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Sample records for farmer field schools

  1. The effectiveness of Farmer Field School (FFS) training on farmers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study assessed the effectiveness of Farmer Field School (FFS) training on farmers\\' competence in Integrated Pest Management of cocoa and the transfer of knowledge to others in Ondo State, Nigeria. Using structured questionnaire and interview schedule, data from 60 randomly selected respondents made up of 30 ...

  2. Farmer Field School (FFS) and Junior Farmer Field and Life School ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Farmer Field School (FFS) and Junior Farmer Field and Life School (JFFLS) as challenges to agricultural extension development and practice in Nigeria. ... The paper suggests the need for promotion of these approaches by national extension policy and donor agencies to ensure sustainability. It notes that these ...

  3. Effect of integrated pest management farmer field school (IPMFFS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research aimed to explore the effect of the Integrated Pest Management Farmer Field School (IPMFFS), on farmer knowledge, farmer group's ability, process of adoption and diffusion of IPM in Jember district. The population of the research was 556 farmer groups consisting of 22.240 farmers engaged in the IPMFFS in ...

  4. Farmer Field Schools as a Springboard for Enhanced Uptake of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The latest approach in enhancing the uptake of agricultural technologies is through the Farmer Field Schools that have only a short history in Tanzania.This paper reviews the literature on Farmer Field Schools, first giving a brief description of the nature of Farmer Field Schools. This is then followed by experiences from ...

  5. Evaluation Of Farmer Field School On Integrated Pest | Rustum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research is aimed to explore the quality of the program implementation of the Integrated Pest Management Field Farmer School (IPMFFS) (in Indonesian ... quantity (3) participate agricultural extension, (4) remedial practice, (5) insight development, (6) motivation establishment, (7) the readiness of the participants, ...

  6. Analysis Of The Executive Components Of The Farmer Field School ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analysis Of The Executive Components Of The Farmer Field School (Ffs) Project (Grape Gardeners) In Uromieh County Of West Azerbaijan Province, Iran. ... Also the findings revealed that there was significant correlation between members and non-members (as control group) of FFS pilots in productivity of grape gardens.

  7. An Impact Analysis of Farmer Field School in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyang Cai

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate the impact of the Farmer Field School (FFS intervention among small-scale tomato farmers in Beijing. Using data collected by face-to face-interview from 358 households on 426 planting plots in 2009, we evaluate the yield effect and find evidence of positive impact. We then examine the determining factors of farmers’ FFS attendance using the zero-inflated Poisson model. We find evidence of the positive impact of the FFS program on male participants but no impact on female participants. We find that some factors, such as being the household head, wealth level and land size affect both FFS participation decisions and attendance decisions, whereas other factors may affect only one decision but not the other. The results suggest that FFS is a useful way to increase production of farmers in Beijing and that the approach is especially effective for male and wealthy producers with smaller farm sizes and higher literacy.

  8. Comparative Analysis Of Empowerment Under Farmer Field School ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Based on the findings of the study the following recommendations were made: That agricultural extension should change from information –driven approach of introducing technology, to a participatory approach of learning-by-doing. That in the course of regular field trainings and experimentations the farmer will easily learn ...

  9. Farmer Field Schools as a Springboard for Enhanced Uptake of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kyakaisho, 2000), various. Farmer ... relationships between pest population-crop damage- yields. In this cyclical learning process, farmers develop .... improved technologies. Farmers actively cultivate interpersonal networks and use these networks for.

  10. The contribution of farmer field schools to rural development in Nepal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westendorp, A.M.B.

    2012-01-01

     This thesis argues that Farmer Field Schools in Nepal contributed to agriculture and rural development and to gendered empowerment. The Nepalese government, but also NGOs involved in FFS applied a rather technocratic approach towards development (Li, 1999) and assumed that will well-defined

  11. Comparative assessment of pest management practices in potato production at farmer field schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer field schools (FFS) and other participatory approaches are useful methods for rapid delivery of agricultural technologies in resource-constrained agro-ecosystems. Cultivar selection, weekly fungicide applications and integrated disease management (IDM) based on a disease monitoring strategy w...

  12. The Farmer Field School: a method for enhancing the role of rural communities in malaria control ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knols Bart GJ

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Malaria has strong linkages with agriculture, and farmers in malarious regions have a central position in creating or controlling the conditions that favour disease transmission. An interdisciplinary and integrated approach is needed to involve farmers and more than one sector in control efforts. It is suggested that malaria control can benefit from a complementary intervention in rural development, the Farmer Field School (FFS on Integrated Pest Management (IPM. This is a form of education that uses experiential learning methods to build farmers' expertise, and has proven farm-level and empowerment effects. The benefits of incorporating malaria control into the IPM curriculum are discussed. An example of a combined health-agriculture curriculum, labeled Integrated Pest and Vector Management (IPVM, developed in Sri Lanka is presented. Institutional ownership and support for IPVM could potentially be spread over several public sectors requiring a process for institutional learning and reform.

  13. Prospects of Farmer Field School Extension Approach in Enugu State

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The performance of the school could be enhanced through provision of logistic support, adequate funding and access to credits, provision of infrastructure, proper selection and orientation of members, as well as availability and timely access to inputs. The study concludes that agencies should intensify efforts on orientation,

  14. Sustainability of smallholder tea production in developing countries: Learning experiences from farmer field schools in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.D. Onduru

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A study to determine the impacts of farmers field schools (FFS on smallholders’ adoption of good agricultural practices in tea and to assess sustainability of smallholder tea production was conducted in the highlands of Kenya. Input-output data on tea management and on sustainability indicators (score 0-10 were collected from a sample of 120 FFS participants at the beginning of the study and from 60 randomly selected FFS participants and a comparison group of 60 non-FFS participants at the end of the study, 18 months later. The study showed that the smallholder tea systems are moving towards social sustainability and economic returns were positive. Sustainability indicator scores, for FFS members, increased by 4% from the base period. The FFS participants also attained a significantly higher level of farm sustainability, knowledge gains on good agricultural practices (GAP and higher yields and farm and tea income than their non-FFS counterparts. These findings indicate that FFS methodology had a positive contribution to enhancing farmer learning and adoption of good agricultural practices in tea and improved farmers’ livelihoods.

  15. ECONOMIC IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF INTEGRATED CROP MANAGEMENT FARMER FIELD SCHOOL PROGRAM ON CORN PRODUCTION IN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Ketut Kariyasa

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Domestic supply of corn in Indonesia has not been able to meet demand satisfactorily due to demand rising faster than supply. Therefore, Indonesia has been continuously importing corn about of 10% of the total demand. To address this problem, the Indonesian government started to implement the Farmer Field School of Integrated Crop Management (ICM-FFS program on corn production since 2009. This study aimed to assess the impact of ICM-FFS on corn productivity, comparative and competitive advantages to produce corn as well as farmer’s income. The study found that ICM-FFS program could increase corn productivity by 30.95% of non ICM-FFS farms, of which 27.94% contributed by the difference in input use, while only 3.01% contributed by technological change. ICM-FFS farms were able to increase farmer’s income by 71.03% and social welfare by 94.69% compared to non ICMFFS farms. Through this program, Indonesia had higher comparative advantage in producing corn as an import substitute. The provision of competitive input and output markets, enhanced technical assistance to improve corn productivity and quality, and increasing attention on corn ICM-FFS development could be considered as policy directions to improve the next implementation strategies of corn production in Indonesia.

  16. Stepping-stones to improve upon functioning of participatory agricultural extension programmes : farmer field schools in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Isubikalu, P.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis deals with Farmer Field Schools (FFS) inUganda.FFSis a grassroots learning and application device for

  17. Food Security and Nutrition Outcomes of Farmer Field Schools in Eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doocy, Shannon; Cohen, Sarah; Emerson, Jillian; Menakuntuala, Joseph; Santos Rocha, Jozimo

    2017-12-28

    Food and nutrition security in eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo are threatened by political instability and chronic poverty. The Jenga Jamaa II project, implemented between 2011 and 2016 in South Kivu Province, aimed to improve household food security and child nutritional status using various intervention strategies, including farmer field school (FFS) programs. To characterize the changes in agricultural production techniques, household food security, and child nutritional status associated with participation in FFS programs. We used a community-matched design to select FFS intervention and control households from 3 health zones in which the project was operating. Data on food security (Household Dietary Diversity Score [HDDS] and Household Food Insecurity Access Scale [HFIAS]) and child anthropometry were collected semiannually for 3.5 years in both groups. Additional data on agricultural practices were collected annually in the FFS group only. Focus groups with FFS staff and beneficiaries were conducted in the final project year. Statistical analyses included basic descriptive statistics such as paired t tests and analysis of covariance; regression models using a bootstrap were applied to generate P values and confidence intervals while accounting for differences between groups. The study enrolled 388 FFS beneficiaries and their households in the intervention group and 324 non-FFS households in the control group. FFS participants reported increasing the number of different agricultural techniques they used by an average of 2.7 techniques over the project period, from 5.1 in 2013 to 7.9 in 2016 ( P group than in the control group (mean difference between intervention and control for HDDS was 0.9 points and for HFIAS was -4.6 points; P groups at endline ( P >.05). Although FFS participants diversified their agricultural production strategies and experienced improvements in household food security, there was not a positive impact on child nutritional

  18. The farmer field school: a method for enhancing the role of rural communities in malaria control?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den H.; Knols, B.G.J.

    2006-01-01

    Malaria has strong linkages with agriculture, and farmers in malarious regions have a central position in creating or controlling the conditions that favour disease transmission. An interdisciplinary and integrated approach is needed to involve farmers and more than one sector in control efforts. It

  19. Danish stable schools for experiential common learning in groups of organic dairy farmers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waarst, M.; Nissen, T.B; Østergaard, I.

    2007-01-01

    The farmer field school (FFS) is a concept for farmers' learning, knowledge exchange, and empowerment that has been developed and used in developing countries. In Denmark, a research project focusing on explicit non-antibiotic strategies involves farmers who have actively expressed an interest...... and in this context, problems were identified and solutions proposed based on each farmer's individual goals. In this article, we describe the experiences of 4 stable school groups (each comprising farmers and a facilitator), and the common process of building a concept that is suitable for Danish organic dairy...

  20. Comparative analysis of local and improved practices used by farmer seed production schools in Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tin Huynh Quang,; Struik, P.C.; Price, L.L.; Be, T.T.

    2008-01-01

    Farmer seed production schools in combination with participatory field experimentation might be effective instruments to enhance the skills of farmers to produce high-quality seed in the informal seed system in Vietnam. Four hundred twenty nine, unreplicated on-farm experiments were carried out in

  1. The Farmer Life School: experience from an innovative approach to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Farmer Life School (FLS) is an innovative approach to integrating HIV education into life skills and technical training for farmers. This study aims to gain insight into the strengths and weaknesses of this relatively new approach, through the implementation of an adapted version in South Africa. The results are presented ...

  2. Farmers’ learning and diffusion of farmer field school’s knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thai, Thi Minh; Hjortsø, Carsten Nico Portefée

    of the FFS-introduced innovations and how these innovations are communicated among farmers. Results show that farmers’ cognitive ability to adjust, test, and adopt FFS-introduced innovations in combination with farmers attitude towards these innovations and linkages to the social system and dynamics......As farmers field school (FFS) increases in use in agricultural extension and rural development, understanding how FFS-introduced knowledge retained and diffused among participants and their community is needed. This study aimed to investigate how farmers’ learning determines their adoption...

  3. Escuela de campo de agricultores para el fitomejoramiento participativo del boniato (Ipomoea batatas (L. Lam.. Farmer´s Field School for the sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L. Lam. participatory breeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Díaz López

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Resumen.Se presenta una Escuela de Campo para capacitar a los agricultores de sub urbanos en el Fitomejoramiento Participativo del boniato. En su concepción se emplearon métodos del nivel teórico (análisis – síntesis, inducción - deducción, histórico y lógico, así como del nivel empírico (entrevistas, entrevistas a grupos focales, análisis de documentos, observación, encuestas que permitieron integrar el Fitomejoramiento Participativo con la capacitación de los agricultores. Se discuten los aspectos metodológicos relacionados con su aplicación. Abstract. A Farmer´s Field School is presented to train farmers in the sub urban Participatory Plant Breeding of sweet potato. And the empirical level (interviews, focus group interviews, document analysis, observation, surveys that allowed integrating Participatory Plant Breeding in concept with theoretical methods (analysis,- synthesis, induction -deduction, historical and logical analysis were used training of farmers. methodological issues related to its implementation are discussed.

  4. Rice Production without Insecticide in Smallholder Farmer's Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Ali

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Highlights:Use of perching, sweeping, and need based insecticide (IPM technique useage produce at par yields compared to prophylactic insecticide useage in rice fields.There exists a technique that can reduce 75% of insecticide useage in rice field.The results were obtained in cooperation between smallholder rice farmers and researchers of Bangladesh.Currently rice protection from insect pests solely depends on chemical pesticides which have tremendous impact on biodiversity, environment, animal, and human health. To reduce their impact from our society we need to cut pesticide use from agricultural practices. To address this issue, we did an experiment to identify realistic solutions that could help farmers build sustainable crop protection systems and minimize useage of insecticides and thus reduce the impact of pesticides in the environment. Innovations developed jointly by farmers and researchers and evaluated for their potential to be adopted by more farmers. In this paper we tested four management practices jointly with smallholder farmer fields in order to select the best one. Four management practices were used namely, T1 = Prophylactic use of insecticide where insecticide was applied in rice field at every 15 days interval without judging the infestation level; T2 = Perching (that is, placing roosting (perching sites for insectivorous birds within the rice field and concurrent sweep net samples along with need-based insecticide application; T3 = Perching only; and T4 = Farmer's own practices. The results revealed that routine application of insecticides for crop protection is not mandatory which is commonly found at use in rice farmers. In our experiment, where prophylactic method or farmers used 3–4 times insecticides without judging the insect pests infestation level, the similar pest population was found when compared to the field where insecticide was not applied. Our management system reduced by 75% the use of insecticides even

  5. Market Diversification and Social Benefits: Motivations of Farmers Participating in Farm to School Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Betty T.; Wright, D. Wynne; Hamm, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    Activists and academics are increasingly advocating for public procurement of locally grown food as a key market opportunity for farmers. In the United States, linking farmers directly with school cafeterias through farm to school programs are among the efforts that advocates say can provide a significant boost to rural economies. Through an…

  6. Increase of Farmers' Knowledge through Farmer Seed Production Schools in Vietnam as Assessed on the Basis of Ex-Ante and Ex-Post Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tin, Huynh Q.; Struik, Paul C.; Price, Lisa L.; Tuyen, Nguyen P.; Hoan, Nguyen P.; Bos, Heleen

    2010-01-01

    The study was designed to assess changes in farmers' knowledge of farmer seed production through schools (FSPSs) in Vietnam. A set of 25 questions covering five technical areas of the seed production process was used for pre and post knowledge testing at 12 FSPSs in the provinces Binh Dinh, Nam Dinh, Nghe An and Dong Thap. The main findings show…

  7. Climate Information and Agricultural Practice in Adaptation to Climate Variability: The Case of Climate Field Schools in Indramayu, Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crane, T.A.; Siregar, P.R.

    2011-01-01

    Inspired by the Farmer Field School methodology, a “Climate Field School” was conducted with farmers in the Indramayu region of Indonesia in 2003 to promote adaptive application of climate forecasts to crop selection decisions. However, five years after the Climate Field School, use of the forecasts

  8. Farmers' Interest in Nature and Its Relation to Biodiversity in Arable Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ahnström

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodiversity declines in farmland have been attributed to intensification of farming at the field level and loss of heterogeneity at the landscape level. However, farmers are not solely optimizing production; their actions are also influenced by social factors, tradition and interest in nature, which indirectly influence biodiversity but rarely are incorporated in studies of farmland biodiversity. We used social science methods to quantify farmers' interest in nature on 16 farms with winter wheat fields in central Sweden, and combined this with biodiversity inventories of five organism groups (weeds, carabid beetles, bumblebees, solitary bees, and birds and estimates of landscape composition and management intensity at the field level. Agricultural intensity, measured as crop density, and farmers' interest in nature explained variation in biodiversity, measured as the proportion of the regional species richness found on single fields. Interest in nature seemed to incorporate many actions taken by farmers and appeared to be influenced by both physical factors, for example, the surrounding landscape, and social factors, for example, social motivations. This study indicates that conservation of biodiversity in farmland, and design of new agri-environmental subsidy systems, would profit from taking farmers' interest in nature and its relation to agricultural practices into account.

  9. Impact of Training Bolivian Farmers on Integrated Pest Management and Diffusion of Knowledge to Neighboring Farmers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørs, Erik; Konradsen, Flemming; Huici, Omar

    2016-01-01

    Teaching farmers Integrated Pest Management (IPM) in Farmer Field Schools (FFS) has led to reduced pesticide use and safer handling. This article evaluates the long term impact of training farmers on IPM and the diffusion of knowledge from trained farmers to neighboring farmers, a subject...... the impact of the intervention, self-reported knowledge and practice on pesticide handling and IPM among trained farmers (N=23) and their neighboring farmers (N=47) were analyzed in a follow up study and compared in a cross-sectional analysis to a control group of farmers (N=138) introduced in 2009....... Variables were analyzed using χ(2)-test test and ANOVA. Trained farmers improved and performed significantly better in all tested variables than their neighboring farmers, although the latter also improved their performance from 2002 t0 2009. Including a control group showed an increasing trend in all...

  10. Participatory Common Learning in Groups of Dairy Farmers in Uganda (FFS approach) and Danish Stable Schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaarst, Mette

    on a Master Thesis in Health Anthropology and a mini manual to the so-called Stable Schools. Improvements of farming practices should be based on the context of the individual farm and include the goals of the farmer and the farming system. This should be the case in all types of farming systems. Viewing...

  11. Evaluation of rhizobacterial indicators of tobacco black root rot suppressiveness in farmers' fields

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kyselková, Martina; Almario, J.; Kopecký, J.; Ságová-Marečková, M.; Haurat, J.; Muller, D.; Grundmann, G.L.; Moënne-Loccoz, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 4 (2014), s. 346-353 ISSN 1758-2229 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : rhizobacterial indicators * tobacco black root rot suppressiveness * farmers' fields Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.293, year: 2014

  12. A method to assess soil erosion from smallholder farmers' fields: a case study from Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamoud, Yusuf M

    2013-09-01

    Soil erosion by water is a major threat to sustainable food production systems in Africa. This study presents a qualitative soil erosion assessment method that links the number of broken ridges (NBRS) observed on a smallholder farmer's field after a rain event to factors of soil erosion (e.g., rainfall intensity, slope steepness, crop canopy height, and conservation practice) and to soil loss data measured from a runoff plot and receiving small streams. The assessment method consists of a rapid survey of smallholder farmers combined with field monitoring. Results show an indirect relationship between NBRS and factors of soil erosion. Results also show a direct relationship between NBRS and suspended sediment concentrations measured from an experimental runoff plot and receiving streams that drain the sub-watersheds where farmers' fields are located. Given the limited human and financial resources available to soil erosion research in developing countries, monitoring NBRS is a simple, cost-effective, and reliable erosion assessment method for regions where smallholder farmers practice contour ridging.

  13. [Panorama of purchasing food products from family farmers for the Brazilian School Nutrition Program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva, Elisa Braga; da Silva, Ana Paula Ferreira; de Sousa, Anete Araújo; Cerqueira, Gabrielle Fernandes; Chagas, Carolina Martins dos Santos; Toral, Natacha

    2013-04-01

    This article seeks to describe the viewpoint of purchasing food products from family farmers, analyzing their performance within the new guidelines of the Brazilian School Nutrition Program (PNAE). It is a critical assessment based on a review of the literature and the official data provided by the National Fund for the Development of Education/Ministry of Education relating to 2010. The program budget in 2010 was approximately R$2.5 billion and attended 45.6 million children, adolescents and adults. From the total amount, R$150,397,052.68 was allocated for the purchase of agricultural products from family farmers. In Brazil, 47.4% of the local councils acquired food products from family farmers for the Brazilian School Nutrition Program and the purchase percentage was, on average, 22.7%. Given the nature of recent legislation, other aspects should be explored in order to strengthen the compliance with the regulations in different Brazilian contexts and thus contribute both to local economic development and the provision of school meals which fulfill the principles of a healthy and adequate diet.

  14. Effect of Integrated Pest Management Training on Ugandan Small-Scale Farmers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Anna Sabine; Jørs, Erik; Atuhaire, Aggrey

    2017-01-01

    Small-scale farmers in developing countries use hazardous pesticides taking few or no safety measures. Farmer field schools (FFSs) teaching integrated pest management (IPM) have been shown to reduce pesticide use among trained farmers. This cross-sectional study compares pesticide-related knowledge......, attitude, practice (KAP), potential exposure, and self-reported poisoning symptoms among 35 FFS farmers, 44 neighboring farmers, and 35 control farmers after an IPM intervention in Uganda (2011-2012). The FFS farmers were encouraged to teach their neighboring farmers. Data were based on standardized...

  15. Farmers taking responsibility for herd health development—stable schools in research and advisory activities as a tool for dairy health and welfare planning in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivemeyer, Silvia; Bell, Nick J.; Brinkmann, Jan

    2015-01-01

    , farmers take responsibility for health and welfare planning by identifying issues, setting goals, and acting to improve the health situation based on farm-specific data, e.g. milk production. This paper reviews the results from intervention studies that used a modified ‘farmer field school’ approach...... for animal health and welfare planning, providing an overview of ongoing activities and their implementation into advisory situations in selected European countries. Studies on stable schools as an intervention tool showed improvements regarding the specific project aim on the majority of the participating...... farms. Farmers and facilitators were convinced of the approach and benefits for dairy herds. Farmers’ attitude and attention towards their herds and their ownership of the process appear to be crucial success factors for herd health and welfare situations. In some European countries, this method has...

  16. Exploring the yield gap of orange-fleshed sweet potato varieties on smallholder farmers' fields in Malawi

    OpenAIRE

    Vugt, van, D.; Franke, A.C.

    2017-01-01

    Orange-fleshed sweet potato (OFSP) can contribute to combating vitamin A deficiency and establishing more resilient cropping systems in sub-Saharan Africa. There is limited understanding of the factors that affect yield and quality of OFSP on smallholder farmers' fields. This study aimed to assess the performance of six OFSP varieties, identify factors limiting productivity and explore options to close the gap between actual and attainable OFSP yields on fields of smallholder farmers. Data we...

  17. Application price of the field: proposal of a ICT solution for small farmer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Cristina de Andrade Pereira

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Family farming performs multiple functions for society, as environmental preservation and food security, because it is responsible for most of the domestic food production of several products. However, despite its importance, this sector faces many obstacles, and one of them is the lack of access to information, which is of great importance because it helps family farmers in decision making, making them more competitive in the market. Therefore, the objective of this paper is to present a mobile application proposal that assists the small producer in decision making. This research is exploratory about the goal, with a quantitative and qualitative approach. The qualitative approach is justified by the identification of the problems faced by family farming through bibliographic research, and the quantitative approach is justified by the use of secondary data for the mobile application proposal. In order to facilitate the access to information by the small farmer, it was proposed the application Price of the Field, that would present the average price paid for a particular product and its estimated cost, and the margin generated by the difference between the two values. Through this application, the farmer will have access to information that will help him decide what to produce, through the estimated cost of production, and he will be able to establish a more fair price for his products, based on average prices.

  18. Effect of rate, timing and placement of nitrogen on spring wheat in farmers' fields in the Yaqui Valley of Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz-Monasterio, I.; Naylor, R.

    2000-01-01

    The objective was to validate, in farmers' fields in the Yaqui Valley, N-management practices that had resulted, under experimental conditions, in reduction of trace-gas emissions while maintaining grain yield and quality. Trials were variously established in five different farmers' fields. The local management practice was compared with a new alternative, under various rates of N. The farmers managed all aspects of the trials, except for fertilizer application. The new N-management practice resulted in higher yield, protein and fertilizer recovery. The SPAD chlorophyll meter was found to be a promising tool for predicting grain-protein concentration. The method of application, broadcast vs. banding, did not affect fertilizer-N recovery. We conclude that it is possible to improve N-uptake efficiency in wheat grown in the Valley by delaying most of the N application close to the time of the first auxiliary irrigation. (author)

  19. Evidence for the Emergence of New Rice Types of Interspecific Hybrid Origin in West African Farmers' Fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuijten, H.A.C.P.; Treuren, van R.; Struik, P.C.; Mokuwa, G.A.; Okry, F.; Teeken, B.W.E.; Richards, P.

    2009-01-01

    In West Africa two rice species (Oryza glaberrima Steud. and Oryza sativa L.) co-exist. Although originally it was thought that interspecific hybridization is impossible without biotechnological methods, progenies of hybridization appear to occur in farmer fields. AFLP analysis was used to assess

  20. Exploring the yield gap of orange-fleshed sweet potato varieties on smallholder farmers' fields in Malawi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vugt, van D.; Franke, A.C.

    2017-01-01

    Orange-fleshed sweet potato (OFSP) can contribute to combating vitamin A deficiency and establishing more resilient cropping systems in sub-Saharan Africa. There is limited understanding of the factors that affect yield and quality of OFSP on smallholder farmers' fields. This study aimed to assess

  1. A field survey on coffee beans drying methods of Indonesian small holder farmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siagian, Parulian; Setyawan, Eko Y.; Gultom, Tumiur; Napitupulu, Farel H.; Ambarita, Himsar

    2017-09-01

    Drying agricultural product is a post-harvest process that consumes significant energy. It can affect the quality of the product. This paper deals with literature review and field survey of drying methods of coffee beans of Indonesia farmers. The objective is to supply the necessary information on developing continuous solar drier. The results show that intermittent characteristic of sun drying results in a better quality of coffee beans in comparison with constant convective drying. In order to use energy efficiently, the drying process should be divided into several stages. In the first stage when the moist content is high, higher drying air temperature is more effective. After this step, where the moist content is low, lower drying air temperature is better. The field survey of drying coffee beans in Sumatera Utara province reveals that the used drying process is very traditional. It can be divided into two modes and depend on the coffee beans type. The Arabica coffee is firstly fermented and dried to moisture content of 80% using sun drying method, then followed by Green House model of drying up to moisture content about 12%. The latter typically spends 3 days of drying time. On the other hand, The Robusta coffee is dried by exposing to the sun directly without any treatment. After the coffee beans dried follow by peeled process. These findings can be considered to develop a continuous solar drying that suitable for coffee beans drying.

  2. Demystifying farmers' entomological and pest management knowledge: A methodology for assessing the impacts on knowledge from IPM-FFS and NES interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Price, L.

    2001-01-01

    Enhancing the environmental soundness of agricultural practices, particularly in high input systems, is of increasing concern to those involved in agricultural research and development. The Integrated Pest Management Farmer Field School, which is based on farmer participatory environmental

  3. Meeting the information needs of ghanaian cocoa farmers: are ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A number of farmer-led approaches to technology transfer have emerged in recent times to replace the largely discredited Transfer of Technology (TOT) and Training and Visit (T&V) models of agricultural extension. One such initiative is the Farmer Field School (FFS), an experiential learning approach originally developed ...

  4. Empowering Farmers Through Discovery Learning: A Case Study Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study assessed the effectiveness of Farmer Field School (FFS) training on farmers\\' competence in Integrated Pest Management of cocoa and the transfer of knowledge to others in Ondo State, Nigeria. Using structured questionnaire and interview schedule, data from 60 randomly selected respondents made up of 30 ...

  5. Adoption of Integrated Pest Management among Cocoa Farmers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    E M IGBOKWE

    there was significant relationship of sex (X2 =130.38) and benefit of IPM. ... Keywords: Integrated pest management, Cocoa farmers, Farmers Field School .... Across the states, most (96.9%) of the respondents had one form of formal education or the other while very few (13.8%) had no formal education. Education is very ...

  6. Effect of Integrated Pest Management Training on Ugandan Small-Scale Farmers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Anna Sabine; Jørs, Erik; Atuhaire, Aggrey

    2017-01-01

    Small-scale farmers in developing countries use hazardous pesticides taking few or no safety measures. Farmer field schools (FFSs) teaching integrated pest management (IPM) have been shown to reduce pesticide use among trained farmers. This cross-sectional study compares pesticide-related knowledge......-reported symptoms. The study supports IPM as a method to reduce pesticide use and potential exposure and to improve pesticide-related KAP among small-scale farmers in developing countries....

  7. Kusheh, na minem Fatu, en mi na koko farmer Hello, I am Fatu and I am a cocoa farmer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witteveen, L.M.; Goris, Margriet; Lie, R.; Ingram, V.J.

    2016-01-01

    This document reports on the development of a prototype Digital Farmer Field School (DFFS) called Kusheh, na minem Fatu, en mi na koko farmer (“Hello, I am Fatu and I am a cocoa farmer”). The DFFS provides an ICT-based alternative to traditional agricultural extension. More specifically, it offers a

  8. Farmers’ learning and diffusion of farmer field school’s knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thai, Thi Minh; Hjortsø, Carsten Nico Portefée

    of these linkages determine the process of utilizing the obtained knowledge and its outcomes. Adoption-diffusion of FFS-introduced innovations is a context-dependent interrelated process, strongly influenced by farming and cultural background, social coherence, collective tradition and connections with external...... of the FFS-introduced innovations and how these innovations are communicated among farmers. Results show that farmers’ cognitive ability to adjust, test, and adopt FFS-introduced innovations in combination with farmers attitude towards these innovations and linkages to the social system and dynamics...

  9. Fish Pond Aquaculture in Cameroon: A Field Survey of Determinants for Farmers' Adoption Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndah, Hycenth Tim; Knierim, Andrea; Ndambi, Oghaiki Asaah

    2011-01-01

    Although fish farming in Cameroon started in the late 1940s, currently the country meets only half of its domestic demand for fish. This article examines the complex issue of farmers' adoption decisions and attempts to answer why there is a lag in the diffusion process. The theory of behaviour modification and key variables of adoption form the…

  10. Beyond the field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lilleør, Helene Bie; Larsen, Anna Folke

    and household level, despite the lack of baseline data. we find strong positive effects on measures of food security, but we find no effect on the poverty indicators. We investigate possible mechanisms for this and conclude that both reallocation of labor ressources and improved production smoothing among......In this paper, we estimate the impact of a farmer field school intervention among small scale farmers in Northers Tanzania. Unlike previous farmer field school evaluations, we go beyond the immediate agricultural impact and estimate the impact of farmer field school participation in the pre...

  11. DAIRY BUSINESS: THE CASE OF BULGARIAN DAIRY CATTLE FARMERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsvetana HARIZANOVA-METODIEVA

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to explore differences between dairy cattle farmers in Bulgaria, according to certain factors. Information about the social characteristics of the farmers (educational level, gender, and age, and about the farm characteristics (number of cows in the main herd, average milk yield, and the rate of return on investment was collected. Sixty percent of the farmers were up to 50 years of age. Fifty percent of the farmers had had a secondary education and the rest had gained a university degree. The study found that only one of the 20 farmers was a woman. It was found that the group of farmers with a university degree had lower average age than the group of farmers with secondary school. There was no significant difference in the rate of return between the two groups of farms in terms of the effectiveness of the farm. The difference in the number of cows in the main herd was not significant too. The research identified a need for additional training for farmers in order to reduce their dependence on hired workers. It was found that farmers attend basic courses in the field of agriculture and livestock breeding in order to fill the gap between the existing levels of knowledge of farmers and the necessary skills for the effective management of dairy farms.

  12. Measurements of magnetic field sources in schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.B.

    1992-01-01

    The Electrical Systems Division of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has initiated several research projects to investigate magnetic field levels, their characteristics, and their sources. This paper describes measurements of magnetic field sources in schools. Magnetic field measurements were made at four schools in the service areas of two utility companies. Magnetic field measurements included profiles of the magnetic field versus distance near power lines, around the perimeter of the school buildings, and at several locations within each school. Twenty-four hour measurements were also made to record the temporal variation of the magnetic field at several locations at each school. The instrumentation, measurement techniques, and magnetic field sources identified are discussed

  13. Moving On: Farmer Education in Integrated Insect Pest and Disease Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiggins, J.L.S.; Mancini, F.

    2009-01-01

    This chapter explores intensive hands-on occupational education for farmers in selected European, African, Latin American countries and in south India. An Indian case study of Farmer Field Schools for Integrated Pest and Production Management (IPPM) to ensure food security and livelihood improvement

  14. Farmer and Veterinarian Attitudes towards the Bovine Tuberculosis Eradication Programme in Spain: What Is Going on in the Field?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciaravino, Giovanna; Ibarra, Patricia; Casal, Ester; Lopez, Sergi; Espluga, Josep; Casal, Jordi; Napp, Sebastian; Allepuz, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    The effectiveness of health interventions against bovine tuberculosis (bTB) is influenced by several “non-biological” factors that may hamper bTB detection and control. Although the engagement of stakeholders is a key factor for the eradication programme’s success, social factors have been often ignored in the control programmes of animal diseases, especially in developed countries. In this study, we used a qualitative approach to investigate perceptions, opinions, attitudes, and beliefs of farmers, and veterinarians who may influence the effectiveness of the Spanish bTB eradication programme. The study was carried out in two phases. First, 13 key representatives of different groups involved in the programme were interviewed through exploratory interviews to identify most relevant themes circulating in the population. Interviews focused on strong and weak points of the programme; reasons for failure to achieve eradication; benefits of being disease free; future perspectives, and proposed changes to the programme. Based on these results, a thematic guide was developed and detailed information was gained through face-to-face in-depth interviews conducted on a purposive sample of 39 farmers and veterinarians. Data were analysed following an ethnographic methodology. Main results suggested that the bTB programme is perceived as a law enforcement duty without an adequate motivation of some stakeholders and a general feeling of distrust arose. The complexity of bTB epidemiology combined with gaps in knowledge and weak communication throughout stakeholders contributed to causing disbeliefs, which in turn generated different kinds of guesses and interpretations. Low reliability in the routine skin test for bTB screening was expressed and the level of confidence on test results interpretation was linked with skills and experience of public and private veterinarians in the field. Lack of training for farmers and pressure faced by veterinarians during field activities

  15. Farmer and Veterinarian Attitudes towards the Bovine Tuberculosis Eradication Programme in Spain: What Is Going on in the Field?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Ciaravino

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of health interventions against bovine tuberculosis (bTB is influenced by several “non-biological” factors that may hamper bTB detection and control. Although the engagement of stakeholders is a key factor for the eradication programme’s success, social factors have been often ignored in the control programmes of animal diseases, especially in developed countries. In this study, we used a qualitative approach to investigate perceptions, opinions, attitudes, and beliefs of farmers, and veterinarians who may influence the effectiveness of the Spanish bTB eradication programme. The study was carried out in two phases. First, 13 key representatives of different groups involved in the programme were interviewed through exploratory interviews to identify most relevant themes circulating in the population. Interviews focused on strong and weak points of the programme; reasons for failure to achieve eradication; benefits of being disease free; future perspectives, and proposed changes to the programme. Based on these results, a thematic guide was developed and detailed information was gained through face-to-face in-depth interviews conducted on a purposive sample of 39 farmers and veterinarians. Data were analysed following an ethnographic methodology. Main results suggested that the bTB programme is perceived as a law enforcement duty without an adequate motivation of some stakeholders and a general feeling of distrust arose. The complexity of bTB epidemiology combined with gaps in knowledge and weak communication throughout stakeholders contributed to causing disbeliefs, which in turn generated different kinds of guesses and interpretations. Low reliability in the routine skin test for bTB screening was expressed and the level of confidence on test results interpretation was linked with skills and experience of public and private veterinarians in the field. Lack of training for farmers and pressure faced by veterinarians during

  16. GATEWAY Report: Tuning the Light in Classrooms: Evaluating Trial LED Lighting Systems in Three Classrooms at the Carrollton-Farmers Branch Independent School District in Carrollton, TX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2017-09-29

    The GATEWAY program evaluated a trial installation of tunable-white LED lighting systems in three classrooms in the Carrollton-Farmers Branch Independent School District in Carrollton, TX. The report provides valuable insights into the use of this technology in a real-world setting.

  17. GATEWAY Report Brief: Tuning the Light in Classrooms: Evaluating Trial LED Lighting Systems in Three Classrooms at the Carrollton-Farmers Branch Independent School District in Carrollton, TX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2017-09-29

    Summary of GATEWAY report evaluating a trial installation of tunable-white LED lighting systems in three classrooms in the Carrollton-Farmers Branch Independent School District in Carrollton, TX. The report provides valuable insights into the use of this technology in a real-world setting.

  18. Elementary school children's science learning from school field trips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glick, Marilyn Petty

    This research examines the impact of classroom anchoring activities on elementary school students' science learning from a school field trip. Although there is prior research demonstrating that students can learn science from school field trips, most of this research is descriptive in nature and does not examine the conditions that enhance or facilitate such learning. The current study draws upon research in psychology and education to create an intervention that is designed to enhance what students learn from school science field trips. The intervention comprises of a set of "anchoring" activities that include: (1) Orientation to context, (2) Discussion to activate prior knowledge and generate questions, (3) Use of field notebooks during the field trip to record observations and answer questions generated prior to field trip, (4) Post-visit discussion of what was learned. The effects of the intervention are examined by comparing two groups of students: an intervention group which receives anchoring classroom activities related to their field trip and an equivalent control group which visits the same field trip site for the same duration but does not receive any anchoring classroom activities. Learning of target concepts in both groups was compared using objective pre and posttests. Additionally, a subset of students in each group were interviewed to obtain more detailed descriptive data on what children learned through their field trip.

  19. Farmers' perception of the role of some wild plants for the predatory coccinellidae (Adalia bipunctata L and Coccinella septempunctata L) in developing refugia in the agricultural field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanuwiadi, Bagyo

    2017-11-01

    The decreases in plant and animal diversity in intensive agricultural practice have been caused by the application of new and very broad-spectrum pesticides. This situation motivated some researchers to observe the attractiveness of wild plants for some predatory Coccinellids. This was done with a view to improving the agricultural ecosystem. Previous research results showed that Blumea sp. (L), Tagetes erecta L. and Bidens pilosa L. could attract predatory Coccinellidae: Adalia bipunctata L. and Coccinella septempunctata L. But, unfortunately, there were no research results showing how farmers accepted those related new improved strategies for controlling pests. The research was conducted to analyze what they felt about introducing the function of wild plants for attracting beneficial arthropods. To this end, 60 farmers were selected purposively as respondents in the south of Malang and interviewed in depth with the main question focusing on their knowledge of the general function of wild plants in agriculture. Then, more specifically, they were asked about the role of wild plants in the agricultural field for attracting these beneficial arthropods. Their answers were grouped into the following categories: they don't know, they know a little, they know enough, they know a lot about the general function of wild plants in general and more specifically as attractants for some beneficial arthropods. The results showed that the majority of farmers know only a little about the function of wild plants in general. None of the farmers realized that wild plants can be used as ground-covering plants. Most of them knew only about the use of wild plants for cattle feed. The majority of them did not know that some of the wild plants that can be found in their agricultural fields can be used as attractants in looking for beneficial arthropods. Farmers, as the frontier in the agricultural field, must become knowledgeable about the specific use of the wild plants in their fields

  20. Field-based evaluations of horizontal flat-plate fish screens, II: Testing of a unique off-stream channel device - The Farmers Screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesa, Matthew G.; Rose, Brien P.; Copeland, Elizabeth S.

    2012-01-01

    Screens are installed at water diversion sites to reduce entrainment of fish. Recently, the Farmers Irrigation District (Oregon) developed a unique flat-plate screen (the “Farmers Screen”) that operates passively and may offer reduced installation and operating costs. To evaluate the effectiveness of this screen on fish, we conducted two separate field experiments. First, juvenile coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch were released over a working version of this screen under a range of inflows (0.02–0.42 m3/s) and diversion flows (0.02–0.34 m3/s) at different water depths. Mean approach velocities ranged from 0 to 5 cm/s and sweeping velocities ranged from 36 to 178 cm/s. Water depths over the screen surface ranged from 1 to 25 cm and were directly related to inflow. Passage of fish over the screen under these conditions did not severely injure them or cause delayed mortality, and no fish were observed becoming impinged on the screen surface. Second, juvenile coho salmon and steelhead O. mykiss were released at the upstream end of a 34-m flume and allowed to volitionally move downstream and pass over a 3.5-m section of the Farmers Screen to determine whether fish would refuse to pass over the screen after encountering its leading edge. For coho salmon, 75–95% of the fish passed over the screen within 5 min and 82–98% passed within 20 min, depending on hydraulic conditions. For steelhead, 47–90% of the fish passed over the screen within 5 min and 79–95% passed within 20 min. Our results indicate that when operated within its design criteria, the Farmers Screen provides safe and efficient downstream passage of juvenile salmonids under a variety of hydraulic conditions.

  1. A Prototype Tool to Enable Farmers to Measure and Improve the Welfare Performance of the Farm Animal Enterprise: The Unified Field Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colditz, Ian G.; Ferguson, Drewe M.; Collins, Teresa; Matthews, Lindsay; Hemsworth, Paul H.

