WorldWideScience

Sample records for failure definitions radiotherapie

  1. Pattern of loco-regional failure after definitive radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytte, Tine; Nielsen, Tine Bjørn; Brink, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    , and occurrence of distant metastasis. It is challenging to evaluate loco-regional control after definitive radiotherapy for NSCLC since it is difficult to distinguish between radiation-induced damage to the lung tissue and tumour progression/recurrence. In addition it may be useful to distinguish between...... intrapulmonary failure and mediastinal failure to be able to optimize radiotherapy in order to improve loco-regional control even though it is not easy to discriminate between the two sites of failure. Material and methods. This study is a retrospective analysis of 331 NSCLC patients treated with definitive...... with mediastinal relapse. Conclusion. We conclude that focus should be on increasing doses to intrapulmonary tumour volume, when dose escalation is applied to improve local tumour control in NSCLC patients treated with definitive radiotherapy, since most recurrences are located here....

  2. Lymph Node Failure Pattern and Treatment Results of Esophageal Cancer Patients Treated with Definitive Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sun Young; Kwon, Hyoung Cheol; Kim, Jung Soo [Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Heui Kwan [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Soo Geon [Jesushospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    We evaluated the failure pattern of the celiac axis, gastric lymph node, and treatment outcome in the upper and mid-esophageal region of cancer patients treated by definitive radiotherapy, except when treating the celiac axis and gastric lymph node for treatment volume, retrospectively. Materials and Methods: The study constituted the evaluation 108 patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer receiving radiotherapy or a combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy at Chonbuk National University Hospital from January 1986 to December 2006. In total, 82 patients treated by planned radiotherapy, except when treating the celiac axis and gastric lymph node for treatment volume, were analysed retrospectively. The study population consisted of 78 men and 2 women (mean age of 63.2 years). In addition, 51 patients received radiotherapy alone, whereas 31 patients received a combination of radiation therapy and chemotherapy. The primary cancer sites were located in the upper portion (17 patients), and mid portion (65 patients), respectively. Further, the patients were in various clinical stages including T1N0-1M0 (7 patients), T2N0-1M0 (18 patients), T3N0-1M0 (44 patients) and T4N0-1M0 (13 patients). The mean follow up period was 15 months. Results: The various treatment outcomes included complete response (48 patients), partial response (31 patients) and no response (3 patients). The failure patterns of the lymph node were comprised of the regional lymph node (23 patients) and the distance lymph node which included celiac axis and gastric lymph node (13 patients). However, metastasis was not observed in the regional and distant lymph node in 10 patients, whereas 36 patients were not evaluated. Furthermore, of the 13 patients who developed celiac axis and gastric lymph node metastases, 3 were in stage T1N0-1M0 and 10 were in stage T2-4N0-1M0. A complete response appeared in 12 patients, whereas a partial response appeared in 1 patient. The mean survival time of the

  3. Long-Term Outcome of Definitive Radiotherapy for Early Glottic Cancer: Prognostic Factors and Patterns of Local Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Yu Jin; Wu, Hong-Gyun; Kwon, Tack-Kyun; Hah, J. Hun; Sung, Myung-Whun; Kim, Kwang Hyun; Park, Charn Il

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluates the long-term results of definitive radiotherapy (RT) for early glottic cancer. Clinical and treatment factors related to local control and patterns of failure are analyzed. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed 222 patients with T1-2N0 squamous cell carcinoma of the glottic larynx treated with definitive RT from 1981 to 2010. None of the patients received elective nodal RT or combined chemotherapy. The median total RT dose was 66 Gy. The daily fractio...

  4. Metabolic Response on Post-therapy FDG-PET Predicts Patterns of Failure After Radiotherapy for Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Julie K., E-mail: jschwarz@radonc.wustl.edu [Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Siegel, Barry A.; Dehdashti, Farrokh [Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Division of Nuclear Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Grigsby, Perry W. [Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Division of Nuclear Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the patterns of failure in patients with cervical cancer treated with definitive radiotherapy and evaluated for metabolic response with early posttherapy {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Methods and Materials: The records of 238 patients with cervical cancer were reviewed. All patients were treated with a combination of external radiotherapy and intracavitary brachytherapy. Two hundred and nineteen patients (92%) received concurrent chemotherapy. All patients underwent pretreatment FDG-PET, and posttherapy FDG-PET was performed within 8-16 weeks of the completion of radiotherapy. Posttherapy FDG-PET results were categorized as complete metabolic response (CMR), partial metabolic response (PMR), and progressive disease (PD). Failure patterns were categorized as none, isolated local failure (central pelvis {+-} pelvic lymph nodes), distant failure, or combined local plus distant failure. Results: Of the 91 patients (38%) who had a recurrence, 22 had isolated local failures, and 69 had distant failures (49 distant failures and 20 combined local plus distant failures). Of the 173 patients with a CMR, 40 (23%) experienced treatment failure. All 25 patients with PD experienced treatment failure, which was distant in 24 patients (96%). Among the 40 patients with PMR, no failure has been observed for 14 patients (35%). Of the 26 failures within the PMR group, 15 (58%) were limited to the pelvis. Differences in the patterns of failure between the three groups (CMR, PMR, PD) were statistically significant (chi-square test; p < 0.0001). Conclusions: The majority of failures after definitive radiotherapy for cervical cancer include distant failures, even in the setting of concurrent chemotherapy. PMR within the cervix or lymph nodes is more commonly associated with isolated local recurrence.

  5. Cardiac Toxicity after definitive Radiotherapy of locally advanced NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytte, Tine; Hansen, Olfred; Stohlberg-Rohr, Thomine

    2010-01-01

    report the heart toxicities in locally-regionally advanced NSCLC (LA-NSCLC) patients (pts) treated with RT in our centre.   Methods and material: From 01.01.1995-30.11.2007, 287 pts with LA-NSCLC (stage IIB-IIIB) were treated with RT at our centre with planned dose 60-66 Gy. All RT was applied as 3D RT......    Cardiac Toxicity after definitive Radiotherapy of locally advanced NSCLC Tine Schytte, Olfred Hansen, Thomine Stolberg-Rohr* and Carsten Brink*. Dept. Oncology and Radiophysic Lab.* Odense University Hospital, Denmark   Keyword: Radiotherapy, Locally advanced NSCLC, Cardiac toxicity...

  6. Radiotherapy in desmoid tumors. Treatment response, local control, and analysis of local failures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santti, Kirsi; Beule, Annette; Tuomikoski, Laura; Jaeaeskelaeinen, Anna-Stina; Saarilahti, Kauko; Tarkkanen, Maija; Blomqvist, Carl [Helsinki University Hospital and University of Helsinki, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Helsinki (Finland); Roenty, Mikko [HUSLAB and University of Helsinki, Department of Pathology, Helsinki (Finland); Ihalainen, Hanna [Helsinki University Hospital and University of Helsinki, Department of Plastic Surgery, Helsinki (Finland)

    2017-04-15

    Desmoid tumors (aggressive fibromatosis) are rare soft tissue tumors which frequently recur after surgery. Desmoid tumors arise from musculoaponeurotic tissue in the extremities, head and neck, abdominal wall, or intra-abdominally. Our aim was to examine the outcome of radiotherapy of desmoid tumors in a single institution series. We evaluated 41 patients with desmoid tumors treated with 49 radiotherapies between 1987 and 2012. Radiologic images for response evaluation were reassessed and responses to treatment registered according to RECIST criteria 1.1. For patients with local failures radiation dose distribution was determined in each local failure volume using image co-registration. Recurrences were classified as in-target, marginal, or out-of-target. Prognostic factors for radiotherapy treatment failure were evaluated. Radiotherapy doses varied from 20-63 Gy (median 50 Gy) with a median fraction size of 2 Gy. The objective response rate to definitive radiotherapy was 55% (12/22 patients). Median time to response was 14 months. A statistically significant dose-response relation for definitive and postoperative radiotherapy was observed both in univariate (p-value 0.002) and in multivariate analysis (p-value 0.02) adjusted for potential confounding factors. Surgery before radiotherapy or surgical margin had no significant effect on time to progression. Nine of 11 (82%) local failures were classified as marginal and two of 11 (18%) in-target. None of the recurrences occurred totally out-of-target. Radiotherapy is a valuable option for treating desmoid tumors. Radiotherapy dose appears to be significantly associated to local control. (orig.) [German] Desmoide (aggressive Fibromatosen) sind seltene Weichteiltumore der muskulaeren Membranen von Kopf, Hals, Extremitaeten und Bauchwand. Ziel war es, die Wirksamkeit der Strahlentherapie bei aggressiver Fibromatose an einer einzelnen Klinik zu untersuchen. Ausgewertet wurden 41 Patienten mit aggressiver Fibromatose, die

  7. Recent Advances in Definitive Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Pinkawa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Definitive radiation therapy is a well-recognised curative treatment option for localised prostate cancer. A suitable technique, dose, target volume, and the option of a combination with androgen deprivation therapy needs to be considered. An optimal standard external beam radiotherapy includes currently the intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy techniques with total doses of ≥76-78 Gy in conventional fractionation. Data from several randomised studies increasingly support the rationale for hypofractionated radiotherapy. A simultaneous integrated boost with dose escalation focused on a computed tomography/positron emission tomography or magnetic resonance imaging/magnetic resonance spectroscopy detected malignant lesion is an option to increase tumour control with potentially no additional toxicity. The application of a spacer is a promising concept for optimal protection of the rectal wall.

  8. Changes in pulmonary function after definitive radiotherapy for NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytte, Tine; Bentzen, Søren M; Brink, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    a negative impact on FVC. Long-term FEV1 and FVC were analyzed using linear regression. Treatment year and V60 had a significant impact on loss of FEV1. V60 had a significant impact on FVC changes. CONCLUSION: In this study, early PF change reached a plateau at 6months after the start of radiotherapy......INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study was to identify factors associated with early and long-term pulmonary function (PF) changes after definitive radiotherapy for NSCLC patients. PF was measured by spirometry i.e. forced expiratory volume in 1s (FEV1), and forced vital capacity (FVC......, they were tested as covariates in multivariable analysis. RESULTS: Early PF change was quantified at six months after the start of radiotherapy. Smoking status and increasing V60 was associated with a significant decrease in PF, whereas smoking was protective. In addition, neoadjuvant chemotherapy had...

  9. Acute Heart Failure: Definition, Classification and Epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurmani, Sameer; Squire, Iain

    2017-08-07

    The purpose of this review is to describe the extent and scope of acute heart failure (AHF), place it within its clinical context and highlight some of the difficulties in defining it as a pathophysiological entity. A diagnosis of AHF is made when patients present acutely with signs and symptoms of heart failure, often with decompensation of pre-existing cardiomyopathy. The most current guidelines classify based on clinical features at initial presentation and are used to both risk stratify and guide the management of haemodynamic compromise. Despite this, AHF remains a diagnosis with a poor prognosis and there is no therapy proven to have long-term mortality benefits. We provide an introduction to AHF and discuss its definition, causes and precipitants. We also present epidemiological and demographic data to suggest that there is significant patient heterogeneity and that AHF is not a single pathology, but rather a range of pathophysiological entities. This poses a challenge when designing clinical trials and may, at least in part, explain why the results in this area have been largely disappointing.

  10. Volumes and doses for external radiotherapy - Definitions and recommendations; Volum og doser i ekstern straaleterapi - Definisjoner og anbefalinger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levernes, Sverre (ed.)

    2012-07-01

    The report contains definitions of volume and dose parameters for external radiotherapy. In addition the report contains recommendations for use, documentation and minimum reporting for radiotherapy of the individual patient.(Author)

  11. Diagnosis of Post-Radiotherapy Local Failures in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: A Prospective Institutional Study

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background This prospective study was conducted to evaluate and compare the efficacies of nasopharyngoscopy and CT scan in the diagnosis of local failure of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods Total 52 patients of histopathologically proven nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), were included in this study. For every patient computed tomography (CT), nasopharyngoscopy and nasopharyngeal biopsies were performed 3 months afte...

  12. Smoking, radiotherapy, diabetes and osteoporosis as risk factors for dental implant failure: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There are conflicting reports as to the association between smoking, radiotherapy, diabetes and osteoporosis and the risk of dental implant failure. We undertook a meta-analysis to evaluate the association between smoking, radiotherapy, diabetes and osteoporosis and the risk of dental implant failure. METHODS: A comprehensive research on MEDLINE and EMBASE, up to January 2013, was conducted to identify potential studies. References of relevant studies were also searched. Screening, data extraction and quality assessment were conducted independently and in duplicate. A random-effects meta-analysis was used to pool estimates of relative risks (RRs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs. RESULTS: A total of 51 studies were identified in this meta-analysis, with more than 40,000 dental implants placed under risk-threatening conditions. The pooled RRs showed a direct association between smoking (n = 33; RR = 1.92; 95% CI, 1.67-2.21 and radiotherapy (n = 16; RR = 2.28; 95% CI, 1.49-3.51 and the risk of dental implant failure, whereas no inverse impact of diabetes (n = 5; RR = 0.90; 95% CI, 0.62-1.32 on the risk of dental implant failure was found. The influence of osteoporosis on the risk of dental implant failure was direct but not significant (n = 4; RR = 1.09; 95% CI, 0.79-1.52. The subgroup analysis indicated no influence of study design, geographical location, length of follow-up, sample size, or mean age of recruited patients. CONCLUSIONS: Smoking and radiotherapy were associated with an increased risk of dental implant failure. The relationship between diabetes and osteoporosis and the risk of implant failure warrant further study.

  13. Re-irradiation of recurrent esophageal cancer after primary definitive radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Suk; Lee, Chang Geol; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Tae Hyung [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University Health System, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    For recurrent esophageal cancer after primary definitive radiotherapy, no general treatment guidelines are available. We evaluated the toxicities and clinical outcomes of re-irradiation (re-RT) for recurrent esophageal cancer. We analyzed 10 patients with recurrent esophageal cancer treated with re-RT after primary definitive radiotherapy. The median time interval between primary radiotherapy and re-RT was 15.6 months (range, 4.8 to 36.4 months). The total dose of primary radiotherapy was a median of 50.4 Gy (range, 50.4 to 63.0 Gy). The total dose of re-RT was a median of 46.5 Gy (range, 44.0 to 50.4 Gy). The median follow-up period was 4.9 months (range, 2.6 to 11.4 months). The tumor response at 3 months after the end of re-RT was complete response (n = 2), partial response (n = 1), stable disease (n = 2), and progressive disease (n = 5). Grade 5 tracheoesophageal fistula developed in three patients. The time interval between primary radiotherapy and re-RT was less than 12 months in two of these three patients. Late toxicities included grade 1 dysphagia (n = 1). Re-RT of recurrent esophageal cancer after primary radiotherapy can cause severe toxicity.

  14. Resected Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: Patterns of Failure and Disease-Related Outcomes With or Without Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagar, Timothy M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); White, Rebekah R. [Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Willett, Christopher G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Tyler, Douglas S. [Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Papavassiliou, Paulie [Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Papalezova, Katia T. [Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Guy, Cynthia D. [Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Broadwater, Gloria [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Clough, Robert W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Czito, Brian G., E-mail: czito001@mc.duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NET) are rare and have better disease-related outcomes compared with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Surgical resection remains the standard of care, although many patients present with locally advanced or metastatic disease. Little is known regarding the use of radiotherapy in the prevention of local recurrence after resection. To better define the role of radiotherapy, we performed an analysis of resected patients at our institution. Methods: Between 1994 and 2009, 33 patients with NET of the pancreatic head and neck underwent treatment with curative intent at Duke University Medical Center. Sixteen patients were treated with surgical resection alone while an additional 17 underwent resection with adjuvant or neoadjuvant radiation therapy, usually with concurrent fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy (CMT). Median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy and median follow-up 28 months. Results: Thirteen patients (39%) experienced treatment failure. Eleven of the initial failures were distant, one was local only and one was local and distant. Two-year overall survival was 77% for all patients. Two-year local control for all patients was 87%: 85% for the CMT group and 90% for the surgery alone group (p = 0.38). Two-year distant metastasis-free survival was 56% for all patients: 46% and 69% for the CMT and surgery patients, respectively (p = 0.10). Conclusions: The primary mode of failure is distant which often results in mortality, with local failure occurring much less commonly. The role of radiotherapy in the adjuvant management of NET remains unclear.

  15. Definitive radiotherapy of prostatic cancer: the Norwegian Radium Hospital's experience (1976-1982)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telhaug, R.; Fossa, S.D.O.; Ous, S.

    1987-01-01

    During the years 1976 to 1982 definitive curatively aimed radiotherapy to the primary tumor was given to 53 patients with prostatic cancer confined to the true pelvis (T0, 2; T1-2, 19; T3, 24; T4, 8; N0, 18; N+, 2; Nx, 33); all patients were of the Mo-category. The pelvic lymph nodes received a total dose of 2 Gy X 25 by means of an anterior and posterior radiation field. The prostatic gland was irradiated by an additional booster dose of 2 Gy X 10 given to a perineal field. Twenty-four patients have relapsed after their prostatic radiotherapy, only three of them within the irradiated area. For the patients with T0-T2 tumors, the 5-year crude survival was 69%, whereas it was only 37% for patients with T3 tumors. Thirty-five patients developed intestinal (26 patients) and/or urogenital (23 patients) radiation side effects. In three patients a colostomy had to be performed owing to rectal stricture or fistula. The poor survival after radiotherapy in the present series is probably due to a high incidence of unrecognized pelvic lymph node metastases. In the future only prostatic cancer patients without pelvic lymph node spread will be considered candidates for definitive radiotherapy. An optimal radiation technique is mandatory in order to avoid major radiotherapy-induced toxicity.

  16. Definitive radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy for clinical stage T4N0-1 non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeon Joo; Song, Si Yeol; Jeong, Seong Yun; Kim, Sang We; Lee, Jung Shin; Kim, Su Ssan; Choi, Eun Kyung [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Won Sik [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Gangneung Asan Hospital, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    To determine failure patterns and survival outcomes of T4N0-1 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with definitive radiotherapy. Ninety-five patients with T4N0-1 NSCLC who received definitive radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy from May 2003 to October 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. The standard radiotherapy scheme was 66 Gy in 30 fractions. The main concurrent chemotherapy regimen was 50 mg/m2 weekly paclitaxel combined with 20 mg/m2 cisplatin or AUC 2 carboplatin. The primary outcome was overall survival (OS). Secondary outcomes were failure patterns and toxicities. The median age was 64 years (range, 34 to 90 years). Eighty-eight percent of patients (n = 84) had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0-1, and 42% (n = 40) experienced pretreatment weight loss. Sixty percent of patients (n = 57) had no metastatic regional lymph nodes. The median radiation dose was EQD2 67.1 Gy (range, 56.9 to 83.3 Gy). Seventy-one patients (75%) were treated with concurrent chemotherapy; of these, 13 were also administered neoadjuvant chemotherapy. At a median follow-up of 21 months (range, 1 to 102 months), 3-year OS was 44%. The 3-year cumulative incidences of local recurrence and distant recurrence were 48.8% and 36.3%, respectively. Pretreatment weight loss and combined chemotherapy were significant factors for OS. Acute esophagitis over grade 3 occurred in three patients and grade 3 chronic esophagitis occurred in one patient. There was no grade 3-4 radiation pneumonitis. Definitive radiotherapy for T4N0-1 NSCLC results in favorable survival with acceptable toxicity rates. Local recurrence is the major recurrence pattern. Intensity modulated radiotherapy and radio-sensitizing agents would be needed to improve local tumor control.

  17. Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rema Jyothirmayi

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Conservative treatment in the form of limited surgery and post-operative radiotherapy is controversial in hand and foot sarcomas, both due to poor radiation tolerance of the palm and sole, and due to technical difficulties in achieving adequate margins.This paper describes the local control and survival of 41 patients with soft tissue sarcoma of the hand or foot treated with conservative surgery and radiotherapy. The acute and late toxicity of megavoltage radiotherapy to the hand and foot are described. The technical issues and details of treatment delivery are discussed. The factors influencing local control after radiotherapy are analysed.

  18. Guidelines for target volume definition in post-operative radiotherapy for prostate cancer, on behalf of the EORTC Radiation Oncology Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poortmans, Philip; Bossi, Alberto; Vandeputte, Katia; Bosset, Mathieu; Miralbell, Raymond; Maingon, Philippe; Boehmer, Dirk; Budiharto, Tom; Symon, Zvi; van den Bergh, Alfons C. M.; Scrase, Christopher; Van Poppel, Hendrik; Bolla, Michel

    2007-01-01

    The appropriate application of 3-D conformal radiotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy or image guided radiotherapy for patients undergoing post-operative radiotherapy for prostate cancer requires a standardisation of the target volume definition and delineation as well as stanclardisation of t

  19. Automatic definition of targeted biological volumes for the radiotherapy applications; Definition automatique des volumes biologiques cibles pour les applications de radiotherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatt, M.; Visvikis, D. [LaTIM, U650 Inserm, 29 - Brest (France); Cheze-Le-Rest, C. [Service de medecine nucleaire, 29 - Brest (France); Pradier, O. [Service de radiotherapie, 29 - Brest (France)

    2009-10-15

    The proposed method: Fuzzy locally adaptive Bayesian (F.L.A.B.) showed its reliability and its precision on very complete collection of realistic simulated and real data. Its use in the context of radiotherapy allows to consider easily the studies implementation and scenari of dose painting or dose escalation, including in complex cases of heterogenous fixations. It is conceivable to apply F.L.A.B. on PET images with F.M.I.S.O. ({sup 18}F fluoro misonidazole) or F.L.T. (fluoro-L-thymidine) to complete the definition of the biological target volume. (N.C.)

  20. Patterns of failure and prognostic factors in resected extrahepatic bile duct cancer: implication for adjuvant radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Tae Ryool; Eom, Keun Yong; Kim, In Ah; Cho, Jai Young; Yoon, Yoo Seok; Hwang, Dae Wook; Han, Ho Seong; Kim, Jae Sung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    To find the applicability of adjuvant radiotherapy for extrahepatic bile duct cancer (EBDC), we analyzed the pattern of failure and evaluate prognostic factors of locoregional failure after curative resection without adjuvant treatment. In 97 patients with resected EBDC, the location of tumor was classified as proximal (n = 26) and distal (n = 71), using the junction of the cystic duct and common hepatic duct as the dividing point. Locoregional failure sites were categorized as follows: the hepatoduodenal ligament and tumor bed, the celiac artery and superior mesenteric artery, and other sites. The median follow-up time was 29 months for surviving patients. Three-year locoregional progression-free survival, progression-free survival, and overall survival rates were 50%, 42%, and 52%, respectively. Regarding initial failures, 79% and 81% were locoregional failures in proximal and distal EBDC patients, respectively. The most common site was the hepatoduodenal ligament and tumor bed. In the multivariate analysis, perineural invasion was associated with poor locoregional progression-free survival (p = 0.023) and progression-free survival (p = 0.012); and elevated postoperative CA19-9 (> or =37 U/mL) did with poor locoregional progression-free survival (p = 0.002), progression-free survival (p < 0.001) and overall survival (p < 0.001). Both proximal and distal EBDC showed remarkable proportion of locoregional failure. Perineural invasion and elevated postoperative CA19-9 were risk factors of locoregional failure. In these patients with high risk of locoregional failure, adjuvant radiotherapy could be considered to improve locoregional control.

  1. [Definition of accurate planning target volume margins for esophageal cancer radiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesueur, P; Servagi-Vernat, S

    2016-10-01

    More than 4000 cases of esophagus neoplasms are diagnosed every year in France. Radiotherapy, which can be delivered in preoperative or exclusive with a concomitant chemotherapy, plays a central role in treatment of esophagus cancer. Even if efficacy of radiotherapy no longer has to be proved, the prognosis of esophagus cancer remains unfortunately poor with a high recurrence rate. Toxicity of esophageal radiotherapy is correlated with the irradiation volume, and limits dose escalation and local control. Esophagus is a deep thoracic organ, which undergoes cardiac and respiratory motion, making the radiotherapy delivery more difficult and increasing the planning target volume margins. Definition of accurate planning target volume margins, taking into account the esophagus' intrafraction motion and set up margins is very important to be sure to cover the clinical target volume and restrains acute and late radiotoxicity. In this article, based on a review of the literature, we propose planning target volume margins adapted to esophageal radiotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Tumors of the Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinuses: Clinical Outcomes and Patterns of Failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiegner, Ellen A.; Daly, Megan E.; Murphy, James D.; Abelson, Jonathan; Chapman, Chris H.; Chung, Melody; Yu, Yao; Colevas, A. Dimitrios; Kaplan, Michael J.; Fischbein, Nancy; Le, Quynh-Thu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Chang, Daniel T., E-mail: dtchang@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To report outcomes in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for tumors of the paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity (PNS/NC). Methods/Materials: Between June 2000 and December 2009, 52 patients with tumors of the PNS/NC underwent postoperative or definitive radiation with IMRT. Twenty-eight (54%) patients had squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Twenty-nine patients (56%) received chemotherapy. The median follow-up was 26.6 months (range, 2.9-118.4) for all patients and 30.9 months for living patients. Results: Eighteen patients (35%) developed local-regional failure (LRF) at median time of 7.2 months. Thirteen local failures (25%) were observed, 12 in-field and 1 marginal. Six regional failures were observed, two in-field and four out-of-field. No patients treated with elective nodal radiation had nodal regional failure. Two-year local-regional control (LRC), in-field LRC, freedom from distant metastasis (FFDM), and overall survival (OS) were 64%, 74%, 71%, and 66% among all patients, respectively, and 43%, 61%, 61%, and 53% among patients with SCC, respectively. On multivariate analysis, SCC and >1 subsite involved had worse LRC (p = 0.0004 and p = 0.046, respectively) and OS (p = 0.003 and p = 0.046, respectively). Cribriform plate invasion (p = 0.005) and residual disease (p = 0.047) also had worse LRC. Acute toxicities included Grade {>=}3 mucositis in 19 patients (37%), and Grade 3 dermatitis in 8 patients (15%). Six patients had Grade {>=}3 late toxicity including one optic toxicity. Conclusions: IMRT for patients with PNS/NC tumors has good outcomes compared with historical series and is well tolerated. Patients with SCC have worse LRC and OS. LRF is the predominant pattern of failure.

  3. Patterns of failure for patients with glioblastoma following O-(2-[(18)F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine PET- and MRI-guided radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundemann, Michael; Costa, Junia Cardoso; Law, Ian

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To evaluate the patterns of failure following clinical introduction of amino-acid O-(2-[(18)F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (FET)-PET-guided target definition for radiotherapy (RT) of glioblastoma patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The first 66 consecutive patients with confirmed...... evaluable, with median follow-up of 45months. Central, in-field, marginal and distant recurrences were observed for 82%, 10%, 2%, and 6% of the patients, respectively. We found a volumetric overlap of 26%, 31% and 39% of the RV with the contrast-enhancing MR volume, PETvol and the composite MRPETvol...

  4. A Review of Healthcare Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (HFMEA) in Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardina, M; Cantone, M C; Tomarchio, E; Veronese, I

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a review of risk analyses in radiotherapy (RT) processes carried out by using Healthcare Failure Mode Effect Analysis (HFMEA) methodology, a qualitative method that proactively identifies risks to patients and corrects medical errors before they occur. This literature review was performed to provide an overview of how to approach the development of HFMEA applications in modern RT procedures, comparing recently published research conducted to support proactive programs to identify risks. On the basis of the reviewed literature, the paper suggests HFMEA shortcomings that need to be addressed.

  5. Intraoperative radiotherapy in the definitive treatment of localized carcinoma of the prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, M.; Okada, K.; Shibamoto, Y.; Abe, M.; Yoshida, O.

    1985-01-01

    A preliminary analysis of the effectiveness of intraoperative radiotherapy with an electron beam for the treatment of prostatic cancer in 14 patients is presented. The perineal approach was employed as an operative procedure for placing a treatment cone onto the tumor. The electron energy used for irradiation ranged from 10 to 14 MeV. Of five patients treated by intraoperative radiotherapy alone, four who received single doses of 3000 to 3500 cGy achieved local control. A single dose of 2000 or 2500 cGy was delivered intraoperatively to nine patients as a boost dose in conjunction with external irradiation of 5000 cGy for the treatment of pelvic lymph nodes. All nine patients achieved local control. None of the 14 patients developed any serious complication of the bladder, urethra or rectum, which has been associated with intraoperative electron irradiation. Although no definite conclusion can be drawn at present because of the small number of patients and insufficient follow-up, the results suggest that single doses of 3300 cGy by intraoperative radiotherapy alone or 2500 cGy as a boost in conjunction with external radiotherapy can be curative for prostatic cancer with minimal moribidity.

  6. Definitive radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: update and perspectives on the basis of EBM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodaira, Takeshi; Nishimura, Yasumasa; Kagami, Yoshikazu; Ito, Yoshinori; Shikama, Naoto; Ishikura, Satoshi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2015-03-01

    Radiotherapy plays an essential role in the management of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Radiotherapy has a distinct advantage over surgical procedures in that it could achieve organ and function preservation with an efficacy similar to that of surgical series. To improve the clinical outcomes achievable by radiotherapy, altered fractionated radiotherapy has been prospectively tested for early and intermediate risk diseases, and was previously shown to be beneficial for local control and survival. Radiotherapy alone is insufficient for locally advanced disease; therefore, concurrent chemoradiotherapy is typically performed and plays an important role. A meta-analysis (Level Ia) revealed that the concurrent use of platinum agents appeared to improve tumor control and survival; however, this was accompanied by increases in the rates of both acute and late toxicities. Regarding radiation techniques, intensity modulated radiotherapy evolved in the 1990s, and has been globally used to treat head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients. Intensity modulated radiotherapy reduces the exposure of normal tissue to radiation while preserving excellent dose coverage to the target volume; therefore, the rate of late toxicities especially xerostomia is minimized. Small size randomized studies and a meta-analysis have provided evidence to support the benefits of intensity modulated radiotherapy over two-dimensional or three-dimensional radiation therapy. Intensity modulated radiotherapy can also preserve quality of life following definitive chemoradiotherapy. Further improvements using intensity modulated proton therapy are warranted. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Impact of obesity on outcomes after definitive dose-escalated intensity-modulated radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lora S; Murphy, Colin T; Ruth, Karen; Zaorsky, Nicholas G; Smaldone, Marc C; Sobczak, Mark L; Kutikov, Alexander; Viterbo, Rosalia; Horwitz, Eric M

    2015-09-01

    Previous publications have demonstrated conflicting results regarding body mass index (BMI) and prostate cancer (CaP) outcomes after definitive radiotherapy (RT) before the dose escalation era. The goal of the current study was to determine whether increasing BMI was associated with outcomes in men with localized CaP who were treated with dose-escalated RT. The authors identified patients with localized (T1b-T4N0M0) CaP who were treated with definitive intensity-modulated RT and image-guided RT from 2001 through 2010. BMI was analyzed as a continuous variable. Adjusting for confounders, multivariable competing risk and Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to assess the association between BMI and the risk of biochemical failure (BF), distant metastases (DM), cause-specific mortality (CSM), and overall mortality. Of the 1442 patients identified, approximately 20% had a BMI prostate-specific antigen level (P = .018). On multivariable analysis, increasing BMI was associated with an increased risk of BF (hazard ratio [HR], 1.03; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.00-1.07 [P = .042]), DM (HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.02-1.11 [P = .004]), CSM (HR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.07-1.23 [PCancer Society.

  8. Multidisciplinary collaborative gross tumour volume definition for lung cancer radiotherapy: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingdale, Abigail E; Roques, Tom W; Curtin, John; Martin, W M Craig; Horan, Gail; Barrett, Ann

    2011-12-07

    Variability in gross tumour volume (GTV) definition is a major source of systematic error in conformal radiotherapy. This prospective study assesses the role of multidisciplinary collaboration between oncologists and radiologists in defining lung cancer volumes. Twenty patients with non-small cell lung cancer due to receive three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy formed the study population. GTVs were defined by a radiologist (GTVrad) and an oncologist (GTVonc) using available clinical information and imaging. A collaborative meeting was then held to agree on a final, common GTV (GTVfin) to be used for treatment planning, and differences analysed. The collaboration changed the GTV in 19/20 patients with a total of 50 regions being edited. Changes made were categorized as (a) differentiation of tumour from atelectasis or ground glass shadowing, (b) separation of tumour from vasculature, and (c) defining mediastinal extent of tumour. Oncologists were more confident in the GTVfin than the GTVonc. The radiologist took longer to define the GTV than the oncologist. Real-time collaborative GTV definition by a radiologist and oncologist is practical and feasible. This approach allows specific areas of uncertainty to be categorized and focussed on, reducing systematic error in GTV definition. The physician's approach to risk and decision making for each patient may also play a role.

  9. Acute liver failure and acute kidney injury: Definitions, prognosis, and outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Włodzimirow, K.A.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to investigate definitions, prognostic indicators and their association with adverse events, mainly mortality for acute liver failure (ALF), acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) and acute kidney injury (AKI).

  10. Can FDG-PET assist in radiotherapy target volume definition of metastatic lymph nodes in head-and-neck cancer?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schinagl, D.A.X.; Hoffmann, A.L.; Vogel, W.V.; Dalen, J.A. van; Verstappen, S.M.M.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The role of FDG-PET in radiotherapy target volume definition of the neck was evaluated by comparing eight methods of FDG-PET segmentation to the current CT-based practice of lymph node assessment in head-and-neck cancer patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seventy-eight head-and-

  11. Can FDG-PET assist in radiotherapy target volume definition of metastatic lymph nodes in head-and-neck cancer?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schinagl, D.A.X.; Hoffmann, A.L.; Vogel, W.V.; Dalen, J.A. van; Verstappen, S.M.M.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The role of FDG-PET in radiotherapy target volume definition of the neck was evaluated by comparing eight methods of FDG-PET segmentation to the current CT-based practice of lymph node assessment in head-and-neck cancer patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seventy-eight

  12. The significance of VEGF expression in stage II carcinoma of uterine cervix treated with definitive radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Won; Choi, Yoon La; Huh, Seung Jae; Yoon, Sang Min; Park, Young Je; Nam, Hee Rim; Ahn, Yong Chan; Lim, Do Hoon; Park, Hee Chul [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-03-15

    We wanted to determine the clinical characteristics and prognosis according to the VEGF expression in stage II cervical carcinoma patients treated with definitive radiotherapy. We enrolled 31 patients who were diagnosed with cervical cancer from 1995 to 2003 at Samsumg Medical Center and their paraffin block tissue samples were available for study. The median age of the patients was 65 years. The mean tumor size was 4.1 cm (range: 1.2 {approx}8.2 cm). Seven patients (22.6%) were suspected of having pelvic lymph node metastasis. An external beam irradiation dose of 45-56.4 Gy was administered to the whole pelvis with a 15 MV linear accelerator, and an additional 24 Gy was given to point A by HDR intracavitary brachytherapy. VEGF staining was defined as positive when more than 10% of the tumor cells were stained. The median follow-up duration was 58 months. A positive VEGF expression was observed in 21 patients (67.7%). There was no significant correlation between the VEGF expression and pelvic lymph node metastasis, tumor size and the response of radiotherapy. During follow-up, 7 patients had recurrence. The complete response rate was not significant between the VEGF (-) and VEGF(+) tumors. However, the VEGF(+) tumors showed a significantly higher recurrence rate in comparison with the VEGF(-) tumors ({rho} = 0.040). The three year disease-free survival rates were 100% and 66.7%, respectively, for patients with VEGF(-) or VEGF(+) tumor ({rho} = 0.047). The VEGF expression was a significant factor for recurrence and disease-free survival. However, the significance of the VEGF expression is still controversial because of the various definitions of VEGF expression and the mismatches of the clinical data in the previous studies.

  13. Clinical efficacy of concurrent carboplatin, etoposide, and definitive radiotherapy for stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. Consideration as to therapeutic outcomes and morbidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kodaira, Takeshi; Yamakawa, Kouji; Taniguchi, Hiroyuki [Tosei General Hospital, Seto, Aichi (Japan); Matsubara, Kazuhito; Ishigaki, Takeo

    1998-08-01

    To improve the therapeutic outcome for inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer, we applied definitive thoracic radiotherapy combined with concurrent administration of carboplatin and etoposide. We retrospectively analyzed 55 eligible patients with Stage III disease. The one-year rate of overall survival (OAS) and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) of the total group were 46.1% and 36.1%, respectively. Twenty-nine patients developed thoracic failures (52.7%) and 23 (41.8%) distant failures. Using univariate and multivariate analyses, radiation dose, performance status and LDH were revealed as significant prognostic factors of OAS, and LDH had a strong adverse effect on DMFS. Leucopenia of Grade 3 or higher was noted in 75.9%, anemia in 55.6%, thrombocytopenia in 59.3%, esophagitis in 20.4%, and lung injury in 10.9%. Sufficient gain was not obtained by out strategy, and higher morbidity, especially of lung, was noted than was expected. It was suspected that simultaneous use of oral etoposide might increase radiation pneumonitis, so one should take special care of unexpected toxicity in concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Both the hyperfractionated technique of radiotherapy and the time-dose modification of anti-tumor drugs should be considered in further steps. (author)

  14. Risk of Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction in Older Women After Contemporary Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, Hirofumi; Petersen, Ivy A; Scott, Christopher G; Bailey, Kent R; Dunlay, Shannon M; Finley, Randi R; Ruddy, Kathryn J; Yan, Elizabeth; Redfield, Margaret M

    2017-04-11

    Cardiomyocytes are resistant to radiation. However, cardiac radiation exposure causes coronary microvascular endothelial inflammation, a perturbation implicated in the pathogenesis of heart failure (HF) and particularly HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Radiotherapy for breast cancer results in variable cardiac radiation exposure and may increase the risk of HF. We conducted a population-based case-control study of incident HF in 170 female residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota (59 cases and 111 controls), who underwent contemporary (1998-2013) radiotherapy for breast cancer with computed tomography-assisted radiotherapy planning. Controls were matched to cases for age, tumor side, chemotherapy use, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension. Mean cardiac radiation dose (MCRD) in each patient was calculated from the patient's computed tomography images and radiotherapy plan. Mean age at radiotherapy was 69±9 years. Of HF cases, 38 (64%) had EF≥50% (HFpEF), 18 (31%) had EF<50% (HF with reduced EF), and 3 (5%) did not have EF measured. The EF was ≥40% in 50 of the 56 HF cases (89%) with an EF measurement. The mean interval from radiotherapy to HF was 5.8±3.4 years. The odds of HF was higher in patients with a history of ischemic heart disease or atrial fibrillation. The MCRD was 2.5 Gy (range, 0.2-13.1 Gy) and higher in cases (3.3±2.7 Gy) than controls (2.1±2.0 Gy; P=0.004). The odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for HF per log MCRD was 9.1 (3.4-24.4) for any HF, 16.9 (3.9-73.7) for HFpEF, and 3.17 (0.8-13.0) for HF with reduced EF. The increased odds of any HF or HFpEF with increasing MCRD remained significant after adjustment for HF risk factors and in sensitivity analyses matching by cancer stage rather than tumor side. Only 18.6% of patients experienced new or recurrent ischemic events between radiotherapy and the onset of HF. The relative risk of HFpEF increases with increasing cardiac radiation exposure during contemporary conformal breast cancer

  15. Heart failure as an endpoint in heart failure and non-heart failure cardiovascular clinical trials: the need for a consensus definition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zannad, F.; Stough, W.G.; Pitt, B.

    2008-01-01

    led to challenges in determining the incidence of heart failure in cardiovascular studies and the effects of interventions on these endpoints. This paper examines issues related to defining heart failure events in cardiovascular clinical trials and presents a definition to formally address this issue...... of hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, diabetes, and coronary heart disease, yet a consistent approach to defining heart failure events has not yet been realized. The wide range of definitions used in clinical trials makes it difficult to interpret new data in the context of existing literature. This inconsistency has...

  16. Matched Cohort Analysis of Outcomes of Definitive Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahn, Shannon, E-mail: shannonkahn@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Jani, Ashesh; Edelman, Scott; Rossi, Peter; Godette, Karen; Landry, Jerome; Anderson, Cynthia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To compare the biochemical outcome and toxicity scores of men with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and prostate cancer with a matched control population with negative or unknown HIV status when treated with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: A single-institution database of men with prostate cancer treated with EBRT from 1999 to 2009 was reviewed. Thirteen men with HIV were identified and matched to 2 control patients according to age, race, T stage, prostate-specific antigen level, Gleason score, RT dose, intensity-modulated RT vs. three-dimensional conformal RT, and whole-pelvis vs. prostate-only RT, for a total of 39 cases. The median follow-up time was 39 months (range, 3-110 months). Results: The 4-year biochemical failure (BF)-free survival rate was 87% in the HIV-positive group vs. 89% in the controls (p = 0.94). Pre- and post-RT viral loads were found to be predictive of BF (p = 0.04 and p = 0.04, respectively). No men with HIV died, whereas 2 in the control group died of causes unrelated to prostate cancer. Acute and chronic genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity were less in the HIV-positive patients than in controls (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p = 0.003, and p < 0.001, respectively). The HIV-positive men experienced an average decline in CD4 count of 193 cells/mm{sup 3}. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that men with HIV treated with EBRT have a similar risk of BF; however, high viral loads may contribute to an increased risk. This analysis supports that HIV-positive men with prostate cancer can be treated with definitive EBRT with similar disease control and toxicity outcomes as in the general population.

  17. Definition of stereotactic body radiotherapy. Principles and practice for the treatment of stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guckenberger, M.; Sauer, O. [University of Wuerzburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Andratschke, N. [University of Rostock, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Rostock (Germany); Alheit, H. [Distler Radiation Oncology, Bautzen/Pirna (Germany); Holy, R. [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Aachen (Germany); Moustakis, C. [University of Muenster, Department of Radiation Oncology, Muenster (Germany); Nestle, U. [University of Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany)

    2014-01-15

    This report from the Stereotactic Radiotherapy Working Group of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (Deutschen Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie, DEGRO) provides a definition of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) that agrees with that of other international societies. SBRT is defined as a method of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) that accurately delivers a high irradiation dose to an extracranial target in one or few treatment fractions. Detailed recommendations concerning the principles and practice of SBRT for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are given. These cover the entire treatment process; from patient selection, staging, treatment planning and delivery to follow-up. SBRT was identified as the method of choice when compared to best supportive care (BSC), conventionally fractionated radiotherapy and radiofrequency ablation. Based on current evidence, SBRT appears to be on a par with sublobar resection and is an effective treatment option in operable patients who refuse lobectomy. (orig.) [German] Die Arbeitsgruppe ''Stereotaktische Radiotherapie'' der Deutschen Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie (DEGRO) erarbeitete eine Definition der Koerperstereotaxie (SBRT), die sich an vorhandene internationale Definitionen anlehnt: Die SBRT ist eine Form der perkutanen Strahlentherapie, die mit hoher Praezision eine hohe Bestrahlungsdosis in einer oder wenigen Bestrahlungsfraktionen in einem extrakraniellen Zielvolumen appliziert. Zur Praxis der SBRT beim nichtkleinzelligen Bronchialkarzinom (NSCLC) im fruehen Stadium werden detaillierte Empfehlungen gegeben, die den gesamten Ablauf der Behandlung von der Indikationsstellung, Staging, Behandlungsplanung und Applikation sowie Nachsorge umfassen. Die Koerperstereotaxie wurde als Methode der Wahl im Vergleich zu Best Supportive Care, zur konventionell fraktionierten Strahlentherapie sowie zur Radiofrequenzablation identifiziert. Die Ergebnisse nach SBRT und sublobaerer Resektion

  18. Impact of Including Peritumoral Edema in Radiotherapy Target Volume on Patterns of Failure in Glioblastoma following Temozolomide-based Chemoradiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seo Hee; Kim, Jun Won; Chang, Jee Suk; Cho, Jae Ho; Kim, Se Hoon; Chang, Jong Hee; Suh, Chang-Ok

    2017-01-01

    We assessed the impact of including peritumoral edema in radiotherapy volumes on recurrence patterns among glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients treated with standard chemoradiotherapy (CRT). We analyzed 167 patients with histologically confirmed GBM who received temozolomide (TMZ)-based CRT between May 2006 and November 2012. The study cohort was divided into edema (+) (n = 130) and edema (−) (n = 37) groups, according to whether the entire peritumoral edema was included. At a median follow-up of 20 months (range, 2–99 months), 118 patients (71%) experienced progression/recurrence (infield: 69%; marginal: 26%; outfield: 16%; CSF seeding: 12%). The median overall survival and progression-free survival were 20 months and 15 months, respectively. The marginal failure rate was significantly greater in the edema (−) group (37% vs. 22%, p = 0.050). Among 33 patients who had a favorable prognosis (total resection and MGMT-methylation), the difference in the marginal failure rates was increased (40% vs. 14%, p = 0.138). Meanwhile, treatment of edema did not significantly increase the incidence of pseudoprogression/radiation necrosis (edema (−) 49% vs. (+) 37%, p = 0.253). Inclusion of peritumoral edema in the radiotherapy volume can reduce marginal failures following TMZ-based CRT without increasing pseudoprogression/radiation necrosis. PMID:28176884

  19. ESPEN endorsed recommendations. Definition and classification of intestinal failure in adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pironi, L; Arends, J.; Baxter, J.; Bozzetti, F.; Pelaez, R.B.; Cuerda, C.; Forbes, A.; Gabe, S.; Gillanders, L.; Holst, M.; Jeppesen, P.B.; Joly, F.; Kelly, D.; Klek, S.; Irtun, O.; Damink, S.W. Olde; Panisic, M.; Rasmussen, H.H.; Staun, M.; Szczepanek, K.; Gossum, A. van; Wanten, G.J.A.; Schneider, S.M.; Shaffer, J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Intestinal failure (IF) is not included in the list of PubMed Mesh terms, as failure is the term describing a state of non functioning of other organs, and as such is not well recognized. No scientific society has yet devised a formal definition and classification of IF. The Europ

  20. 11C choline PET guided salvage radiotherapy with volumetric modulation arc therapy and hypofractionation for recurrent prostate cancer after HIFU failure: preliminary results of tolerability and acute toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alongi, Filippo; Liardo, Rocco L E; Iftode, Cristina; Lopci, Egesta; Villa, Elisa; Comito, Tiziana; Tozzi, Angelo; Navarria, Pierina; Ascolese, Anna M; Mancosu, Pietro; Tomatis, Stefano; Bellorofonte, Carlo; Arturo, Chiti; Scorsetti, Marta

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate tolerance, feasibility and acute toxicity in patients undergoing salvage radiotherapy after high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) failure. From 2005 to 2011 a total of 15 patients were treated with HIFU as primary radical treatment. Between July 2011 and February 2013, all 15 patients presented biochemical relapse after HIFU and 11C choline PET documenting intrapostatic-only failure. Salvage EBRT was performed with moderate hypofractionation schedule in 28 fractions with volumetric modulation arc therapy (VMAT). Genito-urinary (GU) and rectal and bowel toxicity were scored by common terminology criteria for adverse events version 4 (CTCAE V.4) scale. Biochemical response was assessed by ASTRO Phoenix criteria. Median age of patients was 67 years (range: 53-85). The median Gleason score was 7 (range: 6-9). The median prostate specific antigen (PSA) at the time of biochemical relapse after HIFU was 5.2 ng/mL (range: 2-64.2). Seven of the 15 patients received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) started after HIFU failure, interrupted before 11C choline PET and radiotherapy. Median prescribed dose was 71.4 Gy (range: 71.4-74.2 Gy) in 28 fractions. No radiation related major upper gastrointestinal (GI), rectal and GU toxicity were experienced. GU, acute grade 1 and grade 2 toxicities were recorded in 7/15 and 4/15 respectively; bowel acute grade 1 and grade 2 toxicities in 4/15 and 1/15; rectal acute grade 1 and grade 2 toxicities in 3/15 and 2/15 respectively. No grade 3 or greater acute or late toxicities occurred. Biochemical control was assessed in 12/15 (80%) patients. With a median follow up of 12 months, three out of 15 patients, with biochemical relapse, showed lymph-nodal recurrence. Our early clinical results and biochemical data confirm the feasibility and show a good tolerance of the 11C choline PET guided salvage radiation therapy after HIFU failure. The findings of low acute toxicity is encouraging, but longer

  1. Radiation Field Design and Patterns of Locoregional Recurrence Following Definitive Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Susie A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Schuster, David M. [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Radiology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Mister, Donna; Liu Tian; Godette, Karen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Torres, Mylin A., E-mail: matorre@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Locoregional control is associated with breast cancer-specific and overall survival in select women with breast cancer. Although several patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics have been shown to contribute to locoregional recurrence (LRR), studies evaluating factors related to radiotherapy (XRT) technique have been limited. We investigated the relationship between LRR location and XRT fields and dose delivered to the primary breast cancer in women experiencing subsequent locoregional relapse. Methods and Materials: We identified 21 women who were previously treated definitively with surgery and XRT for breast cancer. All patients developed biopsy-result proven LRR and presented to Emory University Hospital between 2004 and 2010 for treatment. Computed tomography (CT) simulation scans with XRT dose files for the initial breast cancer were fused with {sup 18}F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET)/CT images in DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) format identifying the LRR. Each LRR was categorized as in-field, defined as {>=}95% of the LRR volume receiving {>=}95% of the prescribed whole-breast dose; marginal, defined as LRR at the field edge and/or not receiving {>=}95% of the prescribed dose to {>=}95% of the volume; or out-of-field, that is, LRR intentionally not treated with the original XRT plan. Results: Of the 24 identified LRRs (3 patients experienced two LRRs), 3 were in-field, 9 were marginal, and 12 were out-of-field. Two of the 3 in-field LRRs were marginal misses of the additional boost XRT dose. Out-of-field LRRs consisted of six supraclavicular and six internal mammary nodal recurrences. Conclusions: Most LRRs in our study occurred in areas not fully covered by the prescribed XRT dose or were purposely excluded from the original XRT fields. Our data suggest that XRT technique, field design, and dose play a critical role in preventing LRR in women with breast cancer.

  2. Definition, Detection, and Recovery of Single-Page Failures, a Fourth Class of Database Failures

    CERN Document Server

    Graefe, Goetz

    2012-01-01

    The three traditional failure classes are system, media, and transaction failures. Sometimes, however, modern storage exhibits failures that differ from all of those. In order to capture and describe such cases, single-page failures are introduced as a fourth failure class. This class encompasses all failures to read a data page correctly and with plausible contents despite all correction attempts in lower system levels. Efficient recovery seems to require a new data structure called the page recovery index. Its transactional maintenance can be accomplished writing the same number of log records as today's efficient implementations of logging and recovery. Detection and recovery of a single-page failure can be sufficiently fast that the affected data access is merely delayed, without the need to abort the transaction.

  3. Definitive conformation radiotherapy combined with chemo-hormonal therapy in the treatment of adenocarcinoma of the prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karasawa, Katsuyuki; Kodaira, Takeshi [Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital (Japan); Nakagawa, Keiichi; Onogi, Yuzo; Hara, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Hidetsugu; Sasaki, Yasuhito

    1996-12-01

    To ascertain the clinical benefits of photon conformation radiotherapy, since 1988 we have been conducting a clinical trial of photon conformation radiotherapy for adenocarcinoma of the prostate, and we have analyzed the findings thus far. Between 1988 and 1993, 33 evaluable patients with prostate cancer were treated with definitive radiotherapy at the Dept. of Radiology, Social Health Insurance Medical Center. Their ages ranged from 54 to 86, and averaged 69.3 y.o. (median 67). Their stages were as follows: 3 stage-B, 25 stage-C, and 5 stage-D cases. The minimum follow-up period was 1 year. Patients received 40 to 50 Gy (fraction dose ranged from 1.8 Gy to 2 Gy) to the pelvis using the AP-PA technique followed by a 20 to 30 Gy conformal boost (fraction dose 2 Gy) to the prostate gland. Total dose ranged from 68 Gy to 70.4 Gy, with an average of 70 Gy. Systemic multiagent chemotherapy with CDDP, ADR, MTX, 5FU, and CPM was administered concurrently and adjuvantly. Hormonal therapy was also adjuvantly administered. Overall survival rates at 3 years for stage B, C, and D were 100%, 100%, and 60%, respectively. and was 85% at 5 years for stage C. Relapse-free survival rates at 3 years for stage B and C were 100% and 96%, respectively, and was 61% at 5 years for stage C. Regarding stage C cases, the initial site of recurrence was bone in 5 cases. As for complications, there were 5 (15%) grade 1, 4 (12%) grade 2, and 1 (3%) grade 3 rectal complications. Although the number of cases is rather small and the follow-up period is rather short, definitive conformal radiotherapy with adjuvant chemo-hormonal therapy appears promising in the treatment of prostate cancer by improving survival rates with acceptable normal tissue toxicity. (author)

  4. Late Fecal Incontinence After High-Dose Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Better Prediction Using Longitudinal Definitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiorino, Claudio, E-mail: fiorino.claudio@hsr.it [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy); Rancati, Tiziana [Prostate Program, Scientific Directorate, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milano (Italy); Fellin, Gianni [Department of Radiotherapy, Ospedale Santa Chiara, Trento (Italy); Vavassori, Vittorio [Department of Radiotherapy, Cliniche Humanitas Gavazzeni, Bergamo (Italy); Cagna, Emanuela [Department of Radiotherapy, Ospedale Sant' Anna, Como (Italy); Casanova Borca, Valeria [Department of Medical Physics, Ospedale di Ivrea, Turin (Italy); Girelli, Giuseppe [Department of Radiotherapy, Ospedale di Ivrea, Turin (Italy); Menegotti, Loris [Department of Medical Physics, Ospedale Santa Chiara, Trento (Italy); Monti, Angelo Filippo [Department of Medical Physics, Ospedale Sant' Anna, Como (Italy); Tortoreto, Francesca [Department of Radiotherapy, Ospedale Fatebenefratelli, Roma (Italy); Delle Canne, Stefania [Department of Medical Physics, Ospedale Fatebenefratelli, Roma (Italy); Valdagni, Riccardo [Prostate Program, Scientific Directorate, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milano (Italy)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To model late fecal incontinence after high-dose prostate cancer radiotherapy (RT) in patients accrued in the AIROPROS (prostate working group of the Italian Association of Radiation Oncology) 0102 trial using different endpoint definitions. Methods and Materials: The self-reported questionnaires (before RT, 1 month after RT, and every 6 months for {<=}3 years after RT) of 586 patients were available. The peak incontinence (P{sub I}NC) and two longitudinal definitions (chronic incontinence [C{sub I}NC], defined as the persistence of Grade 1 or greater incontinence after any Grade 2-3 event; and mean incontinence score [M{sub I}NC], defined as the average score during the 3-year period after RT) were considered. The correlation between the clinical/dosimetric parameters (including rectal dose-volume histograms) and P{sub I}NC (Grade 2 or greater), C{sub I}NC, and M{sub I}NC of {>=}1 were investigated using multivariate logistic analyses. Receiver operating characteristic curves and the area under the curve were used to assess the predictive value of the different multivariate models. Results: Of the 586 patients, 36 with a Grade 1 or greater incontinence score before RT were not included in the present analysis. Of the 550 included patients, 197 (35.8%) had at least one control with a Grade 1 or greater incontinence score (M{sub I}NC >0). Of these 197 patients, 37 (6.7%), 22 (4.0%), and 17 (3.1%) were scored as having P{sub I}NC, M{sub I}NC {>=}1, and C{sub I}NC, respectively. On multivariate analysis, Grade 2 or greater acute incontinence was the only predictor of P{sub I}NC (odds ratio [OR], 5.9; p = .0009). Grade 3 acute incontinence was predictive of C{sub I}NC (OR, 9.4; p = .02), and percentage of the rectal volume receiving >40 Gy of {>=}80% was predictive of a M{sub I}NC of {>=}1 (OR, 3.8; p = .008) and of C{sub I}NC (OR, 3.6; p = .03). Previous bowel disease, previous abdominal/pelvic surgery, and the use of antihypertensive (protective factor

  5. A dosimetric analysis of volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy with jaw width restriction vs 7 field intensity-modulated radiotherapy for definitive treatment of cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, B; Fang, Z; Huang, Y; Lin, P; Chen, Z

    2014-07-01

    Radiation therapy treatment planning was performed to compare the dosimetric difference between volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy (RapidArc™ v. 10; Varian® Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) and 7-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (7f-IMRT) in the definitive treatment of cervical cancer. 13 patients with cervical cancer were enrolled in this study. Planning target volume (PTV) 50 and PTV60 were prescribed at a dose of 50 and 60 Gy in 28 fractions, respectively. The dose to the PTV60 was delivered as a simultaneous integrated boost to the pelvic lymph nodes. Owing to the mechanical limitation of the multileaf collimator in which the maximum displacement was limited to 15 cm, two types of RapidArc with different jaw width restrictions (15 and 20-23 cm) were investigated to evaluate their dosimetric differences. The RapidArc plan type with dosimetric superiority was then compared against the 7f-IMRT on the target coverage, sparing of the organs at risk (OARs), monitor units, treatment time and delivery accuracy to determine whether RapidArc is beneficial for the treatment of cervical cancer. The 15-cm jaw width restriction had better performance compared with the restrictions that were longer than 15 cm in the sparing of the OARs. The 15-cm RapidArc spared the OARs, that is, the bladder, rectum, small intestine, femoral heads and bones, and improved treatment efficiency compared with 7f-IMRT. Both techniques delivered a high quality-assurance passing rate (>90%) according to the Γ3mm,3% criterion. RapidArc with a 15-cm jaw width restriction spares the OARs and improves treatment efficiency in cervical cancer compared with 7f-IMRT. This study describes the dosimetric superiority of RapidArc with a 15-cm jaw width restriction and explores the feasibility of using RapidArc for the definitive treatment of cervical cancer.

  6. Worsening renal function in heart failure: the need for a consensus definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheerin, Noella J; Newton, Phillip J; Macdonald, Peter S; Leung, Dominic Y C; Sibbritt, David; Spicer, Stephen Timothy; Johnson, Kay; Krum, Henry; Davidson, Patricia M

    2014-07-01

    Acute decompensated heart failure is a common cause of hospitalisation. This is a period of vulnerability both in altered pathophysiology and also the potential for iatrogenesis due to therapeutic interventions. Renal dysfunction is often associated with heart failure and portends adverse outcomes. Identifying heart failure patients at risk of renal dysfunction is important in preventing progression to chronic kidney disease or worsening renal function, informing adjustment to medication management and potentially preventing adverse events. However, there is no working or consensus definition in international heart failure management guidelines for worsening renal function. In addition, there appears to be no concordance or adaptation of chronic kidney disease guidelines by heart failure guideline development groups for the monitoring of chronic kidney disease in heart failure. Our aim is to encourage the debate for an agreed definition given the prognostic impact of worsening renal function in heart failure. We present the case for the uptake of the Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria for acute kidney injury with some minor alterations. This has the potential to inform study design and meta-analysis thereby building the knowledgebase for guideline development. Definition consensus supports data element, clinical registry and electronic algorithm innovation as instruments for quality improvement and clinical research for better patient outcomes. In addition, we recommend all community managed heart failure patients have their baseline renal function classified and routinely monitored in accordance with established renal guidelines to help identify those at increased risk for worsening renal function or progression to chronic kidney disease.

  7. Definitions of Acute-On-Chronic Liver Failure: The Past, the Present, and the Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Amathieu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF is an entity used to define patients with liver cirrhosis presenting with acute decompensation. For over 20 years, ACLF has taken multiple definitions and/or classifications. Unfortunately, to date, there has not been a universally accepted definition/classification of this entity. In this short review, we discuss the definition evolution of ACLF, the strengths and weaknesses of the existing definitions and classifications, and finally the potential role of the ‘omic’ approaches for the diagnosis of this complex syndrome.

  8. [Role of functional imaging in the definition of target volumes for lung cancer radiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thureau, S; Hapdey, S; Vera, P

    2016-10-01

    Functional imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) is interesting to optimize lung radiotherapy planning, and probably to deliver a heterogeneous dose or adapt the radiation dose during treatment. Only fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET-computed tomography (CT) is validated for staging lung cancer and planning radiotherapy. The optimal segmentation methods remain to be defined as well as the interest of "dose painting" from pre-treatment PET (metabolism: FDG) or hypoxia (fluoromisonidazole: FMISO) and the interest of replanning based on pertherapeutic PET.

  9. Association of genetic variants in VEGF-A with clinical recurrence in prostate cancer patients treated with definitive radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langsenlehner, T.; Thurner, E.M.; Kapp, K.S. [Medical University of Graz, Department of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, Graz (Austria); Renner, W. [Medical University of Graz, Clinical Institute of Medical and Chemical Laboratory Diagnostics, Graz (Austria); Gerger, A. [Medical University of Graz, Division of Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Graz (Austria); Langsenlehner, U. [GKK Outpatient Department, Division of Internal Medicine, Graz (Austria)

    2014-04-15

    Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A), a key regulator of tumor-induced angiogenesis, is critical for tumor growth and metastasization. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the prognostic value of VEGF single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and haplotypes for clinical recurrence after definitive radiotherapy for prostate cancer. The association of seven VEGF-A polymorphisms and their haplotypes with clinical recurrence (defined as the occurrence of local recurrence and/or distant metastases) in 496 prostate cancer patients treated with definitive radiotherapy were investigated. Genotypes were determined by 5'-nuclease (TaqMan) assays; haplotypes were analyzed using the Haploview program. Within a median follow-up time of 80 months, 44 patients (9%) developed clinical recurrences. Haplotype analysis showed two separate blocks of high-linkage disequilibrium, formed by five polymorphisms (-2578C > A, -2489C > T, -1498C > T, -634G > C, -7C > T) upstream of the coding sequence (CCCCC, ATTGC, CCCGC, ATTGT) and two polymorphisms (936C > T, 1612G > A) downstream of the coding sequence (CA, CG, TG). Carriers of at least 1 copy of the ATTGC haplotype were at higher risk of recurrence (hazard ratio [HR] 3.83; 95%CI 1.48-9.90, p=0.006); for carriers of 2 copies, the HR was 4.85 (95%CI 1.72-13.6; p=0.003). In multivariate analysis, patients harboring at least one copy of the ATTGC haplotype remained at increased risk of recurrence (HR 3.63, 95%CI 1.38-9.55, p=0.009); in patients carrying 2 copies, the HR was 4.72 (95%CI 1.64-13.6, p=0.004). Our findings indicate that the VEGF-A ATTGC haplotype may predict clinical recurrence in prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. (orig.)

  10. [18F]Fluorodeoxyglucose uptake by positron emission tomography predicts outcomes for oropharyngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer treated with definitive radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Takeaki; Kitajima, Kazuhiro; Suenaga, Yuko; Ejima, Yasuo; Komatsu, Hirokazu; Otsuki,, Naoki; Nibu, Ken-ichi; kiyota, Naomi; Takahashi, Satoru; Sasaki, Ryohei

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study evaluated the prognostic significance of the maximum standardized uptake value of the primary site (pSUVmax) in 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) scans of patients with oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal cancer who were treated using definitive radiotherapy. The study included 86 patients who were primarily treated with radiotherapy for oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal cancer. Sixty-nine patients underwent concurrent chemotherapy. The associations between pre-treatment pSUVmax and treatment outcomes were evaluated. The most appropriate pSUVmax cut-off value for predicting disease-free survival (DFS) and local control (LC) was selected using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. The median follow-up time for surviving patients was 60 months, while the median survival time in the entire patient cohort was 55 months. A pSUVmax cut-off value of 9.0 showed the best discriminative performance. Five-year OS and DFS rates were 65.9% and 60.0%, respectively. In univariate analyses, pSUVmax (p = 0.009), T-stage (p = 0.001), N-stage (p = 0.039), and clinical stage (p = 0.017) were identified as significant prognostic predictors for DFS. The multivariate analysis did not identify any statistically significant factors, but the association between pSUVmax and DFS was borderline significant (p = 0.055). Interestingly, pSUVmax was predictive of local controllability in T1–T2 disease (p = 0.024), but there was no significant association for T3–T4 disease (p = 0.735). In this study, pSUVmax was predictive of DFS and LC in patients with oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal cancer that was treated with definitive radiotherapy. pSUVmax was strongly associated with LC in T1–T2 disease.

  11. Use of pretreatment metabolic tumour volumes to predict the outcome of pharyngeal cancer treated by definitive radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, Chia-Hung [China Medical University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET Center, Taichung (China); China Medical University, Institute of Clinical Medicine Science and School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taichung (China); China Medical University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET center, Taichung (China); Lin, Shih-Chieh; Wang, Yao-Ching [China Medical University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Taichung (China); Hsieh, Te-Chun [China Medical University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET Center, Taichung (China); Yen, Kuo-Yang [China Medical University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET Center, Taichung (China); China Medical University, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Science, Taichung (China); Yang, Shih-Neng [China Medical University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Taichung (China); China Medical University, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Science, Taichung (China); Liang, Ji-An [China Medical University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Taichung (China); China Medical University, Institute of Clinical Medicine Science and School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taichung (China); Hua, Chun-Hung [China Medical University Hospital, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Taichung (China); Chen, Shang-Wen [China Medical University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Taichung (China); China Medical University, Institute of Clinical Medicine Science and School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taichung (China); Taipei Medical University, Institute of Clinical Medicine Science and School of Medicine, Taipei (China)

    2012-08-15

    The aim of the study was to investigate the predictive role of pretreatment metabolic volume (MTV) in pharyngeal cancer (PC) patients treated with definitive (chemo) radiotherapy. This retrospective analysis enrolled 64 patients with PC treated with (chemo) radiotherapy. All patients received pretreatment fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT. Four PET segmentation methods were used, namely applying an isocontour at a standardized uptake value (SUV) of either 2.5 or 3.0 (MTV2.5 and MTV3.0) or using fixed thresholds of either 40 or 50 % (MTV40 %, MTV50 %) of the maximum intratumoural FDG activity. Disease-free survival (DFS) and primary relapse-free survival (PRFS) were examined according to cutoffs of the median values for each MTV and the gross tumour volume (GTVp). Independent prognosticators were identified by Cox regression analysis. With a median follow-up of 24 months, 19 patients died, and 26 patients experienced tumour relapse at primary sites. Multivariate analysis of the DFS showed that MTV2.5 > 13.6 ml was the only predictor of relapse [p = 0.011, hazard ratio = 2.69, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.25-5.76]. The independent predictor for PRFS was MTV2.5 > 13.6 ml (p = 0.003, hazard ratio = 3.76, 95 % CI 1.57-8.92), whereas GTVp > 15.5 ml had a marginal impact on PRFS (p = 0.06, hazard ratio = 3.54, 95 % CI 0.97-11.85). Patients having tumours with MTV2.5 > 13.6 ml had a significantly inferior 2-year PRFS compared with patients who had lower MTV2.5 tumours (39 vs 72 %, respectively, p = 0.001). For PC patients treated with definitive (chemo)radiotherapy, pretreatment MTV2.5 volume achieved the best predictive value for primary recurrence, and the same value was also a prognosticator for DFS. (orig.)

  12. Definition of ACLF and inclusion criteria for extra-hepatic organ failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojing; Sarin, Shiv Kumar; Ning, Qin

    2015-07-01

    A prominent characteristic of ACLF is rapid hepatic disease progression with subsequent extra-hepatic organ failure, manifesting as either hepatic coma or hepatorenal syndrome, which is associated with a high mortality rate in a short time. The APASL definition mainly emphasizes recognizing patients with hepatic failure. These patients may subsequently develop extra-hepatic multisystem organ failure leading to high mortality. It is therefore worthwhile to identify the short interim period between the development of liver failure and the onset of extra-hepatic organ failure, the potential therapeutic 'golden window.' Interventions during this period may prevent the development of complications and eventually change the course of the illness. Organ failure is suggested to be a central component of ACLF and may behave differently from chronic decompensated liver disease. Clear and practical criteria for the inclusion of organ failure are urgently needed so that patients with these life-threatening complications can be treated in a timely and appropriate manner. Recent studies suggested that the scoring systems evaluating organ failure [acute physiology, age and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) and sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores] work better than those addressing the severity of liver disease [Child-Pugh and model of end-stage liver disease (MELD) scores] in ACLF. However, a key problem remains that the former scoring systems are reflective of organ failure and not predictive, thus limiting their value as an early indication for intervention.

