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Sample records for failing hormone therapy

  1. Hormone Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it also can be a sign of endometrial cancer. All bleeding after menopause should be evaluated. Other side effects reported by women who take hormone therapy include fluid retention and breast soreness. This soreness usually lasts for a short ...

  2. Types of hormone therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... both. Sometimes testosterone is also added. Menopause and Hormones Menopause symptoms include: Hot flashes Night sweats Sleep problems ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Hormone Replacement Therapy Menopause Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  3. Hormone therapy for breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It is different from hormone therapy to treat menopause symptoms. Hormones and Breast Cancer The hormones estrogen and progesterone ... other tissues such as fat and skin. After menopause, the ovaries stop producing these hormones. But the body continues to make a small ...

  4. Ectopic microRNA-150-5p transcription sensitizes glucocorticoid therapy response in MM1S multiple myeloma cells but fails to overcome hormone therapy resistance in MM1R cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Palagani

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids (GCs selectively trigger cell death in the multiple myeloma cell line MM1S which express NR3C1/Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR protein, but fail to kill MM1R cells which lack GR protein. Given recent demonstrations of altered microRNA profiles in a diverse range of haematological malignancies and drug resistance, we characterized GC inducible mRNA and microRNA transcription profiles in GC sensitive MM1S as compared to GC resistant MM1R cells. Transcriptome analysis revealed that GCs regulate expression of multiple genes involved in cell cycle control, cell organization, cell death and immunological disease in MM1S cells, which remain unaffected in MM1R cells. With respect to microRNAs, mir-150-5p was identified as the most time persistent GC regulated microRNA, out of 5 QPCR validated microRNAs (mir-26b, mir-125a-5p, mir-146-5p, mir-150-5p, and mir-184, which are GC inducible in MM1S but not in MM1R cells. Functional studies further revealed that ectopic transfection of a synthetic mir-150-5p mimics GR dependent gene expression changes involved in cell death and cell proliferation pathways. Remarkably, despite the gene expression changes observed, overexpression of mir-150-5p in absence of GCs did not trigger significant cytotoxicity in MM1S or MM1R cells. This suggests the requirement of additional steps in GC induced cell death, which can not be mimicked by mir-150-5p overexpression alone. Interestingly, a combination of mir-150-5p transfection with low doses GC in MM1S cells was found to sensitize therapy response, whereas opposite effects could be observed with a mir-150-5p specific antagomir. Although mir-150-5p overexpression did not substantially change GR expression levels, it was found that mir-150-5p evokes GR specific effects through indirect mRNA regulation of GR interacting transcription factors and hormone receptors, GR chaperones, as well as various effectors of unfolded protein stress and chemokine signalling

  5. Ectopic microRNA-150-5p transcription sensitizes glucocorticoid therapy response in MM1S multiple myeloma cells but fails to overcome hormone therapy resistance in MM1R cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palagani, Ajay; Op de Beeck, Ken; Naulaerts, Stefan; Diddens, Jolien; Sekhar Chirumamilla, Chandra; Van Camp, Guy; Laukens, Kris; Heyninck, Karen; Gerlo, Sarah; Mestdagh, Pieter; Vandesompele, Joke; Berghe, Wim Vanden

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) selectively trigger cell death in the multiple myeloma cell line MM1S which express NR3C1/Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR) protein, but fail to kill MM1R cells which lack GR protein. Given recent demonstrations of altered microRNA profiles in a diverse range of haematological malignancies and drug resistance, we characterized GC inducible mRNA and microRNA transcription profiles in GC sensitive MM1S as compared to GC resistant MM1R cells. Transcriptome analysis revealed that GCs regulate expression of multiple genes involved in cell cycle control, cell organization, cell death and immunological disease in MM1S cells, which remain unaffected in MM1R cells. With respect to microRNAs, mir-150-5p was identified as the most time persistent GC regulated microRNA, out of 5 QPCR validated microRNAs (mir-26b, mir-125a-5p, mir-146-5p, mir-150-5p, and mir-184), which are GC inducible in MM1S but not in MM1R cells. Functional studies further revealed that ectopic transfection of a synthetic mir-150-5p mimics GR dependent gene expression changes involved in cell death and cell proliferation pathways. Remarkably, despite the gene expression changes observed, overexpression of mir-150-5p in absence of GCs did not trigger significant cytotoxicity in MM1S or MM1R cells. This suggests the requirement of additional steps in GC induced cell death, which can not be mimicked by mir-150-5p overexpression alone. Interestingly, a combination of mir-150-5p transfection with low doses GC in MM1S cells was found to sensitize therapy response, whereas opposite effects could be observed with a mir-150-5p specific antagomir. Although mir-150-5p overexpression did not substantially change GR expression levels, it was found that mir-150-5p evokes GR specific effects through indirect mRNA regulation of GR interacting transcription factors and hormone receptors, GR chaperones, as well as various effectors of unfolded protein stress and chemokine signalling. Altogether GC

  6. Hormone Replacement Therapy and Your Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormone replacement therapy and your heart Are you taking — or considering — hormone therapy to treat bothersome menopausal symptoms? Understand ... you. By Mayo Clinic Staff Long-term hormone replacement therapy used to be routinely prescribed for postmenopausal ...

  7. Hormone therapy and ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Andreasen, Anne Helms

    2009-01-01

    CONTEXT: Studies have suggested an increased risk of ovarian cancer among women taking postmenopausal hormone therapy. Data are sparse on the differential effects of formulations, regimens, and routes of administration. OBJECTIVE: To assess risk of ovarian cancer in perimenopausal and postmenopau...... therapy each year. CONCLUSION: Regardless of the duration of use, the formulation, estrogen dose, regimen, progestin type, and route of administration, hormone therapy was associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer.......CONTEXT: Studies have suggested an increased risk of ovarian cancer among women taking postmenopausal hormone therapy. Data are sparse on the differential effects of formulations, regimens, and routes of administration. OBJECTIVE: To assess risk of ovarian cancer in perimenopausal...... and postmenopausal women receiving different hormone therapies. DESIGN AND SETTING: Nationwide prospective cohort study including all Danish women aged 50 through 79 years from 1995 through 2005 through individual linkage to Danish national registers. Redeemed prescription data from the National Register...

  8. Side Effects of Hormone Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for PCF: Many vs Cancer Contact Us Side Effects of Hormone Therapy Testosterone is the primary male ... processes in the body. The list of potential effects of testosterone loss is long: hot flashes, decreased ...

  9. Hormone therapy and ovarian borderline tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Andreasen, Anne Helms

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the influence of postmenopausal hormone therapy on the risk of ovarian borderline tumors. We aimed at assessing the influence of different hormone therapies on this risk.......Little is known about the influence of postmenopausal hormone therapy on the risk of ovarian borderline tumors. We aimed at assessing the influence of different hormone therapies on this risk....

  10. Menopausal Hormone Therapy and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... studied in the WHI trials? Is there an optimal age at which to initiate MHT or an optimal duration of therapy that maximizes benefits and minimizes ... PubMed Abstract] Holmberg L, Anderson H. HABITS (hormonal replacement therapy after breast cancer―is it safe?), a ...

  11. Parathyroid hormone therapy for hypoparathyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusano, Natalie E.; Rubin, Mishaela R.; Bilezikian, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Hypoparathyroidism is a disease characterized by hypocalcemia and insufficient parathyroid hormone (PTH). It is a rare disorder that has been given an orphan disease designation in the United States and European Union. Hypoparathyroidism is the only endocrine deficiency disease for which the missing hormone, PTH, is not yet an approved therapy. Conventional therapy includes calcium and active vitamin D supplementation, often in large doses. Although serum calcium can be controlled with conventional therapy, it can be a challenge and, moreover, does not address other aspects of the disease, such as abnormal skeletal features and reduced quality of life. This review focuses on PTH replacement therapy in hypoparathyroidism, utilizing the full-length molecule PTH(1–84) as well as the fully active but truncated form PTH(1–34). PTH therapy addresses some aspects of the disease not ameliorated with conventional therapy. PMID:25617172

  12. Thyroid hormone replacement therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersinga, W. M.

    2001-01-01

    Thyroid hormone replacement has been used for more than 100 years in the treatment of hypothyroidism, and there is no doubt about its overall efficacy. Desiccated thyroid contains both thyroxine (T(4)) and triiodothyronine (T(3)); serum T(3) frequently rises to supranormal values in the absorption

  13. Progestogens in menopausal hormone therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Bińkowska

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Progestogens share one common effect: the ability to convert proliferative endometrium to its secretory form. In contrast, their biological activity is varied, depending on the chemical structure, pharmacokinetics, receptor affinity and different potency of action. Progestogens are widely used in the treatment of menstrual cycle disturbances, various gynaecological conditions, contraception and menopausal hormone therapy. The administration of progestogen in menopausal hormone therapy is essential in women with an intact uterus to protect against endometrial hyperplasia and cancer. Progestogen selection should be based on the characteristics available for each progestogen type, relying on the assessment of relative potency of action in experimental models and animal models, and on the indirect knowledge brought by studies of the clinical use of different progestogen formulations. The choice of progestogen should involve the conscious use of knowledge of its benefits, with a focus on minimizing potential side effects. Unfortunately, there are no direct clinical studies comparing the metabolic effects of different progestogens.

  14. Hormone Replacement Therapy: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Integrative Health) Related Issues Bioidentical Hormones and Menopause (Hormone Health Network) - PDF Also in Spanish Hormone Replacement ... Hormone Therapy Health Risks and Benefits (North American Menopause Society) - PDF ... Specifics Menopausal Hormone Therapy for the Primary Prevention of Chronic Conditions ( ...

  15. Estrogen and Progestin (Hormone Replacement Therapy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... report any lumps immediately.If you are taking hormone replacement therapy to treat symptoms of menopause, your doctor will check every 3 to 6 months to see if you still need this medication. If you are taking this ... hormone replacement therapy, because this medication may interfere with ...

  16. Menopausal Hormone Therapy for the Primary Prevention of Chronic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... These medications can be given during or after menopause. Hormone Therapy to Prevent Chronic Conditions Many women take ... a recommendation. Click Here to Learn More About Menopause and Hormone Therapy Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy: Information for the Public ( ...

  17. Hormone Replacement Therapy: Can It Cause Vaginal Bleeding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormone replacement therapy: Can it cause vaginal bleeding? I'm taking hormone therapy for menopause symptoms, and my monthly ... mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/menopause/expert-answers/hormone-replacement-therapy/FAQ-20058499 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions ...

  18. Postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy--clinical implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, S H; Rosenberg, J; Bostofte, E

    1994-01-01

    The menopause is defined as cessation of menstruation, ending the fertile period. The hormonal changes are a decrease in progesterone level, followed by a marked decrease in estrogen production. Symptoms associated with these hormonal changes may advocate for hormonal replacement therapy. This re......The menopause is defined as cessation of menstruation, ending the fertile period. The hormonal changes are a decrease in progesterone level, followed by a marked decrease in estrogen production. Symptoms associated with these hormonal changes may advocate for hormonal replacement therapy....... This review is based on the English-language literature on the effect of estrogen therapy and estrogen plus progestin therapy on postmenopausal women. The advantages of hormone replacement therapy are regulation of dysfunctional uterine bleeding, relief of hot flushes, and prevention of atrophic changes...... in the urogenital tract. Women at risk of osteoporosis will benefit from hormone replacement therapy. The treatment should start as soon after menopause as possible and it is possible that it should be maintained for life. The treatment may be supplemented with extra calcium intake, vitamin D, and maybe calcitonin...

  19. Effects of hormone therapy on blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Zeinab; Seely, Ellen W; Rahme, Maya; El-Hajj Fuleihan, Ghada

    2015-04-01

    Although hormone therapy remains the most efficacious option for the management of vasomotor symptoms of menopause, its effects on blood pressure remain unclear. This review scrutinizes evidence of the mechanisms of action of hormone therapy on signaling pathways affecting blood pressure and evidence from clinical studies. Comprehensive Ovid MEDLINE searches were conducted for the terms "hypertension" and either of the following "hormone therapy and menopause" or "selective estrogen receptor modulator" from year 2000 to November 2013. In vitro and physiologic studies did not reveal a clear deleterious effect of hormone therapy on blood pressure. The effect of oral therapy was essentially neutral in large trials conducted in normotensive women with blood pressure as primary outcome. Results from all other trials had several limitations. Oral therapy had a neutral effect on blood pressure in hypertensive women. Transdermal estrogen and micronized progesterone had a beneficial effect on blood pressure in normotensive women and, at most, a neutral effect on hypertensive women. In general, tibolone and raloxifene had a neutral effect on blood pressure in both hypertensive and normotensive women. Large randomized trials are needed to assess the effect of oral hormone therapy on blood pressure as a primary outcome in hypertensive women and the effect of transdermal preparations on both normotensive and hypertensive women. Transdermal preparations would be the preferred mode of therapy for hypertensive women, in view of their favorable physiologic and clinical profiles. The decision regarding the use of hormone therapy should be individualized, and blood pressure should be monitored during the course of treatment.

  20. Menopause, hormone therapy and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuenkel, C A

    2017-02-01

    Over the past three decades, the prevalence of diabetes has increased four-fold. Coupled with the global obesity epidemic and aging of the world's population, a perfect metabolic storm is brewing. The influence of menopause and exogenous estrogen and progestogens must be included in this equation. In this review, criteria for diagnosing diabetes and recommendations for screening are described. The reported effects of menopause on diabetes risk in healthy women are reviewed as well as the relationship between established diabetes and the timing of menopause. The effects of menopausal hormone therapies (MHT) on glucose control in women with diabetes and the effect of MHT on diabetes risk in menopausal women without diabetes are described. Evidence-based strategies to prevent diabetes in midlife women are highlighted. The augmenting effect of diabetes on chronic health concerns of aging women, such as cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and cancer, along with current recommendations for screening and prevention are presented. Given the current demographics of today's world, the content of this review may apply to as many as one-third of the average practitioner's postmenopausal patient population.

  1. Hormone abnormalities in patients with severe and chronic pain who fail standard treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennant, Forest

    2015-01-01

    Some patients with severe and chronic pain fail to obtain adequate pain relief with standard pharmacologic treatment agents, including low to moderate dosages of opioids. Understandably, physicians might not believe patients who claim that a standard opioid dosage is an ineffective treatment. These patients may be severely impaired, nonfunctional, and bedridden or housebound. To help characterize these individuals and develop treatment strategies for them, a serum hormone profile consisting of adrenocorticotropin, cortisol, pregnenolone, progesterone, dehydroepiandrosterone, and testosterone was obtained on 61 chronic pain patients who failed standard treatments; 49 patients (80.3%) demonstrated ≥ 1 hormone abnormality defined as a serum concentration or level above or below the normal range, and 7 patients (11.5%) showed a severe pituitary-adrenal-gonadal deficiency as indicated by deficient serum levels of adrenocorticotropin and ≥ 2 adrenal-gonadal hormones. Hormone serum abnormalities are biomarkers of severe, uncontrolled pain, and, in a patient who has failed standard treatment, they are an indicator that enhanced analgesia is required and that hormone replacement may be indicated.

  2. Therapy for obesity based on gastrointestinal hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Jonatan I; Christensen, Mikkel; Knop, Filip K

    2011-01-01

    It has long been known that peptide hormones from the gastrointestinal tract have significant impact on the regulation of nutrient metabolism. Among these hormones, incretins have been found to increase insulin secretion, and thus incretin-based therapies have emerged as new modalities...

  3. Hormone therapy and different ovarian cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Andreasen, Anne Helms

    2012-01-01

    Postmenopausal hormone therapy use increases the risk of ovarian cancer. In the present study, the authors examined the risks of different histologic types of ovarian cancer associated with hormone therapy. Using Danish national registers, the authors identified 909,946 women who were followed from.......8). Similar increased risks of serous and endometrioid tumors were found with estrogen/progestin therapy, whereas no association was found with mucinous tumors. Consistent with results from recent cohort studies, the authors found that ovarian cancer risk varied according to tumor histology. The types...... 1995-2005. The women were 50-79 years of age and had no prior hormone-sensitive cancers or bilateral oophorectomy. Hormone therapy prescription data were obtained from the National Register of Medicinal Product Statistics. The National Cancer and Pathology Register provided data on ovarian cancers...

  4. Menopause and hormone replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Baziad

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The global population in the 21st century has reached 6.2 billion people, by the year 2025 it is to be around 8.3-8.5 billion, and will increase further. Elderly people are expected to grow rapidly than other groups. The fastest increase in the elderly population will take place in Asia. Life expectancy is increasing steadily throughout developed and developing countries. For many  menopausal women, increased life expectancy will accompanied by many health problems. The consequences of estrogen deficiency are the menopausal symptoms. The treatment of menopause related complaints and diseases became an  important socioeconomic and medical issue. Long term symptoms, such as the increase in osteoporosis fractures, cardio and cerebrovascular disesses and dementia, created a large financial burden on individuals and society. All these health problems can be lreated or prevented by hormone replacement therapy (HRT. Natural HRT is usually prefened. Synthetic  estrogen in oral contraceptives (oc are not recommended for HRT. Many contra-indications for oc, but now it is widely usedfor HRT. The main reasons for discontinuing HRT are unwanted bleeding, fear of cancer, and negative side effects. Until now there are sill debates about the rebrtonship between HRT and the incidence of breast cancer. Many data showed that there were no clear relationship between the use of HRT and breast cancer. ThereÎore, nwny experts advocate the use of HRTfrom the first sign of climacteric complaints until death. (Med J Indones 2001;10: 242-51Keywords: estrogen deficiency, climacteric phases, tibolone.

  5. Effect of growth hormone replacement therapy on pituitary hormone secretion and hormone replacement therapies in GHD adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubina, Erika; Mersebach, Henriette; Rasmussen, Ase Krogh

    2004-01-01

    We tested the impact of commencement of GH replacement therapy in GH-deficient (GHD) adults on the circulating levels of other anterior pituitary and peripheral hormones and the need for re-evaluation of other hormone replacement therapies, especially the need for dose changes.......We tested the impact of commencement of GH replacement therapy in GH-deficient (GHD) adults on the circulating levels of other anterior pituitary and peripheral hormones and the need for re-evaluation of other hormone replacement therapies, especially the need for dose changes....

  6. Postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy--clinical implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, S H; Rosenberg, J; Bostofte, E

    1994-01-01

    in the urogenital tract. Women at risk of osteoporosis will benefit from hormone replacement therapy. The treatment should start as soon after menopause as possible and it is possible that it should be maintained for life. The treatment may be supplemented with extra calcium intake, vitamin D, and maybe calcitonin......The menopause is defined as cessation of menstruation, ending the fertile period. The hormonal changes are a decrease in progesterone level, followed by a marked decrease in estrogen production. Symptoms associated with these hormonal changes may advocate for hormonal replacement therapy......, but the contribution of progestins for about 10 days every month excludes this risk. Breast cancer in relation to estrogen-progestogen therapy has been given much concern, and the problem is still not fully solved. If there is a risk, it is small, and only after prolonged use of estrogen (15-20 years). The decision...

  7. The menopause and hormone replacement therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Nuttall, Dilyse

    2014-01-01

    Hormone replacement therapy can ease the symptoms of the menopause. The National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is developing guidelines on the diagnosis and management of menopause, which are due for release in October 2015. This welcome development acknowledges the impact that menopause-related symptoms can have on an individual. NICE (2013) identify menopause as the ending of menstruation resulting from a failure in ovarian follicular activity. Changes in hormone levels can...

  8. Hormonal component of tumor photodynamic therapy response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Merchant, Soroush

    2008-02-01

    The involvement of adrenal glucocorticoid hormones in the response of the treatment of solid tumors by photodynamic therapy (PDT) comes from the induction of acute phase response by this modality. This adrenal gland activity is orchestrated through the engagement of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal hormonal axis incited by stress signals emanating from the PDT-treated tumor. Glucocorticoid hormone activity engendered within the context of PDT-induced acute phase response performs multiple important functions; among other involvements they beget acute phase reactant production, systemic neutrophil mobilization, and control the production of inflammation-modulating and immunoregulatory proteins.

  9. Hormonal therapy in female pattern hair loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin R. Brough

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Female pattern hair loss is the most common cause of hair loss in women and one of the most common problems seen by dermatologists. This hair loss is a nonscarring alopecia in which loss occurs on the vertex scalp, generally sparing the frontal hairline. Hair loss can have significant psychosocial effects on patients, and treatment can be long and difficult. The influence of hormones on the pathogenesis of female pattern hair loss is not entirely known. The purpose of this paper is to review physiology and potential hormonal mechanisms for the pathogenesis of female pattern hair loss. We also discuss the current hormonal and hormone-modifying therapies that are available to providers as they partner with patients to treat this frustrating issue.

  10. Hormone replacement therapy and risk of glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lene; Friis, Søren; Hallas, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Several studies indicate that use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is associated with an increased risk of intracranial meningioma, while associations between HRT use and risk of other brain tumors have been less explored. We investigated the influence of HRT use on the risk of glioma...

  11. Hormone Therapy in Clinical Equine Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCue, Patrick M

    2016-12-01

    A wide variety of hormone therapies are used in clinical practice in the reproductive management of horses. The goal of this article is to review therapeutic options for a variety of clinical indications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Spermatogenesis Abnormalities following Hormonal Therapy in Transwomen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirachai Jindarak

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To measure spermatogenesis abnormalities in transwomen at the time of sex reassignment surgery (SRS and to analyze the association between hormonal therapy duration and infertility severity. Design. Retrospective study. Setting. University hospital. Patients. One-hundred seventy-three transwomen who underwent SRS from January 2000 to December 2015. Interventions. All orchidectomy specimens were retrospectively reviewed and classified. History of hormonal therapy duration was retrieved from medical records. Main Outcome Measures. Histological examinations of orchidectomy specimens were performed to assess spermatogenesis. Results. One-hundred seventy-three orchidectomy specimens were evaluated. Histological examinations showed maturation arrest in 36.4%, hypospermatogenesis in 26%, Sertoli cell-only syndrome in 20.2%, normal spermatogenesis in 11%, and seminiferous tubule hyalinization in 6.4% of the specimens. Spermatogenesis abnormality severity was not associated with the total therapy duration (P=0.81 or patient age at the time of surgery (P=0.88. Testicular volumes and sizes were associated with spermatogenesis abnormality severity (P=0.001 and P=0.026, right testicle and left testicle, resp.. Conclusion(s. Feminizing hormonal treatment leads to reductions in testicular germ cell levels. All transwomen should be warned about this consequence, and gamete preservation should be offered before starting hormonal treatment.

  13. Hormone Replacement Therapy and Physical Function in Healthy Older Men. Time to Talk Hormones?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannoulis, Manthos G.; Martin, Finbarr C.; Nair, K. Sreekumaran; Umpleby, A. Margot

    2012-01-01

    Improving physical function and mobility in a continuously expanding elderly population emerges as a high priority of medicine today. Muscle mass, strength/power, and maximal exercise capacity are major determinants of physical function, and all decline with aging. This contributes to the incidence of frailty and disability observed in older men. Furthermore, it facilitates the accumulation of body fat and development of insulin resistance. Muscle adaptation to exercise is strongly influenced by anabolic endocrine hormones and local load-sensitive autocrine/paracrine growth factors. GH, IGF-I, and testosterone (T) are directly involved in muscle adaptation to exercise because they promote muscle protein synthesis, whereas T and locally expressed IGF-I have been reported to activate muscle stem cells. Although exercise programs improve physical function, in the long-term most older men fail to comply. The GH/IGF-I axis and T levels decline markedly with aging, whereas accumulating evidence supports their indispensable role in maintaining physical function integrity. Several studies have reported that the administration of T improves lean body mass and maximal voluntary strength in healthy older men. On the other hand, most studies have shown that administration of GH alone failed to improve muscle strength despite amelioration of the detrimental somatic changes of aging. Both GH and T are anabolic agents that promote muscle protein synthesis and hypertrophy but work through separate mechanisms, and the combined administration of GH and T, albeit in only a few studies, has resulted in greater efficacy than either hormone alone. Although it is clear that this combined approach is effective, this review concludes that further studies are needed to assess the long-term efficacy and safety of combined hormone replacement therapy in older men before the medical rationale of prescribing hormone replacement therapy for combating the sarcopenia of aging can be established

  14. Hormone replacement therapy and physical function in healthy older men. Time to talk hormones?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannoulis, Manthos G; Martin, Finbarr C; Nair, K Sreekumaran; Umpleby, A Margot; Sonksen, Peter

    2012-06-01

    Improving physical function and mobility in a continuously expanding elderly population emerges as a high priority of medicine today. Muscle mass, strength/power, and maximal exercise capacity are major determinants of physical function, and all decline with aging. This contributes to the incidence of frailty and disability observed in older men. Furthermore, it facilitates the accumulation of body fat and development of insulin resistance. Muscle adaptation to exercise is strongly influenced by anabolic endocrine hormones and local load-sensitive autocrine/paracrine growth factors. GH, IGF-I, and testosterone (T) are directly involved in muscle adaptation to exercise because they promote muscle protein synthesis, whereas T and locally expressed IGF-I have been reported to activate muscle stem cells. Although exercise programs improve physical function, in the long-term most older men fail to comply. The GH/IGF-I axis and T levels decline markedly with aging, whereas accumulating evidence supports their indispensable role in maintaining physical function integrity. Several studies have reported that the administration of T improves lean body mass and maximal voluntary strength in healthy older men. On the other hand, most studies have shown that administration of GH alone failed to improve muscle strength despite amelioration of the detrimental somatic changes of aging. Both GH and T are anabolic agents that promote muscle protein synthesis and hypertrophy but work through separate mechanisms, and the combined administration of GH and T, albeit in only a few studies, has resulted in greater efficacy than either hormone alone. Although it is clear that this combined approach is effective, this review concludes that further studies are needed to assess the long-term efficacy and safety of combined hormone replacement therapy in older men before the medical rationale of prescribing hormone replacement therapy for combating the sarcopenia of aging can be established.

  15. [Menopausal hormonal therapy and cancer risks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasserre, A; Fournier, A

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen-progestagen menopausal hormonal therapy (MHT) is recognized as carcinogenic to humans. The article presents the associations between MHT and breast, ovary and endometrial cancer risks, in particular according to treatment modalities. If MHT must be prescribed, it is recommended to use the lowest dose for the shortest possible duration. Discussing with the patient the benefits but also the risks and making regular gynecological follow-up are strongly encouraged. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Hypoparathyroidism: Replacement Therapy with Parathyroid Hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Rejnmark

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hypoparathyroidism (HypoPT is characterized by low serum calcium levels caused by an insufficient secretion of parathyroid hormone (PTH. Despite normalization of serum calcium levels by treatment with activated vitamin D analogues and calcium supplementation, patients are suffering from impaired quality of life (QoL and are at increased risk of a number of comorbidities. Thus, despite normalization of calcium levels in response to conventional therapy, this should only be considered as an apparent normalization, as patients are suffering from a number of complications and calcium-phosphate homeostasis is not normalized in a physiological manner. In a number of recent studies, replacement therapy with recombinant human PTH (rhPTH(1-84 as well as therapy with the N-terminal PTH fragment (rhPTH(1-34 have been investigated. Both drugs have been shown to normalize serum calcium while reducing needs for activated vitamin D and calcium supplements. However, once a day injections cause large fluctuations in serum calcium. Twice a day injections diminish fluctuations, but don't restore the normal physiology of calcium homeostasis. Recent studies using pump-delivery have shown promising results on maintaining normocalcemia with minimal fluctuations in calcium levels. Further studies are needed to determine whether this may improve QoL and lower risk of complications. Such data are needed before replacement with the missing hormone can be recommended as standard therapy.

