WorldWideScience

Sample records for fe-doped calcium sulfide

  1. A newly developed Fe-doped calcium sulfide nanoparticles with magnetic property for cancer hyperthermia

    Wu, Steven Yueh-Hsiu; Tseng, Ching-Li; Lin, Feng-Huei

    2010-05-01

    In this study, a magnetic iron-doped calcium sulfide (Fe-CaS) nanoparticle was newly developed and studied for the purpose of hyperthermia due to its promising magnetic property, adequate biodegradation rate, and relatively good biocompatibility. Fe-CaS nanoparticles were synthesized by a wet chemical co-precipitation process with heat treatment in a N2 atmosphere, and were subsequently cooled in N2 and exposed to air at a low temperature. The crystal structure of the Fe-CaS nanoparticles was similar to that of the CaS, which was identified by an X-ray diffractometer (XRD). The particle size was less than 40 nm based on a Debye-Scherrer equation and transmission electron microscope (TEM) examination. Magnetic properties obtained from the SQUID magnetometer demonstrated that the synthesized CaS was a diamagnetic property. Once the Fe ions were doped, the synthesized Fe-CaS converted into paramagnetism which showed no hysteresis loop. Having been heated above 600 °C in N2, the Fe-CaS showed a promising magnetic property to produce enough energy to increase the temperature for hyperthermia. 10 mg/ml of the Fe-CaS was able to generate heat to elevate the media temperature over 42.5 °C within 6 min. The area of the hysteresis loop increased with the increasing of the treated temperature, especially at 800 °C for 1 h. This is because more Fe ions replaced Ca ions in the lattice at the higher heat treatment temperature. The heat production was also increasing with the increasing of heat treatment temperature, which resulted in an adequate specific absorption ratio (SAR) value, which was found to be 45.47 W/g at 37 °C under an alternative magnetic field of f = 750 KHz , H = 10 Oe. The in vitro biocompatibility test of the synthesized Fe-CaS nanoparticles examined by the LDH assay showed no cytotoxicity to 3T3 fibroblast. The result of in vitro cell hyperthermia shows that under magnetic field the Fe-CaS nanoparticles were able to generate heat and kill the CT-26 cancer

  2. A newly developed Fe-doped calcium sulfide nanoparticles with magnetic property for cancer hyperthermia

    Wu, Steven Yueh-Hsiu; Tseng, Ching-Li; Lin, Feng-Huei

    2010-01-01

    In this study, a magnetic iron-doped calcium sulfide (Fe-CaS) nanoparticle was newly developed and studied for the purpose of hyperthermia due to its promising magnetic property, adequate biodegradation rate, and relatively good biocompatibility. Fe-CaS nanoparticles were synthesized by a wet chemical co-precipitation process with heat treatment in a N 2 atmosphere, and were subsequently cooled in N 2 and exposed to air at a low temperature. The crystal structure of the Fe-CaS nanoparticles was similar to that of the CaS, which was identified by an X-ray diffractometer (XRD). The particle size was less than 40 nm based on a Debye-Scherrer equation and transmission electron microscope (TEM) examination. Magnetic properties obtained from the SQUID magnetometer demonstrated that the synthesized CaS was a diamagnetic property. Once the Fe ions were doped, the synthesized Fe-CaS converted into paramagnetism which showed no hysteresis loop. Having been heated above 600 o C in N 2 , the Fe-CaS showed a promising magnetic property to produce enough energy to increase the temperature for hyperthermia. 10 mg/ml of the Fe-CaS was able to generate heat to elevate the media temperature over 42.5 o C within 6 min. The area of the hysteresis loop increased with the increasing of the treated temperature, especially at 800 o C for 1 h. This is because more Fe ions replaced Ca ions in the lattice at the higher heat treatment temperature. The heat production was also increasing with the increasing of heat treatment temperature, which resulted in an adequate specific absorption ratio (SAR) value, which was found to be 45.47 W/g at 37 o C under an alternative magnetic field of f = 750 KHz, H = 10 Oe. The in vitro biocompatibility test of the synthesized Fe-CaS nanoparticles examined by the LDH assay showed no cytotoxicity to 3T3 fibroblast. The result of in vitro cell hyperthermia shows that under magnetic field the Fe-CaS nanoparticles were able to generate heat and kill the CT-26

  3. Silica-modified Fe-doped calcium sulfide nanoparticles for in vitro and in vivo cancer hyperthermia

    Wu, Steven Yueh-Hsiu; Yang, Kai-Chiang; Tseng, Ching-Li; Chen, Jung-Chih; Lin, Feng-Huei

    2011-01-01

    In this study, sulfide-based magnetic Fe-doped CaS nanoparticles modified with a silica layer were investigated for cancer hyperthermia. A polyvinyl pyrrolidone polymer was used as the coupling agent. The developed nanoparticles contained 11.6 wt% iron concentration, and their X-ray diffraction pattern was similar to those of CaS and Fe–CaS nanoparticles. The average particle size was approximately 47.5 nm and homogeneously dispersed in aqueous solutions. The major absorption bands of silica were observed from the FTIR spectrum. The magnetic properties and heating efficiency were also examined. The specific absorption ratio of nanoparticles at a concentration of 10 mg/mL at 37 °C in an ethanol carrier fluid was 37.92 W/g, and the nanoparticles would raise the temperature to over 45 °C within 15 min. A cytotoxicity analysis revealed that the nanoparticles had good biocompatibility, which indicated that the nanoparticles did not affect cell viability. The therapeutic effects of the nanoparticles were investigated using in vitro and animal studies. Cells seeded with nanoparticles and treated under an AC magnetic field revealed a percentage of cytotoxicity (60%) that was significantly higher from that in other groups. In the animal study, during a hyperthermia period of 15 days, tumor-bearing Balb/c mice that were subcutaneously injected with nanoparticles and exposed to an AC magnetic field manifested a reduction in tumor volume. The newly developed silica-modified Fe–CaS nanoparticles can thus be considered a promising and attractive hyperthermia thermoseed.

  4. Fabrication of mesoporous iron (Fe) doped copper sulfide (CuS) nanocomposite in the presence of a cationic surfactant via mild hydrothermal method for supercapacitors

    Brown, J. William; Ramesh, P. S.; Geetha, D.

    2018-02-01

    We report fabrication of mesoporous Fe doped CuS nanocomposites with uniform mesoporous spherical structures via a mild hydrothermal method employing copper nitrate trihydrate (Cu (NO3).3H2O), Thiourea (Tu,Sc(NH2)2 and Iron tri nitrate (Fe(No3)3) as initial materials with cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylamoniame bromide (CTAB) as stabilizer/size controller and Ethylene glycol as solvent at 130 °C temperature. The products were characterized by XRD, SEM/EDX, TEM, FTIR and UV analysis. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra confirmed the Fe doped CuS nanocomposites which are crystalline in nature. EDX and XRD pattern confirmed that the product is hexagonal CuS phase. Fe doped spherical structure of CuS with grain size of 21 nm was confirmed by XRD pattern. Fe doping was identified by energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). The Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy results revealed the occurrence of active functional groups required for the reduction of copper ions. Studies showed that after a definite time relining on the chosen copper source, the obtained Fe-CuS nanocomposite shows a tendency towards self-assembly and creating mesoporous like nano and submicro structures by TEM/SAED. The achievable mechanism of producing this nanocomposite was primarily discussed. The electrochemical study confirms the pseudocapacitive nature of the CuS and Fe-CuS electrodes. The CuS and Fe-CuS electrode shows a specific capacitance of about 328.26 and 516.39 Fg-1 at a scan rate of 5 mVs-1. As the electrode in a supercapacitor, the mesoporous nanostructured Fe-CuS shows excellent capacitance characteristics.

  5. Indium sulfide precipitation from hydrochloric acid solutions of calcium and sodium chlorides

    Kochetkova, N.V.; Bayandina, Yu.E.; Toptygina, G.M.; Shepot'ko, A.O.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of precipitation duration, acid concentration, indium complexing with chloride ions on the process of indium sulfide chemical precipitation in hydrochloric acid solutions, precipitate composition and dispersity are studied. It is established that indium sulfide solubility increases in solutions with acid concentration exceeding 0.40-0.45 mol/l. Calcium and indium chloride addition to diluted hydrochloric solutions greatly increases the solubility of indium sulfide. The effect of calcium chloride on In 2 S 3 solubility is higher than that of sodium chloride

  6. DFT study of adsorption and dissociation behavior of H2S on Fe-doped graphene

    Zhang, Hong-ping; Luo, Xue-gang; Song, Hong-tao; Lin, Xiao-yan; Lu, Xiong; Tang, Youhong

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Fe-doped and Pt-doped graphene can significantly improve the interactions between H 2 S and graphene. • The location of S had an important role in the interactions between H 2 S and Fe-doped graphene. • The influence of Fe-S distance can be very weak in a certain range and H 2 S can be dissociated into S and H 2 . - Abstracts: Understanding the interaction mechanisms of hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) with graphene is important in developing graphene-based sensors for gas detection and removal. In this study, the effects of doped Fe atom on interaction of H 2 S with graphene were investigated by density functional theory calculations. Analyses of adsorption energy, electron density difference, and density of states indicated that the doped Fe atom can significantly improve the interaction of H 2 S gas molecules with graphene, as well as Pt-doped graphene. The location of the sulfur atom is important in the interactions between H 2 S and Fe-doped graphene. The influence of the Fe-S distance can be very weak within a certain distance, as simulated in this study

  7. Valorization of Calcium Carbonate-Based Solid Wastes for the Treatment of Hydrogen Sulfide from the Gas Phase

    Pham Xuan , Huynh; Pham Minh , Doan; Galera Martinez , Marta; Nzihou , Ange; Sharrock , Patrick

    2015-01-01

    International audience; This paper focuses on the valorization of calcium carbonate-based solid wastes for theremoval of hydrogen sulfide from gas phase. Two solid wastes taken from industrial sites for theproduction of sodium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate by the Solvay process® were analyzedby different physico-chemical methods. Calcium carbonate was found as the main component ofboth the solid wastes. Trace amounts of other elements such as Mg, Al, Fe, Si, Cl, Na etc. werealso present in...

  8. Studying inhibition of calcium oxalate stone formation: an in vitro approach for screening hydrogen sulfide and its metabolites

    S. Vaitheeswari

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTPurpose:Calcium oxalate urolithiasis is one of the most common urinary tract diseases and is of high prevalence. The present study proposes to evaluate the antilithiatic property of hydrogen sulfide and its metabolites like thiosulfate & sulfate in an in vitro model.Materials and Methods:The antilithiatic activity of sodium hydrogen sulfide (NaSH, sodium thiosulfate (Na2S2O3 and sodium sulfate (Na2SO4 on the kinetics of calcium oxalate crystal formation was investigated both in physiological buffer and in urine from normal and recurrent stone forming volunteers. The stones were characterized by optical and spectroscopic techniques.Results:The stones were characterized to be monoclinic, prismatic and bipyramidal habit which is of calcium monohydrate and dihydrate nature. The FTIR displayed fingerprint corresponding to calcium oxalate in the control while in NaSH treated, S=O vibrations were visible in the spectrum. The order of percentage inhibition was NaSH>Na2S2O3>Na2SO4.Conclusion:Our study indicates that sodium hydrogen sulfide and its metabolite thiosulfate are inhibitors of calcium oxalate stone agglomeration which makes them unstable both in physiological buffer and in urine. This effect is attributed to pH changes and complexing of calcium by S2O32-and SO42- moiety produced by the test compounds.

  9. Comparative assessment of the efficiency of Fe-doped TiO2 prepared by two doping methods and photocatalytic degradation of phenol in domestic water suspensions

    Mst. Shamsun Nahar, Kiyoshi Hasegawa, Shigehiro Kagaya and Shigeyasu Kuroda

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Fe-doped TiO2 particles responding to visible light were synthesized by impregnation and calcination method using TiO2 particle and Ti element, respectively. The optical and the chemical properties were characterized by measuring the X-ray diffraction (XRD and UV–visible spectroscopy. The onset of absorption shifted to longer wavelengths on doping TiO2 by the calcination process, which showed a better response as compared to the impregnation method. The photocatalytic reactivity was evaluated by the degradation of phenol with impregnated Fe-doped (0.5% w/w in Fe and calcined Fe-doped (FexTi1−xO2, x=0.005 (Fe/Ti molar ratio TiO2 separately in distilled and tap water. The characterization results have confirmed the advanced possibility of correlation between photoactivity and the special property of sulfur-containing calcined Fe-doped TiO2. In case of the coagulation of the undoped A-I and the Fe-doped B-I, the photoactivity showed a decrease due to the presence of natural electrolytes and due to the high pH of tap water, whereas in the case of the coagulation of calcined Fe-doped TiO2 prepared from sulfides (FexTiS2, the photoactivity showed an increase. In this study, highest catalytic activity was found to be strongly dependent both on catalyst structure and on the type of water used.

  10. Europium and samarium doped calcium sulfide thin films grown by PLD

    Christoulakis, S.; Suchea, M; Katsarakis, N.; Koudoumas, E

    2007-01-01

    Europium and samarium doped calcium sulfide thin films (CaS:Eu,Sm) with different thickness were prepared by the pulsed laser deposition technique using sintered targets. A typical homemade deposition chamber and XeCl excimer laser (308 nm) were employed and the films were deposited in helium atmosphere onto silicon and corning glass substrates. Structural investigations carried out by X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy showed a strong influence of the deposition parameters on the film properties. The films grown had an amorphous or polycrystalline structure depending on growth temperature and the number of pulses used, the same parameters affecting the film roughness, the grain shape and dimensions, the film thickness and the optical transmittance. This work indicates that pulsed laser deposition can be a suitable technique for the preparation of CaS:Eu,Sm thin films, the film characteristics being controlled by the growth conditions

  11. Hydrogen sulfide interacts with calcium signaling to enhance the chromium tolerance in Setaria italica.

    Fang, Huihui; Jing, Tao; Liu, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Liping; Jin, Zhuping; Pei, Yanxi

    2014-12-01

    The oscillation of intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) concentration is a primary event in numerous biological processes in plants, including stress response. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), an emerging gasotransmitter, was found to have positive effects in plants responding to chromium (Cr(6+)) stress through interacting with Ca(2+) signaling. While Ca(2+) resemblances H2S in mediating biotic and abiotic stresses, crosstalk between the two pathways remains unclear. In this study, Ca(2+) signaling interacted with H2S to produce a complex physiological response, which enhanced the Cr(6+) tolerance in foxtail millet (Setaria italica). Results indicate that Cr(6+) stress activated endogenous H2S synthesis as well as Ca(2+) signaling. Moreover, toxic symptoms caused by Cr(6+) stress were strongly moderated by 50μM H2S and 20mM Ca(2+). Conversely, treatments with H2S synthesis inhibitor and Ca(2+) chelators prior to Cr(6+)-exposure aggravated these toxic symptoms. Interestingly, Ca(2+) upregulated expression of two important factors in metal metabolism, MT3A and PCS, which participated in the biosynthesis of heavy metal chelators, in a H2S-dependent manner to cope with Cr(6+) stress. These findings also suggest that the H2S dependent pathway is a component of the Ca(2+) activating antioxidant system and H2S partially contributes Ca(2+)-activating antioxidant system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Oxygen vacancy and Moessbauer parameters of Fe doped tin oxides

    Nomura, K.; Mudarra Navarro, A.M.; Errico, L.; Rodriguez Torres, C.E.

    2013-01-01

    It is not clear what the local environment of Fe ions included in rutile structure is. In order to clarify this point, Moessbauer parameters of 57 Fe doped SnO 2 are compared with the results of ab initio calculation taking into account different configurations of iron and oxygen vacancy in the rutile structure of SnO 2 . Calculations were performed using the LAPW+lo method (Wien2k); RMT x Kmax = 7, A mesh of 50 k-points at IBZ, 2x2x2 super cell of SnO 2 . (J.P.N.)

  13. Photocatalytic and microwave absorbing properties of polypyrrole/Fe-doped TiO2 composite by in situ polymerization method

    Li Qiaoling; Zhang Cunrui; Li Jianqiang

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Polypyrrole/Fe-doped TiO 2 composite is prepared by in situ polymerization of pyrrole on the Fe-doped TiO 2 template. → The Fe-doped TiO 2 microbelts are prepared by sol-gel method using the absorbent cotton template for the first time. → Then the Fe-doped TiO 2 microbelts are used as template for the preparation of polypyrrole/Fe-doped TiO 2 composites. → The structure, morphology and properties of the composites are characterized with scanning electron microscope (SEM), IR, Net-work Analyzer. → A possible formation mechanism of Fe-doped TiO 2 microbelts and polypyrrole/Fe-doped TiO 2 composites has been proposed. → The effect of the mol ratio of pyrrole/Fe-doped TiO 2 on the photocatalysis properties and microwave loss properties of the composites is investigated. - Abstract: The Fe-doped TiO 2 microbelts were prepared by sol-gel method using the absorbent cotton template for the first time. Then the Fe-doped TiO 2 microbelts were used as templates for the preparation of polypyrrole/Fe-doped TiO 2 composites. Polypyrrole/Fe-doped TiO 2 composites were prepared by in situ polymerization of pyrrole on the Fe-doped TiO 2 template. The structure, morphology and properties of the composites were characterized with scanning electron microscope (SEM), FTIR, Net-work Analyzer. The possible formation mechanisms of Fe-doped TiO 2 microbelts and polypyrrole/Fe-doped TiO 2 composites have been proposed. The effect of the molar ratio of pyrrole/Fe-doped TiO 2 on the photocatalytic properties and microwave loss properties of the composites was investigated.

  14. The influence of Fe doping on the surface topography of GaN epitaxial material

    Cui Lei; Yin Haibo; Jiang Lijuan; Wang Quan; Feng Chun; Xiao Hongling; Wang Cuimei; Wang Xiaoliang; Gong Jiamin; Zhang Bo; Li Baiquan; Wang Zhanguo

    2015-01-01

    Fe doping is an effective method to obtain high resistivity GaN epitaxial material. But in some cases, Fe doping could result in serious deterioration of the GaN material surface topography, which will affect the electrical properties of two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in HEMT device. In this paper, the influence of Fe doping on the surface topography of GaN epitaxial material is studied. The results of experiments indicate that the surface topography of Fe-doped GaN epitaxial material can be effectively improved and the resistivity could be increased after increasing the growth rate of GaN materials. The GaN material with good surface topography can be manufactured when the Fe doping concentration is 9 × 10 19 cm −3 . High resistivity GaN epitaxial material which is 1 × 10 9 Ω·cm is achieved. (paper)

  15. Ferromagnetic Behaviors in Fe-Doped NiO Nanofibers Synthesized by Electrospinning Method

    Yi-Dong Luo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ni1−xFexO nanofibers with different Fe doping concentration have been synthesized by electrospinning method. An analysis of the phase composition and microstructure shows that Fe doping has no influence on the crystal structure and morphology of NiO nanofibers, which reveals that the doped Fe ions have been incorporated into the NiO host lattice. Pure NiO without Fe doping is antiferromagnetic, yet all the Fe-doped NiO nanofiber samples show obvious room-temperature ferromagnetic properties. The saturation magnetization of the nanofibers can be enhanced with increasing Fe doping concentration, which can be ascribed to the double exchange mechanism through the doped Fe ions and free charge carriers. In addition, it was found that the diameter of nanofibers has significant impact on the ferromagnetic properties, which was discussed in detail.

  16. Purification of hydrogen sulfide

    Tsao, U.

    1978-01-01

    A process is described for purifying a hydrogen sulfide gas stream containing carbon dioxide, comprising (a) passing the gas stream through a bed of solid hydrated lime to form calcium hydrosulfide and calcium carbonate and (b) regenerating hydrogen sulfide from said calcium hydrosulfide by reacting the calcium hydrosulfide with additional carbon dioxide. The process is especially applicable for use in a heavy water recovery process wherein deuterium is concentrated from a feed water containing carbon dioxide by absorption and stripping using hydrogen sulfide as a circulating medium, and the hydrogen sulfide absorbs a small quantity of carbon dioxide along with deuterium in each circulation

  17. Structural properties of Fe-doped lanthanum gallate

    Mori, Kazuhiro; Fukunaga, Toshiharu; Shibata, Koji; Iwase, Kenji; Harjo, Stefanus; Hoshikawa, Akinori; Itoh, Keiji; Kamiyama, Takashi; Ishigaki, Toru

    2004-01-01

    Structural characteristics of Fe-doped LaGaO 3-δ were studied by differential scanning calorimeter, neutron and high-temperature X-ray powder diffraction measurements. It was found that a phase transition temperature increases in proportion to an amount of Fe. The crystal structure could be described as a low-temperature orthorhombic phase (Pnma) and a high-temperature rhombohedral one (R3-bar c), respectively. Lattice parameters and bond lengths between M (=Ga/Fe) and O are monotonically expand with increasing Fe-content on both orthorhombic and rhombohedral phases. This means that a substitution of Ga 3+ with Fe 3+ leads to an electronic configuration of t 2g 3 e g 2 (high-spin state, HS)

  18. Structural properties of Fe-doped lanthanum gallate

    Mori, Kazuhiro [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan)]. E-mail: kmori@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Fukunaga, Toshiharu [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Shibata, Koji [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Iwase, Kenji [Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Harjo, Stefanus [Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Hoshikawa, Akinori [Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Itoh, Keiji [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Kamiyama, Takashi [Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Ishigaki, Toru [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Muroran Institute for Technology, Muroran 050-8585 (Japan)

    2004-10-30

    Structural characteristics of Fe-doped LaGaO{sub 3-{delta}} were studied by differential scanning calorimeter, neutron and high-temperature X-ray powder diffraction measurements. It was found that a phase transition temperature increases in proportion to an amount of Fe. The crystal structure could be described as a low-temperature orthorhombic phase (Pnma) and a high-temperature rhombohedral one (R3-bar c), respectively. Lattice parameters and bond lengths between M (=Ga/Fe) and O are monotonically expand with increasing Fe-content on both orthorhombic and rhombohedral phases. This means that a substitution of Ga{sup 3+} with Fe{sup 3+} leads to an electronic configuration of t{sub 2g}{sup 3}e{sub g}{sup 2} (high-spin state, HS)

  19. Structural properties of Fe-doped lanthanum gallate

    Mori, Kazuhiro; Fukunaga, Toshiharu; Shibata, Koji; Iwase, Kenji; Harjo, Stefanus; Hoshikawa, Akinori; Itoh, Keiji; Kamiyama, Takashi; Ishigaki, Toru

    2004-10-01

    Structural characteristics of Fe-doped LaGaO3-δ were studied by differential scanning calorimeter, neutron and high-temperature X-ray powder diffraction measurements. It was found that a phase transition temperature increases in proportion to an amount of Fe. The crystal structure could be described as a low-temperature orthorhombic phase (Pnma) and a high-temperature rhombohedral one (R 3 bar c), respectively. Lattice parameters and bond lengths between M (=Ga/Fe) and O are monotonically expand with increasing Fe-content on both orthorhombic and rhombohedral phases. This means that a substitution of Ga3+ with Fe3+ leads to an electronic configuration of t2g3eg2 (high-spin state, HS).

  20. Photoluminescence quenching and enhanced spin relaxation in Fe doped ZnO nanoparticles

    Ovhal, Manoj M.; Santhosh Kumar, A. [Department of Materials Engineering, Defence Institute of Advanced Technology, Girinagar, Pune 411025 (India); Khullar, Prerna [School of Materials Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi 221005 (India); Kumar, Manjeet [Department of Materials Engineering, Defence Institute of Advanced Technology, Girinagar, Pune 411025 (India); Abhyankar, A.C., E-mail: ashutoshabhyankar@gmail.com [Department of Materials Engineering, Defence Institute of Advanced Technology, Girinagar, Pune 411025 (India)

    2017-07-01

    Cost-effective ultrasonically assisted precipitation method is utilized to synthesize Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) at room temperature and the effect of Iron (Fe) doping on structural, optical and spin relaxation properties also presented. As-synthesized pure and Fe doped ZnO NPs possess a perfect hexagonal growth habit of wurtzite zinc oxide, along the (101) direction of preference. With Fe doping, ‘c/a’ ratio and compressive lattice strain in ZnO NPs are found to reduce and increase, respectively. Raman studies demonstrate that the E{sub 1} longitudinal optical (LO) vibrational mode is very weak in pure which remarkably enhanced with Fe doping into ZnO NPs. The direct band gap energy (E{sub g}) of the ZnO NPs has been increased from 3.02 eV to 3.11 eV with Fe doping. A slight red-shift observed with strong green emission band, in photoluminescence spectra, is strongly quenched in 6 wt.% Fe doped ZnO NPs. The field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals spherical shape of ZnO NPs with 60–70 nm, which reduces substantially on Fe doping. The energy dispersive X-ray spectrum and elemental mapping confirms the homogeneous distribution of Fe in ZnO NPs. Moreover, the specific relaxation rate (R{sub 2sp} = 1/T{sub 2}) has been measured using Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) method and found to be maximum in 6 wt.% Fe doped ZnO NPs. Further, the correlation of structural, optical and dynamic properties is proposed. - Highlights: • Pure ZnO and Fe doped ZnO NPs were successfully prepared by cost effective ultrasonically assisted precipitation method. • The optical band gap of ZnO has been enhanced form 3.02–3.11 eV with Fe doping. • PL quenching behaviour has been observed with Fe{sup 3+} ions substitution in ZnO lattice. • Specific relaxation rate (R{sub 2sp} = 1/T{sub 2}) has been varied with Fe doping and found to be maximum in 6 wt.% Fe doped ZnO NPs.

  1. XRD analysis of undoped and Fe doped TiO2 nanoparticles by Williamson Hall method

    Bharti, Bandna; Barman, P. B.; Kumar, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Undoped and Fe doped titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) nanoparticles were synthesized by sol-gel method at room temperature. The synthesized samples were annealed at 500°C. For structural analysis, the prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The crystallite size of TiO 2 and Fe doped TiO 2 nanoparticles were calculated by Scherer’s formula, and was found to be 15 nm and 11 nm, respectively. Reduction in crystallite size of TiO 2 with Fe doping was observed. The anatase phase of Fe-doped TiO 2 nanoparticles was also confirmed by X-ray diffraction. By using Williamson-Hall method, lattice strain and crystallite size were also calculated. Williamson–Hall plot indicates the presence of compressive strain for TiO 2 and tensile strain for Fe-TiO 2 nanoparticles annealed at 500°C

  2. Highly improved sensibility and selectivity ethanol sensor of mesoporous Fe-doped NiO nanowires

    Li, X. Q.; Wei, J. Q.; Xu, J. C.; Jin, H. X.; Jin, D. F.; Peng, X. L.; Hong, B.; Li, J.; Yang, Y. T.; Ge, H. L.; Wang, Xinqing

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, nickel oxides (NiO) and iron (Fe)-doped NiO nanowires (NWs) with the various doping content (from 1 to 9 at%) were synthesized by using SBA-15 templates with the nanocasting method. All samples were synthesized in the same conditions and exhibited the same mesoporous-structures, uniform diameter, and defects. Mesoporous-structures with high surface area created more active sites for the adsorption of oxygen on the surface of all samples, resulting in the smaller surface resistance in air. The impurity energy levels from the donor Fe-doping provided electrons to neutralize the holes of p-type Fe-doped NiO NWs, which greatly enhanced the total resistance. The comparative gas-sensing study between NiO NWs and Fe-doped NiO NWs indicated that the high-valence donor Fe-doping obviously improved the ethanol sensitivity and selectivity for Fe-doped NiO NWs. And Ni0.94Fe0.06O1.03 NWs sensor presented the highest sensitivity of 14.30 toward ethanol gas at 320 °C for the high-valence metal-doping.

  3. Magnetic properties of Fe-doped organic-inorganic nanohybrids

    Silva, N. J. O.; Amaral, V. S.; Carlos, L. D.; de Zea Bermudez, V.

    2003-05-01

    We present a magnetic study of Fe-doped diureasils (siloxane-based networks to which poly(ethylene oxide)-based chains are grafted by urea cross linkages doped with Fe(II) or Fe(III) ions. Structural studies show that the Fe(II) ions interact mainly with the organic chain, whereas the incorporation of Fe(III) leads to the formation of iron-based nanoclusters, with radius increasing from 20 to 40 Å. Fe(II)-doped samples behave as simple paramagnets, with μeff=5.32μB. Fe(III)-doped hybrids present antiferromagnetic interactions, with TN increasing with Fe(III) concentration up to 13.6 K for 6% doping. Thermal irreversibility was observed below ˜40 K and is stronger for higher concentrations. The coercive fields (HC) are of the order of 1000 Oe at 5 K. Hysteresis cycles are shifted to negative fields, revealing the presence of exchange anisotropy interactions with exchange fields (HE) of the order of 100 Oe. Both fields decrease rapidly with increasing temperature. We analyze this behavior in terms of the contribution of surface spin disorder to exchange anisotropy.

  4. Magnetic anomalies in Fe-doped NiO nanoparticle

    Pradeep, R.; Gandhi, A. C.; Tejabhiram, Y.; Mathar Sahib, I. K. Md; Shimura, Y.; Karmakar, L.; Das, D.; Wu, Sheng Yun; Hayakawa, Y.

    2017-09-01

    Undoped and iron-doped NiO nanoparticle were synthesized by standard hydrothermal method. A detailed study is carried out on the effect of dopant concentration on morphology, structural, resonance and magnetic properties of NiO nanoparticle by varying the Fe concentration from 0.01 to 0.10 M. The synchrotron-x-ray diffraction confirmed that no secondary phase was observed other than NiO. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies revealed that, Fe was primarily in the trivalent state, replacing the Ni2+ ion inside the octahedral crystal site of NiO. The Electron paramagnetic studies revealed the ferromagnetic cluster formation at high doping concentration (5 and 10%). The ZFC-FC curves displayed an average blocking temperature around 180 K due to particle size distribution. The anomalous behaviour of spontaneous exchange bias (H SEB) and magnetic remanence (M r) for all Fe-doped samples observed at 5 K showed an increase (0.1316-0.1384 emu g-1) in the moment of frozen spin (M p) as the dopant concentration increased. The role of frozen spin moment in spontaneous exchange bias behaviour was discussed.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of Fe doped cadmium selenide thin films by spray pyrolysis

    Yadav, Abhijit A., E-mail: aay_physics@yahoo.co.in [Thin Film Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Electronics and Photonics, Rajarshi Shahu Mahavidyalaya, Latur 413 512, Maharashtra (India)

    2012-12-05

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simple and inexpensive method to dope trivalent Fe in CdSe thin films. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fe doped CdSe thin films are highly photosensitive. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AFM analysis shows uniform deposition of film over the entire substrate surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The band gap energy decreases from 1.74 to 1.65 eV with Fe doping. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Film resistivity decreases to 6.76 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} {Omega}-cm with Fe doping in CdSe thin films. - Abstract: Undoped and Fe doped CdSe thin films have been deposited onto the amorphous and fluorine doped tin oxide coated glass substrates by spray pyrolysis. The Fe doping concentration has been optimized by photoelectrochemical (PEC) characterization technique. The structural, surface morphological, compositional, optical and electrical properties of undoped and Fe doped CdSe thin films have been studied. X-ray diffraction study reveals that the as deposited CdSe films possess hexagonal crystal structure with preferential orientation along (1 0 0) plane. AFM analysis shows uniform deposition of the film over the entire substrate surface with minimum surface roughness of 7.90 nm. Direct allowed type of transition with band gap decreasing from 1.74 to 1.65 eV with Fe doping has been observed. The activation energy of the films has been found to be in the range of 0.14-0.19 eV at low temperature and 0.27-0.44 eV at high temperature. Semi-conducting behavior has been observed from resistivity measurements. The thermoelectric power measurements reveal that the films are of n type.

  6. Superparamagnetic behavior of Fe-doped SnO2 nanoparticles

    Hachisu, M.; Onuma, K.; Kondo, T.; Miike, K.; Miyasaka, T.; Mori, K.; Ichiyanagi, Y.

    2014-01-01

    SnO 2 is an n-type semiconductor with a wide band gap of 3.62 eV, and SnO 2 nanoparticles doped with magnetic ions are expected to realized new diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMSs). Realizing ferromagnetism at room temperature is important for spintronics device applications, and it is interesting that the magnetic properties of these DMS systems can be varied significantly by modifying the preparation methods or conditions. In this study, the magnetic properties of Fe-doped (3% and 5%) SnO 2 nanoparticles, prepared using our novel chemical preparation method and encapsulated in amorphous SiO 2 , were investigated. The particle size (1.8–16.9 nm) and crystal phase were controlled by the annealing temperature. X-ray diffraction confirmed a rutile SnO 2 single-phase structure for samples annealed at 1073–1373 K, and the composition was confirmed using X-ray fluorescence analysis. SQUID magnetometer measurements revealed superparamagnetic behavior of the 5%-Fe-doped sample at room temperature, although SnO 2 is known to be diamagnetic. Magnetization curves at 5 K indicated that the 3%-Fe-doped has a larger magnetization than that of the 5%-Fe-doped sample. We conclude that the magnetization of the 5%-Fe-doped sample decreased at 5 K due to the superexchange interaction between the antiferromagnetic coupling in the nanoparticle system

  7. Superparamagnetic behavior of Fe-doped SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles

    Hachisu, M.; Onuma, K.; Kondo, T.; Miike, K.; Miyasaka, T.; Mori, K.; Ichiyanagi, Y. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Engineering, Yokohama National University, 79-5 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya, Yokohama, Kanagawa 240-8501 (Japan)

    2014-02-20

    SnO{sub 2} is an n-type semiconductor with a wide band gap of 3.62 eV, and SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles doped with magnetic ions are expected to realized new diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMSs). Realizing ferromagnetism at room temperature is important for spintronics device applications, and it is interesting that the magnetic properties of these DMS systems can be varied significantly by modifying the preparation methods or conditions. In this study, the magnetic properties of Fe-doped (3% and 5%) SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles, prepared using our novel chemical preparation method and encapsulated in amorphous SiO{sub 2}, were investigated. The particle size (1.8–16.9 nm) and crystal phase were controlled by the annealing temperature. X-ray diffraction confirmed a rutile SnO{sub 2} single-phase structure for samples annealed at 1073–1373 K, and the composition was confirmed using X-ray fluorescence analysis. SQUID magnetometer measurements revealed superparamagnetic behavior of the 5%-Fe-doped sample at room temperature, although SnO{sub 2} is known to be diamagnetic. Magnetization curves at 5 K indicated that the 3%-Fe-doped has a larger magnetization than that of the 5%-Fe-doped sample. We conclude that the magnetization of the 5%-Fe-doped sample decreased at 5 K due to the superexchange interaction between the antiferromagnetic coupling in the nanoparticle system.

  8. Superparamagnetic behavior of Fe-doped SnO2 nanoparticles

    Hachisu, M.; Onuma, K.; Kondo, T.; Miike, K.; Miyasaka, T.; Mori, K.; Ichiyanagi, Y.

    2014-02-01

    SnO2 is an n-type semiconductor with a wide band gap of 3.62 eV, and SnO2 nanoparticles doped with magnetic ions are expected to realized new diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMSs). Realizing ferromagnetism at room temperature is important for spintronics device applications, and it is interesting that the magnetic properties of these DMS systems can be varied significantly by modifying the preparation methods or conditions. In this study, the magnetic properties of Fe-doped (3% and 5%) SnO2 nanoparticles, prepared using our novel chemical preparation method and encapsulated in amorphous SiO2, were investigated. The particle size (1.8-16.9 nm) and crystal phase were controlled by the annealing temperature. X-ray diffraction confirmed a rutile SnO2 single-phase structure for samples annealed at 1073-1373 K, and the composition was confirmed using X-ray fluorescence analysis. SQUID magnetometer measurements revealed superparamagnetic behavior of the 5%-Fe-doped sample at room temperature, although SnO2 is known to be diamagnetic. Magnetization curves at 5 K indicated that the 3%-Fe-doped has a larger magnetization than that of the 5%-Fe-doped sample. We conclude that the magnetization of the 5%-Fe-doped sample decreased at 5 K due to the superexchange interaction between the antiferromagnetic coupling in the nanoparticle system.

  9. Room temperature ferromagnetism in Fe-doped semiconductor ZrS2 single crystals

    Muhammad, Zahir; Lv, Haifeng; Wu, Chuanqiang; Habib, Muhammad; Rehman, Zia ur; Khan, Rashid; Chen, Shuangming; Wu, Xiaojun; Song, Li

    2018-04-01

    Two dimensional (2D) layered magnetic materials have obtained much attention due to their intriguing properties with a potential application in the field of spintronics. Herein, room-temperature ferromagnetism with 0.2 emu g‑1 magnetic moment is realized in Fe-doped ZrS2 single crystals of millimeter size, in comparison with diamagnetic behaviour in ZrS2. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy reveals that 5.2wt% Fe-doping ZrS2 crystal exhibit high spin value of g-factor about 3.57 at room temperature also confirmed this evidence, due to the unpaired electrons created by doped Fe atoms. First principle static electronic and magnetic calculations further confirm the increased stability of long range ferromagnetic ordering and enhanced magnetic moment in Fe-doped ZrS2, originating from the Fe spin polarized electron near the Fermi level.

  10. Synthesis and microwave absorption enhancement of Fe-doped NiO@SiO2@graphene nanocomposites

    Wang, Lei; Huang, Ying; Ding, Xiao; Liu, Panbo; Zong, Meng; Wang, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Fe-doped NiO@SiO 2 @graphene composites have excellent microwave performance. • The reflection loss of Fe doped NiO@SiO 2 @graphene was below −10 dB in 7–11 GHz. • The maximum absorption of Fe-doped NiO@SiO 2 @graphene was −51.2 dB at 8.6 GHz. -- Abstract: Fe-doped NiO@SiO 2 @graphene nanocomposites have been successfully fabricated for the first time, in which Fe-doped NiO nanoparticles are about 3 nm in diameter. In order to measure their electromagnetic properties, Fe-doped NiO@SiO 2 @graphene (25 wt%) wax composites were then prepared. The experimental results show that Fe-doped NiO@SiO 2 @graphene nanocomposites exhibit significantly enhanced microwave absorption performance in terms of both the maximum reflection loss value and the absorption bandwidth in comparison with NiO@SiO 2 @graphene. The maximum reflection loss of Fe-doped NiO@SiO 2 @graphene nanocomposites can reach −51.2 dB at 8.6 GHz with a thickness of 4 mm, and the absorption bandwidth with the reflection loss below −10 dB is 4 GHz (from 7 to 11 GHz). Therefore, this kind of nanocomposites may have the potential as high-efficient absorbers for microwave absorption applications

  11. Hydrothermal synthesis of Fe-doped TiO2 nanostructure photocatalyst

    Nguyen, Van Nghia; Nguyen, Ngoc Khoa Truong; Nguyen, Phi Hung

    2011-01-01

    Fe-doped TiO 2 catalyst was prepared by the hydrothermal method. The resulting nanopowders were characterized by x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and Raman and UV-visible spectroscopies. The photocatalytic activity of the Fe-doped TiO 2 was tested by decomposition of methylene orange with a concentration of 10 mg l −1 in aqueous solution. The obtained results showed that methylene orange was significantly degraded after irradiation for 90 min under a halogen lamp and sunlight. The doping effect on the photocatalytic activity of the iron-doped catalyst samples are discussed

  12. Theoretical investigation of electronic, magnetic and optical properties of Fe doped GaN thin films

    Salmani, E.; Mounkachi, O.; Ez-Zahraouy, H.; Benyoussef, A.; Hamedoun, M.; Hlil, E.K.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Magnetic and optical properties Fe-doped GaN thin films are studied using DFT. •The band gaps of GaN thin films are larger than the one of the bulk. •The layer thickness and acceptor defect can switch the magnetic ordering. -- Abstract: Using first principles calculations based on spin-polarized density functional theory, the magnetic and optical properties of GaN and Fe-doped GaN thin films with and without acceptor defect is studied. The band structure calculations show that the band gaps of GaN thin films with 2, 4 and 6 layers are larger than the one of the bulk with wurtzite structure and decreases with increasing the film thickness. In Fe doped GaN thin films, we show that layer of thickness and acceptor defect can switch the magnetic ordering from disorder local moment (DLM) to ferromagnetic (FM) order. Without acceptor defect Fe doped GaN exhibits spin glass phase in 4 layers form and ferromagnetic state for 2 layers form of the thin films, while it exhibits ferromagnetic phase with acceptor defect such as vacancies defect for 2 and 4 layers. In the FM ordering, the thin films is half-metallic and is therefore ideal for spin application. The different energy between ferromagnetic state and disorder local moment state was evaluated. Moreover, the optical absorption spectra obtained by ab initio calculations confirm the ferromagnetic stability based on the charge state of magnetic impurities

  13. Photocatalytic activity of Fe-doped CaTiO₃ under UV-visible light.

    Yang, He; Han, Chong; Xue, Xiangxin

    2014-07-01

    The photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB) over Fe-doped CaTiO₃ under UV-visible light was investigated. The as-prepared samples were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with an energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) system, Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR), and UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS). The results show that the doping with Fe significantly promoted the light absorption ability of CaTiO₃ in the visible light region. The Fe-doped CaTiO₃ exhibited higher photocatalytic activity than CaTiO₃ for the degradation of MB. However, the photocatalytic activity of the Fe-doped CaTiO₃ was greatly influenced by the calcination temperature during the preparation process. The Fe-doped CaTiO₃ prepared at 500°C exhibited the best photocatalytic activity, with degradation of almost 100% MB (10ppm) under UV-visible light for 180 min. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Room temperature ferromagnetism in Fe-doped CuO nanoparticles.

    Layek, Samar; Verma, H C

    2013-03-01

    The pure and Fe-doped CuO nanoparticles of the series Cu(1-x)Fe(x)O (x = 0.00, 0.02, 0.04, 0.06 and 0.08) were successfully prepared by a simple low temperature sol-gel method using metal nitrates and citric acid. Rietveld refinement of the X-ray diffraction data showed that all the samples were single phase crystallized in monoclinic structure of space group C2/c with average crystallite size of about 25 nm and unit cell volume decreases with increasing iron doping concentration. TEM micrograph showed nearly spherical shaped agglomerated particles of 4% Fe-doped CuO with average diameter 26 nm. Pure CuO showed weak ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature with coercive field of 67 Oe. The ferromagnetic properties were greatly enhanced with Fe-doping in the CuO matrix. All the doped samples showed ferromagnetism at room temperature with a noticeable coercive field. Saturation magnetization increases with increasing Fe-doping, becomes highest for 4% doping then decreases for further doping which confirms that the ferromagnetism in these nanoparticles are intrinsic and are not resulting from any impurity phases. The ZFC and FC branches of the temperature dependent magnetization (measured in the range of 10-350 K by SQUID magnetometer) look like typical ferromagnetic nanoparticles and indicates that the ferromagnetic Curie temperature is above 350 K.

  15. Effect of Fe Doping by Thermal in-Diffusion on the Defect Structure of Lithium Niobate

    Mignoni, S; Zaltron, A; Ciampolillo, M V; Bazzan, M; Argiolas, N; Sada, C; Fontana, M D, E-mail: zaltronam@padova.infm.it

    2010-11-15

    In this work we investigate the iron incorporation in thermally diffused Fe doped LN, by combining two experimental techniques, i.e. micro-Raman spectroscopy and proton induced X rays emission. Our results point out that in substituting for Li, Fe ions induces a decrease of Nb{sub Li} antisite defects and rearrangement of the Nb sublattice.

  16. Molecular adsorption of hydrogen peroxide on N- and Fe-doped titania nanoclusters

    Mohajeri, Afshan, E-mail: amohajeri@shirazu.ac.ir; Dashti, Nasimeh Lari

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • The stability and electronic properties of N/Fe-doped (TiO{sub 2}){sub n} clusters with n = 5,6 were studied. • The adsorption H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on the surface of doped clusters has been investigated. • This is the first report of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} adsorption onto the (TiO{sub 2}){sub n} cluster in the presence of metal and non-metal dopants. • The effect of N and Fe dopants on interaction strength was studied. - Abstract: Titanium dioxide (titania) nanoparticles have been extensively investigated for photocatalytic applications such as the decomposition and adsorption of pollutant and undesirable compound in air and waste water. In this context, the present article reports the molecular adsorption of hydrogen peroxide on the surface of doped titania clusters. Density functional theory calculations were performed to investigate the structures and electronic properties of two nanoscale (TiO{sub 2}){sub n} clusters (n = 5,6) modified by nitrogen and iron dopants. The relative stability of all possible N-doped and Fe-doped isomers has been compared with each other and with the parent cluster. It was found that the Fe-doped clusters are in general more stable than the N-doped counterparts. Moreover, after N/Fe doping an enhanced in the magnetization of the clusters is observed. In the second part, we have investigated different modes of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} adsorption on the lowest-energy isomers of doped clusters. In almost all the cases, the adsorptions on the doped clusters are found to be less exothermic than on the corresponding undoped parent cluster. Our results highlight the essential role of charge transfer into the interaction between H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and doped (TiO{sub 2}){sub n} clusters, especially for Fe-doped clusters.

  17. Depositional environments inferred from variations of calcium carbonate, organic carbon, and sulfide sulfur: a core from southeastern Arabian Sea

    Paropkari, A.L.; Iyer, S.D.; Chauhan, O.S.; PrakashBabu, C.

    Pleistocene has been inferred. The higher contents of organic carbon and sulfide sulfur and their negative relationship clearly establish the existence of a reducing environment below 65 cm subbottom depth. The occurrence of pyrite framboids and crystals...

  18. XAFS Studies of Fe Doped PhTiO3 Nanoparticles

    Shibata, Tomohiro; Chattopadhyay, Soma; Lin Bin; Palkar, V. R.

    2007-01-01

    Fe K and Ti K edge XAFS studies are reported on Fe doped PbTiO3 nanoparticles down to the 10 nm size. Fe forms Fe3+ ions and substitute for Ti4+ ions. For 18 nm nanoparticles, the Fe and Ti environment is found to be quite different. For PbFe0.5Ti0.5O3, locally the structure remains distorted from bulk to 10 nm size although the average structure changes

  19. Ferromagnetism in Fe-doped ZnO Nanocrystals: Experimental and Theoretical investigations

    Karmakar, Debjani; Mandal, S. K.; Kadam, R. M.; Paulose, P. L.; Rajarajan, A. K.; Nath, T. K.; Das, A. K.; Dasgupta, I.; Das, G. P.

    2007-01-01

    Fe-doped ZnO nanocrystals are successfully synthesized and structurally characterized by using x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Magnetization measurements on the same system reveal a ferromagnetic to paramagnetic transition temperature > 450 K with a low-temperature transition from ferromagnetic to spin-glass state due to canting of the disordered surface spins in the nanoparticle system. Local magnetic probes like EPR and Mossbauer indicate the presence of Fe in both v...

  20. First principles study of magneto-optical properties of Fe-doped ZnO

    Shaoqiang, Guo [College of Science, Inner Mongolia University of Technology, Hohhot 010051 (China); Qingyu, Hou, E-mail: by0501119@126.com [College of Science, Inner Mongolia University of Technology, Hohhot 010051 (China); Zhenchao, Xu [College of Science, Inner Mongolia University of Technology, Hohhot 010051 (China); Chunwang, Zhao [College of Science, Inner Mongolia University of Technology, Hohhot 010051 (China); College of Arts and Sciences, Shanghai Maritime University, Shanghai 201306 (China)

    2016-12-15

    Studies on optical band gaps and absorption spectra of Fe-doped ZnO have conflicting conclusions, such as contradictory redshifted and blueshifted spectra. To solve this contradiction, we constructed models of un-doped and Fe-doped ZnO using first-principles theory and optimized the geometry of the three models. Electronic structures and absorption spectra were also calculated using the GGA+U method. Higher doping content of Fe resulted in larger volume of doped system, and higher total energy resulted in lower stability. Higher formation energy also led to more difficult doping. Meanwhile, the band gaps broadened and the absorption spectra exhibited an evident blue shift. The calculations were in good agreement with the experimental results. Given the unipolar structure of ZnO, four possible magnetic coupling configurations for Zn{sub 14}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 16} were calculated to investigate the magnetic properties. Results suggest that Fe doping can improve ferromagnetism in the ZnO system and that ferromagnetic stabilization was mediated by p–d exchange interaction between Fe-3d and O-2p orbitals. Therefore, the doped system is expected to obtain high stability and high Curie temperature of diluted magnetic semiconductor material, which are useful as theoretical bases for the design and preparation of the Fe-doped ZnO system’s magneto-optical properties. - Highlights: • A biomonitoring tool for the freshwater zone of template estuaries. • Water quality characterization related to nutrients and organic matter enrichment. • The percentage of a group of 24 tolerant species were capable of detecting the impairment of the water quality. • Characterization of morpho-functional traits of the selected tolerant species.

  1. Structural, optical, and magnetic properties of Mn and Fe-doped Co3O4 nanoparticles

    C. Stella

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Mn and Fe-doped Co3O4 nanoparticles were prepared by a simple precipitation method. The synthesized particles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscope (SEM, transmission electron microscope (TEM, UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, Raman spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM techniques. XRD analysis showed the cubic structure of Co3O4. SEM and TEM images confirmed the formation of interconnected nanoparticles. Mn and Fe-doped Co3O4 showed broad absorption in the visible region compared to undoped sample and the band gap values are red shifted. Five Raman active modes were observed from the Raman spectra. FTIR spectra confirmed the spinel structure of Co3O4 and the doping of Mn and Fe shifts the vibrational modes to lower wave number region. The magnetic measurements confirmed that Fe-doped Co3O4 shows a little ferromagnetic behavior compared to undoped and Mn-doped Co3O4, which could be related to the uncompensated surface spins and the finite size effects.

  2. Room temperature ferromagnetism in Fe-doped CeO2 nanoparticles.

    Maensiri, Santi; Phokha, Sumalin; Laokul, Paveena; Seraphin, Supapan

    2009-11-01

    RT ferromagnetism was observed in nanoparticles of Fe-doped CeO2 (i.e., Ce(0.97)Fe(0.03)O2) synthesized by a sol-gel method. The undoped and Fe-doped CeO2 were characterized by XRD, Raman spectroscopy, TEM, and VSM. The undoped samples and Ce(0.97)Fe(0.03)O2 precursor exhibit a diamagnetic behavior. The 673 K-calcined Ce(0.97)Fe(0.03)O2 sample is paramagnetic whereas 773 and 873 K-calcined Ce(0.97)Fe(0.03)O2 samples are ferromagnetism having the magnetizations of 4.65 x 10(-3) emu/g and 6.20 x 10(-3) emu/g at 10 kOe, respectively. Our results indicate that the ferromagnetic property is intrinsic to the Fe-doped CeO2 system and is not a result of any secondary magnetic phase or cluster formation.

  3. Reduced graphene oxide decorated with Fe doped SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles for humidity sensor

    Toloman, D. [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 67-103 Donat Street, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Popa, A., E-mail: popa@itim-cj.ro [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 67-103 Donat Street, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Stan, M.; Socaci, C.; Biris, A.R. [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 67-103 Donat Street, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Katona, G. [Babes-Bolyai University, Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, 11 Arany Janos Street, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Tudorache, F. [Interdisciplinary Research Department – Field Science & RAMTECH, Al. I. Cuza University, 11 Carol I Blvd., 7000506 Iasi (Romania); Petrila, I. [Interdisciplinary Research Department – Field Science & RAMTECH, Al. I. Cuza University, 11 Carol I Blvd., 7000506 Iasi (Romania); Faculty of Automatic Control and Computer Engineering, Gheorghe Asachi Technical University, 27 Dimitrie Mangeron Street, 700050 Iasi (Romania); Iacomi, F. [Faculty of Physics, Al. I. Cuza University, 11 Carol I Blvd., 7000506 Iasi (Romania)

    2017-04-30

    Highlights: • Reduced graphene oxide decorated with Fe doped SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles were synthesized. • The decoration of rGO layers with SnO{sub 2}:Fe nanoparticles was highlited by TEM. • The reduction of graphene oxide was evidenced using XRD and FT-IR. • Sensitivity tests for relative humidity (RH) were carried out. • The composite sensor exhibited enhanced sensing response as compared with Fe:SnO{sub 2}. - Abstract: Reduced graphene oxide (rGO) decorated with Fe doped SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles were fabricated via the electrostatic interaction between positively charged modified Fe-doped SnO{sub 2} oxide and negatively charged graphene oxide (GO) in the presence of poly(allylamine) hydrochloride (PAH). The decoration of rGO layers with SnO{sub 2}:Fe nanoparticles was highlited by TEM microsopy. For composite sample the diffraction patterns coincide well with those of SnO{sub 2}:Fe nanoparticles. The reduction of graphene oxide was evidenced using XRD and FT-IR spectroscopy. The formation of SnO{sub 2}:Fe-PAH-graphene composites was confirmed by FT-IR, Raman and EPR spectroscopy. Sensitivity tests for relative humidity (RH) measurements were carried out at five different concentrations of humid air at room temperature. The prepared composite sensor exhibited a higher sensing response as compared with Fe:SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles.

  4. Role of Fe doping on structural and vibrational properties of ZnO nanostructures

    Pandiyarajan, T.; Udayabhaskar, R.; Karthikeyan, B. [National Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Tiruchirappalli (India)

    2012-05-15

    In this report, Raman and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) measurements were carried out to study the phonon modes of pure and Fe doped ZnO nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were prepared by sol-gel technique at room temperature. The X-ray diffraction measurements reveal that the nanoparticles are in hexagonal wurtzite structure and doping makes the shrinkage of the lattice parameters, whereas there is no alteration in the unit cell. Raman measurements show both E{sub 2}{sup low} and E{sub 2}{sup High} optical phonon mode is shifted towards lower wave number with Fe incorporation and explained on the basis of force constant variation, stress measurements, respectively. In addition, Fe related local vibrational modes (LVM) were observed for higher concentration of Fe doping. FTIR spectra reveal a band at 444 cm{sup -1} which is specific to E{sub 1} (TO) mode; a red-shift of this mode in Fe doped samples and some surface phonon modes were observed. Furthermore, the observation of additional IR modes, which is considered to have an origin related to Fe dopant in the ZnO nanostructures, is also reported. These additional mode features can be regarded as an indicator for the incorporation of Fe ions into the lattice position of the ZnO nanostructures. (orig.)

  5. Calcium

    ... You can get decent amounts of calcium from baked beans, navy beans, white beans, and others. Canned fish. You're in luck if you like sardines and canned salmon with bones. Almond milk. Working Calcium Into Your ...

  6. Photocatalytic behaviors and structural characterization of nanocrystalline Fe-doped TiO2 synthesized by mechanical alloying

    Kim, Dong Hyun; Hong, Hyun Seon; Kim, Sun Jae; Song, Jae Sung; Lee, Kyung Sub

    2004-01-01

    Nanocrystalline Fe-doped TiO 2 powders were synthesized by mechanical alloying (MA) with varying Fe contents from 0 up to 4.8 wt.% to shift the absorption threshold into the visible light region. The photocatalytic feasibility of the Fe-doped TiO 2 powder was evaluated by quantifying the visible light absorption capacity using ultraviolet and visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy. Effects of Fe additions on the crystal structures and the morphologies of the Fe-doped powders were also investigated as a function of the doping content using transmission electron microscopy-electron diffraction pattern (TEM-EDP), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDAX) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The UV-Vis study showed that the UV absorption for the Fe-doped powder moved to a longer wavelength (red shift) and the photoefficiency was enhanced. Based on the analysis of the photoluminescence spectra, the red shift was believed to be induced by localizing the dopant level near the valence band of TiO 2 . The UV-Vis absorption depended on the Fe concentration. TEM-EDP and XRD investigations showed that the Fe-doped powder had a rutile phase in which the added Fe atoms were dissolved. The rutile phase was composed of spherical particles and chestnut bur shaped particles, resulting in a larger surface area than the spherical P-25 powder

  7. Comparative study of (N, Fe) doped TiO{sub 2} photocatalysts

    Larumbe, S., E-mail: silvia.larumbe@unavarra.es [Departamento Física, Universidad Pública de Navarra, Campus de Arrosadia, 31006 Pamplona (Spain); Monge, M. [Departamento de Química, Universidad de la Rioja, Centro de Investigación en Síntesis Química (CISQ), Complejo Científico Tecnológico, 26006 Logroño (Spain); Gómez-Polo, C. [Departamento Física, Universidad Pública de Navarra, Campus de Arrosadia, 31006 Pamplona (Spain)

    2015-02-01

    Highlights: • Fe, N doped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were synthesized by sol–gel. • The nitrogen content controlled the mean size of nanoparticles and afterwards the modification of cell parameters with respect the undoped sample. • Both doping elements induced the increase of the anatase-rutile transition temperature. • A red-shift is observed in the absorption spectra with the introduction of both elements. • An improvement of photocatalytic activity is observed with the introduction of nitrogen under UV and Visible light. However for higher concentrations a decrease in kinetic constants was observed as consequence of the oxygen vacancies acting as recombination centers. On the contrary, a deterioration of photocatalytic efficiency is found for the Fe doped samples. • A correlation between magnetic behavior and photocatalytic activity was found. - Abstract: The effect of N and Fe doping on the structural, optical, photocatalytic and magnetic properties of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles is analyzed. Undoped, N and Fe doped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were synthesized by sol–gel method. Titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) was used as the alkoxyde precursor and iron (III) nitrate and urea were the employed precursors to obtain Fe and N doped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, respectively. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetrical Analysis (TGA) enabled the analysis of the thermal decomposition process and the final calcination temperature. X-Ray Diffraction patterns of the calcined nanoparticles displayed a monophasic anatase structure in all the samples with mean crystallite diameter around 4–6 nm. The introduction of Fe or N induced a red-shift in the absorption spectra. Such a red-shift is characterized by a decrease in the band-gap energy and the occurrence of an absorption (Urbach) tail in the visible region. Finally, the photocatalytic efficiency was evaluated under UV and Visible light, obtaining an improvement of the kinetic constants in

  8. High-temperature ferromagnetism in heavily Fe-doped ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Fe)Sb

    Tu, Nguyen Thanh; Hai, Pham Nam; Anh, Le Duc; Tanaka, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    We show high-temperature ferromagnetism in heavily Fe-doped ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga_1_−_x,Fe_x)Sb (x = 23% and 25%) thin films grown by low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy. Magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy and anomalous Hall effect measurements indicate intrinsic ferromagnetism of these samples. The Curie temperature reaches 300 K and 340 K for x = 23% and 25%, respectively, which are the highest values reported so far in intrinsic III-V ferromagnetic semiconductors.

  9. Investigation of the effect of temperature on aging behavior of Fe-doped lead zirconate titanate

    Promsawat, Napatporn; Promsawat, Methee; Janphuang, Pattanaphong; Marungsri, Boonruang; Luo, Zhenhua; Pojprapai, Soodkhet

    The aging degradation behavior of Fe-doped Lead zirconate titanate (PZT) subjected to different heat-treated temperatures was investigated over 1000h. The aging degradation in the piezoelectric properties of PZT was indicated by the decrease in piezoelectric charge coefficient, electric field-induced strain and remanent polarization. It was found that the aging degradation became more pronounced at temperature above 50% of the PZT’s Curie temperature. A mathematical model based on the linear logarithmic stretched exponential function was applied to explain the aging behavior. A qualitative aging model based on polar macrodomain switchability was proposed.

  10. High-temperature ferromagnetism in heavily Fe-doped ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Fe)Sb

    Tu, Nguyen Thanh [Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Systems, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Department of Physics, Ho Chi Minh City University of Pedagogy, 280, An Duong Vuong Street, District 5, Ho Chi Minh City 748242 (Viet Nam); Hai, Pham Nam [Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Systems, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Department of Physical Electronics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-0033 (Japan); Center for Spintronics Research Network (CSRN), The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Anh, Le Duc [Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Systems, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Tanaka, Masaaki [Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Systems, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Center for Spintronics Research Network (CSRN), The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2016-05-09

    We show high-temperature ferromagnetism in heavily Fe-doped ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga{sub 1−x},Fe{sub x})Sb (x = 23% and 25%) thin films grown by low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy. Magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy and anomalous Hall effect measurements indicate intrinsic ferromagnetism of these samples. The Curie temperature reaches 300 K and 340 K for x = 23% and 25%, respectively, which are the highest values reported so far in intrinsic III-V ferromagnetic semiconductors.

  11. Preparation of Fe-doped TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays and their photocatalytic activities under visible light

    Tu, Ya-Fang; Huang, Sheng-You [Department of Physics, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Sang, Jian-Ping, E-mail: jpsang@acc-lab.whu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Department of Physics, Jianghan University, Wuhan 430056 (China); Zou, Xian-Wu [Department of Physics, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2010-02-15

    Fe-doped TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays have been prepared by the template-based liquid phase deposition method. Their morphologies, structures and optical properties were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. Their photocatalytic activities were evaluated by the degradation of methylene blue under visible light. The UV-vis absorption spectra of the Fe-doped TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays showed a red shift and an enhancement of the absorption in the visible region compared to the undoped sample. The Fe-doped TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays exhibited good photocatalytic activities under visible light irradiation, and the optimum dopant amount was found to be 5.9 at% in our experiments.

  12. Investigation on structural and electrical properties of Fe doped ZnO nanoparticles synthesized by solution combustion method

    Ram, Mast; Bala, Kanchan; Sharma, Hakikat; Kumar, Arun; Negi, N. S.

