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Sample records for features pathophysiology diagnosis

  1. Update on Mastocytosis (Part 1): Pathophysiology, Clinical Features, and Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azaña, J M; Torrelo, A; Matito, A

    2016-01-01

    Mastocytosis is a term used to describe a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by clonal proliferation of mast cells in various organs. The organ most often affected is the skin. Mastocytosis is a relatively rare disorder that affects both sexes equally. It can occur at any age, although it tends to appear in the first decade of life, or later, between the second and fifth decades. Our understanding of the pathophysiology of mastocytosis has improved greatly in recent years, with the discovery that somatic c-kit mutations and aberrant immunophenotypic features have an important role. The clinical manifestations of mastocytosis are diverse, and skin lesions are the key to diagnosis in most patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  2. Cluster Headache: Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, Clinical Features, and Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Diana Yi-Ting; Yuan Ong, Jonathan Jia; Goadsby, Peter James

    2018-04-01

    Cluster headache is a primary headache disorder affecting up to 0.1% of the population. Patients suffer from cluster headache attacks lasting from 15 to 180 min up to 8 times a day. The attacks are characterized by the severe unilateral pain mainly in the first division of the trigeminal nerve, with associated prominent unilateral cranial autonomic symptoms and a sense of agitation and restlessness during the attacks. The male-to-female ratio is approximately 2.5:1. Experimental, clinical, and neuroimaging studies have advanced our understanding of the pathogenesis of cluster headache. The pathophysiology involves activation of the trigeminovascular complex and the trigeminal-autonomic reflex and accounts for the unilateral severe headache, the prominent ipsilateral cranial autonomic symptoms. In addition, the circadian and circannual rhythmicity unique to this condition is postulated to involve the hypothalamus and suprachiasmatic nucleus. Although the clinical features are distinct, it may be misdiagnosed, with patients often presenting to the otolaryngologist or dentist with symptoms. The prognosis of cluster headache remains difficult to predict. Patients with episodic cluster headache can shift to chronic cluster headache and vice versa. Longitudinally, cluster headache tends to remit with age with less frequent bouts and more prolonged periods of remission in between bouts.

  3. Dry eye disease: pathophysiology, classification, and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Henry D

    2008-04-01

    Dry eye disease (DED) is a multifactorial disorder of the tear film and ocular surface that results in eye discomfort, visual disturbance, and often ocular surface damage. Although recent research has made progress in elucidating DED pathophysiology, currently there are no uniform diagnostic criteria. This article discusses the normal anatomy and physiology of the lacrimal functional unit and the tear film; the pathophysiology of DED; DED etiology, classification, and risk factors; and DED diagnosis, including symptom assessment and the roles of selected diagnostic tests.

  4. Otosclerosis update (1). Pathophysiology and diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Kaoru; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Saito, Hideyuki; Kanzaki, Sho; Okamoto, Yasuhide; Mizutari, Kunio; Suzuki, Takashi; Oishi, Naoki

    2009-01-01

    Otosclerosis is an otological disease that typicaly causes conductive hearing loss. This disease is an important clinical entity since hearing impairment in these case can be dramatically improved by surgery. In this review paper, we review recent research into the pathophysiology of otosclerosis and summarize clinical features, audiometry and diagnostic imaging examinations in 160 ears with otosclerosis that we treated surgically in our department. (author)

  5. Sepsis: Current Definition, Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taeb, Abdalsamih M; Hooper, Michael H; Marik, Paul E

    2017-06-01

    Sepsis is a clinical syndrome that results from the dysregulated inflammatory response to infection that leads to organ dysfunction. The resulting losses to society in terms of financial burden, morbidity, and mortality are enormous. We provide a review of sepsis, its underlying pathophysiology, and guidance for diagnosis and management of this common disease. Current established treatments include appropriate antimicrobial agents to target the underlying infection, optimization of intravascular volume to improve stroke volume, vasopressors to counteract vasoplegic shock, and high-quality supportive care. Appropriate implementation of established treatments combined with novel therapeutic approaches promises to continue to decrease the impact of this disease.

  6. Restless Legs Syndrome: From Pathophysiology to Clinical Diagnosis and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyi Guo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Restless legs syndrome (RLS, a common neurological sensorimotor disorder in western countries, has gained more and more attention in Asian countries. The prevalence of RLS is higher in older people and females. RLS is most commonly related to iron deficiency, pregnancy and uremia. The RLS symptoms show a significant circadian rhythm and a close relationship to periodic limb movements (PLMs in clinical observations, while the pathophysiological pathways are still unknown. The diagnostic criteria have been revised in 2012 to improve the validity of RLS diagnosis. Recent studies have suggested an important role of iron decrease of brain in RLS pathophysiology. Dopaminergic (DA system dysfunction in A11 cell groups has been recognized long ago from clinical treatment and autopsy. Nowadays, it is believed that iron dysfunction can affect DA system from different pathways and opioids have a protective effect on DA system. Several susceptible single nucleotide polymorphisms such as BTBD9 and MEIS1, which are thought to be involved in embryonic neuronal development, have been reported to be associated with RLS. Several pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment are discussed in this review. First-line treatments of RLS include DA agents and α2δ agonists. Augmentation is very common in long-term treatment of RLS which makes prevention and management of augmentation very important for RLS patients. A combination of different types of medication is effective in preventing and treating augmentation. The knowledge on RLS is still limited, the pathophysiology and better management of RLS remain to be discovered.

  7. Acetazolamide in cerebral diagnosis: Physiological and pathophysiological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerch, H.; Franke, W.G.; Templin, A.

    1990-01-01

    The sensitivity in the diagnosis of cerebrovascular diseases using radiotracers can be enhanced by the use of the acetazolamide test. In this paper we present and discuss some physiological and pathophysiological aspects of its mechanism. The physiological action of the carboanhydrase inhibitor is like the action of enhanced pCO 2 in the tissue, thus acting at the site of metabolic regulation. The reaction of the vascular bed is influenced in part by subcortical structures. Pathologically the reaction can be disturbed at first by an altered regulation with the vessels being mechanically intact, e.g. in hypoxia or transient ischemia. Secondly, the mechanics of the vessels may be not intact e.g., in atherosclerosis or surrounding edema. Lastly, the vessels have already dilated, e.g. poststenotically. All these facts have to be taken into consideration interpreting an acetazolamid test. (orig.) [de

  8. The Postural Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis & Management

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    Satish R Raj

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS, characterized by orthostatic tachycardia in the absence of orthostatic hypotension, has been the focus of increasing clinical interest over the last 15 years 1. Patients with POTS complain of symptoms of tachycardia, exercise intolerance, lightheadedness, extreme fatigue, headache and mental clouding. Patients with POTS demonstrate a heart rate increase of ≥30 bpm with prolonged standing (5-30 minutes, often have high levels of upright plasma norepinephrine (reflecting sympathetic nervous system activation, and many patients have a low blood volume. POTS can be associated with a high degree of functional disability. Therapies aimed at correcting the hypovolemia and the autonomic imbalance may help relieve the severity of the symptoms. This review outlines the present understanding of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of POTS.

  9. Missing cells: pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of (pancytopenia in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam eErlacher

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral blood cytopenia in children can be due to a variety of acquired or inherited diseases. Genetic disorders affecting a single hematopoietic lineage are frequently characterized by typical bone marrow findings such as lack of progenitors or maturation arrest in congenital neutropenia or a lack of megakaryocytes in congenital amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia whereas antibody mediated diseases such as autoimmune neutropenia are associated with a rather unremarkable bone marrow morphology. In contrast, pancytopenia is frequently associated with a hypocellular bone marrow and the differential diagnosis includes acquired aplastic anemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, inherited bone marrow failure syndromes such as Fanconi anemia and dyskeratosis congenita and a variety of immunological disorders including hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. Thorough bone marrow analysis is of special importance for the diagnostic work-up of most patients. Cellularity, cellular composition and dysplastic signs are the cornerstones of the differential diagnosis. Pancytopenia in the presence of a normo- or hypercellular marrow with dysplastic changes may indicate myelodysplastic syndrome. More challenging for the hematologist is the evaluation of the hypocellular bone marrow. Although aplastic anemia and hypocellular refractory cytopenia of childhood (RCC can reliably be differentiated on a morphological level the overlapping pathophysiology remains a significant challenge for the choice of the therapeutic strategy. Furthermore, inherited bone marrow failure syndromes are usually associated with the morphological picture of RCC and the recognition of these entities is essential as they often present a multisystem disease requiring different diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. This paper gives an overview over the different disease entities presenting with (pancytopenia, their pathophysiology, characteristic bone marrow findings and therapeutic approaches.

  10. Relapses in Multiple Sclerosis: Definition, Pathophysiology, Features, Imitators, and Treatment

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    Serhan Sevim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Relapse in multiple sclerosis (MS is defined as a neurologic deficit associated with an acute inflammatory demyelinating event that lasts at least 24 hours in the absence of fever and infection. Myelinoclasis and axonal transection occur in relapses. Diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, and many other features of the disease are directly related to the relapses. MS starts as the relapsing-remitting (RRMS form in 85% of patients. A large number of relapses in the first years, polysymptomatic relapses, and pyramidal system, brain stem, and spinal cord involvement are signs of a poor outcome. The average frequency of relapses is approximately one per year during the first years of RRMS. The frequency of relapses increases during systemic infections, psychological stress, and in the postpartum first 3 months. Seventy-five percent of relapses are monosymptomatic. Pseudo-relapses and paroxysmal symptoms are distinguished from relapses by their sudden onset, sudden termination, and shorter duration. Contrast enhancement is valuable in imaging, but undetectable in most relapses. The regression in the first few weeks of relapses is explained by reduction of the edema, and by remyelination in the following months. Relapses and their features are also among the main determinants of treatment. High-dose methylprednisolone and early treatment with adrenocorticotropic hormone reduce post-relapse disability and shorten the duration of relapses. Plasmapheresis is a good option for patients who do not respond to steroid treatment. Identification of relapses by patients and physicians, distinguishing them from imitators, proper evaluation, treatment when necessary, and monitoring the results are of great importance for patients with MS. The educational levels of patients and physicians regarding these parameters should be increased. Well-designed studies that evaluate the long-term effect of relapse treatment on disability are needed.

  11. Acromegaly: clinical features at diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, Lucio; Vilar, Clarice Freitas; Lyra, Ruy; Lyra, Raissa; Naves, Luciana A

    2017-02-01

    Acromegaly is a rare and underdiagnosed disorder caused, in more than 95% of cases, by a growth hormone (GH)-secreting pituitary adenoma. The GH hypersecretion leads to overproduction of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) which results in a multisystem disease characterized by somatic overgrowth, multiple comorbidities, physical disfigurement, and increased mortality. This article aims to review the clinical features of acromegaly at diagnosis. Acromegaly affects both males and females equally and the average age at diagnosis ranges from 40 to 50 years (up to 5% of cases acromegaly is often diagnosed five to more than ten years after its onset. The typical coarsening of facial features include furrowing of fronthead, pronounced brow protrusion, enlargement of the nose and the ears, thickening of the lips, skin wrinkles and nasolabial folds, as well as mandibular prognathism that leads to dental malocclusion and increased interdental spacing. Excessive growth of hands and feet (predominantly due to soft tissue swelling) is present in the vast majority of acromegalic patients. Gigantism accounts for up to 5% of cases and occurs when the excess of GH becomes manifest in the young, before the epiphyseal fusion. The disease also has rheumatologic, cardiovascular, respiratory, neoplastic, neurological, and metabolic manifestations which negatively impact its prognosis and patients quality of life. Less than 15% of acromegalic patients actively seek medical attention for change in appearance or enlargement of the extremities. The presentation of acromegaly is more often related to its systemic comorbidities or to local tumor effects.

  12. Pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of canine hip dysplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.L.; Tomlinson, J.L.; Constantinescu, G.M.

    1996-01-01

    Dogs with hip dysplasia are commonly presented to veterinarians for evaluation. Although many causes of the condition have been proposed, a definitive cause has not been established. The multifactorial nature of canine hip dysplasia can confuse client education and management ofthe disease. The basic concept involved is the biomechanical imbalance between the forces on the coxofemoral joint and the associated muscle mass; the result is joint laxity in young, growing dogs. This laxity leads to incongruity; the eventual result is degenerative joint disease. Canine hip dysplasia can affect any breed but is most often reported in large and giant breeds. Understanding the pathophysiology and biomechanics involved with this developmental disease is important in providing clients with diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic information. The selection of treatment is influenced by the following factors:the age, health, and intended use of the patient; clinical signs; diagnostic findings; the availability of treatment; and the financial constraints of the owner. This article discusses the current concepts concerning the pathophysiology and biomechanics of canine hip dysplasia and outlines diagnostic and therapeutic options. The objective of the article is to provide practitioners with a reference for decision making and client education

  13. Feature Hepatitis: Hepatitis Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Feature Hepatitis Hepatitis: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention Past Issues / Spring 2009 ... No appetite Fever Headaches Diagnosis To check for hepatitis viruses, your doctor will test your blood. You ...

  14. [Dysphagia in Parkinson's Disease: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis and Therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttrup, I; Warnecke, T

    2016-07-01

    Oropharyngeal and esophageal dysphagia are a frequent, but seldom diagnosed symptom of Parkinson's disease (PD). More than 80 % of patients with PD develop dysphagia during the course of their disease leading to a reduced quality of life, complicated medication intake, malnutrition and aspiration pneumonia, which is a major cause of death in PD. The underlying pathophysiology is poorly understood. Impaired dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic mechanisms of the cortical swallowing network as well as peripheral neuromuscular involvement have been suggested to contribute to its multifactorial genesis. Diagnostic screening methods include PD-specific questionnaires and a modified water test. Fiber optic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) and videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS), which complement each other, are the gold standard for evaluation of PD-related dysphagia. For evaluation of esophageal dysphagia, the high-resolution manometry (HRM) may be a helpful tool. In addition to dysphagia-specific treatment by speech and language therapists (SLTs), optimized dopaminergic medication is a meaningful therapeutic option. A promising novel method is intensive training of expiratory muscle strength (EMST). Deep brain stimulation does not seem to have a clinically relevant effect on swallowing function in PD. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Left main coronary artery disease: pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, Carlos; Capodanno, Davide; Onuma, Yoshinobu; Banning, Adrian; Stone, Gregg W; Taggart, David P; Sabik, Joseph; Serruys, Patrick W

    2018-06-01

    The advent of coronary angiography in the 1960s allowed for the risk stratification of patients with stable angina. Patients with unprotected left main coronary artery disease have an increased risk of death related to the large amount of myocardium supplied by this vessel. Although coronary angiography remains the preferred imaging modality for the evaluation of left main coronary artery stenosis, this technique has important limitations. Angiograms of the left main coronary artery segment can be difficult to interpret, and almost one-third of patients can be misclassified when fractional flow reserve is used as the reference. In patients with clinically significant unprotected left main coronary artery disease, surgical revascularization was shown to improve survival compared with medical therapy and has been regarded as the treatment of choice for unprotected left main coronary artery disease. Two large-scale clinical trials published in 2016 support the usefulness of catheter-based revascularization in selected patients with unprotected left main coronary artery disease. In this Review, we describe the pathophysiology of unprotected left main coronary artery disease, discuss diagnostic approaches in light of new noninvasive and invasive imaging techniques, and detail risk stratification models to aid the Heart Team in the decision-making process for determining the best revascularization strategy for these patients.

  16. Hydroxychloroquine-induced cardiomyopathy: case report, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogasundaram, Haran; Putko, Brendan N; Tien, Julia; Paterson, D Ian; Cujec, Bibiana; Ringrose, Jennifer; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2014-12-01

    Drug-induced heart and vascular disease remains an important health burden. Hydroxychloroquine and its predecessor chloroquine are medications commonly used in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and other connective tissue disorders. Hydroxychloroquine interferes with malarial metabolites, confers immunomodulatory effects, and also affects lysosomal function. Clinical monitoring and early recognition of toxicity is an important management strategy in patients who undergo long-term treatment with hydroxychloroquine. Retinal toxicity, neuromyopathy, and cardiac disease are recognized adverse effects of hydroxychloroquine. Immediate withdrawal of hydroxychloroquine is essential if toxicity is suspected because of the early reversibility of cardiomyopathy. In addition to recommended ophthalmological screening, regular screening with 12-lead electrocardiogram and transthoracic echocardiography to detect conduction system disease and/or biventricular morphological or functional changes should be considered in hydroxychloroquine-treated patients. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and endomyocardial biopsy are valuable tools to provide prognostic insights and confirm the diagnosis of hydroxychloroquine-induced cardiomyopathy. In conclusion, chronic use of hydroxychloroquine can result in an acquired lysosomal storage disorder, leading to a drug-induced cardiomyopathy characterized by concentric hypertrophy and conduction abnormalities associated with increased adverse clinical outcomes and mortality. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Sleep apnea and heart failure: pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monda, Cinzia; Scala, Oriana; Paolillo, Stefania; Savarese, Gianluigi; Cecere, Milena; D'Amore, Carmen; Parente, Antonio; Musella, Francesca; Mosca, Susanna; Filardi, Pasquale Perrone

    2010-11-01

    Sleep apnea, defined as a pathologic pause in breathing during sleep >10 s, promotes the progression of chronic heart failure and may be a predictor of poor prognosis. It causes, in fact, several mechanical, hemodynamic, chemical and inflammatory changes that negatively compromise cardiovascular homeostasis of heart failure patients. Sleep apnea is recognized as sleep apnea syndrome when specific symptoms, such as sleepiness and headache during the daytime and snoring, are present and is diagnosed with an overnight test called polysomnography. There are two different forms of sleep apnea, central and obstructive. Breathing is interrupted by the loss of respiratory drive and the lack of respiratory effort in the central form, which affects about 40-60% of heart failure patients. In obstructive sleep apnea, breathing stops when throat muscles relax, despite respiratory effort. This form affects about 3% of the general population, while it is present in at least 30% of heart failure patients. The diagnosis of sleep disorders in heart failure becomes very important to help patients adopting lifestyle changes and starting specific therapies to improve quality of life and retard the progression of chronic heart failure.

  18. Herpes Simplex Virus-1 Encephalitis in Adults: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Michael J; Venkatesan, Arun

    2016-07-01

    Herpetic infections have plagued humanity for thousands of years, but only recently have advances in antiviral medications and supportive treatments equipped physicians to combat the most severe manifestations of disease. Prompt recognition and treatment can be life-saving in the care of patients with herpes simplex-1 virus encephalitis, the most commonly identified cause of sporadic encephalitis worldwide. Clinicians should be able to recognize the clinical signs and symptoms of the infection and familiarize themselves with a rational diagnostic approach and therapeutic modalities, as early recognition and treatment are key to improving outcomes. Clinicians should also be vigilant for the development of acute complications, including cerebral edema and status epilepticus, as well as chronic complications, including the development of autoimmune encephalitis associated with antibodies to the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor and other neuronal cell surface and synaptic epitopes. Herein, we review the pathophysiology, differential diagnosis, and clinical and radiological features of herpes simplex virus-1 encephalitis in adults, including a discussion of the most common complications and their treatment. While great progress has been made in the treatment of this life-threatening infection, a majority of patients will not return to their previous neurologic baseline, indicating the need for further research efforts aimed at improving the long-term sequelae.

  19. Gerbode defect: A comprehensive review of its history, anatomy, embryology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erfanul Saker

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to survey the literature on Gerbode defect and provide an overview of its history, anatomy, development, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment options. The available literature on this topic, including case reports, was thoroughly reviewed. Gerbode defect is defined as abnormal shunting between the left ventricle and right atrium resulting from either a congenital defect or prior cardiac insults. The pathophysiology underlying the development of Gerbode defect is a disease process that injures the atrioventricular septum and leads to the abnormal shunting of blood. Although the most prevalent cause of Gerbode defect has historically been congenital, an increasing trend towards acquired cases has recently been reported owing to improved diagnostic capabilities and a greater number of invasive cardiac procedures. In conclusion, Gerbode defect is an increasingly recognized condition that warrants further study.

  20. A review of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of allergic reactions in the dental office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochford, Christopher; Milles, Maano

    2011-02-01

    Since more than 50 million people in the United States have allergies, knowledge of the management of allergic reactions in the dental office is extremely important. Appropriate care may range from a simple referral to a primary care physician to lifesaving measures implemented during acute anaphylactic reactions. The authors present a basic review of the pathophysiology of allergic reactions and provide information detailing the diagnosis and management of allergic reactions that may be encountered in the dental office. Utilizing this information, the dental practitioner and ancillary staff will have a thorough understanding of allergic reactions and be prepared to successfully identify and treat these reactions.

  1. The rumination syndrome in adults: A review of the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papadopoulos V

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Rumination in adults is considered to be the effortless regurgitation of recently ingested food into the mouth, followed by either rechewing and reswallowing or expulsion of the regurgitate. On the basis of the definition of rumination as a unique category of functional gastroduodenal disorders, according to the newly established Rome III classification, a review of the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of the rumination syndrome in adults is presented after systematic and critical approach of all articles that could be retrieved through PubMed using the term "rumination".

  2. Role of Anti-Müllerian Hormone in pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Agathe; Robin, Geoffroy; Catteau-Jonard, Sophie; Dewailly, Didier

    2015-12-21

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common cause of chronic anovulation and hyperandrogenism in young women. Excessive ovarian production of Anti-Müllerian Hormone, secreted by growing follicles in excess, is now considered as an important feature of PCOS. The aim of this review is first to update the current knowledge about the role of AMH in the pathophysiology of PCOS. Then, this review will discuss the improvement that serum AMH assay brings in the diagnosis of PCOS. Last, this review will explain the utility of serum AMH assay in the management of infertility in women with PCOS and its utility as a marker of treatment efficiency on PCOS symptoms. It must be emphasized however that the lack of an international standard for the serum AMH assay, mainly because of technical issues, makes it difficult to define consensual thresholds, and thus impairs the widespread use of this new ovarian marker. Hopefully, this should soon improve.

  3. An International Consortium Update: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome in Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez, Lourdes; Oberfield, Sharon E; Witchel, Selma; Auchus, Richard J; Chang, R Jeffrey; Codner, Ethel; Dabadghao, Preeti; Darendeliler, Feyza; Elbarbary, Nancy Samir; Gambineri, Alessandra; Garcia Rudaz, Cecilia; Hoeger, Kathleen M; López-Bermejo, Abel; Ong, Ken; Peña, Alexia S; Reinehr, Thomas; Santoro, Nicola; Tena-Sempere, Manuel; Tao, Rachel; Yildiz, Bulent O; Alkhayyat, Haya; Deeb, Asma; Joel, Dipesalema; Horikawa, Reiko; de Zegher, Francis; Lee, Peter A

    2017-01-01

    This paper represents an international collaboration of paediatric endocrine and other societies (listed in the Appendix) under the International Consortium of Paediatric Endocrinology (ICPE) aiming to improve worldwide care of adolescent girls with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)1. The manuscript examines pathophysiology and guidelines for the diagnosis and management of PCOS during adolescence. The complex pathophysiology of PCOS involves the interaction of genetic and epigenetic changes, primary ovarian abnormalities, neuroendocrine alterations, and endocrine and metabolic modifiers such as anti-Müllerian hormone, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, adiposity, and adiponectin levels. Appropriate diagnosis of adolescent PCOS should include adequate and careful evaluation of symptoms, such as hirsutism, severe acne, and menstrual irregularities 2 years beyond menarche, and elevated androgen levels. Polycystic ovarian morphology on ultrasound without hyperandrogenism or menstrual irregularities should not be used to diagnose adolescent PCOS. Hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and obesity may be present in adolescents with PCOS, but are not considered to be diagnostic criteria. Treatment of adolescent PCOS should include lifestyle intervention, local therapies, and medications. Insulin sensitizers like metformin and oral contraceptive pills provide short-term benefits on PCOS symptoms. There are limited data on anti-androgens and combined therapies showing additive/synergistic actions for adolescents. Reproductive aspects and transition should be taken into account when managing adolescents. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Review article: the pathophysiology, differential diagnosis and management of rumination syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tack, J; Blondeau, K; Boecxstaens, V; Rommel, N

    2011-04-01

    Rumination syndrome, characterised by the effortless, often repetitive, regurgitation of recently ingested food into the mouth, was originally described in children and in the developmentally disabled. It is now well-recognised that rumination syndrome occurs in patients of all ages and cognitive abilities. To review a scholarly review on our current understanding of the rumination syndrome. The review was conducted on the basis of a medline search to identify relevant publications pertaining to the pathophysiology, clinical diagnosis and management of rumination syndrome. The Rome III consensus established diagnostic criteria for rumination syndrome in adults, children and infants. A typical history can be highly suggestive but oesophageal (high resolution) manometry/impedance with ingestion of a meal may help to distinguish rumination syndrome from other belching/regurgitation disorders. The pathophysiology is incompletely understood, but involves a rise in intra-gastric pressure, generated by a voluntary, but often unintentional, contraction of the abdominal wall musculature, at a time of low pressure in the lower oesophageal sphincter, causing retrograde movement of gastric contents into the oesophagus. To date, controlled trials in the treatment rumination syndrome are lacking. The mainstay of treatment for rumination syndrome is explanation and behavioural treatment which consists of habit reversal techniques that compete with the urge to regurgitate. Chewing gum, prokinetics, baclofen and even antireflux surgery have been proposed as adjunctive therapies, but high quality studies are generally lacking. Rumination is an under-recognised condition with incompletely understood pathophysiology. Behavioural therapy seems effective, but controlled treatment trials are lacking. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. ACE Inhibitor-Induced Angioedema of the Intestine: Case Report, Incidence, Pathophysiology, Diagnosis and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin Oudit

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A case report of fosinopril-induced angioedema of the intestine with a chronic course accompanied by multiple acute exacerbations is described. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitor-induced angioedema of the intestine (AIAI occurs in a minority of patients taking an ACE inhibitor. The clinical presentation encompasses acute abdominal symptoms, pronounced bowel edema and ascites with occasional facial and/or oropharyngeal swelling. AIAI is diagnosed based on the temporal relationship between the symptomatic presentation and drug use, absence of alternative diagnoses including other causes of angioedema, and the prompt resolution of symptoms upon discontinuation of the ACE inhibitor. Prompt radiological investigation (abdominal computerized tomography and/or ultrasound is critical in making an early diagnosis and in preventing unnecessary surgical intervention. There is a female predominance of AIAI, which may reflect the interaction of estradiol with the various pathways involved in the pathophysiology of AIAI. Management of AIAI consists mainly of conservative measures and discontinuation of the ACE inhibitor. Angiotensin II receptor antagonists should not be considered as appropriate alternatives. Awareness and knowledge of AIAI are important because of the increasing use of ACE inhibitors, current delays in making the diagnosis, obvious management strategies once the diagnosis is made and the dysutility of alternative diagnoses, which may lead to considerable morbidity. AIAI must be considered in patients taking ACE inhibitors who develop gastrointestinal complaints irrespective of the duration of the therapy.

  6. The features of HPOA on dynamic bone scintigraphy: A reflection of underlying pathophysiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, E.J.; Howman-Giles, R.; Macauley, D.I.; Uren, R.F.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy (HPOA) is the clinical syndrome of clubbing, arthritis and periostitis which may accompany a spectrum of underlying disease processes. Increased blood flow through involved extremities is an invariable accompaniment of the syndrome and it is hypothesised that the chronic increase in peripheral blood flow results in the known pathological changes of periosteal inflammation and proliferation, oedema, synovial congestion and exudation and hyperplasia of the finger pulp. The dynamic and blood pool phases of bone scintigraphy provide a unique tool for examining the vascular changes in bone and soft tissues and we describe the previously unreported features of the dynamic bone scan in HPOA. We performed three-phase bone scans on two adolescent patients with cystic fibrosis with knee discomfort. Both studies showed marked hyperaemia to the knees. On the blood pool phase, hyperaemia was seen to the tissues closely related to the periosteum of the long bones in upper and lower limbs, periarticular tissues and finger pulps. The delayed images showed the classic features of HPOA with linear uptake of tracer in the shafts and metaphyseal regions of the long bones and minor periarticular uptake of tracer. A WBC scan performed in one patient showed WBC accumulation in the periosteum of the metaphyseal regions, extending in the shafts, of the distal femurs and proximal tibias. Negligible WBC accumulation was seen in the synovium of the knees reflecting the non-inflammatory nature of the articular changes as is described in most patients with HPOA. In conclusion, the dynamic phases of the bone scan examination in HPOA reflect the pivotal underlying pathophysiological process of abnormally increased blood flow to the periosteal and periarticular tissues of involved long bones and finger pulps and further expands the known diagnostic features of this disease on bone scintigraphy

  7. Chronic Pruritus in the Absence of Skin Disease: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Manuel P; Kremer, Andreas E; Mettang, Thomas; Ständer, Sonja

    2016-08-01

    Chronic pruritus arises not only from dermatoses, but also, in up to half of cases, from extracutaneous origins. A multitude of systemic, neurological, psychiatric, and somatoform conditions are associated with pruritus in the absence of skin disease. Moreover, pruritus is a frequently observed side effect of many drugs. It is therefore difficult for physicians to make a correct diagnosis. Chronic pruritus patients frequently present to the dermatologist with skin lesions secondary to a long-lasting scratching behavior, such as lichenification and prurigo nodularis. A structured clinical history and physical examination are essential in order to evaluate the pruritus, along with systematic, medical history-adapted laboratory and radiological tests carried out according to the differential diagnosis. For therapeutic reasons, a symptomatic therapy should be promptly initiated parallel to the diagnostic procedures. Once the underlying factor(s) leading to the pruritus are identified, a targeted therapy should be implemented. Importantly, the treatment of accompanying disorders such as sleep disturbances or mental symptoms should be taken into consideration. Even after successful treatment of the underlying cause, pruritus may persist, likely due to chronicity processes including peripheral and central sensitization or impaired inhibition at spinal level. A vast arsenal of topical and systemic agents targeting these pathophysiological mechanisms has been used to deter further chronicity. The therapeutic options currently available are, however, still insufficient for many patients. Thus, future studies aiming to unveil the complex mechanisms underlying chronic pruritus and develop new therapeutic agents are urgently needed.

  8. Anemia of Chronic Disease and Iron Deficiency Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murawska, Natalia; Fabisiak, Adam; Fichna, Jakub

    2016-05-01

    Anemia coexists with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in up to two-thirds of patients, significantly impairing quality of life. The most common types of anemia in patients with IBD are iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disease, which often overlap. In most cases, available laboratory tests allow successful diagnosis of iron deficiency, where difficulties appear, recently established indices such as soluble transferrin-ferritin ratio or percentage of hypochromic red cells are used. In this review, we discuss the management of the most common types of anemia in respect of the latest available data. Thus, we provide the mechanisms underlying pathophysiology of these entities; furthermore, we discuss the role of hepcidin in developing anemia in IBD. Next, we present the treatment options for each type of anemia and highlight the importance of individual choice of action. We also focus on newly developed intravenous iron preparations and novel, promising drug candidates targeting hepcidin. Concurrently, we talk about difficulties in differentiating between the true and functional iron deficiency, and discuss tools facilitating the process. Finally, we emphasize the importance of proper diagnosis and treatment of anemia in IBD. We conclude that management of anemia in patients with IBD is tricky, and appropriate screening of patients regarding anemia is substantial.

  9. Classic galactosemia: features of diagnosis and treatment

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    N.O. Pichkur

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. Galactosemia type I, or classic galactosemia (CG, is the most severe form of hereditary disorders of carbohydrate metabolism, in particular, galactose. Galactosemia is not included in the program of massive neonatal screening in Ukraine. The CG is characterized by the non-specific onset symptoms and leads to high mortality among infants in the neonatal period. The problem of early diagnosis and treatment of infants with CG in the absence of a program for massive neonatal screening in Ukraine requires solution. The purpose was to analyse the clinical and laboratory, molecular genetic features of patients with CG; to define a set of clinical symptoms and to form selective groups of patients for administration of diet therapy and laboratory diagnosis; to develop schemes-stages of effective early diagnosis and treatment of patients with CG in the absence of mass neonatal screening in order to reduce infant mortality and prevent the disability of patients with this pathology. Materials and methods. In 2014–2017, 317 patients with a diagnosis of hepatitis of uncertain origin were examined. The age of patients ranged from 3 days to 16 years; 145 (45 % of them were males, 172 (55 % — females. In all patients, a polysyndromic clinical picture with predominant lesion in the liver function was observed. All patients were examined for the activity of galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT enzyme in the red blood cells and underwent DNA diagnosis for the detection of major mutations in the GALT gene. All patients were examined for viral hepatitis, underwent biochemical blood tests for hepatic transaminases, alkaline phosphatase, bilirubin levels, and coagulopathy. Tandem mass spectrometry was also performed to exclude or confirm the metabolic imbalance of amino acids, organic acids, and mitochondrial beta-oxi­dation of fatty acids. Five patients with suspected glycogenosis have been subjected to a quantitative glycogen test in the

  10. Pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of glaucoma associated with Sturge-Weber syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaid, Usman; Ali, Muhammad Hassaan; Jamal, Samreen; Butt, Nadeem Hafeez

    2018-02-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS), also known as encephalotrigeminal angiomatosis, is a condition which includes leptomeningeal hemangioma, facial angiomatosis or nevus flammeus, and ocular changes. SWS can lead to severe complications of anterior segment involving conjunctiva and eyelids, whereas posterior segment of the eye may also be affected by diffuse choroidal hemorrhages. This article was written with the objectives to determine the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of glaucoma associated with this rare and challenging disorder. A detailed literature search was conducted on PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar using the key words. Forty-five articles matched our inclusion criteria that were included in this systematic review. Glaucoma is the one of the commonest ocular manifestations of SWS. It is caused by anterior chamber malformations, increased pressure in the episcleral veins, and changes in ocular hemodynamics. Glaucoma associated with SWS is usually congenital but can develop adults as well. The treatment of glaucoma associated with SWS is quite challenging because of early-onset, severe visual field impairment at the time of diagnosis, and unresponsiveness to standard medical treatment. Several surgical procedures have been devised but the long-term control of the intraocular pressure and visual function remain unsatisfactory. Modifications in the filtration surgery techniques and use of newer anti-fibrotic agents have produced good control of intraocular pressure. Management of glaucoma associated with SWS is multi-dimensional and needs both medical and surgical interventions for better control. The treatment should be devised on case to case basis depending upon the intraocular pressure, stage of the disease, and type of glaucoma.

  11. Reclassification of clinical sleep disorders using traditional models of syndromic, neuroanatomic, pathophysiological and etiological diagnosis.

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    Spitzer, A Robert

    2014-09-01

    Existing classifications of central nervous system sleep disorders do not often provide tools to diagnose the majority of patients complaining of sleep-related symptoms, nor always guide effective treatment. I present a novel classification system that completely separates clinical syndromes from anatomical localization, pathophysiology, and etiology. The clinical syndrome I present can describe the majority of patients, but can be fractionated into individual subgroups for further study. By then separating the anatomy and physiology from the symptoms, an avenue of research becomes available to study the different possible structures that regulate sleep, that may be damaged and cause syndromes of sleep dysfunction. Some of these may produce symptoms that overlap with narcolepsy and some may be distinct. Because the clinical syndrome should be distinguished from anatomy or physiology, I have proposed the term narcoleptiform syndrome for the clinical syndrome. The model also clearly separates etiology from anatomy in a classical neurological manner. This allows etiology, localization and symptoms to be studied separately. It is likely that different etiologies may produce damage in areas that produce similar syndromes. For example, in this model, different causes of damage to the orexin nucleus would result in the same clinical syndrome. This reinforces the concept of studying anatomy, symptoms and etiology separately. By studying the relationship of syndromes or symptoms to anatomic localization and pathophysiology, it should be possible to test novel approaches to treatment based on different underlying structure or function. For example, patients with lesions in the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus or the thalamic intralaminar nuclei may both present with insomnia symptoms but need different treatment; or they might present with symptoms overlapping narcolepsy (a narcoleptiform syndrome) yet need different treatment. In some cases, a single treatment may cross over

  12. Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction – Concept, Pathophysiology, Diagnosis and Challenges for Treatment

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    Lidija Veterovska Miljkovik

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF with preserved left ventricular (LV ejection fraction (HFpEF occurs in 40 to 60% of the patients with HF, with a prognosis which is similar to HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF. HFpEF pathophysiology is different from that of HFrEF, and has been characterized with diastolic dysfunction. Diastolic dysfunction has been defined with elevated left ventricular stiffness, prolonged iso-volumetric LV relaxation, slow LV filing and elevated LV end-diastolic pressure. Arterial hypertension occurs in majority cases with HFpEF worldwide. Patients are mostly older and obese. Diabetes mellitus and atrial fibrillation appear proportionally in a high frequency of patients with HFpEF. The HFpEF diagnosis is based on existence of symptoms and signs of heart failure, normal or approximately normal ejection and diagnosing of LV diastolic dysfunction by means of heart catheterization or Doppler echocardiography and/or elevated concentration of plasma natriuretic peptide. The present recommendations for HFpEF treatment include blood pressure control, heart chamber frequency control when atrial fibrillation exists, in some situations even coronary revascularization and an attempt for sinus rhythm reestablishment. Up to now, it is considered that no medication or a group of medications improve the survival of HFpEF patients. Due to these causes and the bad prognosis of the disorder, rigorous control is recommended of the previously mentioned precipitating factors for this disorder. This paper presents a universal review of the most important parameters which determine this disorder.

  13. Amblyaudia: Review of Pathophysiology, Clinical Presentation, and Treatment of a New Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Alyson B; Kozin, Elliott D; Remenschneider, Aaron; Eftekhari, Kian; Jung, David H; Polley, Daniel B; Lee, Daniel J

    2016-02-01

    Similar to amblyopia in the visual system, "amblyaudia" is a term used to describe persistent hearing difficulty experienced by individuals with a history of asymmetric hearing loss (AHL) during a critical window of brain development. Few clinical reports have described this phenomenon and its consequent effects on central auditory processing. We aim to (1) define the concept of amblyaudia and (2) review contemporary research on its pathophysiology and emerging clinical relevance. PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane databases. A systematic literature search was performed with combinations of search terms: "amblyaudia," "conductive hearing loss," "sensorineural hearing loss," "asymmetric," "pediatric," "auditory deprivation," and "auditory development." Relevant articles were considered for inclusion, including basic and clinical studies, case series, and major reviews. During critical periods of infant brain development, imbalanced auditory input associated with AHL may lead to abnormalities in binaural processing. Patients with amblyaudia can demonstrate long-term deficits in auditory perception even with correction or resolution of AHL. The greatest impact is in sound localization and hearing in noisy environments, both of which rely on bilateral auditory cues. Diagnosis and quantification of amblyaudia remain controversial and poorly defined. Prevention of amblyaudia may be possible through early identification and timely management of reversible causes of AHL. Otolaryngologists, audiologists, and pediatricians should be aware of emerging data supporting amblyaudia as a diagnostic entity and be cognizant of the potential for lasting consequences of AHL. Prevention of long-term auditory deficits may be possible through rapid identification and correction. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  14. PATHOPHYSIOLOGY, DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENTOF DUMPING SYNDROME AND ITS RELATION TO BARIATRIC SURGERY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Yasmin da Silva; Destefani, Afrânio Côgo

    The dumping syndrome is frequent in bariatric surgery. It is probably the most common syndrome following partial or complete gastrectomy. Its prevalence in partial gastrectomy can reach up to 50%, thus it can be a significant complication arising from some types of bariatric surgeries. Critical analysis on dumping syndrome, its pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment. A literature review was performed using the key words: 'dumping syndrome', 'bariatric surgery' and 'rapid dumping syndrome'. Inclusion criteria were: books, original works, case reports and meta-analyzes, and the exclusion criterion was literature review. Concerning the publication time, articles were screened between 1960 and May 2015. The dumping syndrome is complication arising from obesity surgeries, but also can be a result of vagus nerve damage. Diagnosis is done primarily through the use of questionnaires based on scores. The Sigstad score and Arts survey are valid means for assessing the dumping syndrome. Initial therapy consists in the adoption of dietary measures, short acting drugs administration. A síndrome de dumping é frequente após operações bariátricas. É, provavelmente, a mais comum das síndromes que sucedem gastrectomias parciais ou completas. Sua prevalência, em gastrectomias parciais pode chegar a até 50%, tornando-se assim complicação significante em alguns tipos de operações bariátricas. Realizar análise crítica sobre a síndrome de dumping em sua fisiopatologia, diagnóstico e tratamento. Foi realizada revisão bibliográfica utilizando os descritores: 'síndrome de dumping', 'cirurgia bariátrica' e 'síndrome do esvaziamento rápido'. Os critérios de inclusão foram: livros, trabalhos originais, relatos de caso e metanálises; excluíram-se as revisões bibliográficas. Quanto ao tempo de publicação, foram selecionados artigos entre 1960 e maio de 2015. A síndrome de dumping é complicação gastrointestinal oriunda de operações para obesidade, mas tamb

  15. Narcolepsy: etiology, clinical features, diagnosis and treatment

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    Jolanta B. Zawilska

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available [u][/u] Narcolepsy is a chronic hypersomnia characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS and manifestations of disrupted rapid eye movement sleep stage (cataplexy, sleep paralysis, and hypnagogic/hypnopompic hallucinations. Mechanisms underlying narcolepsy are not fully understood. Experimental data indicate that the disease is caused by a loss of hypocretin neurons in the hypothalamus, likely due to an autoimmune process triggered by environmental factors in susceptible individuals. Most patients with narcolepsy and cataplexy have very low hypocretin-1 levels in the cerebrospinal fluid. An appropriate clinical history, polysomnogram, and multiple sleep latency test are necessary for diagnosis of the disease. Additionally, two biological markers, i.e., cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin-1 levels and expression of the DQB1*0602 gene, are used. The treatment of narcolepsy is aimed at the different symptoms that the patient manifests. Excessive daytime sleepiness is treated with psychostimulants (amphetamine-like, modafinil and armodafinil. Cataplexy is treated with sodium oxybate (GHB, tricyclic antidepressants, or selective serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors. Sleep paralysis, hallucinations, and fragmented sleep may be treated with sodium oxybate. Patients with narcolepsy should follow proper sleep hygiene and avoid strong emotions.

  16. Parasomnias: Diagnosis, Classification and Clinical Features

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    Fatma Ozlem Orhan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Parasomnias, as described in the recent second edition of the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, are “undesirable physical events or experiences” occurring during sleep transition, during arousal from sleep, or within the sleep period. These events encompass abnormal sleep related movements, behaviors, emotions, perceptions, dreaming, and autonomic nervous system functioning. Parasomnias are classified as: 1 disorders of arousal (from non-rapid eye movement, or NREM, sleep; 2 parasomnias usually associated with REM (rapid eye movement sleep; and 3 other parasomnias. This sleep disorders in childhood are common, and often more frequent than in adults. Clinicians should be aware that many pediatric parasomnias have benign and self-limited nature. Most of the parasomnias may not persist into late childhood or adolescence. Parasomnias in adults often differ in type from childhood parasomnias and may portend significant psychiatric disturbances or neurodegenerative disorders. A reliable diagnosis can often be made from a detailed history from the patient and, if possible, the parents or bed partner. Detailed overnight investigations of parasomnias are usually not required. The non-REM parasomnias are more common in community although REM parasomnias are more likely to be seen in general neurological practice. Sleep related eating disorder, sleep related dissociative disorders and sleep related sexual behavior and sleep related violence are novel and rarely reported sleep disorders. REM sleep behavior disorder is common and should be sought in all neurodegenerative diseases. They are included among clinical disorders due to the resulting injuries, and adverse health and psychosocial effects, which may affect the bed partner as well as the patient. Finally, parasomnias are common disturbances of sleep that may significantly affect the patient’s quality of life and that of the bed partner. Therefore, appropriate diagnostic and

  17. School Refusal: Clinical Features, Diagnosis and Treatment

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    Kayhan Bahali

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Children regularly and voluntarily go to school in order to fulfill the expectations of society from them to continue their education or schooling. School continuation has been made compulsory by laws. Nonetheless, contrary to popular belief, for some children it is distressing to go to school. These children have difficulty continuing school and/or refuse to go to school. Today school refusal is defined as a child’s inability to continue school for reasons, such as anxiety and depression. The prevalence of school refusal has been reported to be approximately 1% in school-age children and 5% in child psychiatry samples. The prevalence of school refusal is similar among boys and girls. School refusal can occur at any time throughout the child’s academic life and at all socio-economic levels. School refusal is considered a symptom rather than a clinical diagnosis and can manifest itself as a sign of many psychiatric disorders, with anxiety disorders predominant. Separation anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, specific phobia, and adjustment disorder with anxiety symptoms are the most common disorders co-occurring with school refusal. While separation anxiety disorder is associated with school refusal in younger children, other anxiety disorders, especially phobias, are associated with school refusal in adolescents. Children who have parents with psychiatric disorders have a higher incidence of school refusal, and psychiatric disorders are more frequently seen in adult relatives of children with school refusal, which supports a significant role of genetic and environmental factors in th etiology of school refusal. School refusal is a emergency state for child mental health. As it leads to detrimental effects in the short term and the long term, it should be regarded as a serious problem. The long-lasting follow-up studies of school refusing children have revealed that these children have a higher incidence of

  18. Interarterial course of anomalous right coronary artery: Pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment

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    George Renchao Wu, BS

    2017-12-01

    A timely diagnosis of an anomalous coronary artery is critical in symptomatic patients because of the risk of sudden cardiac death, especially in patients with arteries with an interarterial course. This case demonstrates the importance of making the correct diagnosis, as appropriate surgical management can drastically improve outcomes.

  19. Clinical features and pathophysiology of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome – current state of the art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinus, Johan; Moseley, G. Lorimer; Birklein, Frank; Baron, Ralf; Maihöfner, Christian; Kingery, Wade S.; van Hilten, Jacobus J.

    2017-01-01

    That a minor injury can trigger a complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) - multiple system dysfunction, severe and often chronic pain and disability - has fascinated scientists and perplexed clinicians for decades. However, substantial advances across several medical disciplines have recently increased our understanding of CRPS. Compelling evidence implicates biological pathways that underlie aberrant inflammation, vasomotor dysfunction, and maladaptive neuroplasticity in the clinical features of CRPS. Collectively, the evidence points to CRPS being a multifactorial disorder that is associated with an aberrant host response to tissue injury. Varying susceptibility to perturbed regulation of any of the underlying biological pathways probably accounts for the clinical heterogeneity of CRPS. PMID:21683929

  20. Headache attributed to airplane travel: diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment - a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Sebastian Bao Dinh; Gazerani, Parisa

    2017-08-16

    Headache attributed to airplane travel, also named "airplane headache" (AH) is a headache that occurs during take-off and landing. Today, there are still uncertainties about the pathophysiology and treatment of AH. This systematic review was performed to facilitate identification of the existing literature on AH in order to discuss the current evidence and areas that remain to be investigated in AH. The systematic literature search was performed in 3 relevant medical databases; PubMed, Scopus, and Embase. The search yielded 220 papers and the papers were sorted based on inclusion and exclusion criteria established for this study. This systematic review included 39 papers. Main findings revealed that AH attacks are clinically stereotyped and appear mostly during landing phases. The headache presents as a severe painful headache that often disappears within 30 min. The pain is unilateral and localized in the fronto-orbital region. Sinus barotrauma has been considered as the main cause of AH. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and triptans have been taken by passengers with AH, to relieve the headache. Based on this systematic review, further studies seem required to investigate underlying mechanisms in AH and also to investigate the biological effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and triptans for alleviating of AH. These studies would advance our understanding of AH pathogenesis and potential use of treatments that are not yet established.

  1. Foreign Body Granulomas after the Use of Dermal Fillers: Pathophysiology, Clinical Appearance, Histologic Features, and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Min Lee

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A foreign body granuloma is a non-allergic chronic inflammatory reaction that is mainly composed of multinucleated giant cells. Foreign body granulomas may occur after the administration of any dermal filler. Factors such as the volume of the injection, impurities present in the fillers, and the physical properties of fillers affect granuloma formation. The formation of granulomas involves five phases: protein adsorption, macrophage adhesion, macrophage fusion, and crosstalk. The clinical and pathologic features of granulomas vary depending on the type of filler that causes them. Foreign body granulomas can be treated effectively with intralesional corticosteroid injections. Surgical excisions of granulomas tend to be incomplete because granulomas have ill-defined borders and moreover, surgical excisions may leave scars and deformities.

  2. Acetazolamide in cerebral diagnosis: Physiological and pathophysiological aspects. Acetazolamid in der zerebrovaskulaeren Diagnostik: Physiologische und pathophysiologische Aspekte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerch, H.; Franke, W.G.; Templin, A. (Medizinische Akademie ' Carl Gustav Carus' , Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Dresden (Germany) Medizinische Akademie ' Carl Gustav Carus' , Klinik fuer Psychiatrie und Neurologie, Abt. Neurologie, Dresden (Germany))

    1990-01-01

    The sensitivity in the diagnosis of cerebrovascular diseases using radiotracers can be enhanced by the use of the acetazolamide test. In this paper we present and discuss some physiological and pathophysiological aspects of its mechanism. The physiological action of the carboanhydrase inhibitor is like the action of enhanced pCO{sub 2} in the tissue, thus acting at the site of metabolic regulation. The reaction of the vascular bed is influenced in part by subcortical structures. Pathologically the reaction can be disturbed at first by an altered regulation with the vessels being mechanically intact, e.g. in hypoxia or transient ischemia. Secondly, the mechanics of the vessels may be not intact e.g., in atherosclerosis or surrounding edema. Lastly, the vessels have already dilated, e.g. poststenotically. All these facts have to be taken into consideration interpreting an acetazolamid test. (orig.).

  3. Pathophysiological Features of Endogenous Intoxication in Pregnant Women with Arterial Hypertension

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    N. V. Kabanova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to determine the nature and specific features of development of endogenous intoxication in pregnant women with arterial hypertension. Subjects and materials. Humoral extracellular fluid volume regulation, partial renal functions, placental hormonal function, membranous lipid peroxidation activity, antiradical defense, the parameters of central hemodynamics, endogenous intoxication, and a biochemical coagulogram were studied and differential blood count with the leukocytic ratio indices was estimated in 172 pregnant females with arterial hypertension and 54 healthy pregnant ones in the third trimester. The statistical package «Stadia» was applied. Results. Arterial hypertension caused by pregnancy was ascertained to involve pathogenetically different types: low-, normal-, and high-renin ones. In pregnant women with arterial hypertension, the general pathogenetic homeostatic changes were placental hormonal imbalance, activated membranous lipid peroxidation, impaired lymph outflow, sodium and water retention, hepatic and renal failure, and endogenous intoxication. Conclusion. Placental ischemia appearing as placental hormonal imbalance (extrarenal pressor system was accompanied by a compensatory humoral response: arterial hypertension and metabolic disturbances. Changes in medium-weight molecule 280, leukocytic intoxication index, erythrocytic sorption capacity, and Paramecium test, by confirming the presence of endogenous intoxication in pregnant females with arterial hypertension, were caused by a type of arterial hypertension (by the hemodynamic profile and the type of impaired partial renal functions. Key words: pregnancy, arterial hypertension, endogenous intoxication.

  4. Feline hyperparathyroidism: pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of primary and secondary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Valerie J; Gilor, Chen; Chew, Dennis J

    2015-05-01

    Hyperparathyroidism exists in primary and secondary forms. Primary hyperparathyroidism has typically been considered a disease that uncommonly affects cats, but this condition is more prevalent than previous diagnoses would suggest. Secondary hyperparathyroidism may be caused by either nutritional influences (ie, nutritional secondary hyperparathyroidism) or chronic kidney disease (ie, renal secondary hyperparathyroidism). Tertiary hyperparathyroidism has yet to be documented in veterinary medicine, but it is possible that this condition occurs in some cats following longstanding renal secondary hyperparathyroidism. Diagnosis of this group of calcium metabolic disorders presents a number of challenges for the clinician. For example, clinical signs can be non-specific and, especially in the case of primary hyperparathyroidism, there is often a low index of suspicion for the disease; careful sample handling is required for testing of parathyroid hormone (PTH) and ionized calcium levels; and there is currently no feline-specific assay for PTH, which has implications for test sensitivity and interpretation of results. This article briefly outlines PTH and calcium physiology by way of introduction to a review of PTH measurement and interpretation. Various forms of feline hyperparathyroidism are then described, encompassing diagnosis and treatment options. © ISFM and AAFP 2015.

  5. Lymphomas of the gastro-intestinal tract - Pathophysiology, pathology, and differential diagnosis

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    Diana M Cardona

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal tract (GIT is the most commonly involved site of extranodal lymphomas. The close association between chronic inflammation and specific GIT lymphomas not only provide interesting insights into the pathobiology of lymphomas but also poses unique diagnostic challenges. A clear understanding of marginal zone and mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT in health and disease is helpful to place GIT lymphomas in proper context. A wide variety of lymphomas besides MALT lymphomas occur in various parts of the GIT. The characteristic pathological, immunophenotypic, and genetic features of different GIT lymphomas categorized according to World Health Organization (WHO classification are presented. The epidemiological, clinical, and pathological features of lymphomas occurring in each part of the GIT are summarized and the key points regarding lymphomas at each site are emphasized. A tabular summary of the important differential diagnostic considerations at each site is given and suggestions for a minimal diagnostic work up are provided.

  6. Texture Feature Extraction and Classification for Iris Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lin; Li, Naimin

    Appling computer aided techniques in iris image processing, and combining occidental iridology with the traditional Chinese medicine is a challenging research area in digital image processing and artificial intelligence. This paper proposes an iridology model that consists the iris image pre-processing, texture feature analysis and disease classification. To the pre-processing, a 2-step iris localization approach is proposed; a 2-D Gabor filter based texture analysis and a texture fractal dimension estimation method are proposed for pathological feature extraction; and at last support vector machines are constructed to recognize 2 typical diseases such as the alimentary canal disease and the nerve system disease. Experimental results show that the proposed iridology diagnosis model is quite effective and promising for medical diagnosis and health surveillance for both hospital and public use.

  7. Combining morphometric features and convolutional networks fusion for glaucoma diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdomo, Oscar; Arevalo, John; González, Fabio A.

    2017-11-01

    Glaucoma is an eye condition that leads to loss of vision and blindness. Ophthalmoscopy exam evaluates the shape, color and proportion between the optic disc and physiologic cup, but the lack of agreement among experts is still the main diagnosis problem. The application of deep convolutional neural networks combined with automatic extraction of features such as: the cup-to-disc distance in the four quadrants, the perimeter, area, eccentricity, the major radio, the minor radio in optic disc and cup, in addition to all the ratios among the previous parameters may help with a better automatic grading of glaucoma. This paper presents a strategy to merge morphological features and deep convolutional neural networks as a novel methodology to support the glaucoma diagnosis in eye fundus images.

  8. Influence of Familiar Features on Diagnosis: Instantiated Features in an Applied Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dore, Kelly L.; Brooks, Lee R.; Weaver, Bruce; Norman, Geoffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    Medical diagnosis can be viewed as a categorization task. There are two mechanisms whereby humans make categorical judgments: "analytical reasoning," based on explicit consideration of features and "nonanalytical reasoning," an unconscious holistic process of matching against prior exemplars. However, there is evidence that prior experience can…

  9. Autistic spectrum disorders: A review of clinical features, theories and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhoury, Marc

    2015-06-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a set of neurodevelopmental disorders that is among the most severe in terms of prevalence, morbidity and impact to the society. It is characterized by complex behavioral phenotype and deficits in both social and cognitive functions. Although the exact cause of ASD is still not known, the main findings emphasize the role of genetic and environmental factors in the development of autistic behavior. Environmental factors are also likely to interact with the genetic profile and cause aberrant changes in brain growth, neuronal development, and functional connectivity. The past few years have seen an increase in the prevalence of ASD, as a result of enhanced clinical tests and diagnostic tools. Despite growing evidence for the involvement of endogenous biomarkers in the pathophysiology of ASD, early detection of this disorder remains a big challenge. This paper describes the main behavioral and cognitive features of ASD, as well as the symptoms that differentiate autism from other developmental disorders. An attempt will be made to integrate all the available evidence which point to reduced brain connectivity, mirror neurons deficits, and inhibition-excitation imbalance in individuals with ASD. Finally, this review discusses the main factors involved in the pathophysiology of ASD, and illustrates some of the most important markers used for the diagnosis of this debilitating disorder. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Pathophysiology of Venous Thromboembolism with Respect to the Anatomical Features of the Deep Veins of Lower Limbs: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ro, Ayako; Kageyama, Norimasa; Mukai, Toshiji

    2017-06-25

    Here the pathophysiology of venous thromboembolism is reviewed with respect to the anatomical features of the deep veins of lower limbs. A thrombus is less likely to form in the thigh veins compared with that in the calf veins; however, clinical symptoms are more likely to appear in the thigh veins owing to vascular occlusion. When a patient is bedridden, thrombosis is more likely to occur in the intramuscular vein, which mainly depends on muscular pumping and the venous valve, rather than in the three crural branches, which mainly depends on the pulsation of the accompanying artery. Thrombi are prone to be generated in the soleal vein compared with those in the gastrocnemius vein because of the vein and muscle structures. A soleal vein thrombosis grows toward the proximal veins along the drainage veins. To prevent a sudden pulmonary thromboembolism-related death in bedridden patients, preventing soleal vein thrombus formation and observing the thrombus proximal propagation via the drainage veins are clinically important. When deep vein thrombosis occurs, avoiding embolization and sequela caused by the thrombus organization is necessary.

  11. Medico legal and de ontological features of breast diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, J. A.; Lopez, M. C.

    2001-01-01

    A medical and legal review of the literature in regards to the medico legal and de ontological features involved in Imaging Diagnosis of the breast was performed in order to elaborate a series of preventive measures to prevent or reduce the demands on the radiologist. Basically, the contents of the Spanish Medical De ontology Code as well the rules and laws in force in our country have been considered, both from the medical professional point of view as well as from that of the law professional. As a result of the review carried out, a series of preventive measures aimed at reducing the incidence of possible lawsuits against the radiologist who works in breast imaging diagnosis are proposed. The radiologist is regularly involved in lawsuits, especially related with the delay in the diagnosis of breast cancer. In the United States of America and Italy. he(she is the professional who receives the greatest number of lawsuits, being ahead of the gynecologist. The radiologist occupies and important place in the diagnosis of breast cancer, which converts him/her into the object of possible lawsuits. Within these, deadly in the diagnosis of cancer caused by several situations are included: these being, principally, non-detection by mammography, not using the complementary studies and not carrying out an integrated reading of the triad or binomial diagnosis. In some cases, these situations are favored by lack of experience (incompetence) of the radiologists as well as by lack of information from the patient. In order to avoid possible lawsuits, the most important preventive measures are: a) inform the patient; b) be competent in the material: c) follow an action Protocol according to the l ex artis: d) in the case of being staff, comply with the guidelines of Quality Control: e) elaborate clear and concise written reports, maintaining, if relevant, the limitations of the procedures used and suggestions for the professional clinician. (Author) 27 refs

  12. Noonan syndrome: clinical features, diagnosis, and management guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Alicia A; Allanson, Judith E; Dahlgren, Jovanna; Gelb, Bruce D; Hall, Bryan; Pierpont, Mary Ella; Roberts, Amy E; Robinson, Wanda; Takemoto, Clifford M; Noonan, Jacqueline A

    2010-10-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is a common, clinically and genetically heterogeneous condition characterized by distinctive facial features, short stature, chest deformity, congenital heart disease, and other comorbidities. Gene mutations identified in individuals with the NS phenotype are involved in the Ras/MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) signal transduction pathway and currently explain ∼61% of NS cases. Thus, NS frequently remains a clinical diagnosis. Because of the variability in presentation and the need for multidisciplinary care, it is essential that the condition be identified and managed comprehensively. The Noonan Syndrome Support Group (NSSG) is a nonprofit organization committed to providing support, current information, and understanding to those affected by NS. The NSSG convened a conference of health care providers, all involved in various aspects of NS, to develop these guidelines for use by pediatricians in the diagnosis and management of individuals with NS and to provide updated genetic findings.

  13. Fault diagnosis of rotating machine by isometric feature mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yun; Li, Benwei; Wang, Lin; Wang, Wen; Wang, Zibin

    2013-01-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminate analysis (LDA) are well-known linear dimensionality reductions for fault classification. However, since they are linear methods, they perform not well for high-dimensional data that has the nonlinear geometric structure. As kernel extension of PCA, Kernel PCA is used for nonlinear fault classification. However, the performance of Kernel PCA largely depends on its kernel function which can only be empirically selected from finite candidates. Thus, a novel rotating machine fault diagnosis approach based on geometrically motivated nonlinear dimensionality reduction named isometric feature mapping (Isomap) is proposed. The approach can effectively extract the intrinsic nonlinear manifold features embedded in high-dimensional fault data sets. Experimental results with rotor and rolling bearing data show that the proposed approach overcomes the flaw of conventional fault pattern recognition approaches and obviously improves the fault classification performance.

  14. Fault Features Extraction and Identification based Rolling Bearing Fault Diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, B; Sun, G D; Zhang L Y; Wang J G; HU, J

    2017-01-01

    For the fault classification model based on extreme learning machine (ELM), the diagnosis accuracy and stability of rolling bearing is greatly influenced by a critical parameter, which is the number of nodes in hidden layer of ELM. An adaptive adjustment strategy is proposed based on vibrational mode decomposition, permutation entropy, and nuclear kernel extreme learning machine to determine the tunable parameter. First, the vibration signals are measured and then decomposed into different fault feature models based on variation mode decomposition. Then, fault feature of each model is formed to a high dimensional feature vector set based on permutation entropy. Second, the ELM output function is expressed by the inner product of Gauss kernel function to adaptively determine the number of hidden layer nodes. Finally, the high dimension feature vector set is used as the input to establish the kernel ELM rolling bearing fault classification model, and the classification and identification of different fault states of rolling bearings are carried out. In comparison with the fault classification methods based on support vector machine and ELM, the experimental results show that the proposed method has higher classification accuracy and better generalization ability. (paper)

  15. Iris features-based heart disease diagnosis by computer vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguchu, Benedictor A.; Li, Li

    2017-07-01

    The study takes advantage of several new breakthroughs in computer vision technology to develop a new mid-irisbiomedical platform that processes iris image for early detection of heart-disease. Guaranteeing early detection of heart disease provides a possibility of having non-surgical treatment as suggested by biomedical researchers and associated institutions. However, our observation discovered that, a clinical practicable solution which could be both sensible and specific for early detection is still lacking. Due to this, the rate of majority vulnerable to death is highly increasing. The delayed diagnostic procedures, inefficiency, and complications of available methods are the other reasons for this catastrophe. Therefore, this research proposes the novel IFB (Iris Features Based) method for diagnosis of premature, and early stage heart disease. The method incorporates computer vision and iridology to obtain a robust, non-contact, nonradioactive, and cost-effective diagnostic tool. The method analyzes abnormal inherent weakness in tissues, change in color and patterns, of a specific region of iris that responds to impulses of heart organ as per Bernard Jensen-iris Chart. The changes in iris infer the presence of degenerative abnormalities in heart organ. These changes are precisely detected and analyzed by IFB method that includes, tensor-based-gradient(TBG), multi orientations gabor filters(GF), textural oriented features(TOF), and speed-up robust features(SURF). Kernel and Multi class oriented support vector machines classifiers are used for classifying normal and pathological iris features. Experimental results demonstrated that the proposed method, not only has better diagnostic performance, but also provides an insight for early detection of other diseases.

  16. Primary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: computed tomography features at diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berteloot, Laureline; Emond-Gonsard, Sophie; Mamou-Mani, Tania; Lambot, Karen; Grevent, David; Taam, Rola Abou; Le Bourgeois, Muriel; Elie, Caroline; Delacourt, Christophe; Blic, Jacques de; Brunelle, Francis

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is characterized by an abnormal accumulation of periodic acid-schiff-positive lipoproteinaceous material in the alveoli. Early diagnosis allows setting up of therapeutic lung lavages, which reduces the need for oxygen supplementation and weight gain. To provide a description of radiological features by CT at the onset of primary PAP in children. The clinical and radiological data of 24 patients, including 16 boys and 8 girls (median age: 12 months), diagnosed with a primary form of PAP between April 1992 and May 2012 in a tertiary referral hospital, were retrospectively reviewed. CT images were examined for the presence of alveolar and interstitial elementary lesions. Correlation between clinical and radiological findings was assessed. The types of elementary lesions detected were: ground-glass opacities (n = 24), intralobular lines (n = 24), thickened interlobular septa (n = 22), thickened fissures (n = 21), airspace consolidation (n = 16), hyperinflation (n = 16), cystic lesions (n = 2) and micronodules (n = 1). A crazy-paving pattern was found in 92% of cases. Consolidation and hyperinflation were especially detected in younger children (median age, 8 months, P < 0.01). A density dependent gradient was found. The distribution of the lesions was symmetrical. There was no correlation between radiological and clinical data of severity of the disease. CT findings are suggestive of diagnosis of PAP in immunocompetent children with chronic respiratory failure. (orig.)

  17. Primary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: computed tomography features at diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berteloot, Laureline; Emond-Gonsard, Sophie; Mamou-Mani, Tania; Lambot, Karen; Grevent, David [Hopital Necker Enfants-Malades, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Paris (France); Taam, Rola Abou; Le Bourgeois, Muriel [Hopital Necker Enfants-Malades, Department of Pediatric Pneumology and Allergology, Paris (France); Elie, Caroline [Hopital Necker Enfants-Malades, Department of Biostatistics, Paris (France); Paris Descartes University, Paris (France); Delacourt, Christophe; Blic, Jacques de [Hopital Necker Enfants-Malades, Department of Pediatric Pneumology and Allergology, Paris (France); Paris Descartes University, Paris (France); Brunelle, Francis [Hopital Necker Enfants-Malades, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Paris (France); Paris Descartes University, Paris (France)

    2014-07-15

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is characterized by an abnormal accumulation of periodic acid-schiff-positive lipoproteinaceous material in the alveoli. Early diagnosis allows setting up of therapeutic lung lavages, which reduces the need for oxygen supplementation and weight gain. To provide a description of radiological features by CT at the onset of primary PAP in children. The clinical and radiological data of 24 patients, including 16 boys and 8 girls (median age: 12 months), diagnosed with a primary form of PAP between April 1992 and May 2012 in a tertiary referral hospital, were retrospectively reviewed. CT images were examined for the presence of alveolar and interstitial elementary lesions. Correlation between clinical and radiological findings was assessed. The types of elementary lesions detected were: ground-glass opacities (n = 24), intralobular lines (n = 24), thickened interlobular septa (n = 22), thickened fissures (n = 21), airspace consolidation (n = 16), hyperinflation (n = 16), cystic lesions (n = 2) and micronodules (n = 1). A crazy-paving pattern was found in 92% of cases. Consolidation and hyperinflation were especially detected in younger children (median age, 8 months, P < 0.01). A density dependent gradient was found. The distribution of the lesions was symmetrical. There was no correlation between radiological and clinical data of severity of the disease. CT findings are suggestive of diagnosis of PAP in immunocompetent children with chronic respiratory failure. (orig.)