    2014-01-01

    Simple Summary Benchmarking is a tool widely used in agricultural industries that harnesses the experience of farmers to generate knowledge of practices that lead to better on-farm productivity and performance. We propose, by analogy with production performance, a method for measuring the animal welfare performance of an enterprise and describe a tool for farmers to monitor and improve the animal welfare performance of their business. A general framework is outlined for assessing and monitoring risks to animal welfare based on measures of animals, the environment they are kept in and how they are managed. The tool would enable farmers to continually improve animal welfare. Abstract Schemes for the assessment of farm animal welfare and assurance of welfare standards have proliferated in recent years. An acknowledged short-coming has been the lack of impact of these schemes on the welfare standards achieved on farm due in part to sociological factors concerning their implementation. Here we propose the concept of welfare performance based on a broad set of performance attributes of an enterprise and describe a tool based on risk assessment and benchmarking methods for measuring and managing welfare performance. The tool termed the Unified Field Index is presented in a general form comprising three modules addressing animal, resource, and management factors. Domains within these modules accommodate the principle conceptual perspectives for welfare assessment: biological functioning; emotional states; and naturalness. Pan-enterprise analysis in any livestock sector could be used to benchmark welfare performance of individual enterprises and also provide statistics of welfare performance for the livestock sector. An advantage of this concept of welfare performance is its use of continuous scales of measurement rather than traditional pass/fail measures. Through the feedback provided via benchmarking, the tool should help farmers better engage in on-going improvement of

  2. Farmers Preference For Different Farmer Education Methods ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A structured questionnaire of 30 items was used for data collection. Collected data were analyzed using the mean. The major finding of this study was that farmers preferred more of individual farmer education methods. Keywords: Farmers preference, farmer education methods. Global Approaches to Extension Practice Vol.

  3. Farmers’ perception of stable schools as a tool to improve management for the benefit of mink welfare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Britt I. F.; Anneberg, Inger; Sørensen, Jan Tind

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore farmers' perception of stable schools as a tool to improve management for the benefit of mink welfare. Stable schools are knowledge exchange between farmers working towards a common goal, being able to give practical advice to each other. The concept is based...... on farmer field schools, developed and used in developing countries. Several Danish mink farmers are familiar with erfa-groups which also are farmers meeting, often with an advisor taking part, but the stable schools with only farmers and a facilitator have never been tested on mink farms. In 2013, we...... therefore established two stable schools with farmers from five Danish mink farms in each group. The meetings were on the respective farms, and every farm was visited once within a year. The host-farmer presented one success story and two challenges he/she wanted to work with and get contributions to from...

  4. What do farmers' weed control decisions imply about glyphosate resistance? Evidence from surveys of US corn fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wechsler, Seth J; McFadden, Jonathan R; Smith, David J

    2018-05-01

    The first case of glyphosate-resistant weeds in the United States was documented in 1998, 2 years after the commercialization of genetically engineered herbicide-resistant (HR) corn and soybeans. Currently, over 15 glyphosate-resistant weed species affect US crop production areas. These weeds have the potential to reduce yields, increase costs, and lower farm profitability. The objective of our study is to develop a behavioral model of farmers' weed management decisions and use it to analyze weed resistance to glyphosate in US corn farms. On average, we find that weed control increased US corn yields by 3700 kg ha -1 (worth approximately $US 255 ha -1 ) in 2005 and 3500 kg ha -1 (worth approximately $US 575 ha -1 ) in 2010. If glyphosate resistant weeds were absent, glyphosate killed approximately 99% of weeds, on average, when applied at the label rate in HR production systems. Average control was dramatically lower in states where glyphosate resistance was widespread. We find that glyphosate resistance had a significant impact on weed control costs and corn yields of US farmers in 2005 and 2010. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  5. Erosion of Farmer Field Schools in Ecuador: Politics of Agricultural Science and Development Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sherwood, S.G.; Schut, M.; Leeuwis, C.

    2011-01-01

    The recognition that innovation occurs in networks of heterogeneous actors and requires broad systemic support beyond knowledge brokering has resulted in a changing landscape of the intermediary domain in an increasingly market-driven agricultural sector in developing countries. This paper presents

  6. Erosion of Farmer Field Schools in Ecuador: Politics of Agricultural Science and Development Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Sherwood, S.G.; Schut, M.; Leeuwis, C.

    2011-01-01

    The recognition that innovation occurs in networks of heterogeneous actors and requires broad systemic support beyond knowledge brokering has resulted in a changing landscape of the intermediary domain in an increasingly market-driven agricultural sector in developing countries. This paper presents findings of an explorative case study that looked at 22 organisations identified as fulfilling an intermediary role in the Kenyan agricultural sector. The results show that these organisations fulf...

  7. Farmers\\' knowledge and perceptions of insect pests of yam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    these farmers were small, averaging 2.8 acres (range 0.5- 12 acres). Most farmers were illiterate, because 88 per cent had not received formal education. Farmers identified yam pests as one of the major production constraints. Pests mentioned by farmers as causing the most serious damage in the field and storage, and ...

  8. High School Students' Representations and Understandings of Electric Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ying; Brizuela, Bárbara M.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the representations and understandings of electric fields expressed by Chinese high school students 15 to 16 years old who have not received high school level physics instruction. The physics education research literature has reported students' conceptions of electric fields post-instruction as indicated by students'…

  9. Local Poultry Farmers' Media Use, Access and Understanding of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Farmers listened to radio in the morning and evening but watch television in the evening. Publication readership was low though farmers look at billboards and posters. Posters pictures were important in attracting farmers' attention. Road junctions, churches, schools and mosques were identified as appropriate locations for ...

  10. Risk Factors for Low Back Disorders in Saskatchewan Farmers: Field-based Exposure Assessment to Build a Foundation for Epidemiological Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Trask, Catherine; Bath, Brenna; Johnson, Peter W; Teschke, Kay

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies of many geographical settings and agricultural commodities show that low back disorders are an important public health issue among farmers, who represent a special rural population. However, few studies have examined the impact of low back disorders on farmers? work or the strategies that they adopt to avoid associated pain and disability. Objective This study protocol will investigate 3 issues related to low back disorders in Saskatchewan farmers: (1) the vibration, heavy ...

  11. Detailed survey of 60-Hz magnetic fields in schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peralta, S.B.; Mader, D.L.; Scheer, R.R.

    1991-01-01

    Data concerning magnetic field exposure levels in schools is sparse in comparison with data for houses. Surveys were made of power frequency magnetic fields in two schools in the Toronto area of Ontario. One school was a small, older school with a relatively simple electrical network, while the other was a newer, larger facility with more a complex system. Measured field levels clustered around the 0.06-0.125 microTesla range, a factor of two less than the fields commonly encountered in homes. Classrooms exhibited low-level fields, typically of the order of 0.05 microTesla. While a transmission line near one school raised ambient levels slightly, fields were mainly due to local sources such as building wiring and distribution panels. In one school, the major field source is a site transformer. However, the highest fields outside the transformer room, 0.3 microTesla, are found right next to the room, and decay rapidly with distance from the transformer. 7 refs., 24 figs

  12. Developing management packages for acid sulphate soils based on farmer and expert knowledge : field study in the Mekong Delta, Viet Nam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quang Tri, Le

    1996-01-01


    Effective interaction of farmers' expertise and expert knowledge has been a special point of attention for this study. The objectives of the study were to describe the process of interaction between farmers and experts in improving the use of acid sulphate soils and to point out

  13. Determinants Of Cattle Farmers Particiaption In Farmers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study focused on determinants of cattle farmers particiaption in farmers organization in Hamadan province of Iran. Data was colleted from 75 randomly selected respondents with the aid of a questionnaire. Data were analyzed using percentage, mean score, analysis of variance and factor analysis. The findings revealed ...

  14. Risk Factors for Low Back Disorders in Saskatchewan Farmers: Field-based Exposure Assessment to Build a Foundation for Epidemiological Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trask, Catherine; Bath, Brenna; Johnson, Peter W; Teschke, Kay

    2016-06-10

    Studies of many geographical settings and agricultural commodities show that low back disorders are an important public health issue among farmers, who represent a special rural population. However, few studies have examined the impact of low back disorders on farmers' work or the strategies that they adopt to avoid associated pain and disability. This study protocol will investigate 3 issues related to low back disorders in Saskatchewan farmers: (1) the vibration, heavy lifting, and awkward postures farmers encounter during their work that might contribute to low back disorders; (2) the impact low back disorders have on farmers in terms of their ability to work; and (3) the types of preventative measures and solutions that farmers implement to reduce the occurrence of low back pain. To answer these questions, researchers will travel to 30 farms to make measurements of vibration, lifting, and posture during the farmers' regular work tasks. Farmers will be interviewed about any pain and/or disability using standardized interview questions. Farmers will also be asked about safety measures they have implemented at their farm, such as modified tools or equipment, to reduce the occurrence of low back disorders or pain. Data collection is currently underway for this study, with the intention to complete all data collection and analysis by the end of 2018. Occupational determinants of health such as vibration, heavy lifting, and awkward postures are important in the development and progression of low back disorders, and the results of this study will allow for cost-effective epidemiological studies of these determinants in the future. In identifying prevention strategies, this study will also facilitate future research evaluating the effectiveness of safety measures.

  15. Adoption of fodder legumes technology through farmer-to-farmer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mo

    Adoption of fodder legumes technology through farmer-to-farmer extension approach. J. Sinja,ab*J. Karugia,b M. Waithakaac, D. Miano,c I. Baltenwecka; S. Franzeld ... informal methods of dissemination especially farmer-to-farmer extension. It is not known ... Results showed that farmers with positions in farmer groups, with.

  16. Can Schools Offer Solutions to Small-Scale Farmers in Africa? Analysis of the Socioeconomic Benefits of Primary School Agriculture in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okiror, John James; Oonyu, Joseph; Matsiko, Frank; Kibwika, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Agriculture;This paper discusses the factors influencing application of school gardening knowledge and skills by pupils at school and household level; and whether pupils are effective sources of information to their parents. A quasi-experimental design was used to compare cohorts of 30 pupils randomly selected from eight schools in Kumi and Tororo…

  17. Impact of FFS on farmer's adoption of IPM options for tomato: A case study from the Gezira State, Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Mirghani Abdel Rahman

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In Sudan pests and diseases are the major problem of vegetables production. Tomato crop is considered as the most important vegetable crop in the country according to its economic and nutrition value. There are many pest and diseases retarding tomato production such as whitefly, American bollworm, TYLCV and powdery mildew. Therefore some IPM options for tomato and onion were validated in FFS in order to help farmers in controlling the most important pests and diseases. The main objective of this study was to determine the impact of FFS on farmer's adoption of IPM options for tomato in the Gezira State, Sudan. Field survey was used to collect data from three Farmer Field Schools in the Gezira State namely: Um Dagarsi, Hantoub and Faris in the 2009/2010 growing season. All FFS participants were used, i.e. 30 FFS- participants from each school. Equal number of non-FFS participants (90 was used for comparison, by using the simple random sampling technique. The collected data were statistically analyzed and interpreted using percentage, frequency distribution and chi-square test. The results showed that the FFS schools were positively affected farmer's adoption of IPM options for tomato. It can be concluded that the FFS approach is very efficient in the transfer of farm technology for vegetable farmers through their participation in various activities of FFS schools. Thus, FFS approach must become national policy, share authority of extension organizations in control and execution of FFS activities with farmer unions for more effective participations of clientele in all activities of the schools and More efforts should be exerted in distribution of all inputs to farmers with reasonable prices through various agricultural centres.

  18. Developing management packages for acid sulphate soils based on farmer and expert knowledge : field study in the Mekong Delta, Viet Nam

    OpenAIRE

    Quang Tri, Le

    1996-01-01


    Effective interaction of farmers' expertise and expert knowledge has been a special point of attention for this study. The objectives of the study were to describe the process of interaction between farmers and experts in improving the use of acid sulphate soils and to point out difficulties encountered. Actual conditions for four major areas were described including variabilities. Four representative areas: Tan Thanh, Tri Ton, Phung Hiep, and Hong Dan in the Mekong Delta, Viet Nam...

  19. Third International Volcanological Field School in Kamchatka and Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikov, D.; Eichelberger, J.; Gordeev, E.; Malcolm, J.; Shipman, J.; Izbekov, P.

    2005-12-01

    The Kamchatka State University, Institute of Volcanology and Seismology FEB RAS (Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky, Russia) and University of Alaska Fairbanks have developed an international field school focused on explosive volcanism of the North Pacific. The concept of the field school envisages joint field studies by young Russian scientists and their peers from the United States and Japan. Beyond providing first-hand experience with some of Earth's most remarkable volcanic features, the intent is to foster greater interest in language study, cultures, and ultimately in international research collaborations. The students receive both theoretical and practical knowledge of active volcanic systems, as well experience in working productively in a harsh environment. Each year, the class is offered in both Alaska and Kamchatka. The Alaska session is held in the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes, Katmai National Park, product of the greatest volcanic eruption of the 20th century. A highlight in 2005 was the discovery of a new 70-m crater atop Trident Volcano. Also this year, we added the Great Tolbachik Eruption of 1975-76 to the itinerary of the Kamchatka school. Day trips were conducted to summit craters of New Tolbachik volcanoes and Plosky Tolbachik, Tolbachik lava flows; fumarole fields of Mutnovsky volcano, and a geothermal area and 60 MWe power plant. Students who attended both the Alaska and Kamchatka sessions could ponder the implications of great lateral separation of active vents - 10 km at Katmai and 30 km at Tolbachik - with multiple magmas and non-eruptive caldera collapse at the associated stratocones. During the evenings and on days of bad weather, the school faculty conducted lectures on various topics of volcanology in either Russian or English, with translation. The field school is a strong stimulus for growth of young volcanologists and cooperation among Russia, USA and Japan, leading naturally to longer student exchange visits and to joint research projects.

  20. Current Practices for Providing School Field Trip Meals: Perspectives of School Nutrition Managers and Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneed, Jeannie; Vaterlaus Patten, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The Healthy, Hunger Free Kids Act of 2010 extended the requirements for a school food safety program to wherever food is stored, prepared, or served, including meals for field trips. The purpose of this study was to determine what foods are used for field trip meals, how those foods are transported and stored, and what standard…

  1. Danish farmers and investors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hajderllari, Luljeta; Karantininis, Konstantinos; Bonnichsen, Ole

    The purpose of this paper is to provide some evidence on the push and pull factors that motivate farmers to expand across their home countries’ borders. The focus is on Danish expansion farmers and investor farmers setting up activities in Central and Eastern European countries like Slovakia......, Poland, Romania and Latvia. Data from 44 mail surveys was analysed to explore the push and pull factors that contribute to farmers’ level of activities outside their home country. The responses given in the mail survey are analysed using two analytical methods of frequency analysis and an ordered probit...... model. The results indicate that the important factors for Danish farmers to extend overseas are price and availability of land, institutional governance, network and image with regard to farming. These findings generally support the literature regarding reasons for farmers to increase their cross...

  2. Determinants Of Cattle Farmers Particiaption In Farmers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the activities of the farmer organizations in Hamadan province of Iran. All the members of the cattle-breeding cooperative in Hamadan province (N= 550) were included in the study. By use of simple random method 75 respondents were selected. The study was a descriptive-exploration, survey research. A questionnaire ...

  3. Cosmic Magnetic Fields : XXV Canary Islands Winter School of Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez Gonzalez, Maria Jesus

    2018-01-01

    Magnetic fields pervade the universe and play an important role in many astrophysical processes. However, they require specialised observational tools, and are challenging to model and understand. This volume provides a unified view of magnetic fields across astrophysical and cosmological contexts, drawing together disparate topics that are rarely covered together. Written by the lecturers of the XXV Canary Islands Winter School, it offers a self-contained introduction to cosmic magnetic fields on a range of scales. The connections between the behaviours of magnetic fields in these varying contexts are particularly emphasised, from the relatively small and close ranges of the Sun, planets and stars, to galaxies and clusters of galaxies, as well as on cosmological scales. Aimed at young researchers and graduate students, this up-to-date review uniquely brings together a subject often tackled by disconnected communities, conveying the latest advances as well as highlighting the limits of our current understandi...

  4. International Field School on Permafrost: Yenisei, Russian Federation - 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyland, K. E.; Streletskiy, D. A.; Grebenets, V. I.

    2013-12-01

    The International Field School on Permafrost was established in Russia as part of International Polar Year activities. The first course was offered in 2007 in Northwestern Siberia and attracted students from Russia, Germany, and the United States. Over the past seven years undergraduate and graduate students representing eight different countries in North America, Europe, and Asia have participated in the field school. This annual summer field course visits different regions of the Russian Arctic each year, but the three course foci remain consistent, which are to make in depth examinations of, 1) natural permafrost characteristics and conditions, 2) field techniques and applications, and 3) engineering practices and construction on permafrost. During these field courses students participate in excursions to local museums and exhibitions, meet with representatives from local administrations, mining and construction industries, and learn field techniques for complex permafrost investigations, including landscape and soil descriptions, temperature monitoring, active-layer measurements, cryostratigraphy, and more. During these courses students attend an evening lecture series by their professors and also give presentations on various regionally oriented topics of interest, such as the local geology, climate, or historical development of the region. This presentation will relate this summer's (July 2013) field course which took place in the Yenisei River region of central Siberia. The course took place along a bioclimatic transect from south to north along the Yenisei River and featured extended stays in the cities of Igarka and Noril'sk. This year's students (undergraduate, masters, and one PhD student) represented universities in the United States, Canada, and the Russian Federation. The organization of this course was accomplished through the cooperation of The George Washington University's Department of Geography and the Lomonosov Moscow State University

  5. The Lamont-Doherty Secondary School Field Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, R.; Vincent, S.; Shaw, A.

    2007-12-01

    Three years ago the Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory instituted an educational outreach program with several New York City high schools. The schools all serve lower-income students (greater than 90 percent Title 1 eligible), and are focused on the STEM disciplines as potentially "leveling" areas, where motivated students can make up ground if properly supported. The program enlists high school teachers and several of their students to work alongside Lamont scientists on funded research programs that have a local (NYC/Hudson Valley) field and/or laboratory measurement component. The program runs full-time for 6 weeks in the summer and continues through laboratory visits and enhanced curriculum during the school year. Preliminary results are positive: teachers report that the program has deepened their curriculum; heightened their enthusiasm; and expanded their view of their students' potential. Nearly all of the participating students are college bound, and several are working their way through their freshmen year in college as laboratory technicians. In addition, the participating teachers and students have been able to collect large numbers of samples in the Hudson estuary, contributing concretely to funded research there. Lessons learned and best practices will be discussed for expanding such partnerships, with a focus on issues faced by partnerships between research scientists and public school science programs in urban areas.

  6. Mozambique - Farmer Income Support

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — Trees For the epidemic zone, the evaluation estimated the impact of FISP on disease prevalence and estimated the consequent impact on coconut production and farmer...

  7. Farmers under pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrade, Stefan Bastholm; Anneberg, Inger

    2013-01-01

    troubles are connected to convictions of neglect. Second, we analyse narratives where interviewed farmers, involved in cases of neglect, describe how they themselves experienced the incidents. We find that while livestock farmers in general have a low risk of animal neglect problems, a small percentage...... of them face severe financial difficulties, divorce and psychiatric problems, which are connected to an increased risk of being convicted for the neglect of farm animals. The narratives bring forward themes of pressure related to financial trouble, technological break down, family problems, stress...... and a growing concern among the farmers towards the governmental control in farm animal production. We discuss how these factors can be used to identify and help farmers with a high risk of being convicted of livestock neglect....

  8. PREFACE: XV Mexican School of Particles and Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Humberto; Napsuciale Mendivil, Mauro; Delepine, David

    2013-11-01

    The XV Mexican School of Particles and Fields was held at Puebla, Mexico at The Old and beautiful building of the Colegio Carolino from 6-15 September 2013. It gathered more than 132 national physicists, and 10 from other countries. This school lasted seven days and consisted of pedagogical lectures, discussions and poster sessions. Experimental, and theoretical developments were presented by distinguished physicists; addressing the most recent results in particle and field physics. The school lectures included topics on collider physics, neutrino physics, physics beyond the standard model, astroparticle physics, effective theories among others. The highlight topic of the conference was the discovery of the new boson, announced on 4 July 2012 by the LHC. The discovery of a particle consistent with the long-sought Higgs boson, considered one of the most important discoveries of the 21st Century, was fully addressed. The particle represented the final piece of the standard model. The searching methods and latest results were extensively presented as well as the detector design. The physics implications of the discovery and the future of searches for physics BSM, like SUSY, were covered. The topical conference included: 'Recent results on Higgs' by John Ellis, 'The CMS experiment, Highlights and Performance' by Tiziano Camporesi (CMS spokesperson), and 'LHC physics program by Emilio' Meschi (LHC physics coordinator). For many of the participants, however, the highlight of the school may have been the Sunday excursion to the Large Millimeter Telescope and HAWC Observatory, two of the world's largest astrophysics experiments in their field. We thank all the lecturers for making this a timely and informative school. Thanks to all who encouraged the discussions and stimulated the flow of information during the question time and the discussion sessions. Finally, the School and these Proceedings would have not been possible without the efforts of the sponsors as well as the

  9. Archaeological Investigations Along Owl Creek: Results of the 1992 Summer Archaeological Field School

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carson, David

    1997-01-01

    .... The purpose of the field school was to train undergraduate and graduate students in archaeological field techniques while providing the army with information regarding significance of its cultural...

  10. 5th International School on Field Theory and Gravitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Following the philosophy that the International School on Field Theory and Gravitation must be held each three years in different Brazilian Universities and, if possible, in different brazilian states, the next meeting will take place at Physics Institute of Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso, UFMT, Cuiabá city on April, 20-24/2009 very close to the beautiful Pantanal and Chapada dos Guimarães area. The goal of the meeting is to promote a greater integration among many physicists from the local university, UFMT, Co-organizing institutions in Brasil and foreign countries such as Canada, USA, Italy, China, England, Swiss, Spain, Brazil and others; to stimulate the organization of scientific events in our physics Institute and thus contributing to local research activities; to exhibit different fields of physics and to stimulate new lines of theoretical research and technological developments in the Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso, UFMT. Finally, we make efforts to promote the development of advanced studies, taking it to the present core of research in a strong process of affirmation of new lines of theoretical studies in our Physics Institute. To this, we invite colleagues, collaborators, researchers, students, and friends to attend this fifth edition of International School on Field Theory and gravitation-2009.

  11. PREFACE: The XI Mexican School on Particles and Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The XI Mexican School on Particles and Fields took place on 2-13 August 2004, in the city of Xalapa, Veracruz, México. The School continued with the tradition of promoting High Energy Physics among the younger generation in Mexico. Thus, it was aimed specifically at graduate students and postdocs. The School consisted of several courses delivered by international experts on subjects of current interest to the scientific community. The length of each course was of six to eight hours, English being the language of instruction. A novelty in this edition of the School was its total duration (two weeks as opposed to one), the number of hours assigned to one subject, and the addition of some experimental courses for the students to overcome their inhibitions of a direct encounter with the equipment and its usage. There were also a few overview talks delivered by local experts on the current status of some of the research fields actively pursued in Mexico. The XI-MSPF was organized by the Particles and Fields Division of the Mexican Physical Society. It was generously sponsored by several institutions: Universidad de Veracruz, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Centro de Investigaciones y Estudios Avanzados del IPN (CINVESTAV) and Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACyT). We are very grateful to Dr Raúl Arias Lovillo, Dr Víctor Manuel Alcaráz Romero, Dr Asdrúbal Flóres López and Mtro Walter Saiz González, head of the Academic Secretariat, Director and Subdirector of the Office of Scientific Research and Director of the Division of Exact Sciences of the University of Veracruz, respectively, for their invaluable support in all senses to our Summer School. We also appreciate the important and useful assistance provided by Dr Rubén Bernardo Morante López, Director of the Museum of Anthropology of Xalapa, and Dr Héctor Coronel Brizio of the Secretariat of Education and Culture of the state of

  12. International Volcanological Field School: Introduction to Geohazard Research and Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izbekov, P. E.; Kravchunovskaya, E. A.; Eichelberger, J. C.; Gordeev, E.; Novik, Y. O.; Chebrov, V. N.

    2012-12-01

    The Kurile-Kamchatka-Aleutian- Alaska portion of the Pacific Rim of Fire spans nearly 5,400 km. It is home for more than 110 active volcanoes, which produce 4-6 significant explosive eruptions per year. It is also the source of some of the largest tsunami-generating earthquakes in the history of mankind. Volcanic ash clouds and tsunami waves generated in this area travel for thousands of kilometers defying political boundaries, thus making the international cooperation crucial for mitigating geohazards in the Northern Pacifica. In 2003, the University of Alaska Fairbanks, the Institute of Volcanology and Seismology, the Vitus Bering Kamchatka State University, with strong support from the Kamchatka Branch of the Geophysical Survey of the Russian Academy of Sciences, have established the International Volcanological Field School. This field camp serves as an introduction to volcanology and covers fundamental aspects of geohazard research and monitoring. Offered at both sides of the Russia-US border, the School attracts students from various disciplines and cultures, providing a direct access to the best examples of explosive volcanism at Katmai National Park in Alaska and at Mutnovsky & Gorely volcanoes in Kamchatka. It complements our efforts to build a strong geoscience community in the Northern Pacifica and serves as an important tool to attract brightest young scientists to geohazard research and monitoring.

  13. Farmers\\' Perception Of Improved And Local Cassava Cultivars In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quantity of the byproduct of cassava, taste of byproduct, maturity time and disease resistance significantly contributed to farmers' perception of the cassava cultivars. Apart from good agronomic characteristics of disease resistance and early maturity, farmers' perception of cultivars is also tied to food value issues, field ...

  14. Problems associated with extension visists among maize farmers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the problems related to field visits carried out by extension staff to farmers in the rural areas. A total of 125 farmers were purposively and randomly sampled for this study from two villages, in Kaduna State, Nigeria. The three objectives were; (1) to identify the period of extension visits carried out by the ...

  15. FARMERS'PERSPECTIVE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    outbreak of BBW but few knew its mode of spread and mainly in areas it has existed for some time (Kayunga,. Kamuli and Luwero). In the same sites, a good proportion of farmers knew the importance ofremoval ofmale buds and other control methods such as uprooting infected plants but implementation was a problem.

  16. Issues and Preferences of Horticulture Farmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Venkattakumar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A National Farmers Meet (NFM was organized by Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR and Tamil Nadu Agricultural University (TNAU at Regional Research Station (RRS, Paiyur, Tamil Nadu on 14.3.2015. The purpose was to sensitize the farmers about improved horticultural production technologies and obtain first-hand information about issues of horticulture farmers of Karnataka, Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh and Kerala. A brief survey was conducted at NFM with horticulture farmers as respondents (60 through a structured questionnaire. Analysis of the survey data indicated that Mango, Tomato and Marigold are the major fruit, vegetable and ornamental crops cultivated respectively. Non-availability of critical inputs such as fertilizers, seeds/ planting material and lack of remunerative market price are the major issues in contemporary horticulture, apart from unawareness towards improved horticulture production technologies. Field demonstrations and offcampus training programmes are the two major extension interventions preferred by the horticulture farmers; whereas mass media channels are preferred as information sources apart from institutional sources such as development departments and research institutes. Appropriate extension strategies are suggested based on the findings of the survey.

  17. Zoonotic Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Prevalence Among Farmers in Central Tunisia, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellali, Hedia; Chemak, Fraj; Nouiri, Issam; Ben Mansour, Dorra; Ghrab, Jamila; Chahed, Mohamed Kouni

    2017-01-01

    Zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL) is endemic in central Tunisia and is more prevalent in rural agricultural areas. The aim of this work was to determine ZCL prevalence among farmers and to test their availability to take ownership of the problem and participate actively to fight and address the disease. A sample of farmers from Sidi Bouzid, central Tunisia, was selected randomly. Farmers were interviewed using a standardized questionnaire about ZCL lesion occurrence, its date of onset among family members, and the farmers' availability to contribute to fighting this disease. ZCL occurred in at least one of the family members of 38.5% interviewed farmers. The disease was endemic with recurrent epidemics every 4 or 5 years. ZCL among farmers was associated with irrigation management. With regard to ZCL preventive measures, the majority of farmers agreed and expressed willingness to collaborate (93.1%), to follow health care facilities instructions (73.1%), and to join the nongovernmental organization (NGO) (56.9%). However, they did not agree to reduce irrigation activities mainly at night, to live far from their irrigated fields, or to sleep out of their houses at night. ZCL is more prevalent in farmers engaged in irrigation activities. Farmers are not agreeable to reducing their activity to avoid exposure to the sand fly bites. Thus, population involvement and commitment is required to implement effective control measures to fight and address ZCL.

  18. Reading the Water Table: The Interaction between Literacy Practices and Groundwater Management Training in Preparing Farmers for Climate Change in South India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavva, Konda Reddy; Smith, Cristine A.

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on farmers' use of literacy for individual decision-making on crop-water management and crop choices and investigates how farmer participants perceive the usefulness of Farmer Water School (FWS) training. It draws upon a study conducted with farmers of Kurnool district of Andhra Pradesh, India. This study has demonstrated that…

  19. Cooperation Models, Motivation and Objectives behind Farm–School Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyg, Pernille Malberg; Mikkelsen, Bent Egberg

    2016-01-01

    people and their ability to understand the food system. Thus, efforts are made to promote food literacy through strengthening of farm–school links. The case-study research from Denmark investigates existing cooperation arrangements in farm–school collaboration and the underlying motivation of the farmers...... propose more generic collaboration models of farm–school collaboration to characterize the field: from short-term, informal cooperation involving just a farmer and a teacher to longer-term and closer collaboration involving several teachers, farms, schools or other stakeholders from a foodscapes approach...

  20. Perception, Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies of Irrigated Paddy Farmer Community to Face Climate Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siska Rasiska Suantapura

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Climate change has a real impact on the condition of agriculture in developing countries, including Indonesia. Irrigated paddy farmers are the ones really feeling the impact of climate change. Therefore, we need to understand the perceptions, mitigation and adaptation strategies of irrigated paddy farmer community to face climate change. The study is conducted in Indramayu and Tasikmalaya Regency in West Java by using descriptive survey method, regression analysis and path analysis through Structural Equation Modelling approach with Lisrel TM 8.5. The results showes that: (1 changes to climate variability affects the productivity of rice; (2 perception of irrigated paddy farmer community on climate change and its affects are influenced by internal and external factors; and (3 adaptation strategy are influenced by internal and external factors, whereas no mitigation strategy. Therefore, mitigation and adaptation strategies with site specific location are very necessary improving climate information services, increasing empowerment of farmers through field schools, and providing the provision of facilities that are practical and adaptive to climate.

  1. Health of farmer-saved maize seed in north-east Nigeria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biemond, P.C.; Oguntade, O.; Stomph, T.J.; Lava Kumar, P.; Termorshuizen, A.J.; Struik, P.C.

    2013-01-01

    Many Nigerian farmers depend for their seed on seed-producing farmers, the so-called informal Seed System (SS), but seed quality of the SS is unknown. Farmers planting low quality seed risk poor field emergence and low plant vigour as a result of low physiological quality or infection with

  2. Spreading Geodiversity awareness in schools through field trips and ICT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magagna, Alessandra; Giardino, Marco; Ferrero, Elena

    2014-05-01

    Geodiversity, unlike Biodiversity, is not a topic included in the Italian schools curriculum. Nevertheless, Geomorphology is taught at all levels, and it seems to be the right tool for introducing the students to the concepts related to Geodiversity. In this context, a research on the use of field trips and Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) is being carried out for spreading the value of Geodiversity in Secondary Schools. Relevant international literature states that field trips are effective didactic tools for Earth Science education, because they stimulate an active learning process and allow students to appreciate the geological complexity of an area. On the other side, ICT allow students to get knowledge about the variety of landforms of their own territory by staying indoor, using virtual field trips and free software like Google Earth, Google Maps, Bing etc. In order to connect the two strategies, an innovative educational project is proposed here; it involves both the indoor and the outdoor activities, by enhancing a critical approach to the complexity of geological processes. As a starting point, a multimedia product on 20 Italian geological tours, designed for analyzing Geodiversity at a regional scale, has been tested with teachers and students, in order to understand its effectiveness by using it solely indoor. In a second phase, teachers and students have been proposed to compare and integrate indoor and outdoor activities to approach Geodiversity directly at a local scale, by means of targeted field trips. For achieving this goal, during the field trips, students used their mobile devices (smartphone and tablet) equipped with free and/or open source applications (Epicollect, Trimble Outdoor Navigator). These tools allow to track field trips, to gather data (geomorphological observations and related photographs), and to elaborate them in the laboratory; a process useful for reasoning on concepts such as spatial and temporal scales and for

  3. [Farmer's lung antigens in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennekamp, J; Joest, M; Sander, I; Engelhart, S; Raulf-Heimsoth, M

    2012-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that besides the long-known farmer's lung antigen sources Saccharopolyspora rectivirgula (Micropolyspora faeni), Thermoactinomyces vulgaris, and Aspergillus fumigatus, additionally the mold Absidia (Lichtheimia) corymbifera as well as the bacteria Erwinia herbicola (Pantoea agglomerans) and Streptomyces albus may cause farmer's lung in Germany. In this study the sera of 64 farmers with a suspicion of farmer's lung were examined for the following further antigens: Wallemia sebi, Cladosporium herbarum, Aspergillus versicolor, and Eurotium amstelodami. Our results indicate that these molds are not frequent causes of farmer's lung in Germany. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Future of international cooperative activity for graduate school education in nuclear field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obara, Toru

    2008-01-01

    Further improvement of graduate school education in nuclear field is one of the important issues in universities in nuclear field. The COE-INES program has performed international cooperative activities for graduate school education with foreign universities in nuclear field. There are a lot of possibilities in international cooperation with foreign universities for graduate school education. The use of Internet can be a strong tool for the activities. (author)

  5. PREFACE: XIV Mexican School on Particles and Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Adnan; Contreras, Guillermo; Raya, Alfredo; Tejeda-Yeomans, Maria Elena

    2011-03-01

    The XIV Mexican School on Particles and Fields took place from 8-12 November, 2010, in the colonial city of Morelia, Michoacan, Mexico. The format of the school was such that the morning sessions were devoted to theoretical and experimental reviews, whereas parallel thematic sessions were held in the afternoons. All the reviews and seminars were delivered by experts of international prestige on subjects which are of current interest to the global scientific community and are also actively pursued within Mexico. In order to equip the attending graduate students and post docs with the necessary introductory tools to allow them to benefit substantially from the specialized seminars, a series of mini-courses were offered prior to the event from 4-7 November 2010, in the Auditorium of the Faculty of Science of the University of Michoacan (UMSNH). The length of each course was about 5 hours, English being the language of instruction. An informal and friendly atmosphere was encouraged during the courses so that the students could overcome their inhibitions and actively participate in the discussions. A novel feature of this event was a colloquium aimed at the general public and younger students of pre-undergraduate level, which allowed the expert scientists to reach out to a wider community and raise their awareness and interest in one of the most fascinating and vital fields of knowledge. The XIV-MSPF was organized by the Division of Particles and Fields of the Mexican Physical Society. It was generously sponsored by several institutions: Consejo Estatal de Ciencia y Tecnológico (COECyT) del Estado de Michoacán, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Universidad de Sonora, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Universidad de Guanajuato, Universidad de Sinaloa, Centro de Investigaciones de Estudios Avanzados del IPN (CINVESTAV), Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACyT), la Academia Mexicana de Ciencias and, most importantly, the Red Nacional

  6. Grain iron density variability among new farmer-preferred ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    int ... field work. ABSTRACT. Grain micronutrient content assessment is important in breeding pearl millet, in order to maintain or improve its high nutritional quality. Grain samples of 12 farmer-preferred pearl millet varieties produced in.

  7. Appraisal of young farmers' club programme in Abia state, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study appraised Young Farmers' Clubs programme in secondary schools in Abia State. Data were collected using simple random sampling technique and structured interview schedule as instrument. Results showed that only a small proportion (about 27%) of the secondary schools had functional YFCs. Reasons for ...

  8. University Clinics as Field Placements in School Psychology Training: A National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Jan N.; Benson, A. Jerry

    Although many school psychology programs use university-based clinics as field placements for school psychology students, there is little information in the literature on how these clinics are organized, administered, and funded or on the nature, duration, and sequencing of clinic field experiences. A national telephone survey of 71 directors of…

  9. Wolves Are Beautiful and Proud: Science Learning from a School Field Trip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glick, Marilyn Petty; Samarapungavan, Ala

    2008-01-01

    This research examines the impact of related classroom activities on fourth grade students' science learning from a school field trip. The current study draws upon research in psychology and education to create an intervention that is designed to enhance what students learn from school science field trips. The intervention comprises a set of…

  10. Communication, Community, and Disconnection: Pre-Service Teachers in Virtual School Field Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkens, Christian; Eckdahl, Kelli; Morone, Mike; Cook, Vicki; Giblin, Thomas; Coon, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the experiences of 11 graduate-level pre-service teachers completing Virtual School Field Experiences (VSFEs) with cooperating teachers in fully online, asynchronous high school courses in New York State. The VSFEs included a 7-week online teacher training course, and a 7-week online field experience. Pre-service teachers…

  11. Occupational hearing loss in farmers.

    OpenAIRE

    Plakke, B L; Dare, E

    1992-01-01

    Studies have shown that there is a great deal of high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss among farmers. The studies have failed, however, to differentiate farmers who have occupational noise exposure only from other potential hearing loss etiologies. This study, through extensive case history information, has isolated a farm noise-exposure group and matched its members by age with persons with no significant noise exposure. Results indicate that farmers exposed only to noise from farming ha...

  12. Panorama da compra de alimentos da agricultura familiar para o Programa Nacional de Alimentação Escolar Panorama of purchasing food products from family farmers for the Brazilian School Nutrition Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Martins dos Santos Chagas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available O artigo tem por objetivo apresentar um panorama da compra de alimentos provenientes da agricultura familiar, analisando o seu cumprimento frente às novas diretrizes de execução do Programa Nacional de Alimentação Escolar (PNAE. Trata-se de ensaio crítico realizado com base em revisão da literatura e em dados oficiais fornecidos pelo Fundo Nacional de Desenvolvimento da Educação/Ministério da Educação/PNAE, referentes às prestações de contas dos órgãos gestores municipais relativas ao exercício 2010. O orçamento do PNAE em 2010 foi de aproximadamente R$ 2,5 bilhões e beneficiou 45,6 milhões de estudantes da educação básica e de jovens e adultos. Deste montante, R$ 150.397.052,68 foram destinados para a compra da agricultura familiar. No Brasil, 47,4% dos municípios adquiriram alimentos da agricultura familiar para o PNAE e o percentual médio de compra nestes municípios foi de 22,7%. Em função do caráter recente da legislação, destaca-se a necessidade de organização de gestores e agricultores para a efetivação desta normativa nos diferentes contextos brasileiros e assim contribuir tanto para o desenvolvimento econômico local, como para o fornecimento de refeições aos escolares que atendam aos princípios de uma alimentação saudável e adequada.This article seeks to describe the viewpoint of purchasing food products from family farmers, analyzing their performance within the new guidelines of the Brazilian School Nutrition Program (PNAE. It is a critical assessment based on a review of the literature and the official data provided by the National Fund for the Development of Education/Ministry of Education relating to 2010. The program budget in 2010 was approximately R$2.5 billion and attended 45.6 million children, adolescents and adults. From the total amount, R$150,397,052.68 was allocated for the purchase of agricultural products from family farmers. In Brazil, 47.4% of the local councils acquired food

  13. ENERGY SMART SCHOOLS - APPLIED RESEARCH, FIELD TESTING, AND TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kate Burke

    2004-01-01

    This multi-state collaborative project will coordinate federal, state, and private sector resources and high-priority school-related energy research under a comprehensive initiative that includes tasks that increase adoption of advanced energy efficiency high-performance technologies in both renovation of existing schools and building new ones; educate and inform school administrators, architects, engineers, and manufacturers nationwide as to the energy, economic, and environmental benefits of energy efficiency technologies; and improve the learning environment for the nation's students through use of better temperature controls, improvements in air quality, and increased daylighting in schools.

  14. Lamont-Doherty's Secondary School Field Research Program: 10 years of field research-based education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, R.; Vincent, S.; Gribbin, S.; Peteet, D. M.; Sambrotto, R.; Bostick, B. C.; Corbett, E.; Nguyen, K.; Bjornton, J.; Lee, D.; Dubossi, D.; Reyes, N.

    2014-12-01

    This fall marks the 10th year in which we have run a research-project-based educational program for high school students and science teachers at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. This summer's cohort included 31 teenagers, 7 science teachers, and 16 college students, most of whom are returning to the program to help run the research projects. Nearly all of our students attend non-competitive-entry public schools in NYC or the neighborhoods around the Observatory. Over 80% are from under-served minority populations. Most receive Title I/III assistance. About 60% are young women. During the past 10 years, nearly all of our participants have gone on to 4-year colleges. About half are declaring science and engineering majors. Our students receive scholarship support at rates several times higher than their graduating peers, including 5 Gates Millennium scholars over the past 5 years. Our science is centered on studies of a nearby tidal wetland, where we have expanded from fish collections in year one to include everything from sediment core analysis to soil chemistry to nutrient cycles to the local food web. In this presentation we will look back over 10 years of experience and focus on what lessons can be learned about (1) how to engage teams of young investigators in authentic scientific research; (2) what cultural/organizational structures encourage them to make use of place- and project-based learning and (3) what the participants themselves report as the most useful aspects of our programming. The presentation will include video clips from the students' field experiences and from reflective interviews with "graduates".

  15. Entrepreneurship of Dutch dairy farmers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergevoet, R.H.M.

    2005-01-01

    Several developments in the Netherlands as well as in the other countries within the EU are forcing dairy farmers to reconsider their involvement in dairy production. Farmers are being called to account more for the entrepreneurial element of their farming behaviour. Up till now it was unclear how

  16. Extensiveness of Farmers' Buying Process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kool, M.; Meulenberg, M.T.G.; Broens, D.F.