  13. Definitive salvage for vaginal recurrence of endometrial cancer: the impact of modern intensity-modulated-radiotherapy with image-based HDR brachytherapy and the interplay of the PORTEC 1 risk stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargo, John A; Kim, Hayeon; Houser, Christopher J; Berhane, Hebist; Sukumvanich, Paniti; Olawaiye, Alexander B; Kelley, Joseph L; Edwards, Robert P; Comerci, John T; Huang, Marilyn; Courtney-Brooks, Madeleine; Beriwal, Sushil

    2014-10-01

    Data for salvage radiotherapy for recurrent endometrial cancer are limited especially in the era of modern radiotherapy including IMRT and 3-dimensional image-based HDR brachytherapy. Theoretically, modern radiotherapy reduces the dose to critical organs-at-risk and maximizes dose to the target volume, possibly decreasing morbidity and increasing tumor control. Forty-one patients completing definitive salvage radiotherapy for vaginal recurrence of endometrial cancer from June 2004 to December 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. HDR Brachytherapy was completed using image-based planning with contouring/optimization with each fraction to a median dose of 23.75 Gy in 5 fractions. HDR brachytherapy was preceded by external beam radiotherapy predominately using an IMRT technique (90%) to a median dose of 45 Gy in 25 fractions. Toxicity was reported according to CTCAEv4. At a median follow-up of 18 months (range: 3-78), the clinical complete response rate was 95%. The 3-year local control, distant control, recurrence free survival, and overall survival were 95%, 61%, 68%, and 67%. Significant predictors of both distant failure and overall survival were primary prognostic factors of depth of myometrial invasion, FIGO stage, and FIGO grade. There was no grade 3+ acute toxicity; the 3-year rate of grade 3+ late toxicity was 8%. Salvage IMRT plus 3-dimensional image-based HDR brachytherapy shows excellent tumor control and minimal morbidity for vaginal recurrence of endometrial cancer. Anticipated salvage rates must be taken in the context of primary risk factors including depth of myometrial invasion, FIGO stage, and FIGO grade. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Duration of Hemodialysis Following Peritoneal Dialysis Cessation in Australia and New Zealand: Proposal for a Standardized Definition of Technique Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Patrick G; Clayton, Philip A; Johnson, David W; McDonald, Stephen P; Borlace, Monique; Badve, Sunil V; Sud, Kamal; Boudville, Neil

    ♦ BACKGROUND: Although technique failure is a key outcome in peritoneal dialysis (PD), there is currently no agreement on a uniform definition. We explored different definitions of PD technique failure using data from the Australia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant (ANZDATA) Registry. ♦ METHODS: We included 16,612 incident PD patients in Australia and New Zealand from January 1998 to December 2012. Different definitions of technique failure were applied according to the minimum number of days (30, 60, 90, 180, or 365) the patient received hemodialysis after cessation of PD. ♦ RESULTS: Median technique survival varied from 2.0 years with the 30-day definition to 2.4 years with the 365-day definition. For all definitions, the most common causes of technique failure were death, followed by infectious complications. The likelihood of a patient returning to PD within 12 months of technique failure was highest in the 30-day definition (24%), and was very small when using the 180- and 365-day definitions (3% and 0.8%, respectively). Patients whose technique failed due to mechanical reasons were the most likely to return to PD (46% within 12 months using the 30-day definition). ♦ CONCLUSIONS: Both 30- and 180-day definitions have clinical relevance but offer different perspectives with very different prognostic implications for further PD. Therefore, we propose that PD technique failure be defined by a composite endpoint of death or transfer to hemodialysis using both 30-day and 180-day definitions.

  15. Dosimetric consequences of the shift towards computed tomography guided target definition and planning for breast conserving radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korevaar Erik W

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The shift from conventional two-dimensional (2D to three-dimensional (3D-conformal target definition and dose-planning seems to have introduced volumetric as well as geometric changes. The purpose of this study was to compare coverage of computed tomography (CT-based breast and boost planning target volumes (PTV, absolute volumes irradiated, and dose delivered to the organs at risk with conventional 2D and 3D-conformal breast conserving radiotherapy. Methods Twenty-five patients with left-sided breast cancer were subject of CT-guided target definition and 3D-conformal dose-planning, and conventionally defined target volumes and treatment plans were reconstructed on the planning CT. Accumulated dose-distributions were calculated for the conventional and 3D-conformal dose-plans, taking into account a prescribed dose of 50 Gy for the breast plans and 16 Gy for the boost plans. Results With conventional treatment plans, CT-based breast and boost PTVs received the intended dose in 78% and 32% of the patients, respectively, and smaller volumes received the prescribed breast and boost doses compared with 3D-conformal dose-planning. The mean lung dose, the volume of the lungs receiving > 20 Gy, the mean heart dose, and volume of the heart receiving > 30 Gy were significantly less with conventional treatment plans. Specific areas within the breast and boost PTVs systematically received a lower than intended dose with conventional treatment plans. Conclusion The shift towards CT-guided target definition and planning as the golden standard for breast conserving radiotherapy has resulted in improved target coverage at the cost of larger irradiated volumes and an increased dose delivered to organs at risk. Tissue is now included into the breast and boost target volumes that was never explicitly defined or included with conventional treatment. Therefore, a coherent definition of the breast and boost target volumes is needed, based on

  16. ESPEN endorsed recommendations. Definition and classification of intestinal failure in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pironi, Loris; Arends, Jann; Baxter, Janet

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Intestinal failure (IF) is not included in the list of PubMed Mesh terms, as failure is the term describing a state of non functioning of other organs, and as such is not well recognized. No scientific society has yet devised a formal definition and classification of IF......"[Publication Type], the project was developed using the Delphi round methodology. The final consensus was reached on March 2014, after 5 Delphi rounds and two live meetings. RESULTS: The recommendations comprise the definition of IF, a functional and a pathophysiological classification for both acute and chronic...... IF and a clinical classification of chronic IF. IF was defined as "the reduction of gut function below the minimum necessary for the absorption of macronutrients and/or water and electrolytes, such that intravenous supplementation is required to maintain health and/or growth". CONCLUSIONS: This formal definition...

  17. Characteristics and Discrepancies in Acute-on-Chronic Liver Failure: Need for a Unified Definition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Yeob Kim

    Full Text Available To investigate the prevalence, mortalities, and patient characteristics of Acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF according to the AARC (Asian Pacific Association for the Study of the Liver ACLF Research Consortium and European Association for the Study of the Liver CLIF-C (Chronic Liver Failure Consortium definitions.We collected retrospective data for 1470 hospitalized patients with chronic liver disease (CLD and acute deterioration between January 2013 and December 2013 from 21 university hospitals in Korea.Of the patients assessed, the prevalence of ACLF based on the AARC and CLIF-C definitions was 9.5% and 18.6%, respectively. The 28-day and 90-day mortality rates were higher in patients with ACLF than in those without ACLF. Patients who only met the CLIF-C definition had significantly lower 28-day and 90-day survival rates than those who only met the AARC definition (68.0% vs. 93.9%, P<0.001; 55.1% vs. 92.4%, P<0.001. Among the patients who had non-cirrhotic CLD, the 90-day mortality of the patients with ACLF was higher than of those without ACLF, although not significant (33.3% vs. 6.0%, P = 0.192. Patients with previous acute decompensation (AD within 1- year had a lower 90-day survival rate than those with AD more than 1 year prior or without previous AD (81.0% vs. 91.9% or 89.4%, respectively, all P<0.001. Patients who had extra-hepatic organ failure without liver failure had a similar 90-day survival rate to those who had liver failure as a prerequisite (57.0% vs. 60.6%, P = 0.391.The two ACLF definitions result in differences in mortality and patient characteristics among ACLF patients. We suggest that non-cirrhotic CLD, previous AD within 1 year, and extra-hepatic organ failure should be included in the ACLF diagnostic criteria. In addition, further studies are necessary to develop a universal definition of ACLF.

  18. Predictors of distant relapse in patients with FIGO stage IIB-IVA cervical cancer treated with definitive radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazawa-Sakai, Mika; Mabuchi, Seiji; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Kawashima, Atsushi; Yokoi, Eriko; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Kimura, Tadashi

    2017-08-17

    To investigate the predictors of distant relapse in International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IIB-IVA cervical cancer patients treated with definitive radiotherapy (RT). The clinical data of 219 patients with FIGO stage IIB-IVA cervical cancer treated with definitive RT between January 1997 and December 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. The cumulative distant relapse, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. A Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to investigate the predictors of distant relapse in patients. Following treatment with definitive RT, 61 of the 219 (27.9%) patients developed distant relapse with median PFS and OS rates of 9.9 and 32.8 months, and estimated five-year PFS and OS rates of 4.9% and 21.3%, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that pelvic node metastasis, pretreatment leukocytosis and pretreatment neutrophilia were significant predictors of distant relapse. The risk of developing distant relapse was found to be associated with the number of predictors that the patients displayed: the estimated five-year distant relapse rates of the patients with no predictors, one predictor and two predictors were 20.3%, 35.5% and 88.9%, respectively. Roughly 28% of patients with FIGO stage IIB-IVA cervical cancer developed distant relapse after definitive RT. Pelvic lymph node metastasis and pretreatment leukocytosis/neutrophilia are independent predictors of distant relapse. © 2017 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  19. Outcome and patterns of failure after postoperative intensity modulated radiotherapy for locally advanced or high-risk oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geretschläger Andreas

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine the outcome and patterns of failure in oral cavity cancer (OCC patients after postoperative intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT with concomitant systemic therapy. Methods All patients with locally advanced (AJCC stage III/IV or high-risk OCC (AJCC stage II who underwent postoperative IMRT at our institution between December 2006 and July 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. The primary endpoint was locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRRFS. Secondary endpoints included distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS, overall survival (OS, acute and late toxicities. Results Overall 53 patients were analyzed. Twenty-three patients (43% underwent concomitant chemotherapy with cisplatin, two patients with carboplatin (4% and four patients were treated with the monoclonal antibody cetuximab (8%. At a median follow-up of 2.3 (range, 1.1–4.6 years the 3-year LRRFS, DMFS and OS estimates were 79%, 90%, and 73% respectively. Twelve patients experienced a locoregional recurrence. Eight patients, 5 of which had both a flap reconstruction and extracapsular extension (ECE, showed an unusual multifocal pattern of recurrence. Ten locoregional recurrences occurred marginally or outside of the high-risk target volumes. Acute toxicity grades of 2 (27% and 3 (66% and late toxicity grades of 2 (34% and 3 (11% were observed. Conclusion LRRFS after postoperative IMRT is satisfying and toxicity is acceptable. The majority of locoregional recurrences occurred marginally or outside of the high-risk target volumes. Improvement of high-risk target volume definition especially in patients with flap reconstruction and ECE might transfer into better locoregional control.

  20. [Optimized definition and delineation of supraclavicular lymph nodes target in postmastectomy radiotherapy for breast cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shujing; Huang, Xiaobo; Wang, Xicheng; Zhang, Yujing; Sun, Jiayuan; He, Liru; Wen, Ge; He, Zhichun

    2014-07-01

    To explore the optimized methods to define and delineate supraclavicular lymph nodal target in postmastectomy radiotherapy for breast cancer patients. From September 2012 to August 2013, a total of 10 breast cancer patients at Sun Yan-sen University Cancer were selected for mastectomy plus postoperative radiotherapy. The clinical target volume (CTV) of every patient was delineated on CT-slices after computed tomography (CT) simulation by 6 radiation oncologists. Then the coverage discrepancy in anatomic lymphatic drainage subregions was analyzed among both CTVs by different oncologists and CTVs for patients with different clinical characters. The average volume of SCLN-CTVs was 110 ± 28 cm(3). All SCLN, neck-IV and axilla III regions were covered in CTV, none of axillaIregion. The covergy rates of nonsurgery-axillaII, Rotter-LN, intraclavicular-LN, neck-Vb, scalenus gap, neck-III and surgery-axilla IIregions was 75%, 85%, 73%, 88%, 68%, 10%, 17% , respectively. SCLN, neck-IV and axilla III regions should be covered according to consensus. However, the opinions of nonsurgery-axillaII, Rotter-LN, intraclavicular-LN, neck-Vb, scalenus gap, neck-III and surgery-axilla IIremain divisive.

  1. Freedom from local and regional failure of contralateral neck with ipsilateral neck radiotherapy for node-positive tonsil cancer: updated results of an institutional clinical management approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Tu D; Raben, David; Schneider, Charles J; Hockstein, Neil G; Witt, Robert L; Dzeda, Michael; Cormier, Jennifer F; Raben, Adam

    2015-06-01

    To update the outcomes of an institutional clinical management approach using ipsilateral neck radiotherapy in the treatment of node-positive squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil with a well-lateralized primary lesion. Between August 2003 and April 2014, 61 consecutive patients with ipsilateral node-positive squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil without involvement of the base of the tongue or midline soft palate were treated at a community hospital-based cancer center with radiotherapy to the primary site and ipsilateral neck. Overall survival, disease-free survival and freedom from contralateral failure were calculated. Median follow up was 37.2months (range 4-121months). Freedom from contralateral nodal failure at 5years was 98% with one contralateral nodal failure noted. The patient underwent a salvage neck dissection and was treated with post-operative radiotherapy with no evidence of disease to date. 5-year overall survival (OS) was 92.4% and 5year disease-free survival (DFS) was 86.7%. This represents the single largest series reported from a community hospital-based cancer center in which lateralized tonsil cancers with N+ disease were treated with ipsilateral neck radiotherapy. In this carefully selected cohort of patients with well-lateralized tonsil cancers, the risk of contralateral nodal failure appears to be <5%, suggesting that prophylactic radiation of the contralateral neck may not be necessary. Future planned studies will focus on prospectively selecting subgroups of patients eligible for treatment de-intensification as survivorship issues in excellent prognosis HPV positive patients are increasingly becoming relevant. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Role of {sup 18}F-choline PET/CT in suspicion of relapse following definitive radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chondrogiannis, Sotirios; Marzola, Maria Cristina; Maffione, Anna Margherita; Rampin, Lucia; Grassetto, Gaia; Rubello, Domenico [Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, PET/CT Centre, Rovigo (Italy); Ferretti, Alice [Hospital, Medical Physics and Biostatistics Unit, Rovigo (Italy); Nanni, Cristina [University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, PET/CT Centre, Bologna (Italy); Colletti, Patrick M. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2013-09-15

    The aims of the study were (a) to evaluate the diagnostic role, by means of positive detection rate (PDR), of {sup 18}F-choline (CH) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT in patients with prostate cancer treated with radiotherapy, with curative intent, and suspicion of relapse during follow-up, (b) to correlate the PDR with trigger prostate-specific antigen (PSA), (c) to investigate the possible influence of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) at the time of scan on PDR and (d) to assess distribution of metastatic spread. {sup 18}F-CH PET/CT exams from 46 consecutive patients (mean age 71.3 years, range 51-84 years) with prostate cancer (mean Gleason score 6.4, range 5-8) previously treated by definitive radiotherapy and with suspicion of relapse with negative or inconclusive conventional imaging were retrospectively evaluated. Of the 46 patients, 12 were treated with brachytherapy and 34 with external beam radiation therapy. Twenty-three patients were under ADT at the time of the examination. Trigger PSA was measured within 1 month before the exam (mean value 6.5 ng/ml, range 1.1-49.4 ng/ml). Patients were subdivided into four groups according to their PSA level: 1.0 < PSA {<=} 2.0 ng/ml (11 patients), 2.0 < PSA {<=} 4.0 ng/ml (16 patients), 4.0 < PSA {<=} 6.0 ng/ml (9 patients) and PSA > 6.0 ng/ml (10 patients). Correlation between ADT and PDR was investigated as well as between PSA and distribution of metastatic spread. The overall PDR of {sup 18}F-CH PET/CT was 80.4 % (37/46 patients), increasing with the increase of trigger PSA. PDR of {sup 18}F-CH PET/CT is not influenced by ADT (p = 0.710) even if PET performed under ADT demonstrated an overall higher PDR (82.6 %). The majority of the patients (59 %, 22/37 patients) showed local relapse only, confined to the prostatic bed; 22 % of the PET/CT-positive patients (8/37 patients) showed distant relapse only (bone localizations in all of them), while the remaining 19 % (7/37 patients) showed both local and distant

  3. Salvage Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) Following In-Field Failure of Initial SBRT for Spinal Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thibault, Isabelle; Campbell, Mikki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Tseng, Chia-Lin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Atenafu, Eshetu G. [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Letourneau, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Yu, Eugene [Department of Radiology, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Cho, B.C. John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Lee, Young K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Fehlings, Michael G. [Department of Radiology, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sahgal, Arjun, E-mail: arjun.sahgal@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: We report our experience in salvaging spinal metastases initially irradiated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), who subsequently progressed with imaging-confirmed local tumor progression, and were re-irradiated with a salvage second SBRT course to the same level. Methods and Materials: From a prospective database, 56 metastatic spinal segments in 40 patients were identified as having been irradiated with a salvage second SBRT course to the same level. In addition, 24 of 56 (42.9%) segments had initially been irradiated with conventional external beam radiation therapy before the first course of SBRT. Local control (LC) was defined as no progression on magnetic resonance imaging at the treated segment, and calculated according to the competing risk model. Overall survival (OS) was evaluated for each patient treated by use of the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median salvage second SBRT total dose and number of fractions was 30 Gy in 4 fractions (range, 20-35 Gy in 2-5 fractions), and for the first course of SBRT was 24 Gy in 2 fractions (range, 20-35 Gy in 1-5 fractions). The median follow-up time after salvage second SBRT was 6.8 months (range, 0.9-39 months), the median OS was 10.0 months, and the 1-year OS rate was 48%. A longer time interval between the first and second SBRT courses predicted for better OS (P=.02). The crude LC was 77% (43/56), the 1-year LC rate was 81%, and the median time to local failure was 3.0 months (range, 2.7-16.7 months). Of the 13 local failures, 85% (11/13) and 46% (6/13) showed progression within the epidural space and paraspinal soft tissues, respectively. Absence of baseline paraspinal disease predicted for better LC (P<.01). No radiation-induced vertebral compression fractures or cases of myelopathy were observed. Conclusion: A second course of spine SBRT, most often with 30 Gy in 4 fractions, for spinal metastases that failed initial SBRT is a feasible and efficacious salvage treatment option.

  4. Celiac Node Failure Patterns After Definitive Chemoradiation for Esophageal Cancer in the Modern Era

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amini, Arya [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); UC Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, California (United States); Xiao Lianchun [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Allen, Pamela K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Suzuki, Akihiro; Hayashi, Yuki [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hofstetter, Wayne [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Crane, Christopher; Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Bhutani, Manoop S.; Lee, Jeffrey H.; Ajani, Jaffer A. [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Welsh, James, E-mail: jwelsh@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: The celiac lymph node axis acts as a gateway for metastatic systemic spread. The need for prophylactic celiac nodal coverage in chemoradiation therapy for esophageal cancer is controversial. Given the improved ability to evaluate lymph node status before treatment via positron emission tomography (PET) and endoscopic ultrasound, we hypothesized that prophylactic celiac node irradiation may not be needed for patients with localized esophageal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the radiation treatment volumes for 131 patients who underwent definitive chemoradiation for esophageal cancer. Patients with celiac lymph node involvement at baseline were excluded. Median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy. The location of all celiac node failures was compared with the radiation treatment plan to determine whether the failures occurred within or outside the radiation treatment field. Results: At a median follow-up time of 52.6 months (95% CI 46.1-56.7 months), 6 of 60 patients (10%) without celiac node coverage had celiac nodal failure; in 5 of these patients, the failures represented the first site of recurrence. Of the 71 patients who had celiac coverage, only 5 patients (7%) had celiac region relapse. In multivariate analyses, having a pretreatment-to-post-treatment change in standardized uptake value on PET >52% (odds ratio [OR] 0.198, p = 0.0327) and having failure in the clinical target volume (OR 10.72, p = 0.001) were associated with risk of celiac region relapse. Of those without celiac coverage, the 6 patients that later developed celiac failure had a worse median overall survival time compared with the other 54 patients who did not fail (median overall survival time: 16.5 months vs. 31.5 months, p = 0.041). Acute and late toxicities were similar in both groups. Conclusions: Although celiac lymph node failures occur in approximately 1 of 10 patients, the lack of effective salvage treatments and subsequent low morbidity may justify prophylactic treatment

  5. A practical and theoretical definition of very small field size for radiotherapy output factor measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles, P. H., E-mail: p.charles@qut.edu.au; Crowe, S. B.; Langton, C. M.; Trapp, J. V. [School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, GPO Box 2434, Brisbane, QLD 4001 (Australia); Cranmer-Sargison, G. [Department of Medical Physics, Saskatchewan Cancer Agency, 20 Campus Dr., Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7L 3P6, Canada and Academic Unit of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Leeds, 8.001 Worsley Building, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Thwaites, D. I. [Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Kairn, T. [School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, GPO Box 2434, Brisbane, QLD 4001, Australia and Premion, The Wesley Medical Centre, Suite 1, 40 Chasely St, Auchenflower, Brisbane, QLD 4066 (Australia); Knight, R. T. [Premion, The Wesley Medical Centre, Suite 1, 40 Chasely St, Auchenflower, Brisbane, QLD 4066 (Australia); Kenny, J. [The Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service, Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency, 619 Lower Plenty Road, Yallambie, VIC 3085, Australia and Radiation Oncology Queensland, St Andrew' s Toowoomba Hospital, Toowoomba, QLD 4350 (Australia)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: This work introduces the concept of very small field size. Output factor (OPF) measurements at these field sizes require extremely careful experimental methodology including the measurement of dosimetric field size at the same time as each OPF measurement. Two quantifiable scientific definitions of the threshold of very small field size are presented. Methods: A practical definition was established by quantifying the effect that a 1 mm error in field size or detector position had on OPFs and setting acceptable uncertainties on OPF at 1%. Alternatively, for a theoretical definition of very small field size, the OPFs were separated into additional factors to investigate the specific effects of lateral electronic disequilibrium, photon scatter in the phantom, and source occlusion. The dominant effect was established and formed the basis of a theoretical definition of very small fields. Each factor was obtained using Monte Carlo simulations of a Varian iX linear accelerator for various square field sizes of side length from 4 to 100 mm, using a nominal photon energy of 6 MV. Results: According to the practical definition established in this project, field sizes ≤15 mm were considered to be very small for 6 MV beams for maximal field size uncertainties of 1 mm. If the acceptable uncertainty in the OPF was increased from 1.0% to 2.0%, or field size uncertainties are 0.5 mm, field sizes ≤12 mm were considered to be very small. Lateral electronic disequilibrium in the phantom was the dominant cause of change in OPF at very small field sizes. Thus the theoretical definition of very small field size coincided to the field size at which lateral electronic disequilibrium clearly caused a greater change in OPF than any other effects. This was found to occur at field sizes ≤12 mm. Source occlusion also caused a large change in OPF for field sizes ≤8 mm. Based on the results of this study, field sizes ≤12 mm were considered to be theoretically very small for 6

  6. The survival outcome and patterns of failure in node positive endometrial cancer patients treated with surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy with curative intent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasooriyar, Chrishanthi; Bernshaw, David; Kondalsamy-Chennakesavan, Srinivas; Mileshkin, Linda; Narayan, Kailash

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the patterns of failure, overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS) and factors influencing outcome in endometrial cancer patients who presented with metastatic lymph nodes and were treated with curative intent. One hundred and twenty-six patients treated between January 1996 to December 2008 with surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy were identified from our service's prospective database. Radiotherapy consisted of 45 Gy in 1.8 Gy fractions to the whole pelvis. The involved nodal sites were boosted to a total dose of 50.4 to 54 Gy. The 5-year OS rate was 61% and the 5-year DFS rate was 59%. Grade 3 endometrioid, serous, and clear cell histologies and involvement of upper para-aortic nodes had lower OS and DFS. The number of positive nodes did not influence survival. Among the histological groups, serous histology had the worst survival. Among the 54 patients relapsed, only three (6%) failed exclusively in the pelvis and the rest of the 94% failed in extrapelvic nodal or distant sites. Patients with grade 3 endometrioid, serous and clear cell histologies did not influence pelvic failure but had significant extrapelvic failures (pendometrial cancer patients fail at extrapelvic sites. The most important factors influencing survival and extrapelvic failure are grade 3 endometrioid, clear cell and serous histologies and involvement of upper para-aortic nodes.

  7. Radiotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Specht, Lena [Rigshospitalet Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Depts. of Oncology and Haematology; Yahalom, Joachim (eds.) [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2011-07-01

    This book deals in detail with all aspects of the best practice in modern radiotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma. It provides the background and rationale for the inclusion of radiotherapy in today's combined-modality approach, including special clinical situations such as Hodgkin lymphoma in children, in the pregnant patient, and in the elderly. Radiotherapy planning using state-of-the-art imaging, target definition, planning software, and treatment equipment is expounded in detail. Acute and long-term side effects of radiotherapy are analyzed, and the implications for modern radiotherapy approaches in Hodgkin lymphomas are explained. (orig.)

  8. Dosimetric study of volumetric arc modulation with RapidArc and intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with cervical cancer and comparison with 3-dimensional conformal technique for definitive radiotherapy in patients with cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guy, Jean-Baptiste [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut de Cancérologie de la Loire Lucien Neuwirth, Saint-Priest en Jarez (France); Falk, Alexander T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France); Auberdiac, Pierre [Department of Radiation Oncology, Clinique Claude Bernard, Albi (France); Cartier, Lysian; Vallard, Alexis [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut de Cancérologie de la Loire Lucien Neuwirth, Saint-Priest en Jarez (France); Ollier, Edouard [Department of Pharmacology-Toxicology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Saint-Etienne, Saint-Priest en Jarez (France); Trone, Jane-Chloé; Khodri, Moustapha [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut de Cancérologie de la Loire Lucien Neuwirth, Saint-Priest en Jarez (France); Chargari, Cyrus [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hôpital d’instruction de Armées du Val-de-Grâce, Paris (France); Magné, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.magne@icloire.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut de Cancérologie de la Loire Lucien Neuwirth, Saint-Priest en Jarez (France)

    2016-04-01

    Introduction: For patients with cervical cancer, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) improves target coverage and allows dose escalation while reducing the radiation dose to organs at risk (OARs). In this study, we compared dosimetric parameters among 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), “step-and-shoot” IMRT, and volumetric intensity-modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) in a series of patients with cervical cancer receiving definitive radiotherapy. Computed tomography (CT) scans of 10 patients with histologically proven cervical cancer treated with definitive radiation therapy (RT) from December 2008 to March 2010 at our department were selected for this study. The gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) were delineated following the guidelines of the Gyn IMRT consortium that included cervix, uterus, parametrial tissues, and the pelvic nodes including presacral. The median age was 57 years (range: 30 to 85 years). All 10 patients had squamous cell carcinoma with Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IB-IIIB. All patients were treated by VMAT. OAR doses were significantly reduced for plans with intensity-modulated technique compared with 3D-CRT except for the dose to the vagina. Between the 2 intensity-modulated techniques, significant difference was observed for the mean dose to the small intestine, to the benefit of VMAT (p < 0.001). There was no improvement in terms of OARs sparing for VMAT although there was a tendency for a slightly decreased average dose to the rectum: − 0.65 Gy but not significant (p = 0.07). The intensity modulation techniques have many advantages in terms of quality indexes, and particularly OAR sparing, compared with 3D-CRT. Following the ongoing technologic developments in modern radiotherapy, it is essential to evaluate the intensity-modulated techniques on prospective studies of a larger scale.

  9. Biochemical failure as single abnormality in patients with prostate cancer following radical treatment with external radiotherapy: follow-up without immediate treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio L. Faria

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Biochemical failure has been defined as 3 consecutive increases in PSA following curative treatment of prostate cancer. The appropriate management in such cases is controversial. The most usual treatment has been early introduction of hormones. Such patients will live for many years and hormone therapy causes important secondary effects and increases costs. The guideline in our Department of Radiotherapy has been to follow up, with no initial therapy, cases with low PSA and short PSA doubling time. The present study reports this experience. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 528 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated by radical approach between 1992 and 1999, with external radiotherapy, with or without adjuvant hormone therapy. After a median follow-up of 77 months, there were 207 (39% cases with biochemical failure, 78 of which were followed without therapy after the identification of biochemical failure. All of them were asymptomatic patients and had negative radiographic examinations or did not have imaging exams requested since they presented a favorable outcome. The follow-up included at least 2 annual visits with physical examination and PSA. RESULTS: Of the 78 patients with biochemical failure followed without initial therapy, 7 died from other causes than prostate cancer and the remaining 71 cases were alive and asymptomatic in the last follow-up. Prognostic factors previous to radiotherapy such as stage and Gleason score were not considered when deciding for follow-up without initial therapy in these cases. The most significant aspects considered for this decision were low PSA value (median PSA on the last visit for the 78 cases was only 3.9 ng/mL and a slow PSA doubling time (in the present experience the median PSA doubling time was 22.5 months. CONCLUSION: There seems to be space for expectant management, without initial hormone therapy, in patients with prostate cancer who present biochemical failure and are

  10. Intensity modulated radiotherapy for high risk prostate cancer based on sentinel node SPECT imaging for target volume definition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasiadis Aristotelis

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The RTOG 94-13 trial has provided evidence that patients with high risk prostate cancer benefit from an additional radiotherapy to the pelvic nodes combined with concomitant hormonal ablation. Since lymphatic drainage of the prostate is highly variable, the optimal target volume definition for the pelvic lymph nodes is problematic. To overcome this limitation, we tested the feasibility of an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT protocol, taking under consideration the individual pelvic sentinel node drainage pattern by SPECT functional imaging. Methods Patients with high risk prostate cancer were included. Sentinel nodes (SN were localised 1.5–3 hours after injection of 250 MBq 99mTc-Nanocoll using a double-headed gamma camera with an integrated X-Ray device. All sentinel node localisations were included into the pelvic clinical target volume (CTV. Dose prescriptions were 50.4 Gy (5 × 1.8 Gy / week to the pelvis and 70.0 Gy (5 × 2.0 Gy / week to the prostate including the base of seminal vesicles or whole seminal vesicles. Patients were treated with IMRT. Furthermore a theoretical comparison between IMRT and a three-dimensional conformal technique was performed. Results Since 08/2003 6 patients were treated with this protocol. All patients had detectable sentinel lymph nodes (total 29. 4 of 6 patients showed sentinel node localisations (total 10, that would not have been treated adequately with CT-based planning ('geographical miss' only. The most common localisation for a probable geographical miss was the perirectal area. The comparison between dose-volume-histograms of IMRT- and conventional CT-planning demonstrated clear superiority of IMRT when all sentinel lymph nodes were included. IMRT allowed a significantly better sparing of normal tissue and reduced volumes of small bowel, large bowel and rectum irradiated with critical doses. No gastrointestinal or genitourinary acute toxicity Grade 3 or 4 (RTOG

  11. The morpho-PET with {sup 18}F-F.D.G. improves the definition of the target volume for the radiotherapy of child Hodgkin disease; Le morpho-TEP au 18F-FDG ameliore la definition du volume cible pour la radiotherapie des maladies de Hodgkin de l'enfant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metwally, H.; Courbon, F.; David, I.; Blouet, A.; Izar, F.; Rives, M.; Filleron, T.; Vial, J.; Laprie, A. [Institut Claudius-Regaud, Toulouse, (France); Robert, A. [CHU Toulouse, (France)

    2009-05-15

    The objective is to study the impact of PET-T.D.M. images re-timing before chemotherapy with these ones of dosimetric scanner ( post chemotherapy) on the target volume determination and their inter observers variability among children receiving a closing radiotherapy for a Hodgkin disease. Conclusions: the inter observers variability for the clinical target volume (C.T.V.) definition is significantly reduced by the re-timing of initial PET-T.D.M. images on the ballistic scanner. This study illustrates the interest of the multidisciplinary cooperation between nuclear doctor and radiotherapist for the radiotherapy optimization. (N.C.)

  12. Impact of histological subtype on survival in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer that were treated with definitive radiotherapy: adenocarcinoma/adenosquamous carcinoma versus squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Hiromasa; Kimura, Tadashi

    2017-01-01

    Objective To compare the survival outcomes of patients with cervical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and adenocarcinoma/adenosquamous carcinoma (AC/ASC) among patients with locally advanced cervical cancer that were treated with definitive radiotherapy. Methods The baseline characteristics and outcome data of patients with locally advanced cervical cancer who were treated with definitive radiotherapy between November 1993 and February 2014 were collected and retrospectively reviewed. A Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to investigate the prognostic significance of AC/ASC histology. Results The patients with AC/ASC of the cervix exhibited significantly shorter overall survival (OS) (p=0.004) and progression-free survival (PFS) (p=0.002) than the patients with SCC of the cervix. Multivariate analysis showed that AC/ASC histology was an independent negative prognostic factor for PFS. Among the patients who displayed AC/ASC histology, larger tumor size, older age, and incomplete response to radiotherapy were found to be independent prognostic factors. PFS was inversely associated with the number of poor prognostic factors the patients exhibited (the estimated 1-year PFS rates; 100.0%, 77.8%, 42.8%, 0.0% for 0, 1, 2, 3 factors, respectively). Conclusion Locally advanced cervical cancer patients with AC/ASC histology experience significantly worse survival outcomes than those with SCC. Further clinical studies are warranted to develop a concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) protocol that is specifically tailored to locally advanced cervical AC/ASC. PMID:28028992

  13. Italian survey in postoperative radiation therapy for prostate carcinoma by the AIRO National Working Group on Prostate Radiotherapy: definitive results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinverni, Giuseppe; Greco, Carlo; Bianchi, Pieromaria; Busutti, Luciano; Cagna, Emanuela; Cozzarini, Cesare; Del Duca, Massimo; Franzone, Paola; Frezza, Giovanni; Gabriele, Pietro; Genovesi, Domenico; Girelli, Giuseppe Franco; Italia, Corrado; Mandoliti, Giovanni; Mauro, Floranna; Nava, Simonetta; Pratissoli, Silvia; Saracino, Maria Bianca; Squillace, Luigi; Signor, Marco; Tagliagambe, Angiolo; Vavassori, Vittorio; Villa, Sergio; Zini, Giampaolo; Valdagni, Riccardo

    2005-01-01

    The National Working Group on Prostate Radiotherapy of AIRO (Associazione Italiana Radioterapia Oncologica, Italian Association of Radiotherapeutic Oncology) was established in March 2001. A retrospective multi-center survey was performed to analyze the patterns of care for prostate cancer patients treated with postoperative radiotherapy following radical prostatectomy in Italy with regard to the year 2000. A structured questionnaire was mailed to 47 Italian radiotherapy centers to assess patient accrual in the postoperative setting in the interval comprised between period January-December 2000. Numbers of patients treated for different stages, specific prognostic factors indicating the need for adjuvant radiotherapy, fractionation schedules and prescription doses were acquired as well as other clinically important factors such as radiotherapy timing and the use of hormone therapy. More technical features of the treatment, such as patient positioning, mode of simulation, typical field setup and dose prescription criteria were also included in the questionnaire. The questionnaire was returned by 24 radiotherapy Institutions (51%) with a total number of 470 patients treated postoperatively in the year 2000. An average of about 20 patients were enrolled by each radiotherapy center. The age range was 45-81 years. Radiotherapy was delivered within 6 months of radical prostatectomy in 297 patients (65.4%) (mean, 3.4 months). In 157 (34.6%), the treatment was delivered as a salvage approach for biochemical or micro-macroscopic recurrence. Most of patients had locally advanced stage disease (pT3-pT4) (76%). Unfavorable prognostic factors, such as positive margins, capsular invasion, Gleason pattern score > 7 were present in about 50% of patients. The study confirmed that important risk factors for recurrences are present in a significant percentage of patients treated by radical prostatectomy. The number of patients that would benefit from adjuvant radiotherapy is

  14. Predictors of acute toxicities during definitive chemoradiation using intensity-modulated radiotherapy for anal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julie, Diana A R; Oh, Jung Hun; Apte, Aditya P; Deasy, Joseph O; Tom, Ashlyn; Wu, Abraham J; Goodman, Karyn A

    2016-01-01

    To identify clinical and dosimetric factors associated with acute hematologic and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities during definitive therapy using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for anal squamous cell carcinoma (ASCC). We retrospectively analyzed 108 ASCC patients treated with IMRT. Clinical information included age, gender, stage, concurrent chemotherapy, mitomycin (MMC) chemotherapy and weekly hematologic and GI toxicity during IMRT. From contours of the bony pelvis and bowel, dose-volume parameters were extracted. Logistic regression models were used to test associations between toxicities and clinical or dosimetric predictors. The median age was 59 years, 81 patients were women and 84 patients received concurrent MMC and 5-fluorouracil (5FU). On multivariate analysis (MVA), the model most predictive of Grade 2 + anemia included the maximum bony pelvis dose (Dmax), female gender, and T stage [p = 0.035, cross validation area under the curve (cvAUC) = 0.66]. The strongest model of Grade 2 + leukopenia included V10 (percentage of pelvic bone volume receiving ≥ 10 Gy) and number of MMC cycles (p = 0.276, cvAUC = 0.57). The model including MMC cycle number and T stage correlated best with Grade 2 + neutropenia (p = 0.306, cvAUC = 0.57). The model predictive of combined Grade 2 + hematologic toxicity (HT) included V10 and T stage (p = 0.016, cvAUC = 0.66). A model including VA45 (absolute bowel volume receiving ≥ 45 Gy) and MOH5 (mean dose to hottest 5% of bowel volume) best predicted diarrhea (p = 0.517, cvAUC = 0.56). Dosimetric constraints to the pelvic bones should be integrated into IMRT planning to reduce toxicity, potentially reducing treatment interruptions and improving disease outcomes in ASCC. Specifically, our results indicate that Dmax should be confined to ≤ 57 Gy to minimize anemia and that V10 should be restricted to ≤ 87% to reduce incidence of all HT.

  15. Interobserver comparison of CT and MRI-based prostate apex definition. Clinical relevance for conformal radiotherapy treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachter, S.; Wachter-Gerstner, N.; Goldner, G.; Poetter, R. [University Hospital Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiobiology; Bock, T. [University Hospital Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiobiology; University Hospital Kiel (Germany). Interdisziplinary Center of Brachytherapy; Kovacs, G. [University Hospital Kiel (Germany). Interdisziplinary Center of Brachytherapy; Fransson, A. [University Hospital Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiobiology; Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Hospital

    2002-05-01

    Background: CT is widely used for conformal radiotherapy treatment planning of prostate carcinoma. Its limitations are especially at the prostatic apex which cannot be separated from the urogenital diaphragm. The aim of this study was to compare the localization of the prostatic apex in CT and axial MRI to the sagittal MRI in an interobserver analysis. Patients and Methods: 22 patients with pathologically proven prostatic carcinoma were included in the analysis. In all patients sagittal and axial T2-weighted MRI and conventional CT were performed. The position of the MRI and CT apices were localized independently by three observers in relation to the intertrochanteric line. Additional subjective judgement of the ability to define the apical border of the prostatic gland was performed by a five-scaled score. Results: The apex of the prostate could be discriminated statistically significant (p<0.001) better in the MRI as compared to CT with best judgement for the sagittal MRI. The interobserver variation for the definition of the prostatic apex was statistically significant (p=0.009) smaller for the sagittal MRI compared to axial MRI and CT. On the average the apex as determined by sagittal MRI, axial MRI and CT was located 29 mm, 27 mm and 24 mm above the intertrochanteric line. The apex defined by CT would have led to an additional treatment of 6-13 mm in 10/22 patients compared to the sagittal MRI, defined by axial MRI only in five patients. Conclusion: Additional MRI provides a superior anatomic information especially in the apical portion of the prostate. It should be recommended for every single patient in the treatment planning process. It helps to avoid an unnecessary irradiation of healthy tissue and could lead to a decrease of anal side effects and radiation-induced impotency due to a reduction of the extent of irradiated penile structures. (orig.)

  16. Radiotherapy for PSA failure after prostatectomy: which volumes?; Radiotherapie pelvienne pour recidive biochimique isolee apres prostatectomie pour cancer de prostate: quels volumes?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosset, M.; Maingon, P. [Centre Georges-Francois-Leclerc, Service de Radiotherapie, 21 - Dijon (France); Bosset, J.F. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Jean Minjoz, Service de Radiotherapie, 25 - Besancon (France)

    2006-05-15

    After prostatectomy, radiotherapy is a potential curable treatment. From the surgery series, it is possible to identify all the localization at risk in case of biochemical relapse after prostatectomy. The target volume of irradiation has to be defined according to the pathological findings. The CTV is limited to the pelvic fascia laterally, to the anterior wall of the rectum behind. The inferior limit includes the anastomosis, and the superior is easier to define with the length of the prostatic gland. The inclusion of area of seminal vesicles and pelvic node areas should be discussed. The use of surgical clips on the anastomosis and image fusion techniques including the preoperative imaging would help physicians to define the CTV's limits. (authors)

  17. A Single-Center, Adult Chronic Intestinal Failure Cohort Analyzed According to the ESPEN-Endorsed Recommendations, Definitions, and Classifications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Christopher Filtenborg; Tribler, Siri; Hvistendahl, Mark

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: The objective of this study was to describe a clinically well-defined, single-center, intestinal failure (IF) cohort based on a template of definitions and classifications endorsed by the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN). METHODS: A cross-sectional, ......BACKGROUND/AIMS: The objective of this study was to describe a clinically well-defined, single-center, intestinal failure (IF) cohort based on a template of definitions and classifications endorsed by the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN). METHODS: A cross...

  18. Salvage surgery for local failures after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for early stage non-small cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Verstegen (Naomi); A.W.P.M. Maat (Alex); F.J. Lagerwaard (Frank); M.A. Paul (Marinus); M. Versteegh (Michel); J.J. Joosten (Joris); W. Lastdrager (Willem); E.F. Smit (Egbert); B.J. Slotman (Ben); J.J.M.E. Nuyttens (Joost); S. Senan (Suresh)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstract__Introduction:__ The literature on surgical salvage, i.e. lung resections in patients who develop a local recurrence following stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), is limited. We describe our experience with salvage surgery in nine patients who developed a local recurrence

  19. SU-E-J-39: Dosimetric Benefit of Implanted Marker-Based CBCT Setup for Definitive Prostatic Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhen, H; Wu, Z; Bluemenfeld, P; Chu, J; Wang, D [Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose Daily setup for definitive prostatic radiotherapy is challenged by suboptimal visibility of the prostate boundary and daily variation of rectum shape and position. For patients with improved bowel preparation, we conducted a dosimetric comparison between prostate implanted marker (IM)-based daily setup and anterior rectal wall (ARW)-based setup, with the hypothesis that the former leads to adequate target coverage with better rectal sparing. Methods Five IMRT/VMAT prostate cases with implanted markers were selected for analysis. Daily CBCT showed improvement of the rectal volume compared to planning CT. For each patient, the prostate and rectum were contoured on three CBCT images (fraction 5/15/25) with subsequent physician review. The CBCTs were then registered to a planning CT using IM-based registration. The deviation of ARW positions from planning CT to CBCT were analyzed at various sup-inf levels (−1.8 cm to 1.8 cm from level of prostate center). To estimate the potential dosimetric impact from ARW-based setup, the treatment plans were recalculated using A-P shifts ranging from −1mm to +6mm. Clinically important rectum DVH values including Dmax, D3cc and Dmean were computed. Results For the studied patients, we observed on average 32% rectum volume reduction from planning CT to CBCT. As a Results, the ARW on average shifts posteriorly by −1mm to +5mm, depending on the sup-inf level of observation, with larger shifts observed at more superior levels. Recalculation shows that when ARW shifts 1mm posteriorly, ARW-based CBCT setup leads to a 1.0%, 4.2%, and 3.2% increase in rectum Dmax, D3cc, and Dmean, respectively, compared to IM-based setup. The dosimetric deviations increase to 4.7%, 25.8% and 24.7% when ARW shifts 6mm posteriorly. No significant prostate-only dose difference was observed. Conclusion For patients with improved bowel preparation, IM-based CBCT setup leads to accurate prostate coverage along with significantly lower rectal dose

  20. Patterns of failure after radical surgery among patients with thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: implications for the clinical target volume design of postoperative radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study evaluated patterns of treatment failure (especially locoregional failure; LRF after radical esophagectomy and proposes a clinical target volume (CTV for postoperative radiotherapy (PORT among patients with thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC. METHODS: All patients who were followed up in our center after radical esophagectomy between 2007 and 2011 were retrospectively enrolled. The patterns of first discovered failure were assessed, and LRFs (including anastomotic and regional lymph node recurrences were evaluated to determine whether our proposed PORT CTV encompassed these areas. The clinicopathologic factors predictive of lymphatic recurrence type were analyzed. RESULTS: Of the 414 patients who underwent surgery and were followed up over the study, 207 experienced recurrent or metastatic diseases. The median time to progression was 11.0 months. Of the 173 patients with locoregional recurrence, nodal failure recurred in 160; supraclavicular and superior mediastinal lymph nodes had the highest metastasis rates. All 233 recurrent sites across the 160 patients were located in a standard CTV area, including the bilateral supraclavicular areas, the entire mediastinum, and the left gastric lymphatic drainage region. A total of 203 sites (87.2% were located in either the bilateral supraclavicular areas or the entire mediastinum, and 185 sites (79.4% were located in either the bilateral supraclavicular areas or the upper mediastinum. A multivariate analysis revealed the lymph node metastatic ratio (LNMR and tumor differentiation were risk factors for nodal failure. CONCLUSIONS: Locoregional recurrence (especially lymph node recurrence was the most common and potentially preventable type of initial treatment failure after curative surgery among patients with thoracic esophageal SCC. The proposed PORT CTV covered most LRF sites. The lymphatic drainage regions for PORT are selective, and the supraclavicular and superior

  1. Pretreatment nutritional status and locoregional failure of patients with head and neck cancer undergoing definitive concurrent chemoradiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platek, Mary E; Reid, Mary E; Wilding, Gregory E; Jaggernauth, Wainwright; Rigual, Nestor R; Hicks, Wesley L; Popat, Saurin R; Warren, Graham W; Sullivan, Maureen; Thorstad, Wade L; Khan, Mohamed K; Loree, Thom R; Singh, Anurag K

    2011-11-01

    This study was carried out to determine if markers of nutritional status predict for locoregional failure following intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). We performed a retrospective chart review of 78 patients with SCCHN who received definitive CCRT. We compared patient factors, tumor characteristics, and nutritional status indicators between patients with and without locoregional failure. Fifteen of 78 patients (19%) experienced locoregional failure. Median follow-up for live patients was 38 months. On univariate analysis, pretreatment percentage of ideal body weight (%IBW) (p cancer undergoing definitive CCRT based on pretreatment %IBW should be examined further. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. PRETREATMENT NUTRITIONAL STATUS AND LOCOREGIONAL FAILURE IN PATIENTS WITH HEAD AND NECK CANCER UNDERGOING DEFINITIVE CONCURRENT CHEMORADIATION THERAPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platek, Mary E.; Reid, Mary E.; Wilding, Gregory E.; Jaggernauth, Wainwright; Rigual, Nestor R.; Hicks, Wesley L.; Popat, Saurin R.; Warren, Graham W.; Sullivan, Maureen; Thorstad, Wade L.; Khan, Mohamed K.; Loree, Thom R.; Singh, Anurag K.

    2015-01-01

    Background This study was carried out to determine if markers of nutritional status predict for locoregional failure following intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Methods We performed a retrospective chart review of 78 patients with SCCHN who received definitive CCRT. We compared patient factors, tumor characteristics, and nutritional status indicators between patients with and without locoregional failure. Results Fifteen of 78 patients (19%) experienced locoregional failure. Median follow-up for live patients was 38 months. On univariate analysis, pretreatment percentage of ideal body weight (%IBW) (p cancer undergoing definitive CCRT based on pre-treatment %IBW should be examined further. PMID:21990220

  3. Long-term results of ipsilateral radiotherapy for tonsil cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Tae Ryoolk; Wu, Hong Gyun [Dept. of Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    We evaluated the effectiveness and safety of ipsilateral radiotherapy for the patient with well lateralized tonsil cancer: not cross midline and <1 cm of tumor invasion into the soft palate or base of tongue. From 2003 to 2011, twenty patients with well lateralized tonsil cancer underwent ipsilateral radiotherapy. Nineteen patients had T1-T2 tumors, and one patient had T3 tumor; twelve patients had N0-N2a disease and eight patients had N2b disease. Primary surgery followed by radiotherapy was performed in fourteen patients: four of these patients received chemotherapy. Four patients underwent induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). The remaining two patients received induction chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy and definitive CCRT, respectively. No patient underwent radiotherapy alone. We analyzed the pattern of failure and complications. The median follow-up time was 64 months (range, 11 to 106 months) for surviving patients. One patient had local failure at tumor bed. There was no regional failure in contralateral neck, even in N2b disease. At five-year, local progression-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, and progression-free survival rates were 95%, 100%, and 95%, respectively. One patient with treatment failure died, and the five-year overall survival rate was 95%. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade 2 xerostomia was found in one patient at least 6 months after the completion of radiotherapy. Ipsilateral radiotherapy is a reasonable treatment option for well lateralized tonsil cancer. Low rate of chronic xerostomia can be expected by sparing contralateral major salivary glands.

  4. Four and five dimensional radiotherapy with reference to prostate cancer - definitions, state of the art and further directions - an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lennernaes, Bo (Dept. of Oncology, Sahlgrenska Hospital and Academy, Univ. of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden)), e-mail: bo.lennernas@telia.com; Castellanos, Enrique; Nilsson, Sten; Levitt, Seymour (Dept. of Oncology/Pathology, Karolinska Univ. Hospital and Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2011-06-15

    Radiotherapy (RT) always requires a compromise between tumor control and normal tissue side-effects. Technical innovation in radiation therapy (RT), such as three dimensional RT, is now established. Concerning prostate cancer (PC), it is reasonable to assume that RT of PC will increase in the future. The combination of small margins, a movable target (prostate), few fractions and high doses will probably demand dynamically positioning systems and in real time. This is called four dimensional radiotherapy (4DRT). Moreover, biological factors must be included in new treatments such as hypofractionation schedules. This new era is called five dimensional radiotherapy, 5DRT. In this paper we discuss new concepts in RT in respect to PC

  5. The Impact of Extent and Location of Mediastinal Lymph Node Involvement on Survival in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With Definitive Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Annemarie T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Mitra, Nandita [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Xanthopoulos, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Evans, Tracey; Stevenson, James; Langer, Corey [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Kucharczuk, John C. [Department of Thoracic Surgery, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Lin, Lilie; Rengan, Ramesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Several surgical series have identified subcarinal, contralateral, and multilevel nodal involvement as predictors of poor overall survival in patients with Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with definitive resection. This retrospective study evaluates the impact of extent and location of mediastinal lymph node (LN) involvement on survival in patients with Stage III NSCLC treated with definitive radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 106 consecutive patients with T1-4 N2-3 Stage III NSCLC treated with definitive radiotherapy at University of Pennsylvania between January 2003 and February 2009. For this analysis, mediastinal LN stations were divided into four mutually exclusive groups: supraclavicular, ipsilateral mediastinum, contralateral mediastinum, and subcarinal. Patients' conditions were then analyzed according to the extent of involvement and location of mediastinal LN stations. Results: The majority (88%) of patients received sequential or concurrent chemotherapy. The median follow-up time for survivors was 32.6 months. By multivariable Cox modeling, chemotherapy use (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.21 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.07-0.63]) was associated with improved overall survival. Increasing primary tumor [18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose avidity (HR: 1.11 [CI: 1.06-1.19]), and subcarinal involvement (HR: 2.29 [CI: 1.11-4.73]) were significant negative predictors of overall survival. On univariate analysis, contralateral nodal involvement (HR: 0.70 [CI: 0.33-1.47]), supraclavicular nodal involvement (HR: 0.78 [CI: 0.38-1.67]), multilevel nodal involvement (HR: 0.97 [CI: 0.58-1.61]), and tumor size (HR: 1.04 [CI: 0.94-1.14]) did not predict for overall survival. Patients with subcarinal involvement also had lower rates of 2-year nodal control (51.2% vs. 74.9%, p = 0.047) and 2-year distant control (28.4% vs. 61.2%, p = 0.043). Conclusions: These data suggest that the factors that determine oncologic outcome in Stage III

  6. Low-dose external beam radiotherapy for greater trochanteric pain syndrome. Target volume definition and treatment outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaltenborn, Alexander [Federal Armed Forces Hospital Westerstede, Department of Orthopedic and Trauma Surgery, Westerstede (Germany); Hannover Medical School, Core Facility Quality Management and Health Technology Assessment in Transplantation, Integrated Research and Treatment Center Transplantation (IFB-Tx), Hannover (Germany); Carl, Ulrich Martin; Hinsche, Tanja [Center for Radiotherapy and Radiooncology Bremen and Westerstede, Westerstede (Germany); Nitsche, Mirko [Center for Radiotherapy and Radiooncology Bremen and Westerstede, Westerstede (Germany); University of Schleswig Holstein, Campus Kiel, Department of Radiotherapy, Karl-Lennert Cancer Center, Kiel (Germany); Hermann, Robert Michael [Center for Radiotherapy and Radiooncology Bremen and Westerstede, Westerstede (Germany); Hannover Medical School, Department of Radiotherapy and Special Oncology, Hannover (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    Low-dose external beam radiotherapy (ED-EBRT) is frequently used in the therapy of refractory greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS). As studies reporting treatment results are scarce, we retrospectively analyzed our own patient collectives. In all, 60 patients (74 hips) received LD-EBRT (6 x 0.5 Gy in 29 hips, 6 x 1 Gy in 45). The endpoint was the patient's reported subjective response to treatment. The influence of different patient and treatment characteristics on treatment outcome was investigated. At the end of LD-EBRT, 69% reported partial remission, 4% complete remission, no change 28%. A total of 3 months later (n = 52 hips), the results were 37, 33, and 30% and 18 months after LD-EBRT (n = 47) 21, 51, and 28%. In univariate analysis ''inclusion of the total femoral head into the PTV'' and ''night pain before LD-EBRT'' were correlated with symptom remission at the end of LD-EBRT, while ''initial increase in pain during LD-EBRT'' was significantly associated with treatment failure. In multivariable modeling ''initial increase in pain'' was identified as a risk factor for treatment failure (p = 0.007; odds ratio [OR] 0.209; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.048-0.957), while ''night pain'' was an independent factor for remission (p = 0.038; OR 3.484; 95% CI 1.004-12.6). Three months after LD-EBRT ''night pain'' and ''inclusion of the complete femoral neck circumference into the PTV'' were predictive for remission. LD-EBRT represents a useful treatment option for patients suffering from GTPS. Three months after therapy two-thirds of the patients reported a partial or complete symptom remission. Especially patients who suffered from nocturnal pain seemed to benefit. Treatment appeared to be more effective when the entire circumference of the femoral neck was encompassed. (orig.) [German] In der Behandlung des

  7. Palladium interstitial implant in combination with external beam radiotherapy and chemotherapy for the definitive treatment of a female urethral carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilary P. Bagshaw

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Primary urethral cancer is a rare diagnosis, especially in females. This report presents the utilization of a palladium interstitial implant and a review of the retrospective data published on the management of female urethral cancer. Excellent local control and survival has been obtained with the use of a palladium interstitial implant in combination with external beam radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy. This modality represents a novel and effective way to treat primary urethral cancer in females.

  8. Research on Postoperative Radiotherapy for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer of Stage IIIA (N2 according to the Failure Patterns after Pulmonary Resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiyan QIN

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Postoperative radiotherapy (PORT after complete resection of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC has been introduced in order to reduce locoregional recurrence, but it remains controversy whether PORT can improve survival. Therefore, we want to investigate the effect of PORT and the relationship between failure patterns and primarily location of stage IIIA (N2 in NSCLC. Methods This retrospective analysis included 233 patients who underwent resection of NSCLC, first recurrence involving a local-regional site. It illustrated the factors affecting local recurrence and the sites of failure on the basis of lobe of primary tumor. Results Multivariable analysis demonstrated the number of positive lymph nodes (P=0.003, T stage (P<0.001, histological type (P=0.038, modus operandi (P=0.013 and the number of mediastinal lymph node stations involved (P=0.018 were the independent factors. For all patients, the most common site of failure was the bronchial stump/staple line, which was present more often in those who had a wedge resection than in those who had a more radical procedure (P<0.001. The local-region frequency of squamous was higher than adenocarcinoma carcinoma (P=0.025. The recurrence frequency of mediastinal lymph node among T1 and T2-3 were 36.4%, 62.0% (P=0.009 respectively. The localregion recurrence among primarily tumor location were different. Conclusion The number of positive lymph nodes, T stage, histological type, modus operations and the number of mediastinal lymph node stations involved were the independent factors in IIIA (N2 NSCLC.

  9. MO-D-213-02: Quality Improvement Through a Failure Mode and Effects Analysis of Pediatric External Beam Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, J; Lukose, R; Bronson, J; Chandler, B; Merchant, T; Farr, J [St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To conduct a failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) as per AAPM Task Group 100 on clinical processes associated with teletherapy, and the development of mitigations for processes with identified high risk. Methods: A FMEA was conducted on clinical processes relating to teletherapy treatment plan development and delivery. Nine major processes were identified for analysis. These steps included CT simulation, data transfer, image registration and segmentation, treatment planning, plan approval and preparation, and initial and subsequent treatments. Process tree mapping was utilized to identify the steps contained within each process. Failure modes (FM) were identified and evaluated with a scale of 1–10 based upon three metrics: the severity of the effect, the probability of occurrence, and the detectability of the cause. The analyzed metrics were scored as follows: severity – no harm = 1, lethal = 10; probability – not likely = 1, certainty = 10; detectability – always detected = 1, undetectable = 10. The three metrics were combined multiplicatively to determine the risk priority number (RPN) which defined the overall score for each FM and the order in which process modifications should be deployed. Results: Eighty-nine procedural steps were identified with 186 FM accompanied by 193 failure effects with 213 potential causes. Eighty-one of the FM were scored with a RPN > 10, and mitigations were developed for FM with RPN values exceeding ten. The initial treatment had the most FM (16) requiring mitigation development followed closely by treatment planning, segmentation, and plan preparation with fourteen each. The maximum RPN was 400 and involved target delineation. Conclusion: The FMEA process proved extremely useful in identifying previously unforeseen risks. New methods were developed and implemented for risk mitigation and error prevention. Similar to findings reported for adult patients, the process leading to the initial treatment has an

  10. [Radiotherapy in cancers of the oesophagus, the gastric cardia and the stomach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Créhange, G; Huguet, F; Quero, L; N'Guyen, T V; Mirabel, X; Lacornerie, T

    2016-09-01

    Localized oesophageal and gastric cancers have a poor prognosis. In oesophageal cancer, external radiotherapy combined with concomitant chemotherapy is accepted as part of the therapeutic armamentarium in a curative intent in the preoperative setting for resectable tumours; or without surgery in inoperable patients or non-resectable tumours due to wide local and/or regional extension. Data from the literature show conflicting results with no clinical evidence in favour of either a unique dose protocol or consensual target volume definition in the setting of exclusive chemoradiation. In the preoperative setting, chemoradiotherapy has become the standard in oesophageal cancer, even though there is no evidence that surgery may be beneficial in locally advanced tumours that respond to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The main cause of failure after exclusive chemoradiotherapy in oesophageal cancer is locoregional relapse suggesting that doses and volumes usually considered may be inadequate. In gastric cancer, radiotherapy may be indicated postoperatively in patients with resected tumours that include less than D2 lymph node dissection or in the absence of perioperative chemotherapy. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy in gastric cancers is still under investigation. The evolving techniques of external radiotherapy, such as image-guided radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arctherapy (VMAT) have reduced the volume of lung and heart exposed to radiation, which seems to have diminished radiotherapy-related morbi-mortality rates. Given this, quality assurance for radiotherapy and protocols for radiotherapy delivery must be better standardized. This article on the indications for radiotherapy and the techniques used in oesophageal and gastric cancers is included in a special issue dedicated to national recommendations from the French society of radiation oncology (SFRO) on radiotherapy indications, planning, dose prescription, and techniques of radiotherapy delivery.

  11. Acute-on-chronic and Decompensated Chronic Liver Failure: Definitions, Epidemiology, and Prognostication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Jody C

    2016-07-01

    Chronic liver disease is the fifth leading cause of death worldwide and represents a major burden for the health care community. Cirrhosis is a progressive disease resulting in end-stage liver failure, which in the absence of liver transplantation is fatal. Acute-on-chronic liver failure carries high short-term mortality but is potentially reversible. Viral hepatitis, alcohol, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease remain the principal causes of liver disease. Though treatments exist for hepatitis B and C, they remain unavailable to many with these diseases. This article reviews the epidemiology of advanced liver disease and the concept of acute-on-chronic liver failure.

  12. Variations in target volume definition for postoperative radiotherapy in stage III non-small-cell lung cancer: analysis of an international contouring study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoelstra, Femke O B; Senan, Suresh; Le Péchoux, Cecile; Ishikura, Satoshi; Casas, Francesc; Ball, David; Price, Allan; De Ruysscher, Dirk; van Sörnsen de Koste, John R

    2010-03-15

    Postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) in patients with completely resected non-small-cell lung cancer with mediastinal involvement is controversial because of the failure of earlier trials to demonstrate a survival benefit. Improved techniques may reduce toxicity, but the treatment fields used in routine practice have not been well studied. We studied routine target volumes used by international experts and evaluated the impact of a contouring protocol developed for a new prospective study, the Lung Adjuvant Radiotherapy Trial (Lung ART). Seventeen thoracic radiation oncologists were invited to contour their routine clinical target volumes (CTV) for 2 representative patients using a validated CD-ROM-based contouring program. Subsequently, the Lung ART study protocol was provided, and both cases were contoured again. Variations in target volumes and their dosimetric impact were analyzed. Routine CTVs were received for each case from 10 clinicians, whereas six provided both routine and protocol CTVs for each case. Routine CTVs varied up to threefold between clinicians, but use of the Lung ART protocol significantly decreased variations. Routine CTVs in a postlobectomy patient resulted in V(20) values ranging from 12.7% to 54.0%, and Lung ART protocol CTVs resulted in values of 20.6% to 29.2%. Similar results were seen for other toxicity parameters and in the postpneumectomy patient. With the exception of upper paratracheal nodes, protocol contouring improved coverage of the required nodal stations. Even among experts, significant interclinician variations are observed in PORT fields. Inasmuch as contouring variations can confound the interpretation of PORT results, mandatory quality assurance procedures have been incorporated into the current Lung ART study. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Technological advances in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Milan; Vosmik; Jiri; Petera; Igor; Sirak; Miroslav; Hodek; Petr; Paluska; Jiri; Dolezal; Marcela; Kopacova

    2010-01-01

    Radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy and surgery represent the main treatment modalities in esophageal cancer.The goal of modern radiotherapy approaches,based on recent technological advances,is to minimize post-treatment complications by improving the gross tumor volume definition (positron emission tomography-based planning),reducing interfraction motion (image-guided radiotherapy) and intrafraction motion (respiratory-gated radiotherapy),and by better dose delivery to the precisely defined planning ...

  14. Small Business Failure Rates: Choice of Definition and the Size Effect

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    Results of many previous studies on the rate of small business failure suggest an inverse relationship between size of business and propensity to fail. However, it has been suggested that this inverse relationship, between firm size and the rate of discontinuance, may more accurately be characterized as an inverse relationship between age of business and the rate of discontinuance. While some studies have confirmed the positive association between failure and age, they have generally found th...

  15. Definitive (chemo)radiotherapy in patients with esophageal cancer : A population-based study in northeast Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Justin Kendrick; Muijs, Christina T.; Timmer, Paul R.; Paardekooper, Gabriel; Muller, Karin; Woutersen, Dankert; Mul, Veronique E.; Beukema, Jannet; Hospers, Geesiena; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Plukker, John Theodorus

    2012-01-01

    83 Background: Definitive (chemo)radiation as primary treatment modality is offered to esophageal cancer (EC) patients, as an alternative for patients considered medically unfit for surgery or having irresectable tumors. We evaluated the results in our cohort to improve selection of patients for int

  16. Three linked nomograms for predicting biochemical failure in prostate cancer treated with radiotherapy plus androgen deprivation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Torrecilla, Jose [Hospital General Universitario, Servicio Oncologia Radioterapica- ERESA, Valencia (Spain); Boladeras, Anna [Institut Catala d' Oncologia, S.Oncologia Radioterapica, Hospitalet (Spain); Angeles Cabeza, Maria [Hospital Universitario Doce de Octubre, S.Oncologia Radioterapica, Madrid (Spain); Zapatero, Almudena [Hospital Universitario de la Princesa, S.Oncologia Radioterapica, Madrid (Spain); Jove, Josep [Institut Catala d' Oncologia, S.Oncologia Radioterapica, Badalona (Spain); Esteban, Luis M. [Universidad de Zaragoza, Escuela Universitaria Politecnica de La Almunia, Zaragoza (Spain); Henriquez, Ivan [Hospital Universitari Sant Joan de Reus, S.Oncologia Radioterapica, Reus (Spain); Casana, Manuel; Mengual, Jose Luis [Fundacion Instituto Valenciano de Oncologia, S.Oncologia Radioterapica, Valencia (Spain); Gonzalez-San Segundo, Carmen [Hospital Universitario Gregorio Maranon, S.Oncologia Radioterapica, Madrid (Spain); Gomez-Caamano, Antonio [Hospital Clinico Universitario de Santiago, S.Oncologia Radioterapica, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Hervas, Asuncion [Hospital Universitario Ramon y Cajal, S.Oncologia Radioterapica, Madrid (Spain); Munoz, Julia Luisa [Hospital Infanta Cristina, S.Oncologia Radioterapica, Badajoz (Spain); Sanz, Gerardo [Universidad de Zaragoza, Departamento de Metodos Estadisticos, Zaragoza (Spain)

    2015-10-15

    Nomograms were established to predict biochemical recurrence (BCR) after radiotherapy (RT) with a low weight of the characteristic variables of RT and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Our aim is to provide a new stratified tool for predicting BCR at 4 and 7 years in patients treated using RT with radical intent. A retrospective, nonrandomized analysis was performed on 5044 prostate cancer (PCa) patients with median age 70 years, who received RT - with or without ADT - between November 1992 and May 2007. Median follow-up was 5.5 years. BCR was defined as a rise in serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) of 2 ng/ml over the post-treatment PSA nadir. Univariate association between predictor variables and BCR was assessed by the log-rank test, and three linked nomograms were created for multivariate prognosis of BCR-free survival. Each nomogram corresponds to a category of the Gleason score - either 6,7, or 8-10 - and all of them were created from a single proportional hazards regression model stratified also by months of ADT (0, 1-6, 7-12, 13-24, 25-36, 36-60). The performance of this model was analyzed by calibration, discrimination, and clinical utility. Initial PSA, clinical stage, and RT dose were significant variables (p < 0.01). The model showed a good calibration. The concordance probability was 0.779, improving those obtained with other nomograms (0.587, 0.571, 0.554) in the database. Survival curves showed best clinical utility in a comparison with National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) risk groups. For each Gleason score category, the nomogram provides information on the benefit of adding ADT to a specific RT dose. (orig.) [German] Es wurden Nomogramme etabliert, um ein biochemisches Rezidiv (BCR) nach einer Strahlentherapie (RT) vorhersagen zu koennen und den Einfluss der charakteristischen Variablen der RT und der Androgendeprivationstherapie (ADT) dabei moeglichst gering zu halten. Unser Ziel ist es, ein neues stratifiziertes Instrument

  17. Dysphagia after definitive radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. Correlation of dose-volume parameters of the pharyngeal constrictor muscles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deantonio, L.; Masini, L. [University Hospital ' Maggiore della Carita' , Novara (Italy). Radiotherapy; Brambilla, M. [University Hospital ' Maggiore della Carita' , Novara (Italy). Medical Physics; Pia, F. [University Hospital ' Maggiore della Carita' , Novara (Italy). Otolaryngology; University of ' Piemonte Orientale' , Novara (Italy). Dept. of Medical Sciences; Krengli, M. [University Hospital ' Maggiore della Carita' , Novara (Italy). Radiotherapy; University of ' Piemonte Orientale' , Novara (Italy). Dept. of Translational Medicine and BRMA

    2013-03-15

    Background: Dysphagia is a complication of head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT). We analysed frequency and severity of swallowing dysfunction and correlated these findings with dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the pharyngeal constrictor muscles. Methods: A total of 50 patients treated by radical RT were enrolled. DVHs of constrictor muscles were correlated with acute and late dysphagia and with the items of three quality of life questionnaires. Results: Mean dose to superior and middle constrictor muscles (SCM, MCM), partial volume of SCM and MCM receiving a dose {>=} 50 Gy dose to the whole constrictor muscles {>=} 60 Gy and tumour location were associated to late dysphagia at univariate analysis. Mean dose to the MCM was the only statistically significant predictor of late dysphagia at the multivariable analysis. Conclusion: The study shows a significant relationship between long-term dysphagia and mean doses to SCM, MCM, whole constrictor muscles, and oropharyngeal tumour. This finding suggests a potential advantage in reducing the RT dose to swallowing structures to avoid severe dysphagia. (orig.)

  18. Hypofractionated radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy technique: 3 years toxicity analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R White

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypofractionated radiotherapy in the radical treatment of localized prostate cancer has potential biological advantages relative to conventional fractionation. We report prospectively collected toxicity data from a cohort of patients treated with a 3D conformal technique (3DCRT. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 90 patients receiving curative intent hypofractionated radiotherapy with 57Gy in 19 daily fractions over 3.8 weeks were evaluated prospectively for the development of radiation related toxicity over a 3 year period. RESULTS: All patients completed treatment. Maximal acute toxicity experienced was 58.6, 10 and 1.1% for grade 1, 2 and 3 genitourinary (GU toxicity respectively and 75.6, 9 and 0% for gastrointestinal (GI toxicity. For late toxicity the three year actuarial rates of grade 1, 2 and 3 GU and GI toxicity respectively were 47.3, 2.4 and 0%; and 40, 9.3 and 4.7%. There were no grade 4 or worse acute or late toxicities. 97.6% of evaluable patients remained free of biochemical failure 36 months post radiotherapy. CONCLUSIONS: A 57Gy in 19 daily fraction radiotherapy schedule using 3D conformal radiotherapy for the definitive treatment of localized prostate cancer has acceptable early and late toxicity.

  19. Definition and visualisation of regions of interest in post-prostatectomy image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, Linda J, E-mail: linda.bell1@health.nsw.gov.au; Cox, Jennifer [Radiation Oncology Department, Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, New South Wales (Australia); Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Lidcombe, New South Wales (Australia); Eade, Thomas; Rinks, Marianne; Kneebone, Andrew [Radiation Oncology Department, Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, New South Wales (Australia)

    2014-09-15

    Standard post-prostatectomy radiotherapy (PPRT) image verification uses bony anatomy alignment. However, the prostate bed (PB) moves independently of bony anatomy. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) can be used to soft tissue match, so radiation therapists (RTs) must understand pelvic anatomy and PPRT clinical target volumes (CTV). The aims of this study are to define regions of interest (ROI) to be used in soft tissue matching image guidance and determine their visibility on planning CT (PCT) and CBCT. Published CTV guidelines were used to select ROIs. The PCT scans (n = 23) and CBCT scans (n = 105) of 23 post-prostatectomy patients were reviewed. Details on ROI identification were recorded. Eighteen patients had surgical clips. All ROIs were identified on PCTs at least 90% of the time apart from mesorectal fascia (MF) (87%) due to superior image quality. When surgical clips are present, the seminal vesicle bed (SVB) was only seen in 2.3% of CBCTs and MF was unidentifiable. Most other structures were well identified on CBCT. The anterior rectal wall (ARW) was identified in 81.4% of images and penile bulb (PB) in 68.6%. In the absence of surgical clips, the MF and SVB were always identified; the ARW was identified in 89.5% of CBCTs and PB in 73.7%. Surgical clips should be used as ROIs when present to define SVB and MF. In the absence of clips, SVB, MF and ARW can be used. RTs must have a strong knowledge of soft tissue anatomy and PPRT CTV to ensure coverage and enable soft tissue matching.