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, nanoparticles of Fe doped zinc oxide (ZnO) [Zn_1_-_xFe_xO where x=0.0, 0.01, 0.02, 0.03 and 0.05] were prepared by cost effective solution combustion method. The powder X-ray diffractometry confirms the formation of single phase wurtzite structure. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to investigate the micrsostructure of Fe-doped ZnO nanoparticles. The DC electrical conductivity was found to increase with temperature and measurement was carried out in the temperature range of 300-473K. DC electrical conductivity increases with temperature and decreases with Fe doping concentration.

  13. Half-metallic ferromagnetism in Fe-doped Zn3P2 from first-principles calculations

    Jaiganesh, G.; Jaya, S. Mathi

    2014-01-01

    Using the first-principles calculations based on the density functional theory, we have studied the magnetism and electronic structure of Fe-doped Zinc Phosphide (Zn 3 P 2 ). Our results show that the half-metallic ground state and ferromagnetic stability for the small Fe concentrations considered in our study. The stability of the doped material has been studied by calculating the heat of formation and analyzing the minimum total energies in nonmagnetic and ferromagnetic phases. A large value of the magnetic moment is obtained from our calculations and our calculation suggests that the Fe-doped Zn 3 P 2 may be a useful material in semiconductor spintronics

  14. Violet emission from Fe doped ZnO nanoparticles synthesized by precipitation method

    Kanchana, S., E-mail: skanchana09@gmail.com [PG & Research Department of Physics, Urumu Dhanalaksmi College, Tiruchirapalli 620019 (India); Chithra, M. Jay [Nanomaterials Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, Government Arts College, Karur 639005 (India); Ernest, Suhashini [PG & Research Department of Physics, Urumu Dhanalaksmi College, Tiruchirapalli 620019 (India); Pushpanathan, K. [Nanomaterials Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, Government Arts College, Karur 639005 (India)

    2016-08-15

    In this article we have reported the synthesis of Fe doped zinc oxide nanoparticles by the chemical precipitation method. The structural, compositional and optical properties have been examined by powder X-ray diffractometer, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, ultraviolet–visible and spectrophotometer. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the crystallites are in nanometer size and the sample contains polycrystals with hexagonal wurtzite structure. The average crystallite size has been found to increase from 25 nm to 36 nm with increase in Fe concentration. Scanning electron microscope result also confirmed the nanosize of the particles. Ultraviolet–visible spectrum of Fe doped zinc oxide shows a red shift with respect to undoped zinc oxide. The band gap of the samples was calculated from ultraviolet–visible spectrum and it is narrow from 3.30 eV to 3.23 eV with increasing Fe dopant upto 6%. The stretching bonds in Zn– Fe–O have been observed in FTIR spectra.

  15. Superior acidic catalytic activity and stability of Fe-doped HTaWO6 nanotubes

    Liu, He

    2017-07-26

    Fe-doped HTaWO6 (H1-3xFexTaWO6, x = 0.23) nanotubes as highly active solid acid catalysts were prepared via an exfoliation-scrolling-exchange process. The specific surface area and pore volume of undoped nanotubes (20.8 m2 g-1, 0.057 cm3 g-1) were remarkably enhanced through Fe3+ ion-exchange (>100 m2 g-1, 0.547 cm3 g-1). Doping Fe ions into the nanotubes endowed them with improved thermal stability due to the stronger interaction between the intercalated Fe3+ ions and the host layers. This interaction also facilitated the preservation of effective Brønsted acid sites and the generation of new acid sites. The integration of these functional roles resulted in Fe-doped nanotubes with high acidic catalytic activities in the Friedel-Crafts alkylation of anisole and the esterification of acetic acid. Facile accessibility to active sites, generation of effective Brønsted acid sites, high stability of the tubular structure and strong acid sites were found to synergistically contribute to the excellent acidic catalytic efficiency. Additionally, the activity of cycled nanocatalysts can be easily recovered through annealing treatment.

  16. Improving the selective cancer killing ability of ZnO nanoparticles using Fe doping.

    Thurber, Aaron; Wingett, Denise G; Rasmussen, John W; Layne, Janet; Johnson, Lydia; Tenne, Dmitri A; Zhang, Jianhui; Hanna, Charles B; Punnoose, Alex

    2012-06-01

    This work reports a new method to improve our recent demonstration of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) selectively killing certain human cancer cells, achieved by incorporating Fe ions into the NPs. Thoroughly characterized cationic ZnO NPs (∼6 nm) doped with Fe ions (Zn(1-x )Fe (x) O, x = 0-0.15) were used in this work, applied at a concentration of 24 μg/ml. Cytotoxicity studies using flow cytometry on Jurkat leukemic cancer cells show cell viability drops from about 43% for undoped ZnO NPs to 15% for ZnO NPs doped with 7.5% Fe. However, the trend reverses and cell viability increases with higher Fe concentrations. The non-immortalized human T cells are markedly more resistant to Fe-doped ZnO NPs than cancerous T cells, confirming that Fe-doped samples still maintain selective toxicity to cancer cells. Pure iron oxide samples displayed no appreciable toxicity. Reactive oxygen species generated with NP introduction to cells increased with increasing Fe up to 7.5% and decreased for >7.5% doping.

  17. Structural and optical inhomogeneities of Fe doped GaN grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    Malguth, E.; Hoffmann, A.; Phillips, M. R.

    2008-12-01

    We present the results of cathodoluminescence experiments on a set of Fe doped GaN samples with Fe concentrations of 5×1017, 1×1018, 1×1019, and 2×1020 cm-3. These specimens were grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy with different concentrations of Fe. The introduction of Fe is found to promote the formation of structurally inhomogeneous regions of increased donor concentration. We detect a tendency of these regions to form hexagonal pits at the surface. The locally increased carrier concentration leads to enhanced emission from the band edge and the internal T41(G)-A61(S) transition of Fe3+. In these areas, the luminescence forms a finely structured highly symmetric pattern, which is attributed to defect migration along strain-field lines. Fe doping is found to quench the yellow defect luminescence band and to enhance the blue luminescence band due to the lowering of the Fermi level and the formation of point defects, respectively.

  18. Photocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine B dye using Fe doped TiO2 nanocomposites

    Barkhade, Tejal; Banerjee, Indrani

    2018-05-01

    The unique properties of titanium dioxide (TiO2) such as high photo catalytic activity, high chemical stability and low toxicity have made it a suitable photocatalyst in recent decades. The effect of modification of TiO2 with doping of iron on its characteristics and photo catalytic efficiency was studied. The change in band gap energy of TiO2 nanoparticles after doping with Fe has been studied. Significant enhancement in photo catalytic property of TiO2 after Fe doping under light exposure conditions has been investigated. Acute exposure to non-biodegradable Rhodamine B resulted in many health problems like burning of eyes, skin irritation, nasal burning, and chest pain etc. Therefore, degradation of this dye is needed to save environment and animals. Considering the similar radius of Fe3+ and Ti4+ ions (respectively 0.64 Å and 0.68 Å), titanium position in the lattice of TiO2 can be replaced by iron cations easily. The undoped and Fe doped TiO2 nano composites were synthesized by sol-gel method, in which 1.0M% of Fe was doped with TiO2 and then the samples were characterized by using FE-SEM, UV-Visible diffuse spectroscopy, Raman Spectroscopy, and FTIR. Photo catalytic degradation of Rhodamine B dye experiment was carried out in visible light range. After 90 min time duration pink colour of dye turned colourless, indicating significant degradation rate with time.

  19. Probing magnetism and electronic structure of Fe-doped ZnO thin films

    El Amiri, A.; Moubah, R.; Lmai, F.; Abid, M.; Hassanain, N.; Hlil, E.K.; Lassri, H.

    2016-01-01

    Ab-initio calculations using Korringa–Kohn–Rostoker method combined with the coherent potential approximation were performed in order to study the magnetic properties of Fe-doped ZnO thin films with different Fe contents. The extracted parameters are compared with those determined experimentally. Based on total and partial densities of state curves, we demonstrate that there is a competition between p–d exchange and superexchange mechanisms leading to weak ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic contributions, respectively. The dominant mechanism is found to be antiferromagnetic. However, with increasing Fe content the ferromagnetic contribution increases. In addition, the effect of structural defects on the magnetism of the system is reported. It is shown that both Zn and O vacancies increase ferromagnetism, which is more pronounced in case of Zn. - Highlights: • The KKR–CPA approach was used to study the magnetism of Fe-doped ZnO thin films. • There is a competition between p–d exchange and superexchange mechanisms leading to weak ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic contributions. • Zn vacancies are more significant than the O ones for obtaining ferromagnetism.

  20. Probing magnetism and electronic structure of Fe-doped ZnO thin films

    El Amiri, A., E-mail: aelamiri@casablanca.ma [LPFA, Faculté des Sciences Ain Chock, Université Hassan II, BP 5366 Mâarif, Casablanca (Morocco); Moubah, R., E-mail: reda.moubah@hotmail.fr [LPMMAT, Faculté des Sciences Ain Chock, Université Hassan II, BP 5366 Mâarif, Casablanca (Morocco); Lmai, F. [LPTA, Faculté des Sciences Ain Chock, Université Hassan II, BP 5366 Mâarif, Casablanca (Morocco); Abid, M. [LPFA, Faculté des Sciences Ain Chock, Université Hassan II, BP 5366 Mâarif, Casablanca (Morocco); Hassanain, N. [Laboratoire de Physique des Matériaux, Faculté des Sciences, BP 1014 Rabat (Morocco); Hlil, E.K. [Institut Néel, CNRS et Université Joseph Fourier, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble (France); Lassri, H. [LPMMAT, Faculté des Sciences Ain Chock, Université Hassan II, BP 5366 Mâarif, Casablanca (Morocco)

    2016-01-15

    Ab-initio calculations using Korringa–Kohn–Rostoker method combined with the coherent potential approximation were performed in order to study the magnetic properties of Fe-doped ZnO thin films with different Fe contents. The extracted parameters are compared with those determined experimentally. Based on total and partial densities of state curves, we demonstrate that there is a competition between p–d exchange and superexchange mechanisms leading to weak ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic contributions, respectively. The dominant mechanism is found to be antiferromagnetic. However, with increasing Fe content the ferromagnetic contribution increases. In addition, the effect of structural defects on the magnetism of the system is reported. It is shown that both Zn and O vacancies increase ferromagnetism, which is more pronounced in case of Zn. - Highlights: • The KKR–CPA approach was used to study the magnetism of Fe-doped ZnO thin films. • There is a competition between p–d exchange and superexchange mechanisms leading to weak ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic contributions. • Zn vacancies are more significant than the O ones for obtaining ferromagnetism.

  1. Superior acidic catalytic activity and stability of Fe-doped HTaWO6 nanotubes

    Liu, He; Zhang, Haitao; Fei, Linfeng; Ma, Hongbin; Zhao, Guoying; Mak, CheeLeung; Zhang, Xixiang; Zhang, Suojiang

    2017-01-01

    Fe-doped HTaWO6 (H1-3xFexTaWO6, x = 0.23) nanotubes as highly active solid acid catalysts were prepared via an exfoliation-scrolling-exchange process. The specific surface area and pore volume of undoped nanotubes (20.8 m2 g-1, 0.057 cm3 g-1) were remarkably enhanced through Fe3+ ion-exchange (>100 m2 g-1, 0.547 cm3 g-1). Doping Fe ions into the nanotubes endowed them with improved thermal stability due to the stronger interaction between the intercalated Fe3+ ions and the host layers. This interaction also facilitated the preservation of effective Brønsted acid sites and the generation of new acid sites. The integration of these functional roles resulted in Fe-doped nanotubes with high acidic catalytic activities in the Friedel-Crafts alkylation of anisole and the esterification of acetic acid. Facile accessibility to active sites, generation of effective Brønsted acid sites, high stability of the tubular structure and strong acid sites were found to synergistically contribute to the excellent acidic catalytic efficiency. Additionally, the activity of cycled nanocatalysts can be easily recovered through annealing treatment.

  2. Inhibition of hydrogen sulfide on the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells involved in the modulation of calcium sensing receptor in high homocysteine

    Wang, Yuwen; Wang, Xiyao; Liang, Xiaohui; Wu, Jichao; Dong, Shiyun; Li, Hongzhu; Jin, Meili; Sun, Dianjun; Zhang, Weihua; Zhong, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia induces the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) inhibits the phenotype switch of VSMCs and calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) regulated the production of endogenous H 2 S. However, whether CaSR inhibits the proliferation of VSMCs by regulating the endogenous cystathionine-gamma-lyase (CSE, a major enzyme that produces H 2 S) pathway in high homocysteine (HHcy) has not been previously investigated. The intracellular calcium concentration, the concentration of H 2 S, the cell viability, the proliferation and the expression of proteins of cultured VSMCs from rat thoracic aortas were measured, respectively. The results showed that the [Ca 2+ ] i and the expression of p-CaMK and CSE increased upon treatment with CaSR agonist. In HHcy, the H 2 S concentration decrease, the proliferation and migration rate increased, the expression of Cyclin D1, PCNA, Osteopontin and p-Erk1/2 increased while the α-SM actin, P21 Cip/WAK−1 and Calponin decreased. The CaSR agonist or exogenous H 2 S significantly reversed the changes of VSMCs caused by HHcy. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that CaSR regulate the endogenous CSE/H 2 S is related to the PLC-IP 3 receptor and CaM signal pathways which inhibit the proliferation of VSMCs, and the latter is involved in the Erk1/2 dependent signal pathway in high homocysteine. - Highlights: • CaSR activation increased the production of endogenous H 2 S in high homocysteine VSMCs. • CaSR modulated the CSE/H 2 S are related to the PLC-IP 3 R and Ca 2+ -CaM signal pathways. • Inhibition of H 2 S on the proliferation of VSMCs is involved in the Erk1/2 pathway. • Explore the potential roles of CaSR in regulating VSMCs proliferation in high homocysteine.

  3. High-Quality Fe-doped TiO2 films with Superior Visible-Light Performance

    Su, Ren; Bechstein, Ralf; Kibsgaard, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    We report on high-quality polycrystalline Fe-doped TiO2 (Fe–TiO2) porous films synthesized via one-step electrochemical oxidation. We demonstrate that delicate properties such as the impurity concentration and the microstructure that strongly influence the performance of the material for photovol...

  4. Transparent nanostructured Fe-doped TiO2 thin films prepared by ultrasonic assisted spray pyrolysis technique

    Rasoulnezhad, Hossein; Hosseinzadeh, Ghader; Ghasemian, Naser; Hosseinzadeh, Reza; Homayoun Keihan, Amir

    2018-05-01

    Nanostructured TiO2 and Fe-doped TiO2 thin films with high transparency were deposited on glass substrate through ultrasonic-assisted spray pyrolysis technique and were used in the visible light photocatalytic degradation of MB dye. The resulting thin films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction (XRD), and UV-visible absorption spectroscopy techniques. Based on Raman spectroscopy results, both of the TiO2 and Fe-doped TiO2 films have anatase crystal structure, however, because of the insertion of Fe in the structure of TiO2 some point defects and oxygen vacancies are formed in the Fe-doped TiO2 thin film. Presence of Fe in the structure of TiO2 decreases the band gap energy of TiO2 and also reduces the electron–hole recombination rate. Decreasing of the electron–hole recombination rate and band gap energy result in the enhancement of the visible light photocatalytic activity of the Fe-doped TiO2 thin film.

  5. Synthesis and Electrochemical Properties of Fe-doped V6O13 as Cathode Material for Lithium-ion Battery

    YUAN Qi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fe-doped V6O13 was synthesized via a facile hydrothermal method after preparing precursor in order to improve the discharge capacity and cycle performance of V6O13 cathode material at high-lithium state. XRD, SEM and XPS were employed to characterize the phase, morphology and valence of the Fe-doped V6O13. Meanwhile, the electrochemical performance was analyzed and researched. Different morphologies and electrochemical performances of Fe-doped V6O13 were obtained via doping different contents of Fe3+ ion. The sample 0.02 presented the largest thickness of nanosheets (the thickness of 600-900nm and clearance between layers. The Fe-doped V6O13 has a better electrochemical performance than that of pure V6O13. The sample 0.02 exhibits the best electrochemical performance, the initial discharge specific capacity is 433mAh·g-1 and the capacity retention is 47.1% after 100 cycles.

  6. Density functional theory study of hydrogenation mechanism in Fe-doped Mg(0 0 0 1) surface

    Wu Guangxin; Zhang Jieyu; Wu Yongquan; Li Qian; Chou Kuochih; Bao Xinhua

    2009-01-01

    Using density functional theory (DFT) in combination with nudged elastic band (NEB) method, the dissociative chemisorptions and diffusion processes of hydrogen on both pure and Fe-doped Mg(0 0 0 1) surfaces are studied. Firstly, the dissociation pathway of H 2 and the relative barrier were investigated. The calculated dissociation barrier (1.08 eV) of hydrogen molecule on a pure Mg(0 0 0 1) surface is in good agreement with comparable experimental and theoretical studies. For the Fe-doped Mg(0 0 0 1) surface, the activated barrier decreases to 0.101 eV due to the strong interaction between the s orbital of H and the d orbital of Fe. Then, the diffusion processes of atomic hydrogen on pure and Fe-doped Mg(0 0 0 1) are presented. The obtained diffusion barrier to the first subsurface is 0.45 eV and 0.98 eV, respectively. Finally, Chou method was used to investigate the hydrogen sorption kinetic mechanism of pure MgH 2 and Mg mixed with 5 at.% Fe atoms composites. The obtained activation energies are 0.87 ± 0.02 and 0.31 ± 0.01 eV for H 2 dissociation on the pure surface and H atom diffusion in Fe-doped Mg surfaces, respectively. It suggests that the rate-controlling step is dissociation of H 2 on the pure Mg surface while it is diffusion of H atom in the Fe-doped Mg surface. And both of fitting data are matching well with our calculation results.

  7. Towards understanding the electronic structure of Fe-doped CeO2 nanoparticles with X-ray spectroscopy.

    Wang, Wei-Cheng; Chen, Shih-Yun; Glans, Per-Anders; Guo, Jinghua; Chen, Ren-Jie; Fong, Kang-Wei; Chen, Chi-Liang; Gloter, Alexandre; Chang, Ching-Lin; Chan, Ting-Shan; Chen, Jin-Ming; Lee, Jyh-Fu; Dong, Chung-Li

    2013-09-21

    This study reports on the electronic structure of Fe-doped CeO2 nanoparticles (NPs), determined by coupled X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray emission spectroscopy. A comparison of the local electronic structure around the Ce site with that around the Fe site indicates that the Fe substitutes for the Ce. The oxygen K-edge spectra that originated from the hybridization between cerium 4f and oxygen 2p states are sensitive to the oxidation state and depend strongly on the concentration of Fe doping. The Ce M(4,5)-edges and the Fe L(2,3)-edges reveal the variations of the charge states of Ce and Fe upon doping, respectively. The band gap is further obtained from the combined absorption-emission spectrum and decreased upon Fe doping, implying Fe doping introduces vacancies. The oxygen vacancies are induced by Fe doping and the spectrum reveals the charge transfer between Fe and Ce. Fe(3+) doping has two major effects on the formation of ferromagnetism in CeO2 nanoparticles. The first, at an Fe content of below 5%, is that the formation of Fe(3+)-Vo-Ce(3+) introduces oxygen deficiencies favoring ferromagnetism. The other, at an Fe content of over 5%, is the formation of Fe(3+)-Vo-Fe(3+), which favors antiferromagnetism, reducing the Ms. The defect structures Fe(3+)-Vo-Ce(3+) and Fe(3+)-Vo-Fe(3+) are crucial to the magnetism in these NPs and the change in Ms can be described as the effect of competitive interactions of magnetic polarons and paired ions.

  8. The effect of Ni and Fe doping on YBCO powder prepared by sol gel method

    F Saeb

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available  We fabricated YBa2Cu3-xMxO7- d (M=Ni, Fe bulk samples, with stochiometric amount 0≤x≤0.045 by sol-gel method. The phase analysis and microstructure of specimens were examined by XRD and SEM. The electrical resistivity was measured using standard four probe technique for 77-300K. Investigation of XRD spectrum by MAUD shows Ni and Fe ions substitute in Cu(2 and Cu(1 site, respectively. Transition temperature decreases in 93-87K for Ni-doped samples and 93-92K for Fe-doped series. It seems that the suppression of superconductivity has no direct correlation with the magnetism of ions itself .

  9. Monte Carlo simulations of magnetic order in Fe-doped manganites

    Alonso, J.; Gutierrez, J.; Barandiaran, J.M.; Bermejo, F.J.; Brey, L.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of Fe doping on the magnetic properties of La 0.7 Pb 0.3 Mn 1-x Fe x O 3 (x=0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.15 and 0.2) manganites is studied by the Monte Carlo simulation technique. As a first approximation, by means of a simple Heisenberg Hamiltonian, experimental normalized magnetizations at low temperatures have been reproduced for concentrations of Fe (x<0.2), but the calculated order temperatures show a large deviation from the measured ones. This shortcoming can be corrected by using a one electron effective hopping semi-classical Hamiltonian, with a simplified expression for the kinetic energy of the free electrons, which also avoids time-consuming diagonalizations

  10. Selenium Sulfide

    Selenium sulfide, an anti-infective agent, relieves itching and flaking of the scalp and removes the dry, ... Selenium sulfide comes in a lotion and is usually applied as a shampoo. As a shampoo, selenium ...

  11. Farm-scale testing of soybean peroxidase and calcium peroxide for surficial swine manure treatment and mitigation of odorous VOCs, ammonia and hydrogen sulfide emissions

    Maurer, Devin L.; Koziel, Jacek A.; Bruning, Kelsey; Parker, David B.

    2017-10-01

    The swine industry, regulatory agencies, and the public are interested in farm-tested methods for controlling gaseous emissions from swine barns. In earlier lab- and pilot-scale studies, a renewable catalyst consisting of soybean peroxidase (SBP) mixed with calcium peroxide (CaO2) was found to be effective in mitigating gaseous emissions from swine manure. Thus, a farm-scale experiment was conducted at the university's 178-pig, shallow-pit, mechanically-ventilated swine barn to evaluate SBP/CaO2 as a surficial manure pit additive under field conditions. The SBP was applied once at the beginning of the 42-day experiment at an application rate of 2.28 kg m-2 with 4.2% CaO2 added by weight. Gas samples were collected from the primary barn exhaust fans. As compared to the control, significant reductions in gaseous emissions were observed for ammonia (NH3, 21.7%), hydrogen sulfide (H2S, 79.7%), n-butyric acid (37.2%), valeric acid (47.7%), isovaleric acid (39.3%), indole (31.2%), and skatole (43.5%). Emissions of dimethyl disulfide/methanethiol (DMDS/MT) increased by 30.6%. Emissions of p-cresol were reduced by 14.4% but were not statistically significant. There were no significant changes to the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O). The total (material + labor) treatment cost was 2.62 per marketed pig, equivalent to 1.5% of the pig market price. The cost of CaO2 catalyst was ∼60% of materials cost. The cost of soybean hulls (SBP source) was 0.60 per marketed pig, i.e., only 40% of materials cost.

  12. Inhibition of hydrogen sulfide on the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells involved in the modulation of calcium sensing receptor in high homocysteine

    Wang, Yuwen; Wang, Xiyao [Department of Clinical Laboratory, The second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150081 (China); Liang, Xiaohui [Department of Radiology, Central Hospital of the Red Cross, Harbin 150080 (China); Wu, Jichao; Dong, Shiyun; Li, Hongzhu [Department of Pathophysiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150081 (China); Jin, Meili [Department of Clinical Laboratory, The second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150081 (China); Sun, Dianjun [Center for Endemic Disease Control, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China); Zhang, Weihua [Department of Pathophysiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150081 (China); Zhong, Xin, E-mail: xzhong1111@163.com [Department of Pathophysiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150081 (China)

    2016-09-10

    Hyperhomocysteinemia induces the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) inhibits the phenotype switch of VSMCs and calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) regulated the production of endogenous H{sub 2}S. However, whether CaSR inhibits the proliferation of VSMCs by regulating the endogenous cystathionine-gamma-lyase (CSE, a major enzyme that produces H{sub 2}S) pathway in high homocysteine (HHcy) has not been previously investigated. The intracellular calcium concentration, the concentration of H{sub 2}S, the cell viability, the proliferation and the expression of proteins of cultured VSMCs from rat thoracic aortas were measured, respectively. The results showed that the [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and the expression of p-CaMK and CSE increased upon treatment with CaSR agonist. In HHcy, the H{sub 2}S concentration decrease, the proliferation and migration rate increased, the expression of Cyclin D1, PCNA, Osteopontin and p-Erk1/2 increased while the α-SM actin, P21{sup Cip/WAK−1} and Calponin decreased. The CaSR agonist or exogenous H{sub 2}S significantly reversed the changes of VSMCs caused by HHcy. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that CaSR regulate the endogenous CSE/H{sub 2}S is related to the PLC-IP{sub 3} receptor and CaM signal pathways which inhibit the proliferation of VSMCs, and the latter is involved in the Erk1/2 dependent signal pathway in high homocysteine. - Highlights: • CaSR activation increased the production of endogenous H{sub 2}S in high homocysteine VSMCs. • CaSR modulated the CSE/H{sub 2}S are related to the PLC-IP{sub 3}R and Ca{sup 2+}-CaM signal pathways. • Inhibition of H{sub 2}S on the proliferation of VSMCs is involved in the Erk1/2 pathway. • Explore the potential roles of CaSR in regulating VSMCs proliferation in high homocysteine.

  13. Synthesis of nano-TiO2 photocatalysts with tunable Fe doping concentration from Ti-bearing tailings

    Sui, Yulei; Liu, Qingxia; Jiang, Tao; Guo, Yufeng

    2018-01-01

    In this work, highly pure nano-TiO2 photocatalysts with varying Fe doping concentration were successfully synthesized from low-cost Ti-bearing tailings by an acidolysis-hydrothermal route. The effects of H2SO4 concentration, leaching temperature, acid/tailings ratio and leaching time on the recovery of TiO2 from the tailings were investigated. Synthesized samples were characterized by XRD, TEM, EDS, XPS, and UV-vis spectroscopy. The results showed that the material prepared is characteristic anatase with the average size of 20 nm and the Fe doping concentration in the synthesized nano-TiO2 is tunable. The photocatalytic activity of synthesized nano-TiO2 photocatalyst was also evaluated by the photodegradation of Rhodamine B under visible light and UV light irradiation. Our study demonstrates a low-cost approach to synthesize highly efficient and visible light responsive catalysts.

  14. Electrical, dielectric and photocatalytic properties of Fe-doped ZnO nanomaterials synthesized by sol gel method

    Yacine Cherif

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Fe-doped ZnO nanoparticles were synthesized by sol gel technique. Fine-scale and single phase hexagonal wurtzite structure in all samples were confirmed by SEM and XRD, respectively. The band gap energy depends on the amount of Fe and was found to be in the range of 3.11–2.53 eV. The electric and dielectric properties were investigated using complex impedance spectroscopy. AC conductivity data were correlated with the barrier hopping (CBH model to evaluate the binding energy (Wm, the minimum hopping distance (Rmin and the density of states at Fermi level, N(EF. Fe doping in ZnO also improved the photocatalytic activity. Thus, the sample Zn0.95Fe0.05O showed high degradation potential towards methylene blue (MB, i.e. it degrades 90% of BM in 90 min under UV light.

  15. The role of disorder in Fe-doped CMR manganites as explored by μSR spectroscopy

    Gutierrez, J.; Bermejo, F.J.; Barandiaran, J.M.; Cottrell, S.P.; Romano, P.; Mondelli, C.; Fernandez Barquin, L.; Pena, A.

    2006-01-01

    A study on the effect of Fe doping on the magnetic properties of La 0.7 Pb 0.3 Mn 1-x Fe x O x , x=0 and x=0.2 perovskites is conducted using muon spectroscopy and macroscopic static magnetization measurements. For x=0, magnetization curves show a clear ferromagnetic component while a 20% Fe doping leads to the appearance of a kink in zero-field curves at low temperatures, attributed to progressive spin freezing together with a reduction of the ferromagnetic component. On dynamic grounds, we show that this effect translates into the appearance of non-exponential relaxation as T c is crossed from above. d from above

  16. The magnetic characterization of Fe doped TiO{sub 2} semiconducting oxide nanoparticles synthesized by sol–gel method

    Yeganeh, M., E-mail: mahboubeh.yeganeh@yahoo.co.uk [Department of Physics, Kosar University of Bojnord, P.O. Box 94104455 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahtahmasebi, N.; Kompany, A. [Department of Physics, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karimipour, M. [Department of Physics, Vali-e-Asr University of Rafsanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Razavi, F. [Department of Physics, Brock University (Canada); Nasralla, N.H.S. [Electron Microscope and Thin Film Department, Physics Division, 33 El Buhouth st., Dokki, 12622 Giza (Egypt); Šiller, L. [School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials, Newcastle University, NE1 7RU (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-15

    In this work Fe doped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were synthesized at different Fe/Ti molar ratio from 1% to 5% by sol-gel technique. The post annealing of the samples was carried out at T=400, 600, and 800 °C. HRTEM of the samples revealed that the mean size of the nanoparticles increases from about 8 nm to about 100 nm as the annealing temperature increased. SQUID magnetometry of 1% and 5% Fe doped TiO{sub 2} has shown mixed ferromagnetic and paramagnetic phases within the crystal while ferromagnetic order with T{sub c} about 350 K was only observed in 5% Fe:TiO{sub 2} sample annealed at T=800 °C. The oxygen vacancy mediated ferromagnetic (FM) interaction could be responsible for the observed FM.

  17. Influence of Fe-doping on the structural, optical and magnetic properties of ZnO nanoparticles

    Liu Changzhen; Meng Dawei; Pang Haixia; Wu Xiuling; Xie Jing; Yu Xiaohong; Chen Long; Liu Xiaoyang

    2012-01-01

    Zn 1–x Fe x O (x=0–0.05) nanoparticles were synthesized without a catalyst by a two-step method. Fe was doped into ZnO by a source of metallic Fe sheets in a solid–liquid system at 80 °C, and the Zn 1−x Fe x O nanoparticles were obtained by annealing at 300 °C. X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the structural properties of the as-grown Zn 1−x Fe x O. The optical properties were determined by Infrared and Ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy. The results confirm that the crystallinity of the ZnO is deteriorated due to Fe-doping. XPS results show that there is a mixture of Fe 0+ and the Fe 3+ in the representative Zn 0.95 Fe 0.05 O sample. The optical band gap of Zn 1−x Fe x O is enhanced with increasing of Fe-doping. Room temperature ferromagnetism was observed in all the Fe-doped ZnO samples. - Highlights: ► Zn 1−x Fe x O nanoparticles were synthesized with a simple two-step method. ► The Zn 1−x Fe x O predecessors were synthesized at a low temperature. ► Fe element was readily doped from the source of metallic Fe sheet. ► All the Fe doping ZnO samples have room temperature ferromagnetism. ► The structural and properties of the Zn 1−x Fe x O are regular with different x.

  18. Structural, optical, and magnetic properties of Fe doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} powders

    Krishna, N. Sai [Thin Films Laboratory, School of Advanced Sciences, VIT University, Vellore 632 014, Tamilnadu (India); Kaleemulla, S., E-mail: skaleemulla@gmail.com [Thin Films Laboratory, School of Advanced Sciences, VIT University, Vellore 632 014, Tamilnadu (India); Amarendra, G. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, Tamilnadu (India); UGC-DAE-CSR, Kalpakkam Node, Kokilamedu 603 104, Tamilnadu (India); Rao, N. Madhusudhana; Krishnamoorthi, C.; Kuppan, M.; Begam, M. Rigana [Thin Films Laboratory, School of Advanced Sciences, VIT University, Vellore 632 014, Tamilnadu (India); Reddy, D. Sreekantha [Department of Physics and Sungkyunkwan Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Omkaram, I. [Department of Electronics and Radio Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Synthesis of Fe doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} powders using a solid state reaction. • Characterization of the samples using XRD, UV–vis-NIR, FT-IR, and VSM. • All Fe doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} powders exhibited the cubic structure of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}. • All the Fe doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} samples exhibited room temperature ferromagnetism. - Abstract: Iron doped indium oxide dilute magnetic semiconductor (In{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x}){sub 2}O{sub 3} (x = 0.00, 0.03, 0.05, and 0.07) powders were synthesized by standard solid state reaction method followed by vacuum annealing. The effect of Fe concentration on structural, optical, and magnetic properties of the (In{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x}){sub 2}O{sub 3} powders have been systematically studied. X-ray diffraction patterns confirmed the polycrystalline cubic structure of all the samples. An optical band gap increases from 3.12 eV to 3.16 eV while Fe concentration varying from 0.03 to 0.07. Magnetic studies reveal that virgin/undoped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} is diamagnetic. However, all the Fe-doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} samples are ferromagnetic. The saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) of ferromagnetic (In{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x}){sub 2}O{sub 3} (x = 0.03, 0.05, and 0.07) samples increases from 11.56 memu/g to 148.64 memu/g with x = 0.03–0.07. The observed ferromagnetism in these samples was attributed to magnetic nature of the dopant (Fe) as well as defects created in the samples during vacuum annealing.

  19. Glassy behavior of the Nd sublattice induced by Fe doping in NdFexGa1-xO3

    Bartolome, F.; Parra-Borderias, M.; Blasco, J.; Bartolome, J.

    2007-01-01

    The evolution of the magnetic ordering of Nd with the Fe content in NdFe x Ga 1-x O 3 is studied by low-temperature specific-heat measurements for x= =0.2. Fe doping creates a distribution of internal fields on Nd, originating a Schottky contribution to the specific heat which is present for x>0. The power law followed by the low-temperature specific heat suggests a glassy behavior for x>=0.1

  20. Effect of Fe doping on optical properties of freestanding semi-insulating HVPE GaN:Fe

    Gladkov, Petar; Humlíček, J.; Hulicius, Eduard; Šimeček, Tomislav; Paskova, T.; Evans, K.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 312, č. 8 (2010), s. 1205-1209 ISSN 0022-0248 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100100719; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06040 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512; CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : Fe-doping * Optical characterization * Hybride vapor phase epitaxy * Nitrides Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 1.737, year: 2010

  1. Enhanced visible light photocatalytic properties of Fe-doped TiO2 nanorod clusters and monodispersed nanoparticles

    Liu, Y.; Wei, J.H.; Xiong, R.; Pan, C.X.; Shi, J.

    2011-01-01

    In order to get photocatalysts with desired morphologies and enhanced visible light responses, the Fe-doped TiO 2 nanorod clusters and monodispersed nanoparticles were prepared by modified hydrothermal and solvothermal method, respectively. The microstructures and morphologies of TiO 2 crystals can be controlled by restraining the hydrolytic reaction rates. The Fe-doped photocatalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis absorption spectroscopy (UV-vis), N 2 adsorption-desorption measurement (BET), and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). The refinements of the microstructures and morphologies result in the enhancement of the specific surface areas. The Fe 3+ -dopants in TiO 2 lattices not only lead to the significantly extending of the optical responses from UV to visible region but also diminish the recombination rates of the electrons and holes. The photocatalytic activities were evaluated by photocatalytic decomposition of formaldehyde in air under visible light illumination. Compared with P25 (TiO 2 ) and N-doped TiO 2 nanoparticles, the Fe-doped photocatalysts show high photocatalytic activities under visible light.

  2. Fe-doping effect on the Bi{sub 3}Ni superconductor microstructure

    Gonsalves, Silvio Henrique; Monteiro, Joao Frederico Haas Leandro; Leal, Adriane Consuelo da Silva; Andrade, Andre Vitor Chaves de; Souza, Gelson Biscaia de; Siqueira, Ezequiel Costa; Serbena, Francisco Carlos; Jurelo, Alcione Roberto, E-mail: arjurelo@uepg.br [Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa (UEPG), PR (Brazil). Departamento de Fisica

    2017-05-15

    The substitution effects of Fe ion on the structure of the intermetallic Bi{sub 3}Ni{sub 1-x}Fe{sub x} (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.10) superconductor were studied. The morphology of samples consists of an inhomogeneous laminar slab-like microstructure. The main phase corresponds to Bi{sub 3}Ni{sub 1-x}Fe{sub x} with an orthorhombic structure (Pnma), but with very small quantities of impurities of BiNi and Bi as revealed by X-ray diffraction. SEM and AFM reveal that the Bi3{sub N}i1{sub -x}Fe{sub x} phase consists of two regions. One region is Bi richer and Ni and Fe poorer than the other region.Raman spectroscopy revealed two phonon modes at room temperature. No significant changes were observed in the spectra with Fe doping and in different regions of the Bi{sub 3}Ni{sub 1-x}Fe{sub x} phase. Superconductivity is observed below a transition temperature T{sub C} = 4 K and regardless of iron doping. (author)

  3. Thickness-modulated anisotropic ferromagnetism in Fe-doped epitaxial HfO2 thin films

    Liu, Wenlong; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Ruyi; Ma, Rong; Wang, Hong

    2017-10-01

    Epitaxial tetragonal Fe-doped Hf0.95Fe0.05O2 (FHO) thin films with various thicknesses were deposited on (001)-oriented NdCaAlO4 (NCAO) substrates by using a pulsed laser deposition (PLD) system. The crystal structure and epitaxial nature of the FHO thin films were confirmed by typical x-ray diffraction (XRD) θ-2θ scan and reciprocal space mapping (RSM). The results indicate that two sets of lattice sites exist with two different crystal orientations [(001) and (100)] in the thicker FHO thin films. Further, the intensity of the (100) direction increases with the increase in thicknesses, which should have a significant effect on the anisotropic magnetization of the FHO thin films. Meanwhile, all the FHO thin films possess a tetragonal phase structure. An anisotropy behavior in magnetization has been observed in the FHO thin films. The anisotropic magnetization of the FHO thin films is slowly weakened as the thickness increases. Meanwhile, the saturation magnetization (Ms) of both in-plane and out-of-plane decreases with the increase in the thickness. The change in the anisotropic magnetization and Ms is attributed to the crystal lattice and the variation in the valence of Fe ions. These results indicate that the thickness-modulated anisotropic ferromagnetism of the tetragonal FHO epitaxial thin films is of potential use for the integration of metal-oxide semiconductors with spintronics.

  4. A close correlation between induced ferromagnetism and oxygen deficiency in Fe doped In2O3

    Singhal, R.K.; Samariya, A.; Kumar, Sudhish; Sharma, S.C.; Xing, Y.T.; Deshpande, U.P.; Shripathi, T.; Saitovitch, E.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the reversible manipulation of room temperature ferromagnetism in Fe (5%) doped In 2 O 3 polycrystalline magnetic semiconductor. The X-ray diffraction and photoemission measurements confirm that the Fe ions are well incorporated into the lattice, substituting the In 3+ ions. The magnetization measurements show that the host In 2 O 3 has a diamagnetic ground state, while it shows weak ferromagnetism at 300 K upon Fe doping. The as-prepared sample was then sequentially annealed in hydrogen, air, vacuum and finally in air. The ferromagnetic signal shoots up by hydrogenation as well as vacuum annealing and bounces back upon re-annealing the samples in air. The sequence of ferromagnetism shows a close inter-relationship with the behavior of oxygen vacancies (V o ). The Fe ions tend to a transform from 3+ to 2+ state during the giant ferromagnetic induction, as revealed by photoemission spectroscopy. A careful characterization of the structure, purity, magnetic, and transport properties confirms that the ferromagnetism is due to neither impurities nor clusters but directly related to the oxygen vacancies. The ferromagnetism can be reversibly controlled by these vacancies while a parallel variation of carrier concentration, as revealed by resistance measurements, appears to be a side effect of the oxygen vacancy variation.

  5. Magnetic and dielectric study of Fe-doped CdSe nanoparticles

    Das, Sayantani; Banerjee, Sourish; Bandyopadhyay, Sudipta; Sinha, Tripurari Prasad

    2018-01-01

    Nanoparticles of cadmium selenide (CdSe) and Fe (5% and 10%) doped CdSe have been synthesized by soft chemical route and found to have cubic structure. The magnetic field dependent magnetization measurement of the doped samples indicates the presence of anti-ferromagnetic order. The temperature dependent magnetization (M-T) measurement under zero field cooled and field cooled conditions has also ruled out the presence of ferromagnetic component in the samples at room temperature as well as low temperature. In order to estimate the anti-ferromagnetic coupling among the doped Fe atoms, an M-T measurement at 500 Oe has been carried out, and the Curie-Weiss temperature θ of the samples has been estimated from the inverse of susceptibility versus temperature plots. The dielectric relaxation peaks are observed in the spectra of imaginary part of dielectric constant. The temperature dependent relaxation time is found to obey the Arrhenius law having activation energy 0.4 eV for Fe doped samples. The frequency dependent conductivity spectra are found to obey the power law. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. Optical and Magnetic Properties of Fe Doped ZnO Nanoparticles Obtained by Hydrothermal Synthesis

    Xiaojuan Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diluted magnetic semiconductors Zn1-xFexO nanoparticles with different doping concentration (x=0, 0.01, 0.05, 0.10, and 0.20 were successfully synthesized by hydrothermal method. The crystal structure, morphology, and optical and magnetic properties of the samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM, Raman scattering spectra (Raman, photoluminescence spectra (PL, and the vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM. The experiment results show that all samples synthesized by this method possess hexagonal wurtzite crystal structure with good crystallization, no other impurity phases are observed, and the morphology of the sample shows the presence of ellipsoidal nanoparticles. All the Fe3+ successfully substituted for the lattice site of Zn2+ and generates single-phase Zn1-xFexO. Raman spectra shows that the peak shifts to higher frequency. PL spectra exhibit a slight blue shift and the UV emission is annihilated with the increase of Fe3+ concentration. Magnetic measurements indicated that Fe-doped ZnO samples exhibit ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature and the saturation magnetization is enhanced with the increase of iron doping content.

  7. Adsorption of CO2 on Fe-doped graphene nano-ribbons: Investigation of transport properties

    Othman, W.; Fahed, M.; Hatim, S.; Sherazi, A.; Berdiyorov, G.; Tit, N.

    2017-07-01

    Density functional theory combined with the non-equilibrium Green’s function formalism is used to study the conductance response of Fe-doped graphene nano-ribbons (GNRs) to CO2 gas adsorption. A single Fe atom is either adsorbed on GNR’s surface (aFe-graphene) or it substitutes the carbon atom (sFe-graphene). Metal atom doping reduces the electronic transmission of pristine graphene due to the localization of electronic states near the impurity site. Moreover, the aFe-graphene is found to be less sensitive to the CO2 molecule attachment as compared to the sFe-graphene system. These behaviours are not only consolidated but rather confirmed by calculating the IV characteristics from which both surface resistance and its sensitivity to the gas are estimated. Since the change in the conductivity is one of the main outputs of sensors, our findings will be useful in developing efficient graphene-based solid-state gas sensors.

  8. CO2 adsorption on Fe-doped graphene nanoribbons: First principles electronic transport calculations

    G. R. Berdiyorov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Decoration of graphene with metals and metal-oxides is known to be one of the effective methods to enhance gas sensing and catalytic properties of graphene. We use density functional theory in combination with the nonequilibrium Green’s function formalism to study the conductance response of Fe-doped graphene nanoribbons to CO2 gas adsorption. A single Fe atom is either adsorbed on graphene’s surface (aFe-graphene or it substitutes the carbon atom (sFe-graphene. Metal atom doping reduces the electronic transmission of pristine graphene due to the localization of electronic states near the impurities. The reduction in the transmission is more pronounced in the case of aFe-graphene. In addition, the aFe-graphene is found to be less sensitive to the CO2 molecule attachment as compared to the sFe-graphene system. Pristine graphene is also found to be less sensitive to the molecular adsorption. Since the change in the conductivity is one of the main outputs of sensors, our findings will be useful in developing graphene-based solid-state gas sensors.

  9. Structural, Optical, and Electronic Characterization of Fe-Doped Alumina Nanoparticles

    Heiba, Zein K.; Mohamed, Mohamed Bakr; Wahba, Adel Maher; Imam, N. G.

    2018-01-01

    The effects of iron doping on the structural, optical, and electronic properties of doped alumina have been studied. Single-phase iron-doped alumina Al2- x Fe x O3 ( x = 0.00 to 0.30) nanoparticles were synthesized via citrate-precursor method. Formation of single-phase hexagonal corundum structure with no other separate phases was demonstrated by x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The effects of iron doping on the α-Al2O3 structural parameters, viz. atomic coordinates, lattice parameters, crystallite size, and microstrain, were estimated from XRD data by applying the Rietveld profile fitting method. Transmission electron microscopy further confirmed the nanosize nature of the prepared samples with size ranging from 12 nm to 83 nm. The electronic band structure was investigated using density functional theory calculations to explain the decrease in the energy gap of Al2- x Fe x O3 as the amount of Fe was increased. The colored emission peaks in the visible region (blue, red, violet) of the electromagnetic spectrum obtained for the Fe-doped α-Al2O3 nanoparticles suggest their potential application as ceramic nanopigments.

  10. Investigation on Fe-doped ZnO nanostructures prepared by a chemical route

    Mishra, A.K.; Das, D.

    2010-01-01

    Zn 1-x Fe x O (x = 0.03, 0.05 and 0.07) nanoparticles synthesized by a chemical route were characterized by different techniques. The structural characterization by XRD and TEM confirmed the phase purity of the samples and indicated a reduction in particle size with increase in the dopant (Fe) concentration in ZnO. The optical characterization of the nanoparticles by FTIR, PL and UV-visible spectroscopy confirmed the formation of wurtzite structure and incorporation of Fe in the ZnO lattice. Magnetization measurements by VSM and Faraday balance techniques indicate presence of room temperature ferromagnetism in the Fe-doped ZnO samples. Local environment around the Fe atoms has been probed by 57 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy and the measured isomer shifts confirmed the charge state of iron as Fe 3+ . Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) measurements confirm the presence of cation vacancies in the nanoparticles and indicate a reduction of overall defect concentration with incorporation of Fe atoms in the ZnO structure.

  11. Investigation on Fe-doped ZnO nanostructures prepared by a chemical route

    Mishra, A.K. [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Kolkata Centre III/LB-8, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700098 (India); Das, D., E-mail: ddas@alpha.iuc.res.in [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Kolkata Centre III/LB-8, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700098 (India)

    2010-07-25

    Zn{sub 1-x}Fe{sub x}O (x = 0.03, 0.05 and 0.07) nanoparticles synthesized by a chemical route were characterized by different techniques. The structural characterization by XRD and TEM confirmed the phase purity of the samples and indicated a reduction in particle size with increase in the dopant (Fe) concentration in ZnO. The optical characterization of the nanoparticles by FTIR, PL and UV-visible spectroscopy confirmed the formation of wurtzite structure and incorporation of Fe in the ZnO lattice. Magnetization measurements by VSM and Faraday balance techniques indicate presence of room temperature ferromagnetism in the Fe-doped ZnO samples. Local environment around the Fe atoms has been probed by {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy and the measured isomer shifts confirmed the charge state of iron as Fe{sup 3+}. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) measurements confirm the presence of cation vacancies in the nanoparticles and indicate a reduction of overall defect concentration with incorporation of Fe atoms in the ZnO structure.

  12. Electrosynthesis and characterization of Fe doped CdSe thin films from ethylene glycol bath

    Pawar, S.M.; Moholkar, A.V.; Rajpure, K.Y.; Bhosale, C.H.

    2007-01-01

    The CdSe and Fe doped CdSe (Fe:CdSe) thin films have been electrodeposited potentiostatically onto the stainless steel and fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) glass substrates, from ethylene glycol bath containing (CH 3 COO) 2 .Cd.2H 2 O, SeO 2 , and FeCl 3 at room temperature. The doping concentration of Fe is optimized by using (photo) electrochemical (PEC) characterization technique. The deposition mechanism and Fe incorporation are studied by cyclic voltammetry. The structural, surface morphological and optical properties of the deposited CdSe and Fe:CdSe thin films have been studied by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical absorption techniques respectively. The PEC study shows that Fe:CdSe thin films are more photosensitive than that of undoped CdSe thin films. The X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the films are polycrystalline with hexagonal crystal structure. SEM studies reveal that the films with uniformly distributed grains over the entire surface of the substrate. The complete surface morphology has been changed after doping. Optical absorption study shows the presence of direct transition and a considerable decrease in bandgap, E g from 1.95 to 1.65 eV

  13. First-principles investigation of Fe-doped MgSiO3-ilmenite

    Stashans, Arvids; Rivera, Krupskaya; Pinto, Henry P.

    2012-01-01

    First principles density functional theory and generalised gradient approximation (GGA) have been exploited to investigate Fe-doped ilmenite-type MgSiO 3 mineral. Strong electron correlation effects not included in a density-functional formalism are described by a Hubbard-type on-site Coulomb repulsion (the DFT+U approach). Microstructure of equilibrium geometries, electronic band structures as well as magnetic properties are computed and discussed in detail. Hartree-Fock methodology is used as an extra tool to study optical properties of the same system. For equilibrium state of the doped mineral we find zigzag-type atomic rearrangements around the Fe impurity. The inclusion of correlation effects leads to an improved description of the electronic properties. In particular, it is discovered that Fe incorporation produces local energy levels within the band-gap of the material. Using ΔSCF method optical absorption energies are found to be equal to 2.2 and 2.6 eV leading to light absorption at longer wavelengths compared to the undoped MgSiO 3 . Our results provide evidence on the occurrence of local magnetic moment in the region surrounding iron dopant. According to the outcomes, the Fe⇒Mg reaction can be described as substitutionally labile with Fe 2+ complex being found in the high-spin state at low pressure MgSiO 3 -ilmenite conditions.

  14. First-principles investigation of Fe-doped MgSiO{sub 3}-ilmenite

    Stashans, Arvids, E-mail: arvids@utpl.edu.ec [Grupo de Fisicoquimica de Materiales, Universidad Tecnica Particular de Loja, Apartado 11-01-608, Loja (Ecuador); Rivera, Krupskaya [Grupo de Fisicoquimica de Materiales, Universidad Tecnica Particular de Loja, Apartado 11-01-608, Loja (Ecuador); Escuela de Geologia y Minas, Universidad Tecnica Particular de Loja, Apartado 11-01-608, Loja (Ecuador); Pinto, Henry P. [Interdisciplinary Center for Nanotoxicity, Department of Chemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi 39217-0510 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    First principles density functional theory and generalised gradient approximation (GGA) have been exploited to investigate Fe-doped ilmenite-type MgSiO{sub 3} mineral. Strong electron correlation effects not included in a density-functional formalism are described by a Hubbard-type on-site Coulomb repulsion (the DFT+U approach). Microstructure of equilibrium geometries, electronic band structures as well as magnetic properties are computed and discussed in detail. Hartree-Fock methodology is used as an extra tool to study optical properties of the same system. For equilibrium state of the doped mineral we find zigzag-type atomic rearrangements around the Fe impurity. The inclusion of correlation effects leads to an improved description of the electronic properties. In particular, it is discovered that Fe incorporation produces local energy levels within the band-gap of the material. Using {Delta}SCF method optical absorption energies are found to be equal to 2.2 and 2.6 eV leading to light absorption at longer wavelengths compared to the undoped MgSiO{sub 3}. Our results provide evidence on the occurrence of local magnetic moment in the region surrounding iron dopant. According to the outcomes, the Fe Rightwards-Double-Arrow Mg reaction can be described as substitutionally labile with Fe{sup 2+} complex being found in the high-spin state at low pressure MgSiO{sub 3}-ilmenite conditions.

  15. Magnetic and ferroelectric properties of Fe doped SrTiO{sub 3-{delta}} films

    Kumar, A Sendil; Suresh, P; Srinath, S [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad, 500 046 (India); Kumar, M Mahesh; Post, M L [Institute for Chemical Process and Environmental Technology, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON, K1A 0R6 (Canada); Srikanth, H [Materials Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida, 33620 (United States); Sahner, Kathy; Moos, Ralf, E-mail: sssp@uohyd.ernet.i [Functional Materials, University of Bayreuth, 95447, Bayreuth (Germany)

    2010-01-01

    Recent interest in SrTiO{sub 3} stems from its wide applicability in microwave devices based on the tunable characteristics of dielectric constant in the microwave frequency range. It is obvious that for any such application, SrTiO{sub 3} should have a ferroelectric Curie temperature (T{sub C}) close to room temperature or higher. By inducing strains by chemical substitutions, it was possible to obtain T{sub C} as high as 200{sup 0}C in SrTiO{sub 3} modified with Fe{sup 4+}. Hysteresis loops obtained confirms the presence of ferroelectric domains. Two apparent transitions, one at {approx}200 {sup 0}C and another {approx}300 {sup 0}C were seen in {epsilon}', which are replicated as sharp drops in resistivity curves. These temperatures far exceed the T{sub C}s reported in the literature till now and could open new avenues for innumerable other applications for SrTiO{sub 3}. The magnetic properties of Fe doped SrTiO{sub 3} are also investigated. Low doping of Fe exhibits simple antiferromagnetic behaviour.

  16. Colloidal Fe-doped ZnO nanocrystals: Facile low temperature synthesis, characterization and properties

    Singhal, A. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)], E-mail: ansing@barc.gov.in; Achary, S.N.; Tyagi, A.K. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Manna, P.K.; Yusuf, S.M. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2008-09-25

    Colloidal Fe-doped ZnO nanocrystals, Zn{sub 1-x}Fe{sub x}O (x = 0.00, 0.05, 0.07 and 0.1) have been prepared by thermal decomposition of metal precursors at 200 deg. C with hexadecylamine (HDA) as solvent and surfactant. The nanocrystals so prepared can be easily dispersed in non-polar solvents like chloroform and toluene. The nanocrystals have been structurally characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Magnetization measurements on a representative sample, Zn{sub 0.95}Fe{sub 0.05}O using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) reveal that the nanocrystals exhibit a weak ferromagnetic behavior at 300 K. This observation is further confirmed by the electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum of Zn{sub 0.95}Fe{sub 0.05}O nanocrystals, which shows a distinct ferromagnetic resonance signal at room temperature.

  17. Structural properties of pure and Fe-doped Yb films prepared by vapor condensation

    Rojas-Ayala, C., E-mail: chachi@cbpf.br [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rio de Janeiro 22290-180, RJ (Brazil); Facultad de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, P.O.B. 14-149, Lima 14 (Peru); Passamani, E.C. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória 29075-910, ES (Brazil); Suguihiro, N.M. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rio de Janeiro 22290-180, RJ (Brazil); Litterst, F.J. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rio de Janeiro 22290-180, RJ (Brazil); Institut für Physik der Kondensierten Materie, Technische Universität Braunschweig, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Baggio Saitovitch, E. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rio de Janeiro 22290-180, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-10-15

    Ytterbium and iron-doped ytterbium films were prepared by vapor quenching on Kapton substrates at room temperature. Structural characterization was performed by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The aim was to study the microstructure of pure and iron-doped films and thereby to understand the effects induced by iron incorporation. A coexistence of face centered cubic and hexagonal close packed-like structures was observed, the cubic-type structure being the dominant contribution. There is an apparent thickness dependence of the cubic/hexagonal relative ratios in the case of pure ytterbium. Iron-clusters induce a crystalline texture effect, but do not influence the cubic/hexagonal volume fraction. A schematic model is proposed for the microstructure of un-doped and iron-doped films including the cubic- and hexagonal-like structures, as well as the iron distribution in the ytterbium matrix. - Highlights: • Pure and Fe-doped Yb films have been prepared by vapor condensation. • Coexistence of fcc- and hcp-type structures was observed. • No oxide phases have been detected. • Fe-clustering does not affect the fcc/hcp ratio, but favors a crystalline texture. • A schematic model is proposed to describe microscopically the microstructure.

  18. Development of amperometric L-tyrosine sensor based on Fe-doped hydroxyapatite nanoparticles

    Kanchana, P.; Lavanya, N.; Sekar, C.

    2014-01-01

    A novel biosensor based on Fe-doped hydroxyapatite (Fe-HA) nanoparticles and tyrosinase has been developed for the detection of L-tyrosine. Nanostructured Fe-HA was synthesized by a simple microwave irradiation method, and its phase formation, morphology and magnetic property were examined by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Electrochemical performance of the nano Fe-HA/tyrosinase modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) for detection of L-tyrosine was investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and amperometric methods. The fabricated biosensor exhibited a linear response to L-tyrosine over a wide concentration range of 1.0 × 10 −7 to 1.0 × 10 −5 M with a detection limit of 245 nM at pH 7.0. In addition, the fabricated sensor showed an excellent selectivity, good reproducibility, long-term stability and anti-interference towards the determination of L-tyrosine. - Highlights: • A novel amperometric L-tyrosine biosensor has been fabricated using nanostructured Fe-HA. • The fabricated sensor exhibits a wide linear range, good stability and high reproducibility. • Fe-HA assists microenvironment and direct electron transfer between enzyme and electrode surface. • The nano Fe-HA and electrode fabrication procedure are simple and less expensive

  19. Photo-Hall-effect study of excitation and recombination in Fe-doped GaN

    Look, David C.; Leach, Jacob H.; Metzger, Robert

    2017-02-01

    The photo-Hall-effect was applied to the study of electron dynamics in semi-insulating Fe-doped GaN. High-powered light-emitting diodes of wavelengths λ = 940, 536, 449, 402, and 365 nm were used to excite steady-state free-electron volume concentrations Δn = 105-108 cm-3, depending on λ and intensity I0. Electron lifetime τ was determined from the energy E dependence of the excited sheet electron concentration Δns through the relationship Δns = I0τA(E), where the absorbance A(E) is a known function of sample thickness d and absorption coefficient α, and the energy dependence of α is taken from a theory of deep-center photoionization. The major sample impurities were Fe, Si, and C, with [Fe] ≫ [Si] and [C]. Fitted lifetimes τ ranged from 15 to 170 ps, depending on [Fe]. It was found that Δns ∝ I0 for [Si] > [C] and ∝ I01/2 for [Si] [C], some of the neutral Fe3+ is converted to Fe2+ with ground state Fe2+(5E) and excited state Fe2+(5T2); a fit of n vs. temperature T over the range of 290-325 K in the dark establishes E5E with respect to the conduction band: ECB - E5E = 0.564 eV - β5ET, where β5E = 3.6 × 10-4 eV/K. At room temperature, 294 K, ECB - E5E = 0.46 eV and ECB - E5T2 = 0.07 eV.

  20. Characterization of transparent superconductivity Fe-doped CuCrO{sub 2} delafossite oxide

    Taddee, Chutirat [Materials Science and Nanotechnology Program, Faculty of Science, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Kamwanna, Teerasak, E-mail: teekam@kku.ac.th [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Nanotec-KKU Center of Excellence on Advanced Nanomaterials for Energy Production and Storage, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Integrated Nanotechnology Research Center (INRC), Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Amornkitbamrung, Vittaya [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Nanotec-KKU Center of Excellence on Advanced Nanomaterials for Energy Production and Storage, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Integrated Nanotechnology Research Center (INRC), Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand)

    2016-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Effect of Fe substitution on the physical properties in CuCrO{sub 2} is studied. • The substitution of Cr{sup 3+} by Fe{sup 3+} produces a mixed effect on the magnetic properties. • CuCr{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x}O{sub 2} delafossite oxides show transparent superconductivity. - Abstract: Delafossite CuCr{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x}O{sub 2} (0.0 ≤ x ≤ 0.15) semiconductors were synthesized using a self-combustion urea nitrate process. The effects of Fe concentration on its microstructural, optical, magnetic, and electrical properties were investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis results revealed the delafossite structure in all the samples. The lattice spacing of CuCr{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x}O{sub 2} slightly increased with increasing substitution of Fe at the Cr sites. The optical properties measured at room temperature using UV–visible spectroscopy showed a weak absorbability in the visible light and near IR regions. The corresponding direct optical band gap was about 3.61 eV, exhibiting transparency in the visible region. The magnetic hysteresis loop measurements showed that the Fe-doped CuCrO{sub 2} samples exhibited ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature. This indicated that the substitution of Fe{sup 3+} for Cr{sup 3+} produced a mixed effect on the magnetic properties of CuCrO{sub 2} delafossite oxide. The temperature dependent resistivity measurements clearly revealed the presence of superconductivity in the CuCr{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x}O{sub 2} with a superconducting transition up to 118 K.

  1. Morphology-controlled synthesis and novel microwave electromagnetic properties of hollow urchin-like chain Fe-doped MnO2 under 10 T high magnetic field

    Yuping, Duan; Jia, Zhang; Hui, Jing; Shunhua, Liu

    2011-01-01

    Fe-doped MnO 2 with a hollow sea urchin-like ball chain shape was first synthesized under a high magnetic field of 10 T. The formation mechanism was investigated and discussed in detail. The synthesized samples were characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, EMPA, and vector network analysis. By doping MnO 2 with Fe, the relative complex permittivity of MnO 2 and its corresponding loss tangent clearly decreases, but its relative complex permeability and its corresponding loss tangent markedly increases. Moreover, the theoretically calculated values of reflection loss show that with increasing the Fe content, the as-prepared Fe-doped MnO 2 exhibits good microwave absorption capability. -- Graphical Abstract: Fe-doped MnO 2 with a hollow sea urchin-like ball chain shape was first synthesized in a high magnetic field of 10 T via a simple chemical process. Display Omitted Highlights: → Fe-doped MnO 2 with a hollow sea urchin-like ball chain shape was first synthesized. → We investigated formation mechanism and electromagnetic properties of the Fe-doped MnO 2 . → By doping MnO 2 with Fe, the electromagnetic properties are improved obviously.