    1997-01-01

    In this article we study farmers' buying processes, in particular the selection of a supplier for a given farm input. Extensiveness of farmers' buying processes is defined as the degree information acquisition and alternative evaluation effort carried out to prepare that selection. Hypotheses,

  17. Charter School Discipline: Examples of Policies and School Climate Efforts from the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Nora; Kim, Suzie

    2016-01-01

    Students need a safe and supportive school environment to maximize their academic and social-emotional learning potential. A school's discipline policies and practices directly impact school climate and student achievement. Together, discipline policies and positive school climate efforts can reinforce behavioral expectations and ensure student…

  18. The impact of training in integrated pest management among Nicaraguan maize farmers: increased net returns and reduced health risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruska, Allan J; Corriols, Marianela

    2002-01-01

    To assess the impact of training resource-poor maize farmers on the Pacific Plain of Nicaragua in the use of integrated pest management (IPM), 1,200 farmers received training during two years. CARE trained 13 extensionists and they provided intensive training to 60 promoter-farmers, who trained the 1,200 farmers. The farmers were trained in: the dangers of pesticides, recognition of the important organisms (pests and beneficials) in their fields, the biology and ecology of the organisms, how to determine pest population levels, how to choose the best method and product for control, and how to make decisions in the fields according to their new understanding and simple cost-benefit analysis. Three groups of farmers were monitored for two years: the intensively trained farmers (60 promoter-farmers), the trained farmers (1,200), and a group of "control" farmers who did not receive training during the first two years. After two years, the trained farmers used fewer pesticides, spent less money on pest control, made higher net returns, and suffered less exposure to cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides than did farmers who did not receive IPM training. In addition, a comparison of cholinesterase levels of farmers who used personal protective equipment showed no reduction of exposure to organophosphate insecticides, compared with farmers who did not use the equipment.

  19. Farmers on Welfare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Ann-Christina

    In 2007 the farm subsidies of the European Union's common agricultural policy took over 40 percent of the entire EU budget. How did a sesctor of diminishing social and economic importance manage to maintain such political prominence? The conventional answer focuses on the negotiations among...... the member states of the European Community from 1958 onward. That story holds that the political priority given to the CAP, as well as its long-term stability, resides in a basic devil's bargain between French agriculture and German industry. In Farmers on Welfare, a landmark new account of the making...... on extensive archival research from a variety of political actors across the Community, she illustrates how and why this supranational farm regime was created in the 1960s, and also provides us with a detailed narrative history of how national and European administrations gradually learned about this kind...

  20. School Context, the Field Researcher Role, and Achieving Data Comparability in Multisite Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, H. Dickson

    1984-01-01

    School context constrains and supports field researchers' data collection activities, just as it can influence the educational change processes being studied. For outsiders, the accessibility of a school is affected by a number of factors. These influence findings and have implications for achieving data comparability across several sites.…

  1. School Bullying and Fitting into the Peer Landscape: A Grounded Theory Field Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornberg, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Research on school bullying has its roots in the field of developmental and educational psychology, and appeals to the need for a theoretical and methodological widening in order to grasp its ambiguity and complexity. The article draws on ethnographic fieldwork in which 144 pupils and seven teachers participated from seven school classes in three…

  2. High School Students Group Interaction with the Electric Field Hockey Interactive Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Ying

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates a group of high school students in a physics classroom interacting with a computer simulation that simulates the electrostatic interaction as a hockey game, the Electric Field Hockey. The activity featured in this study took place prior to the students receiving formal instruction about the electric field. The learning goal was to allow students to explore the simulated electrostatic phenomena. The study asks the following research question: How do high school students...

  3. Environmental effectiveness of GAEC cross-compliance standard 1.1c ‘Maintenance of farm channel networks and field convexity’ and economic evaluation of the competitiveness gap for farmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Bazzoffi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows the results of the monitoring carried out in three farms of the project MO.NA.CO. in order to verify the effectiveness of the cross-compliance standard 1.1c which obliges the farmer to the ‘Maintenance of farm channel networks and field convexity’ in order to ensure its efficiency and functionality in draining water. It was also examined the competitiveness gap induced to the agricultural enterprise by the application of the standard, that is to say the additional costs borne by the beneficiary of the single payment determined by cleaning farm collector channels. Effectiveness was determined by evaluating the degradation of soil structure at the end of winter, on flat fields  sown in autumn with winter wheat, in the two cases: a Factual (channels along the field edges not clogged and no waterlogging present on the cultivated soil b Counterfactual (channels clogged and waterlogging present on the cultivated soil. The monitoring confirmed a positive effect of the adoption of this standard on predisposing soil to the ideal conditions for the maintenance of the structure. Despite the statistical evidence found, it must be said that the change in the surface roughness factor was so small as not to take any practical significance in order to affirm that the functional maintenance of collectors channels have been effective in reducing erosion. Overall, the soils were unstructured and crusted at the end of the observation period. Indexes Icli, NTU, and DS show a structural fragility from medium to high for soils of the three monitoring farms. This explains the lack of appreciable differences in the soil roughness parameter, especially in relation to   heavy rains and long waterlogging periods in the cropping years of monitoring. The competitiveness gap induced by the application of this standard, amounted to 19.89±€ 6.35 ha-1 year-1. Atmospheric emission of CO2, was equal to 14.53±6.62 kg ha-1 year-1. It is considered

  4. Outbreak of Rift Valley fever affecting veterinarians and farmers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. During 2008, Rift Valley fever (RVF) virus re-emerged in South Africa as focal outbreaks in several provinces. Aims. To investigate an outbreak affecting cattle farmers and farm workers, and the staff and students of a veterinary school, assess the prevalence of infection during the outbreak, document the clinical ...

  5. Farmers deserve credit for contributing to the weed surveys

    OpenAIRE

    Salonen, Jukka; Hofmeijer, Merel A.J.; Zarina, Livija; Krawczyk, Roman; Verwijst, Theo; Melander, Bo

    2018-01-01

    Weed surveys were carried out in the PRODIVA project during 2015-2016 with a smooth collaboration with farmers. More than 200 fields were surveyed in six countries around the Baltic Sea. In addition to the weed observations in spring cereal fields we collected information about the farming practices in organic cropping.

  6. Pesticide risk perceptions and the differences between farmers and extensionists: Towards a knowledge-in-context model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ríos-González, Adriana; Jansen, Kees; Javier Sánchez-Pérez, Héctor

    2013-01-01

    A growing body of literature analyzes farmer perceptions of pesticide risk, but much less attention has been given to differences in risk perception between farmers and technical experts. Furthermore, inconsistencies in knowledge have too easily been explained in terms of lack of knowledge rather than exploring the underlying reasons for particular forms of thinking about pesticide risks. By doing this, the division between expert and lay knowledge has been deepened rather than transcended. Objective: This study aims to understand differences and similarities among the perceptions of pesticide risks of farmers, farm workers, and technical experts such as extensionists, by applying a social science approach towards knowledge and risk attitudes. Methods: Semi-structured interviews and field observations were conducted to smallholders, farm workers, extensionists, health professionals and scientists involved in the use and handling of pesticides. Subsequently, a survey was carried out to quantify the farmers and extensionists' acceptance or rejection of typical assertions expressed previously in the semi-structured interviews. Results: Smallholders showed to gain knowledge from their own experiences and to adapt pesticides practices, which is a potential basis for transforming notions of pesticide safety and risk reduction strategies. Though extensionists have received formal education, they sometimes develop ideas deviating from the technical perspective. The risk perception of the studied actors appeared to vary according to their role in the agricultural labor process; they varied much less than expected according to their schooling level. Conclusions: Commitment to the technical perspective is not dramatically different for extensionists on the one hand and farmers as well as farm workers on the other hand. Ideas about a supposed lack of knowledge by farmers and the need of formal training are too much driven by a deficit model of knowledge. Further research on

  7. Participatory Barley Variety Selection and Farmers' Selection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Selection criteria was set together with farmers; and ranked by farmers and breeders. Farmers and breeders made visual score of each plot on 1-5 scale beside variety selection. Some farmers were supported by the staff in case of data recording problem. The result showed that grain yield, disease resistance, effective tillers ...

  8. Reflections on Teaching and Learning for Sustainability from the Cascadia Sustainability Field School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Cameron; Sotoudehnia, Maral; Erickson-McGee, Paige

    2015-01-01

    A complex and contested concept, sustainability presents a great challenge to teachers and learners. Field study is a potentially promising venue to unpack the problematics of sustainability in practice. This paper reflects on the Cascadia Sustainability Field School, offered through the University of Victoria, Canada, providing an overview of the…

  9. Improving a Field School Curriculum Using Modularized Lessons and Authentic Case-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, Roy V.; Hodder, Dexter P.

    2007-01-01

    University course evaluations are replete with student comments expressing frustration with taking time out of work, paying money for, and putting energy into field education projects that lack authentic "real-world" problem-solving objectives. Here, we describe a model for field school education that borrows on pedagogical tools such as…

  10. Preventive measures used by farmers during agricultural pesticide application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cihan Önen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study describes protective measures used by farmers during agricultural pesticide application in Çelikhan, Adıyaman. Methods: The target population of this descriptive study consists of 900 active farmers registered at Chamber of Agriculture in Çelikhan. The Sample included 381 farmers, who were interviewed, face to face, during January and February 2014. The Chi-square (Fisher’s exact test was used for the statistical evaluation. Results: Of the 363 farmers, who were growing tobacco, 358 used pesticides. The percentage of the farmers who use protective equipment during the application of pesticides was as follows: 78.8% used a face-mask, 73.2% used protective gloves, 29.6% used protective clothing, 16.8% used protective goggles and 15.6% used boots, while 4.7% never used any protective equipment. The following related to environmental factors: 72.3%, used appropriate doses and qualifications, 70.7% did not use pesticides during windy weather, 66.2% removed people from the field (55.6% kept it the pesticide in an appropriate warehouse and 17.6% used warning signs. A significant statistical relationship was found between the educational status and safe disposal of pesticide waste, not releasing pesticide boxes into the environment and knowing the harm of pesticide to human body (p<0.05. Conclusion: Farmers in this study are using masks and gloves for personal protection, a majority of them are not eating and drinking during spraying and nearly half of them are removing drug equipment safely. The need for protective equipment and for health education of the farmers is important as is the need for the safe disposal of waste materials. In order to awaken the interest of farmers, environmental and individual consciousness must be created.

  11. Use of Student Field-Based Consulting in Business Education: A Comparison of American and Australian Business Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciglimpaglia, Donald; Toole, Howard R.

    2010-01-01

    This study reports the results of a comparative study of American business schools and Australian schools of commerce regarding utilization of field-based consultancy and associated critical variables. Respondents in the survey were 141 deans of Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) accredited business schools in the United…

  12. Post Modernity Theory and Its Educational Applications in School Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Baz, Maaly Bent Mohamed Saleh

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to identify the fundamental principles on which the post modernity theory is based and to notice this in the field of Education, since this theory deals with two basic rules on which the postmodernist orientation is based, one of them denies on the absolute truth on Ontology level (related to the existence nature), and the other…

  13. Farmers' Cohort for Agricultural Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders (FARM) Study: Study Design, Methods, and Baseline Characteristics of Enrolled Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Hannae; Baek, Sora; Park, Hee-Won; Lee, Sang-Ah; Moon, Jiyoung; Yang, Jae E; Kim, Ki Sung; Kim, Jee Yong; Kang, Eun Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    The ongoing Farmers' Cohort for Agricultural Work-related Musculoskeletal Disorders (FARM) study was developed to evaluate health status and related factors in farmers. Farmers in Kangwon Province, South Korea, were recruited. Baseline characteristics were determined using questionnaires about sociodemographic and health characteristics and agricultural work-related factors. In addition, laboratory examinations (lumbar spinal radiography and serologic testing) were conducted. The FARM study covers eight rural areas and recruited 1013 subjects (534 women; mean [standard deviation {SD}] age, 57.2 [7.5] years). Musculoskeletal pain in multiple areas was reported by 925 subjects (91.3%), and low back pain (63.8%) was the most frequent site of pain. Farmer's Stress Inventory (mean [SD], 77.7 [10.2]; range, 28-112] and subjective stress index (mean [SD], 5.3 [2.4]; range, 0-10) were above median scale values, reflecting a stressful condition, while the EuroQol-5D-3L index and the EuroQol-Visual Analog Scale scores were high (mean [SD], 0.9 [0.1]; range -0.171-1 and mean [SD], 67.7 [18.7]; range 0-100, respectively), reflecting good life quality. In total, 53% of participants had worked in farming for more than 30 years, and workers involved in dry-field farming comprised the largest subgroup (41.5%). Most participants (94.3%) had no more than a high school education, and families with annual income below 20 million won constituted the largest subgroup (36.3%). The FARM study may provide data on the current health status and related sociodemographic and agricultural work-related risk factors in Korean farmers, with the goal of providing a scientific basis for developing coping interventions and preventive strategies.

  14. Assessing farmers' practices on disposal of pesticide waste after use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damalas, Christos A.; Telidis, Georgios K.; Thanos, Stavros D.

    2008-01-01

    Common practices of farmers on disposal of pesticide waste after use were surveyed in five regions of the rural area of Pieria in northern Greece using a structured questionnaire administered via personal interviews. Concerning leftover spray solutions, most farmers reported that they normally re-spray the treated field area until the spraying tank is empty (54.9%) or they apply the leftover spray solutions to another crop listed on the product label (30.2%). A minority of the farmers (4.3%) mentioned that they often release the leftover spray solutions near or into irrigation canals and streams. As regards rinsates generated from washing the application equipment, most farmers reported that they release the rinsates over a non-cropped area (45.7%) or they drop the rinsates near or into irrigation canals and streams (40.7%). Moreover, a great proportion of the farmers stated that they dump the empty containers by the field (30.2%) or they throw them near or into irrigation canals and streams (33.3%). Burning the empty containers in open fire (17.9%) or throwing the empty containers in common waste places (11.1%) was also reported. Several farmers stated that they continue to use old pesticides for spraying (35.8%). Training programs which raise awareness of farmers of the potential hazards of pesticide use and particularly of the proper management of waste products, recycling programs and collection systems for unwanted agricultural chemicals to prevent inappropriate waste disposal, as well as improving packaging of pesticides to minimize waste production are essential for promoting safety during all phases of pesticide handling

  15. Farmers' use of nutrient management: lessons from watershed case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmond, Deanna L; Hoag, Dana L K; Luloff, Al E; Meals, Donald W; Neas, Kathy

    2015-03-01

    Nutrient enrichment of water resources has degraded coastal waters throughout the world, including in the United States (e.g., Chesapeake Bay, Gulf of Mexico, and Neuse Estuary). Agricultural nonpoint sources have significant impacts on water resources. As a result, nutrient management planning is the primary tool recommended to reduce nutrient losses from agricultural fields. Its effectiveness requires nutrient management plans be used by farmers. There is little literature describing nutrient management decision-making. Here, two case studies are described that address this gap: (i) a synthesis of the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, the Conservation Effects Assessment Project, and (ii) field surveys from three nutrient-impaired river basins/watersheds in North Carolina (Neuse, Tar-Pamlico, and Jordan Lake drainage areas). Results indicate farmers generally did not fully apply nutrient management plans or follow basic soil test recommendations even when they had them. Farmers were found to be hesitant to apply N at university-recommended rates because they did not trust the recommendations, viewed abundant N as insurance, or used recommendations made by fertilizer dealers. Exceptions were noted when watershed education, technical support, and funding resources focused on nutrient management that included easing management demands, actively and consistently working directly with a small group of farmers, and providing significant resource allocations to fund agency personnel and cost-share funds to farmers. Without better dialogue with farmers and meaningful investment in strategies that reward farmers for taking what they perceive as risks relative to nutrient reduction, little progress in true adoption of nutrient management will be made. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  16. Field Dependence-Field Independence Cognitive Style, Gender, Career Choice and Academic Achievement of Secondary School Students in Emohua Local Government Area of Rivers State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyekuru, Bruno Uchenna

    2015-01-01

    This is a descriptive study that investigated the relationships among field dependence-field independence cognitive style and gender, career choice and academic achievement of secondary school students in Emohua Local Government Area of Rivers State, Nigeria. From the initial sample of 320 senior secondary school one (SS1) students drawn from the…

  17. Job Motivation Level for Elementary School Teachers Who Made Field Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdener, Mehmet Akif; Dalkiran, Merve

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this research is to determine the job motivation levels of primary school teachers who have made or have had to make field changes due to the new education system (4+4+4). The sample of the research consists of 512 teachers working in primary and secondary schools in Balikesir province in 2016-2017. The data needed for the research were…

  18. Do Schools Discriminate Against Homosexual Parents? Evidence from an Internet Field Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Meix Llop, Enric; Díaz Serrano, Lluís

    2015-01-01

    The recognition of homosexual rights is a controversial issue in many countries. Spain was the third country in the world (after Netherlands and Belgium) to introduce a law recognizing homosexual marriage and adoption of children. In this paper, we examine for the first time whether schools are more hesitant to give feedback to homosexual parents during children's pre-registration period in Spain. In order to do that, we designed an internet field experiment to be conducted in schools. We cre...

  19. Understanding collaborative partnerships between farmers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asai, Masayasu

    arrangements, either as family or neighbors, or through their local or professional networks. Social relationships are also shown to play an important role in shaping the functions of partnerships, expressed for example in the burden-sharing of manure transportation and spreading, frequency of communication......, duration of the partnership and transport distance. The most important aspects of farmers' perception of successful collaborative arrangements seem to be trust, continuity, flexibility and accessibility. These findings supplement the understanding of farmer collaboration based on spatial-economic models...

  20. Fertility management and landscape position: farmers' use of nutrient sources in western Niger and possible improvements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gandah, M.; Brouwer, J.; Duivenbooden, van N.; Hiernaux, P.

    2003-01-01

    Poor millet growth and yields in Niger are commonly attributed to rainfall deficits and low soil nutrient content. Land management by local farmers is done as a function of soil types, crops, and available resources. Farmer management practices in millet fields located on four different landscape

  1. Farmers find ways to reap the financial and nutritional benefits of ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2013-09-19

    Sep 19, 2013 ... In this project, 778 men and 533 women farmers evaluated local varieties of small millets, improved varieties released by universities and research stations, and improved pre-release varieties in “mother” field trials. But it wasn't always the high-yielding varieties that got top marks. Overall, farmers identified ...

  2. Factors affecting farmers networking decisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pascucci, S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyses farmers' decisions to carry out transactions by using three different types of networks: input supply cooperatives, processing and/or marketing cooperatives, and producers associations. We use arguments from economic sociology and new institutional economics to define the main

  3. Research-extension-farmer linkages

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    i Training extension staff and farmers . ..ii Producing fry for satellite centres at the regions and for fish fanners; and iii Conducting experiments on fish production, productivity and water quality. Restructuring of Agricultural Research and Extension services. The organisation ofUganda's national agricultural research.

  4. Farmers' perceptions of practices and constraints in cassava ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-11-19

    Nov 19, 2008 ... insufficient drying (42%), the use of infected cassava roots by plant pathogenic microbes from the fields (12%), or too ... discolouration, 112 farmers out of a total of 185 who were aware about chips damage, practiced sun- drying, and 21% ... important constraints in cassava chips production. From the results ...

  5. determinants of contact farmers adoption of improved cassava

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    iya beji

    productivity, they (farmers) need to learn and use new scientific, cultural methods and techniques in place of ... natural enemies there has been a 95% reduction in cassava mealybug damage and a 50% reduction in damage ... grow on and hardened in individual plastic bags or nursery beds before being planted in the field.

  6. Effects of Green River Project on Cassava Farmers Production in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examined the effects of Green River project on cassava farmers' production in Ogba/Egbema/ Ndoni LGA of Rivers State. Purposive and stratified random sampling techniques were used to select the locations of Green River project, cooperative societies and respondents. Using structured questionnaire, a field ...

  7. Influence of information sources on farmers knowledge of poultry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Influence of information sources on farmers knowledge of poultry drugs in Delta State, Nigeria: implication for rural community development. ... The primary data used in this study were obtained from field surveyed through the use of structured questionnaire administered to 100 respondents. Data were analyzed using ...

  8. Bridging the Gap between Scientists and Farmers in China

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC

    filming the action. What they see is a rich diversity of crops — 38 crops and 107 varieties. Some are rare and unique to the area, such as black wax maize and mountain lily. They include 31 varieties of maize, 17 of beans, 16 of .... Meanwhile, in several provinces land- races in farmers' fields are degrading and disappearing.

  9. Contemporary Trends in Farmer-Based Tree Management and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the contemporary trends in tree growing and management in the context of changing farmer livelihood systems in southeastern Nigeria. Data were collected in 1998-99 through a field survey involving interviews with 160 households drawn from 8 rural communities across the different agroecological ...

  10. Constraints To Farmers Effective Participation In Agricultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eastern Nigeria is the provision of agricultural extension services to farmers. This study, therefore, examined the constraints to farmers' effective participation in the agricultural extension programmes of four non-profit NGOs in three states of ...

  11. Armenia - Water to Market Farmer Training

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — The Farming Practices Survey (FPS) was commissioned by MCC to evaluate the impact of Water-to-Market (WtM) activities, particularly farmer training, on rural farmers...

  12. Training Needs Assessment of Cocoa Farmers Association ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The influence of soil fertility on the performance of any crop cannot be overemphasized. The study assessed cocoa farmers' training needs on soil management techniques in Cross River State of Nigeria. Study data were obtained from random sample of farmers belonging to Cocoa Farmers Association of Nigeria (CFAN) in ...

  13. Institutional Factors Influencing Crop Farmers Adoption of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    E M IGBOKWE

    A total of 260 crop farmers who have sustained the use of agrochemicals for at ..... Internet. 105 (40.4). 10th. NAFDAC. 88 (32.3). 11th. EPA. 36 (13.8). 12th. Extension Visits to Crop Farmers. More than 30% of crop farmers were not visited in the last one ..... parameters of eggplant protection in Jessore District of Bangladesh.

  14. Factors Influencing Livelihood Diversification among Rural Farmers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research study was set out to analyze factors influencing rural farmer's engagement in livelihood diversification in the study area. The specific objectives were; to identify the different levels of farmers' engagement in livelihood diversification, determine the socio-demographic factors or forces that influence farmers' ...

  15. Farmers' involvement in agricultural problems identification and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Majority of the technologies disseminated were not based on farmers' identified problems and felt needs. Some of the constraints that might have militated against farmers' involvement were poor motivation and encouragement of farmers by researchers and extension officers, lack of adequate knowledge of research and ...

  16. Iinformation accessibility and farmers manageriability of guinea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined the farmers' access to information and their manageriability of the intervention programme in the study area. To achieve the objective, there was need to determine farmers' information accessibility and manageriability of guinea worm intervention package; then determine farmers satisfaction with the ...

  17. Anxiety and depression among dairy farmers: the impact of COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillien A

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Alicia Guillien,1 Lucie Laurent,2 Thibaud Soumagne,3 Marc Puyraveau,4 Jean-Jacques Laplante,5 Pascal Andujar,6 Isabella Annesi-Maesano,7 Nicolas Roche,8,9 Bruno Degano,1,* Jean-Charles Dalphin3,* 1Research Unit EA 3920, Franche-Comté University, Besançon, France; 2Department of Clinical Physiology, University Hospital, Besançon, France; 3Department of Respiratory Diseases, University Hospital, Besançon, France; 4Clinical Methodology Center, University Hospital, Besançon, France; 5Department of Occupational Diseases, Mutualité sociale agricole, Besançon, France; 6University of Medical Sciences, Paris-est Créteil University, Créteil, France; 7Epidemiology of Allergic and Respiratory Diseases Department (EPAR, Saint-Antoine Medical School, Paris, France; 8Respiratory and Intensive Care Medicine, Cochin Hospital (AP-HP, University Paris Descartes, Paris, France; 9Research Unit EA 2511, University Paris Descartes, Paris, France *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and farming are two conditions that have been associated with an increased risk of anxiety and depression. Dairy farming is an independent risk factor for COPD.Objective: To test the hypotheses that the prevalence of anxiety and/or depression is higher in dairy farmers with COPD than in farmers without COPD, and higher in dairy farmers with COPD than in non-farmers with COPD.Methods: Anxiety and depression were evaluated using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale in 100 dairy farmers with COPD (DF-COPD, 98 dairy farmers without COPD (DF-controls, 85 non-farming patients with COPD (NF-COPD and 89 non-farming subjects without COPD (NF-controls, all identified by screening in the Franche-Comté region of France. Anxiety and depression were considered present when the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale score was ≥8. COPD was defined by a post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital

  18. Eye Protection and Risk of Eye Injuries in High School Field Hockey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriz, Peter K; Zurakowski, David; Almquist, Jon L; Reynolds, John; Ruggieri, Danielle; Collins, Christy L; d'Hemecourt, Pierre A; Comstock, R Dawn

    2015-09-01

    To determine if injury rates among female field hockey players differ before and after implementation of a national mandate for protective eyewear (MPE). We analyzed girls' field hockey exposure and injury data collected from national (High School Reporting Information Online [RIO]) and regional (Fairfax County Public Schools) high school sports injury databases in 2 seasons before (2009/10 and 2010/11) and 2 seasons after (2011/12 and 2012/13) a national MPE. The incidence of eye/orbital injuries was significantly higher in states without MPE (0.080 injuries per 1000 athletic exposures [AEs]) than in states with MPE (before the 2011/12 mandate) and the postmandate group (0.025 injuries per 1000 AEs) (odds ratio 3.20, 95% confidence interval 1.47-6.99, P = .003). There was no significant difference in concussion rates for the 2 groups (odds ratio 0.77, 95% confidence interval 0.58-1.02, P = .068). After the 2011/12 MPE, severe eye/orbital injuries (time loss >21 days) were reduced by 67%, and severe/medical disqualification head/face injuries were reduced by 70%. Concussion rates for field hockey (0.335 per 1000 AEs) rank third among girls' sports included in the High School RIO surveillance program. Among female high school field hockey players, MPE is associated with a reduced incidence of eye/orbital injuries and fewer severe eye/orbital and head/face injuries. Concussion rates did not change as a result of the national MPE. Concussion remains the most common injury involving the head and face among female field hockey players, prompting further inquiry into potential effects of adopting protective headgear/helmets. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  19. School Psychology Research and Practice in East Asia: Perspectives on the Past, Present, and Future Directions of the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jacqueline A.; Watanabe, Yayoi; Lee, Dong Hun; McIntosh, Kent

    2016-01-01

    To engage in a comparison of school psychology research and practice in eastern and western countries, the current study sought to identify key themes that have influenced the field of school psychology in East Asian countries. Forty-six leading school psychology professionals in Japan, Hong Kong, South Korea, Thailand, and Taiwan provided their…

  20. Zimbabwean farmers in Nigeria: exceptional farmers or spectacular support?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Abdul Raufu

    2011-01-01

    Since 2004, white commercial farmers displaced under Zimbabwe's fast-track land reform programme have established new successful farms near the central Nigerian town of Shonga. This article explores the basis of that success. It addresses three key questions: (1) What has actually happened near Shonga since 2004? (2) What or who is driving the process of agrarian transformation? And (3) What are the long-term consequences for the peasantry since Nigerian agriculture is still largely peasant-based? It argues that contrary to popular myths of ‘enterprising’ white Zimbabwean farmers, the process is driven by a complex group of actors, including the national and regional states. Comparative evidence from similar transplantations of Zimbabwean farmers suggests that active state support is central to the success of Shonga. With respect to the relationship between the commercial farms and the peasantry, it is argued that all the synergies included in the project design to promote a symbiotic development have failed to materialize. As a result, the peasantry faces a process of ‘development by dispossession’.

  1. Family farmers as subjects of rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everton Lazzaretti Picolotto

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The process of the family farmers' recognition as individuals with rights demonstrates having their first roots, in spite of being recent, if compared to the history of the Brazilian rural syndicalism, still in the constitution of the labor-syndical legislation in 1930. Therefore, seeking to explore that process the present paper has as objective to analyze the family farmers' emergence as individuals of rights in the contemporary Brazilian society, analyzing the processes of formation of the rural syndicalism and the expansion of the labor law for the rural workers as a form of accomplishment of a “regulated citizens hip” until the decade of 1970; the urge to the official syndicalism, the structuring of a “new syndicalism” and the new social actors' appearance in the field, which made possible the enlargement of the citizenship spaces in the period of re-democratization in Brazil; the “crisis” of the new syndicalism, the creation of new syndical structures “apart” of the official structure (syndicalism of the family agriculture and the emergency of the “family farmers” as subject of rights in the recent period.

  2. Helmholtz international Summer school quantum field theory at the limits. From strong fields to heavy quarks (HQ 2016). Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Ahmed; Blaschke, David; Issadykov, Aidos; Ivanov, Mikhail (eds.)

    2017-04-15

    The Helmholtz International Summer School (HISS) entitled ''Quantum Field Theory at the Limits: from Strong Fields to Heavy Quarks (SF→HQ)'', was held in the period July 18-30, 2016 at the Bogolyubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics (BLTP) of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna, Russia, as part of the activities of the Dubna International Advanced School of Theoretical Physics (DIAS-TH). It was co-organized by Ahmed Ali (DESY Hamburg), David Blaschke (JINR Dubna, MEPhI and Univ. Wroclaw), Holger Gies (HI Jena), and Mikhail Ivanov (JINR Dubna), and was attended by 82 participants (faculty+students), not counting the JINR physicists who attended some lectures as non-registered participants. The school (SF→HQ) continued the workshops and schools of the HISS series held earlier in Dubna (1993, 1996, 2000, 2005, 2008, 2013), Bad Honnef (1994) and Rostock (1997). The scientific program of the school consisted of five regular (one-hour long) lectures in the morning and afternoon sessions, with typically two contributed talks given by younger participants (students and postdocs), each half-hour long, in the late afternoons. Altogether, we had sixty lectures by the faculty and participants. In addition, black-board exercises were held in the post-lunch periods on selected aspects of strong fields and field theory. The HISS series of schools has played an important role in bringing together an international faculty and young physicists (Ph.D. and postdocs), mostly from Russia and Germany, but increasingly also from other countries, including those affiliated to JINR Dubna. They participate in two-week long intense scientific discourse, mainly dedicated lectures on selected topics covering the foundation and the frontiers of high energy physics and cosmology. The novelty of this year's school was its bifocal interest, which brought together two different physical science communities - particle and laser physicists. There were

  3. Helmholtz international Summer school quantum field theory at the limits. From strong fields to heavy quarks (HQ 2016). Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Ahmed; Blaschke, David; Issadykov, Aidos; Ivanov, Mikhail

    2017-04-01

    The Helmholtz International Summer School (HISS) entitled ''Quantum Field Theory at the Limits: from Strong Fields to Heavy Quarks (SF→HQ)'', was held in the period July 18-30, 2016 at the Bogolyubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics (BLTP) of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna, Russia, as part of the activities of the Dubna International Advanced School of Theoretical Physics (DIAS-TH). It was co-organized by Ahmed Ali (DESY Hamburg), David Blaschke (JINR Dubna, MEPhI and Univ. Wroclaw), Holger Gies (HI Jena), and Mikhail Ivanov (JINR Dubna), and was attended by 82 participants (faculty+students), not counting the JINR physicists who attended some lectures as non-registered participants. The school (SF→HQ) continued the workshops and schools of the HISS series held earlier in Dubna (1993, 1996, 2000, 2005, 2008, 2013), Bad Honnef (1994) and Rostock (1997). The scientific program of the school consisted of five regular (one-hour long) lectures in the morning and afternoon sessions, with typically two contributed talks given by younger participants (students and postdocs), each half-hour long, in the late afternoons. Altogether, we had sixty lectures by the faculty and participants. In addition, black-board exercises were held in the post-lunch periods on selected aspects of strong fields and field theory. The HISS series of schools has played an important role in bringing together an international faculty and young physicists (Ph.D. and postdocs), mostly from Russia and Germany, but increasingly also from other countries, including those affiliated to JINR Dubna. They participate in two-week long intense scientific discourse, mainly dedicated lectures on selected topics covering the foundation and the frontiers of high energy physics and cosmology. The novelty of this year's school was its bifocal interest, which brought together two different physical science communities - particle and laser physicists. There were

  4. Water Quality: A Field-Based Quality Testing Program for Middle Schools and High Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massachusetts State Water Resources Authority, Boston.

    This manual contains background information, lesson ideas, procedures, data collection and reporting forms, suggestions for interpreting results, and extension activities to complement a water quality field testing program. Information on testing water temperature, water pH, dissolved oxygen content, biochemical oxygen demand, nitrates, total…

  5. Qualitative analysis on the field training program for clinical school counselling―Interview survey on psychology department of the universities having post graduate field training program―

    OpenAIRE

    岡本, 淳子; 佐藤, 秀行; 金, 亜美; 水﨑, 光保

    2016-01-01

     In this study, we have interviewed 20 universities with psychology departments that have the postgraduate field training programs of clinical school counselling for more than a year to find out the currentsituation. The results of the study revealed that the field training programs are implementedthrough various channels, largely categorized into the following types: 1)counselling support to thelocal schools through the board of education; 2)counselling support to the individual students thr...

  6. Organic dairy farmers put more emphasis on production traits than conventional farmers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slagboom, Margot; Kargo, Morten; Edwards, David

    2016-01-01

    with herd characteristics and production systems (organic or conventional). We established a web-based survey to characterize the preferences of farmers for improvements in 10 traits, by means of pairwise rankings. We also collected a considerable number of herd characteristics. Overall, 106 organic farmers......, and farmers that gave the highest ranking to cow and heifer fertility had the lowest conception rate in their herds. This finding suggests that farmers prefer to improve traits that are more problematic in their herd. The proportion of organic and conventional farmers also differed between clusters; we found...... a higher proportion of organic farmers in the production-based clusters. When we analyzed organic and conventional data separately, we found that organic farmers ranked production traits higher than conventional farmers. The herds of organic farmers had lower milk yields and lower disease incidences, which...

  7. A Mobile Farmers' Market Brings Nutrition Education to Low-Income Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsworth, Devin; Ernst, Jenny; Snelling, Anastasia

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of a nutrition-education intervention delivered at low-income middle schools in Washington, DC in the USA, using a mobile farmers' market to bring hands-on lessons to schools. The program was a partnership between a local farm and university and was funded by the United States Department…

  8. A survey of brassica vegetable smallholder farmers in the Gauteng and Limpopo provinces of South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Mandiriza-Mukwirimba

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A study was taken to investigate the types of brassica vegetables mostly grown by smallholder farmers in two provinces of South Africa. Thirty-one smallholder vegetable farmers in the Gauteng province and Waterberg district in the Limpopo province were surveyed. In addition, the study also sought to establish the common diseases, the management strategies used and problems encountered by the farmers. Farmers were interviewed using a questionnaire with closed and open–ended questions. The results indicated that the smallholder farmers mostly grew cabbage (93.6% as their main brassica crop followed by rape (41.2%. Thirty percent of farmers could not identify or name the predominant disease/s encountered in their fields. Major diseases encountered by farmers surveyed were an unknown disease/s (33.3%, black rot (26.7%, Alternaria leaf spot (6.7% and white rust (6.7%. Smallholder farmers have inadequate technical information available especially relating to crop diseases, their identification and control. Farmers encountered challenges with black rot disease especially on cabbage, rape and kale and the disease was a problem during winter and summer. Generally, the smallholder farmers used crop rotation (74.2% as a major practice to manage the diseases experienced. They rotated their brassica vegetables with other crops/vegetables like tomatoes, onions, beetroots and maize. Most of the farmers interviewed (61.3% did not use chemicals to control diseases, whereas 38.7% of them used chemicals. This was mostly because they lacked information and knowledge, high costs associated with use of chemical fungicides and some were shifting towards organic farming. From the study it was noted that there was a need for technical support to improve farmers’ knowledge on disease identification and control within the surveyed areas.

  9. Prevalence of low back pain and associated factors among farmers during the rice transplanting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keawduangdee, Petcharat; Puntumetakul, Rungthip; Swangnetr, Manida; Laohasiriwong, Wongsa; Settheetham, Dariwan; Yamauchi, Junichiro; Boucaut, Rose

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of low back pain and associated factors in Thai rice farmers during the rice transplanting process. [Subjects and Methods] Three hundred and forty-four farmers, aged 20-59 years old, were asked to answer a questionnaire modified from the Standard Nordic Questionnaire (Thai version). The questionnaire sought demographic, back-related, and psychosocial data. [Results] The results showed that the prevalence of low back pain was 83.1%. Farmers younger than 45 years old who worked in the field fewer than six days were more likely to experience low back pain than those who worked for at least six days. Farmers with high stress levels were more likely to have low back pain. [Conclusion] In the rice transplanting process, the low back pain experienced by the farmers was associated with the weekly work duration and stress.

  10. Measurement procedure to assess exposure to extremely low-frequency fields: A primary school case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, A.; Bahillo, A.; De la Rosa, R.; Carrera, A.; Duran, R. J.; Fernandez, P.

    2012-01-01

    How to correctly measure the exposure of general public to extremely low-frequency (ELF) radiation is a key issue for ELF epidemiological studies. This paper proposes a measurement procedure to accurately assess the exposure of people to electric and magnetic field in the frequency band from 5 Hz to 100 kHz in buildings and their premises. As ELF radiation could be particularly harmful to children, the measurement procedure is focused on exposure to ELF in schools. Thus, the students' exposure to ELF fields can be assessed by correlating the ELF measurements to the hours of school activity. In this paper, the measurement protocol was applied to study the ELF exposure on students from Garcia Quintana primary school in Valladolid, Spain. The campaign of measurements for ELF exposure assessment in this primary school was of great interest for the Regional Council of Public Health because of the social alarm generated by the presence of a significant number cancer cases in children. (authors)

  11. 6th Summer School on Geometric and Topological Methods for Quantum Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Contreras, Iván; Reyes-Lega, Andrés F

    2013-01-01

    Based on lectures given at the renowned Villa de Leyva summer school, this book provides a unique presentation of modern geometric methods in quantum field theory. Written by experts, it enables readers to enter some of the most fascinating research topics in this subject. Covering a series of topics on geometry, topology, algebra, number theory methods and their applications to quantum field theory, the book covers topics such as Dirac structures, holomorphic bundles and stability, Feynman integrals, geometric aspects of quantum field theory and the standard model, spectral and Riemannian geometry and index theory. This is a valuable guide for graduate students and researchers in physics and mathematics wanting to enter this interesting research field at the borderline between mathematics and physics.

  12. Hydrogeology of the Owego-Apalachin Elementary School Geothermal Fields, Tioga County, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, John H.; Kappel, William M.

    2015-12-22

    The hydrogeology of the Owego-Apalachin Elementary School geothermal fields, which penetrate saline water and methane in fractured upper Devonian age bedrock in the Owego Creek valley, south-central New York, was characterized through the analysis of drilling and geophysical logs, water-level monitoring data, and specific-depth water samples. Hydrogeologic insights gained during the study proved beneficial for the design of the geothermal drilling program and protection of the overlying aquifer during construction, and may be useful for the development of future geothermal fields and other energy-related activities, such as drilling for oil and natural gas in similar fractured-bedrock settings.

  13. Engaging High School Students in Investigative STEM Activities Based on Field Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, J.; Sheriff, M. M.; Washington, D. S.; Putnam, A. E.; Strand, P.; Radue, M. J.

    2017-12-01

    The lead author, an Environmental Science teacher at Gary Comer High School (GCHS), a public charter on the South Side of Chicago, accompanied two students over the course of two summers to conduct field research in remote mountain ranges of interior Asia. The expeditions were funded by the National Science Foundation and orchestrated collaboratively with PI Putnam with the purposes of bringing along high school students and teachers (1) to introduce students from urban areas to practical Earth Science and (2) to bolster the Environmental Science curriculum at GCHS by providing real world events to relate to classroom learning. During the first field trip, a student from GCHS and the lead author traveled to western Mongolia to participate in collecting samples for cosmogenic-nuclide dating of glacial landforms. The student performed all parts of sample collection and used the data to create a poster analyzing the rate of recession of the Potanin Glacier. She went on to present her findings at the AGU Fall Meeting 2016. At GCHS, she assisted the teacher in lessons about climate change. Next year she will be attending the University of Vermont to pursue a major in a STEM field. The second student traveled to the Tibetan Plateau in China and also participated fully in sampling activities. She plans on presenting her project on creating 3D models of sample boulders at the AGU Meeting in 2017. She will present her findings to the rest of the student body at GCHS, assist with pertinent Environmental Science lessons for Freshmen, and explain her experience at the Gary Comer Middle School. The lead author faced several restrictions in the classroom due to standardized testing requirements, leading to more focus on testing skills rather than investigative learning. Next year the focus will switch from ACT to SAT standards, allowing more freedom to pursue investigative lessons. The success of adding information on the field experience will be assessed at the end of the 2017

  14. Investigation of the radiation level and electromagnetic field strength in sample of Damascus schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shweikani, R.; Abukassem, I.; Raja, G.; Algamdi, H.

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this work is to determine radon concentration and natural gamma dose rate, and to measure the electromagnetic fields (EMFs) level produced by electric power lines and also mobile phone base station inside some elementary and preparatory schools in old town during two terms (studding terms and summer break). Results showed that most of the obtained values were less than 200 Bq/m 3 the action levels, but there were some classrooms concentrations which are more than 200 Bq/m 3 . These high values may be due to building materials, radon concentration in the soil and poor ventilation. It has been noticed that radon concentrations during the second term (summer) were higher than the first term. This may be due to the poor ventilation as schools are closed during summer break. The results showed also decreasing in radon concentration with increasing height of the floor, and radon concentration in old schools is higher than modern ones. EMFs levels in ground and first floors were higher than second floor; the maximum detected values exceeded 50 V/m and 270 mA/m for electric and magnetic field strength respectively, and 0.5 μT for magnetic flux density. Mobile microwave radiation level was relatively low in all positions, and signal increases with floor height. Finally, no observable correlation between the measured electromagnetic fields and the radon concentration were established.

  15. Geological field study for science education on Elementary and Junior high school student, in Shimane prefecture, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, I.