  20. Top-down and bottom-up definitions of human failure events in human reliability analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boring, Ronald Laurids [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-10-01

    In the probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) used in the nuclear industry, human failure events (HFEs) are determined as a subset of hardware failures, namely those hardware failures that could be triggered by human action or inaction. This approach is top-down, starting with hardware faults and deducing human contributions to those faults. Elsewhere, more traditionally human factors driven approaches would tend to look at opportunities for human errors first in a task analysis and then identify which of those errors is risk significant. The intersection of top-down and bottom-up approaches to defining HFEs has not been carefully studied. Ideally, both approaches should arrive at the same set of HFEs. This question is crucial, however, as human reliability analysis (HRA) methods are generalized to new domains like oil and gas. The HFEs used in nuclear PRAs tend to be top-down—defined as a subset of the PRA—whereas the HFEs used in petroleum quantitative risk assessments (QRAs) often tend to be bottom-up—derived from a task analysis conducted by human factors experts. The marriage of these approaches is necessary in order to ensure that HRA methods developed for top-down HFEs are also sufficient for bottom-up applications.

  1. Polymorphisms of homologous recombination genes and clinical outcomes of non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with definitive radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Yin

    Full Text Available The repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs is the major mechanism to maintain genomic stability in response to irradiation. We hypothesized that genetic polymorphisms in DSB repair genes may affect clinical outcomes among non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients treated with definitive radio(chemotherapy. We genotyped six potentially functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs (i.e., RAD51 -135G>C/rs1801320 and -172G>T/rs1801321, XRCC2 4234G>C/rs3218384 and R188H/rs3218536 G>A, XRCC3 T241M/rs861539 and NBN E185Q/rs1805794 and estimated their associations with overall survival (OS and radiation pneumonitis (RP in 228 NSCLC patients. We found a predictive role of RAD51 -135G>C SNP in RP development (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 0.52, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.31-0.86, P = 0.010 for CG/CC vs. GG. We also found that RAD51 -135G>C and XRCC2 R188H SNPs were independent prognostic factors for overall survival (adjusted HR = 1.70, 95% CI, 1.14-2.62, P = 0.009 for CG/CC vs. GG; and adjusted HR = 1.70; 95% CI, 1.02-2.85, P = 0.043 for AG vs. GG, respectively and that the SNP-survival association was most pronounced in the presence of RP. Our study suggests that HR genetic polymorphisms, particularly RAD51 -135G>C, may influence overall survival and radiation pneumonitis in NSCLC patients treated with definitive radio(chemotherapy. Large studies are needed to confirm our findings.

  2. Improving target definition for head and neck radiotherapy: a place for magnetic resonance imaging and 18-fluoride fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestwich, R J D; Sykes, J; Carey, B; Sen, M; Dyker, K E; Scarsbrook, A F

    2012-10-01

    Defining the target for head and neck radiotherapy is a critical issue with the introduction of steep dose gradients associated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Tumour delineation inaccuracies are a major source of error in radiotherapy planning. The integration of 18-fluoride fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ((18)FDG-PET) and magnetic resonance imaging directly into the radiotherapy planning process has the potential to greatly improve target identification/selection and delineation. This raises a range of new issues surrounding image co-registration, delineation methodology and the use of functional data and treatment adaptation. This overview will discuss the practical aspects of integrating (18)FDG-PET and magnetic resonance imaging into head and neck radiotherapy planning.

  3. The association between TGF-β1 polymorphisms and radiation pneumonia in lung cancer patients treated with definitive radiotherapy: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiazhuo; Deng, Lei; Na, Feifei; Xue, Jianxin; Gao, Hui; Lu, You

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies investigating the association between TGF-β1 polymorphisms and Radiation Pneumonia (RP) risk have provided inconsistent results. The aim of our study was to assess the association between the TGF-β1 genes C509T, G915C and T869C polymorphisms and risk of RP in lung cancer patients treated with definitive radiotherapy. Two investigators independently searched the Medline, Embase, CNKI, and Chinese Biomedicine Databases for studies published before September 2013. Summary odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for TGF-β1 polymorphisms and RP were calculated in a fixed-effects model or a random-effects model when appropriate. Ultimately, each 7 studies were found to be eligible for meta-analyses of C509T, G915C and T869C, respectively. Our analysis suggested that the variant genotypes of T869C were associated with a significantly increased RP risk in dominant model (OR = 0.59, 95% CI = 0.45-0.79) and CT vs. TT model (OR = 0.47, 95% CI = 0.32-0.69). In the subgroup analyses by ethnicity/country, a significantly increased risk was observed among Caucasians. For C509T and G915C polymorphism, no obvious associations were found for all genetic models. This meta-analysis suggests that T869C polymorphism of TGF-β1 may be associated with RP risk only in Caucasians, and there may be no association between C509T and G915C polymorphism and RP risk.

  4. The association between TGF-β1 polymorphisms and radiation pneumonia in lung cancer patients treated with definitive radiotherapy: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiazhuo He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies investigating the association between TGF-β1 polymorphisms and Radiation Pneumonia (RP risk have provided inconsistent results. The aim of our study was to assess the association between the TGF-β1 genes C509T, G915C and T869C polymorphisms and risk of RP in lung cancer patients treated with definitive radiotherapy. METHODS: Two investigators independently searched the Medline, Embase, CNKI, and Chinese Biomedicine Databases for studies published before September 2013. Summary odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs for TGF-β1 polymorphisms and RP were calculated in a fixed-effects model or a random-effects model when appropriate. RESULTS: Ultimately, each 7 studies were found to be eligible for meta-analyses of C509T, G915C and T869C, respectively. Our analysis suggested that the variant genotypes of T869C were associated with a significantly increased RP risk in dominant model (OR = 0.59, 95% CI = 0.45-0.79 and CT vs. TT model (OR = 0.47, 95% CI = 0.32-0.69. In the subgroup analyses by ethnicity/country, a significantly increased risk was observed among Caucasians. For C509T and G915C polymorphism, no obvious associations were found for all genetic models. CONCLUSION: This meta-analysis suggests that T869C polymorphism of TGF-β1 may be associated with RP risk only in Caucasians, and there may be no association between C509T and G915C polymorphism and RP risk.

  5. Changes of plasma cytokines and chemokines expression level in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients after treatment with definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ya-Bin; Zhang, Guo-Yi; Lin, Kai-Rong; Chen, Xiang-Ping; Cui, Jin-Huan; Wang, Yue-Jian; Luo, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Potential clinical application values of certain cytokines and chemokines that participate in the process of tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis have been reported. However, there still lack of biomarkers for a great many of malignancy. This study identified cytokines or chemokines involved in the occurrence and development of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), which might be a biomarker for noninvasive early diagnosis. The plasma levels of 19 cytokines and chemokines were detected by the luminex liquid array-based multiplexed immunoassays in 39 NPC patients before and after treatment by definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Plasma levels of almost all of the 19 cytokines and chemokines in NPC patients were higher than healthy controls, while only IFN-γ, IL-1b IL-6, MCP-1, TNF-α, FKN, IL-12P70, IL-2, IL-5 and IP-10 showed significant differences. However, expression levels of most of the 19 cytokines and chemokines decreased after therapy, especially IFN-γ, IL-10, IL-1b, IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1, TNF-α, VEGF, IL-17A, IL-2, IL-5 and MIP-1b, have a dramatic decline. Taking together, plasma levels of IFN-γ, IL-1b, IL-6, MCP-1, TNF-α, IL-2 and IL-5 are significantly increased in NPC patients and dramatically decreased after treatment, suggesting these cytokines and chemokines might play important roles in the progress of NPC. More interestingly, the expression level of MPC-1 is significantly associated with clinical stage. MCP-1 might involve in the genesis and development process of NPC, which might serve as a noninvasive biomarker for early diagnosis.

  6. Probability of mediastinal involvement in non-small-cell lung cancer: a statistical definition of the clinical target volume for 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud, Philippe; De Rycke, Yann; Lavole, Armelle; Milleron, Bernard; Cosset, Jean-Marc; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E

    2006-01-01

    Conformal irradiation (3D-CRT) of non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) is largely based on precise definition of the nodal clinical target volume (CTVn). A reduction of the number of nodal stations to be irradiated would facilitate tumor dose escalation. The aim of this study was to design a mathematical tool based on documented data to predict the risk of metastatic involvement for each nodal station. We reviewed the large surgical series published in the literature to identify the main pretreatment parameters that modify the risk of nodal invasion. The probability of involvement for the 17 nodal stations described by the American Thoracic Society (ATS) was computed from all these publications. Starting with the primary site of the tumor as the main characteristic, we built a probabilistic tree for each nodal station representing the risk distribution as a function of each tumor feature. Statistical analysis used the inversion of probability trees method described by Weinstein and Feinberg. Validation of the software based on 134 patients from two different populations was performed by receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves and multivariate logistic regression. Analysis of all of the various parameters of pretreatment staging relative to each level of the ATS map results in 20,000 different combinations. The first parameters included in the tree, depending on tumor site, were histologic classification, metastatic stage, nodal stage weighted as a function of the sensitivity and specificity of the diagnostic examination used (positron emission tomography scan, computed tomography scan), and tumor stage. Software is proposed to compute a predicted probability of involvement of each nodal station for any given clinical presentation. Double cross validation confirmed the methodology. A 10% cutoff point was calculated from ROC and logistic model giving the best prediction of mediastinal lymph node involvement. To more accurately define the CTVn in NSCLC three

  7. Adaptive Image-Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT) Eliminates the Risk of Biochemical Failure Caused by the Bias of Rectal Distension in Prostate Cancer Treatment Planning: Clinical Evidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sean S.; Yan Di; McGrath, Samuel; Dilworth, Joshua T.; Liang Jian; Ye Hong; Krauss, Daniel J.; Martinez, Alvaro A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Kestin, Larry L., E-mail: lkestin@comcast.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Rectal distension has been shown to decrease the probability of biochemical control. Adaptive image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) corrects for target position and volume variations, reducing the risk of biochemical failure while yielding acceptable rates of gastrointestinal (GI)/genitourinary (GU) toxicities. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2006, 962 patients were treated with computed tomography (CT)-based offline adaptive IGRT. Patients were stratified into low (n = 400) vs. intermediate/high (n = 562) National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) risk groups. Target motion was assessed with daily CT during the first week. Electronic portal imaging device (EPID) was used to measure daily setup error. Patient-specific confidence-limited planning target volumes (cl-PTV) were then constructed, reducing the standard PTV and compensating for geometric variation of the target and setup errors. Rectal volume (RV), cross-sectional area (CSA), and rectal volume from the seminal vesicles to the inferior prostate (SVP) were assessed on the planning CT. The impact of these volumetric parameters on 5-year biochemical control (BC) and chronic Grades {>=}2 and 3 GU and GI toxicity were examined. Results: Median follow-up was 5.5 years. Median minimum dose covering cl-PTV was 75.6 Gy. Median values for RV, CSA, and SVP were 82.8 cm{sup 3}, 5.6 cm{sup 2}, and 53.3 cm{sup 3}, respectively. The 5-year BC was 89% for the entire group: 96% for low risk and 83% for intermediate/high risk (p < 0.001). No statistically significant differences in BC were seen with stratification by RV, CSA, and SVP in quartiles. Maximum chronic Grades {>=}2 and 3 GI toxicities were 21.2% and 2.9%, respectively. Respective values for GU toxicities were 15.5% and 4.3%. No differences in GI or GU toxicities were noted when patients were stratified by RV. Conclusions: Incorporation of adaptive IGRT reduces the risk of geometric miss and results in excellent biochemical control that is

  8. Updated results of high-dose rate brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy for locally and locally advanced prostate cancer using the RTOG-ASTRO phoenix definition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio C. Pellizzon

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the prognostic factors for patients with local or locally advanced prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy (RT and high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR according to the RTOG-ASTRO Phoenix Consensus Conference. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The charts of 209 patients treated between 1997 and 2005 with localized RT and HDR as a boost at the Department of Radiation Oncology, AC Camargo Hospital, Sao Paulo, Brazil were reviewed. Clinical and treatment parameters i.e.: patient's age, Gleason score, clinical stage, initial PSA (iPSA, risk group (RG for biochemical failure, doses of RT and HDR were evaluated. Median age and median follow-up time were 68 and 5.3 years, respectively. Median RT and HDR doses were 45 Gy and 20 Gy. RESULTS: Disease specific survival (DSS at 3.3 year was 94.2%. Regarding RG, for the LR (low risk, IR (intermediate risk and HR (high risk, the DSS rates at 3.3 years were 91.5%, 90.2% and 88.5%, respectively. On univariate analysis prognostic factors related to DSS were RG (p = 0.040, Gleason score ≤ 6 ng/mL (p = 0.002, total dose of HDR ≥ 20 Gy (p < 0.001 On multivariate analysis the only statistical significant predictive factor for biochemical control (bNED was the RG, p < 0.001 (CI - 1.147-3.561. CONCLUSIONS: Although the radiation dose administered to the prostate is an important factor related to bNED, this could not be established with statistical significance in this group of patients. To date , in our own experience, HDR associated to RT could be considered a successful approach in the treatment of prostate cancer.

  9. Medically inoperable endometrial cancer in patients with a high body mass index (BMI): Patterns of failure after 3-D image-based high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acharya, Sahaja; Esthappan, Jacqueline; Badiyan, Shahed

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: High BMI is a reason for medical inoperability in patients with endometrial cancer in the United States. Definitive radiation is an alternative therapy for these patients; however, data on patterns of failure after definitive radiotherapy are lacking. We describe...... the patterns of failure after definitive treatment with 3-D image-based high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy for medically inoperable endometrial cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty-three consecutive patients with endometrial cancer FIGO stages I-III were treated definitively with HDR brachytherapy...

  10. Influence of the definition of acute renal failure post-cardiac surgery on incidence, patient identification, and identification of risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noyez, L.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Acute renal failure post-cardiac surgery (RF) is a major complication and is associated with increased postoperative morbidity and mortality. Early recognition and identification of risk factors for RF is therefore important. However, several definitions of RF are used. The intention of

  11. Molecular cytogenetic definition of a translocation t(X;15) associated with premature ovarian failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertini, Veronica; Ghirri, Paolo; Bicocchi, Maria Patrizia; Simi, Paolo; Valetto, Angelo

    2010-08-01

    To characterize the breakpoints of a t(X;15) found in a woman with premature ovarian failure (POF). Case report. Molecular and cytogenetics unit in a university-affiliated hospital. A 19-year-old infertile woman presenting with a normal female phenotype but primary amenorrhea. Molecular cytogenetic analyses and genetic counseling. Translocation t(X;15) defined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH). Chromosome and FISH analysis revealed 46,XX, t(X;15)(Xq22.1;p11); the active X was translocated and had been inherited from her mother. Detailed molecular characterization by FISH showed that the NXF5 (nuclear RNA export factor 5) gene was contained in the clone spanning the breakpoint on the X chromosome. The NXF5 gene is an appealing candidate for POF because it shows functional homology with the FMR1 (fragile X mental retardation 1) gene. Further analyses of its expression as well as mutation screening in other POF patients will help to elucidate its role. Copyright (c) 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Concurrent use of cisplatin or cetuximab with definitive radiotherapy for locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, Antonin; Blanchard, Pierre; Bellefqih, Sara; Brahimi, Nacera; Deutsch, Eric; Daly-Schveitzer, Nicolas; Tao, Yungan [Gustave Roussy, Department of Radiation Oncology, Villejuif (France); Guigay, Joel [Gustave Roussy, Department of Medical Oncology, Villejuif (France); Janot, Francois; Temam, Stephane [Gustave Roussy, Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Villejuif (France); Bourhis, Jean [Gustave Roussy, Department of Radiation Oncology, Villejuif (France); University Hospital Lausanne, Department of Radiation Oncology, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2014-09-15

    The goal of the present work was to compare outcomes of definitive concurrent cisplatin-based chemoradiotherapy (CRT) with cetuximab-based bioradiotherapy (BRT) in locally advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Between 2006 and 2012, 265 patients with locally advanced HNSCC were treated at our institution with CRT (n = 194; 73 %) with three cycles of cisplatin (100 mg/m{sup 2}, every 3 weeks) or BRT (n = 71; 27 %) with weekly cetuximab. Patients receiving BRT had more pre-existing conditions (Charlson index ≥ 2) than the CRT group (p = 0.005). Median follow-up was 29 months. In all, 56 % of patients treated with CRT received the planned three cycles (92 % at least two cycles) and 79 % patients treated with BRT received six cycles or more. The 2-year actuarial overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 72 % and 61 %, respectively. In the multivariate analysis (MVA), T4 stage, N2-3 stage, smoking status (current smoker as compared with never smoker), and non-oropharyngeal locations predicted for OS, whereas BRT association with OS was of borderline significance (p = 0.054). The 2-year actuarial locoregional control (LRC) and distant control (DC) rates were 73 and 79 %, respectively. CRT was independently associated with an improved LRC (2-year LRC: 76 % for CRT vs. 61 % for BRT) and DC (2-year LRC: 81 % for CRT vs. 68 % for BRT) in comparison with BRT (p < 0.001 and p = 0.01 in the MVA). Subgroup analyses showed that T4 patients benefited significantly from CRT (vs. BRT) in LRC, while T1-3 did not. BRT patients had more G3-4 skin complications (p < 0.001) and CRT patients had higher rates of feeding tube placement (p = 0.006) and G3-4 gastrointestinal toxicities (p < 0.001). This retrospective analysis showed a better LRC in locally advanced HNSCC treated by cisplatin-based CRT than cetuximab-based BRT, and a nonsignificant trend towards an improved OS. (orig.) [German] Die Therapieeffektivitaet mit Platin

  13. Acute Kidney Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... out of balance. Acute kidney failure — also called acute renal failure or acute kidney injury — develops rapidly over ... 2015. Palevsky PM. Definition of acute kidney injury (acute renal failure). http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April ...

  14. Four and five dimensional radiotherapy with reference to prostate cancer--definitions, state of the art and further directions--an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennernäs, Bo; Castellanos, Enrique; Nilsson, Sten; Levitt, Seymour

    2011-06-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) always requires a compromise between tumor control and normal tissue side-effects. Technical innovation in radiation therapy (RT), such as three dimensional RT, is now established. Concerning prostate cancer (PC), it is reasonable to assume that RT of PC will increase in the future. The combination of small margins, a movable target (prostate), few fractions and high doses will probably demand dynamically positioning systems and in real time. This is called four dimensional radiotherapy (4DRT). Moreover, biological factors must be included in new treatments such as hypofractionation schedules. This new era is called five dimensional radiotherapy, 5DRT. In this paper we discuss new concepts in RT in respect to PC.

  15. Long-Term Outcome and Patterns of Failure in Primary Ocular Adnexal Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma Treated With Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Naoki [Division of Radiation Oncology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Hyogo (Japan); Sasaki, Ryohei, E-mail: rsasaki@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Division of Radiation Oncology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Hyogo (Japan); Nishimura, Hideki; Yoshida, Kenji; Miyawaki, Daisuke; Nakayama, Masao; Uehara, Kazuyuki; Okamoto, Yoshiaki; Ejima, Yasuo [Division of Radiation Oncology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Hyogo (Japan); Azumi, Atsushi [Division of Ophthalmology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Hyogo (Japan); Matsui, Toshimitsu [Division of Hematology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Hyogo (Japan); Sugimura, Kazuro [Division of Radiation Oncology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Hyogo (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term treatment outcome and disease behavior of primary ocular adnexal MALT (mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue) lymphoma (POAML) after treatment with radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Seventy-eight patients (42 male, 36 female) diagnosed with stage I POAML between 1991 and 2010 at Kobe University Hospital were included. The median age was 60 years (range, 22-85 years). The median radiation dose administered was 30.6 Gy. Rituximab-based targeted therapy and/or chemotherapy was performed in 20 patients (25.6%). Local control (LC), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS) rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median follow-up duration was 66 months. Major tumor sites were conjunctiva in 37 patients (47.4%), orbita in 29 (37.2%), and lacrimal glands in 12 (15.4%). The 5- and 10-year OS rates were 98.1% and 95.3%, respectively. The 5- and 10-year LC rates were both 100%, and the 5- and 10-year RFS rates were 88.5% and 75.9%, respectively. Patients treated with a combination of radiotherapy and targeted therapy and/or chemotherapy had a trend for a better RFS compared with those treated with radiotherapy alone (p = 0.114). None developed greater than Grade 2 acute morbidity. There were 14 patients who experienced Grade 2 morbidities (cataract: 14; retinal disorders: 7; dry eye: 3), 23 patients who had Grade 3 morbidities (cataract: 23; dry eye: 1), and 1 patient who had Grade 4 glaucoma. Conclusions: Radiotherapy for POAML was shown to be highly effective and safe for LC and OS on the basis of long-term observation. The absence of systemic relapse in patients with combined-modality treatment suggests that lower doses of radiation combined with targeted therapy may be worth further study.

  16. Prospective Multi-Institutional Study of Definitive Radiotherapy With High-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy in Patients With Nonbulky (<4-cm) Stage I and II Uterine Cervical Cancer (JAROG0401/JROSG04-2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toita, Takafumi, E-mail: b983255@med.u-ryukyu.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Kato, Shingo [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Niibe, Yuzuru [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Kitasato University, Sagamihara (Japan); Ohno, Tatsuya [Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center, Maebashi (Japan); Kazumoto, Tomoko [Department of Radiology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan); Kodaira, Takeshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center, Nagoya (Japan); Kataoka, Masaaki [Department of Radiology, National Shikoku Cancer Center, Ehime (Japan); Shikama, Naoto [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saku Central Hospital, Saku (Japan); Kenjo, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Tokumaru, Sunao [Department of Radiology, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Yamauchi, Chikako [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shiga Medical Center for Adults, Moriyama (Japan); Suzuki, Osamu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer, Osaka (Japan); Sakurai, Hideyuki [Proton Medical Research Center and Tsukuba University, Tsukuba (Japan); Numasaki, Hodaka; Teshima, Teruki [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Oguchi, Masahiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Kagami, Yoshikazu [Radiation Oncology Division, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Nakano, Takashi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University, Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi (Japan); Hiraoka, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Kyoto University, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Mitsuhashi, Norio [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of a definitive radiotherapy protocol using high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) with a low cumulative dose schedule in nonbulky early-stage cervical cancer patients, we conducted a prospective multi-institutional study. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had squamous cell carcinoma of the intact uterine cervix, Federation of Gynecologic Oncology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stages Ib1, IIa, and IIb, tumor size <40 mm in diameter (assessed by T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging), and no pelvic/para-aortic lymphadenopathy. The treatment protocol consisted of whole-pelvis external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) of 20 Gy/10 fractions, pelvic EBRT with midline block of 30 Gy/15 fractions, and HDR-ICBT of 24 Gy/4 fractions (at point A). The cumulative biologically effective dose (BED) was 62 Gy{sub 10} ({alpha}/{beta} = 10) at point A. The primary endpoint was the 2-year pelvic disease progression-free (PDPF) rate. All patients received a radiotherapy quality assurance review. Results: Between September 2004 and July 2007, 60 eligible patients were enrolled. Thirty-six patients were assessed with FIGO stage Ib1; 12 patients with stage IIa; and 12 patients with stage IIb. Median tumor diameter was 28 mm (range, 6-39 mm). Median overall treatment time was 43 days. Median follow-up was 49 months (range, 7-72 months). Seven patients developed recurrences: 3 patients had pelvic recurrences (2 central, 1 nodal), and 4 patients had distant metastases. The 2-year PDPF was 96% (95% confidence interval [CI], 92%-100%). The 2-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 90% (95% CI, 82%-98%) and 95% (95% CI, 89%-100%), respectively. The 2-year late complication rates (according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer of Grade {>=}1) were 18% (95% CI, 8%-28%) for large intestine/rectum, 4% (95% CI, 0%-8%) for small intestine, and 0% for bladder. No Grade {>=}3 cases were

  17. Report of the ECCO pathogenesis workshop on anti-TNF therapy failures in inflammatory bowel diseases: definitions, frequency and pharmacological aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allez, Matthieu; Karmiris, Konstantinos; Louis, Edouard

    2010-01-01

    The first ECCO pathogenesis workshop focused on anti-TNF therapy failures in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). The overall objective was to better understand and explore primary non response and loss of response to anti-TNF agents in IBD. The outcome of this workshop is presented into two parts......, including mechanisms of action of anti-TNF agents, and discuss hypothesis regarding their failures and phenomenon of paradoxical inflammation, including the potential role of TNF independent inflammatory pathways........ This first section addresses definitions, frequency and pharmacological aspects of anti-TNF therapy failure, including pharmacokinetics of anti-TNF monoclonal antibodies and immune and non-immune mediated clearance of anti-TNF mAbs. The second section concerns the biological roles of TNF and TNF antagonists...

  18. Converting from CT- to MRI-only-based target definition in radiotherapy of localized prostate cancer. A comparison between two modalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seppaelae, Tiina; Visapaeae, Harri; Collan, Juhani; Kapanen, Mika; Kouri, Mauri; Tenhunen, Mikko; Saarilahti, Kauko [University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Comprehensive Cancer Center, POB 180, Helsinki (Finland); Beule, Annette [University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, HUS Medical Imaging Center, Radiology, POB 180, Helsinki (Finland)

    2015-11-15

    To investigate the conversion of prostate cancer radiotherapy (RT) target definition from CT-based planning into an MRI-only-based planning procedure. Using the CT- and MRI-only-based RT planning protocols, 30 prostate cancer patients were imaged in the RT fixation position. Two physicians delineated the prostate in both CT and T2-weighted MRI images. The CT and MRI images were coregistered based on gold seeds and anatomic borders of the prostate. The uncertainty of the coregistration, as well as differences in target volumes and uncertainty of contour delineation were investigated. Conversion of margins and dose constraints from CT- to MRI-only-based treatment planning was assessed. On average, the uncertainty of image coregistration was 0.4 ± 0.5 mm (one standard deviation, SD), 0.9 ± 0.8 mm and 0.9 ± 0.9 mm in the lateral, anterior-posterior and base-apex direction, respectively. The average ratio of the prostate volume between CT and MRI was 1.20 ± 0.15 (one SD). Compared to the CT-based contours, the MRI-based contours were on average 2-7 mm smaller in the apex, 0-1 mm smaller in the rectal direction and 1-4 mm smaller elsewhere. When converting from a CT-based planning procedure to an MRI-based one, the overall planning target volumes (PTV) are prominently reduced only in the apex. The prostate margins and dose constraints can be retained by this conversion. (orig.) [German] Ziel unserer Studie war es, die Umstellung der Strahlentherapieplanung des Prostatakarzinoms von CT-gestuetzter in ausschliesslich MR-gestuetzte Zieldefinition zu untersuchen. Bei 30 Patienten mit Prostatakarzinom wurden eine CT und eine MRT unter Planungsbedingungen durchgefuehrt. Zwei Untersucher konturierten die Prostata in CT- und T2-gewichteten MR-Bildern. Mit Hilfe der Position von Goldstiften und der anatomischen Grenzen der Prostata wurden die CT- und MR-Bilder koregistriert. Es wurden die Genauigkeit der Koregistrierung sowie die Unterschiede der Zielvolumina und der

  19. Radiotherapy; Strahlentherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wannenmacher, M. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Abt. fuer Klinische Radiologie; Debus, J. [Univ. Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie; Wenz, F. (eds.) [Universitaetsklinikum Mannheim (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie

    2006-07-01

    The book is focussed on the actual knowledge on the clinical radiotherapy and radio-oncology. Besides fundamental and general contributions specific organ systems are treated in detail. The book contains the following contributions: Basic principles, radiobiological fundamentals, physical background, radiation pathology, basics and technique of brachytherapy, methodology and technique of the stereotactic radiosurgery, whole-body irradiation, operative radiotherapy, hadron therapy, hpyerthermia, combined radio-chemo-therapy, biometric clinical studies, intensity modulated radiotherapy, side effects, oncological diagnostics; central nervous system and sense organs, head-neck carcinomas, breast cancer, thorax organs, esophagus carcinoma, stomach carcinoma, pancreas carcinoma, heptabiliary cancer and liver metastases, rectal carcinomas, kidney and urinary tract, prostate carcinoma, testicular carcinoma, female pelvis, lymphatic system carcinomas, soft tissue carcinoma, skin cancer, bone metastases, pediatric tumors, nonmalignant diseases, emergency in radio-oncology, supporting therapy, palliative therapy.

  20. A comparative study of the target volume definition in radiotherapy with «Slow CT Scan» vs. 4D PET/CT Scan in early stages non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molla, M; Anducas, N; Simó, M; Seoane, A; Ramos, M; Cuberas-Borros, G; Beltran, M; Castell, J; Giralt, J

    To evaluate the use of 4D PET/CT to quantify tumor respiratory motion compared to the «Slow»-CT (CTs) in the radiotherapy planning process. A total of 25 patients with inoperable early stage non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were included in the study. Each patient was imaged with a CTs (4s/slice) and 4D PET/CT. The adequacy of each technique for respiratory motion capture was evaluated using the volume definition for each of the following: Internal target volume (ITV) 4D and ITVslow in relation with the volume defined by the encompassing volume of 4D PET/CT and CTs (ITVtotal). The maximum distance between the edges of the volume defined by each technique to that of the total volume was measured in orthogonal beam's eye view. The ITV4D showed less differences in relation with the ITVtotal in both the cranio-caudal and the antero-posterior axis compared to the ITVslow. The maximum differences were 0.36mm in 4D PET/CTand 0.57mm in CTs in the antero-posterior axis. 4D PET/CT resulted in the definition of more accurate (ITV4D/ITVtotal 0.78 vs. ITVs/ITVtotal 0.63), and larger ITVs (19.9 cc vs. 16.3 cc) than those obtained with CTs. Planning with 4D PET/CT in comparison with CTs, allows incorporating tumor respiratory motion and improving planning radiotherapy of patients in early stages of lung cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  1. Erythropoietin and radiotherapy; Erythropoietine et radiotherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Fur, E.; Albarghach, M.N.; Pradier, O. [CHU de Morvan, Dept. de radiotherapie, 29 - Brest (France)

    2010-01-15

    Erythropoietin (E.P.O.) is a glycoprotein hormone. This hormone is a growth factor for red blood cells precursors in the bone marrow. The decrease of oxygen partial pressure, a reduced number of erythrocytes caused by bleeding or excessive destruction, or increased tissues oxygen requirements lead to increased secretion of E.P.O.. Its action takes place on bone marrow erythroblastic cells through specific receptors. E.P.O. stimulates the proliferation of red cell precursors stem cells in the bone marrow, thus increasing their production in one to two weeks. The effectiveness of E.P.O. at increasing haemoglobin and improving patients quality of life has been demonstrated by several studies. However, its use in radiotherapy remains controversial. While tumour hypoxia caused by anaemia is a factor of radio resistance and thus a source of local failure, tumour expression of E.P.O. receptors presents a significant risk for tumour progression and neo-angiogenesis, which would be increased during the administration of E.P.O.. The purpose of this article is to answer the question: is there a place for E.P.O. in combination with radiotherapy in the management of cancer?

  2. Incidence of radiation toxicity in cervical cancer and endometrial cancer patients treated with radiotherapy alone versus adjuvant radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszak, Andrzej; Wareńczak-Florczak, Żaneta; Bratos, Krystyna; Milecki, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    Aim The study was made to evaluate early and late toxicity in a diversified group of patients receiving definitive or adjuvant radiotherapy in terms of clinical diagnosis and treatment methods. Background Radiotherapy is a standard way of treatment in cervical and endometrial cancer patients, both as definitive and adjuvant therapy. But every radiation treatment may be involved with toxicity. Materials and methods A detailed analysis was performed of 263 patients with gynaecological cancer treated with definitive (90 patients with cervical cancer received radiochemotherapy or radiotherapy exclusively) and adjuvant radiotherapy (38 with cervical and 135 with endometrial cancer). Results Acute reactions were found in 51.3% and late reactions were found in 14.8% of patients. It was stated that early (p radiotherapy. The analysis of the whole group revealed higher rate of toxicity, both early and late, in the gastrointestinal tract than in the urinary system (p radiotherapy group than in the adjuvant one. The occurrence of side effects was associated with the prolongation of total irradiation time due to necessary interruptions of radiotherapy. The comparison of the subgroups showed that interruptions occurred more frequently in patients receiving definitive rather than adjuvant radiotherapy (17.7–2.9%). Conclusions Definitive radiotherapy compared with adjuvant treatment may by associated with higher percentage of side effects caused by dose of therapy and correlation with chemotherapy. PMID:24377035

  3. An expert consensus definition of failure of a treatment to provide adequate relief (F-PAR) for chronic constipation - an international Delphi survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tack, J; Boardman, H; Layer, P;

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As treatments for constipation become increasingly available, it is important to know when to progress along the treatment algorithm if the patient is not better. AIM: To establish the definition of failure of a treatment to provide adequate relief (F-PAR) to support this management...... and referral process in patients with chronic constipation. METHODS: We conducted an international Delphi Survey among gastroenterologists and general practitioners with a special interest in chronic constipation. An initial questionnaire based on recognised rating scales was developed following a focus group...... (after replicate statements had been removed). CONCLUSIONS: We present an international consensus on chronic constipation, of five symptoms and their severities, any of which would be sufficient to provide clinical evidence of treatment failure. We also provide data representing an expert calibration...

  4. Should viral load thresholds be lowered?: Revisiting the WHO definition for virologic failure in patients on antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labhardt, Niklaus D; Bader, Joëlle; Lejone, Thabo Ishmael; Ringera, Isaac; Hobbins, Michael A; Fritz, Christiane; Ehmer, Jochen; Cerutti, Bernard; Puga, Daniel; Klimkait, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines on antiretroviral therapy (ART) define treatment failure as 2 consecutive viral loads (VLs) ≥1000 copies/mL. There is, however, little evidence supporting 1000 copies as an optimal threshold to define treatment failure. Objective of this study was to assess the correlation of the WHO definition with the presence of drug-resistance mutations in patients who present with 2 consecutive unsuppressed VL in a resource-limited setting.In 10 nurse-led clinics in rural Lesotho children and adults on first-line ART for ≥6 months received a first routine VL. Those with plasma VL ≥80 copies/mL were enrolled in a prospective study, receiving enhanced adherence counseling (EAC) and a follow-up VL after 3 months. After a second unsuppressed VL genotypic resistance testing was performed. Viruses with major mutations against ≥2 drugs of the current regimen were classified as "resistant".A total of 1563 adults and 191 children received a first routine VL. Of the 138 adults and 53 children with unsuppressed VL (≥80 copies/mL), 165 (116 adults; 49 children) had a follow-up VL after EAC; 108 (74 adults; 34 children) remained unsuppressed and resistance testing was successful. Ninety of them fulfilled the WHO definition of treatment failure (both VL ≥1000 copies/mL); for another 18 both VL were unsuppressed but with definition was 81.1% (73/90) for the presence of resistant virus. Among the 18 with VL levels between 80 and 1000 copies/mL, thereby classified as "non-failures", 17 (94.4%) harbored resistant viruses. Lowering the VL threshold from 1000 copies/mL to 80 copies/mL at both determinations had no negative influence on the PPV (83.3%; 90/108).The current WHO-definition misclassifies patients who harbor resistant virus at VL below 1000 c/mL as "nonfailing." Lowering the threshold to VL ≥80 copies/mL identifies a significantly higher number of patients with treatment-resistant virus and should be

  5. Clinical usefulness of the definitions for defining characteristics of activity intolerance, excess fluid volume and decreased cardiac output in decompensated heart failure: a descriptive exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Vanessa; Zeitoun, Sandra Salloum; Lopes, Camila Takao; de Oliveira, Ana Paula Dias; Lopes, Juliana de Lima; de Barros, Alba Lucia Bottura Leite

    2015-09-01

    To assess the clinical usefulness of the operational definitions for the defining characteristics of the NANDA International nursing diagnoses, activity intolerance, decreased cardiac output and excess fluid volume, and the concomitant presence of those diagnoses in patients with decompensated heart failure. Content validity of the operational definitions for the defining characteristics of activity intolerance, excess fluid volume and decreased cardiac output have been previously validated by experts. Their clinical usefulness requires clinical validation. This was a descriptive exploratory study. Two expert nurses independently assessed 25 patients with decompensated heart failure for the presence or absence of 29 defining characteristics. Interrater reliability was analysed using the Kappa coefficient as a measure of clinical usefulness. The Fisher's exact test was used to test the association of the defining characteristics of activity intolerance and excess fluid volume in the presence of decreased cardiac output, and the correlation between the three diagnoses. Assessments regarding the presence of all defining characteristics reached 100% agreement, except with anxiety. Five defining characteristics of excess fluid volume were significantly associated with the presence of decreased cardiac output. Concomitant presence of the three diagnoses occurred in 80% of the patients. However, there was no significant correlation between the three diagnoses. The operational definitions for the diagnoses had strong interrater reliability, therefore they were considered clinically useful. Only five defining characteristics were representative of the association between excess fluid volume and decreased cardiac output. Therefore, excess fluid volume is related to decreased cardiac output, although these diagnoses are not necessarily associated with activity intolerance. The operational definitions may favour early recognition of the sequence of responses to decompensation

  6. Impact of (18)F-Fluciclovine PET on Target Volume Definition for Postprostatectomy Salvage Radiotherapy: Initial Findings from a Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jani, Ashesh B; Schreibmann, Eduard; Rossi, Peter J; Shelton, Joseph; Godette, Karen; Nieh, Peter; Master, Viraj A; Kucuk, Omer; Goodman, Mark; Halkar, Raghuveer; Cooper, Sherrie; Chen, Zhengjia; Schuster, David M

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of the synthetic amino acid PET radiotracer (18)F-fluciclovine in modifying the defined clinical and treatment-planning target volumes in postprostatectomy patients undergoing salvage radiotherapy and to evaluate the resulting dosimetric consequences to surrounding organs at risk. Methods: Ninety-six patients were enrolled in a randomized, prospective intention-to-treat clinical trial for potential salvage radiotherapy for recurrent prostate cancer after prostatectomy. The initial treatment plan was based on the results from conventional abdominopelvic CT and MRI. The 45 patients in the experimental arm also underwent abdominopelvic (18)F-fluciclovine PET/CT, and the images were registered with the conventional images to determine whether the results would modify the initial treatment plan. The 51 patients in the control arm did not undergo (18)F-fluciclovine PET/CT. For each patient, the clinical and treatment-planning target volumes that would have been treated before (18)F-fluciclovine registration were compared with those after registration. For organs at risk (rectum, bladder, and penile bulb), the volumes receiving 40 Gy and 65 Gy before registration were compared with those after registration. Statistical comparisons were made using the paired t test. Acute genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity as defined by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group was compared between the control and experimental arms using the χ(2) test. Results: In 24 cases, radiotherapy was planned to a clinical target volume consisting of the prostate bed alone (CTV) (64.8-66.6 Gy). In 21 cases, radiotherapy was planned to a clinical target volume consisting of the pelvis (CTV1) (45.0 Gy) followed by a boost to the prostate bed (CTV2) (19.8-25.2 Gy). In each case, the respective treatment-planning target volume expansion (PTV, PTV1, or PTV2) was 0.8 cm (0.6 cm posterior). With the exception of PTV2, all postregistration volumes were

  7. [Radiotherapy for Graves' ophthalmopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhnt, T; Müller, A C; Janich, M; Gerlach, R; Hädecke, J; Duncker, G I W; Dunst, J

    2004-11-01

    Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO) is the most frequent extrathyroidal manifestation of Graves' disease, an autoimmune disorder of the thyroid, whereas the precise pathogenesis still remains unclear. In Hashimoto's thyroiditis the occurrence of proptosis is an extremely rare event. The therapy for middle and severe courses of GO shows in partly disappointing results, although several therapy modalities are possible (glucocorticoid therapy, radiotherapy, antithyroid drug treatment, surgery). All these therapies lead in only 40 - 70 % to an improvement of the pathogenic symptoms. An intensive interdisciplinary cooperation is necessary to satisfy the requirements for the treatment of Graves' ophthalmopathy. As a consequence of the very different results of the few of clinical studies that were accomplished with reference to this topic, treatment by radiotherapy in the management of the disease is presently controversially discussed. In the German-speaking countries the radiotherapy is, however, firmly established as a therapy option in the treatment of the moderate disease classes (class 2-5 according to NO SPECS), especially if diplopia is present. This article describes the sequences, dosages and fractionation schemes as well as the risks and side effects of the radiotherapy. Altogether, radiotherapy is assessed as an effective and sure method. The administration of glucocorticoids can take place before the beginning of or during the radiotherapy. For the success of treatment the correct selection of patients who may possibly profit from a radiotherapy is absolutely essential. By realising that GO proceeds normally over a period of 2-5 years, which is followed by a period of fibrotic alteration, the application of the radiotherapy in the early, active phase is indispensable. A precise explanation for the effects of radiotherapy in treatment of the GO does not exist at present. The determination of the most effective irradiation doses was made from retrospectively evaluated

  8. Risk factors for failure to thrive in infancy depend on the anthropometric definitions used: the Copenhagen County Child Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Else Marie; Skovgaard, Anne M; Weile, Birgitte

    2007-01-01

    for FTT in a general infant population using different definitions of FTT. Three different criteria of FTT mirroring those used in previous population studies were applied to a birth cohort of 6090 infants. Sociodemographic data and prospectively collected information concerning physical and mental...... at present. However, only longitudinal studies including different anthropometric measures and different outcomes can unravel the discriminating power of the different FTT definitions concerning long-term prognosis....

  9. [Role of 18FDG-PET/CT in the management and gross tumor volume definition for radiotherapy of head and neck cancer; single institution experiences based on long-term follow-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hideghéty, Katalin; Cserháti, Adrienne; Besenyi, Zsuzsanna; Zag, Levente; Gaál, Szilvia; Együd, Zsófia; Mózes, Petra; Szántó, Erika; Csenki, Melinda; Rusz, Orsolya; Varga, Zoltán; Dobi, Ágnes; Maráz, Anikó; Pávics, László; Lengyel, Zsolt

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of our work is evaluation of the impact of 18FDG-PET/CT on the complex management of locoregionally advanced (T3-4N1-3) head and neck squamous cell cancer (LAHNSC), and on the target definition for 3D conformal (3DCRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). 18FDG-PET/CT were performed on 185 patients with LAHNSC prior to radiotherapy/chemoradiation in the treatment position between 2006 and 2011. Prior to it 91 patients received induction chemotherapy (in 20 cases of these, baseline PET/CT was also available). The independently delineated CT-based gross tumor volume (GTVct) and PET/CT based ones (GTVpet) were compared. Impact of PET/CT on the treatment strategy, on tumor response evaluation to ICT, on GTV definition furthermore on overall and disease-specific survival (OS, DSS) was analysed. PET/CT revealed 10 head and neck, 2 lung cancers for 15 patients with carcinoma of unknown primary (CUP) while 3 remained unknown. Second tumors were detected in 8 (4.4%), distant metastasis in 15 (8.2%) cases. The difference between GTVct and GTVpet was significant (p=0.001). In 16 patients (14%) the GTVpet were larger than GTVct due to multifocal manifestations in the laryngo-pharyngeal regions (4 cases) or lymph node metastases (12 cases). In the majority of the cases (82 pts, 72%) PET/CT-based conturing resulted in remarkable decrease in the volume (15-20%: 4 cases, 20-50%: 46 cases, >50%: 32 cases). On the basis of the initial and post-ICT PET/CT comparison in 15/20 patients more than 50% volume reduction and in 6/20 cases complete response were achieved. After an average of 6.4 years of follow-up the OS (median: 18.3±2.6 months) and DSS (median: 25.0±4.0 months) exhibited close correlation (p=0.0001) to the GTVpet. In cases with GTVpet 40 cm3 the median DSS was 8.4±0.96 months (HR= 11.48; 95% CI: 5.3-24.9). Our results suggest that 18FDG-PET/CT plays an important role for patient with LAHNSC, by modifying the treatment concept and improving the target

  10. Definition of the planning target volume of organs at risk (planning organ at risk volume, PRV) in case of radiotherapy of the ORL sphere; Definition d'un volume cible previsionnel d'organe a risque (Planning organ at risk volume, PRV) en cas de radiotherapie de la sphere ORL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louvel, G.; Le Prise, E.; Williaume, D.; De Crevoisier, R. [Centre Eugene-Marquis, 35 - Rennes (France); Cazoulat, G.; Lafond, C.; Simon, A.; Haigron, P.; De Crevoisier, R. [Universite de Rennes 1 LTSI, 35 - Rennes (France); Inserm U642, 35 - Rennes (France); Li, B.S. [Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan (China); Boisselier, P. [Centre Val d' Aurelle, 34 - Montpellier (France)

    2010-10-15

    The authors report a study which aimed at quantifying anatomic variations of organs at risk and their dosimetric impact, and at computing appropriate margins around organs at risk to generate planning target volumes of organs at risk, representative of the dose delivered to organs at risk. Nine patients have been treated for a locally advanced ORL cancer by a concomitant combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy, with weekly scanographies during the radiotherapy. Registration has been successfully performed according to three bone references. Volume modifications and motions have been computed to define the margins around three organs at risk. Short communication

  11. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy for stage IVA/IVB nasopharyngeal carcinoma: clinical outcomes and patterns of failure in an endemic area in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Lei; Tian, Yun-Ming; Sun, Xue-Ming; Huang, Ying; Chen, Chun-Yan; Han, Fei; Liu, Shuai; Lan, Mei; Guan, Ying; Deng, Xiao-Wu; Lu, Tai-Xiang

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the mode of relapse patterns and survival of 209 patients with stage IVA and IVB nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). A total of 209 patients who underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and were subsequently histologically diagnosed with nondisseminated stage IV NPC received intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) as their primary treatment and were included in this retrospective study. Median follow-up time was 65 months (range, 3-108 months). The 5-year overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), local recurrence-free survival (LRFS), locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRRFS), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) rates for patients with stage IVA and stage IVB NPC were 72.7 vs. 60.0 % (p = 0.319), 62.9 vs. 51.3 % (p = 0.070), 82.9 vs. 93.1 % (p = 0.070), 82.9 vs. 82.9 % (p = 0.897), 76.4 vs. 58.5 % (p = 0.003), respectively. Age older than 44 years was found to be a statistically significant adverse independent prognostic factor for OS. Patients with advanced N status had worse OS, DFS, and DMFS rates. Patients with a primary gross tumor volume (GTV-P) ≥ 55.11 ml had worse OS, DFS, and LRRFS rates. The results of treating stage IVA NPC with IMRT were excellent. Distant metastasis remains the most difficult treatment challenge for patients with stage IVA and IVB NPC, and more effective systemic chemotherapy should be explored.

  12. Troponin elevation in patients with heart failure: on behalf of the third Universal Definition of Myocardial Infarction Global Task Force: Heart Failure Section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januzzi, James L; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Nieminen, Markku; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2012-09-01

    Cardiac troponin testing is commonly performed in patients with heart failure (HF). Despite being strongly linked to spontaneous (Type I) acute myocardial infarction (MI)--a common cause of acute HF syndromes--it is well recognized that concentrations of circulating troponins above the 99 th percentile of a normal population in the context of both acute and chronic HF are highly prevalent, and frequently unrelated to Type I MI. Other mechanism(s) leading to troponin elevation in HF syndromes remain elusive in many cases but prominently includes supply-demand inequity (Type II MI), which may be associated with coronary artery obstruction and endothelial dysfunction, or may occur in the absence of coronary obstruction due to increased oxygen demand related to increased wall tension, anaemia, or other factors provoking subendocardial injury. Non-coronary triggers, such as cellular necrosis, apoptosis, or autophagy in the context of wall stress may explain the troponin release in HF, as can toxic effects of circulating neurohormones, toxins, inflammation, and infiltrative processes, among others. Nonetheless, across a wide spectrum of HF syndromes, when troponin elevation occurs, independent of mechanism, it is strongly predictive of an adverse outcome. Clinicians should be aware of the high frequency of troponin elevation when measuring the marker in patients with HF, should keep in mind the possible causes of this phenomenon, and, independent of a diagnosis of 'acute MI', should recognize the considerable ramifications of troponin elevation in this setting.

  13. Postmastectomy radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shikama, Naoto; Koguchi, Masahiko; Sasaki, Shigeru; Kaneko, Tomoki; Shinoda, Atsunori; Nishikawa, Atsushi [Shinshu Univ., Matsumoto, Nagano (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-10-01

    Since there have been few reports on postmastectomy radiotherapy having a high evidence level in Japan, the significance of postoperative radiotherapy and the irradiation techniques were reviewed based on reports from Western countries. Authors focused on the indications for postoperative irradiation, irradiation methods (irradiation sites, irradiation techniques; prosthetics, methods of irradiating the chest wall and lymph nodes, timing of irradiation), and complications, and discuss them. The factors thought to be adaptable to postmastectomy radiotherapy have been listed. Axillary lymph node metastasis and the size of the primary focus are thought to be important factors in locoregional recurrence. The chest wall and the supraclavicular lymph nodes are the usual sites of irradiation after mastectomy. The irradiation method consists of tangential irradiation of the chest wall and single-field irradiation of the supraclavicular lymph nodes, with 46-50 Gy in fractional doses of 1.8-2 Gy x 5/w is administered for 4.5-5.5 weeks. The timing of irradiation in the West is generally after chemotherapy. Adverse radiation effects include ischemic heart disease, pneumonitis, arm edema, rib fractures, and brachial plexus paralysis. The frequency of these complications is increased by the combined use of chemotherapy or surgery. The breast cancer cure rate in Japan is generally better than in the West. It remains to be determined whether the clinical data from Europe and America are applicable to the treatment of breast cancer in Japan. To address this issue, a clinical investigation should be performed in Japan with close cooperation between surgeons, physicians, pathologists, and radiotherapists. (K.H.)

  14. Variation in radiotherapy target volume definition, dose to organs at risk and clinical target volumes using anatomic (computed tomography) versus combined anatomic and molecular imaging (positron emission tomography/computed tomography): intensity-modulated radiotherapy delivered using a tomotherapy Hi Art machine: final results of the VortigERN study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, S; Frew, J; Mott, J; McCallum, H; Stevenson, P; Maxwell, R; Wilsdon, J; Kelly, C G

    2012-12-01

    Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) is the current standard for delineating tumours of the head and neck for radiotherapy. Although metabolic imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) has been used in recent years, the studies were non-confirmatory in establishing its routine role in radiotherapy planning in the modern era. This study explored the difference in gross tumour volume and clinical target volume definitions for the primary and nodal volumes when FDG PET/CT was used as compared with CECT in oropharyngeal cancer cases. Twenty patients with oropharyngeal cancers had a PET/CT scan in the treatment position after consent. Target volumes were defined on CECT scans by a consultant clinical oncologist who was blind to the PET scans. After obtaining inputs from a radiologist, another set of target volumes were outlined on the PET/CT data set. The gross and clinical target volumes as defined on the two data sets were then analysed. The hypothesis of more accurate target delineation, preventing geographical miss and comparative overlap volumes between CECT and PET/CT, was explored. The study also analysed the volumes of intersection and analysed whether there was any TNM stage migration when PET/CT was used as compared with CECT for planning. In 17 of 20 patients, the TNM stage was not altered when adding FDG PET information to CT. PET information prevented geographical miss in two patients and identified distant metastases in one case. PET/CT gross tumour volumes were smaller than CECT volumes (mean ± standard deviation: 25.16 cm(3) ± 35.8 versus 36.56 cm(3) ± 44.14; P 0.86) were not statistically different. Similarity and discordance coefficients were calculated and are reported. PET/CT as compared with CECT could provide more clinically relevant information and prevent geographical miss when used for radiotherapy planning for advanced oropharyngeal tumours. Also, PET/CT provided a smaller better-defined target volume when compared with CECT

  15. A Comparison of Traditional and Novel Definitions (RIFLE, AKIN, and KDIGO) of Acute Kidney Injury for the Prediction of Outcomes in Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Andrew K.; Mc Gorrian, Catherine; Treacy, Cecelia; Kavanaugh, Edel; Brennan, Alice; Mahon, Niall G.; Murray, Patrick T.

    2013-01-01

    Aims To determine if newer criteria for diagnosing and staging acute kidney injury (AKI) during heart failure (HF) admission are more predictive of clinical outcomes at 30 days and 1 year than the traditional worsening renal function (WRF) definition. Methods We analyzed prospectively collected clinical data on 637 HF admissions with 30-day and 1-year follow-up. The incidence, stages, and outcomes of AKI were determined using the following four definitions: KDIGO, RIFLE, AKIN, and WRF (serum creatinine rise ≥0.3 mg/dl). Receiver operating curves were used to compare the predictive ability of each AKI definition for the occurrence of adverse outcomes (death, rehospitalization, dialysis). Results AKI by any definition occurred in 38.3% (244/637) of cases and was associated with an increased incidence of 30-day (32.3 vs. 6.9%, χ2 = 70.1; p < 0.001) and 1-year adverse outcomes (67.5 vs. 31.0%, χ2 = 81.4; p < 0.001). Most importantly, there was a stepwise increase in primary outcome with increasing stages of AKI severity using RIFLE, KDIGO, or AKIN (p < 0.001). In direct comparison, there were only small differences in predictive abilities between RIFLE and KDIGO and WRF concerning clinical outcomes at 30 days (AUC 0.76 and 0.74 vs. 0.72, χ2 = 5.6; p = 0.02) as well as for KDIGO and WRF at 1 year (AUC 0.67 vs. 0.65, χ2 = 4.8; p = 0.03). Conclusion During admission for HF, the benefits of using newer AKI classification systems (RIFLE, AKIN, KDIGO) lie with the ability to identify those patients with more severe degrees of AKI who will go on to experience adverse events at 30 days and 1 year. The differences in terms of predictive abilities were only marginal. PMID:23801998

  16. Gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery as salvage therapy after failure of whole-brain radiotherapy in patients with small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Sunit; Chan, Michael D; Lovato, James F; Ellis, Thomas L; Tatter, Stephen B; Bourland, J Daniel; Munley, Michael T; deGuzman, Allan F; Shaw, Edward G; Urbanic, James J; McMullen, Kevin P

    2012-05-01

    Radiosurgery has been successfully used in selected cases to avoid repeat whole-brain irradiation (WBI) in patients with multiple brain metastases of most solid tumor histological findings. Few data are available for the use of radiosurgery for small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Between November 1999 and June 2009, 51 patients with SCLC and previous WBI and new brain metastases were treated with GammaKnife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS). A median dose of 18 Gy (range, 10-24 Gy) was prescribed to the margin of each metastasis. Patients were followed with serial imaging. Patient electronic records were reviewed to determine disease-related factors and clinical outcomes after GKSRS. Local and distant brain failure rates, overall survival, and likelihood of neurologic death were determined based on imaging results. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to determine survival and local and distant brain control. Cox proportional hazard regression was performed to determine strength of association between disease-related factors and survival. Median survival time for the entire cohort was 5.9 months. Local control rates at 1 and 2 years were 57% and 34%, respectively. Distant brain failure rates at 1 and 2 years were 58% and 75%, respectively. Fifty-three percent of patients ultimately died of neurologic death. On multivariate analysis, patients with stable (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.89) or progressive (HR = 6.98) extracranial disease (ECD) had worse overall survival than patients without evidence of ECD (p = 0.00002). Concurrent chemotherapy improved local control (HR = 89; p = 0.006). GKSRS represents a feasible salvage option in patients with SCLC and brain metastases for whom previous WBI has failed. The status of patients' ECD is a dominant factor predictive of overall survival. Local control may be inferior to that seen with other cancer histological results, although the use of concurrent chemotherapy may help to improve this. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  17. Gamma Knife Stereotactic Radiosurgery as Salvage Therapy After Failure of Whole-Brain Radiotherapy in Patients With Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Sunit [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Chan, Michael D., E-mail: mchan@wfubmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Lovato, James F. [Division of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Ellis, Thomas L.; Tatter, Stephen B. [Department of Neurosurgery, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Bourland, J. Daniel; Munley, Michael T.; Guzman, Allan F. de; Shaw, Edward G.; Urbanic, James J.; McMullen, Kevin P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Radiosurgery has been successfully used in selected cases to avoid repeat whole-brain irradiation (WBI) in patients with multiple brain metastases of most solid tumor histological findings. Few data are available for the use of radiosurgery for small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Methods and Materials: Between November 1999 and June 2009, 51 patients with SCLC and previous WBI and new brain metastases were treated with GammaKnife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS). A median dose of 18 Gy (range, 10-24 Gy) was prescribed to the margin of each metastasis. Patients were followed with serial imaging. Patient electronic records were reviewed to determine disease-related factors and clinical outcomes after GKSRS. Local and distant brain failure rates, overall survival, and likelihood of neurologic death were determined based on imaging results. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to determine survival and local and distant brain control. Cox proportional hazard regression was performed to determine strength of association between disease-related factors and survival. Results: Median survival time for the entire cohort was 5.9 months. Local control rates at 1 and 2 years were 57% and 34%, respectively. Distant brain failure rates at 1 and 2 years were 58% and 75%, respectively. Fifty-three percent of patients ultimately died of neurologic death. On multivariate analysis, patients with stable (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.89) or progressive (HR = 6.98) extracranial disease (ECD) had worse overall survival than patients without evidence of ECD (p = 0.00002). Concurrent chemotherapy improved local control (HR = 89; p = 0.006). Conclusions: GKSRS represents a feasible salvage option in patients with SCLC and brain metastases for whom previous WBI has failed. The status of patients' ECD is a dominant factor predictive of overall survival. Local control may be inferior to that seen with other cancer histological results, although the use of concurrent chemotherapy may help to

  18. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy for stage IVA/IVB nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Clinical outcomes and patterns of failure in an endemic area in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Lei; Tian, Yun-Ming; Sun, Xue-Ming; Huang, Ying; Chen, Chun-Yan; Han, Fei; Liu, Shuai; Lan, Mei; Guan, Ying [Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, State Key Laboratory Oncology in South China, Guangzhou (China); Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Guangzhou (China); Deng, Xiao-Wu; Lu, Tai-Xiang [Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Guangzhou (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, State Key Laboratory Oncology in South China, Guangzhou (China)

    2014-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the mode of relapse patterns and survival of 209 patients with stage IVA and IVB nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). A total of 209 patients who underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and were subsequently histologically diagnosed with nondisseminated stage IV NPC received intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) as their primary treatment and were included in this retrospective study. Median follow-up time was 65 months (range, 3-108 months). The 5-year overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), local recurrence-free survival (LRFS), locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRRFS), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) rates for patients with stage IVA and stage IVB NPC were 72.7 vs. 60.0 % (p = 0.319), 62.9 vs. 51.3 % (p = 0.070), 82.9 vs. 93.1 % (p = 0.070), 82.9 vs. 82.9 % (p = 0.897), 76.4 vs. 58.5 % (p = 0.003), respectively. Age older than 44 years was found to be a statistically significant adverse independent prognostic factor for OS. Patients with advanced N status had worse OS, DFS, and DMFS rates. Patients with a primary gross tumor volume (GTV-P) ≥ 55.11 ml had worse OS, DFS, and LRRFS rates. The results of treating stage IVA NPC with IMRT were excellent. Distant metastasis remains the most difficult treatment challenge for patients with stage IVA and IVB NPC, and more effective systemic chemotherapy should be explored. (orig.) [German] Ziel dieser Studie war die Analyse der Rezidivmuster und des Ueberlebens von 209 Patienten mit nasopharyngealem Karzinom (NPC) im Stadium IVA und IVB. Insgesamt 209 Patienten, die mittels MRT und anschliessender histologischer Untersuchung mit nichtdisseminiertem NPC im Stadium IV diagnostiziert worden waren, erhielten eine intensitaetsmodulierte Strahlentherapie (IMRT) als Primaerbehandlung und wurden in diese retrospektive Studie aufgenommen. Die mediane Follow-up-Dauer betrug 65 Monate (Bereich 3-108 Monate). Das 5-Jahres-Gesamtueberleben (OS), das

  19. Anatomo-clinical target volumes (GTV and CTV) in radiotherapy; Volumes cibles anatomocliniques (GTV et CTV) en radiotherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kantor, G. [Institut Bergonie, Universite Victor-Segalen, Dept. de Radiotherapie, Centre Regional de Lutte Contre le Cancer, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Halimi, P. [Hopital Europeen Georges-Pompidou, Service de Radiologie, Faculte de Medecine Paris-5, 75 - Paris (France)

    2005-06-15

    In this issue will be tackled the development of tools (multi modules scanner and images fusion) and the analysis of volumes for cerebral tumors (head and neck). It seemed necessary to update this theme because of the ever more widespread use of conformation radiotherapy and new constraints of volumes definitions brought by radiotherapy with intensity modulation. (N.C.)

  20. Risk factors for locoregional recurrence in patients with resected N1 non-small cell lung cancer: a retrospective study to identify patterns of failure and implications for adjuvant radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Meta-analysis of randomized trials has shown that postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) had a detrimental effect on overall survival (OS) in patients with resected N1 non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Conversely, the locoregional recurrence (LR) rate is reported to be high without adjuvant PORT in these patients. We have evaluated the pattern of failure, actuarial risk and risk factors for LR in order to identify the subset of N1 NSCLC patients with the highest risk of LR. These patients could potentially benefit from PORT. Methods We conducted a retrospective study on 199 patients with pathologically confirmed T1–3N1M0 NSCLC who underwent surgery. None of the patients had positive surgical margins or received preoperative therapy or PORT. The median follow-up was 53.8 months. Complete mediastinal lymph node (MLN) dissection and examination was defined as ≥3 dissected and examined MLN stations; incomplete MLN dissection or examination (IMD) was defined as 10% were significantly associated with lower FFLR rates (P < 0.05). Multivariate analyses further confirmed positive lymph nodes at station 10 and IMD as risk factors for LR (P < 0.05). The 5-year LR rate was highest in patients with both these risk factors (48%). Conclusions The incidence of LR in patients with surgically resected T1–3N1M0 NSCLC is high. Patients with IMD and positive lymph nodes at station 10 have the highest risk of LR, and may therefore benefit from adjuvant PORT. Further investigations of PORT in this subset of patients are warranted. PMID:24321392

  1. Risk factors for failure to thrive in infancy depend on the anthropometric definitions used: The Copenhagen County Child Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Else Marie; Skovgaard, Anne M; Weile, Birgitte

    2007-01-01

    used criterion of downward crossing of centiles on an ordinary weight-for-age chart was associated with factors normally linked with low risk of adverse physical and mental development. Slow conditional weight gain, irrespective of additional thinness, seemed to identify infants with prenatal growth......Failure to thrive (FTT) is the term widely used to describe poor weight gain in infancy, a condition associated with cognitive deficiency in later childhood. FTT has been investigated in earlier population studies, but little is known about risk factors for FTT or the sequence of events...... as this requires data to be collected prospectively within the first year of life. Furthermore, several different anthropometric criteria have been used to define FTT, and it is not known whether children identified by the different criteria are comparable. In the present population study we compared risk factors...

  2. An idic(15) associated with POF (premature ovarian failure): molecular cytogenetic definition of a case and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertini, Veronica; Viola, David; Vitti, Paolo; Simi, Paolo; Valetto, Angelo

    2012-07-15

    We report on a 36-year-old infertile woman, presenting a premature ovarian failure with an otherwise normal female phenotype. Cytogenetic analyses showed the presence of a supernumerary marker chromosome, that was characterized by FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization) and array CGH (comparative genomic hybridization). This marker chromosome was derived from chromosome 15, and contained only heterochromatic material. The Prader Willi/Angelman region was not present. No duplications of the 15q regions were detected by array CGH. Supernumerary markers of chromosome 15 have been reported in cases of infertility and amenorrhea, that is also described in cases with marker derived by other acrocentric chromosomes. The case here presented constitutes a further example that etiology of POF is not always associated with a defective gene, but in some cases oocytes atresia can be the consequence of the abnormal meiotic pairing of chromosomes.

  3. A Phase II Study of Bevacizumab in Combination With Definitive Radiotherapy and Cisplatin Chemotherapy in Untreated Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Carcinoma: Preliminary Results of RTOG 0417

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schefter, Tracey E., E-mail: tracey.schefter@ucdenver.edu [University of Colorado-Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Winter, Kathryn [RTOG Statistical Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Kwon, Janice S. [University of British Columbia and BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Stuhr, Kelly [Anschutz Cancer Pavilion, Aurora, CO (United States); Balaraj, Khalid [King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Yaremko, Brian P. [University of Western Ontario, London Regional Cancer Program, London, ON (Canada); Small, William [The Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Gaffney, David K. [University of Utah Health Science Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Concurrent cisplatin-based chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is the standard treatment for locally advanced cervical cancer. RTOG 0417 was a Phase II study exploring the safety and efficacy of the addition of bevacizumab to standard CRT. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients with bulky tumors (Stage IB-IIIB) were treated with once-weekly cisplatin (40 mg/m{sup 2}) chemotherapy and standard pelvic radiotherapy and brachytherapy. Bevacizumab was administered at 10 mg/kg intravenously every 2 weeks for three cycles. Treatment-related serious adverse event (SAE) and other adverse event (AE) rates within the first 90 days from treatment start were determined. Treatment-related SAEs were defined as any Grade {>=}4 vaginal bleeding or thrombotic event or Grade {>=}3 arterial event, gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, or bowel/bladder perforation, or any Grade 5 treatment-related death. Treatment-related AEs included all SAEs and Grade 3 or 4 GI toxicity persisting for >2 weeks despite medical intervention, Grade 4 neutropenia or leukopenia persisting for >7 days, febrile neutropenia, Grade 3 or 4 other hematologic toxicity, and Grade 3 or 4 GI, renal, cardiac, pulmonary, hepatic, or neurologic AEs. All AEs were scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria (CTCAE) v 3.0 (MedDRA version 6.0). Results: A total of 60 patients from 28 institutions were enrolled between 2006 and 2009, and of these, 49 patients were evaluable. The median follow-up was 12.4 months (range, 4.6-31.4 months).The median age was 45 years (range, 22-80 years). Most patients had FIGO Stage IIB (63%) and were of Zubrod performance status of 0 (67%). 80% of cases were squamous. There were no treatment-related SAEs. There were 15 (31%) protocol-specified treatment-related AEs within 90 days of treatment start; the most common were hematologic (12/15; 80%). 18 (37%) occurred during treatment or follow-up at any time. 37 of the 49 patients (76%) had cisplatin and bevacizumab

  4. The prognostic impact of supraclavicular lymph node in N3-IIIB stage non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with definitive concurrent chemo-radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Dongryul; Ahn, Yong Chan; Park, Hee Chul; Lim, Do Hoon; Noh, Jae Myoung; Cho, Won Kyung; Pyo, Hongryull

    2017-05-30

    This study aimed to investigate the prognostic impact of supraclavicular lymph node (SCN) metastasis in patients who were treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy for N3-IIIB stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The 2- and 5-year overall survival (OS) rates were 57.3% and 35.7% in patients without SCN metastasis and 56.4% and 26.7% in patients with SCN metastasis, respectively. The median OS was 34 months in both groups. There was no significant difference in OS between the two groups (p = 0.679). The 2- and 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 24.1% and 12.6% in patients without SCN metastasis and 18.0% and 16.0% in patients with SCN metastasis, respectively. Patients without SCN metastasis had slightly longer median PFS (10 months vs. 8 months), but the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.223). In multivariate analysis, SCN metastasis was not a significant factor for OS (p = 0.391) and PFS (p = 0.149). This retrospective analysis included 204 consecutive patients who were treated with chemoradiotherapy for N3-IIIB stage NSCLC between May 2003 and December 2012. A median RT dose of 66 Gy was administered over 6.5 weeks. Of these, 119 patients (58.3%) had SCN metastasis and 85 (41.7%) had another type of N3 disease: mediastinal N3 nodes in 84 patients (98.8%) and contralateral hilar node in one (1.2%). The patients were divided into two groups according to SCN metastasis. SCN metastasis does not compromise treatment outcomes compared to other mediastinal metastasis in the setting of definitive chemoradiotherapy.

