WorldWideScience

Sample records for family medicine elects

  1. Behavior therapy in a family context: treating elective mutism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, J B; Lindblad, M B

    1978-03-01

    This paper discusses the necessity of using both behavioral and family approaches in combination, while working with electively mute children. The symptom and its significance within the family system is presented along with a rationale for avoiding the pitfalls of individual approaches with such children. A case history outlining specific behavioral techniques is described in detail with an exploration of the use of reinforcement theory, counter-conditioning, and successive approximations in bringing about change in electively mute children. The need for bringing about changes within the family system so as to maintain the changes that have occurred through use of the behavior techniques is discussed and presented as crucial to the treatment process. The paper takes the position that either approach, by itself, will not be effective in helping electively mute children but that the treatment of choice is a combination of therapeutic techniques.

  2. Family medicine in Cuba

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    Eduardo Alemañy Pérez

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 50 years, the Cuban health system has been developing a roster of programs to ensure its social mission: to achieve a health status of the population consistent with the priority established by the highest authorities of the country. In response to the call of the Commander in Chief, Fidel Castro Ruz, to create a different doctor and a new specialist that would take into account the needs of the Cuban population; the family doctor model was implemented. Thus, in the decade of the eighties, the “Family Doctor and Nurse Working Program” was established, together with the corresponding polyclinic and hospital. At the same time, comprehensive general medicine as a medical specialty was created to serve the primary health care services. Both actions constituted a vital component in the development of Cuban public health services in recent decades. This article presents an account of the unique characteristics of these processes, while highlighting their impact on health indicators, as well as the participation of this specialty in the training of human resources for the health system.

  3. Family Medicine's Waltz with Systems

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    Downing, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Family Medicine first formally confronted systems thinking with the adoption of the biopsychosocial model for understanding disease in a holistic manner; this is a description of a natural system. More recently, Family Medicine has been consciously engaged in developing itself as a system for delivering health care, an artificial system. We make…

  4. Family Medicine's Waltz with Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Family Medicine first formally confronted systems thinking with the adoption of the biopsychosocial model for understanding disease in a holistic manner; this is a description of a natural system. More recently, Family Medicine has been consciously engaged in developing itself as a system for delivering health care, an artificial system. We make…

  5. [Teaching family medicine in Lausanne].

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    Bischoff, Thomas; Junod, Michel; Cornuz, Jacques; Herzig, Lilli; Bonvin, Raphael

    2010-12-01

    The Faculty of Biology and Medicine of Lausanne has integrated education of family medicine all along its new undergraduate medical curriculum. The Institute of general medicine is in charge to implement those offers among which two are presented hereafter. In the new module "Generalism" several courses cover the specificities of the discipline as for example medical decision in the practice. A mandatory one-month internship in the medical practice offers an experiential immersion into family medicine for all students. In a meeting at the end of their internship, students discuss in group with their peers their individual experiences and are asked to identify, based on their personal experience, the general concepts of the specialty of family medicine and general practice.

  6. Teaching evidence based medicine in family medicine

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    Davorka Vrdoljak

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The concept of evidence based medicine (EBM as the integrationof clinical expertise, patient values and the best evidence was introduced by David Sackett in the 1980’s. Scientific literature in medicine is often marked by expansion, acummulation and quick expiration. Reading all important articles to keep in touch with relevant information is impossible. Finding the best evidence that answers a clinical question in general practice (GP in a short time is not easy. Five useful steps are described –represented by the acronym “5A+E”: assess, ask, acquire, appraise, apply and evaluate.The habit of conducting an evidence search “on the spot’’ is proposed. Although students of medicine at University of Split School of Medicine are taught EBM from the first day of their study and in all courses, their experience of evidence-searching and critical appraisal of the evidence, in real time with real patient is inadequate. Teaching the final-year students the practical use of EBM in a GP’s office is different and can have an important role in their professional development. It can positively impact on quality of their future work in family practice (or some other medical specialty by acquiring this habit of constant evidence-checking to ensure that best practice becomes a mechanism for life-long learning. Conclusion. EBM is a foundation stone of every branch of medicine and important part of Family Medicine as scientific and professional discipline. To have an EB answer resulting from GP’s everyday work is becoming a part of everyday practice.

  7. Impact of subspecialty elective exposures on outcomes on the American board of internal medicine certification examination

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    Shanmugam Victoria K

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The American Board of Internal Medicine Certification Examination (ABIM-CE is one of several methods used to assess medical knowledge, an Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME core competency for graduating internal medicine residents. With recent changes in graduate medical education program directors and internal medicine residents are seeking evidence to guide decisions regarding residency elective choices. Prior studies have shown that formalized elective curricula improve subspecialty ABIM-CE scores. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate whether the number of subspecialty elective exposures or the specific subspecialties which residents complete electives in impact ABIM-CE scores. Methods ABIM-CE scores, elective exposures and demographic characteristics were collected for MedStar Georgetown University Hospital internal medicine residents who were first-time takers of the ABIM-CE in 2006–2010 (n=152. Elective exposures were defined as a two-week period assigned to the respective subspecialty. ABIM-CE score was analyzed using the difference between the ABIM-CE score and the standardized passing score (delta-SPS. Subspecialty scores were analyzed using percentage of correct responses. Data was analyzed using GraphPad Prism version 5.00 for Windows. Results Paired elective exposure and ABIM-CE scores were available in 131 residents. There was no linear correlation between ABIM-CE mean delta-SPS and the total number of electives or the number of unique elective exposures. Residents with ≤14 elective exposures had higher ABIM-CE mean delta-SPS than those with ≥15 elective exposures (143.4 compared to 129.7, p=0.051. Repeated electives in individual subspecialties were not associated with significant difference in mean ABIM-CE delta-SPS. Conclusions This study did not demonstrate significant positive associations between individual subspecialty elective exposures and ABIM-CE mean delta

  8. Family Medicine: Bridge to Life.

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    Luz, Clare

    2016-01-01

    Reflecting on the suicide of a close friend, this essay explores what comprises, and inspires a will to live, and how those in Family Medicine can address suicide risk even in the face of debilitating or terminal illness. Research indicates that the will to live is a measurable indicator of general well-being, distinct from depression, and an important predictor of a person's motivation to "hold on to life". As such, understanding what is at the heart of a desire to live should alter clinical practice. This essay offers ideas for ways in which to create bridges for patients that could help sustain life.

  9. Family medicine 360°: Global exchanges in family medicine

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    Barata, Ana N.; Rigon, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The global world of the 21st century has created communities and cultures that are interconnected, thanks to the development both in the field of transportation and technology. In this global intercultural community, future physicians, and even more so future general practitioners (GPs)/family physicians (FPs), need to be clinically competent and culturally sensitive and flexible in order to adapt to different social settings while delivering holistic care in multiethnic teams and environments with professionalism. As such, exchange programs are exceptional opportunities for international collaboration and the development of personal and professional competencies of these health care professionals. Materials and Methods: This article presents a review of the literature on the value of exchanges as well as the results of exchange programs with educational content that are aimed at junior GPs/FPs. Results: Exchange programs have been growing in popularity, especially among junior GPs/FPs. Since its launch in 2013, The “Family Medicine 360° (FM360°) program has been receiving up to 163 inquires till date, promoting global cooperation among the World Organization of family Doctors (WONCA)'s Young Doctors’ Movementd (YDMs). Conclusions: By participating in an exchange program, future GPs/FPs are given the chance to experience intercultural communication and peer collaboration. They also develop personal and professional skills and thus, actively contribute to the growth and development of primary care all over the world. PMID:26288763

  10. Improving clerkship preparedness: a hospital medicine elective for pre-clerkship students.

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    Connor, Denise M; Conlon, Paul J; O'Brien, Bridget C; Chou, Calvin L

    2017-01-01

    Medical students often struggle to apply their nascent clinical skills in clerkships. While transitional clerkships can orient students to new roles and logistics, students may benefit from developing clinical skills in inpatient environments earlier in their curriculum to improve readiness for clerkships. Our four- to six-session elective provides pre-clerkship students with individualized learning in the inpatient setting with the aim of improving clerkship preparedness. Students work one-on-one with faculty who facilitate individualized learning through mentoring, deliberate practice, and directed feedback. Second-year medical students are placed on an attending-only, traditionally 'non-teaching' service in the hospital medicine division of a Veterans Affairs (VA) hospital for half-day sessions. Most students self-select into the elective following a class-wide advertisement. The elective also accepts students who are referred for remediation of their clinical skills. In the elective's first two years, 25 students participated and 47 students were waitlisted. We compared participant and waitlisted (non-participant) students' self-efficacy in several clinical and professional domains during their first clerkship. Elective participants reported significantly higher clerkship preparedness compared to non-participants in the areas of physical exam, oral presentation, and formulation of assessments and plans. Students found the one-on-one feedback and personalized attention from attending physicians to be a particularly useful aspect of the course. This frequently cited benefit points to students' perceived needs and the value they place on individualized feedback. Our innovation harnesses an untapped resource - the hospital medicine 'non-teaching' service - and serves as an attainable option for schools interested in enhancing early clinical skill-building for all students, including those recommended for remediation. A&P: Assessment and plan; H&P: History and

  11. Narratives in family medicine: a global perspective

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    Gibson, Christine; Woollard, Robert; Kapoor, Videsh; Ponka, David

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore the development of family medicine postgraduate training in countries with varying levels of resources at different stages of development of the discipline. Composition of the committee Since 2012, the College of Family Physicians of Canada has hosted the Besrour Conferences to reflect on its role in advancing the discipline of family medicine globally. The Besrour Narrative Working Group was conceived in 2012 at the first Besrour Conference. Their mandate was to use narrative and appreciative inquiry to gather stories of family medicine worldwide. The working group comprised members of various academic departments of family medicine in Canada and abroad who attended the conferences. Methods A consultation process with our partners from lower-middle–income countries was undertaken from 2012 to 2014. Stories were sought from each global partner institute with ties to Canadian family medicine departments. An appreciative inquiry approach was chosen to elicit narratives. Thematic analysis was used to search for common threads and important elements of success that could serve to inform other initiatives in other nations and, in turn, offer hope for greater effect. Report Sixteen narrative stories have been collected so far. These stories highlight insightful solutions, foresight, perseverance, and ultimately a steadfast belief that family medicine will improve the health system and the care provided to the citizens of each nation. Seventeen themes were elucidated by 3 independent Canadian readers. At a subsequent workshop, these themes were validated by Besrour Centre members from Canada and elsewhere. The linkage between the thematic analysis and the experiences of various schools helps to illustrate both the robustness and the usefulness of the narratives in exploring generalizable observations and the features supporting success in each institute. Conclusion If we are to understand, and contribute to, the development of family

  12. Management of early pregnancy failure and induced abortion by family medicine educators.

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    Herbitter, Cara; Bennett, Ariana; Schubert, Finn D; Bennett, Ian M; Gold, Marji

    2013-01-01

    Reproductive health care, including treatment of early pregnancy failure (EPF) and induced abortion, is an integral part of patient-centered care provided by family physicians, but data suggest that comprehensive training is not widely available to family medicine residents. The purpose of this study was to assess EPF and induced abortion management practices and attitudes of family medicine physician educators throughout the United States and Canada. These data were collected as part of a cross-sectional survey conducted by the Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance that was distributed via E-mail to 3152 practicing physician members of Council of Academic Family Medicine organizations. The vast majority of respondents (88.2%) had treated EPF, whereas few respondents (15.3%) had provided induced medication or aspiration abortions. Of those who had treated EPF, most had offered medication management (72.7%), whereas a minority had provided aspiration management (16.4%). Almost all respondents (95%) agreed that EPF management is within the scope of family medicine, and nearly three-quarters (73.2%) agreed that early induced abortion is within the scope of family medicine. Our findings suggest that family physician educators are more experienced with EPF management than elective abortion. Given the overlap of skills needed for provision of these services, there is the potential to increase the number of family physician faculty members providing induced abortions.

  13. Generation to Generation: The Heart of Family Medicine

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    Winter, Robin O.

    2012-01-01

    According to the American Board of Family Medicine, "The scope of family medicine encompasses all ages, both sexes, each organ system and every disease entity." What makes the seemingly daunting task of practicing family medicine possible is that family physicians learn to utilize similar clinical reasoning for all of their patients regardless of…

  14. [Core values in family medicine revisited].

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    Álvarez Montero, Santiago

    2017-04-01

    Family medicine has to continually reinvent itself around a core of values that constitutes its navigation system. But accurate data on its impact on the health of people will account for how far the values are actually being implemented. Thus, we can say that family medicine is a specialty based on values and as well as evidence based. The absence of a clarification system of values or its implementation threatens its very existence. Some of the values that are reviewed have shown great recognition and survival over time. Others are presented because they seem sufficiently significant. These are: people, comprehensiveness, trust relationship, patient-centred method, accessibility, continuity, family unity and the community, teamwork, sustainability of the health system, and continuous improvement. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. A predoctoral curriculum in family medicine.

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    Leaman, T L

    1975-04-01

    Development of a new discipline, such as family medicine, requires careful definition of scope and purpose. This must be followed by delineation of specific education objectives. The teaching program is often carried out by people experienced as clinicans but not as teachers and requires selection of methods most natural to this kind of faculty. This article describes the current stage of curricular development at the institution with the longest experience in predoctoral family medicine in the United States. Based on seven years' experimentation, this paper provides an overview of the philosophy behind this particular curriculum and describes, in brief, four educational methods which have proven useful. These methods will be discussed in greater detail in subsequent articles focusing on specific educational objectives, illustrative examples, and evaluative methods.

  16. Training experts in family medicine teaching.

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    Švab, Igor; Allen, Justin; Žebiene, Egle; Petek Šter, Marija; Windak, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Family medicine teachers require specific educational skills. A framework for their professional development is essential for future development of the discipline in Europe. EURACT developed a framework on educational expertise, and subsequently applied it in a curriculum of teaching-skills courses of various levels. The aim of this article is to describe the development of the teaching framework, and of an international three-level course programme for 'teaching-the-teachers'. Furthermore, we describe our experiences and lessons learned, in particular with regard to the level-three programme for proficient teachers, which was new. We conclude that it is possible to develop a theoretical framework of family medicine teaching expertise and to apply it in an international high-level educational programme for future experts in family medicine education. Research evidence of the usefulness of this approach is needed, and the threats for its further development into a sustainable activity are its high teacher/student ratio associated with relatively high costs and difficulties in recruiting suitable participants.

  17. The Reported Value of Rural Internal Medicine Residency Electives and Factors That Influence Rural Career Choice.

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    Jensen, Christine C.; DeWitt, Dawn E.

    2002-01-01

    A survey of 58 medical residents participating in a 1-2 month rural elective and 51 matched nonparticipants found that participants' interest in rural practice increased significantly after the elective. Respondents suggested means to increase rural career choice, barriers to rural practice, and ways of increasing the rural elective's influence on…

  18. Family Medicine Curriculum Resource Project: the future.

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    Stearns, Jeffrey A; Stearns, Marjorie A; Paulman, Paul M; Chessman, Alexander W; Davis, Ardis K; Sherwood, Roger A; Sheets, Kent J; Steele, David J; Matson, Christine C

    2007-01-01

    Under contract to the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine (STFM) created an undergraduate medical education curricular resource designed to train physicians to practice in the 21st century. An interdisciplinary group of more than 35 educators worked for 4 years to create the Family Medicine Curriculum Resource (FMCR). By consensus, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competencies were adopted as the theoretical framework for this project. The FMCR provides materials for the preclerkship years, the third-year family medicine clerkship, the postclerkship year, and faculty development, as well as guidance for integrating topics of special interest to the federal government (such as, geriatrics, Healthy People 2010, genetics, informatics) into a 4-year continuum of medical education. There are challenges inherent in implementing each component of the FMCR. For example, can the ACGME competency-based approach be adapted to undergraduate medical education? Can the densely packed preclerkship years be adapted to include more focused effort on developing these competencies, and whose job is it anyway? What is "core" to being a competent clinician, and what information can be obtained when needed from medical informatics sources? Will family medicine educators embrace the FMCR recommendations for their third-year clerkships? Will exit assessment of the competency levels of graduating medical students be achieved, and can it make them more capable residents? Can faculty in different clinical and educational settings integrate the teaching of "how to learn" into their repertoire? How will faculty development innovation progress in a time of increasing emphasis on clinical productivity? Developing a common language and adoption of core competencies for all levels of medical education is imperative in a society that is focusing on improving health care quality and outcomes. The FMCR Project

  19. Reasons for family involvement in elective surgical decision-making in Taiwan: a qualitative study.

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    Lin, Mei-Ling; Huang, Chuen-Teng; Chen, Ching-Huey

    2017-07-01

    To inquire into the reasons for family involvement in adult patients' surgical decision-making processes from the point of view of the patients' family. Making a patient the centre of medical decision-making is essential for respecting individual's autonomy. However, in a Chinese society, family members are often deeply involved in a patient's medical decision-making. Although family involvement has long been viewed as an aspect of the Chinese culture, empirical evidence of the reasons for family involvement in medical decision-making has been lacking. A qualitative study. In order to record and examine reasons for family involvement in adult patients' surgical decision-making, 12 different family members of 12 elective surgery patients were interviewed for collecting and analysing data. Three major reasons for family involvement emerged from the data analyses: (1) to share responsibility; (2) to ensure the correctness of medical information; and (3) to safeguard the patient's well-being. These findings also reveal that culture is not the only reason for family involvement. Making decision to undergo a surgery is a tough and stressful process for a patient. Family may provide the patient with timely psychological support to assist the patient to communicate with his or her physician(s) and other medical personnel to ensure their rights. It is also found that due to the imbalanced doctor-patient power relationship, a patient may be unable, unwilling to, or even dare not, tell the whole truth about his or her illness or feelings to the medical personnel. Thus, a patient would expect his or her family to undertake such a mission during the informed consent and decision-making processes. The results of this study may provide medical professionals with relevant insights into family involvement in adult patients' surgical decision-making. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Length of training debate in family medicine: idealism versus realism?

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    Orientale, Eugene

    2013-06-01

    How long a resident must train to achieve competency is an ongoing debate in medicine. For family medicine, there is an Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-approved proposal to examine the benefits of lengthening family medicine training from 3 to 4 years. The rationale for adding another year of residency in family medicine has included the following: (1) overcoming the effect of the duty hour limits in further reducing educational opportunities, (2) reversing the growing number of first-time takers of the American Board of Family Medicine primary board who fail to pass the exam, (3) enhancing the family medicine training experience by "decompressing" the ever-growing number of Residency Review Committee requirements to maintain accreditation, and (4) improving the overall quality of family medicine graduates.

  1. Health is primary: Family medicine for America's health.

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    Phillips, Robert L; Pugno, Perry A; Saultz, John W; Tuggy, Michael L; Borkan, Jeffrey M; Hoekzema, Grant S; DeVoe, Jennifer E; Weida, Jane A; Peterson, Lars E; Hughes, Lauren S; Kruse, Jerry E; Puffer, James C

    2014-10-01

    More than a decade ago the American Academy of Family Physicians, American Academy of Family Physicians Foundation, American Board of Family Medicine, Association of Departments of Family Medicine, Association of Family Practice Residency Directors, North American Primary Care Research Group, and Society of Teachers of Family Medicine came together in the Future of Family Medicine (FFM) to launch a series of strategic efforts to "renew the specialty to meet the needs of people and society," some of which bore important fruit. Family Medicine for America's Health was launched in 2013 to revisit the role of family medicine in view of these changes and to position family medicine with new strategic and communication plans to create better health, better health care, and lower cost for patients and communities (the Triple Aim). Family Medicine for America's Health was preceded and guided by the development of a family physician role definition. A consulting group facilitated systematic strategic plan development over 9 months that included key informant interviews, formal stakeholder surveys, future scenario testing, a retreat for family medicine organizations and stakeholder representatives to review strategy options, further strategy refinement, and finally a formal strategic plan with draft tactics and design for an implementation plan. A second communications consulting group surveyed diverse stakeholders in coordination with strategic planning to develop a communication plan. The American College of Osteopathic Family Physicians joined the effort, and students, residents, and young physicians were included. The core strategies identified include working to ensure broad access to sustained, primary care relationships; accountability for increasing primary care value in terms of cost and quality; a commitment to helping reduce health care disparities; moving to comprehensive payment and away from fee-for-service; transformation of training; technology to support

  2. Personality profile and coping resources of family medicine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Personality profile and coping resources of family medicine vocational trainees ... to various stress factors in their personal and family lives, as well as in the workplace. ... coping resources optimally and reported poor help-seeking behaviour.

  3. How medical schools can encourage students' interest in family medicine.

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    Rohan-Minjares, Felisha; Alfero, Charles; Kaufman, Arthur

    2015-05-01

    The discipline of family medicine is essential to improving quality and reducing the cost of care in an effective health care system. Yet the slow growth of this field has not kept pace with national demand. In their study, Rodríguez and colleagues report on the influence of the social environment and academic discourses on medical students' identification with family medicine in four countries-the United Kingdom, Canada, France, and Spain. They conclude that these factors-the social environment and discursive activity within the medical school-influence students' specialty choices. While the discourses in Canada, France, and Spain were mostly negative, in the United Kingdom, family medicine was considered a prestigious academic discipline, well paying, and with a wide range of practice opportunities. Medical students in the United Kingdom also were exposed early and often to positive family medicine role models.In the United States, academic discourses about family medicine are more akin to those in Canada, France, and Spain. The hidden curriculum includes negative messages about family medicine, and "badmouthing" primary care occurs at many medical schools. National education initiatives highlight the importance of social determinants in medical education and the integration of public health and medicine in practice. Other initiatives expose students to family medicine role models and practice during their undergraduate training and promote primary care practice through new graduate medical education funding models. Together, these initiatives can reduce the negative effects of the social environment and create a more positive discourse about family medicine.

  4. [Family medicine in Mexico: Present and future].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela-Rueda, Carlos E; Reyes-Morales, Hortensia; Albavera-Hernández, Cidronio; Ochoa-Díaz-López, Héctor; Gómez-Dantés, Héctor; García-Peña, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing the challenges and the future scenario of Family Medicine is a priority to address challenges such as the reduction of benefits granted by social security; to adapt their practice to the changing health profile; and to curb demand for specialized services and contain the high costs of care in the second and third level. The program is aimed at three professional roles: medical care, research, and education. It is imperative review these in the light of changing demographic conditions, the type of health needs arising from new social determinants, the public expectations for greater participation in their care, and the evolution of the health system itself with the advancement of technology and a variety of organizational options with frequently limited resources. For primary care, as the core of a health system that covers principles of equity, solidarity, universality, participation, decentralization, and intra- and inter-sectorial coordination, it is necessary to put at the center of the primary care team the family doctor and not an administrator, who plays an important role in supporting the care team, but can not take the lead.

  5. Final year medical students’ understanding of family medicine

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    Marija Petek Šter

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The European Academy of Teachers in General Practice / Family Medicine (EURACT has developed an educational agenda, the key document for teaching family medicine in Europe. The aim of our study was to find out how final year medical students at the beginning of their family medicine clerkship understand the discipline of family medicine. Methods. The attitudes toward family medicine were paraphrased and developed into a 164-item questionnaire, which was administered to 335 final-year medical students at the beginning of their clerkship. Using combinatorial optimization with genetic algorithms we selected 30 items which yielded the highest Cronbach alpha reliability coefficient. Finally, we performed a factor analysis to find which dimensions of family medicine were recognised by the students and compared them with the domains defined in the EURACT definition. Results. The 30-item questionnaire had a Cronbach alpha reliability coefficient of 0.919. The differences between male and female students were not very significant (p=0.061. With the factor analysis we recognised seven factors, belonging to three out of six domains of the EURACT educational agenda: primary care management, personcenteredness and comprehensive approach. Conclusion. Final-year medical students at the beginning of their family medicine clerkship understand some of the dimensions of family medicine rather well, but they are not aware of some important competences of family doctors. There is a necessity to teach students about specific problem solving skills and the importance of balance between the health needs of an individual patient and the community.

  6. Hospitalist involvement in family medicine residency training: A CERA study.

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    Baldor, Robert; Savageau, Judith A; Shokar, Navkiran; Potts, Stacy; Gravel, Joseph; Eisenstock, Kimberly; Ledwith, James

    2014-02-01

    Little is known about the impact of hospitalists on family medicine residencies. We surveyed family medicine residency directors to assess attitudes about hospitalists and their involvement in residency teaching. Questions were included in the 2012 Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance (CERA) survey of family medicine residency directors. Univariate statistics were used to describe programs, directors, and our questions on the use of hospitalists. Bivariate statistics were used to examine relationships between the use of hospitalists to teach and program characteristics. Forty-one percent (n=175) of residency directors completed the hospitalist section of the CERA survey. Sixty-six percent of residency programs were community based/university affiliated. The majority of directors who have, or are planning to develop, a hospitalist service currently use an internal medicine service (92.5%), followed by family medicine (39.1%), pediatrics (35.4%), OB/laborists (18.0%), and combined services (8.7%). The majority of programs with a hospitalist training track (or plans to develop one) indicated that this was for a family medicine service. Sixty percent of programs that have a hospitalist service involve hospitalists in teaching. Twenty percent of directors reported that hospitalists serve as family medicine faculty, and 63% viewed them as "good educators." However, 85% reported no reduction in inpatient teaching by family medicine faculty despite using hospitalist teaching services. Hospitalists have a significant educational role in family medicine resident training. Further research is needed to explore how hospitalists and family medicine faculty can collaborate to promote enhanced efficiency and effectiveness as residency teachers.

  7. Student perceptions of reproductive health education in US medical schools: a qualitative analysis of students taking family planning electives

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    Kathryn Veazey

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Abortion services will be sought by an estimated one in three US women before they reach age 45. Despite the importance of family planning (FP care, many medical schools do not currently offer formal education in this area, and students are unable to meet associated competency standards prior to graduation. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore students’ motivations in pursuing FP electives throughout the United States, their experiences during these courses, and any impact of these rotations on their plans for future practice. Method: We conducted a qualitative study consisting of semi-structured interviews with medical students upon completing fourth-year FP electives at US medical schools. Thirty-seven LCME-accredited US medical schools offered fourth-year FP electives. Course directors at 21 of these institutions recruited study participants between June 2012 and June 2013. Interviews were transcribed, coded, and analyzed with ATLAS/ti software to identify salient themes. Results: We interviewed 29 students representing 14 institutions from all regions of the United States (East Coast, Midwest, South, and West Coast. Five central themes emerged. Medical students are using FP electives to fill gaps in the standard curriculum. Elective participation did not change students’ pre-elective stance on abortion. Many students intend to provide abortion in the future but identified possible limiting factors. Proficiency in contraception and options counseling were top competencies desired and gained. Students reported excellent satisfaction with FP electives and would recommend it to their peers, regardless of their personal beliefs. Conclusions: Interview data revealed that students are using FP electives to fill gaps within preclinical and clinical medical school curriculum. Future physicians will be unable to provide comprehensive care for their female patients if they are not provided with this education. Research

  8. Student perceptions of reproductive health education in US medical schools: a qualitative analysis of students taking family planning electives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veazey, Kathryn; Nieuwoudt, Claudia; Gavito, Christina; Tocce, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Abortion services will be sought by an estimated one in three US women before they reach age 45. Despite the importance of family planning (FP) care, many medical schools do not currently offer formal education in this area, and students are unable to meet associated competency standards prior to graduation. The purpose of this study was to explore students' motivations in pursuing FP electives throughout the United States, their experiences during these courses, and any impact of these rotations on their plans for future practice. We conducted a qualitative study consisting of semi-structured interviews with medical students upon completing fourth-year FP electives at US medical schools. Thirty-seven LCME-accredited US medical schools offered fourth-year FP electives. Course directors at 21 of these institutions recruited study participants between June 2012 and June 2013. Interviews were transcribed, coded, and analyzed with ATLAS/ti software to identify salient themes. We interviewed 29 students representing 14 institutions from all regions of the United States (East Coast, Midwest, South, and West Coast). Five central themes emerged. Medical students are using FP electives to fill gaps in the standard curriculum. Elective participation did not change students' pre-elective stance on abortion. Many students intend to provide abortion in the future but identified possible limiting factors. Proficiency in contraception and options counseling were top competencies desired and gained. Students reported excellent satisfaction with FP electives and would recommend it to their peers, regardless of their personal beliefs. Interview data revealed that students are using FP electives to fill gaps within preclinical and clinical medical school curriculum. Future physicians will be unable to provide comprehensive care for their female patients if they are not provided with this education. Research should be directed at development and analysis of comprehensive FP curricula

  9. [Petrus Hispanus, medieval physician elected as Pope named John XXI: Sketck of medicine in the Middle Age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laval, Enrique

    2013-10-01

    The Pope John XXI, named Pedro Rebuli Guiliani, was born in Lisbon, Portugal, around 1215. Known as Petrus Hispanus, Master Jullian, Peter of Spain, among other names. Besides medical studies, he studied Theology , Aristotelic Physics and Metaphysics at the University of Paris. He was named Professor of Medicine and Ophthalmology at the University of Sienna in 1247. In addition to several works about medicine, logic, and phylosophy, he authored the Tesaurus Pauperum ("Treasure of the Poor"), a prescription handbook of home-made, simple and cheap remedies. He was archbishop of Braga and Cardinal in 1272 and 1273, respectively. Elected Pope in 1276, he died tragically on May 20, 1277. Precedes this article a sketch of Medieval Medicine with emphasis on the XII and XIII centuries.

  10. Family medicine around the world: overview by region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Neil; Gibson, Christine; Ponka, David; Haq, Cynthia; Hansel, Stephanie; Dahlman, Bruce; Rouleau, Katherine

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To demonstrate how family medicine has been recognized and integrated into primary health care systems in contrasting contexts around the world and to provide an overview of how family physicians are trained and certified. Composition of the committee Since 2012, the College of Family Physicians of Canada has hosted the Besrour Conferences to reflect on its role in advancing the discipline of family medicine globally. The Besrour Papers Working Group, which was struck at the 2013 conference, was tasked with developing a series of papers to highlight the key issues, lessons learned, and outcomes emerging from the various activities of the Besrour collaboration. The working group comprised members of various academic departments of family medicine in Canada and abroad who attended the conferences. Methods An initial search was conducted in PubMed using a family medicine hedge of MeSH terms, text words, and family medicine journals, combined with text words and terms representing low- and middle-income countries and the concept of family medicine training programs. A second search was completed using only family medicine terms in the CAB Direct and World Bank databases. Subsequent PubMed searches were conducted to identify articles about specific conditions or services based on suggestions from the authors of the articles selected from the second search. Additional articles were identified through reference lists of key articles and through Google searches. We then attempted to verify and augment the information through colleagues and partners. Report The scope of family medicine and the nature of family medicine training vary considerably worldwide. Challenges include limited capacity, incomplete understanding of roles, and variability of standards and recognition. Opportunities for advancement might include technology, collaboration, changes in pedagogy, flexible training methods, and system-wide support. PMID:28615392

  11. Beyond diagnoses: family medicine core themes in student reflective writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradner, Melissa K; Crossman, Steven H; Gary, Judy; Vanderbilt, Allison A; VanderWielen, Lynn

    2015-03-01

    We share qualitative study results of third-year medical student writings during their family medicine clerkship utilizing a reflective writing exercise from 2005 and 2013. For this paper, 50 student writings were randomly selected from the 2005 cohort in addition to 50 student writings completed by the 2013 cohort. Deductive thematic analysis utilizing Atlas.ti software was completed utilizing the Future of Family Medicine core attributes of family physicians as the a priori coding template. Student writings actively reflect key attributes of family physicians as described by the Future of Family Medicine Report: a deep understanding of the dynamics of the whole person, a generative impact on patients' lives, a talent for humanizing the health care experience, and a natural command of complexity and multidimensional access to care. We discuss how to lead the writing exercise and provide suggestions for facilitating the discussion to bring out these important aspects of family medicine care.

  12. Behavioral Medicine and University Departments of Family Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Grantham, Peter

    1983-01-01

    Behavioral medicine brings knowledge and skills from the social sciences to the practice of medicine. Modifying behavior which causes a health problem, disease prevention and health promotion, improving the relationship between patients and health professionals, understanding cultural and ethical issues, and the effect of illness on behavior are all aspects of behavioral medicine. Such `whole person' medicine fits well into family practice. However, careful consideration of the risks, challen...

  13. Undergraduate Courses in Family Medicine in the UK, Ireland, the Netherlands and the Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jan-Helge

    1993-01-01

    Almen medicin, Family Medicine, undergraduate Courses, the UK, Ireland, the Netherlands, the Nordic Countries......Almen medicin, Family Medicine, undergraduate Courses, the UK, Ireland, the Netherlands, the Nordic Countries...

  14. AAAS joins the Translational Medicine family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brander, Christian; Marincola, Francesco M

    2009-05-07

    The AAAS has announced the launch of Science Translational Medicine. This is further and critical recognition of this discipline and we are deeply gratified that translational medicine has risen to the level of recognition by one of the world's most prestigious scientific organizations. We believe that Science Translational Medicine will provide another valuable venue for the rapid and broad dissemination of important articles in the field and contribute to enhancing the effectiveness of translational medicine overall. It has been almost six years since we launched the Journal of Translational Medicine as an open-access journal with Biomed Central. At the beginning, we faced the inevitable skepticism and received several inquires among others also from Science reporters questioning both the significance of translational medicine in today's biomedical world and the need for a new journal dedicated to it.

  15. AAAS joins the Translational Medicine family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marincola Francesco M

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The AAAS has announced the launch of Science Translational Medicine. This is further and critical recognition of this discipline and we are deeply gratified that translational medicine has risen to the level of recognition by one of the world's most prestigious scientific organizations. We believe that Science Translational Medicine will provide another valuable venue for the rapid and broad dissemination of important articles in the field and contribute to enhancing the effectiveness of translational medicine overall. It has been almost six years since we launched the Journal of Translational Medicine as an open-access journal with Biomed Central 1. At the beginning, we faced the inevitable skepticism and received several inquires among others also from Science reporters questioning both the significance of translational medicine in today's biomedical world and the need for a new journal dedicated to it.

  16. Three generations of family medicine: a comparison of social identities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, T G; Cole, D R; Lieberman, J A

    1984-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that students and residents choosing Family Medicine career orientations have attained an academic parity with their counterparts in other specialties which was not demonstrated by their general practitioner predecessors. Similarly, the advent of Family Practice residencies and undergraduate course work has significantly altered the educational experience of today's medical students. This study adds to the literature by comparing a third element, the social character of Family Medicine oriented students, residents and practicing physicians. Three subgroups of Family Medicine oriented individuals; students, residents, and physicians, were surveyed through a mailed questionnaire. A study population of 768 individuals yielded a 73% response rate. The findings show that students and residents share a common pattern of identities and that this pattern is not shared with the physician subgroup. This results in rejection of the cohort replication theory. It also suggests a need for Family Practice training to provide role models from the new and emerging generation of family physicians.

  17. Shared Canadian Curriculum in Family Medicine (SHARC-FM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, David A.; Scott, Ian; Sylvester, Michael; Tan, Amy; Horrey, Kathleen; Weston, W. Wayne

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Problem addressed In 2006, leaders of undergraduate family medicine education programs faced a series of increasing curriculum mandates in the context of limited time and financial resources. Additionally, it became apparent that a hidden curriculum against family medicine as a career choice was active in medical schools. Objective of program The Shared Canadian Curriculum in Family Medicine was developed by the Canadian Undergraduate Family Medicine Education Directors and supported by the College of Family Physicians of Canada as a national collaborative project to support medical student training in family medicine clerkship. Its key objective is to enable education leaders to meet their educational mandates, while at the same time countering the hidden curriculum and providing a route to scholarship. Program description The Shared Canadian Curriculum in Family Medicine is an open-access, shared, national curriculum (www.sharcfm.ca). It contains 23 core clinical topics (determined through a modified Delphi process) with demonstrable objectives for each. It also includes low- and medium-fidelity virtual patient cases, point-of-care learning resources (clinical cards), and assessment tools, all aligned with the core topics. French translation of the resources is ongoing. Conclusion The core topics, objectives, and educational resources have been adopted by medical schools across Canada, according to their needs. The lessons learned from mounting this multi-institutional collaborative project will help others develop their own collaborative curricula. PMID:28404720

  18. Complementary and alternative medicine use among military family medicine patients in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Jeremy B; Oh, Robert C

    2010-07-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is a growing component of medicine within the U.S. civilian and military populations. Tripler Army Medical Center (TAMC) Family Medicine Clinic represents an overseas medical facility stationed among a diverse ethnic population. The impact that local cultures have on CAM utilization in the military population in overseas medical facilities is unknown. Cross-sectional survey. The authors surveyed all volunteer soldiers, family members, and retirees 18 years old or greater enrolled at TAMC Family Medicine Clinic with appointments between September 1 and September 25, 2008. 503 volunteers were surveyed with a response rate of 73% (n = 369). A total of 50.7% reported using at least one CAM therapy within the last year. CAM use was significantly higher among women, Caucasians, and a college level education or greater. Prevalence of CAM use is higher within a military family medicine clinic in Hawaii than the prevalence among mainland civilian or other military populations.

  19. Erasmus exchange in the field of family medicine in Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotar-Pavlič, Danica

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the Erasmus exchange of students at the University of Ljubljana, Department of family medicine in the period from 2005 to 2010. The beginnings of an Erasmus exchange in the field of family medicine in Europe are described. Ljubljana Medical School has currently 60 bilateral agreements with universities or medical faculties in the EU and EFTA countries. We collected data of all students who come from the foreign faculties to the Department of family medicine and those from Slovenia who went to study abroad. In addition to basic descriptive statistics, we used the elements of qualitative analysis, where we reviewed the reports of the Slovenian Erasmus students, who went on exchange in the field of family medicine. Department of family medicine cooperated with 14 foreign medical schools since 2005. 42 Slovenian students went on academic exchange in the field of family medicine. 21 foreign students came to Department of family medicine in Ljubljana. Female students were more frequent in exchange compared with male students. The largest proportion of students went abroad in 2009. Most foreign students visited Department of Family medicine in Ljubljana in 2011. Reports of students show that they learned a lot. Students were able to compare the organization of health care in a foreign country and Slovenian health care system. Erasmus exchange has proven to be an important addition to the existing educational system. Students are acquainted with the progress of health care in Europe in this way. They are able to compare the benefits and disadvantages of foreign health care systems with home health care organization. Copyright 2012 by Academy of Sciences and Arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  20. Erasmus exchange in the field of family medicine in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danica Rotar-Pavlič

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the Erasmus exchange of students at the University of Ljubljana, Department of family medicine in the period from 2005 to 2010. The beginnings of an Erasmus exchange in the field of family medicine in Europe are described. Ljubljana Medical School has currently 60 bilateral agreements with universities or medical faculties in the EU and EFTA countries. Materials and methods. We collected data of all students who come from the foreign faculties to the Department of family medicine and those from Slovenia who went to study abroad. In addition to basic descriptive statistics, we used the elements of qualitative analysis, where we reviewed the reports of the Slovenian Erasmus students, who went on exchange in the field of family medicine. Results. Department of family medicine cooperated with 14 foreign medical schools since 2005. 42 Slovenian students went on academic exchange in the field of family medicine. 21 foreign students came to Department of family medicine in Ljubljana. Female students were more frequent in exchange compared with male students. The largest proportion of students went abroad in 2009. Most foreign students visited Department of Family medicine in Ljubljana in 2011. Reports of students show that they learned a lot. Students were able to compare the organization of health care in a foreign country and Slovenian health care system. Conclusion. Erasmus exchange has proven to be an important addition to the existing educational system. Students are acquainted with the progress of health care in Europe in this way. They are able to compare the benefits and disadvantages of foreign health care systems with home health care organization.

  1. Student perceptions of reproductive health education in US medical schools: a qualitative analysis of students taking family planning electives

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background: Abortion services will be sought by an estimated one in three US women before they reach age 45. Despite the importance of family planning (FP) care, many medical schools do not currently offer formal education in this area, and students are unable to meet associated competency standards prior to graduation.Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore students’ motivations in pursuing FP electives throughout the United States, their experiences during these courses, and any i...

  2. Experiences of family medicine residents in primary care obstetrics training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppula, Sudha; Brown, Judith Belle; Jordan, John M

    2012-03-01

    Obstetrical practice by family physicians has been declining rapidly for many reasons over the past number of decades. One reason for this trend is family medicine residents not considering intrapartum care as part of their future careers. Decisions such as this may be related to experiences during obstetrical training. This study explored the experiences of family medicine residents in core primary care obstetrics training. Using qualitative approaches, focus groups of family medicine residents were conducted. The resulting data were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Independent and team analysis was both iterative and interpretive. Data obtained from the focus groups revealed findings relating to the following categories: (1) perceived facilitators to practicing primary care obstetrics, (2) perceived barriers to practicing primary care obstetrics, and (3) learner experiences at the fulcrum of career decision making. Family medicine residents were encouraged by favorable learning experiences and group shared-call arrangements by their primary care obstetrics preceptors. Some concerns about a career including obstetrics persisted; however, positive experiences, including influential fulcrum points, may inspire family medicine residents to pursue a career involving primary care obstetrics.

  3. Opinions of Primary Care Family Physicians About Family Medicine Speciality Training Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamit Sirri Keten

    2014-04-01

    Material and Method: A total of 170 family physicians working in Kahramanmaras were included in the study. After obtaining informed consent a questionnaire comprising questions regarding socio-demographic properties, conveying contracted family physicians as family medicine specialists and organization of the training program was applied to participants. Results: Among physicians participating in the study 130 (76.5% were male and 40 (23.5% were female, with a mean age of 40.7±7.1 (min = 26 years, max = 64 years. The mean duration of professional experience of physicians was 15.3±7.0 (min = 2 years, max = 40 years years. Of all, 91 (53.5% participants had already read the decree on family medicine specialist training program for contracted family physicians. A hundred and fifteen (67.6% family physicians supported that Family Medicine Specialty program should be taken part-time without interrupting routine medical tasks. Only 51 (30.0% participants stated the requirement of an entrance examination (TUS for family medicine specialty training. Conclusion: Family medicine specialty training program towards family physicians should be considered in the light of scientific criteria. In family medicine, an area exhibited a holistic approach to the patient; specialty training should be through residency training instead of an education program. For this purpose, family medicine departments in medical faculties should play an active role in this process. Additionally further rotations in needed branches should be implemented with a revision of area should be performed. In medicine practical training is of high importance and distant or part-time education is not appropriate, and specialist training shall be planned in accordance with the medical specialty training regulations. [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(2.000: 298-304

  4. Defining competency-based evaluation objectives in family medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Tim; Brailovsky, Carlos; Rainsberry, Paul; Lawrence, Katherine; Crichton, Tom; Carpentier, Marie-Pierre; Visser, Shaun

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To develop a definition of competence in family medicine sufficient to guide a review of Certification examinations by the Board of Examiners of the College of Family Physicians of Canada. Design Delphi analysis of responses to a 4-question postal survey. Setting Canadian family practice. Participants A total of 302 family physicians who have served as examiners for the College of Family Physicians of Canada’s Certification examination. Methods A survey comprising 4 short-answer questions was mailed to the 302 participating family physicians asking them to list elements that define competence in family medicine among newly certified family physicians beginning independent practice. Two expert groups used a modified Delphi consensus process to analyze responses and generate 2 basic components of this definition of competence: first, the problems that a newly practising family physician should be competent to handle; second, the qualities, behaviour, and skills that characterize competence at the start of independent practice. Main findings Response rate was 54%; total number of elements among all responses was 5077, for an average 31 per respondent. Of the elements, 2676 were topics or clinical situations to be dealt with; the other 2401 were skills, behaviour patterns, or qualities, without reference to a specific clinical problem. The expert groups identified 6 essential skills, the phases of the clinical encounter, and 99 priority topics as the descriptors used by the respondents. More than 20% of respondents cited 30 of the topics. Conclusion Family physicians define the domain of competence in family medicine in terms of 6 essential skills, the phases of the clinical encounter, and priority topics. This survey represents the first level of definition of evaluation objectives in family medicine. Definition of the interactions among these elements will permit these objectives to become detailed enough to effectively guide assessment. PMID

  5. On becoming a teacher of family medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, G

    1977-02-01

    The emergence of family practice education in the past decade has created an unprecedented demand for faculty. Since no reservoir of trained teachers existed, it has become necessary for practicing family physicians to enter the academic world and assume the role of teacher. This paper examines the internal processes by which this transformation occurs. It begins with the fantasies common to physicians who are considering the decision to teach;, and progresses through self-assessment of qualifications to a consideration of the content of family practice teaching. It concludes with guidelines for negotiation with an academic institution and the early stages of professionalization in the new role.

  6. Can medicine be aesthetic? Disentangling beauty and health in elective surgeries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edmonds, A.

    2013-01-01

    This article analyzes tensions between aesthetics and health in medicine. The blurring of distinctions between reconstructive and cosmetic procedures, and the linking of plastic surgery with other medical treatments, have added to the legitimacy of an emerging "aesthetic medicine." As cosmetic surge

  7. A medical student elective promoting humanism, communication skills, complementary and alternative medicine and physician self-care: an evaluation of the HEART program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossett, Michelle L; Kohatsu, Wendy; Nunley, William; Mehta, Darshan; Davis, Roger B; Phillips, Russell S; Yeh, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    In 2002 the American Medical Student Association (AMSA) created a fourth-year medical student elective known as the Humanistic Elective in alternative medicine, Activism, and Reflective Transformation (HEART) that provided the opportunity for students to explore humanism in medicine, self-care, complementary and alternative medicine modalities, communication, activism, and community building in a four-week immersion experience. The educational effects of this elective, and whether it has met its stated goals, are unknown. The authors conducted a web-based, cross-sectional survey of the first eight cohorts of HEART graduates in 2010. Survey questions assessed respondents' demographics and perspectives on the educational impact of the elective. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the sample and qualitative analyses were guided by grounded theory. Of 168 eligible alumni, 122 (73%) completed the survey. The majority were female (70%), age ≤35 (77%) years, and trained in primary care specialties (66%). Half were attendings in practice. The majority of respondents felt the elective taught professionalism (89%) and communication skills (92%) well or very well. The majority highly agreed that the elective helped them better cope with stress during residency training (80%), taught them self-care skills (75%), and improved their ability to empathize and connect with patients (71%). Qualitative analysis of the personal and professional impact of the elective identified twelve common themes with self-discovery, self-care, and collegial development/community most frequently cited. The majority of HEART graduates endorse learning important skills and benefiting from the experience both personally and professionally. Aspects of the HEART curriculum may help training programs teach professionalism and improve trainee well-being. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Translating the family medicine vision into educational programmes in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Teck Yee; Cheong, Seng Kwing; Koh, Gerald Ch; Goh, Lee Gan

    2008-05-01

    The core of the Family Medicine (FM) vision is patient-centred care, requiring specific education and vocational training. We traced how FM education started and what have been achieved. FM training began in 1971 with the formation of the College of General Practitioners Singapore. Previously, training consisted of self-directed learning, lunchtime talks and examination preparation courses run by hospital specialists. Formal FM vocational training programmes in the United Kingdom and Australia provided the model for a 3-year programme in 1988. The tripartite relationship between the local university, College of Family Physicians and Ministry of Health, together with a structured training programme, contributed to its success. To date, more than 240 Family Physicians in Singapore have been awarded the Masters in Medicine (FM) degree. The Graduate Diploma in Family Medicine programme (GDFM) was introduced in 2000 for Family Physicians who wished to practice at an enhanced level. This programme has trained 194 doctors since then. Behind the scenes, the following were important developments: counterculture with a difference, tripartite stake-holding, training the trainers and learning from others. For the FM undergraduate programme, our aim is to develop the knowledge base, core values and roles of the Family Physician. Sustaining the value of Family Medicine as a career choice is the enduring vision.

  9. Benefits of comprehensive reproductive health education in family medicine residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothnagle, Melissa; Prine, Linda; Goodman, Susan

    2008-03-01

    Given the high prevalence of unintended pregnancy and early pregnancy failure, family physicians frequently encounter these clinical problems. Early abortion care and miscarriage management are within the scope of family medicine, yet few family medicine residency programs' curricula routinely include training in these skills. Comprehensive reproductive health education for family physicians could benefit patients by improving access to safe care for unintended pregnancy and early pregnancy loss and by improving continuity of care, especially for rural and low-income women. By promoting reflection on conflicts between personal beliefs and responsibility to patients, training in options counseling and abortion care fosters patient-centered care and informed decision making. Managing pregnancy loss and termination also improves skills in patient-centered counseling and primary care gynecology. Multiple studies document the feasibility and success of several training models for abortion and miscarriage management in family medicine. Incorporating comprehensive reproductive health care into family medicine residency training enables family physicians to provide a full range of reproductive health services.

  10. Teaching Humanities in Medicine: The University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Hugh; Shields, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Humanities in medicine (HIM) is an important aspect of medical education intended to help preserve humanism and a focus on patients. At the University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program, we have been expanding our HIM curriculum for our residents including orientation, home visit reflective writing, didactics and a department-wide…

  11. [Education in family medicine--a new approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zildzić, M; Masić, I; Hasanović, M; Beganlić, A; Tulumović, A; Herenda, S; Salihefendić, N

    2001-01-01

    The subject of the family medicine on the medical faculties in Bosnia and Herzegovina existed from recently as a separate curiculum of the medical study. Until recently the contents of this discipline interpreted within the subject of the social medicine or the object of the primary healthcare protection, and programs of teaching were based mainly on Anglosaxon experiences. The fact is that some teachers of the medical faculty in Sarajevo had their own visions and programs of the family medicine which by years were tested in the units of the family healthcare protection in Sarajevo, Mostar, and Banja Luka, about what was published in our and foreign literature. New approach from the family medicine should be based on as follows: greater use of the standardized procedures for the improvement of the communication skills; revised educational procedure of all the participants 6 interdisciplinaryilly in the education of the family medicine; improvement of knowledge about methodlogy and the principles of the research; improvement of the techniques and knowledge about the maipulatin of the medical informations; development of the skills of the continued studying through the total working aga; to the development of the capability of the critical estimation of the own work important; by the defining of the important educational goals in the curriculum of the urgent medicine; to the development and use of the methods feed-back informations from the students; to the modernizing of the methods of the evaluation of the educational process-adopted knowledge and the attitudes and the carrying out of the practice of the patients, and the ethic values in that process. In this work the authors consider the stated experiences in the education from the subject family medicine at our faculties realting to the foreign, and suggest that new concept of the education on the basis of these experiences in the practice.

  12. Importance of international networking in academic family medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zalika Klemenc-Ketiš

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available European family medicine/general practice (FM/GP has travelled the long and successful journey of profiling the discipline and has produced valuable position papers on education and research. Nowadays, academic medicine is one of the pillars in the future development of FM/GP in Europe. A common European curriculum on undergraduate and postgraduate family medicine is needed. Also, a sound international platform of teaching institutions and/or teachers of family medicine would foster the further development of family medicine as an academic discipline. This would stimulate students and teachers to engage in international exchange to gain new knowledge and experiences, present their work and ideas abroad and prepare the conditions for further exchange of students and teachers. Conclusion. Established departments of FM/GP, led by a teacher who is a family physician/general practitioner, at each Medical School in Europe should provide students with knowledge and skills related to the core attributes of FM/GP. International exchanges of teachers and students should foster the development of a common curriculum on FM in Europe and foster improvement in the quality of FM education.

  13. Determinants of choosing a career in family medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Ian; Gowans, Margot; Wright, Bruce; Brenneis, Fraser; Banner, Sandra; Boone, Jim

    2011-01-11

    Student choice is an important determinant of the distribution of specialties of practising physicians in many countries. Understanding characteristics at entry into medical school that are associated with the choice of residency in family medicine can assist medical schools in admitting an appropriate mix of students to serve the health care needs of their regions. From 2002 to 2004, we collected data from students in 15 classes at 8 of 16 Canadian medical schools at entry. Surveys included questions on career choice, attitudes to practice and socio-demographic characteristics. We followed students prospectively with these data linked to their residency choice. We used multiple logistic regression analysis to identify entry characteristics that predicted a student's ultimate career choice in family medicine. Of 1941 eligible students in the participating classes, 1542 (79.4%) contributed data to the final analyses. The following 11 entry variables predicted whether a student named family medicine as his or her top residency choice: being older, being engaged or in a long-term relationship, not having parents with postgraduate university education nor having family or close friends practicing medicine, having undertaken voluntary work in a developing nation, not volunteering with elderly people, desire for varied scope of practice, a societal orientation, a lower interest in research, desire for short postgraduate training, and lower preference for medical versus social problems. Demographic and attitudinal characteristics at entry into medical school predicted whether students chose a career in family medicine.

  14. Training Experiences of Family Medicine Residents on Behavioral Health Rotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubatsky, Max; Brieler, Jay; Jacobs, Christine

    2017-09-01

    Although accreditation guidelines for residency in family medicine include behavioral health curriculum, little is known about resident learning activities in real world training. Our study explored residents' perceptions about and exposure to specific activities during their behavioral health rotations. Family medicine residents (N=84) recruited via faculty list serves completed a survey about their experiences during behavioral health rotations. The survey included quantitative Likert scale questions, along with open-ended questions on which a qualitative content analysis was performed. Open-ended responses indicated that many residents receive constructive observation and collaboration opportunities during their training month. However, residents wanted more time to practice behavioral health skills beyond the rotation, more practice in psychotherapy skills, and additional education on medication management. Most residents (62%) received either limited or no training in couples or family therapy during their behavioral health rotation. Residents who reported more behavioral health knowledge gain during the rotation also reported higher self-perceived competency using Motivational Interviewing (M=3.82, P<.01). While family medicine as a discipline is based on the biopsychosocial model of care, residents reported deficits in education about family systems. Residents desire additional opportunities to learn psychotherapy techniques and practice counseling skills. Family medicine residency programs and faculty may consider supplementing their core behavioral curriculum to include these content areas.

  15. Defining competency-based evaluation objectives in family medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Kathrine; Allen, Tim; Brailovsky, Carlos; Crichton, Tom; Bethune, Cheri; Donoff, Michel; Laughlin, Tom; Wetmore, Stephen; Carpentier, Marie-Pierre; Visser, Shaun

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To develop key features for priority topics previously identified by the College of Family Physicians of Canada that, together with skill dimensions and phases of the clinical encounter, broadly describe competence in family medicine. Design Modified nominal group methodology, which was used to develop key features for each priority topic through an iterative process. Setting The College of Family Physicians of Canada. Participants An expert group of 7 family physicians and 1 educational consultant, all of whom had experience in assessing competence in family medicine. Group members represented the Canadian family medicine context with respect to region, sex, language, community type, and experience. Methods The group used a modified Delphi process to derive a detailed operational definition of competence, using multiple iterations until consensus was achieved for the items under discussion. The group met 3 to 4 times a year from 2000 to 2007. Main findings The group analyzed 99 topics and generated 773 key features. There were 2 to 20 (average 7.8) key features per topic; 63% of the key features focused on the diagnostic phase of the clinical encounter. Conclusion This project expands previous descriptions of the process of generating key features for assessment, and removes this process from the context of written examinations. A key-features analysis of topics focuses on higher-order cognitive processes of clinical competence. The project did not define all the skill dimensions of competence to the same degree, but it clearly identified those requiring further definition. This work generates part of a discipline-specific, competency-based definition of family medicine for assessment purposes. It limits the domain for assessment purposes, which is an advantage for the teaching and assessment of learners. A validation study on the content of this work would ensure that it truly reflects competence in family medicine. PMID:21998245

  16. Influence of folk medicine on the family practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gums, J G; Carson, D S

    1987-02-01

    The practice of folk medicine in the United States is increasing. Awareness by the family practitioner is essential in order to effectively communicate and successfully recommend medical treatment to those patients who hold belief in these traditional practices. Root medicine is particularly thriving in the southeastern United States. The influx of refugees into the southern coastal states has introduced new concepts into traditional medical practices. Interaction with patients who are involved with traditional health care providers and the modern medical community occurs more frequently than may be appreciated by the physicians. This article is intended to increase physicians' knowledge of some of the basic philosophies and practices of folk medicine, particularly root medicine, and to provide some insight into the reasons why the practitioners of folk medicine can be strongly influential in the medical and psychologic concerns of patients who believe in the power of the supernatural.

  17. Violence against health workers in Family Medicine Centers

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Turki N; Afify AAM; AlAteeq M

    2016-01-01

    Nouf Al-Turki,1 Ayman AM Afify,1 Mohammed AlAteeq2 1Family Medicine Department, Prince Sultan Military Medical City, 2Department of Family Medicine and PHC, King Abdul-Aziz Medical City, National Guard Health Affairs, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Background: Health care violence is a significant worldwide problem with negative consequences on both the safety and well-being of health care workers as well as workplace activities. Reports examining health care violence in Saudi Arabia are lim...

  18. Can medicine be aesthetic? Disentangling beauty and health in elective surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Alexander

    2013-06-01

    This article analyzes tensions between aesthetics and health in medicine. The blurring of distinctions between reconstructive and cosmetic procedures, and the linking of plastic surgery with other medical treatments, have added to the legitimacy of an emerging "aesthetic medicine." As cosmetic surgeries become linked to other medical procedures with perceived greater medical necessity, health and aesthetics become entangled. One consequence is that medical needs are magnified while perceptions of the risks of surgery are minimized. Drawing on ethnographic work on plastic surgery, as well as other studies of obstetrics and cosmetic surgery, I illustrate this entanglement of health and aesthetics within the field of women's reproductive health care in Brazil. I argue that while it would be difficult to wholly disentangle aesthetics and health, analysis of how risk-benefit calculations are made in clinical practice offers a useful critical strategy for illuminating ethical problems posed by aesthetic medicine.

  19. Teaching-skills training programs for family medicine residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacasse, Miriam; Ratnapalan, Savithiri

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To review the literature on teaching-skills training programs for family medicine residents and to identify formats and content of these programs and their effects. DATA SOURCES Ovid MEDLINE (1950 to mid-July 2008) and the Education Resources Information Center database (pre-1966 to mid-July 2008) were searched using and combining the MeSH terms teaching, internship and residency, and family practice; and teaching, graduate medical education, and family practice. STUDY SELECTION The initial MEDLINE and Education Resources Information Center database searches identified 362 and 33 references, respectively. Titles and abstracts were reviewed and studies were included if they described the format or content of a teaching-skills program or if they were primary studies of the effects of a teaching-skills program for family medicine residents or family medicine and other specialty trainees. The bibliographies of those articles were reviewed for unidentified studies. A total of 8 articles were identified for systematic review. Selection was limited to articles published in English. SYNTHESIS Teaching-skills training programs for family medicine residents vary from half-day curricula to a few months of training. Their content includes leadership skills, effective clinical teaching skills, technical teaching skills, as well as feedback and evaluation skills. Evaluations mainly assessed the programs’ effects on teaching behaviour, which was generally found to improve following participation in the programs. Evaluations of learner reactions and learning outcomes also suggested that the programs have positive effects. CONCLUSION Family medicine residency training programs differ from all other residency training programs in their shorter duration, usually 2 years, and the broader scope of learning within those 2 years. Few studies on teaching-skills training, however, were designed specifically for family medicine residents. Further studies assessing the

  20. Predoctoral education in family medicine: a ten-year perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaman, T L

    1979-11-01

    The educational goals chosen by teachers of family medicine for predoctoral students a decade ago differ substantially from the present goals. The original goals were to increase the number of family physicians, provide them with the basic knowledge and skills to practice, integrate the concepts of family medicine into the total medical school curriculum, and develop the "attitudes and ideals" of the good family physician. A series of basic learning principles were evolved to attain these goals. These included: teach in a practice setting, focus on persons rather than disease processes, use a team approach to teaching, involve students in the planning and evaluation process, and recognize curriculum development as a dynamic process. The present curriculum has an increased emphasis on clinical skills in family practice and on integration of behavioral science; there is a new emphasis on the role of the physician in the community and a better understanding of health care systems. Future directions for family medicine include increasing the emphasis on interpersonal communications, clinical synthesis, and clinical assessment.

  1. Frequently asked questions about family medicine in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Raman

    2016-01-01

    Family medicine (FM) is an independent and distinct medical specialty in the developed countries such as USA, UK, Australia, and Canada since 1960s. FM teaching is imparted at undergraduate and postgraduate levels in countries such as Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. Family practice is the practicing vocation of the majority doctors in India. The practitioners of FM include general practitioners, family physicians, FM specialists, and medical officers in the public sector. Medical students are largely unaware about FM career as this concept is not introduced at MBBS level. Faculty and senior doctors from other disciplines are also not able to answer the queries related to FM as they themselves also have gone through the same education system for last three decades, largely unexposed to the concept of academic family medicine. This article is a compilation of frequently asked questions, and their appropriate responses, presented here to dispel myths and misinformation about FM specialty. The answers are deliberated upon by Dr. Raman Kumar the founder president of the Academy of Family Physicians of India and the chief editor of the Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care. This article was originally published as an interview in Docplexus, a popular online network and website for medical doctors in November 2015.

  2. Teaching prenatal ultrasound to family medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresang, Lee T; Rodney, William MacMillan; Dees, Jason

    2004-02-01

    Prenatal ultrasound is a powerful diagnostic tool, but there has been little research on how to teach ultrasound to family physicians. The available evidence supports teaching through didactics followed by supervised scanning. Didactic topics include physics and machine usage, indications, fetal biometry, anatomic survey, practice management, ethical issues, and resources. Supervised scanning reinforces the didactic components of training. A "hand-on-hand" supervised scanning technique is recommended for the transmission of psychomotor skills in these sessions. Curricula for teaching ultrasound should include information on which residents will be taught prenatal ultrasound, who will teach them, how to create time for learning ultrasound skills, and how to test for competency. The literature suggests that competency can be achieved within 25-50 supervised scans. Measures of competency include examination and qualitative analysis of scanning. Competency-based testing needs further development because no uniform standards have been established.