  18. Pathophysiology and diagnosis of hibernating myocardium in patients with post-ischemic heart failure. The contribution of PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camici, P.G.; Rimoldi, O.E.

    2003-01-01

    Identification and treatment of hibernating myocardium (HM) lead to improvement in left ventricular (LV) function and prognosis in patients with post-ischemic heart failure. Different techniques are used to diagnose HM: echocardiography, MRI, SPECT and PET and, in patients with moderate LV impairment, their predictive values are similar. There are few data on patients with severe LV dysfunction and heart failure in whom the greatest benefits are apparent after revascularization. Quantification of FDG uptake with PET during hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp is accurate in these patients with the greatest mortality risk in whom other techniques may give high false negative rates. The debate on whether resting myocardial blood flow to HM is reduced or not has stimulated new research on heart failure in patients with coronary artery disease. PET with H 2 15 O or 13 NH 3 has been used for the absolute quantification of regional blood flow in human HM. When HM is properly identified, resting blood flow is not different from that in healthy volunteers although a reduction of ∼20% can be demonstrated in a minority of cases. PET studies have shown that the main feature of HM is a severe impairment of coronary vasodilator reserve that improves after revascularization in parallel with LV function. Thus, the pathophysiology of HM is more complex than initially postulated. The recent evidence that repetitive ischemia in patients can be cumulative and lead to more severe and prolonged stunning, lends further support to the hypothesis that, at least initially, stunning and HM are two facets of the same coin. (author)

  19. Clinical features, diagnosis and treatment of spinal injuries in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorokovikov V.A.

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Spine injuries in children are of great social significance. Currently, the incidence of spinal cord injuries in children has increased; this is due to the use of modern imaging devices (digital X-ray examination, CT, MRI at the prehospital and hospital stages. For children, compression fractures of the vertebral body, which are associated with serious injuries to the musculoskeletal system, are more characteristic. Compression fractures of vertebral bodies (1–2 % with improper treatment can lead to aseptic necrosis of the vertebra, kyphoscoliosis and other pathological conditions, which often results in disability. When X-ray diagnosis of fractures of transverse and spinous processes, one should consider additional ossification points, which can be mistaken for fractures. Also, differential diagnosis should take into account congenital wedge vertebrae and other abnormalities of vertebral development, which can be mistaken for fractures. The publication presents the results of a comprehensive examination and treatment of 85 children with spine trauma. The age of the examined was from 3 months to 16 years. In 20 cases, we detected compression fractures of the spine at different levels (cervical – 1, upper-thoracic – 4, medium-thoracic – 10, lower-thoracic – 2, lumbar – 3. In 25 cases, a rotational subluxation of the C I vertebra was diagnosed, in 3 – a traumatic rupture of the intervertebral disc, in 29 – a fracture of the coccyx. Complicated injuries of the spine accompanied by lesions of the spinal cord and roots were noted in 7 patients. Given the anatomical and physiological features of spine injuries in children, conservative methods of treatment were predominantly used.

  20. Infective endocarditis: the specific features of its course, the criteria for diagnosis, differential diagnosis (part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B S Belov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Infective endocarditis (IE is today characterized by polyetiology due to a wide range of pathogens. The paper describes the specific features of the clinical picture of the disease in relation to the etiological agent, which have, in some cases, a crucial role in the choice of empiric antibiotic therapy. Significant clinical polymorphism, obscure symptoms, and monosyndromic onset as guises all enhance the importance of the differential diagnosis of IE, at its early stages in particular. Basic approaches to differentiating IE from the diseases in which differentially diagnostic problems arise to the utmost are outlined.

  1. Role of hepcidin-ferroportin axis in the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of anemia of chronic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Arielle L; Ginzburg, Yelena Z

    2017-06-01

    Anemia of chronic inflammation (ACI) is a frequently diagnosed anemia and portends an independently increased morbidity and poor outcome associated with multiple underlying diseases. The pathophysiology of ACI is multifactorial, resulting from the effects of inflammatory cytokines which both directly and indirectly suppress erythropoiesis. Recent advances in molecular understanding of iron metabolism provide strong evidence that immune mediators, such as IL-6, lead to hepcidin-induced hypoferremia, iron sequestration, and decreased iron availability for erythropoiesis. The role of hepcidin-ferroportin axis in the pathophysiology of ACI is stimulating the development of new diagnostics and targeted therapies. In this review, we present an overview of and rationale for inflammation-, iron-, and erythropoiesis-related strategies currently in development. © 2017 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  2. Powerful functional imaging of respiratory nuclear medicine. Is CT imaging alone really sufficient for diagnosis and pathophysiologic assessment of lung diseases?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suga, Kazuyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Ventilation (V)-perfusion (Q) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) provides important information of functional impairment in various lung diseases, and often sensitively detects CT-undetectable lesions. V·Q SPECT also provides objective and quantitative assessment of severity of lung functional impairment. Functional-morphological correlation on V·Q SPECT-CT fusion images further facilitates these advantages of V·Q SPECT. This article describes clinical feasibility of V·Q SPECT in functional assessment and diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, pulmonary embolism, pulmonary hypertension, interstitial lung diseases, and lung right-to-left shunt diseases. This article hopefully provides sufficient responses to the crucial query of ''Is CT imaging alone really sufficient for diagnosis and pathophysiological assessment of various lung diseases?'' (author)

  3. A Practical Approach to the Diagnosis and Understanding of Chronic Low Back Pain, Based on Its Pathophysiology.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, Gerbrand; Beese, Ulrich; Van de Kelft, Erik; Groen, Robertus; Van de Kelft, Eric

    2016-01-01

    As outlined abundantly in this book, chronic low back pain is not a diagnosis, but a symptom. Thorough knowledge of the cause and nature of the pain might help when looking for a correct diagnosis. Often, this clinical knowledge is more important with respect to therapeutic strategies than advanced

  4. Wavelet-Based Feature Extraction in Fault Diagnosis for Biquad High-Pass Filter Circuit

    OpenAIRE

    Yuehai Wang; Yongzheng Yan; Qinyong Wang

    2016-01-01

    Fault diagnosis for analog circuit has become a prominent factor in improving the reliability of integrated circuit due to its irreplaceability in modern integrated circuits. In fact fault diagnosis based on intelligent algorithms has become a popular research topic as efficient feature extraction and selection are a critical and intricate task in analog fault diagnosis. Further, it is extremely important to propose some general guidelines for the optimal feature extraction and selection. In ...

  5. Autoimmune Subepidermal Bullous Diseases of the Skin and Mucosae: Clinical Features, Diagnosis, and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amber, Kyle T; Murrell, Dedee F; Schmidt, Enno; Joly, Pascal; Borradori, Luca

    2018-02-01

    and immunoserological assays. Management of affected patients is often challenging. We will here review the clinical and immunopathological features as well as the pathophysiology of this group of organ-specific autoimmune diseases. Finally, we will discuss the diagnostic approach and the principles of management in clinical practice.

  6. A comparative rabies laboratory diagnosis: Peculiar features of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many diagnostic methods have been used to detect rabies virus antigen. The preferred method for routine rabies diagnosis in fresh brain tissue is fluorescent antibody test (FAT). In this study, FAT was used to evaluate the presence of rabies virus antigen in the brain (hippocampus) of fifty apparently healthy dogs. Mouse ...

  7. A Proteomic Approach for the Diagnosis of ‘Oketsu’ (blood stasis, a Pathophysiologic Concept of Japanese Traditional (Kampo Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinami Matsumoto

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available ‘Oketsu’ is a pathophysiologic concept in Japanese traditional (Kampo medicine, primarily denoting blood stasis/stagnant syndrome. Here we have explored plasma protein biomarkers and/or diagnostic algorithms for ‘Oketsu’. Sixteen rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients were treated with keishibukuryogan (KBG, a representative Kampo medicine for improving ‘Oketsu’. Plasma samples were diagnosed as either having an ‘Oketsu’ (n = 19 or ‘non-Oketsu’ (n = 29 state according to Terasawa's ‘Oketsu’ scoring system. Protein profiles were obtained by surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF MS and hierarchical clustering and decision tree analyses were performed. KBG treatment for 4 or 12 weeks decreased the ‘Oketsu’ scores significantly. SELDI protein profiles gave 266 protein peaks, whose expression was significantly different between the ‘Oketsu’ and ‘non-Oketsu’ states. Hierarchical clustering gave three major clusters (I, II, III. The majority (68.4% of ‘Oketsu’ samples were clustered into one cluster as the principal component of cluster I. The remaining ‘Oketsu’ profiles constituted a minor component of cluster II and were all derived from patients cured of the ‘Oketsu’ state at 12 weeks. Construction of the decision tree addressed the possibility of developing a diagnostic algorithm for ‘Oketsu’. A reduction in measurement/pre-processing conditions (from 55 to 16 gave a similar outcome in the clustering and decision tree analyses. The present study suggests that the pathophysiologic concept of Kampo medicine ‘Oketsu’ has a physical basis in terms of the profile of blood proteins. It may be possible to establish a set of objective criteria for diagnosing ‘Oketsu’ using a combination of proteomic and bioinformatics-based classification methods.

  8. Using Comprehensive Feature Lists to Bias Medical Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulatunga-Moruzi, Chan; Brooks, Lee R.; Norman, Geoffrey R.

    2004-01-01

    Clinicians routinely report fewer features in a case than they subsequently agree are present. The authors report studies that assess the effect of considering a more comprehensive description than physicians usually offer. These comprehensive descriptions were generated from photographs of dermatology and internal medicine and were complete and…

  9. Dactylitis in psoriatic arthritis: clinical features, diagnosis, immunopathogenesis, and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Korotaeva

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available When dactylitis is detected in a patient with psoriatic arthritis (PsA, it is necessary to use active treatment as soon as possible, since in the absence of therapy the disease progresses to joint erosion and  functional disorders. The paper considers the clinical signs and  diagnosis of PsA and notes the importance of differential diagnosis in this sign with other joint inflammatory diseases. It points to the  necessity of elaborating common approaches to an objective  assessment of the severity of dactylitis. Its immunopathogenesis and main treatment areas, including the use of biological agents (BAs,  are detailed. There are data of clinical trials that have evaluated the  efficiency of treatment for dactylitis and established that in most  cases, the use of BAs considerably reduce not only the severity of its clinical signs, but also concomitant bone marrow edema. It is noted  that the development of new pathogenetic treatments targeting a number of currently established biologically active molecules that  play an important role in the pathogenesis of dactylitis will enhance  the efficiency of treatment in patients with PsA.

  10. Posterior fossa malformations: main features and limits in prenatal diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garel, Catherine [Hopital d' Enfants Armand-Trousseau, Department of Radiology, Paris (France)

    2010-06-15

    Posterior fossa (PF) malformations are commonly observed during prenatal screening. Their understanding requires knowledge of the main steps of PF development and knowledge of normal patterns in US and MR imaging. The vast majority of PF malformations can be strongly suspected by acquiring a midline sagittal slice and a transverse slice and by systematically scrutinizing the elements of the PF: cerebellar vermis, hemispheres, brainstem, fourth ventricle, PF fluid spaces and tentorium. Analysis of cerebellar echogenicity and biometry is also useful. This review explains how to approach the diagnosis of the main PF malformations by performing these two slices and answering six key questions about the elements of the PF. The main imaging characteristics of PF malformations are also reviewed. (orig.)

  11. Raman spectral feature selection using ant colony optimization for breast cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahzadeh, Omid; Dehghani-Bidgoli, Zohreh; Assarian, Mohammad

    2018-06-04

    Pathology as a common diagnostic test of cancer is an invasive, time-consuming, and partially subjective method. Therefore, optical techniques, especially Raman spectroscopy, have attracted the attention of cancer diagnosis researchers. However, as Raman spectra contain numerous peaks involved in molecular bounds of the sample, finding the best features related to cancerous changes can improve the accuracy of diagnosis in this method. The present research attempted to improve the power of Raman-based cancer diagnosis by finding the best Raman features using the ACO algorithm. In the present research, 49 spectra were measured from normal, benign, and cancerous breast tissue samples using a 785-nm micro-Raman system. After preprocessing for removal of noise and background fluorescence, the intensity of 12 important Raman bands of the biological samples was extracted as features of each spectrum. Then, the ACO algorithm was applied to find the optimum features for diagnosis. As the results demonstrated, by selecting five features, the classification accuracy of the normal, benign, and cancerous groups increased by 14% and reached 87.7%. ACO feature selection can improve the diagnostic accuracy of Raman-based diagnostic models. In the present study, features corresponding to ν(C-C) αhelix proline, valine (910-940), νs(C-C) skeletal lipids (1110-1130), and δ(CH2)/δ(CH3) proteins (1445-1460) were selected as the best features in cancer diagnosis.

  12. New Informative Features for Fault Diagnosis of Industrial Systems by Supervised Classification

    OpenAIRE

    Verron , Sylvain; Tiplica , Teodor; Kobi , Abdessamad

    2009-01-01

    International audience; The purpose of this article is to present a method for industrial process diagnosis. We are interested in fault diagnosis considered as a supervised classication task. The interest of the proposed method is to take into account new features (and so new informations) in the classifier. These new features are probabilities extracted from a Bayesian network comparing the faulty observations to the normal operating conditions. The performances of this method are evaluated ...

  13. Vibration Feature Extraction and Analysis for Fault Diagnosis of Rotating Machinery-A Literature Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Saleem Riaz; Hassan Elahi; Kashif Javaid; Tufail Shahzad

    2017-01-01

    Safety, reliability, efficiency and performance of rotating machinery in all industrial applications are the main concerns. Rotating machines are widely used in various industrial applications. Condition monitoring and fault diagnosis of rotating machinery faults are very important and often complex and labor-intensive. Feature extraction techniques play a vital role for a reliable, effective and efficient feature extraction for the diagnosis of rotating machinery. Therefore, deve...

  14. Clinical features and differential diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Leonidovna Kuraeva

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This review was designed to evaluate prevalence, specific clinical features, and differential diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2 in childrenand adolescents. Special emphasis is laid on the importance of immunological and molecular-genetic studies for the verification of diagnosis and activecase detection in h groups.

  15. Venom ophthalmia caused by venoms of spitting elapid and other snakes: Report of ten cases with review of epidemiology, clinical features, pathophysiology and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Edward R; Weinstein, Scott A; White, Julian; Warrell, David A

    2010-09-01

    Venom ophthalmia caused by venoms of spitting elapid and other snakes: report of ten cases with review of epidemiology, clinical features, pathophysiology and management. Chu, ER, Weinstein, SA, White, J and Warrell, DA. Toxicon XX:xxx-xxx. We present ten cases of ocular injury following instillation into the eye of snake venoms or toxins by spitting elapids and other snakes. The natural history of spitting elapids and the toxinology of their venoms are reviewed together with the medical effects and management of venom ophthalmia in humans and domestic animals including both direct and allergic effects of venoms. Although the clinical features and management of envenoming following bites by spitting elapids (genera Naja and Hemachatus) are well documented, these snakes are also capable of "spraying" venom towards the eyes of predators, a defensive strategy that causes painful and potentially blinding ocular envenoming (venom ophthalmia). Little attention has been given to the detailed clinical description, clinical evolution and efficacy of treatment of venom ophthalmia and no clear management guidelines have been formulated. Knowledge of the pathophysiology of ocular envenoming is based largely on animal studies and a limited body of clinical information. A few cases of ocular exposure to venoms from crotaline viperids have also been described. Venom ophthalmia often presents with pain, hyperemia, blepharitis, blepharospasm and corneal erosions. Delay or lack of treatment may result in corneal opacity, hypopyon and/or blindness. When venom is "spat" into the eye, cranial nerve VII may be affected by local spread of venom but systemic envenoming has not been documented in human patients. Management of venom ophthalmia consists of: 1) urgent decontamination by copious irrigation 2) analgesia by vasoconstrictors with weak mydriatic activity (e.g. epinephrine) and limited topical administration of local anesthetics (e.g. tetracaine) 3) exclusion of corneal abrasions

  16. An Effective Fault Feature Extraction Method for Gas Turbine Generator System Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Hua Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fault diagnosis is very important to maintain the operation of a gas turbine generator system (GTGS in power plants, where any abnormal situations will interrupt the electricity supply. The fault diagnosis of the GTGS faces the main challenge that the acquired data, vibration or sound signals, contain a great deal of redundant information which extends the fault identification time and degrades the diagnostic accuracy. To improve the diagnostic performance in the GTGS, an effective fault feature extraction framework is proposed to solve the problem of the signal disorder and redundant information in the acquired signal. The proposed framework combines feature extraction with a general machine learning method, support vector machine (SVM, to implement an intelligent fault diagnosis. The feature extraction method adopts wavelet packet transform and time-domain statistical features to extract the features of faults from the vibration signal. To further reduce the redundant information in extracted features, kernel principal component analysis is applied in this study. Experimental results indicate that the proposed feature extracted technique is an effective method to extract the useful features of faults, resulting in improvement of the performance of fault diagnosis for the GTGS.

  17. Feature selection using genetic algorithm for breast cancer diagnosis: experiment on three different datasets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalaei, Shokoufeh; Shahraki, Hadi; Rowhanimanesh, Alireza; Eslami, Saeid

    2016-01-01

    This study addresses feature selection for breast cancer diagnosis. The present process uses a wrapper approach using GA-based on feature selection and PS-classifier. The results of experiment show that the proposed model is comparable to the other models on Wisconsin breast cancer datasets. To

  18. Intelligent fault diagnosis of rolling bearing based on kernel neighborhood rough sets and statistical features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiao Ran; Zhang, You Yun; Zhu, Yong Sheng [Xi' an Jiaotong Univ., Xi' an (China)

    2012-09-15

    Intelligent fault diagnosis benefits from efficient feature selection. Neighborhood rough sets are effective in feature selection. However, determining the neighborhood value accurately remains a challenge. The wrapper feature selection algorithm is designed by combining the kernel method and neighborhood rough sets to self-adaptively select sensitive features. The combination effectively solves the shortcomings in selecting the neighborhood value in the previous application process. The statistical features of time and frequency domains are used to describe the characteristic of the rolling bearing to make the intelligent fault diagnosis approach work. Three classification algorithms, namely, classification and regression tree (CART), commercial version 4.5 (C4.5), and radial basis function support vector machines (RBFSVM), are used to test UCI datasets and 10 fault datasets of rolling bearing. The results indicate that the diagnostic approach presented could effectively select the sensitive fault features and simultaneously identify the type and degree of the fault.

  19. Intelligent fault diagnosis of rolling bearing based on kernel neighborhood rough sets and statistical features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Xiao Ran; Zhang, You Yun; Zhu, Yong Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Intelligent fault diagnosis benefits from efficient feature selection. Neighborhood rough sets are effective in feature selection. However, determining the neighborhood value accurately remains a challenge. The wrapper feature selection algorithm is designed by combining the kernel method and neighborhood rough sets to self-adaptively select sensitive features. The combination effectively solves the shortcomings in selecting the neighborhood value in the previous application process. The statistical features of time and frequency domains are used to describe the characteristic of the rolling bearing to make the intelligent fault diagnosis approach work. Three classification algorithms, namely, classification and regression tree (CART), commercial version 4.5 (C4.5), and radial basis function support vector machines (RBFSVM), are used to test UCI datasets and 10 fault datasets of rolling bearing. The results indicate that the diagnostic approach presented could effectively select the sensitive fault features and simultaneously identify the type and degree of the fault

  20. An expert support system for breast cancer diagnosis using color wavelet features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issac Niwas, S; Palanisamy, P; Chibbar, Rajni; Zhang, W J

    2012-10-01

    Breast cancer diagnosis can be done through the pathologic assessments of breast tissue samples such as core needle biopsy technique. The result of analysis on this sample by pathologist is crucial for breast cancer patient. In this paper, nucleus of tissue samples are investigated after decomposition by means of the Log-Gabor wavelet on HSV color domain and an algorithm is developed to compute the color wavelet features. These features are used for breast cancer diagnosis using Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier algorithm. The ability of properly trained SVM is to correctly classify patterns and make them particularly suitable for use in an expert system that aids in the diagnosis of cancer tissue samples. The results are compared with other multivariate classifiers such as Naïves Bayes classifier and Artificial Neural Network. The overall accuracy of the proposed method using SVM classifier will be further useful for automation in cancer diagnosis.

  1. A New Feature Ensemble with a Multistage Classification Scheme for Breast Cancer Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idil Isikli Esener

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A new and effective feature ensemble with a multistage classification is proposed to be implemented in a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD system for breast cancer diagnosis. A publicly available mammogram image dataset collected during the Image Retrieval in Medical Applications (IRMA project is utilized to verify the suggested feature ensemble and multistage classification. In achieving the CAD system, feature extraction is performed on the mammogram region of interest (ROI images which are preprocessed by applying a histogram equalization followed by a nonlocal means filtering. The proposed feature ensemble is formed by concatenating the local configuration pattern-based, statistical, and frequency domain features. The classification process of these features is implemented in three cases: a one-stage study, a two-stage study, and a three-stage study. Eight well-known classifiers are used in all cases of this multistage classification scheme. Additionally, the results of the classifiers that provide the top three performances are combined via a majority voting technique to improve the recognition accuracy on both two- and three-stage studies. A maximum of 85.47%, 88.79%, and 93.52% classification accuracies are attained by the one-, two-, and three-stage studies, respectively. The proposed multistage classification scheme is more effective than the single-stage classification for breast cancer diagnosis.

  2. Application of textural features to the objective diagnosis of Alzheimer-type dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Naoki; Shimada, Tetsuo; Kaeriyama, Tomoharu; Kaneko, Tomoyuki; Fukumoto, Ichiro; Kobayashi, Yoshio

    2003-01-01

    In this study, patients with Alzheimer-type dementia were compared with healthy elderly individuals by means of 13 textural features to evaluate the application of these features to the objective diagnosis of the dementia. A statistically significant difference was found in 8 of the 13 textural features between dementia patients and healthy controls. Discriminant analysis using the eight features demonstrated a sensitivity of 91.2% and a specificity of 86.4%, with an overall accuracy of 89.1%. Multiple discriminant analysis using the eight features by dementia stage showed an overall accuracy of 78.2% for discrimination of four stages. These results indicate that quantitative textural feature measurements can be used as an objective diagnostic technique for Alzheimer-type dementia. (author)

  3. Computer-Aided Diagnosis of Solid Breast Lesions Using an Ultrasonic Multi-Feature Analysis Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    ultrasound. 1. BACKGROUND AND INTRODUCTION Breast cancer affects one of every eight women, it kills one of 29 women in the United States, and is the leading...feature analysis procedure for computer-aided diagnosis of solid breast lesions,” Ultrason Imag, 2010 (In Press). 22. C. B. Shakespeare , personal

  4. Unusual Features of Extraarticular Skeletal Tuberculosis: New Classification and Differential Diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kun Sang; Park, Soo Soung

    1983-01-01

    Twenty two cases of extra articular skeletal tuberculosis which showed unusual radiological features are reported and classified into several categories with discussion on the differential diagnosis. Radiological patterns of skeletal tuberculosis is so variable that with any kind of skeletal changes the possibility of the skeletal tuberculosis should not be excluded between of lack of its classical patterns.

  5. Automatic feature learning using multichannel ROI based on deep structured algorithms for computerized lung cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenqing; Zheng, Bin; Qian, Wei

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to analyze the ability of extracting automatically generated features using deep structured algorithms in lung nodule CT image diagnosis, and compare its performance with traditional computer aided diagnosis (CADx) systems using hand-crafted features. All of the 1018 cases were acquired from Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) public lung cancer database. The nodules were segmented according to four radiologists' markings, and 13,668 samples were generated by rotating every slice of nodule images. Three multichannel ROI based deep structured algorithms were designed and implemented in this study: convolutional neural network (CNN), deep belief network (DBN), and stacked denoising autoencoder (SDAE). For the comparison purpose, we also implemented a CADx system using hand-crafted features including density features, texture features and morphological features. The performance of every scheme was evaluated by using a 10-fold cross-validation method and an assessment index of the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). The observed highest area under the curve (AUC) was 0.899±0.018 achieved by CNN, which was significantly higher than traditional CADx with the AUC=0.848±0.026. The results from DBN was also slightly higher than CADx, while SDAE was slightly lower. By visualizing the automatic generated features, we found some meaningful detectors like curvy stroke detectors from deep structured schemes. The study results showed the deep structured algorithms with automatically generated features can achieve desirable performance in lung nodule diagnosis. With well-tuned parameters and large enough dataset, the deep learning algorithms can have better performance than current popular CADx. We believe the deep learning algorithms with similar data preprocessing procedure can be used in other medical image analysis areas as well. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. A hybrid fault diagnosis approach based on mixed-domain state features for rotating machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xiaoming; Zhou, Jianzhong

    2017-01-01

    To make further improvement in the diagnosis accuracy and efficiency, a mixed-domain state features data based hybrid fault diagnosis approach, which systematically blends both the statistical analysis approach and the artificial intelligence technology, is proposed in this work for rolling element bearings. For simplifying the fault diagnosis problems, the execution of the proposed method is divided into three steps, i.e., fault preliminary detection, fault type recognition and fault degree identification. In the first step, a preliminary judgment about the health status of the equipment can be evaluated by the statistical analysis method based on the permutation entropy theory. If fault exists, the following two processes based on the artificial intelligence approach are performed to further recognize the fault type and then identify the fault degree. For the two subsequent steps, mixed-domain state features containing time-domain, frequency-domain and multi-scale features are extracted to represent the fault peculiarity under different working conditions. As a powerful time-frequency analysis method, the fast EEMD method was employed to obtain multi-scale features. Furthermore, due to the information redundancy and the submergence of original feature space, a novel manifold learning method (modified LGPCA) is introduced to realize the low-dimensional representations for high-dimensional feature space. Finally, two cases with 12 working conditions respectively have been employed to evaluate the performance of the proposed method, where vibration signals were measured from an experimental bench of rolling element bearing. The analysis results showed the effectiveness and the superiority of the proposed method of which the diagnosis thought is more suitable for practical application. Copyright © 2016 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Pneumococcal pneumonia: clinical features, diagnosis and management in HIV-infected and HIV noninfected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeddu, Giordano; Fois, Alessandro Giuseppe; Pirina, Pietro; Mura, Maria Stella

    2009-05-01

    In this review, we focus on the clinical features, diagnosis and management of pneumococcal pneumonia in HIV-infected and noninfected patients, with particular attention to the most recent advances in this area. Classical clinical features are found in young adults, whereas atypical forms occur in immunocompromised patients including HIV-infected individuals. Bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia is more frequently observed in HIV-infected and also in low-risk patients, according to the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI). Pneumococcal pneumonia diagnostic process includes physical examination, radiologic findings and microbiologic diagnosis. However, etiologic diagnosis using traditional culture methods is difficult to obtain. In this setting, urinary antigen test, which recognizes Streptococcus pneumoniae cell wall C-polysaccharide, increases the probability of etiologic diagnosis. A correct management approach is crucial in reducing pneumococcal pneumonia mortality. The use of the PSI helps clinicians in deciding between inpatient and outpatient management in immunocompetent individuals, according to Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA)-American Thoracic Society (ATS) guidelines. Recent findings support PSI utility also in HIV-infected patients. Recently, efficacy of pneumococcal vaccine in reducing pneumococcal disease incidence has been evidenced in both HIV-infected and noninfected individuals. Rapid diagnosis and correct management together with implementation of preventive measures are crucial in order to reduce pneumococcal pneumonia related incidence and mortality in HIV-infected and noninfected patients.

  8. An integrated multi-sensor fusion-based deep feature learning approach for rotating machinery diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Hu, Youmin; Wang, Yan; Wu, Bo; Fan, Jikai; Hu, Zhongxu

    2018-05-01

    The diagnosis of complicated fault severity problems in rotating machinery systems is an important issue that affects the productivity and quality of manufacturing processes and industrial applications. However, it usually suffers from several deficiencies. (1) A considerable degree of prior knowledge and expertise is required to not only extract and select specific features from raw sensor signals, and but also choose a suitable fusion for sensor information. (2) Traditional artificial neural networks with shallow architectures are usually adopted and they have a limited ability to learn the complex and variable operating conditions. In multi-sensor-based diagnosis applications in particular, massive high-dimensional and high-volume raw sensor signals need to be processed. In this paper, an integrated multi-sensor fusion-based deep feature learning (IMSFDFL) approach is developed to identify the fault severity in rotating machinery processes. First, traditional statistics and energy spectrum features are extracted from multiple sensors with multiple channels and combined. Then, a fused feature vector is constructed from all of the acquisition channels. Further, deep feature learning with stacked auto-encoders is used to obtain the deep features. Finally, the traditional softmax model is applied to identify the fault severity. The effectiveness of the proposed IMSFDFL approach is primarily verified by a one-stage gearbox experimental platform that uses several accelerometers under different operating conditions. This approach can identify fault severity more effectively than the traditional approaches.

  9. Feature extraction through parallel Probabilistic Principal Component Analysis for heart disease diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Syed Muhammad Saqlain; Batool, Safeera; Khan, Imran; Ashraf, Muhammad Usman; Abbas, Syed Hussnain; Hussain, Syed Adnan

    2017-09-01

    Automatic diagnosis of human diseases are mostly achieved through decision support systems. The performance of these systems is mainly dependent on the selection of the most relevant features. This becomes harder when the dataset contains missing values for the different features. Probabilistic Principal Component Analysis (PPCA) has reputation to deal with the problem of missing values of attributes. This research presents a methodology which uses the results of medical tests as input, extracts a reduced dimensional feature subset and provides diagnosis of heart disease. The proposed methodology extracts high impact features in new projection by using Probabilistic Principal Component Analysis (PPCA). PPCA extracts projection vectors which contribute in highest covariance and these projection vectors are used to reduce feature dimension. The selection of projection vectors is done through Parallel Analysis (PA). The feature subset with the reduced dimension is provided to radial basis function (RBF) kernel based Support Vector Machines (SVM). The RBF based SVM serves the purpose of classification into two categories i.e., Heart Patient (HP) and Normal Subject (NS). The proposed methodology is evaluated through accuracy, specificity and sensitivity over the three datasets of UCI i.e., Cleveland, Switzerland and Hungarian. The statistical results achieved through the proposed technique are presented in comparison to the existing research showing its impact. The proposed technique achieved an accuracy of 82.18%, 85.82% and 91.30% for Cleveland, Hungarian and Switzerland dataset respectively.

  10. New Features of Disease after Diagnosis in Six Forms of Systemic Vasculitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayson, Peter C.; Cuthbertson, David; Carette, Simon; Hoffman, Gary S.; Khalidi, Nader A.; Koening, Curry L.; Langford, Carol A.; Maksimowicz-McKinnon, Kathleen; Monach, Paul A.; Seo, Philip; Specks, Ulrich; Ytterberg, Steven R.; Merkel, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To quantify the occurrence of features of vasculitis that initially present after diagnosis in 6 types of primary vasculitis. Methods Standardized collection of data on 95 disease manifestations in 6 vasculitides, including granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's, GPA), microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Churg-Strauss, EGPA), polyarteritis nodosa (PAN), giant cell arteritis (GCA), and Takayasu's arteritis (TAK), was performed within a set of multicenter longitudinal, observational cohorts. For each form of vasculitis, the frequency of disease-specific manifestations at diagnosis was compared to the cumulative frequency of each manifestation. The percentage of patients who initially developed “severe” manifestations after diagnosis, defined as organ- or life-threatening in the small and medium vessel vasculitides (GPA, MPA, EGPA, PAN) and as ischemic/vascular in the large vessel vasculitides (GCA, TAK), was reported. Results Out of 838 patients with vasculitis, 490 (59%) experienced ≥ 1 new disease manifestation after diagnosis. On average, patients with vasculitis experienced 1.3 new manifestations after diagnosis (GPA - 1.9, MPA - 1.2, EGPA - 1.5, PAN - 1.2, GCA - 0.7, TAK - 1.0). New severe manifestations occurred after diagnosis in 224 (27%) out of 838 patients (GPA - 26%, MPA - 19%, EGPA - 21%, PAN - 23%, GCA - 24%, and TAK - 44%). Timing of onset of new manifestations was not significantly associated with disease duration. Conclusion A majority of patients with vasculitis develop new disease features after diagnosis, including a substantial number of new, severe manifestations. Ongoing assessment of patients with established vasculitis should remain broad in scope. PMID:23908447

  11. Vibration Feature Extraction and Analysis for Fault Diagnosis of Rotating Machinery-A Literature Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleem Riaz

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Safety, reliability, efficiency and performance of rotating machinery in all industrial applications are the main concerns. Rotating machines are widely used in various industrial applications. Condition monitoring and fault diagnosis of rotating machinery faults are very important and often complex and labor-intensive. Feature extraction techniques play a vital role for a reliable, effective and efficient feature extraction for the diagnosis of rotating machinery. Therefore, developing effective bearing fault diagnostic method using different fault features at different steps becomes more attractive. Bearings are widely used in medical applications, food processing industries, semi-conductor industries, paper making industries and aircraft components. This paper review has demonstrated that the latest reviews applied to rotating machinery on the available a variety of vibration feature extraction. Generally literature is classified into two main groups: frequency domain, time frequency analysis. However, fault detection and diagnosis of rotating machine vibration signal processing methods to present their own limitations. In practice, most healthy ingredients faulty vibration signal from background noise and mechanical vibration signals are buried. This paper also reviews that how the advanced signal processing methods, empirical mode decomposition and interference cancellation algorithm has been investigated and developed. The condition for rotating machines based rehabilitation, prevent failures increase the availability and reduce the cost of maintenance is becoming necessary too. Rotating machine fault detection and diagnostics in developing algorithms signal processing based on a key problem is the fault feature extraction or quantification. Currently, vibration signal, fault detection and diagnosis of rotating machinery based techniques most widely used techniques. Furthermore, the researchers are widely interested to make automatic

  12. Comparison of image features calculated in different dimensions for computer-aided diagnosis of lung nodules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ye; Lee, Michael C.; Boroczky, Lilla; Cann, Aaron D.; Borczuk, Alain C.; Kawut, Steven M.; Powell, Charles A.

    2009-02-01

    Features calculated from different dimensions of images capture quantitative information of the lung nodules through one or multiple image slices. Previously published computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) systems have used either twodimensional (2D) or three-dimensional (3D) features, though there has been little systematic analysis of the relevance of the different dimensions and of the impact of combining different dimensions. The aim of this study is to determine the importance of combining features calculated in different dimensions. We have performed CADx experiments on 125 pulmonary nodules imaged using multi-detector row CT (MDCT). The CADx system computed 192 2D, 2.5D, and 3D image features of the lesions. Leave-one-out experiments were performed using five different combinations of features from different dimensions: 2D, 3D, 2.5D, 2D+3D, and 2D+3D+2.5D. The experiments were performed ten times for each group. Accuracy, sensitivity and specificity were used to evaluate the performance. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were applied to compare the classification results from these five different combinations of features. Our results showed that 3D image features generate the best result compared with other combinations of features. This suggests one approach to potentially reducing the dimensionality of the CADx data space and the computational complexity of the system while maintaining diagnostic accuracy.

  13. Fault Diagnosis for Rotating Machinery Using Vibration Measurement Deep Statistical Feature Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Fault diagnosis is important for the maintenance of rotating machinery. The detection of faults and fault patterns is a challenging part of machinery fault diagnosis. To tackle this problem, a model for deep statistical feature learning from vibration measurements of rotating machinery is presented in this paper. Vibration sensor signals collected from rotating mechanical systems are represented in the time, frequency, and time-frequency domains, each of which is then used to produce a statistical feature set. For learning statistical features, real-value Gaussian-Bernoulli restricted Boltzmann machines (GRBMs are stacked to develop a Gaussian-Bernoulli deep Boltzmann machine (GDBM. The suggested approach is applied as a deep statistical feature learning tool for both gearbox and bearing systems. The fault classification performances in experiments using this approach are 95.17% for the gearbox, and 91.75% for the bearing system. The proposed approach is compared to such standard methods as a support vector machine, GRBM and a combination model. In experiments, the best fault classification rate was detected using the proposed model. The results show that deep learning with statistical feature extraction has an essential improvement potential for diagnosing rotating machinery faults.

  14. Wire Finishing Mill Rolling Bearing Fault Diagnosis Based on Feature Extraction and BP Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Yu LIU

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Rolling bearing is main part of rotary machine. It is frail section of rotary machine. Its running status affects entire mechanical equipment system performance directly. Vibration acceleration signals of the third finishing mill of Anshan Steel and Iron Group wire plant were collected in this paper. Fourier analysis, power spectrum analysis and wavelet transform were made on collected signals. Frequency domain feature extraction and wavelet transform feature extraction were made on collected signals. BP neural network fault diagnosis model was adopted. Frequency domain feature values and wavelet transform feature values were treated as neural network input values. Various typical fault models were treated as neural network output values. Corresponding relations between feature vector and fault omen were utilized. BP neural network model of typical wire plant finishing mill rolling bearing fault was constructed by training many groups sample data. After inputting sample needed to be diagnosed, wire plant finishing mill rolling bearing fault can be diagnosed. This research has important practical significance on enhancing rolling bearing fault diagnosis precision, repairing rolling bearing duly, decreasing stop time, enhancing equipment running efficiency and enhancing economic benefits.

  15. Fault Diagnosis for Rotating Machinery Using Vibration Measurement Deep Statistical Feature Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuan; Sánchez, René-Vinicio; Zurita, Grover; Cerrada, Mariela; Cabrera, Diego

    2016-06-17

    Fault diagnosis is important for the maintenance of rotating machinery. The detection of faults and fault patterns is a challenging part of machinery fault diagnosis. To tackle this problem, a model for deep statistical feature learning from vibration measurements of rotating machinery is presented in this paper. Vibration sensor signals collected from rotating mechanical systems are represented in the time, frequency, and time-frequency domains, each of which is then used to produce a statistical feature set. For learning statistical features, real-value Gaussian-Bernoulli restricted Boltzmann machines (GRBMs) are stacked to develop a Gaussian-Bernoulli deep Boltzmann machine (GDBM). The suggested approach is applied as a deep statistical feature learning tool for both gearbox and bearing systems. The fault classification performances in experiments using this approach are 95.17% for the gearbox, and 91.75% for the bearing system. The proposed approach is compared to such standard methods as a support vector machine, GRBM and a combination model. In experiments, the best fault classification rate was detected using the proposed model. The results show that deep learning with statistical feature extraction has an essential improvement potential for diagnosing rotating machinery faults.

  16. Fault diagnosis for analog circuits utilizing time-frequency features and improved VVRKFA

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; He, Yigang; Luo, Qiwu; Zhang, Chaolong

    2018-04-01

    This paper proposes a novel scheme for analog circuit fault diagnosis utilizing features extracted from the time-frequency representations of signals and an improved vector-valued regularized kernel function approximation (VVRKFA). First, the cross-wavelet transform is employed to yield the energy-phase distribution of the fault signals over the time and frequency domain. Since the distribution is high-dimensional, a supervised dimensionality reduction technique—the bilateral 2D linear discriminant analysis—is applied to build a concise feature set from the distributions. Finally, VVRKFA is utilized to locate the fault. In order to improve the classification performance, the quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization technique is employed to gradually tune the learning parameter of the VVRKFA classifier. The experimental results for the analog circuit faults classification have demonstrated that the proposed diagnosis scheme has an advantage over other approaches.

  17. The clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment of cognitive impairments in Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. N. Akhmadeeva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The review presents the data of recent studies dealing with cognitive impairments (CI in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD and gives their characteristics and epidemiology, the specific features of the pathogenesis and clinical manifestations, as well as current methods for their diagnosis and treatment. Moderate CIs (MCIs occur in 18.9–55% of patients with PD; the prevalence of dementia during a cross-sectional study approaches 30%. The 2007 Movement Disorder Society criteria and algorithm for the diagnosis of dementia in PD and the 2012 criteria and the algorithm for the diagnosis of MCIs allow one to maximally accurately identify these disorders. Only rivastigmine is now recognized as effective in treating CI in PD and recommended for use. Overall, therapies for CI in PD have been inadequately investigated, making it necessary to conduct further large-scale studies.

  18. Basal Cell Carcinoma: Pathogenesis, Epidemiology, Clinical Features, Diagnosis, Histopathology, and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzuka, Alexander G.; Book, Samuel E.

    2015-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common malignancy. Exposure to sunlight is the most important risk factor. Most, if not all, cases of BCC demonstrate overactive Hedgehog signaling. A variety of treatment modalities exist and are selected based on recurrence risk, importance of tissue preservation, patient preference, and extent of disease. The pathogenesis, epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis, histopathology, and management of BCC will be discussed in this review. PMID:26029015

  19. Branchial fistula arising from pyriform fossa: CT diagnosis of a case and discussion of radiological features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Narvir Singh; Sharma, Yash Paul; Bhagra, Tilak; Sud, Bindu

    2012-01-01

    Anomalies of third or fourth branchial apparatus origin are very uncommon and present as recurrent neck infections or thyroiditis with a predominant left-sided involvement. Radiological diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion and is critical for initiation of proper treatment. We describe a case of branchial sinus of pyriform fossa with external fistulization that presented in adulthood and was diagnosed on computed tomographic scan. The radiological features of this rare anomaly are revisited. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. BLINCK?A diagnostic algorithm for skin cancer diagnosis combining clinical features with dermatoscopy findings

    OpenAIRE

    Bourne, Peter; Rosendahl, Cliff; Keir, Jeff; Cameron, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Background: Deciding whether a skin lesion requires biopsy to exclude skin cancer is often challenging for primary care clinicians in Australia. There are several published algorithms designed to assist with the diagnosis of skin cancer but apart from the clinical ABCD rule, these algorithms only evaluate the dermatoscopic features of a lesion. Objectives: The BLINCK algorithm explores the effect of combining clinical history and examination with fundamental dermatoscopic assessment in primar...

  1. A Hybrid Feature Model and Deep-Learning-Based Bearing Fault Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Sohaib

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Bearing fault diagnosis is imperative for the maintenance, reliability, and durability of rotary machines. It can reduce economical losses by eliminating unexpected downtime in industry due to failure of rotary machines. Though widely investigated in the past couple of decades, continued advancement is still desirable to improve upon existing fault diagnosis techniques. Vibration acceleration signals collected from machine bearings exhibit nonstationary behavior due to variable working conditions and multiple fault severities. In the current work, a two-layered bearing fault diagnosis scheme is proposed for the identification of fault pattern and crack size for a given fault type. A hybrid feature pool is used in combination with sparse stacked autoencoder (SAE-based deep neural networks (DNNs to perform effective diagnosis of bearing faults of multiple severities. The hybrid feature pool can extract more discriminating information from the raw vibration signals, to overcome the nonstationary behavior of the signals caused by multiple crack sizes. More discriminating information helps the subsequent classifier to effectively classify data into the respective classes. The results indicate that the proposed scheme provides satisfactory performance in diagnosing bearing defects of multiple severities. Moreover, the results also demonstrate that the proposed model outperforms other state-of-the-art algorithms, i.e., support vector machines (SVMs and backpropagation neural networks (BPNNs.

  2. A Hybrid Feature Model and Deep-Learning-Based Bearing Fault Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohaib, Muhammad; Kim, Cheol-Hong; Kim, Jong-Myon

    2017-12-11

    Bearing fault diagnosis is imperative for the maintenance, reliability, and durability of rotary machines. It can reduce economical losses by eliminating unexpected downtime in industry due to failure of rotary machines. Though widely investigated in the past couple of decades, continued advancement is still desirable to improve upon existing fault diagnosis techniques. Vibration acceleration signals collected from machine bearings exhibit nonstationary behavior due to variable working conditions and multiple fault severities. In the current work, a two-layered bearing fault diagnosis scheme is proposed for the identification of fault pattern and crack size for a given fault type. A hybrid feature pool is used in combination with sparse stacked autoencoder (SAE)-based deep neural networks (DNNs) to perform effective diagnosis of bearing faults of multiple severities. The hybrid feature pool can extract more discriminating information from the raw vibration signals, to overcome the nonstationary behavior of the signals caused by multiple crack sizes. More discriminating information helps the subsequent classifier to effectively classify data into the respective classes. The results indicate that the proposed scheme provides satisfactory performance in diagnosing bearing defects of multiple severities. Moreover, the results also demonstrate that the proposed model outperforms other state-of-the-art algorithms, i.e., support vector machines (SVMs) and backpropagation neural networks (BPNNs).

  3. Intelligent Fault Diagnosis of HVCB with Feature Space Optimization-Based Random Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Suliang; Chen, Mingxuan; Wu, Jianwen; Wang, Yuhao; Jia, Bowen; Jiang, Yuan

    2018-04-16

    Mechanical faults of high-voltage circuit breakers (HVCBs) always happen over long-term operation, so extracting the fault features and identifying the fault type have become a key issue for ensuring the security and reliability of power supply. Based on wavelet packet decomposition technology and random forest algorithm, an effective identification system was developed in this paper. First, compared with the incomplete description of Shannon entropy, the wavelet packet time-frequency energy rate (WTFER) was adopted as the input vector for the classifier model in the feature selection procedure. Then, a random forest classifier was used to diagnose the HVCB fault, assess the importance of the feature variable and optimize the feature space. Finally, the approach was verified based on actual HVCB vibration signals by considering six typical fault classes. The comparative experiment results show that the classification accuracy of the proposed method with the origin feature space reached 93.33% and reached up to 95.56% with optimized input feature vector of classifier. This indicates that feature optimization procedure is successful, and the proposed diagnosis algorithm has higher efficiency and robustness than traditional methods.

  4. Scoring relevancy of features based on combinatorial analysis of Lasso with application to lymphoma diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zare Habil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract One challenge in applying bioinformatic tools to clinical or biological data is high number of features that might be provided to the learning algorithm without any prior knowledge on which ones should be used. In such applications, the number of features can drastically exceed the number of training instances which is often limited by the number of available samples for the study. The Lasso is one of many regularization methods that have been developed to prevent overfitting and improve prediction performance in high-dimensional settings. In this paper, we propose a novel algorithm for feature selection based on the Lasso and our hypothesis is that defining a scoring scheme that measures the "quality" of each feature can provide a more robust feature selection method. Our approach is to generate several samples from the training data by bootstrapping, determine the best relevance-ordering of the features for each sample, and finally combine these relevance-orderings to select highly relevant features. In addition to the theoretical analysis of our feature scoring scheme, we provided empirical evaluations on six real datasets from different fields to confirm the superiority of our method in exploratory data analysis and prediction performance. For example, we applied FeaLect, our feature scoring algorithm, to a lymphoma dataset, and according to a human expert, our method led to selecting more meaningful features than those commonly used in the clinics. This case study built a basis for discovering interesting new criteria for lymphoma diagnosis. Furthermore, to facilitate the use of our algorithm in other applications, the source code that implements our algorithm was released as FeaLect, a documented R package in CRAN.

  5. Multivariate Feature Selection of Image Descriptors Data for Breast Cancer with Computer-Assisted Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos E. Galván-Tejada

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is an important global health problem, and the most common type of cancer among women. Late diagnosis significantly decreases the survival rate of the patient; however, using mammography for early detection has been demonstrated to be a very important tool increasing the survival rate. The purpose of this paper is to obtain a multivariate model to classify benign and malignant tumor lesions using a computer-assisted diagnosis with a genetic algorithm in training and test datasets from mammography image features. A multivariate search was conducted to obtain predictive models with different approaches, in order to compare and validate results. The multivariate models were constructed using: Random Forest, Nearest centroid, and K-Nearest Neighbor (K-NN strategies as cost function in a genetic algorithm applied to the features in the BCDR public databases. Results suggest that the two texture descriptor features obtained in the multivariate model have a similar or better prediction capability to classify the data outcome compared with the multivariate model composed of all the features, according to their fitness value. This model can help to reduce the workload of radiologists and present a second opinion in the classification of tumor lesions.

  6. Multivariate Feature Selection of Image Descriptors Data for Breast Cancer with Computer-Assisted Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván-Tejada, Carlos E; Zanella-Calzada, Laura A; Galván-Tejada, Jorge I; Celaya-Padilla, José M; Gamboa-Rosales, Hamurabi; Garza-Veloz, Idalia; Martinez-Fierro, Margarita L

    2017-02-14

    Breast cancer is an important global health problem, and the most common type of cancer among women. Late diagnosis significantly decreases the survival rate of the patient; however, using mammography for early detection has been demonstrated to be a very important tool increasing the survival rate. The purpose of this paper is to obtain a multivariate model to classify benign and malignant tumor lesions using a computer-assisted diagnosis with a genetic algorithm in training and test datasets from mammography image features. A multivariate search was conducted to obtain predictive models with different approaches, in order to compare and validate results. The multivariate models were constructed using: Random Forest, Nearest centroid, and K-Nearest Neighbor (K-NN) strategies as cost function in a genetic algorithm applied to the features in the BCDR public databases. Results suggest that the two texture descriptor features obtained in the multivariate model have a similar or better prediction capability to classify the data outcome compared with the multivariate model composed of all the features, according to their fitness value. This model can help to reduce the workload of radiologists and present a second opinion in the classification of tumor lesions.

  7. A ROC-based feature selection method for computer-aided detection and diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Songyuan; Zhang, Guopeng; Liao, Qimei; Zhang, Junying; Jiao, Chun; Lu, Hongbing

    2014-03-01

    Image-based computer-aided detection and diagnosis (CAD) has been a very active research topic aiming to assist physicians to detect lesions and distinguish them from benign to malignant. However, the datasets fed into a classifier usually suffer from small number of samples, as well as significantly less samples available in one class (have a disease) than the other, resulting in the classifier's suboptimal performance. How to identifying the most characterizing features of the observed data for lesion detection is critical to improve the sensitivity and minimize false positives of a CAD system. In this study, we propose a novel feature selection method mR-FAST that combines the minimal-redundancymaximal relevance (mRMR) framework with a selection metric FAST (feature assessment by sliding thresholds) based on the area under a ROC curve (AUC) generated on optimal simple linear discriminants. With three feature datasets extracted from CAD systems for colon polyps and bladder cancer, we show that the space of candidate features selected by mR-FAST is more characterizing for lesion detection with higher AUC, enabling to find a compact subset of superior features at low cost.

  8. Erectile dysfunction as a manifestation of urogenital autonomic neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes: epidemiology, classification, pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment options

    OpenAIRE

    Gagik Radikovich Galstyan; yana Grigor'evna Shwarts; Sergey Anatol'evich Dubsky; Aleksandr Evgen'evich Lepetukhin; Roman Viktorovich Rozhivanov; Dmitry Gennadievich Kurbatov

    2014-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction characterized by a significant decline in the quality of life of patients and leading to infertility and problems in social life is diagnosed in more than 40% of patients with diabetes mellitus (DM).Erectile dysfunction is the most common sexual disorder in DM patients. The article describes epidemiology, classification, pathophysiology, diagnostic and treatment of erectile dysfunction in T1DM patients.

  9. Discourse Features Among Providers, Patients, and Companions and Their Effect on Outcomes of Dementia Diagnosis Disclosure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Matthew J; Carpenter, Brian D

    2017-12-13

    Receiving a diagnosis of dementia has major implications. Although protocols for disclosing difficult information have been developed for other health conditions, no such evidence-based method exists for dementia. As a step toward that goal, this study analyzed the discourse within dementia diagnosis disclosure sessions to identify conversational features associated with psychological outcomes. The Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS) was used to code the discourse among patients, their companions, and providers during 84 dementia diagnosis disclosure sessions following an initial evaluation at an Alzheimer's Disease Research Center. Providers dominated the conversation in terms of overall time spent talking. With more severe dementia, patients spoke less and companions spoke more. Provider-positive rapport building was associated with lower patient depression and anxiety following the disclosure session. Patient-positive rapport building was associated with higher companion anxiety, but only when the patient was not suspected to have dementia. No associations were found between other types of discourse and patient or companion psychological outcomes. A relatively small amount of positive rapport building by providers can lead to reduced distress following dementia disclosure. Dementia disclosure best practices should emphasize patient-centered communication techniques in order to minimize psychological distress following diagnosis. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. A Diagnosis to Consider in an Adult Patient with Facial Features and Intellectual Disability: Williams Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğan, Özlem Akgün; Şimşek Kiper, Pelin Özlem; Utine, Gülen Eda; Alikaşifoğlu, Mehmet; Boduroğlu, Koray

    2017-03-01

    Williams syndrome (OMIM #194050) is a rare, well-recognized, multisystemic genetic condition affecting approximately 1/7,500 individuals. There are no marked regional differences in the incidence of Williams syndrome. The syndrome is caused by a hemizygous deletion of approximately 28 genes, including ELN on chromosome 7q11.2. Prenatal-onset growth retardation, distinct facial appearance, cardiovascular abnormalities, and unique hypersocial behavior are among the most common clinical features. Here, we report the case of a patient referred to us with distinct facial features and intellectual disability, who was diagnosed with Williams syndrome at the age of 37 years. Our aim is to increase awareness regarding the diagnostic features and complications of this recognizable syndrome among adult health care providers. Williams syndrome is usually diagnosed during infancy or childhood, but in the absence of classical findings, such as cardiovascular anomalies, hypercalcemia, and cognitive impairment, the diagnosis could be delayed. Due to the multisystemic and progressive nature of the syndrome, accurate diagnosis is critical for appropriate care and screening for the associated morbidities that may affect the patient's health and well-being.

  11. Multiple-Fault Diagnosis Method Based on Multiscale Feature Extraction and MSVM_PPA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Identification of rolling bearing fault patterns, especially for the compound faults, has attracted notable attention and is still a challenge in fault diagnosis. In this paper, a novel method called multiscale feature extraction (MFE and multiclass support vector machine (MSVM with particle parameter adaptive (PPA is proposed. MFE is used to preprocess the process signals, which decomposes the data into intrinsic mode function by empirical mode decomposition method, and instantaneous frequency of decomposed components was obtained by Hilbert transformation. Then, statistical features and principal component analysis are utilized to extract significant information from the features, to get effective data from multiple faults. MSVM method with PPA parameters optimization will classify the fault patterns. The results of a case study of the rolling bearings faults data from Case Western Reserve University show that (1 the proposed intelligent method (MFE_PPA_MSVM improves the classification recognition rate; (2 the accuracy will decline when the number of fault patterns increases; (3 prediction accuracy can be the best when the training set size is increased to 70% of the total sample set. It verifies the method is feasible and efficient for fault diagnosis.

  12. A novel relational regularization feature selection method for joint regression and classification in AD diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaofeng; Suk, Heung-Il; Wang, Li; Lee, Seong-Whan; Shen, Dinggang

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we focus on joint regression and classification for Alzheimer's disease diagnosis and propose a new feature selection method by embedding the relational information inherent in the observations into a sparse multi-task learning framework. Specifically, the relational information includes three kinds of relationships (such as feature-feature relation, response-response relation, and sample-sample relation), for preserving three kinds of the similarity, such as for the features, the response variables, and the samples, respectively. To conduct feature selection, we first formulate the objective function by imposing these three relational characteristics along with an ℓ 2,1 -norm regularization term, and further propose a computationally efficient algorithm to optimize the proposed objective function. With the dimension-reduced data, we train two support vector regression models to predict the clinical scores of ADAS-Cog and MMSE, respectively, and also a support vector classification model to determine the clinical label. We conducted extensive experiments on the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) dataset to validate the effectiveness of the proposed method. Our experimental results showed the efficacy of the proposed method in enhancing the performances of both clinical scores prediction and disease status identification, compared to the state-of-the-art methods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. FEATURE EXTRACTION BASED WAVELET TRANSFORM IN BREAST CANCER DIAGNOSIS USING FUZZY AND NON-FUZZY CLASSIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelin GORGEL

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study helps to provide a second eye to the expert radiologists for the classification of manually extracted breast masses taken from 60 digital mammıgrams. These mammograms have been acquired from Istanbul University Faculty of Medicine Hospital and have 78 masses. The diagnosis is implemented with pre-processing by using feature extraction based Fast Wavelet Transform (FWT. Afterwards Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS based fuzzy subtractive clustering and Support Vector Machines (SVM methods are used for the classification. It is a comparative study which uses these methods respectively. According to the results of the study, ANFIS based subtractive clustering produces ??% while SVM produces ??% accuracy in malignant-benign classification. The results demonstrate that the developed system could help the radiologists for a true diagnosis and decrease the number of the missing cancerous regions or unnecessary biopsies.

  14. Sclerosing cholangitis: Clinicopathologic features, imaging spectrum, and systemic approach to differential diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Ni Eun [Dept. of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, So Yeon; Lee, Seung Soo; Byun, Jae Ho; Kim, Hyoung Jung; Kim, Jin Hee; Lee, Moon Gyu [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Sclerosing cholangitis is a spectrum of chronic progressive cholestatic liver disease characterized by inflammation, fibrosis, and stricture of the bile ducts, which can be classified as primary and secondary sclerosing cholangitis. Primary sclerosing cholangitis is a chronic progressive liver disease of unknown cause. On the other hand, secondary sclerosing cholangitis has identifiable causes that include immunoglobulin G4-related sclerosing disease, recurrent pyogenic cholangitis, ischemic cholangitis, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related cholangitis, and eosinophilic cholangitis. In this review, we suggest a systemic approach to the differential diagnosis of sclerosing cholangitis based on the clinical and laboratory findings, as well as the typical imaging features on computed tomography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with MR cholangiography. Familiarity with various etiologies of sclerosing cholangitis and awareness of their typical clinical and imaging findings are essential for an accurate diagnosis and appropriate management.

  15. Sclerosing Cholangitis: Clinicopathologic Features, Imaging Spectrum, and Systemic Approach to Differential Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Nieun; Kim, So Yeon; Lee, Seung Soo; Byun, Jae Ho; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Hyoung Jung; Lee, Moon-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Sclerosing cholangitis is a spectrum of chronic progressive cholestatic liver disease characterized by inflammation, fibrosis, and stricture of the bile ducts, which can be classified as primary and secondary sclerosing cholangitis. Primary sclerosing cholangitis is a chronic progressive liver disease of unknown cause. On the other hand, secondary sclerosing cholangitis has identifiable causes that include immunoglobulin G4-related sclerosing disease, recurrent pyogenic cholangitis, ischemic cholangitis, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related cholangitis, and eosinophilic cholangitis. In this review, we suggest a systemic approach to the differential diagnosis of sclerosing cholangitis based on the clinical and laboratory findings, as well as the typical imaging features on computed tomography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with MR cholangiography. Familiarity with various etiologies of sclerosing cholangitis and awareness of their typical clinical and imaging findings are essential for an accurate diagnosis and appropriate management.

  16. Erectile dysfunction as a manifestation of urogenital autonomic neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes: epidemiology, classification, pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagik Radikovich Galstyan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Sexual dysfunction characterized by a significant decline in the quality of life of patients and leading to infertility and problems in social life is diagnosed in more than 40% of patients with diabetes mellitus (DM.Erectile dysfunction is the most common sexual disorder in DM patients. The article describes epidemiology, classification, pathophysiology, diagnostic and treatment of erectile dysfunction in T1DM patients.

  17. CLINICAL FEATURES AND PATTERN OF FRACTURES AT THE TIME OF DIAGNOSIS OF OSTEOGENESIS IMPERFECTA IN CHILDREN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brizola, Evelise; Zambrano, Marina Bauer; Pinheiro, Bruna de Souza; Vanz, Ana Paula; Félix, Têmis Maria

    2017-01-01

    To characterize the fracture pattern and the clinical history at the time of diagnosis of osteogenesis imperfecta. In this retrospective study, all patients with osteogenesis imperfecta, of both genders, aged 0-18 years, who were treated between 2002 and 2014 were included. Medical records were assessed to collect clinical data, including the presence of blue sclerae, dentinogenesis imperfecta, positive familial history of osteogenesis imperfecta, and the site of the fractures. In addition, radiographic findings at the time of the diagnosis were reviewed. Seventy-six patients (42 females) were included in the study. Individuals' age ranged from 0 to 114 months, with a median (interquartile range) age of 38 (6-96) months. Blue sclerae were present in 93.4% of patients, dentinogenesis imperfecta was observed in 27.6% of patients, and wormian bones in 29.4% of them. The number of fractures at diagnosis ranged from 0 to 17, with a median of 3 (2-8) fractures. Forty (57%) patients had fractures of the upper and lower extremities, and 9 patients also had spinal fractures. The diagnosis was performed at birth in 85.7% of patients with type 3, and 39.3% of those with type 4/5 of the disorder. Osteogenesis imperfecta is a genetic disorder with distinctive clinical features such as bone fragility, recurrent fractures, blue sclerae, and dentinogenesis imperfecta. It is important to know how to identify these characteristics in order to facilitate the diagnosis, optimize the treatment, and differentiate osteogenesis imperfecta from other disorders that also can lead to fractures.

  18. Problems of Formation of Diagnostic Features in the Diagnosis of Aircraft Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pronyakin V.I.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the evaluation of current technical condition of aircraft engines. Deals with the choice of the detection method of diagnostic features required for degradation assessment, emergency protection and detection of incipient defects on the example of cyclic machines and mechanisms. For the formation of diagnostic features in the diagnosis of aircraft engines use different physical effects (vibration, shock, heat radiation, electrodynamic and thermal processes, wear debris in oil, etc.. Classification of defects and requirements for the development of diagnostics systems is formed based on them. The article describes the requirements for diagnostic signs. The article provides a promising phase method that allows obtaining stable diagnostic characters in exploitation. The result of applying the method is shown. Diagnostic signs are formed. In mathematical modeling it was used the traditional theory of the description of rotary mechanisms. The data obtained are compared with experimental data.

  19. Cognitive impairment and dementia in Parkinson’s disease: clinical features, diagnosis, and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana eMeireles

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is a common, disabling, neurodegenerative disorder. In addition to classical motor symptoms, nonmotor features are now widely accepted as part of the clinical picture, and cognitive decline is a very important aspect of the disease, as it brings an additional significant burden for the patient and caregivers. The diagnosis of cognitive decline in PD, namely mild cognitive impairment and dementia, can be extremely challenging, remaining largely based on clinical and cognitive assessments. Diagnostic criteria and methods for PD dementia and mild cognitive impairment have been recently issued by expert work groups. This manuscript has synthesized relevant data in order to obtain a pragmatic and updated review regarding cognitive decline in PD, from milder stages to dementia. This text will summarize clinical features, diagnostic methodology, and therapeutic issues of clinical decline in Parkinson’s disease. Relevant clinical genetic issues, including recent advances, will also be approached.

  20. Gearbox fault diagnosis based on time-frequency domain synchronous averaging and feature extraction technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shengli; Tang, Jiong

    2016-04-01

    Gearbox is one of the most vulnerable subsystems in wind turbines. Its healthy status significantly affects the efficiency and function of the entire system. Vibration based fault diagnosis methods are prevalently applied nowadays. However, vibration signals are always contaminated by noise that comes from data acquisition errors, structure geometric errors, operation errors, etc. As a result, it is difficult to identify potential gear failures directly from vibration signals, especially for the early stage faults. This paper utilizes synchronous averaging technique in time-frequency domain to remove the non-synchronous noise and enhance the fault related time-frequency features. The enhanced time-frequency information is further employed in gear fault classification and identification through feature extraction algorithms including Kernel Principal Component Analysis (KPCA), Multilinear Principal Component Analysis (MPCA), and Locally Linear Embedding (LLE). Results show that the LLE approach is the most effective to classify and identify different gear faults.

  1. Update on Merkel Cell Carcinoma: Epidemiology, Etiopathogenesis, Clinical Features, Diagnosis, and Staging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llombart, B; Requena, C; Cruz, J

    2017-03-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare, highly aggressive tumor, and local or regional disease recurrence is common, as is metastasis. MCC usually develops in sun-exposed skin in patients of advanced age. Its incidence has risen 4-fold in recent decades as the population has aged and immunohistochemical techniques have led to more diagnoses. The pathogenesis of MCC remains unclear but UV radiation, immunosuppression, and the presence of Merkel cell polyomavirus in the tumor genome seem to play key roles. This review seeks to update our understanding of the epidemiology, etiology, pathogenesis, and clinical features of MCC. We also review histologic and immunohistochemical features required for diagnosis. MCC staging is discussed, given its great importance in establishing a prognosis for these patients. Copyright © 2016 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Rolling Bearing Fault Diagnosis Using Modified Neighborhood Preserving Embedding and Maximal Overlap Discrete Wavelet Packet Transform with Sensitive Features Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Dong

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to enhance the performance of bearing fault diagnosis and classification, features extraction and features dimensionality reduction have become more important. The original statistical feature set was calculated from single branch reconstruction vibration signals obtained by using maximal overlap discrete wavelet packet transform (MODWPT. In order to reduce redundancy information of original statistical feature set, features selection by adjusted rand index and sum of within-class mean deviations (FSASD was proposed to select fault sensitive features. Furthermore, a modified features dimensionality reduction method, supervised neighborhood preserving embedding with label information (SNPEL, was proposed to realize low-dimensional representations for high-dimensional feature space. Finally, vibration signals collected from two experimental test rigs were employed to evaluate the performance of the proposed procedure. The results show that the effectiveness, adaptability, and superiority of the proposed procedure can serve as an intelligent bearing fault diagnosis system.

  3. Application of Multilabel Learning Using the Relevant Feature for Each Label in Chronic Gastritis Syndrome Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guo-Ping; Yan, Jian-Jun; Wang, Yi-Qin; Fu, Jing-Jing; Xu, Zhao-Xia; Guo, Rui; Qian, Peng

    2012-01-01

    Background. In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), most of the algorithms are used to solve problems of syndrome diagnosis that only focus on one syndrome, that is, single label learning. However, in clinical practice, patients may simultaneously have more than one syndrome, which has its own symptoms (signs). Methods. We employed a multilabel learning using the relevant feature for each label (REAL) algorithm to construct a syndrome diagnostic model for chronic gastritis (CG) in TCM. REAL combines feature selection methods to select the significant symptoms (signs) of CG. The method was tested on 919 patients using the standard scale. Results. The highest prediction accuracy was achieved when 20 features were selected. The features selected with the information gain were more consistent with the TCM theory. The lowest average accuracy was 54% using multi-label neural networks (BP-MLL), whereas the highest was 82% using REAL for constructing the diagnostic model. For coverage, hamming loss, and ranking loss, the values obtained using the REAL algorithm were the lowest at 0.160, 0.142, and 0.177, respectively. Conclusion. REAL extracts the relevant symptoms (signs) for each syndrome and improves its recognition accuracy. Moreover, the studies will provide a reference for constructing syndrome diagnostic models and guide clinical practice. PMID:22719781

  4. Application of Multilabel Learning Using the Relevant Feature for Each Label in Chronic Gastritis Syndrome Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Ping Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM, most of the algorithms are used to solve problems of syndrome diagnosis that only focus on one syndrome, that is, single label learning. However, in clinical practice, patients may simultaneously have more than one syndrome, which has its own symptoms (signs. Methods. We employed a multilabel learning using the relevant feature for each label (REAL algorithm to construct a syndrome diagnostic model for chronic gastritis (CG in TCM. REAL combines feature selection methods to select the significant symptoms (signs of CG. The method was tested on 919 patients using the standard scale. Results. The highest prediction accuracy was achieved when 20 features were selected. The features selected with the information gain were more consistent with the TCM theory. The lowest average accuracy was 54% using multi-label neural networks (BP-MLL, whereas the highest was 82% using REAL for constructing the diagnostic model. For coverage, hamming loss, and ranking loss, the values obtained using the REAL algorithm were the lowest at 0.160, 0.142, and 0.177, respectively. Conclusion. REAL extracts the relevant symptoms (signs for each syndrome and improves its recognition accuracy. Moreover, the studies will provide a reference for constructing syndrome diagnostic models and guide clinical practice.