  5. Efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy for the histology-confirmed intracranial germinoma-preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Young Ju; Kim, Hak Jae; Heo, Dae Seog; Shin, Hee Yung; Kim, Il Han [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-06-15

    We intended to decrease late CNS reaction after radical radiotherapy for an intracranial germinoma by using combined neoadjuvant chemotherapy and involved-field radiotherapy. The efficacy in terms of its acute toxicity and short-term relapse patterns was analyzed. Eighteen patients were treated with combined neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy between 1995 and 2001. The chemotherapy regimen used was the Children's Cancer Group (CCG) 9921A (cisplatin, cyclophosphamide, VP-16, vincristine) for 5 patients younger than 16 years, BEP(bleomycin, VP-16, cisplatin) for 12 patients, and EP (VP-16, cisplatin) for 1 patient. The radiotherapy covered the whole craniospinal axis for 5 patients, the whole brain for 1, and the partial brain (involved field) for 12. the primary lesion received tumour doses between 3,960 and 5,400 cGy. The male to female ratio was 16:2 and the median age was 16 years old. The tumors were located in the pineal gland in 12 patients, in the suprasellar region in 1, in the basal ganglia in 1, in the thalamus in 1. Three patients had multiple lesions and ventricular seedings were shown at MRI. In 3 patients, tumor cells were detected in the cerebrospinal fluid and MRI detected a spinal seeding in 2 patients. The response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy was complete remission in 5 patients, partial remission in 12, and no response in 1. However, after radiotherapy, all except 1 patient experienced complete remission. The toxicity during or after chemotherapy greater than or equal to grade III was remarkable; hematologic toxicity was observed in 11 patients, liver toxicity in none, kidney toxicity in none, and gastrointestinal toxicity in one. One patient suffered from bleomycin-induced pneumonitis. Radiotherapy was therefore stopped and the patient eventually died of respiratory failure. The other 17 are alive without any evidence of disease or relapse during an average of 20 months follow-up. A high response rate and disease control was

  6. Radiotherapy with linear accelerator in a patient with permanent pacemaker, methodology and results of dose determination in a case in vivo; Radioterapia con Linac en un paciente con marcapasos permanente, metodologia y resultados de determinacion de dosis en un caso in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz A, P.; Dominguez O, X.; Toledo B, V.; Nungaray, H.; Zazueta L, F., E-mail: pdiaz@hospitalsanjavier.co [Hospital San Javier, Pablo Casals No. 640, Col. Prados Providencia, 44670 Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico)

    2010-09-15

    This work presents the methodology used by the radiotherapy department of the Hospital San Javier in the patients handling with pacemaker. By means of dosimetry to the implant area of the pacemaker together with electrocardiography measurements during the radiotherapy sessions, the pacemaker performance is evaluated with the objective of detecting any anomaly to the same caused by electromagnetic interference and/or accumulated dose. It is necessary to follow specific protocols in these patients type that guarantee their security during the exposition to ionizing radiation since a definitive consent that allows to calculate the failure probability of pacemaker in this therapeutic condition does not exist. (Author)

  7. The Early Result of Whole Pelvic Radiotherapy and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Boost for High Risk Localized Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Wei eLin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available PurposeThe rationale for hypofractionated radiotherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer is based on the modern understanding of radiobiology and advances in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT techniques. Whole-pelvis irradiation combined with SBRT boost for high-risk prostate cancer might escalate biologically effective dose without increasing toxicity. Here, we report our 4-year results of SBRT boost for high-risk localized prostate cancer.Methods and MaterialsFrom October 2009 to August 2012, 41 patients of newly diagnosed, high-risk or very high-risk (NCCN definition localized prostate cancer patients were treated with whole-pelvis irradiation and SBRT boost. The whole pelvis dose was 45Gy (25 fractions of 1.8Gy. The SBRT boost dose was 21 Gy (three fractions of 7 Gy. Ninety percent of these patients received hormone therapy. The toxicities of gastrointestinal (GI and genitourinary (GU tracts were scored by Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Effect (CTCAE v3.0. Biochemical failure was defined by Phoenix definition.ResultsMedian follow-up was 42 months. Mean PSA before treatment was 44.18 ng/ml. Mean PSA level at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months was 0.94, 0.44, 0.13, 0.12, and 0.05 ng/ml, respectively. The estimated 4-year biochemical failure-free survival was 91.9%. Three biochemical failures were observed. GI and GU tract toxicities were minimal. No grade 3 acute GU or GI toxicity was noted. During radiation therapy, 27% of the patient had grade 2 acute GU toxicity and 12% had grade 2 acute GI toxicity. At 3 months, most toxicity scores had returned to baseline. At the last follow up, there was no grade 3 late GU or GI toxicity.ConclusionsWhole-pelvis irradiation combined with SBRT boost for high-risk localized prostate cancer is feasible with minimal toxicity and encouraging biochemical failure-free survival. Continued accrual and follow-up would be necessary to confirm the biochemical control rate and the toxicity profiles.

  8. Do Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors Reduce the Risk of Symptomatic Radiation Pneumonitis in Patients with Non-small Cell Lung Cancer after Definitive Radiotherapy? Analysis of a Single-Institution Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongmei; Liao, Zhongxing; Zhuang, Yan; Xu, Ting; Nguyen, Quynh-Nhu; Levy, Lawrence B.; O'eilly, Michael S.; Gold, Kathryn A.; Gomez, Daniel R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Preclinical studies have suggested that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) can mitigate radiation-induced lung injury. We sought here to investigate possible associations between ACEI use and the risk of symptomatic radiation pneumonitis (RP) among patients undergoing radiation therapy (RT) for non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods We retrospectively identified patients who received definitive radiotherapy for stage I–III NSCLC in 2004–2010 at a single tertiary cancer center. Patients must have received a radiation dose of at least 60 Gy for a single primary lung tumor and have had imaging and dosimetric data available for analysis. RP was quantified according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0. A Cox proportional hazard model was used to assess potential associations between ACEI use and risk of symptomatic RP. Results Of the 413 patients analyzed, 65 were using ACEIs during RT. In univariate analysis, the rate of grade ⩾2 RP seemed lower in ACEI users than in nonusers (34% vs 46%), but this apparent difference was not statistically significant (P=0.06). In multivariate analysis of all patients, ACEI use was not associated with the risk of symptomatic RP (hazard ratio [HR]=0.66, P=0.07) after adjustment for sex, smoking status, mean lung dose (MLD), and concurrent carboplatin and paclitaxel chemotherapy. Subgroup analysis showed that ACEI use did have a protective effect from grade ≥2 RP among patients who received a low (⩽;20 Gy) MLD (PACEIs during RT for NSCLC was not statistically significant on univariate or multivariate analyses, though certain subgroups may benefit from use (i.e., male patients and those with low MLD). The evidence at this point is insufficient to establish whether the use of ACEIs does or does not reduce the risk of RP. PMID:24161424

  9. Radiotherapy for breast cancer and pacemaker; Radiotherapie pour un cancer du sein et stimulateur cardiaque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menard, J.; Campana, F.; Bollet, M.A.; Dendale, R.; Fournier-Bidoz, N.; Marchand, V.; Mazal, A.; Fourquet, A.; Kirova, Y.M. [Oncologie-radiotherapie, institut Curie, 26, rue d' Ulm, 75005 Paris (France); Kirov, K.M.; Esteve, M. [Departement d' anesthesie-reanimation-douleur, institut Curie, 75005 Paris (France)

    2011-06-15

    before radiotherapy and everyday monitoring permitted the safe treatment of our patients. Updated guidelines are definitely needed with more details about acceptable doses at the different parts of the pacemaker. (authors)

  10. [Understanding heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boo, José Fernando Guadalajara

    2006-01-01

    Heart failure is a disease with several definitions. The term "heart failure" is used by has brougth about confusion in the terminology. For this reason, the value of the ejection fraction (< 0.40 or < 0.35) is used in most meganalyses on the treatment of heart failure, avoiding the term "heart failure" that is a confounding concept. In this paper we carefully analyze the meaning of contractility, ventricular function or performance, preload, afterload, heart failure, compensation mechanisms in heart failure, myocardial oxygen consumption, inadequate, adequate and inappropriate hypertrophy, systole, diastole, compliance, problems of relaxation, and diastolic dysfunction. Their definitions are supported by the original scientific descriptions in an attempt to clarify the concepts about ventricular function and heart failure and, in this way, use the same scientific language about the meaning of ventricular function, heart failure, and diastolic dysfunction.

  11. SU-E-J-184: Volumetric Indices to Aid Definition of Respiratory Gates with Particular Reference to Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malhotra, H; Gomez, J [Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Conventional definition of respiratory gates relies on tumor motion determination in limited planes. We are proposing a new method to define the RPM gates in a consistent manner ensuring that the tumor motion is restricted to 4 mm in 3D for lung SBRT patients. The method relies on studying the ratio of volumes obtained by GTVnn intersection with GTV50+2mm margin and GTVnn where GTVnn is the GTV volume in phase nn (=0,10,30.) while GTV50+2mm is a pseudo structure created by adding an isotropic margin of 2mm to GTV50. If for any phase nn, above ratio equals 1, it ensures that the tumor motion is ≤ ±2 mm in 3D from GTV50. Methods: This method was tested for 50 patients (14-Central, 36-peripheral) to determine the RPM gates which were then compared with the gates used clinically. The minimum cut-off value of the above coefficient for its inclusion of a phase in RPM gate was taken as 0.97 for central and 0.95 for peripheral tumors. Results: 15 (30%) of the patients did not require any change in the RPM gates w.r.t. gates defined using conventional motion assessment methods. In 15(30%) cases, the RPM gates could have been smaller while in remaining 20 patients, gates could have been larger. 5(/14) patient’s central tumors and 10 (/36) peripheral tumors did not need any gate change. 8(/50) patients could have RPM gate change of 30% while 10(/50) could have a gate change of up to 20%. 10, 20 & 30% RPM gate change could have happened for 11, 10 & 9 patients, respectively. Conclusion: Proposed volumetric indices based method allows a consistent, scientific and objective method to decide optimal RPM gates which is free from any inter or intra person variability and satisfies the tumor motion limits as defined by AAPM TG-76 in totality.

  12. Radiobiology of human cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, J.R.

    1978-01-01

    The author has systematically collected and collated the scientific literature correlating the basic and clinical sciences in this field in order to produce a definitive treatise. The book thoroughly reviews the biology and biochemistry relevant to radiobiology and describes the critical locus for the extinction of cell reproductive capacity. Extensive coverage is given to oxygen effect, hyperthermia, high linear energy transfer, cell populations, and similar topics. Separate sections cover time, dose, and fractionation; radiation hematology; cancer chemotherapy; and cancer immunology. The book also contains invaluable discussions of techniques for optimizing radiotherapy alone and in combination with other therapies.

  13. Oral verrucous carcinoma. Treatment with radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nair, M.K.; Sankaranarayanan, R.; Padmanabhan, T.K.; Madhu, C.S.

    1988-02-01

    Fifty-two cases of oral verrucous carcinoma treated with radiotherapy at the Regional Cancer Centre, Trivandrum, Kerala, India in 1982 were evaluated to determine the distribution within the oral cavity, clinical extent, and effectiveness of radiotherapy in controlling the disease. The most common site was the buccal mucosa. Fifty percent of the patients had clinically negative regional lymph nodes and 33% were in earlier stages (T1, T2, N0, and M0). The overall 3-year no evidence of disease (NED) survival rate was 44%. The 3-year NED survival rate with radium implant was 86%. We cannot comment on anaplastic transformation after radiotherapy because our treatment failures have not been subjected for biopsy concerning this matter. Because the results are comparable with those of well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma, we think that the treatment policies advocated for oral squamous cell carcinoma are also applicable to oral verrucous carcinoma.

  14. Postoperative radiotherapy for endometrial cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Eun Cheol; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Ok Bae; Byun, Sang Jun; Park, Seung Gyu; Kwon, Sang Hoon [Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    To investigate the prognostic factors and effectiveness of postoperative radiotherapy alone for endometrial carcinoma. Sixty four patients with stage I?III endometrial cancer (EC) treated with postoperative radiotherapy alone between January 1989 and December 2008 at the Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center were chosen for the present study. Typically, total hysterectomy, salpingo-oophorectomy and lymphadenectomy were performed on the patient's pelvis. Total dose from 50.4 Gy to 63 Gy was irradiated at pelvis or extended fi eld. Thirteen patients were treated with Co-60 or Ir-192 intracavitary radiotherapy. Follow-up periods were from 7 to 270 months, with a median of 56 months. Five year overall survival (OS) rate was 58.7%, respectively. Five year disease-free survival (DFS) rate was 59.2%, respectively. In univariate analysis for OS and DFS, stage, menopausal age, type of operation, serosal invasion, and lymph node involvement were found to be statistically significant. Histologic type was marginally significant. In multivariate analysis for OS and DFS, stage, types of operation, histologic type were also found to be statistically significant. Treatment failure occurred in 14 patients. The main pattern of failure was found to be distant metastasis. Time to distant metastasis was from 3 to 86 months (median, 12 months). There were no grade 3 or 4 complications. Stage, types of operation, and histologic type could be the predictive prognostic factors in patients. We contemplated postoperative radiation as effective and safe treatment method for EC. Additional treatment would be needed to reduce distant metastasis.

  15. PET/CT Based Dose Planning in Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Jakobsen, Annika Loft; Sapru, Wendy;

    2011-01-01

    This mini-review describes how to perform PET/CT based radiotherapy dose planning and the advantages and possibilities obtained with the technique for radiation therapy. Our own experience since 2002 is briefly summarized from more than 2,500 patients with various malignant diseases undergoing...... radiotherapy planning with PET/CT prior to the treatment. The PET/CT, including the radiotherapy planning process as well as the radiotherapy process, is outlined in detail. The demanding collaboration between mould technicians, nuclear medicine physicians and technologists, radiologists and radiology...... technologists, radiation oncologists, physicists, and dosimetrists is emphasized. We strongly believe that PET/CT based radiotherapy planning will improve the therapeutic output in terms of target definition and non-target avoidance and will play an important role in future therapeutic interventions in many...

  16. IMAGE-GUIDED RADIOTHERAPY AND -BRACHYTHERAPY FOR CERVICAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh eDutta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Conventional radiotherapy for cervical cancer relies on clinical examination, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT, and 2-dimensional intracavitary brachytherapy.Excellent local control and survival have been obtained for small early stage cervical cancer with definitive radiotherapy. For bulky and locally advanced disease, the addition of chemotherapy has improved the prognosis but toxicity remains significant. New imaging technology such as positron emission tomography (PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has improved tumor delineation for radiotherapy planning. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT may decrease treatment toxicity of whole pelvic radiation because of its potential for bone marrow, bowel, and bladder sparring. Tumor shrinkage during whole pelvic IGRT may optimize image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT, allowing for better local control and reduced toxicity for patients with cervical cancer. IGRT and IGBT should be integrated in future prospective studies for cervical cancer.

  17. The relationship between the biochemical control outcomes and the quality of planning of high-dose rate brachytherapy as a boost to external beam radiotherapy for locally and locally advanced prostate cancer using the RTOG-ASTRO Phoenix definition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Cassio Assis Pellizzon, João Salvajoli, Paulo Novaes, Maria Maia, Ricardo Fogaroli, Doglas Gides, Rodrigues Horriot

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluated prognostic factors and impact of the quality of planning of high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT for patients with local or locally advanced prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT and HDR-BT. Methods and Materials: Between 1997 and 2005, 209 patients with biopsy proven prostate adenocarcinoma were treated with localized EBRT and HDR-BT at the Department of Radiation-Oncology, Hospital A. C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, Brazil. Patient's age, Gleason score (GS, clinical stage (CS, initial PSA (iPSA, risk group for biochemical failure (GR, doses of EBRT and HDR-BT, use of three-dimensional planning for HDR-BT (3DHDR and the Biological Effective Dose (BED were evaluated as prognostic factors for biochemical control (bC. Results: Median age and median follow-up time were 68 and 5.3 years, respectively. Median EBRT and HDR-BT doses were 45 Gy and 20 Gy. The crude bC at 3.3 year was 94.2%. For the Low, intermediate and high risk patients the bC rates at 3.3 years were 91.5%, 90.2% and 88.5%, respectively. Overall survival (OS and disease specific survival rates at 3.3 years were 97.8% and 98.4%, respectively. On univariate analysis the prognostic factors related bC were GR (p= 0.040, GS ≤ 6 (p= 0.002, total dose of HDR-BT ≥ 20 Gy (p< 0.001, 3DHDR (p< 0.001, BED-HDR ≥ 99 Gy1.5 (p<0.001 and BED-TT ≥ 185 (p<0.001. On multivariate analysis the statistical significant predictive factors related to bC were RG (p< 0.001, HDR-BT ≥ 20 Gy (p=0.008 and 3DHDR (p<0.001. Conclusions: we observed that the bC rates correlates with the generally accepted risk factors described in the literature. Dose escalation, evaluated through the BED, and the quality of planning of HDR-BT are also important predictive factors when treating prostate cancer.

  18. Reappearance of cancer of the cervix 19 years after radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ampil, F. [Lousiana State Univ. Medical Center, Dept. of Radiology, Louisiana (United States); Bell, M.; Martin, D. [Lousiana State Univ. Medical Center, Dept. of Obstetrics- Gynecology, Louisiana (United States)

    1997-07-01

    Most of the recurrences after Wertheim hysterectomy or definitive radiotherapy for cancer of the cervix occur within two or three years following treatment. Late recurrence is an uncommon event accounting for less than 1% of all patients with cancer of the cervix treated by radiotherapy. We present a case of reappearance of cervical cancer 19 years after irradiation and review the literature. (au) 7 refs.

  19. A systematic review of antiproton radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin-Immanuel eBittner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiprotons have been proposed as possible particles for radiotherapy; over the past years, the renewed interest in the potential biomedical relevance led to an increased research activity. It is the aim of this review to deliver a comprehensive overview regarding the evidence accumulated so far, analysing the background and depicting the current status of antiprotons in radiotherapy. A literature search has been conducted, including major scientific and commercial databases. All articles and a number of relevant conference abstracts published in the respective field have been included in this systematic review. The physical basis of antiproton radiotherapy is complex; however, the characterisation of the energy deposition profile supports its potential use in radiotherapy. Also the dosimetry improved considerably over the past few years. Regarding the biological properties, data on the effects on cells are presented; however, definite conclusions regarding the relative biological effectiveness cannot be made at the moment and radiobiological evidence of enhanced effectiveness remains scarce. In addition, there is new evidence supporting the potential imaging properties, for example for online dose verification. Clinical settings which might profit from the use of antiprotons have been further tracked. Judging from the evidence available so far, clinical constellations requiring optimal sparing in the entrance region of the beam and re-irradiations might profit most from antiproton radiotherapy. While several open questions remain to be answered, first steps towards a thorough characterisation of this interesting modality have been made.

  20. 宫颈癌根治性放疗旋转容积调强技术及固定野动态调强放疗技术的剂量学差异%Dso im etric study of volumetric modulated radiotherapy in cervical cancer treated with definitive radiotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴丽丽; 谢文佳; 张武哲; 林珠; 翟田田; 谢良喜

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare volumetic modulated radiotherapy ( VMAT) techniques with dynamic multileaf collimator intensi-ty-modulated radiotherapy ( DMLC-IMRT) techniques in cervical cancer treated with definitive whole pelvic radiotherapy , and to explore its advantage to protect the pelvic bone marrow ( PMB) .Methods CT datasets of 9 staged ⅡA~ⅢB intact cervical cancer patients were in-cluded.VMAT plans and DMLC-IMRT plans were created based on each CT dataset by planning treatment system (Eclipse 10.0).Plans were evaluated on parameters of target , PMB and other pelvic organs , derived from dose volume histograms .The MU and delivery time were scored to measure expected treatment efficiency .Results Both VMAT and DMLC-IMRT resulted in equivalent target coverage and heteroge-neity index (HI), but VMAT had a slightly improved conformity index (CI =0.93±0.00 for VMAT and 0.92±0.02 for DMLC-IMRT). Compared with DMLC-IMRT, VMAT showed comparable volume of PBM at dose level of 10, 20 and 40 Gy, and mildly reduced the volume of bowel at 40 Gy and 45 Gy dose level(P<0.05).Similar trends were observed for the bladder .However, on retumn the volume received 45 Gy were increased (P<0.05),and the mean doses were the similar .The MU from VMAT was (848.4±58.8)s corresponding to an average beam on time of(136.2±3.6)s per fraction of 2 Gy.IMRT plans presented significantly higher values with an average of MU =(1 850.3± 227.8)s and of beam on time =(353.2±25.1)s.Conclusions VMAT is invesgated for intact cervix cancer showing comparable avoidance of PBM and other organ at risk with umcompromised target coverage in regard to DMLC-IMRT.In combination with the confirmed shorter de-livery time and fewer MUs , could lead to clinically significant advances in the management of this highly aggressive cancer type .%目的:探讨旋转容积调强技术( VMAT)和固定野动态调强放疗技术( DMLCI-MRT )在宫颈癌根治性放疗中的剂量学差异及其保护骨盆

  1. Radiotherapy for renal cell carcinoma: renaissance of an overlooked approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siva, Shankar; Kothari, Gargi; Muacevic, Alexander; Louie, Alexander V; Slotman, Ben J; Teh, Bin S; Lo, Simon S

    2017-06-20

    Conventional radiotherapy previously had a limited role in the definitive treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), owing to the disappointing outcomes of several trials and the perceived radioresistance of this type of cancer. In this context, radiotherapy has been relegated largely to the palliation of symptoms in patients with metastatic disease, with variable rates of response. Following the availability of newer technologies that enable safe delivery of high-dose radiotherapy, stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) has become increasingly used in patients with RCC. Preclinical evidence demonstrates that RCC cells are sensitive to ablative doses of radiotherapy (≥8-10 Gy). Trials in the setting of intracranial and extracranial oligometastases, as well as primary RCC, have demonstrated excellent tumour control using this approach. Additionally, an awareness of the capacity of high-dose radiation to stimulate antitumour immunity has resulted in novel combinations of SABR with immunotherapies. Here we describe the historical application of conventional radiotherapy, the current biological understanding of the effects of radiation, and the clinical evidence supporting the use of ablative radiotherapy in RCC. We also explore emerging opportunities to combine systemic targeted agents or immunotherapies with radiation. Radiotherapy, although once an overlooked approach, is moving towards the forefront of RCC treatment.

  2. Radiotherapy of esthesioneuroblastoma. Radiotherapie beim Aesthesioneuroblastom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strnad, V. (Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Strahlentherapeutische Klinik und Poliklinik); Grabenbauer, G.G. (Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Strahlentherapeutische Klinik und Poliklinik); Dunst, J. (Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Strahlentherapeutische Klinik und Poliklinik); Sauer, R. (Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Strahlentherapeutische Klinik und Poliklinik)

    1994-02-01

    From 1985 through 1990, twelve patients with estehesioneuroblastoma have been treated at the Department of Radiotherapy at the University of Erlangen. Two had Kadish stage A, one stage B, and nine stage C. There were seven males and five females with a mean age of 43 years. Eleven patients had combined trancranial-transbasal surgery prior to radiotherapy (five R0-, four R1-, and two patients R2-resections) and one received radiotherapy only. The dose was 12 to 60 Gy (mean 54 Gy) in 1.8 Gy to 2 Gy per fraction. 8/12 patients (67%) were locally controlled. One had progressive disease during radiotherapy after partial resection and died. Three had local recurrences, one in-field and two marginal. One patient with a local recurrence developed cervical lymph node metastases, and one locally controlled patient developed bone metastases but is alive eight years after chemotherapy plus radiotherapy for metastatic disease. The five-year-overall and recurrence-free survival was 72% and 55%, respectively. (orig./MG)

  3. Radioprotectors in Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nair, C.K.K. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Parida, D.K.; Nomura, Taisei

    2001-03-01

    This review article focuses on clinically relevant radioprotectors and their mechanisms of radioprotection. Radiotherapy is the most common modality of human cancer therapy. Obtaining optimal results requires a judicious balance between the total dose of radiotherapy delivered and the threshold limit of critical surrounding normal tissues, and the normal tissues need to be protected against radiation injury to obtain better tumor control by using a higher dose. For this reason, radiation-protective agents play an important role in clinical radiotherapy. Radiation-protective agents can be classified into three groups: radioprotectors, adaptogens, and absorbents. The first group generally consists of sulfhydryl compounds and other antioxidants. They include several myelo-, entero-, and cerebro-protectors. Adaptogens act as promotors of radioresistance. They are natural protectors that offer chemical protection against low levels of ionizing radiation. Absorbents protect organs from internal radiation and chemicals. They include drugs that prevent incorporation of radioiodine by the thyroid gland and absorption of radionuclides. This article thoroughly describes the properties, mechanisms of action, and perspectives on clinical application of the following categories of radioprotectors: sulfhydryl compounds (e.g., cysteine, cysteamine, glutathione, AET, WR 2127, and other WR-compounds), antioxidants (e.g., tempace, Hoechst 33342, vitamin A, E, and C, TMG, melatonin), angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (e.g., captopril, elanopril, penicillamine, pentoxifylline, L-158, 809), cytoprotective agents (mesna, dexrazoxane, and amifostin), metalloelements (e.g., manganese chloride, cadmium salts, bismuth subnitrate), immunomodulators (gamma-interferon, polysaccharides AM5, AM218, heat-killed lactobacillus cells, broncho-vaxom, trehalose dicorynomycolate, and AS101), lipopolysaccharides and prostaglandins, plant extracts and compounds isolated from plants (curcmin

  4. Targeted tumor radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unak Perihan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Targeted tumor radiotherapy is selectively delivery of curative doses of radiation to malignant sites. The aim of the targeted tumor radiotherapy is to use the radionuclides which have high LET particle emissions conjugated to appropriate carrier molecules. The radionuclides are selectively collected by tumor cells, depositing lethal doses to tumor cells while no admission occur to normal cells. In theory, targeted radiotherapy has several advantages over conventional radiotherapy since it allows a high radiation dose to be administered without causing normal tissue toxicity, although there are some limitations in the availability of appropriate targeting agents and in the calculations of administered doses. Therefore, for routine clinical applications more progress is still needed. In this article, the potential use of targeted tumor radiotherapy is briefly reviewed. More general aspects and considerations, such as potential radionuclides, mechanisms of tumor targeting was also outlined.

  5. Varying recurrence rates and risk factors associated with different definitions of local recurrence in patients with surgically resected, stage I nonsmall cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varlotto, John M; Recht, Abram; Flickinger, John C; Medford-Davis, Laura N; Dyer, Anne-Marie; DeCamp, Malcolm M

    2010-05-15

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of different definitions of local recurrence on the reported patterns of failure and associated risk factors in patients who undergo potentially curative resection for stage I nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The study included 306 consecutive patients who were treated from 2000 to 2005 without radiotherapy. Local recurrence was defined either as 'radiation' (r-LR) (according to previously defined postoperative radiotherapy fields), including the bronchial stump, staple line, ipsilateral hilum, and ipsilateral mediastinum; or as 'comprehensive' (c-LR), including the same sites plus the ipsilateral lung and contralateral mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes. All recurrences that were not classified as "local" were considered to be distal. The median follow-up was 33 months. The proportions of c-LR and r-LR at 2 years, 3 years, and 5 years were 14%, 21%, and 29%, respectively, and 7%, 12%, and 16%, respectively. Significant risk factors for c-LR on multivariate analysis were diabetes, lymphatic vascular invasion, and tumor size; and significant factors for r-LR were resection of less than a lobe and lymphatic vascular invasion. The proportions of distant (non-local) recurrence using these definitions at 2 years, 3 years, and 5 years were 10%, 12%, and 18%, respectively, and 14%, 19%, and 29%, respectively. Significant risk factors for distant failure were histology when using the c-LR definition and tumor size when using the r-LR definition. Local recurrence increased nearly 2-fold when a broad definition was used instead of a narrow definition. The definition also affected which factors were associated significantly with both local and distant failure on multivariate analysis. Comparable definitions must be used when analyzing different series. (c) 2010 American Cancer Society.

  6. Estimation of the mediastinal involvement probability in non-small cell lung cancer: a statistical definition of the clinical target volume for 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy?; Estimation de la propabilite d'envahissement tumoral mediastinal: une definition statistique du volume-cible anatomoclinique pour la radiotherapie conformationnelle des cancers bronchiques non a petites cellules?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giraud, P.; Dubray, B.; Helfre, S.; Dauphinot, C.; Rosenwald, J.C.; Cosset, J.M. [Institut Curie, Dept. d' Oncologie-Radiotherapie, 75 - Paris (France); Rycke, Y. de [Institut Curie, Dept. de Biostatistiques, 75 - Paris (France); Minet, P. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Service de Radiotherapie, Liege (Belgium); Danhier, S. [Hopital Europeen Georges-Pompidou, Service de Radiotherapie, 75 - Paris (France)

    2001-12-01

    Purpose. - Conformal irradiation of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) is largely based on a precise definition of the nodal clinical target volume (CTVn). The reduction of the number of nodal stations to be irradiated would render tumor dose escalation more achievable. The aim of this work was to design an mathematical tool based on documented data, that would predict the risk of metastatic involvement for each nodal station. Methods and material. - From the large surgical series published in the literature we looked at the main pre-treatment parameters that modify the risk of nodal invasion. The probability of involvement for the 17 nodal stations described by the American Thoracic Society (ATS) was computed from all these publications and then weighted according to the French epidemiological data. Starting from the primitive location of the tumour as the main characteristic, we built a probabilistic tree for each nodal station representing the risk distribution as a function of each tumor feature. From the statistical point of view, we used the inversion of probability trees method described by Weinstein and Feinberg. Results. -Taking into account all the different parameters of I the pre-treatment staging relative to each level of the ATS map brings up to 20,000 different combinations. The first chosen parameters in the tree were, depending on the tumour location, the histological classification, the metastatic stage, the nodal stage weighted in function of the sensitivity and specificity of the diagnostic examination used (PET scan, CAT scan) and the tumoral stage. A software is proposed to compute a predicted probability of involvement of each nodal station for any given clinical presentation.Conclusion. -To better define the CTVn in NSCLC 3DRT, we propose a software that evaluates the mediastinal nodal involvement risk from easily accessible individual pretreatment parameters. (authors)

  7. Postoperative radiotherapy in salivary ductal carcinoma: a single institution experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Hyung; Kim, Mi Sun; Choi, Seo Hee; Suh, Yang Gun; Koh, Yoon Woo; Kim, Se Hun; Choi, Eun Chang; Keum, Ki Chang [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    We reviewed treatment outcomes and prognostic factors for patients with salivary ductal carcinoma (SDC) treated with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy from 2005 to 2012. A total of 16 patients were identified and 15 eligible patients were included in analysis. Median age was 61 years (range, 40 to 71 years) and 12 patients (80%) were men. Twelve patients (80%) had a tumor in the parotid gland, 9 (60%) had T3 or T4 disease, and 9 (60%) had positive nodal disease. All patients underwent surgery and postoperative radiotherapy. Postoperative radiotherapy was delivered using 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy or intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Locoregional failure-free survival (LRFFS), distant failure-free survival (DFFS), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Differences in survival based on risk factors were tested using a log-rank test. Median total radiotherapy dose was 60 Gy (range, 52.5 to 63.6 Gy). Four patients received concurrent weekly chemotherapy with cisplatin. Among 10 patients who underwent surgery with neck dissection, 7 received modified radical neck dissection. With a median follow-up time of 38 months (range, 24 to 105 months), 4-year rates were 86% for LRFFS, 51% for DFFS, 46% for PFS, and 93% for OS. Local failure was observed in 2 patients (13%), and distant failure was observed in 7 (47%). The lung was the most common involved site of distant metastasis. Surgery and postoperative radiotherapy in SDC patients resulted in good local control, but high distant metastasis remained a major challenge.

  8. Radiotherapy in the management of Graves` ophthalmopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakata, Koh-ichi; Hareyama, Masato; Oouchi, Atsushi; Shidou, Mitsuo; Nagakura, Hisayasu; Morita, Kazuo; Osanai, Hajime; Ohtsuka, Kenji; Hinoda, Yuji [Sapporo Medical Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1998-06-01

    To report the results of radiotherapy for patients with failure, adverse reactions or relative contraindications to the use of steroids or immunosuppressants, by using newly developed quantitative indexes. Fourteen female and six male patients with Graves` ophthalmopathy were treated with radiotherapy between 1989 and 1996. Prior to radiotherapy, eight patients received treatment with prednisone, four received immunosuppressants and four received a combination of both. Four patients with contraindications to steroids were initially managed with radiotherapy. Most of the patients received a dose of 24-28 Gy in 2 Gy fractions. We used the newly developed motility limitation index to assess extraocular motility. Treatment was well tolerated. There have been no late complications. All 12 patients with soft tissue signs such as edema, irritation, tearing and pain were improved. Proptosis did not improve or improved only slightly, 3 mm at best. However, proptosis in all but two has been stabilized and has not deteriorated in the follow-up period. Most of the patients have experienced an improvement of eye-muscle motility. Extraocular muscles that work for elevation were impaired more severely than the other muscles and this tended to remain. Of the 16 patients using steroids before or when radiotherapy was initiated, 15 were tapered off and only one patient required additional steroids, thus sparing the majority from steroid adverse reactions. Radiotherapy was effective in preventing exacerbations of active inflammatory ophthalmopathy in patients with Graves` disease with minimal morbidity and thus eliminated the adverse reactions associated with protracted corticosteroid use. The newly developed motility limitation index was useful in detecting delicate changes in motility of individual extraocular muscles. (author)

  9. Definition of intractable epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Shobhit; Siddiqui, Khurram A

    2011-01-01

    Defining intractable epilepsy is essential not only to identify up to 40% of patients refractory to pharmacological management, but also to facilitate selection and comparison of such patients for research purposes. The ideal definition still eludes us. Multiple factors including number of antiepileptic drug (AED) failures, seizure frequency and duration of unresponsiveness, etiology, and epilepsy syndromes are considered in formulating the definition of pharmaco-resistant epilepsy. Most definitions used in the literature agree on the number of AED failures, which seem to be 2 or 3, however, the seizure frequency and time factor are varied. The International League Against Epilepsy proposed a definition of drug-resistant epilepsy as a failure of adequate trials of 2 tolerated and appropriately chosen and used AED schedules. This for now, could provide an operational definition for clinical and research settings. However, with emergence of new data and novel treatments the criteria for intractability may change.

  10. Planning a Radiotherapy Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Merwe, D

    2017-02-01

    The master planning of new radiotherapy facilities requires the input and engagement of a range of highly specialised professionals, both in the construction and health sector. Although radiation protection and safety aspects of radiotherapy services are universal, low and middle income countries are often presented with unique challenges that also need to be considered, e.g. competing needs within the health sector, lack of financial and human resources, environmental factors like poor provision of transport or electrical power, inadequate regulatory infrastructure, etc. Efforts to establish, upgrade or expand radiotherapy services should therefore not only focus on the technology that is appropriate and sustainable, but also be mindful of the need for quality, safety and optimal utilisation of technology. The workflow in a radiotherapy department can be facilitated by strategic placement of the main functional areas into the concept design. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Nanoparticle-guided radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method and nano-sized particles for image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of a target tissue. More specifically, the invention relates to nano-sized particles comprising X-ray-imaging contrast agents in solid form with the ability to block x-rays, allowing for simult...... for simultaneous or integrated external beam radiotherapy and imaging, e.g., using computed tomography (CT)....

  12. Radiotherapy of prostate cancer; Strahlentherapie des Prostatakarzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, S.; Herfarth, K. [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Klinik fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    With the development of modern radiation techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), a dose escalation in the definitive radiotherapy of prostate cancer and a consecutive improvement in biochemical recurrence-free survival (BFS) could be achieved. Among others, investigators at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) saw 5-year BFS rates of up to 98%. A further gain in effectiveness and safety is expected of hypofractionation schedules, as suggested by data published by Kupelian et al., who saw a low 5-year rate of grade {>=}2 rectal side-effects of 4.5%. However, randomized studies are just beginning to mature. Patients with intermediate or high-risk tumors should receive neoadjuvant (NHT) and adjuvant (AHT) androgen deprivation. Bolla et al. could show an increase in 5-year overall survival from 62-78%. The inclusion of the whole pelvis in the treatment field (WPRT) is still controversial. The RTOG 94-13 study showed a significant advantage in disease-free survival after 60 months but long-term data did not yield significant differences between WPRT and irradiation of the prostate alone. The German Society of Urology strongly recommends adjuvant radiotherapy of the prostate bed for pT3 N0 tumors with positive margins. In a pT3 N0 R0 or pT2 N0 R+ situation, adjuvant radiotherapy should at least be considered. So far, no randomized data on NHT and AHT have been published, so androgen deprivation remains an individual decision in the postoperative setting. In a retrospective analysis Spiotto et al. reported a positive effect for adjuvant WPRT and biochemical control. This article summarizes the essential publications on definitive and adjuvant radiotherapy and discusses the additional use of androgen deprivation and WPRT. (orig.) [German] Die Entwicklung der intensitaetsmodulierten Radiotherapie (IMRT) ermoeglichte in den letzten Jahren eine Dosiseskalation bei der primaeren Radiotherapie des Prostatakarzinoms und damit eine Verbesserung

  13. Development of evaluation and performance verification technology for radiotherapy radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J. Y.; Jang, S. Y.; Kim, B. H. and others

    2005-02-15

    No matter how much the importance is emphasized, the exact assessment of the absorbed doses administered to the patients to treat the various diseases such as lately soaring malignant tumors with the radiotherapy practices is the most important factor. In reality, several over-exposed patients from the radiotherapy practice become very serious social issues. Especially, the development of a technology to exactly assess the high doses and high energies (In general, dose administered to the patients with the radiotherapy practices are very huge doses, and they are about three times higher than the lethal doses) generated by the radiation generators and irradiation equipment is a competing issue to be promptly conducted. Over fifty medical centers in Korea operate the radiation generators and irradiation equipment for the radiotherapy practices. However, neither the legal and regulatory systems to implement a quality assurance program are sufficiently stipulated nor qualified personnel who could run a program to maintain the quality assurance and control of those generators and equipment for the radiotherapy practices in the medical facilities are sufficiently employed. To overcome the above deficiencies, a quality assurance program such as those developed in the technically advanced countries should be developed to exactly assess the doses administered to patients with the radiotherapy practices and develop the necessary procedures to maintain the continuing performance of the machine or equipment for the radiotherapy. The QA program and procedures should induce the fluent calibration of the machine or equipment with quality, and definitely establish the safety of patients in the radiotherapy practices. In this study, a methodology for the verification and evaluation of the radiotherapy doses is developed, and several accurate measurements, evaluations of the doses delivered to patients and verification of the performance of the therapy machine and equipment are

  14. Clinical application of multimodality imaging in radiotherapy treatment planning for rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan Yang; Zhe, Hong

    2013-12-11

    Radiotherapy plays an important role in the treatment of rectal cancer. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy are mainstay techniques of radiotherapy for rectal cancer. However, the success of these techniques is heavily reliant on accurate target delineation and treatment planning. Computed tomography simulation is a cornerstone of rectal cancer radiotherapy, but there are limitations, such as poor soft-tissue contrast between pelvic structures and partial volume effects. Magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography (PET) can overcome these limitations and provide additional information for rectal cancer treatment planning. PET can also reduce the interobserver variation in the definition of rectal tumor volume. However, there is a long way to go before these image modalities are routinely used in the clinical setting. This review summarizes the most promising studies on clinical applications of multimodality imaging in target delineation and treatment planning for rectal cancer radiotherapy.

  15. Presentations of endometrial activity after curative radiotherapy for cervical cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hullu, J.A. de; Pras, E.; Hollema, H.; Zee, A. van der; Bogchelman, D.H.; Mourits, M.J.E.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The treatment of choice for patients with advanced stage cervical cancer is (chemo)radiotherapy. Gynaecologic side effects consist of loss of ovarian function and destruction of the endometrium, resulting in infertility and premature ovarian failure. In premenopausal patients estrogens a

  16. Presentations of endometrial activity after curative radiotherapy for cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hullu, JA; Pras, E; Hollema, H; van der Zee, AGJ; Bogchelman, DH; Mourits, MJE

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: The treatment of choice for patients with advanced stage cervical cancer is (chemo)radiotherapy. Gynaecologic side effects consist of loss of ovarian function and destruction of the endometrium, resulting in infertility and premature ovarian failure. In premenopausal patients estrogens a

  17. The Results of Radiotherapy in Locally Advanced

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Hyun Soo; Kang, Seung Hee; Kim, Sang Won; Jun, Mi Seon; Jo, Seon Mi; Lim, Jun Cheol; Oh, Young Taek; Kang, Seock Yoon [Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-09-15

    We retrospectively studied the outcomes and prognostic factors of patients with locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic cancer who were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) or radiotherapy only. Fifty-one patients with locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic cancer (stage IIA{approx}III) who received radiotherapy ({>=}30 Gy) between January 1994 and August 2008 were reviewed retrospectively. The median radiation dose was 39 Gy. Chemotherapy consisted of gemcitabine, cisplatin, or 5-FU alone or in various combinations, and was administered concurrently with radiotherapy in 38 patients. The follow-up period ranged from 2{approx}40 months (median, 8 months). The median survival, and the 1-and 2-year overall survival (OS) rates were 7 months, 15.7%, and 5.9%, respectively. Based on univariate analysis, the baseline CA19-9, performance status, and chemotherapy regimen were significant prognostic factors. The median survival was 8 months for CCRT, and 6 months for radiotherapy alone. The patients treated with gemcitabine-containing regimens had longer survival (median, 10 months) than the patients treated with radiotherapy alone (p=0.027). Twenty-three patients were available to evaluate the patterns of failure. Distant metastases (DM) occurred in 18 patients and regional recurrences were demonstrated in 4 patients. Local progression developed in 14 patients. We analyzed the association between the time-to-DM and the baseline CA19-9 levels for 18 evaluable patients. The median time-to-DM was 20 months for patients with normal baseline CA19-9 levels and 2 months for patients with baseline CA19-9 levels {>=}200 U/ml. CCRT with gemcitabine-based regimens was effective in improving OS in patients with locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic cancer. We suggest that the baseline CA19-9 level is valuable in determining the treatment strategy for patients with locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic cancer.

  18. Associations between nutritional status, weight loss, radiotherapy treatment toxicity and treatment outcomes in gastrointestinal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Amanda; Kiss, Nicole; Hodgson, Belinda; Crowe, Timothy C; Walsh, Adam D

    2011-02-01

    Patients with gastrointestinal cancers are susceptible to nutritional deterioration which may be compounded by radiotherapy treatment toxicities. This study aimed to determine whether nutritional status at radiotherapy commencement or changes in nutritional status throughout radiotherapy were associated with treatment toxicity and outcomes in gastrointestinal cancer patients. Seventy-three gastrointestinal cancer patients receiving curative radiotherapy underwent medical record audits assessing body weight, radiotherapy toxicity, unplanned treatment breaks or hospital admissions and completion of prescribed treatment/s. Nutritional status was assessed in a subset of patients (n = 11) using the Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment tool. Seventy-five percent of patients lost weight throughout radiotherapy. Weight loss was significantly greater in patients experiencing unplanned radiotherapy breaks (-3.1% vs -1.6%, p nutritional status during radiotherapy (as measured by weight loss) may be associated with poorer short-term treatment outcomes in gastrointestinal cancer patients. Patient numbers were too small to definitively determine the effect of nutritional status at radiotherapy commencement or changes in nutritional status throughout radiotherapy (defined by PG-SGA) on treatment outcomes. Further research is required to investigate this in larger, longer-term studies. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Report of the ECCO pathogenesis workshop on anti-TNF therapy failures in inflammatory bowel diseases: definitions, frequency and pharmacological aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allez, Matthieu; Karmiris, Konstantinos; Louis, Edouard;

    2010-01-01

    The first ECCO pathogenesis workshop focused on anti-TNF therapy failures in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). The overall objective was to better understand and explore primary non response and loss of response to anti-TNF agents in IBD. The outcome of this workshop is presented into two parts...

  20. Radiotherapy for the medulloblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gose, Kyuhei; Imajo, Yoshinari; Imanaka, Kazufumi (Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1983-08-01

    Eighteen patients with medulloblastoma, treated between 1972 and 1981, at Kobe University School of Medicine, were retrospectively studied. Of those completing post operative irradiation, 50% have survived for 2 years, 15% for 5 years and mean survival periods was 22.2 months. 13 out of 18 patients developed local recurrence and spinal dissemination. The mean time from the initial radiotherapy to recurrence was 8.5 months. It was suggested that posterior fossa should recieve 5,000 rad, the spine should 2,000 rad and recurrences should be treated by the combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

  1. Xerostomia induced by radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alimi D

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available David Alimi Department of Anesthesiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USAWe read with great interest the excellent review on xerostomia induced by radiotherapy, by Pinna et al.1 The authors should be congratulated for a very detailed review of the physiopathology, clinical symptoms, and therapeutic management of an extremely difficult condition. Although we agree that the use of anticholinergic medication represents treatment, it requires the patient to have residual salivary gland function. Unfortunately, it is well established that in most cases radiotherapy destroys most of the salivary gland and associated salivary secretions.     

  2. Radiotherapy in Glioblastoma: the Past, the Present and the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gzell, C; Back, M; Wheeler, H; Bailey, D; Foote, M

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this review is to explore the changing utility of radiotherapy in the treatment of patients with glioblastoma over the past 60 years. Together with surgery, radiotherapy has always been the cornerstone of treatment of glioblastoma, but techniques have significantly advanced over this time. The exploration of early two-dimensional techniques, investigation of dose escalation, concomitant chemotherapy and modern techniques, including intensity-modulated radiotherapy, image-guided radiotherapy, and volumetric-modulated arc therapy will be covered. In addition, current controversies including decreasing margin size, re-irradiation, treatment of elderly patients, and novel imaging tracers will be discussed. Future directions including immunotherapy and tumour treating fields are examined. Radiotherapy-based treatments cannot rely solely on advances in chemotherapy or immunotherapy to improve the overall survival of patients with glioblastoma. Radiation oncology needs to continue to develop and improve the delivery, target definition, and dose of radiotherapy to these patients to improve their survival and the toxicity associated with treatment.

  3. Carcinoma of the prostate: treatment with external radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harisiadis, L.; Veenema, R.J.; Senyszyn, J.J.; Puchner, P.J.; Tretter, P.; Romas, N.A.; Chang, C.H.; Lattimer, J.K.; Tannenbaum, M.

    1978-06-01

    Among 146 prostate carcinoma patients treated with external radiotherapy at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, the 5 and 10 year survival rates were 64.1% and 40.5%, respectively. The 5-year survival rate was 88.2% for patients with Stage A, 86.8% for Stage B, and 58% for Stage C; it was 64.4% for patients with more differentiated carcinomas, but only 28.7% for patients with undifferentiated tumors. Patients with obstructive changes on IVP had a 5 year survival rate of 24.1%, whereas, for patients with no obstruction on IVP, this rate was 71.3%. When radiotherapy started within 6 months after the diagnosis, the 5 year survival rate was 70.3%, whereas, a delay in starting radiotherapy, for more than 6 months after the diagnosis, was associated with a survival rate of 31.9%. Radiation dose of 6500 rad or more was associated with a 5-year survival rate of 86.7%, whereas, for a dose of less than 6500 rad this survival rate was 57.1%. All the above differences were statistically significant (p < 0.05). Other factors found to influence the prognosis to a degree that was not statistically significant included: age of the patient at the time of radiotherapy, presenting symptoms, levels of acid phosphatase in the serum and in the bone marrow, and size of the irradiated volume. In agreement with other published series the complications were usually mild and their incidence low. Tumor involving and protruding into the urethra may have contributed to the formation of urethral strictures. Local control of this cancer with external radiotherapy appears very successful. Treatment failures were manifested most often with distant metastases with or without local recurrence, suggesting that subclinical distant metastases might have been present prior to initiation of radiotherapy. External radiotherapy rather than brachytherapy, appears to be the treatment of choice for cancer of the prostate with indications for radiotherapy.

  4. Innovations in Radiotherapy Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feain, I J; Court, L; Palta, J R; Beddar, S; Keall, P

    2017-02-01

    Many low- and middle-income countries, together with remote and low socioeconomic populations within high-income countries, lack the resources and services to deal with cancer. The challenges in upgrading or introducing the necessary services are enormous, from screening and diagnosis to radiotherapy planning/treatment and quality assurance. There are severe shortages not only in equipment, but also in the capacity to train, recruit and retain staff as well as in their ongoing professional development via effective international peer-review and collaboration. Here we describe some examples of emerging technology innovations based on real-time software and cloud-based capabilities that have the potential to redress some of these areas. These include: (i) automatic treatment planning to reduce physics staffing shortages, (ii) real-time image-guided adaptive radiotherapy technologies, (iii) fixed-beam radiotherapy treatment units that use patient (rather than gantry) rotation to reduce infrastructure costs and staff-to-patient ratios, (iv) cloud-based infrastructure programmes to facilitate international collaboration and quality assurance and (v) high dose rate mobile cobalt brachytherapy techniques for intraoperative radiotherapy. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. All rights reserved.

  5. Radiotherapy for craniopharyngioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Ajay; Fersht, Naomi; Brada, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Radiotherapy remains the mainstay of multidisciplinary management of patients with incompletely resected and recurrent craniopharyngioma. Advances in imaging and radiotherapy technology offer new alternatives with the principal aim of improving the accuracy of treatment and reducing the volume of normal brain receiving significant radiation doses. We review the available technologies, their technical advantages and disadvantages and the published clinical results. Fractionated high precision conformal radiotherapy with image guidance remains the gold standard; the results of single fraction treatment are disappointing and hypofractionation should be used with caution as long term results are not available. There is insufficient data on the use of protons to assess the comparative efficacy and toxicity. The precision of treatment delivery needs to be coupled with experienced infrastructure and more intensive quality assurance to ensure best treatment outcome and this should be carried out within multidisciplinary teams experienced in the management of craniopharyngioma. The advantages of the combined skills and expertise of the team members may outweigh the largely undefined clinical gain from novel radiotherapy technologies.

  6. Evaluation for local failure by 18F-FDG PET/CT in comparison with CT findings after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for localized non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Atsuya; Kunieda, Etsuo; Fujii, Hirofumi; Yokosuka, Noriko; Aoki, Yousuke; Oooka, Yoshikazu; Oku, Yohei; Ohashi, Toshio; Sanuki, Naoko; Mizuno, Tomikazu; Ozawa, Yukihiko

    2013-03-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is the standard care for medically inoperable early non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, it can be difficult to differentiate local recurrence from non-recurrence radiation-induced lung opacity. We retrospectively assessed (18)F-FDG PET/CT to detect local recurrence after SBRT for NSCLC. Between 2005 and 2011, 273 NSCLCs in 257 patients were treated with SBRT. Prescribed doses were 50Gy and 40Gy per 5 fractions for peripheral and central lesions, respectively. Tri-monthly follow-up CT scans were acquired. (18)F-FDG PET/CT scans were scheduled for screening at one year after SBRT or when recurrence was highly suspected. The dual-time-point maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmaxs) and their retention indexes (RIs) were obtained. A total of 214 (18)F-FDG PET/CT scans were obtained for 164 localized NSCLC tumors in 154 patients. The median follow-up period was 24.9 months (range: 6.3-72.1). Among these, 21 scans of 17 tumors were diagnosed as local recurrence. The median SUVmaxs on early and late images of recurrence and their RI were 5.0 (range: 3.2-10.7), 6.3 (range: 4.2-13.4), and 0.20 (range; 0-0.41), respectively. These were significantly higher than the respective values of non-recurrence images of 1.8 (range: 0.5-4.6), 1.7 (range: 0.5-6.1), and 0.00 (range: -0.37-0.41) (all precurrence were 0, 0, 1, 3, and 17. SUVmaxs of (18)F-FDG PET/CT could detect local recurrence after SBRT for localized NSCLC. In contrast, CT scan results had a limited ability to diagnose local recurrence. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. 'Whose failure counts?' A critical reflection on definitions of failure for community health volunteers providing HIV self-testing in a community-based HIV/TB intervention study in urban Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambakunsi, Rodrick; Kumwenda, Moses; Choko, Augustine; Corbett, Elizabeth L; Desmond, Nicola Ann

    2015-12-01

    The category of community health worker applied within the context of health intervention trials has been promoted as a cost-effective approach to meeting study objectives across large populations, relying on the promotion of the concept of 'community belonging' to encourage altruistic volunteerism from community members to promote health. This community-based category of individuals is recruited to facilitate externally driven priorities defined by large research teams, outside of the target research environment. An externally defined intervention is then 'brought to' the community through locally recruited community volunteers who form a bridge between the researchers and participants. The specific role of these workers is context-driven and responsive to the needs of the intervention. This paper is based on the findings from an annual evaluation of community health worker performance employed as community counsellors to deliver semi-supervised HIV self-testing (HIVST) at community level of a large HIV/TB intervention trial conducted in urban Blantyre, Malawi. A performance evaluation was conducted to appraise individual service delivery and assess achievements in meeting pre-defined targets for uptake of HIVST with the aim of improving overall uptake of HIVST. Through an empirical 'evaluation of the evaluation' this paper critically reflects on the position of the community volunteer through the analytical lens of 'failure', exploring the tensions in communication and interpretation of intervention delivery between researchers and community volunteers and the differing perspectives on defining failure. It is concluded that community interventions should be developed in collaboration with the population and that information guiding success should be clearly defined.

  8. Failure pattern implications following external beam irradiation of prostate cancer: long-term follow-up and indications of cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, A L; Hanks, G E

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to present patterns and risk of biochemical failure following external beam irradiation of prostate cancer and to make comparisons to a published modern radical prostatectomy series. Between January 1987 and December 1994, 328 men were treated definitively at Fox Chase Cancer Center for localized prostate cancer using conventional or three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. The median biochemical follow-up was 6.4 years, with all patients having at least 5 years follow-up. Two prognostic patient groups were established on the basis of proportional hazards modeling that considered treatment and presenting tumor characteristics. For each of the two prognostic groups, biochemical failure and hazard functions were estimated using the ASTRO consensus definition of failure and life table methodology. Failure risk comparisons were made to modern published radical prostatectomy series. Multivariate analysis demonstrated the independent predictive power of pretreatment PSA level, palpation stage, Gleason score, and dose. Thus, the favorable prognosis group, Group I, consisted of 83 patients who were treated with a dose level > or = 74 Gy and who presented with PSA levels or = 20 ng/ml, T2B/T3 tumor, Gleason score 7-10, dose tapering to a low rate at 4 years with no failures observed after 6 years. Differences in patterns of failure by prognostic group show maximum risk of failure at 24 months (median, 31 months) for Group I, and 12 to 36 months (median, 22 months) for Group II. Group II reaches low levels of risk at 6 years, in contrast to 4 years for the patients with a more favorable prognosis. We concluded that patients treated with external beam radiation alone show little risk of failure after 4 to 6 years. This result suggests that the 5-year bNED control rate approximates the eventual cure rate of prostate cancer.

  9. The result of Radiotherapy in Malignant thymona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Sung Ja [Chonnam National University College of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Park, Charn Il [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-12-15

    Twenty one patients of malignant thymoma treated with curative aim at the Department of Therapeutic Radiology of Seoul National University Hospital from 1979 to 1987 were analysed retrospectively. The 3 year overall and relapse free survival rate was 80.5% and 78.6%, respectively. Myasthenia gravis (MG) was seen in 43.5% at presentation and disappeared in 40% (4/10) after radiotherapy with or without operation. The 3 year cumulative survival rate with and without MG was 90% and 78.8%, respectively. We could consider that MG was no longer adverse prognostic factor. The complete response rate after partial resection was 100% (3/3), and that after biopsy was 20% (3/15). The overall local control rate including complete and partial response rate (33% vs 56%) was 89% and the 3 year actuarial survival rate by the response rate was 88.9% and 81.7%, respectively. There was no statistically significant survival difference between two groups. The crude rate of relapse at 3 years was 23.8% (5/21), and 80% (4/5) were locoregional failures. All failures were observed in biopsy only group, while no failure was observed in resected group. The major pattern of the treatment failure was the locoregional failure and the distant metastases was rarely observed.

  10. Role of additional radiotherapy in advanced stages of Hodgkin's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerwaldt, J H; Coleman, C N; Fischer, R I; Lister, T A; Diehl, V

    1992-09-01

    Although radiotherapy is widely used as additional treatment following chemotherapy, its precise role has never been clearly proven. Relapses tend to occur in previously involved bulky sites. Non-randomized studies may suggest a positive effect of the addition of radiotherapy. This effect however, might also be caused by selection. Randomized studies have not resulted in a survival advantage for the patients treated with additional radiotherapy compared to no further treatment or additional chemotherapy. The SWOG study 7808 suggest a 20% benefit in remission duration for the nodular sclerosis histology subgroup. Definitive conclusions have to wait for more mature results of randomized studies including the ongoing EORTC study and the possibility to perform an overview of all studies.

  11. Radiotherapy of cutaneous lymphomas; Radiotherapie des lymphomes cutanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirova, Y.M.; Piedbois, Y.; Pan, Q.; Guo, J.P.; Le Bourgeois, J.P. [Hopital Henri-Mondor, 94 - Creteil (France). Dept. de cancerologie

    1999-03-01

    Radiotherapy plays an important role in the treatment of cutaneous lymphomas. In the treatment of Mycosis fungoides, total skin electron beam radiation therapy is efficient for patients with limited and superficial forms of the disease. Radiotherapy is also efficient for the locally advanced forms of non-epidermo-tropic lymphomas. The palliative radiotherapy is indicated for advanced, nodular and treatment resistant forms of cutaneous lymphomas and for voluminous lymphadenopathies. (authors)

  12. Endometrial adenocarcinoma, adjuvant radiotherapy tailored to prognostic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerwaldt, J H; Hoekstra, C J; van Putten, W L; Tjokrowardojo, A J; Koper, P C

    1990-02-01

    The optimal adjuvant radiotherapy for surgically treated endometrial cancer has not yet been defined. We report on 389 patients treated between 1970 and 1985 with adjuvant radiotherapy. The treatment was tailored to the known prognostic factors: myometrial invasion and grade of differentiation of the tumor. Ten-year overall survival was 67%, 10-year relapse-free survival 77%; 23% relapse, of which 21% distant and 6% locoregional relapse. In a multivariate analysis, stage (pT), grade, and myometrial invasion were prognostic factors. The number of locoregional failures was very small (n = 23). This small number, the fact that radiation treatment was tailored to prognostic factors, and the absence of a nontreated control group precluded an analysis of the effect of the adjuvant irradiation. Large randomized studies with a control (no treatment) arm should be performed to determine the value of adjuvant radiotherapy.

  13. Radiotherapy for pituitary adenomas: long-term outcome and complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rim, Chai Hong; Yang, Dae Sik; Park, Young Je; Yoon, Won Sup; Lee, Jung AE; Kim, Chul Yong [Korea University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    To evaluate long-term local control rate and toxicity in patients treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for pituitary adenomas. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 60 patients treated with EBRT for pituitary adenoma at Korea University Medical Center from 1996 and 2006. Thirty-fi ve patients had hormone secreting tumors, 25 patients had non-secreting tumors. Fifty-seven patients had received postoperative radiotherapy (RT), and 3 had received RT alone. Median total dose was 54 Gy (range, 36 to 61.2 Gy). The definition of tumor progression were as follows: evidence of tumor progression on computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, worsening of clinical sign requiring additional operation or others, rising serum hormone level against a previously stable or falling value, and failure of controlling serum hormone level so that the hormone level had been far from optimal range until last follow-up. Age, sex, hormone secretion, tumor extension, tumor size, and radiation dose were analyzed for prognostic significance in tumor control. Median follow-up was 5.7 years (range, 2 to 14.4 years). The 10-year actuarial local control rates for non-secreting and secreting adenomas were 96% and 66%, respectively. In univariate analysis, hormone secretion was significant prognostic factor (p = 0.042) and cavernous sinus extension was marginally significant factor (p = 0.054) for adverse local control. All other factors were not significant. In multivariate analysis, hormone secretion and gender were significant. Fifty-three patients had mass-effect symptoms (headache, dizziness, visual disturbance, hypopituitarism, loss of consciousness, and cranial nerve palsy). A total of 17 of 23 patients with headache and 27 of 34 patients with visual impairment were improved. Twenty-seven patients experienced symptoms of endocrine hypersecretion (galactorrhea, amenorrhea, irregular menstruation, decreased libido, gynecomastia, acromegaly, and Cushing

  14. Radiotherapy of hemangiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauwerky, F.

    1982-10-11

    The findings about the regular, spontaneous and complete regression of cavernous skin hemangiomas occurring in infants and those findings about the damaging effects due to ionising radiation - here particularly local growth disturbances - led to the development of very cautious diagnostic methods and to a considerate individual dosage and radiotherapy, which always takes into consideration the spontaneous regression tendency of the hemangiomas. However, a function-impairing localisation at the orifices, fulminant macrosomia, tendency to hemorrhages and poly-infection with superficial ulceration and even thrombopenic syndromes of the Kasabach-Merritt type may become necessary, urgent and also vital indications for a particular radiotherapy. For the sake of the patients, irradiation methods, which do not provoke any risk of radiation hazards, have to be preserved and applied in practice. Certainly further research and the nosologic nature of hemangiomas is required. A general non-treatment of hemangiomas is refused.

  15. Patterns of failure after the reduced volume approach for elective nodal irradiation in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seol, Ki Ho; Lee, Jeong Eun [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    To evaluate the patterns of nodal failure after radiotherapy (RT) with the reduced volume approach for elective neck nodal irradiation (ENI) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Fifty-six NPC patients who underwent definitive chemoradiotherapy with the reduced volume approach for ENI were reviewed. The ENI included retropharyngeal and level II lymph nodes, and only encompassed the echelon inferior to the involved level to eliminate the entire neck irradiation. Patients received either moderate hypofractionated intensity-modulated RT for a total of 72.6 Gy (49.5 Gy to elective nodal areas) or a conventional fractionated three-dimensional conformal RT for a total of 68.4-72 Gy (39.6-45 Gy to elective nodal areas). Patterns of failure, locoregional control, and survival were analyzed. The median follow-up was 38 months (range, 3 to 80 months). The out-of-field nodal failure when omitting ENI was none. Three patients developed neck recurrences (one in-field recurrence in the 72.6 Gy irradiated nodal area and two in the elective irradiated region of 39.6 Gy). Overall disease failure at any site developed in 11 patients (19.6%). Among these, there were six local failures (10.7%), three regional failures (5.4%), and five distant metastases (8.9%). The 3-year locoregional control rate was 87.1%, and the distant failure-free rate was 90.4%; disease-free survival and overall survival at 3 years was 80% and 86.8%, respectively. No patient developed nodal failure in the omitted ENI site. Our investigation has demonstrated that the reduced volume approach for ENI appears to be a safe treatment approach in NPC.

  16. Melanoma: Last call for radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espenel, Sophie; Vallard, Alexis; Rancoule, Chloé; Garcia, Max-Adrien; Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Chargari, Cyrus; Deutsch, Eric; Magné, Nicolas

    2017-02-01

    Melanoma is traditionally considered to be a radioresistant tumor. However, radiotherapy and immunotherapy latest developments might upset this radiobiological dogma. Stereotactic radiotherapy allows high dose per fraction delivery, with high dose rate. More DNA lethal damages, less sublethal damages reparation, endothelial cell apoptosis, and finally clonogenic cell dysfunction are produced, resulting in improved local control. Radiotherapy can also enhance immune responses, inducing neoantigens formation, tumor antigen presentation, and cytokines release. A synergic effect of radiotherapy with immunotherapy is expected, and might lead to abscopal effects. If hadrontherapy biological properties seem able to suppress hypoxia-induced radioresistance and increase biological efficacy, ballistic advantages over photon radiations might also improve radiotherapy outcomes on usually poor prognosis locations. The present review addresses biological and clinical effects of high fraction dose, bystander effect, abscopal effect, and hadrontherapy features in melanoma. Clinical trials results are warranted to establish indications of innovative radiotherapy in melanoma.

  17. Radiotherapy of vertebral hemangiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakata, Kohichi; Hareyama, Masato; Oouchi, Atushi; Sido, Mitsuo; Nagakura, Hisayasu; Tamakawa, Mituharu; Akiba, Hidenari; Morita, Kazuo [Dept. of Radiology, Sapporo Medical Univ., School of Medicine (Japan)

    1997-12-31

    Between 1975 and 1996, 14 patients (11 females, 3 males) with vertebral hemangioma received treatment with radiotherapy. Thirteen patients had a history of back pain or lumbago and 2 patients had neurological symptoms such as sensory impairment or paraplegia. The standard dose administered was 36 Gy in 18 fractions (five treatments per week). In the 13 patients with pain, this was completely or partially relieved. The condition of a man with hypesthesia of the legs deteriorated and a woman with paraplegia who was treated with decompressive laminectomy followed by radiotherapy recovered completely after irradiation. CT scan before irradiation showed thickened trabeculae as small punctate areas of sclerosis in all patients. At MR imaging before irradiation, T2-weighted MR images showed areas of high intensity in all patients and MR images demonstrated lesion enhancement. However, none of the patients who were treated successfully with radiation demonstrated any changes of the affected vertebra in the conventional radiographic films, CT scan or MR imaging, even 5 years after irradiation. Radiological imaging is indispensable for the diagnosis of vertebral hemangiomas but does not appear to be useful for evaluating the effects of radiotherapy. (orig.).

  18. Proton Radiotherapy for Parameningeal Rhabdomyosarcoma: Clinical Outcomes and Late Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Childs, Stephanie K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Kozak, Kevin R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wisconsin Cancer Center Johnson Creek, Madison, WI (United States); Friedmann, Alison M. [Department of Pediatric Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Yeap, Beow Y. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Adams, Judith; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Liebsch, Norbert J.; Tarbell, Nancy J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Yock, Torunn I., E-mail: tyock@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To report the clinical outcome and late side effect profile of proton radiotherapy in the treatment of children with parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma (PM-RMS). Methods and Materials: Seventeen consecutive children with PM-RMS were treated with proton radiotherapy at Massachusetts General Hospital between 1996 and 2005. We reviewed the medical records of all patients and asked referring physicians to report specific side effects of interest. Results: Median patient age at diagnosis was 3.4 years (range, 0.4-17.6). Embryonal (n = 11), alveolar (n = 4), and undifferentiated (n = 2) histologies were represented. Ten patients (59%) had intracranial extension. Median prescribed dose was 50.4 cobalt gray equivalents (GyRBE) (range, 50.4-56.0 GyRBE) delivered in 1.8-2.0-GyRBE daily fractions. Median follow-up was 5.0 years for survivors. The 5-year failure-free survival estimate was 59% (95% confidence interval, 33-79%), and overall survival estimate was 64% (95% confidence interval, 37-82%). Among the 7 patients who failed, sites of first recurrence were local only (n = 2), regional only (n = 2), distant only (n = 2), and local and distant (n = 1). Late effects related to proton radiotherapy in the 10 recurrence-free patients (median follow-up, 5 years) include failure to maintain height velocity (n = 3), endocrinopathies (n = 2), mild facial hypoplasia (n = 7), failure of permanent tooth eruption (n = 3), dental caries (n = 5), and chronic nasal/sinus congestion (n = 2). Conclusions: Proton radiotherapy for patients with PM-RMS yields tumor control and survival comparable to that in historical controls with similar poor prognostic factors. Furthermore, rates of late effects from proton radiotherapy compare favorably to published reports of photon-treated cohorts.

  19. Tumor hypoxia and reoxygenation: the yin and yang for radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Beom Ju; Kim, Jong Woo; Jeong, Hoi Bin; Bok, Seo Yeon; Kim, Young Eun; Ahn, G One [Division of Integrative Biosciences and Biotechnology, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Tumor hypoxia, a common feature occurring in nearly all human solid tumors is a major contributing factor for failures of anticancer therapies. Because ionizing radiation depends heavily on the presence of molecular oxygen to produce cytotoxic effect, the negative impact of tumor hypoxia had long been recognized. In this review, we will highlight some of the past attempts to overcome tumor hypoxia including hypoxic radiosensitizers and hypoxia-selective cytotoxin. Although they were (still are) a very clever idea, they lacked clinical efficacy largely because of ‘reoxygenation’ phenomenon occurring in the conventional low dose hyperfractionation radiotherapy prevented proper activation of these compounds. Recent meta-analysis and imaging studies do however indicate that there may be a significant clinical benefit in lowering the locoregional failures by using these compounds. Latest technological advancement in radiotherapy has allowed to deliver high doses of radiation conformally to the tumor volume. Although this technology has brought superb clinical responses for many types of cancer, recent modeling studies have predicted that tumor hypoxia is even more serious because ‘reoxygenation’ is low thereby leaving a large portion of hypoxic tumor cells behind. Wouldn’t it be then reasonable to combine hypoxic radiosensitizers and/or hypoxia-selective cytotoxin with the latest radiotherapy? We will provide some preclinical and clinical evidence to support this idea hoping to revamp an enthusiasm for hypoxic radiosensitizers or hypoxia-selective cytotoxins as an adjunct therapy for radiotherapy.