  3. Genetic Programming for Medicinal Plant Family Identification System

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    Indra Laksmana

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Information about medicinal plants that is available in text documents is generally quite easy to access, however, one needs some efforts to use it. This research was aimed at utilizing crucial information taken from a text document to identify the family of several species of medicinal plants using a heuristic approach, i.e. genetic programming. Each of the species has its unique features. The genetic program puts the characteristics or special features of each family into a tree form. There are a number of processes involved in the investigated method, i.e. data acquisition, booleanization, grouping of training and test data, evaluation, and analysis. The genetic program uses a training process to select the best individual, initializes a generate-rule process to create several individuals and then executes a fitness evaluation. The next procedure is a genetic operation process, which consists of tournament selection to choose the best individual based on a fitness value, the crossover operation and the mutation operation. These operations have the purpose of complementing the individual. The best individual acquired is the expected solution, which is a rule for classifying medicinal plants. This process produced three rules, one for each plant family, displaying a feature structure that distinguishes each of the families from each other. The genetic program then used these rules to identify the medicinal plants, achieving an average accuracy of 86.47%.

  4. Pharmacist educators in family medicine residency programs: A qualitative analysis

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    Jorgenson Derek

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 25-29% of North American family medicine residency programs utilize a pharmacist to teach residents. Little is known about the impact that these pharmacist educators have on residency training. The purpose of this study was to examine the experiences of residents, residency directors and pharmacists within Canadian family medicine residency programs that employ a pharmacist educator to better understand the impact of the role. Methods Recruitment from three cohorts (residents, residency directors, pharmacists within family medicine residency programs across Canada for one-on-one semi-structured interviews followed by thematic analysis of anonymized transcript data. Results 11 residents, 6 residency directors and 17 pharmacist educators participated in interviews. Data themes were: (1 strong value of the teaching with respect to improved resident knowledge, confidence and patient care delivery; (2 lack of a formal pharmacotherapy curriculum; (3 desire for expansion of pharmacist teaching; (4 impact of teaching on collaboration; (5 impact of teaching on residency program faculty; and (6 lack of criticism of the role. Conclusions The pharmacist educator role is valued within residency programs across Canada and the role has a positive impact on several important aspects of family medicine resident training. Suggestions for improvement focused on expanding the teaching role and on implementing a formal curriculum for pharmacist educators to follow.

  5. Family Medicine and Primary Care: Trends and Student Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Mary W.; Veloski, Jon

    1977-01-01

    Using data from a longitudinal study of medical students at Jefferson Medical College, the authors analyzed trends in senior student interest in primary care specialties between 1971 and 1975 and selected background characteristics and performance levels of students choosing family medicine compared with those in other specialties. (Author/LBH)

  6. NON-MUSCULOSKELETAL SPORTS MEDICINE LEARNING IN FAMILY MEDICINE RESIDENCY PROGRAMS

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    Pasqualino Caputo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite the increasing popularity of primary care sports medicine fellowships, as evidenced by the more than two-fold increase in family medicine sports medicine fellowships from a total of 31 accredited programs during the 1998/1999 academic year (ACGME, 1998 to 63 during the 2003/2004 academic year (ACGME, 2006, there are few empirical studies to support the efficacy of such programs. To the best of our knowledge, no studies have been conducted to assess the impact of primary care sports medicine fellowships on family medicine residents' learning of non-musculoskeletal sports medicine topics. Rigorous evaluations of the outcomes of such programs are helpful to document the value of such programs to both the lay public and interested medical residents. In order to evaluate such programs, it is helpful to apply the same objective standards to residents trained across multiple programs. Hence, we would like to know if there is a learning effect with respect to non-musculoskeletal sports medicine topics identified on yearly administered American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM in-training exams (ITE to family medicine residents in family medicine residency programs in the United States with and without primary care sports medicine fellowship programs. Review and approval for the research proposal was granted by the ABFM, who also allowed access to the required data. Permission to study and report only non-musculoskeletal sports medicine topics excluding musculoskeletal topics was granted at the time due to other ongoing projects at the ABFM involving musculoskeletal topics. ABFM allowed us access to examinations from 1998 to 2003. We were given copies of each exam and records of responses to each item (correct or incorrect by each examinee (examinees were anonymous for each year.For each year, each examinee was classified by the ABFM as either (a belonging to a program that contained a sports medicine fellowship, or (b not belonging to a program

  7. Differences between family and emergency medicine training before sports medicine fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Mark; Christensen, Heidi K

    2015-01-01

    Residency training clearly impacts physicians' approach toward fellowship in Primary Care Sports Medicine. Although the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education sets strict standards for all programs, family medicine and emergency medicine training differ a great deal in general and provide physicians from both backgrounds varied perspectives and skill sets. The family physician acquires a substantial amount of experience in continuity of care and integration of health care into a patient's everyday life. On the other hand, the emergency physician receives exceptional training in the management of acutely ill and injured patients and leadership of a large health care team. Furthermore, while the emergency physician may be skilled in procedures such as fracture reduction and diagnostic ultrasound, the family physician is proficient in developing patient rapport and compliance with a treatment plan. Although physicians from different backgrounds may start with many differences, fellowship training is essential in bridging those gaps.

  8. Predictors of job satisfaction among academic family medicine faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Paul; White, David; Meaney, Christopher; Kwong, Jeffrey; Antao, Viola; Kim, Florence

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To identify predictors of job satisfaction among academic family medicine faculty members. Design A comprehensive Web-based survey of all faculty members in an academic department of family medicine. Bivariate and multivariable analyses (logistic regression) were used to identify variables associated with job satisfaction. Setting The Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Toronto in Ontario and its 15 affiliated community teaching hospitals and community-based teaching practices. Participants All 1029 faculty members in the Department of Family and Community Medicine were invited to complete the survey. Main outcome measures Faculty members’ demographic and practice information; teaching, clinical, administration, and research activities; leadership roles; training needs and preferences; mentorship experiences; health status; stress levels; burnout levels; and job satisfaction. Faculty members’ perceptions about supports provided, recognition, communication, retention, workload, teamwork, respect, resource distribution, remuneration, and infrastructure support. Faculty members’ job satisfaction, which was the main outcome variable, was obtained from the question, “Overall, how satisfied are you with your job?” Results Of the 1029 faculty members, 687 (66.8%) responded to the survey. Bivariate analyses revealed 26 predictors as being statistically significantly associated with job satisfaction, including faculty members’ ratings of their local department and main practice setting, their ratings of leadership and mentorship experiences, health status variables, and demographic variables. The multivariable analyses identified the following 5 predictors of job satisfaction: the Maslach Burnout Inventory subscales of emotional exhaustion and personal accomplishment; being born in Canada; the overall quality of mentorship that was received being rated as very good or excellent; and teamwork being rated as very

  9. Development of a global health curriculum for family medicine based on ACGME competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Therese; Solberg, Erik

    2014-01-01

    With the popularity of global health among medical students and residents, family medicine (FM) residencies are developing pathways in global health. Curriculum based on Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competencies adds rigor to the efforts. We describe the adaptation of a comprehensive pediatric global health curriculum based on ACGME competencies for family medicine. The curriculum maps out goals, objectives, curricular elements, and evaluation modalities for each of the six competencies (medical knowledge, patient care, practice-based learning, professionalism, communication, and systems-based practice). A literature review, followed by an iterative process, guided the expansion of the pediatric curriculum and the prioritization of domains for FM. Input was sought from FM global health faculty at our 8 residencies, affiliated community faculty, and international health experts from across the United States who attended our workshop at a national FM global health meeting. The final product includes comprehensive competency-based curriculum, open-source resources, and evaluation modalities. The goals and objectives pertinent to all FM residents, and those specific to global health pathway residents and fellows, are outlined. The limiting and enabling factors of the curriculum implementation are presented. This global family medicine curriculum has added structure and rigor to our international electives in the department at the University of Minnesota. The competency-based curriculum is in the early stages of implementation and evaluation. It has already strengthened components of the residency learning experience for all residents. A robust evaluation is needed and requires monitoring pathway graduates and their career choices into the future. The curriculum is available for adoption by other FM residencies.

  10. Development and Implementation of a Novel Lifestyle Medicine Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience Elective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas L. Lenz, PharmD, MS, PAPHS, FACLM

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To develop and implement an Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE to increase student’s awareness and use of lifestyle modifications in chronic disease prevention and management. Design: A five-week APPE was developed that utilized a wide variety of activities, including direct patient care, patient education, case studies, journal clubs and reflective assessment and writing to explore various lifestyle modifications and their relation to chronic disease prevention and management. Conclusion: The novel lifestyle medicine APPE provides students a unique opportunity to advance their knowledge in therapeutic lifestyle changes and expand their understanding of the pharmacist’s role in chronic disease prevention and management.

  11. Health care of homeless families. A growing challenge for family medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinreb, L F; Bassuk, E L

    1990-07-01

    The number of homeless families in the United States is growing at an alarming rate. Homeless families are at an increased risk for numerous medical conditions and have complex health and psychosocial needs. In response to the growing crisis, policymakers have generally focused on families' immediate needs rather than developing a comprehensive long-term response. Health programs have been challenged to develop effective methods of providing outreach and comprehensive, continuous, coordinated services. Family medicine is uniquely qualified to meet the health care needs of homeless families and can play an important role in providing clinical service, designing medical education, developing research, and defining a national advocacy agenda.

  12. The Effect of Elective Rotations on the Self-assessment Examination Results of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Residents: Implications for Minimizing Educational Resource Disparities in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, I-Nan; Wu, Pei-Shen; Wang, Tyng-Guey; Chen, Wen-Shiang; Lew, Henry L

    2017-08-01

    The aims of the study were (1) to assess whether a knowledge disparity existed between physical medicine and rehabilitation residents from community hospitals versus those from medical centers, before the introduction of short-term elective training at the end of 2008 and (2), if such disparity existed, to determine whether 1-month short-term elective training was associated with minimizing such disparity, as reflected in the self-assessment examination scores. Self-assessment examination scores from 2007-2016 were analyzed in each of the following three topics: (a) cardiac rehabilitation, (b) pulmonary rehabilitation, and (c) orthotics. Student's t tests were used to identify score discrepancies between both groups. (1) At baseline (2007-2008), trainees from community hospitals scored lower in all three topics (P < 0.05). (2) After the short-term elective training, follow-up comparisons showed no differences in either cardiac or pulmonary rehabilitation for 2009-2016. Regarding orthotics, trainees from both groups showed no significant differences for 2009-2010 and 2011-2012. Interestingly, for 2013-2014 and 2015-2016, trainees from medical centers scored higher again, but only in orthotics. (1) In 2007-2008, a knowledge disparity existed between physical medicine and rehabilitation residents from community hospitals and medical centers in Taiwan. (2) Short-term elective training was associated with minimizing such disparity from 2009-2016, especially in cardiac and pulmonary rehabilitation.

  13. Folk medicinal uses of Verbenaceae family plants in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmatullah, Mohammed; Jahan, Rownak; Azam, F M Safiul; Hossan, S; Mollik, M A H; Rahman, Taufiq

    2011-01-01

    Folk medicinal practitioners form the first tier of primary health-care providers to most of the rural population of Bangladesh. They are known locally as Kavirajes and rely almost solely on oral or topical administration of whole plants or plant parts for treatment of various ailments. Also about 2% of the total population of Bangladesh are scattered among more than twenty tribes residing within the country's borders. The various tribes have their own tribal practitioners, who use medicinal plants for treatment of diseases. The objective of the present survey was to conduct an ethnomedicinal survey among the Kavirajes and tribal practitioners to determine which species of plants belonging to the Verbenaceae family are used by the practitioners. The Verbenaceae family plants are well known for constituents having important bio-active properties. The present survey indicated that 13 species belonging to 8 genera are used by the folk and tribal medicinal practitioners of Bangladesh. A comparison of their folk medicinal uses along with published reports in the scientific literature suggests that the Verbenaceae family plants used in Bangladesh can potentially be important sources of lead compounds or novel drugs for treatment of difficult to cure debilitating diseases like malaria and rheumatoid arthritis.

  14. Competency-based evaluation tools for integrative medicine training in family medicine residency: a pilot study

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    Schneider Craig

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As more integrative medicine educational content is integrated into conventional family medicine teaching, the need for effective evaluation strategies grows. Through the Integrative Family Medicine program, a six site pilot program of a four year residency training model combining integrative medicine and family medicine training, we have developed and tested a set of competency-based evaluation tools to assess residents' skills in integrative medicine history-taking and treatment planning. This paper presents the results from the implementation of direct observation and treatment plan evaluation tools, as well as the results of two Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs developed for the program. Methods The direct observation (DO and treatment plan (TP evaluation tools developed for the IFM program were implemented by faculty at each of the six sites during the PGY-4 year (n = 11 on DO and n = 8 on TP. The OSCE I was implemented first in 2005 (n = 6, revised and then implemented with a second class of IFM participants in 2006 (n = 7. OSCE II was implemented in fall 2005 with only one class of IFM participants (n = 6. Data from the initial implementation of these tools are described using descriptive statistics. Results Results from the implementation of these tools at the IFM sites suggest that we need more emphasis in our curriculum on incorporating spirituality into history-taking and treatment planning, and more training for IFM residents on effective assessment of readiness for change and strategies for delivering integrative medicine treatment recommendations. Focusing our OSCE assessment more narrowly on integrative medicine history-taking skills was much more effective in delineating strengths and weaknesses in our residents' performance than using the OSCE for both integrative and more basic communication competencies. Conclusion As these tools are refined further they will be of value both in improving

  15. Teaching legal competencies through an individualized elective in medicine and law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapp, Marshall B

    2016-10-14

    Medical education, including education intended to prepare future physicians to care to older individuals, should include development and implementation of competencies relating to a physician's ability to understand and interact with the legal environment and legal actors who will affect the practice of medicine. The wisdom of integrating legal knowledge into the medical curriculum has been documented, and literature discusses the content and methods of teaching medical students and residents about law and the legal system. This article describes one unique but replicable, pedagogical approach to preparing future physicians to thrive in their inevitably interprofessional careers as they fulfill the fiduciary responsibilities that lie at the heart of their therapeutic and advocacy relationships with older patients.

  16. Leadership training in a family medicine residency program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Erin; Moore, Ainsley; Schabort, Inge

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess the current status of leadership training as perceived by family medicine residents to inform the development of a formal leadership curriculum. Design Cross-sectional quantitative survey. Setting Department of Family Medicine at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont, in December 2013. Participants A total of 152 first- and second-year family medicine residents. Main outcome measures Family medicine residents’ attitudes toward leadership, perceived level of training in various leadership domains, and identified opportunities for leadership training. Results Overall, 80% (152 of 190) of residents completed the survey. On a Likert scale (1 = strongly disagree, 4 = neutral, 7 = strongly agree), residents rated the importance of physician leadership in the clinical setting as high (6.23 of 7), whereas agreement with the statement “I am a leader” received the lowest rating (5.28 of 7). At least 50% of residents desired more training in the leadership domains of personal mastery, mentorship and coaching, conflict resolution, teaching, effective teamwork, administration, ideals of a healthy workplace, coalitions, and system transformation. At least 50% of residents identified behavioural sciences seminars, a lecture and workshop series, and a retreat as opportunities to expand leadership training. Conclusion The concept of family physicians as leaders resonated highly with residents. Residents desired more personal and system-level leadership training. They also identified ways that leadership training could be expanded in the current curriculum and developed in other areas. The information gained from this survey might facilitate leadership development among residents through application of its results in a formal leadership curriculum. PMID:28292816

  17. E-Learning Readiness in Medicine: Turkish Family Medicine (FM) Physicians Case

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    Parlakkiliç, Alaattin

    2015-01-01

    This research investigates e-learning readiness level of family medicine physicians (FM) in Turkey. The study measures the level of e-learning readiness of Turkish FM physicians by an online e-learning readiness survey. According to results five areas are ready at Turkish FM physicians but need a few improvements:…

  18. Reflective practice and social responsibility in family medicine: Effect of performing an international rotation in a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loignon, Christine; Gottin, Thomas; Valois, Carol; Couturier, François; Williams, Robert; Roy, Pierre-Michel

    2016-11-01

    To explore the perceived effect of an elective international health rotation on family medicine resident learning. Qualitative, collaborative study based on semistructured interviews. Quebec. A sample of 12 family medicine residents and 9 rotation supervisors (N = 21). Semistructured interviews of residents and rotation supervisors. Residents and supervisors alike reported that their technical skills and relationship skills had benefited. All increased their knowledge of tropical pathologies and learned to expand their clinical examinations. They benefited from having very rich interactions in other care settings, working with vulnerable populations. The rotations had their greatest effect on relationship skills (communication, empathy, etc) and the ability to work with vulnerable patients. All of the participants were exposed to local therapies and local interpretations of disease symptoms and pathogenesis. The findings of this study will have a considerable effect on pedagogy. The residents' experiences of their international health rotations and what they learned in terms of medical skills and pedagogic approaches in working with patients are described. Using a collaborative approach with the rotation supervisors, the data were triangulated and the benefits of an international rotation on academic training were more accurately defined. The findings can now be used to enrich academic programs in social and preventive medicine and more adequately prepare future family physicians for work in various social and cultural settings. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  19. Residents' views about family medicine specialty education in Turkey

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    Uzuner Arzu

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Residents are one of the key stakeholders of specialty training. The Turkish Board of Family Medicine wanted to pursue a realistic and structured approach in the design of the specialty training programme. This approach required the development of a needs-based core curriculum built on evidence obtained from residents about their needs for specialty training and their needs in the current infrastructure. The aim of this study was to obtain evidence on residents' opinions and views about Family Medicine specialty training. Methods This is a descriptive, cross-sectional study. The board prepared a questionnaire to investigate residents' views about some aspects of the education programme such as duration and content, to assess the residents' learning needs as well as their need for a training infrastructure. The questionnaire was distributed to the Family Medicine Departments (n = 27 and to the coordinators of Family Medicine residency programmes in state hospitals (n = 11 by e-mail and by personal contact. Results A total of 191 questionnaires were returned. The female/male ratio was 58.6%/41.4%. Nine state hospitals and 10 university departments participated in the study. The response rate was 29%. Forty-five percent of the participants proposed over three years for the residency duration with either extensions of the standard rotation periods in pediatrics and internal medicine or reductions in general surgery. Residents expressed the need for extra rotations (dermatology 61.8%; otolaryngology 58.6%; radiology 52.4%. Fifty-nine percent of the residents deemed a rotation in a private primary care centre necessary, 62.8% in a state primary care centre with a proposed median duration of three months. Forty-seven percent of the participants advocated subspecialties for Family Medicine, especially geriatrics. The residents were open to new educational methods such as debates, training with models, workshops and e

  20. Patterns of Benzodiazepine Usage in a Family Medicine Centre

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    In a one year survey of the use of diazepam, chlordiazepoxide and flurazepam at a university family medicine centre, the per capita prescribing of the three drugs rose with the age of the patients. Diazepam was used approximately four times as frequently as chlordiazepoxide and for four times as many problems, even though it has similar pharmacological properties and a half-life nearly three times that of chlordiazepoxide. The over 65 age group received 36% of prescriptions for diazepam for m...

  1. Fellowship or Further Training for Family Medicine Residents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sairenji, Tomoko; Dai, Mingliang; Eden, Aimee R; Peterson, Lars E; Mainous, Arch G

    2017-09-01

    The breadth of family medicine (FM) generates debate about the length of residency training. One argument used by proponents for lengthening training is that residents feel unprepared for practice. The objectives of our study were to (1) identify the proportion of FM residency graduates intending to pursue fellowship training and those who would have done an additional year of core residency training had it been available, and (2) determine whether an association exists between these two variables. We used data collected by the American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM) as part of resident certification examination application in 2014 and 2015. Data included fellowship intention, and interest in pursuing another year of residency training if it were available. We used descriptive and bivariate statistics. The questionnaire was completed by 6,235 residents, of which 17.0% (n=1,063) intended to enroll in a fellowship. Overall 54.2% of residents were "not at all likely" to extend residency training, with 19.9% "extremely/moderately likely". Forty-six percent of those intending a fellowship were "not at all likely" to extend training and only 29% of those "extremely/moderately likely" to extend residency training intended to enroll in a fellowship. We found a disconnect between fellowship intention and desire for another year of residency training. Desire for fellowship may be more about obtaining specific skills and expertise or additional certifications, and less about being prepared for general practice in family medicine.

  2. The Family Medicine Curriculum Resource Project: implications for faculty development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Kent J; Quirk, Mark E; Davis, Ardis K

    2007-01-01

    Faculty development implications related to implementing the Family Medicine Curriculum Resource (FMCR) Project provide an opportunity to look at the recommendations of the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine's federally funded Faculty Futures Initiative (FFI) and the recent Future of Family Medicine (FFM) project. Implications for faculty development include the importance of the clerkship setting, originally defined in 1991, with new features added in today's practice environment as outlined by the FFM and the changing assumptions in approaching faculty development. Previously, faculty development focused on teaching learners to master current knowledge. Now, faculty must teach learners how to master new competencies throughout their lives; learners need to learn how they and others learn now. Teaching must focus on how to learn in the future as well as what to learn for the present. Competence ("what individuals know or are able to do in terms of knowledge, skills, and attitudes") has become the focus of curriculum development efforts over the last few years and most appropriately serves as the focus of curriculum development in the FMCR Project. Implications for developing teachers and preceptors focus on the skills and circumstances required to teach and evaluate all types (cognitive, metacognitive, and affective) of competence. In the new culture, novel teaching methods will serve as the focus of faculty development in teaching and of educational ("best practices") research.

  3. The new curriculum for family medicine at the University of Split, School of Medicine

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    Ivančica Pavličević

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available According to the new curriculum at the University of Split School ofMedicine for the 2010/2011 academic year, the Department of FamilyMedicine based its teaching on its own expert and research work. Theadequacy of the communication with the patient, his or her familyand the social environment, as well as the concept of evidence-basedmedicine (EBM have been defined as the foundation of expert andresearch work in family medicine. In accordance with this strategy,the members of the Department are involved in conducting journalclubs, Cochrane systematic reviews, research into the health of families where the father is absent working abroad (there are many such families with emigrant fathers in the region, and some are working on developing student letters to patients as an instrument for encouraging communication and empathy. The proportion of theoreticalclasses was reduced to provide more time for practice-based classes for students. The Work Diary was also introduced, as well as the student letter to the patient, practice of clinical skills and objective, structured, clinical examination (OSCE. The assessment of students is performed in four parts: the grade given by the student’s practice supervisor, the grade for student letters to patients, the OSCE exam grade and the written exam grade. Students achieved, on average, very high grades. The Department is also involved in the course on clinical and social skills to first and second year students, taking on the task of introducing students to patients and their surroundings.

  4. Examining Critical Thinking Skills in Family Medicine Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, David; Schipper, Shirley; Westbury, Chris; Linh Banh, Hoan; Loeffler, Kim; Allan, G Michael; Ross, Shelley

    2016-02-01

    Our objective was to determine the relationship between critical thinking skills and objective measures of academic success in a family medicine residency program. This prospective observational cohort study was set in a large Canadian family medicine residency program. Intervention was the California Critical Thinking Skills Test (CCTST), administered at three points in residency: upon entry, at mid-point, and at graduation. Results from the CCTST, Canadian Residency Matching Service file, and interview scores were compared to other measures of academic performance (Medical Colleges Admission Test [MCAT] and College of Family Physicians of Canada [CCFP] certification examination results). For participants (n=60), significant positive correlations were found between critical thinking skills and performance on tests of knowledge. For the MCAT, CCTST scores correlated positively with full scores (n=24, r=0.57) as well as with each section score (verbal reasoning: r=0.59; physical sciences: r=0.64; biological sciences: r=0.54). For CCFP examination, CCTST correlated reliably with both sections (n=49, orals: r=0.34; short answer: r=0.47). Additionally, CCTST was a better predictor of performance on the CCFP exam than was the interview score at selection into the residency program (Fisher's r-to-z test, z=2.25). Success on a critical thinking skills exam was found to predict success on family medicine certification examinations. Given that critical thinking skills appear to be stable throughout residency training, including an assessment of critical thinking in the selection process may help identify applicants more likely to be successful on final certification exam.

  5. [Family medicine as a medical specialty and an academic discipline in the medical students' assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krztoń-Królewiecka, Anna; Jarczewska, Dorota Łucja; Windak, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Family medicine has been recognized as the key element of a good health care system. Despite the significance of the family physician's role the number of medical students choosing to train in family medicine has been declining in recent years. The aim of this study was to describe opinions about family medicine and family medicine teaching among medical students. A cross sectional study with an anonymous questionnaire was carried out. The study population was all sixth-year students in Faculty Medicine of Jagiellonian University Medical College, who completed family medicine course in winter semester of academic year 2012/2013. 111 students filled in the questionnaire. The response rate was 84.1%. Less than one third of respondents (30.6%) considered family medicine as a future career choice. Almost all students recognized responsibility of the family doctor for the health of community. 52% of respondents agreed that the family doctor is competent to provide most of the health care an individual may require. Experience from family medicine course was according to the students the most important factor influencing their opinions. Medical students appreciate the social role of family doctors. Family medicine teachers should not only pass on knowledge, but they also should encourage medical students to family medicine as a future career choice.

  6. A Third-Year Family Medicine Clerkship Based in an Academic Family Practice Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Robert B; And Others

    1984-01-01

    A 5-week family medicine clerkship is described that uses several innovative techniques: problem-based learning focusing on patient management tutorials; consultation with specialists; supervised patient care and a nursing home inpatient teaching service; and workshops on topics such as office-surgical techniques, practice management, and…

  7. Interdisciplinary, interinstitutional and international collaboration of family medicine researchers in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Hsuan; Tseng, Yen-Han; Chang, Hsiao-Ting; Lin, Ming-Hwai; Tseng, Yen-Chiang; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Hwang, Shinn-Jang

    2015-01-01

    The family medicine researches flourished worldwide in the past decade. However, the collaborative patterns of family medicine publications had not been reported. Our study analyzed the collaborative activity of family medicine researchers in Taiwan. We focused on the types of collaboration among disciplines, institutions and countries. We searched "family medicine" AND "Taiwan" in address field from Web of Science and documented the disciplines, institutions and countries of all authors. We analyzed the collaborative patterns of family medicine researchers in Taiwan from 2010 to 2014. The journal's impact factor of each article in the same publication year was also retrieved. Among 1,217 articles from 2010 to 2014, interdisciplinary collaboration existed in 1,185 (97.3%) articles, interinstitutional in 1,012 (83.2%) and international in 142 (11.7%). Public health was the most common collaborative discipline. All international researches were also interdisciplinary and interinstitutional. The United States (75 articles), the United Kingdom (21) and the People's Republic of China (20) were the top three countries with which family medicine researchers in Taiwan had collaborated. We found a high degree of interdisciplinary and interinstitutional collaboration of family medicine researches in Taiwan. However, the collaboration of family medicine researchers in Taiwan with family medicine colleagues of other domestic or foreign institutions was insufficient. The future direction of family medicine studies could focus on the promotion of communication among family medicine researchers.

  8. Context and trade-offs in family medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seehusen, Dean A; Bowman, Marjorie A; Neale, Anne Victoria

    2014-01-01

    This issue contains several articles that highlight the effect of context and tradeoffs encountered in the practice of family medicine. Some articles demonstrate how context affects the implementation of the patient-centered medical home model, the community risk of a measles outbreak, the rate of complementary and alternative medicine among different generations, and the number of family physicians primarily providing urgent and emergent care in a region. Tradeoffs are explored in articles that look at how electronic medical record use has changed the composition of workload in primary care and how the burgeoning number of clinical guidelines affects the choices made by family physicians. A look at diabetic patients' perceptions of their risk of negative outcomes reveals an interesting pattern of underestimation of the risk of death. Patients with chronic mental disorders are at risk of having significant difficulties in the workplace, which may place a heavy cost on the individual and society. An interesting retrospective study found that it takes a surprising amount of replacement therapy to correct vitamin D deficiency.

  9. Family medicine residents' practice intentions: Theory of planned behaviour evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grierson, Lawrence E M; Fowler, Nancy; Kwan, Matthew Y W

    2015-11-01

    To assess residents' practice intentions since the introduction of the College of Family Physicians of Canada's Triple C curriculum, which focuses on graduating family physicians who will provide comprehensive care within traditional and newer models of family practice. A survey based on Ajzen's theory of planned behaviour was administered on 2 occasions. McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont. Residents (n = 135) who were enrolled in the Department of Family Medicine Postgraduate Residency Program at McMaster University in July 2012 and July 2013; 54 of the 60 first-year residents who completed the survey in 2012 completed it again in 2013. The survey was modeled so as to measure the respondents' intentions to practise with a comprehensive scope; determine the degree to which their attitudes, subjective norms, and perceptions of control about comprehensive practice influence those intentions; and investigate how these relationships change as residents progress through the curriculum. The survey also queried the respondents about their intentions with respect to particular medical services that underpin comprehensive practice. The responses indicate that the factors modeled by the theory of planned behaviour survey account for 60% of the variance in the residents' intentions to adopt a comprehensive scope of practice upon graduation, that there is room for curricular improvement with respect to encouraging residents to practise comprehensive care, and that targeting subjective norms about comprehensive practice might have the greatest influence on improving resident intentions. The theory of planned behaviour presents an effective approach to assessing curricular effects on resident practice intentions while also providing meaningful information for guiding further program evaluation efforts in the Department of Family Medicine at McMaster University.

  10. Twitter use at a family medicine conference: analyzing #STFM13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishori, Ranit; Levy, Brendan; Donvan, Benjamin

    2014-09-01

    The use of social media is expanding in medicine. A few articles sought to describe participant behavior using Twitter at scientific conferences. Family physicians are known as active participants in social media, but their behavior and practices at conferences have not been methodically described. We recorded all public tweets at the 2013 Society of Teachers of Family Medicine (STFM) Annual Spring Conference bearing the hashtag #STFM13, using commercially available services. We created a transcript of all tweets for the 5 days of the conference and 3 days before and after. We looked at the total number of tweets, number of original tweets and re-tweets, active users, most prolific users, and impressions. We categorized the content based on (1) Session related, (2) Social, (3) Logistics, (4) Ads, and (5) Other. We compared major metrics (but not content) to the 2012 STFM Annual Spring Conference. There were a total of 1,818 tweets from 181 user accounts: 13% of the conference registrants. The top tweeter accounted for over 15% of the total tweets, and the top 10 accounted for over 50% of the total volume. Most original tweets (69.7%) were related to session content. Social content came in second (14.2%), followed by other, logistics, and advertisement (7.6%, 6.9%, 1.6%). This preliminary analysis provides an initial snapshot of twitter activity at a family medicine conference. It may suggest avenues for further inquiry: trend identification, "influencer" identification, and qualitative analysis. Interdisciplinary research should focus on evaluation methods that can assess the quality, value, and impact of tweeting.

  11. Teaching and assessing family medicine clerks' use of medical interpreters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriner, Constance J; Hickey, Daniel P

    2008-05-01

    Academic health centers must develop strategies to prepare health care providers to meet the needs of an increasingly diverse population. We designed a curriculum module, including didactic presentation and a standardized patient experience, to teach and evaluate the knowledge and skills necessary for third-year family medicine clerks to effectively communicate with non-English-speaking patients when using interpreters in clinical settings. Analyses indicated improvement both in students' knowledge and skills following participation in the curriculum module. The instructional intervention was successful in improving students' effective use of interpreters in a simulated clinical setting.

  12. Interdisciplinary, interinstitutional and international collaboration of family medicine researchers in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hsuan Lin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The family medicine researches flourished worldwide in the past decade. However, the collaborative patterns of family medicine publications had not been reported. Our study analyzed the collaborative activity of family medicine researchers in Taiwan. We focused on the types of collaboration among disciplines, institutions and countries. We searched “family medicine” AND “Taiwan” in address field from Web of Science and documented the disciplines, institutions and countries of all authors. We analyzed the collaborative patterns of family medicine researchers in Taiwan from 2010 to 2014. The journal’s impact factor of each article in the same publication year was also retrieved. Among 1,217 articles from 2010 to 2014, interdisciplinary collaboration existed in 1,185 (97.3% articles, interinstitutional in 1,012 (83.2% and international in 142 (11.7%. Public health was the most common collaborative discipline. All international researches were also interdisciplinary and interinstitutional. The United States (75 articles, the United Kingdom (21 and the People’s Republic of China (20 were the top three countries with which family medicine researchers in Taiwan had collaborated. We found a high degree of interdisciplinary and interinstitutional collaboration of family medicine researches in Taiwan. However, the collaboration of family medicine researchers in Taiwan with family medicine colleagues of other domestic or foreign institutions was insufficient. The future direction of family medicine studies could focus on the promotion of communication among family medicine researchers.

  13. A Comparison of Students' Clinical Experience in Family Medicine and Traditional Clerkships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkerson, George R., Jr.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Experience on the traditional internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, obstetrics-gynecology, and psychiatry clerkships was compared with the experience on a family medicine clerkship. The family medicine clerkship offered the most experience with circulatory, respiratory, digestive, neurological, musculoskeletal, and skin problems and with…

  14. Social media beliefs and usage among family medicine residents and practicing family physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klee, David; Covey, Carlton; Zhong, Laura

    2015-03-01

    Incorporation of social media (SM) use in medicine is gaining support. The Internet is now a popular medium for people to solicit medical information. Usage of social networks, such as Facebook and Twitter, is growing daily and provides physicians with nearly instantaneous access to large populations for both marketing and patient education. The benefits are myriad, but so are the inherent risks. We investigated the role providers' age and medical experience played in their beliefs and use of SM in medicine. Using multiple state-wide and national databases, we assessed social media use by family medicine residents, faculty, and practicing family physicians with a 24-question online survey. Descriptive data is compared by age and level of medical experience. A total of 61 family medicine residents and 192 practicing family physicians responded. There is a trend toward higher SM utilization in the younger cohort, with 90% of resident respondents reporting using SM, half of them daily. A total of 64% of family physician respondents over the age of 45 have a SM account. An equal percentage of senior physicians use SM daily or not at all. Practicing physicians, more than residents, agree that SM can be beneficial in patient care. The vast majority of residents and physicians polled believe that SM should be taught early in medical education. The high utilization of SM by younger providers, high prevalence of patient use of the Internet, and the countless beneficial opportunities SM offers should be catalysts to drive curriculum development and early implementation in medical education. This curriculum should focus around four pillars: professional standards for SM use, SM clinical practice integration, professional networking, and research.

  15. Family medicine residents' and community physicians' concerns about patient truthfulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, D; Clements, T

    1997-02-01

    To assess how often family physicians question patient truthfulness, what factors influence them to do so, and how often resident physicians experience such doubts as compared with senior physicians. In 1994-95, after half-day patient care sessions, 44 residents from the University of Kansas School of Medicine's three Wichita family practice residency programs and nine community family physicians associated with the programs recorded their impressions of each patient's truthfulness, what issues prompted concern about patient truthfulness, and their feelings about each encounter. The residents doubted patients in 54 of 277 encounters (19.5%); the senior physicians doubted patients in 16 of 183 encounters (8.7%) (p = .003). Both groups had more negative than positive emotions toward such encounters, with no significant difference in feelings. The demographics of the resident and senior physician populations differed greatly. Although preliminary, the present study suggests that family physicians question patient truthfulness fairly often, resident physicians more than senior physicians, and that these physicians have some negative feelings toward such situations. Because such feelings may contribute to inadequate patient care, the authors recommend that further research is warranted to understand contributing factors and to guide the development of resident and student education programs in this neglected area of the doctor-patient relationship.

  16. [Family medicine and practice in the Mexican Social Security Institute].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas Patiño, Donovan; Jarillo Soto, Edgar; Rodríguez Torres, Alejandra

    2014-06-26

    The central ideas of this research paper are related to the practice of family medicine as a specialty. It focuses in its origins, problems, unique characteristics, limitations, scope, management, and processes within the context of primary care of the Mexican Social Security System. This approach was based on a qualitative, hermeneutical study closely related to the Structural Functionalism Theory. Within this framework, medical practice is seen as an equation: Meaning = action + function/structure. This offers an approach to the understanding of reality through surveys and observations in five categories: identity, activity, purpose, values/norms, and power/relationship. The practice of family medicine is defined as a medical act in the Mexican Social Security Institute. This act is limited to a brief encounter and a prescription, which makes it a short, fleeting, medicalized interaction. The result is a negative social imaginary of the physician, the patient and the whole of society. Thus, individuals and society host a negative social imaginary bestowed on doctors and users of the health system.

  17. Family medicine and practice in the Mexican Social Security Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donovan Casas Patiño

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The central ideas of this research paper are related to the practice of family medicine as a specialty. It focuses in its origins, problems, unique characteristics, limitations, scope, management, and processes within the context of primary care of the Mexican Social Security System. This approach was based on a qualitative, hermeneutical study closely related to the Structural Functionalism Theory. Within this framework, medical practice is seen as an equation: Meaning = action + function/structure. This offers an approach to the understanding of reality through surveys and observations in five categories: identity, activity, purpose, values/norms, and power/relationship. The practice of family medicine is defined as a medical act in the Mexican Social Security Institute. This act is limited to a brief encounter and a prescription, which makes it a short, fleeting, medicalized interaction. The result is a negative social imaginary of the physician, the patient and the whole of society. Thus, individuals and society host a negative social imaginary bestowed on doctors and users of the health system.

  18. ¿Medicina general integral o medicina familiar? ¿Integral general medicine or family medicine?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo A. Cuesta Mejías

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available En el presente trabajo, además de ofrecer la opinión basada en la experiencia personal del autor, se aplica encuesta confeccionada al efecto en la que se indaga fundamentalmente cuál es la preferencia de los profesionales vinculados a la práctica de la Medicina General Integral o de la Medicina Familiar a la hora de denominar la especialidad que desempeñan. Es decir, responder la pregunta que da título al trabajo es la intención u objetivo general del mismo.At present paper, beside to offer author's personal experience-based opinion, it is applied survey to know which is the preference of professionals related to practice of Integral General Medicine o Family Medicine, at moment of to denominates its real specialty. That is, to answer the question that is the title of this paper, is its general aim.

  19. Violence against health workers in Family Medicine Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Turki N

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Nouf Al-Turki,1 Ayman AM Afify,1 Mohammed AlAteeq2 1Family Medicine Department, Prince Sultan Military Medical City, 2Department of Family Medicine and PHC, King Abdul-Aziz Medical City, National Guard Health Affairs, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Background: Health care violence is a significant worldwide problem with negative consequences on both the safety and well-being of health care workers as well as workplace activities. Reports examining health care violence in Saudi Arabia are limited and the results are conflicting.Objective: To estimate the prevalence and determine the demographic and occupational characteristics associated with workplace violence in primary care centers in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.Methods: A cross-sectional study included 270 health care workers in 12 family medicine centers in Riyadh during November and December 2014. A structured self-administered questionnaire was used to estimate the frequency, timing, causes, reactions, and consequences of workplace violence plus participants’ demographic and occupational data.Results: A total 123 health care workers (45.6% experienced some kind of violence over 12 months prior to the study. These included physical (6.5% and nonphysical violence (99.2%, including verbal violence (94.3% and intimidation (22.0%. Offenders were patients (71.5% in the majority of cases, companions (20.3%, or both (3.3%. Almost half (48.0% of health care workers who experienced violence did nothing, 38.2% actively reported the event, and 13.8% consulted a colleague. A significant association of workplace violence was found with working multiple shifts, evening or night shift, and lack of an encouraging environment to report violence.Conclusion: Workplace violence is still a significant problem in primary care centers. The high frequency of violence together with underreporting may indicate the inefficiency of the current safety program. More safety programs and training activities for health care

  20. Instruction to the authors of the Journal of Family and Community Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Editor RBMFC

    2010-01-01

    The Journal of Family Medicine and Community RBMFC) is a quarterly publication of the Brazilian Society of Family Medicine and Community, which aims to: raise awareness among professionals and health authorities in the area of interest of Family Medicine and Community; stimulate and disseminate research on issues and Primary Health Care (PHC), enabling the exchange between academia, service and social movement organizations, to promote the dissemination of abordageminterdisciplinar and serve ...

  1. FAMNET: The Use of an Electronic Mail System in Canadian Academic Family Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostbye, Truls; Needler, M.C.; Shires, David B.

    1988-01-01

    The major Canadian universities are connected via a computer communications network called `Netnorth'. We have used Netnorth's accessible, low-cost, electronic mail system to develop a network of academic Family Medicine users (Famnet). We then tested Famnet's utility for conducting rapid surveys. Famnet shows promise of being a useful means of undertaking regular inter-departmental communication. This system may also increase collegiality among Canadian Departments of Family Medicine and facilitate international communication in family medicine. PMID:21264023

  2. The American Board of Family Medicine: New Tools to Assist Program Directors and Graduates Achieve Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozakowski, Stanley M; Pugno, Perry A

    2017-01-01

    In this commentary we review the improvements in the pass rates for first-time American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM) Certification Examination test takers in the context of new tools and resources for program directors against the backdrop of a changing accreditation system and increased competition for a relatively fixed number of graduate medical education positions in family medicine. While causality cannot be established between the strategic initiatives of the ABFM and higher pass rates, we can all celebrate the new tools and resources provided to residents and program directors, and the improved performance of family medicine graduates on the certification examination. © Copyright 2017 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  3. Medical advertising: the Family Encyclopaedia of Medicine scandal of 1914.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellinek, E H

    2008-12-01

    The past 100 years have seen a transition from a total ban in Britain on all advertising by doctors to the laity to almost total freedom of medical information, with probable benefit to public health but also a risk of loss of privacy. The Family Encyclopaedia of Medicine, written by Dr Hugh Howard Riddle and published by Lord Northcliffe's Daily Mail in 1914, started a flood of medical journalism in the press and the newer media. The lavishly advertised misattribution of its authorship to 'thirty eminent specialists', including Clifford Allbutt and William Osler, caused a major rumpus in the London Royal College of Physicians, but the fortnightly publication continued and became a four-volume book, popular with a public avid for more and more medical information.

  4. Neuro-Linguistic Programming and Its Use in Family Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenan Taştan1

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP is reprogramming the brain nerve language (or NLP means that you can program the language of your mind. NLP helps to the effective use of language in order to achieve a success behavior and provides us programs and techniques to organize the nervous system for achieving our goals which were determined before. NLP is particularly assertive in this field because of the fact that NLP takes its roots from psychotherapy (or because of the roots of NLP are based on the psychotherapy. On the other hand, due to the effect of human psychology on a person’s body and that the healing process can be modeled NLP is also used as a powerful tool in other branches of therapy. In this article it is intended to give information about the nature of NLP as it is practiced today and it’s usage in family medicine practice.

  5. Satisfaction of trainees of Saudi Diploma Family Medicine, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khaldi, Yahia M; AlDawood, Kassim M; AlKhudeer, Basima K; AlSaqqaf, Abdullah A

    2016-09-01

    This paper aims to assess trainees' satisfaction with the process and assessment aspects of the Saudi Diploma of Family Medicine (SDFM). This cross-sectional study was conducted in February 2015 among trainees undertaking the SDFM. A questionnaire was distributed to all trainees in four examination centres in Saudi Arabia, under the supervision and guidance of the investigators (four members of the scientific committee of SDFM). There was a total of 97 participants in this study, the majority of whom were Saudis. More than 85% were satisfied with most elements of training including; an adequate number and variety of patients and cases, allocating time for training, giving regular written evaluation. Satisfaction with mentoring and giving constructive feedback scored less well and trainees were less satisfied with some hospital clinical rotations, which requires further exploration.

  6. Human capital identification process: linkage for family medicine and community medicine to mobilize the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanasugarn, Chanuantong; Thongbunjob, Krid

    2012-06-01

    Community diagnosis and approach has shifted from a professional focus to a community focus. The information system has also been developed to reflect socio-cultural information. This new system has been established throughout the country and is being recorded in the computer system. However these data still lack human capital information to promote community mobilization. The present study aims to develop a process which reflects human capital from the insider and outsider points of view and which builds on the existing work system of primary care service, family medicine, and community medicine. The present study applies the participatory action research design with mixed methods including community grand-tour, household survey socio-metric questionnaire and focus group discussion in order to gather insider view of human capital. A key instrument developed in the present study is the socio-metric questionnaire which was designed according to the community grand tour and household survey results. The findings indicate that the process is feasible and the insider point of view given a longer evidence based list of the human capital. The model enhanced a closer relationship between professional and community people and suggested the realistic community mobilizer name list. Human capital identification process is feasible and should be recommended to integrate in the existing work process of the health staff in family and community practice.

  7. A Brief Boot Camp for 4th-Year Medical Students Entering into Pediatric and Family Medicine Residencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Mark; Mangold, Karen; Trainor, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    The transition from medical student to intern is a challenging process characterized by a steep learning curve. Focused courses targeting skills necessary for success as a resident have increased self-perceived preparedness, confidence, and medical knowledge. Our aim was to create a brief educational intervention for 4th-year medical students entering pediatric, family practice, and medicine/pediatric residencies to target skills necessary for an internship. The curriculum used a combination of didactic presentations, small group discussions, role-playing, facilitated debriefing, and simulation-based education. Participants completed an objective structured clinical exam requiring synthesis and application of multiple boot camp elements before and after the elective. Participants completed anonymous surveys assessing self-perceived preparedness for an internship, overall and in regards to specific skills, before the elective and after the course. Participants were asked to provide feedback about the course. Using checklists to assess performance, students showed an improvement in performing infant lumbar punctures (47.2% vs 77.0%; p 4. A focused boot camp addressing key knowledge and skills required for pediatric-related residencies was well received and led to improved performance of targeted skills and increased self-reported preparedness in many targeted domains. PMID:27014522

  8. Development and validation of a questionnaire for evaluation of students' attitudes towards family medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šter, Marija Petek; Švab, Igor; Klemenc-Ketiš, Zalika; Kersnik, Janko

    2015-03-01

    The development of the EURACT (European Academy of Teachers in General Practice) Educational Agenda helped many family medicine departments in development of clerkship and the aims and objectives of family medicine teaching. Our aims were to develop and validate a tool for assessment of students' attitudes towards family medicine and to evaluate the impact of the clerkship on students' attitudes regarding the competences of family doctor. In the pilot study, experienced family doctors were asked to describe their attitudes towards family medicine by using the Educational Agenda as a template for brainstorming. The statements were paraphrased and developed into a 164-items questionnaire, which was administered to 176 final-year students in academic year 2007/08. The third phase consisted of development of a final tool using statistical analysis, which resulted in the 60-items questionnaire in six domains which was used for the evaluation of students' attitudes. At the beginning of the clerkship, person-centred care and holistic approach scored lower than the other competences. Students' attitudes regarding the competences at the end of 7 weeks clerkship in family medicine were more positive, with exception of the competence regarding primary care management. The students who named family medicine as his or her future career choice, found holistic approach as more important than the students who did not name it as their future career. With the decision tree, which included students' attitudes to the competences of family medicine, we can successfully predict the future career choice in family medicine in 93.5% of the students. This study reports on the first attempt to develop a valid and reliable tool for measuring attitudes towards family medicine based on EURACT Educational Agenda. The questionnaire could be used for evaluating changes of students' attitudes in undergraduate curricula and for prediction of students' preferences regarding their future professional

  9. Narratives in family medicine: a global perspective: The Besrour Papers: a series on the state of family medicine in the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Christine; Woollard, Robert; Kapoor, Videsh; Ponka, David

    2017-02-01

    To explore the development of family medicine postgraduate training in countries with varying levels of resources at different stages of development of the discipline. Since 2012, the College of Family Physicians of Canada has hosted the Besrour Conferences to reflect on its role in advancing the discipline of family medicine globally. The Besrour Narrative Working Group was conceived in 2012 at the first Besrour Conference. Their mandate was to use narrative and appreciative inquiry to gather stories of family medicine worldwide. The working group comprised members of various academic departments of family medicine in Canada and abroad who attended the conferences. A consultation process with our partners from lower-middle-income countries was undertaken from 2012 to 2014. Stories were sought from each global partner institute with ties to Canadian family medicine departments. An appreciative inquiry approach was chosen to elicit narratives. Thematic analysis was used to search for common threads and important elements of success that could serve to inform other initiatives in other nations and, in turn, offer hope for greater effect. Sixteen narrative stories have been collected so far. These stories highlight insightful solutions, foresight, perseverance, and ultimately a steadfast belief that family medicine will improve the health system and the care provided to the citizens of each nation. Seventeen themes were elucidated by 3 independent Canadian readers. At a subsequent workshop, these themes were validated by Besrour Centre members from Canada and elsewhere. The linkage between the thematic analysis and the experiences of various schools helps to illustrate both the robustness and the usefulness of the narratives in exploring generalizable observations and the features supporting success in each institute. If we are to understand, and contribute to, the development of family medicine throughout the world (a key objective of the Besrour Centre), we must

  10. Report on financing the new model of family medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spann, Stephen J

    2004-12-02

    To foster redesigning the work and workplaces of family physicians, this Future of Family Medicine task force was created to formulate and recommend a financial model that sustains and promotes a thriving New Model of care by focusing on practice reimbursement and health care finances. The goals of the task force were to develop a financial model that assesses the impact of the New Model on practice finances, and to recommend health care financial policies that, if implemented, would be expected to promote the New Model and the primary medical care function in the United States for the next few decades. The members of the task force reflected a wide range of professional backgrounds and expertise. The group met in person on 2 occasions and communicated by e-mail and conference calls to achieve consensus. A marketing study was carried out using focus groups to test the concept of the New Model with consumers. External consultants with expertise in health economics, health care finance, health policy, and practice management were engaged to assist the task force with developing the microeconomic (practice level) and macroeconomic (societal level) financial models necessary to achieve its goals. Model assumptions were derived from the published medical literature, existing practice management databases, and discussions with experienced physicians and other content experts. The results of the financial modeling exercise are included in this report. The initial draft report of the findings and recommendations was shared with a reactor panel representing a broad spectrum of constituencies. Feedback from these individuals was reviewed and incorporated, as appropriate, into the final report. The practice-level financial model suggests that full implementation of the New Model of care within the current fee-for-service system of reimbursement would result in a 26% increase in compensation (from 167,457 dollars to 210,288 dollars total annual compensation) for prototypical

  11. Compensation and Production in Family Medicine by Practice Ownership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison C. Essary

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The increasing focus on high performance, patient-centered, team-based care calls for a strategy to evaluate cost-effective primary care. The trend toward physician practice consolidation further challenges the primary care health care system. Productivity measures establish provider value and help inform decision making regarding resource allocation in this evolving health care system. In this national survey of family medicine practices, physician assistant (PA productivity, as defined by mean annual patient encounters, exceeds that of both nurse practitioners (NPs and physicians in physician-owned practices and of NPs in hospital or integrated delivery system-owned practices. Total compensation, defined as salary, bonus, incentives, and honoraria for physicians, is significantly more compared to both PAs and NPs, regardless of practice ownership or productivity. Physician assistants and NPs earn equivalent compensation, regardless of practice ownership or productivity. Not only do these data support the value and role of PAs and NPs on the primary care team but also highlight differences in patient encounters between practice settings. Rural and underserved community practices, where physician-owned practices persist, also merit further consideration. Further research is needed to inform both organizational and policy decisions for the provision of high-quality, cost-effective, and accessible primary health care.

  12. Compensation and Production in Family Medicine by Practice Ownership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison C. Essary

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The increasing focus on high performance, patient-centered, team-based care calls for a strategy to evaluate cost-effective primary care. The trend toward physician practice consolidation further challenges the primary care health care system. Productivity measures establish provider value and help inform decision making regarding resource allocation in this evolving health care system. In this national survey of family medicine practices, physician assistant (PA productivity, as defined by mean annual patient encounters, exceeds that of both nurse practitioners (NPs and physicians in physician-owned practices and of NPs in hospital or integrated delivery system-owned practices. Total compensation, defined as salary, bonus, incentives, and honoraria for physicians, is significantly more compared to both PAs and NPs, regardless of practice ownership or productivity. Physician assistants and NPs earn equivalent compensation, regardless of practice ownership or productivity. Not only do these data support the value and role of PAs and NPs on the primary care team but also highlight differences in patient encounters between practice settings. Rural and underserved community practices, where physician-owned practices persist, also merit further consideration. Further research is needed to inform both organizational and policy decisions for the provision of high-quality, cost-effective, and accessible primary health care.

  13. The influence of academic discourses on medical students' identification with the discipline of family medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Charo; López-Roig, Sofía; Pawlikowska, Teresa; Schweyer, François-Xavier; Bélanger, Emmanuelle; Pastor-Mira, Maria Angeles; Hugé, Sandrine; Spencer, Sarah; Lévasseur, Gwenola; Whitehead, Ian; Tellier, Pierre-Paul

    2015-05-01

    To understand the influence of academic discourses about family medicine on medical students' professional identity construction during undergraduate training. The authors used a multiple case study research design involving international medical schools, one each from Canada, France, Spain, and the United Kingdom (UK). The authors completed the fieldwork between 2007 and 2009 by conducting 18 focus groups (with 132 students) and 67 semistructured interviews with educators and by gathering pertinent institutional documents. They carried out discursive thematic analyses of the verbatim transcripts and then performed within- and cross-case analyses. The most striking finding was the diverging responses between those at the UK school and those at the other schools. In the UK case, family medicine was recognized as a prestigious academic discipline; students and faculty praised the knowledge and skills of family physicians, and students more often indicated their intent to pursue family medicine. In the other cases, family medicine was not well regarded by students or faculty. This was expressed overtly or through a paradoxical academic discourse that stressed the importance of family medicine to the health care system while decrying its lack of innovative technology and the large workload-to-income ratio. Students at these schools were less likely to consider family medicine. These results stress the influence of academic discourses on medical students' ability to identify with the practice of family medicine. Educators must consider processes of professional identity formation during undergraduate medical training as they develop and reform medical education.

  14. Addressing holistic healthcare needs of oncology patients: Implementation and evaluation of a complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) course within an elective module designed for healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klafke, Nadja; Homberg, Angelika; Glassen, Katharina; Mahler, Cornelia

    2016-12-01

    Patients, and especially oncology patients, increasingly demand information and application of complementary therapies to supplement their conventional medical treatment and follow-up care. Due to the widespread interest in holistic treatment opportunities in oncology populations, healthcare professionals need to be prepared in differentiating evidence-based methods of the complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) spectrum and how to consult with patients about it. This paper reports on the implementation and evaluation of a newly designed module "Complementary and Alternative Medicine in oncological healthcare" in the bachelor degree program Interprofessional Health Care (B.Sc.). The study applied a developed evaluation questionnaire to capture students' perspectives on the CAM contents. This assessment instrument was administered pre and post the CAM teaching unit. Interprofessional medical education, University Hospital Heidelberg, Germany. The integration of the CAM elective module was possible and was met by positive response. Students' interest was reflected in an increase of their self-reported knowledge gain and positive CAM attitude. Comparison of pre and post evaluation data demonstrate that, particularly, students' expectations on developing their own opinion about CAM, and getting an overview of the evidence-base of different CAM methods have been met. Evaluation results indicate that the module content was in line with the students' expectations and may have positively impacted on their general CAM attitude. The results support us in continuing to offer this CAM course within the elective module to prepare today's healthcare professionals for patient-oriented healthcare delivery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A National CERA Study of the Use of Laborists in Family Medicine Residency Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldor, Robert A; Pecci, Christine Chang; Moreno, Gerardo; Van Duyne, Virginia; Potts, Stacy E

    2017-02-01

    Little is known about the impact of laborists (which we defined as "clinicians dedicated to providing L&D care services in the hospital environment for pregnant patients, regardless of who provided the prenatal care" for this survey) on family medicine residency training. We surveyed family medicine residency directors to assess characteristics about laborist services and their involvement in family medicine residency teaching. Questions were included in the 2015 Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance (CERA) survey of family medicine residency directors. Univariate statistics were used to describe programs, directors, and our questions on the use of laborists. Chi-square tests and Student's t tests were used to evaluate bivariate relationships using a P30% of their graduates included L&D care in their first practice.. Laborists have an important role in family medicine resident obstetrics training and education. More research is needed to explore how laborists and family medicine faculty can collaborate to promote enhanced efficiency and effectiveness as residency teachers.

  16. Family medicine in undergraduate medical curriculum: a cost-effective approach to health care in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Saima P

    2010-01-01

    Shifa College of Medicine introduced a two-week rotation in Family Medicine for their third-year medical students in 2008. The purpose of this study was to determine what impact it made on students and how many would consider becoming Family Physicians in future. A questionnaire-based prospective study conducted at Shifa College of Medicine, Islamabad during academic year 2008. A total of 46 students rotated in Family Medicine throughout the academic year-2008. Fifteen students were aware of Family Medicine as a specialty prior to starting their rotation, and only 3 expressed an interest to pursue Family Medicine as a future career. At the start of the rotation only 15 students were able to give correct definition of Family Medicine and on questioning whether it should be a part of the undergraduate curriculum, only 24 answered yes while the rest were unsure. After the rotation, a significant number of students (37%; p definition of Family Medicine as a humanistic approach of medicine with aim to prevent, treat and rehabilitate. About its utility in the undergraduate curriculum, 44 (96%) students believed it should be a regular feature in their curriculum, while 30 (65%) students agreed that their outlook towards patient care had changed. When asked what they learnt most during the rotation, students quoted empathy and development of communication skills. Family medicine rotation as part of undergraduate medical curriculum may help in fostering an interest among medical students in this newly emerging subspecialty which could have a profound effect on delivery of quality health care in this country.

  17. Differences in prescribing patterns for anxiety and depression between General Internal Medicine and Family Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brieler, Jay A; Scherrer, Jeffrey F; Salas, Joanne

    2015-02-01

    Depression and anxiety are routinely managed by physicians in Family Medicine (FM) or General Internal Medicine (GIM). Because FM requires more behavioral health training than GIM, we sought to determine if prescribing patterns for patients with anxiety, depression, or both differed between FM vs. GIM providers. In a cross-sectional design, patient data and provider type were obtained from 2008 to 2013 electronic medical record patient data registry (n=27,225 (FM=10,994, GIM=16,231)) Prescription orders were modeled for specific benzodiazepines and antidepressants and by drug class. Covariates included gender, age, race, marital status and comorbidity index. Separate logistic regression models were computed, before and after adjusting for covariates, to estimate the odds of FM vs. GIM providers prescribing benzodiazepine or antidepressant medication to patients with anxiety, depression, and both disorders. After adjusting for covariates, patients with anxiety alone, depression alone, and both had significantly greater odds of receiving an antidepressant (OR=2.08;95%CI:1.46-2.96, OR=2.13;95%CI:1.48-3.06, and OR=2.26;95%CI:1.09-4.66, respectively) if treated by FM vs. GIM. Benzodiazepine prescription did not differ by physician type. It is not known if results will generalize to other regions of the United States. Patients with anxiety, depression, and both seen by FM providers, as compared to GIM providers, are more likely to receive antidepressant medications. Further investigation into the determinants of these differences is warranted. Under-treatment in GIM may result in less advantageous outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparison of Patient Health History Questionnaires Used in General Internal and Family Medicine, Integrative Medicine, and Complementary and Alternative Medicine Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laube, Justin G R; Shapiro, Martin F

    2017-05-01

    Health history questionnaires (HHQs) are a set of self-administered questions completed by patients prior to a clinical encounter. Despite widespread use, minimal research has evaluated the content of HHQs used in general internal medicine and family medicine (GIM/FM), integrative medicine, and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM; chiropractic, naturopathic, and Traditional Chinese Medicine [TCM]) clinics. Integrative medicine and CAM claim greater emphasis on well-being than does GIM/FM. This study investigated whether integrative medicine and CAM clinics' HHQs include more well-being content and otherwise differ from GIM/FM HHQs. HHQs were obtained from GIM/FM (n = 9), integrative medicine (n = 11), naturopathic medicine (n = 5), chiropractic (n = 4), and TCM (n = 7) clinics in California. HHQs were coded for presence of medical history (chief complaint, past medical history, social history, family history, surgeries, hospitalizations, medications, allergies, review of systems), health maintenance procedures (immunization, screenings), and well-being components (nutrition, exercise, stress, sleep, spirituality). In HHQs of GIM/FM clinics, the average number of well-being components was 1.4 (standard deviation [SD], 1.4) compared with 4.0 (SD, 1.1) for integrative medicine (p medicine (p = 0.04), 2.0 (SD, 1.4) for chiropractic (p = 0.54), and 2.0 (SD, 1.5) for TCM (p = 0.47). In HHQs of GIM/FM clinics, the average number of medical history components was 6.4 (SD, 1.9) compared with 8.3 (SD, 1.2) for integrative medicine (p = 0.01), 9.0 (SD, 0) for naturopathic medicine (p = 0.01), 7.1 (SD, 2.8) for chiropractic (p = 0.58), and 7.1 (SD, 1.7) for TCM (p = 0.41). Integrative and naturopathic medicine HHQs included significantly more well-being and medical history components than did GIM/FM HHQs. Further investigation is warranted to determine the optimal HHQ content to support the clinical and preventive

  19. Development and Validation of Search Filters to Identify Articles on Family Medicine in Online Medical Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pols, David H J; Bramer, Wichor M; Bindels, Patrick J E; van de Laar, Floris A; Bohnen, Arthur M

    2015-01-01

    Physicians and researchers in the field of family medicine often need to find relevant articles in online medical databases for a variety of reasons. Because a search filter may help improve the efficiency and quality of such searches, we aimed to develop and validate search filters to identify research studies of relevance to family medicine. Using a new and objective method for search filter development, we developed and validated 2 search filters for family medicine. The sensitive filter had a sensitivity of 96.8% and a specificity of 74.9%. The specific filter had a specificity of 97.4% and a sensitivity of 90.3%. Our new filters should aid literature searches in the family medicine field. The sensitive filter may help researchers conducting systematic reviews, whereas the specific filter may help family physicians find answers to clinical questions at the point of care when time is limited.