  2. Synthesis of Fe-Doped ZnO Nanorods by Rapid Mixing Hydrothermal Method and Its Application for High Performance UV Photodetector

    Chan Oeurn Chey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We have successfully synthesized Fe-doped ZnO nanorods by a new and simple method in which the adopted approach is by using ammonia as a continuous source of OH- for hydrolysis instead of hexamethylenetetramine (HMT. The energy dispersive X-ray (EDX spectra revealed that the Fe peaks were presented in the grown Fe-doped ZnO nanorods samples and the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS results suggested that Fe3+ is incorporated into the ZnO lattice. Structural characterization indicated that the Fe-doped ZnO nanorods grow along the c-axis with a hexagonal wurtzite structure and have single crystalline nature without any secondary phases or clusters of FeO or Fe3O4 observed in the samples. The Fe-doped ZnO nanorods showed room temperature (300 K ferromagnetic magnetization versus field (M-H hysteresis and the magnetization increases from 2.5 μemu to 9.1 μemu for Zn0.99Fe0.01O and Zn0.95Fe0.05O, respectively. Moreover, the fabricated Au/Fe-doped ZnO Schottky diode based UV photodetector achieved 2.33 A/W of responsivity and 5 s of time response. Compared to other Au/ZnO nanorods Schottky devices, the presented responsivity is an improvement by a factor of 3.9.

  3. Effect of Al and Fe doping in ZnO on magnetic and magneto-transport properties

    Kumar, Santosh; Deepika; Tripathi, Malvika; Vaibhav, Pratyush; Kumar, Aman; Kumar, Ritesh; Choudhary, R.J.; Phase, D.M.

    2016-01-01

    The structural, magnetic and magneto-transport of undoped ZnO, Zn_0_._9_7Al_0_._0_3O, Zn_0_._9_5Fe_0_._0_5O and Zn_0_._9_2Al_0_._0_3Fe_0_._0_5O thin films grown on Si(100) substrate using pulsed laser deposition were investigated. The single phase nature of the films is confirmed by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy measurements. The possibility of Fe metal cluster in Fe doped/co-doped films is ruled out by Fe 2p core level photoelectron spectra. From O 1s core level spectra it is observed that oxygen vacancy is present in all the films. The undoped ZnO film shows magnetic ordering below ∼175 K, whereas Fe doped/codoped samples show magnetic ordering even at 300 K. The Al doped sample reveals paramagnetic behavior. The magneto-transport measurements suggest that the mobile carriers undergo exchange interaction with local magnetic moments. - Highlights: • Al, Fe, Al–Fe co-doped and undoped films of ZnO are deposited on Si by PLD. • Single phase (002) oriented Wurtzite ZnO phase is formed for all films. • Fe doped and Fe–Al co-doped ZnO films reveal magnetic hysteresis at 300 K. • Negative magnetoresistance is observed in undoped and Fe–Al co-doped ZnO film. • It is apparent that charge carriers are coupled with the local magnetic moment.

  4. Effect of Al and Fe doping in ZnO on magnetic and magneto-transport properties

    Kumar, Santosh, E-mail: skphysics@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics, College of Commerce, Arts & Science, Patna 800020, Bihar (India); Deepika [Department of Physics, College of Commerce, Arts & Science, Patna 800020, Bihar (India); Tripathi, Malvika [UGC DAE, Consortium for scientific research, Indore 452001, Madhya Pradesh (India); Vaibhav, Pratyush [Jaypee University of Engineering and Technology, Guna 473226, Madhya Pradesh (India); Kumar, Aman [Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India); Kumar, Ritesh [Department of Physics, College of Commerce, Arts & Science, Patna 800020, Bihar (India); Choudhary, R.J., E-mail: ram@csr.res.in [UGC DAE, Consortium for scientific research, Indore 452001, Madhya Pradesh (India); Phase, D.M. [UGC DAE, Consortium for scientific research, Indore 452001, Madhya Pradesh (India)

    2016-12-01

    The structural, magnetic and magneto-transport of undoped ZnO, Zn{sub 0.97}Al{sub 0.03}O, Zn{sub 0.95}Fe{sub 0.05}O and Zn{sub 0.92}Al{sub 0.03}Fe{sub 0.05}O thin films grown on Si(100) substrate using pulsed laser deposition were investigated. The single phase nature of the films is confirmed by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy measurements. The possibility of Fe metal cluster in Fe doped/co-doped films is ruled out by Fe 2p core level photoelectron spectra. From O 1s core level spectra it is observed that oxygen vacancy is present in all the films. The undoped ZnO film shows magnetic ordering below ∼175 K, whereas Fe doped/codoped samples show magnetic ordering even at 300 K. The Al doped sample reveals paramagnetic behavior. The magneto-transport measurements suggest that the mobile carriers undergo exchange interaction with local magnetic moments. - Highlights: • Al, Fe, Al–Fe co-doped and undoped films of ZnO are deposited on Si by PLD. • Single phase (002) oriented Wurtzite ZnO phase is formed for all films. • Fe doped and Fe–Al co-doped ZnO films reveal magnetic hysteresis at 300 K. • Negative magnetoresistance is observed in undoped and Fe–Al co-doped ZnO film. • It is apparent that charge carriers are coupled with the local magnetic moment.

  5. Sensitive measurement of nonlinear absorption and optical limiting in undoped and Fe-doped ZnO quantum dots using pulsed laser

    Sharma, D.; Malik, B. P.; Gaur, A.

    2016-11-01

    Zinc oxide quantum dots (QDs) with Fe-doping at different concentrations were prepared by chemical co-precipitation method. The prepared QDs were characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and Z-scan technique. The sizes of QDs were found to be within 4.6-6.6 nm range. The nonlinear parameters viz. two-photon absorption coefficient (βTPA) and two-photon absorption cross-section (σTPA) were extracted with the help of open aperture Z-scan technique using nanosecond Nd:YAG laser operating at wavelength 532 nm. Higher values of βTPA and σTPA for Fe doped ZnO implied that they were potential materials for development of photonics devices and sensor protection applications. Fe doped sample (3 % by wt) was found to be the best optical limiter with limiting threshold intensity of 0.64 TW/cm2.

  6. Fe-Doping Effect on Thermoelectric Properties of p-Type Bi0.48Sb1.52Te3

    Hyeona Mun

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The substitutional doping approach has been shown to be an effective strategy to improve ZT of Bi2Te3-based thermoelectric raw materials. We herein report the Fe-doping effects on electronic and thermal transport properties of polycrystalline bulks of p-type Bi0.48Sb1.52Te3. After a small amount of Fe-doping on Bi/Sb-sites, the power factor could be enhanced due to the optimization of carrier concentration. Additionally, lattice thermal conductivity was reduced by the intensified point-defect phonon scattering originating from the mass difference between the host atoms (Bi/Sb and dopants (Fe. An enhanced ZT of 1.09 at 300 K was obtained in 1.0 at% Fe-doped Bi0.48Sb1.52Te3 by these synergetic effects.

  7. Photoluminescence and magnetic properties of Fe-doped ZnS nano-particles synthesized by chemical co-precipitation

    Nie Eryong; Liu Donglai; Zhang Yunsen; Bai Xue; Yi Liang; Jin Yong; Jiao Zhifeng [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064, Sichuan (China); Sun Xiaosong, E-mail: sunxs@scu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064, Sichuan (China)

    2011-08-15

    This paper is focusing on the synthesis of Zn{sub 1-x}Fe{sub x}S nano-particles with x = 0, 0.1 and 0.2 by chemical co-precipitation method, the prepared of which are characterized by XRD, EDS, TEM, PL, magnetization versus field behavior and M-T curve. In the XRD patterns, Zn{sub 1-x}Fe{sub x}S nano-particles are shown of cubic zinc blende structure, and the broadening diffraction peaks consistent with the small-size characteristic of nano-materials. The diameter of nano-particles is between 3.3 and 5.5 nm according to the HR-TEM images. The EDS data confirm the existence of Fe ions in Fe-doped ZnS nanoparticles. There we found that Fe-doping did not import new energy bands or defect states, but reduced the intensity of PL peaks. The magnetization versus field behaviors were illustrated by the M-H curves at both 5 K and 300 K, respectively, where no remanence or coercive force was observed. This phenomenon indicates that the Zn{sub 1-x}Fe{sub x}S (x = 0.1) nano-particles are superparamagnetic. The zero-field-cooled (ZFC) and field-cooled (FC) magnetization curves further reveal that the blocking temperature (T{sub B}) of the superparamagnetic behavior might be below 5 K.

  8. Low Temperature Ferromagnetism and Optical Properties of Fe Doped ZnO Nanoparticles Synthesized by Sol-Gel Method

    B. Sathya

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this present investigation, pure and Fe doped Zinc oxide nanoparticles were successfully synthesized by sol gel method.The structural and optical properties were examined by using X-ray diffraction (XRD, Scanning electron microscope (SEM, Transmission electron microscope (TEM, Ultraviolet spectroscopy and Photoluminescence (PL techniques.The structural characterization of XRD analysis confirmed the phase purity of the samples and crystallite size can be decreased with increasing doping concentrations.SEM image show that nanoparticles in spherical shape. The optical band gap calculated through UV-visible spectroscopy is found to be increasing from 3.48 to 3.57eV. TEM analysis depicted the crystallinity of nanoparticles prepared and chemical composition conformed the EDAX analysis. The PL spectra reveal that, Fe doped ZnO exhibit a decrease in intensity of the band edge emission peak while the intensity of the deep level emission peak increases.The enhancement of low temperature ferromagnetism in ZnO: Fe was achieved.

  9. The electronic structures and ferromagnetism of Fe-doped GaSb: The first-principle calculation study

    Lin, Xue-ling; Niu, Cao-ping; Pan, Feng-chun; Chen, Huan-ming; Wang, Xu-ming

    2017-09-01

    The electronic structures and the magnetic properties of Fe doped GaSb have been investigated by the first-principles calculation based on the framework of the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) and GGA+U schemes. The calculated results indicated that Fe atoms tend to form the anti-ferromagnetic (AFM) coupling with the nearest-neighbor positions preferentially. Compared with the anti-ferromagnetic coupling, the ferromagnetic interactions occurred at the second nearest-neighbor and third nearest-neighbor sites have a bigger superiority energetically. The effect of strong electron correlation at Fe-d orbit taking on the magnetic properties predicted by GGA+U approach demonstrated that the ferromagnetic (FM) coupling between the Fe ions is even stronger in consideration of the strong electron correlation effect. The ferromagnetism in Fe doped GaSb system predicted by our investigation implied that the doping of Fe into GaSb can be as a vital routine for manufacturing the FM semiconductors with higher Curie temperature.

  10. X-ray absorption and resonant photoelectron spectroscopy of epitaxial Fe-doped SrTiO{sub 3}

    Koehl, Annemarie; Lenser, Christian; Xu, Chencheng; Wicklein, Sebastian; Dittmann, Regina [Peter Gruenberg Institut 7, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany); Kajewski, Dariusz; Kubacki, Jurek; Szade, Jacek [A.Chelkowski Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Katowic (Poland)

    2012-07-01

    In recent years resistive switching in transition metal oxides received a lot of research interest due to the proposed application as non-volatile data memory. SrTiO{sub 3} serves as a model system for the investigation of resistive switching due to the valency change mechanism. Frequently, slightly Fe doping is used, as it has shown to improve the switching properties. The focus of this study is the effect of Fe-doping of SrTiO{sub 3} in thin epitaxial films. Thin film samples with Fe concentration of 2 at.% and 5 at.% were prepared by pulsed laser deposition at varying substrate temperatures. The surface morphology of the films is studied with AFM. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is performed in total-electron and auger-electron yield offering different probing depths. Significant variations of the Fe-L edge between bulk and interface as well as after annealing are observed and discussed in terms of integration into the lattice and evolution of secondary phases. Resonant photoelectron spectroscopy at the absorption edge of Ti, O and Fe was used to determine the spectral contributions to the valence band. Most noteworthy we find significant spectral weight above the valence band, which can be attributed to Fe-states.

  11. Exploring a new phenomenon in the bactericidal response of TiO{sub 2} thin films by Fe doping: Exerting the antimicrobial activity even after stoppage of illumination

    Naghibi, Sanaz, E-mail: naghibi@iaush.ac.ir [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Shahreza Branch, Islamic Azad University, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Vahed, Shohreh, E-mail: sh_vahed@iaush.ac.ir [Department of Food Science, Shahreza Branch, Islamic Azad University, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Torabi, Omid, E-mail: omid_trb@yahoo.com [Department of Materials Engineering, Najafabad Branch, Advanced Materials Research Center, Islamic Azad University, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jamshidi, Amin, E-mail: amin_jam_g@yahoo.com [Department of Materials Engineering, Najafabad Branch, Advanced Materials Research Center, Islamic Azad University, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Golabgir, Mohammad Hossein, E-mail: m.hosseingolabgir@yahoo.com [Department of Materials Engineering, Najafabad Branch, Advanced Materials Research Center, Islamic Azad University, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-02-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Highly uniform Fe–TiO{sub 2} thin films were deposited on glass using sol–gel hot-dipping technique. • The photocatalytic properties were studied upon UV and visible irradiation. • By Fe doping into TiO{sub 2} structure, its microbial performance was prolonged even after stopping the illumination. • Due to Fe doping, the significant improvement in bactericidal coating was evident. - Abstract: Antibacterial properties of Fe-doped TiO{sub 2} thin films prepared on glass by the sol–gel hot-dipping technique were studied. The films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, scanning probe microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The photocatalytic activities were evaluated by measuring the decomposition rate of methylene blue under ultra violet and visible light. The antibacterial properties of the coatings were investigated against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Saccharomyces cerevisia and Aspergillus niger. The principle of incubation methods was also discussed. The results indicated that Fe doping of thin films eventuated in high antibacterial properties under visible light and this performance remained even after stoppage of illumination. This article tries to provide some explanation for this fact.

  12. Physical properties of Fe doped Mn3O4 thin films synthesized by SILAR method and their antibacterial performance against E. coli

    M.R. Belkhedkar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystalline Fe doped Mn3O4 thin films were deposited by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction method onto glass substrates. The X-ray diffraction study revealed that Fe doped Mn3O4 films are nanocrystalline in nature. The morphological investigations were carried out by using field emission scanning electron and atomic force microscopy studies. The optical absorption measurements showed that Mn3O4 films exhibit direct band gap energy of the order of 2.78 eV and it increased to 2.89 eV as the percentage of Fe doping in it increases from 0 to 8 wt.%. The room temperature electrical resistivity of Mn3O4 increases from 1.84 × 103 to 2.64 × 104 Ω cm as Fe doping increases from 0 to 8 wt.%. The SILAR grown Mn3O4 showed antibacterial performance against Escherichia coli bacteria which improved remarkably with doping.

  13. Pure and Fe-Doped Mesoporous Titania Catalyse the Oxidation of Acid Orange 7 by H2O2 under Different Illumination Conditions: Fe Doping Improves Photocatalytic Activity under Simulated Solar Light

    Francesca S. Freyria

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A sample of mesoporous TiO2 (MT, specific surface area = 150 m2·g−1 and two samples of MT containing 2.5 wt.% Fe were prepared by either direct synthesis doping (Fe2.5-MTd or impregnation (Fe2.5-MTi. Commercial TiO2 (Degussa P25, specific surface area = 56 m2 g−1 was used both as a benchmark and as a support for impregnation with either 0.8 or 2.5 wt.% Fe (Fe0.80-IT and Fe2.5-IT. The powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction, N2 isotherms at −196 °C, Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX Spectroscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS, Diffuse Reflectance (DR ultra-violet (UV-Vis and Mössbauer spectroscopies. Degradation of Acid Orange 7 (AO7 by H2O2 was the test reaction: effects of dark-conditions versus both UV and simulated solar light irradiation were considered. In dark conditions, AO7 conversion was higher with MT than with Degussa P25, whereas Fe-containing samples were active in a (slow Fenton-like reaction. Under UV light, MT was as active as Degussa P25, and Fe doping enhanced the photocatalytic activity of Fe2.5-MTd; Fe-impregnated samples were also active, likely due to the occurrence of a photo-Fenton process. Interestingly, the Fe2.5-MTd sample showed the best performance under solar light, confirming the positive effect of Fe doping by direct synthesis with respect to impregnation.

  14. Investigation of the physical, optical, and photocatalytic properties of CeO2/Fe-doped InVO4 composite

    Chaison, Jindaporn; Wetchakun, Khatcharin; Wetchakun, Natda

    2017-12-01

    The CeO2/Fe-doped InVO4 composites with various Fe concentrations (0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 5.0 and 6.0 mol%) was synthesized by homogeneous precipitation and hydrothermal methods. The as-synthesized samples were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Brunauer Emmett and Teller (BET)-specific surface area, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS). Fe-doping into InVO4 crystal induces the distortion of the crystalline structure, the transformation of InVO4 morphology, and the new energy subband level generation of Fe between the CB and VB edge of InVO4. The electron excitation from the VB to Fe orbitals results in the decreased band gap and the extended absorption of visible-light, and thus enhances its photocatalytic performance. Visible-light-driven photocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) dye in water was used to evaluate the photocatalytic performance of CeO2/Fe-doped InVO4 composites. The results revealed that there is an optimum Fe (5.0 mol %) doping level. The composite with the optimum doping level obtains high photocatalytic activity of CeO2/Fe-doped InVO4 composite compared to pure CeO2 and pure InVO4 host. The increase of photocatalytic activity of CeO2/Fe-doped InVO4 composite was ascribed to the surface area, crystal defect, and band gap energy. Moreover, the photocatalytic enhancement is also because iron ions act as a trapping site, which results in the higher separation efficiency of photogenerated electrons and holes pairs in the CeO2/InVO4 composite. The evaluation of radical scavengers confirmed that hydroxyl radical was the main active species during the photodegradation of RhB. These synergistic effects are responsible for the enhanced photocatalytic activity of CeO2/Fe-doped InVO4 composite. Furthermore, the possible enhanced photocatalytic mechanism

  15. Flow boiling heat transfer enhancement on copper surface using Fe doped Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–TiO{sub 2} composite coatings

    Sujith Kumar, C.S., E-mail: sujithdeepam@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli 620015, Tamil Nadu (India); Suresh, S., E-mail: ssuresh@nitt.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli 620015, Tamil Nadu (India); Aneesh, C.R., E-mail: aneeshcr87@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli 620015, Tamil Nadu (India); Santhosh Kumar, M.C., E-mail: santhoshmc@nitt.edu [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli 620015, Tamil Nadu (India); Praveen, A.S., E-mail: praveen_as_1215@yahoo.co.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli 620015, Tamil Nadu (India); Raji, K., E-mail: raji.kochandra@gmail.com [School of Nano Science and Technology, National Institute of Technology, Calicut 673601, Kerala (India)

    2015-04-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Fe–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–TiO{sub 2} composite coatings were coated on the copper using spray pyrolysis. • Effect of Fe doping on porosity was determined using AFM. • Effect of Fe doping on hydrophilicity was determined. • Higher enhancement in CHF was obtained for 7.2 at% Fe doped coated sample. - Abstract: In the present work, flow boiling experiments were conducted to study the effect of spray pyrolyzed Fe doped Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–TiO{sub 2} composite coatings over the copper heater blocks on critical heat flux (CHF) and boiling heat transfer coefficient. Heat transfer studies were conducted in a mini-channel of overall dimension 30 mm × 20 mm × 0.4 mm using de-mineralized water as the working fluid. Each coated sample was tested for two mass fluxes to explore the heat transfer performance. The effect of Fe addition on wettability and porosity of the coated surfaces were measured using the static contact angle metre and the atomic force microscope (AFM), and their effect on flow boiling heat transfer were investigated. A significant enhancement in CHF and boiling heat transfer coefficient were observed on all coated samples compared to sand blasted copper surface. A maximum enhancement of 52.39% and 44.11% in the CHF and heat transfer coefficient were observed for 7.2% Fe doped TiO{sub 2}–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} for a mass flux of 88 kg/m{sup 2} s.

  16. The effect of Ni and Fe doping on Hall anomaly in vortex state of doped YBCO samples

    M Nazarzadeh

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated hall effect on YBa2Cu3-xMxO7-δ (M=Ni, Fe bulk samples, with dopant amount 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.045 for Ni and 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.03 for Fe, with magnetic field (H=2.52, 4.61, 6.27 kOe perpendicular to sample’s surface with constant current 100 mA. Our study shows that as both dopants increases, TC decreases and it decreases faster by Ni . In these ranges of dopant and magnetic field the Hall sign reversal has been observed in all samples once and also ∆max has occurred in lower temperatures, its magnitude increases by Ni, and in Fe doped samples except in sample with dopant amount x=0.03, which almost decreases, that it can show effect of magnetic doping on hall effect.

  17. Preparation of Fe-Doped TiO2 Nanotubes and Their Photocatalytic Activities under Visible Light

    Honghui Teng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fe-doped TiO2 nanotubes (Fe-TNTs have been prepared by ultrasonic-assisted hydrothermal method. The structure and composition of the as-prepared TiO2 nanotubes were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and UV-Visible absorption spectroscopy. Their photocatalytic activities were evaluated by the degradation of MO under visible light. The UV-visible absorption spectra of the Fe-TNT showed a red shift and an enhancement of the absorption in the visible region compared to the pure TNT. The Fe-TNTs were provided with good photocatalytic activities and photostability and under visible light irradiation, and the optimum molar ratio of Ti : Fe was found to be 100 : 1 in our experiments.

  18. Dielectric properties of semi-insulating Fe-doped InP in the terahertz spectral region.

    Alyabyeva, L N; Zhukova, E S; Belkin, M A; Gorshunov, B P

    2017-08-04

    We report the values and the spectral dependence of the real and imaginary parts of the dielectric permittivity of semi-insulating Fe-doped InP crystalline wafers in the 2-700 cm -1 (0.06-21 THz) spectral region at room temperature. The data shows a number of absorption bands that are assigned to one- and two-phonon and impurity-related absorption processes. Unlike the previous studies of undoped or low-doped InP material, our data unveil the dielectric properties of InP that are not screened by strong free-carrier absorption and will be useful for designing a wide variety of InP-based electronic and photonic devices operating in the terahertz spectral range.

  19. Ternary mixed metal Fe-doped NiCo2O4 nanowires as efficient electrocatalysts for oxygen evolution reaction

    Yan, Kai-Li; Shang, Xiao; Li, Zhen; Dong, Bin; Li, Xiao; Gao, Wen-Kun; Chi, Jing-Qi; Chai, Yong-Ming; Liu, Chen-Guang

    2017-09-01

    Designing mixed metal oxides with unique nanostructures as efficient electrocatalysts for water electrolysis has been an attractive approach for the storage of renewable energies. The ternary mixed metal spinel oxides FexNi1-xCo2O4 (x = 0, 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 0.9, 1) have been synthesized by a facile hydrothermal approach and calcination treatment using nickel foam as substrate. Fe/Ni ratios have been proved to affect the nanostructures of FexNi1-xCo2O, which imply different intrinsic activity for oxygen evolution reaction (OER). SEM images show that Fe0.5Ni0.5Co2O4 has the uniform nanowires morphology with about 30 nm of the diameter and 200-300 nm of the length. The OER measurements show that Fe0.5Ni0.5Co2O4 exhibits the better electrocatalytic performances with lower overpotential of 350 mV at J = 10 mA cm-2. In addition, the smaller Tafel slope of 27 mV dec-1 than other samples with different Fe/Ni ratios for Fe0.5Ni0.5Co2O4 is obtained. The improved OER activity of Fe0.5Ni0.5Co2O4 may be attributed to the synergistic effects from ternary mixed metals especially Fe-doping and the uniform nanowires supported on NF. Therefore, synthesizing Fe-doped multi-metal oxides with novel nanostructures may be a promising strategy for excellent OER electrocatalysts and it also provides a facile way for the fabrication of high-activity ternary mixed metal oxides electrocatalysts.

  20. Photocatalytic characteristics of single phase Fe-doped anatase TiO2 nanoparticles sensitized with vitamin B12

    Gharagozlou, Mehrnaz; Bayati, R.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Anatase TiO 2 /B 12 hybrid nanostructured catalyst was successfully synthesized by sol–gel technique. • The nanoparticle catalyst was doped with iron at several concentrations. • Nanoparticles were characterized in detail by XRD, Raman, TEM, EDS, and spectroscopy techniques. • The formation mechanism and role of point defects on photocatalytic properties were discussed. • A structure-property-processing correlation was established. - Abstract: We report a processing-structure-property correlation in B 12 -anatase titania hybrid catalysts doped with several concentrations of iron. Our results clearly show that low-level iron doping alters structure, defect content, and photocatalytic characteristics of TiO 2 . XRD and Raman studies revealed formation of a single-phase anatase TiO 2 where no iron based segregation in particular iron oxide, was detected. FT-IR spectra clearly confirmed sensitization of TiO 2 nanoparticles with vitamin B 12 . TEM micrographs and diffraction patterns confirmed crystallization of anatase nanoparticles with a radius of 15–20 nm. Both XRD and Raman signals showed a peak shift and a peak broadening which are surmised to originate from creation of point defects, namely oxygen vacancy and titanium interstitial. The doped samples revealed a narrower band gap as compared to undoped samples. Photocatalytic activity of the samples was assessed through measuring the decomposition rate of rhodamine B. It was found that sensitization with vitamin B 12 and Fe-doping significantly enhances the photocatalytic efficiency of the anatase nanoparticles. We also showed that there is an optimum Fe-doping level where the maximum photocatalytic activity is achieved. The boost of photocatalytic activity was qualitatively understood to originate from a more effective use of the light photons, formation of point defects, which enhance the charge separation, higher carrier mobility

  1. Farm-scale testing of soybean peroxidase and calcium peroxide for surficial swine manure treatment and mitigation of odorous VOCs, ammonia and hydrogen sulfide

    The swine industry, regulatory agencies, and the public are interested in farm-tested methods for controlling gaseous emissions from swine barns. In earlier lab- and pilot-scale studies, a renewable catalyst consisting of soybean peroxidase (SBP) mixed with calcium peroxide was found to be effective...

  2. Influence of film thickness and Fe doping on LPG sensing properties of Mn3O4 thin film grown by SILAR method

    Belkhedkar, M. R.; Ubale, A. U.

    2018-05-01

    Nanocrystalline Fe doped and undoped Mn3O4 thin films have been deposited by Successive Ionic Layer Adsorption and Reaction (SILAR) method onto glass substrates using MnCl2 and NaOH as cationic and anionic precursors. The grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM)) have been carried out to analyze structural and surface morphological properties of the films. The LPG sensing performance of Mn3O4thin films have been studied by varying temperature, concentration of LPG, thickness of the film and doping percentage of Fe. The LPG response of the Mn3O4thin films were found to be enhances with film thickness and decreases with increased Fe doping (0 to 8 wt. %) at 573 K temperature.

  3. Structure and magnetic properties of Fe doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films prepared by electron beam evaporation

    Krishna, N. Sai; Kaleemulla, S., E-mail: skaleemulla@gmail.com; Rao, N. Madhusudhana; Krishnamoorthi, C.; Begam, M. Rigana [Thin Films Laboratory, School of Advanced Sciences, VIT University, Vellore – 632014 (India); Amarendra, G. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam – 603102 (India); UGC-DAE-CSR, Kalpakkam Node, Kokilamedu, Tamilnadu -603104 (India)

    2015-06-24

    Pure and Fe (7 at.%) doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films were grown onto the glass substrates by electron beam evaporation technique. The structural and magnetic properties of the pure and Fe doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films have been studied. The undoped and Fe doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films shown ferromagnetic property at room temperature. A magnetization of 24 emu/cm{sup 3} was observed for pure In{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films. The magnetization of 38.23 emu/cm{sup 3} was observed for the Fe (7 at.%) doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films.

  4. Performance evaluation of Mn and Fe doped SrCo0.9Nb0.1O3-δ cathode for IT-SOFC application

    Bele, Lokesh; Lenka, R. K.; Patro, P. K.; Muhmood, L.; Mahata, T.; Sinha, P. K.

    2018-02-01

    Cathode materials of Mn and Fe doped SrCo0.9Nb0.1O3-δ, are synthesized by solid state route for intermediate temperature fuel cell applications. Phase pure material is obtained after calcining the precursors at 1100 °C. Phase compatibility is observed between this novel cathode material with gadolinia doped ceria (GDC) electrolyte material as reflected in the diffraction pattern. The state of art YSZ electrolyte is not compatible with this cathode material. Average thermal expansion coefficient of the material varies between 17 to 22 X 10-6 K-1 on doping, from room temperature to 800 °C. Increase in thermal expansion coefficient is observed with Mn and Fe doping associated with the loss of oxygen from the crystal. The electrical conductivity of the cathode material decreases with Fe and Mn doping. Mn doped samples show lowest conductivity. From the symmetric cell measurement lower area specific resistance (0.16 Ω-cm2) is obtained for un-doped samples, at 850 °C. From the initial results it can be inferred that Mn/Fe doping improves neither the thermal expansion co-efficient nor the electrochemical activity.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of Fe-doped TiO2 photocatalyst by the sol–gel method

    Luu, Cam Loc; Ho, Si Thoang; Nguyen, Quoc Tuan

    2010-01-01

    Thin layers of pure TiO 2 and TiO 2 doped by different amounts of Fe 2 O 3 have been prepared by the sol–gel method with tetraisopropyl orthotitanate and Fe(NO 3 ) 3 . Physico-chemical properties of catalysts were characterized by BET Adsorption, x-ray Diffraction (XRD), FE-SEM, as well as Raman and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The photocatalytic activity of the obtained materials was investigated in the reaction of complete oxidation of p-xylene in gas phase under the radiation of UV (λ=365 nm) and LED (λ=470 nm) lamps. It has been found that the particle size of all samples was distributed in the range 20–30 nm. The content of the rutile phase in Fe-doped TiO 2 samples varied in the range 6.8 to 41.8% depending on the Fe content. Iron oxide doped into TiO 2 enables the photon absorbing zone of TiO 2 to extend from UV towards visible waves as well as to reduce its band gap energy from 3.2 to 2.67 eV. Photocatalytic activities of the TiO 2 samples modified by Fe 3+ have been found to be higher than those of pure TiO 2 by about 2.5 times

  6. Negative Thermal Expansion over a Wide Temperature Range in Fe-Doped MnNiGe Composites.

    Zhao, Wenjun; Sun, Ying; Liu, Yufei; Shi, Kewen; Lu, Huiqing; Song, Ping; Wang, Lei; Han, Huimin; Yuan, Xiuliang; Wang, Cong

    2018-01-01

    Fe-doped MnNiGe alloys were successfully synthesized by solid-state reaction. Giant negative thermal expansion (NTE) behaviors with the coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) of -285.23 × 10 -6 K -1 (192-305 K) and -1167.09 × 10 -6 K -1 (246-305 K) have been obtained in Mn 0.90 Fe 0.10 NiGe and MnNi 0.90 Fe 0.10 Ge, respectively. Furthermore, these materials were combined with Cu in order to control the NTE properties. The results indicate that the absolute value of CTE gradually decreases with increasing Cu contents. In Mn 0.92 Fe 0.08 NiGe/ x %Cu, the CTE gradually changes from -64.92 × 10 -6 K -1 (125-274 K) to -4.73 × 10 -6 K -1 (173-229 K) with increasing value of x from 15 to 70. The magnetic measurements reveal that the NTE behaviors in this work are strongly correlated with the process of the magnetic phase transition and the introduction of Fe atoms could also change the spiral anti-ferromagnetic (s-AFM) state into ferromagnetic (FM) state at low temperature. Our study launches a new candidate for controlling thermal expansion properties of metal matrix materials which could have potential application in variable temperature environment.

  7. Negative Thermal Expansion over a Wide Temperature Range in Fe-Doped MnNiGe Composites

    Wenjun Zhao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Fe-doped MnNiGe alloys were successfully synthesized by solid-state reaction. Giant negative thermal expansion (NTE behaviors with the coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE of −285.23 × 10−6 K−1 (192–305 K and −1167.09 × 10−6 K−1 (246–305 K have been obtained in Mn0.90Fe0.10NiGe and MnNi0.90Fe0.10Ge, respectively. Furthermore, these materials were combined with Cu in order to control the NTE properties. The results indicate that the absolute value of CTE gradually decreases with increasing Cu contents. In Mn0.92Fe0.08NiGe/x%Cu, the CTE gradually changes from −64.92 × 10−6 K−1 (125–274 K to −4.73 × 10−6 K−1 (173–229 K with increasing value of x from 15 to 70. The magnetic measurements reveal that the NTE behaviors in this work are strongly correlated with the process of the magnetic phase transition and the introduction of Fe atoms could also change the spiral anti-ferromagnetic (s-AFM state into ferromagnetic (FM state at low temperature. Our study launches a new candidate for controlling thermal expansion properties of metal matrix materials which could have potential application in variable temperature environment.

  8. A DFT analysis of the adsorption of nitrogen oxides on Fe-doped graphene, and the electric field induced desorption

    Cortés-Arriagada, Diego; Villegas-Escobar, Nery

    2017-10-01

    Density functional theory calculations were carried out to study the adsorption and sensing properties of Fe-doped graphene nanosheets (FeG) toward nitrogen oxides (NO, NO2, and N2O). The results indicated the adsorption of nitrogen oxides is significantly increased onto FeG compared to pristine graphene, reaching adsorption energies of 1.1-2.2 eV, even with a high stability at room temperature. As a result of the larger charge transfer and strong chemical binding, the bandgap of the adsorbent-adsorbate systems is increased in up to 0.5 eV with respect to the free FeG, indicating that FeG is highly sensitive to nitrogen oxides. It was also evidenced the adsorption and sensing properties remain even in the presence of O2 currents for N2O, where a co-adsorption mechanism was analyzed. Besides, NO2 is capable to induce the largest magnetization of FeG. Finally, positive electric fields of at least 0.04 a.u. decrease the stability of the adsorbent-adsorbate interactions, inducing the desorption process. Therefore, FeG emerges as a promising low-dimensional material with excellent adsorption and sensing properties to be applied in solid state sensors of nitrogen oxides, where electric fields can be used as a strategy for the FeG reactivation in repetitive sensing applications.

  9. Ab-initio investigation of spin-dependent transport properties in Fe-doped armchair graphyne nanoribbons

    GolafroozShahri, S.; Roknabadi, M.R., E-mail: roknabad@um.ac.ir; Shahtahmasebi, N.; Behdani, M.

    2016-12-15

    An ab-initio study on the spin-polarized transport properties of H-passivated Fe-doped graphyne nanoribbons is presented. All the calculations were based on density functional theory (DFT). Doping single magnetic atom on graphyne nanoribbons leads to metallicity which can significantly improve the conductivity. The currents are not degenerate for both up and down spin electrons and they are considerably spin-polarized. Therefore a relatively good spin-filtering can be expected. For configurations with geometric symmetry spin-rectifying is also observed. Therefore they can be applied as a dual spin-filter or a dual spin-diode in spintronic equipment. - Highlights: • The existence of Fe additional electrons lead to metallicity. • Doping magnetic atom on studied n-AGyNRs, has improved the conductance of nanoribbons. • The current for both spin electrons is considerably spin-polarized. • Threshold voltage decreased by increasing the width of ribbon. • For configurations with geometric symmetry spin-rectifying effect was also observed.

  10. A Mössbauer and magnetic study of ball milled Fe-doped ZnO Powders

    Zamora, Ligia E., E-mail: ligia.zamora@correounivalle.edu.co; Paz, J. C.; Piamba, J. F.; Tabares, J. A.; Alcázar, G. A. Pérez [Universidad del Valle, Departamento de física (Colombia)

    2015-06-15

    The structural and magnetic properties of Fe-doped ZnO are reported in this study, as obtained by mechanical alloying from elemental powders of ZnO and Fe. The properties of Zn{sub 0.90}Fe{sub 0.10}O samples alloying while varying the milling time (6, 12, 24 and 36 h) are also reported. The Rietveld refinement of X-ray Diffraction (XRD) patterns revealed that the system presents two structures: the würtzite structure of ZnO and the bcc structure of α-Fe. The Mössbauer spectra show that the samples present three components: a ferromagnetic component, associated with the Fe phase and two paramagnetic components, associated with the Fe atoms, which penetrate inside the ZnO matrix behaving as Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 2+}. The milling time contributes to an increase in the paramagnetic sites, and a solubility limit of the Fe atoms in the ZnO lattice was detected. The VSM measurements at room temperature detected ferromagnetic behavior with a saturation magnetization of 11 emu/g and a coercive field of 330 Oe for the sample alloyed over 24 h. A similar behavior was shown by the other samples.

  11. Fabrication of a 3D active mixer based on deformable Fe-doped PDMS cones with magnetic actuation

    Riahi, Mohammadreza; Alizadeh, Elaheh

    2012-01-01

    In this paper an active 3D mixer for lab-on-chip applications is presented. The micrometer size cone shape holes are ablated on a PMMA sheet utilizing a CO 2 laser. The holes are filled with Fe micro-particles and the whole structure is molded with PDMS which cause the Fe micro-particles to be trapped in a PDMS cone structure. These Fe-doped PDMS cones are placed in a PMMA micro-channel structure fabricated by CO 2 laser machining. By applying an external periodic magnetic field, the cones periodically bend in the micro-channel and stir the fluid. The fabrication method and the effect of the magnetic field on the bending of the cones with different aspect ratios is also discussed utilizing computer simulation. Doping the polymers with micro- and nano-metallic particles has been carried out by different research groups before, but according to our knowledge, application of such structures for the fabrication of a 3D active mixer has not been presented before. (paper)

  12. MESSENGER MASCS/UVVS Observations of Cold Exospheric Calcium

    Cassidy, T. A.

    2018-05-01

    Exospheric calcium is primarily ejected by a high energy process on the dawn hemisphere. UVVS data also show a sporadic cold component at low altitudes. Its temperature is consistent with laboratory measurements of photodesorption of calcium sulfide.

  13. Magnetic properties of pure and Fe doped HoCrO{sub 3} thin films fabricated via a solution route

    Yin, Shiqi; Sauyet, Theodore [Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States); Guild, Curt [Department of Chemistry, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States); Suib, S.L. [Department of Chemistry, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States); Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States); Jain, Menka, E-mail: menka.jain@uconn.edu [Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States); Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Multiferroic properties of orthorhombically distorted perovskite rare-earth chromites, such as HoCrO{sub 3}, are being investigated extensively in recent years. In the present work, we report on the effect of Fe substitution on the magnetic properties of HoCrO{sub 3} thin films. Thin films of HoCrO{sub 3} and HoCr{sub 0.7}Fe{sub 0.3}O{sub 3} were fabricated via a solution route on platinized silicon substrates. Structural properties of the films were evaluated by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy techniques. The surface morphology and cross-sections of the films were examined using scanning electron microscopy. Optical band gaps of pure and Fe doped HoCrO{sub 3} films are found to be 3.45 eV and 3.39 eV, respectively. The magnetization measurements show that the Néel temperatures (where Cr{sup 3+} orders) for the HoCrO{sub 3} and HoCr{sub 0.7}Fe{sub 0.3}O{sub 3} films are 134 and 148 K, respectively. In a magnetic field of 2 T, the maximum entropy change and relative cooling power, two parameters to evaluate the magnetocaloric properties of a material, were 0.813 J/kg K at 11 K and 21.1 J/kg for HoCrO{sub 3} film, in comparison with 0.748 J/kg K at 15 K and 26.8 J/kg for HoCr{sub 0.7}Fe{sub 0.3}O{sub 3} film. To our knowledge, this is the first work exploring the band gap and magnetocaloric properties of rare-earth chromite thin films. These findings should inspire the development of rare-earth chromite thin films for temperature control of nanoscale electronic devices and sensors in the low temperature region (< 30 K). - Highlights: • Phase-pure HoCrO{sub 3} and HoCr{sub 0.7}Fe{sub 0.3}O{sub 3}films were fabricated on platinized Sivia a solution route. • This is the first work on the exploration of band gap and magnetocaloric properties of rare-earth chromitefilms. • From 0-2 T, maximum entropy change for the HoCrO{sub 3} film was 0.813 J/kg K at 11 K.From 0-2 T, maximum entropy change for HoCr{sub 0.7}Fe{sub 0.3}O{sub 3} film was 0.748 J/kg K at 15

  14. Synthesis, characterization and in vitro study of magnetic biphasic calcium sulfate-bioactive glass

    Goh, Yi-Fan; Akram, Muhammad; Alshemary, Ammar Z. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai, Johor, Darul Ta' zim (Malaysia); Hussain, Rafaqat, E-mail: rafaqat@kimia.fs.utm.my [Ibnu Sina Institute for Fundamental Science Studies, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai, Johor Darul Ta' zim (Malaysia)

    2015-08-01

    Calcium sulfate-bioactive glass (CSBG) composites doped with 5, 10 and 20 mol% Fe were synthesized using quick alkali sol–gel method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) data of samples heated at 700 °C revealed the presence of anhydrite, while field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) characterization confirmed the formation of nano-sized CSBGs. The UV–vis studies confirmed that the main iron species in 5% Fe and 10% Fe doped CSBGs were tetrahedral Fe(III) whereas that in 20% Fe doped CSBG were extra-framework FeO{sub x} oligomers or iron oxide phases. Measurement of magnetic properties of the samples by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) showed very narrow hysteresis loop with zero coercivity and remanence for 10% Fe and 20% Fe doped CSBG, indicating that they are superparamagnetic in nature. All samples induced the formation of apatite layer with Ca/P ratio close to the stoichiometric HA in simulated body fluid (SBF) assessment. - Highlights: • Biphasic calcium sulphate-bioactive glass containing iron was prepared. • Composite bioglass was superparamagnetic in nature. • All samples promoted the growth of apatite layer with Ca/P close to 1.67.

  15. Tuning Fermi level of Cr{sub 2}CoZ (Z=Al and Si) inverse Heusler alloys via Fe-doping for maximum spin polarization

    Singh, Mukhtiyar [Department of Physics, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra-136119, Haryana (India); Saini, Hardev S. [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh-160014 (India); Thakur, Jyoti [Department of Physics, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra-136119, Haryana (India); Reshak, Ali H. [New Technologies—Research Center, University of West Bohemia, Univerzitni 8, 306 14 Pilsen (Czech Republic); Center of Excellence Geopolymer and Green Technology, School of Material Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, 01007 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Kashyap, Manish K., E-mail: manishdft@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra-136119, Haryana (India)

    2014-12-15

    We report full potential treatment of electronic and magnetic properties of Cr{sub 2−x}Fe{sub x}CoZ (Z=Al, Si) Heusler alloys where x=0.0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1.0, based on density functional theory (DFT). Both parent alloys (Cr{sub 2}CoAl and Cr{sub 2}CoSi) are not half-metallic frromagnets. The gradual replacement of one Cr sublattice with Fe induces the half-metallicity in these systems, resulting maximum spin polarization. The half-metallicity starts to appear in Cr{sub 2−x}Fe{sub x}CoAl and Cr{sub 2−x}Fe{sub x}CoSi with x=0.50 and x=0.25, respectively, and the values of minority-spin gap and half-metallic gap or spin-flip gap increase with further increase of x. These gaps are found to be maximum for x=1.0 for both cases. An excellent agreement between the structural properties of CoFeCrAl with available experimental study is obtained. The Fermi level tuning by Fe-doping makes these alloys highly spin polarized and thus these can be used as promising candidates for spin valves and magnetic tunnelling junction applications. - Highlights: • Tuning of E{sub F} in Cr{sub 2}CoZ (Z=Al, Si) has been demonstrated via Fe doping. • Effect of Fe doping on half-metallicity and magnetism have been discussed. • The new alloys have a potential of being used as spin polarized electrodes.

  16. Effect of calcination temperature on the structural, optical and magnetic properties of pure and Fe-doped ZnO nanoparticles

    Pal Singh Raminder Preet

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, pure ZnO and Fe-doped ZnO (Zn0.97Fe0.03O nanoparticles were synthesized by simple coprecipitation method with zinc acetate, ferric nitrate and sodium hydroxide precursors. Pure ZnO and Fe-doped ZnO were further calcined at 450 °C, 600 °C and 750 °C for 2 h. The structural, morphological and optical properties of the samples were characterized by X-ray diffractometer (XRD, scanning electron microscope (SEM, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS and UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. The X-ray diffraction studies revealed that the as-synthesized pure and doped ZnO nanoparticles have hexagonal wurtzite structure. The average crystallite size was calculated using Debye-Scherrer’s formula. The particle size was found to be in nano range and increased with an increase in calcination temperature. SEM micrographs confirmed the formation of spherical nanoparticles. Elemental compositions of various elements in pure and doped ZnO nanoparticles were determined by EDX spectroscopy. UV-Vis absorption spectra showed red shift (decrease in band gap with increasing calcination temperature. Effect of calcination on the magnetic properties of Fe-doped ZnO sample was also studied using vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM. M-H curves at room temperature revealed that coercivity and remanent polarization increase with an increase in calcination temperature from 450 °C to 750 °C, whereas reverse effect was observed for magnetization saturation.

  17. SULFIDE MINERALS IN SEDIMENTS

    The formation processes of metal sulfides in sediments, especially iron sulfides, have been the subjects of intense scientific research because of linkages to the global biogeochemical cycles of iron, sulfur, carbon, and oxygen. Transition metal sulfides (e.g., NiS, CuS, ZnS, Cd...

  18. Converse piezoelectric strain in undoped and Fe-doped AlGaN/GaN heterostructure field effect transistors studied by Raman scattering

    Sarua, A; Ji, Hangfeng; Pomeroy, J W; Kuball, M; Uren, M J; Martin, T

    2010-01-01

    Converse piezoelectric strain in undoped and Fe-doped AlGaN/GaN heterostructure field effect transistors (HFETs), i.e. the strain induced by applying bias to a transistor, was studied using micro-Raman scattering spectroscopy as a function of applied source–drain voltage for different GaN buffer doping levels and substrate types. By monitoring the phonon frequency shifts and line width of the E 2 and A 1 (LO) phonon modes of GaN, a considerable piezoelectric strain/stress was found in undoped devices, which exhibited a saturation above 40 V bias. This saturation voltage was used to quantify the deep acceptor concentration in the GaN buffer layer. Using experimental Raman data and numerical modelling of the electric field distribution in the device, it was furthermore established that Fe doping causes confinement of the strain/stress to the vicinity of the AlGaN/GaN interface, i.e. near the electron channel, with potential implications for device reliability. It was concluded that varying the structure and doping in the buffer layer has the potential to modify the converse piezoelectric strain and hence affect reliability issues in AlGaN/GaN HFETs

  19. Periodic DFT study of acidic trace atmospheric gas molecule adsorption on Ca- and Fe-doped MgO(001) surface basic sites.

    Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Hatch, Courtney; Orlando, Roberto

    2012-08-02

    The electronic properties of undoped and Ca- or Fe-doped MgO(001) surfaces, as well as their propensity toward atmospheric acidic gas (CO2, SO2, and NO2) uptake was investigated with an emphasis on gas adsorption on the basic MgO oxygen surface sites, O(surf), using periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Adsorption energy calculations show that MgO doping will provide stronger interactions of the adsorbate with the O(surf) sites than the undoped MgO for a given adsorbate molecule. Charge transfer from the iron atom in Fe-doped MgO(001) to NO2 was shown to increase the binding interaction between adsorbate by an order of magnitude, when compared to that of undoped and Ca-doped MgO(001) surfaces. Secondary binding interactions of adsorbate oxygen atoms were observed with surface magnesium sites at distances close to those of the Mg-O bond within the crystal. These interactions may serve as a preliminary step for adsorption and facilitate further adsorbate transformations into other binding configurations. Impacts on global atmospheric chemistry are discussed as these adsorption phenomena can affect atmospheric gas budgets via altered partitioning and retention on mineral aerosol surfaces.

  20. Effect of thermal annealing on the structure and magnetism of Fe-doped ZnO nanocrystals synthesized by solid state reaction

    Wang, Dong; Chen, Z. Q.; Wang, D. D.; Gong, J.; Cao, C. Y.; Tang, Z.; Huang, L. R.

    2010-11-01

    High purity Fe 2O 3/ZnO nanocomposites were annealed in air at different temperatures between 100 and 1200 °C to get Fe-doped ZnO nanocrystals. The structure and grain size of the Fe 2O 3/ZnO nanocomposites were investigated by X-ray diffraction 2θ scans. Annealing induces an increase of the grain size from 25 to 195 nm and appearance of franklinite phase of ZnFe 2O 4. Positron annihilation measurements reveal large number of vacancy defects in the interface region of the Fe 2O 3/ZnO nanocomposites, and they are gradually recovered with increasing annealing temperature. After annealing at temperatures higher than 1000 °C, the number of vacancies decreases to the lower detection limit of positrons. Room temperature ferromagnetism can be observed in Fe-doped ZnO nanocrystals using physical properties measurement system. The ferromagnetism remains after annealing up to 1000 °C, suggesting that it is not related with the interfacial defects.

  1. Effect of thermal annealing on the structure and magnetism of Fe-doped ZnO nanocrystals synthesized by solid state reaction

    Wang Dong [Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, Department of Physics, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Chen, Z.Q., E-mail: chenzq@whu.edu.c [Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, Department of Physics, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Wang, D.D.; Gong, J. [Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, Department of Physics, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Cao, C.Y.; Tang, Z. [Department of Electronic and Engineering, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 (China); Huang, L.R. [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, College of Opto-electronics Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2010-11-15

    High purity Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/ZnO nanocomposites were annealed in air at different temperatures between 100 and 1200 {sup o}C to get Fe-doped ZnO nanocrystals. The structure and grain size of the Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/ZnO nanocomposites were investigated by X-ray diffraction 2{theta} scans. Annealing induces an increase of the grain size from 25 to 195 nm and appearance of franklinite phase of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. Positron annihilation measurements reveal large number of vacancy defects in the interface region of the Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/ZnO nanocomposites, and they are gradually recovered with increasing annealing temperature. After annealing at temperatures higher than 1000 {sup o}C, the number of vacancies decreases to the lower detection limit of positrons. Room temperature ferromagnetism can be observed in Fe-doped ZnO nanocrystals using physical properties measurement system. The ferromagnetism remains after annealing up to 1000 {sup o}C, suggesting that it is not related with the interfacial defects.

  2. Effect of thermal annealing on the structure and magnetism of Fe-doped ZnO nanocrystals synthesized by solid state reaction

    Wang Dong; Chen, Z.Q.; Wang, D.D.; Gong, J.; Cao, C.Y.; Tang, Z.; Huang, L.R.

    2010-01-01

    High purity Fe 2 O 3 /ZnO nanocomposites were annealed in air at different temperatures between 100 and 1200 o C to get Fe-doped ZnO nanocrystals. The structure and grain size of the Fe 2 O 3 /ZnO nanocomposites were investigated by X-ray diffraction 2θ scans. Annealing induces an increase of the grain size from 25 to 195 nm and appearance of franklinite phase of ZnFe 2 O 4 . Positron annihilation measurements reveal large number of vacancy defects in the interface region of the Fe 2 O 3 /ZnO nanocomposites, and they are gradually recovered with increasing annealing temperature. After annealing at temperatures higher than 1000 o C, the number of vacancies decreases to the lower detection limit of positrons. Room temperature ferromagnetism can be observed in Fe-doped ZnO nanocrystals using physical properties measurement system. The ferromagnetism remains after annealing up to 1000 o C, suggesting that it is not related with the interfacial defects.

  3. Magnetism mediated by a majority of [Fe³⁺ + VO²⁻] complexes in Fe-doped CeO₂ nanoparticles.

    Paidi, V K; Ferreira, N S; Goltz, D; van Lierop, J

    2015-08-26

    We examine the role of Fe(3+) and vacancies (V(O)) on the magnetism of Fe-doped CeO2 nanoparticles. Magnetic nanoparticles of Ce(100-x)Fe(x)O2 (x  =  0, 0.26, 1.82, 2.64, 5.26, 6.91, and 7.22) were prepared by a co-precipitation method, and their structural, compositional and magnetic properties were investigated. The CeO2 nanoparticles had a mixed valance of Ce(4+) and Ce(3+) ions, and doping introduced Fe(3+) ions. The decrease in Ce(3+) and increase in Fe(3+) concentrations indicated the presence of more [Fe(3+) + V(O)(2-)] complexes with Fe loading in the particles. Charge neutralization, Fe(3+) + V(O)(2-) + 2Ce(4+) ↔ 2Ce(3+) + Fe(3+), identified the impact of V(O) on the magnetism, where our results suggest that the Fe-doped CeO2 nanoparticle magnetism is mediated by a majority of [Fe(3+) + V(O)(2-)]-Ce(3+) -[Fe(3+) + V(O)(2-)] complexes.

  4. Investigation of the electroforming and resistive switching mechanisms in Fe-doped SrTiO{sub 3} thin films

    Menke, Tobias

    2009-11-27

    To overcome the physical limits of todays memory technologies new concepts are needed. The resistive random access memory (RRAM), which bases on a nonvolatile and repeatable change of the resistance by external electrical stimuli, seems to be one promising candidate. Within the scope of this work, the model system Strontium titanate (SrTiO{sub 3}) has been investigated to get a deeper understanding of the underlying physical mechanism related to the resistance change. The electrical properties of SrTiO{sub 3} (STO) can be modulated from a band insulator to metallic conduction by a self-doping with oxygen vacancies which act as shallow donors. A local accumulation or depletion of oxygen vacancies at the vicinity of the surface will lead to a local redox process which is responsible for the resistance change. To study the influence of the interfaces on the switching properties of SrTiO{sub 3} thin films, epitaxial films of Fe-doped SrTiO{sub 3} were grown on different bottom electrodes (SrRuO{sub 3}, LaNiO{sub 3} und Nb:STO) by a ''Pulsed Laser Deposition'' technique. An atomic force microscope equipped with a conductive tip (LC-AFM) allowed studying the conductivity of the deposited films on the nanometer scale. Resistive switching of lateral structures smaller than {proportional_to}5 nm could be realized which represents the potential of this material for a further downscaling of RRAM devices. The deposition of top electrodes, made of Platinum or Titanium, allowed the electrical characterization of metal-insulator-metal (MIM) structures. An extensive investigation of pristine MIM-devices by impedance spectroscopy showed the big impact of the metal-insulator interface on the overall device resistance. Furthermore, a chemical polarization was studied by dynamical current sweeps and identified as a volatile resistance variation. Usually a forming procedure is needed to ''enable'' the resistive switching properties in MIM devices

  5. Investigation of the electroforming and resistive switching mechanisms in Fe-doped SrTiO3 thin films

    Menke, Tobias

    2009-01-01

    To overcome the physical limits of todays memory technologies new concepts are needed. The resistive random access memory (RRAM), which bases on a nonvolatile and repeatable change of the resistance by external electrical stimuli, seems to be one promising candidate. Within the scope of this work, the model system Strontium titanate (SrTiO 3 ) has been investigated to get a deeper understanding of the underlying physical mechanism related to the resistance change. The electrical properties of SrTiO 3 (STO) can be modulated from a band insulator to metallic conduction by a self-doping with oxygen vacancies which act as shallow donors. A local accumulation or depletion of oxygen vacancies at the vicinity of the surface will lead to a local redox process which is responsible for the resistance change. To study the influence of the interfaces on the switching properties of SrTiO 3 thin films, epitaxial films of Fe-doped SrTiO 3 were grown on different bottom electrodes (SrRuO 3 , LaNiO 3 und Nb:STO) by a ''Pulsed Laser Deposition'' technique. An atomic force microscope equipped with a conductive tip (LC-AFM) allowed studying the conductivity of the deposited films on the nanometer scale. Resistive switching of lateral structures smaller than ∝5 nm could be realized which represents the potential of this material for a further downscaling of RRAM devices. The deposition of top electrodes, made of Platinum or Titanium, allowed the electrical characterization of metal-insulator-metal (MIM) structures. An extensive investigation of pristine MIM-devices by impedance spectroscopy showed the big impact of the metal-insulator interface on the overall device resistance. Furthermore, a chemical polarization was studied by dynamical current sweeps and identified as a volatile resistance variation. Usually a forming procedure is needed to ''enable'' the resistive switching properties in MIM devices. The electroforming of these devices was extensively studied and could be

  6. Fe-doping induced Griffiths-like phase in La0.7Ba0.3CoO3

    Wan-Guo, Huang; Xiang-Qun, Zhang; Guo-Ke, Li; Young, Sun; Qing-An, Li; Zhao-Hua, Cheng

    2009-01-01

    The effect of Fe-doping on the magnetic properties of the ABO 3 -type perovskite cobaltites La 0.7 Ba 0.3 Co 1–y Fe y O 3 (0 ≤ y ≤ 0.80) is reported. With no apparent structural change in any doped sample, the Curie temperature (T C ) and the magnetization (M) are greatly suppressed for y ≤ 0.30 samples, while a distinct increase in T C for the y = 0.40 sample is observed. With the further increase of Fe concentration, T C increases monotonically. Griffiths-like phases in 0.40 ≤ y ≤ 0.60 samples are confirmed. The formation of the Griffiths-like phase is ascribed to B-site disordering induced isolation of ferromagnetic (FM) clusters above T C . (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  7. Magnetic, electrical transport and electron spin resonance studies of Fe-doped manganite LaMn0.7Fe0.3O3+δ

    Liu, X.J.; Li, Z.Q.; Yu, A.; Liu, M.L.; Li, W.R.; Li, B.L.; Wu, P.; Bai, H.L.; Jiang, E.Y.

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the magnetic, electrical transport and electron spin resonance (ESR) properties of polycrystalline Fe-doped manganite LaMn 0.7 Fe 0.3 O 3+ δ prepared by sol-gel method. A typical cluster-glass feature is presented by DC magnetization and AC susceptibility measurements and a sharp but shallow memory effect was observed. Symmetrical Lorentzian lines of the Mn/Fe spectra were detected above 120 K, where the sample is a paramagnetic (PM) insulator. When the temperature decreases from 120 K, magnetic clusters contributed from ferromagnetic (FM) interaction between Mn 3+ and Mn 3+ /Fe 3+ ions develop and coexist with PM phase. At lower temperature, these FM clusters compete with antiferromagnetic (AFM) ones between Fe 3+ ions, which are associated with a distinct field-cooled (FC) effect in characteristic of cluster-glass state

  8. Safe-by-Design CuO Nanoparticles via Fe-Doping, Cu-O Bond Length Variation, and Biological Assessment in Cells and Zebrafish Embryos.

    Naatz, Hendrik; Lin, Sijie; Li, Ruibin; Jiang, Wen; Ji, Zhaoxia; Chang, Chong Hyun; Köser, Jan; Thöming, Jorg; Xia, Tian; Nel, Andre E; Mädler, Lutz; Pokhrel, Suman

    2017-01-24

    The safe implementation of nanotechnology requires nanomaterial hazard assessment in accordance with the material physicochemical properties that trigger the injury response at the nano/bio interface. Since CuO nanoparticles (NPs) are widely used industrially and their dissolution properties play a major role in hazard potential, we hypothesized that tighter bonding of Cu to Fe by particle doping could constitute a safer-by-design approach through decreased dissolution. Accordingly, we designed a combinatorial library in which CuO was doped with 1-10% Fe in a flame spray pyrolysis reactor. The morphology and structural properties were determined by XRD, BET, Raman spectroscopy, HRTEM, EFTEM, and EELS, which demonstrated a significant reduction in the apical Cu-O bond length while simultaneously increasing the planar bond length (Jahn-Teller distortion). Hazard screening was performed in tissue culture cell lines and zebrafish embryos to discern the change in the hazardous effects of doped vs nondoped particles. This demonstrated that with increased levels of doping there was a progressive decrease in cytotoxicity in BEAS-2B and THP-1 cells, as well as an incremental decrease in the rate of hatching interference in zebrafish embryos. The dissolution profiles were determined and the surface reactions taking place in Holtfreter's solution were validated using cyclic voltammetry measurements to demonstrate that the Cu + /Cu 2+ and Fe 2+ /Fe 3+ redox species play a major role in the dissolution process of pure and Fe-doped CuO. Altogether, a safe-by-design strategy was implemented for the toxic CuO particles via Fe doping and has been demonstrated for their safe use in the environment.

  9. Magnetocaloric effect and negative thermal expansion in hexagonal Fe doped MnNiGe compounds with a magnetoelastic AFM-FM-like transition.

    Xu, Kun; Li, Zhe; Liu, Enke; Zhou, Haichun; Zhang, Yuanlei; Jing, Chao

    2017-01-30

    We report a detailed study of two successive first-order transitions, including a martensitic transition (MT) and an antiferromagnetic (AFM)-ferromagnetic (FM)-like transition, in Mn 1-x Fe x NiGe (x = 0, 0.06, 0.11) alloys by X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, magnetization and linear thermal expansion measurements. Such an AFM-FM-like transition occurring in the martensitic state has seldom been observed in the M(T) curves. The results of Arrott plot and linear relationship of the critical temperature with M 2 provide explicit evidence of its first-order magnetoelastic nature. On the other hand, their performances as magnetocaloric and negative thermal expansion materials were characterized. The isothermal entropy change for a field change of 30 kOe reaches an impressive value of -25.8 J/kg K at 203 K for x = 0.11 compared to the other two samples. It demonstrates that the magneto-responsive ability has been significantly promoted since an appropriate amount of Fe doping can break the local Ni-6Mn AFM configuration. Moreover, the Fe-doped samples reveal both the giant negative thermal expansion and near-zero thermal expansion for different temperature ranges. For instance, the average thermal expansion coefficient ā of x = 0.06 reaches -60.7 × 10 -6 /K over T = 231-338 K and 0.6 × 10 -6 /K over T = 175-231 K during cooling.