  17. Hormone therapy in metastatic prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jebelameli P

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available Only orchiectomy is still commonly used today either as a single therapy or in combination regimens. Hypophysectomy & adrenalectomy showed such devastating effects on the endocrine equilibrium as to be inconsistent with an acceptable quality of life or even with survival. Chemical adrenalectomy was also tried with drugs (eg. aminoglutethmide, spironolactone leading to consequences superimposable to those of surgical adrenalectomy. Along with orchiectomy, three groups of substances are commonly used today for the hormonal therapy of prostate cancer: estrogens, LHRH agonists & anti androgens. Bilateral orchiectomy removes 90-95% of circulating testosterone. Clinical studies document 60-80% of positive responders to castration, on continued evaluation, relapse occurs usually within 6-24 months in responders, with a death rate of 50% within 6 months. The androgenic activity still remaining after castration may explain the partial & progressively decreasing effectiveness of this & other testosterone reducing therapies. Antiandrogens define substances that act directly at the target site, where interacting with steroid hormone receptors, they impede the binding of androgens. A trend towards the combination of testosterone-reducing & androgen-blocking treatment is developing in modern therapy of prostate cancer. This is due to the complementary characteristics of the two different pharmacological mechanisms that are involved. In this study castration+antiandrogen is compared to castration alone. The results demonstrate a significantly greater percentage of positive objective & subjective responses with antiandrogen than with placebo. In addition survival time was increased in patients treated with castration+antiandrogen than castration+placebo.

  18. Growth hormone therapy for people with thalassaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngim, Chin Fang; Lai, Nai Ming; Hong, Janet Yh; Tan, Shir Ley; Ramadas, Amutha; Muthukumarasamy, Premala; Thong, Meow-Keong

    2017-09-18

    Thalassaemia is a recessively-inherited blood disorder that leads to anaemia of varying severity. In those affected by the more severe forms, regular blood transfusions are required which may lead to iron overload. Accumulated iron from blood transfusions may be deposited in vital organs including the heart, liver and endocrine organs such as the pituitary glands which can affect growth hormone production. Growth hormone deficiency is one of the factors that can lead to short stature, a common complication in people with thalassaemia. Growth hormone replacement therapy has been used in children with thalassaemia who have short stature and growth hormone deficiency. To assess the benefits and safety of growth hormone therapy in people with thalassaemia. We searched the Cochrane Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register, compiled from electronic database searches and handsearching of journals and conference abstract books. We also searched the reference lists of relevant articles, reviews and clinical trial registries. Our database and trial registry searches are current to 10 August 2017 and 08 August 2017, respectively. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing the use of growth hormone therapy to placebo or standard care in people with thalassaemia of any type or severity. Two authors independently selected trials for inclusion. Data extraction and assessment of risk of bias were also conducted independently by two authors. The quality of the evidence was assessed using GRADE criteria. One parallel trial conducted in Turkey was included. The trial recruited 20 children with homozygous beta thalassaemia who had short stature; 10 children received growth hormone therapy administered subcutaneously on a daily basis at a dose of 0.7 IU/kg per week and 10 children received standard care. The overall risk of bias in this trial was low except for the selection criteria and attrition bias which were unclear. The quality of the evidence for all major outcomes

  19. Hormone therapy and different ovarian cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Andreasen, Anne Helms

    2012-01-01

    , including information about tumor histology. The authors performed Poisson regression analyses that included hormone exposures and confounders as time-dependent covariates. In an average of 8.0 years of follow up, 2,681 cases of epithelial ovarian cancer were detected. Compared with never users, women.......8). Similar increased risks of serous and endometrioid tumors were found with estrogen/progestin therapy, whereas no association was found with mucinous tumors. Consistent with results from recent cohort studies, the authors found that ovarian cancer risk varied according to tumor histology. The types...... of ovarian tumors should be given attention in future studies....

  20. Hormone replacement therapy in cancer survivors: Utopia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angioli, Roberto; Luvero, Daniela; Armento, Grazia; Capriglione, Stella; Plotti, Francesco; Scaletta, Giuseppe; Lopez, Salvatore; Montera, Roberto; Gatti, Alessandra; Serra, Giovan Battista; Benedetti Panici, Pierluigi; Terranova, Corrado

    2018-04-01

    As growing of old women population, menopausal women will also increase: an accurate estimation of postmenopausal population is an essential information for health care providers considering that with aging, the incidence of all cancers is expected to increase. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) has proven to be highly effective in alleviating menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes, night sweats, dyspareunia, sexual disorders, and insomnia and in preventing osteoporosis. According to preclinical data, estrogen and progesterone are supposed to be involved in the induction and progression of breast and endometrial cancers. Similarly, in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), the pathogenesis seems to be at least partly hormonally influenced. Is HRT in gynecological cancer survivors possible? The literature data are controversial. Many clinicians remain reluctant to prescribe HRT for these patients due to the fear of relapse and the risk to develop coronary heart disease or breast cancer. Before the decision to use HRT an accurate counselling should be mandatory in order to individualizing on the basis of potential risks and benefits, including a close follow-up. Nevertheless, we do believe that with strong informed consent doctors may individually consider to prescribe some course of HRT in order to minimize menopausal symptoms and disease related to hormonal reduction. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Hand osteoarthritis, menopause and menopausal hormone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Fiona E

    2016-01-01

    Hand osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the commonest musculoskeletal conditions, primarily affecting women over the age of 50, typically around the age of the menopause. Symptomatic disease can give rise to substantial pain, impairment of hand function and quality of life, leading to significant socioeconomic cost. There is currently no disease-modifying therapy, representing a huge unmet clinical need. The evidence for a relationship between hand OA and the menopause is summarised. Whether there is evidence for an effect of menopausal hormonal therapy on the incidence, prevalence or severity of symptomatic hand OA is critically reviewed, and gaps in our knowledge identified. Lastly, the potential mechanisms by which estrogen, or newer agents such as SERMs, might act to interfere with disease pathogenesis are overviewed. The need for specifically designed, controlled trials of agents in cohorts with symptomatic hand OA, refractory to standard symptomatic management is highlighted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Hormones and tumour therapy: current clinical status and future developments in endocrine therapy of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szepesi, T.; Schratter-Sehn, A.U.

    1982-01-01

    Postoperative adjuvant hormone therapy and hormone therapy in disseminated breast cancer will be discussed systematically. The classical ablative and additive endocrine therapeutic measures - with the exception of ovarectomy and gestagen therapy - are increasinlgy being replaced by antagonists. Individual chapters discuss recent experience with combined hormone-radiotherapy or hormone-chemotherapy. In addition, a successful therapy scheme for the treatment of disseminated breast cancer will be presented. (Author)

  3. Hormonal contraception and postmenopausal hormone therapy in Spain: time trends and patterns of use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costas, Laura; Sequera, Víctor-Guillermo; Quesada, Paloma; Altzibar, Jone M; Lope, Virginia; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Benavente, Yolanda; Martín, Vicente; Casabonne, Delphine; Robles, Claudia; Llorca, Javier; Moreno-Iribas, Conchi; Fernandez-Tardón, Guillermo; Moreno, Victor; Caballero-Granado, Francisco Javier; Salas, Dolores; Jiménez-Moleón, José Juan; Marcos-Gragera, Rafael; Chirlaque, María-Dolores; Amiano, Pilar; Molina, Antonio Jose; Castaño-Vinyals, Gemma; Aragonés, Nuria; Kogevinas, Manolis; Pollán, Marina; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to describe time trends in and patterns of use of hormonal contraception and postmenopausal hormone therapy and to identify factors associated with their use among Spanish women. We performed a cross-sectional analysis using data from 1,954 population controls (aged 24-85 y) in 12 provinces of Spain who were enrolled in the Multi Case-Control Spain study (2007-2013). Data were collected from a questionnaire conducted face-to-face by trained personnel. We collected information on sociodemographic factors, lifestyle, sleep patterns, reproductive history, and occupational history. Overall, 48.5% of Spanish women reported ever use of hormonal contraception, and 9.8% of women in the postmenopausal group reported use of postmenopausal hormone therapy. Younger cohorts used hormonal contraception for a longer period, whereas postmenopausal hormone therapy use dramatically dropped in the 2000s. Women with higher education levels (including education of partners) and smoking history were the most probable users of hormonal contraception, whereas inverse associations were observed among housewives, obese women, and nulliparous women. Postmenopausal hormone therapy use was associated with a surgical or therapeutic cause of menopause and with occupational history of rotating shifts. In this Spanish population, several demographic, lifestyle, occupational, and reproductive factors are associated with use of hormonal compounds. Characterizing hormonal users and monitoring trends in the use of these hormonal compounds are essential from a public health perspective.

  4. Therapeutic options after failed Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hulst, R. W.; Weel, J. F.; van der Ende, A.; ten Kate, F. J.; Dankert, J.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Many of the currently used Helicobacter pylori eradication regimens fail to cure 5-20% of the patients. Those patients will remain at risk of developing a potentially fatal complication of peptic ulcer disease. Therefore, a new attempt to cure H. pylori infection after initial failure of

  5. Hormone replacement therapy increases the risk of cranial meningioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lene; Friis, Søren; Hallas, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the influence of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use on the risk of meningioma in a population-based setting.......We investigated the influence of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use on the risk of meningioma in a population-based setting....

  6. Risk of Stroke with Various Types of Menopausal Hormone Therapies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, Ellen; Nielsen, Lars Hougaard; Keiding, Niels

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Double-blind randomized studies on the effects of oral postmenopausal hormone therapies were stopped mainly because of increased risk of stroke. We aimed to assess the risk of all strokes and various subtypes associated with hormone therapy and explore the influence of reg...

  7. Improving compliance with hormonal replacement therapy in primary osteoporosis prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, P; Hermann, A P; Gram, J

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate whether introduction of treatment alternatives would improve compliance with hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) as primary osteoporosis prevention in women not tolerating the first line osteoporosis prevention schedule.......To evaluate whether introduction of treatment alternatives would improve compliance with hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) as primary osteoporosis prevention in women not tolerating the first line osteoporosis prevention schedule....

  8. Growth Hormone Therapy in Adults with Prader-Willi Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen S. Vogt

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS is characterized by hyperphagia, obesity if food intake is not strictly controlled, abnormal body composition with decreased lean body mass and increased fat mass, decreased basal metabolic rate, short stature, low muscle tone, cognitive disability, and hypogonadism. In addition to improvements in linear growth, the benefits of growth hormone therapy on body composition and motor function in children with PWS are well established. Evidence is now emerging on the benefits of growth hormone therapy in adults with PWS. This review summarizes the current literature on growth hormone status and the use of growth hormone therapy in adults with PWS. The benefits of growth hormone therapy on body composition, muscle strength, exercise capacity, certain measures of sleep-disordered breathing, metabolic parameters, quality of life, and cognition are covered in detail along with potential adverse effects and guidelines for initiating and monitoring therapy.

  9. Menopause-related symptoms: traditional Chinese medicine vs hormone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Hoda; Feng Liu, Yan; Du, Lin; Hua Wang, Chao; Bahrami-Taghanaki, Hamidreza; Ollah Esmaily, Habib; Azizi, Hamideh; Ou Xue, Xiao

    2011-01-01

    To compare the therapeutic effect of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM), acupuncture, and hormone therapy on menopause- related symptoms of peri- and postmenopausal women. Fifty-seven Chinese women completed 2 months of treatment with either CHM (5 g twice daily, n = 22), acupuncture plus CHM (Kun Bao Wan) 5 g twice daily plus sessions of acupuncture, n = 20), or hormone therapy (n = 15). Kupperman index score, levels of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and estradiol, and the number of symptoms before and after treatment were the main outcome measures. CHM, acupuncture plus CHM, and hormone therapy significantly decreased Kupperman score (P acupuncture plus CHM and CHM with significantly better results by acupuncture plus CHM. Acupuncture plus CHM, as well as hormone therapy, significantly reduced the level of FSH (P .05). The mean difference in the level of FSH between baseline and 2 months among the three groups was significantly different (P = .02). This difference was only between CHM and hormone therapy with significantly better results by hormone therapy. The three treatments didn't make any significant increase in the level of E2 (P > .05). application of the combination of Chinese herbal medicine and acupuncture proved as effective as hormone therapy in the treatment of menopause-related symptoms, and it achieved better outcomes than herbal medicine alone.

  10. Therapy of hypoparathyroidism by replacement with parathyroid hormone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rejnmark, Lars; Underbjerg, Line; Sikjaer, Tanja

    2014-01-01

    L) seems impaired and patients are at increased risk of renal complications. A number of studies have suggested subcutaneous injections with PTH as an alternative therapy. By replacement with the missing hormone, urinary calcium may be lowered and QoL may improve. PTH replacement therapy (PTH-RT) possesses....... If beneficial, it seems likely that standard treatment of HypoPT in the future will change into replacement therapy with the missing hormone....

  11. [Our experience with hormonal therapy in transsexual patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Vladimír; Weiss, Petr; Fifková, Hana

    2015-03-01

    Hormonal therapy in transsexual patients (TS) includes sexagens administration: androgens in female-to-male transsexual patients (FtM) and oestrogens and antiandrogens in male-to-female transsexual patients (MtF). Duration of hormonal therapy should continue at least 1 year before gender reassignment surgery. Hormonal therapy supresses former gender and induces partially new gender changes. Hormonal therapy continues subsequently after surgery during life. Hormonal therapy in MtF TS includes oestrogens and antiandrogens application. In very young persons in both groups blocking gonadoliberin analogues can be used. In FtM TS testosterone oneself is given (orally and/or parenterally). Authors describe their own experiences with hormonal treatment in 282 TS (163 FtM and 119 MtF). During hormonal therapy statistically significant weight increasing was found in both groups. Total cholesterol increased in FtM. In MtF during hormonal therapy average prolactin level increased from 350.1 to 570.5 mU/l without clinical significance. Total average hormonal therapy duration was 6.73 years in FtM and 4.64 years in MtF and so overall therapy safety assessment is not possible. Any endocrinopathy occurence in the beginning of surveillance was found in 35 persons (12.4 %): simple goiter, autoimmune thyreoiditis, hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, gynecomastia, DM type 1, congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), Klinefelter syndrome and nonfunctional pituitary adenoma. It is appropriate as well as in other rare medicine conditions to manage diagnosing and therapy in centers with experience with these issues.

  12. Efficacy of chemotherapy after hormone therapy for hormone receptor–positive metastatic breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryutaro Mori

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: According to the guidelines for metastatic breast cancer, hormone therapy for hormone receptor–positive metastatic breast cancer without life-threatening metastasis should be received prior to chemotherapy. Previous trials have investigated the sensitivity of chemotherapy for preoperative breast cancer based on the efficacy of neoadjuvant hormone therapy. In this retrospective study, we investigated the efficacy of chemotherapy for metastatic breast cancer in hormone therapy–effective and hormone therapy–ineffective cases. Methods: Patients who received chemotherapy after hormone therapy for metastatic breast cancer between 2006 and 2013 at our institution were investigated. Results: A total of 32 patients received chemotherapy after hormone therapy for metastatic breast cancer. The median patient age was 59 years, and most of the primary tumors exhibited a T2 status. A total of 26 patients had an N(+ status, while 7 patients had human epidermal growth factor receptor 2–positive tumors. A total of 13 patients received clinical benefits from hormone therapy, with a rate of clinical benefit of subsequent chemotherapy of 30.8%, which was not significantly different from that observed in the hormone therapy–ineffective patients (52.6%. A total of 13 patients were able to continue the hormone therapy for more than 1 year, with a rate of clinical benefit of chemotherapy of 38.5%, which was not significantly different from that observed in the short-term hormone therapy patients (47.4%. The luminal A patients were able to continue hormone therapy for a significantly longer period than the non-luminal A patients (median survival time: 17.8 months vs 6.35 months, p = 0.0085. However, there were no significant differences in the response to or duration of chemotherapy. Conclusion: The efficacy of chemotherapy for metastatic breast cancer cannot be predicted based on the efficacy of prior hormone therapy or tumor subtype

  13. Hormone-replacement therapy: current thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Roger A

    2017-04-01

    For several decades, the role of hormone-replacement therapy (HRT) has been debated. Early observational data on HRT showed many benefits, including a reduction in coronary heart disease (CHD) and mortality. More recently, randomized trials, including the Women's Health Initiative (WHI), studying mostly women many years after the the onset of menopause, showed no such benefit and, indeed, an increased risk of CHD and breast cancer, which led to an abrupt decrease in the use of HRT. Subsequent reanalyzes of data from the WHI with age stratification, newer randomized and observational data and several meta-analyses now consistently show reductions in CHD and mortality when HRT is initiated soon after menopause. HRT also significantly decreases the incidence of various symptoms of menopause and the risk of osteoporotic fractures, and improves quality of life. In younger healthy women (aged 50-60 years), the risk-benefit balance is positive for using HRT, with risks considered rare. As no validated primary prevention strategies are available for younger women (<60 years of age), other than lifestyle management, some consideration might be given to HRT as a prevention strategy as treatment can reduce CHD and all-cause mortality. Although HRT should be primarily oestrogen-based, no particular HRT regimen can be advocated.

  14. Hormone therapy after the Women's Health Initiative: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holtrop Jodi S

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Publication of results from the Women's Health Initiative study in July 2002 was a landmark event in biomedical science related to postmenopausal women. The purpose of this study was to describe the impact of new hormone therapy recommendations on patients' attitudes and decision-making in a primary care practice. Methods A questionnaire including structured and open-ended questions was administered in a family practice office waiting room from August through October 2003. Rationale for taking or not taking hormone therapy was specifically sought. Women 50–70 years old attending for office visits were invited to participate. Data were analyzed qualitatively and with descriptive statistics. Chart review provided medication use rates for the entire practice cohort of which the sample was a subset. Results Respondents (n = 127 were predominantly white and well educated, and were taking hormone therapy at a higher rate (38% than the overall rate (26% for women of the same age range in this practice. Belief patterns about hormone therapy were, in order of frequency, 'use is risky', 'vindication or prior beliefs', 'benefit to me outweighs risk', and 'unaware of new recommendations'. Twenty-eight out of 78 women continued hormones use after July 2002. Of 50 women who initially stopped hormone therapy after July 2002, 12 resumed use. Women who had stopped hormone therapy were a highly symptomatic group. Responses with emotional overtones such as worry, confusion, anger, and grief were common. Conclusion Strategies for decision support about hormone therapy should explicitly take into account women's preferences about symptom relief and the trade-offs among relevant risks. Some women may need emotional support during transitions in hormone therapy use.

  15. Hormone replacement therapy in Denmark, 1995-2004

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, Ellen; Lidegaard, Ojvind; Møller, Lisbeth Nørgaard

    2007-01-01

    Recently, the Danish National Register of Medicinal Product Statistics (NRM) was opened for research purposes, and therefore, on an individual basis, can merge with other national registers. The aim of this study was to analyse the use of hormones based on the individual data of the entire Danish...... female population, with the focus on a detailed evaluation of specific hormone regimens and factors associated with systemic hormone replacement therapy (HRT)....

  16. Empiric medical therapy with hormonal agents for idiopathic male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas N Tadros

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Gonadotropins, SERMs, and aromatase inhibitors may improve semen parameters and hormone levels in men with idiopathic infertility with the best results from SERMs. Testosterone should never be used to treat infertility. Large multicenter randomized controlled studies are needed to better determine the success of empiric use of hormonal therapy on pregnancy rates.

  17. Starting Hormone Therapy at Menopause Increases Breast Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    According to a January 28, 2011 article in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, women who start taking menopausal hormone therapy around the time of menopause have a higher risk of breast cancer than women who begin taking hormones a few years later.

  18. Menopausal hormone therapy post WHI: a window of opportunity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Women's Health Initiative randomised controlled trials that were mainly of relatively older postmenopausal women, reported that menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) has adverse consequences including an increased risk of breast cancer, coronary heart disease (CHD), venous thromboembolism (VTE) and stroke.

  19. Endocrine therapy use among elderly hormone receptor-pos...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Clinical guidelines recommend that women with hormone-receptor positive breast cancer receive endocrine therapy (selective estrogen receptor modulators or aromatase...

  20. Improving compliance with hormonal replacement therapy in primary osteoporosis prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, P; Hermann, A P; Gram, J

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate whether introduction of treatment alternatives would improve compliance with hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) as primary osteoporosis prevention in women not tolerating the first line osteoporosis prevention schedule....

  1. Hormone replacement therapy and survival after surgery for ovarian cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Eeles, R A; Tan, S; Wiltshaw, E; Fryatt, I; A'Hern, R P; Shepherd, J H; Harmer, C L; Blake, P R; Chilvers, C E

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To evaluate whether hormone replacement therapy affects survival in women who have undergone bilateral salphingo-oophorectomy because of epithelial ovarian cancer. DESIGN--Retrospective analysis by review of patients' notes and questionnaires completed by general practitioners to compare the overall survival and disease free survival in patients with ovarian cancer who did or did not receive hormone replacement therapy after diagnosis. Data were analysed by Cox regression, with hor...

  2. Incretin hormones as a target for therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Jens Juul

    2016-01-01

    Incretin hormones are responsible for the incretin effect, which is the amplification of insulin secretion when nutrients are taken in orally, as opposed to intravenously.......Incretin hormones are responsible for the incretin effect, which is the amplification of insulin secretion when nutrients are taken in orally, as opposed to intravenously....

  3. Increased survival in men with metastatic prostate cancer receiving chemo and hormone therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men with hormone-sensitive metastatic prostate cancer who received the chemotherapy drug docetaxel given at the start of standard hormone therapy lived longer than patients who received hormone therapy alone, according to early results from a NIH-supporte

  4. Effects of Growth Hormone Replacement Therapy on Bone Mineral Density in Growth Hormone Deficient Adults: A Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Xue, Peng; Wang, Yan; Yang, Jie; Li, Yukun

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Growth hormone deficiency patients exhibited reduced bone mineral density compared with healthy controls, but previous researches demonstrated uncertainty about the effect of growth hormone replacement therapy on bone in growth hormone deficient adults. The aim of this study was to determine whether the growth hormone replacement therapy could elevate bone mineral density in growth hormone deficient adults. Methods. In this meta-analysis, searches of Medline, Embase, and The Cochr...

  5. Progressive pituitary hormone deficiency following radiation therapy in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loureiro, Rafaela A.; Vaisman, Mario

    2004-01-01

    Hypopituitarism can be caused by radiation therapy, even when it is not directly applied on the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, and can lead to anterior pituitary deficiency mainly due to hypothalamic damage. The progressive loss of the anterior pituitary hormones usually occurs in the following order: growth hormone, gonadotropin hormones, adrenocorticotropic hormone and thyroid-stimulating hormone. Although there are several different tests available to confirm anterior pituitary deficiency, this paper will focus on the gold standard tests for patients submitted to radiation therapy. We emphasize that the decline of anterior pituitary function is time- and dose-dependent with some variability among the different axes. Therefore, awareness of the need of a joint management by endocrinologists and oncologists is essential to improve treatment and quality of life of the patients. (author)

  6. Functional and molecular neuroimaging of menopause and hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comasco, Erika; Frøkjær, Vibe; Sundström-Poromaa, Inger

    2014-01-01

    The level of gonadal hormones to which the female brain is exposed considerably changes across the menopausal transition, which in turn, is likely to be of great relevance for neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. However, the neurobiological consequences of these hormone fluctuat......The level of gonadal hormones to which the female brain is exposed considerably changes across the menopausal transition, which in turn, is likely to be of great relevance for neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. However, the neurobiological consequences of these hormone...... fluctuations and of hormone replacement therapy in the menopause have only begun to be understood. The present review summarizes the findings of thirty-five studies of human brain function, including functional magnetic resonance imaging, positron and single-photon computed emission tomography studies, in peri......-controlled multi-modal prospective neuroimaging studies as well as investigation on the related molecular mechanisms of effects of menopausal hormonal variations on the brain....

  7. Optimization of growth hormone therapy in growth hormone deficient children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M.P.F. de Muinck Keizer-Schrama (Sabine)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractIt is obvious that the results published so far as well as the present preliminary data do not answer many questions regarding the optimal therapeutic regimen in GH deficiency. In particular, long-term follow-up must be organized to evaluate efficacy and safety of GH therapy not only in

  8. The influence of hormone therapies on colon and rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Lidegaard, Øjvind; Keiding, Niels; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Kjær, Susanne Krüger

    2016-05-01

    Exogenous sex hormones seem to play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Little is known about the influence of different types or durations of postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) on colorectal cancer risk. A nationwide cohort of women 50-79 years old without previous cancer (n = 1,006,219) were followed 1995-2009. Information on HT exposures was from the National Prescription Register and updated daily, while information on colon (n = 8377) and rectal cancers (n = 4742) were from the National Cancer Registry. Potential confounders were obtained from other national registers. Poisson regression analyses with 5-year age bands included hormone exposures as time-dependent covariates. Use of estrogen-only therapy and combined therapy were associated with decreased risks of colon cancer (adjusted incidence rate ratio 0.77, 95 % confidence interval 0.68-0.86 and 0.88, 0.80-0.96) and rectal cancer (0.83, 0.72-0.96 and 0.89, 0.80-1.00), compared to never users. Transdermal estrogen-only therapy implied more protection than oral administration, while no significant influence was found of regimen, progestin type, nor of tibolone. The benefit of HT was stronger for long-term hormone users; and hormone users were at lower risk of advanced stage of colorectal cancer, which seems supportive for a causal association between hormone therapy and colorectal cancer.