  5. Computer-aided diagnosis with textural features for breast lesions in sonograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dar-Ren; Huang, Yu-Len; Lin, Sheng-Hsiung

    2011-04-01

    Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems provided second beneficial support reference and enhance the diagnostic accuracy. This paper was aimed to develop and evaluate a CAD with texture analysis in the classification of breast tumors for ultrasound images. The ultrasound (US) dataset evaluated in this study composed of 1020 sonograms of region of interest (ROI) subimages from 255 patients. Two-view sonogram (longitudinal and transverse views) and four different rectangular regions were utilized to analyze each tumor. Six practical textural features from the US images were performed to classify breast tumors as benign or malignant. However, the textural features always perform as a high dimensional vector; high dimensional vector is unfavorable to differentiate breast tumors in practice. The principal component analysis (PCA) was used to reduce the dimension of textural feature vector and then the image retrieval technique was performed to differentiate between benign and malignant tumors. In the experiments, all the cases were sampled with k-fold cross-validation (k=10) to evaluate the performance with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. The area (A(Z)) under the ROC curve for the proposed CAD system with the specific textural features was 0.925±0.019. The classification ability for breast tumor with textural information is satisfactory. This system differentiates benign from malignant breast tumors with a good result and is therefore clinically useful to provide a second opinion. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Examining applying high performance genetic data feature selection and classification algorithms for colon cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rajab, Murad; Lu, Joan; Xu, Qiang

    2017-07-01

    This paper examines the accuracy and efficiency (time complexity) of high performance genetic data feature selection and classification algorithms for colon cancer diagnosis. The need for this research derives from the urgent and increasing need for accurate and efficient algorithms. Colon cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide, hence it is vitally important for the cancer tissues to be expertly identified and classified in a rapid and timely manner, to assure both a fast detection of the disease and to expedite the drug discovery process. In this research, a three-phase approach was proposed and implemented: Phases One and Two examined the feature selection algorithms and classification algorithms employed separately, and Phase Three examined the performance of the combination of these. It was found from Phase One that the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm performed best with the colon dataset as a feature selection (29 genes selected) and from Phase Two that the Support Vector Machine (SVM) algorithm outperformed other classifications, with an accuracy of almost 86%. It was also found from Phase Three that the combined use of PSO and SVM surpassed other algorithms in accuracy and performance, and was faster in terms of time analysis (94%). It is concluded that applying feature selection algorithms prior to classification algorithms results in better accuracy than when the latter are applied alone. This conclusion is important and significant to industry and society. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Intraindividual right-left comparison of sonographic features in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köninger, Angela; Koch, Laura; Edimiris, Philippos; Nießen, Stefanie; Kasimir-Bauer, Sabine; Kimmig, Rainer; Strowitzki, Thomas; Schmidt, Börge

    2014-10-01

    Sonographic features of polycystic ovaries consist of elevated antral follicle count or ovarian volume of at least one ovary. The aim of this prospective cross-sectional study was to estimate intraindividual differences in sonographic measurements between the both ovaries of PCOS patients and controls and clinical consequences. Both ovaries of 85 PCOS patients and 48 controls were scanned transvaginally and agreement of sonographic measurements was analyzed using the Bland-Altman method. Concordance correlation coefficients (CCC) were computed. Mean differences between right and left ovaries were 0.24 (95% confidence interval [95% CI]: -0.32-0.80) follicles for AFC and 1.14 (95% CI: 0.34-1.92)ml for OV in the whole study population, 0.14 (95% CI: -0.68-0.96) follicles for AFC and 1.48 (95% CI: 0.39-2.58)ml for OV in PCOS patients, 0.42 (95% CI: -0.19-1.02) follicles for AFC and 0.53 (95% CI: -0.50-1.56)ml for OV in controls. Rather wide limits of agreement and low CCCs (ovaries for both sonographic measurements. Width between lower and upper limits of agreement was higher for PCOS patients than for controls. 23.5% of the PCOS patients showed polycystic ovarian morphology (PCOM) only in one ovary, resulting in 9.4% potentially missed PCOS diagnosis according to the Rotterdam ESHRE/ASRM-Sponsored PCOS Consensus Workshop Group. Substantial differences in antral follicle count and ovarian volume between the right and left ovary were observed. In approximately 10% of the PCOS patients in our study only the examination of both ovaries has led to a reliable diagnosis of PCOS. In clinical practice it is recommended to scan both ovaries for a reliable diagnosis of abnormal sonographic findings in PCOM and PCOS diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Diabetic mastopathy: Imaging features and the role of image-guided biopsy in its diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Hyeon; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Min Jung; Moon, Hee Jung; Yoon, Jung Hyun

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the imaging features of diabetic mastopathy (DMP) and the role of image-guided biopsy in its diagnosis. Two experienced radiologists retrospectively reviewed the mammographic and sonographic images of 19 pathologically confirmed DMP patients. The techniques and results of the biopsies performed in each patient were also reviewed. Mammograms showed negative findings in 78% of the patients. On ultrasonography (US), 13 lesions were seen as masses and six as non-mass lesions. The US features of the mass lesions were as follows: irregular shape (69%), oval shape (31%), indistinct margin (69%), angular margin (15%), microlobulated margin (8%), well-defined margin (8%), heterogeneous echogenicity (62%), hypoechoic echogenicity (38%), posterior shadowing (92%), parallel orientation (100%), the absence of calcifications (100%), and the absence of vascularity (100%). Based on the US findings, 17 lesions (89%) were classified as Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System category 4 and two (11%) as category 3. US-guided core biopsy was performed in 18 patients, and 10 (56%) were diagnosed with DMP on that basis. An additional vacuum-assisted biopsy was performed in seven patients and all were diagnosed with DMP. The US features of DMP were generally suspicious for malignancy, whereas the mammographic findings were often negative or showed only focal asymmetry. Core biopsy is an adequate method for initial pathological diagnosis. However, since it yields non-diagnostic results in a considerable number of cases, the evaluation of correlations between imaging and pathology plays an important role in the diagnostic process

  9. Diabetic mastopathy: Imaging features and the role of image-guided biopsy in its diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Hyeon; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Min Jung; Moon, Hee Jung; Yoon, Jung Hyun [Dept. of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the imaging features of diabetic mastopathy (DMP) and the role of image-guided biopsy in its diagnosis. Two experienced radiologists retrospectively reviewed the mammographic and sonographic images of 19 pathologically confirmed DMP patients. The techniques and results of the biopsies performed in each patient were also reviewed. Mammograms showed negative findings in 78% of the patients. On ultrasonography (US), 13 lesions were seen as masses and six as non-mass lesions. The US features of the mass lesions were as follows: irregular shape (69%), oval shape (31%), indistinct margin (69%), angular margin (15%), microlobulated margin (8%), well-defined margin (8%), heterogeneous echogenicity (62%), hypoechoic echogenicity (38%), posterior shadowing (92%), parallel orientation (100%), the absence of calcifications (100%), and the absence of vascularity (100%). Based on the US findings, 17 lesions (89%) were classified as Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System category 4 and two (11%) as category 3. US-guided core biopsy was performed in 18 patients, and 10 (56%) were diagnosed with DMP on that basis. An additional vacuum-assisted biopsy was performed in seven patients and all were diagnosed with DMP. The US features of DMP were generally suspicious for malignancy, whereas the mammographic findings were often negative or showed only focal asymmetry. Core biopsy is an adequate method for initial pathological diagnosis. However, since it yields non-diagnostic results in a considerable number of cases, the evaluation of correlations between imaging and pathology plays an important role in the diagnostic process.

  10. Differences in clinical features and computed tomographic findings between embolic and non-embolic acute ischemic stroke. A quantitative differential diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Kentaro; Yamaguchi, Takenori; Minematsu, Kazuo; Sawada, Tohru; Omae, Teruo

    1998-01-01

    A diagnosis based on the presumed mechanism of stroke onset is useful for management strategies in acute ischemic stroke. Ninety-two patients with embolic (cardiac or artery-to-artery) and 107 with non-embolic (thrombotic or hemodynamic) stroke were diagnosed on strict cerebral angiographic criteria alone. To clearly discriminate between these two groups, the neurological and computed tomographic (CT) findings were then compared. Rapidity of onset, vomiting, urinary incontinence, level of consciousness, cervical bruit, anisocoria, tongue deviation, sensory disturbance, and CT findings (location of hypodense area, findings of brain edema and hemorrhagic transformation) were discriminatory factors between the two groups (p<0.01). According to these 11 items, we prepared a numerical table for quantitative differential diagnosis. A diagnostic accuracy of 98.9% for embolic and 87.9% for non-embolic stroke in internal verification, and 90.0% and 82.9%, respectively, in external verification was observed. The differences in clinical features and CT findings between embolic and non-embolic stroke may reflect the pathophysiological mechanisms of the occlusive process of cerebral artery as well as the extent and severity of ischemia. (author)

  11. Differences in clinical features and computed tomographic findings between embolic and non-embolic acute ischemic stroke. A quantitative differential diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takano, Kentaro; Yamaguchi, Takenori; Minematsu, Kazuo; Sawada, Tohru; Omae, Teruo [National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    1998-02-01

    A diagnosis based on the presumed mechanism of stroke onset is useful for management strategies in acute ischemic stroke. Ninety-two patients with embolic (cardiac or artery-to-artery) and 107 with non-embolic (thrombotic or hemodynamic) stroke were diagnosed on strict cerebral angiographic criteria alone. To clearly discriminate between these two groups, the neurological and computed tomographic (CT) findings were then compared. Rapidity of onset, vomiting, urinary incontinence, level of consciousness, cervical bruit, anisocoria, tongue deviation, sensory disturbance, and CT findings (location of hypodense area, findings of brain edema and hemorrhagic transformation) were discriminatory factors between the two groups (p<0.01). According to these 11 items, we prepared a numerical table for quantitative differential diagnosis. A diagnostic accuracy of 98.9% for embolic and 87.9% for non-embolic stroke in internal verification, and 90.0% and 82.9%, respectively, in external verification was observed. The differences in clinical features and CT findings between embolic and non-embolic stroke may reflect the pathophysiological mechanisms of the occlusive process of cerebral artery as well as the extent and severity of ischemia. (author)

  12. Tularemia in differential diagnosis of cervical lymphadenopathy: cytologic features of tularemia lymphadenitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markoc, Fatma; Koseoglu, Resid Dogan; Koc, Sema; Gurbuzler, Levent

    2014-01-01

    Tularemia can cause cervical lymphadenopathy. Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) cytology is the first step in the workup for cervical lymphadenopathy; however, little has been published regarding the cytomorphological features of tularemia lymphadenitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the FNA cytology of tularemia lymphadenitis. Review of medical records identified 36 patients with serologically proven tularemia, and who had undergone lymph node FNA. In each case, the original May-Grünwald-Giemsa-stained FNA smears from enlarged cervical lymph node were reevaluated. Suppuration and cytolysis were frequent cytological findings. Twenty-three (63.8%) of the 36 cases were assessed as suppurative inflammation. In 10 of these cases (27.8% of the total), cytolysis was prominent. In 7 cases (19.4%) the smears featured microgranulomas as well as suppuration, and 2 of these (5.6%) also featured giant cells. In 1 case (2.8%), there was caseous necrosis. In 2 cases (5.6%), the cytopathological findings were consistent with reactive lymphoid hyperplasia. Three aspirates (8.3%) were inadequate for evaluation. Cytopathological findings on FNA of tularemia lymphadenitis are nonspecific; however, in regions where tularemia is endemic, this disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis for suppurative lymphadenitis. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Automatic recognition of severity level for diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy using deep visual features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Qaisar; Fondon, Irene; Sarmiento, Auxiliadora; Jiménez, Soledad; Alemany, Pedro

    2017-11-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is leading cause of blindness among diabetic patients. Recognition of severity level is required by ophthalmologists to early detect and diagnose the DR. However, it is a challenging task for both medical experts and computer-aided diagnosis systems due to requiring extensive domain expert knowledge. In this article, a novel automatic recognition system for the five severity level of diabetic retinopathy (SLDR) is developed without performing any pre- and post-processing steps on retinal fundus images through learning of deep visual features (DVFs). These DVF features are extracted from each image by using color dense in scale-invariant and gradient location-orientation histogram techniques. To learn these DVF features, a semi-supervised multilayer deep-learning algorithm is utilized along with a new compressed layer and fine-tuning steps. This SLDR system was evaluated and compared with state-of-the-art techniques using the measures of sensitivity (SE), specificity (SP) and area under the receiving operating curves (AUC). On 750 fundus images (150 per category), the SE of 92.18%, SP of 94.50% and AUC of 0.924 values were obtained on average. These results demonstrate that the SLDR system is appropriate for early detection of DR and provide an effective treatment for prediction type of diabetes.

  14. Integrating angle-frequency domain synchronous averaging technique with feature extraction for gear fault diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shengli; Tang, J.

    2018-01-01

    Gear fault diagnosis relies heavily on the scrutiny of vibration responses measured. In reality, gear vibration signals are noisy and dominated by meshing frequencies as well as their harmonics, which oftentimes overlay the fault related components. Moreover, many gear transmission systems, e.g., those in wind turbines, constantly operate under non-stationary conditions. To reduce the influences of non-synchronous components and noise, a fault signature enhancement method that is built upon angle-frequency domain synchronous averaging is developed in this paper. Instead of being averaged in the time domain, the signals are processed in the angle-frequency domain to solve the issue of phase shifts between signal segments due to uncertainties caused by clearances, input disturbances, and sampling errors, etc. The enhanced results are then analyzed through feature extraction algorithms to identify the most distinct features for fault classification and identification. Specifically, Kernel Principal Component Analysis (KPCA) targeting at nonlinearity, Multilinear Principal Component Analysis (MPCA) targeting at high dimensionality, and Locally Linear Embedding (LLE) targeting at local similarity among the enhanced data are employed and compared to yield insights. Numerical and experimental investigations are performed, and the results reveal the effectiveness of angle-frequency domain synchronous averaging in enabling feature extraction and classification.

  15. Automated diagnosis of focal liver lesions using bidirectional empirical mode decomposition features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, U Rajendra; Koh, Joel En Wei; Hagiwara, Yuki; Tan, Jen Hong; Gertych, Arkadiusz; Vijayananthan, Anushya; Yaakup, Nur Adura; Abdullah, Basri Johan Jeet; Bin Mohd Fabell, Mohd Kamil; Yeong, Chai Hong

    2018-03-01

    Liver is the heaviest internal organ of the human body and performs many vital functions. Prolonged cirrhosis and fatty liver disease may lead to the formation of benign or malignant lesions in this organ, and an early and reliable evaluation of these conditions can improve treatment outcomes. Ultrasound imaging is a safe, non-invasive, and cost-effective way of diagnosing liver lesions. However, this technique has limited performance in determining the nature of the lesions. This study initiates a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system to aid radiologists in an objective and more reliable interpretation of ultrasound images of liver lesions. In this work, we have employed radon transform and bi-directional empirical mode decomposition (BEMD) to extract features from the focal liver lesions. After which, the extracted features were subjected to particle swarm optimization (PSO) technique for the selection of a set of optimized features for classification. Our automated CAD system can differentiate normal, malignant, and benign liver lesions using machine learning algorithms. It was trained using 78 normal, 26 benign and 36 malignant focal lesions of the liver. The accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of lesion classification were 92.95%, 90.80%, and 97.44%, respectively. The proposed CAD system is fully automatic as no segmentation of region-of-interest (ROI) is required. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Differential diagnosis of scrub typhus meningitis from tuberculous meningitis using clinical and laboratory features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valappil, Ashraf V; Thiruvoth, Sohanlal; Peedikayil, Jabir M; Raghunath, Praveenkumar; Thekkedath, Manojan

    2017-12-01

    The involvement of the central nervous system in the form of meningitis or meningoencephalitis is common in scrub typhus and is an important differential diagnosis of other lymphocytic meningitis like tuberculous meningitis (TBM). The aim of this study was to identify the clinical and laboratory parameters that may be helpful in differentiating scrub typhus meningitis from TBM. We compared of the clinical and laboratory features of 57 patients admitted with scrub typhus meningitis or TBM during a 3-year period. Patients who had abnormal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and positive scrub typhus enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay serology (n=28) were included in the scrub typhus meningitis group, while the TBM group included those who satisfied the consensus diagnostic criteria of TBM (n=29). Compared with the TBM group, the mean duration of symptoms was less in patients with scrub typhus meningitis, who also had a lower magnitude of neurological deficits, such as altered mental status and cranial nerve and motor deficits. Patients with scrub typhus meningitis had a lower CSF white blood-cell count (WBC) than the TBM group (130.8±213 195±175 cells/mm 3 , P=0.002), lower CSF protein elevation (125±120 vs. 195.2±108.2mg/dl, P=0.002), and higher CSF sugar (70.1±32.4 vs. 48.7±23.4mg/dl, P=0.006). Features predictive of the diagnosis of scrub typhus meningitis included the absence of neurological impairment at presentation, blood serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase>40 international units (IU)/L, serum glutamic-pyruvic transaminase>60 IU/L, total blood leukocyte count>10,000/mm 3 , CSF protein50mg/dl, CSF WBC<100 cells/mm 3 . All patients with scrub typhus meningitis recovered completely following doxycycline therapy CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that, clinical features, including duration of fever, neurological deficits at presentation and laboratory parameters such as CSF pleocytosis,CSF protein elevation, CSF sugar levels and liver enzyme values are helpful in

  17. Features of the differential diagnosis of persons with gender identity disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z.D. Novikova

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We presented a study of the features of gender identity in people undergoing gender, psychological and psychiatric examination to address the issue of gender reassignment. We analyze the specifics of gender identity, levels of masculinity and femininity, the similarities and differentiation within four nosological groups, which include persons with gender identity disorders (GID with transsexualism, personality disorders, diseases of the schizophrenia spectrum, and with organic mental disorders. We address the question of the differential diagnosis in the process of psychological screening of people with transsexualism and other types of GID. The analytical description of the four algorithms and their comparison are psychologically specific, qualitative research, almost impossible using statistical method of data processing. The data presented may be useful to specialists involved in the study of persons with gender identity disorders

  18. Clinical, genetic, and neuroimaging features of Early Onset Alzheimer Disease: the challenges of diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberici, Antonella; Benussi, Alberto; Premi, Enrico; Borroni, Barbara; Padovani, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Early Onset Alzheimer Disease (EOAD) is a rare condition, frequently associated with genetic causes. The dissemination of genetic testing along with biomarker determinations have prompted a wider recognition of EOAD in experienced clinical settings. However, despite the great efforts in establishing the contribution of causative genes to EOAD, atypical disease presentation and clinical features still makes its diagnosis and treatment a challenge for the clinicians. This review aims to provide an extensive evaluation of literature data on EOAD, in order to improve understanding and knowledge of EOAD, underscore its significant impact on patients and their caregivers and influence public policies. This would be crucial to define the urgency of evidence-based treatment approaches.

  19. The early clinical features of dengue in adults: challenges for early clinical diagnosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny G H Low

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The emergence of dengue throughout the tropical world is affecting an increasing proportion of adult cases. The clinical features of dengue in different age groups have not been well examined, especially in the context of early clinical diagnosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We structured a prospective study of adults (≥ 18 years of age presenting with acute febrile illness within 72 hours from illness onset upon informed consent. Patients were followed up over a 3-4 week period to determine the clinical outcome. A total of 2,129 adults were enrolled in the study, of which 250 (11.7% had dengue. Differences in the rates of dengue-associated symptoms resulted in high sensitivities when the WHO 1997 or 2009 classification schemes for probable dengue fever were applied to the cohort. However, when the cases were stratified into age groups, fewer older adults reported symptoms such as myalgia, arthralgia, retro-orbital pain and mucosal bleeding, resulting in reduced sensitivity of the WHO classification schemes. On the other hand, the risks of severe dengue and hospitalization were not diminished in older adults, indicating that this group of patients can benefit from early diagnosis, especially when an antiviral drug becomes available. Our data also suggests that older adults who present with fever and leukopenia should be tested for dengue, even in the absence of other symptoms. CONCLUSION: Early clinical diagnosis based on previously defined symptoms that are associated with dengue, even when used in the schematics of both the WHO 1997 and 2009 classifications, is difficult in older adults.

  20. Celiac disease in Saudi children. Evaluation of clinical features and diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjum Saeed

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To characterize the clinical presentations and diagnosis including serological tests and histopathological findings in children with celiac disease. Methods: All children (less than 18 years with confirmed celiac disease diagnosed over a 6 year period at a private tertiary care health care center in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia were studied retrospectively. Information collected included demographics, clinical presentation and diagnostic modalities with serology and small intestinal histology reported by Marsh grading. Results: A total of 59 children had confirmed celiac disease. Thirty (50.8% were male. Median age was 8 years (range 1 to 16 years. The mean duration of symptoms before diagnosis was 2.3 (±1.5 years. Classical disease was present only in 30.5%, whereas 69.5% had either non-classical presentations or belonged to high risk groups for celiac disease such as those with type-1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroiditis, Down syndrome and siblings. Failure to thrive was the most common presentation followed by short stature, abdominal pain and chronic diarrhea. Anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody was positive in 91.5%, and titers were no different between those with classical and non-classical disease. All had Marsh-graded biopsy findings consistent with celiac disease. Conclusion: Children with celiac disease usually present with non-classical features. A high index of suspicion needs to be maintained to consider this disorder in the diagnostic workup of pediatric patients. High risk group should be screened early to avoid complications associated with untreated celiac disease.

  1. Multi-Stage Feature Selection by Using Genetic Algorithms for Fault Diagnosis in Gearboxes Based on Vibration Signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariela Cerrada

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available There are growing demands for condition-based monitoring of gearboxes, and techniques to improve the reliability, effectiveness and accuracy for fault diagnosis are considered valuable contributions. Feature selection is still an important aspect in machine learning-based diagnosis in order to reach good performance in the diagnosis system. The main aim of this research is to propose a multi-stage feature selection mechanism for selecting the best set of condition parameters on the time, frequency and time-frequency domains, which are extracted from vibration signals for fault diagnosis purposes in gearboxes. The selection is based on genetic algorithms, proposing in each stage a new subset of the best features regarding the classifier performance in a supervised environment. The selected features are augmented at each stage and used as input for a neural network classifier in the next step, while a new subset of feature candidates is treated by the selection process. As a result, the inherent exploration and exploitation of the genetic algorithms for finding the best solutions of the selection problem are locally focused. The Sensors 2015, 15 23904 approach is tested on a dataset from a real test bed with several fault classes under different running conditions of load and velocity. The model performance for diagnosis is over 98%.

  2. Kernel-based Joint Feature Selection and Max-Margin Classification for Early Diagnosis of Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeli, Ehsan; Wu, Guorong; Saghafi, Behrouz; An, Le; Shi, Feng; Shen, Dinggang

    2017-01-01

    Feature selection methods usually select the most compact and relevant set of features based on their contribution to a linear regression model. Thus, these features might not be the best for a non-linear classifier. This is especially crucial for the tasks, in which the performance is heavily dependent on the feature selection techniques, like the diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases. Parkinson’s disease (PD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders, which progresses slowly while affects the quality of life dramatically. In this paper, we use the data acquired from multi-modal neuroimaging data to diagnose PD by investigating the brain regions, known to be affected at the early stages. We propose a joint kernel-based feature selection and classification framework. Unlike conventional feature selection techniques that select features based on their performance in the original input feature space, we select features that best benefit the classification scheme in the kernel space. We further propose kernel functions, specifically designed for our non-negative feature types. We use MRI and SPECT data of 538 subjects from the PPMI database, and obtain a diagnosis accuracy of 97.5%, which outperforms all baseline and state-of-the-art methods.

  3. Kernel-based Joint Feature Selection and Max-Margin Classification for Early Diagnosis of Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeli, Ehsan; Wu, Guorong; Saghafi, Behrouz; An, Le; Shi, Feng; Shen, Dinggang

    2017-01-01

    Feature selection methods usually select the most compact and relevant set of features based on their contribution to a linear regression model. Thus, these features might not be the best for a non-linear classifier. This is especially crucial for the tasks, in which the performance is heavily dependent on the feature selection techniques, like the diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases. Parkinson’s disease (PD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders, which progresses slowly while affects the quality of life dramatically. In this paper, we use the data acquired from multi-modal neuroimaging data to diagnose PD by investigating the brain regions, known to be affected at the early stages. We propose a joint kernel-based feature selection and classification framework. Unlike conventional feature selection techniques that select features based on their performance in the original input feature space, we select features that best benefit the classification scheme in the kernel space. We further propose kernel functions, specifically designed for our non-negative feature types. We use MRI and SPECT data of 538 subjects from the PPMI database, and obtain a diagnosis accuracy of 97.5%, which outperforms all baseline and state-of-the-art methods. PMID:28120883

  4. Celiac disease in Saudi children. Evaluation of clinical features and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Anjum; Assiri, Asaad; Assiri, Hebah; Ullah, Anhar; Rashid, Mohsin

    2017-09-01

     Objectives: To characterize the clinical presentations and diagnosis including serological tests and histopathological findings in children with celiac disease. Methods: All children (less than 18 years) with confirmed celiac disease diagnosed over a 6 year period at a private tertiary care health care center in Riyadh,  Saudi Arabia were studied retrospectively. Information collected included demographics, clinical presentation and diagnostic modalities with serology and small intestinal histology reported by Marsh grading. Results: A total of 59 children had confirmed celiac disease. Thirty (50.8%) were male. Median age was 8 years (range 1 to 16 years). The mean duration of symptoms before diagnosis was 2.3 (±1.5) years. Classical disease was present only in 30.5%, whereas 69.5% had either non-classical presentations or belonged to high risk groups for celiac disease such as those with type-1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroiditis, Down syndrome and siblings. Failure to thrive was the most common presentation followed by short stature, abdominal pain and chronic diarrhea. Anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody was positive in 91.5%, and titers were no different between those with classical and non-classical disease. All had Marsh-graded biopsy findings consistent with celiac disease. Conclusion: Children with celiac disease usually present with non-classical features. A high index of suspicion needs to be maintained to consider this disorder in the diagnostic workup of pediatric patients. High risk group should be screened early to avoid complications associated with untreated celiac disease.

  5. Radiographic features of Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia: differential diagnosis and performance timing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyashita, Naoyuki; Sugiu, Tadaaki; Kawai, Yasuhiro; Oda, Keiko; Yamaguchi, Tetsuya; Ouchi, Kazunobu; Kobashi, Yoshihiro; Oka, Mikio

    2009-01-01

    The Japanese Respiratory Society guidelines propose a differential diagnosis for atypical pneumonia and bacterial pneumonia using a scoring system for the selection of appropriate antibiotic. In order to improve this scoring system, the guidelines are seeking new specific parameter. The purpose of this study was to clarify the pattern of abnormalities with Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia on chest computed tomography (CT) and whether the radiographic findings could distinguish M. pneumoniae pneumonia from Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia. A retrospective review was performed of the CT findings of 64 cases and 68 cases where M. pneumoniae and S. pneumoniae, respectively, were the only pathogen identified by the panel of diagnostic tests used. Of the 64 patients with M. pneumoniae pneumonia, bronchial wall thickening was observed most frequently (81%), followed by centrilobular nodules (78%), ground-glass attenuation (78%), and consolidation (61%). Bronchial wall thickening and centrilobular nodules were observed more often in M. pneumoniae patients than in S. pneumoniae patients (p < 0.0001). The presence of bilateral bronchial wall thickening or centrilobular nodules was only seen in patients with M. pneumoniae pneumonia. Using the scoring system of the Japanese Respiratory Society guidelines and chest CT findings, 97% of M. pneumoniae patients were suspected to be M. pneumoniae pneumonia without serology. When comparing the CT findings between early stage and progressed stage in the same patients with severe pneumonia, the radiographic features of early stage M. pneumoniae pneumonia were not observed clearly in the progressed stage. The present results indicate that the diagnosis of M. pneumoniae pneumonia would appear to be reliable when found with a combination of bronchial wall thickening and centrilobular nodules in the CT findings. However, these CT findings are not observed in progressed severe M. pneumoniae pneumonia patients

  6. Diagnosis and constitutional and laboratory features of Korean girls referred for precocious puberty

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    Doosoo Kim

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available &lt;B&gt;Purpose:&lt;/B&gt; Precocious puberty is defined as breast development before the age of 8 years in girls. The present study aimed to reveal the diagnosis of Korean girls referred for precocious puberty and to compare the constitutional and endocrinological features among diagnosis groups. &lt;B&gt;Methods:&lt;/B&gt; The present study used a retrospective chart review of 988 Korean girls who had visited a pediatric endocrinology clinic from 2006 to 2010 for the evaluation of precocious puberty. Study groups comprised fast puberty, true precocious puberty (PP, pseudo PP, premature thelarche, and control. We determined the height standard deviation score (HSDS, weight standard deviation score (WSDS, and body mass index standard deviation score (BMISDS of each group using the published 2007 Korean growth charts. Hormone tests were performed at our outpatient clinic. &lt;B&gt;Results:&lt;/B&gt; The PP groups comprised fast puberty (67%, premature thelarche (17%, true PP (15%, and pseudo PP (1%. Advanced bone age and levels of estradiol, basal luteinizing hormone (LH, and peak LH after gonadotropin-releasing hormone stimulation testing were significantly high in the fast puberty and true PP groups compared with the control group. HSDS, WSDS, and BMISDS were significantly higher in the true PP group than in the control group (P&lt;0.05. &lt;B&gt;Conclusion:&lt;/B&gt; The frequent causes of PP were found to be fast puberty, true PP, and premature thelarche. Furthermore, BMISDS were significantly elevated in the true PP group. Therefore, we emphasize the need for regular follow-up of girls who are heavier or taller than others in the same age group.

  7. Gilbert’s syndrome: clinical features, diagnostics, differential diagnosis and treatment (part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.V. Sorokman

    2017-02-01

    discoloration of the skin (“teinte bilieuse”, especially on the face, hands, and feet without a distinct scleral icterus. Sometimes the development of repeatedly intermittent episodes of jaundice with high bilirubinemia (indirect bilirubin without the evidence of hemolysis (differential diagnostic feature is observed. 2. A tendency to development of pigmented and vascular nevi and xanthelasma of the eyelids, and hyperpigmentation around the eyes; to bradycardia, hypothermia, migraine, postural, intermittent albuminuria or to alimentary glycosuria. 3. An increased tendency to pigmentation under the influence of light, heat, and also chemical and mechanical stimuli. 4. A neuromuscular hyperexcitability. 5. Increased sensitivity to cold. 6. Dyspeptic complaints (pain, nausea, abdominal bloa­ting, diarrhea or constipation. 7. No signs of increased hemolysis (differential diagnostic feature with increasing content in, bilirubin (differential diagnostic feature. 8. The majority of patients have normal liver function tests (differential diagnostic feature also normal bromsulphalein test is also normal (differential diagnostic feature. 9. The biochemical abnormality is not detected by histological methods (differential diagnostic feature .10. Frequently, a family disease of the liver is observed. The differential diagnosis of GS is conducted with all types of hyperbilirubinemias, hemolytic anemias, congenital hepatic cirrhosis, hepatitis, cholecystopathy, atresia of biliary ducts or the small intestine. Medications are used only in severe hyperbilirubinemias and as concomitant therapy in the presence of symptoms of vitamin deficiencies, violations of a motor-evacuation function of the upper digestive tract in the clinical picture and to prevent complications (cholelithiasis.

  8. Deep Fault Recognizer: An Integrated Model to Denoise and Extract Features for Fault Diagnosis in Rotating Machinery

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    Xiaojie Guo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Fault diagnosis in rotating machinery is significant to avoid serious accidents; thus, an accurate and timely diagnosis method is necessary. With the breakthrough in deep learning algorithm, some intelligent methods, such as deep belief network (DBN and deep convolution neural network (DCNN, have been developed with satisfactory performances to conduct machinery fault diagnosis. However, only a few of these methods consider properly dealing with noises that exist in practical situations and the denoising methods are in need of extensive professional experiences. Accordingly, rethinking the fault diagnosis method based on deep architectures is essential. Hence, this study proposes an automatic denoising and feature extraction method that inherently considers spatial and temporal correlations. In this study, an integrated deep fault recognizer model based on the stacked denoising autoencoder (SDAE is applied to both denoise random noises in the raw signals and represent fault features in fault pattern diagnosis for both bearing rolling fault and gearbox fault, and trained in a greedy layer-wise fashion. Finally, the experimental validation demonstrates that the proposed method has better diagnosis accuracy than DBN, particularly in the existing situation of noises with superiority of approximately 7% in fault diagnosis accuracy.

  9. Sciatica-like symptoms and the sacroiliac joint: clinical features and differential diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, L H; Nijssen, P G N; Tijssen, C C; van Middendorp, J J; Schieving, J

    2013-07-01

    To compare the clinical features of patients with sacroiliac joint (SIJ)-related sciatica-like symptoms to those with sciatica from nerve root compression and to investigate the necessity to perform radiological imaging in patients with sciatica-like symptoms derived from the SIJ. Patients with pain radiating below the buttocks with a duration of 4 weeks to 1 year were included. After physical and radiological examinations, a diagnosis of SI joint-related pain, pain due to disk herniation, or a combination of these two causes was made. Patients with SIJ-related leg pain (n = 77/186) were significantly more often female, had shorter statue, a shorter duration of symptoms, and had more often pain radiating to the groin and a history of a fall on the buttocks. Muscle weakness, corkscrew phenomenon, finger-floor distance ≥25 cm, lumbar scoliosis, positive Bragard or Kemp sign, and positive leg raising test were more often present when radiologic nerve root compression was present. Although these investigations may help, MRI of the spine is necessary to discriminate between the groups. Sciatica-like symptoms derived from the SIJ can clinically mimic a radiculopathy. We suggest to perform a thorough physical examination of the spine, SI joints, and hips with additional radiological tests to exclude other causes.

  10. Computer-aided diagnosis with morphological features for breast lesion on sonograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yu-Len; Jiang Yu-Ru; Shiu Jia-Jia; Chen Dar-Ren; Moon Woo Kyung

    2007-01-01

    Information about shape, provided by a breast tumor contour is important to physicians in making diagnostic decisions. To avoid needless biopsy and enhance the diagnostic accuracy, a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system can provide a second beneficial support reference. This paper aimed to evaluate the potential role of the CAD with automatic contouring and morphologic analysis in the differential of breast tumors for ultrasound (US) images. This study evaluated 118 breast lesions. The suspicious tumor contour in the digitized US image was automatically extracted by the proposed contouring algorithm. Then 20 practical morphologic features from the extracted contour were calculated and a support vector machine (SVM) classifier identified the breast tumor as benign or malignant. The area (Az) under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for the proposed CAD system was 0.91 ± 0.03. This system differentiates benign from malignant breast tumors with relative high accuracy and is therefore clinically useful to reduce patients needed for dispensable breast biopsy. (orig.)

  11. CT scanning in pediatric head trauma: correlation of clinical features with CT scan diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkoncel, Mary Ann P.; Posadas, Ma. Belen A.

    1997-01-01

    A retrospective review was conducted on 205 cases of pediatric head trauma for which cranial computed tomography scans were done at the Makati Medical Center, to determine which clinical features might positively predict an abnormality on CT scan. The clinical findings of loss of consciousness, GCS < 12, vomiting headache, seizures, and focal abnormalities on Neurologic Examination were significantly associated with abnormal findings on CT scan. However, a significant discrepancy does exist as to how accurately clinical findings do in fact predict normal and abnormal CT scan findings. Such a discrepancy allows us to conclude that a more liberal use of CT Scanning in cases of pediatric head trauma must be stressed to insure proper diagnosis. This study shows that when a patient presents with the aforementioned positive signs and symptoms, or with a focal neurologic deficit, or in combination, a 60-100 % positive prediction of abnormal CT Scan can be made. However, prediction of normal CT Scan is only 0-40%. (Author)

  12. Clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of melanoma: melanomas that lack classical clinical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mar, Victoria J; Chamberlain, Alex J; Kelly, John W; Murray, William K; Thompson, John F

    2017-10-16

    A Cancer Council Australia multidisciplinary working group is currently revising and updating the 2008 evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for the management of cutaneous melanoma. While there have been many recent improvements in treatment options for metastatic melanoma, early diagnosis remains critical to reducing mortality from the disease. Improved awareness of the atypical presentations of this common malignancy is required to achieve this. A chapter of the new guidelines was therefore developed to aid recognition of atypical melanomas. Main recommendations: Because thick, life-threatening melanomas may lack the more classical ABCD (asymmetry, border irregularity, colour variegation, diameter > 6 mm) features of melanoma, a thorough history of the lesion with regard to change in morphology and growth over time is essential. Any lesion that is changing in morphology or growing over a period of more than one month should be excised or referred for prompt expert opinion. Changes in management as a result of the guidelines: These guidelines provide greater emphasis on improved recognition of the atypical presentations of melanoma, in particular nodular, desmoplastic and acral lentiginous subtypes, with particular awareness of hypomelanotic and amelanotic lesions.

  13. The clinical pathological features, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of small intestine primary malignant tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaochuan; Mao, Zhiyuan; Su, Dan; Jiang, Zhaocai; Bai, Li

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the study was to describe and analyze the clinicopathological features and diagnosis of Chinese patients with small intestine primary malignant tumors and to explore the best therapy to small bowel adenocarcinoma (SBA). More than 26,000 patients with digestive tract malignant tumors received treatment in PLA hospital from 2000 to 2011, and among them, there were 887 patients who had small intestine primary malignant tumors, and 666 of 887 patients had the completed basic clinical documents. We retrospectively analyzed the correlation between clinical and pathological features of the 666 patients and analyzed the survival and prognosis of 173 SBA patients with follow-up data. Both the number of patients with primary malignant tumors of the small intestine and the number of patients who received chemotherapy showed an increasing trend. The ratio of male to female was 1.58:1. The male patients significantly exceed the female patients with tumors of non-ampullary duodenum, jejunum and duodenal ampulla; and most of the patients are over 60 years of age. For patients burdened with either of the pathological types of tumors, the males exceeded the females, but there was no significant difference. Abdominal pain was the main clinical manifestation for patients with tumors of non-ampullary duodenum, jejunum and ileum, and the most common clinical manifestations were jaundice and abdominal pain for patients with ampullary duodenal tumors, adenocarcinoma, neuroendocrine tumors and sarcoma. In addition, patients with stromal tumors were prone to gastrointestinal bleeding. Gastrointestinal endoscopy was the most common examinational procedure. Patients under 60 years of age were prone to surgery and chemotherapy after surgery, and patients over 60 years of age were prone to supportive treatment and chemotherapy without surgery. The medium overall survival of patients who received surgery without chemotherapy, chemotherapy after surgery, chemotherapy without surgery

  14. Genetic Fuzzy System (GFS based wavelet co-occurrence feature selection in mammogram classification for breast cancer diagnosis

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    Meenakshi M. Pawar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is significant health problem diagnosed mostly in women worldwide. Therefore, early detection of breast cancer is performed with the help of digital mammography, which can reduce mortality rate. This paper presents wrapper based feature selection approach for wavelet co-occurrence feature (WCF using Genetic Fuzzy System (GFS in mammogram classification problem. The performance of GFS algorithm is explained using mini-MIAS database. WCF features are obtained from detail wavelet coefficients at each level of decomposition of mammogram image. At first level of decomposition, 18 features are applied to GFS algorithm, which selects 5 features with an average classification success rate of 39.64%. Subsequently, at second level it selects 9 features from 36 features and the classification success rate is improved to 56.75%. For third level, 16 features are selected from 54 features and average success rate is improved to 64.98%. Lastly, at fourth level 72 features are applied to GFS, which selects 16 features and thereby increasing average success rate to 89.47%. Hence, GFS algorithm is the effective way of obtaining optimal set of feature in breast cancer diagnosis.

  15. Computer-Based Image Analysis for Plus Disease Diagnosis in Retinopathy of Prematurity: Performance of the "i-ROP" System and Image Features Associated With Expert Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataer-Cansizoglu, Esra; Bolon-Canedo, Veronica; Campbell, J Peter; Bozkurt, Alican; Erdogmus, Deniz; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Patel, Samir; Jonas, Karyn; Chan, R V Paul; Ostmo, Susan; Chiang, Michael F

    2015-11-01

    We developed and evaluated the performance of a novel computer-based image analysis system for grading plus disease in retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), and identified the image features, shapes, and sizes that best correlate with expert diagnosis. A dataset of 77 wide-angle retinal images from infants screened for ROP was collected. A reference standard diagnosis was determined for each image by combining image grading from 3 experts with the clinical diagnosis from ophthalmoscopic examination. Manually segmented images were cropped into a range of shapes and sizes, and a computer algorithm was developed to extract tortuosity and dilation features from arteries and veins. Each feature was fed into our system to identify the set of characteristics that yielded the highest-performing system compared to the reference standard, which we refer to as the "i-ROP" system. Among the tested crop shapes, sizes, and measured features, point-based measurements of arterial and venous tortuosity (combined), and a large circular cropped image (with radius 6 times the disc diameter), provided the highest diagnostic accuracy. The i-ROP system achieved 95% accuracy for classifying preplus and plus disease compared to the reference standard. This was comparable to the performance of the 3 individual experts (96%, 94%, 92%), and significantly higher than the mean performance of 31 nonexperts (81%). This comprehensive analysis of computer-based plus disease suggests that it may be feasible to develop a fully-automated system based on wide-angle retinal images that performs comparably to expert graders at three-level plus disease discrimination. Computer-based image analysis, using objective and quantitative retinal vascular features, has potential to complement clinical ROP diagnosis by ophthalmologists.

  16. Occupational methaemoglobinaemia. Mechanisms of production, features, diagnosis and management including the use of methylene blue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradberry, Sally M

    2003-01-01

    Methaemoglobin is formed by oxidation of ferrous (FeII) haem to the ferric (FeIII) state and the mechanisms by which this occurs are complex. Most cases are due to one of three processes. Firstly, direct oxidation of ferrohaemoglobin, which involves the transfer of electrons from ferrous haem to the oxidising compound. This mechanism proceeds most readily in the absence of oxygen. Secondly, indirect oxidation, a process of co-oxidation which requires haemoglobin-bound oxygen and is involved, for example, in nitrite-induced methaemoglobinaemia. Thirdly, biotransformation of a chemical to an active intermediate that initiates methaemoglobin formation by a variety of mechanisms. This is the means by which most aromatic compounds, such as amino- and nitro-derivatives of benzene, produce methaemoglobin. Methaemoglobinaemia is an uncommon occupational occurrence. Aromatic compounds are responsible for most cases, their lipophilic nature and volatility facilitating absorption during dermal and inhalational exposure, the principal routes implicated in the workplace. Methaemoglobinaemia presents clinically with symptoms and signs of tissue hypoxia. Concentrations around 80% are life-threatening. Features of toxicity may develop over hours or even days when exposure, whether by inhalation or repeated skin contact, is to relatively low concentrations of inducing chemical(s). Not all features observed in patients with methaemoglobinaemia are due to methaemoglobin formation. For example, the intravascular haemolysis caused by oxidising chemicals such as chlorates poses more risk to life than the methaemoglobinaemia that such chemicals induce. If an occupational history is taken, the diagnosis of methaemoglobinaemia should be relatively straightforward. In addition, two clinical observations may help: firstly, the victim is often less unwell than one would expect from the severity of 'cyanosis' and, secondly, the 'cyanosis' is unresponsive to oxygen therapy. Pulse oximetry is

  17. Cardio-Metabolic Features of Type 2 Diabetes Subjects Discordant in the Diagnosis of Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sa Rah Lee

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe aim of this study is to investigate the cardio-metabolic parameters and surrogate markers of insulin resistance in a discordant group of type 2 diabetes (T2DM subjects who satisfy the Adults Treatment Panel (ATP III criteria, but not the International Diabetes Federation (IDF criteria, for metabolic syndrome (MetS.MethodsWe assessed the prevalence of MetS in T2DM subjects (n=167 who were selected from subjects registered at the diabetes center of Dong-A University Medical Center. We used the ATP III criteria and the IDF criteria for the diagnosis of MetS and sorted the subjects into 2 MetS groups: one group diagnosed per ATP III criteria (MetSa and one diagnosed per IDF criteria (MetSi. We then compared the clinical characteristics, metabolic parameters (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and uric acid values and co-morbidities (prevalence of microalbuminuria, fatty liver, and cardiovascular disease between the MetSa, MetSi, and discordant MetS groups.ResultsThe prevalence of MetS in the MetSa group (73.6% was higher than in the MetSi group (62.2%. The MetS prevalence in the discordant group was 11.4%. The discordant group showed no significant differences in clinical characteristics (except waist circumference and body mass index, metabolic parameters, or prevalence of co-morbidities, as compared with subjects with MetS by both criteria.ConclusionIn this study, cardio-metabolic features of the subjects diagnosed with MetS using ATP III criteria, but not IDF criteria, are not significantly different from those of subjects diagnosed with MetS using both criteria.

  18. Recent advances in the management of chronic stable angina I: Approach to the patient, diagnosis, pathophysiology, risk stratification, and gender disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kones, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The potential importance of both prevention and personal responsibility in controlling heart disease, the leading cause of death in the USA and elsewhere, has attracted renewed attention. Coronary artery disease is preventable, using relatively simple and inexpensive lifestyle changes. The inexorable rise in the prevalence of obesity, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and hypertension, often in the risk cluster known as the metabolic syndrome, drives the ever-increasing incidence of heart disease. Population-wide improvements in personal health habits appear to be a fundamental, evidence based public health measure, yet numerous barriers prevent implementation. A common symptom in patients with coronary artery disease, classical angina refers to the typical chest pressure or discomfort that results when myocardial oxygen demand rises and coronary blood flow is reduced by fixed, atherosclerotic, obstructive lesions. Different forms of angina and diagnosis, with a short description of the significance of pain and silent ischemia, are discussed in this review. The well accepted concept of myocardial oxygen imbalance in the genesis of angina is presented with new data about clinical pathology of stable angina and acute coronary syndromes. The roles of stress electrocardiography and stress myocardial perfusion scintigraphic imaging are reviewed, along with the information these tests provide about risk and prognosis. Finally, the current status of gender disparities in heart disease is summarized. Enhanced risk stratification and identification of patients in whom procedures will meaningfully change management is an ongoing quest. Current guidelines emphasize efficient triage of patients with suspected coronary artery disease. Many experts believe the predictive value of current decision protocols for coronary artery disease still needs improvement in order to optimize outcomes, yet avoid unnecessary coronary angiograms and radiation exposure. Coronary angiography remains the

  19. Recent advances in the management of chronic stable angina I: approach to the patient, diagnosis, pathophysiology, risk stratification, and gender disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kones, Richard

    2010-08-09

    The potential importance of both prevention and personal responsibility in controlling heart disease, the leading cause of death in the USA and elsewhere, has attracted renewed attention. Coronary artery disease is preventable, using relatively simple and inexpensive lifestyle changes. The inexorable rise in the prevalence of obesity, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and hypertension, often in the risk cluster known as the metabolic syndrome, drives the ever-increasing incidence of heart disease. Population-wide improvements in personal health habits appear to be a fundamental, evidence based public health measure, yet numerous barriers prevent implementation. A common symptom in patients with coronary artery disease, classical angina refers to the typical chest pressure or discomfort that results when myocardial oxygen demand rises and coronary blood flow is reduced by fixed, atherosclerotic, obstructive lesions. Different forms of angina and diagnosis, with a short description of the significance of pain and silent ischemia, are discussed in this review. The well accepted concept of myocardial oxygen imbalance in the genesis of angina is presented with new data about clinical pathology of stable angina and acute coronary syndromes. The roles of stress electrocardiography and stress myocardial perfusion scintigraphic imaging are reviewed, along with the information these tests provide about risk and prognosis. Finally, the current status of gender disparities in heart disease is summarized. Enhanced risk stratification and identification of patients in whom procedures will meaningfully change management is an ongoing quest. Current guidelines emphasize efficient triage of patients with suspected coronary artery disease. Many experts believe the predictive value of current decision protocols for coronary artery disease still needs improvement in order to optimize outcomes, yet avoid unnecessary coronary angiograms and radiation exposure. Coronary angiography remains the

  20. Improved Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Diagnosis in Jaundiced and Non-Jaundiced Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Patients through the Combination of Routine Clinical Markers Associated to Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, María José; Saez, Marc; Figueras, Joan; Fort, Esther; Sabat, Miriam; López-Ben, Santiago; de Llorens, Rafael; Aleixandre, Rosa Núria; Peracaula, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    There is still no reliable biomarker for the diagnosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) is a tumor marker only recommended for pancreatic adenocarcinoma follow-up. One of the clinical problems lies in distinguishing between this cancer and other benign pancreatic diseases such as chronic pancreatitis. In this study we will assess the value of panels of serum molecules related to pancreatic cancer physiopathology to determine whether alone or in combination could help to discriminate between these two pathologies. CA 19-9, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), C-reactive protein, albumin, insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and IGF binding protein-3 were measured using routine clinical analyzers in a cohort of 47 pancreatic adenocarcinoma, 20 chronic pancreatitis and 15 healthy controls. The combination of CA 19-9, IGF-1 and albumin resulted in a combined area under the curve (AUC) of 0.959 with 93.6% sensitivity and 95% specificity, much higher than CA 19-9 alone. An algorithm was defined to classify the patients as chronic pancreatitis or pancreatic cancer with the above specificity and sensitivity. In an independent validation group of 20 pancreatic adenocarcinoma and 13 chronic pancreatitis patients, the combination of the four molecules classified correctly all pancreatic adenocarcinoma and 12 out of 13 chronic pancreatitis patients. Although this panel of markers should be validated in larger cohorts, the high sensitivity and specificity values and the convenience to measure these parameters in clinical laboratories shows great promise for improving pancreatic adenocarcinoma diagnosis.

  1. Improved Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Diagnosis in Jaundiced and Non-Jaundiced Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Patients through the Combination of Routine Clinical Markers Associated to Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Pathophysiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María José Ferri

    Full Text Available There is still no reliable biomarker for the diagnosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9 is a tumor marker only recommended for pancreatic adenocarcinoma follow-up. One of the clinical problems lies in distinguishing between this cancer and other benign pancreatic diseases such as chronic pancreatitis. In this study we will assess the value of panels of serum molecules related to pancreatic cancer physiopathology to determine whether alone or in combination could help to discriminate between these two pathologies.CA 19-9, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, C-reactive protein, albumin, insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1 and IGF binding protein-3 were measured using routine clinical analyzers in a cohort of 47 pancreatic adenocarcinoma, 20 chronic pancreatitis and 15 healthy controls.The combination of CA 19-9, IGF-1 and albumin resulted in a combined area under the curve (AUC of 0.959 with 93.6% sensitivity and 95% specificity, much higher than CA 19-9 alone. An algorithm was defined to classify the patients as chronic pancreatitis or pancreatic cancer with the above specificity and sensitivity. In an independent validation group of 20 pancreatic adenocarcinoma and 13 chronic pancreatitis patients, the combination of the four molecules classified correctly all pancreatic adenocarcinoma and 12 out of 13 chronic pancreatitis patients.Although this panel of markers should be validated in larger cohorts, the high sensitivity and specificity values and the convenience to measure these parameters in clinical laboratories shows great promise for improving pancreatic adenocarcinoma diagnosis.

  2. A Novel Approach for Multi Class Fault Diagnosis in Induction Machine Based on Statistical Time Features and Random Forest Classifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonje, M. Deepak; Kundu, P.; Chowdhury, A.

    2017-08-01

    Fault diagnosis and detection is the important area in health monitoring of electrical machines. This paper proposes the recently developed machine learning classifier for multi class fault diagnosis in induction machine. The classification is based on random forest (RF) algorithm. Initially, stator currents are acquired from the induction machine under various conditions. After preprocessing the currents, fourteen statistical time features are estimated for each phase of the current. These parameters are considered as inputs to the classifier. The main scope of the paper is to evaluate effectiveness of RF classifier for individual and mixed fault diagnosis in induction machine. The stator, rotor and mixed faults (stator and rotor faults) are classified using the proposed classifier. The obtained performance measures are compared with the multilayer perceptron neural network (MLPNN) classifier. The results show the much better performance measures and more accurate than MLPNN classifier. For demonstration of planned fault diagnosis algorithm, experimentally obtained results are considered to build the classifier more practical.

  3. Data-driven technology for engineering systems health management design approach, feature construction, fault diagnosis, prognosis, fusion and decisions

    CERN Document Server

    Niu, Gang

    2017-01-01

    This book introduces condition-based maintenance (CBM)/data-driven prognostics and health management (PHM) in detail, first explaining the PHM design approach from a systems engineering perspective, then summarizing and elaborating on the data-driven methodology for feature construction, as well as feature-based fault diagnosis and prognosis. The book includes a wealth of illustrations and tables to help explain the algorithms, as well as practical examples showing how to use this tool to solve situations for which analytic solutions are poorly suited. It equips readers to apply the concepts discussed in order to analyze and solve a variety of problems in PHM system design, feature construction, fault diagnosis and prognosis.

  4. Discrete Pathophysiology is Uncommon in Patients with Nonspecific Arm Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortlever, Joost T P; Janssen, Stein J; Molleman, Jeroen; Hageman, Michiel G J S; Ring, David

    2016-06-01

    Nonspecific symptoms are common in all areas of medicine. Patients and caregivers can be frustrated when an illness cannot be reduced to a discrete pathophysiological process that corresponds with the symptoms. We therefore asked the following questions: 1) Which demographic factors and psychological comorbidities are associated with change from an initial diagnosis of nonspecific arm pain to eventual identification of discrete pathophysiology that corresponds with symptoms? 2) What is the percentage of patients eventually diagnosed with discrete pathophysiology, what are those pathologies, and do they account for the symptoms? We evaluated 634 patients with an isolated diagnosis of nonspecific upper extremity pain to see if discrete pathophysiology was diagnosed on subsequent visits to the same hand surgeon, a different hand surgeon, or any physician within our health system for the same pain. There were too few patients with discrete pathophysiology at follow-up to address the primary study question. Definite discrete pathophysiology that corresponded with the symptoms was identified in subsequent evaluations by the index surgeon in one patient (0.16% of all patients) and cured with surgery (nodular fasciitis). Subsequent doctors identified possible discrete pathophysiology in one patient and speculative pathophysiology in four patients and the index surgeon identified possible discrete pathophysiology in four patients, but the five discrete diagnoses accounted for only a fraction of the symptoms. Nonspecific diagnoses are not harmful. Prospective randomized research is merited to determine if nonspecific, descriptive diagnoses are better for patients than specific diagnoses that imply pathophysiology in the absence of discrete verifiable pathophysiology.

  5. Differential Diagnosis of Patients with Inconclusive Parkinsonian Features Using [{sup 18}F]FP-CIT PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Eunkyung; Hwang, Yu Mi; Lee, Channyoung; Oh, Sun Young; Kim, Young Chul; Choe, Jae Gol; Park, Kun Woo [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sujin [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    It is often difficult to differentiate parkinsonism, especially when patients show uncertain parkinsonian features. We investigated the usefulness of dopamine transporter (DAT) imaging for the differential diagnosis of inconclusive parkinsonism using [{sup 18}F]FP-CIT PET. Twenty-four patients with inconclusive parkinsonian features at initial clinical evaluation and nine healthy controls were studied. Patients consisted of three subgroups: nine patients whose diagnoses were unclear concerning whether they had idiopathic Parkinson's disease or drug-induced parkinsonism ('PD/DIP'), nine patients who fulfilled neither the diagnostic criteria of PD nor of essential tremor ('PD/ET'), and six patients who were alleged to have either PD or atypical parkinsonian syndrome ('PD/APS'). Brain PET images were obtained 120 min after injection of 185 MBq [{sup 18}F]FP-CIT. Imaging results were quantified and compared with follow-up clinical diagnoses. Overall, 11 of 24 patients demonstrated abnormally decreased DAT availability on the PET scans, whereas 13 were normal. PET results could diagnose PD/DIP and PD/ET patients as having PD in six patients, DIP in seven, and ET in five; however, the diagnoses of all six PD/APS patients remained inconclusive. Among 15 patients who obtained a final follow-up diagnosis, the image-based diagnosis was congruent with the follow-up diagnosis in 11 patients. Four unsolved cases had normal DAT availability, but clinically progressed to PD during the follow-up period. [{sup 18}F]FP-CIT PET imaging is useful in the differential diagnosis of patients with inconclusive parkinsonian features, except in patients who show atypical features or who eventually progress to PD.

  6. Diagnosis of Alzheimer’s Disease Based on Structural MRI Images Using a Regularized Extreme Learning Machine and PCA Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Kumar Lama

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a progressive, neurodegenerative brain disorder that attacks neurotransmitters, brain cells, and nerves, affecting brain functions, memory, and behaviors and then finally causing dementia on elderly people. Despite its significance, there is currently no cure for it. However, there are medicines available on prescription that can help delay the progress of the condition. Thus, early diagnosis of AD is essential for patient care and relevant researches. Major challenges in proper diagnosis of AD using existing classification schemes are the availability of a smaller number of training samples and the larger number of possible feature representations. In this paper, we present and compare AD diagnosis approaches using structural magnetic resonance (sMR images to discriminate AD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI, and healthy control (HC subjects using a support vector machine (SVM, an import vector machine (IVM, and a regularized extreme learning machine (RELM. The greedy score-based feature selection technique is employed to select important feature vectors. In addition, a kernel-based discriminative approach is adopted to deal with complex data distributions. We compare the performance of these classifiers for volumetric sMR image data from Alzheimer’s disease neuroimaging initiative (ADNI datasets. Experiments on the ADNI datasets showed that RELM with the feature selection approach can significantly improve classification accuracy of AD from MCI and HC subjects.

  7. The Pathophysiology of Insomnia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenson, Jessica C.; Kay, Daniel B.

    2015-01-01

    Insomnia disorder is characterized by chronic dissatisfaction with sleep quantity or quality that is associated with difficulty falling asleep, frequent nighttime awakenings with difficulty returning to sleep, and/or awakening earlier in the morning than desired. Although progress has been made in our understanding of the nature, etiology, and pathophysiology of insomnia, there is still no universally accepted model. Greater understanding of the pathophysiology of insomnia may provide important information regarding how, and under what conditions, the disorder develops and is maintained as well as potential targets for prevention and treatment. The aims of this report are (1) to summarize current knowledge on the pathophysiology of insomnia and (2) to present a model of the pathophysiology of insomnia that considers evidence from various domains of research. Working within several models of insomnia, evidence for the pathophysiology of the disorder is presented across levels of analysis, from genetic to molecular and cellular mechanisms, neural circuitry, physiologic mechanisms, sleep behavior, and self-report. We discuss the role of hyperarousal as an overarching theme that guides our conceptualization of insomnia. Finally, we propose a model of the pathophysiology of insomnia that integrates the various types of evidence presented. PMID:25846534

  8. Dysbetalipoproteinaemia-clinical and pathophysiological features ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. Dysbetalipoproteinaemia (type III hyperlipidaemia, broad-beta disease) is a highly atherogenic genetic disorder of lipoprotein metabolism. It presents with a severe mixed hyperlipidaemia in which the ratio of total cholesterol to triglycerides is typically 2:1. There is a high incidence of atherosclerotic complications ...

  9. Pathophysiology of Glucocorticoid Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitellius, Géraldine; Trabado, Séverine; Bouligand, Jérôme; Delemer, Brigitte; Lombès, Marc

    2018-06-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC), such as cortisol or dexamethasone, control various physiological functions, notably those involved in development, metabolism, inflammatory processes and stress, and exert most of their effects upon binding to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR, encoded by NR3C1 gene). GC signaling follows several consecutive steps leading to target gene transactivation, including ligand binding, nuclear translocation of ligand-activated GR complexes, DNA binding, coactivator interaction and recruitment of functional transcriptional machinery. Any step may be impaired and may account for altered GC signaling. Partial or generalized glucocorticoid resistance syndrome may result in a reduced level of functional GR, a decreased hormone affinity and binding, a defect in nuclear GR translocation, a decrease or lack of DNA binding and/or post-transcriptional GR modifications. To date, 26 loss-of-function NR3C1 mutations have been reported in the context of hypertension, hirsutism, adrenal hyperplasia or metabolic disorders. These clinical signs are generally associated with biological features including hypercortisolism without negative regulatory feedback loop on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Patients had often low plasma aldosterone and renin levels despite hypertension. Only one GR gain-of-function mutation has been described associating Cushing's syndrome phenotype with normal urinary-free cortisol. Some GR polymorphisms (ER22/23EK, GR-9β) have been linked to glucocorticoid resistance and a healthier metabolic profile whereas some others seemed to be associated with GC hypersensitivity (N363S, BclI), increasing cardiovascular risk (diabetes type 2, visceral obesity). This review focuses on the earlier findings on the pathophysiology of GR signaling and presents criteria facilitating identification of novel NR3C1 mutations in selected patients. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Radiological diagnosis of renal osteodystrophy with reference to clinical features in patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebsch, P.; Trattnig, S.; Barton, P.; Seidl, G.

    1989-01-01

    Pathophysiological, histological and radiological findings in renal osteodystrophy are described. Special emphasis is laid on secondary hyperparathyroidism. Preliminary results of the authors' investigations show a good correlation between radiological findings in the phalanges of the hand and the concentration of parathyroid hormone (PTH) in 14 patients. The concentration of the hormone in the blood was measured by a new 'two-site' immunoradiometric assay, which is specific for the intact, biologically active hormone. Patients with high concentrations of PTH in the blood tended to have more severe radiological changes. In 4 patients for whom radiographs of the hands revealed no pathologic findings, normal PTH concentrations in the blood were measured by this method, whereas the conventional assay gave elevated hormone concentrations for the same patients. This is due to the lack of specificity of the conventional method for the intact, biologically active hormone. Nevertheless, further investigations are needed to confirm these findings. (orig.) [de

  11. A novel computer-aided diagnosis system for breast MRI based on feature selection and ensemble learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei; Li, Zhe; Chu, Jinghui

    2017-04-01

    Breast cancer is a common cancer among women. With the development of modern medical science and information technology, medical imaging techniques have an increasingly important role in the early detection and diagnosis of breast cancer. In this paper, we propose an automated computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) framework for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The scheme consists of an ensemble of several machine learning-based techniques, including ensemble under-sampling (EUS) for imbalanced data processing, the Relief algorithm for feature selection, the subspace method for providing data diversity, and Adaboost for improving the performance of base classifiers. We extracted morphological, various texture, and Gabor features. To clarify the feature subsets' physical meaning, subspaces are built by combining morphological features with each kind of texture or Gabor feature. We tested our proposal using a manually segmented Region of Interest (ROI) data set, which contains 438 images of malignant tumors and 1898 images of normal tissues or benign tumors. Our proposal achieves an area under the ROC curve (AUC) value of 0.9617, which outperforms most other state-of-the-art breast MRI CADx systems. Compared with other methods, our proposal significantly reduces the false-positive classification rate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Intelligence diagnosis method for roller bearings using features of AE signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, J; Wang, H Q; Wang, F; Yang, J F; Liu, W B

    2012-01-01

    Rolling bearings are important components in rotating machines, which are wildly used in industrial production. The fault diagnosis technology plays a very important role for quality and life of machines. Based on symptom parameters of acoustic emission (AE) signals, this paper presents an intelligent diagnosis method for roller bearings using the principal component analysis, rough sets, and BP neural network to detect faults and distinguish fault types. The principal component analysis and the rough sets algorithm are used to reduce details of time-domain symptom parameters for training the BP neural network. The BP neural network, which is used for condition diagnosis of roller bearings, can obtain good convergence using the symptom parameters acquired by the principal component analysis and the rough sets during learning, and automatically distinguish fault types during diagnosing. Practical examples are provided to verify the efficiency of the proposed method.

  13. The pathophysiology of migraine: implications for clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Andrew

    2018-02-01

    The understanding of migraine pathophysiology is advancing rapidly. Improved characterisation and diagnosis of its clinical features have led to the view of migraine as a complex, variable disorder of nervous system function rather than simply a vascular headache. Recent studies have provided important new insights into its genetic causes, anatomical and physiological features, and pharmacological mechanisms. The identification of new migraine-associated genes, the visualisation of brain regions that are activated at the earliest stages of a migraine attack, a greater appreciation of the potential role of the cervical nerves, and the recognition of the crucial role for neuropeptides are among the advances that have led to novel targets for migraine therapy. Future management of migraine will have the capacity to tailor treatments based on the distinct mechanisms of migraine that affect individual patients. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Pathophysiology and Biomarkers in Acute Ischemic Stroke – A Review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The pathophysiology of ischemic stroke is complex, and majorly involves excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation, blood-brain barrier dysfunction, apoptosis, etc. Several of the biomarkers are related to these pathophysiologic mechanisms and they may have applications in stroke prediction, diagnosis, assessment, ...

  15. Fault Diagnosis of Rotating Machinery Based on Multisensor Information Fusion Using SVM and Time-Domain Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-li Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multisensor information fusion, when applied to fault diagnosis, the time-space scope, and the quantity of information are expanded compared to what could be acquired by a single sensor, so the diagnostic object can be described more comprehensively. This paper presents a methodology of fault diagnosis in rotating machinery using multisensor information fusion that all the features are calculated using vibration data in time domain to constitute fusional vector and the support vector machine (SVM is used for classification. The effectiveness of the presented methodology is tested by three case studies: diagnostic of faulty gear, rolling bearing, and identification of rotor crack. For each case study, the sensibilities of the features are analyzed. The results indicate that the peak factor is the most sensitive feature in the twelve time-domain features for identifying gear defect, and the mean, amplitude square, root mean square, root amplitude, and standard deviation are all sensitive for identifying gear, rolling bearing, and rotor crack defect comparatively.

  16. Neonatal Features of The Prader-Willi Syndrome; The Case for Making The Diagnosis During The First Week of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çizmecioğlu, Filiz Mine; Jones, Jeremy Huw; Forsyth Paterson, Wendy; Kherra, Sakina; Kourime, Mariam; McGowan, Ruth; Shaikh, M Guftar; Donaldson, Malcolm

    2018-03-19

    Early diagnosis is of proven benefit in Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). We therefore examined key perinatal features to aid early recognition. Data were collected from case records of subjects attending a multi-disciplinary clinic and from a retrospective birth questionnaire. Ninety patients (54 male: 36 female) were seen between 1991-2015, most with paternal deletion (n=56) or maternal isodisomy (n=26). Features included cryptorchidism in 94% males, preterm birth (26%), birthweight 28 days: 1-12 months in 7; and 3.75-10.5 years in 5. Typical PWS features in these 12 infants included hypotonia (100%), feeding difficulties (75%), cryptorchidism (83% males) and reduced FM (66%). Causes other than PWS including neuromuscular disease were considered in nine patients. Neonatal hypotonia, reduced FM, feeding difficulties and cryptorchidism should immediately suggest PWS, yet late diagnosis continues in some cases. Awareness of the typical features of PWS in newborn units is required to allow prompt detection even in the presence of confounding factors such as prematurity.

