waveguide are refocused by a gold-coated toroidal mirror into the sample gas cell, where the soft x-ray light intersects with an optical pump pulse. The transmitted high-order harmonics are spectrally dispersed with a home-built soft x-ray spectrometer, which consists of a gold-coated toroidal mirror, a uniform-line spaced plane grating, and a soft x-ray CCD camera. The optical layout of the instrument, design of the soft x-ray spectrometer, and spatial and temporal characterization of the high-order harmonics are described. Examples of static and time-resolved photoabsorption spectra collected on this apparatus are presented.

  9. X-ray echo spectroscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri V.

    2016-09-01

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin-echo, was recently introduced [1] to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a point-like x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x-rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-meV and 0.02-meV ultra-high-resolution IXS applications (resolving power > 10^8) with broadband 5-13 meV dispersing systems will be presented featuring more than 1000-fold signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains. [1.] Yu. Shvyd'ko, Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, accepted (2016), arXiv:1511.01526.

  10. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of metalloproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jesse; Ollmann, Emily; Maxey, Evan; Finney, Lydia A

    2014-01-01

    Metalloproteins are enormously important in biology. While a variety of techniques exist for studying metals in biology, X-ray absorption spectroscopy is particularly useful in that it can determine the local electronic and physical structure around the metal center, and is one of the few avenues for studying "spectroscopically silent" metal ions like Zn(II) and Cu(I) that have completely filled valence bands. While X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) are useful for studying metalloprotein structure, they suffer the limitation that the detected signal is an average of all the various metal centers in the sample, which limits its usefulness for studying metal centers in situ or in cell lysates. It would be desirable to be able to separate the various proteins in a mixture prior to performing X-ray absorption studies, so that the derived signal is from one species only. Here we describe a method for performing X-ray absorption spectroscopy on protein bands following electrophoretic separation and western blotting.

  11. Serial femtosecond X-ray diffraction of enveloped virus microcrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M. Lawrence

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX using X-ray free-electron lasers has produced high-resolution, room temperature, time-resolved protein structures. We report preliminary SFX of Sindbis virus, an enveloped icosahedral RNA virus with ∼700 Å diameter. Microcrystals delivered in viscous agarose medium diffracted to ∼40 Å resolution. Small-angle diffuse X-ray scattering overlaid Bragg peaks and analysis suggests this results from molecular transforms of individual particles. Viral proteins undergo structural changes during entry and infection, which could, in principle, be studied with SFX. This is an important step toward determining room temperature structures from virus microcrystals that may enable time-resolved studies of enveloped viruses.

  12. Near Edge X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy with X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, D.P.; Acremann, Y.; Scherz, A.; Burkhardt, M.; Stohr, J.; /SLAC; Beye, M.; Schlotter, W.F.; Beeck, T.; Sorgenfrei, F.; Pietzsch, A.; Wurth, W.; Fohlisch, A.; /Hamburg U.

    2009-12-11

    We demonstrate the feasibility of Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy on solids by means of femtosecond soft x-ray pulses from a free-electron laser (FEL). Our experiments, carried out at the Free-Electron Laser at Hamburg (FLASH), used a special sample geometry, spectrographic energy dispersion, single shot position-sensitive detection and a data normalization procedure that eliminates the severe fluctuations of the incident intensity in space and photon energy. As an example we recorded the {sup 3}D{sub 1} N{sub 4,5}-edge absorption resonance of La{sup 3+}-ions in LaMnO{sub 3}. Our study opens the door for x-ray absorption measurements on future x-ray FEL facilities.

  13. Femtosecond X-ray scattering in condensed matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korff Schmising, Clemens von

    2008-11-24

    This thesis investigates the manifold couplings between electronic and structural properties in crystalline Perovskite oxides and a polar molecular crystal. Ultrashort optical excitation changes the electronic structure and the dynamics of the connected reversible lattice rearrangement is imaged in real time by femtosecond X-ray scattering experiments. An epitaxially grown superlattice consisting of alternating nanolayers of metallic and ferromagnetic strontium ruthenate (SRO) and dielectric strontium titanate serves as a model system to study optically generated stress. In the ferromagnetic phase, phonon-mediated and magnetostrictive stress in SRO display similar sub-picosecond dynamics, similar strengths but opposite sign and different excitation spectra. The amplitude of the magnetic component follows the temperature dependent magnetization square, whereas the strength of phononic stress is determined by the amount of deposited energy only. The ultrafast, phonon-mediated stress in SRO compresses ferroelectric nanolayers of lead zirconate titanate in a further superlattice system. This change of tetragonal distortion of the ferroelectric layer reaches up to 2 percent within 1.5 picoseconds and couples to the ferroelectric soft mode, or ion displacement within the unit cell. As a result, the macroscopic polarization is reduced by up to 100 percent with a 500 femtosecond delay that is due to final elongation time of the two anharmonically coupled modes. Femtosecond photoexcitation of organic chromophores in a molecular, polar crystal induces strong changes of the electronic dipole moment via intramolecular charge transfer. Ultrafast changes of transmitted X-ray intensity evidence an angular rotation of molecules around excited dipoles following the 10 picosecond kinetics of the charge transfer reaction. Transient X-ray scattering is governed by solvation, masking changes of the chromophore's molecular structure. (orig.)

  14. Visualizing the non-equilibrium dynamics of photoinduced intramolecular electron transfer with femtosecond X-ray pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canton, Sophie E.; Kjær, Kasper S.; Vankó, György;

    2015-01-01

    spectroscopy with ultrafast X-ray emission spectroscopy and diffuse X-ray scattering at the SACLA facility to track the non-equilibrated electronic and structural dynamics within a bimetallic donor–acceptor complex that contains an optically dark centre. Exploiting the 100-fold increase in temporal resolution...... states is a key mechanistic feature. The present study demonstrates the extensive potential of femtosecond X-ray techniques as diagnostics of non-adiabatic electron transfer processes in synthetic and biological systems, and some directions for future studies, are outlined....

  15. X-Ray photoelectron Spectroscopy Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelhard, Mark H.; Droubay, Timothy C.; Du, Yingge

    2017-01-03

    With capability for obtaining quantitative elemental composition, chemical and electronic state, and overlayer thickness information from the top ~10 nm of a sample surface, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) or Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA) is a versatile and widely used technique for analyzing surfaces. The technique is applied to a host of materials, from insulators to conductors in virtually every scientific field and sub-discipline. More recently, XPS has been extended under in-situ and operando conditions. Following a brief introduction to XPS principles and instrument components, this article exemplifies widely ranging XPS applications in material and life sciences.

  16. Tomographic x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroer, C. G.; Kuhlmann, M.; Gunzler, T. F.; Lengeler, B.; Richwin, M.; Griesebock, B.; Lutzenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Frahm, R.; Ziegler, E.; Mashayekhi, A.; Haeffner, D. R.; Grunwaldt, J. -D.; Baiker, A.; Experimental Facilities Division (APS); Aachen Univ.; HASYLAB at DESY; Bergische Univ. Wuppertal; ESRF; Inst. for Chemical and Bioengineering

    2004-01-01

    Hard x-ray absorption spectroscopy is combined with scanning microtomography to reconstruct full near edge spectra of an elemental species at each point on an arbitrary virtual section through a sample. These spectra reveal the local concentration of different chemical compounds of the absorbing element inside the sample and give insight into the oxidation state and the local projected free density of states. The method is implemented by combining a quick scanning monochromator and data acquisition system with a scanning microprobe setup based on refractive x-ray lenses. The full XANES spectra reconstructed at each point of the tomographic slice allow one to detect slight variations in concentration of the chemical compounds, such as Cu and Cu(I){sub 2}O.

  17. Neutron and X-ray Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Hippert, Françoise; Hodeau, Jean Louis; Lelièvre-Berna, Eddy; Regnard, Jean-René

    2006-01-01

    Neutron and X-Ray Spectroscopy delivers an up-to-date account of the principles and practice of inelastic and spectroscopic methods available at neutron and synchrotron sources, including recent developments. The chapters are based on a course of lectures and practicals (the HERCULES course) delivered to young scientists who require these methods in their professional careers. Each chapter, written by a leading specialist in the field, introduces the basic concepts of the technique and provides an overview of recent work. This volume, which focuses on spectroscopic techniques in synchrotron radiation and inelastic neutron scattering, will be a primary source of information for physicists, chemists and materials scientists who wish to acquire a basic understanding of these techniques and to discover the possibilities offered by them. Emphasizing the complementarity of the neutron and X-ray methods, this tutorial will also be invaluable to scientists already working in neighboring fields who seek to extend thei...

  18. Ultrafast molecular processes mapped by femtosecond x-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsaesser, Thomas

    2012-02-01

    X-ray diffraction with a femtosecond time resolution allows for mapping photoinduced structural dynamics on the length scale of a chemical bond and in the time domain of atomic and molecular motion. In a pump-probe approach, a femtosecond excitation pulse induces structural changes which are probed by diffracting a femtosecond hard x-ray pulse from the excited sample. The transient angular positions and intensities of diffraction peaks give insight into the momentary atomic or molecular positions and into the distribution of electronic charge density. The simultaneous measurement of changes on different diffraction peaks is essential for determining atom positions and charge density maps with high accuracy. Recent progress in the generation of ultrashort hard x-ray pulses (Cu Kα, wavelength λ=0.154 nm) in laser-driven plasma sources has led to the implementation of the powder diffraction and the rotating crystal method with a time resolution of 100 fs. In this contribution, we report new results from powder diffraction studies of molecular materials. A first series of experiments gives evidence of a so far unknown concerted transfer of electrons and protons in ammonium sulfate [(NH4)2SO4], a centrosymmetric structure. Charge transfer from the sulfate groups results in the sub-100 fs generation of a confined electron channel along the c-axis of the unit cell which is stabilized by transferring protons from the adjacent ammonium groups into the channel. Time-dependent charge density maps display a periodic modulation of the channel's charge density by low-frequency lattice motions with a concerted electron and proton motion between the channel and the initial proton binding site. A second study addresses atomic rearrangements and charge dislocations in the non-centrosymmetric potassium dihydrogen phosphate [KH2PO4, KDP]. Photoexcitation generates coherent low-frequency motions along the LO and TO phonon coordinates, leaving the average atomic positions unchanged

  19. Femtosecond Single-Shot Imaging of Nanoscale Ferromagnetic Order in Co/Pd Multilayers using Resonant X-ray Holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Tianhan; Zhu, Diling; Benny Wu,; Graves, Catherine; Schaffert, Stefan; Rander, Torbjorn; Muller, leonard; Vodungbo, Boris; Baumier, Cedric; Bernstein, David P.; Brauer, Bjorn; Cros, Vincent; Jong, Sanne de; Delaunay, Renaud; Fognini, Andreas; Kukreja, Roopali; Lee, Sooheyong; Lopez-Flores, Victor; Mohanty, Jyoti; Pfau, Bastian; Popescu, 5 Horia

    2012-05-15

    We present the first single-shot images of ferromagnetic, nanoscale spin order taken with femtosecond x-ray pulses. X-ray-induced electron and spin dynamics can be outrun with pulses shorter than 80 fs in the investigated fluence regime, and no permanent aftereffects in the samples are observed below a fluence of 25 mJ/cm{sup 2}. Employing resonant spatially-muliplexed x-ray holography results in a low imaging threshold of 5 mJ/cm{sup 2}. Our results open new ways to combine ultrafast laser spectroscopy with sequential snapshot imaging on a single sample, generating a movie of excited state dynamics.

  20. Optical Synchronization Systems for Femtosecond X-raySources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilcox, Russell; Staples, John W.; Holzwarth, Ronald

    2004-05-09

    In femtosecond pump/probe experiments using short X-Ray and optical pulses, precise synchronization must be maintained between widely separated lasers in a synchrotron or FEL facility. We are developing synchronization systems using optical signals for applications requiring different ranges of timing error over 100 meter of glass fiber. For stabilization in the hundred femtosecond range a CW laser is amplitude modulated at 1 10 GHz, the signal retroreflected from the far end, and the relative phase used to correct the transit time with a piezoelectric phase modulator. For the sub-10 fsec range the laser frequency itself is upshifted 55 MHz with an acousto-optical modulator, retroreflected, upshifted again and phase compared at the sending end to a 110 MHz reference. Initial experiments indicate less than 1 fsec timing jitter. To lock lasers in the sub-10 fs range we will lock two single-frequency lasers separated by several tera Hertz to a master modelocked fiber laser, transmit the two frequencies over fiber, and lock two comb lines of a slave laser to these frequencies, thus synchronizing the two modelocked laser envelopes.

  1. Stochastic stimulated electronic x-ray Raman spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Kimberg, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) is a well-established tool for studying electronic, nuclear and collective dynamics of excited atoms, molecules and solids. An extension of this powerful method to a time-resolved probe technique at x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) to ultimately unravel ultrafast chemical and structural changes on a femtosecond time scale is often challenging, due to the small signal rate in conventional implementations at XFELs that rely on the usage of a monochromator set up to select a small frequency band of the broadband, spectrally incoherent XFEL radiation. Here, we suggest an alternative approach, based on stochastic spectroscopy, that uses the full bandwidth of the incoming XFEL pulses. Our proposed method is relying on stimulated resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, where in addition to a pump pulse that resonantly excites the system a probe pulse on a specific electronic inelastic transition is provided, that serves as seed in the stimulated scattering process. The limit...

  2. Review of X-ray Tomography and X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shear, Trevor A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-16

    This literature review will focus on both laboratory and synchrotron based X-ray tomography of materials and highlight the inner workings of these instruments. X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy will also be reviewed and applications of the tandem use of these techniques will be explored. The real world application of these techniques during the internship will also be discussed.

  3. X-ray Spectroscopy of Cooling Cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, J.R.; /SLAC; Fabian, A.C.; /Cambridge U., Inst. of Astron.

    2006-01-17

    We review the X-ray spectra of the cores of clusters of galaxies. Recent high resolution X-ray spectroscopic observations have demonstrated a severe deficit of emission at the lowest X-ray temperatures as compared to that expected from simple radiative cooling models. The same observations have provided compelling evidence that the gas in the cores is cooling below half the maximum temperature. We review these results, discuss physical models of cooling clusters, and describe the X-ray instrumentation and analysis techniques used to make these observations. We discuss several viable mechanisms designed to cancel or distort the expected process of X-ray cluster cooling.

  4. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Ridgway, Mark

    2015-01-01

    X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) is a powerful technique with which to probe the properties of matter, equally applicable to the solid, liquid and gas phases. Semiconductors are arguably our most technologically-relevant group of materials given they form the basis of the electronic and photonic devices that now so widely permeate almost every aspect of our society. The most effective utilisation of these materials today and tomorrow necessitates a detailed knowledge of their structural and vibrational properties. Through a series of comprehensive reviews, this book demonstrates the versatility of XAS for semiconductor materials analysis and presents important research activities in this ever growing field. A short introduction of the technique, aimed primarily at XAS newcomers, is followed by twenty independent chapters dedicated to distinct groups of materials. Topics span dopants in crystalline semiconductors and disorder in amorphous semiconductors to alloys and nanometric material as well as in-sit...

  5. Optical Synchronization Systems for Femtosecond X-Ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Wilcox, Russell; Staples, John W

    2005-01-01

    In femtosecond pump/probe experiments using short x-ray and optical pulses, precise synchronization must be maintained between widely separated lasers in a synchrotron or FEL facility. We are developing synchronization systems using optical signals for applications requiring different ranges of timing error. For the sub-100fs range we use an amplitude modulated CW laser at 1GHz to transmit RF phase information, and control the delay through a 100m fiber by observing the retroreflected signal. Initial results show 40fs peak-to-peak error above 10Hz, and 200fs long term drift, mainly due to amplitude sensitivity in the analog mixers. For the sub-10fs range we will lock two single-frequency lasers separated by several teraHertz to a master modelocked fiber laser, transmit the two frequencies over fiber, and lock two comb lines of a slave laser to these frequencies, thus synchronizing the two modelocked laser envelopes. For attosecond synchronization we propose a stabilized, free space link using bulk lens wavegu...

  6. Visualizing the non-equilibrium dynamics of photoinduced intramolecular electron transfer with femtosecond X-ray pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canton, Sophie E.; Kjær, Kasper S.; Vankó, György;

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast photoinduced electron transfer preceding energy equilibration still poses many experimental and conceptual challenges to the optimization of photoconversion since an atomic-scale description has so far been beyond reach. Here we combine femtosecond transient optical absorption...... spectroscopy with ultrafast X-ray emission spectroscopy and diffuse X-ray scattering at the SACLA facility to track the non-equilibrated electronic and structural dynamics within a bimetallic donor–acceptor complex that contains an optically dark centre. Exploiting the 100-fold increase in temporal resolution...

  7. Few-femtosecond time-resolved measurements of X-ray free-electron lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, C; Decker, F-J; Ding, Y; Dolgashev, V A; Frisch, J; Huang, Z; Krejcik, P; Loos, H; Lutman, A; Maxwell, T J; Turner, J; Wang, J; Wang, M-H; Welch, J; Wu, J

    2014-04-30

    X-ray free-electron lasers, with pulse durations ranging from a few to several hundred femtoseconds, are uniquely suited for studying atomic, molecular, chemical and biological systems. Characterizing the temporal profiles of these femtosecond X-ray pulses that vary from shot to shot is not only challenging but also important for data interpretation. Here we report the time-resolved measurements of X-ray free-electron lasers by using an X-band radiofrequency transverse deflector at the Linac Coherent Light Source. We demonstrate this method to be a simple, non-invasive technique with a large dynamic range for single-shot electron and X-ray temporal characterization. A resolution of less than 1 fs root mean square has been achieved for soft X-ray pulses. The lasing evolution along the undulator has been studied with the electron trapping being observed as the X-ray peak power approaches 100 GW.

  8. The rotating-crystal method in femtosecond X-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyer, B; Stingl, J; Zamponi, F; Woerner, M; Elsaesser, T

    2011-08-01

    We report the first implementation of the rotating-crystal method in femtosecond X-ray diffraction. Applying a pump-probe scheme with 100 fs hard X-ray probe pulses from a laser-driven plasma source, the novel technique is demonstrated by mapping structural dynamics of a photoexcited bismuth crystal via changes of the diffracted intensity on a multitude of Bragg reflections. The method is compared to femtosecond powder diffraction and to Bragg diffraction from a crystal with stationary orientation.

  9. High energy resolution off-resonant X-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojciech, Blachucki [Univ. of Fribourg (Switzerland). Dept. of Physics

    2015-10-16

    This work treats of the high energy resolution off-resonant X-ray spectroscopy (HEROS) method of determining the density of unoccupied electronic states in the vicinity of the absorption edge. HEROS is an alternative to the existing X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) methods and opens the way for new studies not achievable before.

  10. The Need for X-Ray Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winebarger, Amy R.; Cirtain, Jonathan; Kobayashi, Ken

    2011-01-01

    For over four decades, X-ray, EUV, and UV spectral observations have been used to measure physical properties of the solar atmosphere. During this time, there has been substantial improvement in the spectral, spatial, and temporal resolution of the observations for the EUV and UV wavelength ranges. At wavelengths below 100 Angstroms, however, observations of the solar corona with simultaneous spatial and spectral resolution are limited, and not since the late 1970's have spatially resolved solar X-ray spectra been measured. The soft-X-ray wavelength range is dominated by emission lines formed at high temperatures and provides diagnostics unavailable in any other wavelength range. In this presentation, we will discuss the important science questions that can be answered using spatially and spectrally resolved X-ray spectra.

  11. Spectroscopy in X-ray astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, R.

    1981-01-01

    Detailed features in cosmic X-ray sources and their associated temporal variation over a wide energy range were studied. Excess emission and absorption at approximately 6 to 7 kiloelectron volts in the spectra of supernova remnants, binary X-ray sources, and clusters of galaxies were observed. A gas scintillation proportional counter (GSPC) will be used as the detector system. In the gas scintillator the principal limitation is due to the statistics of the initial ionization process only.

  12. Recent applications of hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiland, Conan; Woicik, Joseph C., E-mail: Joseph.Woicik@NIST.gov [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Rumaiz, Abdul K. [National Synchrotron Light Source II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Pianetta, Piero [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Recent applications of hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) demonstrate its many capabilities in addition to several of its limitations. Examples are given, including measurement of buried interfaces and materials under in situ or in operando conditions, as well as measurements under x-ray standing-wave and resonant excitation. Physical considerations that differentiate HAXPES from photoemission measurements utilizing soft x-ray and ultraviolet photon sources are also presented.

  13. Current Problems in X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Joseph I.; Williams, David B.; Lyman, Charles E.

    1989-01-01

    Various problems that limit X-ray analysis in the analytical electron microscope are reviewed. Major emphasis is given to the trade-off between minimum mass fraction and spatial resolution. New developments such as high-brightness electron guns, new X-ray spectrometers and clean high-vacuum analysis conditions will lead to major improvements in the accuracy and detectability limits of X-ray emission spectroscopy.

  14. Characterization of Metalloproteins and Biomaterials by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and X-ray Diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankær, Christian Grundahl

    This thesis presents thework on combining complementary X-rays techniques for studying the structures of proteins and other biomaterials, and consists of three different projects: (i) Characterization of protein powders with X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). (ii) The combination of X......-ray crystallography and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) applied to studying different hexameric insulin conformations. (iii) The structures of polymorphs of strontium ranelate and the distribution of strontium in bone tissue. A procedure for fast identification and verification of protein powders using XRPD...... was developed and tested on micro-crystals of lysozyme and insulin. Different protein crystal forms were identified by comparing experimental powder diffraction patternswith patterns calculated from PDB coordinates. The key factor to bring the calculated patterns in agreement with the observed patterns...

  15. High-resolution detectors for soft X-ray spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Soman, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) is a modern soft X-ray spectroscopy technique used to investigate the structure of and excitations in materials. It requires high resolution spectrometers and a brilliant, tunable, X-ray source and therefore is carried out at spectrometers such as SAXES at the Swiss Light Source Light, a synchrotron at the Paul Scherrer Institut.\\ud \\ud SAXES uses a grating to disperse X-rays scattered from a sample across a position sensitive detector, a Charge-Coup...

  16. Tokamak Spectroscopy for X-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Kevin B.; Finkenthal, M.; Pacella, D.; May, M. J.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Mattioli, M.; Leigheb, M.; Rice, J. E.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the measured x-ray and Extreme Ultraviolet (XUV) spectra of three astrophysically abundant elements (Fe, Ca and Ne) from three different tokamak plasmas. In every case, each spectrum touches on an issue of atomic physics that is important for simulation codes to be used in the analysis of high spectral resolution data from current and future x-ray telescopes. The utility of the tokamak as a laboratory test bed for astrophysical data is demonstrated. Simple models generated with the HULLAC suite of codes demonstrate how the atomic physics issues studied can affect the interpretation of astrophysical data.

  17. Time-resolved X-ray spectroscopies of chemical systems: New perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chergui, Majed

    2016-05-01

    The past 3-5 years have witnessed a dramatic increase in the number of time-resolved X-ray spectroscopic studies, mainly driven by novel technical and methodological developments. The latter include (i) the high repetition rate optical pump/X-ray probe studies, which have greatly boosted the signal-to-noise ratio for picosecond (ps) X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies, while enabling ps X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) at synchrotrons; (ii) the X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) are a game changer and have allowed the first femtosecond (fs) XES and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering experiments to be carried out; (iii) XFELs are also opening the road to the development of non-linear X-ray methods. In this perspective, I will mainly focus on the most recent technical developments and briefly address some examples of scientific questions that have been addressed thanks to them. I will look at the novel opportunities in the horizon.

  18. Spectroscopy and X-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Stephen S.

    2000-01-01

    The new x-ray astronomical observatories have sufficient spectroscopic capability to allow the determination of plasma conditions in the form of velocities, temperatures, densities, and turbulence parameters at levels that were previously unattainable. The utilization of these diagnostics are possible only if the atomic and plasma physics are well-enough understood to match the observational sensitivity.

  19. X-ray spectroscopy of manganese clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grush, M.M. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Applied Science]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.

    1996-06-01

    Much of this thesis represents the groundwork necessary in order to probe Mn clusters more productively than with conventional Mn K-edge XAS and is presented in Part 1. Part 2 contains the application of x-ray techniques to Mn metalloproteins and includes a prognosis at the end of each chapter. Individual Mn oxidation states are more readily distinguishable in Mn L-edge spectra. An empirical mixed valence simulation routine for determining the average Mn oxidation state has been developed. The first Mn L-edge spectra of a metalloprotein were measured and interpreted. The energy of Mn K{beta} emission is strongly correlated with average Mn oxidation state. K{beta} results support oxidation states of Mn(III){sub 2}(IV){sub 2} for the S{sub 1} state of Photosystem II chemical chemically reduced preparations contain predominantly Mn(II). A strength and limitation of XAS is that it probes all of the species of a particular element in a sample. It would often be advantageous to selectively probe different forms of the same element. The first demonstration that chemical shifts in x-ray fluorescence energies can be used to obtain oxidation state-selective x-ray absorption spectra is presented. Spin-dependent spectra can also be used to obtain a more simplified picture of local structure. The first spin-polarized extended x-ray absorption fine structure using Mn K{beta} fluorescence detection is shown.

  20. Valence-to-core-detected X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Eleanor R.; Pollock, Christopher J.; Bendix, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) can provide detailed insight into the electronic and geometric structures of transition-metal active sites in metalloproteins and chemical catalysts. However, standard XAS spectra inherently represent an average contribution from the entire coordination...

  1. Communication: The electronic structure of matter probed with a single femtosecond hard x-ray pulse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szlachetko

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Physical, biological, and chemical transformations are initiated by changes in the electronic configuration of the species involved. These electronic changes occur on the timescales of attoseconds (10−18 s to femtoseconds (10−15 s and drive all subsequent electronic reorganization as the system moves to a new equilibrium or quasi-equilibrium state. The ability to detect the dynamics of these electronic changes is crucial for understanding the potential energy surfaces upon which chemical and biological reactions take place. Here, we report on the determination of the electronic structure of matter using a single self-seeded femtosecond x-ray pulse from the Linac Coherent Light Source hard x-ray free electron laser. By measuring the high energy resolution off-resonant spectrum (HEROS, we were able to obtain information about the electronic density of states with a single femtosecond x-ray pulse. We show that the unoccupied electronic states of the scattering atom may be determined on a shot-to-shot basis and that the measured spectral shape is independent of the large intensity fluctuations of the incoming x-ray beam. Moreover, we demonstrate the chemical sensitivity and single-shot capability and limitations of HEROS, which enables the technique to track the electronic structural dynamics in matter on femtosecond time scales, making it an ideal probe technique for time-resolved X-ray experiments.

  2. Transfer Functions for Direct Temporal Structure Measurement of Femtosecond Soft X-Ray

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Yu-Cheng

    2005-01-01

    @@ Under cross correlation between linearly polarized short duration laser and narrow bandwidth soft x-ray, the temporal structure of femtosecond soft x-ray can be directly reconstructed via the presented transfer functions from energy derivative of the excited photoelectron energy spectrum measured in the direction of or perpendicular to the laser polarization. The method has a broader temporal measurement range. The energy resolution of a photoelectron spectrometer and the size of energy bin are two important parameters for both measurement and calculation. The methods can be used for ultra-fast measurements and pump-probe detections on the femtosecond time scale.

  3. Soft-x-ray spectroscopy study of nanoscale materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, J.-H.

    2005-07-30

    The ability to control the particle size and morphology of nanoparticles is of crucial importance nowadays both from a fundamental and industrial point of view considering the tremendous amount of high-tech applications. Controlling the crystallographic structure and the arrangement of atoms along the surface of nanostructured material will determine most of its physical properties. In general, electronic structure ultimately determines the properties of matter. Soft X-ray spectroscopy has some basic features that are important to consider. X-ray is originating from an electronic transition between a localized core state and a valence state. As a core state is involved, elemental selectivity is obtained because the core levels of different elements are well separated in energy, meaning that the involvement of the inner level makes this probe localized to one specific atomic site around which the electronic structure is reflected as a partial density-of-states contribution. The participation of valence electrons gives the method chemical state sensitivity and further, the dipole nature of the transitions gives particular symmetry information. The new generation synchrotron radiation sources producing intensive tunable monochromatized soft X-ray beams have opened up new possibilities for soft X-ray spectroscopy. The introduction of selectively excited soft X-ray emission has opened a new field of study by disclosing many new possibilities of soft X-ray resonant inelastic scattering. In this paper, some recent findings regarding soft X-ray absorption and emission studies of various nanostructured systems are presented.

  4. X-ray spectroscopy of clusters of galaxies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naomi Ota

    2012-01-01

    Clusters of galaxies are the most massive objects in the Universe and precise knowledge of their mass structure is important to understand the history of structure formation and constrain still unknown types of dark contents of the Universe.X-ray spectroscopy of galaxy clusters provides rich information about the physical state of hot intracluster gas and the underlying potential structure.In this paper,starting from the basic description of clusters under equilibrium conditions,we review properties of clusters revealed primarily through X-ray observations considering their thermal and dynamical evolutions.The future prospects of cluster studies using upcoming X-ray missions are also mentioned.

  5. Time dependence of X-ray polarizability of a crystal induced by an intense femtosecond X-ray pulse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Leonov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The time evolution of the electron density and the resulting time dependence of Fourier components of the X-ray polarizability of a crystal irradiated by highly intense femtosecond pulses of an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL is investigated theoretically on the basis of rate equations for bound electrons and the Boltzmann equation for the kinetics of the unbound electron gas. The photoionization, Auger process, electron-impact ionization, electron–electron scattering and three-body recombination have been implemented in the system of rate equations. An algorithm for the numerical solution of the rate equations was simplified by incorporating analytical expressions for the cross sections of all the electron configurations in ions within the framework of the effective charge model. Using this approach, the time dependence of the inner shell populations during the time of XFEL pulse propagation through the crystal was evaluated for photon energies between 4 and 12 keV and a pulse width of 40 fs considering a flux of 1012 photons pulse−1 (focusing on a spot size of ∼1 µm. This flux corresponds to a fluence ranging between 0.8 and 2.4 mJ µm−2. The time evolution of the X-ray polarizability caused by the change of the atomic scattering factor during the pulse propagation is numerically analyzed for the case of a silicon crystal. The time-integrated polarizability drops dramatically if the fluence of the X-ray pulse exceeds 1.6 mJ µm−2.

  6. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Hard X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy on a Tabletop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miaja-Avila, Luis; O'Neil, Galen C.; Joe, Young I.; Alpert, Bradley K.; Damrauer, Niels H.; Doriese, William B.; Fatur, Steven M.; Fowler, Joseph W.; Hilton, Gene C.; Jimenez, Ralph; Reintsema, Carl D.; Schmidt, Daniel R.; Silverman, Kevin L.; Swetz, Daniel S.; Tatsuno, Hideyuki; Ullom, Joel N.

    2016-07-01

    Experimental tools capable of monitoring both atomic and electronic structure on ultrafast (femtosecond to picosecond) time scales are needed for investigating photophysical processes fundamental to light harvesting, photocatalysis, energy and data storage, and optical display technologies. Time-resolved hard x-ray (>3 keV ) spectroscopies have proven valuable for these measurements due to their elemental specificity and sensitivity to geometric and electronic structures. Here, we present the first tabletop apparatus capable of performing time-resolved x-ray emission spectroscopy. The time resolution of the apparatus is better than 6 ps. By combining a compact laser-driven plasma source with a highly efficient array of microcalorimeter x-ray detectors, we are able to observe photoinduced spin changes in an archetypal polypyridyl iron complex [Fe (2 ,2'-bipyridine)3]2 + and accurately measure the lifetime of the quintet spin state. Our results demonstrate that ultrafast hard x-ray emission spectroscopy is no longer confined to large facilities and now can be performed in conventional laboratories with 10 times better time resolution than at synchrotrons. Our results are enabled, in part, by a 100- to 1000-fold increase in x-ray collection efficiency compared to current techniques.

  7. Kinetic Inductance Detectors for X-Ray Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecil, T.; Miceli, A.; Gades, L.; Datesman, A.; Quaranta, O.; Yefremenko, V.; Novosad, V.; Mazin, B.

    The lack of efficient x-ray detectors is often the main factor limiting the effective use of ever more powerful synchrotron light sources. Spectroscopic X-ray detectors are used for a wide variety of synchrotron experiments including X-ray micro/nano-probes and X-ray absorption spectroscopy for biology and geophysical applications. The current state-of-art spectroscopic X-ray detectors are semiconductor devices, and their energy resolutions are approaching their theoretical limit of about 100 eV at 6 keV. We describe a detector research and development program to develop the next-generation of high-resolution spectroscopic X-ray detectors using superconducting Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs). With a required energy per charge carrier four orders of magnitude smaller than that of Si, superconducting detectors offer up to two orders of magnitude increase in energy resolution. In addition, KIDs can be optimized for detection of photons ranging in energy from hard X-ray to IR.

  8. X-ray laser–induced electron dynamics observed by femtosecond diffraction from nanocrystals of Buckminsterfullerene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbey, Brian; Dilanian, Ruben A.; Darmanin, Connie; Ryan, Rebecca A.; Putkunz, Corey T.; Martin, Andrew V.; Wood, David; Streltsov, Victor; Jones, Michael W. M.; Gaffney, Naylyn; Hofmann, Felix; Williams, Garth J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M. Marvin; Williams, Sophie; Curwood, Evan; Balaur, Eugeniu; Peele, Andrew G.; Nugent, Keith A.; Quiney, Harry M.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) deliver x-ray pulses with a coherent flux that is approximately eight orders of magnitude greater than that available from a modern third-generation synchrotron source. The power density of an XFEL pulse may be so high that it can modify the electronic properties of a sample on a femtosecond time scale. Exploration of the interaction of intense coherent x-ray pulses and matter is both of intrinsic scientific interest and of critical importance to the interpretation of experiments that probe the structures of materials using high-brightness femtosecond XFEL pulses. We report observations of the diffraction of extremely intense 32-fs nanofocused x-ray pulses by a powder sample of crystalline C60. We find that the diffraction pattern at the highest available incident power significantly differs from the one obtained using either third-generation synchrotron sources or XFEL sources operating at low output power and does not correspond to the diffraction pattern expected from any known phase of crystalline C60. We interpret these data as evidence of a long-range, coherent dynamic electronic distortion that is driven by the interaction of the periodic array of C60 molecular targets with intense x-ray pulses of femtosecond duration. PMID:27626076

  9. X-ray laser-induced electron dynamics observed by femtosecond diffraction from nanocrystals of Buckminsterfullerene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbey, Brian; Dilanian, Ruben A; Darmanin, Connie; Ryan, Rebecca A; Putkunz, Corey T; Martin, Andrew V; Wood, David; Streltsov, Victor; Jones, Michael W M; Gaffney, Naylyn; Hofmann, Felix; Williams, Garth J; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M Marvin; Williams, Sophie; Curwood, Evan; Balaur, Eugeniu; Peele, Andrew G; Nugent, Keith A; Quiney, Harry M

    2016-09-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) deliver x-ray pulses with a coherent flux that is approximately eight orders of magnitude greater than that available from a modern third-generation synchrotron source. The power density of an XFEL pulse may be so high that it can modify the electronic properties of a sample on a femtosecond time scale. Exploration of the interaction of intense coherent x-ray pulses and matter is both of intrinsic scientific interest and of critical importance to the interpretation of experiments that probe the structures of materials using high-brightness femtosecond XFEL pulses. We report observations of the diffraction of extremely intense 32-fs nanofocused x-ray pulses by a powder sample of crystalline C60. We find that the diffraction pattern at the highest available incident power significantly differs from the one obtained using either third-generation synchrotron sources or XFEL sources operating at low output power and does not correspond to the diffraction pattern expected from any known phase of crystalline C60. We interpret these data as evidence of a long-range, coherent dynamic electronic distortion that is driven by the interaction of the periodic array of C60 molecular targets with intense x-ray pulses of femtosecond duration.

  10. Apparatus and method for nanoflow liquid jet and serial femtosecond x-ray protein crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogan, Michael J.; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond G.

    2016-03-01

    Techniques for nanoflow serial femtosecond x-ray protein crystallography include providing a sample fluid by mixing a plurality of a first target of interest with a carrier fluid and injecting the sample fluid into a vacuum chamber at a rate less than about 4 microliters per minute. In some embodiments, the carrier fluid has a viscosity greater than about 3 centipoise.

  11. Initial lattice studies for the Berkeley Femtosecond X-ray Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zholents, A.; Reichel, I.; Robin, D.; Tanabe, J.; Wan, W.

    2002-05-01

    We present lattice studies for a proposed femtosecond synchrotron radiation X-ray source based on a recirculating accelerator. After a general description, we cover specific aspects of the lattice that are relevant to this type of machine and show preliminary results of particle tracking and briefly describe a new code developed for a comprehensive particle tracking in recirculating accelerators.

  12. Perspective: Structural dynamics in condensed matter mapped by femtosecond x-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsaesser, T.; Woerner, M. [Max-Born-Institut für Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-01-14

    Ultrashort soft and hard x-ray pulses are sensitive probes of structural dynamics on the picometer length and femtosecond time scales of electronic and atomic motions. Recent progress in generating such pulses has initiated new directions of condensed matter research, exploiting a variety of x-ray absorption, scattering, and diffraction methods to probe photoinduced structural dynamics. Atomic motion, changes of local structure and long-range order, as well as correlated electron motion and charge transfer have been resolved in space and time, providing a most direct access to the physical mechanisms and interactions driving reversible and irreversible changes of structure. This perspective combines an overview of recent advances in femtosecond x-ray diffraction with a discussion on ongoing and future developments.

  13. Soft X-Ray and Vacuum Ultraviolet Based Spectroscopy of the Actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin, J G

    2011-03-17

    The subjects of discussion included: VUV photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Synchrotron-radiation-based photoelectron spectroscopy, Soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy, Soft x-ray emission spectroscopy, Inverse photoelectron spectroscopy, Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy, Low energy IPES, Resonant inverse photoelectron spectroscopy.

  14. Femtosecond X-ray diffraction from two-dimensional protein crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Matthias; Carlson, David B; Hunter, Mark S; Williams, Garth J; Messerschmidt, Marc; Zatsepin, Nadia A; Barty, Anton; Benner, W Henry; Chu, Kaiqin; Graf, Alexander T; Hau-Riege, Stefan P; Kirian, Richard A; Padeste, Celestino; Pardini, Tommaso; Pedrini, Bill; Segelke, Brent; Seibert, M Marvin; Spence, John C H; Tsai, Ching-Ju; Lane, Stephen M; Li, Xiao-Dan; Schertler, Gebhard; Boutet, Sebastien; Coleman, Matthew; Evans, James E

    2014-03-01

    X-ray diffraction patterns from two-dimensional (2-D) protein crystals obtained using femtosecond X-ray pulses from an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) are presented. To date, it has not been possible to acquire transmission X-ray diffraction patterns from individual 2-D protein crystals due to radiation damage. However, the intense and ultrafast pulses generated by an XFEL permit a new method of collecting diffraction data before the sample is destroyed. Utilizing a diffract-before-destroy approach at the Linac Coherent Light Source, Bragg diffraction was acquired to better than 8.5 Å resolution for two different 2-D protein crystal samples each less than 10 nm thick and maintained at room temperature. These proof-of-principle results show promise for structural analysis of both soluble and membrane proteins arranged as 2-D crystals without requiring cryogenic conditions or the formation of three-dimensional crystals.

  15. Soft x-ray source for nanostructure imaging using femtosecond-laser-irradiated clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Y.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Pikuz, T.; Kando, M.; Kotaki, H.; Daito, I.; Ma, J.; Chen, L. M.; Homma, T.; Kawase, K.; Kameshima, T.; Kawachi, T.; Daido, H.; Kimura, T.; Tajima, T.; Kato, Y.; Bulanov, S. V.

    2008-03-01

    The intense soft x-ray light source using the supersonic expansion of the mixed gas of He and CO2, when irradiated by a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser pulse, is observed to enhance the radiation of soft x-rays from the CO2 clusters. Using this soft x-ray emissions, nanostructure images of 100-nm-thick Mo foils in a wide field of view (mm2 scale) with high spatial resolution (800nm ) are obtained with high dynamic range LiF crystal detectors. The local inhomogeneities of soft x-ray absorption by the nanometer-thick foils is measured with an accuracy of less than ±3%.

  16. Ways to produce and measure atto- and femtosecond soft X-ray pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE YuCheng

    2007-01-01

    The ways to produce and measure atto- and femtosecond soft X-ray pulses are reported. The laser phase relation of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) shows two different radiation energy distributions in time (or laser phase) domain. These energy-phase relations are helpful for realizing the dynamic processes of HHG. Two presented parameterized formulas can be used to calculate the durations of the energy distributions with a bandwidth of the pulse. These formulas are useful in calculating and simulating pulses transports and interactions with mediums. The time structures of atto- and femtosecond soft X-ray pulses can be directly measured with photoelectron spectrum transfer equations and the related laser phase determination methods without any previous pulse shape and the instantaneous frequency assumptions. These equations and methods can be used to evaluate and improve the technical parameters of the ultra-short X-ray sources. They have wide measurement ranges and high time resolutions, which may enable ultra-fast measurements to reach metrological precisions, and lead to a new tide of scientific researches in physics, chemistry, biochemistry, etc. The application of attoand femtosecond X-rays as well as the theoretical and technical problems in measurements are briefly discussed.

  17. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Database (Version 4.1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 20 X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Database (Version 4.1) (Web, free access)   The NIST XPS Database gives access to energies of many photoelectron and Auger-electron spectral lines. The database contains over 22,000 line positions, chemical shifts, doublet splittings, and energy separations of photoelectron and Auger-electron lines.

  18. Improved x-ray spectroscopy with room temperature CZT detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Shannon G; Shikhaliev, Polad M; Matthews, Kenneth L

    2011-09-07

    Compact, room temperature x-ray spectroscopy detectors are of interest in many areas including diagnostic x-ray imaging, radiation protection and dosimetry. Room temperature cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) semiconductor detectors are promising candidates for these applications. One of the major problems for CZT detectors is low-energy tailing of the energy spectrum due to hole trapping. Spectral post-correction methods to correct the tailing effect do not work well for a number of reasons; thus it is advisable to eliminate the hole trapping effect in CZT using physical methods rather than correcting an already deteriorated energy spectrum. One method is using a CZT detector with an electrode configuration which modifies the electric field in the CZT volume to decrease low-energy tailing. Another method is to irradiate the CZT surface at a tilted angle, which modifies depth of interaction to decrease low-energy tailing. Neither method alone, however, eliminates the tailing effect. In this work, we have investigated the combination of modified electric field and tilted angle irradiation in a single detector to further decrease spectral tailing. A planar CZT detector with 10 × 10 × 3 mm³ size and CZT detector with 5 × 5 × 5 mm³ size and cap-shaped electrode were used in this study. The cap-shaped electrode (referred to as CAPture technology) modifies the electric field distribution in the CZT volume and decreases the spectral tailing effect. The detectors were investigated at 90° (normal) and 30° (tilted angle) irradiation modes. Two isotope sources with 59.6 and 122 keV photon energies were used for gamma-ray spectroscopy experiments. X-ray spectroscopy was performed using collimated beams at 60, 80 and 120 kVp tube voltages, in both normal and tilted angle irradiation. Measured x-ray spectra were corrected for K x-ray escape fractions that were calculated using Monte Carlo methods. The x-ray spectra measured with tilted angle CAPture detector at 60, 80 and 120

  19. Principles of femtosecond X-ray/optical cross-correlation with X-ray induced transient optical reflectivity in solids

    OpenAIRE

    Eckert, S.; Beye, M.; Schlotter, W. F.; Dakovski, G. L.; Khalil, M.; Huse, N.; Föhlisch, A.; Pietzsch, A.; Quevedo, W.; Hantschmann, M.; Ochmann, M.; Ross, M.; Minitti, M. P.; Turner, J. J.; Moeller, S. P.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of ultrafast X-ray induced optical reflectivity changes enabled the development of X-ray/optical cross correlation techniques at X-ray free electron lasers worldwide. We have now linked through experiment and theory the fundamental excitation and relaxation steps with the transient optical properties in finite solid samples. Therefore, we gain a thorough interpretation and an optimized detection scheme of X-ray induced changes to the refractive index and the X-ray/optical cross ...

  20. Principles of femtosecond X-ray/optical cross-correlation with X-ray induced transient optical reflectivity in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckert, S., E-mail: sebastian.eckert@helmholtz-berlin.de, E-mail: martin.beye@helmholtz-berlin.de; Beye, M., E-mail: sebastian.eckert@helmholtz-berlin.de, E-mail: martin.beye@helmholtz-berlin.de; Pietzsch, A.; Quevedo, W.; Hantschmann, M. [Institute for Methods and Instrumentation in Synchrotron Radiation Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Ochmann, M.; Huse, N. [Institute for Nanostructure and Solid State Physics, University of Hamburg, Jungiusstr. 11, 20355 Hamburg, Germany and Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Ross, M.; Khalil, M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Box 351700, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Minitti, M. P.; Turner, J. J.; Moeller, S. P.; Schlotter, W. F.; Dakovski, G. L. [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Föhlisch, A. [Institute for Methods and Instrumentation in Synchrotron Radiation Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Institut für Physik und Astronomie, Universität Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24/25, 14476 Potsdam (Germany)

    2015-02-09

    The discovery of ultrafast X-ray induced optical reflectivity changes enabled the development of X-ray/optical cross correlation techniques at X-ray free electron lasers worldwide. We have now linked through experiment and theory the fundamental excitation and relaxation steps with the transient optical properties in finite solid samples. Therefore, we gain a thorough interpretation and an optimized detection scheme of X-ray induced changes to the refractive index and the X-ray/optical cross correlation response.

  1. Simultaneous surface plasmon resonance and x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, A.; Rodríguez de la Fuente, O.; Collado, V.; Rubio-Zuazo, J.; Monton, C.; Castro, G. R.; García, M. A.

    2012-08-01

    We present an experimental setup for the simultaneous measurement of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) on metallic thin films at a synchrotron beamline. The system allows measuring in situ and in real time the effect of x-ray irradiation on the SPR curves to explore the interaction of x-rays with matter. It is also possible to record XAS spectra while exciting SPR in order to study changes in the films induced by the excitation of surface plasmons. Combined experiments recording simultaneously SPR and XAS curves while scanning different parameters can be also carried out. The relative variations in the SPR and XAS spectra that can be detected with this setup range from 10-3 to 10-5, depending on the particular experiment.

  2. Simultaneous Surface Plasmon Resonance and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Serrano, A; Collado, V; Rubio-Zuazo, J; Monton, C; Castro, G; García, M A

    2012-01-01

    We present here an experimental set-up to perform simultaneously measurements of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) in a synchrotron beamline. The system allows measuring in situ and in real time the effect of X-ray irradiation on the SPR curves to explore the interaction of X-rays with matter. It is also possible to record XAS spectra while exciting SPR in order to detect the changes in the electronic configuration of thin films induced by the excitation of surface plasmons. Combined experiments recording simultaneously SPR and XAS curves while scanning different parameters can be carried out. The relative variations in the SPR and XAS spectra that can be detected with this set-up ranges from 10-3 to 10-5, depending on the particular experiment.

  3. Simultaneous surface plasmon resonance and x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano, A. [Instituto de Ceramica y Vidrio (ICV-CSIC), Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Rodriguez de la Fuente, O. [Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Collado, V.; Rubio-Zuazo, J.; Castro, G. R. [SpLine, Spanish CRG Beamline at the ESRF, F-38043 Grenoble, Cedex 09, France and Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, (ICMM-CSIC), Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Monton, C. [Department of Physics and Center for Advanced Nanoscience, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Garcia, M. A. [Instituto de Ceramica y Vidrio (ICV-CSIC), Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); IMDEA Nanociencia, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-08-15

    We present an experimental setup for the simultaneous measurement of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) on metallic thin films at a synchrotron beamline. The system allows measuring in situ and in real time the effect of x-ray irradiation on the SPR curves to explore the interaction of x-rays with matter. It is also possible to record XAS spectra while exciting SPR in order to study changes in the films induced by the excitation of surface plasmons. Combined experiments recording simultaneously SPR and XAS curves while scanning different parameters can be also carried out. The relative variations in the SPR and XAS spectra that can be detected with this setup range from 10{sup -3} to 10{sup -5}, depending on the particular experiment.

  4. An upgraded x-ray spectroscopy diagnostic on MST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, D J; Almagri, A F; Burke, D R; Forest, C B; Goetz, J A; Kaufman, M C; O'Connell, R

    2010-10-01

    An upgraded x-ray spectroscopy diagnostic is used to measure the distribution of fast electrons in MST and to determine Z(eff) and the particle diffusion coefficient D(r). A radial array of 12 CdZnTe hard-x-ray detectors measures 10-150 keV Bremsstrahlung from fast electrons, a signature of reduced stochasticity and improved confinement in the plasma. A new Si soft-x-ray detector measures 2-10 keV Bremsstrahlung from thermal and fast electrons. The shaped output pulses from both detector types are digitized and the resulting waveforms are fit with Gaussians to resolve pileup and provide good time and energy resolution. Lead apertures prevent detector saturation and provide a well-known etendue, while lead shielding prevents pickup from stray x-rays. New Be vacuum windows transmit >2 keV x-rays, and additional Al and Be filters are sometimes used to reduce low energy flux for better resolution at higher energies. Measured spectra are compared to those predicted by the Fokker-Planck code CQL3D to deduce Z(eff) and D(r).

  5. Femtosecond powder diffraction with a laser-driven hard X-ray source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamponi, F; Ansari, Z; Woerner, M; Elsaesser, T

    2010-01-18

    X-ray powder diffraction with a femtosecond time resolution is introduced to map ultrafast structural dynamics of polycrystalline condensed matter. Our pump-probe approach is based on photoexcitation of a powder sample with a femtosecond optical pulse and probing changes of its structure by diffracting a hard X-ray pulse generated in a laser-driven plasma source. We discuss the key aspects of this scheme including an analysis of detection sensitivity and angular resolution. Applying this technique to the prototype molecular material ammonium sulfate, up to 20 powder diffraction rings are recorded simultaneously with a time resolution of 100 fs. We describe how to derive transient charge density maps of the material from the extensive set of diffraction data in a quantitative way.

  6. Reflection of femtosecond pulses from soft X-ray free-electron laser by periodical multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ksenzov, D.; Grigorian, S.; Pietsch, U. [Faculty of Physics, University of Siegen (Germany); Hendel, S.; Bienert, F.; Sacher, M.D.; Heinzmann, U. [Faculty of Physics, University of Bielefeld (Germany)

    2009-08-15

    Recent experiments on a soft X-ray free-electron laser (FEL) source (FLASH in Hamburg) have shown that multilayers (MLs) can be used as optical elements for highly intense X-ray irradiation. An effort to find most appropriate MLs has to consider the femtosecond time structure and the particular photon energy of the FEL. In this paper we have analysed the time response of 'low absorbing' MLs (e.g. such as La/B{sub 4}C) as a function of the number of periods. Interaction of a pulse train of Gaussian shaped sub-pulses using a realistic ML grown by electron-beam evaporation technique has been analysed in the soft-X-ray range. The structural parameters of the MLs were obtained by reflectivity measurements at BESSY II and subsequent profile fittings. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  7. Femtosecond laser-generated high-energy-density states studied by x-ray FELs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsutsumi, M.; Appel, K.; Baehtz, C.; Chen, B.; Cowan, T. E.; Göde, S.; Konopkova, Z.; Pelka, A.; Priebe, G.; Schmidt, A.; Sukharnikov, K.; Thorpe, I.; Tschentscher, Th; Zastrau, U.

    2017-01-01

    The combination of powerful optical lasers and an x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) provides unique capabilities to study the transient behaviour of matter in extreme conditions. The high energy density science instrument (HED instrument) at the European XFEL will provide the experimental platform on which an unique x-ray source can be combined with various types of high-power optical lasers. In this paper, we highlight selected scientific examples together with the associated x-ray techniques, with particular emphasis on femtosecond (fs)-timescale pump-probe experiments. Subsequently, we present the current design status of the HED instrument, outlining how the experiments could be performed. First user experiments will start at the beginning of 2018, after which various optical lasers will be commissioned and made available to the international scientific community.

  8. Crystal structure of rhodopsin bound to arrestin by femtosecond X-ray laser

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) signal primarily through G proteins or arrestins. Arrestin binding to GPCRs blocks G protein interaction and redirects signaling to numerous G protein-independent pathways. Here we report the crystal structure of a constitutively active form of human rhodopsin bound to a pre-activated form of the mouse visual arrestin, determined by serial femtosecond X-ray laser crystallography. Together with extensive biochemical and mutagenesis data, the structure reveal...

  9. Hard X-rays in–soft X-rays out: An operando piggyback view deep into a charging lithium ion battery with X-ray Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, Artur, E-mail: artur.braun@alumni.ethz.ch [Laboratory for High Performance Ceramics. Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Nordlund, Dennis [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94720 (United States); Song, Seung-Wan [Department of Fine Chemical Engineering & Applied Chemistry, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Huang, Tzu-Wen [Laboratory for High Performance Ceramics. Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Sokaras, Dimosthenis [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94720 (United States); Liu, Xiasong; Yang, Wanli [Advanced Light Source, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Weng, Tsu-Chien [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94720 (United States); Liu, Zhi [Advanced Light Source, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Graphical abstract: - Abstract: For lithium intercalation battery electrodes, understanding of the electronic structure of bulk and surface is essential for their operation and functionality. Soft X-rays are excellent probes for such electronic structure information, but soft X-rays are predominantly surface sensitive and thus cannot probe the bulk. Moreover, soft X-rays hardly permit meaningful in situ and operando studies in battery assemblies. We show here how we penetrate with hard X-rays (>10 keV) in situ a lithium cell, containing a manganite-based cathode. Through X-ray Raman spectroscopy we extract the Mn 2p multiplet from the entire cathode material, thus obtaining bulk-sensitive electronic structure information during battery charging and discharging.

  10. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of Theta Car

    CERN Document Server

    Naze, Yael

    2008-01-01

    Context : The peculiar hot star Theta Car in the open cluster IC2602 is a blue straggler as well as a single-line binary of short period (2.2d). Aims : Its high-energy properties are not well known, though X-rays can provide useful constraints on the energetic processes at work in binaries as well as in peculiar, single objects. Methods : We present the analysis of a 50ks exposure taken with the XMM-Newton observatory. It provides medium as well as high-resolution spectroscopy. Results : Our high-resolution spectroscopy analysis reveals a very soft spectrum with multiple temperature components (1--6MK) and an X-ray flux slightly below the `canonical' value (log[L_X(0.1-10.)/L_{BOL}] ~ -7). The X-ray lines appear surprisingly narrow and unshifted, reminiscent of those of beta Cru and tau Sco. Their relative intensities confirm the anomalous abundances detected in the optical domain (C strongly depleted, N strongly enriched, O slightly depleted). In addition, the X-ray data favor a slight depletion in neon and ...

  11. Muonic X-ray spectroscopy: Effect of the presence of protons on X-ray production

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohamadsalehi, F; Gheisari, R; Rahimi, N

    2016-01-01

    ... . The target has a high efficiency for analyzing characteristic X-rays in ion implantation. To predict the effect of the presence of protons on X-ray production, we have proposed a new kinetic schema...

  12. Time-resolved X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy for Electron Transport Study in Warm Dense Gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Won; Bae, Leejin; Engelhorn, Kyle; Heimann, Philip; Ping, Yuan; Barbrel, Ben; Fernandez, Amalia; Beckwith, Martha Anne; Cho, Byoung-Ick; GIST Team; IBS Team; LBNL Collaboration; SLAC Collaboration; LLNL Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The warm dense Matter represents states of which the temperature is comparable to Fermi energy and ions are strongly coupled. One of the experimental techniques to create such state in the laboratory condition is the isochoric heating of thin metal foil with femtosecond laser pulses. This concept largely relies on the ballistic transport of electrons near the Fermi-level, which were mainly studied for the metals in ambient conditions. However, they were barely investigated in warm dense conditions. We present a time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy measured for the Au/Cu dual layered sample. The front Au layer was isochorically heated with a femtosecond laser pulse, and the x-ray absorption changes around L-edge of Cu, which was attached on the backside of Au, was measured with a picosecond resolution. Time delays between the heating of the `front surface' of Au layer and the alternation of x-ray spectrum of Cu attached on the `rear surface' of Au indicate the energetic electron transport mechanism through Au in the warm dense conditions. IBS (IBS-R012-D1) and the NRF (No. 2013R1A1A1007084) of Korea.

  13. kHz femtosecond laser-plasma hard X-ray and fast ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoss, A.; Korn, G.; Richardson, M. C.; Faubel, M.; Stiel, H.; Voigt, U.; Siders, C. W.; Elsaesser, T.

    2002-04-01

    We describe the first demonstration of a new stable, kHz femtosecond laser-plasma source of hard x-ray continuum and Kα emission using a thin liquid metallic jet target. kHz femtosecond x-ray sources will find many applications in time-resolved x-ray diffraction and microscopy studies. As high intensity lasers become more compact and operate at increasingly high repetition-rates, they require a target configuration that is both repeatable from shot-to-shot and is debris-free. We have solved this requirement with the use of a fine (10-30 μm diameter) liquid metal jet target that provides a pristine, unperturbed filament surface at rates >100 kHz. A number of liquid metal targets are considered. We will show hard x-ray spectra recorded from liquid Ga targets that show the generation of the 9.3 keV and 10.3 keV, Kα and Kβ lines superimposed on a multi-keV Bremsstrahlung continuum. This source was generated by a 50fs duration, 1 kHz, 2W, high intensity Ti:Sapphire laser. We will discuss the extension of this source to higher powers and higher repetition rates, providing harder x-ray emission, with the incorporation of pulse-shaping and other techniques to enhance the x-ray conversion efficiency. Using the same liquid target technology, we have also demonstrated the generation of forward-going sub-MeV protons from a 10 μm liquid water target at 1 kHz repetition rates. kHz sources of high energy ions will find many applications in time-resolved particle interaction studies, as well as lead to the efficient generation of short-lived isotopes for use in nuclear medicine and other applications. The protons were detected with CR-39 track detectors both in the forward and backward directions up to energies of ~500 keV. As the intensity of compact high repetition-rate lasers sources increase, we can expect improvements in the energy, conversion efficiency and directionality to occur. The impact of these developments on a number of fields will be discussed. As compact

  14. Advances in X-ray spectroscopy contributions in honour of professor Y. Cauchois

    CERN Document Server

    Bonnelle, C

    1982-01-01

    Advances in X-Ray Spectroscopy covers topics relevant to the advancement of X-ray spectroscopy technology. The book is a collection of papers written by specialists in X-ray spectroscopy and pays tribute to the scientific work of Prof. Yvette Cauchois. The text is organized into four parts. Part I covers the analysis of X-ray transitions between atomic levels and relativistic theories of X-ray emission satellites and electron BremsStrahlung. Part II reviews the means provided by X-ray spectroscopy for the determination of the electronic structure of solids, while Part III discusses methods of

  15. Ways of development of compact coherent femtosecond X-ray sources for applications in nano- and biophotonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikheev, L.

    2017-01-01

    Ways of the development of compact coherent sources of soft X-ray femtosecond pulses are discussed, which meet the requirements for the implementation of the “diffraction-before-destruction” approach in the lensless X-ray Coherent Diffractive Imaging (CDI) technique enabling quantitative 3D mapping of material structure with the nanoscale spatial resolution. An innovative hybrid (solid/gas) approach to produce ultra-intense femtosecond laser pulses in the visible is described in the context of its applications for laser driven high harmonic generation (HHG) and soft X-ray generation in laser plasmas due to recombination mechanism of excitation.

  16. Goniometer-based femtosecond X-ray diffraction of mutant 30S ribosomal subunit crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Han Dao

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we collected radiation-damage-free data from a set of cryo-cooled crystals for a novel 30S ribosomal subunit mutant using goniometer-based femtosecond crystallography. Crystal quality assessment for these samples was conducted at the X-ray Pump Probe end-station of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS using recently introduced goniometer-based instrumentation. These 30S subunit crystals were genetically engineered to omit a 26-residue protein, Thx, which is present in the wild-type Thermus thermophilus 30S ribosomal subunit. We are primarily interested in elucidating the contribution of this ribosomal protein to the overall 30S subunit structure. To assess the viability of this study, femtosecond X-ray diffraction patterns from these crystals were recorded at the LCLS during a protein crystal screening beam time. During our data collection, we successfully observed diffraction from these difficult-to-grow 30S ribosomal subunit crystals. Most of our crystals were found to diffract to low resolution, while one crystal diffracted to 3.2 Å resolution. These data suggest the feasibility of pursuing high-resolution data collection as well as the need to improve sample preparation and handling in order to collect a complete radiation-damage-free data set using an X-ray Free Electron Laser.

  17. Arsenic speciation in solids using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Andrea L.; Kim, Chris S.

    2014-01-01

    Synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is an in situ, minimally-destructive, element-specific, molecular-scale structural probe that has been employed to study the chemical forms (species) of arsenic (As) in solid and aqueous phases (including rocks, soils, sediment, synthetic compounds, and numerous types of biota including humans) for more than 20 years. Although several excellent reviews of As geochemistry and As speciation in the environment have been published previously (including recent contributions in this volume), the explosion of As-XAS studies over the past decade (especially studies employing microfocused X-ray beams) warrants this new review of the literature and of data analysis methods.

  18. Hard X-ray emission spectroscopy with pink beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kvashnina, Kristina O.; Rossberg, Andre; Exner, Joerg; Scheinost, Andreas C. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Molecular Structures

    2017-06-01

    Valence-band X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) with a ''pink beam'', i.e. a beam with large energy bandwidth produced by a double-multilayer monochromator, is introduced here to overcome the weak count rate of monochromatic beams produced by conventional double-crystal monochromators. Our results demonstrate that - in spite of the large bandwidth in the order of 100 eV - the high spectral resolution of the Johann-type spectrometer is maintained, while the two orders of magnitude higher flux greatly reduces the required counting time. The short working distance Johann-type X-ray emission spectrometer and multilayer monochromator is available at ROBL.

  19. Compton Scattering and Its Applications: The PLEIADES Femtosecond X-ray Source at LLNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartemann, F V; Brown, W J; Anderson, S G; Barty, C P J; Betts, S M; Booth, R; Crane, J K; Cross, R R; Fittinghoff, D N; Gibson, D J; Kuba, J; Rupp, B; Tremaine, A M; Springer, P T

    2003-05-01

    Remarkable developments in critical technologies including terawatt-class lasers using chirped-pulse amplification, high brightness photoinjectors, high-gradient accelerators, and superconducting linacs make it possible to design and operate compact, tunable, subpicosecond Compton scattering x-ray sources with a wide variety of applications. In such novel radiation sources, the collision between a femtosecond laser pulse and a low emittance relativistic electron bunch in a small ({micro}m{sup 3}) interaction volume produces Doppler-upshifted scattered photons with unique characteristics: the energy is tunable in the 5-500 keV range, the angular divergence of the beam is small (mrad), and the pulses are ultrashort (10 fs - 10 ps). Two main paths are currently being followed in laboratories worldwide: high peak brightness, using ultrahigh intensity femtosecond lasers at modest repetition rates, and high average brightness, using superconducting linac and high average power laser technology at MHz repetition rates. Targeted applications range from x-ray protein crystallography and high contrast medical imaging to femtosecond pump-probe and diffraction experiments. More exotic uses of such sources include the {gamma}-{gamma} collider, NIF backlighting, nonlinear Compton scattering, and high-field QED. Theoretical considerations and experimental results will be discussed within this context.

  20. Compton Scattering and its Applications:. the Pleiades Femtosecond X-Ray Source at LLNL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartemann, F. V.; Brown, W. J.; Anderson, S. G.; Barty, C. P. J.; Betts, S. M.; Booth, R.; Crane, J. K.; Cross, R. R.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Gibson, D. J.; Kuba, J.; Rupp, B.; Tremaine, A. M.; Springer, P. T.

    2004-10-01

    Remarkable developments in critical technologies including terawatt-class lasers using chirped-pulse amplification, high brightness photoinjectors, high-gradient accelerators, and superconducting linacs make it possible to design and operate compact, tunable, subpicosecond Compton scattering x-ray sources with a wide variety of applications. In such novel radiation sources, the collision between a femtosecond laser pulse and a low emittance relativistic electron bunch in a small (μm3) interaction volume produces Doppler-upshifted scattered photons with unique characteristics: the energy is tunable in the 5-500 keV range, the angular divergence of the beam is small (mrad), and the pulses are ultrashort (10 fs - 10 ps). Two main paths are currently being followed in laboratories worldwide: high peak brightness, using ultrahigh intensity femtosecond lasers at modest repetition rates, and high average brightness, using superconducting linac and high average power laser technology at MHz repetition rates. Targeted applications range from x-ray protein crystallography and high contrast medical imaging to femtosecond pump-probe and diffraction experiments. More exotic uses of such sources include the γ-γ collider, NIF backlighting, nonlinear Compton scattering, and high-field QED. Theoretical considerations and experimental results will be discussed within this context.