  10. Photocatalytic characteristics of single phase Fe-doped anatase TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles sensitized with vitamin B{sub 12}

    Gharagozlou, Mehrnaz, E-mail: gharagozlou@icrc.ac.ir [Department of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology, Institute for Color Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bayati, R. [Intel Corporation, IMO-SC, SC2, Santa Clara, CA 95054 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Anatase TiO{sub 2}/B{sub 12} hybrid nanostructured catalyst was successfully synthesized by sol–gel technique. • The nanoparticle catalyst was doped with iron at several concentrations. • Nanoparticles were characterized in detail by XRD, Raman, TEM, EDS, and spectroscopy techniques. • The formation mechanism and role of point defects on photocatalytic properties were discussed. • A structure-property-processing correlation was established. - Abstract: We report a processing-structure-property correlation in B{sub 12}-anatase titania hybrid catalysts doped with several concentrations of iron. Our results clearly show that low-level iron doping alters structure, defect content, and photocatalytic characteristics of TiO{sub 2}. XRD and Raman studies revealed formation of a single-phase anatase TiO{sub 2} where no iron based segregation in particular iron oxide, was detected. FT-IR spectra clearly confirmed sensitization of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles with vitamin B{sub 12}. TEM micrographs and diffraction patterns confirmed crystallization of anatase nanoparticles with a radius of 15–20 nm. Both XRD and Raman signals showed a peak shift and a peak broadening which are surmised to originate from creation of point defects, namely oxygen vacancy and titanium interstitial. The doped samples revealed a narrower band gap as compared to undoped samples. Photocatalytic activity of the samples was assessed through measuring the decomposition rate of rhodamine B. It was found that sensitization with vitamin B{sub 12} and Fe-doping significantly enhances the photocatalytic efficiency of the anatase nanoparticles. We also showed that there is an optimum Fe-doping level where the maximum photocatalytic activity is achieved. The boost of photocatalytic activity was qualitatively understood to originate from a more effective use of the light photons, formation of point defects, which enhance the charge separation, higher carrier mobility.

  11. Change of sulfide inclusions in steel microalloying with rare earth and alkaline-earth elements

    Averin, V.V.; Polonskaya, S.M.; Chistyakov, V.F.

    1977-01-01

    The conditions for the formation of sulfides in molten and solid iron were determined by considering the thermodynamics of the interaction of sulfur and of oxygen with various components. It was shown in casting of low-carbon steel under a blanket of slag-forming briquettes, calcium of the silicocalcium partly passes to iron and to the sulfide phase. The sulfide inclusions with calcium in rolling become lens-shaped and acquire a greater strength, proportional to the content of calcium, thus ensuring a lesser anisotropy of steel. The change in the shape and the composition of sulfide inclusions effects the fracture of the metal which changes in type from separation along lamellar inclusions to a plastic fracture, i.e., enhances resilience. It is thus noted that rare-earth and alkali-earth elements, in particular, cerium and calcium are promising agents for desulfurating molten iron

  12. Mesostructured metal germanium sulfides

    MacLachlan, M.J.; Coombs, N.; Bedard, R.L.; White, S.; Thompson, L.K.; Ozin, G.A.

    1999-12-29

    A new class of mesostructured metal germanium sulfide materials has been prepared and characterized. The synthesis, via supramolecular assembly of well-defined germanium sulfide anionic cluster precursors and transition-metal cations in formamide, represents a new strategy for the formation of this class of solids. A variety of techniques were employed to examine the structure and composition of the materials. Structurally, the material is best described as a periodic mesostructured metal sulfide-based coordination framework akin to periodic hexagonal mesoporous silica, MCM-41. At the molecular scale, the materials strongly resemble microstructured metal germanium sulfides, in which the structure of the [Ge{sub 4}S{sub 10}]{sup 4{minus}} cluster building-blocks are intact and linked via {mu}-S-M-S bonds. Evidence for a metal-metal bond in mesostructured Cu/Ge{sub 4}S{sub 10} is also provided.

  13. Novel phenomenon of magnetism and superconductivity in Fe-doped superconductor Bi{sub 4-x}Fe{sub x}O{sub 4}S{sub 3} (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.1)

    Li, Qing [Shanghai University, Department of Physics, Shanghai (China); Shanghai University, Materials Genome Institute, Shanghai (China); Wang, Difei; Yu, Chuan; Yin, Xunqing; Kang, Jian; Cheng, Cheng; Deng, Dongmei; Jing, Chao [Shanghai University, Department of Physics, Shanghai (China); Feng, Zhenjie; Cao, Shixun; Zhang, Jincang [Shanghai University, Department of Physics, Shanghai (China); Shanghai University, Materials Genome Institute, Shanghai (China); Shanghai Key Laboratory of High Temperature Superconductors, Shanghai (China); Chu, Hao [California Institute of Technology, Department of Applied Physics, Pasadena, CA (United States); Li, Xiaolong [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Shanghai (China)

    2017-06-15

    We report the effects of Fe doping on the BiS{sub 2}-based superconductor Bi{sub 4}O{sub 4}S{sub 3}. It has been found that the superconducting transition temperature (T{sub C}{sup onset}) is slightly enhanced by Fe doping. The magnetic susceptibility results reveal the coexistence of superconductivity and long-range ferrimagnetism in these samples. A new magnetic transition temperature T{sub V} (Verwey transition) from the M-T curves at ∝112 K is observed. The isothermal magnetization curves (M-H) indicate a weak ferrimagnetism, which is probably due to the antiparallel ordering of Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} magnetic moments. The coexistence of superconductivity and ferro/ferrimagnetism makes bismuth oxysulfide superconductor a platform for understanding superconductivity from a new perspective. (orig.)

  14. Influence of nanostructure Fe-doped ZnO interlayer on the electrical properties of Au/n-type InP Schottky structure

    Padma, R.; Balaram, N.; Reddy, I. Neelakanta; Reddy, V. Rajagopal, E-mail: reddy_vrg@rediffmail.com

    2016-07-01

    The Au/Fe-doped ZnO/n-InP metal/interlayer/semiconductor (MIS) Schottky structure is fabricated with Fe-doped ZnO nanostructure (NS) as an interlayer. The field emission scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy results demonstrated that the surface morphology of the Fe−ZnO NS on n-InP is fairly smooth. The x-ray diffraction results reveal that the average grain size of the Fe−ZnO film is 12.35 nm. The electrical properties of the Au/n-InP metal-semiconductor (MS) and Au/Fe−ZnO NS/n-InP MIS Schottky structures are investigated by current-voltage and capacitance-voltage measurements at room temperature. The Au/Fe−ZnO NS/n-InP MIS Schottky structure has good rectifying ratio with low-leakage current compared to the Au/n-InP MS structure. The barrier height obtained for the MIS structure is higher than those of MS Schottky structure because of the modification of the effective barrier height by the Fe−ZnO NS interlayer. Further, the barrier height, ideality factor and series resistance are determined for the MS and MIS Schottky structures using Norde and Cheung's functions and compared to each other. The estimated interface state density of MIS Schottky structure is lower than that of MS Schottky structure. Experimental results revealed that the Poole-Frenkel emission is the dominant conduction mechanism in the lower bias region whereas Schottky emission is the dominant in the higher bias region for both the Au/n-InP MS and Au/Fe−ZnO NS/n-InP MIS Schottky structures. - Highlights: • Barrier height of Au/n-InP Schottky diode was modified by Fe−ZnO nanostructure interlayer. • MIS structure has a good rectification ratio compared to the MS structure. • The interface state density of MIS structure is lower than that of MS structure. • Poole-Frenkel mechanism is found to dominate in both MS and MIS structure.

  15. Influence of Fe doped on the magnetocaloric behavior of La_{{2}/{3}} Ca_{{1}/{3}} Mn1-x Fe x O3 compounds: a Monte Carlo simulation

    Alzate-Cardona, J. D.; Barco-Rios, H.; Restrepo-Parra, E.

    2018-02-01

    The magnetocaloric behavior of La{2/{3}} Ca{1/{3}} Mn1-x Fe x O3 for x  =  0.00, 0.02, 0.03, 0.05, 0.07, 0.08 and 0.10 under the influence of an external magnetic field was simulated and analyzed. Simulations were carried out using the Monte Carlo method and the classical Heisenberg model under the Metropolis algorithm. These mixed valence manganites are characterized by having three types of magnetic ions corresponding to Mn4+≤ft(S=\\frac{3}{2}\\right) , which are bonded with Ca2+ , and Mneg3+ and Mneg\\prime3+ (S=2) , related to La3+ . The Fe ions were randomly included, replacing Mn ions. With this model, the magnetic entropy change, Δ S , in an isothermal process was determined. -Δ Sm showed maximum peaks around the paramagnetic-ferromagnetic transition temperature, which depends on Fe doping. Relative cooling power was computed for different Fe concentrations varying the magnetic applied field. Our model and results show that the Fe doping decreases the magnetocaloric effect in the La{2/{3}} Ca{1/{3}} Mn1-x Fe x O3, making this a bad candidate for magnetic refrigeration. The strong dependence of the magnetocaloric behavior on Fe doping and the external magnetic field in La{2/{3}} Ca{1/{3}} Mn1-x Fe x O3 can boost these materials for the future technological applications.

  16. Facile preparation of novel dandelion-like Fe-doped NiCo2O4 microspheres@nanomeshes for excellent capacitive property in asymmetric supercapacitors

    Liu, Li; Zhang, Huijuan; Fang, Ling; Mu, Yanping; Wang, Yu

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we successfully synthesized the dandelion-like Fe-doped NiCo2O4 microspheres@nanomeshes (Fe-NCO-M@N-1h) using a facile hydrothermal method, followed by calcinations. In the unique structure, numerous nanoneedles radially grow on the surface of microsphere and some porous nanomeshes orderly develop in the inside of microsphere, therefore dandelion-like Fe-NCO-M@N-1h displays large specific surface area (101.15 m2 g-1) and more active sites. Electrochemical properties of the Fe-NCO-M@N-1h have been tested for symmetric supercapacitors (SCs) and asymmetric supercapacitors (ASCs). Benefiting from the structural advantages, Fe-NCO-M@N-1h electrode exhibits outstanding capacitive behaviors, such as the desirable specific capacitance and eminent rate performance (2237 and 1810 F g-1 at the current densities of 1 and 20 A g-1, respectively) and remarkable cycling performance (95.8% retention after 4500 cycles). Besides, a Fe-NCO-M@N-1h//AC-ASCs device has been constructed successfully, presenting the highest energy density of 46.68 Wh kg-1. The results indicate that the Fe-NCO-M@N-1h is a potential material for SCs.

  17. Low Concentration Fe-Doped Alumina Catalysts Using Sol-Gel and Impregnation Methods: The Synthesis, Characterization and Catalytic Performance during the Combustion of Trichloroethylene

    Carolina Solis Maldonado

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The role of iron in two modes of integration into alumina catalysts was studied at 0.39 wt% Fe and tested in trichloroethylene combustion. One modified alumina was synthesized using the sol-gel method with Fe added in situ during hydrolysis; another modification was performed using calcined alumina, prepared using the sol-gel method and impregnated with Fe. Several characterization techniques were used to study the level of Fe modification in the γ-Al2O3 phase formed and to correlate the catalytic properties during trichloroethylene (TCE combustion. The introduction of Fe in situ during the sol-gel process influenced the crystallite size, and three iron species were generated, namely, magnetite, maghemite and hematite. The impregnated Fe-alumina formed hematite and maghemite, which were highly dispersed on the γ-Al2O3 surface. The X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS, FT-IR and Mössbauer spectroscopy analyses revealed how Fe interacted with the γ-Al2O3 lattice in both catalysts. The impregnated Fe-catalyst showed the best catalytic performance compared to the catalyst that was Fe-doped in situ by the sol-gel method; both had better catalytic activity than pure alumina. This difference in activity was correlated with the accessibility of the reactants to the hematite iron species on the surface. The chlorine poisoning for all three catalysts was less than 1.8%.

  18. Low Concentration Fe-Doped Alumina Catalysts Using Sol-Gel and Impregnation Methods: The Synthesis, Characterization and Catalytic Performance during the Combustion of Trichloroethylene.

    Maldonado, Carolina Solis; De la Rosa, Javier Rivera; Lucio-Ortiz, Carlos J; Hernández-Ramírez, Aracely; Barraza, Felipe F Castillón; Valente, Jaime S

    2014-03-12

    The role of iron in two modes of integration into alumina catalysts was studied at 0.39 wt% Fe and tested in trichloroethylene combustion. One modified alumina was synthesized using the sol-gel method with Fe added in situ during hydrolysis; another modification was performed using calcined alumina, prepared using the sol-gel method and impregnated with Fe. Several characterization techniques were used to study the level of Fe modification in the γ-Al₂O₃ phase formed and to correlate the catalytic properties during trichloroethylene (TCE) combustion. The introduction of Fe in situ during the sol-gel process influenced the crystallite size, and three iron species were generated, namely, magnetite, maghemite and hematite. The impregnated Fe-alumina formed hematite and maghemite, which were highly dispersed on the γ-Al₂O 3 surface. The X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS), FT-IR and Mössbauer spectroscopy analyses revealed how Fe interacted with the γ-Al₂O₃ lattice in both catalysts. The impregnated Fe-catalyst showed the best catalytic performance compared to the catalyst that was Fe-doped in situ by the sol-gel method; both had better catalytic activity than pure alumina. This difference in activity was correlated with the accessibility of the reactants to the hematite iron species on the surface. The chlorine poisoning for all three catalysts was less than 1.8%.

  19. Sulfide oxidation in a biofilter

    Pedersen, Claus Lunde; Dezhao, Liu; Hansen, Michael Jørgen

    Observed hydrogen sulfide uptake rates in a biofilter treating waste air from a pig farm were too high to be explained within conventional limits of sulfide solubility, diffusion in a biofilm and bacterial metabolism. Clone libraries of 16S and 18S rRNA genes from the biofilter found no sulfide...... higher hydrogen sulfide uptake followed by oxidation catalyzed by iron-containing enzymes such as cytochrome c oxidase in a process uncoupled from energy conservation....

  20. Sulfide oxidation in a biofilter

    Pedersen, Claus Lunde; Liu, Dezhao; Hansen, Michael Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    Observed hydrogen sulfide uptake rates in a biofilter treating waste air from a pig farm were too high to be explained within conventional limits of sulfide solubility, diffusion in a biofilm and bacterial metabolism. Clone libraries of 16S and 18S rRNA genes from the biofilter found no sulfide...... higher hydrogen sulfide uptake followed by oxidation catalyzed by iron-containing enzymes such as cytochrome c oxidase in a process uncoupled from energy conservation....

  1. Titanocene sulfide chemistry

    Horáček, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 314, MAY 2016 (2016), s. 83-102 ISSN 0010-8545 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/12/2368 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : titanocene sulfide chemistry * photolysis * titanocene hydrosulfides Ti-(SH)n Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 13.324, year: 2016

  2. Electron transfer to sulfides:

    Meneses, Ana Belen; Antonello, Sabrina; Arevalo, Maria Carmen; Maran, Flavio

    2005-01-01

    The problem of characterizing the steps associated with the dissociative reduction of sulfides has been addressed. The electrochemical reduction of diphenylmethyl para-methoxyphenyl sulfide in N,N-dimethylformamide, on both glassy carbon and mercury electrodes, was chosen as a test system. The electrode process involves the slow heterogeneous outer-sphere electron transfer to the sulfide, the fast cleavage of the C-S bond, the reduction of the ensuing carbon radical, and the self-protonation triggered by the generation of the strong base Ph 2 CH - . The latter reaction is rather slow, in agreement with the large intrinsic barriers characterizing proton transfers between CH-acids and carbon bases. The dissociative reduction was studied in the presence of an exogenous acid. The results, obtained by convolution analysis, point to a stepwise DET mechanism in which the ET step is accompanied by rather large reorganization energy. Similar results were obtained on both electrode materials. Analysis of the heterogeneous electron transfer and associated C-S bond cleavage indicate that the reduction of this and other sulfides lies between the stepwise dissociative electron transfers leading to the formation of stiff π* radical anions and those going through the intermediacy of loose σ* radical anions

  3. Calcium supplements

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007477.htm Calcium supplements To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. WHO SHOULD TAKE CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS? Calcium is an important mineral for the ...

  4. Thermal-annealing effects on the structural and magnetic properties of 10% Fe-doped SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles synthetized by a polymer precursor method

    Aragón, F.H., E-mail: fermin964@hotmail.com [Núcleo de Física Aplicada, Instituto de Física, Universidade de Brasília, Brasília DF 70910-900 (Brazil); Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Pós-graduação em Nanociência e Nanobiotecnologia, Universidade de Brasília, Brasilia DF 70919-970 (Brazil); Coaquira, J.A.H. [Núcleo de Física Aplicada, Instituto de Física, Universidade de Brasília, Brasília DF 70910-900 (Brazil); Nagamine, L.C.C.M.; Cohen, R. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo SP 05508-090 (Brazil); Silva, S.W. da [Núcleo de Física Aplicada, Instituto de Física, Universidade de Brasília, Brasília DF 70910-900 (Brazil); Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Pós-graduação em Nanociência e Nanobiotecnologia, Universidade de Brasília, Brasilia DF 70919-970 (Brazil); and others

    2015-02-01

    In this work, we present the experimental results of Sn{sub 0.9}Fe{sub 0.1}O{sub 2} nanoparticles synthesized by a polymer precursor method. Studies were performed in the as-prepared (AP) and thermally-annealed (TA) samples. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) data analysis carried out using the Rietveld refinement method shows the formation of only the rutile-type structure in the AP sample and this phase remains stable for the TA sample. Additionally, the mean crystallite size shows an increase from ∼4 nm to ∼17 nm after the annealing and a clear reduction of the residual strain has also been determined. Micro-Raman spectroscopy measurements show the formation of an iron oxide phase (likely α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) after the thermal treatment. Magnetic measurements show a paramagnetic behavior for the AP sample and the coexistence of a weak ferromagnetism and paramagnetism for the TA sample. The magnetically-ordered contribution of the TA sample has been assigned to the formation of the hematite phase. DC and AC magnetic features of the TA sample are consistent with a cluster-glass behavior which seems to be related to the magnetic disorder of spins located at the particle surface. Those spins clusters seem to be formed due to the diffusion of iron ions from the core of the particle to the surface caused by the annealing process. - Highlights: • Thermal annealing effects in the 10% Fe-doped SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles have been studied. • XRD data analysis shows the formation of the rutile-type structure. • Raman measurements show the formation of small amount of α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} after the annealing. • Paramagnetic and magnetically ordered phases were determined after the annealing. • Spin clusters likely at the particle surface have been formed after the annealing.

  5. A novel disposable electrochemical sensor for determination of carbamazepine based on Fe doped SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles modified screen-printed carbon electrode

    Lavanya, N. [Department of Biosensors and Bioelectronics, Alagappa University, Karaikudi 630003, TN (India); Department of Electronic Engineering, Chemistry and Materials Engineering, University of Messina, Messina 98166 (Italy); Sekar, C., E-mail: Sekar2025@gmail.com [Department of Biosensors and Bioelectronics, Alagappa University, Karaikudi 630003, TN (India); Ficarra, S.; Tellone, E. [Department of Chemical Sciences, University of Messina, Messina 98166 (Italy); Bonavita, A.; Leonardi, S.G.; Neri, G. [Department of Electronic Engineering, Chemistry and Materials Engineering, University of Messina, Messina 98166 (Italy)

    2016-05-01

    An effective strategy to fabricate a novel disposable screen printing carbon electrode modified by iron doped tin dioxide nanoparticles for carbamazepine (CBZ) detection has been developed. Fe–SnO{sub 2} (Fe = 0 to 5 wt.%) NPs were synthesized by a simple microwave irradiation method and assessed for their structural and morphological changes due to Fe doping into SnO{sub 2} matrix by X-ray diffraction and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The electrochemical behaviour of carbamazepine at the Fe–SnO{sub 2} modified screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE) was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and square wave voltammetry. Electron transfer coefficient α (0.63) and electron transfer rate constant k{sub s} (0.69 s{sup −1}) values of the 5 wt.% Fe–SnO{sub 2} modified SPCE indicate that the diffusion controlled process takes place on the electrode surface. The fabricated sensor displayed a good electrooxidation response towards the detection of CBZ at a lower oxidation potential of 0.8 V in phosphate buffer solution at pH 7.0. Under the optimal conditions, the sensor showed fast and sensitive current response to CBZ over a wide linear range of 0.5–100 μM with a low detection limit of 92 nM. Furthermore, the practical application of the modified electrode has been investigated by the determination of CBZ in pharmaceutical products using standard addition method. - Highlights: • A novel mediator-free disposable screen printed carbon electrode has been fabricated based on Fe- SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles for determination of carbamazepine • The Fe-SnO{sub 2}/SPCE showed wide linear range (0.5–100 μM), low detection limit (92 nM), high sensitivity, good stability and reproducibility. • The carbamazepine sensor was successfully applied to the analysis of pharmaceutical products with satisfactory recoveries.

  6. Structural and optical characterization of p-type highly Fe-doped SnO2 thin films and tunneling transport on SnO2:Fe/p-Si heterojunction

    Ben Haj Othmen, Walid; Ben Hamed, Zied; Sieber, Brigitte; Addad, Ahmed; Elhouichet, Habib; Boukherroub, Rabah

    2018-03-01

    Nanocrystalline highly Fe-doped SnO2 thin films were prepared using a new simple sol-gel method with iron amounts of 5, 10, 15 and 20%. The obtained gel offers a long durability and high quality allowing to reach a sub-5 nm nanocrystalline size with a good crystallinity. The films were structurally characterized through X-ray diffraction (XRD) that confirms the formation of rutile SnO2. High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) images reveals the good crystallinity of the nanoparticles. Raman spectroscopy shows that the SnO2 rutile structure is maintained even for high iron concentration. The variation of the PL intensity with Fe concentration reveals that iron influences the distribution of oxygen vacancies in tin oxide. The optical transmittance results indicate a redshift of the SnO2 band gap when iron concentration increases. The above optical results lead us to assume the presence of a compensation phenomenon between oxygen vacancies and introduced holes following Fe doping. From current-voltage measurements, an inversion of the conduction type from n to p is strongly predicted to follow the iron addition. Electrical characterizations of SnO2:Fe/p-Si and SnO2:Fe/n-Si heterojunctions seem to be in accordance with this deduction. The quantum tunneling mechanism is expected to be important at high Fe doping level, which was confirmed by current-voltage measurements at different temperatures. Both optical and electrical properties of the elaborated films present a particularity for the same iron concentration and adopt similar tendencies with Fe amount, which strongly correlate the experimental observations. In order to evaluate the applicability of the elaborated films, we proceed to the fabrication of the SnO2:Fe/SnO2 homojunction for which we note a good rectifying behavior.

  7. Calcium absorption

    Carlmark, B.; Reizenstein, P.; Dudley, R.A.

    1976-01-01

    The methods most commonly used to measure the absorption and retention of orally administered calcium are reviewed. Nearly all make use of calcium radioisotopes. The magnitude of calcium absorption and retention depends upon the chemical form and amount of calcium administered, and the clinical and nutritional status of the subject; these influences are briefly surveyed. (author)

  8. Al/Fe isomorphic substitution versus Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} clusters formation in Fe-doped aluminosilicate nanotubes (imogolite)

    Shafia, Ehsan [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Applied Science and Technology and INSTM Unit of Torino-Politecnico (Italy); Esposito, Serena [Università degli Studi di Cassino e del Lazio Meridionale, Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering (Italy); Manzoli, Maela; Chiesa, Mario [Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Chimica and Centro Interdipartimentale NIS (Italy); Tiberto, Paola [Electromagnetism, I.N.Ri.M. (Italy); Barrera, Gabriele [Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Chimica and Centro Interdipartimentale NIS (Italy); Menard, Gabriel [Harvard University, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology (United States); Allia, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.allia@polito.it [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Applied Science and Technology and INSTM Unit of Torino-Politecnico (Italy); Freyria, Francesca S. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry (United States); Garrone, Edoardo; Bonelli, Barbara, E-mail: barbara.bonelli@polito.it [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Applied Science and Technology and INSTM Unit of Torino-Politecnico (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    Textural, magnetic and spectroscopic properties are reported of Fe-doped aluminosilicate nanotubes (NTs) of the imogolite type, IMO, with nominal composition (OH){sub 3}Al{sub 2−x}Fe{sub x}O{sub 3}SiOH (x = 0, 0.025, 0.050). Samples were obtained by either direct synthesis (Fe-0.025-IMO, Fe-0.050-IMO) or post-synthesis loading (Fe-L-IMO). The Fe content was either 1.4 wt% (both Fe-0.050-IMO and Fe-L-IMO) or 0.7 wt% (Fe-0.025-IMO). Textural properties were characterized by High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-ray diffraction and N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption isotherms at 77 K. The presence of different iron species was studied by magnetic moment measurements and three spectroscopies: Mössbauer, UV–Vis and electron paramagnetic resonance, respectively. Fe{sup 3+}/Al{sup 3+} isomorphic substitution (IS) at octahedral sites at the external surface of NTs is the main process occurring by direct synthesis at low Fe loadings, giving rise to the formation of isolated high-spin Fe{sup 3+} sites. Higher loadings give rise, besides IS, to the formation of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} clusters. IS occurs up to a limit of Al/Fe atomic ratio of ca. 60 (corresponding to x = 0.032). A fraction of the magnetism related to NCs is pinned by the surface anisotropy; also, clusters are magnetically interacting with each other. Post-synthesis loading leads to a system rather close to that obtained by direct synthesis, involving both IS and cluster formations. Slightly larger clusters than with direct synthesis samples, however, are formed. The occurrence of IS indicates a facile cleavage/sealing of Al–O–Al bonds: this opens the possibility to exchange Al{sup 3+} ions in pre-formed IMO NTs, a much simpler procedure compared with direct synthesis.

  9. Photoluminescence and Raman studies for the confirmation of oxygen vacancies to induce ferromagnetism in Fe doped Mn:ZnO compound

    Das, J., E-mail: jayashree304@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Silicon Institute of Technology, Bhubaneswar 751024, Odisha (India); Department of Physics, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, University of South Africa, Johannesburg 1710 (South Africa); Mishra, D.K. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, University of South Africa, Johannesburg 1710 (South Africa); Department of Physics, Institute of Technical Education and Research, Siksha ‘O’ Anusandhan University, Khandagiri Square, Bhubaneswar 751030, Odisha (India); Srinivasu, V.V. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, University of South Africa, Johannesburg 1710 (South Africa); Sahu, D.R. [Amity Institute of Nanotechnology, Amity University, Noida (India); Roul, B.K. [Institute of Materials Science, Planetarium Building, Acharya Vihar, Bhubaneswar, Odisha (India)

    2015-05-15

    With a motivation to compare the magnetic property, we synthesised undoped, transition metal (TM) Mn doped and (Mn:Fe) co-doped ZnO ceramics in the compositions ZnO, Zn{sub 0.98}Mn{sub 0.02}O and Zn{sub 0.96}(Mn{sub 0.02}Fe{sub 0.02})O. Systematic investigations on the structural, microstructural, defect structure and magnetic properties of the samples were performed. Low temperature as well as room temperature ferromagnetism has been observed for all our samples, however, enhanced magnetisation at room temperature has been noticed when ZnO is co-doped with Fe along with Mn. Particularly the sample with the composition Zn{sub 0.96}Mn{sub 0.02}Fe{sub 0.02}O showed a magnetisation value more than double of the sample with composition Zn{sub 0.98}Mn{sub 0.02}O, indicating long range strong interaction between the magnetic impurities leading to higher ferromagnetic ordering. Raman and PL studies reveal presence of higher defects in form of oxygen vacancy clusters created in the sample due to Fe co doping. PL study also reveals enhanced luminescence efficiency in the co doped sample. Temperature dependent magnetisation study of this sample shows the spin freezing temperature around 39 K indicating the presence of small impurity phase of Mn{sub 2−x}Zn{sub x}O{sub 3} type. Electron Spin Resonance signal obtained supports ferromagnetic state in the co doped sample. Enhancement of magnetisation is attributed to interactions mediated by magnetic impurities through large number of oxygen vacancies created by Fe{sup 3+} ions forming bound magnetic polarons (BMP) and facilitating long range ferromagnetic ordering in the co- doped system. - Highlights: • Comparison of magnetic property of ZnO, Zn{sub 0.98}Mn {sub 0.02}O and Zn{sub 0.96}(Mn{sub 0.02}Fe{sub 0.02})O. • Observation of enhanced magnetisation at room temperature in (Mn,Fe) doped ZnO. • Raman and PL studies reveal presence of higher oxygen vacancy clusters. • Electron Spin Resonance signal supports

  10. Calcium - ionized

    ... diuretics Thrombocytosis (high platelet count) Tumors Vitamin A excess Vitamin D excess Lower-than-normal levels may be due to: Hypoparathyroidism Malabsorption Osteomalacia Pancreatitis Renal failure Rickets Vitamin D deficiency Alternative Names Free calcium; Ionized calcium ...

  11. Calcium Carbonate

    ... Calcium is needed by the body for healthy bones, muscles, nervous system, and heart. Calcium carbonate also ... to your pharmacist or contact your local garbage/recycling department to learn about take-back programs in ...

  12. Sulfide Mineral Surfaces

    Rosso, Kevin M.; Vaughan, David J.

    2006-01-01

    The past twenty years or so have seen dramatic development of the experimental and theoretical tools available to study the surfaces of solids at the molecular (?atomic resolution?) scale. On the experimental side, two areas of development well illustrate these advances. The first concerns the high intensity photon sources associated with synchrotron radiation; these have both greatly improved the surface sensitivity and spatial resolution of already established surface spectroscopic and diffraction methods, and enabled the development of new methods for studying surfaces. The second centers on the scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques initially developed in the 1980's with the first scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments. The direct 'observation' of individual atoms at surfaces made possible with these methods has truly revolutionized surface science. On the theoretical side, the availability of high performance computers coupled with advances in computational modeling has provided powerful new tools to complement the advances in experiment. Particularly important have been the quantum mechanics based computational approaches such as density functional theory (DFT), which can now be easily used to calculate the equilibrium crystal structures of solids and surfaces from first principles, and to provide insights into their electronic structure. In this chapter, we review current knowledge of sulfide mineral surfaces, beginning with an overview of the principles relevant to the study of the surfaces of all crystalline solids. This includes the thermodynamics of surfaces, the atomic structure of surfaces (surface crystallography and structural stability, adjustments of atoms at the surface through relaxation or reconstruction, surface defects) and the electronic structure of surfaces. We then discuss examples where specific crystal surfaces have been studied, with the main sulfide minerals organized by structure type

  13. Sulfide Mineral Surfaces

    Rosso, Kevin M.; Vaughan, David J.

    2006-08-01

    The past twenty years or so have seen dramatic development of the experimental and theoretical tools available to study the surfaces of solids at the molecular (?atomic resolution?) scale. On the experimental side, two areas of development well illustrate these advances. The first concerns the high intensity photon sources associated with synchrotron radiation; these have both greatly improved the surface sensitivity and spatial resolution of already established surface spectroscopic and diffraction methods, and enabled the development of new methods for studying surfaces. The second centers on the scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques initially developed in the 1980's with the first scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments. The direct 'observation' of individual atoms at surfaces made possible with these methods has truly revolutionized surface science. On the theoretical side, the availability of high performance computers coupled with advances in computational modeling has provided powerful new tools to complement the advances in experiment. Particularly important have been the quantum mechanics based computational approaches such as density functional theory (DFT), which can now be easily used to calculate the equilibrium crystal structures of solids and surfaces from first principles, and to provide insights into their electronic structure. In this chapter, we review current knowledge of sulfide mineral surfaces, beginning with an overview of the principles relevant to the study of the surfaces of all crystalline solids. This includes the thermodynamics of surfaces, the atomic structure of surfaces (surface crystallography and structural stability, adjustments of atoms at the surface through relaxation or reconstruction, surface defects) and the electronic structure of surfaces. We then discuss examples where specific crystal surfaces have been studied, with the main sulfide minerals organized by

  14. Photovoltaic semiconductor materials based on alloys of tin sulfide, and methods of production

    Lany, Stephan

    2016-06-07

    Photovoltaic thin-film materials comprising crystalline tin sulfide alloys of the general formula Sn.sub.1-x(R).sub.xS, where R is selected from magnesium, calcium and strontium, as well as methods of producing the same, are disclosed.

  15. Mechanochemical reduction of copper sulfide

    Balaz, P.; Takacs, L.; Jiang, Jianzhong

    2002-01-01

    The mechanochemical reduction of copper sulfide with iron was induced in a Fritsch P-6 planetary mill, using WC vial filled with argon and WC balls. Samples milled for specific intervals were analyzed by XRD and Mossbauer spectroscopy. Most of the reaction takes place during the first 10 min...... of milling and only FeS and Cu are found after 60 min. The main chemical process is accompanied by phase transformations of the sulfide phases as a result of milling. Djurleite partially transformed to chalcocite and a tetragonal copper sulfide phase before reduction. The cubic modification of FeS was formed...... first, transforming to hexagonal during the later stages of the process. The formation of off-stoichiometric phases and the release of some elemental sulfur by copper sulfide are also probable....

  16. LIGNOCELLULOSE NANOCOMPOSITE CONTAINING COPPER SULFIDE

    Sanchi Nenkova; Peter Velev; Mirela Dragnevska; Diyana Nikolova; Kiril Dimitrov

    2011-01-01

    Copper sulfide-containing lignocellulose nanocomposites with improved electroconductivity were obtained. Two methods for preparing the copper sulfide lignocellulose nanocomposites were developed. An optimization of the parameters for obtaining of the nanocomposites with respect to obtaining improved electroconductivity, economy, and lower quantities and concentration of copper and sulfur ions in waste waters was conducted. The mechanisms and schemes of delaying and subsequent connection of co...

  17. All-solid-state asymmetric supercapacitors based on Fe-doped mesoporous Co3O4 and three-dimensional reduced graphene oxide electrodes with high energy and power densities.

    Zhang, Cheng; Wei, Jun; Chen, Leiyi; Tang, Shaolong; Deng, Mingsen; Du, Youwei

    2017-10-19

    An asymmetric supercapacitor offers opportunities to effectively utilize the full potential of the different potential windows of the two electrodes for a higher operating voltage, resulting in an enhanced specific capacitance and significantly improved energy without sacrificing the power delivery and cycle life. To achieve high energy and power densities, we have synthesized an all-solid-state asymmetric supercapacitor with a wider voltage range using Fe-doped Co 3 O 4 and three-dimensional reduced graphene oxide (3DrGO) as the positive and negative electrodes, respectively. In contrast to undoped Co 3 O 4 , the increased density of states and modified charge spatial separation endow the Fe-doped Co 3 O 4 electrode with greatly improved electrochemical capacitive performance, including high specific capacitance (1997 F g -1 and 1757 F g -1 at current densities of 1 and 20 A g -1 , respectively), excellent rate capability, and superior cycling stability. Remarkably, the optimized all-solid-state asymmetric supercapacitor can be cycled reversibly in a wide range of 0-1.8 V, thus delivering a high energy density (270.3 W h kg -1 ), high power density (9.0 kW kg -1 at 224.2 W h kg -1 ), and excellent cycling stability (91.8% capacitance retention after 10 000 charge-discharge cycles at a constant current density of 10 A g -1 ). The superior capacitive performance suggests that such an all-solid-state asymmetric supercapacitor shows great potential for developing energy storage systems with high levels of energy and power delivery.

  18. Speciation-dependent studies on removal of arsenic by iron-doped calcium alginate beads

    Banerjee, Anupam; Nayak, Dalia; Lahiri, Susanta

    2007-01-01

    This work aims to study the differential attitude of Fe-doped calcium alginate (Fe-CA) beads towards As(III) and As(V) compounds so that speciation-dependent environmentally sustainable methodologies can be developed for removal of arsenic from contaminated water. Throughout the experiment, 76 As has been used as precursor of stable arsenic. The affinity of As(V) towards the Fe-CA beads is greater than that of As(III). Removal efficiency of Fe-CA beads for As(V) increases with increasing number of beads and longer shaking times. At pH 3, 30 Fe-CA beads remove As(V) completely from a solution containing 20 mg kg -1 As(V). The technique has been successfully applied to the ground water collected from an arsenic-contaminated area

  19. Calcium waves.

    Jaffe, Lionel F

    2008-04-12

    Waves through living systems are best characterized by their speeds at 20 degrees C. These speeds vary from those of calcium action potentials to those of ultraslow ones which move at 1-10 and/or 10-20 nm s(-1). All such waves are known or inferred to be calcium waves. The two classes of calcium waves which include ones with important morphogenetic effects are slow waves that move at 0.2-2 microm s(-1) and ultraslow ones. Both may be propagated by cycles in which the entry of calcium through the plasma membrane induces subsurface contraction. This contraction opens nearby stretch-sensitive calcium channels. Calcium entry through these channels propagates the calcium wave. Many slow waves are seen as waves of indentation. Some are considered to act via cellular peristalsis; for example, those which seem to drive the germ plasm to the vegetal pole of the Xenopus egg. Other good examples of morphogenetic slow waves are ones through fertilizing maize eggs, through developing barnacle eggs and through axolotl embryos during neural induction. Good examples of ultraslow morphogenetic waves are ones during inversion in developing Volvox embryos and across developing Drosophila eye discs. Morphogenetic waves may be best pursued by imaging their calcium with aequorins.

  20. Iron sulfide oxidation as influenced by calcium carbonate application

    Hossner, L.R.; Doolittle, J.J. [Texas A& M University, College Station, TX (USA). Dept. of Soil & Crop Science

    2003-06-01

    Two overburden materials, with different FeS{sub 2} contents (1.9 and 4.1%) and low acid neutralization potential, were limed with CaCO{sub 3} at rates of 0, 25,50,75, 100, and 125% based on the amount of CaCO{sub 3} needed to provide an acid-base account deficit (A/B-a) of zero (A/B-a = neutratization potential - potential acidity - exchangeable acidity). The limed overburden materials were inoculated with Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and leached weekly with deionized water. Residual FeS{sub 2} and CaCO{sub 3} were determined in samples over a 378-d period. Oxidation followed zero-order kinetics with respect to FeS{sub 2} concentration at pH values greater than 4 and first-order kinetics at pH values less than 4. Zero-order oxidation rates ranged from 0.01 to 0.46 {mu}mol g{sup -1} d{sup -1} in the overburden with 1.9% FeS{sub 2} and from 0.01 to 0.22 {mu}mol g{sup -1} d{sup -1} in the overburden with 4.1% FeS{sub 2}. Oxidation following the first-order rate law had a first-order rate constant of 0.03 d{sup -1} in the 1.9% FeS{sub 2} overburden and 0.01 d{sup -1} in the 4.1% FeS{sub 2} overburden. The calculated half-life was 23 d for the 1.9% FeS{sub 2} overburden and 69 d for the 4.1% FeS{sub 2} overburden. Additions of CaCO{sub 3} affected FeS{sub 2} oxidation by controlling the pH of the system. Liming to greater than 50% of the acid-base account deficit did not significantly affect the zero-order oxidation rate. Dissolution of the applied CaCO{sub 3} was found to be faster than the oxidation of FeS{sub 2} at pH values greater than 4. It was projected that at lime rates up to 125%, the CaCO{sub 3} would dissolve and leach out of the system before all the FeS{sub 2} oxidized, leaving the potential for acid minesoil formation.

  1. A Reaction Involving Oxygen and Metal Sulfides.

    Hill, William D. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a procedure for oxygen generation by thermal decomposition of potassium chlorate in presence of manganese dioxide, reacted with various sulfides. Provides a table of sample product yields for various sulfides. (JM)

  2. Sulfide-conducting solid electrolytes

    Kalinina, L.A.; Shirokova, G.I.; Murin, I.V.; Ushakova, Yu.N.; Fominykh, E.G.; Lyalina, M.Yu.

    2000-01-01

    Feasibility of sulfide transfer in phases on the basis of BaZrS 3 and MLn 2 S 4 ( M = Ca, Ba; Ln = La, Y, Tm, Nd, Sm, Pr) is considered. Solid solution regions on the basis of ternary compounds are determined. Systematic study of the phases is carried out making use of the methods of conductometry, emf in chemical concentration chains without/with transfer, potentiostatic chronoamperometry. Possible mechanism of defect formation during successive alloying of ternary sulfides by binary ones in suggested [ru

  3. Nanostructured metal sulfides for energy storage

    Rui, Xianhong; Tan, Huiteng; Yan, Qingyu

    2014-08-01

    Advanced electrodes with a high energy density at high power are urgently needed for high-performance energy storage devices, including lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and supercapacitors (SCs), to fulfil the requirements of future electrochemical power sources for applications such as in hybrid electric/plug-in-hybrid (HEV/PHEV) vehicles. Metal sulfides with unique physical and chemical properties, as well as high specific capacity/capacitance, which are typically multiple times higher than that of the carbon/graphite-based materials, are currently studied as promising electrode materials. However, the implementation of these sulfide electrodes in practical applications is hindered by their inferior rate performance and cycling stability. Nanostructures offering the advantages of high surface-to-volume ratios, favourable transport properties, and high freedom for the volume change upon ion insertion/extraction and other reactions, present an opportunity to build next-generation LIBs and SCs. Thus, the development of novel concepts in material research to achieve new nanostructures paves the way for improved electrochemical performance. Herein, we summarize recent advances in nanostructured metal sulfides, such as iron sulfides, copper sulfides, cobalt sulfides, nickel sulfides, manganese sulfides, molybdenum sulfides, tin sulfides, with zero-, one-, two-, and three-dimensional morphologies for LIB and SC applications. In addition, the recently emerged concept of incorporating conductive matrices, especially graphene, with metal sulfide nanomaterials will also be highlighted. Finally, some remarks are made on the challenges and perspectives for the future development of metal sulfide-based LIB and SC devices.

  4. 30 CFR 250.504 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.504 Section 250.504... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Well-Completion Operations § 250.504 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-completion operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in...

  5. 30 CFR 250.808 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.808 Section 250.808... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Production Safety Systems § 250.808 Hydrogen sulfide. Production operations in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S...

  6. 30 CFR 250.604 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.604 Section 250.604... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Well-Workover Operations § 250.604 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-workover operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in...

  7. Calcium Electroporation

    Frandsen, Stine Krog; Gibot, Laure; Madi, Moinecha

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Calcium electroporation describes the use of high voltage electric pulses to introduce supraphysiological calcium concentrations into cells. This promising method is currently in clinical trial as an anti-cancer treatment. One very important issue is the relation between tumor cell kill...... efficacy-and normal cell sensitivity. METHODS: Using a 3D spheroid cell culture model we have tested the effect of calcium electroporation and electrochemotherapy using bleomycin on three different human cancer cell lines: a colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT29), a bladder transitional cell carcinoma (SW780......), and a breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB231), as well as on primary normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDF-n). RESULTS: The results showed a clear reduction in spheroid size in all three cancer cell spheroids three days after treatment with respectively calcium electroporation (p

  8. STUDY OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE REMOVAL FROM GROUNDWATER

    T. Lupascu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The process of the hydrogen sulfide removal from the underground water of the Hancesti town has been investigated. By oxygen bubbling through the water containing hydrogen sulfide, from the Hancesti well tube, sulfur is deposited in the porous structure of studied catalysts, which decreases their catalytic activity. Concomitantly, the process of adsorption / oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfate take place. The kinetic research of the hydrogen sulfide removal from the Hancesti underground water, after its treatment by hydrogen peroxide, proves greater efficiency than in the case of modified carbonic adsorbents. As a result of used treatment, hydrogen sulfide is completely oxidized to sulfates

  9. Ultrafast Screening of a Novel, Moderately Hydrophilic Angiotensin-Converting-Enzyme-Inhibitory Peptide, RYL, from Silkworm Pupa Using an Fe-Doped-Silkworm-Excrement-Derived Biocarbon: Waste Conversion by Waste.

    Liu, Long; Wei, Yanan; Chang, Qing; Sun, Huaju; Chai, Kungang; Huang, Zuqiang; Zhao, Zhenxia; Zhao, Zhongxing

    2017-12-27

    A novel, moderately hydrophilic peptide (RYL) with high ACE-inhibitory activity was screened ultrafast via a concept of waste conversion using waste. This novel peptide was screened from silkworm pupa using an Fe-doped porous biocarbon (FL/Z-SE) derived from silkworm excrement. FL/Z-SE possessed magnetic properties and specific selection for peptides due to Fe's dual functions. The selected RYL, which has moderate hydrophilicity (LogP = -0.22), exhibited a comparatively high ACE-inhibitory activity (IC 50 = 3.31 ± 0.11 μM). The inhibitory kinetics and docking-simulation results show that, as a competitive ACE inhibitor, RYL formed five hydrogen bonds with the ACE residues in the S1 and S2 pockets. In this work, both the screening carbon material and the selected ACE-inhibitory peptide were derived from agricultural waste (silkworm excrement and pupa), which offers a new way of thinking about the development of advanced uses of the silkworm byproducts and wastes.

  10. Get Enough Calcium

    ... Calcium Print This Topic En español Get Enough Calcium Browse Sections The Basics Overview Foods and Vitamins ... women, don't get enough calcium. How much calcium do I need every day? Women: If you ...

  11. Calcium - urine

    ... Female urinary tract Male urinary tract Calcium urine test References Bringhurst FR, Demay MB, Kronenberg HM. Hormones and disorders of mineral metabolism. In: Melmed S, Polonsky KS, Larsen PR, Kronenberg HM, eds. Williams Textbook of Endocrinology . 13th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; ...

  12. LIGNOCELLULOSE NANOCOMPOSITE CONTAINING COPPER SULFIDE

    Sanchi Nenkova

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Copper sulfide-containing lignocellulose nanocomposites with improved electroconductivity were obtained. Two methods for preparing the copper sulfide lignocellulose nanocomposites were developed. An optimization of the parameters for obtaining of the nanocomposites with respect to obtaining improved electroconductivity, economy, and lower quantities and concentration of copper and sulfur ions in waste waters was conducted. The mechanisms and schemes of delaying and subsequent connection of copper sulfides in the lignocellulosic matrix were investigated. The modification with a system of 2 components: cupric sulfate pentahydrate (CuSO4. 5H2O and sodium thiosulfate pentahydrate (Na2S2O3.5H2O for wood fibers is preferred. Optimal parameters were established for the process: 40 % of the reduction system; hydromodule M=1:6; and ratio of cupric sulfate pentahydrate:sodium thiosulfate pentahydrate = 1:2. The coordinative connection of copper ions with oxygen atoms of cellulose OH groups and aromatic nucleus in lignin macromolecule was observed.

  13. Chemical dissolution of sulfide minerals

    Chao, T.T.; Sanzolone, R.F.

    1977-01-01

    Chemical dissolution treatments involving the use of aqua regia, 4 N HNO3, H2O2-ascorbic acid, oxalic acid, KClO3+HCl, and KClO3+HCl followed by 4 N HNO3 were applied to specimens of nine common sulfide minerals (galena, chalcopyrite, cinnabar, molybdenite, orpiment, pyrite, stibnite, sphalerite, and tetrahedrite) mixed individually with a clay loam soil. The resultant decrease in the total sulfur content of the mixture, as determined by using the Leco induction furnace, was used to evaluate the effectiveness of each chemical treatment. A combination of KClO3+HCl followed by 4 N HNO3 boiling gently for 20 min has been shown to be very effective in dissolving all the sulfide minerals. This treatment is recommended to dissolve metals residing in sulfide minerals admixed with secondary weathering products, as one step in a fractionation scheme whereby metals in soluble and adsorbed forms, and those associated with organic materials and secondary oxides, are first removed by other chemical extractants.

  14. Sulfide intrusion and detoxification in seagrasses ecosystems

    Hasler-Sheetal, Harald; Holmer, Marianne

    Sulfide intrusion in seagrasses represents a global threat to seagrasses and thereby an important parameter in resilience of seagrass ecosystems. In contrast seegrasses colonize and grow in hostile sediments, where they are constantly exposed to invasion of toxic gaseous sulfide. Remarkably little...... strategies of seagrasses to sustain sulfide intrusion. Using stable isotope tracing, scanning electron microscopy with x-ray analysis, tracing sulfur compounds combined with ecosystem parameters we found different spatial, intraspecific and interspecific strategies to cope with sulfidic sediments. 1...... not present in terrestrial plants at that level. Sulfide is not necessarily toxic but used as sulfur nutrition, presupposing healthy seagrass ecosystems that can support detoxification mechanisms. Presence or absence of those mechanisms determines susceptibility of seagrass ecosystems to sediment sulfide...

  15. Neutron diffraction investigations of the superionic conductors lithium sulfide and sodium sulfide

    Altorfer, F.

    1990-03-01

    Statics and dynamics of the superionic conductors lithium sulfide and sodium sulfide were investigated using the following experimental methods: elastic scattering on sodium sulfide powder in the temperature range 20 - 1000 C, elastic scattering on a lithium sulfide single crystal in the temperature range 20 - 700 C, inelastic scattering on a 7 Li 2 S single crystal at 10 K. 34 figs., 2 tabs., 10 refs

  16. Sulfidation behavior of Fe20Cr alloys

    Pillis, Marina Fuser

    2001-01-01

    Alloys for use in high temperature environments rely on the formation of an oxide layer for their protection. Normally, these protective oxides are Cr 2 O 3 , Al 2 O 3 and, some times, SiO 2 . Many industrial gaseous environments contain sulfur. Sulfides, formed in the presence of sulfur are thermodynamically less stable, have lower melting points and deviate much more stoichiometrically, compared to the corresponding oxides. The mechanism of sulfidation of various metals is as yet not clear, in spite of the concerted efforts during the last decade. To help address this situation, the sulfidation behavior of Fe20Cr has been studied as a function of compositional modifications and surface state of the alloy. The alloys Fe20Cr, Fe20Cr0.7Y, Fe20Cr5Al and Fe20Cr5Al0.6Y were prepared and three sets of sulfidation tests were carried out. In the first set, the alloys were sulfidized at 700 deg C and 800 deg C for 10h. In the second set, the alloys were pre-oxidized at 1000 deg C and then sulfidized at 800 deg C for up to 45h. In the third set of tests, the initial stages of sulfidation of the alloys was studied. All the tests were carried out in a thermobalance, in flowing H 2 /2%H 2 S, and the sulfidation behavior determined as mass change per unit area. Scanning electron microscopy coupled to energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis were used to characterize the reaction products. The addition of Y and Al increased sulfidation resistance of Fe20Cr. The addition of Y altered the species that diffused predominantly during sulfide growth. It changed from predominant cationic diffusion to predominant anionic diffusion. The addition of Al caused an even greater increase in sulfidation resistance of Fe20Cr, with the parabolic rate constant decreasing by three orders of magnitude. Y addition to the FeCrAl alloy did not cause any appreciable alteration in sulfidation resistance. Pre-oxidation of the FeCrAl and FeCrAlY alloys resulted in an extended

  17. Calcium paradox and calcium entry blockers

    Ruigrok, T.J.C.; Slade, A.M.; Nayler, W.G.; Meijler, F.L.

    1984-01-01

    Reperfusion of isolated hearts with calcium-containing solution after a short period of calcium-free perfusion results in irreversible cell damage (calcium paradox). This phenomenon is characterized by an excessive influx of calcium into the cells, the rapid onset of myocardial contracture,

  18. Fe doped TiO2 photocatalyst for the removal of As(III) under visible radiation and its potential application on the treatment of As-contaminated groundwater

    Garza-Arévalo, J.I.; García-Montes, I.; Reyes, M.Hinojosa; Guzmán-Mar, J.L.; Rodríguez-González, V.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Incorporation of Fe in TiO 2 lattice extended absorption to visible light region. • TiO 2 –Fe 1.0 in anatase crystalline form was synthesized by sol–gel method. • TiO 2 –Fe 1.0 showed the highest photocatalytic activity for As(III) oxidation. • TiO 2 –Fe 1.0 had the highest adsorption capacity for the removal of generated As(V). • TiO 2 –Fe is a promising material on the treatment of As contaminated groundwater. - Abstract: The Fe doped TiO 2 catalyst was evaluated under visible radiation for As(III) removal. The TiO 2 –Fe was synthesized by sol–gel technique at 0.0, 1.0, 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 wt% iron doping concentrations. The semiconductors were characterized by X-ray diffraction, diffuse reflectance UV–vis, Raman spectroscopy, nitrogen physisorption, SEM–EDS and potentiometric titration for point of zero charge determination. The photocatalytic oxidation of As(III) was assessed in aqueous suspension contained 5 mg L −1 As(III) at pH 7 with 0.25 g L −1 catalyst loading. The incorporation of iron ions in TiO 2 lattice extended the absorption to visible light region and create surface oxygen vacancies which favor photocatalytic oxidation reaction of As(III) using a small doping amount of Fe (1.0 wt%) in TiO 2 powder. Additionally, TiO 2 –Fe 1.0 showed the highest adsorption capacity for As(V) removal compared to sol–gel TiO 2 and P25 indicating that this catalyst is a promising material for As contaminated groundwater treatment.

  19. Fe doped TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst for the removal of As(III) under visible radiation and its potential application on the treatment of As-contaminated groundwater

    Garza-Arévalo, J.I.; García-Montes, I. [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, UANL, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Cd. Universitaria, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León C.P. 66451, México (Mexico); Reyes, M.Hinojosa [Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica, IPICYT, División de Materiales Avanzados, Camino a la Presa San José 2055, Col. Lomas 4a. sección, San Luis Potosí, SLP 78216, México (Mexico); Guzmán-Mar, J.L. [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, UANL, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Cd. Universitaria, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León C.P. 66451, México (Mexico); Rodríguez-González, V. [Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica, IPICYT, División de Materiales Avanzados, Camino a la Presa San José 2055, Col. Lomas 4a. sección, San Luis Potosí, SLP 78216, México (Mexico); and others

    2016-01-15

    Highlights: • Incorporation of Fe in TiO{sub 2} lattice extended absorption to visible light region. • TiO{sub 2}–Fe 1.0 in anatase crystalline form was synthesized by sol–gel method. • TiO{sub 2}–Fe 1.0 showed the highest photocatalytic activity for As(III) oxidation. • TiO{sub 2}–Fe 1.0 had the highest adsorption capacity for the removal of generated As(V). • TiO{sub 2}–Fe is a promising material on the treatment of As contaminated groundwater. - Abstract: The Fe doped TiO{sub 2} catalyst was evaluated under visible radiation for As(III) removal. The TiO{sub 2}–Fe was synthesized by sol–gel technique at 0.0, 1.0, 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 wt% iron doping concentrations. The semiconductors were characterized by X-ray diffraction, diffuse reflectance UV–vis, Raman spectroscopy, nitrogen physisorption, SEM–EDS and potentiometric titration for point of zero charge determination. The photocatalytic oxidation of As(III) was assessed in aqueous suspension contained 5 mg L{sup −1} As(III) at pH 7 with 0.25 g L{sup −1} catalyst loading. The incorporation of iron ions in TiO{sub 2} lattice extended the absorption to visible light region and create surface oxygen vacancies which favor photocatalytic oxidation reaction of As(III) using a small doping amount of Fe (1.0 wt%) in TiO{sub 2} powder. Additionally, TiO{sub 2}–Fe 1.0 showed the highest adsorption capacity for As(V) removal compared to sol–gel TiO{sub 2} and P25 indicating that this catalyst is a promising material for As contaminated groundwater treatment.

  20. Sulfide toxicity kinetics of a uasb reactor

    D. R. Paula Jr.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of sulfide toxicity on kinetic parameters of anaerobic organic matter removal in a UASB (up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor is presented. Two lab-scale UASB reactors (10.5 L were operated continuously during 12 months. The reactors were fed with synthetic wastes prepared daily using glucose, ammonium acetate, methanol and nutrient solution. One of the reactors also received increasing concentrations of sodium sulfide. For both reactors, the flow rate of 16 L.d-1 was held constant throughout the experiment, corresponding to a hydraulic retention time of 15.6 hours. The classic model for non-competitive sulfide inhibition was applied to the experimental data for determining the overall kinetic parameter of specific substrate utilization (q and the sulfide inhibition coefficient (Ki. The application of the kinetic parameters determined allows prediction of methanogenesis inhibition and thus the adoption of operating parameters to minimize sulfide toxicity in UASB reactors.

  1. Interaction of H2S with Calcium Permeable Channels and Transporters

    Weihua Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A growing amount of evidence has suggested that hydrogen sulfide (H2S, as a gasotransmitter, is involved in intensive physiological and pathological processes. More and more research groups have found that H2S mediates diverse cellular biological functions related to regulating intracellular calcium concentration. These groups have demonstrated the reciprocal interaction between H2S and calcium ion channels and transporters, such as L-type calcium channels (LTCC, T-type calcium channels (TTCC, sodium/calcium exchangers (NCX, transient receptor potential (TRP channels, β-adrenergic receptors, and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR in different cells. However, the understanding of the molecular targets and mechanisms is incomplete. Recently, some research groups demonstrated that H2S modulates the activity of calcium ion channels through protein S-sulfhydration and polysulfide reactions. In this review, we elucidate that H2S controls intracellular calcium homeostasis and the underlying mechanisms.

  2. Calcium blood test

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003477.htm Calcium blood test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The calcium blood test measures the level of calcium in the blood. ...

  3. Calcium source (image)

    Getting enough calcium to keep bones from thinning throughout a person's life may be made more difficult if that person has ... as a tendency toward kidney stones, for avoiding calcium-rich food sources. Calcium deficiency also effects the ...

  4. Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD)

    ... Patient / Caregiver Diseases & Conditions Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD) Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD) Fast Facts The risk of ... young people, too. Proper diagnosis depends on detecting calcium pyrophosphate crystals in the fluid of an affected ...

  5. Calcium carbonate overdose

    Tums overdose; Calcium overdose ... Calcium carbonate can be dangerous in large amounts. ... Products that contain calcium carbonate are certain: Antacids (Tums, Chooz) Mineral supplements Hand lotions Vitamin and mineral supplements Other products may also contain ...

  6. Calcium and bones (image)

    Calcium is one of the most important minerals for the growth, maintenance, and reproduction of the human ... body, are continually being re-formed and incorporate calcium into their structure. Calcium is essential for the ...

  7. Calcium hydroxide poisoning

    Hydrate - calcium; Lime milk; Slaked lime ... Calcium hydroxide ... These products contain calcium hydroxide: Cement Limewater Many industrial solvents and cleaners (hundreds to thousands of construction products, flooring strippers, brick cleaners, cement ...

  8. Sulfidation/oxidation resistant alloys

    Smith, G.D.; Tassen, C.S.

    1989-01-01

    The patent describes a nickel-base, high chromium alloy. It is characterized by excellent resistance to sulfidation and oxidation at elevated temperatures as high as 2000 degrees F. (1093 degrees C.) and higher, a stress-rupture life of about 200 hours or more at a temperature at least as high as 1800 degrees F. (990:0083 degrees C.) and under a stress of 2000 psi, good tensile strength and good ductility both at room and elevated temperature. The alloy consists essentially of about 27 to 35% chromium, about 2.5 to 5% aluminum, about 2.5 to about 6% iron, 0.5 to 2.5% columbium, up to 0.1% carbon, up to 1% each of titanium and zirconium, up to 0.05% cerium, up to 0.05% yttrium, up to 1% silicon, up to 1% manganese, and the balance nickel

  9. Calcium in Urine Test

    ... K. Brunner & Suddarth's Handbook of Laboratory and Diagnostic Tests. 2 nd Ed, Kindle. Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer Health, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; c2014. Calcium, Serum; Calcium and Phosphates, Urine; ...

  10. Transcellular transport of calcium

    Terepka, A R; Coleman, J R; Armbrecht, H J; Gunter, T E

    1976-01-01

    Studies of two calcium transporting epithelia, embryonic chick chorioallantoic membrane and the small intestine of rat and chick, have strongly suggested that the transfer of calcium across a cell involves processes distinctly different from intracellular calcium ion regulation. In the proposed model, transcellular calcium transport is considered as a specialized process developed only by certain cells in those tissues charged with bulk transfer of calcium. The overall effect of the endocytotic mechanism is bulk calcium movement across a cell, protection of mitochondria from exposure to high concentrations of calcium, and the avoidance of wide and potentially toxic fluctuations in cytosol ionic calcium levels. (MFB)

  11. Involvement of ERK in NMDA receptor-independent cortical neurotoxicity of hydrogen sulfide

    Kurokawa, Yuko; Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Kubo, Satoko; Yamasaki, Yoshiko; Matsuda, Sachi; Okamoto, Yukari; Sekimoto, Teruki; Fukatsu, Anna; Nishikawa, Hiroyuki; Kume, Toshiaki; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Akaike, Akinori; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Hydrogen sulfide causes NMDA receptor-independent neurotoxicity in mouse fetal cortical neurons. ► Activation of ERK mediates the toxicity of hydrogen sulfide. ► Apoptotic mechanisms are involved in the hydrogen-induced cell death. -- Abstract: Hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S), a gasotransmitter, exerts both neurotoxicity and neuroprotection, and targets multiple molecules including NMDA receptors, T-type calcium channels and NO synthase (NOS) that might affect neuronal viability. Here, we determined and characterized effects of NaHS, an H 2 S donor, on cell viability in the primary cultures of mouse fetal cortical neurons. NaHS caused neuronal death, as assessed by LDH release and trypan blue staining, but did not significantly reduce the glutamate toxicity. The neurotoxicity of NaHS was resistant to inhibitors of NMDA receptors, T-type calcium channels and NOS, and was blocked by inhibitors of MEK, but not JNK, p38 MAP kinase, PKC and Src. NaHS caused prompt phosphorylation of ERK and upregulation of Bad, followed by translocation of Bax to mitochondria and release of mitochondrial cytochrome c, leading to the nuclear condensation/fragmentation. These effects of NaHS were suppressed by the MEK inhibitor. Our data suggest that the NMDA receptor-independent neurotoxicity of H 2 S involves activation of the MEK/ERK pathway and some apoptotic mechanisms.