  9. Hormone therapy might be underutilized in women with early menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindh-Åstrand, L; Hoffmann, M; Järvstråt, L; Fredriksson, M; Hammar, M; Spetz Holm, A-C

    2015-04-01

    Are Swedish women age 40-44 years with assumed early menopause 'undertreated' by hormone therapy (HT)? Many women with probable early menopause discontinue their HT after a short period of time. Thus, they fail to complete the recommended replacement up to age 51-52 years, the average age of menopause. Spontaneous early menopause occurs in ∼5% of women age 40-45 years. Regardless of the cause, women who experience hormonal menopause due to bilateral oophorectomy before the median age of spontaneous menopause are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease, neurological disease, osteoporosis, psychiatric illness and even death. The study is descriptive, and epidemiological and was based on the use of national registers of dispensed drug prescriptions (HT) linking registers from the National Board of Health and Welfare and Statistics Sweden from 1 July 2005 until 31 December 2011. The study population consisted of 310 404 women, 40-44 years old on 31 December 2005 who were followed from 1 July 2005 until 31 December 2011. Only 0.9% of women 40-44 years old started HT during the study period. A majority of these women used HT menopause was the main reason. Because of the study design-making a retrospective study of registers-we can only speculate on the reasons for most of the women in this group discontinuing HT. Another limitation of this study is that we have a rather short observation time. However, we have up to now only been able to collect and combine the data since July 2005. As the occurrence of spontaneous early menopause in women age 40-45 is reported to be ∼5%, the fact that menopause may have used combined contraceptives as supplementation therapy, but in Sweden HT is the recommended treatment for early menopause so any such women are not following this recommendation. Women who experience early menopause are at increased risk for overall morbidity and mortality, and can expect to benefit from HT until they have reached at least the median age of

  10. Cross-gender hormone therapy in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steever, John

    2014-06-01

    Many transgender youth experience significant amounts of emotional distress regarding the incongruence between their internal gender identity and their physical body. Cross-gender hormonal medical treatments, as managed by a multidisciplinary medical/mental health team, assist patients in transitioning to their desired gender by aligning the physical body to match the gender identity. The World Professional Association for Transgender Health Standards of Care and the Endocrine Society's Clinical Practice Guidelines provide a basic road map for practitioners. Expectations of the youth and the concerns of the family must be addressed and the youth psychologically supported during the transition period. Issues around future fertility should be explored as well. The goal of this article is to introduce the general pediatrician to cross-gender hormone treatments, their management, monitoring laboratory tests and clinical effects, and the issues surrounding their use in adolescents. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Hormone therapy for the management of menopause symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins Fantasia, Heidi; Sutherland, Melissa A

    2014-01-01

    Many women will undergo menopause without incident, but others will experience bothersome effects resulting from declining estrogen levels. Vasomotor symptoms, which manifest as intense feelings of warmth, flushing, and perspiration, are the most common symptoms for which women seek treatment. Hormone therapy is indicated for the relief of vasomotor symptoms related to menopause. We review current Food Drug Administration-approved options for hormone therapy and discuss implications for practice and patient education. © 2014 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  12. Functional and molecular neuroimaging of menopause and hormone replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika eComasco

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The level of gonadal hormones to which the female brain is exposed considerably changes across the menopausal transition, which in turn, is likely to be of great relevance for neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. However, the neurobiological consequences of these hormone fluctuations and of hormone replacement therapy in the menopause have only begun to be understood. This review summarizes the findings of thirty-four studies of human brain function, including functional magnetic resonance imaging, positron and single-photon computed emission tomography studies, in peri- and postmenopausal women treated with estrogen, or estrogen-progestagen replacement therapy. Seven studies using gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist intervention as a model of hormonal withdrawal are also included. Cognitive paradigms are employed by the majority of studies evaluating the effect of unopposed estrogen or estrogen-progestagen treatment on peri- and postmenopausal women’s brain. In randomized-controlled trials, estrogen treatment enhances activation of fronto-cingulate regions during cognitive functioning, though in many cases no difference in cognitive performance was present. Progestagens seems to counteract the effects of estrogens. Findings on cognitive functioning during acute ovarian hormone withdrawal suggest a decrease in activation of the inferior frontal gyrus, thus essentially corroborating the findings in postmenopausal women. Studies of the cholinergic and serotonergic systems indicate these systems as biological mediators of hormonal influences on the brain. More, hormonal replacement appears to increase cerebral blood flow in cortical regions. On the other hand, studies on emotion processing in postmenopausal women are lacking. These results call for well-powered randomized-controlled multi-modal prospective neuroimaging studies as well as investigation on the related molecular mechanisms of effects of menopausal hormonal

  13. Abnormal Bleeding during Menopause Hormone Therapy: Insights for Clinical Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastião Freitas De Medeiros

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective Our objective was to review the involved mechanisms and propose actions for controlling/treating abnormal uterine bleeding during climacteric hormone therapy. Methods A systemic search of the databases SciELO, MEDLINE, and Pubmed was performed for identifying relevant publications on normal endometrial bleeding, abnormal uterine bleeding, and hormone therapy bleeding. Results Before starting hormone therapy, it is essential to exclude any abnormal organic condition, identify women at higher risk for bleeding, and adapt the regimen to suit eachwoman's characteristics. Abnormal bleeding with progesterone/progestogen only, combined sequential, or combined continuous regimens may be corrected by changing the progestogen, adjusting the progestogen or estrogen/progestogen doses, or even switching the initial regimen to other formulation. Conclusion To diminish the occurrence of abnormal bleeding during hormone therapy (HT, it is important to tailor the regimen to the needs of individual women and identify those with higher risk of bleeding. The use of new agents as adjuvant therapies for decreasing abnormal bleeding in women on HT awaits future studies.

  14. Old and New Gut Hormone, Gastrin and Acid Suppressive Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruma, Ken; Kamada, Tomoari; Manabe, Noriaki; Suehiro, Mitsuhiko; Kawamoto, Hirofumi; Shiotani, Akiko

    2018-03-27

    Gastrin acts physiologically as a gut hormone to stimulate acid secretion after meal and as a cell-growth factor of oxyntic mucosa. Increase in serum gastrin level happens under various conditions including Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, antral G cell hyperplasia, autoimmune gastritis, atrophic gastritis, renal failure, vagotomy, Helicobacter pylori infection and acid suppressive therapy. As acid suppressive therapy causes hypergastrinemia, the association between acid suppressive therapy and gastric neuroendocrine cell tumor (NET) has been discussed during the past 30 years. In this review article, the definition of hypergastrinemia and the related disorders including acid suppressive therapy and gastric NET are discussed. © 2018 Japanese Gastroenterological Association Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Continuation of growth hormone therapy versus placebo in transition-phase patients with growth hormone deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jens; Nørrelund, Helene; Vahl, Nina

    2002-01-01

    In a placebo-controlled, parallel study of 18 patients with a mean age of 20 years who had confirmed growth hormone (GH) deficiency, we evaluated body composition, insulin sensitivity, and glucose turnover at baseline (when all were receiving GH replacement); after 12 months of continued GH therapy...... or placebo; and after a 12-month open phase of GH therapy. In the placebo group, insulin sensitivity and fat mass increased and lipid oxidation decreased, whereas glucose oxidation increased (p...

  16. [Effects of growth hormone replacement therapy on bone metabolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Masahiro; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu

    2014-06-01

    Growth hormone (GH) as well as insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) are essential hormones to maintain homeostasis of bone turnover by activating osteoblastogenesis and osteoclastogenesis. Results from GH replacement therapy for primary osteoporosis and adult-onset GH deficiency (AGHD) suggest that one year or more treatment period by this agent is required to gain bone mineral density (BMD) over the basal level after compensating BMD loss caused by dominant increase in bone resorption which was observed at early phase of GH treatment. A recent meta-analysis demonstrates the efficacy of GH replacement therapy on increases in BMD in male patients with AGHD. Additional analyses are needed to draw firm conclusions in female patients with AGHD, because insufficient amounts of GH might be administrated to them without considerations of influence of estrogen replacement therapy on IGF-1 production. Further observational studies are needed to clarify whether GH replacement therapy prevent fracture risk in these patients.

  17. Continuation of growth hormone therapy versus placebo in transition-phase patients with growth hormone deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jens; Nørrelund, Helene; Vahl, Nina

    2002-01-01

    In a placebo-controlled, parallel study of 18 patients with a mean age of 20 years who had confirmed growth hormone (GH) deficiency, we evaluated body composition, insulin sensitivity, and glucose turnover at baseline (when all were receiving GH replacement); after 12 months of continued GH therapy...

  18. QUALITY OF LIFE, COUNSELLING AND HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nena Kopčavar Guček

    2008-12-01

    Quality of life in menopause is a result of many factors and therefore it is very individual.Hormone replacement therapy is one of the possibilities of improvement. Therefore, it isessential that a woman is adequately informed about all the advantages and risks of thehormonal replacement therapy. Only an informed patient can be a partner in shareddecision making about the improvement of quality of life

  19. Hyaluronic acid solution injection for upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding after failed conventional endoscopic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Wook; Kim, Hyung Hun

    2014-03-01

    Hyaluronic acid solution injection can be an additional endoscopic modality for controlling bleeding in difficult cases when other techniques have failed. We evaluated 12 cases in which we used hyaluronic acid solution injection for stopping bleeding. Immediately following hyaluronic acid solution injection, bleeding was controlled in 11 out of 12 cases. There was no clinical evidence of renewed bleeding in 11 cases during follow up.Hyaluronic acid solution injection can be a simple and efficient additional method for controlling upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding after failed endoscopic therapy. © 2013 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2013 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  20. The role of hormone therapy in the treatment of osteoporosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-11-11

    Nov 11, 2009 ... The use of menopausal hormone therapy (HT) to prevent bone loss has long been considered one of the major indications for its use. Following the publication of the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) study in 20031 the role of HT in the prevention of chronic diseases such as osteoporosis and cardiovascular ...

  1. Hormone replacement therapy and the risk of endometrial cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjögren, Lea L; Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Løkkegaard, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 1975, estrogen only was found to be associated with an increased risk of endometrial cancer. In November 2015, NICE guidelines on hormone therapy were published that did not take this risk into account. AIM: This systematic literature review assesses the safety of estrogen plus pro...

  2. Therapy for obesity based on gastrointestinal hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Jonatan I; Christensen, Mikkel; Knop, Filip K

    2011-01-01

    for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. In contrast to other antidiabetic treatments, these agents have a positive outcome profile on body weight. Worldwide there are 500 million obese people, and 3 million are dying every year from obesity-related diseases. Recently, incretin-based therapy was proposed...... for the treatment of obesity. Currently two different incretin therapies are widely used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes: 1) the GLP-1 receptor agonists which cause significant and sustained weight loss in overweight patients, and 2) dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors being weight neutral. These findings...... have led to a greater interest in the physiology of intestinal peptides with potential weight-reducing properties. This review discusses the effects of the incretin-based therapies in obesity, and provides an overview of intestinal peptides with promising effects as potential new treatments for obesity....

  3. HIV-1 CCR5 gene therapy will fail unless it is combined with a suicide gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Aridaman; de Boer, Rob J

    2015-12-17

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (ART) has successfully turned Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) from a deadly pathogen into a manageable chronic infection. ART is a lifelong therapy which is both expensive and toxic, and HIV can become resistant to it. An alternative to lifelong ART is gene therapy that targets the CCR5 co-receptor and creates a population of genetically modified host cells that are less susceptible to viral infection. With generic mathematical models we show that gene therapy that only targets the CCR5 co-receptor fails to suppress HIV-1 (which is in agreement with current data). We predict that the same gene therapy can be markedly improved if it is combined with a suicide gene that is only expressed upon HIV-1 infection.

  4. Effect of hormone replacement therapy on cardiovascular events in recently postmenopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schierbeck, Louise Lind; Rejnmark, Lars; Tofteng, Charlotte Landbo

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the long term effect of hormone replacement therapy on cardiovascular outcomes in recently postmenopausal women.......To investigate the long term effect of hormone replacement therapy on cardiovascular outcomes in recently postmenopausal women....

  5. Menopause hormonal therapy in women with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Guerrero, Jorge; González-Pérez, Marisol; Durand-Carbajal, Marta; Lara-Reyes, Pilar; Jiménez-Santana, Luisa; Romero-Díaz, Juanita; Cravioto, María-del-Carmen

    2007-09-01

    To evaluate the effects of menopause hormonal therapy on disease activity in women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We conducted a double-blind, randomized clinical trial involving 106 women with SLE who were in the menopausal transition or in early or late postmenopause. Patients received a continuous-sequential estrogen-progestogen regimen (n = 52) or placebo (n = 54). Disease activity was assessed at baseline and at 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 21, and 24 months, according to the SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI). The primary outcome measure was global disease activity, estimated by measuring the area under the SLEDAI curve. Secondary outcome measures included maximum SLEDAI score, change in SLEDAI score, incidence of lupus flares, median time to flare, medication use, and adverse events. Results were studied using intent-to-treat analysis. At baseline, demographic and disease characteristics were similar in both groups. Mean +/- SD SLEDAI scores were 3.5 +/- 3.3 and 3.1 +/- 3.4 in the menopause hormonal therapy and placebo groups, respectively (P = 0.57). Disease activity remained mild and stable in both groups throughout the trial. There were no significant differences between the groups in global or maximum disease activity, incidence or probability of flares, or medication use. Median time to flare was 3 months in both groups. Thromboses occurred in 3 patients who received menopause hormonal therapy and in 1 patient who received placebo. One patient in each group died during the trial due to sepsis. Menopause hormonal therapy did not alter disease activity during 2 years of treatment. However, an apparently increased risk of thrombosis seems to be a real threat in women with SLE who receive menopausal hormone therapy.

  6. Accumulation of protease mutations among patients failing second-line antiretroviral therapy and response to salvage therapy in Nigeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly E Rawizza

    Full Text Available To date, antiretroviral therapy (ART guidelines and programs in resource-limited settings (RLS have focused on 1(st- and 2(nd-line (2 L therapy. As programs approach a decade of implementation, policy regarding access to 3(rd-line (3 L ART is needed. We aimed to examine the impact of maintaining patients on failing 2 L ART on the accumulation of protease (PR mutations.From 2004-2011, the Harvard/APIN PEPFAR Program provided ART to >100,000 people in Nigeria. Genotypic resistance testing was performed on a subset of patients experiencing 2 L failure, defined as 2 consecutive viral loads (VL>1000 copies/mL after ≥6 months on 2 L. Of 6714 patients who received protease inhibitor (PI-based ART, 673 (10.0% met virologic failure criteria. Genotypes were performed on 61 samples. Patients on non-suppressive 2 L therapy for 24 months. Patients developed a median of 0.6 (IQR: 0-1.4 IAS PR mutations per 6 months on failing 2 L therapy. In 38% of failing patients no PR mutations were present. For patients failing >24 months, high- or intermediate-level resistance to lopinavir and atazanavir was present in 63%, with 5% to darunavir.This is the first report assessing the impact of duration of non-suppressive 2 L therapy on the accumulation of PR resistance in a RLS. This information provides insight into the resistance cost of failing to switch non-suppressive 2 L regimens and highlights the issue of 3 L access.

  7. Hormone replacement therapy and risk of non-fatal stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A T; Lidegaard, O; Kreiner, S

    1997-01-01

    of hormone use and stroke, on which information was obtained from postal questionnaires, were controlled for by multivariate analyses based on log-linear graphical models. The analyses included data on 1422 cases classified in four subtypes of stroke (160 subarachnoid haemorrhage, 95 intracerebral......BACKGROUND: The effect of postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on the risk of subtypes of stroke is as yet unclear. To investigate the effect of oestrogen and combined oestrogen-progestagen therapy on the risk of non-fatal haemorrhagic and thromboembolic stroke, we carried out a case...... to some extent be explained by selection--HRT users being more aware of symptoms than non-users. INTERPRETATION: Unopposed oestrogen and combined oestrogen-progestagen replacement therapy have no influence on the risk of non-fatal thromboembolic or haemorrhagic stroke in women aged 45-64 years....

  8. Revisiting the Cutaneous Impact of Oral Hormone Replacement Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gérald E. Piérard

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Menopause is a key point moment in the specific aging process of women. It represents a universal evolution in life. Its initiation is defined by a 12-month amenorrhea following the ultimate menstrual period. It encompasses a series of different biologic and physiologic characteristics. This period of life appears to spot a decline in a series of skin functional performances initiating tissue atrophy, withering, and slackness. Any part of the skin is possibly altered, including the epidermis, dermis, hypodermis, and hair follicles. Hormone replacement therapy (oral and nonoral and transdermal estrogen therapy represent possible specific managements for women engaged in the climacteric phase. All the current reports indicate that chronologic aging, climacteric estrogen deficiency, and adequate hormone therapy exert profound effects on various parts of the skin.

  9. Primary prevention of cardiovascular disease with hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schierbeck, L

    2015-01-01

    Many peri- and postmenopausal women suffer from a reduced quality of life due to menopausal symptoms and preventable diseases. The importance of cardiovascular disease in women must be emphasized, as it is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in women. It is well known that female hormones...... contribute to the later onset of cardiovascular disease in women. The effect of estrogens has for decades been understood from observational studies of postmenopausal women treated with hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Later, treatment with HRT was disregarded due to the fear of side...

  10. Mechanisms of hormonal therapy resistance in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Shin-ichi; Kimura, Mariko

    2015-04-01

    Whilst estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancers are preferentially treated with hormone therapy, approximately one-third of them relapse. The mechanisms of refractoriness have been investigated by numerous studies but have not been fully clarified. Hormonal therapy resistance, particularly aromatase inhibitor (AI) resistance, may be related to the acquisition of alternative intracellular ER signaling. We have been investing the mechanisms using cancer specimens and cell lines by monitoring the transcription activity of ERs. AI refractory specimens showed diverse ER activity in the adenovirus estrogen receptor element-green fluorescent protein (ERE-GFP) assay and varied sensitivity to anti-estrogens, indicating the existence of multiple resistant mechanisms. We established six different types of cell lines mimicking AI resistance from ERE-GFP-introduced ER-positive cell lines. They revealed that multiple and alternative ER activating pathways were involved in the resistance, such as phosphorylation-dependent or androgen metabolite-dependent mechanisms. The response to fulvestrant and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor also varied among individual resistant cell lines. These results indicate that further subclassification of ER-positive breast cancer is extremely important to decide the therapeutic management of not only hormonal therapy but also new molecular target therapy.

  11. [Recombinant human parathyroid hormone in the therapy of hypoparathyroidism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremkina, A K; Mokrysheva, N G; Kovaleva, E V; Krupinova, Yu A

    Hypoparathyroidism is an endocrine disease that results from deficiency or complete absence of parathyroid hormone (PTH), a biologically active 84-amino acid polypeptide. Standard therapy for chronic hypoparathyroidism includes oral calcium salts and active vitamin D metabolites and is aimed at maintaining a balance between optimal near-normal serum calcium concentration and normocalcuria. Traditional treatment regimens not always lead to the compensation for calcium and phosphorus metabolism. Until recently, hypoparathyroidism is the only endocrine disorder that has not been treated with the recombinant hormone. To date, two recombinant PTH forms have been synthesized, which can be used as pathogenetic therapy for hypoparathyroidism. This review is dedicated to replacement therapy for hypoparathyroidism, by using both the full-length PTH molecule (1-84) and its shorter, but fully active, PTH form (1-34). This review considers stages in the developmental of hormone replacement therapy for hypoparathyroidism, discusses the most rational dosing regimens, and compares their efficacy and safety, as well as prospects for the development of this area.

  12. Hormone Therapy and Other Treatments for Symptoms of Menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, D Ashley; Crider, Mark; Hill, Susan R

    2016-12-01

    The results of large clinical trials have led physicians and patients to question the safety of hormone therapy for menopause. In the past, physicians prescribed hormone therapy to improve overall health and prevent cardiac disease, as well as for symptoms of menopause. Combined estrogen/progestogen therapy, but not estrogen alone, increases the risk of breast cancer when used for more than three to five years. Therefore, in women with a uterus, it is recommended that physicians prescribe combination therapy only to treat menopausal symptoms such as vasomotor symptoms (hot flashes) and vaginal atrophy, using the smallest effective dosage for the shortest possible duration. Although estrogen is the most effective treatment for hot flashes, nonhormonal alternatives such as low-dose paroxetine, venlafaxine, and gabapentin are effective alternatives. Women with a uterus who are using estrogen should also take a progestogen to reduce the risk of endometrial cancer. Women who cannot tolerate adverse effects of progestogens may benefit from a combined formulation of estrogen and the selective estrogen receptor modulator bazedoxifene. There is no highquality, consistent evidence that yoga, paced respiration, acupuncture, exercise, stress reduction, relaxation therapy, and alternative therapies such as black cohosh, botanical products, omega-3 fatty acid supplements, and dietary Chinese herbs benefit patients more than placebo. One systematic review suggests modest improvement in hot flashes and vaginal dryness with soy products, and small studies suggest that clinical hypnosis significantly reduces hot flashes. Patients with genitourinary syndrome of menopause may benefit from vaginal estrogen, nonhormonal vaginal moisturizers, or ospemifene (the only nonhormonal treatment approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for dyspareunia due to menopausal atrophy). The decision to use hormone therapy depends on clinical presentation, a thorough evaluation of the risks and

  13. Sex hormones modulate circulating antioxidant enzymes: Impact of estrogen therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Bellanti

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: Menopause is associated with significant change in antioxidant gene expression that in turn affects circulating redox state. Estrogens replacement therapy is able to prevent and counteract such modifications by acting as regulators of key antioxidant gene expression. These findings suggest that antioxidant genes are, almost in part, under the control of sex hormones, and that pathophysiology of the difference in gender disease may depend on the redox biology.

  14. Effects of Hormone Deprivation, 2-Methoxyestradiol Combination Therapy on Hormone-Dependent Prostate Cancer In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuminori Sato

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available 2-Methoxyestradiol (2-ME has potent anti proliferative effects on cancer cells. Its utility alone or in combination with other therapies for treating prostate cancer, however, has not been fully explored. Androgendependent, independent human prostate cancer cells were examined in vivo for their response to combination therapy. Efficacy was assessed by terminal deoxynucleotide transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling assay, measuring microvessel density (MVD in excised tumors. Animals harboring hormonedependent tumors treated with 2-ME alone, androgen deprivation therapy alone, or the combination of the two had a 3.1-fold, 5.3-fold, 10.1-fold increase in apoptosis, respectively. For hormone-independent tumors, treatment with 2-ME resulted in a 2.43-fold increase in apoptosis, a 73% decrease in MVD. 2-ME was most effective against hormone-dependent tumors in vivo, combination therapy resulted in a significant increase in efficacy compared to no treatment controls, trended toward greater efficacy than either 2-ME or androgen deprivation alone. Combination therapy should be investigated further as an additional therapeutic option for early prostate cancer.

  15. Parathyroid Hormone Replacement Therapy in Hypoparathyroidism: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X-X; Zhu, X-Y; Mei, G-H

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated the effect of human parathyroid hormone replacement therapy on specific disease-related outcomes in patients with hypoparathyroidism. Medline, Cochrane, EMBASE, and Google Scholar databases were searched until January 13, 2015 for randomized trials using the following search terms: hypoparathyroidism, parathyroid hormone/PTH, and hormone replacement therapy. Five randomized controlled trials (n=245) that investigated effect of either PTH (1-34) (3 trials) or PTH (1-84) (2 trials) on serum calcium, phosphate, 1, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D levels, and urine level of calcium were included in the meta-analysis. Both PTH (1-34) and PTH (1-84) therapies were not associated with change in serum calcium level compared with calcitriol/placebo. The level of 24-h urine calcium excretion had a significant decrease in PTH (1-34)-treated group compared placebo/calcitriol (control) group (p≤0.012). PTH (1-34) did not change serum phosphate (p=0.053). PTH (1-84) did not change level of 24-h urine calcium excretion compared with control (p≥0.214) but it did decrease the levels of serum phosphorous (p=0.000). Both PTH-replacement therapies were not associated with change in serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D level compared with control (p≥0.606), but were associated with a significant decrease in serum 25-dihydroxyvitamin D levels (p≤0.04). In conclusion, although the number of randomized trial is limited, our meta-analysis suggests that PTH (1-34) replacement therapy may maintain the serum calcium levels in the normal range by reducing the levels of urine calcium excretion, and both replacement therapies may maintain 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D serum levels by reducing serum level of 25-dihydroxyvitamin D. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. When dialogue fails. Music therapy with elderly with neurological degenerative diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2004-01-01

    they can happen, the music therapist must build up a structure for the therapy that compensates for missing cognitive abilities of the client. This is illustrated by the following steps that integrate neuropsychological and psychodynamic theories: 1. Focus attention 2. Regulate arousal level 3. Dialogue 4...... the meaning of new cues. The first step in music therapy is to focus attention, e.g. with stability and cues, and the next step is to regulate arousal level towards environmental attention. 2. Environmental attention depends on levels of arousal. There is a relation between medium arousal levels......When dialogue fails. Music therapy with elderly with neurological degenerative diseases. In persons suffering from neurological degenerative diseases we often see the following symptoms: difficulties in remembering, concentrating, perceiving input, and controlling and timing movements. Normal every...

  17. The menopause and HRT. Urogenital effects of hormone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Dudley; Cardozo, Linda

    2003-03-01

    The urogenital tract and lower urinary tract are sensitive to the effects of oestrogen and progesterone throughout adult life. Epidemiological studies have implicated oestrogen deficiency in the aetiology of lower urinary tract symptoms occurring following the menopause. Although to date the role of oestrogen replacement therapy in the management of post-menopausal urinary incontinence remains controversial, its use in the management of women complaining of urogenital atrophy is now well established. This aim of this chapter is to review the recent evidence regarding the urogenital effects of hormone therapy with a particular emphasis on the management of post-menopausal urinary incontinence, recurrent lower urinary tract infections and urogenital atrophy.

  18. Effects of Growth Hormone Replacement Therapy on Bone Mineral Density in Growth Hormone Deficient Adults: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Xue

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Growth hormone deficiency patients exhibited reduced bone mineral density compared with healthy controls, but previous researches demonstrated uncertainty about the effect of growth hormone replacement therapy on bone in growth hormone deficient adults. The aim of this study was to determine whether the growth hormone replacement therapy could elevate bone mineral density in growth hormone deficient adults. Methods. In this meta-analysis, searches of Medline, Embase, and The Cochrane Library were undertaken to identify studies in humans of the association between growth hormone treatment and bone mineral density in growth hormone deficient adults. Random effects model was used for this meta-analysis. Results. A total of 20 studies (including one outlier study with 936 subjects were included in our research. We detected significant overall association of growth hormone treatment with increased bone mineral density of spine, femoral neck, and total body, but some results of subgroup analyses were not consistent with the overall analyses. Conclusions. Our meta-analysis suggested that growth hormone replacement therapy could have beneficial influence on bone mineral density in growth hormone deficient adults, but, in some subject populations, the influence was not evident.

  19. Hormone therapy in transgender adults is safe with provider supervision; A review of hormone therapy sequelae for transgender individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Weinand, Jamie D.; Safer, Joshua D.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Some providers report concern for the safety of transgender hormone therapy (HT). Methods: This is a systematic literature review of HT safety for transgender adults. Results: Current literature suggests HT is safe when followed carefully for certain risks. The greatest health concern for HT in transgender women is venous thromboembolism. HT among transgender men appears to cause polycythemia. Both groups experienced elevated fasting glucose. There is no increase in cancer...

  20. Improvement of preclinical animal models for autoimmune-mediated disorders via reverse translation of failed therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    't Hart, Bert A; Jagessar, S Anwar; Kap, Yolanda S; Haanstra, Krista G; Philippens, Ingrid H C H M; Serguera, Che; Langermans, Jan; Vierboom, Michel

    2014-09-01

    The poor translational validity of autoimmune-mediated inflammatory disease (AIMID) models in inbred and specific pathogen-free (SPF) rodents underlies the high attrition of new treatments for the corresponding human disease. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a frequently used preclinical AIMID model. We discuss here how crucial information needed for the innovation of current preclinical models can be obtained from postclinical analysis of the nonhuman primate EAE model, highlighting the mechanistic reasons why some therapies fail and others succeed. These new insights can also help identify new targets for treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The effects of growht hormone therapy in children with radiation-induced growth hormone deficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalet, S.M.; Whitehead, E.; Chapman, A.J.; Beardwell, C.G.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of growth hormone (GH) therapy were studied in 6 children, previously treated for brain tumours which did not directly involve the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, and who had received cranial irradiation between 2.1 and 10 years earlier. All 6 were short with a standing height standard deviation score (SDS) from -1.7 to -3.3. Impaired growth hormone responses to an insulin tolerance test (ITT) were observed in all 6 and a Bovril stimulation test in 5 children. The remainder of pituitary function was essentially normal. All 6 were prepubertal and 5 had a retarded bone age. Subsequently all received human GH in a dose of 5 units 3 times weekly for 1 year. The growth rate in each was at least 2 cm greater during the treatment year than the pre-treatment year.(author)

  2. Lower Testosterone Levels With Luteinizing Hormone-Releasing Hormone Agonist Therapy Than With Surgical Castration: New Insights Attained by Mass Spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluis, T.M.; Bui, H.N.; Meuleman, E.J.H.; Heijboer, A.C.; Hartman, J.F.; van Adrichem, N.; Boeve, E.; de Ronde, W.; van Moorselaar, R.J.A.; Vis, A.N.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Androgen deprivation therapy by bilateral orchiectomy (surgical castration) or luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist therapy (medical castration) is recommended for advanced or metastatic prostate cancer. Both methods aim at reducing serum testosterone concentrations to a castrate

  3. Lower testosterone levels with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist therapy than with surgical castration: new insights attained by mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluis, Tim M.; Bui, Hong N.; Meuleman, Eric J. H.; Heijboer, Annemieke C.; Hartman, Jeroen F.; van Adrichem, Nick; Boevé, Egbert; de Ronde, Willem; van Moorselaar, R. Jeroen A.; Vis, André N.