  1. Coherence Properties of Individual Femtosecond Pulses of an X-ray Free-Electron Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vartanyants, I.A.; /DESY /Moscow Phys. Eng. Inst.; Singer, A.; Mancuso, A.P.; Yefanov, O.M.; /DESY; Sakdinawat, A.; Liu, Y.; Bang, E.; /UC, Berkeley; Williams, G.J.; /SLAC; Cadenazzi, G.; Abbey, B.; /Melbourne U.; Sinn, H.; /European XFEL, Hamburg; Attwood, D.; /UC, Berkeley; Nugent, K.A.; /Melbourne U.; Weckert, E.; /DESY; Wang, T.; Zhu, D.; Wu, B.; Graves, C.; Scherz, A.; Turner, J.J.; Schlotter, W.F.; /SLAC /LERMA, Ivry /Zurich, ETH /LBL, Berkeley /ANL, APS /Argonne /SLAC /LLNL, Livermore /Latrobe U. /SLAC /SLAC /European XFEL, Hamburg /SLAC /Hamburg U.

    2012-06-06

    Measurements of the spatial and temporal coherence of single, femtosecond x-ray pulses generated by the first hard x-ray free-electron laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source, are presented. Single-shot measurements were performed at 780 eV x-ray photon energy using apertures containing double pinholes in 'diffract-and-destroy' mode. We determined a coherence length of 17 {micro}m in the vertical direction, which is approximately the size of the focused Linac Coherent Light Source beam in the same direction. The analysis of the diffraction patterns produced by the pinholes with the largest separation yields an estimate of the temporal coherence time of 0.55 fs. We find that the total degree of transverse coherence is 56% and that the x-ray pulses are adequately described by two transverse coherent modes in each direction. This leads us to the conclusion that 78% of the total power is contained in the dominant mode.

  2. Coherence Properties of Individual Femtosecond Pulses of an X-ray Free-Electron Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vartanyants, I.A.; /DESY /Moscow Phys. Eng. Inst.; Singer, A.; Mancuso, A.P.; Yefanov, O.M.; /DESY; Sakdinawat, A.; Liu, Y.; Bang, E.; /UC, Berkeley; Williams, G.J.; /SLAC; Cadenazzi, G.; Abbey, B.; /Melbourne U.; Sinn, H.; /European XFEL, Hamburg; Attwood, D.; /UC, Berkeley; Nugent, K.A.; /Melbourne U.; Weckert, E.; /DESY; Wang, T.; Zhu, D.; Wu, B.; Graves, C.; Scherz, A.; Turner, J.J.; Schlotter, W.F.; /SLAC /LERMA, Ivry /Zurich, ETH /LBL, Berkeley /ANL, APS /Argonne /SLAC /LLNL, Livermore /Latrobe U. /SLAC /SLAC /European XFEL, Hamburg /SLAC /Hamburg U.

    2012-06-06

    Measurements of the spatial and temporal coherence of single, femtosecond x-ray pulses generated by the first hard x-ray free-electron laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source, are presented. Single-shot measurements were performed at 780 eV x-ray photon energy using apertures containing double pinholes in 'diffract-and-destroy' mode. We determined a coherence length of 17 {micro}m in the vertical direction, which is approximately the size of the focused Linac Coherent Light Source beam in the same direction. The analysis of the diffraction patterns produced by the pinholes with the largest separation yields an estimate of the temporal coherence time of 0.55 fs. We find that the total degree of transverse coherence is 56% and that the x-ray pulses are adequately described by two transverse coherent modes in each direction. This leads us to the conclusion that 78% of the total power is contained in the dominant mode.

  3. Femtosecond X-ray diffraction from two-dimensional protein crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Frank

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available X-ray diffraction patterns from two-dimensional (2-D protein crystals obtained using femtosecond X-ray pulses from an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL are presented. To date, it has not been possible to acquire transmission X-ray diffraction patterns from individual 2-D protein crystals due to radiation damage. However, the intense and ultrafast pulses generated by an XFEL permit a new method of collecting diffraction data before the sample is destroyed. Utilizing a diffract-before-destroy approach at the Linac Coherent Light Source, Bragg diffraction was acquired to better than 8.5 Å resolution for two different 2-D protein crystal samples each less than 10 nm thick and maintained at room temperature. These proof-of-principle results show promise for structural analysis of both soluble and membrane proteins arranged as 2-D crystals without requiring cryogenic conditions or the formation of three-dimensional crystals.

  4. Suborbital Soft X-Ray Spectroscopy with Gaseous Electron Multipliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Thomas D.

    This thesis consists of the design, fabrication, and launch of a sounding rocket payload to observe the spectrum of the soft X-ray emission (0.1-1 keV) from the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant. This instrument, designated the Off-plane Grating Rocket for Extended Source Spectroscopy (OGRESS), was launched from White Sands Missile Range on May 2nd, 2015. The X-ray spectrograph incorporated a wire-grid focuser feeding an array of gratings in the extreme off-plane mount which dispersed the spectrum onto Gaseous Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors. The gain characteristics of OGRESS's GEM detectors were fully characterized with respect to applied voltage and internal gas pressure, allowing operational settings to be optimized. The GEMs were optimized to operate below laboratory atmospheric pressure, allowing lower applied voltages, thus reducing the risk of both electrical arcing and tearing of the thin detector windows. The instrument recorded 388 seconds of data and found highly uniform count distributions over both detector faces, in sharp contrast to the expected thermal line spectrum. This signal is attributed to X-ray fluorescence lines generated inside the spectrograph. The radiation is produced when thermal ionospheric particles are accelerated into the interior walls of the spectrograph by the high voltages of the detector windows. A fluorescence model was found to fit the flight data better than modeled supernova spectra. Post-flight testing and analysis revealed that electrons produce distinct signal on the detectors which can also be successfully modeled as fluorescence emission.

  5. Kilohertz sources of hard x rays and fast ions with femtosecond laser plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoss, A.; Richardson, M.; Korn, G.; Faubel, M.; Stiel, H.; Vogt, U.; Elsaesser, T.

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate a new, stable, kilohertz femtosecond laser plasma source of hard-x-ray continuum and Kα emission that uses a microscopic liquid jet target that is continuous and debris free. Plasmas produced by ultrashort (50-fs) intense laser pulses from a fine (10-30-μm diameter) liquid Ga jet emit bright 9.3- and 10.3-keV Kα and Kβ lines superimposed on a multikilovolt bremmstrahlung continuum. Kilohertz femtosecond x-ray sources will find many applications in time-resolved x-ray diffraction and microscopy studies. As high-intensity lasers become more compact and operate at increasingly high repetition-rates, they require a target configuration that is both repeatable from shot to shot and debris free. Our target provides a pristine, unperturbed filament surface at rates >100 kHz. A number of liquid metal targets are considered. We show the hard-x-ray spectrum described above. The source was generated by a 50-fs-duration, 1-kHz, 2-W, high-intensity Ti:sapphire laser. Using the same technology, we also generate forward-going sub-mega-electron-volt (sub-MeV) protons from a 10-μm liquid water target at 1-kHz repetition rates. Kilohertz sources of high-energy ions will find many applications in time-resolved particle interaction studies and will lead to efficient generation of short-lived isotopes for use in nuclear medicine and other applications. The protons were detected with CR-39 track detectors in both the forward and the backward directions up to energies of ~500 keV. As the intensity of compact high-repetition-rate lasers sources increases, we can expect improvements in the energy, conversion efficiency, and directionality to occur. The effect of these developments is discussed. As compact, high-repetition-rate femtosecond laser technology reaches focused intensities of ~1019 W/cm2, many new applications of high-repetition-rate hard-x-ray and MeV ion sources will become practical.

  6. X-ray diffuse scattering measurements of nucleation dynamics at femtosecond resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenberg, A M; Engemann, S; Gaffney, K J; Sokolowski-Tinten, K; Larsson, J; Hillyard, P B; Reis, D A; Fritz, D M; Arthur, J; Akre, R A; George, M J; Deb, A; Bucksbaum, P H; Hajdu, J; Meyer, D A; Nicoul, M; Blome, C; Tschentscher, Th; Cavalieri, A L; Falcone, R W; Lee, S H; Pahl, R; Rudati, J; Fuoss, P H; Nelson, A J; Krejcik, P; Siddons, D P; Lorazo, P; Hastings, J B

    2008-04-01

    Femtosecond time-resolved small and wide angle x-ray diffuse scattering techniques are applied to investigate the ultrafast nucleation processes that occur during the ablation process in semiconducting materials. Following intense optical excitation, a transient liquid state of high compressibility characterized by large-amplitude density fluctuations is observed and the buildup of these fluctuations is measured in real time. Small-angle scattering measurements reveal snapshots of the spontaneous nucleation of nanoscale voids within a metastable liquid and support theoretical predictions of the ablation process.

  7. X-ray diffuse scattering measurements of nucleation dynamics at femtosecond resolution.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindenberg, A. M.; Engemann, S.; Gaffney, K. J.; Sokolowski-Tinten, K.; Larsson, J.; Rudati, J.; Fuoss, P. H. (Advanced Photon Source); ( MSD); (Stanford Linear Acelerator Center); (Stanford Univ.); (Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab.); (Univ. Duisberg-Essen); (Lund Inst. of Tech.); (Univ. of Michigan); (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY); (Max-Planck Inst. Quantum Optics); (Univ. of California at Berkeley); (Korea Research Inst. Standards and Science); (Univ. of Chicago); (LLNL); (BNL); (Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal)

    2008-03-01

    Femtosecond time-resolved small and wide angle x-ray diffuse scattering techniques are applied to investigate the ultrafast nucleation processes that occur during the ablation process in semiconducting materials. Following intense optical excitation, a transient liquid state of high compressibility characterized by large-amplitude density fluctuations is observed and the buildup of these fluctuations is measured in real time. Small-angle scattering measurements reveal snapshots of the spontaneous nucleation of nanoscale voids within a metastable liquid and support theoretical predictions of the ablation process.

  8. Femtosecond x-ray free electron laser pulse duration measurement from spectral correlation function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Lutman

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel method for measuring the duration of femtosecond x-ray pulses from self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron lasers by performing statistical analysis in the spectral domain. Analytical expressions of the spectral correlation function were derived in the linear regime to extract both the pulse duration and the spectrometer resolution. Numerical simulations confirmed that the method can be also used in the nonlinear regime. The method was demonstrated experimentally at the Linac Coherent Light Source by measuring pulse durations down to 13 fs FWHM.

  9. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Uranium Dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin, J G

    2010-12-10

    After the CMMD Seminar by Sung Woo Yu on the subject of the x-ray spectroscopy of UO2, there arose some questions concerning the XAS of UO2. These questions can be distilled down to these three issues: (1) The validity of the data; (2) The monchromator energy calibration; and (3) The validity of XAS component of the figure shown. The following will be shown: (1) The data is valid; (2) It is possible to calibrate the monchromator; and (3) The XAS component of the above picture is correct. The remainder of this document is in three sections, corresponding to these three issues.

  10. Small pixel CZT detector for hard X-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Matthew David, E-mail: Matt.Wilson@stfc.ac.uk [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Cernik, Robert [Henry Moseley X-ray Imaging Facility, School of Materials, University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Chen, Henry [Redlen Technologies, Saanichton, British Columbia (Canada); Hansson, Conny [Henry Moseley X-ray Imaging Facility, School of Materials, University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Iniewski, Kris [Redlen Technologies, Saanichton, British Columbia (Canada); Jones, Lawrence L.; Seller, Paul; Veale, Matthew C. [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-01

    A new small pixel cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector has been developed for hard X-ray spectroscopy. The X-ray performance of four detectors is presented and the detectors are analysed in terms of the energy resolution of each pixel. The detectors were made from CZT crystals grown by the travelling heater method (THM) bonded to a 20x20 application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) and data acquisition (DAQ) system. The detectors had an array of 20x20 pixels on a 250 {mu}m pitch, with each pixel gold-stud bonded to an energy resolving circuit in the ASIC. The DAQ system digitised the ASIC output with 14 bit resolution, performing offset corrections and data storage to disc in real time at up to 40,000 frames per second. The detector geometry and ASIC design was optimised for X-ray spectroscopy up to 150 keV and made use of the small pixel effect to preferentially measure the electron signal. A {sup 241}Am source was used to measure the spectroscopic performance and uniformity of the detectors. The average energy resolution (FWHM at 59.54 keV) of each pixel ranged from 1.09{+-}0.46 to 1.50{+-}0.57 keV across the four detectors. The detectors showed good spectral performance and uniform response over almost all pixels in the 20x20 array. A large area 80x80 pixel detector will be built that will utilise the scalable design of the ASIC and the large areas of monolithic spectroscopic grade THM grown CZT that are now available. The large area detector will have the same performance as that demonstrated here.

  11. Small pixel CZT detector for hard X-ray spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Matthew David; Cernik, Robert; Chen, Henry; Hansson, Conny; Iniewski, Kris; Jones, Lawrence L.; Seller, Paul; Veale, Matthew C.

    2011-10-01

    A new small pixel cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector has been developed for hard X-ray spectroscopy. The X-ray performance of four detectors is presented and the detectors are analysed in terms of the energy resolution of each pixel. The detectors were made from CZT crystals grown by the travelling heater method (THM) bonded to a 20×20 application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) and data acquisition (DAQ) system. The detectors had an array of 20×20 pixels on a 250 μm pitch, with each pixel gold-stud bonded to an energy resolving circuit in the ASIC. The DAQ system digitised the ASIC output with 14 bit resolution, performing offset corrections and data storage to disc in real time at up to 40,000 frames per second. The detector geometry and ASIC design was optimised for X-ray spectroscopy up to 150 keV and made use of the small pixel effect to preferentially measure the electron signal. A 241Am source was used to measure the spectroscopic performance and uniformity of the detectors. The average energy resolution (FWHM at 59.54 keV) of each pixel ranged from 1.09±0.46 to 1.50±0.57 keV across the four detectors. The detectors showed good spectral performance and uniform response over almost all pixels in the 20×20 array. A large area 80×80 pixel detector will be built that will utilise the scalable design of the ASIC and the large areas of monolithic spectroscopic grade THM grown CZT that are now available. The large area detector will have the same performance as that demonstrated here.

  12. Hubbard Model Approach to X-ray Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Towfiq

    We have implemented a Hubbard model based first-principles approach for real-space calculations of x-ray spectroscopy, which allows one to study excited state electronic structure of correlated systems. Theoretical understanding of many electronic features in d and f electron systems remains beyond the scope of conventional density functional theory (DFT). In this work our main effort is to go beyond the local density approximation (LDA) by incorporating the Hubbard model within the real-space multiple-scattering Green's function (RSGF) formalism. Historically, the first theoretical description of correlated systems was published by Sir Neville Mott and others in 1937. They realized that the insulating gap and antiferromagnetism in the transition metal oxides are mainly caused by the strong on-site Coulomb interaction of the localized unfilled 3d orbitals. Even with the recent progress of first principles methods (e.g. DFT) and model Hamiltonian approaches (e.g., Hubbard-Anderson model), the electronic description of many of these systems remains a non-trivial combination of both. X-ray absorption near edge spectra (XANES) and x-ray emission spectra (XES) are very powerful spectroscopic probes for many electronic features near Fermi energy (EF), which are caused by the on-site Coulomb interaction of localized electrons. In this work we focus on three different cases of many-body effects due to the interaction of localized d electrons. Here, for the first time, we have applied the Hubbard model in the real-space multiple scattering (RSGF) formalism for the calculation of x-ray spectra of Mott insulators (e.g., NiO and MnO). Secondly, we have implemented in our RSGF approach a doping dependent self-energy that was constructed from a single-band Hubbard model for the over doped high-T c cuprate La2-xSrxCuO4. Finally our RSGF calculation of XANES is calculated with the spectral function from Lee and Hedin's charge transfer satellite model. For all these cases our

  13. Generating femtosecond X-ray pulses using an emittance-spoiling foil in free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Y., E-mail: ding@slac.stanford.edu; Coffee, R.; Decker, F.-J.; Emma, P.; Field, C.; Huang, Z.; Krejcik, P.; Krzywinski, J.; Loos, H.; Lutman, A.; Marinelli, A.; Maxwell, T. J.; Turner, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Behrens, C. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Helml, W. [Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Straße 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-11-09

    Generation of femtosecond to sub-femtosecond pulses is attracting much attention in X-ray free-electron laser user community. One method is to use a slotted, emittance-spoiling foil which was proposed before (P. Emma et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 074801 (2004)) and has been widely used at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Direct experimental characterization of the slotted-foil performance was previously unfeasible due to a lack of appropriate diagnostics. With a recently installed X-band radio-frequency transverse deflector, we are able to characterize the electron bunch spoiling effect and X-ray pulse when using the slotted foil. We show that few-femtosecond X-ray pulses are generated with flexible control of the single-pulse duration or double-pulse separation with comparison to the theoretical model.

  14. The High Throughput X-ray Spectroscopy (HTXS) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, N. E.; Tananbaum, H.; Kahn, S. M.

    1997-01-01

    The HTXS mission concept combines large effective area (approximately 15,000 sq cm at 1 keV), high spectral resolution (E/Delta(E) approximately 300-3000), and broad energy bandpass (0.25-40 keV and possibly up to 100 keV) by using replicated optics together with a complement of spectroscopic instrumentation including reflection gratings readout by charge-coupled device detectors (CCDs), quantum micro-calorimeters, and cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) or comparable high energy detectors. An essential feature of this concept involves minimization of cost (approximately $350M for development and approximately $500-600M including launches) and risk by building six identical modest satellites to achieve the large area. Current mission and technology studies are targeted towards a new start in the 2002 timeframe, with first launch around 2005-2006. The HTXS mission represents a major advance, providing as much as a factor of 100 increase in sensitivity over currently planned high resolution X ray spectroscopy missions. HTXS will mark the start of a new era when high quality X ray spectra will be obtained for all classes of X ray sources, over a wide range of luminosity and distance. With its increased capabilities, HTXS will address many fundamental astrophysics questions such as the origin and distribution of the elements from carbon to zinc, the formation and evolution of clusters of galaxies, the validity of general relativity in the strong gravity limit, the evolution of supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei, the details of supernova explosions and their aftermath, and the mechanisms involved in the heating of stellar coronae and driving of stellar winds.

  15. Experimental characterization of hohlraum conditions by X-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, C.A.; Hsieh, E.J.; Kauffman, R.L. [and others

    1996-06-01

    Spectroscopy is a powerful technique used to measure the plasma parameters relevant to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) plasmas. For instance, the onset of spectral signals from multilayer targets have been used to determine ablation rate scalings. Temperature and density measurements in coronal plasmas have enabled the study of laser coupling efficiency as a function of the laser wavelengths. More recently, dopants have been successfully used to determine capsule conditions of ICF targets. However, few spectroscopic studies have been performed to diagnose plasma conditions of the hohlraum itself. Several laboratories have studied enclosed cavities, previously concentrating on measurements of the radiative heat wave, the x-ray conversion efficiency, and temporal evolution of Au x rays. Measurements of electron temperature T{sub e} and electron densities n{sub e} are difficult because many physical processes occur and each diagnostic`s line-of-sight is restricted by the hohlraum wall. However, they are worth pursuing because they can provide critical information on the target energetics and the evolution of plasma parameters important to achieving fusion. Here the authors discuss spectroscopic tracers to diagnose plasma conditions in the hohlraum, using time- and space-resolved measurements. The tracers are typically mid-Z elements which are placed on the hohlraum wall or supended in the hohlraum volume. To demonstrate the breadth of measurements that can be performed, three types of experiments are presented.

  16. X-ray Emission Spectroscopy of Biomimetic Mn Coordination Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Scott C; Davis, Katherine M; Sullivan, Brendan; Hartzler, Daniel A; Seidler, Gerald T; Casa, Diego M; Kasman, Elina; Colmer, Hannah E; Massie, Allyssa A; Jackson, Timothy A; Pushkar, Yulia

    2017-06-15

    Understanding the function of Mn ions in biological and chemical redox catalysis requires precise knowledge of their electronic structure. X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) is an emerging technique with a growing application to biological and biomimetic systems. Here, we report an improved, cost-effective spectrometer used to analyze two biomimetic coordination compounds, [Mn(IV)(OH)2(Me2EBC)](2+) and [Mn(IV)(O)(OH)(Me2EBC)](+), the second of which contains a key Mn(IV)═O structural fragment. Despite having the same formal oxidation state (Mn(IV)) and tetradentate ligands, XES spectra from these two compounds demonstrate different electronic structures. Experimental measurements and DFT calculations yield different localized spin densities for the two complexes resulting from Mn(IV)-OH conversion to Mn(IV)═O. The relevance of the observed spectroscopic changes is discussed for applications in analyzing complex biological systems such as photosystem II. A model of the S3 intermediate state of photosystem II containing a Mn(IV)═O fragment is compared to recent time-resolved X-ray diffraction data of the same state.

  17. X-ray spectroscopy of chemical systems in liquids phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Zhong; Kubicek, Katharina [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Goettingen (Germany); Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Techert, Simone; Rajkovic, Ivan [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Goettingen (Germany); Foehlisch, Alexander [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin, Berlin (Germany); University of Potsdam (Germany); Wernet, Philippe; Quevedo, Wilson [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Based on their ability to salt in or salt out macromolecules salt ions are classified according to the Hofmeister series. While the macroscopic effect is known for over 100 years, the origin of the effect on the molecular level is still not understood. We present X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) on the oxygen K-edge of water in aqueous solutions of inorganic salts using BESSY II synchrotron (Berlin, Germany) X-rays. The FlexRIXS end station utilized a liquid micro jet for sample delivery. The element- and site-specific XES method contains information about occupied and unoccupied molecular orbitals and is therefore sensitive to the chemical environment. The aim of our measurements was to reveal the influence of the water-ion interactions on the local water structure further elucidating the understanding of the structure maker and structure breaker concept. Structural changes while utilizing different salts were expected to show as spectral changes in the oxygen K-edge spectra, e.g. of peak shapes or intensities.

  18. The Advanced X-ray Spectroscopy and Imaging Observatory (AXSIO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Nicholas E.; Bookbinder, Jay; Petre, Robert; Smith, Randall; Ptak, Andrew; Tananbaum, Harvey; Garcia, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Following recommendations from the 2010 "New Worlds, New Horizons" (NWNH) report, the Advanced X-ray Spectroscopy and Imaging Observatory (AXSIO) concept streamlines the International X-ray Observatory (IXO) mission to concentrate on the science objectives that are enabled by high-resolution spectroscopic capabilities. AXSIO will trace orbits close to the event horizon of black holes, measure black hole spin for tens of supermassive black holes (SMBH), use spectroscopy to characterize outflows and the environment of AGN during their peak activity, observe 5MBH out to redshift z=6, map bulk motions and turbulence in galaxy clusters, find the missing baryons in the cosmic web using background quasars, and observe the process of cosmic feedback where black holes and supernovae inject energy on galactic and intergalactic scales. These measurements are enabled by a 0.9 sq m collecting area at 1.25 keV, a micro calorimeter array providing high-resolution spectroscopic imaging and a deployable high efficiency grating spectrometer. AXSIO delivers a 30-fold increase in effective area for high resolution spectroscopy. The key simplifications are guided by recommendations in the NWNH panel report include a reduction in focal length from 20m to 10m, eliminating the extendable optical bench, and a reduction in the instrument complement from six to two, avoiding a movable instrument platform. A focus on spectroscopic science allows the spatial resolution requirement to be relaxed to 10 arc sec (with a 5 arc sec goal). These simplifications decrease the total mission cost to under the $2B cost to NASA recommended by NWNH. AXSIO will be available to the entire astronomical community with observing allocations based on peer-review.

  19. Quantum interference in laser-assisted photo-ionization excited by a femtosecond x-ray pulse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ge Yu-Cheng

    2008-01-01

    The photoelectron energy spectra (PESs) excited by monochromatic femtosecond x-ray pulses in the presence of a femtosecond laser are investigated. APES is composed of a set of separate peaks, showing interesting comb-like structures. These structures result from the quantum interferences between photoelectron wave packets generated at different times. The width and the localization of each peak as well as the number of peaks are determined by all the laser and x-ray parameters. Most of peak heights of the PES are higher than the classical predictions.

  20. X-Ray Spectroscopy of the Liquid Water Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saykally, Richard

    2004-03-01

    We have developed a new experiment for probing molecular details of liquid-vapor interfaces of volatile substances and their solutions under equilibrium conditions. Electronic and geometric structures of interfacial molecules are probed by EXAFS and NEXAFS methods in the soft X-ray region, using the Advanced Light Source, Berkeley, CA. Liquids are introduced into a high vacuum environment through the use of liquid microjets, which have been characterized independently by Raman spectroscopy. Detection of ions and electrons produced by the Auger avalanche probe the bulk and surface regions of the microjet, respectively, as a result of their different escape depths. Our first efforts involved a comparative study of the interfaces of water and methanol, wherein we detailed the first observation of surface relaxation for a liquid. Analysis of EXAFS data yielded a 6distance at the water interface, whereas a 5was found for methanol. NEXAFS measurements, interpreted in terms of density functional theory simulations, indicate a large population of interfacial water molecules having two free OH bonds ("acceptor only molecules"). This complements the "single donor" species identified in sum frequency generation experiments. These results are supported by recent theoretical calculations. For methanol and other simple alcohols, the data indicate that free alkyl groups extend into the vapor part of the interface. Preliminary results for aqueous solutions, as well as for other pure liquids, have been obtained and are presently under analysis. REFERENCES 1. K.R. Wilson, R.D. Schaller, B.S. Rude, T. Catalano, D.T. Co, J.D. Bozek, and R.J. Saykally, "Surface relaxation in liquid water and methanol studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy," J. Chem. Phys 117,7738(2002). 2. K.R. Wilson, M. Cavalleri, B.S. Rude, R.D. Schaller, A. Nilsson, L.G.M. Pettersson, N. Goldman, T. Catalano, J.D. Bozek, and R.J. Saykally, "Characterization of hydrogen bond acceptor molecules at the water surface

  1. Spatiotemporal stability of a femtosecond hard-x-ray undulator source studied by control of coherent optical phonons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaud, P; Johnson, S L; Streun, A; Abela, R; Abramsohn, D; Grolimund, D; Krasniqi, F; Schmidt, T; Schlott, V; Ingold, G

    2007-10-26

    We report on the temporal and spatial stability of the first tunable femtosecond undulator hard-x-ray source for ultrafast diffraction and absorption experiments. The 2.5-1 Angstrom output radiation is driven by an initial 50 fs laser pulse employing the laser-electron slicing technique. By using x-ray diffraction to probe laser-induced coherent optical phonons in bulk bismuth, we estimate an x-ray pulse duration of 140+/-30 fs FWHM with timing drifts below 30 fs rms measured over 5 days. Optical control of coherent lattice motion is demonstrated.

  2. heterojunction interface investigated by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lingyan; Yu, Jinling; Cheng, Shuying; Lu, Peimin; Lai, Yunfeng; Lin, Sile; Zhao, Pengyi

    2014-09-01

    The band alignment at the In2S3/Cu2ZnSnS4 heterojunction interface is investigated by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. In2S3 is thermally evaporated onto the contamination-free polycrystalline Cu2ZnSnS4 surface prepared by magnetron sputtering. The valence band offset is measured to be 0.46 ± 0.1 eV, which matches well with the valance band offset value 0.49 eV calculated using "transitivity" method. The conduction band offset is determined to be 0.82 ± 0.1 eV, indicating a `type I' band alignment at the heterojunction interface.

  3. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of FeP phosphide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teterin, Yu. A.; Sobolev, A. V., E-mail: salex12@rambler.ru, E-mail: alex@radio.chem.msu.ru; Presnyakov, I. A.; Maslakov, K. I. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Teterin, A. Yu. [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute,” (Russian Federation); Morozov, I. V.; Chernyavskii, I. O. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Ivanov, K. E. [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute,” (Russian Federation); Shevel’kov, A. V. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    The structure of the outer and inner electron spectra of iron (2p, 3p, 3s, and 3d) and phosphorus (3s and 3p) atoms in FeP monophosphide is studied in detail by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) method. On the basis of the analysis of the binding energy of electrons, as well as the parameters characterizing the structure of experimental spectra, a conclusion is made that Fe{sup 3+} (d{sup 5}) cations in FeP are stabilized in a state with intermediate value of the total spin (IS, S = 3/2). The range of values of intra-atomic parameters (10Dq, J{sub H}) is established in which the consideration of the high degree of covalence of Fe–P bonds may lead to the stabilization of (FeP{sub 6}){sup 15–} clusters in the IS state.

  4. Constraining the Kerr parameters via X-ray reflection spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ghasemi-Nodehi, M

    2016-01-01

    In a recent paper [Ghasemi-Nodehi & Bambi, EPJC 76 (2016) 290], we have proposed a new parametrization for testing the Kerr nature of astrophysical black hole candidates. In the present work, we study the possibility of constraining the "Kerr parameters" of our proposal using X-ray reflection spectroscopy, the so-called iron line method. We simulate observations with the LAD instrument on board of the future eXTP mission assuming an exposure time of 200 ks. We fit the simulated data to see if the Kerr parameters can be constrained. If we have the correct astrophysical model, 200 ks observations with LAD/eXTP can constrain all the Kerr parameters with the exception of $b_{11}$, whose impact on the iron line profile is extremely weak and its measurement looks very challenging.

  5. Metalloprotein active site structure determination: synergy between X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotelesage, Julien J H; Pushie, M Jake; Grochulski, Pawel; Pickering, Ingrid J; George, Graham N

    2012-10-01

    Structures of metalloprotein active sites derived from X-ray crystallography frequently contain chemical anomalies such as unexpected atomic geometries or elongated bond-lengths. Such anomalies are expected from the known errors inherent in macromolecular crystallography (ca. 0.1-0.2Å) and from the lack of appropriate restraints for metal sites which are often without precedent in the small molecule structure literature. Here we review the potential of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to provide information and perspective which could aid in improving the accuracy of metalloprotein crystal structure solutions. We also review the potential problem areas in analysis of the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and discuss the use of density functional theory as another possible source of geometrical restraints for crystal structure analysis of metalloprotein active sites.

  6. Taking X-ray Diffraction to the Limit: Macromolecular Structures from Femtosecond X-ray Pulses and Diffraction Microscopy of Cells with Synchrotron Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, H N; Miao, J; Kirz, J; Sayre, D; Hodgson, K O

    2003-10-01

    The methodology of X-ray crystallography has recently been successfully extended to the structure determination of non-crystalline specimens. The phase problem was solved by using the oversampling method, which takes advantage of ''continuous'' diffraction pattern from non-crystalline specimens. Here we review the principle of this newly developed technique and discuss the ongoing experiments of imaging non-periodic objects, like cells and cellular structures using coherent and bright X-rays from the 3rd generation synchrotron radiation. In the longer run, the technique may be applied to image single biomolecules by using the anticipated X-ray free electron lasers. Computer simulations have so far demonstrated two important steps: (1) by using an extremely intense femtosecond X-ray pulse, a diffraction pattern can be recorded from a macromolecule before radiation damage manifests itself, and (2) the phase information can be ab initio retrieved from a set of calculated noisy diffraction patterns of single protein molecules.

  7. Femtosecond X-ray Pulses From a frequency chirped SASE FEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Z

    2003-01-14

    We discuss the temporal and spectral properties of self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) utilizing an energy-chirped electron beam. A short temporal pulse is generated by using a monochromator to select a narrow radiation bandwidth from the frequency chirped SASE. For the filtered radiation, the minimum pulse length is limited by the intrinsic SASE bandwidth, while the number of modes and the energy fluctuation can be controlled through the monochromator bandwidth. Two cases are considered: (1) placing the monochromator at the end of a single long undulator; (2) placing the monochromator after an initial undulator and amplifying the short-duration output in a second undulator. We analyze these cases and show that tens of femtosecond x-ray pulses may be generated for the linac coherent light source.

  8. Interaction of femtosecond X-ray pulses with periodical multilayer structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ksenzov, Dmitry

    2010-07-01

    The VUV Free Electron Laser FLASH operates in soft X-ray range and produces high-intensive pulse trains with few tens femtoseconds duration. The transversely fully coherent beam will open new experiments in solid state physics which can not be studied with present radiation sources. The study of the time dependent response of the multilayer to the X-ray pulse can provide insights into the process of interaction of highly intense FEL radiation with matter. To test the influence of electron excitation on the optical properties of boron carbide, the refractive index of B{sub 4}C was measured near B K-edge by energy-resolved photon-in-photon-out method probing a Bragg reflection from periodical multilayers. The measured data clearly show that the variation of the fine structure of the Kabsorption edges due to the chemical nature of the absorber element. The knowledge obtained from experiments with continuous radiation was used to design the respective experiments with pulse from the FEL. In my thesis, it is proposed that the geometrical setup, where the incident pulse arrives from the FEL under the angle close to the 1st order ML Bragg peak, provides the most valuable information. Preliminary simulation considering form factors of neutral and ionized boron showed that due to ionization, pronounced changes in the reflectivity curve are expected. The proposed scheme can be the powerful tool to study the various processes within the electronic subsystem of the FEL pulse interaction with matter. This type of investigations gives a deep understanding of the nature of the electronic excitation and the recombination at the femtosecond scale. (orig.)

  9. Synchronizing femtosecond laser with x-ray synchrotron operating at arbitrarily different frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Wonhyuk [Department of Physics, Soongsil University, Seoul 156-743 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sooheyong, E-mail: sooheyong@gmail.com [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Eom, Intae, E-mail: neplus@postech.ac.kr [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Landahl, Eric C. [Department of Physics, DePaul University, Chicago, Illinois 60614 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    The ability to synchronize a femtosecond laser to x-ray pulses is crucial for performing ultrafast time-resolved x-ray scattering experiments at synchrotrons. Conventionally, the task has been achieved by locking a harmonic frequency of the laser oscillator to the storage ring master radio-frequency (RF). However, when the frequency mismatch between the two sources cannot be compensated by small adjustments to the laser cavity length, synchronization to a harmonic frequency requires modifying the optical components of the laser system. We demonstrate a novel synchronization scheme, which is a flexible alternative for synchronizing these two sources operating at arbitrarily different frequencies. First, we find the greatest common divisor (GCD) of the two frequencies that is still within the limited tuning range of the laser cavity length. The GCD is generated by dividing down from the storage ring RF, and is separately multiplied up to provide a feedback signal for synchronizing the laser cavity. Unique to our scheme, the GCD also serves as a harmonic RF source for the laser amplifier such that only laser oscillator pulses at fixed integer multiples of the storage ring RF are selected for amplification and delivery to experiments. Our method is implemented at the Photon Test Facility beamline of Pohang Light Source where timing-jitter less than 4 ps (r.m.s.) is measured using a new shot-to-shot method.

  10. Combined measurement of X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy and diffracted X-ray tracking using pink beam X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Yuya; Watanabe, Akira; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Amemiya, Yoshiyuki

    2013-09-01

    Combined X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) and diffracted X-ray tracking (DXT) measurements of carbon-black nanocrystals embedded in styrene-butadiene rubber were performed. From the intensity fluctuation of speckle patterns in a small-angle scattering region (XPCS), dynamical information relating to the translational motion can be obtained, and the rotational motion is observed through the changes in the positions of DXT diffraction spots. Graphitized carbon-black nanocrystals in unvulcanized styrene-butadiene rubber showed an apparent discrepancy between their translational and rotational motions; this result seems to support a stress-relaxation model for the origin of super-diffusive particle motion that is widely observed in nanocolloidal systems. Combined measurements using these two techniques will give new insights into nanoscopic dynamics, and will be useful as a microrheology technique.

  11. Composition variations in Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} thin films analyzed by X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, particle induced X-ray emission, photoluminescence, and Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Dahyun [Department of Physics, Sogang University, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Opanasyuk, A.S.; Koval, P.V.; Ponomarev, A.G. [Department of Electronics and Computer Technology, Sumy State University, Sumy UA-40007 (Ukraine); Jeong, Ah Reum; Kim, Gee Yeong; Jo, William [Department of Physics, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of); Cheong, Hyeonsik, E-mail: hcheong@sogang.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Sogang University, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    Compositional and structural studies of Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} (CZTSe) thin films were carried out by X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE), photoluminescence, and Raman spectroscopy. CZTSe thin films with different compositions were deposited on sodalime glass by co-evaporation. The composition of the films measured by two different methods, EDS and PIXE, showed significant differences. Generally, the Zn/Sn ratio measured by EDS is larger than that measured by PIXE. Both the micro-PIXE and the micro-Raman imaging results indicated the compositional and structural inhomogeneity of the sample. - Highlights: • Particle induced X-ray emission was used to analyze the composition of CZTSe films. • Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy tends to underestimate the Sn composition. • Local Raman intensity is related with the composition rather than the crystallinity.

  12. Measurements of transient electron density distributions by femtosecond X-ray diffraction; Messungen transienter Elektronendichteverteilungen durch Femtosekunden-Roentgenbeugung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freyer, Benjamin

    2013-05-02

    This thesis concerns measurements of transient charge density maps by femtosecond X-ray diffraction. Different X-ray diffraction methods will be considered, particularly with regard to their application in femtosecond X-ray diffraction. The rotation method is commonly used in stationary X-ray diffraction. In the work in hand an X-ray diffraction experiment is demonstrated, which combines the method with ultrafast X-ray pulses. This experiment is the first implementation which makes use of the rotation method to map transient intensities of a multitude of Bragg reflections. As a prototype material Bismuth is used, which previously was studied frequently by femtosecond X-ray diffraction by measuring Bragg reflections successively. The experimental results of the present work are compared with the literature data. In the second part a powder-diffraction experiment will be presented, which is used to study the dynamics of the electron-density distribution on ultrafast time scales. The experiment investigates a transition metal complex after photoexcitation of the metal to ligand charge transfer state. Besides expected results, i. e. the change of the bond length between the metal and the ligand and the transfer of electronic charge from the metal to the ligand, a strong contribution of the anion to the charge transfer was found. Furthermore, the charge transfer has predominantly a cooperative character. That is, the excitation of a single complex causes an alteration of the charge density of several neighboring units. The results show that more than 30 transition-metal complexes and 60 anions contribute to the charge transfer. This collective response is a consequence of the strong coulomb interactions of the densely packed ions.

  13. Multi-anode linear SDDs for high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Sonsky, J.

    2002-01-01

    Radiation detectors are used in a variety of fields to sense X-rays and y-rays, visible, UV and IR photons, neutrons or charged particles. With their help, advanced medical diagnostics can be performed (e.g. X-ray radiography, computed tomography, fluoroscopy), material research can undergo a rapid development (e.g. X-ray microanalysis, X-ray diffraction, Mauer spectroscopy and element imaging), space and its evolution (astronomy and astrophysics) can be explored through observation of X-rays...

  14. Electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma characterization by X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mascali, David, E-mail: davidmascali@lns.infn.it; Castro, Giuseppe; Celona, Luigi; Neri, Lorenzo; Gammino, Santo [INFN–Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); Biri, Sándor; Rácz, Richárd; Pálinkás, József [Institute for Nuclear Research (Atomki), Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Bem tér 18/c, H-4026 Debrecen (Hungary); Caliri, Claudia [INFN–Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Catania, Dip.to di Fisica e Astronomia, via Santa Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Romano, Francesco Paolo [INFN–Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); CNR, Istituto per i Beni Archeologici e Monumentali, Via Biblioteca 4, 95124 Catania (Italy); Torrisi, Giuseppe [INFN–Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); Università Mediterranea di Reggio Calabria, DIIES, Via Graziella, I-89100 Reggio Calabria (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    An experimental campaign aiming to investigate electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma X-ray emission has been recently carried out at the ECRISs—Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources laboratory of Atomki based on a collaboration between the Debrecen and Catania ECR teams. In a first series, the X-ray spectroscopy was performed through silicon drift detectors and high purity germanium detectors, characterizing the volumetric plasma emission. The on-purpose developed collimation system was suitable for direct plasma density evaluation, performed “on-line” during beam extraction and charge state distribution characterization. A campaign for correlating the plasma density and temperature with the output charge states and the beam intensity for different pumping wave frequencies, different magnetic field profiles, and single-gas/gas-mixing configurations was carried out. The results reveal a surprisingly very good agreement between warm-electron density fluctuations, output beam currents, and the calculated electromagnetic modal density of the plasma chamber. A charge-coupled device camera coupled to a small pin-hole allowing X-ray imaging was installed and numerous X-ray photos were taken in order to study the peculiarities of the ECRIS plasma structure.

  15. Insights into Photosystem II from Isomorphous Difference Fourier Maps of Femtosecond X-ray Diffraction Data and Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Structural Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jimin; Askerka, Mikhail; Brudvig, Gary W; Batista, Victor S

    2017-02-10

    Understanding structure-function relations in photosystem II (PSII) is important for the development of biomimetic photocatalytic systems. X-ray crystallography, computational modeling, and spectroscopy have played central roles in elucidating the structure and function of PSII. Recent breakthroughs in femtosecond X-ray crystallography offer the possibility of collecting diffraction data from the X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) before radiation damage of the sample, thereby overcoming the main challenge of conventional X-ray diffraction methods. However, the interpretation of XFEL data from PSII intermediates is challenging because of the issues regarding data-processing, uncertainty on the precise positions of light oxygen atoms next to heavy metal centers, and different kinetics of the S-state transition in microcrystals compared to solution. Here, we summarize recent advances and outstanding challenges in PSII structure-function determination with emphasis on the implementation of quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics techniques combined with isomorphous difference Fourier maps, direct methods, and high-resolution spectroscopy.

  16. Development of an X-ray delay unit for correlation spectroscopy and pump-probe experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roseker, Wojciech

    2008-07-15

    Probing condensed matter on time scales ranging from femtoseconds to nanoseconds will be one of the key topics for future X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) sources. The accessible time windows are, however, compromised by the intrinsic time structure of the sources. One way to overcome this limitation is the usage of a time delay unit. A prototype device capable of splitting an X-ray pulse into two adjustable fractions, delaying one of them with the aim to perform X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy and pump-probe type studies was designed and manufactured. The device utilizes eight perfect crystals in vertical 90 scattering geometry. Its performance has been verified with 8.39 keV and 12.4 keV Xrays at various synchrotron sources. The measured throughput of the device with a Si(333) monochromator at 8.39 keV under ambient conditions is 0.6%. The stability was verified at 12.4 keV and operation without realignment and feedback was possible for more than 30 minutes. Time delays up to 2.95 ns have been achieved. The highest resolution achieved in an experiment was 15.4 ps, a value entirely determined by the diagnostics system. The influence of the delay unit optics on the coherence properties of the beam was investigated by means of Fraunhofer diffraction and static speckle analysis. The obtained high fringe visibility and contrast values larger than 23% indicate the feasibility of performing coherence based experiments with the delay line. (orig.)

  17. Kr X-ray spectroscopy to diagnose NIF ICF implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, A.; Ouart, N.; Giuliani, J. L.; Clark, R. W.; Schneider, M. B.; Scott, H. A.; Chen, H.; Ma, T.; Apruzese, J. P.

    2016-10-01

    X ray spectroscopy is used on the NIF to diagnose the plasma conditions in the ignition target in indirect drive ICF implosions. High-energy emission spectra from mid to high atomic number elements can provide estimates of electron temperature near stagnation of an ICF implosion. A platform is being developed at NIF where small traces of krypton are used as a dopant to the fuel gas for spectroscopic diagnostics using krypton line emissions. The fraction of krypton dopant was varied in the experiments and was selected so as not to perturb the implosion. Simulations of the krypton spectra using a 1 in 104 atomic fraction of krypton in direct-drive exploding pusher with a range of electron temperatures and densities show discrepancies when different atomic models are used. We use our non-LTE atomic model with a detailed fine-structure level atomic structure and collisional-radiative rates to investigate the krypton spectra at the same conditions. Synthetic spectra are generated with a detailed multi-frequency radiation transport scheme from the emission regions of interest to analyze the experimental data and compare and contrast with the existing simulations at LLNL. Work supported by DOE/NNSA and under the auspices of DOE by LLNL under Contract # DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  18. Testing black holes via X-ray reflection spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bambi, Cosimo; Nampalliwar, Sourabh; Cardenas-Avendano, Alejandro

    2016-07-01

    Astrophysical black hole candidates are thought to be the Kerr black holes of general relativity. However, a direct observational evidence is still lacking. The study of the properties of the radiation emitted by gas in the inner part of the accretion disk can provide useful information on the spacetime geometry around these compact objects and test the Kerr black hole hypothesis. The iron line method is the most promising techniques to test black hole candidates. In this talk, we present a new reflection model for testing the Kerr black hole hypothesis. We use the formalism of the transfer function and we split the calculations into two blocks. One is the calculation of the transfer function, which takes into account all the relativistic effects and only depends on the background metric. The second block is the calculation of the intrinsic spectrum in the rest frame of the gas. We have developed a code to compute transfer functions in arbitrary stationary and axisymmetric spacetimes. The transfer functions are tabulated in FITS files and combined with XILLVER, which is the best reflection code available today. The result is best model to test black hole candidates via X-ray reflection spectroscopy.

  19. Development of Compton X-ray spectrometer for high energy resolution single-shot high-flux hard X-ray spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Sadaoki; Ikenouchi, Takahito; Arikawa, Yasunobu; Sakata, Shohei; Zhang, Zhe; Abe, Yuki; Nakai, Mitsuo; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Ozaki, Tetsuo; Miyamoto, Shuji; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Takemoto, Akinori; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    Hard X-ray spectroscopy is an essential diagnostics used to understand physical processes that take place in high energy density plasmas produced by intense laser-plasma interactions. A bundle of hard X-ray detectors, of which the responses have different energy thresholds, is used as a conventional single-shot spectrometer for high-flux (>10(13) photons/shot) hard X-rays. However, high energy resolution (Δhv/hv spectrometer because its energy resolution is limited by energy differences between the response thresholds. Experimental demonstration of a Compton X-ray spectrometer has already been performed for obtaining higher energy resolution than that of DET spectrometers. In this paper, we describe design details of the Compton X-ray spectrometer, especially dependence of energy resolution and absolute response on photon-electron converter design and its background reduction scheme, and also its application to the laser-plasma interaction experiment. The developed spectrometer was used for spectroscopy of bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by intense laser-plasma interactions using a 200 μm thickness SiO2 converter. The X-ray spectrum obtained with the Compton X-ray spectrometer is consistent with that obtained with a DET X-ray spectrometer, furthermore higher certainly of a spectral intensity is obtained with the Compton X-ray spectrometer than that with the DET X-ray spectrometer in the photon energy range above 5 MeV.

  20. X-ray spectroscopy in the EC nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Seung Kook; Cho, Hyun Jae; Nha, Sang Kyun

    1998-10-01

    The probabilities PKK of double K-shell vacancy production per K electron capture decay and per K internal conversion of 109Cd and 207Bi have been determined by means of the double- and triple-coincidence experiments using Kα X-ray and K internal conversion. For 109Cd we find PKK(EC) = (4.2 ± 0.5) × 10 -5 and PKK(IC) = (4.32 ± 0.46) × 10 -5, and for 207Bi, PKK(EC) = (2.54 ± 0.50) × 10 -5. The observed X-ray energy shifts of the hypersatellite Ag ( Kα1H) X-ray and the hypersatellite Pb ( Kα1H) X-ray lines are 545±15 eV and 1238±45 eV, respectively.

  1. X-ray photometry and spectroscopy of T Tauri stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, F. M.; Kuhi, L. V.

    1984-01-01

    Follow-up Einstein X-ray observations of four fields containing pre-main-sequence stars are presented. A search has been made for evidence of variability on time scales of hours and of 1 year. A large, slow flare in AS 205, and the X-ray disappearance of AA Tau are reported. Otherwise, T Tauri stars appear no more variable in X-rays than do active solar-like stars. An attempt has been made to determine spectral parameters for a number of the brighter sources. X-ray absorption column densities are consistent with those inferred from A(v), and T(x) of about 10-million K, in all cases. The importance of these observations for models of T Tauri stars and their coronae is considered.

  2. X-ray Spectroscopy of Cygnus X-3

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Choudhury; A. R. Rao

    2002-03-01

    We have analysed the X-ray spectra of the highly variable X-ray source Cygnus X-3 over a wide energy range from 5 keV to 150 keV using data selected from the RXTE archives. Separate analysis of the low and hard states show the presence of a hard powerlaw tail in both the states. Here we present the result of the wide band spectral study of the source.

  3. Multiple scattering approach to X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we present the state of the art of the theoretical background needed for analyzing X-ray absorption spectra in the whole energy range. The multiple-scattering (MS) theory is presented in detail with some applications on real systems. We also describe recent progress in performing geometrical fitting of the XANES (X-ray absorption near-edge structure) energy region and beyond using a full multiple-scattering approach.

  4. A split-beam probe-pump-probe scheme for femtosecond time resolved protein X-ray crystallography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasper J. van Thor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to exploit the femtosecond pulse duration of X-ray Free-Electron Lasers (XFEL operating in the hard X-ray regime for ultrafast time-resolved protein crystallography experiments, critical parameters that determine the crystallographic signal-to-noise (I/σI must be addressed. For single-crystal studies under low absorbed dose conditions, it has been shown that the intrinsic pulse intensity stability as well as mode structure and jitter of this structure, significantly affect the crystallographic signal-to-noise. Here, geometrical parameters are theoretically explored for a three-beam scheme: X-ray probe, optical pump, X-ray probe (or “probe-pump-probe” which will allow experimental determination of the photo-induced structure factor amplitude differences, ΔF, in a ratiometric manner, thereby internally referencing the intensity noise of the XFEL source. In addition to a non-collinear split-beam geometry which separates un-pumped and pumped diffraction patterns on an area detector, applying an additional convergence angle to both beams by focusing leads to integration over mosaic blocks in the case of well-ordered stationary protein crystals. Ray-tracing X-ray diffraction simulations are performed for an example using photoactive yellow protein crystals in order to explore the geometrical design parameters which would be needed. The specifications for an X-ray split and delay instrument that implements both an offset angle and focused beams are discussed, for implementation of a probe-pump-probe scheme at the European XFEL. We discuss possible extension of single crystal studies to serial femtosecond crystallography, particularly in view of the expected X-ray damage and ablation due to the first probe pulse.

  5. Femtosecond X-ray solution scattering reveals that bond formation mechanism of a gold trimer complex is independent of excitation wavelength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Hwan Kim

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The [Au(CN2−]3 trimer in water experiences a strong van der Waals interaction between the d10 gold atoms due to large relativistic effect and can serve as an excellent model system to study the bond formation process in real time. The trimer in the ground state (S0 exists as a bent structure without the covalent bond between the gold atoms, and upon the laser excitation, one electron in the antibonding orbital goes to the bonding orbital, thereby inducing the formation of a covalent bond between gold atoms. This process has been studied by various time-resolved techniques, and most of the interpretation on the structure and dynamics converge except that the structure of the first intermediate (S1 has been debated due to different interpretations between femtosecond optical spectroscopy and femtosecond X-ray solution scattering. Recently, the excitation wavelength of 267 nm employed in our previous scattering experiment was suggested as the culprit for misinterpretation. Here, we revisited this issue by performing femtosecond X-ray solution scattering with 310 nm excitation and compared the results with our previous study employing 267 nm excitation. The data show that a linear S1 structure is formed within 500 fs regardless of excitation wavelength and the structural dynamics observed at both excitation wavelengths are identical to each other within experimental errors.

  6. Hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: A few recent applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taguchi, M., E-mail: mtaguchi@spring8.or.jp [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Takata, Y.; Chainani, A. [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► We discuss recent applications of HAXPES carried out at BL29XU in SPring-8. ► We provide a brief description of the salient features of the instrument. ► The recoil effect of photoelectrons in core levels and valence band are discussed. ► We overview HAXPES studies of a series of 3d transition metal compounds. ► The extended cluster model for explaining well-screened feature is presented. -- Abstract: In this report, we discuss a few recent applications of hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) carried out at the RIKEN beamline BL29XU in SPring-8. We first provide a brief description of the salient features of the instrument in operation at BL29 XU in SPring-8. HAXPES studies on the recoil effect of photoelectrons in core levels and valence band states are presented. The experiments show remarkable consistency with theoretical results and indicate the role of phonon excitations in the recoil effect of photoelectrons. We then overview HAXPES applied to the study of a series of 3d transition metal (TM) compounds. The HAXPES experimental results often show an additional well-screened feature in bulk sensitive electronic structure of strongly correlated compounds compared to surface sensitive spectra. The extended cluster model developed by us for explaining this well-screened feature is validated for a series of TM compounds. These results show that HAXPES is a valuable tool for the study of doping and temperature dependent electronic structure of solids with tremendous potential for future activities.

  7. The chemical sensitivity of X-ray spectroscopy: high energy resolution XANES versus X-ray emission spectroscopy of substituted ferrocenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Andrew J; Bauer, Matthias; Jacob, Christoph R

    2013-06-07

    X-ray spectroscopy at the metal K-edge is an important tool for understanding catalytic processes and provides insight into the geometric and electronic structures of transition metal complexes. In particular, X-ray emission-based methods such as high-energy resolution fluorescence detection (HERFD), X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) and valence-to-core X-ray emission spectroscopy (V2C-XES) hold the promise of providing increased chemical sensitivity compared to conventional X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Here, we explore the ability of HERFD-XANES and V2C-XES spectroscopy to distinguish substitutions beyond the directly coordinated atoms for the example of ferrocene and selected ferrocene derivatives. The experimental spectra are assigned and interpreted through the use of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We find that while the pre-edge peaks in the HERFD-XANES spectra are affected by substituents at the cyclopentadienyl ring containing π-bonds [A. J. Atkins, Ch. R. Jacob and M. Bauer, Chem.-Eur. J., 2012, 18, 7021], the V2C-XES spectra are virtually unchanged. The pre-edge in HERFD-XANES probes the weak transition to unoccupied metal d-orbitals, while the V2C-XES spectra are determined by dipole-allowed transitions from occupied ligand orbitals to the 1s core hole. The latter turn out to be less sensitive to changes beyond the first coordination shell.

  8. Combining X-ray and neutron crystallography with spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    X-ray protein crystallography has, through the determination of the three-dimensional structures of enzymes and their complexes, been essential to the understanding of biological chemistry. However, as X-rays are scattered by electrons, the technique has difficulty locating the presence and position of H atoms (and cannot locate H+ ions), knowledge of which is often crucially important for the understanding of enzyme mechanism. Furthermore, X-ray irradiation, through photoelectronic effects, will perturb the redox state in the crystal. By using single-crystal spectrophotometry, reactions taking place in the crystal can be monitored, either to trap intermediates or follow photoreduction during X-ray data collection. By using neutron crystallography, the positions of H atoms can be located, as it is the nuclei rather than the electrons that scatter neutrons, and the scattering length is not determined by the atomic number. Combining the two techniques allows much greater insight into both reaction mechanism and X-ray-induced photoreduction. PMID:28177310

  9. Hard x-ray spectroscopy for proton flare prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Howard A.; Farnik, Frantisek; Kiplinger, Alan L.

    1998-11-01

    High energy interplanetary proton events can jeopardize vital military and civilian spacecraft by disrupting logical circuits and by actually damaging spacecraft electronic components. Studies of solar hard x-rays indicate that high-energy proton events observed near Earth are highly associated with an uncommon type of solar flare exhibiting temporal progressively hardening hard x-ray spectra. A hard x-ray spectrometer is being developed by the Czech Astronomical Institute to provide a test bed for evaluating this phenomenon as a possible proton-storm prediction method. The instrument is designed to measure hard x-ray spectra in a high fluence, high-energy particle background environment such as that found at geosynchronous altitude. This experiment has been selected for space flight by the DoD Space Test Program and will fly aboard the Department of Energy satellite, Multi-spectral thermal Imager, scheduled for a three year mission, beginning in late 1999. The timing of this mission, fortuitously, coincides with the experiment are: 1) to evaluate the efficacy of this type of solar instrument in predicting interplanetary proton storms; 2) to study the high-energy physics of solar flares in concert with the premier flight of the NOAA soft x-ray imaging telescope, SXI, on the GOES 12 weather satellite and other solar mission. If the first goal is demonstrated by this mission, continuous monitoring of the Sun for proton events could become operational from geo-synchronous orbit during solar cycle 24.

  10. Self-referenced coherent diffraction x-ray movie of Angstrom- and femtosecond-scale atomic motion

    CERN Document Server

    Glownia, J M; Cryan, J P; Hartsock, R; Kozina, M; Minitti, M P; Nelson, S; Robinson, J; Sato, T; van Driel, T; Welch, G; Weninger, C; Zhi, D; Bucksbaum, P H

    2016-01-01

    Time-resolved femtosecond x-ray diffraction patterns from laser-excited molecular iodine are used to create a movie of intramolecular motion with time and space resolution of $30~$fs and $0.3$ \\AA . The high spatial fidelity is due to interference between the moving excitation and the static initial charge distribution. This x-ray interference has not been employed to image internal motion in molecules before. The initial state is used as the local oscillator for heterodyne amplification of the excited charge distribution to retrieve real-space movies of atomic motion on \\AA ngstrom and femtosecond scales. Coherent vibrational motion and dispersion, dissociation, and rotational dephasing are all clearly visible in the data, thereby demonstrating the stunning sensitivity of heterodyne methods.

  11. X-ray spectroscopy of kaonic atoms at SIDDHARTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cargnelli M.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The X-ray measurements of kaonic atoms play an important role for understanding the low-energy QCD in the strangeness sector. The SIDDHARTA experiment studied the X-ray transitions of 4 light kaonic atoms (H, D, 3He, and 4He using the DAFNE electron-positron collider at LNF (Italy. Most precise values of the shift and width of the kaonic hydrogen 1s state were determined, which have been now used as fundamental information for the low-energy K−p interaction in theoretical studies. An upper limit of the X-ray yield of kaonic deuterium was derived, important for future K−d experiments. The shifts and widths of the kaonic 3He and 4He 2p states were obtained, confirming the end of the “kaonic helium puzzle”. In this contribution also the plans for new experiments of kaonic deuterium are being presented.

  12. Evaluating Superconducting YBCO Film Properties Using X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    AFRL-RZ-WP-TP-2012-0093 EVALUATING SUPERCONDUCTING YBCO FILM PROPERTIES USING X-RAY PHOTOELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY (POSTPRINT) Paul N. Barnes...2012 Conference Paper Postprint 01 January 2002 – 01 January 2004 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE EVALUATING SUPERCONDUCTING YBCO FILM PROPERTIES USING X-RAY

  13. Enrichment study of hot intra-cluster gas through X-ray spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plaa, J. de

    2007-01-01

    Enrichment study of hot intra-cluster gas through X-ray spectroscopy Clouds of hot X-ray emitting gas associated with clusters of galaxies are the biggest aggregates of baryons that we know, except for the cosmic web. A typical cloud contains the nuclear-fusion products of billions of supernovae. Th

  14. White Dwarf Mass Estimation with X-ray Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, T.

    2017-03-01

    I present X-ray spectral modeling of intermediate polars (IPs) and its application to Suzaku satellite data. The intrinsic thermal X-rays are modeled by integrating the plasma emissions of various temperatures in the post-shock accretion column (PSAC). The physical quantity distributions for the thermal spectral model is calculated from quasi-one-dimensional hydrodynamics. The PSAC calculation includes especially the dipolar geometry and variation of the specific accretion rate. The X-ray reflection from the white dwarf (WD) is modeled by a Monte Carlo simulation. In this simulation, the PSAC irradiates a cool, neutral and spherical WD with the various thermal spectra from the corresponding positions in the PSAC according to the thermal spectral model. The coherent and incoherent scattering, the photoelectric absorption, and Kα and Kβ re-emission of iron and nickel are taken into account for the photons arriving at the WD. The constructed X-ray spectral model is applied to EX Hya and V1223 Sgr, finding 0.65+0.11 –0.12 M⊙ and 0.91+0.08–0.03 M⊙, respectively. Their specific accretion rates are estimated at 0.069+0.33–0.045 g cm–2 s-1 and > 2 g cm–2 s-1, respectively, while the reflecting angles are 78.0–1.6+1.4 deg and 66.2+2.5–2.3 deg, respectively.

  15. X-ray Spectroscopy of Dips of Cir X-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    We present X-ray spectral analyses of the low-mass X-ray binary Cir X-1 during X-ray dips, using the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) data. Each dip was divided into several segments, and the spectrum of each segment was fitted with a three-component blackbody model, in which the first two components are affected by partial covering and the third one is unaffected. A Gaussian emission line is also included in the spectral model to represent the Fe Kα line at ~ 6.4 keV. The fitted temperatures of the two partially covered components are about 2keV and 1 keV, while the uncovered component has a temperature of ~0.5-0.6keV. The equivalent blackbody emission radius of the hottest component is the smallest and that of the coolest component is the largest. During the dips the fluxes of the two hot components are linearly correlated, while that of the third component does not show any significant variation. The Fe line flux remains constant, within the errors, during the short dips. However, during the long dips the line flux varies significantly and is positively correlated with the fluxes of the two hot components. These results suggest: (1) that the temperature of the X-ray emitting region decreases with radius, (2) that the Fe Kα line emitting region is close to the hot continuum emitting region, and (3) that the size of the Fe line emitting region is larger than that of the obscuring matter causing the short dips but smaller than the region of that causing the long dips.

  16. Soft X-ray induced damage in PVA-based membranes in water environment monitored by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzvetkov, George; Späth, Andreas; Fink, Rainer H.

    2014-10-01

    The effect of synchrotron X-ray flux in a soft X-ray scanning-transmission microspectroscope (STXM) instrument on the chemical structure of air-filled poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) based microbubbles and their stabilizing shell has been examined. Prolonged soft X-ray illumination of the particles in aqueous suspension leads to the breaking of the microbubbles' protective polymer shell and substantial chemical changes. The latter were clarified via a micro-spot C K-edge near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy with further respect to the absorbed X-ray doses. Our results revealed a continuous degradation of the PVA network associated with formation of carbonyl- and carboxyl-containing species as well as an increased content of unsaturated bonds. The observed effects must be taken into account in studies of micro- and nanostructured polymer materials utilizing X-rays.

  17. Pushing the Boundaries of Suborbital Soft X-ray Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEntaffer, Randall

    There are two primary objectives for this investigation. First, we propose to launch a preexisting payload to perform scientific investigations. Second, we propose to build a new payload which will integrate and demonstrate key technologies vital to future X-ray observatories. These efforts will train graduate students and prepare junior researchers to be major contributors to the next suite of NASA missions. We propose to increase the ability of gratings to obtain high resolution at energies below 1 keV. The concept that will be developed in this proposed investigation will be capable of meeting the requirements of future X-ray observatories. In addition, the design could be utilized effectively on smaller, Explorer class missions as pathfinders to the larger observatories while providing important scientific insights along the way. For this investigation, we propose to fly two separate, but related, rocket payloads. The first payload, christened OGRESS, has already been constructed and successfully flown three times. OGRESS is optimized to observe diffuse X-ray sources with a wire-grid collimating optic, parallel groove sinusoidal gratings, and Gaseous Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors and is capable of attaining high resolution of E/dE ~ 25-80 in the 1/4 keV band. OGRESS will take high resolution spectra of the Vela Supernova Remnant (SNR) in the 1/4 keV band. This flight will provide the highest resolution spectra yet taken of Vela in this band and will produce a PhD thesis. The second payload, OGRE, will demonstrate key technologies necessary for the next X-ray observatory and provide even higher resolution of E/dE ~ 1000-2000 between 0.2 1.0 keV. To improve upon the resolution of OGRESS, OGRE will integrate several key technologies which have already been developed in a laboratory setting, but have not been flight proven. OGRE will use a modified Wolter telescope made from slumped glass to provide a smaller focus and increase throughput. Slumped glass

  18. X-ray analysis of mechanical and thermal effects induced by femtosecond laser treatment of aluminum single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valette, S. [Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et Instrumentation, Universite Jean Monnet, UMR CNRS 5516, 10 rue Barrouin 42000 Saint-Etienne (France)]. E-mail: stephane.valette@ec-lyon.fr; Le Harzic, R. [Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et Instrumentation, Universite Jean Monnet, UMR CNRS 5516, 10 rue Barrouin 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Audouard, E. [Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et Instrumentation, Universite Jean Monnet, UMR CNRS 5516, 10 rue Barrouin 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Huot, N. [Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et Instrumentation, Universite Jean Monnet, UMR CNRS 5516, 10 rue Barrouin 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Fillit, R. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne, 158 Cours Fauriel, 42023 Saint-Etienne Cedex 2 (France); Fortunier, R. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne, 158 Cours Fauriel, 42023 Saint-Etienne Cedex 2 (France)

    2006-04-30

    Surface marking of aluminum single crystal is performed with femtosecond laser pulses. X-ray analysis allows to measure thermal and mechanical effects induced by the femtosecond laser pulses. These effects are estimated by comparing the pole figures (crystallinity) and the broadening of the diffraction peaks (mechanical contribution) before and after the laser irradiation. The results show that the femtosecond laser treatment ensures a re-crystallization of the structure and the presence of mechanical residual stresses. The analysis of the pole figures provides the sign of a re-crystallization on smaller volumes compared to initial ones. After the laser irradiation, the crystallization is perfectly oriented like the (1 1 0) orientation of the massive sample. Moreover, following the laser treatment, we show that the crystallographic structure is purer than the initial one. We also prove that the laser effect is persistent on a typical scale of 10 {mu}m beyond the surface.