  12. Iron-sulfide crystals in probe deposits

    Laursen, Karin; Frandsen, Flemming

    1998-01-01

    Iron-sulfides were observed in deposits collected on a probe inserted at the top of the furnace of a coal-fired power station in Denmark. The chemical composition of the iron-sulfides is equivalent to pyrrhotite (FeS). The pyrrhotites are present as crystals and, based on the shape of the crystals......: (1) impact of low viscous droplets of iron sulfide; and (2) sulfur diffusion. Previous research on the influence of pyrite on slagging focused on the decomposition of pyrite into pyrrhotite and especially on the oxidation stage of this product during impact on the heat transfer surfaces...

  13. Microbial control of hydrogen sulfide production

    Montgomery, A.D.; Bhupathiraju, V.K.; Wofford, N.; McInerney, M.J. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Tulsa, OK (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    A sulfide-resistant strain of Thiobacillus denitrificans, strain F, prevented the accumulation of sulfide by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans when both organisms were grown in liquid medium. The wild-type strain of T. denitrificans did not prevent the accumulation of sulfide produced by D. desulfuricans. Strain F also prevented the accumulation of sulfide by a mixed population of sulfate-reducing bacteria enriched from an oil field brine. Fermentation balances showed that strain F stoichiometrically oxidized the sulfide produced by D. desulfuricans and the oil field brine enrichment to sulfate. The ability of a strain F to control sulfide production in an experimental system of cores and formation water from the Redfield, Iowa, natural gas storage facility was also investigated. A stable, sulfide-producing biofilm was established in two separate core systems, one of which was inoculated with strain F while the other core system (control) was treated in an identical manner, but was not inoculated with strain F. When formation water with 10 mM acetate and 5 mM nitrate was injected into both core systems, the effluent sulfide concentrations in the control core system ranged from 200 to 460 {mu}M. In the test core system inoculated with strain F, the effluent sulfide concentrations were lower, ranging from 70 to 110 {mu}M. In order to determine whether strain F could control sulfide production under optimal conditions for sulfate-reducing bacteria, the electron donor was changed to lactate and inorganic nutrients (nitrogen and phosphate sources) were added to the formation water. When nutrient-supplemented formation water with 3.1 mM lactate and 10 mM nitrate was used, the effluent sulfide concentrations of the control core system initially increased to about 3,800 {mu}M, and then decreased to about 1,100 {mu}M after 5 weeks. However, in the test core system inoculated with strain F, the effluent sulfide concentrations were much lower, 160 to 330 {mu}M.

  14. Model of Inclusion Evolution During Calcium Treatment in the Ladle Furnace

    Tabatabaei, Yousef; Coley, Kenneth S.; Irons, Gordon A.; Sun, Stanley

    2018-04-01

    Calcium treatment of steel is typically employed to modify alumina inclusions to liquid calcium aluminates. However, injected calcium also reacts with the dissolved sulfur to form calcium sulfide. The current work aims to develop a kinetic model for the evolution of oxide and sulfide inclusions in Al-killed alloyed steel during Ca treatment in the ladle refining process. The model considers dissolution of the calcium from the calcium bubbles into the steel and reduction of calcium oxide in the slag to dissolved calcium. A steel-inclusion kinetic model is used for mass transfer to the inclusion interface and diffusion within the calcium aluminate phases formed on the inclusion. The inclusion-steel kinetic model is then coupled with a previously developed steel-slag kinetic model. The coupled inclusion-steel-slag kinetic model is applied to the chemical composition changes in molten steel, slag, and evolution of inclusions in the ladle. The result of calculations is found to agree well with an industrial heat for species in the steel as well as inclusions during Ca treatment.

  15. Sulfide Intrusion and Detoxification in the Seagrass Zostera marina

    Hasler-Sheetal, Harald; Holmer, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Gaseous sulfide intrusion into seagrasses growing in sulfidic sediments causes little or no harm to the plant, indicating the presence of an unknown sulfide tolerance or detoxification mechanism. We assessed such mechanism in the seagrass Zostera marina in the laboratory and in the field...... as sulfate throughout the plant. We conclude that avoidance of sulfide exposure by reoxidation of sulfide in the rhizosphere or aerenchyma and tolerance of sulfide intrusion by incorporation of sulfur in the plant are likely major survival strategies of seagrasses in sulfidic sediments....

  16. Crossett Hydrogen Sulfide Air Sampling Report

    This report summarizes the results of the EPA’s hydrogen sulfide air monitoring conducted along Georgia Pacific’s wastewater treatment system and in surrounding Crossett, AR, neighborhoods in 2017.

  17. Calcium sensing in exocytosis

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Wu, Bingbing; Han, Weiping

    2012-01-01

    an increase in intracellular calcium levels. Besides the triggering role, calcium signaling modulates the precise amount and kinetics of vesicle release. Thus, it is a central question to understand the molecular machineries responsible for calcium sensing in exocytosis. Here we provide an overview of our...... current understanding of calcium sensing in neurotransmitter release and hormone secretion....

  18. Durable regenerable sorbent pellets for removal of hydrogen sulfide coal gas

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V.

    1999-01-01

    Pellets for removing hydrogen sulfide from a coal gasification stream at an elevated temperature are prepared in durable form, usable over repeated cycles of absorption and regeneration. The pellets include a material reactive with hydrogen sulfide, in particular zinc oxide, a binder, and an inert material, in particular calcium sulfate (drierite), having a particle size substantially larger than other components of the pellets. A second inert material and a promoter may also be included. Preparation of the pellets may be carried out by dry, solid-state mixing of components, moistening the mixture, and agglomerating it into pellets, followed by drying and calcining. Pellet size is selected, depending on the type of reaction bed for which the pellets are intended. The use of inert material with a large particle size provides a stable pellet structure with increased porosity, enabling effective gas contact and prolonged mechanical durability.

  19. Durable regenerable sorbent pellets for removal of hydrogen sulfide from coal gas

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V.

    1997-01-01

    Pellets for removing hydrogen sulfide from a coal gasification stream at an elevated temperature are prepared in durable form usable over repeated cycles of absorption and regeneration. The pellets include a material reactive with hydrogen sulfide, in particular zinc oxide, a binder, and an inert material, in particular calcium sulfate (drierite), having a particle size substantially larger than other components of the pellets. A second inert material and a promoter may also be included. Preparation of the pellets may be carried out by dry, solid-state mixing of components, moistening the mixture, and agglomerating it into pellets, followed by drying and calcining. Pellet size is selected, depending on the type of reaction bed for which the pellets are intended. The use of inert material with a large particle size provides a stable pellet structure with increased porosity, enabling effective gas contact and prolonged mechanical durability.

  20. Calcium fluoride

    King, C.W.; Nestor, O.H.

    1989-01-01

    A new process for producing large, single, oriented crystals of calcium fluoride (CaF 2 ) has been developed which overcomes the limitations of current growing methods. This process has been reduced to practice and has yielded oriented crystals 17.5 x 17.5 x 5 cm 3 . Currently nearing completion is a system for producing 35 x 35 x 7.5 cm 3 single crystals. A scale up to one-meter-square is considered feasible. This crystal growing process makes possible the fabrication of very large CaF 2 windows. Suitability for very high power lasers, however, requires attention to properties beyond mere size. A process to generate higher purity growth stock (starting material) was also developed. The additional purification of the growth stock contributes to lower bulk absorption, the absence of color centers and increased radiation hardness. Also identified were several specific impurities which correlate with radiation hardness. A correlation was found between color centers induced by laser radiation and ionizing radiation. Other CaF 2 crystal properties such as tensile strength, absorption and laser damage thresholds were studied and are discussed

  1. Air-water transfer of hydrogen sulfide

    Yongsiri, C.; Vollertsen, J.; Rasmussen, M. R.

    2004-01-01

    The emissions process of hydrogen sulfide was studied to quantify air–water transfer of hydrogen sulfide in sewer networks. Hydrogen sulfide transfer across the air–water interface was investigated at different turbulence levels (expressed in terms of the Froude number) and pH using batch...... experiments. By means of the overall mass–transfer coefficient (KLa), the transfer coefficient of hydrogen sulfide (KLaH2S), referring to total sulfide, was correlated to that of oxygen (KLaO2) (i.e., the reaeration coefficient). Results demonstrate that both turbulence and pH in the water phase play...... a significant role for KLaH2S. An exponential expression is a suitable representation for the relationship between KLaH2S and the Froude number at all pH values studied (4.5 to 8.0). Because of the dissociation of hydrogen sulfide, KLaH2S increased with decreasing pH at a constant turbulence level. Relative...

  2. Characterization of Fe -doped silver phosphate glasses

    ... to their several spe- cial properties such as large thermal expansion coefficients, ... increase the conductivity of these glasses is to increase the modifier or dopant ... phosphate glasses were measured by the a.c. impedance spectroscopic .... and Fe2O3-doped Ag2O–P2O5 glasses were determined from. DSC curves and ...

  3. Ternary Sulfide Infrared Window Materials.

    1981-10-10

    results. Oxalates of the two cations can also be used for those combinations where oxalates of good purity are available. The reaction is: CaCO3 + 2La(OH... hydrothermal condi- tions. At 3000C and 300 bars pressure, CaLa2S4 breaks down completely into a mixture of calcium and lanthanum hydroxides. 3.0 CERAMIC...also occurred in the hand-ground sample. Samples dissolved in concentrated nitric acid produced 1 wt% silica as an insoluble residue. IV. Sinterina

  4. Hydrogen sulfide can inhibit and enhance oxygenic photosynthesis in a cyanobacterium from sulfidic springs

    Klatt, Judith M.; Haas, Sebastian; Yilmaz, Pelin; de Beer, Dirk; Polerecky, Lubos

    We used microsensors to investigate the combinatory effect of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and light on oxygenic photosynthesis in biofilms formed by a cyanobacterium from sulfidic springs. We found that photosynthesis was both positively and negatively affected by H2S: (i) H2S accelerated the recovery of

  5. Sulfide response analysis for sulfide control using a pS electrode in sulfate reducing bioreactors

    Villa Gomez, D.K.; Cassidy, J.; Keesman, K.J.; Sampaio, R.M.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2014-01-01

    Step changes in the organic loading rate (OLR) through variations in the influent chemical oxygen demand (CODin) concentration or in the hydraulic retention time (HRT) at constant COD/SO4 2- ratio (0.67) were applied to create sulfide responses for the design of a sulfide control in sulfate reducing

  6. Transient Kinetic Analysis of Hydrogen Sulfide Oxidation Catalyzed by Human Sulfide Quinone Oxidoreductase*

    Mishanina, Tatiana V.; Yadav, Pramod K.; Ballou, David P.; Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-01-01

    The first step in the mitochondrial sulfide oxidation pathway is catalyzed by sulfide quinone oxidoreductase (SQR), which belongs to the family of flavoprotein disulfide oxidoreductases. During the catalytic cycle, the flavin cofactor is intermittently reduced by sulfide and oxidized by ubiquinone, linking H2S oxidation to the electron transfer chain and to energy metabolism. Human SQR can use multiple thiophilic acceptors, including sulfide, sulfite, and glutathione, to form as products, hydrodisulfide, thiosulfate, and glutathione persulfide, respectively. In this study, we have used transient kinetics to examine the mechanism of the flavin reductive half-reaction and have determined the redox potential of the bound flavin to be −123 ± 7 mV. We observe formation of an unusually intense charge-transfer (CT) complex when the enzyme is exposed to sulfide and unexpectedly, when it is exposed to sulfite. In the canonical reaction, sulfide serves as the sulfur donor and sulfite serves as the acceptor, forming thiosulfate. We show that thiosulfate is also formed when sulfide is added to the sulfite-induced CT intermediate, representing a new mechanism for thiosulfate formation. The CT complex is formed at a kinetically competent rate by reaction with sulfide but not with sulfite. Our study indicates that sulfide addition to the active site disulfide is preferred under normal turnover conditions. However, under pathological conditions when sulfite concentrations are high, sulfite could compete with sulfide for addition to the active site disulfide, leading to attenuation of SQR activity and to an alternate route for thiosulfate formation. PMID:26318450

  7. Transient Kinetic Analysis of Hydrogen Sulfide Oxidation Catalyzed by Human Sulfide Quinone Oxidoreductase.

    Mishanina, Tatiana V; Yadav, Pramod K; Ballou, David P; Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-10-09

    The first step in the mitochondrial sulfide oxidation pathway is catalyzed by sulfide quinone oxidoreductase (SQR), which belongs to the family of flavoprotein disulfide oxidoreductases. During the catalytic cycle, the flavin cofactor is intermittently reduced by sulfide and oxidized by ubiquinone, linking H2S oxidation to the electron transfer chain and to energy metabolism. Human SQR can use multiple thiophilic acceptors, including sulfide, sulfite, and glutathione, to form as products, hydrodisulfide, thiosulfate, and glutathione persulfide, respectively. In this study, we have used transient kinetics to examine the mechanism of the flavin reductive half-reaction and have determined the redox potential of the bound flavin to be -123 ± 7 mV. We observe formation of an unusually intense charge-transfer (CT) complex when the enzyme is exposed to sulfide and unexpectedly, when it is exposed to sulfite. In the canonical reaction, sulfide serves as the sulfur donor and sulfite serves as the acceptor, forming thiosulfate. We show that thiosulfate is also formed when sulfide is added to the sulfite-induced CT intermediate, representing a new mechanism for thiosulfate formation. The CT complex is formed at a kinetically competent rate by reaction with sulfide but not with sulfite. Our study indicates that sulfide addition to the active site disulfide is preferred under normal turnover conditions. However, under pathological conditions when sulfite concentrations are high, sulfite could compete with sulfide for addition to the active site disulfide, leading to attenuation of SQR activity and to an alternate route for thiosulfate formation. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Experimental simulations of sulfide formation in the solar nebula.

    Lauretta, D S; Lodders, K; Fegley, B

    1997-07-18

    Sulfurization of meteoritic metal in H2S-H2 gas produced three different sulfides: monosulfide solid solution [(Fe,Ni)1-xS], pentlandite [(Fe,Ni)9-xS8], and a phosphorus-rich sulfide. The composition of the remnant metal was unchanged. These results are contrary to theoretical predictions that sulfide formation in the solar nebula produced troilite (FeS) and enriched the remaining metal in nickel. The experimental sulfides are chemically and morphologically similar to sulfide grains in the matrix of the Alais (class CI) carbonaceous chondrite, suggesting that these meteoritic sulfides may be condensates from the solar nebula.

  9. Sulfide Precipitation in Wastewater at Short Timescales

    Kiilerich, Bruno; van de Ven, Wilbert; Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning

    2017-01-01

    Abatement of sulfides in sewer systems using iron salts is a widely used strategy. When dosing at the end of a pumping main, the reaction kinetics of sulfide precipitation becomes important. Traditionally the reaction has been assumed to be rapid or even instantaneous. This work shows that this i......Abatement of sulfides in sewer systems using iron salts is a widely used strategy. When dosing at the end of a pumping main, the reaction kinetics of sulfide precipitation becomes important. Traditionally the reaction has been assumed to be rapid or even instantaneous. This work shows...... that this is not the case for sulfide precipitation by ferric iron. Instead, the reaction time was found to be on a timescale where it must be considered when performing end-of-pipe treatment. For real wastewaters at pH 7, a stoichiometric ratio around 14 mol Fe(II) (mol S(−II))−1 was obtained after 1.5 s, while the ratio...

  10. Functional consortium for denitrifying sulfide removal process.

    Chen, Chuan; Ren, Nanqi; Wang, Aijie; Liu, Lihong; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2010-03-01

    Denitrifying sulfide removal (DSR) process simultaneously converts sulfide, nitrate, and chemical oxygen demand from industrial wastewaters to elemental sulfur, nitrogen gas, and carbon dioxide, respectively. This investigation utilizes a dilution-to-extinction approach at 10(-2) to 10(-6) dilutions to elucidate the correlation between the composition of the microbial community and the DSR performance. In the original suspension and in 10(-2) dilution, the strains Stenotrophomonas sp., Thauera sp., and Azoarcus sp. are the heterotrophic denitrifiers and the strains Paracoccus sp. and Pseudomonas sp. are the sulfide-oxidizing denitrifers. The 10(-4) dilution is identified as the functional consortium for the present DSR system, which comprises two functional strains, Stenotrophomonas sp. strain Paracoccus sp. At 10(-6) dilution, all DSR performance was lost. The functions of the constituent cells in the DSR granules were discussed based on data obtained using the dilution-to-extinction approach.

  11. Production and Preservation of Sulfide Layering in Mercury's Magma Ocean

    Boukare, C.-E.; Parman, S. W.; Parmentier, E. M.; Anzures, B. A.

    2018-05-01

    Mercury's magma ocean (MMO) would have been sulfur-rich. At some point during MMO solidification, it likely became sulfide saturated. Here we present physiochemical models exploring sulfide layer formation and stability.

  12. Calcium and magnesium determination

    Bhattacharya, S.K.

    1982-01-01

    The roles of calcium and magnesium in human health and disease have been extensively studied. Calcium and magnesium have been determined in biological specimens by atomic absorption spectroscopy using stiochiometric nitrous oxide-acetylene flame

  13. Fenoprofen calcium overdose

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002649.htm Fenoprofen calcium overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Fenoprofen calcium is a type of medicine called a nonsteroidal ...

  14. Calcium channel blocker overdose

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002580.htm Calcium-channel blocker overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Calcium-channel blockers are a type of medicine used ...

  15. Acute inhalation toxicity of carbonyl sulfide

    Benson, J.M.; Hahn, F.F.; Barr, E.B. [and others

    1995-12-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS), a colorless gas, is a side product of industrial procedures sure as coal hydrogenation and gasification. It is structurally related to and is a metabolite of carbon disulfide. COS is metabolized in the body by carbonic anhydrase to hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), which is thought to be responsible for COS toxicity. No threshold limit value for COS has been established. Results of these studies indicate COS (with an LC{sub 50} of 590 ppm) is slightly less acutely toxic than H{sub 2}S (LC{sub 50} of 440 ppm).

  16. Girdler-sulfide process physical properties

    Neuburg, H.J.; Atherley, J.F.; Walker, L.G.

    1977-05-01

    Physical properties of pure hydrogen sulfide and of gaseous and liquid solutions of the H 2 S-H 2 O system have been formulated. Tables for forty-nine different properties in the pressure and temperature range of interest to the Girdler-Sulfide (GS) process for heavy water production are given. All properties are presented in SI units. A computer program capable of calculating properties of the pure components as well as gaseous mixtures and liquid solutions at saturated and non-saturated conditions is included. (author)

  17. Calcium and Mitosis

    Hepler, P.

    1983-01-01

    Although the mechanism of calcium regulation is not understood, there is evidence that calcium plays a role in mitosis. Experiments conducted show that: (1) the spindle apparatus contains a highly developed membrane system that has many characteristics of sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle; (2) this membrane system contains calcium; and (3) there are ionic fluxes occurring during mitosis which can be seen by a variety of fluorescence probes. Whether the process of mitosis can be modulated by experimentally modulating calcium is discussed.

  18. Calcium en cardioplegie

    Ruigrok, T.J.C.; Meijler, F.L.

    1985-01-01

    Coronary perfusion with a calcium-free solution, followed by reperfusion with a calcium containing solution, may result in acute myocardial cell death and in irreversible loss of the e1ectrical and mechanical activity of the heart. This phenomenon is known as the calcium paradox. A number of

  19. Use of biogenic sulfide for ZnS precipitation

    Esposito, G.; Veeken, A.; Weijma, J.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2006-01-01

    A 600 ml continuously stirred tank reactor was used to assess the performance of a zinc sulfide precipitation process using a biogenic sulfide solution (the effluent of a sulfate-reducing bioreactor) as sulfide source. In all experiments, a proportional-integral (PI) control algorithm was used to

  20. Modeling Sulfides, pH and Hydrogen Sulfide Gas in the Sewers of San Francisco

    Vollertsen, Jes; Revilla, Nohemy; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild

    2015-01-01

    An extensive measuring campaign targeted on sewer odor problems was undertaken in San Francisco. It was assessed whether a conceptual sewer process model could reproduce the measured concentrations of total sulfide in the wastewater and H2S gas in the sewer atmosphere, and to which degree...... such simulations have potential for further improving odor and sulfide management. The campaign covered measurement of wastewater sulfide by grab sampling and diurnal sampling, and H2S gas in the sewer atmosphere was logged. The tested model was based on the Wastewater Aerobic/Anaerobic Transformations in Sewers...... (WATS) sewer process concept, which never had been calibrated to such an extensive dataset. The study showed that the model was capable of reproducing the general levels of wastewater sulfide, wastewater pH, and sewer H2S gas. It could also reproduce the general variability of these parameters, albeit...

  1. Reaction between Hydrogen Sulfide and Limestone Calcines

    Hartman, Miloslav; Svoboda, Karel; Trnka, Otakar; Čermák, Jiří

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 10 (2002), s. 2392-2398 ISSN 0888-5885 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4072711; GA AV ČR IAA4072801 Keywords : hydrogen sulfide * limestone calcines * desulfurization Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.247, year: 2002

  2. Microaeration reduces hydrogen sulfide in biogas

    Although there are a variety of biological and chemical treatments for removal of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from biogas, all require some level of chemical or water inputs and maintenance. In practice, managing biogas H2S remains a significant challenge for agricultural digesters where labor and opera...

  3. Support Effect in Hydrodesulfurization over Ruthenium Sulfide

    Gulková, Daniela; Kaluža, Luděk; Vít, Zdeněk; Zdražil, Miroslav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 2 (2009), s. 146-149 ISSN 1337-7027 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/06/0705 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : ruthenium sulfide * hydrodesulfurization * support effect Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  4. Monitoring sulfide and sulfate-reducing bacteria

    Tanner, R.S.

    1995-12-31

    Simple yet precise and accurate methods for monitoring sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and sulfide remain useful for the study of bacterial souring and corrosion. Test kits are available to measure sulfide in field samples. A more precise methylene blue sulfide assay for both field and laboratory studies is described here. Improved media, compared to that in API RP-38, for enumeration of SRB have been formulated. One of these, API-RST, contained cysteine (1.1 mM) as a reducing agent, which may be a confounding source of sulfide. While cysteine was required for rapid enumeration of SRB from environmental samples, the concentration of cysteine in medium could be reduced to 0.4 mM. It was also determined that elevated levels of yeast extract (>1 g/liter) could interfere with enumeration of SRB from environmental samples. The API-RST medium was modified to a RST-11 medium. Other changes in medium composition, in addition to reduction of cysteine, included reduction of the concentration of phosphate from 3.4 mM to 2.2 mM, reduction of the concentration of ferrous iron from 0.8 mM to 0.5 mM and preparation of a stock mineral solution to ease medium preparation. SRB from environmental samples could be enumerated in a week in this medium.

  5. Acid volatile sulfide (AVS)- a comment

    Meysman, F.J.R.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2005-01-01

    The review by Rickard and Morse (this volume) adequately summarizes our current understanding with respect to acid-volatile sulfides (AVS). At the same time, this review addresses some of the misunderstandings with regard to measurements and dynamics of this important sedimentary sulfur pool. In

  6. Carbon a support for sulfide catalysts

    Vissers, J.P.R.; Lensing, T.J.; Mercx, F.P.M.; Beer, de V.H.J.; Prins, R.

    1983-01-01

    Two types of carbon materials, carbon black composite and carbon covered alumina, were studied for-their use as support for sulfide catalysts. The following parameters were varied: type of carbon black, carbon coverage of the alumina and carbon pretreatment. Pore size distributions were determined

  7. Study on the sulfidation behavior of smithsonite

    Wu, Dandan; Wen, Shuming; Deng, Jiushuai; Liu, Jian; Mao, Yingbo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Zeta potential showed that the pH IEP of smithsonite decreased from 7.7 to 6. • ICP test showed the gradual reduction of C S in the solution. • SEM showed that the mineral surface was partially changed to ZnS film. • XPS indicated that the presence of a characteristic signal peak of sulfur ions. - Abstract: Zinc extraction from low-grade mineral resources of oxidized zinc has recently become a focus of study. Sulfidation is an important process in oxidized ore flotation. In this study, the influence of sulfur ion adsorption on smithsonite surface was investigated with the use of zeta potential, inductively coupled plasma (ICP), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies. Zeta potential measurements of sodium sulfide showed that sulfur ions were adsorbed onto the surface of pure smithsonite, as evidenced by the increased negative charge and the decrease in the pH IEP of smithsonite from 7.7 to 6 after sodium sulfide treatment. The ICP test revealed the gradual reduction in sulfur ion adsorption onto the surface of smithsonite in pulp sulfur. After 30 min of absorption, C S in the solution declined from 1000 × 10 −6 mol/L to 1.4 × 10 −6 mol/L. SEM results showed that the mineral surface was partially changed to ZnS film after sodium sulfide treatment, whereas EDS analysis results showed that 2% S is contained on the smithsonite surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results indicated the presence of a characteristic signal peak of sulfur ions after sulfidation. Sulfur concentration increased to 11.89%, whereas oxygen concentration decreased from 42.31% to 13.74%. Sulfur ions were not only present during chemical adsorption, but were also incorporated into the crystal lattices of minerals by the exchange reaction between S 2− and CO 3 2− ions

  8. Calcium absorption and achlorhydria

    Recker, R.R.

    1985-01-01

    Defective absorption of calcium has been thought to exist in patients with achlorhydria. The author compared absorption of calcium in its carbonate form with that in a pH-adjusted citrate form in a group of 11 fasting patients with achlorhydria and in 9 fasting normal subjects. Fractional calcium absorption was measured by a modified double-isotope procedure with 0.25 g of calcium used as the carrier. Mean calcium absorption (+/- S.D.) in the patients with achlorhydria was 0.452 +/- 0.125 for citrate and 0.042 +/- 0.021 for carbonate (P less than 0.0001). Fractional calcium absorption in the normal subjects was 0.243 +/- 0.049 for citrate and 0.225 +/- 0.108 for carbonate (not significant). Absorption of calcium from carbonate in patients with achlorhydria was significantly lower than in the normal subjects and was lower than absorption from citrate in either group; absorption from citrate in those with achlorhydria was significantly higher than in the normal subjects, as well as higher than absorption from carbonate in either group. Administration of calcium carbonate as part of a normal breakfast resulted in completely normal absorption in the achlorhydric subjects. These results indicate that calcium absorption from carbonate is impaired in achlorhydria under fasting conditions. Since achlorhydria is common in older persons, calcium carbonate may not be the ideal dietary supplement

  9. Calcium channel blocker poisoning

    Miran Brvar

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Calcium channel blockers act at L-type calcium channels in cardiac and vascular smooth muscles by preventing calcium influx into cells with resultant decrease in vascular tone and cardiac inotropy, chronotropy and dromotropy. Poisoning with calcium channel blockers results in reduced cardiac output, bradycardia, atrioventricular block, hypotension and shock. The findings of hypotension and bradycardia should suggest poisoning with calcium channel blockers.Conclusions: Treatment includes immediate gastric lavage and whole-bowel irrigation in case of ingestion of sustainedrelease products. All patients should receive an activated charcoal orally. Specific treatment includes calcium, glucagone and insulin, which proved especially useful in shocked patients. Supportive care including the use of catecholamines is not always effective. In the setting of failure of pharmacological therapy transvenous pacing, balloon pump and cardiopulmonary by-pass may be necessary.

  10. Dengue and Calcium

    Shivanthan, Mitrakrishnan C; Rajapakse, Senaka

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is potentially fatal unless managed appropriately. No specific treatment is available and the mainstay of treatment is fluid management with careful monitoring, organ support, and correction of metabolic derangement. Evidence with regards to the role of calcium homeostasis in dengue is limited. Low blood calcium levels have been demonstrated in dengue infection and hypocalcemia maybe more pronounced in more severe forms. The cause of hypocalcemia is likely to be multifactorial. Calcium...

  11. Calcium Channel Blockers

    ... Certain calcium channel blockers interact with grapefruit products. Kaplan NM, et al. Treatment of hypertension: Drug therapy. In: Kaplan's Clinical Hypertension. 11th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Wolters Kluwer ...

  12. Hydrogen sulfide concentration in Beaver Dam Creek

    Kiser, D.L.

    1979-01-01

    Concentration-time profiles calculated with LODIPS for various hypothetical releases of hydrogen sulfide from the heavy water extraction facility predict lethal conditions for swamp fish from releases as small as 568 kg discharged over a period of 30 minutes or from releases of 1818 kg discharged over a period of 6 hours or less. The necessary volatilization and oxidation coefficients for LODIPS were derived from field measurements following planned releases of H 2 S. Upsets in the operation of the wastewater strippers in the Girdler-Sulfide (GS) heavy water extraction facility in D Area have released significant amounts of dissolved H 2 S to Beaver Dam Creek. Because H 2 S is toxic to fish in concentrations as low as 1 mg/liter, the downstream environmental impact of H 2 S releases from D Area was evaluated

  13. Iron-sulfide redox flow batteries

    Xia, Guan-Guang; Yang, Zhenguo; Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Liu, Jun; Graff, Gordon L

    2013-12-17

    Iron-sulfide redox flow battery (RFB) systems can be advantageous for energy storage, particularly when the electrolytes have pH values greater than 6. Such systems can exhibit excellent energy conversion efficiency and stability and can utilize low-cost materials that are relatively safer and more environmentally friendly. One example of an iron-sulfide RFB is characterized by a positive electrolyte that comprises Fe(III) and/or Fe(II) in a positive electrolyte supporting solution, a negative electrolyte that comprises S.sup.2- and/or S in a negative electrolyte supporting solution, and a membrane, or a separator, that separates the positive electrolyte and electrode from the negative electrolyte and electrode.

  14. Hydrogen sulfide prodrugs—a review

    Yueqin Zheng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S is recognized as one of three gasotransmitters together with nitric oxide (NO and carbon monoxide (CO. As a signaling molecule, H2S plays an important role in physiology and shows great potential in pharmaceutical applications. Along this line, there is a need for the development of H2S prodrugs for various reasons. In this review, we summarize different H2S prodrugs, their chemical properties, and some of their potential therapeutic applications.

  15. Simultaneous removal of sulfide, nitrate and acetate: Kinetic modeling

    Wang Aijie; Liu Chunshuang; Ren Nanqi; Han Hongjun; Lee Duujong

    2010-01-01

    Biological removal of sulfide, nitrate and chemical oxygen demand (COD) simultaneously from industrial wastewaters to elementary sulfur (S 0 ), N 2 , and CO 2 , or named the denitrifying sulfide (DSR) process, is a cost effective and environmentally friendly treatment process for high strength sulfide and nitrate laden organic wastewater. Kinetic model for the DSR process was established for the first time on the basis of Activated Sludge Model No. 1 (ASM1). The DSR experiments were conducted at influent sulfide concentrations of 200-800 mg/L, whose results calibrate the model parameters. The model correlates well with the DSR process dynamics. By introducing the switch function and the inhibition function, the competition between autotrophic and heterotrophic denitrifiers is quantitatively described and the degree of inhibition of sulfide on heterotrophic denitrifiers is realized. The model output indicates that the DSR reactor can work well at 0.5 1000 mg/L influent sulfide, however, the DSR system will break down.

  16. Microaeration for hydrogen sulfide removal in UASB reactor.

    Krayzelova, Lucie; Bartacek, Jan; Kolesarova, Nina; Jenicek, Pavel

    2014-11-01

    The removal of hydrogen sulfide from biogas by microaeration was studied in Up-flow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactors treating synthetic brewery wastewater. A fully anaerobic UASB reactor served as a control while air was dosed into a microaerobic UASB reactor (UMSB). After a year of operation, sulfur balance was described in both reactors. In UASB, sulfur was mainly presented in the effluent as sulfide (49%) and in biogas as hydrogen sulfide (34%). In UMSB, 74% of sulfur was detected in the effluent (41% being sulfide and 33% being elemental sulfur), 10% accumulated in headspace as elemental sulfur and 9% escaped in biogas as hydrogen sulfide. The efficiency of hydrogen sulfide removal in UMSB was on average 73%. Microaeration did not cause any decrease in COD removal or methanogenic activity in UMSB and the elemental sulfur produced by microaeration did not accumulate in granular sludge. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Reduction of produced elementary sulfur in denitrifying sulfide removal process.

    Zhou, Xu; Liu, Lihong; Chen, Chuan; Ren, Nanqi; Wang, Aijie; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2011-05-01

    Denitrifying sulfide removal (DSR) processes simultaneously convert sulfide, nitrate, and chemical oxygen demand from industrial wastewater into elemental sulfur, dinitrogen gas, and carbon dioxide, respectively. The failure of a DSR process is signaled by high concentrations of sulfide in reactor effluent. Conventionally, DSR reactor failure is blamed for overcompetition for heterotroph to autotroph communities. This study indicates that the elementary sulfur produced by oxidizing sulfide that is a recoverable resource from sulfide-laden wastewaters can be reduced back to sulfide by sulfur-reducing Methanobacterium sp. The Methanobacterium sp. was stimulated with excess organic carbon (acetate) when nitrite was completely consumed by heterotrophic denitrifiers. Adjusting hydraulic retention time of a DSR reactor when nitrite is completely consumed provides an additional control variable for maximizing DSR performance.

  18. Study on the sulfidation behavior of smithsonite

    Wu, Dandan; Wen, Shuming, E-mail: shmwen@126.com; Deng, Jiushuai, E-mail: dengshuai689@163.com; Liu, Jian; Mao, Yingbo

    2015-02-28

    Highlights: • Zeta potential showed that the pH{sub IEP} of smithsonite decreased from 7.7 to 6. • ICP test showed the gradual reduction of C{sub S} in the solution. • SEM showed that the mineral surface was partially changed to ZnS film. • XPS indicated that the presence of a characteristic signal peak of sulfur ions. - Abstract: Zinc extraction from low-grade mineral resources of oxidized zinc has recently become a focus of study. Sulfidation is an important process in oxidized ore flotation. In this study, the influence of sulfur ion adsorption on smithsonite surface was investigated with the use of zeta potential, inductively coupled plasma (ICP), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies. Zeta potential measurements of sodium sulfide showed that sulfur ions were adsorbed onto the surface of pure smithsonite, as evidenced by the increased negative charge and the decrease in the pH{sub IEP} of smithsonite from 7.7 to 6 after sodium sulfide treatment. The ICP test revealed the gradual reduction in sulfur ion adsorption onto the surface of smithsonite in pulp sulfur. After 30 min of absorption, C{sub S} in the solution declined from 1000 × 10{sup −6} mol/L to 1.4 × 10{sup −6} mol/L. SEM results showed that the mineral surface was partially changed to ZnS film after sodium sulfide treatment, whereas EDS analysis results showed that 2% S is contained on the smithsonite surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results indicated the presence of a characteristic signal peak of sulfur ions after sulfidation. Sulfur concentration increased to 11.89%, whereas oxygen concentration decreased from 42.31% to 13.74%. Sulfur ions were not only present during chemical adsorption, but were also incorporated into the crystal lattices of minerals by the exchange reaction between S{sup 2−} and CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} ions.

  19. Acidosis and Urinary Calcium Excretion

    Alexander, R Todd; Cordat, Emmanuelle; Chambrey, Régine

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis is associated with increased urinary calcium excretion and related sequelae, including nephrocalcinosis and nephrolithiasis. The increased urinary calcium excretion induced by metabolic acidosis predominantly results from increased mobilization of calcium out of bone and inhibi...

  20. Calcium D-saccharate

    Garcia, André Castilho; Hedegaard, Martina Vavrusova; Skibsted, Leif Horsfelt

    2016-01-01

    Molar conductivity of saturated aqueous solutions of calcium d-saccharate, used as a stabilizer of beverages fortified with calcium d-gluconate, increases strongly upon dilution, indicating complex formation between calcium and d-saccharate ions, for which, at 25 °C, Kassoc = 1032 ± 80, ΔHassoc......° = -34 ± 6 kJ mol-1, and ΔSassoc° = -55 ± 9 J mol-1 K-1, were determined electrochemically. Calcium d-saccharate is sparingly soluble, with a solubility product, Ksp, of (6.17 ± 0.32) × 10-7 at 25 °C, only moderately increasing with the temperature: ΔHsol° = 48 ± 2 kJ mol-1, and ΔSassoc° = 42 ± 7 J mol-1...... K-1. Equilibria in supersaturated solutions of calcium d-saccharate seem only to adjust slowly, as seen from calcium activity measurements in calcium d-saccharate solutions made supersaturated by cooling. Solutions formed by isothermal dissolution of calcium d-gluconate in aqueous potassium d...

  1. Nanostructured silver sulfide: synthesis of various forms and their application

    Sadovnikov, S. I.; Rempel, A. A.; Gusev, A. I.

    2018-04-01

    The results of experimental studies on nanostructured silver sulfide are analyzed and generalized. The influence of small particle size on nonstoichiometry of silver sulfide is discussed. Methods for the synthesis of various forms of nanostructured Ag2S including nanopowders, stable colloidal solutions, quantum dots, core–shell nanoparticles and heteronanostructures are described. The advantages and drawbacks of different synthetic procedures are analyzed. Main fields of application of nanostructured silver sulfide are considered. The bibliography includes 184 references.

  2. Calcium metabolism in birds.

    de Matos, Ricardo

    2008-01-01

    Calcium is one of the most important plasma constituents in mammals and birds. It provides structural strength and support (bones and eggshell) and plays vital roles in many of the biochemical reactions in the body. The control of calcium metabolism in birds is highly efficient and closely regulated in a number of tissues, primarily parathyroid gland, intestine, kidney, and bone. The hormones with the greatest involvement in calcium regulation in birds are parathyroid hormone, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (calcitriol), and estrogen, with calcitonin playing a minor and uncertain role. The special characteristics of calcium metabolism in birds, mainly associated with egg production, are discussed, along with common clinical disorders secondary to derangements in calcium homeostasis.

  3. Enhanced relative cooling power of Fe-doped La{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.22}Ba{sub 0.11}Mn{sub 1-x}Fe{sub x}O{sub 3} perovskites: Structural, magnetic and magnetocaloric properties

    Ben Hassine, R.; Cherif, W. [Sfax University, Faculty of Sciences, B. P. 1171, 3000 (Tunisia); Alonso, J.A., E-mail: ja.alonso@icmm.csic.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Mompean, F. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Fernández-Díaz, M.T. [Institut Laue-Langevin, B.P. 156, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Elhalouani, F. [Sfax University, National School of Engineers, B. P. W 3038 (Tunisia)

    2015-11-15

    We present the structural and magnetic properties of a novel series of La{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.22}Ba{sub 0.11}Mn{sub 1-x}Fe{sub x}O{sub 3} (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.3) perovskites prepared by the sol–gel method. These oxides were characterized by x-ray (XRD), neutron powder diffraction (NDP) at room temperature and magnetization measurements versus temperature and various applied magnetic fields. The NPD data, very sensitive to the octahedral tilting, show a crystallographic phase transition from an orthorhombic structure (Pnma) for x = 0 to a rhombohedral structure (R-3c) for Fe-doped samples. Magnetic data show that x = 0 and x = 0.1 perovskites exhibit a paramagnetic–ferromagnetic transition at low temperature, while for 0.2 ≤ x ≤ 0.3 a strong divergence between ZFC and FC curves suggest the presence of antagonistic antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic interactions. The magnetic entropy change (|ΔSmax|) takes values of 2.46 J kg{sup −1} K{sup −1}, 2.43 J kg{sup −1} K{sup −1} and 0.91 J kg{sup −1} for x = 0, x = 0.1 and 0.2, respectively at 5 T. The relative cooling power (RCP) amounts 169 J Kg{sup −1}, 241 J Kg{sup −1} and 70 J Kg{sup −1} at 5 T for x = 0, 0.1, 0.2 respectively. These values are compared favorably with those of some others reported manganites, making La{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.22}Ba{sub 0.11}Mn{sub 0.9}Fe{sub 0.1}O{sub 3} a promising candidate for magnetic refrigeration. - Graphical abstract: The title perovskites present a crystallographic phase transition from an orthorhombic structure (Pnma) for x = 0 to a rhombohedral structure (R-3c) for Fe-doped samples, as shown in a neutron study. Magnetic data show that x = 0 and x = 0.1 perovskites exhibit sharp paramagnetic–ferromagnetic transitions. The relative cooling power (RCP) is as high as 241 J Kg{sup −1} for x = 0.1, being a promising candidate for magnetic refrigeration. - Highlights: • Novel Fe-doped manganite oxides prepared by a sol–gel procedure. • Neutron diffraction shows

  4. HYPERTHERMIA, INTRACELLULAR FREE CALCIUM AND CALCIUM IONOPHORES

    STEGE, GJJ; WIERENGA, PK; KAMPINGA, HH; KONINGS, AWT

    1993-01-01

    It is shown that heat-induced increase of intracellular calcium does not correlate with hyperthermic cell killing. Six different cell lines were investigated; in four (EAT, HeLa S3, L5178Y-R and L5178Y-S) heat treatments killing 90% of the cells did not affect the levels of intracellular free

  5. Carbon steel protection in G.S. (Girlder sulfide) plants. Iron sulfide scales formation conditions. Pt. 1

    Bruzzoni, P.; Burkart, A.L.; Garavaglia, R.N.

    1981-11-01

    An ASTM A 516 degree 60 carbon steel superficial protection technique submitted to a hydrogen-water sulfide corrosive medium at 2 MPa of pressure and 40-125 deg C forming on itself an iron sulfide layer was tested. Studies on pH influence, temperature, passivating mean characteristics and exposure time as well as the mechanical resistance of sulfide layers to erosion are included. (Author) [es

  6. 76 FR 64022 - Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting

    2011-10-17

    ... Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Lifting of Administrative Stay for Hydrogen Sulfide. SUMMARY: EPA is announcing... (EPCRA) section 313 toxic chemical release reporting requirements for hydrogen sulfide (Chemical...

  7. Iron sulfide crystal growth: a literature review

    Dewar, E.J.

    1977-04-01

    Iron pyrite (FeS 2 ) is often found on trays and in heat exchangers in Girdler-Sulfide (G.S.) plants used to extract D 2 O from fresh water. A critical review of the literature was made to find: (i) what is known about FeS 2 crystal growth; (ii) which techniques could be used to study FeS 2 crystal growth experimentally; (iii) potential chemical additives that could be used in trace amounts to poison FeS 2 crystals and reduce their growth rate in G.S. plants. (author)

  8. Sulfide geochronlogy along the Southwest Indian Ridge

    Yang, W.; Tao, C.; Li, H.; Liang, J.; Liao, S.

    2017-12-01

    Dragon Flag and Duanqiao hydrothermal field is located between the Indomed and Gallieni fracture zones in the ultraslow-spreading Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR). Ten subsamples from active and inactive vents of Dragon Flag hydrothermal field and twenty-eight subsamples from Duanqiao hydrothermal field were dated using the 230Th/238U method. Four main episodes of hydrothermal activity of Duanqiao were determined according to the restricted results: 68.9-84.3, 43.9-48.4, 25.3-34.8, and 0.7-17.3 kyrs. Hydrothermal activity of Duanqiao probably started about 84.3 (±0.5) kyrs ago and ceased about 0.737 (±0.023) kyrs ago. And sulfide samples from the nearby Dragon Flag filed at the same time and the results show that the ages of most sulfides from Dragon Flag field range from 1.496(±0.176) to 5.416 (±0.116) kyrs with the oldest age estimated at 15.997 (±0.155) kyrs Münch et al. (2001) reconstructed the evolution history of Mt. Jourdanne hydrothermal field. The age dating results indicate activity in two episodes, at 70-40 and 27-13 kyrs. The hydrothermal activity in Dragon Flag field is much more recent than that of Duanqiao or Mt. Jourdanne fields. The massive sulfides are younger than the sulfides from other hydrothermal fields such as Rainbow, Sonne and Ashadze-2. All these results suggest that hydrothermal activity of Dragon Flag field is much more recent than that of Duanqiao or Mt. Jourdanne fields. Mt. Jourdanne is situated on an axial volcanic ridge which has both volcanic and tectonic activity. This is necessary to develop the heat source and pathways for the fluid convection, which enables the hydrothermal circulation. Hydrothermal activity in Dragon Flag Field is located next to the detachment fault termination. The detachment fault system provides a pathway for hydrothermal convection. Such style of heat source can contribute to continuous hydrothermal activity for over 1000 years. Duanqiao field is located near the central volcano and there is a hot

  9. Microbial selenium sulfide reduction for selenium recovery from wastewater

    Hageman, S.P.W.; Weijden, van der R.D.; Stams, A.J.M.; Cappellen, van P.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2017-01-01

    Microbial reduction of selenium sulfide (SeS2) is a key step in a new treatment process to recover selenium from selenate and selenite streams. In this process, selenate is first reduced to selenite, and subsequently selenite is reduced by sulfide and precipitates from the solution as SeS2. The

  10. Recent findings on sinks for sulfide in gravity sewer networks

    Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild; Vollertsen, Jes

    2006-01-01

    summarizes this newly obtained knowledge and emphasizes important implications of the findings. Model simulations of the in-sewer processes important for the sulfur cycle showed that sulfide oxidation in the wetted biofilm is typically the most important sink for dissolved sulfide in gravity sewers. However...

  11. Technetium behavior in sulfide and ferrous iron solutions

    Lee, S.Y.; Bondietti, E.A.

    1982-01-01

    Pertechnetate oxyanion ( 99 TcO 4- ), a potentially mobile species in leachate from a breached radioactive waste repository, was removed from a brine solution by precipitation with sulfide, iron, and ferrous sulfide at environmental pH's. Maghemite (ν-Fe 2 O 3 ) and geothite (α-FeOOH) were the dominant minerals in the precipitate obtained from the TcO 4- -ferrous iron reaction. The observation of small particle size and poor crystallinity of the minerals formed in the presence of Tc suggested that the Tc was incorporated into the mineral structure after reduction to a lower valence state. Amorphous ferrous sulfide, an initial phase precipitating in the TcO 4- -ferrous iron-sulfide reaction, was transformed to goethite and hematite (α-Fe 2 O 3 ) on aging. The black precipitate obtained from the TcO 4- -sulfide reaction was poorly crystallized technetium sulfide (Tc 2 S 7 ) which was insoluble in both acid and alkaline solution in the absence of strong oxidents. The results suggested that ferrous- and/or sulfide-bearing groundwaters and minerals in host rocks or backfill barriers could reduce the mobility of Tc through the formation of less-soluble Tc-bearing iron and/or sulfide minerals

  12. Sulfidation of carbon-supported iron oxide catalysts

    Ramselaar, W.L.T.M.; Hadders, R.H.; Gerkema, E.; Beer, de V.H.J.; Oers, van E.M.; Kraan, van der A.M.

    1989-01-01

    The sulfidation of carbon-supported iron oxide catalysts was studied by means of in-situ Mössbauer spectroscopy at temperatures down to 4.2 K. The catalysts were dried in two different ways and then sulfided in a flow of 10% H2S in H2 at temperatures between 293 and 773 K. Thiophene

  13. DIHYDROPYRIDINE CALCIUM- CHANNELBLOCKERSFOR ...

    Furthermore, the controversy over the role of calci~-channel blockers as first-line ..... group trials while fully accounting for placebo effects as well as interindividual ..... Reducing calcium overload in the ischemic brain. N Engl JMed. 1999; 341 ...

  14. Calcium and Your Child

    ... calcium-set tofu edamame (soybeans) broccoli, collard greens, kale, chard, Chinese cabbage, and other leafy greens almonds ... more dark green, leafy vegetables (such as broccoli, kale, collard greens, or Chinese cabbage) with meals. Kids ...

  15. Influence of Water Salinity on Air Purification from Hydrogen Sulfide

    Leybovych L.I.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical modeling of «sliding» water drop motion in the air flow was performed in software package FlowVision. The result of mathematical modeling of water motion in a droplet with diameter 100 microns at the «sliding» velocity of 15 m/s is shown. It is established that hydrogen sulfide oxidation occurs at the surface of phases contact. The schematic diagram of the experimental setup for studying air purification from hydrogen sulfide is shown. The results of the experimental research of hydrogen sulfide oxidation by tap and distilled water are presented. The dependence determining the share of hydrogen sulfide oxidized at the surface of phases contact from the dimensionless initial concentration of hydrogen sulfide in the air has been obtained.

  16. Sulindac Sulfide, but Not Sulindac Sulfone, Inhibits Colorectal Cancer Growth

    Christopher S. Williams

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Sulindac sulfide, a metabolite of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID sulindac sulfoxide, is effective at reducing tumor burden in both familial adenomatous polyposis patients and in animals with colorectal cancer. Another sulindac sulfoxide metabolite, sulindac sulfone, has been reported to have antitumor properties without inhibiting cyclooxygenase activity. Here we report the effect of sulindac sulfone treatment on the growth of colorectal carcinoma cells. We observed that sulindac sulfide or sulfone treatment of HCA-7 cells led to inhibition of prostaglandin E2 production. Both sulindac sulfide and sulfone inhibited HCA-7 and HCT-116 cell growth in vitro. Sulindac sulfone had no effect on the growth of either HCA-7 or HCT-116 xenografts, whereas the sulfide derivative inhibited HCA-7 growth in vivo. Both sulindac sulfide and sulfone inhibited colon carcinoma cell growth and prostaglandin production in vitro, but sulindac sulfone had no effect on the growth of colon cancer cell xenografts in nude mice.

  17. Oxidation and Precipitation of Sulfide in Sewer Networks

    Nielsen, A. H.

    risks and corrosion of concrete and metals. Most of the problems relate to the buildup of hydrogen sulfide in the atmosphere of sewer networks. In this respect, the processes of the sulfur cycle are of fundamental importance in ultimately determining the extent of such problems. This study focused...... calibrated and validated against field data. In the extension to the WATS model, sulfur transformations were described by six processes: 1. Sulfide production taking place in the biofilm and sediments covering the permanently wetted sewer walls; 2. Biological sulfide oxidation in the permanently wetted...... to the sewer atmosphere, potentially resulting in concrete corrosion. The extended WATS model represents a major improvement over previously developed models for prediction of sulfide buildup in sewer networks. Compared to such models, the major processes governing sulfide buildup in sewer networks...

  18. Kinetic Spectrophotometric Determination of Trace Amounts of Sulfide

    Barzegar, Mohsen [Tarbiat Modarres University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jabbari, Ali [K. N. Toosi University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Esmaeili, Majid [Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2003-09-15

    A method for the determination of trace amount of sulfide based on the addition reaction of sulfide with methyl green at pH 7.5 and 25 .deg. C is described. The reaction is monitored spectrophotometrically by measuring the decrease in absorbance of the dyestuff at 637 nm by the initial rate and fixed time method. The calibration graph is linear in the range 30-1200 ppb. The theoretical limit of detection was 0.014 ppm. Seven replicate analysis of a sample solution containing 0.70 ppm sulfide gave a relative standard deviation of 1.5%. The interfering effects of various ions on sulfide determination have been reported and procedures for removal of interference have been described. The proposed method was applied successfully to the determination of sulfide in tap and wastewater samples.

  19. Kinetic Spectrophotometric Determination of Trace Amounts of Sulfide

    Barzegar, Mohsen; Jabbari, Ali; Esmaeili, Majid

    2003-01-01

    A method for the determination of trace amount of sulfide based on the addition reaction of sulfide with methyl green at pH 7.5 and 25 .deg. C is described. The reaction is monitored spectrophotometrically by measuring the decrease in absorbance of the dyestuff at 637 nm by the initial rate and fixed time method. The calibration graph is linear in the range 30-1200 ppb. The theoretical limit of detection was 0.014 ppm. Seven replicate analysis of a sample solution containing 0.70 ppm sulfide gave a relative standard deviation of 1.5%. The interfering effects of various ions on sulfide determination have been reported and procedures for removal of interference have been described. The proposed method was applied successfully to the determination of sulfide in tap and wastewater samples

  20. Calcium binding by dietary fibre

    James, W.P.T.; Branch, W.J.; Southgate, D.A.T.

    1978-01-01

    Dietary fibre from plants low in phytate bound calcium in proportion to its uronic-acid content. This binding by the non-cellulosic fraction of fibre reduces the availability of calcium for small-intestinal absorption, but the colonic microbial digestion of uronic acids liberates the calcium. Thus the ability to maintain calcium balance on high-fibre diets may depend on the adaptive capacity on the colon for calcium. (author)

  1. Anoxic sulfide biooxidation using nitrite as electron acceptor

    Mahmood, Qaisar; Zheng Ping; Cai Jing; Wu Donglei; Hu, Baolan; Li Jinye

    2007-01-01

    Biotechnology can be used to assess the well being of ecosystems, transform pollutants into benign substances, generate biodegradable materials from renewable sources, and develop environmentally safe manufacturing and disposal processes. Simultaneous elimination of sulfide and nitrite from synthetic wastewaters was investigated using a bioreactor. A laboratory scale anoxic sulfide-oxidizing (ASO) reactor was operated for 135 days to evaluate the potential for volumetric loading rates, effect of hydraulic retention time (HRT) and substrate concentration on the process performance. The maximal sulfide and nitrite removal rates were achieved to be 13.82 and 16.311 kg/(m 3 day), respectively, at 0.10 day HRT. The process can endure high sulfide concentrations, as the sulfide removal percentage always remained higher than 88.97% with influent concentration up to 1920 mg/L. Incomplete sulfide oxidation took place due to lower consumed nitrite to sulfide ratios of 0.93. It also tolerated high nitrite concentration up to 2265.25 mg/L. The potential achieved by decreasing HRT at fixed substrate concentration is higher than that by increasing substrate concentration at fixed HRT. The process can bear short HRT of 0.10 day but careful operation is needed. Nitrite conversion was more sensitive to HRT than sulfide conversion when HRT was decreased from 1.50 to 0.08 day. Stoichiometric analyses and results of batch experiments show that major part of sulfide (89-90%) was reduced by nitrite while some autooxidation (10-11%) was resulted from presence of small quantities of dissolved oxygen in the influent wastewater. There was ammonia amassing in considerably high amounts in the bioreactor when the influent nitrite concentration reached above 2265.25 mg/L. High ammonia concentrations (200-550 mg/L) in the bioreactor contributed towards the overall inhibition of the process. Present biotechnology exhibits practical value with a high potential for simultaneous removal of nitrite

  2. A model of propagating calcium-induced calcium release mediated by calcium diffusion

    Backx, P. H.; de Tombe, P. P.; van Deen, J. H.; Mulder, B. J.; ter Keurs, H. E.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of sudden local fluctuations of the free sarcoplasmic [Ca++]i in cardiac cells on calcium release and calcium uptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) was calculated with the aid of a simplified model of SR calcium handling. The model was used to evaluate whether propagation of calcium

  3. [Calcium suppletion for patients who use gastric acid inhibitors: calcium citrate or calcium carbonate?].

    Jonge, H.J. de; Gans, R.O.; Huls, G.A.

    2012-01-01

    Various calcium supplements are available for patients who have an indication for calcium suppletion. American guidelines and UpToDate recommend prescribing calcium citrate to patients who use antacids The rationale for this advice is that water-insoluble calcium carbonate needs acid for adequate

  4. Carbon steel protection in G.S. (Girlder sulfide) plants. Pressure influence on iron sulfide scales formation. Pt. 5

    Delfino, C.A.; Lires, O.A.; Rojo, E.A.

    1987-01-01

    In order to protect carbon steel towers and piping of Girlder sulfide (G.S.) experimental heavy water plants against corrosion produced by the action of aqueous solutions of hydrogen sulfide, a method, previously published, was developed. Carbon steel, exposed to saturated aqueous solutions of hydrogen sulfide, forms iron sulfide scales. In oxygen free solutions evolution of corrosion follows the sequence: mackinawite → cubic ferrous sulfide → troilite → pyrrotite → pyrite. Scales formed by pyrrotite-pyrite or pyrite are the most protective layers (these are obtained at 130 deg C, 2MPa, for periods of 14 days). Experiments, at 125 deg C and periods of 10-25 days, were performed in two different ways: 1- constant pressure operations at 0.5 and 1.1 MPa. 2- variable pressure operation between 0.3-1 MPa. In all cases pyrrotite-pyrite scales were obtained. (Author) [es

  5. Calcium in plant cells

    V. V. Schwartau

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the review on the role of calcium in many physiological processes of plant organisms, including growth and development, protection from pathogenic influences, response to changing environmental factors, and many other aspects of plant physiology. Initial intake of calcium ions is carried out by Ca2+-channels of plasma membrane and they are further transported by the xylem owing to auxins’ attractive ability. The level of intake and selectivity of calcium transport to ove-ground parts of the plant is controlled by a symplast. Ca2+enters to the cytoplasm of endoderm cells through calcium channels on the cortical side of Kaspary bands, and is redistributed inside the stele by the symplast, with the use of Ca2+-АТPases and Ca2+/Н+-antiports. Owing to regulated expression and activity of these calcium transporters, calclum can be selectively delivered to the xylem. Important role in supporting calcium homeostasis is given to the vacuole which is the largest depo of calcium. Regulated quantity of calcium movement through the tonoplast is provided by a number of potential-, ligand-gated active transporters and channels, like Ca2+-ATPase and Ca2+/H+ exchanger. They are actively involved in the inactivation of the calcium signal by pumping Ca2+ to the depo of cells. Calcium ATPases are high affinity pumps that efficiently transfer calcium ions against the concentration gradient in their presence in the solution in nanomolar concentrations. Calcium exchangers are low affinity, high capacity Ca2+ transporters that are effectively transporting calcium after raising its concentration in the cell cytosol through the use of protons gradients. Maintaining constant concentration and participation in the response to stimuli of different types also involves EPR, plastids, mitochondria, and cell wall. Calcium binding proteins contain several conserved sequences that provide sensitivity to changes in the concentration of Ca2+ and when you

  6. Occupational exposure to hydrogen sulfide: management of hydrogen sulfide exposure victims (Preprint No. SA-5)

    Srivastava, P.P.

    1989-04-01

    National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, U.S.A. has listed 73 industries with potential exposure to hydrogen sulphide. Though the toxicity of hydrogen sulfide is known to mankind since the beginning of seventeenth century the exact mode of its toxicity and effective therapeutic regimen remains unclear as yet. This paper presents current thoughts on the toxicity of this substance and a discussion on the role of various antidotes used in H 2 S poisoning. (autho r)

  7. Azo dye decolorization assisted by chemical and biogenic sulfide

    Prato-Garcia, Dorian [Laboratory for Research on Advanced Processes for Water Treatment, Unidad Académica Juriquilla, Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Blvd. Juriquilla 3001, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico); Cervantes, Francisco J. [División de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica, Camino a la Presa de San José 2055, San Luis Potosí 78216 (Mexico); Buitrón, Germán, E-mail: gbuitronm@ii.unam.mx [Laboratory for Research on Advanced Processes for Water Treatment, Unidad Académica Juriquilla, Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Blvd. Juriquilla 3001, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► Azo dyes were reduced efficiently by chemical and biogenic sulfide. ► Biogenic sulfide was more efficient than chemical sulfide. ► There was no competition between dyes and sulfate for reducing equivalents. ► Aromatic amines barely affected the sulfate-reducing process. -- Abstract: The effectiveness of chemical and biogenic sulfide in decolorizing three sulfonated azo dyes and the robustness of a sulfate-reducing process for simultaneous decolorization and sulfate removal were evaluated. The results demonstrated that decolorization of azo dyes assisted by chemical sulfide and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) was effective. In the absence of AQDS, biogenic sulfide was more efficient than chemical sulfide for decolorizing the azo dyes. The performance of sulfate-reducing bacteria in attached-growth sequencing batch reactors suggested the absence of competition between the studied azo dyes and the sulfate-reducing process for the reducing equivalents. Additionally, the presence of chemical reduction by-products had an almost negligible effect on the sulfate removal rate, which was nearly constant (94%) after azo dye injection.

  8. Simultaneous removal of sulfide, nitrate and acetate: Kinetic modeling

    Wang Aijie, E-mail: waj0578@hit.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology (SKLUWRE, HIT), Harbin 150090 (China); Liu Chunshuang; Ren Nanqi; Han Hongjun [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology (SKLUWRE, HIT), Harbin 150090 (China); Lee Duujong [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology (SKLUWRE, HIT), Harbin 150090 (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2010-06-15

    Biological removal of sulfide, nitrate and chemical oxygen demand (COD) simultaneously from industrial wastewaters to elementary sulfur (S{sup 0}), N{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2}, or named the denitrifying sulfide (DSR) process, is a cost effective and environmentally friendly treatment process for high strength sulfide and nitrate laden organic wastewater. Kinetic model for the DSR process was established for the first time on the basis of Activated Sludge Model No. 1 (ASM1). The DSR experiments were conducted at influent sulfide concentrations of 200-800 mg/L, whose results calibrate the model parameters. The model correlates well with the DSR process dynamics. By introducing the switch function and the inhibition function, the competition between autotrophic and heterotrophic denitrifiers is quantitatively described and the degree of inhibition of sulfide on heterotrophic denitrifiers is realized. The model output indicates that the DSR reactor can work well at 0.5 < C/S < 3.0 with influent sulfide concentration of 400-1000 mg/L. At >1000 mg/L influent sulfide, however, the DSR system will break down.

  9. Interactions among sulfide-oxidizing bacteria

    Poplawski, R.

    1985-01-01

    The responses of different phototrophic bacteria in a competitive experimental system are studied, one in which primary factors such as H2S or light limited photometabolism. Two different types of bacteria shared one limited source of sulfide under specific conditions of light. The selection of a purple and a green sulfur bacteria and the cyanobacterium was based on their physiological similarity and also on the fact that they occur together in microbial mats. They all share anoxygenic photosynthesis, and are thus probably part of an evolutionary continuum of phototrophic organisms that runs from, strictly anaerobic physiology to the ability of some cyanobacteria to shift between anoxygenic bacterial style photosynthesis and the oxygenic kind typical of eukaryotes.