  17. Imaging diagnosis--positive contrast peritoneographic features of true diaphragmatic hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jihye; Kim, Hyunwook; Kim, Mieun; Yoon, Junghee

    2009-01-01

    A true diaphragmatic hernia is a congenital diaphragmatic malformation that can appear identical to a peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia (PPDH). True diaphragmatic hernias are rare in dogs. Herein we describe the use of positive contrast peritoneography for diagnosis of a true diaphragmatic hernia in two dogs.

  18. Diagnosis of Hair Loss: Clinical features of common causes of hair loss

    OpenAIRE

    Coupe, Robert L.M.

    1992-01-01

    Common causes of hair loss include androgenic hair loss, alopecia areata, trichotillomania, tinea capitis, telogen effluvium, and traction alopecia. The author discusses their distinguishing clinical features and those of less common alopecias.

  19. Fault diagnosis of automobile hydraulic brake system using statistical features and support vector machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegadeeshwaran, R.; Sugumaran, V.

    2015-02-01

    Hydraulic brakes in automobiles are important components for the safety of passengers; therefore, the brakes are a good subject for condition monitoring. The condition of the brake components can be monitored by using the vibration characteristics. On-line condition monitoring by using machine learning approach is proposed in this paper as a possible solution to such problems. The vibration signals for both good as well as faulty conditions of brakes were acquired from a hydraulic brake test setup with the help of a piezoelectric transducer and a data acquisition system. Descriptive statistical features were extracted from the acquired vibration signals and the feature selection was carried out using the C4.5 decision tree algorithm. There is no specific method to find the right number of features required for classification for a given problem. Hence an extensive study is needed to find the optimum number of features. The effect of the number of features was also studied, by using the decision tree as well as Support Vector Machines (SVM). The selected features were classified using the C-SVM and Nu-SVM with different kernel functions. The results are discussed and the conclusion of the study is presented.

  20. Clinician Ratings of Vulnerable and Grandiose Narcissistic Features: Implications for an Expanded Narcissistic Personality Disorder Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Kasey; Zimmerman, Mark

    2017-12-07

    Conceptualizations of narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (American Psychiatric Association, 2013) have been criticized for focusing too exclusively on grandiose narcissistic traits (e.g., exploitativeness and entitlement) and failing to capture vulnerable narcissistic features (e.g., feelings of inadequacy). We extended prior grandiose and vulnerable narcissism research by examining the degree to which clinician ratings of traits related to grandiosity overlapped with traits related to vulnerability in a large sample of adult outpatients (N = 2,149). We also examined relations with other psychopathology and psychosocial impairment for both (a) narcissistic trait configurations including both vulnerable and grandiose features and (b) configurations focusing on grandiose narcissistic traits. Structural results indicated that some personality features related to vulnerability (e.g., perfectionism and inadequacy) were unrelated to ratings of grandiose narcissistic personality features. Additionally, our results suggest that emphasizing vulnerable features within narcissism trait configurations may increase NPD's overlap with other disorders (e.g., borderline personality disorder and social anxiety) and does not appear to discriminate pathological narcissism from antisocial personality disorder, a disorder with which NPD is highly comorbid. Finally, scores on configurations defined only by grandiose narcissistic traits related positively to all psychosocial impairment indicators, although configurations also including vulnerable features generally showed stronger relations with psychosocial impairment. The implications of these findings in regard to future conceptualizations of NPD are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Computer aided diagnosis system for Alzheimer disease using brain diffusion tensor imaging features selected by Pearson's correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graña, M; Termenon, M; Savio, A; Gonzalez-Pinto, A; Echeveste, J; Pérez, J M; Besga, A

    2011-09-20

    The aim of this paper is to obtain discriminant features from two scalar measures of Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) data, Fractional Anisotropy (FA) and Mean Diffusivity (MD), and to train and test classifiers able to discriminate Alzheimer's Disease (AD) patients from controls on the basis of features extracted from the FA or MD volumes. In this study, support vector machine (SVM) classifier was trained and tested on FA and MD data. Feature selection is done computing the Pearson's correlation between FA or MD values at voxel site across subjects and the indicative variable specifying the subject class. Voxel sites with high absolute correlation are selected for feature extraction. Results are obtained over an on-going study in Hospital de Santiago Apostol collecting anatomical T1-weighted MRI volumes and DTI data from healthy control subjects and AD patients. FA features and a linear SVM classifier achieve perfect accuracy, sensitivity and specificity in several cross-validation studies, supporting the usefulness of DTI-derived features as an image-marker for AD and to the feasibility of building Computer Aided Diagnosis systems for AD based on them. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Diagnosis, pathophysiology, and management of cluster headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Jan; May, Arne

    2018-01-01

    Cluster headache is a trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia characterised by extremely painful, strictly unilateral, short-lasting headache attacks accompanied by ipsilateral autonomic symptoms or the sense of restlessness and agitation, or both. The severity of the disorder has major effects on the patient's quality of life and, in some cases, might lead to suicidal ideation. Cluster headache is now thought to involve a synchronised abnormal activity in the hypothalamus, the trigeminovascular system, and the autonomic nervous system. The hypothalamus appears to play a fundamental role in the generation of a permissive state that allows the initiation of an episode, whereas the attacks are likely to require the involvement of the peripheral nervous system. Triptans are the most effective drugs to treat an acute cluster headache attack. Monoclonal antibodies against calcitonin gene-related peptide, a crucial neurotransmitter of the trigeminal system, are under investigation for the preventive treatment of cluster headache. These studies will increase our understanding of the disorder and perhaps reveal other therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [The pathophysiology and diagnosis of anxiety disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyoshi, Jotaro

    2012-01-01

    In addition to genetic factors, the role of epigenetic and other environmental factors in the promotion of anxiety disorder has attracted much attention in psychiatric research. When stress is encountered in the environment, the hypothalamus-pituitary adrenal system (HPA system) is activated and cortisol is secreted. CRHR gene function is closely related to this response. As a result of haplotype analysis of CRHR genes in depression and panic disorder patients, it was found that genetic polymorphism of CRHR1 and CRHR2 was related to both disorders. It is reported that abused children are more susceptible to developing depression and anxiety disorder upon reaching adulthood, but there also exist genetic polymorphisms that may moderate this relationship. Direct methylation of DNA (typically repressing gene expression) and modification of chromatin structure (complexes of histone proteins and DNA) via acetylation (typically facilitating gene expression) represent epigenetic modifications that are thought to influence behavioral phenotypes. For example, it is rare that schizophrenia develops in identical twins brought up together in the same environment, and thus phenotypic differences cannot be explained simply by genetic polymorphism. We also evaluated salivary cortisol and amylase reactivity (indices of the HPA system and sympathoadrenal medullary system, respectfully) after electrical stimulation stress and Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) administration. Here we found differences in the cortisol stress response between electrical stimulation and TSST stressors, in contrast to the theory of Selye. In addition, we found alterations in activity patterns and difficulties integrating sensorimotor information in panic disorder patients, suggesting links between sensorimotor integration and stress in panic disorder. Moreover, state and trait anxiety may be associated with stabilograph factors.

  4. [Clinical features, diagnosis and surgical treatment of solitary air cysts of the lungs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudovskiĭ, L M; Platov, I I; Korenev, A E

    2001-01-01

    86 cases of solitary air cysts of the lung (6.83% of all maldevelopments) were analyzed. This maldevelopment of bronchial tree is found most often in men (10:7) and more often in the right lung than in the left (18:13). There were no clinical symptoms in 33 (38.37%) patients. Uncomplicated course of the disease was in 51 (59.3%) patients, the disease was complicated by infection in 28 (32.56%) patients. Solitary bronchial cysts were complicated by spontaneous pneumothorax in 8.14% cases, by hemoptysis--in 6.98%. Roentgenography of the chest thorax on two projections and tomography (including CT) are enough for diagnosis of solitary air bronchial cysts. Bronchoscopy, bronchography and APG are not much informative in diagnosis of cysts and should be used on special indications. Cystectomy or cystectomy with partial resection of lung tissue were performed in 67.14% patients with good results.

  5. Allergic fungal sinusitis - new aspects of clinical features, laboratory diagnosis and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsić-Arsenijević Valentina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS is a chronic non­invasive disease. Hypersensitive immune response is usually initiated by allergens of filamentous fungi Aspergillus, Penicillium, Cladosporium, Fusarium, Bipolaris, Curvularia and Alternaria. AFS is a clinical and immune analogue of the allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA as the sinus exudate resembles that of the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL in ABPA. Patients with AFS are usually immunocompetent, atopic and males. The most common symptoms are headache, fullness in the paranasal sinuses, and difficult breathing through the nose. Clinically, there is a chronic mucosal inflammation and histopathologic finding shows allergic mucin and eosinophils. Specific staining methods, Gomori’s Methenamine Silver (GMS or periodic acid­Schiff (PAS, are used for microscopic visualisation of hyphae, which are, in addition to the isolated fungi, most reliable evidence of AFS. Computerized tomography (CT of paranasal sinuses shows the areas of hyperdensity. In cases where AFS is complicated by the erosion of bone tissue, discontinuation of the sinus bone wall can be seen. Significant laboratory finding, which correlate highly with the AFS, are high immunoglobulin E (IgE antibodies specific for fungi, detected by the skin prick test or in serum. Treatment is often surgical, and after removal of the allergic mucin, therapy involves oral and nasal corticosteroids, immunotherapy and locally applied antimycotics (with verified fungal etiology. During treatment, the total/specific IgE is monitored - concentration increases with the development of AFS, and decreases during the improvement process. Knowledge of the pathophysiological mechanisms of AFS is scarce, and represents the focus of further research in order to define an optimal diagnostic and therapeutic approach. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke republike Srbije, br. OI175034

  6. Abdominal tuberculosis: Imaging features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Jose M. [Department of Radiology, Hospital de S. Joao, Porto (Portugal)]. E-mail: jmpjesus@yahoo.com; Madureira, Antonio J. [Department of Radiology, Hospital de S. Joao, Porto (Portugal); Vieira, Alberto [Department of Radiology, Hospital de S. Joao, Porto (Portugal); Ramos, Isabel [Department of Radiology, Hospital de S. Joao, Porto (Portugal)

    2005-08-01

    Radiological findings of abdominal tuberculosis can mimic those of many different diseases. A high level of suspicion is required, especially in high-risk population. In this article, we will describe barium studies, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) findings of abdominal tuberculosis (TB), with emphasis in the latest. We will illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis and describe imaging features that differentiate it from other inflammatory and neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma and Crohn's disease. As tuberculosis can affect any organ in the abdomen, emphasis is placed to ileocecal involvement, lymphadenopathy, peritonitis and solid organ disease (liver, spleen and pancreas). A positive culture or hystologic analysis of biopsy is still required in many patients for definitive diagnosis. Learning objectives:1.To review the relevant pathophysiology of abdominal tuberculosis. 2.Illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis.

  7. Abdominal tuberculosis: Imaging features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Jose M.; Madureira, Antonio J.; Vieira, Alberto; Ramos, Isabel

    2005-01-01

    Radiological findings of abdominal tuberculosis can mimic those of many different diseases. A high level of suspicion is required, especially in high-risk population. In this article, we will describe barium studies, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) findings of abdominal tuberculosis (TB), with emphasis in the latest. We will illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis and describe imaging features that differentiate it from other inflammatory and neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma and Crohn's disease. As tuberculosis can affect any organ in the abdomen, emphasis is placed to ileocecal involvement, lymphadenopathy, peritonitis and solid organ disease (liver, spleen and pancreas). A positive culture or hystologic analysis of biopsy is still required in many patients for definitive diagnosis. Learning objectives:1.To review the relevant pathophysiology of abdominal tuberculosis. 2.Illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis

  8. Unexpected diagnosis of superficial neurofibroma in a lesion with imaging features of a vascular malformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Keefe, Patrick; Reid, Janet; Morrison, Stuart [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Department of Radiology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Vidimos, Allison [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Department of Dermatology, Cleveland, OH (United States); DiFiore, John [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2005-12-01

    Plexiform neurofibroma is a pathognomonic, often disabling feature of neurofibromatosis type I. Although the target-like appearance of deep plexiform neurofibroma on T2-weighted MRI has been well-described, a second superficial form of plexiform neurofibroma has differing imaging features. We report a 15-year-old boy who presented with multiple cutaneous lesions exhibiting clinical and imaging characteristics of a venolymphatic malformation. These lesions were histologically proved to represent superficial plexiform neurofibromas. We wish to emphasize the unique MR findings of superficial plexiform neurofibromas; these findings are different from the imaging characteristics of the deep form and can be confused with a low-flow vascular malformation. (orig.)

  9. Computer-Aided Diagnosis for Breast Ultrasound Using Computerized BI-RADS Features and Machine Learning Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Juan; Alam, S Kaisar; Garra, Brian; Zhang, Yingtao; Ahmed, Tahira

    2016-04-01

    This work identifies effective computable features from the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS), to develop a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system for breast ultrasound. Computerized features corresponding to ultrasound BI-RADs categories were designed and tested using a database of 283 pathology-proven benign and malignant lesions. Features were selected based on classification performance using a "bottom-up" approach for different machine learning methods, including decision tree, artificial neural network, random forest and support vector machine. Using 10-fold cross-validation on the database of 283 cases, the highest area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) was 0.84 from a support vector machine with 77.7% overall accuracy; the highest overall accuracy, 78.5%, was from a random forest with the AUC 0.83. Lesion margin and orientation were optimum features common to all of the different machine learning methods. These features can be used in CAD systems to help distinguish benign from worrisome lesions. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. All rights reserved.

  10. Sciatica-like symptoms and the sacroiliac joint: clinical features and differential diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, L.H.; Nijssen, P.G.; Tijssen, C.C.; Middendorp, J.J. van; Schieving, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare the clinical features of patients with sacroiliac joint (SIJ)-related sciatica-like symptoms to those with sciatica from nerve root compression and to investigate the necessity to perform radiological imaging in patients with sciatica-like symptoms derived from the SIJ. METHODS:

  11. Imaging Alzheimer's disease pathophysiology with PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Porcello Schilling

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Alzheimer's disease (AD has been reconceptualised as a dynamic pathophysiological process characterized by preclinical, mild cognitive impairment (MCI, and dementia stages. Positron emission tomography (PET associated with various molecular imaging agents reveals numerous aspects of dementia pathophysiology, such as brain amyloidosis, tau accumulation, neuroreceptor changes, metabolism abnormalities and neuroinflammation in dementia patients. In the context of a growing shift toward presymptomatic early diagnosis and disease-modifying interventions, PET molecular imaging agents provide an unprecedented means of quantifying the AD pathophysiological process, monitoring disease progression, ascertaining whether therapies engage their respective brain molecular targets, as well as quantifying pharmacological responses. In the present study, we highlight the most important contributions of PET in describing brain molecular abnormalities in AD.

  12. Preeclampsia: from Pathophysiology to Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaculini Enton

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia is a multisystem disorder unique to human pregnancy and is its most common glomerular complication. It occurs in 2% to 8% of pregnancies and is a major contributor to maternal mortality worldwide. Although the pathophysiology of this syndrome is not fully understood, many pathogenetic mechanisms are involved in this disorder. The role of the placenta is crucial in the development of this disorder. Some pathogenetic mechanisms involved in this disease comprise defective deep placentation, autoantibodies to type-1 angiotensin II receptor, endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress, platelet and thrombin activation, intravascular inflammation, and the imbalance between angiogenic and antiangiogenic factors which is thought to be one of the most crucial mechanisms. Further understanding of the full picture could enhance our current knowledge of the pathogenesis of preeclampsia and improve its treatment. Thus, based on specific biomarkers the diagnosis and subclassification of preeclampsia might be more accurate in identifying patients at risk, monitoring disease progression and providing effective interventions

  13. Pathophysiology of diurnal drooling in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalf, J.G.; Munneke, M.; Engel-Hoek, L. van den; Swart, B.J.M. de; Borm, G.F.; Bloem, B.R.; Zwarts, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Drooling is an incapacitating feature of Parkinson's disease. Better pathophysiological insights are needed to improve treatment. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the cause of drooling is multifactorial. We examined 15 patients with Parkinson's disease with distinct diurnal saliva loss

  14. Clinical features for diagnosis and management of patients with PRDM12 congenital insensitivity to pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Stella; Malik Sharif, Saghira; Chen, Ya-Chun; Valente, Enza-Maria; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Sheridan, Eamonn; Bennett, Christopher; Woods, Geoffrey

    2016-08-01

    Congenital insensitivity to pain (CIP) is a rare extreme phenotype characterised by an inability to perceive pain present from birth due to lack of, or malfunction of, nociceptors. PRDM12 has recently been identified as a new gene that can cause CIP. The full phenotype and natural history have not yet been reported. We have ascertained five adult patients and report their clinical features. Based on our findings, and those of previous patients, we describe the natural history of the PRDM12-CIP disorder, and derive diagnostic and management features to guide the clinical management of patients. PRDM12-CIP is a distinct and diagnosable disorder, and requires specific clinical management to minimise predictable complications. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  15. Calorimetric features of IgM gammopathies. Implication for patient’s diagnosis and monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krumova, Sashka; Todinova, Svetla; Danailova, Avgustina [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., bl. 21, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Petkova, Violeta; Dimitrova, Keranka; Gartcheva, Lidia [National Specialized Hospital for Active Treating of Haematological Diseases, Sofia 1756 (Bulgaria); Taneva, Stefka G., E-mail: stefka.germanova@ehu.es [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., bl. 21, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Unidad de Biofísica (CSIC-UPV/EHU) and Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular, Universidad del País Vasco, 48080 Bilbao (Spain)

    2015-09-10

    Highlights: • DSC reveals distinct calorimetric features for IgM gammopaties. • Calorimetry sets of IgM multiple myeloma and Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia patients. • DSC features correlate with the level of involved IgM heavy/light chains. • DSC and “Heavylite” are complementary methods for patients diagnostics/monitoring. - Abstract: The serum proteome of patients featuring immunoglobulin M (IgM) gammopathy and diagnosed as having IgM multiple myeloma or Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia was characterized by differential scanning calorimetry and HevyLite™ (HLC) assay. The thermodynamic properties of the thermograms and their deviation from the typical healthy thermogram were found to correlate with the monoclonal protein concentration and the level of the involved (monoclonal) IgM heavy/light chains. Patients monitoring during treatment showed that the variations in the shape of the DSC profiles corresponded to fluctuations of the IgM heavy/light chain levels verifying the two parameters as non-invasive markers for disease progression.

  16. Differential diagnosis of mechanical bowel obstruction and paralytic ileus on CT features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Yong Sun; Kim, Mi Young; Suh, Chang Hae; Chung, Won Kyun; Kim, Kyung Rae; Kim, Kyung Kook; Shin, Yong Woon

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate CT findings for the differential diagnosis of mechanical bowel obstruction and paralytic ileus. Without information relating to clinical or operative findings, we retrospectively analyzed the CT scans of 24 patients with mechanical bowel obstruction and 19 patients with paralytic ileus. Final diagnosis was confirmed by operation (n=26), or by clinical symptoms, radiologic findings and follow-up study CT findings were obtained:1) the diameter of the most dilated part of the small bowel, and the thickness and enhancing pattern of the dilated small bowel wall;2) the diameter of the most dilated part of the descending colon and the ratio of the diameter of the small bowel to that of the descending colon;3) the number of transitional zones, length and thickness and 4) associated ascites and its location. The mean diameters of the most dilated part of the small bowel in mechanical bowel obstruction and paralytic ileus were 3.6cm and 2.9cm, respectively. The diameter of the small bowel in mechanical bowel obstruction was significantly greater than in paralytic ileus(p<.05). The mean thickness of dilated small bowel wall was 4.0mm in mechanical bowel obstruction and 2.4mm in paralytic ileus, and target-like enhancement was prominent in mechanical bowel obstruction(46%)(p<.05). The mean diameter of the most dilated part of the descending colon was not significantly different to that of the most dilated part of the small bowel, but the ratio of the diameter of the small bowel to that of the colon was 2.9 in mechanical bowel obstruction and 1.9 in paralytic ileus, respectively, which was statistically significant(p<.05). A transitional zone was seen in 23 cases(96%) of mechanical bowel obstruction and in nine (47%) of paralytic ileus. In mechanical bowel obstruction, mean transitional zone length was 2cm, shorter than that of paralytic ileus(3.4cm)(p<.05) The thickness of transitional zone and the presence of ascites and its locations were not significantly

  17. Current Approaches to Diagnosis and Classification Features of Neuroosteoarthropathy Charcot (literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balatiuk Irina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article provides the analysis of the publications of domestic and foreign authors on such complication of diabetes as diabetic Charcot osteoarthropathy. It formulates modern domestic classification of diabetic foot syndrome. It has been stated that diabetic foot syndrome is a serious medical and social problem, due to the high level of disability of patients, it causes significant social and economic losses to society. Pathogenetic basis for the development of diabetic osteoarthropathy is a combination of uncontrolled bone resorption and the lack of sensitivity of the defense, which leads to the destruction of joints. The gold standard for diagnosis of Charcot osteoarthropathy is X-ray densitometry that allows you to objectively assess the state of bone mineral density.

  18. Anxiety Level and Descriptive Features of Women Requesting Mammography at Early Diagnosis Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadime Gok Ozer

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: This research was conducted as a descriptive study for the purpose of determining the level of anxiety of women requesting to have mammography done in Denizli State Hospital at the Early Diagnosis Center. METHODS: The research population was comprised of all individuals who came to the Early Diagnosis Center between December 2005 and May 2006 to have mammography done. Between these dates refer to the center (101 persons and women who received oral onamlari working group formed. Data were collected using a survey form and Beck Anxiety Inventory in face-to-face interviews. In the analysis of the data, number and percentage calculations, t test, Kruskal Wallis and Mann Whitney U tests were used. RESULTS: The mean age of the women participating in the research was 50.68±7.43 years. The majority (71.3% of the women were housewives, married (89.1%, had a child (97.0%, did not have a family history of breast cancer (86.1%, had not previously been diagnosed with any kind of cancer (92.1%, had not had any previous breast-related illness (84.2%, had not had radiation therapy for any reason (86.1%. A statistically significant association was found between women's status of having previously had radiation therapy and their anxiety level (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: The anxiety level of women who had previously had radiation therapy for any reason was found to be higher. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2009; 8(4.000: 333-338

  19. Obesity: Pathophysiology and Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Obesity presents a major health hazard of the 21st century. It promotes co-morbid diseases such as heart disease, type 2 diabetes, obstructive sleep apnea, certain types of cancer, and osteoarthritis. Excessive energy intake, physical inactivity, and genetic susceptibility are main causal factors for obesity, while gene mutations, endocrine disorders, medication, or psychiatric illnesses may be underlying causes in some cases. The development and maintenance of obesity may involve central pathophysiological mechanisms such as impaired brain circuit regulation and neuroendocrine hormone dysfunction. Dieting and physical exercise offer the mainstays of obesity treatment, and anti-obesity drugs may be taken in conjunction to reduce appetite or fat absorption. Bariatric surgeries may be performed in overtly obese patients to lessen stomach volume and nutrient absorption, and induce faster satiety. This review provides a summary of literature on the pathophysiological studies of obesity and discusses relevant therapeutic strategies for managing obesity.

  20. Characterization of the major histopathological components of thyroid nodules using sonographic textural features for clinical diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shao-Jer; Yu, Sung-Nien; Tzeng, Jeh-En; Chen, Yen-Ting; Chang, Ku-Yaw; Cheng, Kuo-Sheng; Hsiao, Fu-Tsung; Wei, Chang-Kuo

    2009-02-01

    In this study, the characteristic sonographic textural feature that represents the major histopathologic components of the thyroid nodules was objectively quantified to facilitate clinical diagnosis and management. A total of 157 regions-of-interest thyroid ultrasound image was recruited in the study. The sonographic system used was the GE LOGIQ 700), (General Electric Healthcare, Chalfant St. Giles, UK). The parameters affecting image acquisition were kept in the same condition for all lesions. Commonly used texture analysis methods were applied to characterize thyroid ultrasound images. Image features were classified according to the corresponding pathologic findings. To estimate their relevance and performance to classification, ReliefF was used as a feature selector. Among the various textural features, the sum average value derived from co-occurrence matrix can well reflect echogenicity and can effectively differentiate between follicles and fibrosis base thyroid nodules. Fibrosis shows lowest echogenicity and lowest difference sum average value. Enlarged follicles show highest echogenicity and difference sum average values. Papillary cancer or follicular tumors show the difference sum average values and echogenicity between. The rule of thumb for the echogenicity is that the more follicles are mixed in, the higher the echo of the follicular tumor and papillary cancer will be and vice versa for fibrosis mixed. Areas with intermediate and lower echo should address the possibility of follicular or papillary neoplasm mixed with either follicles or fibrosis. These areas provide more cellular information for ultrasound guided aspiration

  1. Diagnosis of OCD Patients Using Drawing Features of Bender Gestalt Shapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boostani R.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Since psychological tests such as questionnaire or drawing tests are almost qualitative, their results carry a degree of uncertainty and sometimes subjectivity. The deficiency of all drawing tests is that the assessment is carried out after drawing the objects and lots of information such as pen angle, speed, curvature and pressure are missed through the test. In other words, the psychologists cannot assess their patients while running the tests. One of the famous drawing tests to measure the degree of Obsession Compulsion Disorder (OCD is the Bender Gestalt, though its reliability is not promising. Objective: The main objective of this study is to make the Bender Gestalt test quantitative; therefore, an optical pen along with a digital tablet is utilized to preserve the key drawing features of OCD patients during the test. Materials and Methods: Among a large population of patients who referred to a special clinic of OCD, 50 under therapy subjects voluntarily took part in this study. In contrast, 50 subjects with no sign of OCD performed the test as a control group. This test contains 9 shapes and the participants were not constraint to draw the shapes in a certain interval of time; consequently, to classify the stream of feature vectors (samples through drawing Hidden Markov Model (HMM is employed and its flexibility increased by incorporating the fuzzy technique into its learning scheme. Results: Applying fuzzy HMM classifier to the data stream of subjects could classify two groups up to 95.2% accuracy, whereas the results by applying the standard HMM resulted in 94.5%. In addition, multi-layer perceptron (MLP, as a strong static classifier, is applied to the features and resulted in 86.6% accuracy. Conclusion: Applying the pair of T-test to the results implies a significant supremacy of the fuzzy HMM to the standard HMM and MLP classifiers.

  2. Diagnosis of the OCD Patients using Drawing Features of the Bender Gestalt Shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boostani, R; Asadi, F; Mohammadi, N

    2017-03-01

    Since psychological tests such as questionnaire or drawing tests are almost qualitative, their results carry a degree of uncertainty and sometimes subjectivity. The deficiency of all drawing tests is that the assessment is carried out after drawing the objects and lots of information such as pen angle, speed, curvature and pressure are missed through the test. In other words, the psychologists cannot assess their patients while running the tests. One of the famous drawing tests to measure the degree of Obsession Compulsion Disorder (OCD) is the Bender Gestalt, though its reliability is not promising. The main objective of this study is to make the Bender Gestalt test quantitative; therefore, an optical pen along with a digital tablet is utilized to preserve the key drawing features of OCD patients during the test. Among a large population of patients who referred to a special clinic of OCD, 50 under therapy subjects voluntarily took part in this study. In contrast, 50 subjects with no sign of OCD performed the test as a control group. This test contains 9 shapes and the participants were not constraint to draw the shapes in a certain interval of time; consequently, to classify the stream of feature vectors (samples through drawing) Hidden Markov Model (HMM) is employed and its flexibility increased by incorporating the fuzzy technique into its learning scheme. Applying fuzzy HMM classifier to the data stream of subjects could classify two groups up to 95.2% accuracy, whereas the results by applying the standard HMM resulted in 94.5%. In addition, multi-layer perceptron (MLP), as a strong static classifier, is applied to the features and resulted in 86.6% accuracy. Applying the pair of T-test to the results implies a significant supremacy of the fuzzy HMM to the standard HMM and MLP classifiers.

  3. Pathophysiology of cervical myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptiste, Darryl C; Fehlings, Michael G

    2006-01-01

    Cervical myelopathy is a group of closely related disorders usually caused by spondylosis or by ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament and is characterized by compression of the cervical spinal cord or nerve roots by varying degrees and number of levels. The decrease in diameter of the vertebral canal secondary to disc degeneration and osteophytic spurs compresses the spinal cord and nerve roots at one or several levels, producing direct damage and often secondary ischemic changes. Clinicians who treat cervical myelopathy cord injuries should have a basic understanding of the pathophysiology and the processes that are initiated after the spinal cord has been injured. Literature review. Literature review of human cervical myelopathy and clinically relevant animal models to further our understanding of the pathological mechanisms involved. The pathophysiology of cervical myelopathy involves static factors, which result in acquired or developmental stenosis of the cervical canal and dynamic factors, which involve repetitive injury to the cervical cord. These mechanical factors in turn result in direct injury to neurons and glia as well as a secondary cascade of events including ischemia, excitotoxicity, and apoptosis; a pathobiology similar to that occurring in traumatic spinal cord injury. This review summarizes some of the significant pathophysiological processes involved in cervical myelopathy.

  4. Comparison of parameters of 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy for differential diagnosis in patients with parkinsonism. Correlation with clinical features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchiyama, Yumiko; Momose, Mitsuru; Kondo, Chisato; Kusakabe, Kiyoko; Uchiyama, Shinichiro

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the diagnostic accuracy of 123 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy to diagnose Lewy body disease (LBD), including Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies, and to clarify the relationship between MIBG parameters and the clinical findings. One hundred-and-forty-four patients with parkinsonism without diabetes mellitus or a history of cardiac disease were retrospectively selected in the study. Clinical diagnosis was confirmed by follow-up during more than 6 months by neurologists. All patients underwent MIBG imaging at 15 min (initial) and 4 h (delayed) after the tracer injection, and clinical features such as Hoehn and Yahr (H-Y) classification or symptoms specific to parkinsonism were also investigated. The heart to mediastinum ratio (H/M) and the washout ratio (WR) of MIBG were calculated, and correlation with the clinical features was analyzed. Ninety-seven and 47 patients were diagnosed as LBD and Parkinson's syndrome (PS), respectively. Initial and delayed H/M were significantly lower and WR was significantly higher in LBD than in PS (p<0.0001). The initial H/M was independently correlated with tremor (F value 10.45), hesitation (F=4.49), and hallucinations (F=5.09) (p<0.0001). The sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of LBD were 64.9 and 87.2% with initial H/M, 78.4 and 68.1% with delayed H/M, and 80.4 and 61.7% with WR, respectively. Using multivariate analysis, initial H/M (F=39.33) and tremor (F=10.46) were independently correlated to the diagnosis of LBD (r=0.562, p<0.0001) among the MIBG and various clinical parameters. The initial H/M was the most useful of the 3 different parameters of MIBG for the diagnosis of LBD, but had low sensitivity. WR and delayed H/M had no incremental value to initial H/M for the diagnosis of PD. Careful long-term follow-up is needed for patients with parkinsonism who are clinically diagnosed as LBD with normal initial H/M, or diagnosed as no LBD with

  5. Main neuroendocrine features, diagnosis and therapeutic possibilities in the chronic fatigue syndrome, an underdiagnosed entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amihăesei, Ioana Cristina; Cojocaru, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome is characterized by severe, persistent fatigue which is not relieved by rest and is not associated to other medical conditions. Other common symptoms are including concentration and memory impairment, muscle and multiple joints pain, extreme exhaustion after physical or mental exertions, irritable bowel syndrome-like symptoms and depression, anxiety, mood swings and panic attacks. Etiology of the syndrome is not yet clear, post-viral and stress hypotheses were not verified. Diagnosis is confirmed in case of new onset of severe fatigue, for six consecutive months or more; fatigue is leading to significant reduction of the activity levels and is accompanied by other four or more of the specific associated symptoms, which are also lasting for six months or longer. The management of the disease is based on cognitive behavioral therapy, graded exercise therapy and pacing; medication plays a minor role in therapy. The occupational status is severely affected, more than half of the cases being unable to work. Full recovery rate is in average of about 5%.

  6. Tuberculosis lymphadenitis in a southeastern region in Tunisia: Epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaoui, Salma; Mezghanni, Mohamed Amine; Hammami, Bousaima; Zalila, Neila; Marouane, Chema; Kammoun, Sana; Ghorbel, Abdelmonoom; Ben Jemaa, Mounir; Messadi-Akrout, Férièle

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate patients' profiles, demographics, clinical and therapeutic approaches and strategies in patients with tuberculous lymphadenitis (TBG). A retrospective study of all TBG-confirmed cases admitted in a tuberculosis-specific health care facility between 1 January 2009 and 16 June 2013. A total of 181 clinical files were examined. Mean age was 32years old; the female/male ratio was 1.78 to 1. Raw milk consumption was noted in 1/3 of patients. Most cases involved the head and neck region (83.4%), nodes involvement, including axillary (12 cases), and mediastinal (9 cases). Clinical symptoms were present in only 55.2%. Tuberculin skin test (TST) was conducted with 82.6% positive responses. Diagnostics confirmation was done with anatomical pathology in most of the patients; only 56 of them had any microbiology analysis done. Demonstration of acid-fast bacilli in microscopy from either fine-needle aspirates or biopsies was done in 17.5% of cases, and cultures yielded positive results in 27%. Treatment duration was varied. Paradoxical reactions were noted in 12% and persistent lymphadenopathy after treatment completion was noted in 10% of cases. TBG remains a disease of interest. Today, its diagnosis and management is still a problem despite its increasing worldwide incidence, and especially in this study area. Disease control should be strengthened in this country. Copyright © 2015 Asian-African Society for Mycobacteriology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Tuberculosis lymphadenitis in a southeastern region in Tunisia: Epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salma Smaoui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate patients’ profiles, demographics, clinical and therapeutic approaches and strategies in patients with tuberculous lymphadenitis (TBG. Patients and methods: A retrospective study of all TBG-confirmed cases admitted in a tuberculosis-specific health care facility between 1 January 2009 and 16 June 2013. Results: A total of 181 clinical files were examined. Mean age was 32 years old; the female/male ratio was 1.78 to 1. Raw milk consumption was noted in 1/3 of patients. Most cases involved the head and neck region (83.4%, nodes involvement, including axillary (12 cases, and mediastinal (9 cases. Clinical symptoms were present in only 55.2%. Tuberculin skin test (TST was conducted with 82.6% positive responses. Diagnostics confirmation was done with anatomical pathology in most of the patients; only 56 of them had any microbiology analysis done. Demonstration of acid-fast bacilli in microscopy from either fine-needle aspirates or biopsies was done in 17.5% of cases, and cultures yielded positive results in 27%. Treatment duration was varied. Paradoxical reactions were noted in 12% and persistent lymphadenopathy after treatment completion was noted in 10% of cases. Conclusions: TBG remains a disease of interest. Today, its diagnosis and management is still a problem despite its increasing worldwide incidence, and especially in this study area. Disease control should be strengthened in this country.

  8. Contrast-enhanced MRI features in the early diagnosis of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemke, Robert; Maas, Mario [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kuijpers, Taco W.; Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke [University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nusman, Charlotte M. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rossum, Marion A.J. van; Berg, J.M. van den [University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Reade, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dolman, Koert M. [Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Reade, Amsterdam (Netherlands); St. Lucas Andreas Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-11-15

    To determine whether clinical, laboratory or Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) measures differentiate Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) from other forms of active childhood arthritis. We prospectively collected data of 80 treatment-naive patients clinically suspected of JIA with active non-infectious arthritis of (at least) one knee for <12 months duration. Upon presentation patients underwent clinical and laboratory assessments and contrast-enhanced MRI. MRI was not used as a diagnostic criterion. Forty-four (55 %) patients were clinically diagnosed with JIA, whereas in 36 (45 %) patients the diagnosis of JIA was discarded on clinical or laboratory findings. MRI-based synovitis was present in 27 (61.4 %) JIA patients and in 7 (19.4 %) non-JIA patients (P < 0.001). Five factors (male gender, physician's global assessment of overall disease activity, joints with limited range of motion, HLA-B27, MRI-based synovitis) were associated with the onset of JIA. In multivariate analysis MRI-based synovitis proved to be independently associated with JIA (OR 6.58, 95 % CI 2.36-18.33). In patients with MRI-based synovitis, the RR of having JIA was 3.16 (95 % CI 1.6-6.4). The presence of MRI-based synovitis is associated with the clinical onset of JIA. Physical examination could be supported by MRI, particularly to contribute in the early differentiation of different forms of non-infectious childhood arthritis. (orig.)

  9. Differential Diagnosis of Cystic Lymphangioma of the Pancreas Based on Imaging Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Kai Leung

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymphangioma is a benign tumor, which is a consequence of lymphatic malformation with blockage of lymphatic flow. Most lymphangiomas occur in the neck and axillary region, and < 1% occur in the mesentery or retroperitoneum. Lymphangiomas arising from the pancreas are extremely rare. We report the case of a 34-year-old woman with cystic lymphangioma of the pancreas without major symptoms or signs. A 6 × 6 cm intra-abdominal cystic mass was incidentally revealed by sonography during a health examination. It is always a challenge to differentiate the lesion from other possible cystic-like pancreatic neoplasms. Differential diagnosis of cystic lymphangioma from other cystic-like tumors of the pancreas can be performed based on their imaging characteristics, including presence of septa, cystic or wall calcification, soft tissue, wall thickness, single or multiple loculation, and dilatation of the pancreatic duct. Post-gadolinium magnetic resonance imaging is excellent in defining the origin of intra-abdominal cystic mass and intracystic septa.

  10. Contrast-enhanced MRI features in the early diagnosis of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemke, Robert; Maas, Mario; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke; Nusman, Charlotte M.; Rossum, Marion A.J. van; Berg, J.M. van den; Dolman, Koert M.

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether clinical, laboratory or Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) measures differentiate Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) from other forms of active childhood arthritis. We prospectively collected data of 80 treatment-naive patients clinically suspected of JIA with active non-infectious arthritis of (at least) one knee for <12 months duration. Upon presentation patients underwent clinical and laboratory assessments and contrast-enhanced MRI. MRI was not used as a diagnostic criterion. Forty-four (55 %) patients were clinically diagnosed with JIA, whereas in 36 (45 %) patients the diagnosis of JIA was discarded on clinical or laboratory findings. MRI-based synovitis was present in 27 (61.4 %) JIA patients and in 7 (19.4 %) non-JIA patients (P < 0.001). Five factors (male gender, physician's global assessment of overall disease activity, joints with limited range of motion, HLA-B27, MRI-based synovitis) were associated with the onset of JIA. In multivariate analysis MRI-based synovitis proved to be independently associated with JIA (OR 6.58, 95 % CI 2.36-18.33). In patients with MRI-based synovitis, the RR of having JIA was 3.16 (95 % CI 1.6-6.4). The presence of MRI-based synovitis is associated with the clinical onset of JIA. Physical examination could be supported by MRI, particularly to contribute in the early differentiation of different forms of non-infectious childhood arthritis. (orig.)

  11. Thyrotropin-secreting pituitary adenomas: biological and molecular features, diagnosis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losa, M; Fortunato, M; Molteni, L; Peretti, E; Mortini, P

    2008-12-01

    Central hyperthyroidism due to a thyrotropin (TSH)-secreting pituitary adenoma is a rare cause of hyperthyroidism, representing 0.5-1.0% of all pituitary adenomas. The etiopathogenesis of TSH-secreting-adenomas is unknown and no definite role for various oncogenes has been proven. Patients with TSH-secreting adenoma usually present with signs and symptoms of hyperthyroidism milder than those in patients with hyperthyroidism of thyroid origin, in addition to symptoms secondary to mass effects of the pituitary tumour. Mixed pituitary tumours co-secrete growth hormone and prolactin. The characteristic biochemical abnormalities are normal or high serum TSH concentrations in the presence of elevated total and/or free thyroid hormones concentrations. Measurement of markers of peripheral thyroid hormone action and dynamic tests may aid in the differential diagnosis with the syndrome of resistance to thyroid hormone. Neuroimaging is fundamental to visualize the pituitary tumor. Therapy of TSH-secreting adenomas can be accomplished by surgery, radiation therapies, and medical treatment with somatostatin analogs or dopamine agonists. Nowadays, and in contrast with the first reports on this rare disease, most patients are well controlled by current therapies.

  12. Features of the Diagnosis and Treatment of Acid-Related Disease in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Tkach

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the problem of the combined course of acid-related disorder of the gastrointestinal tract and diabetes mellitus (DM. The attention is paid to the fact that in most cases the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease and peptic ulcers in patients with diabetes mellitus should be carried out not as a proton pump inhibitor monotherapy, but as a comprehensive and differentiated treatment, taking into account etiological and pathogenetic features of the disease. When choosing the components of triple or quadruple therapy for the eradication of H.pylori in patients with DM among the group of proton pump inhibitors, it is desirable to give preference to pantoprazole (Zovanta. Pantoprazole does not interact with clarithromycin — basic antibiotic of H.pylori therapy. H.pylori therapy based on pantoprazole reduces the likelihood of side effects and increases the effectiveness of treatment.

  13. Chikungunya virus infection in Aruba: Diagnosis, clinical features and predictors of post-chikungunya chronic polyarthralgia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph Huits

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV emerged in Aruba for the first time in 2014. We studied the clinical presentation of acute CHIKV infection and the contribution of serologic and molecular assays to its diagnosis. In a cohort of confirmed CHIKV cases, we analysed the frequency, duration and predictors of post-chikungunya chronic polyarthralgia (pCHIK-CPA, defined as joint pains lasting longer than 6 weeks or longer than 1 year.Patient sera obtained within 10 days of symptom onset were tested for CHIKV, using an indirect immunofluorescence test for the detection of CHIKV-specific Immunoglobulin M (IgM and post-hoc, by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. CHIKV was isolated from selected samples and genotyped. For confirmed CHIKV cases, clinical data from chart review were complemented by a Telephone survey, conducted 18-24 months after diagnosis. When joint pain was reported, the duration, presence of inflammatory signs, type and number of joints affected, were recorded. Joint involvement was scored according to the 2010 'American College of Rheumatology/ European League Against Rheumatism' criteria for seronegative rheumatoid arthritis (ACR-score. Risk factors for pCHIK-CPA were identified by logistic regression.Acute CHIKV infection was diagnosed in 269 of 498 sera, by detection of IgM (n = 105, by RT-PCR (n = 59, or by both methods (n = 105. Asian genotype was confirmed in 7 samples. Clinical data were complete for 171 of 248 (69.0% patients, aged 15 years or older (median 49.4 [35.0-59.6]. The female-to-male ratio was 2.2. The main acute symptoms were arthralgia (94%, fever (85%, myalgia (85%, headache (73% and rash (63%. In patients with arthralgia (n = 160, pCHIK-CPA longer than 6 weeks was reported by 44% and longer than 1 year by 26% of cases. Inflammatory signs, stiffness, edema and redness were frequent (71%, 39% and 21%, respectively. Joints involved were knees (66%, ankles (50%, fingers (52%, feet (46%, shoulders (36

  14. CT diagnosis of splenic infarction in blunt trauma: imaging features, clinical significance and complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, L.A.; Mirvis, S.E.; Shanmuganathan, K.; Ohson, A.S.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: The object of this study is to describe the appearance, complications, and outcome of segmental splenic infarctions occurring after blunt trauma using computed tomography (CT). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirteen blunt trauma patients were identified with splenic infarction on contrast-enhanced CT. CT images were retrospectively reviewed and the percentage of infarcted splenic tissue and presence of splenic injury separate from the site of infarction were identified. Splenic angiograms were reviewed and follow-up CT images were assessed for interval change in the appearance of the infarcts. RESULTS: The mean age of patients was 32 years and the most common mechanism of injury was road traffic accident. The majority (54%) had 25-50% infarction of the spleen. Splenic angiograms were performed in nine patients and seven demonstrated wedge-shaped regions of decreased perfusion corresponding to the infarction seen on CT with no need for intervention. Eleven patients underwent a follow-up CT that demonstrated the following: no significant change in six, near-complete resolution in two, delayed appearance of infarction in one, abscess formation in one, and delayed splenic rupture in one. CONCLUSION: Segmental splenic infarction is a rare manifestation of blunt splenic trauma. The diagnosis is readily made using contrast-enhanced CT. The majority will decrease in size on follow-up CT and resolve without clinical sequelae. Resolution of infarction is also seen and these cases are best described as temporary perfusion defects. Splenic abscess or delayed rupture are uncommon complications that may necessitate angiographic or surgical intervention

  15. CT diagnosis of splenic infarction in blunt trauma: imaging features, clinical significance and complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, L.A.; Mirvis, S.E.; Shanmuganathan, K.; Ohson, A.S. E-mail: lmiller@um.edu

    2004-04-01

    AIM: The object of this study is to describe the appearance, complications, and outcome of segmental splenic infarctions occurring after blunt trauma using computed tomography (CT). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirteen blunt trauma patients were identified with splenic infarction on contrast-enhanced CT. CT images were retrospectively reviewed and the percentage of infarcted splenic tissue and presence of splenic injury separate from the site of infarction were identified. Splenic angiograms were reviewed and follow-up CT images were assessed for interval change in the appearance of the infarcts. RESULTS: The mean age of patients was 32 years and the most common mechanism of injury was road traffic accident. The majority (54%) had 25-50% infarction of the spleen. Splenic angiograms were performed in nine patients and seven demonstrated wedge-shaped regions of decreased perfusion corresponding to the infarction seen on CT with no need for intervention. Eleven patients underwent a follow-up CT that demonstrated the following: no significant change in six, near-complete resolution in two, delayed appearance of infarction in one, abscess formation in one, and delayed splenic rupture in one. CONCLUSION: Segmental splenic infarction is a rare manifestation of blunt splenic trauma. The diagnosis is readily made using contrast-enhanced CT. The majority will decrease in size on follow-up CT and resolve without clinical sequelae. Resolution of infarction is also seen and these cases are best described as temporary perfusion defects. Splenic abscess or delayed rupture are uncommon complications that may necessitate angiographic or surgical intervention.

  16. Congenital cytomegalovirus infection in pregnancy: a review of prevalence, clinical features, diagnosis and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naing, Zin W; Scott, Gillian M; Shand, Antonia; Hamilton, Stuart T; van Zuylen, Wendy J; Basha, James; Hall, Beverly; Craig, Maria E; Rawlinson, William D

    2016-02-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) is under-recognised, despite being the leading infectious cause of congenital malformation, affecting ~0.3% of Australian live births. Approximately 11% of infants born with congenital CMV infection are symptomatic, resulting in clinical manifestations, including jaundice, hepatosplenomegaly, petechiae, microcephaly, intrauterine growth restriction and death. Congenital CMV infection may cause severe long-term sequelae, including progressive sensorineural hearing loss and developmental delay in 40-58% of symptomatic neonates, and ~14% of initially asymptomatic infected neonates. Up to 50% of maternal CMV infections have nonspecific clinical manifestations, and most remain undetected unless specific serological testing is undertaken. The combination of serology tests for CMV-specific IgM, IgG and IgG avidity provide improved distinction between primary and secondary maternal infections. In pregnancies with confirmed primary maternal CMV infection, amniocentesis with CMV-PCR performed on amniotic fluid, undertaken after 21-22 weeks gestation, may determine whether maternofetal virus transmission has occurred. Ultrasound and, to a lesser extent, magnetic resonance imaging are valuable tools to assess fetal structural and growth abnormalities, although the absence of fetal abnormalities does not exclude fetal damage. Diagnosis of congenital CMV infection at birth or in the first 3 weeks of an infant's life is crucial, as this should prompt interventions for prevention of delayed-onset hearing loss and neurodevelopmental delay in affected infants. Prevention strategies should also target mothers because increased awareness and hygiene measures may reduce maternal infection. Recognition of the importance of CMV in pregnancy and in neonates is increasingly needed, particularly as therapeutic and preventive interventions expand for this serious problem. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  17. The radiological features, diagnosis and management of screen-detected lobular neoplasia of the breast: Findings from the Sloane Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Anthony J; Clements, Karen; Dodwell, David J; Evans, Andrew J; Francis, Adele; Hussain, Monuwar; Morris, Julie; Pinder, Sarah E; Sawyer, Elinor J; Thomas, Jeremy; Thompson, Alastair

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the radiological features, diagnosis and management of screen-detected lobular neoplasia (LN) of the breast. 392 women with pure LN alone were identified within the prospective UK cohort study of screen-detected non-invasive breast neoplasia (the Sloane Project). Demography, radiological features and diagnostic and therapeutic procedures were analysed. Non-pleomorphic LN (369/392) was most frequently diagnosed among women aged 50-54 and in 53.5% was at the first screen. It occurred most commonly on the left (58.0%; p = 0.003), in the upper outer quadrant and confined to one site (single quadrant or retroareolar region). No bilateral cases were found. The predominant radiological feature was microcalcification (most commonly granular) which increased in frequency with increasing breast density. Casting microcalcification as a predominant feature had a significantly higher lesion size compared to granular and punctate patterns (p = 0.034). 326/369 (88.3%) women underwent surgery, including 17 who underwent >1 operation, six who had mastectomy and six who had axillary surgery. Two patients had radiotherapy and 15 had endocrine treatment. Pleomorphic lobular carcinoma in situ (23/392) presented as granular microcalcification in 12; four women had mastectomy and six had radiotherapy. Screen-detected LN occurs in relatively young women and is predominantly non-pleomorphic and unilateral. It is typically associated with granular or punctate microcalcification in the left upper outer quadrant. Management, including surgical resection, is highly variable and requires evidence-based guideline development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. High dimension feature extraction based visualized SOM fault diagnosis method and its application in p-xylene oxidation process☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Tian; Wenli Du; Feng Qian

    2015-01-01

    Purified terephthalic acid (PTA) is an important chemical raw material. P-xylene (PX) is transformed to terephthalic acid (TA) through oxidation process and TA is refined to produce PTA. The PX oxidation reaction is a complex process involving three-phase reaction of gas, liquid and solid. To monitor the process and to im-prove the product quality, as wel as to visualize the fault type clearly, a fault diagnosis method based on self-organizing map (SOM) and high dimensional feature extraction method, local tangent space alignment (LTSA), is proposed. In this method, LTSA can reduce the dimension and keep the topology information simultaneously, and SOM distinguishes various states on the output map. Monitoring results of PX oxidation reaction process in-dicate that the LTSA–SOM can wel detect and visualize the fault type.

  19. The pathophysiology of bronchiectasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul T King

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Paul T KingDepartment of Medicine, Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, Monash University, Monash Medical Centre, Melbourne, Victoria, AustraliaAbstract: Bronchiectasis is defined by permanent and abnormal widening of the bronchi. This process occurs in the context of chronic airway infection and inflammation. It is usually diagnosed using computed tomography scanning to visualize the larger bronchi. Bronchiectasis is also characterized by mild to moderate airflow obstruction. This review will describe the pathophysiology of noncystic fibrosis bronchiectasis. Studies have demonstrated that the small airways in bronchiectasis are obstructed from an inflammatory infiltrate in the wall. As most of the bronchial tree is composed of small airways, the net effect is obstruction. The bronchial wall is typically thickened by an inflammatory infiltrate of lymphocytes and macrophages which may form lymphoid follicles. It has recently been demonstrated that patients with bronchiectasis have a progressive decline in lung function. There are a large number of etiologic risk factors associated with bronchiectasis. As there is generally a long-term retrospective history, it may be difficult to determine the exact role of such factors in the pathogenesis. Extremes of age and smoking/chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may be important considerations. There are a variety of different pathogens involved in bronchiectasis, but a common finding despite the presence of purulent sputum is failure to identify any pathogenic microorganisms. The bacterial flora appears to change with progression of disease. Keywords: bronchiectasis, inflammation, obstructive lung disease, pathophysiology, pathology

  20. [Non iatrogenic primary hypothyrodism in adults at Le Dantec Hospital : clinical features, diagnosis and treatment. Review of 19 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leye, A; Pouye, A; Fall, S; Ndongo, S; Ould Isselmou, El B; Ka, M M; Moreira-Diop, T

    2004-01-01

    The authors report 19 cases of non iatrogenic primary hypothyroidism in adults at Le Dantec Hospital of Dakar. Those cases had been found during a period of 6 years and half in the internal medicine service. The aim was to study clinical features, diagnosis and outcome of patients after treatment. The mean age of patients was 42.2 years with a sex-ratio of 0.33 M/F. The diagnosis delay was around 6,1 years. All patients presented clinical signs of hypometabolism: physical asthenia (63.15%), frilosity (26.3%), bradycardia (47.3%), constipation (36.8%). The cutaneomucal syndrom was composed by myxoedema (73.6%), macroglossia (26.3%), raucousness of voice (26.3%), alopecia (57.9%). Muscle weakness was found in 2 cases and genital troubles in 3 cases. Five patients presented goiter and 9 others had spontaneous thyroid atrophy. All patients presented a high level of TSH associated with decreased level of T4. Anemia was found in 7 cases and hypercholesterolemia in 13 cases. Treatment was based on substitutive hormonotherapy with L-Thyroxin (75 to 250 microg/day). Evolution was favorable after 10 month mean duration of processing. More alertness is necessary on behalf of the practitioners in front of any sign suggesting hypometabolism to reduce the diagnostic delay and prevent complete form of hypothyroidism that might be complicated, by cardiac involvement in particular.

  1. Pathophysiology of glucagon secretion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boettger, J.; Pabst, H.W.

    1980-01-01

    Pathophysiology of glucagon secretion is reviewed in brief separating hyperglucagonemic from hypoclucagonemic states. Many questions concerning the role of glucagon in diabetes mellitus and in other diseases are still unresolved. The clucagon RIA is of clinical significance in a few diseases like glucagonoma, which may present without symptoms of the 'glucagonoma syndrome', the probably very rare hyperglucagonemia and some of the spontaneous hypoglycemias. Glucagon secretion may be evaluated by the determination of fasting immunoreactive glucagon (IRG) and by appropriate function tests as stimulation with i.v. arginine and suppression with oral glucose. However, the glucagon RIA at present is not a routine method, although commercial kits are available. Many pitfalls of radioimmunological glucagon determination still exist. (orig.) [de

  2. Pathophysiology of nocturnal enuresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rittig, Søren; Kamperis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    The perception of the pathogenesis of enuresis has undergone marked changes over the past 30 years from a psychiatric/psychological background to a more somatic model where nighttime urine production and bladder capacity are main components together with an arousal dysfunction that prevents...... that dysfunction of the intrinsic circadian regulation located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus results in dysfunction of one or more of the brainstem centers involved in AVP secretion, arousal function, bladder control, and blood pressure regulation. Furthermore, nocturnal enuresis has a strong genetic influence...... that in some families present as autosomal dominant inheritance with high degree of penetrance. Linkage to several chromosomal areas have been confirmed in such families although a specific causative enuresis gene has not yet been identified. In conclusion, our understanding of enuresis pathophysiology has...

  3. Pathophysiology of acute small bowel disease with CT correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarwani, N.; Tappouni, R.; Tice, J.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this article is to review the pathophysiology of acute small bowel diseases, and to correlate the mechanisms of disease with computed tomography (CT) findings. Disease entities will be classified into the following: immune mediated and infectious causes, vascular causes, mechanical causes, trauma, and others. Having an understanding of acute small bowel pathophysiology is a useful teaching tool, and can lead to imaging clues to the most likely diagnosis of acute small bowel disorders.

  4. Development and clinical use of a software for the analysis of the diagnosis and the features of polypoid lesions of the colon and rectum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellomi, M.; Pestalozza, M.A.; Bellegotti, L.; Gardani, G.S.; Graziano, M.

    1987-01-01

    Double contrast enema and endoscopy are very important in the diagnosis of adenomas and early cancer of the colon and rectum. These exams can not only detect the presence, but also suggest the histologic diagnosis, of polypoid lesions of the colon. An Olivetti M24 Personal Computer was used to create a software to study the results obtained by double contrast enema, and to compare them with endoscopy and pathology. The data base is formed by 7 files: one anagraphic, 3 collecting the characteristics of the diagnosis - namely the radiologic, the endoscopic and the pathologic one - and 3 multiple files featuring each lesion, as defined by the three diagnostic techniques. The software allows to evaluate the different lesions that can be detected by three techniques in the same patient and to compare the diagnosis of presence to the morphologic features of each lesion. False negatives and false positive of each technique are easily recognized. It is also possible to characterize the single morphological feature leading the radiologist and/or the endoscopist to express an opinion about the histologic diagnosis of each lesion and to compare them with pathological features. The first experience in clinical use of the software, in the analysis of the characters of 336 lesions in 218 patients, is described

  5. Papillary squamous cell carcinoma, not otherwise specified (NOS) of the penis: clinicopathologic features, differential diagnosis, and outcome of 35 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaux, Alcides; Soares, Fernando; Rodríguez, Ingrid; Barreto, José; Lezcano, Cecilia; Torres, José; Velazquez, Elsa F; Cubilla, Antonio L

    2010-02-01

    were exophytic albeit, often deeply invasive low-grade neoplasms, with a low rate of nodal metastasis characterized by complex papillae, irregular fibrovascular cores, and jagged tumor base. Papillary SCC should be distinguished from other penile verruciform tumors, including verrucous and variants, warty and papillary basaloid carcinomas, and carcinoma cuniculatum. Helpful morphologic features for differential diagnosis are provided.

  6. Pathophysiology of Cushing's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehm, H L; Voigt, K H

    1979-01-01

    The term Cushing's disease is applied to those cases of Cushing's syndrome in which hypercortisolism is secondary to inappropriate secretion of ACTH by the pituitary. Studies on control of ACTH secretion in these patients reveal: (a) that the episodic secretion of ACTH is similar to the normal; however, frequency and amplitude of the secretory episodes lack the normal circadian rhythm; (b) that ACTH release can be stimulated by vasopressin and metyrapone in a normal or above-normal manner; and (c) that it can be suppressed by large doses of corticosteroids. When the dynamic aspects of the ACTH response to corticosteroid administration are studied, it appears that the normally negative differential feedback mechanism is converted into a positive one, whereas the delayed, integral mechanism is undisturbed. Patients with Cushing's disease in the presence of obvious pituitary tumors cannot be distinguished from those without pituitary tumors by studying only the pituitary function. All these and other well-known facts would favor the concept that ACTH secretion in Cushing's disease is under hypothalamic control whether or not a pituitary tumor is present. Moreover, there are observations that suggest that brain centers superior to the hypophysiotropic area of the hypothalamus are involved in the pathophysiology of Cushing's disease. This concept has led to the discovery of neurotropic drugs that are able to induce complete remission of Cushing's syndrome in a cerain percentage of patients. In some patients with severe psychiatric diseases, neuroendocrine abnormalities are present that resemble closely those characteristic for Cushing's disease. With the most refined neuroradiological methods, pituitary microadenomas are demonstrable in approximately 70% of patients with Cushing's disease, and this number compares well with those of earlier autopsy findings (70 to 80%). In a small number of patients (4 to 10%), these tumors are large and can easily be detected by

  7. Comparison of the diagnosis using FDG-PET and AC-PET with histopathological features in lung adenocarcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Satoko

    2011-01-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) is a useful tool for lung cancer diagnosis because of its good sensitivity and specificity. However, FDG-PET is problematically causing the false negative in cases of well differentiated lung adenocarcinomas which are low grade malignancies. Acetate (AC)-PET using 11 C-acetate is thought to be a superior detection tool for low grade malignancies. In this study, comparison of each type of PET in relation with histopathological features of lung adenocarcinomas was conducted. Samples obtained from 81 lesions in 75 patients with a lung adenocarcinoma who were operated at various institutions of our collaborators between 2005 and 2009 following FDG-PET and AC-PET procedures were examined. These samples consisted of fifty-seven cases of a well differentiated adenocarcinoma and twenty-four cases of a moderately- or a poorly-differentiated adenocarcinoma. Relationships between the histopathological factors (ly, v, p) as well as the lymphatic microvessel and microvessel densities in a tumor and FDG- and AC-PET findings were evaluated. AC-PET was more sensitive than FDG-PET (0.58 vs 0.74, p=0.0001). FDG-PET showed a correlation with invasiveness of the tumor and intratumoral lymphatic microvessel density (p<0.05). Furthermore, AC-PET possessed a superior sensitivity for the detection of well differentiated adenocarcinomas, and tumors without ly, v, or p factors. In lung adenocarcinoma AC-PET showed better sensitivity than FDG-PET and true positive in all cases of stage I B or more. FDG-PET showed the correlation with the pathological invasiveness (ly, v, p) of a tumor and the intratumoral lymphatic microvessel density. (author)

  8. [Functional pathophysiology of consciousness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellinger, Kurt A

    2009-01-01

    from important somatic and sensory pathways and acts as a control system of neuronal activities of the cerebral cortex. The principal function of the ARAS is to focus our alertness on specific stimuli or internal processes, which run via complex neuronal cell groups and numerous neurotransmitters that influence various aspects of consciousness and wakefulness. Stimulation of the ARAS produces an arousal reaction as the electric correlate of consciousness; its destruction causes coma and related states. The highest level are cortical (prefrontal and association) networks for recognition, motor activity, longterm memory and attention, the left hemisphere being considered as the dominant one. Different levels of consciousness are distinguished: 1. hyperalertness, 2. alertness (normal state of wakefulness), 3. somnolence or lethargy, 4. obtundation with tendency to fall asleep, 5. stupor, 6. coma and its subtypes, like akinetic mutism, apallic syndrome or persistent vegative state, locked-in syndrome, delirium, and catatonia. They are caused by damages in various functional levels of the brain, by psychogenic factors or experimentally, and are accompanied by characteristic neurological and psychiatric disorders. The relevant morphological lesions can be detected by electrophysiological and imaging studies. The bases of functional anatomy and pathophysiology of consciousness, its cognitive aspects and its major disorders, their causes and functional substrates with reference to sleep and both spontaneous and iatrogenic disorders of consciousness are critically summarized.

  9. [Pathophysiology and treatment of orofacial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoda, Masamichi; Noma, Noboru

    "Pain" is one of body defense mechanisms and crucial for the life support. However, orofacial pain such as myofascial pain syndrome, burning mouth syndrome and trigeminal neuralgia plays no part in body defense mechanisms and requires therapeutic intervention. Recent studies have indicated that plastic changes in the activities of trigeminal neurons, satellite glial cells in trigeminal ganglion, secondary neurons, microglia and astrocytes in trigeminal spinal subnucleus following orofacial inflammation and trigeminal nerve injury are responsible for orofacial pain mechanisms. Clinically, it is well known that the etiologic differential diagnosis which consists of careful history-taking and physical examination is essential for therapeutic decision in patients with orofacial pain. This report outlines the current knowledge on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment of orofacial pain.

  10. TFOS DEWS II pathophysiology report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bron, Anthony J; de Paiva, Cintia S; Chauhan, Sunil K; Bonini, Stefano; Gabison, Eric E; Jain, Sandeep; Knop, Erich; Markoulli, Maria; Ogawa, Yoko; Perez, Victor; Uchino, Yuichi; Yokoi, Norihiko; Zoukhri, Driss; Sullivan, David A

    2017-07-01

    The TFOS DEWS II Pathophysiology Subcommittee reviewed the mechanisms involved in the initiation and perpetuation of dry eye disease. Its central mechanism is evaporative water loss leading to hyperosmolar tissue damage. Research in human disease and in animal models has shown that this, either directly or by inducing inflammation, causes a loss of both epithelial and goblet cells. The consequent decrease in surface wettability leads to early tear film breakup and amplifies hyperosmolarity via a Vicious Circle. Pain in dry eye is caused by tear hyperosmolarity, loss of lubrication, inflammatory mediators and neurosensory factors, while visual symptoms arise from tear and ocular surface irregularity. Increased friction targets damage to the lids and ocular surface, resulting in characteristic punctate epithelial keratitis, superior limbic keratoconjunctivitis, filamentary keratitis, lid parallel conjunctival folds, and lid wiper epitheliopathy. Hybrid dry eye disease, with features of both aqueous deficiency and increased evaporation, is common and efforts should be made to determine the relative contribution of each form to the total picture. To this end, practical methods are needed to measure tear evaporation in the clinic, and similarly, methods are needed to measure osmolarity at the tissue level across the ocular surface, to better determine the severity of dry eye. Areas for future research include the role of genetic mechanisms in non-Sjögren syndrome dry eye, the targeting of the terminal duct in meibomian gland disease and the influence of gaze dynamics and the closed eye state on tear stability and ocular surface inflammation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Statistical-techniques-based computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) using texture feature analysis: application in computed tomography (CT) imaging to fatty liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Woon-Kwan; Park, Hyong-Hu; Im, In-Chul; Lee, Jae-Seung; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Dong, Kyung-Rae

    2012-09-01

    This paper proposes a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system based on texture feature analysis and statistical wavelet transformation technology to diagnose fatty liver disease with computed tomography (CT) imaging. In the target image, a wavelet transformation was performed for each lesion area to set the region of analysis (ROA, window size: 50 × 50 pixels) and define the texture feature of a pixel. Based on the extracted texture feature values, six parameters (average gray level, average contrast, relative smoothness, skewness, uniformity, and entropy) were determined to calculate the recognition rate for a fatty liver. In addition, a multivariate analysis of the variance (MANOVA) method was used to perform a discriminant analysis to verify the significance of the extracted texture feature values and the recognition rate for a fatty liver. According to the results, each texture feature value was significant for a comparison of the recognition rate for a fatty liver ( p fatty liver had the same scale as that for the F-value, showing 100% (average gray level) at the maximum and 80% (average contrast) at the minimum. Therefore, the recognition rate is believed to be a useful clinical value for the automatic detection and computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) using the texture feature value. Nevertheless, further study on various diseases and singular diseases will be needed in the future.

  12. An update on pancreatic pathophysiology (do we have to rewrite pancreatic pathophysiology?).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Heinz F

    2014-02-01

    This review focuses on seven aspects of physiology and pathophysiology of the exocrine pancreas that have been intensively discussed and studied within the past few years: (1) the role of neurohormonal mechanisms like melatonin, leptin, or ghrelin in the stimulation of pancreatic enzyme secretion; (2) the initiation processes of acute pancreatitis, like fusion of zymogen granules with lysosomes leading to intracellular activation of trypsinogen by the lysosomal enzyme cathepsin B, or autoactivation of trypsinogen; (3) the role of genes in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis; (4) the role of alcohol and constituents of alcoholic beverages in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis; (5) the role of pancreatic hypertension, neuropathy, and central mechanisms for the pathogenesis of pain in chronic pancreatitis; (6) the relation between exocrine pancreatic function and diabetes mellitus; and (7) pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic steatorrhea.