  19. X-ray absorption and X-ray emission spectroscopy theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lamberti, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    During the last two decades, remarkable and often spectacular progress has been made in the methodological and instrumental aspects of x–ray absorption and emission spectroscopy. This progress includes considerable technological improvements in the design and production of detectors especially with the development and expansion of large-scale synchrotron reactors All this has resulted in improved analytical performance and new applications, as well as in the perspective of a dramatic enhancement in the potential of x–ray based analysis techniques for the near future. This comprehensive two-volume treatise features articles that explain the phenomena and describe examples of X–ray absorption and emission applications in several fields, including chemistry, biochemistry, catalysis, amorphous and liquid systems, synchrotron radiation, and surface phenomena. Contributors explain the underlying theory, how to set up X–ray absorption experiments, and how to analyze the details of the resulting spectra. X-R...

  20. Ligand-field symmetry effects in Fe(ii) polypyridyl compounds probed by transient X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Hana; Strader, Matthew L.; Hong, Kiryong; Jamula, Lindsey; Gullikson, Eric M.; Kim, Tae Kyu; de Groot, Frank M. F.; McCusker, James K.; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Huse, Nils

    2012-01-01

    Ultrafast excited-state evolution in polypyridyl FeII complexes are of fundamental interest for understanding the origins of the sub-ps spin-state changes that occur upon photoexcitation of this class of compounds as well as for the potential impact such ultrafast dynamics have on incorporation of these compounds in solar energy conversion schemes or switchable optical storage technologies. We have demonstrated that ground-state and, more importantly, ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption methods can offer unique insights into the interplay between electronic and geometric structure that underpin the photo-induced dynamics of this class of compounds. The present contribution examines in greater detail how the symmetry of the ligand field surrounding the metal ion can be probed using these x-ray techniques. In particular, we show that steady-state K-edge spectroscopy of the nearest-neighbour nitrogen atoms reveals the characteristic chemical environment of the respective ligands and suggests an interesting target for future charge-transfer femtosecond and attosecond spectroscopy in the x-ray water window.

  1. High Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy with a Microcalorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norrell, J.; Anderson, I.

    2005-01-01

    Energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS) is often the preferred choice for X-ray microanalysis, but there are still many disadvantages associated with EDS, the most significant of which is the relatively poor energy resolution, which limits detection sensitivity and the ability to distinguish among closely spaced spectral features, limiting even qualitative analysis. A new type of EDS detector that operates on the principle of microcalorimetry has the potential to eliminate this shortcoming, reaching resolutions an order of magnitude better. The detector consists of an absorber in thermal contact with a transition edge sensor (TES). An X-ray from the specimen hits the absorber and manifests itself as a change in temperature. Because the system is kept at 80 mK, the heat capacity is low and the temperature spike is observable. The TES responds to the increase in temperature by transitioning from its superconducting to its normal conducting state, thus sharply raising the overall resistance of the circuit. The circuit is kept at a constant voltage, so the increase in resistance is manifested as a decrease in current flow. This decrease in current is measured by a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), and by integrating the current over time, the energy of the incident X-ray is determined. The prototype microcalorimeter was developed by NIST, and this technology is now available commercially through a partnership between Vericold Technologies and EDAX International. ORNL has received the first of these commercial microcalorimeters in the United States. The absorber in this detector is gold, and the TES consists of a gold-iridium bilayer. It is designed to offer spectral resolution of 10-15 eV at a count rate of ~150 s-1. The goal of this project was to analyze and document the performance of the detector, with particular attention given to the effects of an X-ray optic used to improve collection efficiency, the multiple window system and any other sources

  2. The role of X-ray spectroscopy in understanding the geometric and electronic structure of nitrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalska, Joanna; DeBeer, Serena

    2015-06-01

    X-ray absorption (XAS) and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) provide element specific probes of the geometric and electronic structures of metalloprotein active sites. As such, these methods have played an integral role in nitrogenase research beginning with the first EXAFS studies on nitrogenase in the late 1970s. Herein, we briefly explain the information that can be extracted from XAS and XES. We then highlight the recent applications of these methods in nitrogenase research. The influence of X-ray spectroscopy on our current understanding of the atomic structure and electronic structure of iron molybdenum cofactor (FeMoco) is emphasized. Contributions of X-ray spectroscopy to understanding substrate interactions and cluster biosynthesis are also discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Fe/S proteins: Analysis, structure, function, biogenesis and diseases.

  3. Hard X-ray Spectroscopy of Obscured AGN with NuSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balokovic, Mislav; Harrison, Fiona; NuSTAR Extragalactic Surveys Team

    2017-01-01

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) has enabled studies of the local active galactic nuclei (AGN) to extend into the hard X-ray band, up to 79 keV, with unprecedented spatial resolution and sensitivity. As a part of its extragalactic program, NuSTAR is surveying the nearby population of AGN detected at hard X-ray energies by the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (Swift/BAT), selecting even the most obscured local AGN. I will highlight some of the results based on broadband X-ray spectroscopy of individual targets and present my work on the large representative sample of more than a hundred nearby obscured AGN, which constitutes the largest available atlas of hard X-ray spectra of obscured AGN to date. The high quality of the data allows us to probe the details of AGN structures such as the X-ray-emitting corona and the toroidal obscurer in the under-explored spectral window above 10 keV. I will present both phenomenological results important for synthesis models of the cosmic X-ray background, and a novel approach for constraining the geometry of the gas surrounding the supermassive black hole (including the accretion disk, the broad-line region, and the torus) from the hard X-ray band. Finally, I will discuss how what we learned from this survey of local AGN relates to deeper high-redshift X-ray surveys and AGN structure probes at other wavelengths.

  4. X-ray polarization spectroscopy from ultra-intense interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booth, N; Pasley, J; Wagenaars, E; Waugh, J N; Woolsey, N C [Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York, YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Clarke, R; Gallegos, P; Rajeev, P P [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, OX11 0QN (United Kingdom); Gizzi, L; Koester, P; Labate, L; Levato, T [ILIL-IPCF, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Gregori, G; Li, B [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, OX4 1PJ (United Kingdom); Makita, M; Riley, D, E-mail: nb505@york.ac.u [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Queens University Belfast, Belfast, BT1 4NN (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-01

    Detailed knowledge of fast electron energy transport following the interaction of ultrashort intense laser pulses is a key subject for fast ignition. This is a problem relevant to many areas of laser-plasma physics with particular importance to fast ignition and X-ray secondary source development, necessary for the development of large-scale facilities such as HiPER and ELI. Operating two orthogonal crystal spectrometers set at Bragg angles close to 45{sup 0} determines the X-ray s- and p- polarization ratio. From this ratio, it is possible to infer the velocity distribution function of the fast electron beam within the dense plasma. We report on results of polarization measurements at high density for sulphur and nickel buried layer targets in the high intensity range of 10{sup 19} - 10{sup 21} Wcm{sup -2}. We observe at 45{sup 0} the Ly-{alpha} doublet using two sets of orthogonal highly-orientated pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) crystals set in 1st order for sulphur and 3rd order for nickel.

  5. ISM composition through X-ray spectroscopy of LMXBs

    CERN Document Server

    Pinto, C; Costantini, E; de Vries, C

    2013-01-01

    The diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) is an integral part of the evolution of the entire Galaxy. Metals are produced by stars and their abundances are the direct testimony of the history of stellar evolution. However, the interstellar dust composition is not well known and the total abundances are yet to be accurately determined. We probe ISM dust composition, total abundances, and abundance gradients through the study of interstellar absorption features in the high-resolution X-ray spectra of Galactic low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). We use high-quality grating spectra of nine LMXBs taken with XMM-Newton. We measure the column densities of O, Ne, Mg, and Fe with an empirical model and estimate the Galactic abundance gradients. The column densities of the neutral gas species are in agreement with those found in the literature. Solids are a significant reservoir of metals like oxygen and iron. Respectively, 15-25 % and 65-90 % of the total amount of O I and Fe I is found in dust. The dust amount and mixture se...

  6. Soft X-ray spectroscopy of nanoparticles by velocity map imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostko, O.; Xu, B.; Jacobs, M. I.; Ahmed, M.

    2017-07-01

    Velocity map imaging (VMI), a technique traditionally used to study chemical dynamics in the gas phase, is applied here to study X-ray photoemission from aerosol nanoparticles. Soft X-rays from the Advanced Light Source synchrotron, probe a beam of nanoparticles, and the resulting photoelectrons are velocity mapped to obtain their kinetic energy distributions. A new design of the VMI spectrometer is described. The spectrometer is benchmarked by measuring vacuum ultraviolet photoemission from gas phase xenon and squalene nanoparticles followed by measurements using soft X-rays. It is demonstrated that the photoelectron distribution from X-ray irradiated squalene nanoparticles is dominated by secondary electrons. By scanning the photon energies and measuring the intensities of these secondary electrons, a near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectrum is obtained. The NEXAFS technique is used to obtain spectra of aqueous nanoparticles at the oxygen K edge. By varying the position of the aqueous nanoparticle beam relative to the incident X-ray beam, evidence is presented such that the VMI technique allows for NEXAFS spectroscopy of water in different physical states. Finally, we discuss the possibility of applying VMI methods to probe liquids and solids via X-ray spectroscopy.

  7. Quantitative investigation of two metallohydrolases by X-ray absorption spectroscopy near-edge spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, W. [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); Chu, W.S.; Yang, F.F.; Yu, M.J.; Chen, D.L.; Guo, X.Y. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhou, D.W.; Shi, N. [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); Marcelli, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, P.O. Box 13, Frascati 00044 (Italy); Niu, L.W.; Teng, M.K. [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); Gong, W.M. [Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Benfatto, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, P.O. Box 13, Frascati 00044 (Italy); Wu, Z.Y. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, P.O. Box 13, Frascati 00044 (Italy)], E-mail: wuzy@ihep.ac.cn

    2007-09-21

    The last several years have witnessed a tremendous increase in biological applications using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (BioXAS), thanks to continuous advancements in synchrotron radiation (SR) sources and detector technology. However, XAS applications in many biological systems have been limited by the intrinsic limitations of the Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) technique e.g., the lack of sensitivity to bond angles. As a consequence, the application of the X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy changed this scenario that is now continuously changing with the introduction of the first quantitative XANES packages such as Minut XANES (MXAN). Here we present and discuss the XANES code MXAN, a novel XANES-fitting package that allows a quantitative analysis of experimental data applied to Zn K-edge spectra of two metalloproteins: Leptospira interrogans Peptide deformylase (LiPDF) and acutolysin-C, a representative of snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs) from Agkistrodon acutus venom. The analysis on these two metallohydrolases reveals that proteolytic activities are correlated to subtle conformation changes around the zinc ion. In particular, this quantitative study clarifies the occurrence of the LiPDF catalytic mechanism via a two-water-molecules model, whereas in the acutolysin-C we have observed a different proteolytic activity correlated to structural changes around the zinc ion induced by pH variations.

  8. Quantitative investigation of two metallohydrolases by X-ray absorption spectroscopy near-edge spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, W.; Chu, W. S.; Yang, F. F.; Yu, M. J.; Chen, D. L.; Guo, X. Y.; Zhou, D. W.; Shi, N.; Marcelli, A.; Niu, L. W.; Teng, M. K.; Gong, W. M.; Benfatto, M.; Wu, Z. Y.

    2007-09-01

    The last several years have witnessed a tremendous increase in biological applications using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (BioXAS), thanks to continuous advancements in synchrotron radiation (SR) sources and detector technology. However, XAS applications in many biological systems have been limited by the intrinsic limitations of the Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) technique e.g., the lack of sensitivity to bond angles. As a consequence, the application of the X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy changed this scenario that is now continuously changing with the introduction of the first quantitative XANES packages such as Minut XANES (MXAN). Here we present and discuss the XANES code MXAN, a novel XANES-fitting package that allows a quantitative analysis of experimental data applied to Zn K-edge spectra of two metalloproteins: Leptospira interrogans Peptide deformylase ( LiPDF) and acutolysin-C, a representative of snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs) from Agkistrodon acutus venom. The analysis on these two metallohydrolases reveals that proteolytic activities are correlated to subtle conformation changes around the zinc ion. In particular, this quantitative study clarifies the occurrence of the LiPDF catalytic mechanism via a two-water-molecules model, whereas in the acutolysin-C we have observed a different proteolytic activity correlated to structural changes around the zinc ion induced by pH variations.

  9. First results from the high-brightness x-ray spectroscopy beamline at ALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perera, R.C.C.; Ng, W.; Jones, G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Beamline 9.3.1 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a windowless beamline, covering the 1-6 keV photon-energy range, designed to achieve the goal of high brightness at the sample for use in the X-ray Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy (XAMS) science, surface and interface science, biology and x-ray optical development programs at ALS. X-ray absorption and time of flight photo emission measurements in 2 - 5 keV photon energy in argon along with the flux, resolution, spot size and stability of the beamline will be discussed. Prospects for future XAMS measurements will also be presented.

  10. The O2-Evolving Complex of Photosystem II: Recent Insights from Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM), Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS), and Femtosecond X-ray Crystallography Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askerka, Mikhail; Brudvig, Gary W; Batista, Victor S

    2017-01-17

    structure are still not consistent with high-resolution EXAFS spectroscopy, partially due to the poorly resolved oxygen positions next to Mn centers and partial reduction due to extended dark adaptation of the sample. These inconsistencies led to the new models of the OEC with an alternative low oxidation state and raised questions on the protonation state of the cluster, especially the O5 μ-oxo bridge. This Account summarizes the most recent models of the OEC that emerged from QM/MM, EXAFS and femtosecond X-ray crystallography methods. When PSII in the S1 state is exposed to light, the S1 state is advanced to the higher oxidation states and eventually binds substrate water molecules. Identifying the substrate waters is of paramount importance for establishing the water-oxidation mechanism but is complicated by a large number of spectroscopically similar waters. Water analogues can, therefore, be helpful because they serve as spectroscopic markers that help to track the motion of the substrate waters. Due to a close structural and electronic similarity to water, ammonia has been of particular interest. We review three competing hypotheses on substrate water/ammonia binding and compile theoretical and experimental evidence to support them. Binding of ammonia as a sixth ligand to Mn4 during the S1 → S2 transition seems to satisfy most of the criteria, especially the most compelling recent EPR data on D1-D61A mutated PSII. Such a binding mode suggests delivery of water from the "narrow" channel through a "carousel" rearrangement of waters around Mn4 upon the S2 → S3 transition. An alternative hypothesis suggests water delivery through the "large" channel on the Ca side. However, both water delivery paths lead to a similar S3 structure, seemingly reaching consensus on the nature of the last detectable S-state intermediate in the Kok cycle before O2 evolution.

  11. Advanced experimental applications for x-ray transmission gratings Spectroscopy using a novel grating fabrication method

    CERN Document Server

    Hurvitz, G; Strum, G; Shpilman, Z; Levy, I; Fraenkel, M

    2012-01-01

    A novel fabrication method for soft x-ray transmission grating and other optical elements is presented. The method uses Focused-Ion-Beam (FIB) technology to fabricate high-quality free standing grating bars on Transmission Electron Microscopy grids (TEM-grid). High quality transmission gratings are obtained with superb accuracy and versatility. Using these gratings and back-illuminated CCD camera, absolutely calibrated x-ray spectra can be acquired for soft x-ray source diagnostics in the 100-3000 eV spectral range. Double grating combinations of identical or different parameters are easily fabricated, allowing advanced one-shot application of transmission grating spectroscopy. These applications include spectroscopy with different spectral resolutions, bandwidths, dynamic ranges, and may serve for identification of high-order contribution, and spectral calibrations of various x-ray optical elements.

  12. Capturing molecular structural dynamics by 100 ps time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Tokushi [Department of Materials Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-H61 Ohokayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Non-Equilibrium Dynamics Project, ERATO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Nozawa, Shunsuke; Ichiyanagi, Kohei [Non-Equilibrium Dynamics Project, ERATO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Tomita, Ayana [Department of Materials Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-H61 Ohokayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Non-Equilibrium Dynamics Project, ERATO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Chollet, Matthieu [Department of Materials Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-H61 Ohokayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Ichikawa, Hirohiko [Non-Equilibrium Dynamics Project, ERATO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Fujii, Hiroshi [Institute for Molecular Science and Okazaki Institute for Integrative Bioscience, Myodaiji, Okazaki 444-8787 (Japan); Adachi, Shin-ichi [Non-Equilibrium Dynamics Project, ERATO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Koshihara, Shin-ya, E-mail: skoshi@cms.titech.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-H61 Ohokayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Non-Equilibrium Dynamics Project, ERATO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Frontier Research Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ohokayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan)

    2009-01-01

    An experimental set-up for time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy with 100 ps time resolution at beamline NW14A at the Photon Factory Advanced Ring is presented. An experimental set-up for time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy with 100 ps time resolution at beamline NW14A at the Photon Factory Advanced Ring is presented. The X-ray positional active feedback to crystals in a monochromator combined with a figure-of-merit scan of the laser beam position has been utilized as an essential tool to stabilize the spatial overlap of the X-ray and laser beams at the sample position. As a typical example, a time-resolved XAFS measurement of a photo-induced spin crossover reaction of the tris(1,10-phenanthrorine)iron(II) complex in water is presented.

  13. A time-correlation function approach to nuclear dynamical effects in X-ray spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Karsten, Sven; Aziz, Saadullah G; Ivanov, Sergei D; Kühn, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Modern X-ray spectroscopy has proven itself as a robust tool for probing the electronic structure of atoms in complex environments. Despite working on energy scales that are much larger than those corresponding to nuclear motions, taking nuclear dynamics and the associated nuclear correlations into account may be of importance for X-ray spectroscopy. Recently, we have developed an efficient protocol to account for nuclear dynamics in X-ray absorption and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectra [Karsten \\textit{et al.} arXiv:1608.03436], based on ground state molecular dynamics accompanied with state-of-the-art calculations of electronic excitation energies and transition dipoles. Here, we present an alternative derivation of the formalism and elaborate on the developed simulation protocol on the examples of gas phase and bulk water. The specific spectroscopic features stemming from the nuclear motions are analyzed and traced down to the dynamics of electronic energy gaps and transition dipole correlation ...

  14. Multidimensional resonant nonlinear spectroscopy with coherent broadband x-ray pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Kochise; Zhang, Yu; Kowalewski, Markus; Hua, Weijie; Mukamel, Shaul

    2016-12-01

    New x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) and high harmonic generation (HHG) light sources are capable of generating short and intense pulses that make x-ray nonlinear spectroscopy possible. Multidimensional spectroscopic techniques, which have long been used in the nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared, and optical regimes to probe the electronic structure and nuclear dynamics of molecules by sequences of short pulses with variable delays, can thus be extended to the attosecond x-ray regime. This opens up the possibility of probing core-electronic structure and couplings, the real-time tracking of impulsively created valence-electronic wavepackets and electronic coherences, and monitoring ultrafast processes such as nonadiabatic electron-nuclear dynamics near conical-intersection crossings. We survey various possible types of multidimensional x-ray spectroscopy techniques and demonstrate the novel information they can provide about molecules.

  15. Note: application of a pixel-array area detector to simultaneous single crystal X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Cheng-Jun; Zhang, Bangmin; Brewe, Dale L; Chen, Jing-Sheng; Chow, G M; Venkatesan, T; Heald, Steve M

    2014-04-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) are two main x-ray techniques in synchrotron radiation facilities. In this Note, we present an experimental setup capable of performing simultaneous XRD and XAS measurements by the application of a pixel-array area detector. For XRD, the momentum transfer in specular diffraction was measured by scanning the X-ray energy with fixed incoming and outgoing x-ray angles. By selecting a small fixed region of the detector to collect the XRD signal, the rest of the area was available for collecting the x-ray fluorescence for XAS measurements. The simultaneous measurement of XRD and X-ray absorption near edge structure for Pr0.67Sr0.33MnO3 film was demonstrated as a proof of principle for future time-resolved pump-probe measurements. A static sample makes it easy to maintain an accurate overlap of the X-ray spot and laser pump beam.

  16. X-ray spectroscopy around the pile-up region

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Gaurav; Kumar, Basu; Puri, Nitin Kumar; Nandi, Tapan

    2015-01-01

    We report a pile-up rejection technique based on X-ray absorption concept of Beer-Lambert law for measuring true events in the pile-up region. We have detected a four orders times weaker peak in the pile-up region. This technique also enables one to resolve the weak peaks adjacent to an intense peak provided the latter lies in the lower energy side, and the peaks are at least theoretically resolvable by the detector used. We have resolved such peaks by reducing the intensity ratios in our experiment. The technique allows us to obtain the actual intensities of the observed peaks to have been measured without any attenuator. The possible applications of this technique can be to study the physics of two electron one-photon transition as well as the properties of projectile-like or target-like ions.

  17. Arcus: An X-ray Grating Spectroscopy Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Randall K.; Arcus Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    We present the design and scientific motivation for Arcus, an X-ray grating spectrometer mission to be proposed to NASA as a MIDEX in 2016. This mission will observe structure formation at and beyond the edges of clusters and galaxies, feedback from supermassive black holes, the structure of the interstellar medium and the formation and evolution of stars. Key mission design parameters are R~3000 and >700 cm^2 of effective area at the crucial O VII and O VIII lines, with the full bandpass going from ~10-50Å. Arcus will use the silicon pore optics proposed for ESA's Athena mission, paired with off-plane gratings being developed at the University of Iowa and combined with MIT/Lincoln Labs CCDs.

  18. Crystal optics for hard-X-ray spectroscopy of highly charged ions

    OpenAIRE

    Beyer, H. F.; Attia, D.; Banas, D; Bigot, E. -O. Le; Bosch, F.; Dousse, Jean-Claude; Förster, E.; Gumberidze, A.; Hagmann, S.; Heß, S.; J. Hoszowska; Indelicato, P.; Jagodzinski, P.; Kozhuharov, Chr.; Krings, Th.

    2009-01-01

    A twin crystal-spectrometer assembly, operated in the focusing compensated asymmetric Laue geometry has been developed for accurate spectroscopy of fast highly charged heavy ions in the hard-X-ray region. Coupled to the focusing crystal optics is a specially developed two-dimensional position-sensitive X-ray detector which is necessary for retaining spectral resolution also for fast moving sources. We summarize the crystal optics and demonstrate the usefulness of the instrument for spectrosco...

  19. X-ray imaging and spectroscopy using low cost COTS CMOS sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, David W., E-mail: d.w.lane@cranfield.ac.uk [Department of Engineering and Applied Science, Cranfield University, Shrivenham, Swindon SN6 8LA (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-01

    Whilst commercial X-ray sensor arrays are capable of both imaging and spectroscopy they are currently expensive and this can limit their widespread use. This study examines the use of very low cost CMOS sensors for X-ray imaging and spectroscopy based on the commercial off the shelf (COTS) technology used in cellular telephones, PC multimedia and children's toys. Some examples of imaging using a 'webcam' and a modified OmniVision OV7411 sensor are presented, as well as a simple energy dispersive X-ray detector based on an OmniVision OV7221 sensor. In each case X-ray sensitivity was enabled by replacing the sensor's front glass window with a 5 {mu}m thick aluminium foil, with X-rays detected as an increase in a pixel's dark current due to the generation of additional electron-hole pairs within its active region. The exposure control and data processing requirements for imaging and spectroscopy are discussed. The modified OV7221 sensor was found to have a linear X-ray energy calibration and a resolution of approximately 510 eV.

  20. A broadband x-ray imaging spectroscopy with high-angular resolution: the FORCE mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Koji; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Okajima, Takashi; Murakami, Hiroshi; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Matsumoto, Hironori; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Zhang, William W.

    2016-07-01

    We are proposing FORCE (Focusing On Relativistic universe and Cosmic Evolution) as a future Japan-lead Xray observatory to be launched in the mid 2020s. Hitomi (ASTRO-H) possesses a suite of sensitive instruments enabling the highest energy-resolution spectroscopy in soft X-ray band, a broadband X-ray imaging spectroscopy in soft and hard X-ray bands, and further high energy coverage up to soft gamma-ray band. FORCE is the direct successor to the broadband X-ray imaging spectroscopy aspect of Hitomi (ASTRO-H) with significantly higher angular resolution. The current design of FORCE defines energy band pass of 1-80 keV with angular resolution of black holes" in various mass-scales: "buried supermassive black holes (SMBHs)" (> 104 M⊙) residing in the center of galaxies in a cosmological distance, "intermediate-mass black holes" (102-104 M⊙) acting as the possible seeds from which SMBHs grow, and "orphan stellar-mass black holes" (mirror and wide-band X-ray detector. The focal length is currently planned to be 10 m. The silicon mirror with multi-layer coating is our primary choice to achieve lightweight, good angular optics. The detector is a descendant of hard X-ray imager onboard Hitomi (ASTRO-H) replacing its silicon strip detector with SOI-CMOS silicon pixel detector, allowing an extension of the low energy threshold down to 1 keV or even less.

  1. Ultrashort hard x-ray pulses generated by 90 degrees Thomson scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, A.H. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Schoenlein, R.W.; Glover, T.E. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Ultrashort x-ray pulses permit observation of fast structural dynamics in a variety of condensed matter systems. The authors have generated 300 femtosecond, 30 keV x-ray pulses by 90 degrees Thomson scattering between femtosecond laser pulses and relativistic electrons. The x-ray and laser pulses are synchronized on a femtosecond time scale, an important prerequisite for ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy. Analysis of the x-ray beam properties also allows for electron bunch characterization on a femtosecond time scale.

  2. RGS X-Ray Spectroscopy of the Crab Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaastra, J. S.; de Vries, C. P.; Costantini, E.; den Herder, J. A.

    The Crab nebula and pulsar have been widely used as a calibration source for X-ray instruments. The in-flight effective area calibration of the Reflection Grating Spectrometers (RGS) of XMM-Newton depends upon the availability of reliable calibration sources. We analyse RGS observations of the Crab using different instrument configurations and spatial offsets, and make use of previous determinations of the continuum spectrum of the nebula plus pulsar. Due to the high spectral resolution of the RGS, we resolve the main absorption edges. We get an excellent fit to the Crab spectrum using this fixed continuum and the absorption spectrum determined by RGS. We get accurate column densities for the neutral atoms of H, N, O, Ne, Mg and Fe as well as a clear detection of Fe II and firm upper limits for other ions (O II, Mg II). We find solar-like abundances for N, O and Mg, and Fe (adding Fe I and Fe II), while Ne is overabundant. Finally, we show how we can determine the absolute flux of Crab with high accuracy by combining RGS and Chandra LETGS spectra of different sources.

  3. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray spectroscopy applied to mycelial phase of sporothrix schenckii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Thibaut

    1975-04-01

    Full Text Available Scanning electron microscopy applied to the mycelial phase of Sporothrix schenckii shows a matted mycelium with conidia of a regular pattern. X-Ray microanalysis applied in energy dispersive spectroscopy and also in wavelength dispersive spectroscopy reveals the presence of several elements of Mendeleef's classification.

  4. Structure of reactively sputter deposited tin-nitride thin films: A combined X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, in situ X-ray reflectivity and X-ray absorption spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luetzenkirchen-Hecht, Dirk [Fachbereich C-Physik, Bergische Universitaet Wuppertal, Gaussstr. 20, D-42097 Wuppertal (Germany)]. E-mail: dirklh@uni-wuppertal.de; Frahm, Ronald [Fachbereich C-Physik, Bergische Universitaet Wuppertal, Gaussstr. 20, D-42097 Wuppertal (Germany)

    2005-12-22

    Amorphous tin-nitride thin films were prepared by reactive sputter deposition on smooth float glass substrates in a vacuum chamber with an integrated small magnetron source. The films were investigated using in situ reflection mode X-ray absorption spectroscopy and ex situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Both the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) were analysed, yielding bond distances, coordination numbers and Debye-Waller factors. XPS yields the chemical composition and the binding state of the constituents of the films, specular X-ray reflectivity allows the determination of the sample density and of the roughness and its changes with film thickness. The results were compared to those of crystalline Sn{sub 3}N{sub 4}, indicating that the electronic and atomic structure of the amorphous films determined by EXAFS data analysis are very similar to the stoichiometric reference compound. Two different Sn-N interactions with about 2.09 and 2.19 A bond distance and 4 and 6 nearest neighbours, respectively, are present. These bond distances are slightly relaxed compared to the crystalline reference material, which is consistent with the sample density, which is reduced by about 8% in comparison to Sn{sub 3}N{sub 4}. XPS as well as XANES revealed a Sn valence of about 4+ and the presence of nitric bonds, while XPS also suggests that the nitride is slightly decomposed under X-ray irradiation in ultra-high vacuum.

  5. Simultaneous X-ray and optical spectroscopy of the Oef supergiant lambda Cep

    CERN Document Server

    Rauw, G; Naze, Y; Gonzalez-Perez, J N; Hempelmann, A; Mittag, M; Schmitt, J H M M; Schroeder, K -P; Gosset, E; Eenens, P; Uuh-Sonda, J M

    2015-01-01

    Probing the structures of stellar winds is of prime importance for the understanding of massive stars. Based on their optical spectral morphology and variability, the stars of the Oef class have been suggested to feature large-scale structures in their wind. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy and time-series of X-ray observations of presumably-single O-type stars can help us understand the physics of their stellar winds. We have collected XMM-Newton observations and coordinated optical spectroscopy of the O6Ief star lambda Cep to study its X-ray and optical variability and to analyse its high-resolution X-ray spectrum. We investigate the line profile variability of the He II 4686 and H-alpha emission lines in our time series of optical spectra, including a search for periodicities. We further discuss the variability of the broadband X-ray flux and analyse the high-resolution spectrum of lambda Cep using line-by-line fits as well as a code designed to fit the full high-resolution X-ray spectrum consistently. D...

  6. Laboratory von Hámos X-ray spectroscopy for routine sample characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Németh, Zoltán; Szlachetko, Jakub; Bajnóczi, Éva G.; Vankó, György

    2016-10-01

    High energy resolution, hard X-ray spectroscopies are powerful element selective probes of the electronic and local structure of matter, with diverse applications in chemistry, physics, biology, and materials science. The routine application of these techniques is hindered by the complicated and slow access to synchrotron radiation facilities. Here we propose a new, economic, easily operated laboratory high resolution von Hámos type X-ray spectrometer, which offers rapid transmission experiments for X-ray absorption and is also capable of recording X-ray emission spectra. The use of a cylindrical analyzer crystal and a position sensitive detector enabled us to build a robust, flexible setup with low operational costs, while delivering synchrotron grade signal to noise measurements in reasonable acquisition times. We demonstrate the proof of principle and give examples for both measurement types. Finally, tracking of a several day long chemical transformation, a case better suited for laboratory than synchrotron investigation, is also presented.

  7. Laboratory von H\\'amos X-ray Spectroscopy for Routine Sample Characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Németh, Zoltán; Bajnóczi, Éva G; Vankó, György

    2016-01-01

    High energy resolution, hard X-ray spectroscopies are powerful element selective probes of the electronic and local structure of matter, with diverse applications in chemistry, physics, biology and materials science. The routine application of these techniques is hindered by the complicated and slow access to synchrotron radiation facilities. Here we propose a new, economic, easily operated laboratory high resolution von H\\'amos type X-ray spectrometer, which offers rapid transmission experiments for X-ray absorption, and is also capable of recording X-ray emission spectra. The use of a cylindrical analyzer crystal and a position sensitive detector enabled us to build a maintenance free, flexible setup with low operational costs, while delivering synchrotron grade signal to noise measurements in reasonable acquisition times. We demonstrate the proof of principle and give examples for both measurement types. Finally, tracking of a several day long chemical transformation, a case better suited for laboratory th...

  8. Single-shot 3D structure determination of nanocrystals with femtosecond X-ray free electron laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Rui; Song, Changyong; Rodriguez, Jose A; Huang, Zhifeng; Chen, Chien-Chun; Nam, Daewoong; Park, Jaehyun; Gallagher-Jones, Marcus; Kim, Sangsoo; Kim, Sunam; Suzuki, Akihiro; Takayama, Yuki; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Takahashi, Yukio; Fan, Jiadong; Zou, Yunfei; Hatsui, Takaki; Inubushi, Yuichi; Kameshima, Takashi; Yonekura, Koji; Tono, Kensuke; Togashi, Tadashi; Sato, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Masaki; Nakasako, Masayoshi; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Miao, Jianwei

    2013-01-01

    Coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) using synchrotron radiation, X-ray free electron lasers (X-FELs), high harmonic generation, soft X-ray lasers, and optical lasers has found broad applications across several disciplines. An active research direction in CDI is to determine the structure of single particles with intense, femtosecond X-FEL pulses based on diffraction-before-destruction scheme. However, single-shot 3D structure determination has not been experimentally realized yet. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of single-shot 3D structure determination of individual nanocrystals using ~10 femtosecond X-FEL pulses. Coherent diffraction patterns are collected from high-index-faceted nanocrystals, each struck by a single X-FEL pulse. Taking advantage of the symmetry of the nanocrystal, we reconstruct the 3D structure of each nanocrystal from a single-shot diffraction pattern at ~5.5 nm resolution. As symmetry exists in many nanocrystals and virus particles, this method can be applied to 3D st...

  9. Development of x-ray and ion diagnostics of plasma obtained with a 10-TW femtosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryć, L.; Dobrzański, L.; Dubecky, F.; Jabłoński, S.; Parys, P.; Słysz, W.; Rosiński, M.

    2016-07-01

    Several x-ray and ion semiconductor detectors have been developed for the diagnostics of femtosecond laser plasma generated by a 10-TW laser which was recently commissioned for operation at the Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw. A range of detectors has been employed including a CdTe detector for hard x-rays and four detectors for proton detection. These four are SiC and GaN employing a sandwich structure, an interdigitated M-S-M InP detector and finally a silicon photo-diode equipped with an aluminium filter (to shield against scattered light). The detectors presented are innovative as they are not commonly used for the diagnostic of laser plasma. The details of the internal structures of the detectors are presented. The immunity of the detectors to the noise coming from the laser system and the femtosecond plasma is discussed. Lastly, the possibility for further modifications and improvements are considered and discussed.

  10. X-ray excited optical luminescence, photoluminescence, photostimulated luminescence and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy studies on BaFBr:Eu

    CERN Document Server

    Subramanian, N; Govinda-Rajan, K; Mohammad-Yousuf; Santanu-Bera; Narasimhan, S V

    1997-01-01

    The results of x-ray excited optical luminescence (XEOL), photoluminescence (PL), photostimulated luminescence (PSL) and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) studies on the x-ray storage phosphor BaFBr:Eu are presented in this paper. Analyses of XEOL, PL and PSL spectra reveal features corresponding to the transitions from 4f sup 6 td sup 1 to 4f sup 7 configurations in different site symmetries of Eu sup 2 sup +. Increasing x-ray dose is seen to lead to a red shift in the maximum of the PL excitation spectrum for the 391 nm emission. The XEOL and XPS spectra do not show any signature of Eu sup 3 sup + in the samples studied by us, directly raising doubts about the model of Takahashi et al in which Eu sup 2 sup + is expected to ionize to Eu sup 3 sup + upon x-ray irradiation and remain stable until photostimulation. XEOL and PSL experiments with simultaneous x-ray irradiation and He - Ne laser excitation as well as those with sequential x-ray irradiation and laser stimulation bring out the competition betwe...

  11. Ultra-soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy: A bulk and surface probe of materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, D.A. (National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)); Mitchell, G.E.; Dekoven, B.M. (Dow Chemical Co., Midland, MI (United States)); Yeh, A.T.; Gland, J.L. (Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States)); Moodenbaugh, A.R. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Direct comparisons between surface and bulk of diverse materials can be made by simultaneous electron yield (5 nm depth sensitivity) and fluorescence yield (200 nm) ultra soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements utilizing a rapid sample interchange apparatus. For example the orientations of functional groups have been characterized at and near the surface of a series of model polymeric materials highlighting the chemical and molecular sensitivity of ultra soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy. In addition we discuss a bulk sensitive use of fluorescence yield to non destructively study a buried metal polymer interface. A second bulk sensitive example is the use of fluorescence yield oxygen K near edge x-ray spectroscopy as a method to determine the hole state density of high Tc materials.

  12. Ultra-soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy: A bulk and surface probe of materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, D.A. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Mitchell, G.E.; Dekoven, B.M. [Dow Chemical Co., Midland, MI (United States); Yeh, A.T.; Gland, J.L. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Moodenbaugh, A.R. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-06-01

    Direct comparisons between surface and bulk of diverse materials can be made by simultaneous electron yield (5 nm depth sensitivity) and fluorescence yield (200 nm) ultra soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements utilizing a rapid sample interchange apparatus. For example the orientations of functional groups have been characterized at and near the surface of a series of model polymeric materials highlighting the chemical and molecular sensitivity of ultra soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy. In addition we discuss a bulk sensitive use of fluorescence yield to non destructively study a buried metal polymer interface. A second bulk sensitive example is the use of fluorescence yield oxygen K near edge x-ray spectroscopy as a method to determine the hole state density of high Tc materials.

  13. The X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Caronna, Chiara; Chollet, Matthieu; Curtis, Robin; Damiani, Daniel S.; Defever, Jim; Feng, Yiping; Flath, Daniel L.; Glownia, James M. [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Lee, Sooheyong [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Hasylab at DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Lemke, Henrik T.; Nelson, Silke; Bong, Eric; Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Srinivasan, Venkat; Stefanescu, Daniel; Zhu, Diling; Robert, Aymeric, E-mail: aymeric@slac.stanford.edu [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2015-04-14

    A description of the X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source is presented. Recent highlights illustrate the coherence properties of the source as well as some recent dynamics measurements and future directions. The X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument is dedicated to the study of dynamics in condensed matter systems using the unique coherence properties of free-electron lasers. It covers a photon energy range of 4–25 keV. The intrinsic temporal characteristics of the Linac Coherent Light Source, in particular the 120 Hz repetition rate, allow for the investigation of slow dynamics (milliseconds) by means of X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. Double-pulse schemes could probe dynamics on the picosecond timescale. A description of the instrument capabilities and recent achievements is presented.

  14. Ultra-soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy: A bulk and surface probe of materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, D.A. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Mitchell, G.E.; Dekoven, B.M. [Dow Chemical Co., Midland, MI (United States); Yeh, A.T.; Gland, J.L. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Moodenbaugh, A.R. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-06-01

    Direct comparisons between surface and bulk of diverse materials can be made by simultaneous electron yield (5 nm depth sensitivity) and fluorescence yield (200 nm) ultra soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements utilizing a rapid sample interchange apparatus. For example the orientations of functional groups have been characterized at and near the surface of a series of model polymeric materials highlighting the chemical and molecular sensitivity of ultra soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy. In addition we discuss a bulk sensitive use of fluorescence yield to non destructively study a buried metal polymer interface. A second bulk sensitive example is the use of fluorescence yield oxygen K near edge x-ray spectroscopy as a method to determine the hole state density of high Tc materials.

  15. Ultra-soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy: A bulk and surface probe of materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, D.A. (National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)); Mitchell, G.E.; Dekoven, B.M. (Dow Chemical Co., Midland, MI (United States)); Yeh, A.T.; Gland, J.L. (Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States)); Moodenbaugh, A.R. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Direct comparisons between surface and bulk of diverse materials can be made by simultaneous electron yield (5 nm depth sensitivity) and fluorescence yield (200 nm) ultra soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements utilizing a rapid sample interchange apparatus. For example the orientations of functional groups have been characterized at and near the surface of a series of model polymeric materials highlighting the chemical and molecular sensitivity of ultra soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy. In addition we discuss a bulk sensitive use of fluorescence yield to non destructively study a buried metal polymer interface. A second bulk sensitive example is the use of fluorescence yield oxygen K near edge x-ray spectroscopy as a method to determine the hole state density of high Tc materials.

  16. Observing Solvation Dynamics with Simultaneous Femtosecond X-ray Emission Spectroscopy and X-ray Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haldrup, Kristoffer; Gawelda, Wojciech; Abela, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    In liquid phase chemistry dynamic solute solvent interactions often govern the path, ultimate outcome, and efficiency of chemical reactions. These steps involve many-body movements on subpicosecond time scales and thus ultrafast structural tools capable of capturing both intramolecular electronic...

  17. Hard X-ray photoelectron and X-ray absorption spectroscopy characterization of oxidized surfaces of iron sulfides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhlin, Yuri; Tomashevich, Yevgeny; Vorobyev, Sergey; Saikova, Svetlana; Romanchenko, Alexander; Félix, Roberto

    2016-11-01

    Hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) using an excitation energy range of 2 keV to 6 keV in combination with Fe K- and S K-edge XANES, measured simultaneously in total electron (TEY) and partial fluorescence yield (PFY) modes, have been applied to study near-surface regions of natural polycrystalline pyrite FeS2 and pyrrhotite Fe1-xS before and after etching treatments in an acidic ferric chloride solution. It was found that the following near-surface regions are formed owing to the preferential release of iron from oxidized metal sulfide lattices: (i) a thin, no more than 1-4 nm in depth, outer layer containing polysulfide species, (ii) a layer exhibiting less pronounced stoichiometry deviations and low, if any, concentrations of polysulfide, the composition and dimensions of which vary for pyrite and pyrrhotite and depend on the chemical treatment, and (iii) an extended almost stoichiometric underlayer yielding modified TEY XANES spectra, probably, due to a higher content of defects. We suggest that the extended layered structure should heavily affect the near-surface electronic properties, and processes involving the surface and interfacial charge transfer.

  18. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy of Faint Discrete X-ray Point Sources Constituting the Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Morihana, Kumiko; Dubath, Pierre; Yoshida, Tessei; Suzuki, Kensuke; Ebisawa, Ken

    2016-01-01

    The Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission (GRXE) is apparently extended X-ray emission along the Galactic Plane. The X-ray spectrum is characterized by hard continuum with a strong Fe K emission feature in the 6-7 keV band. A substantial fraction (~80%) of the GRXE in the Fe band was resolved into point sources by deep Chandra imaging observations, thus GRXE is mostly composed of dim Galactic X-ray point sources at least in this energy band. To investigate the populations of these dim X-ray point sources, we carried out Near-Infrared (NIR) follow-up spectroscopic observations in two deep Chandra fields located in the Galactic plane at (l,b)=(0.1{\\arcdeg}, -1.4{\\arcdeg}) and (28.5{\\arcdeg}, 0.0{\\arcdeg}) using NTT/SofI and Subaru/MOIRCS. We obtained well-exposed NIR spectra from 65 objects and found that there are three main classes of Galactic sources based on the X-ray color and NIR spectral features: those having (A) hard X-ray spectra and NIR emission features such as HI(Br{\\gamma}), HeI, and HeII (2 objects), (B)...

  19. Metalloprotein structures at ambient conditions and in real-time: biological crystallography and spectroscopy using X-ray free electron lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Jan; Yachandra, Vittal K; Yano, Junko

    2015-10-01

    Although the structure of enzymes and the chemistry at the catalytic sites have been studied intensively, an understanding of the atomic-scale chemistry requires a new approach beyond steady state X-ray crystallography and X-ray spectroscopy at cryogenic temperatures. Following the dynamic changes in the geometric and electronic structure of metallo-enzymes at ambient conditions, while overcoming the severe X-ray-induced changes to the redox active catalytic center, is key for deriving reaction mechanisms. Such studies become possible by the intense and ultra-short femtosecond (fs) X-ray pulses from an X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) by acquiring a signal before the sample is destroyed. This review describes the recent and pioneering uses of XFELs to study the protein structure and dynamics of metallo-enzymes using crystallography and scattering, as well as the chemical structure and dynamics of the catalytic complexes (charge, spin, and covalency) using spectroscopy during the reaction to understand the electron-transfer processes and elucidate the mechanism.

  20. Mode-Locked Multichromatic X-Rays in a Seeded Free-Electron Laser for Single-Shot X-Ray Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Dao; Ding, Yuantao; Raubenheimer, Tor; Wu, Juhao; /SLAC

    2012-05-10

    We present the promise of generating gigawatt mode-locked multichromatic x rays in a seeded free-electron laser (FEL). We show that, by using a laser to imprint periodic modulation in electron beam phase space, a single-frequency coherent seed can be amplified and further translated to a mode-locked multichromatic output in an FEL. With this configuration the FEL output consists of a train of mode-locked ultrashort pulses which span a wide frequency gap with a series of equally spaced sharp lines. These gigawatt multichromatic x rays may potentially allow one to explore the structure and dynamics of a large number of atomic states simultaneously. The feasibility of generating mode-locked x rays ranging from carbon K edge ({approx}284 eV) to copper L{sub 3} edge ({approx}931 eV) is confirmed with numerical simulation using the realistic parameters of the linac coherent light source (LCLS) and LCLS-II. We anticipate that the mode-locked multichromatic x rays in FELs may open up new opportunities in x-ray spectroscopy (i.e. resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, time-resolved scattering and spectroscopy, etc.).

  1. Mode-Locked Multichromatic X-Rays in a Seeded Free-Electron Laser for Single-Shot X-Ray Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Dao; Ding, Yuantao; Raubenheimer, Tor; Wu, Juhao; /SLAC

    2012-05-10

    We present the promise of generating gigawatt mode-locked multichromatic x rays in a seeded free-electron laser (FEL). We show that, by using a laser to imprint periodic modulation in electron beam phase space, a single-frequency coherent seed can be amplified and further translated to a mode-locked multichromatic output in an FEL. With this configuration the FEL output consists of a train of mode-locked ultrashort pulses which span a wide frequency gap with a series of equally spaced sharp lines. These gigawatt multichromatic x rays may potentially allow one to explore the structure and dynamics of a large number of atomic states simultaneously. The feasibility of generating mode-locked x rays ranging from carbon K edge ({approx}284 eV) to copper L{sub 3} edge ({approx}931 eV) is confirmed with numerical simulation using the realistic parameters of the linac coherent light source (LCLS) and LCLS-II. We anticipate that the mode-locked multichromatic x rays in FELs may open up new opportunities in x-ray spectroscopy (i.e. resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, time-resolved scattering and spectroscopy, etc.).

  2. Pushing X-Ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy beyond the continuous frame rate limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dufresne, Eric M.; Narayanan, Suresh; Sandy, Alec R.; Kline, David M.; Zhang, Qingteng; Landahl, Eric C.; Ross, Steve

    2016-01-11

    We demonstrate delayed-frame X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy with 120 microsecond time resolution, limited only by sample scattering rates, with a prototype Pixel-array detector capable of taking two image frames separated by 153 ns or less. Although the overall frame rate is currently limited to about 4 frame pairs per second, we easily measured millisecond correlation functions. This technology, coupled to the use of brighter synchrotrons such as Petra III or the NSLS-II should enable X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy on microsecond time scales on a wider variety of materials.

  3. In situ anodization of aluminum surfaces studied by x-ray reflectivity and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, F.; Zhang, F.; Evertsson, J.; Carlà, F.; Pan, J.; Messing, M. E.; Mikkelsen, A.; Nilsson, J.-O.; Lundgren, E.

    2014-07-01

    We present results from the anodization of an aluminum single crystal [Al(111)] and an aluminum alloy [Al 6060] studied by in situ x-ray reflectivity, in situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and ex situ scanning electron microscopy. For both samples, a linear increase of oxide film thickness with increasing anodization voltage was found. However, the slope is much higher in the single crystal case, and the break-up of the oxide film grown on the alloy occurs at a lower anodization potential than on the single crystal. The reasons for these observations are discussed as are the measured differences observed for x-ray reflectivity and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

  4. In situ anodization of aluminum surfaces studied by x-ray reflectivity and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertram, F., E-mail: florian.bertram@sljus.lu.se; Evertsson, J.; Messing, M. E.; Mikkelsen, A.; Lundgren, E. [Division of Synchrotron Radiation Research, Lund University, Box 118, 221 00 Lund (Sweden); Zhang, F.; Pan, J. [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Division of Surface and Corrosion Science, Drottning Kristinas väg 51, 10044 Stockholm (Sweden); Carlà, F. [ESRF, B. P. 220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Nilsson, J.-O. [Sapa Technology, Kanalgatan 1, 612 31 Finspång (Sweden)

    2014-07-21

    We present results from the anodization of an aluminum single crystal [Al(111)] and an aluminum alloy [Al 6060] studied by in situ x-ray reflectivity, in situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and ex situ scanning electron microscopy. For both samples, a linear increase of oxide film thickness with increasing anodization voltage was found. However, the slope is much higher in the single crystal case, and the break-up of the oxide film grown on the alloy occurs at a lower anodization potential than on the single crystal. The reasons for these observations are discussed as are the measured differences observed for x-ray reflectivity and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

  5. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Strontium(II) Coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Day; Newville; Neuhoff; Sahai; Carroll

    2000-02-15

    Detailed analyses of crystalline, hydrated, and precipitated strontium compounds and an aqueous strontium solution by synchrotron extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) were used to quantify local thermal and static disorder and to characterize strontium coordination in a variety of oxygen-ligated bonding environments. Analysis of anharmonic vibrational disorder (i.e., significant contribution from a third cumulant term (C(3)) in the EXAFS phase-shift function) in compounds with low and high static disorder around strontium showed that first-shell anharmonic contributions were generally not significant above experimental error in the EXAFS fits (R+/-0.02 Å with and without C(3)). The only case in which a significant apparent decrease in Sr-O distance was observed with increasing temperature, and for which a third cumulant term was significant, was for dilute strontium in aqueous solution. Empirical parameterization of Debye-Waller factor (sigma(2)) for strontium compounds as a function of backscatterer atomic number (Z), interatomic Sr-Z distance, and temperature of spectral data collection showed systematic increases in sigma(2) as a function of increasing temperature and Sr-Z bond length. At values of sigma(2) greater than approximately 0.025 Å(2) (for N3 Å), backscattering was generally not significant above noise levels in spectra of compounds of known crystal structure. Comparison of the EXAFS spectra of freshly precipitated SrCO(3) (spectra collected wet) to that of dry, powdered strontianite (SrCO(3)(s)) indicated no significant differences in the local atomic structure around strontium. Analysis of partially hydrated strontium in natural Ca-zeolite (heulandite) showed that strontium is substituted only in the calcium (Ca2) site. Backscattering from aluminum and silicon atoms in the zeolite framework were apparent in the EXAFS spectra at low and room temperature at distances from central strontium of strontium structural coordination determined

  6. AXSIS: Exploring the frontiers in attosecond X-ray science, imaging and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kärtner, F.X., E-mail: franz.kaertner@cfel.de [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); The Hamburg Center for Ultrafast Imaging, Hamburg (Germany); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Ahr, F. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Hamburg (Germany); Calendron, A.-L. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); The Hamburg Center for Ultrafast Imaging, Hamburg (Germany); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Çankaya, H. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); The Hamburg Center for Ultrafast Imaging, Hamburg (Germany); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Carbajo, S. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Chang, G.; Cirmi, G. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); The Hamburg Center for Ultrafast Imaging, Hamburg (Germany); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Dörner, K. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Dorda, U. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Fallahi, A. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Hartin, A. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Hemmer, M. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); and others

    2016-09-01

    X-ray crystallography is one of the main methods to determine atomic-resolution 3D images of the whole spectrum of molecules ranging from small inorganic clusters to large protein complexes consisting of hundred-thousands of atoms that constitute the macromolecular machinery of life. Life is not static, and unravelling the structure and dynamics of the most important reactions in chemistry and biology is essential to uncover their mechanism. Many of these reactions, including photosynthesis which drives our biosphere, are light induced and occur on ultrafast timescales. These have been studied with high time resolution primarily by optical spectroscopy, enabled by ultrafast laser technology, but they reduce the vast complexity of the process to a few reaction coordinates. In the AXSIS project at CFEL in Hamburg, funded by the European Research Council, we develop the new method of attosecond serial X-ray crystallography and spectroscopy, to give a full description of ultrafast processes atomically resolved in real space and on the electronic energy landscape, from co-measurement of X-ray and optical spectra, and X-ray diffraction. This technique will revolutionize our understanding of structure and function at the atomic and molecular level and thereby unravel fundamental processes in chemistry and biology like energy conversion processes. For that purpose, we develop a compact, fully coherent, THz-driven attosecond X-ray source based on coherent inverse Compton scattering off a free-electron crystal, to outrun radiation damage effects due to the necessary high X-ray irradiance required to acquire diffraction signals. This highly synergistic project starts from a completely clean slate rather than conforming to the specifications of a large free-electron laser (FEL) user facility, to optimize the entire instrumentation towards fundamental measurements of the mechanism of light absorption and excitation energy transfer. A multidisciplinary team formed by laser

  7. AXSIS: Exploring the frontiers in attosecond X-ray science, imaging and spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kärtner, F. X.; Ahr, F.; Calendron, A.-L.; Çankaya, H.; Carbajo, S.; Chang, G.; Cirmi, G.; Dörner, K.; Dorda, U.; Fallahi, A.; Hartin, A.; Hemmer, M.; Hobbs, R.; Hua, Y.; Huang, W. R.; Letrun, R.; Matlis, N.; Mazalova, V.; Mücke, O. D.; Nanni, E.; Putnam, W.; Ravi, K.; Reichert, F.; Sarrou, I.; Wu, X.; Yahaghi, A.; Ye, H.; Zapata, L.; Zhang, D.; Zhou, C.; Miller, R. J. D.; Berggren, K. K.; Graafsma, H.; Meents, A.; Assmann, R. W.; Chapman, H. N.; Fromme, P.

    2016-09-01

    X-ray crystallography is one of the main methods to determine atomic-resolution 3D images of the whole spectrum of molecules ranging from small inorganic clusters to large protein complexes consisting of hundred-thousands of atoms that constitute the macromolecular machinery of life. Life is not static, and unravelling the structure and dynamics of the most important reactions in chemistry and biology is essential to uncover their mechanism. Many of these reactions, including photosynthesis which drives our biosphere, are light induced and occur on ultrafast timescales. These have been studied with high time resolution primarily by optical spectroscopy, enabled by ultrafast laser technology, but they reduce the vast complexity of the process to a few reaction coordinates. In the AXSIS project at CFEL in Hamburg, funded by the European Research Council, we develop the new method of attosecond serial X-ray crystallography and spectroscopy, to give a full description of ultrafast processes atomically resolved in real space and on the electronic energy landscape, from co-measurement of X-ray and optical spectra, and X-ray diffraction. This technique will revolutionize our understanding of structure and function at the atomic and molecular level and thereby unravel fundamental processes in chemistry and biology like energy conversion processes. For that purpose, we develop a compact, fully coherent, THz-driven attosecond X-ray source based on coherent inverse Compton scattering off a free-electron crystal, to outrun radiation damage effects due to the necessary high X-ray irradiance required to acquire diffraction signals. This highly synergistic project starts from a completely clean slate rather than conforming to the specifications of a large free-electron laser (FEL) user facility, to optimize the entire instrumentation towards fundamental measurements of the mechanism of light absorption and excitation energy transfer. A multidisciplinary team formed by laser

  8. Relativistically Self-Channeled Femtosecond Terawatt Lasers for High-Field Physics and X-Ray Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borisov, A.B.; Boyer, K.; Cameron, S.M.; Luk, T.S.; McPherson, A.; Nelson, T.; Rhodes, C.K.

    1999-01-01

    Optical channeling or refractive guiding processes involving the nonlinear interaction of intense femtosecond optical pulses with matter in the self-focussing regime has created exciting opportunities for next-generation laser plasma-based x-ray sources and directed energy applications. This fundamentally new form of extended paraxial electromagnetic propagation in nonlinear dispersive media such as underdense plasma is attributed to the interplay between normal optical diffraction and intensity-dependent nonlinear focussing and refraction contributions in the dielectric response. Superposition of these mechanisms on the intrinsic index profile acts to confine the propagating energy in a dynamic self-guiding longitudinal waveguide structure which is stable for power transmission and robust compression. The laser-driven channels are hypothesized to support a degree of solitonic transport behavior, simultaneously stable in the space and time domains (group velocity dispersion balances self-phase modulation), and are believed to be self-compensating for diffraction and dispersion over many Rayleigh lengths in contrast with the defining characteristics of conventional diffractive imaging and beamforming. By combining concentrated power deposition with well-ordered spatial localization, this phenomena will also create new possibilities for production and regulation of physical interactions, including electron beams, enhanced material coupling, and self-modulated plasma wakefields, over extended gain distances with unprecedented energy densities. Harmonious combination of short-pulse x-ray production with plasma channeling resulting from a relativistic charge displacement nonlinearity mechanism in the terawatt regime (10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) has been shown to generate high-field conditions conducive to efficient multi-kilovolt x-ray amplification and peak spectral brightness. Channeled optical propagation with intense short-pulse lasers is expected to impact several

  9. Electron Spectroscopy: Ultraviolet and X-Ray Excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, A. D.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Reviews recent growth in electron spectroscopy (54 papers cited). Emphasizes advances in instrumentation and interpretation (52); photoionization, cross-sections and angular distributions (22); studies of atoms and small molecules (35); transition, lanthanide and actinide metal complexes (50); organometallic (12) and inorganic compounds (2);…

  10. Microscale X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy on the GSECARS Sector 13 at the APS

    CERN Document Server

    Stephen-Sutto

    2000-01-01

    GeoSoilEnviroCARS (GSECARS) is a national user facility for frontier research in the earth sciences using synchrotrons radiation at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. GSECARS provides earth scientists with access to the high-brilliance hard x-rays from this third-generation synchrotrons light source. The research conducted at this facility will advance our knowledge of the composition, structure and properties of earth materials, the processes they control and the processes that produce them. All principal synchrotron-based analytical techniques in demand by earth scientists are being brought to bear on earth science problems: (1) high-pressure/high-temperature crystallography and spectroscopy using the diamond anvil cell; (2) high-pressure/high-temperature crystallography using the large-volume press; (3) powder, single crystal and interface diffraction; (4) x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy; (5) x-ray fluorescence microprobe analysis and microspectroscopy; and (6) mic...

  11. Firing of Clays Studied by X-ray Diffraction and Moessbauer Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haeusler, W. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department E15 (Germany)

    2004-06-15

    Three bentonites of varying purity were fired in air under controlled conditions up to 1300{sup o}C in an attempt to provide data for the assessment of firing techniques used in prehistoric pottery making. X-ray diffraction of samples heated at increasing temperatures allows to study the mineral transformations, the breakdown of the clay structure and the formation of new minerals in the high-temperature region. Moessbauer spectroscopy reveals the change of valence state and of the environment of the iron atoms on heating. Non iron-bearing minerals are only accessible by X-ray diffraction, while iron-containing oxidic and amorphous phases may be difficult to detect, due to poor crystallinity and small particle size. The combination of X-ray diffraction and Moessbauer spectroscopy therefore has a considerable potential in the study of the chemical and physical transformations occurring in pottery clays during firing.

  12. Firing of Clays Studied by X-ray Diffraction and Mössbauer Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häusler, W.

    2004-06-01

    Three bentonites of varying purity were fired in air under controlled conditions up to 1300°C in an attempt to provide data for the assessment of firing techniques used in prehistoric pottery making. X-ray diffraction of samples heated at increasing temperatures allows to study the mineral transformations, the breakdown of the clay structure and the formation of new minerals in the high-temperature region. Mössbauer spectroscopy reveals the change of valence state and of the environment of the iron atoms on heating. Non iron-bearing minerals are only accessible by X-ray diffraction, while iron-containing oxidic and amorphous phases may be difficult to detect, due to poor crystallinity and small particle size. The combination of X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy therefore has a considerable potential in the study of the chemical and physical transformations occurring in pottery clays during firing.

  13. Multidimensional X-Ray Spectroscopy of Valence and Core Excitations in Cysteine

    CERN Document Server

    Biggs, Jason D; Healion, Daniel; Mukamel, Shaul

    2013-01-01

    Several nonlinear spectroscopy experiments which employ broadband x-ray pulses to probe the coupling between localized core and delocalized valence excitation are simulated for the amino acid cysteine at the K-edges of oxygen and nitrogen and the K and L-edges of sulfur. We focus on two dimensional (2D) and 3D signals generated by two- and three-pulse stimulated x-ray Raman spectroscopy (SXRS) with frequency-dispersed probe. We show how the four-pulse x-ray signals $\\boldsymbol{k}_\\mathrm{I}=-\\boldsymbol{k}_1+\\boldsymbol{k}_2+\\boldsymbol{k}_3$ and $\\boldsymbol{k}_\\mathrm{II}=\\boldsymbol{k}_1-\\boldsymbol{k}_2+\\boldsymbol{k}_3$ can give new 3D insight into the SXRS signals. The coupling between valence- and core-excited states can be visualized in three dimensional plots, revealing the origin of the polarizability that controls the simpler pump-probe SXRS signals.

  14. Soft X-ray spectroscopy of transition metal compounds: a theoretical perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokarev, S. I.; Hilal, R.; Aziz, S. G.; Kühn, O.

    2016-12-01

    To date, X-ray spectroscopy has become a routine tool that can reveal highly local and element-specific information on the electronic structure of atoms in complex environments. Here, we report on the development of an efficient and versatile theoretical methodology for the treatment of soft X-ray spectra of transition metal compounds based on the multi-configurational self-consistent field electronic structure theory. A special focus is put on the L-edge photon-in/photon-out and photon-in/electron-out processes, i.e. X-ray absorption, resonant inelastic scattering, partial fluorescence yield, and photoelectron spectroscopy, all treated on the same theoretical footing. The investigated systems range from small prototypical coordination compounds and catalysts to aggregates of biomolecules.

  15. A model for testing strong gravity via X-ray reflection spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bambi, Cosimo; Nampalliwar, Sourabh; Cardenas-Avendano, Alejandro

    2016-07-01

    Astrophysical black hole candidates are thought to be the Kerr black holes of general relativity. However, a direct observational evidence is still lacking. The X-ray radiation produced in the inner part of the accretion disk can be a powerful tool to test the Kerr nature of these objects. In this talk, we present a new model for testing the Kerr black hole hypothesis via X-ray reflection spectroscopy. We employ the formalism of the transfer function proposed by Cunningham 40 years ago. The transfer function acts as an integration kernel and takes into account all the relativistic effects. We have developed a code to compute transfer functions in arbitrary stationary and axisymmetric spacetimes. These transfer functions are tabulated in FITS files and combined with XILLVER. The result is best model that we can have today for testing black hole candidates via X-ray reflection spectroscopy.

  16. Nuclear dynamical correlation effects in X-ray spectroscopy from a time-domain perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Karsten, Sven; Aziz, Saadullah G; Bokarev, Sergey I; Kühn, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    To date X-ray spectroscopy has become a routine tool that can reveal highly local and element-specific information on the electronic structure of atoms in complex environments. Here, we focus on nuclear dynamical effects in X-ray spectra and develop a rigorous time-correlation method employing ground state molecular dynamics simulations. The importance of nuclear correlation phenomena is demonstrated by comparison against the results from the conventional sampling approach for gas phase water. In contrast to the first-order absorption, second-order resonant inelastic scattering spectra exhibit pronounced fingerprints of nuclear motions. The developed methodology does not depend on the accompanying electronic structure method in principle as well as on the spectral range and, thus, can be applied to, e.g., UV and X-ray photo-electron and Auger spectroscopies.

  17. Crystal optics for precision x-ray spectroscopy on highly charged ions—conception and proof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, H. F.; Gassner, T.; Trassinelli, M.; Heß, R.; Spillmann, U.; Banaś, D.; Blumenhagen, K.-H.; Bosch, F.; Brandau, C.; Chen, W.; Dimopoulou, Chr; Förster, E.; Grisenti, R. E.; Gumberidze, A.; Hagmann, S.; Hillenbrand, P.-M.; Indelicato, P.; Jagodzinski, P.; Kämpfer, T.; Kozhuharov, Chr; Lestinsky, M.; Liesen, D.; Litvinov, Yu A.; Loetzsch, R.; Manil, B.; Märtin, R.; Nolden, F.; Petridis, N.; Sanjari, M. S.; Schulze, K. S.; Schwemlein, M.; Simionovici, A.; Steck, M.; Stöhlker, Th; Szabo, C. I.; Trotsenko, S.; Uschmann, I.; Weber, G.; Wehrhan, O.; Winckler, N.; Winters, D. F. A.; Winters, N.; Ziegler, E.