  10. Eelgrass fairy rings: sulfide as inhibiting agent

    Borum, Jens; Raun, Ane-Marie Løvendahl; Hasler-Sheetal, Harald

    2014-01-01

    specifically, for the apparent die- off of eelgrass shoots on the inner side of the rings. The fairy rings were up to 15 m in diameter consisting of 0.3- to 1-m-wide zones of sea grass shoots at densities of up to 1,200 shoots m−2 and rooted in an up to 10-cm-thick sediment layer. On the outer side, shoots...... expanded over the bare chalk plates. On the inner side, shoots were smaller, had lower absolute and specific leaf growth, shoot density was lower and the sediment eroded leaving the bare chalk with scattered boulders behind. Sediment organic matter and nutrients and tissue nutrient contents were...... substantial invasion of sulfide from the sediment. neither the clonal growth pattern of eelgrass, sediment burial of shoots, hydrodynamic forcing nor nutrient limitation could explain the ring-shaped pattern. We conclude that the most likely explanation must be found in invasion of eelgrass shoots by toxic...

  11. On the pelletizing of sulfide molybdenite concentrate

    Palant, A.A.

    2007-01-01

    Investigation results are discussed on the process of pelletizing with the use of various binders (water, syrup, sulfite-alcoholic residue and bentonite) for flotation sulfide molybdenite concentrate (∼84 % MoS 2 ) of the Mongolian deposit. It is established that with the use of syrup rather strong pellets (>300 g/p) of desired size (2-3 mm) can be obtained at a binder flowrate of 1 kg per 100 kg of concentrate. The main advantage of using syrup instead of bentonite lies in the fact that in this instance no depletion of a molybdenum calcine obtained by oxidizing roasting of raw ore takes place due to syrup complete burning out. This affects positively subsequent hydrometallurgical conversion because of decreasing molybdenum losses with waste cakes [ru

  12. Modulated structure calculated for superconducting hydrogen sulfide

    Majumdar, Arnab; Tse, John S.; Yao, Yansun [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2017-09-11

    Compression of hydrogen sulfide using first principles metadynamics and molecular dynamics calculations revealed a modulated structure with high proton mobility which exhibits a diffraction pattern matching well with experiment. The structure consists of a sublattice of rectangular meandering SH{sup -} chains and molecular-like H{sub 3}S{sup +} stacked alternately in tetragonal and cubic slabs forming a long-period modulation. The novel structure offers a new perspective on the possible origin of the superconductivity at very high temperatures in which the conducting electrons in the SH chains are perturbed by the fluxional motions of the H{sub 3}S resulting in strong electron-phonon coupling. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Mechanism of hydrodenitrogenation on phosphides and sulfides.

    Oyama, S Ted; Lee, Yong-Kul

    2005-02-17

    The mechanism of hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) of 2-methylpiperidine was studied over a silica-supported nickel phosphide catalyst (Ni2P/SiO2, Ni/P = 1/2) and a commercial Ni-Mo-S/Al2O3 catalyst in a three-phase trickle-bed reactor operated at 3.1 MPa and 450-600 K. Analysis of the product distribution as a function of contact time indicated that the reaction proceeded in both cases predominantly by a substitution mechanism, with a smaller contribution of an elimination mechanism. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) of the 2-methylpiperidine indicated that at reaction conditions a piperidinium ion intermediate was formed on both the sulfide and the phosphide. It is concluded that the mechanism of HDN on nickel phosphide is very similar to that on sulfides. The mechanism on the nickel phosphide was also probed by comparing the reactivity of piperidine and several of its derivatives in the presence of 3000 ppm S. The relative elimination rates depended on the structure of the molecules, and followed the sequence: 4-methylpiperidine approximately piperidine > 3-methylpiperidine > 2,6-dimethylpiperidine > 2-methylpiperidine. [Chemical structure: see text] This order of reactivity was not dependent on the number of alpha-H or beta-H atoms in the molecules, ruling out their reaction through a single, simple mechanism. It is likely that the unhindered piperidine molecules reacted by an S(N)2 substitution process and the more hindered 2,6-dimethylpiperidine reacted by an E2 elimination process.

  14. New cyclic sulfides, garlicnins I2, M, N, and O, from Allium sativum.

    Nohara, Toshihiro; Ono, Masateru; Nishioka, Naho; Masuda, Fuka; Fujiwara, Yukio; Ikeda, Tsuyoshi; Nakano, Daisuke; Kinjo, Junei

    2018-01-01

    One atypical thiolane-type sulfide, garlicnin I 2 (1), two 3,4-dimethylthiolane-type sulfides, garlicnins M (2) and N (3), and one thiabicyclic-type sulfide, garlicnin O (4), were isolated from the acetone extracts of Chinese garlic bulbs, Allium sativum and their structures were characterized. Hypothetical pathways for the production of the respective sulfides were discussed.

  15. Optimization of the superconducting phase of hydrogen sulfide

    Degtyarenko, N. N.; Masur, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    The electron and phonon spectra, as well as the densities of electron and phonon states of the SH3 phase and the stable orthorhombic structure of hydrogen sulfide SH2, are calculated for the pressure interval 100-225 GPa. It is found that the I4/ mmm phase can be responsible for the superconducting properties of metallic hydrogen sulfide along with the SH3 phase. Sequential stages for obtaining and conservation of the SH2 phase are proposed. The properties of two (SH2 and SH3) superconducting phases of hydrogen sulfide are compared.

  16. Process for scavenging hydrogen sulfide from hydrocarbon gases

    Fox, I.

    1981-01-01

    A process for scavenging hydrogen sulfide from hydrocarbon gases utilizes iron oxide particles of unique chemical and physical properties. These particles have large surface area, and are comprised substantially of amorphous Fe 2 O 3 containing a crystalline phase of Fe 2 O 3 , Fe 3 O 4 and combinations thereof. In scavenging hydrogen sulfide, the iron oxide particles are suspended in a liquid which enters into intimate mixing contact with hydrocarbon gases; the hydrogen sulfide is reacted at an exceptional rate and only acid-stable reaction products are formed. Thereafter, the sweetened hydrocarbon gases are collected

  17. Sulfidization of an aluminocobaltomolybdenum catalyst using the 35S radioisotope

    Isagulyants, G.V.; Greish, A.A.; Kogan, V.M.

    1987-01-01

    It has been established that in aluminocobaltomolybdenum catalyst sulfidized with elemental sulfur there are two types of sulfur, free and bound. The maximum amount of bound sulfur in ACM catalyst is 6.6 wt. %, which corresponds to practically complete sulfidation of the ACM catalyst. In the presence of hydrogen an equilibrium distribution of bound sulfur is achieved in a granule of ACM catalyst irrespective of the temperature of sulfidation. In a nitrogen atmosphere it is primarily the surface layers of the catalyst that are sulfured

  18. Sulfide Oxidation in the Anoxic Black-Sea Chemocline

    JØRGENSEN, BB; FOSSING, H.; WIRSEN, CO

    1991-01-01

    per day, occurred in anoxic water at the top of the sulfide zone concurrent with the highest rates of dark CO2 assimilation. The main soluble oxidized products of sulfide were thiosulfate (68-82%) and sulfate. Indirect evidence was presented for the formation of elemental sulfur which accumulated...... that the measured H2S oxidation rates were 4-fold higher than could be explained by the downward flux of organic carbon and too high to balance the availability of electron acceptors such as oxidized iron or manganese. A nitrate maximum at the lower boundary of the O2 zone did not extend down to the sulfide zone....

  19. Thermoelectric properties of non-stoichiometric lanthanum sulfides

    Shapiro, E.; Danielson, L.R.

    1983-01-01

    The lanthanum sulfides are promising candidate materials for high-efficiency thermoelectric applications at temperatures up to 1300 0 C. The nonstoichiometric lanthanum sulfides (LaS /SUB x/ , where 1.33 2 //rho/ can be chosen. The thermal conductivity remains approximately constant with stoichiometry, so a material with an optimum value of α 2 //rho/ should possess the optimum figure-of-merit. Data for the Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity of non-stoichiometric lanthanum sulfides is presented, together with structural properties of these materials

  20. Denitrifying sulfide removal process on high-salinity wastewaters.

    Liu, Chunshuang; Zhao, Chaocheng; Wang, Aijie; Guo, Yadong; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2015-08-01

    Denitrifying sulfide removal (DSR) process comprising both heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrifiers can simultaneously convert nitrate, sulfide, and acetate into nitrogen gas, elemental sulfur (S(0)), and carbon dioxide, respectively. Sulfide- and nitrate-laden wastewaters at 2-35 g/L NaCl were treated by DSR process. A C/N ratio of 3:1 was proposed to maintain high S(0) conversion rate. The granular sludge with a compact structure and smooth outer surface was formed. The microbial communities of DSR consortium via high-throughput sequencing method suggested that salinity shifts the predominating heterotrophic denitrifiers at 10 g/L NaCl.

  1. Use of sulfide-containing liquors for removing mercury from flue gases

    Nolan, Paul S.; Downs, William; Bailey, Ralph T.; Vecci, Stanley J.

    2006-05-02

    A method and apparatus for reducing and removing mercury in industrial gases, such as a flue gas, produced by the combustion of fossil fuels, such as coal, adds sulfide ions to the flue gas as it passes through a scrubber. Ideally, the source of these sulfide ions may include at least one of: sulfidic waste water, kraft caustic liquor, kraft carbonate liquor, potassium sulfide, sodium sulfide, and thioacetamide. The sulfide ion source is introduced into the scrubbing liquor as an aqueous sulfide species. The scrubber may be either a wet or dry scrubber for flue gas desulfurization systems.

  2. Remediation of Sulfidic Wastewater by Aeration in the Presence of Ultrasonic Vibration

    F. Ahmad

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available In the current study, the aerial oxidation of sodium sulfide in the presence of ultrasonic vibration is investigated. Sulfide analysis was carried out by the methylene blue method. Sodium sulfide is oxidized to elemental sulfur in the presence of ultrasonic vibration. The influence of air flow rate, initial sodium sulfide concentration and ultrasonic vibration intensity on the oxidation of sodium sulfide was investigated. The rate law equation regarding the oxidation of sulfide was determined from the experimental data. The order of reaction with respect to sulfide and oxygen was found to be 0.36 and 0.67 respectively. The overall reaction followed nearly first order kinetics.

  3. Glutamate decarboxylase and. gamma. -aminobutyric acid transaminase activity in brain structures during action of high concentrated sulfide gas on a background of hypo- and hypercalcemia

    Kadyrov, G.K.; Aliyev, A.M.

    Activity of the following enzymes was studied on the background of hypo- and hypercalcemia and exposure to high concentration of sulfide gas: glutamate decarboxylase (GDC) and {gamma}-aminobutyric acid transaminase (GABA-T). These enzymes regulate metabolism of GABA. The results showed that a 3.5 hr exposure to sulfide gas at a concentration of 0.3 mg/1 led to significantly increased activity of GDC in cerebral hemispheres, cerebellum and in brain stem. Activity of GABA-T dropped correspondingly. On the background of hypercalcemia induced by im. injection of 10% calcium gluconate (0.6 m1/200 g body weight of experimental rats) the negative effect caused by the exposure to sulfide gas was diminished. Under conditions of hypocalcemia (im. injection of 10 mg/200 g body weight of sodium oxalate), exposure to sulfide gas led to a significantly decreased activity of GDC and GABA-T in the hemispheres and in the brain stem, but in the cerebellum the activity of GDC increased sharply while that of GABA-T decreased correspondingly. 8 refs.

  4. Calcium ferrite formation from the thermolysis of calcium tris (maleato)

    For preparing calcium ferrite, calcium tris (maleato) ferrate(III) precursor was prepared by mixing aqueous solutions of iron(III) maleate, calcium maleate and maleic acid. Various physico-chemical techniques i.e. TG, DTG, DTA, Mössbauer, XRD, IR etc have been used to study the decomposition behaviour from ambient to ...

  5. Enhanced sulfidation xanthate flotation of malachite using ammonium ions as activator

    Dandan Wu; Wenhui Ma; Yingbo Mao; Jiushuai Deng; Shuming Wen

    2017-01-01

    In this study, ammonium ion was used to enhance the sulfidation flotation of malachite. The effect of ammonium ion on the sulfidation flotation of malachite was investigated using microflotation test, inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analysis, zeta potential measurements, and scanning electron microscope analysis (SEM). The results of microflotation test show that the addition of sodium sulfide and ammonium sulfate resulted in better sulfidation than the addition of sodium sulfide alone. The ...

  6. A sensor for calcium uptake

    Collins, Sean; Meyer, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria — the cell’s power plants — increase their energy production in response to calcium signals in the cytoplasm. A regulator of the elusive mitochondrial calcium channel has now been identified. PMID:20844529

  7. Children's Bone Health and Calcium

    ... Twitter Pinterest Email Print Children's Bone Health and Calcium: Condition Information What is bone health and how ... straight, walk, run, and lead an active life. Calcium is one of the key dietary building blocks ...

  8. Calcium – how and why?

    Unknown

    biological processes because of its unusual physical and chemical properties. 1. History of calcium ... cellular roles of calcium has established the importance of this ion ..... Ca2+ ion, for example in regulating enzyme activity (Price. 1975 ...

  9. Instrument for Airborne Measurement of Carbonyl Sulfide, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Southwest Sciences proposes to develop small, low power instrumentation for the real-time direct measurement of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) in the atmosphere, especially...

  10. New sulfide catalysts for the hydroliquefaction of coal

    Vissers, J.P.R.; Oers, van E.M.; Beer, de V.H.J.; Prins, R.

    1987-01-01

    Possibilities for the preparation of new metal sulfide catalyst systems based on carbon carriers having favourable textural and surface properties have been explored, and attention has been given to the characterization (structure) and evaluation (hydrosulfurization activity) of these catalysts. Two

  11. Formation of Copper Sulfide Precipitate in Solid Iron

    Urata, Kentaro; Kobayashi, Yoshinao

    The growth rate of copper sulfide precipitates has been measured in low carbon steel samples such as Fe-0.3mass%Cu-0.03mass%S-0.1mass%C and Fe-0.1mass%Cu-0.01mass%S- 0.1mass%C. Heat-treatment of the samples was conducted at 1273, 1423 and 1573 K for 100 s - 14.4 ks for precipitation of copper sulfides and then the samples were observed by a scanning electron microscope and a transmission electron microscope to measure the diameter of copper sulfides precipitated in the samples. The growth rate of copper sulfide has been found to be well described by the Ostwald growth model, as follows: R\

  12. Optimization of biological sulfide removal in a CSTR bioreactor.

    Roosta, Aliakbar; Jahanmiri, Abdolhossein; Mowla, Dariush; Niazi, Ali; Sotoodeh, Hamidreza

    2012-08-01

    In this study, biological sulfide removal from natural gas in a continuous bioreactor is investigated for estimation of the optimal operational parameters. According to the carried out reactions, sulfide can be converted to elemental sulfur, sulfate, thiosulfate, and polysulfide, of which elemental sulfur is the desired product. A mathematical model is developed and was used for investigation of the effect of various parameters on elemental sulfur selectivity. The results of the simulation show that elemental sulfur selectivity is a function of dissolved oxygen, sulfide load, pH, and concentration of bacteria. Optimal parameter values are calculated for maximum elemental sulfur selectivity by using genetic algorithm as an adaptive heuristic search. In the optimal conditions, 87.76% of sulfide loaded to the bioreactor is converted to elemental sulfur.

  13. Solar Imagery - Chromosphere - Calcium

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of full-disk images of the sun in Calcium (Ca) II K wavelength (393.4 nm). Ca II K imagery reveal magnetic structures of the sun from about 500...

  14. INVESTIGATIONS ON BIOCHEMICAL PURIFICATION OF GROUND WATER FROM HYDROGEN SULFIDE

    Yu. P. Sedlukho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers problems and features of biochemical removal of hydrogen sulfide from ground water. The analysis of existing methods for purification of ground water from hydrogen sulfide has been given in the paper. The paper has established shortcomings of physical and chemical purification of ground water. While using aeration methods for removal of hydrogen sulfide formation of colloidal sulfur that gives muddiness and opalescence to water occurs due to partial chemical air oxidation. In addition to this violation of sulfide-carbonate equilibrium taking place in the process of aeration due to desorption of H2S and CO2, often leads to clogging of degasifier nozzles with formed CaCO3 that causes serious operational problems. Chemical methods require relatively large flow of complex reagent facilities, storage facilities and transportation costs.In terms of hydrogen sulfide ground water purification the greatest interest is given to the biochemical method. Factors deterring widespread application of the biochemical method is its insufficient previous investigation and necessity to execute special research in order to determine optimal process parameters while purifying groundwater of a particular water supply source. Biochemical methods for oxidation of sulfur compounds are based on natural biological processes that ensure natural sulfur cycle. S. Vinogradsky has established a two-stage mechanism for oxidation of hydrogen sulfide with sulfur bacteria (Beggiatoa. The first stage presupposes oxidation of hydrogen sulphide to elemental sulfur which is accumulating in the cytoplasm in the form of globules. During the second stage sulfur bacteria begin to oxidize intracellular sulfur to sulfuric acid due to shortage of hydrogen sulfide.The paper provides the results of technological tests of large-scale pilot plants for biochemical purification of groundwater from hydrogen sulfide in semi-industrial conditions. Dependences of water quality

  15. Determination of Hydrogen Sulfide in Fermentation Broths Containing SO21

    Acree, T. E.; Sonoff, Elisabeth P.; Splittstoesser, D. F.

    1971-01-01

    A procedure for the determination of hydrogen sulfide in fermentation broths containing up to 100 μg of SO2 per ml is described. The method involves the sparging of H2S from the broth into a cadmium hydroxide absorption solution, the formation of methylene blue from the absorbed sulfide, and the measuring of this color spectrophotometrically. The use of cadmium hydroxide instead of zinc acetate, the common absorbent, substantially reduced the interference of SO2 with the analysis. PMID:5111300

  16. Antenatal calcium intake in Malaysia.

    Mahdy, Zaleha Abdullah; Basri, Hashimah; Md Isa, Zaleha; Ahmad, Shuhaila; Shamsuddin, Khadijah; Mohd Amin, Rahmah

    2014-04-01

    To determine the adequacy of antenatal calcium intake in Malaysia, and the influencing factors. A cross-sectional study was conducted among postnatal women who delivered in two tertiary hospitals. Data were collected from antenatal cards, hospital documents and diet recall on daily milk and calcium intake during pregnancy. SPSS version 19.0 was used for statistical analyses. A total of 150 women were studied. The total daily calcium intake was 834 ± 43 mg (mean ± standard error of the mean), but the calcium intake distribution curve was skewed to the right with a median intake of 725 mg daily. When calcium intake from milk and calcium supplements was excluded, the daily dietary calcium intake was only 478 ± 25 mg. Even with inclusion of milk and calcium supplements, more than a third (n=55 or 36.7%) of the women consumed less than 600 mg calcium in their daily diet. The adequacy of daily calcium intake was not influenced by maternal age, ethnicity, income or maternal job or educational status as well as parity. The daily dietary calcium intake of the Malaysian antenatal population is far from adequate without the addition of calcium supplements and milk. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2013 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  17. The Plasma Membrane Calcium Pump

    Rasmussen, H.

    1983-01-01

    Three aspect of cellular calcium metabolism in animal cells was discussed including the importance of the plasma membrane in calcium homeostasis, experiments dealing with the actual mechanism of the calcium pump, and the function of the pump in relationship to the mitochondria and to the function of calmodulin in the intact cell.

  18. Hydrogen sulfide oxidation without oxygen - oxidation products and pathways

    Fossing, H.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide oxidation was studied in anoxic marine sediments-both in undisturbed sediment cores and in sediment slurries. The turn over of hydrogen sulfide was followed using 35 S-radiolabeled hydrogen sulfide which was injected into the sediment. However, isotope exchange reactions between the reduced sulfur compounds, in particular between elemental sulfur and hydrogen sulfide, influenced on the specific radioactivity of these pools. It was, therefore, not possible to measure the turn over rates of the reduced sulfur pools by the radiotracer technique but merely to use the radioisotope to demonstrate some of the oxidation products. Thiosulfate was one important intermediate in the anoxic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide and was continuously turned over by reduction, oxidation and disproportionation. The author discusses the importance of isotope exchange and also presents the results from experiments in which both 35 S-radiolabeled elemental sulfur, radiolabeled hydrogen sulfide and radiolabeled thiosulfate were used to study the intermediates in the oxidative pathways of the sulfur cycle

  19. Bioavailability and stability of mercury sulfide in Armuchee (USA) soil

    Han, Fengxiang; Shiyab, Safwan; Su, Yi; Monts, David L.; Waggoner, Charles A.; Matta, Frank B.

    2007-01-01

    Because of the adverse effects of elemental mercury and mercury compounds upon human health, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is engaged in an on-going effort to monitor and remediate mercury-contaminated DOE sites. In order to more cost effectively implement those extensive remediation efforts, it is necessary to obtain an improved understanding of the role that mercury and mercury compounds play in the ecosystem. We have conducted pilot scale experiments to study the bioavailability of mercury sulfide in an Armuchee (eastern US ) soil. The effects of plants and incubation time on chemical stability and bioavailability of HgS under simulated conditions of the ecosystem have been examined, as has the dynamics of the dissolution of mercury sulfide by various extractants. The results show that mercury sulfide in contaminated Armuchee soil was still to some extent bioavailable to plants. After planting, soil mercury sulfide is more easily dissolved by both 4 M and 12 M nitric acid than pure mercury sulfide reagent. Dissolution kinetics of soil mercury sulfide and pure chemical reagent by nitric acid are different. Mercury release by EDTA from HgS-contaminated soil increased with time of reaction and soil mercury level. Chelating chemicals increase the solubility and bioavailability of mercury in HgS-contaminated soil. (authors)

  20. Laser cleaning of sulfide scale on compressor impeller blade

    Tang, Q.H.; Zhou, D.; Wang, Y.L.; Liu, G.F.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The effects of sulfide layers and fluence values on the mechanism of laser cleaning were experimentally established. • The specimen surface with sulfide scale becomes slightly smoother than that before laser cleaning. • The mechanism of laser cleaning the sulfide scale of stainless steel is spallation without oxidization. • It would avoid chemical waste and dust pollution using a fiber laser instead of using nitric acids or sandblasting. - Abstract: Sulfide scale on the surface of a compressor impeller blade can considerably reduce the impeller performance and its service life. To prepare for subsequent remanufacturing, such as plasma spraying, it needs to be removed completely. In the corrosion process on an FV(520)B stainless steel, sulfide scale is divided into two layers because of different outward diffusion rates of Cr, Ni and Fe. In this paper, the cleaning threshold values of the upper and inner layers and the damage threshold value of the substrate were investigated using a pulsed fiber laser. To obtain experimental evidence, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and 3D surface profilometry were employed to investigate the two kinds of sulfide layers on specimens before, during, and after laser cleaning.

  1. Hydrogen sulfide production from subgingival plaque samples.

    Basic, A; Dahlén, G

    2015-10-01

    Periodontitis is a polymicrobial anaerobe infection. Little is known about the dysbiotic microbiota and the role of bacterial metabolites in the disease process. It is suggested that the production of certain waste products in the proteolytic metabolism may work as markers for disease severity. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a gas produced by degradation of proteins in the subgingival pocket. It is highly toxic and believed to have pro-inflammatory properties. We aimed to study H2S production from subgingival plaque samples in relation to disease severity in subjects with natural development of the disease, using a colorimetric method based on bismuth precipitation. In remote areas of northern Thailand, adults with poor oral hygiene habits and a natural development of periodontal disease were examined for their oral health status. H2S production was measured with the bismuth method and subgingival plaque samples were analyzed for the presence of 20 bacterial species with the checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique. In total, 43 subjects were examined (age 40-60 years, mean PI 95 ± 6.6%). Fifty-six percent had moderate periodontal breakdown (CAL > 3  7 mm) on at least one site. Parvimonas micra, Filifactor alocis, Porphyromonas endodontalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum were frequently detected. H2S production could not be correlated to periodontal disease severity (PPD or CAL at sampled sites) or to a specific bacterial composition. Site 21 had statistically lower production of H2S (p = 0.02) compared to 16 and 46. Betel nut chewers had statistically significant lower H2S production (p = 0.01) than non-chewers. Rapid detection and estimation of subgingival H2S production capacity was easily and reliably tested by the colorimetric bismuth sulfide precipitation method. H2S may be a valuable clinical marker for degradation of proteins in the subgingival pocket. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Physiological behavior of hydrogen sulfide in rice plant. Part 5. Effect of hydrogen sulfide on respiration of rice roots

    Okajima, H; Takagi, S

    1955-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of hydrogen sulfide on the respiration of rice plant roots were investigated using Warburg's manometory technique. Hydrogen sulfide inhibited not only aerobic respiration but anaerobic respiration process of roots. Inhibitory action of hydrogen sulfide and potassium cyanide on the respiration were apparently reversible, but the style of recovery reaction from inhibition was somewhat different in each case. Oxygen consumption of roots was increased by addition of ammonium salts, but the same effects were not recognized by the addition of any other salt examined (except nitrate salts). There was close relationship between respiration of roots and assimilation of nitrogen by roots. The increased oxygen uptake by addition of ammonium salt was also inhibited by hydrogen sulfide. The reactivation of this reaction occurred with the recovery of endogenous respiration of roots. 19 references, 8 figures, 3 tables.

  3. Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    Zamponi, Gerald Werner

    Voltage Gated Calcium Channels is the first comprehensive book in the calcium channel field, encompassing over thirty years of progress towards our understanding of calcium channel structure, function, regulation, physiology, pharmacology, and genetics. This book balances contributions from many of the leading authorities in the calcium channel field with fresh perspectives from risings stars in the area, taking into account the most recent literature and concepts. This is the only all-encompassing calcium channel book currently available, and is an essential resource for academic researchers at all levels in the areas neuroscience, biophysics, and cardiovascular sciences, as well as to researchers in the drug discovery area.

  4. Thiosulfate leaching of gold from sulfide wastes

    Block-Bolten, A.; Torma, A.E.

    1986-07-01

    The kinetics of gold extraction from lead-zinc sulfide flotation tailings by thiosulfate leachants has been investigated. The order of reaction as well as the overall reaction rate constant were, with respect to thiosulfate concentration, calculated to be n=0.75 and k=1.05 x 10/sup -6/ mol/sup 1/4/ dm/sup 5/4/ min/sup -1/. The apparent activation energy was found to be ..delta..E/sub a/=48.53 kJ and the frequency factor A=7.5 x 10/sup 2/ mol dm/sup -3/ min/sup -1/. This activation energy value suggests chemical control of the reaction mechanism. Optimum leach temperature of 50/sup 0/C was established. Gold extractions as high as 99% have been realized in two step countercurrent leachings. Change in pH throughout the leaching process was found to be an excellent indicator for the progress of the extraction. A preliminary economic evaluation of the process is given.

  5. Luminescent sulfides of monovalent and trivalent cations

    1975-01-01

    The invention discloses a family of luminescent materials or phosphors having a rhombohedral crystal structure and consisting essentially of a mixed host sulfide of at least one monovalent host cation and at least one trivalent host cation, and containing, for each mole of phosphor, 0.0005 to 0.05 mole of at least one activating cation. The monovalent host cations may be Na, K or Rb and Cs. The trivalent host cations may be Gd, La, Lu, Sc and Y. The activating cations may be one or more of trivalent As, Bi, Ce, Dy, Er, Pr, Sb, Sm, Tb and Tm; divalent Lu, Mn, Pb and Sn; and monovalent Ag, Cu and Tl. The novel phosphors may be used in devices to convert electron-beam, ultraviolet or x-ray energy to light in the visible spectrum. Such energy conversion can be employed for example in fluoroscopic screens, and in viewing screens of cathode-ray tubes and other electron tubes

  6. Comparison of Carbon XANES Spectra from an Iron Sulfide from Comet Wild 2 with an Iron Sulfide Interplanetary Dust Particle

    Wirick, S.; Flynn, G. J.; Keller, L. P.; Sanford, S. A.; Zolensky, M. E.; Messenger, Nakamura K.; Jacobsen, C.

    2008-01-01

    Among one of the first particles removed from the aerogel collector from the Stardust sample return mission was an approx. 5 micron sized iron sulfide. The majority of the spectra from 5 different sections of this particle suggests the presence of aliphatic compounds. Due to the heat of capture in the aerogel we initially assumed these aliphatic compounds were not cometary but after comparing these results to a heated iron sulfide interplanetary dust particle (IDP) we believe our initial interpretation of these spectra was not correct. It has been suggested that ice coating on iron sulfides leads to aqueous alteration in IDP clusters which can then lead to the formation of complex organic compounds from unprocessed organics in the IDPs similar to unprocessed organics found in comets [1]. Iron sulfides have been demonstrated to not only transform halogenated aliphatic hydrocarbons but also enhance the bonding of rubber to steel [2,3]. Bromfield and Coville (1997) demonstrated using Xray photoelectron spectroscopy that "the surface enhancement of segregated sulfur to the surface of sulfided precipitated iron catalysts facilitates the formation of a low-dimensional structure of extraordinary properties" [4]. It may be that the iron sulfide acts in some way to protect aliphatic compounds from alteration due to heat.

  7. Adsorption of sulfide ions on cerussite surfaces and implications for flotation

    Feng, Qicheng; Wen, Shuming; Zhao, Wenjuan; Deng, Jiushuai; Xian, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A new discussion on the lead sulfide species is introduced. • The Na_2S concentration determines cerussite sulfidization. • The activity of lead sulfide species also determines cerussite sulfidization. • Disulfide and polysulfide in lead sulfide species affect its activity. - Abstract: The adsorption of sulfide ions on cerussite surfaces and implications for flotation were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis, micro-flotation tests, and surface adsorption experiments. The XPS analysis results indicated that lead sulfide species formed on the mineral surface after treatment by Na_2S, and the increase in the Na_2S concentration was beneficial for sulfidization. In addition to the content of lead sulfide species, its activity, which was determined by the proportion of sulfide, disulfide and polysulfide, also played an important role in cerussite sulfidization. Micro-flotation tests results demonstrated that insufficient or excessive addition of Na_2S in pulp solutions has detrimental effects on flotation performance, which was attributed to the dosage of Na_2S and the activity of lead sulfide species formed on the mineral surface. Surface adsorption experiments of sulfide ions determined the residual S concentrations in pulp solutions and provided a quantitative illustration for the inhibition of cerussite flotation by excessive sulfide ions. Moreover, it also revealed that sulfide ions in the pulp solution were transformed onto the mineral surface and formed lead sulfide species. These results showed that both of lead sulfide species and its activity acted as an important role in sulfidization flotation process of cerussite.

  8. Adsorption of sulfide ions on cerussite surfaces and implications for flotation

    Feng, Qicheng [State Key Laboratory of Complex Nonferrous Metal Resources Clean Utilization, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Faculty of Land Resource Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Wen, Shuming, E-mail: fqckmust@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Complex Nonferrous Metal Resources Clean Utilization, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Faculty of Land Resource Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Zhao, Wenjuan [Kunming Metallurgical Research Institute, Kunming 650031 (China); Deng, Jiushuai; Xian, Yongjun [State Key Laboratory of Complex Nonferrous Metal Resources Clean Utilization, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Faculty of Land Resource Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China)

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A new discussion on the lead sulfide species is introduced. • The Na{sub 2}S concentration determines cerussite sulfidization. • The activity of lead sulfide species also determines cerussite sulfidization. • Disulfide and polysulfide in lead sulfide species affect its activity. - Abstract: The adsorption of sulfide ions on cerussite surfaces and implications for flotation were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis, micro-flotation tests, and surface adsorption experiments. The XPS analysis results indicated that lead sulfide species formed on the mineral surface after treatment by Na{sub 2}S, and the increase in the Na{sub 2}S concentration was beneficial for sulfidization. In addition to the content of lead sulfide species, its activity, which was determined by the proportion of sulfide, disulfide and polysulfide, also played an important role in cerussite sulfidization. Micro-flotation tests results demonstrated that insufficient or excessive addition of Na{sub 2}S in pulp solutions has detrimental effects on flotation performance, which was attributed to the dosage of Na{sub 2}S and the activity of lead sulfide species formed on the mineral surface. Surface adsorption experiments of sulfide ions determined the residual S concentrations in pulp solutions and provided a quantitative illustration for the inhibition of cerussite flotation by excessive sulfide ions. Moreover, it also revealed that sulfide ions in the pulp solution were transformed onto the mineral surface and formed lead sulfide species. These results showed that both of lead sulfide species and its activity acted as an important role in sulfidization flotation process of cerussite.

  9. Chemical and colloidal aspects of collectorless flotation behavior of sulfide and non-sulfide minerals.

    Aghazadeh, Sajjad; Mousavinezhad, Seyed Kamal; Gharabaghi, Mahdi

    2015-11-01

    Flotation has been widely used for separation of valuable minerals from gangues based on their surface characterizations and differences in hydrophobicity on mineral surfaces. As hydrophobicity of minerals widely differs from each other, their separation by flotation will become easier. Collectors are chemical materials which are supposed to make selectively valuable minerals hydrophobic. In addition, there are some minerals which based on their surface and structural features are intrinsically hydrophobic. However, their hydrophobicities are not strong enough to be floatable in the flotation cell without collectors such as sulfide minerals, coal, stibnite, and so forth. To float these minerals in a flotation cell, their hydrophobicity should be increased in specific conditions. Various parameters including pH, Eh, size distribution, mill types, mineral types, ore characterization, and type of reaction in flotation cells affect the hydrophobicity of minerals. Surface analysis results show that when sulfide minerals experience specific flotation conditions, the reactions on the surface of these minerals increase the amount of sulfur on the surface. These phenomenons improve the hydrophobicity of these minerals due to strong hydrophobic feature of sulfurs. Collectorless flotation reduces chemical material consumption amount, increases flotation selectivity (grade increases), and affects the equipment quantities; however, it can also have negative effects. Some minerals with poor surface floatability can be increased by adding some ions to the flotation system. Depressing undesirable minerals in flotation is another application of collectorless flotation.

  10. Silver sulfide nanoparticle assembly obtained by reacting an assembled silver nanoparticle template with hydrogen sulfide gas.

    Chen, Rui; Nuhfer, Noel T; Moussa, Laura; Morris, Hannah R; Whitmore, Paul M

    2008-11-12

    A fast, simple procedure is described for obtaining an assembly of silver sulfide nanoparticles (Ag(2)S NPs) on a glass substrate through reaction of a template of an assembled layer of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) with hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) gas. The Ag NP template was prepared by assembling a monolayer of spherical Ag NPs (mean diameter of 7.4 nm) on a polyethylenimine-treated glass substrate. Exposure to pure H(2)S for 10 min converted the Ag NPs of the template to Ag(2)S NPs. The resulting Ag(2)S NP assembly, which retains the template nanostructure and particle distribution, was characterized by optical absorption spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning high resolution TEM, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The Ag(2)S NPs have a crystal structure of monoclinic acanthite, and while they retained the spherical shape of the original Ag NPs, their mean particle size increased to 8.4 nm due to changes to the crystal structure when the Ag NPs are converted into Ag(2)S NPs. The measured optical absorption edge of the Ag(2)S NP assembly indicated an indirect interband transition with a band gap energy of 1.71 eV. The Ag(2)S NP assembly absorbed light with wavelengths below 725 nm, and the absorbance increased monotonically toward the UV region.

  11. Calcium, essential for health

    Martínez de Victoria, Emilio

    2016-07-12

    Calcium (Ca) is the most abundant mineral element in our body. It accounts for about 2% of body weight. The functions of calcium are: a) functions skeletal and b) regulatory functions. Bone consists of a protein matrix that mineralizes mainly with calcium (the most abundant), phosphate and magnesium, for it is essential an adequate dietary intake of Ca, phosphorus and vitamin D. The ionic Ca (Ca2+) is essential to maintain and / or perform different specialized functions of, virtually, all body cells cellular. Because of its important functions Ca2+ must be closely regulated, keeping plasma concentrations within narrow ranges. For this reason there is an accurate response against hypocalcemia or hypercalcemia in which the parathormone, calcitriol, calcitonin and vitamin K are involved. Ca intakes in the Spanish population are low in a significant percentage of the older adult’s population, especially in women. The main source of Ca in the diet is milk and milk derivatives. Green leafy vegetables, fruits and legumes can be important sources of Ca in a Mediterranean dietary pattern. The bioavailability of dietary Ca depends on physiological and dietary factors. Physiological include age, physiological status (gestation and lactation) Ca and vitamin D status and disease. Several studies relate Ca intake in the diet and various diseases, such as osteoporosis, cancer, cardiovascular disease and obesity.

  12. Models of calcium signalling

    Dupont, Geneviève; Kirk, Vivien; Sneyd, James

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses the ways in which mathematical, computational, and modelling methods can be used to help understand the dynamics of intracellular calcium. The concentration of free intracellular calcium is vital for controlling a wide range of cellular processes, and is thus of great physiological importance. However, because of the complex ways in which the calcium concentration varies, it is also of great mathematical interest.This book presents the general modelling theory as well as a large number of specific case examples, to show how mathematical modelling can interact with experimental approaches, in an interdisciplinary and multifaceted approach to the study of an important physiological control mechanism. Geneviève Dupont is FNRS Research Director at the Unit of Theoretical Chronobiology of the Université Libre de Bruxelles;Martin Falcke is head of the Mathematical Cell Physiology group at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin;Vivien Kirk is an Associate Professor in the Depar...

  13. Activation mechanism of ammonium ions on sulfidation of malachite (-201) surface by DFT study

    Wu, Dandan; Mao, Yingbo; Deng, Jiushuai; Wen, Shuming

    2017-07-01

    The activation mechanism of ammonium ions on the sulfidation of malachite (-201) was determined by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Results of DFT calculations indicated that interlayer sulfidation occurs during the sulfidation process of malachite (-201). The absorption of both the ammonium ion and sulfide ion on the malachite (-201) surface is stronger than that of sulfur ion. After sulfidation was activated with ammonium ion, the Cu 3d orbital peak is closer to the Fermi level and characterized by a stronger peak value. Therefore, the addition of ammonium ions activated the sulfidation of malachite (-201), thereby improving the flotation performance.

  14. Determination of percent calcium carbonate in calcium chromate

    Middleton, H.W.

    1979-01-01

    The precision, accuracy and reliability of the macro-combustion method is superior to the Knorr alkalimetric method, and it is faster. It also significantly reduces the calcium chromate waste accrual problem. The macro-combustion method has been adopted as the official method for determination of percent calcium carbonate in thermal battery grade anhydrous calcium chromate and percent calcium carbonate in quicklime used in the production of calcium chromate. The apparatus and procedure can be used to measure the percent carbonate in inorganic materials other than calcium chromate. With simple modifications in the basic apparatus and procedure, the percent carbon and hydrogen can be measured in many organic material, including polymers and polymeric formulations. 5 figures, 5 tables

  15. Calcium oxalate stone and gout.

    Marickar, Y M Fazil

    2009-12-01

    Gout is well known to be produced by increased uric acid level in blood. The objective of this paper is to assess the relationship between gout and calcium oxalate stone formation in the humans. 48 patients with combination of gout and calcium oxalate stone problem were included. The biochemical values of this group were compared with 38 randomly selected uric acid stone patients with gout, 43 stone patients with gout alone, 100 calcium oxalate stone patients without gout and 30 controls, making a total of 259 patients. Various biochemical parameters, namely serum calcium, phosphorus and uric acid and 24-h urine calcium, phosphorus, uric acid, oxalate, citrate and magnesium were analysed. ANOVA and Duncan's multiple-range tests were performed to assess statistical significance of the variations. The promoters of stone formation, namely serum calcium (P stone patients and gouty calcium oxalate stone patients compared to the non-gouty patients and controls. Urine oxalate (P stones patients. The inhibitor urine citrate (P stone gouty patients, followed by the gouty uric acid stone formers and gouty calcium oxalate stone patients. The high values of promoters, namely uric acid and calcium in the gouty stone patients indicate the tendency for urinary stone formation in the gouty stone patients. There is probably a correlation between gout and calcium oxalate urinary stone. We presume this mechanism is achieved through the uric acid metabolism. The findings point to the summation effect of metabolic changes in development of stone disease.

  16. Calcium Signaling in Taste Cells

    Medler, Kathryn F.

    2014-01-01

    The sense of taste is a common ability shared by all organisms and is used to detect nutrients as well as potentially harmful compounds. Thus taste is critical to survival. Despite its importance, surprisingly little is known about the mechanisms generating and regulating responses to taste stimuli. All taste responses depend on calcium signals to generate appropriate responses which are relayed to the brain. Some taste cells have conventional synapses and rely on calcium influx through voltage-gated calcium channels. Other taste cells lack these synapses and depend on calcium release to formulate an output signal through a hemichannel. Beyond establishing these characteristics, few studies have focused on understanding how these calcium signals are formed. We identified multiple calcium clearance mechanisms that regulate calcium levels in taste cells as well as a calcium influx that contributes to maintaining appropriate calcium homeostasis in these cells. Multiple factors regulate the evoked taste signals with varying roles in different cell populations. Clearly, calcium signaling is a dynamic process in taste cells and is more complex than has previously been appreciated. PMID:25450977

  17. Cuprous sulfide as a film insulation for superconductors

    Wagner, G.R.; Uphoff, J.H.; Vecchio, P.D.

    1982-01-01

    The LCP test coil utilizes a conductor of forced-flow design having 486 strands of multifilametary Nb 3 Sn compacted in a stainless steel sheath. The impetus for the work reported here stemmed from the need for some form of insulation for those strands to prevent sintering during reaction and to reduce ac losses. The work reported here experimented with cuprous sulfide coatings at various coating rates and thicknesses. Two solenoids that were wound with cuprous sulfide-coated wires and heat-treated at 700 degrees C were found to demonstrate that the film is effective in providing turn-to-turn insulation for less than about 0.5V between turns. The sulfide layer provided a metal-semiconductor junction which became conducting at roughly 0.5V. Repeated cycling of the coil voltage in excess of that value produced no damage to the sulfide layer. The junction provided self-protection for the coil as long as the upper allowable current density in the sulfide was not exceeded. No training was apparent up to 6.4 T

  18. Sulfide Species Optical Monitoring by a Miniaturized Silicon Photomultiplier

    Salvatore Petralia

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The monitoring of water-soluble pollutants is receiving a growing interest from the scientific community. In this context, sulfide anion species S2− and HS− are particularly relevant since they can cause acute and chronic toxicity including neurological effects and at high concentrations, even death. In this study, a new strategy for fast and sensitive optical detection of sulfide species in water samples is described. The method uses an integrated silicon photomultiplier (SiPM device coupled with the appropriate analytical strategy applied in a plastic microchip with dried reagents on board. More specifically, all sulfide species (H2S, HS− and S2− in water samples are detected by the fluorescence signal emitted upon the reaction with N,N-dimethyl-phenylenediamine sulfate in the presence of Fe3+, leading to the formation of the fluorescent methylene blue (MB species. It has been proven that the system herein proposed is able to measure sulfide concentration in a linear range from 0–10 mg L−1 with a sensitivity value of about 6.7 µA mg−1 L and a detection limit of 0.5 mg L−1. A comparison with conventional UV-Vis detection method has been also carried out. Data show a very good linear correlation (R2 = 0.98093, proving the effectiveness of the method. Results pave the way toward the development of portable and low-cost device systems for water-soluble sulfide pollutants.

  19. Aerobic transformation of cadmium through metal sulfide biosynthesis in photosynthetic microorganisms.

    Edwards, Chad D; Beatty, Joseph C; Loiselle, Jacqueline B R; Vlassov, Katya A; Lefebvre, Daniel D

    2013-07-15

    Cadmium is a non-essential metal that is toxic because of its interference with essential metals such as iron, calcium and zinc causing numerous detrimental metabolic and cellular effects. The amount of this metal in the environment has increased dramatically since the advent of the industrial age as a result of mining activities, the use of fertilizers and sewage sludge in farming, and discharges from manufacturing activities. The metal bioremediation utility of phototrophic microbes has been demonstrated through their ability to detoxify Hg(II) into HgS under aerobic conditions. Metal sulfides are generally very insoluble and therefore, biologically unavailable. When Cd(II) was exposed to cells it was bioconverted into CdS by the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae, and the cyanobacterium, Synechoccocus leopoliensis. Supplementation of the two eukaryotic algae with extra sulfate, but not sulfite or cysteine, increased their cadmium tolerances as well as their abilities to produce CdS, indicating an involvement of sulfate assimilation in the detoxification process. However, the combined activities of extracted serine acetyl-transferase (SAT) and O-acetylserine(thiol)lyase (OASTL) used to monitor sulfate assimilation, was not significantly elevated during cell treatments that favored sulfide biosynthesis. It is possible that the prolonged incubation of the experiments occurring over two days could have compensated for the low rates of sulfate assimilation. This was also the case for S. leopoliensis where sulfite and cysteine as well as sulfate supplementation enhanced CdS synthesis. In general, conditions that increased cadmium sulfide production also resulted in elevated cysteine desulfhydrase activities, strongly suggesting that cysteine is the direct source of sulfur for CdS synthesis. Cadmium(II) tolerance and CdS formation were significantly enhanced by sulfate supplementation, thus indicating that algae and cyanobacteria

  20. Hyperhomocysteinemia potentiates diabetes-impaired EDHF-induced vascular relaxation: Role of insufficient hydrogen sulfide

    Zhongjian Cheng

    2018-06-01

    impaired EDHF-induced vascular relaxation via oxidative stress and IKCa inactivation in T2DM/HHcy mice. H2S therapy may be beneficial for prevention and treatment of micro-vascular complications in patients with T2DM and HHcy. Keywords: Hydrogen sulfide, Endothelial dysfunction, Micro-vasculature, T2DM, Calcium-activated potassium channel (KCa

  1. Simultaneous removal of sulfide, nitrate and acetate under denitrifying sulfide removal condition: Modeling and experimental validation

    Xu, Xijun; Chen, Chuan; Wang, Aijie; Guo, Wanqian; Zhou, Xu [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Lee, Duu-Jong, E-mail: djlee@ntu.edu.tw [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Ren, Nanqi, E-mail: rnq@hit.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Chang, Jo-Shu [Research Center for Energy Technology and Strategy, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China)

    2014-01-15

    Graphical abstract: Model evaluation applied to case study 1: (A-G) S{sup 2−}, NO{sub 3}{sup −}-N, NO{sub 2}{sup −}-N, and Ac{sup −}-C profiles under initial sulfide concentrations of 156.2 (A), 539 (B), 964 (C), 1490 (D), 342.7 (E), 718 (F), and 1140.7 (G) mg L{sup −1}. The solid line represents simulated result and scatter represents experimental result. -- Highlights: • This work developed a mathematical model for DSR process. • Kinetics of sulfur–nitrogen–carbon and interactions between denitrifiers were studied. • Kinetic parameters of the model were estimated via data fitting. • The model described kinetic behaviors of DSR processes over wide parametric range. -- Abstract: Simultaneous removal of sulfide (S{sup 2−}), nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup −}) and acetate (Ac{sup −}) under denitrifying sulfide removal process (DSR) is a novel biological wastewater treatment process. This work developed a mathematical model to describe the kinetic behavior of sulfur–nitrogen–carbon and interactions between autotrophic denitrifiers and heterotrophic denitrifiers. The kinetic parameters of the model were estimated via data fitting considering the effects of initial S{sup 2−} concentration, S{sup 2−}/NO{sub 3}{sup −}-N ratio and Ac{sup −}-C/NO{sub 3}{sup −}-N ratio. Simulation supported that the heterotrophic denitratation step (NO{sub 3}{sup −} reduction to NO{sub 2}{sup −}) was inhibited by S{sup 2−} compared with the denitritation step (NO{sub 2}{sup −} reduction to N{sub 2}). Also, the S{sup 2−} oxidation by autotrophic denitrifiers was shown two times lower in rate with NO{sub 2}{sup −} as electron acceptor than that with NO{sub 3}{sup −} as electron acceptor. NO{sub 3}{sup −} reduction by autotrophic denitrifiers occurs 3–10 times slower when S{sup 0} participates as final electron donor compared to the S{sup 2−}-driven pathway. Model simulation on continuous-flow DSR reactor suggested that the adjustment of

  2. Assessing the Role of Iron Sulfides in the Long Term Sequestration of Uranium by Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    Hayes, Kim F. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Bi, Yuqiang [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Carpenter, Julian [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Hyng, Sung Pil [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Rittmann, Bruce E. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Zhou, Chen [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Vannela, Raveender [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Davis, James A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-12-31

    -based reductions of U(VI) occurred in parallel. The UO2 produced in presence of ferrous iron was poorly crystalline. At UM, laboratory-scale reactor studies were performed to assess the potential for the predominant abiotic reductants formed under sulfate reducing conditions (SRCs) to: (1) reduce U(VI) in contaminated groundwater sediments), and (2) inhibit the re-oxidation of U(IV) species, and in particular, uraninite (UO2(s)). Under SRCs, mackinawite and aqueous sulfide are the key reductants expected to form. To assess their potential for abiotic reduction of U(VI) species, a series of experiments were performed in which either FeS or S(-II) was added to solutions of U(VI), with the rates of conversion to U(IV) solids monitored as a function of pH, and carbonate and calcium concentration. In the presence of FeS and absence of oxygen or carbonate, U(IV) was completely reduced uraninite. S(-II) was also found to be an effective reductant of aqueous phase U(VI) species and produced uraninite, with the kinetics and extent of reduction depending on geochemical conditions. U(VI) reduction to uraninite was faster under higher S(-II) concentrations but was slowed by an increase in the dissolved Ca or carbonate concentration. Rapid reduction of U(VI) occurred at circumneutral pH but virtually no reduction occurred at pH 10.7. In general, dissolved Ca and carbonate slowed abiotic U(VI) reduction by forming stable Ca-U(VI)-carbonate soluble complexes that are resistant to reaction with aqueous sulfide. To investigate the stability of U(IV) against re-oxidation in the presence of iron sulfides by oxidants in simulated groundwater environments, and to develop a mechanistic understanding the controlling redox processes, continuously-mixed batch reactor (CMBR) and flow-through reactor (CMFR) studies were performed at UM. In these studies a series of experiments were conducted under various oxic groundwater conditions to examine the effectiveness of FeS as an oxygen

  3. Separation of platinum metals by theirs extraction as sulfides

    Pilipenko, A.T.; Ryabushko, O.P.; Ty Van Mak

    1978-01-01

    Separation of platinum metals by means of their sediment in the form of sulfides with subsequent extraction is studied. The optimum conditions of metal sulfide extraction are determined, the metal output dependence from acidness and aqueous phase composition and also the organic solvent nature are investigated. Ruthenium concentration was determined photometrically. Ruthenium sulfide is extracted by butyl spirit from 1-4 normal hydrochloric acid. The maximum extraction grade of 63% is reached in 3.2-normal acid. When the mixture of acetic and hydrochloric acids (2:1) is used for decomposition of ruthenium tiosalts, the grade of ruthenium extraction by amyl spirit or the mixture of anyl and butyl spirits (1:1) constitutes 100%

  4. Metal sulfide electrodes and energy storage devices thereof

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Woodford, William Henry; Li, Zheng; Carter, W. Craig

    2017-02-28

    The present invention generally relates to energy storage devices, and to metal sulfide energy storage devices in particular. Some aspects of the invention relate to energy storage devices comprising at least one flowable electrode, wherein the flowable electrode comprises an electroactive metal sulfide material suspended and/or dissolved in a carrier fluid. In some embodiments, the flowable electrode further comprises a plurality of electronically conductive particles suspended and/or dissolved in the carrier fluid, wherein the electronically conductive particles form a percolating conductive network. An energy storage device comprising a flowable electrode comprising a metal sulfide electroactive material and a percolating conductive network may advantageously exhibit, upon reversible cycling, higher energy densities and specific capacities than conventional energy storage devices.

  5. Preparation of transition metal sulfide nanoparticles via hydrothermal route

    Fei-Ling, P.; Chin-Hua, C.; Sarani Zakaria; Tze-Khong, L.; Mohd Ambar Yarmo; Nay-Ming, H.

    2010-01-01

    Nano sized copper sulfide, iron sulfide and molybdenum sulfide were successfully synthesised via a simple hydrothermal method. Sodium thiosulfate pentahydrate (Na 2 S 2 O 3 ·5H 2 O) and hydroxylamine sulfate ((H 3 NO) 2 ·H 2 SO 4 ) were used as the starting materials and reacted with the transition metal source at 200 degree Celsius for 90 min. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Spherical shape CuS and FeS 2 nanoparticles with high crystallinity were successfully produced. The transmission electron micrographs revealed the well-dispersibility of the produced nanoparticles. Scanning electron micrograph showed the MoS 2 nanoparticles possessed a spherical shape with sheet-like structure covering on the outer surface of the particles. (author)

  6. Conspicuous veils formed by vibrioid bacteria on sulfidic marine sediment

    Thar, Roland Matthias; Kühl, Michael

    2002-01-01

    , but the bacteria have so far not been isolated in pure culture, and a detailed characterization of their metabolism is still lacking. The bacteria are colorless, gram-negative, and vibrioid-shaped (1.3- to 2.5- by 4- to 10-µm) cells that multiply by binary division and contain several spherical inclusions of poly......We describe the morphology and behavior of a hitherto unknown bacterial species that forms conspicuous veils (typical dimensions, 30 by 30 mm) on sulfidic marine sediment. The new bacteria were enriched on complex sulfidic medium within a benthic gradient chamber in oxygen-sulfide countergradients......, forming a cohesive whitish veil at the oxic-anoxic interface. Bacteria attached to the veil kept rotating and adapted their stalk lengths dynamically to changing oxygen concentrations. The joint action of rotating bacteria on the veil induced a homogeneous water flow from the oxic water region toward...

  7. Study of radiation synovectomy using 188Re-sulfide

    Chen Gang; Li Peiyong; Jiang Xufeng; Zhang Liying; Wang Xuefeng; Sun Zhenming; Zhang Huan

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the radiation synovectomy with 188 Re-sulfide. Methods: Thirty cases were divided into 2 groups, the group with hemophilia and the group with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Patients with joint synovitis were injected different doses of 188 Re-sulfide, 222 - 444 MBq intra-articular. MRI was taken before and 3 - 6 months after the radiation synovectomy to evaluate the treatment efficacy, and the symptoms were also evaluated. Results: MRI study showed that after the treatment the synovium became thiner and the edema was reduced in the lesioned joint. The symptoms were improved with the pain relieved and duration of intra-articular hemorrhage reduced. Conclusions: Radiation synovectomy using 188 Re-sulfide has effects on synovitis. It can be used clinically to improve the symptoms of joint synovitis and reduce the duration of intra-articular hemorrhage

  8. Cardiovascular Effects of Calcium Supplements

    Ian R. Reid

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Calcium supplements reduce bone turnover and slow the rate of bone loss. However, few studies have demonstrated reduced fracture incidence with calcium supplements, and meta-analyses show only a 10% decrease in fractures, which is of borderline statistical and clinical significance. Trials in normal older women and in patients with renal impairment suggest that calcium supplements increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. To further assess their safety, we recently conducted a meta-analysis of trials of calcium supplements, and found a 27%–31% increase in risk of myocardial infarction, and a 12%–20% increase in risk of stroke. These findings are robust because they are based on pre-specified analyses of randomized, placebo-controlled trials and are consistent across the trials. Co-administration of vitamin D with calcium does not lessen these adverse effects. The increased cardiovascular risk with calcium supplements is consistent with epidemiological data relating higher circulating calcium concentrations to cardiovascular disease in normal populations. There are several possible pathophysiological mechanisms for these effects, including effects on vascular calcification, vascular cells, blood coagulation and calcium-sensing receptors. Thus, the non-skeletal risks of calcium supplements appear to outweigh any skeletal benefits, and are they appear to be unnecessary for the efficacy of other osteoporosis treatments.

  9. ELECTROCHEMICAL DETERMINATION OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE AT CARBON NANOTUBE MODIFIED ELECTRODES. (R830900)

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) modified glassy carbon electrodes exhibiting a strong and stable electrocatalytic response towards sulfide are described. A substantial (400 mV) decrease in the overvoltage of the sulfide oxidation reaction (compared to ordinary carbon electrodes) is...

  10. SR calcium handling and calcium after-transients in a rabbit model of heart failure

    Baartscheer, Antonius; Schumacher, Cees A.; Belterman, Charly N. W.; Coronel, Ruben; Fiolet, Jan W. T.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: After-depolarization associated arrhythmias are frequently observed in heart failure and associated with spontaneous calcium release from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), calcium after-transients. We hypothesize that disturbed SR calcium handling underlies calcium after-transients in heart

  11. Vegetation successfully prevents oxidization of sulfide minerals in mine tailings.

    Li, Yang; Sun, Qingye; Zhan, Jing; Yang, Yang; Wang, Dan

    2016-07-15

    The oxidization of metal sulfide in tailings causes acid mine drainage. However, it remains unclear whether vegetation prevents the oxidization of metal sulfides. The oxidization characteristics and microbial indices of the tailings in the presence of various plant species were investigated to explore the effects of vegetation on the oxidization of sulfide minerals in tailings. The pH, reducing sulfur, free iron oxides (Fed), chemical oxygen consumption (COC) and biological oxygen consumption (BOC) were measured. Key iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (Acidithiobacillus spp., Leptospirillum spp. and Thiobacillus spp.) were quantified using real-time PCR. The results indicate that vegetation growing on tailings can effectively prevent the oxidization of sulfide minerals in tailings. A higher pH and reducing-sulfur content and lower Fed were observed in the 0-30 cm depth interval in the presence of vegetation compared to bare tailings (BT). The COC gradually decreased with depth in all of the soil profiles; specifically, the COC rapidly decreased in the 10-20 cm interval in the presence of vegetation but gradually decreased in the BT profiles. Imperata cylindrica (IC) and Chrysopogon zizanoides (CZ) profiles contained the highest BOC in the 10-20 cm interval. The abundance of key iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in the vegetated tailings were significantly lower than in the BT; in particular, IC was associated with the lowest iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacterial abundance. In conclusion, vegetation successfully prevented the oxidization of sulfide minerals in the tailings, and Imperata cylindrica is the most effective in reducing the number of iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and helped to prevent the oxidization of sulfide minerals in the long term. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. 21 CFR 573.240 - Calcium periodate.

    2010-04-01

    ... with calcium hydroxide or calcium oxide to form a substance consisting of not less than 60 percent by... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium periodate. 573.240 Section 573.240 Food... Additive Listing § 573.240 Calcium periodate. The food additive calcium periodate may be safely used in...

  13. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and... Listing § 573.260 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be safely used as an anticaking agent in animal feed, provided that the amount of calcium silicate does not...

  14. Experimental constraints on gold and silver solubility in iron sulfides

    Pal' yanova, Galina [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 3, Koptyuga, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Russia, 2, Pirogova, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Mikhlin, Yuri [Institute of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Akademgorodok, 50/24, Krasnoyarsk, 660036 (Russian Federation); Kokh, Konstantin, E-mail: k.a.kokh@gmail.com [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 3, Koptyuga, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Russia, 2, Pirogova, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Siberian Physical–Technical Institute of Tomsk State University, 1, Novosobornaya, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Karmanov, Nick [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 3, Koptyuga, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Seryotkin, Yurii [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 3, Koptyuga, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Russia, 2, Pirogova, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-15

    Experiments were performed to determine crystallization of Fe,S-melts (pyriti≿ and troilitic with molar ratio S/Fe ratios of 2 and 1, respectively) containing traces of gold and silver at (Ag/Au){sub wt} ratios varying from 10 to 0.1. The solid products were studied by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), microprobe analysis, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in order to reveal the concentration limits of “invisible” gold and silver in magmatic iron sulfides, and to determine the influence of sulfur on forms of precious metals in the Fe–S system with different Ag/Au ratios. Au–Ag phases do not form inclusions but instead concentrate on the grain boundaries in the synthetic pyrrhotite and troilite, while pyrite comprises micro- (1–5 μm) and macroinclusions of Au–Ag alloys and Au–Ag sulfides. In “pyriti≿” systems, the fineness of alloys increases from 650 to 970‰ and the composition of sulfides changes from acanthite (Ag{sub 2}S) to uytenbogaardtite (Ag{sub 3}AuS{sub 2}) and petrovskaite (AgAuS) as the Ag/Au ratio decreases. The concentrations of “invisible” precious metals revealed in troilite were 0.040 ± 0.013 wt.% Au and 0.079 ± 0.016 wt.% Ag. Measured concentrations in pyrite and pyrrhotite were <0.024 wt.% Au and <0.030 wt.% Ag. The surface layers of iron sulfides probed with XPS were enriched in the precious metals, and in silver relative to gold, especially in the systems with Fe/S = 1, probably, due to depletion of the metallic alloy surfaces with gold. Au- and Ag-bearing iron sulfides crystallized primarily from melts may be the source of redeposited phases in hydrothermal and hypergene processes. - Highlights: • The samples of Fe–S–Au–Ag system were synthesized. • Coupled solubility of gold and silver in iron sulfides was specified. • Ag–Au inclusions on surfaces of iron sulfides are likely to be enriched in silver. • Au–Ag sulfides can exist along with

  15. A sulfidation-resistant nickel-base alloy

    Lai, G.Y.