  20. Tumor hypoxia and reoxygenation: the yin and yang for radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Beom-Ju; Kim, Jeongwoo; Jeong, Hoibin; Bok, Seoyeon; Kim, Young-Eun; Ahn, G-One

    2016-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia, a common feature occurring in nearly all human solid tumors is a major contributing factor for failures of anticancer therapies. Because ionizing radiation depends heavily on the presence of molecular oxygen to produce cytotoxic effect, the negative impact of tumor hypoxia had long been recognized. In this review, we will highlight some of the past attempts to overcome tumor hypoxia including hypoxic radiosensitizers and hypoxia-selective cytotoxin. Although they were (still are) a very clever idea, they lacked clinical efficacy largely because of ‘reoxygenation’ phenomenon occurring in the conventional low dose hyperfractionation radiotherapy prevented proper activation of these compounds. Recent meta-analysis and imaging studies do however indicate that there may be a significant clinical benefit in lowering the locoregional failures by using these compounds. Latest technological advancement in radiotherapy has allowed to deliver high doses of radiation conformally to the tumor volume. Although this technology has brought superb clinical responses for many types of cancer, recent modeling studies have predicted that tumor hypoxia is even more serious because ‘reoxygenation’ is low thereby leaving a large portion of hypoxic tumor cells behind. Wouldn’t it be then reasonable to combine hypoxic radiosensitizers and/or hypoxia-selective cytotoxin with the latest radiotherapy? We will provide some preclinical and clinical evidence to support this idea hoping to revamp an enthusiasm for hypoxic radiosensitizers or hypoxia-selective cytotoxins as an adjunct therapy for radiotherapy. PMID:28030900

  1. Effect of image-guided hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy on peripheral non-small-cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu-wen; Ren, Juan; Yan, Yan-li; Xue, Chao-fan; Tan, Li; Ma, Xiao-wei

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effects of image-guided hypofractionated radiotherapy and conventional fractionated radiotherapy on non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Fifty stage- and age-matched cases with NSCLC were randomly divided into two groups (A and B). There were 23 cases in group A and 27 cases in group B. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and stereotactic radiotherapy were conjugately applied to the patients in group A. Group A patients underwent hypofractionated radiotherapy (6–8 Gy/time) three times per week, with a total dose of 64–66 Gy; group B received conventional fractionated radiotherapy, with a total dose of 68–70 Gy five times per week. In group A, 1-year and 2-year local failure survival rate and 1-year local failure-free survival rate were significantly higher than in group B (P0.05) were lower in group A than in group B. The overall survival rate of group A was significantly higher than that of group B (P=0.03), and the survival rate at 1 year was 87% vs 63%, (P0.05). Compared with conventional fractionated radiation therapy, image-guided hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in NSCLC received better treatment efficacy and showed good tolerability. PMID:27574441

  2. Long-Term Outcomes From a Prospective Trial of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Low-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Christopher R., E-mail: crking@mednet.ucla.edu [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Urology, University of California Los Angeles School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Brooks, James D.; Gill, Harcharan; Presti, Joseph C. [Department of Urology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiotherapy has an intrinsically different normal tissue and tumor radiobiology. The results of a prospective trial of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for prostate cancer with long-term patient-reported toxicity and tumor control rates are presented. Methods and Materials: From 2003 through 2009, 67 patients with clinically localized low-risk prostate cancer were enrolled. Treatment consisted of 36.25 Gy in 5 fractions using SBRT with the CyberKnife as the delivery technology. No patient received hormone therapy. Patient self-reported bladder and rectal toxicities were graded on the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale (RTOG). Results: Median follow-up was 2.7 years. There were no grade 4 toxicities. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3, 2, and 1 bladder toxicities were seen in 3% (2 patients), 5% (3 patients), and 23% (13 patients) respectively. Dysuria exacerbated by urologic instrumentation accounted for both patients with Grade 3 toxicity. Urinary incontinence, complete obstruction, or persistent hematuria was not observed. Rectal Grade 3, 2, and 1 toxicities were seen in 0, 2% (1 patient), and 12.5% (7 patients), respectively. Persistent rectal bleeding was not observed. Low-grade toxicities were substantially less frequent with QOD vs. QD dose regimen (p = 0.001 for gastrointestinal and p = 0.007 for genitourinary). There were two prostate-specific antigen (PSA), biopsy-proven failures with negative metastatic workup. Median PSA at follow-up was 0.5 {+-} 0.72 ng/mL. The 4-year Kaplan-Meier PSA relapse-free survival was 94% (95% confidence interval, 85%-102%). Conclusion: Significant late bladder and rectal toxicities from SBRT for prostate cancer are infrequent. PSA relapse-free survival compares favorably with other definitive treatments. The current evidence supports consideration of stereotactic body radiotherapy among the therapeutic options for localized prostate cancer.

  3. [Heart failure and anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reda, S; Motloch, L J; Hoppe, U C

    2013-09-01

    Chronic heart failure has an age-dependent prevalence of 2% and is therefore one of the most frequent diseases in western societies. A reduced hemoglobin concentration according to the definition of the World Health Organization is a common comorbidity affecting more than half of all heart failure patients. Elderly patients, patients suffering from renal impairment and women are more likely to develop anemia but a definitive etiology of anemia is only identified in the minority of cases. Anemia is associated with a poor clinical status and a greater risk of hospitalization and is a predictive factor for increased mortality. The incidence of anemia appears to increase with a poorer functional class. Intravenous iron therapy improves the exercise capacity in patients with systolic heart failure and iron deficiency and is currently being recommended for patients with persistent symptoms despite optimal medical and device therapy. However, erythropoietin-stimulating agents as a treatment for anemia in chronic heart failure have failed to improve clinical outcome in a large randomized trial. In patients with heart failure but with maintained ejection fraction, anemia is also associated with a poor prognosis. Specific therapeutic recommendations for these patients are still not available.

  4. [HARDROCK project: parametric data collection and analysis of patients with head and neck cancer in the comprehensive cancer centre of Ostrava - role of fractionation and target volume definition in radiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halámka, M; Feltl, D; Cvek, J; Dušek, L

    2012-01-01

    The HARDROCK project has been designed as a retrospective data collection study in a locally run database system, which fulfils the requirements on the basic version of electronic medical records of cancer patients. The diagnostic category of head and neck tumors has been selected on purpose, as it presents a major problem in the Comprehensive Cancer Centre of Ostrava, and it is relevant given the high incidence and mortality in the Moravian-Silesian Region. The target parameters of the assessment include short-term as well as long-term treatment results in patients with head and neck tumors, evaluated with standard indicators of treatment response and survival. A special emphasis is put on major treatment modalities, i.e. surgery and radiation therapy, and on related complications. In this article, we present a sample of collected data. The data from patients has been separated into two groups based on the time of their acquisition: data from patients treated in 2004-2005 versus patients treated in 2006-2010. This division was given by the change of treatment protocols in 2006 introducing accelerated radiotherapy with concomitant boost and expanded lymph node irradiation field compared to normofractionation and hyperfractionation regimes used before 2006. Introduction of new irradiation techniques did not increase the rate of acute toxicity but slightly increased late toxicity. Further, we found a decrease of number of relapse and improved overall survival in patients with stage IV disease treated in 2006-2010. The project results will contribute methodically to the exact evaluation of diagnostics and treatment of patients with head and neck cancer and will help to optimize their medical care.

  5. Improved local control without elective nodal radiotherapy in patients with unresectable NSCLC treated by 3D-CRT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Kunyu; CAO Fengjun; WANG Jianhua; LIU Li; ZHANG Tao; WU Gang

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the influence of prophylactic elective nodal irradiation on the therapeutic results of definitive radiotherapy for patients with stage IliA or stage IIIB unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer,55 patients with clinically inoperable advanced non-small-cell lung cancer were studied.After four cycles of induction chemotherapy,the patients were divided into two groups at random.In one group,the elective nodal irradiation was included in clinical tumor volume(CTV)of definitive radiotherapy(ENI group);and in the other group,elective nodal irradiation was not included in CTV(non-ENI group).For the patients in the ENI group,the mean prescription dose for gross tumor volumes was 58.4 Gy,while for the patients in the non-ENI group,it was 65.8 Gy(P<0.05).The responsive rates were 45.8% and 74.0%(P<0.05),and the rate of the elective nodal failure (ENF)was 4.2% and 11.1%,respectively.Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that the mean local-progression-free survival time was 11.0 and 15.0 months,and one-year local-failure rates were 51.9% and 24.5%(P<0.05).The median overall survival time was 13.0 and 15.0 months,respectively (P=0.084).The one-year survival rates were 55.7% and 72.5%,and two-year survival rates were 0% and 19.9%.There was no significant difference in the occurrences of radiation-associated complications between the two groups.Our results showed that omitting elective nodal irradiation did not result in a high incidence of elective nodal failure.On the contrary,it decreased local failure by increasing prescription doses to the primary diseases and lymphadenopaphy,and thereby it may further prolong the patients' survival.

  6. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abelson, Jonathan A.; Murphy, James D.; Minn, Ann Yuriko; Chung, Melody [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Fisher, George A.; Ford, James M.; Kunz, Pamela [Department of Medical Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Norton, Jeffrey A.; Visser, Brendan C.; Poultsides, George A. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Koong, Albert C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Chang, Daniel T., E-mail: dtchang@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To report the outcomes and toxicities in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: Forty-seven patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma were treated with IMRT between 2003 and 2008. Of these 47 patients, 29 were treated adjuvantly and 18 definitively. All received concurrent 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. The treatment plans were optimized such that 95% of the planning target volume received the prescription dose. The median delivered dose for the adjuvant and definitive patients was 50.4 and 54.0 Gy, respectively. Results: The median age at diagnosis was 63.9 years. For adjuvant patients, the 1- and 2-year overall survival rate was 79% and 40%, respectively. The 1- and 2-year recurrence-free survival rate was 58% and 17%, respectively. The local-regional control rate at 1 and 2 years was 92% and 80%, respectively. For definitive patients, the 1-year overall survival, recurrence-free survival, and local-regional control rate was 24%, 16%, and 64%, respectively. Four patients developed Grade 3 or greater acute toxicity (9%) and four developed Grade 3 late toxicity (9%). Conclusions: Survival for patients with pancreatic cancer remains poor. A small percentage of adjuvant patients have durable disease control, and with improved therapies, this proportion will increase. Systemic therapy offers the greatest opportunity. The present results have demonstrated that IMRT is well tolerated. Compared with those who received three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in previously reported prospective clinical trials, patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma treated with IMRT in our series had improved acute toxicity.

  7. Challenges in integrating 18FDG PET-CT into radiotherapy planning of head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandekar, P; Partridge, M; Kazi, R; Nutting, C; Harrington, K; Newbold, K

    2010-01-01

    Radiotherapy forms one of the major treatment modalities for head and neck cancers (HNC), and precision radiotherapy techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy require accurate target delineation to ensure success of the treatment. Conventionally used imaging modalities, such as X-ray computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging are used to delineate the tumor. Imaging, such as positron emission tomography (PET)-CT, which combines the functional and anatomic modalities, is increasingly being used in the management of HNC. Currently, 18-fluorodeoxyglucose is the most commonly used radioisotope, which is accumulated in areas of high glucose uptake, such as the tumor tissue. Because most disease recurrences are within the high-dose radiotherapy volume, defining a biological target volume for radiotherapy boost is an attractive approach to improve the results. There are many challenges in employing the PET-CT for radiotherapy planning, such as patient positioning, target edge definition, and use of new PET tracers, which represent various functional properties, such as hypoxia, protein synthesis, and proliferation. The role of PET-CT for radiotherapy planning is ever expanding and more clinical data underlining the advantages and challenges in this approach are emerging. In this article, we review the current clinical evidence for the application of functional imaging to radiotherapy planning and discuss some of the current challenges and possible solutions that have been suggested to date.

  8. Plan optimization for stereotactic radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. de Pooter (Jacobus Abraham)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractCancer is one of the leading causes of death in the world. Next to surgery and chemotherapy, radiotherapy is one of the most used treatment modalities for cancer. About 50% of the patients with cancer will be treated with radiotherapy during the management of their disease. In radiothera

  9. The Confluence of Radiotherapy & Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph Robert Weichselbaum

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy has been considered a local modality and outcomes have emphasized local and regional control of tumors. Recent data suggests that radiotherapy may activate the immune system and the combination of radiation therapy and immune therapies may have the potential to improve both local and distant control of tumor deposits. Below we review principals underlying the concepts of combining both modalities.

  10. Bystander effects and radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Alicia; Martín, Margarita; Liñán, Olga; Alvarenga, Felipe; López, Mario; Fernández, Laura; Büchser, David; Cerezo, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects are defined as biological effects expressed after irradiation by cells whose nuclei have not been directly irradiated. These effects include DNA damage, chromosomal instability, mutation, and apoptosis. There is considerable evidence that ionizing radiation affects cells located near the site of irradiation, which respond individually and collectively as part of a large interconnected web. These bystander signals can alter the dynamic equilibrium between proliferation, apoptosis, quiescence or differentiation. The aim of this review is to examine the most important biological effects of this phenomenon with regard to areas of major interest in radiotherapy. Such aspects include radiation-induced bystander effects during the cell cycle under hypoxic conditions when administering fractionated modalities or combined radio-chemotherapy. Other relevant aspects include individual variation and genetics in toxicity of bystander factors and normal tissue collateral damage. In advanced radiotherapy techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the high degree of dose conformity to the target volume reduces the dose and, therefore, the risk of complications, to normal tissues. However, significant doses can accumulate out-of-field due to photon scattering and this may impact cellular response in these regions. Protons may offer a solution to reduce out-of-field doses. The bystander effect has numerous associated phenomena, including adaptive response, genomic instability, and abscopal effects. Also, the bystander effect can influence radiation protection and oxidative stress. It is essential that we understand the mechanisms underlying the bystander effect in order to more accurately assess radiation risk and to evaluate protocols for cancer radiotherapy.

  11. Radiotherapy of benign diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haase, W.

    1982-10-11

    Still today radiotherapy is of decisive relevance for several benign diseases. The following ones are briefly described in this introductory article: 1. Certain inflammatory and degenerative diseases as furuncles in the face, acute thrombophlebitis, recurrent pseudoriparous abscesses, degenerative skeletal diseases, cervical syndrome and others; 2. rheumatic joint diseases; 3. Bechterew's disease; 4. primary presenile osteoporosis; 5. syringomyelia; 6. endocrine ophthalmopathy; 7. hypertrophic processes of the connective tissue; 8. hemangiomas. A detailed discussion and a profit-risk analysis is provided in the individual chapters of the magazine.

  12. Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart failure due to systolic dysfunction. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Sept. 26, 2014. Colucci WS. ... patient with heart failure or cardiomyopathy. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Sept. 26, 2014. Colucci WS. ...

  13. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy with vagina carotica protection technique for local residual nasopharyngeal carcinoma after primary radiotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Feng; HUAN Fu-kui; FANG Hao; WAN Bao; LI Ye-xiong; XIAO Jian-ping; XU Ying-jie; ZHANG Ye; XU Guo-zhen; GAO Li; YI Jun-lin; LUO Jing-wei; HUANG Xiao-dong

    2012-01-01

    Background Local failure of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) after radiotherapy (RT) remains one of the major treatment failures.This study aimed to evaluate the clinical efficacy and complications of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) with vagina carotica protection technique for local residual of NPC patients after the primary RT.Methods From August 2006 to August 2010,FSRT with vagina carotica protection technique was applied to 36 patients in our department,the patients aged between 13 and 76 years with a median of 41.3 years,25 of them were male and 11were female.According to 2002 Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) Staging System,the stages before primary radiotherapy were:Ⅱa 2,Ⅱb 5,Ⅲ 18,Ⅳa 7,Ⅳb 4.In the first course of radiotherapy,9 patients received conventional RT,27 patients received intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and 20 out of the 36 patients received concurrent chemoradiotherapy.The total dose in the first course of RT was 69.96-76.90 Gy (median,72.58 Gy).The intervals between the primary RT and FSRT ranged from 12 to 147 days (median,39.8 days).Target volumes ranged from 1.46 to 32.98 cm3 (median,14.94 cm3).The total FSRT doses were 10.0-24.0 Gy (median,16.5 Gy) with 2.0-5.0Gy per fraction.The most common regimen was 15 Gy in 5 fractions of 3 Gy,the irradiation dose to vagina carotica was less than 2 Gy per fraction.Results The median follow-up time was 34 months (range,12-59 months).The 3-year local control rate was 100%;the 3-year overall survival rate was 94.4%;the 3-year disease-free survival rate was 77.8%.In this study,we had one case of cranial nerve injury,two cases of temporal lobe necrosis,and no nasopharyngeal massive hemorrhage was observed.Conclusion FSRT with vagina carotica protection technique is an effective and safe RT regimen for local residual of NPC with reduction of radiation-related neurovascular lesions.

  14. Contemporary Role of Radiotherapy in the Management of Primary Penile Tumors and Metastatic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crook, Juanita

    2016-11-01

    Squamous cell cancer of the penis is a radiocurable malignancy all too often managed solely by partial or total penectomy. Effective management of the primary tumor while preserving penile morphology and function is a priority. External radiotherapy and brachytherapy have a role to play in the definitive management of the primary tumor. Surgical nodal staging remains a cornerstone of management because it is the strongest predictor of survival, and inguinal status determines pelvic management. Postoperative radiotherapy of the regional nodes for high-risk pathology is indicated. Chemoradiotherapy should be considered as neoadjuvant treatment for unresectable nodes or as definitive management. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Proton minibeam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girst, Stefanie

    2016-03-08

    The risk of developing adverse side effects in the normal tissue after radiotherapy is often limiting for the dose that can be applied to the tumor. Proton minibeam radiotherapy, a spatially fractionated radiotherapy method using sub-millimeter proton beams, similar to grid therapy or microbeam radiation radiotherapy (MRT) using X-rays, has recently been invented at the ion microprobe SNAKE in Munich. The aim of this new concept is to minimize normal tissue injuries in the entrance channel and especially in the skin by irradiating only a small percentage of the cells in the total irradiation field, while maintaining tumor control via a homogeneous dose in the tumor, just like in conventional broad beam radiotherapy. This can be achieved by optimizing minibeam sizes and distances according to the prevailing tumor size and depth such that after widening of the minibeams due to proton interactions in the tissue, the overlapping minibeams produce a homogeneous dose distribution throughout the tumor. The aim of this work was to elucidate the prospects of minibeam radiation therapy compared to conventional homogeneous broad beam radiotherapy in theory and in experimental studies at the ion microprobe SNAKE. Treatment plans for model tumors of different sizes and depths were created using the planning software LAPCERR, to elaborate suitable minibeam sizes and distances for the individual tumors. Radiotherapy-relevant inter-beam distances required to obtain a homogeneous dose in the target volume were found to be in the millimeter range. First experiments using proton minibeams of only 10 μm and 50 μm size (termed microchannels in the corresponding publication Zlobinskaya et al. 2013) and therapy-conform larger dimensions of 100 μm and 180 μm were performed in the artificial human in-vitro skin model EpiDermFT trademark (MatTek). The corresponding inter-beam distances were 500 μm, 1mm and 1.8 mm, respectively, leading to irradiation of only a few percent of the cells

  16. Breast cancer radiotherapy: controversies and prospectives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Jin-ming; WANG Yong-sheng

    2008-01-01

    @@ Despite consensus on breast cancer radiotherapy, there are still some controversies over post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in patients with 1-3 positive lymph nodes, accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI), appropriate sequence of radiotherapy, chemotherapy and hormonal treatment, and radiotherapy after preoperative systemic therapy.

  17. Target margins in radiotherapy of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yartsev, Slav; Bauman, Glenn

    2016-11-01

    We reviewed the literature on the use of margins in radiotherapy of patients with prostate cancer, focusing on different options for image guidance (IG) and technical issues. The search in PubMed database was limited to include studies that involved external beam radiotherapy of the intact prostate. Post-prostatectomy studies, brachytherapy and particle therapy were excluded. Each article was characterized according to the IG strategy used: positioning on external marks using room lasers, bone anatomy and soft tissue match, usage of fiducial markers, electromagnetic tracking and adapted delivery. A lack of uniformity in margin selection among institutions was evident from the review. In general, introduction of pre- and in-treatment IG was associated with smaller planning target volume (PTV) margins, but there was a lack of definitive experimental/clinical studies providing robust information on selection of exact PTV values. In addition, there is a lack of comparative research regarding the cost-benefit ratio of the different strategies: insertion of fiducial markers or electromagnetic transponders facilitates prostate gland localization but at a price of invasive procedure; frequent pre-treatment imaging increases patient in-room time, dose and labour; online plan adaptation should improve radiation delivery accuracy but requires fast and precise computation. Finally, optimal protocols for quality assurance procedures need to be established.

  18. Unilateral Radiotherapy for the Treatment of Tonsil Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chronowski, Gregory M., E-mail: gchronowski@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Garden, Adam S.; Morrison, William H.; Frank, Steven J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Schwartz, David L. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Long Island Jewish Hospital (United States); Shah, Shalin J.; Beadle, Beth M.; Gunn, G. Brandon [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Kupferman, Michael E. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Ang, Kian K.; Rosenthal, David I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To assess, through a retrospective review, clinical outcomes of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil treated at the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center with unilateral radiotherapy techniques that irradiate the involved tonsil region and ipsilateral neck only. Methods and Materials: Of 901 patients with newly diagnosed squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil treated with radiotherapy at our institution, we identified 102 that were treated using unilateral radiotherapy techniques. All patients had their primary site of disease restricted to the tonsillar fossa or anterior pillar, with <1 cm involvement of the soft palate. Patients had TX (n = 17 patients), T1 (n = 52), or T2 (n = 33) disease, with Nx (n = 3), N0 (n = 33), N1 (n = 23), N2a (n = 21), or N2b (n = 22) neck disease. Results: Sixty-one patients (60%) underwent diagnostic tonsillectomy before radiotherapy. Twenty-seven patients (26%) underwent excision of a cervical lymph node or neck dissection before radiotherapy. Median follow-up for surviving patients was 38 months. Locoregional control at the primary site and ipsilateral neck was 100%. Two patients experienced contralateral nodal recurrence (2%). The 5-year overall survival and disease-free survival rates were 95% and 96%, respectively. The 5-year freedom from contralateral nodal recurrence rate was 96%. Nine patients required feeding tubes during therapy. Of the 2 patients with contralateral recurrence, 1 experienced an isolated neck recurrence and was salvaged with contralateral neck dissection only and remains alive and free of disease. The other patient presented with a contralateral base of tongue tumor and involved cervical lymph node, which may have represented a second primary tumor, and died of disease. Conclusions: Unilateral radiotherapy for patients with TX-T2, N0-N2b primary tonsil carcinoma results in high rates of disease control, with low rates of contralateral nodal failure and a low incidence of acute toxicity

  19. Adaptive Motion Compensation in Radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, Martin J

    2011-01-01

    External-beam radiotherapy has long been challenged by the simple fact that patients can (and do) move during the delivery of radiation. Recent advances in imaging and beam delivery technologies have made the solution--adapting delivery to natural movement--a practical reality. Adaptive Motion Compensation in Radiotherapy provides the first detailed treatment of online interventional techniques for motion compensation radiotherapy. This authoritative book discusses: Each of the contributing elements of a motion-adaptive system, including target detection and tracking, beam adaptation, and pati

  20. Factors associated with mortality in adults admitted with heart failure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esem

    with Heart Failure at the University Teaching Hospital in Lusaka ... based studies have been done on the prevalence of heart failure and the .... Anaemia (2008 ESC Guidelines and W.H.O definition) ..... The contribution of poor renal function to.

  1. A matched cohort study of standard chemo-radiotherapy versus radiotherapy alone in elderly nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Zeng

    Full Text Available The impact of standard chemo-radiotherapy (CRT as preferred therapy for elderly patients (age≥60 years with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC remains unclear. Therefore, a strict matched cohort study was conducted to compare the survival and treatment toxicity of standard chemo-radiotherapy in the elderly NPC patients with those of radiotherapy (RT alone. From 1998 to 2003, total 498 newly diagnosed elderly non-metastatic NPC patients were abstracted and classified into two groups by the treatments they received. For each patient in the CRT group, a matched pair in RT group was identified by matching for gender, age, histological type, T and N classifications, RT dose to primary tumor and neck nodes, and days of radiotherapy. Treatment tolerability and toxicity were clarified, and treatment outcomes were calculated and compared between the two groups. Two groups were well balanced in clinical characteristics because of the strict matching conditions. Totally 87 pairs can be assessed according to the criteria. The 5-year OS, CSS, FFS, and LR-FFS for CRT and RT groups were 62% versus 40% (P=0.013, 67% versus 47% (P=0.018, 65% versus 53% (log-rank: P=0.064, Breslow: P=0.048, and 88% versus 72%, (P=0.019, respectively. There was no significant difference in 5-year D-FFS between the two groups (75% vs. 73%, P=0.456. The CRT group experienced significantly more Grade ≥3 acute mucositis (46.0% vs. 28.7%, P= 0.019. We concluded that standard chemo-radiotherapy can achieve a reasonable local and regional control in elderly NPC patients with acceptable and reversible acute toxicity. However, distant metastasis remains the dominant failure pattern. When the elderly NPC patients are in good performance status following a complete evaluation of overall functional status and comorbidity conditions, standard chemo-radiotherapy is worthy of recommendation.

  2. [Radiotherapy phase I trials' methodology: Features].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivoirard, R; Vallard, A; Langrand-Escure, J; Guy, J-B; Ben Mrad, M; Yaoxiong, X; Diao, P; Méry, B; Pigne, G; Rancoule, C; Magné, N

    2016-12-01

    In clinical research, biostatistical methods allow the rigorous analysis of data collection and should be defined from the trial design to obtain the appropriate experimental approach. Thus, if the main purpose of phase I is to determine the dose to use during phase II, methodology should be finely adjusted to experimental treatment(s). Today, the methodology for chemotherapy and targeted therapy is well known. For radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy phase I trials, the primary endpoint must reflect both effectiveness and potential treatment toxicities. Methodology should probably be complex to limit failures in the following phases. However, there are very few data about methodology design in the literature. The present study focuses on these particular trials and their characteristics. It should help to raise existing methodological patterns shortcomings in order to propose new and better-suited designs. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Postprostatectomy Radiotherapy Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sefrova, Jana, E-mail: sefrova@post.cz [Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Odrazka, Karel [Department of Clinical and Radiation Oncology, Multiscan and Pardubice Regional Hospital, Pardubice (Czech Republic); First and Third Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Paluska, Petr [Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Belobradek, Zdenek [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Brodak, Milos [Department of Urology, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Dolezel, Martin [Department of Clinical and Radiation Oncology, Multiscan and Pardubice Regional Hospital, Pardubice (Czech Republic); First and Third Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Prosvic, Petr [Department of Urology, Regional Hospital Nachod, Nachod (Czech Republic); Macingova, Zuzana; Vosmik, Milan [Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Hoffmann, Petr [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Louda, Miroslav [Department of Urology, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Nejedla, Anna [Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in prostate bed treatment planning could influence definition of the clinical target volume (CTV) and organs at risk. Methods and Materials: A total of 21 consecutive patients referred for prostate bed radiotherapy were included in the present retrospective study. The CTV was delineated according to the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer recommendations on computed tomography (CT) and T{sub 1}-weighted (T{sub 1}w) and T{sub 2}-weighted (T{sub 2}w) MRI. The CTV magnitude, agreement, and spatial differences were evaluated on the planning CT scan after registration with the MRI scans. Results: The CTV was significantly reduced on the T{sub 1}w and T{sub 2}w MRI scans (13% and 9%, respectively) compared with the CT scans. The urinary bladder was drawn smaller on the CT scans and the rectum was smaller on the MRI scans. On T{sub 1}w MRI, the rectum and urinary bladder were delineated larger than on T{sub 2}w MRI. Minimal agreement was observed between the CT and T{sub 2}w images. The main spatial differences were measured in the superior and superolateral directions in which the CTV on the MRI scans was 1.8-2.9 mm smaller. In the posterior and inferior border, no difference was seen between the CT and T{sub 1}w MRI scans. On the T{sub 2}w MRI scans, the CTV was larger in these directions (by 1.3 and 1.7 mm, respectively). Conclusions: The use of MRI in postprostatectomy radiotherapy planning resulted in a reduction of the CTV. The main differences were found in the superior part of the prostate bed. We believe T{sub 2}w MRI enables more precise definition of prostate bed CTV than conventional planning CT.

  4. Technical Advances and Pitfalls in Head and Neck Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upendra Parvathaneni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT is the standard of care in the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC based on level 1 evidence. Technical advances in radiotherapy have revolutionized the treatment of HNSCC, with the most tangible gain being a reduction in long term morbidity. However, these benefits come with a serious and sobering price. Today, there is a greater chance of missing the target/tumor due to uncertainties in target volume definition by the clinician that is demanded by the highly conformal planning process involved with IMRT. Unless this is urgently addressed, our patients would be better served with the historically practiced non conformal radiotherapy, than IMRT which promises lesser morbidity. Image guided radiotherapy (IGRT ensures the level of set up accuracy warranted to deliver a highly conformal treatment plan and should be utilized with IMRT, where feasible. Proton therapy has a theoretical physical advantage over photon therapy due to a lack of “exit dose”. However, clinical data supporting the routine use of this technology for HNSCC are currently sparse. The purpose of this article is to review the literature, discuss the salient issues and make recommendations that address the gaps in knowledge.

  5. Systems failure.

    OpenAIRE

    Macleod, Anna

    1998-01-01

    Systems Failure A solo exhibition of new work by Anna Macleod developed in conversation with curator Liz Burns. The Dock, Carrick on Shannon, Co Leitrim. Ireland. 12th February – 17th April 2010. The works for the exhibition Systems Failure include drawings, prints and small constructions that examine the delicate balance that exists between need and aspects of failure rooted in the relationship between humanity and land use. The work seeks to question the relationship between scient...

  6. Postoperative radiotherapy for endometrial cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Choi, Eun Cheol; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Ok Bae; Byun, Sang Jun; Park, Seung Gyu; Kwon, Sang Hoon

    2012-01-01

    .... Sixty four patients with stage I-III endometrial cancer (EC) treated with postoperative radiotherapy alone between January 1989 and December 2008 at the Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center were chosen for the present study...

  7. Targeted intraoperative radiotherapy in oncology

    CERN Document Server

    Keshtgar, Mohammed; Wenz, Frederik

    2014-01-01

    Targeted intraoperative radiotherapy is a major advance in the management of cancer patients. With an emphasis on practical aspects, this book offers an ideal introduction to this innovative  technology for clinicians.

  8. Stereotactic radiotherapy for vestibular schwannoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muzevic, Dario; Legcevic, Jelena; Splavski, Bruno;

    2014-01-01

    ; Web of Science; CAB Abstracts; ISRCTN and additional sources for published and unpublished trials. The date of the search was 24 July 2014. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) exploring the efficacy of stereotactic radiotherapy compared with observation alone, microsurgical...

  9. Polypharmacy in Older Patients ≥70 Years Receiving Palliative Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieder, Carsten; Mannsăker, Bărd; Pawinski, Adam; Haukland, Ellinor

    2017-02-01

    Many older cancer patients receive five or more daily medications (polypharmacy). The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of polypharmacy in older patients undergoing palliative radiotherapy and its influence on the risk of being unable to complete the prescribed number of fractions, as well as the 30-day mortality and overall survival. Retrospective review of 289 patients aged 70 years or older. The median and mean Charlson comorbidity index (11) was 2, ranging between 0-7 (presently treated cancer not included). The median and mean number of daily medications was 7, ranging between 0-18. Only 27% of patients used less than 5 daily medications. Corticosteroids were used by 59% of the patients and opioid analgesics by 55%. Comorbidity, but also symptom severity, as indexed by pain medication, correlated significantly with the prevalence of polypharmacy. In multivariate analysis, neither polypharmacy nor use of corticosteroids or opioid analgesics influenced overall survival. No trends were seen for 30-day mortality or failure to complete radiotherapy. Polypharmacy is a common phenomenon in older patients receiving palliative radiotherapy and it does not predict adverse radiotherapy outcomes. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  10. Comparing Cystatin C Changes as a Measure of Renal Function Before and After Radiotherapy in Patients with Stomach Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ameri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine and compare Cystatin C changes before and after radiotherapy in patients with stomach cancer who were candidate for radiotherapy. This study was conducted as a prospective cohort one. Eighteen patients with definite diagnosis of stomach cancer under treatment by radiotherapy who presented to Radiotherapy-Oncology Center of Imam Hossein Hospital, Tehran-Iran, and the treatment in all cases was simultaneous chemoradiation with Xeloda were included. In all patients before radiotherapy and after radiotherapy serum creatinine (Cr and Cystatin C were measured simultaneously. Mean cystatin level before treatment (1.2±0.4 was significantly lower than that of post-treatment (1.6±0.36, (P=0.001. Serum Cr level before treatment was 1.15±0.33 and after radiotherapy was 1.08±0.24 and did not show significant difference. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR of the patients before radiotherapy was -46.8 ± 21.0 and after radiotherapy was 43.8±15.8 that did not have significant difference (P=0.146 and also blood urea nitrogen (BUN before radiotherapy was 20.72±3.7 and 20 ± 6.38 after radiotherapy that did not have significant difference (P=0.6. Comparison of the Cystatin C difference with total radiation dose of the kidneys that are put in three dose groups in radiotherapy field had association that in dose of less that 18 gray (Gy the Cystatin C change showed significant and positive association (P=0.027; r=0.52 and about 18-24 Gy the Cystatin C difference showed significant and negative association (P=0.023, r=-0.53. It seems that for evaluating the renal function, serum Cystatin C measurement is preferable than serum Cr. level.

  11. Radiotherapy in early stage Dupuytren`s contracture; Radiotherapie im fruehen Stadium des Morbus Dupuytren. Indikation, Technik und Langzeitergebnisse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keilholz, L. [Univ. Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany). Strahlentherapeutische Klinik und Poliklinik; Seegenschmiedt, M.H. [Univ. Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany). Strahlentherapeutische Klinik und Poliklinik]|[Alfried-Krupp-Krankenhaus, Essen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologie, Strahlentherapie und Nuklearmedizin; Born, A.D. [Univ. Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany). Strahlentherapeutische Klinik und Poliklinik; Sauer, R. [Univ. Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany). Strahlentherapeutische Klinik und Poliklinik

    1997-01-01

    Patients and Method: Between 1982 and 1993, 96 patients (142 hands) received orthovoltage radiotherapy, which consisted of 2 radiotherapy courses with daily fractionation of 5 x 3 Gy (total dose: 30 Gy) separated by a 6 weeks interval. The Dupuytren`s contracture was staged according to the classification of Tubiana et al. [38]. The initial evaluation was performed 3 months after completion of radiotherapy, while long-term outcome was analysed at last follow-up between February and April 1994. The mean follow-up was 6{+-}2 (range 1 to 12) years. Fifty-seven patients with a follow-up of {>=}5 (median 7,5; mean 9,5 to 12) years were separately evaluated for long-term outcome, i.e. prevention of disease progression. Acute and late treatment toxicity was assessed using the RTOG/EORTC criteria. Results: According to stage, 130 (92%) cases remained stable at 3 months follow-up, 10 (7%) improved and 2 (1%) progressed. An objective reduction of symptomatic cords and nodules was achieved in 107 (75%) case at 3 months follow-up. Moreover, 87% of the patients reported a subjective relief of symptoms. In long-term follow-up, only 16 of 142 (11%) cases had progressed according to stage. In the group with a minimum follow-up of 5 years (n=57), 44 (77%) patients experienced no progression, while 13 (23%) progressed inside (8 cases) or outside (5 cases) of the radiotherapy field. Many `failures` could have been avoided with appropriate choice of larger safety margins included in the treated portals, however, most failures were successfully managed by a second radiotherapy or hand surgery. (orig./AJ) [Deutsch] Patienten und Methode: Von 1982 bis 1993 wurden 96 Patienten (142 Haende) mit Orthovolt-Radiotherapie bestrahlt. Dazu wurden zwei Kurse zu je 5 x 3 Gy taeglich fraktioniert im Abstand von sechs Wochen verabreicht (insgesamt 30 Gy). Das klinische Stadium der Dupuytrenschen Kontraktur wurde nach Tubiana et al. [38] bestimmt. Die initiale Beurteilung erfolgte drei Monate nach

  12. Clarification of Failure Terminology by Examining a Generic Failure Development Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen S. B. Tam

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available One key objective of good plant asset management is to prevent undesirable failure that may cause loss of life, destruction of asset, loss of economic benefit or damage to the environment. In order to deploy strategies that prevent failure, one needs to first understand the processes leading to failure, and definitions used for describing the failure of physical assets. A number of different definitions for the same terms related to equipment failure can be found in the literature. The looseness of terminology and often overlapping shades of meaning lead to ambiguity and confusion. This paper aims to offer clearer definitions derived from examining a generic failure development process exhibited by physical assets (herein referred to as "equipment".

  13. Cause-Specific Colostomy Rates After Radiotherapy for Anal Cancer: A Danish Multicentre Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sunesen, Kåre G; Nørgaard, Mette; Lundby, Lilli

    2011-01-01

    In anal cancer, colostomy-free survival is a measure of anal sphincter preservation after treatment with radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Failure to control anal cancer and complications of treatment are alternative indications for colostomy. However, no data exist on cause-specific colostomy...

  14. Survival and Symptom Relief after Palliative Radiotherapy for Esophageal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Julia; Kup, Philipp Günther; Nieder, Carsten; Khosrawipour, Veria; Bühler, Helmut; Adamietz, Irenäus A; Fakhrian, Khashayar

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the 6-months dysphagia-free survival, improvement in swallowing function, complication rate, and overall survival in patients with incurable esophageal cancer treated with palliative radiotherapy. We retrospectively reviewed data from 139 patients (median age 72 years) with advanced/recurrent incurable esophageal cancer, who were referred to 3 German radiation oncology centers for palliative radiotherapy between 1994 and 2014. Radiotherapy consisted of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) with 30 - 40.5 Gy/2.5 - 3 Gy per fraction, brachytherapy alone (BT) with 15 - 25 Gy/5 - 7Gy per fraction/weekly and EBRT + BT (30 - 40.5 Gy plus 10 - 14 Gy with BT) in 65, 46, and 28 patients, respectively. Dysphagia-free survival (Dy-PFS) was defined as the time to worsening of dysphagia for at least one point, a new loco-regional failure or death of any cause. Median follow-up time was 6 months (range 1-6 months). Subjective symptom relief was achieved in 72 % of patients with median response duration of 5 months. The 1-year survival rate was 30%. The 6-months Dy-PFS time for the whole group was 73 ± 4%. The 6-months Dy-PFS was 90 ± 4% after EBRT, 92 ± 5% after EBRT + BT and 37 ± 7% after BT, respectively (p<0.001). Five patients lived for more than 2 years, all of them were treated with EBRT ± BT. Ulceration, fistula and stricture developed in 3, 6 and 7 patients, respectively. Radiotherapy leads to symptom improvement in the majority of patients with advanced incurable esophageal cancer. The present results favor EBRT ± BT over BT alone. Due to the retrospective nature of this study, imbalances in baseline characteristics might have contributed to this finding, and further trials appear necessary.

  15. Pragmatic Failure and English Language Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张彦苓

    2004-01-01

    This paper illustrates the definition and classification of pragmatic failure, causes of pragmatic failure and relation between pragmatic failure and English language teaching based on cross-cultural communication and pragmatic theory. It analyses students' pragmatic failure during their learning English and communicating with native speakers of English in detail, points out that English language teaching should take communicative culture and training students' pragmatic competence as main points. When teachers of English improve students' speech competence, they also should let students know the close relation between cultural differences and pragmatic differences and cross-cultural communication. Thus they should improve students' pragmatic competence to reduce their pragmatic failure.

  16. Exclusion of elective nodal irradiation is associated with minimal elective nodal failure in non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cox James D

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Controversy still exists regarding the long-term outcome of patients whose uninvolved lymph node stations are not prophylactically irradiated for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC treated with definitive radiotherapy. To determine the frequency of elective nodal failure (ENF and in-field failure (IFF, we examined a large cohort of patients with NSCLC staged with positron emission tomography (PET/computed tomography (CT and treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT that excluded uninvolved lymph node stations. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of 115 patients with non-small cell lung cancer treated at our institution with definitive radiation therapy with or without concurrent chemotherapy (CHT. All patients were treated with 3D-CRT, including nodal regions determined by CT or PET to be disease involved. Concurrent platinum-based CHT was administered for locally advanced disease. Patients were analyzed in follow-up for survival, local regional recurrence, and distant metastases (DM. Results The median follow-up time was 18 months (3 to 44 months among all patients and 27 months (6 to 44 months among survivors. The median overall survival, 2-year actuarial overall survival and disease-free survival were 19 months, 38%, and 28%, respectively. The majority of patients died from DM, the overall rate of which was 36%. Of the 31 patients with local regional failure, 26 (22.6% had IFF, 5 (4.3% had ENF and 2 (1.7% had isolated ENF. For 88 patients with stage IIIA/B, the frequencies of IFF, any ENF, isolated ENF, and DM were 23 (26%, 3 (9%, 1 (1.1% and 36 (40.9%, respectively. The comparable rates for the 22 patients with early stage node-negative disease (stage IA/IB were 3 (13.6%, 1(4.5%, 0 (0%, and 5 (22.7%, respectively. Conclusion We observed only a 4.3% recurrence of any ENF and a 1.7% recurrence of isolated ENF in patients with NSCLC treated with definitive 3D-CRT without prophylactic irradiation of

  17. Radiotherapy and skin tumors; Radiotherapie et tumeurs curanees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calitchi, E.; KIrova, Y.; Le bourgeois, J.P. [Hopital Henri-Mondor, 94 - Creteil (France)

    1998-09-01

    Radiotherapy plays an important role in treatment of skin tumours. For skin carcinomas, external irradiation (kilo-voltage X-rays or electrons according to clinical characteristics) is more valuable than interstitial brachytherapy, which is recommended for tumours of the lip and of the nasal vestibule. In mycosis fungoides, total cutaneous electron beam radiation therapy is efficient for patients with limited superficial plaques. In the classical form of Kaposi`s sarcoma, radiotherapy can achieve local control-whereas it obtains good palliative results in the epidemic form. (author)

  18. Application of failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) to pretreatment phases in tomotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broggi, Sara; Cantone, Marie Claire; Chiara, Anna; Di Muzio, Nadia; Longobardi, Barbara; Mangili, Paola; Veronese, Ivan

    2013-09-06

    The aim of this paper was the application of the failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) approach to assess the risks for patients undergoing radiotherapy treatments performed by means of a helical tomotherapy unit. FMEA was applied to the preplanning imaging, volume determination, and treatment planning stages of the tomotherapy process and consisted of three steps: 1) identification of the involved subprocesses; 2) identification and ranking of the potential failure modes, together with their causes and effects, using the risk probability number (RPN) scoring system; and 3) identification of additional safety measures to be proposed for process quality and safety improvement. RPN upper threshold for little concern of risk was set at 125. A total of 74 failure modes were identified: 38 in the stage of preplanning imaging and volume determination, and 36 in the stage of planning. The threshold of 125 for RPN was exceeded in four cases: one case only in the phase of preplanning imaging and volume determination, and three cases in the stage of planning. The most critical failures appeared related to (i) the wrong or missing definition and contouring of the overlapping regions, (ii) the wrong assignment of the overlap priority to each anatomical structure, (iii) the wrong choice of the computed tomography calibration curve for dose calculation, and (iv) the wrong (or not performed) choice of the number of fractions in the planning station. On the basis of these findings, in addition to the safety strategies already adopted in the clinical practice, novel solutions have been proposed for mitigating the risk of these failures and to increase patient safety.

  19. Heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008275 Relationship of calcineure in mRNA level in peripheral blood and cardiac muscle of patients with heart failure.WANG Mengmeng(王萌萌),et al.Dept Cardiol,Shandong Prov Hosp,Shandong Univ,Jinan 250021.Chin Cir J 2008;23(2):113-116.Objective To study the relationship of calcineurin mRNA level between peripheral lymphocytes and cardiac muscles of patients with chronic heart failure.Methods

  20. Heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008037 Factors associated with efficacy of cardiac resynchronization therapy for patients with congestive heart failure. SHI Haoying(史浩颖), et al. Dept Cardiol, Zhongshan Hosp Fudan Univ, Shanghai 200032. Chin J Cardiol 2007;35(12):1099-1163. Objective The efficacy of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in patients with congestive heart failure and the potential factors associated with responder or nonresponder were investigated. Methods Fifty

  1. Perioperative acute renal failure.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mahon, Padraig

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Recent biochemical evidence increasingly implicates inflammatory mechanisms as precipitants of acute renal failure. In this review, we detail some of these pathways together with potential new therapeutic targets. RECENT FINDINGS: Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin appears to be a sensitive, specific and reliable biomarker of renal injury, which may be predictive of renal outcome in the perioperative setting. For estimation of glomerular filtration rate, cystatin C is superior to creatinine. No drug is definitively effective at preventing postoperative renal failure. Clinical trials of fenoldopam and atrial natriuretic peptide are, at best, equivocal. As with pharmacological preconditioning of the heart, volatile anaesthetic agents appear to offer a protective effect to the subsequently ischaemic kidney. SUMMARY: Although a greatly improved understanding of the pathophysiology of acute renal failure has offered even more therapeutic targets, the maintenance of intravascular euvolaemia and perfusion pressure is most effective at preventing new postoperative acute renal failure. In the future, strategies targeting renal regeneration after injury will use bone marrow-derived stem cells and growth factors such as insulin-like growth factor-1.

  2. Skin Cancer of the Head and Neck with Perineural Invasion: Defining the Clinical Target Volumes Based on the Pattern of Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluck, Iris; Ibrahim, Mohannad; Popovtzer, Aron; Teknos, Theodoros N.; Chepeha, Douglas B; Prince, Mark E; Moyer, Jeffrey S; Bradford, Carol R; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To analyze patterns of failure in patients with head and neck cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (HNCSCC) and clinical/radiological evidence of perineural invasion (CPNI), in order to define neural clinical target volume (CTV) for treatment planning. Methods Patients treated with 3D conformal or intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for HNCSCC with CPNI were included in the study. A retrospective review of the clinical charts, radiotherapy (RT) plans and radiological studies has been conducted. Results Eleven consecutive patients with HNCSCCs with CPNI were treated from 2000 through 2007. Most patients received multiple surgical procedures and RT courses. The most prevalent failure pattern was along cranial nerves (CNs), and multiple CNs were ultimately involved in the majority of cases. In all cases the involved CNs at recurrence were the main nerves innervating the primary tumor sites, as well as their major communicating nerves. We have found several distinct patterns of disease spread along specific CNs depending on the skin regions harboring the primary tumors, including multiple branches of CN V and VII. These patterns and the pertinent anatomy are detailed in the paper. Conclusions Predictable disease spread patterns along cranial nerves supplying the primary tumor sites were found in this study. Awareness of these patterns, as well as knowledge of the relevant cranial nerve anatomy, should be the basis for CTV definition and delineation for RT treatment planning. PMID:18938044

  3. DEGRO practical guidelines. Radiotherapy of breast cancer I. Radiotherapy following breast conserving therapy for invasive breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedlmayer, F. [Paracelsus Medical Univ. Hospital, Salzburg (Austria). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology; Sautter-Bihl, M.L. [Staedtisches Klinium Karlsruhe (Germany). Klinik fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie; Budach, W. [University Hospital Duesseldorf (Germany)] [and others

    2013-10-15

    Background and purpose: The aim of the present paper is to update the practical guidelines for postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy of breast cancer published in 2007 by the breast cancer expert panel of the German Society for Radiooncology (Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie, DEGRO). The present recommendations are based on a revision of the German interdisciplinary S-3 guidelines published in July 2012. Methods: A comprehensive survey of the literature concerning radiotherapy following breast conserving therapy (BCT) was performed using the search terms 'breast cancer', 'radiotherapy', and 'breast conserving therapy'. Data from lately published meta-analyses, recent randomized trials, and guidelines of international breast cancer societies, yielding new aspects compared to 2007, provided the basis for defining recommendations according to the criteria of evidence-based medicine. In addition to the more general statements of the DKG (Deutsche Krebsgesellschaft), this paper addresses indications, target definition, dosage, and technique of radiotherapy of the breast after conservative surgery for invasive breast cancer. Results: Among numerous reports on the effect of radiotherapy during BCT published since the last recommendations, the recent EBCTCG report builds the largest meta-analysis so far available. In a 15 year follow-up on 10,801 patients, whole breast irradiation (WBI) halves the average annual rate of disease recurrence (RR 0.52, 0.48-0.56) and reduces the annual breast cancer death rate by about one sixth (RR 0.82, 0.75-0.90), with a similar proportional, but different absolute benefit in prognostic subgroups (EBCTCG 2011). Furthermore, there is growing evidence that risk-adapted dose augmentation strategies to the tumor bed as well as the implementation of high precision RT techniques (e.g., intraoperative radiotherapy) contribute substantially to a further reduction of local relapse rates. A main focus of ongoing

  4. Radiotherapy of supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D. Y. [Sung Kyun Kwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine; Kim, I. H.; Yoo, H. J. [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine; Cho, Y. K. [Inha Univ., Inchon (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine

    1997-03-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of combined treatment of surgery and chemoradiotherapy for supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors (SPNET) and obtain the prognostic factors and complications. The age of 18 patients ranged from 1 to 27 years (median = 5 years). There were 12 males and 6 females. The extents of surgery were gross total (n=9), subtotal (n=8), biopsy only (n=1). Craniospinal radiotherapy was delivered to all the patients except 2 patients who were treated only with the whole brain and primary lesion. Radiation dose were 3120 - 5800 cGy (median=5460) to primary mass, 1500 - 4200 cGy (median = 3600 cGy) to the whole brain and 1320 - 3600 cGy (median = 2400 cGy) to the spinal axis. Chemotherapy was done in 13 patients. Median follow-up period was 45 months ranged from 1 to 89 months. Patterns of failure were as follows; local recurrence (1), multiple intracranial recurrence (2), spinal seeding (3), craniospinal seeding (2) and multiple bone metastasis (1). Two of two patients who did not received craniospinal radiotherapy failed at spinal are. All the relapsed cases died at 1 to 13 months after diagnosis of progression. The 2- and 5-year overall survival rates were 61% and 49%, respectively. The age, sex, tumor location did not influence the survival bu aggressive resection with combined chemotherapy showed better outcome. Among 9 survivors, complications were detected as radiation necrosis (n=1), hypopituitarism (n=2), cognitive defect (n=1), memory deficit (n=1), growth retardation (n=1). To improve the results of treatment of SPENT, maximal surgical resection followed by radiation therapy and chemotherapy is necessary. The extended radiation field including craniospinal axis may reduce the recurrence in spinal axis. (author).

  5. Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Adrenal Gland Metastases: University of Florence Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casamassima, Franco, E-mail: f.casamassima@dfc.unifi.it [Clinical Radiobiological Institute, University of Florence, Florence (Italy); Livi, Lorenzo [Department of Radiation-Oncology, University of Florence, Florence (Italy); Masciullo, Stefano; Menichelli, Claudia; Masi, Laura [Clinical Radiobiological Institute, University of Florence, Florence (Italy); Meattini, Icro [Department of Radiation-Oncology, University of Florence, Florence (Italy); Bonucci, Ivano [Clinical Radiobiological Institute, University of Florence, Florence (Italy); Agresti, Benedetta; Simontacchi, Gabriele [Department of Radiation-Oncology, University of Florence, Florence (Italy); Doro, Raffaela [Clinical Radiobiological Institute, University of Florence, Florence (Italy)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a retrospective single-institution outcome after hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for adrenal metastases. Methods and Materials: Between February 2002 and December 2009, we treated 48 patients with SBRT for adrenal metastases. The median age of the patient population was 62.7 years (range, 43-77 years). In the majority of patients, the prescription dose was 36 Gy in 3 fractions (70% isodose, 17.14 Gy per fraction at the isocenter). Eight patients were treated with single-fraction stereotactic radiosurgery and forty patients with multi-fraction stereotactic radiotherapy. Results: Overall, the series of patients was followed up for a median of 16.2 months (range, 3-63 months). At the time of analysis, 20 patients were alive and 28 patients were dead. The 1- and 2-year actuarial overall survival rates were 39.7% and 14.5%, respectively. We recorded 48 distant failures and 2 local failures, with a median interval to local failure of 4.9 months. The actuarial 1-year disease control rate was 9%; the actuarial 1- and 2-year local control rate was 90%. Conclusion: Our retrospective study indicated that SBRT for the treatment of adrenal metastases represents a safe and effective option with a control rate of 90% at 2 years.

  6. Clinical Usefulness of Implanted Fiducial Markers for Hypofractionated Radiotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Young Min; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Lee, Hyung Hwan; Lee, Hyung Sik; Hur, Woo Joo; Yoon, Jin Han; Kim, Tae Hyo; Kim, Soo Dong; Yun, Seong Guk [Dong-A University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    To assess the usefulness of implanted fiducial markers in the setup of hypofractionated radiotherapy for prostate cancer patients by comparing a fiducial marker matched setup with a pelvic bone match. Four prostate cancer patients treated with definitive hypofractionated radiotherapy between September 2009 and August 2010 were enrolled in this study. Three gold fiducial markers were implanted into the prostate and through the rectum under ultrasound guidance around a week before radiotherapy. Glycerin enemas were given prior to each radiotherapy planning CT and every radiotherapy session. Hypofractionated radiotherapy was planned for a total dose of 59.5 Gy in daily 3.5 Gy with using the Novalis system. Orthogonal kV X-rays were taken before radiotherapy. Treatment positions were adjusted according to the results from the fusion of the fiducial markers on digitally reconstructed radiographs of a radiotherapy plan with those on orthogonal kV X-rays. When the difference in the coordinates from the fiducial marker fusion was less than 1 mm, the patient position was approved for radiotherapy. A virtual bone matching was carried out at the fiducial marker matched position, and then a setup difference between the fiducial marker matching and bone matching was evaluated. Three patients received a planned 17-fractionated radiotherapy and the rest underwent 16 fractionations. The setup error of the fiducial marker matching was 0.94{+-}0.62 mm (range, 0.09 to 3.01 mm; median, 0.81 mm), and the means of the lateral, craniocaudal, and anteroposterior errors were 0.39{+-}0.34 mm, 0.46{+-}0.34 mm, and 0.57{+-}0.59 mm, respectively. The setup error of the pelvic bony matching was 3.15{+-}2.03 mm (range, 0.25 to 8.23 mm; median, 2.95 mm), and the error of craniocaudal direction (2.29{+-}1.95 mm) was significantly larger than those of anteroposterior (1.73{+-}1.31 mm) and lateral directions (0.45{+-}0.37 mm), respectively (p< 0.05). Incidences of over 3 mm and 5 mm in setup

  7. Efficacy and toxicity of (chemo)radiotherapy for primary subglottic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hata, M.; Koike, I.; Odagiri, K.; Minagawa, Y.; Inoue, T. [Yokohama City Univ. Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Taguchi, T.; Nishimura, G.; Takahashi, M.; Komatsu, M.; Sano, D. [Yokohama City Univ. Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan). Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology

    2013-01-15

    Background and purpose: Primary subglottic cancer is a rare malignancy. We investigated the efficacy and toxicity of radiotherapy for subglottic cancer. Patients and methods: Nineteen patients with primary squamous cell carcinoma of the subglottis received radiotherapy, 14 of whom also underwent chemotherapy. Of the 19 patients, 15 received definitive radiotherapy to the gross tumors with total doses of 70-70.2 Gy in 35-39 fractions, and 4 underwent preoperative radiotherapy with total doses of 37.8-55.8 Gy in 21-31 fractions, followed by total laryngectomy. Results: Of the 19 patients, 5 developed local progression and 2 developed distant metastasis at the median follow-up period of 5 years. The 5-year local control and disease-free rates were 74 and 63%, respectively. Three patients died of tumor progression, and the 5-year overall and disease-free survival rates were 80 and 63%, respectively. Regarding acute toxicities, transient mucositis and dermatitis of grade 3 or lower were observed in all patients, but there were no late toxicities of grade 3 or higher. Conclusion: Radiotherapy is a safe and effective treatment for patients with primary squamous cell carcinoma of the subglottis. The use of chemotherapy together with radiotherapy may enhance treatment efficacy and contribute to larynx preservation through good local control. (orig.)

  8. [Definition of shock types].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, H A; Baumann, G; Gänsslen, A; Janssens, U; Knoefel, W; Koch, T; Marx, G; Müller-Werdan, U; Pape, H C; Prange, W; Roesner, D; Standl, T; Teske, W; Werner, G; Zander, R

    2001-11-01

    Definitions of shock types. Hypovolaemic shock is a state of insufficient perfusion of vital organs with consecutive imbalance of oxygen supply and demand due to an intravascular volume deficiency with critically impaired cardiac preload. Subtypes are haemorrhagic shock, hypovolaemic shock in the narrow sense, traumatic-haemorrhagic shock and traumatic-hypovolaemic shock. Cardiac shock is caused by a primary critical cardiac pump failure with consecutive inadequate oxygen supply of the organism. Anaphylactic shock is an acute failure of blood volume distribution (distributive shock) and caused by IgE-dependent, type-I-allergic, classical hypersensibility, or a physically, chemically, or osmotically induced IgE-independent anaphylactoid hypersensibility. The septic shock is a sepsis-induced distribution failure of the circulating blood volume in the sense of a distributive shock. The neurogenic shock is a distributive shock induced by generalized and extensive vasodilatation with consecutive hypovolaemia due to an imbalance of sympathetic and parasympathetic regulation of vascular smooth muscles.

  9. Treatment results of adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy in breast cancer patients with positive axillary nodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hyun Soo [College of Medicine, Pochon CHA Univ, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Chang Ok [College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-01

    Between January 1983 and December 1988, 218 female patients with known breast cancer and positive axillary nodes were treated with adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy following radical mastectomy. Treatment results were retrospectively analysed at the Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University of College of Medicine. The patients were classified into 3 groups; group 1 included 80 patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy alone; in group 2, 52 patients treated with radiotherapy alone; and in group 3, 86 patients treated with combined chemo-radiotherapy. The mean age was 44 years and ranged from 27 to 70. The median follow-up time was 51 months. Seven-year relapse free and overall survival rates were 56% and 67%; in group 1, 50% and 56%; in group 2, 51% and 65%; and in group 3, 62% and 75% respectively. This difference was not statistically significant(p<0.05). The loco-regional failure rates were 13% and distant failure rates were 33%. There was less risk of loco-regional failure in group 2 and 3 which included radiotherapy (.0<0.05). But there was no significant y difference in the rates of distant failure(p>0.05). By univariate analysis, the only significant prognostic factor affecting relapse-free survival was the percentage of positive axillary nodes; and the overall survival significantly correlated with the primary tumor size, the number or percentage of positive axillary nodes, and stage. But in multivariate analysis, the only significant prognostic factor was treatment modality. By univariate analysis of prognostic factors affecting the rates of overall failure and distant failure, the significant prognostic factors was the percentage of positive axillary nodes; and the risk of the loco-regional failure significantly correlated with the treatment modality. In conclusion, these results suggest a potential for decreasing the risk of loco-regional failure with the addition of postoperative radiotherapy to chemotherapy in the

  10. A case of BOOP following breast conservative radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Masao; Sekine, Hiroshi; Aoki, Manabu; Kanehira, Chihiro; Sato, Tetsuo; Kubo, Hirotaka; Ikegami, Masahiro [Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1998-12-01

    The great majority of individuals with early breast cancer are potential candidates for treatment with conservative surgery and radiotherapy. A 55 years old women with pre-existing rheumatoid arthritis suffered from severe cough and SOB within 3 months after definitive radiation therapy for breast cancer. The chest radiograph showed bilateral pulmonary infiltrate and the diagnosis of BOOP was confirmed by TBLB findings. After corticosteroid therapy, the clinical improvement was dramatic, and the pulmonary shadow disappeared completely. Radiation oncologists should be cautious in the treatment of early breast cancer with collagen vascular disease even in the remission status. (author)

  11. School failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, P H

    1989-04-01

    Numerous factors may contribute to a child's failure to learn. Certain causes of school failure, such as specific learning disabilities, mental retardation, sensory impairment, and chronic illness may be regarded as intrinsic characteristics of the child. Other causes, such as family dysfunction, social problems, and ineffective schooling, are characteristics of the child's environment. Still other influences on school performance, such as temperamental dysfunction, attention deficits, and emotional illness, may be viewed as the consequence of the interaction between the child and his or her environment. The reasons for a child's school failure must not be considered in isolation but rather within the context of social and environmental circumstances. Evaluation must consider the myriad of reasons for a child's school failure and attempt to identify "clusters" of adverse influences on school performance. Detailed information must be sought from the student, parents, and school system through the history and physical examination. Questionnaires are useful in data gathering. Ancillary methods of assessment that may be of value include neurodevelopmental screening and laboratory studies. Further investigations and referrals, particularly psychoeducational evaluation, are of major importance. Traditional roles of the pediatrician in school failure include the treatment of underlying medical conditions, counseling, the coordination of further investigations and referrals, and the facilitation of communication with community services and resources. Participation with other disciplines in the development of a child's educational plan is feasible and useful.

  12. Spinal radiosurgery - efficacy and safety after prior conventional radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolajek Katharina

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conventional external beam radiotherapy is a standard procedure for treatment of spinal metastases. In case of progression spinal cord tolerance limits further radiotherapy in pre-irradiated areas. Spinal stereotactic radiotherapy is a non-invasive option to re-treat pre-irradiated patients. Nevertheless, spinal radiosurgery results in relevant dose deposition within the myelon with potential toxicity. Aim of the study was to retrospectively analyse the efficacy and feasibility for salvage radiosurgery of spinal metastases. Methods During a period of 4 years (2005-2009 70 lesions in 54 patients were treated in 60 radiosurgery sessions and retrospectively analysed. Clinical (pain, sensory and motor deficit and radiological (CT/MRI follow-up data were collected prospectively after radiosurgery. Pain - as main symptom - was classified by the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS score. Every patient received single session radiosurgery after having been treated first-line with conventionally fractionated radiotherapy. Kaplan-Meier method and life tables were used to analyse freedom from local failure and overall survival. Results At a median follow-up of 14.5 months the actuarial rates of freedom from local failure at 6/12/18 months were 93%, 88% and 85%, respectively. The median radiosurgery dose was 1 × 18 Gy (range 10-28 Gy to the median 70% isodose. The VAS score of patients with pain (median 6 dropped significantly (median 4, p = 0.002. In 6 out of 7 patients worse sensory or motor deficit after SRS was caused by local or distant failures (diagnosed by CT/MRI. One patient with metastatic renal cell carcinoma developed a progressive complete paraparesis one year after the last treatment at lumbar level L3. Due to multiple surgery and radiosurgery treatments at the lumbar region and further local progression, the exact reason remained unclear. Apart from that, no CTC grade III or higher toxicity has been observed. Conclusions By

  13. Bringing Definitions into High Definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, John

    2010-01-01

    Why do definitions play such a central role in mathematics? It may seem obvious that precision about the terms one uses is necessary in order to use those terms reasonably (while reasoning). Definitions are chosen so as to be definite about the terms one uses, but also to make both the statement of, and the reasoning to justify, theorems as…

  14. 不同调强技术在宫颈癌骨髓保护根治性放疗中的应用%Various Techniques of Bone Marrow-Sparing Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Cervical Cancer Treated with Definitive Radiotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林柏翰; 吴丽丽; 张基永

    2015-01-01

    目的:分析比较固定野调强技术和不同弧数的旋转容积调强在宫颈癌骨髓保护根治性全盆腔放射治疗的剂量学特点,寻找更优的治疗方案。方法:选取在汕头大学医学院附属肿瘤医院接受根治性放疗的ⅡA~ⅢB期宫颈癌患者9例,针对每例患者分别设计九野固定野调强(FF-IMRT)计划、双弧、三弧和四弧旋转容积调强(2A-VMAT、3A-VMAT、4VMAT)计划,比较四者靶区、骨盆骨髓,其他危及器官的剂量学差异和加速器跳数和照射时间。结果:IMRT、2A-VMAT、3A-VMAT和4A-VMAT四组计划均具有良好的靶区覆盖率,靶区适形度和均匀性以及骨盆骨髓受照剂量和受照体积(V10,V20,V40)无差异。三组VMAT计划在危及器官的保护上无差异。VMAT计划的小肠均略低于FF-IMRT计划(P<0.008),在直肠的保护上,FF-IMRT计划略优于3弧VMAT计划(P<0.008)。IMRT、2A-VMAT、3A-VMAT和4A-VMAT计划的加速器跳数分别为(1850.3±227.8)MU、(848.4±58.8)MU、(835.0±76.2)MU和(910.8±43.3)MU,照射时间分别为(353.2±25.1)s、(136.2±3.6)s、(211.2±3.5)s和(286.2±3.4)s。各组的加速器跳数和照射时间比较差异有统计学意义,调强计划的跳数和照射时间最多,两弧VMAT最少。结论:综合考虑各种物理和生物因素,在宫颈癌骨髓保护根治性放疗计划中,双弧VMAT技术照射为最优选择。%Objective: To compare static intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique with various arcs of volumetric-modulated arc radiation therapy (VMAT) techniques in patients with cervical cancer treated with definitive bone morrow-sparing whole pelvic radiotherapy, and to explore a better treatment management.Method: 9 CT image sets of staged ⅡA-ⅢB cervical cancer patients, treated in Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, were included. Nine fixed-field IMRT (FF-IMRT) plans and two

  15. Adjuvant chemotherapy (Nedaplatin/UFT) after radiotherapy for locallu advanced head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubota, Akira; Furukawa, Madoka; Kawano, Toshiro; Yamashita, Kohsuke; Sugiyama, Masato [Kanagawa Cancer Center (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    To evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy after radiotherapy for patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cancer, 40 patients, previously untreated (6 with stage III and 34 with stage IV; 26 with resectable, 10 with unresectable and 4 patients with inoperable) were treated with radiotherapy followed by adjuvant chemotherapy (Nedaplatin /tegafur-uracil (UFT)) at our outpatient clinic. The primary site was identified in the larynx or hypopharynx in 15, oral cavity or oropharynx in 11, sinuses in 6, nasopharynx in 4, unknown primary in 3, and parotis in 1 patient. Treatment consisted of 6 courses of Nedaplatin 80 mg/m{sup 2} repeated at 4 weeks intervals, and one-year oral administration of UFTE 400mg/day, after radiotherapy. Toxicities included leukopenia (grade 3, 20.5%, grade 4, 2.6%), thrombocytopenia (grade 3, 7.7%). There was one death due to gastric ulcer. Twenty-five patients (62.5%) received 6 courses of adjuvant chemotherapy. Two-year overall survival rate was 100% for stage III and 61.1% for stage IV. Over the same period, the progression-free survival rate was 83.3% for stage III and 46.1% for stage IV. 85.7% of complete response (CR) (12/14 patients) and 63.6% of partial response (PR) (14/22 patients) to radiotherapy showed that the effect of radiotherapy was maintained during adjuvant chemotherapy. If the effect of radiotherapy was maintained during adjuvant chemotherapy, the two-year progression free survival rate was not different between 81.8% for CR to radiotherapy and 81.3% for PR. The rate of distant failure was 2.5%, which was lower than that citedin previous reports. This adjuvant chemotherapy regimen is tolerable at outpatient clinics and might suppress distant metastasis after radiotherapy. (author)

  16. Thalassaemic osteoarthropathy treated with radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, A.N. (King' s Coll. Hospital, London (United Kingdom))

    1993-11-01

    Patients with beta thalassaemia may develop a specific osteoarthropathy involving the feet. A number of different treatments for this condition have been tried, including rest, analgesia and hypertransfusion. We report a case of a patient with thalassaemic osteoarthropathy who responded to radiotherapy after failing conventional treatment. (author).

  17. Oral complications of cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreizen, S.; Daly, T.E.; Drane, J.B.; Brown, L.R.

    1977-02-01

    Injury to surrounding tissues during radiotherapy for oral cancer can have devastating physical and psychologic consequences for the patient. Oral complications include xerostomia, dental decay, mucositis, taste loss, osteoradionecrosis, infection, and trismus. In many instances, these problems can be eradicated or controlled with appropriate treatment.

  18. The role of postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy in resected esophageal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Geol; Kim, Choong Bae; Chung, Kyung Young; Lee, Doo Yun; Seong Jin Sil; Kim, Gwi Eon; Suh, Chang Ok [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Yonsei Cancer Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-12-15

    A retrospective study was performed to evaluate whether postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy can improve survival and decrease recurrence as compared with surgery alone in resected esophageal cancer. From Jan. 1985 to Dec. 1993, among 94 esophageal cancer patients treated with surgery, fifty-one patients were included in this study. Transthoracic esophagectomy was performed in 35 patients and transhiatal esophagectomy in 16. Postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy was performed 4 weeks after surgery in 26 among 38 patients in stage II and III. A total dose of 30 {approx} 60 Gy in 1.8 Gy daily fraction, median 54 Gy over 6 weeks, was delivered in the mediastinum + both supraclavicular lymph nodes or celiac lymph nodes according to the tumor location. Forty-seven patients (92%) had squamous histology. The median follow-up period was 38 months. The overall 2-year and 5-year survival and median survival were 56.4%, 36.8% and 45 months. Two-year and 5-year survival and median survival by stage were 92%, 60.3% for stage I, 63%, 42% and 51 months for stage II and 34%, 23% and 19 months for stage III ({rho} = 0.04). For stage II and III patients, 5-year survival and median survival were 22.8%. 45 months for the surgery alone group and 37.8%, 22 months for the postoperative RT group ({rho} = 0.89). For stage III patients, 2-year survival and median survival were 0%, 11 months for the surgery alone group and 36.5%, 20 months for the postoperative RT group ({rho} = 0.14). Local and distant failure rates for stage II and III were 50%, 16% for the surgery alone and 39%, 31% for the postoperative RT group. For N1 patients, local failure rate was 71% for the surgery alone group and 37% for the postoperative RT group ({rho} = 0.19). Among 10 local failures in the postoperative RT group, in-field failures were 2, marginal failures 1, out-field 5 and anastomotic site failures 2. There were no statistically significant differences in either the overall survival or the patterns of failure

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging for precise radiotherapy of small laboratory animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frenzel, Thorsten [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Bereich Strahlentherapie; Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Anatomie und Experimentelle Morphologie; Kaul, Michael Gerhard; Ernst, Thomas Michael; Salamon, Johannes [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Jaeckel, Maria [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie; Schumacher, Udo [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Anatomie und Experimentelle Morphologie; Kruell, Andreas [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Bereich Strahlentherapie

    2017-05-01

    Radiotherapy of small laboratory animals (SLA) is often not as precisely applied as in humans. Here we describe the use of a dedicated SLA magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner for precise tumor volumetry, radiotherapy treatment planning, and diagnostic imaging in order to make the experiments more accurate. Different human cancer cells were injected at the lower trunk of pfp/rag2 and SCID mice to allow for local tumor growth. Data from cross sectional MRI scans were transferred to a clinical treatment planning system (TPS) for humans. Manual palpation of the tumor size was compared with calculated tumor size of the TPS and with tumor weight at necropsy. As a feasibility study MRI based treatment plans were calculated for a clinical 6 MV linear accelerator using a micro multileaf collimator (μMLC). In addition, diagnostic MRI scans were used to investigate animals which did clinical poorly during the study. MRI is superior in precise tumor volume definition whereas manual palpation underestimates their size. Cross sectional MRI allow for treatment planning so that conformal irradiation of mice with a clinical linear accelerator using a μMLC is in principle feasible. Several internal pathologies were detected during the experiment using the dedicated scanner. MRI is a key technology for precise radiotherapy of SLA. The scanning protocols provided are suited for tumor volumetry, treatment planning, and diagnostic imaging.