    2015-07-01

    The experimental investigation of quantum-electrodydamic contributions to the binding energies of inner shells of highly charged heavy ions requires an accurate spectroscopy in the region of hard x-rays suitable at a limited source strength. For this purpose the focusing compensated asymmetric Laue crystal optics has been developed and a twin-spectrometer assembly has been built and commissioned at the experimental storage ring of the GSI Helmholtzzentrum Darmstadt. We characterize the crystal optics and demonstrate the usefulness of the instrumentation for accurate spectroscopy of both stationary and fast moving x-ray sources. The experimental procedures discussed here may also be applied for other spectroscopic studies where a transition from conventional germanium x-ray detectors to crystal spectrometers seems too demanding because of low source intensity.

  18. X-ray spectroscopy of highly-charged heavy ions at FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gumberidze, A. [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, Universite P. et M. Curie, Paris (France)], E-mail: a.gumberidze@gsi.de; Stoehlker, Th. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbh, 64291 GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Physikalisches Institut, Universitt Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Beyer, H.F.; Bosch, F.; Braeuning-Demian, A.; Hagmann, S.; Kozhuharov, C.; Kuehl, Th.; Mann, R. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbh, 64291 GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Indelicato, P. [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, Universite P. et M. Curie, Paris (France); Quint, W. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbh, 64291 GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Schuch, R. [Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Warczak, A. [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Cracow (Poland)

    2009-01-15

    In the current contribution, we give an overview of the envisioned X-ray spectroscopy program within the atomic physics research collaboration SPARC (Stored Particle Atomic Research Collaboration) at FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research). These activities comprise, among others, the investigation of relativistic collision dynamics, electron correlation in the presence of strong fields, the test of Quantum Electrodynamics in extremely strong electromagnetic fields, and ideas to test the predictions of fundamental theories besides Quantum Electrodynamics. The state of the art X-ray spectroscopy will be of key importance for realization of these challenging goals. The world-wide unique experimental conditions and opportunities offered by the future FAIR facility will be combined with advanced X-ray detection devices, i.e. large-area, segmented solid-state detectors, high-resolution crystal spectrometers, calorimetric detectors etc.

  19. Room temperature femtosecond X-ray diffraction of photosystem II microcrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Jan; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Hellmich, Julia; Tran, Rosalie; Hattne, Johan; Laksmono, Hartawan; Glöckner, Carina; Echols, Nathaniel; Sierra, Raymond G.; Sellberg, Jonas; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Gildea, Richard J.; Glatzel, Pieter; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Latimer, Matthew J.; McQueen, Trevor A.; DiFiore, Dörte; Fry, Alan R.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Miahnahri, Alan; Schafer, Donald W.; Seibert, M. Marvin; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Zwart, Petrus H.; White, William E.; Adams, Paul D.; Bogan, Michael J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J.; Messinger, Johannes; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Zouni, Athina; Bergmann, Uwe; Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2012-01-01

    Most of the dioxygen on earth is generated by the oxidation of water by photosystem II (PS II) using light from the sun. This light-driven, four-photon reaction is catalyzed by the Mn4CaO5 cluster located at the lumenal side of PS II. Various X-ray studies have been carried out at cryogenic temperatures to understand the intermediate steps involved in the water oxidation mechanism. However, the necessity for collecting data at room temperature, especially for studying the transient steps during the O–O bond formation, requires the development of new methodologies. In this paper we report room temperature X-ray diffraction data of PS II microcrystals obtained using ultrashort (X-ray pulses from a hard X-ray free electron laser, namely the Linac Coherent Light Source. The results presented here demonstrate that the ”probe before destroy” approach using an X-ray free electron laser works even for the highly-sensitive Mn4CaO5 cluster in PS II at room temperature. We show that these data are comparable to those obtained in synchrotron radiation studies as seen by the similarities in the overall structure of the helices, the protein subunits and the location of the various cofactors. This work is, therefore, an important step toward future studies for resolving the structure of the Mn4CaO5 cluster without any damage at room temperature, and of the reaction intermediates of PS II during O–O bond formation. PMID:22665786

  20. XDS: a flexible beamline for X-ray diffraction and spectroscopy at the Brazilian synchrotron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, F A; Saleta, M E; Pagliuca, R J S; Eleotério, M A; Reis, R D; Fonseca Júnior, J; Meyer, B; Bittar, E M; Souza-Neto, N M; Granado, E

    2016-11-01

    The majority of the beamlines at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Source Laboratory (LNLS) use radiation produced in the storage-ring bending magnets and are therefore currently limited in the flux that can be used in the harder part of the X-ray spectrum (above ∼10 keV). A 4 T superconducting multipolar wiggler (SCW) was recently installed at LNLS in order to improve the photon flux above 10 keV and fulfill the demands set by the materials science community. A new multi-purpose beamline was then installed at the LNLS using the SCW as a photon source. The XDS is a flexible beamline operating in the energy range between 5 and 30 keV, designed to perform experiments using absorption, diffraction and scattering techniques. Most of the work performed at the XDS beamline concentrates on X-ray absorption spectroscopy at energies above 18 keV and high-resolution diffraction experiments. More recently, new setups and photon-hungry experiments such as total X-ray scattering, X-ray diffraction under high pressures, resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy, among others, have started to become routine at XDS. Here, the XDS beamline characteristics, performance and a few new experimental possibilities are described.

  1. High-Resolution Structure of the Photosynthetic Mn4Ca Catalyst from X-ray Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yachandra, Vittal; Yano, Junko; Kern, Jan; Pushkar, Yulia; Sauer, Kenneth; Glatzel, Pieter; Bergmann, Uwe; Messinger, Johannes; Zouni, Athina; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2007-08-01

    The application of high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy methods to study the photosynthetic water oxidizing complex, which contains a unique hetero-nuclear catalytic Mn4Ca cluster, are described. Issues of X-ray damage especially at the metal sites in the Mn4Ca cluster are discussed. The structure of the Mn4Ca catalyst at high-resolution which has so far eluded attempts of determination by X-ray diffraction, EXAFS and other spectroscopic techniques has been addressed using polarized EXAFS techniques applied to oriented PS II membrane preparations and PS II single crystals. A review of how the resolution of traditional EXAFS techniques can be improved, using methods such as range-extended EXAFS is presented, and the changes that occur in the structure of the cluster as it advances through the catalytic cycle are described. X-ray absorption and emission techniques (XANES and K? emission) have been used earlier to determine the oxidation states of the Mn4Ca cluster, and in this report we review the use of X-ray resonant Raman spectroscopy to understand the electronic structure of the Mn4Ca cluster as it cycles through the intermediate S-states.

  2. Hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy of transition-metal oxide thin films and interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wadati, H., E-mail: wadati@ap.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Applied Physics and Quantum-Phase Electronics Center (QPEC), University of Tokyo, Hongo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Fujimori, A. [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •Photoemission spectroscopy is a powerful technique to study the electronic structures of transition-metal oxides. •Hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (HXPES) is a new type of photoemission spectroscopy which can probe bulk states. •HXPES is very suitable for studying oxide thin films such as the composition dependence and the film thickness dependence. -- Abstract: Photoemission spectroscopy is a powerful experimental technique to study the electronic structures of solids, especially of transition-metal oxides. Recently, hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (HXPES) has emerged as a more relevant experimental technique to obtain clear information about bulk states. Here, we describe how HXPES can be conveniently applied to study the interesting subjects on oxide thin films such as the composition dependence and the film thickness dependence of the electronic structures and the interfacial electronic structure of multilayers.

  3. Hard X-ray photoelectron and X-ray absorption spectroscopy characterization of oxidized surfaces of iron sulfides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikhlin, Yuri, E-mail: yumikh@icct.ru [Institute of Chemistry and Chemical Technology of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of sciences, Akademgorodok, 50/24, Krasnoyarsk, 660036 (Russian Federation); Tomashevich, Yevgeny [Institute of Chemistry and Chemical Technology of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of sciences, Akademgorodok, 50/24, Krasnoyarsk, 660036 (Russian Federation); Vorobyev, Sergey [Institute of Chemistry and Chemical Technology of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of sciences, Akademgorodok, 50/24, Krasnoyarsk, 660036 (Russian Federation); Siberian Federal University, Svobodny pr. 79, Krasnoyarsk, 660041 (Russian Federation); Saikova, Svetlana [Siberian Federal University, Svobodny pr. 79, Krasnoyarsk, 660041 (Russian Federation); Romanchenko, Alexander [Institute of Chemistry and Chemical Technology of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of sciences, Akademgorodok, 50/24, Krasnoyarsk, 660036 (Russian Federation); Félix, Roberto [Renewable Energy, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Lise-Meitner-Campus, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Pyrite and pyrrhotite in-air abraded and etched in aqueous Fe{sup 3+} solution were studied. • HAXPES (2 keV-6 keV) and Fe K-, S K-edge XANES (TEY and PFY mode) were measured. • Outer “polysulfide”, strongly S-excessive layers are no more than 1–4 nm thick. • “Metal-depleted” layers depend on the treatment and differ for pyrite and pyrrhotite. • Extended nearly-stoichiometric “defective” underlayers were detected using TEY XANES. - Abstract: Hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) using an excitation energy range of 2 keV to 6 keV in combination with Fe K- and S K-edge XANES, measured simultaneously in total electron (TEY) and partial fluorescence yield (PFY) modes, have been applied to study near-surface regions of natural polycrystalline pyrite FeS{sub 2} and pyrrhotite Fe{sub 1−x}S before and after etching treatments in an acidic ferric chloride solution. It was found that the following near-surface regions are formed owing to the preferential release of iron from oxidized metal sulfide lattices: (i) a thin, no more than 1–4 nm in depth, outer layer containing polysulfide species, (ii) a layer exhibiting less pronounced stoichiometry deviations and low, if any, concentrations of polysulfide, the composition and dimensions of which vary for pyrite and pyrrhotite and depend on the chemical treatment, and (iii) an extended almost stoichiometric underlayer yielding modified TEY XANES spectra, probably, due to a higher content of defects. We suggest that the extended layered structure should heavily affect the near-surface electronic properties, and processes involving the surface and interfacial charge transfer.

  4. Structural investigation of bistrifluron using x-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and molecular modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Moon, J K; Rhee, S K; Kim, G B; Yun, H S; Chung, B J; Lee, S S; Lim, Y H

    2002-01-01

    A new insecticide, bistrifluron acts as an inhibitor of insect development and interferes with the cuticle formation of insects. Since it shows low acute oral and dermal toxicities, it can be one of potent insecticides. Based on X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling, the structural studies of bistrifluron have been carried out.

  5. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Investigation on Electrochemical Degradation of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Shuang Ma; Dhiman, Rajnish; Skou, Eivind Morten

    2015-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies were systematically carried out on the electrodes before and after the electrochemical stress tests in an aqueous electrolyte at 20 °C and 70 °C. The electrodes have different ionomer structures (no ionomer, only ionomer, physically mixed ionomer and hot p...

  6. New frontiers in X-ray spectroscopy of FeZSM-5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijboer, Willem Matthijs

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the research described in this work is two-fold. Firstly, new techniques based on X-ray spectroscopy have been introduced in the field of heterogeneous catalysis. As a consequence, a more advanced characterization of catalytic solids could be pursued. Secondly, the application of these ne

  7. Cationic Tri-Rhenium Rafts on gamma-Alumina: Characterization by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koningsberger, D.C.; Fung, A.S.; Tooley, P.A.; Kelley, M.J.; Gates, B.C.

    1991-01-01

    Rhenium surface species, derived by treating [H,Re,(CO),,] adsorbed on y-A1203 in hydrogen at 400 'C, formed extremely small surface grouping of rhenium atoms having an average Re-Re coordination number of 2, as determined by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Results of

  8. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for the study of microbial cell surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Mei, Henderina C; de Vries, Jacob; Busscher, Hendrik J

    2000-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is well known for the characterisation of material surfaces, but at first glance, is an unexpected technique to study the composition of microbial cell surfaces. Despite the fact that intimate contact between materials and microbial cell surfaces occurs in many

  9. Picosecond x-ray absorption spectroscopy of photochemical transient species in solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenlein, Robert William; Khalil, Munira; Marcus, Matthew A.; Smeigh, Amanda L.; McCusker, James K.; Chong, Henry H.W.; Schoenlein, Robert W.

    2006-08-07

    A photoinduced Fe(II) spin crossover reaction in solution is studied with ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The iron-nitrogen bond lengthens by 0.21+-0.03 Angstrom in the high-spin transient excited state relative to the ground state.

  10. 2p3d Resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy of cobalt compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schooneveld, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    This manuscript demonstrates that 2p3d resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy (RXES) yields unique information on the chemically relevant valence electrons of transition metal atoms or ions. Experimental data on cobalt compounds and several theories were used hand-in-hand. In chapter 1 2p3d RXES was s

  11. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for the study of microbial cell surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Mei, Henderina C; de Vries, Jacob; Busscher, Hendrik J

    2000-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is well known for the characterisation of material surfaces, but at first glance, is an unexpected technique to study the composition of microbial cell surfaces. Despite the fact that intimate contact between materials and microbial cell surfaces occurs in many

  12. The Mn₄Ca photosynthetic water-oxidation catalyst studied by simultaneous X-ray spectroscopy and crystallography using an X-ray free-electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Rosalie; Kern, Jan; Hattne, Johan; Koroidov, Sergey; Hellmich, Julia; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Sauter, Nicholas K; Bergmann, Uwe; Messinger, Johannes; Zouni, Athina; Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K

    2014-07-17

    The structure of photosystem II and the catalytic intermediate states of the Mn₄CaO₅ cluster involved in water oxidation have been studied intensively over the past several years. An understanding of the sequential chemistry of light absorption and the mechanism of water oxidation, however, requires a new approach beyond the conventional steady-state crystallography and X-ray spectroscopy at cryogenic temperatures. In this report, we present the preliminary progress using an X-ray free-electron laser to determine simultaneously the light-induced protein dynamics via crystallography and the local chemistry that occurs at the catalytic centre using X-ray spectroscopy under functional conditions at room temperature.

  13. Phase-resolved X-ray spectroscopy and spectral energy distribution of the X-ray soft polar RS Caeli

    CERN Document Server

    Traulsen, I; Schwope, A D; Schwarz, R; Walter, F M; Burwitz, V

    2014-01-01

    RS Cae is the third target in our series of XMM-Newton observations of soft X-ray-dominated polars. Our observational campaign aims to better understand and describe the multiwavelength data, the physical properties of the system components, and the short- and long-term behavior of the component fluxes in RS Cae. We employ stellar atmosphere, stratified accretion-column, and widely used X-ray spectral models. We fit the XMM-Newton spectra, model the multiband light curves, and opt for a mostly consistent description of the spectral energy distribution. Results. Our XMM-Newton data of RS Cae are clearly dominated by soft X-ray emission. The X-ray light curves are shaped by emission from the main accretion region, which is visible over the whole orbital cycle, interrupted only by a stream eclipse. The optical light curves are formed by cyclotron and stream emission. The XMM-Newton X-ray spectra comprise a black-body-like and a plasma component at mean temperatures of 36eV and 7keV. The spectral fits give eviden...

  14. Femtosecond Diffractive Imaging with a Soft-X-Ray Free-Electron Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, Henry N.; /LLNL, Livermore /UC, Davis; Barty, Anton: AUTHOR = Bogan, Michael J.; /LLNL, Livermore; Boutet, Sebastian; /LLNL, Livermore /SLAC /Uppsala U., Biomed. Ctr.; Frank, Matthias; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; /LLNL, Livermore; Marchesini, Stefano; /LLNL, Livermore /UC, Davis; Woods, Bruce W.; Bajt, Sasa; Benner, W.Henry; /LLNL, Livermore; London, Richard A.; /LLNL, Livermore /UC, Davis; Plonjes, Elke; Kuhlmann, Marion; Treusch, Rolf; Dusterer, Stefan; Tschentscher, Thomas; Schneider, Jochen R.; /CERN; Spiller, Eberhard; /Spiller X-ray Optics, Livermore; Moller, Thomas; Bostedt, Christoph; Hoener, Matthias; /Berlin, Tech. U.; Shapiro, David A.; /UC, Davis /SLAC /Uppsala U. /LLNL, Livermore /Uppsala U. /Uppsala U. /SLAC /Uppsala U.

    2010-10-07

    Theory predicts that with an ultrashort and extremely bright coherent X-ray pulse, a single diffraction pattern may be recorded from a large macromolecule, a virus, or a cell before the sample explodes and turns into a plasma. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of this principle using the FLASH soft X-ray free-electron laser. An intense 25 fs, 4 x 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2} pulse, containing 10{sup 12} photons at 32 nm wavelength, produced a coherent diffraction pattern from a nano-structured non-periodic object, before destroying it at 60,000 K. A novel X-ray camera assured single photon detection sensitivity by filtering out parasitic scattering and plasma radiation. The reconstructed image, obtained directly from the coherent pattern by phase retrieval through oversampling, shows no measurable damage, and extends to diffraction-limited resolution. A three-dimensional data set may be assembled from such images when copies of a reproducible sample are exposed to the beam one by one.

  15. Femtosecond Diffractive Imaging with a Soft-X-ray Free-Electron Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, H N; Barty, A; Bogan, M; Boutet, S; Frank, M; Hau-Riege, S P; Marchesini, S; Woods, B; Bajt, S; Benner, W H; London, R; Ploenjes-Palm, E; Kuhlmann, M; Treusch, R; Dusterer, S; Tschentscher, T; Schneider, J; Spiller, E; Moller, T; Bostedt, C; Hoener, M; Shapiro, D; Hodgson, K O; der Spoel, D v; Burmeister, F; Bergh, M; Caleman, C; Huldt, G; Seibert, M; Maia, F; Lee, R; Szoke, A; Timneanu, N; Hajdu, J

    2006-03-13

    Theory predicts that with an ultrashort and extremely bright coherent X-ray pulse, a single diffraction pattern may be recorded from a large macromolecule, a virus, or a cell before the sample explodes and turns into a plasma. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of this principle using the FLASH soft X-ray free-electron laser. An intense 25 fs, 4 x 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2} pulse, containing 10{sup 12} photons at 32 nm wavelength, produced a coherent diffraction pattern from a nano-structured non-periodic object, before destroying it at 60,000 K. A novel X-ray camera assured single photon detection sensitivity by filtering out parasitic scattering and plasma radiation. The reconstructed image, obtained directly from the coherent pattern by phase retrieval through oversampling, shows no measurable damage, and extends to diffraction-limited resolution. A three-dimensional data set may be assembled from such images when copies of a reproducible sample are exposed to the beam one by one.

  16. Hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of chalcopyrite solar cell components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloskovskii, A.; Jenkins, C. A.; Ouardi, S.; Balke, B.; Fecher, G. H.; Dai, X.-F.; Gruhn, T.; Johnson, B.; Lauermann, I.; Caballero, R.; Kaufmann, C. A.; Felser, C.

    2012-02-01

    Hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to examine the partial density of states of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGSe), a semiconducting component of solar cells. The investigated, thin Cu(In,Ga)Se2 films were produced by multi-stage co-evaporation. Details of the measured core level and valence band spectra are compared to the calculated density of states. The semiconducting type electronic structure of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 is clearly resolved in the hard x-ray photoelectron spectra.

  17. Testing LaMgAl11O19 crystal for X-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H; Beiersdorfer, P; Baronova, E; Kalashnikova, I; Stepanenko, M

    2004-03-31

    We investigated the properties of the rare earth crystal LaMgAl{sub 11}O{sub 19} and its application to soft X-ray spectroscopy. Its relative reflectivity and half width rocking curve were measured to up to the reflection order of 28. In addition, a comparative measurement of the iron L-shell soft X-ray line emission was made on the EBIT-I Livermore electron beam ion trap by fielding the LaMgAl{sub 11}O{sub 19} crystal side by side with a rubidium hydrogen phthalate crystal in a flat crystal spectrometer. From these measurements, reflectivity and spectral resolving power were determined.

  18. A Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode array for X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, I; Sadygov, Z; Bunk, O; Menzel, A; Pfeiffer, F; Renker, D

    2009-01-01

    X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) provides an opportunity to study the dynamics of systems by measuring the temporal fluctuations in a far-field diffraction pattern. A two-dimensional detector system has been developed to investigate fluctuations in the frequency range of several Hz to kHz. The X-ray detector system consists of a thin 100 microm scintillation crystal coupled to a Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode array. In this article the elements of the system are detailed and the detector for XPCS measurements is demonstrated.

  19. Solar X-Ray Spectroscopy And Polarimetry By Instrument Ping-M Onboard Interhelioprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotov, Yury; Dergachev, Valentin; Kochemasov, Alexey; Yurov, Vitaly; Tyshkevich, V.; Glyanenko, Alexander; Savchenko, Mikhail; Lazutkov, Vadim; Skorodumov, Dmitry; Trofimov, Yury; Zakharov, Mikhail; Rubtsov, Igor; Kruglov, Evgeniy

    The instrument PING-M for X-ray spectroscopy and polarimetry of solar full disk radiation is described. It will be the part of scientific instrument set for the InterHelioProbe space mission. Instrument consists of three detectors: the Soft X-ray detector (SXRD), the Hard X-ray detector (HXRD) and Hard X-ray polarimeter (PING-P). Spectrometer SXRD is based on a relatively novel type of semiconductor detector SDD (Silicon Drift Detector) that will operate in the energy range 1.5-25 keV, which is similar to GOES X-Ray Sensor (XRS) region. Unlike GOES the SXRD is capable to measure the energy of each photon with high resolution (better 200 eV at 5.9 keV) and operate with high count rate. The X-ray spectra of solar flares obtained by the SXRD should show evidence of Fe and Fe/Ni line emission and multi-thermal plasma. HXRD operates in energy range 15-150 keV. Fast nonorganic scintillator (is based on LaBr3(Ce)) with good energy resolution (≤12% at 60keV and ≤3.5% at 662keV) is used. Apart from measurement of spectra the value of the break energy point that separates the thermal and non-thermal processes in flare would be revealed. In the talk the results of testing of laboratory models are presented. PING-P Hard X-ray polarimeter consists of active scatterer made of three organic p-terphenyl scintillators and six peripheral scattered radiation detectors made of CsI(Tl) scintillators. Effective area of polarimeter is about 5 cm2 in its energy range. Minimal measurable degree of polarization is 0.9 % for 100 sec exposition and X1 solar flare.

  20. X-RAY ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY OF YB3+-DOPED OPTICAL FIBERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Citron, Robert; Kropf, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Optical fibers doped with Ytterbium-3+ have become increasingly common in fiber lasers and amplifiers. Yb-doped fibers provide the capability to produce high power and short pulses at specific wavelengths, resulting in highly effective gain media. However, little is known about the local structure, distribution, and chemical coordination of Yb3+ in the fibers. This information is necessary to improve the manufacturing process and optical qualities of the fibers. Five fibers doped with Yb3+ were studied using Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES), in addition to Yb3+ mapping. The Yb3+ distribution in each fiber core was mapped with 2D and 1D intensity scans, which measured X-ray fluorescence over the scan areas. Two of the five fibers examined showed highly irregular Yb3+ distributions in the core center. In four of the five fibers Yb3+ was detected outside of the given fiber core dimensions, suggesting possible Yb3+ diffusion from the core, manufacturing error, or both. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) analysis has so far proven inconclusive, but did show that the fibers had differing EXAFS spectra. The Yb3+ distribution mapping proved highly useful, but additional modeling and examination of fiber preforms must be conducted to improve XAS analysis, which has been shown to have great potential for the study of similar optical fi bers.

  1. Chemical Modification of Graphene Oxide by Nitrogenation: An X-ray Absorption and Emission Spectroscopy Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Cheng-Hao; Ray, Sekhar C.; Mazumder, Debarati; Sharma, Surbhi; Ganguly, Abhijit; Papakonstantinou, Pagona; Chiou, Jau-Wern; Tsai, Huang-Ming; Shiu, Hung-Wei; Chen, Chia-Hao; Lin, Hong-Ji; Guo, Jinghua; Pong, Way-Faung

    2017-02-01

    Nitrogen-doped graphene oxides (GO:Nx) were synthesized by a partial reduction of graphene oxide (GO) using urea [CO(NH2)2]. Their electronic/bonding structures were investigated using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), valence-band photoemission spectroscopy (VB-PES), X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS). During GO:Nx synthesis, different nitrogen-bonding species, such as pyrrolic/graphitic-nitrogen, were formed by replacing of oxygen-containing functional groups. At lower N-content (2.7 at%), pyrrolic-N, owing to surface and subsurface diffusion of C, N and NH is deduced from various X-ray spectroscopies. In contrast, at higher N-content (5.0 at%) graphitic nitrogen was formed in which each N-atom trigonally bonds to three distinct sp2-hybridized carbons with substitution of the N-atoms for C atoms in the graphite layer. Upon nitrogen substitution, the total density of state close to Fermi level is increased to raise the valence-band maximum, as revealed by VB-PES spectra, indicating an electron donation from nitrogen, molecular bonding C/N/O coordination or/and lattice structure reorganization in GO:Nx. The well-ordered chemical environments induced by nitrogen dopant are revealed by XANES and RIXS measurements.

  2. Studies of multilayer structure in depth direction by soft X-ray spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    It is demonstrated that two kinds of soft X-ray spectroscopy are useful as nondestructive methods to investigate multilayer structures modified by interdiffusion or by chemical reaction of adjoining layers in depth direction. One is the total electron yield (TEY) spectroscopy involving angular dependence measurement. Using this method, it was found that in LiF/Si/LiF trilayers, the Si layers exhibited a characteristic similar to porous Si, and in CaF2/Si/CaF2 trilayers, it was found that CaF2 segregated through the Si layer. Moreover, it has been shown that the thickness of the top layer of a Mo/Si X-ray multilayer can be determined by analyzing TEY signals generated by the standing wave. The other is the soft X-ray emission spectroscopy involving spectral shape analysis. Using this method,it was found that in Mo/Si X-ray multilayers, the interdiffusion or chemical reaction giving rise to deterioration of reflectance character occurs in as-deposited samples as well as in heated samples. In antiferromagnetic Fe/Si multilayers, it was confirmed that there was no existence of pure Si layers, but insulating FeSi2 layers were present. This result suggests that the source of antiferromagnetic coupling is not conduction electrons but quantum wave interference.

  3. Chemical Modification of Graphene Oxide by Nitrogenation: An X-ray Absorption and Emission Spectroscopy Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Cheng-Hao; Ray, Sekhar C.; Mazumder, Debarati; Sharma, Surbhi; Ganguly, Abhijit; Papakonstantinou, Pagona; Chiou, Jau-Wern; Tsai, Huang-Ming; Shiu, Hung-Wei; Chen, Chia-Hao; Lin, Hong-Ji; Guo, Jinghua; Pong, Way-Faung

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped graphene oxides (GO:Nx) were synthesized by a partial reduction of graphene oxide (GO) using urea [CO(NH2)2]. Their electronic/bonding structures were investigated using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), valence-band photoemission spectroscopy (VB-PES), X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS). During GO:Nx synthesis, different nitrogen-bonding species, such as pyrrolic/graphitic-nitrogen, were formed by replacing of oxygen-containing functional groups. At lower N-content (2.7 at%), pyrrolic-N, owing to surface and subsurface diffusion of C, N and NH is deduced from various X-ray spectroscopies. In contrast, at higher N-content (5.0 at%) graphitic nitrogen was formed in which each N-atom trigonally bonds to three distinct sp2-hybridized carbons with substitution of the N-atoms for C atoms in the graphite layer. Upon nitrogen substitution, the total density of state close to Fermi level is increased to raise the valence-band maximum, as revealed by VB-PES spectra, indicating an electron donation from nitrogen, molecular bonding C/N/O coordination or/and lattice structure reorganization in GO:Nx. The well-ordered chemical environments induced by nitrogen dopant are revealed by XANES and RIXS measurements. PMID:28186190

  4. Theoretical studies on electronic structure and x-ray spectroscopies of 2D materials

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Extraordinary chemical and physical properties have been discovered from the studies of two-dimensional (2D) materials, ever since the successful exfoliation of graphene, the first 2D material. Theoretical investigations of electronic structure and spectroscopies of these materials play a fundamental role in deep understanding the various properties. In particular, the band structure and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy can provide critical information near the ...

  5. X-ray and optical spectroscopy of the massive young open cluster IC1805

    CERN Document Server

    Rauw, Gregor

    2016-01-01

    Very young open clusters are ideal places to study the X-ray properties of a homogeneous population of early-type stars. In this respect, the IC1805 open cluster is very interesting as it hosts the O4If$^+$ star HD15570 thought to be in an evolutionary stage intermediate between a normal O-star and a Wolf-Rayet star. Such a star could provide a test for theoretical models aiming at explaining the empirical scaling relation between the X-ray and bolometric luminosities of O-type stars. We have observed IC1805 with XMM-Newton and further collected optical spectroscopy of some of the O-star members of the cluster. The optical spectra allow us to revisit the orbital solutions of BD+60$^{\\circ}$ 497 and HD15558, and provide the first evidence of binarity for BD+60$^{\\circ}$ 498. X-ray emission from colliding winds does not appear to play an important role among the O-stars of IC1805. Notably, the X-ray fluxes do not vary significantly between archival X-ray observations and our XMM-Newton pointing. The very fast r...

  6. A streaked X-ray spectroscopy platform for rapidly heated, near-solid density plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillman, C. R.; Nilson, P. M.; Ivancic, S. T.; Mileham, C.; Begishev, I. A.; Junquist, R. K.; Nelson, D. J.; Froula, D. H.

    2016-11-01

    A picosecond, time-resolved, x-ray spectroscopy platform was developed to study the thermal line emission from rapidly heated solid targets containing buried aluminum or iron layers. The targets were driven by high-contrast 1ω or 2ω laser pulses at focused intensities up to 1 × 1019 W/cm2. The experimental platform combines time-integrating and time-resolved x-ray spectrometers. Picosecond time resolution was achieved with a pair of ultrafast x-ray streak cameras coupled to high-throughput Hall spectrometers. Time-integrated spectra were collected on each shot to correct the streaked data for variations in x-ray photocathode spectral sensitivity. The time-integrated spectrometer uses three elliptical crystals to disperse x rays with energies between 800 and 2100 eV with moderate (E/ΔE ˜ 450) resolving power. The streaked spectrometers accept four interchangeable conical crystals with higher resolving power (E/ΔE ˜ 650) to measure the brightest thermal lines in the 1300 to 1700 eV spectral range.

  7. Flow-aligned, single-shot fiber diffraction using a femtosecond X-ray free-electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, David; Loh, N Duane; Zorgati, Habiba; Ghoshdastider, Umesh; Liow, Lu Ting; Ivanova, Magdalena I; Larsson, Mårten; DePonte, Daniel P; Bean, Richard; Beyerlein, Kenneth R; Gati, Cornelius; Oberthuer, Dominik; Arnlund, David; Brändén, Gisela; Berntsen, Peter; Cascio, Duilio; Chavas, Leonard M G; Chen, Joe P J; Ding, Ke; Fleckenstein, Holger; Gumprecht, Lars; Harimoorthy, Rajiv; Mossou, Estelle; Sawaya, Michael R; Brewster, Aaron S; Hattne, Johan; Sauter, Nicholas K; Seibert, Marvin; Seuring, Carolin; Stellato, Francesco; Tilp, Thomas; Eisenberg, David S; Messerschmidt, Marc; Williams, Garth J; Koglin, Jason E; Makowski, Lee; Millane, Rick P; Forsyth, Trevor; Boutet, Sébastien; White, Thomas A; Barty, Anton; Chapman, Henry; Chen, Swaine L; Liang, Mengning; Neutze, Richard; Robinson, Robert C

    2017-06-02

    A major goal for X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) based science is to elucidate structures of biological molecules without the need for crystals. Filament systems may provide some of the first single macromolecular structures elucidated by XFEL radiation, since they contain one-dimensional translational symmetry and thereby occupy the diffraction intensity region between the extremes of crystals and single molecules. Here, we demonstrate flow alignment of as few as 100 filaments (Escherichia coli pili, F-actin, and amyloid fibrils), which when intersected by femtosecond X-ray pulses result in diffraction patterns similar to those obtained from classical fiber diffraction studies. We also determine that F-actin can be flow-aligned to a disorientation of approximately 5 degrees. Using this XFEL-based technique, we determine that gelsolin amyloids are comprised of stacked β-strands running perpendicular to the filament axis, and that a range of order from fibrillar to crystalline is discernable for individual α-synuclein amyloids. © 2017 The Authors Cytoskeleton Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Characterization of metallic nanoparticles by high-resolution X-ray absorption and X-ray emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehn, Timna-Josua

    2012-03-15

    In almost all areas of technology, metallic nanoparticles are of interest due to their special thermal, electronic, magnetic and optical properties. Their special properties are mainly due to their small size which implies the relevance of quantum effects as well as the significance of the surface: For 2 nm nanoparticles, the surface-to-volume ratio is already 1:1. However, the identification of surface-to-volume interactions - that are responsible for the new properties - is a difficult task due to the small size that inhibits a lot of 'standard' techniques to be applicable. Here X-ray absorption/emission spectroscopy (XAS/XES) is a favorable tool for the characterization of nanoparticles, independent on size, degree of crystallinity and shape/condition of the surface. Using XAS, a tempered nanosized Co{sub 3}Pt/C catalyst have been investigated. Its outstanding oxygen-reduction reaction (ORR) properties in a fuel cell could be related to a lowered Pt 5d-band center connected to a tightened Pt-Pt bonding distance, leading to a weakening of the oxygen adsorption strength so that the ORR may proceed faster. One drawback remains, however, as the properties found by (standard) XAS are summed up for different chemical environments of the chosen element. Thus, no distinction can be made between, e.g., the pure metal in a nanoparticles' interior and the ligated metal in the outer shells or surface. Here, high-resolution fluorescence-detected XAS (HRFD-XAS) provides additional opportunities as, due to its chemical sensitivity, it leads to site-selective XAS. For a system of 6 nm sized Co nanoparticles, build up of a metallic core surrounded by a protecting shell, that resulted from the 'smooth oxidation' process, this technique of site-selective XAS was proven to be applicable. For the first time, the interior and outer shell of a metallic nanoparticle could be characterized separately. In particular, the Co-hcp phase could be determined for the

  9. Near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy at atmospheric pressure with a table-top laser-induced soft x-ray source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kühl, Frank-Christian, E-mail: Frank-christian.kuehl@mail.de; Müller, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.mueller@llg-ev.de; Schellhorn, Meike; Mann, Klaus [Laser-Laboratorium Göttingen e.V., Hans-Adolf-Krebs-Weg 1, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Wieneke, Stefan [Hochschule für angewandte Wissenschaft und Kunst, Von-Ossietzky-Str 99, D-37085 Göttingen (Germany); Eusterhues, Karin [Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Fürstengraben 1, D-07743 Jena (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    The authors present a table-top soft x-ray absorption spectrometer, accomplishing investigations of the near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) in a laboratory environment. The system is based on a low debris plasma ignited by a picosecond laser in a pulsed krypton gas jet, emitting soft x-ray radiation in the range from 1 to 5 nm. For absorption spectroscopy in and around the “water window” (2.3–4.4 nm), a compact helium purged sample compartment for experiments at atmospheric pressure has been constructed and tested. NEXAFS measurements on CaCl{sub 2} and KMnO{sub 4} samples were conducted at the calcium and manganese L-edges, as well as at the oxygen K-edge in air, atmospheric helium, and under vacuum, respectively. The results indicate the importance of atmospheric conditions for an investigation of sample hydration processes.

  10. Thin film subsurface environments; Advanced X-ray spectroscopies and a novel Bayesian inference modeling algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Jonathan R.

    New condensed matter metrologies are being used to probe ever smaller length scales. In support of the diverse field of materials research synchrotron based spectroscopies provide sub-micron spatial resolutions and a breadth of photon wavelengths for scientific studies. For electronic materials the thinnest layers in a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) device have been reduced to just a few nanometers. This raises concerns for layer uniformity, complete surface coverage, and interfacial quality. Deposition processes like chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and atomic layer deposition (ALD) have been shown to deposit the needed high-quality films for the requisite thicknesses. However, new materials beget new chemistries and, unfortunately, unwanted side-reactions and by-products. CVD/ALD tools and chemical precursors provided by our collaborators at Air Liquide utilized these new chemistries and films were deposited for which novel spectroscopic characterization methods were used. The second portion of the thesis focuses on fading and decomposing paint pigments in iconic artworks. Efforts have been directed towards understanding the micro-environments causing degradation. Hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) and variable kinetic energy X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (VKE-XPS) are advanced XPS techniques capable of elucidating both chemical environments and electronic band structures in sub-surface regions of electronic materials. HAXPES has been used to study the electronic band structure in a typical CMOS structure; it will be shown that unexpected band alignments are associated with the presence of electronic charges near a buried interface. Additionally, a computational modeling algorithm, Bayes-Sim, was developed to reconstruct compositional depth profiles (CDP) using VKE-XPS data sets; a subset algorithm also reconstructs CDP from angle-resolved XPS data. Reconstructed CDP produced by Bayes-Sim were most strongly correlated to the real

  11. X-ray structure analysis of a metalloprotein with enhanced active-site resolution using in situ x-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcovito, Alessandro; Benfatto, Maurizio; Cianci, Michele; Hasnain, S Samar; Nienhaus, Karin; Nienhaus, G Ulrich; Savino, Carmelinda; Strange, Richard W; Vallone, Beatrice; Della Longa, Stefano

    2007-04-10

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy is exquisitely sensitive to the coordination geometry of an absorbing atom and therefore allows bond distances and angles of the surrounding atomic cluster to be measured with atomic resolution. By contrast, the accuracy and resolution of metalloprotein active sites obtainable from x-ray crystallography are often insufficient to analyze the electronic properties of the metals that are essential for their biological functions. Here, we demonstrate that the combination of both methods on the same metalloprotein single crystal yields a structural model of the protein with exceptional active-site resolution. To this end, we have collected an x-ray diffraction data set to 1.4-A resolution and Fe K-edge polarized x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra on the same cyanomet sperm whale myoglobin crystal. The XANES spectra were quantitatively analyzed by using a method based on the multiple scattering approach, which yielded Fe-heme structural parameters with +/-(0.02-0.07)-A accuracy on the atomic distances and +/-7 degrees on the Fe-CN angle. These XANES-derived parameters were subsequently used as restraints in the crystal structure refinement. By combining XANES and x-ray diffraction, we have obtained an cyanomet sperm whale myoglobin structural model with a higher precision of the bond lengths and angles at the active site than would have been possible with crystallographic analysis alone.

  12. Investigation of nanoparticulate silicon as printed layers using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unuigbe, David M.; Harting, Margit; Jonah, Emmanuel O.; Britton, David T.; Nordlund, Dennis

    2017-08-21

    The presence of native oxide on the surface of silicon nanoparticles is known to inhibit charge transport on the surfaces. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies reveal that the particles in the printed silicon network have a wide range of sizes and shapes. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals that the particle surfaces have mainly the (111)- and (100)-oriented planes which stabilizes against further oxidation of the particles. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements at the O 1s-edge have been utilized to study the oxidation and local atomic structure of printed layers of silicon nanoparticles which were milled for different times. XANES results reveal the presence of the +4 (SiO2) oxidation state which tends towards the +2 (SiO) state for higher milling times. Si 2pXPS results indicate that the surfaces of the silicon nanoparticles in the printed layers are only partially oxidized and that all three sub-oxide, +1 (Si2O), +2 (SiO) and +3 (Si2O3), states are present. The analysis of the change in the sub-oxide peaks of the silicon nanoparticles shows the dominance of the +4 state only for lower milling times.

  13. Excited state X-ray absorption spectroscopy: Probing both electronic and structural dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Simon P.; Averbukh, Vitali; Ruberti, Marco; Yun, Renjie; Patchkovskii, Serguei; Chergui, Majed; Stolow, Albert; Schuurman, Michael S.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of X-ray absorption spectra, simulated using a general method, to properties of molecular excited states. Recently, Averbukh and co-workers [M. Ruberti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 184107 (2014)] introduced an efficient and accurate L 2 method for the calculation of excited state valence photoionization cross-sections based on the application of Stieltjes imaging to the Lanczos pseudo-spectrum of the algebraic diagrammatic construction (ADC) representation of the electronic Hamiltonian. In this paper, we report an extension of this method to the calculation of excited state core photoionization cross-sections. We demonstrate that, at the ADC(2)x level of theory, ground state X-ray absorption spectra may be accurately reproduced, validating the method. Significantly, the calculated X-ray absorption spectra of the excited states are found to be sensitive to both geometric distortions (structural dynamics) and the electronic character (electronic dynamics) of the initial state, suggesting that core excitation spectroscopies will be useful probes of excited state non-adiabatic dynamics. We anticipate that the method presented here can be combined with ab initio molecular dynamics calculations to simulate the time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy of excited state molecular wavepacket dynamics.

  14. High resolution x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy - a new technique for site- and spin-selectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xin [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Applied Science

    1996-12-01

    X-ray spectroscopy has long been used to elucidate electronic and structural information of molecules. One of the weaknesses of x-ray absorption is its sensitivity to all of the atoms of a particular element in a sample. Through out this thesis, a new technique for enhancing the site- and spin-selectivity of the x-ray absorption has been developed. By high resolution fluorescence detection, the chemical sensitivity of K emission spectra can be used to identify oxidation and spin states; it can also be used to facilitate site-selective X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and site-selective Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS). The spin polarization in K fluorescence could be used to generate spin selective XANES or spin-polarized EXAFS, which provides a new measure of the spin density, or the nature of magnetic neighboring atoms. Finally, dramatic line-sharpening effects by the combination of absorption and emission processes allow observation of structure that is normally unobservable. All these unique characters can enormously simplify a complex x-ray spectrum. Applications of this novel technique have generated information from various transition-metal model compounds to metalloproteins. The absorption and emission spectra by high resolution fluorescence detection are interdependent. The ligand field multiplet model has been used for the analysis of K{alpha} and K{beta} emission spectra. First demonstration on different chemical states of Fe compounds has shown the applicability of site selectivity and spin polarization. Different interatomic distances of the same element in different chemical forms have been detected using site-selective EXAFS.

  15. On Relativistic Disk Spectroscopy in Compact Objects with X-ray CCD Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J. M.; D'Aì, A.; Bautz, M. W.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Burrows, D. N.; Cackett, E. M.; Fabian, A. C.; Freyberg, M. J.; Haberl, F.; Kennea, J.; Nowak, M. A.; Reis, R. C.; Strohmayer, T. E.; Tsujimoto, M.

    2010-12-01

    X-ray charge-coupled devices (CCDs) are the workhorse detectors of modern X-ray astronomy. Typically covering the 0.3-10.0 keV energy range, CCDs are able to detect photoelectric absorption edges and K shell lines from most abundant metals. New CCDs also offer resolutions of 30-50 (E/ΔE), which is sufficient to detect lines in hot plasmas and to resolve many lines shaped by dynamical processes in accretion flows. The spectral capabilities of X-ray CCDs have been particularly important in detecting relativistic emission lines from the inner disks around accreting neutron stars and black holes. One drawback of X-ray CCDs is that spectra can be distorted by photon "pile-up," wherein two or more photons may be registered as a single event during one frame time. We have conducted a large number of simulations using a statistical model of photon pile-up to assess its impacts on relativistic disk line and continuum spectra from stellar-mass black holes and neutron stars. The simulations cover the range of current X-ray CCD spectrometers and operational modes typically used to observe neutron stars and black holes in X-ray binaries. Our results suggest that severe photon pile-up acts to falsely narrow emission lines, leading to falsely large disk radii and falsely low spin values. In contrast, our simulations suggest that disk continua affected by severe pile-up are measured to have falsely low flux values, leading to falsely small radii and falsely high spin values. The results of these simulations and existing data appear to suggest that relativistic disk spectroscopy is generally robust against pile-up when this effect is modest.

  16. Development of extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray multilayer optics for scientific studies with femtosecond/attosecond sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aquila, Andrew Lee [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2009-05-21

    The development of multilayer optics for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation has led to advancements in many areas of science and technology, including materials studies, EUV lithography, water window microscopy, plasma imaging, and orbiting solar physics imaging. Recent developments in femtosecond and attosecond EUV pulse generation from sources such as high harmonic generation lasers, combined with the elemental and chemical specificity provided by EUV radiation, are opening new opportunities to study fundamental dynamic processes in materials. Critical to these efforts is the design and fabrication of multilayer optics to transport, focus, shape and image these ultra-fast pulses This thesis describes the design, fabrication, characterization, and application of multilayer optics for EUV femtosecond and attosecond scientific studies. Multilayer mirrors for bandwidth control, pulse shaping and compression, tri-material multilayers, and multilayers for polarization control are described. Characterization of multilayer optics, including measurement of material optical constants, reflectivity of multilayer mirrors, and metrology of reflected phases of the multilayer, which is critical to maintaining pulse size and shape, were performed. Two applications of these multilayer mirrors are detailed in the thesis. In the first application, broad bandwidth multilayers were used to characterize and measure sub-100 attosecond pulses from a high harmonic generation source and was performed in collaboration with the Max-Planck institute for Quantum Optics and Ludwig- Maximilians University in Garching, Germany, with Professors Krausz and Kleineberg. In the second application, multilayer mirrors with polarization control are useful to study femtosecond spin dynamics in an ongoing collaboration with the T-REX group of Professor Parmigiani at Elettra in Trieste, Italy. As new ultrafast x-ray sources become available, for example free electron lasers, the multilayer designs

  17. UV-Visible Absorption Spectroscopy Enhanced X-ray Crystallography at Synchrotron and X-ray Free Electron Laser Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Aina E; Doukov, Tzanko; Soltis, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    This review describes the use of single crystal UV-Visible Absorption micro-Spectrophotometry (UV-Vis AS) to enhance the design and execution of X-ray crystallography experiments for structural investigations of reaction intermediates of redox active and photosensitive proteins. Considerations for UV-Vis AS measurements at the synchrotron and associated instrumentation are described. UV-Vis AS is useful to verify the intermediate state of an enzyme and to monitor the progression of reactions within crystals. Radiation induced redox changes within protein crystals may be monitored to devise effective diffraction data collection strategies. An overview of the specific effects of radiation damage on macromolecular crystals is presented along with data collection strategies that minimize these effects by combining data from multiple crystals used at the synchrotron and with the X-ray free electron laser.

  18. X-ray photo-emission and energy dispersive spectroscopy of HA coated titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drummond, J.L.; Steinberg, A.D. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States); Krauss, A.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the chemical composition changes of hydroxyapatite (HA) coated titanium using surface analysis (x-ray photo-emission) and bulk analysis (energy dispersive spectroscopy). The specimens examined were controls, 30 minutes and 3 hours aged specimens in distilled water or 0.2M sodium phosphate buffer (pH 7.2) at room temperature. Each x-ray photo-emission cycle consisted of 3 scans followed by argon sputtering for 10 minutes for a total of usually 20 cycles, corresponding to a sampling depth of {approximately} 1500 {angstrom}. The energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis was on a 110 by 90 {mu}m area for 500 sec. Scanning electron microscopy examination showed crystal formation (3P{sub 2}O{sub 5}*2CAO*?H{sub 2}O by energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis) on the HA coating for the specimens aged in sodium phosphate buffer. The x-ray photo-emission results indicated the oxidation effect of water on the titanium (as TiO{sub 2}) and the effect of the buffer to increase the surface concentration of phosphorous. No differences in the chemical composition were observed by energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis. The crystal growth was only observed for the sodium phosphate buffer specimens and only on the HA surface.

  19. X-ray and photoelectron spectroscopy of the structure, reactivity, and electronic structure of semiconductor nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamad, Kimberly Sue [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals are a system which has been the focus of interest due to their size dependent properties and their possible use in technological applications. Many chemical and physical properties vary systematically with the size of the nanocrystal and thus their study enables the investigation of scaling laws. Due to the increasing surface to volume ratio as size is decreased, the surfaces of nanocrystals are expected to have a large influence on their electronic, thermodynamic, and chemical behavior. In spite of their importance, nanocrystal surfaces are still relatively uncharacterized in terms of their structure, electronic properties, bonding, and reactivity. Investigation of nanocrystal surfaces is currently limited by what techniques to use, and which methods are suitable for nanocrystals is still being determined. This work presents experiments using x-ray and electronic spectroscopies to explore the structure, reactivity, and electronic properties of semiconductor (CdSe, InAs) nanocrystals and how they vary with size. Specifically, x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) in conjunction with multiple scattering simulations affords information about the structural disorder present at the surface of the nanocrystal. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) probe the electronic structure in terms of hole screening, and also give information about band lineups when the nanocrystal is placed in electric contact with a substrate. XPS of the core levels of the nanocrystal as a function of photo-oxidation time yields kinetic data on the oxidation reaction occurring at the surface of the nanocrystal.

  20. Structure of the Mn complex in photosystem II: Insights from x-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2002-04-02

    We have used Mn K-edge absorption and Kb emission spectroscopies to determine the oxidation states of the Mn complex in the various S-states. We have started exploring the new technique of resonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectroscopy (RIXS); this technique can be characterized as a Raman process that uses K-edge energies (1s to 4p, {approx}6550 eV) to obtain L-edge-like spectra (2p to 3d, {approx}650 eV). The relevance of these data to the oxidation states and structure of the Mn complex is presented. We have obtained EXAFS data from the S0 and S3 states and observed heterogeneity in the Mn-Mn distances, leading us to conclude that there may be three rather than two di-(mu)-oxo bridged units present per tetranuclear Mn cluster. In addition, we have obtained data using Ca/Sr X-ray spectroscopy that provide evidence for a heteronuclear Mn/Ca cluster. The possibility of three di-(mu)-oxo-bridged Mn Mn moieties and the proximity of Ca is incorporated into developing structural models for the Mn cluster. The involvement of bridging and terminal O ligands of Mn in the mechanism of oxygen evolution is discussed in the context of our X-ray spectroscopy results.

  1. X-ray and photoelectron spectroscopy of the structure, reactivity, and electronic structure of semiconductor nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamad, K.S.

    2000-05-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals are a system which has been the focus of interest due to their size dependent properties and their possible use in technological applications. Many chemical and physical properties vary systematically with the size of the nanocrystal and thus their study enables the investigation of scaling laws. Due to the increasing surface to volume ratio as size is decreased, the surfaces of nanocrystals are expected to have a large influence on their electronic, thermodynamic, and chemical behavior. In spite of their importance, nanocrystal surfaces are still relatively uncharacterized in terms of their structure, electronic properties, bonding, and reactivity. Investigation of nanocrystal surfaces is currently limited by what techniques to use, and which methods are suitable for nanocrystals is still being determined. This work presents experiments using x-ray and electronic spectroscopies to explore the structure, reactivity, and electronic properties of semiconductor (CdSe, InAs) nanocrystals and how they vary with size. Specifically, x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) in conjunction with multiple scattering simulations affords information about the structural disorder present at the surface of the nanocrystal. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) probe the electronic structure in terms of hole screening, and also give information about band lineups when the nanocrystal is placed in electric contact with a substrate. XPS of the core levels of the nanocrystal as a function of photo-oxidation time yields kinetic data on the oxidation reaction occurring at the surface of the nanocrystal.

  2. Charge transfer in dissociating iodomethane and fluoromethane molecules ionized by intense femtosecond X-ray pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Boll

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast electron transfer in dissociating iodomethane and fluoromethane molecules was studied at the Linac Coherent Light Source free-electron laser using an ultraviolet-pump, X-ray-probe scheme. The results for both molecules are discussed with respect to the nature of their UV excitation and different chemical properties. Signatures of long-distance intramolecular charge transfer are observed for both species, and a quantitative analysis of its distance dependence in iodomethane is carried out for charge states up to I21+. The reconstructed critical distances for electron transfer are in good agreement with a classical over-the-barrier model and with an earlier experiment employing a near-infrared pump pulse.

  3. Simultaneous X-ray and Ultraviolet spectroscopy of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 5548. III. X-ray time variability

    CERN Document Server

    Kaastra, J S; Crenshaw, D M; Krämer, S B; Arav, N; George, I M; Liedahl, D A; Van der Meer, R L J; Paerels, F B S; Turner, T J; Yaqoob, T

    2004-01-01

    The Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 was observed for a week by Chandra using both the HETGS and LETGS spectrometers. In this paper we study the time variability of the continuum radiation. During our observation, the source showed a gradual increase in flux over four days, followed by a rapid decrease and flattening of the light curve afterwards. Superimposed upon these relatively slow variations several short duration bursts or quasi-periodic oscillations occured with a typical duration of several hours and separation between 0.6-0.9 days. The bursts show a delay of the hard X-rays with respect to the soft X-rays of a few hours. We interprete these bursts as due to a rotating, fluctuating hot spot at approximately 10 gravitational radii; the time delay of the hard X-rays from the bursts agree with the canonical picture of Inverse Compton scattering of the soft accretion disk photons on a hot medium that is relatively close to the central black hole.

  4. A von Hamos x-ray spectrometer based on a segmented-type diffraction crystal for single-shot x-ray emission spectroscopy and time-resolved resonant inelastic x-ray scattering studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szlachetko, J; Nachtegaal, M; de Boni, E; Willimann, M; Safonova, O; Sa, J; Smolentsev, G; Szlachetko, M; van Bokhoven, J A; Dousse, J-Cl; Hoszowska, J; Kayser, Y; Jagodzinski, P; Bergamaschi, A; Schmitt, B; David, C; Lücke, A

    2012-10-01

    We report on the design and performance of a wavelength-dispersive type spectrometer based on the von Hamos geometry. The spectrometer is equipped with a segmented-type crystal for x-ray diffraction and provides an energy resolution in the order of 0.25 eV and 1 eV over an energy range of 8000 eV-9600 eV. The use of a segmented crystal results in a simple and straightforward crystal preparation that allows to preserve the spectrometer resolution and spectrometer efficiency. Application of the spectrometer for time-resolved resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and single-shot x-ray emission spectroscopy is demonstrated.

  5. Use of X-ray absorption spectroscopy in the search for the best LIGO mirror coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Stephen C.

    2008-03-01

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) seeks to improve its sensitivity for gravity-wave detection by a factor of ten during its next phase of operation, Advanced LIGO. In order to achieve this goal it is necessary to design and fabricate test mass mirrors that help minimize the noise in the interferometers and in doing so maximize gravity-wave detection capability. In this talk we will present recent results from our program of X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements to obtain detailed chemical composition and structure of titania (TiO2)-doped tantala (Ta2O5) multilayers fabricated via ion beam sputtering on SiO2 substrates. Our investigations focus on how the microscopic features of the coatings influence their macroscopic mechanical loss properties. Our goal is to obtain correlations between chemical impurities and/or dopants and the optical absorption and mechanical loss characteristics of these multilayer coatings. To examine our samples we use synchrotron-based X-ray absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) techniques including Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS), X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and X-ray Fluorescence (XRF). We present chemical and structural data obtained at the titanium K-edge and tantalum LIII-edge as well as relative elemental distribution information (Ti/Ta, Fe/Ta, and Cr/Ta) obtained via XRF. Following a brief description of the LIGO experiment, our program of research in optical materials for use in advanced versions of the interferometer will be described.

  6. Retention Characteristics of CBTi144 Thin Films Explained by Means of X-Ray Photoemission Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Biasotto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available CaBi4Ti4O15 (CBTi144 thin films were grown on Pt/Ti/SiO2/Si substrates using a soft chemical solution and spin-coating method. Structure and morphology of the films were characterized by the X-ray Diffraction (XRD, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, Raman analysis, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The films present a single phase of layered-structured perovskite with polar axis orient. The a/b-axis orientation of the ferroelectric film is considered to be associated with the preferred orientation of the Pt bottom electrode. XPS measurements were employed to understand the nature of defects on the retention behavior of CBTi144 films. We have observed that the main source of retention-free characteristic of the capacitors is the oxygen environment in the CBTi144 lattice.

  7. Origin-independent calculation of quadrupole intensities in X-ray spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Bernadotte, Stephan; Jacob, Christoph R

    2012-01-01

    For electronic excitations in the ultraviolet and visible range of the electromagnetic spectrum, the intensities are usually calculated within the dipole approximation, which assumes that the oscillating electric field is constant over the whole molecule. For the short wavelengths used in X-ray spectroscopy, this dipole approximation breaks down and it becomes necessary to include higher-order contributions. In quantum-chemical approaches to X-ray spectroscopy, these so-called quadrupole intensities have so far been calculated by including contributions depending on the square of the electric-quadrupole and magnetic-dipole transition moments. However, the resulting quadrupole intensities depend on the choice of the origin of the coordinate system. Here, we show that for obtaining an origin-independent theory, one has to include all contributions that are of the same order in the wave vector consistently. This leads to two additional contributions depending on products of the electric-dipole and electric-octup...

  8. X-ray spectroscopy of the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauer, Ken; Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K

    2007-04-05

    Water oxidation to dioxygen in photosynthesis is catalyzed by a Mn4Ca cluster with O bridging in Photosystem II (PS II) of plants, algae and cyanobacteria. A variety of spectroscopic methods have been applied to analyzing the participation of the complex. X-ray spectroscopy is particularly useful because it is element-specific, and because it can reveal important structural features of the complex with high accuracy and identify the participation of Mn in the redox chemistry. Following a brief history of the application of X-ray spectroscopy to PS II, an overview of newer results will be presented and a description of the present state of our knowledge based on this approach.

  9. Coherent X-ray and laser spectroscopy measurements of diffusion in concentrated alpha-crystallin solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunaratne, V. N. C.

    The mammalian eye lens is composed of a concentrated solution of water soluble proteins called crystallins. Alpha-crystallin, the most abundant protein found in the lens, plays a crucial role in maintaining lens transparency and lens accommodation. However, alpha-crystallins along with other ocular proteins suffer from irreversible processes such as oxidation. One cause of oxidation is radiation-induced radical formation which alters the inter-molecular interactions, thereby degrading the normal function of ocular proteins. The main goal of this thesis is to quantify molecular scale dynamics of concentrated solutions of alpha-crystallins using coherent X-rays and visible laser light. I believe a detailed analysis of the dynamics pertaining to alpha-crystallin will provide the foundation to understand molecular scale mechanisms that lead to conditions like cataract and presbyopia. I explore the dynamics of concentrated alpha-crystallin solutions by measuring diffusive motion over a range of length scales using Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS). To a certain extent, the dynamical properties of crystallins obtained in this manner are consistent with established theories in colloidal physics. However, there are some deviations, which I will address in this thesis. In terms of X-ray data, I employed a new, efficient photon correlation technique to obtain the best possible signal, furthermore this technique is embedded in a stand-alone software program that has the ability to provide real time results, quickly and efficiently with the help of high performance computing resources available at Northern Illinois University (NIU). The technique has potential to be used by the coherent X-ray spectroscopy community in the future. In addition, by using X-ray scattering data, I probe potential modifications and or damage effects on alpha-crystallins due to radiation exposure. The damage analysis methodology described in this thesis

  10. X-ray absorption spectroscopy investigations on radioactive matter using MARS beamline at SOLEIL synchrotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llorens, Isabelle; Solari, Pier Lorenzo; Sitaud, Bruno [Synchrotron SOLEIL - l' Orme des Merisiers Saint Aubin, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); and others

    2014-07-01

    The MARS beamline at the SOLEIL synchrotron is dedicated to the characterization of radioactive material samples. One great advantage of the beamline is the possibility to characterize about 380 radionuclides by different X-ray techniques in the same place. This facility is unique in Europe. A wide energy range from around 3.5 keV to 36 keV K-edges from K to Cs, and L3 edges from Cd to Am and beyond can be used. The MARS beamline is optimized for X-ray absorption spectroscopy techniques (XANES/EXAFS), powder diffraction (XRD) but X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis, High Energy Resolution Fluorescence Detected-XAS (HERFD-XAS), X-ray Emission (XES) and μ-XAS/XRD are also possible. A description of the beamline as well as its performances are given in a first part. Then some scientific examples of XAS studies from users are presented which cover a wide variety of topics in radiochemistry and nuclear materials.

  11. Recent progress of soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of uranium compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimori, Shin-ichi; Takeda, Yukiharu; Okane, Tetsuo; Saitoh, Yuji [Condensed Matter Science Divisions, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Sayo, Hyogo (Japan); Fujimori, Atsushi [Condensed Matter Science Divisions, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Sayo, Hyogo (Japan); Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Yamagami, Hiroshi [Condensed Matter Science Divisions, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Sayo, Hyogo (Japan); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Yamamoto, Etsuji; Haga, Yoshinori [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Ōnuki, Yoshichika [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Faculty of Science, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    Recent progresses in the soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) studies (hν ≳ 100 eV) for uranium compounds are briefly reviewed. The soft X-ray PES has enhanced sensitivities for the bulk U 5f electronic structure, which is essential to understand the unique physical properties of uranium compounds. In particular, the recent remarkable improvement in energy resolutions from an order of 1 eV to 100 meV made it possible to observe fine structures in U 5f density of states. Furthermore, soft X-ray ARPES becomes available due to the increase of photon flux at beamlines in third generation synchrotron radiation facilities.The technique made it possible to observe bulk band structures and Fermi surfaces of uranium compounds and therefore, the results can be directly compared with theoretical models such as band-structure calculations. The core-level spectra of uranium compounds show a systematic behavior depending on their electronic structures, suggesting that they can be utilized to determine basic physical parameters such as the U 5f-ligand hybridizations or Comlomb interaction between U 5f electrons. It is shown that soft X-ray PES provides unique opportunities to understand the electronic structures of uranium compounds.

  12. The first X-ray imaging spectroscopy of quiescent solar active regions with NuSTAR

    CERN Document Server

    Hannah, I G; Smith, D M; Glesener, L; Krucker, S; Hudson, H S; Madsen, K K; Marsh, A; White, S M; Caspi, A; Shih, A Y; Harrison, F A; Stern, D; Boggs, S E; Christensen, F E; Craig, W W; Hailey, C J; Zhang, W W

    2016-01-01

    We present the first observations of quiescent active regions (ARs) using NuSTAR, a focusing hard X-ray telescope capable of studying faint solar emission from high temperature and non-thermal sources. We analyze the first directly imaged and spectrally resolved X-rays above 2~keV from non-flaring ARs, observed near the west limb on 2014 November 1. The NuSTAR X-ray images match bright features seen in extreme ultraviolet and soft X-rays. The NuSTAR imaging spectroscopy is consistent with isothermal emission of temperatures $3.1-4.4$~MK and emission measures $1-8\\times 10^{46}$~cm$^{-3}$. We do not observe emission above 5~MK but our short effective exposure times restrict the spectral dynamic range. With few counts above 6~keV, we can place constraints on the presence of an additional hotter component between 5 and 12~MK of $\\sim 10^{46}$cm$^{-3}$ and $\\sim 10^{43}$ cm$^{-3}$, respectively, at least an order of magnitude stricter than previous limits. With longer duration observations and a weakening solar c...

  13. Helium Atmosphere Chamber for Soft X-ray Spectroscopy of Biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Matthew Hollis

    X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) is a powerful technique that can provide important information for the study of biological systems. The study of the structure and chemistry at the active metal sites in metalloproteins is important not only for the understanding of the function of the molecules themselves, but also in the hope that the mechanisms once understood may lead to advancement in catalytic chemistry and materials. While techniques using high-energy "hard" X-rays have been well developed for over three decades, the highly useful low-energy or "soft" X-ray regime has seen more recent application to biomolecules. Furthermore, the technical necessities of soft X-ray experiments - most notably the need for Ultra-High Vacuum (UHV) - place restrictions on the form and state of the sample and usually preclude liquid or frozen solution measurements. The Helium atmosphere chamber is designed to allow soft XAS of biomolecules and model compounds in a frozen state without exposure to UHV by isolating the sample inside a cryogenic gaseous exchange gas environment. The implementation allows easier sample handling than typical UHV chambers and measurement in conditions ranging from atmosphere (760 Torr) to 100s of mTorr. The system integrates with the existing end station setup at beam line 4.0.2 at the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  14. X-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy for Analysis of Explosive-Related Materials and Unknowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    common thin-film materials . Table B-1. Compatibility of Support Films for Wavelength Dispersive XRF Samples Sample Component Etnom...X-RAY FLUORESCENCE SPECTROSCOPY FOR ANALYSIS OF EXPLOSIVE-RELATED MATERIALS AND UNKNOWNS ECBC-TR-1455...of Explosive-Related Materials and Unknowns 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Valdes, Erica R

  15. A quantum perturbative pair distribution for determining interatomic potentials from extended X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Piazza, Francesco

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we develop a technique for determining interatomic potentials in materials in the quantum regime from single--shell Extended X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (EXAFS) spectra. We introduce a pair distribution function, based on ordinary quantum time--independent perturbation theory. In the proposed scheme, the model potential parameters enter the distribution through a fourth--order Taylor expansion of the potential, and are directly refined in the fit of the model signal to the exp...