  13. Chemical sensitivity: pathophysiology or pathopsychology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genuis, Stephen J

    2013-05-01

    Escalating numbers of people throughout the world are presenting to primary care physicians, allergists, and immunologists with myriad clinical symptoms after low-level exposure to assorted everyday chemicals such as smoke, perfumes, air fresheners, paints, glues, and other products. This clinical state is referred to by various diagnostic labels, including multiple chemical sensitivity disorder, environmental intolerance, chemical sensitivity (CS), and sensitivity-related illness, and has been the subject of much controversy within the health care community. The goal of this study was to provide a brief overview of the etiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, and management of CS. An evaluation of the medical community's response to this emerging diagnosis was also explored. This review was prepared by assessing available medical and scientific literature from MEDLINE, as well as by reviewing numerous books, toxicology journals, conference proceedings, government publications, and environmental health periodicals. A primary observation, however, is that there is limited scientific literature available on the issue of CS. The format of a traditional integrated review was chosen because such reviews play a pivotal role in scientific research and professional practice in medical issues with limited primary study and uncharted clinical territory. The sensitization state of CS seems to be initiated by a significant toxic exposure, occurring as a 1-time event, or on surpassing a threshold of toxicity after toxicant accrual from repeated lower-level exposures. Once sensitized through a toxicant-induced loss of tolerance, individuals exposed to inciting triggers such as minute amounts of diverse everyday chemicals may experience various clinical and immune sequelae, sometimes involving lymphocyte, antibody, or cytokine responses. Precautionary avoidance of inciting triggers will prevent symptoms, and desensitization immunotherapy or immune suppression may improve

  14. Deep learning-based features of breast MRI for prediction of occult invasive disease following a diagnosis of ductal carcinoma in situ: preliminary data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhe; Harowicz, Michael; Zhang, Jun; Saha, Ashirbani; Grimm, Lars J.; Hwang, Shelley; Mazurowski, Maciej A.

    2018-02-01

    Approximately 25% of patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) diagnosed from core needle biopsy are subsequently upstaged to invasive cancer at surgical excision. Identifying patients with occult invasive disease is important as it changes treatment and precludes enrollment in active surveillance for DCIS. In this study, we investigated upstaging of DCIS to invasive disease using deep features. While deep neural networks require large amounts of training data, the available data to predict DCIS upstaging is sparse and thus directly training a neural network is unlikely to be successful. In this work, a pre-trained neural network is used as a feature extractor and a support vector machine (SVM) is trained on the extracted features. We used the dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRIs of patients at our institution from January 1, 2000, through March 23, 2014 who underwent MRI following a diagnosis of DCIS. Among the 131 DCIS patients, there were 35 patients who were upstaged to invasive cancer. Area under the ROC curve within the 10-fold cross-validation scheme was used for validation of our predictive model. The use of deep features was able to achieve an AUC of 0.68 (95% CI: 0.56-0.78) to predict occult invasive disease. This preliminary work demonstrates the promise of deep features to predict surgical upstaging following a diagnosis of DCIS.

  15. Specific features of the clinical and laboratory diagnosis of Lesch—Nyhan syndrome and current therapy options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Yablonskaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The rare hereditary diseases encountered in the practice of pediatricians, pediatric neurologists, and geneticists include Lesch—Nyhan syndrome associated with purine metabolic disorders caused by mutations in the HPRT1 gene encoding the enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT. HGPRT deficiency gives rise to hyperuricemia, hyperuricemic nephropathy, and a CNS lesion reminiscent of dystonic or hyperkinetic infantile cerebral paralysis concurrent with a propensity to have autoaggressive behavior. The diagnosis is based on a range of history data, characteristic neurological symptoms, the detection of high blood and urine uric acid levels, and the identification of pathogenic mutagens in the HPRT1 gene. Early diagnosis contributes to timely therapy and assists in medical genetic counseling. The paper describes a clinical case of a boy with Lesch-Nyhan syndrome and elucidates the problems of diagnosis and treatment of this disease.

  16. Diagnosing the pathophysiologic mechanisms of nocturnal polyuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goessaert, An-Sofie; Krott, Louise; Hoebeke, Piet; Vande Walle, Johan; Everaert, Karel

    2015-02-01

    Diagnosis of nocturnal polyuria (NP) is based on a bladder diary. Addition of a renal function profile (RFP) for analysis of concentrating and solute-conserving capacity allows differentiation of NP pathophysiology and could facilitate individualized treatment. To map circadian rhythms of water and solute diuresis by comparing participants with and without NP. This prospective observational study was carried out in Ghent University Hospital between 2011 and 2013. Participants with and without NP completed a 72-h bladder dairy. RFP, free water clearance (FWC), and creatinine, solute, sodium, and urea clearance were measured for all participants. The study participants were divided into those with (n=77) and those without (n=35) NP. The mean age was 57 yr (SD 16 yr) and 41% of the participants were female. Compared to participants without NP, the NP group exhibited a higher diuresis rate throughout the night (p=0.015); higher FWC (p=0.013) and lower osmolality (p=0.030) at the start of the night; and persistently higher sodium clearance during the night (p<0.001). The pathophysiologic mechanism of NP was identified as water diuresis alone in 22%, sodium diuresis alone in 19%, and a combination of water and sodium diuresis in 47% of the NP group. RFP measurement in first-line NP screening to discriminate between water and solute diuresis as pathophysiologic mechanisms complements the bladder diary and could facilitate optimal individualized treatment of patients with NP. We evaluated eight urine samples collected over 24h to detect the underlying problem in NP. We found that NP can be attributed to water or sodium diuresis or a combination of both. This urinalysis can be used to adapt treatment according to the underlying mechanism in patients with bothersome consequences of NP, such as nocturia and urinary incontinence. Copyright © 2014 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Clinical features, diagnosis, treatment and molecular studies in paediatric Cushing's syndrome due to primary nodular adrenocortical hyperplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storr, Helen L; Mitchell, J H; Swords, F M

    2004-01-01

    0.2-0.8 years) from diagnosis. Hypercortisolaemia was treated preoperatively by metyrapone alone 0.50-0.75 g/day (n = 4), metyrapone 0.75-1.50 g/day + o'p'DDD/mitotane 1-2 g/day (n = 1), or ketoconazole (n = 1). Adrenal histology showed nodular cortical hyperplasia with shrinkage of intervening...

  18. Pathophysiological mechanisms of insulin resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brands, M.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we studied pathophysiological mechanisms of insulin resistance in different conditions in humans, i.e. in obesity, during lipid infusions, after hypercaloric feeding, and glucocorticoid treatment. We focused on 3 important hypotheses that are suggested to be implicated in the

  19. Pathophysiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeckxstaens, Guy E.; Rohof, Wout O.

    2014-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the most common digestive diseases in the Western world, with typical symptoms, such as heartburn, regurgitation, or retrosternal pain, reported by 15% to 20% of the general population. The pathophysiology of GERD is multifactorial. Our understanding

  20. Gas embolism: pathophysiology and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hulst, Robert A.; Klein, Jan; Lachmann, Burkhard

    2003-01-01

    Based on a literature search, an overview is presented of the pathophysiology of venous and arterial gas embolism in the experimental and clinical environment, as well as the relevance and aims of diagnostics and treatment of gas embolism. The review starts with a few historical observations and

  1. Mammographic and sonographic features of fat necrosis of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhyaya, Vidya S; Uppoor, Raghuraj; Shetty, Lathika

    2013-01-01

    Imaging features of fat necrosis vary depending on its stage of evolution and can mimic malignancy in late stages. Imaging may suffice to differentiate fat necrosis in the early stages from malignancy and thus avoid unnecessary biopsy. In this pictorial essay, we present combination of benign features in mammography and/or ultrasonography (USG) that can lead to imaging diagnosis of fat necrosis. The follow-up imaging features of fat necrosis which mirror its pathophysiological evolution have also been demonstrated. To summarize, in the appropriate clinical setting, no mammographic features suspicious for malignancy should be present. When the typical mammographic features are not present, USG can aid with the diagnosis and follow up USG can confirm it

  2. An improved high order texture features extraction method with application to pathological diagnosis of colon lesions for CT colonography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Bowen; Zhang, Guopeng; Lu, Hongbing; Wang, Huafeng; Han, Fangfang; Zhu, Wei; Liang, Zhengrong

    2014-03-01

    Differentiation of colon lesions according to underlying pathology, e.g., neoplastic and non-neoplastic, is of fundamental importance for patient management. Image intensity based textural features have been recognized as a useful biomarker for the differentiation task. In this paper, we introduce high order texture features, beyond the intensity, such as gradient and curvature, for that task. Based on the Haralick texture analysis method, we introduce a virtual pathological method to explore the utility of texture features from high order differentiations, i.e., gradient and curvature, of the image intensity distribution. The texture features were validated on database consisting of 148 colon lesions, of which 35 are non-neoplastic lesions, using the random forest classifier and the merit of area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristics. The results show that after applying the high order features, the AUC was improved from 0.8069 to 0.8544 in differentiating non-neoplastic lesion from neoplastic ones, e.g., hyperplastic polyps from tubular adenomas, tubulovillous adenomas and adenocarcinomas. The experimental results demonstrated that texture features from the higher order images can significantly improve the classification accuracy in pathological differentiation of colorectal lesions. The gain in differentiation capability shall increase the potential of computed tomography (CT) colonography for colorectal cancer screening by not only detecting polyps but also classifying them from optimal polyp management for the best outcome in personalized medicine.

  3. Statistical-techniques-based computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) using texture feature analysis: application in computed tomography (CT) imaging to fatty liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Woon-Kwan; Park, Hyong-Hu; Im, In-Chul; Lee, Jae-Seung; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Dong, Kyung-Rae

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system based on texture feature analysis and statistical wavelet transformation technology to diagnose fatty liver disease with computed tomography (CT) imaging. In the target image, a wavelet transformation was performed for each lesion area to set the region of analysis (ROA, window size: 50 x 50 pixels) and define the texture feature of a pixel. Based on the extracted texture feature values, six parameters (average gray level, average contrast, relative smoothness, skewness, uniformity, and entropy) were determined to calculate the recognition rate for a fatty liver. In addition, a multivariate analysis of the variance (MANOVA) method was used to perform a discriminant analysis to verify the significance of the extracted texture feature values and the recognition rate for a fatty liver. According to the results, each texture feature value was significant for a comparison of the recognition rate for a fatty liver (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the F-value, which was used as a scale for the difference in recognition rates, was highest in the average gray level, relatively high in the skewness and the entropy, and relatively low in the uniformity, the relative smoothness and the average contrast. The recognition rate for a fatty liver had the same scale as that for the F-value, showing 100% (average gray level) at the maximum and 80% (average contrast) at the minimum. Therefore, the recognition rate is believed to be a useful clinical value for the automatic detection and computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) using the texture feature value. Nevertheless, further study on various diseases and singular diseases will be needed in the future.

  4. Systematic review of type-specific pathophysiological symptoms of Sasang typology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoo Ri Han

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies on the Sasang typology have focused on the differential diagnosis of each Sasang type with type-specific pathophysiological symptoms (TSPS. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the latent physiological mechanism related to these clinical indicators. We searched six electronic databases for articles published from 1990 to 2015 using the Sasang typology-related keywords, and found and analyzed 35 such articles. The results were summarized into six TSPS categories: perspiration, temperature preference, sleep, defecation, urination, and susceptibility to stress. The Tae-Eum and So-Eum types showed contrasting features with TSPS, and the So-Yang type was in the middle. The Tae-Eum type has good digestive function, regular bowel movement and defecation, high sleep quality, and low susceptibility to stress and cold. The Tae-Eum type has relatively large volumes of sweat and feels fresh after sweating; however, the urine is highly concentrated. These clinical features might be related to the biopsychological traits of the Tae-Eum type, including a low trait anxiety level and high ponderal and body mass indices. This study used the autonomic reactivity hypothesis for explaining the pathophysiological predispositions in the Sasang typology. The Tae-Eum and So-Eum Sasang types have a low threshold in parasympathetic and sympathetic activation, respectively. This study provides a foundation for integrating traditional Korean personalized medicine and Western biomedicine.

  5. Pathophysiology, Clinical, and Therapeutic Aspects of Narcolepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinar Guzel Ozdemir

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Narcolepsy is a lifelong sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucination, and sleep paralysis. The exact cause remains unknown, but there is significant evidence that hypocretin deficiency plays an integral role. There have been advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of narcolepsy. It has a negative effect on the quality of life and can restrict the patients from certain careers and activities. Diagnosis relies on patient history and objective data gathered from polysomnography and multiple sleep latency testing. Treatment focuses on symptom relief through medication, education, and behavioral modification. Both classic pharmacological treatments as well as newer options have significant problems, especially because of side effects and abuse potential. Some novel modalities are being examined to expand options for treatment. In this review, the pathophysiological, clinical, and pharmacotherapeutic aspects of narcolepsy are discussed. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(3.000: 271-283

  6. Pathophysiology of diurnal drooling in Parkinson’s disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenie van den Engel-Hoek; Johanna Kalf; Bastiaan Bloem; George Borm; Machiel Zwarts; Bert de Swart; Marten Munneke

    2011-01-01

    Drooling is an incapacitating feature of Parkinson's disease. Better pathophysiological insights are needed to improve treatment. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the cause of drooling is multifactorial. We examined 15 patients with Parkinson's disease with distinct diurnal saliva loss

  7. Parkinson's disease : The syndrome, the pathogenesis and pathophysiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, Anna L.; Leenders, Klaus L.

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterised by a slowly expanding degeneration of neurons particularly in the mesencephalon. The causes are unknown although risk factors in the genetic and toxic domain are being discovered. An important pathophysiological feature in PD is the loss of part of the

  8. Unravelling narcolepsy : from pathophysiology to measuring treatment effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heide, van der A.

    2017-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a disorder of the regulation of sleep and wakefulness, with as its major features excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucinations, sleep paralysis and disturbed nocturnal sleep. The first part of this thesis concernes an overview of the pathophysiology,

  9. The Early Diagnosis of Hypothyroidism as a Factor in the Progression of Osteoarthritis and Comorbid Processes, the Features of Phytocorrection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.O. Voloshynа

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the prevalence and forms of hypothyroidism in patients with osteoarthritis (OA and to investigate the effect of phytomedication zobofit on the functional and morphological status of the thyroid gland, the manifestations of comorbid diseases, oxidative status, fibrinolytic and proteolytic activity of the blood. Materials and methods. In 312 patients with OA, we have studied the manifestations of comorbid processes, and among them — hypothyroidism phenomena. We have used clinical, biochemical, radioimmunological, ultrasound methods. Results. All patients with OA after 50 years had the increasing number and severity of comorbid processes. Among them, 4.48 % of patients has symptomatic and 13.78 % — subclinical hypothyroidism. Symptoms of hypothyroidism were marked in people over 55, especially — over 60 years. Subclinical hypothyroidism slightly worsened clinical symptoms of OA and comorbid processes, but enhanced the effects of oxidative stress, reduction of fibrinolytic and increase of proteolytic activity of the blood, impaired glomerular filtration rate of the kidneys. The above is considered as non-specific pathophysiological basis for the progression of identified ailments. Three-month application of the herbal medication zobofit in most patients has normalized thyroid homeostasis, improved overall outcomes of the treatment for underlying and comorbid illnesses, reduced the severity of metabolic disorders. Conclusions. In OA patients aged over 50 years with a high level of comorbidity, it is necessary to carry out screening for hypothyroidism. If you noticed the signs of subclinical hypothyroidism in this population of patients, it is appropriate to use multicomponental phytomedications with diverse thyroid-stimulating action.

  10. Localization and diagnosis framework for pediatric cataracts based on slit-lamp images using deep features of a convolutional neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Long, Erping; Cui, Jiangtao; Zhu, Mingmin; An, Yingying; Zhang, Jia; Liu, Zhenzhen; Lin, Zhuoling; Li, Xiaoyan; Chen, Jingjing; Cao, Qianzhong; Li, Jing; Wu, Xiaohang; Wang, Dongni

    2017-01-01

    Slit-lamp images play an essential role for diagnosis of pediatric cataracts. We present a computer vision-based framework for the automatic localization and diagnosis of slit-lamp images by identifying the lens region of interest (ROI) and employing a deep learning convolutional neural network (CNN). First, three grading degrees for slit-lamp images are proposed in conjunction with three leading ophthalmologists. The lens ROI is located in an automated manner in the original image using two successive applications of Candy detection and the Hough transform, which are cropped, resized to a fixed size and used to form pediatric cataract datasets. These datasets are fed into the CNN to extract high-level features and implement automatic classification and grading. To demonstrate the performance and effectiveness of the deep features extracted in the CNN, we investigate the features combined with support vector machine (SVM) and softmax classifier and compare these with the traditional representative methods. The qualitative and quantitative experimental results demonstrate that our proposed method offers exceptional mean accuracy, sensitivity and specificity: classification (97.07%, 97.28%, and 96.83%) and a three-degree grading area (89.02%, 86.63%, and 90.75%), density (92.68%, 91.05%, and 93.94%) and location (89.28%, 82.70%, and 93.08%). Finally, we developed and deployed a potential automatic diagnostic software for ophthalmologists and patients in clinical applications to implement the validated model. PMID:28306716

  11. Localization and diagnosis framework for pediatric cataracts based on slit-lamp images using deep features of a convolutional neural network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiyang Liu

    Full Text Available Slit-lamp images play an essential role for diagnosis of pediatric cataracts. We present a computer vision-based framework for the automatic localization and diagnosis of slit-lamp images by identifying the lens region of interest (ROI and employing a deep learning convolutional neural network (CNN. First, three grading degrees for slit-lamp images are proposed in conjunction with three leading ophthalmologists. The lens ROI is located in an automated manner in the original image using two successive applications of Candy detection and the Hough transform, which are cropped, resized to a fixed size and used to form pediatric cataract datasets. These datasets are fed into the CNN to extract high-level features and implement automatic classification and grading. To demonstrate the performance and effectiveness of the deep features extracted in the CNN, we investigate the features combined with support vector machine (SVM and softmax classifier and compare these with the traditional representative methods. The qualitative and quantitative experimental results demonstrate that our proposed method offers exceptional mean accuracy, sensitivity and specificity: classification (97.07%, 97.28%, and 96.83% and a three-degree grading area (89.02%, 86.63%, and 90.75%, density (92.68%, 91.05%, and 93.94% and location (89.28%, 82.70%, and 93.08%. Finally, we developed and deployed a potential automatic diagnostic software for ophthalmologists and patients in clinical applications to implement the validated model.

  12. Unsupervised consensus cluster analysis of [18F]-fluoroethyl-L-tyrosine positron emission tomography identified textural features for the diagnosis of pseudoprogression in high-grade glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebir, Sied; Khurshid, Zain; Gaertner, Florian C; Essler, Markus; Hattingen, Elke; Fimmers, Rolf; Scheffler, Björn; Herrlinger, Ulrich; Bundschuh, Ralph A; Glas, Martin

    2017-01-31

    Timely detection of pseudoprogression (PSP) is crucial for the management of patients with high-grade glioma (HGG) but remains difficult. Textural features of O-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine positron emission tomography (FET-PET) mirror tumor uptake heterogeneity; some of them may be associated with tumor progression. Fourteen patients with HGG and suspected of PSP underwent FET-PET imaging. A set of 19 conventional and textural FET-PET features were evaluated and subjected to unsupervised consensus clustering. The final diagnosis of true progression vs. PSP was based on follow-up MRI using RANO criteria. Three robust clusters have been identified based on 10 predominantly textural FET-PET features. None of the patients with PSP fell into cluster 2, which was associated with high values for textural FET-PET markers of uptake heterogeneity. Three out of 4 patients with PSP were assigned to cluster 3 that was largely associated with low values of textural FET-PET features. By comparison, tumor-to-normal brain ratio (TNRmax) at the optimal cutoff 2.1 was less predictive of PSP (negative predictive value 57% for detecting true progression, p=0.07 vs. 75% with cluster 3, p=0.04). Clustering based on textural O-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine PET features may provide valuable information in assessing the elusive phenomenon of pseudoprogression.

  13. [Current concepts in pathophysiology of CRPS I].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickel, F T; Maihöfner, C

    2010-02-01

    Knowledge about the pathophysiology underlying the complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) has increased over the last years. Classically, CRPS has been considered to be mainly driven by sympathetic dysfunction with sympathetically maintained pain being its major pathogenetic mechanism. Currently, the disease is understood as result of a complex interplay between altered somatosensory, motor, autonomic and inflammatory systems. Peripheral and central sensitization is a common feature in CRPS as in other neuropathic pain syndromes. One important mechanism is the sensitization of spinal dorsal horn cells via activation of postsynaptic NMDA-receptors by chronic C-fiber input. Differential activity of endogenous pain modulating systems may play a pivotal role in the development of CRPS, too. Neuronal plasticity of the somatosensory cortex accounts for central sensory signs. Also the motor system is subject to central adaptive changes in patients with CRPS. Calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP) and substance P mediate neurogenic inflammation. Additionally other proinflammatory cytokines involved in the inflammatory response in CRPS have been identified. In terms of the sympathetic nervous system, recent evidence rather points to a sensitization of adrenergic receptors than to increased efferent sympathetic activity. Particularly the expression of alpha (1)-adrenoceptors on nociceptive C-fibers may play a major role. These pathophysiological ideas do not exclude each other. In fact they complement one another. The variety of the involved systems may explain the versatile clinical picture of CRPS. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart, New York.

  14. Pathogenesis and Pathophysiology of Pneumococcal Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mook-Kanamori, Barry B.; Geldhoff, Madelijn; van der Poll, Tom; van de Beek, Diederik

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Pneumococcal meningitis continues to be associated with high rates of mortality and long-term neurological sequelae. The most common route of infection starts by nasopharyngeal colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae, which must avoid mucosal entrapment and evade the host immune system after local activation. During invasive disease, pneumococcal epithelial adhesion is followed by bloodstream invasion and activation of the complement and coagulation systems. The release of inflammatory mediators facilitates pneumococcal crossing of the blood-brain barrier into the brain, where the bacteria multiply freely and trigger activation of circulating antigen-presenting cells and resident microglial cells. The resulting massive inflammation leads to further neutrophil recruitment and inflammation, resulting in the well-known features of bacterial meningitis, including cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis, cochlear damage, cerebral edema, hydrocephalus, and cerebrovascular complications. Experimental animal models continue to further our understanding of the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis and provide the platform for the development of new adjuvant treatments and antimicrobial therapy. This review discusses the most recent views on the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis, as well as potential targets for (adjunctive) therapy. PMID:21734248

  15. Assessing pathophysiology of cancer anorexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laviano, Alessandro; Koverech, Angela; Seelaender, Marilia

    2017-09-01

    Cancer anorexia is a negative prognostic factor and is broadly defined as the loss of the interest in food. However, multiple clinical domains contribute to the phenotype of cancer anorexia. The characterization of the clinical and molecular pathophysiology of cancer anorexia may enhance the efficacy of preventive and therapeutic strategies. Clinical trials showed that cancer anorexia should be considered as an umbrella encompassing different signs and symptoms contributing to appetite disruption in cancer patients. Loss of appetite, early satiety, changes in taste and smell are determinants of cancer anorexia, whose presence should be assessed in cancer patients. Interestingly, neuronal correlates of cancer anorexia-related symptoms have been revealed by brain imaging techniques. The pathophysiology of cancer anorexia is complex and involves different domains influencing eating behavior. Limiting the assessment of cancer anorexia to questions investigating changes in appetite may impede correct identification of the targets to address.

  16. Meckel-Gruber Syndrome: a population-based study on prevalence, prenatal diagnosis, clinical features, and survival in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barisic, Ingeborg; Boban, Ljubica; Loane, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Meckel-Gruber Syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive lethal ciliopathy characterized by the triad of cystic renal dysplasia, occipital encephalocele and postaxial polydactyly. We present the largest population-based epidemiological study to date using data provided by the European Surveillance of...... diagnosis is important for timely counseling of affected couples regarding the option of pregnancy termination and prenatal genetic testing in future pregnancies.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 3 September 2014; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2014.174....

  17. The pathophysiology of Peyronie's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sakka, Ahmed I; Salabas, Emre; Dinçer, Murat; Kadioglu, Ates

    2013-09-01

    To review the contemporary knowledge of the pathophysiology of Peyronie's disease (PD). Medline was searched for papers published in English from 2000 to March 2013, using the keywords 'Peyronie's disease' and 'pathophysiology'. More than 300 relevant articles were identified for the purpose of this review. Unfortunately only a few studies had a high level of evidence, and the remaining studies were not controlled in their design. Many theories have been proposed to explain the cause of PD, but the true pathogenesis of PD remains an enigma. Identifying particular growth factors and the specific genes responsible for the induction of PD have been the ultimate goal of research over the past several decades. This would provide the means to devise a possible gene therapy for this devastating condition. We discuss present controversies and new discoveries related to the pathophysiology of this condition. PD is one of the most puzzling diseases in urology. The pathogenesis remains uncertain and there is still controversy about the best management. The pathogenesis of PD has been explored in animal models, cell cultures and clinical trials, but the results have led to further questions. New research on the aetiology and pathogenesis of PD is needed, and which will hopefully improve the understanding and management for patients with this frustrating disease.

  18. Distribution of late gadolinium enhancement in various types of cardiomyopathies: Significance in differential diagnosis, clinical features and prognosis

    OpenAIRE

    Satoh, Hiroshi; Sano, Makoto; Suwa, Kenichiro; Saitoh, Takeji; Nobuhara, Mamoru; Saotome, Masao; Urushida, Tsuyoshi; Katoh, Hideki; Hayashi, Hideharu

    2014-01-01

    The recent development of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) techniques has allowed detailed analyses of cardiac function and tissue characterization with high spatial resolution. We review characteristic CMR features in ischemic and non-ischemic cardiomyopathies (ICM and NICM), especially in terms of the location and distribution of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE). CMR in ICM shows segmental wall motion abnormalities or wall thinning in a particular coronary arterial territory, and the suben...

  19. Clinical Features of Hereditary and Mast Cell-mediated Angioedema Focusing on the Differential Diagnosis in Japanese Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohsawa, Isao; Honda, Daisuke; Hisada, Atsuko; Inoshita, Hiroyuki; Onda-Tsueshita, Kisara; Mano, Satoshi; Sato, Nobuyuki; Nakamura, Yuya; Shimizu, Tatsuo; Gotoh, Hiromichi; Goto, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Yusuke; Tomino, Yasuhiko

    2018-02-01

    Objective The present study was designed to identify the clinical characteristics that permit the differential diagnosis of hereditary angioedema (HAE) and mast cell-mediated angioedema (Mast-AE) during the first consultation. Methods The medical histories and laboratory data of 46 patients with HAE and 41 patients with Mast-AE were compared. Results The average age of onset in the HAE group (19.8±9.0 years) was significantly lower than that in the Mast-AE group (35.2±12.0 years). The incidence of familial angioedema (AE) in the HAE group (73.9%) was significantly higher than that in the Mast-AE group (9.7%). The frequency of history of AE in the extremities, larynx, or gastrointestinal tract was significantly higher in the HAE group. The frequency of AE episodes of the lips and eyelids was significantly lower in the HAE group. The serum C4 concentration and CH50 titer were lower than the normal limit in 91.3% and 45.6% of the patients in the HAE group, respectively; in Mast-AE group the serum C4 concentration and CH50 titer were significantly lower than the normal limit in 4.8% and 0% of the patients, the difference between the two groups was statistically significant. A C1-inhibitor (C1-INH) activity level of <50% was observed in all of the HAE patients, but none of the Mast-AE patients. The mean serum IgE titer in the HAE group (120.8±130.5 IU/mL) was significantly lower than that in the Mast-AE group (262.2±314.9 IU/mL). Conclusion The parameters within the patients' medical histories, such as the age at the onset of AE, a family history of AE, and the locations of past AE episodes are critical for the successful diagnosis of the disease. Measurements of the C4 and C1-INH activity are very useful for differential diagnosis of HAE from Mast-AE.

  20. Role of leukotrienes in asthma pathophysiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H

    2000-01-01

    Inflammation is an essential component of asthma pathophysiology. While beta(2)-agonists are often used for short-term relief of acute bronchospasm, anti-inflammatory agents are required for the long-term management of chronic inflammation in this disease. Corticosteroids have emerged as the first......-line anti-inflammatory therapy for asthma management. However, in some patients, especially children, the high doses of corticosteroids that may be required to control features of hyperresponsiveness, including exercise-induced asthma, raise safety concerns. Thus, there is a need for complementary anti......-inflammatory, steroid-sparing agents in asthma therapy. Several inflammatory mediators have been targeted in an attempt to thwart this inflammatory process, but so far with little success. The cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLT), LTC(4), LTD(4), and LTE(4), have been shown to be essential mediators in asthma, making them...

  1. The role of ADAMs in disease pathophysiology.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duffy, Michael J

    2012-02-01

    The ADAMs are a family of multidomain transmembrane and secreted proteins involved in both proteolysis and cell adhesion. Altered expression of specific ADAMs is implicated in the pathophysiology of several diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer\\'s disease, cardiac hypertrophy, asthma and cancer. Of these different diseases, it is in cancer where most research has been carried out. Multiple ADAMs, including ADAM-9, ADAM-10, ADAM-12, ADAM-15 and ADAM-17, have been shown to play a role in either cancer formation or progression. Consistent with these findings, increased expression of specific ADAMs in several cancer types was found to correlate with features of aggressive disease and poor prognosis. Currently, selective ADAM inhibitors against ADAM-10 and ADAM-17 are undergoing clinical trials for the treatment of cancer. Further work is required in order to establish a causative role for ADAMs in rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer\\'s disease, cardiac hypertrophy and asthma.

  2. Clinical manifestations and pathophysiology of lissencephaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oi, Shizuo; Sasaki, Koji; Yamada, Hiroshi; Ando, Shoko; Tamura, Yasunori; Fukuda, Kuniaki; Furukawa, Seikyo; Matsumoto, Satoshi.

    1985-01-01

    Four cases of lissencephaly were analyzed in light of clinical manifestations, CT findings and the state of hydrocephalus. Lissencephaly had been diagnosed mainly by autopsy until CT scan was introduced in the early 1970's. Since then, diagnosis of lissencephaly early in life is possible. Presently the major interest in this congenital CNS anomaly, which is caused by a neuronal migration disorder in the relatively late stages of fetal development, is to learn the dynamic pathophysiological state and management. The purpose of this paper is to analyze those points of lissencephaly in diagnosis during life and possible treatment in the hydrocephalic state. The common findings in CT in all four cases are as follows: No. 1. smooth cortical surface (agyria--pachygyria), No. 2. wide sylvian fissure (complete or incomplete lack of opercularization, No. 3. ventricular dilatation (remarkable bilateral enlargement of lateral ventricle and third ventricle--colpocephaly), No. 4. wide subdural or subarachnoid space in supratentorial region, No. 5. periventricular low density, No. 6. midline cavum, No. 7. normal CT findings in posterior fossa structure. Three out of four patients demonstrated full or bulged and tense anterior fontanella. Because of this suggestion of increased intracranial pressure and enlarged ventricles with periventricular lucency in CT findings, one patient underwent CT cisternography for dynamic analysis of the CSF circulation and continuous ICP monitoring for dynamic evaluation of the ICP pattern. The results revealed very much delayed CSF circulation and intermittently increased. ICP, with pressure waves appearing in 35.7 % of all recordings. (J.P.N.)

  3. Distribution of late gadolinium enhancement in various types of cardiomyopathies: Significance in differential diagnosis, clinical features and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Hiroshi; Sano, Makoto; Suwa, Kenichiro; Saitoh, Takeji; Nobuhara, Mamoru; Saotome, Masao; Urushida, Tsuyoshi; Katoh, Hideki; Hayashi, Hideharu

    2014-07-26

    The recent development of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) techniques has allowed detailed analyses of cardiac function and tissue characterization with high spatial resolution. We review characteristic CMR features in ischemic and non-ischemic cardiomyopathies (ICM and NICM), especially in terms of the location and distribution of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE). CMR in ICM shows segmental wall motion abnormalities or wall thinning in a particular coronary arterial territory, and the subendocardial or transmural LGE. LGE in NICM generally does not correspond to any particular coronary artery distribution and is located mostly in the mid-wall to subepicardial layer. The analysis of LGE distribution is valuable to differentiate NICM with diffusely impaired systolic function, including dilated cardiomyopathy, end-stage hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), cardiac sarcoidosis, and myocarditis, and those with diffuse left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy including HCM, cardiac amyloidosis and Anderson-Fabry disease. A transient low signal intensity LGE in regions of severe LV dysfunction is a particular feature of stress cardiomyopathy. In arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia, an enhancement of right ventricular (RV) wall with functional and morphological changes of RV becomes apparent. Finally, the analyses of LGE distribution have potentials to predict cardiac outcomes and response to treatments.

  4. Spasmodic Dysphonia: A Review. Part 2: Characterization of Pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintze, Justin M; Ludlow, Christy L; Bansberg, Stephen F; Adler, Charles H; Lott, David G

    2017-10-01

    Objective The purpose of this review is to describe the recent advances in characterizing spasmodic dysphonia. Spasmodic dysphonia is a task-specific focal laryngeal dystonia characterized by irregular and uncontrolled voice breaks. The pathophysiology is poorly understood, and there are diagnostic difficulties. Data Sources PubMed, Google Scholar, and Cochrane Library. Review Methods The data sources were searched using the following search terms: ( spasmodic dysphonia or laryngeal dystonia) and ( etiology, aetiology, diagnosis, pathogenesis, or pathophysiology). Conclusion The diagnosis of spasmodic dysphonia can be difficult due to the lack of a scientific consensus on diagnostic criteria and the fact that other voice disorders may present similarly. Confusion can arise between spasmodic dysphonia and muscle tension dysphonia. Spasmodic dysphonia symptoms are tied to particular speech sounds, whereas muscle tension dysphonia is not. With the advent of more widespread use of high-speed laryngoscopy and videokymography, measures of the disruptions in phonation and delays in the onset of vocal fold vibration after vocal fold closure can be quantified. Recent technological developments have expanded our understanding of the pathophysiology of spasmodic dysphonia. Implications for Practice A 3-tiered approach, involving a questionnaire, followed by speech assessment and nasolaryngoscopy is the most widely accepted method for making the diagnosis in most cases. More experimental and invasive techniques such as electromyography and neuroimaging have been explored to further characterize spasmodic dysphonia and aid in diagnosing difficult cases.

  5. Molecular pathophysiology of cerebral edema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in molecular biology have led to a greater understanding of the individual proteins responsible for generating cerebral edema. In large part, the study of cerebral edema is the study of maladaptive ion transport. Following acute CNS injury, cells of the neurovascular unit, particularly brain endothelial cells and astrocytes, undergo a program of pre- and post-transcriptional changes in the activity of ion channels and transporters. These changes can result in maladaptive ion transport and the generation of abnormal osmotic forces that, ultimately, manifest as cerebral edema. This review discusses past models and current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of cerebral edema. PMID:26661240

  6. Narcolepsy: Pathophysiology and Neuropsychological Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Naumann

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Narcolepsy is now recognized as a distinctive disorder with specific pathophysiology and neurochemical abnormalities. Findings on the role of the neuropeptide hypocretin are opening new avenues of research and new strategies for therapy. Recently, neuropsychological and electrophysiological studies have provided evidence for reduced memory performance on standard memory tests in addition to subjective complaints of forgetfulness which may be related to changes in attentional processing. Further studies are, however, necessary to clarify the neuropsychological profile in narcolepsy. This review focuses on the recent advances in understanding narcolepsy.

  7. The specific features of the diagnosis and treatment of coronary heart disease in rheumatoid arthritis (Results of the authors’ studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya Anatolyevna Khramtsova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary heart disease (CHD and its complications occupy the leading place in the pattern of the causes of untimely death in rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Objective: to study the incidence, pattern, and specific features of CHD in patients with RA. Patients and methods. An analytical cross-sectional study was conducted in 257 patients with RA (ARA, 1987. The patients’ mean age was 55.4±11.6 years; RA duration was 14.7years (range 2—20 years. Results. The incidence of CHD in RA was as much as 45.9% (n = 118, including 52.5% (n = 62 for typical angina pectoris on exertion; 25.4% (n = 30 and 22.1% (n = 26 for silent ischemia and arrhythmias, respectively. A high proportion of vertebrogenic cardialgias (48.8%; n = 100 were noted in those who complained of heart pain. The authors identified traditional risk factors, such as hypertension (OR = 12.1, smoking (OR = 10.2, early menopause (OR = 3.6, decreased glomerular filtration rate (OR = 3.5, cardiovascular heredity (OR = 3.1, overweight (OR = 2.5, a heart rate of more than 70 beats/min (OR = 2.3, atherogenic dyslipidemia (OR = 2.3, hyperglycemia (OR = 2.1, and age (OR = 1.7. Along with those, the authors also ascertained CHD predictors associating with chronic inflammation consequences: use of glucocorticoids (OR = 5.0, concomitant anemia as a common complication of RA (OR = 4.7, high DAS 28 scores (OR = 3.7, visual analog scale pain scores of > 50 mm (OR = 2.6, and RA duration of >10 years (OR = 2.2. Conclusion. The specific features of CHD in RA include the frequent detection of arrhythmias and silent ischemia. The importance of the degree of inflammatory activity along with the traditional risk factors of CHD is apparent.

  8. New aids for the non-invasive prenatal diagnosis of achondroplasia: dysmorphic features, charts of fetal size and molecular confirmation using cell-free fetal DNA in maternal plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chitty, L. S.; Griffin, D. R.; Meaney, C.; Barrett, A.; Khalil, A.; Pajkrt, E.; Cole, T. J.

    2011-01-01

    To improve the prenatal diagnosis of achondroplasia by constructing charts of fetal size, defining frequency of sonographic features and exploring the role of non-invasive molecular diagnosis based on cell-free fetal deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in maternal plasma. Data on fetuses with a confirmed

  9. Digestive system-related pathophysiological symptoms of Sasang typology: Systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi Suk; Sohn, Kyungwoo; Kim, Yun Hee; Hwang, Min-Woo; Kwon, Young Kyu; Bae, Na Young; Chae, Han

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to review clinical studies on digestive system-related pathophysiological symptoms of each Sasang type to obtain the generalizable typespecific clinical features, which are important for the diagnosis of the Sasang type and subsequent disease treatment. Sasang typology and digestive system symptom-related keywords were used to search through eight domestic and foreign databases up to March 2012. The results were organized and analyzed based on four categories [digestive function, appetite, eating pattern, and body mass index (BMI)] to elucidate type-specific symptoms. Sasang type-specific digestive system-related symptoms were identified by reviewing 30 related articles that were gathered by searching through the databases. The Tae-Eum (TE) type had the highest digestive functions and the So-Eum (SE) type had the lowest. The TE type appeared to have larger volume with fast eating speed compared with the SE type and individuals in the TE category preferred fatty or salty food, which is responsible for the high occurrence rates of organic digestive diseases such as gastritis. Moreover, BMI was higher in the TE type and lower in the SE type. We systematically reviewed previously published clinical reports on digestive functions, which can be used to meet the objective of Sasang-type differentiation and pathophysiological pattern identification.

  10. Digestive system-related pathophysiological symptoms of Sasang typology: Systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Suk Lee

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to review clinical studies on digestive system-related pathophysiological symptoms of each Sasang type to obtain the generalizable typespecific clinical features, which are important for the diagnosis of the Sasang type and subsequent disease treatment. Sasang typology and digestive system symptom-related keywords were used to search through eight domestic and foreign databases up to March 2012. The results were organized and analyzed based on four categories [digestive function, appetite, eating pattern, and body mass index (BMI] to elucidate type-specific symptoms. Sasang type-specific digestive system-related symptoms were identified by reviewing 30 related articles that were gathered by searching through the databases. The Tae-Eum (TE type had the highest digestive functions and the So-Eum (SE type had the lowest. The TE type appeared to have larger volume with fast eating speed compared with the SE type and individuals in the TE category preferred fatty or salty food, which is responsible for the high occurrence rates of organic digestive diseases such as gastritis. Moreover, BMI was higher in the TE type and lower in the SE type. We systematically reviewed previously published clinical reports on digestive functions, which can be used to meet the objective of Sasang-type differentiation and pathophysiological pattern identification.

  11. Stress fractures: pathophysiology, clinical presentation, imaging features, and treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matcuk, George R; Mahanty, Scott R; Skalski, Matthew R; Patel, Dakshesh B; White, Eric A; Gottsegen, Christopher J

    2016-08-01

    Stress fracture, in its most inclusive description, includes both fatigue and insufficiency fracture. Fatigue fractures, sometimes equated with the term "stress fractures," are most common in runners and other athletes and typically occur in the lower extremities. These fractures are the result of abnormal, cyclical loading on normal bone leading to local cortical resorption and fracture. Insufficiency fractures are common in elderly populations, secondary to osteoporosis, and are typically located in and around the pelvis. They are a result of normal or traumatic loading on abnormal bone. Subchondral insufficiency fractures of the hip or knee may cause acute pain that may present in the emergency setting. Medial tibial stress syndrome is a type of stress injury of the tibia related to activity and is a clinical syndrome encompassing a range of injuries from stress edema to frank-displaced fracture. Atypical subtrochanteric femoral fracture associated with long-term bisphosphonate therapy is also a recently discovered entity that needs early recognition to prevent progression to a complete fracture. Imaging recommendations for evaluation of stress fractures include initial plain radiographs followed, if necessary, by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is preferred over computed tomography (CT) and bone scintigraphy. Radiographs are the first-line modality and may reveal linear sclerosis and periosteal reaction prior to the development of a frank fracture. MRI is highly sensitive with findings ranging from periosteal edema to bone marrow and intracortical signal abnormality. Additionally, a brief description of relevant clinical management of stress fractures is included.

  12. Atopic Dermatitis in Children: Clinical Features, Pathophysiology and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Jonathan J.; Milner, Joshua D.; Stone, Kelly D.

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, relapsing, highly pruritic skin condition resulting from disruption of the epithelial barrier and associated immune dysregulation in the skin of genetically predisposed hosts. AD generally develops in early childhood, has a characteristic age-dependent distribution and is commonly associated with elevated IgE, peripheral eosinophilia and other allergic diseases. Staphylococcus aureus colonization is common and may contribute to disease progression and severity. Targeted therapies to restore both impaired skin barrier and control inflammation are required for optimal outcomes for patients with moderate to severe disease. Pruritus is universal among patients with AD and has a dominant impact on diminishing quality of life. Medications such as anti-histamines have demonstrated poor efficacy in controlling AD-associated itch. Education of patients regarding the primary underlying defects and provision of a comprehensive skin care plan is essential for disease maintenance and management of flares. PMID:25459583

  13. The Pathophysiology of Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Avi Lemberg

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE is an emerging disease characterised by esophageal eosinophilia (>15eos/hpf, lack of responsiveness to acid-suppressive medication and is managed by allergen elimination and anti-allergy therapy. Although the pathophysiology of EoE is currently unsubstantiated, evidence implicates food and aeroallergen hypersensitivity in genetically predisposed individuals as contributory factors. Genome-wide expression analyses have isolated a remarkably conserved gene-expression profile irrespective of age and gender, suggesting a genetic contribution. EoE has characteristics of mainly TH2 type immune responses but also some TH1 cytokines, which appear to strongly contribute to tissue fibrosis, with esophageal epithelial cells providing a hospitable environment for this inflammatory process. Eosinophil-degranulation products appear to play a central role in tissue remodeling in EoE. This remodeling and dysregulation predisposes to fibrosis. Mast cell-derived molecules such as histamine may have an effect on enteric nerves and may also act in concert with TGF-β to interfere with esophageal musculature. Additionally, the esophageal epithelium may facilitate the inflammatory process under pathogenic contexts such as in EoE. This article aims to discuss the contributory factors in the pathophysiology of EoE.

  14. Fisiopatologia da enxaqueca Migraine pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAURICE B. VINCENT

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available A fisiopatologia da enxaqueca ainda não foi completamente elucidada. As principais estruturas envolvidas parecem ser o sistema nervoso central (córtex e tronco cerebral, o sistema trigeminovascular e os vasos correspondentes, outras fibras autonômicas que inervam estes vasos, e os vários agentes vasoativos locais, como a SP, CGRP, NO, VIP, NPY, ACh, NA, NKA, entre outros. A depressão alastrante é o fenômeno neurológico que provavelmente justifica achados experimenais e clínicos na enxaqueca. Ela tem velocidade de propagação semelhante à aura, ativa o núcleo espinhal do trigêmeo e está relacionada à liberação de CGRP e NO. Alterações circulatórias detectadas por métodos complementares reforçam o papel da depressão alastrante. A identificação de anormalidades em pelo menos três loci (cromossomas 19 e 1 na enxaqueca hemiplégica familiar ocorreu recentemente. Elas estão relacionadas a anormalidades nos canais de cálcio voltagem dependentes tipo P/Q, específicos do sistema nervoso central, que regulam a liberação de vários neurotransmissores, incluindo possivelmente a serotonina. A exemplo de outras anormalidades neurológicas paroxísticas que resultam da hiperexcitabilidade da membrana plasmática, é possível que a enxaqueca ocorra devido a uma desordem de canais iônicos.The pathophysiology of migraine is not yet fully understood. The most important structures involved seem to be the central nervous system (cortex and brain stem, the trigeminovascular system and related cranial arteries, other autonomic fibres innervating such vessels, and various local vasoactive agents, including SP, CGRP, NO, VIP, NPY, ACh, NA, NKA, among others. The spreading depression phenomenon may explain clinical as well experimental findings in migraine. Its propagation velocity mirrors what is found in clinical aura, it may activate the spinal trigeminal nucleus and may induce CGRP and NO release. Circulatory changes detected with

  15. Understanding changes in cardiovascular pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chummun, Harry

    Cardiovascular pathophysiological changes, such as hypertension and enlarged ventricles, reflect the altered functions of the heart and its circulation during ill-health. This article examines the normal and altered anatomy of the cardiac valves, the contractile elements and enzymes of the myocardium, the significance of the different factors associated with cardiac output, and the role of the autonomic nervous system in the heart beat. It also explores how certain diseases alter these functions and result in cardiac symptoms. Nurses can benefit from knowledge of these specific changes, for example, by being able to ask relevant questions in order to ascertain the nature of a patients condition, by being able to take an effective patient history and by being able to read diagnostic results, such as electrocardiograms and cardiac enzyme results. All this will help nurses to promote sound cardiac care based on a physiological rationale.

  16. Pathophysiology of MDS: genomic aberrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Motoshi

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are characterized by clonal proliferation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells and their apoptosis, and show a propensity to progress to acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Although MDS are recognized as neoplastic diseases caused by genomic aberrations of hematopoietic cells, the details of the genetic abnormalities underlying disease development have not as yet been fully elucidated due to difficulties in analyzing chromosomal abnormalities. Recent advances in comprehensive analyses of disease genomes including whole-genome sequencing technologies have revealed the genomic abnormalities in MDS. Surprisingly, gene mutations were found in approximately 80-90% of cases with MDS, and the novel mutations discovered with these technologies included previously unknown, MDS-specific, mutations such as those of the genes in the RNA-splicing machinery. It is anticipated that these recent studies will shed new light on the pathophysiology of MDS due to genomic aberrations.

  17. Fibromyalgia Syndrome: An Overview of Pathophysiology, Diagnosis and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firdous Jahan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia Syndrome (FMS is a chronic condition causing pain, stiffness, and tenderness of the muscles, tendons, and joints. It is also characterized by restless sleep, tiredness, fatigue, anxiety, depression, and disturbances in bowel functions. The etiology of fibromyalgia remains unknown, but recent advances and discoveries have helped to unravel some of the mysteries of this disease. Research highlights some of the biochemical, metabolic, and immunoregulatory abnormalities associated with fibromyalgia. Management of FMS at the present time is very difficult as it has multiple etiological factors and psychological predispositions; however, a patient centered approach is essential to handle this problem.

  18. Hydrocephalus after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrocephalus (HCP is a common complication in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. In this review, we summarize the advanced research on HCP and discuss the understanding of the molecular originators of HCP and the development of diagnoses and remedies of HCP after SAH. It has been reported that inflammation, apoptosis, autophagy, and oxidative stress are the important causes of HCP, and well-known molecules including transforming growth factor, matrix metalloproteinases, and iron terminally lead to fibrosis and blockage of HCP. Potential medicines for HCP are still in preclinical status, and surgery is the most prevalent and efficient therapy, despite respective risks of different surgical methods, including lamina terminalis fenestration, ventricle-peritoneal shunting, and lumbar-peritoneal shunting. HCP remains an ailment that cannot be ignored and even with various solutions the medical community is still trying to understand and settle why and how it develops and accordingly improve the prognosis of these patients with HCP.

  19. Acute Brain Failure: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, Management, and Sequelae of Delirium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, José R

    2017-07-01

    Delirium is the most common psychiatric syndrome found in the general hospital setting, with an incidence as high as 87% in the acute care setting. Delirium is a neurobehavioral syndrome caused by the transient disruption of normal neuronal activity secondary to systemic disturbances. The development of delirium is associated with increased morbidity, mortality, cost of care, hospital-acquired complications, placement in specialized intermediate and long-term care facilities, slower rate of recovery, poor functional and cognitive recovery, decreased quality of life, and prolonged hospital stays. This article discusses the epidemiology, known etiological factors, presentation and characteristics, prevention, management, and impact of delirium. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Tuberculosis 2: Pathophysiology and microbiology of pulmonary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2005-08-01

    Aug 1, 2005 ... February 2013 Downloaded from www.southsudanmedicaljournal.com. MaIN arTIClES. 10. Tuberculosis 2: Pathophysiology and microbiology of pulmonary tuberculosis. Robert L. Serafino Wania MBBS, MrCP, MSc (Trop Med). Pathophysiology. Inhalation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis leads to one of.

  1. Pathophysiology of pediatric fecal incontinence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Benninga, Marc A.

    2004-01-01

    This article addresses the diagnosis and treatment of pediatric fecal incontinence in 4 main categories: (1) Functional fecal retention, the withholding of feces because of fear of painful defecation, results in constipation and overflow soiling. Treatment includes dietary changes, use of laxatives,

  2. Pathophysiologic mechanisms of biomedical nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Liming, E-mail: wangliming@ihep.ac.cn; Chen, Chunying, E-mail: chenchy@nanoctr.cn

    2016-05-15

    Nanomaterials (NMs) have been widespread used in biomedical fields, daily consuming, and even food industry. It is crucial to understand the safety and biomedical efficacy of NMs. In this review, we summarized the recent progress about the physiological and pathological effects of NMs from several levels: protein-nano interface, NM-subcellular structures, and cell–cell interaction. We focused on the detailed information of nano-bio interaction, especially about protein adsorption, intracellular trafficking, biological barriers, and signaling pathways as well as the associated mechanism mediated by nanomaterials. We also introduced related analytical methods that are meaningful and helpful for biomedical effect studies in the future. We believe that knowledge about pathophysiologic effects of NMs is not only significant for rational design of medical NMs but also helps predict their safety and further improve their applications in the future. - Highlights: • Rapid protein adsorption onto nanomaterials that affects biomedical effects • Nanomaterials and their interaction with biological membrane, intracellular trafficking and specific cellular effects • Nanomaterials and their interaction with biological barriers • The signaling pathways mediated by nanomaterials and related biomedical effects • Novel techniques for studying translocation and biomedical effects of NMs.

  3. Pathophysiologic mechanisms of biomedical nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Liming; Chen, Chunying

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials (NMs) have been widespread used in biomedical fields, daily consuming, and even food industry. It is crucial to understand the safety and biomedical efficacy of NMs. In this review, we summarized the recent progress about the physiological and pathological effects of NMs from several levels: protein-nano interface, NM-subcellular structures, and cell–cell interaction. We focused on the detailed information of nano-bio interaction, especially about protein adsorption, intracellular trafficking, biological barriers, and signaling pathways as well as the associated mechanism mediated by nanomaterials. We also introduced related analytical methods that are meaningful and helpful for biomedical effect studies in the future. We believe that knowledge about pathophysiologic effects of NMs is not only significant for rational design of medical NMs but also helps predict their safety and further improve their applications in the future. - Highlights: • Rapid protein adsorption onto nanomaterials that affects biomedical effects • Nanomaterials and their interaction with biological membrane, intracellular trafficking and specific cellular effects • Nanomaterials and their interaction with biological barriers • The signaling pathways mediated by nanomaterials and related biomedical effects • Novel techniques for studying translocation and biomedical effects of NMs

  4. Molecular Testing of Nodules with a Suspicious or Malignant Cytologic Diagnosis in the Setting of Non-Invasive Follicular Thyroid Neoplasm with Papillary-Like Nuclear Features (NIFTP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Kyle C; Eszlinger, Markus; Paschke, Ralf; Angell, Trevor E; Alexander, Erik K; Marqusee, Ellen; Nehs, Matthew A; Jo, Vickie Y; Lowe, Alarice; Vivero, Marina; Hollowell, Monica; Qian, Xiaohua; Wieczorek, Tad; French, Christopher A; Teot, Lisa A; Cibas, Edmund S; Lindeman, Neal I; Krane, Jeffrey F; Barletta, Justine A

    2018-03-01

    Non-invasive follicular thyroid neoplasm with papillary-like nuclear features (NIFTP) is an indolent thyroid tumor characterized by frequent RAS mutations and an absence of the BRAF V600E mutation commonly seen in classical papillary thyroid carcinoma (cPTC). The ability to differentiate potential NIFTP/follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma (FVPTC) from cPTC at the time of fine-needle aspiration (FNA) can facilitate conservative management of NIFTP. The aim of the current study was to investigate how molecular testing may add to cytologic assessment in the pre-operative differentiation of potential NIFTP/FVPTC and cPTC. We had previously evaluated cytologists' ability to prospectively distinguish potential NIFTP/FVPTC from cPTC in a cohort of 56 consecutive FNAs diagnosed as malignant or suspicious for malignancy. We utilized this cohort to perform molecular analysis. Detected molecular abnormalities were stratified into two groups: (1) those supporting malignancy and (2) those supporting a diagnosis of potential NIFTP/FVPTC. The cytologists' characterization of cases and the detected molecular alterations were correlated with the final histologic diagnoses. Molecular testing was performed in 52 (93%) of the 56 cases. For the 37 cases cytologists favored to be cPTC, 31 (84%) had a molecular result that supported malignancy (28 BRAF V600E mutations, 2 NTRK1 fusions, 1 AGK-BRAF fusion). For the 8 cases that were favored to be NIFTP/FVPTC by cytologists, 7 (88%) had a molecular result that supported conservative management (1 NRAS mutation, 6 wild-type result). Seven cases were designated as cytomorphologically indeterminate for NIFTP/FVPTC or cPTC, of which 6 (86%) had a molecular result that would have aided in the pre-operative assessment of potential NIFTP/FVPTC or cPTC/malignancy. These included 3 BRAF V600E mutations in nodules that were cPTC on resection, an HRAS mutation, and a wild-type result in the 2 nodules that were NIFTP, and a TERT promoter

  5. Influence of the measurement method of features in ultrasound images of the thyroid in the diagnosis of Hashimoto’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koprowski Robert

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction This paper shows the influence of a measurement method of features in the diagnosis of Hashimoto’s disease. Sensitivity of the algorithm to changes in the parameters of the ROI, namely shift, resizing and rotation, has been presented. The obtained results were also compared to the methods known from the literature in which decision trees or average gray level thresholding are used. Material In the study, 288 images obtained from patients with Hashimoto’s disease and 236 images from healthy subjects have been analyzed. For each person, an ultrasound examination of the left and right thyroid lobe in transverse and longitudinal sections has been performed. Method With the use of the developed algorithm, a discriminant analysis has been conducted for the following five options: linear, diaglinear, quadratic, diagquadratic and mahalanobis. The left and right thyroid lobes have been analyzed both together and separately in transverse and longitudinal sections. In addition, the algorithm enabled to analyze specificity and sensitivity as well as the impact of sensitivity of ROI shift, repositioning and rotation on the measured features. Results and summary The analysis has shown that the highest accuracy was obtained for the longitudinal section (LD with the method of linear, yielding sensitivity = 76%, specificity = 95% and accuracy ACC = 84%. The conducted sensitivity assessment confirms that changes in the position and size of the ROI have little effect on sensitivity and specificity. The analysis of all cases, that is, images of the left and right thyroid lobes in transverse and longitudinal sections, has shown specificity ranging from 60% to 95% and sensitivity from 62% to 89%. Additionally, it was shown that the value of ACC for the method using decision trees as a classifier is equal to 84% for the analyzed data. Thresholding of average brightness of the ROI gave ACC equal to 76%.

  6. The pathophysiology of heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Clinton D; Conte, John V

    2012-01-01

    Heart failure is a clinical syndrome that results when the heart is unable to provide sufficient blood flow to meet metabolic requirements or accommodate systemic venous return. This common condition affects over 5 million people in the United States at a cost of $10-38 billion per year. Heart failure results from injury to the myocardium from a variety of causes including ischemic heart disease, hypertension, and diabetes. Less common etiologies include cardiomyopathies, valvular disease, myocarditis, infections, systemic toxins, and cardiotoxic drugs. As the heart fails, patients develop symptoms which include dyspnea from pulmonary congestion, and peripheral edema and ascites from impaired venous return. Constitutional symptoms such as nausea, lack of appetite, and fatigue are also common. There are several compensatory mechanisms that occur as the failing heart attempts to maintain adequate function. These include increasing cardiac output via the Frank-Starling mechanism, increasing ventricular volume and wall thickness through ventricular remodeling, and maintaining tissue perfusion with augmented mean arterial pressure through activation of neurohormonal systems. Although initially beneficial in the early stages of heart failure, all of these compensatory mechanisms eventually lead to a vicious cycle of worsening heart failure. Treatment strategies have been developed based upon the understanding of these compensatory mechanisms. Medical therapy includes diuresis, suppression of the overactive neurohormonal systems, and augmentation of contractility. Surgical options include ventricular resynchronization therapy, surgical ventricular remodeling, ventricular assist device implantation, and heart transplantation. Despite significant understanding of the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms in heart failure, this disease causes significant morbidity and carries a 50% 5-year mortality. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Clinical and echocardiographic features of aorto-atrial fistulas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananthasubramaniam Karthik

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aorto-atrial fistulas (AAF are rare but important pathophysiologic conditions of the aorta and have varied presentations such as acute pulmonary edema, chronic heart failure and incidental detection of the fistula. A variety of mechanisms such as aortic dissection, endocarditis with pseudoaneurysm formation, post surgical scenarios or trauma may precipitate the fistula formation. With increasing survival of patients, particularly following complex aortic reconstructive surgeries and redo valve surgeries, recognition of this complication, its clinical features and echocardiographic diagnosis is important. Since physical exam in this condition may be misleading, echocardiography serves as the cornerstone for diagnosis. The case below illustrates aorto-left atrial fistula formation following redo aortic valve surgery with slowly progressive symptoms of heart failure. A brief review of the existing literature of this entity is presented including emphasis on echocardiographic diagnosis and treatment.

  8. Stroke MRI: pathophysiology, potential and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiehler, J.; Kucinski, T.; Zeumer, H.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRT) is increasingly utilized as the primary imaging modality in major stroke centers. The ability to depict several aspects of individual pathophysiology makes the use of MRI in stroke both attractive and complex. Profound knowledge of the pathophysiology of the imaging findings is crucial for a rational diagnostic workup. The pathophysiology of MRI in stroke will be reviewed considering recent experiences in clinical application, and the potential of stroke MRI will be assessed. Further perspectives like application of 'blood oxygen level dependent' (BOLD) and the use of multiparametric prediction maps will be discussed. (orig.) [de

  9. Gynecomastia: Pathophysiology, Evaluation, and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ruth E.; Murad, M. Hassan

    2009-01-01

    Gynecomastia, defined as benign proliferation of male breast glandular tissue, is usually caused by increased estrogen activity, decreased testosterone activity, or the use of numerous medications. Although a fairly common presentation in the primary care setting and mostly of benign etiology, it can cause patients considerable anxiety. The initial step is to rule out pseudogynecomastia by careful history taking and physical examination. A stepwise approach that includes imaging and laboratory testing to exclude neoplasms and endocrinopathies may facilitate cost-effective diagnosis. If results of all studies are normal, idiopathic gynecomastia is diagnosed. The evidence in this area is mainly of observational nature and lower quality. PMID:19880691

  10. Thalassemia: Pathophysiology and management. Part A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fucharoen, S.; Rowley, P.T.; Paul, N.W.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains papers divided among the following sections: molecular biology and pathogenesis; pathophysiology - molecular and cellular; clinical manifestations and hematologic changes; cardiopulmonary defects and platelet function; hormones and minerals; and infection and immunology

  11. A vicious circle in chronic lymphoedema pathophysiology?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cucchi, F; Rossmeislova, L; Simonsen, L

    2017-01-01

    Chronic lymphoedema is a disease caused by a congenital or acquired damage to the lymphatic system and characterized by complex chains of pathophysiologic events such as lymphatic fluid stasis, chronic inflammation, lymphatic vessels impairment, adipose tissue deposition and fibrosis. These event....... Together, these observations indicate strong reciprocal relationship between lymphatics and adipose tissue and suggest a possible key role of the adipocyte in the pathophysiology of chronic lymphoedema's vicious circle....

  12. [Application of support vector machine-recursive feature elimination algorithm in Raman spectroscopy for differential diagnosis of benign and malignant breast diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haipeng; Fu, Tong; Zhang, Zhiru; Fan, Zhimin; Zheng, Chao; Han, Bing

    2014-08-01

    To explore the value of application of support vector machine-recursive feature elimination (SVM-RFE) method in Raman spectroscopy for differential diagnosis of benign and malignant breast diseases. Fresh breast tissue samples of 168 patients (all female; ages 22-75) were obtained by routine surgical resection from May 2011 to May 2012 at the Department of Breast Surgery, the First Hospital of Jilin University. Among them, there were 51 normal tissues, 66 benign and 51 malignant breast lesions. All the specimens were assessed by Raman spectroscopy, and the SVM-RFE algorithm was used to process the data and build the mathematical model. Mahalanobis distance and spectral residuals were used as discriminating criteria to evaluate this data-processing method. 1 800 Raman spectra were acquired from the fresh samples of human breast tissues. Based on spectral profiles, the presence of 1 078, 1 267, 1 301, 1 437, 1 653, and 1 743 cm(-1) peaks were identified in the normal tissues; and 1 281, 1 341, 1 381, 1 417, 1 465, 1 530, and 1 637 cm(-1) peaks were found in the benign and malignant tissues. The main characteristic peaks differentiating benign and malignant lesions were 1 340 and 1 480 cm(-1). The accuracy of SVM-RFE in discriminating normal and malignant lesions was 100.0%, while that in the assessment of benign lesions was 93.0%. There are distinct differences among the Raman spectra of normal, benign and malignant breast tissues, and SVM-RFE method can be used to build differentiation model of breast lesions.

  13. Alzheimer's disease: pathophysiology and applications of magnetic nanoparticles as MRI theranostic agents.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amiri, H.; Saeidi, K.; Borhani, P.; Manafirad, A.; Ghavami, M.; Zerbi, V.

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. During the recent decade, nanotechnology has been widely considered, as a promising tool, for theranosis (diagnosis and therapy) of AD. Here we first discuss pathophysiology and characteristics of AD with a focus on the amyloid cascade

  14. Pathophysiological aspects of ureterorenoscopic management of upper urinary tract calculi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osther, Palle J S; Pedersen, Katja V; Lildal, Søren K

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Indications for ureterorenoscopy are expanding without hard scientific evidence to support its efficacy. Therefore, it is extremely important to focus on potential harmful effects of the procedure itself. This review explores how physiology of the upper urinary tract reacts...... of the β-receptor agonist isoproterenol in the irrigation fluid has shown a potential for reducing both intrarenal pressure and ureteral tone during ureterorenoscopy. SUMMARY: Upper urinary tract physiology has unique features that may be pushed into pathophysiological processes by the unique elements...

  15. Priapism: etiology, pathophysiology and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Der Horst C.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of erectile physiology has improved the prompt diagnosis and treatment of priapism. Priapism is defined as prolonged and persistent erection of the penis without sexual stimulation and failure to subside despite orgasm. Numerous etiologies of this condition are considered. Among others a disturbed detumescence mechanism, which may due to excess release of contractile neurotransmitters, obstruction of draining venules, malfunction of the intrinsic detumescence mechanism or prolonged relaxation of intracavernosal smooth muscle are postulated. Treatment of priapism varies from a conservative medical to a drastic surgical approach. Two main types of priapism; veno-occlusive low flow (ischemic and arterial high flow (non-ischemic, must be distinguished to choose the correct treatment option for each type. Patient history, physical examination, penile hemodynamics and corporeal metabolic blood quality provides distinction between a static or dynamic pathology. Priapism can be treated effectively with intracavernous vasoconstrictive agents or surgical shunting. Alternative options, such as intracavernous injection of methylene blue (MB or selective penile arterial embolization (SPEA, for the management of high and low flow priapism are described and a survey on current treatment modalities is given.

  16. Intramural hemorrhage of the thoracic aorta - imaging features and differential diagnosis; Das intramurale Haematom der thorakalen Aorta: Bildgebende Diagnostik und Differentialdiagnose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, T. [Bonn Univ. (Germany) Radiologische Klinik; Abu-Ramadan, D. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Herz- und Gefaesschirurgie; Busch, M. [Bonn Univ. (Germany) Radiologische Klinik; Bierhoff, E. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Pathologische Inst.; Kreft, B. [Bonn Univ. (Germany) Radiologische Klinik; Kuhl, C. [Bonn Univ. (Germany) Radiologische Klinik; Lutterbey, G. [Bonn Univ. (Germany) Radiologische Klinik; Keller, E. [Bonn Univ. (Germany) Radiologische Klinik; Schild, H. [Bonn Univ. (Germany) Radiologische Klinik

    1996-09-01

    Purpose: Aortic wall thickening due to intramural hemorrhage may be the only sign of aortic dissection. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence, imaging features and differential diagnoses of intramural hemorrhage (IMH) of the thoracic aorta. Methods: 98 patients with clinically suspected aortic dissection were investigated via Spiral-CT and MRT. Diagnosis of IMH based on the presence of smooth crescentic or concentric wall thickening over a longer segment of the thoracic aorta without flow visualization and without compression or distortion of the aortic lumen. Results: 69 patients had classic aortic dissections and 7 patients were diagnosed to have IMH of the thoracic aorta. One patient with IMH of the ascending aorta died of aortic rupture and subsequent pericardial tamponade 12 hours after onset of symptoms. In one patient with IMH of the descending aorta on initial examination, there was a progression of overt aortic dissection at follow-up after three weeks. In two patients with IMH of the descending aorta, wall thickening decreased in size at follow-up (10-15 weeks), whereas in one patient it remained unchanged. Conclusion: IMH of the aorta should be considered a precursor of aortic dissection. At follow-up IMH may decrease in size, rupture or progress to overt aortic dissection. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Eine aortale Wandverdichtung als Ausdruck eines intramuralen Haematoms kann die einzige Manifestation einer Aortendissektion sein. Ziel dieser Arbeit war die Evaluierung der Inzidenz, bildgebenden Aspekte und Differentialdiagnosen dieses in der deutschsprachigen Literatur wenig bekannten Krankheitsbildes. Methode: 98 Patienten mit klinischem Verdacht auf eine Aortendissektion wurden MR- und computertomographisch untersucht. Kriterium fuer das Vorliegen eines intramuralen Haematoms war der Nachweis einer laengerstreckigen aortalen Wandverdickung ohne Flussnachweis sowie ohne Konfigurationsaenderung des aortalen Lumens. Ergebnisse: 69 Patienten

  17. Current concepts in the pathophysiology of glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agarwal Renu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma, the second leading cause of blindness, is characterized by changes in the optic disc and visual field defects. The elevated intraocular pressure was considered the prime factor responsible for the glaucomatous optic neuropathy involving death of retinal ganglion cells and their axons. Extensive investigations into the pathophysiology of glaucoma now reveal the role of multiple factors in the development of retinal ganglion cell death. A better understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the onset and progression of glaucomatous optic neuropathy is crucial in the development of better therapeutic options. This review is an effort to summarize the current concepts in the pathophysiology of glaucoma so that newer therapeutic targets can be recognized. The literature available in the National Medical Library and online Pubmed search engine was used for literature review.