    1989-01-01

    For applications in mildly to moderately sulfidizing environments, stainless steels, Fe-Ni-Cr alloys (e.g., alloys 800 and 330), and more recently Fe-Ni-Cr-Co alloys (e.g., alloy 556) are frequently used for construction of process equipment. However, for many highly sulfidizing environments, few existing commercial alloys have adequate performance. Thus, a new nickel-based alloy containing 27 wt.% Co, 28 wt.% Cr, 4 wt.% Fe, 2.75 wt.% Si, 0.5 wt.% Mn and 0.05 wt.% C (Haynes alloy HR-160) was developed

  16. The solubility of iron sulfides and their role in mass transport in Girdler-Sulfide heavy water plants

    Tewari, P.H.; Wallace, G.; Campbell, A.B.

    1978-04-01

    The solubilities of several iron sulfides, mackinawite FeSsub((1-x)), troilite FeS, pyrrhotite Fesub((1-x))S (monoclinic and hexagonal), and pyrite FeS 2 have been determined in aqueous H 2 S solution at 0.1 MPa and 1.8 MPa H 2 S pressures between 25 deg and 125 deg C. The dependence of solubility on the pH of the medium has also been studied. It is concluded that since mackinawite is the most soluble of the iron sulfides, and has the highest dissolution rate and the steepest decline in solubility with temperature, its prolonged formation during plant operation should be avoided to minimize iron transport from lower to higher temperature areas in Girdler-Sulfide (G.S.) heavy water plants. This can be achieved by a preconditioning of carbon steel surfaces to convert mackinawite to pyrrhotite and pyrite

  17. Is succession in wet calcareous dune slacks affected by free sulfide?

    Adema, EB; van Gemerden, H; Grootjans, AP; Adema, Erwin B.; Grootjans, Ab P.; Rapson, G.

    Consequences of sulfide toxicity on succession in wet calcareous dune slacks were investigated. Sulfide may exert an inhibitory effect on dune slack plants, but several pioneer species exhibit ROL (Radial Oxygen Loss) and thereby protect themselves against free sulfide. Under oxic conditions free

  18. Identifying the Prospective Area of Sulfide Groundwater within the Area of Palvantash Oil and Gas Deposit

    M. R. Zhurayev

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the methodology of prospecting for sulfide groundwater in the area of Palvantash oil fields. In result of study allowed determining the favorable conditions for the sulfide waters formation, and mapping the areas of different sulfide water concentration. The relatively permeable areas were established and the water borehole positions were recommended.

  19. 76 FR 69136 - Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting

    2011-11-08

    ... Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Lifting of Administrative Stay for Hydrogen Sulfide; Correction. SUMMARY: The... Administrative Stay of the reporting requirements for hydrogen sulfide. The Office of the Federal Register...

  20. A real support effect on the hydrodeoxygenation of methyl oleate by sulfided NiMo catalysts

    Coumans, A.E.; Hensen, E.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    The effect of the support on the catalytic performance of sulfided NiMo in the hydrodeoxygenation of methyl oleate as a model compound for triglyceride upgrading to green diesel was investigated. NiMo sulfides were prepared by impregnation and sulfidation on activated carbon, silica, γ-alumina and

  1. Sulfide-iron interactions in domestic wastewater from a gravity sewer

    Nielsen, A.H.; Lens, P.N.L.; Vollertsen, J.; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Th.

    2005-01-01

    Interactions between iron and sulfide in domestic wastewater from a gravity sewer were investigated with particular emphasis on redox cycling of iron and iron sulfide formation. The concentration ranges of iron and total sulfide in the experiments were 0.4-5.4 mg Fe L-1 and 0-5.1 mg S L-1,

  2. Sulfidation of alumina-supported iron and iron-molybdenum oxide catalysts

    Ramselaar, W.L.T.M.; Crajé, M.W.J.; Hadders, R.H.; Gerkema, E.; Beer, de V.H.J.; Kraan, van der A.M.

    1990-01-01

    The transition of alumina-supported iron and iron-molybdenum catalysts from the oxidic precursor to the sulfided catalysts was systematically studied by means of in-situ Mössbauer spectroscopy at room temperature. This enabled the adjudgement of various sulfidic phases in the sulfided catalysts. The

  3. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.330 Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt. The food additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate may...

  4. The Effects of Dietary Calcium and/or Iron Deficiency upon Murine Intestinal Calcium Binding Protein Activity and Calcium Absorption

    McDonald, Catherine M.

    1980-01-01

    Iron deficiency has been shown to impair calcium absorption, leading to decreased bone mass. Vitamin D3-dependent calcium binding protein (CaBP) has been demonstrated to be necessary for the active transport of calcium in the intestine of numerous species. Iron deficiency might affect the activity of the calcium binding protein. Four experimental diets were formulated as follows: Diet 1, iron adequate, calcium adequate; Diet 2, iron deficient, calcium adequate; Diet 3, iron adequate, calci...

  5. Red coloration by heat treatment of the coprecipitate of cadmium sulfide and mercury(II) sulfide prepared from the nitrates

    Nakahara, Fujiya

    1979-01-01

    The effects of starting salts on the color, particle size and crystal structure of mercury-cadmium-sulfide pigments were investigated. The coprecipitate (N-S) of cadmium sulfide and mercury (II) sulfide was prepared by adding sodium sulfide solution to a mixed cadmium-mercury (II) nitrate solution. The coprecipitate (C-S) of cadmium sulfide and mercury (II) sulfide was also prepared from the mixed solution of their chlorides by the same method as described above. The coprecipitated products were heat-treated (calcination or hydrothermal treatment) at 350 0 C for 2 hours and subsequent changes in powder properties of both products were compared from each other. The powder properties of N-S, C-S and their heat-treated products were investigated by spectral reflectance, electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and specific surface area measurements. Sample (N-C) obtained by the calcination of N-S was brown, indicating no red coloration, but the calcined product (C-C) of C-S developed a red color. Cl - and hot water were found to be effective for the red color development of the pigment. The effectiveness was confirmed by calcining N-S in the presence of NaCl or by treating it hydrothermally. It was found that halides other than NaCl, (e.g., NH 4 Cl, KCl, KBr and KI), were also effective for the color development of the pigment. The red samples are solid solutions with a basically hexagonal CdS structure, and it appears that CdS takes up HgS without any apparent structural changes. The particle size of the red samples are larger than those of the non red samples. (author)

  6. Calcium, vitamin D, and your bones

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000490.htm Calcium, vitamin D, and your bones To use the sharing ... and maintain strong bones. How Much Calcium and Vitamin D do I Need? Amounts of calcium are ...

  7. Calcium Supplements: Do Men Need Them Too?

    ... Lifestyle Nutrition and healthy eating Should men take calcium supplements? Answers from Katherine Zeratsky, R.D., L. ... Most healthy men don't need to take calcium supplements. Calcium is important for men for optimal ...

  8. Calcium transport in turtle bladder

    Sabatini, S.; Kurtzman, N.A.

    1987-01-01

    Unidirectional 45 Ca fluxes were measured in the turtle bladder under open-circuit and short-circuit conditions. In the open-circuited state net calcium flux (J net Ca ) was secretory (serosa to mucosa). Ouabain reversed J net Ca to an absorptive flux. Amiloride reduced both fluxes such that J net Ca was not significantly different from zero. Removal of mucosal sodium caused net calcium absorption; removal of serosal sodium caused calcium secretion. When bladders were short circuited, J net Ca decreased to approximately one-third of control value but remained secretory. When ouabain was added under short-circuit conditions, J net Ca was similar in magnitude and direction to ouabain under open-circuited conditions (i.e., absorptive). Tissue 45 Ca content was ≅30-fold lower when the isotope was placed in the mucosal bath, suggesting that the apical membrane is the resistance barrier to calcium transport. The results obtained in this study are best explained by postulating a Ca 2+ -ATPase on the serosa of the turtle bladder epithelium and a sodium-calcium antiporter on the mucosa. In this model, the energy for calcium movement would be supplied, in large part, by the Na + -K + -ATPase. By increasing cell sodium, ouabain would decrease the activity of the mucosal sodium-calcium exchanger (or reverse it), uncovering active calcium transport across the serosa

  9. Calcium chromate process related investigations

    Dillard, B.M.

    1979-01-01

    A pilot plant for production of calcium chromate has been scaled up to a small production facility at the General Electric Neutron Devices Department. In preparation for this scale-up, the process and final product were studied in order to evaluate problems not considered previously. The variables and processes studied included: (1) the determination of optimum drying temperature and time for product analysis; (2) the effect of the grade of lime used as the precipitating agent on the purity of the calcium chromate; (3) product purity when calcium chromate is precipitated by the addition of ammonium chromate to slaked lime; (4) the reagents best suited for cleaning calcium chromate spills; and (5) methods for determining hydroxide ion concentration in calcium chromate. The optimum drying time for the product before analysis is four hours at 600 0 C. Gases evolved at various temperatures during the drying process were carbon dioxide and water vapor. Technical grade lime produced calcium chromate of the highest purity. Both nitric and acetic acids were efficient dissolvers of calcium chromate spills. Direct titration of hydroxide ion with sulfuric acid gave an average recovery of 93% for samples spiked with calcium hydroxide. 1 figure, 17 tables

  10. Ferromagnetism in Fe-doped transition metal nitrides

    Sharma, Ramesh; Sharma, Yamini

    2018-04-01

    Early transition metal mononitrides ScN and YN are refractory compounds with high hardness and melting points as well semiconducting properties. The presence of nitrogen vacancies in ScN/YN introduces asymmetric peaks in the density of states close to Fermi level, the same effects can be achieved by doping by Mn or Fe-atoms. Due to the substitution of TM atoms at Sc/Y sites, it was found that the p-d hybridization induces small magnetic moments at both Sc/Y and N sites giving rise to magnetic semiconductors (MS). From the calculated temperature dependent transport properties, the power factor and ZT is found to be lowered for doped ScN whereas it increases for doped YN. It is proposed that these materials have promising applications as spintronics and thermoelectric materials.

  11. Fe doped Magnetic Nanodiamonds made by Ion Implantation.

    Chen, ChienHsu; Cho, I C; Jian, Hui-Shan; Niu, H

    2017-02-09

    Here we present a simple physical method to prepare magnetic nanodiamonds (NDs) using high dose Fe ion-implantation. The Fe atoms are embedded into NDs through Fe ion-implantation and the crystal structure of NDs are recovered by thermal annealing. The results of TEM and Raman examinations indicated the crystal structure of the Fe implanted NDs is recovered completely. The SQUID-VSM measurement shows the Fe-NDs possess room temperature ferromagnetism. That means the Fe atoms are distributed inside the NDs without affecting NDs crystal structure, so the NDs can preserve the original physical and chemical properties of the NDs. In addition, the ion-implantation-introduced magnetic property might make the NDs to become suitable for variety of medical applications.

  12. Fe doped Magnetic Nanodiamonds made by Ion Implantation

    Chen, Chienhsu; Cho, I. C.; Jian, Hui-Shan; Niu, H.

    2017-02-01

    Here we present a simple physical method to prepare magnetic nanodiamonds (NDs) using high dose Fe ion-implantation. The Fe atoms are embedded into NDs through Fe ion-implantation and the crystal structure of NDs are recovered by thermal annealing. The results of TEM and Raman examinations indicated the crystal structure of the Fe implanted NDs is recovered completely. The SQUID-VSM measurement shows the Fe-NDs possess room temperature ferromagnetism. That means the Fe atoms are distributed inside the NDs without affecting NDs crystal structure, so the NDs can preserve the original physical and chemical properties of the NDs. In addition, the ion-implantation-introduced magnetic property might make the NDs to become suitable for variety of medical applications.

  13. Magnetic study of Fe-doped CdSe nanomaterials

    Das, Sayantani; Banerjee, Sourish; Sinha, T. P.

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles of pure and iron (50 %) doped cadmium selenide (CdSe) have been synthesized by soft chemical route. EDAX analysis supports the inclusion of Fe into CdSe nanoparticles. The average particle size of pure and doped CdSe is found to be ∼50 nm from scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Magnetization of the samples are measured under the field cooled (FC) and zero field cooled (ZFC) modes in the temperature range from 5K to 300K applying a magnetic field of 500Oe. Field dependent magnetization (M-H) measurement indicates presence of room temperature (RT) paramagnetism and low temperature (5K) ferromagnetism of the sample.

  14. Magnetic properties of Fe-doped NiO nanoparticles

    Kurokawa, A.; Sakai, N.; Zhu, L.; Takeuchi, H.; Yano, S.; Yanoh, T.; Onuma, K.; Kondo, T.; Miike, K.; Miyasaka, T.; Ichiyanagi, Y.

    2013-08-01

    Ni1- x Fe x O ( x = 0, 0.05, 0.1) nanoparticles with several nanometers encapsulated with amorphous SiO2 were prepared by our novel preparation method. A NiO single phase structure was confirmed using the X-ray diffraction measurements. It is considered that Ni ions are replaced by Fe ions because it is observed that the lattice constant decreases. The temperature dependence behavior of the magnetization revealed that the blocking temperature, T B , shifted from 17 to 57 K as the amount of Fe ions increased, and that below T B , ferromagnetic behaviors were exhibited. The coercive force, H C , increased from 0.8 to 1.5 kOe as the amount of Fe ions increased.

  15. Hydrogenation Properties of TiFe Doped with Zirconium

    Catherine Gosselin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to optimize the activation behaviour of hydrogen storage alloy TiFe. We found that the addition of a small amount of Zr in TiFe alloy greatly reduces the hydrogenation activation time. Two different procedural synthesis methods were applied: co-melt, where the TiFe was melted and afterward re-melted with the addition of Zr, and single-melt, where Ti, Fe and Zr were melted together in one single operation. The co-melted sample absorbed hydrogen at its maximum capacity in less than three hours without any pre-treatment. The single-melted alloy absorbed its maximum capacity in less than seven hours, also without pre-treatment. The reason for discrepancies between co-melt and single-melt alloys was found to be the different microstructure. The effect of air exposure was also investigated. We found that the air-exposed samples had the same maximum capacity as the argon protected samples but with a slightly longer incubation time, which is probably due to the presence of a dense surface oxide layer. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the presence of a rich Zr intergranular phase in the TiFe matrix, which is responsible for the enhanced hydrogenation properties of these Zr-doped TiFe alloys.

  16. Calcium addition in straw gasification

    Risnes, H.; Fjellerup, Jan Søren; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk

    2003-01-01

    The present work focuses on the influence of calcium addition in gasification. The inorganic¿organic element interaction as well as the detailed inorganic¿inorganic elements interaction has been studied. The effect of calcium addition as calcium sugar/molasses solutions to straw significantly...... affected the ash chemistry and the ash sintering tendency but much less the char reactivity. Thermo balance test are made and high-temperature X-ray diffraction measurements are performed, the experimental results indicate that with calcium addition major inorganic¿inorganic reactions take place very late...... in the char conversion process. Comprehensive global equilibrium calculations predicted important characteristics of the inorganic ash residue. Equilibrium calculations predict the formation of liquid salt if sufficient amounts of Ca are added and according to experiments as well as calculations calcium binds...

  17. An eco-friendly oxidation of sulfide compounds

    An improved green route has been developed for the oxidation of sulfide compounds. Albendazole is converted to ricobendazole or albendazole sulfone using H₂O₂ as an oxidant and H₂O as the solvent. High yields of the corresponding products were obtained by carrying out the reaction at room temperature.

  18. The Complex Resistivity Spectrum Characteristics About Stratabound Sulfide Deposits

    Dong, P.; Sun, B.; Wang, L.; Chen, Z.; Dong, Z.; Wu, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Complex resistivity method has become the key technique of deep prospecting, and widely applied in stratabound sulfide deposits which often form massive ores. However, the complex resistivity spectrum characteristics of stratabound sulfide deposits remains unknown. Through studying variation problem of two-dimensional polarization medium, deducing the differential equations and calculating formula,we applied Cole-Cole model to deduce the spectrum of complex resistivity based on the model of three-node and four-node finite element method, and programmed homologous procedure. We utilized the Earth Model of Geological Layers which has accurate analytical solution to test rationality and accuracy of our modeling. We applied the layer structure provided by drilling results in Chenmenshan copper mine,which is typical strata-bound sulfide deposits in Jiangxi province,China, and calculated the spectra of complex resistivity, then made comparison between modeled and measured values. We find good corellation between them. Our studies may have imporved the interpretation of complex resistivity data, which help apply complex resistivity methods of propecting on stratabound sulfide deposites.

  19. Luminescence in Sulfides: A Rich History and a Bright Future

    Philippe F. Smet

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Sulfide-based luminescent materials have attracted a lot of attention for a wide range of photo-, cathodo- and electroluminescent applications. Upon doping with Ce3+ and Eu2+, the luminescence can be varied over the entire visible region by appropriately choosing the composition of the sulfide host. Main application areas are flat panel displays based on thin film electroluminescence, field emission displays and ZnS-based powder electroluminescence for backlights. For these applications, special attention is given to BaAl2S4:Eu, ZnS:Mn and ZnS:Cu. Recently, sulfide materials have regained interest due to their ability (in contrast to oxide materials to provide a broad band, Eu2+-based red emission for use as a color conversion material in white-light emitting diodes (LEDs. The potential application of rare-earth doped binary alkaline-earth sulfides, like CaS and SrS, thiogallates, thioaluminates and thiosilicates as conversion phosphors is discussed. Finally, this review concludes with the size-dependent luminescence in intrinsic colloidal quantum dots like PbS and CdS, and with the luminescence in doped nanoparticles.

  20. Rapid biosynthesis of cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles using ...

    Rapid biosynthesis of cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles using culture supernatants of Escherichia coli ATCC 8739, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633 and Lactobacillus ... The process of extracellular and fast biosynthesis may help in the development of an easy and eco-friendly route for the synthesis of CdS nanoparticles.

  1. 21 CFR 177.2490 - Polyphenylene sulfide resins.

    2010-04-01

    ... Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2490 Polyphenylene sulfide resins. Polyphenylene... coatings of articles intended for repeated use in contact with food, in accordance with the following... are available from the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (HFS-200), Food and Drug...

  2. 40 CFR 425.04 - Applicability of sulfide pretreatment standards.

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applicability of sulfide pretreatment standards. 425.04 Section 425.04 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS LEATHER TANNING AND FINISHING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY General Provisions...

  3. 40 CFR 425.03 - Sulfide analytical methods and applicability.

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sulfide analytical methods and applicability. 425.03 Section 425.03 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS LEATHER TANNING AND FINISHING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY General Provisions...

  4. Estimation of bacterial hydrogen sulfide production in vitro

    Amina Basic

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Oral bacterial hydrogen sulfide (H2S production was estimated comparing two different colorimetric methods in microtiter plate format. High H2S production was seen for Fusobacterium spp., Treponema denticola, and Prevotella tannerae, associated with periodontal disease. The production differed between the methods indicating that H2S production may follow different pathways.

  5. Carbon-supported iron and iron-molybdenum sulfide catalysts

    Ramselaar, W.L.T.M.

    1988-01-01

    The main objective was to describe the relations between the characteristics (composition and dispersion) of the actual sulfide phase and the catalytic activity. Attention was also paid to the influence of preparational aspects on these characteristics. The catalysts were characterized using in-situ Moessbauer spectroscopy down to 2.0 K. 254 refs.; 47 figs.; 22 tabs

  6. Impact of Iron Sulfide Transformation on Trichloroethylene Degradation

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is one of the most common and persistent groundwater contaminants encountered at hazardous waste sites around the world. A growing body of evidence indicates that iron sulfides play an important role in degrading TCE in natural environments and in enginee...

  7. Selective Sulfidation of Lead Smelter Slag with Sulfur

    Han, Junwei; Liu, Wei; Wang, Dawei; Jiao, Fen; Qin, Wenqing

    2016-02-01

    The selective sulfidation of lead smelter slag with sulfur was studied. The effects of temperature, sulfur dosage, carbon, and Na salts additions were investigated based on thermodynamic calculation. The results indicated that more than 96 pct of zinc in the slag could be converted into sulfides. Increasing temperature, sulfur dosage, or Na salts dosage was conducive to the sulfidation of the zinc oxides in the slag. High temperature and excess Na salts would result in the more consumption of carbon and sulfur. Carbon addition not only promoted the selective sulfidation but reduced the sulfur dosage and eliminated the generation of SO2. Iron oxides had a buffering role on the sulfur efficient utilization. The transformation of sphalerite to wurtzite was feasible under reducing condition at high temperature, especially above 1273 K (1000 °C). The growth of ZnS particles largely depended upon the roasting temperature. They were significantly increased when the temperature was above 1273 K (1000 °C), which was attributed to the formation of a liquid phase.

  8. A physiologically based kinetic model for bacterial sulfide oxidation.

    Klok, Johannes B M; de Graaff, Marco; van den Bosch, Pim L F; Boelee, Nadine C; Keesman, Karel J; Janssen, Albert J H

    2013-02-01

    In the biotechnological process for hydrogen sulfide removal from gas streams, a variety of oxidation products can be formed. Under natron-alkaline conditions, sulfide is oxidized by haloalkaliphilic sulfide oxidizing bacteria via flavocytochrome c oxidoreductase. From previous studies, it was concluded that the oxidation-reduction state of cytochrome c is a direct measure for the bacterial end-product formation. Given this physiological feature, incorporation of the oxidation state of cytochrome c in a mathematical model for the bacterial oxidation kinetics will yield a physiologically based model structure. This paper presents a physiologically based model, describing the dynamic formation of the various end-products in the biodesulfurization process. It consists of three elements: 1) Michaelis-Menten kinetics combined with 2) a cytochrome c driven mechanism describing 3) the rate determining enzymes of the respiratory system of haloalkaliphilic sulfide oxidizing bacteria. The proposed model is successfully validated against independent data obtained from biological respiration tests and bench scale gas-lift reactor experiments. The results demonstrate that the model is a powerful tool to describe product formation for haloalkaliphilic biomass under dynamic conditions. The model predicts a maximum S⁰ formation of about 98 mol%. A future challenge is the optimization of this bioprocess by improving the dissolved oxygen control strategy and reactor design. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Thioamides as collectors at flotation of sulfide minerals

    Fomin, B.M.; Solozhenkin, P.M.; Rukhadze, E.G.; Lyubavina, L.L.

    1976-01-01

    The collective properties of thioamides at flotation of number of sulfide minerals are considered. It is defined that studied thioamides fix on the surface of minerals with formation of appropriate complexes. The spectres of copper thioamides are studied by means of electron paramagnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopy.

  10. Iridium Sulfide and Ir Promoted Mo Based Catalysts.

    Vít, Zdeněk

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 322, - (2007), s. 142-151 ISSN 0926-860X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA104/06/0870 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : iridium sulfide * IrMo catalyst * hydrodesulfurization Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.166, year: 2007

  11. Remediation of arsenic and lead with nanocrystalline zinc sulfide.

    Piquette, Alan; Cannon, Cody; Apblett, Allen W

    2012-07-27

    Nanocrystalline (1.7 ± 0.3 nm) zinc sulfide with a specific surface area up to 360 m(2) g(-1) was prepared from the thermal decomposition of a single-source precursor, zinc ethylxanthate. Zinc ethylxanthate decomposes to cubic zinc sulfide upon exposure to temperatures greater than or equal to 125 °C. The resulting zinc sulfide was tested as a water impurity extractant. The target impurities used in this study were As(5+), As(3+), and Pb(2+). The reaction of the nanocrystalline ZnS with Pb(2+) proceeds as a replacement reaction where solid PbS is formed and Zn(2+) is released into the aqueous system. Removal of lead to a level of less than two parts per billion is achievable. The results of a detailed kinetics experiment between the ZnS and Pb(2+) are included in this study. Unlike the instance of lead, both As(5+) and As(3+) adsorb on the surface of the ZnS extractant as opposed to an ion-exchange process. An uptake capacity of > 25 mg g(-1) for the removal of As(5+) is possible. The uptake of As(3+) appears to proceed by a slower process than that of the As(5+) with a capacity of nearly 20 mg g(-1). The nanocrystalline zinc sulfide was extremely successful for the removal of arsenic and lead from simulated oil sand tailing pond water.

  12. Exploiting fields of gases containing hydrogen-sulfide

    Shevets, V.A.

    1980-01-01

    The anthology is devoted to problems of geology, hydrogeology, drilling, industrial development, and processing of gas and condensate at the Orenburg Gas-Chemical Complex. Reviews ways to develop the technology for further processing of hydrogen sulfide gas, as well as handling corrosion.

  13. Hydrogen sulfide release from dairy manure storages containing gypsum bedding

    Recycled gypsum products can provide a cost-effective bedding alternative for dairy producers. Manufacturers report reduced odors, moisture and bacteria in the stall environment when compared to traditional bedding. Gypsum provides a sulfate source that can be converted to hydrogen sulfide under ana...

  14. Synthesis and photovoltaic application of coper (I) sulfide nanocrystals

    Wu, Yue; Wadia, Cyrus; Ma, Wanli; Sadtler, Bryce; Alivisatos, A.Paul

    2008-06-24

    We present the rational synthesis of colloidal copper(I) sulfide nanocrystals and demonstrate their application as an active light absorbing component in combination with CdS nanorods to make a solution-processed solar cell with 1.6percent power conversion efficiency on both conventional glass substrates and flexible plastic substrates with stability over a 4 month testing period.

  15. Formation of nanocolloidal metacinnabar in mercury-DOM-sulfide systems

    Gerbig, Chase A.; Kim, Christopher S.; Stegemeier, John P.; Ryan, Joseph N.; Aiken, George R.

    2011-01-01

    Direct determination of mercury (Hg) speciation in sulfide-containing environments is confounded by low mercury concentrations and poor analytical sensitivity. Here we report the results of experiments designed to assess mercury speciation at environmentally relevant ratios of mercury to dissolved organic matter (DOM) (i.e., structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Aqueous Hg(II) and a DOM isolate were equilibrated in the presence and absence of 100 μM total sulfide. In the absence of sulfide, mercury adsorption to the resin increased as the Hg:DOM ratio decreased and as the strength of Hg-DOM binding increased. EXAFS analysis indicated that in the absence of sulfide, mercury bonds with an average of 2.4 ± 0.2 sulfur atoms with a bond length typical of mercury-organic thiol ligands (2.35 Å). In the presence of sulfide, mercury showed greater affinity for the C18 resin, and its chromatographic behavior was independent of Hg:DOM ratio. EXAFS analysis showed mercury–sulfur bonds with a longer interatomic distance (2.51–2.53 Å) similar to the mercury–sulfur bond distance in metacinnabar (2.53 Å) regardless of the Hg:DOM ratio. For all samples containing sulfide, the sulfur coordination number was below the ideal four-coordinate structure of metacinnabar. At a low Hg:DOM ratio where strong binding DOM sites may control mercury speciation (1.9 nmol mg–1) mercury was coordinated by 2.3 ± 0.2 sulfur atoms, and the coordination number rose with increasing Hg:DOM ratio. The less-than-ideal coordination numbers indicate metacinnabar-like species on the nanometer scale, and the positive correlation between Hg:DOM ratio and sulfur coordination number suggests progressively increasing particle size or crystalline order with increasing abundance of mercury with respect to DOM. In DOM-containing sulfidic systems nanocolloidal metacinnabar-like species may form, and these species need to be considered when addressing mercury biogeochemistry.

  16. Volcanogenic massive sulfide occurrence model: Chapter C in Mineral deposit models for resource assessment

    Shanks, W.C. Pat; Koski, Randolph A.; Mosier, Dan L.; Schulz, Klaus J.; Morgan, Lisa A.; Slack, John F.; Ridley, W. Ian; Dusel-Bacon, Cynthia; Seal, Robert R.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Shanks, W.C. Pat; Thurston, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits, also known as volcanic-hosted massive sulfide, volcanic-associated massive sulfide, or seafloor massive sulfide deposits, are important sources of copper, zinc, lead, gold, and silver (Cu, Zn, Pb, Au, and Ag). These deposits form at or near the seafloor where circulating hydrothermal fluids driven by magmatic heat are quenched through mixing with bottom waters or porewaters in near-seafloor lithologies. Massive sulfide lenses vary widely in shape and size and may be podlike or sheetlike. They are generally stratiform and may occur as multiple lenses.

  17. Solubility Measurements and Modeling of Zinc, Lead and Iron Sulfides at High Temperatures and High Pressures

    Carolina Figueroa Murcia, Diana; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Thomsen, Kaj

    Solubility measurements of sulfides in aqueous solutions are necessary to understand the behaviour of these scaling minerals in geothermal and oil reservoirs. The low solubility levels of Zinc Sulfide (ZnS), Lead Sulfide (PbS) and Iron Sulfide (FeS) make the solubility measurements a challenging...... oxygen atmosphere to avoid the risk of oxidation of sulfide minerals. The solution is kept in an equilibrium cell at constant temperature and pressure with continuous stirring. The concentration of Zn2+, Pb2+, Fe2+ and S2- are measured using Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission spectrometry (ICP...

  18. Evolution of the Calcium Paradigm: The Relation between Vitamin D, Serum Calcium and Calcium Absorption

    Borje E. Christopher Nordin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is the index disease for calcium deficiency, just as rickets/osteomalacia is the index disease for vitamin D deficiency, but there is considerable overlap between them. The common explanation for this overlap is that hypovitaminosis D causes malabsorption of calcium which then causes secondary hyperparathyroidism and is effectively the same thing as calcium deficiency. This paradigm is incorrect. Hypovitaminosis D causes secondary hyperparathyroidism at serum calcidiol levels lower than 60 nmol/L long before it causes malabsorption of calcium because serum calcitriol (which controls calcium absorption is maintained until serum calcidiol falls below 20 nmol/L. This secondary hyperparathyroidism, probably due to loss of a “calcaemic” action of vitamin D on bone first described in 1957, destroys bone and explains why vitamin D insufficiency is a risk factor for osteoporosis. Vitamin D thus plays a central role in the maintenance of the serum (ionised calcium, which is more important to the organism than the preservation of the skeleton. Bone is sacrificed when absorbed dietary calcium does not match excretion through the skin, kidneys and bowel which is why calcium deficiency causes osteoporosis in experimental animals and, by implication, in humans.

  19. Hydrogen sulfide waste treatment by microwave plasma-chemistry

    Harkness, J.B.L.; Doctor, R.D.

    1994-03-01

    A waste-treatment process that recovers both hydrogen and sulfur from industrial acid-gas waste streams is being developed to replace the Claus technology, which recovers only sulfur. The proposed process is derived from research reported in the Soviet technical literature and uses microwave (or radio-frequency) energy to initiate plasma-chemical reactions that dissociate hydrogen sulfide into elemental hydrogen and sulfur. This process has several advantages over the current Claus-plus-tail-gas-cleanup technology, which burns the hydrogen to water. The primary advantage of the proposal process is its potential for recovering and recycling hydrogen more cheaply than the direct production of hydrogen. Since unconverted hydrogen sulfide is recycled to the plasma reactor, the plasma-chemical process has the potential for sulfur recoveries in excess of 99% without the additional complexity of the tail-gas-cleanup processes associated with the Claus technology. There may also be some environmental advantages to the plasma-chemical process, because the process purge stream would primarily be the carbon dioxide and water contained in the acid-gas waste stream. Laboratory experiments with pure hydrogen sulfide have demonstrated the ability of the process to operate at or above atmospheric pressure with an acceptable hydrogen sulfide dissociation energy. Experiments with a wide range of acid-gas compositions have demonstrated that carbon dioxide and water are compatible with the plasma-chemical dissociation process and that they do not appear to create new waste-treatment problems. However, carbon dioxide does have negative impacts on the overall process. First, it decreases the hydrogen production, and second, it increases the hydrogen sulfide dissociation energy.

  20. Hydrogen sulfide production from cysteine and homocysteine by periodontal and oral bacteria.

    Yoshida, Akihiro; Yoshimura, Mamiko; Ohara, Naoya; Yoshimura, Shigeru; Nagashima, Shiori; Takehara, Tadamichi; Nakayama, Koji

    2009-11-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is one of the predominant volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) produced by oral bacteria. This study developed and evaluated a system for detecting hydrogen sulfide production by oral bacteria. L-methionine-alpha-deamino-gamma-mercaptomethane-lyase (METase) and beta carbon-sulfur (beta C-S) lyase were used to degrade homocysteine and cysteine, respectively, to produce hydrogen sulfide. Enzymatic reactions resulting in hydrogen sulfide production were assayed by reaction with bismuth trichloride, which forms a black precipitate when mixed with hydrogen sulfide. The enzymatic activities of various oral bacteria that result in hydrogen sulfide production and the capacity of bacteria from periodontal sites to form hydrogen sulfide in reaction mixtures containing L-cysteine or DL-homocysteine were assayed. With L-cysteine as the substrate, Streptococcus anginosus FW73 produced the most hydrogen sulfide, whereas Porphyromonas gingivalis American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) 33277 and W83 and Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 10953 produced approximately 35% of the amount produced by the P. gingivalis strains. Finally, the hydrogen sulfide found in subgingival plaque was analyzed. Using bismuth trichloride, the hydrogen sulfide produced by oral bacteria was visually detectable as a black precipitate. Hydrogen sulfide production by oral bacteria was easily analyzed using bismuth trichloride. However, further innovation is required for practical use.

  1. Adaptation of cyanobacteria to the sulfide-rich microenvironment of black band disease of coral.

    Myers, Jamie L; Richardson, Laurie L

    2009-02-01

    Black band disease (BBD) is a cyanobacteria-dominated microbial mat that migrates across living coral colonies lysing coral tissue and leaving behind exposed coral skeleton. The mat is sulfide-rich due to the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria, integral members of the BBD microbial community, and the sulfide they produce is lethal to corals. The effect of sulfide, normally toxic to cyanobacteria, on the photosynthetic capabilities of five BBD cyanobacterial isolates of the genera Geitlerinema (3), Leptolyngbya (1), and Oscillatoria (1) and six non-BBD cyanobacteria of the genera Leptolyngbya (3), Pseudanabaena (2), and Phormidium (1) was examined. Photosynthetic experiments were performed by measuring the photoincorporation of [(14)C] NaHCO(3) under the following conditions: (1) aerobic (no sulfide), (2) anaerobic with 0.5 mM sulfide, and (3) anaerobic with 0.5 mM sulfide and 10 microM 3-(3',4'-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU). All five BBD cyanobacterial isolates tolerated sulfide by conducting sulfide-resistant oxygenic photosynthesis. Five of the non-BBD cyanobacterial isolates did not tolerate sulfide, although one Pseudanabaena isolate continued to photosynthesize in the presence of sulfide at a considerably reduced rate. None of the isolates conducted anoxygenic photosynthesis with sulfide as an electron donor. This is the first report on the physiology of a culture of Oscillatoria sp. found globally in BBD.

  2. Enrichment and immobilization of sulfide removal microbiota applied for environmental biological remediation of aquaculture area

    Zhao, Yang-Guo; Zheng, Yu; Tian, Weijun; Bai, Jie; Feng, Gong; Guo, Liang; Gao, Mengchun

    2016-01-01

    To remove sulfide in the deteriorating aquaculture sediment and water, sulfide-oxidizing microbiota was enriched from Jiaozhou Bay, China, by using sulfide-rich medium. Composition and structure of microbial communities in the enrichments were investigated by 16S rDNA molecular biotechniques. Results showed that microbial community structure continuously shifted and the abundance of sulfate reducing bacteria, i.e., Desulfobacterium, Desulfococcus and Desulfobacca apparently declined. Several halophile genera, Vibrio, Marinobacter, Pseudomonas, Prochlorococcus, Pediococcus and Thiobacillus predominated finally in the microbiota. The enriched microbiota was capable of removing a maximum of 1000 mg/L sulfide within 12 h with 10% inoculum at pH 7.0, 20–30 °C. After immobilized, the microbiota presented excellent resistance to impact and could completely remove 600 mg/L sulfide in 12 h. Moreover, the immobilized microbiota recovered well even recycled for five times. In conclusion, the immobilized sulfide-removing microbiota showed a quite promising application for biological restoring of sulfide-rich aquaculture environment. - Highlights: • A sulfide-oxidizing microbiota successfully enriched from aquaculture sediment. • Microbiota dominated by Vibrio, Marinobacter, Pseudomonas and Thiobacillus spp. • Sulfide-oxidizing microbiota removed sulfide at an average rate of 100 mg/(L·h). • Immobilized microbiota removed over 85% of sulfide even recycled for five times.

  3. The mechanism of the catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide: II. Kinetics and mechanism of hydrogen sulfide oxidation catalyzed by sulfur

    Steijns, M.; Derks, F.; Verloop, A.; Mars, P.

    1976-01-01

    The kinetics of the catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide by molecular oxygen have been studied in the temperature range 20–250 °C. The primary reaction product is sulfur which may undergo further oxidation to SO2 at temperatures above 200 °C. From the kinetics of this autocatalytic reaction we

  4. Pyrite formation and mineral transformation pathways upon sulfidation of ferric hydroxides depend on mineral type and sulfide concentration

    Peiffer, Stefan; Behrends, Thilo; Hellige, Katrin; Larese-Casanova, Philip; Wan, Moli; Pollok, Kilian

    2015-01-01

    The reaction of ferric (hydr)oxides with dissolved sulfide does not lead to the instantaneous production of thermodynamically stable products but can induce a variety of mineral transformations including the formation of metastable intermediates. The importance of the various transformation pathways

  5. Calcium and Calcium Supplements: Achieving the Right Balance

    ... may have on heart attack risk. A similar controversy surrounds calcium and prostate cancer. Some studies have ... your agreement to the Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy linked below. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy ...

  6. Calcium signals in olfactory neurons.

    Tareilus, E; Noé, J; Breer, H

    1995-11-09

    Laser scanning confocal microscopy in combination with the fluorescent calcium indicators Fluo-3 and Fura-Red was employed to estimate the intracellular concentration of free calcium ions in individual olfactory receptor neurons and to monitor temporal and spatial changes in the Ca(2+)-level upon stimulation. The chemosensory cells responded to odorants with a significant increase in the calcium concentration, preferentially in the dendritic knob. Applying various stimulation paradigma, it was found that in a population of isolated cells, subsets of receptor neurons display distinct patterns of responsiveness.

  7. Development and functioning of microorganisms in concentration cycles of sulfide copper-nickel and non-sulfide apatite-nepheline ores

    Fokina N. V.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The number and trophic diversity of bacteria in flotation samples of apatite-nepheline and sulfide copper-nickel ores at the concentration plants of JSC "Apatite" and Kola Mining and Metallurgical Company have been determined. The study of the size and diversity of the microbiota has been conducted by culture on selective nutrient media. The total number and biomass of bacteria have been considered by fluorescence microscopy using Cyclopore polycarbonate membrane filters. Bacteria have been identified by molecular genetic methods. The least amount of both saprotrophic and other trophic groups of bacteria has been observed in the samples of ore and recycled water as at the concentrating factory of Apatit JSC, and also at the plant "Pechenganikel". It has been found out that the bacteria contained in the ore and recycling water flowing from the tailings increased their number during the flotation process due to coming of the nutrients with the flotation reagents, aeration and increased temperature. Strains which occurrence is more than 60 % have been extracted from recycled water and basic flotation products and classified as Pseudomonas. Two strains with occurrence of more than 60 % have been discovered at Apatit JSC and classified as Stenotrophomonas and Acinetobacter. The number of fungi in the cycle of apatite-nepheline ore enrichment at the factories is very low (1 to 24 CFU / 1 ml or 1 g of ore. Fungi of the genus Penicillium have been dominated, fungi of the genera Acremonium, Aureobasidium, Alternaria, Chaetomium have also been detected. At the plant "Pechenganikel" species Aspergillus fumigatus, Penicillium aurantiogriseum and P. glabrum have been extracted. It has been shown that the bacteria deteriorate the apatite flotation as a result of their interaction with active centers of calcium-containing minerals and intensive flocculation decreasing the floatation selectivity. Also some trend of copper and nickel recovery change has been

  8. Kinetic studies of sulfide mineral oxidation and xanthate adsorption

    Mendiratta, Neeraj K.

    2000-10-01

    Sulfide minerals are a major source of metals; however, certain sulfide minerals, such as pyrite and pyrrhotite, are less desirable. Froth flotation is a commonly used separation technique, which requires the use of several reagents to float and depress different sulfide minerals. Xanthate, a thiol collector, has gained immense usage in sulfide minerals flotation. However, some sulfides are naturally hydrophobic and may float without a collector. Iron sulfides, such as pyrite and pyrrhotite, are few of the most abundant minerals, yet economically insignificant. Their existence with other sulfide minerals leads to an inefficient separation process as well as environmental problems, such as acid mine drainage during mining and processing and SO 2 emissions during smelting process. A part of the present study is focused on understanding their behavior, which leads to undesired flotation and difficulties in separation. The major reasons for the undesired flotation are attributed to the collectorless hydrophobicity and the activation with heavy metal ions. To better understand the collectorless hydrophobicity of pyrite, Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) of freshly fractured pyrite electrodes was used to study the oxidation and reduction of the mineral. The EIS results showed that the rate of reaction increases with oxidation and reduction. At moderate oxidizing potentials, the rate of reaction is too slow to replenish hydrophilic iron species leaving hydrophobic sulfur species on the surface. However, at higher potentials, iron species are replaced fast enough to depress its flotation. Effects of pH and polishing were also explored using EIS. Besides collectorless hydrophobicity, the activation of pyrrhotite with nickel ions and interaction with xanthate ions makes the separation more difficult. DETA and SO2 are commonly used as pyrrhotite depressants; however, the mechanism is not very well understood. Contact angle measurements, cyclic voltammetry and Tafel

  9. Why Calcium? How Calcium Became the Best Communicator*

    Carafoli, Ernesto; Krebs, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Calcium carries messages to virtually all important functions of cells. Although it was already active in unicellular organisms, its role became universally important after the transition to multicellular life. In this Minireview, we explore how calcium ended up in this privileged position. Most likely its unique coordination chemistry was a decisive factor as it makes its binding by complex molecules particularly easy even in the presence of large excesses of other cations,...

  10. Isomorfic Substitutions of Calcium by Strontium in Calcium Hydroxyapatite

    Christensen, Hilbert

    1962-12-01

    By means of homogeneous precipitation it has been possible to synthesize crystalline solid solutions of calcium strontium hydroxyapatite from aqueous solutions. The lattice constants for the solid solutions were measured in the range Ca 9 Sr(PO 4 ) 6 (OH) 2 - CaSr 9 (PO 4 ) 6 (OH) 2 . The investigations show that the discrimination of strontium against calcium is considerably smaller than reported elsewhere (1). Strontium is preferentially built into the c-axis direction of the apatite lattice

  11. Influence of dietary calcium on bone calcium utilization

    Farmer, M.; Roland, D.A. Sr.; Clark, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    In Experiment 1, 10 microCi 45 Ca/day were administered to 125 hens for 10 days. Hens were then allocated to five treatments with calcium levels ranging from .08 to 3.75% of the diet. In Experiment 2, hens with morning oviposition times were randomly allocated to 11 treatments that were periods of time postoviposition ranging from 6 hr to 24 hr, in 2-hr increments (Experiment 2). At the end of each 2-hr period, eggs from 25 hens were removed from the uterus. The 18-, 20-, and 22-hr treatments were replicated three times. In Experiment 3, hens were fed either ad libitum or feed was withheld the last 5 or 6 hr before oviposition. In Experiment 4, hens were fed 10 microCi of 45 Ca for 15 days to label skeletal calcium. Hens were divided into two groups and fed a .08 or 3.75% calcium diet for 2 days. On the second day, 25 hens fed the 3.75% calcium diet were intubated with 7 g of the same diet containing .5 g calcium at 1700, 2100, 0100, 0500, and 0700 hr. The measurements used were egg weight, shell weight, and 45 Ca content of the egg shell. Results indicated a significant linear or quadratic regression of dietary calcium levels on 45 Ca accumulation in eggshells and eggshell weight (Experiment 1). As the calcium level of the diet increased, eggshell weight increased and 45 Ca recovery decreased. Utilization of skeletal calcium for shell formation ranged from 28 to 96%. In Experiment 2, the rate of shell calcification was not constant throughout the calcification process but varied significantly

  12. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be safely...

  13. A Crash Course in Calcium Channels.

    Zamponi, Gerald W

    2017-12-20

    Much progress has been made in understanding the molecular physiology and pharmacology of calcium channels. Recently, there have been tremendous advances in learning about calcium channel structure and function through crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy studies. Here, I will give an overview of our knowledge about calcium channels, and highlight two recent studies that give important insights into calcium channel structure.

  14. Calcium-sensing beyond neurotransmitters

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Han, Weiping

    2009-01-01

    Neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and hormones are released through the regulated exocytosis of SVs (synaptic vesicles) and LDCVs (large dense-core vesicles), a process that is controlled by calcium. Synaptotagmins are a family of type 1 membrane proteins that share a common domain structure. Most....... Also, we discuss potential roles of synaptotagmins in non-traditional endocrine systems....... synaptotagmins are located in brain and endocrine cells, and some of these synaptotagmins bind to phospholipids and calcium at levels that trigger regulated exocytosis of SVs and LDCVs. This led to the proposed synaptotagmin-calcium-sensor paradigm, that is, members of the synaptotagmin family function...... as calcium sensors for the regulated exocytosis of neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and hormones. Here, we provide an overview of the synaptotagmin family, and review the recent mouse genetic studies aimed at understanding the functions of synaptotagmins in neurotransmission and endocrine-hormone secretion...

  15. Calcium phosphates for biomedical applications

    Maria Canillas

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The history of calcium phosphates in the medicine field starts in 1769 when the first evidence of its existence in the bone tissue is discovered. Since then, the interest for calcium phosphates has increased among the scientific community. Their study has been developed in parallel with new advances in materials sciences, medicine or tissue engineering areas. Bone tissue engineering is the field where calcium phosphates have had a great importance. While the first bioceramics are selected according to bioinert, biocompatibility and mechanical properties with the aim to replace bone tissue damaged, calcium phosphates open the way to the bone tissue regeneration challenge. Nowadays, they are present in the majority of commercial products directed to repair or regenerate damaged bone tissue. Finally, in the last few decades, they have been suggested and studied as drug delivering devices and as vehicles of DNA and RNA for the future generation therapies.

  16. Functions of vitamin D / Calcium

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Excitation-contraction coupling,. Cardiac functions. Hormonal secretion. Control of enzymatic reactions. Mitotic division. Maintenance of cell integrity. Ciliary motility. Notes: Calcium is a vital second messenger.

  17. Calcium signals in planetary embryos

    Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2018-03-01

    The calcium-isotope composition of planetary bodies in the inner Solar System correlates with the masses of such objects. This finding could have implications for our understanding of how the Solar System formed.

  18. Calcium homeostasis in diabetes mellitus.

    Ahn, Changhwan; Kang, Ji-Houn; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2017-09-30

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is becoming a lifestyle-related pandemic disease. Diabetic patients frequently develop electrolyte disorders, especially diabetic ketoacidosis or nonketotic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome. Such patients show characteristic potassium, magnesium, phosphate, and calcium depletion. In this review, we discuss a homeostatic mechanism that links calcium and DM. We also provide a synthesis of the evidence in favor or against this linking mechanism by presenting recent clinical indications, mainly from veterinary research. There are consistent results supporting the use of calcium and vitamin D supplementation to reduce the risk of DM. Clinical trials support a marginal reduction in circulating lipids, and some meta-analyses support an increase in insulin sensitivity, following vitamin D supplementation. This review provides an overview of the calcium and vitamin D disturbances occurring in DM and describes the underlying mechanisms. Such elucidation will help indicate potential pathophysiology-based precautionary and therapeutic approaches and contribute to lowering the incidence of DM.

  19. Calcium phosphates for biomedical applications

    Canillas, M.; Pena, P.; Aza, A.H. de; Rodriguez, M.A.

    2017-07-01

    The history of calcium phosphates in the medicine field starts in 1769 when the first evidence of its existence in the bone tissue is discovered. Since then, the interest for calcium phosphates has increased among the scientific community. Their study has been developed in parallel with new advances in materials sciences, medicine or tissue engineering areas. Bone tissue engineering is the field where calcium phosphates have had a great importance. While the first bioceramics are selected according to bioinert, biocompatibility and mechanical properties with the aim to replace bone tissue damaged, calcium phosphates open the way to the bone tissue regeneration challenge. Nowadays, they are present in the majority of commercial products directed to repair or regenerate damaged bone tissue. Finally, in the last few decades, they have been suggested and studied as drug delivering devices and as vehicles of DNA and RNA for the future generation therapies. (Author)

  20. Calcium signaling in liver.

    Gaspers, Lawrence D; Thomas, Andrew P

    2005-01-01

    In hepatocytes, hormones linked to the formation of the second messenger inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) evoke transient increases or spikes in cytosolic free calcium ([Ca2+]i), that increase in frequency with the agonist concentration. These oscillatory Ca2+ signals are thought to transmit the information encoded in the extracellular stimulus to down-stream Ca2+-sensitive metabolic processes. We have utilized both confocal and wide field fluorescence microscopy techniques to study the InsP3-dependent signaling pathway at the cellular and subcellular levels in the intact perfused liver. Typically InsP3-dependent [Ca2+]i spikes manifest as Ca2+ waves that propagate throughout the entire cytoplasm and nucleus, and in the intact liver these [Ca2+]i increases are conveyed through gap junctions to encompass entire lobular units. The translobular movement of Ca2+ provides a means to coordinate the function of metabolic zones of the lobule and thus, liver function. In this article, we describe the characteristics of agonist-evoked [Ca2+]i signals in the liver and discuss possible mechanisms to explain the propagation of intercellular Ca2+ waves in the intact organ.

  1. Effects of diphosphonate on kidney calcium content and duodenal absorption of 45calcium

    Goulding, A.; Cameron, V.

    1978-01-01

    In rats the relationships between EHDP-induced changes in serum calcium concentration, kidney calcium content and duodenal transport of 45 calcium were studied. Body weights and kidney weights were similar in all groups. EHDP administration was associated with an increase in serum calcium concentration and kidney calcium content, and a decrease in duodenal 45 calcium transport. In the EHDP-treated rats, there was a significant negative correlation between kidney calcium concentration and duodenal 45 calcium transport but no correlation between either kidney calcium content and serum calcium concentration (r = 0.116) or between serum calcium concentration and duodenal 45 calcium transport (r = 0.02). Further experiments will be needed to determine whether the demonstrated increase in kidney calcium content induced by EHDP administration was the cause of, or was secondary to, inhibition of 1, 25(OH) 2 D 3 synthesis. (orig./AJ) [de

  2. Research of calcium oxide hydration in calcium nitrate solutions

    M.A. Oliynyk

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Mineral fertilizers are one of the important factors of agriculture intensification and increasing of food products quantity. The volume of fertilizers production and its domestic consumption in Ukraine indicate that nitrogen fertilizer using only comes nearer to the required number of science-based. One of the most widespread artificial fertilizers is the calcium nitrate. Aim: The aim is to study and theoretically substantiate the processes occurring in the preparation of suspensions of calcium hydroxide Са(ОН2 in solution of calcium nitrate Ca(NО32. Materials and Methods: The technical calcium oxide (quicklime DSTU BV.2.7-90-99, solutions of calcium nitrate of 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40% Ca(NО32 concentrations were used in the work. The content of lime in the preparation of a suspension in the solution changed (in terms of calcium oxide CaO from 150 g/dm3 to the maximum possible. Each of these solutions saturated at 40°С in lime to maximum concentration. Suitable for use in these experiments and in the technology of calcium nitrate obtaining are considered the solutions (suspensions that within 12 hours did not lose their mobility (transportability. Results: The experimental results show that increasing of the concentration of calcium nitrate in solution within the range 15...40%, the amount of lime that you can put into the solution without loss of transportability decreases. Further increasing of lime quantity in solutions concentrations causes to its solidifying, loss of mobility (transportability. Calculations showed that in the presence of calcium nitrate the solubility of Са(ОН2 is reduced nearly by order that can lead to the formation of calcium oxide CaO the solid phase Са(ОН2 on the surface, which also can form hydrogen bonds with the components of the solution. As the probability of formation of hydrogen bonds in solutions is high, there is a possibility of formation of clusters.

  3. Modification of Alumina and Spinel Inclusions by Calcium in Liquid Steel

    Verma, Neerav

    2011-12-01

    Steel Cleanliness plays a crucial role in determining steel properties such as toughness, ductility, formability, corrosion resistance and surface quality. The production of clean steel often involves the elimination or chemical and morphological modification of oxide and sulfide inclusions. Along with deteriorating the steel properties, solid inclusions can affect steel castability through nozzle clogging. Nozzle clogging occurs when solid inclusions accumulate in the caster pouring system such as the ladle shroud or submerged entry nozzle (SEN). Thus, it is important to understand how to achieve desired inclusion characteristics (shape, size and chemistry) through the steelmaking process. Among the various practices adopted in industries to counteract the effect of solid inclusions, modification of solid inclusions to liquid or partially liquid state through calcium treatment is one of the methods. Calcium can be used because it has a strong ability to form oxides and sulfides. In Al-killed steels, the most common inclusions are alumina (Al2O3) inclusions, which are solid at steelmaking temperatures. On calcium treatment, solid alumina inclusions are converted to calcium aluminates, which have liquidus temperatures lower than steelmaking temperature (1600°C) [14]. It has been found that alumina inclusions may contain some MgO and such inclusions are termed alumina magnesia spinels (Al2O3.xMgO) [18]. These spinels are more stable than alumina and it has been suggested that they might be more difficult to modify [18]. But, some authors have proposed that MgO can actually help in the liquefaction of inclusions, and have demonstrated successful modification of spinels by Ca treatment [20, 21]. In the present research, the mechanism of transformation of alumina and spinel inclusions upon calcium treatment was studied by characterizing transient evolution of inclusions. A vacuum induction was used for melting, making additions (Al, Al-Mg and CaSi2) and sampling. The

  4. Calcium Orthophosphate Cements and Concretes

    Sergey V. Dorozhkin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In early 1980s, researchers discovered self-setting calcium orthophosphate cements, which are a bioactive and biodegradable grafting material in the form of a powder and a liquid. Both phases form after mixing a viscous paste that after being implanted, sets and hardens within the body as either a non-stoichiometric calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA or brushite, sometimes blended with unreacted particles and other phases. As both CDHA and brushite are remarkably biocompartible and bioresorbable (therefore, in vivo they can be replaced with newly forming bone, calcium orthophosphate cements represent a good correction technique for non-weight-bearing bone fractures or defects and appear to be very promising materials for bone grafting applications. Besides, these cements possess an excellent osteoconductivity, molding capabilities and easy manipulation. Furthermore, reinforced cement formulations are available, which in a certain sense might be described as calcium orthophosphate concretes. The concepts established by calcium orthophosphate cement pioneers in the early 1980s were used as a platform to initiate a new generation of bone substitute materials for commercialization. Since then, advances have been made in the composition, performance and manufacturing; several beneficial formulations have already been introduced as a result. Many other compositions are in experimental stages. In this review, an insight into calcium orthophosphate cements and concretes, as excellent biomaterials suitable for both dental and bone grafting application, has been provided.

  5. The removal of hydrogen sulfide from gas streams using an aqueous metal sulfate absorbent : Part II. the regeneration of copper sulfide to copper oxide - An experimental study

    Ter Maat, H.; Hogendoorn, J. A.; Versteeg, G. F.

    2005-01-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate the possibilities for a selective and efficient method to convert copper(II) sulfide (CuS) into copper(II) oxide (CuO). The oxidation of copper sulfide has been studied experimentally using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) at temperatures ranging from 450 to

  6. Influence of pipe material and surfaces on sulfide related odor and corrosion in sewers.

    Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Vollertsen, Jes; Jensen, Henriette Stokbro; Wium-Andersen, Tove; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild

    2008-09-01

    Hydrogen sulfide oxidation on sewer pipe surfaces was investigated in a pilot scale experimental setup. The experiments were aimed at replicating conditions in a gravity sewer located immediately downstream of a force main where sulfide related concrete corrosion and odor is often observed. During the experiments, hydrogen sulfide gas was injected intermittently into the headspace of partially filled concrete and plastic (PVC and HDPE) sewer pipes in concentrations of approximately 1,000 ppm(v). Between each injection, the hydrogen sulfide concentration was monitored while it decreased because of adsorption and subsequent oxidation on the pipe surfaces. The experiments showed that the rate of hydrogen sulfide oxidation was approximately two orders of magnitude faster on the concrete pipe surfaces than on the plastic pipe surfaces. Removal of the layer of reaction (corrosion) products from the concrete pipes was found to reduce the rate of hydrogen sulfide oxidation significantly. However, the rate of sulfide oxidation was restored to its background level within 10-20 days. A similar treatment had no observable effect on hydrogen sulfide removal in the plastic pipe reactors. The experimental results were used to model hydrogen sulfide oxidation under field conditions. This showed that the gas-phase hydrogen sulfide concentration in concrete sewers would typically amount to a few percent of the equilibrium concentration calculated from Henry's law. In the plastic pipe sewers, significantly higher concentrations were predicted because of the slower adsorption and oxidation kinetics on such surfaces.

  7. Fabrication and applications of copper sulfide (CuS) nanostructures

    Shamraiz, Umair, E-mail: umairshamraiz@gmail.com; Hussain, Raja Azadar, E-mail: hussainazadar@gamil.com; Badshah, Amin, E-mail: aminbadshah@yahoo.com

    2016-06-15

    This review article presents different fabrication procedures (under the headlines of solvothermal routes, aerosol methods, solution methods and thermolysis), and applications (photocatalytic degradation, ablation of cancer cells, electrode material in lithium ion batteries and in gas sensing, organic solar cells, field emission properties, super capacitor applications, photoelectrochemical performance of QDSCs, photocatalytic reduction of organic pollutants, electrochemical bio sensing, enhanced PEC characteristics of pre-annealed CuS film electrodes) of copper sulfide (Covellite). - Highlights: • This review article presents the synthesis and applications of copper sulfide. • CuS has been used over the years for different applications in nanoscience. • Different synthetic protocols are followed for their preparation which help in the possible modifications in the morphology of CuS.

  8. 'Low-acid' sulfide oxidation using nitrate-enriched groundwater

    Donn, Michael; Boxall, Naomi; Reid, Nathan; Meakin, Rebecca; Gray, David; Kaksonen, Anna; Robson, Thomas; Shiers, Denis

    2016-04-01

    Acid drainage (AMD/ARD) is undoubtedly one of the largest environmental, legislative and economic challenges facing the mining industry. In Australia alone, at least 60m is spent on AMD related issues annually, and the global cost is estimated to be in the order of tens of billions US. Furthermore, the challenge of safely and economically storing or treating sulfidic wastes will likely intensify because of the trend towards larger mines that process increasingly higher volumes of lower grade ores and the associated sulfidic wastes and lower profit margins. While the challenge of managing potentially acid forming (PAF) wastes will likely intensify, the industrial approaches to preventing acid production or ameliorating the effects has stagnated for decades. Conventionally, PAF waste is segregated and encapsulated in non-PAF tips to limit access to atmospheric oxygen. Two key limitations of the 'cap and cover' approach are: 1) the hazard (PAF) is not actually removed; only the pollutant linkage is severed; and, 2) these engineered structures are susceptible to physical failure in short-to-medium term, potentially re-establishing that pollutant linkage. In an effort to address these concerns, CSIRO is investigating a passive, 'low-acid' oxidation mechanism for sulfide treatment, which can potentially produce one quarter as much acidity compared with pyrite oxidation under atmospheric oxygen. This 'low-acid' mechanism relies on nitrate, rather than oxygen, as the primary electron accepter and the activity of specifically cultured chemolithoautotrophic bacteria and archaea communities. This research was prompted by the observation that, in deeply weathered terrains of Australia, shallow (oxic to sub-oxic) groundwater contacting weathering sulfides are commonly inconsistent with the geochemical conditions produced by ARD. One key characteristic of these aquifers is the natural abundance of nitrate on a regional scale, which becomes depleted around the sulfide bodies, and

  9. 21 CFR 184.1207 - Calcium lactate.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium lactate. 184.1207 Section 184.1207 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1207 Calcium lactate. (a) Calcium lactate (C6H10CaO6.xH2O, where x is any... calcium carbonate or calcium hydroxide. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the Food Chemicals...

  10. Optical and structural characteristics of lead sulfides thin films

    Karim Deraman; Bakar Ismail; Samsudi Sakrani; Gould, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    Tin sulfide films have been prepared by evaporation technique at 1x10 - 4 torr and at substrate temperatures between 100 to 300 0 C. The films thickness were 52 to 370 nm. From the absorption 1.47 eV and X-ray diffraction patent shows that the composition of films have changed from SnS 2 (at low temperature) to SnS (at higher temperature)

  11. Non-stoichiometry in sulfides produced by pulsed laser deposition

    Canulescu, Stela; Cazzaniga, Andrea Carlo; Ettlinger, Rebecca Bolt

    and the most volatile component in the film. A very well studied case in the one of oxides, for which the O2 or N2O background gases can reduce the loss of oxygen in the growing films. A much less studied case is the one of sulfides or selenides, such as the solar cell absorber layers of CIGS (Cu(Ga,In)Se2...