    2011-12-01

    The importance of learning at field has been increasing in the elementary and the junior high school in Japan. And, an environmental education is one of the important subjects even in the school education, too. It was important, as for science education, understanding with actual feeling and learning were specified as for the Teaching outlines (the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology) of the new science textbook of the elementary and the junior high school as well. However, It is a little actual situation that there is in an opportunity for the field learning enforced in the school lesson by the investigation of JST (Japan Science and Tecnology Agency). This tendency is strong as much as school of the city and that circumference. I have this cause think that there are a few suitable places for learning to observe geological and biological field near school. In addition, below two is pointed out as a big problem to obstruct the execution of field learning. 1) A natural experience isn't being done sufficient as much as a teacher can teach to the student. 2) It doesn't have the confidence that a teacher teaches a student geology and biology at the field. I introduce the practical example of geological field learning at the public elementary school of the Shimane prefecture by this research. Though it is the place where nature is comparatively rich even in Japan, it can't be said that field learning is popular in Shimane prefecture. A school teacher has to learning experience at field, and he must settle confidence to guide a student at the field. A specialist in the university and the museum must support continuous learning for that to the school teacher.

  16. Farmers' willingness to pay for groundwater protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenberg, Erik; Zimmerman, Rae

    1999-03-01

    The effectiveness of current groundwater protection policies depends largely on farmers' voluntary compliance with leaching reduction measures, an important component of which is their willingness to adopt costlier production practices in order to prevent leaching of chemicals. Data from an original survey of 1611 corn and soybean growers in the mid-Atlantic region were used to estimate farmers' willingness to pay to prevent leaching of pesticides into groundwater. The results indicate that farmers are willing to pay more for leaching prevention than nonfarm groundwater consumers, both absolutely and relative to total income. The primary motivation appears to be concern for overall environmental quality rather than protection of drinking water or the health and safety of themselves and their families. Hobby farmers are willing to pay more than farmers with commercial activity. Certified pesticide applicators are willing to pay less than farmers without certification.

  17. ASSESSING ECONOMIC RETURNS FROM FARMERS' RIGHTS

    OpenAIRE

    Srinivasan, Chittur S.

    2003-01-01

    Many developing countries are attempting to address the inequities of plant breeders' rights by incorporating farmers' rights provisions in their Plant Variety Protection legislations to reward the role of farmers' as conservers and enhancers of agro-biodiversity. Developing countries expect to generate substantial revenues for biodiversity conservation or for community reward schemes through the application of farmers' rights provisions. This paper applies a patent-renewal model to assess th...

  18. Danish dairy farmers' perception of biosecurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Erling; Jakobsen, Esben B

    2011-05-01

    To implement biosecurity measures at farm-level is a motivational challenge to dairy farmers as emerging diseases and their consequences largely are unpredictable. One of the reasons for this challenge is that outcomes are more likely to benefit society than the individual farmer. From the individual farmer's point of view the impacts of zoonotic risk, international trade and welfare concerns appear less obvious than the direct costs at farm-level. Consequently, a social dilemma may arise where collective interests are at odds with private interests. To improve biosecurity at farm-level farmers must be motivated to change behavior in the 'right' direction which could provide selfish farmers with unintended possibilities to exploit the level of biosecurity provided by other dairy farmers' collective actions. Farmers' perception of risk of disease introduction into a dairy herd was explored by means of Q-methodology. Participating farmers owned very large dairy herds and were selected for this study because Danish legislation since 2008 has required that larger farms develop and implement a farm specific biosecurity plan. However, a year from introduction of this requirement, none of the participating farmers had developed a biosecurity plan. Farmers' perception of biosecurity could meaningfully be described by four families of perspectives, labeled: cooperatives; confused; defectors, and introvert. Interestingly, all families of perspectives agreed that sourcing of animals from established dealers represented the highest risk to biosecurity at farm-level. Farmers and policy-makers are faced with important questions about biosecurity at farm-level related to the sanctioning system within the contextual framework of social dilemmas. To solve these challenges we propose the development of a market-mediated system to (1) reduce the risk of free-riders, and (2) provide farmers with incentives to improve biosecurity at farm-level. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All

  19. Sweetpotato breeding for northeastern Uganda: farmer varieties, farmer-participatory selection, and stability of performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abidin, P.E.

    2004-01-01

    Keywords: Agro-biodiversity, farmer varieties, indigenous knowledge, farmer-participatory research, genetic diversity, genotype-by-environment interaction, germplasm collection, Ipomoea batatas , specific adaptation, yield stability, sweetpotato, variance component

  20. Initial Characterization of Colombian High School Physics Teachers' Pedagogical Content Knowledge on Electric Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo-Niño, Lina Viviana; Cañada, Florentina; Mellado, Vicente

    2017-02-01

    We explore the initial characterization of the pedagogical content knowledge of four, in-service, Colombian pre-university secondary education physics teachers on the concept of electric field. Two of them teach the content in English as a second language. The aim of the study was to obtain an image of the participants' teaching of electric field and the inherent complexities that go with that. The results revealed that factors which involved their personal educational models, such as, how they interpret their school's curriculum, the relationship they see between physics and mathematics, the most effective strategies for teaching physics, and the time they have available to develop the topic played a significant role. The teachers considered it essential to establish new strategies that would motivate the pupils by helping them visualize the electric field.

  1. International Volcanological Field School in Kamchatka and Alaska: Experiencing Language, Culture, Environment, and Active Volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelberger, J. C.; Gordeev, E.; Ivanov, B.; Izbekov, P.; Kasahara, M.; Melnikov, D.; Selyangin, O.; Vesna, Y.

    2003-12-01

    The Kamchatka State University of Education, University of Alaska Fairbanks, and Hokkaido University are developing an international field school focused on explosive volcanism of the North Pacific. An experimental first session was held on Mutnovsky and Gorely Volcanoes in Kamchatka during August 2003. Objectives of the school are to:(1) Acquaint students with the chemical and physical processes of explosive volcanism, through first-hand experience with some of the most spectacular volcanic features on Earth; (2) Expose students to different concepts and approaches to volcanology; (3) Expand students' ability to function in a harsh environment and to bridge barriers in language and culture; (4) Build long-lasting collaborations in research among students and in teaching and research among faculty in the North Pacific region. Both undergraduate and graduate students from Russia, the United States, and Japan participated. The school was based at a mountain hut situated between Gorely and Mutnovsky Volcanoes and accessible by all-terrain truck. Day trips were conducted to summit craters of both volcanoes, flank lava flows, fumarole fields, ignimbrite exposures, and a geothermal area and power plant. During the evenings and on days of bad weather, the school faculty conducted lectures on various topics of volcanology in either Russian or English, with translation. Although subjects were taught at the undergraduate level, lectures led to further discussion with more advanced students. Graduate students participated by describing their research activities to the undergraduates. A final session at a geophysical field station permitted demonstration of instrumentation and presentations requiring sophisticated graphics in more comfortable surroundings. Plans are underway to make this school an annual offering for academic credit in the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes, Alaska and in Kamchatka. The course will be targeted at undergraduates with a strong interest in and

  2. A Metacognitive Profile of Vocational High School Student’s Field Independent in Mathematical Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugraheni, L.; Budayasa, I. K.; Suwarsono, S. T.

    2018-01-01

    The study was designed to discover examine the profile of metacognition of vocational high school student of the Machine Technology program that had high ability and field independent cognitive style in mathematical problem solving. The design of this study was exploratory research with a qualitative approach. This research was conducted at the Machine Technology program of the vocational senior high school. The result revealed that the high-ability student with field independent cognitive style conducted metacognition practices well. That involved the three types of metacognition activities, consisting of planning, monitoring, and evaluating at metacognition level 2 or aware use, 3 or strategic use, 4 or reflective use in mathematical problem solving. The applicability of the metacognition practices conducted by the subject was never at metacognition level 1 or tacit use. This indicated that the participant were already aware, capable of choosing strategies, and able to reflect on their own thinking before, after, or during the process at the time of solving mathematical problems.That was very necessary for the vocational high school student of Machine Technology program.

  3. EPIDEMIOLOGY OF TRACK & FIELD INJURIES: A ONE YEAR EXPERIENCE IN ATHLETIC SCHOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apostolos TH Stergioulas

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to record injuries in track & field events that were sustained by students who attended the athletic schools during a one-year period. From September 2009 to May 2010, the researchers observed 2045 students (883 males and 1163 females, who were participating in track and field events at the mentioned schools. During the study period 150 injuries were recorded, which accounted for 13.3% of all injuries sustained by students. Most of the injuries (34% according to the diagnosis were sprains and strains and occurred during the months of February, December and January. A large percentage of the injuries (45.4% were sustained by students who attended the Athletic Schools, which operated in the urban region. Students who attended the second class sustained more injuries than the other classes (first and third. Students who were practising or competing on a tartan playing surface were more likely to sustain an injury. Knee and ankle were the most frequent anatomical sites in which injuries (43.9% occurred. Additionally, 80.0% of injuries occurred in students who were practising or competing in running events. No statistical differences were observed in all above mentioned parameters amongst male and female students. Physical education (P.E. teachers should place more emphasis on prevention measures. These measures should include proper supervision of students during training, warming up and cooling down sessions with stretching techniques. By following these suggestions students will compete in a safe and healthy environment.

  4. Exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields from Wi-Fi in Australian schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karipidis, Ken; Henderson, Stuart; Wijayasinghe, Don; Tjong, Lydiawati; Tinker, Rick

    2017-01-01

    The increasing use of Wi-Fi in schools and other places has given rise to public concern that the radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields from Wi-Fi have the potential to adversely affect children. The current study measured typical and peak RF levels from Wi-Fi and other sources in 23 schools in Australia. All of the RF measurements were much lower than the reference levels recommended by international guidelines for protection against established health effects. The typical and peak RF levels from Wi-Fi in locations occupied by children in the classroom were of the order of 10 4 and 10 2 % of the exposure guidelines, respectively. Typical RF levels in the classroom were similar between Wi-Fi and radio but higher than other sources. In the school yard typical RF levels were higher for radio, TV and mobile phone base stations compared to Wi-Fi. The results of this study showed that the typical RF exposure of children from Wi-Fi at school is very low and comparable or lower to other sources in the environment. (authors)

  5. Do organic farmers have different risk attitudes than non-organic farmers?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gardebroek, C.

    2002-01-01

    Perceived risks of organic farming are often suggested to be an impediment for non-organic farmers to switch to organic farming. If this hypothesis holds, organic farmers should be less risk averse than non-organic farmers. This paper estimates absolute Arrow-Pratt coefficients of risk aversion for

  6. Interview-survey of farmers. Experiences after the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlen, G.

    1994-01-01

    71 farm households in contaminated areas of Sweden were interviewed at visits to farms, where measurements of the contamination of pastures and fields had been made. The aim of the survey was to find out what remedial actions had been taken by the farmers, what their appreciation of the information from authorities was, how the Chernobyl accident had affected their situation, and if they were prepared to take similar actions in case of a new accident. 15 refs

  7. Socioeconomic Effects of Farmer-Pastoralist Conflict on Agricultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Socioeconomic Effects of Farmer-Pastoralist Conflict on Agricultural Extension Service Delivery in Oyo State, Nigeria. ... The majority (71%) of farmers suffer economic losses from farmer-pastoralist conflicts. ... There was a significant difference (p=0.000) in socio-economic losses among farmers and pastoralists. Farmers are ...

  8. Digital field mapping for stimulating Secondary School students in the recognition of geological features and landforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardino, Marco; Magagna, Alessandra; Ferrero, Elena; Perrone, Gianluigi

    2015-04-01

    Digital field mapping has certainly provided geoscientists with the opportunity to map and gather data in the field directly using digital tools and software rather than using paper maps, notebooks and analogue devices and then subsequently transferring the data to a digital format for subsequent analysis. But, the same opportunity has to be recognized for Geoscience education, as well as for stimulating and helping students in the recognition of landforms and interpretation of the geological and geomorphological components of a landscape. More, an early exposure to mapping during school and prior to university can optimise the ability to "read" and identify uncertainty in 3d models. During 2014, about 200 Secondary School students (aged 12-15) of the Piedmont region (NW Italy) participated in a research program involving the use of mobile devices (smartphone and tablet) in the field. Students, divided in groups, used the application Trimble Outdoors Navigators for tracking a geological trail in the Sangone Valley and for taking georeferenced pictures and notes. Back to school, students downloaded the digital data in a .kml file for the visualization on Google Earth. This allowed them: to compare the hand tracked trail on a paper map with the digital trail, and to discuss about the functioning and the precision of the tools; to overlap a digital/semitransparent version of the 2D paper map (a Regional Technical Map) used during the field trip on the 2.5D landscape of Google Earth, as to help them in the interpretation of conventional symbols such as contour lines; to perceive the landforms seen during the field trip as a part of a more complex Pleistocene glacial landscape; to understand the classical and innovative contributions from different geoscientific disciplines to the generation of a 3D structural geological model of the Rivoli-Avigliana Morainic Amphitheatre. In 2013 and 2014, some other pilot projects have been carried out in different areas of the

  9. Physics Laboratory Investigation of Vocational High School Field Stone and Concrete Construction Techniques in the Central Java Province (Indonesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purwandari, Ristiana Dyah

    2015-01-01

    The investigation aims in this study were to uncover the observations of infrastructures and physics laboratory in vocational high school for Stone and Concrete Construction Techniques Expertise Field or Teknik Konstruksi Batu dan Beton (TKBB)'s in Purwokerto Central Java Province, mapping the Vocational High School or Sekolah Menengah Kejuruan…

  10. Dynamic Instructional Leadership to Support Student Learning and Development: The Field Guide to Comer Schools in Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, Edward T., Ed.; Ben-Avie, Michael, Ed.; Comer, James P., Ed.

    2004-01-01

    Schools are the only universally accessible institutions where there are enough adults to provide continuous support for children's growth, development, and success in life. Using the process pioneered by renowned child psychiatrist Dr. James P. Comer and his colleagues at the Yale School Development Program (SDP), this unique field guide offers…

  11. 12th International School of Mathematics "G Stampacchia" : Applied Mathematics in the Aerospace Field "Ettore Majorana"

    CERN Document Server

    Salvetti, Attilio; Applied Mathematics in Aerospace Science and Engineering

    1994-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings ofthe meeting on "Applied Mathematics in the Aerospace Field," held in Erice, Sicily, Italy from September 3 to September 10, 1991. The occasion of the meeting was the 12th Course of the School of Mathematics "Guido Stampacchia," directed by Professor Franco Giannessi of the University of Pisa. The school is affiliated with the International Center for Scientific Culture "Ettore Majorana," which is directed by Professor Antonino Zichichi of the University of Bologna. The objective of the course was to give a perspective on the state-of­ the-art and research trends concerning the application of mathematics to aerospace science and engineering. The course was structured with invited lectures and seminars concerning fundamental aspects of differential equa­ tions, mathematical programming, optimal control, numerical methods, per­ turbation methods, and variational methods occurring in flight mechanics, astrodynamics, guidance, control, aircraft design, fluid mechanic...

  12. Factors Influencing Access to Integrated Soil Fertility Management Information and Knowledge and Its Uptake among Smallholder Farmers in Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwandu, T.; Mtambanengwe, F.; Mapfumo, P.; Mashavave, T. C.; Chikowo, R.; Nezomba, H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The study evaluated how farmer acquisition, sharing and use patterns of information and knowledge interact with different socioeconomic factors to influence integrated soil fertility management (ISFM) technology uptake. Design/methodology/approach: The study was conducted as part of an evaluation of field-based farmer learning approaches…

  13. Traditional Geology Field Camp: A capstone course at South Dakota School of Mines and Technology (BHNSFS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzunlar, N.; Lisenbee, A. L.

    2012-12-01

    The Black Hills Natural Sciences Field Station (BHNSFS) has provided field training in geology and geological engineering for more than 40 years, and since the 1980's as a consortium serving five schools with South Dakota School of Mines and Technology as the coordinator. The traditional summer geology field camp is a five week long, intense program aimed to prepare students for subsequent professional geologic experiences. It is delivered from two separate facilities, one in the Black Hills (South Dakota) from a beautiful log lodge along Sand Creek, in eastern Wyoming, and a second from the town of Taskesti along the North Anatolian fault approximately 200 km east of Istanbul, Turkey. At both locations, the courses maintain a strong emphasis on basic field applications, including the use of GPS as a mapping tool in most exercises. The preparation of well-written reports, based on field descriptions supplemented by research on the web or through published documents, is strongly emphasized. Projects at the Black Hills field camp includes mapping of Precambrian basement, Paleozoic stratigraphy, and Laramide Tertiary plutons and structural features as welll as post-Laramide,, faulted continental strata. The popular Taskesti field camp utilizes the diverse geology of the Tethyan realm, as well as the culture and history, of central Turkey (Anatolia). The course is based at a Turkish Government Earthquake Research Center facility along the North Anatolian fault. Students examine and map selected locations across the Izmir-Ankara suture including: 1) Deformed Cretaceous and Tertiary carbonate and clastic strata of the Sakarya micro-continent in a fore-arc basin; 2) Marble and skarn surrounding Eocene, subduction-related granite intruded into a passive margin sequence in the Sivrihisar region of central Anatolia; 3) Faulted and folded Neogene strata in the northern flank of the post-Tethyan, Haymana Basin and the contrasting terrains across the North Anatolian fault (J

  14. Farmer and input marketer's involvement in researchextension ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study determined the level of involvement of farmers and input marketers in the Research-Extension-Farmer-Input Linkage System (REFILS) continuum of activities in the Southeastern agro-ecological zone of Nigeria. Data were collected with the aid of structured questionnaire administered to 80 randomly selected ...

  15. Qualitative evaluation of smallholder farmer decisions, support ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Qualitative evaluation of smallholder farmer decisions, support systems, knowledge and disease management tools. ... A group of 15 extension officers and 12 researchers were purposively selected for the study because they play a major role in organising and disseminating information to the farmers. Participatory ...

  16. Farmers' perception and knowledge of environmental problems ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined farmers' perception and knowledge of environmental problems affecting their food production. A total of 120 farmers randomly selected from six communities in Orhionmwon and Uhunmwonde Local Government areas of Edo State were used for the study. Data were collected from respondents using ...

  17. Human prehistory: Hunting for the earliest farmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley-Conwy, Peter

    2009-11-03

    The degree to which the spread of farming into Europe was accompanied by demographic shifts is subject to intense debate. Genetic evidence from Europe's first farmers and their hunter-gatherer counterparts now suggests an important role for the immigration of farmers.

  18. Farmer's lung is now in decline.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Arya, A

    2012-02-03

    Farmer\\'s lung incidence in Ireland was constant until 1996, even though hay making methods were revolutionised in late 1980\\'s. We undertook this study to find out the incidence of farmer\\'s lung in Ireland from 1982-2002 and its correlation with rainfall and the effect of changing farm practices. The primary cases of farmer\\'s lung were identified from Hospital in Patients Enquiry (HIPE) unit of the national Economic & Social Research Institute (ESRI) Dublin. Rainfall data were obtained from Met Eireann whereas population, hay production and silage production were obtained from the Central Statistics Office, Dublin. As the farming population is in decline, we used the annual working unit (AWU), which reflects the true population at risk. An AWU is the equivalent of 1800 hours per farm worker per year. The incidence rates were constant from 1982-1996, but from 1997-2002 a marked decline was observed. There was strong positive correlation with hay production (r = 0.81) and strong negative correlation with silage production (r = -0.82). This study indicates that the incidence of farmer\\'s lung is now in decline.

  19. Institutional Factors Influencing Crop Farmers Adoption of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the institutional factors influencing adoption of recommended agrochemical practices (RAPs) among crop farmers in Nigeria. A total of 260 crop farmers who have sustained the use of agrochemicals for at least five years were selected for the study using multi-stage sampling technique. Data were ...

  20. Farmers\\' Characteristics And Adoption Of Recommended Practices ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study focused on farmers under the fadama project scheme in Edo State, Nigeria with emphasis on the relationship between farmers\\' characteristics and adoption of recommended technologies. Analyses of data obtained from a random sample of 80 respondents reveals that fadama farming was dominated by females ...

  1. Perception of agricultural biotechnology among farmers, journalists ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study sought to establish the perception of farmers, journalists and scientists of genetically-modified (GM) crops in Tanzania. Its specific objectives were to determine the perception of GM Crops among farmers, journalists and scientists in Tanzania, and to determine the factors that influence their perception.

  2. Sustainable agriculture development through effective farmer groups

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Group formation cannot simply be achieved by calling people together. The formation and development of an effective farmer group is influenced by the skills of the group promoter and the adherence to certain basic group dynamic principles. This paper reflects on the experience of establishing and working with farmer ...

  3. Linkage activities amongst researchers, extension agents, farmers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examined the research- extension- farmer- input dealer and marketer linkage activities in the North West Province of South Africa. A simple random sampling technique was used to select researchers, extension agents, farmers, agricultural input dealers and marketers. Their responses in linkage activities were ...

  4. farmer's characteristics and adoption of recommended practices ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Ekwueme

    The study focused on farmers under the fadama project scheme in Edo State, Nigeria with emphasis on the relationship between farmers' .... estimated parameters, and standard error of estimates. Based on these criteria the linear ... the reason given by respondents for this preference was the local varieties taste better than ...

  5. Social Network Structures among Groundnut Farmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuo, Mary; Bell, Alexandra A.; Bravo-Ureta, Boris E.; Okello, David K.; Okoko, Evelyn Nasambu; Kidula, Nelson L.; Deom, C. Michael; Puppala, Naveen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Groundnut farmers in East Africa have experienced declines in production despite research and extension efforts to increase productivity. This study examined how social network structures related to acquisition of information about new seed varieties and productivity among groundnut farmers in Uganda and Kenya.…

  6. Understanding farmers' preferences for wastewater reuse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South Africa has included water reuse as a policy option; hence the aim of this study is to understand farmers' preferences regarding water reuse frameworks for irrigation. A choice modelling approach was applied to identify the elements defining these frameworks and to quantify their relative importance amongst farmers in ...

  7. Engaging High School Science Teachers in Field-Based Seismology Research: Opportunities and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    Research experiences for secondary school science teachers have been shown to improve their students' test scores, and there is a substantial body of literature about the effectiveness of RET (Research Experience for Teachers) or SWEPT (Scientific Work Experience Programs for Teachers) programs. RET programs enjoy substantial support, and several opportunities for science teachers to engage in research currently exist. However, there are barriers to teacher participation in research projects; for example, laboratory-based projects can be time consuming and require extensive training before a participant can meaningfully engage in scientific inquiry. Field-based projects can be an effective avenue for involving teachers in research; at its best, earth science field work is a fun, highly immersive experience that meaningfully contributes to scientific research projects, and can provide a payoff that is out of proportion to a relatively small time commitment. In particular, broadband seismology deployments provide an excellent opportunity to provide teachers with field-based research experience. Such deployments are labor-intensive and require large teams, with field tasks that vary from digging holes and pouring concrete to constructing and configuring electronics systems and leveling and orienting seismometers. A recently established pilot program, known as FEST (Field Experiences for Science Teachers) is experimenting with providing one week of summer field experience for high school earth science teachers in Connecticut. Here I report on results and challenges from the first year of the program, which is funded by the NSF-CAREER program and is being run in conjunction with a temporary deployment of 15 seismometers in Connecticut, known as SEISConn (Seismic Experiment for Imaging Structure beneath Connecticut). A small group of teachers participated in a week of field work in August 2015 to deploy seismometers in northern CT; this experience followed a visit of the

  8. Improving community development by linking agriculture, nutrition and education: design of a randomised trial of "home-grown" school feeding in Mali.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masset, Edoardo; Gelli, Aulo

    2013-02-21

    Providing food through schools has well documented effects in terms of the education, health and nutrition of school children. However, there is limited evidence in terms of the benefits of providing a reliable market for small-holder farmers through "home-grown" school feeding approaches. This study aims to evaluate the impact of school feeding programmes sourced from small-holder farmers on small-holder food security, as well as on school children's education, health and nutrition in Mali. In addition, this study will examine the links between social accountability and programme performance. This is a field experiment planned around the scale-up of the national school feeding programme, involving 116 primary schools in 58 communities in food insecure areas of Mali. The randomly assigned interventions are: 1) a school feeding programme group, including schools and villages where the standard government programme is implemented; 2) a "home-grown" school feeding and social accountability group, including schools and villages where the programme is implemented in addition to training of community based organisations and local government; and 3) the control group, including schools and household from villages where the intervention will be delayed by at least two years, preferably without informing schools and households. Primary outcomes include small-holder farmer income, school participation and learning, and community involvement in the programme. Other outcomes include nutritional status and diet-diversity. The evaluation will follow a mixed method approach, including household, school and village level surveys as well as focus group discussions with small-holder farmers, school children, parents and community members. The impact evaluation will be incorporated within the national monitoring and evaluation (M&E) system strengthening activities that are currently underway in Mali. Baselines surveys are planned for 2012. A monthly process monitoring visits, spot

  9. Farmer Cooperation in the Context of Agro-clusters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wardhana, D.; Ihle, R.; Heijman, W.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    The geographical concentration of farming activities can promote institutional innovations for farmers. Sharing resources, knowledge, and markets in clustered regions lead to the income improvements of farmers. We explore such advantages for smallholder farmers in West Java of Indonesia by

  10. Implantation of recreation al espace for production knowing ins a school field: challenges and opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Licia Baruki

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The playful used as alternative practice is important facilitator in the acquisition ofknowledge, so this research aims generally to identify the impacts of creating and usingrecreational space on Education in the field and specific objectives: to delineate thespace interfere in relations between students and teachers and to investigate how thesite can contribute to the formation of knowledge, criticality, creativity and identity inEducation Field. The research is a qualitative and ten participants were third-year studentsand five teachers from 1st to 5th grade Municipal Agricultural School Governor ArnaldoEstevão de Figueiredo. Data were collected through semi-structured questionnaires. Therecreational space proved to be an area of development activities systematized used byteachers. In his free moments were important to strengthen the sense of group identityamong students and rural showed up, not by the repertoire of toys available, but thejokes and contextual usages.

  11. Exploring the use of Virtual Field Trips with elementary school teachers: A collaborative action research approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jeffrey Lance

    This research examines how elementary school teachers, when supported, use Virtual Field Trips (VFTs) to address the curricula in meaningful ways. I conducted a qualitative study with six teachers, in a collaborative action research context over a six month period. The teachers, five males and one female, all taught either grade five or six and utilized Virtual Field Trips within a variety of curricula areas including science, social studies, music and language arts. In addition, the thesis examines resulting integration of technology into the regular classroom program as a product of the utilization of Virtual Field Trips. The process of collaborative action research was applied as a means of personal and professional growth both for the participants and the researcher/facilitator. By the end of the research study, all participants had learned to integrate Virtual Field Trips into their classroom program, albeit with different levels of success and in different curricula areas. The development of attitudes, skills and knowledge for students and teachers alike was fostered through the participation in Virtual Field Trips. A common concern regarding the utilization of Virtual Field Trips was the time spent locating an appropriate site that met curricula expectations. Participation in the collaborative action research process allowed each teacher to grow professionally, personally and socially. Each participant strongly encouraged the utilization of a long term project with a common area of exploration as a means for positive professional development. Implications and recommendations for future research on the utilization of Virtual Field Trips, as well as the viability of collaborative action research to facilitate teacher development are presented.

  12. Exposure to Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields From Wi-Fi in Australian Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karipidis, Ken; Henderson, Stuart; Wijayasinghe, Don; Tjong, Lydiawati; Tinker, Rick

    2017-08-01

    The increasing use of Wi-Fi in schools and other places has given rise to public concern that the radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields from Wi-Fi have the potential to adversely affect children. The current study measured typical and peak RF levels from Wi-Fi and other sources in 23 schools in Australia. All of the RF measurements were much lower than the reference levels recommended by international guidelines for protection against established health effects. The typical and peak RF levels from Wi-Fi in locations occupied by children in the classroom were of the order of 10-4 and 10-2% of the exposure guidelines, respectively. Typical RF levels in the classroom were similar between Wi-Fi and radio but higher than other sources. In the schoolyard typical RF levels were higher for radio, TV and mobile phone base stations compared to Wi-Fi. The results of this study showed that the typical RF exposure of children from Wi-Fi at school is very low and comparable or lower to other sources in the environment. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  13. Farmer decision making and spatial variables in northern Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Jefferson; Kanter, Rebekah; Yarnasarn, Sanay; Ekasingh, Methi; Jones, Royce

    1994-05-01

    This research has two interrelated objectives. The first is to determine the extent to which a relationship exists between farmer characteristics and farming practices in three villages in northern Thailand. The second is to use standard statistical methods for incorporating spatial variables into the analysis and to assess the effects of these variables on farmer decision making. The data base includes information on the location and size of villages, roads, streams, and fields; a digital elevation model with information on elevation, slope, and aspect; and information keyed to individual fields on crops and cropping methods and the ethnicity, income, and religion of farmers. The map data (517 plots) were entered into a computerized geographic information systems (GIS). Results suggest several hypotheses about the relationships between land use and owner characteristics. More significantly, the study concludes that spatial analysis appears to be most useful when the dependent variable is either continuous or ordinal. The outlook is not quite as optimistic when the dependent variable is a nonordinal categorical variable. Before spatial analysis can be applied regularly to social science data, better computational tools need to be developed.

  14. Transforming School Leadership and Management to Support Student Learning and Development: The Field Guide to Comer Schools in Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, Edward T., Ed.; Ben-Avie, Michael, Ed.; Comer, James P., Ed.

    2004-01-01

    For more than 35 years, the Yale School Development Program (SDP) has been pioneering the Comer Process for planned change in schools. From initial planning and preparation, through foundation building, transformation, institutionalization, and renewal, the Comer Process provides school leaders with a comprehensive and effective framework for…

  15. Heat exposure on farmers in northeast Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frimpong, Kwasi; Van Etten E J, Eddie; Oosthuzien, Jacques; Fannam Nunfam, Victor

    2017-03-01

    Environmental health hazards faced by farmers, such as exposure to extreme heat stress, are a growing concern due to global climate change, particularly in tropical developing countries. In such environments, farmers are considered to be a population at risk of environmental heat exposure. The situation is exacerbated due to their farming methods that involve the use of primitive equipment and hard manual labour conducted in full sunshine under hot and humid conditions. However, there is inadequate information about the extent of heat exposure to such farmers, both at the household and farm levels. This paper presents results from a study assessing environmental heat exposure on rural smallholder farmers in Bawku East, Northern Ghana. From January to December 2013, Lascar USB temperature and humidity sensors and a calibrated Questemp heat stress monitor were deployed to farms and homes of rural farmers at Pusiga in Bawku East to capture farmers' exposure to heat stress in both their living and working environments as they executed regular farming routines. The Lascar sensors have the capability to frequently, accurately and securely measure temperature and humidity over long periods. The Questemp heat stress monitor was placed in the same vicinity and showed strong correlations to Lascar sensors in terms of derived values of wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT). The WBGT in the working environment of farmers peaked at 33.0 to 38.1 °C during the middle of the day in the rainy season from March to October and dropped to 14.0-23.7 °C in the early morning during this season. A maximum hourly WBGT of 28.9-37.5 °C (March-October) was recorded in the living environment of farmers, demonstrating little relief from heat exposure during the day. With these levels of heat stress, exposed farmers conducting physically demanding outdoor work risk suffering serious health consequences. The sustainability of manual farming practices is also under threat by such high levels of

  16. Assessment of Conservation Agriculture Practices by Smallholder Farmers in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindah Muzangwa

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Conservation agriculture (CA can sustainably address soil degradation and improve crop yields. However, the success of CA amongst South African smallholder farmers is not known. The aims of the study were to find out: (1 the extent of CA practice by the Eastern Cape smallholder farmers; (2 perceptions towards CA amongst smallholder farmers with some history of practising the technology; and (3 the impact of practised CA components on soil quality indicators. Diagnostic survey techniques and soil sampling in farmers’ fields were employed to gather data from five districts of the Eastern Cape, South Africa. The most common CA principle adopted by surveyed farmers was no-till (34.81%, whilst crop rotation and residue retention were practised by only 25.93% and 22.22% of the farmers, respectively. Education level and CA training influenced the likelihood of a farmer to practise no-till farming, whilst the likelihood of farmers to retain residues was influenced by education level and access to grazing lands. Lack of appropriate equipment and costly herbicides were the major constraining factors to practising CA. Crop residue retention conflicted with the common practice of free-range livestock grazing. Cabbage, maize and beans were the most common crops of choice for the few farmers that practised crop rotations. No significant (p > 0.05 improvement on soil quality indicators was observed with CA compared to the conventional farming method. The noted high dependency on government grants by the smallholder farmers could be a disincentive towards the adoption of agricultural innovations such as CA. Identification of practical key CA entry points is recommended, bearing in mind the noted impediments to CA adoption.

  17. Geophysics field school: A team-based learning experience for students and faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karchewski, B.; Innanen, K. A.; Lauer, R. M.; Pidlisecky, A.

    2016-12-01

    The core challenge facing a modern science educator is to deliver a curriculum that reaches broadly and deeply into the technical domain, while also helping students to develop fundamental scientific skills such as inquiry, critical thinking and technical communication. That is, our aim is for students to achieve significant learning at all levels summarized by Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives. It is not always clear how to achieve the full spectrum of goals, with much debate over which component is more important in a science education. Team-based and experiential learning are research-supported approaches that aim to reach across the spectrum by placing students in a setting where they solve practical problems in teams of peers. This learning mode modifies the role of the instructor to a guide or facilitator, and students take a leadership role in their own education. We present a case study of our team's implementation of team-based learning in a geophysics field school, an inherently experiential learning environment. The core philosophies behind our implementation are to present clearly defined learning outcomes, to recognize that students differ in their learning modalities and to strive to engage students through a range of evidence-based learning experiences. We discuss the techniques employed to create functional teams, the key learning activities involved in a typical day of field school and data demonstrating the learning activities that showed the strongest correlation to overall performance in the course. In the process, we also realized that our team-based approach to course design and implementation also enhanced our skillsets as educators, and our institution recently recognized our efforts with a team teaching award. Therefore, we conclude with some of our observations of best practices for team teaching in a field setting to initiate discussions with colleagues engaged in similar activities.

  18. PERFORMANCE OF BALI BULL IN GREENLOT FATTENING BY FARMERS WHEN RAINY SEASON IN TIMOR ISLAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.K. Tahuk

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to determine the performance of Bali bull in rainy season underfeedlotting management on farmer level in Timor Island. Twenty Bali bulls with 2.0-2.5 years old on thebasis of teeth eruption were used in this study. Feed for animals was field grass, king grass and cornstraw. The type, quantity and quality of feed given in accordance with the habits of farmers in thefattened cattle. Research was conducted by direct observation in farmer management during rainyseason. Data measured were daily gain, feed consumption and feed conversion. The data collected wastabulated and analyzed descriptively. The result showed that the average of daily gain weight was 0.53kg/head/d, dry matter intake was 3.88 kg/head/d and feed conversion was 7.55 kg DM/kg daily gain. Inconclusion, performance of Bali bull fattened at farmers level with forage in the rainy season could beimproved.

  19. Information Seeking Behaviour of Shrimp Farmers and their Perception towards Technology Dissemination through Mobile Phones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand PR

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted among the shrimp farmers to ascertain their information seeking behaviour and perception concerning extension service through mobile phones. The findings indicate that the farmer respondents were of the perception that mobile phone-aided extension service is a viable, expedient, prompt, cost-effective and novel approach. Further they expressed that a dedicated mobile app on shrimp farming with dynamic content modules on ‘disease diagnosis, calculations for water quality corrections, feed management, pond risk management and post your query ’would be very useful for farmers and extension workers to update their capacity and sharing of field experiences. Therefore, developing a mobile app on shrimp farming, incorporating the above features would enhance the access to quality information and minimise the information gap among the shrimp farmers.

  20. Addressing challenges in communicating adaptation practices to smallholder farmers in Kenya through a radio intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona Nyawira Mwaniki

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Farmers in Africa are particularly vulnerable to the impacts of climate change due to their high dependency on climate-sensitive natural resources. Kenyan farmers are faced with limited public agricultural extension services, narrowing their sources of useful information including adaptive strategies that would help them cope with the impacts of climate change. Radio can be an effective extension tool with the ability to reach many farmers in their local language. This study investigated the potential of radio in influencing the utilization of climate change information by farmers in Kilifi County, located along the Kenyan coast. Education and communication about climate change was undertaken using radio to make available and understandable information to different social and cultural groups. This study revealed that radio can effectively complement other agricultural extension methods and has the potential to engage farmers on climate change issues and motivate them to take action, if appropriate approaches are used. Although very few farmers (33% reported to have listened to the programs, a high percentage (82% of those who did implemented the recommended strategies and technologies they heard. The major challenges reported by farmers to accessing the radio programs were lack of a radio and unsuitable program timing. An additional reported challenge was the inability to store or record the programs resulting in farmers relying on their own recollection when implementing strategies. Further research should explore the use of social learning approaches that encourage group rather than individual listenership (such as community listening clubs and community-based radio schools to overcome these challenges.

  1. Income analysis of goat farmers on the farmers group in district of Serdang Bedagai

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manurung, J. N.; Hasnudi; Supriana, T.

    2018-02-01

    The farmers group are expected to reduce the production cost of goat breeding and improve the income of farmers which impact on the welfare of goat farmers. This research aim to analyze the factors that influence the income of farmers group, in sub-district Dolok Masihul Pegajahan, and Dolok Merawan, Serdang Bedagai. The method used is survey method with 90 respondents. Data was analysed by multiple linear regression. The result showed, simultaneously goat cost, sale price of goat, fixed cost and variable cost had significant effect on income of goat farmers. Partially, goat cost, variable cost and sale price of goat had significant effect on income of goat farmers, while fixed cost had no significant effect.

  2. Recognition and development of "educational technology" as a scientific field and school subject

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilović Mirčeta S.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper explores the process of development, establishment and recognition of "educational technology" as an independent scientific field and a separate teaching subject at universities. The paper points to: (a the problems that this field deals with or should deal with, (b knowledge needed for the profession of "educational technologist", (c various scientific institutions across the world involved in educational technology, (d scientific journals treating issues of modern educational technology, (e the authors i.e. psychologists and educators who developed and formulated the basic principles of this scientific field, (f educational features and potentials of educational technologies. Emphasis is placed on the role and importance of AV technology in developing, establishing and recognition of educational technology, and it is also pointed out that AV technology i.e. AV teaching aids and a movement for visualization of teaching were its forerunners and crucial factors for its establishing and developing into an independent area of teaching i.e. school subject. In summary it is stressed that educational technology provides for the execution of instruction through emission transmission, selection, coding, decoding, reception, memorization transformation of all types of pieces of information in teaching.

  3. Agricultural waste utilisation strategies and demand for urban waste compost: Evidence from smallholder farmers in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigussie, Abebe; Kuyper, Thomas W; de Neergaard, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    The use of agricultural waste for soil amendment is limited in developing countries. Competition between fuel and feed is the major cause for the insufficient application of agricultural waste on cropland. The aims of this study were therefore (i) to investigate variation in agricultural waste allocation between groups of farmers with different livelihood strategies and link this allocation with the nutrient balances of their production systems, (ii) to identify farm characteristics that influence utilisation of agricultural waste for soil amendment, and (iii) to assess demand for urban waste compost. A total of 220 farmers were selected randomly and interviewed using standardised semi-structured questionnaires. Four groups of farmers, namely (i) field crop farmers, (ii) vegetable producers, (iii) ornamental-plant growers, and (iv) farmers practising mixed farming, were identified using categorical principal component and two-step cluster analyses. Field crop farmers produced the largest quantity of agricultural waste, but they allocated 80% of manure to fuel and 85% of crop residues to feed. Only crop residues were applied on soils. Farmers also sold manure and crop residues, and this generated 5-10% of their annual income. Vegetable and ornamental-plant growers allocated over 40% of manure and crop residues to soil amendment. Hence, nutrient balances were less negative in vegetable production systems. Education, farm size, land tenure and access to extension services were the variables that impeded allocation of agricultural waste to soil amendment. Replacement of fuel and feed through sustainable means is a viable option for soil fertility management. Urban waste compost should also be used as alternative option for soil amendment. Our results showed variation in compost demand between farmers. Education, landownership, experience with compost and access to extension services explained variation in compost demand. We also demonstrated that labour availability

  4. Impacts of farmer-based training in seed production in Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tin Huynh Quang,

    2009-01-01

    Key words: farmer seed production school, farm-saved seed, formal seed sector, impact assessment, improved practice, local practice, rice (Oryza sativa), seed production, seed quality, Vietnam Rice (Oryza sativa) is the most important food and cash crop of Vietnam. It is cultivated in all

  5. extent of use of ict by fish farmers in isoko agricultural zone of delta

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mr. TONY A

    and Nenna (2008) that vast majority of the adult population of any society consists of married people. The result reveals that 62.50% of the respondents had secondary school education, indicating that the farmers had moderate level of awareness about agricultural activities as a result of their level of education. Also, ...

  6. Farmers have their say “where the water world meets” | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    If I had the $70 it takes to build the cheapest toilet, I would use it first for school fees, food, clothes, or a bicycle,” Patricia, a farmer from Zimbabwe, told international water experts gathered at a major global forum in Sweden. So why, she continued, did they think she would choose to sink her money first into building a latrine?

  7. Management of School Infrastructure in the Context of a No-Fee Schools Policy in Rural South African Schools: Lessons from the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marishane, Ramodikoe Nylon

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the management of school infrastructure in the context of the "no-fee schools" policy introduced in the South African education delivery system. Focusing on four rural schools, the study applied a qualitative method, which involved observation of infrastructure conditions prevailing at four selected schools and…

  8. Farmers' reactions to the internationalisation of cooperatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petri Ollila

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This study examined the extent to which farmer cooperatives enjoy social capital within their memberships as they become internationalised. The empirical basis was a survey of farmers in Finland. Findings from limited dependent variable regression models suggest that one group of farmers is loyal to the cooperative and opposes its foreign investments. A second and a third group have lower levels of social capital and switch membership status between multiple cooperatives or opt out of cooperatives. These farmers welcome international investment. This finding was more significant for individual farm types than the social capital-linked opposition to internationalisation. A general conclusion is that the internationalization of cooperatives seems affect the members’ trust in the cooperative differently. The increasing heterogeneity within the memberships may give rise to governance problems.