  16. Atomic structure of machined semiconducting chips: An x-ray absorption spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paesler, M.; Sayers, D.

    1988-12-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to examine the atomic structure of chips of germanium that were produced by single point diamond machining. It is demonstrated that although the local (nearest neighbor) atomic structure is experimentally quite similar to that of single crystal specimens information from more distant atoms indicates the presence of considerable stress. An outline of the technique is given and the strength of XAS in studying the machining process is demonstrated.

  17. Ultrafast structural dynamics studied by kilohertz time-resolved x-ray diffraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭鑫; 江舟亚; 陈龙; 陈黎明; 辛建国; 陈洁

    2015-01-01

    Ultrashort multi-keV x-ray pulses are generated by electron plasma produced by the irradiation of femtosecond pulses on metals. These sub-picosecond x-ray pulses have extended the field of x-ray spectroscopy into the femtosecond time domain. However, pulse-to-pulse instability and long data acquisition time restrict the application of ultrashort x-ray systems operating at low repetition rates. Here we report on the performance of a femtosecond laser plasma-induced hard x-ray source that operates at 1-kHz repetition rate, and provides a flux of 2.0 × 1010 photons/s of Cu Kα radiation. Using this system for time-resolved x-ray diffraction experiments, we record in real time, the transient processes and structural changes induced by the interaction of 400-nm femtosecond pulse with the surface of a 200-nm thick Au (111) single crystal.

  18. Investigation Of Li{sub X}CoO{sub 2} Li- Intercalation Electrodes Using X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, O.; Holzapfel, M.; Yang, X.Q. [BNL Lab (United States); Yoon, W.-S. [BNL Lab (United States); Chung, K.-Y. [BNL Lab (United States)

    2005-03-01

    Li{sub X}CoO{sub 2} was investigated with X-ray absorption spectroscopy using hard and soft X-rays and compared with some results obtained in previous investigations of La{sub (1-x)}-Ca{sub x}CoO{sub 3}, which has a similar electron configuration. (author)

  19. Combination of Raman, infrared, and X-ray energy-dispersion spectroscopies and X-ray d diffraction to study a fossilization process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa Filho, Francisco Eduardo de [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Regional do Cariri, Crato, CE (Brazil); Joao Herminio da Silva [Universidade Federal do Ceara, Cariri, Juazeiro do Norte, CE (Brazil); Saraiva, Antonio Alamo Feitosa; Brito, Deyvid Dennys S. [Departamento de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade Regional do Cariri, Crato, CE (Brazil); Viana, Bartolomeu Cruz [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Piaui, Teresina, PI, (Brazil); Abagaro, Bruno Tavares de Oliveira; Freire, Paulo de Tarso Cavalcante, E-mail: tarso@fisica.ufc.br [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil)

    2011-12-15

    X-ray diffraction was combined with X-ray energy-dispersion, Fourier-transform infrared, and Raman spectroscopies to study the fossilization of a Cretaceous specimen of the plant Brachyphyllum castilhoi, a fossil from the Ipubi Formation, in the Araripe Sedimentary Basin, Northeastern Brazil. Among the possible fossilization processes, which could involve pyrite, silicon oxide, calcium oxide, or other minerals, we were able to single out pyritization as the central mechanism producing the fossil, more than 100 million years ago. In addition to expanding the knowledge of the Ipubi Formation, this study shows that, when combined with other experimental techniques, Raman spectroscopy is a valuable tool at the paleontologist's disposal. (author)

  20. First combined total reflection X-ray fluorescence and grazing incidence X-ray absorption spectroscopy characterization of aeolian dust archived in Antarctica and Alpine deep ice cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cibin, G. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxon OX110DE (United Kingdom); IMONT/EIM, Ente Italiano della Montagna, P.za dei Caprettari 70, 00176 Roma (Italy); Universita' degli Studi di Roma Tre, Dipartimento di Scienze Geologiche, L.go S. Leonardo Murialdo 1, 00146 Roma (Italy)], E-mail: giannantonio.cibin@diamond.ac.uk; Marcelli, A. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, P.O. Box 13, 00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Maggi, V. [Universita degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Scienze dell' Ambiente e del Territorio, Piazza della Scienza 1, 20126 Milano (Italy); Sala, M. [Universita degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Scienze dell' Ambiente e del Territorio, Piazza della Scienza 1, 20126 Milano (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra ' A. Desio' , Sez. Mineralogia, Via Mangiagalli 34, 20133 Milano (Italy); Marino, F.; Delmonte, B. [Universita degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Scienze dell' Ambiente e del Territorio, Piazza della Scienza 1, 20126 Milano (Italy); Albani, S. [Universita degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Scienze dell' Ambiente e del Territorio, Piazza della Scienza 1, 20126 Milano (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Siena, Dottorato in Scienze Polari, via Laterina 8, 53100 Siena (Italy); Pignotti, S. [IMONT/EIM, Ente Italiano della Montagna, P.za dei Caprettari 70, 00176 Roma (Italy)

    2008-12-15

    Aeolian mineral dust archived in polar and mid latitude ice cores represents a precious proxy for assessing environmental and climatic variations at different timescales. In this respect, the identification of dust mineralogy plays a key role. In this work we performed the first preliminary X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) experiments on mineral dust particles extracted from Antarctic and from Alpine firn cores using grazing incidence geometry at the Fe K-edge. A dedicated high vacuum experimental chamber was set up for normal-incidence and total-reflection X-Ray Fluorescence and Absorption Spectroscopy analyses on minor amounts of mineral materials at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Results show that this experimental technique and protocol allows recognizing iron inclusion mineral fraction on insoluble dust in the 1-10 {mu}g range.

  1. High-brightness beamline for x-ray spectroscopy at the ALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perera, R.C.C.; Jones, G. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Lindle, D.W. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Beamline 9.3.1 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a windowless beamline, covering the 1-6 keV photon-energy range, designed to achieve the goals of high energy resolution, high flux, and high brightness at the sample. When completed later this year, it will be the first ALS monochromatic hard x-ray beamline, and its brightness will be an order of magnitude higher than presently available in this energy range. In addition, it will provide flux and resolution comparable to any other beamline now in operation. To achieve these goals, two technical improvements, relative to existing x-ray beamlines, were incorporated. First, a somewhat novel optical design for x-rays, in which matched toroidal mirrors are positioned before and after the double-crystal monochromator, was adopted. This configuration allows for high resolution by passing a collimated beam through the monochromator, and for high brightness by focusing the ALS source on the sample with unit magnification. Second, a new {open_quotes}Cowan type{close_quotes} double-crystal monochromator based on the design used at NSLS beamline X-24A was developed. The measured mechanical precision of this new monochromator shows significant improvement over existing designs, without using positional feedback available with piezoelectric devices. Such precision is essential because of the high brightness of the radiation and the long distance (12 m) from the source (sample) to the collimating (focusing) mirror. This combination of features will provide a bright, high resolution, and stable x-ray beam for use in the x-ray spectroscopy program at the ALS.

  2. Unveiling the Structure of Active Galactic Nuclei with Hard X-ray Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balokovic, Mislav

    Despite the long history of studies of active galactic nuclei (AGN), details of the structure of the accretion flow onto supermassive black holes are far from clear. Work presented in this thesis is directed at unveiling properties of AGN structure through broadband X-ray spectroscopy, with particular emphasis on the hard X-ray band (photon energies above 10 keV). With its unprecedented sensitivity in this energy band, the NuSTAR telescope provides the key observational diagnostics of the properties of the AGN X-ray source, the corona, and the surrounding gas in the accretion disk, the broad-line region, and the torus. The first study presented in this thesis focuses on measurements of the optical depth and the temperature of the plasma in the corona of an obscured AGN. Fitting theoretical spectral models for coronal emission to the NuSTAR data constrained these two basic physical parameters under the assumption of either spherical or disk-like geometry for the corona. The remainder of the thesis is dedicated to studies of the anisotropic obscuring structure broadly referred to as the torus. One of them is a case study of three heavily obscured AGN with spectra dominated by the X-ray light scattered and reprocessed in the torus, where it is possible to constrain one of the basic torus properties - its globally averaged column density. The following study presents the calculation of a new spectral model for reprocessing of the intrinsic X-ray continuum within the torus. Its added flexibility compared to previously available models allows for both the average column density of the torus and its covering factor to be constrained from broadband X-ray spectra of a wide variety of AGN. The final part of the thesis in based on a large survey of the local obscured AGN population performed with NuSTAR. Spectral modeling of more than a hundred individual AGN, including both old and new spectral models, is presented. From analyses of the X-ray data for a large and

  3. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray spectroscopy applied to mycelial phase of sporothrix schenckii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Thibaut

    1975-04-01

    Full Text Available Scanning electron microscopy applied to the mycelial phase of Sporothrix schenckii shows a matted mycelium with conidia of a regular pattern. X-Ray microanalysis applied in energy dispersive spectroscopy and also in wavelength dispersive spectroscopy reveals the presence of several elements of Mendeleef's classification.Sporothrix schenckii foi estudado em microscopia eletrônica. Foram observados caracteres das hífas e dos esporos, vários elementos da classificação periódica foram postos em evidência graças à micro-análise a raios X.

  4. Highly multiplexible thermal kinetic inductance detectors for x-ray imaging spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulbricht, Gerhard, E-mail: ulbricht@physics.ucsb.edu; Mazin, Benjamin A.; Szypryt, Paul; Walter, Alex B.; Bockstiegel, Clint [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Bumble, Bruce [NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2015-06-22

    For X-ray imaging spectroscopy, high spatial resolution over a large field of view is often as important as high energy resolution, but current X-ray detectors do not provide both in the same device. Thermal Kinetic Inductance Detectors (TKIDs) are being developed as they offer a feasible way to combine the energy resolution of transition edge sensors with pixel counts approaching CCDs and thus promise significant improvements for many X-ray spectroscopy applications. TKIDs are a variation of Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) and share their multiplexibility: working MKID arrays with 2024 pixels have recently been demonstrated and much bigger arrays are under development. In this work, we present a TKID prototype, which is able to achieve an energy resolution of 75 eV at 5.9 keV, even though its general design still has to be optimized. We further describe TKID fabrication, characterization, multiplexing, and working principle and demonstrate the necessity of a data fitting algorithm in order to extract photon energies. With further design optimizations, we expect to be able to improve our TKID energy resolution to less than 10 eV at 5.9 keV.

  5. Highly Multiplexible Thermal Kinetic Inductance Detectors for X-Ray Imaging Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ulbricht, Gerhard; Szypryt, Paul; Walter, Alex B; Bockstiegel, Clint; Bumble, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    For X-ray imaging spectroscopy, high spatial resolution over a large field of view is often as important as high energy resolution, but current X-ray detectors do not provide both in the same device. Thermal Kinetic Inductance Detectors (TKIDs) are being developed as they offer a feasible way to combine the energy resolution of transition edge sensors with pixel counts approaching CCDs and thus promise significant improvements for many X-ray spectroscopy applications. TKIDs are a variation of Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) and share their multiplexibility: working MKID arrays with 2024 pixels have recently been demonstrated and much bigger arrays are under development. In this work, we present our first working TKID prototypes which are able to achieve an energy resolution of 75 eV at 5.9 keV, even though their general design still has to be optimized. We further describe TKID fabrication, characterization, multiplexing and working principle and demonstrate the necessity of a data fitting algo...

  6. Advancements in time-resolved x-ray laser induced time-of-flight photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, A J; Dunn, J; Widmann, K; Ao, T; Ping, Y; Hunter, J; Ng, A

    2005-07-28

    Time-resolved soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to probe the non-steady-state evolution of the valence band electronic structure of laser heated ultra-thin (50 nm) metal foils and bulk semiconductors. Single-shot soft x-ray laser induced time-of-flight photoelectron spectroscopy with picosecond time resolution was used in combination with optical measurements of the disassembly dynamics that have shown the existence of a metastable liquid phase in fs-laser heated metal foils persisting 4-5 ps. This metastable phase is studied using a 527 nm wavelength 400 fs laser pulse containing 0.3-2.5 mJ laser energy focused in a large 500 x 700 {micro}m{sup 2} spot to create heated conditions of 0.2-1.8 x 10{sup 12} W cm{sup -2} intensity. The unique LLNL COMET compact tabletop soft x-ray laser source provided the necessary high photon flux, highly monoenergetic, picosecond pulse duration, and coherence for observing the evolution of changes in the valence band electronic structure of laser heated metals and semiconductors with picosecond time resolution. This work demonstrates the continuing development of a powerful new technique for probing reaction dynamics and changes of local order on surfaces on their fundamental timescales including phenomena such as non-thermal melting, chemical bond formation, intermediate reaction steps, and the existence of transient reaction products.

  7. Mineral identification in Colombian coals using Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fajardo, M. [Universidad del Valle, A.A, Departamento de Fisica (Colombia); Mojica, J. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones en Geociencia, Mineria y Quimica (INGEOMINAS) (Colombia); Barraza, J. [Universidad del Valle, A.A, Departamento de Procesos Quimicos, Facultad de Ingenieria (Colombia); Perez Alcazar, G.A.; Tabares, J.A. [Universidad del Valle, A.A, Departamento de Fisica (Colombia)

    1999-11-15

    Minerals were identified in three Colombian coal samples from the Southwest of the country using Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Original and sink separated coal fractions of specific gravity 1.40 and 1.60 with particle size less than 600 {mu}m were used in the study. Using Moessbauer spectroscopy, the minerals identified in the original coal samples were pyrite jarosite, ankerite, illite and ferrous sulfate, whereas by means of X-ray diffraction, minerals identified were kaolinite, quartz, pyrite, and jarosite. Differences in mineral composition were found in the original and sink separated fractions using both techniques. Moessbauer spectra show that the mineral phases in low concentrations such as illite, ankerite and ferrous sulfate do not always appear in the spectra of sink coals, despite of those minerals occurring in the original coal, due to the fact that they are associated with the organic matter and not liberated in the grinding process. X-ray results show that the peak intensity grows as the specific gravity is increased indicating that the density separation method could be an effective process to clean coal.

  8. X-ray Spectroscopy and Diffraction at HPCAT - An Integrated High Pressure Synchrotron Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, H.; Hemley, R. J.; Hausermann, D.; Hu, M.; Meng, Y.; Somayazulu, M.

    2002-05-01

    High Pressure Collaborative Access Team (HPCAT) is a new facility dedicated for high-pressure research using the high-energy synchrotron beams at the Advanced Photon Source for in-situ investigations of crystallographic, elastic, rheologic, electronic, and magnetic properties of solids, liquids, and amorphous materials at high P and simultaneous high T or cryogenic T. The HPCAT high-brilliance undulator beamline is optimized for a full range of high-pressure x-ray spectroscopy. For instance, nuclear resonant inelastic scattering measures phonon densities of state of Fe-containing samples that yield valuable information on acoustic wave velocity, elasticity, elastic anisotropy, and thermodynamic quantities (vibrational energy, heat capacity, entropy, Debye temperature, and Gr\\x81neisen parameter) of materials at high pressures. Nuclear resonant x-ray forward scattering measures M”ssbauer spectra in the time domain that yield information on magnetism, site occupancy, oxidation states, and the Lamb-M”ssbauer coefficient of Fe. Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering measures element-specific electronic transitions. The medium-resolution (10-100 meV) non-resonant x-ray inelastic scattering measures electronic energies and dispersions that yield information on plasmons, excitons, electronic band structures, and chemical bondings, and high-resolution (<10 meV) inelastic scattering measures phonon dispersions that yield information on acoustic wave velocity and elasticity as a function of crystallographic orientation. X-ray emission spectroscopy yields information on valence electrons and spin states of d-electrons. A diamond branch monochromator diverts a full-intensity undulator monochromatic beam at energies up to 35 keV for full-time x-ray diffraction studies of crystallography, phase transitions, and equations of state in a side station without affecting the simultaneous operation of the main undualtor beamline. The HPCAT bending-magnet beamline is divided into two

  9. Elemental characterisation of melanin in feathers via synchrotron X-ray imaging and absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Nicholas P.; van Veelen, Arjen; Anné, Jennifer; Manning, Phillip L.; Bergmann, Uwe; Sellers, William I.; Egerton, Victoria M.; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa; Ito, Shosuke; Wogelius, Roy A.

    2016-09-01

    Melanin is a critical component of biological systems, but the exact chemistry of melanin is still imprecisely known. This is partly due to melanin’s complex heterogeneous nature and partly because many studies use synthetic analogues and/or pigments extracted from their natural biological setting, which may display important differences from endogenous pigments. Here we demonstrate how synchrotron X-ray analyses can non-destructively characterise the elements associated with melanin pigment in situ within extant feathers. Elemental imaging shows that the distributions of Ca, Cu and Zn are almost exclusively controlled by melanin pigment distribution. X-ray absorption spectroscopy demonstrates that the atomic coordination of zinc and sulfur is different within eumelanised regions compared to pheomelanised regions. This not only impacts our fundamental understanding of pigmentation in extant organisms but also provides a significant contribution to the evidence-based colour palette available for reconstructing the appearance of fossil organisms.

  10. STRUCTURAL DETERMINATION OF TITANIUM-OXIDE NANOPARTICLES BY X-RAY ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z.Y.Wu; Y.N.Xie; Q.H.Zhang; L.Gao; Z.Z.Chen; J.Zhang; K.Ibrahim; M.I.Abbas; G.Li; Y.Tao; T.D.Hu; F.Q.Liu; H.J.Qian

    2002-01-01

    As a potential application of titanium-oxide nanoparticles, it is extremely importantto investigate a detailed picture of the surface and interior structural properties ofnanocrystalline materials, such as rutile and anatase with diameters 7.0 and 4.5nm,respectively. X-ray absorption spectroscopy has been used to identify the local Ti envi-ronment and related electronic structure. We combine the experimental results at theTi edge in both bulk and nano-crystals to determine the lattice distortion in terms ofdifferently characteristic preedge features and the variation in the multiple-scatteringregion of X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra. The relationshipbetween the transition peaks and the surface-to volume ratio is also discussed.

  11. Identifying anthropogenic uranium compounds using soft X-ray near-edge absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Jesse D.; Bowden, Mark; Tom Resch, C.; Eiden, Gregory C.; Pemmaraju, C. D.; Prendergast, David; Duffin, Andrew M.

    2017-01-01

    Uranium ores mined for industrial use are typically acid-leached to produce yellowcake and then converted into uranium halides for enrichment and purification. These anthropogenic chemical forms of uranium are distinct from their mineral counterparts. The purpose of this study is to use soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy to characterize several common anthropogenic uranium compounds important to the nuclear fuel cycle. Non-destructive chemical analyses of these compounds is important for process and environmental monitoring and X-ray absorption techniques have several advantages in this regard, including element-specificity, chemical sensitivity, and high spectral resolution. Oxygen K-edge spectra were collected for uranyl nitrate, uranyl fluoride, and uranyl chloride, and fluorine K-edge spectra were collected for uranyl fluoride and uranium tetrafluoride. Interpretation of the data is aided by comparisons to calculated spectra. These compounds have unique spectral signatures that can be used to identify unknown samples.

  12. X-Ray Laser Induced Photoelectron Spectroscopy for Single-State Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, A J; Dunn, J; van Buuren, T; Hunter, J

    2004-07-14

    We demonstrate single-shot x-ray laser induced time-of-flight photoelectron spectroscopy on metal and semiconductor surfaces with picosecond time resolution. The LLNL COMET compact tabletop x-ray laser source provides the necessary high photon flux (>10{sup 12}/pulse), monochromaticity, picosecond pulse duration, and coherence for probing ultrafast changes in the chemical and electronic structure of these materials. Static valence band and shallow core-level photoemission spectra are presented for ambient temperature polycrystalline Cu foils and Ge(100). Surface contamination was removed by UV ozone cleaning prior to analysis. The ultrafast nature of this technique lends itself to true single-state measurements of shocked and heated materials.

  13. The nature of arsenic in uranium mill tailings by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, J. N.; Chen, N.; Jiang, D. T.; Demopoulos, G. P.; Jia, Y.; Rowson, J. W.

    2003-05-01

    In order to understand the evolving world of environmental issues, the ability to characterize and predict the stability and bioavailability of heavy métal contaminants in mine waste is becoming increasingly more important. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopies were used to characterize a series of synthetic and natural samples associated with mine tailings processing. XANES was shown to be excellent as a tool to rapidly differentiate oxidation states of arsenic within the samples. The EXAFS spectra provided information on the mineralogy of the precipitated raffinate and tailings and showed that these samples are composed of a mixture of amorphous ferric arsenates, adsorbed arsenates and a mixture of other poorly ordered arsenates.

  14. Elemental characterisation of melanin in feathers via synchrotron X-ray imaging and absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Nicholas P.; van Veelen, Arjen; Anné, Jennifer; Manning, Phillip L.; Bergmann, Uwe; Sellers, William I.; Egerton, Victoria M.; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa; Ito, Shosuke; Wogelius, Roy A.

    2016-01-01

    Melanin is a critical component of biological systems, but the exact chemistry of melanin is still imprecisely known. This is partly due to melanin’s complex heterogeneous nature and partly because many studies use synthetic analogues and/or pigments extracted from their natural biological setting, which may display important differences from endogenous pigments. Here we demonstrate how synchrotron X-ray analyses can non-destructively characterise the elements associated with melanin pigment in situ within extant feathers. Elemental imaging shows that the distributions of Ca, Cu and Zn are almost exclusively controlled by melanin pigment distribution. X-ray absorption spectroscopy demonstrates that the atomic coordination of zinc and sulfur is different within eumelanised regions compared to pheomelanised regions. This not only impacts our fundamental understanding of pigmentation in extant organisms but also provides a significant contribution to the evidence-based colour palette available for reconstructing the appearance of fossil organisms. PMID:27658854

  15. X-ray fluorescence/Auger-electron coincidence spectroscopy of vacancy cascades in atomic argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arp, U. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Electron and Optical Physics Div.; LeBrun, T.; Southworth, S.H.; Jung, M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Physics Div.; MacDonald, M.A. [E.P.S.R.C. Daresbury Lab., Warrington (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-01

    Argon L{sub 2.3}-M{sub 2.3}M{sub 2.3} Auger-electron spectra were measured in coincidence with K{alpha} fluorescent x-rays in studies of Ar K-shell vacancy decays at several photon energies above the K-threshold and on the 1s-4p resonance in atomic argon. The complex spectra recorded by conventional electron spectroscopy are greatly simplified when recorded in coincidence with fluorescent x-rays, allowing a more detailed analysis of the vacancy cascade process. The resulting coincidence spectra are compared with Hartree-Fock calculations which include shake-up transitions in the resonant case. Small energy shifts of the coincidence electron spectra are attributed to post-collision interaction with 1s photoelectrons.

  16. Determination of vertical phase separation in a polyfluorene copolymer : fullerene derivative solar cell blend by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Felicissimo, Marcella Passos; Jarzab, Dorota; Gorgoi, Mihaela; Forster, Michael; Scherf, Ullrich; Scharber, Markus C.; Svensson, Svante; Rudolf, Petra; Loi, Maria Antonietta

    2009-01-01

    A vertical phase separation is evidenced using high-kinetic-energy X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy at different photon energies in a polyfluorene copolymer:C(60) derivative blend relevant for photovoltaic application.

  17. Characterization of the Carancas-Puno meteorite by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffractometry and transmission Moessbauer spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceron Loayza, Maria L., E-mail: malucelo@hotmail.com; Bravo Cabrejos, Jorge A. [Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Laboratorio de Analisis de Suelos, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas (Peru)

    2011-11-15

    We report the results of the study of a meteorite that impacted an inhabited zone on 15 September 2007 in the neighborhood of the town of Carancas, Puno Region, about 1,300 km south of Lima. The analysis carried out by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffractometry and transmission Moessbauer spectroscopy (at room temperature and at 4.2 K), reveal the presence in the meteorite sample of magnetic sites assigned to taenite (Fe,Ni) and troilite (Fe,S) phases, and of two paramagnetic doublets assigned to Fe{sup 2 + }, one associated with olivine and the other to pyroxene. In accord with these results, this meteorite is classified as a type IV chondrite meteorite.

  18. X-ray absorption near the edge structure and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies on pyrite prepared by thermally sulfurizing iron films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Hui; Liu Ying-Shu; Wang Bao-Yi; Wei Long; Kui Re-Xi; Qian Hai-Jie

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports how pyrite films were prepared by thermal sulfurization of magnetron sputtered iron films and characterized by x-ray absorption near edge structure spectra and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy on a 4B9B beam line at the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The band gap of the pyrite agrees well with the optical band gap obtained by a spectrophotometer. The octahedral symmetry of pyrite leads to the splitting of the d orbit into t2g and eg levels. The high spin and low spin states were analysed through the difference of electron exchange interaction and the orbital crystal field. Only when the crystal field splitting is higher than 1.5 eV, the two weak peaks above the white lines can appear, and this was approved by experiments in the present work.

  19. Thermal and magnetic anomalies of α-iron: an exploration by extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and synchrotron x-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccato, Silvia; Sanson, Andrea; Kantor, Innokenty; Mathon, Olivier; Dyadkin, Vadim; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Carnera, Alberto; Pascarelli, Sakura

    2016-09-01

    The local structure and dynamics of α-iron have been investigated by extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD) in order to shed light on some thermal and magnetic anomalies observed in the last decades. The quantitative EXAFS analysis of the first two coordination shells reveals a peculiar local vibrational dynamics of α-iron: the second neighbor distance exhibits anharmonicity and vibrational anisotropy larger than the first neighbor distance. We search for possible distortions of the bcc structure to justify the unexplained magnetostriction anomalies of α-iron and provide a value for the maximum dislocation of the central Fe atom. No thermal anomalies have been detected from the current XRD data. On the contrary, an intriguing thermal anomaly at about 150 K, ascribed to a stiffening of the Fe-Fe bonds, was found by EXAFS.

  20. Characterization of Mo additions in iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts using X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, A. [Cain Department of Chemical Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States)], E-mail: acampo2@lsu.edu; Spivey, J.J. [Cain Department of Chemical Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Roy, A. [J. Bennett Johnson, Sr., Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70806 (United States); Lohitharn, N.; Goodwin, J.; Lotero, E. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Clemson University, 127 Earle Hall, Clemson, SC 29634 0909 (United States); Lamb, H. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Engineering Building I, Box 7905, 911 Partners Way, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)

    2007-11-11

    An iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalyst with a low concentration of molybdenum (90Fe/10Mo/5Cu/17Si) used as a promoter was characterized by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). The catalyst was prepared using coprecipitation, pretreated in CO, then one sample passivated and one calcined. The XRD data show that after CO pretreatment the calcined and passivated catalysts are almost amorphous with respect to Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} with nanoparticle size of 10 and 100 A for Fe{sub 3}C (only present in the passivated sample). Least squares fitting of the XANES region show that the calcined and passivated samples were similar in the bulk and surface structures, with the calcined samples completely oxidized. As expected, K and L{sub III} edges Mo-XANES shows only small molybdenum carbide formation compared to iron carbide.

  1. Investigation by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence and X-ray powder diffraction of the chemical composition of white clay ceramic tiles from Veliki Preslav

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagoev, K.; Grozeva, M.; Malcheva, G.; Neykova, S.

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the results of the application of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, and X-ray powder diffraction in assessing the chemical and phase composition of white clay decorative ceramic tiles from the medieval archaeological site of Veliki Preslav, a Bulgarian capital in the period 893-972 AC, well-known for its original ceramic production. Numerous white clay ceramic tiles with highly varied decoration, produced for wall decoration of city's churches and palaces, were found during the archaeological excavations in the old capital. The examination of fourteen ceramic tiles discovered in one of the city's monasteries is aimed at characterization of the chemical profile of the white-clay decorative ceramics produced in Veliki Preslav. Combining different methods and comparing the obtained results provides complementary information regarding the white-clay ceramic production in Veliki Preslav and complete chemical characterization of the examined artefacts.

  2. Ultrashort X-ray pulse science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, Alan Hap [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (US). Dept. of Physics; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-05-01

    A variety of phenomena involves atomic motion on the femtosecond time-scale. These phenomena have been studied using ultrashort optical pulses, which indirectly probe atomic positions through changes in optical properties. Because x-rays can more directly probe atomic positions, ultrashort x-ray pulses are better suited for the study of ultrafast structural dynamics. One approach towards generating ultrashort x-ray pulses is by 90° Thomson scattering between terawatt laser pulses and relativistic electrons. Using this technique, the author generated ~ 300 fs, 30 keV (0.4 Å) x-ray pulses. These x-ray pulses are absolutely synchronized with ultrashort laser pulses, allowing femtosecond optical pump/x-ray probe experiments to be performed. Using the right-angle Thomson scattering x-ray source, the author performed time-resolved x-ray diffraction studies of laser-perturbated InSb. These experiments revealed a delayed onset of lattice expansion. This delay is due to the energy relaxation from a dense electron-hole plasma to the lattice. The dense electron-hole plasma first undergoes Auger recombination, which reduces the carrier concentration while maintaining energy content. Longitudinal-optic (LO) phonon emission then couples energy to the lattice. LO phonon decay into acoustic phonons, and acoustic phonon propagation then causes the growth of a thermally expanded layer. Source characterization is instrumental in utilizing ultrashort x-ray pulses in time-resolved x-ray spectroscopies. By measurement of the electron beam diameter at the generation point, the pulse duration of the Thomson scattered x-rays is determined. Analysis of the Thomson scattered x-ray beam properties also provides a novel means of electron bunch characterization. Although the pulse duration is inferred for the Thomson scattering x-ray source, direct measurement is required for other x-ray pulse sources. A method based on the laser-assisted photoelectric effect (LAPE) has been demonstrated as a

  3. Ultrashort X-ray pulse science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, Alan Hap [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (US). Dept. of Physics; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-05-01

    A variety of phenomena involves atomic motion on the femtosecond time-scale. These phenomena have been studied using ultrashort optical pulses, which indirectly probe atomic positions through changes in optical properties. Because x-rays can more directly probe atomic positions, ultrashort x-ray pulses are better suited for the study of ultrafast structural dynamics. One approach towards generating ultrashort x-ray pulses is by 90{sup o} Thomson scattering between terawatt laser pulses and relativistic electrons. Using this technique, the author generated {approx} 300 fs, 30 keV (0.4 {angstrom}) x-ray pulses. These x-ray pulses are absolutely synchronized with ultrashort laser pulses, allowing femtosecond optical pump/x-ray probe experiments to be performed. Using the right-angle Thomson scattering x-ray source, the author performed time-resolved x-ray diffraction studies of laser-perturbated InSb. These experiments revealed a delayed onset of lattice expansion. This delay is due to the energy relaxation from a dense electron-hole plasma to the lattice. The dense electron-hole plasma first undergoes Auger recombination, which reduces the carrier concentration while maintaining energy content. Longitudinal-optic (LO) phonon emission then couples energy to the lattice. LO phonon decay into acoustic phonons, and acoustic phonon propagation then causes the growth of a thermally expanded layer. Source characterization is instrumental in utilizing ultrashort x-ray pulses in time-resolved x-ray spectroscopies. By measurement of the electron beam diameter at the generation point, the pulse duration of the Thomson scattered x-rays is determined. Analysis of the Thomson scattered x-ray beam properties also provides a novel means of electron bunch characterization. Although the pulse duration is inferred for the Thomson scattering x-ray source, direct measurement is required for other x-ray pulse sources. A method based on the laser-assisted photoelectric effect (LAPE) has

  4. Characterizing Hohlraum Plasma Conditions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Using X-ray Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, Maria Alejandra

    2015-11-01

    Improved hohlraums will have a significant impact on increasing the likelihood of indirect drive ignition at the NIF. In indirect-drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), a high-Z hohlraum converts laser power into a tailored x-ray flux that drives the implosion of a spherical capsule filled with D-T fuel. The x-radiation drive to capsule coupling sets the velocity, adiabat, and symmetry of the implosion. Previous experiments in gas-filled hohlraums determined that the laser-hohlraum energy coupling is 20-25% less than modeled, therefore identifying energy loss mechanisms that reduce the efficacy of the hohlraum drive is central to improving implosion performance. Characterizing the plasma conditions, particularly the plasma electron temperature (Te) , is critical to understanding mechanism that affect the energy coupling such as the laser plasma interactions (LPI), hohlraum x-ray conversion efficiency, and dynamic drive symmetry. The first Te measurements inside a NIF hohlraum, presented here, were achieved using K-shell X-ray spectroscopy of an Mn-Co tracer dot. The dot is deposited on a thin-walled CH capsule, centered on the hohlraum symmetry axis below the laser entrance hole (LEH) of a bottom-truncated hohlraum. The hohlraum x-ray drive ablates the dot and causes it to flow upward, towards the LEH, entering the hot laser deposition region. An absolutely calibrated streaked spectrometer with a line of sight into the LEH records the temporal history of the Mn and Co X-ray emission. The measured (interstage) Lyα/ Heα line ratios for Co and Mn and the Mn-Heα/Co-Heα isoelectronic line ratio are used to infer the local plasma Te from the atomic physics code SCRAM. Time resovled x-ray images perpendicular to the hohlraum axis record the dot expansion and trajectory into the LEH region. The temporal evolution of the measured Te and dot trajectory are compared with simulations from radiation-hydrodynamic codes. This work was performed under the auspices of the U

  5. X-ray and optical spectroscopy of the massive young open cluster IC 1805

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauw, G.; Nazé, Y.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Very young open clusters are ideal places to study the X-ray properties of a homogeneous population of early-type stars. In this respect, the IC 1805 open cluster is very interesting as it hosts the O4 If+ star HD 15570 thought to be in an evolutionary stage intermediate between a normal O-star and a Wolf-Rayet star. Aims: Such a star could provide a test for theoretical models aiming at explaining the empirical scaling relation between the X-ray and bolometric luminosities of O-type stars. Methods: We have observed IC 1805 with XMM-Newton and further collected optical spectroscopy of some of the O-star members of the cluster. Results: The optical spectra allow us to revisit the orbital solutions of BD+60° 497 and HD 15558, and provide the first evidence of binarity for BD+60° 498. X-ray emission from colliding winds does not appear to play an important role among the O-stars of IC 1805. Notably, the X-ray fluxes do not vary significantly between archival X-ray observations and our XMM-Newton pointing. The very fast rotator BD+60° 513, and to a lesser extent the O4 If+ star HD 15570 appear somewhat underluminous. Whilst the underluminosity of HD 15570 is only marginally significant, its amplitude is found to be compatible with theoretical expectations based on its stellar and wind properties. A number of other X-ray sources are detected in the field, and the brightest objects, many of which are likely low-mass pre-main sequence stars, are analyzed in detail. Based on observations collected with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA member states and the USA (NASA), and with the TIGRE telescope (La Luz, Mexico).Table A.1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/594/A82

  6. Electronic Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials with Photon-in/Photon-out Soft-X-Ray Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Jinghua

    2008-09-22

    The applications of resonant soft X-ray emission spectroscopy on a variety of carbon systems have yielded characteristic fingerprints. With high-resolution monochromatized synchrotron radiation excitation, resonant inelastic X-ray scattering has emerged as a new source of information about electronic structure and excitation dynamics. Photon-in/photon-out soft-X-ray spectroscopy is used to study the electronic properties of fundamental materials, nanostructure, and complex hydrides and will offer potential in-depth understanding of chemisorption and/or physisorption mechanisms of hydrogen adsorption/desorption capacity and kinetics.

  7. Characteristics of ultrafast K line hard x-ray source from femtosecond terawatt laser-produced plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈敏; 陈建文; 高鸿奕; 陆培祥; 徐至展

    2003-01-01

    Theoretical studies and analytical scalings were carried out to find the optimized laser parameters and target conditions so that ultrashort hard x-ray pulses and high x-ray power could be achieved. The dependence of laser intensity and wavelength on the yield of K-shell x-ray emission was studied. We propose an optimal design for a foil target for producing high-yield hard x-ray pulses of customizing duration.

  8. Protein dynamics in an intermediate state of myoglobin: optical absorption, resonance Raman spectroscopy, and x-ray structure analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    N. Engler; Ostermann, A; Gassmann, A.; Lamb, D C; Prusakov, V E; J. Schott; Schweitzer-Stenner, R; Parak, F. G.

    2000-01-01

    A metastable state of myoglobin is produced by reduction of metmyoglobin at low temperatures. This is done either by irradiation with x-rays at 80 K or by electron transfer from photoexcited tris(2, 2'-bipyridine)-ruthenium(II) at 20 K. At temperatures above 150 K, the conformational transition toward the equilibrium deoxymyoglobin is observed. X-ray crystallography, Raman spectroscopy, and temperature-dependent optical absorption spectroscopy show that the metastable state has a six-ligated ...

  9. Hitomi X-ray Astronomy Satellite: Power of High-Resolution Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odaka, Hirokazu; Aff001

    2017-01-01

    Hitomi (ASTRO-H) is an X-ray observatory developed by an international collaboration led by JAXA. An X-ray microcalorimeter onboard this satellite has opened a new window of high-resolution spectroscopy with an unprecedented energy resolution of 5 eV (FWHM) at 6 keV. The spacecraft was launched on February 17, 2016 from Tanegashima Island, Japan, and we completed initial operations including deployment of the hard X-ray imagers on the extensible optical bench. All scientific instruments had successfully worked until the sudden loss of the mission on March 26. We have obtained a spectrum showing fully resolved emission lines through the first-light observation of the Perseus Cluster. The line-of-sight velocity dispersion of 164 +/- 10 km s-1 reveals the quiescent environment of intracluster medium at the cluster core, implying that measured cluster mass requires little correction for the turbulent pressure. We also discuss observations to the Galactic Center which could be performed with Hitomi.

  10. Ultradast Absorption Spectroscopy of Aluminum Plasmas Created by LCLS using Betatron X-Ray Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, Felicie [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-12

    This document summarizes the goals and accomplishments of a six month-long LDRD project, awarded through the LLNL director Early and Mid Career Recognition (EMCR) program. This project allowed us to support beamtime awarded at the Matter under Extreme Conditions (MEC) end station of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The goal of the experiment was to heat metallic samples with the bright x-rays from the LCLS free electron laser. Then, we studied how they relaxed back to equilibrium by probing them with ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy using laser-based betatron radiation. Our work enabled large collaborations between LLNL, SLAC, LBNL, and institutions in France and in the UK, while providing training to undergraduate and graduate students during the experiment. Following this LDRD project, the PI was awarded a 5-year DOE early career research grant to further develop applications of laser-driven x-ray sources for high energy density science experiments and warm dense matter states.

  11. Observation of iron spin-states using tabletop x-ray emission spectroscopy and microcalorimeter sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joe, Y. I.; O'Neil, G. C.; Miaja-Avila, L.; Fowler, J. W.; Jimenez, R.; Silverman, K. L.; Swetz, D. S.; Ullom, J. N.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) is a powerful probe of the electronic and chemical state of elemental species embedded within complex compounds. X-ray sensors that combine high resolving power and high collecting efficiency are desirable for photon-starved XES experiments such as measurements of dilute, gaseous, and radiation-sensitive samples, time-resolved measurements, and in-laboratory XES. To assess whether arrays of cryogenic microcalorimeters will be useful in photon-starved XES scenarios, we demonstrate that these emerging energy-dispersive sensors can detect the spin-state of 3d electrons of iron in two different compounds, Fe2O3 and FeS2. The measurements were conducted with a picosecond pulsed laser-driven plasma as the exciting x-ray source. The use of this tabletop source suggests that time-resolved in-laboratory XES will be possible in the future. We also present simulations of {{K}}α and {{K}}β spectra that reveal the spin-state sensitivity of different combinations of sensor resolution and accumulated counts. These simulations predict that our current experimental apparatus can perform time-resolved XES measurements on some samples with a measurement time of a few 10 s of hours per time delay.

  12. The amorphous Zn biomineralization at Naracauli stream, Sardinia: electron microscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medas, D; Lattanzi, P; Podda, F; Meneghini, C; Trapananti, A; Sprocati, A; Casu, M A; Musu, E; De Giudici, G

    2014-01-01

    An amorphous Zn biomineralization ("white mud"), occurring at Naracauli stream, Sardinia, in association with cyanobacteria Leptolyngbya frigida and diatoms, was investigated by electron microscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Preliminary diffraction analysis shows that the precipitate sampled on Naracauli stream bed is mainly amorphous, with some peaks ascribable to quartz and phyllosilicates, plus few minor unattributed peaks. Scanning electron microscopy analysis shows that the white mud, precipitated in association with a seasonal biofilm, is made of sheaths rich in Zn, Si, and O, plus filaments likely made of organic matter. Transmission electron microscopy analysis shows that the sheaths are made of smaller units having a size in the range between 100 and 200 nm. X-ray absorption near-edge structure and extended X-ray absorption fine structure data collected at the Zn K-edge indicate that the biomineral has a local structure similar to hemimorphite, a zinc sorosilicate. The differences of this biomineral with respect to the hydrozincite biomineralization documented about 3 km upstream in the same Naracauli stream may be related to either variations in the physicochemical parameters and/or different metabolic behavior of the involved biota.

  13. Studies of ionic liquid solutions by soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Fabio [Departamento de Quimica Fundamental, Instituto de Quimica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, CP 26.077, CEP 05513-970, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Nascimento, Gustavo M. do [Departamento de Quimica Fundamental, Instituto de Quimica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, CP 26.077, CEP 05513-970, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: morari@yahoo.com; Santos, Paulo S. [Departamento de Quimica Fundamental, Instituto de Quimica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, CP 26.077, CEP 05513-970, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2007-03-15

    Soft X-ray spectroscopies give specific information about the electronic structure around light elements. The high absorption of soft X-rays by almost every molecule, including air, requires studies under vacuum, which represents a great limitation. Solids with high vapor pressure and liquids are very difficult to be studied, making solution chemistry almost neglected. This work explores the use of ionic liquids, organic liquids with very low vapor pressure, as media to study chemical solutions using soft X-ray. N 1s spectra are reported of ionic liquid solutions of 1-methyl-3alkyl-imidazolium cation with different anions and chain lengths, and urea/choline chloride mixtures (a deep eutectic solvent) with several solutes including dyes (Janus Green B and Congo Red), synthetic polymers (polyaniline) and nitrate salts. While there are significant problems with the signal of the solvent, the results do show that it is possible to detect solute signals, and further to see spectral changes attributed to solvent-solute interactions.

  14. X-ray spectroscopy with a multi-anode sawtooth silicon drift detector the diffusion process

    CERN Document Server

    Sonsky, J; Sarro, P M; Eijk, C W

    2002-01-01

    The position sensitive detection of low-energy X-rays can be realized by means of a multi-anode linear silicon drift detector (SDD). However, a severe worsening of the spectroscopic quality of the detector is observed due to the lateral broadening of the X-ray generated electron cloud during drift. Recently, we have proved experimentally that electron confinement can be achieved by means of sawtooth-shaped p sup + strips; the sawtooth concept. This paper will present room temperature X-ray spectroscopy measurements clearly demonstrating the improvement of spectroscopic quality of the sawtooth SDD as compared with a traditional linear SDD. Using a sawtooth SDD we have measured an energy resolution of 1.4 keV FWHM at the 13.9 keV peak of sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am at room temperature and a substantial reduction of the number of split events is also observed. The calculation of the influence of diffusion on the quality of the pulse height spectrum will also be given.

  15. Ultrafast Absorption Spectroscopy of Aluminum Plasmas Created by LCLS using Betatron X-Ray Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, Felicie [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-12

    This document summarizes the goals and accomplishments of a six month-long LDRD project, awarded through the LLNL director Early and Mid Career Recognition (EMCR) program. This project allowed us to support beamtime awarded at the Matter under Extreme Conditions (MEC) end station of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The goal of the experiment was to heat metallic samples with the bright x-rays from the LCLS free electron laser. Then, we studied how they relaxed back to equilibrium by probing them with ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy using laser-based betatron radiation. Our work enabled large collaborations between LLNL, SLAC, LBNL, and institutions in France and in the UK, while providing training to undergraduate and graduate students during the experiment. Following this LDRD project, the PI was awarded a 5-year DOE early career research grant to further develop applications of laser-driven x-ray sources for high energy density science experiments and warm dense matter states.

  16. New Homogeneous Standards by Atomic Layer Deposition for Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence and Absorption Spectroscopies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butterworth, A.L.; Becker, N.; Gainsforth, Z.; Lanzirotti, A.; Newville, M.; Proslier, T.; Stodolna, J.; Sutton, S.; Tyliszczak, T.; Westphal, A.J.; Zasadzinski, J. (UCB)

    2012-03-13

    Quantification of synchrotron XRF analyses is typically done through comparisons with measurements on the NIST SRM 1832/1833 thin film standards. Unfortunately, these standards are inhomogeneous on small scales at the tens of percent level. We are synthesizing new homogeneous multilayer standards using the Atomic Layer Deposition technique and characterizing them using multiple analytical methods, including ellipsometry, Rutherford Back Scattering at Evans Analytical, Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence (SXRF) at Advanced Photon Source (APS) Beamline 13-ID, Synchrotron X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) at Advanced Light Source (ALS) Beamlines 11.0.2 and 5.3.2.1 and by electron microscopy techniques. Our motivation for developing much-needed cross-calibration of synchrotron techniques is borne from coordinated analyses of particles captured in the aerogel of the NASA Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector (SIDC). The Stardust Interstellar Dust Preliminary Examination (ISPE) team have characterized three sub-nanogram, {approx}1{micro}m-sized fragments considered as candidates to be the first contemporary interstellar dust ever collected, based on their chemistries and trajectories. The candidates were analyzed in small wedges of aerogel in which they were extracted from the larger collector, using high sensitivity, high spatial resolution >3 keV synchrotron x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (SXRF) and <2 keV synchrotron x-ray transmission microscopy (STXM) during Stardust ISPE. The ISPE synchrotron techniques have complementary capabilities. Hard X-ray SXRF is sensitive to sub-fg mass of elements Z {ge} 20 (calcium) and has a spatial resolution as low as 90nm. X-ray Diffraction data were collected simultaneously with SXRF data. Soft X-ray STXM at ALS beamline 11.0.2 can detect fg-mass of most elements, including cosmochemically important oxygen, magnesium, aluminum and silicon, which are invisible to SXRF in this application. ALS beamline 11.0.2 has spatial resolution

  17. Flexible control of femtosecond pulse duration and separation using an emittance-spoiling foil in x-ray free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Y. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Behrens, C. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Coffee, R. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Decker, F. -J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Emma, P. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Field, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Helml, W. [Technische Univ. Munchen, Garching (Germany); Huang, Z. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Krejcik, P. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Krzywinski, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Loos, H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Lutman, A. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Marinelli, A. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Maxwell, T. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Turner, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-06-22

    We report experimental studies of generating and controlling femtosecond x-ray pulses in free-electron lasers (FELs) using an emittance spoiling foil. By selectivity spoiling the transverse emittance of the electron beam, the output pulse duration or double-pulse separation is adjusted with a variable size single or double slotted foil. Measurements were performed with an X-band transverse deflector located downstream of the FEL undulator, from which both the FEL lasing and emittance spoiling effects are observed directly.

  18. Electronic structure of Fe2P(10 1 bar 0) studied by soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugizaki, Y.; Motoyama, H.; Edamoto, K.; Ozawa, K.

    2017-10-01

    The electronic structure of Fe2P(10 1 bar 0) has been investigated by photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The surface prepared by cycles of Ar+ ion sputtering and annealing at 500-800 °C showed a c(2 × 2) low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) pattern. An Fe 3d-P 3p hybrid band (main band) and a satellite were observed at 0-4 eV and 5-8 eV, respectively, in PES spectra of c(2 × 2) Fe2P(10 1 bar 0). The main band showed a clear cut-off at the Fermi edge, indicating the metallic nature of Fe2P. The satellite intensity showed a resonant maximum around the Fe 3p threshold, suggesting that the satellite is caused through a shake-up process. Three types of surface-shifted components were found in P 2p PES spectra. All the P 2p peaks have symmetric line shapes, while the Fe 2p PES and Fe L-edge XAS spectra have asymmetric line shapes, suggesting that the electronic states around the Fermi level are mostly composed of Fe 3d components. These results suggest that the stabilization of the electronic structure at metal sites through the bonding with P atoms is ineffective on Fe2P(10 1 bar 0), as in the case of Fe2P(0001).

  19. Prospects for laser spectroscopy of highly charged ions with high-harmonic XUV and soft x-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothhardt, J.; Hädrich, S.; Demmler, S.; Krebs, M.; Winters, D. F. A.; Kühl, Th; Stöhlker, Th; Limpert, J.; Tünnermann, A.

    2015-11-01

    We present novel high photon flux XUV and soft x-ray sources based on high harmonic generation (HHG). The sources employ femtosecond fiber lasers, which can be operated at very high (MHz) repetition rate and average power (>100 W). HHG with such lasers results in ˜1013 photons s-1 within a single harmonic line at ˜40 nm (˜30 eV) wavelength, a photon flux comparable to what is typically available at synchrotron beam lines. In addition, resonant enhancement of HHG can result in narrow-band harmonics with high spectral purity—well suited for precision spectroscopy. These novel light sources will enable seminal studies on electronic transitions in highly-charged ions. For example, at the experimental storage ring 2s1/2-2p1/2 transitions in Li-like ions can be excited up to Z = 47 (˜100 eV transition energy), which provides unique sensitivity to quantum electro-dynamical effects and nuclear corrections. We estimate fluorescence count rates of the order of tens per second, which would enable studies on short-lived isotopes as well. In combination with the Doppler up-shift available in head-on excitation at future heavy-ion storage rings, such as the high energy storage ring, even multi-keV transitions can potentially be excited. Pump-probe experiments with femtosecond resolution could also be feasible and access the lifetime of short-lived excited states, thus providing novel benchmarks for atomic structure theory.

  20. Sub-100 nanometer lensless probing of Co/Pd magnetic nanodomains using a table-top femtosecond soft X-ray harmonic source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, X.; Ducousso, M.; Boutu, W.; Tudu, B.; Barbrel, B.; Gauthier, D.; Borta, A.; Gonzalez, A.-I.; Wang, F.; Iwan, B.; Billon, M.; Perdrix, M.; Guillaumet, D.; Lepetit, F.; Vodungbo, B.; Gautier, J.; Hawaldar, R.; Tortarolo, M.; Delaunay, R.; Zeitoun, P.; Lüning, J.; Merdji, H.

    2013-10-01

    We present recent developments of our table-top femtosecond high flux harmonic beamline towards single-shot probing of magnetic nanostructures. High harmonic generation (HHG) optimization in a single and two-color infrared laser pulse mode was investigated at high laser energy. Up to 109 photons per harmonic are generated between 40 and 80 eV in a single femtosecond laser shot. These soft X-ray harmonic photons are employed to characterize at the nanoscale the magnetic network of Co/Pd multilayer samples using resonant small-angle X-ray scattering. Selecting harmonics in the vicinity of magnetically dichroic absorption resonances of cobalt and palladium (Co M2,3 at 60 eV and Pd N2,3 at 51 eV) gives access to the magnetic nanodomain spatial structure. The magnetic scattering efficiency at the Pd edge is found to be comparable to that at the Co edge. This indicates that the Pd layers exhibit a significant induced magnetic moment. Magnetic sample optimization is then performed by characterizing its scattering efficiency as a function of layer composition and number of repetitions. We finally measure the spatial organization of magnetic nanodomains with a sub-100 nm spatial resolution from a single femtosecond X-ray pulse.

  1. Characterising legacy spent nuclear fuel pond materials using microfocus X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bower, W.R. [Research Centre for Radwaste Disposal, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); National Nuclear Laboratory, Chadwick House, Warrington Road, Birchwood Park, Warrington, WA3 6AE (United Kingdom); Centre for Radiochemistry Research, Chemistry Building, The University of Manchester, Brunswick Street, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Morris, K. [Research Centre for Radwaste Disposal, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Mosselmans, J.F.W. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Thompson, O.R. [National Nuclear Laboratory, Chadwick House, Warrington Road, Birchwood Park, Warrington, WA3 6AE (United Kingdom); Banford, A.W. [National Nuclear Laboratory, Chadwick House, Warrington Road, Birchwood Park, Warrington, WA3 6AE (United Kingdom); School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Law, K. [Centre for Radiochemistry Research, Chemistry Building, The University of Manchester, Brunswick Street, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Pattrick, R.A.D., E-mail: richard.pattrick@manchester.ac.uk [Research Centre for Radwaste Disposal, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-05

    Highlights: • A sample from a spent fuel pond wall has been analysed via X-ray spectroscopy. • Autoradiography shows a patchy distribution of radioactivity on the core face. • μXAS across a ‘hot spot’ showed Sr associates with the TiO{sub 2} pigment in the paint. • Original concrete coatings prove effective at limiting radionuclide migration. • Sorption studies show Sr immobilisation by the concrete and Cs by aggregate clasts. - Abstract: Analysis of a radioactive, coated concrete core from the decommissioned, spent nuclear fuel cooling pond at the Hunterston-A nuclear site (UK) has provided a unique opportunity to study radionuclides within a real-world system. The core, obtained from a dividing wall and sampled at the fill level of the pond, exhibited radioactivity (dominantly {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr) heterogeneously distributed across both painted faces. Chemical analysis of the core was undertaken using microfocus spectroscopy at Diamond Light Source, UK. Mapping of Sr across the surface coatings using microfocus X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) combined with X-ray absorption spectroscopy showed that Sr was bound to TiO{sub 2} particles in the paint layers, suggesting an association between TiO{sub 2} and radiostrontium. Stable Sr and Cs sorption experiments using concrete coupons were also undertaken to assess their interactions with the bulk concrete in case of a breach in the coating layers. μXRF and scanning electron microscopy showed that Sr was immobilized by the cement phases, whilst at the elevated experimental concentrations, Cs was associated with clay minerals in the aggregates. This study provides a crucial insight into poorly understood infrastructural contamination in complex systems and is directly applicable to the UK’s nuclear decommissioning efforts.

  2. Capturing interfacial photoelectrochemical dynamics with picosecond time-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neppl, Stefan; Shavorskiy, Andrey; Zegkinoglou, Ioannis; Fraund, Matthew; Slaughter, Daniel S; Troy, Tyler; Ziemkiewicz, Michael P; Ahmed, Musahid; Gul, Sheraz; Rude, Bruce; Zhang, Jin Z; Tremsin, Anton S; Glans, Per-Anders; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Wu, Cheng Hao; Guo, Jinghua; Salmeron, Miquel; Bluhm, Hendrik; Gessner, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved core-level spectroscopy using laser pulses to initiate and short X-ray pulses to trace photoinduced processes has the unique potential to provide electronic state- and atomic site-specific insight into fundamental electron dynamics in complex systems. Time-domain studies using transient X-ray absorption and emission techniques have proven extremely valuable to investigate electronic and structural dynamics in isolated and solvated molecules. Here, we describe the implementation of a picosecond time-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (TRXPS) technique at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) and its application to monitor photoinduced electron dynamics at the technologically pertinent interface formed by N3 dye molecules anchored to nanoporous ZnO. Indications for a dynamical chemical shift of the Ru3d photoemission line originating from the N3 metal centre are observed ∼30 ps after resonant HOMO-LUMO excitation with a visible laser pump pulse. The transient changes in the TRXPS spectra are accompanied by a characteristic surface photovoltage (SPV) response of the ZnO substrate on a pico- to nanosecond time scale. The interplay between the two phenomena is discussed in the context of possible electronic relaxation and recombination pathways that lead to the neutralisation of the transiently oxidised dye after ultrafast electron injection. A detailed account of the experimental technique is given including an analysis of the chemical modification of the nano-structured ZnO substrate during extended periods of solution-based dye sensitisation and its relevance for studies using surface-sensitive spectroscopy techniques.

  3. Synchrotron soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy study of carbon and silicon nanostructures for energy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jun; Zhang, Hui; Sun, Xuhui; Lee, Shuit-Tong

    2014-12-10

    Carbon and silicon materials are two of the most important materials involved in the history of the science and technology development. In the last two decades, C and Si nanoscale materials, e.g., carbon nanotubes, graphene, and silicon nanowires, and quantum dots, have also emerged as the most interesting nanomaterials in nanoscience and nanotechnology for their myriad promising applications such as for electronics, sensors, biotechnology, etc. In particular, carbon and silicon nanostructures are being utilized in energy-related applications such as catalysis, batteries, solar cells, etc., with significant advances. Understanding of the nature of surface and electronic structures of nanostructures plays a key role in the development and improvement of energy conversion and storage nanosystems. Synchrotron soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and related techniques, such as X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), show unique capability in revealing the surface and electronic structures of C and Si nanomaterials. In this review, XAS is demonstrated as a powerful technique for probing chemical bonding, the electronic structure, and the surface chemistry of carbon and silicon nanomaterials, which can greatly enhance the fundamental understanding and also applicability of these nanomaterials in energy applications. The focus is on the unique advantages of XAS as a complementary tool to conventional microscopy and spectroscopy for effectively providing chemical and structural information about carbon and silicon nanostructures. The employment of XAS for in situ, real-time study of property evolution of C and Si nanostructures to elucidate the mechanisms in energy conversion or storage processes is also discussed.

  4. Analysis of the Peiting Woman Using Portable X-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bauerochse, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Portable X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy was applied to the skeletal remains of 13 bog bodies and their bog burial environments. The objective was to create a better understanding of Northern European bog environmental chemistry and its diagenetic effects on interred bog bodies, determine bog body geographic disparity and/or origin, and identify if post-discovery preservation procedures were applied to the bog body remains. This paper summarizes the findings for one of those 13 bog bodies: the Peiting Woman from Bavaria, Germany. The elements analyzed include Antimony, Cobalt, Copper, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Lead, Strontium, Titanium, Zinc, and Zirconium.

  5. Study on RE-Al-Zr-C-N Coating by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韦永德; 马楠; 侯仰龙

    2001-01-01

    Thermal diffusion of coating on 45 steel with rare earths, zirconium, aluminum, carbon and nitrogen was reported. Through X-ray photoelectron spectrum, the binding energy of permeated elements and their existence states were analyzed. Their existence on the surface of treated steel was confirmed by scanning electronic microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results show that the rare earth acts as an activator and accelerator of the permeating of other elements. The effect of rare earths on aluminum is greater than that on zirconium.

  6. Metal release in metallothioneins induced by nitric oxide: X-ray absorption spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casero, Elena; Martín-Gago, José A; Pariente, Félix; Lorenzo, Encarnación

    2004-12-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are low molecular weight proteins that include metal ions in thiolate clusters. The capability of metallothioneins to bind different metals has suggested their use as biosensors for different elements. We study here the interaction of nitric oxide with rat liver MTs by using in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy techniques. We univocally show that the presence of NO induces the release of Zn atoms from the MT structure to the solution. Zn ions transform in the presence of NO from a tetrahedral four-fold coordinated environment in the MT into a regular octahedral six-fold coordinated state, with interatomic distances compatible with those of Zn solvated in water.

  7. Study of bulk and interface defects in silicon oxide with X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tallarida, Massimo [Brandenburgische Technische Universitaet, Konrad Wachsmann Allee 17, 03046 Cottbus (Germany)], E-mail: tallamas@tu-cottbus.de; Schmeisser, Dieter [Brandenburgische Technische Universitaet, Konrad Wachsmann Allee 17, 03046 Cottbus (Germany)

    2007-11-25

    We show in this work a detailed study of the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface by means of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The Si2p absorption edge was measured for both a thick (50 nm) oxide layer and a native (1.5 nm) oxide. From the comparison between these two spectra we can address XAS features to bulk defects in SiO{sub 2} and to interface defects in the native oxide. We demonstrate the capability of XAS of achieving information about interface defects and suggest its use in more complex systems.

  8. Chemical Reaction Between Polyvinyl Alcohol and Titanate Coupling Agent with X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bei-xing; ZHANG Wen-sheng

    2003-01-01

    The chemical reaction between polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and tri(dioctylpyrophosphoryloxy) isopropyl titanate (NDZ-201) was studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).The results show that some C-OH functional groups of PVA react with the titanate coupling agent to form CPVA-O-Ti-O-CPVA bond.The cross-linking of the PVA chains occurs through the formation of CPVA-O-Ti-O-CPVA bonds and produces a three dimensional hydrophobic polymer network.Accordingly,the mechanism is proposed that the titanate coupling agent improves the moisture sensitivity of high alumina cement/polyvinyl alcohol (HAC/PVA) based macro defect free (MDF) composite material.

  9. Structural Investigation of SBGESE Glasses by High Resolution X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Golovchak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of the structure of Sb8Ge32Se60 (Z=2.72 and Sb20Ge20Se60 (Z=2.60 chalcogenide glasses is determined by high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Glasses with Z=2.60 the structure consists of deformed tetrahedra and pyramids, in which at least one Se atom is substituted by Ge or Sb atom. For the Z=2.72 structure consisting of shared pyramids and tetrahedra with two or more Se atoms substituted by the cations. At the same time, Se-Se dimers are present in both compositions.

  10. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of the effects of ultrapure water on GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massies, J.; Contour, J. P.

    1985-06-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy has been used to investigate the effects of de-ionized water on chemical etched GaAs surfaces. When the treatment with water is performed in static conditions (stagnant water) a Ga-rich oxide layer is formed on GaAs at the rate of 10-20 Å h-1. In contrast, when the GaAs surface is treated in dynamic conditions (running water), no oxide buildup is observed. Moreover, running water can remove the oxide film formed in static conditions, as well as oxidized layers due to air exposure. These results are discussed in the framework of cleaning prior to molecular beam epitaxy.

  11. A fission-fragment-sensitive target for X-ray spectroscopy in neutron-induced fission

    CERN Document Server

    Ethvignot, T; Giot, L; Casoli, P; Nelson, R O

    2002-01-01

    A fission-fragment-sensitive detector built for low-energy photon spectroscopy applications at the WNR 'white' neutron source at Los Alamos is described. The detector consists of eight layers of thin photovoltaic cells, onto which 1 mg/cm sup 2 of pure sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U is deposited. The detector serves as an active target to select fission events from background and other reaction channels. The fairly small thickness of the detector with respect to transmission of 20-50 keV photons permits the measurement of prompt fission-fragment X-rays. Results with the GEANIE photon spectrometer are presented.

  12. Assessment of nanocomposite photonic systems with the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L. Minati; G. Speranza; M. Anderle; M. Ferrari; A. Chiasera; G. C. Righini

    2007-01-01

    The chemical compositions of Ag-Er co-doped phosphate and silicate glasses were investigated with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with the purpose to identify the chemical state of silver. The analysis of the Ag 3d core lines show the presence of nanometer-sized silver particles in each of the annealed samples, even if these Ag 3d lines appear to be very different from each other. We explain these results as a different interaction of silver with the two glasses matrix, which leads to a different nucleation rate of the Ag clusters.

  13. Real-time compression of streaming X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy area-detector data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, T.; Jemian, P.; Narayanan, S.; Sandy, A. R.; Sikorski, M.; Sprung, M.; Weizeorick, J.

    2011-09-01

    We present a data acquisition system to perform on-the-fly background subtraction and lower-level discrimination compression of streaming X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) data from a fast charge-coupled device area detector. The system is built using a commercial frame grabber with an on-board field-programmable gate array (FPGA). The system is capable of continuously processing 60 CCD frames per second each consisting of 1024×1024 pixels with up to 64 512 photon hits per frame.

  14. A new cell for X-ray absorption spectroscopy study under high pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Li-Rong; CHE Rong-Zheng; LIU Jing; DU Yong-Hua; ZHOU Ying-Li; HU Tian-Dou

    2009-01-01

    X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy is a powerful technique for the investigation of the local environment around selected atoms in condensed matter. XAFS under pressure is an important method for the synchrotron source. We design a cell for a high pressure XAFS experiment. Sintered boron carbide is used as the anvils of this high pressure cell in order to obtain a full XAFS spectrum free from diffraction peaks. In addition, a hydraulic pump was adopted to make in-suit pressure modulation. High quality XAFS spectra of ZrH2 under high pressure (up to 13 Gpa) were obtained by this cell.