  18. Pathophysiology, Evaluation, and Treatment of Bloating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbard, Scott L.; Crowell, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Abdominal bloating is commonly reported by men and women of all ages. Bloating occurs in nearly all patients with irritable bowel syndrome, and it also occurs in patients with other functional and organic disorders. Bloating is frequently disturbing to patients and frustrating to clinicians, as effective treatments are limited and are not universally successful. Although the terms bloating and abdominal distention are often used interchangeably, these symptoms likely involve different pathophysiologic processes, both of which are still not completely understood. The goal of this paper is to review the pathophysiology, evaluation, and treatment of bloating and abdominal distention. PMID:22298969

  19. Genetic Variants Associated with Hyperandrogenemia in PCOS Pathophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is a multifactorial endocrine disorder whose pathophysiology baffles many researchers till today. This syndrome is typically characterized by anovulatory cycles and infertility, altered gonadotropin levels, obesity, and bulky multifollicular ovaries on ultrasound. Hyperandrogenism and insulin resistance are hallmark features of its complex pathophysiology. Hyperandrogenemia is a salient feature of PCOS and a major contributor to cosmetic anomalies including hirsutism, acne, and male pattern alopecia in affected women. Increased androgen levels may be intrinsic or aggravated by preexisting insulin resistance in women with PCOS. Studies have reported augmented ovarian steroidogenesis patterns attributed mainly to theca cell hypertrophy and altered expression of key enzymes in the steroidogenic pathway. Candidate gene studies have been performed in order to delineate the association of polymorphisms in genes, which encode enzymes in the intricate cascade of steroidogenesis or modulate the levels and action of circulating androgens, with risk of PCOS development and its related traits. However, inconsistent findings have impacted the emergence of a unanimously accepted genetic marker for PCOS susceptibility. In the current review, we have summarized the influence of polymorphisms in important androgen related genes in governing genetic predisposition to PCOS and its related metabolic and reproductive traits. PMID:29670770

  20. Genetic Variants Associated with Hyperandrogenemia in PCOS Pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshan Dadachanji

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycystic ovary syndrome is a multifactorial endocrine disorder whose pathophysiology baffles many researchers till today. This syndrome is typically characterized by anovulatory cycles and infertility, altered gonadotropin levels, obesity, and bulky multifollicular ovaries on ultrasound. Hyperandrogenism and insulin resistance are hallmark features of its complex pathophysiology. Hyperandrogenemia is a salient feature of PCOS and a major contributor to cosmetic anomalies including hirsutism, acne, and male pattern alopecia in affected women. Increased androgen levels may be intrinsic or aggravated by preexisting insulin resistance in women with PCOS. Studies have reported augmented ovarian steroidogenesis patterns attributed mainly to theca cell hypertrophy and altered expression of key enzymes in the steroidogenic pathway. Candidate gene studies have been performed in order to delineate the association of polymorphisms in genes, which encode enzymes in the intricate cascade of steroidogenesis or modulate the levels and action of circulating androgens, with risk of PCOS development and its related traits. However, inconsistent findings have impacted the emergence of a unanimously accepted genetic marker for PCOS susceptibility. In the current review, we have summarized the influence of polymorphisms in important androgen related genes in governing genetic predisposition to PCOS and its related metabolic and reproductive traits.

  1. New aids for the non-invasive prenatal diagnosis of achondroplasia: dysmorphic features, charts of fetal size and molecular confirmation using cell-free fetal DNA in maternal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitty, L S; Griffin, D R; Meaney, C; Barrett, A; Khalil, A; Pajkrt, E; Cole, T J

    2011-03-01

    To improve the prenatal diagnosis of achondroplasia by constructing charts of fetal size, defining frequency of sonographic features and exploring the role of non-invasive molecular diagnosis based on cell-free fetal deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in maternal plasma. Data on fetuses with a confirmed diagnosis of achondroplasia were obtained from our databases, records reviewed, sonographic features and measurements determined and charts of fetal size constructed using the LMS (lambda-mu-sigma) method and compared with charts used in normal pregnancies. Cases referred to our regional genetics laboratory for molecular diagnosis using cell-free fetal DNA were identified and results reviewed. Twenty-six cases were scanned in our unit. Fetal size charts showed that femur length was usually on or below the 3(rd) centile by 25 weeks' gestation, and always below the 3(rd) by 30 weeks. Head circumference was above the 50(th) centile, increasing to above the 95(th) when compared with normal for the majority of fetuses. The abdominal circumference was also increased but to a lesser extent. Commonly reported sonographic features were bowing of the femora, frontal bossing, short fingers, a small chest and polyhydramnios. Analysis of cell-free fetal DNA in six pregnancies confirmed the presence of the c.1138G > A mutation in the FGRF3 gene in four cases with achondroplasia, but not the two subsequently found to be growth restricted. These data should improve the accuracy of diagnosis of achondroplasia based on sonographic findings, and have implications for targeted molecular confirmation that can reliably and safely be carried out using cell-free fetal DNA. Copyright © 2011 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. The Dynamics of Concussion: Mapping Pathophysiology, Persistence, and Recovery With Causal-Loop Diagramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenzie, Erin S; Parks, Elle L; Bigler, Erin D; Wright, David W; Lim, Miranda M; Chesnutt, James C; Hawryluk, Gregory W J; Gordon, Wayne; Wakeland, Wayne

    2018-01-01

    Despite increasing public awareness and a growing body of literature on the subject of concussion, or mild traumatic brain injury, an urgent need still exists for reliable diagnostic measures, clinical care guidelines, and effective treatments for the condition. Complexity and heterogeneity complicate research efforts and indicate the need for innovative approaches to synthesize current knowledge in order to improve clinical outcomes. Methods from the interdisciplinary field of systems science, including models of complex systems, have been increasingly applied to biomedical applications and show promise for generating insight for traumatic brain injury. The current study uses causal-loop diagramming to visualize relationships between factors influencing the pathophysiology and recovery trajectories of concussive injury, including persistence of symptoms and deficits. The primary output is a series of preliminary systems maps detailing feedback loops, intrinsic dynamics, exogenous drivers, and hubs across several scales, from micro-level cellular processes to social influences. Key system features, such as the role of specific restorative feedback processes and cross-scale connections, are examined and discussed in the context of recovery trajectories. This systems approach integrates research findings across disciplines and allows components to be considered in relation to larger system influences, which enables the identification of research gaps, supports classification efforts, and provides a framework for interdisciplinary collaboration and communication-all strides that would benefit diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment in the clinic.

  3. The Dynamics of Concussion: Mapping Pathophysiology, Persistence, and Recovery With Causal-Loop Diagramming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin S. Kenzie

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite increasing public awareness and a growing body of literature on the subject of concussion, or mild traumatic brain injury, an urgent need still exists for reliable diagnostic measures, clinical care guidelines, and effective treatments for the condition. Complexity and heterogeneity complicate research efforts and indicate the need for innovative approaches to synthesize current knowledge in order to improve clinical outcomes. Methods from the interdisciplinary field of systems science, including models of complex systems, have been increasingly applied to biomedical applications and show promise for generating insight for traumatic brain injury. The current study uses causal-loop diagramming to visualize relationships between factors influencing the pathophysiology and recovery trajectories of concussive injury, including persistence of symptoms and deficits. The primary output is a series of preliminary systems maps detailing feedback loops, intrinsic dynamics, exogenous drivers, and hubs across several scales, from micro-level cellular processes to social influences. Key system features, such as the role of specific restorative feedback processes and cross-scale connections, are examined and discussed in the context of recovery trajectories. This systems approach integrates research findings across disciplines and allows components to be considered in relation to larger system influences, which enables the identification of research gaps, supports classification efforts, and provides a framework for interdisciplinary collaboration and communication—all strides that would benefit diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment in the clinic.

  4. Epidemiology, genetics, pathophysiology, and prognostic classifications of cerebral arteriovenous malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozpinar, Alp; Mendez, Gustavo; Abla, Adib A

    2017-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are vascular deformities involving fistula formation of arterial to venous structures without an intervening capillary bed. Such anomalies can prove fatal as the high arterial flow can disrupt the integrity of venous walls, thus leading to dangerous sequelae such as hemorrhage. Diagnosis of these lesions in the central nervous system can often prove challenging as intracranial AVMs represent a heterogeneous vascular pathology with various presentations and symptomatology. The literature suggests that most brain AVMs (bAVMs) are identified following evaluation of the etiology of acute cerebral hemorrhage, or incidentally on imaging associated with seizure or headache workup. Given the low incidence of this disease, most of the data accrued on this pathology comes from single-center experiences. This chapter aims to distill the most important information from these studies as well as examine meta-analyses on bAVMs in order to provide a comprehensive introduction into the natural history, classification, genetic underpinnings of disease, and proposed pathophysiology. While there is yet much to be elucidated about AVMs of the central nervous system, we aim to provide an overview of bAVM etiology, classification, genetics, and pathophysiology inherent to the disease process. © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Retinal vein occlusion: pathophysiology and treatment options

    OpenAIRE

    Karia, Niral

    2010-01-01

    Niral KariaDepartment of Ophthalmology, Southend Hospital, Prittlewell Chase, Westcliff on Sea, Essex, United KingdomAbstract: This paper reviews the current thinking about retinal vein occlusion. It gives an overview of its pathophysiology and discusses the evidence behind the various established and emerging treatment paradigms.Keywords: central, hemispheric, branch, retinal vein occlusion, visual loss

  6. GAPO syndrome : a new case of this rare syndrome and a review of the relative importance of different phenotypic features in diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bacon, W; Hall, RK; Roset, JP; Boukari, A; Tenenbaum, H; Walter, B

    1999-01-01

    The case of GAPO syndrome reported here is the 24th recorded case, 23 cases having been published previously. The 29-year-old male under discussion presents all the typical features of the syndrome, having short stature, dysmorphic craniofacial features. total alopecia and pseudoanodontia. Orally,

  7. Pathophysiology, Evaluation, and Management of Chronic Watery Diarrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, Michael; Sellin, Joseph H.; Barrett, Kim E.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic watery diarrhea poses a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge and is often a disabling condition for patients. Although acute diarrhea is likely to be caused by infection, the causes of chronic diarrhea (more than 4 weeks in duration) are more elusive. We review on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of chronic diarrhea. Drawing on recent insights into the molecular mechanisms of intestinal epithelial transport and barrier function, we discuss how diarrhea can result from a decrease in luminal solute absorption, an increase in secretion, or both, as well as derangements in barrier properties. We also describe the various extra-epithelial factors that activate diarrheal mechanisms. Finally, clinical evaluation and tests used in assessment of patients presenting with chronic diarrhea are reviewed, and an algorithm guiding therapeutic decisions and pharmacotherapy is presented. PMID:27773805

  8. Gaucher Disease: The Metabolic Defect, Pathophysiology, Phenotypes And Natural History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baris, Hagit N.; Cohen, Ian J.; Mistry, Pramod K.

    2015-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD), a prototype lysosomal storage disorder, results from inherited deficiency of lysosomal glucocerebrosidase due to biallelic mutations in GBA. The result is widespread accumulation of macrophages engorged with predominantly lysosomal glucocerebroside. A complex multisystem phenotype arises involving the liver, spleen, bone marrow and occasionally the lungs in type 1 Gaucher disease; in neuronopathic fulminant type 2 and chronic type 3 disease there is in addition progressive neurodegenerative disease. Manifestations of Gaucher disease type 1 (GD1) include hepatosplenomegaly, cytopenia, a complex pattern of bone involvement with avascular osteonecrosis (AVN), osteoporosis, fractures and lytic lesions. Enzyme replacement therapy became the standard of care in 1991, and this has transformed the natural history of GD1. This article reviews the clinical phenotypes of GD, diagnosis, pathophysiology and its natural history. A subsequent chapter discusses the treatment options. PMID:25345088

  9. Narcolepsy and Psychiatric Disorders: Comorbidities or Shared Pathophysiology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Marie Morse

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Narcolepsy and psychiatric disorders have a significant but unrecognized relationship, which is an area of evolving interest, but unfortunately, the association is poorly understood. It is not uncommon for the two to occur co-morbidly. However, narcolepsy is frequently misdiagnosed initially as a psychiatric condition, contributing to the protracted time to accurate diagnosis and treatment. Narcolepsy is a disabling neurodegenerative condition that carries a high risk for development of social and occupational dysfunction. Deterioration in function may lead to the secondary development of psychiatric symptoms. Inversely, the development of psychiatric symptoms can lead to the deterioration in function and quality of life. The overlap in pharmaceutical intervention may further enhance the difficulty to distinguish between diagnoses. Comprehensive care for patients with narcolepsy should include surveillance for psychiatric illness and appropriate treatment when necessary. Further research is necessary to better understand the underlying pathophysiology between psychiatric disease and narcolepsy.

  10. Computer-aided diagnosis for phase-contrast X-ray computed tomography: quantitative characterization of human patellar cartilage with high-dimensional geometric features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Mahesh B; Coan, Paola; Huber, Markus B; Diemoz, Paul C; Glaser, Christian; Wismüller, Axel

    2014-02-01

    Phase-contrast computed tomography (PCI-CT) has shown tremendous potential as an imaging modality for visualizing human cartilage with high spatial resolution. Previous studies have demonstrated the ability of PCI-CT to visualize (1) structural details of the human patellar cartilage matrix and (2) changes to chondrocyte organization induced by osteoarthritis. This study investigates the use of high-dimensional geometric features in characterizing such chondrocyte patterns in the presence or absence of osteoarthritic damage. Geometrical features derived from the scaling index method (SIM) and statistical features derived from gray-level co-occurrence matrices were extracted from 842 regions of interest (ROI) annotated on PCI-CT images of ex vivo human patellar cartilage specimens. These features were subsequently used in a machine learning task with support vector regression to classify ROIs as healthy or osteoarthritic; classification performance was evaluated using the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC). SIM-derived geometrical features exhibited the best classification performance (AUC, 0.95 ± 0.06) and were most robust to changes in ROI size. These results suggest that such geometrical features can provide a detailed characterization of the chondrocyte organization in the cartilage matrix in an automated and non-subjective manner, while also enabling classification of cartilage as healthy or osteoarthritic with high accuracy. Such features could potentially serve as imaging markers for evaluating osteoarthritis progression and its response to different therapeutic intervention strategies.

  11. [PRIMARY HEADACHE IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS--DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matar, Amal Khourieh; Kerem, Nogah C; Srugo, Isaac; Genizi, Jacob

    2015-12-01

    Primary headaches are one of the most common disorders of childhood, with migraine and tension type headaches (TTHs) being the most frequent ones. In spite of their prevalence, there is paucity of knowledge regarding the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms that cause headaches and regarding the unique aspects of headaches in children and adolescents. To review the literature and summarize the knowledge regarding clinical features, diagnosis and management of primary headache in children and adolescents, mainly migraine and TTH. Most of our current knowledge regarding primary headaches in children and adolescents is driven from extrapolations from studies that were conducted with adult patients. Therefore, it needs to be validated for the different age groups. Migraines may be diagnosed effectively based on the 2nd edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-II), however, TTH is diagnosed mainly by the absence of features found in other headache types. Treatment strategies for primary headaches vary according to patient's age, family structure, culture and beliefs, headache diagnosis, and based on the disability the headache imposes on the patient's daily living. It was shown that a multidisciplinary approach, that includes continuing counseling, education, and reassurance, in combination with pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment, is an effective strategy for children and adolescents suffering from primary headaches. Further studies are needed to enrich our knowledge about the pathophysiological mechanisms that cause headaches in children and adolescents and to develop efficient strategies to alleviate their burden.

  12. MDD diagnosis based on partial-brain functional connection network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Gaoliang; Hu, Hailong; Zhao, Xiang; Zhang, Lin; Qu, Zehui; Li, Yantao

    2018-04-01

    Artificial intelligence (AI) is a hotspot in computer science research nowadays. To apply AI technology in all industries has been the developing direction for researchers. Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a common disease of serious mental disorders. The World Health Organization (WHO) reports that MDD is projected to become the second most common cause of death and disability by 2020. At present, the way of MDD diagnosis is single. Applying AI technology to MDD diagnosis and pathophysiological research will speed up the MDD research and improve the efficiency of MDD diagnosis. In this study, we select the higher degree of brain network functional connectivity by statistical methods. And our experiments show that the average accuracy of Logistic Regression (LR) classifier using feature filtering reaches 88.48%. Compared with other classification methods, both the efficiency and accuracy of this method are improved, which will greatly improve the process of MDD diagnose. In these experiments, we also define the brain regions associated with MDD, which plays a vital role in MDD pathophysiological research.

  13. Diagnosis features of pediatric Gaucher disease patients in the era of enzymatic therapy, a national-base study from the Spanish Registry of Gaucher Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade-Campos, Marcio; Alfonso, Pilar; Irun, Pilar; Armstrong, Judith; Calvo, Carmen; Dalmau, Jaime; Domingo, Maria-Rosario; Barbera, Jose-Luis; Cano, Horacio; Fernandez-Galán, Maria-Angeles; Franco, Rafael; Gracia, Inmaculada; Gracia-Antequera, Miguel; Ibañez, Angela; Lendinez, Francisco; Madruga, Marcos; Martin-Hernández, Elena; O'Callaghan, Maria Del Mar; Del Soto, Alberto Pérez; Del Prado, Yolanda Ruiz; Sancho-Val, Ignacio; Sanjurjo, Pablo; Pocovi, Miguel; Giraldo, Pilar

    2017-05-03

    The enzymatic replacement therapy (ERT) availability for Gaucher disease (GD) has changed the landscape of the disease, several countries have screening programs. These actions have promoted the early diagnosis and avoided many complications in pediatric patients. In Spain ERT has been available since 1993 and 386 patients have been included in the Spanish Registry of Gaucher Disease (SpRGD). The aim of this study is to analyze the impact of ERT on the characteristics at time of diagnosis and initial complications in pediatric Gaucher disease patients. To analyze the impact of ERT on the characteristics at time of diagnosis and initial complications in pediatric Gaucher disease patients. A review of data in SpRGD from patients' diagnosed before 18 years old was performed. The cohort was split according the year of diagnosis (≤1994, cohort A; ≥1995, cohort B). A total of 98 pediatric patients were included, GD1: 80, GD3: 18; mean age: 7.2 (0.17-16.5) years, 58 (59.2%) males and 40 (40.8%) females. Forty-five were diagnosed ≤ 1994 and 53 ≥ 1995. Genotype: N370S/N370S: 2 (2.0%), N370S/L444P: 27 (27.5%), N370S/other: 47 (48%), L444P/L444P: 7 (7.1%), L444P/D409H: 2 (2.0%), L444P/other: 3 (6.2%), other/other: 10 (10.2%). The mean age at diagnosis was earlier in patients diagnosed after 1995 (p Gaucher disease in the era of ERT availability has permitted to reduce the incidence of severe and irreversible initial complication in pediatric patients, and this has permitted better development of these patients. This is the largest pediatric cohort from a national registry.

  14. Transcranial magnetic stimulation and sleep disorders: pathophysiologic insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardone, Raffaele; Höller, Yvonne; Brigo, Francesco; Tezzon, Frediano; Golaszewski, Stefan; Trinka, Eugen

    2013-11-01

    The neural mechanisms underlying the development of the most common intrinsic sleep disorders are not completely known. Therefore, there is a great need for noninvasive tools which can be used to better understand the pathophysiology of these diseases. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) offers a method to noninvasively investigate the functional integrity of the motor cortex and its corticospinal projections in neurologic and psychiatric diseases. To date, TMS studies have revealed cortical and corticospinal dysfunction in several sleep disorders, with cortical hyperexcitability being a characteristic feature in some disorders (i.e., the restless legs syndrome) and cortical hypoexcitability being a well-established finding in others (i.e., obstructive sleep apnea syndrome narcolepsy). Several research groups also have applied TMS to evaluate the effects of pharmacologic agents, such as dopaminergic agent or wake-promoting substances. Our review will focus on the mechanisms underlying the generation of abnormal TMS measures in the different types of sleep disorders, the contribution of TMS in enhancing the understanding of their pathophysiology, and the potential diagnostic utility of TMS techniques. We also briefly discussed the possible future implications for improving therapeutic approaches. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Pathophysiology of spontaneous venous gas embolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambertsen, C. J.; Albertine, K. H.; Pisarello, J. B.; Flores, N. D.

    1991-01-01

    The use of controllable degrees and durations of continuous isobaric counterdiffusion venous gas embolism to investigate effects of venous gas embolism upon blood, cardiovascular, and respiratory gas exchange function, as well as pathological effects upon the lung and its microcirculation is discussed. Use of N2O/He counterdiffusion permitted performance of the pathophysiologic and pulmonary microstructural effects at one ATA without hyperbaric or hypobaric exposures.

  16. The Role of mf-ERG in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Electrophysiological Features of AMD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschos, Marilita M; Nitoda, Eirini

    2018-01-01

    Age-related macular cegeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of visual dysfunction worldwide, affecting 9-25% of individuals between 65 and 75 years old. We have reviewed the published articles investigating the role of multifocal electroretinogram (mf-ERG) in the diagnosis and treatment of AMD. Visual evoked potentials have revealed decreased amplitudes and higher latencies in patients with AMD, while the degeneration of photoreceptors and abnormalities of retinal pigment epithelium can be identified by electro-oculogram recordings. Moreover, ERG can detect the functional abnormalities observed in AMD and evaluate each therapeutic approach. The record of local electrophysiological responses coming from different retinal areas can be accurately performed by mfERG. The accuracy of mfERG in detecting the degeneration of photoreceptors, as well the disturbances of macular function, could be useful both in the early diagnosis of AMD and the assessment of treatment efficacy.

  17. Abdominal cocoon: sonographic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayaraghavan, S Boopathy; Palanivelu, Chinnusamy; Sendhilkumar, Karuppusamy; Parthasarathi, Ramakrishnan

    2003-07-01

    An abdominal cocoon is a rare condition in which the small bowel is encased in a membrane. The diagnosis is usually established at surgery. Here we describe the sonographic features of this condition.

  18. Clinical features and treatment of organ failure in severe acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CUI Lijian

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Organ failure is an important factor causing death in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP. In recent years, thanks to the further study of pathophysiology of SAP and the continuous accumulation of experience and technology, substantial progress has been made in the diagnosis and treatment of SAP complicated by organ failure. The clinical features of SAP complicated by organ failure and the measures to be strengthened in the treatment of SAP are summarized. Currently, it is thought that organ failure tends to appear once SAP occurs, so timely, standardized treatment can shorten the course of disease and significantly reduce mortality.

  19. MRI features of soft tissue tumors. Analysis of the contribution to the aetiological diagnosis based on a series of 32 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose-Pittet, L.; Lebas, J.F.; Camuset, J.P.; Baudain, P.; Coulomb, M.

    1989-01-01

    This study concerns the investigation of 32 soft-tissue tumors by MRI, subsequently verified by biopsies or surgery (n = 28) or other investigations (n = 4). MRI can suggest the diagnosis in some cases: lipomas cysts, hematomas, neuromas, desmoid tumors, hemangiomas, by contrast analysis and morphologic aspects; sometimes, malignant lesions are suspected on particular anatomic criteria. MRI is excellent in the evaluation of local extension. MRI can therefore be performed when the staging of soft tissue tumor is incompletely provided by other investigations (CT or US) [fr

  20. Acid-Base Disorders in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Pathophysiological Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosimo Marcello Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors describe the pathophysiological mechanisms leading to development of acidosis in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and its deleterious effects on outcome and mortality rate. Renal compensatory adjustments consequent to acidosis are also described in detail with emphasis on differences between acute and chronic respiratory acidosis. Mixed acid-base disturbances due to comorbidity and side effects of some drugs in these patients are also examined, and practical considerations for a correct diagnosis are provided.

  1. [Irritable bowel syndrome: New pathophysiological hypotheses and practical issues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duboc, H; Dior, M; Coffin, B

    2016-08-01

    In 2015, besides the fact that it still fills the gastroenterologists' offices and impairs patient's quality of life, the irritable bowel syndrome has considerably evolved on several points. The pathophysiology is now organized around a consensual hypothesis called the "brain-gut axis", which gather all the influences of peripheral factors as gut microbiota or local serotonin secretion, on the central pain perception, contributing to visceral hypersensitivity and transit modifications. About the diagnosis, the key message is "avoid over-prescription" of additional tests, and reminds that a positive clinical diagnosis based on Rome III criteria is possible after the elimination of simple clinical warning signs. Finally, the food component, a neglected and historical claim of patients, finally finds a strong scientific rational, with a diet low in fermentable sugar and polyols, that gives positive and reproducible results. Copyright © 2016 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Diagnostic Thyroidectomy May Be Preferable in Patients With Suspicious Ultrasonography Features After Cytopathology Diagnosis of AUS/FLUS in the Bethesda System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Sang; Kim, Hyeung Kyoo; Chang, Hojin; Kim, Seok Mo; Kim, Bup-Woo; Chang, Hang-Seok; Park, Cheong Soo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Atypia/follicular lesion of undetermined significance (AUS/FLUS) is a new category in the Bethesda System for Reporting Thyroid Cytopathology (BSRTC) for which repeat fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) is recommended. The aim of this study was to identify specific ultrasonography and clinical predictors of malignancy in a subset of thyroid nodules associated with cytology diagnoses of AUS/FLUS. Between January 2011 and December 2102, 5440 patients underwent thyroid surgery at our institution. Of these, 213 patients were diagnosed AUS/FLUS at the preoperative cytopathology diagnosis. The frequency of FNAC and ultrasonography images was compared between patients with cancerous and benign tumors based on their final pathology. Of the 213 patients, 158 (74.2%) were diagnosed with thyroid carcinoma in their final pathology reports. In univariate and multivariate analyses, the frequency of FNAC was not significantly correlated with the cancer diagnosis. Hypoechogenicity (odds ratio 2.521, P = 0.007) and microcalcification (odds ratio 3.247, P = 0.005) were statistically correlated with cancer risk. Although AUS/FLUS in cytopathology is recommended for repeating FNAC in BSRTC, we proposed that thyroid nodules with ultrasonography findings that suggest the possibility of cancer should undergo thyroidectomy with diagnostic intent. PMID:26705204

  3. The pathology and pathophysiology of vascular dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaria, Raj N

    2017-12-19

    Vascular dementia (VaD) is widely recognised as the second most common type of dementia. Consensus and accurate diagnosis of clinically suspected VaD relies on wide-ranging clinical, neuropsychological and neuroimaging measures in life but more importantly pathological confirmation. Factors defining subtypes of VaD include the nature and extent of vascular pathologies, degree of involvement of extra and intracranial vessels and the anatomical location of tissue changes as well as time after the initial vascular event. Atherosclerotic and cardioembolic diseases combined appear the most common subtypes of vascular brain injury. In recent years, cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) has gained prominence worldwide as an important substrate of cognitive impairment. SVD is characterised by arteriolosclerosis, lacunar infarcts and cortical and subcortical microinfarcts and diffuse white matter changes, which involve myelin loss and axonal abnormalities. Global brain atrophy and focal degeneration of the cerebrum including medial temporal lobe atrophy are also features of VaD similar to Alzheimer's disease. Hereditary arteriopathies have provided insights into the mechanisms of dementia particularly how arteriolosclerosis, a major contributor of SVD promotes cognitive impairment. Recently developed and validated neuropathology guidelines indicated that the best predictors of vascular cognitive impairment were small or lacunar infarcts, microinfarcts, perivascular space dilation, myelin loss, arteriolosclerosis and leptomeningeal cerebral amyloid angiopathy. While these substrates do not suggest high specificity, VaD is likely defined by key neuronal and dendro-synaptic changes resulting in executive dysfunction and related cognitive deficits. Greater understanding of the molecular pathology is needed to clearly define microvascular disease and vascular substrates of dementia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Post-traumatic shoulder movement disorders: A challenging differential diagnosis between organic and functional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Sanjay; Nahab, Fatta; Aldred, Jason; Nutt, John; Hallett, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral trauma may be a trigger for the development of various movement disorders though the pathophysiology remains controversial and some of these patients have a functional (psychogenic) disorder. We report 3 cases of shoulder movement disorders following trauma to the shoulder region. Physiology was done in all the patients to extend the physical examination. Two patients had history of recurrent shoulder dislocation and were diagnosed with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. One patient had shoulder injury following repeated falls while performing as a cheerleader. In two patients there were some clinical features suggesting a functional etiology, but physiological studies in all three failed to produce objective evidence of a functional nature. Shoulder movement following trauma is uncommon. Diagnosis in such cases is challenging considering the complex pathophysiology. The movements can be associated with prolonged pain and handicap, and once established they appear resistant to treatment. PMID:25197686

  5. The pathophysiology of lifelong premature ejaculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    For many decades it has been thought that lifelong premature ejaculation (PE) is only characterized by persistent early ejaculations. Despite enormous progress of in vivo animal research, and neurobiological, genetic and pharmacological research in men with lifelong PE, our current understanding of the mechanisms behind early ejaculations is far from complete. The new classification of PE into four PE subtypes has shown that the symptomatology of lifelong PE strongly differs from acquired PE, subjective PE and variable PE. The phenotype of lifelong PE and therefore also the pathophysiology of lifelong PE is much more complex. A substantial number of men with lifelong PE not only have PE, but also premature erection and premature penile detumescence as part of an acute hypertonic or hypererotic state when engaged in an erotic situation or when making love. As both erectio praecox, ejaculatio praecox, detumescentia praecox, and the hypererotic state are part of the phenotype lifelong PE, it is argued that lifelong PE is not only a disturbance of the timing of ejaculation but also a disturbance of the timing of erection, detumescence and arousal. Since 1998, the pathophysiology of lifelong PE was thought to be mainly mediated by the central serotonergic system in line with genetic polymorphisms of specific serotonergic genes. However, by accepting that lifelong PE is characterized by the reversible hypertonic state the hypothesis of mainly serotonergic dysfunction is no longer tenable. Instead, it has been postulated that the pathophysiology of lifelong PE is mediated by a very complex interplay of central and peripheral serotonergic, dopaminergic, oxytocinergic, endocrinological, genetic and probably also epigenetic factors. Progress in research of lifelong PE can only be accomplished when a stopwatch is used to measure the IELT and the cut-off point of 1 minute for the definition of lifelong PE is maintained. Current use of validated questionnaires, neglect of

  6. Pathophysiology of osteoporosis: new mechanistic insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas, Laura A G; Recker, Robert R

    2012-09-01

    Understanding of the pathophysiology of osteoporosis has evolved to include compromised bone strength and skeletal fragility caused by several factors: (1) defects in microarchitecture of trabeculae, (2) defective intrinsic material properties of bone tissue, (3) defective repair of microdamage from normal daily activities, and (4) excessive bone remodeling rates. These factors occur in the context of age-related bone loss. Clinical studies of estrogen deprivation, antiresorptives, mechanical loading, and disuse have helped further knowledge of the factors affecting bone quality and the mechanisms that underlie them. This progress has led to several new drug targets in the treatment of osteoporosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Pathophysiology of the anorexia of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, John E

    2013-01-01

    Anorexia represents a major problem for older persons leading to weight loss, sarcopenia, functional decline, and mortality. There is increasing information on the pathophysiological mechanisms that lead to anorexia. Increasing evidence has shown the importance of gastrointestinal hormones (ghrelin, cholecystokinin, and glucagon-like peptide) and adipokines in producing the anorexia of aging. Numerous neurotransmitters have been shown to be involved in this aging anorexia, but evidence in humans is lacking. The early recognition of anorexia of aging is important to allow intervention and prevent functional deterioration in older persons. Screening tests for anorexia have been developed. New approaches to managing anorexia are being tested.

  8. 95th Anniversary of Pathophysiology in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovač, Zdenko

    2017-12-01

    University level of Pathophysiology research and teaching in Croatia had started with the third year of Medical School of Zagreb in academic year 1919./20. Ever since, despite historical changes of the main university stake holder, the state of Croatia, Department of Pathophysiology development progressed and has made visible academic achievements, with a broader effect in medical community. The first 95 years of academic tradition and major achievements are shortly described in this paper. Professor Miroslav Mikuličić envisioned Pathophysiology in close relations with Pharmacology and made the pioneering steps of establishing the "double" department at Šalata. His group was academically very pro-active, with strong international scientific participation and recruitment of professionals. The group published the first voluminous textbook of Pharmacology and Pathophysiology, in Croatian. In fifties, professor Pavao Sokolić established clinical pathophysiology within the Hospital Centre at Rebro. Out of "double" department two new departments were founded, the Pathophysiology one was completed with the clinical ward. That institutional move from Šalata hill to the Rebro hill was a necessary gigantic step and a prerequisite for the proper further development. It was in accordance with the concept of the Mikuličić's program of Pathophysiology from 1917. Pavao Sokolić has been remembered for his visions, deep insights into etiopathogenesis, ability to transfer knowledge and friendly relations to students. Sharp intellectual power, emanating charisma, academic erudition and unique clinical competencies made the legendary image of the "Teacher" - as students used to refer to him with admiration. He was second to no one when complex patient issues were to be resolved. Clinical Hospital Centre Zagreb and his Department at Rebro have become a referral point to whom to go to despair. Students recognized in their Teacher the landmark of Croatian medicine, which made a

  9. Lafora disease: epidemiology, pathophysiology and management.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Monaghan, Thomas S

    2010-07-01

    Lafora disease is a rare, fatal, autosomal recessive, progressive myoclonic epilepsy. It may also be considered as a disorder of carbohydrate metabolism because of the formation of polyglucosan inclusion bodies in neural and other tissues due to abnormalities of the proteins laforin or malin. The condition is characterized by epilepsy, myoclonus and dementia. Diagnostic findings on MRI and neurophysiological testing are not definitive and biopsy or genetic studies may be required. Therapy in Lafora disease is currently limited to symptomatic management of the epilepsy, myoclonus and intercurrent complications. With a greater understanding of the pathophysiological processes involved, there is justified hope for future therapies.

  10. Pathophysiology of muscle contractures in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathewson, Margie A; Lieber, Richard L

    2015-02-01

    Patients with cerebral palsy present with a variety of adaptations to muscle structure and function. These pathophysiologic symptoms include functional deficits such as decreased force production and range of motion, in addition to changes in muscle structure such as decreased muscle belly size, increased sarcomere length, and altered extracellular matrix structure and composition. On a cellular level, patients with cerebral palsy have fewer muscle stem cells, termed satellite cells, and altered gene expression. Understanding the nature of these changes may present opportunities for the development of new muscle treatment therapies. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Automatic diagnosis of abnormal macula in retinal optical coherence tomography images using wavelet-based convolutional neural network features and random forests classifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasti, Reza; Mehridehnavi, Alireza; Rabbani, Hossein; Hajizadeh, Fedra

    2018-03-01

    The present research intends to propose a fully automatic algorithm for the classification of three-dimensional (3-D) optical coherence tomography (OCT) scans of patients suffering from abnormal macula from normal candidates. The method proposed does not require any denoising, segmentation, retinal alignment processes to assess the intraretinal layers, as well as abnormalities or lesion structures. To classify abnormal cases from the control group, a two-stage scheme was utilized, which consists of automatic subsystems for adaptive feature learning and diagnostic scoring. In the first stage, a wavelet-based convolutional neural network (CNN) model was introduced and exploited to generate B-scan representative CNN codes in the spatial-frequency domain, and the cumulative features of 3-D volumes were extracted. In the second stage, the presence of abnormalities in 3-D OCTs was scored over the extracted features. Two different retinal SD-OCT datasets are used for evaluation of the algorithm based on the unbiased fivefold cross-validation (CV) approach. The first set constitutes 3-D OCT images of 30 normal subjects and 30 diabetic macular edema (DME) patients captured from the Topcon device. The second publicly available set consists of 45 subjects with a distribution of 15 patients in age-related macular degeneration, DME, and normal classes from the Heidelberg device. With the application of the algorithm on overall OCT volumes and 10 repetitions of the fivefold CV, the proposed scheme obtained an average precision of 99.33% on dataset1 as a two-class classification problem and 98.67% on dataset2 as a three-class classification task.

  12. Automatic diagnosis of abnormal macula in retinal optical coherence tomography images using wavelet-based convolutional neural network features and random forests classifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasti, Reza; Mehridehnavi, Alireza; Rabbani, Hossein; Hajizadeh, Fedra

    2018-03-01

    The present research intends to propose a fully automatic algorithm for the classification of three-dimensional (3-D) optical coherence tomography (OCT) scans of patients suffering from abnormal macula from normal candidates. The method proposed does not require any denoising, segmentation, retinal alignment processes to assess the intraretinal layers, as well as abnormalities or lesion structures. To classify abnormal cases from the control group, a two-stage scheme was utilized, which consists of automatic subsystems for adaptive feature learning and diagnostic scoring. In the first stage, a wavelet-based convolutional neural network (CNN) model was introduced and exploited to generate B-scan representative CNN codes in the spatial-frequency domain, and the cumulative features of 3-D volumes were extracted. In the second stage, the presence of abnormalities in 3-D OCTs was scored over the extracted features. Two different retinal SD-OCT datasets are used for evaluation of the algorithm based on the unbiased fivefold cross-validation (CV) approach. The first set constitutes 3-D OCT images of 30 normal subjects and 30 diabetic macular edema (DME) patients captured from the Topcon device. The second publicly available set consists of 45 subjects with a distribution of 15 patients in age-related macular degeneration, DME, and normal classes from the Heidelberg device. With the application of the algorithm on overall OCT volumes and 10 repetitions of the fivefold CV, the proposed scheme obtained an average precision of 99.33% on dataset1 as a two-class classification problem and 98.67% on dataset2 as a three-class classification task. (2018) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  13. Fault Diagnosis Method of Rolling Bearings Based on Multi-dimensional Vibration Features%基于多维振动特征的滚动轴承故障诊断方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付云骁; 贾利民; 季常煦; 姚德臣; 李文球

    2014-01-01

    单独提取滚动轴承振动信号的时域或频域特征进行故障诊断,是目前常用的轴承诊断方法,诊断精度有待提高。以时域和频域的多维振动特征参量为指标,以历史诊断正确率作为特征参量权值,分别对滚动轴承的无故障和经常出现的滚珠故障、内环故障和外环故障工况进行特征提取和故障识别。多维时频域振动特征是单维特征依据诊断精度权重的集合。运用BP神经网络分别对信号的时域特征(TDF)、IMF能量矩(IEM)、小波包能量矩(WPEM),以及多维时频域特征进行智能故障判别。实验验证用多维时频域振动特征参量综合诊断的方法进行滚动轴承故障诊断,比单维特征的诊断结果精确且效率较高,该方法可以在滚动轴承故障诊断领域展开应用。%Extracting the time-domain or the frequency-domain features of vibration signals for analysis is a conventional method for rolling bearings fault diagnosis. But the effects of this diagnosis method need to be improved. In this paper, taking the multi-dimensional vibration characteristic parameters in time-domain and frequency-domain as the indexes and the correctness rate of historical diagnosis as the parametric weight, the features of fault-free rolling bearings and the features of rolling bearings with ball fault, inner and outer race faults are extracted and the faults are identified. It shows that the multi-dimensional vibration characteristic in time-frequency domains is the assemblage of single features. BP neural network is used for intelligent fault classification of signals according to the time-domain feature (TDF) parameters, IMF energy moment (IEM), wavelet package energy moment (WPEM) and multi-dimensional features respectively. Results of the diagnoses are compared one another. The experiment results verify that using the multi-dimensional feature in time and frequency domains to evaluate the rolling bearing faults is

  14. Human Pathophysiological Adaptations to the Space Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian C. Demontis

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Space is an extreme environment for the human body, where during long-term missions microgravity and high radiation levels represent major threats to crew health. Intriguingly, space flight (SF imposes on the body of highly selected, well-trained, and healthy individuals (astronauts and cosmonauts pathophysiological adaptive changes akin to an accelerated aging process and to some diseases. Such effects, becoming manifest over a time span of weeks (i.e., cardiovascular deconditioning to months (i.e., loss of bone density and muscle atrophy of exposure to weightlessness, can be reduced through proper countermeasures during SF and in due time are mostly reversible after landing. Based on these considerations, it is increasingly accepted that SF might provide a mechanistic insight into certain pathophysiological processes, a concept of interest to pre-nosological medicine. In this article, we will review the main stress factors encountered in space and their impact on the human body and will also discuss the possible lessons learned with space exploration in reference to human health on Earth. In fact, this is a productive, cross-fertilized, endeavor in which studies performed on Earth yield countermeasures for protection of space crew health, and space research is translated into health measures for Earth-bound population.

  15. Pathophysiology and management of pediatric ascites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabri, Mahmoud; Saps, Miguel; Peters, John M

    2003-06-01

    Ascites accumulation is the product of a complex process involving hepatic, renal, systemic, hemodynamic, and neurohormonal factors. The main pathophysiologic theories of ascites formation include the "underfill," "overflow," and peripheral arterial vasodilation hypotheses. These theories are not necessarily mutually exclusive and are linked at some level by a common pathophysiologic thread: The body senses a decreased effective arterial blood volume, leading to stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system, arginine-vasopressin feedback loops, and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Cornerstones of ascites management include dietary sodium restriction and diuretics. Spironolactone is generally tried initially, with furosemide added if clinical response is suboptimal. More refractory patients require large-volume paracentesis (LVP) accompanied by volume expansion with albumin. Placement of a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt is reserved for individuals with compensated liver function who require very frequent sessions of LVP. Peritoneovenous shunts are not used in contemporary ascites management. Liver transplantation remains the definitive therapy for refractory ascites. Although treatment of ascites fails to improve survival, it benefits quality of life and limits the development of such complications as spontaneous bacterial peritonitis.

  16. Adropin – physiological and pathophysiological role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Marczuk

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Adropin is a peptide hormone that was discovered in 2008 by Kumar et al. This protein consists of 76 amino acids, and it was originally described as a secreted peptide, with residues 1-33 encoding a secretory signal peptide sequence. The amino acid sequence of this protein in humans, mice and rats is identical. While our knowledge of the exact physiological roles of this poorly understood peptide continues to evolve, recent data suggest a role in energy homeostasis and the control of glucose and fatty acid metabolism. This protein is encoded by the Enho gene, which is expressed primarily in the liver and the central nervous system. The regulation of adropin secretion is controversial. Adropin immunoreactivity has been reported by several laboratories in the circulation of humans, non-human primates and rodents. However, more recently it has been suggested that adropin is a membrane-bound protein that modulates cell-cell communication. Moreover, adropin has been detected in various tissues and body fluids, such as brain, cerebellum, liver, kidney, heart, pancreas, small intestine, endothelial cells, colostrum, cheese whey and milk. The protein level, as shown by previous research, changes in various physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Adropin is involved in carbohydrate-lipid metabolism, metabolic diseases, central nervous system function, endothelial function and cardiovascular disease. The knowledge of this interesting protein, its exact role and mechanism of action is insufficient. This article provides an overview of the existing literature about the role of adropin, both in physiological and pathophysiological conditions.

  17. Pathophysiology and Treatment of Alien Hand Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harini Sarva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alien hand syndrome (AHS is a disorder of involuntary, yet purposeful, hand movements that may be accompanied by agnosia, aphasia, weakness, or sensory loss. We herein review the most reported cases, current understanding of the pathophysiology, and treatments.Methods: We performed a PubMed search in July of 2014 using the phrases “alien hand syndrome,” “alien hand syndrome pathophysiology,” “alien hand syndrome treatment,” and “anarchic hand syndrome.” The search yielded 141 papers (reviews, case reports, case series, and clinical studies, of which we reviewed 109. Non‐English reports without English abstracts were excluded.Results: Accumulating evidence indicates that there are three AHS variants: frontal, callosal, and posterior. Patients may demonstrate symptoms of multiple types; there is a lack of correlation between phenomenology and neuroimaging findings. Most pathologic and functional imaging studies suggest network disruption causing loss of inhibition as the likely cause. Successful interventions include botulinum toxin injections, clonazepam, visuospatial coaching techniques, distracting the affected hand, and cognitive behavioral therapy.Discussion: The available literature suggests that overlap between AHS subtypes is common. The evidence for effective treatments remains anecdotal, and, given the rarity of AHS, the possibility of performing randomized, placebo‐controlled trials seems unlikely. As with many other interventions for movement disorders, identifying the specific functional impairments caused by AHS may provide the best guidance towards individualized supportive care.

  18. Pathophysiology of Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Starobova

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy-induced neuropathy is a common, dose-dependent adverse effect of several antineoplastics. It can lead to detrimental dose reductions and discontinuation of treatment, and severely affects the quality of life of cancer survivors. Clinically, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy presents as deficits in sensory, motor, and autonomic function which develop in a glove and stocking distribution due to preferential effects on longer axons. The pathophysiological processes are multi-factorial and involve oxidative stress, apoptotic mechanisms, altered calcium homeostasis, axon degeneration and membrane remodeling as well as immune processes and neuroinflammation. This review focusses on the commonly used antineoplastic substances oxaliplatin, cisplatin, vincristine, docetaxel, and paclitaxel which interfere with the cancer cell cycle—leading to cell death and tumor degradation—and cause severe acute and chronic peripheral neuropathies. We discuss drug mechanism of action and pharmacokinetic disposition relevant to the development of peripheral neuropathy, the epidemiology and clinical presentation of chemotherapy-induced neuropathy, emerging insight into genetic susceptibilities as well as current understanding of the pathophysiology and treatment approaches.

  19. Diagnosis and Treatment of Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diagnosis and Treatment of Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura. ... by features of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. ... Current knowledge in the etiopathogenesis, epidemiology, trends in the diagnosis and ...

  20. Nephropathy in diabetes. Pathogenetic and clinical features as well as possibilities of immediate diagnosis by radioimmunological detection of albumin in the urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlagmann, C.

    1984-01-01

    Within the framework of this study, an albumin radioimmunoassay for the immediate diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy in the laboratory was to be introduced and tested for practicability. The assay served as a test tool during a long-term prospective trial designed to yield information relevant to the relationship between optimal metabolic adjustment of the patients using insulin dosimeters and the development of diabetes-induced renal disorders at a later time. The advent of another nephelometric test while this study was still in progress, which was quicker, more convenient to handle and free from radioactivity, prevented the measurements from being carried out on a broader basis. The radioimmunoassay was based on a process by which labeled albumin competes with a predetermined amount of radioactively labeled albumin (I-125) for antibody binding sites. Initial clinical examinations in 14 patients led to the conclusion that there were no close correlations between changes in the daily albumin levels measured in the urine and metabolic fluctuations observed at the corresponding time. Increased microalbuminuria is a highly sensitive, even though non-specific parameter to ascertain any incipient functional impairment of the kidneys. This uncomplicated method of detection is suitable to monitor the renal function of diabetic patients on a routine basis in order to identify those individuals most at risk of developing nephropathy of a clinically relevant degree. (TRV) [de

  1. Pathophysiology of Manganese-Associated Neurotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racette, Brad A.; Aschner, Michael; Guilarte, Tomas R.; Dydak, Ulrike; Criswell, Susan R.; Zheng, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Conference Summary Manganese (Mn) is a well established neurotoxin associated with specific damage to the basal ganglia in humans. The phenotype associated with Mn neurotoxicity was first described in two workers with occupational exposure to Mn oxide.(Couper, 1837) Although the description did not use modern clinical terminology, a parkinsonian illness characterized by slowness of movement (bradykinesia), masked facies, and gait impairment (postural instability) appears to have predominated. Nearly 100 years later an outbreak of an atypical parkinsonian illness in a Chilean Mn mine provided a phenotypic description of a fulminant neurologic disorder with parkinsonism, dystonia, and neuropsychiatric symptoms.(Rodier J, 1955) Exposures associated with this syndrome were massive and an order of magnitude greater than modern exposures.(Rodier J, 1955; Hobson et al., 2011) The clinical syndrome associated with Mn neurotoxicity has been called manganism. Modern exposures to Mn occur primarily through occupations in the steel industry and welding. These exposures are often chronic and varied, occurring over decades in the healthy workforce. Although the severe neurologic disorder described by Rodier and Couper are no longer seen, several reports have suggested a possible increased risk of neurotoxicity in these workers.(Racette et al., 2005b; Bowler et al., 2007; Harris et al., 2011) Based upon limited prior imaging and pathologic investigations into the pathophysiology of neurotoxicity in Mn exposed workers,(Huang et al., 2003) many investigators have concluded that the syndrome spares the dopamine system distinguishing manganism from Parkinson disease (PD), the most common cause of parkinsonism in the general population, and a disease with characteristic degenerative changes in the dopaminergic system.(Jankovic, 2005) The purpose of this symposium was to highlight recent advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of Mn associated neurotoxicity from C. elegans

  2. Contrast medium-induced nephropathy: the pathophysiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, P B; Tepel, Martin

    2006-01-01

    A widespread, rather general, definition of contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) is an impairment in renal function occurring within 3 days following the intravascular administration of contrast media (CM) and the absence of an alternative aetiology. In spite of the vast clinical importance of CIN...... haemodynamics, regional hypoxia, auto-, and paracrine factors (adenosine, endothelin, reactive oxygen species) to direct cytotoxic effects. Although these potential mediators of CIN will be discussed separately, several factors may act in concert to perturb kidney function after exposure to contrast media. From...... the current knowledge of the mechanisms causing CIN, it is not possible to recommend a certain class of contrast media, except to avoid large doses of CM of the first generation. From a pathophysiological perspective, volume expansion is effective in avoiding CIN, since water permeability of the collecting...

  3. New insights into pathophysiology of vestibular migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Espinosa-Sanchez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular migraine (VM is a common disorder in which genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors probably contribute to its development. The pathophysiology of VM is unknown; nevertheless in the last few years, several studies are contributing to understand the neurophysiological pathways involved in VM. The current hypotheses are mostly based on the knowledge of migraine itself. The evidence of trigeminal innervation of the labyrinth vessels and the localization of vasoactive neuropeptides in the perivascular afferent terminals of these trigeminal fibers support the involvement of the trigemino-vascular system. The neurogenic inflammation triggered by activation of the trigeminal-vestibulocochlear reflex, with the subsequent inner ear plasma protein extravasation and the release of inflammatory mediators, can contribute to a sustained activation and sensitization of the trigeminal primary afferent neurons explaining VM symptoms. The reciprocal connections between brainstem vestibular nuclei and the structures that modulate trigeminal nociceptive inputs (rostral ventromedial medulla, ventrolateral periaqueductal grey, locus coeruleus and nucleus raphe magnus are critical to understand the pathophysiology of VM. Although cortical spreading depression can affect cortical areas involved in processing vestibular information, functional neuroimaging techniques suggest a dysmodulation in the multimodal sensory integration and processing of vestibular and nociceptive information, resulting from a vestibulo-thalamo-cortical dysfunction, as the pathogenic mechanism underlying VM. The elevated prevalence of VM suggests that multiple functional variants may confer a genetic susceptibility leading to a dysregulation of excitatory-inhibitory balance in brain structures involved in the processing of sensory information, vestibular inputs and pain. The interactions among several functional and structural neural networks could explain the pathogenic

  4. Capillary leak syndrome: etiologies, pathophysiology, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddall, Eric; Khatri, Minesh; Radhakrishnan, Jai

    2017-07-01

    In various human diseases, an increase in capillary permeability to proteins leads to the loss of protein-rich fluid from the intravascular to the interstitial space. Although sepsis is the disease most commonly associated with this phenomenon, many other diseases can lead to a "sepsis-like" syndrome with manifestations of diffuse pitting edema, exudative serous cavity effusions, noncardiogenic pulmonary edema, hypotension, and, in some cases, hypovolemic shock with multiple-organ failure. The term capillary leak syndrome has been used to describe this constellation of disease manifestations associated with an increased capillary permeability to proteins. Diseases other than sepsis that can result in capillary leak syndrome include the idiopathic systemic capillary leak syndrome or Clarkson's disease, engraftment syndrome, differentiation syndrome, the ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, viral hemorrhagic fevers, autoimmune diseases, snakebite envenomation, and ricin poisoning. Drugs including some interleukins, some monoclonal antibodies, and gemcitabine can also cause capillary leak syndrome. Acute kidney injury is commonly seen in all of these diseases. In addition to hypotension, cytokines are likely to be important in the pathophysiology of acute kidney injury in capillary leak syndrome. Fluid management is a critical part of the treatment of capillary leak syndrome; hypovolemia and hypotension can cause organ injury, whereas capillary leakage of administered fluid can worsen organ edema leading to progressive organ injury. The purpose of this article is to discuss the diseases other than sepsis that produce capillary leak and review their collective pathophysiology and treatment. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Seasonal Allergies: Diagnosis, Treatment & Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Seasonal Allergies Diagnosis, Treatment & Research Past Issues / Spring 2015 Table of Contents Diagnosis Testing for Allergies Knowing exactly what you are allergic to can ...

  6. Diagnosis, Epidemiology and Management of Mixed States in Bipolar Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagiolini, Andrea; Coluccia, Anna; Maina, Giuseppe; Forgione, Rocco N; Goracci, Arianna; Cuomo, Alessandro; Young, Allan H

    2015-09-01

    Approximately 40% of patients with bipolar disorder experience mixed episodes, defined as a manic state with depressive features, or manic symptoms in a patient with bipolar depression. Compared with bipolar patients without mixed features, patients with bipolar mixed states generally have more severe symptomatology, more lifetime episodes of illness, worse clinical outcomes and higher rates of comorbidities, and thus present a significant clinical challenge. Most clinical trials have investigated second-generation neuroleptic monotherapy, monotherapy with anticonvulsants or lithium, combination therapy, and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Neuroleptic drugs are often used alone or in combination with anticonvulsants or lithium for preventive treatment, and ECT is an effective treatment for mixed manic episodes in situations where medication fails or cannot be used. Common antidepressants have been shown to worsen mania symptoms during mixed episodes without necessarily improving depressive symptoms; thus, they are not recommended during mixed episodes. A greater understanding of pathophysiological processes in bipolar disorder is now required to provide a more accurate diagnosis and new personalised treatment approaches. Targeted, specific treatments developed through a greater understanding of bipolar disorder pathophysiology, capable of affecting the underlying disease processes, could well prove to be more effective, faster acting, and better tolerated than existing therapies, therefore providing better outcomes for individuals affected by bipolar disorder. Until such time as targeted agents are available, second-generation neuroleptics are emerging as the treatment of choice in the management of mixed states in bipolar disorder.

  7. Dissecting carboxypeptidase E: properties, functions and pathophysiological roles in disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Ji

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Since discovery in 1982, carboxypeptidase E (CPE has been shown to be involved in the biosynthesis of a wide range of neuropeptides and peptide hormones in endocrine tissues, and in the nervous system. This protein is produced from pro-CPE and exists in soluble and membrane forms. Membrane CPE mediates the targeting of prohormones to the regulated secretory pathway, while soluble CPE acts as an exopeptidase and cleaves C-terminal basic residues from peptide intermediates to generate bioactive peptides. CPE also participates in protein internalization, vesicle transport and regulation of signaling pathways. Therefore, in two types of CPE mutant mice, Cpefat/Cpefat and Cpe knockout, loss of normal CPE leads to a lot of disorders, including diabetes, hyperproinsulinemia, low bone mineral density and deficits in learning and memory. In addition, the potential roles of CPE and ΔN-CPE, an N-terminal truncated form, in tumorigenesis and diagnosis were also addressed. Herein, we focus on dissecting the pathophysiological roles of CPE in the endocrine and nervous systems, and related diseases.

  8. Transforming pathophysiology instruction through narrative pedagogy and Socratic questioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogge, M M

    2001-01-01

    Pathophysiology, heavily content driven, has typically been taught through the use of traditional behavioral pedagogy and a reliance on the formal lecture. The author describes the limitations of this approach to teaching pathophysiology and describes the use of narrative pedagogy and Socratic questioning as alternative methods of instruction to augment lecture methods. Specific strategies for transforming traditional classroom teaching by using Socratic questions in a pathophysiology course for nurse practitioners are described. Student and faculty reactions to the initial efforts to transform pathophysiology instruction are also described.

  9. Atrial Fibrillation: Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Atrial Fibrillation Atrial Fibrillation: Diagnosis Past Issues / Winter 2015 Table of Contents ... of your body's cells and organs. Read More "Atrial Fibrillation" Articles Atrial Fibrillation / Who Is at Risk for ...

  10. Marfan syndrome: clinical diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, John C S

    2007-07-01

    Marfan syndrome is a multisystem connective tissue disorder usually associated with mutation in fibrillin, and occasionally with mutation in TGFBR1 or 2. The clinical diagnosis is made using the Ghent nosology, which will unequivocally diagnose or exclude Marfan syndrome in 86% of cases. Use of a care pathway can help implementation of the nosology in the clinic. The penetrance of some features is age dependent, so the nosology must be used with caution in children. Molecular testing may be helpful in this context. The nosology cannot be used in families with isolated aortic dissection, or with related conditions such as Loeys-Dietz syndrome, although it may help identify families for further diagnostic evaluation because they do not fulfill the nosology, despite a history of aneurysm. Prophylactic medical (eg beta-blockade) and surgical intervention is important in reducing the cardiovascular complications of Marfan syndrome. Musculoskeletal symptoms are common, although the pathophysiology is less clear--for example, the correlation between dural ectasia and back pain is uncertain. Symptoms in other systems require specialist review such as ophthalmology assessment of refractive errors and ectopia lentis. Pregnancy is a time of increased cardiovascular risk for women with Marfan syndrome, particularly if the aortic root exceeds 4 cm at the start of pregnancy. High-intensity static exercise should be discouraged although low-moderate intensity dynamic exercise may be beneficial. The diagnosis and management of Marfan syndrome requires a multidisciplinary team approach, in view of its multisystem effects and phenotypic variability.

  11. Unraveling childhood constipation: Pathophysiology, diagnostics and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mugie, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    Constipation represents a common worldwide problem in children. In > 90% of children presenting with constipation, no obvious organic cause is found and a diagnosis of functional constipation (FC) is made. Most common symptoms of FC include infrequent bowel movements, painful and hard stools, fecal

  12. Tinnitus: Network pathophysiology-network pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Belen eElgoyhen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tinnitus, the phantom perception of sound, is a prevalent disorder. One in 10 adults has clinically significant subjective tinnitus, and for 1 in 100, tinnitus severely affects their quality of life. Despite the significant unmet clinical need for a safe and effective drug targeting tinnitus relief, there is currently not a single FDA-approved drug on the market. The search for drugs that target tinnitus is hampered by the lack of a deep knowledge of the underlying neural substrates of this pathology. Recent studies are increasingly demonstrating that, as described for other central nervous system disorders, tinnitus is a pathology of brain networks. The application of graph theoretical analysis to brain networks has recently provided new information concerning their topology, their robustness and their vulnerability to attacks. Moreover, the philosophy behind drug design and pharmacotherapy in central nervous system pathologies is changing from that of magic bullets that target individual chemoreceptors or disease-causing genes into that of magic shotguns, promiscuous or dirty drugs that target disease-causing networks, also known as network pharmacology. In the present work we provide some insight into how this knowledge could be applied to tinnitus pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy.

  13. Tinnitus: network pathophysiology-network pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgoyhen, Ana B; Langguth, Berthold; Vanneste, Sven; De Ridder, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Tinnitus, the phantom perception of sound, is a prevalent disorder. One in 10 adults has clinically significant subjective tinnitus, and for one in 100, tinnitus severely affects their quality of life. Despite the significant unmet clinical need for a safe and effective drug targeting tinnitus relief, there is currently not a single Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drug on the market. The search for drugs that target tinnitus is hampered by the lack of a deep knowledge of the underlying neural substrates of this pathology. Recent studies are increasingly demonstrating that, as described for other central nervous system (CNS) disorders, tinnitus is a pathology of brain networks. The application of graph theoretical analysis to brain networks has recently provided new information concerning their topology, their robustness and their vulnerability to attacks. Moreover, the philosophy behind drug design and pharmacotherapy in CNS pathologies is changing from that of "magic bullets" that target individual chemoreceptors or "disease-causing genes" into that of "magic shotguns," "promiscuous" or "dirty drugs" that target "disease-causing networks," also known as network pharmacology. In the present work we provide some insight into how this knowledge could be applied to tinnitus pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy.

  14. Orthostatic intolerance: potential pathophysiology and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chih-Cherng; Tseng, Ching-Jiunn; Tang, Hung-Shang; Tung, Che-Se

    2004-09-30

    Orthostatic intolerance affects an estimated 1 in 500 persons and causes a wide range of disabilities. After essential hypertension, it is the most frequently encountered dysautonomia, accounting for the majority of patients referred to centers specializing in autonomic disorders. Patients are typically young females with symptoms such as dizziness, visual changes, head and neck discomfort, poor concentration, fatigue, palpitations, tremulousness, anxiety, and, in some cases, syncope. Syncope is the most hazardous symptom of orthostatic intolerance, presumably occurring because of impaired cerebral perfusion and in part to compensatory autonomic mechanisms. The etiology of this syndrome is still unclear but is heterogeneous. Orthostatic intolerance used to be characterized by an overall enhancement of noradrenergic tone at rest in some patients and by a patchy dysautonomia of postganglionic sympathetic fibers with a compensatory cardiac sympathetic activation in others. However, recent advances in molecular genetics are improving our understanding of orthostatic intolerance, such as several genetic diseases (such as Ehler-Danlos syndrome and norepinephrine transporter deficiency) presenting with symptoms typical of orthostatic intolerance. Future work will include investigation of genetic functional mutations underlying interindividual differences in autonomic cardiovascular control, body fluid regulation, and vascular regulation in orthostatic intolerance patients. The goal of this review article is to describe recent advances in understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms of orthostatic intolerance and their clinical significance.

  15. [Pathophysiology and new treatment of uveitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanai, Ryoji; Takeda, Atsunobu; Yoshimura, Takeru; Sonoda, Koh-Hei

    2014-01-01

    Uveitis is narrow-defined inflammation of the uvea, also clinically include all inflammatory conditions in the eye. Uveitis may occur as a consequence of various causes and background, such as autoimmune diseases, infections, and hematopoietic malignancy. We have to treat uveitis not only controlling the inflammation but also maintaining up the visual function of the eye because the most uveitis is chronic and relapsing inflammatory disorder. Behçét's disease is a systemic disease and results in loss of vision without adequate treatment. Behçét's disease was a representative of vision loss uveitis because Behçét's patient usually had treatment resistance of conventional treatment, such as colchicine and cyclosporine. However, biological therapy with TNF-α, which started from 2007, has revolutionized the treatment strategy of Behçét's disease. It is not too much to say that Behçét's patient is free from fear of vision loss by the dramatic decrease of ocular attach. Biological therapy is not approved as a treatment of uveitis except Behçét's disease. Some protracted cases of Sarcoidosis and Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease are resistant to corticosteroid therapy and require new treatment. In this review, we discuss the pathophysiology of uveitis and report new treatment of Behçét's disease by biological therapy.

  16. Orexinergic system and pathophysiology of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doreulee, N; Alania, M; Vashalomidze, G; Skhirtladze, E; Kapanadze, Ts

    2010-11-01

    Neuropeptids orexins, also known as the hypocretins, are expressed in the lateral hypothalamus. Orexin-containing cells project widely throughout the brains, are crucial for the regulation of wakefulness and dysfunction of this system is associated with pathophysiology of narcolepsy-cataplexy. Orexin neurons play an important role in motivation, feeding and adaptive behaviors. Distribution of orexinergic receptors in the hippocampus tended to the ideas that orexins might be involved in the functions relating to the hippocampus. Effects of neuropeptide orexin-A on epileptiform activity in hippocampal slices were investigated. 500 µm thick hippocampal slices from 8-10 week-old rodents were used. Field excitatory postsynaptic potential (pop-fEPSP) and population spike in CA1 of hippocamopus were registered using standard protocol of in vitro electrophysiological experiments. Initial slope of the fEPSP and amplitude of II pop-spike were measured. Bursting neurons in CA3 were recorded in modified saline. We have found that orexin-A decreases duration/amplitude of multiple discharges of pop-spikes and inhibits spontaneous epileptiform afterdischarges induced by bicuculline methiodide in CA1. Orexin-A also modulates the frequency of discharges of bursting neurons in CA3. Our results suggest possible involvement of orexinergic system in antiepileptic action. Supported by ISTC Grant G-1318.

  17. Metabolic syndrome pathophysiology and clinical presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handelsman, Yehuda

    2009-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a relatively new definition, designed to help the health care practitioner to easily identify people at risk for the development of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. With the obesity epidemic, we are witnessing an epidemic of multiple-risk patients. Insulin resistance is the perceived pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome and defines its clinical presentation. Hypertension, dyslipedemia, polycystic ovarian syndrome, fatty liver disease, pre-diabetes, sleep and breathing disorder, certain cancers, and cognitive impairment are many of the presentations of the syndrome; patients with any of these conditions are at a high risk of developing cardiovascular disease and diabetes. The metabolic syndrome helps identify people at risk to allow early intervention for prevention. Lifestyle modification is the most important part of the management of people with the syndrome. Lately medications--though none approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)--have been recommended by major medical societies when lifestyle modification is not enough or when it fails.