  9. Allegheny County Farmers Markets Locations (2017)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset shows the locations of farmers markets in Allegheny County. If viewing this description on the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center’s open data...

  10. Analyzing the heterogeneity of farmers' preferences for improvements in dairy cow traits using farmer typologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Collado, D; Byrne, T J; Amer, P R; Santos, B F S; Axford, M; Pryce, J E

    2015-06-01

    Giving consideration to farmers' preferences for improvements in animal traits when designing genetic selection tools such as selection indexes might increase the uptake of these tools. The increase in use of genetic selection tools will, in turn, assist in the realization of genetic gain in breeding programs. However, the determination of farmers' preferences is not trivial because of its large heterogeneity. The aim of this study was to quantify Australian dairy farmers' preferences for cow trait improvements to inform and ultimately direct the choice of traits and selection indexes in the 2014 review of the National Breeding Objective. A specific aim was to analyze the heterogeneity of preferences for cow trait improvements by determining whether there are farmer types that can be identified with specific patterns of preferences. We analyzed whether farmer types differed in farming system, socioeconomic profile, and attitudes toward breeding and genetic evaluation tools. An online survey was developed to explore farmers' preferences for improvement in 13 cow traits. The pairwise comparisons method was used to derive a ranking of the traits for each respondent. A total of 551 farmers fully completed the survey. A principal component analysis followed by a Ward hierarchical cluster analysis was used to group farmers according to their preferences. Three types of farmers were determined: (1) production-focused farmers, who gave the highest preference of all for improvements in protein yield, lactation persistency, feed efficiency, cow live weight, and milking speed; (2) functionality-focused farmers with the highest preferences of all for improvements in mastitis, lameness, and calving difficulty; and (3) type-focused farmers with the highest preferences of all for mammary system and type. Farmer types differed in their age, their attitudes toward genetic selection, and in the selection criteria they use. Surprisingly, farmer types did not differ for herd size

  11. The impact of drought on technical efficiency of smallholder farmers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In addition to construction of irrigation infrastructure and reallocation of farmers, we also recommend increased education support, financial inclusion of rural farmers through the development of rural financial institutions and publication of drought related information for farmers' consumption. Key words: Farmers, Drought, ...

  12. Linking African Farmers to Markets (eARN Africa) | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Studies suggest that information and communication technologies (ICTs) are of some benefit to farmers, but how effective they are in linking small farmers to wider markets remains unknown. There are knowledge gaps concerning the factors conditioning farmers' adoption of ICTs, farmers' benefits from ICTs, drivers of ...

  13. Reinforcing key concepts in the discipline of geobiology through active learning in the field - an example integrating middle school through graduate school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilhooly, W., III; Werne, J. P.; O'Beirne, M.; Johnson, E.; Martin, P. A.; Harris, J. H., IV; Fouskas, F.; Steinman, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Our goal was to introduce students to current research in the scientific discipline of geobiology. To accomplish this, we established a three-fold approach to link course work with fieldwork through: 1) active participation in the field and laboratory, 2) multi-tiered mentoring, 3) and formal education modules. During the summer of 2015, six undergraduate students and seven graduate students collected field samples from Green Lake (NY) and Mahoney Lake (BC). The students learned how to take water and sediment samples, process samples in anaerobic chambers in the field, and deal with moderately adverse field conditions. These learning by doing activities reinforced lessons learned in the classroom. The second phase involved two high school students who helped process and analyze the samples in the laboratory during summer session. These students worked with the undergraduate and graduate students who participated in the fieldwork. This interaction benefited both the high school students, who learned new methods, and the university students who learned to explain their field research and mentor younger students. The third phase involved creation of education modules to better inform middle school students of the issues of hypoxia. We piloted portions of our module at a conference for forty middle school girls. Graduate students showed the girls field equipment and how to make oxygen measurements using handheld instruments. In all of these activities, the students had the opportunity to work with the PI's, who were fully engaged in the process and who made a constant effort to be educators in the field and in the lab.

  14. Pros and cons of flowers strips for farmers. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uyttenbroeck, R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Description of the subject. To counteract environmental problems due to agricultural intensification, European farmers can apply agri-environmental schemes in their fields. Flower strips are one example of these schemes, with the aim of supporting biodiversity, leading to an increase in "useful" species groups such as pollinators for crop pollination and natural enemies for pest control. However, to our knowledge, a complete appraisal of the pros and cons of flower strips, from a farmer's point of view, does not yet exist. It is proposed that better and more complete information could increase the adoption and implementation of such agri-environmental schemes. Objectives. This study aims 1 to assess the pros and cons of flower strips, from a farmer's point of view, and 2 to highlight the knowledge gaps that exist in the scientific literature, for the different types of pros and cons. Method. We listed the different components of the appraisal of pros and cons and conducted a systematic screening of the scientific literature on flower strips and these components. Results. The largest part of the 31 selected studies was concerning agronomical and ecological processes, such as pollination and animal pest control. Most of them indicated positive effects of flower strips. For many components of the appraisal, mostly economic and social ones, few or no studies were found. Conclusions. While a positive balance of pros and cons, from a farmer's point of view, came from our literature screening, large research gaps still remain and more research is required, especially in the economic and social components of the evaluation.

  15. Paraquat use among farmers in Korea after the ban.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Ye Jin; Kim, Jaeyoung; Lee, Won Jin

    2017-07-04

    The purpose of this study was to examine the proportion of paraquat use among farmers and to describe their epidemiologic characteristics after the paraquat ban in 2012. We interviewed 249 farmers in Korea in 2014. Approximately 20% of the farmers reported using paraquat in 2014. Farmers with longer farming experience, longer pesticide application years, and upland farming reported an increased risk of paraquat use although the trend was not statistically significant. The majority of the farmers used preexisting paraquat (85.7%), but some farmers purchased it illegally (14.3%). Farmers who used paraquat perceived paraquat as a dangerous chemical; however, they disagreed with the necessity of the paraquat ban.

  16. White School Counselors Becoming Racial Justice Allies to Students of Color: A Call to the Field of School Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Lauren J.; Singh, Anneliese A.

    2015-01-01

    White school counselors must consider how racial identity, and whiteness as a construct, influences their work with students of color. This article addresses opportunities for White school counselors regarding how they may become allies to students of color and suggests way in which counselor educators can support the ally identity development in…

  17. Engaging Families to Support Students' Transition to High School: Evidence from the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Iver, Martha Abele; Epstein, Joyce L.; Sheldon, Steven B.; Fonseca, Ean

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory study addresses the challenge of declining family engagement at the critical transition to high school. We use data from a survey of schools to examine whether and how middle grades and high schools engage families when their students transition to high school. Findings indicate that there is a significant negative relationship…

  18. Factors Limiting Adoption of Technologies by Farmers in Catabola Municipality, Angola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rušarová K.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the paper is to define the factors influencing the adoption of animal traction and/or mechanical-power technology in the conditions of Catabola municipality where hand-tool technology is being used on 99.7% of the area cultivated by small farmers. Primary data collection was conducted in the period July–August 2011; semi-structured questionnaires and focus group discussions were the most frequent methods used. In total, 151 small-scale farmers from 9 villages participated in the survey. Ten factors influencing the dependent variable – level of technology used by farmers in combination with hiring of labour – were defined. The factors were statistically analyzed by ANOVA. The area of cultivated land and the educational level of both parents and children were found to be the factors limiting the process of animal traction or mechanical power adoption by small farmers in the Catabola municipality. In addition, a relatively high rate of child labour was observed. With the exclusion of childless families, 62.7% of small farmer families regularly use children aged 0–14 years for field operations. The results confirm that the factor of hiring extra labour is irrelevant in determining the development in technology use by small farmers in the Catabola municipality.

  19. Empirical analysis of farmers' drought risk perception: objective factors, personal circumstances, and social influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duinen, Rianne van; Filatova, Tatiana; Geurts, Peter; Veen, Anne van der

    2015-04-01

    Drought-induced water shortage and salinization are a global threat to agricultural production. With climate change, drought risk is expected to increase as drought events are assumed to occur more frequently and to become more severe. The agricultural sector's adaptive capacity largely depends on farmers' drought risk perceptions. Understanding the formation of farmers' drought risk perceptions is a prerequisite to designing effective and efficient public drought risk management strategies. Various strands of literature point at different factors shaping individual risk perceptions. Economic theory points at objective risk variables, whereas psychology and sociology identify subjective risk variables. This study investigates and compares the contribution of objective and subjective factors in explaining farmers' drought risk perception by means of survey data analysis. Data on risk perceptions, farm characteristics, and various other personality traits were collected from farmers located in the southwest Netherlands. From comparing the explanatory power of objective and subjective risk factors in separate models and a full model of risk perception, it can be concluded that farmers' risk perceptions are shaped by both rational and emotional factors. In a full risk perception model, being located in an area with external water supply, owning fields with salinization issues, cultivating drought-/salt-sensitive crops, farm revenue, drought risk experience, and perceived control are significant explanatory variables of farmers' drought risk perceptions. © 2014 Society for Risk Analysis.

  20. Management of School Infrastructure in the Context of a No-Fee Schools Policy in Rural South African Schools: Lessons from the Field

    OpenAIRE

    Ramodikoe Nylon Marishane

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the management of school infrastructure in the context of the “no-fee schools” policy introduced in the South African education delivery system. Focusing on four rural schools, the study applied a qualitative method, which involved observation of infrastructure conditions prevailing at four selected schools and in-depth interviews held with their principals. The study has found that though the no-fee policy has come to relieve poor parents of the burden of paying school fe...

  1. Empowering Smallholder Farmers in Markets: strengthening the advocacy capacities of national farmer organisations through collaborative research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ton, G.; Grip, de K.; Lançon, F.; Onumah, G.; Proctor, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    The Empowering Smallholder Farmers in Markets programme (ESFIM) supported the advocacy capacities of national farmer organisations (NFOs) for improving smallholder market access. The programme gave NFOs in 11 countries the opportunity to contract local experts to strengthen the evidence-base of

  2. Lamont-Doherty's Secondary School Field Research Program: Institutionalizing outreach to secondary school students at a soft-money research institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambrotto, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Secondary School Field Research Program is a field and laboratory internship for high school students at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. Over the past 11 years it has grown into a significant program, engaging approximately 50 high school and college students each summer, most of them from ethnic and economic groups that are under-represented in the STEM fields. The internships are based on research-driven science questions on estuarine physics, chemistry, ecology and the paleo-environment. Field studies are linked to associated laboratory analyses whose results are reported by the students as a final project. For the past two years, we have focused on the transition to an institutional program, with sustainable funding and organizational structures. At a grant-driven institution whose mission is largely restricted to basic research, institutionalization has not been an easy task. To leverage scarce resources we have implemented a layered structure that relies on near-peer mentoring. So a typical research team might include a mix of new and more experienced high school students, a college student, a high school science teacher and a Lamont researcher as a mentor. Graduates of the program are employed to assist with administration. Knowledge and best practices diffuse through the organization in an organic, if not entirely structured, fashion. We have found that a key to long-term funding has been survival: as we have sustained a successful program and developed a model adapted to Lamont's unique environment, we have attracted longer term core financing on which grant-driven extensions can be built. The result is a highly flexible program that is student-centered in the context of a broader research culture connecting our participants with the advantages of working at a premier soft-money research institution.

  3. FIELD RESEARCH ON DISCOURSE ANALYSIS: DISCUSSING A DISPOSITIVE TO APPROACH ON MEANINGS OF WORK IN THE EVERYDAY LIFE IN SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno DEUSDARÁ

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to discuss the methodological choices in field research, from discourse studies. We analyze an experience of field research in the staff room of a public school in Rio de Janeiro. In discussing the methodological choices, preference was given to the concepts of active responsive understanding (BAKHTIN, 2000 and speech genres (BAKHTIN, 2000; MAINGUENEAU, 2001. As a result, we observe the productivity of these concepts in an institutional viewpoint of language practices.

  4. Health of farmers in southland: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firth, H; Herbison, P; McBride, D; Feyer, A M

    2001-09-28

    To describe the health of farmers in Southland. Coss-sectional study of a random sample of farmers in Southland. 586 individuals were interviewed from 286 farms with a response rate of 65.4%. The prevalence of at least one injury in the last twelve months which prevented normal farm work was 17.1%. Low back pain was common with 54.6% reporting such an episode in the last twelve months. Noise-induced hearing loss was prevalent among men with 28.7% of those 45 years and over being affected. Levels of asthma appeared low with a point prevalence of 6.8%, with 4.6% on medication. There were 19.3% of male farmers who were obese. The prevalence of alcohol use disorder among men aged 15-24 years was 57.4%, and 39.0% among farm workers. Similarly, 32.0% of men in this age-group smoked, with 35.6% of farm workers being smokers. Farmers experienced high levels of injury, low back pain and noise-induced hearing loss. Community intervention programmes to prevent injury remain a priority for farmers, although lifestyle factors should also be addressed, particularly among farm workers.

  5. The Practical Source of Educational Knowledge for Pre-Service Teachers in Confronting Field-Based Challenges in School Practicum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsien-Chang; Liu, Shih-Hsiung

    2013-01-01

    Educational value in teacher education courses is unquestioned; however, there are still many doubts about the practicality of the knowledge acquired from university courses and a field-based course in school practicum. The purpose of this study is to identify the practicality of the educational knowledge from the above courses for pre-service…

  6. Toward Effective and Compelling Instruction for High School eCommerce Students: Results from a Small Field Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luterbach, Kenneth J.; Rodriguez, Diane; Love, Lakecia

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes an instructional development effort to create effective and compelling instruction for eCommerce students. Results from a small field study inform the development project. Four high school students in an eCommerce course completed the standalone tutorial developed to teach them how to create a web page in the HyperText Markup…

  7. An Elementary School Environmental Education Field Trip: Long-Term Effects on Ecological and Environmental Knowledge and Attitude Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, James; Knapp, Doug; Benton, Gregory M.

    2007-01-01

    Using phenomenological analysis, the authors examined the long-term effects of an environmental education school field trip on fourth grade elementary students who visited Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The authors' findings suggest that one year after the experience, many students remembered what they had seen and heard and had developed a…

  8. Schooling's "Contribution" to Contemporary Violent Conflict: Review of Theoretical Ideas and Case Studies in the Field of Education and Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Mitsuko

    2015-01-01

    Some argue that the field of study of "education and conflict" has yet to be solidified since its emergence in the 1990s, partly due to the weak theory base. This article reviews the literature on the "contribution" of schooling in contemporary violent conflict, via three strands of theoretical ideas, to demonstrate the…

  9. Challenges faced by cocoyam farmers in adapting to climate change in Southeast Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.C. Ifeanyi-Obi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study examined the challenges faced by cocoyam farmers in adapting to climate change in Southeast, Nigeria. Three hundred and eighty-four respondents selected through multi-stage sampling technique were used for the study. Data were collected using structured questionnaire and interview schedule and analysed using both descriptive and inferential statistical tools. Findings showed that majority were females (67%, married (92% and maintain average household size of 6 persons and a mean age of 51 years. They were mainly primary (32% and secondary (34% school certificate holders with farming (77% as their major occupation. The major cropping pattern practiced was mixed farming with cassava (63% and maize (58% as the major crops cultivated by the farmers. Majority of the farmers owned farms of one hectare and below accessed mainly through inheritance (76% and labour sourced mainly through hiring (50%. Most (81% of the farmers have spent more than ten years in farming. Climate change information was accessed mainly through their personal experience (64%, radio (42% and fellow villagers (39%. The study identified eight major challenges faced by cocoyam farmers in adapting to climate change namely Lack/high cost of farm inputs and low soil fertility (Factor 1, Land and labour constraints (Factor 2, Poor access to information and ineffectiveness of cooperatives (Factor 3, lack of/poor access to fund and credit facilities and poor government support (Factor 4, lack of improved varieties of cocoyam (factor 5, poor value attached to cocoyam (Factor 6, poor infrastructural capacity and technology know-how (Factor 7 and Transportation constraint (Factor 8. Analysis of variance identified significant variations in the challenges faced by cocoyam farmers in the study area. The study recommends enrollment in cooperatives and revitalizing existing cooperatives, re-orientation of farmers on the benefits of cocoyam and increased used of climate change

  10. Determinants of tillage frequency among smallholder farmers in two semi-arid areas in Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temesgen, Melesse; Rockstrom, J.; Savenije, H. H. G.; Hoogmoed, W. B.; Alemu, Dawit

    Traditional tillage systems practiced by farmers in semi-arid regions of Ethiopia are characterized by repeated and cross plowing with an indigenous plow called Maresha. Repeated and cross plowing have led to land degradation. Conservation tillage systems that advocate minimum soil disturbance can alleviate land degradation problems. However, before introducing reduced tillage systems, it was found necessary to study why farmers undertake repeated plowing. The study was undertaken in two semi-arid areas called Melkawoba and Wulinchity located in the central rift valley of Ethiopia and on two major crops; Tef ( Eragrostis Tef (Zucc.)) and maize ( Zea mays XX). Fifty farmers from each area were randomly selected and interviewed using a structured questionnaire. The results showed that farmers in the study area plow repeatedly in order to completely disturb unplowed strips of land left between adjacent furrows. Unplowed strips are the results of the V-shaped furrows created by the Maresha plow. Farmers generally do not plow before the soil is wetted by rainfall. Wetting and drying cycles due to dry spells occurring between rainfall events force farmers to plow frequently to avoid moisture losses through surface runoff, evaporation and weed transpiration. Tef fields are plowed 4-5 times while maize fields are plowed 3-4 times. Tillage frequency increased with the education level and experience of farmers; with their perception about the purpose of tillage such as moisture conservation, weed control and soil warming; and with resource availability such as area of land and family labor. Tillage frequency was higher for Tef than for maize and in heavy soils than in light soils.

  11. The prevalence of low back pain and its associated factors in Thai rubber farmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udom, Chadayu; Janwantanakul, Prawit; Kanlayanaphotporn, Rotsalai

    2016-11-29

    Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most prevalent musculoskeletal disorders in the general population, especially among manual laborers. Moreover, it often brings about lost wages and additional medical expenses. However, the potential risk factors for LBP are unknown. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of LBP and to determine the individual, occupational, and psychosocial factors associated with LBP among rubber farmers. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 450 Thai rubber farmers using cluster random sampling. Data were collected using face-to-face interviews and objective examination and were analyzed using multivariate logistic regression. Of the 433 rubber farmers, the point and 12-month prevalence of LBP in rubber farmers was 33% and 55.7%, respectively. BMI, primary school education, exposure to pesticides, and tapping below knee level were statistically associated with LBP after controlling for other variables. Low back pain is common among rubber farmers. Only four factors were identified as being associated with the high prevalence of LBP. However, these factors might be altered if more variables are taken into account. Further research investigating the causal relation between these factors and LBP should be conducted.

  12. Undergraduate Psychology Students' Knowledge and Exposure to School Psychology: Suggestions for Diversifying the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocanegra, Joel O.; Gubi, Aaron A.; Fan, Chung-Hau; Hansmann, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    Trainers within school psychology have struggled to recruit racial/ethnic minority graduate students, with a recent demographic survey suggesting that racial/ethnic minorities comprise 9.3% of school-based practitioners (Curtis, Castillo, & Gelley, 2012). Furthermore, research has suggested that school psychology training programs have also…

  13. Restricted application of insecticides: a promising tsetse control technique, but what do the farmers think of it?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanny Bouyer

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Restricted application of insecticides to cattle is a cheap and safe farmer-based method to control tsetse. In Western Africa, it is applied using a footbath, mainly to control nagana and the tick Amblyomma variegatum. In Eastern and Southern Africa, it might help controlling the human disease, i.e., Rhodesian sleeping sickness as well. The efficiency of this new control method against ticks, tsetse and trypanosomoses has been demonstrated earlier. The invention, co-built by researchers and farmers ten years ago, became an innovation in Burkina Faso through its diffusion by two development projects. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this research, we studied the process and level of adoption in 72 farmers inhabiting the peri-urban areas of Ouagadougou and Bobo-Dioulasso. Variables describing the livestock farming system, the implementation and perception of the method and the knowledge of the epidemiological system were used to discriminate three clusters of cattle farmers that were then compared using indicators of adoption. The first cluster corresponded to modern farmers who adopted the technique very well. The more traditional farmers were discriminated into two clusters, one of which showed a good adoption rate, whereas the second failed to adopt the method. The economic benefit and the farmers' knowledge of the epidemiological system appeared to have a low impact on the early adoption process whereas some modern practices, as well as social factors appeared critical. The quality of technical support provided to the farmers had also a great influence. Cattle farmers' innovation-risk appraisal was analyzed using Rogers' adoption criteria which highlighted individual variations in risk perceptions and benefits, as well as the prominent role of the socio-technical network of cattle farmers. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Results are discussed to highlight the factors that should be taken into consideration, to move discoveries from

  14. Attitude of Farmers towards Kisan Call Centres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shely Mary Koshy

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to measure the attitude of farmers in Kerala, India towards Kisan Call Centre (KCC. Kisan Call Centre provides free agricultural advisory services to every citizen involved in agriculture through a toll free number. One hundred and fifty farmers who have utilized the Kisan Call Centre service were selected from the database of KCC. The results showed that the respondents had moderately favourable attitude towards KCC followed by highly favourable attitude. The variables digital divide, temporal awareness on KCC, satisfaction towards KCC and utilization of KCC were found to have a positive correlation with the attitude of respondents towards KCC.

  15. Pursuing sustainable productivity with millions of smallholder farmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhenling; Zhang, Hongyan; Chen, Xinping; Zhang, Chaochun; Ma, Wenqi; Huang, Chengdong; Zhang, Weifeng; Mi, Guohua; Miao, Yuxin; Li, Xiaolin; Gao, Qiang; Yang, Jianchang; Wang, Zhaohui; Ye, Youliang; Guo, Shiwei; Lu, Jianwei; Huang, Jianliang; Lv, Shihua; Sun, Yixiang; Liu, Yuanying; Peng, Xianlong; Ren, Jun; Li, Shiqing; Deng, Xiping; Shi, Xiaojun; Zhang, Qiang; Yang, Zhiping; Tang, Li; Wei, Changzhou; Jia, Liangliang; Zhang, Jiwang; He, Mingrong; Tong, Yanan; Tang, Qiyuan; Zhong, Xuhua; Liu, Zhaohui; Cao, Ning; Kou, Changlin; Ying, Hao; Yin, Yulong; Jiao, Xiaoqiang; Zhang, Qingsong; Fan, Mingsheng; Jiang, Rongfeng; Zhang, Fusuo; Dou, Zhengxia

    2018-03-01

    Sustainably feeding a growing population is a grand challenge, and one that is particularly difficult in regions that are dominated by smallholder farming. Despite local successes, mobilizing vast smallholder communities with science- and evidence-based management practices to simultaneously address production and pollution problems has been infeasible. Here we report the outcome of concerted efforts in engaging millions of Chinese smallholder farmers to adopt enhanced management practices for greater yield and environmental performance. First, we conducted field trials across China’s major agroecological zones to develop locally applicable recommendations using a comprehensive decision-support program. Engaging farmers to adopt those recommendations involved the collaboration of a core network of 1,152 researchers with numerous extension agents and agribusiness personnel. From 2005 to 2015, about 20.9 million farmers in 452 counties adopted enhanced management practices in fields with a total of 37.7 million cumulative hectares over the years. Average yields (maize, rice and wheat) increased by 10.8–11.5%, generating a net grain output of 33 million tonnes (Mt). At the same time, application of nitrogen decreased by 14.7–18.1%, saving 1.2 Mt of nitrogen fertilizers. The increased grain output and decreased nitrogen fertilizer use were equivalent to US$12.2 billion. Estimated reactive nitrogen losses averaged 4.5–4.7 kg nitrogen per Megagram (Mg) with the intervention compared to 6.0–6.4 kg nitrogen per Mg without. Greenhouse gas emissions were 328 kg, 812 kg and 434 kg CO2 equivalent per Mg of maize, rice and wheat produced, respectively, compared to 422 kg, 941 kg and 549 kg CO2 equivalent per Mg without the intervention. On the basis of a large-scale survey (8.6 million farmer participants) and scenario analyses, we further demonstrate the potential impacts of implementing the enhanced management practices on China’s food security and

  16. Pursuing sustainable productivity with millions of smallholder farmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhenling; Zhang, Hongyan; Chen, Xinping; Zhang, Chaochun; Ma, Wenqi; Huang, Chengdong; Zhang, Weifeng; Mi, Guohua; Miao, Yuxin; Li, Xiaolin; Gao, Qiang; Yang, Jianchang; Wang, Zhaohui; Ye, Youliang; Guo, Shiwei; Lu, Jianwei; Huang, Jianliang; Lv, Shihua; Sun, Yixiang; Liu, Yuanying; Peng, Xianlong; Ren, Jun; Li, Shiqing; Deng, Xiping; Shi, Xiaojun; Zhang, Qiang; Yang, Zhiping; Tang, Li; Wei, Changzhou; Jia, Liangliang; Zhang, Jiwang; He, Mingrong; Tong, Yanan; Tang, Qiyuan; Zhong, Xuhua; Liu, Zhaohui; Cao, Ning; Kou, Changlin; Ying, Hao; Yin, Yulong; Jiao, Xiaoqiang; Zhang, Qingsong; Fan, Mingsheng; Jiang, Rongfeng; Zhang, Fusuo; Dou, Zhengxia

    2018-03-15

    Sustainably feeding a growing population is a grand challenge, and one that is particularly difficult in regions that are dominated by smallholder farming. Despite local successes, mobilizing vast smallholder communities with science- and evidence-based management practices to simultaneously address production and pollution problems has been infeasible. Here we report the outcome of concerted efforts in engaging millions of Chinese smallholder farmers to adopt enhanced management practices for greater yield and environmental performance. First, we conducted field trials across China's major agroecological zones to develop locally applicable recommendations using a comprehensive decision-support program. Engaging farmers to adopt those recommendations involved the collaboration of a core network of 1,152 researchers with numerous extension agents and agribusiness personnel. From 2005 to 2015, about 20.9 million farmers in 452 counties adopted enhanced management practices in fields with a total of 37.7 million cumulative hectares over the years. Average yields (maize, rice and wheat) increased by 10.8-11.5%, generating a net grain output of 33 million tonnes (Mt). At the same time, application of nitrogen decreased by 14.7-18.1%, saving 1.2 Mt of nitrogen fertilizers. The increased grain output and decreased nitrogen fertilizer use were equivalent to US$12.2 billion. Estimated reactive nitrogen losses averaged 4.5-4.7 kg nitrogen per Megagram (Mg) with the intervention compared to 6.0-6.4 kg nitrogen per Mg without. Greenhouse gas emissions were 328 kg, 812 kg and 434 kg CO 2 equivalent per Mg of maize, rice and wheat produced, respectively, compared to 422 kg, 941 kg and 549 kg CO 2 equivalent per Mg without the intervention. On the basis of a large-scale survey (8.6 million farmer participants) and scenario analyses, we further demonstrate the potential impacts of implementing the enhanced management practices on China's food security and

  17. THE IMPORTANCE OF BANK’S REPUTATION IN THE SELECTION OF BANKING PRODUCTS IN THE OPINION OF MIDDLE POMERANIAN FARMERS

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Rosa

    2016-01-01

    Farmers, when choosing a bank whose services they want to use, are guided by various factors. The purpose of the research conducted was to select the most essential factors that determine the choice of a bank and an identification of connections between opinions on a bank (its reputation) and the selected features that characterize farmers from the Middle Pomeranian region. The primary data obtained in the course of the empirical field research conducted and a multidimensional correspondence ...

  18. Social innovation to promote sustainability and independence of small-scale palm oil farmers in the Province of Jambi, Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Firman, Anita Nathalia

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to investigate the situation of the independent small-scale palm oil farmers in the Province of Jambi, Indonesia regarding the practices of palm oil production that cause deforestation in Sumatra. The goal of this thesis was to provide sustainable opportunities for the independent small-scale farmers in Jambi through social innovation. The field research took place at the village of Mekar Jaya and Sungai Rotan Village in the Provinces of Jambi, Indonesia. In the fra...

  19. Local soil quality assessment of north-central Namibia: integrating farmers' and technical knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudat, Brice; Bloemertz, Lena; Kuhn, Nikolaus J.

    2018-02-01

    Soil degradation is a major threat for farmers of semi-arid north-central Namibia. Soil conservation practices can be promoted by the development of soil quality (SQ) evaluation toolboxes that provide ways to evaluate soil degradation. However, such toolboxes must be adapted to local conditions to reach farmers. Based on qualitative (interviews and soil descriptions) and quantitative (laboratory analyses) data, we developed a set of SQ indicators relevant for our study area that integrates farmers' field experiences (FFEs) and technical knowledge. We suggest using participatory mapping to delineate soil units (Oshikwanyama soil units, KwSUs) based on FFEs, which highlight mostly soil properties that integrate long-term productivity and soil hydrological characteristics (i.e. internal SQ). The actual SQ evaluation of a location depends on the KwSU described and is thereafter assessed by field soil texture (i.e. chemical fertility potential) and by soil colour shade (i.e. SOC status). This three-level information aims to reveal SQ improvement potential by comparing, for any location, (a) estimated clay content against median clay content (specific to KwSU) and (b) soil organic status against calculated optimal values (depends on clay content). The combination of farmers' and technical assessment cumulates advantages of both systems of knowledge, namely the integrated long-term knowledge of the farmers and a short- and medium-term SQ status assessment. The toolbox is a suggestion for evaluating SQ and aims to help farmers, rural development planners and researchers from all fields of studies understanding SQ issues in north-central Namibia. This suggested SQ toolbox is adapted to a restricted area of north-central Namibia, but similar tools could be developed in most areas where small-scale agriculture prevails.

  20. Local soil quality assessment of north-central Namibia: integrating farmers' and technical knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Prudat

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Soil degradation is a major threat for farmers of semi-arid north-central Namibia. Soil conservation practices can be promoted by the development of soil quality (SQ evaluation toolboxes that provide ways to evaluate soil degradation. However, such toolboxes must be adapted to local conditions to reach farmers. Based on qualitative (interviews and soil descriptions and quantitative (laboratory analyses data, we developed a set of SQ indicators relevant for our study area that integrates farmers' field experiences (FFEs and technical knowledge. We suggest using participatory mapping to delineate soil units (Oshikwanyama soil units, KwSUs based on FFEs, which highlight mostly soil properties that integrate long-term productivity and soil hydrological characteristics (i.e. internal SQ. The actual SQ evaluation of a location depends on the KwSU described and is thereafter assessed by field soil texture (i.e. chemical fertility potential and by soil colour shade (i.e. SOC status. This three-level information aims to reveal SQ improvement potential by comparing, for any location, (a estimated clay content against median clay content (specific to KwSU and (b soil organic status against calculated optimal values (depends on clay content. The combination of farmers' and technical assessment cumulates advantages of both systems of knowledge, namely the integrated long-term knowledge of the farmers and a short- and medium-term SQ status assessment. The toolbox is a suggestion for evaluating SQ and aims to help farmers, rural development planners and researchers from all fields of studies understanding SQ issues in north-central Namibia. This suggested SQ toolbox is adapted to a restricted area of north-central Namibia, but similar tools could be developed in most areas where small-scale agriculture prevails.

  1. Land conservation knowledge in farmers' language - a case from Tigray, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyssen, Jan; Assefa, Romha; Gebreslassie, Seifu; Frankl, Amaury

    2017-04-01

    Research findings on land degradation and rehabilitation in the Tigray region of Ethiopia over more than 20 years have been published in many journals, and contributed to scientific knowledge that is relevant for rural development and sustainable livelihood. Direct knowledge sharing with farmers was done through (i) the implementation of five development projects, (ii) the organisation of so-called Farmers' Days (a dozen in total) in which research findings were demonstrated in the field, and (iii) the development of three extension manuals (two in the local Tigrigna language and one in English). In a bid to better reach the rural community, to hand the knowledge directly to the farmers, and hence to empower them, we took inspiration from 'almanacs' as they had been used in northwest Europe. One of the traditional functions of such almanacs is, in view of the close links between a calendar and farm works, to make them most useful to the peasant majority of the population. Hence, the objectives of the research reported here were to (1) develop a booklet in local Tigrigna language that holds basic research findings as well as local knowledge on land conservation, expressed in simple words in Tigrigna language, and combined with other useful and sometimes lighter information; (2) distribute it among farmers in our main research district with the aim that it is not only read by farmers but also passed on and discussed within the communities (farmer-to-farmer extension); and (3) evaluate the take-up of the messages contained in the booklet.

  2. An Effective Aquaculture Extension System from Farmers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Government and projects extension professionals should support the system through technical training, study tours, publications and networking. Likewise, since educated and well-off farmers in peri-urban areas can access information, government offices should be equipped with well-trained extension personnel and ...

  3. FARMERS ADAPTATION STRATEGIES TO THE EFFECT OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AGROSEARCH UIL

    (χ2 = 14.068), farm size (χ2 = 99.597) and the level of production of yam farmers. Pearson product moment ... and development of innovation for sustainable yam cropping in the face of climate variation. Key words: Climate variation, ..... and wind storm as serious constraints confronting yam production. Other constraints ...

  4. Food security of small holding farmers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peramaiyan, Panneer; Hermansen, John Erik; Halberg, Niels

    2010-01-01

    practicing different agro-ecological methods were higher under organic systems than conventional systems. These results suggest that organic farming has the potential to improve food security of small farmers by reducing indebtedness due to the lower cost of production without affecting total farm production...

  5. Genetic Alterations in Pesticide Exposed Bolivian Farmers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørs, Erik; González, Ana Rosa; Ascarrunz, Maria Eugenia

    2007-01-01

    Background: Pesticides are of concern in Bolivia because of increasing use. Frequent intoxications have been demonstrated due to use of very toxic pesticides, insufficient control of distribution and sale and little knowledge among farmers of protective measures and hygienic procedures. Method: Q...

  6. Factors Influencing Smallholder Farmers Participation in IFAD ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2015-02-02

    Feb 2, 2015 ... strengthen them for easy access to credit, farm inputs and markets for their agricultural products. References. Agbelemoge, A., Adedoyin, S.F. and Oladoyin, S.D. (2001). Farmers Related. Factors and Adoption of Cocoa Rehabilitation Technology in Oluyole. Local Government Area of Oyo State Nigeria.

  7. Genetic Alterations in Pesticide Exposed Bolivian Farmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørs, Erik; Gonzáles, Ana Rosa; Ascarrunz, Maria Eugenia; Tirado, Noemi; Takahashi, Catharina; Lafuente, Erika; Dos Santos, Raquel A; Bailon, Natalia; Cervantes, Rafael; O, Huici; Bælum, Jesper; Lander., Flemming

    2007-01-01

    Background Pesticides are of concern in Bolivia because of increasing use. Frequent intoxications have been demonstrated due to use of very toxic pesticides, insufficient control of distribution and sale and little knowledge among farmers of protective measures and hygienic procedures. Method Questionnaires were applied and blood tests taken from 81 volunteers from La Paz County, of whom 48 were pesticide exposed farmers and 33 non-exposed controls. Sixty males and 21 females participated with a mean age of 37.3 years (range 17–76). Data of exposure and possible genetic damage were collected and evaluated by well known statistical methods, controlling for relevant confounders. To measure genetic damage chromosomal aberrations and the comet assay analysis were performed. Results Pesticide exposed farmers had a higher degree of genetic damage compared to the control group. The number of chromosomal aberrations increased with the intensity of pesticide exposure. Females had a lower number of chromosomal aberrations than males, and people living at altitudes above 2500 metres seemed to exhibit more DNA damage measured by the comet assay. Conclusions Bolivian farmers showed signs of genotoxic damage, probably related to exposure to pesticides. Due to the potentially negative long term health effects of genetic damage on reproduction and the development of cancer, preventive measures are recommended. Effective control with imports and sales, banning of the most toxic pesticides, education and information are possible measures, which could help preventing the negative effects of pesticides on human health and the environment. PMID:19662224

  8. Technological Packages Extended To Farmers by Non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper investigated technological packages extended to farmers by Non Governmental Organizations in the Niger Delta area of Nigeria. Data for the study was collected with the aid of structured questionnaire from 450 respondents in the study area. Findings revealed that yam minisett technology, hybrid cassava ...

  9. Farmers' Opinions about Third-Wave Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasley, Paul; Bultena, Gordon

    The opinions of 1,585 Iowa farmers about 8 emergent agricultural technologies (energy production from feed grains and oils; energy production from livestock waste; genetic engineering research on plants, livestock, and humans; robotics for on-farm use; confinement livestock facilities; and personal computers for farm families) were found to be…

  10. Discriminant Analysis Of Poultry Farmers Technology Adoption ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study determined the poultry Farmers technology adoption potentials in Abia State Nigeria. Multi-stage random sampling technique was used in the selection of local government areas, blocks, circles and respondents. Instrument of data collection was via a structured and pre-tested questionnaire. The data were ...

  11. Kenyan farmers discover the Internet | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-10-20

    Oct 20, 2010 ... With the Internet linking producers to consumers, the farmer is likely to get better value for her/his produce. "The expectation is that DrumNet ... Kenyan journalist Ken Opala is the recent Gold Medal winner of the 2003 Natali Prize — one of the world's leading awards for journalists. He is also the winner of ...

  12. Fish farmers' perceptions of constraints affecting aquaculture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study focused on fish farmers' perceptions of constraints affecting aquaculture development in Akwa-Ibom State of Nigeria. Random sampling procedure was used to select 120 respondents from whom primary data was collected. Data analysis was with the aid of descriptive statistics. Results show that fish farming ...

  13. GM plants, farmers and the public

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Jesper; Sandøe, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The controversy in Europe over genetically manipulated (GM) foods has been conceived largely as a conflict between a reluctant public and a more enthusiastic agri-food sector. As a result, the political focus has been on the public to the neglect of other actors, such as the farmers, whose willin...

  14. Farmer Assessment, Conservation and Utilization of Endangered ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Grain sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) is an important staple food crop in the savanna zone of Ghana. Surveys to determine farmers' perception, crop management strategies and variety maintenance of neglected sorghum landraces were conducted in the Upper West Region of Ghana in 2004. Fifty-nine samples of ...

  15. Survey Evidence From Ethiopian Coffee Farmers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The worldwide turndown in coffee revenue to the majority of resource poor primary producers has become a serious threat to sustainable development. There is however inadequate knowledge with respect to mechanisms used by resource poor coffee farmers to stave off situations of economic hardship.

  16. Measuring the environmental awareness of young farmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kountios, G.; Ragkos, A.; Padadavid, G.; Hadjimitsis, D.

    2017-09-01

    Young farmers in Europe, especially the beneficiaries of Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) funding schemes, are considered as the ones who could ensure the sustainability of the European Model of Agriculture. Economic efficiency and competitiveness, aversion of depopulation of rural areas and environmental protection constitute some of the key objectives of the CAP and young farmers are expected to play a role to all of them. This study proposes a way of measuring the potential of young farmers to contribute to the latter objectives of the CAP by estimating their environmental attitudes. Data from a questionnaire survey of 492 Greek young farmers were used to design a latent construct measuring their environmental attitudes. The latent construct was designed by means of an Explanatory Factor Analysis (EFA) using the responses to a set of 12 Likert-scale items. The results the EFA yielded a latent construct with three factors related to "Environmental pollution and policies (EPP)", "Environmental factors and food quality (EFF)" and "Farming practices and the environment". These results were validated through a CFA where 8 items in total were categorized in the three factors (latent variables). The utilization of the latent construct for the effective implementation of CAP measures could ameliorate the relationships of agriculture and environment in general.

  17. Climate changes and farmers' endogenous adaptation strategies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It has been claimed that climate changes impact studies often assume certain adaptations and little explicit examination of how, when, why, and under what conditions they occur. This research aims at analysing the endogenous strategies developed by farmers in agricultural land and crop management. With random ...

  18. Why did the First Farmers Toil?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weisdorf, Jacob Louis

    Time-budget studies done among contemporary primitive people suggest that the first farmers worked harder to attain subsistence than their foraging predecessors. This makes the adoption of agriculture in the Stone Age one of the major curiosities in human cultural history. Theories offered...

  19. Why did the First Farmers Toil?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weisdorf, Jacob Louis

    2009-01-01

    Time-budget studies done among contemporary primitive people suggest that the first farmers worked harder to attain subsistence than their foraging predecessors. This makes the adoption of agriculture in the Stone Age one of the major curiosities in human cultural history. Theories offered...

  20. climate changes and farmers' endogenous adaptation strategies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    CLIMATE CHANGES AND FARMERS' ENDOGENOUS ADAPTATION STRATEGIES: SOCIO ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF THE DYNAMIC USE OF AGRICULTURAL LANDS IN. CENTRAL REGION OF BENIN. M.W. ABIDJI, H. DEDEHOUANOU, P. VISSOH, E. AGBOSSOU1 and H. GUIBERT1. University of Abomey-Calavi ...

  1. Farmers\\' Discontinuance Decision Behaviours Of Yam Minisett ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Farmers' discontinuance decision behaviours of technologies is attributed to certain reasons and it is governed by certain socio-economic variables. This study identified and analyzed the rate of discontinuance of yam minisett technology, reasons for discontinuance and the socio-economic determinants of the ...

  2. Farmer awareness, coping mechanisms and economic implications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Coffee leaf rust (CLR) still remains a serious threat to the economics of coffee farming in Uganda. The disease is more severe on Arabica coffee (Coffea arabica) at mid and low altitude (1500 m and below) where crop losses is up to 50%. The objective of this study was to document farmers' knowledge about the disease, ...