  15. Strontium Localization in Bone Tissue Studied by X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankær, Christian Grundahl; Raffalt, Anders Christer; Ståhl, Kenny

    2014-01-01

    Strontium has recently been introduced as a pharmacological agent for the treatment and prevention of osteoporosis. We determined the localization of strontium incorporated into bone matrix from dogs treated with Sr malonate by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. A new approach for analyzing the X...... structural order than when present in serum but less order than when it is incorporated into CaHA. The total amount of strontium in the samples was determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, and the amount of Sr was found to increase with increasing dose levels and treatment periods, whereas...

  16. An x-ray absorption spectroscopy study of Cd binding onto a halophilic archaeon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showalter, Allison R.; Szymanowski, Jennifer E. S.; Fein, Jeremy B.; Bunker, Bruce A.

    2016-05-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and cadmium (Cd) isotherm experiments determine how Cd adsorbs to the surface of halophilic archaeon Halobacterium noricense. This archaeon, isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico could be involved with the transport of toxic metals stored in the transuranic waste in the salt mine. The isotherm experiments show that adsorption is relatively constant across the tolerable pH range for H. noricense. The XAS results indicate that Cd adsorption occurs predominately via a sulfur site, most likely sulfhydryl, with the same site dominating all measured pH values.

  17. High-resolution X-ray absorption spectroscopy of iron carbonyl complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Andrew J; Bauer, Matthias; Jacob, Christoph R

    2015-06-07

    We apply high-energy-resolution fluorescence-detected (HERFD) X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) to study iron carbonyl complexes. Mono-, bi-, and tri-nuclear carbonyl complexes and pure carbonyl complexes as well as carbonyl complexes containing hydrocarbon ligands are considered. The HERFD-XANES spectra reveal multiple pre-edge peaks with individual signatures for each complex, which could not be detected previously with conventional XANES spectroscopy. These peaks are assigned and analysed with the help of TD-DFT calculations. We demonstrate that the pre-edge peaks can be used to distinguish the different types of iron-iron interactions in carbonyl complexes. This opens up new possibilities for applying HERFD-XANES spectroscopy to probe the electronic structure of iron catalysts.

  18. Effect of iron oxide reductive dissolution on the transformation and immobilization of arsenic in soils: New insights from X-ray photoelectron and X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Jian-Xin [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); School of River and Ocean Engineering, Chongqing Jiaotong University, Chongqing 400074 (China); Wang, Yu-Jun, E-mail: yjwang@issas.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Liu, Cun [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Wang, Li-Hua; Yang, Ke [Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of sciences, Shanghai 201204 (China); Zhou, Dong-Mei, E-mail: dmzhou@issas.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Li, Wei; Sparks, Donald L. [Environmental Soil Chemistry Group, Delaware Environmental Institute and Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19717-1303 United States (United States)

    2014-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Immobility and transformation of As on different Eh soils were investigated. • μ-XRF, XANES, and XPS were used to gain As distribution and speciation in soil. • Sorption capacity of As on anaerobic soil was much higher than that on oxic soil. • Fe oxides reductive dissolution is a key factor for As sorption and transformation. - Abstract: The geochemical behavior and speciation of arsenic (As) in paddy soils is strongly controlled by soil redox conditions and the sequestration by soil iron oxyhydroxides. Hence, the effects of iron oxide reductive dissolution on the adsorption, transformation and precipitation of As(III) and As(V) in soils were investigated using batch experiments and synchrotron based techniques to gain a deeper understanding at both macroscopic and microscopic scales. The results of batch sorption experiments revealed that the sorption capacity of As(V) on anoxic soil was much higher than that on control soil. Synchrotron based X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) mapping studies indicated that As was heterogeneously distributed and was mainly associated with iron in the soil. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), micro-X-ray absorption near edge structure (μ-XANES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses revealed that the primary speciation of As in the soil is As(V). These results further suggested that, when As(V) was introduced into the anoxic soil, the rapid coprecipitation of As(V) with ferric/ferrous ion prevented its reduction to As(III), and was the main mechanism controlling the immobilization of As. This research could improve the current understanding of soil As chemistry in paddy and wetland soils.

  19. A New Flexible Monochromator Setup for Quick Scanning X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stotzel, J.; Lutzenkirchen-Hecht, D; Frahm, R

    2010-01-01

    A new monochromator setup for quick scanning x-ray absorption spectroscopy in the subsecond time regime is presented. Novel driving mechanics allow changing the energy range of the acquired spectra by remote control during data acquisition for the first time, thus dramatically increasing the flexibility and convenience of this method. Completely new experiments are feasible due to the fact that time resolution, edge energy, and energy range of the acquired spectra can be changed continuously within seconds without breaking the vacuum of the monochromator vessel and even without interrupting the measurements. The advanced mechanics are explained in detail and the performance is characterized with x-ray absorption spectra of pure metal foils. The energy scale was determined by a fast and accurate angular encoder system measuring the Bragg angle of the monochromator crystal with subarcsecond resolution. The Bragg angle range covered by the oscillating crystal can currently be changed from 0{sup o} to 3.0{sup o} within 20 s, while the mechanics are capable to move with frequencies of up to ca. 35 Hz, leading to ca. 14 ms/spectrum time resolution. A new software package allows performing programmed scan sequences, which enable the user to measure stepwise with alternating parameters in predefined time segments. Thus, e.g., switching between edges scanned with the same energy range is possible within one in situ experiment, while also the time resolution can be varied simultaneously. This progress makes the new system extremely user friendly and efficient to use for time resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy at synchrotron radiation beamlines.

  20. A new flexible monochromator setup for quick scanning x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoetzel, J.; Luetzenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Frahm, R. [Fachbereich C, Physik, Bergische Universitaet Wuppertal, Gaussstr. 20, 42097 Wuppertal (Germany)

    2010-07-15

    A new monochromator setup for quick scanning x-ray absorption spectroscopy in the subsecond time regime is presented. Novel driving mechanics allow changing the energy range of the acquired spectra by remote control during data acquisition for the first time, thus dramatically increasing the flexibility and convenience of this method. Completely new experiments are feasible due to the fact that time resolution, edge energy, and energy range of the acquired spectra can be changed continuously within seconds without breaking the vacuum of the monochromator vessel and even without interrupting the measurements. The advanced mechanics are explained in detail and the performance is characterized with x-ray absorption spectra of pure metal foils. The energy scale was determined by a fast and accurate angular encoder system measuring the Bragg angle of the monochromator crystal with subarcsecond resolution. The Bragg angle range covered by the oscillating crystal can currently be changed from 0 deg. to 3.0 deg. within 20 s, while the mechanics are capable to move with frequencies of up to ca. 35 Hz, leading to ca. 14 ms/spectrum time resolution. A new software package allows performing programmed scan sequences, which enable the user to measure stepwise with alternating parameters in predefined time segments. Thus, e.g., switching between edges scanned with the same energy range is possible within one in situ experiment, while also the time resolution can be varied simultaneously. This progress makes the new system extremely user friendly and efficient to use for time resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy at synchrotron radiation beamlines.

  1. Site- and phase-selective x-ray absorption spectroscopy based on phase-retrieval calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Tomoya; Fukuda, Katsutoshi; Matsubara, Eiichiro

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the chemical state of a particular element with multiple crystallographic sites and/or phases is essential to unlocking the origin of material properties. To this end, resonant x-ray diffraction spectroscopy (RXDS) achieved through a combination of x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) techniques can allow for the measurement of diffraction anomalous fine structure (DAFS). This is expected to provide a peerless tool for electronic/local structural analyses of materials with complicated structures thanks to its capability to extract spectroscopic information about a given element at each crystallographic site and/or phase. At present, one of the major challenges for the practical application of RXDS is the rigorous determination of resonant terms from observed DAFS, as this requires somehow determining the phase change in the elastic scattering around the absorption edge from the scattering intensity. This is widely known in the field of XRD as the phase problem. The present review describes the basics of this problem, including the relevant background and theory for DAFS and a guide to a newly-developed phase-retrieval method based on the logarithmic dispersion relation that makes it possible to analyze DAFS without suffering from the intrinsic ambiguities of conventional iterative-fitting. Several matters relating to data collection and correction of RXDS are also covered, with a final emphasis on the great potential of powder-sample-based RXDS (P-RXDS) to be used in various applications relevant to practical materials, including antisite-defect-type electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries.

  2. Bonding in inorganic compounds: a study by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avanzino, S.C.

    1978-10-01

    Core electron binding energies were measured for a variety of inorganic and organometallic compounds using gas-phase X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The atomic charge distributions in these molecules are deduced from the binding energies, often leading to a better understanding of the bonding in these compounds. The XPS spectra of fifteen volatile tin compounds were recorded. The data suggest that the metal d orbitals are not significantly involved in the bonding. The oxygen ls XPS spectra of gaseous CH/sub 3/Mn(CO)/sub 5/, (..pi..-C/sub 5/H/sub 5/Fe(CO)/sub 2/)/sub 2/, and Co/sub 4/(CO)/sub 12/ can be readily resolved into separate peaks due to bridging and terminal carbonyl groups. The C ls spectrum of Fe(CO)/sub 5/ consists of a single symmetric peak. The carbonyl ligand core binding energies of transition-metal carbonyl complexes are sensitive to differences in the metal-to-CO ligand bonding. Both C ls and O ls carbonyl binding energies correlate well with average C-O stretching force constants or average C-O stretching frequencies. The metal and carbonyl binding energies in a series of pentacarbonylmanganese complexes LMn(CO)/sub 5/ are a good measure of the relative electronegativities of the ligands L. High-quality X-ray photoelectron spectra have been obtained for compounds dissolved in glycerin solutions, and aqueous solutions were converted into glycerin solutions which gave good XRSspectra of the solutes. The technique appears promising as a future analytical application of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The shifts in the binding energies of oxygen, chlorine, and carbon atoms in some isoelectronic isostructural compounds can be explained in terms of simple trends in atomic charges.

  3. A liquid flatjet system for solution phase soft-x-ray spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekimova, Maria; Quevedo, Wilson; Faubel, Manfred; Wernet, Philippe; Nibbering, Erik T. J.

    2015-01-01

    We present a liquid flatjet system for solution phase soft-x-ray spectroscopy. The flatjet set-up utilises the phenomenon of formation of stable liquid sheets upon collision of two identical laminar jets. Colliding the two single water jets, coming out of the nozzles with 50 μm orifices, under an impact angle of 48° leads to double sheet formation, of which the first sheet is 4.6 mm long and 1.0 mm wide. The liquid flatjet operates fully functional under vacuum conditions (<10−3 mbar), allowing soft-x-ray spectroscopy of aqueous solutions in transmission mode. We analyse the liquid water flatjet thickness under atmospheric pressure using interferomeric or mid-infrared transmission measurements and under vacuum conditions by measuring the absorbance of the O K-edge of water in transmission, and comparing our results with previously published data obtained with standing cells with Si3N4 membrane windows. The thickness of the first liquid sheet is found to vary between 1.4–3 μm, depending on the transverse and longitudinal position in the liquid sheet. We observe that the derived thickness is of similar magnitude under 1 bar and under vacuum conditions. A catcher unit facilitates the recycling of the solutions, allowing measurements on small sample volumes (∼10 ml). We demonstrate the applicability of this approach by presenting measurements on the N K-edge of aqueous NH4+. Our results suggest the high potential of using liquid flatjets in steady-state and time-resolved studies in the soft-x-ray regime. PMID:26798824

  4. Surface functional group characterization using chemical derivatization X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (CD-XPS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagst, Eda

    2011-03-18

    Chemical derivatization - X-ray photolectron spectroscopy (CD-XPS) was applied successfully in order to determine different functional groups on thin film surfaces. Different amino group carrying surfaces, prepared by spin coating, self-assembly and plasma polymerization, were successfully investigated by (XPS) and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. Amino groups were derivatized with the widely used primary amino group tags, pentafluorobenzaldehyde (PFB) and 4-(trifluoromethyl)-benzaldehyde (TFBA), prior to analysis. Primary amino group quantification was then carried out according to the spectroscopical data. Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of different terminal groups were prepared and investigated with XPS and spectra were compared with reference surfaces. An angle resolved NEXAFS measurement was applied to determine the orientation of SAMs. Plasma polymerized allylamine samples with different duty cycle, power and pressure values were prepared in order to study the effects of external plasma parameters on the primary amino group retention. CD-XPS was used to quantify the amino groups and experiments show, that the milder plasma conditions promote the retention of amino groups originating from the allylamine monomer. An interlaboratory comparison of OH group determination on plasma surfaces of polypropylene treated with oxygen plasma, was studied. The surfaces were investigated with XPS and the [OH] amount on the surfaces was calculated. (orig.)

  5. Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy of Diamondoid Thiol Monolayers on Gold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willey, T M; Fabbri, J; Lee, J I; Schreiner, P; Fokin, A A; Tkachenko, B A; Fokina, N A; Dahl, J; Carlson, B; Vance, A L; Yang, W; Terminello, L J; van Buuren, T; Melosh, N

    2007-11-27

    Diamondoids, hydrocarbon molecules with cubic-diamond-cage structures, have unique properties with potential value for nanotechnology. The availability and ability to selectively functionalize this special class of nanodiamond materials opens new possibilities for surface-modification, for high-efficiency field emitters in molecular electronics, as seed crystals for diamond growth, or as robust mechanical coatings. The properties of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of diamondoids are thus of fundamental interest for a variety of emerging applications. This paper presents the effects of thiol substitution position and polymantane order on diamondoid SAMs on gold using near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A framework to determine both molecular tilt and twist through NEXAFS is presented and reveals highly ordered diamondoid SAMs, with the molecular orientation controlled by the thiol location. C 1s and S 2p binding energies are lower in adamantane thiol than alkane thiols on gold by 0.67 {+-} 0.05 eV and 0.16 {+-} 0.04 eV respectively. These binding energies vary with diamondoid monolayer structure and thiol substitution position, consistent with different amounts of steric strain and electronic interaction with the substrate. This work demonstrates control over the assembly, in particular the orientational and electronic structure, providing a flexible design of surface properties with this exciting new class of diamond clusters.

  6. XPS: A multi-channel preamplifier shaper IC for X-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krieger, B.; Kipnis, I.; Ludewigt, B.A.

    1997-11-01

    An integrated circuit featuring 48 channels of charge-sensitive preamplifiers followed by variable-gain pulse shaping amplifiers is being developed as part of an x-ray spectrometer with a highly segmented detector to handle high fluxes in synchrotron experiments. Such detector systems can provide excellent energy resolution combined with one-dimensional spatial information. The IC combines many basic spectroscopy amplifier functions with a low-noise preamplifier section to produce a unique circuit capable of driving conventional ADC modules directly. An important feature of the design is the novel CR-RC{sup 2} pulse shaper. In this section, high-linearity transconductor circuits are required in order to provide a broad range of continuously variable peaking times while still maintaining the linearity and noise performance necessary for x-ray spectroscopy. Reported here are first measurements made on the performance of a 16-channel prototype integrated circuit. At present, the preamplifier-shaper circuit achieves an equivalent input noise of 26 electrons rms at 2 {micro}s peaking time with a 0.2 pF external capacitor, which is similar to the capacitance of a single detector element. The design was fabricated in standard 1.2 {micro}m CMOS technology.

  7. Characterization of the Roraima savanna across of X-ray diffraction, thermomagnetic analysis and Moessbauer spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Gilmar A.; Araujo, R.C.; Sergio, C.S. [Universidade Federal de Roraima (UFRR), Boa Vista, RR (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: The technique of X-ray diffraction has great resolving power to determine the phases present in crystalline material, thereby enabling it to determine the elements present in the materials as well as changes in structure that they can suffer when subjected to various physical processes and/or chemical means. The research had as objective to characterize the mineralogy of iron oxides, silicon, aluminum and other minerals in the soil of five points of the Roraima savannah. The points where samples were collected are five municipalities in the state of Roraima. The area of sampling is part of the savanna in Roraima. The samples were collected. We analyzed samples from five points from the collection of natural soil in the locations listed. The samples were placed in a mill to a uniform grain size. After the milling process, the magnetic material was separated using a permanent magnet. Then the samples were analyzed by x-ray diffraction, thermomagnetic analysis and Moessbauer spectroscopy. Preliminary results of XRD showed the occurrence of phases of oxides of iron, silicon, aluminum and other phases less. Thermomagnetic analysis show that the magnetic phases are magnetite and hematite. The results of the Moessbauer spectroscopy indicates the reliability in the two prior art and confirmed the presence of the phases of oxides of iron present in the soil analyzed. (author)

  8. FTIR spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction characterization of microcrystalline cellulose obtained from alfa fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trache D.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Many cereal straws have been used as raw materials for the preparation of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC. These raw materials were gradually replaced with wood products; nevertheless about 10% of the world overall pulp production is obtained from non-wood raw material. The main interest in pulp made from straw is that it provides excellent fibres for different industries with special properties, and that it is the major available source of fibrous raw material in some geographical areas. The aim of the present work was to characterize microcrystalline cellulose prepared from alfa fibers using the hydrolysis process. The products obtained are characterized with FTIR spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction. As a result, FTIR spectroscopy is an appropriate technique for studying changes occurred by any chemical treatment. The spectrum of alfa grass stems shows the presence of lignin and hemicelluloses. However, the cellulose spectrum indicates that the extraction of lignin and hemicellulose was effective. The X-ray analysis indicates that the microcrystalline cellulose is more crystalline than the source material.

  9. Adsorption of mercury on lignin: combined surface complexation modeling and X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Jitao; Luo, Lei; Zhang, Jing; Christie, Peter; Zhang, Shuzhen

    2012-03-01

    Adsorption of mercury (Hg) on lignin was studied at a range of pH values using a combination of batch adsorption experiments, a surface complexation model (SCM) and synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Surface complexation modeling indicates that three types of acid sites on lignin surfaces, namely aliphatic carboxylic-, aromatic carboxylic- and phenolic-type surface groups, contributed to Hg(II) adsorption. The bond distance and coordination number of Hg(II) adsorption samples at pH 3.0, 4.0 and 5.5 were obtained from extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy analysis. The results of SCM and XAS combined reveal that the predominant adsorption species of Hg(II) on lignin changes from HgCl(2)(0) to monodentate complex -C-O-HgCl and then bidentate complex -C-O-Hg-O-C- with increasing pH value from 2.0 to 6.0. The good agreement between SCM and XAS results provides new insight into understanding the mechanisms of Hg(II) adsorption on lignin.

  10. X-ray absorption spectroscopy investigation of structurally modified lithium niobate crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitova, Tonya

    2008-02-15

    The type and concentration of impurity centers in different valence states are crucial for tuning the photorefractive properties of doped Lithium Niobate (LN) crystals. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) is an appropriate tool for studying the local structure of impurity centers. XAS combined with absorption in UV/VIS/IR and High Resolution X-ray Emission Spectroscopy (HRXES) provide information about the valence state of the dopant ions in as-grown, reduced or oxidized doped LN crystals. Cu (Cu{sup 1+} and Cu{sup 2+}) and Fe (Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+}) atoms are found in two different valence states, whereas there are indications for a third Mn valency, in addition to Mn{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 3+} in manganese-doped LN crystals. One of the charge compensation mechanisms during reduction of copper- doped LN crystals is outgassing of oxygen atoms. Cu ions in the reduced crystals have at least two different site symmetries: twofold (Cu{sup 1+}) and sixfold (Cu{sup 2+}) coordinated by O atoms. Fe and Mn atoms are coordinated by six O atoms. Cu and Fe ions are found to occupy only Li sites, whereas Mn ions are also incorporated into Li and Nb sites. The refractive index change in LN crystals irradiated with {sup 3}He{sup 2+} ions is caused by structurally disordered centers, where Nb atoms are displaced from normal crystallographic sites and Li or/and O vacancies are present. (orig.)

  11. Characterising legacy spent nuclear fuel pond materials using microfocus X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, W R; Morris, K; Mosselmans, J F W; Thompson, O R; Banford, A W; Law, K; Pattrick, R A D

    2016-11-05

    Analysis of a radioactive, coated concrete core from the decommissioned, spent nuclear fuel cooling pond at the Hunterston-A nuclear site (UK) has provided a unique opportunity to study radionuclides within a real-world system. The core, obtained from a dividing wall and sampled at the fill level of the pond, exhibited radioactivity (dominantly (137)Cs and (90)Sr) heterogeneously distributed across both painted faces. Chemical analysis of the core was undertaken using microfocus spectroscopy at Diamond Light Source, UK. Mapping of Sr across the surface coatings using microfocus X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) combined with X-ray absorption spectroscopy showed that Sr was bound to TiO2 particles in the paint layers, suggesting an association between TiO2 and radiostrontium. Stable Sr and Cs sorption experiments using concrete coupons were also undertaken to assess their interactions with the bulk concrete in case of a breach in the coating layers. μXRF and scanning electron microscopy showed that Sr was immobilized by the cement phases, whilst at the elevated experimental concentrations, Cs was associated with clay minerals in the aggregates. This study provides a crucial insight into poorly understood infrastructural contamination in complex systems and is directly applicable to the UK's nuclear decommissioning efforts.

  12. Impact of Oriented Clay Particles on X-Ray Spectroscopy Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, A. J. M. S.; Syazwani, R. N.; Wijeyesekera, D. C.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the engineering properties of the mineralogy and microfabic of clayey soils is very complex and thus very difficult for soil characterization. Micromechanics of soils recognize that the micro structure and mineralogy of clay have a significant influence on its engineering behaviour. To achieve a more reliable quantitative evaluation of clay mineralogy, a proper sample preparation technique for quantitative clay mineral analysis is necessary. This paper presents the quantitative evaluation of elemental analysis and chemical characterization of oriented and random oriented clay particles using X-ray spectroscopy. Three different types of clays namely marine clay, bentonite and kaolin clay were studied. The oriented samples were prepared by placing the dispersed clay in water and left to settle on porous ceramic tiles by applying a relatively weak suction through a vacuum pump. Images form a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) was also used to show the comparison between the orientation patterns of both the sample preparation techniques. From the quantitative analysis of the X-ray spectroscopy, oriented sampling method showed more accuracy in identifying mineral deposits, because it produced better peak intensity on the spectrum and more mineral content can be identified compared to randomly oriented samples.

  13. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Unveils the Formation of Gold Nanoparticles in Corn X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Unveils the Formation of Gold Nanoparticles in Corn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Cruz-Jiménez

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available En este estudio se determinó, mediante espectroscopía de absorción de rayos-X, la posible biotransformación de oro en maíz (variedad Golden que se germinó y creció en KAuCl4. Adicionalmente se investigó el efecto de la tiourea y el tiocianato de amonio en la absorción de oro por la planta de maíz. Los resultados indicaron que concentraciones menores a 160 mg Au/L, no afectaron la germinación o el crecimiento de las plántulas. Tanto la tiourea como el tiocianato de amonio incrementaron 6 veces el contenido de oro en las raíces, mientras que la tiourea provocó un incremento de 10 veces la concentración de oro en tallos con respecto a los tratamientos sin este compuesto. El 91% del oro en el maíz se encontró como Au(0 y el resto como Au(III. Los análisis de estructura fi na revelaron que el oro se encontraba con un número de coordinación de 9,5 aproximadamente a 2,86 Å, indicando una esfera de coordinación incompleta, lo cual implica la presencia de una nano-fase. Usando la ecuación de Borowski se determinó que las nanopartículas tenían un tamaño promedio de 10,36 nm.In this study, X-ray absorption spectroscopy was used to determine the possible gold biotransformation by Zea mays (corn var. Golden, germinated and grown in a medium spikedwith KAuCl4. In addition, the gold uptake capacity of corn assisted by thiourea and ammoniumthiocyanate was investigated. Results showed that up to 160 mg/L, gold did no treduce corn seed germination or plant growth. Both thiourea and ammonium thiocyanateresulted in a 6-fold increase of gold concentration in roots and thiourea promoted a 10-fold increase of gold concentration in shoots. X-ray absorption near edge structure studies demonstrated that approximately 91% of the gold present in plant samples was Au(0. Theremaining 9% was present as Au(III. In addition, extended X-ray absorption fi ne structureresults showed that in corn roots, the gold coordination number was around 9

  14. Applications and results of X-ray spectroscopy in implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, R.; Regan, S. P.; Hammel, B. A.; Suter, L. J.; Scott, H. A.; Barrios, M. A.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Cerjan, C.; Collins, G. W.; Dixit, S. N.; Döppner, T.; Edwards, M. J.; Farley, D. R.; Fournier, K. B.; Glenn, S.; Glenzer, S. H.; Golovkin, I. E.; Hamza, A.; Hicks, D. G.; Izumi, N.; Jones, O. S.; Key, M. H.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kline, J. L.; Kyrala, G. A.; Landen, O. L.; Ma, T.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Mancini, R. C.; McCrory, R. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Meezan, N. B.; Nikroo, A.; Park, H.-S.; Patel, P. K.; Ralph, J. E.; Remington, B. A.; Sangster, T. C.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Springer, P. T.; Town, R. P. J.; Tucker, J. L.

    2017-03-01

    hot-spot continuum in the shell. These features provide diagnostics of the central hot spot and the compressed shell, plus a measure of the shell mass that has mixed into the hot spot [S. P. Regan et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 056307 (2012)] and evidence locating the origin of the mixed shell mass in the imploding ablator [S. P. Regan et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 045001 (2013)]. Spectra are analyzed and interpreted using detailed atomic models (including radiation-transport effects) to determine the characteristic temperatures, densities, and sizes of the emitting regions. A mix diagnostic based on enhanced continuum x-ray production, relative to neutron yield, provides sensitivity to the undoped shell material mixed into the hot spot [T. Ma et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 111, 085004 (2013)]. Together, these mix-mass measurements confirm that mix is a serious impediment to ignition. The spectroscopy and atomic physics of shell dopants have become essential in confronting this impediment and will be described.

  15. STROBE-X: X-ray Timing & Spectroscopy on Dynamical Timescales from Microseconds to Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Ray, Paul S.; Gendreau, Keith; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Feroci, Marco; Maccarone, Tom; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Remillard, Ronald A.; Wood, Kent; Griffith, Christopher; STROBE-X Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We describe a proposed probe-class mission concept that will provide an unprecedented view of the X-ray sky, performing timing and spectroscopy over a broad band (0.2-30 keV) probing timescales from microseconds to years. The Spectroscopic Time-Resolving Observatory for Broadband Energy X-rays (STROBE-X) comprises two primary instruments. The soft band (0.2-12 keV) will be covered by an array of lightweight optics (3-m focal length) that concentrate incident photons onto small solid state detectors with CCD-level (85-130 eV) energy resolution, 100 ns time resolution, and low background rates. This technology, fully developed for NICER, would be scaled up with enhanced optics to take advantage of the longer focal length of STROBE-X. The harder band (2 to at least 30 keV) would be covered by large-area collimated silicon drift detectors,developed for the European LOFT mission concept. Each instrument would provide an order of magnitude improvement in effective area compared with its predecessor (NICER in the soft band and RXTE in the hard band). A sensitive sky monitor would act as a trigger for pointed observations, provide high duty cycle, high time resolution, high spectral resolution monitoring of the X-ray sky with ~20 times the sensitivity of the RXTE ASM, and enable multi-wavelength and multi-messenger studies on a continuous, rather than scanning basis.The broad coverage will enable thermal components, non-thermal components, iron lines, and reflection features to be studied simultaneously from a single platform for the first time in accreting black holes at all scales. The enormous collecting area will enable studies of the dense matter equation of state using both soft thermal emission from rotation-powered pulsars and harder emission from X-ray burst oscillations. Revolutionary science, such as high quality spectroscopy of clusters of galaxies and unprecedented timing investigations of active galactic nuclei, would also be obtained.We describe the mission

  16. STROBE-X: X-Ray Timing Spectroscopy on Dynamical Timescales from Microseconds to Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Ray, P. S.; Gendreau, K.; Arzoumanian, Z.; Chakrabarty, D.; Remillard, R.; Feroci, M.; Maccarone, T.; Wood, K.; Jenke, P.

    2017-01-01

    We describe a probe-class mission concept that provides an unprecedented view of the X-ray sky, performing timing and 0.2-30 keV spectroscopy over timescales from microseconds to years. The Spectroscopic Time-Resolving Observatory for Broadband Energy X-rays (STROBE-X) comprises three primary instruments. The first uses an array of lightweight optics (3-m focal length) that concentrate incident photons onto solid state detectors with CCD-level (85-130 eV) energy resolution, 100 ns time resolution, and low background rates to cover the 0.2-12 keV band. This technology is scaled up from NICER, with enhanced optics to take advantage of the longer focal length of STROBE-X. The second uses large-area collimated silicon drift detectors, developed for ESA's LOFT, to cover the 2-30 keV band. These two instruments each provide an order of magnitude improvement in effective area compared with its predecessor (NICER and RXTE, respectively). Finally, a sensitive sky monitor triggers pointed observations, provides high duty cycle, high time resolution, high spectral resolution monitoring of the X-ray sky with approx. 20 times the sensitivity of the RXTE ASM, and enables multi-wavelength and multi-messenger studies on a continuous, rather than scanning basis.For the first time, the broad coverage provides simultaneous study of thermal components, non-thermal components, iron lines, and reflection features from a single platform for accreting black holes at all scales. The enormous collecting area allows detailed studies of the dense matter equation of state using both thermal emission from rotation-powered pulsars and harder emission from X-ray burst oscillations. The combination of the wide-field monitor and the sensitive pointed instruments enables observations of potential electromagnetic counterparts to LIGO and neutrino events. Additional extragalactic science, such as high quality spectroscopy of clusters of galaxies and unprecedented timing investigations of active

  17. In-situ assessment of metal contamination via portable X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy: Zlatna, Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weindorf, David C; Paulette, Laura; Man, Titus

    2013-11-01

    Zlatna, Romania is the site of longtime mining/smelting operations which have resulted in widespread metal pollution of the entire area. Previous studies have documented the contamination using traditional methods involving soil sample collection, digestion, and quantification via inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy or atomic absorption. However, field portable X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (PXRF) can accurately quantify contamination in-situ, in seconds. A PXRF spectrometer was used to scan 69 soil samples in Zlatna across multiple land use types. Each site was georeferenced with data inputted into a geographic information system for high resolution spatial interpolations. These models were laid over contemporary aerial imagery to evaluate the extent of pollution on an individual elemental basis. Pb, As, Co, Cu, and Cd exceeded governmental action limits in >50% of the sites scanned. The use of georeferenced PXRF data offers a powerful new tool for in-situ assessment of contaminated soils.

  18. Design of solar cell materials via soft X-ray spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Himpsel, F.J.; Cook, P.L.; de la Torre, G.

    2013-01-01

    to an oxide acceptor. The bridge to device fabrication is crossed by correlating spectroscopic features with the photocurrent in hematite photoanodes for water splitting. For speeding up the development of new materials and designs of solar cells a feedback loop between spectroscopy, theory, synthesis......This overview illustrates how spectroscopy with soft X-rays can assist the development of new materials and new designs for solar cells. The starting point is the general layout of a solar cell, which consists of a light absorber sandwiched between an electron donor and an electron acceptor......) as a function of the metal atom are presented for the metal 2p and N 1s absorption edges. In combination with density functional theory one can discern trends that are useful for tailoring absorber molecules. A customized porphyrin molecule is investigated that combines an absorber with a donor and a linker...

  19. Energy Dispersive X-Ray and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopies for Performance and Corrosion Analysis of PEMWEs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, S. M., Iii; Zhang, F.-Y.

    2014-11-01

    Proton exchange membrane water electrolyzers (PEMWEs) are a promising energy storage technology due to their high efficiency, compact design, and ability to be used in a renewable energy system. Before they are able to make a large commercial impact, there are several hurdles facing the technology today. Two powerful techniques for both in-situ and ex- situ characterizations to improve upon their performance and better understand their corrosion are electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, respectively. In this paper, the authors use both methods in order to characterize the anode gas diffusion layer (GDL) in a PEMWE cell and better understand the corrosion that occurs in the oxygen electrode during electrolysis.

  20. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Characterization of Electrochemical Processes in Renewable Energy Storage and Conversion Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmand, Maryam [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States)

    2013-05-19

    The development of better energy conversion and storage devices, such as fuel cells and batteries, is crucial for reduction of our global carbon footprint and improving the quality of the air we breathe. However, both of these technologies face important challenges. The development of lower cost and better electrode materials, which are more durable and allow more control over the electrochemical reactions occurring at the electrode/electrolyte interface, is perhaps most important for meeting these challenges. Hence, full characterization of the electrochemical processes that occur at the electrodes is vital for intelligent design of more energy efficient electrodes. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a short-range order, element specific technique that can be utilized to probe the processes occurring at operating electrode surfaces, as well for studying the amorphous materials and nano-particles making up the electrodes. It has been increasingly used in recent years to study fuel cell catalysts through application of the and #916; and mgr; XANES technique, in combination with the more traditional X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) techniques. The and #916; and mgr; XANES data analysis technique, previously developed and applied to heterogeneous catalysts and fuel cell electrocatalysts by the GWU group, was extended in this work to provide for the first time space resolved adsorbate coverages on both electrodes of a direct methanol fuel cell. Even more importantly, the and #916; and mgr; technique was applied for the first time to battery relevant materials, where bulk properties such as the oxidation state and local geometry of a cathode are followed.

  1. Band gap opening in strongly compressed diamond observed by x-ray energy loss spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamboa, E. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Fletcher, L. B. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Lee, H. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); MacDonald, M. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Zastrau, U. [High-Energy Density Science Group, Hamburg (Germany); Gauthier, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Gericke, D. O. [Univ. of Warwick (United Kingdom); Vorberger, J. [Helmholtz Association of German Research Centres, Dresden (Germany); Granados, E. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hastings, J. B. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Glenzer, S. H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2016-01-25

    The extraordinary mechanical and optical properties of diamond are the basis of numerous technical applications and make diamond anvil cells a premier device to explore the high-pressure behavior of materials. However, at applied pressures above a few hundred GPa, optical probing through the anvils becomes difficult because of the pressure-induced changes of the transmission and the excitation of a strong optical emission. Such features have been interpreted as the onset of a closure of the optical gap in diamond, and can significantly impair spectroscopy of the material inside the cell. In contrast, a comparable widening has been predicted for purely hydrostatic compressions, forming a basis for the presumed pressure stiffening of diamond and resilience to the eventual phase change to BC8. We here present the first experimental evidence of this effect at geo-planetary pressures, exceeding the highest ever reported hydrostatic compression of diamond by more than 200 GPa and any other measurement of the band gap by more than 350 GPa. We here apply laser driven-ablation to create a dynamic, high pressure state in a thin, synthetic diamond foil together with frequency-resolved x-ray scattering as a probe. The frequency shift of the inelastically scattered x-rays encodes the optical properties and, thus, the behavior of the band gap in the sample. Using the ultra-bright x-ray beam from the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), we observe an increasing direct band gap in diamond up to a pressure of 370 GPa. This finding points to the enormous strains in the anvils and the impurities in natural Type Ia diamonds as the source of the observed closure of the optical window. Our results demonstrate that diamond remains an insulating solid to pressures approaching its limit strength.

  2. Simulated 'On-Line' Wear Metal Analysis of Lubricating Oils by X-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelliher, Warren C.; Partos, Richard D.; Nelson, Irina

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this project was to assess the sensitivity of X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy (XFS) for quantitative evaluation of metal particle content in engine oil suspensions and the feasibility of real-time, dynamic wear metal analysis. The study was focused on iron as the majority wear metal component. Variable parameters were: particle size, particle concentration and oil velocity. A commercial XFS spectrometer equipped with interchangeable static/dynamic (flow cell) sample chambers was used. XFS spectra were recorded for solutions of Fe-organometallic standard and for a series of DTE oil suspensions of high purity spherical iron particles of 2g, 4g, and 8g diameter, at concentrations from 5 ppm to 5,000 ppm. Real contaminated oil samples from Langley Air Force Base aircraft engines and NASA Langley Research Center wind tunnels were also analyzed. The experimental data conform the reliability of XFS as the analytical method of choice for this project. Intrinsic inadequacies of the instrument for precise analytic work at low metal concentrations were identified as being related to the particular x-ray beam definition, system geometry, and flow-cell materials selection. This work supports a proposal for the design, construction and testing of a conceptually new, miniature XFS spectrometer with superior performance, dedicated to on-line, real-time monitoring of lubricating oils in operating engines. Innovative design solutions include focalization of the incident x-ray beam, non-metal sample chamber, and miniaturization of the overall assembly. The instrument would contribute to prevention of catastrophic engine failures. A proposal for two-year funding has been presented to NASA Langley Research Center Internal Operation Group (IOG) Management, to continue the effort begun by this summer's project.

  3. Characterization and speciation of mercury-bearing mine wastes using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, C.S.; Brown, Gordon E.; Rytuba, J.J.

    2000-01-01

    Mining of mercury deposits located in the California Coast Range has resulted in the release of mercury to the local environment and water supplies. The solubility, transport, and potential bioavailability of mercury are controlled by its chemical speciation, which can be directly determined for samples with total mercury concentrations greater than 100 mg kg-1 (ppm) using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). This technique has the additional benefits of being non-destructive to the sample, element-specific, relatively sensitive at low concentrations, and requiring minimal sample preparation. In this study, Hg L(III)-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra were collected for several mercury mine tailings (calcines) in the California Coast Range. Total mercury concentrations of samples analyzed ranged from 230 to 1060 ppm. Speciation data (mercury phases present and relative abundances) were obtained by comparing the spectra from heterogeneous, roasted (calcined) mine tailings samples with a spectral database of mercury minerals and sorbed mercury complexes. Speciation analyses were also conducted on known mixtures of pure mercury minerals in order to assess the quantitative accuracy of the technique. While some calcine samples were found to consist exclusively of mercuric sulfide, others contain additional, more soluble mercury phases, indicating a greater potential for the release of mercury into solution. Also, a correlation was observed between samples from hot-spring mercury deposits, in which chloride levels are elevated, and the presence of mercury-chloride species as detected by the speciation analysis. The speciation results demonstrate the ability of XAS to identify multiple mercury phases in a heterogeneous sample, with a quantitative accuracy of ??25% for the mercury-containing phases considered. Use of this technique, in conjunction with standard microanalytical techniques such as X-ray diffraction and electron probe microanalysis

  4. Resonant inelastic scattering in dilute magnetic semiconductors by x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawniczak-Jablonska, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)]|[Institute of Physics, Warsaw (Poland); Jia, J.J.; Underwood, J.H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    As modern, technologically important materials have become more complex, element specific techniques have become invaluable in studying the electronic structure of individual components from the system. Soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) and absorption (SXA) spectroscopies provide a unique means of measuring element and angular momentum density of electron states, respectively, for the valence and conducting bands in complex materials. X-ray absorption and the decay through x-ray emission are generally assumed to be two independent one-photon processes. Recent studies, however have demonstrated that SXF excited near the absorption threshold generate an array of spectral features that depend on nature of materials, particularly on the localization of excited states in s and d-band solids and that these two processes can no be longer treated as independent. Resonant SXF offers thus the new way to study the dynamics of the distribution of electronic valence states in the presence of a hole which is bound to the electron low lying in the conduction band. This process can simulate the interaction between hole-electron pair in wide gap semiconductors. Therefore such studies can help in understanding of transport and optics phenomena in the wide gap semiconductors. The authors report the result of Mn and S L-resonant emission in Zn{sub 1{minus}x}Mn{sub x}S (with x=0.2 and 0.3) and MnS as the energy of exciting radiation is tuned across the Mn and S L{sub 3,2} absorption edge, along with the resonant excited spectra from elemental Mn as a reference.

  5. Characterization of Metalloproteins by High-throughput X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W Shi; M Punta; J Bohon; J Sauder; R DMello; M Sullivan; J Toomey; D Abel; M Lippi; et al.

    2011-12-31

    High-throughput X-ray absorption spectroscopy was used to measure transition metal content based on quantitative detection of X-ray fluorescence signals for 3879 purified proteins from several hundred different protein families generated by the New York SGX Research Center for Structural Genomics. Approximately 9% of the proteins analyzed showed the presence of transition metal atoms (Zn, Cu, Ni, Co, Fe, or Mn) in stoichiometric amounts. The method is highly automated and highly reliable based on comparison of the results to crystal structure data derived from the same protein set. To leverage the experimental metalloprotein annotations, we used a sequence-based de novo prediction method, MetalDetector, to identify Cys and His residues that bind to transition metals for the redundancy reduced subset of 2411 sequences sharing <70% sequence identity and having at least one His or Cys. As the HT-XAS identifies metal type and protein binding, while the bioinformatics analysis identifies metal-binding residues, the results were combined to identify putative metal-binding sites in the proteins and their associated families. We explored the combination of this data with homology models to generate detailed structure models of metal-binding sites for representative proteins. Finally, we used extended X-ray absorption fine structure data from two of the purified Zn metalloproteins to validate predicted metalloprotein binding site structures. This combination of experimental and bioinformatics approaches provides comprehensive active site analysis on the genome scale for metalloproteins as a class, revealing new insights into metalloprotein structure and function.

  6. High resolution X-ray emission spectroscopy: An advanced tool for actinide research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitova, T; Brendebach, B; Dardenne, K; Denecke, M A; Lebid, A; Loeble, M; Rothe, J; Batuk, O N; Geckeis, H [Karlsruhe Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Institut fuer Nukleare Entsorgung (INE), PO Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Hormes, J; Liu, D [Physikalisches Institut, Nussallee 12, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Breher, F, E-mail: tonya.vitova@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Engesserstr. 15, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2010-03-15

    High resolution X-ray emission spectroscopy (HRXES) is becoming increasingly important for our understanding of electronic and coordination structures. The combination of such information with development of quantum theoretical tools will advance our capability for predicting reactivity and physical behavior especially of 5f elements. HRXES can be used to remove lifetime broadening by registering the partial fluorescence yield emitted by the sample (i.e., recording a windowed signal from the energy dispersed fluorescence emission while varying incident photon energy), thereby yielding highly resolved X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectra. Such spectra often display resonant features not observed in conventional XAFS. The spectrometer set-up can also be used for a wide range of other experiments, for example, resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS), where bulk electron configuration information in solids, liquids and gases is obtained. Valence-selective XAFS studies, where the local structure of a selected element's valence state present in a mixture of valence states can be obtained, as well as site-selective XAFS studies, where the coordination structure of a metal bound to selected elements can be differentiated from that of all the other ligating atoms. A HRXES spectrometer has been constructed and is presently being commissioned for use at the INE-Beamline for actinide research at the synchrotron source ANKA at FZK. We present the spectrometer's compact, modular design, optimized for attaining a wide range of energies, and first test measurement results. Examples from HRXES studies of lanthanides, actinides counter parts, are also shown.

  7. Fiber-optic based in situ atomic spectroscopy for manufacturing of x-ray optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanasoff, George; Metting, Christopher J.; von Bredow, Hasso

    2016-09-01

    The manufacturing of multilayer Laue (MLL) components for X-ray optics by physical vapor deposition (PVD) requires high precision and accuracy that presents a significant process control challenge. Currently, no process control system provides the accuracy, long-term stability and broad capability for adoption in the manufacturing of X-ray optics. In situ atomic absorption spectroscopy is a promising process control solution, capable of monitoring the deposition rate and chemical composition of extremely thin metal silicide films during deposition and overcoming many limitations of the traditional methods. A novel in situ PVD process control system for the manufacturing of high-precision thin films, based on combined atomic absorption/emission spectrometry in the vicinity of the deposited substrate, is described. By monitoring the atomic concentration in the plasma region independently from the film growth on the deposited substrate, the method allows deposition control of extremely thin films, compound thin films and complex multilayer structures. It provides deposition rate and film composition measurements that can be further utilized for dynamic feedback process control. The system comprises a reconfigurable hardware module located outside the deposition chamber with hollow cathode light sources and a fiber-optic-based frame installed inside the deposition chamber. Recent experimental results from in situ monitoring of Al and Si thin films deposited by DC and RF magnetron sputtering at a variety of plasma conditions and monitoring configurations are presented. The results validate the operation of the system in the deposition of compound thin films and provide a path forward for use in manufacturing of X-Ray optics.

  8. Beyond structure: ultrafast X-ray absorption spectroscopy as a probe of non-adiabatic wavepacket dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Simon P; Averbukh, Vitali; Patchkovskii, Serguei; Ruberti, Marco; Yun, Renjie; Chergui, Majed; Stolow, Albert; Schuurman, Michael S

    2016-12-16

    The excited state non-adiabatic dynamics of polyatomic molecules, leading to the coupling of structural and electronic dynamics, is a fundamentally important yet challenging problem for both experiment and theory. Ongoing developments in ultrafast extreme vacuum ultraviolet (XUV) and soft X-ray sources present new probes of coupled electronic-structural dynamics because of their novel and desirable characteristics. As one example, inner-shell spectroscopy offers localized, atom-specific probes of evolving electronic structure and bonding (via chemical shifts). In this work, we present the first on-the-fly ultrafast X-ray time-resolved absorption spectrum simulations of excited state wavepacket dynamics: photo-excited ethylene. This was achieved by coupling the ab initio multiple spawning (AIMS) method, employing on-the-fly dynamics simulations, with high-level algebraic diagrammatic construction (ADC) X-ray absorption cross-section calculations. Using the excited state dynamics of ethylene as a test case, we assessed the ability of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to project out the electronic character of complex wavepacket dynamics, and evaluated the sensitivity of the calculated spectra to large amplitude nuclear motion. In particular, we demonstrate the pronounced sensitivity of the pre-edge region of the X-ray absorption spectrum to the electronic and structural evolution of the excited-state wavepacket. We conclude that ultrafast time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy may become a powerful tool in the interrogation of excited state non-adiabatic molecular dynamics.

  9. First application of superconducting transition-edge-sensor microcalorimeters to hadronic-atom x-ray spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Okada, S; Curceanu, C; Doriese, W B; Fowler, J W; Gard, J; Gustafsson, F P; Hashimoto, T; Hayano, R S; Hirenzaki, S; Hays-Wehle, J P; Hilton, G C; Ikeno, N; Iliescu, M; Ishimoto, S; Itahashi, K; Iwasaki, M; Koike, T; Kuwabara, K; Ma, Y; Marton, J; Noda, H; O'Neil, G C; Outa, H; Reintsema, C D; Sato, M; Schmidt, D R; Shi, H; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, T; Swetz, D S; Tatsuno, H; Uhlig, J; Ullom, J N; Widmann, E; Yamada, S; Yamagata-Sekihara, J; Zmeskal, J

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution pionic-atom x-ray spectroscopy was performed with an x-ray spectrometer based on a 240-pixel array of superconducting transition-edge-sensor (TES) microcalorimeters at the piM1 beam line of the Paul Scherrer Institute. X-rays emitted by pionic carbon via the 4f->3d transition and the parallel 4d->3p transition were observed with a full-width-at-half-maximum energy resolution of 6.8 eV at 6.4 keV. Measured x-ray energies are consistent with calculated electromagnetic values which considered the strong-interaction effect assessed via the Seki-Masutani potential for the 3p energy level, and favor the electronic population of two filled 1s electrons in the K-shell. Absolute energy calibration with an uncertainty of 0.1 eV was demonstrated under a high-rate hadron beam condition of 1.45 MHz. This is the first application of a TES spectrometer to hadronic-atom x-ray spectroscopy and is an important milestone towards next-generation high-resolution kaonic-atom x-ray spectroscopy.

  10. Preparation, Spectroscopy, Physicochemical Properties and X-ray Structure Analysis of 3,4,5-Trimethoxy N(2-hydroxybenzylidene aniline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kodjo Charles Guillaume

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available 3,4,5-Trimethoxy N-(salicylidene aniline was synthesized and characterized by IR spectroscopy, 1H NMR and x-ray single crystal analysis. UV-visible spectroscopy was used for physicochemical tests. X-ray data reveals that the crystalline network cohesion of this compound is essentially assured by CH/pi type hydrogen bounds. It crystallized in the orthorhombic Pbcn space group. Electronic spectroscopy shows that the title compound doesn't present photochromic property but thermochromic one. Intermolecular interactions analysis confirms for this compound a thermochromic structural predisposition.

  11. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy: the coming-of-age

    CERN Document Server

    Kaastra, J S

    2016-01-01

    Since the launch of Chandra and XMM-Newton, high-resolution X-ray spectra of cosmic sources of all kinds have become available. These spectra have resulted in major scientific breakthroughs. However, due to the techniques used, in general high-quality spectra can only be obtained for the brightest few sources of each class. Moreover, except for the most compact extended sources, like cool core clusters, grating spectra are limited to point sources. Hitomi made another major step forward, in yielding for the first time a high-quality spectrum of an extended source, and improved spectral sensitivity in the Fe-K band. For point sources with the proposed Arcus mission, and for all sources with the launch of Athena, X-ray spectroscopy will become mature. It allows us to extend the investigations from the few handful of brightest sources of each category to a large number of sources far away in space and time, or to get high time-resolution, high-spectral resolution spectra of bright time variable sources.

  12. Direct observation of pentacene-thiol interaction using x-ray spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhang; Lee, Vincent; Floreano, Luca; Verdini, Alberto; Cossaro, Albano; Morgante, Alberto; Kymissis, Ioannis

    2010-03-01

    There has been an intense interest in the surface modification of the source-drain electrodes for organic field effect transistors (OFETs) to improve their performance. A number of thiol based self assembled monolayers demonstrated improvements to the contact resistance and channel performance. Morphological improvements at the contacts, a change in the effective work function, and charge transfer between the thiols and the semiconductor have all been credited with the observed performance improvements. Using in-situ semiconductor deposition together with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure, we are able to directly probe two technologically relevant OFET stacks. This work directly measures the interaction between pentacene and two thiols which have been associated to contact improvement: an electroneutral thiol (1-hexadecanethiol) and an electronegative thiol (pentafluorobenzenethiol). Based on our results we observe no chemical interaction between pentacene and the thiol. The electrical improvements to transistor performance, based on these systems, can be attributed to work function shifts of the contacts and morphological improvements of the organic semiconductor.

  13. Determination of uranyl incorporation into biogenic manganese oxides using X-ray absorption spectroscopy and scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, S.M.; Fuller, C.C.; Tebo, B.M.; Bargar, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    Biogenic manganese oxides are common and an important source of reactive mineral surfaces in the environment that may be potentially enhanced in bioremediation cases to improve natural attenuation. Experiments were performed in which the uranyl ion, UO22+ (U(VI)), at various concentrations was present during manganese oxide biogenesis. At all concentrations, there was strong uptake of U onto the oxides. Synchrotron-based extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies were carried out to determine the molecular-scale mechanism by which uranyl is incorporated into the oxide and how this incorporation affects the resulting manganese oxide structure and mineralogy. The EXAFS experiments show that at low concentrations (2 mol % U, >4 ??M U(VI) in solution), the presence of U(VI) affects the stability and structure of the Mn oxide to form poorly ordered Mn oxide tunnel structures, similar to todorokite. EXAFS modeling shows that uranyl is present in these oxides predominantly in the tunnels of the Mn oxide structure in a tridentate complex. Observations by XRD corroborate these results. Structural incorporation may lead to more stable U(VI) sequestration that may be suitable for remediation uses. These observations, combined with the very high uptake capacity of the Mn oxides, imply that Mn-oxidizing bacteria may significantly influence dissolved U(VI) concentrations in impacted waters via sorption and incorporation into Mn oxide biominerals. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  14. On the Preparation of Nickel Nanoparticles by Chemical Reduction Method: X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-Hsing CHOU

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Nickel nanoparticles were synthesized by the chemical reduction of NiCl2 with N2H4 under controlled pH environment. During nucleation, polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP was added as the protective agents for preventing the agglomeration of metal clusters. Color of the solution changed from green to blue during the reaction period. X-Ray Adsorption Spectroscopy (XAS, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD, and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM analytical methods were used to characterize the product. XAS analysis showed that the reduction reaction occurred within 5 minutes after the addition of N2H4. The length of Ni-Ni bond was 2.59 nm. The results of XRD analysis of the three cases with pH ranging from 11.0 to 13.0 suggest that the optimum pH value for the reaction appeared to be 12.0. The average particle size was 20 – 50 nm under this condition.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.2.12921

  15. Identifying anthropogenic uranium compounds using soft X-ray near-edge absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jesse D.; Bowden, Mark; Tom Resch, C.; Eiden, Gregory C.; Pemmaraju, C. D.; Prendergast, David; Duffin, Andrew M.

    2017-01-01

    Uranium ores mined for industrial use are typically acid-leached to produce yellowcake and then converted into uranium halides for enrichment and purification. These anthropogenic chemical forms of uranium are distinct from their mineral counterparts. The purpose of this study is to use soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy to characterize several common anthropogenic uranium compounds important to the nuclear fuel cycle. Chemical analyses of these compounds are important for process and environmental monitoring. X-ray absorption techniques have several advantages in this regard, including element-specificity, chemical sensitivity, and high spectral resolution. Oxygen K-edge spectra were collected for uranyl nitrate, uranyl fluoride, and uranyl chloride, and fluorine K-edge spectra were collected for uranyl fluoride and uranium tetrafluoride. Interpretation of the data is aided by comparisons to calculated spectra. The effect of hydration state on the sample, a potential complication in interpreting oxygen K-edge spectra, is discussed. These compounds have unique spectral signatures that can be used to identify unknown samples.

  16. High Spatial Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy of Cas A with Chandra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Juan Yang; Fang-Jun Lu; Li Chen

    2008-01-01

    We present high spatial resolution X-ray spectroscopy of the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A with the Chandra observations. The X-ray emitting region of this remnant was divided into 38 × 34 pixels of 10″× 10″ each. Spectra of 960 pixels were created and fitted with an absorbed two component non-equilibrium ionization model. From the results of the spectral analysis we obtained maps of absorbing column density, temperatures, ionization ages, and the abundances of Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ca and Fe. The Si, S and possibly Ca abundance maps show obvious jet structures, while Fe does not follow the jet but seems to be distributed perpendicular to it. The abundances of Si, S and Ca show tight correlations between one another over a range of about two dex. This suggests that they are ejecta from explosive Oburning and incomplete Si-buming. Meanwhile, the Ne abundance is well correlated with that of Mg, indicating them to be the ashes of explosive C/Ne burning. The Fe abundance is positively correlated with that of Si when the latter is lower than 3 times the solar value, and is negatively correlated when higher. We suggest that such a two phase correlation is due to the different ways in which Fe was synthesized.

  17. Biomedical and agricultural applications of energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyroba, Elżbieta; Suski, Szymon; Miller, Karolina; Bartosiewicz, Rafał

    2015-09-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) in electron microscopy has been widely used in many research areas since it provides precise information on the chemical composition of subcellular structures that may be correlated with their high resolution images. In EDS the characteristic X-rays typical of each element are analyzed and the new detectors - an example of which we describe - allow for setting precisely the area of measurements and acquiring signals as a point analysis, as a linescan or in the image format of the desired area. Mapping of the elements requires stringent methods of sample preparation to prevent redistribution/loss of the elements as well as elimination of the risk of overlapping spectra. Both qualitative and quantitative analyses may be performed at a low probe current suitable for thin biological samples. Descriptions of preparation techniques, drawbacks and precautions necessary to obtain reliable results are provided, including data on standards, effects of specimen roughness and quantification. Data on EPMA application in different fields of biomedical and agricultural studies are reviewed. In this review we refer to recent EDS/EPMA applications in medical diagnostics, studies on air pollution and agrochemicals as well as on plant models used to monitor the environment.

  18. Analysis of precipitation and dissolution of the microalloying elements by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyada Suwanpinij

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The dissolution of the microalloying elements in high strength low alloy steels is a cause of longer slab reheating time before hot forming processes compared with those for carbon steels. This is to ensure that all the necessary microalloying elements are dissolved and available for the precipitation hardening during and after the hot forming processes. In order to decrease the enormous amount of the reheating energy, which is the only heat required in the hot forming process, this works selects a high strength low alloy steel containing vanadium and analyses the dissolution kinetics by means of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS. The XAS scans for other elements, i.e., titanium and nitrogen have been carried out and discussed for the possibility of the technique to investigate precipitates in microalloyed steels.Vanadium shows rapid dissolution kinetics that as soon as a lower reheating temperature of 1200 °C is reached, most of it is dissolved into the solid solution. This is opposite to titanium whose most fraction is still in TiN after long reheating time at higher temperature in accordance with the application of TiN for the grain boundary pinning during reheating. X-rays absorption near edge structure (XANES analysis of nitrogen shows different form of spectra before and after the reheating process. This indicates that the change in the coordination around the central nitrogen atoms takes place during the reheating interval.

  19. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of graphitic carbon nanomaterials doped with heteroatoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toma Susi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS is one of the best tools for studying the chemical modification of surfaces, and in particular the distribution and bonding of heteroatom dopants in carbon nanomaterials such as graphene and carbon nanotubes. Although these materials have superb intrinsic properties, these often need to be modified in a controlled way for specific applications. Towards this aim, the most studied dopants are neighbors to carbon in the periodic table, nitrogen and boron, with phosphorus starting to emerge as an interesting new alternative. Hundreds of studies have used XPS for analyzing the concentration and bonding of dopants in various materials. Although the majority of works has concentrated on nitrogen, important work is still ongoing to identify its precise atomic bonding configurations. In general, care should be taken in the preparation of a suitable sample, consideration of the intrinsic photoemission response of the material in question, and the appropriate spectral analysis. If this is not the case, incorrect conclusions can easily be drawn, especially in the assignment of measured binding energies into specific atomic configurations. Starting from the characteristics of pristine materials, this review provides a practical guide for interpreting X-ray photoelectron spectra of doped graphitic carbon nanomaterials, and a reference for their binding energies that are vital for compositional analysis via XPS.

  20. Design of Molecular Solar Cells via Feedback from Soft X-ray Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Himpsel, Franz J. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-06-12

    Spectroscopy with soft X-rays was used to develop new materials and novel designs for solar cells and artificial photosynthesis. In order to go beyond the widely-used trial-and-error approach of gradually improving a particular design, we started from the most general layout of a solar cell (or a photo-electrochemical device) and asked which classes of materials are promising for best performance. For example, the most general design of a solar cell consists of a light absorber, an electron donor, and an electron acceptor. These are characterized by four energy levels, which were measured by a combination of spectroscopic X-ray techniques. Tuning synchrotron radiation to the absorption edges of specific elements provided element- and bond-selectivity. The spectroscopic results were complemented by state-of-the-art calculations of the electronic states. These helped explaining the observed energy levels and the orbitals associated with them. The calculations were extended to a large class of materials (for example thousands of porphyrin dye complexes) in order to survey trends in the energy level structure. A few highlights serve as examples: 1) Organic molecules combining absorber, donor, and acceptor with atomic precision. 2) Exploration of highly p-doped diamond films as inert, transparent electron donors. 3) Surface-sensitive characterization of nanorod arrays used as photoanodes in water splitting. 4) Computational design of molecular complexes for efficient solar cells using two photons.

  1. X-ray absorption spectroscopy and EPR studies of oriented spinach thylakoid preparations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, J.C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Structural Biology Div.

    1995-08-01

    In this study, oriented Photosystem II (PS II) particles from spinach chloroplasts are studied with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to determine more details of the structure of the oxygen evolving complex (OEC). The nature of halide binding to Mn is also studied with Cl K-edge and Mn EXAFS (extended x-ray absorption fine structure) of Mn-Cl model compounds, and with Mn EXAFS of oriented PS II in which Br has replaced Cl. Attention is focused on the following: photosynthesis and the oxygen evolving complex; determination of mosaic spread in oriented photosystem II particles from signal II EPR measurement; oriented EXAFS--studies of PS II in the S{sub 2} state; structural changes in PS II as a result of treatment with ammonia: EPR and XAS studies; studies of halide binding to Mn: Cl K-edge and Mn EXAFS of Mn-Cl model compounds and Mn EXAFS of oriented Br-treated photosystem II.

  2. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for characterization of bionanocomposite functional materials for energy-harvesting technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artyushkova, Kateryna; Atanassov, Plamen

    2013-07-22

    The analysis of hybrid multicomponent bioorganic and bioinorganic composite materials related to energy technologies by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is discussed. The approaches and considerations of overcoming the difficulties of analyzing hybrid multicomponent materials are demonstrated for different types of materials used in bioenzyme fuel cells, that is, enzyme immobilization in a hybrid inorganic-organic matrix, analysis of peptide binding and structure in the mediation of silica nanoparticle formation, analysis of enzyme-polymeric multilayered architectures obtained through layer-by-layer assembly, and study of the mechanism of electropolymerization. Thorough optimization of experimental design through analysis of an adequate set of reference materials, relevant timescales of sample preparation and X-ray exposure, careful peak decomposition and cross-correlation between elemental speciation, results in a detailed understanding of the chemistry of nanocomposite constituents and interactions between them. The methodology presented and examples discussed are of significant importance to the scientific and engineering communities focused on the immobilization of enzymes, proteins, peptides, and other large biological molecules on solid substrates.

  3. High-resolution x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of metal compounds in neurodegenerative brain tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collingwood, J. F.; Mikhaylova, A.; Davidson, M. R.; Batich, C.; Streit, W. J.; Eskin, T.; Terry, J.; Barrea, R.; Underhill, R. S.; Dobson, J.

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescence mapping and microfocus X-ray absorption spectroscopy are used to detect, locate and identify iron biominerals and other inorganic metal accumulations in neurodegenerative brain tissue at sub-cellular resolution (reviewed. Synchrotron X-rays are used to map tissue sections for metals of interest, and XANES and XAFS are used to characterise anomalous concentrations of the metals in-situ so that they can be correlated with tissue structures and disease pathology. Iron anomalies associated with biogenic magnetite, ferritin and haemoglobin are located and identified in an avian tissue model with a pixel resolution ~5 microns. Subsequent studies include brain tissue sections from transgenic Huntington's mice, and the first high-resolution mapping and identification of iron biominerals in human Alzheimer's and control autopsy brain tissue. Technical developments include use of microfocus diffraction to obtain structural information about biominerals in-situ, and depositing sample location grids by lithography for the location of anomalies by conventional microscopy. The combined techniques provide a breakthrough in the study of both intra- and extra-cellular iron compounds and related metals in tissue. The information to be gained from this approach has implications for future diagnosis and treatment of neurodegeneration, and for our understanding of the mechanisms involved.

  4. Characterization of metalloproteins by high-throughput X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wuxian; Punta, Marco; Bohon, Jen; Sauder, J Michael; D'Mello, Rhijuta; Sullivan, Mike; Toomey, John; Abel, Don; Lippi, Marco; Passerini, Andrea; Frasconi, Paolo; Burley, Stephen K; Rost, Burkhard; Chance, Mark R

    2011-06-01

    High-throughput X-ray absorption spectroscopy was used to measure transition metal content based on quantitative detection of X-ray fluorescence signals for 3879 purified proteins from several hundred different protein families generated by the New York SGX Research Center for Structural Genomics. Approximately 9% of the proteins analyzed showed the presence of transition metal atoms (Zn, Cu, Ni, Co, Fe, or Mn) in stoichiometric amounts. The method is highly automated and highly reliable based on comparison of the results to crystal structure data derived from the same protein set. To leverage the experimental metalloprotein annotations, we used a sequence-based de novo prediction method, MetalDetector, to identify Cys and His residues that bind to transition metals for the redundancy reduced subset of 2411 sequences sharing metalloproteins to validate predicted metalloprotein binding site structures. This combination of experimental and bioinformatics approaches provides comprehensive active site analysis on the genome scale for metalloproteins as a class, revealing new insights into metalloprotein structure and function.

  5. An x-ray absorption spectroscopy study of Ni-Mn-Ga shape memory alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathe, V G; Dubey, Aditi; Banik, Soma; Barman, S R; Olivi, L

    2013-01-30

    The austenite to martensite phase transition in Ni-Mn-Ga ferromagnetic shape memory alloys was studied by extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The spectra at all the three elements', namely, Mn, Ga and Ni, K-edges in several Ni-Mn-Ga samples (with both Ni and Mn excess) were analyzed at room temperature and low temperatures. The EXAFS analysis suggested a displacement of Mn and Ga atoms in opposite direction with respect to the Ni atoms when the compound transforms from the austenite phase to the martensite phase. The first coordination distances around the Mn and Ga atoms remained undisturbed on transition, while the second and subsequent shells showed dramatic changes indicating the presence of a modulated structure. The Mn rich compounds showed the presence of antisite disorder of Mn and Ga. The XANES results showed remarkable changes in the unoccupied partial density of states corresponding to Mn and Ni, while the electronic structure of Ga remained unperturbed across the martensite transition. The post-edge features in the Mn K-edge XANES spectra changed from a double peak like structure to a flat peak like structure upon phase transition. The study establishes strong correlation between the crystal structure and the unoccupied electronic structure in these shape memory alloys.