    2012-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy by bilateral orchiectomy (surgical castration) or luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist therapy (medical castration) is recommended for advanced or metastatic prostate cancer. Both methods aim at reducing serum testosterone concentrations to a castrate level

  4. Mesenchymal stromal (stem cell therapy fails to improve outcomes in experimental severe influenza.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilyse Darwish

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: Severe influenza remains a major public health threat and is responsible for thousands of deaths annually. Increasing antiviral resistance and limited effectiveness of current therapies highlight the need for new approaches to influenza treatment. Extensive pre-clinical data have shown that mesenchymal stromal (stem cell (MSC therapy can induce anti-inflammatory effects and enhance repair of the injured lung. We hypothesized that MSC therapy would improve survival, dampen lung inflammation and decrease acute lung injury (ALI in a murine model of severe influenza. METHODS: C57Bl/6 mice were infected with influenza A/PuertoRico/8/34 (mouse-adapted H1N1 or influenza A/Mexico/4108/2009 (swine-origin pandemic H1N1 and administered human or mouse MSCs via the tail vein, either pre- or post- infection. MSC efficacy was evaluated as both an independent and adjunctive treatment strategy in combination with the antiviral agent, oseltamivir. Weight loss and survival were monitored. Inflammatory cells, cytokine/chemokines (IFN-γ, CXCL10, CCL2 and CCL5 and markers of ALI (total protein and IgM, were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung parenchyma. RESULTS: Administration of murine MSCs or human MSCs in a prophylactic or therapeutic regimen failed to improve survival, decrease pulmonary inflammation/inflammatory cell counts or prevent ALI in influenza virus-infected mice. MSCs administered in combination with oseltamivir also failed to improve outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Despite similarities in the clinical presentation and pathobiology of ALI and severe influenza, our findings suggest that MSC therapy may not be effective for prevention and/or treatment of acute severe influenza.

  5. Dysregulation of innate immunity in ulcerative colitis patients who fail anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Angela C; Mallon, Dominic; Radford-Smith, Graham; Boyer, Julien; Piche, Thierry; Prescott, Susan L; Lawrance, Ian C; Tulic, Meri K

    2016-11-07

    To study the innate immune function in ulcerative colitis (UC) patients who fail to respond to anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy. Effects of anti-TNF therapy, inflammation and medications on innate immune function were assessed by measuring peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cytokine expression from 18 inflammatory bowel disease patients pre- and 3 mo post-anti-TNF therapy. Toll-like receptor (TLR) expression and cytokine production post TLR stimulation was assessed in UC "responders" ( n = 12) and "non-responders" ( n = 12) and compared to healthy controls ( n = 12). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were measured in blood to assess disease severity/activity and inflammation. Pro-inflammatory (TNF, IL-1β, IL-6), immuno-regulatory (IL-10), Th1 (IL-12, IFNγ) and Th2 (IL-9, IL-13, IL-17A) cytokine expression was measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay while TLR cellular composition and intracellular signalling was assessed with FACS. Prior to anti-TNF therapy, responders and non-responders had similar level of disease severity and activity. PBMC's ability to respond to TLR stimulation was not affected by TNF therapy, patient's severity of the disease and inflammation or their medication use. At baseline, non-responders had elevated innate but not adaptive immune responses compared to responders ( P innate cytokine responses to all TLRs compared to healthy controls ( P innate immune dysfunction was associated with reduced number of circulating plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) ( P innate immunity in non-responders may explain reduced efficacy to anti-TNF therapy. These serological markers may prove useful in predicting the outcome of costly anti-TNF therapy.

  6. Headache and hormone replacement therapy in the postmenopausal woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGregor, E Anne

    2009-01-01

    Headache and migraine are common symptoms of the menopause, often associated with irregular periods, hot flashes, and night sweats. Perimenopausal women should routinely be asked about headache and migraine, so that they can be offered appropriate advice. If attacks are infrequent, it may be sufficient to optimize acute treatment strategies. Lifestyle changes, alone or combined with a nonprescription treatment such as isoflavones, may be considered, although evidence of efficacy is limited. In women with migraine and more severe menopause symptoms, continuous hormone replacement therapy should be considered, using a nonoral route and the lowest dose effective in controlling symptoms. For women who have contraindications to estrogen therapy or do not wish to use it, compounds that inhibit serotonin reuptake, such as venlafaxine, fluoxetine, and paroxetine, have all shown efficacy for the control of hot flashes and prevention of migraine. Gabapentin is another nonhormonal option that has clinical trial evidence of effectiveness in treating hot flashes and reducing the frequency and severity of migraine attacks. Although clonidine is licensed in several countries for migraine prophylaxis and treatment of vasomotor symptoms, any benefit from treatment is often offset by adverse events. There is evidence that hysterectomy can increase the frequency of migraine and menopause symptoms, with added morbidity and risk of mortality. Therapy should regularly be evaluated to assess its ongoing need, as hormonal triggers are self-limiting and abate after menopause.

  7. Depression related to (neo)adjuvant hormonal therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tol-Geerdink, Julia J. van; Leer, Jan Willem; Lin, Emile N.J.T. van; Schimmel, Erik C.; Stalmeier, Peep F.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: We studied whether hormonal therapy, (neo)adjuvant to radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer, is related to an increase in depression and whether this is caused by the hormonal therapy itself or by the relatively poor prognosis of patients who get (neo)adjuvant hormonal therapy. Methods: Between 2002 and 2005, 288 patients, irradiated for prostate cancer (T1-3N0M0), were studied prospectively in two clinics. In one clinic almost all patients received (neo)adjuvant androgen deprivation (Bicalutamide + Gosereline). In a second clinic hormonal therapy was prescribed mainly for high risk patients. This allowed us to separate the effects of hormonal therapy and the patient's prognosis. Results: During the course of hormonal therapy, depression was significantly heightened by both hormone use (p < 0.001) and poor prognosis (p < 0.01). After completion of hormonal therapy, poor prognosis continued to affect the depression score (p < 0.01). The increase was, however, small. Conclusions: Depression was mildly increased in patients receiving hormonal therapy. The increase appeared to be related to both the hormone therapy itself and the high risk status of patients. High risk status, with the associated poor prognosis, had a more sustained effect on depression. The rise was statistically significant, but was too small, however, to bear clinical significance.

  8. Periodontal aspects in menopausal women undergoing hormone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Marcos, Joaquín Francisco; García-Valle, Silvia; García-Iglesias, Angel Agustín

    2005-01-01

    Currently, an important number of women use HRT to control their hormonal problems during menopause. A large percentage of these have problems at periodontal level. The present study aims at examining the effects that menopause, due to a decline in the synthesis of hormones, mainly of estrogens, can cause on the oral dental health of such women; in particular on the characteristics of the gingiva and periodontium, checking whether characteristics such as gingival recession, pain, tooth mobility and periodontal pocket formation might permit physicians to evaluate the degree of bone loss in menopausal woman. Menopausal women aged 40 to 58 years of age undergoing hormone replacement therapy that had gingival periodontal disturbances. The total population of the study comprised 210 patients, divided into two groups. One group received HRT administered in patches and the other group did not receive this therapy. Gynecologic and odonto-stomatologic protocols were established for data collection. In order to assess the efficacy of the treatment a descriptive statistical study for sociodemographic variables, analysis of variance, McNemar's test and the Stuart-Maxwell test were performed. The mean age of the patients studied was 49.6 years. HRT acts as a protective factor in dental pain and improves tooth mobility and depth of the probing of periodontal pockets. With respect to the variable gingival recession, no significant results were found either for the group not receiving HRT or for the group being treated with patches. The response to the HR therapy in periodontal disease is probably due to the existence of estrogen receptors localized in the gingiva and in the periodontal ligament.

  9. Emerging options in growth hormone therapy: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemp SF

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Stephen F Kemp, J Paul FrindikUniversity of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Arkansas Children's Hospital, Little Rock, AR, USAAbstract: Growth hormone (GH was first used to treat a patient in 1958. For the next 25 years it was available only from cadaver sources, which was of concern because of safety considerations and short supply. In 1985, GH produced by recombinant DNA techniques became available, expanding its possible uses. Since that time there have been three indications approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA for GH-deficiency states and nine indications approved for non-GH-deficiency states. In 2003 the FDA approved GH for use in idiopathic short stature (ISS, which may indirectly cover other diagnoses that have short stature as a feature. However, coverage for GH therapy is usually more reliably obtainable for a specific indication, rather than the ISS indication. Possible future uses for GH therapy could include the treatment of syndromes such as Russell–Silver syndrome or chondrodystrophy. Other non-short-stature indications could include wound healing and burns. Other uses that have been poorly studied include aging and physical performance, in spite of the interest already shown by elite athletes in using GH. The safety profile of GH developed over the past 25 years has shown it to be a very safe hormone with few adverse events associated with it. The challenge for the future is to follow these patients into adulthood to determine whether GH therapy poses any long-term risks.Keywords: growth hormone, somatotropin, anabolic, short stature

  10. Informing women about hormone replacement therapy: the consensus conference statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosconi, Paola; Donati, Serena; Colombo, Cinzia; Mele, Alfonso; Liberati, Alessandro; Satolli, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Background The risks/benefits balance of hormone replacement therapy is controversial. Information can influence consumers' knowledge and behavior; research findings about hormone replacement therapy are uncertain and the messages provided by the media are of poor quality and incomplete, preventing a fully informed decision making process. We therefore felt that an explicit, rigorous and structured assessment of the information needs on this issue was urgent and we opted for the organisation of a national consensus conference (CC) to assess the current status of the quality of information on hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and re-visit recent research findings on its risks/benefits. Methods We chose a structured approach based on the traditional CC method combined with a structured preparatory work supervised by an organising committee (OC) and a scientific board (SB). The OC and SB chose the members of the CC's jury and appointed three multidisciplinary working groups (MWG) which were asked to review clinical issues and different aspects of the quality of information. Before the CC, the three MWGs carried out: a literature review on the risk/benefit profile of HRT and two surveys on the quality of information on lay press and booklets targeted to women. A population survey on women's knowledge, attitude and practice was also carried out. The jury received the documents in advance, listened the presentations during the two-day meeting of the CCs, met immediately after in a closed-door meeting and prepared the final document. Participants were researchers, clinicians, journalists as well as consumers' representatives. Results Key messages in the CC's deliberation were: a) women need to be fully informed about the transient nature of menopausal symptoms, about HRT risks and benefits and about the availability of non-pharmacological interventions; b) HRT is not recommended to prevent menopausal symptoms; c) the term "HRT" is misleading and "post menopausal hormone

  11. Informing women about hormone replacement therapy: the consensus conference statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosconi, Paola; Donati, Serena; Colombo, Cinzia; Mele, Alfonso; Liberati, Alessandro; Satolli, Roberto

    2009-05-29

    The risks/benefits balance of hormone replacement therapy is controversial. Information can influence consumers' knowledge and behavior; research findings about hormone replacement therapy are uncertain and the messages provided by the media are of poor quality and incomplete, preventing a fully informed decision making process. We therefore felt that an explicit, rigorous and structured assessment of the information needs on this issue was urgent and we opted for the organisation of a national consensus conference (CC) to assess the current status of the quality of information on hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and re-visit recent research findings on its risks/benefits. We chose a structured approach based on the traditional CC method combined with a structured preparatory work supervised by an organising committee (OC) and a scientific board (SB). The OC and SB chose the members of the CC's jury and appointed three multidisciplinary working groups (MWG) which were asked to review clinical issues and different aspects of the quality of information. Before the CC, the three MWGs carried out: a literature review on the risk/benefit profile of HRT and two surveys on the quality of information on lay press and booklets targeted to women. A population survey on women's knowledge, attitude and practice was also carried out. The jury received the documents in advance, listened the presentations during the two-day meeting of the CCs, met immediately after in a closed-door meeting and prepared the final document. Participants were researchers, clinicians, journalists as well as consumers' representatives. Key messages in the CC's deliberation were: a) women need to be fully informed about the transient nature of menopausal symptoms, about HRT risks and benefits and about the availability of non-pharmacological interventions; b) HRT is not recommended to prevent menopausal symptoms; c) the term "HRT" is misleading and "post menopausal hormone therapy" should be the

  12. Informing women about hormone replacement therapy: the consensus conference statement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liberati Alessandro

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The risks/benefits balance of hormone replacement therapy is controversial. Information can influence consumers' knowledge and behavior; research findings about hormone replacement therapy are uncertain and the messages provided by the media are of poor quality and incomplete, preventing a fully informed decision making process. We therefore felt that an explicit, rigorous and structured assessment of the information needs on this issue was urgent and we opted for the organisation of a national consensus conference (CC to assess the current status of the quality of information on hormone replacement therapy (HRT and re-visit recent research findings on its risks/benefits. Methods We chose a structured approach based on the traditional CC method combined with a structured preparatory work supervised by an organising committee (OC and a scientific board (SB. The OC and SB chose the members of the CC's jury and appointed three multidisciplinary working groups (MWG which were asked to review clinical issues and different aspects of the quality of information. Before the CC, the three MWGs carried out: a literature review on the risk/benefit profile of HRT and two surveys on the quality of information on lay press and booklets targeted to women. A population survey on women's knowledge, attitude and practice was also carried out. The jury received the documents in advance, listened the presentations during the two-day meeting of the CCs, met immediately after in a closed-door meeting and prepared the final document. Participants were researchers, clinicians, journalists as well as consumers' representatives. Results Key messages in the CC's deliberation were: a women need to be fully informed about the transient nature of menopausal symptoms, about HRT risks and benefits and about the availability of non-pharmacological interventions; b HRT is not recommended to prevent menopausal symptoms; c the term "HRT" is misleading and "post

  13. Bioidentical menopausal hormone therapy: registered hormones (non-oral estradiol ± progesterone) are optimal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Hermite, M

    2017-08-01

    The many advantages of registered bioidentical sex hormones over registered, conventional, non-bioidentical menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) are considered. The transdermal route of estrogen administration avoids excess venous thromboembolic and ischemic stroke events. There is some indication that conjugated equine estrogens are more thrombogenic and most likely induce some hypertensive responses; estradiol might also be superior to conjugated equine estrogens (CEE) in terms of global cardiovascular health. The most valid evidence presently suggests that CEE-only treatment does not increase the risk of breast cancer and even may reduce it. But its combination with a synthetic progestogen (mainly medroxyprogesterone acetate) is a critical issue since it seems to be primarily associated with an increased incidence of breast cancer, however similar to or lower than that associated with some common lifestyle factors. Though not yet proven in a randomized, controlled trial, MHT continuously combining oral micronized progesterone with transdermal estradiol can presently be considered as the optimal MHT. It is not only safer than custom-compounded bioidentical hormones but also than oral conventional MHT and has the best breast profile; registered products for such optimal MHT are available around the world and must be preferred.

  14. Possibility to optimize systemic radionuclide therapy for bone metastases of hormone-dependent tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fyirsova, M.M.; Mechev, D.S.; Polyakova, N.I.

    2009-01-01

    The necessity of complex approach to treatment of bone metastases of hormone-dependent tumors including the use of bisphosphonates, hormone therapy and systemic radionuclide therapy is shown. The use of repeated radionuclide therapy to improve the quality of life of the patients is possible.

  15. [Routine hormonal therapy in the heart transplant donor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zetina-Tun, Hugo; Lezama-Urtecho, Carlos; Careaga-Reyna, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Successful heart transplantation depends largely on donor heart function. During brain death many hormonal changes occur. These events lead to the deterioration of the donor hearts. The 2002 Crystal Consensus advises the use of a triple hormonal scheme to rescue marginal cardiac organs. A prospective, longitudinal study was conducted on potential donor hearts during the period 1 July 2011 to 31 May 2013. All donor hearts received a dual hormonal rescue scheme, with methylprednisolone 15mg/kg IV and 200mcg levothyroxine by the enteral route. There was at least a 4 hour wait prior to the harvesting. The preload and afterload was optimised. The variables measured were: left ventricular ejection fraction cardiac graft recipient; immediate and delayed mortality. A total of 30 orthotopic heart transplants were performed, 11 female and 19 male patients, with age range between 19 and 63 years-old (Mean: 44.3, SD 12.92 years). The donor hearts were 7 female and 23 male, with age range between 15 and 45 years-old (mean 22.5, SD 7.3 years). Immediate mortality was 3.3%, 3.3% intermediate, and delayed 3.3%, with total 30 day-mortality of 10%. Month survival was 90%. The immediate graft left ventricular ejection fraction was 45%, 60% intermediate, and 68% delayed. The causes of death were: 1 primary graft dysfunction, one massive pulmonary embolism, and one due to nosocomial pneumonia. It was concluded that the use of double rescue scheme hormonal therapy is useful for the recovery and preservation of the donor hearts. This scheme improves survival within the first 30 days after transplantation. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  16. Hormonal therapy and risk of breast cancer in mexican women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amina Amadou

    Full Text Available The use of hormonal therapies, including hormonal contraceptives (HC and postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT have been shown to influence breast cancer (BC risk. However, the variations of these effects among populations and ethnic groups are not completely documented, especially among Hispanic women. We evaluated the association between HC and premenopausal BC risk, and between HRT and postmenopausal BC risk in Mexican women. Data from a Mexican multi-center population-based case-control study ofwomen aged 35 to 69 years were analysed. A total of 1000 cases and 1074 matched controls were recruited between 2004 and 2007. Information on hormonal therapy was collected through a structured questionnaire. Results were analysed using conditional logistic regression models. Overall, HC were used by 422/891 (47.3% premenopausal women and HRT was used by 220/1117 (19.7% postmenopausal women. For HC, odds ratios (ORs for BC were 1.11 (95% confidence interval (CI: 0.82, 1.49 for current users and 1.68 (95% CI: 0.67, 4.21 for ever-users. No clear effect of duration of use was observed. For HRT, the OR for BC was significantly increased in ever users (OR: 1.45; 95% CI: 1.01, 2.08. A non-significant increased risk was observed for combined estrogen/progestin, (OR =  1.85; 95% CI: 0.84, 4.07 whereas no effect was observed for the use of estrogen alone (OR = 1.14; 95% CI: 0.68, 1.91. Our results indicate that, HC had a non-significant effect on the risk of pre-menopausal BC, but suggested that injected contraceptives may slightly increase the risk, whereas HRT had a significant effect on post-menopausal BC in this population. This study provides new information about the effects of HC and HRT on BC risk in a Mexican population, which may be of relevance for the population of Latin America as a whole.

  17. Relation between hormone replacement therapy and ischaemic heart disease in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, E; Pedersen, A T; Heitmann, B L

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the risk of ischaemic heart disease and myocardial infarction among women using hormone replacement therapy, especially the potential modifying effect of cardiovascular risk factors....

  18. Intrathecal Trialing of Continuous Infusion Combination Therapy With Hydromorphone and Bupivacaine in Failed Back Surgery Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galica, Ryan J; Hayek, Salim M; Veizi, Elias; McEwan, Matthew T; Katta, Sivakanth; Ali, Omar; Aziz, Nida; Sondhi, Nidhi

    2017-12-05

    Intrathecal (IT) trial is a prognostic interventional pain management procedure employed to determine the potential success of treating intractable pain with an implantable infusion device system. There is a dearth of data regarding trials with continuous infusion of combination therapy (e.g. opioid combined with local anesthetic). The objective of the this study was to determine the overall outcomes of continuous infusion IT trials and factors influencing long-term success of IT therapy in patients with chronic intractable pain post-laminectomy. This is a retrospective analysis of all patients with lumbar failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) who were trialed with a combination of hydromorphone and bupivacaine with a temporary externalized IT catheter from March 2007 to June 2014. From a cohort of 62 patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria, 54 (87.10%) patients had successful IT trials. No significant differences were found between successful and failed trial patients with regards to age, sex, pre-trial pain numeric rating scale scores, pre-trial morphine equivalent daily dose, or trial dosages. Significant positive correlations were found between pretrial oral opioid intake and end of trial hydromorphone dose and hydromorphone dose escalation at 12 months and 24 months. Patients with refractory low back pain due to FBSS who underwent successful combination IT trial with hydromorphone and bupivacaine infused through a temporary IT catheter had significantly improved pain intensity scores following permanent implant. Higher pre-trial MEDD was correlated with higher trial and post-implant opioid doses and higher rates of opioid dose escalation post-implant. © 2017 International Neuromodulation Society.

  19. Effect of thyroid hormone replacement therapy on ovarian volume and androgen hormones in patients with untreated primary hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muderris, Iptisam Ipek; Boztosun, Abdullah; Oner, Gokalp; Bayram, Fahri

    2011-01-01

    Primary hypothyroidism may be associated with ovarian enlargement and/ or cyst formation. We evaluated the effect of thyroid hormone replacement therapy on hormonal changes, ovarian volume and sonographic appearance. Open, prospective study of women admitted to university gynecology clinic. The study included 26 patients with untreated hypothyroidism who had polycystic (n=10) or normal-appearing (n=16) ovaries and 20 euthyroidic controls. Basal serum total testosterone, free testosterone, androstenedione, dehydroepiandosterone-sulfate, prolactin, estradiol, luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, free T3, free T4 and thyroid-stimulating horone, together with ovarian volumes, were determined and repeated after euthyroidism was achieved. Ovarian volumes of patients with hypothyroidism were significantly greater compared with controls, and their magnitudes diminished significantly during thyroid hormone replacement therapy. Hypothyroidic patients with polycystic ovaries had significantly higher serum free testosterone and dehydroepiandosterone-sulfate, but lower androstenodione levels compared with those who had normal-appearing ovaries. Serum total testosterone concentrations were significantly higher in hypothyroidic patients without polycystic ovaries, and thyroid hormone replacement therapy achieved a significant reduction in total as well as free testosterone. Severe longstanding hypothyroidism leads to increased ovarian volume and/or cyst formation. A decrease in ovarian volume, resolution of ovarian cysts and reversal of the polycystic ovary syndrome-like appearance, together with improvement in serum hormone levels, occurred after euthyroidism was achieved.

  20. Growth hormone therapy influences endothelial function in children with renal failure.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lilien, M.R.; Schröder, C.H.; Levtchenko, E.N.; Koomans, H.A.

    2004-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction, an early step in atherogenesis, is prevalent in children with renal insufficiency. Endothelial dysfunction in growth hormone deficiency is reversed by growth hormone (rhGH) therapy. Renal failure induces growth hormone resistance at the receptor and post-receptor level,

  1. Effect of hormone replacement therapy on sex hormones and tumor markers in cervical squamous cell carcinoma postoperative patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Yan Ding

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effect of hormone replacement therapy on sex hormones and tumor markers in cervical squamous cell carcinoma postoperative patients. Methods: A total of 100 cases of cervical squamous cell carcinoma from January 2012 to December 2014 in our hospital were selected as research objects, and the observation group (58 cases were willing to receive hormone replacement therapy, while the control group (42 cases were not willing to receive hormone replacement therapy, with routine treatment. Before and after treatment, the serum levels of neutral hormone and tumor markers were detected in two groups of patients. Results: Before treatment, there were no significant differences in serum E2, FSH and LH levels between the two groups (all P>0.05; after treatment, in the observation group compared with before treatment, the level of serum E2 increased significantly (P0.05. Before and after treatment, the levels of serum SCC-Ag, VEGF-C, M MP-2 and MMP-9 showed no significant differences between the two groups (all P>0.05. Conclusions: The use of hormone replacement therapy in cervical squamous cell carcinoma patients can significantly improve the adverse symptoms caused by low estrogen, improve the quality of life of patients, and not affect the prognosis of patients in the short term.

  2. NIH-Supported Trials Test Hormonal Therapy in Older Men with Low Testosterone Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... test hormonal therapy in older men with low testosterone levels Testosterone treatment improved sexual function, had smaller effect on walking, vitality. A preliminary study of testosterone therapy in older men with low levels of ...

  3. Growth hormone secretion and response to growth hormone therapy after treatment for brain tumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lannering, B.; Marky, I.; Mellander, L.; Albertson-Wikland, K.

    1988-01-01

    Children irradiated for brain tumours constitute an increasing group of patients who will require GH therapy. High-dose cranial irradiation is necessary for cure, but inevitably causes GH deficiency within a few years. In 19 patients investigated between 2 and 9 years after irradiation, the spontaneous 24-hour GH secretion was markedly reduced. The secretory pattern indicated loss of regulating hypothalamic hormones. After exogenous GHRH was administered, the pituitary was able to respond with a prompt GH release, showing that pituitary function was unaffected. Ten prepubertal children growing 3.8+-0.3 cm/year were treated with GH, 0.1 IU/kg/day s.c. Their growth rate increased to 8.2+-0.4 cm in the first year. An increased growth rate was also maintained in the second year. (authors)

  4. The effect of hormone therapy on women's quality of life in the first year of the Estonian Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy trial

    OpenAIRE

    Veerus, Piret; Hovi, Sirpa-Liisa; Sévon, Tiina; Hunter, Myra; Hemminki, Elina

    2012-01-01

    Background For postmenopausal women, the main reason to start hormone therapy (HT) is to reduce menopausal symptoms and to improve quality of life (QOL). The aim of this study was to analyse the impact of HT on different aspects of symptom experience and QOL during a randomised trial. A total of 1823 postmenopausal women were recruited into the Estonian Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy (EPHT) trial in 1999–2001. Women were randomised to blind HT, open-label HT, placebo or non-treatment ...