  20. Lessons learned in developing family medicine residency training programs in Japan

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    Kitamura Kazuya

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While family medicine is not well established as a discipline in Japan, a growing number of Japanese medical schools and training hospitals have recently started sougoushinryoubu (general medicine departments. Some of these departments are incorporating a family medicine approach to residency training. We sought to learn from family medicine pioneers of these programs lessons for developing residency training. Methods This qualitative project utilized a long interview research design. Questions focused on four topics: 1 circumstances when becoming chair/faculty member; 2 approach to starting the program; 3 how Western ideas of family medicine were incorporated; and 4 future directions. We analyzed the data using immersion/crystallization to identify recurring themes. From the transcribed data, we selected representative quotations to illustrate them. We verified the findings by emailing the participants and obtaining feedback. Results Participants included: five chairpersons, two program directors, and three faculty members. We identified five lessons: 1 few people understand the basic concepts of family medicine; 2 developing a core curriculum is difficult; 3 start with undergraduates; 4 emphasize clinical skills; and 5 train in the community. Conclusion While organizational change is difficult, the identified lessons suggest issues that merit consideration when developing a family medicine training program. Lessons from complexity science could inform application of these insights in other countries and settings newly developing residency training.

  1. The Effects of Abortion Training on Family Medicine Residents' Clinical Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summit, Aleza K; Gold, Marji

    2017-01-01

    RHEDI, Reproductive Health Education in Family Medicine, offers technical assistance and funding to family medicine residency programs to support integrated opt-out abortion and reproductive health training for residents. This study assessed the impact of this enhanced training on residents' reproductive health experience. Investigator-developed pre- and post-surveys were administered online to 214 residents at 12 family medicine residency programs before and after their RHEDI training experience. Surveys addressed experience in contraception and abortion, attitudes around abortion provision, and post-residency intentions. Descriptive statistics were generated, and statistical tests were performed to assess changes after training. Surveys had a 90% response rate. After the RHEDI enhanced reproductive health rotation, residents reported increased experience in contraception provision, early pregnancy ultrasound, aspiration and medication abortion, and miscarriage management. After training, residents with experience in IUD insertion increased from 85% to 99%, and contraceptive implant insertion experience rose from 60% to 85%. Residents who had performed any abortions increased from 15% to 79%, and self-rated competency in abortion increased. Finally, almost all residents agreed that early abortion was within the scope of family medicine, and training confirmed residents' intentions to provide reproductive health services after residency. Integrated training in reproductive health, with an emphasis on abortion, increases residents' experience and underscores their understanding of the role of these services in family medicine. Increasing the number of family medicine residency programs that offer this training could help prepare family physicians to meet their patients' needs for reproductive health services.

  2. Geriatric core competencies for family medicine curriculum and enhanced skills: care of elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Lesley; Triscott, Jean A C; Dobbs, Bonnie M; McKay, Rhianne

    2014-06-01

    There is a growing mandate for Family Medicine residency programs to directly assess residents' clinical competence in Care of the Elderly (COE). The objectives of this paper are to describe the development and implementation of incremental core competencies for Postgraduate Year (PGY)-I Integrated Geriatrics Family Medicine, PGY-II Geriatrics Rotation Family Medicine, and PGY-III Enhanced Skills COE for COE Diploma residents at a Canadian University. Iterative expert panel process for the development of the core competencies, with a pre-defined process for implementation of the core competencies. Eighty-five core competencies were selected overall by the Working Group, with 57 core competencies selected for the PGY-I/II Family Medicine residents and an additional 28 selected for the PGY-III COE residents. The core competencies follow the CanMEDS Family Medicine roles. Both sets of core competencies are based on consensus. Due to demographic changes, it is essential that Family Physicians have the required skills and knowledge to care for the frail elderly. The core competencies described were developed for PGY-I/II Family Medicine residents and PGY-III Enhanced Skills COE, with a focus on the development of geriatric expertise for those patients that would most benefit.

  3. Training Family Medicine Residents to Perform Home Visits: A CERA Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sairenji, Tomoko; Wilson, Stephen A; D'Amico, Frank; Peterson, Lars E

    2017-02-01

    Home visits have been shown to improve quality of care, save money, and improve outcomes. Primary care physicians are in an ideal position to provide these visits; of note, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education no longer requires home visits as a component of family medicine residency training. To investigate changes in home visit numbers and expectations, attitudes, and approaches to training among family medicine residency program directors. This research used the Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance (CERA) national survey of family medicine program directors in 2015. Questions addressed home visit practices, teaching and evaluation methods, common types of patient and visit categories, and barriers. There were 252 responses from 455 possible respondents, representing a response rate of 55%. At most programs, residents performed 2 to 5 home visits by graduation in both 2014 (69% of programs, 174 of 252) and 2015 (68%, 172 of 252). The vast majority (68%, 172 of 252) of program directors expect less than one-third of their graduates to provide home visits after graduation. Scheduling difficulties, lack of faculty time, and lack of resident time were the top 3 barriers to residents performing home visits. There appeared to be no decline in resident-performed home visits in family medicine residencies 1 year after they were no longer required. Family medicine program directors may recognize the value of home visits despite a lack of few formal curricula.

  4. Long-term evaluation of undergraduate family medicine curriculum in Slovenia

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    Švab Igor

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction In 1994, as a result of curriculum reform, the Ljubljana medical school established its first department of family medicine and introduced its first curriculum of family medicine. The new subject was well accepted by the students and the medical school. Nevertheless, there was no comprehensive analysis of the curriculum during this period. Objective Our aims were to assess the quality of teaching based on fulfilled expectations, pre-defined learning objectives and satisfaction in a 10-year period, and to measure changes in career preference towards family medicine. Method An analysis of two sets of questionnaires, routinely given to medical students in academic years 1997/1998 and 2006/2007, was made. Results Most of the students' expectations were met, and the level increased over ten years. The level of achievement of learning objectives has been high and increased over the ten-year period. Family medicine still receives high scores in students' satisfaction. Although there is evidence that the family medicine curriculum is well accepted and that it improves some of the attitudes towards family medicine, it does not influence the career choice of students. Conclusion The level of achievement of learning objectives increased with the experiences of the teachers. We improved the attitude of medical students toward general practice and general practitioners. We have not been successful in influencing career choice of students, which is an objective that is probably outside our reach.

  5. A Family Medicine Health Technology Strategy for Achieving the Triple Aim for US Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Robert L; Bazemore, Andrew W; DeVoe, Jennifer E; Weida, Thomas J; Krist, Alex H; Dulin, Michael F; Biagioli, Frances E

    2015-09-01

    Health information technology (health IT) and health technology, more broadly, offer tremendous promise for connecting, synthesizing, and sharing information critical to improving health care delivery, reducing health system costs, and achieving personal and community health. While efforts to spur adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) among US practices and hospitals have been highly successful, aspirations for effective data exchanges and translation of data into measureable improvements in health outcomes remain largely unrealized. There are shining examples of health enhancement through new technologies, and the discipline of family medicine is well poised to take advantage of these innovations to improve patient and population health. The Future of Family Medicine led to important family medicine health IT initiatives over the past decade. For example, the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) Center for Health Information Technology and the Robert Graham Center provided important leadership for informing health IT policy and standard-setting, such as the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services EHR incentives programs (often referred to as "meaningful use."). As we move forward, there is a need for a new and more comprehensive family medicine strategy for technology. To inform the Family Medicine for America's Health (FMAHealth) initiative, this paper explores strategies and tactics that family medicine could pursue to improve the utility of technology for primary care and to help primary care become a leader in rapid development, testing, and implementation of new technologies. These strategies were also designed with a broader stakeholder audience in mind, intending to reach beyond the work being done by FMAHealth. Specific suggestions include: a shared primary care health IT center, meaningful primary care quality measures and capacity to assess/report them, increased primary care technology research, a national family medicine registry

  6. [Preoperative evaluation of adult patients prior to elective, non-cardiac surgery: joint recommendations of German Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, German Society of Surgery and German Society of Internal Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    Evaluation of the patient's medical history and a physical examination are the cornerstones of risk assessment prior to elective surgery and may help to optimize the patient's preoperative medical condition and to guide perioperative management. Whether the performance of additional technical tests (e.g. blood chemistry, ECG, spirometry, chest-x-ray) can contribute to a reduction of perioperative risk is often not very well known or controversial. Similarly, there is considerable uncertainty among anesthesiologists, internists and surgeons with respect to the perioperative management of the patient's long-term medication. Therefore, the German Scientific Societies of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (DGAI), Internal Medicine (DGIM) and Surgery (DGCH) have joined to elaborate and publish recommendations on the preoperative evaluation of adult patients prior to elective, non-cardiac and non-lung resection surgery. In the first part the general principles of preoperative evaluation are described (part A). The current concepts for extended evaluation of patients with known or suspected major cardiovascular disease are presented in part B. Finally, the perioperative management of patients' long-term medication is discussed (part C). The concepts proposed in these interdisciplinary recommendations endorsed by the DGAI, DGIM and DGCH provide a common basis for a structured preoperative risk assessment and management. These recommendations aim to ensure that surgical patients undergo a rational preoperative assessment and at the same time to avoid unnecessary, costly and potentially dangerous testing. The joint recommendations reflect the current state-of-the-art knowledge as well as expert opinions because scientific-based evidence is not always available. These recommendations will be subject to regular re-evaluation and updating when new validated evidence becomes available.

  7. [Preoperative evaluation of adult patients prior to elective, non-cardiac surgery. Joint recommendations of German Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, German Society of Surgery and German Society of Internal Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Evaluation of the patient's medical history and a physical examination are the cornerstones of risk assessment prior to elective surgery and may help to optimize the patient's preoperative medical condition and to guide perioperative management. Whether the performance of additional technical tests (e.g. blood chemistry, ECG, spirometry, chest-x-ray) can contribute to a reduction of perioperative risk is often not very well known or controversial. Similarly, there is considerable uncertainty among anesthesiologists, internists and surgeons with respect to the perioperative management of the patient's long-term medication. Therefore, the German Scientific Societies of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (DGAI), Internal Medicine (DGIM) and Surgery (DGCH) have joined to elaborate and publish recommendations on the preoperative evaluation of adult patients prior to elective, non-cardiac and non-lung resection surgery. In the first part the general principles of preoperative evaluation are described (part A). The current concepts for extended evaluation of patients with known or suspected major cardiovascular disease are presented in part B. Finally, the perioperative management of patients' long-term medication is discussed (part C). The concepts proposed in these interdisciplinary recommendations endorsed by the DGAI, DGIM and DGCH provide a common basis for a structured preoperative risk assessment and management. These recommendations aim to ensure that surgical patients undergo a rational preoperative assessment and at the same time to avoid unnecessary, costly and potentially dangerous testing. The joint recommendations reflect the current state-of-the-art knowledge as well as expert opinions because scientific-based evidence is not always available. These recommendations will be subject to regular re-evaluation and updating when new validated evidence becomes available.

  8. [Preoperative evaluation of adult patients before elective, noncardiothoracic surgery : Joint recommendation of the German Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, the German Society of Surgery, and the German Society of Internal Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwissler, B

    2017-06-01

    Evaluation of the patient's medical history and a physical examination are the cornerstones of risk assessment prior to elective surgery and may help to optimize the patient's preoperative medical condition and to guide perioperative management. Whether the performance of additional technical tests (e. g. blood chemistry, ECG, spirometry, chest x‑ray) can contribute to a reduction of perioperative risk is often not very well known or is controversial. Similarly, there is considerable uncertainty among anesthesiologists, internists and surgeons with respect to the perioperative management of the patient's long-term medication. Therefore, the German Scientific Societies of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (DGAI), Internal Medicine (DGIM) and Surgery (DGCH) have joined to elaborate recommendations on the preoperative evaluation of adult patients prior to elective, noncardiothoracic surgery, which were initially published in 2010. These recommendations have now been updated based on the current literature and existing international guidelines. In the first part the general principles of preoperative evaluation are described (part A). The current concepts for extended evaluation of patients with known or suspected major cardiovascular disease are presented in part B. Finally, the perioperative management of patients' long-term medication is discussed (part C). The concepts proposed in these interdisciplinary recommendations endorsed by the DGAI, DGIM and DGCH provide a common basis for a structured preoperative risk assessment and management. These recommendations aim to ensure that surgical patients undergo a rational preoperative assessment and at the same time to avoid unnecessary, costly and potentially dangerous testing. The joint recommendations reflect the current state-of-the-art knowledge as well as expert opinions because scientific-based evidence is not always available. These recommendations will be subject to regular re-evaluation and

  9. Solidarity in family medicine in Brazil and in Italy: reflecting on ethical issues and contemporary challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita de Cássia Gabrielli Souza Lima

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reflects on solidarity in the practice of family medicine in two realities. The objective is to search for solidarity as an ethical principle in the relationship between family doctor and subject. It is a descriptive exploratory research carried out in Florianópolis, state of Santa Catarina, Brazil, and in the Province of Rome, Lazio Region, Italy. It included fourteen Brazilian family doctors and fifteen Italian family doctors. The theoretical framework consisted of Pierre Bourdieu's theory of Symbolic Power. The results show the importance of the role of the family doctor in the materialization of this ethical principle, as a spokesman for scientific knowledge and as an agent of a State policy. Solidarity was understood within distinct domains and the discursive productions also demonstrated the negation of solidarity in such practice. Globalization proved to be a contemporary challenge for an ethical practice of family medicine that is marked by solidarity.

  10. Family medicine in Denmark: Are there lessons for Botswana and Africa?

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    Vincent Setlhare

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Family medicine is a new specialty in Botswana and many African countries and its definitionand scope are still evolving. In this region, healthcare is constrained by resource limitation andinefficiencies in resource utilisation. Experiences in countries with good health indicators canhelp inform discussions on the future of family medicine in Africa. Observations made duringa visit to family physicians (FPs in Denmark showed that the training of FPs, the practice offamily medicine and the role of support staff in a family practice were often different andsometimes unimaginable by African standards. Danish family practices were friendly andenmeshed in an egalitarian and efficient health system, which is supported by an effectiveinformation technology network. There was a lot of task shifting and nurses and clerical staffattended to simple or uncomplicated aspects of patient care whilst FPs attended to morecomplicated patient problems. Higher taxation and higher health expenditure seemed toundergird the effective health system. An egalitarian relationship amongst patients andhealthcare workers (HCW may help improve patient care in Botswana. Task shifting shouldbe formalised, and all sectors of primary healthcare should have fast and effective informationtechnology systems. HCW training and roles should be revised. Higher health expenditure isnecessary to achieve good health indicators.Keywords: task shifting, Family Medicine, Family Physician, Denmark, health expenditure, egalitarian

  11. [USE OF COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE AMONG FAMILY MEDICINE PATIENTS--EXAMPLE OF THE TOWN OF ČAKOVEC].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Ksenija; Munđar, Roko; Sović, Slavica; Bergman-Marković, Biserka; Janev Holcer, Nataša

    2014-12-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is widespread around the world including Croatia. The number of studies that investigate both quantitative and qualitative use of CAM in Croatia is limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of CAM among family medicine patients in the town of Čakovec and the rate they report it to their family doctor. This was a cross-sectional study in a sample of 300 patients that visited primary health center for any reason. We used anonymous questionnaire already employed in a previous investigation (Čižmešija et al. 2008), which describes socioeconomic characteristics, modalities of CAM use, and reasons for use. We also added questions on the type of herbs used and use of over-the-counter vitamin and mineral supplements. On data analysis we used descriptive statistics, χ2-test and Fisher's exact test, while the level of statistical significance was set at p ≤ 0.05. The response rate was 76%. Out of the total number of patients, 82% used some modality of CAM. Women, patients with secondary school education, employed and retired persons used CAM more often. Students and pupils reported least use of CAM. The most commonly used were herbs (87%), bioenergy (29%), diet therapy (28%), chiropractics (22%), and homeopathy and acupuncture (11% each). Vitamin and mineral supplements were used by 77% of study subjects. CAM was most frequently used for respiratory, urinary and musculoskeletal problems, as well as to improve overall health condition. Of the respondents that reported CAM use, 55% believed it would help them, 43% used it because they wanted to try something new, while only 2% indicated dissatisfaction with their physician as the reason for using CAM. Statistically, there were more subjects that used CAM and did not notify their family doctor about it, which could indicate poor communication between family doctors and health care users. Our results are consistent with a previous quantitative study

  12. Election Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Erich

    2012-01-01

    Kids learn by doing, which, experts agree, is the only real way to teach citizenship. This article presents election-year activities that stress action. These activities will show students what it means to be a good citizen. (Contains 6 online resources.)

  13. Cancer Risk Assessment by Rural and Appalachian Family Medicine Physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Kimberly M.; Love, Margaret M.; Pearce, Kevin A.; Porter, Kyle; Barron, Mary A.; Andrykowski, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Context: Challenges to the identification of hereditary cancer in primary care may be more pronounced in rural Appalachia, a medically underserved region. Purpose: To examine primary care physicians' identification of hereditary cancers. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was mailed to family physicians in the midwestern and southeastern United…

  14. A Problem-Solving Oral Examination for Family Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wart, Arthur D.

    1974-01-01

    The College of Family Physicians of Canada has used in its certification examination a new type of structured problem-solving examination called the Formal Oral. A series of preselected problem areas such as the complaint, relevant data base, investigation, and treatment are scored by two examiners. (Editor/PG)

  15. Cancer Risk Assessment by Rural and Appalachian Family Medicine Physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Kimberly M.; Love, Margaret M.; Pearce, Kevin A.; Porter, Kyle; Barron, Mary A.; Andrykowski, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Context: Challenges to the identification of hereditary cancer in primary care may be more pronounced in rural Appalachia, a medically underserved region. Purpose: To examine primary care physicians' identification of hereditary cancers. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was mailed to family physicians in the midwestern and southeastern United…

  16. The challenge of training for family medicine across different contexts: Insights from providing training in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Sandars

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Physicians with expertise in providing training for family medicine, at both undergraduate level and postgraduate level, are frequently invited to run training workshops in countries with developing systems of family medicine but this approach is often a challenge for the incoming external trainers. There are general challenges in working across different contexts, especially cultural factors, the different approaches to training, including the aims, methods, and assessment, and additional organizational factors, influenced by the wider sociopolitical environment of the host country. Practical responses to these challenges are discussed, with relevance to both external trainers and those responsible for requesting training. This commentary contains insights from the experiences of the authors in providing training for family medicine in China.

  17. Closing the door on pharma? A national survey of family medicine residencies regarding industry interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugh-Berman, Adriane; Brown, Steven R; Trippett, Rachel; Bell, Alicia M; Clark, Paige; Fleg, Anthony; Siwek, Jay

    2011-05-01

    To assess the extent and type of interactions U.S. family medicine residencies permit industry to have with medical students and residents. In 2008, the authors e-mailed a four-question survey to residency directors or coordinators at all 460 accredited U.S. family medicine residencies concerning the types of industry support and interaction permitted. The authors conducted quantitative and qualitative analyses of survey responses and written comments. Residencies that did not permit any industry food, gifts, samples, or support of residency activities were designated "pharma-free." The survey response rate was 62.2% (286/460). Among responding family medicine residencies, 52.1% refused drug samples, 48.6% disallowed industry gifts or food, 68.5% forbade industry-sponsored residency activities, and 44.1% denied industry access to students and residents at the family medicine center. Seventy-five residencies (26.2%) were designated as "pharma-free." Medical-school-based and medical-school-administered residencies were no more likely than community-based residencies to be pharma-free. Among the 211 programs that permitted interaction, 68.7% allowed gifts or food, 61.1% accepted drug samples, 71.1% allowed industry representatives access to trainees in the family medicine center, and 37.9% allowed industry-sponsored residency activities. Respondents commented on challenges inherent to limiting industry interactions. Many programs noted recent changes in plans or practices. Most family medicine residencies limit industry interaction with trainees. Because industry interactions can have adverse effects on rational prescribing, residency programs should assess the benefits and harms of these relationships. Copyright © by the Association of American medical Colleges.

  18. Argentine folk medicine: genotoxic effects of Chenopodiaceae family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadano, A B; Gurni, A A; Carballo, M A

    2006-01-16

    Chenopodium ambrosioides L. and Chenopodium multifidum L. (Chenopodiaceae), common name: Paico, are medicinal plants. They are aromatic shrubs growing in South America. For centuries, they have been used due to its medicinal properties. However, there are few reports in literature about the genotoxic effects of these plants. There for, the aim of these work is the evaluation of genetic damage induced by decoction and infusion of this plants which were assayed in different concentrations (1, 10, 100, 1,000 microL extract/mL culture), by addition of the extract to human lymphocyte cell cultures, negative controls were included. The endpoints evaluated were chromosomal aberrations (CA), sister chromatid exchanges (SCE), cell proliferation kinetics (CPK) and mitotic index (MI). The repeated measure analysis of variance was used for statistic evaluation of the results. The results showed: (a) statistical increase in the percentage of cells with CA and in the frequency of SCE when cultures were exposed to both aromatic plants, (b) a decrease in MI of both Paicos assayed, although no modification in the CPK values was observed, (c) no effect was noticed in the analysis of Chenopodium album L., which was used as negative control of the essential oil. These results suggest a cyto and genotoxic effect of Chenopodium ambrosioides and Chenopodium multifidum aqueous extracts related to the essential oil of the plant (as Chenopodium album did not perform).

  19. Electronic Elections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schürmann, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    Electronic voting technology is a two edged sword. It comes with many risks but brings also many benefits. Instead of flat out rejecting the technology as uncontrollably dangerous, we advocate in this paper a different technological angle that renders electronic elections trustworthy beyond...... the usual levels of doubt. We exploit the trust that voters currently have into the democratic process and model our techniques around that observation accordingly. In particular, we propose a technique of trace emitting computations to record the individual steps of an electronic voting machine...... for a posteriori validation on an acceptably small trusted computing base. Our technology enables us to prove that an electronic elections preserves the voter’s intent, assuming that the voting machine and the trace verifier are independent....

  20. A Significant Number of Charter Diplomates Participate in American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM) Maintenance of Certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puffer, James C

    2015-01-01

    Considerable controversy about the value of participating in Maintenance of Certification has recently arisen within the medical community. Despite this controversy, large numbers of family physicians certified by the American Board of Family Medicine participate in Maintenance of Certification for Family Physicians. Surprisingly, a small but significant number of charter diplomats--those initially certified by the American Board of Family Medicine at its founding--are engaged in the process.

  1. An ethnomedicinal survey of cucurbitaceae family plants used in the folk medicinal practices of Bangladesh 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Rahmatullah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Cucurbitaceae family comprising about 125 genera and 960 species is a family that is further characterized by commonly having five-angled stems and coiled tendrils and is also known as gourd family of flowering plants. Plant species belonging to this family have a worldwide distribution, but most species can be found in tropical and subtropical countries. A number of the plants belonging to this family have reported important pharmacological activities. Cucurbitaceae family plants are also in use in the folk medicinal system of Bangladesh-a traditional medicinal system, which mainly relies on medicinal plants for treatment of diverse ailments. Aims: Since folk medicinal practitioners form the first tier of primary health care in Bangladesh, the objective of this study was to conduct ethnomedicinal surveys among 75 folk medicinal practitioners (Kavirajes practicing among the mainstream Bengali-speaking population of randomly selected 75 villages in 64 districts of Bangladesh and 8 tribal practitioners (1 each from 8 major indigenous communities or tribes, namely, Bede, Chakma, Garo, Khasia, Marma, Murong, Santal, and Tripura of the country. Materials and Methods: Surveys were carried out with the help of a semi-structured questionnaire and the guided field-walk method. Results: It was observed that the folk and tribal medicinal practitioners use a total of 19 Cucurbitaceae family species for treatment of ailments such as dysentery, diabetes, edema, skin disorders, leukoderma, hypertension, jaundice, typhoid, spleen disorders, respiratory problems, leprosy, rheumatoid arthritis, chicken pox, and cancer. The 19 species of Cucurbitaceae family plants in use were Benincasa hispida, Bryonopsis laciniosa, Citrullus colocynthis, Citrullus lanatu, Coccinia grandis, Cucumis melo, Cucumis sativus, Cucurbita maxima, Cucurbita pepo, Hodgsonia macrocarpa, Lagenaria vulgaris, Luffa acutangula, Luffa cylindrica, Momordica charantia, Momordica

  2. Student perceptions of reproductive health education in US medical schools: a qualitative analysis of students taking family planning electives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Veazey, Kathryn; Nieuwoudt, Claudia; Gavito, Christina; Tocce, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    .... Despite the importance of family planning (FP) care, many medical schools do not currently offer formal education in this area, and students are unable to meet associated competency standards prior to graduation...

  3. Family medicine training in sub-Saharan Africa: South-South cooperation in the Primafamed project as strategy for development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flinkenflögel, Maaike; Essuman, Akye; Chege, Patrick; Ayankogbe, Olayinka; De Maeseneer, Jan

    2014-08-01

    Health-care systems based on primary health care (PHC) are more equitable and cost effective. Family medicine trains medical doctors in comprehensive PHC with knowledge and skills that are needed to increase quality of care. Family medicine is a relatively new specialty in sub-Saharan Africa. To explore the extent to which the Primafamed South-South cooperative project contributed to the development of family medicine in sub-Saharan Africa. The Primafamed (Primary Health Care and Family Medicine Education) project worked together with 10 partner universities in sub-Saharan Africa to develop family medicine training programmes over a period of 2.5 years. A SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats) analysis was done and the training development from 2008 to 2010 in the different partner universities was analysed. During the 2.5 years of the Primafamed project, all partner universities made progress in the development of their family medicine training programmes. The SWOT analysis showed that at both national and international levels, the time is ripe to train medical doctors in family medicine and to integrate the specialty into health-care systems, although many barriers, including little awareness, lack of funding, low support from other specialists and reserved support from policymakers, are still present. Family medicine can play an important role in health-care systems in sub-Saharan Africa; however, developing a new discipline is challenging. Advocacy, local ownership, action research and support from governments are necessary to develop family medicine and increase its impact. The Primafamed project showed that development of sustainable family medicine training programmes is a feasible but slow process. The South-South cooperation between the ten partners and the South African departments of family medicine strengthened confidence at both national and international levels. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  4. Family medicine training in sub-Saharan Africa: South–South cooperation in the Primafamed project as strategy for development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flinkenflögel, Maaike; Essuman, Akye; Chege, Patrick; Ayankogbe, Olayinka; De Maeseneer, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Background. Health-care systems based on primary health care (PHC) are more equitable and cost effective. Family medicine trains medical doctors in comprehensive PHC with knowledge and skills that are needed to increase quality of care. Family medicine is a relatively new specialty in sub-Saharan Africa. Objective. To explore the extent to which the Primafamed South–South cooperative project contributed to the development of family medicine in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods. The Primafamed (Primary Health Care and Family Medicine Education) project worked together with 10 partner universities in sub-Saharan Africa to develop family medicine training programmes over a period of 2.5 years. A SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats) analysis was done and the training development from 2008 to 2010 in the different partner universities was analysed. Results. During the 2.5 years of the Primafamed project, all partner universities made progress in the development of their family medicine training programmes. The SWOT analysis showed that at both national and international levels, the time is ripe to train medical doctors in family medicine and to integrate the specialty into health-care systems, although many barriers, including little awareness, lack of funding, low support from other specialists and reserved support from policymakers, are still present. Conclusions. Family medicine can play an important role in health-care systems in sub-Saharan Africa; however, developing a new discipline is challenging. Advocacy, local ownership, action research and support from governments are necessary to develop family medicine and increase its impact. The Primafamed project showed that development of sustainable family medicine training programmes is a feasible but slow process. The South–South cooperation between the ten partners and the South African departments of family medicine strengthened confidence at both national and international levels. PMID:24857843

  5. Breaking bad news: structured training for family medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungar, Lea; Alperin, Mordechai; Amiel, Gilad E; Beharier, Zvi; Reis, Shmuel

    2002-09-01

    Previous research has shown that physicians experience incompetence and difficulty in dealing with patients' feelings after they have broken bad news to them. During the past 10 years, we have implemented a longitudinal training program targeting these issues. The present article describes this training and discusses its contribution to doctors' skills at approaching distressed patients. In order to cope with breaking bad news to patients and their families, physicians should be skilled at crisis intervention and communication techniques. They should also be aware of their personal attitudes and emotional reactions when breaking bad news. Each session encompassed these areas, as well as the most prominent issues arising when breaking bad news. In a 1-5 Likert scale, the course received an overall score of 4.47 (S.D. 0.51). Participants noted that they had gained relevant communication skills for future patient encounters.

  6. The aquaporin family of water channel proteins in clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M D; King, L S; Agre, P

    1997-05-01

    The aquaporins are a family of membrane channel proteins that serve as selective pores through which water crosses the plasma membranes of many human tissues and cell types. The sites where aquaporins are expressed implicate these proteins in renal water reabsorption, cerebrospinal fluid secretion and reabsorption, generation of pulmonary secretions, aqueous humor secretion and reabsorption, lacrimation, and multiple other physiologic processes. Determination of the aquaporin gene sequences and their chromosomal locations has provided insight into the structure and pathophysiologic roles of these proteins, and primary and secondary involvement of aquaporins is becoming apparent in diverse clinical disorders. Aquaporin-1 (AQP1) is expressed in multiple tissues including red blood cells, and the Colton blood group antigens represent a polymorphism on the AQP1 protein. AQP2 is restricted to renal collecting ducts and has been linked to congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in humans and to lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and fluid retention from congestive heart failure in rat models. Congenital cataracts result from mutations in the mouse gene encoding the lens homolog Aqp0 (Mip). The present understanding of aquaporin physiology is still incomplete; identification of additional members of the aquaporin family will affect future studies of multiple disorders of water distribution throughout the body. In some tissues, the aquaporins may participate in the transepithelial movement of fluid without being rate limiting, so aquaporins may be involved in clinical disorders without being causative. As outlined in this review, our challenge is to identify disease states in which aquaporins are involved, to define the aquaporins' roles mechanistically, and to search for ways to exploit this information therapeutically.

  7. Patterns of relating between physicians and medical assistants in small family medicine offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Nancy C; Jacobson, C Jeffrey; Bolon, Shannon K; Fixler, Joseph; Pallerla, Harini; Busick, Christina; Gerrety, Erica; Kinney, Dee; Regan, Saundra; Pugnale, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The clinician-colleague relationship is a cornerstone of relationship-centered care (RCC); in small family medicine offices, the clinician-medical assistant (MA) relationship is especially important. We sought to better understand the relationship between MA roles and the clinician-MA relationship within the RCC framework. We conducted an ethnographic study of 5 small family medicine offices (having career motivations and clinician-MA relationships. MA career motivations comprised interest in health care, easy training/workload, and customer service orientation. Clinician-MA relationships were influenced by how MAs and clinicians respond to their perceptions of MA clinical competence (illustrated predominantly by comparing MAs with nurses) and organizational structure. We propose a model, trust and verify, to describe the structure of the clinician-MA relationship. This model is informed by clinicians' roles in hiring and managing MAs and the social familiarity of MAs and clinicians. Within the RCC framework, these findings can be seen as previously undefined constraints and freedoms in what is known as the Complex Responsive Process of Relating between clinicians and MAs. Improved understanding of clinician-MA relationships will allow a better appreciation of how clinicians and MAs function in family medicine teams. Our findings may assist small offices undergoing practice transformation and guide future research to improve the education, training, and use of MAs in the family medicine setting.

  8. Acting as Standardized Patients Enhances Family Medicine Residents' Self-Reported Skills in Palliative Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittikariyakul, Pat; Jaturapatporn, Darin; Kirshen, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Recent publications have confirmed the use of standardized patients (SPs) in improving clinical skills and enhancing competency. Little research has studied the benefits residents may themselves gain in palliative care playing the role of SPs. Nineteen Family Medicine residents were recruited as standardized patients (FMR-SPs) for a mandatory…

  9. Development and Validation of Search Filters to Identify Articles on Family Medicine in Online Medical Databases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pols, D.H.; Bramer, W.M.; Bindels, P.J.; Laar, F.A. van de; Bohnen, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Physicians and researchers in the field of family medicine often need to find relevant articles in online medical databases for a variety of reasons. Because a search filter may help improve the efficiency and quality of such searches, we aimed to develop and validate search filters to identify

  10. Development and validation of search filters to identify articles on family medicine in online medical databases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.H.J. Pols (David); W.M. Bramer (Wichor); P.J.E. Bindels (Patrick J.E.); F.A. van de Laar (Floris A.); A.M. Bohnen

    2015-01-01

    textabstractPhysicians and researchers in the field of family medicine often need to find relevant articles in online medical databases for a variety of reasons. Because a search filter may help improve the efficiency and quality of such searches, we aimed to develop and validate search filters to

  11. Palliative medicine fellows attend to compassion fatigue using John Stone's 'Talking to the Family'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groninger, Hunter

    2015-04-01

    For graduate medical education trainees, as well as contemporary practitioners, developing skills in recognizing compassion fatigue and practising self-care is vital to professional sustainability. The field of palliative medicine is no exception. In our fellowship programme, we use John Stone's poem, 'Talking to the Family,' to engage trainees in a professional development workshop on personal experiences and strategies for self-care.

  12. Multi-Source Evaluation of Interpersonal and Communication Skills of Family Medicine Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Kai-Kuen; Wang, Wei-Dan; Chen, Yen-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    There is a lack of information on the use of multi-source evaluation to assess trainees' interpersonal and communication skills in Oriental settings. This study is conducted to assess the reliability and applicability of assessing the interpersonal and communication skills of family medicine residents by patients, peer residents, nurses, and…

  13. Development and Validation of Search Filters to Identify Articles on Family Medicine in Online Medical Databases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pols, D.H.; Bramer, W.M.; Bindels, P.J.; Laar, F.A. van de; Bohnen, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Physicians and researchers in the field of family medicine often need to find relevant articles in online medical databases for a variety of reasons. Because a search filter may help improve the efficiency and quality of such searches, we aimed to develop and validate search filters to identify rese

  14. Development and validation of search filters to identify articles on family medicine in online medical databases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.H.J. Pols (David); W.M. Bramer (Wichor M); P.J.E. Bindels (Patrick J.E.); F.A. van de Laar (Floris A.); A.M. Bohnen

    2015-01-01

    textabstractPhysicians and researchers in the field of family medicine often need to find relevant articles in online medical databases for a variety of reasons. Because a search filter may help improve the efficiency and quality of such searches, we aimed to develop and validate search filters to i

  15. Views and Experiences of Malaysian Family Medicine Trainees of Female Sexual Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Pauline Siew Mei; Tan, Sing Yee; Liew, Su May

    2016-11-01

    Sociocultural factors have been shown to be important influencers of sexual health and sexuality. Hence, the aim of our study was to explore the views and experiences of family medicine trainees regarding female sexual dysfunction (FSD) with a focus on the barriers and facilitators towards the initiation of conversation on this topic. A qualitative study design involving semi-structured focus group discussions (FGDs) was conducted with 19 family medicine trainees in Malaysia. The conceptual framework used was based on the Theory of Planned Behavior. Thematic approach was used to analyze the data. Participants perceived FSD as being uncommon and unimportant. According to our participants, patients often presented with indirect complaints, and doctors were not proactive in asking about FSD. Three main barriers were identified: doctor factors, perceived patient factors, and system factors. Lack of confidence, knowledge, experience, time, and embarrassment were the key barriers identified at the doctors' level. Lack of awareness, among patients regarding FSD, and local cultural and religious norms were the perceived patient barriers. System barriers were lack of time and privacy. Various facilitators, such as continuous medical education and public forums, were suggested as means to encourage family medicine trainees to initiate discussion on sexual matters during consultations. In conclusion, family medicine trainees found it difficult to initiate conversation on FSD with patients. Interventions to encourage conversation on FSD should target this and other identified barriers.

  16. Monetary Value of a Prescription Assistance Program Service in a Rural Family Medicine Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, Heather P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the monetary value of medications provided to rural Alabamians through provision of pharmaceutical manufacturer-sponsored prescription assistance programs (PAPs) provided by a clinical pharmacist in a private Black Belt family medicine clinic during 2007 and 2008. Methods: Patients struggling to afford prescription medications…

  17. Clinical Poems and Clinical Conversations: Some Thoughts on Working with Family Medicine Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Howard F.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes an experiment in which Family Medicine residents composed, read, and discussed their poems as a way of bringing to life their often complex relationships with patients. It argues that this approach mobilizes the physicians' own creativity in the service of reflective practice and improved doctor-patient relationships. This…

  18. Evolution of family medicine in Kenya (1990s to date): a case study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PM Chege

    1999-08-26

    Aug 26, 1999 ... PM Chegea*, J Pennerb, P Godoy-Ruizc, V Kapoorb, J Rodasc and K Rouleauc ... bDepartment of Family Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada ..... Ssenyonga gives a Ugandan history of FM development that .... 2.5. Under-five mortality rate (per 1 000 live births). 73. 48. Maternal ...

  19. Teaching wound care to family medicine residents on a wound care service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Little SH

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Sahoko H Little,1,2 Sunil S Menawat,1,3 Michael Worzniak,1 Michael D Fetters2 1Oakwood Annapolis Family Medicine Residency, Wayne, Michigan, USA; 2University of Michigan, Department of Family Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA; 3Ghent Family Medicine Residency, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia, USA Abstract: Primary care physicians often care for patients with chronic wounds, and they can best serve patients if they have knowledge and proficient skills in chronic wound care, including sharp debridement. The Oakwood Annapolis Family Medicine Residency in Michigan, USA developed a Wound Care Service, incorporating wound care training during the surgical rotation. Effectiveness of the wound care training was evaluated through pre- and posttesting of residents, to assess changes in knowledge and comfort in treating chronic wounds. The results demonstrate significant improvement in residents’ knowledge and comfort in wound care. This innovation demonstrates the feasibility of educating residents in chronic wound care through hands-on experience. Keywords: wound care education, primary care, residency education, surgery rotation, curriculum development

  20. Family Medicine Maternity Care Call to Action: Moving Toward National Standards for Training and Competency Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Susanna R; Eidson-Ton, W Suzanne; Leeman, Larry; Tuggy, Michael; Kim, Thomas O; Nothnagle, Melissa; Breuner, Joseph; Loafman, Mark

    2017-03-01

    Maternity care is an integral part of family medicine, and the quality and cost-effectiveness of maternity care provided by family physicians is well documented. Considering the population health perspective, increasing the number of family physicians competent to provide maternity care is imperative, as is working to overcome the barriers discouraging maternity care practice. A standard that clearly defines maternity care competency and a systematic set of tools to assess competency levels could help overcome these barriers. National discussions between 2012 and 2014 revealed that tools for competency assessment varied widely. These discussions resulted in the formation of a workgroup, culminating in a Family Medicine Maternity Care Summit in October 2014. This summit allowed for expert consensus to describe three scopes of maternity practice, draft procedural and competency assessment tools for each scope, and then revise the tools, guided by the Family Medicine and OB/GYN Milestones documents from the respective residency review committees. The summit group proposed that achievement of a specified number of procedures completed should not determine competency; instead, a standardized competency assessment should take place after a minimum number is performed. The traditionally held required numbers for core procedures were reassessed at the summit, and the resulting consensus opinion is proposed here. Several ways in which these evaluation tools can be disseminated and refined through the creation of a learning collaborative across residency programs is described. The summit group believed that standardization in training will more clearly define the competencies of family medicine maternity care providers and begin to reduce one of the barriers that may discourage family physicians from providing maternity care.

  1. The role of family therapists in veterinary medicine: opportunities for clinical services, education, and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafen, McArthur; Rush, Bonnie R; Reisbig, Allison M J; McDaniel, Kara Z; White, Mark B

    2007-04-01

    Marriage and family therapists (MFTs) are applying their specific skill set in a variety of arenas. A new area for collaboration is veterinary medicine. The veterinary medical profession is emphasizing the importance of non-biomedical skills such as communication skills, acknowledging that human clientele are likely to view their pets as family members, and discussing veterinarian personal well-being. Each of these trends has clear application for intervention by MFTs. A discussion of how MFTs may be uniquely positioned to assist veterinary medicine is presented. An example of collaboration between MFT and veterinary medicine at Kansas State University is highlighted. Recommendations are made for development of effective educational relationships and possible private sector collaborations.

  2. Aromatic Medicinal Plants of the Lamiaceae Family from Uzbekistan: Ethnopharmacology, Essential Oils Composition, and Biological Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilufar Z. Mamadalieva

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Plants of the Lamiaceae family are important ornamental, medicinal, and aromatic plants, many of which produce essential oils that are used in traditional and modern medicine, and in the food, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industry. Various species of the genera Hyssopus, Leonurus, Mentha, Nepeta, Origanum, Perovskia, Phlomis, Salvia, Scutellaria, and Ziziphora are widespread throughout the world, are the most popular plants in Uzbek traditional remedies, and are often used for the treatment of wounds, gastritis, infections, dermatitis, bronchitis, and inflammation. Extensive studies of the chemical components of these plants have led to the identification of many compounds, as well as essentials oils, with medicinal and other commercial values. The purpose of this review is to provide a critical overview of the literature surrounding the traditional uses, ethnopharmacology, biological activities, and essential oils composition of aromatic plants of the family Lamiaceae, from the Uzbek flora.

  3. Developing a curriculum framework for global health in family medicine: emerging principles, competencies, and educational approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Briana

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recognizing the growing demand from medical students and residents for more comprehensive global health training, and the paucity of explicit curricula on such issues, global health and curriculum experts from the six Ontario Family Medicine Residency Programs worked together to design a framework for global health curricula in family medicine training programs. Methods A working group comprised of global health educators from Ontario's six medical schools conducted a scoping review of global health curricula, competencies, and pedagogical approaches. The working group then hosted a full day meeting, inviting experts in education, clinical care, family medicine and public health, and developed a consensus process and draft framework to design global health curricula. Through a series of weekly teleconferences over the next six months, the framework was revised and used to guide the identification of enabling global health competencies (behaviours, skills and attitudes for Canadian Family Medicine training. Results The main outcome was an evidence-informed interactive framework http://globalhealth.ennovativesolution.com/ to provide a shared foundation to guide the design, delivery and evaluation of global health education programs for Ontario's family medicine residency programs. The curriculum framework blended a definition and mission for global health training, core values and principles, global health competencies aligning with the Canadian Medical Education Directives for Specialists (CanMEDS competencies, and key learning approaches. The framework guided the development of subsequent enabling competencies. Conclusions The shared curriculum framework can support the design, delivery and evaluation of global health curriculum in Canada and around the world, lay the foundation for research and development, provide consistency across programmes, and support the creation of learning and evaluation tools to align with the

  4. Developing a curriculum framework for global health in family medicine: emerging principles, competencies, and educational approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Recognizing the growing demand from medical students and residents for more comprehensive global health training, and the paucity of explicit curricula on such issues, global health and curriculum experts from the six Ontario Family Medicine Residency Programs worked together to design a framework for global health curricula in family medicine training programs. Methods A working group comprised of global health educators from Ontario's six medical schools conducted a scoping review of global health curricula, competencies, and pedagogical approaches. The working group then hosted a full day meeting, inviting experts in education, clinical care, family medicine and public health, and developed a consensus process and draft framework to design global health curricula. Through a series of weekly teleconferences over the next six months, the framework was revised and used to guide the identification of enabling global health competencies (behaviours, skills and attitudes) for Canadian Family Medicine training. Results The main outcome was an evidence-informed interactive framework http://globalhealth.ennovativesolution.com/ to provide a shared foundation to guide the design, delivery and evaluation of global health education programs for Ontario's family medicine residency programs. The curriculum framework blended a definition and mission for global health training, core values and principles, global health competencies aligning with the Canadian Medical Education Directives for Specialists (CanMEDS) competencies, and key learning approaches. The framework guided the development of subsequent enabling competencies. Conclusions The shared curriculum framework can support the design, delivery and evaluation of global health curriculum in Canada and around the world, lay the foundation for research and development, provide consistency across programmes, and support the creation of learning and evaluation tools to align with the framework. The process used to

  5. Developing a curriculum framework for global health in family medicine: emerging principles, competencies, and educational approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redwood-Campbell, Lynda; Pakes, Barry; Rouleau, Katherine; MacDonald, Colla J; Arya, Neil; Purkey, Eva; Schultz, Karen; Dhatt, Reena; Wilson, Briana; Hadi, Abdullahel; Pottie, Kevin

    2011-07-22

    Recognizing the growing demand from medical students and residents for more comprehensive global health training, and the paucity of explicit curricula on such issues, global health and curriculum experts from the six Ontario Family Medicine Residency Programs worked together to design a framework for global health curricula in family medicine training programs. A working group comprised of global health educators from Ontario's six medical schools conducted a scoping review of global health curricula, competencies, and pedagogical approaches. The working group then hosted a full day meeting, inviting experts in education, clinical care, family medicine and public health, and developed a consensus process and draft framework to design global health curricula. Through a series of weekly teleconferences over the next six months, the framework was revised and used to guide the identification of enabling global health competencies (behaviours, skills and attitudes) for Canadian Family Medicine training. The main outcome was an evidence-informed interactive framework http://globalhealth.ennovativesolution.com/ to provide a shared foundation to guide the design, delivery and evaluation of global health education programs for Ontario's family medicine residency programs. The curriculum framework blended a definition and mission for global health training, core values and principles, global health competencies aligning with the Canadian Medical Education Directives for Specialists (CanMEDS) competencies, and key learning approaches. The framework guided the development of subsequent enabling competencies. The shared curriculum framework can support the design, delivery and evaluation of global health curriculum in Canada and around the world, lay the foundation for research and development, provide consistency across programmes, and support the creation of learning and evaluation tools to align with the framework. The process used to develop this framework can be applied

  6. Family medicine in Denmark: Are there lessons for Botswana and Africa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setlhare, Vincent

    2016-03-30

    Family medicine is a new specialty in Botswana and many African countries and its definitionand scope are still evolving. In this region, healthcare is constrained by resource limitation andinefficiencies in resource utilisation. Experiences in countries with good health indicators canhelp inform discussions on the future of family medicine in Africa. Observations made duringa visit to family physicians (FPs) in Denmark showed that the training of FPs, the practice offamily medicine and the role of support staff in a family practice were often different andsometimes unimaginable by African standards. Danish family practices were friendly andenmeshed in an egalitarian and efficient health system, which is supported by an effectiveinformation technology network. There was a lot of task shifting and nurses and clerical staffattended to simple or uncomplicated aspects of patient care whilst FPs attended to morecomplicated patient problems. Higher taxation and higher health expenditure seemed toundergird the effective health system. An egalitarian relationship amongst patients andhealthcare workers (HCW) may help improve patient care in Botswana. Task shifting shouldbe formalised, and all sectors of primary healthcare should have fast and effective informationtechnology systems. HCW training and roles should be revised. Higher health expenditure isnecessary to achieve good health indicators.

  7. How Many Graduating Family Medicine Residents Have Chosen Financial Support for Service Commitments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Julie; Peterson, Lars E; Fang, Bo; Kovar-Gough, Iris; Phillips, Robert L

    2017-09-01

    New family physicians have opportunities to avoid accruing educational debt or have loans repaid by making a commitment to public service. Little information is available about the numbers of early career family physicians who have made service commitments to fund their education. The purpose of this study is to describe the proportion of graduating family medicine residents who have enrolled in US military and National Health Service Corps (NHSC) scholarship and loan repayment programs, thus obligating them to future public service. The study was a secondary analysis of de-identified data from the 2014 and 2015 American Board of Family Medicine examination registration questionnaire, which is required of all residents applying for board certification. Descriptive statistics were used to indicate the numbers and proportions of respondents who indicated military or NHSC financial support. Chi square analyses were used to analyze differences between groups. Of the 6,231 residents studied, 271 (4.4%) had either obtained military support (n=191, 3.1%) or enrolled in the NHSC (n=80, 1.3%). More men had enrolled in the military than women (4.2% vs 2.2%, P<0.01), but there was no significant NHSC gender difference. Underrepresented minorities (URM) were twice as likely to have enrolled in NHSC as non-URM residents (2.5% vs 1.0%, P<0.01). Only a small fraction of graduating family medicine residents have used either military enrollment or NHSC scholarships to fund their education. Family medicine should advocate strongly for expansion of the NHSC scholarship program, which receives many more applications than it can support.

  8. Complementary and alternative medicine use by visitors to rural Japanese family medicine clinics: results from the international complementary and alternative medicine survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumer, Gregory; Warber, Sara; Motohara, Satoko; Yajima, Ayaka; Plegue, Melissa; Bialko, Matthew; Iida, Tomoko; Sano, Kiyoshi; Amenomori, Masaki; Tsuda, Tsukasa; Fetters, Michael D

    2014-09-25

    There is growing interest in the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) throughout the world, however previous research done in Japan has focused primarily on CAM use in major cities. The purpose of this study was to develop and distribute a Japanese version of the International Complementary and Alternative Medicine Questionnaire (I-CAM-Q) to assess the use of CAM among people who visit rural Japanese family medicine clinics. Using a Japanese version of the International Complementary and Alternative Medicine Questionnaire (I-CAM-Q), a cross-sectional survey was conducted in three rural family medicine clinics. All patients and those accompanying patients who met inclusion criteria were eligible to participate. Data were entered into SPSS Statistics and analyzed for use by age, gender, and location. Of the 519 respondents who participated in the project, 415 participants reported CAM use in the past 12 months (80.0%). When prayer is excluded, the prevalence of CAM use drops to 77.3% in the past year, or 403 respondents. The most common forms of CAM used by respondents were pain relief pads (n = 170, 32.8%), herbal medicines/supplements (n = 167, 32.2%), and massage by self or family (n = 166, 32.0%). Female respondents, individuals with higher levels of education, and those with poorer overall health status were more likely to use CAM than respondents without these characteristics. Only 22.8% of CAM therapies used were reported to physicians by survey participants. These data indicate that CAM use in rural Japan is common. The results are consistent with previous studies that show that Japanese individuals are more interested in forms of CAM such as pain relief pads and massage, than in mind-body forms of CAM like relaxation and meditation. Due to the high utilization of certain CAM practices, and given that most CAM users do not disclose their CAM use to their doctors, we conclude that physicians in rural Japan would benefit by asking about CAM use

  9. The Future of Family Medicine version 2.0: reflections from Pisacano scholars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doohan, Noemi C; Duane, Marguerite; Harrison, Bridget; Lesko, Sarah; DeVoe, Jennifer E

    2014-01-01

    The Future of Family Medicine (FFM) project has helped shape and direct the evolution of primary care medicine over the past decade. Pisacano Scholars, a group of leaders in family medicine supported by the American Board of Family Medicine, gathered for a 2-day symposium in April 2013 to explore the history of the FFM project and outline a vision for the next phase of this work-FFM version 2.0 (v2.0). After learning about the original FFM project (FFM v1.0), the group held interactive discussions using the World Café approach to conversational leadership. This commentary summarizes the discussions and highlights major themes relevant to FFM v2.0 identified by the group. The group endorsed the FFM v1.0 recommendations as still relevant and marvelled at the progress made toward achieving many of those goals. Most elements of FFM v1.0 have moved forward, and some have been incorporated into policy blueprints for reform. Now is the time to refocus attention on facets of FFM v1.0 not yet realized and to identify key aspects missing from FFM v1.0. The Pisacano Scholars are committed to moving the FFM goals forward and hope that this expression of the group's vision will help to do so.

  10. ocial representation of family support for diabetic patients in users of a family medicine unit in Chalco, State of Mexico

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    Alejandra Rodríguez Torres

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE The goal of this study is to compare and interpret the meaning of family support for diabetic patients and their families using social representations according to a structural approach of Abric’s theory. METHODS The study was carried out in a Family Medicine Center of the Chalco Municipality in Mexico State. The population studied comprised ten diabetic patient-family pairs. The first part of the study was a simple word association test that aimed to find terms or statements related to the concept of “family support”, as well as its frequency of appearance and range of association. Once the terms or statements were obtained, they were categorized according to their “support” capabilities. A semi-structured interview for each category was conducted as well as a graphic analysis of Friedman’s meanings. The discourse of diabetic patients was compared to that of the families in order to find similarities and differences. RESULTS Evocation of terms was done in the first part of the study, and it was found that the emotional domain was central to the discourse. However, in the second part of the study, when categorization and analysis of discourse is performed, there are differences in the centrality of terms and statements. The family tends to center in the active domain, whereas the patient centers in the emotional domain. CONCLUSIONS This study brings up the emotional needs of the patient as essential components of support efforts. This promotes reflection about changing strategies in the design of public healthcare programs in that they may include family support from the viewpoint of otherness.

  11. [Social representation of family support for diabetic patients in users of a family medicine unit in Chalco, State of Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Alejandra; Camacho, Esteban Jaime; Escoto, María Del Consuelo; Contreras, Georgina; Casas, Donovan

    2014-08-27

    The goal of this study is to compare and interpret the meaning of family support for diabetic patients and their families using social representations according to a structural approach of Abric's theory. The study was carried out in a Family Medicine Center of the Chalco Municipality in Mexico State. The population studied comprised ten diabetic patient-family pairs. The first part of the study was a simple word association test that aimed to find terms or statements related to the concept of "family support", as well as its frequency of appearance and range of association. Once the terms or statements were obtained, they were categorized according to their "support" capabilities. A semi-structured interview for each category was conducted as well as a graphic analysis of Friedman's meanings. The discourse of diabetic patients was compared to that of the families in order to find similarities and differences. Evocation of terms was done in the first part of the study, and it was found that the emotional domain was central to the discourse. However, in the second part of the study, when categorization and analysis of discourse is performed, there are differences in the centrality of terms and statements. The family tends to center in the active domain, whereas the patient centers in the emotional domain. This study brings up the emotional needs of the patient as essential components of support efforts. This promotes reflection about changing strategies in the design of public healthcare programs in that they may include family support from the viewpoint of otherness.

  12. The extent of familial hypercholesterolemia instruction in US schools and colleges of medicine, pharmacy, and osteopathic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withycombe, Bethany; Winden, Janae C; Hassanyn, Reem; Duell, P Barton; Ito, Matthew K

    2015-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a common autosomal codominant disease characterized by extreme plasma cholesterol concentrations and high risk of early heart disease. FH is underdiagnosed and severely undertreated. This may be due in part to gaps in FH education within medical and pharmacy training programs. To assess the extent to which FH is covered in professional curriculums in accredited schools and colleges of medicine, pharmacy, and osteopathic medicine in the United States. An 18-question survey was distributed via e-mail to 288 US schools and colleges of medicine, pharmacy, and osteopathic medicine. Fifty-six of 288 (19.4%) programs responded to the survey. Three were excluded from analysis because of lack of program accreditation and FH instruction. Overall, 43% indicated that FH instruction at their respective institution was perceived to be adequate. More than 90% of the programs indicated that the following topics were covered within the curriculum: FH pathophysiology; associated morbidity and mortality; guideline-recommended low-density lipoprotein cholesterol goals and risk factor management; consequences of poor lipid management; and the screening, diagnosis, and treatment of adult patients. However, instruction was lacking for FH screening methods as one-third of the programs covered cascade screening and only half of the programs reported distinguishing between heterozygous and homozygous FH including differences in treatment approach. The results suggested important gaps in the coverage of FH in the curriculum, and strategies need to be developed to ensure that FH instruction is sufficient within these professional programs. Copyright © 2015 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Dimensions and singularities of Family and Community Medicine

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    Armando Henrique Norman

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A edição nº 24 da Revista Brasileira de Medicina de Família e Comunidade (RBMFC traz importantes temas a nossa reflexão, tanto para a Estratégia Saúde da Família (ESF - quanto à sua efetividade e abrangência - como para a especialidade em Medicina de Família e Comunidade (MFC, visto que apresenta temas que nos distinguem de outras áreas da biomedicina. A primeira temática poderia ser definida enquanto o potencial da ESF para a produção de saúde no Brasil. Um exemplo é o artigo Desempenho de indicadores nos municípios com alta cobertura da Estratégia Saúde da Família no Estado de São Paulo que destaca como alguns municípios desse Estado apresentam melhores resultados com relação aos indicadores pactuados, quando comparados com municípios que não expandiram a cobertura da ESF. A segunda temática resgata aspectos centrais da especialidade em MFC. Apesar da morte e sofrimento serem comuns a todas as especialidades médicas, na MFC, em particular, ela é problematizada na relação médico-paciente e nos programas de formação, como, por exemplo, na ferramenta Ciclo de vida1. Nesta ferramenta, a morte se destaca como uma das crises normativas que marcam a existência, visto que nela se encerra o drama do sofrimento e da condição humana2. Assim, o artigo Crying Patients in General/Family Practice: incidence, reasons for encounter and health problems resgata o potencial do MFC para ressignificar o sofrimento humano através do cuidado personalizado e longitudinal dos pacientes. Quais os significados das lágrimas? Estamos preparados para um aprofundamento nesta dimensão do cuidado? Esses matizes da profissão do MFC também se descortinam no caso clínico intitulado Ser Médico de (sua Família. Nele, o autor explora os limites da ética e da relação profissional-familiar ao contextualizar a tomada de decisão frente ao processo de cuidado, adoecimento e morte de um membro da família. Entretanto, a morte ainda segue

  14. Delayed elective surgery in a major teaching hospital in Uganda

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    Kajja I

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Isaac Kajja,1 Cees Th Smit Sibinga21Department of Orthopedics, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda; 2ID Consulting for International Development of Transfusion Medicine (IDTM, Groningen, The NetherlandsBackground: A number of factors come into play in determining the timing of an elective surgical intervention, particularly in the developing world. The present study explores the factors that contribute to the timing of elective surgery and patients' opinions on their quality of life as they wait for surgery.Methods: We followed adult patients with delayed elective surgical interventions (n=204. The causes for the delay and, particularly, the influence of blood shortage on the timing of the procedure were noted. Patients' perceptions on their quality of life as they waited for surgery were also noted.Results: We were able to establish a cause for delayed elective surgery in 133 patients. Shortage of operating space was the leading cause of surgery delay in 44 patients, while blood shortage followed closely in 40 patients. The higher the amount of blood ordered for use in the perioperative time, the longer the delay to surgery (P=0.001. Patients waiting for surgery had a low opinion of their in-hospital quality of life. Here, the key indicators included the threat of losing a job, limited family time, and an increase in day-to-day living costs.Conclusion: Blood shortage is the second most common cause of the delayed performance of elective surgical interventions in our institution. The patients have a low opinion on their quality of life as they wait for surgery.Keywords: blood shortage, delayed elective surgery, quality of life

  15. Making the 2007-2010 Action Plan work for women in family medicine in the Asia Pacific

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    Coles Jan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Wonca Working Party for Women and Family Medicine (WWPWFM was organized in 2001 with the following objectives: to identify the key issues for women doctors; to review Wonca policies and procedures for equity and transparency; to provide opportunities to network at meetings and through the group's listserve and website; and to promote women doctors' participation in Wonca initiatives. In October 2008, at the Asia Pacific Regional conference, the Wonca Working Party on Women in Family Medicine (WWPWFM held a preconference day and conference workshops, building on the success and commitment to initiatives which enhance women's participation in Wonca developed in Ontario, Canada (2006 and at the Singapore World Congress (2007. At this meeting fifty women workshopped issues for women in Family Medicine in the Asia Pacific. Using the Action Plan formulated in Singapore (2007 the participants identified key regional issues and worked towards a solution. Key issues identified were professional issues, training in family medicine and women's health. Solutions were to extend the understanding of women's contributions to family medicine, improved career pathways for women in family medicine and improving women's participation in practices, family medicine organizations and academic meetings.

  16. Teaching maternity care in family medicine residencies: what factors predict graduate continuation of obstetrics? A 2013 CERA program directors study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Mary Beth; Prasad, Ramakrishna; Roberts, Mary B; Magee, Susanna R

    2015-06-01

    Maternity care is an essential component of family medicine, yet the number of residency graduates providing this care continues to decline. Residency programs have struggled to identify strategies to increase continuation of obstetric practice among graduates. Leaders in family medicine obstetrics previously proposed a tiered model of training to ensure adequate volume for those desiring to continue maternity care upon graduation. However, whether this approach will be successful is unknown. This study aimed to identify program characteristics and teaching methods that may influence residents to continue obstetrics practice upon graduation. A nationwide survey of family medicine residency program directors (PDs) was conducted as part of the 2013 CERA survey to characterize teaching in maternity care and identify program-level predictors of graduate continuation of obstetrics (OB). Family medicine programs, which were community-based, university-affiliated programs in the Midwest and West, contributed more trainees who continued to provide OB care upon graduation. Trainees at these programs received greater supervision by family medicine faculty preceptors on labor and delivery, reported at least 80 deliveries by graduates during residency, and experienced greater autonomy in decision-making during OB rotations. This study supports a targeted approach to teaching maternity care in family medicine residency programs. Prioritizing continuity delivery experiences and fostering resident independence are strategies toward promoting increased provision of obstetric care by family medicine graduates. Further research is needed to evaluate the impact of tiered or track systems in practice.