  6. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of graphitic carbon nanomaterials doped with heteroatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, Toma; Pichler, Thomas; Ayala, Paola

    2015-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is one of the best tools for studying the chemical modification of surfaces, and in particular the distribution and bonding of heteroatom dopants in carbon nanomaterials such as graphene and carbon nanotubes. Although these materials have superb intrinsic properties, these often need to be modified in a controlled way for specific applications. Towards this aim, the most studied dopants are neighbors to carbon in the periodic table, nitrogen and boron, with phosphorus starting to emerge as an interesting new alternative. Hundreds of studies have used XPS for analyzing the concentration and bonding of dopants in various materials. Although the majority of works has concentrated on nitrogen, important work is still ongoing to identify its precise atomic bonding configurations. In general, care should be taken in the preparation of a suitable sample, consideration of the intrinsic photoemission response of the material in question, and the appropriate spectral analysis. If this is not the case, incorrect conclusions can easily be drawn, especially in the assignment of measured binding energies into specific atomic configurations. Starting from the characteristics of pristine materials, this review provides a practical guide for interpreting X-ray photoelectron spectra of doped graphitic carbon nanomaterials, and a reference for their binding energies that are vital for compositional analysis via XPS.

  7. Strontium localization in bone tissue studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankær, Christian Grundahl; Raffalt, Anders Christer; Stahl, Kenny

    2014-02-01

    Strontium has recently been introduced as a pharmacological agent for the treatment and prevention of osteoporosis. We determined the localization of strontium incorporated into bone matrix from dogs treated with Sr malonate by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. A new approach for analyzing the X-ray absorption spectra resulted in a compositional model and allowed the relative distribution of strontium in the different bone components to be estimated. Approximately 35-45% of the strontium present is incorporated into calcium hydroxyapatite (CaHA) by substitution of some of the calcium ions occupying highly ordered sites, and at least 30% is located at less ordered sites where only the first solvation shell is resolved, suggesting that strontium is surrounded by only oxygen atoms similar to Sr(2+) in solution. Strontium was furthermore shown to be absorbed in collagen in which it obtains a higher structural order than when present in serum but less order than when it is incorporated into CaHA. The total amount of strontium in the samples was determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, and the amount of Sr was found to increase with increasing dose levels and treatment periods, whereas the relative distribution of strontium among the different components appears to be independent of treatment period and dose level.

  8. Semi-transparent SiC Schottky diodes for X-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lees, J.E. [Space Research Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michael Atiyah Building, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: lee@star.le.ac.uk; Bassford, D.J. [Space Research Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michael Atiyah Building, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Fraser, G.W. [Space Research Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michael Atiyah Building, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Horsfall, A.B. [Semiconductor Technology Group, School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, Merz Court, University of Newcastle, Newcastle NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Vassilevski, K.V. [Semiconductor Technology Group, School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, Merz Court, University of Newcastle, Newcastle NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Wright, N.G. [Semiconductor Technology Group, School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, Merz Court, University of Newcastle, Newcastle NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Owens, A. [Office of Science Payload and Advanced Concepts, European Space Agency ESTEC SCI-A, Postbus 299, 2200AG Noordwijk (Netherlands)

    2007-07-21

    We describe a novel SiC Schottky diode architecture. The semi-transparent SiC Schottky diode has an 'ultra-thin' (18 nm Ni/Ti) Schottky contact, a gold annular overlayer and a gold corner-contact pad. We show that the new architecture exhibits the same essential characteristics as a more conventional 'thick-contact' Schottky diode ({>=}100 nm). Such diodes will have a higher efficiency for low-energy (<5 keV) X-rays than that of conventional structures combined with minimal self-fluorescence from the electrode materials. We present X-ray spectra from {sup 55}Fe, {sup 109}Cd and {sup 241}Am radioactive sources that show these diodes can be used for spectroscopy with promising energy resolution (1.47 keV FWHM at 22 keV) at room temperature (23 {sup o}C). The reduction in contact thickness, however, does reduce the barrier height of the new diodes in comparison to those fabricated using the conventional process, and requires a trade-off between the low-energy detection threshold and the noise in the detector.

  9. Identification of Uranyl Minerals Using Oxygen K-Edge X Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Jesse D.; Bowden, Mark E.; Resch, Charles T.; Smith, Steven C.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Buck, Edgar C.; Eiden, Gregory C.; Duffin, Andrew M.

    2016-03-01

    Uranium analysis is consistently needed throughout the fuel cycle, from mining to fuel fabrication to environmental monitoring. Although most of the world’s uranium is immobilized as pitchblende or uraninite, there exists a plethora of secondary uranium minerals, nearly all of which contain the uranyl cation. Analysis of uranyl compounds can provide clues as to a sample’s facility of origin and chemical history. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is one technique that could enhance our ability to identify uranium minerals. Although there is limited chemical information to be gained from the uranium X-ray absorption edges, recent studies have successfully used ligand NEXAFS to study the physical chemistry of various uranium compounds. This study extends the use of ligand NEXAFS to analyze a suite of uranium minerals. We find that major classes of uranyl compounds (carbonate, oxyhydroxide, silicate, and phosphate) exhibit characteristic lineshapes in the oxygen K-edge absorption spectra. As a result, this work establishes a library of reference spectra that can be used to classify unknown uranyl minerals.

  10. The sub-micron resolution X-ray spectroscopy beamline at NSLS-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Andrade, V.; Thieme, J.; Northrup, P.; Yao, Y.; Lanzirotti, A.; Eng, P.; Shen, Q.

    2011-09-01

    For many research areas such as life, environmental, earth or material sciences, novel analytical resources have to be developed for an advance understanding of complex natural and engineered systems that are heterogeneous on the micron to the tenths of microns scale. NSLS-II at BNL will be a synchrotron radiation source with an ultra-high brilliance delivering a high current (500 mA). One of the 1st six NSLS-II beamlines will be the Sub-micron Resolution X-ray spectroscopy beamline (SRX), dedicated as an analytical tool to study complex systems on a sub-micron length scale. SRX will comprise two branches thanks to a canted setup with two undulators: the first branch using Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors as focusing optics will cover the energy range of 4.65-23 keV, allowing for XANES experiments from the Ti to the Rh K-edge. Thanks to a horizontally deflecting double crystal monochromator with maximum stability, a set of slits located on the secondary source, and two sets of complementary and quickly interchangeable KB mirrors, spectroscopy with very high spectral and spatial resolution will be achieved. The spot size will almost fully cover a range from 60×60 to 1300×500 nm 2, providing an attractive adaptability of the observation scale. A 1.5 m long IVU21 will serve as a light source. The expected high flux in a sub-micron-spot (5×10 12 and 7×10 13 ph s -1 at maximum and lowest resolutions) will open new possibilities for spectromicroscopy of trace elements. The 2nd canted undulator will serve as an independent light source for the second branch designed for experiments with X-ray energies in the range of 2-15 keV. Using Fresnel zone plates, the spatial resolution aimed for is around 30 nm with up to 7×10 9 ph s -1 in the spot. This branch would be attractive for many biological applications from life and environmental science due to low-Z elements of interest within that energy range. In both experimental stations, X-ray fluorescence will be used for imaging

  11. An X-ray Imaging System for Hard-to-Reach Facility Diagnosis Using Femtosecond Laser-Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Yuji; Nayuki, Takuya; Nakajima, Chikahito; Fujii, Takashi; Zhidkov, Alexei; Nemoto, Koshichi

    2010-04-01

    For hard-to-reach facility diagnosis, a radiographic testing system that consists of a compact laser-plasma X-ray (LPX) generator and a compact X-ray imaging sensor is shown to be competitive to that based on the isotope imaging. A 1-mm-thick CsI charge-coupled device (CCD) sensor supplied with a cooling system was developed to tolerate a long X-ray exposition. Even without optimization of X-ray yield from a Ta thin film irradiated by 230 mJ, 70 fs laser pulses, clear X-ray images of a SUS304 pipe (outer diameter 34 mm with 4.5 mm thickness) with an elbow were produced.

  12. Broadband x-ray imaging and spectroscopy of the crab nebula and pulsar with NuSTAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristin K.; Reynolds, Stephen; Harrison, Fiona

    2015-01-01

    We present broadband (3-78 keV) NuSTAR X-ray imaging and spectroscopy of the Crab nebula and pulsar. We show that while the phase-averaged and spatially integrated nebula + pulsar spectrum is a power law in this energy band, spatially resolved spectroscopy of the nebula finds a break at ~9 keV in...

  13. High-resolution soft X-ray beamline ADRESS at the Swiss Light Source for resonant inelastic X-ray scattering and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strocov, V. N., E-mail: vladimir.strocov@psi.ch; Schmitt, T.; Flechsig, U.; Schmidt, T.; Imhof, A.; Chen, Q.; Raabe, J. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Betemps, R.; Zimoch, D.; Krempasky, J. [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Wang, X. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Institut de Physique de la Matiére Condensé, Ecole Polytechnique Fédéderale de Lausanne (Switzerland); Grioni, M. [Institut de Physique de la Matiére Condensé, Ecole Polytechnique Fédéderale de Lausanne (Switzerland); Piazzalunga, A. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Patthey, L. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland)

    2010-09-01

    Concepts and technical realization of the high-resolution soft X-ray beamline ADRESS at the Swiss Light Source are described. Optimization of the optical scheme for high resolution and photon flux as well as diagnostics tools and alignment strategies are discussed. The concepts and technical realisation of the high-resolution soft X-ray beamline ADRESS operating in the energy range from 300 to 1600 eV and intended for resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) are described. The photon source is an undulator of novel fixed-gap design where longitudinal movement of permanent magnetic arrays controls not only the light polarization (including circular and 0–180° rotatable linear polarizations) but also the energy without changing the gap. The beamline optics is based on the well established scheme of plane-grating monochromator operating in collimated light. The ultimate resolving power E/ΔE is above 33000 at 1 keV photon energy. The choice of blazed versus lamellar gratings and optimization of their profile parameters is described. Owing to glancing angles on the mirrors as well as optimized groove densities and profiles of the gratings, the beamline is capable of delivering high photon flux up to 1 × 10{sup 13} photons s{sup −1} (0.01% BW){sup −1} at 1 keV. Ellipsoidal refocusing optics used for the RIXS endstation demagnifies the vertical spot size down to 4 µm, which allows slitless operation and thus maximal transmission of the high-resolution RIXS spectrometer delivering E/ΔE > 11000 at 1 keV photon energy. Apart from the beamline optics, an overview of the control system is given, the diagnostics and software tools are described, and strategies used for the optical alignment are discussed. An introduction to the concepts and instrumental realisation of the ARPES and RIXS endstations is given.

  14. Femtosecond laser excitation of mixed Ar/Kr clusters: peculiarities of K-line x-ray production from nanoplasma under varied fraction of initial gas components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhvaniya, I. A.; Dzhidzhoev, M. S.; Gordienko, V. M.

    2017-09-01

    For the first time, we defined the range of krypton fraction (C Kr) in an initial binary Ar-Kr gas mixture that provides the production of large (N ~ 106 atoms/cluster) mixed Ar/Kr clusters under co-expansion of the mixture at room temperature and the stagnant pressure of 25 bar. Mixed Ar/Kr clusters exist at the krypton fraction of 3-15%. The presence of mixed clusters is detected by the simultaneous generation of both x-ray Kα lines of argon (E  =  3.1 keV) and krypton (E  =  12.7 keV) from nanoplasma originating as a result of femtosecond nonlinear laser excitation with intensity about 5 · 1017 W cm-2. It was shown that the amplitude of lines in dual-energy x-ray spectrum can be controlled by proper selection of the fraction of initial gas mixture components. Maximal laser energy conversion efficiency to krypton x-ray line is achieved for pure krypton clusters (i.e. C Kr  =  100%) and reaches 2 · 10-7 at laser intensity of 5 · 1017 W cm-2. The laser energy conversion efficiency to argon x-ray line reaches the maximal value of 3 · 10-6 at C kr  =  0%.

  15. Pump-flow-probe x-ray absorption spectroscopy as a tool for studying aintermediate states of photocatalytic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smolentsev, Grigory; Guda, Alexander; Zhang, Xiaoyi

    2013-01-01

    A new setup for pump-flow-probe X-ray absorption spectroscopy has been implemented at the SuperXAS beamline of the Swiss Light Source. It allows recording X-ray absorption spectra with a time resolution of tens of microseconds and high detection efficiency for samples with sub-millimolar concentr......A new setup for pump-flow-probe X-ray absorption spectroscopy has been implemented at the SuperXAS beamline of the Swiss Light Source. It allows recording X-ray absorption spectra with a time resolution of tens of microseconds and high detection efficiency for samples with sub......-millimolar concentrations. A continuous wave laser is used for the photoexcitation, with the distance between laser and X-ray beams and velocity of liquid flow determining the time delay, while the focusing of both beams and the flow speed profile define the time resolution. This method is compared with the alternative...... measurement technique that utilizes a 1 kHz repetition rate laser and multiple X-ray probe pulses. Such an experiment was performed at beamline 11ID-D of the Advanced Photon Source. Advantages, limitations, and potential for improvement of the pump-flow-probe setup are discussed by analyzing the photon...

  16. Low-energy d-d excitations in MnO studied by resonant x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butorin, S.M.; Guo, J.; Magnuson, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Resonant soft X-ray emission spectroscopy has been demonstrated to possess interesting abilities for studies of electronic structure in various systems, such as symmetry probing, alignment and polarization dependence, sensitivity to channel interference, etc. In the present abstract the authors focus on the feasibility of resonant soft X-ray emission to probe low energy excitations by means of resonant electronic X-ray Raman scattering. Resonant X-ray emission can be regarded as an inelastic scattering process where a system in the ground state is transferred to a low excited state via a virtual core excitation. The energy closeness to a core excitation of the exciting radiation enhances the (generally) low probability for inelastic scattering at these wavelengths. Therefore soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (in resonant electronic Raman mode) can be used to study low energy d-d excitations in transition metal systems. The involvement of the intermediate core state allows one to use the selection rules of X-ray emission, and the appearance of the elastically scattered line in the spectra provides the reference to the ground state.

  17. Design and performance of a soft-x-ray interferometer for ultra-high-resolution fourier transform spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moler, E.J.; Hussain, Z.; Duarte, R.M.; Howells, M.R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    A Fourier Transform Soft X-ray spectrometer (FT-SX) has been designed and is under construction for the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory as a branch of beamline 9.3.2. The spectrometer is a novel soft x-ray interferometer designed for ultra-high resolution (theoretical resolving power E/{delta}E{approximately}10{sup 6}) spectroscopy in the photon energy region of 60-120 eV. This instrument is expected to provide experimental results which sensitively test models of correlated electron processes in atomic and molecular physics. The design criteria and consequent technical challenges posed by the short wavelengths of x-rays and desired resolving power are discussed. The fundamental and practical aspects of soft x-ray interferometry are also explored.

  18. Two mirror X-ray pulse split and delay instrument for femtosecond time resolved investigations at the LCLS free electron laser facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrah, Nora; Fang, Li; Murphy, Brendan F; Kukk, Edwin; Osipov, Timur Y; Coffee, Ryan; Ferguson, Ken R; Xiong, Hui; Castagna, Jean-Charles; Petrovic, Vlad S; Montero, Sebastian Carron; Bozek, John D

    2016-05-30

    We built a two-mirror based X-ray split and delay (XRSD) device for soft X-rays at the Linac Coherent Light Source free electron laser facility. The instrument is based on an edge-polished mirror design covering an energy range of 250 eV-1800 eV and producing a delay between the two split pulses variable up to 400 femtoseconds with a sub-100 attosecond resolution. We present experimental and simulation results regarding molecular dissociation dynamics in CH3I and CO probed by the XRSD device. We observed ion kinetic energy and branching ratio dependence on the delay times which were reliably produced by the XRSD instrument.

  19. Electronic structure of RScO{sub 3} from x-ray spectroscopies and first-principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derks, Christine; Raekers, Michael; Neumann, Manfred [Department of Physics, University of Osnabrueck, D-49069 Osnabrueck (Germany); Kuepper, Karsten [Departement of Solidstate Physics, Univeristy of Ulm, D-89069 Ulm (Germany); Postnikov, Andree [Laboratoire de Physique des Milieux Denses, Universite Paul Verlaine, Metz (France); Uecker, Reinhard [Institute for Crystal Growth, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Perovskites of the type RScO{sub 3}, where R represents a trivalent rare-earth metal, exhibit an enormous variety of physical properties and can be used for different applications. They are high k materials and belong to the best available thin film substrates for the epitaxial growth of high quality thin films. This allows a so called strain tailoring of ferroelectric, ferromagnetic, or multiferroic perovskite thin films by choosing different RScO{sub 3}. The electronic structures of a series of RScO{sub 3} single crystals are investigated by means of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and band structure calculations. By combining XES and XAS measurements together with theoretical calculations the band gaps of the compounds can be accurately determined. The presented results will broaden the complete experimental and theoretical picture of the valence bands of RScO{sub 3} series.

  20. X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of electrochemically deposited thin oxide films.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balasubramanian, M.

    1998-06-02

    We have utilized ''in situ'' X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy to investigate the structure and composition of thin oxide films of nickel and iron that have been prepared by electrodeposition on a graphite substrate from aqueous solutions. The films are generally disordered. Structural information has been obtained from the analysis of the data. We also present initial findings on the local structure of heavy metal ions, e.g. Sr and Ce, incorporated into the electrodeposited nickel oxide films. Our results are of importance in a number of technological applications, among them, batteries, fuel cells, electrochromic and ferroelectric materials, corrosion protection, as well as environmental speciation and remediation.

  1. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy of MDI and TDI polyurethane polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urquhart, S.G.; Smith, A.P.; Ade, H.W. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Physics; Hitchcock, A.P. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada). Brockhouse Inst. for Materials Research; Rightor, E.G. [Dow Chemical USA, Midland, MI (United States); Lidy, W. [Dow Chemical USA, Freeport, TX (United States)

    1999-06-03

    The sensitivity of near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) to differences in key chemical components of polyurethane polymers is presented. Carbon is NEXAFS spectra of polyurethane polymers made from 4,4{prime}-methylene di-p-phenylene isocyanate (MDI) and toluene diisocyanate (TDI) isocyanate monomers illustrate that there is an unambiguous spectroscopic fingerprint for distinguishing between MDI-based and TDI-based polyurethane polymers. NEXAFS spectra of MDI and TDI polyurea and polyurethane models show that the urea and carbamate (urethane) linkages in these polymers can be distinguished. The NEXAFS spectroscopy of the polyether component of these polymers is discussed, and the differences between the spectra of MDI and TDI polyurethanes synthesized with polyether polyols of different molecular composition and different molecular weight are presented. These polymer spectra reported herein provide appropriate model spectra to represent the pure components for quantitative microanalysis.

  2. A novel approach to angular-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy depth-profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanchev, A.; Ignatova, V.; Ghelev, Ch. E-mail: chghelev@ie.bas.bg

    2000-05-02

    The angular-resolved-X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AR-XPS) technique is chosen to investigate the O redistribution on the surface of yttria-stabilized ZrO{sub 2} crystals during 10 keV He{sup +} ion bombardment. The data processing is performed by means of a newly-developed version of the 'Box-car' function method. An energy correction of the inelastic mean free paths (IMFP) of the elements present is performed and the elements peak areas are normalized with respect to surface carbon layer. An algorithm is described, which is tested and applied to the angular-dependent XPS data, and the true elements' depth-profiles are thus obtained.

  3. Melting of iron determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy to 100 GPa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilanti, Giuliana; Trapananti, Angela; Karandikar, Amol; Kantor, Innokenty; Marini, Carlo; Mathon, Olivier; Pascarelli, Sakura; Boehler, Reinhard

    2015-09-29

    Temperature, thermal history, and dynamics of Earth rely critically on the knowledge of the melting temperature of iron at the pressure conditions of the inner core boundary (ICB) where the geotherm crosses the melting curve. The literature on this subject is overwhelming, and no consensus has been reached, with a very large disagreement of the order of 2,000 K for the ICB temperature. Here we report new data on the melting temperature of iron in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell to 103 GPa obtained by X-ray absorption spectroscopy, a technique rarely used at such conditions. The modifications of the onset of the absorption spectra are used as a reliable melting criterion regardless of the solid phase from which the solid to liquid transition takes place. Our results show a melting temperature of iron in agreement with most previous studies up to 100 GPa, namely of 3,090 K at 103 GPa.

  4. Electronic topological transition in zinc under pressure: An x-ray absorption spectroscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilanti, G.; Trapananti, A.; Minicucci, M.; Liscio, F.; Twaróg, A.; Principi, E.; Pascarelli, S.

    2007-10-01

    Zinc metal has been studied at high pressure using x-ray absorption spectroscopy. In order to investigate the role of the different degrees of hydrostaticity on the occurrence of structural anomalies following the electronic topological transition, two pressure transmitting media have been used. Results show that the electronic topological transition, if it exists, does not induce an anomaly in the local environment of compressed Zn as a function of hydrostatic pressure and any anomaly must be related to a loss of hydrostaticity of the pressure transmitting medium. The near-edge structures of the spectra, sensitive to variations in the electronic density of states above the Fermi level, do not show any evidence of electronic transition whatever pressure transmitting medium is used.

  5. Structural analysis of sulfur in natural rubber using X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattanasiriwisawa, Wanwisa; Siritapetawee, Jaruwan; Patarapaiboolchai, Orasa; Klysubun, Wantana

    2008-09-01

    X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) has been applied to natural rubber in order to study the local environment of sulfur atoms in sulfur crosslinking structures introduced in the vulcanization process. Different types of chemical accelerators in conventional, semi-efficient and efficient vulcanization systems were investigated. The experimental results show the good sensitivity and reproducibility of XANES to characterize the local geometry and electronic environment of the sulfur K-shell under various conditions of vulcanization and non-vulcanization of natural rubber. Several applications of XANES in this study demonstrate an alternative way of identifying sulfur crosslinks in treated natural rubber based on differences in their spectra and oxidation states.

  6. Thermal oxidation of vanadium-free Ti alloys: An X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, Maria Francisca, E-mail: mflopez@icmm.csic.es [Department of Surfaces and Coatings, ICMM-CSIC, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, 3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Gutierrez, Alejandro [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada and Instituto Nicolas Cabrera, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Jimenez, Jose Antonio [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo 8, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Martinesi, Maria; Stio, Maria; Treves, Cristina [Department of Biochemical Sciences of University of Florence, Viale Morgagni 50, 50134 Florence (Italy)

    2010-04-06

    In the present work, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to study the surface chemical composition of three alloys for biomedical applications: Ti-7Nb-6Al, Ti-13Nb-13Zr and Ti-15Zr-4Nb. The surface of these alloys was modified by annealing in air at 750 deg. C for different times with the aim of developing an oxide thick layer on top. The evolution of surface composition with annealing time was studied by XPS, and compared with the composition of the native oxide layer present on the samples before annealing. Two different oxidation trends were observed depending on the alloying elements and their corresponding diffusion kinetics, which give rise to different chemical species at the topmost layers. These results were linked with an evaluation of the biological response of the alloys by bringing them in contact with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC).

  7. X-ray diffraction, IR spectroscopy and thermal characterization of partially hydrolyzed guar gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudgil, Deepak; Barak, Sheweta; Khatkar, B S

    2012-05-01

    Guar gum was hydrolyzed using cellulase from Aspergillus niger at 5.6 pH and 50°C temperature. Hydrolyzed guar gum sample was characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction, dilute solution viscometry and rotational viscometry. Viscometry analysis of native guar gum showed a molecular weight of 889742.06, whereas, after enzymatic hydrolysis, the resultant product had a molecular weight of 7936.5. IR spectral analysis suggests that after enzymatic hydrolysis of guar gum there was no major transformation of functional group. Thermal analysis revealed no major change in thermal behavior of hydrolyzed guar gum. It was shown that partial hydrolysis of guar gum could be achieved by inexpensive and food grade cellulase (Aspergillus niger) having commercial importance and utilization as a functional soluble dietary fiber for food industry.

  8. Reflection mode X-ray absorption spectroscopy: new applications in surface science research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luetzenkirchen-Hecht, Dirk [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik und Institut fuer Materialwissenschaften, Fachbereich C-Physik, Bergische Universitaet Wuppertal, Gaussstr. 20, D-42097 Wuppertal (Germany)]. E-mail: dirklh@uni-wuppertal.de; Frahm, Ronald [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik und Institut fuer Materialwissenschaften, Fachbereich C-Physik, Bergische Universitaet Wuppertal, Gaussstr. 20, D-42097 Wuppertal (Germany)

    2005-02-28

    Reflection mode grazing incidence X-ray absorption spectroscopy (GIXAFS) was applied for the in situ investigation of solid/liquid interfaces. Results obtained during the active dissolution of metals are presented. In the case of silver in neutral or weakly acidic Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solutions (pH 6.5), the formation of an Ag-O species at the surface of the Ag-electrode can be proven, i.e. the active dissolution proceeds via a non-protecting surface layer, the thickness of which was estimated to be about 5 nm. The atomic short-range order of this surface layer is different from polycrystalline silver oxides (Ag{sub 2}O and AgO) and relates to a more disordered or amorphous Ag{sup 1+} oxide.

  9. X-ray Spectroscopy and Imaging as Multiscale Probes of Intercalation Phenomena in Cathode Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horrocks, Gregory A.; De Jesus, Luis R.; Andrews, Justin L.; Banerjee, Sarbajit

    2017-09-01

    Intercalation phenomena are at the heart of modern electrochemical energy storage. Nevertheless, as out-of-equilibrium processes involving concomitant mass and charge transport, such phenomena can be difficult to engineer in a predictive manner. The rational design of electrode architectures requires mechanistic understanding of physical phenomena spanning multiple length scales, from atomistic distortions and electron localization at individual transition metal centers to phase inhomogeneities and intercalation gradients in individual particles and concentration variances across ensembles of particles. In this review article, we discuss the importance of the electronic structure in mediating electrochemical storage and mesoscale heterogeneity. In particular, we discuss x-ray spectroscopy and imaging probes of electronic and atomistic structure as well as statistical regression methods that allow for monitoring of the evolution of the electronic structure as a function of intercalation. The layered α-phase of V2O5 is used as a model system to develop fundamental ideas on the origins of mesoscale heterogeneity.

  10. [Surface and interface analysis of PTCDA/ITO using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Gu-ping; Song, Zhen; Gui, Wen-ming; Zhang, Fu-jia

    2006-04-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of surface and interface of PTCDA/ITO in PTCDA/p-Si organic-on-inorganic photoelectric detector was investigated. From C1s fine spectrum we found that the binding energy of C atoms in perylene rings was 284.6 eV; and the binding energy of C atoms in acid radical was 288.7 eV; moreover, some C atoms were oxidized by O atoms from ITO. The binding energy of O atoms in C=O bonds and C-O-C bonds was 531.5 and 533.4 eV, respectively. At the interface, the peak of high binding energy in C1s spectrum disappeared, and the main peak shifted toward lower binding energy.

  11. Simulating systematic errors in X-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments: Sample and beam effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curis, Emmanuel [Laboratoire de Biomathematiques, Faculte de Pharmacie, Universite Rene, Descartes (Paris V)-4, Avenue de l' Observatoire, 75006 Paris (France)]. E-mail: emmanuel.curis@univ-paris5.fr; Osan, Janos [KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute (AEKI)-P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Falkenberg, Gerald [Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor (HASYLAB), Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY)-Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Benazeth, Simone [Laboratoire de Biomathematiques, Faculte de Pharmacie, Universite Rene, Descartes (Paris V)-4, Avenue de l' Observatoire, 75006 Paris (France); Laboratoire d' Utilisation du Rayonnement Electromagnetique (LURE)-Ba-hat timent 209D, Campus d' Orsay, 91406 Orsay (France); Toeroek, Szabina [KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute (AEKI)-P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary)

    2005-07-15

    The article presents an analytical model to simulate experimental imperfections in the realization of an X-ray absorption spectroscopy experiment, performed in transmission or fluorescence mode. Distinction is made between sources of systematic errors on a time-scale basis, to select the more appropriate model for their handling. For short time-scale, statistical models are the most suited. For large time-scale, the model is developed for sample and beam imperfections: mainly sample inhomogeneity, sample self-absorption, beam achromaticity. The ability of this model to reproduce the effects of these imperfections is exemplified, and the model is validated on real samples. Various potential application fields of the model are then presented.

  12. Confocal X-ray fluorescence micro-spectroscopy experiment in tilted geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czyzycki, Mateusz, E-mail: Mateusz.Czyzycki@desy.de [DESY Photon Science, Notkestr. 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, Al. A. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Wrobel, Pawel; Lankosz, Marek [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, Al. A. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland)

    2014-07-01

    This paper provides a generalized mathematical model to describe the intensity of primary X-ray fluorescence radiation collected in the tilted confocal geometry mode, where the collimating optics is rotated over an angle relative to a horizontal plane. The influence of newly introduced terms, which take into account the tilted geometry mode, is discussed. The model is verified with a multi-layer test sample scanned in depth. It is proved that for low-Z matrices, the rotation of the detection channel does not induce any significant differences in a reconstruction of the thickness and chemical composition of layers, so that it may safely be ignored. - Highlights: • A mathematical model for confocal XRF spectroscopy in tilted geometry was derived. • Tilted geometry influenced the analytical capabilities of XRF instrument slightly. • Thickness and the chemical composition of multi-layers were determined.

  13. Determination of band profiles in GaN films using hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Shinji; Yoshiki, Masahiko; Nunoue, Shinya; Sano, Nobuyuki

    2017-02-01

    We investigated band-profile control by introducing interlayers between a semiconductor and metal contact layers to improve the electrical properties of GaN-based semiconductor devices. We evaluated the electronic structure of the semiconductor surface and the metal/semiconductor interface by hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. We also performed Monte Carlo simulations using the Boltzmann transport equation under the potential profile obtained using the Poisson equation. The band profile in the semiconductor substrate was then examined by comparing the energy spectra from the simulations with those from the experiments. We obtained good agreement between the two results. The present experimental and theoretical methods allow one to determine the band profile near the surface of a semiconductor as well as that in a metal interface. This approach may become a useful tool in the design and/or evaluation of processing conditions.

  14. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of excimer laser treated alumina films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, D. G.; Kolev, K.; Laude, L. D.; Mednikarov, B.; Starbov, N.

    1998-01-01

    Amorphous alumina layers are deposited on a single crystal Si substrate by a e-gun evaporation technique. These films are then thermally annealed in oxygen to be crystallized and, further, irradiated with an excimer laser beam. At each stage of the film preparation, an x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis is performed at the film surface and in depth, upon ion beam grinding. Results give evidence for the formation of an aluminosilicate upon thermal annealing of the film in oxygen. At the surface itself, this compound is observed to decompose upon excimer laser irradiation at energy densities exceeding 1.75 J/cm2, giving rise to free Si atoms and SiO2, however with complete disappearance of Al atoms. Model photochemical reactions are proposed to explain such transformations.

  15. Analysis of photographs and photo-paintings by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiva, Augusto Camara; Marcondes, Marli A.; Pinto, Herbert Prince Favero; Almeida, Paula Aline Durães

    2014-02-01

    A collection of Brazilian family photographs and photo-paintings from the beginning of the XX Century was analyzed by portable EDXRF (Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence) spectroscopy. The spectrometer uses a Si-drift Amptek detector and an Oxford Cr-tube or an Oxford W-tube. For every region under analysis, spectra obtained with the W-tube were used to detect all the elements above Al, while the Cr-tube was used to obtain more accurate results for elements between Al and V. Thirty nine elements were identified in the photos, and the origin of the most important ones was discussed. These results can be used for cataloging, preservation and restoring procedures.

  16. An early explanation of the periodic table: Lars Vegard and X-ray spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Kragh, Helge

    2011-01-01

    The Norwegian physicist Lars Vegard may have been the first to propose electron configurations for all the chemical elements, from hydrogen to uranium, on the basis of quantum atomic theory. This he did in papers of 1918-1919 in which he argued that the principal quantum number corresponded to the shells in Bohr's picture of atomic structure. Vegard's theory of the periodic system, based on the methods of theoretical X-ray spectroscopy in particular, was a significant advance but exerted little influence on the further development. It presupposed atoms made up of planar electron rings, and with the abandonment of the ring atom about 1920 this and similar models lost their credibility.

  17. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Characterization of a Li/S Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifan Ye

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The X-ray absorption spectroscopy technique has been applied to study different stages of the lithium/sulfur (Li/S cell life cycle. We have investigated how speciation of S in Li/S cathodes changes upon the introduction of CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, CH3(CH215N+(CH33Br− and with charge/discharge cycling. The introduction of CTAB changes the synthesis reaction pathway dramatically due to the interaction of CTAB with the terminal S atoms of the polysulfide ions in the Na2Sx solution. For the cycled Li/S cell, the loss of electrochemically active sulfur and the accumulation of a compact blocking insulating layer of unexpected sulfur reaction products on the cathode surface during the charge/discharge processes make the capacity decay. A modified coin cell and a vacuum-compatible three-electrode electro-chemical cell have been introduced for further in-situ/in-operando studies.

  18. X-Ray diffraction, spectroscopy and thermochemical characterization of the pharmaceutical paroxetine nitrate salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Paulo S.; de Melo, Cristiane C.; Ayala, Alejandro P.; Ellena, Javier

    2016-08-01

    A comprehensive solid state study of Paroxetine nitrate hydrate, (PRX+·NO3-)H2O, is reported. This salt was characterized by a combination of methods, including Single crystal X-ray diffraction, Thermal analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Solubility measurements. (PRX+·NO3-)H2O crystallizes in the monoclinic C2 space group (Z‧ = 1) and its packing was analyzed in details, showing that the main supramolecular motif consists in a C22(4) chain formed by charge-assisted N+-H⋯O- hydrogen bonds. The salt formation and conformation features were also accuracy established via FTIR spectra. In comparison with the pharmaceutical approved (PRX+ṡCl-)ṡ0.5H2O, (PRX+ṡNO3-)ṡH2O showed a decrease of 24 °C in the drug melting peak and a slight reduction in its water solubility value.

  19. In situ flow cell for combined X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and mass spectrometry at high photon energies under solar thermochemical looping conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothensteiner, Matthäus; Jenni, Joel; Emerich, Hermann; Bonk, Alexander; Vogt, Ulrich F.; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A.

    2017-08-01

    An in situ/operando flow cell for transmission mode X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and combined XAS/XRD measurements in a single experiment under the extreme conditions of two-step solar thermochemical looping for the dissociation of water and/or carbon dioxide was developed. The apparatus exposes materials to relevant conditions of both the auto-reduction and the oxidation sub-steps of the thermochemical cycle at ambient temperature up to 1773 K and enables determination of the composition of the effluent gases by online quadrupole mass spectrometry. The cell is based on a tube-in-tube design and is heated by means of a focusing infrared furnace. It was tested successfully for carbon dioxide splitting. In combined XAS/XRD experiments with an unfocused beam, XAS measurements were performed at the Ce K edge (40.4 keV) and XRD measurements at 64.8 keV and 55.9 keV. Furthermore, XRD measurements with a focused beam at 41.5 keV were carried out. Equimolar ceria-hafnia was auto-reduced in a flow of argon and chemically reduced in a flow of hydrogen/helium. Under reducing conditions, all cerium(iv) was converted to cerium(iii) and a cation-ordered pyrochlore-type structure was formed, which was not stable upon oxidation in a flow of carbon dioxide.

  20. L-Edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Dilute Systems Relevant to Metalloproteins Using an X-ray Free-Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitzner, Rolf; Rehanek, Jens; Kern, Jan; Gul, Sheraz; Hattne, Johan; Taguchi, Taketo; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Tran, Rosalie; Weniger, Christian; Schröder, Henning; Quevedo, Wilson; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond G.; Han, Guangye; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Koroidov, Sergey; Kubicek, Katharina; Schreck, Simon; Kunnus, Kristjan; Brzhezinskaya, Maria; Firsov, Alexander; Minitti, Michael P.; Turner, Joshua J.; Moeller, Stefan; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Bogan, Michael J.; Nordlund, Dennis; Schlotter, William F.; Messinger, Johannes; Borovik, Andrew; Techert, Simone; de Groot, Frank M. F.; Föhlisch, Alexander; Erko, Alexei; Bergmann, Uwe; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Wernet, Philippe; Yano, Junko

    2013-01-01

    L-edge spectroscopy of 3d transition metals provides important electronic structure information and has been used in many fields. However, the use of this method for studying dilute aqueous systems, such as metalloenzymes, has not been prevalent because of severe radiation damage and the lack of suitable detection systems. Here we present spectra from a dilute Mn aqueous solution using a high-transmission zone-plate spectrometer at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The spectrometer has been optimized for discriminating the Mn L-edge signal from the overwhelming O K-edge background that arises from water and protein itself, and the ultrashort LCLS X-ray pulses can outrun X-ray induced damage. We show that the deviations of the partial-fluorescence yield-detected spectra from the true absorption can be well modeled using the state-dependence of the fluorescence yield, and discuss implications for the application of our concept to biological samples. PMID:24466387

  1. Investigation by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence and X-ray powder diffraction of the chemical composition of white clay ceramic tiles from Veliki Preslav

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blagoev, K., E-mail: kblagoev@issp.bas.bg [Institute of Solid State Physics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Grozeva, M., E-mail: margo@issp.bas.bg [Institute of Solid State Physics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Malcheva, G., E-mail: bobcheva@issp.bas.bg [Institute of Solid State Physics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Neykova, S., E-mail: sevdalinaneikova@abv.bg [National Institute of Archaeology with Museum, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 2 Saborna, 1000 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the results of the application of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, and X-ray powder diffraction in assessing the chemical and phase composition of white clay decorative ceramic tiles from the medieval archaeological site of Veliki Preslav, a Bulgarian capital in the period 893–972 AC, well-known for its original ceramic production. Numerous white clay ceramic tiles with highly varied decoration, produced for wall decoration of city's churches and palaces, were found during the archaeological excavations in the old capital. The examination of fourteen ceramic tiles discovered in one of the city's monasteries is aimed at characterization of the chemical profile of the white-clay decorative ceramics produced in Veliki Preslav. Combining different methods and comparing the obtained results provides complementary information regarding the white-clay ceramic production in Veliki Preslav and complete chemical characterization of the examined artefacts. - Highlights: ► LIBS, XRF and XRD analyses of medieval white-clay ceramic tiles fragments are done. ► Different elements and phases, presented in the ceramics fragments were determined. ► Differences in the tiles' raw material mineral composition are found. ► Information of the tiles' production process and the raw clay deposits is obtained.

  2. ZnO/ZnAl2O4 Nanocomposite Films Studied by X-Ray Diffraction, FTIR, and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Iaiche

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ZnO/ZnAl2O4 nanocomposite films were synthesised by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis (USP by extracting Al2O(SO42 oxide with zinc chloride hydrate in deionised water. The sample was then subjected to heat treatment at 650°C and 700°C for 1 h, which led to the formation of the spinel oxide (ZnAl2O4 and wurtzite (ZnO phases. Al2(SO43·18H2O salt was transformed into aluminum oxide sulfate Al2O(SO42, which is an intermediary decomposition product, by calcination at 795°C for 3 h. The structures of the synthesised ZnO/ZnAl2O4 films were confirmed by XRD, FTIR, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. XPS spectra of the major Zn, Al, and O photoelectron lines and the major X-ray induced Zn LMM Auger lines for ZnO/ZnAl2O4 are presented.

  3. Advanced signal separation and recovery algorithms for digital x-ray spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Imbaby I.; El Tokhy, Mohamed S.

    2015-02-01

    X-ray spectroscopy is widely used for in-situ applications for samples analysis. Therefore, spectrum drawing and assessment of x-ray spectroscopy with high accuracy is the main scope of this paper. A Silicon Lithium Si(Li) detector that cooled with a nitrogen is used for signal extraction. The resolution of the ADC is 12 bits. Also, the sampling rate of ADC is 5 MHz. Hence, different algorithms are implemented. These algorithms were run on a personal computer with Intel core TM i5-3470 CPU and 3.20 GHz. These algorithms are signal preprocessing, signal separation and recovery algorithms, and spectrum drawing algorithm. Moreover, statistical measurements are used for evaluation of these algorithms. Signal preprocessing based on DC-offset correction and signal de-noising is performed. DC-offset correction was done by using minimum value of radiation signal. However, signal de-noising was implemented using fourth order finite impulse response (FIR) filter, linear phase least-square FIR filter, complex wavelet transforms (CWT) and Kalman filter methods. We noticed that Kalman filter achieves large peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR) and lower error than other methods. However, CWT takes much longer execution time. Moreover, three different algorithms that allow correction of x-ray signal overlapping are presented. These algorithms are 1D non-derivative peak search algorithm, second derivative peak search algorithm and extrema algorithm. Additionally, the effect of signal separation and recovery algorithms on spectrum drawing is measured. Comparison between these algorithms is introduced. The obtained results confirm that second derivative peak search algorithm as well as extrema algorithm have very small error in comparison with 1D non-derivative peak search algorithm. However, the second derivative peak search algorithm takes much longer execution time. Therefore, extrema algorithm introduces better results over other algorithms. It has the advantage of recovering and

  4. Characterization of interfacially electronic structures of gold-magnetite heterostructures using X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fang-hsin; Doong, Ruey-an

    2014-03-01

    Gold-magnetite heterostructures are novel nanomaterials which can rapidly catalyze the reduction reaction of nitroaromatics. In this study, the interfacially structural and electronic properties of various morphologies of Au-Fe3O4 heterostructures were systematically investigated using X-ray absorbance spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The effect of change in electronic structure and charge transfer on electrochemically catalytic activity of Au-Fe3O4 heterostructures was further evaluated by oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The shifts in binding energy of Au4f and Fe2p peaks in XPS spectra indicate the charge transfer between the Au and Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The increase in d-hole population of Au seeds after the conjugation with iron oxides follows the order flower-like Au-Fe3O4 (FLNPs)>dumbbell-like Au-Fe3O4 (DBNPs)>Au seeds. In addition, the Fe(2+) valence state increases in Au-Fe3O4 heterostructures, which provides evidence to support the hypothesis of charge transfer between Au and Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The theoretical simulation of Au L3-edge XAS further confirms the production of Au-Fe and Au-O bonds at the interface of Au/Fe3O4 and the epitaxial linkage relationship between Au and Fe3O4 nanoparticles. In addition, the electron deficient of Au seeds increases upon increasing Fe3O4 nanoparticles on a single Au seed, and subsequently decreases the catalytic activity of Au in the Au-Fe3O4 heterostructures. The catalytic activity of Au-Fe3O4 toward ORR follows the order Au seeds>Au-Fe3O4 DBNPs>Au-Fe3O4 FLNPs, which is positively correlated to the extent of electronic deficiency of Au in Au-Fe3O4 heterostructures.

  5. Electronic structure of aromatic amino acids studied by soft x-ray spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenhua; Carravetta, Vincenzo; Plekan, Oksana; Feyer, Vitaliy; Richter, Robert; Coreno, Marcello; Prince, Kevin C.

    2009-07-01

    The electronic structure of phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan, and 3-methylindole in the gas phase was investigated by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy at the C, N, and O K-edges. The XPS spectra have been calculated for the four principal conformers of each amino acid, and the spectra weighted by the Boltzmann population ratios calculated from published free energies. Instead of the single peaks expected from the stoichiometry of the compounds, the N 1s core level spectra of phenylalanine and tryptophan show features indicating that more than one conformer is present. The calculations reproduce the experimental features. The C and O 1s spectra do not show evident effects due to conformational isomerism. The calculations predict that such effects are small for carbon, and for oxygen it appears that only broadening occurs. The carbon K-edge NEXAFS spectra of these aromatic amino acids are similar to the published data of the corresponding molecules in the solid state, but show more structure due to the higher resolution in the present study. The N K-edge spectra of tryptophan and 3-methylindole differ from phenylalanine and tyrosine, as the first two both contain a nitrogen atom located in a pyrrole ring. The nitrogen K-edge NEXAFS spectra of aromatic amino acids do not show any measurable effects due to conformational isomerism, in contrast to the photoemission results. Calculations support this result and show that variations of the vertical excitation energies of different conformers are small, and cannot be resolved in the present experiment. The O NEXAFS spectra of these three aromatic compounds are very similar to other, simpler amino acids, which have been studied previously.

  6. Where Water is Oxidized to Dioxygen: Structure of the Photosynthetic Mn4Ca Cluster from X-ray Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, Junko; Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2007-10-24

    Light-driven oxidation of water to dioxygen in plants, algae and cyanobacteria iscatalyzed within photosystem II (PS II) by a Mn4Ca cluster. Although the cluster has been studied by many different methods, the structure and the mechanism have remained elusive. X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy and EXAFS studies have been particularly useful in probing the electronic and geometric structure, and the mechanism of the water oxidation reaction. Recent progress, reviewed here, includes polarized X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements of PS II single crystals. Analysis of those results has constrained the Mn4Ca cluster geometry to a setof three similar high-resolution structures. The structure of the cluster from the present study is unlike either the 3.0 or 3.5 Angstrom-resolution X-ray structures or other previously proposed models. The differences between the models derived from X-rayspectroscopy and crystallography are predominantly because of damage to the Mn4Ca cluster by X-rays under the conditions used for structure determination by X-ray crystallography. X-ray spectroscopy studies are also used for studying the changes in the structure of the Mn4Ca catalytic center as it cycles through the five intermediate states known as the Si-states (i=0-4). The electronic structure of the Mn4Ca cluster has been studied more recently using resonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectroscopy (RIXS), in addition to the earlier X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy methods. These studies are revealing that the assignment of formaloxidation states is overly simplistic. A more accurate description should consider the charge density on the Mn atoms that includes the covalency of the bonds and delocalization of the charge over the cluster. The geometric and electronic structure of the Mn4Ca cluster in the S-states derived from X-ray spectroscopy are leading to a detailed understanding of the mechanism of the O-O bond formation during the photosynthetic water

  7. Electron transfer in a virtual quantum state of LiBH4 induced by strong optical fields and mapped by femtosecond x-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stingl, J; Zamponi, F; Freyer, B; Woerner, M; Elsaesser, T; Borgschulte, A

    2012-10-05

    Transient polarizations connected with a spatial redistribution of electronic charge in a mixed quantum state are induced by optical fields of high amplitude. We determine for the first time the related transient electron density maps, applying femtosecond x-ray powder diffraction as a structure probe. The prototype ionic material LiBH4 driven nonresonantly by an intense sub-40 fs optical pulse displays a large-amplitude fully reversible electron transfer from the BH4(-) anion to the Li+ cation during excitation. Our results establish this mechanism as the source of the strong optical polarization which agrees quantitatively with theoretical estimates.

  8. Highly enhanced hard x-ray emission from oriented metal nanorod arrays excited by intense femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Sudipta; Chakraborty, Indrani; Ahmad, Saima; Carvalho, Daniel; Singh, Prashant; Lad, Amit D.; Narayanan, V.; Ayyub, Pushan; Kumar, G. Ravindra; Zheng, J.; Sheng, Z. M.

    2011-01-01

    We report a 43-fold enhancement in the hard x-ray emission (in the 150-300 keV range) from copper nanorod arrays (compared to a polished Cu surface) when excited by 30-fs, 800-nm laser pulses with an intensity of 1016 W/cm2. The temperature of the hot electrons that emit the x rays is 11 times higher. Significantly, the x-ray yield enhancement is found to depend on both the aspect ratio as well as the cluster size of the nanorods. We show that the higher yield arises from enhanced laser absorption owing to the extremely high local electric fields around the nanorod tips. Particle-in-cell plasma simulations reproduce these observations and provide pointers to further optimization of the x-ray emission.

  9. Molecular characterization of brominated persistent pollutants using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergknut, Magnus; Skyllberg, Ulf [Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Department of Forest Ecology and Management, Umeaa (Sweden); Persson, Per [Umeaa University, Department of Chemistry, Umeaa (Sweden)

    2008-02-15

    X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy spectra were collected for three brominated persistent pollutants: 6-bromo-2,4,5-trichlorophenol (BrTriClP), pentabromophenol (PentaBrP) and 3,3',5,5'-tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBA). The substances were selected to be symmetrical (BrTriClP and TBBA) or asymmetrical (PentaBrP) with respect to the atomic Br positions and to differ in the number of bromine and other halide atoms, as well as their relative positions. The asymmetrical PentaBrP was modelled with special detail as not all bromine atoms have identical coordination environments. The studied substances displayed unique EXAFS spectra, which could be used to determine the molecular structure in fair detail. We conclude that EXAFS spectroscopy is a suitable technique for molecular characterization of the comparatively complex molecules within the class of compounds of brominated organic persistent pollutants. A detailed understanding of the EXAFS spectra of the pure compounds opens up possibilities to study the interactions with soil and sediment matrices by means of EXAFS spectroscopy. (orig.)

  10. Methods development for diffraction and spectroscopy studies of metalloenzymes at X-ray free-electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Jan; Hattne, Johan; Tran, Rosalie; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Laksmono, Hartawan; Gul, Sheraz; Sierra, Raymond G.; Rehanek, Jens; Erko, Alexei; Mitzner, Rolf; Wernet, Phillip; Bergmann, Uwe; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Yachandra, Vittal; Yano, Junko

    2014-01-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) open up new possibilities for X-ray crystallographic and spectroscopic studies of radiation-sensitive biological samples under close to physiological conditions. To facilitate these new X-ray sources, tailored experimental methods and data-processing protocols have to be developed. The highly radiation-sensitive photosystem II (PSII) protein complex is a prime target for XFEL experiments aiming to study the mechanism of light-induced water oxidation taking place at a Mn cluster in this complex. We developed a set of tools for the study of PSII at XFELs, including a new liquid jet based on electrofocusing, an energy dispersive von Hamos X-ray emission spectrometer for the hard X-ray range and a high-throughput soft X-ray spectrometer based on a reflection zone plate. While our immediate focus is on PSII, the methods we describe here are applicable to a wide range of metalloenzymes. These experimental developments were complemented by a new software suite, cctbx.xfel. This software suite allows for near-real-time monitoring of the experimental parameters and detector signals and the detailed analysis of the diffraction and spectroscopy data collected by us at the Linac Coherent Light Source, taking into account the specific characteristics of data measured at an XFEL. PMID:24914169

  11. Microbeam x-ray absorption spectroscopy study of chromium in large-grain uranium dioxide fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieszczynski, C.; Kuri, G.; Bertsch, J.; Martin, M.; Borca, C. N.; Delafoy, Ch; Simoni, E.

    2014-09-01

    Synchrotron-based microprobe x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to study the local atomic structure of chromium in chromia-doped uranium dioxide (UO2) grains. The specimens investigated were a commercial grade chromia-doped UO2 fresh fuel pellet, and materials from a spent fuel pellet of the same batch, irradiated with an average burnup of ~40 MW d kg-1. Uranium L3-edge and chromium K-edge XAS have been measured, and the structural environments of central uranium and chromium atoms have been elucidated. The Fourier transform of uranium L3-edge extended x-ray absorption fine structure shows two well-defined peaks of U-O and U-U bonds at average distances of 2.36 and 3.83 Å. Their coordination numbers are determined as 8 and 11, respectively. The chromium Fourier transform extended x-ray absorption fine structure of the pristine UO2 matrix shows similar structural features with the corresponding spectrum of the irradiated spent fuel, indicative of analogous chromium environments in the two samples studied. From the chromium XAS experimental data, detectable next neighbor atoms are oxygen and uranium of the cation-substituted UO2 lattice, and two distinct subshells of chromium and oxygen neighbors, possibly because of undissolved chromia particles present in the doped fuels. Curve-fitting analyses using theoretical amplitude and phase-shift functions of the closest Cr-O shell and calculations with ab initio computer code FEFF and atomic clusters generated from the chromium-dissolved UO2 structure have been carried out. There is a prominent reduction in the length of the adjacent Cr-O bond of about 0.3 Å in chromia-doped UO2 compared with the ideal U-O bond length in standard UO2 that would be expected because of the change in effective Coulomb interactions resulting from replacing U4+ with Cr3+ and their ionic size differences. The contraction of shortest Cr-U bond is ~0.1 Å relative to the U-U bond length in bulk UO2. The difference in the

  12. Application of X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy to the study of nuclear structural materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shanshan

    One of key technologies for the next generation nuclear systems are advanced materials, including high temperature structural materials, fast neutron resistance core materials and so on. Local structure determination in these systems, which often are crystallographically intractable, is critical to gaining an understanding of their properties. In this thesis, X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS), including Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES), is used to examine the geometric and electronic structure of nuclear structural materials under varying conditions. The thesis is divided into two main sections. The first examines the structural analysis of nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFA) which are dispersion strengthened by an ultra high density of Y-Ti-O enriched nano-features, resulting in remarkable high temperature creep strength and radiation damage resistance. Titanium and Yttrium K-edge XAS shows commercial alloys MA957 and J12YWT more closely resemble the as received Fe-14Cr-3W-0.4Ti (wt. %) powders, and mechanically alloyed (MA) powders with 0.25Y2O3 (wt. %). It shows that a significant fraction of substitutional Ti remains dissolved in the (BCC) ferrite matrix. In contrast, annealed powders and hot isostatic press (HIP) consolidated alloys show high temperature heat treatments shift the Y and Ti to more oxidized states that are consistent with combinations of Y2Ti2O7 and, especially, TiO. The second section describes corrosion studies of Pb with 316L stainless steel, molybdenum and spinet (MgAl2O4) at high temperature by XAS. The corrosion of fuel cladding and structural materials by liquid lead at elevated temperatures is an issue that must be considered when designing advanced nuclear systems and high-power spallation neutron targets. The results of ex-situ studies show that a Mo substrate retained a smooth and less corroded surface than 316L stainless steel sample at elevated temperature. In

  13. Radiation effects and metalloproteins studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurzbach, J.A.

    1975-07-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used to study the bonding structure at the iron site of cytochrome c and the bonding of rare earth ions to the phosphate oxygens of ATP. Radiation effects are studied on several amino acid and simple peptide model systems. The emission spectrum of the x-ray source is calculated from literature references. The distributions of photon energy as a function of photon frequency and as a function of take-off angle are obtained. From these distributions, the radiation dose absorbed by an organic sample is found to be 10/sup 6/ rads/sec. The C 1s and N 1s spectra of amino acids and peptides are studied to characterize an internal reference standard for protein XPS spectra. Samples of native cytochrome c prepared from solutions of pH 1.5, 3, 7, and 11 are studied. Control samples include porphyrin cytochrome c (PCC), the metal free analogue of the native protein, and microperoxidase (MP), a mixture of heme peptides derived from the peptic digestion of cytochrome c. These samples show two S 2p peaks. The first peak has a binding energy (BE) of 163 eV, which corresponds to the S containing amino acids; the second peak is shifted to 167 eV. This large shift may be the result of Fe-S binding, or oxidation, or both. Low spin ferricytochrome c and ferri-MP were found to have Fe 3p BE's that are unusually low (51 eV) compared to other ferric compounds (54 to 58 eV) and even Fe metal (53 eV). X-ray crystal structures of these compounds show that low spin heme Fe lies in the porphyrin plane; while, high spin heme Fe is displaced above the plane. The N 1s and P 2p spectra of ATP show no change except slight broadening when Nd/sup 3 +/ is substituted for Na/sup +/. Thus, there is no inconsistency with proposals that rare earth ions might be useful as substitutes for alkali metal ions and alkaline earth ions in proteins.

  14. Hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of bulk and thin films of Heusler compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozina, Xeniya

    2012-03-26

    X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) is one of the most universal and powerful tools for investigation of chemical states and electronic structures of materials. The application of hard X-rays increases the inelastic mean free path of the emitted electrons within the solid and thus makes hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) a bulk sensitive probe for solid state research and especially a very effective nondestructive technique to study buried layers. This thesis focuses on the investigation of multilayer structures, used in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs), by a number of techniques applying HAXPES. MTJs are the most important components of novel nanoscale devices employed in spintronics. The investigation and deep understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the high performance of such devices and properties of employed magnetic materials that are, in turn, defined by their electronic structure becomes feasible applying HAXPES. Thus the process of B diffusion in CoFeB-based MTJs was investigated with respect to the annealing temperature and its influence on the changes in the electronic structure of CoFeB electrodes that clarify the behaviour and huge TMR ratio values obtained in such devices. These results are presented in chapter 6. The results of investigation of the changes in the valence states of buried off-stoichiometric Co{sub 2}MnSi electrodes were investigated with respect to the Mn content {alpha} and its influence on the observed TMR ratio are described in chapter 7. Magnetoelectronic properties such as exchange splitting in ferromagnetic materials as well as the macroscopic magnetic ordering can be studied by magnetic circular dichroism in photoemission (MCDAD). It is characterized by the appearance of an asymmetry in the photoemission spectra taken either from the magnetized sample with the reversal of the photon helicity or by reversal of magnetization direction of the sample when the photon helicity direction is fixed. Though

  15. Response functions of Si(Li), SDD and CdTe detectors for mammographic x-ray spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomal, A; Cunha, D M; Antoniassi, M; Poletti, M E

    2012-07-01

    In this work, the energy response functions of Si(Li), SDD and CdTe detectors were studied in the mammographic energy range through Monte Carlo simulation. The code was modified to take into account carrier transport effects and the finite detector energy resolution. The results obtained show that all detectors exhibit good energy response at low energies. The most important corrections for each detector were discussed, and the corrected mammographic x-ray spectra obtained with each one were compared. Results showed that all detectors provided similar corrected spectra, and, therefore, they could be used to accurate mammographic x-ray spectroscopy. Nevertheless, the SDD is particularly suitable for clinic mammographic x-ray spectroscopy due to the easier correction procedure and portability.

  16. THREE NEW GALACTIC CENTER X-RAY SOURCES IDENTIFIED WITH NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeWitt, Curtis [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Bandyopadhyay, Reba M.; Eikenberry, Stephen S.; Sarajedini, Ata [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Center, P.O. Box 112055, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Sellgren, Kris [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Blum, Robert; Olsen, Knut [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Bauer, Franz E., E-mail: curtis.n.dewitt@nasa.gov [Departamento de Astronomía y Astrofísica, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile)

    2013-11-01

    We have conducted a near-infrared spectroscopic survey of 47 candidate counterparts to X-ray sources discovered by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory near the Galactic center (GC). Though a significant number of these astrometric matches are likely to be spurious, we sought out spectral characteristics of active stars and interacting binaries, such as hot, massive spectral types or emission lines, in order to corroborate the X-ray activity and certify the authenticity of the match. We present three new spectroscopic identifications, including a Be high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) or a γ Cassiopeiae (Cas) system, a symbiotic X-ray binary, and an O-type star of unknown luminosity class. The Be HMXB/γ Cas system and the symbiotic X-ray binary are the first of their classes to be spectroscopically identified in the GC region.

  17. X-ray absorption spectroscopy in biological systems. Opportunities and limitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bovenkamp, Gudrun Lisa

    2013-05-15

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy has become more important for applications in the material sciences, geology, environmental science and biology, specifically in the field of molecular biology. The scope of this thesis is to add more experimental evidence in order to show how applicable X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) is to biology. Two biological systems were investigated, at the molecular level, lead uptake in plants and the effect of silver on bacteria. This investigation also included an analysis of the sensitivity of Pb L{sub 3}- and Ag L{sub 3}-XANES spectra with regard to their chemical environment. It was shown that Pb L{sub 3}- and Ag L{sub 3}-XANES spectra are sensitive to an environment with at least differences in the second coordination shell. The non-destructive and element specific properties of XANES are the key advantages that were very important for this investigation. However, in both projects the adequate selection of reference compounds, which required in some cases a chemical synthesis, was the critical factor to determine the chemical speciation and, finally, possible uptake and storage mechanisms for plants and antibacterial mechanisms of silver. The chemical environment of Pb in roots and leaves of plants from four different plant families and a lichen from a former lead mining site in the Eifel mountains in Germany was determined using both solid compounds and aqueous solutions of different ionic strength, which simulate the plant environment. The results can be interpreted in such a way that lead is sorbed on the surface of cell walls. Silver bonding as reaction with Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, and Escherichia coli bacteria was determined using inorganic silver compounds and synthesized silver amino acids. Silver binds to sulfur, amine and carboxyl groups in amino acids.

  18. High-Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy of Galactic Supernova Remnants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Katsuda

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs, based on grating spectrometers onboard XMM-Newton and Chandra, has been revealing a variety of new astrophysical phenomena. Broadened oxygen lines for a northwestern compact knot in SN 1006 clearly show a high oxygen temperature of ~300 keV. The high temperature together with a lower electron temperature (kTe ~ 1 keV can be reasonably interpreted as temperature non-equilibration between electrons and oxygen behind a collisionless shock. An ejecta knot in the Puppis A SNR shows blueshifted line emission by ~ 1500kms-1. The line widths are fairly narrow in contrast to the SN 1006's knot; an upper limit of 0.9 eV is obtained for O VIII Lyα, which translates to an oxygen temperature of kTO < 30 keV. The low temperature suggests that the knot was heated by a reverse shock whose velocity is 4 times slower than that of a forward shock. Anomalous intensity ratios in O VII Heα lines, i.e., a stronger forbidden line than a resonance line, is found in a cloud-shock interaction region in Puppis A. The line ratio can be best explained by the charge-exchange emission that should arise at interfaces between the cold/warm clouds and the hot plasma. There are several other targets for which we plan to analyze high-quality grating data prior to the operation of the soft X-ray spectrometer onboard Astro-H.

  19. Characterization of Pr:LuAG scintillating crystals for X-ray spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoni, R.; Bonesini, M.; Cervi, T.; Clemenza, M.; De Bari, A.; Falcone, A.; Mazza, R.; Menegolli, A.; Nastasi, M.; Rossella, M.

    2016-07-01

    The main features of the Pr doped Lu3Al5O12 (Pr:LuAG) scintillating crystals for X-ray spectroscopy applications have been studied using different radioactive sources and photo-detectors. Pr:LuAG is cheaper, compared to a Germanium detector, but with remarkable properties which make it useful for many applications, from fundamental physics measurements to the PET imaging for medical purposes: high density, elevate light yield, fast response, high energy resolution, no hygroscopicity. A sample of Pr:LuAG crystals with 14 mm×14 mm surface area and 13 mm thickness and a NaI crystal of the same surface and 26 mm thickness used as a reference have been characterized with several radioactive sources, emitting photons in the range 100-1000keV. Different light detectors were adopted for the Pr:LuAG studies, sensitive to its UV emission (peak at 310 nm): a 3 in. PMT (Hamamatsu R11065) and new arrays of Hamamatsu SiPM S13361, with siliconic resin as a window. Preliminary results are presented on the performance of the Pr:LuAG crystals, to be mounted in a 2 × 2 array to be tested in the 2015 run of the FAMU experiment at RIKEN-RAL muon facility. The goal is the detection of the X-rays (around 130 keV) emitted during the de-excitation processes of the muonic hydrogen after the excitation with an IR laser with wavelength set at the resonance of the hyperfine splitting, to measure the muonic atom proton radius with unprecedented precision.

  20. Structure of Amorphous Ferric Arsenate from EXAFS Spectroscopy and Total X-ray Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikutta, Christian; Michel, Frederick Marc; Mandaliev, Petar; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2013-04-01

    Short-range ordered ferric arsenate (FeAsO4 ×nH2O) is a secondary As mineral frequently encountered in acid mine-waste environments. Its structure has been proposed to resemble that of scorodite (FeAsO4×2H2O) in which isolated FeO6 octahedra share corners with four adjacent arsenate (AsO4) tetrahedra in a three-dimensional network (scorodite model). Conversely, short-range ordered ferric arsenate was postulated to consist of single chains of corner-sharing FeO6 octahedra being bridged by arsenate bound in a monodentate binuclear 2C complex (butlerite/fibroferrite model). In order to test the accuracy of both structural models, we synthesized ferric arsenates and analyzed their structure by As and Fe K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and total X-ray scattering. We found that both As and Fe K-edge EXAFS spectra were most compatible with isolated FeO6 octahedra being bridged by AsO4 tetrahedra (RFe-As= 3.33 ± 0.01 Å). EXAFS shell-fits and reduced pair distribution functions, G(r), indicated a lack of evidence for single corner-sharing FeO6 linkages in ferric arsenate. Wavelet-transform analyses of the Fe K-edge EXAFS spectra of ferric arsenates complemented by shell fitting confirmed Fe atoms at an average distance of 5.3 Å, consistent with crystallographic data of scorodite and in disagreement with the butlerite/fibroferrite model. A scorodite-type local structure of short-range ordered ferric arsenates provides a plausible explanation for their rapid transformation into scorodite in acid mining environments.