  18. Hemorrhoids: From basic pathophysiology to clinical management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohsiriwat, Varut

    2012-01-01

    This review discusses the pathophysiology, epidemiology, risk factors, classification, clinical evaluation, and current non-operative and operative treatment of hemorrhoids. Hemorrhoids are defined as the symptomatic enlargement and distal displacement of the normal anal cushions. The most common symptom of hemorrhoids is rectal bleeding associated with bowel movement. The abnormal dilatation and distortion of the vascular channel, together with destructive changes in the supporting connective tissue within the anal cushion, is a paramount finding of hemorrhoids. It appears that the dysregulation of the vascular tone and vascular hyperplasia might play an important role in hemorrhoidal development, and could be a potential target for medical treatment. In most instances, hemorrhoids are treated conservatively, using many methods such as lifestyle modification, fiber supplement, suppository-delivered anti-inflammatory drugs, and administration of venotonic drugs. Non-operative approaches include sclerotherapy and, preferably, rubber band ligation. An operation is indicated when non-operative approaches have failed or complications have occurred. Several surgical approaches for treating hemorrhoids have been introduced including hemorrhoidectomy and stapled hemorrhoidopexy, but postoperative pain is invariable. Some of the surgical treatments potentially cause appreciable morbidity such as anal stricture and incontinence. The applications and outcomes of each treatment are thoroughly discussed. PMID:22563187

  19. The pathophysiology of trauma-induced coagulopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frith, Daniel; Brohi, Karim

    2012-12-01

    Transfusion paradigms and protocols have evolved at a rapid pace in the last few years to ameliorate the adverse effects of trauma-induced coagulopathy (TIC). This has occurred despite fragmented and inadequate knowledge of the underlying pathophysiology that they are supposed to treat. This review will collate and assimilate the most recent data about TIC in order to present our state-of-the-art understanding of this condition. TIC was conventionally construed simply as depletion, dysfunction or dilution of procoagulant factors. However, contemporary understanding recognizes it as an imbalance of the dynamic equilibrium between procoagulant factors, anticoagulant factors, platelets, endothelium and fibrinolysis. The endogenous component of TIC (acute traumatic coagulopathy) is not merely a consumptive coagulopathy, but is characterized by isolated factor V inhibition, dysfibrinogenaemia, systemic anticoagulation, impaired platelet function and hyperfibrinolysis. Acute traumatic coagulopathy then becomes exacerbated by hypothermia, acidosis and resuscitation with hypocoagulable fluids. Further improvement in the outcome from trauma-haemorrhage is possible with more refined and tailored haemostatic resuscitation. Achieving this will depend upon a better understanding of the haemostatic defects that develop after injury.

  20. The pathophysiology of amenorrhea in the adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Neville H; Carlson, Jennifer L

    2008-01-01

    Menstrual irregularity is a common occurrence during adolescence, especially within the first 2-3 years after menarche. Prolonged amenorrhea, however, is not normal and can be associated with significant medical morbidity, which differs depending on whether the adolescent is estrogen-deficient or estrogen-replete. Estrogen-deficient amenorrhea is associated with reduced bone mineral density and increased fracture risk, while estrogen-replete amenorrhea can lead to dysfunctional uterine bleeding in the short term and predispose to endometrial carcinoma in the long term. In both situations, appropriate intervention can reduce morbidity. Old paradigms of whom to evaluate for amenorrhea have been challenged by recent research that provides a better understanding of the normal menstrual cycle and its variability. Hypothalamic amenorrhea is the most prevalent cause of amenorrhea in the adolescent age group, followed by polycystic ovary syndrome. In anorexia nervosa, exercise-induced amenorrhea, and amenorrhea associated with chronic illness, an energy deficit results in suppression of hypothalamic secretion of GnRH, mediated in part by leptin. Administration of recombinant leptin to women with hypothalamic amenorrhea has been shown to restore LH pulsatility and ovulatory menstrual cycles. The use of recombinant leptin may improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of hypothalamic amenorrhea in adolescents and may also have therapeutic possibilities.

  1. Pathophysiology of AAA: heredity vs environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björck, Martin; Wanhainen, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) has a complex pathophysiology, in which both environmental and genetic factors play important roles, the most important being smoking. The recently reported falling prevalence rates of AAA in northern Europe and Australia/New Zeeland are largely explained by healthier smoking habits. Dietary factors and obesity, in particular abdominal obesity, are also of importance. A family history of AAA among first-degree relatives is present in approximately 13% of incident cases. The probability that a monozygotic twin of a person with an AAA has the disease is 24%, 71 times higher than that for a monozygotic twin of a person without AAA. Approximately 1000 SNPs in 100 candidate genes have been studied, and three genome-wide association studies were published, identifying different diverse weak associations. An example of interaction between environmental and genetic factors is the effect of cholesterol, where genetic and dietary factors affect levels of both HDL and LDL. True epigenetic studies have not yet been published. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Pathophysiology and Immune Dysfunction in Endometriosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Soo Hyun; Monsanto, Stephany P.; Miller, Caragh; Singh, Sukhbir S.; Thomas, Richard; Tayade, Chandrakant

    2015-01-01

    Endometriosis is an estrogen-dependent, chronic, proinflammatory disease prevalent in 10% of women of reproductive age worldwide. Characterized by the growth of endometrium-like tissue in aberrant locations outside of the uterus, it is responsible for symptoms including chronic pelvic pain, dysmenorrhea, and subfertility that degrade quality of life of women significantly. In Canada, direct and indirect economic cost of endometriosis amounts to 1.8 billion dollars, and this is elevated to 20 billion dollars in the United States. Despite decades of research, the etiology and pathophysiology of endometriosis still remain to be elucidated. This review aims to bring together the current understanding regarding the pathogenesis of endometriosis with specific focus on mechanisms behind vascularization of the lesions and the contribution of immune factors in facilitating lesion establishment and development. The role of hormones, immune cells, and cytokine signaling is highlighted, in addition to discussing the current pharmaceutical options available for management of pain symptoms in women with endometriosis. PMID:26247027

  3. Pathophysiology and Immune Dysfunction in Endometriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Hyun Ahn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Endometriosis is an estrogen-dependent, chronic, proinflammatory disease prevalent in 10% of women of reproductive age worldwide. Characterized by the growth of endometrium-like tissue in aberrant locations outside of the uterus, it is responsible for symptoms including chronic pelvic pain, dysmenorrhea, and subfertility that degrade quality of life of women significantly. In Canada, direct and indirect economic cost of endometriosis amounts to 1.8 billion dollars, and this is elevated to 20 billion dollars in the United States. Despite decades of research, the etiology and pathophysiology of endometriosis still remain to be elucidated. This review aims to bring together the current understanding regarding the pathogenesis of endometriosis with specific focus on mechanisms behind vascularization of the lesions and the contribution of immune factors in facilitating lesion establishment and development. The role of hormones, immune cells, and cytokine signaling is highlighted, in addition to discussing the current pharmaceutical options available for management of pain symptoms in women with endometriosis.

  4. Cardiorenal Syndrome: Diagnosis and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.O. Melnyk

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In the diagnosis of cardiorenal syndrome (CRS, the biological markers are widely used, they can be applied to identify the pathophysiological stages of CRS, to assess the amount of risk, prognosis and outcome, as well as to monitor the effectiveness of treatment. CRS therapy includes diuretics, vasodilators, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor antagonists, nitrates and cardiac glycosides. One of the most effective methods of CRS treatment is the use of renal replacement therapy.

  5. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia - A Review of Pathophysiology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Laboratory Features and Emerging Treatment Options. ... Research has reached advanced stage on the use of alternative drugs (eg Nilotinib and Desatinib) especially in resistant cases. It is hoped that these new drugs will become the treatment of ...

  6. Pathophysiology, Evaluation, and Management of Edema in Childhood Nephrotic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Demetrius

    2016-01-01

    Generalized edema is a major presenting clinical feature of children with nephrotic syndrome (NS) exemplified by such primary conditions as minimal change disease (MCD). In these children with classical NS and marked proteinuria and hypoalbuminemia, the ensuing tendency to hypovolemia triggers compensatory physiological mechanisms, which enhance renal sodium (Na+) and water retention; this is known as the “underfill hypothesis.” Edema can also occur in secondary forms of NS and several other glomerulonephritides, in which the degree of proteinuria and hypoalbuminemia, are variable. In contrast to MCD, in these latter conditions, the predominant mechanism of edema formation is “primary” or “pathophysiological,” Na+ and water retention; this is known as the “overfill hypothesis.” A major clinical challenge in children with these disorders is to distinguish the predominant mechanism of edema formation, identify other potential contributing factors, and prevent the deleterious effects of diuretic regimens in those with unsuspected reduced effective circulatory volume (i.e., underfill). This article reviews the Starling forces that become altered in NS so as to tip the balance of fluid movement in favor of edema formation. An understanding of these pathomechanisms then serves to formulate a more rational approach to prevention, evaluation, and management of such edema. PMID:26793696

  7. Neurobehavioral aspects, pathophysiology, and management of Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shprecher, David R; Schrock, Lauren; Himle, Michael

    2014-08-01

    This update summarizes progress in understanding Tourette syndrome clinical characteristics, etiology, and treatment over the past year. Premonitory sensory phenomena were found to have important impacts on Tourette syndrome quality of life. A rare genetic form of Tourette syndrome due to L-histidine-decarboxylase mutation, with similar features in human and rodent, has inspired new research on functional anatomy of Tourette syndrome. In response to new data, treatment guidelines have been revised to include behavioral therapy as first-line treatment. Novel dopamine receptor antagonists aripiprazole and ecopipam have shown potential efficacy - as well as tolerability concerns. Recent work has suggested efficacy and tolerability of topiramate and fluphenazine, but more rigorous studies are needed to further understand their role in Tourette syndrome management. Recent consensus guidelines explain when deep brain stimulation can be considered for severe refractory cases under a multidisciplinary team. More research is needed to identify better tolerated treatments for, to understand pathophysiology or functional anatomy of, and to predict or influence longitudinal outcome of Tourette syndrome.

  8. Pathophysiology, Evaluation, and Management of Edema in Childhood Nephrotic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Demetrius

    2015-01-01

    Generalized edema is a major presenting clinical feature of children with nephrotic syndrome (NS) exemplified by such primary conditions as minimal change disease (MCD). In these children with classical NS and marked proteinuria and hypoalbuminemia, the ensuing tendency to hypovolemia triggers compensatory physiological mechanisms, which enhance renal sodium (Na(+)) and water retention; this is known as the "underfill hypothesis." Edema can also occur in secondary forms of NS and several other glomerulonephritides, in which the degree of proteinuria and hypoalbuminemia, are variable. In contrast to MCD, in these latter conditions, the predominant mechanism of edema formation is "primary" or "pathophysiological," Na(+) and water retention; this is known as the "overfill hypothesis." A major clinical challenge in children with these disorders is to distinguish the predominant mechanism of edema formation, identify other potential contributing factors, and prevent the deleterious effects of diuretic regimens in those with unsuspected reduced effective circulatory volume (i.e., underfill). This article reviews the Starling forces that become altered in NS so as to tip the balance of fluid movement in favor of edema formation. An understanding of these pathomechanisms then serves to formulate a more rational approach to prevention, evaluation, and management of such edema.

  9. The pathophysiology of restless legs syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Iwanami, Masaoki; Suzuki, Keisuke; Hirata, Koichi

    2009-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a sensorimotor disorder that is frequently associated with periodic leg movements (PLMS). RLS is generally considered to be a central nervous system (CNS)-related disorder although no specific lesion has been found to be associated with the syndrome. Reduced intracortical inhibition has been demonstrated in RLS by transcranial magnetic stimulation. Some MRI studies have revealed the presence of morphologic changes in the somatosensory cortex, motor cortex and thalamic gray matter. The results of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) studies showed that the limbic and opioid systems also play important roles in the pathophysiology of RLS. A functional MRI study revealed abnormal bilateral cerebellar and thalamic activation during the manifestation of sensory symptoms, with additional red nucleus and reticular formation activity during PLMS. PLMS is likely to occur in patients with spinal cord lesions, and some patients with sensory polyneuropathy may exhibit RLS symptoms. RLS symptoms seem to depend on abnormal spinal sensorimotor integration at the spinal cord level and abnormal central somatosensory processing. PLMS appears to depend on increased excitability of the spinal cord and a decreased supraspinal inhibitory mechanism from the A11 diencephalic dopaminergic system. RLS symptoms respond very dramatically to dopaminergic therapy. The results of analysis by PET and SPECT studies of striatal D2 receptor binding in humans are inconclusive. However, studies in animal models suggest that the participation of the A11 dopaminergic system and the D3 receptor in RLS symptoms. The symptoms of RLS are aggravated in those with iron deficiency, and iron treatment ameliorates the symptoms in some patients. Neuroimaging studies, analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid, and studies on postmortem tissue and use of animal models have indicated that low brain iron concentrations and dysfunction of

  10. Altered Mitochondrial Dynamics and TBI Pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Diane Fischer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial function is intimately linked to cellular survival, growth, and death. Mitochondria not only generate ATP from oxidative phosphorylation, but also mediate intracellular calcium buffering, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, and apoptosis. Electron leakage from the electron transport chain, especially from damaged or depolarized mitochondria, can generate excess free radicals that damage cellular proteins, DNA, and lipids. Furthermore, mitochondrial damage releases pro-apoptotic factors to initiate cell death. Previous studies have reported that traumatic brain injury (TBI reduces mitochondrial respiration, enhances production of ROS, and triggers apoptotic cell death, suggesting a prominent role of mitochondria in TBI pathophysiology. Mitochondria maintain cellular energy homeostasis and health via balanced processes of fusion and fission, continuously dividing and fusing to form an interconnected network throughout the cell. An imbalance of these processes, particularly an excess of fission, can be detrimental to mitochondrial function, causing decreased respiration, ROS production, and apoptosis. Mitochondrial fission is regulated by the cytosolic GTPase, dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1, which translocates to the mitochondrial outer membrane to initiate fission. Aberrant Drp1 activity has been linked to excessive mitochondrial fission and neurodegeneration. Measurement of Drp1 levels in purified hippocampal mitochondria showed an increase in TBI animals as compared to sham controls. Analysis of cryo-electron micrographs of these mitochondria also showed that TBI caused an initial increase in the length of hippocampal mitochondria at 24 hours post-injury, followed by a significant decrease in length at 72 hours. Post-TBI administration of Mdivi-1, a pharmacological inhibitor of Drp1, prevented this decrease in mitochondria length. Mdivi-1 treatment also reduced the loss of newborn neurons in the hippocampus and improved

  11. Pathophysiological characterization of asthma transitions across adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Syed Hasan; Raza, Abid; Lau, Laurie; Bawakid, Khalid; Karmaus, Wilfried; Zhang, Hongmei; Ewart, Susan; Patil, Veersh; Roberts, Graham; Kurukulaaratchy, Ramesh

    2014-11-29

    Adolescence is a period of change, which coincides with disease remission in a significant proportion of subjects with childhood asthma. There is incomplete understanding of the changing characteristics underlying different adolescent asthma transitions. We undertook pathophysiological characterization of transitional adolescent asthma phenotypes in a longitudinal birth cohort. The Isle of Wight Birth Cohort (N = 1456) was reviewed at 1, 2, 4, 10 and 18-years. Characterization included questionnaires, skin tests, spirometry, exhaled nitric oxide, bronchial challenge and (in a subset of 100 at 18-years) induced sputum. Asthma groups were "never asthma" (no asthma since birth), "persistent asthma" (asthma at age 10 and 18), "remission asthma" (asthma at age 10 but not at 18) and "adolescent-onset asthma" (asthma at age 18 but not at age 10). Participants whose asthma remitted during adolescence had lower bronchial reactivity (odds ratio (OR) 0.30; CI 0.10 -0.90; p = 0.03) at age 10 plus greater improvement in lung function (forced expiratory flow 25-75% gain: 1.7 L; 1.0-2.9; p = 0.04) compared to persistent asthma by age 18. Male sex (0.3; 0.1-0.7; p adolescent-onset asthma showed eosinophilic airway inflammation (3.0%, 0.7-6.6), not seen in persistent asthma (1.0%, 0-3.9), while remission group had the lowest sputum eosinophil count (0.3%, 0-1.4) and lowest eosinophils/neutrophils ratio of 0.0 (Interquartile range: 0.1). Asthma remission during adolescence is associated with lower initial BHR and greater gain in small airways function, while adolescent-onset asthma is primarily eosinophilic.

  12. Chagas disease. A new pathophysiological assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redruello, M.; Masoli, O.; Hasson, I.; Cragnolino, D.; Traverso, S.; Perez Balino, N.; Sarmiento, R.; Lazzari, J.; Luluaga, E.

    2002-01-01

    Background: There is scarce information on myocardial perfusion abnormalities and on the coronary vasomotor condition in Chagas disease patients. Aims: To assess regional perfusion abnormalities and the coronary vasomotor response of patients in the chronic phase of Chagas disease. Methods: With the use of 99mTc-sestamibi SPECT imaging and cold pressor test and intracoronary acetylcoline (ACH) perfusion, we studied 9 patients aged 42,6±12 years, 4 males, in the chronic stage of Chagas disease (5 with the indeterminate form and 4 with heart lesion) with normal coronary arteries. Vasomotor responses to intracoronary increasing doses of ACH and to a single dose of nitroglycerine (NTG) were assessed with digital quantitative angiography. Regional myocardial perfusion was evaluated at rest and after cold pressor test by a semi quantitative score analysis in an 18-segment model with 99mTc-sestamibi SPECT images. Results were expressed as mean ± 2SD. Differences between continuous variables were measured by two tails Student's t test for paired variables and the significance level was set at 5 %. Results: All patients had regional perfusion defects and abnormal vasomotor response. The diameter of the left anterior descending artery decreased 34% from a basal diameter of 3.66∫0.95 mm down to 2.42±0.74 mm after maximal response to ACH (p<0.002). NTG infusion augmented its diameter to 3.86±0.77 mm (p<0.0002) that is a 60% increase from post ACH diameter. Myocardial perfusion score was 1∫2.66 at rest and 6.22±3.6 after cold pressor test (p<0.0001). Conclusions: This group of patients in the chronic phase of Chagas disease showed an abnormal vasoconstrictive response to intracoronary ACH and cold-induced perfusion defects suggesting that endothelial dysfunction plays a role in the pathophysiology of chronic Chagas heart disease

  13. Epilepsy in autism: A pathophysiological consideration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Yoshiko; Nagao, Yuri; Kimura, Kazue; Hachimori, Kei; Segawa, Masaya

    2010-11-01

    Eighty cases of idiopathic autism with epilepsy and 97 cases without epilepsy were studied to evaluate the pathophysiology of epilepsy in autism. The initial visit to this clinic ranged 8months-30years 3months of age, and the current ages are 5years 8months-42years 3months, 60% reaching to over 30years of age. The average follow up duration is 22.2years±9.4years. The ages of onset of epilepsy were from 7months to 30years of age, with the two peaks at 3.2years and 16.7years. EEG central focus appeared earlier than frontal focus. Abnormality of locomotion and atonic NREM were observed more frequently in epileptic group. These suggest the neuronal system related to abnormality of locomotion and atonic NREM, which are the hypofunction of the brainstem monoaminergic system, is the pathomechanism underling the epilepsy in autism. By showing the abnormal sleep-wake rhythm and locomotion being the very initial symptoms in autism, we had shown the hypofunction of the brainstem monoaminergic system is the initial pathomechanism of autism. Thus, epilepsy in autism is not the secondary manifestation, but one of the pathognomonic symptoms of autism. The brainstem monoaminergic system project to the wider cortical area, and the initial monoaminergic hypofunction may lead to the central focus which appears earlier. The failure of the monoaminergic (serotonergic) system causes dysfunction of the pedunculo-pontine nucleus (PPN) and induces dysfunction of the dopamine (DA) system, and with development of the DA receptor supersensitivity consequently disinhibits the thalamo-frontal pathway, which after maturation of this pathway in teens cause the epileptogenesis in the frontal cortex. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Pathophysiology of heatstroke in dogs - revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruchim, Yaron; Horowitz, Michal; Aroch, Itamar

    2017-01-01

    Heatstroke results from a failure to dissipate accumulated heat during exposure to hot environments, or during strenuous physical exercise under heat stress. It is characterized by core body temperatures > 41°C, with central nervous system dysfunction. Functional morphology and thermoregulatory effectors differences between dogs and humans may require special heatstroke protective adaptations in dogs, however, the risk factors for developing heatstroke are similar in both. In dogs, these include hot, especially highly humid environments, excessive physical activity, obesity, large (>15 kg) body weight, being of certain breed (e.g., Labrador retrievers and brachycephalic breeds), upper airway obstruction and prolonged seizures. Lack of acclimation to heat and physical fitness decreases the survival of heat stroked dogs. At the systemic level, blood pooling within the large internal organs (e.g., spleen, liver) is a major contributor to the development of shock and consequent intestinal ischemia, hypoxia and endothelial hyperpermeability, commonly occurring in heatstroke patients. Evoked serious complications include rhabdomyolysis, acute kidney injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome and ultimately, sepsis and disseminated intravascular coagulation. The most common clinical signs in dogs include acute collapse, tachypnea, spontaneous bleeding, shock signs and mental abnormalities, including depression, disorientation or delirium, seizures, stupor and coma. In such dogs, presence of peripheral blood nucleated red blood cells uniquely occurs, and is a highly sensitive diagnostic and prognostic biomarker. Despite early, appropriate body cooling, and intensive supportive treatment, with no available specific treatment to ameliorate the severe inflammatory and hemostatic derangements, the mortality rate is around 50%, similar to that of human heatstroke victims. This review discusses the pathophysiology of canine heatstroke from a veterinarian's point of view

  15. Faecal soiling: pathophysiology of postdefaecatory incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucciani, F

    2013-08-01

    Passive postdefaecatory incontinence is poorly understood and yet is an important clinical problem. The aim of this study was to characterize the pathophysiology of postdefaecatory incontinence in patients affected by faecal soiling. Seventy-two patients (30 women, age range 49-79 years; 42 men, age range, 53-75 years) affected by faecal passive incontinence with faecal soiling were included in the study. Two patient groups were identified: Group 1 comprised 42 patients with postdefaecatory incontinence and Group 2 had 30 patients without incontinence after bowel movements. After a preliminary clinical evaluation, including the Faecal Incontinence Severity Index (FISI) score and the obstructed defaecation syndrome (ODS) score, all patients of Groups 1 and 2 were studied by means of endoanal ultrasound and anorectal manometry. The results were compared with those from 20 healthy control subjects. A significantly higher ODS score was found in Group 1 (P IAS) in Group 2 (P IAS atrophy and the FISI score (ρs 0.78; P < 0.03). Anal resting pressure (Pmax and Pm ) was significantly lower in Group 2 (P < 0.04). The straining test was considered positive in 30 (71.4%) patients in Group 1, significantly greater than in Group 2 (P < 0.01). A significantly higher conscious rectal sensitivity threshold (CRST) was found in Group 1 patients (P < 0.01). The ODS score, a positive straining test and high CRST values suggest that postdefaecatory incontinence is secondary to impaired defaecation. Colorectal Disease © 2013 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  16. Pulmonary Arterial Stiffness: Toward a New Paradigm in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Pathophysiology and Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Michal; Myers, Cynthia; Brown, R Dale; Frid, Maria G; Tan, Wei; Hunter, Kendall; Stenmark, Kurt R

    2016-01-01

    Stiffening of the pulmonary arterial bed with the subsequent increased load on the right ventricle is a paramount feature of pulmonary hypertension (PH). The pathophysiology of vascular stiffening is a complex and self-reinforcing function of extracellular matrix remodeling, driven by recruitment of circulating inflammatory cells and their interactions with resident vascular cells, and mechanotransduction of altered hemodynamic forces throughout the ventricular-vascular axis. New approaches to understanding the cell and molecular determinants of the pathophysiology combine novel biopolymer substrates, controlled flow conditions, and defined cell types to recapitulate the biomechanical environment in vitro. Simultaneously, advances are occurring to assess novel parameters of stiffness in vivo. In this comprehensive state-of-art review, we describe clinical hemodynamic markers, together with the newest translational echocardiographic and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging methods, to assess vascular stiffness and ventricular-vascular coupling. Finally, fluid-tissue interactions appear to offer a novel route of investigating the mechanotransduction processes and disease progression.

  17. Migraine and epilepsy: a focus on overlapping clinical, pathophysiological, molecular, and therapeutic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchin, Marino Muxfeldt; Londero, Renata Gomes; Lima, José Eduardo; Bigal, Marcelo Eduardo

    2010-08-01

    The association of epilepsy and migraine has been long recognized. Migraine and epilepsy are both chronic disorders with episodic attacks. Furthermore, headache may be a premonitory or postdromic symptom of seizures, and migraine headaches may cause seizures per se (migralepsy). Migraine and epilepsy are comorbid, sharing pathophysiological mechanisms and common clinical features. Several recent studies identified common genetic and molecular substrates for migraine and epilepsy, including phenotypic-genotypic correlations with mutations in the CACNA1A, ATP1A2, and SCN1A genes, as well as in syndromes due to mutations in the SLC1A3, POLG, and C10orF2 genes. Herein, we review the relationship between migraine and epilepsy, focusing on clinical aspects and some recent pathophysiological and molecular studies.

  18. The Emerging Role of Chronic Low-Grade Inflammation in the Pathophysiology of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorakae, Soulmaz; Teede, Helena; de Courten, Barbora; Lambert, Gavin; Boyle, Jacqueline; Moran, Lisa J

    2015-07-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) has become increasingly common over recent years and is associated with reproductive features as well as cardiometabolic risk factors, including visceral obesity, dyslipidemia and impaired glucose homeostasis, and potentially cardiovascular disease. Emerging evidence suggests that these long-term metabolic effects are linked to a low-grade chronic inflammatory state with the triad of hyperinsulinemia, hyperandrogenism, and low-grade inflammation acting together in a vicious cycle in the pathophysiology of PCOS. Dysregulation of the sympathetic nervous system may also act as an important component, potentially creating a tetrad in the pathophysiology of PCOS. The aim of this review is to examine the role of chronic inflammation and the sympathetic nervous system in the development of obesity and PCOS and review potential therapeutic options to alleviate low-grade inflammation in this setting. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  19. Pathophysiology and clinical characteristics of pain in most common locations in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppert, W; Zajaczkowska, R; Wordliczek, J; Dobrogowski, J; Woron, J; Krzakowski, M

    2016-12-01

    Pain is one of the most common symptoms in cancer patients, especially in advanced disease. However, pain also accompanies a significant percentage of patients during diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. In some patients pain may be the first symptom of the disease. The causes of pain in cancer patients are often multifactorial including direct and indirect cancer effects, anticancer therapy and co-morbidities. Moreover, pain in cancer patients often has mixed pathophysiology including both nociceptive and neuropathic components, especially in patients with bone metastases. In this article, basic knowledge regarding epidemiology, pathophysiology and clinical features of pain in cancer patients with a primary tumour localised in lung, gastrointestinal tract (stomach, colon and pancreas), breast in women and prostate in men are presented. Pain is a common symptom in cancer patients and its appropriate assessment and treatment may significantly improve in patients' and families' quality of life.

  20. Congenital pyloric atresia: clinical features, diagnosis, associated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Epidermolysis bullosa was seen in eight (40%) patients and multiple intestinal atresias in five (25%). Three patients had associated esophageal atresia. Pyloric diaphragm was the most common and seen in 13 patients including double diaphragms in two followed by pyloric atresia with a gap in four and pyloric atresia ...

  1. Rhabdomyolysis: Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Patrick A.; Helmstetter, John A.; Kaye, Adam M.; Kaye, Alan David

    2015-01-01

    Background Rhabdomyolysis is a complex medical condition involving the rapid dissolution of damaged or injured skeletal muscle. Methods This review focuses on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, causes, presentation, diagnosis, complications, management, and anesthetic considerations related to rhabdomyolysis. Results Any form of muscle damage––and by extension any entity that causes muscle damage––can initiate rhabdomyolysis. One of the most important treatment goals when rhabdomyolysis is suspected is avoiding acute kidney injury. Conclusion All clinicians should be aware of common causes, diagnosis, and treatment options. PMID:25829882

  2. The influence of the noninvasive follicular thyroid neoplasm with papillary-like nuclear features (NIFTP) resection diagnosis on the false-positive thyroid cytology rate relates to quality assurance thresholds and the application of NIFTP criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohori, N Paul; Wolfe, Jenna; Carty, Sally E; Yip, Linwah; LeBeau, Shane O; Berg, Aaron N; Schoedel, Karen E; Nikiforov, Yuri E; Seethala, Raja R

    2017-09-01

    Noninvasive follicular thyroid neoplasm with papillary-like nuclear features (NIFTP) is a newly defined entity and recent studies have suggested a decrease of a few percentage points in the rate of malignancy (ROM) for the positive-for-malignancy (PFM) cytology category as a result of NIFTP implementation. However, the distinction between a diagnosis of PFM and one of suspicious for malignancy (SFM) may depend on a variety of factors. In the current study, the authors investigated the ROM for the PFM and SFM diagnoses before and after histologic NIFTP reclassification. Cytology cases with PFM and SFM diagnoses and subsequent surgical resection specimens were searched in the files of the study institution from September 2008 to September 2016. The surgical pathology cases of noninvasive encapsulated follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma were reexamined to determine whether they qualified for NIFTP. The distinct ROMs for the PFM and SFM cases were calculated accordingly. The authors' search identified 338 cases of PFM and 139 cases of SFM with a resection outcome. Before NIFTP reclassification, the PFM cases had a ROM of 99.4%; after NIFTP reclassification, the ROM was 99.1% (P = .6861). The ROM of the SFM cases decreased from 75.5% to 66.9% with NIFTP reclassification (P = .1402). One case in the PFM group and 6 cases in the SFM group could not be verified due to insufficient sampling. In the current large series, NIFTP reclassification did not appear to significantly alter the high ROM for the PFM diagnosis. The authors attribute this finding to a strict quality assurance policy, an emphasis on key cytologic criteria, and systematic application of the NIFTP criteria to follicular-patterned lesions. Cancer Cytopathol 2017;125:692-700. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  3. Role of leukotrienes in asthma pathophysiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H

    2000-01-01

    -line anti-inflammatory therapy for asthma management. However, in some patients, especially children, the high doses of corticosteroids that may be required to control features of hyperresponsiveness, including exercise-induced asthma, raise safety concerns. Thus, there is a need for complementary anti...

  4. The pathophysiology of the migraine attack

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.L.H. Spierings

    1980-01-01

    textabstractMigraine, a word of French origin, is a mediaeval corruption of the Greek hemicrania". Its etymological meaning, half-headache, indicates two important features of the disorder, the headache and its onesidedness. In classical migraine, the headache is preceded by an 'aura' of

  5. Autoimmune hepatitis : Pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, AP

    Background: Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic necro-inflammatory disease of the liver. Early recognition is important in order to prevent the development of cirrosis. This review discusses recent developments in the fields of diagnosis, pathophysiology and management of AIH. Methods: Relevant

  6. Radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and treatment of arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosain, F.; Haddon, M.J.; Hosain, H.; Drost, J.K.; Spencer, R.P.

    1990-01-01

    A brief review is given of radiopharmaceuticals for the diagnosis and treatment of arthritis. Topics covered include the pathophysiology of arthritis and the basis for the use of radiotracers, diagnostic procedures and radiotracer applications and therapeutic approaches and radionuclide applications. (UK)

  7. Pathophysiology of Pulmonary Hypertension in Chronic Parenchymal Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Inderjit; Ma, Kevin Cong; Berlin, David Adam

    2016-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension commonly complicates chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and interstitial lung disease. The association of chronic lung disease and pulmonary hypertension portends a worse prognosis. The pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension differs in the presence or absence of lung disease. We describe the physiological determinants of the normal pulmonary circulation to better understand the pathophysiological factors implicated in chronic parenchymal lung disease-associated pulmonary hypertension. This review will focus on the pathophysiology of 3 forms of chronic lung disease-associated pulmonary hypertension: idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and sarcoidosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Celiac Disease: Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Greg; Feighery, Conleth F

    2015-01-01

    Historically the diagnosis of celiac disease has relied upon clinical, serological, and histological evidence. In recent years the use of sensitive serological methods has meant an increase in the diagnosis of celiac disease. The heterogeneous nature of the disorder presents a challenge in the study and diagnosis of the disease with patients varying from subclinical or latent disease to patients with overt symptoms. Furthermore the related gluten-sensitive disease dermatitis herpetiformis, while distinct in some respects, shares clinical and serological features with celiac disease. Here we summarize current best practice for the diagnosis of celiac disease and briefly discuss newer approaches. The advent of next-generation assays for diagnosis and newer clinical protocols may result in more sensitive screening and ultimately the possible replacement of the intestinal biopsy as the gold standard for celiac disease diagnosis.

  9. Pathophysiological basis of pharmacotherapy in the hepatorenal syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Bendtsen, Flemming; Henriksen, Jens H

    2005-01-01

    Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is a functional and reversible impairment of renal function in patients with severe cirrhosis. Major pathophysiological elements include liver dysfunction, a circulatory derangement with central hypovolaemia and neurohumoral activation of potent vasoactive systems leading...

  10. Pathophysiology of shunt dysfunction in shunt treated hydrocephalus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blegvad, C.; Skjolding, A D; Broholm, H

    2013-01-01

    We hypothesized that shunt dysfunction in the ventricular catheter and the shunt valve is caused by different cellular responses. We also hypothesized that the cellular responses depend on different pathophysiological mechanisms....

  11. Visceral hypersensitivity in Irritable Bowel Syndrome:pathophysiological mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerckhoffs, A.P.M.

    2009-01-01

    Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a functional bowel disease characterized by abdominal pain or discomfort associated with a disordered defecation. No unique pathophysiological mechanism has been identified. It is most likely a multifactorial disease involving alterations in intestinal microbiota

  12. 基于特征选择支持向量机的柱塞泵智能诊断%Intelligent Fault Diagnosis for Plunger Pump Based on Features Selection and Support Vector Machines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔英; 杜文辽; 孙旺; 李彦明

    2013-01-01

    柱塞泵是工程机械的关键部件,其性能好坏将直接影响整个设备的正常工作。针对柱塞泵提出基于特征选择支持向量机的智能诊断方法。对采集的振动信号基于小波包分解提取能量特征,然后利用Fisher准则函数选择对智能诊断最有利的特征,利用支持向量机进行训练,并将每个二类支持向量机按二叉树的组织形式构成系统的诊断模型。以汽车起重机柱塞泵为研究对象,其6种故障形式,包括正常、轴承内圈故障、滚动体故障、柱塞故障、配流盘故障、斜盘故障,用于检验所提算法的诊断能力,并与传统的BP神经网络和最近的蚁群神经网络方法进行对比。诊断结果表明:所提出的算法优于另外两种方法,具有较好的诊断效果。%In truck crane,the plunger pump is the key equipment,and the quality of the pump affects directly the performance of whole mechanical system. A novel intelligent diagnosis method based on features selection and support vector machine (SVM)was proposed for plunger pump in truck crane. Based on the wavelet packet decompose,the wavelet packet energy was extracted from the original vibration signal to represent the condition of equipment. Then,the Fisher criterion was utilized to select the most suitable fea-tures for diagnosis. Finally,each two-class SVM with binary tree architecture was trained to recognize the condition of mechanism. The proposed method was employed in the diagnosis of plunger pump in truck crane. The six states,including normal state,bearing inner race fault,bearing roller fault,plunger fault,thrust plate wear fault,and swash plate wear fault,were used to test the classification performance of the proposed Fisher-SVMs model,which was compared with the classical and the latest models,such as BP ANN,ANT ANN,respectively. The experimental results show that the Fisher-SVMs is superior to the other two models,and gets a promising re-sult.

  13. Understanding Legacy Features with Featureous

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olszak, Andrzej; Jørgensen, Bo Nørregaard

    2011-01-01

    Java programs called Featureous that addresses this issue. Featureous allows a programmer to easily establish feature-code traceability links and to analyze their characteristics using a number of visualizations. Featureous is an extension to the NetBeans IDE, and can itself be extended by third...

  14. [Pathophysiology of hypertension secondary to obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Casilimas, Guihovany Alberto; Martin, Daniel Augusto; Martínez, María Alejandra; Merchán, Claudia Rocío; Mayorga, Carol Anne; Barragán, Andrés Felipe

    The obesity is a problem with a high morbidity and mortality all over the world. It has now been designated as a cardiovascular risk factor. It often predisposes the development of many diseases that reduce quality of life, such as hypertension, dyslipidaemia, and diabetes. These diseases are associated with some of the criteria that should be considered in the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome. During this review, explanations will be presented on the relationship between obesity, metabolic syndrome, and the development of hypertension from neurohumoral, biochemical and mechanical concepts. Copyright © 2017 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  15. A review on Alzheimer's disease pathophysiology and its management: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anil; Singh, Arti; Ekavali

    2015-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease acknowledged as progressive multifarious neurodegenerative disorder, is the leading cause of dementia in late adult life. Pathologically it is characterized by intracellular neurofibrillary tangles and extracellular amyloidal protein deposits contributing to senile plaques. Over the last two decades, advances in the field of pathogenesis have inspired the researchers for the investigation of novel pharmacological therapeutics centered more towards the pathophysiological events of the disease. Currently available treatments i.e. acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (rivastigmine, galantamine, donepezil) and N-methyl d-aspartate receptor antagonist (memantine) contribute minimal impact on the disease and target late aspects of the disease. These drugs decelerate the progression of the disease, provide symptomatic relief but fail to achieve a definite cure. While the neuropathological features of Alzheimer's disease are recognized but the intricacies of the mechanism have not been clearly defined. This lack of understanding regarding the pathogenic process may be the likely reason for the non-availability of effective treatment which can prevent onset and progression of the disease. Owing to the important progress in the field of pathophysiology in the last couple of years, new therapeutic targets are available that should render the underlying disease process to be tackled directly. In this review, authors will discusses the different aspects of pathophysiological mechanisms behind Alzheimer's disease and its management through conventional drug therapy, including modern investigational therapeutic strategies, recently completed and ongoing. Copyright © 2014 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  16. Multi-disciplinary management of athletes with post-concussion syndrome: an evolving pathophysiological approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael John Ellis

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Historically, patients with sports-related concussion (SRC have been managed in a uniform fashion consisting mostly of prescribed physical and cognitive rest with the expectation that all symptoms will spontaneously resolve with time. Although this approach will result in successful return to school and sports activities in the majority of athletes, an important proportion will develop persistent concussion symptoms characteristic of post-concussion syndrome (PCS. Recent advances in exercise science, neuroimaging, and clinical research suggest that the clinical manifestations of PCS are mediated by unique pathophysiological processes that can be identified by features of the clinical history and physical examination as well as the use of graded aerobic treadmill testing. Athletes who develop PCS represent a unique population whose care must be individualized and must incorporate a rehabilitative strategy that promotes enhanced recovery of concussion-related symptoms while preventing physical deconditioning. In this review we present our evolving evidence-based approach to evaluation and management of athletes with PCS that aims to identify the pathophysiological mechanisms mediating persistent concussion symptoms and guides the initiation of individually-tailored rehabilitation programs that target these processes. In addition, we outline the important qualified roles that multi-disciplinary healthcare professionals can play in the management of this patient population, and discuss where future research efforts must be focused to further validate this evolving pathophysiological approach.

  17. Multi-Disciplinary Management of Athletes with Post-Concussion Syndrome: An Evolving Pathophysiological Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Michael J; Leddy, John; Willer, Barry

    2016-01-01

    Historically, patients with sports-related concussion (SRC) have been managed in a uniform fashion consisting mostly of prescribed physical and cognitive rest with the expectation that all symptoms will spontaneously resolve with time. Although this approach will result in successful return to school and sports activities in the majority of athletes, an important proportion will develop persistent concussion symptoms characteristic of post-concussion syndrome (PCS). Recent advances in exercise science, neuroimaging, and clinical research suggest that the clinical manifestations of PCS are mediated by unique pathophysiological processes that can be identified by features of the clinical history and physical examination as well as the use of graded aerobic treadmill testing. Athletes who develop PCS represent a unique population whose care must be individualized and must incorporate a rehabilitative strategy that promotes enhanced recovery of concussion-related symptoms while preventing physical deconditioning. In this review, we present our evolving evidence-based approach to evaluation and management of athletes with PCS that aims to identify the pathophysiological mechanisms mediating persistent concussion symptoms and guides the initiation of individually tailored rehabilitation programs that target these processes. In addition, we outline the important qualified roles that multi-disciplinary healthcare professionals can play in the management of this patient population, and discuss where future research efforts must be focused to further evaluate this evolving pathophysiological approach.

  18. Reevaluation of the Thyroid Scan for the Assessment of Pathophysiologic Status of Thyroid Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, In Sook; Nah, Jung Il; Kim, Deog Yoon

    1991-01-01

    To diagnosis and understand the pathophysiologic status of thyroid disease, not only hormonal measurements but also thyroid scan is believed to have a unique role. Especially in the cases of the change of the thyroid function by thyroiditis, it is emphasized that thyroid scan can be helpful in differential diagnosis, Discordant results of thyroid hormone levels and thyroid scan are found in transient hyperthyroidism, or in transient hypothyroidism. We analysed and reevaluated thyroid scan to look at the importance of thyroid scan. The results are summarised as follows: 1) 80%. of hyperthyroid patients had hyperthyroidism increased RAIU with even density, they are compatible with Graves' disease. 2) 2.1% of hyperthyroid patients had normal or decreased RAIU, which are classified as high iodine turn over genuine hyperthyroidism. 3) 8.5% of hyperthyroid patients had markedly decreased RAIU at both 2 hour and 24 hour, whose pathologic processes are suggested to be heterogenous namely subacute thyroiditis, postpartum thyroiditis, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and pamless thyroiditis. 4) 45% of hypothyroid patients had increased 24 hr RAIU, 30% of hypothyroid patients were normal, 25%, decreased. In conclusion, thyroid scan should be reevaluated its useful role to asses the pathophysiologic status of thyroid disease. Especially in cases of transient thyrotoxicosis, thyroid scan is essential to diagnose and follow up the disease process.

  19. Reevaluation of the Thyroid Scan for the Assessment of Pathophysiologic Status of Thyroid Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, In Sook; Nah, Jung Il; Kim, Deog Yoon [Kyunghee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1991-03-15

    To diagnosis and understand the pathophysiologic status of thyroid disease, not only hormonal measurements but also thyroid scan is believed to have a unique role. Especially in the cases of the change of the thyroid function by thyroiditis, it is emphasized that thyroid scan can be helpful in differential diagnosis, Discordant results of thyroid hormone levels and thyroid scan are found in transient hyperthyroidism, or in transient hypothyroidism. We analysed and reevaluated thyroid scan to look at the importance of thyroid scan. The results are summarised as follows: 1) 80%. of hyperthyroid patients had hyperthyroidism increased RAIU with even density, they are compatible with Graves' disease. 2) 2.1% of hyperthyroid patients had normal or decreased RAIU, which are classified as high iodine turn over genuine hyperthyroidism. 3) 8.5% of hyperthyroid patients had markedly decreased RAIU at both 2 hour and 24 hour, whose pathologic processes are suggested to be heterogenous namely subacute thyroiditis, postpartum thyroiditis, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and pamless thyroiditis. 4) 45% of hypothyroid patients had increased 24 hr RAIU, 30% of hypothyroid patients were normal, 25%, decreased. In conclusion, thyroid scan should be reevaluated its useful role to asses the pathophysiologic status of thyroid disease. Especially in cases of transient thyrotoxicosis, thyroid scan is essential to diagnose and follow up the disease process.

  20. Feature Article

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Feature Article. Articles in Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Volume 1 Issue 1 January 1996 pp 80-85 Feature Article. What's New in Computers Windows 95 · Vijnan Shastri · More Details Fulltext PDF. Volume 1 Issue 1 January 1996 pp 86-89 Feature ...

  1. Oxidative stress in sickle cell disease; pathophysiology and potential implications for disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur, Erfan; Biemond, Bart J; Otten, Hans-Martin; Brandjes, Dees P; Schnog, John-John B

    2011-06-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a hemoglobinopathy characterized by hemolytic anemia, increased susceptibility to infections and vaso-occlusion leading to a reduced quality of life and life expectancy. Oxidative stress is an important feature of SCD and plays a significant role in the pathophysiology of hemolysis, vaso-occlusion and ensuing organ damage in sickle cell patients. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the (end-)products of their oxidative reactions are potential markers of disease severity and could be targets for antioxidant therapies. This review will summarize the role of ROS in SCD and their potential implication for SCD management. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Classification and pathophysiology of radiocontrast media hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockow, Knut; Ring, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to radiocontrast media (RCM) are unpredictable and are a concern for radiologists and cardiologists. Immediate hypersensitivity reactions manifest as anaphylaxis, and an allergic IgE-mediated mechanism has been continuously discussed for decades. Non-immediate reactions clinically are exanthemas resembling other drug-induced non-immediate hypersensitivities. During the past years, evidence is increasing that some of these reactions may be immunological. Repeated reactions after re-exposure, positive skin tests, and presence of specific IgE antibodies as well as positive basophil activation tests in some cases, and positive lymphocyte transformation or lymphocyte activation tests in others, indicate that a subgroup of both immediate and non-immediate reactions are of an allergic origin, although many questions remain unanswered. Recently reported cases highlight that pharmacological premedication is not safe to prevent RCM hypersensitivity in patients with previous severe reactions. These insights may have important consequences. A large multicenter study on the value of skin tests in RCM hypersensitivity concluded that skin testing is a useful tool for diagnosis of RCM allergy. It may have a role for the selection of a safe product in previous reactors, although confirmatory validation data is still scarce. In vitro tests to search for RCM-specific cell activation still are in development. In conclusion, recent data indicate that RCM hypersensitivity may have an allergic mechanism and that allergological testing is useful and may indicate tolerability. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Laboratory Diagnosis Of Sarcoidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dutta S.K

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is not an uncommon disease. Unfortunately, the awareness amongst clinicians is lacking and due to overwhelming prevalence of tuberculosis, a disease with many similar features, the diagnosis is missed and often delayed. The gold standard investigation finding in the diagnosis of sarcoidosis is the presence of noncaseating tuberculoid granuloma, also known as sarcoid or sarcoid-like granuloma. Some classical chest X-ray findings, clinico-radiological dissociation. Suggestive organ lesions, negative Mantoux test (MT, development of MT site granuloma, hypercalcemia, hypercalciuria and raised serum angiotensin converting enzyme (SACE value and negative tests for tuberculosis are usually hekpful in the diagnosis of sarcoidosis.

  4. The antiphospholipid syndrome: from pathophysiology to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrini, Simone; Pappalardo, Fabrizio; Murdaca, Giuseppe; Indiveri, Francesco; Puppo, Francesco

    2017-08-01

    Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune acquired thrombophilia characterized by recurrent thrombosis and pregnancy morbidity in the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). APS can be primary, if it occurs in the absence of any underlying disease, or secondary, if it is associated with another autoimmune disorder, most commonly systemic lupus erythematosus. The exact pathogenetic mechanism of APS is unknown, but different, not mutually exclusive, models have been proposed to explain how anti-PL autoantibodies might lead to thrombosis and pregnancy morbidity. Diagnosis of APS requires that a patient has both a clinical manifestation (arterial or venous thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity) and persistently positive aPL, but the clinical spectrum of the disease encompasses additional manifestations which may affect every organ and cannot be explained exclusively by a prothrombotic state. Treatment for aPL-positive patients is based on the patient's clinical status, presence of an underlying autoimmune disease, and history of thrombotic events. In case of aPL positivity without previous thrombotic events, the treatment is mainly focused on reduction of additional vascular risk factors, while treatment of patients with definite APS is based on long-term anticoagulation. Pregnancy complications are usually managed with low-dose aspirin in association with low molecular weight heparin. Refractory forms of APS could benefit from adding hydroxychloroquine and/or intravenous immunoglobulin to anticoagulation therapy. Promising novel treatments include anti-B cell monoclonal antibodies, new-generation anticoagulants, and complement cascade inhibitors. The objective of this review paper is to summarize the recent literature on APS from pathogenesis to current therapeutic options.

  5. Pathophysiology and treatment of psychosis in Parkinson's disease: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahodne, Laura B; Fernandez, Hubert H

    2008-01-01

    Psychotic symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) are relatively common and, in addition to creating a disturbance in patients' daily lives, have consistently been shown to be associated with poor outcome. Our understanding of the pathophysiology of psychosis in PD has expanded dramatically over the past 15 years, from an initial interpretation of symptoms as dopaminergic drug adverse effects to the current view of a complex interplay of extrinsic and disease-related factors.PD psychosis has unique clinical features, namely that it arises within a context of a clear sensorium and retained insight, there is relative prominence of visual hallucinations and progression occurs over time. PD psychosis tends to emerge later in the disease course, and disease duration represents one risk factor for its development. The use of anti-PD medications (particularly dopamine receptor agonists) has been the most widely identified risk factor for PD psychosis. Other risk factors discussed in the literature include older age, disease severity, sleep disturbance, cognitive impairment, dementia and/or depression.Recent efforts have aimed to explore the complex pathophysiology of PD psychosis, which is now known to involve an interaction between extrinsic, drug-related and intrinsic, disease-related components. The most important extrinsic factor is use of dopaminergic medication, which plays a prominent role in PD psychosis. Intrinsic factors include visual processing deficits (e.g. lower visual acuity, colour and contrast recognition deficits, ocular pathology and functional brain abnormalities identified amongst hallucinating PD patients); sleep dysregulation (e.g. sleep fragmentation and altered dream phenomena); neurochemical (dopamine, serotonin, acetylcholine, etc.) and structural abnormalities involving site-specific Lewy body deposition; and genetics (e.g. apolipoprotein E epsilon4 allele and tau H1H1 genotype). Preliminary reports have also shown a potential relationship

  6. Congenital and childhood atrioventricular blocks: pathophysiology and contemporary management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruteau, Alban-Elouen; Pass, Robert H; Thambo, Jean-Benoit; Behaghel, Albin; Le Pennec, Solène; Perdreau, Elodie; Combes, Nicolas; Liberman, Leonardo; McLeod, Christopher J

    2016-09-01

    Atrioventricular block is classified as congenital if diagnosed in utero, at birth, or within the first month of life. The pathophysiological process is believed to be due to immune-mediated injury of the conduction system, which occurs as a result of transplacental passage of maternal anti-SSA/Ro-SSB/La antibodies. Childhood atrioventricular block is therefore diagnosed between the first month and the 18th year of life. Genetic variants in multiple genes have been described to date in the pathogenesis of inherited progressive cardiac conduction disorders. Indications and techniques of cardiac pacing have also evolved to allow safe permanent cardiac pacing in almost all patients, including those with structural heart abnormalities. Early diagnosis and appropriate management are critical in many cases in order to prevent sudden death, and this review critically assesses our current understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms, clinical course, and optimal management of congenital and childhood AV block. • Prevalence of congenital heart block of 1 per 15,000 to 20,000 live births. AV block is defined as congenital if diagnosed in utero, at birth, or within the first month of life, whereas childhood AV block is diagnosed between the first month and the 18th year of life. As a result of several different etiologies, congenital and childhood atrioventricular block may occur in an entirely structurally normal heart or in association with concomitant congenital heart disease. Cardiac pacing is indicated in symptomatic patients and has several prophylactic indications in asymptomatic patients to prevent sudden death. • Autoimmune, congenital AV block is associated with a high neonatal mortality rate and development of dilated cardiomyopathy in 5 to 30 % cases. What is New: • Several genes including SCN5A have been implicated in autosomal dominant forms of familial progressive cardiac conduction disorders. • Leadless pacemaker technology and gene therapy for

  7. Special features of pathophysiological mechanisms of psychical disadaptation under influence of the Chernobyl NPP disaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinitskij, V.N.; Kovtun, T.V.; Kharchenko, N.K.; Stognij, N.A.; Duplenko, P.Yu.; Opanasenko, E.V.

    1994-01-01

    A complex clinical-laboratory examination of 110 patients with various phenomena of psychical disadaptation has been carried out.In the first group (5% of examined patients) the signs of psychical-organical syndrome characteristics for dismnestical dementia has been stated. In the second group (75% of examined patients) the neurological (vascular, vegetative, convulsive) disorders, developed due to systemic lesion of subcortical mezodiencephalular and limbic formation of the brain, have been revealed. For the third group of patients the neurotical and neurosis-like disorders have been typical. The most characteristic changes of electroencephalogram, higher neural activity, psychic-test data, indexes of vegetative-vascular tonus, exchange of biogenic amines (catecholamines and serotonin), the content of key metabolites in the blood, glomeruli filtration of kidneys have been investigated for the patients of each group

  8. Autism: Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Publications Awards Partners Contact Us ¿Qué es Autismo? Donate Home What is Autism? What is Autism? ... Information Publications Awards Partners Contact Us ¿Qué es Autismo? Diagnosis Home / What is Autism? / Diagnosis Expand Medical ...

  9. Early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Clinical significance and future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buerger, K.; Teipel, S.J.; Hampel, H.

    2000-01-01

    Early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease describes the recognition and diagnosis in patients with very mild dementia. Internationally accepted diagnostic criteria support the diagnosis based on clinical evaluation. Recent advances in structural and functional neuroimaging as well as studies on specific proteins in the cerebro-spinal fluid that are related to distinct pathophysiological disease processes are most promising approaches to defining biological markers of Alzheimer's disease. (orig.) [de

  10. Velopharyngeal sphincter pathophysiologic aspects in the in cleft palat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collares, Marcus Vinicius Martins

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cleft lip and palate are common congenital abnormalities with typical functional disorders on speech, deglutition and middle ear function. Objective: This article reviews functional labiopalatine disorders through a pathophysiological view. Method: We performed a literature search on line, as well as books and periodicals related to velopharyngeal sphincter. Our sources were LILACS, MEDLINE and SciELO databases, and we applied to the research Keywords of interest on the velopharyngeal pathophysiology, for articles published between 1965 and 2007. Conclusion: Velopharyngeal sphincter plays a central role in speech, swallowing and middle ear physiology in patients with labiopalatine cleft. At the end of our bibliographic review, pursuant to the velopharyngeal physiology in individuals with this disorder in the functional speech, deglutition and otologic function, we observed that although there is a great number of published data discussing this issue, further studies are necessary to completely understand the pathophysiology, due to the fact they have been exploited superficially.

  11. A Unified Pathophysiological Construct of Diabetes and its Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Stanley S; Epstein, Solomon; Corkey, Barbara E; Grant, Struan F A; Gavin Iii, James R; Aguilar, Richard B; Herman, Mary E

    2017-09-01

    Advances in understanding diabetes mellitus (DM) through basic and clinical research have helped clarify and reunify a disease state fragmented into numerous etiologies and subtypes. It is now understood that a common pathophysiology drives the diabetic state throughout its natural history and across its varied clinical presentations, a pathophysiology involving metabolic insults, oxidative damage, and vicious cycles that aggravate and intensify organ dysfunction and damage. This new understanding of the disease requires that we revisit existing diagnostics and treatment approaches, which were built upon outmoded assumptions. 'The Common Pathophysiologic Origins of Diabetes Mellitus and its Complications Construct' is presented as a more accurate, foundational, and translatable construct of DM that helps make sense of the hitherto ambiguous findings of long-term outcome studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Glaucoma: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Latest Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Glaucoma Glaucoma: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Latest Research Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents Symptoms and Diagnosis Glaucoma can develop in one or both eyes. Often ...

  13. Body imaging: Diagnosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pfannenstiel incision for caesarean section was noted. No synchronous lesions were identified. Based on the location of the lesion, sonar features and MRI enhancement pattern, the principal radiological diagnosis was that of a desmoid tumour of the left rectus muscle. In fact, the initial sonar-guided core biopsy specimen ...

  14. [Overcoming the limitations of the descriptive and categorical approaches in psychiatric diagnosis: a proposal based on Bayesian networks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorias, Soli

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to overcome the problems of descriptive and categorical approaches have not yielded results. In the present article, psychiatric diagnosis using Bayesian networks is proposed. Instead of a yes/no decision, Bayesian networks give the probability of diagnostic category inclusion, thereby yielding both a graded, i.e., dimensional diagnosis, and a value of the certainty of the diagnosis. With the use of Bayesian networks in the diagnosis of mental disorders, information about etiology, associated features, treatment outcome, and laboratory results may be used in addition to clinical signs and symptoms, with each of these factors contributing proportionally to their own specificity and sensitivity. Furthermore, a diagnosis (albeit one with a lower probability) can be made even with incomplete, uncertain, or partially erroneous information, and patients whose symptoms are below the diagnostic threshold can be evaluated. Lastly, there is no need of NOS or "unspecified" categories, and comorbid disorders become different dimensions of the diagnostic evaluation. Bayesian diagnoses allow the preservation of current categories and assessment methods, and may be used concurrently with criteria-based diagnoses. Users need not put in extra effort except to collect more comprehensive information. Unlike the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) project, the Bayesian approach neither increases the diagnostic validity of existing categories nor explains the pathophysiological mechanisms of mental disorders. It, however, can be readily integrated to present classification systems. Therefore, the Bayesian approach may be an intermediate phase between criteria-based diagnosis and the RDoC ideal.

  15. Neuromyelitis optica: clinical features, immunopathogenesis and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarius, S; Wildemann, B; Paul, F

    2014-01-01

    The term ‘neuromyelitis optica’ (‘Devic's syndrome’, NMO) refers to a syndrome characterized by optic neuritis and myelitis. In recent years, the condition has raised enormous interest among scientists and clinical neurologists, fuelled by the detection of a specific serum immunoglobulin (Ig)G reactivity (NMO-IgG) in up to 80% of patients with NMO. These autoantibodies were later shown to target aquaporin-4 (AQP4), the most abundant water channel in the central nervous system (CNS). Here we give an up-to-date overview of the clinical and paraclinical features, immunopathogenesis and treatment of NMO. We discuss the widening clinical spectrum of AQP4-related autoimmunity, the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and new diagnostic means such as optical coherence tomography in the diagnosis of NMO, the role of NMO-IgG, T cells and granulocytes in the pathophysiology of NMO, and outline prospects for new and emerging therapies for this rare, but often devastating condition. Other Articles published in this series Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes. Clinical and Experimental Immunology 2014, 175: 336–48. Disease-modifying therapy in multiple sclerosis and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: common and divergent current and future strategies. Clinical and Experimental Immunology 2014, 175: 359–72. Monoclonal antibodies in treatment of multiple sclerosis. Clinical and Experimental Immunology 2014, 175: 373–84. CLIPPERS: chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids. Review of an increasingly recognized entity within the spectrum of inflammatory central nervous system disorders. Clinical and Experimental Immunology 2014, 175: 385–96. Requirement for safety monitoring for approved multiple sclerosis therapies: an overview. Clinical and Experimental Immunology 2014, 175: 397–407. Myasthenia gravis: an update for the clinician. Clinical and Experimental Immunology 2014, 175: 408

  16. Parkinson's Disease: Diagnosis and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Parkinson's Disease Parkinson's Disease: Diagnosis and Treatment Past Issues / Winter 2014 ... live productive lives and maintain mobility. How is Parkinson's Diagnosed? There are no blood or laboratory tests ...

  17. Feature Extraction

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Feature selection and reduction are key to robust multivariate analyses. In this talk I will focus on pros and cons of various variable selection methods and focus on those that are most relevant in the context of HEP.

  18. Solar Features

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of solar feature datasets contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide.

  19. Site Features

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset consists of various site features from multiple Superfund sites in U.S. EPA Region 8. These data were acquired from multiple sources at different times...

  20. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension – Pathophysiology Based on Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubisavljević Srdjan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available According to the definition, idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH is a pathological state characterized by an increase in intracranial pressure; however, there are no obvious intracranial pathological processes. The pathophysiology of this disorder is not clear, although there are many reports related to it.

  1. New insights into the pathophysiology of postoperative cognitive dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Lene; Rasmussen, Lars Simon; Kehlet, H

    2010-01-01

    There is evidence that postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is a significant problem after major surgery, but the pathophysiology has not been fully elucidated. The interpretation of available studies is difficult due to differences in neuropsychological test batteries as well as the lack...

  2. Pathophysiology and Contributing Factors in Postprostatectomy Incontinence: A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesakkers, J.P.F.A.; Farag, F.; Bauer, R.M.M.J.; Sandhu, J.; Ridder, D. de; Stenzl, A.

    2017-01-01

    CONTEXT: The incidence and awareness of postprostatectomy incontinence (PPI) has increased during the past few years, probably because of an increase in prostate cancer surgery. Many theories have been postulated to explain the pathophysiology of PPI. OBJECTIVE: The current review scrutinizes

  3. Pathophysiology of acute mountain sickness and high altitude pulmonary oedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sutton, J R; Lassen, N

    1979-01-01

    We review the evidence that acute mountain sickness (AMS) and high altitude pulmonary oedema (HAPO) occur together more often than is realized. We hypothesize that AMS and HAPO have a common pathophysiological basis: both are due to increased pressure and flow in the microcirculation, causing...

  4. Elucidation of pathophysiology and treatment of neuropathic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vranken, Jan H.

    2012-01-01

    Neuropathic pain, pain arising as a direct consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system, is relatively common, occurring in about 1% of the population. Studies in animal models describe a number of peripheral and central pathophysiological processes after nerve injury that

  5. An update on oxidative stress-mediated organ pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Kahkashan; Sinha, Krishnendu; Sil, Parames C

    2013-12-01

    Exposure to environmental pollutants and drugs can result in pathophysiological situations in the body. Research in this area is essential as the knowledge on cellular survival and death would help in designing effective therapeutic strategies that are needed for the maintenance of the normal physiological functions of the body. In this regard, naturally occurring bio-molecules can be considered as potential therapeutic targets as they are normally available in commonly consumed foodstuffs and are thought to have minimum side effects. This review article describes the detailed mechanisms of oxidative stress-mediated organ pathophysiology and the ultimate fate of the cells either to survive or to undergo necrotic or apoptotic death. The mechanisms underlying the beneficial role of a number of naturally occurring bioactive molecules in oxidative stress-mediated organ pathophysiology have also been included in the review. The review provides useful information about the recent progress in understanding the mechanism(s) of various types of organ pathophysiology, the complex cross-talk between these pathways, as well as their modulation in stressed conditions. Additionally, it suggests possible therapeutic applications of a number of naturally occurring bioactive molecules in conditions involving oxidative stress. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Pathophysiological and pharmacotherapeutic aspects of serotonin and serotonergic drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zwieten, P. A.; Blauw, G. J.; van Brummelen, P.

    1990-01-01

    A survey shall be given on the physiological, pathophysiological and pharmacotherapeutic backgrounds of the biogenic amine 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin; 5HT), to be preceded by a few historical remarks. 5HT is biosynthesized from L-tryptophan via hydroxylation and subsequent decarboxylation. 5HT

  7. Effects of Triphasic Exercise on Blood Rheology and Pathophysiology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this work is to study the relevance of physiology and pathophysiology in blood rheology as effects of triphasic exercise. Regular exercise which has been established as life prolonging has led to decrease in both peripheral vascular and coronary morbidity that has been associated with certain improvements in ...

  8. Chronic pruritus in the absence of specific skin disease: an update on pathophysiology, diagnosis, and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassano, Nicoletta; Tessari, Gianpaolo; Vena, Gino A; Girolomoni, Giampiero

    2010-12-01

    Chronic pruritus is a major and distressing symptom of many cutaneous and systemic diseases and can significantly impair the patient's quality of life. Pruritus perception is the final result of a complex network involving dedicated nerve pathways and brain areas, and an increasing number of peripheral and central mediators are thought to be involved. Itch is associated with most cutaneous disorders and, in these circumstances, its management overlaps with that of the skin disease. Itch can also occur without associated skin diseases or primary skin lesions, but only with nonspecific lesions secondary to rubbing or scratching. Chronic itch with no or minimal skin changes can be secondary to important diseases, such as neurologic disorders, chronic renal failure, cholestasis, systemic infections, malignancies, and endocrine disorders, and may also result from exposure to some drugs. The search for the cause of pruritus usually requires a meticulous step-by-step assessment involving careful history taking as well as clinical examination and laboratory investigations. Few evidence-based treatments for pruritus are available. Topical therapy, oral histamine H(1) receptor antagonists, and phototherapy with UV radiation can target pruritus elicitation in the skin, whereas antiepileptic drugs, opioid receptor antagonists, and antidepressants can block signal processing in the CNS.

  9. Peak bone mass from longitudinal data: implications for the prevalence, pathophysiology, and diagnosis of osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Claudie; Goltzman, David; Langsetmo, Lisa; Joseph, Lawrence; Jackson, Stuart; Kreiger, Nancy; Tenenhouse, Alan; Davison, K Shawn; Josse, Robert G; Prior, Jerilynn C; Hanley, David A

    2010-09-01

    We estimated peak bone mass (PBM) in 615 women and 527 men aged 16 to 40 years using longitudinal data from the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos). Individual rates of change were averaged to find the mean rate of change for each baseline age. The age range for PBM was defined as the period during which bone mineral density (BMD) was stable. PBM was estimated via hierarchical models, weighted according to 2006 Canadian Census data. Lumbar spine PBM (1.046 ± 0.123 g/cm(2)) occurred at ages 33 to 40 years in women and at 19 to 33 years in men (1.066 ± 0.129 g/cm(2)). Total hip PBM (0.981 ± 0.122 g/cm(2)) occurred at ages 16 to 19 years in women and 19 to 21 years in men (1.093 ± 0.169 g/cm(2)). Analysis of Canadian geographic variation revealed that the levels of PBM and of mean BMD in those over age 65 sometimes were discordant, suggesting that PBM and subsequent rates of bone loss may be subject to different genetic and/or environmental influences. Based on our longitudinally estimated PBM values, the estimated Canadian prevalences of osteoporosis (T-score < -2.5) were 12.0% (L(1)-L(4)) and 9.1% (total hip) in women aged 50 years and older and 2.9% (L(1)-L(4)) and 0.9% (total hip) in men aged 50 years and older. These were higher than prevalences using cross-sectional PBM data. In summary, we found that the age at which PBM is achieved varies by sex and skeletal site, and different reference values for PBM lead to different estimates of the prevalence of osteoporosis. Furthermore, lack of concordance of PBM and BMD over age 65 suggests different determinants of PBM and subsequent bone loss. © 2010 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  10. Elbow dysplasia in the dog : pathophysiology, diagnosis and control : review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.M. Kirberger

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available Elbow dysplasia is a non-specific term denoting abnormal development of the elbow. Elbow dysplasia encompasses the clinical and radiographic manifestation of ununited anconeal process, fragmented medial coronoid process, osteochondritis dissecans, erosive cartilage lesions and elbow incongruity. The net result is elbow arthrosis, which may be clinically inapparent or result in marked lameness. These conditions may be diagnosed by means of routine or special radiographic views and other imaging modalities, or the precise cause of the arthrosis or lameness may remain undetermined. Breeds most commonly affected are the rottweiler, Bernese mountain dog, Labrador and golden retriever and the German shepherd dog. Certain breeds are more susceptible to a particular form of elbow dysplasia and more than 1 component may occur simultaneously. The various conditions are thought to result from osteochondrosis of the articular or physeal cartilage that results in disparate growth of the radius and ulna. Heritability has been proven for this polygenic condition and screening programmes to select suitable breeding stock have been initiated in several countries and have decreased the incidence of elbow dysplasia.