  17. The relationship between marriage and family therapists and complementary and alternative medicine approaches: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Karen L; Winek, Jon L; Becvar, Dorothy S

    2006-01-01

    Respondents to a mail survey of a random sample (N = 424) of Clinical Members of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy provided information about their contexts of practice, use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), and relationships with CAM providers. Consistent with both national trends and the experience of psychologists as reported in a similar survey, the results of this survey suggest that marriage and family therapists have been affected significantly by and have a growing awareness of CAM practices. Limitations of the study and implications for the field are discussed.

  18. E-Learning in family medicine education: faculty support in a community clerkship

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    Gensichen, Jochen

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available E-learning was planned as a test for medical students within their curriculum of family medicine. A multi-modular online-offer specific to the target group accompanies the 10th term medical students during their peripheral practical courses in family practices. Teaching objectives are as follows: (1 Introduction into e-learning, (2 clinical general medicine - online-module, (3 chronic care online-module, (4 online-application. The systematic evaluation shows that e-learning promotes the communication of students both among themselves and with the university during their practical courses. On the basis of the experiences from this pilot test the combination with more traditional teaching methods (blended learning seems to be a promising option for medical education.

  19. The Declaration of Alma Ata on its 30th anniversary: relevance for family medicine today.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hixon, Allen L; Maskarinec, Gregory G

    2008-09-01

    The Declaration of Alma Ata, issued on September 12, 1978, provides a moral vision for primary care that remains valuable today at a time of transformation of the specialty of family medicine. The Declaration asserts a comprehensive definition of health that recognizes health as a fundamental human right, argues persuasively that gross inequalities in health status are politically, socially, and economically unacceptable, and identifies primary health care as the key to improving health and reducing health status inequalities. The values of Alma Ata can guide the specialty of family medicine to lead positive health system change through renewed collaboration, addressing inequalities, efficient use of resources and appropriate technology, and advocacy in the spirit of social justice.

  20. Sherbrooke - Montevideo: a socially responsible international collaboration to foster family medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Martine; Grand'Maison, Paul; Henderson, Eduardo; Vignolo, Julio

    2014-01-01

    The World Health Organization advocates for faculties of medicine to orient health professional education toward the needs of the populations graduates are to serve and to include a greater emphasis on primary health care. It was in this framework that in 2007, the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences at the Université de Sherbrooke (FMHS-UdeS) in Canada and the Facultad de Medicina de la Universidad de la Republica (FMUdelaR) in Montevideo, Uruguay developed a comprehensive collaboration to sustain the development of family medicine in both universities through education, practice and research. ACTIVITIES AND OUTCOMES: In addition to information sharing through email and teleconferencing, this five year collaboration has included 28 bilateral visits by the two institutions' teachers and leaders. During these visits, Uruguayan members participated in workshops and benefited from exchanges during educational and clinical activities. Interactions led to the improvement of their skills as teachers of family medicine with an emphasis on clinical teaching, supervision, feedback to learners in clinical evaluations, use of various educational methods, use of standardized patients for teaching and evaluation, and research. FMHS-UdeS members learned about the community aspects of family medicine in Uruguay and reflected on how these could be implemented to the benefit of Canadians. The international collaboration forged between the FMHS-UdeS and the FMUdelaR represents a socially responsible endeavor that has been highly rewarding for all involved. It represents a significant learning opportunity for each group aiming to better prepare physicians to serve as primary health care providers in their communities.

  1. Personal values of exemplary family physicians: implications for professional satisfaction in family medicine.

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    Eliason, B C; Schubot, D B

    1995-09-01

    Personal social values have been identified as important determinants of generalists' specialty choice. However, the personal values or "guiding principles" of generalist physicians have not been identified scientifically. To establish a benchmark, we measured the personal values of exemplary family physicians because they serve as role models for current and future physicians. We also explored the relationship between personal values and practice satisfaction. We obtained a list of 330 family physicians nominated for the American Academy of Family Physicians' (AAFP) Family Doctor of the Year award for the years 1988 through 1993. We asked them to complete the Schwartz Values Questionnaire, a 56-item instrument for measuring personal values. They also answered three questions concerning practice satisfaction. The return rate was 83%. The physicians' mean age was 63 years. They had been in practice an average of 34 years, 93% were male, and 52% practiced in rural areas. Honesty was rated as the most important of the 56 values, and social power as the least important. Of the 10 value types (groups of common values), the responding physicians rated "Benevolence" as most important and "Power" as least important. Practice satisfaction correlated positively with the Benevolence value type (r = .21, P = .001) and negatively with the Power value type (r = -.15, P = .023). Of the 10 value types, Benevolence was rated the most important and Power the least important by exemplary family physicians, and both value types also correlated, positively and negatively, respectively, with their practice satisfaction. These results have implications for the selection, training, and career satisfaction of generalist physicians.

  2. Federal Research Funding for Family Medicine: Highly Concentrated, with Decreasing New Investigator Awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Brianna J; Bazemore, Andrew W; Morley, Christopher P

    2016-01-01

    A small proportion of National Institutes of Health and other federal research funding is received by university departments of family medicine, the largest primary care specialty. That limited funding is also concentrated, with roughly a quarter of all National Institutes of Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality funding awarded to 3 departments, almost half of that funding coming from 3 agencies, and a recent trend away from funding for new investigators.

  3. The effect of simulation training on PALS skills among family medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerard, James M; Thomas, Scott M; Germino, Kevin W; Street, Megan H; Burch, Wesley; Scalzo, Anthony J

    2011-06-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires that family medicine residents receive structured skills training on pediatric advanced life support (PALS) and should learn procedures for medical emergencies in patients of all ages. Traditional methods of training family medicine residents in PALS is challenging given their limited clinical exposure to critically ill patients. The primary objective of this study was to assess the effect of a 2-hour PALS training session utilizing high-fidelity mannequins on residents' psychomotor skills performances. Between February and June 2009, residents from two urban family medicine residency programs received training on four PALS procedures (bag-mask ventilation, tracheal intubation, intraosseous line placement, and cardiac rhythm assessment/defibrillation) at a university simulation center. Residents completed questionnaires to provide data on previous resuscitation training and experience. We collected self-confidence data and video recordings of residents performing the procedures before and after training. To assess retention at 6 months, we collected self-confidence data and video recordings of PGY-1 and PGY-2 residents performing the procedures. A blinded reviewer scored the video recordings. Forty-seven residents completed the study. The majority of residents (53.2%) had never performed any of the procedures on a real patient. Immediately following skills training, mean overall performance improved from 39.5% (± 11.5%) to 76.5% (± 10.4%), difference 37.0% (95% CI, 33.5%--40.6%). Bag-mask ventilation and intraosseous insertion skills remained above baseline at 6-month follow-up. Simulation training is beneficial for teaching PALS procedures to family medicine residents.

  4. New family medicine residency training programme: Residents’ perspectives from the University of Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tshitenge, Stephane; Setlhare, Vincent; Tsima, Billy; Adewale, Ganiyu; Parsons, Luise

    2016-01-01

    Background Family Medicine (FM) training is new in Botswana. No previous evaluation of the experiences and opinions of residents of the University of Botswana (UB) Family Medicine training programme has been reported. Aims This study explored and assessed residents’ experiences and satisfaction with the FM training programme at the UB and solicited potential strategies for improvement from the residents. Methods A descriptive survey using a self-administered questionnaire based on a Likert-type scale and open-ended questions was used to collect data from FM residents at the UB. Results Eight out the 14 eligible residents participated to this study. Generally, residents were not satisfied with the FM training programme. Staff shortage, inadequate supervision and poor programme organisation by the faculty were the main reasons for this. However, the residents were satisfied with weekly training schedules and the diversity of patients in the current training sites. Residents’ potential solutions included an increase in staff, the acquisition of equipment at teaching sites and emphasis on FM core topics teachings. They had different views regarding how certain future career paths will be. Conclusions Despite the general dissatisfaction among residents because of challenges faced by the training programme, we have learnt that residents are capable of valuable inputs for improvement of their programme when engaged. There is need for the Department of Family Medicine to work with the Ministry of Health to set a clear career pathway for future graduates and to reflect on residents’ input for possible implementation.

  5. Qualitative Evaluation of Theses Written in area of Family Medicine in Turkey

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    Yaman H et al.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to evaluate qualitatively thesis written in Family medicine and to investigate their status of citation and publication as article.Material and Method: the descriptive and cross-sectional included 140 thesis, indexed by ULAKBIM, in area of Family Medicine written between 1981 and 2008 according to status of their citation and publication as article were analyzed as regards of their subjects, date of presentation and publication, study type and place in which to be written were registered in the study. To access data of thesis, ULAKBIM, SCI, CINAHL, Google and PUBMED was screened. Keywords such as “family medicine”, “primary care”, “family practitioner” have been used during the search.Results: Average page of thesis was 82.9±37.0 (19-258. Majority of manager for thesis was academic degree of professor. It was found that several theses were associated with other areas of specialization. Theses were usually designed as descriptive, cross-sectional and observational. Of 140 theses, 15 ones were indexed by international publication. Three different articles in SCI were cited four times until date of present study. When evaluating date of thesis according to years, it peaked in 1999 (27; 19.3% and 2007 (25; 17.9%. Conclusion: Although discipline of Family Medicine was not achieved to come at targets, it was considered that thesis preparation and writing was able with association and cooperation with other medical department disciples. However, it was considered that majority of thesis was not published as article.

  6. How to rationally use information diagnostic technologies in family and general medicine practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivić, Suad; Masic, Izet; Petkovic, Darko; Huseinagic, Senad; Tandir, Salih; Zunic, Lejla

    2009-01-01

    NONE DECLARED New discoveries in technology indeed enabled significant improvement of health care in the last three decades. Only during the last few years a significant breakthrough is achieved in the field of antiviral drugs, biotechnology, digital diagnostic technology, molecular diagnosis, tissues and organs transplantation as well as surgical and information technologies, which all contributed to the improvement of health care. Rapid growth of medical technology has led to the increase in costs of health care, increased access to these technologies and improvement of health care that is permanently encouraging the further development of technology. Technology encompasses the skills, knowledge and ability to understand, use and create useful things. It is the practical application of knowledge. Evaluation of health technology is the systematic evaluation of characteristics, results or impact of health technologies. The primary purpose of evaluation is to provide information to responsible parties for the technology in the health care system, which will be used in decision-making and introduction of these technologies. Information technology in medicine and health care represents all medical and health technology in the process of work, monitoring and evaluation done using computer technology. Progress of medical science in recent years especially needs to thank to the development of information technologies. The health care system of Bosnia and Herzegovina is currently operating in the two sub-systems of primary health care. One is inherited from the past system, in which the primary health care is provided by general practitioners, specialists in general practice, as well as gynecologists, pediatricians and pulmologists, and the second subsystem occurs when in PHC is introduced the system of family medicine doctors and family medicine specialists. Family medicine, based on the concept of orientation towards the methods which are more effective, rational and

  7. Satisfaction with Family Physicians and Specialists and the use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Israel

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    Amir Shmueli

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Higher utilization of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM is commonly explained by dissatisfaction or disappointment with conventional medical treatment. To explore, at two points in time in Israel, the associations between six domains of satisfaction (attitude, length of visits, availability, information sharing, perceived quality of care and overall with conventional family physicians' and specialists' services and the likelihood of consulting CAM providers. This is a secondary analysis of interviews, which were conducted with 2000 persons in 1993 and 2500 persons in 2000, representing the Israeli Jewish urban population aged 45–75 in those years. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used in the investigation. In 1993, users of CAM were less satisfied than non-users with both family physicians' and specialists' care. Lower satisfaction with the attitude of, the amount of information sharing by and in general with family physicians, and with the length of visits and perceived quality of care of specialists were significantly associated with CAM use. In 2000, lower satisfaction with specialists' attitude, length of visits, availability and in general was significantly related to the use of CAM. Lower satisfaction with family physicians and specialists is significantly associated with consulting CAM providers. However, with CAM becoming a mainstream medical care specialty in its own, lower satisfaction with conventional medicine specialists becomes the most important factor.

  8. Striving for excellence: developing a framework for the Triple C curriculum in family medicine education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Colla J; McKeen, Martha; Wooltorton, Eric; Boucher, Francois; Lemelin, Jacques; Leith-Gudbranson, Donna; Viner, Gary; Pullen, Judi

    2012-10-01

    Postgraduate medical education programs will need to be restructured in order to respond to curriculum initiatives promoted by the College of Family Physicians of Canada. To develop a framework for the Triple C Competency-based Curriculum that will help provide residents with quality family medicine (FM) education programs. The Family Medicine Curriculum Framework (FMCF) incorporates the 4 principles of FM, the CanMEDs-FM roles, the Triple C curriculum principles, the curriculum content domains, and the pedagogic strategies, all of which support the development of attitudes, knowledge, and skills in postgraduate FM training programs. The FMCF was an effective approach to the development of an FM curriculum because it incorporated not only core competencies of FM health education but also contextual educational values, principles, and dynamic learning approaches. In addition, the FMCF provided a foundation and quality standard to designing, delivering, and evaluating the FM curriculum to ensure it met the needs of FM education stakeholders, including preceptors, residents, and patients and their families.

  9. Development and professional qualification of general practice and family medicine in Germany

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    Markus Herrmann

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This article aims to analyze the professional and faculty development of general practice and family medicine (GP/FM in Germany and discuss its facing challenges. Methods: It is a case study identifying characteristics and potential intervention tools, describing training and qualification requirements in family medicine in Germany. Results: The traditional caring role of GP in Germany has a long history, but GP has no gatekeeper function, which weakens its position in the system. In the past decades, GP has undergone several transformations; it is no longer a practice based on the traditional “Hausarzt” style. It has become a medical specialty of primary care with more modern foundations; it requires five years of practical training in internal medicine, paediatrics, surgery and general medicine, and it is governed by the Physician Chambers. In undergraduate education, courses in General Practice are mandatory. In recent years, the new curriculum requirements have led to an intense process of academic development with the creation of General Practice departments in 20 of the 36 public medical schools in the country. Conclusions: The process of professionalization and faculty development in GP/FM as well as the expansion of undergraduate training in the specialty aim to enhance the appeal of GP/FM to young doctors. This development strengthens academic research on GP/FM, which contributes to enhancing the institutional basis of GP/FM as a science, allowing bolder interaction and collaboration with other branches of medicine and real appreciation of this subject (GP/FM.

  10. [Mental Health in General Family Medicine - obstacles and expectations perceived by Family Physicians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Liliana; Basílio, Nuno; Figueira, Sofia; Nunes, José Mendes

    2017-03-01

    This study seeks to understand the difficulties experienced by family physicians (FP) in the management of mental disorders (MD) and their proposals to improve the quality of care. It is qualitative study with semi-structured interviews with ten family physicians. These were recorded, transcribed and their content analyzed. Eight thematic categories were identified: perceived working conditions and available resources; perceived level of training in mental health; therapies used for treatment of MD; mental health instruments used in consultation; MD addressed in Primary Health Care (PHC) and referral to hospitals; patient's reaction to referral; articulation of PHC with hospitals; proposals to improve mental health care in PHC. Articulation with the Mental Health Services suffers from lack of accessibility, one-way communication and delayed response. The FP propose creation of consultancies; multidisciplinary teams in the community; creating a two-way communication platform; continuous learning through discussion of cases. The FP have responsibilities in providing MHC. This requires working in a multidisciplinary team. Services should be organized to function as a learning system that allows the progressive improvement of the professionals and the improvement of the interfaces between them.

  11. Public Health Aspects of the Family Medicine Concepts in South Eastern Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet; Hadziahmetovic, Miran; Donev, Doncho; Pollhozani, Azis; Ramadani, Naser; Skopljak, Amira; Pasagic, Almir; Roshi, Enver; Zunic, Lejla; Zildzic, Muharem

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Family medicine as a part of the primary health care is devoted to provide continuous and comprehensive health care to the individuals and families regardless of age, gender, types of diseases and affected system or part of the body. Special emphasis in such holistic approach is given to the prevention of diseases and health promotion. Family Medicine is the first step/link between doctors and patients within patients care as well as regular inspections/examinations and follow-up of the health status of healthy people. Most countries aspire to join the European Union and therefore adopting new regulations that are applied in the European Union. Aim: The aim of this study is to present the role and importance of family medicine, or where family medicine is today in 21 Century from the beginning of development in these countries. The study is designed as a descriptive epidemiological study with data from 10 countries of the former Communist bloc, Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Montenegro, Macedonia, Kosovo, Albania, Bulgaria, Romania, Czech Republic, Slovakia and Hungary, just about half of them are members of the EU. We examined the following variables: socio-organizational indicators, health and educational indicators and health indicators. The data used refer to 2002 and as a source of data are used official data from reference WebPages of family medicine doctors associations, WONCA website (EURACT, EQuiP, EGPRN), WebPages of Bureau of Statistics of the countries where the research was conducted as well as the Ministries of Health. Results: Results indicates that the failures and shortcomings of health care organizations in Southeast Europe. Lack of money hinders the implementation of health care reform in all mentioned countries, the most of them that is more oriented to Bismarck financing system. Problems in the political, legal and economic levels are obstacles for efficient a problem reconstructing health care system toward

  12. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Saff Association

    2013-01-01

    2013 Elections to Staff Council   Vote! Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. More details on the elections can be found on the Staff Association web site (https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2013).   Timetable elections Monday 28 October to Monday 11 November, 12:00 am voting Monday 18 and Monday 25 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 19 November, Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 3 December, first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee.

  13. Support for and aspects of use of educational games in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the US: a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Mark C

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evidence supporting the effectiveness of educational games in graduate medical education is limited. Anecdotal reports suggest their popularity in that setting. The objective of this study was to explore the support for and the different aspects of use of educational games in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the United States. Methods We conducted a survey of family medicine and internal medicine residency program directors in the United States. The questionnaire asked the program directors whether they supported the use of educational games, their actual use of games, and the type of games being used and the purpose of that use. Results Of 434 responding program directors (52% response rate, 92% were in support of the use of games as an educational strategy, and 80% reported already using them in their programs. Jeopardy like games were the most frequently used games (78%. The use of games was equally popular in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs and popularity was inversely associated with more than 75% of residents in the program being International Medical Graduates. The percentage of program directors who reported using educational games as teaching tools, review tools, and evaluation tools were 62%, 47%, and 4% respectively. Conclusions Given a widespread use of educational games in the training of medical residents, in spite of limited evidence for efficacy, further evaluation of the best approaches to education games should be explored.

  14. Support for and aspects of use of educational games in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the US: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akl, Elie A; Gunukula, Sameer; Mustafa, Reem; Wilson, Mark C; Symons, Andrew; Moheet, Amir; Schünemann, Holger J

    2010-03-25

    The evidence supporting the effectiveness of educational games in graduate medical education is limited. Anecdotal reports suggest their popularity in that setting. The objective of this study was to explore the support for and the different aspects of use of educational games in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the United States. We conducted a survey of family medicine and internal medicine residency program directors in the United States. The questionnaire asked the program directors whether they supported the use of educational games, their actual use of games, and the type of games being used and the purpose of that use. Of 434 responding program directors (52% response rate), 92% were in support of the use of games as an educational strategy, and 80% reported already using them in their programs. Jeopardy like games were the most frequently used games (78%). The use of games was equally popular in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs and popularity was inversely associated with more than 75% of residents in the program being International Medical Graduates. The percentage of program directors who reported using educational games as teaching tools, review tools, and evaluation tools were 62%, 47%, and 4% respectively. Given a widespread use of educational games in the training of medical residents, in spite of limited evidence for efficacy, further evaluation of the best approaches to education games should be explored.

  15. Practical training in family medicine in the Dalmatian hinterland: first-hand experience of four physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minka Jerčić

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Four physicians working in private family medicine offices in Dalmatian Hinterland described their first hand experience of teaching sixthyear medical students. They supervised students during the 2010/2011 academic year, in an area that is economically undeveloped, rural, and where a number of people live in extended families. Although hesitant at first, the patients came to like the interaction with students, and later even yearned to provide students with as much information as possible. They also liked the letters that students had to write to them about their illness, because they could take them home and look for information without needing to see the doctor. The students showed diverse attitudes to different types of work in family medicine offices, mostly depending on their plans for future career. In general, they either complained or hesitated to perform duties that they did not fully master during earlier education, especially working with children. They needed several days to adapt to direct contact with the patients, and were more relaxed and cooperative when working in pairs than alone. The physicians themselves felt that they profited both from the novelty in the everyday routine and from the exchange of their experiences with the students. They liked their young colleagues and admitted they could not objectively review their own work, knowledge and skills.

  16. A Methodological Strategy for the Family Health Course in General Internal Medicine Residency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mabel Rocha Vázquez

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: the continuous improvement of the educational process is one of the permanent challenges of medical education in Cuba. When dealing particularly with family medicine it must be ensured that physicians are always getting a better clinical approach to the management of families, since this is one of the key areas that have been identified as problematic in professional practices. Objective: to design a methodological strategy for the improvement of educational activities in the Family Health Course of the General Internal Medicine Residency. Method: a development research, conducted at the University of Medical Sciences of Cienfuegos, from November 2005 to January 2007 is presented. Document analysis and validation by expert criteria were also implemented. Results: for each of the four themes that make up this course, the following aspects are stated: teaching organization, length, contents, activity objectives, methodological guidelines to implement these activities, assessment proposals for some of them and some literature. Conclusions: the design of educational activities, with emphasis on actual or simulated medical practice, could help improving the quality of the teaching process. In addition, following the logical structure of activities, teachers can develop similar proposals to address other health problems according to the different learning needs.

  17. Postgraduate family medicine training in Singapore--a new way forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Teck Yee; Chong, Phui Nah; Chng, Shih Kiat; Tay, Ee Guan

    2012-05-01

    Postgraduate Family Medicine (FM) training is important to train future primary care doctors to provide accessible and cost effective healthcare. In Singapore, a structured postgraduate FM training programme has been available for 20 years. This programme is characterised by involvement of both FM and non-FM doctors, well written modules and a rigorous assessment process. However, challenges faced by both the current healthcare system and training structure underlie the need to review the training structure to ensure its relevancy for future Family Physicians (FPs) to manage the needs of their patients. A workgroup was formed to review the current FM postgraduate programme and to explore the possibility of using the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) framework to enhance our current system. The workgroup felt that broad-based training and comprehensive coverage of topics are areas that are important to retain in any new FM residency programme. Weaknesses identified included a lack of early FM exposure and the need to strengthen formative assessments. New organisational structures such as Family Medicine Centres (FMC) need to be established and the involvement of the private sector in any FM residency progammes could be enhanced. The implementation of the FM Residency Programme in 2011 presented a unique opportunity to realign FM postgraduate education in line with the national objectives and to equip FPs with the necessary knowledge and skills for managing the future healthcare needs of Singaporeans.

  18. Exploring the experience of residents during the first six months of family medicine residency training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Dawn; Nasmith, Louise; Takahashi, Susan Glover; Harvey, Bart J.

    2017-01-01

    Background The shift from undergraduate to postgraduate education signals a new phase in a doctor’s training. This study explored the resident’s perspective of how the transition from undergraduate to postgraduate (PGME) training is experienced in a Family Medicine program as they first meet the reality of feeling and having the responsibility as a doctor. Methods Qualitative methods explored resident experiences using interpretative inquiry through monthly, individual in-depth interviews with five incoming residents during the first six months of training. Focus groups were also held with residents at various stages of training to gather their reflection about their experience of the first six months. Residents were asked to describe their initial concerns, changes that occurred and the influences they attributed to those changes. Results Residents do not begin a Family Medicine PGME program knowing what it means to be a Family Physician, but learn what it means to fulfill this role. This process involves adjusting to significant shifts in responsibility in the areas of Knowledge, Practice Management, and Relationships as they become more responsible for care outcomes. Conclusion This study illuminated the resident perspective of how the transition is experienced. This will assist medical educators to better understand the early training experiences of residents, how these experiences contribute to consolidating their new professional identity, and how to better align teaching strategies with resident learning needs. PMID:28344713

  19. Learning behaviour and preferences of family medicine residents under a flexible academic curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sy, Alice; Wong, Eric; Boisvert, Leslie

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine family medicine residents’ learning behaviour and preferences outside of clinical settings in order to help guide the development of an effective academic program that can maximize their learning. Design Retrospective descriptive analysis of academic learning logs submitted by residents as part of their academic training requirements between 2008 and 2011. Setting London, Ont. Participants All family medicine residents at Western University who had completed their academic program requirements (N = 72) by submitting 300 or more credits (1 credit = 1 hour). Main outcome measures Amount of time spent on various learning modalities, location where the learning took place, resources used for self-study, and the objective of the learning activity. Results A total of 72 residents completed their academic requirements during the study period and logged a total of 25 068 hours of academic learning. Residents chose to spend most of their academic time engaging in self-study (44%), attending staff physicians’ teaching sessions (20%), and participating in conferences, courses, or workshops (12%) and in postgraduate medical education sessions (12%). Textbooks (26%), medical journals (20%), and point-of-care resources (12%) were the 3 most common resources used for self-study. The hospital (32%), residents’ homes (32%), and family medicine clinics (14%) were the most frequently cited locations where academic learning occurred. While all physicians used a variety of educational activities, most residents (67%) chose self-study as their primary method of learning. The topic for academic learning appeared to have some influence on the learning modalities used by residents. Conclusion Residents used a variety of learning modalities and chose self-study over other more traditional modalities (eg, lectures) for most of their academic learning. A successful academic program must take into account residents’ various learning preferences and

  20. Use and teaching of pneumatic otoscopy in a family medicine residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouedraogo, Eva; Labrecque, Michel; Côté, Luc; Charbonneau, Katerine; Légaré, France

    2013-09-01

    To determine to what extent FPs teach and use pneumatic otoscopy and to identify the chief influences on this behaviour. Mixed-methods descriptive study conducted between March and May 2011. The family medicine residency program at Laval University in Quebec city, Que. Directors of the family medicine teaching units (FMTUs), teachers, and residents. We used questionnaires to assess the availability of pneumatic otoscopy equipment in 12 FMTUs, current behaviour and behavioural intention among physicians (residents and teachers) to use or teach pneumatic otoscopy, and facilitators and barriers to these practices. We also conducted 2 focus groups to further explore the facilitators of and barriers to using pneumatic otoscopy. We used descriptive statistics for quantitative data, transcribed the qualitative material, and performed content analysis. Eight of the 12 FMTUs reported having pneumatic otoscopy equipment. Four had it in all of their consulting rooms, and 2 formally taught it. Nine (4%) of 211 physicians reported regular use of pneumatic otoscopy. Mean (SD) intention to teach or use pneumatic otoscopy during the next year was low (2.4 [1.0] out of 5). Teachers identified improved diagnostic accuracy as the main facilitator both for use and for teaching, while residents identified recommendation by practice guidelines as the main facilitator for use. All physicians reported lack of availability of equipment as the main barrier to use. The main barrier to teaching pneumatic otoscopy reported by teachers was that they did not use it themselves. In focus groups, themes of consequences, capabilities, and socioprofessional influences were most dominant. Residents clearly identified role modeling by teachers as facilitating the use of pneumatic otoscopy. Pneumatic otoscopy is minimally used and taught in the family medicine residency program studied. Interventions to increase its use should target identified underlying beliefs and facilitators of and barriers to its

  1. Factors associated to the career choice of family medicine among Japanese physicians: the dawn of a new era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ie, Kenya; Tahara, Masao; Murata, Akiko; Komiyama, Manabu; Onishi, Hirotaka

    2014-01-01

    Despite recent developments in post-graduate family medicine training in Japan, the numbers of junior doctors entering family medicine residencies are still limited. The objective of this qualitative study was to investigate the possible factors associated to the career choice of family medicine, especially in the context of the newly established family medicine programs in Japan. From December 2010 to January 2011, we distributed a semi-structured questionnaire about career choice to 58 physician members of the Japan Primary Care Association, and 41 of them responded. Four researchers used the Modified Grounded Theory Approach (Kinoshita, 2003) for three-stage conceptualization. We extracted a conceptual model of the choice of newly established family medicine as a career in Japan, consisting of six categories and 77 subordinate concepts from 330 variations. The subcategories of personal background affecting the family-medicine career choice were characteristics ("self-reliance," "pioneering spirit"), career direction ("community/rural-orientedness," "multifaceted orientation") and experience (e.g., "discomfort with fragmented care"). We divided the influencing factors that were identified for career choice into supporters (e.g., "role model"), conflict of career choice (e.g., "anxiety about diverse/broad practice"), and the dawn of a new era in family medicine in Japan (e.g., "lack of social recognition," "concern about livelihood," and "too few role models"). Although the dawn of a new era seemed a rather negative influencer, it was unique to our study that the dawn itself could attract those with a "pioneering spirit" and an "attitude of self-training." Unlike previous studies, the positive factors such as lifestyle and the short residency program were not shown to be part of family medicine's attractiveness. In contrast, "concern about livelihood" was specific among our respondents and was related to career choice in the dawn period. "Community

  2. Exploration of Medicinal Species of Lamiaceae family in Ilkhji and Sharafaldin Regions of Esat Azarbaijan in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Joudi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this research medicinal species of Lamiaceae family were detected. As medicinal plants are suitable alternatives for synthetic and chemical drugs (Idu and Osemwegie also because of medical and nutritional importance and valuable protein contents of Lamiaceae sp., all plants of Lamiaceae family are collected in Ilkhji and sharafaldin regions during growth seasons of 2007-2009. Plants were collected in 2 regions according to the classical method of regional floristical studies. Collected plants were recognized by valid references (Parsa 1943-1950; Reshinger, 1963-1990. Then medical species are chosen by using pharmacopeias. The results of the current study demonstrated that at Ilkhji region 16 species belong to 8 genuses and at Sharafaldin region 4 species belong to 4 genuses that all of them belong to Lamiaceae family. Among these species, 18 species at Ilkhji and sharafaldin region had medicinal properties. Medicinal species of these 2 regions consist of: Marrubium vulgare, Mentha longifolia, Nepeta meyeri, Nepeta persica, Nepeta racemosa, Phlomis olivieri, Salvia nemorasa, Salvia sahendica, Salvia spinosa, Stachys virgata, Stachys inflate, Stachys lavandifolia, Stachys turcomanica, Stachys persica, Thymus cotschyanus, Thymus pubescens, Ziziphora tenuior Lamium amplexicaule. The results of this study showed that the region has a great potential for producing respective medicinal plants species belong to those families. Medicinal plants recently become more important because of their medicinal uses and in addition they are valuable source of protein.

  3. Improving health care globally : a critical review of the necessity of family medicine research and recommendations to build research capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weel, C. van; Rosser, W.W.

    2004-01-01

    An invitational conference led by the World Organization of Family Doctors (Wonca) involving selected delegates from 34 countries was held in Kingston, Ontario, Canada, March 8 to12, 2003. The conference theme was "Improving Health Globally: The Necessity of Family Medicine Research." Guiding confer

  4. Are familial factors underlying the association between socioeconomic position and prescription medicine?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Mia; Andersen, Per Kragh; Gerster, Mette;

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Although well established, the association between socioeconomic position and health and health behaviour is not clearly understood, and it has been speculated that familial factors, for example, dispositional factors or exposures in the rearing environment, may be underlying...... analyses were compared. RESULTS: An inverse social gradient in filling of prescriptions for all-purpose and system-specific drugs was observed in the unpaired analyses. In the intrapair analyses, associations were attenuated some in DZSS and more in MZ twins. Filling of drugs targeting the nervous system...... was still strongly associated with income in the intrapair analyses. CONCLUSIONS: Familial factors seem to account for part of the observed social inequality in filling of prescription medicine....

  5. Behavioral interventions for office-based care: interventions in the family medicine setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larzelere, Michele McCarthy

    2014-03-01

    The practice of family medicine includes the care of many patients with mental health or behavior change needs. Patients in mild to moderate distress may benefit from brief interventions performed in the family physician's office. Patients in more extreme distress may be helped by referral to behavioral health clinicians for short-term or open-ended therapies. Electronic therapy programs and bibliotherapy are also useful resources. The transition to the patient-centered medical home model may allow for more widespread integration of behavioral health care clinicians into primary care, in person and through telemental health care. Integrated care holds the promise of improved access, greater effectiveness of behavioral health service provision, and enhanced efficiency of primary care for patients with behavioral health care needs.

  6. 1 st National conference on family medicine and primary care: A journey toward stronger primary care in India

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    Raman Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Academy of Family Physicians of India organized the first National Conference on Family Medicine and Primary Care (FMPC on 20-21 April 2013 at India International Centre New Delhi. The conference was a major success towards positioning of requirement for a distinct academic discipline (family medicine within the medical and nursing education system as a means for strengthening of primary care in India. The event gained its prominence in the times when universal health coverage is being debated. A generalist approach in development of human resource prominently figured in the discussions. The deliberations and talks of the Indian as well as international experts were recorded and released as the report of national consultation on family medicine programme.

  7. Family medicine: its core principles and impact on patient care and medical education in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimbo, Masahito

    2004-06-01

    The specialty of family medicine arose out of a combination of American public and professional concerns regarding fragmentation of health care and was intended to foster a type of physician with a scope of clinical competence that would allow the patient, not the disease, to be the focus. Family physicians serve as the patient's personal physician and provide entry to the health care system, provide comprehensive care, maintain continuing responsibility for the patient including necessary coordination of care and referral, and provide care appropriate to the patient's physical, emotional, and social needs in the context of family and community. The specialty is currently second only to internal medicine in size, and makes a significant contribution to patient care and medical education. As family medicine looks to the future, some of its challenges include continuing to attract medical students to the specialty, refine research themes, and gain further acceptance in academic medical centers.

  8. Where should family medicine papers be published - following the impact factor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg, Roni; Shvartzman, Pesach

    2006-01-01

    Academic institutions weigh the research contribution of family physicians and take this factor into account when determining eligibility for the candidates' promotion. Among other parameters, these institutions consider the journals in which family physicians publish. In this respect, the impact factor (IF) has gained a foothold as one of the most accepted means to measure this contribution. The IF may be a measure of the main importance of a scientific journal. IF has a huge, but controversial, influence on the perception and evaluation of published scientific research. It is important for family physicians to understand and be aware of the importance of the IF and the way it is calculated. The IF is one consideration in the decision-making process of a researcher as to where to publish because the IF of most family medicine journals is less than 2.0. Thus publication in these journals might not yield the proper "score" for academic promotion in many institutions. On the other hand, publication in journals with higher IF that are not necessarily widely read by primary care physicians could result in a small impact of their findings on direct patient care.

  9. [Patient safety culture in family and community medicine residents in Aragon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Cogollo, R; Paredes-Alvarado, I R; Galicia-Flores, T; Barrasa-Villar, J I; Castán-Ruiz, S

    2014-01-01

    having an appropriate patient safety culture is the first recommendation to improve it. The aim of this article is to determine the safety culture in family medicine residents and then to identify improvement strategies. an online cross-sectional survey of residents in family medicine teaching units of Aragon using the translated, validated and adapted to Spanish, Medical Office Survey on Patient Safety Culture (MOSPS) questionnaire. The results were grouped in 12-dimensional responses for analysis, and the mean value of each dimension was calculated. Perceptions were described by Percentages of Positive (PRP) and Negative Responses (PRN) to each dimension. positive results were seen in «the Patient Care Tracking/Follow-up». There were significant differences in the «Information Exchange With Other Settings», «Staff Training» and «Overall Perceptions of Patient Safety and Quality». Study participants viewed «Work Pressure and Pace» negatively. the institutions providing health services, as well as their staff, are increasingly aware of the importance of improving Patient Safety, and the results of this study allowed us to present information that helps identify weaknesses, and to design initiatives and strategies to improve care practices. Copyright © 2013 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Educational Competitions of the Family Doctor in their Acting as Tutor in the Career of Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José de la Caridad Lorenzo López

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: for the identification of a group of competitions characteristic of the educational work of the Family doctors that you/they act as tutors in the formative scenarios of the Primary Attention of Health in University Policlínico Cecilio Ruíz of Zárate. Objective: to identify the educational main competitions of the doctors of the family like tutors in the career of Medicine, in the Area II of the municipality of Cienfuegos. Method: pedagogic investigation of descriptive type in the mark of the medical education that looked for to define the group of educational basic competitions, what can favor a pedagogic management of more quality in the medical clinics as formative scenario of University Policlínico Cecilio Ruíz of Zárate during the year 2010. Results: 61,5% of our tutors has more than 10 years of medical formation; more than the half, their 73.1% is not categorized, 84.6% is specialist of general integral medicine, but of the half they received the preparation shop for tutors and 96.2% they consider the basic competitions as very important. Conclusion: deficiencies exist in the way of the tutor's performance for categorized personnel's lack, pedagogic scarce preparation and the assistance load of the professors in the primary attention of health.

  11. [Diabetic foot risk in patients with type II diabetes mellitus in a family medicine unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-Godínez, S A; Zonana-Nacach, A; Anzaldo-Campos, M C; Muñoz-Martínez, J A

    2014-01-01

    To determine the risk of diabetic foot in patients with type II diabetes mellitus (DM) seen in a Family Medicine Unit. The study included type II DM patients with a disease duration ≥ 5 years seen in a Family Medicine Unit, Tijuana, Mexico, during September-December 2011. Neuropathy was assessed with the Diabetic Neuropathy Symptom questionnaire, and pressure sensation using a 10-g Semmes-Weinstein monofilament. A patient had a high risk of diabetic foot if there was sensitivity loss, foot deformities, and non-palpable pedal pulses. We studied 205 patients with an average (± SD) age and DM duration of 59 ± 10 years and 10.7 ± 6.7 years, respectively. Ninety one patients (44%) had a high risk of developing diabetic foot, and it was associated with; an education of less than 6 years (OR 2.3; 95%CI: 1-1-4.1), DM disease duration ≥ 10 years (OR 5.1; 95%CI: 2.8-9.4), female gender (OR 2.0; 95%CI: 1.1-3.6), monthly familiar income diabetic neuropathy, since they have a high risk of diabetic foot. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  12. Impact of a family medicine resident wellness curriculum: a feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Runyan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Up to 60% of practicing physicians report symptoms of burnout, which often peak during residency. Residency is also a relevant time for habits of self-care and resiliency to be emphasized. A growing literature underscores the importance of this; however, evidence about effective burnout prevention curriculum during residency remains limited. Objectives: The purpose of this project is to evaluate the impact of a new, 1-month wellness curriculum for 12 second-year family medicine residents on burnout, empathy, stress, and self-compassion. Methods: The pilot program, introduced during a new rotation emphasizing competencies around leadership, focused on teaching skills to cultivate mindfulness and self-compassion in order to enhance empathy and reduce stress. Pre-assessments and 3-month follow-up assessments on measures of burnout, empathy, self-compassion, and perceived stress were collected to evaluate the impact of the curriculum. It was hypothesized that this curriculum would enhance empathy and self-compassion as well as reduce stress and burnout among family medicine residents. Results: Descriptive statistics revealed positive trends on the mean scores of all the measures, particularly the Mindfulness Scale of the Self-Compassion Inventory and the Jefferson Empathy Scale. However, the small sample size and lack of sufficient power to detect meaningful differences limited the use of inferential statistics. Conclusions: This feasibility study demonstrates how a residency wellness curriculum can be developed, implemented, and evaluated with promising results, including high participant satisfaction.

  13. Learning to See Beneath the Surface: A Qualitative Analysis of Family Medicine Residents' Reflections About Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Ashley P; Vicini, Andrea; Allen, Lucas; Shaughnessy, Allen F

    2015-01-01

    Patients share straightforward statements with physicians such as describing their fears about their diagnosis. Physicians need to also understanding implicit, indirect, subtle communication cues that give broader context to patients' illness experiences. This project examines physicians' written reflections that offer insight into their interpretation of both the stated and the tacit aspects of their observations about communication, their resulting responses, and their intended actions. Tufts University Family Medicine residents (N = 33) of the Tufts Family Medicine Cambridge Health Alliance completed three reflective exercises each week over the course of 1 year (756 reflective entries). An interdisciplinary research team identified communication-related concepts within the reflections. Identified themes include (a) physicians recognizing and discovering mutual interplay of their communication with and patient disclosure, (b) physicians paying attention to subtleties of patient behavior as indicative of a fuller picture of patients' lives and their coping with illness, and (c) physician images of growth and awareness about communication indicative of their potential for growth and improvement. The project extends the literature in communication and medical education by examining explicit and tacit points of reflection about communication. The project (a) allows for unpacking the multifaceted aspects of reflection and (b) bridges reflective theory and medical education with communication foundations.

  14. Patient empowerment, an additional characteristic of the European definitions of general practice/family medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mola, Ernesto

    2013-06-01

    Growing evidence supports the inclusion of patient empowerment as a key ingredient of care for patients with chronic conditions. In recent years, several studies based on patient empowerment, have been carried out in different European countries in the context of general practice and primary care to improve management of chronic diseases. These studies have shown good results of the care model, increasing patient and health professionals' satisfaction, adherence to guidelines and to treatment, and improving clinical outcomes. In 2011, the Wonca European Council included as the twelfth characteristic of the European definitions of general practice/family medicine: 'promote patient empowerment'. The aim of this paper is to clarify the meaning of 'patient empowerment' and to explain why family medicine should be considered the most suitable setting to promote it. The inclusion of patient empowerment as one of the essential characteristics of general practice fills a conceptual gap and clearly suggests to the European health care systems a tested model to face chronic diseases: involving and empowering patients in managing their own conditions to improve health and well-being.

  15. Teaching family medicine residents how to answer clinical questions using QUIPs

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    Lisa Bishop

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: “Questions in Practice” (QUIP rounds are used to encourage residents to quickly find, evaluate, and incorporate information into clinical practice. It is an opportunity for residents to identify a clinical question, research the answer, present the evidence, and discuss how to apply it to practice. The value of using this method to teach residents has not been evaluated. Methods: A sampling of all first and second-year family medicine residents enrolled in the Memorial University Family Medicine program were invited to participate in the survey. The survey gathered information about the residents’ current experiences with answering clinical questions, their experience during QUIP rounds, and the value of an interdisciplinary approach. Results: The response rate was 91% (42/46. Medical websites (45% and journal article indexes (34% were most often used. Through QUIPs, 50% of the students identified new methods to retrieve answers, 80% considered it a useful learning experience, 75% had improved confidence, and clinical knowledge improved in 97%. Conclusions: Residents are familiar with many general sources of medical information, and QUIPs helped improve confidence in their knowledge and ability to answer questions. QUIPs appear to be a useful tool for teaching information resources and how to interpret and apply evidence to clinical situations.

  16. Impact of a family medicine resident wellness curriculum: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runyan, Christine; Savageau, Judith A.; Potts, Stacy; Weinreb, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Background Up to 60% of practicing physicians report symptoms of burnout, which often peak during residency. Residency is also a relevant time for habits of self-care and resiliency to be emphasized. A growing literature underscores the importance of this; however, evidence about effective burnout prevention curriculum during residency remains limited. Objectives The purpose of this project is to evaluate the impact of a new, 1-month wellness curriculum for 12 second-year family medicine residents on burnout, empathy, stress, and self-compassion. Methods The pilot program, introduced during a new rotation emphasizing competencies around leadership, focused on teaching skills to cultivate mindfulness and self-compassion in order to enhance empathy and reduce stress. Pre-assessments and 3-month follow-up assessments on measures of burnout, empathy, self-compassion, and perceived stress were collected to evaluate the impact of the curriculum. It was hypothesized that this curriculum would enhance empathy and self-compassion as well as reduce stress and burnout among family medicine residents. Results Descriptive statistics revealed positive trends on the mean scores of all the measures, particularly the Mindfulness Scale of the Self-Compassion Inventory and the Jefferson Empathy Scale. However, the small sample size and lack of sufficient power to detect meaningful differences limited the use of inferential statistics. Conclusions This feasibility study demonstrates how a residency wellness curriculum can be developed, implemented, and evaluated with promising results, including high participant satisfaction. PMID:27282276

  17. Training Future Clinician-Educators: A Track for Family Medicine Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Steven; Sattler, Amelia; Chen Yu, Grace; Basaviah, Preetha; Schillinger, Erika

    2016-03-01

    Despite a growing demand for skilled clinician-educators, residents today rarely receive formal training in clinical teaching, curriculum development, administration, leadership, or educational scholarship. The authors describe the development, implementation, and preliminary evaluation of the O'Connor Stanford Leaders in Education Residency (OSLER) track, a novel clinician-educator track within the family medicine residency program affiliated with Stanford University School of Medicine. In 2010, the OSLER track was introduced at O'Connor Hospital, a community hospital that houses an 8-8-8 family medicine residency program. Residents who are in good standing can apply to the track at the midpoint of their first postgraduate year. Residents are immersed in a flexible, experience-based, 2.5-year-long curriculum with hands-on teaching activities at its core. To foster skills in educational scholarship, track residents are required to design and complete a scholarly project. A comprehensive evaluation plan is currently in progress. Preliminary data indicates high levels of satisfaction with the track's overall value, impact on core teaching skills, and effect on career trajectory. Residents gained more confidence in core teaching skills as they progressed through the track. Scholarly work output by residents has increased significantly since the track was implemented. The residency program has seen an increased interest from applicants since the track was started, with data suggesting that applicant quality has increased from the pre-track to post-track years. More research is needed to assess the effectiveness and reproducibility of this clinician-educator track. If proven, this model may be replicated at other academic medical centers.

  18. Evaluation of four commonly used DNA barcoding Loci for chinese medicinal plants of the family schisandraceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Chen, Min; Dong, Xiaoyu; Lin, Ruozhu; Fan, Jianhua; Chen, Zhiduan

    2015-01-01

    Many species of Schisandraceae are used in traditional Chinese medicine and are faced with contamination and substitution risks due to inaccurate identification. Here, we investigated the discriminatory power of four commonly used DNA barcoding loci (ITS, trnH-psbA, matK, and rbcL) and corresponding multi-locus combinations for 135 individuals from 33 species of Schisandraceae, using distance-, tree-, similarity-, and character-based methods, at both the family level and the genus level. Our results showed that the two spacer regions (ITS and trnH-psbA) possess higher species-resolving power than the two coding regions (matK and rbcL). The degree of species resolution increased with most of the multi-locus combinations. Furthermore, our results implied that the best DNA barcode for the species discrimination at the family level might not always be the most suitable one at the genus level. Here we propose the combination of ITS+trnH-psbA+matK+rbcL as the most ideal DNA barcode for discriminating the medicinal plants of Schisandra and Kadsura, and the combination of ITS+trnH-psbA as the most suitable barcode for Illicium species. In addition, the closely related species Schisandra rubriflora Rehder & E. H. Wilson and Schisandra grandiflora Hook.f. & Thomson, were paraphyletic with each other on phylogenetic trees, suggesting that they should not be distinct species. Furthermore, the samples of these two species from the southern Hengduan Mountains region formed a distinct cluster that was separated from the samples of other regions, implying the presence of cryptic diversity. The feasibility of DNA barcodes for identification of geographical authenticity was also verified here. The database and paradigm that we provide in this study could be used as reference for the authentication of traditional Chinese medicinal plants utilizing DNA barcoding.

  19. Evaluation of four commonly used DNA barcoding Loci for chinese medicinal plants of the family schisandraceae.

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    Jian Zhang

    Full Text Available Many species of Schisandraceae are used in traditional Chinese medicine and are faced with contamination and substitution risks due to inaccurate identification. Here, we investigated the discriminatory power of four commonly used DNA barcoding loci (ITS, trnH-psbA, matK, and rbcL and corresponding multi-locus combinations for 135 individuals from 33 species of Schisandraceae, using distance-, tree-, similarity-, and character-based methods, at both the family level and the genus level. Our results showed that the two spacer regions (ITS and trnH-psbA possess higher species-resolving power than the two coding regions (matK and rbcL. The degree of species resolution increased with most of the multi-locus combinations. Furthermore, our results implied that the best DNA barcode for the species discrimination at the family level might not always be the most suitable one at the genus level. Here we propose the combination of ITS+trnH-psbA+matK+rbcL as the most ideal DNA barcode for discriminating the medicinal plants of Schisandra and Kadsura, and the combination of ITS+trnH-psbA as the most suitable barcode for Illicium species. In addition, the closely related species Schisandra rubriflora Rehder & E. H. Wilson and Schisandra grandiflora Hook.f. & Thomson, were paraphyletic with each other on phylogenetic trees, suggesting that they should not be distinct species. Furthermore, the samples of these two species from the southern Hengduan Mountains region formed a distinct cluster that was separated from the samples of other regions, implying the presence of cryptic diversity. The feasibility of DNA barcodes for identification of geographical authenticity was also verified here. The database and paradigm that we provide in this study could be used as reference for the authentication of traditional Chinese medicinal plants utilizing DNA barcoding.

  20. Objective Evaluation of Otoscopy Skills Among Family and Community Medicine, Pediatric, and Otolaryngology Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyewumi, Modupe; Brandt, Michael G; Carrillo, Brian; Atkinson, Adelle; Iglar, Karl; Forte, Vito; Campisi, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate and compare the perceived need for otolaryngology training and otoscopy diagnostic skills in primary care (Family and Community Medicine, Pediatric Medicine), and Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery (OTO-HNS) postgraduate trainees. Participant otoscopy skills were evaluated using the OtoSim simulator. Family and Community Medicine, Pediatric, and OTO-HNS residents were recruited. Each resident participated in 3 separate otoscopy training and assessment sessions. The ability to correctly identify middle ear pathology was objectively evaluated using OtoSim™. Pretest, posttest, and 3-month retention test results were compared among residents in a paired comparison paradigm. Survey data assessing exposure to OTO-HNS during undergraduate and postgraduate training were also collected. A total of 57 residents participated in the study. All residents reported limited exposure to OTO-HNS during undergraduate medical training. Primary care trainees performed poorly on pretest assessments (30% ± 7.8%; 95% CI). Significant improvement in diagnostic accuracy was demonstrated following a single 1-hour teaching session (30%-62%; p < 0.001). Primary care residents demonstrated a significant decrease in diagnostic accuracy at a 3-month follow-up assessment (62%-52%, p < 0.001). Self-perceived comfort with otology was poorly correlated to pretest performance among primary care trainees (r = 0.26) and showed a stronger positive correlation among OTO-HNS trainees (r = 0.56). A single teaching session with an otoscopy simulator significantly improved diagnostic accuracy in primary care and OTO-HNS trainees. Improved performance is susceptible to deterioration at 3 months if acquired skills are not frequently used. Self-perceived comfort with otology may not be an accurate predictor of otoscopic diagnostic skill. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of teaching and learning in family medicine by students: A Sri Lankan experience

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    R. P. J. C. Ramanayake

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Family Medicine occupies a prominent place in the undergraduate curriculum of the Faculty of Medicine, University of Kelaniya, Sri Lanka. The one month clinical attachment during the fourth year utilizes a variety of teaching methods. This study evaluates teaching learning methods and learning environment of this attachment. Methodology: A descriptive cross sectional study was carried out among consenting students over a period of six months on completion of the clinical attachment using a pretested self administered questionnaire. Results: Completed questionnaires were returned by 114(99% students. 90.2% were satisfied with the teaching methods in general while direct observation and feed back from teachers was the most popular(95.1% followed by learning from patients(91.2%, debate(87.6%, seminar(87.5% and small group discussions(71.9%. They were highly satisfied with the opportunity they had to develop communication skills (95.5% and presentation skills (92.9%. Lesser learning opportunity was experienced for history taking (89.9%, problem solving (78.8% and clinical examination (59.8% skills. Student satisfaction regarding space within consultation rooms was 80% while space for history taking and examination (62% and availability of clinical equipment (53% were less. 90% thought the programme was well organized and adequate understanding on family medicine concepts and practice organization gained by 94% and 95% of the students respectively. Conclusions: Overall student satisfaction was high. Students prefer learning methods which actively involve them. It is important to provide adequate infra structure facilities for student activities to make it a positive learning experience for them.

  2. An assessment of implementation of CommunityOriented Primary Care in Kenyan family medicine postgraduate medical education programmes

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    Ian J. Nelligan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Family medicine postgraduate programmes in Kenya are examining the benefits of Community-Oriented Primary Care (COPC curriculum, as a method to train residents in population-based approaches to health care delivery. Whilst COPC is an established part of family medicine training in the United States, little is known about its application in Kenya. We sought to conduct a qualitative study to explore the development and implementation of COPC curriculum in the first two family medicine postgraduate programmes in Kenya. Method: Semi-structured interviews of COPC educators, practitioners, and academic stakeholders and focus groups of postgraduate students were conducted with COPC educators, practitioners and academic stakeholders in two family medicine postgraduate programmes in Kenya. Discussions were transcribed, inductively coded and thematically analysed. Results: Two focus groups with eight family medicine postgraduate students and interviews with five faculty members at two universities were conducted. Two broad themes emerged from the analysis: expected learning outcomes and important community-based enablers. Three learning outcomes were (1 making a community diagnosis, (2 understanding social determinants of health and (3 training in participatory research. Three community-based enablers for sustainability of COPC were (1 partnerships with community health workers, (2 community empowerment and engagement and (3 institutional financial support. Conclusions: Our findings illustrate the expected learning outcomes and important communitybased enablers associated with the successful implementation of COPC projects in Kenya and will help to inform future curriculum development in Kenya.

  3. Use of WONCA global standards to evaluate family medicine postgraduate education for curriculum development and review in Nepal and Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Christine; Ladak, Farah; Shrestha, Ashis; Yadav, Bharat; Thu, Kyaw; Aye, Tin

    2016-09-01

    Family medicine is an integral part of primary care within health systems. Globally, training programmes exhibit a great degree of variability in content and skill acquisition. While this may in part reflect the needs of a given setting, there exists standard criteria that all family medicine programmes should consider core activities. WONCA has provided an open-access list of standards that their expert community considers essential for family medicine (GP) post-graduate training. Evaluation of developing or existing training programmes using these standards can provide insight into the degree of variability, gaps within programmes and equally as important, gaps within recommendations. In collaboration with the host institution, two family medicine programmes in Nepal and Myanmar were evaluated based on WONCA global standards. The results of the evaluation demonstrated that such a process can allow for critical review of curriculum in various stages of development and evaluation. The implications of reviewing training programmes according to WONCA standards can lead to enhanced training world-wide and standardisation of training for post-graduate family medicine.

  4. Reliability testing of a portfolio assessment tool for postgraduate family medicine training in South Africa

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    Louis Jenkins

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Competency-based education and the validity and reliability of workplace-based assessment of postgraduate trainees have received increasing attention worldwide.Family medicine was recognised as a speciality in South Africa six years ago and a satisfactory portfolio of learning is a prerequisite to sit the national exit exam. A massive scaling up of the number of family physicians is needed in order to meet the health needs of the country.Aim: The aim of this study was to develop a reliable, robust and feasible portfolio assessment tool (PAT for South Africa.Methods: Six raters each rated nine portfolios from the Stellenbosch University programme, using the PAT, to test for inter-rater reliability. This rating was repeated three months later to determine test–retest reliability. Following initial analysis and feedback the PAT was modified and the inter-rater reliability again assessed on nine new portfolios. An acceptable intra-classcorrelation was considered to be > 0.80.Results: The total score was found to be reliable, with a coefficient of 0.92. For test–retest reliability, the difference in mean total score was 1.7%, which was not statistically significant. Amongst the subsections, only assessment of the educational meetings and the logbook showed reliability coefficients > 0.80.Conclusion: This was the first attempt to develop a reliable, robust and feasible national portfolio assessment tool to assess postgraduate family medicine training in the South African context. The tool was reliable for the total score, but the low reliability of several sections in the PAT helped us to develop 12 recommendations regarding the use of the portfolio, the design of the PAT and the training of raters.

  5. Evidence-based medicine in primary care: qualitative study of family physicians

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    Dantas Guilherme

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objectives of this study were: a to examine physician attitudes to and experience of the practice of evidence-based medicine (EBM in primary care; b to investigate the influence of patient preferences on clinical decision-making; and c to explore the role of intuition in family practice. Method Qualitative analysis of semi-structured interviews of 15 family physicians purposively selected from respondents to a national survey on EBM mailed to a random sample of Canadian family physicians. Results Participants mainly welcomed the promotion of EBM in the primary care setting. A significant number of barriers and limitations to the implementation of EBM were identified. EBM is perceived by some physicians as a devaluation of the 'art of medicine' and a threat to their professional/clinical autonomy. Issues regarding the trustworthiness and credibility of evidence were of great concern, especially with respect to the influence of the pharmaceutical industry. Attempts to become more evidence-based often result in the experience of conflicts. Patient factors exert a powerful influence on clinical decision-making and can serve as trumps to research evidence. A widespread belief that intuition plays a vital role in primary care reinforced views that research evidence must be considered alongside other factors such as patient preferences and the clinical judgement and experience of the physician. Discussion Primary care physicians are increasingly keen to consider research evidence in clinical decision-making, but there are significant concerns about the current model of EBM. Our findings support the proposed revisions to EBM wherein greater emphasis is placed on clinical expertise and patient preferences, both of which remain powerful influences on physician behaviour.

  6. Reliability testing of a portfolio assessment tool for postgraduate family medicine training in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mash, Bob; Derese, Anselme

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Competency-based education and the validity and reliability of workplace-based assessment of postgraduate trainees have received increasing attention worldwide. Family medicine was recognised as a speciality in South Africa six years ago and a satisfactory portfolio of learning is a prerequisite to sit the national exit exam. A massive scaling up of the number of family physicians is needed in order to meet the health needs of the country. Aim The aim of this study was to develop a reliable, robust and feasible portfolio assessment tool (PAT) for South Africa. Methods Six raters each rated nine portfolios from the Stellenbosch University programme, using the PAT, to test for inter-rater reliability. This rating was repeated three months later to determine test–retest reliability. Following initial analysis and feedback the PAT was modified and the inter-rater reliability again assessed on nine new portfolios. An acceptable intra-class correlation was considered to be > 0.80. Results The total score was found to be reliable, with a coefficient of 0.92. For test–retest reliability, the difference in mean total score was 1.7%, which was not statistically significant. Amongst the subsections, only assessment of the educational meetings and the logbook showed reliability coefficients > 0.80. Conclusion This was the first attempt to develop a reliable, robust and feasible national portfolio assessment tool to assess postgraduate family medicine training in the South African context. The tool was reliable for the total score, but the low reliability of several sections in the PAT helped us to develop 12 recommendations regarding the use of the portfolio, the design of the PAT and the training of raters.

  7. Providing competency-based family medicine residency training in substance abuse in the new millennium: a model curriculum

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    Shellenberger Sylvia

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This article, developed for the Betty Ford Institute Consensus Conference on Graduate Medical Education (December, 2008, presents a model curriculum for Family Medicine residency training in substance abuse. Methods The authors reviewed reports of past Family Medicine curriculum development efforts, previously-identified barriers to education in high risk substance use, approaches to overcoming these barriers, and current training guidelines of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME and their Family Medicine Residency Review Committee. A proposed eight-module curriculum was developed, based on substance abuse competencies defined by Project MAINSTREAM and linked to core competencies defined by the ACGME. The curriculum provides basic training in high risk substance use to all residents, while also addressing current training challenges presented by U.S. work hour regulations, increasing international diversity of Family Medicine resident trainees, and emerging new primary care practice models. Results This paper offers a core curriculum, focused on screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment, which can be adapted by residency programs to meet their individual needs. The curriculum encourages direct observation of residents to ensure that core skills are learned and trains residents with several "new skills" that will expand the basket of substance abuse services they will be equipped to provide as they enter practice. Conclusions Broad-based implementation of a comprehensive Family Medicine residency curriculum should increase the ability of family physicians to provide basic substance abuse services in a primary care context. Such efforts should be coupled with faculty development initiatives which ensure that sufficient trained faculty are available to teach these concepts and with efforts by major Family Medicine organizations to implement and enforce residency requirements for

  8. Congressional Election Forecasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis-Beck, Michael S.; Rice, Tom W.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews the growing literature on the forecasting of elections, providing an example in the form of 1988 congressional election predictions. Briefly discusses the history of election outcome prediction and outlines two scientific forecasting models which, the authors state, are appropriate for use in the classroom. (GEA)

  9. The Election Machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vadgaard, Anne Kathrine Pihl

    2016-01-01

    When democratic elections run smoothly, the practices that ensure a direct – free and fair – link from the will of the people to those who govern are mostly hidden in the bureaucratic machinery of elections. These administrative aspects of elections are seen as a background to the political delib...

  10. Serbian Elections 2016

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    Dušan Pavlović

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Elections in Serbia have been held quite often over the past 26 years. Yet, of all elections that have taken place since the introduction of the multiparty system in 1990, the elections held on April 24 2016, were the most confusing. They were held early, but were neither a product of political, nor economic crisis. So why were they necessary?