  3. Farmers' Characteristics and Adoption' of Recommended Practices ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. The study focused on farmers under the Fadama Project Scheme in Edo State, Nigeria with emphasis ..... respondents for this preference was that the local ... practices. Variables. Standardized t value beta. Education. Age. Household size. Sex. Marital Status. Intercept. Adjusted R2. Standard Error. F. 0.465. - 0.147.

  4. (cadp) on farmers' empowerment in kaduna state

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CIU

    The Kaduna State Commercial Agriculture Development Project (CADP), a ... Project. ii. To examine the extent to which the Kaduna State CADP market opportunities for small and medium scale commercial farmers has enhanced the income ..... In computing the degree of freedom, we now have: V = (3 – 1) (2 – 1) =2 x 1 = 2.

  5. Understanding farmers' preferences for wastewater reuse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    service design, pricing strategy, and distribution channels, as well as concepts of public welfare (Louviere et al., 2000). For this study a choice modelling approach was adopted to foster understanding of farmers' preferences concerning frameworks of water reuse for irrigation. Choice modelling has gained recog- nition in ...

  6. Incorporating Migrant Farmers into Nigeria's Agricultural Extension ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Madukwe

    area. Most of the migrant farmers had strong links with their places of origin and returned more than twelve times in a year for burial ceremonies of relations, traditional festivals, meetings and marriages. Although both migrant men and women were engaged in various agricultural activities, there were significant differences ...

  7. Constraints to Women Farmers' Entrepreneurial Development in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Abstract. This study examined the entrepreneurial competencies among women farmers in Nasarawa State, Nigeria. Specifically, this paper described the characteristics of the respondents, identified the characteristics (type, form and duration) of enterprises the respondents engaged in, and examined their constraints to ...

  8. Back to the future? Understanding Change in Food Habits of Farmers' Market Customers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pascucci, S.; Cicatiello, C.; Franco, S.; Pancino, B.; Marinov, D.; Davide, M.

    2011-01-01

    This study analyses how attending farmers markets may affect consumers’ willingness to change food habits toward high-quality products. A discrete choice model was applied using data col-lected through an extensive field survey in 2009, which involved 400 consumers in 12 different farmers’ markets

  9. Performance of farmers-led extension system in agricultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mo

    -technology package. Adoption rate was estimated at 35%, meaning that farmers applied about 35% of the practices in which they were trained. The rate was lower. (30%) among women than male farmers (37%) due to a combination of ...

  10. Profitability of fungicide use decisions among cocoa farmers in south ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CRIN) recommended fungicide use rate with profit maximization objective of Nigerian cocoa farmers. To achieve this research objective, a cross-sectional survey of cocoa farmers in four local government areas (LGAs) each in Osun and Ondo ...

  11. How can veterinarians be interesting partners for organic dairy farmers?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duval, J E; Bareille, N; Fourichon, C

    2017-01-01

    Organic dairy farmers must live up to the organic goal of 'good health' in respect the organic principles and regulation. Veterinarians could be the organic dairy farmers' expected sparring partners in reaching this goal but have found difficulties to establish advisory relationships with them....... The objectives of this study are -from organic dairy farmers' points of view- (i) to describe farmers' objectives and strategies regarding herd health, (ii) to describe private veterinarians' roles in farmers' animal health promotion strategies and (iii) to identify farmers' reasons for accepting veterinarians...... in an advisory role. Fourteen organic dairy farmers were interviewed using qualitative research interviews. Data collection and analysis was performed using a modified approach to Grounded Theory. Organic dairy farmers had animal health management strategies focusing on animal health promotion. Veterinarians had...

  12. Organic farmers may gain from Green House Gas trade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    2009-01-01

    Farmers may earn money from participating in the ongoing greenhouse gas (GHG) trade system under the Kyoto agreement.......Farmers may earn money from participating in the ongoing greenhouse gas (GHG) trade system under the Kyoto agreement....

  13. Effect of subjective economic status on psychological distress among farmers and non-farmers of rural China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Danjun; Ji, Linqin; Xu, Lingzhong

    2015-08-01

    This study aims to compare the prevalence of psychological distress between farmers and non-farmers of rural China. Further, this examines the effect of subjective economic status on psychological distress and whether this effect varies between farmers and non-farmers. The study design is a cross-sectional survey. The study was conducted in 27 villages of Dongying City in Shandong Province. Rural employed people included 1433 farmers and 584 non-farmers. Psychological distress was assessed by the Kessler 10 questionnaire, and subjective economic status was assessed by a single question. Overall, the farmers did not report significantly higher prevalence of psychological distress than non-farmers (31.13% versus 30.01%). However, the farmers aged 51-70 years did report significantly higher psychological distress than their non-farmer counterparts (33.4% versus 24.2%, P = 0.04). Second, subjective economic status had a significant (β = -0.28, P economic status exerted a stronger effect on psychological distress among farmers (β = 0.30, P China. Subjective economic status exerted a significant effect on the psychological distress of rural employed people, and this effect was stronger for the farmers than for the non-farmers. © 2015 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  14. Tobacco farmers and diversification: opportunities and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, D G; Levine, D W; Howard, G; Hamilton, H

    1996-01-01

    To assess the knowledge, attitudes, and behaviours of tobacco growers and allotment owners in the southeastern United States. Cross-sectional telephone survey. Tobacco growers (n = 529) and tobacco allotment owners (n = 417) were interviewed by telephone in March 1995. Tobacco growing states in the southeastern US. Attitudes of tobacco growers and tobacco allotment owners towards, and experience with, diversification; and attitudes towards an increase in the federal excise tax on tobacco. Half of the respondents had done something to learn about on-farm alternatives to tobacco, had an interest in trying other on-farm ventures to supplement tobacco income, and found alternatives that were profitable. There was a strong, negative linear trend between age and being interested in or trying alternative enterprises. Structural and economic impediments to diversification were noted by respondents (especially younger respondents), but 73% supported an increase in the federal excise tax on tobacco if the money was used to help farmers overcome these barriers. These data suggest that farmers and health professionals have reason to establish dialogue around diversification and using excise tax increases to fund diversification and to promote health. Tobacco companies have been successful in mobilising farmers against tax increases, but efforts must be made to show farmers that tax increases can be beneficial both to their diversification efforts and to public health. The outcome of this dialogue may well affect the economic infrastructure of thousands of rural communities, the livelihood of tens of thousands of tobacco farmers and their families, and the health of millions of tobacco users.

  15. Estimation of Ecological Compensation Standards for Fallow Heavy Metal-Polluted Farmland in China Based on Farmer Willingness to Accept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Xie

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In the context of China’s trial fallow policy; the heavy metal pollution of farmland is addressed via field surveys in Hunan Province, where the fallow policy has been implemented, and in Jiangxi Province, where it has not been implemented. We measured and analyzed willingness to accept (WTA using the contingent valuation method (CVM. The conclusions of this study are as follows: (1 Farmer awareness of heavy metal pollution and pollution sources is higher in Jiangxi Province than in Hunan Province; (2 Ignoring the impact of other factors, the WTA of farmers is 902 (yuan /mu in Jiangxi Province and 902.26 (yuan /mu in Hunan Province. Considering the influence of the basic characteristics of the respondents using the parameter estimation method, the WTA of farmers is 839.34 (yuan/mu in Jiangxi Province and 934.39 (yuan/mu in Hunan Province. There is little difference in WTA between the two provinces, but both estimates are higher than the national compensation standards; (3 The factors that affect the WTA of farmers in Jiangxi Province are gender, education level, average annual income and per capita arable land. The factors that affect the WTA of farmers in Hunan Province are age, education level, family size, average annual income, per capita arable land area and farmer occupation; (4 At present, the means and methods of compensation for the implementation of the fallow policy are recognized by most farmers. The paper concludes with some policy suggestions based on above findings.

  16. Farmers' valuation of incentives to produce genetically modified organism-free milk: Insights from a discrete choice experiment in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, J A; Latacz-Lohmann, U

    2015-11-01

    This paper investigates farmers' willingness to participate in a genetically modified organism (GMO)-free milk production scheme offered by some German dairy companies. The empirical analysis is based upon discrete choice experiments with 151 dairy farmers from 2 regions in Germany. A conditional logit estimation reveals a strong positive effect of the price premium on offer. Reliable feed monitoring and free technical support increase the likelihood of scheme adoption, the latter however only in farms that have been receiving technical support in other fields. By contrast, any interference with the entrepreneurial autonomy of farmers, through pre-arranged feed procurement or prescriptive advice on the part of the dairy company, lowers acceptance probabilities. Farmers' attitudes toward cultivation of genetically modified soy, their assessment of the market potential of GMO-free milk and future feed prices were found to be significant determinants of adoption, as are farmer age, educational status, and current feeding regimens. Respondents requested on average a mark-up of 0.80 eurocents per kilogram of milk to accept a contract. Comparison of the estimates for the 2 regions suggests that farmers in northern Germany are, on average, more likely to convert to genetically modified-free production; however, farmers in the south are, ceteris paribus, more responsive to an increase in the price premium offered. A latent class model reveals significant differences in the valuation of scheme attributes between 2 latent classes of adopters and nonadopters. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. An anthropological approach to teaching health sciences students cultural competency in a field school program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Frank T; Brown, Lori DiPrete; Poulsen, Keith P

    2014-02-01

    International immersion experiences do not, in themselves, provide students with the opportunity to develop cultural competence. However, using an anthropological lens to educate students allows them to learn how to negotiate cultural differences by removing their own cultural filters and seeing events through the eyes of those who are culturally different. Faculty at the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Global Health Institute believed that an embedded experience, in which students engaged with local communities, would encourage them to adopt this Cultural Competency 2.0 position. With this goal in mind, they started the Field School for the Study of Language, Culture, and Community Health in Ecuador in 2003 to teach cultural competency to medical, veterinary, pharmacy, and nursing students. The program was rooted in medical anthropology and embraced the One Health initiative, which is a collaborative effort of multiple disciplines working locally, nationally, and globally to obtain optimal health for people, animals, and the environment. In this article, the authors identify effective practices and challenges for using a biocultural approach to educating students. In a semester-long preparatory class, students study the Spanish language, region-specific topics, and community engagement principles. While in Ecuador for five weeks, students apply their knowledge during community visits that involve homestays and service learning projects, for which they partner with local communities to meet their health needs. This combination of language and anthropological course work and community-based service learning has led to positive outcomes for the local communities as well as professional development for students and faculty.

  18. Present status and future plans of web site ''NUCPAL'' for school education in the field of nuclear radiation and energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumita, Kenji

    2005-01-01

    ''NUCPAL'', a newly combined word of ''nuclear'' and ''pal'', means the fellows having common information for school education in the field of radiation and energy and is actively serving Japanese web-site for internet systems since 2002. The web-site offers basic knowledge information as IT materials for education about energy and environment in elementary, junior-high, and high schools. The kids corner opens since 2003, where people, for instance, call ''Trip to Seek where electricity comes from, '' the sequential game starts from the home electric tool to arrive the power line through terminal spots, and after several steps finally arrive the generator. Following activities are already on: Arrangement of lectures for school education on energy, radiation, and environment; Free charge releasing of video-tape and DVD for education; Issuing the text based on latest information; Introducing of typical example of practical cases for class rooms. (S. Ohno)

  19. Managerial efficiency among yam farmers in Ondo state, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study revealed that the mean age of the farmers was 48.50 years where majority of the farmers fall within the age range of 41-50 years (35%), showing that majority of the yam farmers in the study area are in their active age who are energetic. Majority of them are male accounting for 85.00% , 90.00% of the farmers have ...

  20. Farmers' attitudes to disease risk management in England: a comparative analysis of sheep and pig farmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garforth, C J; Bailey, A P; Tranter, R B

    2013-07-01

    The UK Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) identified practices to reduce the risk of animal disease outbreaks. We report on the response of sheep and pig farmers in England to promotion of these practices. A conceptual framework was established from research on factors influencing adoption of animal health practices, linking knowledge, attitudes, social influences and perceived constraints to the implementation of specific practices. Qualitative data were collected from nine sheep and six pig enterprises in 2011. Thematic analysis explored attitudes and responses to the proposed practices, and factors influencing the likelihood of implementation. Most feel they are doing all they can reasonably do to minimise disease risk and that practices not being implemented are either not relevant or ineffective. There is little awareness and concern about risk from unseen threats. Pig farmers place more emphasis than sheep farmers on controlling wildlife, staff and visitor management and staff training. The main factors that influence livestock farmers' decision on whether or not to implement a specific disease risk measure are: attitudes to, and perceptions of, disease risk; attitudes towards the specific measure and its efficacy; characteristics of the enterprise which they perceive as making a measure impractical; previous experience of a disease or of the measure; and the credibility of information and advice. Great importance is placed on access to authoritative information with most seeing vets as the prime source to interpret generic advice from national bodies in the local context. Uptake of disease risk measures could be increased by: improved risk communication through the farming press and vets to encourage farmers to recognise hidden threats; dissemination of credible early warning information to sharpen farmers' assessment of risk; and targeted information through training events, farming press, vets and other advisers, and farmer groups

  1. Understanding of the farmers privilege concept by smallholder farmers in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Noluthando C. Netnou-Nkoana; Julian B. Jaftha; Mabjang A. Dibiloane; Jacobus N. Eloff

    2015-01-01

    Legislation on plant breeders’ rights – the Plant Breeders’ Rights Act, 1976 (Act No. 15 of 1976) – currently is being reviewed by the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries. This legislation provides for farmers’ privilege, which is one of the exceptions to plant breeders’ rights. It allows farmers to save seed of protected varieties for their own use. Farmers’ privilege, and particularly its impact on smallholder farmers in developing countries, is a widely debated issue. During ...

  2. Socioeconomic factors affecting farmers' perceptions of land degradation and stonewall terraces in central Palestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, Ahmad Abu; Børresen, Trond

    2006-03-01

    Land degradation by soil erosion is a socioeconomic and environmental problem facing many developing countries. Application of stonewall terraces for soil moisture conservation is vital to reducing the environmental impacts of this phenomenon. To this end, a field plot experiment was conducted in the study area along with the use of a closed-ended questionnaire. The object of the experiment was to study the socioeconomic impacts of soil erosion on local farmers and their adoption of the stonewall terrace technique. The study showed a higher net profit in areas that had implemented terrace conservation practices than in areas that had not (i.e., 3.5 to 6 times higher net profit). Correlation analysis indicated that the farmers' perceptions, land ownership, and geomorphology were significantly related to the farmers' incentives and willingness to adopt terraces as soil conservation measures (P < 0.05), although the correlations were negative. Smallholder farmers (52% of the interviewed farmers) were involved in the sale of the agricultural land for urban uses, largely because of the high price and immediate returns offered. However, the associated land use changes warrant greater involvement of both the private and public sectors. This cooperation may be accomplished through the introduction of a long-term agricultural loan system and the development of proper legislation accompanied by a comprehensive and durable infrastructure and service system with the goal of reducing the negative impact of land use changes and encouraging sustainable use of resources.

  3. Determinants of production level of commercial snail farmers in Oyo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigates the determinants of productivity level among commercial snail farmers in Oyo State. A systematic sampling technique was employed to select one-hundred and forty–two snail farmers from the membership list provided by the Snail Farmers Association of Nigeria (SFAN), Oyo State Chapter.

  4. Profitability of groundnut-based cropping systems among farmers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Groundnut is an important cash crop and a good source of vegetable oil to resource-poor farmers. The study examined the Profitability of Groundnut–based Cropping Systems among farmers in Hong Local Government Area of Adamawa State, Nigeria. Specifically, the socio-economic characteristics of the farmers were ...

  5. Adaptation Strategies to Climate Change by Food Crop Farmers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... constraints to farmers adaptation strategies. Inputs supply to the local farmers should also come with government subsidy. This will go a long way in alleviating the sufferings of the farmers, as regards inadequate supply and delivery of agricultural inputs. Key words: Adaptation, Strategies, Climate, Change, Food, Crop,

  6. differentials in socioeconomic attributes of male and female farmers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. (Mrs.) Gladys Erie

    ABSTRACT. This paper was designed to compare the technical efficiency of food crop farmers along gender line ... differences in the socioeconomic attributes of male and female food crop farmers, resulting in differences in .... may be as a result of the fact that older farmers are very conservative and are not receptive to new ...

  7. Irrigation farmers motivation for participating in social networking in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Irrigation farmers motivation for participating in social networking in North Central Nigeria. ... The study focused on the motivation of farmers in participating in social networking on the use of irrigations in north central Nigeria. For the purpose of the study, social ... Key Words: Farmers, Irrigation, Motivation, Social Networking ...

  8. Cocoa Farmer Characteristics and Access to Research-Based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main purpose is to review the state of cocoa extension system and its preparedness to meet the information needs of resource-poor farmers. It also sought to investigate the extent of farmer access to research-based information and how this access is influenced by certain farmer characteristics. Social survey involving ...

  9. Farmers' Willingness to Pay for Private Irrigation Supply in Nandom ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated farmers willingness to pay (WTP) for private irrigation in Nandom district, Ghana. The study randomly sampled 236 farmers and analyzed data using descriptive statistics and ordered logit regression model. Results revealed that 94.5 percent of the farmers were WTP for private irrigation services with ...

  10. 75 FR 20977 - Departmental Management; Advisory Committee on Minority Farmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-22

    ... maximizing the participation of minority farmers and ranchers in USDA programs; and (3) civil rights... organizations with a history of working with minority farmers and ranchers; (3) not less than two civil rights...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Departmental Management; Advisory Committee on Minority Farmers AGENCY: USDA...

  11. Determinants of Access and Farmers' use of Information and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Determinants of Access and Farmers' use of Information and Communication Technologies (1CTs) in Edo State, Nigeria. ... The study recommends organizing farmers into associations for training in the use of and collective acquisition of new ICTs. @JASEM. Keywords: Farmers, Access, Use New Information and ...

  12. Farmers' Perceptions of Rice Postharvest Losses in Eastern Uganda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The cross-sectional survey involving 83 farmers in focus group discussions and 150 individual interviews examined smallholder farmers' perceptions about postharvest losses (PHLs) in in rice in Eastern Uganda. Principal component analysis and logistic regression were used to establish the determinants of farmers' ...

  13. Information Search Behaviors of Indian Farmers: Implications for Extension Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glendenning, Claire J.; Babu, Suresh C.; Asenso-Okyere, Kwadwo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In India, a national survey conducted in 2003 showed that only 40% of farmers accessed extension. But little is known of the characteristics of farmers who did not access extension. However, this understanding is needed in order to target approaches to farmers, who differ in their access and use of information, that is their information…

  14. Perception of Farm Succession Planning by Poultry Farmers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study assessed poultry farm characteristics and poultry farmers' perception of farm succession planning in southwest Nigeria. A multistage sampling procedure was used in selecting poultry farmers in Oyo and Osun states. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results reveal that poultry farmers ...

  15. Assessment of farmers awareness and practice of health safety ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The broad objective of the study was to assess farmers' awareness and practice of health safety measures in the use of agrochemicals in Niger state , Nigeria. The specific objectives were to describe the socio-economic and demographic features of the farmers, identify the common agrochemicals being used by the farmers ...

  16. "American Gothic" Revised: Positive Perceptions from a Young American Farmer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joehl, Regan R.

    2008-01-01

    Grant Wood's "American Gothic," intended to represent the Depression Era, Midwestern farmer, has been regarded by many as the stereotypical representation of a true American farmer for decades. While this painting does represent farmers in the early part of the 20th century, the author feels obliged to say that it is time to drop this…

  17. Veterinary Extension Services Provided To Livestock Farmers In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the differences in the veterinary services provided by university and ministry based officers to livestock farmers in Oyo State. Simple random sampling technique was used to select veterinary clinics and livestock farmers who visited the clinics. One hundred and twenty five farmers were selected and ...

  18. 26 CFR 1.61-4 - Gross income of farmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Gross income of farmers. (a) Farmers using the cash method of accounting. A farmer using the cash receipts and disbursements method of accounting shall include in his gross income for the taxable year— (1... the sale of livestock or other items which were purchased is to be ascertained by deducting the cost...

  19. A Comparative Study of The Economic Performance of Farmers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study determined the better irrigation method between large scale and motorised pump to recommend to farmers in Katsina state of Nigeria. The target populations were Farmers Under Large Scale (FULS) and Farmers Using Motorised Pumps (FUMP) and were compared along their socio-economic characteristics, ...

  20. Evaluation of Effects of Maize Extension Package on Farmers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined the effects of maize extension package on farmers indigenous practices in Nwangele Local Government Area (LGA) of Imo State, Nigeria. Both farmers and extension agents were the target audience. Fifty (50) farmers and two (2) extension agents were purposively sampled from the selected ...

  1. Mentorship by commercial farmers in the land reform programme in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluates commercial farmers' views of their role as mentors in the land reform programme in two regions of the Free State Province. It reveals that the majority of commercial farmers in the study area are willing to act as mentors. The farmers overwhelmingly agreed that their role as mentors is very important.

  2. Constraints to Farmers' Labour Group Productivity in Eastern Kogi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Smallholder farmers in rural Nigeria face farm labour shortages and the need to find ways of dealing with this problem is therefore apt for food security and socioeconomic improvement. In an attempt to deal with this problem, Nigerians rural farmers constitute themselves into farmers' labour groups in other to meet their farm ...

  3. Socio-economic characteristics of small-holder farmers influencing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Socio-economic characteristics of small-holder farmers influencing their utilisation of microcredit in the central agricultural zone of Cross River state. ... The findings revealed that about thirty – four percent (33.6%) of the crop farmers fell between 41-50 years while about 51% of the livestock farmers fell between 31-40 years.

  4. Farmer groups key to boosting technology adoption in Kenya | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2013-09-20

    Sep 20, 2013 ... Kenya Medical Research Institute: Nutrition and health. Farmers share lessons and successes. Engaging farmers in evaluating improved crops and practices and sharing their lessons and successes with more farmer groups is proving to be an effective way to scale up techno- logy adoption — and one that ...

  5. Correlation Matrix Of Farmers Perceived Objectives In Crop ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined the correlation matrix of farmers perceived objectives in crop production in Emohua and Etche local government areas of Rivers State, Nigeria. Data for the study was from 77 farmers in the study area. It was found that small holder farmers have multiple objectives which were ranked according to their ...

  6. Farmer led multiplication of rosette resistant groundnut varieties

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mo

    sure way to provide poor farmers with access to improved varieties, practices, knowledge and information required for ... sustainable, and appropriate, especially for resource poor farmers. In view of this situation this project promotes farmer- led multiplication of rosette resistant Groundnuts varieties .... appropriate solutions.

  7. Fish Farmers' Perception of Climate change impact on fish ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Madukwe

    elements of climate change, ascertain the extent farmers perceived climate change in the zone, find out the various ... most serious environmental threat facing our planet today. Such significant change, according to ... 1. assess the farmers' level of awareness of elements of climate change;. 2. ascertain the extent farmers ...

  8. Farmers' knowledge and perceptions of cotton insect pests and their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A survey of 337 cotton farmers in the three northern regions of Ghana was conducted between November 2002 and March 2003 with the objectives of assessing farmers' knowledge and perceptions of cotton insect pests and examining their control practices. The survey revealed that between 69 and 86% of the farmers ...

  9. Ethno veterinary practices of small ruminant livestock farmers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data were collected from a total of 400 ruminant livestock farmers selected from Oyo, Ogun, Lagos, Ondo and Edo States of Nigeria using Multi-stage sampling technique. The data collected include the specific attributes of small ruminant livestock farmers in the area, ethno-veterinary practices of farmers in the treatment of ...

  10. Transaction Cost Of Borrowing Among Small Scale Farmers In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined transaction cost of borrowing among small scale farmers in Rivers State, Nigeria. Data was collected with the aid of structured questionnaire from 109 randomly selected small scale farmers in the study area. Data analysis was by frequency, percentage and mean. It was found that farmers mostly ...

  11. Rural farmers' perspectives on stock theft: police crime statistics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rural farmers are not only facing challenges of severe drought blamed on the El Nino weather pattern, but the stock theft as well. The South African Police's annual crime statistics report and surveys indicates that rural livestock farmers are mostly affected by stock theft in South Africa. The costs paid by these farmers to ...

  12. Farmers' compliance with the use of approved cocoa pesticides in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The survey evaluates the awareness and level of compliance in the use of approved cocoa pesticides by local farmers in selected cocoa producing states of Nigeria. Thirty farmers were randomly selected in Kwara, Ogun and Osun States. More than 70 percent of the farmers were aware of banned cocoa pesticides.

  13. Cocoa Farmers Attitude towards Utilisation of Integrated Pest ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined cocoa farmers' attitude towards the utilization of integrated pest management (IPM) in Edo and Ogun States of Nigeria. In Edo State, 60 respondents were randomly selected out of 100 trained cocoa farmers. Random selection of 60 respondents from registered cocoa farmers that were not trained in IPM ...

  14. 551 training needs assessment of cocoa farmers association

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osondu

    2013-08-26

    Aug 26, 2013 ... Abstract. The influence of soil fertility on the performance of any crop cannot be overemphasized. The study assessed cocoa farmers' training needs on soil management techniques in Cross River State of. Nigeria. Study data were obtained from random sample of farmers belonging to Cocoa Farmers.

  15. Farmers' Information Needs in Soap Opera Utilisation for Agricultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined farmers' information needs in soap opera utilisation for agricultural enterprise promotion in Southwestern Nigeria. Using a multistage sampling procedure, 150 farmers were randomly selected across selected states in the study area. Data were collected with the use of interview schedule on farmers' ...

  16. Credit worthiness and loan repayment performance among farmer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Credit worthiness and loan repayment performance among farmer cooperators in Owerri Agricultural Zone of Imo State, Nigeria. ... policies that will improve the linkage between farmer cooperatives and formal credit sources in the area. Keywords: Credit worthiness, loan repayment, farmers, cooperative societies and credit ...

  17. Processes of enlightenment : farmer initiatives in rural development in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ye, J.

    2002-01-01

    This research concerns development initiatives in rural communities. I define a farmer initiative as the impetus that sufficiently and necessarily drives a farmer (or group of farmers) to formulate a realistic strategic plan, and to implement it in an

  18. Small Scale Oil Palm Farmers Perception Of Organic Agriculture In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the perception of oil palm farmers in Imo State, Nigeria, with specific objectives of determining personal characteristics of farmers, access their level of practice and preferences for organic farming. A multi-stage sampling technique was used to select 120 farmers while a pre-tested questionnaire was ...

  19. 7 CFR 1216.9 - Farmers stock peanuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Farmers stock peanuts. 1216.9 Section 1216.9... INFORMATION ORDER Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1216.9 Farmers stock peanuts. Farmers stock peanuts means picked or threshed peanuts produced in the United States which have not been...

  20. Influence of information channels on maize farmers\\' adoption of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Of the 5 identified maize technologies in the study area, farmers average level of innovation awareness was higher (mean = 4) as compared to low level of adoption (mean = 2). Farmers level of technology awareness was strongly influenced by farm visits by other farmers (X2 = 12.88), extension agents (X2 = 11.48), radio ...

  1. 7 CFR 760.7 - Other requirements for affected farmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... fallout. (2) None of the milk was produced by dairy cattle which he knew, or had reason to know at the... Payments to Dairy Farmers for Milk § 760.7 Other requirements for affected farmers. An indemnity payment for milk may be made under this subpart to an affected farmer only under the following conditions: (a...

  2. Women farmers' participation in household food security and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined the participation of women farmers in Household Food Security and Nutrition programme in Oyo State. Specifically, the study determined women farmers' participation in various activities of the food security and nutrition programme. It determined the relationship between women farmers' ...

  3. Pattern and prevalence of eye diseases among farmers Inan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Farmers are exposed to certain occupational hazards which predispose them to ocular diseases including ocular injuries. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and pattern of ocular diseases among farmers. A descriptive crosssectional survey carried out among farmers in an agricultural industry in Edo ...

  4. profitability of groundnut-based cropping systems among farmers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Groundnut is an important cash crop and a good source of vegetable oil to resource-poor farmers. The study examined the Profitability of Groundnut–based Cropping Systems among farmers in Hong Local Government Area of. Adamawa State, Nigeria. Specifically, the socio-economic characteristics of the farmers were ...

  5. A Field Study of Culture Contact and Desegregation in an Urban High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianni, Francis J.; And Others

    This report documents an ethnographic study of desegregation in an inner city, polyethnic high school. The study focuses on the relationship between culture contact and the social organization of the school, employing three levels of analysis: the structural level, the level of role behavior, and the level of the individual social actor. A…

  6. The Private School Market in Kuwait: A Field Study on Educational Investment Behavior of Kuwaiti Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqahtani, Abdulmuhsen Ayedh

    2014-01-01

    The current study aims at exploring Kuwaiti families' educational investment behavior pursuant to the selection of a specific private school for their children from the private school market. Using the quantitative approach and the principles of marketing research, a survey was administered to a randomly selected sample of Kuwaiti families (n =…

  7. The Logistics of Implementing a Field-Based Comprehensive School Reform Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Dawn E.

    2014-01-01

    This research is a qualitative, reflective case study regarding a cohort in the form of a district-university partnership between the Oak Park Schools in Oak Park, Michigan and the College of Education at Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo, Michigan. The initiators of the program envisioned a more successful urban school district by offering…

  8. School District Labour Conflict and Frame Analysis: A Field Study of Contentious Negotiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Gordon S.; Vesneske, Staci S.

    2012-01-01

    Labour conflict in school districts is a largely neglected area of educational research. This study examines the perceptions, actions, and decisions of union and district leaders using social movement theory to describe, analyze, and interpret contentious contract negotiations in three school districts in the Pacific Northwest region of the US.…

  9. The Impact of Classification and Framing in Entrepreneurial Education: Field Observations in Two Lower Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Monika; Lindgren, Joakim; Leffler, Eva

    2015-01-01

    This article's purpose is to examine, on the basis of Bernstein's theory of classification and framing, how teachers express the concept and content of entrepreneurship in classroom practices in two Swedish lower secondary schools. The study is part of a national school improvement program aiming to better understand, develop and encourage…

  10. Official Bilingualism and Field Narratives: Does School Practice Echo Policy Discourse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nana, Genevoix

    2013-01-01

    This research builds on several layers of meaning representing views from education officials, head teachers, teachers and pupils to investigate the discourse and implementation of official bilingualism policy in primary schools in Cameroon. While at the macro-level, the celebration of the "National Bilingualism Day" in schools has…

  11. Behavior of farmers in regard to erosion by water as reflected by their farming practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerswald, Karl; Fischer, Franziska K; Kistler, Michael; Treisch, Melanie; Maier, Harald; Brandhuber, Robert

    2018-02-01

    The interplay between natural site conditions and farming raises erosion by water above geological background levels. We examined the hypothesis that farmers take erosion into account in their farming decisions and switch to farming practices with lower erosion risk the higher the site-specific hazard becomes. Erosion since the last tillage was observed from aerial orthorectified photographs for 8100 fields belonging to 1879 farmers distributed across Bavaria (South Germany) and it was modeled by the Universal Soil Loss Equation using highly detailed input data (e.g., digital terrain model with 5×5m 2 resolution, rain data with 1×1km 2 and 5min resolution, crop and cropping method from annual field-specific data from incentive schemes). Observed and predicted soil loss correlated closely, demonstrating the accuracy of this method. The close correlation also indicted that the farmers could easily observe the degree of recent erosion on their fields, even without modelling. Farmers clearly did not consider erosion in their decisions. When natural risk increased, e.g. due to steeper slopes, they neither grew crops with lower erosion potential, nor reduced field size, nor used contouring. In addition, they did not compensate for the cultivation of crops with higher erosion potential by using conservation techniques like mulch tillage or contouring, or by reducing field size. Only subsidized measures, like mulch tillage or organic farming, were applied but only at the absolute minimum that was necessary to obtain subsidies. However, this did not achieve the reduction in erosion that would be possible if these measures had been fully applied. We conclude that subsidies may be an appropriate method of reducing erosion but the present weak supervision, which assumes that farmers themselves will take erosion into account and that subsidies are only needed to compensate for any disadvantages caused by erosion-reducing measures, is clearly not justified. Copyright © 2017

  12. Socio-Economic Profiling of Tribal Dairy Farmers in Northern Hills Zone of Chhattisgarh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Mooventhan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Chhattisgarh is traditionally known as the Rice Bowl of Central India. Chhattisgarh state has one of highest shares of Scheduled Tribe (ST population within a state, accounting for about 10 per cent of the STs in India. Scheduled Castes and STs together constitute more than 50 per cent of the state’s population. Agriculture is counted as the chief economic occupation of the state. About 80% of the population of the state is rural and the main livelihood of the villagers is agriculture and agriculture-based small industry. This exploratory study was conducted in the tribal populated districts of Chhattisgarh state. In this paper, socio-economic profile of tribal farmers are discussed in detail. About 65.33 percent of the tribal farmers were between 36 and 50 years of age group, more than one fourth (34.67% of the farmers were educated up to primary school level, less than half  (39.00% of the respondents had subsistence dairy farming + Minor forest products collection + labour as their sole occupations, nearly half (43.67% of the respondents were marginal farmers, more than half (62.00 % of the farmers were found with medium level of farming experience, about half (49.00 % of the respondents were at the income range of Rs. 25,001 to Rs. 75,000, about half (44.67 % of the respondents falling under the category of medium herd size followed by 35.67 percent in small and 19.66 percent in large herd size, more than half (56.33% of the tribal dairy farmers falling under the category of subsistence level of dairy production system.

  13. EMPOWERING WOMEN FARMERS THROUGHT MULTICHANNEL LEARNING: AN APPLICATION OF NEED ASSESSMENT TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fawzia Sulaiman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The suitability and effectiveness of material, method, and media used in nonformal education provided by government and nongovernment institutions (including agricultural extension has been questioned in recent years, this is especially true for nonformal education catering for poor women farmers. Even though the significant roles and contribution of woman farmers in farming and family economic survival in Indonesia have been widely known, their nonformal educations need are rarely acknowledged. Several socio-cultural norms and values hinder women farmers’ participation in extension activities. The perception that agricultural extension activities fall under public domain has resulted that these activities are under male control (usually head for household. Without special intervention and accurate need assessment for nonformal education, the gap between women farmers and their male counterparts will be wider. This study was designed to identify nonformal educational needs of poor women farmers in Sakra Subdistrict, East Lombok, West Nusa Tenggara. The primary data and information were solicited through the Participatory Rural Appraisal (PRA method using focus group interviews and gender analysis techniques. The result indicated that women farmers in the study area could not afford to participate in learning activities, unless the learning program offer a direct benefit to generate income. However, in general they put a high expectation in their children’s education and learning opportunity that would lead them to earn a better income. Due to their very limited educational background, demonstration and learning by doing method where perceived to be the most effective extension methods. Furthermore, radio and television were not effective educational channels, since there were only a very small number of respondents who owned radio and TV sets. In the efforts to empower women farmers, field extension workers require training on socio

  14. Proceedings of the 5. Jorge Andre Swieca Summer School Field Theory and Particle Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eboli, O.J.P.; Gomes, M.; Santoro, A.

    1989-01-01

    Lectures on quantum field theories and particle physics are presented. The part of quantum field theories contains: constrained dynamics; Schroedinger representation in field theory; application of this representation to quantum fields in a Robertson-Walker space-time; Berry connection; problem of construction and classification of conformal field theories; lattice models; two-dimensional S matrices and conformal field theory for unifying perspective of Yang-Baxter algebras; parasupersymmetric quantum mechanics; introduction to string field theory; three dimensional gravity and two-dimensional parafermionic model. The part of particle physics contains: collider physics; strong interactions and use of strings in strong interactions. (M.C.K.)

  15. [Risk behavior among farmers from Podkarpacie Provinece].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binkowska-Bury, Monika; Penar-Zadarko, Beata; Marć, Małgorzata; Sobolewski, Marek

    2010-01-01

    Increasing awareness of science and medical environments and the society in the scope of behavioral conditioning of many diseases (e.g. cardiovascular diseases, tumors and injuries motivates to shape pro-health behaviors and eliminate harmful habit also in rural areas. There is a need for constant monitoring of behaviors related to health among rural areas inhabitants. The results enriches present state of knowledge in that scope, as well as might be use to increase the effectiveness of health promotion and health education activities and shape pro-health lifestyle among rural areas inhabitants, and particularly among farmers. The aim of the study was to acquaint socio-demographic features related to risk behaviors (tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking) among farmers from Podkarpacie Provinece. The study was carried out between January and December 2009 among 755 farmers with national health insurance KRUS for minimum last year, living in Podkarpacie Provinece, whom had their own farm business, owned a farm either spouse or household member works on the farm. The study population was purposefully chosen. The study was conducted using a diagnostics survey method with questionnaire including above all questions considering tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking and demographic issues. Results from questionnaires were analyzed using the statistical package STATISTICA 9.0 (Statsoft). The gathered data was statistically prepared using chi-square test, logistic regression model with stepwise and progressive regression. Based on results it was assumed that frequency of tobacco smoking in the studied group values 31.5%. More frequent smoke: men than women, people with high economic status and those evaluating their Heath state as a good one. Gender and material status are strong predictors of tobacco smoking among farmers. Age and level of education do not influence on tobacco smoking among studied farmers. Frequency of alcohol drinking in the studied group values 82.0%. More

  16. Energy Smart Schools--Applied Research, Field Testing, and Technology Integration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nebiat Solomon; Robin Vieira; William L. Manz; Abby Vogen; Claudia Orlando; Kimberlie A. Schryer

    2004-12-01

    The National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) in conjunction with the California Energy Commission, the Energy Center of Wisconsin, the Florida Solar Energy Center, the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, and the Ohio Department of Development's Office of Energy Efficiency conducted a four-year, cost-share project with the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to focus on energy efficiency and high-performance technologies in our nation's schools. NASEO was the program lead for the MOU-State Schools Working group, established in conjunction with the USDOE Memorandum of Understanding process for collaboration among state and federal energy research and demonstration offices and organizations. The MOU-State Schools Working Group included State Energy Offices and other state energy research organizations from all regions of the country. Through surveys and analyses, the Working Group determined the school-related energy priorities of the states and established a set of tasks to be accomplished, including the installation and evaluation of microturbines, advanced daylighting research, testing of schools and classrooms, and integrated school building technologies. The Energy Smart Schools project resulted in the adoption of advanced energy efficiency technologies in both the renovation of existing schools and building of new ones; the education of school administrators, architects, engineers, and manufacturers nationwide about the energy-saving, economic, and environmental benefits of energy efficiency technologies; and improved the learning environment for the nation's students through use of better temperature controls, improvements in air quality, and increased daylighting in classrooms. It also provided an opportunity for states to share and replicate successful projects to increase their energy efficiency while at the same time driving down their energy costs.

  17. Adoption of Transgenic Crops by Smallholder Farmers in Entre Rios, Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    Paredes, Cecilia; Martin, Marshall A.

    2007-01-01

    This is a study of the adoption of transgenic crops by 120 smallholder farmers interviewed in July 2005 in the communities of San Jose de Feliciano and La Paz in the Entre Rios Province of Argentina. Logistic regression results indicate that access to a planter is essential for smallholders to adopt Bt corn, while adopters of Roundup Ready soybeans have larger farms, access to credit, availability of all essential machinery, more years of schooling, and are primarily located in the La Paz com...

  18. GeoFORCE Alaska: Four-Year Field Program Brings Rural Alaskan High School Students into the STEM Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowell, S. J.; Rittgers, A.; Stephens, L.; Hutchinson, S.; Peters, H.; Snow, E.; Wartes, D.

    2016-12-01

    GeoFORCE Alaska is a four-year, field-based, summer geoscience program designed to raise graduation rates in rural Alaskan high schools, encourage participants to pursue college degrees, and increase the diversity of Alaska's technical workforce. Residents of predominantly Alaska Native villages holding degrees in science, technology, engineering, or math (STEM) bring valuable perspectives to decisions regarding management of cultural and natural resources. However, between 2010 and 2015 the average dropout rate for students in grades 7-12 was 8.5% per year in the North Slope School District and 7% per year in the Northwest Arctic School District. 2015 graduation rates were 70% and 75%, respectively. Statewide statistics highlight the challenge for Alaska Native students. During the 2014-2015 school year alone 37.6% of Alaska Native students dropped out of Alaskan public schools. At the college level, Alaska Native students are underrepresented in University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) science departments. Launched in 2012 by UAF in partnership with the longstanding University of Texas at Austin program, GeoFORCE applies the cohort model, leading the same group of high school students on geological field academies during four consecutive summers. Through a combination of active learning, teamwork, and hands-on projects at spectacular geological locations, students gain academic skills and confidence that facilitate high school and college success. To date, GeoFORCE Alaska has recruited two cohorts. 78% of these students identify as Alaska Native, reflecting community demographics. The inaugural cohort of 18 students from the North Slope Borough completed the Fourth-Year Academy in summer 2015. 94% of these students graduated from high school, at least 72% plan to attend college, and 33% will major in geoscience. A second cohort of 34 rising 9th and 10th graders entered the program in 2016. At the request of corporate sponsors, this cohort was recruited from both the

  19. Understanding fraction concepts of Indonesian junior high school students: A case of field independent and field dependent students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamonto, K.; Juniati, D.; Siswono, T. Y. E.

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to describe the students’ understanding of fraction concepts. This research is descriptive with the qualitative approach. The subjects consisted of 1 Field Independent (FI) and 1 Field Dependent (FD) students. Setting subjects based on Group Embedded Figure Test (GEFT) results and meeting equivalent mathematical ability. Data obtained techniques through Task-based interview. The results show that FI students were represented a complete fractional concept and express the meaning of fractional notation with its own words.The students use of fractional concept such as the idea of dividing equally, fractional equivalents, and the relative size of the fraction to classify fractions based on certain properties, giving fractional examples and non-fractional examples, and comparing fractions. However, FD students represented declarative farctional concepts, had difficulty in giving a good meaning notation, relation between components, classifying fractions and comparing them. FD students are fixated on fraction notation and the visualization of concrete objects. Overall, these results provide a detailed picture of the understanding of fractional concepts that, FI students tend to use coherent analysis, while FD students tended to be fixated on fractional notation and visualization of concrete objects.