  1. Au36(SPh)24 nanomolecules: X-ray crystal structure, optical spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and theoretical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmala, Praneeth Reddy; Knoppe, Stefan; Jupally, Vijay Reddy; Delcamp, Jared H; Aikens, Christine M; Dass, Amala

    2014-12-11

    The physicochemical properties of gold:thiolate nanomolecules depend on their crystal structure and the capping ligands. The effects of protecting ligands on the crystal structure of the nanomolecules are of high interest in this area of research. Here we report the crystal structure of an all aromatic thiophenolate-capped Au36(SPh)24 nanomolecule, which has a face-centered cubic (fcc) core similar to other nanomolecules such as Au36(SPh-tBu)24 and Au36(SC5H9)24 with the same number of gold atoms and ligands. The results support the idea that a stable core remains intact even when the capping ligand is varied. We also correct our earlier assignment of "Au36(SPh)23" which was determined based on MALDI mass spectrometry which is more prone to fragmentation than ESI mass spectrometry. We show that ESI mass spectrometry gives the correct assignment of Au36(SPh)24, supporting the X-ray crystal structure. The electronic structure of the title compound was computed at different levels of theory (PBE, LDA, and LB94) using the coordinates extracted from the single crystal X-ray diffraction data. The optical and electrochemical properties were determined from experimental data using UV-vis spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and differential pulse voltammetry. Au36(SPh)24 shows a broad electrochemical gap near 2 V, a desirable optical gap of ∼1.75 eV for dye-sensitized solar cell applications, as well as appropriately positioned electrochemical potentials for many electrocatalytic reactions.

  2. Electronic structure of fluorinated multiwalled carbon nanotubes studied using x-ray absorption and photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzhezinskaya, M. M.; Muradyan, V. E.; Vinogradov, N. A.; Preobrajenski, A. B.; Gudat, W.; Vinogradov, A. S.

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents the results of combined investigation of the chemical bond formation in fluorinated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with different fluorine contents (10-55wt%) and reference compounds (highly oriented pyrolytic graphite crystals and “white” graphite fluoride) using x-ray absorption and photoelectron spectroscopy at C1s and F1s thresholds. Measurements were performed at BESSY II (Berlin, Germany) and MAX-laboratory (Lund, Sweden). The analysis of the soft x-ray absorption and photoelectron spectra points to the formation of covalent chemical bonding between fluorine and carbon atoms in the fluorinated nanotubes. It was established that within the probing depth (˜15nm) of carbon nanotubes, the process of fluorination runs uniformly and does not depend on the fluorine concentration. In this case, fluorine atoms interact with MWCNTs through the covalent attachment of fluorine atoms to graphene layers of the graphite skeleton (phase 1) and this bonding is accompanied by a change in the hybridization of the 2s and 2p valence electron states of the carbon atom from the trigonal (sp2) to tetrahedral (sp3) hybridization and by a large electron transfer between carbon an fluorine atoms. In the MWCNT near-surface region the second fluorine-carbon phase with weak electron transfer is formed; it is located mainly within two or three upper graphene monolayers, and its contribution becomes much poorer as the probing depth of fluorinated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (F-MWCNTs) increases. The defluorination process of F-MWCNTs on thermal annealing has been investigated. The conclusion has been made that F-MWCNT defluorination without destruction of graphene layers is possible.

  3. Analysis of the Organic Content of Marine Aerosols with X-ray Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, D.; OBrien, R. E.; Fraund, M.; Laskina, O.; Alpert, P. A.; Prather, K. A.; Knopf, D. A.; Grassian, V. H.; Moffet, R.

    2014-12-01

    The ocean is a major global source of aerosols and the seawater from which they are derived is a complex mixture of organic molecules from organisms including phytoplankton, bacteria, and viruses. Marine aerosols consist of any combination of these components and in different mixing states. The mixing state affects absorption and scattering efficiency as well as their ability to uptake water and form ice. Therefore, there is a need to spatially resolve the chemical composition of individual marine aerosols in order to study their potential effects on the climate. Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy coupled with Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy (SXTM-NEXAFS) gives both spatial resolution as well as the sensitivity to molecular transitions that is necessary to correlate a position on an aerosol with a functional group or inorganic constituent. The morphology, mixing state, and chemical composition from STXM-NEXAFS can be used in conjunction with collocated measurements (light scattering, ice nucleation, etc.) to correlate the spatially resolved chemical composition of aerosols with their physical properties. The goal of this project is to determine if there is a difference in the organic fraction between particles with clearly different morphology and mixing states. Three major classes of marine aerosols have been classified as sea salt, marine gels, and cell fragments. Sea salt is classified by having an inorganic core consisting of NaCl and a thin layer of organic coating on the outside. Marine gels consist of organic material in the form of lipids, polysaccharides, and proteins distributed throughout the aerosol alongside inorganic compounds, such as Ca2+, Mg2+, and K+, that help to stabilize the negative charge of the organic material. Cell fragments include fragments from phytoplankton and bacteria. Efforts are currently underway to quantitatively evaluate differences in NEXAFS spectra for these particle types using nonlinear least

  4. Prospects for laser spectroscopy of highly charged ions with high-harmonic XUV and soft x-ray sources

    OpenAIRE

    Rothhardt, J.; Hädrich, S.; Demmler, S.; Krebs, M.; Winters, Danyal; Kühl, Thomas; Stöhlker, Thomas; Limpert, J.; Tünnermann, A.

    2015-01-01

    We present novel high photon flux XUV and soft x-ray sources based on high harmonic generation (HHG). The sources employ femtosecond fiber lasers, which can be operated at very high (MHz) repetition rate and average power (>100 W). HHG with such lasers results in similar to 10(13) photons s(-1) within a single harmonic line at similar to 40 nm (similar to 30 eV) wavelength, a photon flux comparable to what is typically available at synchrotron beam lines. In addition, resonant enhancement of ...

  5. X-ray scattering and spectroscopy studies on diesel soot from oxygenated fuel under various engine load conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Andreas; Shah, N.; Huggins, Frank E.; Kelly, K.E.; Sarofim, A.; Jacobsen, C.; Wirick, S.; Francis, H.; Ilavsky, J.; Thomas, G.E.; Huffman, G.P.

    2005-01-01

    Diesel soot from reference diesel fuel and oxygenated fuel under idle and load engine conditions was investigated with X-ray scattering and X-ray carbon K-edge absorption spectroscopy. Up to five characteristic size ranges were found. Idle soot was generally found to have larger primary particles and aggregates but smaller crystallites, than load soot. Load soot has a higher degree of crystallinity than idle soot. Adding oxygenates to diesel fuel enhanced differences in the characteristics of diesel soot, or even reversed them. Aromaticity of idle soot from oxygenated diesel fuel was significantly larger than from the corresponding load soot. Carbon near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy was applied to gather information about the presence of relative amounts of carbon double bonds (CC, CO) and carbon single bonds (C-H, C-OH, COOH). Using scanning X-ray transmission microspectroscopy (STXM), the relative amounts of these carbon bond states were shown to vary spatially over distances approximately 50 to 100 nm. The results from the X-ray techniques are supported by thermo-gravimetry analysis and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. X-Ray Fluorescence and Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy analysis of Roman silver denarii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardini, L. [Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organometallici del CNR, Research Area of Pisa, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); El Hassan, A. [National Institute for Laser- Enhanced Sciences (NILES), Cairo University Giza (Egypt); Ferretti, M. [Istituto per le Tecnologie Applicate ai Beni Culturali, Area della Ricerca del CNR di Montelibretti Roma (Italy); Foresta, A.; Legnaioli, S.; Lorenzetti, G. [Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organometallici del CNR, Research Area of Pisa, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Nebbia, E. [Universita degli Studi di Torino (Italy); Catalli, F. [Monetiere di Firenze, Museo Archeologico Nazionale Firenze (Italy); Harith, M.A. [National Institute for Laser- Enhanced Sciences (NILES), Cairo University Giza (Egypt); Diaz Pace, D. [Institute of Physics ' Arroyo Seco' , Faculty of Science, Tandil (Argentina); Anabitarte Garcia, F. [Photonics Engineering Group, University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Scuotto, M. [Dipartimento di Scienze Archeologiche, Via Galvani 1, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Palleschi, V., E-mail: vincenzo.palleschi@cnr.it [Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organometallici del CNR, Research Area of Pisa, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Archeologiche, Via Galvani 1, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2012-08-15

    In this paper we present the results of a study performed on a large collection of silver Roman republican denarii, encompassing about two centuries of history. The joint use of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy allowed for an accurate determination of the coins' elemental composition; the measurements, performed mostly in situ at the 'Monetiere' in Florence, revealed a striking connection between the 'quality' of the silver alloy and some crucial contemporary events. This finding was used to classify a group of denarii whose dating was otherwise impossible. The comparison with other contemporary denarii disproves a recent theory on the origin of the so called 'serrated' denarii (denarii showing notched chisel marks on the edge of the coin). - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied a large collection of Roman republican silver denarii. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XRF and LIBS allowed to determine the precious metal content of the coins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A correlation of the 'quality' of the alloy with some contemporary events was found. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The study allowed to controvert a recent theory on the so called 'serrated' denarii.

  7. Soft X-ray synchrotron radiation spectroscopy study of molecule-based nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunsook; Kim, D. H.; Kang, J.-S.; Kim, Kyung Hyun; Kim, Pil; Baik, Jaeyoon; Shin, H. J.

    2014-11-01

    The electronic structures of molecule-based nanoparticles, such as biomineralized Helicobacter pylori ferritin (Hpf), Heme, and RbCo[Fe(CN)6]H2O (RbCoFe) Prussian blue analogue, have been investigated by employing photoemission spectroscopy and soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Fe ions are found to be nearly trivalent in Hpf and Heme nanoparticles, which provides evidence that the amount of magnetite (Fe3O4) should be negligible in the Hpf core and that the biomineralization of Fe oxides in the high-Fe-bound-state Hpf core arises from a hematite-like formation. On the other hand, Fe ions are nearly divalent and Co ions are Co2+-Co3+ mixed-valent in RbCoFe. Therefore this finding suggests that the mechanism of the photo-induced transition in RbCoFe Prussian blue analogue is not a simple spin-state transition of Fe2+-Co3+ → Fe3+-Co2+. It is likely that Co2+ ions have the high-spin configuration while Fe2+ ions have the low-spin configuration.

  8. X-ray absorption and Raman spectroscopy studies of molybdenum environments in borosilicate waste glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeown, David A.; Gan, Hao; Pegg, Ian L.

    2017-05-01

    Mo-containing high-level nuclear waste borosilicate glasses were investigated as part of an effort to improve Mo loading while avoiding yellow phase crystallization. Previous work showed that additions of vanadium decrease yellow phase formation and increases Mo solubility. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize Mo environments in HLW borosilicate glasses and to investigate possible structural relationships between Mo and V. Mo XAS spectra for the glasses indicate isolated tetrahedral Mo6+O4 with Mo-O distances near 1.75 Å. V XANES indicate tetrahedral V5+O4 as the dominant species. Raman spectra show composition dependent trends, where Mo-O symmetrical stretch mode frequencies (ν1) are sensitive to the mix of alkali and alkaline earth cations, decreasing by up to 10 cm-1 for glasses that change from Li+ to Na+ as the dominant network-modifying species. This indicates that MoO4 tetrahedra are isolated from the borosilicate network and are surrounded, at least partly, by Na+ and Li+. Secondary ν1 frequency effects, with changes up to 7 cm-1, were also observed with increasing V2O5 and MoO3 content. These secondary trends may indicate MoO4-MoO4 and MoO4-VO4 clustering, suggesting that V additions may stabilize Mo in the matrix with respect to yellow phase formation.

  9. Soft X-ray synchrotron radiation spectroscopy study of molecule-based nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, E. S.; Kim, D. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kim, P. [The Catholic University of Korea, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, K. H. [Korea University, Jochiwon (Korea, Republic of); Baik, J. Y.; Shin, H. J. [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    The electronic structures of molecule-based nanoparticles, such as biomineralized Helicobacter pylori ferritin (Hpf), Heme, and RbCo[Fe(CN){sub 6}]H{sub 2}O (RbCoFe) Prussian blue analogue, have been investigated by employing photoemission spectroscopy and soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Fe ions are found to be nearly trivalent in Hpf and Heme nanoparticles, which provides evidence that the amount of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) should be negligible in the Hpf core and that the biomineralization of Fe oxides in the high-Fe-bound-state Hpf core arises from a hematite-like formation. On the other hand, Fe ions are nearly divalent and Co ions are Co{sup 2+}-Co{sup 3+} mixed-valent in RbCoFe. Therefore this finding suggests that the mechanism of the photo-induced transition in RbCoFe Prussian blue analogue is not a simple spin-state transition of Fe{sup 2+}-Co{sup 3+} → Fe{sup 3+}-Co{sup 2+}. It is likely that Co{sup 2+} ions have the high-spin configuration while Fe{sup 2+} ions have the low-spin configuration.

  10. Soft X-ray photoemission spectroscopy of selected neurotransmitters in the gas phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maris, Assimo; Melandri, Sonia; Evangelisti, Luca; Caminati, Walther [Dipartimento di Chimica ' G. Ciamician' dell' Universita, Via Selmi 2, I-40126 Bologna (Italy); Giuliano, Barbara M. [Departamento de Quimica da Universidade de Coimbra, 3004-535 Coimbra (Portugal); Plekan, Oksana [Sincrotrone Trieste, in Area Science Park, I-34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Feyer, Vitaliy [Sincrotrone Trieste, in Area Science Park, I-34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Electronic Properties (PGI-6), Peter Gruenberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Leo-Brandt-Strasse, 52428 Juelich (Germany); Richter, Robert [Sincrotrone Trieste, in Area Science Park, I-34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Coreno, Marcello [CNR-IMIP, Montelibretti, I-00016 Rome (Italy); Prince, Kevin C., E-mail: kevin.prince@elettra.trieste.it [Sincrotrone Trieste, in Area Science Park, I-34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); CNR-IOM, Laboratorio TASC, I-34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neurotransmitter molecules. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photoelectron spectroscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electronic structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Weak hydrogen bonding. -- Abstract: The valence molecular orbitals and core levels of tyramine, tryptamine and tryptophol in the gas phase have been studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and theoretical methods. The energies of the outer valence region spectrum are found to be in agreement with previously reported He I spectra, while new data on the inner valence molecular orbitals are reported. The structures in the carbon, nitrogen and oxygen core level spectra of these molecules have been identified and assigned. These compounds are characterised by conformers with hydrogen bonding in which the {pi} systems of the phenol and indole groups act as hydrogen acceptors, but a spectroscopic signature of this hydrogen bond was not observed. This is in contrast with our previous spectra of amino acids, where conformers with specific hydrogen bonding showed strong effects in core level spectra. We attribute the difference to the weaker strength of the {pi}-hydrogen bonding.

  11. Chemical functionalization of nanodiamond by amino groups: an X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanak, V R; Butenko, Yu V; Brieva, A C; Coxon, P R; Alves, L; Siller, L

    2012-04-01

    The development of chemical functionalization techniques for diamond nanocrystallites opens up ways with a view to altering their solubility in different solvents, improve interfacial adhesion of nanodiamonds with a composite matrix in new materials, and provide new possibilities for the modification of the electronic properties of nanodiamond crystallites. In this work, we present results on the chemical functionalization of nanodiamonds by amino groups using ammonia as a nitrogenation agent. Nanodiamond material used was formed by the detonation technique with average crystallite sizes of 4-5 nm. The final materials and intermediates products were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Chemical functionalization of nanodiamonds by amino groups could enable the preparation of new nylon nano-composite materials. Presence of surface amino groups could alter pH of nanodiamond colloids towards basic values and improve colloidal stability of nanodiamond suspensions at pH close to 7. This could enable syntheses of new drug delivery systems based on nanodiamonds.

  12. [Characterization of biochar by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dong-yu; Jin, Jie; Yan, Yu; Han, Lan-fang; Kang, Ming-jie; Wang, Zi-ying; Zhao, Ye; Sun, Ke

    2014-12-01

    The wood (willow branch) and grass (rice straw) materials were pyrolyzed at different temperatures (300, 450 and 600 °C) to obtain the biochars used in the present study. The biochars were characterized using elementary analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and solid state 13C cross-polarization and magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (13C NMR) to illuminate the structure and composition of the biochars which were derived from the different thermal temperatures and biomass. The results showed that the H/C, O/C and (O+N)/C ratios of the biochars decreased with the increase in the pyrolysis temperatures. The surface polarity and ash content of the grass-derived biochars were higher than those of the wood-derived biochars. The minerals of the wood-derived biochars were mainly covered by the organic matter; in contrast, parts of the mineral surfaces of the grass-derived biochars were not covered by organic matter? The 13C NMR of the low temperature-derived biochars revealed a large contribution of aromatic carbon, aliphatic carbon, carboxyl and carbonyl carbon, while the high temperature-derived biochars contained a large amount of aromatic carbon. Moreover, the wood-derived biochars produced at low heat treatment temperatures contained more lignin residues than grass-derived ones, probably due to the existence of high lignin content in the feedstock soures of wood-derived biochars. The results of the study would be useful for environmental application of biochars.

  13. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy as a probe of rhodium-ligand interaction in ionic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men, Shuang; Lovelock, Kevin R. J.; Licence, Peter

    2016-02-01

    We use X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to identify the interaction between the rhodium atom and phosphine ligands in six 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium-based ionic liquids ([C8C1Im][X]). The formation of a mono-phosphine rhodium complex based upon addition of triphenylphosphine (PPh3) is confirmed by XPS in all ionic liquids studied herein. Due to the electron donation effect of the ligand, the rhodium atom becomes more negatively charged and thus exhibits a lower measured binding energy. The influence of the anion basicity on the formation of different types of rhodium complexes is also investigated. By introducing a biphosphine ligand, a chelated diphosphine rhodium complex is formed in ionic liquids with more basic anions and verified by both XPS and Infrared Spectroscopy (IR). The measured Rh 3d binding energies are correlated to the reaction selectivity of a hydroformylation reaction which inspires a method to design a metal catalyst to control the chemical reaction towards desired products in the future.

  14. Ultrafast dynamics of strong-field dissociative ionization ofCH2Br2 probed by femtosecond soft x-ray transient absorptionspectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loh, Zhi-Heng; Leone, Stephen R.

    2008-01-15

    Femtosecond time-resolved soft x-ray transient absorption spectroscopy based on a high-order harmonic generation source is used to investigate the dissociative ionization of CH{sub 2}Br{sub 2} induced by 800 nm strong-field irradiation. At moderate peak intensities (2.0 x 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}), strong-field ionization is accompanied by ultrafast C-Br bond dissociation, producing both neutral Br ({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) and Br* ({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}) atoms together with the CH{sub 2}Br{sup +} fragment ion. The measured rise times for Br and Br* are 130 {+-} 22 fs and 74 {+-} 10 fs, respectively. The atomic bromine quantum state distribution shows that the Br/Br* population ratio is 8.1 {+-} 3.8 and that the Br {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} state is not aligned. The observed product distribution and the timescales of the photofragment appearances suggest that multiple field-dressed potential energy surfaces are involved in the dissociative ionization process. In addition, the transient absorption spectrum of CH{sub 2}Br{sub 2}{sup +} suggests that the alignment of the molecule relative to the polarization axis of the strong-field ionizing pulse determines the electronic symmetry of the resulting ion; alignment of the Br-Br, H-H, and C{sub 2} axis of the molecule along the polarization axis results in the production of the ion {tilde X}({sup 2}B{sub 2}), {tilde B}({sup 2}B{sub 1}) and {tilde C}({sup 2}A{sub 1}) states, respectively. At higher peak intensities (6.2 x 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}), CH{sub 2}Br{sub 2}{sup +} undergoes sequential ionization to form the metastable CH{sub 2}Br{sub 2}{sup 2+} dication. These results demonstrate the potential of core-level probing with high-order harmonic transient absorption spectroscopy for studying ultrafast molecular dynamics.

  15. Probing the K-edge of a laser heated aluminum plasma using X-rays from betatron oscillations in a laser wakefield accelerator with femtosecond resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behm, Keegan; Hussein, Amina; Zhao, Tony; Hill, Edward; Maksimchuk, Anatoly; Nees, John; Yanovsky, Victor; Mangles, Stuart; Krushelnick, Karl; Thomas, Alexander; CenterUltrafast Optical Science Team; Plasmas Group Team

    2016-10-01

    Presented here are data from a two-beam pump-probe experiment. We used synchrotron-like X-rays created by betatron oscillations to probe a thin metal foil that is pumped by the secondary laser beam. The Hercules Ti:Sapphire laser facility was operated with a pulse duration of 34 fs and a power of 80 TW split. A 75-25 beam splitter was used to drive a laser wakefield accelerator and heat the secondary target. We observed opacity changes around the K-edge of thin aluminum foil as it was heated by an ultrafast pump laser. To understand how the opacity is changing with heating and expansion of the plasma, the delay between the two laser paths was adjusted on a femtosecond time scale from 50 to 400 fs. Experimental data for aluminum shows variation in opacity around the K-edge with changes in the probe delay. The transmitted synchrotron-like spectrum was measured using single photon counting on an X-ray CCD camera and was available on a shot-by-shot basis. The success of this work demonstrates a practical application for X-rays produced from betatron oscillations in a wakefield accelerator. U.S. Department of Energy and the National Nuclear Security Administration.

  16. Proposal to DOE Basic Energy Sciences: Ultrafast X-ray science facility at the Advanced Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenlein, Robert W.; Falcone, Roger W.; Abela, R.; Alivisatos, A.P.; Belkacem, A.; Berrah, N.; Bozek, J.; Bressler, C.; Cavalleri, A.; Chergui, M.; Glover, T.E.; Heimann, P.A.; Hepburn, J.; Larsson, J.; Lee, R.W.; McCusker, J.; Padmore, H.A.; Pattison, P.; Pratt, S.T.; Shank, C.V.; Wark, J.; Chang, Z.; Robin, D.W.; Schlueter, R.D.; Zholents, A.A.; Zolotorev, M.S.

    2001-12-12

    We propose to develop a true user facility for ultrafast x-ray science at the Advanced Light Source. This facility will be unique in the world, and will fill a critical need for the growing ultrafast x-ray research community. The development of this facility builds upon the expertise from long-standing research efforts in ultrafast x-ray spectroscopy and the development of femtosecond x-ray sources and techniques at both the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and at U.C. Berkeley. In particular, the technical feasibility of a femtosecond x-ray beamline at the ALS has already been demonstrated, and existing ultrafast laser technology will enable such a beamline to operate near the practical limit for femtosecond x-ray flux and brightness from a 3rd generation synchrotron.

  17. Multi-anode linear SDDs for high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonsky, J.

    2002-01-01

    Radiation detectors are used in a variety of fields to sense X-rays and y-rays, visible, UV and IR photons, neutrons or charged particles. With their help, advanced medical diagnostics can be performed (e.g. X-ray radiography, computed tomography, fluoroscopy), material research can undergo a rapid

  18. Hard X-ray micro-spectroscopy at Berliner Elektronenspeicherring für Synchrotronstrahlung II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erko, A.; Zizak, I.

    2009-09-01

    The capabilities of the X-ray beamlines at Berliner Elektronenspeicherring für Synchrotronstrahlung II (BESSY II) for hard X-ray measurements with micro- and nanometer spatial resolution are reviewed. The micro-X-ray fluorescence analysis (micro-XRF), micro-extended X-ray absorption fine structure (micro-EXAFS), micro-X-ray absorption near-edge structure (micro-XANES) as well as X-ray standing wave technique (XSW), X-ray beam induced current (XBIC) in combination with micro-XRF and micro-diffraction as powerful methods for organic and inorganic sample characterization with synchrotron radiation are discussed. Mono and polycapillary optical systems were used for fine X-ray focusing down to 1 µm spot size with monochromatic and white synchrotron radiation. Polycapillary based confocal detection was applied for depth-resolved micro-XRF analysis with a volume resolution down to 3.4 · 10 - 6 mm 3. Standing wave excitation in waveguides was also applied to nano-EXAFS measurements with depth resolution on the order of 1 nm. Several examples of the methods and its applications in material research, biological investigations and metal-semiconductor interfaces analysis are given.

  19. Multi-anode linear SDDs for high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonsky, J.

    2002-01-01

    Radiation detectors are used in a variety of fields to sense X-rays and y-rays, visible, UV and IR photons, neutrons or charged particles. With their help, advanced medical diagnostics can be performed (e.g. X-ray radiography, computed tomography, fluoroscopy), material research can undergo a rapid

  20. Elemental profiling of laser cladded multilayer coatings by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lednev, V. N.; Sdvizhenskii, P. A.; Filippov, M. N.; Grishin, M. Ya.; Filichkina, V. A.; Stavertiy, A. Ya.; Tretyakov, R. S.; Bunkin, A. F.; Pershin, S. M.

    2017-09-01

    Multilayer tungsten carbide wear resistant coatings were analyzed by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. Coaxial laser cladding technique was utilized to produce tungsten carbide coating deposited on low alloy steel substrate with additional inconel 625 interlayer. EDX and LIBS techniques were used for elemental profiling of major components (Ni, W, C, Fe, etc.) in the coating. A good correlation between EDX and LIBS data was observed while LIBS provided additional information on light element distribution (carbon). A non-uniform distribution of tungsten carbide grains along coating depth was detected by both LIBS and EDX. In contrast, horizontal elemental profiling showed a uniform tungsten carbide particles distribution. Depth elemental profiling by layer-by-layer LIBS analysis was demonstrated to be an effective method for studying tungsten carbide grains distribution in wear resistant coating without any sample preparation.

  1. INFRARED AND X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY OF THE Kes 75 SUPERNOVA REMNANT SHELL: CHARACTERIZING THE DUST AND GAS PROPERTIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temim, Tea; Arendt, Richard G. [Observational Cosmology Lab, Code 665, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Slane, Patrick [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Dwek, Eli, E-mail: tea.temim@nasa.gov [Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2012-01-20

    We present deep Chandra observations and Spitzer Space Telescope infrared (IR) spectroscopy of the shell in the composite supernova remnant (SNR) Kes 75 (G29.7-0.3). The remnant is composed of a central pulsar wind nebula and a bright partial shell in the south that is visible at radio, IR, and X-ray wavelengths. The X-ray emission can be modeled by either a single thermal component with a temperature of {approx}1.5 keV, or with two thermal components with temperatures of 1.5 and 0.2 keV. Previous studies suggest that the hot component may originate from reverse-shocked supernova (SN) ejecta. However, our new analysis shows no definitive evidence for enhanced abundances of Si, S, Ar, Mg, and Fe, as expected from SN ejecta, or for the IR spectral signatures characteristic of confirmed SN condensed dust, thus favoring a circumstellar or interstellar origin for the X-ray and IR emission. The X-ray and IR emission in the shell are spatially correlated, suggesting that the dust particles are collisionally heated by the X-ray emitting gas. The IR spectrum of the shell is dominated by continuum emission from dust with little, or no line emission. Modeling the IR spectrum shows that the dust is heated to a temperature of {approx}140 K by a relatively dense, hot plasma that also gives rise to the hot X-ray emission component. The density inferred from the IR emission is significantly higher than the density inferred from the X-ray models, suggesting a low filling factor for this X-ray emitting gas. The total mass of the warm dust component is at least 1.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} M{sub Sun }, assuming no significant dust destruction has occurred in the shell. The IR data also reveal the presence of an additional plasma component with a cooler temperature, consistent with the 0.2 keV gas component. Our IR analysis therefore provides an independent verification of the cooler component of the X-ray emission. The complementary analyses of the X-ray and IR emission provide

  2. Infrared and X-Ray Spectroscopy of the Kes 75 Supernova Shell Characterizing the Dust and Gas Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temim, Tea; Arendt, Richard G.; Dwek, Eli; Slane, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    We present deep Chandra observations and Spitzer Space Telescope infrared (IR) spectroscopy of the shell in the composite supernova remnant (SNR) Kes 75 (G29.7-0.3). The remnant is composed of a central pulsar wind nebula and a bright partial shell in the south that is visible at radio, IR, and X-ray wavelengths. The X-ray emission can be modeled by either a single thermal component with a temperature of approx 1.5 keV, or with two thermal components with temperatures of 1.5 and 0.2 keY. Previous studies suggest that the hot component may originate from reverse-shocked SN ejecta. However, our new analysis shows no definitive evidence for enhanced abundances of Si, S, Ar, Mg, and Fe, as expected from supernova (SN) ejecta, or for the IR spectral signatures characteristic of confirmed SN condensed dust, thus favoring a circumstellar or interstellar origin for the X-ray and IR emission. The X-ray and IR emission in the shell are spatially correlated, suggesting that the dust particles are collisionally heated by the X-ray emitting gas. The IR spectrum of the shell is dominated by continuum emission from dust with little, or no line emission. Modeling the IR spectrum shows that the dust is heated to a temperature of approx 140 K by a relatively dense, hot plasma, that also gives rise to the hot X-ray emission component. The density inferred from the IR emission is significantly higher than the density inferred from the X-ray models, suggesting a low filling factor for this X-ray emitting gas. The total mass of the warm dust component is at least 1.3 x 10(exp -2) Solar Mass, assuming no significant dust destruction has occurred in the shell. The IR data also reveal the presence of an additional plasma component with a cooler temperature, consistent with the 0.2 keV gas component. Our IR analysis therefore provides an independent verification of the cooler component of the X-ray emission. The complementary analyses of the X-ray and IR emission provide quantitative

  3. Infrared and X-Ray Spectroscopy of the KES 75 Supernova Remnant Shell: Characterizing the Dust and Gas Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temim, Tea; Dwek, Eli; Slane, Patrick; Arendt, Richard G.

    2009-01-01

    We present deep Chandra observations and Spitzer Space Telescope infrared (IR) spectroscopy of the shell in the composite supernova remnant (SNR) Kes 75 (G29.7-0.3). The remnant is composed of a central pulsar wind nebula and a bright partial shell in the south that is visible at radio, IR, and X-ray wavelengths. The X-ray emission can be modeled by either a single thermal component with a temperature of 1.5 keV, or with two thermal components with temperatures of 1.5 and 0.2 keV. Previous studies suggest that the hot component may originate from reverse-shocked SN ejecta. However, our new analysis shows no definitive evidence for enhanced abundances of Si, S, Ar, Mg, and Fe, as expected from supernova (SN) ejecta, or for the IR spectral signatures characteristic of confirmed SN condensed dust, thus favoring a circumstellar or interstellar origin for the X-ray and IR emission. The X-ray and ill emission in the shell are spatially correlated, suggesting that the dust particles are collisionally heated by the X-ray emitting gas. The IR spectrum of the shell is dominated by continuum emission from dust with little, or no line emission. Modeling the IR spectrum shows that the dust is heated to a temperature of 140 K by a relatively dense, hot plasma, that also gives rise to the hot X-ray emission component. The density inferred from the IR emission is significantly higher than the density inferred from the X-ray models, suggesting a low filling factor for this X-ray emitting gas. The total mass of the warm dust component is at least 1.3 x 10(exp -2) solar mass, assuming no significant dust destruction has occurred in the shell. The IR data also reveal the presence of an additional plasma component with a cooler temperature, consistent with the 0.2 keV gas component. Our IR analysis therefore provides an independent verification of the cooler component of the X-ray emission. The complementary analyses of the X-ray and IR emission provide quantitative estimates of

  4. Investigation of coloration of SrLaGaO sub 4 single crystals by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Novosselov, A; Talik, E; Pajaczkowska, A

    2003-01-01

    An investigation of the X-ray photoelectron spectra of single crystals of SrLaGaO sub 4 grown by the Czochralski method at various oxygen pressures is reported. Light yellow, yellow and red colored crystals were grown at an oxygen pressure lower than about 5x10 sup - sup 4 atm while the green colored crystals were grown at an oxygen pressure higher than 5x10 sup - sup 3 atm. The presence of Ga sup 1 sup + ions for green colored crystals was demonstrated and the existence of interstitial oxygen atoms in the green and red colored crystals was proposed by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  5. A study of ancient pottery by means of X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, multivariate statistics and mineralogical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papachristodoulou, Christina [Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Ioannina, 451 10 Ioannina (Greece); Oikonomou, Artemios [Composite Materials Laboratory, Department of Materials' Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, 451 10 Ioannina (Greece); Ioannides, Kostas [Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Ioannina, 451 10 Ioannina (Greece); Gravani, Konstantina [Archaelogy Section, Department of History-Archaeology, University of Ioannina, 451 10 Ioannina (Greece)

    2006-07-28

    Energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy was used to determine the composition of 64 potsherds from the Hellenistic settlement of Orraon, in northwestern Greece. Data classification by principal components analysis revealed four distinct groups of pottery, pointing to different local production practices rather than different provenance. The interpretation of statistical grouping was corroborated by a complementary X-ray diffraction analysis. Compositional and mineralogical data, combined with archaeological and materials' science criteria, allowed addressing various aspects of pottery making, such as selection of raw clays, tempers and firing conditions.

  6. A study of ancient pottery by means of X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, multivariate statistics and mineralogical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papachristodoulou, Christina; Oikonomou, Artemios; Ioannides, Kostas; Gravani, Konstantina

    2006-07-28

    Energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy was used to determine the composition of 64 potsherds from the Hellenistic settlement of Orraon, in northwestern Greece. Data classification by principal components analysis revealed four distinct groups of pottery, pointing to different local production practices rather than different provenance. The interpretation of statistical grouping was corroborated by a complementary X-ray diffraction analysis. Compositional and mineralogical data, combined with archaeological and materials' science criteria, allowed addressing various aspects of pottery making, such as selection of raw clays, tempers and firing conditions.

  7. Mapping the chemical states of an element inside a sample using tomographic x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroer, C G; Kuhlmann, M; Gunzler, T F; Lengeler, B; Richwin, M; Griesebock, B; Lutzenkirchen-Hect, D; Frahm, R; Ziegler, E; Mashayekhi, A; Haeffner, D R; Grunwaldt, J -D; Baiker, A; XFD,

    2003-05-12

    Hard x-ray absorption spectroscopy is combined with scanning microtomography to reconstruct full near-edge spectra of an elemental species at each location on an arbitrary virtual section through a sample. These spectra reveal the local concentrations of different chemical compounds of the absorbing element inside the sample and give insight into the oxidation state, the local atomic structure, and the local projected free density of states. The method is implemented by combining a quick scanning monochromator and data acquisition system with a scanning microprobe setup based on refractive x-ray lenses.

  8. Mechanical and Thermal Analysis of the Spectroscopy X-ray Telescopes for the Constellation-X Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kai-Wing; Bolognese, Jeffrey; Saha, Timo; Sturm, James; Zhang, William

    2007-01-01

    Area and mass requirements for the Constellation-X Spectroscopy X-Ray Telescopes restrict the thickness of the mirror segment to below a mm. Requirement of angular resolution of 15" over the soft x-ray band implies that allowable optic deformation is sub-micrometer for these thin segments. These requirements place stringent constraint on the mounting, alignment and affixing of these mirror segments in both the metrology and integration processes. We present analyses and optimization of the Constellation-X mirrors under relevant mechanical and thermal environments.

  9. A reaction cell with sample laser heating for in situ soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies under environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, Carlos; Jiang, Peng; Pach, Elzbieta; Borondics, Ferenc; West, Mark W; Tuxen, Anders; Chintapalli, Mahati; Carenco, Sophie; Guo, Jinghua; Salmeron, Miquel

    2013-05-01

    A miniature (1 ml volume) reaction cell with transparent X-ray windows and laser heating of the sample has been designed to conduct X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of materials in the presence of gases at atmospheric pressures. Heating by laser solves the problems associated with the presence of reactive gases interacting with hot filaments used in resistive heating methods. It also facilitates collection of a small total electron yield signal by eliminating interference with heating current leakage and ground loops. The excellent operation of the cell is demonstrated with examples of CO and H2 Fischer-Tropsch reactions on Co nanoparticles.

  10. Femtosecond X-Ray Scattering Study of Ultrafast Photoinduced Structural Dynamics in Solvated [Co(terpy)2]2+

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biasin, Elisa; Brandt van Driel, Tim; Kjær, Kasper Skov;

    2016-01-01

    We study the structural dynamics of photoexcited [Co(terpy)2]2+ in an aqueous solution with ultrafast x-ray diffuse scattering experiments conducted at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Through direct comparisons with density functional theory calculations, our analysis shows that the photoexcitat......We study the structural dynamics of photoexcited [Co(terpy)2]2+ in an aqueous solution with ultrafast x-ray diffuse scattering experiments conducted at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Through direct comparisons with density functional theory calculations, our analysis shows...

  11. A deep view in cultural heritage - confocal micro X-ray spectroscopy for depth resolved elemental analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanngiesser, B.; Malzer, W.; Mantouvalou, I. [Technical University of Berlin, Institut fuer Optik und Atomare Physik, Berlin (Germany); Sokaras, D. [NCSR ' Demokritos' , Institute of Nuclear Physics, Athens (Greece); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Karydas, A.G. [NCSR ' Demokritos' , Institute of Nuclear Physics, Athens (Greece); International Atomic Energy Agency, Nuclear Spectrometry and Applications Laboratory (NSAL), Seibersdorf (Austria)

    2012-02-15

    applications of confocal X-ray microscopy including depth profiling speciation studies by means of confocal X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The solid mathematical formulation developed for the quantitative in-depth elemental analysis of stratified materials is exemplified and depth profile reconstruction techniques are discussed. Selected CH applications related to the characterization of painted layers from paintings and decorated artifacts (enamels, glasses and ceramics), but also from the study of corrosion and patina layers in glass and metals, respectively, are presented. The analytical capabilities, limitations and future perspectives of the two variants of the confocal micro X-ray spectroscopy, 3D micro-XRF and 3D micro-PIXE, with respect to CH applications are critically assessed and discussed. (orig.)

  12. Element-specific characterization of transient electronic structure of solvated Fe(II) complexes with time-resolved soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Kiryong; Cho, Hana; Schoenlein, Robert W; Kim, Tae Kyu; Huse, Nils

    2015-11-17

    Polypyridyl transition-metal complexes are an intriguing class of compounds due to the relatively facile chemical designs and variations in ligand-field strengths that allow for spin-state changes and hence electronic configurations in response to external perturbations such as pressure and light. Light-activated spin-conversion complexes have possible applications in a variety of molecular-based devices, and ultrafast excited-state evolution in these complexes is of fundamental interest for understanding of the origins of spin-state conversion in metal complexes. Knowledge of the interplay of structure and valence charge distributions is important to understand which degrees of freedom drive spin-conversion and which respond in a favorable (or unfavorable) manner. To track the response of the constituent components, various types of time-resolved X-ray probe methods have been utilized for a broad range of chemical and biological systems relevant to catalysis, solar energy conversions, and functional molecular devices. In particular, transient soft X-ray spectroscopy of solvated molecules can offer complementary information on the detailed electronic structures and valence charge distributions of photoinduced intermediate species: First-row transition-metal L-edges consist of 2p-3d transitions, which directly probe the unoccupied valence density of states and feature lifetime broadening in the range of 100 meV, making them sensitive spectral probes of metal-ligand interactions. In this Account, we present some of our recent progress in employing picosecond and femtosecond soft X-ray pulses from synchrotron sources to investigate element specific valence charge distributions and spin-state evolutions in Fe(II) polypyridyl complexes via core-level transitions. Our results on transient L-edge spectroscopy of Fe(II) complexes clearly show that the reduction in σ-donation is compensated by significant attenuation of π-backbonding upon spin-crossover. This underscores

  13. X-Ray Spectroscopy: An Experimental Technique to Measure Charge State Distribution Right at the Ion-Solid Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Prashant

    2015-01-01

    Charge state distributions of $^{56}$Fe and $^{58}$Ni projectile ions passing through thin carbon foils have been studied in the energy range of 1.44 - 2.69 MeV/u using a novel method from the x-ray spectroscopy technique. Interestingly the charge state distribution in the bulk show Lorentzian behavior instead of usual Gaussian distribution. Further, different parameters of charge state distribution like mean charge state, distribution width and asymmetric parameter are determined and compared with the empirical calculations and ETACHA predictions. It is found that the x-ray measurement technique is appropriate to determine the mean charge state right at the interaction zone or in the bulk. Interestingly, empirical formalism predicts much lower projectile mean charge states compare to x-ray measurements which clearly indicate multi-electron capture from the target surface. The ETACHA predictions and experimental results are found to be comparable for energies $\\geq$ 2 MeV/u.

  14. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of Mn doped ZnO thin films prepared by rf sputtering technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, Ashok Kumar; Jha, S. N.; Bhattacharyya, D., E-mail: dibyendu@barc.gov.in [Atomic & Molecular Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai – 400 085 (India); Haque, Sk Maidul [Atomic & Molecular Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, VIZAG Centre, Visakhapatnam-530012 (India); Shukla, Dinesh; Choudhary, Ram Janay [UGC DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Indore-452001 (India)

    2015-11-15

    A set of r.f. sputter deposited ZnO thin films prepared with different Mn doping concentrations have been characterised by Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES) measurements at Zn, Mn and O K edges and at Mn L{sub 2,3} edges apart from long range structural characterisation by Grazing Incident X-ray Diffraction (GIXRD) technique. Magnetic measurements show room temperature ferromagnetism in samples with lower Mn doping which is however, gets destroyed at higher Mn doping concentration. The results of the magnetic measurements have been explained using the local structure information obtained from EXAFS and XANES measurements.

  15. Diagnosis of a two wire X-pinch by X-ray absorption spectroscopy utilizing a doubly curved ellipsoidal crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cahill, A. D., E-mail: adc87@cornell.edu; Hoyt, C. L., E-mail: adc87@cornell.edu; Shelkovenko, T. A., E-mail: adc87@cornell.edu; Pikuz, S. A., E-mail: adc87@cornell.edu; Hammer, D. A., E-mail: adc87@cornell.edu [Cornell University, 439 Rhodes Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the diagnosis of plasmas over a wide range of both temperature and density. However, such a measurement is often limited to probing plasmas with temperatures well below that of the x-ray source in order to avoid object plasma emission lines from obscuring important features of the absorption spectrum. This has excluded many plasmas from being investigated by this technique. We have developed an x-ray spectrometer that provides the ability to record absorption spectra from higher temperature plasmas than the usual approach allows without the risk of data contamination by line radiation emitted by the plasma under study. This is accomplished using a doubly curved mica crystal which is bent both elliptically and cylindrically. We present here initial absorption spectra obtained from an aluminum x-pinch plasma.

  16. The first X-ray imaging spectroscopy of quiescent solar active regions with NuSTAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannah, Iain G.; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Smith, David M.;

    2016-01-01

    resolved X-rays above 2 keV from non-flaring ARs, observed near the west limb on 2014 November 1. The NuSTAR X-ray images match bright features seen in extreme ultraviolet and soft X-rays. The NuSTAR imaging spectroscopy is consistent with isothermal emission of temperatures 3.1-4.4 MK and emission...... measures 1-8 × 1046 cm−3. We do not observe emission above 5 MK, but our short effective exposure times restrict the spectral dynamic range. With few counts above 6 keV, we can place constraints on the presence of an additional hotter component between 5 and 12 MK of∼1046 cm−3 and ∼1043cm−3, respectively...

  17. Experimental station for laser-based picosecond time-resolved x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorchies, F.; Fedorov, N.; Lecherbourg, L.

    2015-07-01

    We present an experimental station designed for time-resolved X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectroscopy (XANES). It is based on ultrashort laser-plasma x-ray pulses generated from a table-top 100 mJ-class laser at 10 Hz repetition rate. A high transmission (10%-20%) x-ray beam line transport using polycapillary optics allows us to set the sample in an independent vacuum chamber, providing high flexibility over a wide spectral range from 0.5 up to 4 keV. Some XANES spectra are presented, demonstrating 1% noise level in only ˜1 mn and ˜100 cumulated laser shots. Time-resolved measurements are reported, indicating that the time resolution of the entire experimental station is 3.3 ± 0.6 ps rms.

  18. 6 MeV storage ring dedicated to hard X-ray imaging and far-infrared spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M M Haque; A Moon; T Hirai; H Yamada

    2011-02-01

    The tabletop storage ring, 6 MeV MIRRORCLE, is dedicated to hard X-ray imaging as well as far-infrared (FIR) spectroscopy. In spite of low electron energy, the 6 MeV MIRRORCLE generates hard X-rays ranging from 10 keV up to its electron energy and milliwatt order submillimetre range FIR rays. Bremsstrahlung is the mechanism for the hard X-ray generation. Images produced with 11 × geometrical magnification display a sharply enhanced edge effect when generated using a 25 mm rod electron target. Bright far-infrared is generated in the same way using a conventional synchrotron light source, but with MIRRORCLE the spectral flux is found to be ∼ 1000 times greater than that of a standard thermal source. Partially coherent enhancement is observed in the case of FIR output.

  19. Experimental station for laser-based picosecond time-resolved x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorchies, F; Fedorov, N; Lecherbourg, L

    2015-07-01

    We present an experimental station designed for time-resolved X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectroscopy (XANES). It is based on ultrashort laser-plasma x-ray pulses generated from a table-top 100 mJ-class laser at 10 Hz repetition rate. A high transmission (10%-20%) x-ray beam line transport using polycapillary optics allows us to set the sample in an independent vacuum chamber, providing high flexibility over a wide spectral range from 0.5 up to 4 keV. Some XANES spectra are presented, demonstrating 1% noise level in only ∼1 mn and ∼100 cumulated laser shots. Time-resolved measurements are reported, indicating that the time resolution of the entire experimental station is 3.3 ± 0.6 ps rms.

  20. Experimental station for laser-based picosecond time-resolved x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorchies, F., E-mail: dorchies@celia.u-bordeaux1.fr; Fedorov, N.; Lecherbourg, L. [Université Bordeaux, CNRS, CEA, CELIA (Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications), UMR 5107, Talence F-33405 (France)

    2015-07-15

    We present an experimental station designed for time-resolved X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectroscopy (XANES). It is based on ultrashort laser-plasma x-ray pulses generated from a table-top 100 mJ-class laser at 10 Hz repetition rate. A high transmission (10%–20%) x-ray beam line transport using polycapillary optics allows us to set the sample in an independent vacuum chamber, providing high flexibility over a wide spectral range from 0.5 up to 4 keV. Some XANES spectra are presented, demonstrating 1% noise level in only ∼1 mn and ∼100 cumulated laser shots. Time-resolved measurements are reported, indicating that the time resolution of the entire experimental station is 3.3 ± 0.6 ps rms.

  1. Measuring redshift through X-ray spectroscopy of galaxy clusters: results from Chandra data and future prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Heng; Borgani, Stefano; Rosati, Piero; Zhu, Zong-Hong

    2011-01-01

    The ubiquitous presence of the Fe line complex in the X-ray spectra of galaxy clusters offers the possibility of measuring their redshift without resorting to spectroscopic follow-up observations. In this paper we assess the accuracy with which the redshift of galaxy clusters can be recovered from X-ray spectral analysis of Chandra archival data. This study indicates a strategy to build large surveys of clusters whose identification and redshift measurement are both based on X-ray data alone. We apply a blind search for K--shell and L--shell Fe line complex in X-ray cluster spectra using Chandra archival observations of galaxy clusters. The presence of the Fe line in the ICM spectra can be detected by simply analyzing the C-statistics variation $\\Delta C_{stat}$ as a function of the redshift parameter. We repeat the measurement under different conditions, and compare the X-ray derived redshift $z_X$ with the one obtained through optical spectroscopy $z_o$. We explore also how a number of priors on metallicity...

  2. Fast Detection Allows Analysis of the Electronic Structure of Metalloprotein by X-ray Emission Spectroscopy at Room Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Katherine M; Mattern, Brian A; Pacold, Joseph I; Zakharova, Taisiya; Brewe, Dale; Kosheleva, Irina; Henning, Robert W; Graber, Timothy J; Heald, Steve M; Seidler, Gerald T; Pushkar, Yulia

    2012-07-19

    The paradigm of "detection-before-destruction" was tested for a metalloprotein complex exposed at room temperature to the high x-ray flux typical of third generation synchrotron sources. Following the progression of the x-ray induced damage by Mn Kβ x-ray emission spectroscopy, we demonstrated the feasibility of collecting room temperature data on the electronic structure of native Photosystem II, a trans-membrane metalloprotein complex containing a Mn(4)Ca cluster. The determined non-damaging observation timeframe (about 100 milliseconds using continuous monochromatic beam, deposited dose 1*10(7) photons/µm(2) or 1.3*10(4) Gy, and 66 microseconds in pulsed mode using pink beam, deposited dose 4*10(7) photons/µm(2) or 4.2*10(4) Gy) is sufficient for the analysis of this protein's electron dynamics and catalytic mechanism at room temperature. Reported time frames are expected to be representative for other metalloproteins. The described instrumentation, based on the short working distance dispersive spectrometer, and experimental methodology is broadly applicable to time-resolved x-ray emission analysis at synchrotron and x-ray free-electron laser light sources.

  3. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies on core-shell structured nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, M. [Surface Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700064 (India); Basu, S.; Ghosh, B. [Unit on Nano Science, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India); Chakravorty, D. [Unit on Nano Science, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India)], E-mail: mlsdc@iacs.res.in

    2007-08-15

    Core-shell nanostructures were grown in silica-based glasses. Copper-copper oxide and iron-iron oxide structures had diameters in the range 3-6 nm, with shell thicknesses {approx}1-2 nm. Silver-lithium niobate core-shell nanostructures had diameters in the range 4.2-46 nm and thicknesses varying from 2.2 to 22 nm. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies were carried out on all these specimens. The analyses of these results show the presence of Cu{sup +}/Cu{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+} and Nb{sup 4+}/Nb{sup 5+} valence states in the above three systems. Electrical resistivity data were fitted satisfactorily to the small polaron hopping model in the case of copper and iron-containing specimens. The presence of ions in the lithium niobate shell provides direct evidence of the formation of localized states between which variable range hopping conduction can be effected.

  4. Magnetism at spinel thin film interfaces probed through soft x-ray spectroscopy techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopdekar, R.V.; Liberati, M.; Takamura, Y.; Kourkoutis, L. Fitting; Bettinger, J. S.; Nelson-Cheeseman, B. B.; Arenholz, E.; Doran, A.; Scholl, A.; Muller, D. A.; Suzuki, Y.

    2009-12-16

    Magnetic order and coupling at the interfaces of highly spin polarized Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} heterostructures have been determined by surface sensitive and element specific soft x-ray spectroscopy and spectromicroscopy techniques. At ambient temperature, the interface between paramagnetic CoCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} or MnCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} and ferrimagnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} isostructural bilayers exhibits long range magnetic order of Co, Mn and Cr cations which cannot be explained in terms of the formation of interfacial MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} or CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. Instead, the ferrimagnetism is induced by the adjacent Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} layer and is the result of the stabilization of a spinel phase not achievable in bulk form. Magnetism at the interface region is observable up to 500 K, far beyond the chromite bulk Curie temperature of 50-95 K.

  5. Near surface composition of some alloys by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Sreemany; T B Ghosh

    2001-10-01

    Chemical compositions of the alloys of CuNi (Cu0.10Ni0.90, Cu0.30Ni0.70, Cu0.70Ni0.30) and BiSb (Bi0.80Sb0.20, Bi0.64Sb0.34, Bi0.55Sb0.45) are determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The stoichiometries are determined and are compared with the bulk compositions. Possible sources of systematic errors contributing to the results are discussed. Errors arising out of preferential etching in these alloys have been investigated. It has been inferred from such studies that the preferential etching does not enrich the surface composition with a particular component for the two systems reported here. Quantitative results of CuNi system indicate that the surface regions of the Cu0.70Ni0.30 alloy is Cu-rich, although no such evidence is observed in case of BiSb system.

  6. Band alignments in Fe/graphene/Si(001) junctions studied by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Breton, J.-C.; Tricot, S.; Delhaye, G.; Lépine, B.; Turban, P.; Schieffer, P.

    2016-08-01

    The control of tunnel contact resistance is of primary importance for semiconductor-based spintronic devices. This control is hardly achieved with conventional oxide-based tunnel barriers due to deposition-induced interface states. Manipulation of single 2D atomic crystals (such as graphene sheets) weakly interacting with their substrate might represent an alternative and efficient way to design new heterostructures for a variety of different purposes including spin injection into semiconductors. In the present paper, we study by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy the band alignments and interface chemistry of iron-graphene-hydrogenated passivated silicon (001) surfaces for a low and a high n-doping concentration. We find that the hydrogen passivation of the Si(001) surface remains efficient even with a graphene sheet on the Si(001) surface. For both doping concentrations, the semiconductor is close to flat-band conditions which indicates that the Fermi level is unpinned on the semiconductor side of the Graphene/Si(001):H interface. When iron is deposited on the graphene/Si(001):H structures, the Schottky barrier height remains mainly unaffected by the metallic overlayer with a very low barrier height for electrons, a sought-after property in semiconductor based spintronic devices. Finally, we demonstrate that the graphene layer intercalated between the metal and semiconductor also serves as a protection against iron-silicide formation even at elevated temperatures preventing from the formation of a Si-based magnetic dead layer.

  7. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy of salts in natural sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obbard, Rachel W.; Lieb-Lappen, Ross M.; Nordick, Katherine V.; Golden, Ellyn J.; Leonard, Jeremiah R.; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Newville, Mathew G.

    2016-11-01

    We describe the use of synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy to examine the microstructural location of specific elements, primarily salts, in sea ice. This work was part of an investigation of the location of bromine in the sea ice-snowpack-blowing snow system, where it plays a part in the heterogeneous chemistry that contributes to tropospheric ozone depletion episodes. We analyzed samples at beamline 13-ID-E of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. Using an 18 keV incident energy beam, we produced elemental maps of salts for sea ice samples from the Ross Sea, Antarctica. The distribution of salts in sea ice depends on ice type. In our columnar ice samples, Br was located in parallel lines spaced roughly 0.5 mm apart, corresponding to the spacing of lamellae in the skeletal region during initial ice growth. The maps revealed concentrations of Br in linear features in samples from all but the topmost and bottommost depths. For those samples, the maps revealed rounded features. Calibration of the Br elemental maps showed bulk concentrations to be 5-10 g/m3, with concentrations ten times larger in the linear features. Through comparison with horizontal thin sections, we could verify that these linear features were brine sheets or layers.

  8. Characterization of peptide attachment on silicon nanowires by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurylo, Ievgen; Dupré, Mathieu; Cantel, Sonia; Enjalbal, Christine; Drobecq, Hervé; Szunerits, Sabine; Melnyk, Oleg; Boukherroub, Rabah; Coffinier, Yannick

    2017-02-27

    In this paper, we report an original method to immobilize a model peptide on silicon nanowires (SiNWs) via a photolinker attached to the SiNWs' surface. The silicon nanowires were fabricated by a metal assisted chemical etching (MACE) method. Then, direct characterization of the peptide immobilization on SiNWs was performed either by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) or by laser-desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS). XPS allowed us to follow the peptide immobilization and its photorelease by recording the variation of the signal intensities of the different elements present on the SiNW surface. Mass spectrometry was performed without the use of an organic matrix and peptide ions were produced via a photocleavage mechanism. Indeed, thanks to direct photorelease achieved upon laser irradiation, a recorded predictable peak related to the molecular peptide ion has been detected, allowing the identification of the model peptide. Additional MS/MS experiments confirmed the photodissociation site and confirmed the N-terminal immobilization of the peptide on SiNWs.

  9. Chemistry of carbon polymer composite electrode - An X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Shuang Ma; Dhiman, Rajnish; Skou, Eivind

    2015-01-01

    Surface chemistry of the electrodes in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell is of great importance for the cell performance. Many groups have reported that electrode preparation condition has a direct influence on the resulting electrode properties. In this work, the oxidation state of electrode components and the composites (catalyst ionomer mixtures) in various electrode structures were systematically studied with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Based on the spectra, when catalyst is physically mixed with Nafion ionomer, the resulting electrode surface chemistry is a combination of the two components. When the electrode is prepared with a lamination procedure, the ratio between fluorocarbon and graphitic carbon is decreased. Moreover, ether type oxide content is decreased although carbon oxide is slightly increased. This indicates structure change of the catalyst layer due to an interaction between the ionomer and the catalyst and possible polymer structural change during electrode fabrication. The surface of micro porous layer was found to be much more influenced by the lamination, especially when it is in contact with catalysts in the interphase. Higher amount of platinum oxide was observed in the electrode structures (catalyst ionomer mixture) compared to the catalyst powder. This also indicates a certain interaction between the functional groups in the polymer and platinum surface.

  10. Properties of aqueous nitrate and nitrite from x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Jacob W.; Lam, Royce K.; Saykally, Richard J., E-mail: saykally@berkeley.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Shih, Orion [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Rizzuto, Anthony M. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Prendergast, David [The Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2015-08-28

    Nitrate and nitrite ions are of considerable interest, both for their widespread use in commercial and research contexts and because of their central role in the global nitrogen cycle. The chemistry of atmospheric aerosols, wherein nitrate is abundant, has been found to depend on the interfacial behavior of ionic species. The interfacial behavior of ions is determined largely by their hydration properties; consequently, the study of the hydration and interfacial behavior of nitrate and nitrite comprises a significant field of study. In this work, we describe the study of aqueous solutions of sodium nitrate and nitrite via X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), interpreted in light of first-principles density functional theory electronic structure calculations. Experimental and calculated spectra of the nitrogen K-edge XA spectra of bulk solutions exhibit a large 3.7 eV shift between the XA spectra of nitrate and nitrite resulting from greater stabilization of the nitrogen 1s energy level in nitrate. A similar shift is not observed in the oxygen K-edge XA spectra of NO{sub 3}{sup −} and NO{sub 2}{sup −}. The hydration properties of nitrate and nitrite are found to be similar, with both anions exhibiting a similar propensity towards ion pairing.

  11. X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy Study of Coating Thickness and Base Metal Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolin, T. D.; Leszczuk, Y.

    2008-01-01

    For electrical, electronic, and electromechanical (EEE) parts to be approved for space use, they must be able to meet safety standards approved by NASA. A fast, reliable, and precise method is needed to make sure these standards are met. Many EEE parts are coated in gold (Au) and nickel (Ni), and the thickness coating is crucial to a part s performance. A nondestructive method that is efficient in measuring coating thickness is x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy. The XRF spectrometer is a machine designed to measure layer thickness and composition of single or multilayered samples. By understanding the limitations in the collection of the data by this method, accurate composition and thickness measurements can be obtained for samples with Au and Ni coatings. To understand the limitations of data found, measurements were taken with the XRF spectrometer and compared to true values of standard reference materials (SRM) that were National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) traceable. For every sample, six different parameters were varied to understand measurement error: coating/substrate combination, number of layers, counting interval, collimator size, coating thickness, and test area location. Each measurement was taken in accordance with standards set by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) International Standard B 568.

  12. Speciation of Selenium in Stream Insects Using X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrahennadi, R.; Wayland, M.; Pickering, I.J.

    2009-05-28

    Selenium contamination in the environment is a widespread problem affecting insects and other wildlife. Insects occupy a critical middle link and aid in trophic transfer of selenium in many terrestrial and freshwater food chains, but the mechanisms of selenium uptake through the food chain are poorly understood. In particular, biotransformation of selenium by insects into different chemical forms will greatly influence how toxic or benign the selenium is to that organism or to its predators. We have used X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to identify the chemical form of selenium in insects inhabiting selenium contaminated streams near Hinton, Alberta (Canada). Selenium K near-edge spectra indicate a variability of selenium speciation among the insects that included mayflies (Ephemeroptera), stoneflies (Plecoptera), caddisflies (Trichoptera), and craneflies (Diptera). Higher percentages of inorganic selenium were observed in primary consumers, detritivores, and filter feeders than in predatory insects. Among the organic forms of selenium, organic selenides constituted a major fraction in most organisms. A species modeled as trimethylselenonium was observed during the pupal stage of caddisflies. These results provide insights into how the insects cope with their toxic cargo, including how the selenium is biotransformed into less toxic forms and how it can be eliminated from the insects. More broadly, this study demonstrates the strengths of XAS to probe the effects of heavy elements at trace levels in insects from the field.

  13. CHARACTERIZING SURFACE LAYERS IN NITINOL USING X-RAY PHOTOELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopfel, R.; Mehta, A.

    2008-01-01

    Nitinol is a shape memory alloy whose properties allow for large reversible deformations and a return to its original geometry. This nickel-titanium (NiTi) alloy has become a material used widely in the biomedical fi eld as a stent to open up collapsed arteries. Both ambient and biological conditions cause surface oxidation in these devices which in turn change its biocompatibility. The thickness of oxidized layers can cause fractures in the material if too large and can allow for penetration if too thin. Depending on the type and abundance of the chemical species on or near the surface, highly toxic metal ions can leak into the body causing cell damage or even cell death. Thus, biocompatibility of such devices is crucial. By using highly surface sensitive x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to probe the surface of these structures, it is possible to decipher both layer composition and layer thickness. Two samples, both of which were mechanically polished, were investigated. Of the two samples, one was then exposed to a phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution to mimic the chemical properties of blood, while the other remained unexposed. Although both samples were found to have oxide layers of appropriate thickness (on the order of a few nm), it was found that the sample exposed to the saline solution had a slightly thicker oxide layer and more signifi cantly, a phosphate layer very near the surface suggesting toxic metal components are well contained within the sample. These are considerable indications of a biocompatible device.

  14. X-ray spectroscopy of light kaonic atoms – new results and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marton, J. [Stefan-Meyer-Institut für subatomare Physik, Boltzmanngasse 3, 1090 Wien (Austria); Bazzi, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Beer, G. [Dep. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, P.O.Box 3055, Victoria B.C. Canada V8W3P6 (Canada); Berucci, C. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Bombelli, L. [Politecnico di Milano, Dip. di Elettronica e Informazione, Piazza L. da Vinci, 32 I-20133 Milano (Italy); Bragadireanu, A.M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); IFIN-HH, P.O. box MG-6, R76900 Magurele, Bucharest (Romania); Cargnelli, M. [Stefan-Meyer-Institut für subatomare Physik, Boltzmanngasse 3, 1090 Wien (Austria); Curceanu, C. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); D' Uffizi, A.; Fiorini, C.; Frizzi, T. [Politecnico di Milano, Dip. di Elettronica e Informazione, Piazza L. da Vinci, 32 I-20133 Milano (Italy); Ghio, F. [INFN Sez. di Roma I and Instituto Superiore di Sanita I-00161, Roma (Italy); Guaraldo, C. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Hayano, R. [University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Iliescu, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Ishiwatari, T. [Stefan-Meyer-Institut für subatomare Physik, Boltzmanngasse 3, 1090 Wien (Austria); Iwasaki, M. [RIKEN, Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Saitama (Japan); and others

    2012-12-15

    The antikaon interaction on nucleons and nuclei in the low-energy regime is neither simple nor well understood. Rather direct access to this field is provided by x-ray spectroscopy of light kaonic atoms like kaonic hydrogen, deuterium and helium isotopes. A series of precision measurements on kaonic atoms was performed very successfully by the SIDDHARTA Collaboration at the DAΦNE electron-positron collider at LNF-INFN (Frascati, Italy). Consequently, new precision data on the strong interaction observables (i.e. energy shift and broadening of low-lying atomic states) were delivered having an important impact on the theory of low-energy QCD with strangeness. Presently, the follow-up experiment, SIDDHARTA-2, is in preparation, aiming at a determination of the strong interaction observables in kaonic deuterium as the highest priority; other type of measurements (light and heavier kaonic atoms) are as well foreseen. With the kaonic deuterium data the antikaon-nucleon isospin-resolved scattering lengths can be extracted for the first time. An overview of the progress and present status of experimental studies and an outlook to future perspectives in this fascinating research field is given.

  15. Effect of Space Radiation Processing on Lunar Soil Surface Chemistry: X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukes, C.; Loeffler, M.J.; Baragiola, R.; Christoffersen, R.; Keller, J.

    2009-01-01

    Current understanding of the chemistry and microstructure of the surfaces of lunar soil grains is dominated by a reference frame derived mainly from electron microscopy observations [e.g. 1,2]. These studies have shown that the outermost 10-100 nm of grain surfaces in mature lunar soil finest fractions have been modified by the combined effects of solar wind exposure, surface deposition of vapors and accretion of impact melt products [1,2]. These processes produce surface-correlated nanophase Feo, host grain amorphization, formation of surface patinas and other complex changes [1,2]. What is less well understood is how these changes are reflected directly at the surface, defined as the outermost 1-5 atomic monolayers, a region not easily chemically characterized by TEM. We are currently employing X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) to study the surface chemistry of lunar soil samples that have been previously studied by TEM. This work includes modification of the grain surfaces by in situ irradiation with ions at solar wind energies to better understand how irradiated surfaces in lunar grains change their chemistry once exposed to ambient conditions on earth.

  16. Speciation of selenium in stream insects using X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrahennadi, Ruwandi; Wayland, Mark