  11. Family medicine residents’ perceived level of comfort in treating common sports injuries across residency programs in the United States

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    Amoako AO

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Adae O Amoako,1 Agyenim B Amoako,2 George GA Pujalte3 1Department of Family and Community Medicine, Penn State Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA, USA; 2Department of Family Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Northwest, Fayetteville, AR, USA; 3Sports Medicine, Divisions of Primary Care, and Orthopedics, Mayo Clinic Health System, Waycross, GA, USA Background and objective: Family physicians are expected to be comfortable in treating common sports injuries. Evidence shows a limited level of comfort in treating these injuries in pediatric and internal medicine residents. Studies are lacking, however, in family medicine residents. The purpose of this study is to assess the comfort level of family medicine residents in treating common sports injuries in adults and children based on their perceived level of knowledge and attitudes. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study of family medicine residents in the United Sates. A written survey of 25 questions related to sports injury knowledge and factors affecting comfort level were collected. A chi-square test was implemented in calculating P-values. Results: Five hundred and fifty-seven residents responded to the survey. A higher percentage of doctors of osteopathy (86.6%, 82.5%, 69.6%, and 68.7% compared to doctors of medicine (78.5%, 71.6%, 53.4%, and 52.8% respectively identified ankle sprain, concussion, plantar fasciitis, and lateral epicondylitis as common injuries, and felt comfortable in treating them (P-values =0.015, 0.004, 0.0001, and 0.0002, respectively. Residents with high interest in sports medicine correctly identified the injuries as common and felt comfortable treating them as well (knowledge, P=0.027, 0.0029, <0.0001, and 0.0001, respectively; comfort level, P=0.0016, <0.0001, 0.0897, and 0.0010, respectively. Conclusion: Medical education background, factors that affect training, and an interest in sports medicine contribute to residents' knowledge and comfort

  12. Conference report: Undergraduate family medicine and primary care training in Sub-Saharan Africa: Reflections of the PRIMAFAMED network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mash, Robert; Essuman, Akye; Flinkenflögel, Maaike

    2017-01-01

    Internationally, there is a move towards strengthening primary healthcare systems and encouraging community-based and socially responsible education. The development of doctors with an interest in primary healthcare and family medicine in the African region should begin during undergraduate training. Over the last few years, attention has been given to the development of postgraduate training in family medicine in the African region, but little attention has been given to undergraduate training. This article reports on the 8th PRIMAFAMED (Primary Care and Family Medicine Education) network meeting held in Nairobi from 21 to 24 May 2016. At this meeting the delegates spent time presenting and discussing the current state of undergraduate training at 18 universities in the region and shared lessons on how to successfully implement undergraduate training. This article reports on the rationale for, information presented, process followed and conclusions reached at the conference. PMID:28155289

  13. Conference report: Undergraduate family medicine and primary care training in Sub-Saharan Africa: Reflections of the PRIMAFAMED network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Innocent Besigye

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Internationally, there is a move towards strengthening primary healthcare systems and encouraging community-based and socially responsible education. The development of doctors with an interest in primary healthcare and family medicine in the African region should begin during undergraduate training. Over the last few years, attention has been given to the development of postgraduate training in family medicine in the African region, but little attention has been given to undergraduate training. This article reports on the 8th PRIMAFAMED (Primary Care and Family Medicine Education network meeting held in Nairobi from 21 to 24 May 2016. At this meeting the delegates spent time presenting and discussing the current state of undergraduate training at 18 universities in the region and shared lessons on how to successfully implement undergraduate training. This article reports on the rationale for, information presented, process followed and conclusions reached at the conference.

  14. Career advising in family medicine: a theoretical framework for structuring the medical student/faculty advisor interview

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    Melissa Bradner

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are unique challenges to recruiting students into the specialty of family medicine within academic medical centers. Methods: At Virginia Commonwealth University, we developed an advising framework to help students address institutional and personal obstacles to choosing family medicine as a career. Results: The role of a faculty advisor is not to direct the student to a career choice but rather to foster a mentor relationship and help the student come to his or her own realizations regarding career choice. The faculty advisor/medical student interview is conceptualized as five discussion topics: self-knowledge, perception, organizational voice, cognitive dissonance, and anticipatory counseling. Conclusion: This framework is intended to assist faculty in their efforts to encourage students to consider a career in family medicine.

  15. Knowledge and perceptions of family leave policies among female faculty in academic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Christine M; Freund, Karen M; Kaplan, Samantha A; Raj, Anita; Carr, Phyllis L

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine the knowledge and perceptions of family leave policies and practices among senior leaders including American Association of Medical College members of the Group on Women in Medicine and Science (GWIMS) to identify perceived barriers to career success and satisfaction among female faculty. In 2011 and 2012, GWIMS representatives and senior leaders at 24 medical schools were invited to participate in an interview about faculty perceptions of gender equity and overall institutional climate. An inductive, thematic analysis of the qualitative data was conducted to identify themes represented in participant responses. The research team read and reviewed institutional family leave policies for concordance with key informant descriptions. There were 22 GWIMS representatives and senior leaders in the final sample. Participants were all female; 18 (82%) were full professors with the remainder being associate professors. Compared with publicly available policies at each institution, the knowledge of nine participants was consistent with policies, was discrepant for six, with the remaining seven acknowledging a lack of knowledge of policies. Four major themes were identified from the interview data: 1) Framing family leave as a personal issue undermines its effect on female faculty success; 2) poor communication of policies impairs access and affects organizational climate; 3) discrepancies in leave implementation disadvantage certain faculty in terms of time and pay; and 4) leave policies are valued and directly related to academic productivity. Family leave policies are an important aspect of faculty satisfaction and academic success, yet policy awareness among senior leaders is lacking. Further organizational support is needed to promote equitable policy creation and implementation to support women in medical academia. Copyright © 2014 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The relationship between marriage and family therapists and complementary and alternative medicine approaches: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becvar, Dorothy S; Caldwell, Karen L; Winek, Jon L

    2006-01-01

    In this article, we delineate the qualitative phase of a mixed-method research study focused on understanding the relationship between Clinical Members of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (MFT) and complementary alternative medicine (CAM). Based on an analysis of the data derived from telephone interviews with 54 respondents, we describe four themes: definitional issues, depth of awareness of CAM, fit with MFT, and ethical considerations. Our discussion focuses on the findings of this phase, considerations from the quantitative phase, and reflections on the research study as a whole. While acknowledging the limitations of the study, we conclude that the growing awareness of and involvement with CAM approaches and practitioners among MFTs suggest a need for further education for both professionals and clients. We also note the importance of additional research support for the use of CAM practices.

  17. Early Career Outcomes of Family Medicine Residency Graduates Exposed to Innovative Flexible Longitudinal Tracks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Richard A; Casey, Dan; Singer, Diana; Waller, Elaine; Carney, Patricia A

    2017-05-01

    The Preparing the Personal Physician for Practice (P4) project used a case series design to study innovations in the content, length, structure, and location of residency training in 14 geographically diverse family medicine programs between 2007 and 2012. We aimed to explore how offering flexible longitudinal tracks (FLT) affected graduates' scope of practice, particularly in maternal child health (MCH), which included at least 17 months of focused training that increased each year over 4 years. We administered a cross-sectional survey to graduates of P4 residencies approximately 18 months after they completed training (2011-2014) and compared graduates of the John Peter Smith (JPS) Family Medicine Residency MCH FLT to all other P4 graduates. The overall response rate was 81.8% (365/446). JPS graduates who completed the flexible MCH track (n=15) compared to all other P4 graduates (n=332) were more likely to deliver babies (13/15, 86.7% versus 48/324, 14.6%) and perform C-sections as the primary surgeon (12/15, 80.0% versus 15/322, 4.7%). Additional areas of expanded scope associated with the MCH track included endoscopy (4/15, 26.7% versus 10/323, 3.1%), the care of hospitalized adults and associated procedures (central lines, eg: 8/15, 53.3% versus 47/322, 14.6%), and the care of hospitalized children (13/15, 86.7% versus 111/323, 34.4%). Graduating from the JPS MCH FLT was associated with a higher provision of maternal, child, and ill adult patient care services, including associated procedures.

  18. Geriatrics Curricula for Internal and Family Medicine Residents: Assessing Study Quality and Learning Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Huai Yong; Davis, Molly

    2017-02-01

    Prior reviews of geriatrics curricula for internal medicine (IM) and family medicine (FM) residents have not evaluated study quality or assessed learning objectives or specific IM or FM competencies. This review of geriatrics curricula for IM and FM residents seeks to answer 3 questions: (1) What types of learning outcomes were measured? (2) How were learning outcomes measured? and (3) What was the quality of the studies? We evaluated geriatrics curricula that reported learning objectives or competencies, teaching methods, and learning outcomes, and those that used a comparative design. We searched PubMed and 4 other data sets from 2003-2015, and assessed learning outcomes, outcome measures, and the quality of studies using the Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument (MERSQI) and Best Evidence Medical Education (BEME) methods. Fourteen studies met inclusion criteria. Most curricula were intended for IM residents in the inpatient setting; only 1 was solely dedicated to FM residents. Median duration was 1 month, and minimum geriatrics competencies covered were 4. Learning outcomes ranged from Kirkpatrick levels 1 to 3. Studies that reported effect size showed a considerable impact on attitudes and knowledge, mainly via pretests and posttests. The mean MERSQI score was 10.5 (range, 8.5-13) on a scale of 5 (lowest quality) to 18 (highest quality). Few geriatrics curricula for IM and FM residents that included learning outcome assessments were published recently. Overall, changes in attitudes and knowledge were sizeable, but reporting was limited to low to moderate Kirkpatrick levels. Study quality was moderate.

  19. Comparative Analysis of Family Medicine Education and Exams at Cathedras of Family Medicine of Universities in Southeastern Europe - "Splitska inicijativa", Sarajevo, 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet; Mujanovic, Olivera Batic; Racic, Maja; Gavran, Larisa; Stanetic, Kosana; Hodzic, Merzika; Cojic, Milena; Cvejanov-Kezunovic, Ljiljana; Stepanovic, Aleksandar; Stavrikj, Katarina; Jatic, Zaim; Obrdalj, Edita Cerny; Zalihic, Amra; Tusek-Bunc, Ksenija

    2017-03-01

    the ability of students and physicians to follow its growth on the other. Furthermore, in our environment, the term technology is generally reserved for its technical component. This terminology essentially means not only the purchase of the computer and related equipment, but also the technological foresight and technological progress, which are defined as specific combination of fundamental scientific, research and development work that gives a concrete result. The quality of the teaching-learning process at the universities in former Yugoslav countries and abroad, depends mainly of infrastructure that includes an optimal teaching space, personnel and equipment, in accordance with existing standards and norms at the cantonal or entity level, which are required to implement adequately the educational curriculum for students from first to sixth year by Bologna studying concept. For all of this it is necessary to ensure adequate funding. Technologies (medical and information, including communications) have a special role and value in ensuring the quality of medical education at universities and their organizational units (faculties). "Splitska inicijativa" project, which started 6 years ago as simple intention to exchange experiences of application new model of education, based on: Bologna studying concept, and other types of under and postgraduate education, was good idea to improve also theory and practice of it within Family medicine as academic and scientific discipline. This year scope of our scientific meeting held in Sarajevo on 24th and 25th March 2017, was quality assessment of theoretical and practical education and, also, evaluation of knowledge by students exams (a-y).

  20. Intended Career Choice in Family Medicine in Slovenia: An Issue of Gender, Family Background or Empathic Attitudes in Final Year Medical Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ster, Marija Petek; Selic, Polona

    2017-01-01

    Background: Among a variety of complex factors affecting a decision to take family medicine as a future specialisation, this study focused on demographic characteristics and assessed empathic attitudes in final year medical students. Methods: A convenience sampling method was employed in two consecutive academic years of final year medical students at the Faculty of Medicine in Ljubljana, Slovenia, in May 2014 and May 2015. A modified version of the 16-item Jefferson Scale of Empathy – Student Version (JSE-S) was administered to examine self-reported empathic attitudes. An intended career in family medicine was reported using a five-point Likert scale. Results: Of the 175 medical school seniors in study year 2013/14, there were 64 (36.6%) men and 111 (63.4%) women, while in the second group (study year 2014/5), there were 68 (40.5%) men and 100 (59.5%) women; 168 students in total. They were 24.9±1.6 (generation 2013/4) and 24.9±1.7 (generation 2014/15) years old. Thirty-six percent of the students in the academic year 2013/14 intended to choose family medicine as a future career, and a similar proportion in academic year 2014/15 (31.7%). Gender (χ2=6.763, p=0.034) and empathic attitudes (c2=14.914; p=0.001) had a bivariate association with an intended career choice of family medicine in the 2014/15 generation. When logistic regression was applied to this group of students, an intended career choice in family medicine was associated with empathic attitudes (OR 1.102, 95% CI 1.040-1.167, p=0.001), being single (OR 3.659, 95% CI 1.150-11.628, p=0.028) and the father having only primary school education (OR 142.857 95% CI 1.868, p=0.025), but not with gender (OR 1.117, 95% CI 0.854-1.621, p=0.320). Conclusion: The level of students’ father’s education, and not living in an intimate partnership, increased the odds on senior medical students to choose family medicine, yet we expected higher JSE-S scores to be associated with interest in this speciality. To

  1. 'These reforms killed me': doctors' perceptions of family medicine during the transition from communism to capitalism.

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    Czachowski, Slawomir; Pawlikowska, Teresa

    2011-08-01

    The establishment of family medicine (FM) in Poland following political reform. To describe family doctors' (FD) experiences during the introduction of FM. A qualitative study of 25 FDs in Poland, using thematic analysis of semi-structured interviews. Open-structured narrative-based interviews with five FDs were then used to deepen understanding of the major emergent themes. Fifteen of 25 had a different initial specialization to FM; 10 of 25 overseas work experience. Many doctors were driven by personal circumstances to engage with this new discipline, which provided a better fit with their life circumstances and a chance to escape from hierarchical structures characterizing the old regime. Personal experience of role models helped embrace FM, whereas adherence to ingrained biomedical approaches led to difficulty with exposure to common problems and could facilitate burnout. Shifting relationships in the reformed system caused tensions between primary and secondary care. While relationships with patients and specialists were being renegotiated, the concept of an independent FD practice surfaced. We observed that the most serious problems that the doctors encountered were circumstances related to the former health care system, in contrast to any lack of professional skills. This is a rare qualitative study exploring Polish doctors' perspectives of the health care reform after the collapse of communism in Central and Eastern Europe. This analysis of newly qualified FDs has provided an insight into the authentic experiences, and motivation of grass roots FM pioneers in Poland.

  2. Evaluation of the educational environment of the Saudi family medicine residency training program

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    Abdullah T Khoja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The study was conducted to evaluate the educational environment (EE in Family Medicine Training Programs. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey, The Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure (PHEEM, was distributed to all residents at the four training centers in the central region. Cronbach′s alpha was used to test the reliability. The mean and standard deviation (SD for each item, the overall score and the three domains were calculated. A multiple linear regression model was developed with PHEEM scores as an outcome. The Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon test was used to compare each item based on the selected factors. Results: The overall score was 67.1/160 (SD: 20.1. The PHEEM′s domains scores: 24.2/56 (SD: 7.13 for perception of role autonomy; 25.3/60 (SD: 8.88, for perception of teaching; and 17/44 (SD: 5.6, for perception of social support. Training center and Level of training were the significant outcome predictors. Centre 1 (Joint Program significantly had better scores than Centre 2. The instrument showed great reliability with a Cronbach′s alpha of 0.92. Conclusions: There are many problems in the training program. Urgent actions are needed to improve the residents′ learning experience particularly during rotations. Also, the curriculum should be restructured, and effective training methods introduced using the Best Evidence in Medical Education to meet the expectations and learning needs of family physicians.

  3. Curricula for teaching the content of clinical practice guidelines to family medicine and internal medicine residents in the US: a survey study

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    Moheet Amir

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Teaching the content of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs is important to both clinical care and graduate medical education. The objective of this study was to determine the characteristics of curricula for teaching the content of CPGs in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the United States. Methods We surveyed the directors of family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the United States. The questionnaire included questions about the characteristics of the teaching of CPGs: goals and objectives, educational activities, evaluation, aspects of CPGs that the program teaches, the methods of making texts of CPGs available to residents, and the major barriers to teaching CPGs. Results Of 434 programs responding (out of 839, 52%, 14% percent reported having written goals and objectives related to teaching CPGs. The most frequently taught aspect was the content of specific CPGs (76%. The top two educational strategies used were didactic sessions (76% and journal clubs (64%. Auditing for adherence by residents was the primary evaluation strategy (44%, although 36% of program directors conducted no evaluation. Programs made texts of CPGs available to residents most commonly in the form of paper copies (54% while the most important barrier was time constraints on faculty (56%. Conclusion Residency programs teach different aspects of CPGs to varying degrees, and the majority uses educational strategies not supported by research evidence.

  4. Predictors of job satisfaction among academic family medicine faculty: Findings from a faculty work-life and leadership survey.

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    Krueger, Paul; White, David; Meaney, Christopher; Kwong, Jeffrey; Antao, Viola; Kim, Florence

    2017-03-01

    To identify predictors of job satisfaction among academic family medicine faculty members. A comprehensive Web-based survey of all faculty members in an academic department of family medicine. Bivariate and multivariable analyses (logistic regression) were used to identify variables associated with job satisfaction. The Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Toronto in Ontario and its 15 affiliated community teaching hospitals and community-based teaching practices. All 1029 faculty members in the Department of Family and Community Medicine were invited to complete the survey. Faculty members' demographic and practice information; teaching, clinical, administration, and research activities; leadership roles; training needs and preferences; mentorship experiences; health status; stress levels; burnout levels; and job satisfaction. Faculty members' perceptions about supports provided, recognition, communication, retention, workload, teamwork, respect, resource distribution, remuneration, and infrastructure support. Faculty members' job satisfaction, which was the main outcome variable, was obtained from the question, "Overall, how satisfied are you with your job?" Of the 1029 faculty members, 687 (66.8%) responded to the survey. Bivariate analyses revealed 26 predictors as being statistically significantly associated with job satisfaction, including faculty members' ratings of their local department and main practice setting, their ratings of leadership and mentorship experiences, health status variables, and demographic variables. The multivariable analyses identified the following 5 predictors of job satisfaction: the Maslach Burnout Inventory subscales of emotional exhaustion and personal accomplishment; being born in Canada; the overall quality of mentorship that was received being rated as very good or excellent; and teamwork being rated as very good or excellent. The findings from this study show that job satisfaction among academic

  5. Barriers to Screening and Possibilities for Active Detection of Family Medicine Attendees Exposed to Intimate Partner Violence

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    Kopčavar Guček Nena

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In 1996 the World Health Organization declared intimate partner violence (IPV the most important public health problem. Meta-analyses in 2013 showed every third female globally had been a victim of violence. Experts find screening controversial; family medicine is the preferred environment for identifying victims of violence, but barriers on both sides prevent patients from discussing it with doctors.

  6. Family medicine publications in Taiwan: An analysis of the Web of Science database from 1993 to 2012

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    Ming-Hwai Lin

    2014-11-01

    Conclusion: Publications from departments/institutes of family medicine in Taiwan increased rapidly from 1993 to 2012. However, the trends of decreased citation number of articles and journal impact factor, as well as the small amount of articles published in the Primary Health Care Category, deserve further attention and effort.

  7. Toward competency-based curricula in patient-centered spiritual care: recommended competencies for family medicine resident education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandarajah, Gowri; Craigie, Frederic; Hatch, Robert; Kliewer, Stephen; Marchand, Lucille; King, Dana; Hobbs, Richard; Daaleman, Timothy P

    2010-12-01

    Spiritual care is increasingly recognized as an important component of medical care. Although many primary care residency programs incorporate spiritual care into their curricula, there are currently no consensus guidelines regarding core competencies necessary for primary care training. In 2006, the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine's Interest Group on Spirituality undertook a three-year initiative to address this need. The project leader assembled a diverse panel of eight educators with dual expertise in (1) spirituality and health and (2) family medicine. The multidisciplinary panel members represented different geographic regions and diverse faith traditions and were nationally recognized senior faculty. They underwent three rounds of a modified Delphi technique to achieve initial consensus regarding spiritual care competencies (SCCs) tailored for family medicine residency training, followed by an iterative process of external validation, feedback, and consensus modifications of the SCCs. Panel members identified six knowledge, nine skills, and four attitude core SCCs for use in training and linked these to competencies of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. They identified three global competencies for use in promotion and graduation criteria. Defining core competencies in spiritual care clarifies training goals and provides the basis for robust curricula evaluation. Given the breadth of family medicine, these competencies may be adaptable to other primary care fields, to medical and surgical specialties, and to medical student education. Effective training in this area may enhance physicians' ability to attend to the physical, mental, and spiritual needs of patients and better maintain sustainable healing relationships.

  8. Security and Elections

    OpenAIRE

    Bishop, Matt; Peisert, Sean

    2012-01-01

    Elections are common to almost all societies. Periodically, groups of people determine their representatives, leaders, neighborhood spokespersons, corporate executives, or union representatives by casting ballots and counting votes using a variety of schemes. Those who don’t participate see others around them doing so. And stories abound about rigged elections or results considered compromised by accident or poor communication. US-based elections follow a general pattern of voter reg...

  9. Slovak Parliamentary Elections 2006

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    Vladimír Pčolinský

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Development of a democratic system and market economy in the Slovak Republic has been going on for less than two decades. The same applies to the development of political marketing. Using the example of the Slovak Parliamentary Elections in 2006, we analyse the situation in the political market, voters’ political perceptions, the marketing activities of the political parties and candidates, main topics of election campaign, role of the media and election results. We also offer a short summary of key legislative changes which influenced the 2006 election campaign.

  10. Party choice and family influence in the age of modernity: Students´ reflections on their party choice as first time voters in a Norwegian election

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Niels Nørgaard; Solhaug, Trond

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes how young, first-time voters reflect on the sources of influence on their party choice, as they for the first time approach a (recent 2013) parliamentary election in Norway. Party identification has traditionally been seen as a result of social (class) identity or professional...... the modernity hypothesis. We suggest that political education should take account of this and allow for reflexivity in the formation of the students´ political self. Keywords: Political identity, first-time voters, Voter Advice Applications, participation, social studies, voter education....

  11. Development of a portfolio of learning for postgraduate family medicine training in South Africa: a Delphi study

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    Jenkins Louis

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Within the 52 health districts in South Africa, the family physician is seen as the clinical leader within a multi-professional district health team. Family physicians must be competent to meet 90% of the health needs of the communities in their districts. The eight university departments of Family Medicine have identified five unit standards, broken down into 85 training outcomes, for postgraduate training. The family medicine registrar must prove at the end of training that all the required training outcomes have been attained. District health managers must be assured that the family physician is competent to deliver the expected service. The Colleges of Medicine of South Africa (CMSA require a portfolio to be submitted as part of the uniform assessment of all registrars applying to write the national fellowship examinations. This study aimed to achieve a consensus on the contents and principles of the first national portfolio for use in family medicine training in South Africa. Methods A workshop held at the WONCA Africa Regional Conference in 2009 explored the purpose and broad contents of the portfolio. The 85 training outcomes, ideas from the WONCA workshop, the literature, and existing portfolios in the various universities were used to develop a questionnaire that was tested for content validity by a panel of 31 experts in family medicine in South Africa, via the Delphi technique in four rounds. Eighty five content items (national learning outcomes and 27 principles were tested. Consensus was defined as 70% agreement. For those items that the panel thought should be included, they were also asked how to provide evidence for the specific item in the portfolio, and how to assess that evidence. Results Consensus was reached on 61 of the 85 national learning outcomes. The panel recommended that 50 be assessed by the portfolio and 11 should not be. No consensus could be reached on the remaining 24 outcomes and these were

  12. Seeing the other through the screen: movies, humanization of medical education and Family and Community Medicine

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    Gustavo de Araújo Porto Landsberg

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The unprecedented technological development observed in the last century and beginning of this one has expanded the horizons of the medical science exponentially, making the content to be envisaged by the colleges practically unfeasible. The incorporation of this knowledge in the curricula took place in detriment to human sciences, formerly included as a routine in the schools of medicine all over the world. Negligence of the humanization of medical education may keep from endowing future physicians with the affective resources necessary to the establishment of a satisfactory physical-patient relationship. This study proposes evaluating the use of motion pictures in the humanization of the way graduates see patients, providing them with capability and empathy toward their patients. Three documentaries that correlate indirectly with themes relative to Family and Community Medicine were selected: worker’s mental and community health. After screening to small groups of students, there was a multidisciplinary discussion covering all the several themes relevant to the medical practice. Finally, questionnaires were applied where the students evaluated the importance of the experience in their education, as well as replied to questions about their contact with arts and personal interests. All the students considered the level of correlation of the motion pictures chosen as a good or excellent medical practice. Questioned on the relevance of the themes covered in their education, 94,1% of them answered good or fine. The same percentage considered the curricular inclusion of methodology also good or fine. It was observed that the students evaluated read less than the national average, and a considerable amount of them is not interested in or has never been to a theater, an art exposition or a dance show. The movies, however, proved to be very popular - confirming its potential as a humanizing teaching resource.

  13. A new paradigm for teaching behavior change: Implications for residency training in family medicine and psychiatry

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    Triana A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary care physicians (PCPs provide ~50 % of all mental health services in the U.S. Given the widening gap between patient mental health needs and resources available to meet those needs, there is an increasing demand for family medicine and psychiatry trainees to master competencies in both behavioral medicine and primary care counseling during residency-if for no other reason than to accommodate the realities of medical practice given the oft present gap between the need for psychiatric services and the availability, quality, and/or affordability of specialized psychiatric care. To begin to address this gap, a skills-based, interactive curriculum based on motivational interviewing (MI as a teaching method is presented. Methods The curriculum described in this paper is a four-week block rotation taught in the second year of residency. Motivational interviewing (MI is used as a teaching approach toward the goal of clinical behavior change. Residents’ strengths, personal choice and autonomy are emphasized. Each week of the rotation, there is a clinical topic and a set of specific skills for mastery. Residents are offered a “menu” of skills, role modeling, role/real play, practice with standardized patients (SP, and direct supervision in clinic. Results Thirty-nine residents have completed the curriculum. Based on residents’ subjective reporting using pre-post scales (i.e., importance and confidence, all participants to date have reported substantial increases in confidence/self-efficacy using primary care counseling skills in their continuity clinic. Conclusions This paper presents an innovative, empirically based model for teaching the essential skills necessary for physicians providing care for patients with mental/emotional health needs as well as health-behavior change concerns. Implications for training in the broader context, particularly as it relates to multi-disciplinary and collaborative models of

  14. Leadership training in a family medicine residency program: Cross-sectional quantitative survey to inform curriculum development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Erin; Moore, Ainsley; Schabort, Inge

    2017-03-01

    To assess the current status of leadership training as perceived by family medicine residents to inform the development of a formal leadership curriculum. Cross-sectional quantitative survey. Department of Family Medicine at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont, in December 2013. A total of 152 first- and second-year family medicine residents. Family medicine residents' attitudes toward leadership, perceived level of training in various leadership domains, and identified opportunities for leadership training. Overall, 80% (152 of 190) of residents completed the survey. On a Likert scale (1 = strongly disagree, 4 = neutral, 7 = strongly agree), residents rated the importance of physician leadership in the clinical setting as high (6.23 of 7), whereas agreement with the statement "I am a leader" received the lowest rating (5.28 of 7). At least 50% of residents desired more training in the leadership domains of personal mastery, mentorship and coaching, conflict resolution, teaching, effective teamwork, administration, ideals of a healthy workplace, coalitions, and system transformation. At least 50% of residents identified behavioural sciences seminars, a lecture and workshop series, and a retreat as opportunities to expand leadership training. The concept of family physicians as leaders resonated highly with residents. Residents desired more personal and system-level leadership training. They also identified ways that leadership training could be expanded in the current curriculum and developed in other areas. The information gained from this survey might facilitate leadership development among residents through application of its results in a formal leadership curriculum. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  15. Quality of osteoarthritis care in family medicine - a cross-sectional study

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    Račić Maja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Effective treatments for osteoarthritis are available, yet little is known about the quality of primary care in the Republic of Srpska for this disabling condition. Objective. The main objective of this study was to analyze the overall quality of osteoarthritis treatment in a family medicine setting, as well as to explore whether the achievement of quality indicators was associated with particular patient characteristics and severity of osteoarthritis. Methods. The cross-sectional study included 120 patients with confirmed hand, knee, and hip osteoarthritis, recruited at seven family practices in the town of Ugljevik, Republic of Srpska, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Data were extracted from a patient questionnaire on quality indicators, as well as from their electronic and paper records, to assess care against 14 indicators. The included quality indicators were based on the Arthritis Foundation’s Quality Indicator set for Osteoarthritis. Summary achievement rates for hip, knee, or hand osteoarthritis, as well as for the total sample, were calculated. Results. The mean achievement rate for all 14 quality indicators obtained from medical records was 74%, and 77% obtained from patient interview. The quality indicators concerning referral for weight reduction (23% and pharmacological treatment (24% had the lowest achievement rates, whereas the highest achievement rates were related to physical examination (100%, pain and functional assessment (100%, and education (90.8%. Patients physical functioning was significantly associated with the quality indicator achievement rate (p = 0.001. Conclusion. Pharmacological therapy and the referral of osteoarthritis patients in need of weight reduction seem to have the greatest potential for improvement in primary health care.

  16. Family strategies for managing childhood cancer: using complementary and alternative medicine in Jordan.

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    Al-Qudimat, Mohammad R; Rozmus, Cathy L; Farhan, Nemah

    2011-03-01

    This paper is a report of a study that examined the use of complementary and alternative medicine therapies among children with cancer in Jordan. Complementary and alternative medicine use by oncology patients has been gaining acceptance in the developed countries and developing countries. Healthcare professionals are becoming increasingly aware that patients use complementary and alternative medicine either covertly or overtly. A descriptive cross-sectional design was used with parents of children with cancer under treatment and follow-up in a paediatric oncology department in Jordan between August 2007 and April 2008. Parents of 69 children with cancer in Jordan were surveyed for their use of complementary and alternative medicine with their children. A total of 65.2% of the sample had used at least one type of complementary and alternative medicine during the course of their child's treatment. The use of biological and nutritional complementary and alternative medicine was 70.5% among the users. Use of body and soul complementary and alternative medicine strategies was reported for 22.2% of the children using complementary and alternative medicine. Twenty per cent of the sample used body movement complementary and alternative medicine for their children. A total of 45.5% of complementary and alternative medicine users perceived benefits in using complementary and alternative medicine for their children with cancer. However, 40% of complementary and alternative medicine users had stopped using complementary and alternative medicine for multiple reasons. Parents used complementary and alternative medicine to support their children's medical treatment and to use all possible methods to cure their children. The reason for parents not using complementary and alternative medicine included not being aware of complementary and alternative medicine. Most of the patients have not discussed the issue of using complementary and alternative medicine with the medical staff.

  17. Content and conceptual frameworks of psychology and social work preceptor feedback related to the educational requests of family medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté, Luc; Rocque, Rhéa; Audétat, Marie-Claude

    2017-06-01

    Supervision of communication competency in clinical settings in medicine is an important component of professional training. The purpose of this study was to describe the content and rationale of psychology and social work preceptor feedback to family medicine residents who express educational needs during case-based written vignettes. We conducted a qualitative study with 25 psychology and social work preceptors from family medicine departments of the three French-speaking universities in the province of Quebec, Canada. During an individual interview, preceptors were asked to respond to three short case-based written vignettes depicting resident educational issues regarding communication and to explain their responses. Authors analyzed the content of responses and the conceptual frameworks reported. The three vignettes elicited 475 responses, including 58 distinct responses and 33 distinct conceptual frameworks. Therapeutic alliance and stages of grief were the two most reported conceptual frameworks. The vignettes stimulated a wealth of responses and conceptual frameworks among psychology and social work preceptors in family medicine. The complete list of responses could be useful for faculty development activities by stimulating preceptors' reflexive practice with regard to their responses, the educational goals of these responses and the conceptual frameworks underlying their feedback. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Leprosy in Pakistan: LEPRA elective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladhani, S

    1998-06-01

    As part of the curriculum, medical students at the United Medical and Dental Schools of Guy's and St Thomas's Hospitals (UMDS), London, are encouraged to spend an elective period of 8 weeks in their final year anywhere in the world, studying any field of medicine they are interested in. Having lived in Tanzania for 10 years, I have had contact with people suffering from leprosy and my interest in leprosy continued after I moved to Europe to continue my education. I therefore decided to use my elective to gain hands-on experience with the disease so that I could understand and appreciate the impact of leprosy in developing countries such as Pakistan.

  19. Using field notes to evaluate competencies in family medicine training: a study of predictors of intention

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    Miriam Lacasse

    2013-03-01

    Methods: This mixed-methods study involved clinical teachers (CT and residents from two family medicine units. Main outcomes were: 1 intention (and its predictors: attitude, perceived behavioural control (PBC and normative belief to use FN, assessed using a 7-item Likert scale questionnaire (1: strongly disagree to 7: strongly agree and 2 related salient beliefs, explored in focus groups three and six months after FN implementation. Results: 27 CT and 28 residents participated. Intention to use FN was 6.20±1.20 and 5.74±1.03 in CT and residents respectively. Predictors of this intention were attitude and PBC (mutually influential: p = 0.04, and normative belief (p = 0.007. Focus groups identified underlying beliefs regarding their use (perceived advantages/disadvantages and facilitators/barriers. Conclusion: Intention to adopt field notes to document competency is influenced by attitude, perceived behavioural control and normative belief. Implementation of field notes should be preceded by interventions that target the identified salient beliefs to improve this competency-based evaluation strategy.

  20. Effectiveness of a Formal Mentorship Program in Family Medicine Residency: The Residents’ Perspective

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    Marie Andrades

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Mentoring is a recognized form of teaching learning strategy in postgraduate medical education. This paper describes the effectiveness of a formal mentorship program from the residents’ perspective after a year of implementation. Methods. The Aga Khan University Family Medicine Residency Program is the first program in Pakistan to our knowledge to implement formal mentorship for all four years of residency. A mentorship program was developed, implemented, and evaluated a year later using a rating scale. The 10-point Likert scale consisted of questions on academics, clinical work, research, administrative issues, and personal/social issues. Results. The response rate was 95% (. Eighty percent ( were women. Satisfaction level in seeking help was the highest for academics (75%. Residents scored mentorship as low in helping to tackle their personal problems (20%. Barriers reported in rapport building with mentor were time constraints and gender difference. The most useful attributes of the mentor which helped rapport building were accessibility, active listening, support for emotional needs, and trustworthiness. Conclusion. Mentoring has a role in trainees’ personal and professional growth especially when their needs are addressed. The effectiveness of the mentorship program in residency can improve if the residents are allowed to choose their own mentors.

  1. Can self-declared personal values be used to identify those with family medicine career aspirations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Renée A; Eva, Kevin W; Reiter, Harold I

    2008-05-01

    Self-declaration of personal values has been suggested as a means of identifying students with greater predilection for future primary care careers. While statistically significant differences have been demonstrated, absolute differences between those interested in primary care and those interested in specialist careers tend to be small. This study's objective was to determine whether limited differences can nevertheless be used to identify those with particular interest in primary care. Schwartz' values were submitted to a paired comparison design in which respondents were asked to identify the value they held most dearly for possible pairings of values. 88 medical school applicants, 57 first year medical students, 78 final year medical students, and 34 admissions interviewers participated. Applicant and medical student subgroups were analyzed as a whole and as a function of self-identified career interest (i.e., primarily interested in Family medicine or other specialty careers). The values statements were remarkably consistent (r > 0.90) between groups, regardless of which subgroups were analyzed. Despite apparent differences in the literature between those interested in primary care and those interested in other specialist careers, the differences are small and do not correlate with career aspirations in a way that could inform admissions decisions.

  2. Attitude and knowledge of family medicine practitioners towards the association between periodontal disease and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Z; Abduljabbar, T; Hanif, A; Khan, A; Vohra, F

    2017-05-01

    To assess the attitude and knowledge of family medicine practitioners (FMPs) towards the association between periodontal disease and obesity. A cross-sectional study was performed and a 13-item survey questionnaire was given to FMPs practicing in 12 different teaching hospitals in Karachi, Pakistan. The questions were aimed at exploring the knowledge of FMP's regarding the association of obesity and periodontal disease and their attitude towards the association of obesity and periodontal disease. Chi-square and Spearman co-efficient were conducted to compare subgroups and correlate factors with the knowledge score of FMPs. A total of 314 questionnaires were completed (response rate = 92%). Median age of participants was 41 years and 57% were females. Almost 61% of FMPs answered all the knowledge questions correctly and 64% reported moderate understanding of the association between periodontal health and obesity. Nearly 73% FMPs inquired from obese patients regarding the periodontal disease and more than half (58%) refer patients to a dentist for evaluation. More than half of FMPs perform periodontal disease screening. Nearly all FMPs considered informing obese patients regarding periodontal disease as one of their roles. FMP's play an important role in the early diagnosis, prevention and treatment of periodontal conditions in obese patients. More than two thirds of FMPs showed good knowledge of the association of obesity and periodontal disease. The attitudes of FMPs towards assessing and referring obese patients at a risk of having periodontal disease were reassuring.

  3. [Knowledge, experience and behavior at climacteric and menopause stages among family medicine female users at IMSS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco-Murillo, Vitelio; Fernández-Gárate, Irma H; Ojeda-Mijares, Rosalba I; Padilla-Vallejo, Isabel; de la Cruz-Mejía, Leticia

    2007-01-01

    To identify knowledge, experiences and behaviors of climacteric and menopause women users of family medicine services of Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS). A descriptive study that included a 37 questions survey about climacteric and menopause was conducted in a national representative sample of 4162 women aged 45 to 59 years between September 2004 and January 2005. The analysis was made by using descriptive statistics and chi2. 82.9 % Of women knew about menopause or its significance; 82.1 % identified hot flushes as a climacteric symptom; 46.1 % knew about pharmacologic treatment and 25.6 % knew about postmenopausal complications such as osteoporosis. Only 26.6 % mentioned preventive measures as physical exercise or consumption of food with high calcium content. Their main information sources were media communication. Mean age at menopause was 46.8 years old; 57.7 % had symptoms at interview and 18.4 % were taking pharmacologic treatment, mainly (53.3 %) hormones. 11.1 % of treated women had had side effects. 10.7 % had received pharmacologic treatment and 39.4 % had withdrawn from medication either for medical indications or for side effects (23 %). Knowledge about climacteric was scarce and obtained from non-medical sources; use of pharmacological treatment and preventive behavior was low. We recommended reinforcing the information and education about treatment and favorable life styles by health personal.

  4. Overcoming early barriers to PCMH practice improvement in family medicine residencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernald, Douglas H; Deaner, Nicole; O'Neill, Caitlin; Jortberg, Bonnie T; degruy, Frank Verloin; Dickinson, W Perry

    2011-01-01

    Residency programs face inevitable challenges as they redesign their practices for higher quality care and resident training. Identifying and addressing early barriers can help align priorities and thereby augment the capacity to change. Evaluation of the Colorado Family Medicine Residency PCMH Project included iterative qualitative analysis of field notes, interviews, and documents to identify early barriers to change and strategies to overcome them. Nine common but not universal barriers were identified: (1) a practice's history reflected some negative past experiences with quality improvement or routines incompatible with transformative change, (2) leadership gaps were evident in unprepared practice leaders or hierarchical leadership, (3) resistance and skepticism about change were expressed through cynicism aimed at change or ability to change, (4) unproductive team processes were reflected in patterns of canceled meetings, absentee leaders, or lack of accountability, (5) knowledge gaps about the Patient-centered Medical Home (PCMH) were apparent from incomplete dissemination about the project or planned changes, (6) EHR implementation distracted focus or stalled improvement activity, (7) sponsoring organizations' constraints emerged from staffing rules and differing priorities, (8) insufficient staff participation resulted from traditional role expectations and structures, and (9) communication was hampered by ineffective methods and part-time faculty and residents. Early barriers responded to varying degrees to specific interventions by practice coaches. Some barriers that interfere with practices getting started with cultural and structural transformation can be addressed with persistent attention and reflection from on-site coaches and by realigning the talents, leaders, and priorities already in these residency programs.

  5. Patient perception and knowledge of acetaminophen in a large family medicine service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, Christopher M; Dankenbring, Dawn M

    2014-06-01

    The use of acetaminophen is currently under increased scrutiny by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) due to the risk of intentional and more concerning, unintentional overdose-related hepatotoxicity. Acetaminophen is responsible for an estimated 48% of all acute liver failure diagnoses. The purpose of this study is to evaluate patient perception and knowledge of the safe use and potential toxicity of acetaminophen-containing products. The authors conducted a descriptive, 2-week study using a convenience sample from a large family medicine clinic waiting room. Survey questions assessed ability to identify acetaminophen, knowledge of the current recommended maximum daily dose, respondent acetaminophen use patterns, common adverse effects associated with acetaminophen, and respondent self-reported alcohol consumption. Acetaminophen safety information was provided to all persons regardless of participation in the study. Of the 102 patients who chose to participate, 79% recognized acetaminophen as a synonym of Tylenol, whereas only 9% identified APAP as a frequently used abbreviation. One third of respondents thought acetaminophen was synonymous with ibuprofen and naproxen. Approximately one fourth of patients correctly identified the then maximum recommended daily acetaminophen dose of 4 g. Seventy-eight percent of patients correctly identified hepatotoxicity as the most common serious adverse effect. We conclude that patient deficiencies in knowledge of acetaminophen recognition, dosing, and toxicity warrant public education by health professionals at all levels of interaction. Current initiatives are promising; however, further efforts are required.

  6. Knowledge and confidence in the diagnosis and management of leprosy among Family Medicine Specialists in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Boon-Bin Yap

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Family Medicine Specialists (FMS play a pivotal role in the detection of leprosy in primary care. This study determines the knowledge and confidence among FMS in Malaysia. Method: Pre-intervention questionnaire was conducted followed by a 3 day educational intervention. Post-intervention questionnaire was conducted again 2 months thereafter. The questionnaire assessed knowledge and confidence in the diagnosis and management of leprosy. Results: The mean total mark for the pre-intervention knowledge questionnaires was 35.4 out of 50 and the mean confidence was 4.0 out of 10 for diagnosis and 3.3 out of 10 for management. Knowledge improved 24.0% post-intervention (p < 0.001. Knowledge on pathogenesis and clinical features improved the most with 38.5% and 32.4% respectively whereas knowledge on leprosy reactions improved the least with only 15.1%. The confidence level improved 85% to 7.4 for diagnosis and 118.2% to 7.2 for management post-intervention (p < 0.001. FMS with more experience, seeing more than 5 patients in their working life, had better confidence pre-intervention but it became insignificant post-intervention. Conclusion: Knowledge of FMS was good but their confidence was low pre-intervention. They improved significantly post-intervention. It is hoped that the improvement can allow for earlier detection of leprosy to prevent clinical and epidemiological sequelae.

  7. Win/win: creating collaborative training opportunities for behavioral health providers within family medicine residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddy, Nancy Breen; Borresen, Dorothy; Myerholtz, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Integrating behavioral health into primary healthcare offers multiple advantages for patients and health professionals. This model requires a new skill set for all healthcare professionals that is not emphasized in current educational models. The new skills include interprofessional team-based care competencies and expanded patient care competencies. Health professionals must learn new ways to efficiently and effectively address health behavior change, and manage behavioral health issues such as depression and anxiety. Learning environments that co-train mental health and primary care professionals facilitate acquisition of both teamwork and patient care competencies for mental health and primary care professional trainees. Family Medicine Residency programs provide an excellent opportunity for co-training. This article serves as a "how to" guide for residency programs interested in developing a co-training program. Necessary steps to establish and maintain a program are reviewed, as well as goals and objectives for a co-training curriculum and strategies to overcome barriers and challenges in co-training models.

  8. 2012 election results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Robert; Tetzlaff, Doerthe

    2012-10-01

    On 4 October 2012, AGU members completed voting for the 2013-2014 leadership term. Union officers, Board members, section and focus group officers, and student and early career representatives to the Council were elected. All members who joined or renewed their membership by 1 July 2012 were eligible to vote in this year's leadership election. The vote was held electronically, and access to voting was provided to all eligible voters for a period of 31 days. The voting was conducted by Survey and Ballot Systems, Inc. (SBS). SBS, which offers election planning and management services, provided unique login credentials and other support services for eligible voters throughout the election. Voting results were certified by SBS on 8 October and by the AGU Tellers Committee on 9 October. The overall participation rate was 21.9%, an increase over previous AGU elections.

  9. [Opportunity cost for men who visit family medicine units in the city of Querétaro, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Carranza, Edith Olimpia; Villarreal Ríos, Enrique; Vargas Daza, Emma Rosa; Galicia Rodríguez, Liliana; Martínez González, Lidia

    2010-12-01

    To determine the opportunity cost for men who seek care in the family medicine units (FMU) of the Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social) in the city of Querétaro. A sample was selected of 807 men, ages 20 to 59 years, who sought care through the family medicine, laboratory, and pharmacy services provided by the FMU at the IMSS in Querétaro. Patients referred for emergency services and those who left the facilities without receiving care were excluded. The sample (n = 807) was calculated using the averages for an infinite population formula, with a confidence interval of 95% (CI95%) and an average opportunity cost of US$5.5 for family medicine, US$3.1 for laboratory services, and US$2.3 for pharmacy services. Estimates included the amount of time spent on travel, waiting, and receiving care; the number of people accompanying the patient, and the cost per minute of paid and unpaid job activities. The opportunity cost was calculated using the estimated cost per minute for travel, waiting, and receiving care for patients and their companions. The opportunity cost for the patient travel was estimated at US$0.97 (CI95%: 0.81-1.15), while wait time was US$5.03 (CI95%: 4.08-6.09) for family medicine, US$0.06 (CI95%: 0.05-0.08) for pharmacy services, and US$1.89 (CI95%: 1.56-2.25) for laboratory services. The average opportunity cost for an unaccompanied patient visit varied between US$1.10 for pharmacy services alone and US$8.64 for family medicine, pharmacy, and laboratory services. The weighted opportunity cost for family medicine was US$6.24. Given that the opportunity cost for men who seek services in FMU corresponds to more than half of a minimum salary, it should be examined from an institutional perspective whether this is the best alternative for care.

  10. Instructions to authors of the Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina de Familia e Comunidade SBMFC

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Instructions to authors of the Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine   The Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine (BJFCM is a three-monthly publication of the Brazilian Society of Family and Community Medicine, aimed at sensitizing professionals and health authorities to this field of interest, stimulating and disseminating Primary Health Care (PHC issues and investigations, and facilitating interchange between academic institutions, health care services and organized social movements. The periodical also aims to promote an interdisciplinary approach to this area and to serve as a vehicle for continued and permanent education in the field of Family and Community Health, with emphasis to the central subject PHC. Manuscripts will be reviewed by members of the Scientific and Editorial Board as well as by outside referees. This peer-review process safeguards the identity of authors and their institutions of origin, which only will be revealed to the Editorial Board in the end of the evaluation process. All manuscripts should be prepared in Portuguese language. Foreign authors, not living in Brazil, can submit their papers in English or Spanish. Categories and formats of papers The journal is divided into the following sections: Editorial Original articles Review articles Directives in Family and Community Medicine Essays Case reports Theses Letters to the Editor The Editorial is responsibility of the editor of the journal, but can be prepared by third persons on his request. The section Original Articles is dedicated to reports on scientific investigations, presenting original data on findings from experiments or observation with emphasis to qualitative or quantitative studies in fields of interest for PHC. Original articles are criticisms or creations on science, technology and the art of health sciences, contributing to the evolution of knowledge about Man, nature and social and cultural inclusion. The papers - including

  11. Status and progress of family health in Latin America and the Caribbean: the Ibero-American Confederation of Family Medicine (ICPM perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Inez Padula Anderson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the XXI century, much of humanity does not have access to comprehensive health care, or even basic equitable health care. If studies show that countries with organized health systems based on a qualified and inclusive model of Primary Health Care (PHC and family physicians as permanent staff are achieving unquestionable results, why a large part of the countries with lower socio-economic development have not committed strongly to implement an efficient reform of their health systems based on PHC and family medicine (FM? These issues are at the core of the Latin American Confederation of Family Medicine’s concerns, an international non-profit organization composed of national associations of countries of FM from Latin America, Spain and Portugal. Its primary mission is to drive the implementation of a proper PHC system in all countries of the region and to ensure that family medicine, as a specialty, is considered critical to health systems, thereby transforming it into a public policy.

  12. Satisfaction with civilian family medicine residency training: Perspectives from serving general duty medical officers in the Canadian Armed Forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfrom, Brent; Hodgetts, Geoff; Kotecha, Jyoti; Pollock, Emily; Martin, Mary; Han, Han; Morissette, Pierre

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate satisfaction with civilian residency training programs among serving general duty medical officers within the Canadian Armed Forces. A 23-item, cross-sectional survey face-validated by the office of the Surgeon General of the Canadian Armed Forces. Canada. General duty medical officers serving in the Canadian Armed Forces as of February 2014 identified through the Directorate of Health Services Personnel of the Canadian Forces Health Services Group Headquarters. Satisfaction with and time spent in 7 domains of training: trauma, critical care, emergency medicine, psychiatry, occupational health, sports medicine, and base clinic training. Overall preparedness for leading a health care team, caring for a military population, working in isolated and challenging environments, and being deployed were evaluated on a 5-point Likert scale. Among the survey respondents (n = 135, response rate 54%), 77% agreed or strongly agreed that their family medicine residency training was relevant to their role as a general duty medical officer. Most respondents were either satisfied or very satisfied with their emergency medicine training (77%) and psychiatry training (63%), while fewer were satisfied or very satisfied with their sports medicine (47%), base clinic (41%), and critical care (43%) training. Even fewer respondents were satisfied or very satisfied with their trauma (26%) and occupational health (12%) training. Regarding overall preparedness, 57% believed that they were adequately prepared to care for a military patient population, and 52% of respondents believed they were prepared for their first posting. Fewer respondents (38%) believed they were prepared to work in isolated, austere, or challenging environments, and even fewer (32%) believed that residency training prepared them to lead a health care team. General duty medical officers were satisfied with many aspects of their family medicine residency training; however, military-specific areas for improvement

  13. Relevance of Chronic Lyme Disease to Family Medicine as a Complex Multidimensional Chronic Disease Construct: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liesbeth Borgermans

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lyme disease has become a global public health problem and a prototype of an emerging infection. Both treatment-refractory infection and symptoms that are related to Borrelia burgdorferi infection remain subject to controversy. Because of the absence of solid evidence on prevalence, causes, diagnostic criteria, tools and treatment options, the role of autoimmunity to residual or persisting antigens, and the role of a toxin or other bacterial-associated products that are responsible for the symptoms and signs, chronic Lyme disease (CLD remains a relatively poorly understood chronic disease construct. The role and performance of family medicine in the detection, integrative treatment, and follow-up of CLD are not well studied either. The purpose of this paper is to describe insights into the complexity of CLD as a multidimensional chronic disease construct and its relevance to family medicine by means of a systematic literature review.

  14. Relevance of chronic lyme disease to family medicine as a complex multidimensional chronic disease construct: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgermans, Liesbeth; Goderis, Geert; Vandevoorde, Jan; Devroey, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease has become a global public health problem and a prototype of an emerging infection. Both treatment-refractory infection and symptoms that are related to Borrelia burgdorferi infection remain subject to controversy. Because of the absence of solid evidence on prevalence, causes, diagnostic criteria, tools and treatment options, the role of autoimmunity to residual or persisting antigens, and the role of a toxin or other bacterial-associated products that are responsible for the symptoms and signs, chronic Lyme disease (CLD) remains a relatively poorly understood chronic disease construct. The role and performance of family medicine in the detection, integrative treatment, and follow-up of CLD are not well studied either. The purpose of this paper is to describe insights into the complexity of CLD as a multidimensional chronic disease construct and its relevance to family medicine by means of a systematic literature review.

  15. Family Medicine Residents' Performance with Detected Versus Undetected Simulated Patients Posing as Problem Drinkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark B. Sobell, PhD

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Simulated patients are commonly used to evaluate medical trainees. Unannounced simulated patients provide an accurate measure of physician performance. Purpose: To determine the effects of detection of SPs on physician performance, and identify factors leading to detection. Methods: Fixty-six family medicine residents were each visited by two unannounced simulated patients presenting with alcohol-induced hypertension or insomnia. Residents were then surveyed on their detection of SPs. Results: SPs were detected on 45 out of 104 visits. Inner city clinics had higher detection rates than middle class clinics. Residents’ checklist and global rating scores were substantially higher on detected than undetected visits, for both between-subject and within-subject comparisons. The most common reasons for detection concerned SP demographics and behaviour; the SP “did not act like a drinker” and was of a different social class than the typical clinic patient. Conclusions: Multi-clinic studies involving residents experienced with SPs should ensure that the SP role and behavior conform to physician expectations and the demographics of the clinic. SP station testing does not accurately reflect physicians’ actual clinical behavior and should not be relied on as the primary method of evaluation. The study also suggests that physicians’ poor performance in identifying and managing alcohol problems is not entirely due to lack of skill, as they demonstrated greater clinical skills when they became aware that they were being evaluated. Physicians’ clinical priorities, sense of responsibility and other attitudinal determinants of their behavior should be addressed when training physicians on the management of alcohol problems.

  16. Training Standards Statements of Family Medicine Postgraduate Training - A Review of Existing Documents Worldwide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Flum

    Full Text Available For the effective and safe management of complex care needs for patients in community settings, high quality family medicine (FM training programmes are needed. In less primary care oriented countries, training standards statements for FM postgraduate training are less commonly found. The aim of this study was to review international training standards statements in FM postgraduate training and to catalogue these statements to be used as a best practice standard guide for FM training programs in Germany.A structured three-tiered search was performed: a systematic literature search in MEDLINE®; a search of international indicator databases; and a search in grey literature, consisting of a survey of international experts and a search in "Google (Scholar". From all identified documents, training standards statements were extracted, translated and summarized into categories referring to the same quality aspect.The search strategy revealed 25 relevant documents (MEDLINE® n = 15, databases n = 2, experts n = 7, "Google" n = 1, containing 337 training standards statements. These were summarized into 80 statements. They covered structure quality (n = 35; process quality (n = 43; and two training standards statements referred to outcome quality (n = 2.A broad range of internationally sourced training standards statements for FM postgraduate training could be identified from countries with well-established primary care systems. Only few statements internationally referred to outcome quality, expressing the difficulty in assessing outcome. The resulting inventory of training standards statements for FM postgraduate training can serve as a resource for institutions seeking to formalise and systematise FM training at regional or national levels.

  17. Sleep duration, quality, or stability and obesity in an urban family medicine center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logue, Everett E; Scott, Edward D; Palmieri, Patrick A; Dudley, Patricia

    2014-02-15

    Inadequate sleep has negative metabolic consequences that may contribute to obesity. A priori hypotheses posit relationships between sleep characteristics, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, appetite, fatigue, and obesity in laboratory, clinical, and population settings. There are few reports from primary care; and none that address sleep duration, quality, and stability. This study examines the relationship between three sleep characteristics-duration, quality, or stability-and obesity in our urban hospital affiliated family medicine center in Akron, Ohio. A systematic sampling process yielded 225 representative patients who completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, the Berlin Apnea Questionnaire, and the Sleep Timing Questionnaire. Demographic, body mass, hypertension, and insurance data were obtained from the electronic medical record. Associations between self-reported sleep characteristics and obesity were examined via contingency tables and regression models. Seventy-eight percent (78%) reported poor quality sleep, 59% had elevated Berlin apnea-risk scores, 12% reported restless legs symptoms, and 9% reported a prior diagnosis of sleep apnea; 62% were obese. We found significant (p obesity. The association between sleep quality and obesity was negative and linear (69%, 72%, 56%, 43%), while the association between sleep duration and obesity was U-shaped (74%, 53%, 53%, 62%; linear term p = 0.02 and quadratic term p = 0.03). Less stable bedtimes during the week (OR = 2.3, p = 0.008) or on the weekend (OR = 1.8, p = 0.04) were also associated with obesity. The association between sleep quality and obesity was not explained by patient demographics or snoring (ORadj = 2.2; p = 0.008). This study adds to the sparse literature on the relationship between three self-reported sleep characteristics and obesity in urban primary care settings which typically differ from both general population and specialty outpatient settings.

  18. Shared Canadian Curriculum in Family Medicine (SHARC-FM): Creating a national consensus on relevant and practical training for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, David A; Scott, Ian; Sylvester, Michael; Tan, Amy; Horrey, Kathleen; Weston, W Wayne

    2017-04-01

    In 2006, leaders of undergraduate family medicine education programs faced a series of increasing curriculum mandates in the context of limited time and financial resources. Additionally, it became apparent that a hidden curriculum against family medicine as a career choice was active in medical schools. The Shared Canadian Curriculum in Family Medicine was developed by the Canadian Undergraduate Family Medicine Education Directors and supported by the College of Family Physicians of Canada as a national collaborative project to support medical student training in family medicine clerkship. Its key objective is to enable education leaders to meet their educational mandates, while at the same time countering the hidden curriculum and providing a route to scholarship. The Shared Canadian Curriculum in Family Medicine is an open-access, shared, national curriculum (www.sharcfm.ca). It contains 23 core clinical topics (determined through a modified Delphi process) with demonstrable objectives for each. It also includes low- and medium-fidelity virtual patient cases, point-of-care learning resources (clinical cards), and assessment tools, all aligned with the core topics. French translation of the resources is ongoing. The core topics, objectives, and educational resources have been adopted by medical schools across Canada, according to their needs. The lessons learned from mounting this multi-institutional collaborative project will help others develop their own collaborative curricula. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  19. A Feminist Perspective of Family Medicine%家庭治疗的女性主义思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐振敏

    2011-01-01

    主要通过女性主义的眼光审视传统家庭治疗流派的理念,反映当前家庭治疗中存在的对女性经验的忽视等不足,探索治疗实践中治疗目标、治疗关系和使用的技术等方面所需要做出的改变,同时简要分析这一现状中家庭治疗师的责任和治疗理念变化的趋向。从家庭治疗自身演变发展的角度,展望未来家庭治疗的发展方向。%This paper adopts a feminist perspective to examine the neglect of women in the traditional theory and practice of family medicine that still prevails today. It investigates in necessary changes in the goals of medicine, relationships in treatment, and technolo- gy used. It also foresees the direction in which changes in responsibilities of family doctors and their perspective of treatment could be made. In so doing, the paper looks into the future development of family medicine.

  20. Telemedicine and E-Learning in a Primary Care Setting in Sudan: The Experience of the Gezira Family Medicine Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, K G; Hunskaar, S; Abdelrahman, S H; Malik, E M

    2015-01-01

    Information and communication technology (ICT) is progressively used in the health sector (e-health), to provide health care in a distance (telemedicine), facilitate medical education (e-learning), and manage patients' information (electronic medical records, EMRs). Gezira Family Medicine Project (GFMP) in Sudan provides a 2-year master's degree in family medicine, with ICT fully integrated in the project. This cross-sectional study describes ICT implementation and utilization at the GFMP for the years 2011-2012. Administrative data was used to describe ICT implementation, while questionnaire-based data was used to assess candidates' perceptions and satisfaction. In the period from April 2011 to December 2012, 3808 telemedicine online consultations were recorded and over 165000 new patients' EMRs were established by the study subjects (125 candidates enrolled in the program). Almost all respondents confirmed the importance of telemedicine. The majority appreciated also the importance of using EMRs. Online lectures were highly rated by candidates in spite of the few challenges encountered by combining service provision with learning activity. Physicians highlighted some patients' concerns about the use of telemedicine and EMRs during clinical consultations. Results from this study confirmed the suitability of ICT use in postgraduate training in family medicine and in service provision.