  5. Adrenal function testing following hormone therapy for infantile spasms: case series and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R Mytinger

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Prednisolone and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH are hormone therapies for infantile spasms. There is limited data on the occurrence of decreased adrenal reserve or signs of clinical adrenal insufficiency after hormone therapy. This is a retrospective medical record review of patients referred to our Infantile Spasms Program. Our standardized infantile spasms management guideline began in September 2012 and initially included a post-hormone laboratory assessment of adrenal function. Medical records were assessed for hormone treatments, adrenal function testing, and signs of adrenal insufficiency. Forty-two patients who received one or both hormone therapies met inclusion criteria. A post-hormone laboratory assessment of adrenal function was done in 14 patients. Of these 14 patients, two had an abnormal laboratory assessment of adrenal function, both by adrenal stimulation testing – one after ACTH and one after prednisolone. One patient received hydrocortisone replacement and the other received stress dose hydrocortisone as needed; neither patient developed signs of adrenal insufficiency. Another patient treated with both types of hormone therapy in tandem, who did not have a post-hormone laboratory assessment, developed signs of mild adrenal insufficiency and required replacement hydrocortisone. Our study suggests that adrenal suppression can occur after modern hormone therapy regimens. We found two patients with abnormal adrenal function testing after hormone therapy and another patient with signs adrenal insufficiency. Given the seriousness of adrenal crisis, caregiver education on the signs of adrenal insufficiency is critical. Greater vigilance may be indicated in patients receiving both types of hormone therapy in tandem. Although a routine post-hormone laboratory assessment of adrenal function may not be feasible in all patients, replacement or stress dose hydrocortisone is necessary for all patients with suspected adrenal

  6. Adrenal Function Testing Following Hormone Therapy for Infantile Spasms: Case Series and Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mytinger, John R; Bowden, Sasigarn A

    2015-01-01

    Prednisolone and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) are "hormone" therapies for infantile spasms. There is limited data on the occurrence of decreased adrenal reserve or signs of clinical adrenal insufficiency after hormone therapy. This is a retrospective medical record review of patients referred to our Infantile Spasms Program. Our standardized infantile spasms management guideline began in September 2012 and initially included a post-hormone laboratory assessment of adrenal function. Medical records were assessed for hormone treatments, adrenal function testing, and signs of adrenal insufficiency. Forty-two patients who received one or both hormone therapies met inclusion criteria. A post-hormone laboratory assessment of adrenal function was done in 14 patients. Of these 14 patients, 2 had an abnormal laboratory assessment of adrenal function, both by adrenal stimulation testing - one after ACTH and one after prednisolone. One patient received hydrocortisone replacement and the other received stress dose hydrocortisone as needed; neither patient developed signs of adrenal insufficiency. Another patient treated with both types of hormone therapy in tandem, who did not have a post-hormone laboratory assessment, developed signs of mild adrenal insufficiency and required replacement hydrocortisone. Our study suggests that adrenal suppression can occur after modern hormone therapy regimens. We found two patients with abnormal adrenal function testing after hormone therapy and another patient with signs adrenal insufficiency. Given the seriousness of adrenal crisis, caregiver education on the signs of adrenal insufficiency is critical. Greater vigilance may be indicated in patients receiving both types of hormone therapy in tandem. Although a routine post-hormone laboratory assessment of adrenal function may not be feasible in all patients, replacement or stress dose hydrocortisone is necessary for all patients with suspected adrenal insufficiency.

  7. Hormone therapy for postmenopausal women—An unanswered issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Ling Lee

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Menopause is a biological and natural process that occurs as part of aging in women and is secondary to ovarian failure with resultant estrogen deficiency; therefore, menopause should not be considered as a disease. However, there is no doubt that estrogen deficiency induces general psychological and physical changes, and that postmenopausal women will experience many health-related issues and problems, including osteoporotic fractures, coronary heart disease (CHD, and most importantly for the quality of life (QOL and vasomotor symptoms (VMS such as hot flashes and night sweats. Hormone therapy (HT is very effective in the management of postmenopausal women with symptoms. With the large number of patients being treated with HT, especially the combination of estrogen and progestin therapy (EPT in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI study, clinicians now recognize the potential adverse effects of EPT. Although this concept is much clearer now, some women might still benefit from short-term HT, especially for young postmenopausal women. In this review, some health issues of postmenopausal women, especially alternative therapies are discussed.

  8. Menopause and postmenopausal hormone therapy and risk of hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curhan, Sharon G; Eliassen, A Heather; Eavey, Roland D; Wang, Molin; Lin, Brian M; Curhan, Gary C

    2017-09-01

    Menopause may be a risk factor for hearing loss, and postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) has been proposed to slow hearing decline; however, there are no large prospective studies. We prospectively examined the independent relations between menopause and postmenopausal HT and risk of self-reported hearing loss. Prospective cohort study among 80,972 women in the Nurses' Health Study II, baseline age 27 to 44 years, followed from 1991 to 2013. Baseline and updated information was obtained from detailed validated biennial questionnaires. Cox proportional-hazards regression models were used to examine independent associations between menopausal status and postmenopausal HT and risk of hearing loss. After 1,410,928 person-years of follow-up, 18,558 cases of hearing loss were reported. There was no significant overall association between menopausal status, natural or surgical, and risk of hearing loss. Older age at natural menopause was associated with higher risk. The multivariable-adjusted relative risk of hearing loss among women who underwent natural menopause at age 50+ years compared with those aged less than 50 years was 1.10 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.03, 1.17). Among postmenopausal women, oral HT (estrogen therapy or estrogen plus progestogen therapy) was associated with higher risk of hearing loss, and longer duration of use was associated with higher risk (P trend menopause and longer duration of postmenopausal HT are associated with higher risk of hearing loss.

  9. Intermittent hormonal therapy in the treatment of post-irradiation residual/recurrent prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Aaron O; Kocherill, Paul G; Wallace, Michelle; Forman, Jeffrey D

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of intermittent hormonal therapy in the treatment of residual/recurrent prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: Seventeen patients with biochemical evidence of residual/recurrent prostate cancer were initially treated with radiation therapy (RT)(13), neo-adjuvant hormonal therapy and RT (3), or RT following prostatectomy (1). The mean follow-up time was 19.4 months from the initiation of hormonal therapy. Hormonal therapy consisted of an LH-RH agonist alone (7), an anti-androgen alone (1) or a combination of both (9). Hormonal therapy was continued until the prostatic specific antigen (PSA) level became undetectable. IHT was reinstituted when the PSA reached a pre-determined level, usually greater than or equal to 10ng/ml. Results: The mean time from completion of primary treatment to the initiation of hormonal therapy was 32.5 months. The mean PSA at the start of the first cycle of hormonal therapy was 43.9ng/ml, the second cycle, 11.9ng/ml and the third cycle, 24ng/ml. The mean PSA levels at the end of the first and second cycle of hormonal therapy were .48 and .42ng/ml, respectively. No patient has yet completed the third cycle of hormonal therapy. The average duration of hormonal therapy was 10 months for the first cycle and 4 months for the second cycle. The mean intermittent time off hormones were 9.3 months between cycles 1 and 2, and 10 months between cycles 2 and 3. No patient has yet become refractory to hormonal therapy. Currently all patients are alive. All patients experienced hot flashes and decreased libido at varying degrees during treatment. Thirty-five percent experienced gynecomastia. During the intervals between hormonal therapy, most patients reported a decrease in hot flashes. Conclusion: This analysis supplies preliminary evidence that intermittent hormonal therapy is a viable option in patients with biochemical evidence of disease following initial therapy. It is associated with less treatment

  10. Perceived adherence barriers among patients failing second-line antiretroviral therapy in Khayelitsha, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Barnett

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. The recent scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART coverage in resource-limited settings has greatly improved access to treatment. However, increasing numbers of patients are failing first- and second-line ART. Objective. To examine factors affecting adherence to second-line ART from the perspective of clinic staff and patients, assessing both individual and structural perceived barriers. Methods. Research was conducted at a large primary care tuberculosis (TB/HIV clinic in Khayelitsha, a peri-urban township in Cape Town, South Africa. Participants were drawn from a Médecins Sans Frontières-run programme to support patients failing second-line ART. A qualitative research approach was used, combining multiple methodologies including key informant interviews with staff (n=11, in-depth interviews with patients (n=10 and a Photovoice workshop (n=11. Responses and photographs were coded by content; data were transformed into variables and analysed accordingly. Results. Staff identified drinking, non-disclosure, not using condoms and pill fatigue as barriers to ART adherence, while patients identified side-effects, not using condoms and a lack of understanding concerning medication timing. With respect to service delivery, staff identified a need for continued counselling and educational support following ART initiation. Patients were concerned about missing medical records and poor staff attitudes in the clinic. Conclusion. These findings identify discrepancies between provider and patient perceptions of barriers to, and facilitators of adherence, as well as of service delivery solutions. This highlights the need for on-going counselling and education following ART initiation, improved quality of counselling, and improved methods to identify and address specific barriers concerning medication adherence.

  11. Hormone therapy and cardiovascular risk markers and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susan H; Lokkegaard, Ellen; Ottesen, Bent

    2006-01-01

    Biological studies have demonstrated estrogen's beneficial effect on cardiovascular risk factors, including plasma lipoproteins, atherogenesis, vascular reactivity, inflammation and antioxidative activity. Additionally, observational studies have supported a cardioprotective effect of hormone...... therapy (HT), although an underlying healthy-user effect may account for these observations. Progestagens are added to protect against an increased risk of endometrial cancer observed with unopposed estrogen treatment. The inclusion of progestagen in HT has been associated with possible adverse...... cardiovascular outcomes. Recent, large-scale, randomized clinical studies did not confirm a beneficial cardiovascular effect of HT. On the contrary, an increased risk was found with continuous combined estrogen-progestagen regimens. The progestagen used in these trials was medroxyprogesterone acetate and other...

  12. Growth hormone therapy and craniofacial bones: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litsas, G

    2013-09-01

    Growth hormone (GH) has significant effects on linear bone growth, bone mass and bone metabolism. The primary role of GH supplementation in children with GH deficiency, those born small for gestational age or with other types of disorders in somatic development is to increase linear growth. However, GH therapy seems to elicit varying responses in the craniofacial region. Whereas the effects of GH administration on somatic development are well documented, comparatively little is known of its effects on the craniofacial region. The purpose of this review was to search the literature and compile results from both animal and human studies related to the impact of GH on craniofacial growth. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Terapia hormonal y calidad del hueso Hormone therapy and bone quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available La osteoporosis se reconoce como uno de los problemas de salud de la población femenina posmenopáusica, y la terapia hormonal de reemplazo (THR como una de las medidas terapéuticas efectivas para evitar la fractura. Nos propusimos mostrar la experiencia acumulada en relación con el efecto de la terapia hormonal de reemplazo sobre la calidad del hueso. En un estudio retrospectivo realizado en 42 mujeres con edades entre 40 y 59 años que asistieron a la Clínica de Climaterio y Osteoporosis y a la consulta multidisciplinaria de climaterio del Hospital Ginecoobstétrico “Ramón González Coro” entre enero de 1997 y diciembre del año 2003, se determinó la calidad ósea mediante absorciometría dual de rayos X en región lumbar (L2-L4 o por ultrasonido del calcáneo (USCAL y recibieron tratamiento continuado con terapia estrogénica (E o con estrógenos progestagenos (EP durante no menos de un año (n = 30. Las mujeres que no pudieron recibir THR fueron agrupadas y evaluadas como grupo control (n =12. Durante el tiempo de observación promedio de 2 años, las mujeres que recibieron THR mejoraron su calidad ósea en el 16,8 %, mientras que las del grupo control empeoraron en el 8 % de los casos. Estos resultados iniciales, aunque son modestos, muestran la utilidad de la THR para mejorar la calidad del hueso y la necesidad de continuar estudios que permitan definir en nuestro medio la persistencia de la mejoría ósea, así como la magnitud de la osteoporosis posmenopáusica.Osteoporosis is recognized as one of the health problems of the female postmenopausic population and the replacement hormone therapy (RHT as one of the effective therapeutical measures to prevent fracture. We proposed ourselves to show the experience accumulated in relation to the effect of the replacement hormone therapy on the bone quality. In a retrospective study conducted among 42 women aged 30-59 that attended the Climacteric and Osteoporosis Clinic and the

  14. Advances in hormone replacement therapy: making the menopause manageable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palacios Santiago

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The importance of the results of some large, randomized controlled trials (RCTs on Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT has modified the risk/benefit perception of HRT. Recent literature review supports a different management. The differences in age at initiation and the duration of HRT are key points. HRT appears to decrease coronary disease in younger women, near menopause; yet, in older women, HRT increases risk of a coronary event. Although HRT is a recognized method in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis, it is not licensed for the prevention of osteoporosis as a first-line treatment. The effectiveness of low and ultra-low estrogen doses has been demonstrated for the treatment of vasomotor symptoms, genital atrophy and the prevention of bone loss, with fewer side-effects than the standard dose therapy. Further research, however, is needed to determine the effect both on fractures, as well as on cardiovascular and breast diseases. Newer progestins show effects that are remarkably different from those of other assays. The effectiveness of testosterone at improving both sexual desire and response in surgically and naturally postmenopausal women is shown by the testosterone patch. The intention, dose and regimen of HRT need to be individualized, based on the principle of choosing the lowest appropriate dose in relation to the severity of symptoms and the time and menopause age.

  15. Bioidentical hormone therapy: Nova Scotia pharmacists’ knowledge and beliefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whelan AM

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To investigate Nova Scotia (NS pharmacists’ knowledge and beliefs regarding the use of bioidentical hormones (BHs for the management of menopause related symptoms. Methods: Using Dillman’s tailored design methodology, an invitation to complete the web-based questionnaire was emailed to pharmacists in NS as part of the Dalhousie College of Pharmacy Continuing Pharmacy Education Department’s (CPE weekly email update. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results: Of approximately 1300 e-mails sent, 113 pharmacists completed the questionnaire (response rate 8.7%. The majority of respondents (94% knew that BHs were not free from adverse drug reactions. More than 50% were aware that conjugated equine estrogens and medroxyprogesterone acetate were not examples of BHs. For seven of eleven knowledge questions, 33-45% indicated that they did not know the answer. When asked about their beliefs regarding BHs, many believed that BHs were similar in efficacy (49% or more effective (21% than conventional hormone therapy (CHT for vasomotor symptoms. Most respondents also believed that both BHs and CHT had similar safety profiles. Additionally, responding pharmacists indicated that more education would be helpful, especially in the area of safety and efficacy of BHTs compared to CHT. Conclusion: NS pharmacists knew BHs were not free of adverse effects, however knowledge was lacking in other areas. This may reflect the level of coverage of this topic in pharmacy school curriculums and in the pharmacy literature. Results indicate a need for additional education of NS pharmacists with respect to BHs, which could be accomplished through modification of undergraduate pharmacy programs and supplementary CPE.

  16. High-Dose Misoprostol as An Alternative Therapy After Failed Medical Abortion

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yiu-Tai; Hou, Guang-Qiong; Chen, Tien-Hui; Chu, Yi-Chih; Lin, Ta-Chin; Kuan, Long-Ching; Lin, Mau; Huang, Shu-Feng; Chen, Fu-Min; Kuo, Tsung-Cheng

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the complete abortion rate for the vaginal administration of high-dose misoprostol after a failed medical abortion. Materials and Methods: When their medical abortions failed after the conventional oral administration of mifepristone and misoprostol, participants then received 1,000 μg of misoprostol vaginally. The efficacy and side effects of this treatment were evaluated. Results: Twenty-seven women who failed to abort after the conven...

  17. Effects of vedolizumab induction therapy for patients with Crohn's disease in whom tumor necrosis factor antagonist treatment failed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sands, Bruce E.; Feagan, Brian G.; Rutgeerts, Paul; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric; Sandborn, William J.; Sy, Richmond; D'Haens, Geert; Ben-Horin, Shomron; Xu, Jing; Rosario, Maria; Fox, Irving; Parikh, Asit; Milch, Catherine; Hanauer, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    There is an increasing need for new treatments for patients with Crohn's disease (CD) in whom previous therapy with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antagonists has failed. We performed a placebo-controlled, phase 3, double-blind trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of vedolizumab, an antibody

  18. Type of hormone therapy and risk of misclassification at mammography screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Njor, Sisse Helle; Hallas, Jesper; Schwartz, Walter

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: Current users of hormone therapy (HT) are known to have a lower accuracy of mammography screening than do never users. We studied whether the risk of misclassification depends on type of hormone, administration, regimen, and dose of the therapy. METHODS:: We linked data from mammography...... higher false-positive risk (RR, 1.94; 95% CI, 1.16-3.26) and a nonsignificantly higher interval cancer proportion (RR, 4.29; 95% CI, 0.69-26.53) when the administration of both hormones was transdermal instead of oral. Using tibolone instead of comparable hormones gave a nonsignificantly lower false...

  19. Time trends in breast cancer and menopause hormone therapy use in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, R; Fenton, A

    2016-01-01

    The publication of preliminary findings from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) Study in 2002 suggested an increased risk of breast cancer among users of menopause hormone therapy (MHT). This resulted world-wide in a rapid and significant decline in the use of hormone therapy. It was later claimed that breast cancer incidence rates had fallen as a result of lower rates of hormone therapy use. Our aim was to investigate whether there was an association between changes in the use of hormone therapy and rates of breast cancer diagnosis in New Zealand subsequent to the publication of the WHI. Validated prescription usage data along with breast cancer screening and cancer registration data were accessed. Time trends extending for 8 years after the publication of the WHI were assessed. The use of hormone therapy for managing menopausal symptoms fell by about 70% following the controversy about its safety. Breast cancer registration rates among women aged 50-59 years had started to fall in advance of this change in prescribing. Changes in other age groups appear to coincide with changes in the screening eligibility for the national breast screening program rather than use of hormone therapy. The time trend analysis does not support an association between changes in hormone therapy use and the incidence rate of breast cancer.

  20. One year growth hormone replacement therapy does not alter colonic epithelial cell proliferation in growth hormone deficient adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beentjes, JAM; van Gorkom, BAP; Sluiter, WJ; de Vries, Emma; Kleibeuker, JH; Dullaart, RPF

    OBJECTIVE Increased colonic epithelial cell proliferation has been found in various conditions associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer including acromegaly. In a placebo-controlled study we determined the effect of growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy in GH deficient adults on the

  1. Hormone replacement therapy in patients after the treatment of gynaecological malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redechova, S.; Hammerova, L.; Borovsky, M.

    2013-01-01

    Women treated for gynaecological malignancies suffer not only from the oncological disease itself but also from the loss of the ovarian function and climacteric symptoms. Iatrogenic menopause is usually more intense due to its sudden onset, younger age of these patients and the oncological therapy itself. These patients have increased risk of cardiovascular diseases, osteoporosis, arthritis, skin changes, eye changes, mucosal changes of the oral, vulval, and vaginal region. The most effective treatment of menopausal symptoms is hormone replacement therapy. However, the use of hormone replacement therapy in patients after the treatment of gynaecological malignancies is controversial. Most of these diseases are not estrogen dependent and therefore the use of hormone replacement therapy is safe. However, it is necessary to evaluate the benefits and risks of hormonal replacement therapy in each patient. (author)

  2. Complete adrenocorticotropin deficiency after radiation therapy for brain tumor with a normal growth hormone reserve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Haruna; Yoshioka, Katsunobu; Yamagami, Keiko

    2002-01-01

    A 34-year-old man with neurofibromatosis type 1, who had received radiation therapy after the excision of a brain tumor 5 years earlier, was admitted to our hospital with vomiting and weight loss. Cortisol and adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) were undetectable before and after administration of 100 μg corticotropin releasing hormone. The level of growth hormone without stimulation was 24.7 ng/ml. We diagnosed him to have complete ACTH deficiency attributable to radiation therapy. This is the first known case of a patient with complete ACTH deficiency after radiation therapy and a growth hormone reserve that remained normal. (author)

  3. Combined radio- and hormone therapy of the prostate carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papic, R.

    1979-08-01

    Intention of this study is to detect in 49 patients suffering from prostate carcinomas, effects and side effects of radiotherapy. According to the present results, there is not any doubt that prostate carcinomas are radiosensitive. In all patients radiotherapy induced a prostate shrinkage and an increasing of consistency. It resulted that a prostate biopsy must be carried out in order to control the success of therapy. The success of the treatment depends upon tumour spreading and on its degree of differentiation. Within the observation period only in four cases metastasation of the prostate carcinoma occurred after radiotherapy. According to literature, the 5-year survival rate with an organ-defined prostate carcinoma ranges between 70 and 80% when radiotherapeutic methods are applied. The same authors indicate a 5-year survival rate between 42 and 48% for scattered carcinomas. Only minor side effects are provoked by radiotherapy. In 75% of the patients pollakisuria and dysuria resulted. After irradiation was finished, the symptoms disappeared and did not cause in any case any late complications. In 12% of the cases proctitic pain occurred during irradiation, which in 6% remained even after the treatment was terminated. We could prove unequivocally on our patients that passage impairments caused by a prostate carcinoma are improved by radiotherapy. Finally it can be said that this treatment is applicable for curing carcinoma which is localised on the prostate. In the case of an undefined, scattered carcinoma radiotherapy combined with hormone therapy is the treatment of choice. With regards to undesired side effects radiotherapy is superior to other therapeutic measures. (orig./MG) [de

  4. Hormones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormones are your body's chemical messengers. They travel in your bloodstream to tissues or organs. They work ... glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the pituitary, pineal, ...

  5. Stopping hormone replacement therapy: were women ill advised?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumming, Grant P; Currie, Heather D; Panay, Nick; Moncur, Rik; Lee, Amanda J

    2011-09-01

    To survey women who stopped hormone replacement therapy (HRT) after 2002, including those who later restarted. A questionnaire on the UK-based menopause website www.menopausematters.co.uk evaluating how women are influenced by HRT advice. Main outcome measures Answers to questions regarding stopping/restarting HRT in response to the advice in the early 2000s and advice given today. A total of 1100 responses were obtained. Of those who made the decision to stop HRT themselves, 56.4% (n = 425/754) said that they were influenced by the media. In those who would potentially most benefit from HRT, 72.8% (n = 220/302) stopped without medical advice. Overall, women aged under 50 years were significantly more likely to stop HRT themselves than women over 50 (P relationships being negatively affected and 29.2% (n = 286) said that symptoms affected their social relationships. Overall 46.5% of women (n = 485/1044) would not have stopped HRT given the current understanding of risk. Compared with women over 50, significantly more women under the age of 50 said that they would not have previously stopped their HRT based on their current understanding of risk (P impact of published research and its reporting from the early 2000s are being mitigated by current press coverage. Media reports appear to influence the younger woman more than the older woman. Health professionals and media must learn the lessons from the past.

  6. Women, the menopause, hormone replacement therapy and coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whayne, Thomas F; Mukherjee, Debabrata

    2015-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease considerations are associated with the menopause. Despite a misconception that women have a minimal risk for coronary heart disease (CHD), it is the major cause of female deaths. This review highlights issues of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and CHD in women. A woman under age 60, who suffers a myocardial infarction (MI), has a 2-year post-MI mortality of 28.9%; it is 19.6% in men. CHD and MI in women are subtle. In addition, female mortality from CHD increases after the menopause. The increased inflammatory risk factor status of women plays a role in development of atherosclerosis, before and after the menopause. Until after the menopause, women overall have a lower CHD mortality rate. Menopause is associated with unique symptoms, especially vasomotor ones; preexisting cardiovascular disease further exacerbates problems associated with the menopause. Use of HRT after the menopause is a major issue. Early menopause at age 39 years or younger and late menopause at age 56 years or older increase cardiovascular risk. HRT should not be prescribed for cardiovascular risk prevention, but when less than 10 years from menopause at a normal age, women can be reassured that cardiovascular risk from HRT is very low. Prescription of HRT should never be made only for cardiovascular risk reduction. However, when symptom-related and other indications are present, HRT is appropriate and well tolerated in the early years after menopause with onset at a normal age.

  7. Hormone replacement therapy in menopause and in premature ovarian insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luisi, S; Orlandini, C; Biliotti, G; Scolaro, V; De Felice, G; Regini, C; Petraglia, F

    2013-12-01

    Menopause is defined by world health organization (WHO) as the permanent cessation of menstruating resulting from a loss of ovarian follicular activity, after one year of amenorrhea. It signifies the last menstrual cycle and the end of women's fertile and reproductive life. The average age for a women to undergo menopause is 51 years; unlike menarche, whose average age has decreased over the past decades, the age of menopause has remained unchanged. We can distinguish: 1) premenopause, the time interval leading up to menopause; 2) climacteric, the time interval between the reproductive e non-reproductive life; 3) premature menopause, that occurs in 1% of women. Menopause can also be induced iatrogenically as a result of surgery, medical therapy, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Beyond the life the number of oocytes falls until there are no more suitable follicles for reproduction and the menopause ensues. At the same time, the ability of the ovary to produce hormones falls, leading to an increasing pulsatile release of FSH in order to stimulate the ovary to produce oestrogens. Menopause is characterized by different symptoms such as hot flushes, night sweats, dispareunia, prolapse, vulval itching due to vaginal atrophy and dryness, urinary incontinence, dysuria, and also the psychological aspects don't should be underestimated because of many women suffer of depression, mood instability, insomnia, fatigue and decreased libido. Long term symptoms include osteoporosis, cardiovascular and neuro-degenerative diseases. The main aim of different treatments was symptoms relief. Pharmacological agents and psychological support represent the goal for menopause treatment.

  8. Hormone replacement therapy and the prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levancini, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Fracture prevention is one of the public health priorities worldwide. Estrogen deficiency is the major factor in the pathogenesis of postmenopausal osteoporosis, the most common metabolic bone disease. Different effective treatments for osteoporosis are available. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) at different doses rapidly normalizes turnover, preserves bone mineral density (BMD) at all skeletal sites, leading to a significant, reduction in vertebral and non-vertebral fractures. Tibolone, a selective tissue estrogenic activity regulator (STEAR), is effective in the treatment of vasomotor symptoms, vaginal atrophy and prevention/treatment of osteoporosis with a clinical efficacy similar to that of conventional HRT. Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) such as raloxifene and bazedoxifene reduce turnover and maintain or increase vertebral and femoral BMD and reduce the risk of osteoporotic fractures. The combination of bazedoxifene and conjugated estrogens, defined as tissue selective estrogen complex (TSEC), is able to reduce climacteric symptoms, reduce bone turnover and preserve BMD. In conclusion, osteoporosis prevention can actually be considered as a major additional benefit in climacteric women who use HRT for treatment of climacteric symptoms. The use of a standard dose of HRT for osteoporosis prevention is based on biology, epidemiology, animal and preclinical data, observational studies and randomized, clinical trials. The antifracture effect of a lower dose HRT or TSEC is supported by the data on BMD and turnover, with compelling scientific evidence. PMID:26327857

  9. Cross-sex hormone therapy for gender dysphoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabris, B; Bernardi, S; Trombetta, C

    2015-03-01

    Gender identity is the sense one has of being male or female. Gender dysphoria (GD) refers to the distress caused by the incongruence between gender identity and biological sex in gender-nonconforming individuals. Cross-sex hormone therapy (CHT) aims at easing GD, improving well-being, and quality of life of gender-nonconforming individuals. This can be achieved by inducing and maintaining the desired-sex characteristics in accordance with the specific aspirations and expectations of each individual. Nevertheless, CHT can be associated with potentially serious long-term complications. Here, we review when, how, and how long to prescribe CHT to adult transsexuals as well as what to expect and monitor once it has been initiated. In recent years, transsexualism has become more and more recognized and depathologized. To manage GD, National and International Standards of Care have been established. Nevertheless, the needs of transgender patients can still be ignored or dismissed. Moreover, some questions remain unanswered because of the lack of specific retrospective or prospective studies on CHT. Education and culturally sensitive training must be supplied to healthcare professionals to overcome the existing issues on GD management and change the perspectives of transsexual people.

  10. Successful Growth Hormone Therapy in Cornelia de Lange Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, Michael; Kant, Sarina G; Wit, Jan Maarten; Willem Redeker, Egbert Johan; Eduard Santen, Gijs Willem; Henriëtta Verkerk, Annemieke Johanna Maria; Uitterlinden, André Gerardus; Losekoot, Monique; Oostdijk, Wilma

    2017-12-15

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a both clinically and genetically heterogeneous syndrome. In its classical form, it is characterised by distinctive facial features, intra-uterine growth retardation, short stature, developmental delay, and anomalies in multiple organ systems. NIPBL, SMC1A, SMC3, RAD21 and HDAC8, all involved in the cohesin pathway, have been identified to cause CdLS. Growth hormone (GH) secretion has been reported as normal, and to our knowledge, there are no reports on the effect of recombinant human GH treatment in CdLS patients. We present a patient born small for gestational age with persistent severe growth retardation [height -3.4 standard deviation score (SDS)] and mild dysmorphic features, who was treated with GH from 4.3 years of age onward and was diagnosed 6 years later with CdLS using whole-exome sequencing. Treatment led to a height gain of 1.6 SDS over 8 years. Treatment was interrupted shortly due to high serum insulin-like growth factor-1 serum values. In conclusion, GH therapy may be effective and safe for short children with CdLS.