  20. Premature ovarian failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vujović Svetlana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Premature ovarian failure (POF is the occurrence of hypergonadotropic hypoestrogenic amenorrhea in women under the age of forty years. It is idiopathic in 74-90% patients. Known cases can be divided into primary and secondary POF. In primary POF genetic aberrations can involve the X chromosome (monosomy, trisomy, translocations, deletions or autosomes. Genetic mechanisms include reduced gene dosage and non-specific chromosome effects impairing meiosis, decreasing the pool of primordial follicles and increasing atresia due to apoptosis or failure of follicle maturation. Autoimmune ovarian damage is caused by alteration of T-cell subsets and T-cell mediated injury, increase of autoantibody producing B-cells, a low number of effector/cytotoxic lymphocyte, which decreases the number and activity of natural killer cells. Bilateral oophorectomy, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and infections cause the secondary POF. Symptoms of POF include irritability, nervousness, loss of libido, depression, lack of concentration, hot flushes, weight gaining, dry skin, vaginal dryness, frequent infections etc. The diagnosis is confirmed by the level of FSH of over 40 IU/L and estradiol below 50 pmol/L in women aged below 40 years. Biochemical and other hormonal analysis (free thyroxin, TSH, prolactin, testosterone, karyotype (<30 years of age, ultrasound of the breasts and pelvis are advisable. Optimal therapy is combined estrogen progestagen therapy given in a sequential rhythm, after excluding absolute contraindications. Testosterone can be added to adnexectomized women and those with a low libido. Sequential estrogen progestagen replacement therapy is the first line therapy for ovulation induction in those looking for pregnancy and after that oocyte donation will be advised. Appropriate estro-progestagen therapy improves the quality of life and prevents complications such as cardiovascular diseases, osteoporosis, stroke etc.

  1. Definitely Life but not Definitively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Joan D.; Perry, Randall S.

    2006-12-01

    Although there have been attempts at a definition of life from many disciplines, none is accepted by all as definitive. Some people believe that it is impossible to define ‘life’ adequately at the moment. We agree with this point of view on linguistic grounds, examining the different types of definition, the contexts in which they are used and their relative usefulness as aids to arriving at a scientific definition of life. We look at some of the more recent definitions and analyse them in the light of our criteria for a good definition. We argue that since there are so many linguistic and philosophical difficulties with such a definition of life, what is needed is a series of working descriptions, which are suited to the audience and context in which they are used and useful for the intended purpose. We provide some ideas and examples of the forms these may take.

  2. Respiratory failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    970318 A study on evoked potentials in cor pul-monale patients with chronic respiratory failure.QIAO Hui(乔慧), et al. Beijing Neurosurg Instit,Beijing, 100050. Chin J Geriatr 1997; 16(1): 43-45. Objective: Evoked protential was used to detect thechange of brain function in cor pulmonale patients with

  3. Heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    2009170 Curcumin attenuates left ventricular dysfunction and remodeling in rabbits with chronic heart failure. TANG Yanhong(唐艳红),et al.Dept Cardiol,Renmin Hosp,Wuhan Univ,Wuhan 430060.Chin J Cardiol,2009;37(3):262-267.

  4. Heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008411 Expression of S100B during heart failure in rats. JIANG Zhenni(蒋珍妮), et al. Dept Cardiol, 2nd Affili Hosp, Zhejiang Univ, Coll Med Hangzhou 310009. Chin J Emerg Med 2008;17(5):475-478. Objective To evaluate the value of S100B gene on cardiovascular remodeling in rats with abdominal aorta coarctation.

  5. Heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    970284 Effects of enalapril on heart rate variabilityin patients with congestive heart failure. ZHANGYouhua(章友华), et a1. Dept Cardiol, Cardiovasc Instit& Fuwai Hosp, CAMS & PUMC, Beijing, 100037. ChinCir J 1996; 11(2): 729-732.

  6. Failure Modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, K. P.; Burcharth, H. F.; Ibsen, Lars Bo;

    1999-01-01

    The present appendix contains the derivation of ten different limit state equations divided on three different failure modes. Five of the limit state equations can be used independently of the characteristics of the subsoil, whereas the remaining five can be used for either drained or undrained...

  7. Do Foreign Language Learners Need Failures?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Kic-Drgas

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A lack of motivation, incomprehensible content and a high workload are only some of the causes leading to students’ failures in the learning process. Dealing with failures seems to have become a new core competence in the current world, which is why the definition and implementation of an appropriate strategy is essential for prospective learning results. The focus of the contribution is on the meaning of failure and sources of potential student failures in the foreign language learning at the university level. The results presented in the paper base on the survey conducted with English language students at Koszalin University of Technology. Students were asked to identify the field causing learning failures. The described survey delivers information about the sources of failures from learner’s point of view, which can be an incentive to develop and implement strategies to cope with failures in the ESP class.

  8. Postoperative Radiotherapy in Prostate Cancer: The Case of the Missing Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croke, Jennifer [Division of Radiation Oncology, Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Malone, Shawn, E-mail: smalone@ottawahospital.on.ca [Division of Radiation Oncology, Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Roustan Delatour, Nicolas; Belanger, Eric [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Ottawa Hospital, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Avruch, Leonard [Department of Radiology, Ottawa Hospital, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Morash, Christopher [Division of Urology, Ottawa Hospital, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Kayser, Cathleen; Underhill, Kathryn; Spaans, Johanna [Division of Radiation Oncology, Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Postoperative radiotherapy (XRT) increases survival in high-risk prostate cancer patients. Approximately 50% of patients on long-term follow-up relapse despite adjuvant XRT and the predominant site of failure remains local. Four consensus guidelines define postoperative clinical target volume (CTV) in prostate cancer. We explore the possibility that inadequate CTV coverage is an important cause of local failure. This study evaluates the utility of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in defining prostate bed CTV. Methods and Materials: Twenty prostate cancer patients treated with postoperative XRT who also had preoperative staging MRI were included. The four guidelines were applied and the CTVs were expanded to create planning target volumes (PTVs). Preoperative MRIs were fused with postoperative planning CT scans. MRI-based prostate and gross visible tumors were contoured. Three-dimensional (3D) conformal four- and six-field XRT plans were developed and dose-volume histograms analyzed. Subtraction analysis was conducted to assess the adequacy of prostate/gross tumor coverage. Results: Gross tumor was visible in 18 cases. In all 20 cases, the consensus CTVs did not fully cover the MRI-defined prostate. On average, 35% of the prostate volume and 32% of the gross tumor volume were missed using six-field 3D treatment plans. The entire MRI-defined gross tumor volume was completely covered in only two cases (six-field plans). The expanded PTVs did not cover the entire prostate bed in 50% of cases. Prostate base and mid-zones were the predominant site of inadequate coverage. Conclusions: Current postoperative CTV guidelines do not adequately cover the prostate bed and/or gross tumor based on preoperative MRI imaging. Additionally, expanded PTVs do not fully cover the prostate bed in 50% of cases. Inadequate CTV definition is likely a major contributing factor for the high risk of relapse despite adjuvant XRT. Preoperative imaging may lead to more

  9. 16 CFR 1115.3 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SUBSTANTIAL PRODUCT HAZARD REPORTS General Interpretation § 1115.3 Definitions. In addition to the definitions given... Sunshine Act, 16 CFR part 1012. (c) Noncompliance means the failure of a consumer product to comply with...

  10. Radiotherapy of Neck Node Metastases from an Unknown Primary Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Eun [Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-12-15

    Purpose: The aim of this retrospective analysis was to analyze the results of radiotherapy administered to patients with neck node metastases from an unknown primary cancer, with or without neck dissection. Materials and Methods: From January 1986 to December 2005, 88 patients with neck node metastases from an unknown primary cancer were treated with curative intent. The age of the patients ranged from 35 to 74 years (median age, 59 years). There were 74 male and 14 female patients. Distribution of patients by N status was as follows: N1, 4 patients; N2a, 10 patients; N2b, 48 patients; N2c, 8 patients; N3, 18 patients. Fifty-one patients underwent neck dissection and 37 patients had only a biopsy (31 patients had fine-needle aspiration and 6 patients had an excisional biopsy). All patients received radiotherapy. The follow-up time ranged from 1 to 154 months, with a median time of 32 months. Results: The overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) rate at 5 years were 43.9% and 41.7%, respectively. The factors associated with the OS rate were neck dissection, and a subsequent primary tumor. Factors associated with the DFS rate were N stage, neck dissection, and a subsequent primary tumor. Neck failure was noted in 15 patients, distant metastases in 18 patients, and a subsequent primary tumor in 8 patients. Conclusion: With comprehensive radiotherapy given to the bilateral neck and the potential mucosal sites, good survival rates can be obtained in patients with neck node metastases from an unknown primary cancer. However, considering the side effects, a randomized trial is required to determine the optimal radiotherapy volume.

  11. Hypofractionated Dose Escalated 3D Conformal Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Outcomes from a Mono-Institutional Phase II Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramacere, Francesco; Arcangeli, Stefano; Pignatelli, Antonietta; Castagna, Roberta; Portaluri, Maurizio

    2015-05-01

    Based on a radiobiological assumption of a low alpha/beta (α/β) ratio for prostate cancer, hypofractionated radiotherapy has increasingly gained traction in the clinical practice and recent guidelines have confirmed the non-inferiority of this approach. Nevertheless, the largest studies that have used hypofractionation so far, employed image-guided radiation therapy/intensity modulated radiation therapy (IGRT/IMRT) facilities that might have overcome the radiobiological advantages, which remain to be fully confirmed. The aim of this trial was to evaluate the feasibility of a hypofractionated schedule delivered with 3D-Conformal Radiotherapy to prostate and seminal vesicles in combination with hormonal therapy. The study included 97 consecutive patients with localized prostate cancer (PCa), irrespective of risk class, treated with a schedule of 62 Gy in 20 fractions over 5 weeks (4 fractions of 3.1 Gy each per week). According to National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) prognostic classification, patients were divided into a favourable group (19%), intermediate group (41%) and unfavourable group (40%). Early and late toxicities were scored using the radiation toxicity grading/European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC) criteria. Additionally, the international prostate symptom index (IPSS) for benign prostate hypertrophy was used to evaluate obstructive urinary symptoms. Biochemical outcome was reported according to the Phoenix definition for biochemical failure. Hormonal therapy (HT) was administrated in 92% of patients. After a median follow-up of 39 months (range=25-52), maximum ≥G2 late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities occurred in 8% and 11% patients, respectively. The corresponding figures for acute toxicities were 24% and 15%. Patients with higher IPSS score before enrolment had significantly worse urinary function after treatment. Only 2% of patients died from PCa. Biochemical non-evidence of disease

  12. 48 CFR 19.701 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-based system for small business subcontracting program reporting. Failure to make a good faith effort to comply with the subcontracting plan means willful or intentional failure to perform in accordance with... PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS The Small Business Subcontracting Program 19.701 Definitions. As used...

  13. Irradiation of low rectal cancers; Radiotherapie des carcinomes du bas rectum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ardiet, J.M.; Coquard, R.; Romestaing, P.; Fric, D.; Baron, M.H.; Rocher, F.P.; Sentenac, I.; Gerard, J.P. [Centre Hospitalier Lyon-Sud, 69 -Pierre-Benite (France)

    1994-12-31

    The low rectal cancers are treated by anorectal amputation and pose the problem of the sphincter conservation. Some authors extend the clinical definition to developed injuries until 12 cm from the anal margin. The rectal cancer is a frequent tumour which remains serious. When the tumour is low, the treatment consists in an anorectal amputation with a permanent colostomy. The radical non preserving surgery is the usual treatment of these injuries. Until 1960 the rectal adenocarcinoma was considered as a radioresistant tumour because of the impossibility to deliver an enough dose to the tumour by external radiotherapy. But other studies showed that those lesions were radiosensitive and often radiocurable. The medical treatments haven`t yet demonstrated their efficiency in the treatment of the rectal cancer. We`ll study the radiotherapy in the treatment of the low rectal cancer, solely radiotherapy, radiosurgical associations. 32 refs., 5 tabs.

  14. Radiotherapy for diffuse brainstem glioma in children and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xin; Fang, Yuan; Hui, Xuhui; Jv, Yan; You, Chao

    2016-06-27

    radiotherapy when compared with participants receiving conventional radiotherapy. The mainly observed adverse effect was local erythema and dry desquamation especially behind the auricles. There were some other toxicities, but there was no statistically significant difference between treatment groups. There was no information on other outcomes. We judged the quality of evidence to be moderate (i.e. further research is likely to have an important impact on our confidence in the estimate of effect and may change the estimate) for OS, and low for PFS and toxicities. It should be mentioned that the sample size in this RCT was small, which could lead to insufficient statistical power for a clinically relevant outcome. We could make no definitive conclusions from this review based on the currently available evidence. Further research is needed to establish the role of radiotherapy in the management of newly diagnosed diffuse brainstem glioma in children and young adults. Future RCTs should be conducted with adequate power and all relevant outcomes should be taken into consideration. Moreover, international multicentre collaboration is encouraged. Considering the potential advantage of hypofractionated radiotherapy to decrease the treatment burden and increase the quality of remaining life, we suggest that more attention should be paid to hypofractionated radiotherapy.

  15. Treatment planning system for carbon ion radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyama-Ito, Hiroko [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2002-06-01

    This paper describes the treatment planning (TP) and its peripheral system for carbon ion therapy that has been developed and in clinical use in recent two years at our institution. A new treatment planning system which is FOCUS customized to our irradiation system will be launched in clinical use soon. A new DICOM based PACS has been developed and in use. Now MRI, PET images are ready to be utilized for patient definition with image fusion functionality of radiotherapy TP. We implemented the exchange functionality of TP data specified by RTOG 3D QA Center in FOCUS, Pinnacle3 and heavy ion TP. Target volume and normal structure contours and dose distributions are exchangeable. A database system of carbon ion therapy dedicated to analysis of therapy data has been designed and implemented. All accessible planning data and treatment records of more than 1000 patients treated for seven and half years have been archived. The system has a DICOM RT sever and a database for miscellaneous text data. Limited numbers of private attributes were introduced for ion therapy specific objects. On-line as well as manual registration along with edit functionalities is prepared. Standard web browser is used to search and retrieve information. A DICOM RT viewer has been developed to view and retrieve RT images, dose distributions and structure set. These system described above are all designed to conform to the up-to-date standards of radiation therapy so as to be bases of the future development of the therapy at our institution. (author)

  16. Reirradiation of head and neck cancer in the era of intensity-modulated radiotherapy: Patient selection, practical aspects, and current evidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeon Sil [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul(Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Locoregional failure is the most frequent pattern of failure in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients and it leads to death in most of the patients. Second primary tumors occurring in the other head and neck region reach up to almost 40% of long-term survivors. Recommended and preferred retreatment option in operable patients is salvage surgical resection, reporting a 5-year overall survival of up to 40%. However, because of tumor location, extent, and underlying comorbidities, salvage surgery is often limited and compromised by incomplete resection. Reirradiation with or without combined chemotherapy is an appropriate option for unresectable recurrence. Reirradiation is carefully considered with a case-by-case basis. Reirradiation protocol enrollment is highly encouraged prior to committing patient to an aggressive therapy. Radiation doses greater than 60 Gy are usually recommended for successful salvage. Despite recent technical improvement in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), the use of concurrent chemotherapy, and the emergence of molecularly targeted agents, careful patient selection remain as the most paramount factor in reirradiation. Tumors that recur or persist despite aggressive prior chemoradiation therapy imply the presence of chemoradio-resistant clonogens. Treatment protocols that combine novel targeted radiosensitizing agents with conformal high precision radiation are required to overcome the resistance while minimizing toxicity. Recent large number of data showed that IMRT may provide better locoregional control with acceptable acute or chronic morbidities. However, additional prospective studies are required before a definitive conclusion can be drawn on safety and effectiveness of IMRT.

  17. The significance of radiotherapy in a multidisciplinary treatment approach of bladder cancer. Die Radiotherapie im interdisziplinaeren Behandlungskonzept des Harnblasenkarzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunst, J. (Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Strahlentherapeutische Klinik und Poliklinik)

    1991-10-01

    Bladder cancer accounts for approximately 3% of all malignancies. About 70% of bladder cancers are superficial tumors (Ta, Tis, T1), the remaining 30% are muscleinvasive (T2-4). Important prognostic factors include TNM-stage, histologic grade, multifocality, associated Tis, and residual tumor after TUR. Superficial cancers are managed by TUR and, if necessary, intravesical chemotherapy, and bladder preservation is possible. In case of T1 G3-cancers, we favour TUR plus irradiation with a moderate dose instead of cystectomy. Even advanced bladder cancers may be treated by an organ sparing approach. TUR plus radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy offer comparable survival figures and local control rate as compared to radical cystectomy. The 5-year survival rates are 60-70% for T1-2, 40% for T3, and 15% for T4-tumors. About 70% of long-term survivors maintain a functioning bladder. Radiochemotherapy (RCT) with platin compounds is equally effective but less toxic as compared to multi-agent chemotherapy or intraarterial administrations. We do not recommend preoperative radiotherapy or RCT with planned cystectomy because of the definitive organ loss. Optimal treatment results are achieved by complete TUR prior to irradiation. Persistent or recurrent tumor after radiotherapy requires salvage cystectomy. Intravesical recurrences in the spared bladder have a good prognosis. Adjuvant chemotherapy of bladder cancer is not established. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy may result in 20-30% complete remissions, but these figures are lower than those after radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy. Nevertheless, adjuvant treatment protocols are necessary because of the fact that even sophisticated local treatment with increased local control has not yet improved the overall survival rates. (orig./MG).

  18. Renal failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930150 Epidermal growth factor and its recep-tor in the renal tissue of patients with acute re-nal failure and normal persons.LIU Zhihong(刘志红),et al.Jinling Hosp,Nanjing,210002.Natl Med J China 1992;72(10):593-595.Epidermal growth factor(EGF)and its receptor(EGF-R)were identified by immunohis-tochemical method(4 layer PAP)in the renaltissue specimens obtained from 11 normal kid-neys and 17 cases of acute renal failure(ARF).The quantitative EGF and EGF-R in the tissuewere expressed as positive tubules per mm~2.The amount of EGF and EGF-R in renal tissue

  19. Correlating metabolic and anatomic responses of primary lung cancers to radiotherapy by combined F-18 FDG PET-CT imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grills Inga

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To correlate the metabolic changes with size changes for tumor response by concomitant PET-CT evaluation of lung cancers after radiotherapy. Methods 36 patients were studied pre- and post-radiotherapy with18FDG PET-CT scans at a median interval of 71 days. All of the patients were followed clinically and radiographically after a mean period of 342 days for assessment of local control or failure rates. Change in size (sum of maximum orthogonal diameters was correlated with that of maximum standard uptake value (SUV of the primary lung cancer before and after conventional radiotherapy. Results There was a significant reduction in both SUV and size of the primary cancer after radiotherapy (p Conclusion Correlating and incorporating metabolic change by PET into size change by concomitant CT is more sensitive in assessing therapeutic response than CT alone.

  20. Heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1992-01-01

    920647 Comparative effects of commonvasodilators on experimental cardiac fai-lure. LI Zhijian (李志坚), et al. Dept Cardiol,2nd Hosp, Tianjin Med Coll. Tianjin Med J1992; 20(8): 456-458. A 9×9 latin square design was employed forcomparing the effects of (1) placebo, (2) nitr-oprusside, (3) phentolamine, (4) isosorbide dini-trate. (5) captopril, (6) captopril-isosorbide

  1. Heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    2005186 The diagnostic application of bedside measurement of plasma brain natriuretic in patients with heart failure. SHAO Le-wen (邵乐文) , Advanced Ward Dept, 1st Hosp, Med Sch, Zhejiang Univ, Hangzhou 310003. Chin J Intern Med, 2005;44(2): 99-101. Objective: To investigate differential diagnosis value of ultra-rapid bedside measurement of brain na-triuretic peptide (BNP) in patients with dyspnea.

  2. Heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    2010316 Tissue doppler imaging observation on effect of long-term use of gingko biloba tabtet on left ventricular function in patients with chronic heart failure. ZHANG Hui(张辉),et al. Dept Cardiovasc Med, 2nd Hosp, Hebei Med Univ,Shijiazhuang 050000. Chin J Integr Tradit & West Med 2010;30(5):478-481. Objective To quantitatively observe the effect of long-term

  3. Renal failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008463 Protective effect of recombination rat augmenter of liver regeneration on kidney in acute renal failure rats. TANG Xiaopeng(唐晓鹏), et al. Dept Nephrol, 2nd Affili Hosp Chongqing Med Univ, Chongqing 400010.Chin J Nephrol 2008;24(6):417-421. Objective To investigate the protective effects of recombination rat augmenter of liver regeneration (rrALR) on tubular cell injury and renal dysfunction

  4. Pediatric radiotherapy planning and treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Olch, Arthur J

    2013-01-01

    "This is a very well-written and -organized book covering the planning and delivery aspects unique to pediatric radiotherapy. The author is a respected and well-known medical physicist with extensive pediatric radiotherapy experience. … a very useful book for any clinical physicist treating pediatric cases and seeking contextual and historical perspective. … a great reference for medical physicists who may not see many pediatric cases and can look to this text as a one-stop shop for not only a comprehensive overview, but detailed explanation for specific pediatric disease sites. Overall, it is a great addition to the reference library of any radiation therapy physicist."-Medical Physics, April 2014.

  5. Proton Radiotherapy for Pediatric Sarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladra, Matthew M.; Yock, Torunn I., E-mail: tyock@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)

    2014-01-14

    Pediatric sarcomas represent a distinct group of pathologies, with approximately 900 new cases per year in the United States alone. Radiotherapy plays an integral role in the local control of these tumors, which often arise adjacent to critical structures and growing organs. The physical properties of proton beam radiotherapy provide a distinct advantage over standard photon radiation by eliminating excess dose deposited beyond the target volume, thereby reducing both the dose of radiation delivered to non-target structures as well as the total radiation dose delivered to a patient. Dosimetric studies comparing proton plans to IMRT and 3D conformal radiation have demonstrated the superiority of protons in numerous pediatric malignancies and data on long-term clinical outcomes and toxicity is emerging. In this article, we review the existing clinical and dosimetric data regarding the use of proton beam radiation in malignant bone and soft tissue sarcomas.

  6. Gel dosimetry for conformal radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambarini, G. [Department of Physics of the University and INFN, Milan (Italy)]. e-mail: grazia.gambarini@mi.infn.it

    2005-07-01

    With the continuum development of conformal radio therapies, aimed at delivering high dose to tumor tissue and low dose to the healthy tissue around, the necessities has appeared of suitable improvement of dosimetry techniques giving the possibility of obtaining dose images to be compared with diagnostic images. Also if wide software has been developed for calculating dose distributions in the fields of various radiotherapy units, experimental verifications are necessary, in particular in the case of complex geometries in conformal radiotherapy. Gel dosimetry is a promising method for imaging the absorbed dose in tissue-equivalent phantoms, with the possibility of 3D reconstruction of the spatial dose distribution, with milli metric resolution. Optical imaging of gel dosimeters, based on visible light absorbance analysis, has shown to be a reliable technique for achieving dose distributions. (Author)

  7. [Perioperative acute kidney injury and failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhor, Vibol; Journois, Didier

    2014-04-01

    Perioperative period is very likely to lead to acute renal failure because of anesthesia (general or perimedullary) and/or surgery which can cause acute kidney injury. Characterization of acute renal failure is based on serum creatinine level which is imprecise during and following surgery. Studies are based on various definitions of acute renal failure with different thresholds which skewed their comparisons. The RIFLE classification (risk, injury, failure, loss, end stage kidney disease) allows clinicians to distinguish in a similar manner between different stages of acute kidney injury rather than using a unique definition of acute renal failure. Acute renal failure during the perioperative period can mainly be explained by iatrogenic, hemodynamic or surgical causes and can result in an increased morbi-mortality. Prevention of this complication requires hemodynamic optimization (venous return, cardiac output, vascular resistance), discontinuation of nephrotoxic drugs but also knowledge of the different steps of the surgery to avoid further degradation of renal perfusion. Diuretics do not prevent acute renal failure and may even push it forward especially during the perioperative period when venous retourn is already reduced. Edema or weight gain following surgery are not correlated with the vascular compartment volume, much less with renal perfusion. Treatment of perioperative acute renal failure is similar to other acute renal failure. Renal replacement therapy must be mastered to prevent any additional risk of hemodynamic instability or hydro-electrolytic imbalance.

  8. DEGRO practical guidelines: radiotherapy of breast cancer III - radiotherapy of the lymphatic pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sautter-Bihl, M.L. [Staedtisches Klinikum Karlsruhe, Klinik fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie, Karlsruhe (Germany); Sedlmayer, F.; Fussl, C. [LKH Salzburg, Paracelsus Medical University Hospital, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Salzburg (Austria); Budach, W. [University Hospital Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf (Germany); Dunst, J. [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany); Feyer, P. [Klinikum Neukoelln, Berlin (Germany); Fietkau, R.; Sauer, R. [University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Harms, W. [St. Clara Hospital, Basel, Basel (Switzerland); Piroth, M.D. [Helios-Klinikum Wuppertal, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Wuppertal (Germany); Souchon, R. [University Hospital Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Wenz, F. [University Hospital Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Haase, W.

    2014-04-15

    The purpose of this work is to update the practical guidelines for adjuvant radiotherapy of the regional lymphatics of breast cancer published in 2008 by the breast cancer expert panel of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO). A comprehensive survey of the literature concerning regional nodal irradiation (RNI) was performed using the following search terms: ''breast cancer'', ''radiotherapy'', ''regional node irradiation''. Recent randomized trials were analyzed for outcome as well as for differences in target definition. Field arrangements in the different studies were reproduced and superimposed on CT slices with individually contoured node areas. Moreover, data from recently published meta-analyses and guidelines of international breast cancer societies, yielding new aspects compared to 2008, provided the basis for defining recommendations according to the criteria of evidence-based medicine. In addition to the more general statements of the German interdisciplinary S3 guidelines updated in 2012, this paper addresses indications, targeting, and techniques of radiotherapy of the lymphatic pathways after surgery for breast cancer. International guidelines reveal substantial differences regarding indications for RNI. Patients with 1-3 positive nodes seem to profit from RNI compared to whole breast (WBI) or chest wall irradiation alone, both with regard to locoregional control and disease-free survival. Irradiation of the regional lymphatics including axillary, supraclavicular, and internal mammary nodes provided a small but significant survival benefit in recent randomized trials and one meta-analysis. Lymph node irradiation yields comparable tumor control in comparison to axillary lymph node dissection (ALND), while reducing the rate of lymph edema. Data concerning the impact of 1-2 macroscopically affected sentinel node (SN) or microscopic metastases on prognosis are conflicting. Recent data

  9. Technological advances in radiotherapy of rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, Ane L; Sebag-Montefiore, David

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review summarizes the available evidence for the use of modern radiotherapy techniques for chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer, with specific focus on intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) techniques. RECENT FINDINGS: The dosimetric....... Overall results are encouraging, as toxicity levels - although varying across reports - appear lower than for 3D conformal radiotherapy. Innovative treatment techniques and strategies which may be facilitated by the use of IMRT/VMAT include simultaneously integrated tumour boost, adaptive treatment...

  10. Inflammatory Skin Conditions Associated With Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Aragüés, I; Pulido Pérez, A; Suárez Fernández, R

    2017-04-01

    Radiotherapy for cancer is used increasingly. Because skin cells undergo rapid turnover, the ionizing radiation of radiotherapy has collateral effects that are often expressed in inflammatory reactions. Some of these reactions-radiodermatitis and recall phenomenon, for example-are very familiar to dermatologists. Other, less common radiotherapy-associated skin conditions are often underdiagnosed but must also be recognized. Copyright © 2016 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Heart failure - tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHF - tests; Congestive heart failure - tests; Cardiomyopathy - tests; HF - tests ... the best test to: Identify which type of heart failure (systolic versus diastolic, valvular) Monitor your heart failure ...

  12. Heart failure - home monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... failure - discharge Heart failure - fluids and diuretics Heart failure - what to ask ... Medical Center, University of Washington Medical School, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, ...

  13. Risk-adapted targeted intraoperative radiotherapy versus whole-breast radiotherapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaidya, Jayant S; Wenz, Frederik; Bulsara, Max;

    2014-01-01

    The TARGIT-A trial compared risk-adapted radiotherapy using single-dose targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT) versus fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for breast cancer. We report 5-year results for local recurrence and the first analysis of overall survival....

  14. The importance of pre-treatment haemoglobin level in inoperable non-small cell lung carcinoma treated with radical radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langendijk, H; de Jong, J; Wanders, R; Lambin, P; Slotman, B

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prognostic significance of the pre-treatment haemoglobin level among patients with inoperable non-small cell lung carcinorna (NSCLC) treated with definitive radiotherapy with regard to loco-regional tumour control (LC) and overall

  15. Role of radiotherapy in hospice care

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Tetsuo; Sugiyama, Akira; Shimizu, Teppei; Ichinohe, Kenji; Teshima, Takeshi; Kaneko, Masao; Hara, Yoshio; Chihara, Satoshi.

    1989-01-01

    The aim of palliative radiotherapy for the terminally ill is to improve the quality of the remaining span of life. From November 1982 to September 1987, 69 patients in the Seirei Hospice have been treated with such radiotherapy, and symptomatic relief was obtained in 64% of these patients. Radiotherapy also proved useful in achieving an improvement in their performance status. While the aim of hospice care is not directed towards treatment of the underlying disease, the use of radiotherapy is considered to have an important role in hospice care.

  16. Human papilloma virus (HPV) status associated with prognosis of cervical cancer after radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harima, Yoko; Miyazaki, Yuki; Imamura, Masahiro; Sougawa, Mitsuharu; Sawada, Satoshi [Kansai Medical Univ., Moriguchi, Osaka (Japan)

    2002-06-01

    Our study explored whether the HPV status of tumors is associated with the outcome of radiotherapy in patients with cervical cancer. A total of 84 patients with cervical cancer (6 stage I, 10 stage II, 49 stage III, and 19 stage IV) who underwent definitive radiotherapy between January 1995 and June 2000 were included in this study. Tumor samples were obtained from all patients by punch biopsy prior to radiotherapy. The presence of HPV and its type were analyzed by PCR-based assay using the consensus primers for E6 and L1 regions. Actuarial methods were used to calculate overall survival, and disease-free survival. A total of 42 patients (50%) had cancer recurrence after radiotherapy. HPV-positive tumors were found in 76.2% (64 cases) of the patients. HPV-negative patients survived significantly shorter compared to the HPV-positive patients in the overall survival (p=0.007) and the disease-free survival (p=0.005). According to multivariate analysis, HPV status is a significant predictor of both overall (p=0.02) and disease-free survival time (p=0.005). These results of this study suggest that HPV-negative patients with cervical carcinoma are have a significantly poorer prognosis after radiotherapy, and may be used as a marker in order to optimize the treatment of patients with this type of cancer. (author)

  17. Changes in Pulmonary Function After Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy, or Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Guerra, Jose L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospitales Universitarios Virgen del Rocio, Seville (Spain); Department of Medicine, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Gomez, Daniel R., E-mail: dgomez@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhuang Yan; Levy, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Eapen, George [Department of Pulmonary Medicine, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liu, Hongmei; Mohan, Radhe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the extent of change in pulmonary function over time after definitive radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with modern techniques and to identify predictors of changes in pulmonary function according to patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics. Patients and Methods: We analyzed 250 patients who had received {>=}60 Gy radio(chemo)therapy for primary NSCLC in 1998-2010 and had undergone pulmonary function tests before and within 1 year after treatment. Ninety-three patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, 97 with intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and 60 with proton beam therapy. Postradiation pulmonary function test values were evaluated among individual patients compared with the same patient's preradiation value at the following time intervals: 0-4 (T1), 5-8 (T2), and 9-12 (T3) months. Results: Lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) was reduced in the majority of patients along the three time periods after radiation, whereas the forced expiratory volume in 1 s per unit of vital capacity (FEV1/VC) showed an increase and decrease after radiation in a similar percentage of patients. There were baseline differences (stage, radiotherapy dose, concurrent chemotherapy) among the radiation technology groups. On multivariate analysis, the following features were associated with larger posttreatment declines in DLCO: pretreatment DLCO, gross tumor volume, lung and heart dosimetric data, and total radiation dose. Only pretreatment DLCO was associated with larger posttreatment declines in FEV1/VC. Conclusions: Lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide is reduced in the majority of patients after radiotherapy with modern techniques. Multiple factors, including gross tumor volume, preradiation lung function, and dosimetric parameters, are associated with the DLCO decline. Prospective studies are needed to better understand whether new radiation technology, such as proton beam therapy or

  18. Radiotherapy and local control in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, V; Rosetto, M E; Fares, C; Mantini, G; Salvi, G; Turriziani, A

    1998-01-01

    Recurrence is a stage in the natural history of rectal cancer. Preoperative radiotherapy or postoperative radiochemotherapy lower the rate of recurrence, improving local control. From 1980 to 1997, at the "Divisione di Radioterapia" of the "Università Cattolica del S. Cuore" of Rome 380 patients with rectal cancer of early clinical stage T2-3, candidates for surgery for cure, underwent radiation therapy. 119 patients underwent postoperative radiotherapy (45-50 Gy); 45 patients underwent "sandwich" radiotherapy (45 Gy:27 Gy before and 28 Gy after surgery), of whom 7 were treated with preoperative radiotherapy alone; 145 patients underwent preoperative concomitant radiochemotherapy according to 3 different protocols, radiotherapy (38 Gy) combined with mitomycin C and 5-FU; radiotherapy (50.4 Gy) combined with cisplatin and 5-FU; radiotherapy (45 Gy) combined with 5-FU and folinic acid. 71 patients were treated with preoperative radiotherapy (38 Gy) combined with IORT (10 Gy). Median follow-up was 6 years. Overall local control was 85% at 3 years, 83% at 5 years, 81% at 10 years. The rate of local control at 5 years was: 76% for postoperative radiotherapy, 83% for "sandwich" radiotherapy, 84% for preoperative radiochemotherapy and 93% for preoperative radiotherapy combined with IORT. Local control was shown to be significantly better with preoperative treatment as compared to postoperative treatment (p = 0.02). The incidence of metastases was 35% in the patients with local recurrence and 16% in those with local control. The difference in survival was highly significant in patients with local control as compared to those with local recurrence: at 5 years 87% and 32% respectively. Patients with local control showed a lower incidence of metastasis and a better survival.

  19. Neuroretinitis -- definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007624.htm Neuroretinitis - definition To use the sharing features on this page, ... this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A.M.'s editorial ...

  20. The failure-tolerant leader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farson, Richard; Keyes, Ralph

    2002-08-01

    "The fastest way to succeed," IBM's Thomas Watson, Sr., once said, "is to double your failure rate." In recent years, more and more executives have embraced Watson's point of view, coming to understand what innovators have always known: Failure is a prerequisite to invention. But while companies may grasp the value of making mistakes at the level of corporate practices, they have a harder time accepting the idea at the personal level. People are afraid to fail, and corporate culture reinforces that fear. In this article, psychologist and former Harvard Business School professor Richard Farson and coauthor Ralph Keyes discuss how companies can reduce the fear of miscues. What's crucial is the presence of failure-tolerant leaders--executives who, through their words and actions, help employees overcome their anxieties about making mistakes and, in the process, create a culture of intelligent risk-taking that leads to sustained innovation. Such leaders don't just accept productive failure, they promote it. Drawing from their research in business, politics, sports, and science, the authors identify common practices among failure-tolerant leaders. These leaders break down the social and bureaucratic barriers that separate them from their followers. They engage at a personal level with the people they lead. They avoid giving either praise or criticism, preferring to take a nonjudgmental, analytical posture as they interact with staff. They openly admit their own mistakes rather than trying to cover them up or shifting the blame. And they try to root out the destructive competitiveness built into most organizations. Above all else, failure-tolerant leaders push people to see beyond traditional definitions of success and failure. They know that as long as a person views failure as the opposite of success, rather than its complement, he or she will never be able to take the risks necessary for innovation.

  1. Market Definition

    OpenAIRE

    Kaplow, Louis

    2014-01-01

    Market definition has long held a central place in competition law. This entry surveys recent analytical work that has called the market definition paradigm into question on a number of fronts: whether the process is feasible, whether market share threshold tests are coherent, whether the hypothetical monopolist test in merger guidelines is counterproductive, and whether and when the frequent focus on cross-elasticities is useful.

  2. A Literature Review of Pragmatic Failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王瑞

    2013-01-01

      In 1983, Jenny Thomas published her“Cross-Cultural Pragmatic Failure”in Applied Linguistics.Since its introduction, pragmatic failure has rapidly become an issue of broad interest in the field of linguistics. This essay aims to provide a literary re⁃view of pragmatic failure in regards to its definition, applications as well as prospects of research from both in China and abroad.

  3. Treatment outcome in patients with vulvar cancer: comparison of concurrent radiotherapy to postoperative radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ja Young; Kim, Sung Hwan; Kim, Ki Won; Park, Dong Choon; Yoon, Joo Hee; Yoon, Sei Chul [St. Vincent' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Mina [St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    To evaluate outcome and morbidity in patients with vulvar cancer treated with radiotherapy, concurrent chemoradiotherapy or postoperative radiotherapy. The records of 24 patients treated with radiotherapy for vulvar cancer between July 1993 and September 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients received once daily 1.8-4 Gy fractions external beam radiotherapy to median 51.2 Gy (range, 19.8 to 81.6 Gy) on pelvis and inguinal nodes. Seven patients were treated with primary concurrent chemoradiotherapy, one patient was treated with primary radiotherapy alone, four patients received palliative radiotherapy, and twelve patients were treated with postoperative radiotherapy. Twenty patients were eligible for response evaluation. Response rate was 55% (11/20). The 5-year disease free survival was 42.2% and 5-year overall survival was 46.2%, respectively. Fifty percent (12/24) experienced with acute skin complications of grade III or more during radiotherapy. Late complications were found in 8 patients. 50% (6/12) of patients treated with lymph node dissection experienced severe late complications. One patient died of sepsis from lymphedema. However, only 16.6% (2/12) of patients treated with primary radiotherapy developed late complications. Outcome of patients with vulvar cancer treated with radiotherapy showed relatively good local control and low recurrence. Severe late toxicities remained higher in patients treated with both node dissection and radiotherapy.

  4. Radiotherapy and Brachytherapy : Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Study Institute on Physics of Modern Radiotherapy & Brachytherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Lemoigne, Yves

    2009-01-01

    This volume collects a series of lectures presented at the tenth ESI School held at Archamps (FR) in November 2007 and dedicated to radiotherapy and brachytherapy. The lectures focus on the multiple facets of radiotherapy in general, including external radiotherapy (often called teletherapy) as well as internal radiotherapy (called brachytherapy). Radiotherapy strategy and dose management as well as the decisive role of digital imaging in the associated clinical practice are developed in several articles. Grouped under the discipline of Conformal Radiotherapy (CRT), numerous modern techniques, from Multi-Leaf Collimators (MLC) to Intensity Modulated RadioTherapy (IMRT), are explained in detail. The importance of treatment planning based upon patient data from digital imaging (Computed Tomography) is also underlined. Finally, despite the quasi- totality of patients being presently treated with gamma and X-rays, novel powerful tools are emerging using proton and light ions (like carbon ions) beams, bound to bec...

  5. Scaling of structural failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazant, Z.P. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Chen, Er-Ping [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This article attempts to review the progress achieved in the understanding of scaling and size effect in the failure of structures. Particular emphasis is placed on quasibrittle materials for which the size effect is complicated. Attention is focused on three main types of size effects, namely the statistical size effect due to randomness of strength, the energy release size effect, and the possible size effect due to fractality of fracture or microcracks. Definitive conclusions on the applicability of these theories are drawn. Subsequently, the article discusses the application of the known size effect law for the measurement of material fracture properties, and the modeling of the size effect by the cohesive crack model, nonlocal finite element models and discrete element models. Extensions to compression failure and to the rate-dependent material behavior are also outlined. The damage constitutive law needed for describing a microcracked material in the fracture process zone is discussed. Various applications to quasibrittle materials, including concrete, sea ice, fiber composites, rocks and ceramics are presented.

  6. Simultaneous Integrated Boost Using Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Compared With Conventional Radiotherapy in Patients Treated With Concurrent Carboplatin and 5-Fluorouracil for Locally Advanced Oropharyngeal Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clavel, Sebastien, E-mail: sebastien.clavel@umontreal.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Nguyen, David H.A.; Fortin, Bernard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montreal, QC (Canada); Despres, Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Khaouam, Nader [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montreal, QC (Canada); Donath, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Soulieres, Denis [Department of Medical Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Guertin, Louis [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To compare, in a retrospective study, the toxicity and efficacy of simultaneous integrated boost using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) vs. conventional radiotherapy (CRT) in patients treated with concomitant carboplatin and 5-fluorouracil for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and December 2007, 249 patients were treated with definitive chemoradiation. One hundred patients had 70 Gy in 33 fractions using IMRT, and 149 received CRT at 70 Gy in 35 fractions. Overall survival, disease-free survival, and locoregional control were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Median follow-up was 42 months. Three-year actuarial rates for locoregional control, disease-free survival, and overall survival were 95.1% vs. 84.4% (p = 0.005), 85.3% vs. 69.3% (p = 0.001), and 92.1% vs. 75.2% (p < 0.001) for IMRT and CRT, respectively. The benefit of the radiotherapy regimen on outcomes was also observed with a Cox multivariate analysis. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was associated with less acute dermatitis and less xerostomia at 6, 12, 24, and 36 months. Conclusions: This study suggests that simultaneous integrated boost using IMRT is associated with favorable locoregional control and survival rates with less xerostomia and acute dermatitis than CRT when both are given concurrently with chemotherapy.

  7. Peer Review of Radiotherapy Planning: Quantifying Outcomes and a Proposal for Prospective Data Collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, J; Graham, G; Olivotto, I A

    2016-12-01

    The Canadian Partnership for Quality Radiotherapy quality assurance guidelines recommend that radiation oncologist peer review of curative radiotherapy plans takes place ideally before the first fraction of treatment is delivered. This study documented and evaluated the outcomes of weekly, disease site-specific, radiotherapy peer review, quality assurance rounds at the Tom Baker Cancer Centre in Calgary, Canada with a view to making recommendations about the optimal timing and documentation of peer review during the radiotherapy planning processes. Outcomes of each case reviewed at (i) breast, (ii) head and neck (including thyroid and cutaneous cases) and (iii) lung team quality assurance rounds from 6 January to 5 May 2015 were recorded prospectively. Each radiotherapy plan was assigned an outcome: A for plans with no suggested changes; B for satisfactory, but where issues were raised to consider for future patients; or C when a change was recommended before the first or next fraction. The B outcomes were further subdivided into B1 for a case-specific concern and B2 for a policy gap. Plans were assessed after contour definition and before the plan was formulated (post-contouring reviews) and/or assessed when the plan was complete (post-planning reviews). 209 radiotherapy plans prescribed by 20 radiation oncologists were peer reviewed at 43 quality assurance meetings. 93% were curative-intent and 7% were palliative. 83% of plans were reviewed before delivery of the first treatment fraction. There were a total of 257 case reviews: 60 at the post-contouring stage, 197 at the post-planning stage, including 46 patients reviewed at both time points. Overall rates of A, B1, B2 and C outcomes were 78%, 9%, 4% and 9%, respectively. The most common reason for a B or C outcome was related to target volume definition. Only 56% of C outcomes at the post-planning stage would have been detected at the post-contouring stage. Results varied between tumour site groups. 9% of

  8. Reducing radiation induced emesis in abdominal radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, K. (Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton (United Kingdom))

    1994-06-01

    In patients with seminoma testes, a comparison was made between radiation induced emesis suffered by patients receiving 'dogleg' radiotherapy with those suffered by patients who received para-aortic radiotherapy. The same comparisons were made between the effects suffered by those patients who received the anti-emetic, Ondansetron, and those suffered by patients who received conventional anti-emetics. (UK).

  9. Radiotherapy versus combined modality in early stages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, L.; Carde, P.; Mauch, P.;

    1992-01-01

    In early stage Hodgkin's disease the optimal choice of treatment for the individual patient is still an unresolved issue. So far, twenty-two randomized trials of radiotherapy alone versus radiotherapy plus combination chemotherapy have been carried out worldwide. The preliminary results of a glob...

  10. [Radiotherapy promises: focus on lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouin, Anaïs; Durand-Labrunie, Jérôme; Leroy, Thomas; Pannier, Diane; Wagner, Antoine; Rault, Erwan; Lartigau, Eric

    2013-06-01

    Radiotherapy is a key cancer treatment, which greatly modified its practice in recent years thanks to medical imaging and technical improvements. The systematic use of computed tomography (CT) for treatment planning, the imaging fusion/co-registration between CT/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or CT/positron emission tomography (PET) improve target identification/selection and delineation. New irradiation techniques such as image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT), stereotactic radiotherapy or hadron therapy offer a more diverse therapeutic armamentarium to patients together with lower toxicity. Radiotherapy, as well as medical oncology, tends to offer a personalized treatment to patients thanks to the IGRT, which takes into account the inter- or intra-fraction anatomic variations. IGRT leads to adaptive radiotherapy (ART) with a new planification in the treatment course in order to decrease toxicity and improve tumor control. The use of systemic therapies with radiations needs to be studied in order to improve efficiency without increasing toxicities from these multimodal approaches. Finally, radiotherapy advances were impacted by radiotherapy accidents like Epinal. They led to an increased quality control with the intensification of identity control, the emergence of in vivo dosimetry or the experience feedback committee in radiotherapy. We will illustrate through the example of lung cancer.

  11. Radiotherapy for carcinoma of the uterine cervix with short uterine cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchida, Emiko; Sugita, Tadashi; Matsumoto, Yasuo; Sasamoto, Ryuta; Sakai, Kunio [Niigata Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Sueyama, Hiroo; Yamanoi, Tadayoshi; Ito, Takeshi; Umetsu, Hisao

    2001-11-01

    We have reviewed 11 patients treated with radiotherapy for carcinoma of the uterine cervix with short uterine cavity less than 3 cm. They consisted of 5 patients with stump cancer and 6 with atrophic uterus. Two patients with stump cancer had local failure and died of tumor progression. The 5-year cause-specific survival was 82%. Rectal and bladder injuries occurred in 5 and 2 patients, respectively. These complications were observed frequently in the patients with atrophic uterus. (author)

  12. Liquefaction, flow, and associated ground failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youd, T. Leslie

    1973-01-01

    Ambiguities in the use of the term liquefaction and in defining the relation between liquefaction and ground failure have led to encumbered communication between workers in various fields and between specialists in the same field, and the possibility that evaluations of liquefaction potential could be misinterpreted or misapplied. Explicit definitions of liquefaction and related concepts are proposed herein. These definitions, based on observed laboratory behavior, are then used to clarify the relation between liquefaction and ground failure. Soil liquefaction is defined as the transformation of a granular material from a solid into a liquefied state as a consequence of increased pore-water pressures. This definition avoids confusion between liquefaction and possible flow-failure conditions after liquefaction. Flow-failure conditions are divided into two types: (1) unlimited flow if pore-pressure reductions caused by dilatancy during flow deformation are not sufficient to solidify the material and thus arrest flow, and (2) limited flow if they are sufficient to solidify the material after a finite deformation. After liquefaction in the field, unlimited flow commonly leads to flow landslides, whereas limited flow leads at most to lateral-spreading landslides. Quick-condition failures such as loss of bearing capacity form a third type of ground failure associated with liquefaction.

  13. Bayesian network approach for modeling local failure in lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jung Hun; Craft, Jeffrey; Al-Lozi, Rawan; Vaidya, Manushka; Meng, Yifan; Deasy, Joseph O; Bradley, Jeffrey D; Naqa, Issam El

    2011-01-01

    Locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients suffer from a high local failure rate following radiotherapy. Despite many efforts to develop new dose-volume models for early detection of tumor local failure, there was no reported significant improvement in their application prospectively. Based on recent studies of biomarker proteins’ role in hypoxia and inflammation in predicting tumor response to radiotherapy, we hypothesize that combining physical and biological factors with a suitable framework could improve the overall prediction. To test this hypothesis, we propose a graphical Bayesian network framework for predicting local failure in lung cancer. The proposed approach was tested using two different datasets of locally advanced NSCLC patients treated with radiotherapy. The first dataset was collected retrospectively, which is comprised of clinical and dosimetric variables only. The second dataset was collected prospectively in which in addition to clinical and dosimetric information, blood was drawn from the patients at various time points to extract candidate biomarkers as well. Our preliminary results show that the proposed method can be used as an efficient method to develop predictive models of local failure in these patients and to interpret relationships among the different variables in the models. We also demonstrate the potential use of heterogenous physical and biological variables to improve the model prediction. With the first dataset, we achieved better performance compared with competing Bayesian-based classifiers. With the second dataset, the combined model had a slightly higher performance compared to individual physical and biological models, with the biological variables making the largest contribution. Our preliminary results highlight the potential of the proposed integrated approach for predicting post-radiotherapy local failure in NSCLC patients. PMID:21335651

  14. Basic radiotherapy physics and biology

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, David S; Das, Indra J; Mendonca, Marc S; Dynlacht, Joseph R

    2014-01-01

    This book is a concise and well-illustrated review of the physics and biology of radiation therapy intended for radiation oncology residents, radiation therapists, dosimetrists, and physicists. It presents topics that are included on the Radiation Therapy Physics and Biology examinations and is designed with the intent of presenting information in an easily digestible format with maximum retention in mind. The inclusion of mnemonics, rules of thumb, and reader-friendly illustrations throughout the book help to make difficult concepts easier to grasp. Basic Radiotherapy Physics and Biology is a

  15. Quality and safety in radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Pawlicki, Todd

    2010-01-01

    The first text to focus solely on quality and safety in radiotherapy, this work encompasses not only traditional, more technically oriented, quality assurance activities, but also general approaches of quality and safety. It includes contributions from experts both inside and outside the field to present a global view. The task of assuring quality is no longer viewed solely as a technical, equipment-dependent endeavor. Instead, it is now recognized as depending on both the processes and the people delivering the service. Divided into seven broad categories, the text covers: Quality Management

  16. Adjuvant radiotherapy for stage I endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Anthony; Johnson, Nick; Kitchener, Henry C; Lawrie, Theresa A

    2012-04-18

    This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 2, 2007. The role of radiotherapy (both pelvic external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and vaginal intracavity brachytherapy (VBT)) in stage I endometrial cancer following hysterectomy remains controversial. To assess the efficacy of adjuvant radiotherapy following surgery for stage I endometrial cancer. We searched The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Specialised Register to end-2005 for the original review, and extended the search to January 2012 for the update. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared post-operative adjuvant radiotherapy (either EBRTor VBT, or both) versus no radiotherapy or VBT in women with stage I endometrial cancer. Two review authors independently assessed trials and extracted data to a specifically designed data collection form. The primary outcome was overall survival. Secondary outcomes were endometrial cancer-related deaths, locoregional recurrence and distant recurrence. Meta-analyses were performed using Cochrane Review Manager Software 5.1. We included eight trials. Seven trials (3628 women) compared EBRT with no EBRT (or VBT), and one trial (645 women) compared VBTwith no additional treatment. We considered six of the eight trials to be of a high quality. Time-to-event data were not available for all trials and all outcomes.EBRT (with or without VBT) compared with no EBRT (or VBT alone) for stage I endometrial carcinoma significantly reduced locoregional recurrence (time-to-event data: five trials, 2965 women; Hazard Ratio (HR) 0.36, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.25 to 0.52; and dichotomous data: seven trials, 3628 women; Risk Ratio (RR) 0.33, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.47). This reduced risk of locoregional recurrence did not translate into improved overall survival (time-to-event data: five trials, 2,965 women; HR 0.99, 95% CI 0.82 to1.20; and dichotomous data: seven trials, 3628 women; RR 0.98, 95

  17. Radiotherapy in patients with connective tissue diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaj-Levra, Niccolò; Sciascia, Savino; Fiorentino, Alba; Fersino, Sergio; Mazzola, Rosario; Ricchetti, Francesco; Roccatello, Dario; Alongi, Filippo

    2016-03-01

    The decision to offer radiotherapy in patients with connective tissue diseases continues to be challenging. Radiotherapy might trigger the onset of connective tissue diseases by increasing the expression of self-antigens, diminishing regulatory T-cell activity, and activating effectors of innate immunity (dendritic cells) through Toll-like receptor-dependent mechanisms, all of which could potentially lead to breaks of immune tolerance. This potential risk has raised some debate among radiation oncologists about whether patients with connective tissue diseases can tolerate radiation as well as people without connective tissue diseases. Because the number of patients with cancer and connective tissue diseases needing radiotherapy will probably increase due to improvements in medical treatment and longer life expectancy, the issue of interactions between radiotherapy and connective tissue diseases needs to be clearer. In this Review, we discuss available data and evidence for patients with connective tissue diseases treated with radiotherapy.

  18. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andolino, David L., E-mail: dandolin@iupui.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Johnson, Cynthia S. [Department of Biostatistics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Maluccio, Mary [Department of Surgery, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Kwo, Paul [Department of Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Tector, A. Joseph [Department of Surgery, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Zook, Jennifer; Johnstone, Peter A.S.; Cardenes, Higinia R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for the treatment of primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods and Materials: From 2005 to 2009, 60 patients with liver-confined HCC were treated with SBRT at the Indiana University Simon Cancer Center: 36 Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) Class A and 24 CTP Class B. The median number of fractions, dose per fraction, and total dose, was 3, 14 Gy, and 44 Gy, respectively, for those with CTP Class A cirrhosis and 5, 8 Gy, and 40 Gy, respectively, for those with CTP Class B. Treatment was delivered via 6 to 12 beams and in nearly all cases was prescribed to the 80% isodose line. The records of all patients were reviewed, and treatment response was scored according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors v1.1. Toxicity was graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v4.0. Local control (LC), time to progression (TTP), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) were calculated according to the method of Kaplan and Meier. Results: The median follow-up time was 27 months, and the median tumor diameter was 3.2 cm. The 2-year LC, PFS, and OS were 90%, 48%, and 67%, respectively, with median TTP of 47.8 months. Subsequently, 23 patients underwent transplant, with a median time to transplant of 7 months. There were no {>=}Grade 3 nonhematologic toxicities. Thirteen percent of patients experienced an increase in hematologic/hepatic dysfunction greater than 1 grade, and 20% experienced progression in CTP class within 3 months of treatment. Conclusions: SBRT is a safe, effective, noninvasive option for patients with HCC {<=}6 cm. As such, SBRT should be considered when bridging to transplant or as definitive therapy for those ineligible for transplant.

  19. Optimization of human cancer radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Swan, George W

    1981-01-01

    The mathematical models in this book are concerned with a variety of approaches to the manner in which the clinical radiologic treatment of human neoplasms can be improved. These improvements comprise ways of delivering radiation to the malignan­ cies so as to create considerable damage to tumor cells while sparing neighboring normal tissues. There is no unique way of dealing with these improvements. Accord­ ingly, in this book a number of different presentations are given. Each presentation has as its goal some aspect of the improvement, or optimization, of radiotherapy. This book is a collection of current ideas concerned with the optimization of human cancer radiotherapy. It is hoped that readers will build on this collection and develop superior approaches for the understanding of the ways to improve therapy. The author owes a special debt of thanks to Kathy Prindle who breezed through the typing of this book with considerable dexterity. TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter GENERAL INTRODUCTION 1. 1 Introduction 1...

  20. Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Parotid Cancer: A Single-Institution Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeidan, Youssef H., E-mail: youssefzaidan@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Shiue, Kevin; Weed, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Johnstone, Peter A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Terry, Colin [Methodist Research Institute, Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Freeman, Stephen; Krowiak, Edward; Borrowdale, Robert; Huntley, Tod [CENTA Otolaryngology, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Yeh, Alex [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Our practice policy has been to provide intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) at resection to patients with head-and-neck malignancies considered to be at high risk of recurrence. The purpose of the present study was to review our experience with the use of IORT for primary or recurrent cancer of the parotid gland. Methods and Materials: Between 1982 and 2007, 96 patients were treated with gross total resection and IORT for primary or recurrent cancer of the parotid gland. The median age was 62.9 years (range, 14.3-88.1). Of the 96 patients, 33 had previously undergone external beam radiotherapy as a component of definitive therapy. Also, 34 patients had positive margins after surgery, and 40 had perineural invasion. IORT was administered as a single fraction of 15 or 20 Gy with 4-6-MeV electrons. The median follow-up period was 5.6 years. Results: Only 1 patient experienced local recurrence, 19 developed regional recurrence, and 12 distant recurrence. The recurrence-free survival rate at 1, 3, and 5 years was 82.0%, 68.5%, and 65.2%, respectively. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rate after surgery and IORT was 88.4%, 66.1%, and 56.2%, respectively. No perioperative fatalities occurred. Complications developed in 26 patients and included vascular complications in 7, trismus in 6, fistulas in 4, radiation osteonecrosis in 4, flap necrosis in 2, wound dehiscence in 2, and neuropathy in 1. Of these 26 patients, 12 had recurrent disease, and 8 had undergone external beam radiotherapy before IORT. Conclusions: IORT results in effective local disease control at acceptable levels of toxicity and should be considered for patients with primary or recurrent cancer of the parotid gland.

  1. Predicting radiotherapy outcomes using statistical learning techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Naqa, Issam; Bradley, Jeffrey D; Deasy, Joseph O [Washington University, Saint Louis, MO (United States); Lindsay, Patricia E; Hope, Andrew J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2009-09-21

    Radiotherapy outcomes are determined by complex interactions between treatment, anatomical and patient-related variables. A common obstacle to building maximally predictive outcome models for clinical practice is the failure to capture potential complexity of heterogeneous variable interactions and applicability beyond institutional data. We describe a statistical learning methodology that can automatically screen for nonlinear relations among prognostic variables and generalize to unseen data before. In this work, several types of linear and nonlinear kernels to generate interaction terms and approximate the treatment-response function are evaluated. Examples of institutional datasets of esophagitis, pneumonitis and xerostomia endpoints were used. Furthermore, an independent RTOG dataset was used for 'generalizabilty' validation. We formulated the discrimination between risk groups as a supervised learning problem. The distribution of patient groups was initially analyzed using principle components analysis (PCA) to uncover potential nonlinear behavior. The performance of the different methods was evaluated using bivariate correlations and actuarial analysis. Over-fitting was controlled via cross-validation resampling. Our results suggest that a modified support vector machine (SVM) kernel method provided superior performance on leave-one-out testing compared to logistic regression and neural networks in cases where the data exhibited nonlinear behavior on PCA. For instance, in prediction of esophagitis and pneumonitis endpoints, which exhibited nonlinear behavior on PCA, the method provided 21% and 60% improvements, respectively. Furthermore, evaluation on the independent pneumonitis RTOG dataset demonstrated good generalizabilty beyond institutional data in contrast with other models. This indicates that the prediction of treatment response can be improved by utilizing nonlinear kernel methods for discovering important nonlinear interactions among

  2. Predicting radiotherapy outcomes using statistical learning techniques*

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Naqa, Issam; Bradley, Jeffrey D; Lindsay, Patricia E; Hope, Andrew J; Deasy, Joseph O

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy outcomes are determined by complex interactions between treatment, anatomical and patient-related variables. A common obstacle to building maximally predictive outcome models for clinical practice is the failure to capture potential complexity of heterogeneous variable interactions and applicability beyond institutional data. We describe a statistical learning methodology that can automatically screen for nonlinear relations among prognostic variables and generalize to unseen data before. In this work, several types of linear and nonlinear kernels to generate interaction terms and approximate the treatment-response function are evaluated. Examples of institutional datasets of esophagitis, pneumonitis and xerostomia endpoints were used. Furthermore, an independent RTOG dataset was used for ‘generalizabilty’ validation. We formulated the discrimination between risk groups as a supervised learning problem. The distribution of patient groups was initially analyzed using principle components analysis (PCA) to uncover potential nonlinear behavior. The performance of the different methods was evaluated using bivariate correlations and actuarial analysis. Over-fitting was controlled via cross-validation resampling. Our results suggest that a modified support vector machine (SVM) kernel method provided superior performance on leave-one-out testing compared to logistic regression and neural networks in cases where the data exhibited nonlinear behavior on PCA. For instance, in prediction of esophagitis and pneumonitis endpoints, which exhibited nonlinear behavior on PCA, the method provided 21% and 60% improvements, respectively. Furthermore, evaluation on the independent pneumonitis RTOG dataset demonstrated good generalizabilty beyond institutional data in contrast with other models. This indicates that the prediction of treatment response can be improved by utilizing nonlinear kernel methods for discovering important nonlinear interactions among model

  3. Predicting radiotherapy outcomes using statistical learning techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Naqa, Issam; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Lindsay, Patricia E.; Hope, Andrew J.; Deasy, Joseph O.

    2009-09-01

    Radiotherapy outcomes are determined by complex interactions between treatment, anatomical and patient-related variables. A common obstacle to building maximally predictive outcome models for clinical practice is the failure to capture potential complexity of heterogeneous variable interactions and applicability beyond institutional data. We describe a statistical learning methodology that can automatically screen for nonlinear relations among prognostic variables and generalize to unseen data before. In this work, several types of linear and nonlinear kernels to generate interaction terms and approximate the treatment-response function are evaluated. Examples of institutional datasets of esophagitis, pneumonitis and xerostomia endpoints were used. Furthermore, an independent RTOG dataset was used for 'generalizabilty' validation. We formulated the discrimination between risk groups as a supervised learning problem. The distribution of patient groups was initially analyzed using principle components analysis (PCA) to uncover potential nonlinear behavior. The performance of the different methods was evaluated using bivariate correlations and actuarial analysis. Over-fitting was controlled via cross-validation resampling. Our results suggest that a modified support vector machine (SVM) kernel method provided superior performance on leave-one-out testing compared to logistic regression and neural networks in cases where the data exhibited nonlinear behavior on PCA. For instance, in prediction of esophagitis and pneumonitis endpoints, which exhibited nonlinear behavior on PCA, the method provided 21% and 60% improvements, respectively. Furthermore, evaluation on the independent pneumonitis RTOG dataset demonstrated good generalizabilty beyond institutional data in contrast with other models. This indicates that the prediction of treatment response can be improved by utilizing nonlinear kernel methods for discovering important nonlinear interactions among model

  4. Respiratory failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930118 Facial or nasal mask pressure supportventilation in managing acute exacerbation ofchronic respiratory failure in COPD patients.CHEN Rongchang(陈荣昌),et al.GuangzhouInstit Respir Dis,Guangzhou 510120.Chin Tu-berc & Respir Dis 1992;15(5)285-287.Eleven COPD patients(age:65±9 yrs)withacute exacerbation of chronic respiratory failure(PaCO2 11.3±1.1kPa)were treated with maskpressure support ventilation,another 10 similarpatients(age:68±12yrs)served as controls.Bi-PAP ventilator was used with the followingmodifications:(1)Non-rehreathing valve set-in proximal to mask;(2)5 LPM oxygen flow de-livered into mask to reduce the dead space ef-fect.Mask ventilation was given 2-3 hours ev-ery time and 1-2 times daily for 7 days.Syn-

  5. Distant Metastases in Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao Min, E-mail: min.yao@uhhospitals.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Lu Minggen [School of Public Health, University of Nevada at Reno, Reno, NV (United States); Savvides, Panayiotis S. [Department of Medicine, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Rezaee, Rod; Zender, Chad A.; Lavertu, Pierre [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Buatti, John M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Machtay, Mitchell [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the pattern and risk factors for distant metastases in head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) after curative treatment with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective study of 284 HNSCC patients treated in a single institution with IMRT. Sites included were oropharynx (125), oral cavity (70), larynx (55), hypopharynx (17), and unknown primary (17). American Joint Committee on Cancer stage distribution includes I (3), II (19), III (42), and IV (203). There were 224 males and 60 females with a median age of 57. One hundred eighty-six patients were treated with definitive IMRT and 98 postoperative IMRT. One hundred forty-nine patients also received concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Results: The median follow-up for all patients was 22.8 months (range, 0.07-77.3 months) and 29.5 months (4.23-77.3 months) for living patients. The 3-year local recurrence-free survival, regional recurrence-free survival, locoregional recurrence-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival were 94.6%, 96.4%, 92.5%, 84.1%, and 68.95%, respectively. There were 45 patients with distant metastasis. In multivariate analysis, distant metastasis was strongly associated with N stage (p = 0.046), T stage (p < 0.0001), and pretreatment maximum standardized uptake value of the lymph node (p = 0.006), but not associated with age, gender, disease sites, pretreatment standardized uptake value of the primary tumor, or locoregional control. The freedom from distant metastasis at 3 years was 98.1% for no factors, 88.6% for one factor, 68.3% for two factors, and 41.7% for three factors (p < 0.0001 by log-rank test). Conclusion: With advanced radiation techniques and concurrent chemotherapy, the failure pattern has changed with more patients failing distantly. The majority of patients with distant metastases had no local or regional failures, indicating that these patients might have microscopic distant

  6. Evaluation of immediate breast reconstruction and radiotherapy: Factors associated with complications; Reconstruction mammaire immediate apres mastectomie suivie de radiotherapie: facteurs de risque de complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, E.; Cowen, D. [Departement de radiotherapie, hopital de la Timone, 13 - Marseille (France); Hannoun-Levi, J.M. [Departement de radiotherapie, centre Antoine-Lacassagne, 06 - Nice (France); Rouanet, P. [Departement de chirurgie, centre Val-d' Aurelle-Paul-Lamarque, 34 - Montpellier (France); Houvenaeghel, G. [Departement de chirurgie, institut Paoli-Calmettes, 13 - Marseille (France); Teissier, E. [Centre azureen de cancerologie, 06 - Mougins (France); Ellis, S. [Centre catalan d' oncologie, 66 - Perpignan (France); Resbeut, M. [Centre de radiotherapie Saint-Louis, 83 - Toulon (France); Tallet, A. [Departement de radiotherapie, institut Paoli-Calmettes, 13 - Marseille (France); Vaini Cowen, V. [Departement de chirurgie gynecologique, polyclinique du Parc-Rambot, 13 - Aix-en-Provence (France); Azria, D. [Departement de radiotherapie, centre Val-d' Aurelle-Paul-Lamarque, 34 - Montpellier (France)

    2010-12-15

    Objectives: To determine prospectively the factors associated with reconstruction failure (i.e. requiring expander removal) and capsular contracture in patients undergoing mastectomy and immediate two-stage breast reconstruction with a tissue expander and implant, and radiotherapy for breast cancer. This is a multi-institutional prospective non-randomized trial. Patients and Methods: Between 2/1998 and 9/2006, we prospectively evaluated 141 consecutive patients who received 141 implants after mastectomy and underwent chest wall radiotherapy (46 to 50 Gy in 23 to 25 fractions). Patients were evaluated after 24 to 36 months by two senior physicians (radiation oncologist and surgeon). Results: Medical follow-up was 37 months. Baker 1 and 2 capsular contracture was observed in 67.5% of patients, Baker 3 and 4 in 32.5%. There were 32 reconstruction failures. In a univariate analysis, the following factors were associated with Baker 3 and 4 capsular contracture: surgeon, use of hormonotherapy and smoking, of which only one remained in the multivariate analysis: surgeon. In a univariate analysis, the following factors were associated with reconstruction failure: tumor size T3 or T4, smoking, pN+ axilla. Three factors remained associated with reconstruction failure in a multiple logistic regression: large tumors T3/T4, smoking and pN+ axilla. Conclusions: Mastectomy, radiotherapy and immediate breast reconstruction with a tissue expander and implant should be considered when breast conserving surgery has been denied. Adequate patients can be easily selected by using three factors of favourable outcome. (authors)

  7. Implementation of a risk assessment tool based on a probabilistic safety assessment developed for radiotherapy practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paz, A.; Godinez, V.; Lopez, R., E-mail: abpaz@cnsns.gob.m [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, Dr. Barragan No. 779, Col. Narvarte, 03020 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2010-10-15

    The present work describes the implementation process and main results of the risk assessment to the radiotherapy practices with Linear Accelerators (Linac), with cobalt 60, and with brachytherapy. These evaluations were made throughout the risk assessment tool for radiotherapy practices SEVRRA (risk evaluation system for radiotherapy), developed at the Mexican National Commission in Nuclear Safety and Safeguards derived from the outcome obtained with the Probabilistic Safety Analysis developed at the Ibero-American Regulators Forum for these radiotherapy facilities. The methodology used is supported by risk matrices method, a mathematical tool that estimates the risk to the patient, radiation workers and public from mechanical failures, mis calibration of the devices, human mistakes, and so. The initiating events are defined as those undesirable events that, together with other failures, can produce a delivery of an over-dose or an under-dose of the medical prescribed dose, to the planned target volume, or a significant dose to non prescribed human organs. Initiating events frequency and reducer of its frequency (actions intended to avoid the accident) are estimated as well as robustness of barriers to those actions, such as mechanical switches, which detect and prevent the accident from occurring. The spectrum of the consequences is parameterized, and the actions performed to reduce the consequences are identified. Based on this analysis, a software tool was developed in order to simplify the evaluations to radiotherapy installations and it has been applied as a first step forward to some Mexican installations, as part of a national implementation process, the final goal is evaluation of all Mexican facilities in the near future. The main target and benefits of the SEVRRA implementation are presented in this paper. (Author)

  8. Outcome of Locally Advanced Esophageal Cancer Treated with Concurrent Chemo-radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Hyun Soo; Kang, Seung Hee; Jo, Sun Mi; Oh, Young Taek; Chun, Mi Son; Choi, Jin Hyuk; Kang, Seok Yun [Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sun Young [Gonyang University School of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    We investigated the outcome and the prognostic factors of patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer who were treated with concurrent chemo-radiotherapy. Two hundred forty six patients with esophageal cancer that were treated by radiotherapy between January 1994 and July 2007. Of these, 78 patients who received radiotherapy of {>=}45 Gy with concurrent chemotherapy were retrospectively enrolled in this study. We included patients stages IIA, IIB, III, IVA, and IVB with supraclavicular metastasis in the middle/lower esophageal cancer or celiac node metastasis in cervical or upper/middle thoracic esophageal cancer. The median radiation dose was 54 Gy and the combination chemotherapy with 5-FU and cisplatin (FP chemotherapy) was given concurrently with radiotherapy in most patients (88%). The follow-up period ranged from 2 to 117 months (median 14 months). The treatment response of the 54 patients could be evaluated by computerized tomography or endoscopy. A complete response (CR) was observed in 17 patients, whereas a partial response was observed in 18 patients. In patients with a CR, the median recurrence time was 20 months and the first relapse sites constituted a locoregional failure in 3 patients and a distant failure in 7 patients. The 1-, 2-, and 5-year overall survival (OS) rates were 58.9%, 21.7%, and 12.2%, respectively. The median survival period was 14 months. A univariate analysis indicated that the treatment response and cycles of FP chemotherapy were significant prognostic factors for OS. Daily or weekly administration of cisplatin as a radiosensitizer showed a better treatment response than FP chemotherapy. This study has shown that results of concurrent chemo-radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer is comparable to those of other studies. Daily or weekly cisplatin administration may be considered as an alternative treatment in patients that are medically unfit for FP chemotherapy.