  12. Hydrogen sulfide metabolism regulates endothelial solute barrier function

    Shuai Yuan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S is an important gaseous signaling molecule in the cardiovascular system. In addition to free H2S, H2S can be oxidized to polysulfide which can be biologically active. Since the impact of H2S on endothelial solute barrier function is not known, we sought to determine whether H2S and its various metabolites affect endothelial permeability. In vitro permeability was evaluated using albumin flux and transendothelial electrical resistance. Different H2S donors were used to examine the effects of exogenous H2S. To evaluate the role of endogenous H2S, mouse aortic endothelial cells (MAECs were isolated from wild type mice and mice lacking cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE, a predominant source of H2S in endothelial cells. In vivo permeability was evaluated using the Miles assay. We observed that polysulfide donors induced rapid albumin flux across endothelium. Comparatively, free sulfide donors increased permeability only with higher concentrations and at later time points. Increased solute permeability was associated with disruption of endothelial junction proteins claudin 5 and VE-cadherin, along with enhanced actin stress fiber formation. Importantly, sulfide donors that increase permeability elicited a preferential increase in polysulfide levels within endothelium. Similarly, CSE deficient MAECs showed enhanced solute barrier function along with reduced endogenous bound sulfane sulfur. CSE siRNA knockdown also enhanced endothelial junction structures with increased claudin 5 protein expression. In vivo, CSE genetic deficiency significantly blunted VEGF induced hyperpermeability revealing an important role of the enzyme for barrier function. In summary, endothelial solute permeability is critically regulated via exogenous and endogenous sulfide bioavailability with a prominent role of polysulfides.

  13. Catalytic oxidation of sulfide in drinking water treatment: activated carbon as catalyst; Katalytische Oxidation von Sulfid bei der Trinkwasseraufbereitung: Aktivkohle als Katalysator

    Hultsch, V; Grischek, T; Wolff, D; Worch, E [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Inst. fuer Wasserchemie; Gun, J [Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (Israel). Div. of Environmental Sciences, Fredy and Nadine Herrmann School of Applied Science

    2001-07-01

    In regions with warm climate and limited water resources high sulfide concentrations in groundwater can cause problems during drinking water treatment. Aeration of the raw water is not always sufficient to ensure the hydrogen sulfide concentration below the odour threshold value for hydrogen sulfide. As an alternative, activated carbon can be used as a catalyst for sulfide oxidation of raw water. The use of different types of activated carbon was investigated in kinetic experiments. Both Catalytic Carbon from Calgon Carbon and granulated activated carbon from Norit showed high catalytic activities. The results of the experiments are discussed with regard to the practical use of activated carbon for the elimination of hydrogen sulfide during drinking water treatment. (orig.)

  14. Benzothiazole sulfide compatibilized polypropylene/halloysite nanotubes composites

    Liu Mingxian [Department of Polymer Materials and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Guo Baochun, E-mail: psbcguo@scut.edu.cn [Department of Polymer Materials and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Lei Yanda; Du Mingliang; Jia Demin [Department of Polymer Materials and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2009-02-15

    Clay-philic benzothiazole sulfide, capable of donating electrons, is grafted onto polypropylene (PP) backbones when N-cyclohexyl-2-benzothiazole sulfonamide (CBS), a commonly used accelerator in the tire industry, is included in the processing of PP/halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) composites. CBS decomposes at elevated temperature and yields benzothiazole sulfide radicals, which react with the PP polymeric free radicals generated during the processing of the composites. On the other hand, the benzothiazole group of CBS is reactive to HNTs via electron transferring. The compatibilization between HNTs and PP is thus realized via interfacial grafting and electron transferring mechanism. The interfacial interactions in the compatibilized systems were fully characterized. Compared with the control sample, the dispersion of HNTs and the interfacial bonding are enhanced substantially in the compatibilized composites. The significantly improved mechanical properties and thermal properties of benzothiazole sulfide compatibilized PP/HNTs composites are correlated to the enhanced interfacial property. The present work demonstrates a novel interfacial design via interfacial grafting/electron transferring for the compatibilization of PP/clay composites.

  15. Reduction kinetics of zinc and cadmium sulfides with hydrogen

    Turgenev, I.S.; Kabisov, I.Kh.; Zviadadze, G.N.; Vasil'eva, O.Yu.

    1985-01-01

    Kinetics of reduction processes of zinc sulfide in the temperature range 800-1100 deg C and of cadmium sulfide 600-900 deg C has been stodied. Activation energies and reaction order in terms of hydrogen are calculated. Thermodynamic processes of reduction depend on aggregate state of the metal formed. For vaporous zinc in the temperature range 1050-950 deq C activation energy constitutes 174 kJ/mol, for liquid in the range 900-850 deg - 151 kJ/mol and reaction order in terms of hydrogen is 1.0. For vaporous cadmium in the temperature range 900-700 deg C activation energy constitutes 144 kJ/mol and reaction order in terms of hydrogen is 0.86, for liquid in the range 675-600 deg C 127 kJ/mol and 0.8 respectively. The processes of zinc and cadmium sulfide reduction proceed in kinetic regime and are limited by the rate of chemical reaction

  16. Reaction between vanadium trichloride oxide and hydrogen sulfide

    Yajima, Akimasa; Matsuzaki, Ryoko; Saeki, Yuzo

    1978-01-01

    The details of the reaction between vanadium trichloride oxide and hydrogen sulfide were examined at 20 and 60 0 C. The main products by the reaction were vanadium dichloride oxide, sulfur, and hydrogen chloride. In addition to these products, small amounts of vanadium trichloride, vanadium tetrachloride, disulfur dichloride, and sulfur dioxide were formed. The formations of the above-mentioned reaction products can be explained as follows: The first stage is the reaction between vanadium trichloride oxide and hydrogen sulfide, 2VOCl 3 (l) + H 2 S(g)→2VOCl 2 (s) + S(s) + 2HCl(g). Then the resulting sulfur reacts with the unreacted vanadium trichloride oxide, 2VOCl 3 (l) + 2S(s)→2VOCl 2 (s) + S 2 Cl 2 (l). The resulting disulfur dichloride subsequently reacts with the unreacted vanadium trichloride oxide, 2VOCl 3 (l) + S 2 Cl 2 (l)→2VCl 4 (l) + S(s) + SO 2 (g). The resulting vanadium tetrachloride reacts with the sulfur formed during the reaction, 2VCl 4 (l) + 2S(s)→2VCl 3 (s) + S 2 Cl 2 (l), and also reacts with hydrogen sulfide, 2VCl 4 (l) + H 2 S(g)→2VCl 3 (s) + S(s) + 2HCl(g). (auth.)

  17. Protective Effects of Hydrogen Sulfide in the Ageing Kidney.

    Hou, Cui-Lan; Wang, Ming-Jie; Sun, Chen; Huang, Yong; Jin, Sheng; Mu, Xue-Pan; Chen, Ying; Zhu, Yi-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Aims . The study aimed to examine whether hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) generation changed in the kidney of the ageing mouse and its relationship with impaired kidney function. Results . H 2 S levels in the plasma, urine, and kidney decreased significantly in ageing mice. The expression of two known H 2 S-producing enzymes in kidney, cystathionine γ -lyase (CSE) and cystathionine- β -synthase (CBS), decreased significantly during ageing. Chronic H 2 S donor (NaHS, 50  μ mol/kg/day, 10 weeks) treatment could alleviate oxidative stress levels and renal tubular interstitial collagen deposition. These protective effects may relate to transcription factor Nrf2 activation and antioxidant proteins such as HO-1, SIRT1, SOD1, and SOD2 expression upregulation in the ageing kidney after NaHS treatment. Furthermore, the expression of H 2 S-producing enzymes changed with exogenous H 2 S administration and contributed to elevated H 2 S levels in the ageing kidney. Conclusions . Endogenous hydrogen sulfide production in the ageing kidney is insufficient. Exogenous H 2 S can partially rescue ageing-related kidney dysfunction by reducing oxidative stress, decreasing collagen deposition, and enhancing Nrf2 nuclear translocation. Recovery of endogenous hydrogen sulfide production may also contribute to the beneficial effects of NaHS treatment.

  18. Control of malodorous hydrogen sulfide compounds using microbial fuel cell.

    Eaktasang, Numfon; Min, Hyeong-Sik; Kang, Christina; Kim, Han S

    2013-10-01

    In this study, a microbial fuel cell (MFC) was used to control malodorous hydrogen sulfide compounds generated from domestic wastewaters. The electricity production demonstrated a distinct pattern of a two-step increase during 170 h of system run: the first maximum current density was 118.6 ± 7.2 mA m⁻² followed by a rebound of current density increase, reaching the second maximum of 176.8 ± 9.4 mA m⁻². The behaviors of the redox potential and the sulfate level in the anode compartment indicated that the microbial production of hydrogen sulfide compounds was suppressed in the first stage, and the hydrogen sulfide compounds generated from the system were removed effectively as a result of their electrochemical oxidation, which contributed to the additional electricity production in the second stage. This was also directly supported by sulfur deposits formed on the anode surface, which was confirmed by analyses on those solids using a scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy as well as an elemental analyzer. To this end, the overall reduction efficiencies for HS⁻ and H₂S(g) were as high as 67.5 and 96.4 %, respectively. The correlations among current density, redox potential, and sulfate level supported the idea that the electricity signal generated in the MFC can be utilized as a potential indicator of malodor control for the domestic wastewater system.

  19. Evaluation of methods for monitoring air concentrations of hydrogen sulfide

    Katarzyna Janoszka

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of different branches of industry and a growing fossil fuels mining results in a considerable emission of by-products. Major air pollutants are: CO, CO₂, SO₂, SO₃, H₂S, nitrogen oxides, as well as compounds of an organic origin. The main aspects of this paper is to review and evaluate methods used for monitoring of hydrogen sulfide in the air. Different instrumental techniques were discussed, electrochemical, chromatographic and spectrophotometric (wet and dry, to select the method most suitable for monitoring low levels of hydrogen sulfide, close to its odor threshold. Based on the literature review the method for H₂S determination in the air, involving absorption in aqueous zinc acetate and reaction with N,N-dimethylo-p-phenylodiamine and FeCl₃, has been selected and preliminary verified. The adopted method allows for routine measurements of low concentration of hydrogen sulfide, close to its odor threshold in workplaces and ambient air. Med Pr 2013;64(3:449–454

  20. Selective Facet Reactivity During Cation Exchange in Cadmium Sulfide Nanorods

    Sadtler, Bryce; Demchenko, Denis; Zheng, Haimei; Hughes, Steven; Merkle, Maxwell; Dahmen, Ulrich; Wang, Lin-Wang; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2008-12-18

    The partial transformation of ionic nanocrystals through cation exchange has been used to synthesize nanocrystal heterostructures. We demonstrate that the selectivity for cation exchange to take place at different facets of the nanocrystal plays an important role in determining the resulting morphology of the binary heterostructure. In the case of copper I (Cu+) cation exchange in cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanorods, the reaction starts preferentially at the ends of the nanorods such that copper sulfide (Cu2S) grows inwards from either end. The resulting morphology is very different from the striped pattern obtained in our previous studies of silver I (Ag+) exchange in CdS nanorods where non-selective nucleation of silver sulfide (Ag2S) occurs. From interface formation energies calculated for several models of epitaxialconnections between CdS and Cu2S or Ag2S, we infer the relative stability of each interface during the nucleation and growth of Cu2S or Ag2S within the CdS nanorods. The epitaxial connections of Cu2S to the end facets of CdS nanorods minimize the formation energy, making these interfaces stable throughout the exchange reaction. However, as the two end facets of wurtzite CdS nanorods are crystallographically nonequivalent, asymmetric heterostructures can be produced.

  1. Why Calcium? How Calcium Became the Best Communicator*

    Carafoli, Ernesto; Krebs, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Calcium carries messages to virtually all important functions of cells. Although it was already active in unicellular organisms, its role became universally important after the transition to multicellular life. In this Minireview, we explore how calcium ended up in this privileged position. Most likely its unique coordination chemistry was a decisive factor as it makes its binding by complex molecules particularly easy even in the presence of large excesses of other cations, e.g. magnesium. Its free concentration within cells can thus be maintained at the very low levels demanded by the signaling function. A large cadre of proteins has evolved to bind or transport calcium. They all contribute to buffer it within cells, but a number of them also decode its message for the benefit of the target. The most important of these “calcium sensors” are the EF-hand proteins. Calcium is an ambivalent messenger. Although essential to the correct functioning of cell processes, if not carefully controlled spatially and temporally within cells, it generates variously severe cell dysfunctions, and even cell death. PMID:27462077

  2. Why Calcium? How Calcium Became the Best Communicator.

    Carafoli, Ernesto; Krebs, Joachim

    2016-09-30

    Calcium carries messages to virtually all important functions of cells. Although it was already active in unicellular organisms, its role became universally important after the transition to multicellular life. In this Minireview, we explore how calcium ended up in this privileged position. Most likely its unique coordination chemistry was a decisive factor as it makes its binding by complex molecules particularly easy even in the presence of large excesses of other cations, e.g. magnesium. Its free concentration within cells can thus be maintained at the very low levels demanded by the signaling function. A large cadre of proteins has evolved to bind or transport calcium. They all contribute to buffer it within cells, but a number of them also decode its message for the benefit of the target. The most important of these "calcium sensors" are the EF-hand proteins. Calcium is an ambivalent messenger. Although essential to the correct functioning of cell processes, if not carefully controlled spatially and temporally within cells, it generates variously severe cell dysfunctions, and even cell death. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Effect of ambient hydrogen sulfide on the physical properties of vacuum evaporated thin films of zinc sulfide

    Singh, Beer Pal [Department of Physics, C.C.S. University, Meerut 250004 (India)], E-mail: drbeerpal@gmail.com; Singh, Virendra [Forensic Science Laboratory, Malviya Nagar, New Delhi 110017 (India); Tyagi, R.C.; Sharma, T.P. [Department of Physics, C.C.S. University, Meerut 250004 (India)

    2008-02-15

    Evaporated thin films of zinc sulfide (ZnS) have been deposited in a low ambient atmosphere of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S {approx}10{sup -4} Torr). The H{sub 2}S atmosphere was obtained by a controlled thermal decomposition of thiourea [CS(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}] inside the vacuum chamber. It has been observed that at elevated substrates temperature of about 200 deg. C helps eject any sulfur atoms deposited due to thermal decomposition of ZnS during evaporation. The zinc ions promptly recombine with H{sub 2}S to give better stoichiometry of the deposited films. Optical spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction patterns and scanning electron micrographs depict the better crystallites and uniformity of films deposited by this technique. These deposited films were found to be more adherent to the substrates and are pinhole free, which is a very vital factor in device fabrication.

  4. A recovery installation for sodium sulfates, thiosulfates and sulfides from waste water resulting from hydrogen sulfide fabrication

    Mazilu, Mihai; Costescu, Sanda

    2002-01-01

    An installation for recovery of sodium sulfate and sulfur suspensions from waste water was conceived. It consists from a preheater, vacuum evaporator and a refrigerating system with drum and scraper. This equipment concentration the solution by eliminating in the first stage the water in the vacuum evaporator. The water resulting at this stage is chemically pure and can be discharged in the sewage sludge system. The concentrated solution is then directed to the refrigerating system with drum and scrapper. Here the sodium sulfates, thiosulfates and sulfides get crystallized onto the drum surface. The resulting aqueous solution to be discharged in the sewage sludge system is previously analyzed as in case of the absent of the recovery installation, but the amount of pollutants will be much lower because sulfates, thiosulfates and sulfides were already recovered as scales from the drum. These solid scales can be used in detergent industry

  5. Testosterone increases urinary calcium excretion and inhibits expression of renal calcium transport proteins.

    Hsu, Y.J.; Dimke, H.; Schoeber, J.P.H.; Hsu, S.C.; Lin, S.H.; Chu, P.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Bindels, R.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Although gender differences in the renal handling of calcium have been reported, the overall contribution of androgens to these differences remains uncertain. We determined here whether testosterone affects active renal calcium reabsorption by regulating calcium transport proteins. Male mice had

  6. Calcium: the molecular basis of calcium action in biology and medicine

    Pochet, Roland; Donato, Rosario

    2000-01-01

    ... of Calcium Calcium Signalling in Excitable Cells Ca2+ Release in Muscle Cells by N. Macrez and J. Mironneau Calcium Signalling in Neurons Exemplified by Rat Sympathetic Ganglion Cells by S.J. M...

  7. Influence of sulfide concentration on the corrosion behavior of pure copper in synthetic seawater

    Taniguchi, Naoki; Kawasaki, Manabu

    2008-01-01

    Corrosion rate and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of pure copper under anaerobic conditions were studied by immersion tests and slow strain rate tests (SSRT) in synthetic seawater containing Na 2 S. The corrosion rate was increased with sulfide concentration both in simple saline solution and in bentnite-sand mixture. The results of SSRT showed that copper was susceptible to intergranular attack; selective dissolution at lower sulfide concentration (less than 0.005 M) and SCC at higher sulfide concentration (0.01 M). It was expected that if the sulfide concentration in groundwater is less than 0.001 M, pure copper is possible to exhibit superior corrosion resistance under anaerobic condition evident by very low corrosion rates and immunity to SCC. In such a low sulfide environment, copper overpack has the potential to achieve super-long lifetimes exceeding several tens of thousands years according to long-term simulations of corrosion based on diffusion of sulfide in buffer material

  8. Effect of Sulfide Concentration on Copper Corrosion in Anoxic Chloride-Containing Solutions

    Kong, Decheng; Dong, Chaofang; Xu, Aoni; Man, Cheng; He, Chang; Li, Xiaogang

    2017-04-01

    The structure and property of passive film on copper are strongly dependent on the sulfide concentration; based on this, a series of electrochemical methods were applied to investigate the effect of sulfide concentration on copper corrosion in anaerobic chloride-containing solutions. The cyclic voltammetry and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis demonstrated that the corrosion products formed on copper in anaerobic sulfide solutions comprise Cu2S and CuS. And the corrosion resistance of copper decreased with increasing sulfide concentration and faster sulfide addition, owing to the various structures of the passive films observed by the atomic force microscope and scanning electron microscope. A p-type semiconductor character was obtained under all experimental conditions, and the defect concentration, which had a magnitude of 1022-1023 cm-3, increased with increasing sulfide concentration, resulting in a higher rate of both film growth and dissolution.

  9. Sulfide phase in the Fe-Ti-S and Fe-C-Ti-S alloys

    Malinochka, Ya.N.; Balakina, N.A.; Shmelev, Yu.S.

    1976-01-01

    The nature of the sulfide phases in Fe-Ti-S and Fe-C-Ti-S alloys was studied. The carbide and the sulfide phase were identified the aid of X-ray spectral microanalysis. It was established that for a small content of titanium and sulfur in ternary Fe-Ti-S alloys the solidification of the γ-solution on the boundaries of dendritic branches is accompanied, along with the precipitation of a sulfide rich in iron of the (Fe, Ti) S type where a small quantity of titanium is dissolved, by the formation of a titanium-bearing sulfide eutectic γ + TiS. The amount of the sulfide eutectic increases with the contents of titanium and sulfur until a purely eutectic alloy is formed. Both carbides and sulfides may be formed in the solidification of quaternary alloys Fe-C-Ti-S

  10. A method for measuring sulfide toxicity in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Livshits, Leonid; Gross, Einav

    2017-01-01

    Cysteine catabolism by gut microbiota produces high levels of sulfide. Excessive sulfide can interfere with colon function, and therefore may be involved in the etiology and risk of relapse of ulcerative colitis, an inflammatory bowel disease affecting millions of people worldwide. Therefore, it is crucial to understand how cells/animals regulate the detoxification of sulfide generated by bacterial cysteine catabolism in the gut. Here we describe a simple and cost-effective way to explore the mechanism of sulfide toxicity in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans ( C. elegans ). •A rapid cost-effective method to quantify and study sulfide tolerance in C. elegans and other free-living nematodes.•A cost effective method to measure the concentration of sulfide in the inverted plate assay.

  11. When can Electrochemical Techniques give Reliable Corrosion Rates on Carbon Steel in Sulfide Media?

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Hemmingsen, Tor; Nielsen, Lars Vendelbo

    2005-01-01

    in combination with ferrous sulfide corrosion products cover the steel surface. Corrosion rates can be overestimated by a factor of 10 to 100 with electrochemical techniques - both by linear polarization resistance (LPR) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Oxygen entering the system accelerates......Effects of film formation on carbon steel in hydrogen sulfide media may corrupt corrosion rate monitoring by electrochemical techniques. Electrochemical data from hydrogen sulfide solutions, biological sulfide media and natural sulfide containing geothermal water have been collected and the process...... of film formation in sulfide solutions was followed by video. It can be shown that capacitative and diffusional effects due to porous reactive deposits tend to dominate the data resulting in unreliable corrosion rates measured by electrochemical techniques. The effect is strongly increased if biofilm...

  12. Alkaline sulfide pretreatment of an antimonial refractory Au-Ag ore for improved cyanidation

    Alp, Ibrahim; Celep, Oktay; Deveci, Haci

    2010-11-01

    This paper presents the alkaline sulfide pretreatment of an antimonial refractory gold and silver ore. In the ore, gold occurs mainly as gold-silver alloys and as associated with quartz and framboidal pyrite grains, and, to a small extent, as the inclusions within antimonial sulfides. Silver is present extensively as antimonial sulfides such as andorite. Alkaline sulfide pretreatment was shown to allow the decomposition of the antimonial sulfide minerals (up to 98% Sb removal) and to remarkably improve the amenability of gold (e.g., from leaching. An increase in reagent concentration (1-4 mol/L Na2S or NaOH) and temperature (20-80°C), and a decrease in particle size seem to produce an enhancing effect on metal extraction. These findings suggest that alkaline sulfide leaching can be suitably used as a chemical pretreatment method prior to the conventional cyanidation for antimonial refractory gold and silver ores.

  13. Leaching of strontium sulfide from produced clinker in conversion furnace

    Ghorbanian, S. A.; Salehpour, A. R.; Radpour, S. R.

    2009-01-01

    Iran is rich in mineral resources one of which is mineral Celestine. Basing on current estimations, the capacity of mineral Celestine is over two million tons, 75-95% of which is strontium sulfate. However; in industries such as Color cathode Ray Tubes, pyrochemical processes, ceramics, paint production, zinc purification processes; strontium sulfate is not a direct feed, rather it is largely consumed in the form of strontium carbonate. Two conventional methods are used to produce strontium carbonate from the sulfate; that is direct reaction and black ash methods. Strontium sulfide, as an intermediate component has a key role in black ash process including strontium sulfate reduction by coke, hence producing and leaching the strontium sulfide by hot water. Finally the reaction of strontium sulfate with sodium carbonate lead to strontium carbonate. In this paper, a system was designed to analyze and optimize the process parameters of strontium sulfide production which is less expensive and available solvent in water. Fundamentally, when strontium sulfide becomes in contact with strontium sulfate; Sr(SH) 2 , and Sr(OH) 2 , are produced. The solubility of strontium sulfide depends on water temperature and the maximum solubility achieved at 90 d egree C . The results showed that in the experimental scale, at water to SrS ratio of 6; they sediment for 45 minutes at 95 d egree C in five operational stages; the separation of 95 and 97.1 percent of imported SrS is possible in effluent of fourth and fifth stages, respectively. Thus; four leaching stages could be recommended for pilot scale plants. Also, the results show that at water to SrS ratio of 8, 40 minutes sedimentation at 85-95 d egree C in one operational stage, the separation of 95 percent separation of inputted SrS, is possible. Solvent leaching process is continued till no smell of sulfur components is felt. It could be used as a key role to determine the number of leaching stages in experiments. Finally, the

  14. Stochastic Simulation of Cardiac Ventricular Myocyte Calcium Dynamics and Waves

    Tuan, Hoang-Trong Minh; Williams, George S. B.; Chikando, Aristide C.; Sobie, Eric A.; Lederer, W. Jonathan; Jafri, M. Saleet

    2011-01-01

    A three dimensional model of calcium dynamics in the rat ventricular myocyte was developed to study the mechanism of calcium homeostasis and pathological calcium dynamics during calcium overload. The model contains 20,000 calcium release units (CRUs) each containing 49 ryanodine receptors. The model simulates calcium sparks with a realistic spontaneous calcium spark rate. It suggests that in addition to the calcium spark-based leak, there is an invisible calcium leak caused by the stochastic ...

  15. Antifoaming materials in G.S. (Girlder sulfide) heavy water plants. Thermical stability. Pt. 2

    Delfino, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    In Girlder sulfide (G.S.) heavy water plants hydrogen sulfide-water systems are inherentely foaming, so the adding of antifoaming materials is of great importance. These may be of high volatility, pyrolizable or chemically unstable in plant operation conditions (water and hydrogen sulfide at 2 MPa, up to 230 deg C). About twenty commercial surfactants were studied from the point of view of their thermical stability. (Author) [es

  16. Lead in calcium supplements (abstract)

    Rehman, S.; Khalid, N.

    2011-01-01

    Lead present in calcium supplements is of grave concern as some lead levels have been measured up to the extent of regulatory limit set by the United States. Calcium supplements inevitably get contaminated with lead as both are naturally occurring elements. Therefore, it is imperative to indicate its level in these supplements in order to create awareness among consumers. In this study, a sophisticated analytical technique, atomic absorption spectrometry was used to analyze Pb contents in 27 commonly consumed Ca supplements manufactured by different national and multinational companies. The daily intake of lead through these supplements was calculated. Only 10% of the calcium supplements analyzed met the criteria of acceptable Pb levels (1.5 mu g/daily dose) in supplements/consumer products set by the United States. It was also found that Pb intake was highest in chelated calcium supplements 28.5 mu g/daily dose, whereas lowest 0.47 mu g/daily dose through calcium supplements with vitamin D formulation. In order to validate our results from the study conducted, IAEA-certified reference material (animal bone, H-5) was analyzed for its Pb levels. The levels of Pb determined were quite in good agreement with the certified values. (author)

  17. Isomorfic Substitutions of Calcium by Strontium in Calcium Hydroxyapatite

    Christensen, Hilbert

    1962-12-15

    By means of homogeneous precipitation it has been possible to synthesize crystalline solid solutions of calcium strontium hydroxyapatite from aqueous solutions. The lattice constants for the solid solutions were measured in the range Ca{sub 9}Sr(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2} - CaSr{sub 9}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}. The investigations show that the discrimination of strontium against calcium is considerably smaller than reported elsewhere (1). Strontium is preferentially built into the c-axis direction of the apatite lattice.

  18. Spectral induced polarization and electrodic potential monitoring of microbially mediated iron sulfide transformations

    Hubbard, Susan; Personna, Y.R.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Slater, L.; Yee, N.; O' Brien, M.; Hubbard, S.

    2008-02-15

    Stimulated sulfate-reduction is a bioremediation technique utilized for the sequestration of heavy metals in the subsurface.We performed laboratory column experiments to investigate the geoelectrical response of iron sulfide transformations by Desulfo vibriovulgaris. Two geoelectrical methods, (1) spectral induced polarization (SIP), and (2) electrodic potential measurements, were investigated. Aqueous geochemistry (sulfate, lactate, sulfide, and acetate), observations of precipitates (identified from electron microscopy as iron sulfide), and electrodic potentials on bisulfide ion (HS) sensitive silver-silver chloride (Ag-AgCl) electrodes (630 mV) were diagnostic of induced transitions between an aerobic iron sulfide forming conditions and aerobic conditions promoting iron sulfide dissolution. The SIP data showed 10m rad anomalies during iron sulfide mineralization accompanying microbial activity under an anaerobic transition. These anomalies disappeared during iron sulfide dissolution under the subsequent aerobic transition. SIP model parameters based on a Cole-Cole relaxation model of the polarization at the mineral-fluid interface were converted to (1) estimated biomineral surface area to pore volume (Sp), and (2) an equivalent polarizable sphere diameter (d) controlling the relaxation time. The temporal variation in these model parameters is consistent with filling and emptying of pores by iron sulfide biofilms, as the system transitions between anaerobic (pore filling) and aerobic (pore emptying) conditions. The results suggest that combined SIP and electrodic potential measurements might be used to monitor spatiotemporal variability in microbial iron sulfide transformations in the field.

  19. Effect of sulfide concentration on the location of the metal precipitates in inversed fluidized bed reactors

    Villa-Gomez, D., E-mail: d.villagomez@unesco-ihe.org [Core Pollution Prevention and Control, UNESCO-IHE, Institute for Water Education, PO Box 3015, 2601 DA Delft (Netherlands); Ababneh, H.; Papirio, S.; Rousseau, D.P.L.; Lens, P.N.L. [Core Pollution Prevention and Control, UNESCO-IHE, Institute for Water Education, PO Box 3015, 2601 DA Delft (Netherlands)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {yields} Sulfide concentration governs the location of metal precipitates in sulfate reducing bioreactors. {yields} High dissolved sulfide induces metal precipitation in the bulk liquid as fines. {yields} Low dissolved sulfide concentrations yield local supersaturation and thus metal precipitation in the biofilm. -- Abstract: The effect of the sulfide concentration on the location of the metal precipitates within sulfate-reducing inversed fluidized bed (IFB) reactors was evaluated. Two mesophilic IFB reactors were operated for over 100 days at the same operational conditions, but with different chemical oxygen demand (COD) to SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} ratio (5 and 1, respectively). After a start up phase, 10 mg/L of Cu, Pb, Cd and Zn each were added to the influent. The sulfide concentration in one IFB reactor reached 648 mg/L, while it reached only 59 mg/L in the other one. In the high sulfide IFB reactor, the precipitated metals were mainly located in the bulk liquid (as fines), whereas in the low sulfide IFB reactor the metal preciptiates were mainly present in the biofilm. The latter can be explained by local supersaturation due to sulfide production in the biofilm. This paper demonstrates that the sulfide concentration needs to be controlled in sulfate reducing IFB reactors to steer the location of the metal precipitates for recovery.

  20. Enhanced sulfidation xanthate flotation of malachite using ammonium ions as activator.

    Wu, Dandan; Ma, Wenhui; Mao, Yingbo; Deng, Jiushuai; Wen, Shuming

    2017-05-18

    In this study, ammonium ion was used to enhance the sulfidation flotation of malachite. The effect of ammonium ion on the sulfidation flotation of malachite was investigated using microflotation test, inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analysis, zeta potential measurements, and scanning electron microscope analysis (SEM). The results of microflotation test show that the addition of sodium sulfide and ammonium sulfate resulted in better sulfidation than the addition of sodium sulfide alone. The results of ICP analysis indicate that the dissolution of enhanced sulfurized malachite surface is significantly decreased. Zeta potential measurements indicate that a smaller isoelectric point value and a large number of copper-sulfide films formed on the malachite surface by enhancing sulfidation resulted in a large amount of sodium butyl xanthate absorbed onto the enhanced sulfurized malachite surface. EDS semi-quantitative analysis and XPS analysis show that malachite was easily sulfurized by sodium sulfide with ammonium ion. These results show that the addition of ammonium ion plays a significant role in the sulfidation of malachite and results in improved flotation performance.

  1. Microbial oxidation of soluble sulfide in produced water from the Bakkeen Sands

    Gevertz, D.; Zimmerman, S. [Agouron Institute, La Jolla, CA (United States); Jenneman, G.E. [Phillips Petroleum Company, Bartlesville, OK (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The presence of soluble sulfide in produced water results in problems for the petroleum industry due to its toxicity, odor, corrosive nature, and potential for wellbore plugging. Sulfide oxidation by indigenous nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) present in brine collected from wells at the Coleville Unit (CVU) in Saskatchewan, Canada, was investigated. Sulfide oxidation took place readily when nitrate and phosphate were added to brine enrichment cultures, resulting in a decrease in sulfide levels of 99-165 ppm to nondetectable levels (< 3.3 ppm). Produced water collected from a number of producing wells was screened to determine the time required for complete sulfide oxidation, in order to select candidate wells for treatment. Three wells were chosen, based on sulfide removal in 48 hours or less. These wells were treated down the backside of the annulus with a solution containing 10 mM KNO{sub 3} and 100 {mu}M NaH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}. Following a 24- to 72-hour shut-in, reductions in pretreatment sulfide levels of greater than 90% were observed for two of the wells, as well as sustained sulfide reductions of 50% for at least two days following startup. NRB populations in the produced brine were observed to increase significantly following treatment, but no significant increases in sulfate-reducing bacteria were observed. These results demonstrate the technical feasibility of stimulating indigenous populations of NRB to remediate and control sulfide in produced brine.

  2. Enhanced performance of denitrifying sulfide removal process under micro-aerobic condition.

    Chen, Chuan; Ren, Nanqi; Wang, Aijie; Liu, Lihong; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2010-07-15

    The denitrifying sulfide removal (DSR) process with bio-granules comprising both heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrifiers can simultaneously convert nitrate, sulfide and acetate into di-nitrogen gas, elementary sulfur and carbon dioxide, respectively, at high loading rates. This study determines the reaction rate of sulfide oxidized into sulfur, as well as the reduction of nitrate to nitrite, would be enhanced under a micro-aerobic condition. The presence of limited oxygen mitigated the inhibition effects of sulfide on denitrifier activities, and enhanced the performance of DSR granules. The advantages and disadvantages of applying the micro-aerobic condition to the DSR process are discussed. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Enhanced performance of denitrifying sulfide removal process under micro-aerobic condition

    Chen Chuan; Ren Nanqi; Wang Aijie; Liu Lihong; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2010-01-01

    The denitrifying sulfide removal (DSR) process with bio-granules comprising both heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrifiers can simultaneously convert nitrate, sulfide and acetate into di-nitrogen gas, elementary sulfur and carbon dioxide, respectively, at high loading rates. This study determines the reaction rate of sulfide oxidized into sulfur, as well as the reduction of nitrate to nitrite, would be enhanced under a micro-aerobic condition. The presence of limited oxygen mitigated the inhibition effects of sulfide on denitrifier activities, and enhanced the performance of DSR granules. The advantages and disadvantages of applying the micro-aerobic condition to the DSR process are discussed.

  4. Electrophysical properties of calcium vanadates

    Krasnenko, T.I.; Fotiev, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    Electrophysical properties of calcium vanadates are studied for the case of alteration of external parameters of the medium (PO 2 , T). It is lshown that structural transformations bring about changes in the nature of electrophysical properties of Ca 2 V 2 O 7 , Ca 3 (VO 4 ) 2 , this being the reason for charge redistribution in anion groupings. It is obvious, that the general conductivity of calcium methavanadate is mainly caused by ion transport. Ca(VO 3 ) 2 possesses amphoteric character of semiconducting properties: the type of conductivity changes from ''p'' to ''n'' with temperature increase. Polytherms of conductivity and sums of ion numbers of Ca 2 V 2 O 7 transition are given. It is established that calcium pyrovanadate has a mixed electron-ion conductivity

  5. Preparation of calcium phosphate paste

    Mohd Reusmaazran Yusof; Norzita Yaacob; Idris Besar; Che Seman Mahmood; Rusnah Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    Calcium phosphate paste were prepared by mixing between calcium sodium potassium phosphate, Ca 2 NaK (PO 4 ) 2 (CSPP) and monocalcium phosphate monohydrate, Ca(H 2 PO 4 ) 2 .H 2 O (MCPM). CSPP were obtained by reaction between calcium hydrogen phosphate (CaHPO 4 ), potassium carbonate (K 2 CO 3 ) and sodium carbonate (Na 2 CO 3 ) in solid state sintering process followed by quenching in air at 1000 degree Celsius. The paste was aging in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 0.5, 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, 48 hrs, 3, 7 and 14 days. The morphological investigation indicated the formation of apatite crystal were first growth after 24 hours. The obvious growth of apatite crystal was shown at 3 days. The obvious growth of apatite crystal was shown in 7 and 14 days indicated the prediction of paste would have rapid reaction with bone after implantation. (author)

  6. Uptake of radiactive calcium by groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L. ) and efficiency of utilisation of applied calcium

    Loganathan, S; Krishnamoorthy, K K [Tamil Nadu Agricultural Univ., Coimbatore (India). Dept. of Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry

    1977-04-01

    A pot experiment was conducted with groundnut applying labelled calcium as its sulphate and carbonate at two levels namely 75 and 150 kg Ca per ha with varying levels of P, K and Mg. Plant samples were taken at different stages of crop growth and analysed for the content of radioactive calcium. Calcium sulphate treatment has resulted in larger uptake of calcium compared to calcium carbonate. An application of 150 kg Ca per ha has caused significantly higher uptake by groundnut plant than 75 kg Ca per ha. The percentage of utilisation of added calcium ranged from 2.2 to 5.4 Recovery of calcium by plants was more in calcium sulphate treatment rather than in calcium carbonate. The plants showed a preference for absorbing applied calcium rather than native calcium.

  7. Uptake of radiactive calcium by groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) and efficiency of utilisation of applied calcium

    Loganathan, S.; Krishnamoorthy, K.K.

    1977-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted with groundnut applying labelled calcium as its sulphate and carbonate at two levels namely 75 and 150 kg Ca per ha with varying levels of P, K and Mg. Plant samples were taken at different stages of crop growth and analysed for the content of radioactive calcium. Calcium sulphate treatment has resulted in larger uptake of calcium compared to calcium carbonate. An application of 150 kg Ca per ha has caused significantly higher uptake by groundnut plant than 75 kg Ca per ha. The percentage of utilisation of added calcium ranged from 2.2 to 5.4 Recovery of calcium by plants was more in calcium sulphate treatment rather than in calcium carbonate. The plants showed a preference for absorbing applied calcium rather than native calcium

  8. The effect of habitat geology on calcium intake and calcium status of wild rodents.

    Shore, R F; Balment, R J; Yalden, D W

    1991-12-01

    Calcium is essential for normal physiological function, reproduction and growth in mammals but its distribution in the natural environment is heterogeneous. Spatial variation in calcium soil content is especially marked in the Peak District, United Kingdom, where both calcium-rich limestone and calcium-poor gritstone rock types occur. Wood mice Apodemus sylvaticus (L) and bank voles Clethrionomys glareolus (Schreber 1780) from limestone areas had significantly higher calcium concentrations in stomach contents and in faeces compared with their counterparts from gritstone areas. Calcium status was assessed from serum calcium concentration, femur weight, ash content of the body, calcium concentration in the femur and body ash. There was no significant difference in serum calcium concentration, femur calcium concentration and body ash calcium concentration between animals from the limestone and the gritstone. However, on the limestone, bank voles, but not wood mice, had significantly heavier femora and a greater proportion of ash in the body compared with their gritstone counterparts.

  9. Calcium and Bone Metabolism Indices.

    Song, Lu

    2017-01-01

    Calcium and inorganic phosphate are of critical importance for many body functions, thus the regulations of their plasma concentrations are tightly controlled by the concerted actions of reabsorption/excretion in the kidney, absorption in the intestines, and exchange from bone, the major reservoir for calcium and phosphate in the body. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH) 2 D) control calcium homeostasis, whereas PTH, 1,25(OH) 2 D, and bone-derived fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF 23) control phosphate homeostasis. Hypoparathyroidism can cause hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia, whereas deficient vitamin D actions can cause osteomalacia in adults and rickets in children. Hyperparathyroidism, alternatively, can cause hypercalcemia and hypophosphatemia. Laboratory tests of calcium, phosphate, PTH, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D are very useful in the diagnosis of abnormalities associated with calcium and/or phosphate metabolisms. Bone is constantly remodeled throughout life in response to mechanical stress and a need for calcium in extracellular fluids. Metabolic bone diseases such as osteoporosis, osteomalacia in adults or rickets in children, and renal osteodystrophy develop when bone resorption exceeds bone formation. Bone turnover markers (BTM) such as serum N-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen (P1NP) and C-terminal collagen cross-link (CTX) may be useful in predicting future fracture risk or monitoring the response to anti-resorptive therapy. There is a need to standardize sample collection protocols because certain BTMs exhibit large circadian variations and tend to be influenced by food intakes. In the United States, a project to standardize BTM sample collection protocols and to establish the reference intervals for serum P1NP and serum CTX is ongoing. We anticipate the outcome of this project to shine lights on the standardization of BTM assays, sample collection protocols, reference intervals in relation to age, sex, and ethnic

  10. Magnetically responsive calcium carbonate microcrystals.

    Fakhrullin, Rawil F; Bikmullin, Aidar G; Nurgaliev, Danis K

    2009-09-01

    Here we report the fabrication of magnetically responsive calcium carbonate microcrystals produced by coprecipitation of calcium carbonate in the presence of citrate-stabilized iron oxide nanoparticles. We demonstrate that the calcite microcrystals obtained possess superparamagnetic properties due to incorporated magnetite nanoparticles and can be manipulated by an external magnetic field. The microcrystals doped with magnetic nanoparticles were utilized as templates for the fabrication of hollow polyelectrolyte microcapsules, which retain the magnetic properties of the sacrificial cores and might be spatially manipulated using a permanent magnet, thus providing the magnetic-field-facilitated delivery and separation of materials templated on magnetically responsive calcite microcrystals.

  11. Hydrogen sulfide: role in ion channel and transporter modulation in the eye

    Ya Fatou eNjie-Mbye

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S, a colorless gas with a characteristic smell of rotten eggs, has been portrayed for decades as a toxic environmental pollutant. Since evidence of its basal production in mammalian tissues a decade ago, H2S has attracted substantial interest as a potential inorganic gaseous mediator with biological importance in cellular functions. Current research suggests that, next to its counterparts nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, H2S is an important multifunctional signaling molecule with pivotal regulatory roles in various physiological and pathophysiological processes as diverse as learning and memory, modulation of synaptic activities, cell survival, inflammation and maintenance of vascular tone in the central nervous and cardiovascular systems. In contrast, there are few reports of a regulatory role of H2S in the eye. Accumulating reports on the pharmacological role of H2S in ocular tissues indicate the existence of a functional trans-sulfuration pathway and a potential physiological role for H2S as a gaseous neuromodulator in the eye. Thus, understanding the role of H2S in vision-related processes is imperative to our expanding knowledge of this molecule as a gaseous mediator in ocular tissues. This review aims to provide a comprehensive and current understanding of the potential role of H2S as a signaling molecule in the eye. This objective is achieved by discussing the involvement of H2S in the regulation of (1 ion channels such as calcium (L-type, T-type and intracellular stores, potassium (KATP and small conductance channels and chloride channels, (2 glutamate transporters such as EAAT1/GLAST and the L-cystine/glutamate antiporter. The role of H2S as an important mediator in cellular functions and physiological processes that are triggered by its interaction with ion channels/transporters in the eye will also be discussed.

  12. Gas-Liquid Precipitation of water dissolved heavy metal ions using hydrogen sulfide gas

    Al Tarazi, M.Y.M.

    2004-01-01

    Precipitation of solids promoted by gas-liquid reactions is applied in many industrial processes such as the production of ammonium phosphate, ammonium sulphate, barium carbonate, calcium carbonate, calcium fluoride, ypsum (calcium sulphate), goethite, sodium bicarbonate, strontium carbonate and

  13. Estimation of presynaptic calcium currents and endogenous calcium buffers at the frog neuromuscular junction with two different calcium fluorescent dyes.

    Samigullin, Dmitry; Fatikhov, Nijaz; Khaziev, Eduard; Skorinkin, Andrey; Nikolsky, Eugeny; Bukharaeva, Ellya

    2014-01-01

    At the frog neuromuscular junction, under physiological conditions, the direct measurement of calcium currents and of the concentration of intracellular calcium buffers-which determine the kinetics of calcium concentration and neurotransmitter release from the nerve terminal-has hitherto been technically impossible. With the aim of quantifying both Ca(2+) currents and the intracellular calcium buffers, we measured fluorescence signals from nerve terminals loaded with the low-affinity calcium dye Magnesium Green or the high-affinity dye Oregon Green BAPTA-1, simultaneously with microelectrode recordings of nerve-action potentials and end-plate currents. The action-potential-induced fluorescence signals in the nerve terminals developed much more slowly than the postsynaptic response. To clarify the reasons for this observation and to define a spatiotemporal profile of intracellular calcium and of the concentration of mobile and fixed calcium buffers, mathematical modeling was employed. The best approximations of the experimental calcium transients for both calcium dyes were obtained when the calcium current had an amplitude of 1.6 ± 0.08 pA and a half-decay time of 1.2 ± 0.06 ms, and when the concentrations of mobile and fixed calcium buffers were 250 ± 13 μM and 8 ± 0.4 mM, respectively. High concentrations of endogenous buffers define the time course of calcium transients after an action potential in the axoplasm, and may modify synaptic plasticity.

  14. Estimation of presynaptic calcium currents and endogenous calcium buffers at the frog neuromuscular junction with two different calcium fluorescent dyes

    Dmitry eSamigullin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available At the frog neuromuscular junction, under physiological conditions, the direct measurement of calcium currents and of the concentration of intracellular calcium buffers—which determine the kinetics of calcium concentration and neurotransmitter release from the nerve terminal—has hitherto been technically impossible. With the aim of quantifying both Ca2+ currents and the intracellular calcium buffers, we measured fluorescence signals from nerve terminals loaded with the low-affinity calcium dye Magnesium Green or the high-affinity dye Oregon Green BAPTA-1, simultaneously with microelectrode recordings of nerve-action potentials and end-plate currents. The action-potential-induced fluorescence signals in the nerve terminals developed much more slowly than the postsynaptic response. To clarify the reasons for this observation and to define a spatiotemporal profile of intracellular calcium and of the concentration of mobile and fixed calcium buffers, mathematical modeling was employed. The best approximations of the experimental calcium transients for both calcium dyes were obtained when the calcium current had an amplitude of 1.6 ± 0.08 рА and a half-decay time of 1.2 ± 0.06 ms, and when the concentrations of mobile and fixed calcium buffers were 250 ± 13 µM and 8 ± 0.4 mM, respectively. High concentrations of endogenous buffers define the time course of calcium transients after an action potential in the axoplasm, and may modify synaptic plasticity.

  15. Calcium electroporation in three cell lines; a comparison of bleomycin and calcium, calcium compounds, and pulsing conditions

    Frandsen, Stine Krog; Gissel, Hanne; Hojman, Pernille

    2013-01-01

    offers several advantages over standard treatment options: calcium is inexpensive and may readily be applied without special precautions, as is the case with cytostatic drugs. Therefore, details on the use of calcium electroporation are essential for carrying out clinical trials comparing calcium...

  16. Calcium fertilization increases the concentration of calcium in sapwood and calcium oxalate in foliage of red spruce

    Kevin T. Smith; Walter C. Shortle; Jon H. Connolly; Rakesh Minocha; Jody Jellison

    2009-01-01

    Calcium cycling plays a key role in the health and productivity of red spruce forests in the northeastern US. A portion of the flowpath of calcium within forests includes translocation as Ca2+ in sapwood and accumulation as crystals of calcium oxalate in foliage. Concentrations of Ca in these tree tissues have been used as markers of...

  17. Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health

    ... Bone Health Featured Resource Find an Endocrinologist Search Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health Download PDFs English ... also helps keep your bones strong. Why are vitamin D and calcium important to bone health? Vitamin ...

  18. Complex formation ions calcium with macromolecules pectin

    Khalikova, M.D.; Avloev, Kh.Kh.; Muhiddinov, Z.K.

    2005-01-01

    In clause the mechanism of sorption of ions of calcium by macromolecules of pectin is opened. Is shown, that the linkage of ions of calcium descends on acid bunches of pectin, and process carries cooperative character

  19. Atomic layer deposition of calcium oxide and calcium hafnium oxide films using calcium cyclopentadienyl precursor

    Kukli, Kaupo; Ritala, Mikko; Sajavaara, Timo; Haenninen, Timo; Leskelae, Markku

    2006-01-01

    Calcium oxide and calcium hafnium oxide thin films were grown by atomic layer deposition on borosilicate glass and silicon substrates in the temperature range of 205-300 o C. The calcium oxide films were grown from novel calcium cyclopentadienyl precursor and water. Calcium oxide films possessed refractive index 1.75-1.80. Calcium oxide films grown without Al 2 O 3 capping layer occurred hygroscopic and converted to Ca(OH) 2 after exposure to air. As-deposited CaO films were (200)-oriented. CaO covered with Al 2 O 3 capping layers contained relatively low amounts of hydrogen and re-oriented into (111) direction upon annealing at 900 o C. In order to examine the application of CaO in high-permittivity dielectric layers, mixtures of Ca and Hf oxides were grown by alternate CaO and HfO 2 growth cycles at 230 and 300 o C. HfCl 4 was used as a hafnium precursor. When grown at 230 o C, the films were amorphous with equal amounts of Ca and Hf constituents (15 at.%). These films crystallized upon annealing at 750 o C, showing X-ray diffraction peaks characteristic of hafnium-rich phases such as Ca 2 Hf 7 O 16 or Ca 6 Hf 19 O 44 . At 300 o C, the relative Ca content remained below 8 at.%. The crystallized phase well matched with rhombohedral Ca 2 Hf 7 O 16 . The dielectric films grown on Si(100) substrates possessed effective permittivity values in the range of 12.8-14.2

  20. Kinetics of calcium sulfoaluminate formation from tricalcium aluminate, calcium sulfate and calcium oxide

    Li, Xuerun; Zhang, Yu; Shen, Xiaodong; Wang, Qianqian; Pan, Zhigang

    2014-01-01

    The formation kinetics of tricalcium aluminate (C 3 A) and calcium sulfate yielding calcium sulfoaluminate (C 4 A 3 $) and the decomposition kinetics of calcium sulfoaluminate were investigated by sintering a mixture of synthetic C 3 A and gypsum. The quantitative analysis of the phase composition was performed by X-ray powder diffraction analysis using the Rietveld method. The results showed that the formation reaction 3Ca 3 Al 2 O 6 + CaSO 4 → Ca 4 Al 6 O 12 (SO 4 ) + 6CaO was the primary reaction 4 Al 6 O 12 (SO 4 ) + 10CaO → 6Ca 3 Al 2 O 6 + 2SO 2 ↑ + O 2 ↑ primarily occurred beyond 1350 °C with an activation energy of 792 ± 64 kJ/mol. The optimal formation region for C 4 A 3 $ was from 1150 °C to 1350 °C and from 6 h to 1 h, which could provide useful information on the formation of C 4 A 3 $ containing clinkers. The Jander diffusion model was feasible for the formation and decomposition of calcium sulfoaluminate. Ca 2+ and SO 4 2− were the diffusive species in both the formation and decomposition reactions. -- Highlights: •Formation and decomposition of calcium sulphoaluminate were studied. •Decomposition of calcium sulphoaluminate combined CaO and yielded C 3 A. •Activation energy for formation was 231 ± 42 kJ/mol. •Activation energy for decomposition was 792 ± 64 kJ/mol. •Both the formation and decomposition were controlled by diffusion

  1. Relative flotation response of zinc sulfide: Mineral and precipitate

    Rao, S.R.; Finch, J.A. [McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Dept. of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering; Zhou, Z.; Xu, Z. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Materials Engineering

    1998-04-01

    Flotation continues to extend to nonmineral applications, including recycling of materials, soil remediation, and effluent treatment. A study has been conducted to compare the floatability of fine zinc sulfide (ZnS) precipitates and sphalerite particles. The floatability of the precipitates was significantly poorer compared to sphalerite particles when xanthate was used as the collector. The floatability was improved by using dodecylamine as the collector, and the difference in floatability between the precipitates was further improved significantly by incorporating a hydrodynamic cavitation tube in a conventional (mechanical) flotation cell. The improved kinetics was attributed to in-situ gas nucleation on the precipitates.

  2. Zinc sulfide in intestinal cell granules of Ancylostoma caninum adults

    Gianotti, A.J.; Clark, D.T.; Dash, J. (Portland State Univ., OR (USA))

    1991-04-01

    A source of confusion has existed since the turn of the century about the reddish brown, weakly birefringent 'sphaerocrystals' located in the intestines of strongyle nematodes, Strongylus and Ancylostoma. X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectrometric analyses were used for accurate determination of the crystalline order and elemental composition of the granules in the canine hookworm Ancylostoma caninum. The composition of the intestinal pigmented granules was identified unequivocally as zinc sulfide. It seems most probable that the granules serve to detoxify high levels of metallic ions (specifically zinc) present due to the large intake of host blood.

  3. Synthesis of copper sulfide nanotube in the hydrogel system

    Tan Changhui; Zhu Yulan; Lu Ran; Xue Pengchong; Bao Chunyan; Liu Xinli; Fei Zhuping; Zhao Yingying

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method for the preparation of copper sulfide (CuS) nanotubes using hydrogel based on N-lauroylalanine as template under mild condition. The resulting samples are examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) FT-IR spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. It is found that the intermolecular hydrogen bonds play an important role on the formation of the hydrogel and the Cu 2+ coordination gel. The formation process of CuS nanotube is also discussed

  4. Synthesis of Lead Sulfide Nanoparticles by Chemical Precipitation Method

    Chongad, L S; Sharma, A; Banerjee, M; Jain, A

    2016-01-01

    Lead sulfide (PbS) nanoparticles were prepared by chemical precipitation method (CPM) with the assistance of H 2 S gas. The microstructure and morphology of the synthesized nanoparticles have been investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The XRD patterns of the PbS nanoparticles reveal formation of cubic phase. To investigate the quality of prepared nanoparticles, the particles size, lattice constant, strain, dislocation density etc. have been determined using XRD. TEM images reveal formation of cubic nanoparticles and the particle size determined from TEM images agree well with those from XRD. (paper)

  5. Microbial Oxidation of Iron Sulfides in Anaerobic Environments

    Vaclavkova, Sarka

    Abstract (shortened): Iron sulfides (FeSx), representing 0.04-10 % of Danish dry soil weight, oxidize in a presence of oxygen, releasing sulfuric acid and free iron. Environmental impact of FeSx oxidation is commonly seen on agricultural sites cultivated by drainage as acid sulfate soil formation....... MISON was found to count for about 1/3 of the net NO3- reduction in MISON active environments, despite the presence of alternative electron donor, organic carbon. The rate of MISON was found to be dependent on the available reactive surface area of FeSx and on the microorganism involved. The findings...

  6. Calcium channel blockers and Alzheimer's disease★

    Tan, Yi; Deng, Yulin; Qing, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by two pathological hallmarks: amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. In addition, calcium homeostasis is disrupted in the course of human aging. Recent research shows that dense plaques can cause functional alteration of calcium signals in mice with Alzheimer's disease. Calcium channel blockers are effective therapeutics for treating Alzheimer's disease. This review provides an overview of the current research of calcium channel blockers involved in Alzheimer's disease therapy. PMID:25767489

  7. 21 CFR 184.1210 - Calcium oxide.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium oxide. 184.1210 Section 184.1210 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1210 Calcium oxide. (a) Calcium oxide (CaO, CAS Reg. No. 1305-78-8) is also known as lime, quick lime, burnt lime, or calx. It is produced from calcium carbonate, limestone, or...

  8. Oxalic acid decreases calcium absorption in rats

    Weaver, C.M.; Martin, B.R.; Ebner, J.S.; Krueger, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    Calcium absorption from salts and foods intrinsically labeled with 45 Ca was determined in the rat model. Calcium bioavailability was nearly 10 times greater for low oxalate kale, CaCO 3 and CaCl 2 than from CaC 2 O 4 (calcium oxalate) and spinach (high in oxalates). Extrinsic and intrinsic labeling techniques gave a similar assessment of calcium bioavailability from kale but not from spinach

  9. Calcium and Nuclear Signaling in Prostate Cancer

    Ivan V. Maly; Wilma A. Hofmann

    2018-01-01

    Recently, there have been a number of developments in the fields of calcium and nuclear signaling that point to new avenues for a more effective diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer. An example is the discovery of new classes of molecules involved in calcium-regulated nuclear import and nuclear calcium signaling, from the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) and myosin families. This review surveys the new state of the calcium and nuclear signaling fields with the aim of identifying the un...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1195 - Calcium citrate.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium citrate. 184.1195 Section 184.1195 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1195 Calcium citrate. (a) Calcium citrate (Ca3(C6H5O7)2·4H2O, CAS Reg. No. 813-0994-095) is the calcium salt of citric acid. It is prepared by neutralizing citric acid with...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1185 - Calcium acetate.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium acetate. 184.1185 Section 184.1185 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1185 Calcium acetate. (a) Calcium acetate (Ca (C2H3O2)2, CAS Reg. No. 62-54-4), also known as acetate of lime or vinegar salts, is the calcium salt of acetic acid. It may be...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1229 - Calcium stearate.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium stearate. 184.1229 Section 184.1229 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1229 Calcium stearate. (a) Calcium stearate (Ca(C17H35COO)2, CAS Reg. No. 1529-23-0) is the calcium salt of stearic acid derived from edible sources. It is prepared as...

  13. Calcium Balance in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Hill Gallant, Kathleen M; Spiegel, David M

    2017-06-01

    The kidneys play a critical role in the balance between the internal milieu and external environment. Kidney failure is known to disrupt a number of homeostatic mechanisms that control serum calcium and normal bone metabolism. However, our understanding of calcium balance throughout the stages of chronic kidney disease is limited and the concept of balance itself, especially with a cation as complex as calcium, is often misunderstood. Both negative and positive calcium balance have important implications in patients with chronic kidney disease, where negative balance may increase risk of osteoporosis and fracture and positive balance may increase risk of vascular calcification and cardiovascular events. Here, we examine the state of current knowledge about calcium balance in adults throughout the stages of chronic kidney disease and discuss recommendations for clinical strategies to maintain balance as well as future research needs in this area. Recent calcium balance studies in adult patients with chronic kidney disease show that neutral calcium balance is achieved with calcium intake near the recommended daily allowance. Increases in calcium through diet or supplements cause high positive calcium balance, which may put patients at risk for vascular calcification. However, heterogeneity in calcium balance exists among these patients. Given the available calcium balance data in this population, it appears clinically prudent to aim for recommended calcium intakes around 1000 mg/day to achieve neutral calcium balance and avoid adverse effects of either negative or positive calcium balance. Assessment of patients' dietary calcium intake could further equip clinicians to make individualized recommendations for meeting recommended intakes.

  14. 21 CFR 184.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium chloride. 184.1193 Section 184.1193 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1193 Calcium chloride. (a) Calcium chloride (CaCl2·2H2O, CAS Reg. No. 10035-04-8) or anhydrous calcium chloride (CaCl2, CAS Reg. No. 10043-52-4) may be commercially...

  15. The Electronic Structure of Calcium

    Jan, J.-P.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1981-01-01

    The electronic structure of calcium under pressure is re-examined by means of self-consistent energy band calculations based on the local density approximation and using the linear muffin-tin orbitals (LMTO) method with corrections to the atomic sphere approximation included. At zero pressure...

  16. The impact of calcium assay change on a local adjusted calcium equation.

    Davies, Sarah L; Hill, Charlotte; Bailey, Lisa M; Davison, Andrew S; Milan, Anna M

    2016-03-01

    Deriving and validating local adjusted calcium equations is important for ensuring appropriate calcium status classification. We investigated the impact on our local adjusted calcium equation of a change in calcium method by the manufacturer from cresolphthalein complexone to NM-BAPTA. Calcium and albumin results from general practice requests were extracted from the Laboratory Information Management system for a three-month period. Results for which there was evidence of disturbance in calcium homeostasis were excluded leaving 13,482 sets of results for analysis. The adjusted calcium equation was derived following least squares regression analysis of total calcium on albumin and normalized to the mean calcium concentration of the data-set. The revised equation (NM-BAPTA calcium method) was compared with the previous equation (cresolphthalein complexone calcium method). The switch in calcium assay resulted in a small change in the adjusted calcium equation but was not considered to be clinically significant. The calcium reference interval differed from that proposed by Pathology Harmony in the UK. Local adjusted calcium equations should be re-assessed following changes in the calcium method. A locally derived reference interval may differ from the consensus harmonized reference interval. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Absorbability of calcium from calcium-bound phosphoryl oligosaccharides in comparison with that from various calcium compounds in the rat ligated jejunum loop.

    To-o, Kenji; Kamasaka, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Takahisa; Kuriki, Takashi; Saeki, Shigeru; Nakabou, Yukihiro

    2003-08-01

    Calcium-bound phosphoryl oligosaccharides (POs-Ca) were prepared from potato starch. Their solubility and in situ absorbability as a calcium source were investigated by comparing with the soluble calcium compounds, calcium chloride and calcium lactate, or insoluble calcium compounds, calcium carbonate and dibasic calcium phosphate. The solubility of POs-Ca was as high as that of calcium chloride and about 3-fold higher than that of calcium lactate. An in situ experiment showed that the intestinal calcium absorption rate of POs-Ca was almost comparable with that of the soluble calcium compounds, and was significantly higher (pcalcium groups. Moreover, the total absorption rate of a 1:1 mixture of the calcium from POs-Ca and a whey mineral complex (WMC) was significantly higher (psoluble calcium source with relatively high absorption in the intestinal tract.

  18. Pyritization processes and greigite formation in the advancing sulfidization front in the Upper Pleistocene sediments of the Black Sea

    Neretin, LN; Bottcher, ME; Jørgensen, BB

    2004-01-01

    Pyritization in late Pleistocene sediments of the Black Sea is driven by sulfide formed during anaerobic methane oxidation. A sulfidization front is formed by the opposing gradients of sulfide and dissolved iron. The sulfidization processes are controlled by the diffusion flux of sulfide from above...... and by the solid reactive iron content. Two processes of diffusion-limited pyrite formation were identified. The first process includes pyrite precipitation with the accumulation of iron sulfide precursors with the average chemical composition of FeSn (n = 1.10-1.29), including greigite. Elemental sulfur...... and polysulfides, formed from H,S by a reductive dissolution of Fe(Ill)-containing minerals, serve as intermediates to convert iron sulfides into pyrite. In the second process, a "direct" pyrite precipitation occurs through prolonged exposure of iron-containing minerals to dissolved sulfide. Methane-driven sulfate...

  19. 21 CFR 582.1210 - Calcium oxide.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium oxide. 582.1210 Section 582.1210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1210 Calcium oxide. (a) Product. Calcium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  20. 21 CFR 582.5210 - Calcium oxide.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium oxide. 582.5210 Section 582.5210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5210 Calcium oxide. (a) Product. Calcium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...