  11. High Prevalence of Abacavir-associated L74V/I Mutations in Kenyan Children Failing Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziuban, Eric J; DeVos, Joshua; Ngeno, Bernadette; Ngugi, Evelyn; Zhang, Guoqing; Sabatier, Jennifer; Wagar, Nick; Diallo, Karidia; Nganga, Lucy; Katana, Abraham; Yang, Chunfu; Rivadeneira, Emilia D; Mukui, Irene; Odhiambo, Francesca; Redfield, Robert; Raizes, Elliot

    2017-08-01

    A survey of 461 HIV-infected Kenyan children receiving antiretroviral therapy found 143 (31%) failing virologically. Drug resistance mutations were found in 121; 37 had L74V/I mutations, with 95% receiving abacavir (ABC)-containing regimens. L74V/I was associated with current ABC usage (P = 0.0001). L74V/I may be more prevalent than previously realized in children failing ABC-containing regimens, even when time on treatment has been short. Ongoing rigorous pediatric drug resistance surveillance is needed.

  12. Endocrinological effects of gamma knife therapy on hormone-producing pituitary adenoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuzuki, Toshihide; Sakaki, Toshisuke; Morimoto, Tetsuya; Tsunoda, Shigeru; Kawai, Shozo; Yoshino, Eiji.

    1997-01-01

    The gamma knife therapy for pituitary adenoma excessively producing hormones was evaluated from an endocrinological aspect. Subjects were 5 cases, all females aged 22-63y, who had received the therapy >1 years ago. Excessive hormones produced by the tumor were prolactin (PRL, 1 case), growth hormone (GH, 2 cases) and ACTH (2 cases). The PRL case received 40 Gy in the past and additionally received the maximal dose of 15 Gy. The maximal doses for 2 GH cases were 30 Gy and for 2 ACTH cases, 35 and 40 Gy. After the therapy, MRI examination and hormone monitoring were done periodically. No morphological change of the tumor was observed by MRI. Normalization of hormone levels was seen in 3 cases except for 1 PRL and 1 ACTH cases. (K.H.)

  13. The validity of self-reported use of hormone replacement therapy among Danish nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, Ellen Christine Leth; Johnsen, Søren Påske; Heitmann, Berit Lillienthal

    2004-01-01

    Recent findings from randomized clinical trials on the effects of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) among postmenopausal women contradict findings from observational studies indicating a protective effect on the development of cardiovascular disease. Most observational studies on HRT are based...

  14. Hormone replacement therapy and intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery: the Rotterdam study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.C.D. Westendorp (Iris); B.A. in 't Veld; M.L. Bots (Michiel); J.M. Akkerhuis (Jurgen); D.E. Grobbee (Diederick); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); A. Hofman (Albert)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Observational data suggest that hormone replacement therapy (HRT) reduces morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease in healthy postmenopausal women. The mechanisms underlying this protection are not entirely clear but may

  15. Recurrent venous thromboembolism and abnormal uterine bleeding with anticoagulant and hormone therapy use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinelli, Ida; Lensing, Anthonie W. A.; Middeldorp, Saskia; Levi, Marcel; Beyer-Westendorf, Jan; van Bellen, Bonno; Bounameaux, Henri; Brighton, Timothy A.; Cohen, Alexander T.; Trajanovic, Mila; Gebel, Martin; Lam, Phuong; Wells, Philip S.; Prins, Martin H.

    2016-01-01

    Women receiving vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) require adequate contraception because of the potential for fetal complications. It is unknown whether the use of hormonal therapy, especially those containing estrogens, is associated with recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) during anticoagulation.

  16. Massive mesenteric and portal venous thrombosis secondary to hormone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, D G; Shapter, O; Mittapalli, D; Murray, W G

    2013-11-01

    Hormone replacement therapy increases risk of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) mainly in the extremities and lungs. There are reports of mesenteric ischemia secondary to oral contraceptive pills but no reports on hormone replacement therapy and mesenteric thrombosis. The authors present a case of a 44-year-old obese (BMI 32) woman, on long-term hormone replacement therapy, presented with thrombosis of portal, splenic and superior mesenteric veins. She underwent surgical resection of ischemic bowel and planned re-look laparotomies with further resections and jejuno-ileal anastomosis at final laparotomy. Thorough haematological investigations were normal. The authors conclude that hormone replacement therapy in obese patients with no other risk factors can cause a catastrophic mesenteric thrombosis. Aggressive surgical resection with re-look laparotomies and further resections can be lifesaving.

  17. Quantitative liver functions in Turner syndrome with and without hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg; Poulsen, Henrik Enghusen; Ott, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Studies have documented elevated levels of liver enzymes in many females with Turner syndrome (TS). Histology has shown a range of changes. Treatment with female hormone replacement therapy (HRT) reduces liver enzymes....

  18. An automatic framework for assessing breast cancer risk due to various hormone replacement therapies (HRT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karemore, Gopal; Brandt, Sami; Nielsen, Mads

    It is well known that menopausal hormone therapy increases mammographic density. Increase in breast density may relate to breast cancer risk. Several computer assisted automatic methods for assessing mammographic density have been suggested by J.W. Byng (1996), N. Karssemeijer (1998), J.M. Boone...... features describing the local elongatedness or stripiness, especially trained to see the effect of HRT (Hormone Replacement Therapy ) thereby providing a non-subjective and reproducible measure and compare it to the BIRADS and percentage density measure....

  19. Current attitudes on self-use and prescription of hormone therapy among New York City gynaecologists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Devi, Gayatri; Sugiguchi, Fumitaka; Pedersen, Anette Tønnes

    2013-01-01

    The results of the Women's Health Initiative studies dramatically altered hormone therapy use around the world. In countries outside the United States, self-use in physicians remained unaltered while prescription use declined, implying that physicians may not concur with the findings. We wished...... to explore prevailing attitudes among American physicians by examining New York City obstetrician-gynaecologists' self-use and prescription use of hormone therapy....

  20. An automatic framework for assessing breast cancer risk due to various hormone replacement therapies (HRT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karemore, Gopal; Brandt, Sami; Nielsen, Mads

    It is well known that menopausal hormone therapy increases mammographic density. Increase in breast density may relate to breast cancer risk. Several computer assisted automatic methods for assessing mammographic density have been suggested by J.W. Byng (1996), N. Karssemeijer (1998), J.M. Boone(...... features describing the local elongatedness or stripiness, especially trained to see the effect of HRT (Hormone Replacement Therapy ) thereby providing a non-subjective and reproducible measure and compare it to the BIRADS and percentage density measure....

  1. Quantitative liver functions in Turner syndrome with and without hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg; Poulsen, Henrik Enghusen; Ott, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Studies have documented elevated levels of liver enzymes in many females with Turner syndrome (TS). Histology has shown a range of changes. Treatment with female hormone replacement therapy (HRT) reduces liver enzymes.......Studies have documented elevated levels of liver enzymes in many females with Turner syndrome (TS). Histology has shown a range of changes. Treatment with female hormone replacement therapy (HRT) reduces liver enzymes....

  2. Hormonal therapy for endometriosis: from molecular research to bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosti, Claudia; Biscione, Antonella; Morgante, Giuseppe; Bifulco, Giuseppe; Luisi, Stefano; Petraglia, Felice

    2017-02-01

    Endometriotic lesions are associated with hormonal imbalance, including increased estrogen synthesis, metabolism and progesterone resistance. These hormonal changes cause increased proliferation, inflammation, pain and infertility. Hormonal imbalances are targets for treatment. Therapeutic strategies and innovations of hormonal drugs for endometriosis are increasing. Acting on estrogen receptors are hormonal drugs decreasing systemic and local estrogen synthesis (GnRH analogs, GnRH antagonists, Aromatase inhibitors) or estrogen activity (selective estrogen receptor modulators). The progesterone resistance is counteracted by progestins (Medroxyprogesterone acetate, Dienogest, Danazol, Levonorgestrel) or by Selective progesterone receptor modulators, a class of drugs under development. The future trend will be to define new drugs to use for prolonged period of time and with poor side effects considering endometriosis a chronic disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Thyroid hormone therapy following the thyroidectomy for thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horster, F.A.

    1986-01-01

    Medication with thyroid hormones following total thyroidectomy for thyroid carcinoma is based on the following principles: 1. The patient is informed about the lifelong necessity of taking a thyroid hormones daily before breakfast. This hormone must be given orally and its bioligical effect is identical with that of the tyhroid hormone secreted by the healthy thyroid gland. 2. The daily dosage of thyroid hormones may be assessed on the basis of the following parameters: a) the patient's clinical euthyroidism, b) suppression of thyrotropic activity, c) unrestricted tolerance of the preparation. 3. The in vitro parameters associated with optimal medication should be within the following ranges: Thyroxine value (TT4 or FT4): above the normal range, triiodothyronine value (TT3 or FT3): within the upper normal range and thyrotropin value (TSH 'ultrasensitive' or TRH-test): suppressed. (orig.) [de

  4. Effect of growth hormone replacement therapy in a boy with Dent's disease: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludwig Michael

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Dent's disease is an X-linked recessive proximal tubulopathy characterized by low molecular weight proteinuria, hypercalciuria, nephrocalcinosis, nephrolithiasis and progressive renal failure. To the best of our knowledge, this is only the third report on the use of growth hormone therapy in a child with poor growth associated with Dent's disease. Case presentation We report on a 7-year-old Montenegrin boy with proteinuria, hypercalciuria, nephrocalcinosis, rickets and short stature with unimpaired growth hormone secretion. A molecular genetic analysis showed S244L substitution on the CLCN5 gene. After two years of conventional treatment with hydrochlorothiazide, laboratory tests revealed more prominent proteinuria, mild hypophosphatemia, increased values of alkaline phosphatase and features of rickets. Phosphate salts, calcitriol, potassium citrate and growth hormone were included in the therapy. After three years of therapy, his adjusted parental stature was 1.53 standard deviations higher than at the initiation of growth hormone therapy. His global kidney functions and levels of proteinuria and calciuria remained relatively stable. In spite of the growth hormone therapy, his tubular reabsorption of phosphate deteriorated. Conclusion Treatment with recombinant human growth hormone may have a positive effect on final height in poorly growing children with Dent's disease and hypophosphatemic rickets. However, it is not possible to reach definite conclusions due to the small sample within the literature and the brief duration of the therapy.

  5. Endocrinology and hormone therapy in breast cancer: Endocrine therapy in premenopausal women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pritchard, Kathleen

    2005-01-01

    Endocrine therapy remains important in premenopausal women with hormone receptor positive breast cancer. Ovarian ablation, used alone, is effective in delaying recurrence and increasing survival in such women. When added to chemotherapy, it is less clear that it is effective perhaps because of the endocrine ablative effect of chemotherapy. Trials comparing ovarian ablation with or without tamoxifen to CMF-type chemotherapy suggest that the endocrine therapy is equivalent to or better than this chemotherapy in women whose tumors have estrogen and/or progesterone receptor. Tamoxifen is also effective in preventing recurrence and prolonging survival in the adjuvant setting in premenopausal women. While most of the available data deals with tamoxifen given alone, it appears to have a similar beneficial effect when added to chemotherapy in the premenopausal adjuvant setting. Adjuvant aromatase inhibitors should not be used in premenopausal women

  6. Impact of hormone therapy on quality of life after menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utian, Wulf H; Woods, Nancy Fugate

    2013-10-01

    Given the complexity of the literature on quality of life (QOL) and hormone therapy (HT) among women in the menopausal transition and postmenopause, the purposes of this integrative review were to (1) define QOL as a multidimensional construct; (2) review validated instruments for measurement of QOL; (3) review results of HT and QOL clinical trials that have used validated instruments; and (4) assess the effectiveness of HT on QOL, including health-related QOL (HRQOL), menopause-specific QOL (MSQOL), and global QOL (GQOL). The literature on HT and QOL was searched for definitions of QOL and validated instruments for measuring QOL, and the results were summarized. The purposes of this integrative review were to evaluate the effects of HT on HRQOL, differentiating the effects of HT on GQOL, HRQOL, and MSQOL. As a basis for this review, we searched for published controlled clinical trials in which the effects of HT on QOL were studied using validated QOL instruments, in particular menopause-specific validated instruments. Clear definitions are elucidated. Validated instruments for the measurements of HRQOL, GQOL, and MSQOL are summarized, and the necessity of their incorporation into future research and clinical practice is emphasized. The published effects on QOL of estrogens and progestogens administered to symptomatic and nonsymptomatic women in the menopausal transition and beyond are reviewed. The impact of various health state-related symptoms on HRQOL and GQOL is now an integral component of contemporary health care. Effects of HT include GQOL and HRQOL and should be menopause-specific. There is clearly a need for further studies on menopause and menopause-related therapies using appropriate and validated instruments. Literature review shows that HT provides a significant benefit for MSQOL in midlife women, mainly through relief of symptoms, but treatment also may result in a global increase in sense of well-being (GQOL). HRQOL benefits are contingent on

  7. Effect of combined hormonal and insulin therapy on the steroid hormone receptors and growth factors signalling in diabetic mice prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fávaro, Wagner J; Cagnon, Valéria H A

    2010-12-01

    Diabetes causes harmful effects on prostatic morphology and function. However, there still are doubts about the occurrence of various diseases in the prostate, as well as abnormal angiogenesis in relation to diabetes. Thus, the aim of this study was to correlate and quantify the level of the steroid hormone receptors and the angiogenic and antiangiogenic factors in non-obese diabetic mice (Nod) after combined hormonal and insulin therapy. Sixty mice were divided into six groups after 20 days of diabetes: the control group received 0.9% NaCl, as did the diabetic group. The diabetic-insulin group received insulin, the diabetic-testosterone group received testosterone cypionate, the diabetic-oestrogen group received 17β-oestradiol, and the diabetic-insulin-testosterone-oestrogen group received insulin, testosterone and oestrogen simultaneously. After 20 days, the ventral lobe was processed for immunocytochemical and hormonal analyses. The results showed that the lowest serum testosterone and androgen receptor levels were found in the diabetic group and the highest testosterone and androgen receptor levels in the diabetic-insulin-testosterone-oestrogen group. The serum oestrogen level and its receptor showed changes opposite to those of testosterone and its receptor. The endostatin reactivity was mainly decreased in diabetic mice. The greatest IGFR-1 and VEGF reactivities occurred in diabetic mice. Thus, diabetes led to the prostatic hormonal imbalance, affecting molecular dynamics and angiogenesis in this organ. Combined insulin and steroid hormone therapy partially restored the hormonal and angiogenic imbalance caused by diabetes. © 2010 The Authors. International Journal of Experimental Pathology © 2010 International Journal of Experimental Pathology.

  8. Development of a label-free LC-MS/MS strategy to approach the identification of candidate protein biomarkers of disease recurrence in prostate cancer patients in a clinical trial of combined hormone and radiation therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Morrissey, Brian

    2013-06-01

    Combined hormone and radiation therapy (CHRT) is one of the principle curative regimes for localised prostate cancer (PCa). Following treatment, many patients subsequently experience disease recurrence however; current diagnostics tests fail to predict the onset of disease recurrence. Biomarkers that address this issue would be of significant advantage.

  9. Mesenchymal Stromal (Stem) Cell Therapy Fails to Improve Outcomes in Experimental Severe Influenza

    OpenAIRE

    Darwish, Ilyse; Banner, David; Mubareka, Samira; Kim, Hani; Besla, Rickvinder; Kelvin, David J.; Kain, Kevin C.; Liles, W. Conrad

    2013-01-01

    RATIONALE: Severe influenza remains a major public health threat and is responsible for thousands of deaths annually. Increasing antiviral resistance and limited effectiveness of current therapies highlight the need for new approaches to influenza treatment. Extensive pre-clinical data have shown that mesenchymal stromal (stem) cell (MSC) therapy can induce anti-inflammatory effects and enhance repair of the injured lung. We hypothesized that MSC therapy would improve survival, dampen lung in...

  10. Long-term effects of growth hormone replacement therapy on thyroid function in adults with growth hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losa, Marco; Scavini, Marina; Gatti, Elisa; Rossini, Alessandro; Madaschi, Sara; Formenti, Ilaria; Caumo, Andrea; Stidley, Christine A; Lanzi, Roberto

    2008-12-01

    Clinical studies on the effect of growth hormone (GH) on thyroid function in patients with GH deficiency are contradictory. Further, the majority of published observations are limited to the first 6-12 months of GH replacement therapy. The aim of our study was to estimate the incidence of clinically relevant hypothyroidism in a cohort of patients with adult GH deficiency (AGHD) during long-term therapy with recombinant human GH (rhGH). The study was designed as a retrospective collection of data on thyroid function in 49 AGHD patients of whom 44 (90%) had multiple hormone deficiency. Thirty-seven patients (76%) were on stable levothyroxine (LT4) replacement therapy (HYPO), and 12 (24%) were euthyroid (EUT). Therapy with rhGH was started at a dose of 3.5 microg/kg body weight and adjusted according to insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) levels. At baseline, 6 months, 12 months, and yearly thereafter we measured free triiodothyronine (fT3), free thyroxine (fT4), thyroid-stimulating hormone, and IGF-I. Study outcome was fT4 level below the normal range (9 pmol/L), irrespectively of fT3 or thyroid-stimulating hormone levels. During a follow-up of 115 patient-years, mean fT4 level decreased significantly, although remaining within the normal range (p = 0.0242; month 48 vs. baseline). The largest decrease was between baseline and month 6, when fT4 decreased of 1.43 pmol/L (95% confidence interval, 0.33-2.53) per 1 unit (microg/kg body weight) increase in rhGH dose. The incidence of hypothyroidism was 1.2 (HYPO group) and 6.7 (EUT group) events per 100 patient-years. We confirm that in patients with AGHD, rhGH therapy is associated with a small, although significant, decrement of fT4 in the first 6 months of replacement therapy. However, the incidence of hypothyroidism is low. Monitoring of thyroid function during rhGH therapy is advisable, particularly in the first year of therapy when the largest decrease in fT4 occurs.

  11. The use of combined radiation therapy and hormonal therapy in the management of lymph node-positive prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittington, Richard; Malkowicz, S. Bruce; Machtay, Mitchell; Van Arsdalen, Keith; Barnes, Margaret M.; Broderick, Gregory A.; Wein, Alan J.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the rate of tumor response and patterns of relapse following combined hormonal-radiation therapy of adenocarcinoma of the prostate and to measure the survival in a group of men with tumor metastatic to pelvic lymph nodes. Methods and Materials: 66 patients with adenocarcinoma of the prostate with pathologically confirmed pelvic lymph node involvement were treated with combined radiation therapy and hormonal therapy. An additional five patients declined hormonal therapy. The patients treated with combined therapy represented a group with locally advanced disease including 44 patients (67%) with T3 or T4 tumors and 51 patients (80%) had N2 or N3 lymph node metastases. The pelvic lymph nodes were treated to a dose of 45 Gy and the prostate was boosted to a dose of 65 to 71 Gy. Hormonal therapy began up to 2 months before radiation and continued indefinitely. Patients were allowed to select their hormonal therapy and could choose DES (2 patients), orchiectomy (21 patients), LHRH agonist (7 patients) or combined androgen blockade (34 patients). Results: Median follow-up is 49 months (range 12 to 131 months) and 21 patients have been followed for longer than 5 years. There have been 15 recurrences the entire group including three local recurrences in the prostate, seven patients with distant metastases, four patients with biochemical recurrences without clinical evidence of disease, and one patient where the location was unknown. Two of the PSA recurrences occurred in patients who elected to discontinue hormones after less than 3 years of therapy. The overall survival at 5 and 8 years is 94 and 84%, the clinical disease free survival is 85 and 67%, and the biochemical disease-free survival is 78 and 47%. There was no increased toxicity of the combined modality regimen compared to the expected effects of radiation and hormonal therapy. Conclusion: Combined hormonal and radiation therapy represents an effective treatment option for patients with

  12. Rilpivirine resistance mutations in HIV patients failing non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anta, Lourdes; Llibre, Josep M; Poveda, Eva; Blanco, José L; Alvarez, Marta; Pérez-Elías, María J; Aguilera, Antonio; Caballero, Estrella; Soriano, Vicente; de Mendoza, Carmen

    2013-01-02

    Rilpivirine (RPV) is the latest approved nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI). It displays in-vitro activity extending over other NNRTI-resistant HIV strains. There is scarce information about the rate of RPV resistance-associated mutations (RAMs) in patients failing other NNRTIs. RPV RAMs were examined in plasma samples collected from HIV patients that had recently failed NNRTI-based regimens at 22 clinics in Spain. Resistance tests from a total of 1064 patients failing efavirenz (EFV) (54.5%), nevirapine (NVP) (40%) or etravirine (ETR) (5.5%) were examined. The prevalence of RPV RAMs was K101E (9.1%), K101P (1.4%), E138A (3.9%), E138G (0.3%), E138K (0.3%), E138Q (0.8%), V179L (0.2%), Y181C (21.8%), Y181I (0.5%), Y181V (0.2%), H221Y (8.3%), F227C (0.1%) and M230L (1.5%). K101E/M184I was seen in 1%. E138K/M184I were absent. Mutations L100I and V108I were significantly more frequent in patients failing EFV than NVP (7.9 vs. 0.2 and 12.2 vs. 7.3%, respectively). Conversely, Y181C, Y181I, V106A, H221Y and F227L were more prevalent following NVP than EFV failures. Using the Spanish resistance interpretation algorithm, 206 genotypes (19.3%) from patients failing NNRTI (NVP 52%, EFV 40.8% and ETR 7.8%) were considered as RPV resistant. In patients with ETR failure, cross-resistance to RPV was seen in 27.6%, mainly as result of Y181C (81.3%), V179I (43.8%), V90I (31.3%) and V108I (18.8%). RPV resistance is overall recognized in nearly 20% of patients failing other NNRTIs. It is more common following ETR (27.6%) or NVP (25%) failures than EFV (14.5%). E138 mutants are rarely seen in this context.

  13. Hormone replacement therapy in postmenopause - where we stand?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damir Franić

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The findings of most relevant randomized clinical studies such as HERS, WHI and MWS, performed in the last decade have shown that hormonal replacement therapy (HRT users are at increased risk for the development of breast cancer, stroke and pulmonary edema. On the other hand they are at a lower risk for the development of large bowel cancer and for hip and vertebral fractures; the incidences of endometrial cancer and coronary heart disease have not been proved to be significantly affected by HRT. As for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases, the findings of these studies differed from those provided by observational studies, it became an imperative to find the causes of these discrepancies. The major criticism of randomized clinical studies was aimed at the inclusion criteria, as the mean women’s age in HERS and in WHI study was 63 years. The women of that age may no longer be healthy, and are particularly exposed to cardiovascular diseases. In all studies the same type of HRT was used, i.e. conjugated equine estrogen alone or in combination with medroxyprogesterone acetate. In Europe, this combination is rarely prescribed; we do not prescribe it in Slovenia either. The same type of HRT used in randomized clinical studies was further criticized, the basic idea of HRT being an individual approach to each woman requiring HRT. For rather sensational and often misinterpreted findings of randomized studies, the largest menopause societies worldwide, the International Menopause Society (IMS, the European Menopause and Andropause Society (EMAS and the North American Menopause Society (NAMS, have revised the guidelines for HRT use in postmenopause. These guidelines have been adopted by the Slovene Menopause Society as well.Conclusions: The indications for HRT remain to be markedly expressed and severe climacteric symptoms, prevention and treatment of osteoporosis, urogenital syndrome and premature menopause. However, the

  14. HIV-1 CCR5 gene therapy will fail unless it is combined with a suicide gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pandit, Aridaman; de Boer, Rob J

    2015-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (ART) has successfully turned Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) from a deadly pathogen into a manageable chronic infection. ART is a lifelong therapy which is both expensive and toxic, and HIV can become resistant to it. An alternative to lifelong ART

  15. Risk of Breast Cancer in Relation to Combined Effects of Hormone Therapy, Body Mass Index, and Alcohol Use, by Hormone-receptor Status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidtfeldt, Ulla Arthur; Tjonneland, Anne; Keiding, Niels

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Alcohol consumption, increased body mass index (BMI), and hormone therapy are risk factors for postmenopausal breast cancer, but their combined effects are not well understood. Because hormone therapy is effective for the relief of menopausal symptoms, the identification of "high......-risk" users is important for therapeutic reasons. We investigated interactions between hormone therapy use and alcohol-use/high BMI status in relation to invasive breast cancer risk, both overall and according to estrogen receptor (ER) status. METHODS: Two Danish prospective cohorts were pooled, including 30......,938 person-years of follow-up, 1579 women developed invasive breast cancer. Among nonusers of hormone therapy, the risk of breast cancer was slightly increased with overweight/obesity and increasing alcohol consumption. Compared with normal-weight nonusers, the risk of breast cancer was higher in hormone...

  16. Mammographic changes in postmenopausal women : comparative effects between continuous combined hormone and single estrogen replacement therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Sug; Choi, Jong Tae; Jung, Kyoon Soon; Jung, Seung Hye [Jeil Women' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-06-01

    As the use of hormone replacement therapy for the menopausal women increases, some caution is advised, since there is an increased risk of breast cancer. Accordingly, the importance of regular mammography has been addressed. This cross-setional study analyzed the effects of different hormone therapies on mammographic density. Sixty-seven postemenopausal women who had completed one year of hormone therapy and had undergone follow-up mammography, were divided into two groups : Group I : continuous conjugated equine estrogen, 0.625mg, plus continuous medroxyprogesterone acetate, 2.5mg (n=48), Group II : continuous conjugated equine estrogen 0.625mg (n=19). The mammograms were read by two radiologists. With regard to the radiologists involved, interobserver reliabillity (kappa) was 0.70 and intraobserver reliability (kappa) was 0.51 and 0.67. Before hormone therapy, factors related to decreased mammographic density were age and number of full term pregnancies (p<0.05). After one year of hormone therapy, body fat showed a significant increase (p<0.05), but in spite of this, increased mammographic density induced by hormone therapy remained significantly high (p<0.05). Compared with Group II, Group I showed a significant increase in mammographic density (p<0.05). In Group I, mammographic density increased from P2 to DY pattern in two cases, but there was no such change in Group II. The increase of mammographic density seen in Group II was much more significant statistically than that seen in Group I. The mammograms of women who have undergone continuous combined hormone therapy should therefore be interpreted very cautiously.