  20. Social Capital And Economic Behavior Of Farmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heliawaty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstrac The purpose of this study to analyze the relationship between social capital affects economic behavior in producing coffee plants in improving coffee farmers income. This study was conducted in the district of Bantaeng South Sulawesi. Subdistrict Tampobulu selected purposively. The study lasted for four months of April to July 2014. The data used in this study consist of primary data and secondary data. It can be concluded that social capital is trust networking and institutions affect economic behavior namely the production of coffee plants. Trust improving technology adoption Robusta and Arabica coffee cuttings while distrust led to rampant theft of coffee is still green. Networking affect the price of coffee and institutions influence the behavior of farmers in obtaining venture capital through middlemen. It is expected that future studies should be focused on the factors that influence the innovative behavior in increasing the production of coffee plants.

  1. The High School "Smoker": A Field Study of Cigarette-Related Cognitions and Social Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotecka, Llynn; Lassleben, Mark

    1981-01-01

    Examined the eidetic imagery, verbalization, and social interaction related to adolescents' smoking behavior in a high school environment. Interventions aimed at helping adults stop smoking were considered applicable to teenagers. (Author/DB)

  2. Food and eating environments: in Canadian schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, H Frances; Laxer, Rachel E; Janssen, Ian

    2013-01-01

    This national study was conducted to examine healthy eating programs, healthy eating education, and the food retail environments of schools. A total of 436 Canadian schools were studied. Administrators completed a questionnaire designed to assess school healthy eating programs, healthy eating education, and food retail environment. The number of chain fast food restaurants, chain cafés/coffee shops, and convenience stores within 1 km of schools was measured using geographic information systems food retailer measures from DMTI Spatial Inc. and the Yellow Pages. During the preceding year, 67% of schools had initiated healthy eating lunch programs while 18% had junk food-free days. The majority of schools offered cooking classes (59%) and healthy eating media literacy education (67%), while a minority offered gardening activities (15%) and field trips to farmers' markets (27%) and grocery stores (36%). Fifty-three percent had a school cafeteria, and most had a school tuck shop (75%) and pop/juice vending machines (76%). Fifty percent had a chain fast food restaurant, 33% had a chain café/coffee shop, and 41% had a convenience store within 1 km. An important aspect of addressing childhood obesity will be improving the food environments of schools and their surrounding neighbourhoods, and providing healthy eating education for all students.

  3. Mobile phone use, school electromagnetic field levels and related symptoms: a cross-sectional survey among 2150 high school students in Izmir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durusoy, Raika; Hassoy, Hür; Özkurt, Ahmet; Karababa, Ali Osman

    2017-06-02

    Health outcomes of electromagnetic fields (EMF) from mobile phones and their base stations are of concern. Conducting multidisciplinary research, targeting children and exploring dose-response are recommended. Our objectives were to describe the mobile phone usage characteristics of high school students and to explore the association between mobile phone usage characteristics, high school EMF levels and self-reported symptoms. This cross-sectional study's data were collected by a survey questionnaire and by measuring school EMF levels between November 2009 and April 2011. A sample size of 2530 was calculated from a total of 20,493 students in 26 high schools and 2150 (85.0%) were included in the analysis. The frequencies of 23 symptoms were questioned and analysed according to 16 different aspects of mobile phone use and school EMF levels, exploring also dose-response. School EMF levels were measured with Aaronia Spectran HF-4060 device. Chi square and trend tests were used for univariate and logistic regression was used for multivariate analyses. Among participants, 2021 (94.0%) were using mobile phones and 129 (6.0%) were not. Among users, 49.4% were speaking mobile phone users. Dose-response relationships were observed especially for the number of calls per day, total duration of calls per day, total number of text messages per day, position and status of mobile phone at night and making calls while charging as exposures and headache, concentration difficulties, fatigue and sleep disturbances as general symptoms and warming of the ear and flushing as local symptoms. We found an association between mobile phone use and especially headache, concentration difficulties, fatigue, sleep disturbances and warming of the ear showing also dose-response. We have found limited associations between vicinity to base stations and some general symptoms; however, we did not find any association with school EMF levels. Decreasing the numbers of calls and messages, decreasing the

  4. MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION OF ELECTRIC FIELD STRENGTH LEVELS IN PRIMARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS IN A PILOT REGION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurnaz, Cetin; Korunur Engiz, Begum; Bozkurt, Murat Cem

    2017-12-11

    In this study, in order to evaluate the exposed radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) levels, and to control their compliance with the limits determined by International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP), extensive short-term/band-selective and long-term RF-EMF measurements were conducted at 92 primary and secondary schools in the Ilkadım district of Samsun/Turkey. The measurements were performed once each in May, June, October and December in 2016, using the PMM-8053 EMF meter. It was seen from the measurement results that the maximum average electric field strength (Eavg) was recorded, 2.34 V/m, in October, when students were at school. It was concluded from the measurement results that the measured Eavg levels recorded at 92 schools were below the limits determined by ICNIRP. According to the band-selective measurement results performed using a Narda SRM-3006 EMF meter, the five main electric field strength (E) sources that had the most contribution in total E were LTE800, GSM900, GSM1800, UMTS2100 and WLAN services. With the use of these main E sources, an empirical model was then proposed that helps to determine the total E with 99.6% accuracy. It was also concluded from the long-term broadband measurement result that the number of active users affected the total E in the medium directly, and that the measured E levels were significantly higher in daytime than those of recorded in night-time. In the final stage of the study, all measurement results were transferred on scaled color maps. The use of these maps helped to determine and maintain control on the levels of RF-EMF exposure at schools using, or intending to install, such systems, and also to take measures for future precautions. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Preparing students for higher education and careers in agriculture and related fields: An ethnography of an urban charter school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Kesha Atasha

    This study explored the preparation of students for higher education and careers in agriculturally-related fields at an urban charter high school. The data were collected through interviews, observations, and field notes. The data were analyzed by qualitative methodology with phenomenology as the theoretical framework. Findings indicated that administrators thought it was important to incorporate agricultural science courses into urban school curricula. They stated that agricultural science courses gave urban students a different way of looking at science and helped to enhance the science and technology focus of the school. Further, agricultural science courses helped to break urban students' stereotypes about agriculture and helped to bring in more state funding for educational programs. However they thought that it was more challenging to teach agricultural science in urban versus rural schools and they focused more on Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) related careers. The students had mixed views about higher education and careers in agriculture. This was based on their limited knowledge and stereotypes about agricultural majors and career options. The students highlighted several key reasons why they chose to enroll in agricultural science courses. This included the benefits of dual science credits and the ability to earn an associate degree upon successful completion of their program. Students also loved science and appreciated the science intensive nature of the agricultural courses. Additionally, they thought that the agricultural science courses were better than the other optional courses. The results also showed that electronic media such as radio and TV had a negative impact on students' perceptions about higher education and careers in agriculturally-related fields. Conclusions and recommendations are presented.

  6. Communicating soil carbon science to farmers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingram, Julie; Mills, Jane; Dibari, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A key narrative within climate change science is that conserving and improving soil carbon through agricultural practices can contribute to agricultural productivity and is a promising option for mitigating carbon loss through sequestration. This paper examines the potential disconnect...... between science and practice in the context of communicating information about soil carbon management. It focuses on the information producing process and on stakeholder (adviser, farmer representative, policy maker etc) assessment of the attributes credibility, salience and legitimacy. In doing...

  7. Can structural adjustment work for women farmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, R

    1991-12-01

    This article discusses the impact of structural adjustment programs (SAPs) on women farmers in developing countries. SAPs aim to improve economic efficiency and promote more rapid economic growth. SAPs are introduced in two phases. The first phase involves short-term loans with the condition that the country adopt monetary restraints and currency devaluation measures. In the second phase, long-term loans are given with the provision that the country deregulate their economy and open up markets. The agricultural sector is affected by SAPs because of their importance in employment, income generation, and export earnings. SAPs result in lower farm commodity prices due to currency devaluations and in removal of subsidies, which results in market-sensitive pricing or higher food prices. The impact of SAPs on agriculture vary between countries. In Morocco and Algeria, agriculture expanded under SAPs. In Indonesia, Bolivia, Costa Rica, and Mexico, the agriculture stagnated or declined. Agricultural growth was slowest in Africa. SAPs were somewhat successful in increasing agricultural exports. Food production grew slowly in many adjusting countries. Blame for failures of SAPs has been placed on government failure to implement reforms properly and overly optimistic assumptions about the timing of productive gains. Little attention has focused on the constraints facing women farmers, who are a large proportion of farmers, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. This article focuses on the issues of limited access to resources, credit, agricultural extension and information, land ownership, education, and time as constraints to women farmers. Women also must ensure household food security. For SAPs to work effectively, complementary policies must be implemented that reallocate available productive resources and new technologies to women and that deal with women's constraints.

  8. Low back pain among Irish farmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Deirdre; Cunningham, Caitriona; Blake, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Despite farming being regarded as a high-risk activity for low back pain (LBP), little LBP research exists for this work sector. To establish LBP prevalence, beliefs regarding LBP, perceived LBP risk factors, related health service utilization, awareness and participation in manual-handling training among farmers in Ireland. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was distributed to 200 farmers in Ireland via five Irish veterinary practices. Data were entered onto the Statistical package for the Social Sciences (version 12.0.1) and analysed using descriptive statistics while qualitative data were coded and analysed for common themes. The response rate was 52% (n = 104). Lifetime, annual and point prevalence of LBP was 74% (n = 77), 54% (n = 56) and 27% (n = 28), respectively. Of respondents with a history of LBP, 72% (n = 55) stated that farming had contributed to their problem. Sixty-three per cent (n = 31) identified lifting as a contributory factor to their LBP. The majority of respondents (86%, n = 66) with LBP sought some form of treatment, with 73% (n = 56) of these having attended a general practitioner (GP). Few respondents (13%, n = 14) had ever attended a manual-handling course. A high prevalence of LBP was found among farmers, with lifting being reported as the major contributing factor. GPs were the most commonly utilized healthcare practitioner for LBP. Farmers do not commonly attend manual-handling courses with many noting they were not widely accessible or adequately publicized. There is a need for high-quality studies to examine the effectiveness of different interventions to prevent LBP among the Irish farming population.

  9. Chemical and microbial properties of farmer's field soils fertilized ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the chemical and microbial characteristic of soils receiving different quantity of waste for several years (20, 10 and 7 years). Soils were sampled around the city of Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso). Soil chemical (C, N, P and pH) and microbial (basal respiration, microbial biomass and microbial diversity) ...

  10. Bringing research to farmers' fields in Malawi: Lizzie Shumba ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-12-09

    . We go out, especially after the harvest, and show communities how to process and use the legumes to improve children's diets. These “recipe days” are becoming very popular. I'm really happy because the rural people are ...

  11. 8. J.A. Swieca summer school on particles and fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barcelos-Neto, J. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Novaes, S.F. [Instituto de Fisica Teorica (IFT), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rivelles, V.O. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil)] (eds.)

    1996-07-01

    Theoretical papers are presented in these proceedings concerning to field theories, supersymmetry, symmetry, gauge invariance, group theory, quantum and space groups, superstrings, algebras, standard model and quantum field theory.

  12. Farmers' pensions and the Polish economic crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simanis, J G

    1983-04-01

    The Polish Government, in 1977, inaugurated a new pension program that made old-age and invalidity benefits available for the first time to most farmers in that country. The evolution and eventual failure of that program were closely intertwined with a growing national economic crisis, manifested in widespread popular unrest and culminating in emergence of the Solidarity movement. The farmers' pension program was originally presented as both a social security measure and a vehicle for improving agricultural efficiency. The economic situation was expected to benefit as farms of older owners were passed to younger, presumably more efficient, successors, with the state sometimes acting as intermediary. A further step to bind the social security concept to agricultural efficiency came through relating the pension amount to the quantity of produce the individual farmer sold to the state over a number of years. The failure of these provisions and other unpopular features of the new program was aggravated by inflation and continuing deterioration of the Polish economy.

  13. Characterizing customers at medical center farmers' markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraschnewski, Jennifer L; George, Daniel R; Rovniak, Liza S; Monroe, Diana L; Fiordalis, Elizabeth; Bates, Erica

    2014-08-01

    Approximately 100 farmers' markets operate on medical center campuses. Although these venues can uniquely serve community health needs, little is known about customer characteristics and outreach efforts. Intercept survey of markets and market customers between August 2010 and October 2011 at three medical centers in different geographic regions of the US (Duke University Medical Center, Cleveland Clinic, and Penn State Hershey Medical Center) were conducted. Markets reported serving 180-2,000 customers per week and conducting preventive medicine education sessions and community health programs. Customers (n = 585) across markets were similar in sociodemographic characteristics--most were middle-aged, white, and female, who were employees of their respective medical center. Health behaviors of customers were similar to national data. The surveyed medical center farmers' markets currently serve mostly employees; however, markets have significant potential for community outreach efforts in preventive medicine. If farmers' markets can broaden their reach to more diverse populations, they may play an important role in contributing to community health.

  14. Algebraic Thinking in Solving Linier Program at High School Level: Female Student’s Field Independent Cognitive Style

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardiani, N.; Budayasa, I. K.; Juniati, D.

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe algebraic thinking of high school female student’s field independent cognitive style in solving linier program problem by revealing deeply the female students’ responses. Subjects in this study were 7 female students having field independent cognitive style in class 11. The type of this research was descriptive qualitative. The method of data collection used was observation, documentation, and interview. Data analysis technique was by reduction, presentation, and conclusion. The results of this study showed that the female students with field independent cognitive style in solving the linier program problem had the ability to represent algebraic ideas from the narrative question that had been read by manipulating symbols and variables presented in tabular form, creating and building mathematical models in two variables linear inequality system which represented algebraic ideas, and interpreting the solutions as variables obtained from the point of intersection in the solution area to obtain maximum benefit.

  15. Understanding of the farmers privilege concept by smallholder farmers in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noluthando C. Netnou-Nkoana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Legislation on plant breeders’ rights – the Plant Breeders’ Rights Act, 1976 (Act No. 15 of 1976 – currently is being reviewed by the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries. This legislation provides for farmers’ privilege, which is one of the exceptions to plant breeders’ rights. It allows farmers to save seed of protected varieties for their own use. Farmers’ privilege, and particularly its impact on smallholder farmers in developing countries, is a widely debated issue. During the public consultation process, several comments proposing amendments to the farmers’ privilege provision were received from various stakeholders. However, no comments were received from the smallholder farmers who may be directly impacted by this provision. This pilot study was undertaken to assess the understanding of the farmers’ privilege concept by smallholder farmers from the historically disadvantaged communities and their current practices with regard to seed saving. The results showed that the majority of the smallholder farmers were not aware of the existence of the legislation on plant breeders’ rights and therefore do not understand the farmers’ privilege concept and its implications. They also did not know whether the varieties they were using were protected by plant breeders’ rights or not. Little information has been published on the impact of plant breeders’ rights in South Africa in general. We hope that this study might inform policy decisions on matters related to plant breeders’ rights and the farmers’ privilege.

  16. Geoscience research helps rice farmers mitigate climate change and world hunger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runkle, B.; Suvocarev, K.; Reba, M. L.

    2017-12-01

    Rice is a globally important crop - it comprises 30% of total human caloric consumption - and will be an important crop in the face of expanding population growth. Unfortunately, it is often grown in flooded paddies whose swampy conditions allow microbes to produce the strong greenhouse gas, methane. Over 10% of anthropogenic methane emission to the atmosphere are attributed to rice cultivation. Fortunately, a water-saving irrigation method known as Alternate Wetting and Drying can reduce methane emissions by periodically drying the soil. In our experiments, the method has no effect on rice harvest yields. In our research with rice farmers in Arkansas, we work to evaluate the amount of methane reductions on different fields with this irrigation practice. This research aims to expand the scientific basis for carbon emission reductions programs that enable farmers to be paid for implementing this practice. There are still gaps in our knowledge about how much methane is produced and under what conditions. Our research involves the continuous detection of field methane emissions and correlates then to changes in environmental conditions like the height and temperature of paddy water. Understanding these relationships may help more farmers qualify for credits in the growing carbon emission reductions programs. Because many farmers are already collecting information about their irrigation practices to reduce water applications, we aim to help them re-use this data to more quickly qualify for carbon emissions reductions payments.

  17. Mobile Digital Applications for Farmers to Transform Agriculture Statistics from the Bottom Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M. E.; Grace, K.; Sahajpal, R.; Nagol, J. R.

    2017-12-01

    As the global population continues to grow and become more wealthy, the amount of food humanity consumes should also grow, particularly in low income countries that are currently consuming significantly less per capita than is optimal. Reducing yield gaps in low income regions can increase overall agricultural production and pull populations conducting subsistence agriculture in rural areas out of poverty. Investment in the transformation of agricultural value chain to include low income farmers can have significant positive impacts on communities and individuals participating, as well as the resilience of the food system itself. A major obstacle to improving the effectiveness of policies and interventions in the rural agriculture sector is a lack of information about the socio-economic, agricultural production and environmental conditions experienced by farmers as they participate in agriculture. There is a significant lack of high quality statistics that can be used to develop effective agricultural development programs. In today's world of online mapping software, accurate global positioning systems that allow instant, affordable location retrieval and growing mobile connectivity, what is needed is community- or even field-level information. Given the enormous geographic, economic and cultural diversity of even small countries, why settle for national statistics? The kind of information that is needed is at the field and farmer level, not the country level. This paper reviews ways geospatial and information technology can be used to generate farmer-specific information across all countries participating in agriculture.

  18. The foreign language effect on the self-serving bias: A field experiment in the high school classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hugten, Joeri; van Witteloostuijn, Arjen

    2018-01-01

    The rise of bilingual education triggers an important question: which language is preferred for a particular school activity? Our field experiment (n = 120) shows that students (aged 13-15) who process feedback in non-native English have greater self-serving bias than students who process feedback in their native Dutch. By contrast, literature on the foreign-language emotionality effect suggests a weaker self-serving bias in the non-native language, so our result adds nuance to that literature. The result is important to schools as it suggests that teachers may be able to reduce students' defensiveness and demotivation by communicating negative feedback in the native language, and teachers may be able to increase students' confidence and motivation by communicating positive feedback in the foreign language.

  19. The foreign language effect on the self-serving bias: A field experiment in the high school classroom.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joeri van Hugten

    Full Text Available The rise of bilingual education triggers an important question: which language is preferred for a particular school activity? Our field experiment (n = 120 shows that students (aged 13-15 who process feedback in non-native English have greater self-serving bias than students who process feedback in their native Dutch. By contrast, literature on the foreign-language emotionality effect suggests a weaker self-serving bias in the non-native language, so our result adds nuance to that literature. The result is important to schools as it suggests that teachers may be able to reduce students' defensiveness and demotivation by communicating negative feedback in the native language, and teachers may be able to increase students' confidence and motivation by communicating positive feedback in the foreign language.

  20. Geospatial techniques to Identify the Location of Farmers Markets and Community Gardens within Food Deserts in Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriharan, S.; Meekins, D.; Comar, M.; Bradshaw, S.; Jackson, L.

    2017-12-01

    Specifically, a food desert is defined as an area where populations live more than one mile from a supermarket or large grocery store if in an urban area or more than 10 miles from a supermarket or large grocery store if in a rural area (Ver Ploeg et al. 2012). According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, a food desert is "an area in the United States with limited access to affordable and nutritious food, particularly such an area composed of predominately lower-income neighborhoods and communities" (110th Congress 2008). Three fourths of these food deserts are urban. In the Commonwealth of Virginia, Petersburg City is among the eight primary localities, where its population is living in a food desert. This project will compare those identified food deserts in Virginia (areas around Virginia State University) with focus to where farmers markets and community gardens are being established. The hypothesis of this study is that these minority groups do not get healthy food due to limited access to grocery stores and superstores. To address this problem, the community development activities should focus on partnering local Petersburg convenience stores with farmers and community gardeners to sell fresh produce. Existing data was collected on convenient stores and community gardens in Petersburg City and Chesterfield County. Rare data was generated for Emporia, Lynchburg and Hopewell. The data was compiled through field work and mapping with ArcGIS where markets and gardens are being established, and create a spatial analysis of their location We have localities that reflect both rural and urban areas. The project provides educational support for students who will find solution to community problems by developing activities to: (a) define and examine characteristics of food deserts, (b) identify causes and consequences of food deserts and determine if their community is a food desert, (c) research closest food desert to their school, and (d) design solutions to help

  1. Track-and-field athletics as an element of health protection technologies at school (through the example of senior classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moskvin N. G.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available using health protection technologies at schools helps to solve the problem of physical education of children, gives them knowledge and skills for leading a healthy lifestyle. Therefore, a lot of attention is paid to this element during the educational process. Implementing track-and-field athletics in schools might well solve the problem of children upbringing. Track-and-field athletics is a significant part of educational system.

  2. Integrating geoscience and Native American experiences through a multi-state geoscience field trip for high school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, P. R.; Brown, L. M.; Spencer, M.; Sabatine, S.; Goetz, E. R.

    2012-12-01

    Lake Superior State University (LSSU) developed the GRANITE (Geological Reasoning And Natives Investigating The Earth) to engage high school students in the geosciences. The GRANITE program's target audience is Native American high school students and other populations underrepresented in the geosciences. Through the GRANITE program students undertake a variety of field and laboratory geosciences activities that culminates in a two week summer geoscience field experience during which they travel from Michigan to Wyoming. The sites students visit were selected because of their interesting and diverse geologic features and because in many cases they have special significance to Native American communities. Examples of the processes and localities studied by GRANITE students include igneous processes at Bear Butte, SD (Mato Paha) and Devil's Tower, WY (Mato Tipila); sedimentary processes in the Badlands, SD (Mako Sica) and Black Hills, SD (Paha Sapa); karst processes at Wind Cave, SD (Wasun Niye) and Vore Buffalo Jump; structural processes at Van Hise rock, WI and Dillon normal fault Badlands, SD; hydrologic and laucustrine processes along the Great Lakes and at the Fond du Lac Reservation, MN; fluvial processes along the Mississippi and Missouri rivers; geologic resources at the Homestake Mine, SD and Champion Mine, MI; and metamorphic processes at Pipestone, MN and Baraboo, WI. Through the GRANITE experience students develop an understanding of how geoscience is an important part of their lives, their communities and the world around them. The GRANITE program also promotes each student's growth and confidence to attend college and stresses the importance of taking challenging math and science courses in high school. Geoscience career opportunities are discussed at specific geologic localities and through general discussions. GRANITE students learn geosciences concepts and their application to Native communities and society in general through activities and

  3. Baseline information development for energy smart schools -- applied research, field testing and technology integration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Tengfang; Piette, Mary Ann

    2004-08-05

    The original scope of work was to obtain and analyze existing and emerging data in four states: California, Florida, New York, and Wisconsin. The goal of this data collection was to deliver a baseline database or recommendations for such a database that could possibly contain window and daylighting features and energy performance characteristics of Kindergarten through 12th grade (K-12) school buildings (or those of classrooms when available). In particular, data analyses were performed based upon the California Commercial End-Use Survey (CEUS) databases to understand school energy use, features of window glazing, and availability of daylighting in California K-12 schools. The outcomes from this baseline task can be used to assist in establishing a database of school energy performance, assessing applications of existing technologies relevant to window and daylighting design, and identifying future R&D needs. These are in line with the overall project goals as outlined in the proposal. Through the review and analysis of this data, it is clear that there are many compounding factors impacting energy use in K-12 school buildings in the U.S., and that there are various challenges in understanding the impact of K-12 classroom energy use associated with design features of window glazing and skylight. First, the energy data in the existing CEUS databases has, at most, provided the aggregated electricity and/or gas usages for the building establishments that include other school facilities on top of the classroom spaces. Although the percentage of classroom floor area in schools is often available from the databases, there is no additional information that can be used to quantitatively segregate the EUI for classroom spaces. In order to quantify the EUI for classrooms, sub-metering of energy usage by classrooms must be obtained. Second, magnitudes of energy use for electricity lighting are not attainable from the existing databases, nor are the lighting levels contributed

  4. International school on high field NMR spectroscopy for solids and liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marion, D.; Meier, B.; Keeler, J.; Berthault, P.; Vedrine, P.; Grandinetti, P.; Delsuc, M.A.; Spiess, H

    2006-07-01

    The aim of the school is to offer high-level pedagogical courses on a wide range of liquid- and solid-state NMR concepts and techniques: theory, instrumentation (magnets and probes), data acquisition, processing and analysis, measurement of dipolar and quadrupolar couplings, spin relaxation and hyper-polarization. This document gathers only the slides of most presentations.

  5. WiFi in Schools, Electromagnetic Fields and Cell Phones: Alberta Health Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Wireless devices and the networks that support them are becoming more common in Alberta schools. WiFi is a wireless networking technology that allows computers and other devices to communicate over a wireless signal. Typically the signal is carried by radio waves over an area of up to 100 meters. Through the implementation of a WiFi network,…

  6. Sign Language as Medium of Instruction in Botswana Primary Schools: Voices from the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpuang, Kerileng D.; Mukhopadhyay, Sourav; Malatsi, Nelly

    2015-01-01

    This descriptive phenomenological study investigates teachers' experiences of using sign language for learners who are deaf in the primary schools in Botswana. Eight in-service teachers who have had more than ten years of teaching deaf or hard of hearing (DHH) learners were purposively selected for this study. Data were collected using multiple…

  7. Inspiring Careers in STEM and Healthcare Fields through Medical Simulation Embedded in High School Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Louis J.; Muret-Wagstaff, Sharon L.; Goyal, Riya; Joyal, Julie A.; Gordon, James A.; Faux, Russell; Oriol, Nancy E.

    2014-01-01

    The most effective ways to promote learning and inspire careers related to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) remain elusive. To address this gap, we reviewed the literature and designed and implemented a high-fidelity, medical simulation-based Harvard Medical School MEDscience course, which was integrated into high school…

  8. Immersion in a Hudson Valley Tidal Marsh and Climate Research Community - Lamont-Doherty's Secondary School Field Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peteet, D. M.; Newton, R.; Vincent, S.; Sambrotto, R.; Bostick, B. C.; Schlosser, P.; Corbett, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    A primary advantage of place-based research is the multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary research that can be applied to a single locale, with a depth of continued study through time. Through the last decade, Lamont-Doherty's Secondary School Field Research Program (SSFRP) has promoted scientific inquiry, mostly among groups under-represented in STEM fields, in Piermont Marsh, a federally protected marsh in the Hudson estuary. At the same time, Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory (LDEO) scientists have become more involved, through mentoring by researchers, postdocs and graduate students, often paired with high school teachers. The sustained engagement of high school students in a natural environment, experiencing the Hudson River and its tidal cycles, protection of coastline, water quality improvement, native and invasive plant communities, is fundamental to their understanding of the importance of wetlands with their many ecosystem services. In addition, the Program has come to see "place" as inclusive of the Observatory itself. The students' work at Lamont expands their understanding of educational opportunities and career possibilities. Immersing students in a research atmosphere brings a level of serious inquiry and study to their lives and provides them with concrete contributions that they make to team efforts. Students select existing projects ranging from water quality to Phragmites removal, read papers weekly, take field measurements, produce lab results, and present their research at the end of six weeks. Ongoing results build from year to year in studies of fish populations, nutrients, and carbon sequestration, and the students have presented at professional scientific meetings. Through the Program students gain a sense of ownership over both their natural and the academic environments. Challenges include sustained funding of the program; segmenting the research for reproducible, robust results; fitting the projects to PIs' research goals, time

  9. Genetic diversity and parentage in farmer selections of cacao from Southern Sulawesi, Indonesia revealed by microsatellite markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinarti, Diny; Susilo, Agung W.; Meinhardt, Lyndel W.; Ji, Kun; Motilal, Lambert A.; Mischke, Sue; Zhang, Dapeng

    2015-01-01

    Indonesia is the third largest cocoa-producing country in the world. Knowledge of genetic diversity and parentage of farmer selections is important for effective selection and rational deployment of superior cacao clones in farmers’ fields. We assessed genetic diversity and parentage of 53 farmer selections of cacao in Sulawesi, Indonesia, using 152 international clones as references. Cluster analysis, based on 15 microsatellite markers, showed that these Sulawesi farmer selections are mainly comprised of hybrids derived from Trinitario and two Upper Amazon Forastero groups. Bayesian assignment and likelihood-based parentage analysis further demonstrated that only a small number of germplasm groups, dominantly Trinitario and Parinari, contributed to these farmer selections, in spite of diverse parental clones having been used in the breeding program and seed gardens in Indonesia since the 1950s. The narrow parentage predicts a less durable host resistance to cacao diseases. Limited access of the farmers to diverse planting materials or the strong preference for large pods and large bean size by local farmers, may have affected the selection outcome. Diverse sources of resistance, harbored in different cacao germplasm groups, need to be effectively incorporated to broaden the on-farm diversity and ensure sustainable cacao production in Sulawesi. PMID:26719747

  10. Continuous professional development of the Physics teachers through the pedagogical content knowledge on the electric field in High School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Melo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The study describes the progress of the pedagogical content knowledge through an intervention program, as an alternative for the training of high school physics teacher based on reflection. The research was conducted in Colombia with a teacher with an assumed name, Maria, for the 2010-2012 periods. The results show that categories such as knowledge of the curriculum, students and teaching strategies progress after the intervention program. However, knowledge of evaluation and the ideas that the teacher has about the electric field change a little. The results also suggest that approaches through reflection on teacher says, designs and does, allow her to teach based on a more constructivist approach.

  11. Second Field Test of the AEL Measure of School Capacity for Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copley, Lisa D.; Meehan, Merrill L.; Howley, Caitlin W.; Hughes, Georgia K.

    2005-01-01

    The major purpose of the second field test of the AEL MSCI instrument was to assess the psychometric properties of the refined version with a larger, more diverse group of respondents. The first objective of this field test was to expand the four-point Likert-type response scale to six points in order to yield more variance in responses. The…

  12. Research and Researchers in the Field of Works of Art and Historical Monuments. The School of Bridges and Roads in France -- the first school of engineers in this field in the world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Raluca Chiriac

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Romanian higher education began a long time ago, having its own national specificity but being also influenced by the education from other developed countries. Between 1813 -- 1840 Gh. Asachi created the School of Terminal Engineering, establi-shing the foundations of the Technical Engineering University. In Moldavia, higher education in engineering, in the field of roads and bridges, coincides with the official opening of the Faculty of Construction of Jassy, in 1941, as part of the Polytechnic Institute, today the „Gheorghe Asachi” Technical University. Over the years, this type of education has evolved and developed, under the influence of schools of engineering such as The School of Bridges and Roads in France. The French School of Bridges and Roads was created by a decree of the king, on the 14th of February 1747. In two and a half centuries, it has trained about 15,000 engineers, who accomplished great works both in their native country and abroad. The reputation of this school is based especially on the discoveries, the accomplishments and the activity of these engineers, who have a great impact on the development of this institution. Most of these engineers did not go down in history (we seldom know the name of the person who built a bridge or a road. We remember some of them by a formula, a machine, a plate on a road, without actually knowing who is the person behind the name. Shaping their portraits, we could bring them back to the memory of the public, emphasizing the common aspects of their professional training at the School of Bridges and Roads. A free professional background, of a high scientific level, comprising a lot of practical issues, based on public transport in the beginning, where reflection and action play an important part. Except a lot of great scientists (among them, a Nobel prize laureate, inventors, entrepreneurs, engineers with prestigious accomplishments, there are also politicians (even a president, writers

  13. Dipendenza-Indipendenza dal Campo e Linguaggio Scritto: Uno Studio su Gruppi di Studenti di Scuola Media Superiore (Field Dependence-Field Independence and the Written Language: A Study of Groups of Senior High School Students).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelletto, Anna Maria

    1995-01-01

    This article describes research carried out with 389 Italian senior high school students to test the hypothesis that there is a relationship between one's written language and cognitive style. This study takes previous research in the area of field dependence and field independence in a new direction. (CFM)

  14. Stochastic Frontier Analysis of Maize Farmers in Azad Jammu and Kashmir, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, F.; Wang, Y.; Yu, H.; Zhu, K.; Zhang, Z.; Zou, F. L. J.

    2015-01-01

    The research study was carried out to analyze the technical efficiency of maize growers through Cobb-Douglas type Stochastic Frontier Analysis in four villages of Muzaffarabad district, Azad Jammu and Kashmir (AJK), Pakistan. The proportional sampling allocation sampling technique was adopted to collect primary data from 80 sampled respondents in 2013-14. The maximum likelihood estimates of major inputs showed that seed, tractor hours, FYM and labor days have contributed significantly to increase the maize yield. However, the DAP and urea have shown no effect on maize yield. The mean technical efficiency was estimated at 83%, implying that the farmers can still enhance their technical efficiency by 11% within the given inputs and technology. The results have demonstrated that maize crop is lucrative crop in the study area as maize growers have received increasing return to scale i.e., 1.90 (Ep>1), hence economies of scale exists. The variance parameter lambda and gamma both were significant indicating the good fitness of model and inefficiency impact, respectively. The estimated value for gamma was 0.77 underscores that 77% variation in the production frontier was explained by technical inefficiency effect. The inefficiency indices showed that farmers with more schooling years and more number of contacts with extension agents were more efficient. Contrarily, age of the farmer and large farm size have inverse relation to technical efficiency of the farmers. This research study concludes that the use of more labor and application of farm yard manure is contributing significantly. It is recommended that the high input prices may be leveled off by the regulatory authorities so that farmers can apply the required crop inputs such as DAP and urea in study area. (author)

  15. The Strategy of Welfare Improvement for Salt Farmers in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudaryana Bambang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Until now, production of salt in Indonesia is done by salt farmers and PT. Garam Indonesia as the only state company that produces salt. As the perpetrators of production which contribute greatly to the national salt production, salt farmer is considered not prosperous. In general, they depend on marine and coastal resources, use requires large investment and rely heavily on season. Climate and weather conditions that are often hostile, the price mechanism and the salt market tend to be contrast to the condition of farmers, this is what makes salt business is risky. The goals of this research are: 1. Improving the Welfare of salt farmers through a focused and effective empowerment. 2. Improving government’spolicies on salt. To conclude, Empowerment of salt farmers in Indonesia should be focused and effective, salt governance and policy revisions significantly affect the welfare of salt farmers.

  16. Assessing Attitude of Tank Irrigated Farmers Towards Climate Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Mohanraj

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted in ten districts of five Agro Climatic Zones of Tamil Nadu to assess the attitude of tank irrigated farmers towards climate change. In order to measure the attitude of tank user farmers, the scale was constructed by following ‘Equal Appearing Interval’ scaling technique developed by Thurstone and Chave (1929. The study revealed that majority of the farmers had moderately favourable attitude towards climate change.

  17. Assessing Attitude of Tank Irrigated Farmers Towards Climate Change

    OpenAIRE

    K. Mohanraj; C. Karthikeyan

    2016-01-01

    The present study was conducted in ten districts of five Agro Climatic Zones of Tamil Nadu to assess the attitude of tank irrigated farmers towards climate change. In order to measure the attitude of tank user farmers, the scale was constructed by following ‘Equal Appearing Interval’ scaling technique developed by Thurstone and Chave (1929). The study revealed that majority of the farmers had moderately favourable attitude towards climate change.

  18. Education in the radioactivity field: a project for the italian schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venoso, G.; Bertucci, A.; Balzano, E.; Giberti, G.; Pugliese, M.; Roca, V.; Romano, M.; Venoso, G.; Balzano, E.; D'Onofrio, A.; Gialanella, L.; Giberti, G.; Pugliese, M.; Roca, V.; Romano, M.; Sabbarese, C.; D'Onofrio, A.; Sabbarese, C.; Bertucci, A.

    2006-01-01

    Environmental topics are today at the centre of the public attention, but people mostly does not have cultural tools for an adequate knowledge. The radioactivity, in particular, is generally misunderstood and this had negatively influence debate about the energy. To fill this gap science subjects need to be study in school with a more efficient approach. Many efforts have spent to obtain this goal: in this framework the Envirad project was developed with the aim to make students of high schools of Campania Region (south-Italy) able to practice experimental method involving directly them in a real environmental physics experiment [1]. The aim of this project, developed by the grant of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, is that the effective experimental activity is the best way to provide for an adequate scientific background. (N.C.)

  19. Impacts of Renewable Energy on European Farmers. Creating benefits for farmers and society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pedroli, G.B.M.; Langeveld, H.

    2011-01-01

    This report presents results of the project Impacts of Renewable Energy on European Farmers. It focuses on the (potential) role that on-farm generation of Renewable Energy in the EU-27 may play both in realisation of national and EU environmental targets as in (re)vitalising agriculture and rural

  20. Of Organic Farmers and "Good Farmers": Changing Habitus in Rural England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Lee-Ann; Darnhofer, Ika

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, numerous studies have identified the importance of cultural constructions of "good farming" to farming practice. In this paper, we develop the "good farming" construct through an empirical study of organic and conventional farmers, focussing on how change occurs. Drawing on Bourdieu's concepts of cultural…

  1. Tomatoes, Cucumbers, and Salad Tag: A Farmer Goes to School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, William

    2013-01-01

    Will Summers has been farming since 2007 when he interned for a small community-supported agriculture (CSA) farm in Austin, Texas. His agricultural experience since then has primarily been with nonprofit organizations where he has cultivated vegetables, kept chickens, milked goats, and introduced young people to the wonders of farming and…

  2. [Review on farmer's climate change perception and adaptation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xue-Yan

    2014-08-01

    As the most serious challenge that the humankind is facing, climate change has been strengthened vulnerability in many countries and regions, and how to scientifically adapt to climate change has become the global issue of common concern to the international community today. The impact of climate change on farming people depending on the nature resource is especially remarkable, and understanding farmers' adaptation mechanism and process is very important to effectively make the adaptation policy. As the basis of understanding the human response action, public perception has provided a new perspective to verify the farmers' adaptation mechanism and process about climate change. Based on the recent theoretical and empirical developments of farmers' perception and adaptation, the impact of climate change on the farmers' livelihood was analyzed, and the main adaptation obstacles which the farmers faced in response to climate change were summarized systematically. Then, we analyzed the relationship between the farmers' climate change perception and adaptation, illuminated the key cognitive elements in the process of the farmers' climate change adaptation and introduced the framework to analyze the relationship between the farmers' climate change perception and adaptation. At last, this review put forward the key questions which should be considered in study on the relationship between the farmers' climate change perception and adaptation.

  3. Experiences with Farmer Participatory Cowpea Improvement and Seed Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, B. B.

    2000-10-01

    Farmer participatory research is not only a significant concept today but it has become an essential approach to certain aspects of contemporary agricultural research. The CGIAR has already launched a system wide program on participatory research to assess the effectiveness of this approach in plant breeding, natural resources management and gender analysis. The need for participatory research arose when some of the superior technologies identified based on the tests at experiment stations failed to gain acceptance/popularity with resource poor farmers. In most cases, there was nothing wrong with the technologies but farmers did not have access to the recommended inputs and without inputs, the new technologies were poorer, equal to or marginally better than what farmers were using. The apparent lacuna was the lack of testing of new technologies in divers conditions including marginal environments without inputs to ensure superior performance under all conditions. Since all possible test conditions cannot be created at the experiment station, it is now generally agreed that farmer participation at strategic stages may be helpful in developing improved technologies intended for resource poor conditions and traditional cropping systems. The farmer participation ensures use of indigenous knowledge, farmer's perception about the acceptable plant types, seed types and use patterns. It also permits testing of selected materials in diverse conditions and farmer to farmer diffusion of improved technologies

  4. Evaluation of salting as a hay preservative against farmer's lung disease agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel, Sandrine; Reboux, Gabriel; Dalphin, Jean-Charles; Laplante, Jean-Jacques; Piarroux, Renaud

    2005-01-01

    Salting is a traditional, empirical practice used commonly in dairy farming regions to prevent moulding and heating in hay. Our aim was to evaluate the effect of salting hay on the proliferation of microorganisms, particularly thermophilic actinomycetes and moulds involved in farmer's lung disease. Fifty-one pairs of salted and unsalted hay bales from 14 farms were produced during the haymaking season between March and July. Both the salted and the unsalted bales came from the same field, and were packed and stored under identical conditions. Sampling was performed by microbiological analysis including 6 culture media during the winter following salting (January-February). The use of salt did not significantly decrease the amount of Saccharopolyspora rectivirgula , the actinomycetes most commonly involved in farmer's lung disease, or that of Absidia corymbifera, Eurotium amstelodami and Wallemia sebi , three moulds responsible for farmer's lung disease in eastern France. Our results are important in that they can inform farmers and dispel the false sense of security induced by salting, which is reinforced by the misconception that palatable hay is healthy hay.