  9. High-dose radiotherapy alone for patients with T4-stage laryngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mucha-Malecka, A. [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Institute, Krakow (Poland). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Skladowski, K. [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Institute, Gliwice (Poland). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2013-08-15

    Background and purpose: The purpose of this retrospective study was to report on the efficacy of radiotherapy alone in patients with T4-stage laryngeal cancer and to establish the prognostic value of (a) the size and location of the extralaryngeal tumor extensions and (b) of emergency tracheostomy. Patients and methods: A group of 114 patients were treated with definitive radiotherapy between 1990 and 1996. The piriform recess was involved in 37 cases (33 %), the base of the tongue and glosso-epiglottic vallecula in 34 cases (30 %), and the hypopharyngeal wall in 10 cases (9 %). In 16 cases (14 %), emergency tracheostomy was performed before radiotherapy. The mean total dose was 68 Gy (range, 60-77.6 Gy). The mean treatment time was 49 days (range, 42-74 days). Results: Actuarial 3-year local control (LC) was noted in 42 % of patients, disease-free survival (DFS) in 35 %, and overall survival (OS) in 40 %. The best prognosis was for the lesion suspected of cartilage infiltration: 56 % 3-year LC. The worst results were noted in the cases with massive infiltrations spreading from the larynx through the hypopharynx: 13 % 3-year LC. Emergency tracheostomy before radiotherapy was significantly connected with the worst treatment results (p = 0.000): 3-year LC in patients with tracheostomy was 0 % vs. 48 % in patients without tracheostomy. Conclusion: Conventional radiotherapy of T4 laryngeal cancer is a method of treatment with limited effectiveness. The efficacy of radiotherapy is dependent on the location and extent of extralaryngeal infiltrations. Emergency tracheostomy is a prognostic factor connected with the worst prognosis. (orig.)

  10. Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy for Oligometastatic Disease in Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myungsoo Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver metastasis in solid tumors, including colorectal cancer, is the most frequent and lethal complication. The development of systemic therapy has led to prolonged survival. However, in selected patients with a finite number of discrete lesions in liver, defined as oligometastatic state, additional local therapies such as surgical resection, radiofrequency ablation, cryotherapy, and radiotherapy can lead to permanent local disease control and improve survival. Among these, an advance in radiation therapy made it possible to deliver high dose radiation to the tumor more accurately, without impairing the liver function. In recent years, the introduction of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR has offered even more intensive tumor dose escalation in a few fractions with reduced dose to the adjacent normal liver. Many studies have shown that SABR for oligometastases is effective and safe, with local control rates widely ranging from 50% to 100% at one or two years. And actuarial survival at one and two years has been reported ranging from 72% to 94% and from 30% to 62%, respectively, without severe toxicities. In this paper, we described the definition and technical aspects of SABR, clinical outcomes including efficacy and toxicity, and related parameters after SABR in liver oligometastases from colorectal cancer.

  11. Five-year follow-up using a prostate stent as fiducial in image-guided radiotherapy of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl, Jesper; Sander, Lotte

    2015-06-01

    To report results from the five-year follow-up on a previously reported study using image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of localized or locally advanced prostate cancer (PC) and a removable prostate stent as fiducial. Patients with local or locally advanced PC were treated using five-field 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DRT). The clinical target volumes (CTV) were treated to 78 Gy in 39 fractions using daily on-line image guidance (IG). Late genito-urinary (GU) and gastro-intestinal (GI) toxicities were scored using the radiotherapy oncology group (RTOG) score and the common toxicity score of adverse events (CTC) score. Urinary symptoms were also scored using the international prostate symptom score (IPSS). Median observation time was 5.4 year. Sixty-two of the 90 patients from the original study cohort were eligible for toxicity assessment. Overall survival, cancer-specific survival and biochemical freedom from failure were 85%, 96% and 80%, respectively at five years after radiotherapy. Late toxicity GU and GI RTOG scores≥2 were 5% and 0%. Comparing pre- and post-radiotherapy IPSS scores indicate that development in urinary symptoms after radiotherapy may be complex. Prostate image-guided radiotherapy using a prostate stent demonstrated survival data comparable with recently published data. GU and GI toxicities at five-year follow-up were low and comparable to the lowest toxicity rates reported. These findings support that the precision of the prostate stent technique is at least as good as other techniques. IPSS revealed a complex development in urinary symptoms after radiotherapy.

  12. Psychological and physical distress of cancer patients during radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    König, A

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: patients undergoing radiotherapy have physical and psychological symptoms related to the underlying disease and the treatment. In order to give the best possible support to the patients, more knowledge about the amount and the changing of distress in the course of radiotherapy is of essentially importance. Methods: The distress was measured in a consecutive sample of cancer patients (n=82) undergoing radiotherapy. Each patient was given the EORTC-QLQ-C30, the HADS and a special questionnaire which ascertain radiotherapy-specific items before starting the radiotherapy, at the onset of radiotherapy, in the third week of radiotherapy and 3 weeks after the end of radiotherapy. Results: within the first week of treatment the psychological distress of the patients is increasing; 98.8 % of the patients are 'moderate distressed', 46 % 'severe distressed'. General physical symptoms seem not to be affected by the radiotherapy, there is no changing. The distress caused by the organization of the radiotherapy is...

  13. Radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy. Immediate or early delayed?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bottke, D.; Bartkowiak, D.; Schrader, M.; Wiegel, T. [University Hospital Ulm (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Background: Biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy (RP) is associated with risk indicators, including Gleason score, preoperative PSA level, tumor stage, seminal vesicle invasion, and positive surgical margins. The 5-year biochemical progression rate among predisposed patients is as high as 50-70%. Post-RP treatment options include adjuvant radiotherapy (ART, for men with undetectable PSA) or salvage radiotherapy (SRT, for PSA persisting or re-rising above detection threshold). Presently, there are no published randomized trials evaluating ART vs. SRT directly. Methods: Published data on ART and SRT were reviewed to allow a comparison of the two treatment approaches. Results: Three randomized phase III trials demonstrated an almost 20% absolute benefit for biochemical progression-free survival after ART (60-64 Gy) compared to a 'wait and see' policy. The greatest benefit was achieved in patients with positive margins and pT3 tumors. SRT can be offered to patients with elevated PSA after RP. In 30-70% of SRT patients, PSA will decrease to an undetectable level, thus giving a second curative chance. The rate of side effects for both treatments is comparably low. The role of irradiation of pelvic lymph nodes and the additional use of hormone therapy and radiation dose are discussed. Conclusion: It remains unclear whether early SRT initiated after PSA failure is equivalent to ART. Where SRT is indicated, it should be started as early as possible. (orig.)

  14. Adjuvant radiotherapy for gallbladder cancer: A dosimetric comparison of conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Nan Sun; Qi Wang; Ben-Xing Gu; Yan-Hong Zhu; Jian-Bin Hu; Guo-Zhi Shi; Shu Zheng

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To assess the efficacy and toxicity of conformal radiotherapy (CRT) and compare with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the treatment of gallbladder cancer.METHODS: Between November 2003 and January 2010, 20 patients with gallbladder cancer were treated with CRT with or without chemotherapy after surgical resection. Preliminary survival data were collected and examined using both Kaplan-Meier and actuarial analysis. Demographic and treatment parameters were collected. All patients were planned to receive 46-56 Gy in 1.8 or 2.0 Gy per fraction. CRT planning was compared with IMRT.RESULTS: The most common reported acute toxicities requiring medication (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade2) were nausea (10/20 patients) and diarrhea (3/20).There were no treatment-related deaths. Compared with CRT planning, IMRT significantly reduced the volume of right kidney receiving > 20 Gy and the volume of liver receiving > 30 Gy. IMRT has a negligible impact on the volume of left kidney receiving > 20 Gy. The 95% of prescribed dose for a planning tumor volume using either 3D CRT or IMRT planning were 84.0% ±6.7%, 82.9% ± 6.1%, respectively (P > 0.05).CONCLUSION: IMRT achieves similar excellent target coverage as compared with CRT planning, while reducingthe mean liver dose and volume above threshold dose. IMRT offers better sparing of the right kidney compared with CRT planning, with a significantly lower mean dose and volume above threshold dose.

  15. Predictors for trismus in patients receiving radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Geer, S Joyce; Kamstra, Jolanda I; Roodenburg, Jan L N; van Leeuwen, Marianne; Reintsema, Harry; Langendijk, Johannes A; Dijkstra, Pieter U

    2016-11-01

    Trismus, a restricted mouth opening in head and neck cancer patients may be caused by tumor infiltration in masticatory muscles, radiation-induced fibrosis or scarring after surgery. It may impede oral functioning severely. The aims of our study were to determine: (1) the incidence of trismus at various time points; and (2) the patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics that predict the development of trismus after radiotherapy in head and neck cancer patients using a large database (n = 641). Maximal mouth opening was measured prior to and 6, 12, 18, 24, 36, and 48 months after radiotherapy. Patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics were analyzed as potential predictors for trismus using a multivariable logistic regression analysis. At six months after radiotherapy, 28.1% of the patients without trismus prior to radiotherapy developed trismus for the first time. At subsequent time points the incidence declined. Over a total period of 48 months after radiotherapy, the incidence of trismus was 3.6 per 10 person years at risk. Patients who had tumors located in the oral cavity, oropharynx or nasopharynx, and the salivary glands or ear, and who had a longer overall treatment time of radiotherapy, were more likely to develop trismus in the first six months after radiotherapy. Maximal mouth opening was a predictor for developing trismus at all time points. Incidence of trismus is 3.6 per 10 person years at risk. Tumor localization and overall treatment time of radiotherapy are predictors for developing trismus the first six months after radiotherapy. Maximal mouth opening is a significant predictor for developing trismus at all time points. Regular measurements of maximal mouth opening are needed to predict trismus.

  16. The impact of radiotherapy on clinical outcomes in parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yun Seon; Lim, Do Hoon [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Radiotherapy (RT) is considered a mainstay of treatment in parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma (PM-RMS). We aim to determine the treatment outcomes and prognostic factors for PM-RMS patients who treated with RT. In addition, we tried to evaluate the adequate dose and timing of RT. Twenty-two patients with PM-RMS from 1995 to 2013 were evaluated. Seven patients had intracranial extension (ICE) and 17 patients had skull base bony erosion (SBBE). Five patients showed distant metastases at the time of diagnosis. All patients underwent chemotherapy and RT. The median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy (range, 40.0 to 56.0 Gy). The median follow-up was 28.7 months. Twelve patients (54.5%) experienced failure after treatment; 4 local, 2 regional, and 6 distant failures. The 5-year local control (LC) and overall survival (OS) were 77.7% and 38.5%, respectively. The 5-year OS rate was 50.8% for patients without distant metastases and 0% for patients with metastases (p < 0.001). Radiation dose (<50 Gy vs. ≥50 Gy) did not compromise the LC (p = 0.645). However, LC was affected by ICE (p = 0.031). Delayed administration (>22 weeks) of RT was related to a higher rate of local failure (40.0%). RT resulted in a higher rate of local control in PM-RMS. However, it was not extended to survival outcome. A more effective treatment for PM-RMS is warranted.

  17. [Current status and perspectives of radiotherapy for esophageal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S X; Wang, L H

    2016-09-23

    Esophageal cancer is one of the most common cancers in China. More than 80% of esophageal cancer patients are diagnosed at a late stage and are not eligible for surgery. Radiotherapy is one of the most important modalities in esophageal cancer treatment. Here we reviewed the advances in esophageal cancer radiotherapy and radiotherapy-based combined-modality therapy, such as optimization of radiation dose and target volume, application of precise radiotherapy technique and the integration of radiotherapy with chemotherapy and targeted therapy.

  18. Radiotherapy for MTRA/RT; Strahlentherapie fuer MTRA/RT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luetter, Christiana [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Radiologische Klinik

    2012-07-01

    The radiological practice textbook covers the following issues: tumor diseases, tumor diagnostics, fundamentals of radiotherapy, DIN, irradiation planning, documentation and quality assurance, strategies of tumor therapy, basic physics of radiotherapy and dosimetry, radiation protection - regulations and guidelines, radiobiology, biological radiation effects, special organ toxicity, psychological and medical attendance of patients, special oncology of the most important organ carcinomas, palliative radiotherapy, radiotherapy of benign diseases, other indications of radiotherapy, supportive therapy.

  19. Carotid artery stenosis after neck radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimamura, Munehisa; Hashimoto, Yoichiro; Kasuya, Junji; Terasaki, Tadashi [Kumamoto City Hospital (Japan); Uchino, Makoto

    2000-02-01

    Carotid artery stenosis sometimes occurs after cervical radiotherapy. We report a 70-year-old woman with a history of radiotherapy for thyroid cancer at the age of 28 years. She had no signs and symptoms except the skin lesion at the irradiation site. Duplex ultrasonography revealed heterogeneous plaques showing 50% stenosis of bilateral common carotid arteries. Those lesions were observed within segment of irradiation, where atheromatous plaque usually seldom occurs. These indicated that the carotid stenosis was induced by radiotherapy. Although the efficacy of antiplatelet therapy for radiation-induced plaque is not clear, the plaques remained unchanged for 4 years in spite of aspirin administration. (author)

  20. Image Fusion for Radiosurgery, Neurosurgery and Hypofractionated Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Hiroshi K; Nakajima, Atsushi; Sato, Hiro; Noda, Shin-Ei; Saitoh, Jun-Ichi; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki

    2015-03-01

    Precise target detection is essential for radiosurgery, neurosurgery and hypofractionated radiotherapy because treatment results and complication rates are related to accuracy of the target definition. In skull base tumors and tumors around the optic pathways, exact anatomical evaluation of cranial nerves are important to avoid adverse effects on these structures close to lesions. Three-dimensional analyses of structures obtained with MR heavy T2-images and image fusion with CT thin-sliced sections are desirable to evaluate fine structures during radiosurgery and microsurgery. In vascular lesions, angiography is most important for evaluations of whole structures from feeder to drainer, shunt, blood flow and risk factors of bleeding. However, exact sites and surrounding structures in the brain are not shown on angiography. True image fusions of angiography, MR images and CT on axial planes are ideal for precise target definition. In malignant tumors, especially recurrent head and neck tumors, biologically active areas of recurrent tumors are main targets of radiosurgery. PET scan is useful for quantitative evaluation of recurrences. However, the examination is not always available at the time of radiosurgery. Image fusion of MR diffusion images with CT is always available during radiosurgery and useful for the detection of recurrent lesions. All images are fused and registered on thin sliced CT sections and exactly demarcated targets are planned for treatment. Follow-up images are also able to register on this CT. Exact target changes, including volume, are possible in this fusion system. The purpose of this review is to describe the usefulness of image fusion for 1) skull base, 2) vascular, 3) recurrent target detection, and 4) follow-up analyses in radiosurgery, neurosurgery and hypofractionated radiotherapy.

  1. Radiogenomics and radiotherapy response modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Naqa, Issam; Kerns, Sarah L.; Coates, James; Luo, Yi; Speers, Corey; West, Catharine M. L.; Rosenstein, Barry S.; Ten Haken, Randall K.

    2017-08-01

    Advances in patient-specific information and biotechnology have contributed to a new era of computational medicine. Radiogenomics has emerged as a new field that investigates the role of genetics in treatment response to radiation therapy. Radiation oncology is currently attempting to embrace these recent advances and add to its rich history by maintaining its prominent role as a quantitative leader in oncologic response modeling. Here, we provide an overview of radiogenomics starting with genotyping, data aggregation, and application of different modeling approaches based on modifying traditional radiobiological methods or application of advanced machine learning techniques. We highlight the current status and potential for this new field to reshape the landscape of outcome modeling in radiotherapy and drive future advances in computational oncology.

  2. Tomodensitometry images: integration in radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dessy, F.; Hoornaert, M.T. [Jolimont Hospital, Haine Saint Paul (France). Cancer and Nuclear Medicine Dept.; Malchair, F. [Biomed Engineering, Boncelles (France)

    1995-12-01

    With a view to utilization of CT scan images in radiotherapy, the effective energy and the linearity of four different scanners (Siemens somatom CR, HiQS, Plus and Picker PQ 2000) and two non standard scanners, simulators with CT option (Webb 1990) (Varian Ximatron and Oldelft Simulx CT) has been measured using the method described by White and Speller in 1980. When the linearity relation in presented using the density or the electron density as the abscissa, a blurred area where two different components of equal density or electron density can have two different Hounsfield`s numbers. Using the linearity relation, the density of Rando`s lung heterogeneity is determined. We calculated a treatment planning (TP) using this value and made a comparison between the TP and the real absorbed dose with was measured using diodes. The comparison between the TP and the relative Absorbed doses showed a difference of up to 4.5%.

  3. Radiotherapy. 2. rev. ed.; Strahlentherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wannenmacher, Michael; Debus, Juergen [Radiologische Klinik, Heidelberg (Germany). Abteilung fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie; Wenz, Frederik (ed.) [Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this medical specialty book, besides presenting the state of the art in clinical radiotherapy and radiooncology, is to explain the basic principles of medical physics and radiobiology. Following a number of chapters on general topics and theory it provides detailed coverage of the individual organ systems, briefly addressing future aspects in the process. The authors relate their view that radiooncology as a medical specialty will continue to be under pressure to change and that it will take continuous innovation to secure its status within the interdisciplinary context around the treatment of cancer patients. The authors of this, the textbook's second edition, have dedicated much space to modern methods and techniques in order to do justice to these developments.

  4. Proton radiotherapy of skin carcinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umebayashi, Y.; Uyeno, K.; Otsuka, F. (Tsukuba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine); Tsujii, H. (Proton Medical Research Center, Tsukuba (Japan))

    1994-01-01

    At the Proton Medical Research Centre, University of Tsukuba, a pilot study of proton-beam radiotherapy was performed in 12 patients with the following types of carcinoma: Bowen's disease (4), oral verrucous carcinoma (5), and squamous cell carcinoma (3). They received total doses of 51-99.2 Gy in fractions of 2-12.5 Gy. All tumours responded well to the treatment. All four lesions of Bowen's disease, three of the five oral verrucous carcinomas, and the three squamous cell carcinomas completely regressed following irradiation. Two squamous cell carcinomas recurred during the follow-up period. One recurrent squamous cell carcinoma was successfully treated by a salvage surgical operation, and in the other case the patient refused further therapy. In two verrucous carcinomas there was 90% regression of tumour volume. No severe radiation-related complication occurred. (Author).

  5. Kidney (Renal) Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How is kidney failure treated? What is kidney (renal) failure? The kidneys are designed to maintain proper fluid ... marrow and strengthen the bones. The term kidney (renal) failure describes a situation in which the kidneys have ...

  6. Acute kidney failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidney failure; Renal failure; Renal failure - acute; ARF; Kidney injury - acute ... There are many possible causes of kidney damage. They include: ... cholesterol (cholesterol emboli) Decreased blood flow due to very ...

  7. Living with Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Heart Failure Currently, heart failure has no cure. You'll ... avoid harmful side effects. Take Steps To Prevent Heart Failure From Getting Worse Certain actions can worsen your ...

  8. Classes of Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Classes of Heart Failure Updated:Sep 28,2016 Doctors usually classify patients' ... Blood Pressure Tracker Find additional helpful resources here Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure Introduction Types of Heart ...

  9. About Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... talk about your health and the medicines About Heart Failure Heart failure is a disease where the heart cannot do ... very important for your health. common causes of heart failure are diseases or conditions that damage the heart. ...

  10. What Is Heart Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Heart Failure? Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can' ... force. Some people have both problems. The term "heart failure" doesn't mean that your heart has stopped ...

  11. The role of PET in target localization for radiotherapy treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rembielak, Agata; Price, Pat

    2008-02-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is currently accepted as an important tool in oncology, mostly for diagnosis, staging and restaging purposes. It provides a new type of information in radiotherapy, functional rather than anatomical. PET imaging can also be used for target volume definition in radiotherapy treatment planning. The need for very precise target volume delineation has arisen with the increasing use of sophisticated three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy techniques and intensity modulated radiation therapy. It is expected that better delineation of the target volume may lead to a significant reduction in the irradiated volume, thus lowering the risk of treatment complications (smaller safety margins). Better tumour visualisation also allows a higher dose of radiation to be applied to the tumour, which may lead to better tumour control. The aim of this article is to review the possible use of PET imaging in the radiotherapy of various cancers. We focus mainly on non-small cell lung cancer, lymphoma and oesophageal cancer, but also include current opinion on the use of PET-based planning in other tumours including brain, uterine cervix, rectum and prostate.

  12. Mid-radiotherapy PET/CT for prognostication and detection of early progression in patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gensheimer, Michael F; Hong, Julian C; Chang-Halpenny, Christine; Zhu, Hui; Eclov, Neville C W; To, Jacqueline; Murphy, James D; Wakelee, Heather A; Neal, Joel W; Le, Quynh-Thu; Hara, Wendy Y; Quon, Andrew; Maxim, Peter G; Graves, Edward E; Olson, Michael R; Diehn, Maximilian; Loo, Billy W

    2017-08-19

    Pre- and mid-radiotherapy FDG-PET metrics have been proposed as biomarkers of recurrence and survival in patients treated for stage III non-small cell lung cancer. We evaluated these metrics in patients treated with definitive radiation therapy (RT). We also evaluated outcomes after progression on mid-radiotherapy PET/CT. Seventy-seven patients treated with RT with or without chemotherapy were included in this retrospective study. Primary tumor and involved nodes were delineated. PET metrics included metabolic tumor volume (MTV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG), and SUVmax. For mid-radiotherapy PET, both absolute value of these metrics and percentage decrease were analyzed. The influence of PET metrics on time to death, local recurrence, and regional/distant recurrence was assessed using Cox regression. 91% of patients had concurrent chemotherapy. Median follow-up was 14months. None of the PET metrics were associated with overall survival. Several were positively associated with local recurrence: pre-radiotherapy MTV, and mid-radiotherapy MTV and TLG (p=0.03-0.05). Ratio of mid- to pre-treatment SUVmax was associated with regional/distant recurrence (p=0.02). 5/77 mid-radiotherapy scans showed early out-of-field progression. All of these patients died. Several PET metrics were associated with risk of recurrence. Progression on mid-radiotherapy PET/CT was a poor prognostic factor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. CHRONIC RENAL FAILURE TODAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetislav Kostić

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The syndrome of chronic renal failure (CRF is already known for more than 150 years. Current research in this domain changed our understanding in epidemiology, aetiology, prevention of disease progression, classifications, definition, and adequate treatment of comorbid conditions in predialytic period. With data collection and registration on CRF patients it is obvious an increase in prevalence and incidence of patients with CRF in the world. The diabetic nephropathy is the most common disease leading in 40% of cases to terminal CRF. In the follow up of these patients the most important goal is slowing down the disease progression with low protein diet (0,6-0,8 g/kg BW/day and vigorous blood pressure control (target values: 120-135/75-85 mmHg. The adequate therapy of anaemia and secondary hyperparathyroidism including predialytic use of erythopoietin and vitamin D significantly slow down the progression of CRF and postpones the beginning of dialytic treatment. Numerous comorbid conditions present in predialytic period fasten the progression of CRF. The most common are of cardiovascular origin (congestive heart failure and coronary artery disease. Those cardiovascular comorbid conditions have an impact on CRF progresion as well as on the outcome in dialytic therapy. The most common causes of cardiovascular comorbidity are hypertension, anemia and secondary hyperparathyroidism, all of which should be treated in predialytic period. Of special concern is use of nephrotoxic drugs, particularly nephrotoxic antibioticsaminoglycosides. The optimal timing of creation of permanent vascular access and vaccination against hepatitis B in predialytic period are cost-effective and have an impact on quality of dialysis.

  14. Pancreatic insufficiency secondary to abdominal radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dookeran, K.A.; Thompson, M.M.; Allum, W.H. (Leicester Royal Infirmary (United Kingdom). Dept. of Surgery)

    1993-02-01

    Delayed post-irradiation steatorrhoea secondary to acute pancreatic insufficiency is rare. The authors describe a case occurring in a patient 23 years following radical abdominal radiotherapy for testicular seminoma. (Author).

  15. Historical aspects of heavy ion radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raju, M.R.

    1995-03-01

    This paper presents historical developments of heavy-ion radiotherapy including discussion of HILAC and HIMAC and discussion of cooperation between Japan and the United States, along with personal reflections.

  16. Stereotactic body radiotherapy a practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    Gaya, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Collecting the key information in this burgeoning field into a single volume, this handbook for clinical oncology trainees and consultants covers all of the basic aspects of stereotactic radiotherapy systems and treatment and includes plenty of case studies.

  17. Heavy particle radiotherapy: prospects and pitfalls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faju, M.R.

    1980-01-01

    The use of heavy particles in radiotherapy of tumor volumes is examined. Particles considered are protons, helium ions, heavy ions, negative pions, and fast neutrons. Advantages and disadvantages are discussed. (ACR)

  18. Relationship between interval from surgery to radiotherapy and local recurrence rate in patients with endometrioid-type endometrial cancer: a retrospective mono-institutional Italian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrini, Maria Grazia; Gadducci, Angiolo; Perrone, Franco; La Liscia, Concetta; Cosio, Stefania; Moda, Stefano; Guerrieri, Maria Elena; Grandinetti, Antonella; Greco, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    To assess the relationship between the timing of radiotherapy and the risk of local failure in patients with endometrioid-type endometrial cancer who had undergone surgery and adjuvant external pelvic radiotherapy (with or without brachytherapy), but not chemotherapy. One hundred and seventy seven patients were analyzed in this study. The median follow-up of the survivors was 72 months. Radiotherapy was delivered after a median time of 14.6 weeks from surgery and the median overall treatment time was 6.4 weeks. The tumor relapsed in 32 (18.1%) patients after a median time of 21 months. The local recurrence (vaginal or central pelvic) occurred in 11 patients. The local recurrence rate was associated with tumor grade (p=0.02), myometrial invasion (p=0.046), FIGO stage (p=0.003), pathological node status (p=0.037) and time interval from surgery to radiotherapy using 9 weeks as the cut-off value (p=0.046), but not with the overall treatment time. All the local relapses occurred in patients who received adjuvant irradiation after an interval from surgery >9 weeks. The time interval from surgery to radiotherapy might affect the local recurrence rate in patients not receiving chemotherapy. Every possible effort should be made to start radiotherapy within 9 weeks, when radiotherapy only is deemed necessary as adjuvant treatment.

  19. Blisters - an unusual effect during radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höller, U; Schubert, T; Budach, V; Trefzer, U; Beyer, M

    2013-11-01

    The skin reaction to radiation is regularly monitored in order to detect enhanced radiosensitivity of the patient, unexpected interactions (e.g. with drugs) or any inadvertent overdosage. It is important to distinguish secondary disease from radiation reaction to provide adequate treatment and to avoid unnecessary discontinuation of radiotherapy. A case of bullous eruption or blisters during radiotherapy of the breast is presented. Differential diagnoses bullous pemphigoid, pemphigus vulgaris, and bullous impetigo are discussed and treatment described.

  20. Radiotherapy in Dupuytren's contracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, A.H. (Bezirkskrankenhaus Cottbus (German Democratic Republic))

    1984-01-01

    In Dupuytren's contracture grade I by Iselin radiotherapy is indicated. With X-ray half-depth therapy and a total dose of 20.0 Gy the disease could be treated successfully in 82 % of the cases in a sense of inhibition of progression, whereas in 18 % radiotherapy failed. Possibly the results can be improved by increase of the radiation dose and/or modified fractionating.

  1. Stereotactic multiple are radiotherapy. IV--Haemangioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborti, P R; Chakrabarti, K B; Doughty, D; Plowman, P N

    1997-04-01

    Our initial experience in the treatment of haemangioblastoma using conventional external beam radiotherapy and stereotactic radiotherapy (radiosurgery), by the linear accelerator method, is reported. Six haemangioblastomas in five patients were treated with a mean follow-up of 40 months (range 14-60). Five haemangioblastomas in four patients were treated with stereotactic radiotherapy, where four showed complete radiological response and the fifth was static. Neurological symptoms and signs improved in those patients. The sixth haemangioblastoma was situated close to the pituitary and optic chiasm, and was treated with conventionally fractionated external beam radiotherapy. The lesion showed partial response. No complications were noted in this patient group. This series complements and extends the relatively sparse published literature demonstrating that radiotherapy is an effective option for treating haemangioblastomas. Radiosurgery often lends itself particularly well to these discrete lesions allowing highly focused treatment. For patients with multiple and metachronous cerebellar haemangioblastomas as part of the von Hipple-Lindau syndrome, the data support a policy of conventionally fractionated external beam radiotherapy to the whole cerebellum of 50-55 Gy followed, after a period of time, by radiosurgery to persisting lesions (patients 3 and 4).

  2. Failure of engineering artifacts: a life cycle approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Frate, Luca

    2013-09-01

    Failure is a central notion both in ethics of engineering and in engineering practice. Engineers devote considerable resources to assure their products will not fail and considerable progress has been made in the development of tools and methods for understanding and avoiding failure. Engineering ethics, on the other hand, is concerned with the moral and social aspects related to the causes and consequences of technological failures. But what is meant by failure, and what does it mean that a failure has occurred? The subject of this paper is how engineers use and define this notion. Although a traditional definition of failure can be identified that is shared by a large part of the engineering community, the literature shows that engineers are willing to consider as failures also events and circumstance that are at odds with this traditional definition. These cases violate one or more of three assumptions made by the traditional approach to failure. An alternative approach, inspired by the notion of product life cycle, is proposed which dispenses with these assumptions. Besides being able to address the traditional cases of failure, it can deal successfully with the problematic cases. The adoption of a life cycle perspective allows the introduction of a clearer notion of failure and allows a classification of failure phenomena that takes into account the roles of stakeholders involved in the various stages of a product life cycle.

  3. Associations of coefficient of variation of serum GH with previous radiotherapy, hypopituitarism and cardiac disease in patients with treated acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasena, Channa N; Izzi-Engbeaya, Chioma; Narayanaswamy, Shakunthala; Modi, Manish; Clarke, Holly; Nijher, Gurjinder M K; Meeran, Karim; Dhillo, Waljit S

    2015-06-01

    Cardiovascular complications represent the biggest cause of mortality in acromegaly. It is therefore important to optimally stratify acromegalic patients according to disease activity and complication risk. GH is secreted in a pulsatile manner from the pituitary gland, but GH pulsatility is not routinely assessed clinically. The coefficient of variation of serum GH (GHCV) during oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) quantifies the variation of GH secretion in patients with acromegaly, but has not been reported previously. To investigate whether GHCV during OGTT is associated with clinical parameters predicted to relate with hypothalamo-pituitary dysfunction during acromegaly, such as radiotherapy treatment, pituitary deficiency and cardiac disease. GHCV was calculated during 584 OGTTs and compared with nadir serum GH and IGF-1 in 111 acromegalic patients treated at a single centre. Acromegalic patients treated with radiotherapy had a 37% lower level of GHCV when compared to the nonradiotherapy group (mean GHCV: 0·298 ± 0·015, no radiotherapy; 0·189 ± 0·007, radiotherapy; P < 0·001). Neither serum IGF-1 nor nadir GH was significantly altered in the radiotherapy group. Mean GHCV was 50% lower in the acromegalic patients with cardiac failure when compared to acromegalic patients with normal echocardiogram (0·161 ± 0·034 vs 0·297 ± 0·055; P < 0·05). Neither serum IGF-1 nor nadir GH was significantly altered during cardiac failure. Our preliminary data suggest that GHCV during OGTT may be reduced during acromegaly in patients with previous radiotherapy, pituitary deficiencies and cardiac disease. Larger studies are required to determine whether GHCV could provide help to assess the morbidity status of patients with treated acromegaly. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Mild soaps and radiotherapy: a survey of the UK public to identify brands of soap considered mild and analysis of these to ascertain suitability for recommendation in radiotherapy departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, K; Brown, P

    2011-05-01

    Cancer agencies recommend that patients use mild soap when undergoing external beam radiotherapy to minimise skin reactions. They define 'mild soap' as non-alkaline, lanolin free, unperfumed soap with a neutral pH. This study aimed to identify which soaps the UK public perceive as mild and ascertain if these were clinically mild and could potentially be recommended within radiotherapy departments. A survey of 237 participants identified eight top brands of mild soap, which were then tested for pH and analysed for potential irritants. All soaps were lanolin free and non-alkaline, with Simple and Johnson's the closest to pH 5.5. All contained fragrances except Simple and E45. Dove, Pears and Imperial Leather contained the highest concentration of fragrances. All soaps except E45 contained potential irritants. Only Simple and E45 fit the cancer agencies' definition of mild soap and could therefore be recommended for radiotherapy patients. Future research should identify current practices and recommendations in the UK as anecdotal evidence suggests large variations in skin care advice. Further scientific analysis could potentially identify cheaper brands that fit the definition of 'mild'. UK recommendations should be standardised and consistent with best practice to reduce skin reaction severity in radiotherapy patients.

  5. Standards, options and recommendations for the radiotherapy of patients having an endometrium neoplasm; Standards, options et recommandations pour la radiotherapie des patientes atteintes de cancer de l'endometre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, L.; Pigneux, J. [Institut Bergonie Centre Regional de Lutte Contre le Cancer, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Bataillard, A.; Fervers, B. [Federation Nationale des Centres de Lutte Contre le Cancer, 75 - Paris (France); Bremond, A.; Farsi, F.; Guastalla, J.P. [Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Leon-Berard, 69 - Lyon (France); Fondrinier, E. [Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Paul-Papin, 49 - Angers (France); Achard, J.L.; Bailly, C. [Centre Jean-Perrin, 63 - Clermont-Ferrand (France); Lansac, J. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Bretonneau, 37 - Tours (France); Hoffstetter, S. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Basuyau, J.P.; D' Anjou, J. [Centre Henri Becquerel, 76 - Rouen (France); Deschamps, P. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 49 - Angers (France); Laffargue, F. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Hopital Arnaud-de-Villeneuve, 34 - Montpellier (France); Rodier, J.F. [Centre Paul-Strauss, 67 - Strasbourg (France); Vincent, P. [Clinique Sainte-Catherine, 84 - Avignon (France)

    2001-04-01

    The 'Standards, Options and Recommendations'(SOR) project, started in 1993, is a collaboration between the Federation of the French Cancer Centres (FNCLCC), the 20 French Cancer Centres and specialists from French Public Universities, General Hospitals and Private Clinics. The main objective is the development of clinical practice guidelines to improve the quality of health care and outcome for cancer patients. The methodology is based on literature review and critical appraisal by a multidisciplinary group of experts, with feedback from specialists in cancer care delivery. To develop clinical practice guidelines according to the definitions of the Standards, Options and Recommendations project for the radiotherapy of carcinoma of the endometrium. Data were identified by searching Medline and personal reference lists of members of the expert groups. Once the guidelines were defined, the document was submitted for review to independent reviewers, and to the medical committees of the 20 French Cancer Centres. The main recommendations for the radiotherapy of carcinoma of the endometrium are: For grade 1 and 2 stage IA tumours, follow-up alone is standards as additional treatment. For grade 1 and 2 stage IB tumours, vaginal brachytherapy or follow-up alone are options. For grade 3, stage IB tumours and stage IC disease, there are two treatment options: external pelvic radiotherapy with a brachytherapy boost or vaginal brachytherapy. Treatment for stage II disease can be preoperative when stage II disease has been suggested by a positive endometrial curettage. Postoperative vaginal brachytherapy is given for stage IIA tumours if the penetration of the myometrium is less than 50% or if the tumour is grade 1 or 2. In the case of deep penetration, or higher grade disease, or for stage IIB external radiotherapy with brachytherapy boosting must be undertaken routinely. After surgery, for stage IIIA disease, either external pelvic radiotherapy or abdomino

  6. Radiotherapy for pain management of bone metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezende Junior, Ismar de; Mattos, Marcos Duarte de; Nakamura, Ricardo; Lemes Junior, Joaquim; Vanzelli, Talita Lozano, E-mail: rezende.med@terra.com.br [Radioterapia do Hospital de Cancer de Barretos, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: This is the first Brazilian study intended to evaluate the response of pain relief with radiotherapy in three different fractionation and the clinical differences in managing pain in patients with painful bone metastases. Methods: Prospective study of patients with painful bone metastases referred to the Radiotherapy Sector of the Hospital de Cancer de Barretos for pain-relieving radiotherapy between March and December 2010. It is known that radiotherapy seems to alter the activation of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption, relieving pain in cases of painful bone metastases. Patients were assessed in relation to the status of pain intensity before and after the initiation of radiotherapy. Either a single fraction of 8Gy, five fractions of 4Gy or ten fractions of 3Gy were given. A visual analog scale (VAS) was applied by doctors, nurses and nursing technicians to assess pain intensity at each session of radiotherapy, and follow-up at 8, 30 and 90 days from the end of treatment. Results: We evaluated 92 consecutive patients, 48 male and 44 female, with a median age of 58 years. We found that 14% of patients referred from the Palliative Care or Clinical Oncology sectors need better pharmacological analgesia due to severe pain, compared with 40.5% of patients from the other sectors (p = 0.004). We also found that the onset of pain relief to patients receiving 10 fractions of 300cGy analgesia without changing the pre-radiotherapy analgesia occurred with significance after the fifth fraction. Improvement in pain experienced within 90 days of follow-up was found in eighty percent of patients, independent of fractionated radiotherapy, site of metastases and the clinical condition of the patient. Discussion/Conclusion: The Palliative Care and Clinical Oncology sectors expressed greater concern in regards to analgesia for the patient with painful bone metastases. Radiotherapy is an effective pain-relieving treatment in different fractionation studied, even though the

  7. Palliative radiotherapy for hematuria complicating the local evolution of primitive bladder cancers; Radiotherapie palliative pour hematurie compliquant l'evolution locale des cancers primitifs de vessie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saillard, S.M.; Benyoucef, A.; Dubray, B. [Centre Henri-Becquerel, 76 - Rouen (France); Smaali, C.; Albouy, B.; Pfister, C.; Grise, P. [Centre hospitalier universitaire, 76 - Rouen (France)

    2010-10-15

    As a haemostatic irradiation is often proposed to patients suffering from a primitive bladder cancer, the authors report a retrospective mono-centric analysis of the effects of an external bi-dimensional palliative radiotherapy on patients taken into care for relapsing macroscopic hematuria after failure of local urological treatments. The assessment concerns the hematuria persistence, the interval without hematuric relapse, global survival, and transfusion needs. Based on a sample of 21 patients submitted to different irradiation schemes, the authors notice that a simple pelvic irradiation technique results in a fast symptomatic improvement of hematuria among fragile patients. Short communication

  8. Types of Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Types of Heart Failure Updated:Feb 9,2017 Left-sided heart failure ... making. This content was last reviewed April 2015. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure Introduction Types of Heart ...

  9. Differential risk assessments from five hypoxia specific assays: The basis for biologically adapted individualized radiotherapy in advanced head and neck cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordsmark, Marianne; Eriksen, Jesper Grau; Gebski, Val

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: Hypoxia adversely relates with prognosis in human tumours. Five hypoxia specific predictive marker assays were compared and correlated with definitive radiotherapy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Sixty-seven patients with advanced head and neck carcinomas were studied for pre-treatment plasma...

  10. How to irradiate bone metastases?; Radiotherapie des metastases osseuses: quel est le meilleur schema de radiotherapie?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pradier, O.; Bouchekoua, M.; Albargach, N.; Muller, M.; Malhaire, J.P. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Service de Radiotherapie, Institut de Cancerologie et d' Hematologie, 29 - Brest (France)

    2008-12-15

    Radiotherapy for bone metastases represents an important part of daily practice in our departments of radiotherapy. Majority of treatments deliver either one fraction (6 to 10 Gy) or multi-fractions mainly using 30 Gy in ten fractions. In the past decade, several randomized trials aimed to determine the optimal scheme of radiotherapy in this setting. In the present review, the efficacy of radiotherapy on bone metastases will be evaluated using the following parameters: the partial or complete responses on pain, the reduction of antalgic intake, bone re-calcification, and need for reirradiation. Other parameters must also be considered, such as the primary site, number of metastasis, performance status, overall prognosis and side effects of radiotherapy. (authors)

  11. Study comparing sequential (neo-adjuvant) versus concurrent chemo-radiotherapy in patients with squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okawa, Tomohiko; Karasawa, Kumiko; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Tanaka, Makiko; Kita-Okawa, Midori; Ishii, Tetsuo [Tokyo Women`s Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1994-11-01

    Radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy is still used for standard treatment in patients with locally advanced unresectable cancer. A study was undertaken to compare a sequential (neo-adjuvant) with a simultaneous (concurrent) chemotherapy and radiotherapy program. Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy with cisplatin (80 mg/m{sup 2} i.v. day 1) and 5FU (600 mg/m{sup 2} continuous i.v. day 1-5) every 3 weeks prior to definitive conventional radiotherapy (60-65 Gy), or cisplatin (20 mg/m{sup 2} i.v. day 1-5) and 5FU (250 mg/m{sup 2} continuous i.v. infusion. day 1-14) were given simultaneously for same radiotherapy. Complete response rate was 45% in the sequential treatment and 43% in the simultaneous arm. Leukopenia and other adverse effects were slightly more frequent in the simultaneous arm, but there were no significant differences. These results suggested that individualization of treatment planning and establishment of optimum treatment were most important for combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. (author).

  12. Radiotherapy induced xerostomia: mechanisms, diagnostics, prevention and treatment--evidence based up to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kałużny, Jarosław; Wierzbicka, Małgorzata; Nogala, Hanna; Milecki, Piotr; Kopeć, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Definition and prevalence of xerostomia were shortly presented. Radiosensitivity of the salivary glands, mechanism, diagnostics, and possible prediction methods of the intensity of xerostomia in the pre-radiotherapy period are widely discussed. Prevention of xerostomia: salivary gland sparing radiotherapy, cytoprotective agents, preservation by stimulation with cholinergic muscarinic agonists, surgical transfer of submandibular glands according to ASCO Management Guidelines and Quality of Life Recommendations were cited. Oral Care Study Group (2010) therapeutic approaches for relieving xerostomia are referred. Current therapies, restricted to symptom relief such as oral hygiene with fluoride agents, antimicrobials to prevent dental caries, saliva substitutes to relieve symptoms, and sialogenic agents to stimulate saliva were also discussed. Copyright © 2013 Polish Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z.o.o. All rights reserved.

  13. Results of Definitive Chemoradiotherapy for Unresectable Esophageal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, O Kyu; Je, Hyoung Uk; Kim, Sung Bae [Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2008-12-15

    To investigate the treatment outcome and failure patterns after definitive chemoradiation therapy in locally advanced, unresectable esophageal cancer. Materials and Methods: From February 1994 to December 2002, 168 patients with locally advanced unresectable or medically inoperable esophageal cancer were treated by definitive chemoradiation therapy. External beam radiation therapy (EBRT) (42-46 Gy) was delivered to the region encompassing the primary tumor and involved lymph nodes, while the supraclavicular fossa and celiac area were included in the treatment area as a function of disease location. The administered cone-down radiation dose to the gross tumor went up to 54-66 Gy, while the fraction size of the EBRT was 1.8-2.0 Gy/fraction qd or 1.2 Gy/fraction bid. An optional high dose rate (HDR) intraluminal brachytherapy (BT) boost was also administered (Ir-192, 9-12 Gy/3 -4 fx). Two cycles of concurrent FP chemotherapy (5-FU 1,000 mg/m2/day, days 2-6, 30-34, cisplatin 60 mg/m2/day, days 1, 29) were delivered during radiotherapy with the addition of two more cycles. Results: One hundred sixty patients were analyzable for this review [median follow-up time: 10 months (range 1-149 months)]. The number of patients within AJCC stages I, II, III, and IV was 5 (3.1%), 38 (23.8%), 68 (42.5%), and 49 (30.6%), respectively. A HDR intraluminal BT was performed in 26 patients. The 160 patients had a median EBRT radiation dose of 59.4 Gy (range 44.4-66) and a total radiation dose, including BT, of 60 Gy (range 44.4-72), while 144 patients received a dose higher than 40 Gy. Despite the treatment, the disease recurrence rate was 101/160 (63.1%). Of these, the patterns of recurrence were local in 20 patients (12.5%), persistent disease and local progression in 61 (38.1%), distant metastasis in 15 (9.4%), and concomitant local and distant failure in 5 (3.1%). The overall survival rate was 31.8% at 2 years and 14.2% at 5 years (median 11.1 months). Disease-free survival was 29

  14. Radiotherapy Treatment Planning for Testicular Seminoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilder, Richard B., E-mail: richardbwilder@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Buyyounouski, Mark K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Efstathiou, Jason A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Beard, Clair J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Virtually all patients with Stage I testicular seminoma are cured regardless of postorchiectomy management. For patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy, late toxicity is a major concern. However, toxicity may be limited by radiotherapy techniques that minimize radiation exposure of healthy normal tissues. This article is an evidence-based review that provides radiotherapy treatment planning recommendations for testicular seminoma. The minority of Stage I patients who choose adjuvant treatment over surveillance may be considered for (1) para-aortic irradiation to 20 Gy in 10 fractions, or (2) carboplatin chemotherapy consisting of area under the curve, AUC = 7 Multiplication-Sign 1-2 cycles. Two-dimensional radiotherapy based on bony anatomy is a simple and effective treatment for Stage IIA or IIB testicular seminoma. Centers with expertise in vascular and nodal anatomy may consider use of anteroposterior-posteroanterior fields based on three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy instead. For modified dog-leg fields delivering 20 Gy in 10 fractions, clinical studies support placement of the inferior border at the top of the acetabulum. Clinical and nodal mapping studies support placement of the superior border of all radiotherapy fields at the top of the T12 vertebral body. For Stage IIA and IIB patients, an anteroposterior-posteroanterior boost is then delivered to the adenopathy with a 2-cm margin to the block edge. The boost dose consists of 10 Gy in 5 fractions for Stage IIA and 16 Gy in 8 fractions for Stage IIB. Alternatively, bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin chemotherapy for 3 cycles or etoposide and cisplatin chemotherapy for 4 cycles may be delivered to Stage IIA or IIB patients (e.g., if they have a horseshoe kidney, inflammatory bowel disease, or a history of radiotherapy).

  15. Understanding chronic heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Fenton, Matthew; Burch, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The key principles of chronic heart failure and the development of clinical management strategies are described. The physiological changes in chronic heart failure and the clinical management of children with heart failure are considered, but the treatment of heart failure related to congenital heart disease or the intensive care management of heart failure are not mentioned as both topics require consideration in their own right. A greater understanding of the maladaptive responses to chroni...

  16. Immune mediated liver failure

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiaojing; Ning, Qin

    2014-01-01

    Liver failure is a clinical syndrome of various etiologies, manifesting as jaundice, encephalopathy, coagulopathy and circulatory dysfunction, which result in subsequent multiorgan failure. Clinically, liver failure is classified into four categories: acute, subacute, acute-on-chronic and chronic liver failure. Massive hepatocyte death is considered to be the core event in the development of liver failure, which occurs when the extent of hepatocyte death is beyond the liver regenerative capac...

  17. Understanding contraceptive failure

    OpenAIRE

    Trussell, James

    2009-01-01

    Contraceptive failure is a major source of unintended pregnancy. This chapter will review sources of data and measurement of contraceptive failure, summarize results from the literature on the risks of contraceptive failure during typical and perfect use for available methods of contraception, provide a tool for communicating risks of contraceptive failure to clients, examine determinants of contraceptive failure, and identify methodological pitfalls in the published literature.

  18. Differentiated Thyroid Cancer with Extrathyroidal Extension: Prognosis and the Role of External Beam Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Sia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was performed to identify variables that affected cause-specific survival (CSS and local relapse-free rate (LRFR in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC and extrathyroid extension (ETE and to examine the role of external beam radiotherapy (XRT. Prognostic factors were similar to those found in studies of all patients with DTC. In patients with postoperative gross residual disease treated with radiotherapy, 10-year CSS and LRFR were 48% and 90%. For patients with no residual or microscopic disease, 10-year CSS and LRFR were 92% and 93%. In patients older than 60 years with T3 ETE but no gross residual disease postoperatively there was an improved LRFR at 5 years of 96%, compared to 87.5% without XRT (P=.02. Patients with gross ETE benefit from XRT and there may be a potential benefit in reducing locoregional failure in patients over 60 years with minimal extrathyroidal extension (T3.

  19. State-of-the-art radiotherapy in the management of clinically localized prostate carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez, R Scott; Izaguirre, Alejandra; Roach, Mack

    2007-02-01

    Four Phase III trials demonstrating higher prostate-specific antigen control rates in prostate cancer patients treated with higher doses of radiation have changed the standard of care. Emerging on-line technologies, improved imaging and computer algorithms, combined with an improved understanding of how best to apply them, have allowed radiation oncologists to move ever closer to the optimal application of curative radiation. This technology allows a higher dose to be delivered to tumor-bearing areas while minimizing the dose delivered to surrounding normal tissues. Real-time adaptive techniques have made each step more accurate, and commercialization has increasingly moved these advances further into the community setting. Phase III trials have also helped to define the role of hormonal therapy in combination with radiation and the benefits of prophylactic pelvic nodal radiotherapy in subsets of patients. We have also learnt how to optimize the use of prostate-specific antigen to better determine success and failure following radiotherapy.

  20. Post Pelvic Radiotherapy Bony Changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huh, Seung Jae [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-03-15

    There has been recent interest in radiation-induced bone injury in clinical conditions, especially for pelvic insufficiency fracture (PIF). A PIF is caused by the effect of normal or physiological stress on bone with demineralization and decreased elastic resistance. Pelvic radiotherapy (RT) can also contribute to the development of a PIF. A PIF has been regarded as a rare complication with the use of megavoltage equipment. However, recent studies have reported the incidence of PIFs as 8.2{approx}20% after pelvic RT in gynecological patients, an incidence that was higher than previously believed. The importance of understanding a PIF lies in the potential for misdiagnosis as a bony metastasis. If patients complain of pelvic pain after whole-pelvis radiation therapy, the presence of a PIF must be considered in the differential diagnosis. The use of multibeam arrangements and conformal RT to reduce the volume and dose of irradiated pelvic bone can be helpful to minimize the risk of fracture. In addition to a PIF, osteonecrosis and avascular necrosis of the femoral head can develop after radiation therapy. Osteoradionecrosis of the pelvic bone is a clinical diagnostic challenge that must be differentiated from an osseous metastasis. A post-radiation bone sarcoma can result as a long-term sequela of pelvic irradiation for uterine cervical cancer.

  1. External beam radiotherapy boosted with high dose rate brachytherapy in completely resected uterine sarcomas. Is this a treatment option?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio Assis; Novaes, Paulo Eduardo Ribeiro dos Santos; Maia, Maria Aparecida Conte; Ferrigno, Robson; Fogarolli, Ricardo; Salvajoli, Joao Vitor [Hospital de Cancer A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Oncologia de Radiacao]. E-mail: pellizzon@aol.com

    2005-04-15

    Uterine sarcoma (US) is a relative rare tumor, which accounts for only about 3-5% of all uterine cancers. Aggressive cytoreductive surgery at the time of the initial diagnosis with maximum tumor debulking may lead to a prolonged survival or cure. Objective: to identify and review the role of adjuvant external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) associated with high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRB) in the management of patients presenting US with complete resection. Material and methods: this study is a retrospective analysis of 23 patients with US treated from 10/92 to 03/03, with surgery, external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRB). The inclusion criteria for study participation included: histologically proven and graded US, completely resection of tumor, Karnofsky status 60-100, absence of significant infection, and recovery from recent surgery. Results: The median age of patients was 62 years (range 39-84); ten-year actuarial disease-free and overall survivals were 42.2% and 63.4%, respectively. On univariate analysis, predictive factors for disease-free survival (DFS) were age at initial presentation (p=0.0268), parity (p=0.0441), tumor grade (p= 0.0095), cervical or vaginal invasion (p=0.0014) and node dissection at time of surgery (p= 0.0471). On multivariate analysis, the only predictive factor was cervical or vaginal invasion (p= 0.048), hazard ratio of 4.7. Conclusion: it is quite likely that neither radiotherapy nor chemotherapy alone will appreciably improve survival in US. If radiation therapy provides better locoregional tumor control, hematogenous metastases will assume an even greater proportion of treatment failures. Unfortunately, our small and heterogeneous group analyzed precludes any definitive conclusions about the impact of HDRB associated to EBRT radiation therapy on recurrence or survival. (author)

  2. Recurrences after intensity modulated radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma more likely to originate from regions with high baseline [18F]-FDG uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, Anne Kirkebjerg; Vogelius, Ivan Richter; Aznar, Marianne;

    2014-01-01

    received radiotherapy for HNSCC from 2005 to 2009. Among 100 patients achieving complete clinical response and a later recurrence, 39 patients with 48 loco-regional failures had a recurrence CT scan before any salvage therapy. The estimated point of origin of each recurrence was transferred to the planning...

  3. Factors influencing conformity index in radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brennan, Sinead M

    2010-01-01

    The radiotherapy conformity index (CI) is a useful tool to quantitatively assess the quality of radiotherapy treatment plans, and represents the relationship between isodose distributions and target volume. A conformity index of unity implies high planning target volume (PTV) coverage and minimal unnecessary irradiation of surrounding tissues. We performed this analysis to describe the CI for lung cancer 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and to identify clinical and technical determinants of CI, as it is not known which factors are associated with good quality 3D conformal radiotherapy treatment planning. Radiotherapy treatment plans from a database of 52 patients with inoperable Stage 1 to 3b lung cancer, on a hypofractionated 3DCRT trial were evaluated. A CI was calculated for all plans using the definition of the ICRU 62:CI = (TV\\/PTV), which is the quotient of the treated volume (TV) and the PTV. Data on patient, tumor, and planning variables, which could influence CI, were recorded and analyzed. Mean CI was 2.01 (range = 1.06-3.8). On univariate analysis, PTV (p = 0.023), number of beams (p = 0.036), medial vs. lateral tumor location (p = 0.016), and increasing tumor stage (p = 0.041) were associated with improved conformity. On multiple regression analysis, factors found to be associated with CI included central vs. peripheral tumor location (p = 0.041) and PTV size (p = 0.058). The term 3DCRT is used routinely in the literature, without any indication of the degree of conformality. We recommend routine reporting of conformity indices. Conformity indices may be affected by both planning variables and tumor factors.

  4. Radiotherapy technical considerations in the management of locally advanced pancreatic cancer: American-French consensus recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguet, Florence; Goodman, Karyn A; Azria, David; Racadot, Severine; Abrams, Ross A

    2012-08-01

    Pancreatic carcinoma is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Approximately 30% of pancreatic cancer patients present with locally advanced, unresectable nonmetastatic disease. For these patients, two therapeutic options exist: systemic chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Within this context, the optimal technique for pancreatic irradiation is not clearly defined. A search to identify relevant studies was undertaken using the Medline database. All Phase III randomized trials evaluating the modalities of radiotherapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer were included, as were some noncontrolled Phase II and retrospective studies. An expert panel convened with members of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and GERCOR cooperative groups to review identified studies and prepare the guidelines. Each member of the working group independently evaluated five endpoints: total dose, target volume definition, radiotherapy planning technique, dose constraints to organs at risk, and quality assurance. Based on this analysis of the literature, we recommend either three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy or intensity-modulated radiation therapy to a total dose of 50 to 54 Gy at 1.8 to 2 Gy per fraction. We propose gross tumor volume identification to be followed by an expansion of 1.5 to 2 cm anteriorly, posteriorly, and laterally, and 2 to 3 cm craniocaudally to generate the planning target volume. The craniocaudal margins can be reduced with the use of respiratory gating. Organs at risk are liver, kidneys, spinal cord, stomach, and small bowel. Stereotactic body radiation therapy should not be used for pancreatic cancer outside of clinical trials. Radiotherapy quality assurance is mandatory in clinical trials. These consensus recommendations are proposed for use in the development of future trials testing new chemotherapy combinations with radiotherapy. Not all of these recommendations will be appropriate for trials testing radiotherapy dose or dose intensity

  5. Radiotherapy Technical Considerations in the Management of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: American-French Consensus Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huguet, Florence, E-mail: florence.huguet@tnn.aphp.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tenon Hospital, APHP, University Paris VI, Paris (France); Goodman, Karyn A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Azria, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, CRLC Val d' Aurelle-Paul Lamarque, Montpellier (France); Racadot, Severine [Department of Radiation Oncology, CRLC Leon Berard, Lyon (France); Abrams, Ross A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Summary: Pancreatic carcinoma is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Approximately 30% of pancreatic cancer patients present with locally advanced, unresectable nonmetastatic disease. For these patients, two therapeutic options exist: systemic chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Within this context, the optimal technique for pancreatic irradiation is not clearly defined. A search to identify relevant studies was undertaken using the Medline database. All Phase III randomized trials evaluating the modalities of radiotherapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer were included, as were some noncontrolled Phase II and retrospective studies. An expert panel convened with members of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and GERCOR cooperative groups to review identified studies and prepare the guidelines. Each member of the working group independently evaluated five endpoints: total dose, target volume definition, radiotherapy planning technique, dose constraints to organs at risk, and quality assurance. Based on this analysis of the literature, we recommend either three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy or intensity-modulated radiation therapy to a total dose of 50 to 54 Gy at 1.8 to 2 Gy per fraction. We propose gross tumor volume identification to be followed by an expansion of 1.5 to 2 cm anteriorly, posteriorly, and laterally, and 2 to 3 cm craniocaudally to generate the planning target volume. The craniocaudal margins can be reduced with the use of respiratory gating. Organs at risk are liver, kidneys, spinal cord, stomach, and small bowel. Stereotactic body radiation therapy should not be used for pancreatic cancer outside of clinical trials. Radiotherapy quality assurance is mandatory in clinical trials. These consensus recommendations are proposed for use in the development of future trials testing new chemotherapy combinations with radiotherapy. Not all of these recommendations will be appropriate for trials testing radiotherapy dose or dose

  6. Xerostomia after radiotherapy. What matters - mean total dose or dose to each parotid gland?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tribius, S.; Sommer, J.; Prosch, C.; Bajrovic, A.; Kruell, A.; Petersen, C. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Muenscher, A. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery; Blessmann, M. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery; Todorovic, M. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Medical Physics; Tennstedt, P. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Martini-Clinic, Prostate Cancer Center

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Xerostomia is a debilitating side effect of radiotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer. We undertook a prospective study of the effect on xerostomia and outcomes of sparing one or both parotid glands during radiotherapy for patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Methods and materials: Patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck received definitive (70 Gy in 2 Gy fractions) or adjuvant (60-66 Gy in 2 Gy fractions) curative-intent radiotherapy using helical tomotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy if appropriate. Group A received < 26 Gy to the left and right parotids and group B received < 26 Gy to either parotid. Results: The study included 126 patients; 114 (55 in group A and 59 in group B) had follow-up data. There were no statistically significant differences between groups in disease stage. Xerostomia was significantly reduced in group A vs. group B (p = 0.0381). Patients in group A also had significantly less dysphagia. Relapse-free and overall survival were not compromised in group A: 2-year relapse-free survival was 86% vs. 72% in group B (p = 0.361); 2-year overall survival was 88% and 76%, respectively (p = 0.251). Conclusion: This analysis suggests that reducing radiotherapy doses to both parotid glands to < 26 Gy can reduce xerostomia and dysphagia significantly without compromising survival. Sparing both parotids while maintaining target volume coverage and clinical outcome should be the treatment goal and reporting radiotherapy doses delivered to the individual parotids should be standard practice. (orig.)

  7. Factors influencing conformity index in radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Sinead M; Thirion, Pierre; Buckney, Steve; Shea, Carmel O; Armstrong, John

    2010-01-01

    The radiotherapy conformity index (CI) is a useful tool to quantitatively assess the quality of radiotherapy treatment plans, and represents the relationship between isodose distributions and target volume. A conformity index of unity implies high planning target volume (PTV) coverage and minimal unnecessary irradiation of surrounding tissues. We performed this analysis to describe the CI for lung cancer 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and to identify clinical and technical determinants of CI, as it is not known which factors are associated with good quality 3D conformal radiotherapy treatment planning. Radiotherapy treatment plans from a database of 52 patients with inoperable Stage 1 to 3b lung cancer, on a hypofractionated 3DCRT trial were evaluated. A CI was calculated for all plans using the definition of the ICRU 62:CI = (TV/PTV), which is the quotient of the treated volume (TV) and the PTV. Data on patient, tumor, and planning variables, which could influence CI, were recorded and analyzed. Mean CI was 2.01 (range = 1.06-3.8). On univariate analysis, PTV (p = 0.023), number of beams (p = 0.036), medial vs. lateral tumor location (p = 0.016), and increasing tumor stage (p = 0.041) were associated with improved conformity. On multiple regression analysis, factors found to be associated with CI included central vs. peripheral tumor location (p = 0.041) and PTV size (p = 0.058). The term 3DCRT is used routinely in the literature, without any indication of the degree of conformality. We recommend routine reporting of conformity indices. Conformity indices may be affected by both planning variables and tumor factors.

  8. The role of radiotherapy for locally advanced gallbladder carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hyun Soo [College of Medicine, Pochon CHA Univ., Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Seong, Jin Sil [College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-01

    A retrospective review of 72 patients with locally advanced gallbladder carcinoma, between January 1900 and December 1996, was performed. Survival results and prognostic factors are analyzed for the patients treated with a various modalities. The patients were classified by treatment modality: group 1 included to 27 patients treated with palliative surgery alone, and group 2 for 11 patient treated with palliative surgery and radiotherapy; group 3 for 18 patients not treated by any treatment modality, and group 4 for 16 patients treated with radiotherapy alone. Age distribution ranged from 35 to 80 years with a mean of 63 years. The stage was classified by TNM and Nevin's staging system; all patients had an advanced stage more than III. Palliative surgery was done in 3B patients and adjuvant radiation therapy (Rl1 was followed in 11. For 34 patients, in whom no resection was tried, definitive RT was done in 16. Radiation delivered to tumor site and draining nodes up to 45-612 Gy using 10 MY linear accelerator. Chemotherapy was given to 25 patients with 5-FU based regimens. Median survival time was 10.3 months and 3-year survival rates (3-YSR) were 13.0% in all patients. Survival rates according to the treatment modalities were as followed; in palliative surgery alone, 3-YSR was 2.5%; in palliative surgery and adjuvant RT, 3-YSR was 45.5%; in no treatment group, 3YSR were 8.3%; and definitive RT was 13.1%. It was better survival in additional RT after palliative surgery group than palliative surgery alone (p=0.0009). It was better survival in definitive RT group than no treatment group (p=0.022). Significant prognostic factors by multivariate analysis were treatment modalities, the type of tumor and TNM stage. Significant prognostic factors by multivariate analysis were treatment modalities, the type of tumor and the presence of jaundice. It is suggested that RT could be potentially effective as adjuvant treatment modalities after palliative surgery or primary

  9. Physical and adhesive properties of dental enamel after radiotherapy and bonding of metal and ceramic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santin, Gabriela Cristina; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka; Romano, Fábio Lourenço; de Oliveira, Harley Francisco; Nelson Filho, Paulo; de Queiroz, Alexandra Mussolino

    2015-08-01

    The increasing success rates for cancer patients treated with radiotherapy and the frequent occurrence of tooth loss during treatment have led to an increased demand for orthodontic treatment after radiotherapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate tooth enamel of irradiated teeth after the bonding and debonding of metal and ceramic brackets. Ten permanent molars were cut into enamel fragments measuring 1 mm(2) and divided into an irradiated group (total dose of 60 Gy) and a nonirradiated group. The fragments were subjected to microshear testing to evaluate whether radiotherapy altered the strength of the enamel. Furthermore, 90 prepared premolars were divided into 6 groups and subgroups (n = 15): group 1, nonirradiated and nonaged; group 2, nonirradiated and aged (thermal cycled); group 3, irradiated and aged; each group was divided into 2 subgroups: metallic and ceramic brackets. After thermal cycling and radiotherapy, the brackets were bonded onto the specimens with Transbond XT (3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif). After 24 hours, the specimens were subjected to the shear tests. Images of the enamel surfaces were classified using the adhesive remnant index. The composite resin-enamel interface was also evaluated. Enamel fragments subjected to radiation had lower strength than did the nonirradiated samples (P enamel interface, resin tags were more extensive on irradiated tooth enamel. Radiation decreased tooth enamel strength, and the specimens treated with radiotherapy had higher frequencies of adhesive failure between the bracket and the composite resin as well as more extensive tags. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Exchange of medical imaging and data information in radiotherapy: needs, methods and current limits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manens, J P

    1997-01-01

    Extension of the image network within radiotherapy departments provides the technical infrastructure which is made necessary by the rapid evolution of techniques in the field of diagnosis and treatment in radiotherapy. The system is aimed at managing the whole set of data (textual data and images) that are needed for planning and control of treatments. The radiotherapy network addresses two objectives: managing both the information necessary for treatment planning (target volumes definition, planning dosimetry) and the control of all parameters involved during the patient's treatment under the treatment unit. The major challenge is to improve the quality of treatment. Multimodal imaging is a major advance as it allows the use of new dosimetry and simulation techniques. The need for standards to exchange medical imaging information is now recognized by all the institutions and a majority of users and manufacturers. It is widely accepted that the lack of standard has been one of the fundamental obstacles in the deployment of operational "Picture Archiving Communication Systems". The International Standard Organisation Open System Interconnection model is the standard reference mode used to describe network protocols. The network is based on the Ethernet and TCP/IP protocol that provides the means to interconnect imaging devices and workstations dedicated to specific image processing or machines used in radiotherapy. The network uses Ethernet cabled on twisted-pair (10 BaseT) or optical fibres in a star-shaped physical layout. Dicom V3.0 supports fundamental network interactions: transfer of images (computerized tomography magnetic resonance imaging query and retrieve of images), printing on network attached cameras, support of HIS/RIS related interfacing and image management. The supplement to the Dicom standard, Dicom RT, specifies five data objects known in Dicom as Information Object Definition for relevant radiotherapy. Dicom RT objects can provide a mean for

  11. Multimodality treatment with radiotherapy for huge hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hee Ji; Kim, Mi Sun; Cha, Jihye; Choi, Jin Sub; Han, Kwang Hyub; Seong, Jinsil

    2014-01-01

    For huge hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), therapeutic decisions have varied from local therapy to systemic therapy, with radiotherapy (RT) playing only a palliative role. In this study, we investigated whether multimodality treatment involving RT could be effective in huge HCC. This study was performed in 116 patients with HCC >10 cm. The number of patients in stage II, III and IV was 12, 54 and 50, respectively. RT was given as a combined modality in most patients. The median dose was 45 Gy, with 1.8 Gy per fraction. The median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 14.8 and 6.5 months, respectively. The median infield PFS was not reached. Infield failure, outfield intrahepatic and extrahepatic failure were observed in 8.6, 18.1, and 12.1% of patients, respectively. For OS and PFS, number of tumors, initial alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) level, treatment response, percent AFP decrement, and hepatic resection were significant prognostic factors. Tumor characteristics and treatment response were significantly different between long-term survivors and the other patients. Although huge HCC presents an aggressive clinical course, multimodality approaches involving RT can offer an opportunity for prolonged survival. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with localized prostate cancer: a preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hye Jin; Kay, Chul Seung; Son, Seok Hyun; Kim, Myung Soo; Jo, In Young; Lee, So Jung; Lee, Dong Hwan; Suh, Hong Jin; Choi, Yong Sun [Incheon St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    The aim of this work was to assess the efficacy and tolerability of hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in patients with localized prostate cancer. Thirty-nine patients who received radical hypofractionated IMRT were retrospectively reviewed. Based on a pelvic lymph node involvement risk of 15% as the cutoff value, we decided whether to deliver treatment prostate and seminal vesicle only radiotherapy (PORT) or whole pelvis radiotherapy (WPRT). Sixteen patients (41%) received PORT with prostate receiving 45 Gy in 4.5 Gy per fraction in 2 weeks and the other 23 patients (59%) received WPRT with the prostate receiving 72 Gy in 2.4 Gy per fraction in 6 weeks. The median equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions to the prostate was 79.9 Gy based on the assumption that the α/β ratio is 1.5 Gy. The median follow-up time was 38 months (range, 4 to 101 months). The 3-year biochemical failure-free survival rate was 88.2%. The 3-year clinical failure-free and overall survival rates were 94.5% and 96.3%, respectively. The rates of grade 2 acute genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities were 20.5% and 12.8%, respectively. None of the patients experienced grade ≥3 acute GU and GI toxicities. The grade 2-3 late GU and GI toxicities were found in 8.1% and 5.4% of patients, respectively. No fatal late toxicity was observed. Favorable biochemical control with low rates of toxicity was observed after hypofractionated IMRT, suggesting that our radiotherapy schedule can be an effective treatment option in the treatment of localized prostate cancer.