  1. Instructions to authors of the Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina de Familia e Comunidade SBMFC

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine (BJFCM is a three-monthly publication of the Brazilian Society of Family and Community Medicine, aimed at sensitizing professionals and health authorities to this field of interest, stimulating and disseminating Primary Health Care (PHC issues and investigations, and facilitating interchange between academic institutions, health care services and organized social movements. The periodical also aims to promote an interdisciplinary approach to this area and to serve as a vehicle for continued and permanent education in the field of Family and Community Health, with emphasis to the central subject PHC. Manuscripts will be reviewed by members of the Scientific and Editorial Board as well as by outside referees. This peer-review process safeguards the identity of authors and their institutions of origin, which only will be revealed to the Editorial Board in the end of the evaluation process. All manuscripts should be prepared in Portuguese language. Foreign authors, not living in Brazil, can submit their papers in English or Spanish. Categories and formats of papers The journal is divided into the following sections: Editorial Original articles Review articles Directives in Family and Community Medicine Essays Case reports Theses Letters to the Editor The Editorial is responsibility of the editor of the journal, but can be prepared by third persons on his request. The section Original Articles is dedicated to reports on scientific investigations, presenting original data on findings from experiments or observation with emphasis to qualitative or quantitative studies in fields of interest for PHC. Original articles are criticisms or creations on science, technology and the art of health sciences, contributing to the evolution of knowledge about Man, nature and social and cultural inclusion. The papers - including introduction, material or rationale, methods, results, discussion and conclusion

  2. Instructions to authors of the Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revista Brasileira de Medicina de Família e Comunidade RBMFC

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine (BJFCM is a three-monthly publication of the Brazilian Society of Family and Community Medicine, aimed at sensitizing professionals and health authorities to this field of interest, stimulating and disseminating Primary Health Care (PHC issues and investigations, and facilitating interchange between academic institutions, health care services and organized social movements. The periodical also aims to promote an interdisciplinary approach to this area and to serve as a vehicle for continued and permanent education in the field of Family and Community Health, with emphasis to the central subject PHC. Manuscripts will be reviewed by members of the Scientific and Editorial Board as well as by outside referees. This peer-review process safeguards the identity of authors and their institutions of origin, which only will be revealed to the Editorial Board in the end of the evaluation process. All manuscripts should be prepared in Portuguese language. Foreign authors, not living in Brazil, can submit their papers in English or Spanish. Categories and formats of papers The journal is divided into the following sections: Editorial Original articles Review articles Directives in Family and Community Medicine Essays Case reports Theses Letters to the Editor The Editorial is responsibility of the editor of the journal, but can be prepared by third persons on his request. The section Original Articles is dedicated to reports on scientific investigations, presenting original data on findings from experiments or observation with emphasis to qualitative or quantitative studies in fields of interest for PHC. Original articles are criticisms or creations on science, technology and the art of health sciences, contributing to the evolution of knowledge about Man, nature and social and cultural inclusion. The papers - including introduction, material or rationale, methods, results, discussion and conclusion

  3. Instructions to authors of the Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamilton Lima Wagner

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine (BJFCM is a three-monthly publication of the Brazilian Society of Family and Community Medicine, aimed at sensitizing professionals and health authorities to this field of interest, stimulating and disseminating Primary Health Care (PHC issues and investigations, and facilitating interchange between academic institutions, health care services and organized social movements. The periodical also aims to promote an interdisciplinary approach to this area and to serve as a vehicle for continued and permanent education in the field of Family and Community Health, with emphasis to the central subject PHC. Manuscripts will be reviewed by members of the Scientific and Editorial Board as well as by outside referees. This peer-review process safeguards the identity of authors and their institutions of origin, which only will be revealed to the Editorial Board in the end of the evaluation process. All manuscripts should be prepared in Portuguese language. Foreign authors, not living in Brazil, can submit their papers in English or Spanish. Categories and formats of papers The journal is divided into the following sections: Editorial Original articles Review articles Directives in Family and Community Medicine Essays Case reports Theses Letters to the Editor The Editorial is responsibility of the editor of the journal, but can be prepared by third persons on his request. The section Original Articles is dedicated to reports on scientific investigations, presenting original data on findings from experiments or observation with emphasis to qualitative or quantitative studies in fields of interest for PHC. Original articles are criticisms or creations on science, technology and the art of health sciences, contributing to the evolution of knowledge about Man, nature and social and cultural inclusion. The papers - including introduction, material or rationale, methods, results, discussion and conclusion

  4. Instructions to authors of the Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina de Família e Comunidade SBMFC

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine (BJFCM is a three-monthly publication of the Brazilian Society of Family and Community Medicine, aimed at sensitizing professionals and health authorities to this field of interest, stimulating and disseminating Primary Health Care (PHC issues and investigations, and facilitating interchange between academic institutions, health care services and organized social movements. The periodical also aims to promote an interdisciplinary approach to this area and to serve as a vehicle for continued and permanent education in the field of Family and Community Health, with emphasis to the central subject PHC. Manuscripts will be reviewed by members of the Scientific and Editorial Board as well as by outside referees. This peer-review process safeguards the identity of authors and their institutions of origin, which only will be revealed to the Editorial Board in the end of the evaluation process. All manuscripts should be prepared in Portuguese language. Foreign authors, not living in Brazil, can submit their papers in English or Spanish. Categories and formats of papers The journal is divided into the following sections: Editorial Original articles Review articles Directives in Family and Community Medicine Essays Case reports Theses Letters to the Editor The Editorial is responsibility of the editor of the journal, but can be prepared by third persons on his request. The section Original Articles is dedicated to reports on scientific investigations, presenting original data on findings from experiments or observation with emphasis to qualitative or quantitative studies in fields of interest for PHC. Original articles are criticisms or creations on science, technology and the art of health sciences, contributing to the evolution of knowledge about Man, nature and social and cultural inclusion. The papers - including introduction, material or rationale, methods, results, discussion and conclusion

  5. Institute of Medicine 2009 Gestational Weight Gain Guideline Knowledge: Survey of Obstetrics/Gynecology and Family Medicine Residents of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore Simas, Tiffany A.; Waring, Molly E.; Sullivan, Gina M. T.; Liao, Xun; Rosal, Milagros C.; Hardy, Janet R.; Berry, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2009, the Institute of Medicine revised gestational weight gain recommendations; revisions included body mass index (BMI) category cut-point changes and provision of range of gain for obese women. Our objective was to examine resident prenatal care providers’ knowledge of revised guidelines. Methods Anonymous electronic survey of Obstetrics/Gynecology and Family Medicine residents across U.S. from January–April 2010. Results 660 completed the survey; 79% female and 69% aged 21–30 years. When permitted to select ≥1 response, 87.0% reported using BMI to assess weight status at initial visits, 44.4% reported using “clinical impression based on patient appearance”, and 1.4% reported not using any parameters. When asked the most important baseline parameter for providing recommendations, 35.8% correctly identified pre-pregnancy BMI, 2.1% reported “I don’t provide guidelines,” and 4.5% reported “I do not discuss gestational weight gain.” 57.6% reported not being aware of new guidelines. Only 7.6% selected correct BMI ranges for each category. Only 5.8% selected correct gestational weight gain ranges. Only 2.3% correctly identified both BMI cutoffs and recommended gestational weight gain ranges per 2009 guidelines. Conclusions Guideline knowledge is the foundation of accurate counseling, yet resident prenatal care providers were minimally aware of the 2009 Institute of Medicine gestational weight gain guidelines almost a year after their publication. PMID:24344704

  6. Global Cardiovascular Risk Assessment by Family Physicians in Suez Canal University-Family Medicine Centers-Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Nour-Eldein, Hebatallah; Abdelsalam, Shimaa A.; Nasr, Gamila M.; Abdelwahed, Hassan A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The close sustained contact of family physician with their patients and local community makes preventive care an integral part of their routine work. Most cardiovascular diseases (CVD) can be prevented by addressing their risk factors. There are several guidelines that recommend different CV risk assessment tools to support CV prevention strategies. Aim: This study aimed to assess awareness and attitude of global CV risk assessment and use of their tools by family physicians; aimi...

  7. Elective course planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Simon; Sørensen, Matias; Stidsen, Thomas Riis

    2011-01-01

    Efficient planning increasingly becomes an indispensable tool for management of both companies and public organizations. This is also the case for high school management in Denmark, because the growing individual freedom of the students to choose courses makes planning much more complex. Due...... to reforms, elective courses are today an important part of the curriculum, and elective courses are a good way to make high school education more attractive for the students. In this article, the problem of planning the elective courses is modeled using integer programming and three different solution...... for the Elective Course Planning Problem has been described in the literature before. The proposed algorithms are tested on data sets from 98 of the 150 high schools in Denmark. The tests show that for the majority of the problems, the optimal solution can be obtained within the one hour time bound. Furthermore...

  8. Experience with using second life for medical education in a family and community medicine education unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melús-Palazón Elena

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The application of new technologies to the education of health professionals is both a challenge and a necessity. Virtual worlds are increasingly being explored as a support for education. Aim: The aim of this work is to study the suitability of Second Life (SL as an educational tool for primary healthcare professionals. Methods Design: Qualitative study of accredited clinical sessions in SL included in a continuing professional development (CPD programme for primary healthcare professionals. Location: Zaragoza I Zone Family and Community Medicine Education Unit (EU and 9 health centres operated by the Aragonese Health Service, Aragon, Spain. Method: The EU held two training workshops in SL for 16 healthcare professionals from 9 health centres by means of two workshops, and requested them to facilitate clinical sessions in SL. Attendance was open to all personnel from the EU and the 9 health centres. After a trail period of clinical sessions held at 5 health centres between May and November 2010, the CPD-accredited clinical sessions were held at 9 health centres between February and April 2011. Participants: 76 healthcare professionals attended the CPD-accredited clinical sessions in SL. Main measurements: Questionnaire on completion of the clinical sessions. Results Response rate: 42-100%. Questionnaire completed by each health centre on completion of the CPD-accredited clinical sessions: Access to SL: 2 centres were unable to gain access. Sound problems: 0% (0/9. Image problems: 0% (0/9. Voice/text chat: used in 100% (10/9; 0 incidents. Questionnaire completed by participants in the CPD-accredited clinical sessions: Preference for SL as a tool: 100% (76/76. Strengths of this method: 74% (56/76 considered it eliminated the need to travel; 68% (52/76 believed it made more effective use of educational resources; and 47% (36/76 considered it improved accessibility. Weaknesses: 91% (69/76 experienced technical problems, while; 9

  9. Relevance of clerkship characteristics in changing students' interest in family medicine: a questionnaire survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herwig, Anna; Viehmann, Anja; Thielmann, Anika; Gesenhues, Stefan; Weltermann, Birgitta

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Exposure to family medicine (FM) can serve to promote students' interest in this field. This study aimed at identifying clerkship characteristics which decrease or increase students' interest in FM. Design This cross-sectional questionnaire study analysed students' clerkship evaluations between the years 2004 and 2014. Descriptive statistics were used to compare four predefined groups: (1) high interest in FM before and after the clerkship (Remained high), (2) poor interest before and after the clerkship (Remained low), (3) poor interest before the clerkship which improved (Increased) and (4) high interest before the clerkship which decreased (Decreased). Setting Students' evaluations of FM clerkships in the fourth of 6 years of medical school. Participants All questionnaires with complete answers on students' interest in FM and its change as a result of the clerkship (2382 of 3963; 60.1%). The students' mean age was 26 years (± 3.9), 62.7% (n=1505) were female. Outcome measure The outcome was a change in students' interest in FM after completing the clerkship. Results Interest in FM after the clerkship was as follows: 40.1% (n=954) Remained high, 5.5% (n=134) Remained low, 42.1% (n=1002) Increased and 12.3% (n=292) Decreased. Students with decreased interest had performed a below-average number of learning activities (4 vs 6 activities). A total of 45.9% (n=134 of 292) of the students with decreased interest reported that the difficulty of the challenge was inadequate for their educational level: 81.3% (n=109) felt underchallenged and 18.7% (n=25) overchallenged. Conclusions In more than 50% of cases, the clerkship changed the students' interest in FM. Those with decreased interest were more frequently underchallenged. We observed an increase in FM if at least six learning activities were trained. Our findings stress the importance of well-designed FM clerkships. There is a need for standardised educational strategies which enable teaching

  10. Art-making in a family medicine clerkship: how does it affect medical student empathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potash, Jordan S; Chen, Julie Y; Lam, Cindy L K; Chau, Vivian T W

    2014-11-28

    To provide patient-centred holistic care, doctors must possess good interpersonal and empathic skills. Medical schools traditionally adopt a skills-based approach to such training but creative engagement with the arts has also been effective. A novel arts-based approach may help medical students develop empathic understanding of patients and thus contribute to medical students' transformative process into compassionate doctors. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of an arts-making workshop on medical student empathy. This was a mixed-method quantitative-qualitative study. In the 2011-12 academic year, all 161 third year medical students at the University of Hong Kong were randomly allocated into either an arts-making workshop or a problem-solving workshop during the Family Medicine clerkship according to a centrally-set timetable. Students in the arts-making workshop wrote a poem, created artwork and completed a reflective essay while students in the conventional workshop problem-solved clinical cases and wrote a case commentary. All students who agreed to participate in the study completed a measure of empathy for medical students, the Jefferson Scale of Empathy (JSE) (student version), at the start and end of the clerkship. Quantitative data analysis: Paired t-test and repeated measures ANOVA was used to compare the change within and between groups respectively. Qualitative data analysis: Two researchers independently chose representational narratives based on criteria adapted from art therapy. The final 20 works were agreed upon by consensus and thematically analysed using a grounded theory approach. The level of empathy declined in both groups over time, but with no statistically significant differences between groups. For JSE items relating to emotional influence on medical decision making, participants in the arts-making workshop changed more than those in the problem-solving workshop. From the qualitative data, students perceived benefits in arts

  11. Global Cardiovascular Risk Assessment by Family Physicians in Suez Canal University-Family Medicine Centers-Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nour-Eldein, Hebatallah; Abdelsalam, Shimaa A; Nasr, Gamila M; Abdelwahed, Hassan A

    2013-01-01

    The close sustained contact of family physician with their patients and local community makes preventive care an integral part of their routine work. Most cardiovascular diseases (CVD) can be prevented by addressing their risk factors. There are several guidelines that recommend different CV risk assessment tools to support CV prevention strategies. This study aimed to assess awareness and attitude of global CV risk assessment and use of their tools by family physicians; aiming to improve CV prevention service. The current study is a cross-sectional descriptive analytic. Sixty-five family physicians were asked to respond to, validated anonymous questionnaire to collect data about characteristics of family physicians, their awareness, attitude, current use, barriers, and recommendations of global CV risk assessment. Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 18 was used for data entry and analysis. Awareness of guidelines of global CV risk assessment was relatively higher regarding the American guidelines (30.8%) than that recommended by World Health Organization (WHO) for Egypt (20.2%). 50.8% of participants had favorable attitude. There was statistical significant relationship between attitude scores and physician characteristics; age (P = 0.003), qualification (P = 0.001) and number of patients seen per week (P = 0.009). Routine use of global CV risk assessment tools was reported only (23%) by family physicians. Relative higher attitude scores than use of global CV risk assessment tools in practice. The most frequent barriers were related to lack of resources and shortage in training/skills and the raised suggestions were towards training.

  12. Starting a family during medical studies? Results of a pilot study on family friendliness in the study of medicine at the University of Ulm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebhardt, Hubert; Stolz, Katrin; Mörtl, Kathrin; Prospero, Katrin; Niehues, Johanna; Fegert, Jörg

    2011-01-01

    The Ulm pilot study aimed to explore factors for a successful combination of medical education and starting a family. The empirical data derived from this study constitutes the foundation for an evidence-based reform of the medical curriculum in Ulm. In 2009, qualitative interviews with 37 of the 79 medical students with children at University of Ulm were conducted and analyzed using content analysis. The detected problem areas were used to develop a quantitative questionnaire for studying parents and academic teaching members in medical education in Ulm. The parents were older, more often married and more likely to already have obtained a first training. One third of the students thought there was no ideal time to start a family during the years of medical education or specialist training. However, the majority of the students (61%) were convinced that parenthood is more compatible with medical studies than with specialist training. The interview data suggests that the end of medical school (4(th) to 6(th) year of studies), preferably during semester break, is especially suitable for child birth since it allows students to continue their studies without 'losing time'. The biography and career of studying parents in medicine have specific characteristics. Universities and teaching hospitals are required to no longer leave the compatibility of family and study responsibilities to the students themselves. Rather, flexible structures need to be implemented that enable students to start a family while continuing their education. This means providing more childcare and greater support regarding academic counselling and career development.

  13. Evaluation of the Learning Environment for Diploma in Family Medicine with the Dundee Ready Education Environment (DREEM) Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, A Sattar; Akturk, Zekeriya; Al-Megbil, Tarek

    2010-11-29

    The primary healthcare system is at a turning point in Saudi Arabia. However, the sustainability of family medicine as the core element of that system is increasingly being called into question because of lack of family physicians. In keeping view this problem; a postgraduate diploma program in family medicine has started in 2008. A validated measure of educational environment i.e., Dundee Ready Education Environment (DREEM) questionnaire consisting of 50 questions having five domains of perception was administered to all 13 trainees of the diploma course at the completion of the program to check their perception about learning evironment. The trainees comprised of 4 males (40%) and 6 females (60%). The overall score showed more positive than negative side (147/200). There is no significant difference (P > 0.05) in the mean scores of five different domains of perception. The subclasses of five domains showed that teaching perceived as positive by 50%, moving towards right direction by 80%, feeling more positive by 50%, positive attitude by 80% and the 70% scored the course as not too bad. The overall high score and positive attitude towards the course assures the better teaching environment. However, there are areas to improve and it requires continuous evaluation.

  14. Eight years of building community partnerships and trust: the UCLA family medicine community-based participatory research experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Gerardo; Rodríguez, Michael A; Lopez, Glenn A; Bholat, Michelle A; Dowling, Patrick T

    2009-10-01

    Acknowledging the growing disparities in health and health care that exist among immigrant families and minority populations in large urban communities, the UCLA Department of Family Medicine (DFM) sought a leadership role in the development of family medicine training and community-based participatory research (CBPR). Performing CBPR requires that academic medicine departments build sustainable and long-term community partnerships. The authors describe the eight-year (2000-2008) process of building sustainable community partnerships and trust between the UCLA DFM and the Sun Valley community, located in Los Angeles County.The authors used case studies of three research areas of concentration (asthma, diabetes prevention, and establishing access to primary care) to describe how they established community trust and sustained long-term community research partnerships. In preparing each case study, they used an iterative process to review qualitative data.Many lessons were common across their research concentration areas. They included the importance of (1) having clear and concrete community benefits, (2) supporting an academic-community champion, (3) political advocacy, (4) partnering with diverse organizations, (5) long-term academic commitment, and (6) medical student involvement. The authors found that establishing a long-term relationship and trust was a prerequisite to successfully initiate CBPR activities that included an asthma school-based screening program, community walking groups, and one of the largest school-based primary care clinics in the United States.Their eight-year experience in the Sun Valley community underscores how academic-community research partnerships can result in benefits of high value to communities and academic departments.

  15. Uncertified Presidential Election Results Allegheny County General Election

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset contains uncertified data we compiled since the 2004 general election containing vote totals for presidential candidates by Allegheny County Election...

  16. Elections From Afar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JENNIFER; JETT

    2008-01-01

    Packed into a Beijing cafe on November 5, 6,000 miles and 16 hours away from the U. S. presidential election, the crowd excitedly began counting down the seconds until Wes Coast polls closed: 10,9,8 Earlier voter surveys had shown Barack Obama would win California, Oregon and Washington by wide margins. Together with the states he had already won, these states would give him more than enough electoral votes. As soon as the countdown ended, up flashed on the TV screen: "Barack Obama Elected President."

  17. The Complexity of Manipulating $k$-Approval Elections

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    An important problem in computational social choice theory is the computability and complexity of undesirable behavior among agents, such as control, manipulation, and bribery in election systems. These kind of voting strategies are often tempting at the individual level but disasterous for the agents as a whole. Creating election systems where the determination of such strategies is difficult is thus an important goal. Previous work in this area has demonstrated the complexity of misuse in cases involving a fixed number of candidates, and of specific election systems on unbounded number of candidates such as Borda. In contrast, we take the first step in generalizing the results of computational complexity of election misuse to cases of infinitely many systems on an unbounded number of candidates. Interesting families of systems include $k$-approval and $k$-veto elections, in which voters distinguish $k$ candidates from the candidate set. We also demonstrate a surprising connection between manipulation in ele...

  18. 2014 Election forecast - a post-election analysis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ittmann, HW

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available . This election forecasting model had been used successfully for a number of elections in the past and in these previous elections, with around 5% {10% of the results available, the predictions produced by the model were very close to the final outcome...

  19. Theoretical approaches to elections defining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya V. Lebedeva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical approaches to elections defining develop the nature, essence and content of elections, help to determine their place and a role as one of the major national law institutions in democratic system.

  20. Accelerating Momentum Toward Improved Health for Patients and Populations: Family Medicine as a Disruptive Innovation-A Perspective from the Keystone IV Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stream, Glen; DeVoe, Jennifer E; Hughes, Lauren S; Phillips, Robert L

    2016-01-01

    This paper was prepared in follow up to the G. Gayle Stephens Keystone IV Conference by authors who attended the conference and are also members of the Family Medicine for America's Health board of directors (FMAHealth.org). It connects the aspirations of the current strategic and communications efforts of FMAHealth with the ideas developed at the conference. The FMAHealth project is sponsored by 8 national family medicine organizations and seeks to build on the work of the original Future of Family Medicine project. Among its objectives are a robust family physician workforce practicing in a continually improving medical home model, supported by a comprehensive payment model sufficient to sustain the medical home and enable the personal physician relationship with patients.

  1. Approaching confidentiality at a familial level in genomic medicine: a focus group study with healthcare professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dheensa, Sandi; Fenwick, Angela; Lucassen, Anneke

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Clinical genetics guidelines from 2011 conceptualise genetic information as confidential to families, not individuals. The normative consequence of this is that the family's interest is the primary consideration and genetic information is shared unless there are good reasons not to do so. We investigated healthcare professionals' (HCPs') views about, and reasoning around, individual and familial approaches to confidentiality and how such views influenced their practice. Method 16 focus groups with 80 HCPs working in/with clinical genetics services were analysed, drawing on grounded theory. Results Participants raised seven problems with, and arguments against, going beyond the individual approach to confidentiality. These problems fell into two overlapping categories: ‘relationships’ and ‘structures’. Most participants had never considered ways to—or thought it was impossible to—treat familial genetic information and personal information differently. They worried that putting the familial approach into practice could disrupt family dynamics and erode patient trust in the health service. They also thought they had insufficient resources to share information and feared that sharing might change the standard of care and make them more vulnerable to liability. Conclusions A familial approach to confidentiality has not been accepted or adopted as a standard, but wider research suggests that some of the problems HCPs perceived are surmountable and sharing in the interest of the family can be achieved. However, further research is needed to explore how personal and familial genetic information can be separated in practice. Our findings are relevant to HCPs across health services who are starting to use genome tests as part of their routine investigations. PMID:28159847

  2. Constitutional Law--Elective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Joan; Wood, Robert J.

    The elective unit on Constitutional Law is intended for 11th and 12th grade students. The unit is designed around major course goals which are to develop those concepts whereby students recognize and understand the following three topic areas: 1) Role of the Federal Judicial Branch of Government, 2) Supreme Court Cases Involving the Three Branches…

  3. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. The voting takes place from the 31st of October to the 14th of November, at noon. As you may have noted when reading Echo, many issues concerning our employment conditions are on the agenda of the coming months and will keep the next Staff Council very busy. So, make your voice heard and take part in the elections for a new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will be representing you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. Every member of the Staff Association will have received an email containing a link to the webpage which will allow voting. If you are a member of the Staff Association and you did not receive such an email, please contact the Staff Association secretariat (staff.association@cern.ch). Do not forget to vote * * * * * * * Vote Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. More details on the election...

  4. AGU elects 1989 Fellows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twenty-two distinguished scientists have been elected Fellows of the Union. Fellows are scientists who are judged by their peers as having attained ackowledged eminence in a branch of geophysics. The number of Fellows elected each year is limited to 0.1 % of the total membership at the time of election. The newly elected Fellows are Walter Alvarez, University of California, Berkeley; John R. Booker, University of Washington, Seattle; Peter G. Brewer, Woods Hole Oceanographie Institution, Woods Hole, Mass.; Michael H. Carr, U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, Calif.; Gedeon Dagan, Tel Aviv University, Israel; James H. Dieterich, USGS, Menlo Park; Thomas Dunne, University of Washington, Seattle; Jack Fooed Evernden, USGS, Menlo Park; Edward A. Flinn, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C.; Arnold L. Gordon, Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory, Palisades, N.Y.; Gerhard Haerendel, Max Planck Institut, Garching, Federal Republic of Germany; David L. Kohlstedt, Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y.; Robert A. Langel, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD; James G. Moore, USGS, Menlo Park; Marcia Neugebauer, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Robert C. Newton, University of Chicago, Illinois; John A. Orcutt, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, Calif.; Robert B. Smith, University of Utah, Salt Lake City; Bengt U. Sonnerup, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H.; Martin A. Uman, University of Florida, Gainesville; Joe Veverka, Cornell University; and James C.G. Walker, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

  5. Election IAPSM UPUK 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Secretary IAPSMUPUK

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available As per the constitution of IAPSM UPUK, all the members of IAPSM UPUK are hereby informed that Nomination Form for the election of Office Bearers of IAPSM UPUK is now available on the official website (www.iapsmupuk.org. The interested candidates can send their duly filled nomination form for the election of the following posts of IAPSM UP & UK state chapter for the session 2017 – 2018.Secretary:                             01 PostVice - President:                  01 PostChief Editor:                         01 PostExecutive Member:            09 Posts (Six from UP & three from UKThe eligibility criteria for the posts are given in the constitution of IAPSM UPUK. The last date of nomination for the above posts is 30th August 2016 and the last date of withdrawal of nomination is 10th September 2016. Nominations should be sent to secetaryiapsmupuk@gmail.com before the deadline. Candidates seeking election for the post of Secretary/ Chief Editor/Vice - President should send a demand draft of Rs. 1000/- and those for the post of the members of executive committee of governing council Rs. 500/- along with the duly filled nomination form. The details of the nomination fee and its mode of payment etc are given in the prescribed nomination form, which can be downloaded from the official website of IAPSM UPUK state chapter (www.iapsmupuk.org.For conducting fair elections, Prof. J. V. Singh (MZN has been appointed by the Governing Council as                      Chief Election Officer. I hope this democratic way of electing our office bearers of IAPSM UP & UK will strengthen our association many fold. The elections will be held on the first day of IAPSM UPUK conference i.e., on 15th Oct’ 2016 during the General Council Meeting (GBM. I look forward to have active participation and cooperation all over.

  6. Training Family Medicine Residents in Effective Communication Skills While Utilizing Promotoras as Standardized Patients in OSCEs: A Health Literacy Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagels, Patti; Kindratt, Tiffany; Arnold, Danielle; Brandt, Jeffrey; Woodfin, Grant; Gimpel, Nora

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Future health care providers need to be trained in the knowledge and skills to effectively communicate with their patients with limited health literacy. The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a curriculum designed to increase residents' health literacy knowledge, improve communication skills, and work with an interpreter. Materials and Methods. Family Medicine residents (N = 25) participated in a health literacy training which included didactic lectures and an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). Community promotoras acted as standardized patients and evaluated the residents' ability to measure their patients' health literacy, communicate effectively using the teach-back and Ask Me 3 methods, and appropriately use an interpreter. Pre- and postknowledge, attitudes, and postdidactic feedback were obtained. We compared OSCE scores from the group that received training (didactic group) and previous graduates. Residents reported the skills they used in practice three months later. Results. Family Medicine residents showed an increase in health literacy knowledge (p = 0.001) and scored in the adequately to expertly performed range in the OSCE. Residents reported using the teach-back method (77.8%) and a translator more effectively (77.8%) three months later. Conclusions. Our innovative health literacy OSCE can be replicated for medical learners at all levels of training.

  7. Protective Effects of Some Medicinal Plants from Lamiaceae Family Against Beta-Amyloid Induced Toxicity in PC12 Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Saeidnia

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Excessive accumulation of beta-amyliod peptide (Aβ, the major component of senile plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD, causes neuronal cell death through induction of oxidative stress. Therefore, antioxidants may be of use in the treatment of AD. The medicinal plants from the Lamiaceae family have been widely used in Iranian traditional medicine. These plants contain compounds with antioxidant activity and some species in this family have been reported to have neuroprotective properties. In the present study, methanolic extract of seven plants from salvia and satureja species were evaluated for their protective effects against beta-amyloid induced neurotoxicity.Methods: Aerial parts of the plants were extracted with ethyl acetate and methanol, respectively, by percolation at room temperature and subsequently, methanolic extracts of the plants were prepared. PC12 cells were incubated with different concentrations of the extracts in culture medium 1h prior to incubation with Aβ. Cell toxicity was assessed 24h after addition of Aβ by MTT assay.Results: Satureja bachtiarica, Salvia officinalis and Salvia macrosiphon methanolic extracts exhibited high protective effects against Aβ induced toxicity (P<0.001. Protective effects of Satureja bachtiarica and Salvia officinalis were dose-dependent.Conclusion: The main constituents of these extracts are polyphenolic and flavonoid compounds such as rosmarinic acid, naringenin, apigenin and luteolin which have antioxidant properties and may have a role in neuroprotection. Based on neuroprotective effect of these plants against Aβ induced toxicity, we recommend greater attention to their use in the treatment of Alzheimer disease.

  8. The standard of knowledge for cesarean section in women who applied to family medicine: Two centered cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metin Canbal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We aimed to examine, mothers' level of knowledge about complications of cesarean section and the factors that influence preference for cesarean section in this study Methods: The universe of the study consisted of the women who admitted to the family medicine outdoor clinics in two different regions of Turkey namely Doğansehir State Hospital, Malatya and Kadışehri Entegrated State Hospital, Yozgat. Two hundred and one women included in the study who recruited the family medicine outdoor clinic irrespective of their primary complaint. The data was analyzed by the SPSS program. Results: Statistically significant difference was observed in terms of caesarean section operation rates in high school graduates. 29% of all the participants in this study had caesarean section operation in their first delivery. Conclusion: Personal predilections appear to be an influencing factor in deciding the type of the delivery currently. It is assumed that knowledge may be converted into the behaviors by giving the evidence based information to our patients in consistence with their perceptions along with the shared decision model in a collaborative manner.

  9. Training Family Medicine Residents in Effective Communication Skills While Utilizing Promotoras as Standardized Patients in OSCEs: A Health Literacy Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patti Pagels

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Future health care providers need to be trained in the knowledge and skills to effectively communicate with their patients with limited health literacy. The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a curriculum designed to increase residents’ health literacy knowledge, improve communication skills, and work with an interpreter. Materials and Methods. Family Medicine residents N=25 participated in a health literacy training which included didactic lectures and an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE. Community promotoras acted as standardized patients and evaluated the residents’ ability to measure their patients’ health literacy, communicate effectively using the teach-back and Ask Me 3 methods, and appropriately use an interpreter. Pre- and postknowledge, attitudes, and postdidactic feedback were obtained. We compared OSCE scores from the group that received training (didactic group and previous graduates. Residents reported the skills they used in practice three months later. Results. Family Medicine residents showed an increase in health literacy knowledge p=0.001 and scored in the adequately to expertly performed range in the OSCE. Residents reported using the teach-back method (77.8% and a translator more effectively (77.8% three months later. Conclusions. Our innovative health literacy OSCE can be replicated for medical learners at all levels of training.

  10. Electives in Graduate Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Santosh; Zayapragassarazan, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Modern curricula have both compulsory portions and electives or portions chosen by students. Electives have been a part of graduate and postgraduate general higher education. Electives are included in various standards for graduate medical education and are also included in proposed Medical Council of India Regulations on Graduate Medical…

  11. Self-reported colorectal cancer screening of Medicare beneficiaries in family medicine vs. internal medicine practices in the United States: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higgins Angela Y

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The benefit of screening for decreasing the risk of death from colorectal cancer (CRC has been shown, yet many patients in primary care are still not undergoing screening according to guidelines. There are known variations in delivery of preventive health care services among primary care physicians. This study compared self-reported CRC screening rates and patient awareness of the need for CRC screening of patients receiving care from family medicine (FPs vs. internal medicine (internists physicians. Methods Nationally representative sample of non-institutionalized beneficiaries who received medical care from FPs or internists in 2006 (using Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey. The main outcome was the percentage of patients screened in 2007. We also examined the percentage of patients offered screening. Results Patients of FPs, compared to those of internists, were less likely to have received an FOBT kit or undergone home FOBT, even after accounting for patients' characteristics. Compared to internists, FPs' patients were more likely to have heard of colonoscopy, but were less likely to receive a screening colonoscopy recommendation (18% vs. 27%, or undergo a colonoscopy (43% vs. 46%, adjusted odds ratios [AOR], 95% confidence interval [CI]-- 0.65, 0.51-0.81 or any CRC screening (52% vs. 60%, AOR, CI--0.80, 0.68-0.94. Among subgroups examined, higher income beneficiaries receiving care from internists had the highest screening rate (68%, while disabled beneficiaries receiving care from FPs had the lowest screening rate (34%. Conclusion Patients cared for by FPs had a lower rate of screening compared to those cared for by internists, despite equal or higher levels of awareness; a difference that remained statistically significant after accounting for socioeconomic status and access to healthcare. Both groups of patients remained below the national goal of 70 percent.

  12. The perceived value of clinical pharmacy service provision by pharmacists and physicians: an initial assessment of family medicine and internal medicine providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wietholter, Jon P; Ponte, Charles D; Long, Dustin M

    2016-10-24

    Few publications have addressed the perceptions of pharmacists and physicians regarding the value of clinical pharmacist services. A survey-based study was conducted to determine whether Internal Medicine (IM) and Family Medicine (FM) pharmacists and physicians differed in their attitudes regarding the benefits of collaboration in an acute care setting. The primary objective was to evaluate perceived differences regarding self-assessment of value between IM and FM pharmacists. The secondary objective was to evaluate perceived differences of clinical pharmacist benefit between IM and FM physicians. An eight-item questionnaire assessed the attitudes and beliefs of pharmacists and physicians regarding the value of clinical pharmacy services. Surveys were emailed and participants marked their responses using a 7-point Likert scale for each item. Demographic data and overall comments were collected from each participant. Overall, 167 surveys were completed. When comparing cumulative physician and pharmacist responses, none of the eight questions showed significant differences. Statistically significant differences were noted when comparing IM and FM clinical pharmacists on five of the eight survey items; for each of these items, FM pharmacists had more favourable perceptions than their IM counterparts. No statistically significant differences were noted when comparing responses of IM and FM physicians. This study found that FM pharmacists perceived a greater benefit regarding participation in inpatient acute care rounds when compared to their IM pharmacist counterparts. Future studies are necessary to determine if other medical specialties' perceptions of clinical pharmacy provision differ from our findings and to evaluate the rationale behind specific attitudes and behaviours. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  13. 5 CFR 891.201 - Election.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... election. (c) Each retired employee who elects to receive a Government contribution toward the cost of a... FEDERAL EMPLOYEES HEALTH BENEFITS Election and Change of Election § 891.201 Election. (a) The original period for election by each eligible retired employee was during the months of March and April 1961...

  14. Twenty-five years of the international Bled course for teachers of family medicine in Europe: Glancing back and looking forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemenc-Ketis, Zalika; Svab, Igor; Petek-Ster, Marija; Bulc, Mateja; Buchanan, Josephine; Finnegan, Henry; Correia de Sousa, Jaime; Yaphe, John

    2016-12-01

    The international Bled course for teacher training has played a central role in faculty development in family medicine for the past 25 years. The course was originally designed to promote faculty development for family medicine teachers in the new academic discipline of family medicine in Slovenia in 1990 and to introduce new topics into the family medicine curriculum. In this background paper, we perform a SCOT analysis (strengths, challenges, opportunities, and threats) of the current course, evaluating participant feedback and reviewing past topics and their impact on local and international teaching programmes. We also review the place of the course in the context of other teacher-training programmes in family medicine in Europe. We found that the structure and learning aims of the Bled course have remained stable over 25 years. It provides a safe, well-structured learning environment for the participants even though the course topic is different every year. The course has had a significant impact on curriculum development and teacher training in Slovenia as well as in many other countries in Europe and beyond. Because of the positive impact of the course and the high degree of satisfaction of the participants and course directors, it seems worthwhile to continue this endeavour. New directions for the course will depend on the learning needs of the participants and the evolving medical curricula in the countries they represent.

  15. Equation of States for Elections

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Bih-Yaw

    2012-01-01

    In the US 2008 presidential election, Barack Obama was elected as the 44th president of United States, winning the 53% of popular votes and 68% of electoral votes; in the election of 2000, Al Gore lost the election receiving 49 % of electoral votes, although he had more popular votes. It is generally believed that the electoral votes and the popular votes are correlated; however the detailed quantitative relationship for these two quantities is unclear. Here, we found an interesting relationship between fractions of electoral votes and fractions of popular votes in the presidential elections of the United States by examining the election results from 1932 to 2004. Moreover, this curve could provide an interesting explanation for the results of other elections that have taken place in Taiwan.

  16. Trust in Internet Election

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Randi; Ronquillo, Lorena; Schürmann, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the Decryption and Counting Ceremony held in conjunction with the internet voting trial on election day in the Ministry of Local Government and Regional Development of Norway in 2013. We examine the organizers' ambition of making the decryption and counting of electronic votes...... public in order to sustain trust in internet voting. We introduce a pragmatic approach to trust that emphasises the inseparability of truth from witnessing it. Based on this and on a description of how the event was made observable and how the complexities in the counting process were disclosed, we...... discuss what we term economy of truth from the perspective of the IT community involved in the ceremony. We claim that broadening the economy of truth by including more explicitly social and political perspectives in the ceremony, and in internet elections in general, and how witnessing is brought about...

  17. Election IAPSM UPUK 2016

    OpenAIRE

    Secretary IAPSMUPUK

    2016-01-01

    As per the constitution of IAPSM UPUK, all the members of IAPSM UPUK are hereby informed that Nomination Form for the election of Office Bearers of IAPSM UPUK is now available on the official website (www.iapsmupuk.org). The interested candidates can send their duly filled nomination form for the election of the following posts of IAPSM UP & UK state chapter for the session 2017 – 2018.Secretary:                             01 PostVice - President:                  01 PostChief Editor:   ...

  18. The importance of longitudinal studies in family medicine: experiences of two practice-based research networks.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weel, C. van; Weel-Baumgarten, E.M. van; Mold, J.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For evidence-based decision making in family practice, it is essential to know the long-term (natural) course of common diseases and their outcomes under care and treatment. This article, based on a research methodology workshop, aims to raise awareness and interest in longitudinal resea

  19. Crew Resource Management Use in U.S. Air Force Flight and Family Medicine Clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-30

    The study was designed as a cross-sectional quantitative analysis. Inclusion criteria were active duty Air Force base-level flight surgeons and family...Remember the Titans [videorecording]. Burbank, CA: Walt Disney Home Video; 2001. 14 Distribution A: Approved for public release

  20. Chronic noncancer pain management in primary care: family medicine physicians' risk assessment of opioid misuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavukcu, Ethem; Akdeniz, Melahat; Avci, Hasan Huseyin; Altuğ, Mehmet; Öner, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    The majority of patients with chronic noncancer pain (CNCP) are managed in the primary care settings. The primary care family physician (PCFP) generally has limited time, training, or access to resources to effectively evaluate and treat these patients, particularly when there is the added potential liability of prescribing opioids. The aim of this study is to make a favorable change in PCFPs' knowledge, attitudes, and practices about opioid use in CNCP via education on assessment of the risk of opioid misuse. The universe of this cross-sectional study comprised 36 family physicians working at Family Health Centers affiliated to Antalya Provincial Directorate of Health who volunteered to participate in the study. Initially, a survey on patients risk assessment was performed in both intervention and control groups; whereas the intervention group received education on assessment of the risk of opioid misuse, the control group did not. The survey was repeated after 6 months and the intervention group underwent a core examination. Data obtained were analyzed with Statistical Package for the Social Sciences 18.0 statistics program. Intervention and control groups were compared. Additionally, pre- and post-education results of the intervention group were also compared. About 61.1% of family physicians reported concern and hesitation in prescribing opioids due to known risks, such as overdose, addiction, dependence, or diversion, and agreed that family physicians should apply risk assessment before opioid use in CNCP. Only 16.6% of PCFP reported that risk assessment is not so necessary, whereas 22.2% of PCFP were undecided. Although 47.2% of the family physicians expressed a willingness to apply risk assessment before starting opioids, the rate of eagerness increased markedly to 77.7% after the education, but the rate of increase in practicing was not statistically significant. Knowledge and competency of the family physicians in managing CNCP were improved as was

  1. A Structured Curriculum for an Undergraduate Elective Clerkship in Pediatric Nephrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, Jerome S.; Schwartz, M. William

    1977-01-01

    An organizational structure was developed at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine for a pediatric nephrology elective. A study guide and format ensure that students have a common knowledge base--the lack of which has been a problem in electives--and allows them to participate in patient problems. (LBH)

  2. Upcoming Leadership Elections

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhaden, Mike

    2014-05-01

    AGU continues to evolve into a stronger, more innovative organization thanks to the dedication of volunteer leaders working in partnership with AGU staff. The Board and Council, which form the core of AGU's bicameral governance structure, provide guidance for the organization within the framework of its stakeholder-driven strategic plan. Members elected to Board and Council leadership positions are critically important to AGU's continued success.

  3. [Prevalence and factors associated with frequent attendence in family medicine clinic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parejo Maestre, N; Lendínez-de la Cruz, J M; Bermúdez-Torres, F M; Gónzalez-Contero, L; Gutierrez-Espinosa de Los Monteros, M P; Espejo-Almazán María, T

    2016-01-01

    The use of health services has seen a steep rise. The frequent users are responsible for significant economic, human and social impact. The objective is to analyze the characteristics of frequent attenders in our Health Center, in order to evaluate the possibility of taking corrective measures to improve the quality of care and efficiency in the use of resources. Descriptive observational study of a sample of 379 patients over 18 years old. The dependent variables were attendance (number of visits to their family doctor during the previous year), frequent attendance (10 or more visits to the family doctor in the last year), and persistent frequent attenders (10 or more visits to the family doctor in each of the last two years). Data were collected from medical records and by telephone interview. The mean attendance was 6.83 (95%CI: 6.13-7.53), frequent attendance reached 25.4% (95%CI: 21.4-29.6), and persistent frequent attenders, 1.6% (95%CI: 0.5-2.9). Frequent attendance was associated with sex, age, marital status, educational level, family structure, existence of chronic disease, use of anxiolytic and antidepressants, request for additional tests, and referrals to other specialists, proximity to the health center, and level of satisfaction with their family doctor. The low persistent frequent attenders found suggests that frequent attendance could be largely due to factors related to professional and organization. Studies are required to address the high level of consumption of psychotropic drugs, and improving professional skills in dealing with mental problems. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. And after the elections!

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    What happens to the newly elected, and the re-elected delegates after the election of the new Staff Council? (see Écho No 47-48 / 2016). It is the outgoing Staff Council which is responsible for preparing the new staff representatives to take on their new roles. To do this, information days are organized in the form of assizes. This year they took place on November 23 in the afternoon; as well as on November 24, bringing together the new Staff Council. These days mainly aim to inform delegates about the role of the Staff Association (SA) at CERN, ist the organs, committees, forums, etc.; with whom the SA interacts, how the work of the Staff Association is organization, the issues on which it works (e.g., the Five-Yearly Review..). These days are like a kind of "induction". Inform, but not only! Assizes are also aiming to integrate the newcomers, inviting them to discover the various internal committees of the SA, explaining to them the challenges ahead as well as defining the act...

  5. Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitory, Antioxidant and Phytochemical Properties of Selected Medicinal Plants of the Lamiaceae Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanda Vladimir-Knežević

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to evaluate acetylcholinesterase (AChE inhibitory and antioxidant activities of Lamiaceae medicinal plants growing wild in Croatia. Using Ellman’s colorimetric assay all tested ethanolic extracts and their hydroxycinnamic acid constituents demonstrated in vitro AChE inhibitory properties in a dose dependent manner. The extracts of Mentha x piperita, M. longifolia, Salvia officinalis, Satureja montana, Teucrium arduini, T. chamaedrys, T. montanum, T. polium and Thymus vulgaris at 1 mg/mL showed strong inhibitory activity against AChE. The antioxidant potential of the investigated Lamiaceae species was assessed by DPPH• scavenging activity and total antioxidant capacity assays, in comparison with hydroxycinnamic acids and trolox. The extracts differed greatly in their total hydroxycinnamic derivatives content, determined spectrophotometrically. Rosmarinic acid was found to be the predominant constituent in most of the investigated medicinal plants (by RP-HPLC and had a substantial influence on their AChE inhibitory and antioxidant properties, with the exception of Teucrium species. These findings indicate that Lamiaceae species are a rich source of various natural AChE inhibitors and antioxidants that could be useful in the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer’s and other related diseases.

  6. Natural potentials of the medicinal plants from the Orchidaceae family with mucus as the main ingredients from Zlatar mountain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matović, M.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The spontaneous medicinal flora of Zlatar Mountain was studied in the aim of realizing the possibilities of its sustainable use for the needs of the pharmaceutical industry. The special attention was paid to genera Orchis, Ophrys, Plathanthera, Gimnadenia, etc. from the orchid family (Orchidaceae of which salep is made (Tuber salep. Salep is a typical mucous drug (contains over 50% of mucus, which is very beneficial and useful. The primary role of salep is to heal and strengthen the organism and urge the sexual and every other biological ability. Orchids of which salep is made (Orchis coriophora, Orchis laxiflora, Orchis morio, Orchis mascula, Orchis pallens, Orchis purpurea, Orchis simia, Orchis tridentata and Orchis ustulata are to be found on numerous habitats of Zlatar (in the bright forests, clearing areas and on forest meadows.

  7. [Learning concepts of diagnosis in family medicine: the "mark robinson sign" - the traces that should not be there].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turabián, José Luis; Samarín-Ocampos, Elena; Minier, Luis; Pérez-Franco, Benjamín

    2015-11-01

    We review the mechanisms of the mental operation to identify the disease in family medicine, using five cases where the diagnosis process began in "the trace that should not be there" or "Robinson sign" as happened to Robinson Crusoe when he saw a human footprint on the beach of the "desert island". How could it be there?; It was a mystery, and based on metaphors, we framed the mechanism of "the trace that should not be there" mainly in the first phase of clinical or intuitive reasoning, but this intuition of the doctor should be accompanied by the diagnostic process, like the "basso continuo" of Baroque music, allowing improvisation and personal style, and in this way, eventually observing the footprint "that should not have been there" that may arise in the analytical, as well as in the verification phase of the assumptions made. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Bending the cost curve and increasing revenue: a family medicine model that works!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Bernard J; Needham, Mark R

    2012-12-01

    This article attempts to illustrate ways in which family physician practices are able to demonstrate high value, enhanced quality, and streamlined costs, essential components of practice sustainability. Specific examples are provided to assist practices to consider questions and information that allow for skillful engagement during contract negotiations, consider increasing practice revenues by adopting practice enhancements that make sense for the location of the practice and community needs, develop workflow analyses, and review opportunities for expense reduction.

  9. Can credit systems help in family medicine training in developing countries? An innovative concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raji, J Beulah; Velavan, Jachin; Anbarasi, Sahaya; Grant, Liz

    2014-07-01

    There is irrefutable evidence that health systems perform best when supported by a Family Physician network. Training a critical mass of highly skilled Family Physicians can help developing countries to reach their Millennium Development Goals and deliver comprehensive patient-centered health care to their population. The challenge in developing countries is the need to rapidly train these Family Physicians in large numbers, while also ensuring the quality of the learning, and assuring the quality of training. The experience of Christian Medical College (CMC), Vellore, India and other global examples confirm the fact that training large numbers is possible through well-designed blended learning programs. The question then arises as to how these programs can be standardized. Globally, the concept of the "credit system" has become the watch-word for many training programs seeking standardization. This article explores the possibility of introducing incremental academic certifications using credit systems as a method to standardize these blended learning programs, gives a glimpse at the innovation that CMC, Vellore is piloting in this regard partnering with the University of Edinburgh and analyses the possible benefits and pitfalls of such an approach.

  10. Attitudes and perceptions of medical students about family medicine in Spain: protocol for a cross-sectional survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Villa, Josep Jiménez; Hijar, Antonio Monreal; Tuduri, Xavier Mundet; Puime, Ángel Otero

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite the fact that family medicine (FM) has become established as a specialty in the past 25 years, this has not been reflected in the inclusion of the specialty in the majority of medical schools in Spain. Almost 40% of the students will work in primary care but, in spite of this, most universities do not have an assessed placement as such. There are only specific practice periods in health centres or some student-selected components with little weight in the overall curricula. Objectives To evaluate the attitudes and perceptions of medical students about FM in the health system and their perception about the need for specific training in FM at the undergraduate level. To explore change over time of these attitudes and perceptions and to examine potential predictive factors for change. Finally, we will review what teaching activity in FM is offered across the Spanish schools of medicine. Methods Descriptive cross-sectional survey. Each one of the different analyses will consist of two surveys: one for all the students in the first, third and fifth year of medical school in all the Spanish schools of medicine asking about their knowledge, perceptions and attitudes in relation to primary care and FM. There will be an additional survey for the coordinating faculty of the study in each university about the educational activities related to FM that are carried out in their centres. The repetition of the study every 2 years will allow for an analysis of the evolution of the cohort of students until they receive their degree and the potential predictive factors. Discussion This study will provide useful information for strategic planning decisions, content and educational methodology in medical schools in Spain and elsewhere. It will also help to evaluate the influence of the ongoing changes in FM, locally and at the European level, on the attitudes and perceptions of the students towards FM in Spain. PMID:22189348

  11. Drug Testing Incoming Residents and Medical Students in Family Medicine Training: A Survey of Program Policies and Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Paul F; Semelka, Michael W; Bigdeli, Laleh

    2015-03-01

    Despite well-established negative consequences, high rates of substance use and related disorders continue to be reported. Physicians in training are not immune from this, or the associated risks to their health and careers, while impaired physicians are a threat to patient safety. We surveyed family medicine residency programs' practices relating to drug testing of medical students and incoming residents. The survey asked about the extent to which residency programs are confronted with trainees testing positive for prohibited substances, and how they respond. The survey was sent to the directors of family medicine residency programs. A total of 205 directors (47.2%) completed the survey. A majority of the responding programs required drug testing for incoming residents (143, 68.9%). Most programs did not require testing of medical students (161, 81.7%). Few programs reported positive drug tests among incoming residents (9, 6.5%), and there was only 1 reported instance of a positive result among medical students (1, 3.3%). Respondents reported a range of responses to positive results, with few reporting that they would keep open training spots or offer supportive services for a medical student who tested positive. Changing laws legalizing certain drugs may require corresponding changes in the focus on drug testing and associated issues in medical training; however, many residency program directors were not aware of their institution's current policies. Programs will need to reexamine drug testing policies as new generations of physicians, growing up under altered legal circumstances concerning drug use, progress to clinical training.

  12. Intern evaluation strategies in family medicine residency education: what is-and is not-being done.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Jennifer E

    2013-06-01

    Family medicine interns often have deficiencies that are not initially appreciated. By recognizing those growth opportunities early, programs may be able to better meet their interns' training needs. This study provides a needs assessment to ascertain what evaluation tools are being utilized by residency programs to assess their incoming interns. A questionnaire was sent to all US family medicine residency program coordinators (439 programs) via Survey Monkey© inquiring about whether intern evaluation is performed and, if so, what strategies are used. A mixed mode methodology was used: mailing with incentive, email prompts, and telephone calls. Of 439 programs, 220 (50%) responded to the survey. Most respondents (145, 66%) think intern evaluation is needed. However, only 79 (36%) programs are actually doing intern evaluations-only 14 (6.4%) extensively. Most programs are performing simulations (81, 45%) and assessing knowledge/comfort levels (79, 36%); less than one third are considering personality/learning styles, and almost no programs are evaluating skills such as typing (three, 1.4%) and math (one, 0.5%). Many programs use evaluations to guide future planning, help with early identification of challenging learners, and to match training to the residents' needs. Several programs expressed concern about how they would use the information once obtained. The majority of respondents agreed that a baseline intern evaluation is useful; few are actually doing it. This area is not well-described in the literature; residency programs could benefit from information sharing. The next step is to encourage interest in and implementation of such strategies.

  13. Factors influencing the implementation, adoption, use, sustainability and scalability of eLearning for family medicine specialty training: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotič, Živa; Rees, Rebecca; Wark, Petra A; Car, Josip

    2016-10-19

    In 2013, there was a shortage of approximately 7.2 million health workers worldwide, which is larger among family physicians than among specialists. eLearning could provide a potential solution to some of these global workforce challenges. However, there is little evidence on factors facilitating or hindering implementation, adoption, use, scalability and sustainability of eLearning. This review aims to synthesise results from qualitative and mixed methods studies to provide insight on factors influencing implementation of eLearning for family medicine specialty education and training. Additionally, this review aims to identify the actions needed to increase effectiveness of eLearning and identify the strategies required to improve eLearning implementation, adoption, use, sustainability and scalability for family medicine speciality education and training. A systematic search will be conducted across a range of databases for qualitative studies focusing on experiences, barriers, facilitators, and other factors related to the implementation, adoption, use, sustainability and scalability of eLearning for family medicine specialty education and training. Studies will be synthesised by using the framework analysis approach. This study will contribute to the evaluation of eLearning implementation, adoption, use, sustainability and scalability for family medicine specialty training and education and the development of eLearning guidelines for postgraduate medical education. PROSPERO http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO/display_record.asp?ID=CRD42016036449.

  14. Communication skills of tutors and family medicine physician residents in Primary Care clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde Bolívar, Francisco Javier; Pedregal González, Miguel; Pérez Fuentes, María Francisca; Alcalde Molina, María Dolores; Torío Durántez, Jesús; Delgado Rodríguez, Miguel

    2016-12-01

    To determine the communicative profiles of family physicians and the characteristics associated with an improved level of communication with the patient. A descriptive multicentre study. Primary Healthcare Centres in Almeria, Granada, Jaen and Huelva. 119 family physicians (tutors and 4th year resident physicians) filmed and observed with patients. Demographic and professional characteristics. Analysis of the communication between physicians and patients, using a CICAA (Connect, Identify, Understand, Agree and Assist, in English) scale. A descriptive, bivariate, multiple linear regression analysis was performed. There were 436 valid interviews. Almost 100% of physicians were polite and friendly, facilitating a dialogue with the patient and allowing them to express their doubts. However, few physicians attempted to explore the state of mind of the patient, or enquire about their family situation or any important stressful events, nor did they ask open questions. Furthermore, few physicians summarised the information gathered. The mean score was 21.43±5.91 points (maximum 58). There were no differences in the total score between gender, city, or type of centre. The linear regression verified that the highest scores were obtained from tutors (B: 2.98), from the duration of the consultations (B: 0.63), and from the age of the professionals (B: -0.1). Physicians excel in terms of creating a friendly environment, possessing good listening skills, and providing the patient with information. However the ability to empathise, exploring the psychosocial sphere, carrying out shared decision-making, and asking open questions must be improved. Being a tutor, devoting more time to consultations, and being younger, results in a significant improvement in communication with the patient. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Early Signs of Atherogenesis in Adolescents in a Havana Family Medicine Catchment Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés, Wendy; Díaz-Perera, Georgia; Espinosa, Tania M

    2015-10-01

    INTRODUCTION Atherosclerosis is the common underlying cause of cardiovascular diseases; the leading cause of morbidity and mortality globally. It is a major contributor to disability and poorer quality of life and is costly to health systems, individuals, families and society. Early signs of atherogenesis are manifestations of atherosclerosis and known atherogenic risk factors occurring at young ages and detectable by health professionals. Early detection of such signs in children and adolescents enables actions to prevent short- and long-term complications. OBJECTIVE Detect early signs of atherogenesis in adolescents in Family Doctor-and-Nurse Office No. 13 of the Raúl Gómez García Polyclinic in Havana's 10 de Octubre Municipality. METHODS An observational, cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted: the universe consisted of 110 adolescents and, once exclusion criteria were applied, the sample was made up of 96 adolescents in the office's geographical catchment area. Variables included sociodemographic data; measurements from physical and anthropometric examinations (weight, height, body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure, presence of acanthosis nigricans); maternal history of diabetes mellitus and hypertension, smoking during pregnancy; birth weight and duration of exclusive breastfeeding; lifestyle (physical activity, dietary habits by frequency of consumption of fruits and vegetables, salt intake, and smoking); and a history of atherogenic risk factors and atherosclerotic diseases (hypertension, diabetes mellitus, heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, peripheral arterial disease and chronic kidney disease) in adolescents and their families. The number of early signs of atherogenesis was determined. Descriptive statistics and a chi-square test, with significance threshold set at p = 0.05, were used to examine differences by sex and age. RESULTS A total of 62.5% of participating adolescents were female and the same percent of the total

  16. A cultural diversity seen in Croatian family medicine: a lady from Janjevo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Renata

    2014-12-01

    The role of cultural diversities in doctor's everyday work is going more and more important in globalised world, therefore it draws lots of attention in literature. Cultural differences that exist between people, such as language, dress and traditions, are usually distinguished from the term cultural diversity which is mainly understood as having different cultures respect each other's differences. The great effort is made to educate culturally competent practitioners, nurses or doctors. The presented case of lady from Janjevo was a good role model for work with all patients with culturally different background coming to family practice. This lady example could also help to other colleagues to learn from experience on systematic way.

  17. 2011 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Vote Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. Voting will begin on Monday 31 October. Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will  represent you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. More details on the elections can be found on the Staff Association web site. (http://association.web.cern.ch) Elections Timetable Monday 31 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 14 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 21 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 22 and Wednesday 29 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 6 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee. 

  18. 2015 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Document Server

    Staff Asscociation

    2015-01-01

    Make your voice heard, support your candidates! Be many to vote and to elect the new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will represent you over the next two years and they will without doubt appreciate your gratitude. The voting takes place from the 26th of October to the 9th of November, at noon at https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2015.   Elections Timetable Monday 9 November, at noon Closing date for voting Monday 16 and Monday 23 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 8 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 16 and 24 November. Candidates for the 2015 elections

  19. The Value of an Elective in Business and Leadership for Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Ankit; Anderson, Jade; Sarfaty, Suzanne; Rimer, Edward; Hirsch, Ariel E

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the impact of the implementation of an elective in business and leadership targeted to preclinical medical students. Of the 42 students who completed the elective, 30 (71%) completed the survey. Students reported that they had a better understanding of the U.S. healthcare system (p business and leadership in medicine is a valuable addition to the standard undergraduate medical curriculum to enhance medical student exposure to the principles of the business of medicine and physician leadership.

  20. Peer-support writing group in a community family medicine teaching unit: Facilitating professional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Imari, Lina; Yang, Jaisy; Pimlott, Nicholas

    2016-12-01

    Aspiring physician writers need an environment that promotes self-reflection and can help them improve their skills and confidence in writing. To create a peer-support writing group for physicians in the Markham-Stouffville community in Ontario to promote professional development by encouraging self-reflection and fostering the concept of physician as writer. The program, designed based on a literature review and a needs assessment, was conducted in 3 sessions over 6 months. Participants included an emergency physician, 4 family physicians, and 3 residents. Four to 8 participants per session shared their projects with guest physician authors. Eight pieces of written work were brought to the sessions, 3 of which were edited. A mixed quantitative and qualitative evaluation model was used with preprogram and postprogram questionnaires and a focus group. This program promoted professional development by increasing participants' frequency of self-reflection and improving their proficiency in writing. Successful elements of this program include creating a supportive group environment and having a physician-writer expert facilitate the peer-feedback sessions. Similar programs can be useful in postgraduate education or continuing professional development. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  1. Family medicine education in rural communities as a health service intervention supporting recruitment and retention of physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soles, Trina Larsen; Ruth Wilson, C.; Oandasan, Ivy F.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To develop a pan-Canadian rural education road map to advance the recruitment and retention of family physicians in rural, remote, and isolated regions of Canada in order to improve access and health care outcomes for these populations. Composition of the task force Members of the task force were chosen from key stakeholder groups including educators, practitioners, the College of Family Physicians of Canada education committee chairs, deans, chairs of family medicine, experts in rural education, and key decision makers. The task force members were purposefully selected to represent a mix of key perspectives needed to ensure the work produced was rigorous and of high quality. Observers from the Canadian Medical Association and Health Canada’s Council on Health Workforce, and representatives from the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, were also invited to provide their perspectives and to encourage and coordinate multiorganization action. Methods The task force commissioned a focused literature review of the peer-reviewed and gray literature to examine the status of rural medical education, training, and practice in relation to the health needs of rural and remote communities in Canada, and also completed an environmental scan. Report The environmental scan included interviews with more than 100 policy makers, government representatives, providers, educators, learners, and community leaders; 17 interviews with practising rural physicians; and 2 surveys administered to all 17 faculties of medicine. The gaps identified from the focused literature review and the results of the environmental scan will be used to develop the task force’s recommendations for action, highlighting the role of key partners in implementation and needed action. Conclusion The work of the task force provides an opportunity to bring the various partners together in a coordinated way. By understanding who is responsible and the actions each stakeholder

  2. On Leader Green Election

    OpenAIRE

    Cichon, Jacek; Kapelko, Rafal; Markiewicz, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the number of survivors in the Leader Green Election (LGE) algorithm introduced by P. Jacquet, D. Milioris and P. Muhlethaler in 2013. Our method is based on the Rice method and gives quite precise formulas. We derive upper bounds on the number of survivors in this algorithm and we propose a proper use of LGE. Finally, we discuss one property of a general urns and balls problem and show a lower bound for a required number of rounds for a large class of distributed leader electi...

  3. CHEMICAL COMPOSITION AND ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITY OF SOME MEDICINAL PLANTS FROM LAMIACEAE FAMILY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozłowska, Mariola; Laudy, Agnieszka E; Przybył, Jarosław; Ziarno, Małgorzata; Majewska, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of aqueous (ethanolic and methanolic) extracts from herbs often used in Polish cuisine and traditional herbal medicine including thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.), rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.), oregano (Origanum vulgare L.), peppermint (Mentha piperita L.) and sage (Salvia officinalis L.) were compared. The aqueous ethanolic extracts contained slightly higher levels of phenolics compared to the aqueous methanolic extracts. In turn, GC-MS analysis showed that the aqueous methanolic extracts of thyme, rosemary and sage contained several additional compounds such as eugenol or ledol. The present studies also indicated that the bacterial species applied in the experiment exhibited different sensitivities towards tested extracts. Staphylococcus aureus strains were found to be the most sensitive bacteria to aqueous (ethanolic and methanolic) rosemary and sage extracts and aqueous methanolic thyme extract. Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC 13883 and Proteus vulgaris NCTC 4635 were more susceptible to the aqueous methanolic thyme extract. However, Listeria monocytogenes 1043S was the most sensitive to the aqueous ethanolic rosemary extract. Gram-positive bacteria were generally more sensitive to the tested extracts than Gram-negative ones.

  4. "Taibai seven medicine" is the buttercup family plant resources research%"太白七药"属毛茛科植物资源调查研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白吉庆; 王小平; 王西芳

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To pass to "taibai seven medicine" is the buttercup family plant resources survey for reasonable development and application of the resources, provides the basis. Methods: using GPS satellite tracking elevation position determination field investigation and finishing material. Results: the buttercup family medicinal plants is "too white seven medicine" in one of the largest number of families, about 12. Conclusion: in "taibai seven medicine" resource should pay full attention to the buttercup family medical plant resource protection, and properly conducted wild resources in parenting or artificial cultivation, so as to realize the sustainable utilization of resources.%目的:通过对"太白七药"属毛茛科植物资源调查,为合理开发和应用该科资源提供依据.方法:应用GPS全球卫星定位仪测定海拔方位进行实地调查并整理资料.结果:毛茛科药用植物是"太白七药"中数量最多的科之一,约有12种.结论:在"太白七药"资源中应充分重视毛茛科药用植物资源的保护,并适当开展野生资源抚育或开展人工栽培,以实现资源可持续利用.