  17. Recurrent venous thromboembolism and abnormal uterine bleeding with anticoagulant and hormone therapy use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Ida; Lensing, Anthonie W A; Middeldorp, Saskia; Levi, Marcel; Beyer-Westendorf, Jan; van Bellen, Bonno; Bounameaux, Henri; Brighton, Timothy A; Cohen, Alexander T; Trajanovic, Mila; Gebel, Martin; Lam, Phuong; Wells, Philip S; Prins, Martin H

    2016-03-17

    Women receiving vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) require adequate contraception because of the potential for fetal complications. It is unknown whether the use of hormonal therapy, especially those containing estrogens, is associated with recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) during anticoagulation. Despite the absence of data, World Health Organization guidelines state that use of estrogen-containing contraceptives confers an "unacceptable health risk" during established anticoagulation for VTE. We compared the incidences of recurrent VTE and abnormal uterine bleeding with and without concomitant hormonal therapy in women aged abnormal uterine bleeding. In total, 1888 women were included. VTE incidence densities on and off hormonal therapy were 3.7%/year and 4.7%/year (adjusted HR, 0.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.23-1.39), respectively, and were 3.7%/year and 3.8%/year, respectively, for estrogen-containing and progestin-only therapy. The adjusted HR for all abnormal uterine bleeding (on vs off hormonal therapy) was 1.02 (95% CI, 0.66-1.57). Abnormal uterine bleeding occurred more frequently with rivaroxaban than with enoxaparin/VKA (HR, 2.13; 95% CI, 1.57-2.89). Hormonal therapy was not associated with an increased risk of recurrent VTE in women receiving therapeutic anticoagulation. The observed increased risk of abnormal uterine bleeding with rivaroxaban needs further exploration. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  18. Failing Failed States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Hans-Henrik

    2002-01-01

    from inaction. Often, the media are blamed. Politicians complain about the media when they interfere (the CNN effect), and when they do not. This article looks at how the media do cover failing states. Sierra Leone and Congo are used as examples. The analysis shows that there is little independent...

  19. Contemporary management of patients with high-risk non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer who fail intravesical BCG therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, D R; Rouprêt, M

    2011-08-01

    It is advocated that patients with high-risk non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) receive an adjuvant course of intravesical Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) as first-line treatment. However, a substantial proportion of patients will 'fail' BCG, either early with persistent (refractory) disease or recur late after a long disease-free interval (relapsing). Guideline recommendation in the 'refractory' setting is radical cystectomy, but there are situations when extirpative surgery is not feasible due to competing co-morbidity, a patient's desire for bladder preservation or reluctance to undergo surgery. In this review, we discuss the contemporary management of NMIBC in patients who have failed prior BCG and are not suitable for radical surgery and highlight the potential options available. These options can be categorised as immunotherapy, chemotherapy, device-assisted therapy and combination therapy. However, the current data are still inadequate to formulate definitive recommendations, and data from ongoing trials and maturing studies will give us an insight into whether there is a realistic efficacious second-line treatment for patients who fail intravesical BCG but are not candidates for definitive surgery.

  20. Breast cancer risk in relation to the interval between menopause and starting hormone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beral, Valerie; Reeves, Gillian; Bull, Diana; Green, Jane

    2011-02-16

    Although breast cancer risk is greater in users of estrogen-progestin than estrogen-only formulations of menopausal hormonal therapy, reports on their effects have been somewhat inconsistent. We investigated whether the timing of these therapies affected breast cancer incidence. A total of 1,129,025 postmenopausal UK women provided prospective information on hormonal therapy use and other factors relevant for breast cancer risk. We used Cox regression to estimate adjusted relative risks (RRs) of breast cancer in hormonal therapy users vs never users and calculated standardized incidence rates. All statistical tests were two-sided. During 4.05 million woman-years of follow-up, 15,759 incident breast cancers occurred, with 7107 in current users of hormonal therapy. Breast cancer incidence was increased in current users of hormonal therapy, returning to that of never users a few years after use had ceased. The relative risks for breast cancer in current users were greater if hormonal therapy was begun before or soon after menopause than after a longer gap (P(heterogeneity) menopause (RR = 1.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.89 to 1.24), but risk was statistically significantly increased if use began before or less than 5 years after menopause (RR = 1.43, 95% CI = 1.35 to 1.51). A similar pattern was observed among current users of estrogen-progestin formulations (RR = 1.53, 95% CI = 1.38 to 1.70, and RR = 2.04, 95% CI = 1.95 to 2.14, respectively). At 50-59 years of age, annual standardized incidence rates for breast cancer were 0.30% (95% CI = 0.29% to 0.31%) among never users of hormone therapy and 0.43% (95% CI = 0.42% to 0.45%) and 0.61% (95% CI = 0.59% to 0.64%), respectively, among current users of estrogen-only and estrogen-progestin formulations who began use less than 5 years after menopause. There was substantial heterogeneity in breast cancer risk among current users of hormonal therapy. Risks were greater among users of estrogen-progestin than estrogen

  1. Hormonal therapy in the senescence: Prostatic microenvironment structure and adhesion molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montico, Fábio; Hetzl, Amanda Cia; Cândido, Eduardo Marcelo; Fávaro, Wagner José; Cagnon, Valéria Helena Alves

    2011-08-01

    Hormonal replacement has been utilized to minimize the harmful effects of hormonal imbalance in elderly men. The development and progression of prostatic diseases and their relation to hormone therapy is still unclear. Thus, the aim herewith was to characterize the structure and dystroglycan molecule (DGs) reactivities in the ventral prostatic lobe from elderly rats submitted to steroid hormone replacement. Male rats (Sprague-Dawley) were divided into one Young group and six senile groups. The Young group (YNG) (4 months old) received peanut oil (5mL/kg, s.c.). The senile rats (10 months old) were submitted to the following treatments: Senile group (SEN) (5mL/kg peanut oil, s.c.); Testosterone group (TEST) (5mg/kg testosterone cipionate, s.c.); Estrogen group (EST) (25μg/kg 17β-estradiol, s.c.); Castrated group (CAS) (surgical castration); Castrated-Testosterone (CT) (surgical castration and treatment similar to TEST group); and Castrated-Estrogen (CE) (surgical castration and treatment similar to EST group). After 30 days treatment, blood samples were collected for hormonal analysis and ventral prostate samples were processed for light and transmission electron microscopies, morphometrical analysis, immunohistochemistry and Western Blotting. The results showed decreased serum testosterone levels in the senescence and increased testosterone and estrogen plasmatic levels after hormone administration in the TEST and EST groups, respectively, highlighting the therapy efficiency. Hypertrophied stroma and inflammatory cells were verified in the SEN group. After hormone replacement in the senescence or following castration, atrophic epithelium, epithelial cells with clear cytoplasmic halo around the nucleus, microacini and maintenance of hypertrophied stroma were seen. Decreased DG levels were verified in the senescence. After hormonal therapy, increased protein levels of these molecules were observed, especially in those groups which received estradiol. Thus, the

  2. Menopausal hormone therapy is associated with having high blood pressure in postmenopausal women: observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Christine L; Lujic, Sanja; Thornton, Charlene; O'Loughlin, Aiden; Makris, Angela; Hennessy, Annemarie; Lind, Joanne M

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) and cardiovascular risk remains controversial, with a number of studies advocating the use of MHT in reducing risk of cardiovascular diseases, while others have shown it to increase risk. The aim of this study was to determine the association between menopausal hormone therapy and high blood pressure. A total of 43,405 postmenopausal women were included in the study. Baseline data for these women were sourced from the 45 and Up Study, Australia, a large scale study of healthy ageing. These women reported being postmenopausal, having an intact uterus, and had not been diagnosed with high blood pressure prior to menopause. Odds ratios for the association between MHT use and having high blood pressure were estimated using logistic regression, stratified by age (high blood pressure: past menopausal hormone therapy use: high blood pressure, with the effect of hormone therapy use diminishing with increasing age. Menopausal hormone therapy use is associated with significantly higher odds of having high blood pressure, and the odds increase with increased duration of use. High blood pressure should be conveyed as a health risk for people considering MHT use.

  3. Prepubertal Gynecomastia Due to Indirect Exposure to Nonformulary Bioidentical Hormonal Replacement Therapy: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pinho, Joao Correia; Aghajanova, Lusine; Herndon, Christopher N

    2016-01-01

    Gynecomastia is a disorder of the endocrine system characterized by an abnormal presence of a palpable unilateral or bilateral enlargement and proliferation of glandular ductal benign breast tissue in male individuals. This case discusses the medical implications of an unregulated, indirect exposure to nonformulary, bioidentical hormone replacement therapy in male children. An 8-year-old boy presented with prepubertal gynecomastia secondary to estrogen exposure from maternal use of bioidentical hormonal replacement therapy (the Wiley protocol). We review the literature on prepubertal gynecomastia secondary to exogenous estrogen exposure, evaluation, clinical surveillance of the pubertal development, and relevant short- and long-term implications. Indirect exposure to nonformulary hormonal replacement in our case report was an etiologic factor in the development of prepubertal gynecomastia. This novel estrogen exposure source has important implications in the differential diagnosis of prepubertal gynecomastia and potential adverse effects secondary to precocious hormonal exposure.

  4. Plasma cytokine profiles in depressed patients who fail to respond to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Brien, Sinead M

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVE: Approximately 30% of patients with depression fail to respond to a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). Few studies have attempted to define these patients from a biological perspective. Studies suggest that overall patients with depression show increased production of proinflammatory cytokines. We examined pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine levels in patients who were SSRI resistant. METHODS: Plasma concentrations of IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, TNF-alpha and sIL-6R were measured with enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) in DSM-1V major depressives who were SSRI resistant, in formerly SSRI resistant patients currently euthymic and in healthy controls. RESULTS: Patients with SSRI-resistant depression had significantly higher production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 (p=0.01) and TNF-alpha (p=0.004) compared to normal controls. Euthymic patients who were formerly SSRI resistant had proinflammatory cytokine levels which were similar to the healthy subject group. Anti-inflammatory cytokine levels did not differ across the 3 groups. CONCLUSION: Suppression of proinflammatory cytokines does not occur in depressed patients who fail to respond to SSRIs and is necessary for clinical recovery.

  5. [Hormone therapy in prostate cancer; a pharmacotherapeutic challenge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westdorp, H.; Benoist, G.E.; Schers, H.J.; Erp, P.H. van; Gerritsen, W.R.; Mulders, P.F.A.; Kramers, C.

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common form of cancer in men in the Western world. One-third of the patients with localised prostate cancer will develop recurrent disease, localised disease spread or distant metastases. The presence of distant metastases is an indication for primary palliative hormone

  6. Dietary therapy of obesity: Effect on some hormonal and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is now clear that the presence of obesity substantially increases the risk of related co-morbidities such as insulin resistance, diabetes, dyslipidemia, hypertension and others. The objective of this study was to measure adiponectin, insulin hormones, and homocysteine concentrations in obese Egyptian women before and ...

  7. Associations between the number of natural teeth in postmenopausal women and hormone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyungdo; Ko, Youngkyung; Park, Yong-Gyu; Park, Jun-Beom

    2016-12-01

    Increasing research suggests that periodontal status is associated with hormone replacement therapy in postmenopausal women. This study was performed to assess the relationship between the number of natural teeth and ever use of hormone replacement therapy in postmenopausal women using nationally representative Korean data. Data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 2010 and 2012 were used, and the analysis in this study was confined to a total of 4869 respondents over 19 years old who had gone through menopause and who had no missing data for the reproductive factors and outcome variables in that study. The total number of natural teeth was then calculated after excluding third molars. The time of day when tooth brushing was done was recorded as representative oral health behavior. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to assess association between the number of natural teeth and the use of hormone replacement therapy. Among participants who had ever used hormone replacement therapy, the proportions (percentage and standard error) with no teeth, 1-9 teeth, 10-19 teeth, 20-27 teeth, and 28 teeth were 5.0±2.4%, 6.7±1.4%, 12.5±1.7%, 18.9±1.0%, and 20.7±1.6%, respectively (Preplacement therapy, after adjustments. The analysis revealed that the use of hormone replacement therapy by postmenopausal women showed positive effects for retention of natural teeth. Lack of hormone replacement therapy may be considered to be an independent risk indicator for tooth loss in Korean postmenopausal women. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Nanostructured transdermal hormone replacement therapy for relieving menopausal symptoms: a confocal Raman spectroscopy study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Botelho

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the safety and efficacy of a transdermal nanostructured formulation of progesterone (10% combined with estriol (0.1% + estradiol (0.25% for relieving postmenopausal symptoms. METHODS: A total of 66 postmenopausal Brazilian women with climacteric symptoms of natural menopause received transdermal nanostructured formulations of progesterone and estrogens in the forearm daily for 60 months to mimic the normal ovarian secretory pattern. Confocal Raman spectroscopy of hormones in skin layers was performed. Clinical parameters, serum concentrations of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone, blood pressure, BI-RADS classification from bilateral mammography, and symptomatic relief were compared between baseline and 60 months post-treatment. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT02033512. RESULTS: An improvement in climacteric symptoms was reported in 92.5% of women evaluated before and after 60 months of treatment. The serum concentrations of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone changed significantly (p<0.05 after treatment; the values of serum follicle-stimulating hormone decreased after 60 months from 82.04±4.9 to 57.12±4.1 IU/mL. A bilateral mammography assessment of the breasts revealed normal results in all women. No adverse health-related events were attributed to this hormone replacement therapy protocol. CONCLUSION: The nanostructured formulation is safe and effective in re-establishing optimal serum levels of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone and relieving the symptoms of menopause. This transdermal hormone replacement therapy may alleviate climacteric symptoms in postmenopausal women.

  9. Nanostructured transdermal hormone replacement therapy for relieving menopausal symptoms: a confocal Raman spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botelho, Marco Antonio; Queiroz, Dinalva Brito; Barros, Gisele; Guerreiro, Stela; Umbelino, Sonia; Lyra, Arao; Borges, Boniek; Freitas, Allan, E-mail: marcobotelho@pq.cnpq.br [Universidade Potiguar, Natal, RN (Brazil). Lab. de Nanotecnologia; Fechine, Pierre [Universidade Federal do Ceara (GQMAT/UFCE), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica Analitica. Grupo Avancado de Biomateriais em Quimica; Queiroz, Danilo Caldas de [Instituto Federal de Ciencia e Tecnologia (IFCT), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Lab. de Biotecnologia; Ruela, Ronaldo [Instituto de Biotecnologia Aplicada (INBIOS), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Almeida, Jackson Guedes [Universidade Federal do Vale de Sao Francisco (UNIVALE), Petrolina, PE (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Farmaceuticas; Quintans Junior, Lucindo [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFSE), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil). Dept. de Fisiologia

    2014-06-01

    Objective:to determine the safety and efficacy of a transdermal nanostructured formulation of progesterone (10%) combined with estriol (0.1%) + estradiol (0.25%) for relieving postmenopausal symptoms. Methods: a total of 66 postmenopausal Brazilian women with climacteric symptoms of natural menopause received transdermal nanostructured formulations of progesterone and estrogens in the forearm daily for 60 months to mimic the normal ovarian secretory pattern. Confocal Raman spectroscopy of hormones in skin layers was performed. Clinical parameters, serum concentrations of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone, blood pressure, BI-RADS classification from bilateral mammography, and symptomatic relief were compared between baseline and 60 months post-treatment. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT02033512. Results: an improvement in climacteric symptoms was reported in 92.5% of women evaluated before and after 60 months of treatment. The serum concentrations of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone changed significantly (p<0.05) after treatment; the values of serum follicle-stimulating hormone decreased after 60 months from 82.04 ± 4.9 to 57.12 ± 4.1 IU/mL. A bilateral mammography assessment of the breasts revealed normal results in all women. No adverse health-related events were attributed to this hormone replacement therapy protocol. Conclusion: the nanostructured formulation is safe and effective in re-establishing optimal serum levels of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone and relieving the symptoms of menopause. This transdermal hormone replacement therapy may alleviate climacteric symptoms in postmenopausal women. (author)

  10. Nanostructured transdermal hormone replacement therapy for relieving menopausal symptoms: a confocal Raman spectroscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botelho, Marco Antonio; Queiroz, Dinalva Brito; Barros, Gisele; Guerreiro, Stela; Umbelino, Sonia; Lyra, Arao; Borges, Boniek; Freitas, Allan; Almeida, Jackson Guedes; Quintans Junior, Lucindo

    2014-01-01

    Objective:to determine the safety and efficacy of a transdermal nanostructured formulation of progesterone (10%) combined with estriol (0.1%) + estradiol (0.25%) for relieving postmenopausal symptoms. Methods: a total of 66 postmenopausal Brazilian women with climacteric symptoms of natural menopause received transdermal nanostructured formulations of progesterone and estrogens in the forearm daily for 60 months to mimic the normal ovarian secretory pattern. Confocal Raman spectroscopy of hormones in skin layers was performed. Clinical parameters, serum concentrations of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone, blood pressure, BI-RADS classification from bilateral mammography, and symptomatic relief were compared between baseline and 60 months post-treatment. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT02033512. Results: an improvement in climacteric symptoms was reported in 92.5% of women evaluated before and after 60 months of treatment. The serum concentrations of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone changed significantly (p<0.05) after treatment; the values of serum follicle-stimulating hormone decreased after 60 months from 82.04 ± 4.9 to 57.12 ± 4.1 IU/mL. A bilateral mammography assessment of the breasts revealed normal results in all women. No adverse health-related events were attributed to this hormone replacement therapy protocol. Conclusion: the nanostructured formulation is safe and effective in re-establishing optimal serum levels of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone and relieving the symptoms of menopause. This transdermal hormone replacement therapy may alleviate climacteric symptoms in postmenopausal women. (author)

  11. Does Interpersonal Therapy Help Patients with Binge Eating Disorder Who Fail to Respond to Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agras, W. Stewart; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Examines the effectiveness of group interpersonal therapy (IPT) in treating overweight, binge-eating patients. Participants were randomly allocated to cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) or to an assessment-only group. After 12 weeks, those who did not respond to CBT were assigned 12 weeks of IPT. IPT led to no further improvement. (JPS)

  12. Lipoproteína a, aterosclerosis y terapia hormonal de reemplazo Lipoprotein a, atherosclerosis and replacement hormone therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Lugones Botell

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó una revisión sobre la lipoproteína plasmática, Lp(a, cuyo papel fisiológico es poco conocido. Se ha descrito una asociación entre las concentraciones aumentadas de Lp(a y el proceso aterosclerótico. Además, su exceso podría inducir una disminución de la actividad fibrinolítica y, por tanto, favorecer la trombosis. También analizamos la terapia hormonal de reemplazo. En relación con los efectos positivos, mejora los síntomas climatéricos y previene la osteoporosis, aunque entre los efectos adversos en las mujeres que la siguen, se ha descrito un ligero aumento del riesgo del tromboembolismo venoso, y más recientemente, en estudios realizados en EE.UU. en los años 2002 y 2004, en el ya conocido estudio (Women´s Health Initiative Study, se reportó mayor incidencia de eventos cardiovasculares para la terapia combinada con estrógenos conjugados equinos y medroxiprogesterona, y de stroke para la terapia estrogénica. Estos estudios pusieron en su lugar los efectos de esta terapia, que no es totalmente inocua. Se precisan estudios más amplios para definir el papel de la terapia hormonal de reemplazo y otras medidas terapéuticas sobre el sistema hemostático, el metabolismo lipídico y la enfermedad cardiovascular.A review of plasmatic lipoprotein, Lp(a, whose physiological role is little known, was made. An association between the augmented concentrations of Lp(a and the atherosclerotic proccess has been described. Besides, its excess may lead to a reduction of the fibrinolytic activity and, therefore, favor thrombosis. The replacement hormone therapy was also analyzed. In relation to its positive effects, it improves the climacteric symptoms and prevents osteoporosis. Among its adverse effects, it has been observed a mild increase of the risk for venous thromboembolism and, more recently, in the aleady known Women's Health Initiative Study, it was reported a higher incidence of cardiovascular events for the combined

  13. Efeitos da terapia hormonal na menopausa sobre o sistema imune Effects of the menopause hormone therapy on the immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastião Freitas de Medeiros

    2007-11-01

    be altered during pregnancy, gonadectomy, menopause and hormone therapy. Estrogen depresses the cellular immunity, suppresses the natural killer cell activity and increases the production of antibodies. Progesterone/progestogen suppresses the cellular immune system. Androgens, after metabolization in estrogens, might stimulate the humoral immune response. Hormone therapy is still broadly used in post-menopause women with the purpose of decreasing climacteric symptoms, as well as preventing genital atrophy and bone loss. Its use to attenuate the risk of cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases remains in debate. A few studies have been carried out to examine the effect of post-menopause hormone therapy on the immune system. There is evidence that the hypoestrogenic state, following menopause, could result in less resistance to infections. The present review examines the interaction between sexual steroids and the immune system and, based on epidemiological and clinical studies, evaluates the effects of hormone therapy on the immune responses. It was concluded that the hormone therapy normalizes the cellular immune response in post-menopausal women.

  14. HORMONE AND RADIATION THERAPY IN HIGH- AND VERY HIGH-RISK PATIENTS WITH PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. O. Karyakin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of prostate cancer (PC is steadily growing every year. In the Russian Federation, its peak morbidity is in the age group of 70 years. Some patients refuse surgery or have contraindications because of comorbidity. Teleradiotherapy in combination with or without hormone therapy is an alternative treatment. The paper analyzes the authors’ results of treating high- and very high-risk patients with PC who received hormone and radiation therapy. The study retrospectively included the data of 132 patients who had been allocated to 3 groups according to the duration of adjuvant hormone therapy. The treatment results were assessed over a 5-year follow-up period according the following parameters: a lower decreased prostate-specific antigen (PSA score, recurrence rate, and 5-year relapse-free survival determined the by PSA level.

  15. The usefulness of MRI in evaluation of hormonal therapy for the ovarian chocolate cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimura, Kazuro; Ishida, Tetsuya; Takemori, Masayuki; Kono, Michio; Yamasaki, Katsuhito.

    1988-01-01

    We evaluated the diagnostic capability of MRI in ovarian chocolate cysts treated by Danazol (analogue of testosterone). Both inversion recovery as T1-weighted image and long TE and TR spin echo as T2-weighted image were performed before and during hormonal therapy. Temporal change of signal intensity and size was evaluated in three ovarian chocolate cysts (stage II: 2 cases, stage III: 1 case by Beecham classification, 1966) using the 0.15-T MR system. The high intense signal from all of the cysts was seen on both T1 and T2 weighted images before treatment. There was marked decrease in size of the chocolate cysts during hormonal therapy, and they were of considerably lower signal intensity than initially on T2-weighted image. We concluded that MRI was useful to evaluate hormonal therapy for ovarian chocolate cysts. (author)

  16. Response to microneedling treatment in men with androgenetic alopecia who failed to respond to conventional therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachita Dhurat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The efficacy of conventional therapy viz. finasteride and minoxidil in androgenetic alopecia (AGA that is based on both preventing hair loss and promoting new hair growth, varies between 30% and 60%. This has led to a large number of patients unsatisfied who demand for a better cosmetic coverage over the scalp. Microneedling has recently been reported to be promising, effective and a safe treatment modality in the treatment of AGA. This augments the response of conventional therapy. Materials and Methods: Four men with AGA were on finasteride and 5% minoxidil solution since 2 to 5 years. Though there was no worsening in their respective AGA stages with the therapy, they showed no new hair growth. They were subjected to microneedling procedure over a period of 6 months along with their ongoing therapy. Patients were assessed with the use of the standardized 7-point evaluation scale and patients′ subjective hair growth assessment scale. The patients were followed up for 18 months post microneedling procedure to assess the sustainability of the response. Results: All patients showed a response of + 2 to + 3 on standardized 7-point evaluation scale. The response in the form of new hair growth started after 8-10 sessions. The patients′ satisfaction was more than 75% in three patients and more 50% in one patient, on patients′ subjective hair growth assessment scale. The obtained results were sustained post procedure during 18 months follow-up period. Conclusion : Treatment with microneedling showed an accelerated response with addition of microneedling procedure leading to significant scalp density. This is the first case series to report the boosting effect of microneedling with respect to new hair follicle stimulation in patients with androgenetic alopecia who were poor responders to conventional therapy.

  17. Hormonal therapy is associated with better self-esteem, mood, and quality of life in transsexuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorin-Lazard, Audrey; Baumstarck, Karine; Boyer, Laurent; Maquigneau, Aurélie; Penochet, Jean-Claude; Pringuey, Dominique; Albarel, Frédérique; Morange, Isabelle; Bonierbale, Mireille; Lançon, Christophe; Auquier, Pascal

    2013-11-01

    Few studies have assessed the role of cross-sex hormones on psychological outcomes during the period of hormonal therapy preceding sex reassignment surgery in transsexuals. The objective of this study was to assess the relationship between hormonal therapy, self-esteem, depression, quality of life (QoL), and global functioning. This study incorporated a cross-sectional design. The inclusion criteria were diagnosis of gender identity disorder (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision) and inclusion in a standardized sex reassignment procedure. The outcome measures were self-esteem (Social Self-Esteem Inventory), mood (Beck Depression Inventory), QoL (Subjective Quality of Life Analysis), and global functioning (Global Assessment of Functioning). Sixty-seven consecutive individuals agreed to participate. Seventy-three percent received hormonal therapy. Hormonal therapy was an independent factor in greater self-esteem, less severe depression symptoms, and greater "psychological-like" dimensions of QoL. These findings should provide pertinent information for health care providers who consider this period as a crucial part of the global sex reassignment procedure.

  18. Cognitive Deficits in Breast Cancer Survivors After Chemotherapy and Hormonal Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Jennifer Sandson; Vance, David E; Triebel, Kristen L; Meneses, Karen M

    2015-12-01

    Adjuvant treatments, specifically chemotherapy and hormonal therapy, have dramatically increased breast cancer survival, resulting in increased attention to the residual effects of treatment. Breast cancer survivors (BCS) frequently report that cognitive deficits are a particular source of distress, interfering with many aspects of quality of life. The literature on neuropsychological performance measures in BCS supports the reality of subtle cognitive deficits after both chemotherapy and hormonal therapy. This premise is supported by recent imaging studies, which reveal anatomical changes after chemotherapy as well as changes in patterns of neural activation while performing cognitive tasks. This review suggests that, even when performance on neuropsychological performance measures is within normal limits, BCS may be using increased cognitive resources in the face of reduced cognitive reserve. Potential interventions for cognitive deficits after adjuvant therapy include prescriptions for healthy living, pharmacotherapy, complementary therapy, and cognitive remediation therapy directed toward specific cognitive deficits or a combination of several strategies.

  19. When dialogue fails. Music therapy with elderly with neurological degenerative diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigram, Anthony Lewis

    2004-01-01

    . Conclusion 1. In order to compensate for missing short-term memory it is important to work deliberately with cuing. A specific song in the beginning of the music therapy session will e.g. signalise that the music therapy is to start. Using songs as cues activates cortical memory function, and work as memory...... traces in the brain. Using the same “hello-song” in the beginning of a session - session after session - gives stability. Stability is constancy and familiarity of cues over time (Roberts & Algase 1988), and even people with severe memory deficits are capable of creating new memory traces and of learning...... and the ability to understand ‘what is going on’. “You need to have just the right level of activation to perform optimally” (LeDoux 1998, p. 289). Stimulating and sedating effects of music or songs are obtained by musical parameters, such as tempo, rhythm, timbre, volume, pitch, phrasing, dynamic, and timing...

  20. Development of a symptomatic intracranial meningioma in a male-to-female transsexual after initiation of hormone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deipolyi, Amy R; Han, Seunggu J; Parsa, Andrew T

    2010-10-01

    Transsexual patients are routinely treated with sex hormone therapy, which may be a risk factor for meningiomas, although the data are largely inconclusive. Here we describe a male-to-female transsexual patient treated with estradiol patches, who developed an occipital meningioma causing generalized seizures. This is the second report of a male-to-female transsexual patient who developed a symptomatic meningioma after sex hormone treatment, adding to the growing evidence that sex hormones contribute to the pathogenesis of meningiomas. Meningiomas may therefore complicate hormone therapy and sex hormones may be contraindicated in transsexual candidates with meningiomas identified upon screening. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Hormone Therapy Plus Chemotherapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    A trial of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) plus six cycles of docetaxel versus ADT alone found that after a median follow-up of nearly 29 months, median overall survival was 13.6 months longer with the combination therapy than with ADT alone.