  11. Antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplantation: a review of pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Miae; Martin, Spencer T; Townsend, Keri R; Gabardi, Steven

    2014-07-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR), also known as B-cell-mediated or humoral rejection, is a significant complication after kidney transplantation that carries a poor prognosis. Although fewer than 10% of kidney transplant patients experience AMR, as many as 30% of these patients experience graft loss as a consequence. Although AMR is mediated by antibodies against an allograft and results in histologic changes in allograft vasculature that differ from cellular rejection, it has not been recognized as a separate disease process until recently. With an improved understanding about the importance of the development of antibodies against allografts as well as complement activation, significant advances have occurred in the treatment of AMR. The standard of care for AMR includes plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulin that remove and neutralize antibodies, respectively. Agents targeting B cells (rituximab and alemtuzumab), plasma cells (bortezomib), and the complement system (eculizumab) have also been used successfully to treat AMR in kidney transplant recipients. However, the high cost of these medications, their use for unlabeled indications, and a lack of prospective studies evaluating their efficacy and safety limit the routine use of these agents in the treatment of AMR in kidney transplant recipients. © 2014 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  12. Pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of intermittent claudication in patients with lumbar canal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Shigeru

    2014-04-18

    Spinal nerve roots have a peculiar structure, different from the arrangements in the peripheral nerve. The nerve roots are devoid of lymphatic vessels but are immersed in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) within the subarachnoid space. The blood supply of nerve roots depends on the blood flow from both peripheral direction (ascending) and the spinal cord direction (descending). There is no hypovascular region in the nerve root, although there exists a so-called water-shed of the bloodstream in the radicular artery itself. Increased mechanical compression promotes the disturbance of CSF flow, circulatory disturbance starting from the venous congestion and intraradicular edema formation resulting from the breakdown of the blood-nerve barrier. Although this edema may diffuse into CSF when the subarachnoid space is preserved, the endoneurial fluid pressure may increase when the area is closed by increased compression. On the other hand, the nerve root tissue has already degenerated under the compression and the numerous macrophages releasing various chemical mediators, aggravating radicular symptoms that appear in the area of Wallerian degeneration. Prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) is a potent vasodilator as well as an inhibitor of platelet aggregation and has therefore attracted interest as a therapeutic drug for lumbar canal stenosis. However, investigations in the clinical setting have shown that PGE1 is effective in some patients but not in others, although the reason for this is unclear.

  13. Sitosterolemia: a review and update of pathophysiology, clinical spectrum, diagnosis, and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Gyong Yoo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sitosterolemia is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by increased plant sterol levels, xanthomas, and accelerated atherosclerosis. Although it was originally reported in patients with normolipemic xanthomas, severe hypercholesterolemia have been reported in patients with sitosterolemia, especially in children. Sitosterolemia is caused by increased intestinal absorption and decreased biliary excretion of sterols resulting from biallelic mutations in either ABCG5 or ABCG8, which encode the sterol efflux transporter ABCG5 and ABCG8. Patients with sitosterolemia show extreme phenotypic heterogeneity, ranging from almost asymptomatic individuals to those with severe hypercholesterolemia leading to accelerated atherosclerosis and premature cardiac death. Hematologic manifestations include hemolytic anemia with stomatocytosis, macrothrombocytopenia, splenomegaly, and abnormal bleeding. The mainstay of therapy includes dietary restriction of both cholesterol and plant sterols and the sterol absorption inhibitor, ezetimibe. Foods rich in plant sterols include vegetable oils, wheat germs, nuts, seeds, avocado, shortening, margarine and chocolate. Hypercholesterolemia in patients with sitosterolemia is dramatically responsive to low cholesterol diet and bile acid sequestrants. Plant sterol assay should be performed in patients with normocholesterolemic xanthomas, hypercholesterolemia with unexpectedly good response to dietary modifications or to cholesterol absorption inhibitors, or hypercholesterolemia with poor response to statins, or those with unexplained hemolytic anemia and macrothrombocytopenia. Because prognosis can be improved by proper management, it is important to find these patients out and diagnose correctly. This review article aimed to summarize recent publications on sitosterolemia, and to suggest clinical indications for plant sterol assay.

  14. Current management of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: evidence in pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quesada Mena, Luis Diego

    2013-01-01

    Available literary evidence is reviewed on the current management of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The bibliographical search is carried out in physical and online texts, cardiology journals, databases (MEDLINE), original studies, reviews and metaanalysis. Literature in English and Spanish is included from the first descriptions of the disease in the fifties, until the date of the investigation. Clinical management of patients is compared and recommendations published by consensus groups of international associations [es

  15. [50 years of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of chronic pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, M M; Mayerle, J

    2013-04-01

    The German Journal of Gastroenterology celebrates its fifties anniversary in 2013. Over half a century original studies, reviews and guidelines covering the topics of acute and chronic pancreatitis as well as pancreatic cancer have assumed a prominent role on its pages. Already in the first edition of the Journal Haemmerli and Hefti have summarized the Zurich experience with chronic pancreatitis and provided a detailed state-of-the-art review for the year 1963. 50 years later the current guidelines of the German Society of Digestive and Metabolic Diseases (DGVS) have been published in the same Journal and allow to summarize the scientific progress over this period. Back then chronic pancreatitis was regarded as a rare disorder (tenfold less common than e. g. acute pancreatitis or pancreatic cancer). This misconception had little to do with actual prevalence but with highly insensitive diagnostic tests, particularly in the area of diagnostic imaging. While pathogenetic factors for chronic pancreatitis, including a possible genetic disposition, were largely known in 1963, our understanding of their cellular mechanisms has very much improved. The greatest progress in diagnostic options was achieved by the introduction of novel imaging techniques such as ultrasound and endoscopic ultrasound, ERCP, CT and MRCP. In terms of therapy the notion that a blockage of pancreatitic secretion is an effective pharmacological option has been abandoned and endoscopic intervention and surgical treatment have been newly developed as alternatives. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Review article: dyssynergic defaecation and biofeedback therapy in the pathophysiology and management of functional constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skardoon, G R; Khera, A J; Emmanuel, A V; Burgell, R E

    2017-08-01

    Functional constipation is a common clinical presentation in primary care. Functional defaecation disorders are defined as the paradoxical contraction or inadequate relaxation of the pelvic floor muscles during attempted defaecation (dyssynergic defaecation) and/or inadequate propulsive forces during attempted defaecation. Prompt diagnosis and management of dyssynergic defaecation is hindered by uncertainty regarding nomenclature, diagnostic criteria, pathophysiology and efficacy of management options such as biofeedback therapy. To review the evidence pertaining to the pathophysiology of functional defaecation disorders and the efficacy of biofeedback therapy in the management of patients with dyssynergic defaecation and functional constipation. Relevant articles addressing functional defaecation disorders and the efficacy of biofeedback therapy in the management of dyssynergic defaecation and functional constipation were identified from a search of Pubmed, MEDLINE Ovid and the Cochrane Library. The prevalence of dyssynergic defaecation in patients investigated for chronic constipation is as many as 40%. Randomised controlled trials have demonstrated major symptom improvement in 70%-80% of patients undergoing biofeedback therapy for chronic constipation resistant to standard medical therapy and have determined it to be superior to polyethylene glycol laxatives, diazepam or sham therapy. Long-term studies have shown 55%-82% of patients maintain symptom improvement. Dyssynergic defaecation is a common clinical condition in patients with chronic constipation not responding to conservative management. Biofeedback therapy appears to be a safe, successful treatment with sustained results for patients with dyssynergic defaecation. Further studies are required to standardise the diagnosis of dyssynergic defaecation in addition to employing systematic protocols for biofeedback therapy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Radiological diagnosis of fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finlay, D.B.L.; Allen, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    This book is about radiology of fractures. While it contains sections of clinical features it is not intended that readers should rely entirely upon these for the diagnosis and management of the injured patient. As in the diagnosis and treatment of all medical problems, fracture management must be carried out in a logical step-by-step fashion - namely, history, examination, investigation, differential diagnosis, diagnosis and then treatment. Each section deals with a specific anatomical area and begins with line drawings of the normal radiographs demonstrating the anatomy. Accessory views that may be requested, and the indications for these, are included. Any radiological pitfalls for the area in general are then described. The fractures in adults are then examined in turn, their radiological features described, and any pitfalls in their diagnosis discussed. A brief note of important clinical findings is included. A brief mention is made of pediatric fractures which are of significance and their differences to the adult pattern indicated. Although fractures can be classified into types with different characteristics, in life every fracture is individual. Fractures by and large follow common patterns, but many have variations

  18. Prevalence and Features of a Probable Diagnosis in First-Visit Headache Patients Based on the Criteria of the Third Beta Edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders: A Prospective, Cross-Sectional Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Kyoung; Moon, Heui-Soo; Cha, Myong-Jin; Kim, Byung-Su; Kim, Byung-Kun; Park, Jeong-Wook; Park, Kwang-Yeol; Sohn, Jong-Hee; Chu, Min-Kyung; Song, Tae-Jin; Kim, Jae-Moon; Cho, Soo-Jin

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to determine the characteristics and significance of a probable diagnostic entity for primary headache disorder (PHD). A diagnosis of probable primary headache disorder (PPHD) is given when a patient's headache fulfills all but one criteria of the third beta edition of the international classification of headache disorder (ICHD-3β). Despite the uncertainty regarding this diagnosis, the inclusion of a probable diagnosis entity in this manual may aid in the accurate classification of headache disorders and allow effective treatment strategies to be started at the patient's initial visit. This cross-sectional multicenter registry study assessed first-visit patients with complaints of headaches who presented at the outpatient clinics of 11 neurologists in Korea. The classification of a headache disorder was made according to the criteria of the ICHD-3β by each investigator based on the initial evaluation of the patient or by a consensus meeting for uncertain cases. The rates of a probable diagnosis among PPHD patients were assessed and the clinical characteristics of these patients were compared with those of patients with a diagnosis of definite primary headache disorder (DPHD). A total of 1429 patients were diagnosed with PHD, and 305 (21.3%) of these patients had PPHD. The proportions of PPHD differed among the subtypes of DPHD as follows: migraines (16.1%), tension-type headaches (TTH; 33%), trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia (TAC; 40.9%), and other PHD (14%, P headache intensity than patients with DPHD (5.8 ± 2.2 vs. 6.5 ± 2.1, respectively, P headache from onset (median: 1 vs. 4 months, respectively, P headaches. The incorporation of a probable diagnosis into the ICHD-3β may be useful for reducing the diagnoses of unspecified headaches. © 2016 American Headache Society.

  19. Old and new aspects in the pathophysiology of pre-eclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Prefumo

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Pre-eclampsia is a condition affecting the feto-placental unit and the mother. Three to five percent of pregnancies are complicated by pre-eclampsia, a multisystem disorder characterized by hypertension and proteinuria that occurs after 20 weeks of pregnancy. Pre-eclampsia is associated with substantial risks. For the fetus, these include intrauterine growth restriction, death, and prematurity with attendant complications, whereas the mother is at risk for complications of widespread alterations in endothelial function such as seizures (eclampsia, renal failure, pulmonary edema, stroke, and death. The establishment of pathological uterine perfusion raises the problem of stage two. The problem at stage three describes pre-eclampsia as a syndrome with the global maternal endothelial damage as the central pathophysiological feature.\tIt has been suggested that the pathophysiology of pre-eclampsia can be thought of as a ‘three-stage problem’, where each stage generates one, so far unsolved problem. An impaired trophoblast invasion is thought to be the central factor (first step regarding the etiology of pre-eclampsia. An increased uterine artery Doppler findings (PI, RI, lower maternal serum PAPP-A and free ßhCG levels, ischaemia modified albumin (IMA may be associated with pre-eclampsia.

  20. The hypertension of Cushing's syndrome: controversies in the pathophysiology and focus on cardiovascular complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isidori, Andrea M.; Graziadio, Chiara; Paragliola, Rosa Maria; Cozzolino, Alessia; Ambrogio, Alberto G.; Colao, Annamaria; Corsello, Salvatore M.; Pivonello, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    Cushing's syndrome is associated with increased mortality, mainly due to cardiovascular complications, which are sustained by the common development of systemic arterial hypertension and metabolic syndrome, which partially persist after the disease remission. Cardiovascular diseases and hypertension associated with endogenous hypercortisolism reveal underexplored peculiarities. The use of exogenous corticosteroids also impacts on hypertension and cardiovascular system, especially after prolonged treatment. The mechanisms involved in the development of hypertension differ, whether glucocorticoid excess is acute or chronic, and the source endogenous or exogenous, introducing inconsistencies among published studies. The pleiotropic effects of glucocorticoids and the overlap of the several regulatory mechanisms controlling blood pressure suggest that a rigorous comparison of in-vivo and in-vitro studies is necessary to draw reliable conclusions. This review, developed during the first ‘Altogether to Beat Cushing's syndrome’ workshop held in Capri in 2012, evaluates the most important peculiarities of hypertension associated with CS, with a particular focus on its pathophysiology. A critical appraisal of most significant animal and human studies is compared with a systematic review of the few available clinical trials. A special attention is dedicated to the description of the clinical features and cardiovascular damage secondary to glucocorticoid excess. On the basis of the consensus reached during the workshop, a pathophysiology-oriented therapeutic algorithm has been developed and it could serve as a first attempt to rationalize the treatment of hypertension in Cushing's syndrome. PMID:25415766

  1. Pathophysiology of GPCR Homo- and Heterodimerization: Special Emphasis on Somatostatin Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rishi K. Somvanshi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs are cell surface proteins responsible for translating >80% of extracellular reception to intracellular signals. The extracellular information in the form of neurotransmitters, peptides, ions, odorants etc is converted to intracellular signals via a wide variety of effector molecules activating distinct downstream signaling pathways. All GPCRs share common structural features including an extracellular N-terminal, seven-transmembrane domains (TMs linked by extracellular/intracellular loops and the C-terminal tail. Recent studies have shown that most GPCRs function as dimers (homo- and/or heterodimers or even higher order of oligomers. Protein-protein interaction among GPCRs and other receptor proteins play a critical role in the modulation of receptor pharmacology and functions. Although ~50% of the current drugs available in the market target GPCRs, still many GPCRs remain unexplored as potential therapeutic targets, opening immense possibility to discover the role of GPCRs in pathophysiological conditions. This review explores the existing information and future possibilities of GPCRs as tools in clinical pharmacology and is specifically focused for the role of somatostatin receptors (SSTRs in pathophysiology of diseases and as the potential candidate for drug discovery.

  2. Pathophysiological appraisal of a rat model of total hepatic ischemia with an extracorporeal portosystemic shunt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, S; Nakamura, S; Sakaguchi, T; Mitsuoka, H; Tsuchiya, Y; Kojima, Y; Konno, H; Baba, S

    1998-11-01

    Animal models of total hepatic ischemia (THI) and reperfusion injury are restricted by concomitant splanchnic congestion. This study was performed to determine the requirement suitable for an extracorporeal portosystemic shunt (PSS) to maintain the intestinal integrity in a rat model of THI. Using a polyethylene tube (0.86 or 1 mm i.d.), PSS was placed between the mesenteric and jugular veins. Comparison was done between THI models with or without PSS and a partial ischemia model with hepatectomy of the nonischemic lobes. Well-tolerated hepatic ischemic period, portal pressure after 10 min of hepatic ischemia, portal endotoxin levels at 1 h after reperfusion, histological features of the small bowel just before reperfusion, and local jejunal and ileal blood hemoglobin oxygen saturation index (ISO2) were compared among the models. Animals without PSS poorly tolerated 30 min of THI. Animals receiving THI with PSS or partial hepatic ischemia tolerated a longer ischemic period (60 min) with a significantly higher small bowel ISO2, lower portal pressure and endotoxin levels (P tube as well as partial hepatic ischemia were significantly lower than those after THI with PSS using a 0.86-mm i.d. tube. THI with PSS using a 1-mm i.d. tube was strikingly similar to partial hepatic ischemia in the pathophysiological profile during hepatic ischemia. PSS with a tube 1 mm or more in inner diameter offers pathophysiological advantages in experiments on THI and reperfusion. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  3. Pathophysiological significance and therapeutic applications of snake venom protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Rupamoni; Mukherjee, Ashis K

    2017-06-01

    Protease inhibitors are important constituents of snake venom and play important roles in the pathophysiology of snakebite. Recently, research on snake venom protease inhibitors has provided valuable information to decipher the molecular details of various biological processes and offer insight for the development of some therapeutically important molecules from snake venom. The process of blood coagulation and fibrinolysis, in addition to affecting platelet function, are well known as the major targets of several snake venom protease inhibitors. This review summarizes the structure-functional aspects of snake venom protease inhibitors that have been described to date. Because diverse biological functions have been demonstrated by protease inhibitors, a comparative overview of their pharmacological and pathophysiological properties is also highlighted. In addition, since most snake venom protease inhibitors are non-toxic on their own, this review evaluates the different roles of individual protease inhibitors that could lead to the identification of drug candidates and diagnostic molecules. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Pathophysiological relationships between heart failure and depression and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapa, Deborah W; Akintade, Bimbola; Son, Heesook; Woltz, Patricia; Hunt, Dennis; Friedmann, Erika; Hartung, Mary Kay; Thomas, Sue Ann

    2014-04-01

    Depression and anxiety are common comorbid conditions in patients with heart failure. Patients with heart failure and depression have increased mortality. The association of anxiety with increased mortality in patients with heart failure is not established. The purpose of this article is to illustrate the similarities of the underlying pathophysiology of heart failure, depression, and anxiety by using the Biopsychosocial Holistic Model of Cardiovascular Health. Depression and anxiety affect biological processes of cardiovascular function in patients with heart failure by altering neurohormonal function via activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, autonomic dysregulation, and activation of cytokine cascades and platelets. Patients with heart failure and depression or anxiety may exhibit a continued cycle of heart failure progression, increased depression, and increased anxiety. Understanding the underlying pathophysiological relationships in patients with heart failure who experience comorbid depression and/or anxiety is critical in order to implement appropriate treatments, educate patients and caregivers, and educate other health professionals.

  5. Modern iron replacement therapy: clinical and pathophysiological insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girelli, Domenico; Ugolini, Sara; Busti, Fabiana; Marchi, Giacomo; Castagna, Annalisa

    2018-01-01

    Iron deficiency, with or without anemia, is extremely frequent worldwide, representing a major public health problem. Iron replacement therapy dates back to the seventeenth century, and has progressed relatively slowly until recently. Both oral and intravenous traditional iron formulations are known to be far from ideal, mainly because of tolerability and safety issues, respectively. At the beginning of this century, the discovery of hepcidin/ferroportin axis has represented a turning point in the knowledge of the pathophysiology of iron metabolism disorders, ushering a new era. In the meantime, advances in the pharmaceutical technologies are producing newer iron formulations aimed at minimizing the problems inherent with traditional approaches. The pharmacokinetic of oral and parenteral iron is substantially different, and diversities have become even clearer in light of the hepcidin master role in regulating systemic iron homeostasis. Here we review how iron therapy is changing because of such important advances in both pathophysiology and pharmacology.

  6. Different Pathophysiological Phenotypes among Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stidsen, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) can be considered a syndrome with several different pathophysiological mechanisms leading to hyperglycemia. Nonetheless, T2D is treated according to algorithms as if it was one disease entity. Methods: We investigated the prevalence of different pathophysiological phenotypes...... or secondary diabetes), classic obesity-associated insulin resistant diabetes ( f-P-C-peptide >= 568 pmol/l) and a normoinsulinopenic group (333 age of our new T2D patients was 61 years (range 21-95 years), 57% were men. We found that 3.0% newly diagnosed T2D patients...... suffered from LADA, 3.9% from secondary diabetes, 6.0% from steroid induced diabetes 5.9% had insulinopenic diabetes, whereas 56.7% presented the classic obesity-associated insulin-resistant phenotype. 24.6% was classified as normoinsulinopenic patients. Conclusion: We conclude that newly diagnosed T2D...

  7. Pathophysiological analyses of leptomeningeal heterotopia using gyrencephalic mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Naoyuki; Kobayashi, Naoki; Uda, Natsu; Hirota, Miwako; Kawasaki, Hiroshi

    2018-03-15

    Leptomeningeal glioneuronal heterotopia (LGH) is a focal malformation of the cerebral cortex and frequently found in patients with thanatophoric dysplasia (TD). The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying LGH formation are still largely unclear because of difficulties in obtaining brain samples from human TD patients. Recently, we established a new animal model for analysing cortical malformations of human TD by utilizing our genetic manipulation technique for gyrencephalic carnivore ferrets. Here we investigated the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the formation of LGH using our TD ferrets. We found that LGH was formed during corticogenesis in TD ferrets. Interestingly, we rarely found Ki-67-positive and phospho-histone H3-positive cells in LGH, suggesting that LGH formation does not involve cell proliferation. We uncovered that vimentin-positive radial glial fibers and doublecortin-positive migrating neurons were accumulated in LGH. This result may indicate that preferential cell migration into LGH underlies LGH formation. Our findings provide novel mechanistic insights into the pathogenesis of LGH in TD.

  8. The pathophysiology of arterial vasodilatation and hyperdynamic circulation in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Bendtsen, Flemming

    2018-01-01

    transplantation and point to the pathophysiological significance of portal hypertension. In this paper we aimed to review current knowledge on the pathophysiology of arterial vasodilatation and the hyperdynamic circulation in cirrhosis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.......Patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension often develop complications from a variety of organ systems leading to a multiple organ failure. The combination of liver failure and portal hypertension result in a hyperdynamic circulatory state partly owing to simultaneous splanchnic and peripheral...... arterial vasodilatation. Increases in circulatory vasodilators are believed to be due to portosystemic shunting and bacterial translocation leading to redistribution of the blood volume with central hypovolemia. Portal hypertension per se and increased splanchnic blood flow are mainly responsible...

  9. Hypertension in women--pathophysiological and clinical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdine, Serap; Arslan, Eren; Olszanecka, Agnieszka

    2012-01-01

    Hypertension is the most important risk factor, responsible for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality worldwide, both in men and women. Cardiovascular disorders in women are still underestimated, due to lower absolute risk calculations and the underdetection of classical risk factors. In recent years the differences in pathophysiology and the clinical presentation and treatment of cardiac diseases in women have become fields of interest and research. Several studies have examined gender-related differences in the pathophysiology of hypertension, its prevalence and control. The influence of menopause, obesity and salt-sensitivity on the pathogenesis of hypertension in women has been widely investigated. This article presents current data on differences in prevalence, control and mechanisms of hypertension in women.

  10. Gender Differences in Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, and Treatment of Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giosia, Paolo; Giorgini, Paolo; Stamerra, Cosimo Andrea; Petrarca, Marco; Ferri, Claudio; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2018-02-14

    This review aims to examine gender differences in both the epidemiology and pathophysiology of hypertension and to explore gender peculiarities on the effects of antihypertensive agents in decreasing BP and CV events. Men and women differ in prevalence, awareness, and control rate of hypertension in an age-dependent manner. Studies suggest that sex hormones changes play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of hypertension in postmenopausal women. Estrogens influence the vascular system inducing vasodilatation, inhibiting vascular remodeling processes, and modulating the renin-angiotensin aldosterone system and the sympathetic system. This leads to a protective effect on arterial stiffness during reproductive age that is dramatically reversed after menopause. Data on the efficacy of antihypertensive therapy between genders are conflicting, and the underrepresentation of aged women in large clinical trials could influence the results. Therefore, further clinical research is needed to uncover potential gender differences in hypertension to promote the development of a gender-oriented approach to antihypertensive treatment.

  11. Pathophysiology of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Venegas-Mariño

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS is a disease characterized by recurrent upper airway obstruction (UAO, with decreased airflow, intermittent hypoxemia, and awakening during sleep. Two essential factors are related to the pathophysiology of OSAHS: anatomical alterations and reduction or absence of neural control. While studying OSAHS, the site or sites of obstruction of the UA should be identified; they may extend from the nasal wings to the hypopharynx. Another important factor in this syndrome is the nervous influence on muscle tone of the hypopharynx, as well as the changes in blood pH, which are secondary to micro-arousals. Body position and sleep stage determine the severity. The pathophysiology of OSAHS should be understood to properly study a patient and provide the best treatment option.

  12. A mixed methods evaluation of team-based learning for applied pathophysiology in undergraduate nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branney, Jonathan; Priego-Hernández, Jacqueline

    2018-02-01

    It is important for nurses to have a thorough understanding of the biosciences such as pathophysiology that underpin nursing care. These courses include content that can be difficult to learn. Team-based learning is emerging as a strategy for enhancing learning in nurse education due to the promotion of individual learning as well as learning in teams. In this study we sought to evaluate the use of team-based learning in the teaching of applied pathophysiology to undergraduate student nurses. A mixed methods observational study. In a year two, undergraduate nursing applied pathophysiology module circulatory shock was taught using Team-based Learning while all remaining topics were taught using traditional lectures. After the Team-based Learning intervention the students were invited to complete the Team-based Learning Student Assessment Instrument, which measures accountability, preference and satisfaction with Team-based Learning. Students were also invited to focus group discussions to gain a more thorough understanding of their experience with Team-based Learning. Exam scores for answers to questions based on Team-based Learning-taught material were compared with those from lecture-taught material. Of the 197 students enrolled on the module, 167 (85% response rate) returned the instrument, the results from which indicated a favourable experience with Team-based Learning. Most students reported higher accountability (93%) and satisfaction (92%) with Team-based Learning. Lectures that promoted active learning were viewed as an important feature of the university experience which may explain the 76% exhibiting a preference for Team-based Learning. Most students wanted to make a meaningful contribution so as not to let down their team and they saw a clear relevance between the Team-based Learning activities and their own experiences of teamwork in clinical practice. Exam scores on the question related to Team-based Learning-taught material were comparable to those

  13. Migraine aura pathophysiology: the role of blood vessels and microembolisation

    OpenAIRE

    Dalkara, Turgay; Nozari, Ala; Moskowitz, Michael A

    2010-01-01

    Migraine attacks with auras are sometimes associated with underlying hereditary or acquired cerebrovascular disorders. A unifying pathophysiological explanation linking migraine to these conditions has been diffcult to identify. On the basis of genetic and epidemiological evidence, we suggest that changes in blood vessels, hypoperfusion disorders, and microembolisation can cause neurovascular dysfunction and evoke cortical spreading depression, an event that is widely thought to underlie aura...

  14. Pathophysiology of pelvic organ prolapse and stress urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payal D Patel

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Although they may present with significant morbidity, pelvic organ prolapse and stress urinary incontinence are mainly afflicitions that affect quality of life. To appropiately treat these entities, comprehension of the various theories of pathophysiology is paramount. Utilizing a Medline search, this article reviews recent data concerning intrinsic (i.e., genetics, postmenopausal status and extrinsic factors (i.e., previous hysterectomy, childbirth leading to organ prolapse or stress incontinence

  15. Pathophysiology of Headaches with a Prominent Vascular Component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A Pareja

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular changes, whether preliminary or secondary, seem to accompany most headaches. The literature concerning pathophysiological mechanisms in headaches where vascular phenomena are a major, integral part, ie, migraine and cluster headache syndrome, is reviewed and the most common forms of headache associated with cerebrovascular disease are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the vascular phenomena and on the abundant hypotheses and theories regarding headache mechanisms. This review also presents alternative explanatory models, and compares the available anatomical, physiological and biochemical results.

  16. Pancreatitis in dogs and cats – definitions and pathophysiology

    OpenAIRE

    Watson, Penelope Jayne

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatitis, or inflammation of the pancreas, is commonly seen in dogs and cats and presents a spectrum of disease severities from acute to chronic and mild to severe. It is usually sterile, but the causes and pathophysiology remain poorly understood. The acute end of the disease spectrum is associated with a high mortality but the potential for complete recovery of organ structure and function if the animal survives. At the other end of the spectrum, chronic pancreatitis in either species c...

  17. Blended Learning Versus Traditional Lecture in Introductory Nursing Pathophysiology Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blissitt, Andrea Marie

    2016-04-01

    Currently, many undergraduate nursing courses use blended-learning course formats with success; however, little evidence exists that supports the use of blended formats in introductory pathophysiology courses. The purpose of this study was to compare the scores on pre- and posttests and course satisfaction between traditional and blended course formats in an introductory nursing pathophysiology course. This study used a quantitative, quasi-experimental, nonrandomized control group, pretest-posttest design. Analysis of covariance compared pre- and posttest scores, and a t test for independent samples compared students' reported course satisfaction of the traditional and blended course formats. Results indicated that the differences in posttest scores were not statistically significant between groups. Students in the traditional group reported statistically significantly higher satisfaction ratings than students in the blended group. The results of this study support the need for further research of using blended learning in introductory pathophysiology courses in undergraduate baccalaureate nursing programs. Further investigation into how satisfaction is affected by course formats is needed. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Pathophysiological analyses of periventricular nodular heterotopia using gyrencephalic mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Naoyuki; Hoshiba, Yoshio; Morita, Kazuya; Uda, Natsu; Hirota, Miwako; Minamikawa, Maki; Ebisu, Haruka; Shinmyo, Yohei; Kawasaki, Hiroshi

    2017-03-15

    Although periventricular nodular heterotopia (PNH) is often found in the cerebral cortex of people with thanatophoric dysplasia (TD), the pathophysiology of PNH in TD is largely unknown. This is mainly because of difficulties in obtaining brain samples of TD patients and a lack of appropriate animal models for analyzing the pathophysiology of PNH in TD. Here we investigate the pathophysiological mechanisms of PNH in the cerebral cortex of TD by utilizing a ferret TD model which we recently developed. To make TD ferrets, we electroporated fibroblast growth factor 8 (FGF8) into the cerebral cortex of ferrets. Our immunohistochemical analyses showed that PNH nodules in the cerebral cortex of TD ferrets were mostly composed of cortical neurons, including upper layer neurons and GABAergic neurons. We also found disorganizations of radial glial fibers and of the ventricular lining in the TD ferret cortex, indicating that PNH may result from defects in radial migration of cortical neurons along radial glial fibers during development. Our findings provide novel mechanistic insights into the pathogenesis of PNH in TD. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Tics and Tourette's: update on pathophysiology and tic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganos, Christos

    2016-08-01

    To describe recent advances in the pathophysiology of tics and Tourette syndrome, and novel insights on tic control. The cortico-basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical loops are implicated in generation of tics. Disruption of GABAergic inhibition lies at the core of tic pathophysiology, but novel animal models also implicate cholinergic and histaminergic neurotransmission. Tourette syndrome patients have altered awareness of volition and enhanced formation of habits. Premonitory urges are not the driving force behind all tics. The intensity of premonitory urges depends on patients' capacity to perceive interoceptive signals. The insular cortex is a key structure in this process. The trait intensity of premonitory urges is not a prerequisite of voluntary tic inhibition, a distinct form of motor control. Voluntary tic inhibition is most efficient in the body parts that tic the least. The prefrontal cortex is associated with the capacity to inhibit tics. The management of tics includes behavioral, pharmacological and surgical interventions. Treatment recommendations differ based on patients' age. The study of Tourette syndrome pathophysiology involves different neural disciplines and provides novel, exciting insights of brain function in health and disease. These in turn provide the basis for innovative treatment approaches of tics and their associations.

  20. Central voice production and pathophysiology of spasmodic dysphonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mor, Niv; Simonyan, Kristina; Blitzer, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    Our ability to speak is complex, and the role of the central nervous system in controlling speech production is often overlooked in the field of otolaryngology. In this brief review, we present an integrated overview of speech production with a focus on the role of central nervous system. The role of central control of voice production is then further discussed in relation to the potential pathophysiology of spasmodic dysphonia (SD). Peer-review articles on central laryngeal control and SD were identified from PUBMED search. Selected articles were augmented with designated relevant publications. Publications that discussed central and peripheral nervous system control of voice production and the central pathophysiology of laryngeal dystonia were chosen. Our ability to speak is regulated by specialized complex mechanisms coordinated by high-level cortical signaling, brainstem reflexes, peripheral nerves, muscles, and mucosal actions. Recent studies suggest that SD results from a primary central disturbance associated with dysfunction at our highest levels of central voice control. The efficacy of botulinum toxin in treating SD may not be limited solely to its local effect on laryngeal muscles and also may modulate the disorder at the level of the central nervous system. Future therapeutic options that target the central nervous system may help modulate the underlying disorder in SD and allow clinicians to better understand the principal pathophysiology. NA.Laryngoscope, 128:177-183, 2018. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  1. Acute Kidney Injury: Definition, Pathophysiology and Clinical Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makris, Konstantinos; Spanou, Loukia

    2016-05-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a clinical syndrome that complicates the course and worsens the outcome in a significant number of hospitalised patients. Recent advances in clinical and basic research will help with a more accurate definition of this syndrome and in the elucidation of its pathogenesis. With this knowledge we will be able to conduct more accurate epidemiologic studies in an effort to gain a better understanding of the impact of this syndrome. AKI is a syndrome that rarely has a sole and distinct pathophysiology. Recent evidence, in both basic science and clinical research, is beginning to change our view for AKI from a single organ failure syndrome to a syndrome where the kidney plays an active role in the progress of multi-organ dysfunction. Accurate and prompt recognition of AKI and better understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the various clinical phenotypes are of great importance to research for effective therapeutic interventions. In this review we provide the most recent updates in the definition, epidemiology and pathophysiology of AKI.

  2. Pancreatitis in dogs and cats: definitions and pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, P

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatitis, or inflammation of the pancreas, is commonly seen in dogs and cats and presents a spectrum of disease severities from acute to chronic and mild to severe. It is usually sterile, but the causes and pathophysiology remain poorly understood. The acute end of the disease spectrum is associated with a high mortality but the potential for complete recovery of organ structure and function if the animal survives. At the other end of the spectrum, chronic pancreatitis in either species can cause refractory pain and reduce quality of life. It may also result in progressive exocrine and endocrine functional impairment. There is confusion in the veterinary literature about definitions of acute and chronic pancreatitis and there are very few studies on the pathophysiology of naturally occurring pancreatitis in dogs and cats. This article reviews histological and clinical definitions and current understanding of the pathophysiology and causes in small animals by comparison with the much more extensive literature in humans, and suggests many areas that need further study in dogs and cats. © 2015 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  3. Clinical Presentation and Diagnosis of Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinik, Aaron I; Chaya, Celine

    2016-02-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are slow-growing neoplasms capable of storing and secreting different peptides and neuroamines. Some of these substances cause specific symptom complexes, whereas others are silent. They usually have episodic expression, and the diagnosis is often made at a late stage. Although considered rare, the incidence of NETs is increasing. For these reasons, a high index of suspicion is needed. In this article, the different clinical syndromes and the pathophysiology of each tumor as well as the new and emerging biochemical markers and imaging techniques that should be used to facilitate an early diagnosis, follow-up, and prognosis are reviewed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Anthrax: Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diagnosis Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Doctors in the United States rarely see a patient with anthrax. CDC Guidance and case definitions are available to help doctors diagnose anthrax, take ...

  5. The physiology of deglutition and the pathophysiology and complications of oropharyngeal dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Catriona M

    2012-01-01

    The opening session of the 2nd International Conference on Oropharyngeal Dysphagia featured a series of invited talks reviewing the definition of dysphagia, its prevalence and its pathophysiology. The discussion arising from these talks focused heavily on the current underrecognition of dysphagia as a significant concern for older adults, particularly those over 75. The burdens associated with dysphagia in this sector of the population were recognized to be substantial, both in social/psychological terms and in terms of economic consequences for the healthcare system. The importance of developing swallow screening protocols as a routine method for the early identification of dysphagia and aspiration was explored. The idea of launching political initiatives aimed at increasing awareness and the utilization of appropriate dysphagia healthcare codes was also discussed. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Morel-Lavallee Lesions-Review of Pathophysiology, Clinical Findings, Imaging Findings and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diviti, Sreelatha; Gupta, Nishant; Hooda, Kusum; Sharma, Komal; Lo, Lawrence

    2017-04-01

    Morel-Lavallee lesion is a post-traumatic soft tissue degloving injury. This is commonly associated with sports injury caused by a shearing force resulting in separation of the hypodermis from the deeper fascia. Most common at the greater trochanter, these injuries also occur at flank, buttock, lumbar spine, scapula and the knee. Separation of the tissue planes result in a complex serosanguinous fluid collection with areas of fat within it. The imaging appearance is variable and non specific, potentially mimicking simple soft tissue haematoma, superficial bursitis or necrotic soft tissue neoplasms. If not treated in the acute or early sub acute settings, these collections are at risk for superinfection, overlying tissue necrosis and continued expansion. In this review article, we discuss the clinical presentation, pathophysiology, imaging features and differential diagnostic considerations of Morel-Lavallee lesions. Role of imaging in guiding prompt and appropriate treatment has also been discussed.

  7. Radiological diagnosis and differential diagnosis of headache

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langner, S.; Kirsch, M.

    2015-01-01

    Headache is very common and affects almost everyone at some point. It is one of the most common disorders that leads patients to see their physician. All different forms have the nociception via trigeminal nerve fibers in common. Beside the clinical course headaches are classified as either primary or secondary, with the latter having an identifiable structural or biochemical cause. Imaging has a low diagnostic yield in primary headache but play an important role in the differential diagnosis of secondary forms. An overview of different forms of secondary headache is given, outlining diagnostic procedures and the morphologic imaging features of each syndrome.

  8. Urinary Tract Infections in Pregnancy - Diagnosis, Treatment and Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Figueiredo, A; Gomes, G; Campos, A

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Literature review of classification, epidemiology, pathophysiology, microbiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, complications, treatment and prevention of urinary tract infections (UTI) in pregnancy. Data Sources and Review Methods: Bibliographic research in Medline, through PubMed and Medscape, of systematic reviews, observational studies, clinical guidelines, meta-analyses and randomized controlled trials published between January 1992 and December 2010. Results: Asymp...

  9. Diagnosis and management of feline hyperthyroidism: current perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Grauer, Gregory F; Schermerhorn,Thomas; Armbrust,Laura; Vaske,Heather

    2014-01-01

    Heather H Vaske, Thomas Schermerhorn, Laura Armbrust, Gregory F Grauer Department of Clinical Sciences, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, USA Abstract: Previous and ongoing research has provided insights to the pathophysiology and diagnosis of hyperthyroidism as well as new treatment modalities. This paper reviews the etiology, clinical presentation, and clinicopathologic changes associated with hyperthyroidism, and provides a thorough explanation of confirmatory testing and treatment ...

  10. DMPD: Pathophysiological roles of interleukin-18 in inflammatory liver diseases. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 10807517 Pathophysiological roles of interleukin-18 in inflammatory liver diseases....l) Show Pathophysiological roles of interleukin-18 in inflammatory liver diseases. PubmedID 10807517 Title P...athophysiological roles of interleukin-18 in inflammatory liver diseases. Authors

  11. Features of Diphtheria in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.K. Koloskova

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The lecture describes the etiology, epidemiology, classification and clinical features of diphtheria in children, taking into account various sites, covers the issues of diagnosis. Treatment for diphtheria in children is carried as per the order of Ministry of Healthcare of Ukraine № 354 dated July 9, 2004 in accordance with the form and severity of the disease.

  12. Fault diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Kathy

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the research in this area of fault management is to develop and implement a decision aiding concept for diagnosing faults, especially faults which are difficult for pilots to identify, and to develop methods for presenting the diagnosis information to the flight crew in a timely and comprehensible manner. The requirements for the diagnosis concept were identified by interviewing pilots, analyzing actual incident and accident cases, and examining psychology literature on how humans perform diagnosis. The diagnosis decision aiding concept developed based on those requirements takes abnormal sensor readings as input, as identified by a fault monitor. Based on these abnormal sensor readings, the diagnosis concept identifies the cause or source of the fault and all components affected by the fault. This concept was implemented for diagnosis of aircraft propulsion and hydraulic subsystems in a computer program called Draphys (Diagnostic Reasoning About Physical Systems). Draphys is unique in two important ways. First, it uses models of both functional and physical relationships in the subsystems. Using both models enables the diagnostic reasoning to identify the fault propagation as the faulted system continues to operate, and to diagnose physical damage. Draphys also reasons about behavior of the faulted system over time, to eliminate possibilities as more information becomes available, and to update the system status as more components are affected by the fault. The crew interface research is examining display issues associated with presenting diagnosis information to the flight crew. One study examined issues for presenting system status information. One lesson learned from that study was that pilots found fault situations to be more complex if they involved multiple subsystems. Another was pilots could identify the faulted systems more quickly if the system status was presented in pictorial or text format. Another study is currently under way to

  13. The control of independent students’ work effectiveness during pathophysiology study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. V. Melnikova

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The course of Pathophysiology study includes both auditoria hours (lectures and practical classes and independent work of students. The latter makes up 38% of total hours given for Pathophysiology study. Independent work of students includes the following items: preparation for practical classes, writing reviews on different topics, preparation for current and final computer testing, study of the topics which are not discussed during lectures and practical classes. In order to assimilate the course of Pathophysiology completely students should effectively use their hours given for independent work. Unfortunately, the level of students’ independent individual work is low; it includes only learning of single facts, that is not enough for higher medical education. THE AIM OF STUDY: To propose the method of control of the effectiveness of students’ independent work. The most important part of student’s individual work is preparation for study in auditoria, because it determines the qualitative level of study during practical classes. The student should enter the class not only with the knowledge of basic sciences (Anatomy, Histology, Biochemistry, Normal Physiology etc. but also with the understanding of key items of the topic of the practical class. The problem consists in the following: the teacher can’t check the level of basic knowledge in each student – there is not enough time during practical class for this procedure. In order to increase the effectiveness of individual students’ work a special workbook for the practical classes was developed at the Pathophysiology department. While preparing for practical classes students write down basic items of the topic, refresh some questions from Normal Physiology, Biochemistry and other subjects. In the beginning of the practical class the teacher controls the level of student’s preparation to the topic by checking the fulfillment of tasks in the workbook. It takes a little time, but it

  14. Adrenal Disorders and the Paediatric Brain: Pathophysiological Considerations and Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Salpietro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Various neurological and psychiatric manifestations have been recorded in children with adrenal disorders. Based on literature review and on personal case-studies and case-series we focused on the pathophysiological and clinical implications of glucocorticoid-related, mineralcorticoid-related, and catecholamine-related paediatric nervous system involvement. Childhood Cushing syndrome can be associated with long-lasting cognitive deficits and abnormal behaviour, even after resolution of the hypercortisolism. Exposure to excessive replacement of exogenous glucocorticoids in the paediatric age group (e.g., during treatments for adrenal insufficiency has been reported with neurological and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI abnormalities (e.g., delayed myelination and brain atrophy due to potential corticosteroid-related myelin damage in the developing brain and the possible impairment of limbic system ontogenesis. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH, a disorder of unclear pathophysiology characterised by increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF pressure, has been described in children with hypercortisolism, adrenal insufficiency, and hyperaldosteronism, reflecting the potential underlying involvement of the adrenal-brain axis in the regulation of CSF pressure homeostasis. Arterial hypertension caused by paediatric adenomas or tumours of the adrenal cortex or medulla has been associated with various hypertension-related neurological manifestations. The development and maturation of the central nervous system (CNS through childhood is tightly regulated by intrinsic, paracrine, endocrine, and external modulators, and perturbations in any of these factors, including those related to adrenal hormone imbalance, could result in consequences that affect the structure and function of the paediatric brain. Animal experiments and clinical studies demonstrated that the developing (i.e., paediatric CNS seems to be particularly vulnerable to alterations induced by

  15. Advanced MR diagnostic imaging in pediatric glial cell tumors: from morphological to pathophysiological evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balev, B.; Georgiev, R.; Novakova, M.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: The conventional MR imaging is important, and in most cases necessary imaging tool for studying the macroscopic structure, for localization and distribution of a glial brain tumor. It is an integral part of the optimal MR protocol, which further comprises a diffusion, perfusion techniques, techniques for the permeability and oxygenation assessment, as well as MR spectroscopy to the metabolism assessment. What you will learn: Glial brain tumors in children - incidence, histology, classification, diagnosis; Nature and principles of MR diffusion, perfusion, techniques for permeability and oxygenation assessment, MR spectroscopy; Contemporary techniques allowing to obtain not only MR morphological information but also to evaluate the tumor the pathophysiology: the cellular atypia, cellularity, tumor neovascularization, oxygen consumption, metabolism, status of the blood-brain barrier. This assessment determines the biological potential of the tumor, treatment options and prognosis. Discussion: The findings from conventional MR examinations, incl. administration of gadolinium contrast agents are associated with the degree of glioma and can be useful for their classification. Taking into account that from 20% to 45 % of the unenhanced supratentorial gliomas are malignant, some low-grade gliomas enhance (ganglioglioma, pilocytic astrocytoma, oligodendroglioma), 9% of malignant gliomas have no contrast enhancement, and in general, the contrast enhancement is not seen as a reliable indicator for the infiltration extent. The contemporary MR techniques improve the assessment of the pathophysiology of the tumor which is relevant to its histology and biological potential. Conclusion: Modern MR techniques besides purely diagnostic advantages (determine the extent and distribution of glioma), enable: differentiation of tumor recurrence from radiation necrosis; identification of optimal locations for biopsy or operative resection; prognosis, planning and

  16. Stable coronary syndromes: pathophysiology, diagnostic advances and therapeutic need

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, David

    2018-01-01

    The diagnostic management of patients with angina pectoris typically centres on the detection of obstructive epicardial CAD, which aligns with evidence-based treatment options that include medical therapy and myocardial revascularisation. This clinical paradigm fails to account for the considerable proportion (approximately one-third) of patients with angina in whom obstructive CAD is excluded. This common scenario presents a diagnostic conundrum whereby angina occurs but there is no obstructive CAD (ischaemia and no obstructive coronary artery disease—INOCA). We review new insights into the pathophysiology of angina whereby myocardial ischaemia results from a deficient supply of oxygenated blood to the myocardium, due to various combinations of focal or diffuse epicardial disease (macrovascular), microvascular dysfunction or both. Macrovascular disease may be due to the presence of obstructive CAD secondary to atherosclerosis, or may be dynamic due to a functional disorder (eg, coronary artery spasm, myocardial bridging). Pathophysiology of coronary microvascular disease may involve anatomical abnormalities resulting in increased coronary resistance, or functional abnormalities resulting in abnormal vasomotor tone. We consider novel clinical diagnostic techniques enabling new insights into the causes of angina and appraise the need for improved therapeutic options for patients with INOCA. We conclude that the taxonomy of stable CAD could improve to better reflect the heterogeneous pathophysiology of the coronary circulation. We propose the term ‘stable coronary syndromes’ (SCS), which aligns with the well-established terminology for ‘acute coronary syndromes’. SCS subtends a clinically relevant classification that more fully encompasses the different diseases of the epicardial and microvascular coronary circulation. PMID:29030424

  17. Featuring animacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Ritter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Algonquian languages are famous for their animacy-based grammatical properties—an animacy based noun classification system and direct/inverse system which gives rise to animacy hierarchy effects in the determination of verb agreement. In this paper I provide new evidence for the proposal that the distinctive properties of these languages is due to the use of participant-based features, rather than spatio-temporal ones, for both nominal and verbal functional categories (Ritter & Wiltschko 2009, 2014. Building on Wiltschko (2012, I develop a formal treatment of the Blackfoot aspectual system that assumes a category Inner Aspect (cf. MacDonald 2008, Travis 1991, 2010. Focusing on lexical aspect in Blackfoot, I demonstrate that the classification of both nouns (Seinsarten and verbs (Aktionsarten is based on animacy, rather than boundedness, resulting in a strikingly different aspectual system for both categories. 

  18. Presence of multiple spondyloarthritis (SpA) features is important but not sufficient for a diagnosis of axial spondyloarthritis: data from the SPondyloArthritis Caught Early (SPACE) cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ez-Zaitouni, Z.; Bakker, P. A. C.; van Lunteren, M.; Berg, I. J.; Landewe, R.; van Oosterhout, M.; Lorenzin, M.; van der Heijde, D.; van Gaalen, F. A.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Concerns have been raised about overdiagnosis of axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA). We investigated whether patients with chronic back pain (CBP) of short duration and multiple SpA features are always diagnosed with axSpA by the rheumatologist, and to what extent fulfilment of the

  19. Prenatal Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozge Ozalp Yuregir

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Prenatal diagnosis is the process of determining the health or disease status of the fetus or embryo before birth. The purpose is early detection of diseases and early intervention when required. Prenatal genetic tests comprise of cytogenetic (chromosome assessment and molecular (DNA mutation analysis tests. Prenatal testing enables the early diagnosis of many diseases in risky pregnancies. Furthermore, in the event of a disease, diagnosing prenatally will facilitate the planning of necessary precautions and treatments, both before and after birth. Upon prenatal diagnosis of some diseases, termination of the pregnancy could be possible according to the family's wishes and within the legal frameworks. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2012; 21(1.000: 80-94

  20. Bone pain induced by metastatic cancer: pathophysiology and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salas-Herrera, Isaias; Huertas-Gabert, Luis Carlos

    2004-01-01

    Cancer patients who develop bone metastases are an estimated 60 to 84% . Of these 79% experienced pain syndromes are difficult to manage, of which 50% die without adequate pain relief and with a poor quality of life. Therefore, it is necessary to have accessible and effective medications for the management of this condition. The pathophysiology of pain in bone is reviewed and the drugs used most frequently in the management of this type of cancer pain are described. Furthermore an algorithm of 6 steps is presented and can guide the physician when making a therapeutic decision. (author) [es

  1. Pathophysiology of Portal Hypertension and Its Clinical Links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yeon Seok; Shah, Vijay H

    2011-01-01

    Portal hypertension is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with liver cirrhosis. Intrahepatic vascular resistance due to architectural distortion and intrahepatic vasoconstriction, increased portal blood flow due to splanchnic vasodilatation, and development of collateral circulation have been considered as major factors for the development of portal hypertension. Recently, sinusoidal remodeling and angiogenesis have been focused as potential etiologic factors and various researchers have tried to improve portal hypertension by modulating these new targets. This article reviews potential new treatments in the context of portal hypertension pathophysiology concepts. PMID:25755320

  2. The pathophysiology of the nodular and micronodular small bowel fold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olmsted, W.W.; Ros, P.R.; Moser, R.P.; Shekita, K.M.; Lichtenstein, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    The normal small bowel fold is easily seen on conventional studies of the small intestine, but visualization of the small bowel villus is at the limit of resolution of current roentgenographic technique. When the villi are enlarged, they appear radiographically as an irregularity or micronodularity of the small bowel fold. The anatomy of the fold and the pathophysiology of diseases producing fold nodularity (tumor,inflammatory disease, NLH, mastocytosis) and micronodularity (lymphangiectasia, Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia, Whipple disease) are presented, with an emphasis on radiologic-pathologic correlation. The radiologist should suggest certain diseases or conditions based on the roentgenographic characteristics of the closely analyzed small bowel fold

  3. Pathophysiology of the nodular and micronodular small bowel fold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olmstead, W.W.; Ros, P.R.; Moser, R.P.; Shekitka, K.M.; Lichtenstein, J.E.; Buck, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    The normal small bowel fold is easily seen on conventional studies of the small intestine, but visualization of the small bowel villus is just at the resolution of current roentgenographic technique. When the villi are enlarged, they can be seen radiographically as an irregularity or micronodularity of the small bowel fold. The anatomy of the fold and the pathophysiology of diseases producing fold nodularity (tumor, inflammatory disease, NLH, mastocytosis) and micronodularity (lymphangiectasia, Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia, Whipple disease) are presented, with an emphasis on radiologic-pathologic correlation. The radiologist should suggest certain diseases or conditions based on the roentgenographic characteristics of the closely analyzed small bowel fold

  4. Obesity and Pulmonary Hypertension: A Review of Pathophysiologic Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott E. Friedman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hypertension (PH is a potentially life-threatening condition arising from a wide variety of pathophysiologic mechanisms. Effective treatment requires a systematic diagnostic approach to identify all reversible mechanisms. Many of these mechanisms are relevant to those afflicted with obesity. The unique mechanisms of PH in the obese include obstructive sleep apnea, obesity hypoventilation syndrome, anorexigen use, cardiomyopathy of obesity, and pulmonary thromboembolic disease. Novel mechanisms of PH in the obese include endothelial dysfunction and hyperuricemia. A wide range of effective therapies exist to mitigate the disability of PH in the obese.

  5. The Sphenopalatine Ganglion: Anatomy, Pathophysiology, and Therapeutic Targeting in Headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Matthew S; Robertson, Carrie E; Kaplan, Eugene; Ailani, Jessica; Charleston, Larry; Kuruvilla, Deena; Blumenfeld, Andrew; Berliner, Randall; Rosen, Noah L; Duarte, Robert; Vidwan, Jaskiran; Halker, Rashmi B; Gill, Nicole; Ashkenazi, Avi

    2016-02-01

    The sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) has attracted the interest of practitioners treating head and face pain for over a century because of its anatomical connections and role in the trigemino-autonomic reflex. In this review, we discuss the anatomy of the SPG, as well as what is known about its role in the pathophysiology of headache disorders, including cluster headache and migraine. We then address various therapies that target the SPG, including intranasal medication delivery, new SPG blocking catheter devices, neurostimulation, chemical neurolysis, and ablation procedures. © 2015 American Headache Society.

  6. Oral submucous fibrosis: An update on pathophysiology of malignant transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakeri, Gururaj; Patil, Shekar Gowda; Aljabab, Abdulsalam S; Lin, Kuan-Chou; Merkx, M A W; Gao, Shan; Brennan, Peter A

    2017-07-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) is a potentially malignant condition associated with areca nut chewing. Formerly confined to the Indian subcontinent, it is now often seen in Asian populations of the United Kingdom, USA and other developed countries, and is therefore a serious problem for global health. What makes it more sinister is the malignant transformation rate, which has been reported to be around 7.6% over a 17-year period. In this concise article, we review the current trends in the pathophysiology of malignant transformation of OSMF. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Role of renal vascular potassium channels in physiology and pathophysiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsson, Max; Brasen, Jens Christian; Sorensen, Charlotte Mehlin

    2017-01-01

    The control of renal vascular tone is important for the regulation of salt and water balance, blood pressure and the protection against damaging elevated glomerular pressure. The K+ conductance is a major factor in the regulation of the membrane potential (Vm ) in vascular smooth muscle (VSMC...... the ambiguous in vitro and in vivo results. We discuss the role of single types of K+ channels and the integrated function of several classes. We also deal with the possible role of renal vascular K+ channels in the pathophysiology of hypertension, diabetes mellitus and sepsis. This article is protected...

  8. The pathophysiology of the trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias, with clinical implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barloese, Mads C J

    2018-01-01

    , it is obvious that this brainstem reflex is regulated by higher centers that seemingly play a pivotal role in the attacks and the wide range of other symptoms indicating a homeostatic disturbance. These symptoms, as well as a number of well-validated findings, implicate the hypothalamus in the pathophysiology....... over the course of the past 2-3 decades, novel therapies and technological advances have helped increase our knowledge of these clinical syndromes, and will likely continue to do so in the coming years as we witness the arrival of new drugs and neurostimulation options. In this review, the clinical...

  9. Pathophysiological Mechanisms of Laser Correction in Critical Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. L. Kozhura

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides the generalized results of studies dealing with the use of low-intensive laser irradiation in blood loss-induced critical conditions in an experiment and in patients with severe mechanical injury. In the light of recent data and the data available in the literature, the authors consider some pathophysiological mechanisms of action of laser radiation at all living matter organization levels: molecular, cellular, organ, and systemic. The feasibilities of laser correction of hemostastic disorders are defined in relation to the volume of blood loss and the functional state of compensatory systems. 

  10. CT Features of pseudo tumoral bronchopulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zidi, A.; Hantoux, S.; Mestiri, I.; Ben Miled-Mrad, K.

    2006-01-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis may at times simulate lung carcinoma on bronchoscopic examination or imaging studies. Diagnosis can be delayed and lead to surgical resection. Based on review of 25 cases, the different CT features are reviewed. (author)

  11. SARS - Diagnosis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SARS - Diagnosis. Mainly by exclusion of known causes of atypical pneumonia; * X ray Chest; * PCR on body fluids- primers defined by WHO centres available from website.-ve result does not exclude SARS. * Sequencing of amplicons; * Viral Cultures – demanding; * Antibody tests.

  12. Glutamate abnormalities in obsessive compulsive disorder: neurobiology, pathophysiology, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittenger, Christopher; Bloch, Michael H; Williams, Kyle

    2011-12-01

    Obsessive compulsive disorder is prevalent, disabling, incompletely understood, and often resistant to current therapies. Established treatments consist of specialized cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy with medications targeting serotonergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission. However, remission is rare, and more than a quarter of OCD sufferers receive little or no benefit from these approaches, even when they are optimally delivered. New insights into the disorder, and new treatment strategies, are urgently needed. Recent evidence suggests that the ubiquitous excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate is dysregulated in OCD, and that this dysregulation may contribute to the pathophysiology of the disorder. Here we review the current state of this evidence, including neuroimaging studies, genetics, neurochemical investigations, and insights from animal models. Finally, we review recent findings from small clinical trials of glutamate-modulating medications in treatment-refractory OCD. The precise role of glutamate dysregulation in OCD remains unclear, and we lack blinded, well-controlled studies demonstrating therapeutic benefit from glutamate-modulating agents. Nevertheless, the evidence supporting some important perturbation of glutamate in the disorder is increasingly strong. This new perspective on the pathophysiology of OCD, which complements the older focus on monoaminergic neurotransmission, constitutes an important focus of current research and a promising area for the ongoing development of new therapeutics. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Jaundice associated pruritis: a review of pathophysiology and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassari, Ramez; Koea, Jonathan B

    2015-02-07

    To review the underlying pathophysiology and currently available treatments for pruritis associated with jaundice. English language literature was reviewed using MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE and clinicaltrials.gov for papers and trails addressing the pathophysiology and potential treatments for pruritis associated with jaundice. Recent advances in the understanding of the peripheral anatomy of itch transmission have defined a histamine stimulated pathway and a cowhage stimulated pathway with sensation conveyed centrally via the contralateral spinothalamic tract. Centrally, cowhage and histamine stimulated neurons terminate widely within the thalamus and sensorimotor cortex. The causative factors for itch in jaundice have not been clarified although endogenous opioids, serotonin, steroid and lysophosphatidic acid all play a role. Current guidelines for the treatment of itching in jaundice recommend initial management with biliary drainage where possible and medical management with ursodeoxycholic acid, followed by cholestyramine, rifampicin, naltrexone and sertraline. Other than biliary drainage no single treatment has proved universally effective. Pruritis associated with jaundice is a common but poorly understood condition for which biliary drainage is the most effective therapy. Pharmacological therapy has advanced but remains variably effective.

  14. Pathophysiology of increased intestinal permeability in obstructive jaundice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assimakopoulos, Stelios F; Scopa, Chrisoula D; Vagianos, Constantine E

    2007-01-01

    Despite advances in preoperative evaluation and postoperative care, intervention, especially surgery, for relief of obstructive jaundice still carries high morbidity and mortality rates, mainly due to sepsis and renal dysfunction. The key event in the pathophysiology of obstructive jaundice-associated complications is endotoxemia of gut origin because of intestinal barrier failure. This breakage of the gut barrier in obstructive jaundice is multi-factorial, involving disruption of the immunologic, biological and mechanical barrier. Experimental and clinical studies have shown that obstructive jaundice results in increased intestinal permeability. The mechanisms implicated in this phenomenon remain unresolved, but growing research interest during the last decade has shed light in our knowledge in the field. This review summarizes the current concepts in the pathophysiology of obstructive jaundice-induced gut barrier dysfunction, analyzing pivotal factors, such as altered intestinal tight junctions expression, oxidative stress and imbalance of enterocyte proliferation and apoptosis. Clinicians handling patients with obstructive jaundice should not neglect protecting the intestinal barrier function before, during and after intervention for the relief of this condition, which may improve their patients’ outcome. PMID:18161914

  15. Concussion: the history of clinical and pathophysiological concepts and misconceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrory, P R; Berkovic, S F

    2001-12-26

    Concussion is a well-recognized clinical entity; however, its pathophysiologic basis remains a mystery. One unresolved issue is whether concussion is associated with lesser degrees of diffuse structural change seen in severe traumatic brain injury, or is the mechanism entirely caused by reversible functional changes. This issue is clouded not only by the lack of critical data, but also by confusion in terminology, even in contemporary literature. This confusion began in ancient times when no distinction was made between the transient effects of concussion and severe traumatic brain injury. The first clear separate recognition of concussion was made by the Persian physician, Rhazes, in the 10th century. Lanfrancus subsequently expanded this concept as brain "commotion" in the 13th century, although other Renaissance physicians continued to obscure this concept. By the 18th century, a variety of hypotheses for concussion had emerged. The 19th century discovery of petechial hemorrhagic lesions in severe traumatic brain injury led to these being posited as the basis of concussion, and a similar logic was used later to suggest diffuse axonal injury was responsible. The neuropathology and pathophysiology of concussion has important implications in neurology, sports medicine, medicolegal medicine, and in the understanding of consciousness. Fresh approaches to these questions are needed and modern research tools, including functional imaging and experimental studies of ion-channel function, could help elucidate this puzzle that has evolved over the past 3,000 years.

  16. SREBP-regulated lipid metabolism: convergent physiology - divergent pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimano, Hitoshi; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2017-12-01

    Cellular lipid metabolism and homeostasis are controlled by sterol regulatory-element binding proteins (SREBPs). In addition to performing canonical functions in the transcriptional regulation of genes involved in the biosynthesis and uptake of lipids, genome-wide system analyses have revealed that these versatile transcription factors act as important nodes of convergence and divergence within biological signalling networks. Thus, they are involved in myriad physiological and pathophysiological processes, highlighting the importance of lipid metabolism in biology. Changes in cell metabolism and growth are reciprocally linked through SREBPs. Anabolic and growth signalling pathways branch off and connect to multiple steps of SREBP activation and form complex regulatory networks. In addition, SREBPs are implicated in numerous pathogenic processes such as endoplasmic reticulum stress, inflammation, autophagy and apoptosis, and in this way, they contribute to obesity, dyslipidaemia, diabetes mellitus, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, chronic kidney disease, neurodegenerative diseases and cancers. This Review aims to provide a comprehensive understanding of the role of SREBPs in physiology and pathophysiology at the cell, organ and organism levels.

  17. Extra-osseous uterine pathophysiology demonstrated on skeletal scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansberg, R.; Lewis, G.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Skeletal scintigraphy is a sensitive procedure for evaluating disease and trauma involving the skeleton. Extra-skeletal pathophysiology is also often demonstrated. This may include uptake by tumours, soft tissue calcification and infection as well as renal pathology. Skeletal scintigraphy is often performed to evaluate hip and back pain and extra-osseous uterine pathophysiology can be demonstrated in both the early and late phases of the study as in the following cases. Three women underwent skeletal scintigraphy for the investigation of low back pain in two patients and post-partum hip pain in one. A large vascular uterus with deviation of the bladder was demonstrated in the post-partum patient. Increased pelvic vascularity and bladder deviation in the second patient was shown by ultrasound to correspond to a left-sided fibroid with associated adenomyosis. In the third case, right-sided pelvic vascularity and left bladder deviation were shown on ultrasound to be due to an anteverted, anteflexed uterus tilted to the right. These cases illustrate the importance of documenting extra-osseous findings on skeletal scintigraphy and the benefits of correlation with anatomical imaging

  18. Studies on the Pathophysiology and Genetic Basis of Migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, Claudia F; Sutherland, Heidi G.; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2013-01-01

    Migraine is a neurological disorder that affects the central nervous system causing painful attacks of headache. A genetic vulnerability and exposure to environmental triggers can influence the migraine phenotype. Migraine interferes in many facets of people’s daily life including employment commitments and their ability to look after their families resulting in a reduced quality of life. Identification of the biological processes that underlie this relatively common affliction has been difficult because migraine does not have any clearly identifiable pathology or structural lesion detectable by current medical technology. Theories to explain the symptoms of migraine have focused on the physiological mechanisms involved in the various phases of headache and include the vascular and neurogenic theories. In relation to migraine pathophysiology the trigeminovascular system and cortical spreading depression have also been implicated with supporting evidence from imaging studies and animal models. The objective of current research is to better understand the pathways and mechanisms involved in causing pain and headache to be able to target interventions. The genetic component of migraine has been teased apart using linkage studies and both candidate gene and genome-wide association studies, in family and case-control cohorts. Genomic regions that increase individual risk to migraine have been identified in neurological, vascular and hormonal pathways. This review discusses knowledge of the pathophysiology and genetic basis of migraine with the latest scientific evidence from genetic studies. PMID:24403849

  19. Postoperative ileus: Recent developments in pathophysiology and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg, Damian; El-Sharkawy, Ahmed M; Psaltis, Emmanouil; Maxwell-Armstrong, Charles A; Lobo, Dileep N

    2015-06-01

    Postoperative ileus (POI) is a frequent occurrence after abdominal and other types of surgery, and is associated with significant morbidity and costs to health care providers. The aims of this narrative review were to provide an update of classification systems, preventive techniques, pathophysiological mechanisms, and treatment options for established POI. The Web of Science, MEDLINE, PubMed and Google Scholar databases were searched using the key phrases 'ileus', 'postoperative ileus' and 'definition', for relevant studies published in English from January 1997 to August 2014. POI is still a problematic and frequent complication of surgery. Fluid overload, exogenous opioids, neurohormonal dysfunction, and gastrointestinal stretch and inflammation are key mechanisms in the pathophysiology of POI. Evidence is supportive of thoracic epidural analgesia, avoidance of salt and water overload, alvimopan and gum chewing as measures for the prevention of POI, and should be incorporated into perioperative care protocols. Minimal access surgery and avoidance of nasogastric tubes may also help. Novel strategies are emerging, but further studies are required for the treatment of prolonged POI, where evidence is still lacking. Although POI is often inevitable, methods to reduce its duration and facilitate recovery of postoperative gastrointestinal function are evolving rapidly. Utilisation of standardised diagnostic classification systems will help improve applicability of future studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  20. Air leak after lung resection: pathophysiology and patients' implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompili, Cecilia; Miserocchi, Giuseppe

    2016-02-01

    Protocols for the management of air leaks are critical aspects in the postoperative course of patients following lung resections. Many investigations in the last decade are focusing on the chest tube modalities or preventative measures, however, little is known about the pathophysiology of air leak and the patient perception of this common complication. This review concentrates on understanding the reasons why a pulmonary parenchyma may start to leak or an air leak may be longer than others. Experimental works support the notion that lung overdistension may favor air leak. These studies may represent the basis of future investigations. Furthermore, the standardization of nomenclature in the field of pleural space management and the creation of novel air leak scoring systems have contributed to improve the knowledge among thoracic surgeons and facilitate the organization of trials on this matter. We tried to summarize available evidences about the patient perception of a prolonged air leak and about what would be useful for them in order to prevent worsening of their quality of life. Future investigations are warranted to better understand the pathophysiologic mechanisms responsible of prolonged air leak in order to define tailored treatments and protocols. Improving the care at home with web-based telemonitoring or real time connected chest drainage may in a future improve the quality of life of the patients experience this complication and also enhance hospital finances.