  5. Atenção primária, atenção psicossocial, práticas integrativas e complementares e suas afinidades eletivas Primary care, psychosocial care and complementary and alternative medicine: elective affinities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Dalcanale Tesser

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Discutem-se afinidades eletivas entre três fenômenos na área da saúde: a atenção primária à saúde (APS, a abordagem psicossocial no cuidado à Saúde Mental e uso crescente das práticas integrativas e complementares (PIC. Apesar de suas diferenças, eles convergem como críticas e respostas a problemas do modelo médico hegemônico. Embora regulamentados e em implantação no Sistema Único de Saúde (as PIC de forma quase incipiente, tais fenômenos portam um caráter contra-hegemônico. Suas concepções de objeto, de meios e de fins do trabalho ou cuidado apresentam relevantes afinidades, como: centramento nos sujeitos em seus contextos sociais/familiares; abordagens ampliadas e holísticas; valorização de saberes/práticas não-biomédicos e de múltiplas formas, vivências e técnicas de cuidado; estímulo à auto-cura, participação ativa e empoderamento dos usuários; abordagem familiar e comunitária. Na organização das práticas e no relacionamento com a clientela há afinidades quanto à adequação sócio-cultural; parceria, dialogicidade e democratização das relações; trabalho territorial e construção/exploração de vínculos terapêuticos. Assinalam-se também convergências quanto aos efeitos terapêuticos e ético-políticos e discute-se o caráter relativamente desmedicalizante desses fenômenos, mais acentuado na atenção psicossocial e na procura pelas PIC. Tais afinidades significam sinergia entre os três fenômenos, ora relativamente independentes e isolados entre si. O reconhecimento e exploração dessas afinidades pela Saúde Coletiva, pelos movimentos sociais, bem como de profissionais e gestores do SUS, podem contribuir para qualificar a APS e a atenção em saúde mental e sua abertura para as PIC, ampliando as possibilidades de cuidado e fortalecendo os três fenômenos tematizados.This article discusses the elective affinities between three phenomena in health: primary health care, the

  6. Disaster Preparedness Medical School Elective: Bridging the Gap Between Volunteer Eagerness and Readiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vishnu M; Dahl-Grove, Deanna

    2016-07-23

    Eager medical students may not be prepared for unanticipated complexities of disaster response. This study aimed to answer 2 questions: does an online disaster preparedness curriculum create a convenient method to educate medical students and motivate them to be better prepared to volunteer? An online disaster preparedness elective was created for medical students. Four modules were created using Softchalk and hosted on the Blackboard Learning Management System. Students completed embedded pre-elective, post-lesson, and post-elective surveys. Fifty-five students completed the elective. When posed with the statement, "I feel prepared for an emergency at the University or the immediate area," 70% stated that they disagreed or strongly disagreed before the elective. Subsequently, only 11% claimed to disagree after the elective. At the conclusion of the elective, 13% of students had prepared a personal emergency kit and 28% had prepared a family communication plan for reunification. Students were surveyed on the statement "I would like to be involved in a community disaster response while continuing my medical training." Ninety-four percent claimed to agree or strongly agree before the elective, and 93% stated the same after elective completion. This disaster preparedness elective was envisioned to be a resource for students. Advantages of online availability are ease of student access and minimal demand on faculty resources. A voluntary, self-paced online elective in disaster preparedness has shown to create a stronger interest in disaster participation in medical students. Student readiness to volunteer improved; however, willingness remained stagnant.

  7. ELECTIONS PENSION FUND

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    ORGANISATION EUROPEENNE POUR LA RECHERCHE NUCLEAIRE CERN EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH CAISSE DE PENSIONS / PENSION FUND Caisse de Pensions - ELECTIONS - Pension Fund This candidature has been duly registered and is hereby presented in accordance with paragraph 6.h of the Regulations for Elections to the Governing Board of the Pension Fund. Candidate : Name : CHIAVERI First Name : Enrico I have been a CERN staff member since 1973 and have always been interested in our working conditions. As a member of the Executive Committee of the Staff Association I participated from 1980 to 1984 in the Working Group on Pensions mandated by the CERN Council. This commitment led to my becoming a member of the Governing Board of the Pension Fund in 1983, since when I have taken an active part in various commissions and working groups (Real Estate Asset Management Committee, Working Group on Actuarial Matters etc.); in so doing I have gained a thorough knowledge of different areas of the Pension Fund. Since ...

  8. ELECTIONS - Pension Fund

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    CERN - EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH PENSION FUND ELECTIONS - Pension Fund This candidature has been duly registered and is hereby presented in accordance with paragraph 6.h of the Regulations for Elections to the Governing Board of the Pension Fund. Candidate: First name: Michel Name: Goossens The CERN/ESO Pension Fund represents, for most staff, the sole source of income when they retire. The health of our Pension Fund is thus of the utmost importance to ensure the payment of pensions up to the death of the last beneficiary. The 2003 actuarial review showed a large deficit and several corrective measures have already been taken. The next months will see the results of the 2006 actuarial review. We hope they will show that the measures taken last year are going in the right direction. However, we must remain proactive since further measures will no doubt be necessary. New and imaginative proposals must be prepared and discussed in the widest possible forum, by regular direct contact ...

  9. ELECTIONS - Pension Fund

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    CERN - EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH PENSION FUND ELECTIONS - Pension Fund This candidature has been duly registered and is hereby presented in accordance with paragraph 6.h of the Regulations for Elections to the Governing Board of the Pension Fund. Candidate: First name: Michel Name: Goossens The CERN/ESO Pension Fund represents, for most staff, the sole source of income when they retire. The health of our Pension Fund is thus of the utmost importance to ensure the payment of pensions up to the death of the last beneficiary. The 2003 actuarial review showed a large deficit and several corrective measures have already been taken. The next months will see the results of the 2006 actuarial review. We hope they will show that the measures taken last year are going in the right direction. However, we must remain proactive since further measures will no doubt be necessary. New and imaginative proposals must be prepared and discussed in the widest possible forum, by regular direct contact with staff...

  10. ELECTIONS - Pension Fund

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    CERN - EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH PENSION FUND ELECTIONS - Pension Fund This candidature has been duly registered and is hereby presented in accordance with paragraph 6.h of the Regulations for Elections to the Governing Board of the Pension Fund. Candidate: First name: Michel Name: Goossens The CERN/ESO Pension Fund represents, for most staff, the sole source of income when they retire. The health of our Pension Fund is thus of the utmost importance to ensure the payment of pensions up to the death of the last beneficiary. The 2003 actuarial review showed a large deficit and several corrective measures have already been taken. The next months will see the results of the 2006 actuarial review. We hope they will show that the measures taken last year are going in the right direction. However, we must remain proactive since further measures will no doubt be necessary. New and imaginative proposals must be prepared and discussed in the widest possible forum, by regular direct contact with staf...

  11. Neurodynamics of an election.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rocha, Armando Freitas; Rocha, Fábio Theoto; Burattini, Marcelo Nascimento; Massad, Eduardo

    2010-09-10

    Variables influencing decision-making in real settings, as in the case of voting decisions, are uncontrollable and in many times even unknown to the experimenter. In this case, the experimenter has to study the intention to decide (vote) as close as possible in time to the moment of the real decision (election day). Here, we investigated the brain activity associated with the voting intention declared 1 week before the election day of the Brazilian Firearms Control Referendum about prohibiting the commerce of firearms. Two alliances arose in the Congress to run the campaigns for YES (for the prohibition of firearm commerce) and NO (against the prohibition of firearm commerce) voting. Time constraints imposed by the necessity of studying a reasonable number (here, 32) of voters during a very short time (5 days) made the EEG the tool of choice for recording the brain activity associated with voting decision. Recent fMRI and EEG studies have shown decision-making as a process due to the enrollment of defined neuronal networks. In this work, a special EEG technique is applied to study the topology of the voting decision-making networks and is compared to the results of standard ERP procedures. The results show that voting decision-making enrolled networks in charge of calculating the benefits and risks of the decision of prohibiting or allowing firearm commerce and that the topology of such networks was vote- (i.e., YES/NO-) sensitive.

  12. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. The voting takes place from the 28 of October to the 11th of November, at noon. As you may have noted when reading Echo, many issues concerning our employment conditions are on the agenda of the coming months, and in particular the Five-yearly-Review 2015, subject of the questionnaire that you probably recently filled out. All this will keep the next Staff Council very busy indeed. So, make your voice heard and take part in the elections for a new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will be representing you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. Every member of the Staff Association will have received an email containing a link to the webpage which will allow voting. If you are a member of the Staff Association and you did not receive such an email, please contact the Staff Association secretariat (staff.association@cern.ch). Do not forget to v...

  13. Effects of a refugee elective on medical student perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dussán Kathleen

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are growing numbers of refugees throughout the world. Refugee health is a relatively unstudied and rarely taught component of medical education. In response to this need, a Refugee Health Elective was begun. Medical student perceptions toward cultural aspects of medicine and refugee health before and after participation in the elective were measured. Methods Preliminary questionnaires were given to all preclinical students at the academic year commencement with follow-up questionnaires at the refugee elective's conclusion. Both questionnaires examined students' comfort in interacting with patients and familiarity with refugee medical issues, alternative medical practices, and social hindrances to medical care. The preliminary answers served as a control and follow-up questionnaire data were separated into participant/non-participant categories. All preclinical medical students at two Midwestern medical schools were provided the opportunity to participate in the Refugee Health Elective and surveys. The 3 data groups were compared using unadjusted and adjusted analysis techniques with the Kruskall-Wallis, Bonferroni and ANCOVA adjustment. P-values Results 408 and 403 students filled out the preliminary and follow-up questionnaires, respectfully, 42 of whom participated in the elective. Students considering themselves minorities or multilingual were more likely to participate. Elective participants were more likely to be able to recognize the medical/mental health issues common to refugees, to feel comfortable interacting with foreign-born patients, and to identify cultural differences in understanding medical/mental health conditions, after adjusting for minority or multilingual status. Conclusion As medical schools integrate a more multicultural curriculum, a Refugee Health Elective for preclinical students can enhance awareness and promote change in attitude toward medical/mental health issues common to refugees. This

  14. Patient safety principles in family medicine residency accreditation standards and curriculum objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassam, Aliya; Sharma, Nishan; Harvie, Margot; O’Beirne, Maeve; Topps, Maureen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To conduct a thematic analysis of the College of Family Physicians of Canada’s (CFPC’s) Red Book accreditation standards and the Triple C Competency-based Curriculum objectives with respect to patient safety principles. Design Thematic content analysis of the CFPC’s Red Book accreditation standards and the Triple C curriculum. Setting Canada. Main outcome measures Coding frequency of the patient safety principles (ie, patient engagement; respectful, transparent relationships; complex systems; a just and trusting culture; responsibility and accountability for actions; and continuous learning and improvement) found in the analyzed CFPC documents. Results Within the analyzed CFPC documents, the most commonly found patient safety principle was patient engagement (n = 51 coding references); the least commonly found patient safety principles were a just and trusting culture (n = 5 coding references) and complex systems (n = 5 coding references). Other patient safety principles that were uncommon included responsibility and accountability for actions (n = 7 coding references) and continuous learning and improvement (n = 12 coding references). Conclusion Explicit inclusion of patient safety content such as the use of patient safety principles is needed for residency training programs across Canada to ensure the full spectrum of care is addressed, from community-based care to acute hospital-based care. This will ensure a patient safety culture can be cultivated from residency and sustained into primary care practice. PMID:27965349

  15. The protocol of chronic patient management in a family medicine practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlasta Vodopivec Jamšek

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Health care of patients with chronic diseases is a major challenge faced by health care systems worldwide. Primary care can offer good quality care for a range of chronic diseases, at the same time providing continuity of care and management of comorbidity. In Slovenia, the primary care faces a dilemma of how to provide the recommended acute, chronic and preventive care, considering the shortage of primary care physicians. New models of primary care teams are thus necessary for redesigning health care delivery systems to improve the care for patients with chronic conditions. In 2011, new model practices were implemented in our county. In these practices, a part of preventive and chronic care services are delegated to the new members of family physicians’ teams – specially trained nurses who deliver care according to newly introduced protocols for the management of chronic diseases. The protocols provide guidelines for primary health care teams in terms of clinical care and organisational aspects of practice. Much emphasis is also given to self-management support for patients, which is essential for extending health care outside the doctor’s office into patient’s daily life.

  16. Early detection of ovarian cancer in FB&H - role of family medicine team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dž. Ljuca

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of problems with ovarian malignancy in the Federation B&H requires a comprehensive and precise analysis of the population characteristics with particular focus on risk factors such as age, parity, hereditary factors, menstrual cycle characteristics (short cycle, early menarche, late menopause. A retrospective study of medical documentation involving 272 patients with ovarian cancer within the Federation of BiH in the period from 1996 to 2000 was conducted. Usual statistical methods were used (T- test, 2 -Test, Fisher exact test. The research showed that the disease was in most cases diagnosed too late, in the stages III and IV (60% whereas histology of the tissue showed epithelial cancer in 88,6% cases, most frequently between the age of 55 to 70. Out of 272 patients null-parity was recorded in 16,9 %, whereas 19,8 % of patients had just one pregnancy. Menstrual cycle duration shorter than 21 days was recorded in 26,5% cases. Approximately 1,8% patients had close relatives that suffered of cancer of breast, ovary or colon. Prerequisites for application of algorhithms in diagnostic procedures would be met by identification of risk groups consisting of those with one or more risk factors in their history. Bearing in mind the role of the family doctors in the future health system reform, it can be concluded that they could have an important role in the process.

  17. Results of chart reviews conducted to evaluate primary care patients seen by second and third year family medicine residents for potential adverse polypharmacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang LF

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the prescribing patterns of family medicine residents for patients aged more than 60 years with 2 or more chronic diseases and seen at least twice in a 12 month timeframe.Methods: This is a descriptive analysis which was based on chart reviews. The setting was the University of Illinois-Rockford Family Practice Residency. Patients aged 60 years with 2 or more chronic diseases who were seen at least twice by second and third year residents.Results: Findings from this chart review include: 28.8% of the prescribed medications were not effective for the documented condition, 26.3% of the prescribed doses were incorrect, and 44.5% of the drugs prescribed were not the least expensive alternative.Discussion: This preliminary study suggests a need for a focused intervention with family medicine residents regarding inappropriate polypharmacy issues with older patients.

  18. 2009 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2009-01-01

    Stand for election Until now you may have been unsure whether to stand for election. If you would like to serve the Staff Association’s ideal of excellence, then take the plunge and become a candidate now. To do this, go to our web site where a short flash animation1 explains the role of a delegate.

  19. Lack of chart reminder effectiveness on family medicine resident JNC-VI and NCEP III guideline knowledge and attitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upshur Ross EG

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The literature demonstrates that medical residents and practicing physicians have an attitudinal-behavioral discordance concerning their positive attitudes towards clinical practice guidelines (CPG, and the implementation of these guidelines into clinical practice patterns. Methods A pilot study was performed to determine if change in a previously identified CPG compliance factor (accessibility would produce a significant increase in family medicine resident knowledge and attitude toward the guidelines. The primary study intervention involved placing a summary of the Sixth Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC VI and the National Cholesterol Education Program Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults (NCEP III CPGs in all patient (>18 yr. charts for a period of three months. The JNC VI and NCEP III CPGs were also distributed to each Wayne State family medicine resident, and a copy of each CPG was placed in the preceptor's area of the involved clinics. Identical pre- and post- intervention questionnaires were administered to all residents concerning CPG knowledge and attitude. Results Post-intervention analysis failed to demonstrate a significant difference in CPG knowledge. A stastically significant post-intervention difference was found in only on attitude question. The barriers to CPG compliance were identified as 1 lack of CPG instruction; 2 lack of critical appraisal ability; 3 insufficient time; 4 lack of CPG accessibility; and 5 lack of faculty modeling. Conclusion This study demonstrated no significant post intervention changes in CPG knowledge, and only one question that reflected attitude change. Wider resident access to dedicated clinic time, increased faculty modeling, and the implementation of an electronic record/reminder system that uses a team-based approach are compliance factors that

  20. Bayesian inference on proportional elections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Hideki Vatanabe Brunello

    Full Text Available Polls for majoritarian voting systems usually show estimates of the percentage of votes for each candidate. However, proportional vote systems do not necessarily guarantee the candidate with the most percentage of votes will be elected. Thus, traditional methods used in majoritarian elections cannot be applied on proportional elections. In this context, the purpose of this paper was to perform a Bayesian inference on proportional elections considering the Brazilian system of seats distribution. More specifically, a methodology to answer the probability that a given party will have representation on the chamber of deputies was developed. Inferences were made on a Bayesian scenario using the Monte Carlo simulation technique, and the developed methodology was applied on data from the Brazilian elections for Members of the Legislative Assembly and Federal Chamber of Deputies in 2010. A performance rate was also presented to evaluate the efficiency of the methodology. Calculations and simulations were carried out using the free R statistical software.

  1. Integrating an internet-mediated walking program into family medicine clinical practice: a pilot feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Ananda

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regular participation in physical activity can prevent many chronic health conditions. Computerized self-management programs are effective clinical tools to support patient participation in physical activity. This pilot study sought to develop and evaluate an online interface for primary care providers to refer patients to an Internet-mediated walking program called Stepping Up to Health (SUH and to monitor participant progress in the program. Methods In Phase I of the study, we recruited six pairs of physicians and medical assistants from two family practice clinics to assist with the design of a clinical interface. During Phase II, providers used the developed interface to refer patients to a six-week pilot intervention. Provider perspectives were assessed regarding the feasibility of integrating the program into routine care. Assessment tools included quantitative and qualitative data gathered from semi-structured interviews, surveys, and online usage logs. Results In Phase I, 13 providers used SUH and participated in two interviews. Providers emphasized the need for alerts flagging patients who were not doing well and the ability to review participant progress. Additionally, providers asked for summary views of data across all enrolled clinic patients as well as advertising materials for intervention recruitment. In response to this input, an interface was developed containing three pages: 1 a recruitment page, 2 a summary page, and 3 a detailed patient page. In Phase II, providers used the interface to refer 139 patients to SUH and 37 (27% enrolled in the intervention. Providers rarely used the interface to monitor enrolled patients. Barriers to regular use of the intervention included lack of integration with the medical record system, competing priorities, patient disinterest, and physician unease with exercise referrals. Intention-to-treat analyses showed that patients increased walking by an average of 1493 steps

  2. Development of the quality assessment model of EHR software in family medicine practices: research based on user satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damir Kralj

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Family medicine practices (FMPs make the basis for the Croatian health care system. Use of electronic health record (EHR software is mandatory and it plays an important role in running these practices, but important functional features still remain uneven and largely left to the will of the software developers.Objective The objective of this study was to develop a novel and comprehensive model for functional evaluation of the EHR software in FMPs, based on current world standards, models and projects, as well as on actual user satisfaction and requirements.Methods Based on previous theoretical and experimental research in this area, we made the initial framework model consisting of six basic categories as a base for online survey questionnaire. Family doctors assessed perceived software quality by using a five-point Likert-type scale. Using exploratory factor analysis and appropriate statistical methods over the collected data, the final optimal structure of the novel model was formed. Special attention was focused on the validity and quality of the novel model.Results The online survey collected a total of 384 cases. The obtained results indicate both the quality of the assessed software and the quality in use of the novel model. The intense ergonomic orientation of the novel measurement model was particularly emphasised.Conclusions The resulting novel model is multiple validated, comprehensive and universal. It could be used to assess the user-perceived quality of almost all forms of the ambulatory EHR software and therefore useful to all stakeholders in this area of the health care informatisation. 

  3. Quantum Leader Election

    CERN Document Server

    Ganz, Maor

    2009-01-01

    A group of n individuals who do not trust each other and are located far away from each other, want to select a leader. This is the leader election problem, a natural extension of the coin flipping problem to n players. We want a protocol which will guarantee that an honest player will have almost 1/n chance of winning, regardless of what the other players do (whether they are honest, cheating alone or in groups). It is known to be impossible classically. This work gives a simple algorithm that does it, based on the weak coin flipping protocol with arbitrarily small bias recently derived by Mochon [2007]. The protocol is quite simple to achieve if the number of rounds is linear; We provide an improvement to logarithmic number of rounds.

  4. Genome-wide analysis of auxin response factor gene family members in medicinal model plant Salvia miltiorrhiza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhichao Xu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Auxin response factors (ARFs can function as transcriptional activators or repressors to regulate the expression of auxin response genes by specifically binding to auxin response elements (AuxREs during plant development. Based on a genome-wide strategy using the medicinal model plant Salvia miltiorrhiza, 25 S. miltiorrhiza ARF (SmARF gene family members in four classes (class Ia, IIa, IIb and III were comprehensively analyzed to identify characteristics including gene structures, conserved domains, phylogenetic relationships and expression patterns. In a hybrid analysis of the phylogenetic tree, microRNA targets, and expression patterns of SmARFs in different organs, root tissues, and methyl jasmonate or indole-3-acetic acid treatment conditions, we screened for candidate SmARFs involved in various developmental processes of S. miltiorrhiza. Based on this analysis, we predicted that SmARF25, SmARF7, SmARF16 and SmARF20 are involved in flower, leaf, stem and root development, respectively. With the further insight into the targets of miR160 and miR167, specific SmARF genes in S. miltiorrhiza might encode products that participate in biological processes as described for ARF genes in Arabidopsis. Our results provide a foundation for understanding the molecular basis and regulatory mechanisms of SmARFs in S. miltiorrhiza.

  5. Quality evaluation and pattern recognition analyses of marker compounds from five medicinal drugs of Rutaceae family by HPLC/PDA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bing Tian; Kim, Eun Jung; Son, Kun Ho; Son, Jong Keun; Min, Byung Sun; Woo, Mi Hee

    2015-08-01

    To establish a standard of quality control and to identify different origins for the Rutaceae family [Citri Unshiu Peel (CU), Citri Unshiu Immature Peel (CI), Ponciri Immature Fructus (PI), Aurantii Immature Fructus (AI), and Aurantii Fructus (AU)], 13 standards including rutin (1), narirutin (2), naringin (3), hesperidin (4), neohesperidin (5), neoponcirin (6), poncirin (7), naringenin (8), isosinensetin (9), sinensetin (10), nobiletin (11), heptamethoxyflavone (12), and tangeretin (13) were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)/photo-diode array (PDA) analysis. A YMC ODS C18 (250 × 4.6 mm, 5 µm) column was used and the ratio of mobile phases of water (A) and acetonitrile (B) delivered to the column for gradient elution was applied. This method was fully validated with respect to linearity, accuracy, precision, stability, and robustness. The HPLC/PDA method was applied successfully to quantify 13 major compounds in the extracts of CU, CI, PI, AI, and AU. The pattern recognition analysis combined with LC chromatographic data was performed by repeated analysis of 27 reference samples in the above five Rutaceae oriental medicinal drugs. The established HPLC method was rapid and reliable for quantitative analysis and quality control of multiple components in five Rutaceae species with different origins.

  6. Personality, Political Behavior, and Political Views about Mexico’s 2012 Presidential Election

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Moreno

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available People’s electoral behavior is understood as political predispositions and attitudes in specific institutional contexts. Recent scholarly work has included personality as a key explanatory factor in individual-level models of political participation. In this paper we build upon these recent efforts. We utilize the Big Five approach to assess the effects of different personality traits on people’s likelihood of political engagement during the 2012 presidential election in Mexico. We focus on the effects of personality on voting in the election and on individual views about the integrity of the electoral process. We use post election survey data collected for the Comparative National Elections Project in the 2012 Mexican presidential election. Our findings show that extraversion is a critical individual-level factor accounting for the propensity to turnout in this election as well as to encourage political discussion with family members, friends, neighbors, and co-workers.

  7. Predictors of Work-Family Role Conflict and Its Impact on Professional Women in Medicine, Engineering, and Information Technology in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzoigwe, Anthonia Ginika; Low, Wah Yun; Noor, Siti Nurani Mohd

    2016-10-01

    This study examines work-family role conflict and the factors predicting it, with a sample of 173 professional women in engineering and information technology (IT) firms, including 2 hospitals-1 public and 1 private. Our findings show no significant difference in the level of work-family role conflict encountered by women across medicine, engineering, and IT, whereas hours of work, family responsibilities, job demand, and work role overload were significantly correlated with work-family role conflict. Multiple linear regression analysis indicates that only work role overload, family responsibilities, and hours of work significantly predicted 45.9% of work-family role conflict. This implies that working women are burdened by work demands, which invariably affects the work-family role conflict they experience and leads to deterioration of their occupational health. It is suggested that employers should create a flexible work schedule and establish family-friendly policies in the workplace to promote a healthy work-life balance for women in science careers.

  8. PENSION FUND - ELECTIONS

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    This candidature has been duly registered and is hereby presented in accordance with paragraph 6.h of the Regulations for Elections to the Governing Board of the Pension Fund.   Candidate: Name: RANJARD First Name: Florence Having been a member of the Governing Board of the Pension Fund since 1983 as Guy Maurin’s alternate, I am standing for a further 3-year term of office. Over the past few years work has concentrated essentially on following items: Monitoring of the work of the fund managers and their performances. The three-yearly study of the Fund’s actuarial situation. The pension guarantees ­ second phase. The Fund is approaching its maturity: the level of benefits exceeds contributions. In this context it has to strike a suitable balance between management of the risk from a dynamic investment policy, while by a prudent policy avoiding any significant loss of its capital. These will be my concerns within the Governing Board of the Pension Fund if you give me your support.

  9. Quantum leader election

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganz, Maor

    2017-03-01

    A group of n individuals A1,ldots An who do not trust each other and are located far away from each other, want to select a leader. This is the leader election problem, a natural extension of the coin flipping problem to n players. We want a protocol which will guarantee that an honest player will have at least 1/n-ɛ chance of winning (forall ɛ >0), regardless of what the other players do (whether they are honest, cheating alone or in groups). It is known to be impossible classically. This work gives a simple algorithm that does it, based on the weak coin flipping protocol with arbitrarily small bias derived by Mochon (Quantum weak coin flipping with arbitrarily small bias, arXiv:0711.4114, 2000) in 2007, and recently published and simplified in Aharonov et al. (SIAM J Comput, 2016). A protocol with linear number of coin flipping rounds is quite simple to achieve; we further provide an improvement to logarithmic number of coin flipping rounds. This is a much improved journal version of a preprint posted in 2009; the first protocol with linear number of rounds was achieved independently also by Aharon and Silman (New J Phys 12:033027, 2010) around the same time.

  10. Elections in November

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Become a delegate, it’s simple! CERN’s employment conditions have had a rather hard time over the past few years. The Staff Association, with the support of the staff, has managed to avoid the worst on many occasions. The next few years will be decisive, which is why we must continue to be on the scene, active, a source of proposals, and a real negotiating partner. The Staff Association is your only formal representative vis-à-vis the Management and the Member States, and the Staff Council your voice. A rapidly evolving Staff Association In November, all 60 seats in the Staff Council must be filled. All delegates are therefore outgoing. About a dozen current delegates have informed us that they will not stand for election again, which corresponds to a standard turnover. We thank these outgoing delegates for their past investment. If you are interested in the work of the Staff Association, become involved. We need new, talented, enthusiastic people who are willing to inv...

  11. PENSION FUND - ELECTIONS

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    This candidature has been duly registered and is hereby presented in accordance with paragraph 6.h of the Regulations for Elections to the Governing Board of the Pension Fund.   Candidate: Name: MAURIN First Name: Guy I have been a member of the personnel since 1967 and as early as 1972 I was involved, in my capacity as President of the Staff Association, in the improvement of the Pension Fund benefits. As for most of us the Pension Fund is the only social provident scheme to which we belong, it is important to ensure that it is well managed and in balance. As a member of the Governing Board since 1974 and Vice-Chairman of this Board since 1977, I have continued to pursue these objectives. One of the main responsibilities of the Governing Board is our asset investment policy. The Investment Committee, of which I am Chairman, must have an overall view of the management of our 4 billion Swiss francs and seek the best yield with minimum risk. The investment structure must continuously be adapted i...

  12. Tactical Voting in Plurality Elections

    CERN Document Server

    Araújo, Nuno A M; Herrmann, Hans J; 10.1371/journal.pone.0012446

    2010-01-01

    How often will elections end in landslides? What is the probability for a head-to-head race? Analyzing ballot results from several large countries rather anomalous and yet unexplained distributions have been observed. We identify tactical voting as the driving ingredient for the anomalies and introduce a model to study its effect on plurality elections, characterized by the relative strength of the feedback from polls and the pairwise interaction between individuals in the society. With this model it becomes possible to explain the polarization of votes between two candidates, understand the small margin of victories frequently observed for different elections, and analyze the polls' impact in American, Canadian, and Brazilian ballots. Moreover, the model reproduces, quantitatively, the distribution of votes obtained in the Brazilian mayor elections with two, three, and four candidates.

  13. 5 CFR 850.202 - Survivor elections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Survivor elections. 850.202 Section 850... (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT SYSTEMS MODERNIZATION Applications for Benefits; Elections § 850.202 Survivor elections. (a) A survivor election under subsection (j) or (k) of section 8339, or under section 8416,...

  14. Getting elections right? Measuring electoral integrity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ham, C.T.

    2015-01-01

    Holding elections has become a global norm. Unfortunately, the integrity of elections varies strongly, ranging from “free and fair” elections with genuine contestation to “façade” elections marred by manipulation and fraud. Clearly, electoral integrity is a topic of increasing concern. Yet electoral

  15. Scaling up family medicine training in Gezira, Sudan – a 2-year in-service master programme using modern information and communication technology: a survey study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2010 the Gezira Family Medicine Project (GFMP) was initiated in Gezira state, Sudan, designed as an in-service training model. The project is a collaboration project between the University of Gezira, which aims to provide a 2-year master’s programme in family medicine for practicing doctors, and the Ministry of Health, which facilitates service provision and funds the training programme. This paper presents the programme, the teaching environment, and the first batch of candidates enrolled. Methods In this study a self-administered questionnaire was used to collect baseline data at the start of the project from doctors who joined the programme. A checklist was also used to assess the health centres where they work. A total of 188 out of 207 doctors responded (91%), while data were gathered from all 158 health centres (100%) staffed by the programme candidates. Results The Gezira model of in-service family medicine training has succeeded in recruiting 207 candidates in its first batch, providing health services in 158 centres, of which 84 had never been served by a doctor before. The curriculum is community oriented. The mean age of doctors was 32.5 years, 57% were males, and 32% were graduates from the University of Gezira. Respondents stated high confidence in practicing some skills such as asthma management and post-abortion uterine evacuation. They were least confident in other skills such as managing depression or inserting an intrauterine device. The majority of health centres was poorly equipped for management of noncommunicable diseases, as only 10% had an electrocardiography machine (ECG), 5% had spirometer, and 1% had a defibrillator. Conclusions The Gezira model has responded to local health system needs. Use of modern information and communication technology is used to facilitate both health service provision and training. The GFMP represents an example of a large-volume scaling-up programme of family medicine in Africa. PMID:24443978

  16. Developing and successfully implementing a competency-based portfolio assessment system in a postgraduate family medicine residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, Laura A; Griffiths, Jane; Schultz, Karen

    2015-11-01

    The use of portfolios in postgraduate medical residency education to support competency development is increasing; however, the processes by which these assessment systems are designed, implemented, and maintained are emergent. The authors describe the needs assessment, development, implementation, and continuing quality improvement processes that have shaped the Portfolio Assessment Support System (PASS) used by the postgraduate family medicine program at Queen's University since 2009. Their description includes the impetus for change and contextual realities that guided the effort, plus the processes used for selecting assessment components and developing strategic supports. The authors discuss the identification of impact measures at the individual, programmatic, and institutional levels and the ways the department uses these to monitor how PASS supports competency development, scaffolds residents' self-regulated learning skills, and promotes professional identity formation. They describe the "academic advisor" role and provide an appendix covering the portfolio elements. Reflection elements include learning plans, clinical question logs, confidence surveys, and reflections about continuity of care and significant incidents. Learning module elements cover the required, online bioethics, global health, and consult-request modules. Assessment elements cover each resident's research project, clinical audits, presentations, objective structured clinical exam and simulated office oral exam results, field notes, entrustable professional activities, multisource feedback, and in-training evaluation reports. Document elements are the resident's continuing medical education activities including procedures log, attendance log, and patient demographic summaries.The authors wish to support others who are engaged in the systematic portfolio-design process or who may adapt aspects of PASS for their local programs.

  17. International electives in neurology training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Jennifer L.; Coleman, Mary E.; Engstrom, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain the current status of global health training and humanitarian relief opportunities in US and Canadian postgraduate neurology programs. Background: There is a growing interest among North American trainees to pursue medical electives in low- and middle-income countries. Such training opportunities provide many educational and humanitarian benefits but also pose several challenges related to organization, human resources, funding, and trainee and patient safety. The current support and engagement of neurology postgraduate training programs for trainees to pursue international rotations is unknown. Methods: A survey was distributed to all program directors in the United States and Canada (December 2012–February 2013) through the American Academy of Neurology to assess the training opportunities, institutional partnerships, and support available for international neurology electives. Results: Approximately half of responding programs (53%) allow residents to pursue global health–related electives, and 11% reported that at least 1 trainee participated in humanitarian relief during training (survey response rate 61%, 143/234 program directors). Canadian programs were more likely to allow residents to pursue international electives than US programs (10/11, 91% vs 65/129, 50%, p = 0.023). The number of trainees participating in international electives was low: 0%–9% of residents (55% of programs) and 10%–19% of residents (21% of programs). Lack of funding was the most commonly cited reason for residents not participating in global health electives. If funding was available, 93% of program directors stated there would be time for residents to participate. Most program directors (75%) were interested in further information on global health electives. Conclusions: In spite of high perceived interest, only half of US neurology training programs include international electives, mostly due to a reported lack of funding. By contrast, the majority

  18. Modified Bully Algorithm using Election Commission

    CERN Document Server

    Rahman, Muhammad Mahbubur

    2010-01-01

    Electing leader is a vital issue not only in distributed computing but also in communication network [1, 2, 3, 4, 5], centralized mutual exclusion algorithm [6, 7], centralized control IPC, etc. A leader is required to make synchronization between different processes. And different election algorithms are used to elect a coordinator among the available processes in the system such a way that there will be only one coordinator at any time. Bully election algorithm is one of the classical and well-known approaches in coordinator election process. This paper will present a modified version of bully election algorithm using a new concept called election commission. This approach will not only reduce redundant elections but also minimize total number of elections and hence it will minimize message passing, network traffic, and complexity of the existing system.

  19. A Study of Global Health Elective Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, Christiana M.; Tran, Tony; Silverman, Melanie; Palfrey, Judith

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives: To identify the effects of global health electives over a decade in a pediatric residency program. Methods: This was an anonymous email survey of the Boston Combined Residency alumni funded for global health electives from 2002 to 2011. A test for trend in binomial proportions and logistic regression were used to document associations between elective and participant characteristics and the effects of the electives. Qualitative data were also analyzed. Results: Of the 104 alumni with available email addresses, 69 (66%) responded, describing 94 electives. Elective products included 27 curricula developed, 11 conference presentations, and 7 academic publications. Thirty-two (46%) alumni continued global health work. Previous experience, previous travel to the site, number of global electives, and cumulative global elective time were associated with postresidency work in global health or with the underserved. Conclusions: Resident global electives resulted in significant scholarship and teaching and contributed to long-term career trajectories. PMID:28229096

  20. A psychodynamic perspective on elections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Norman A

    2010-11-01

    In a democracy, elections are the way in which the collective thought processes of the voters arrive at a decision to direct their government. The author explores how the individual voter assesses and resolves many conflicting internal and external forces to arrive at a vote. The midterm elections of 2010 illustrate the parallel between individual resolution of conflicting forces and the process of a campaign leading to the outcome of an election. The psychodynamic concepts of conflict and compromise, affects, aggression, unconscious forces, mechanisms of defense, superego, and the ego's integrative functions are evident in both the individual voter and the collective electoral process. The author expresses concern about the historical vulnerability of democracies and the unbalancing effect of allowing limitless infusion of anonymous corporate money to pour into campaigns.

  1. Applied Formal Methods for Elections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    bounded model-checking and satisfiability modulo theories (SMT) solvers can be used to check these criteria. Voter Experience: Technology profoundly affects the voter experience. These effects need to be measured and the data should be used to make decisions regarding the implementation of the electoral...... to voting software producing evidence so that can be retroactively analyzed, in case that something went wrong. There are two possible ways to analyze implementations for verifiability, first statically, i.e. before the technology is deployed, which gives the developers the opportunity to fix issues during...... development time, or second dynamically, i.e. monitoring while an implementation is used during an election, or after the election is over, for forensic analysis. This thesis contains two chapters on this subject: the chapter Analyzing Implementations of Election Technologies describes a technique...

  2. Quantitative Analysis of Contributing Factors Affecting Patient Satisfaction in Family Medicine Service Clinics at Brooke Army Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-06

    physicians, Doctors of Medicine (M.D.) or Doctors of Osteopathy (D.O.); physician assistants; or clinical nurse practitioners. Physicians, physician...treatment methods including spinal manipulation and the whole body concept and confer the Doctor of Osteopathy (D.O.) degree. After completion of...medical school, both Doctors of Medicine and Doctors of Osteopathy are licensed by their state boards and may become board certified in any medical

  3. Receipt-Free Secure Elections

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    A fundamental requirement for secure and uncoercible elections is the receipt-free property; if voters cannot prove how they voted to anyone other than themselves, then they cannot be coerced by a second party to cast a particular vote. We begin by describing a protocol for receipt-free elections that was developed by Benaloh & Tuinstra, and then show how this protocol, although correct, is impractical to implement. We then show how to modify this protocol to make it practical to implement. O...

  4. Series: The research agenda for general practice/family medicine and primary health care in Europe. Part 2. Results: Primary care management and community orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummers-Pradier, Eva; Beyer, Martin; Chevallier, Patrick; Eilat-Tsanani, Sophia; Lionis, Christos; Peremans, Lieve; Petek, Davorina; Rurik, Imre; Soler, Jean Karl; Stoffers, Henri Ejh; Topsever, Pinar; Ungan, Mehmet; van Royen, Paul

    2010-03-01

    At the WONCA Europe conference 2009 the recently published 'Research Agenda for General Practice/Family Medicine and Primary Health Care in Europe' was presented. It is a background paper and reference manual, providing advocacy of general practice/family medicine (GP/FM) in Europe. The Research Agenda summarizes the evidence relating to the core competencies and characteristics of the WONCA Europe definition of GP/FM, and its implications for general practitioners/family doctors, researchers and policy makers. The European Journal of General Practice publishes a series of articles based on this document. In a first article, background, objectives, and methodology were discussed. In this second article, the results for the core competencies 'primary care management' and 'community orientation' are presented. Though there is a large body of research on various aspects of 'primary care management', it represents a very scattered rather than a meta view. Many studies focus on care for specific diseases, the primary/secondary care interface, or the implications of electronic patient records. Cost efficiency or process indicators of quality are current outcomes. Current literature on community orientation is mainly descriptive, and focuses on either care for specific diseases, or specific patient populations, or on the uptake of preventive services. Most papers correspond poorly to the WONCA concept. For both core competencies, there is a lack of research with a longitudinal perspective and/or relevant health or quality of life outcomes as well as research on patients' preferences and education for organizational aspects of GP/FM.

  5. Postgraduate training for family medicine in a rural district hospital in South Africa: Appropriateness and sufficiency of theatre procedures as a sentinel indicator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawie Du Plessis

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Since 2007, the postgraduate training of family physicians for South African district hospitals has been formalised. This training differs from European and North American programmes as up to 30% of the skills needed rely on district hospital surgical, obstetrics and anaesthetics procedures, particularly in rural areas, as outlined in the national unit standards. The aim of this study was to evaluate the appropriateness and sufficiency of learning opportunities for these skills in a rural district hospital.Methods: A descriptive, cross-sectional study was undertaken of the number and type of procedures performed in theatre for a 1-year period and compared with the required procedural skills stipulated in the national unit standards. Descriptive statistical analyses were used to analyse categorical data.Results: Three thousand seven hundred and forty-one procedures were performed during the study period. Anaesthesia was the most common procedure, followed by Caesarean section. There were adequate opportunities for teaching most core skills.Conclusions: Sufficient and appropriate learning opportunities exist for postgraduate family medicine training in all the core skills performed in a theatre according to the national unit standards.Keywords: Post Graduate Training, Family Medicine, Procedural Skills, Rural, District hospitals

  6. Using Qualitative Research to Inform Development of Professional Guidelines: A Case Study of the Society of Critical Care Medicine Family-Centered Care Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, Maureen A; Davidson, Judy E; Nunnally, Mark E; Wickline, Mary A; Curtis, J Randall

    2017-08-01

    To explore the importance, challenges, and opportunities using qualitative research to enhance development of clinical practice guidelines, using recent guidelines for family-centered care in the ICU as an example. In developing the Society of Critical Care Medicine guidelines for family-centered care in the neonatal ICU, PICU, and adult ICU, we developed an innovative adaptation of the Grading of Recommendations, Assessments, Development and Evaluations approach to explicitly incorporate qualitative research. Using Grading of Recommendations, Assessments, Development and Evaluations and the Council of Medical Specialty Societies principles, we conducted a systematic review of qualitative research to establish family-centered domains and outcomes. Thematic analyses were undertaken on study findings and used to support Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome question development. We identified and employed three approaches using qualitative research in these guidelines. First, previously published qualitative research was used to identify important domains for the Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome questions. Second, this qualitative research was used to identify and prioritize key outcomes to be evaluated. Finally, we used qualitative methods, member checking with patients and families, to validate the process and outcome of the guideline development. In this, a novel report, we provide direction for standardizing the use of qualitative evidence in future guidelines. Recommendations are made to incorporate qualitative literature review and appraisal, include qualitative methodologists in guideline taskforce teams, and develop training for evaluation of qualitative research into guideline development procedures. Effective methods of involving patients and families as members of guideline development represent opportunities for future work.

  7. Democratising Afghanistan: An Analysis of the 2005 Parliamentary Elections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahabuddin Ra’ees

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-MY X-NONE AR-SA /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} Abstract: The interviews and observation of the September 2005 elections for the lower house of parliament and provincial councils in Afghanistan disclose that despite shortcomings, the elections were relatively free. The elections, conducted in the absence of party politics, created a divided legislature struggling to unite. Women members, equally divided by region and ethnicity, may exert a moderating influence on the legislature, which is dominated by the “Islamist right.”

  8. The effect of polyphenolic-polysaccharide conjugates from selected medicinal plants of Asteraceae family on the peroxynitrite-induced changes in blood platelet proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saluk-Juszczak, Joanna; Pawlaczyk, Izabela; Olas, Beata; Kołodziejczyk, Joanna; Ponczek, Michal; Nowak, Pawel; Tsirigotis-Wołoszczak, Marta; Wachowicz, Barbara; Gancarz, Roman

    2010-12-01

    Lots of plants belonging to Asteraceae family are very popular in folk medicine in Poland. These plants are also known as being rich in acidic polysaccharides, due to the presence of hexuronic acids or its derivatives. Our preliminary experiments have shown that the extract from Conyza canadensis L. possesses various biological activity, including antiplatelet, antiocoagulant and antioxidant properties. The aim of our study was to assess if macromolecular glycoconjugates from selected herbal plants of Asteraceae family: Achillea millefolium L., Arnica montana L., Echinacea purpurea L., Solidago virgaurea L., Chamomilla recutita (L.) Rauschert., and Conyza canadensis L. protect platelet proteins against nitrative and oxidative damage induced by peroxynitrite, which is responsible for oxidative/nitrative modifications of platelet proteins: the formation of 3-nitrotyrosine and carbonyl groups. These modifications may lead to changes of blood platelet functions and can have pathological consequences. The role of these different medicinal plants in the defence against oxidative/nitrative stress in human platelets is still unknown, therefore the oxidative damage to platelet proteins induced by peroxynitrite and protectory effects of tested conjugates by the estimation of carbonyl group level and nitrotyrosine formation (a marker of protein nitration) were studied in vitro. The antioxidative properties of the polyphenolic-polysaccharide conjugates from selected tested medicinal plants were also compared with the action of a well characterized antioxidative commercial polyphenol - resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene). The obtained results demonstrate that the compounds from herbal plants: A. millefolium, A. montana, E. purpurea, C. recutita, S. virgaurea, possess antioxidative properties and protect platelet proteins against peroxynitrite toxicity in vitro, similar to the glycoconjugates from C. canadensis. However, in the comparative studies, the polyphenolic

  9. The national portfolio for postgraduate family medicine training in South Africa: a descriptive study of acceptability, educational impact, and usefulness for assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Louis; Mash, Bob; Derese, Anselme

    2013-07-25

    Since 2007 a portfolio of learning has become a requirement for assessment of postgraduate family medicine training by the Colleges of Medicine of South Africa. A uniform portfolio of learning has been developed and content validity established among the eight postgraduate programmes. The aim of this study was to investigate the portfolio's acceptability, educational impact, and perceived usefulness for assessment of competence. Two structured questionnaires of 35 closed and open-ended questions were delivered to 53 family physician supervisors and 48 registrars who had used the portfolio. Categorical and nominal/ordinal data were analysed using simple descriptive statistics. The open-ended questions were analysed with ATLAS.ti software. Half of registrars did not find the portfolio clear, practical or feasible. Workshops on portfolio use, learning, and supervision were supported, and brief dedicated time daily for reflection and writing. Most supervisors felt the portfolio reflected an accurate picture of learning, but just over half of registrars agreed. While the portfolio helped with reflection on learning, participants were less convinced about how it helped them plan further learning. Supervisors graded most rotations, suggesting understanding the summative aspect, while only 61% of registrars reflected on rotations, suggesting the formative aspects are not yet optimally utilised. Poor feedback, the need for protected academic time, and pressure of service delivery impacting negatively on learning. This first introduction of a national portfolio for postgraduate training in family medicine in South Africa faces challenges similar to those in other countries. Acceptability of the portfolio relates to a clear purpose and guide, flexible format with tools available in the workplace, and appreciating the changing educational environment from university-based to national assessments. The role of the supervisor in direct observations of the registrar and dedicated

  10. Excellence in Family Paediatricians: the FIMP-MCRN (Medicines for Children Research Network) becomes a member of ENPR-EMA (European Network of Paediatric Research at the European Medicines Agency).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoleone, Ettore

    2011-01-19

    One of the objectives of the Paediatric Regulation (EC) No 1901/2006, is to foster high quality ethical research on medicinal products to be used in children. To achieve this objective, the EMA is responsible for developing a European paediatric network of existing national and European networks and centres with specific expertise in research and clinical trials relating to paediatric medicines. The purpose of this article is to disseminate knowledge of the structure and goals of ENPR-EMA and to highlight the cultural and organizational difficulties for its implementation.Following the publication of research quality requirements, a set of recognition criteria, which have to be fulfilled to become a member of ENPR-EMA were agreed. So far, 32 networks and centres (of 62 identified networks) submitted self-assessment reports indicating whether or not they fulfill the agreed minimum criteria. Sixteen networks (26% of 62 identified networks) fulfilled all minimum criteria and became therefore members of ENPR-EMA. The Family Paediatricians Medicines for Children Research Network (FIMP-MCRN), established with the aim of developing competence, infrastructure, networking and education for paediatric clinical trials, became member of the ENPR-EMA responding satisfactorily to all the points of the self-assessment report.

  11. Excellence in Family Paediatricians: the FIMP-MCRN (Medicines for Children Research Network becomes a member of ENPR-EMA (European Network of Paediatric Research at the European Medicines Agency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Napoleone Ettore

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract One of the objectives of the Paediatric Regulation (EC No 1901/2006, is to foster high quality ethical research on medicinal products to be used in children. To achieve this objective, the EMA is responsible for developing a European paediatric network of existing national and European networks and centres with specific expertise in research and clinical trials relating to paediatric medicines. The purpose of this article is to disseminate knowledge of the structure and goals of ENPR-EMA and to highlight the cultural and organizational difficulties for its implementation. Following the publication of research quality requirements, a set of recognition criteria, which have to be fulfilled to become a member of ENPR-EMA were agreed. So far, 32 networks and centres (of 62 identified networks submitted self-assessment reports indicating whether or not they fulfill the agreed minimum criteria. Sixteen networks (26% of 62 identified networks fulfilled all minimum criteria and became therefore members of ENPR-EMA. The Family Paediatricians Medicines for Children Research Network (FIMP-MCRN, established with the aim of developing competence, infrastructure, networking and education for paediatric clinical trials, became member of the ENPR-EMA responding satisfactorily to all the points of the self-assessment report.

  12. Report on Scottish council elections 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Bochel, Hugh; Denver, David; Steven, Martin

    2012-01-01

    This report to the Electoral Commission covers the Scottish council elections of May 2012. It considers aspects of the administration of the elections, turnout, patterns of candidature and party support and control of councils.

  13. LATTE - Log and Time Tracking for Elections

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — LATTE - Log and Time Tracking for Elections is a time tracking and voucher preparation system used to schedule employees to cover elections, to document their time...

  14. Medizinstudierende Eltern – die Dichotomie der Erfahrungswelten [Parents Studying Medicine – the dichotomy of studying with a family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iden, Kirstin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available [english] Introduction: In this article the personal study and life situation of parents who are also medical students at the Medical School of the Goethe University Frankfurt am Main is discussed. There is a special focus on the topics “studying with children” and “family-friendly university”, which have been present in discussions about university development and in the daily life of academics, especially during the last decade. The workgroup “Individual Student Services” at the medical faculty at the Goethe University tries to meet the necessities of the individual study courses and to support the study success with a new counselling and student service concept.Methods: The experience of parents studying medicine was recorded in semi-structured interviews (Date: April 2010, which were held as part of the sponsored pilot project on part-time medical studies (“Pilot Project Part-time Medical Studies”. Additionally, study results from the Medical School of the Goethe University Frankfurt am Main were integrated as well as a literature analysis.Results: It was found that the teaching demands and support services, which have been suggested and needed for years now, have been partially implemented and are without sufficient support at the faculty level to date. Thus the current situation of medical students with children is still difficult and seems a big challenge for everyone involved.Solution: As part of the “Individual Student Services” a new pilot project on part-time medical studies was established in November 2009. Only the use of new, unconventional and innovative ideas allows universities to adequately support the changing and heterogeneous student population and support them to successfully completing their medical studies.[german] Einleitung: In dem vorliegenden Artikel wird die persönliche Studien- und Lebenssituation von Studierenden mit Kindern am Fachbereich Medizin der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main

  15. 2015 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Elections Timetable Monday 21 September, at noon Start date for receipt of the application Friday 16 October, at noon Closing date for receipt of the applications Monday 26 October, at noon Start date for voting Monday 9 November, at noon Closing date for voting Monday 16 and Monday 23 November, publication of the results in Echo Monday 23 and Tuesday 24 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 1st December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 16 and 24 November. During its meeting of March 17 2015, the Staff Council approved the election rules, which define the allocation of seats in each department, as follows:   Number of seats in the electoral colleges Departments BE EN TE DG/DGS FP GS HR/PF IT PH Career paths AA - D 2 3 3 1 1 2 1 1 2 Career paths E - G 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 3   ...

  16. 2015 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Elections Timetable Monday 26 October, at noon Start date for voting Monday 9 November, at noon Closing date for voting Monday 16 and Monday 23 November, publication of the results in Echo Monday 23 and Tuesday 24 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 1st December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 16 and 24 November. During its meeting of March 17 2015, the Staff Council approved the election rules, which define the allocation of seats in each department, as follows:   Number of seats in the electoral colleges Departments BE EN TE DG/DGS FP GS HR/PF IT PH Career paths AA - D 2 3 3 1 1 2 1 1 2 Career paths E - G 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 3   Global CERN Career paths AA - G 14     Number of seats for fellows representatives Global CERN 5 For more informat...

  17. to enhance re-election

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. O. E. OSUAGWU

    2013-12-01

    Dec 1, 2013 ... Assessing the Impact of Information Technology (WWW) on the attainment of Positive Corporate Image (PCI) to enhance re-election bid of incumbent ... public legitimacy and influence electoral victory at the polls. .... recognized main media and subdivision for ..... To avoid social and political conflicts,.

  18. Machine Learning in Parliament Elections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Esfandiari

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Parliament is considered as one of the most important pillars of the country governance. The parliamentary elections and prediction it, had been considered by scholars of from various field like political science long ago. Some important features are used to model the results of consultative parliament elections. These features are as follows: reputation and popularity, political orientation, tradesmen's support, clergymen's support, support from political wings and the type of supportive wing. Two parameters of reputation and popularity and the support of clergymen and religious scholars that have more impact in reducing of prediction error in election results, have been used as input parameters in implementation. In this study, the Iranian parliamentary elections, modeled and predicted using learnable machines of neural network and neuro-fuzzy. Neuro-fuzzy machine combines the ability of knowledge representation of fuzzy sets and the learning power of neural networks simultaneously. In predicting the social and political behavior, the neural network is first trained by two learning algorithms using the training data set and then this machine predict the result on test data. Next, the learning of neuro-fuzzy inference machine is performed. Then, be compared the results of two machines.

  19. Sublinear Bounds for Randomized Leader Election

    OpenAIRE

    Kutten, Shay; Pandurangan, Gopal; Peleg, David; Robinson, Peter; Trehan, Amitabh

    2012-01-01

    This paper concerns {\\em randomized} leader election in synchronous distributed networks. A distributed leader election algorithm is presented for complete $n$-node networks that runs in O(1) rounds and (with high probability) uses only $O(\\sqrt{n}\\log^{3/2} n)$ messages to elect a unique leader (with high probability). When considering the "explicit" variant of leader election where eventually every node knows the identity of the leader, our algorithm yields the asymptotically optimal bounds...

  20. Speak Out (K-8) [and] Election '80.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield.

    These two teaching guides contain step-by-step procedures for an election education program in which all Illinois school children vote for and elect a State animal. The program, mandated by the Illinois State Legislature, is intended to provide students with the unique opportunity to learn about the entire election process through actual voting…

  1. 29 CFR 44.3 - Election process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Election process. 44.3 Section 44.3 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor PROCESS FOR ELECTING STATE AGENCY EMPLOYMENT STATISTICS REPRESENTATIVES FOR CONSULTATIONS WITH DEPARTMENT OF LABOR § 44.3 Election process. (a) Process. The Commissioner of Labor Statistics...

  2. Political budget cycles and election outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klomp, Jeroen; de Haan, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses two empirical questions. Is fiscal policy affected by upcoming elections? If so, do election-motivated fiscal policies enhance the probability of re-election of the incumbent? Employing data for 65 democratic countries over 1975-2005 in a semi-pooled panel model, we find that in

  3. Political budget cycles and election outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klomp, J.G.; Haan, de J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses two empirical questions. Is fiscal policy affected by upcoming elections? If so, do election-motivated fiscal policies enhance the probability of re-election of the incumbent? Employing data for 65 democratic countries over 1975–2005 in a semi-pooled panel model, we find that in

  4. Elections and Social Conflict in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    democratic process will be allowed to take its course. In countries that lack these traits , elections have often led to violence. In the Democratic...participation. While elections are COUNTRY ELECTION DATE DEATHS Kenya December, 2007 1502 South Africa April, 1994 239 Nigeria April, 2007 226 Cote

  5. Education Blogs Hit Our Elections next Month

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlmutter, David D.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author examines the role blogs will play in future campaigns and elections and how bloggers will affect the election of the next commander in chief. A necessary starting point in discussing the role of blogs in the presidential election of 2008 is to consider how similar blogs are, as a new medium or genre or venue, to…

  6. 75 FR 32273 - Representation Election Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-08

    ... 29 CFR Parts 1202 and 1206 RIN 3140-ZA00 Representation Election Procedure AGENCY: National Mediation... delaying the effective date of its rule regarding representation election procedures from June 10, 2010 to... Representation Election Procedure Rule have been made. The NMB will notify participants if there are any further...

  7. Media and the 2013 Kenyan election

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    In March 2013, Kenya held its first election after the post-election violence (PEV) in 2008, which media were blamed for contributing to by partisan reporting and hate speech. Prior to the 2013 election, several organizations worked to raise awareness of the negative consequences of hate speech...

  8. School, Community Leadership, and Election Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Ann

    2008-01-01

    This article examines how the political structure of school elections contributes to leadership perspectives related to school-community engagement. Interview data from school superintendents, school board presidents, and city mayors across four cities and two election types were analyzed to determine if differences in school election structure…

  9. The 2011 municipal elections in South Africa and new trends since the 2009 national elections

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Greben, JM

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available in elections A trend matrix relates the election results of and ?old? and a ?new? election by counting how voters for a particular old party voted in the new election. If there are Pold parties in The 2011 municipal elections in SA and new trends since... matrix with Pnew ?Pold elements is necessary to characterize this behavior. To calculate such a matrix exactly, one needs all individual election results of the two elections. Clearly this information is not available, and one has to derive...

  10. Radiologic-pathologic Correlation-An Advanced Fourth-year Elective: How We Do It.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Matthew; Silverman, Jan; Spruill, Laura; Hill, Jeanne

    2016-07-01

    Traditionally, the radiology elective has been designed to teach medical students the fundamentals of radiologic interpretation. When questioned, many students state that they want to take a radiology elective so they can "interpret images." For the students on radiology, rotation/elective education was often passive, consisting of didactic conferences and observational shadowing of radiologists as they interpreted images. Students had only a superficial appreciation of how radiologists interacted with clinical services, multidisciplinary teams, and pathology. There was very little emphasis on imaging appropriateness or the most efficient and effective imaging for various clinical problems. With the expansion of numerous imaging modalities and the emphasis on patient-centered care, including imaging safety and dose reduction, it is important to change the focus of radiology education from interpretation to the optimal integration of imaging into clinical medicine. Radiology-pathology (rad path) electives were created at Allegheny General Hospital and the Medical University of South Carolina as a new option to provide a high-quality advanced elective for fourth-year medical students. These electives enable students to correlate radiologic images with gross and microscopic pathology specimens, thus increasing their knowledge and understanding of both. The rad path elective combines aspects of surgery, radiology, and pathology and requires students to be active learners. The implementation of this elective is an exciting work in progress that has been evolving over the past 2 and 4 years at Medical University of South Carolina and Allegheny General Hospital, respectively. We will discuss the historical basis for the elective, the advantages and challenges of having such an integrated course, and some different strategies for creating a rad path elective.

  11. Collaborative Care for Older Adults with low back pain by family medicine physicians and doctors of chiropractic (COCOA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goertz, Christine M; Salsbury, Stacie A; Vining, Robert D

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low back pain is a prevalent and debilitating condition that affects the health and quality of life of older adults. Older people often consult primary care physicians about back pain, with many also receiving concurrent care from complementary and alternative medicine providers, most...

  12. Six decades of the chair of Internal Medicine at the Medical Faculty in Skopje.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakalaroski, K

    2013-01-01

    The chair of internal medicine in Republic of Macedonia was created in 1947. The Department of Internal Medicine (CIM) is the most numerous at Skopje's medical faculty (currently 56 members). According to the archive material from the first session of the Scientific Teaching Council of the Faculty of Medicine (17.03.1947), Mr Mario Krmpotic (Professor of Internal Medicine) was proposed as the first Director of the Internal Clinic (1947). For reasons unknown, Mr Krmpotic never came to Skopje to accept the post. As a consequence of this fact, the real founder of the CIM was the Russian Professor Alexandar Ignjatovski (1875-1955). Mr Ignjatovski was elected as the first Director of the Clinic for Internal Medicine in 1948 for a period of 4 years (1948-1952). At the same time, he was the first Chief of the CIM in Skopje (Macedonia). Dr D. Arsov was elected as the first Assistant Professor of Medicine in 1947, and second (and last) Director of the Clinic for Internal Medicine (1952-1974). For the same period (22 years) he was Head of the CIM. Dr D. Arsov sequentially and successively became first associated and then ordinary professor of medicine in the years 1951 and 1958. The regular activities of the CIM are as follows: 1) Undergraduate education for students (Clinical Investigation, Internal Medicine, Clinical Pharmacy) in general medicine, dentistry, geriatrics, urgent and family medicine (ECKTS); Undergraduate educationfor nurses, speech therapists, physiotherapists, radiologists (high /three year/ nurses School, ECKTS); 2) Postgraduate education (candidates for specialisation in internal medicine, infectology, anaesthesiology, neurology and surgery; 3) Continual medical education (a traditional morning scientific meeting on Thursdays, 08 h; weekly meetings of all internal medicine subspecialists); Scientific meetings, symposiums, congresses of former internal medicine associations (cardiology, pulmoallergology, gastroenterology, nephrology, haematology

  13. [Sports medicine in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickhuth, H-H

    2005-08-01

    Sports medicine covers many different aspects, ranging from clinical specialties, such as internal medicine, orthopedics or pediatrics to physiology and sports sciences. The requirements for sports medicine evolve mainly from exercise physiology (elite, leisure and health oriented physical activity), orthopedics and traumatology as well as from preventive and rehabilitative issues. In the new German curriculum, sports medicine is defined as a subspecialty. Historically, sports medicine in Germany has a federal structure with a governing body (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Sportmedizin und Prävention). Due to these facts, University Departments of Sports Medicine (which vary greatly in size and performance) are either attached to Medical or non-Medical Faculties, such as Sports Sciences. In medical schools, sports medicine can be selected as an elective subject. However, the main part of teaching sports medicine is covered by Sports Science Faculties. In an international context, the strength of German sports medicine is its clinical orientation and close cooperation with the sport itself, especially high-performance sports. In the future, like in the Anglo- American countries, sports medicine in Germany will play a major role in health prevention and rehabilitation.