  13. Radiotherapy Doses of 80 Gy and Higher Are Associated With Lower Mortality in Men With Gleason Score 8 to 10 Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pahlajani, Niraj [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cooper University Hospital, Camden, NJ (United States); Ruth, Karen J. [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Buyyounouski, Mark K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Chen, David Y.T. [Department of Urology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Horwitz, Eric M.; Hanks, Gerald E.; Price, Robert A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Pollack, Alan, E-mail: apollack@med.miami.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Men with Gleason score (GS) 8-10 prostate cancer (PCa) are assumed to have a high risk of micrometastatic disease at presentation. However, local failure is also a major problem. We sought to establish the importance of more aggressive local radiotherapy (RT) to {>=}80 Gy. Methods and Materials: There were 226 men treated consecutively with RT {+-} ADT from 1988 to 2002 for GS 8-10 PCa. Conventional, three-dimensional conformal or intensity-modulated (IM) RT was used. Radiation dose was divided into three groups: (1) <75 Gy (n = 50); (2) 75-79.9 Gy (n = 60); or (3) {>=}80 Gy (n = 116). The endpoints examined included biochemical failure (BF; nadir + 2 definition), distant metastasis (DM), cause-specific mortality, and overall mortality (OM). Results: Median follow-up was 66, 71, and 58 months for Groups 1, 2, and 3. On Fine and Gray's competing risk regression analysis, significant predictors of reduced BF were RT dose {>=}80 Gy (p = 0.011) and androgen deprivation therapy duration {>=}24 months (p = 0.033). In a similar model of DM, only RT dose {>=}80 Gy was significant (p = 0.007). On Cox regression analysis, significant predictors of reduced OM were RT dose {>=}80 Gy (p = 0.035) and T category (T3/4 vs. T1, p = 0.041). Dose was not a significant determinant of cause-specific mortality. Results for RT dose were similar in a model with RT dose and ADT duration as continuous variables. Conclusion: The results indicate that RT dose escalation to {>=}80 Gy is associated with lower risks of BF, DM, and OM in men with GS 8-10 PCa, independently of androgen deprivation therapy.

  14. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Oropharyngeal Cancer: An Update of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setton, Jeremy; Caria, Nicola; Romanyshyn, Jonathan; Koutcher, Lawrence; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Rowan, Nicholas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Sherman, Eric J.; Fury, Matthew G.; Pfister, David G. [Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Wong, Richard J.; Shah, Jatin P.; Kraus, Dennis H. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Shi Weiji; Zhang Zhigang [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Schupak, Karen D.; Gelblum, Daphna Y.; Rao, Shyam D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Lee, Nancy Y., E-mail: Leen2@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To update the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center's experience with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Methods and Materials: Between September 1998 and April 2009, 442 patients with histologically confirmed OPC underwent IMRT at our center. There were 379 men and 63 women with a median age of 57 years (range, 27-91). The disease was Stage I in 2%, Stage II in 4%, Stage III in 21%, and Stage IV in 73% of patients. The primary tumor subsite was tonsil in 50%, base of tongue in 46%, pharyngeal wall in 3%, and soft palate in 2%. The median prescription dose to the planning target volume of the gross tumor was 70 Gy for definitive (n = 412) cases and 66 Gy for postoperative cases (n = 30). A total 404 patients (91%) received chemotherapy, including 389 (88%) who received concurrent chemotherapy, the majority of which was platinum-based. Results: Median follow-up among surviving patients was 36.8 months (range, 3-135). The 3-year cumulative incidence of local failure, regional failure, and distant metastasis was 5.4%, 5.6%, and 12.5%, respectively. The 3-year OS rate was 84.9%. The incidence of late dysphagia and late xerostomia {>=}Grade 2 was 11% and 29%, respectively. Conclusions: Our results confirm the feasibility of IMRT in achieving excellent locoregional control and low rates of xerostomia. According to our knowledge, this study is the largest report of patients treated with IMRT for OPC.

  15. Analysis of Radiotherapy Associated Factors in Stage IIb Carcinoma of Uterine Cervix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Chang Woo; Jeung, Tae Sig; Yum, Ha Yong [Kosin Medical College of Medicine, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-12-15

    331 patients of stage IIb uterine cervix cancer treated by radiation alone at Kosin Medical Center between June 1980 and Dec. 1985 were analysed to determine parameters of radiotherapy associated to disease states. Survival rate was highest among the reported (82.8% for crude and 82.4% for disease free survival). Pelvic control rate in 6 weeks after the end of radiotherapy was 93.6% in the patients treated with ICR following total pelvic radiation and 71.6% with small field additional external irradiation. 5 year survival rate in those who achieved pelvic control was 98. 9% and 12.9% in those who had pelvic failure and/or metastasis after radiation. The survival rate figured maximal 88.5% with dosage of 7500-8500 cGy to point A with acceptable incidence of complications (4.9%) but without increasing survival above it and minimal 74.1% with dosage of less than 6500 cGy. The treatment failure was counted 18.7% (62 of 331 patients): Local failure 72. 6% ( 45 of 62 patients), locoregional failure 3.2% (2 of 62 patients) and distant failure 24% (15 of 62 patients). Late complications were found In 50 patients (15.1%) and 42% of them was rectal bleeding and stenosis. The dose of 8500 cGy to point A was found to be critical for complication and 70% of complications occurred above it and was more serious one such as fistula. Rectal complications were developed above rectal dose 6500 cGy and bladder complication above bladder dose 7500 cGy. Major cause of death was cachexia due to locoregional failure (73.7% of death), next was due to metastasis to lung, liver and bone, and only 3 patients died of complication of intestinal perforations and obstruction. In conclusion higher external radiation dose for a bulky uterine cervix and barrel shaped uterus was essential for local control.

  16. Clinical efficacy of radiotherapy combined with sodium glycididazole ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To assess the clinical efficacy and side effects of radiotherapy combined with sodium glycididazole in ... effect in the treatment of recurrent oesophageal carcinoma than radiotherapy alone. Keywords: ..... Chen J, Zhou ZR. Research ...

  17. pragmatic failure in middle school english teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李娟

    2011-01-01

    as a study and research subject,pragmatics investigates the language using and language comprehension in the specific context.after more than twenty years,people have made great progress in it.but because the english learners do not know the social and cultural background of english countries well and cannot comprehend and use english combining together the context.so sometimes they make pragmatic failure when they study or communicate with others.the author finds that the pragmatic failure exists among nearly all the middle school students.while giving an account of pragmatic failures in middle school english teaching,the paper not only classifies the definition of pragmatic failure,but also provides the categories of pragmatic failure,the influence,displaying and causes of pragmatic failure in middle school english teaching.and the author gives the idea that in order to avoid the pragmatic failure during the middle school english teaching; people should cultivate and strengthen the social cultural consciousness.

  18. The Outcome of Conventional External Beam Radiotherapy for Patients with Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Ji Young [Chosun University College of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-03-15

    The best treatment for advanced esophageal cancer is chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery. In spite of the advance of multimodality therapy, most patients with esophageal cancer are treated with radiation therapy alone. This study reports the outcome of the use of conventional external beam radiotherapy alone for the treatment of esophageal cancer. Between January 1998 and December 2005, 30 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus were treated with external beam radiotherapy using a total dose exceeding 40 Gy. Radiotherapy was delivered with a total dose of 44-60 Gy (median dose, 57.2 Gy) over 36 {approx}115 days (median time, 45 days). Thirteen patients (43.3%) had a history of disorders such as diabetes, hypertension, tuberculosis, lye stricture, asthma, cerebral infarct, and cancers. Four patients metachronously had double primary cancers. The most common location of a tumor was the mid-thoracic portion of the esophagus (56.7%). Tumor lengths ranged from 2 cm to 11 cm, with a median length of 6 cm. For AJCC staging, stage III was the most common (63.3%). Five patients had metastases at diagnosis. The median overall survival was 8.3 months. The survival rates at 1-year and 2-years were 33.3% and 18.7%, respectively. The complete response rate 1{approx}3 months after radiotherapy was 20% (6/30) and the partial response rate was 70% (21/30). Sixteen patients (53.3%) had an improved symptom of dysphagia. Significant prognostic factors were age, tumor length, stage, degree of dysphagia at the time of diagnosis and tumor response. Cox regression analysis revealed the aim of treatment, clinical tumor response and tumor length as independent prognostic factors for overall survival. Twenty-eight patients had local failure and another four patients had metastases. Three patients were detected with double primary cancers in this analysis. A complication of esophageal stricture was observed in three patients (10%), and radiation pneumonitis occurred in two

  19. Cerebral control and survival after stereotactic radiotherapy of brain metastases; Zerebrale Kontrolle und Ueberleben nach stereotaktischer Strahlentherapie von Hirnmetastasen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, Elmar Till

    2014-06-04

    This retrospective study, including 275 patients who underwent stereotactic radiotherapy due to brain metastases between 2003 and 2008, investigates influencing factors regarding cerebral control and survival, symptomatic effects and a potential benefit for patients older than 70 years. We were able to identify risk factors for remote brain failure which leads to a therapeutic recommendation. Furthermore we confirm a positive symptomatic effect and a benefit of stereotactic readiotherapy for patients over 70 years.

  20. Radiotherapy-induced hypopituitarism: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyapalan, Thozhukat; Dixit, Sanjay

    2012-05-01

    Hypopituitarism is a disorder caused by impaired hormonal secretions from the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. Radiotherapy is the most common cause of iatrogenic hypopituitarism. The hypothalamic-pituitary axis inadvertently gets irradiated in patients receiving prophylactic cranial radiotherapy for leukemia, total body irradiation and radiotherapy for intracranial, base skull, sinonasal and nasopharyngeal tumors. Radiation-induced hypopituitarism (RIH) is insidious, progressive and largely nonreversible. Mostly, RIH involves one hypothalamic-pituitary axis; however, multiple hormonal axes deficiency starts developing at higher doses. Although the clinical effects of the hypopituitarism are more profound in children and young adults, its implications in older adults are being increasingly recognized. The risk continues to persist or increase up to 10 years following radiation exposure. The clinical management of hypopituitarism is challenging both for the patients and healthcare providers. Here we have reviewed the scale of the problem, the risk factors and the management of RIH.

  1. Pelvic radiotherapy and sexual dysfunction in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Tine; Froeding, Ligita Paskeviciute

    2015-01-01

    of life (QOL) issues; sexual functioning has proved to be one of the most important aspects of concern in long-term survivors. METHODS: An updated literature search in PubMed was performed on pelvic radiotherapy and female sexual functioning/dysfunction. Studies on gynaecological, urological...... and gastrointestinal cancers were included. The focus was on the period from 2010 to 2014, on studies using PROs, on potential randomized controlled trials (RCTs) where female sexual dysfunction (FSD) at least constituted a secondary outcome, and on studies reporting from modern radiotherapy modalities. RESULTS...... during the next five years. Several newer studies confirm that health care professionals are still reluctant to discuss treatment induced sexual dysfunction with patients. CONCLUSIONS: Pelvic radiotherapy has a persistent deteriorating effect on the vaginal mucosa impacting negatively on the sexual...

  2. Estimating the Risks of Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, Carolyn; Correa, Candace; Duane, Frances K

    2017-01-01

    and cause-specific mortality and excess RRs (ERRs) per Gy for incident lung cancer and cardiac mortality. Smoking status was unavailable. Third, the lung or heart ERRs per Gy in the trials and the 2010 to 2015 doses were combined and applied to current smoker and nonsmoker lung cancer and cardiac mortality.......06) ERR per Gy whole-heart dose. Estimated absolute risks from modern radiotherapy were as follows: lung cancer, approximately 4% for long-term continuing smokers and 0.3% for nonsmokers; and cardiac mortality, approximately 1% for smokers and 0.3% for nonsmokers. Conclusion For long-term smokers......Purpose Radiotherapy reduces the absolute risk of breast cancer mortality by a few percentage points in suitable women but can cause a second cancer or heart disease decades later. We estimated the absolute long-term risks of modern breast cancer radiotherapy. Methods First, a systematic literature...

  3. [Radiotherapy of choroid metastases in breast carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowsky, W; Schmid, A P; Dobrowsky, E

    1987-06-01

    From 1975 to 1984, thirteen patients were submitted to radiotherapy for choroid metastases of mammary carcinoma. Bilateral manifestation was found in three cases, thus sixteen eyes have been treated. All irradiations were performed with high voltage equipment. The posterior section of the eye was irradiated with 25 to 50 Gy over 2.5 to 5 weeks. Complete regression was achieved in nine out of sixteen cases, five patients showed an improvement of at least 50%, no considerable effect was found in two cases. The survival is 4 to 48 months (median survival 20 months) from the beginning of radiotherapy. Radiotherapy is a quick, efficient, and sparing treatment in choroid metastases. If applied in due time, it can prevent a visual disorder or amaurosis, thus improving the patients' quality of life.

  4. Growth Laws in Cancer: Implications for Radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Castorina, P; Gabriele, P; Guiot, C

    2006-01-01

    Comparing both, the more conventional Gompertz tumor growth law (GL) and the ``Universal'' law (UL), recently proposed and applied to cancer,we have investigated the growth law's implications on various radiotherapy regimen. According to GL, the surviving tumor cell fraction could be reduced 'ad libidum', independently of the initial tumor mass,simply by increasing the number of treatments. On the contrary, if tumor growth dynamics would indeed follow the Universal scaling law, there is a lower limit of the survival fraction that cannot be reduced any further regardless of the total number of treatments. This finding can explain the so called ``tumor size effect'' and re-emphasizes the importance of early diagnosis as it implies that radiotherapy may be successful provided the tumor mass at treatment onset is rather small. Taken together with our previous works, implications of these findings include revisiting standard radiotherapy regimen and overall treatment protocols.

  5. Track structure modelling for ion radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Korcyl, Marta

    2014-01-01

    In its broadest terms, doctoral dissertation entitled "Track structure modelling for ion radiotherapy" is part of the supporting research background in the development of the ambitious proton radiotherapy project currently under way at the Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN in Krak\\'ow. Another broad motivation was the desire to become directly involved in research on a topical and challenging subject of possibly developing a therapy planning system for carbon beam radiotherapy, based in its radiobiological part on the Track Structure model developed by prof. Robert Katz over 50 years ago. Thus, the general aim of this work was, firstly, to recapitulate the Track Structure model and to propose an updated and complete formulation of this model by incorporating advances made by several authors who had contributed to its development in the past. Secondly, the updated and amended (if necessary) formulation of the model was presented in a form applicable for use in computer codes which would constitute the "radiobio...

  6. The Dosimetric Consequences of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy for Cervix Cancer: The Impact of Organ Motion, Deformation and Tumour Regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Karen Siah Huey

    Hypothesis: In intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for cervix cancer, the dose received by the tumour target and surrounding normal tissues is significantly different to that indicated by a single static plan. Rationale: The optimal use of IMRT in cervix cancer requires a greater attention to clinical target volume (CTV) definition and tumour & normal organ motion to assure maximum tumour control with the fewest side effects. Research Aims: 1) Generate consensus CTV contouring guidelines for cervix cancer; 2) Evaluate intra-pelvic tumour and organ dynamics during radiotherapy; 3) Analyze the dose consequences of intra-pelvic organ dynamics on different radiotherapy strategies. Results: Consensus CTV definitions were generated using experts-in-the-field. Substantial changes in tumour volume and organ motion, resulted in significant reductions in accumulated dose to tumour targets and variability in accumulated dose to surrounding normal tissues. Significance: Formalized CTV definitions for cervix cancer is important in ensuring consistent standards of practice. Complex and unpredictable tumour and organ dynamics mandates daily soft-tissue image guidance if IMRT is used. To maximize the benefits of IMRT for cervix cancer, a strategy of adaptation is necessary.

  7. Hypothyroidism after Radiotherapy of Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Eun; Eun; Kim, Jae Chul; Park, In Kyu [Kyungpook National Yonsei University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Yea, Ji Woon [Dongguk University Gyeongju Hospital, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    The aim of the present study was to retrospectively evaluate the incidence of hypothyroidism in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients who received radiotherapy (RT) either with or without neck dissection. From January 2000 to December 2005, 115 patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer and who received definitive RT or postoperative RT including standard anterior low-neck field were recruited to be part of this study. Nineteen patients had undergone ipsilateral neck dissection, whereas, 18 patients underwent bilateral neck dissection, and 78 patients were received RT alone. Patients' ages ranged from 28 to 85 years (median, 59 years) and there were a total of 73 male and 42 female patients. The primary tumor sites were the oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, larynx, and other sites in 18, 40, 28, 22 and 7 patients, respectively. Radiation dose to the thyroid gland ranged from 44 Gy to 66 Gy with a median dose of 50 Gy. Follow-up time ranged from 2 to 91 months, with a median of 29 months. The 1- and 3- year incidence of hypothyroidism was 28.7% (33 patients) and 33.0% (38 patients), respectively. The median time to detection of hypothyroidism was 8.5 months (range, 0 to 36 months). A univariate analysis revealed that neck node dissection was a risk factor for hypothyroidism (p=0.037). However, no factor was statistically significant from the results of a multivariate analysis. Patients treated for advanced head and neck cancer with radiotherapy with or without neck dissection will develop hypothyroidism. It is important to check the thyroid function periodically in these patients especially with the risk factor of neck node dissection.

  8. Applications of three-dimensional image correlation in conformal radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Herk, M.; Gilhuijs, K.; Kwa, S.; Lebesque, J.; Muller, S.; De Munck, J.; Touw, A. [Nederlands Kanker Inst. `Antoni van Leeuwenhoekhuis`, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kooy, H. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The development of techniques for the registration of CT, MRI and SPECT creates new possibilities for improved target volume definition and quantitative image analysis. The discussed technique is based on chamfer matching and is suitable for automatic 3-D matching of CT with CT, CT with MRI, CT with SPECT and MRI with SPECT. By integrating CT with MRI, the diagnostic qualities of MRI are combined with the geometric accuracy of the planning CT. Significant differences in the delineation of the target volume for brain, head and neck and prostate tumors were demonstrated when using integrated CT and MRI compared with using CT alone. In addition, integration of the planning CT with pre-operative scans improves knowledge of possible tumor extents. By first matching scans based on the bony anatomy and subsequently matching on an organ of study, relative motion of the organ is quantified accurately. In a study with 42 CT scans of 11 patients, magnitude and causes of prostate motion were analysed. The most important motion of the prostate is a forward-backward rotation around a point near the apex caused by rectal volume difference. Significant correlations were also found between motion of the legs and the prostate. By integrating functional images made before and after radiotherapy with the planning CT, the relation between local change of lung function and delivered dose has been quantified accurately. The technique of chamfer matching is a convenient and more accurate alternative for the use of external markers in a CT/SPECT lung damage study. Also, damage visible in diagnostic scans can be related to radiation dose, thereby improving follow-up diagnostics. It can be concluded that 3-D image integration plays an important role in assessing and improving the accuracy of radiotherapy and is therefore indispensable for conformal therapy. However, user-friendly implementation of these techniques remains to be done to facilitate clinical application on a large scale.

  9. Prevention and treatment of the orofacial complications of radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothwell, B.R.

    1987-03-01

    Radiotherapy of malignant head and neck tumors often causes extensive, permanent changes in salivary glands, peridental alveolar bone, and mucosal structures. Dental neglect and inappropriate dental management can cause complications. The potential orofacial side effects of radiotherapy are reviewed, as are preventive strategies for the dental treatment of patients scheduled to undergo radiotherapy.

  10. [Recent developments in radiotherapy of hepatocellular carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Jinsil

    2004-12-01

    With the accumulation of clinical experiences, the efficacy of radiotherapy has been recognized in management scheme for HCC. While hepatologists are beginning to show less reluctance for applying radiotherapy to the treatment of HCC, it is necessary that the hepatologists be informed of the rapid developments in technical strategy for radiation oncology. Recent advances in several technologies have opened a new era in radiation oncology. Modern imaging technologies can provide a 3-dimensional model of patient's anatomy, and this allows radiation oncologists to identify accurate tumor volumes as well as the tumors' relationship with the adjacent normal tissues. Moreover, the development of the computer-controlled multileaf collimator systems now enables physicians to perform precise beam shaping and to modulate the radiation dose distribution. A combination of these systems, 3-DCRT, is rapidly replacing the more conventional 2-D radiotherapy. 3-DCRT has evolved into a more sophisticated technology, intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). In IMRT, with the powerful computer-aided optimization process, the radiation dose can be delivered to the target using highly complex isodose profiles. This new technology has been further developed into IGRT, which combines the CT-images scanning system and radiation equipments into one hardware package, and this system is currently ready for clinical application. In parallel with the radiation technologies described above, the strategy of stereotactic radiation has evolved from the conventional linear accelerator-based system to a gammaknife, and more recently, to a cyberknife. These systems are primarily based on the concept of radiosurgery. Currently, various radiation technologies have been adopted for the radiotherapy of HCC. In this article, each strategy will be discussed as well as the indications for radiotherapy and the radiation-related complications.

  11. Conformal radiotherapy of prostate carcinoma: Procedure description

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erak Marko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Today, three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy is a standard way in the radical treatment of localized prostate cancer, and it is an alternative to the radical prostatectomy. This method of radiotherapy treatment is widely accepted in the treatment of prostate cancer patients, and provides irradiation of targeted volume (prostate, seminal vesicles with dose escalation sparing the surrounding healthy tissues (rectum, bladder at the same time. That is not possible with the conventional twodimension technique. Procedure description. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy is a volumetric, visual simulation according to the computed tomography slices; it defines the tumour and organ at risk individually in each patient. Results of several studies have shown that there is a significant decrease in the development of acute toxicity when prostate cancer patients are treated with conformal radiotherapy. High dose irradiation gives excellent results in treatment of localized prostate carcinoma and improves treatment results in the patients with locally advanced carcinoma of prostate. Discussion. Prostate carcinoma irradiation techniques have been changed dramatically during recent years. Data obtained by computed tomography are important since the size and shapes of the prostate as well as its anatomic relations towards the rectum and bladder are considerably different in individual patients. The three-dimension plan of irradiation can be designed for each patient individually by performing computed tomography technique when planning radiotherapy. Conclusion. The advanced planning systems for conformal radiotherapy can reconstruct the anatomic structures of pelvis in three-dimension technique on the basis of computed tomography scans, which provides better conformality between the irradiation beam and geometrical shape of the tumour with minimal irradiation of the surrounding healthy tissue.

  12. 3-Dimentional radiotherapy versus conventional treatment plans for gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aghili M

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: The current standard of adjuvant management for gastric cancer after curative resection based on the results of intergroup 0116 is concurrent chemoradiation. Current guidelines for designing these challenging fields still include two-dimensional simulation with simple AP-PA parallel opposed design. However, the implementation of radiotherapy (RT remains a concern. Our objective was to compare three-dimensional (3D techniques to the more commonly used AP-PA technique."n"nMethods: A total of 24 patients with stages II-IV adenocarcinoma of the stomach were treated with adjuvant postoperative chemoradiation with simple AP-PA technique, using Cobalt-60. Total radiation dose was 50.4Gy. Landmark-based fields were simulated to assess PTV coverage. For each patient, three additional radiotherapy treatment plans were generated using three-dimensional (3D technique. The four treatment plans were then compared for target volume coverage and dose to normal tissues (liver, spinal cord, kidneys using dose volume histogram (DVH analysis."n"nResults: The three-dimensional planning techniques provided 10% superior PTV coverage compared to conventional AP-PA fields (p<0.001. Comparative DVHs for the right kidney, left kidney

  13. Stereotactic radiotherapy of primary liver cancer and hepatic metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wulf, Joern; Guckenberger, Matthias; Haedinger, Ulrich; Oppitz, Ulrich; Mueller, Gerd; Baier, Kurt; Flentje, Michael [Univ. of Wuerzburg (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    2006-09-15

    The purpose was to evaluate the clinical results of stereotactic radiotherapy in primary liver tumors and hepatic metastases. Five patients with primary liver cancer and 39 patients with 51 hepatic metastases were treated by stereotactic radiotherapy since 1997. Twenty-eight targets were treated in a 'low-dose'-group with 3x10 Gy (n=27) or 4x7 Gy (n=1) prescribed to the PTV-encl. 65%-isodose. In a 'high-dose'-group patients were treated with 3x12 - 12.5 Gy (n=19; same dose prescription) or 1x26 Gy/PTV-enclosing 80%-isodose (n=9). Median follow-up was 15 months (2-48 months) for primary liver cancer and 15 months (2-85 months) for hepatic metastases. While all primary liver cancers were controlled, nine local failures (3-19 months) of 51 metastases were observed resulting in an actuarial local control rate of 92% after 12 months and 66% after 24 months and later. A borderline significant correlation between dose and local control was observed (p=0.077): the actuarial local control rate after 12 and 24?months was 86% and 58% in the low-dose-group versus 100% and 82% in the high-dose-group. In multivariate analysis high versus low-dose was the only significant factor predicting local control (p=0.0089). Overall survival after 1 and 2 years was 72% and 32% for all patients and was impaired due to systemic progression of disease. No severe acute or late toxicity exceeding RTOG/EORTC-score 2 were observed. Stereotactic irradiation of primary liver cancer and hepatic metastases offers a locally effective treatment without significant complications in patients, who are not amenable for surgery. Patient selection is important, because those with low risk for systemic progression are more likely to benefit from this approach.

  14. Pelvic radiotherapy and sexual function in women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froeding, Ligita Paskeviciute

    2015-01-01

    Background During the past decade there has been considerable progress in developing new radiation methods for cancer treatment. Pelvic radiotherapy constitutes the primary or (neo) adjuvant treatment of many pelvic cancers e.g., locally advanced cervical and rectal cancer. There is an increasing focus on late effects and an increasing awareness that patient reported outcomes (PROs) i.e., patient assessment of physical, social, psychological, and sexual functioning provides the most valid information on the effects of cancer treatment. Following cure of cancer allow survivors focus on quality of life (QOL) issues; sexual functioning has proved to be one of the most important aspects of concern in long-term survivors. Methods An updated literature search in PubMed was performed on pelvic radiotherapy and female sexual functioning/dysfunction. Studies on gynaecological, urological and gastrointestinal cancers were included. The focus was on the period from 2010 to 2014, on studies using PROs, on potential randomized controlled trials (RCTs) where female sexual dysfunction (FSD) at least constituted a secondary outcome, and on studies reporting from modern radiotherapy modalities. Results The literature search revealed a few RCTs with FSD evaluated as a PRO and being a secondary outcome measure in endometrial and in rectal cancer patients. Very limited information could be extracted regarding FSD in bladder, vulva, and anal cancer patients. The literature before and after 2010 confirms that pelvic radiotherapy, independent on modality, increases the risk significantly for FSD both compared to data from age-matched healthy control women and compared to data on patients treated by surgery only. There was only very limited data available on modern radiotherapy modalities. These are awaited during the next five years. Several newer studies confirm that health care professionals are still reluctant to discuss treatment induced sexual dysfunction with patients. Conclusions

  15. Radiotherapy in the management of aggressive fibromatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atahan, I.L.; Akyol, F.; Zorlu, F.; Guerkaynak, M. (Hacettepe University Hospital, Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Radiology)

    1989-09-01

    Four case reports are summarised concerning the management of aggressive fibromatosis in children and adolescents up to the age of 15. It was concluded that radiotherapy should be reserved for recurrences or inoperable cases. A dose of 5000-6000 cGy in 25-30 fractions depending on age of patient, site, and size of tumour is necessary, since most surgical recurrences appear in 12 months, all cases with positive surgical margins should receive doses in the range 4000-4500 cGy for microscopic disease. Radiotherapy-chemotherapy combinations can also be used. (UK).

  16. Radiotherapy versus combined modality in early stages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, L; Carde, P; Mauch, P;

    1992-01-01

    In early stage Hodgkin's disease the optimal choice of treatment for the individual patient is still an unresolved issue. So far, twenty-two randomized trials of radiotherapy alone versus radiotherapy plus combination chemotherapy have been carried out worldwide. The preliminary results of a global...... be kept at a minimum. Recently, trials have been carried out testing chemotherapy alone. The results of these trials are however conflicting. In order not to jeopardize the good results achieved with the standard treatments developed over the last three decades, newer treatment approaches should...... be carefully tested in large randomized trials before being implemented for general clinical use....

  17. Second Study of Hyper-Fractionated Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Jacob

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose and Method. Hyper-fractionated radiotherapy for treatment of soft tissue sarcomas is designed to deliver a higher total dose of radiation without an increase in late normal tissue damage. In a previous study at the Royal Marsden Hospital, a total dose of 75 Gy using twice daily 1.25 Gy fractions resulted in a higher incidence of late damage than conventional radiotherapy using 2 Gy daily fractions treating to a total of 60 Gy. The current trial therefore used a lower dose per fraction of 1.2 Gy and lower total dose of 72 Gy, with 60 fractions given over a period of 6 weeks.

  18. Much Ado About the New Definitions of Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Copotoiu Sanda-Maria

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Following the publication of the new definition of sepsis (Sepsis-3, a plethora of articles have been published in medical journals. Recognizing the epidemiological importance of the previous definitions, first issued in 1992 (Sepsis-1, and subsequently revised in 2001 (Sepsis-2, the most recent opinion emphasizes the failure “to provide adequate groups of patients with homogenous aetiologies, presentations and outcomes”, and blamed one of the causes “for the failure of several randomized controlled trials (RCTs, that tested the efficacy of adjuvant sepsis therapies”. This review summarizes the recent advances in sepsis definition.

  19. Real System Failures

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This resource area contains descriptions of actual electronic systems failure scenarios with an emphasis on the diversity of failure modes and effects that can...

  20. Contraceptive failure in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Duolao

    2002-09-01

    This study examines patterns and differentials of contraceptive failure rates by method and characteristics of users, using the Chinese Two-per-Thousand Fertility Survey data. The results show that contraceptive failure rates for modern methods including sterilization are some of the highest in the world. The first year failure rates are 4.2% for male sterilization, 0.7% for female sterilization, 10.3% for IUD, 14.5% for pill, and 19.0% for condom. There are also some differentials in contraceptive failure rates by users' sociodemographic and fertility characteristics. Contraceptive failure rate declines with women's age for all reversible methods. Rural women have higher sterilization, IUD, and condom contraceptive failure rates than urban women. Women with two or more children have a higher failure rate for sterilization methods but have lower failure rates for other methods.

  1. Acute liver failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Fin Stolze; Bjerring, Peter Nissen

    2011-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) results in a multitude of serious complications that often lead to multi-organ failure. This brief review focuses on the pathophysiological processes in ALF and how to manage these.......Acute liver failure (ALF) results in a multitude of serious complications that often lead to multi-organ failure. This brief review focuses on the pathophysiological processes in ALF and how to manage these....

  2. Radiotherapy-induced emesis. An overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feyer, P.; Buchali, A.; Hinkelbein, M.; Budach, V. [Department Radiotherapy, Humboldt-University Berlin (Germany); Zimmermann, J.S. [Department Radiotherapy, Christian Albrechts-University Kiel (Germany); Titlbach, O.J. [Department of Medicine I, Hospital Friedrichshain, Berlin (Germany)

    1998-11-01

    Background: A significant number of patients receiving radiotherapy experience the distressing side effects of emesis and nausea. These symptoms are some of the most distressing problems for the patients influencing their quality of life. Methods: International study results concerning radiotherapy-induced emesis are demonstrated. A German multicenter questionnaire examining the strategies to prevent or to treat radiotherapy-induced nausea and emesis is presented. An international analysis concerning incidence of emesis and nausea in fractionated radiotherapy patients is discussed. Finally the consensus of the consensus conference on antiemetic therapy from the Perugia International Cancer Conference V is introduced. Results: Untreated emesis can lead to complications like electrolyte disorders, dehydration, metabolic disturbances and nutrition problems with weight loss. Prophylactic antiemetics are often given to patients receiving single high-dose radiotherapy to the abdomen. A survey has revealed that antiemetic prophylaxis is not routinely offered to the patients receiving fractionated radiotherapy. However, there is a need for an effective treatment of emesis for use in this group of patients, too. In 20% of patients nausea and emesis can cause a treatment interruption because of an inadequate control of symptoms. Like in chemotherapy strategies there exist high, moderate, and low emetogenic treatment regimens in radiotherapy as well. The most emetogenic potential has the total body irradiation followed by radiotherapy to the abdomen. Radiotherapy induced emesis can be treated effectively with conventional antiemetics up to 50%. Conclusions: Studies with total body irradiation, fractionated treatment and high-dose single exposures have cleary demonstrated the value of 5-HT3-receptor antagonist antiemetics. There is a response between 60 and 97%. There is no difference in the efficacy of the different 5-HT3-antagonists. High-risk patients should be prophylactic

  3. Effect of intensity-modulated radiotherapy versus three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy on clinical outcomes in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yi-dong; FENG Jin; FANG Tong; YANG Ming; QIU Xiao-guang; JIANG Tao

    2013-01-01

    Background Few studies were reported on the comparison of clinical outcomes between intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM).This study aimed to determine whether IMRT improves clinical outcomes compared with 3D-CRT in patients with GBM.Methods The records of 54 patients with newly-diagnosed GBM from July 2009 to December 2010 were reviewed.The patients underwent postoperative IMRT or 3D-CRT with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide.Kaplan-Meier method and log rank test were used to estimate differences of patients' survival.Results The median follow-up was 13 months.Of the 54 patients,fifty (92.6%) completed the combined modality treatment.The 1-year overall survival rate (OS) was 79.6%.The pattern of failure was predominantly local.A comparative analysis revealed that no statistical difference was observed between the IMRT group (n=21) and the 3D-CRT group (n=33) for 1-year OS (89.6% vs.75.8%,P=0.795),or 1-year progression-free survival (PFS) (61.0% vs.45.5%,P=0.867).In dosimetric comparison,IMRT seemed to allow better sparing of organs at risk than 3D-CRT did (P=0.050,P=0.055).However,there was no significant difference for toxicities of irradiation between the IMRT group and the 3D-CRT group.Conclusions Our preliminary results suggested that delivering standard radiation doses by IMRT is unlikely to improve local control or overall survival for GBM compared with 3D-CRT.Given this lack of survival benefit and increased costs of IMRT,the utilization of IMRT treatment for GBM needs to be carefully rationalized.

  4. A Subjective Report of Pragmalinguistic Failure

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    This paper begins with a subjective history of the writer's L2 (Japanese) learning experience. It i followed by a detailed description of three instances of pragmalinguistic failure, each related to th correct use of keigo (honourific formal Japanese according to many definitions). Keigo is both a indispensable part of sociolinguistic life in Japan and a major linguistic challenge to almost all foreig Japanese language learners, and even some native Japanese speakers. To be exact, the speech ...

  5. In Support of Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Allison

    2013-01-01

    In this essay, I propose a concerted effort to begin devising a theory and pedagogy of failure. I review the discourse of failure in Western culture as well as in composition pedagogy, ultimately suggesting that failure is not simply a judgement or indication of rank but is a relational, affect-bearing concept with tremendous relevance to…

  6. Film dosimetry in conformal radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danciu, C.; Proimos, B.S. [Patras Univ. (Greece). Dept. of Medical Physics

    1995-12-01

    Dosimetry, through a film sandwiched in a transverse cross-section of a solid phantom, is a method of choice in Conformal Radiotherapy because: (a) the blackness (density) of the film at each point offers a measure of the total dose received at that point, and (b) the film is easily calibrated by exposing a film strip in the same cross-section, through a stationary field. The film must therefore have the following properties: (a) it must be slow, in order not to be overexposed, even at a therapeutic dose of 200 cGy, and (b) the response of the film (density versus dose curve) must be independent of the photon energy spectrum. A few slow films were compared. It was found that the Kodak X-Omat V for therapy verification was the best choice. To investigate whether the film response was independent of the photon energy, response curves for six depths, starting from the depth of maximum dose to the depth of 25 cm, in solid phantom were derived. The vertical beam was perpendicular to the anterior surface of the phantom, which was at the distance of 100 cm from the source and the field was 15x15 cm at that distance. This procedure was repeated for photon beams emitted by a Cobalt-60 unit, two 6 MV and 15 MV Linear Accelerators, as well as a 45 MV Betatron. For each of those four different beams the film response was the same for all six depths. The results, as shown in the diagrams, are very satisfactory. The response curve under a geometry similar to that actually applied, when the film is irradiated in a transverse cross-section of the phantom, was derived. The horizontal beam was almost parallel (angle of 85) to the plane of the film. The same was repeated with the central ray parallel to the film (angle 90) and at a distance of 1.5 cm from the horizontal film. The field size was again 15x15 at the lateral entrance surface of the beam. The response curves remained the same, as when the beam was perpendicular to the films.

  7. Respiratory Failure Associated with Ascariasis in a Patient with Immunodeficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandra, Lanocha; Barbara, Zdziarska; Natalia, Lanocha-Arendarczyk; Danuta, Kosik-Bogacka; Renata, Guzicka-Kazimierczak; Ewa, Marzec-Lewenstein

    2016-01-01

    In industrialized countries, risk groups for parasitic diseases include travelers, recent immigrants, and patients with immunodeficiency following chemotherapy and radiotherapy and AIDS. A 66-year-old Polish male was admitted in December 2012 to the Department of Haematology in a fairly good general condition. On the basis of cytological, cytochemical, immunophenotypic, and cytogenetic analysis of bone marrow, the patient was diagnosed with acute myeloblastic leukemia. On the 7th day of hospitalization in the Department of Haematology, patient was moved to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) due to acute respiratory and circulatory failure. In March 2013, 3 months after the onset of respiratory failures, a mature form of Ascaris spp. appeared in the patient's mouth. This report highlights the importance of considering an Ascaris infection in patients with low immunity presenting no eosinophilia but pulmonary failure in the central countries of Europe. PMID:27313919

  8. An unusual cause of type 2 respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas Rajagopala

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a female patient who was referred for management of respiratory failure. She was being evaluated and managed as worsening chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy with type 2 respiratory failure. Initial examination showed hypertrichosis, clubbing and papilledema along with severe distal and proximal motor-predominant weakness with impending respiratory failure. She was managed with noninvasive ventilation (NIV and plasmapheresis awaiting diagnostic investigations. Immunofixation showed an "M band" and free lambda chain levels were elevated. Radiographs showed the classic osteosclerotic lesions of POEMS (polyradiculoneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M-protein and Skin abnormalities syndrome. Six weeks after commencing radiotherapy to the osteosclerotic lesions, the patient responded favorably and remains off nocturnal NIV support.

  9. Grounded theory for radiotherapy practitioners: Informing clinical practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, N.A., E-mail: Nadia.Walsh@gstt.nhs.u [Medical Physics Department, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, St Thomas' Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-15

    Radiotherapy practitioners may be best placed to undertake qualitative research within the context of cancer, due to specialist knowledge of radiation treatment and sensitivity to radiotherapy patient's needs. The grounded theory approach to data collection and analysis is a unique method of identifying a theory directly based on data collected within a clinical context. Research for radiotherapy practitioners is integral to role expansion within the government's directive for evidence-based practice. Due to the paucity of information on qualitative research undertaken by radiotherapy radiographers, this article aims to assess the potential impact of qualitative research on radiotherapy patient and service outcomes.

  10. Advancements in radiotherapy for lung cancer in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lujun Zhao; Luhua Wang

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death due to cancer in China. In recent years, great progress has been made in radiotherapy for lung cancer patients in China. The main advance-ments include the fol owing aspects:(1) stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for early stage non-smal cel lung cancer (NSCLC), (2) post-operative radiotherapy for NSCLC, (3) combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy for local y advanced NSCLC, (4) improved radiotherapy for advanced NSCLC, and 5) prediction of radiation-induced lung toxicity.

  11. Radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei [Westmead Breast Cancer Institute, Westmead Hospital, Westmead, New South Wales (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Westmead Hospital, New South Wales (Australia)

    2013-03-15

    Radiotherapy is an indispensible part of the management of all stages of breast cancer. In this article, the common indications for radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer (stages 0, I, and II) are reviewed, including whole-breast radiotherapy as part of breast-conserving treatment for early invasive breast cancer and pre-invasive disease of ductal carcinoma in situ, post-mastectomy radiotherapy, locoregional radiotherapy, and partial breast irradiation. Key clinical studies that underpin our current practice are discussed briefly.

  12. Local Control With Reduced-Dose Radiotherapy for Low-Risk Rhabdomyosarcoma: A Report From the Children's Oncology Group D9602 Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breneman, John, E-mail: john.breneman@uchealth.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Cincinnati and Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Meza, Jane [Department of Biostatistics, University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Public Health, Omaha, NE (United States); Donaldson, Sarah S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Raney, R. Beverly [Children' s Cancer Hospital and Division of Pediatrics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Children' s Ambulatory Blood and Cancer Center, Dell Children' s Medical Center of Central Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Wolden, Suzanne [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Michalski, Jeff [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Laurie, Fran [Quality Assurance Review Center, Lincoln, RI (United States); Rodeberg, David A. [Department of Surgery, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Meyer, William [Section of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Walterhouse, David [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children' s Memorial Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Hawkins, Douglas S. [Department of Pediatrics, Seattle Children' s Hospital, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To analyze the effect of reduced-dose radiotherapy on local control in children with low-risk rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) treated in the Children's Oncology Group D9602 study. Methods and Materials: Patients with low-risk RMS were nonrandomly assigned to receive radiotherapy doses dependent on the completeness of surgical resection of the primary tumor (clinical group) and the presence of involved regional lymph nodes. After resection, most patients with microscopic residual and uninvolved nodes received 36 Gy, those with involved nodes received 41.4 to 50.4 Gy, and those with orbital primary tumors received 45 Gy. All patients received vincristine and dactinomycin, with cyclophosphamide added for patient subsets with a higher risk of relapse in Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study Group III and IV studies. Results: Three hundred forty-two patients were eligible for analysis; 172 received radiotherapy as part of their treatment. The cumulative incidence of local/regional failure was 15% in patients with microscopic involved margins when cyclophosphamide was not part of the treatment regimen and 0% when cyclophosphamide was included. The cumulative incidence of local/regional failure was 14% in patients with orbital tumors. Protocol-specified omission of radiotherapy in girls with Group IIA vaginal tumors (n = 5) resulted in three failures for this group. Conclusions: In comparison with Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study Group III and IV results, reduced-dose radiotherapy does not compromise local control for patients with microscopic tumor after surgical resection or with orbital primary tumors when cyclophosphamide is added to the treatment program. Girls with unresected nonbladder genitourinary tumors require radiotherapy for postsurgical residual tumor for optimal local control to be achieved.

  13. Treatment results of radical radiotherapy of carcinoma uterine cervix using external beam radiotherapy and high dose rate intracavitary radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azad S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To report the outcome of carcinoma cervix patients treated radically by external beam radiotherapy and high dose rate intracavitary radiotherapy. Material and Methods: From January 2005 to December 2006, a total of 709 newly diagnosed cases of carcinoma cervix were reported in our department. All cases were staged according to the International Federation of Gynecologist and Oncologist staging system. Out of 709 cases, 342 completed radical radiotherapy and were retrospectively analyzed for the presence of local residual disease, local recurrence, distant metastases, radiation reaction, and disease free survival. Results: There were 11(3.22%, 82(23.98%, 232(67.83%, and 17(4.97% patients in stages I, II, III, and IV, respectively. The median follow up time for all patients was 36 months (range 3 -54 months. The overall treatment time (OTT ranged from 52 to 69 days (median 58 days. The 3 year disease free survival rate was 81.8%, 70.7%, 40.08%, and 11.76% for stages I, II, III, and IV, respectively. There were 91 (26.6% cases with local residual diseases, 27(7.9% developed distant metastasis, and 18(5.26% pts had local recurrence. Discussion: The results of this study suggest that radical radiotherapy with HDR brachytherapy was appropriate for the treatment of early staged cancer of uterine cervix. For locally advanced cancer of cervix addition of concurrent chemotherapy, higher radiation doses, reduction of overall treatment time to less than 8 weeks, and use of latest radiotherapy techniques such as IMRT is recommended to improve the results.

  14. Modern Approach in Premature Ovarian Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacu Irina

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Premature ovarian failure (POF is a condition affecting 1-2% of women younger than 40 years of age, characterized by amenorrhea, hypoestrogenism and elevated gonadotropin levels. In the last years it became a problem of social health interest as the frequency increased due to environmental factors and new, efficient methods for cancer treatment in young women. Few genes have beed identified to explain cases of POF but there are also autoimmune associated conditions and an increasing number of iatrogenic cases (chemotherapy, surgery, radiotherapy. Modern approach in POF means not only a precise etiological diagnosis, but also a correct counseling for these patients who often want to become parents, and a chance for a healthy life without the long term consequences of estrogen deprivation from an early age. In vitro fertilization (IVF techniques can be useful for certain cases but research is needed on strategies to improve fertility for women who have follicles remaining in the ovaries.

  15. Prostate cancer radiotherapy in elderly person; Radiotherapie du cancer de la prostate chez la personne agee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serre, A. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, Nancy (France)

    2011-10-15

    The author discusses the issue of prostate cancer radiotherapy in the case of elderly persons. The choice of the therapeutic strategy (local, hormonotherapy, simple monitoring) is complex. Different aspects must be considered: the carcinologic situation assessment, the patient health condition, the patient life expectancy, and the possible side effects of treatment. Radiotherapy appears to be a major therapeutic asset, but dose levels, toxicity effects must then be considered. Short communication

  16. Barriers to palliative radiotherapy referral: A Canadian perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samant, Rajiv S.; Fitzgibbon, Edward; Meng, Joanne; Graham, Ian D. [Univ. of Ottawa. Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2007-07-15

    Radiotherapy is an effective but underutilized treatment modality for cancer patients. We decided to investigate the factors influencing radiotherapy referral among family physicians in our region. A 30-item survey was developed to determine palliative radiotherapy knowledge and factors influencing referral. It was sent to 400 physicians in eastern Ontario (Canada) and the completed surveys were evaluated. The overall response rate was 50% with almost all physicians seeing cancer patients recently (97%) and the majority (80%) providing palliative care. Approximately 56% had referred patients for radiotherapy previously and 59% were aware of the regional community oncology program. Factors influencing radiotherapy referral included the following: waiting times for radiotherapy consultation and treatment, uncertainty about the benefits of radiotherapy, patient age, and perceived patient inconvenience. Physicians who referred patients for radiotherapy were more than likely to provide palliative care, work outside of urban centres, have hospital privileges and had sought advice from a radiation oncologist in the past. A variety of factors influence the referral of cancer patients for radiotherapy by family physicians and addressing issues such as long waiting times, lack of palliative radiotherapy knowledge and awareness of Cancer Centre services could increase the rate of appropriate radiotherapy patient referral.

  17. Machinery failure analysis and troubleshooting practical machinery management for process plants

    CERN Document Server

    Bloch, Heinz P

    2012-01-01

    Solve the machinery failure problems costing you time and money with this classic, comprehensive guide to analysis and troubleshooting  Provides detailed, complete and accurate information on anticipating risk of component failure and avoiding equipment downtime Includes numerous photographs of failed parts to ensure you are familiar with the visual evidence you need to recognize Covers proven approaches to failure definition and offers failure identification and analysis methods that can be applied to virtually all problem situations Demonstr

  18. SU-C-BRD-05: Implementation of Incident Learning in the Safety and Quality Management of Radiotherapy: The Primary Experience in a New Established Program with Advanced Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, R; Wang, J [Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing, Beijing (China)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the implementation and effectiveness of incident learning for the safety and quality of radiotherapy in a new established radiotherapy program with advanced technology. Methods: Reference to the consensus recommendations by American Association of Physicist in Medicine, an incident learning system was specifically designed for reporting, investigating, and learning of individual radiotherapy incidents in a new established radiotherapy program, with 4D CBCT, Ultrasound guided radiotherapy, VMAT, gated treatment delivered on two new installed linacs. The incidents occurring in external beam radiotherapy from February, 2012 to January, 2014 were reported. Results: A total of 33 reports were analyzed, including 28 near misses and 5 incidents. Among them, 5 originated in imaging for planning, 25 in planning, 1 in plan transfer, 1 in commissioning and 1 in treatment delivery. Among them, three near misses originated in the safety barrier of the radiotherapy process. In terms of error type, 1 incident was classified as wrong patient, 7 near misses/incidents as wrong site, 6 as wrong laterality, 5 as wrong dose, 7 as wrong prescription, and 7 as suboptimal plan quality. 5 incidents were all classified as grade 1/2 of dosimetric severity, 1 as grade 0, and the other 4 as grade 1 of medical severity. For the causes/contributory factors, negligence, policy not followed, inadequate training, failure to develop an effective plan, and communication contributed to 19, 15, 12, 5 and 3 near misses/incidents, respectively. The average incident rate per 100 patients treated was 0.4; this rate fell to 0.28% in the second year from 0.56% in the first year. The rate of near miss fell to 1.24% from 2.22%. Conclusion: Effective incident learning can reduce the occurrence of near miss/incidents, enhance the culture of safety. Incident learning is an effective proactive method for improving the quality and safety of radiotherapy.

  19. Sorafenib and radiotherapy association for hepatocellular carcinoma; Sorafenib et radiotherapie dans le carcinome hepatocellulaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girard, N. [Service de pneumologie, hopital Louis-Pradel, hospices Civils de Lyon, 28, avenue du Doyen-Jean-Lepine, 69500 Bron (France); UMR 754, universite Claude-Bernard Lyon 1, 43, boulevard du 11-novembre-1918, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Mornex, F. [UMR 754, universite Claude-Bernard Lyon 1, 43, boulevard du 11-novembre-1918, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Departement de radiotherapie-oncologie, centre hospitalier Lyon Sud, 165, chemin du Grand-Revoyet, 69495 Pierre-Benite cedex (France)

    2011-02-15

    Conformal radiotherapy is a promising therapeutic strategy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), producing local control rates above 90% within the radiation beam. However, survival after radiotherapy remains limited by the high frequency of intra- and extra-hepatic recurrences, which occurs in 40-50 and 20-30% of cases, respectively. Sorafenib (BAY43-9006, Nexavar; Bayer, West Haven, CT) is a small molecule inhibitor that demonstrated potent activity to target v-raf murine sarcoma oncogene homologue B1 (BRAF) and VEGFR tyrosine kinases. Sorafenib is the only drug that demonstrated effectiveness to increase overall survival in advanced or metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma. The rationale to combine radiotherapy with sorafenib is the following: (1) targeting RAS-RAF-MAPK and VEGFR signaling pathways, which are specifically activated after exposure to radiation, and responsible for radio-resistance phenomenon; (2) enhancing the oxygen effect through normalization of the surviving tumor vasculature; and (3) synchronization of the cell cycle. Sorafenib and radiotherapy represent complementary strategies, as radiotherapy may be useful to prolong the effect of sorafenib through control of the macroscopic disease, when sorafenib may target latent microscopic disease. Sorafenib and radiotherapy associations are thus based on a relevant biological and clinical rationale and are being evaluated in ongoing phase I-II trials. (authors)

  20. Radiotherapy for inverted papilloma: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levendag, P.C.; Annyas, A.A.; Escajadillo, J.R.; Elema, J.D. (Rijksuniversiteit Groningen (Netherlands). Academisch Ziekenhuis)

    1984-06-01

    Inverted papilloma is an infrequent tumour of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses associated with controversy. The incidence of carcinoma in situ associated with inverted papilloma, has not been very well documented until now. Therefore the authors present a case report characterized by an aggressive clinical behaviour, treated by extensive surgery and ultimately controlled by radiotherapy.

  1. Radiotherapy for inverted papilloma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levendag, P C; Annyas, A A; Escajadillo, J R; Elema, J D

    1984-06-01

    Inverted papilloma is an infrequent tumour of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses associated with controversy. The incidence of carcinoma in situ associated with inverted papilloma, has not been very well documented until now. Therefore, we present a case report characterized by an aggressive clinical behaviour, treated by extensive surgery and ultimately controlled by radiotherapy.

  2. Towards online MRI-guided radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bol, G.H.

    2015-01-01

    First, we present two offline position verification methods which can be used in radiotherapy for detecting the position of the bony anatomy of a patient automatically with portal imaging, even if every single portal image of each segment of an (IMRT) treatment beam contains insufficient matching in

  3. Effects of radiotherapy on bone tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, Samantha Seara da; Almeida, Darcy de [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil)]. E-mail: samanthaseara@hotmail.com; Sarmento, Viviane Almeida; Ramalho, Luciana Maria Pedreira; Freitas, Andre Carlos de [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia; Tavares, Maria Eulina; Souza, Jailton Caetano [Hospital Santa Izabel (HSI), Salvador, BA (Brazil); Veeck, Elaine Bauer; Costa, Nilza Pereira da [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2007-05-15

    Objective: To investigate the effects of radiotherapy on bone tissues and the accuracy of gray level measurements on radiographic images. Materials and methods: Four Wistar rats were submitted to external radiotherapy (single 3000 cGy dose) on an area of 2 cm x 2 cm of their right legs. The animals were sacrificed six weeks after radiotherapy, and both irradiated and contralateral (non-irradiated) legs were removed, dissected, evaluated for thickness, x-rayed in a standardized form and histologically processed (stained with hematoxylin-eosin and picrosirius red). The radiographs were digitalized and the gray level average was measured with the ImageTool{sup R} software. Results: The femur thickness of non-irradiated legs was greater than that of the irradiated legs (p < 0.05). Radiographically, the findings indicated a higher bone density in the non-irradiated legs, although with no statistically significant difference (p > 0.05). Histological analysis of the irradiated legs demonstrated a decrease in the number of osteocytes and Haversian canals, although with no statistically significance (p > 0.05). On the other hand, a significant increase in adipocytes was observed, resulting in a reduction of medullary tissue in the irradiated legs (p < 0.05), besides a higher osteoblastic activity in the non-irradiated legs (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Radiotherapy within the above mentioned parameters determined a decrease in activity of bone remodeling, which could be radiographically detected in the majority of the evaluated specimens. (author)

  4. The Role of Radiotherapy in Acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, Mark J; Barkan, Ariel L; Drake, William M

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy has, historically, played a central role in the management of acromegaly, and the last 30 years have seen substantial improvements in the technology used in the delivery of radiation therapy. More recently, the introduction of highly targeted radiotherapy, or 'radiosurgery', has further increased the therapeutic options available in the management of secretory pituitary tumors. Despite these developments, improvements in primary surgical outcomes, an increase in the range and effectiveness of medical therapy options, and long-term safety concerns have combined to dictate that, although still deployed in selected cases, the use of radiotherapy in the management of acromegaly has declined steadily over the past 2 decades. In this article, we review some of the main studies that have documented the efficacy of pituitary radiotherapy on growth hormone hypersecretion and summarize the data around its potential deleterious effects, including hypopituitarism, cranial nerve damage, and the development of radiation-related intracerebral tumors. We also give practical recommendations to guide its future use in patients with acromegaly, generally, as a third-line intervention after neurosurgical intervention in combination with various medical therapy options.

  5. INDICATIONS FOR RADIOTHERAPY AFTER NECK DISSECTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strojan, Primoz; Ferlito, Alfio; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Silver, Carl E.

    Up-front surgery and postoperative radiotherapy constitute a well-recognized treatment concept for locally or regionally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. This "treatment package" is further intensified with the concomitant application of chemotherapy during irradiation when

  6. Three dimensional conformal postoperative radiotherapy for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Azza Helal

    2013-06-17

    Jun 17, 2013 ... showed the best dose homogeneity and conformity and lowest max dose to PTV and to the ... nique, size of treatment field, total dose and dose/fraction.6,7 ..... Cooperative Group: the role of radiotherapy in the treatment of.

  7. Oral sequelae of head and neck radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissink, A; Jansma, J; Spijkervet, FKL; Burlage, FR; Coppes, RP

    In addition to anti-tumor effects, ionizing radiation causes damage in normal tissues located in the radiation portals. Oral complications of radiotherapy in the head and neck region are the result of the deleterious effects of radiation on, e. g., salivary glands, oral mucosa, bone, dentition,

  8. [Hopes of high dose-rate radiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouillade, Charles; Favaudon, Vincent; Vozenin, Marie-Catherine; Romeo, Paul-Henri; Bourhis, Jean; Verrelle, Pierre; Devauchelle, Patrick; Patriarca, Annalisa; Heinrich, Sophie; Mazal, Alejandro; Dutreix, Marie

    2017-04-01

    In this review, we present the synthesis of the newly acquired knowledge concerning high dose-rate irradiations and the hopes that these new radiotherapy modalities give rise to. The results were presented at a recent symposium on the subject. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging in radiotherapy treatment planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerland, Marinus Adriaan

    2001-01-01

    From its inception in the early 1970's up to the present, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved into a sophisticated technique, which has aroused considerable interest in var- ious subelds of medicine including radiotherapy. MRI is capable of imaging in any plane and does not use ionizing rad

  10. Tumour-host dynamics under radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Placeres Jimenez, Rolando, E-mail: rpjcu@yahoo.com [Departamento de Fi' sica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Sao Carlos - SP (Brazil); Ortiz Hernandez, Eloy [Centre of Medicine and Complexity, Medical University Carlos J. Finlay, Carretera Central s/n, Camagueey (Cuba)

    2011-09-15

    Highlight: > Tumour-host interaction is modelled by Lotka-Volterra equations. > A brief review of the motion integral and analysis of linear stability is presented. > Radiotherapy is introduced into the model, using a periodic Dirac delta function. > A two-dimensional logistic map is derived from the modified Lotka-Volterra model. > It is shown that tumour can be controlled by a correct selection of therapy strategy. - Abstract: Tumour-host interaction is modelled by the Lotka-Volterra equations. Qualitative analysis and simulations show that this model reproduces all known states of development for tumours. Radiotherapy effect is introduced into the model by means of the linear-quadratic model and the periodic Dirac delta function. The evolution of the system under the action of radiotherapy is simulated and parameter space is obtained, from which certain threshold of effectiveness values for the frequency and applied doses are derived. A two-dimensional logistic map is derived from the modified Lotka-Volterra model and used to simulate the effectiveness of radiotherapy in different regimens of tumour development. The results show the possibility of achieving a successful treatment in each individual case by employing the correct therapeutic strategy.

  11. Radical radiotherapy for urinary bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fokdal, Lars; von der Maase, Hans; Høyer, Morten

    2006-01-01

    The exact value of radiotherapy in the treatment of muscle-invasive       bladder cancer is difficult to establish, as most studies exploring this       issue are retrospective with different procedures for selecting patients       for treatment, as well as varying treatment strategies. An estima...

  12. Bone Marrow Failure Secondary to Cytokinesis Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    have assessed the role of FA pathway in mitosis and confirmed that murine FA-deficient hematopoietic stem cells exhibit p53- mediated growth defects...results suggest that bone marrow failure in FA may be caused, in part, by p53- mediated cellular defects and underscore the importance of... mediated apoptosis of HSCs due to cytokinesis failure. The major goal of the project was to assess whether the p53- mediated apoptosis due to

  13. Radiotherapy combined with hormonal therapy in prostate cancer: the state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Milecki

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Piotr Milecki1,2, Piotr Martenka1, Andrzej Antczak3, Zbigniew Kwias31Department of Radiotherapy, Greater Poland Cancer Center, Poznan, Poland; 2Department of Electroradiology, Medical University, Poznan, Poland; 3Chair of Urology, Medical University, Poznan, PolandAbstract: Androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT is used routinely in combination with definitive external beam radiation therapy (EBRT in patients with high-risk clinically localized or locally advanced disease. The combined treatment (ADT–EBRT also seems to play a significant role in improving treatment results in the intermediate-risk group of prostate cancer patients. On the other hand, there is a growing body of evidence that treatment with ADT can be associated with serious and lifelong adverse events including osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and many others. Almost all ADT adverse events are time dependant and tend to increase in severity with prolongation of hormonal manipulation. Therefore, it is crucial to clearly state the optimal schedule for ADT in combination with EBRT, that maintaining the positive effect on treatment efficacy would keep the adverse events risk at reasonable level. To achieve this goal, treatment schedule may have to be highly individualized on the basis of the patient-specific potential vulnerability to adverse events. In this study, the concise and evidence-based review of current literature concerning the general rationales for combining radiotherapy and hormonal therapy, its mechanism, treatment results, and toxicity profile is presented.Keywords: prostate cancer, radiotherapy, androgen deprivation, combined treatment

  14. Cardiorenal syndrome in children with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Jack F; Goldstein, Stuart L

    2009-09-01

    Concomitant cardiac and renal dysfunction has been termed the cardiorenal syndrome (CRS). This clinical condition usually manifests as heart failure with worsening renal function and occurs frequently in the acute care setting. A consistent definition of CRS has not been universally agreed upon, although a recent classification of CRS describes several subtypes depending on the primary organ injured and the chronicity of the injury. CRS may develop in adults and children and is a strong predictor of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized and ambulatory patients. The underlying physiology of CRS is not well understood, creating a significant challenge for clinicians when treating heart failure patients with renal insufficiency. This review summarizes recent data characterizing the incidence, physiology, and management of children who have heart failure and acute kidney injury.

  15. Epithelioid hemangioendothelioma of the spine treated with RapidArc volumetric-modulated radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Trone, Jane-Chloé [Department of Radiotherapy, Institut de Cancérologie de la Loire, St Priest en Jarez (France); Chargari, Cyrus [Department of Radiation Oncology, HIA du Val de Grâce, Paris (France); Falk, Alexander Tuan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France); Khodri, Mustapha [Department of Physics, Institut de Cancérologie de la Loire, St Priest en Jarez (France); Magné, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.magne@icloire.fr [Department of Radiotherapy, Institut de Cancérologie de la Loire, St Priest en Jarez (France)

    2014-10-01

    Radiotherapy for epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (EHE) using volumetric intensity-modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT). A 48-year-old woman was referred for curative irradiation of a vertebral EHE after failure of surgery. A comparison between VMAT and conventional conformal tridimensional (3D) dosimetry was performed and potential advantage of VMAT for sparing critical organs from irradiation's side effects was discussed. The total delivered dose on the planning target volume was 54 Gy in 27 fractions. The patient was finally treated with VMAT. The tolerance was excellent. There was no acute toxicity, including no increase in pain. With a follow-up of 18 months, no delayed toxicity was reported. The clinical response consisted of a decrease in the dorsal pain. The D{sub max} for the spinal cord was reduced from 55 Gy (3D-radiotherapy [RT]) (which would be an unacceptable dose to the spine because of the risk of myelopathy) to 42.8 Gy (VMAT), which remains below the recommended dose threshold (45 Gy). The dose delivered to 20% of organ volume (D{sub 20}) was reduced from 47 Gy (3D-RT) to 3 Gy (VMAT) for the spinal cord. The study shows that VMAT allows the delivery of curative treatment for vertebral EHEs because of critical organ sparing.

  16. Handling Rejection as Failure: Aspiring Writers Getting the Rejection Slip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Fürst

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Included in the definition of being an aspiring person is the risk of failure. Aspiring fiction writers are no exception. This article shows that the role of aspiring fiction writer involves managing three issues: the hope of being published, rejection by a publisher, and the perception of the rejection as a failure. Drawing on 47 interviews with fiction writers who have attempted to become first-time writers, the analysis shows that aspiring writers' responses to rejection are related to accepting and dismissing responsibility for having failed and admitting or dismissing the rejection as a perceived failure. Based on these findings, the article presents procedures associated with four main approaches to dealing with failure: conceding, excusing, justifying, and refusing. This conceptual framework for understanding failure contributes to a theoretical understanding of evaluation and valuation processes and their consequences and to empirical studies of rejection as career failure; it also systematizes and extends Goffmans work on cooling out strategies.

  17. TU-AB-BRD-02: Failure Modes and Effects Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huq, M. [University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Current quality assurance and quality management guidelines provided by various professional organizations are prescriptive in nature, focusing principally on performance characteristics of planning and delivery devices. However, published analyses of events in radiation therapy show that most events are often caused by flaws in clinical processes rather than by device failures. This suggests the need for the development of a quality management program that is based on integrated approaches to process and equipment quality assurance. Industrial engineers have developed various risk assessment tools that are used to identify and eliminate potential failures from a system or a process before a failure impacts a customer. These tools include, but are not limited to, process mapping, failure modes and effects analysis, fault tree analysis. Task Group 100 of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine has developed these tools and used them to formulate an example risk-based quality management program for intensity-modulated radiotherapy. This is a prospective risk assessment approach that analyzes potential error pathways inherent in a clinical process and then ranks them according to relative risk, typically before implementation, followed by the design of a new process or modification of the existing process. Appropriate controls are then put in place to ensure that failures are less likely to occur and, if they do, they will more likely be detected before they propagate through the process, compromising treatment outcome and causing harm to the patient. Such a prospective approach forms the basis of the work of Task Group 100 that has recently been approved by the AAPM. This session will be devoted to a discussion of these tools and practical examples of how these tools can be used in a given radiotherapy clinic to develop a risk based quality management program. Learning Objectives: Learn how to design a process map for a radiotherapy process Learn how to

  18. Target volume for adjuvant radiotherapy after prostatectomy; Volume cible de la radiotherapie adjuvante apres prostatectomie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossi, A. [Institut Gustave-Roussy, Dept. de Radiotherapie, 94 - Villejuif (France)

    2007-11-15

    Although radical prostatectomy is an effective treatment for clinically localized prostate cancer, it fails in up to 20 to 40% of the cases. Local failure represents one of the possible patterns of relapse and is announced by detectable serum P.S.A. levels. Patients at high risk for local relapse have extra prostatic disease, positive surgical margins or seminal vesicles infiltration at pathology. Three recently published phase III randomized clinical trials have clearly shown that, for these patients, immediate adjuvant irradiation reduces the risk of progression. For patients undergoing postoperative irradiation the standardisation of the target volume definition and delineation is required because no general consensus exists on prostate bed definition. The Genito-Urinary Working Party of the Radiation Oncology Group of the European Organization for the Research and treatment of cancer (R.O.G. O.R.T.C.) has developed a set of Guidelines to assist radiotherapists in the contouring of target volumes for postoperative irradiation: a consensus has been reached on a set of recommendations that are proposed to the radiation oncologist community. Emphasis has been put on the optimal cooperation between the surgeon, the pathologist and the radiotherapist in the frame of a multidisciplinary approach. Data on the presence and on the localization of extra prostatic extension and on positive surgical margins must be used. Placement of metallic clips in the tumor bed is of great help in localizing fixed anatomical sites as the anastomosis. The goal of such a document is to reduce inter-observer variability in target delineation in the framework of future clinical trials. (author)

  19. Long-term decision regret after post-prostatectomy image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakespeare, Thomas P; Chin, Stephen; Manuel, Lucy; Wen, Shelly; Hoffman, Matthew; Wilcox, Shea W; Aherne, Noel J

    2017-02-01

    obtaining clear margins), and ensuring adequately discussing definitive radiotherapy as an alternative to surgery. © 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  20. Initial management of primary mediastinal seminoma: radiotherapy or cisplatin-based chemotherapy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Chevalier, T.; Ruffie, P.; Rixe, O. [Department of Medical Oncology, Institut Gustave-Roussy, 39 rue Camille-Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France); Wibault, P. [Department of Radiotherapy, Institut Gustave-Roussy, 39 rue Camille-Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France); Theodore, C. [Department of Medical Oncology, Institut Gustave-Roussy, 39 rue Camille-Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France); Terrier-Lacombe, M.-J. [Department of Pathology, Institut Gustave-Roussy, 39 rue Camille-Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France); Droz, J.-P.; Culine, S.; Fizazi, K. [Department of Medical Oncology, Institut Gustave-Roussy, 39 rue Camille-Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France)

    1998-02-01

    Primary mediastinal seminoma is an uncommon neoplasm, the optimal management of which is still debated. Radiotherapy produces a 65% disease-free survival rate. We assess whether these results have been improved with the advent of cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Data from 14 patients treated at the Institut Gustave-Roussy were reviewed. 9 had received cisplatin-based chemotherapy (Group 1): their outcome was compared with that of 5 patients treated with radiotherapy without chemotherapy (Group 2). We also reviewed data from the English literature using strict criteria, and report results concerning patients who received cisplatin-based chemotherapy and those who received radiotherapy. 8 of the 9 patients (89%) in Group 1 are long-term disease-free survivors and only 3 of 5 patients in Group 2. The patient who died in Group 1 was the only one who refused surgical resection of residual masses after chemotherapy. The review of the literature revealed that 59 of 68 (87%) patients initially managed with cisplatin- or carboplatin-based chemotherapy and for whom sufficient data are available, are long-term survivors and free of disease. Some of these patients had also received radiotherapy. Only 64 of 103 (62%) treated with thoracic radiotherapy without chemotherapy were long-term disease-free survivors. The disease-free survival rate of 51 patients who received cisplatin-based chemotherapy (excluding those who received carboplatin) was 86%. The difference in survival between patients administered cisplatin-based chemotherapy and those who underwent radiotherapy is apparently not due to unbalanced prognostic factors, the effect of time or non-specific medical management. We conclude that cisplatin-based chemotherapy allows long-term disease-free survival in approximately 85% of patients. These results seem to be higher than those obtained without cisplatin-based chemotherapy. However, a randomised study is required for definitive conclusions, but it is very unlikely that

  1. Managing Feelings about Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Heart Failure Module 6: Managing Feelings About Heart Failure Download Module Order Hardcopy Heart failure can cause ... professional help for emotional problems. Common Feelings About Heart Failure It is common for people to feel depressed ...

  2. New Sepsis and Septic Shock Definitions: Clinical Implications and Controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Chanu; Klompas, Michael

    2017-09-01

    New sepsis definitions shift emphasis from the systemic inflammatory response syndrome to organ dysfunction, quantified using the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score. The new definitions also propose Quick SOFA criteria to rapidly identify potentially infected patients at risk for poor outcomes. The diagnosis of septic shock requires vasopressor dependence and increased lactate levels. Strengths of these definitions include their simplicity and clear association with adverse outcomes. However, their utility in identifying patients with serious infections before frank sepsis ensues remains to be seen. This article reviews challenges in defining sepsis, strengths and weaknesses of the new definitions, and unresolved issues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Reactor Materials Program process water piping indirect failure frequency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daugherty, W.L.