  5. Multi-approach model for improving agrochemical safety among rice farmers in Pathumthani, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siriwong W

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Buppha Raksanam,1,2 Surasak Taneepanichskul,2 Wattasit Siriwong,2 Mark Robson3,41Sirindhorn College of Public Health, Trang, 2College of Public Health Sciences, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand; 3School of Environmental and Biological Sciences, Rutgers University, 4School of Public Health, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ, USAAbstract: The large-scale use of agrochemicals has raised environmental and human health concerns. A comprehensive intervention strategy for improving agrochemical safety among rice farmers in Thailand is lacking. The objective of this study is to develop a model in order to improve farmers’ health and prevent them from being exposed to agrochemical hazards, in addition to evaluating the effectiveness of the intervention in terms of agrochemical safety. This study was conducted between October 2009 and January 2011. It measures changes in the mean scores of agrochemical knowledge, health beliefs, agrochemical use behaviors, and in-home pesticide safety. Knowledge of agrochemical use constitutes a basic knowledge of agrochemicals and agrochemical safety behaviors. Health beliefs constitute perceived susceptibility, severity, benefits, and barriers to using agrochemicals. Agrochemical use behaviors include self-care practices in terms of personal health at specific times including before spraying, while spraying, during storage, transportation, waste management, and health risk management. Fifty rice farmers from Khlong Seven Community (study group and 51 rice farmers from Bueng Ka Sam community (control group were randomly recruited with support from community leaders. The participants were involved in a combination of home visits (ie, pesticide safety assessments at home and community participatory activities regarding agrochemical safety. This study reveals that health risk behaviors regarding agrochemical exposure in the study area are mainly caused by lack of attention to

  6. Basic pulmonary function tests in pig farmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đuričić Slaviša M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Many epidemiological and clinical studies have demonstrated an increased risk for the symptoms of respiratory disorders consistent with chronic bronchitis and asthma and alterations of pulmonary function tests in pig farmers. AIM The aim of this study was to determine basic pulmonary function values in workers in swine confinement buildings and to compare them with the same values in the control group of unexposed persons. The next aim was to examine the association between these values with duration of professional exposure, cigarette smoking, age, and sex of the examined persons. METHODS We randomly selected for examination 145 workers of both sex who had worked for at least 2 previous years in pig farms and spent at least 3 hours per day, 6 days per week in a swine confinement building. The farmers worked at 6 different farms with 12,383 pigs on average on each farms. The subject was eligible for the study if he had had no history of atopic disease nor any serious chronic disease, and no acute respiratory infection within 3 previous months. As control group we examined 156 subjects who had lived and/or worked in the same areas and had had no history of exposure to farming environment or any other known occupational air pollutants. In both groups the study comprised cigarette smokers and persons who had never smoked. Pulmonary function data were collected according to the standard protocol with a Micro Spirometer, (Micro Medical Ltd, England, UK. The registered parameters were FEV1 and FVC At least three satisfactory forced maximal expirations were performed by each subject and the best value was accepted for analyses. The results were also expressed as a percentage of predicted values and FEV1/FVCxlOO was calculated. RESULTS There were no differences in the main demographic characteristics between two examined groups (Table1. Mean duration of work in pig farming was 11.6 years (SD=8.5; range 2-40. The average values of examined

  7. Perspectives on Extremes as a Climate Scientist and Farmer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotjahn, R.

    2016-12-01

    The speaker is both a climate scientist whose research emphasizes climate extremes and a small farmer in the most agriculturally productive region in the world. He will share some perspectives about the future of extremes over the United States as they relate to farming. General information will be drawn from the National Climate Assessment (NCA) published in 2014. Different weather-related quantities are useful for different commodities. While plant and animal production are time-integrative, extreme events can cause lasting harm long after the event is over. Animal production, including dairy, is sensitive to combinations of high heat and humidity; lasting impacts include suspended milk production, aborted fetuses, and increased mortality. The rice crop can be devastated by the wrong combination of wind and humidity just before harvest time. Extremes at the bud break, flowering, and nascent fruit stage and greatly reduce the fruit production for the year in tree crops. Saturated soils from heavy rainfall cause major losses to some crops (for example, by fostering pathogen growth), harm water delivery systems, and disrupt timing of field activities (primarily harvest).After an overview of some general issues relating to Agriculture, some extreme weather impacts on specific commodities (primarily dairy and specialty crops, some grains) will be highlighted including quantities relevant to agriculture. Example extreme events economic impacts will be summarized. If there is interest, issues related to water availability and management will be described. Projected extreme event changes over the US will be discussed. Some conclusions will be drawn about: future impacts and possible changes to farming (some are already occurring). Perspectives will be given on including the diverse range of quantities useful to agriculture when developing climate models. As time permits, some personal experiences with climate change and discussing it with fellow farmers will be shared.

  8. Stories from the field: Teaching science in low-performing, rural schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conetta, Patrick John

    If teachers matter to the academic success of students, then having experienced teachers shows significant promise in eliminating persistent achievement gaps. However, high rates of teacher attrition are persistent in schools serving low-income and minority students serving to reinforce these persistent gaps. The purpose of this study is to allow the voices of science teachers working in low-performing, rural schools to be heard and expand our current understanding of teacher retention beyond "yes" or "no" decisions. The narratives teachers share demonstrate that persistence is constructed daily through frustrations and hard-won victories that are significant to one's career decisions. With an ear for the structures that guide teacher's practice and create professional tension, teacher narratives also represent hope for the subtle and splendid ways they challenge these tensions to carve out their existence as educators. Their stories are inspirational to future teachers and teacher educators because they provide insights to the ways teachers learn to persist. My research was guided by three general interests: What experiences bring individuals to teach science in hard to staff schools, what conditions did teachers find when they arrived, and how do science teachers respond to the circumstances in which they find themselves teaching. Steered by Holland, Lachicotte, Skinner, and Cain's (1998) theoretical framework of Figured Worlds, and inspired by previous work utilizing this framework, I gathered data through extended interviews with nine participants and examined their stories through qualitative narrative analysis to illustrate the delicate interplay between structure and agency and how this interplay is intertwined with teachers' willingness to persist. This study revealed that individual willingness to persist was interwoven with their ability to author themselves within and/or against existing cultural models of the "good teacher" and its implications lead to

  9. Effects of farmers\\' seed source on maize seed quality and crop ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    determined the seed quality and field performance of farmer-saved seeds of the most popular quality protein maize (QPM) variety, Obatanpa, compared to the ... Une étude était entreprise pour déterminer la qualité de graine et le rendement sur le terrain de semence gardé par l'agriculteur de la variété la plus populaire du ...

  10. Exploration of Problems in Developing Jilin Farmers’ Professional Cooperatives

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Hong; Zheng, Mei; Huang, Tian-tian; Li, Si-yun

    2012-01-01

    Establishment of farmers’ professional cooperatives is an effective approach of settling conflicts between small-scale production of rural households and great market, however, there are still many problems such as low level of standardization, unscientific market positioning, poor capacity of mitigating risks, and unfavorable ecological benefits. This study, based on field investigation data and successful support experience, further explored operation and management problems existing in J...

  11. Robust transformation procedure for the production of transgenic farmer-preferred cassava landraces

    OpenAIRE

    Zainuddin Ima M; Schlegel Kim; Gruissem Wilhelm; Vanderschuren Hervé

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Recent progress in cassava transformation has allowed the robust production of transgenic cassava even under suboptimal plant tissue culture conditions. The transformation protocol has so far been used mostly for the cassava model cultivar 60444 because of its good regeneration capacity of embryogenic tissues. However, for deployment and adoption of transgenic cassava in the field it is important to develop robust transformation methods for farmer- and industry-preferred landraces an...

  12. Inclusiveness of identification among farmers in The Netherlands and Galicia (Spain)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klandermans, P.G.; Sabucedo, J.M.; Rodriguez, M.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we discuss inclusiveness of identification among farmers in Galicia (Spain) and The Netherlands. Identification with three nested categories - farmers in the local community, farmers in the country, and farmers in Europe was assessed among 167 Dutch and 248 Galician farmers at three

  13. Stories from the field: students' descriptions of gender discrimination and sexual harassment during medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Florence M; Stratton, Terry D; Nora, Lois Margaret

    2006-07-01

    Previous studies have documented the prevalence of gender discrimination and sexual harassment during medical training, but very few have examined the behaviors that students perceive as discriminatory or harassing. The authors addressed this lack of information by examining graduating medical students' written descriptions of personal experiences with such behaviors during medical school. The authors reviewed the responses of graduating seniors at 12 U.S. medical schools to a questionnaire, administered in 2001-02, that asked them to provide written descriptions of their personal experiences with gender discrimination and sexual harassment. Seven response categories were created on the basis of recurring themes: educational inequalities; stereotypical comments; sexual overtures; offensive, embarrassing, or sexually explicit comments; inappropriate touching; sexist remarks; and not classifiable. The three authors examined the students' written accounts and placed each into one or more of the categories. Of the students' responses, 290 (36.6%) contained 313 written descriptions of personal experiences that the students perceived as either discriminatory or harassing. The most frequently reported experiences involved educational inequalities; experiences in this category were reported more frequently by men than by women. All other categories of experiences were reported more frequently by women. The results support earlier findings of the prevalence of gender discrimination and sexual harassment during undergraduate medical education. Perhaps formal antiharassment policies should provide examples of unacceptable behavior that are based on categories such as those revealed by this analysis. Perhaps, too, medical students' comments could be used to develop educational interventions for physicians in supervisory positions.

  14. Potential Contradictions Connected to the Inclusion of Stable Schools in the Legislation for Danish Organic Dairy Farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaarst, Mette; Fisker, I

    2013-01-01

    generally found the Stable Schools useful for many organic farmers, also after introduction to the legislation, given that farmers are motivated and the process is actively supported by a skilled facilitator. We raise the question of a potential mismatch between the legislative aims and the farmer group...

  15. Agricultural Extension Messages Using Video on Portable Devices Increased Knowledge about Seed Selection, Storage and Handling among Smallholder Potato Farmers in Southwestern Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjorn Van Campenhout

    Full Text Available To feed a growing population, agricultural productivity needs to increase dramatically. Agricultural extension information, with its public, non-rival nature, is generally undersupplied, and public provision remains challenging. In this study, simple agricultural extension video messages, delivered through Android tablets, were tested in the field to determine if they increased farmers' knowledge of recommended practices on (i potato seed selection and (ii seed storage and handling among a sample of potato farmers in southwestern Uganda. Using a field experiment with ex ante matching in a factorial design, it was established that showing agricultural extension videos significantly increased farmers' knowledge. However, results suggested impact pathways that went beyond simply replicating what was shown in the video. Video messages may have triggered a process of abstraction, whereby farmers applied insights gained in one context to a different context.

  16. The Biotic Indexing of Water Quality and Its Application to Field Work in Schools and Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, C. R.

    1980-01-01

    Discussed is the biotic indexing of water quality and its application to A-level field work with reference to the Trent Biotic Index and Chandler Score system. These indices are related to the classification of water quality used by the Department of the Environment. Interpretations and limitations of the indices are discussed. (Author/DS)

  17. Forest Field Trips among High School Science Teachers in the Southern Piedmont

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Shannon M.; Munsell, John F.; Seiler, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Students benefit in many ways by taking field trips to forests. Improved academic performance, increased participation in outdoor recreation, and a better grasp of natural resources management are some of the advantages. However, trips are not easy for teachers to organize and lead. Declining budgets, on-campus schedules, and standards of learning…

  18. Graduate School as the Third Level of Higher Education: Field of Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shestak, V. P.; Shestak, N. V.

    2016-01-01

    This article proposes a shift in the discussion of graduate educational programs (graduate military courses) used to train academic personnel. This proposed shift is toward a social field of discourse where the inconsistencies and uncertainties of the current regulatory framework (for modernizing the training and certification of highly qualified…

  19. The adaptive capacity of smallholder farmers to climate change in the Northern Region of Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majeed Abdul-Razak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Climate change is expected to adversely affect agricultural production, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa where the agricultural sector forms the backbone of most countries’ economies. This thus holds true for the agriculture sector of the Northern Region of Ghana which is largely rain-fed and dominated by smallholder farmers with minimal livelihood alternatives. The main research question of this paper is how the adaptive capacity to climate change of smallholder farmers in the Northern Region of Ghana can be characterised? The paper proposes an indicator-based framework for assessing the adaptive capacity of smallholder farmers in the Northern Region of Ghana along six main determinants of adaptive capacity: economic resources, social capital, awareness and training, technology, infrastructure and institutions. Based on a thorough literature review and qualitative interviews with experts for rural livelihoods and agriculture in the study region, the determinants were ranked and three to five indicators per determinant were selected. The results of the expert interviews show that economic resources, awareness and training as well as technological capacities seem most relevant for smallholder farmers’ adaptive capacity while infrastructure, social capital, and institutions were ranked least important. The study operationalized the indicators in a standardized survey questionnaire and tested it in two agrarian communities in the Northern Region of Ghana. The survey results show the aggregate adaptive capacity of respondents is low. However, disparities in adaptive capacity were recorded among respondents in terms of gender and education. Differentiating between the determinants women farmer show significantly lower capacities in fields of economic resources, technology and knowledge and awareness. This paper recommends resilience building interventions in the study area that target individuals with low adaptive capacities, especially women

  20. What are farmers really planting? Measuring the presence and effectiveness of Bt cotton in Pakistan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Spielman

    Full Text Available Genetically modified, insect-resistant Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt cotton is cultivated extensively in Pakistan. Past studies, however, have raised concerns about the prevalence of Bt cotton varieties possessing weak or nonperforming insect-resistance traits conferred by the cry gene. We examine this issue using data drawn from a representative sample of cotton-growing households that were surveyed in six agroclimatic zones spanning 28 districts in Pakistan in 2013, as well as measurements of Cry protein levels in cotton tissue samples collected from the sampled households' main fields. The resultant dataset combines information from 593 sampled households with corresponding plant tissue diagnostics from 70 days after sowing, as well as information from 589 sampled households with corresponding diagnostics from 120 days after sowing. Our analysis indicates that 11 percent of farmers believed they were cultivating Bt cotton when, in fact, the Cry toxin was not present in the tested tissue at 70 days after sowing (i.e., a Type I error. The analysis further indicates that 5 percent of farmers believed they were cultivating non-Bt cotton when, in fact, the Cry toxin was present in the tested tissue (i.e., a Type II error. In addition, 17 percent of all sampled farmers were uncertain whether or not they were cultivating Bt cotton. Overall, 33 percent of farmers either did not know or were mistaken in their beliefs about the presence of the cry gene in the cotton they cultivated. Results also indicate that toxic protein levels in the plant tissue samples occurred below threshold levels for lethality in a significant percentage of cases, although these measurements may also be affected by factors related to tissue sample collection, handling, storage, and testing procedures. Nonetheless, results strongly suggest wide variability both in farmers' beliefs and in gene expression. Such variability has implications for policy and regulation in Pakistan

  1. Striga Biocontrol on a Toothpick: A Readily Deployable and Inexpensive Method for Smallholder Farmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nzioki, Henry S; Oyosi, Florence; Morris, Cindy E; Kaya, Eylul; Pilgeram, Alice L; Baker, Claire S; Sands, David C

    2016-01-01

    Striga hermonthica (witchweed) is a parasitic weed that attacks and significantly reduces the yields of maize, sorghum, millet, and sugarcane throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Low cost management methods such as hand weeding, short crop rotations, trap cropping, or conventional biocontrol have not been effective. Likewise, Striga-tolerant or herbicide-resistant maize cultivars are higher yielding, but are often beyond the economic means of sustenance farmers. The fungal pathogen, Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. strigae, has been the object of numerous studies to develop Striga biocontrol. Under experimental conditions this pathogen can reduce the incidence of Striga infestation but field use is not extensive, perhaps because it has not been sufficiently effective in restoring crop yield and reducing the soil Striga seed bank. Here we brought together Kenyan and US crop scientists with smallholder farmers to develop and validate an effective biocontrol strategy for management of Striga on smallholder farms. Key components of this research project were the following: (1) Development of a two-step method of fungal delivery, including laboratory coating of primary inoculum on toothpicks, followed by on-farm production of secondary field inoculum in boiled rice enabling delivery of vigorous, fresh inoculum directly to the seedbed; (2) Training of smallholder farmers (85% women), to produce the biocontrol agent and incorporate it into their maize plantings in Striga-infested soils and collect agronomic data. The field tests expanded from 30 smallholder farmers to a two-season, 500-farmer plot trial including paired plus and minus biocontrol plots with fertilizer and hybrid seed in both plots and; (3) Concerted selection of variants of the pathogen identified for enhanced virulence, as has been demonstrated in other host parasite systems were employed here on Striga via pathogen excretion of the amino acids L-leucine and L-tyrosine that are toxic to Striga but innocuous to maize

  2. Striga Biocontrol on a Toothpick: A Readily Deployable and Inexpensive Method for Smallholder Farmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Chandler Sands

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Striga hermonthica (witchweed is a parasitic weed that attacks and significantly reduces the yields of maize, sorghum, millet and sugarcane throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Low cost management methods such as hand weeding, short crop rotations, trap cropping, or conventional biocontrol have not been effective. Likewise, Striga-tolerant or herbicide-resistant maize cultivars are higher yielding, but are often beyond the economic means of sustenance farmers. The fungal pathogen, Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. strigae, has been the object of numerous studies to develop Striga biocontrol. Under experimental conditions this pathogen can reduce the incidence of Striga infestation but field use is not extensive, perhaps because it has not been sufficiently effective in restoring crop yield and reducing the soil Striga seed bank. Here we brought together Kenyan and US crop scientists with smallholder farmers to develop and validate an effective biocontrol strategy for management of Striga on smallholder farms. Key components of this research project were the following: 1. Development of a two-step method of fungal delivery, including laboratory coating of primary inoculum on toothpicks, followed by on-farm production of secondary field inoculum in boiled rice enabling delivery of vigorous, fresh inoculum directly to the seedbed; 2. Training of smallholder farmers (85% women, to produce the biocontrol agent and incorporate it into their maize plantings in Striga-infested soils and collect agronomic data. The field tests expanded from 30 smallholder farmers to a two-season, 500-farmer plot trial including paired plus and minus biocontrol plots with fertilizer and hybrid seed in both plots and; 3. Concerted selection of variants of the pathogen identified for enhanced virulence, as has been demonstrated in other host parasite systems were employed here on Striga via pathogen excretion of the amino acids L-leucine and L-tyrosine that are toxic to Striga but

  3. Ergonomic and health assessment of farmers' multi-pesticide exposure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study assessed the ergonomic risk factors, and occupational health and safety conditions of farmers' multi-pesticide exposures.Methods. Methods consisted of ... Farmers reported pesticide spills on their body parts while spraying (79%), and 49 % complained of getting sick because of work. Of those who got ill, 69.8% ...

  4. Information flow on agronomic practices among oil palm farmers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information flow on agronomic practices among oil palm farmers in delta state, Nigeria. ... Journal of Agriculture and Food Sciences ... There is the need for extension agents to intensify effort in improving, educating, and encouraging the farmers to share information on improved agronomic practices among themselves.

  5. Farmers' awareness and perceived benefits of agro-ecological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A transition towards intensification of smallholder banana systems requires that the full range of ecosystem services provided by AEI practices are recognized and valued by farmers. Therefore, empowering farmers with knowledge on their agro-ecological systems and locally adapting AEI practices is essential for realization ...

  6. Socioeconomic Effects of Farmer-Pastoralist Conflict on Agricultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    Abstract. The study examined the socio - economic effect of farmer-pastoralist conflict on family farming in Oyo State, Nigeria. Multi-stage sampling technique was used to select to 60 farmers and 60 pastoralists for the research and were interviewed with structured questionnaire. Results showed that a little above.

  7. Farmers' preferences for tree species on Agroforestry System in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Farmers' preferences for tree species on Agroforestry System in Ijebu North Local Government Area, Ogun State, Nigeria. RI Mustapha, SO Jimoh. Abstract. This study was conducted to generate information on tree species farmers are willing to retain or plant on their farms; the benefits they derive from the trees and the ...

  8. Farmers` satisfaction with the performance of the Mooi River ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An investigation was instituted to determine factors that significantly influence the satisfaction status of farmers at the Mooi-River Irrigation Scheme (MRIS) in KwaZulu Natal, South Africa. A multinomial Logit regression model was employed to analyse the response of the farmers. It was established that about 57% of the ...

  9. 75 FR 49886 - Trade Adjustment Assistance for Farmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Foreign Agricultural Service Trade Adjustment Assistance for Farmers... Service (FAS) today accepted and began a review of a petition for trade adjustment assistance filed under... INFORMATION CONTACT: Trade Adjustment Assistance for Farmers Program Staff, FAS, USDA by phone: (202) 720-0638...

  10. 75 FR 49458 - Trade Adjustment Assistance for Farmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Foreign Agricultural Service Trade Adjustment Assistance for Farmers... Service (FAS) today accepted and began a review of a petition for trade adjustment assistance filed under... and cash benefits. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Trade Adjustment Assistance for Farmers Program...

  11. 75 FR 48642 - Trade Adjustment Assistance for Farmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Foreign Agricultural Service Trade Adjustment Assistance for Farmers... Service (FAS) today accepted and began a review of a petition for trade adjustment assistance filed under... benefits. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Trade Adjustment Assistance for Farmers Program Staff, FAS, USDA...

  12. 75 FR 43485 - Trade Adjustment Assistance for Farmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    ... Service Trade Adjustment Assistance for Farmers AGENCY: Foreign Agricultural Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice... petition for trade adjustment assistance filed under the FY 2011 Program by three wool producers on behalf... cash benefits. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Trade Adjustment Assistance for Farmers Staff, FAS...

  13. Assessing farmer involvement in collective action for enhancing the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessing farmer involvement in collective action for enhancing the sorghum value chain in Soroti, Uganda. ... in six sub-counties of Soroti, Uganda, where associations are established. A binomial logit regression model was employed to ascertain socio-economic factors that influenced membership to farmer associations.

  14. Fuzzy modeling of farmers' knowledge for land suitability classification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sicat, R.S.; Carranza, E.J.M.; Nidumolu, U.B.

    2005-01-01

    In a case study, we demonstrate fuzzy modeling of farmers' knowledge (FK) for agricultural land suitability classification using GIS. Capture of FK was through rapid rural participatory approach. The farmer respondents consider, in order of decreasing importance, cropping season, soil color, soil

  15. An analysis of social status and social participation of farmers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the socio economic status and social participation of farmers cultivating soybean in Kwara State, Nigeria. Their social status was determined and the relationship between these characteristics and adoption of soybean were explored. From a sampling frame of 1800 farmers, three hundred soybean ...

  16. Evaluation of pesticide safety measures adopted by potato farmers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to increase productivity and quality, farmers use pesticides and other agrochemicals. These pesticides if improperly handled impact negatively on the health of the users. The objective of the study was to evaluate the pesticide safety measures adopted by potato farmers in Chebiemit Division of Elgeyo/Marakwet ...

  17. Farmer-led documentation as a possible tool for improved ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Training on FLD, camera maintenance and taking photographs was done during a workshop, and further supported during follow-up visits through the season. The final feedback workshop enabled farmers to share the content of their photographs, as well as their experiences with FLD and photography. Farmers discussed ...

  18. Purchase of Catastrophe Insurance by Dutch Dairy and Arable Farmers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ogurtsov, V.; Asseldonk, van M.A.P.M.; Huirne, R.B.M.

    2009-01-01

    This article analyzed the impact of risk perception, risk attitude, and other farmer personal and farm characteristics on the actual purchase of catastrophe insurance by Dutch dairy and arable farmers. The specific catastrophe insurance types considered were hail–fire–storm insurance for buildings,

  19. Technical Efficiency of Enugu Urban Broiler Farmers in Enugu State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study measured the level of technical efficiency and among determinants in broiler farmers in Enugu urban of Enugu State, Nigeria using stochastic frontier production function. Multi-stage sampling technique was used to select 120 broiler farmers from which data were collected using well-structured questionnaire and ...

  20. innovations adoption levels of small ruminant farmers in tolon

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    UDS-CAPTURED

    ruminant farmers need to adopt innovations in order to promote and sustain small ruminant production. This paper .... innovations have been adopted by small ruminant farmers in the Tolon-Kumbungu District of the. Northern Region ..... to be able to carry out closed castration in their respective communities. As indicated in ...

  1. Farmers\\' Attitudes And Problems Associated With The Adoption Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The farmers showed favourable attitudes to rejuvenate their farms with the hybrid, but are sceptical about their success in the long-run. Thus, only few had planted the hybrid. Farmers interested in the hybrid expressed common problems of getting true-to-type seedlings at the right time and at a reasonable cost. Salvaging ...

  2. Using the VOICE tool to make good farmer programming Appendix

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2014-04-23

    Apr 23, 2014 ... program? Do you broadcast at a time that is suitable for farmers? Do farmers' voices really shine through in your programming? These are the kinds of questions radio broadcasters ask themselves when it's time to evaluate their programs. Sometimes, it is good to take a step back and carefully analyze.

  3. sources and use of extension information among maize farmers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR ADESOPE

    benefit, some pertinent questions became imperative. These are. -. Should extension services be information dissemination or knowledge enhancing? -. Should the determination of farmers need and solutions to them remain that of the external agency, the government, the farmer themselves or a joint venture of all the.

  4. Farmer groups key to boosting technology adoption in Kenya | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2013-09-20

    Sep 20, 2013 ... Impressed by the success of the PPATE/SPATE model, farmers are now organizing to explore marketing opportunities. ... Farmers are more likely to implement new practices and stick with them, the project team found, if they see direct economic benefits (i.e., increased productivity, better means of ...

  5. Response of farmers to agricultural insurance in Kogi State, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study conducted in Kogi and Adavi Local Government Areas of Kogi State, assessed farmers response to the Agricultural Insurance Scheme of the Nigerian Insurance Company (NAIC). The willingness of farmers to take up the scheme was also determined. The data obtained were subjected to descriptive statistics and ...

  6. Determinant of farmers' ability to pay for improved irrigation water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An ordinary least squares regression was used to investigate factors affecting ATP. Results indicate that factors such as labour, training, household assets and road conditions positively influence ATP. The study highlights the importance of support to farmers and their institutions. The study also concludes that farmers are ...

  7. Socio-economic determinants of income among cowpea farmers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Socio-economic determinants of income among cowpea farmers in Bama local government area of Borno state, Nigeria. ... Based on the results of the study, it was recommended that policy measures aimed at providing relevant training opportunities and education schemes to the farmers should be encouraged; further ...

  8. Development Aid, Agricultural Value Chains and Farmers' Benefits ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article assesses farmers' benefits from a donor-funded programme that promoted non-traditional agricultural export crops, specifically vanilla and hot pepper. Data was obtained from a survey of 125 famers from eight farmers' associations working with a Dutch NGO and trading company, four focus group discussions ...

  9. Farmers, consumers and gatekeepers and their attitudes towards ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In 1999, a project to develop insect resistance maize for Africa was launched. Social scientists from this team used participatory rural appraisals, consumer studies, a baseline and gatekeeper survey to study the awareness and attitudes towards biotechnology among farmers, consumers and gatekeepers. Farmers' ...

  10. Women Farmers' Perception and Utilization of Marketing Information ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study ascertained the perception of women farmers' on utilization of marketing information on cassava in Osun State, Nigeria.Multistage sampling technique was adopted in the selection of 110 women cassava farmers in Osun State. Data were collected from the women with the aid of structured interview schedule .

  11. Benefits of zucchini crop cultivation among farmers in Oluyole Local ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data were collected from 79 farmers on socioeconomic characteristics, access to information and knowledge of the potentials of zucchini cultivation as well as constraints ... Awareness campaign on the potentials of the crop should be created while farmers' capacity on appropriate storage technologies should be enhanced.

  12. This paper describes farmer's perception towards potential adoption

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ademola

    2013-12-23

    Dec 23, 2013 ... We assessed the perception of farmers towards potential adoption of genetic modification (GM) technology for improving health, food security and agricultural productivity using a semi-structured interview. A total sample of 54 small-scale farmers participated in 6 focus group meetings (FGMs) and.

  13. Improving farmer adaptive capacity by integrating local and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-22

    Improving farmer adaptive capacity by integrating local and indigenous knowledge in climate forecasting. April 22, 2016. Image. Despite the availability of more reliable forecasts from meteorological services in Kenya, farmers seldom use them for farm level decision-making. This case study discusses how downscaled ...

  14. Perception Of Farmers About Profitability Of Vegetable Gardening ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study assessed perception of farmers about profitability of vegetable gardening enterprise in Ahiazu Mbaise local government area of Imo state, Nigeria. A structured questionnaire was administered to 60 randomly selected farmers in the study area. Data collected were analysed using frequencies, percentages and ...

  15. An assessment of farmers' awareness and practices of land ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The continuous deterioration of the agricultural land resulting in low food output necessitated this study. One hundred and twenty farmers were selected for interview, using a systematic random sampling from the list of 360 registered farmers provided by the ADP officials. A list of ten management practices was drawn for the ...

  16. Maize stemborers distribution, their natural enemies and farmers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2013-04-25

    Apr 25, 2013 ... Farmers perception on effects of climate change on maize stem borers distribution and their natural enemies. 4773. Maize stemborers distribution, their natural enemies and farmers' perception on climate change and stemborers in southern Togo. Tounou Agbéko Kodjo1*, Agboka Komi1, Agbodzavu Komi ...

  17. Adaptation Practices to Climate Change Among Rice Farmers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined adaptation practices to climate change among rice farmers in Anambra State, Nigeria. Data were collected from 100 rice farmers by the combination of multistage, purposive and simple random sampling techniques, through the use of interview schedule. Percentage and mean statistics were used for ...

  18. Agricultural extension needs of farmers in Telfairia production and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study assessed agricultural extension needs of farmers in Telfairia production and marketing in Enugu State, Nigeria. Multistage sampling technique was used to select 160 Telfairia farmers for the study. Structured interview schedule was used to collect data. Data was analysed by use of descriptive statistics and factor ...

  19. The influence of farmer perception on pesticide usage for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The insect pest complex infesting cowpea has made farmers in Uganda to increasingly use pesticides as the major means of pest control. A case study conducted in eastern Uganda revealed that: (a) pesticide usage depended on farmer production goal, (b) change from one pesticide to another depended on perceived ...

  20. Farmer's knowledge and perception of horticultural insect pest ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Whilst 89% were aware of insect pest problems, only 35% used chemical treatment even though about 79% thought that pest damage ranged from mild to severe. Majority of the farmers adopt diverse number of traditional methods in pest control. Key words: Farmers, pests, horticultural crops, vegetable, control

  1. Effects Of Educational Workshops On Farmers' Pest Management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The heavy use of pesticides in Iran not only has critically harmful health effects on the farmers, but also harms the environment and consumer's health. One of the best approaches for overcoming this problem can be adoption of pest management practices and IPM (integrated pest management) systems by farmers.

  2. Comparison of youth farmers' utilization of agricultural farm land in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This entails that farming enterprise needs active, productive and relatively young farmers who are energetic to participate actively to raise the enterprise. The study therefore recommended that, youth farmers in Benue State should be encouraged to undertake tertiary education through short term programmes, and early ...

  3. Determinants of Farmers' Willingness to Pay for Agricultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results showed that majority of the farmers (65%) were males. The result also revealed that such socio-economic variables like level of education, farm size, income and farming experience had a direct relationship to farmer's willingness to pay for extension services. The constraints identified by the study as serious ...

  4. Evaluation Of Farmers\\' Extension Education Needs In Ohaji ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study evaluated farmers extension education needs in Ohaji/Egbema local government area of Imo State, Nigeria. Data for the study was collected with the aid of questionnaire and interview from 124 randomly selected farmers in the study area. Data analysis was with the use of frequencies, percentages and Pearson ...

  5. The influence of farmers\\' adoption behaviour on maize production ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was therefore designed to determine the contribution of farmers\\' adoption of recommended maize production practices, namely maize varieties, seed spacing, fertilization and weeding on production efficiency in order to assess the soundness of the advice given to farmers. The research was conducted in the ...

  6. Farmer preferences and the production strategies of agroforestry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Agroforestry projects in Madagascar that promote fruit trees address social and environmental threats to rainforests by reducing farmers' reliance on rice cultivation as long as fruit production is a more economically efficient option. This study aims to understand farmer planting preferences for fruit trees around Ranomafana ...

  7. Selected socio-demographic factors affecting involvement of farmers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Selected socio-demographic factors affecting involvement of farmers in part-time farming in Emohua, Rivers State. DO Onu. Abstract. The study investigates selected socio-demographic factors affecting involvement of farmers in part-time farming in Emohua, Rivers State. Structured questionnaire was administered to 87 ...

  8. Assessment of food crop farmers' participation and performance in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    List of farmers who participated in WAAPP collected from N.R.C.R.I WAAPP Coordinating office, Umudike and Agricultural Innovation Platform (AIP), Umudike served as the study population. A structured questionnaire was used to elicit information from the farmers. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential ...

  9. From Complementarity to Conflict: A Historical Analysis of Farmer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    From Complementarity to Conflict: A Historical Analysis of Farmer-Fulbe Relations in West Africa. M Davidheiser, AM Luna. Abstract. This paper provides a socio-historical analysis of conflict between Fulbe pastoralists and farmers in Sub-Saharan Africa. The discussion examines various structural factors that have fostered ...

  10. Contribution of agroforestry in farmers' livelihood and its impact on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Agri-silicultural system is in vogue for livelihood under prevailing biophysical limitations of the environment in northern areas of Pakistan. Therefore, to make the farmers realise the significance of agroforestry system and to analyse its income, agro ecological effect on agroforestry income of farmers a study was carried out in ...

  11. Determinants of rice output among ADP contact farmers in mining ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study analyzed factors affecting rice output among Agricultural Development Programme (ADP) contact farmers in the mining and non mining locations of IVO LGA of Ebonyi State, Nigeria. Multistage random sampling technique was used to select agricultural circles and rice farmers. The sample size was 120 rice ...

  12. Behavioural changes among Fadama II Project farmers and lessons ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Behavioural changes among Fadama II Project farmers and lessons in agriculture development of Enugu State, Nigeria. ... Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) ... The study analyzed the behavioral changes and Fadama ii project farmers and lesson in Agricultural development of Enugu State, Nigeria.

  13. Impact of National Fadama Development Project II on Rice farmers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the impact of National Fadama Development Project II on the profitability of rice farmers and assessed the extent to which the various innovations disseminated by the project were adopted by the rice farmer beneficiaries. The project which had all operating expenses cofinanced by the various key ...

  14. Information Needs of Cassava Farmers in Delta State of Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    significant relationship between level of education and marketing pattern. Education is a very important variable in farm production. According to Ogunsumi et al (2002) educated farmers have more access to information on farm improvement techniques and credit than non-educated farmers. There exists positive and non- ...

  15. Farmer participation in radio campaigns for technology adoption ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thus, farmer exposure to and participation in radio campaigns may increase awareness and knowledge as did the AFRRI campaign, but may not necessarily lead the farmers and consumers into adopting new maize varieties, technologies or innovations. Key words: radio campaign, participation, radio production, adoption, ...

  16. Conflict over landownership: The case of farmers and cattle graziers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It argues that the recurrent conflicts involving farmers and cattle graziers over landownership in the northwest region of Cameroon have their roots in scarcity of land, climate change and the 'poor' application of statutory laws guaranteeing landownership. Although some farmers have struggled to enjoy their right to use land, ...

  17. The rural farmer and plant genetic resources conservation: A case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The methods of conservation used by rural farmers were studied in the Fanteakwa District in the Eastern Region of Ghana. Ten rural communities were randomly selected, and10 rural farmers were interviewed in each community. Questions posed ranged from methods of conservation to traditional belief systems associated ...

  18. sources and use of extension information among maize farmers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR ADESOPE

    execute farm plans. Some farmers are opportune to generate funds internally to prosecute their farm programmes. Unfortunately, however, a majority of the Nigerian farmers cannot generate enough financial .... Kendal coefficient was used to analyze the data on degree of association among ranking of factors of supply of ...

  19. Analysis of Technical Efficiency among Swamp Rice Farmers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to evaluate the Technical efficiency among swamp rice farmers in Niger State, Nigeria. A multi-stage sampling technique was used to select 159 swamp rice farmers. The data collected were analysed using descriptive statistics, and the stochastic frontier production function. The results showed ...

  20. Adoption Of Improved Cassava Varieties By Farmers In Kogi State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Improved cassava varieties have been developed and disseminated to farmers in the study area but the rate of adoption has not been ascertained. This gave rise to the study. The data for the study were collected with the aid of structured questionnaire, from 60 farmers randomly sampled from two Local Government Areas ...

  1. Adoption of improved rice varieties by farmers in Bende local ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the adoption of improved rice varieties by farmers in Bende Local Government Area, Abia State, Nigeria. A multi-stage random sampling technique was used to select a total of 120 rice farmers. Descriptive statistics and tobit regression model were employed to analyze the data. Results showed that ...

  2. Farmers Adoption Scenarios for the Control of Cassava Mosaic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study determined farmers' adoption levels of the cassava varieties and value adding technologies introduced under the project. Data for the study were collected from 260 randomly selected respondents using interview schedule. Farmers' adoption indices were used to summarize information on adoption levels, while ...

  3. Farmers' perception of the performance of the National Special ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The farmers indicated that only fertilizers and maize seeds were inputs readily available in the programme. Most of the technologies disseminated by the extension staff to the farmers were adopted and already in use. In general, the SPFS programme was perceived to be effective in terms of crop intensification, number of ...

  4. Farmers' perception on the effects of climate change on groundnut ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Farmers' perception on the effects of climate change on groundnut production in Obi Local Government Area of Benue. ... Journal of Agriculture and Food Sciences ... Farmers perceived high rainfall, temperature and spread of pests and diseases among others, as the greatest adverse effects of climate change. Some of the ...

  5. Enhancing Performance of Farmers' Cooperative in Rice Innovation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The state has witnessed proliferation of farmers' cooperative; and while new ones are emerging in their numbers, some old ones are becoming less functional and others going into extinct The study examined factors for enhancing performance of rice farmers' cooperative in rice innovation system. Seventy members of rice ...

  6. Sources of Technical Efficiency Among Smallholders Maize Farmers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Maize yield in Tanzania has been decreasing in the past few years. The decline has been attributed to many factors. This paper assesses production efficiency and its determinants among maize farmers in Babati district. The paper uses data collected from 122 maize farmers residing in six villages in the study district.

  7. Improving Farmers' Efficiency in Rice Production In Nigeria: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper assesses the effects of extension services on farmers' efficiency and productivity in rice production in Kano State, Nigeria. Data for the study were collected from 126 rice farmers selected using multi stage sampling technique. Stochastic production frontier function was estimated to ascertain the effects of ...

  8. Determinants of poverty among bee farmers: An antidote for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined the poverty status of bee-farmers in two ecological zones of Kwara State, Nigeria with modern bee-keeping farmers as a case study. Primary data subjected to a pre-survey which involved structured questionnaire and interview schedule were administered using multistage random technique to selected ...

  9. Social network and innovation dissemination among farmers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is no adequate link between the farmers and the social groups which are very pivotal to the adoption of innovation and its eventual usage. This study therefore looked at social network and innovation dissemination among farmers in Kwara state Nigeria. This research specifically examined the impact of social network ...

  10. Indigenous methods of controlling pests among rice farmers in Patigi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Considering the negative effects of the continuous dependence on chemical, it is therefore necessary to look into the potentials in local experiences and practices adopted by rice farmers to control pests. The objective of the study is to assess the indigenous methods used to control pests of rice by farmers in Patigi Local ...

  11. Technologies Extended To Women Farmers in Abia State, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... as hindrance to the use of extended technologies by the women farmers. Based on the findings, four recommendations for enhancing Home Economics extension programmes were made. Key words: Technologies, Women Farmers, Abia State Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences Vol.2(2) 2004: 58-67 ...

  12. Farm size - productivity relationships among arable crops farmers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was designed to analyze the relationship between farm size and resource productivity among arable crop farmers in Imo state, and isolate the major determinants of agricultural productivity. Data used for the study were collected from a sample of 120 farmers randomly selected from Okigwe and Orlu agricultural ...

  13. Resource Use Productivity Among Small-Scale Farmers In Yola ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study conducted in Yola Local Government Area of Adamawa State, Nigeria, has the overall objective of determining resource use productivity among the small-scale farmers. The findings of the study revealed that characteristics of the farmers such as age, level of education, farm size, sources of farm labour and of ...

  14. Farmers select innovations and practices that work for them | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2013-09-11

    Sep 11, 2013 ... Determining what works. Maize continues to be the dominant staple in Kenya. But its susceptibility to drought puts the food security of smallholder farmers at risk. Early results from this project show that farmers are increasingly receptive to growing more nutritious crops, in addition to maize, that produce ...

  15. Perceptions of drought among rural farmers in the Savelugu district ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some farmers perceived a reduction in drought intensity and changes in the time dimension of drought occurrence. In addition, some farmers expected the risk of drought to rise in the near future. These observations are partially consistent with the science of climate change. However, the explanations for these perceptions ...

  16. Policy Issues in Meeting Rice Farmers Agricultural Information ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Madukwe

    The study aimed at assessing rice farmers agricultural information needs ... especially in an information dependent sector like agriculture where there are new and rather complex problems facing farmers every day. The information .... to the fact that e-mail and internet are just beginning to make their make in rural areas.

  17. The perception of corn farmers about biological control of Caradrina ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-08

    Aug 8, 2011 ... The purpose of this study was to analyze the perception of corn farmers about biological control of. Caradrina by Braconid in Dezful Township, Khouzestan Province, Iran. The method used in this study was correlative descriptive and causal relation. A random sample of Dezful township corn farmers of.

  18. Smallholder food crop farmers' participation in Bank of Agriculture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Low participation of smallholder farmers in agricultural loans, despite efforts by governments and NGOs to make funds available for agricultural growth and development, has remained a matter of concern in Nigeria. The study analysed smallholder food crop farmers' participation in Bank of Agriculture loan (BOA) scheme in ...

  19. Farmers Utilization Of Loan Schemes Of The Nigerian Agricultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study on utilization of loans was conducted in the five branches of theNigerian Agricultural and Cooperatives Bank (NACRDB), in Abia State Nigeria. Two farmer customers were sampled randomly in proportion to the category of the bank branch . Thirty-two (32) farmers who had mandatory savings with the bank were ...

  20. Technical Efficiency Among Cassava Farmers im Ikenne Local ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cassava has played and continues to play a remarkable role on the agricultural stage of Nigeria. The inability of the country meeting existing demand has been traced to resource use efficiency of the farmers. The study evaluates the technical efficiency among cassava farmers in Ikenne Local Government Area of Ogun ...