  14. Certification of ICTs in Elections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schürmann, Carsten; Barrat, Jordi; Bolo, Eden

    2015-01-01

    voting or tabulation systems. The key elements of quality control are certification and evaluation. Certification refers to the confirmation proof of compliance with a given standard. Evaluation is the most labour intensive part of the quality control process during which the requirements, designs......, hardware, firmware, software, networks and operational contexts are examined for faults. An election technology can only be certified by third-party reviewers who are accredited to assess compliance with a standard. An EMB should consider quality control early in the process of introducing new technologies......, starting during the feasibility study, and especially if it is bound by law to provide such a certification. The evaluation reports and related documents can also be used to increase the transparency of the election, improve the dialogue between EMBs and voters, and increase the EMB’s credibility....

  15. Vote Bying I: General Elections

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    We examine the consequences of vote buying, assuming this practice were al- lowed and free of stigma. Two parties compete in a binary election and may purchase votes in a sequential bidding game via up-front binding payments and/or campaign promises (platforms) that are contingent upon the outcome of the elec- tion. We analyze the role of the parties' and voters' preferences in determining the winner and the payments to voters.

  16. 2013 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Elections Timetable Starting with Echo of 16 September, posters, etc. call for applications Monday 21 October, at noon closing date for receipt of the applications Monday 28 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 11 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 18 and Monday 25 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 19 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 3 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 18 and 25 November. n its meeting on 11 September 2013, the Electoral Commission decided on the following distribution of seats in colleges O.1 to O.6: Sectors Departments Career paths AA – A – B – C – D Career paths E – F – G – H Accelerators and Technology BE TE EN Electoral college 0.1 13 si&...

  17. Results of the 2009 elections

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    The elections to renew the Staff Council for the 2010-2011 period are now behind us and we are very pleased to have had at least as many candidates as posts in five of the six electoral colleges. Furthermore, the average rate of participation of 56.8% in these elections is a very good result compared to previous years. We thank the candidates who have committed themselves to actively defending the interests of the staff, and all our members have shown, by voting, their full support of the candidates in their college and Department. This newly-elected Staff Council (see its composition on the following page) will therefore be truly representative of all the sectors and professions of the Organization, which will be a major asset when the Staff Association representatives begin discussions with the Management and Member States in 2010 on the key issues of the five-yearly review and the measures to be taken to absorb the deficit of our Pension Fund. Armed with this vote of confidence, we know that we can count o...

  18. 2011 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2011-01-01

    Elections Timetable Starting with Echo of 26 September, posters, etc. call for applications Wednesday 26 October, at noon closing date for receipt of the application Monday 31 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 14 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 21 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 22 and Wednesday 29 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 6 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 21 November. In its meeting on 19 September 2011, the Electoral Commission decided on the following distribution of seats in colleges 0.1 to 0.6: Sector Department Career path AA – A – B – C – D Career path E – F – G – H Accelerators and Technology BE TE EN Electoral college 0.1 18 si&e...

  19. 2013 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Elections Timetable Starting with Echo of 16 September, posters, etc. call for applications Monday 21 October, at noon closing date for receipt of the applications Monday 28 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 11 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 18 and Monday 25 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 19 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 3 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 18 and 25 November. n its meeting on 11 September 2013, the Electoral Commission decided on the following distribution of seats in colleges O.1 to O.6: Sectors Departments Career paths AA – A – B – C – D Career paths E – F – G – H Accelerators and Technology BE TE EN Electoral colle...

  20. 2011 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Elections Timetable Starting with Echo of 26 September, posters, etc. call for applications Wednesday 26 October, at noon closing date for receipt of the application Monday 31 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 14 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 21 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 22 and Wednesday 29 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 6 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 21 November. In its meeting on 19 September 2011, the Electoral Commission decided on the following distribution of seats in colleges 0.1 to 0.6: Sector Department Career path AA – A – B – C – D Career path E – F – G – H Accelerators and Technology BE TE EN Electoral college 0.1 18 si&e...

  1. Legal Status Of The Election Organizer Ethics Council An Analysis Of Indonesian Election Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to identify and to analyze the legal status of the Election Organizer Ethics Council in the General Election in Indonesia. This research is a normative research by using statute approach official records and the judges verdict which is then described qualitatively. These results indicate that the legal status of the Election Organizer Ethics Council in the general election in Indonesia as supporting organ that serves to uphold ethics rule of ethics and guarding democracy. The authority of Election Organizer Ethics Council in the general election in Indonesia sometimes out of authority. Ideal concept of the legal status of the Election Organizer Ethics Council in general elections was as supporting organ which have the infrastructure secretary general and administrative staff so it has a public legal entity as similar to the Election organizers serve as code of ethics enforcement agencies code of ethics and can equated to other state institutions.

  2. Knowledge, attitudes and barriers regarding vaccination against hepatitis A and B in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection: a survey of family medicine and internal medicine physicians in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenner, C T; Herzog, K; Chaudhari, S; Bini, E J; Weinshel, E H

    2012-10-01

    Although vaccination against hepatitis A virus (HAV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) is recommended for all patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, physician vaccination practices are suboptimal. Since training for family medicine (FM) and internal medicine (IM) physicians differ, we hypothesised that there are differences in knowledge, attitudes and barriers regarding vaccination against HAV and HBV in patients with chronic HCV between these two groups. A two-page questionnaire was mailed to 3000 primary care (FM and IM) physicians randomly selected from the AMA Physician Masterfile in 2005. The survey included questions about physician demographics, knowledge and attitudes regarding vaccination. Among the 3000 physicians surveyed, 1209 (42.2%) returned completed surveys. There were no differences between respondents and non-respondents with regard to age, gender, geographic location or specialty. More FM than IM physicians stated that HCV+ patients should not be vaccinated against HAV (23.7% vs. 11.8%, p infection, physicians often do not test or vaccinate susceptible individuals. Interventions are needed to overcome the barriers identified and improve vaccination rates. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. [International Health Electives in developing countries for medical and nursing students: four experiences from French-speaking Switzerland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chastonay, Philippe; Baumann, Fritz; Chastonay, Oriane; Staudacher, Kevin; Verloo, Henk; Kabengele, Emmanuel; Mattig, Thomas; Michaud, Pierre-André; Bernheim, Laurent

    2015-06-10

    International Health Electives performed in developing countries by students of medical and nursing schools from industrialized nations have recently become a highly valued element in curricula of medical and nursing schools. We report here four examples of such electives developed over the years at the Faculties of medicine of Geneva and Lausanne, one involving both medical and nursing school students. These electives foster enthusiasm and commitment among students and host institutions abroad. A selective review of the literature highlights the many positive aspects of such electives for the professional and personal development of students. It also emphasizes what the host institutions can gain from these electives provided the latter are organized in a balanced partnership and that the students receive a careful preparation to avoid possible pitfalls.

  4. Person-centred medicine in the context of primary care: a view from the World Organization of Family Doctors (Wonca)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weel, C. van

    2011-01-01

    RATIONALE, AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: Most professional medical care is provided in the community, and this determines the importance of primary care for the health care system. As family doctors are involved in the care of different health problems over time to the same individual, the personal dimension

  5. Family medicine, 'La Herencia' and breast cancer; understanding the (dis)continuities of predictive genetics in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbon, Sahra

    2011-06-01

    Building on social science research examining the relationship between genetic knowledge, identity and the family this paper takes the cultural context of Cuba as a site for critical ethnographic engagement. The paper makes use of research working with a range of Cuban public and genetic professionals as part of a collaborative research project exploring the social and cultural context of health beliefs about breast cancer. It illuminates the contrasting ways in which genomic knowledge linked to an increased risk of breast cancer is perceived, communicated, and acted upon. It is argued that the particular meaning and significance of genetic risk linked to breast cancer in this context must be examined in relation to long standing institutional practices relating to public health care provision. The focus on 'the family' in the provision of Cuban health provides a particularly viable foundation for the expansion of what is described as 'community genetics', including the collation of family history details for common complex diseases such as breast cancer. Nevertheless specific public perceptions of risk related to breast cancer and the difficulties of discussing a diagnosis of cancer openly in the family point to the very specific challenges for the translation and application of predictive interventions in Cuba. In summary the dynamic interrelationship between public health, perceptions of risk or health beliefs about the causes of the disease and attitudes towards cancer diagnosis within the family point to both continuities and discontinuities in the way that genomic interventions linked to breast cancer are unfolding as part of a dynamic yet still ostensibly socialist project of health care in Cuba.

  6. Introduction and preparation of an objective structured clinical examination in family medicine for undergraduate students at the University of Split.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakarija-Grković, Irena; Šimunović, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    To describe the implementation of the first Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) conducted at the University of Split School of Medicine. Twenty-one clinical skills relevant to general practice were selected and described in a Handbook for students. Assessment sheets were created. After performing an inventory of available resources, teaching models were purchased and practical classes arranged. A Centre for Clinical Competencies was established, where the first OSCE at the University of Split School of Medicine was conducted in March 2011. Attendance by students to the practical classes and the OSCE was 100%. Positive feedback was received by students, who requested extra lessons in clinical skills training. Despite not setting a minimal pass rate, the average OSCE score was 27 out of 30 points. Organization of clinical skills training and assessment was demanding, requiring many hours of preparation and numerous staff involvement but was ultimately very rewarding. Both practical classes and the OSCE were very well received by students, who seemed to be empowered by this experience. Copyright 2012 by Academy of Sciences and Arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  7. Family medicine, ‘La Herencia’ and breast cancer; understanding the (dis)continuities of predictive genetics in Cuba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbon, Sahra

    2011-01-01

    Building on social science research examining the relationship between genetic knowledge, identity and the family this paper takes the cultural context of Cuba as a site for critical ethnographic engagement. The paper makes use of research working with a range of Cuban publics and genetic professionals as part of a collaborative research project exploring the social and cultural context of health beliefs about breast cancer. It illuminates the contrasting ways in which genomic knowledge linked to an increased risk of breast cancer is perceived, communicated, and acted upon. It is argued that the particular meaning and significance of genetic risk linked to breast cancer in this context must be examined in relation to long standing institutional practices relating to public health care provision. The focus on ‘the family’ in the provision of Cuban health provides a particularly viable foundation for the expansion of what is described as ‘community genetics’, including the collation of family history details for common complex diseases such as breast cancer. Nevertheless specific public perceptions of risk related to breast cancer and the difficulties of discussing a diagnosis of cancer openly in the family point to the very specific challenges for the translation and application of predictive interventions in Cuba. In summary the dynamic interrelationship between public health, perceptions of risk or health beliefs about the causes of the disease and attitudes towards cancer diagnosis within the family point to both continuities and discontinuities in the way that genomic interventions linked to breast cancer are unfolding as part of a dynamic yet still ostensibly socialist project of health care in Cuba. PMID:21239101

  8. Quality of care and health-related quality of life of climacteric stage women cared for in family medicine clinics in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladislavovna Doubova Dubova, Svetlana; Flores-Hernández, Sergio; Rodriguez-Aguilar, Leticia; Pérez-Cuevas, Ricardo

    2010-02-10

    1) To design and validate indicators to measure the quality of the process of care that climacteric stage women receive in family medicine clinics (FMC). 2) To assess the quality of care that climacteric stage women receive in FMC. 3) To determine the association between quality of care and health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) among climacteric stage women. The study had two phases: I. Design and validation of indicators to measure the quality of care process by using the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method. II. Evaluation of the quality of care and its association with HR-QoL through a cross-sectional study conducted in two FMC located in Mexico City that included 410 climacteric stage women. The quality of care was measured by estimating the percentage of recommended care received (PRCR) by climacteric stage women in three process components: health promotion, screening, and treatment. The HR-QoL was measured using the Cervantes scale (0-155). The association between quality of care and HR-QoL was estimated through multiple linear regression analysis. The lowest mean of PRCR was for the health promotion component (24.1%) and the highest for the treatment component (86.6%). The mean of HR-QoL was 50.1 points. The regression analysis showed that in the treatment component, for every 10 additional points of the PRCR, the global HR-QoL improved 2.8 points on the Cervantes scale (coefficient -0.28, P < 0.0001). The indicators to measure quality of care for climacteric stage women are applicable and feasible in family medicine settings. There is a positive association between the quality of the treatment component and HR-QoL; this would encourage interventions to improve quality of care for climacteric stage women.

  9. Severe Medicine Nurses and Patients Family Communication Model Research%重症医学科护士与患者家属沟通模式的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏平

    2012-01-01

      目的建立护士与患者家属沟通模式。方法通过调查、分析、经验总结对重症医学科护士与患者家属沟通进行研究。结果形成了重症医学科护士与患者家属沟通运行模式。结论建立规范的重症医学科护士与患者家属沟通模式有利于护理管理的科学化,能有效规范重症医学科护士与患者家属沟通的全过程,建立和谐护患关系。%  Objective To establish the nurse and patient family communication model. Methods Through the investigation and analysis, summarized experience of severe medicine nurses and patients family communication research. Results Form the severe medicine nurses and patients family communication operation mode. Conclusion The established standard severe medicine nurses and patients family communication model is helpful to scientific nursing management, can effectively regulate severe medicine nurses and patients family communication process, the establishment of a harmonious relationship between a guard.

  10. The Singapore general election 1997

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Jinshan; Elklit, Jørgen

    1999-01-01

    The parliamentary eklection in singapore in January 1997 is examined, as is the particular electoral system ('the party block vote') which is found to be a central element in the electoral strategy of the ruling party, PAP. the functioning of this rare electoral system is, however, only one eleme...... in explaining how PAP has been able to win comfortable majorities in the House. The analysis contributes to the understandi9ng of how a semi-democratic regime can stay in power. The political and electoral process in relation to the 1997 election is also analysed...

  11. Electronic Elections: A Balancing Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, Pedro A. D.

    This article aims to share some major lessons learned from the pioneering experience in Brazil with the world's first full national implementation of universal electronic voting. Differing notions of security, and their "collateral entanglements", appear to play a key role and are contrasted in Brazil's pioneering electronic voting saga. After an introduction, we puzzle through what election security may mean. We elaborate on how technological innovations may affect the underlying risks, their nature, corrections and balance. Then we describe some ways in which innovations have been deployed and validated, and how the results are being perceived, before some closing remarks.

  12. Curricula and Organization of Primary Care Residencies in Internal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, John M.

    1980-01-01

    The organization and curricula of internal medicine residencies programs that emphasize primary care are described and compared with traditional residencies in internal medicine. It is noted that primary care residents spend more time in ambulatory care and are allowed more electives in specialties outside of internal medicine. Out-of-hospital…

  13. Election Media and Youth Political Engagement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Diana Owen

    2009-01-01

    .... In fact, much traditional election media coverage of youth has emphasized their lack of interest and involvement, and thus works to discourage the development of activist political orientations...

  14. 2010 Election Administration and Voting Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Election Assistance Commission — This dataset contains data about domestic absentee voting, provisional balloting, poll books, polling place, precincts, poll workers, and voting technology used in...

  15. Democracy and Elections in Africa: Critical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wondwosen Teshome

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to assess the democratization process in Africa in general and the multi-party elections in particular. The decolonization process in Africa (1960s and 1970s, which was known as the “first liberation” completed by the emergence of many, new independent African countries. In most of the newly liberated countries the political parties that led the anti-colonial struggle established one-party domination after independence. The rapid democratization process (“second liberation” in Africa began in the first half of the 1990s, particularly with Benin’s multiparty election in 1991. In this period, multi-party elections had taken place in most of African countries. These transitions led to “limited” democracies, characterized by a lack of liberal freedoms, low levels of popular involvement (except at election times, narrow range of civil liberties and the concentration of political power in the hands of small elite groups. Holding an election is a milestone, but it is not the key to Africa’s democratic legitimacy. Many elections in the African region have failed to meet the internationally accepted standards for free and fair elections. Though Africa’s record on free and fair elections is mixed, at present, most of Africans have embraced elections as indispensable mechanism for determining their future course.

  16. 2008 Election Administration and Voting Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Election Assistance Commission — This dataset contains data about domestic absentee voting, provisional balloting, poll books, polling place, precincts, poll workers, and voting technology used in...

  17. Bacteremia during quinsy and elective tonsillectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klug, Tejs Ehlers; Henriksen, Jens-Jacob; Rusan, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Bacteremia during elective tonsillectomy is well recognized, whereas bacteremia during quinsy tonsillectomy has never been studied. The aim of the present study was to explore the incidence of bacteremia during elective and quinsy tonsillectomy in order to evaluate the antibiotic...... swabs, core tissue, and pus aspirates were analyzed by standard microbiological techniques. Results: Bacteremia was detected in 73% of patients during elective tonsillectomy compared to 56% during quinsy tonsillectomy (P ¼ .089, Fishers exact test). Significantly more blood culture bottles were positive...... for each isolate obtained from elective tonsillectomy cases compared to quinsy tonsillectomy cases (P bacteremia with microorganisms that are predominant in bacterial endocarditis...

  18. Local government elections – Some personal perspectives

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ittmann, HW

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available the next elections. Various forms of election forecasts exist and are being used in most elections (Brown, et al 1999; Greben, et al 2005; Karandikar, et al 1998; Lichtman, et al 1990; Morton 1988; Samuelson 2011 and Thedeen 1990). Before an election...? answer (Samuelson, 2008). The ?yes? answers favour the incumbent party candidate. If five or fewer answers are ?no?, the incumbent party retains the presidency, while if six or more are ?no?, the challenger wins. This method is based on a statistical...

  19. [Gustav Klimt and the field of medicine. Painting of the medical faculty--relationship with the Zuckerkandl family].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultheiss, D

    2007-09-01

    The art nouveau painter Gustav Klimt (1862-1918), a cofounder of the Vienna Secession movement, was commissioned in 1894 to prepare three ceiling paintings for the Great Hall of the University of Vienna portraying the faculties of "Philosophy," "Medicine," and "Jurisprudence." After the first public presentations of these paintings starting in 1900 fierce protests erupted since the artist had not painted a historical allegory but rather had created a modern symbolic picture in the Secessionism style. The controversy over the so-called faculty paintings escalated to the point that in 1905 Klimt irrevocably distanced himself from the commission and bought back his pictures from the state. The paintings were later purchased by the Austrian Gallery and in 1943 placed in storage in Lower Austria at the Immendorf Castle where they were destroyed by a fire in May 1945 when the German troops withdrew. Besides Klimt's preliminary sketches, only black and white photographs of the three paintings now exist as well as a color reproduction of the section depicting Hygieia from the "Medicine" painting. Due to the public rejection of the faculty paintings, Gustav Klimt broke away from official government-commissioned art and focused on private clients from among Viennese society. One of these intensive associations was with the anatomist Emil Zuckerkandl and his wife Berta, who was very active in cultural affairs. During the dispute over the faculty paintings, Zuckerkandl was one of the few university professors who signed a petition in favor of retaining the paintings. His brother, the industrialist Victor Zuckerkandl, was one of the major collectors and patrons of Secessionist art. The third brother, the well-known urologist Otto Zuckerkandl (1861-1921), president of the Second and Third Congresses of the German Society of Urology in 1909 and 1911, was also in close contact with Klimt. A portrait of his wife Amalie was a work in progress between 1913 and 1917, but it remained

  20. The interpretation of the reasons for encounter ‘cough’ and ‘sadness’ in four international family medicine populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean K Soler

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background This is a study of the relationships between common reasons for encounter and common diagnoses (episode titles within episodes of care in family practice populations in four countries.Method Participating family doctors recorded details of all their patient contacts in an EoC structure using the International Classification of Primary Care, including RfEs presented by the patient, and the FDs’ diagnostic labels. The relationships between RfEs and episode titles were studied using Bayesian methods.Results The RfE ‘cough’ is a strong, reliable predictor for the diagnoses ‘cough’, ‘acute bronchitis’, ‘URTI’ and ‘acute laryngitis/tracheitis’ and a less strong, but reliable predictor for ‘sinusitis’, ‘pneumonia’, ‘influenza’, ‘asthma’, ‘other viral diseases’, ‘whooping cough’, ‘chronic bronchitis’, ‘wheezing’ and ‘phlegm’. The absence of cough is a weak but reliable predictor to exclude a diagnosis of ‘cough’, ‘acute bronchitis’ and ‘tracheitis’. Its presence allows strong, reliable exclusion of the diagnoses ‘gastroenteritis’, ‘no disease’ and ‘health promotion/prevention’, and less strong exclusion of ‘adverse effects of medication’. The RfE ‘sadness’ is a strong, reliable predictor for the diagnoses ‘feeling sad/depressed’ and ‘depressive disorder’. It is a less strong, but reliable predictor of a diagnosis of ‘acute stress reaction’. The absence of sadness is a weak but reliable predictor to exclude the symptom diagnosis ‘feeling sad/depressed’. Its presence does not support the exclusion of any diagnosis.Conclusions We describe clinically and statistically significant diagnostic associations observed between the RfEs ‘cough’ and ‘sadness’, presenting as a new problem in family practice, and all the episode titles in ICPC.

  1. 22 CFR 1422.17 - Election procedure; request for authorized representation election observers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... representation election observers. 1422.17 Section 1422.17 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE LABOR RELATIONS...; request for authorized representation election observers. This section governs all elections conducted... among the employees in the unit. (f) Any party may be represented at the polling place(s) by...

  2. Model for election night forecasting applied to the 2004 South African elections

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Greben, JM

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available A novel model has been developed to predict elections on the basis of early results. The electorate is clustered according to their behaviour in previous elections. Early results in the new elections can then be translated into voter behaviour per...

  3. Potential drug-drug and drug-disease interactions in prescriptions for ambulatory patients over 50 years of age in family medicine clinics in Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres-Arreola Laura del Pilar

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Mexico, inappropriate prescription of drugs with potential interactions causing serious risks to patient health has been little studied. Work in this area has focused mainly on hospitalized patients, with only specific drug combinations analyzed; moreover, the studies have not produced conclusive results. In the present study, we determined the frequency of potential drug-drug and drug-disease interactions in prescriptions for ambulatory patients over 50 years of age, who used Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS family medicine clinics. In addition, we aimed to identify the associated factors for these interactions. Methods We collected information on general patient characteristics, medical histories, and medication (complete data. The study included 624 ambulatory patients over 50 years of age, with non-malignant pain syndrome, who made ambulatory visits to two IMSS family medicine clinics in Mexico City. The patients received 7-day prescriptions for non-opioid analgesics. The potential interactions were identified by using the Thompson Micromedex program. Data were analyzed using descriptive, bivariate and multiple logistic regression analyses. Results The average number of prescribed drugs was 5.9 ± 2.5. About 80.0% of patients had prescriptions implying one or more potential drug-drug interactions and 3.8% of patients were prescribed drug combinations with interactions that should be avoided. Also, 64.0% of patients had prescriptions implying one or more potential drug disease interactions. The factors significantly associated with having one or more potential interactions included: taking 5 or more medicines (adjusted Odds Ratio (OR: 4.34, 95%CI: 2.76–6.83, patient age 60 years or older (adjusted OR: 1.66, 95% CI: 1.01–2.74 and suffering from cardiovascular diseases (adjusted OR: 7.26, 95% CI: 4.61–11.44. Conclusion The high frequency of prescription of drugs with potential drug interactions showed in

  4. Suggestions for better election security.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, R.G.; Warner, J.S. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2011-01-01

    Summary of Common Security Mistakes: (1) Electronic voting machines that fundamentally lack security thought and features, including an ability to detect tampering or intrusion, or to be reliably locked or sealed; (2) Failure to disassemble, inspect, and thoroughly inspect (not just test) a sufficient number of voting machines before and after elections in order to detect hardware or software tampering; (3) Assuming that tamper - indicating seals will either be blatantly ripped/smashed open, or else there is no tampering. In reality, even amateurs can spoof most seals leaving (at most) subtle evidence; (4) Inadequate seal use protocols and training of seal installers and inspectors. Failure to show examples of blatantly and subtly attacked seals to seal inspectors; (5) Over confidence in use of a voter verified paper record (VVPR), a VVPR is an excellent security countermeasure, but it is not a silver bullet, especially for an election organization with poor overall security; (6) Little or no insider thr at mitigation; and (7) A poor security culture, including denial and no a priori procedures for dealing with security questions or concerns.

  5. Results of the 2015 Elections

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    The elections to renew the Staff Council for the period 2016-2017 are now behind us and we welcome the turnout for the vote of 55.9 %, which was considerably higher than that of last time. This clearly shows the interest that members of the Staff Association attach to the work and dedication of their delegates and expresses their full support for the candidates of their department. We also thank all candidates who committed themselves to actively defend the interests of the staff. This newly-elected Staff Council (see its composition below) is meant to be truly representative of all sectors and professions of the Organization. This will be a major asset when representatives of the Staff Association will have discussions with Management and Member States on issues which we will have to address the next two years. Strong with this vote of confidence, we are certain that we can count on your active and ongoing support in the future. We know there will be no shortage of challenges. Together we will be stronger t...

  6. Results of the 2011 elections

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    The elections to renew the Staff Council for the period 2012–2013 are now behind us and we welcome the turnout for the vote was 63.6%, This clearly shows the interest that members of the Staff Association attach to the work and dedication of their delegates and expresses their full support for the candidates of their college and department. We also thank all candidates who committed themselves to actively defend the interests of the staff. This newly-elected Staff Council (see its composition on the following page) is meant to be truly representative of all sectors and professions of the Organization, and this will be a major asset when representatives of the Staff Association will have discussions with Management and Member States on issues we have will have to treat the next two years. Armed with this vote of confidence, we are certain that we can count on your active and ongoing support in the future. We know there will be no shortage of challenges. Together we will be stronger to take them o...

  7. Measurement of the Dose to the Family Members Taking Care of Thyroid Cancer Patients Undergoing I-131 Therapy in Nuclear Medicine Using TLD-100.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehtabian, M; Dehghan, N; Danaei Ghazanfarkhani, M; Haghighatafshar, M; Sina, S

    2017-05-01

    The family members or friends of the patients undergoing treatment using radioiodine in nuclear medicine are inevitably exposed to ionization radiation. The purpose of this study is measurement of the dose received by the people taking care of the thyroid cancer patients treated by 131I. For this purpose, the dose amounts received by 29 people accompanying patients were measured using thermoluminescence dosimeters. A badge containing three TLD-100 chips was given to each caregiver. The people were asked to wear the badges for 24 days, when they are taking care of the patients. Finally the dose to each person was estimated by averaging the readings of the three TLDs. The measured dose amounts to the people were compared with the recommendations of international commitions. According to the results obtained in this study, the amounts of dose received by the caregivers were between 0.03 and 0.38 mSv, with the average of 0.12 mSv. By comparison of the results of this study with the recommendations of International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), it can be observed that the dose to family members of the patients is less than the dose constraints. However, it is recommended that the caregivers be aware of the radiation protection principles in order to reduce their dose. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. What Are the Factors Influencing Implementation of Advanced Access in Family Medicine Units? A Cross-Case Comparison of Four Early Adopters in Quebec.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Malham, Sabina; Touati, Nassera; Maillet, Lara; Gaboury, Isabelle; Loignon, Christine; Breton, Mylaine

    2017-01-01

    Advanced access is an organizational model that has shown promise in improving timely access to primary care. In Quebec, it has recently been introduced in several family medicine units (FMUs) with a teaching mission. The objectives of this paper are to analyze the principles of advanced access implemented in FMUs and to identify which factors influenced their implementation. A multiple case study of four purposefully selected FMUs was conducted. Data included document analysis and 40 semistructured interviews with health professionals and staff. Cross-case comparison and thematic analysis were performed. Three out of four FMUs implemented the key principles of advanced access at various levels. One scheduling pattern was observed: 90% of open appointment slots over three- to four-week periods and 10% of prebooked appointments. Structural and organizational factors facilitated the implementation: training of staff to support change, collective leadership, and openness to change. Conversely, family physicians practicing in multiple clinical settings, lack of team resources, turnover of clerical staff, rotation of medical residents, and management capacity were reported as major barriers to implementing the model. Our results call for multilevel implementation strategies to improve the design of the advanced access model in academic teaching settings.

  9. What Are the Factors Influencing Implementation of Advanced Access in Family Medicine Units? A Cross-Case Comparison of Four Early Adopters in Quebec

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Abou Malham

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Advanced access is an organizational model that has shown promise in improving timely access to primary care. In Quebec, it has recently been introduced in several family medicine units (FMUs with a teaching mission. The objectives of this paper are to analyze the principles of advanced access implemented in FMUs and to identify which factors influenced their implementation. Methods. A multiple case study of four purposefully selected FMUs was conducted. Data included document analysis and 40 semistructured interviews with health professionals and staff. Cross-case comparison and thematic analysis were performed. Results. Three out of four FMUs implemented the key principles of advanced access at various levels. One scheduling pattern was observed: 90% of open appointment slots over three- to four-week periods and 10% of prebooked appointments. Structural and organizational factors facilitated the implementation: training of staff to support change, collective leadership, and openness to change. Conversely, family physicians practicing in multiple clinical settings, lack of team resources, turnover of clerical staff, rotation of medical residents, and management capacity were reported as major barriers to implementing the model. Conclusion. Our results call for multilevel implementation strategies to improve the design of the advanced access model in academic teaching settings.

  10. Series: The research agenda for general practice/family medicine and primary health care in Europe. Part 5: Needs and implications for future research and policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Royen, Paul; Beyer, Martin; Chevallier, Patrick; Eilat-Tsanani, Sophia; Lionis, Christos; Peremans, Lieve; Petek, Davorina; Rurik, Imre; Soler, Jean Karl; Stoffers, Henri E J H; Topsever, Pinar; Ungan, Mehmet; Hummers-Pradier, Eva

    2010-12-01

    The recently published 'Research Agenda for General Practice/Family Medicine and Primary Health Care in Europe' summarizes the evidence relating to the core competencies and characteristics of the Wonca Europe definition of GP/FM, and highlights related needs and implications for future research and policy. The European Journal of General Practice publishes a series of articles based on this document. In a first article, background, objectives, and methodology were discussed. In three subsequent, articles the results for the six core competencies of the European Definition of GP/FM were presented. This article formulates the common aims for further research and appropriate research methodologies, based on the missing evidence and research gaps identified form the comprehensive literature review. In addition, implications of this research agenda for general practitioners/family doctors, researchers, research organizations, patients and policy makers are presented. The concept of six core competencies should be abandoned in favour of a model with four dimensions, including clinical, person related, community oriented and management aspects. Future research and policy should consider more the involvement and rights of patients; more attention should be given to how new treatments or technologies are effectively translated into routine patient care, in particular primary care. There is a need for a European ethics board. The promotion of GP/FM research demands a good infrastructure in each country, including access to literature and databases, appropriate funding and training possibilities.

  11. The research agenda for general practice/family medicine and primary health care in Europe. Part 3. Results: person centred care, comprehensive and holistic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Royen, Paul; Beyer, Martin; Chevallier, Patrick; Eilat-Tsanani, Sophia; Lionis, Christos; Peremans, Lieve; Petek, Davorina; Rurik, Imre; Soler, Jean Karl; Stoffers, Henri E J H; Topsever, Pinar; Ungan, Mehmet; Hummers-Pradier, Eva

    2010-06-01

    The recently published 'Research Agenda for General Practice/Family Medicine and Primary Health Care in Europe' summarizes the evidence relating to the core competencies and characteristics of the Wonca Europe definition of GP/FM, and its implications for general practitioners/family doctors, researchers and policy makers. The European Journal of General Practice publishes a series of articles based on this document. In a first article, background, objectives, and methodology were discussed. In a second article, the results for the two core competencies 'primary care management' and 'community orientation' were presented. This article reflects on the three core competencies, which deal with person related aspects of GP/FM, i.e. 'person centred care', 'comprehensive approach' and 'holistic approach'. Though there is an important body of opinion papers and (non-systematic) reviews, all person related aspects remain poorly defined and researched. Validated instruments to measure these competencies are lacking. Concerning patient-centredness, most research examined patient and doctor preferences and experiences. Studies on comprehensiveness mostly focus on prevention/care of specific diseases. For all domains, there has been limited research conducted on its implications or outcomes.

  12. Performance on the American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM) certification examination: are superior test-taking skills alone sufficient to pass?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Thomas R; Royal, Kenneth D; Puffer, James C

    2011-01-01

    Certification examinations used by American specialty boards have been the sine qua non for demonstrating the knowledge sufficient for attainment of board certification in the United States for more than 75 years. Some people contend that the examination is predominantly a test of superior test-taking skills rather than of family medicine decision-making ability. In an effort to explore the validity of this assertion, we administered the American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM) Certification to examinees who had demonstrated proficiency in taking standardized tests but had limited medical knowledge. Four nonphysician experts in the field of measurement and testing were administered one version of the 2009 ABFM certification examination. Scaled scores were calculated for each examinee, and psychometric analyses were performed on the examinees responses to examination items and compared with the performance of physicians who took the same examination. The minimum passing threshold for the examination was a scaled score of 390, corresponding to 57.7% to 61.0% of questions answered correctly, depending on the version of the examination. The 4 nonphysician examinees performed poorly, with scaled scores that ranged from 20 to 160 (mean, 87.5; SD, 57.4). The number of questions answered correctly ranged from 24.0% to 35.1% (mean, 29.2%; SD, 0.05%). Rasch analyses of the examination items revealed that the nonphysician examinees were more likely to use guessing strategies in an effort to answer questions correctly. Distracter analysis suggest near-complete randomness in the nonphysician responses. Though all 4 nonphysician examinees performed better than would have been predicted by chance alone, none performed well enough to even fall within 8 SE below the passing thresholds; their performance was far below that of almost all physicians who completed the examination. Given that the nonphysicians relied heavily on the identifying cues in the phrasing of items and the

  13. Harnessing Integrative Omics to Facilitate Molecular Imaging of the Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Family for Precision Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, Martin; de Boer, H Rudolf; Hooge, Marjolijn N Lub-de; van Vugt, Marcel A T M; de Vries, Elisabeth G E

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is a growing problem worldwide. The cause of death in cancer patients is often due to treatment-resistant metastatic disease. Many molecularly targeted anticancer drugs have been developed against 'oncogenic driver' pathways. However, these treatments are usually only effective in properly selected patients. Resistance to molecularly targeted drugs through selective pressure on acquired mutations or molecular rewiring can hinder their effectiveness. This review summarizes how molecular imaging techniques can potentially facilitate the optimal implementation of targeted agents. Using the human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) family as a model in (pre)clinical studies, we illustrate how molecular imaging may be employed to characterize whole body target expression as well as monitor drug effectiveness and the emergence of tumor resistance. We further discuss how an integrative omics discovery platform could guide the selection of 'effect sensors' - new molecular imaging targets - which are dynamic markers that indicate treatment effectiveness or resistance.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: familial porencephaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stroke Johns Hopkins Medicine Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery: Intracerebral Hemorrhage Johns Hopkins Medicine Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery: Stroke MalaCards: familial porencephaly Orphanet: Familial porencephaly Patient ...

  15. MH Smit SCHOOL GOVERNING BODY ELECTION DEFICIENCIES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    13093185

    bodies are comprised of members elected from among the parents, learners, ..... autonomy to nominate and elect their own candidates irrespective of the ..... constrain true participation.50 This has led to the development of a revitalised ...... South Africa: An Education Law Perspective (PhD-thesis North-West University. 2009).

  16. 51 CAS Members Elected in 2005

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Atotal of 51 prominent Chinese scientists were elected CAS members in 2005. The announce ment was made at a press conference held on Dec. 16 in Beijing. CAS President LU Yongxiang was present at the conference to give a briefing on the election and the new members.

  17. 12 CFR 269.5 - Elections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Bank to recognize a labor organization as the exclusive collective bargaining representative without a... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Elections. 269.5 Section 269.5 Banks and... LABOR RELATIONS FOR THE FEDERAL RESERVE BANKS § 269.5 Elections. (a) Once there has been a final...

  18. 39 CFR 955.9 - Hearing election.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hearing election. 955.9 Section 955.9 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF PRACTICE BEFORE THE POSTAL SERVICE BOARD OF CONTRACT APPEALS § 955.9 Hearing election. As directed by Board order, each party shall inform the Board...

  19. 42 CFR 422.60 - Election process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... initial coverage election periods under § 422.62(a)(1), annual election periods under § 422.62(a)(2), and... if the health and safety of beneficiaries is at risk, such as if the provider network is not... disclosure and exchange of necessary information between the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services...

  20. Nerio: Leader Election and Edict Ordering

    OpenAIRE

    van Renesse, Robbert; Schneider, Fred B.; Gehrke, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Coordination in a distributed system is facilitated if there is a unique process, the leader, to manage the other processes. The leader creates edicts and sends them to other processes for execution or forwarding to other processes. The leader may fail, and when this occurs a leader election protocol selects a replacement. This paper describes Nerio, a class of such leader election protocols.

  1. Model checking the HAVi leader election protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romijn, J.M.T.

    1999-01-01

    The HAVi specification proposes an architecture for audio/video interoperability in home networks. Part of the HAVi specification is a distributed leader election protocol. We have modelled this leader election protocol in Promela and Lotos and have checked several properties with the tools Spin a

  2. 2008 Presidential General Election, County Results - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set portrays election results, by counties for 49 States and by election districts for Alaska, for the 2008 Presidential general election. Reported for...

  3. 2004 Presidential General Election, County Results - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set portrays election results, by counties for 49 States and by election districts for Alaska, for the 2004 Presidential general election. Reported for...

  4. Local Election Campaign in Social Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bock Segaard, Signe; Agger Nielsen, Jeppe

    in local election campaigns. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the use of social media as it was intended to be central arenas for local election campaigns in Norwegian municipalities. For that purpose we first develop a model of political communication in social media that conceptualise......In this paper we focus on the usage of social media in political election campaigns. These new arenas have become increasingly important for democratic purposes, such as opinion sharing and discussions between candidates and voters. But there is a lack of research on how social media is used...... the horizontal and vertical conversation along three dimensions: participants, interaction and the level of nuance. Secondly, we use the model in an empirical study of the use of election blogs in the Norwegian local elections of 2011. We base the study on several different data sources (survey to political...

  5. A Mathematical Model of Democratic Elections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mato Nagel

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Democratic election is the preferred method for determining political administrators nowadays. The intention is to find the best possible leader in order to improve the group's competitiveness and success. Though preferred, democratic election is far from being optimal in this respect, and is increasingly becoming the target for fraud. A model was developed to scientifically analyze the present electoral system's insufficiency. It is based on fauceir assumptions. Its calculations enable principles to be developed that optimize the election process, while also revealing the limits of elections in societies growing ever more complex, so that in the end elections have to be replaced by processes similar to what has proved optimal throughout naturally occurring evolution-natural selection.

  6. Election and Exceptions – The Danish Fine Count

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vadgård, Anne Kathrine Pihl

    In this paper I explore the role of the Danish election law in the conduct of elections. Based on 9 months of ethnographic fieldwork in an election office in a Danish municipality, I focus on the conflicting relation between the legal framework and deviating election practices. I argue that handl...... correspond with Weber’s ideas of bureaucratic rationality. Instead, proper bureaucratic management of disruptive election practices is characterized by enthusiasm, attentiveness, and overview of the overall election goals....

  7. México: elected transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio MERINO HUERTA

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The results of the Mexican federal elections of July 2000 raised new questions for those interested in transitions. In contrast to the South American, East-European, and South European experiences –that have produced a rich literature on the subject–, political changes in Mexico are not easily placed within the existing theoretical frameworks. This paper aims at contrasting the ideal model of transition and the real Mexican transition. The argument focuses on three differences: instead of a transition based on pact –as suggested by theory– this has been a transition based on voting. Moreover, there has not been –as in other cases— a breaking point with the previous regime, but a gradual and continuous opening. Finally, rather than a transformation of the rules of the game, what has taken place is a recovery of formal institutions, not the design of new ones.

  8. Effects of traditional herbal medicine, Hwaotang, on atherosclerosis using the spontaneous familial hypercholesterolemia model, Kurosawa and Kusanagi-hypercholesterolemic rabbits and the venous thrombosis rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Won-Hwan; Hong, Mun-Yeob; Chung, Kang-Hyun; Kim, Hyung-Min; Lee, Young-Choon; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2005-10-01

    Hwaotang (HOT), a traditional Korean medicinal formulation, is a dried decoctum of a mixture of seven herbal medicines, consisting of Angelica gigantis Radix, Rehmanniae Radix, Paeoniae Radix, Ciniamomi Cortex, Cnidii Rhizoma, Persicae Semen and Carthami Flos. In the present study, the inhibitory effects and anti thrombic properties of HOT on the progression of atherosclerotic lesions were studied using the spontaneous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) model, Kurosawa and Kusanagi-hypercholesterolemic (KHC) rabbits and rats. Changes in blood chemistry, pathology and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation were measured in a control and HOT group. In the control group, the area of atheromatous plaques of the aorta progressed between week 12 (36.65%) and week 14 (46.22%). This progression of atherosclerotic lesions did not occur in the HOT-treated group after 12 (24.24%) and 14 (23.34%) weeks. Antioxidative effects on LDL were seen in the HOT in weeks 12 and 14. HOT improved the hypercholesterolemia in the KHC rabbits. On the other hand, HOT and five of the seven herbs, except Cnidii Rhizoma and Carthami Flos, inhibited the endotoxin-induced hepatic venous thrombosis in high cholesterol diet-treated rats. However, Ciniamomi Cortex showed a very weak inhibitory effect on the endotoxin-induced hepatic venous thrombosis. The extract also inhibited the endotoxin-induced decrease in blood platelets and fibrinogen, and endotoxin-induced increase in fibrin degradation products (FDP) on disseminated intravascular coagulation in normal rats. In conclusion, these results suggest that HOT has inhibitory effects on the development of atheromatous plaque formation in spontaneous FH rabbits. It is also suggested that the antioxidative effects of HOT on LDL led to the beneficial effects observed in this study. The protection by HOT and its herbs on the artificially induced ischemic infarction might be related to their inhibitory effects on disseminated intravascular coagulation

  9. Death is not always a failure: outcomes from implementing an online virtual patient clinical case in palliative care for family medicine clerkship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Tan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The dying patient is a reality of medicine. Medical students, however, feel unprepared to effectively manage the complex end-of-life (EOL management issues of the dying patient and want increased experiential learning in Palliative Care. Aims: To address the need for more formal curriculum in EOL care, we developed and implemented an online virtual patient (VP clinical case in Palliative Care into the 2010–2011 Year Three Family Medicine Clerkship rotation curriculum. Methods: A mixed-method design was used to measure the change in knowledge and perceived preparedness level in EOL care before and after completing the online VP case. A survey collected qualitative descriptions of the students’ educational experience of using this case. Results: Ninety five percent (130/137 of the students voluntarily consented to have their results analyzed. The group knowledge score (n=127 increased significantly from a pre-course average of 7.69/16±2.27, to a post-course average of 10.02/16±2.39 (p<0.001. The students’ self-assessed comfort level increased significantly with all aspects of EOL management from pre-course to post-course (p<0.001. Nearly, 91.1% of the students rated the VP realism as ‘Good to Excellent’, 86% rated the case as educationally beneficial. Nearly 59.3% of students felt emotionally engaged with the VP. Qualitative feedback found that the case content was very useful and realistic, but that the interface was sometimes awkward to navigate. Conclusions: The online VP case in Palliative Care is a useful teaching tool that may help to address the need for increased formal Palliative Care experience in medical school training programs.

  10. Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Parents/Teachers Resource Links for Students Glossary Nuclear Medicine What is nuclear medicine? What are radioactive ... NIBIB-funded researchers advancing nuclear medicine? What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty that ...

  11. Statistical detection of systematic election irregularities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimek, Peter; Yegorov, Yuri; Hanel, Rudolf; Thurner, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Democratic societies are built around the principle of free and fair elections, and that each citizen’s vote should count equally. National elections can be regarded as large-scale social experiments, where people are grouped into usually large numbers of electoral districts and vote according to their preferences. The large number of samples implies statistical consequences for the polling results, which can be used to identify election irregularities. Using a suitable data representation, we find that vote distributions of elections with alleged fraud show a kurtosis substantially exceeding the kurtosis of normal elections, depending on the level of data aggregation. As an example, we show that reported irregularities in recent Russian elections are, indeed, well-explained by systematic ballot stuffing. We develop a parametric model quantifying the extent to which fraudulent mechanisms are present. We formulate a parametric test detecting these statistical properties in election results. Remarkably, this technique produces robust outcomes with respect to the resolution of the data and therefore, allows for cross-country comparisons. PMID:23010929

  12. Series: The research agenda for general practice/family medicine and primary health care in Europe. Part 4. Results: specific problem solving skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummers-Pradier, Eva; Beyer, Martin; Chevallier, Patrick; Eilat-Tsanani, Sophia; Lionis, Christos; Peremans, Lieve; Petek, Davorina; Rurik, Imre; Soler, Jean Karl; Stoffers, Henri Ejh; Topsever, Pinar; Ungan, Mehmet; van Royen, Paul

    2010-09-01

    The 'Research Agenda for General Practice/Family Medicine and Primary Health Care in Europe' summarizes the evidence relating to the core competencies and characteristics of the Wonca Europe definition of GP/FM, and its implications for general practitioners/family doctors, researchers and policy makers. The European Journal of General Practice publishes a series of articles based on this document. The previous articles presented background, objectives, and methodology, as well results on 'primary care management' and 'community orientation' and the person-related core competencies of GP/FM. This article reflects on the general practitioner's 'specific problem solving skills'. These include decision making on diagnosis and therapy of specific diseases, accounting for the properties of primary care, but also research questions related to quality management and resource use, shared decision making, or professional education and development. Clinical research covers most specific diseases, but often lacks pragmatism and primary care relevance. Quality management is a stronghold of GP/FM research. Educational interventions can be effective when well designed for a specific setting and situation. However, their message that 'usual care' by general practitioners is insufficient may be problematic. GP and their patients need more research into diagnostic reasoning with a step-wise approach to increase predictive values in a setting characterized by uncertainty and low prevalence of specific diseases. Pragmatic comparative effectiveness studies of new and established drugs or non-pharmaceutical therapy are needed. Multi-morbidity and complexity should be addressed. Studies on therapy, communication strategies and educational interventions should consider impact on health and sustainability of effects.

  13. Association of common mental disorders and quality of life with the frequency of attendance in Slovenian family medicine practices: longitudinal study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janez Rifel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most research on frequent attendance has been cross-sectional and restricted to one year attendance rates. A few longitudinal studies suggest that frequent attendance is self-limiting. Frequent attenders are more likely to have social and psychiatric problems, medically unexplained physical symptoms, chronic somatic diseases (especially diabetes and are prescribed more psychotropic medication and analgesics. RESEARCH QUESTION: To describe the attendance rates in a longitudinal study and to test if depression, panic syndrome, other anxiety syndrome, alcohol misuse and general quality of life are associated with frequent attendance in next two consecutive years. METHODS: 1118 consecutive family practice attendees, aged 18 to 75 years from randomly selected family medicine practices were recruited at baseline and followed up at 12 and 24 months. We identified frequent attenders in the top 10 centile within one year. Using a multivariate model, we ascertained if presence of common mental disorders and quality of life assessed at baseline in 2003 predict frequent attendance in 2004 and 2005. RESULTS: 40% of frequent attenders continue to be frequent attenders in the following year and 20% of the frequent attenders were so for the 24 month period. Lower physical scores on the SF-12 questionnaire were strongly associated with future frequent attendance at 12 and 24 months. There was a trend for people with greater than elementary school education to be less likely to become frequent attenders at both 12 and 24 months. For other variables these effects were less consistent. Presence of major depression, panic syndrome, other anxiety syndrome and alcohol misuse were not predictive of frequent attendance in the following two years. CONCLUSION: Low physical quality of life is strongly predictive of higher frequent attendance and similar finding was observed for people with lower educational level but further confirmatory research is required to

  14. Online Training for Working with Student Veterans: A Social Work Elective Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selber, Katherine; Biggs, Mary Jo Garcia; Chavkin, Nancy Feyl; Wright, Micah C.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes one school of social work's innovative online elective course to prepare Masters of Social Work (MSW) students for practice with the military, veterans and their families. Developed as part of a university-wide Veterans Initiative, this online course keeps the focus on the student veteran and uses the best practices of…

  15. Knowledge and use of asthma control measurement tools in the management of asthma: a survey of doctors working in family and internal medicine practice in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desalu, Olufemi Olumuyiwa; Onyedum, Cajetan C; Adeoti, Adekunle O; Ozoh, Obianuju B; Fadare, Joseph O

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the knowledge and use of asthma control measurement (ACM) tools in the management of asthma among doctors working in family and internal medicine practice in Nigeria. A questionnaire based on the global initiative on asthma (GINA) guideline was self-administered by 194 doctors. It contains 12 test items on knowledge of ACM tools and its application. The knowledge score was obtained by adding the correct answers and classified as good if the score ≥ 9, satisfactory if score was 6-8 and poor if knowledge score of ACM tools was 4.49±2.14 (maximum of 12). Pulmonologists recorded the highest knowledge score of 10.75±1.85. The majority (69.6%) had poor knowledge score of ACM tools. Fifty (25.8%) assessed their patients' level of asthma control and 34(17.5%) at every visit. Thirty-nine (20.1%) used ACM tools in their consultation, 29 (15.0%) of them used GINA defined control while 10 (5.2 %) used asthma control test (ACT). The use of the tools was associated with pulmonologists, having attended CME within six months and graduated within five years prior to the survey. The results highlight the poor knowledge and use of ACM tools and the need to address the knowledge gap.

  16. The national portfolio of learning for postgraduate family medicine training in South Africa: experiences of registrars and supervisors in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Louis; Mash, Bob; Derese, Anselme

    2013-11-08

    In South Africa the submission of a portfolio of learning has become a national requirement for assessment of family medicine training. A national portfolio has been developed, validated and implemented. The aim of this study was to explore registrars' and supervisors' experience regarding the portfolio's educational impact, acceptability, and perceived usefulness for assessment of competence. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 17 purposively selected registrars and supervisors from all eight South African training programmes. The portfolio primarily had an educational impact through making explicit the expectations of registrars and supervisors in the workplace. This impact was tempered by a lack of engagement in the process by registrars and supervisors who also lacked essential skills in reflection, feedback and assessment. The acceptability of the portfolio was limited by service delivery demands, incongruence between the clinical context and educational requirements, design of the logbook and easy availability of the associated tools. The use of the portfolio for formative assessment was strongly supported and appreciated, but was not always happening and in some cases registrars had even organised peer assessment. Respondents were unclear as to how the portfolio would be used for summative assessment. The learning portfolio had a significant educational impact in shaping work-place based supervision and training and providing formative assessment. Its acceptability and usefulness as a learning tool should increase over time as supervisors and registrars become more competent in its use. There is a need to clarify how it will be used in summative assessment.

  17. Patterns of prescription drugs use among pregnant women at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital and Sultan Qaboos University Hospital Family and Community Medicine Clinic, Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Z Al-Hamimi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study evaluates the patterns of prescription drugs use among women attending antenatal clinic at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH and SQUH Family and Community Medicine clinic (FAMCO, Oman. Methods: The study was a descriptive retrospective cross-sectional study on pregnant women who attended the antenatal clinic at SQUH and FAMCO from February to April 2014 and received a prescription containing at least one drug. Patients' information was extracted from SQUH electronic records. Results: A total of 105 pregnant women were included in the study. Among the recruited pregnant women, 35 (33.3% had at least one chronic disease. The average number of drugs prescribed per patient per prescription during the period of pregnancy was 2.33 ± 1.43. Vitamins and minerals were the most frequently prescribed class of drugs (30.60% followed by analgesics (11.19% and antidiabetic drugs (10.13%. According to the Food and Drug Administration risk classification, most of the prescribed drugs were from category B (30.0% and C (27.14%. No drug was prescribed from category X. There was a significant decrease in prescribing category A drugs over the three trimesters (20.7%, 12.7%, and 9.3%, respectively (P < 0.047. Conclusion: The study gives an overview of the extent of drug prescription during pregnancy and increases the awareness of health-care providers and women about the potential risks of drug use during pregnancy.

  18. Implementation of a New Kiosk Technology for Blood Pressure Management in a Family Medicine Clinic: from the WWAMI Region Practice and Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Chia-Fang; Munson, Sean A; Thompson, Matthew J; Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Kaplan, Jeffrey; Cline, Randall; Green, Beverly B

    2016-01-01

    Using a self-service kiosk to measure blood pressure (BP) has the potential to increase patients' awareness of their BP control and free up medical assistant (MA) time. The objective of this study was to evaluate BP kiosk acceptability and usability, as well as its effects on the workflow of patient BP self-measurement in a primary care clinic. We used qualitative and quantitative assessments of kiosk implementation via meetings with clinic leaders, focus groups with clinic providers and staff, observations of kiosk users, and surveys of kiosk users at 2 and 8 months. Most patients were comfortable using the kiosk (82% at 2 months, 87% at 8 months). Initial provider concerns included accuracy, but most gained confidence after comparing it with other monitors and reviewing the literature supporting its accuracy. Patients and providers saw many benefits: easier BP checks, increased patient engagement, and saved MA time for other tasks. The clinic addressed early concerns (eg, infection control, confusing instructions, perceived loss of personal touch). Most patients (86%) supported the clinic continuing to use the kiosks. Providers, staff, and patients adapted to the use of BP kiosks, providing value by engaging patients in their own care and saving MA time. The clinic decided to keep the self-service kiosk after the pilot period. © Copyright 2016 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  19. A comparison of the chemical constituents of Barbadian medicinal plants within their respective plant families with established drug compounds and phytochemicals used to treat communicable and non-communicable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohall, D; Carrington, S

    2012-01-01

    Barbados has a strong base in the practice of folklore botanical medicines. Consistent with the rest of the Caribbean region, the practice is criticized due to lack of evidence on the efficacy and safety testing. The objectives of this review article are i) to categorize and identify plants by their possible indications and their scientific classification and ii) to determine if the chemical constituents of the plants will be able to provide some insight into their possible uses in folklore medicine based on existing scientific research on their chemical constituents and also by their classification. A review of the folklore botanical medicines of Barbados was done. Plants were primarily grouped based on their use to treat particular communicable and non-communicable diseases. Plants were then secondarily grouped based on their families. The chemical profiles of the plants were then compared to established drug compounds currently approved for the conventional treatment of illnesses and also to established phytochemicals. The extensive literature review identified phytochemical compounds in particular plants used in Barbadian folklore medicine. Sixty-six per cent of reputed medicinal plants contain pharmacologically active phytochemicals; fifty-one per cent of these medicinal plants contain phytochemicals with activities consistent with their reported use. Folklore botanical medicine is well grounded on investigation of the scientific rationale. The research showed that fifty-one per cent of the identified medicinal plants have chemical compounds which have been identified to be responsible for its associated medicinal activity. To a lesser extent, approved drug compounds from drug regulatory bodies with similar chemical structure to the bioactive compounds in the plants proved to validate the use of some of these plants to treat illnesses.

  20. An Analysis of the Degree of Importance of Plant Families in the Medicinal Ferns of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region%广西药用蕨类植物所在科的重要度分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘金标; 卢家仕; 黄敏; 宋日云

    2008-01-01

    The study was undertaken to determine the degree of importance of plant families in the medicinal ferns of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China. A regression residual analysis was carried out on the number of medicinal ferns and the total number of ferns in each family for 56 fern families in the region. According to the residual values the 56 families were divided into 31 high use families and 25 low use families.%旨在确定广西药用蕨类植物所在各科的重要程度,用回归残差分析法对该地区56科蕨类植物中各科的植物种数和药用植物种数之间的关系进行了分析,根据残差值将56科分成31个高利用科和25个低利用科.

  1. The Offering, Scheduling and Maintenance of Elective Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rex O. Brown

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE provides standards for colleges of pharmacy to assist in the provision of pharmacy education to student pharmacists. An integral part of all college educational programs includes the provision of experiential learning. Experiential learning allows students to gain real-world experience in direct patient care during completion of the curriculum. All college of pharmacy programs provide several Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences (APPEs, which include a balance between the four required experiences and a number of other required or elective APPEs. Required APPEs include advanced community, advanced institutional, ambulatory care, and general medicine. The elective APPEs include a myriad of opportunities to help provide a balanced education in experiential learning for student pharmacists. These unique opportunities help to expose student pharmacists to different career tracks that they may not have been able to experience otherwise. Not all colleges offer enough elective APPEs to enable the student pharmacist to obtain experiences in a defined area. Such an approach is required to produce skilled pharmacy graduates that are capable to enter practice in various settings. Elective APPEs are scheduled logically and are based upon student career interest and site availability. This article describes the offering, scheduling and maintenance of different elective APPEs offered by The University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy.

  2. Family Structure and Voter Turnout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfinger, Nicholas H.; Wolfinger, Raymond E.

    2008-01-01

    We use data from the Voting and Registration Supplement of the Current Population Survey to explore the effects of family structure on turnout in the 2000 presidential election. Our results indicate that family structure, defined as marital status and the presence of children, has substantial consequences for turnout. Married adults are more…

  3. Pension Fund - ELECTIONS - Irene SEIS

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    CERN - EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH PENSION FUND   This candidature has been duly registered and is hereby presented in accordance with paragraph 6.h of the Regulations for Elections to the Governing Board of the Pension Fund. Candidate: Name: SEIS First Name : Irene Our Pension Fund (that of CERN and ESO personnel) is for most of us the only social protection when we retire. Its purpose is to give us a pension, which permits to maintain a certain standard of living for us, and for our dependants. I have worked in the Governing Board of the Pension Fund, as well as in numerous working groups on pension matters, since 11 years, either in my role as a Staff Association delegate, or as a member of the Governing Board. In both environments, I defend the principles of solidarity, which are part of our social security system, and I stand up for maintaining its primary principle, being a defined benefit scheme. Another of my preoccupations is the long-term future of the fund, including the gu...

  4. Elections and Electoral Tribunal in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2011-04-19

    Apr 19, 2011 ... Through such elections, citizens participate in the governance ... the Nigeria's electoral history since its corporate existence as a sovereign state. .... not only corrupt, but unfit to correct the perceived anomalies in the Nigeria's.

  5. Presidential General Election Results - 2012 - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer portrays Presidential general election results for 2012, with results reported by county or county equivalent, for the 50 United States and the...

  6. Complications associated with malnutrition in elective surgical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Complications associated with malnutrition in elective surgical patients in a Malaysian setting. ... Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research ... Purpose: To identify the level of malnutrition and complications observed in Malaysia. Methods: A ...

  7. Local Election Campaign in Social Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bock Segaard, Signe; Agger Nielsen, Jeppe

    In this paper we focus on the usage of social media in political election campaigns. These new arenas have become increasingly important for democratic purposes, such as opinion sharing and discussions between candidates and voters. But there is a lack of research on how social media is used...... in local election campaigns. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the use of social media as it was intended to be central arenas for local election campaigns in Norwegian municipalities. For that purpose we first develop a model of political communication in social media that conceptualise...... candidates, content registration of local blogs, and log file data of local blogs through Google Analytics). In contrast to the democratic vision for social media the analysis demonstrates that the election blogs primarily are used by those who are most politically active in advance. The analysis also shows...

  8. Deterministic Leader Election Among Disoriented Anonymous Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    dieudonné, Yoann; Petit, Franck; Villain, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    We address the Leader Election (LE) problem in networks of anonymous sensors sharing no kind of common coordinate system. Leader Election is a fundamental symmetry breaking problem in distributed computing. Its goal is to assign value 1 (leader) to one of the entities and value 0 (non-leader) to all others. In this paper, assuming n > 1 disoriented anonymous sensors, we provide a complete charac- terization on the sensors positions to deterministically elect a leader, provided that all the sensors' positions are known by every sensor. More precisely, our contribution is twofold: First, assuming n anonymous sensors agreeing on a common handedness (chirality) of their own coordinate system, we provide a complete characterization on the sensors positions to deterministically elect a leader. Second, we also provide such a complete chararacterization for sensors devoided of a common handedness. Both characterizations rely on a particular object from combinatorics on words, namely the Lyndon Words.

  9. The Elections in Uganda, February 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Gibb

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available On 18 February, Uganda conducted presidential and parliamentary elections. Incumbent president Yoweri Museveni of the National Resistance Movement (NRM won the multiparty contest for a third consecutive time. If his reign as the NRM leader during Uganda’s stint as a one-party state is counted, the February elections marked the beginning of Museveni’s fifth overall term as president. The NRM continues to dominate parliament, having won a super-majority of the contested seats. Opposition members who competed for both the presidential seat and a seat in parliament contested the results of the election, and the primary opposition candidate Kizza Besigye was placed under house arrest. International observers questioned the integrity of the results, specifically in rural areas that were poorly monitored, and opposition strongholds in urban centres suffered logistical problems. The elections reconfirmed the strength of the NRM following years of political infighting.

  10. 1980-81 Literature Electives Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Art

    1981-01-01

    A group of 97 college English departments was surveyed regarding the most popular elective literature courses. Most popular were courses in Shakespeare, fiction, American literature, genre literature, modern and contemporary literature, and the novel. (AEA)

  11. Elections in Russia, 1991-2008

    CERN Document Server

    Treisman, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, I review the main trends in voting in national elections in Russia since 1991, discuss the evidence of manipulation or falsification by the authorities, and use statistical techniques to examine the determinants of voting trends.

  12. 42 CFR 418.24 - Election of hospice care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Election of hospice care. 418.24 Section 418.24... (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPICE CARE Eligibility, Election and Duration of Benefits § 418.24 Election of hospice care. (a) Filing an election statement. An individual who meets the eligibility requirement...