  2. Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis as a Complication of Growth Hormone Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo-Yu Wang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE is a rare complication of growth hormone (GH therapy. Here, we report three patients who developed SCFE during GH therapy. The first two patients had hypopituitarism and had started GH therapy at the age of 15 years 6 months and 13 years 9 months, respectively. SCFE developed 4 years and 1 year after GH therapy, respectively. The third patient had Prader-Willi syndrome with obesity and hypogonadism and began GH therapy at the age of 12 years and 11 months. SCFE developed 2 months after starting GH therapy. Pain over the hip joints or over the knees is an early sign of SCFE. Despite recommendation, none of the three patients continued GH therapy. A high index of suspicion during GH therapy in patients at high risk of SCFE is important for early diagnosis and appropriate management. [J Formos Med Assoc 2007;106(2 Suppl:S46-S50

  3. MRI in predicting the response of ovarian endometriomas to hormone therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimura, Kazuro; Okizuka, Hiromi; Kaji, Yasushi [Shimane Medical Univ., Izumo (Japan)] [and others

    1996-01-01

    Our goal was to investigate the usefulness of MRI in predicting the response of endometriomas to hormone therapy. MRI and laparoscopy at the onset of treatment and follow-up MRI after 6 months of hormone therapy were performed in 21 patients with 49 endometriomas. T1- and T2-weighted images were obtained with a 1.5 T apparatus using a body coil. The lesions were divided into a responder group and a nonresponder group according to whether the lesion size decreased by 50% or not. With MRI, shading was seen in 25 of 27 lesions (93%) from the nonresponder group, but in only 6 of 22 (27%) from the responder group. Low SI rim was seen in 59% of the responders and 89% of the nonresponders. Multiplicity in 68% of the responders and in 85% of the nonresponders and irregularity in 41% of the responders and in 78% of the nonresponders were shown. Multiple logistic analysis revealed shading was the most important factor in prediction of the response to hormone therapy. Shading was an important sign in evaluating the response of endometriomas to hormone therapy. MRI may assist in selecting the appropriate therapy for endometriomas. 16 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Feasibility of salvage interstitial microwave thermal therapy for prostate carcinoma following failed brachytherapy: studies in a tissue equivalent phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCann, Claire; Kumaradas, J Carl; Gertner, Mark R; Davidson, Sean R H; Dolan, Alfred M; Sherar, Michael D

    2003-01-01

    Thermal therapy is an experimental treatment to destroy solid tumours by heating them to temperatures ranging from 55 deg C to 90 deg C, inducing thermal coagulation and necrosis of the tumour. We are investigating the feasibility of interstitial microwave thermal therapy as a salvage treatment for prostate cancer patients with local recurrence following failed brachytherapy. Due to the electrical and thermal conductivity of the brachytherapy seeds, we hypothesized that the seeds could scatter the microwave energy and cause unpredictable heating. To investigate this, a 915 MHz helical antenna was inserted into a muscle-equivalent phantom with and without brachytherapy seeds. Following a 10 W, 5 s input to the antenna, the temperature rise was used to calculate absorbed power, also referred to as specific absorption rate (SAR). Plane wave models based on Maxwell's equations were also used to characterize the electromagnetic scattering effect of the seeds. In addition, the phantom was heated with 8 W for 5 min to quantify the effect of the seeds on the temperature distribution during extended heating. SAR measurements indicated that the seeds had no significant effect on the shape and size of the SAR pattern of the antenna. However, the plane wave simulations indicated that the seeds could scatter the microwave energy resulting in hot spots at the seed edges. Lack of experimental evidence of these hot spots was probably due to the complex polarization of the microwaves emitted by the helical antenna. Extended heating experiments also demonstrated that the seeds had no significant effect on the temperature distributions and rates of temperature rise measured in the phantom. The results indicate that brachytherapy seeds are not a technical impediment to interstitial microwave thermal therapy as a salvage treatment following failed brachytherapy

  5. Comparison of illumina and 454 deep sequencing in participants failing raltegravir-based antiretroviral therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Z Li

    Full Text Available The impact of raltegravir-resistant HIV-1 minority variants (MVs on raltegravir treatment failure is unknown. Illumina sequencing offers greater throughput than 454, but sequence analysis tools for viral sequencing are needed. We evaluated Illumina and 454 for the detection of HIV-1 raltegravir-resistant MVs.A5262 was a single-arm study of raltegravir and darunavir/ritonavir in treatment-naïve patients. Pre-treatment plasma was obtained from 5 participants with raltegravir resistance at the time of virologic failure. A control library was created by pooling integrase clones at predefined proportions. Multiplexed sequencing was performed with Illumina and 454 platforms at comparable costs. Illumina sequence analysis was performed with the novel snp-assess tool and 454 sequencing was analyzed with V-Phaser.Illumina sequencing resulted in significantly higher sequence coverage and a 0.095% limit of detection. Illumina accurately detected all MVs in the control library at ≥0.5% and 7/10 MVs expected at 0.1%. 454 sequencing failed to detect any MVs at 0.1% with 5 false positive calls. For MVs detected in the patient samples by both 454 and Illumina, the correlation in the detected variant frequencies was high (R2 = 0.92, P<0.001. Illumina sequencing detected 2.4-fold greater nucleotide MVs and 2.9-fold greater amino acid MVs compared to 454. The only raltegravir-resistant MV detected was an E138K mutation in one participant by Illumina sequencing, but not by 454.In participants of A5262 with raltegravir resistance at virologic failure, baseline raltegravir-resistant MVs were rarely detected. At comparable costs to 454 sequencing, Illumina demonstrated greater depth of coverage, increased sensitivity for detecting HIV MVs, and fewer false positive variant calls.

  6. Comparison of illumina and 454 deep sequencing in participants failing raltegravir-based antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jonathan Z; Chapman, Brad; Charlebois, Patrick; Hofmann, Oliver; Weiner, Brian; Porter, Alyssa J; Samuel, Reshmi; Vardhanabhuti, Saran; Zheng, Lu; Eron, Joseph; Taiwo, Babafemi; Zody, Michael C; Henn, Matthew R; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Hide, Winston; Wilson, Cara C; Berzins, Baiba I; Acosta, Edward P; Bastow, Barbara; Kim, Peter S; Read, Sarah W; Janik, Jennifer; Meres, Debra S; Lederman, Michael M; Mong-Kryspin, Lori; Shaw, Karl E; Zimmerman, Louis G; Leavitt, Randi; De La Rosa, Guy; Jennings, Amy

    2014-01-01

    The impact of raltegravir-resistant HIV-1 minority variants (MVs) on raltegravir treatment failure is unknown. Illumina sequencing offers greater throughput than 454, but sequence analysis tools for viral sequencing are needed. We evaluated Illumina and 454 for the detection of HIV-1 raltegravir-resistant MVs. A5262 was a single-arm study of raltegravir and darunavir/ritonavir in treatment-naïve patients. Pre-treatment plasma was obtained from 5 participants with raltegravir resistance at the time of virologic failure. A control library was created by pooling integrase clones at predefined proportions. Multiplexed sequencing was performed with Illumina and 454 platforms at comparable costs. Illumina sequence analysis was performed with the novel snp-assess tool and 454 sequencing was analyzed with V-Phaser. Illumina sequencing resulted in significantly higher sequence coverage and a 0.095% limit of detection. Illumina accurately detected all MVs in the control library at ≥0.5% and 7/10 MVs expected at 0.1%. 454 sequencing failed to detect any MVs at 0.1% with 5 false positive calls. For MVs detected in the patient samples by both 454 and Illumina, the correlation in the detected variant frequencies was high (R2 = 0.92, PE138K mutation in one participant by Illumina sequencing, but not by 454. In participants of A5262 with raltegravir resistance at virologic failure, baseline raltegravir-resistant MVs were rarely detected. At comparable costs to 454 sequencing, Illumina demonstrated greater depth of coverage, increased sensitivity for detecting HIV MVs, and fewer false positive variant calls.

  7. Does hormone replacement therapy and use of oral contraceptives increase the risk of non-melanoma skin cancer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birch-Johansen, Fatima; Jensen, Allan; Olesen, Anne Braae

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to examine whether use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and oral contraceptives (OC) affect the risk of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in women.......We aimed to examine whether use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and oral contraceptives (OC) affect the risk of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in women....

  8. The effect of hormone replacement therapy on serum homocysteine levels in perimenopausal women : a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hak, AE; Bak, AAA; Lindemans, J; Planellas, J; Bennink, HJTC; Hofman, A; Grobbee, DE; Witteman, JCM

    2001-01-01

    Serum homocysteine levels may be lowered by hormone replacement therapy, but randomized controlled trial data are scarce. We performed a single center randomized placebo-controlled trial to assess the 6 months effect of hormone replacement therapy compared with placebo on fasting serum homocysteine

  9. Prevention of Alzheimer's disease, cerebrovascular disease and dementia in women: the case for menopause hormone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Dennis A

    2017-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease, cerebrovascular disease and aging-related cognitive impairment and dementia (ARCID) increase in prevalence in women with advancing age. The development of Alzheimer's disease, cerebrovascular disease and ARCID may be postponed or prevented by protective measures including the active treatment of vascular risk factors and continuing exercise and healthy lifestyle from early- and mid-life onward. Bilateral oophorectomy before the natural menopause is associated with an increased incidence of ARCID and the increased risk is significantly reduced by estrogen therapy. Recent advances in menopause hormone therapy including transdermal estrogen therapy have favorably influenced the balance of benefits and risks. A case can be made for menopause hormone therapy in healthy postmenopausal women for 5-10 years starting during the menopausal transition (the 'window of opportunity'), together with all other protective measures, to delay or prevent the development of ARCID in later life.

  10. Heart Failure Summit Review: cardiac re-synchronisation therapy in the failing heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Mitchell I

    2015-08-01

    Extrapolating cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) to pediatric patients with heart failure has at times been difficult given the heterogeneity of pediatric cardiomyopathies, varying congenital heart disease (CHD) substrates, and the fact that most pediatric heart failure patients have right bundle branch block (RBBB) as opposed to LBBB. Yet, despite these limitations a number of multi-center retrospective studies in North America and Europe have identified some data to suggest that certain sub-populations tend to respond positively to CRT. In order to address some of the heterogeneity it is helpful to subdivide pediatric and young adult patients with CHD into four potential groups: (1) CRT for chronic RV pacing, (2) dilated cardiomyopathies, (3) pulmonary right ventricles, and (4) systemic right ventricles. The chronic RV paced group, especially long-standing RV apical pacing, with ventricular dyssynchrony has consistently shown to be the group that best responds to a proactive resynchronization course. CRT therapy in pulmonary right ventricles such as post-op tetralogy of Fallot have shown some promise and may be considered especially if there is evidence of concomitant left ventricular dysfunction with an electrical dyssynchrony. Patients with systemic right ventricles such as post-atrial baffle surgery or congenitally corrected transposition reportedly do well with CRT in the presence of both inter-ventricular and intra-ventricular dyssynchrony. There is little doubt that moving forward to best way to identify which pediatric patients with heart failure will respond to CRT, will require a collaborative effort between the electrophysiologist and the echocardiographer to identify appropriate candidates with electrical and mechanical dyssynchrony.

  11. Long-term medical management of endometriosis with dienogest and with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist and add-back hormone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedaiwy, Mohamed A; Allaire, Catherine; Alfaraj, Sukinah

    2017-03-01

    Endometriosis can recur after either surgical or medical therapy. Long-term medical therapy is implemented to treat symptoms or prevent recurrence. Dienogest and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogues with hormone add-back therapy seem to be equally effective for long-term treatment of pain symptoms associated with endometriosis. There is insufficient evidence to support the superiority of one therapy over the other. However, add-back hormone therapy (HT) is recommended for patients using GnRH agonists. The treatment selection depends on therapeutic effectiveness, tolerability, drug cost, the physician's experience, and expected patient compliance. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cognitive function and discontinuation of adjuvant hormonal therapy in older breast cancer survivors: CALGB 369901 (Alliance).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluethmann, Shirley M; Alfano, Catherine M; Clapp, Jonathan D; Luta, George; Small, Brent J; Hurria, Arti; Cohen, Harvey J; Sugarman, Steven; B Muss, Hyman; Isaacs, Claudine; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the effects of cognitive function on discontinuation of hormonal therapy in breast cancer survivors ages 65+ ("older"). Older breast cancer survivors with invasive, non-metastatic disease, and no reported cognitive difficulties were recruited from 78 Alliance sites between 2004 and 2011. Eligible survivors (n = 1280) completed baseline interviews; follow-up was conducted annually for up to 7 years. Survivors with estrogen-receptor-positive (ER+) cancers who initiated hormonal therapy (n = 990) were included. Self-reported cognitive function was measured using the EORTC-QLQ30 scale; a difference of eight points on the 0-100 scale was considered clinically significant. Based on varying rates of discontinuation over time, discontinuation was evaluated separately for three time periods: early (3-5 years). Cox models for each time period were used to evaluate the effects of cognition immediately preceding discontinuation, controlling for age, chemotherapy, and other covariates. Survivors were 65-91 years old (mean 72.6 years), and 79% had stages 1 or 2A disease. Overall, 43% discontinued hormonal therapy before 5 years. Survivors who reported lower cognitive function in the period before discontinuation had greater hazards of discontinuing therapy at the treatment midpoint (HR 1.22 per 8-point difference, CI 1.09-1.40, p cognition was not related to discontinuation in the other periods. Self-reported cognitive problems were a significant risk factor for discontinuation of hormonal therapy 1-3 years post-initiation. Additional research is needed on the temporality of cognitive effects and hormonal therapy to support survivorship care needs of older survivors.

  13. South African Menopause Society revised consensus position statement on menopausal hormone therapy, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidozzi, Franco; Alperstein, A; Bagratee, J S; Dalmeyer, P; Davey, M; de Villiers, T J; Hirschowitz, S; Kopenhager, T; Moodley, S P; Roos, P; Shaw, A; Shimange, O; Smith, T; Thomas, C; Titus, J; van der Spuy, Z; van Waart, J

    2014-06-19

    The South African Menopause Society (SAMS) consensus position statement on menopausal hormone therapy (HT) 2014 is a revision of the SAMS Council consensus statement on menopausal HT published in the SAMJ in May 2007. Information presented in the previous statement has been re-evaluated and new evidence has been incorporated. While the recommendations pertaining to HT remain similar to those in the previous statement, the 2014 revision includes a wider range of clinical benefits for HT, the inclusion of non-hormonal alternatives such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors for the management of vasomotor symptoms, and an appraisal of bioidentical hormones and complementary medicines used for treatment of menopausal symptoms. New preparations that are likely to be more commonly used in the future are also mentioned. The revised statement emphasises that commencing HT during the 'therapeutic window of opportunity' maximises the benefit-to-risk profile of therapy in symptomatic menopausal women.

  14. α1A-Subtype adrenergic agonist therapy for the failing right ventricle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, Patrick M; Wang, Guanying; Joshi, Sunil; Swigart, Philip M; Lovett, David H; Simpson, Paul C; Baker, Anthony J

    2017-12-01

    Failure of the right ventricle (RV) is a serious disease with a poor prognosis and limited treatment options. Signaling by α 1 -adrenergic receptors (α 1 -ARs), in particular the α 1A -subtype, mediate cardioprotective effects in multiple heart failure models. Recent studies have shown that chronic treatment with the α 1A -subtype agonist A61603 improves function and survival in a model of left ventricular failure. The goal of the present study was to determine if chronic A61603 treatment is beneficial in a RV failure model. We used tracheal instillation of the fibrogenic antibiotic bleomycin in mice to induce pulmonary fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension, and RV failure within 2 wk. Some mice were chronically treated with a low dose of A61603 (10 ng·kg -1 ·day -1 ). In the bleomycin model of RV failure, chronic A61603 treatment was associated with improved RV fractional shortening and greater in vitro force development by RV muscle preparations. Cell injury markers were reduced with A61603 treatment (serum cardiac troponin I, RV fibrosis, and expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2). RV oxidative stress was reduced (using the probes dihydroethidium and 4-hydroxynonenal). Consistent with lowered RV oxidative stress, A61603 was associated with an increased level of the cellular antioxidant superoxide dismutase 1 and a lower level of the prooxidant NAD(P)H oxidase isoform NOX4. In summary, in the bleomycin model of RV failure, chronic A61603 treatment reduced RV oxidative stress, RV myocyte necrosis, and RV fibrosis and increased both RV function and in vitro force development. These findings suggest that in the context of pulmonary fibrosis, the α 1A -subtype is a potential therapeutic target to treat the failing RV. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Right ventricular (RV) failure is a serious disease with a poor prognosis and no effective treatments. In the mouse bleomycin model of RV failure, we tested the efficacy of a treatment using the α 1A -adrenergic receptor subtype

  15. Dienogest Therapy as a Treatment for Catamenial Pneumothorax: Case Report and Review of Hormonal Options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalani, Shifana; Black, Amanda; Hodge, Meryl C; Tulandi, Togas; Chen, Innie

    2017-09-01

    Catamenial pneumothorax is a rare but serious condition for women of reproductive age. We describe a trial of dienogest as hormonal therapy for catamenial pneumothorax and review the literature on hormonal suppressive therapy for this condition. A 39-year-old female, gravida 0 para 0, presented with recurrent pneumothoraces coinciding with her menses. After surgical therapy, she was started on leuprolide acetate injections for 6 months to reduce recurrence. To reduce long-term side effects of leuprolide acetate, the patient was started on dienogest 4 mg orally once daily instead of leuprolide acetate for hormonal suppression and experienced resolution of recurrent pneumothoraces. For women with recurrent catamenial pneumothorax, dienogest may be an effective hormonal treatment option and alternative to long-term GnRH agonist therapy for long-term suppression. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada/La Société des obstétriciens et gynécologues du Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Breast cancer incidence and use of hormone therapy in Denmark 1978-2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Euler-Chelpin, My

    2011-01-01

    Internationally, there have recently been reports of declining incidence rates for breast cancer. Decreased use of hormone therapy and decreased use of mammography has been put forward as possible reasons for this decline. The aim of this study was to analyse breast cancer incidence trends in Den...

  17. Effect of long-term Hormone Replacement Therapy on Plasma Homocysteine in Postmenopausal Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jonna S; Kristensen, Søren R; Klitgaard, Niels A

    2002-01-01

    hormone replacement therapy had significantly lower total homocysteine concentrations than women in the control group; median total homocysteine values were 8.6 micromol/L and 9.7 micromol/L, respectively, in a per-protocol analysis (P =.02). The effect was comparable in all methylenetetrahydrofolate...

  18. A Changing Landscape of Advanced Prostate Cancer: Understanding Mechanisms of Resistance to Potent Hormonal Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    protein expression alterations involving DNA mismatch repair genes consistent with prior studies. The significant overlap between CRPC-Adeno and CRPC...activation of AR signaling through the development of additional AR alterations (AR gene amplification, alternative splicing, AR-activating gene ...2. To prospectively evaluate circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from patients receiving potent hormonal therapies for acquisition of gene alterations in

  19. Impact of recent studies on attitudes and use of hormone therapy among Scandinavian gynaecologists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anette Tønnes; Iversen, Ole-Erik; Løkkegaard, Ellen

    2007-01-01

    Climacteric medicine has been in focus during the last 2 decades, and an intensive debate has been ongoing regarding the positive and negative aspects of postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT). Recent randomised controlled studies have been unable to confirm data from observational studies of primary...

  20. Breast Cancer Risk After Radiation Therapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma : Influence of Gonadal Hormone Exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krul, Inge M; Opstal-van Winden, Annemieke W J; Aleman, Berthe M P; Janus, Cécile P M; van Eggermond, Anna M; De Bruin, Marie L; Hauptmann, Michael; Krol, Augustinus D G; Schaapveld, Michael; Broeks, Annegien; Kooijman, Karen R; Fase, Sandra; Lybeert, Marnix L; Zijlstra, Josée M; van der Maazen, Richard W M; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Diallo, Ibrahima; de Vathaire, Florent; Russell, Nicola S; van Leeuwen, Flora E

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Young women treated with chest radiation therapy (RT) for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) experience a strongly increased risk of breast cancer (BC). It is unknown whether endogenous and exogenous gonadal hormones affect RT-associated BC risk. METHODS: We conducted a nested case-control study

  1. Breast Cancer Risk After Radiation Therapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma: Influence of Gonadal Hormone Exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krul, I.M.; Opstal-van Winden, A.W.J.; Aleman, B.M.P.; Janus, C.P.; Eggermond, A.M. van; Bruin, M.L. De; Hauptmann, M.; Krol, A.D.; Schaapveld, M.; Broeks, A.; Kooijman, K.R.; Fase, S.; Lybeert, M.L.; Zijlstra, J.M.; Maazen, R.W.M. van der; Kesminiene, A.; Diallo, I.; Vathaire, F. de; Russell, N.S.; Leeuwen, F.E. van

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Young women treated with chest radiation therapy (RT) for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) experience a strongly increased risk of breast cancer (BC). It is unknown whether endogenous and exogenous gonadal hormones affect RT-associated BC risk. METHODS: We conducted a nested case-control study

  2. The role of hormone therapy in the treatment of osteoporosis | Davey ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The concerns raised by the findings of the Women's Health Initiative study resulted in many practitioners no longer considering the use of menopausal hormone therapy for the treatment of osteoporosis. Subsequent re-analyses of this study, recent publications on the use of lower doses and different modes of delivery of ...

  3. Noonan syndrome and Turner syndrome patients respond similarly to 4 years' growth-hormone therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Peter A; Ross, Judith L; Pedersen, Birgitte Tønnes

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Turner syndrome (TS) and Noonan syndrome (NS) are distinct syndromes associated with short stature and other similar phenotypic features. We compared the responses to growth hormone (GH) therapy of TS and NS patients enrolled in the NordiNet® International Outcome Study (IOS) or the A...

  4. Hormonal changes during GnRH analogue therapy in children with central precocious puberty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, J; Juul, A; Andersson, A M

    2000-01-01

    Gonadotropin releasing hormone analogues (GnRHa) have been used for treatment of central precocious puberty (CPP) for more than 15 years. They are generally considered safe although data on potential long-term side effects are scarce. However, GnRHa therapy has profound effects on both the hypoth...

  5. Hormonal replacement therapy reduces forearm fracture incidence in recent postmenopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosekilde, Leif; Beck-Nielsen, H.; Sørensen, O.H.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the fracture reducing potential of hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) in recent postmenopausal women in a primary preventive scenario. METHODS: Prospective controlled comprehensive cohort trial: 2016 healthy women aged 45-58 years, from three to 24 months past last menstrual ...

  6. Effects of non-oral postmenopausal hormone therapy on markers of cardiovascular risk: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemelaar, M.; Mooren, M.J. van der; Rad, M.; Kluft, C.; Kenemans, P.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To review the effects of non-oral administration of postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) on risk markers for atherosclerotic and venous thromboembolic disease.Non-oral postmenopausal HT appears not to increase venous thromboembolic risk, whereas the effect on coronary heart disease risk is

  7. Replacing hormone therapy-is the decline in prescribing sustained, and are nonhormonal drugs substituted?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vegter, Stefan; Kolling, Pieternel; Toben, Marjolijn; Visser, Sipke T.; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T. W.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: After two cautioning landmark studies in 2002 and 2003, a dramatic decrease in hormonal therapy (HT) prescribing for menopausal symptoms was seen. Our objectives were to (1) determine whether this decline in HT prescribing sustained until 2007 and (2) investigate nonhormonal drug

  8. Carotid artery distensibility and hormone therapy and menopause: the Los Angeles Atherosclerosis Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shufelt, Chrisandra; Elboudwarej, Omeed; Johnson, B Delia; Mehta, Puja; Bittner, Vera; Braunstein, Glenn; Berga, Sarah; Stanczyk, Frank; Dwyer, Kathleen; Merz, C Noel Bairey

    2016-02-01

    Observational studies have suggested that arterial distensibility decreases during menopause; however, its relationship with hormone therapy use remains controversial. We prospectively studied distensibility and hormone therapy use at different menopause stages. One hundred sixty-one women (aged between 42 and 61 y) without cardiovascular disease underwent carotid artery measurements by ultrasound to calculate distensibility index at baseline and 3 years later. Menopause stage was classified at each visit as premenopausal, perimenopausal, and postmenopausal. Across 3 years of prospective observation, women were classified as remaining premenopausal, remaining postmenopausal, or transitioning (defined as change from premenopausal to perimenopausal, from premenopausal to postmenopausal, from perimenopausal to perimenopausal, or from perimenopausal to postmenopausal). Distensibility declined across time at all menopause stages (P menopausal transition is associated with reduced vascular compliance. Hormone therapy is associated with better arterial distensibility only during the menopausal transition. Additional prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings and to determine whether hormone therapy use beyond the menopausal transition is related to distensibility.

  9. Genetic modifiers of menopausal hormone replacement therapy and breast cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolph, Anja; Hein, Rebecca; Lindström, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Women using menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) are at increased risk of developing breast cancer (BC). To detect genetic modifiers of the association between current use of MHT and BC risk, we conducted a meta-analysis of four genome-wide case-only studies followed by replication in 11 case...

  10. The association between early menopause and risk of ischaemic heart disease: Influence of Hormone Therapy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, E; Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic; Heitmann, B L

    2006-01-01

    Randomised clinical trials find no protection against development of ischaemic heart disease by use of Hormone Therapy (HT) after the age of 50 years. Observational studies suggest that early menopause is a risk factor for ischaemic heart disease. Yet, a clinical very relevant question is whether...... HT reduces this risk associated with early menopause....

  11. Carotid Artery Distensibility and Hormone Therapy and Menopause: The Los Angeles Atherosclerosis Study (LAAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shufelt, Chrisandra; Elboudwarej, Omeed; Johnson, B. Delia; Mehta, Puja; Bittner, Vera; Braunstein, Glenn; Berga, Sarah; Stanczyk, Frank; Dwyer, Kathleen; Merz, C. Noel Bairey

    2015-01-01

    Objective Observational studies suggest that arterial distensibility decreases during menopause; however, the relation to hormone therapy use is controversial. We prospectively studied distensibility and hormone therapy use during different menopause stages. Methods 161 women between 42–61 years of age without cardiovascular disease had carotid artery measurements by ultrasound to calculate the distensibility index at baseline and 3 years later. Menopause stage was classified at each visit as premenopausal, perimenopausal, and postmenopausal. Over 3 years of prospective observation, women were classified as remaining premenopausal, remaining postmenopausal, or transitioning, defined as change from premenopausal-to-perimenopausal, premenopausal-to-postmenopausal, perimenopausal-to-perimenopausal, or perimenopausal-to-postmenopausal. Results Distensibility declined over time in all menopause stages (pmenopause transition is associated with reduced vascular compliance. Hormone therapy is associated with better arterial distensibility only during menopause transition. Additional prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings and to determine if hormone therapy use beyond menopause transition is related to distensibility. PMID:26308234

  12. Hormone therapy and the risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Eisen (Andrea); J. Lubinski (Jan); J. Gronwald (Jacek); P. Moller (Pal); H. Lynch (Henry); J.G.M. Klijn (Jan); C. Kim-Sing (Charmaine); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); L. Gilbert (Lucy); P. Ghadirian (Parviz); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); G. Rennert (Gad); E. Friedman (Eitan); C. Isaacs (Claudine); B. Rosen (Barry); M.J. Daly (Mark); P. Sun (Ping); S. Narod (Steven); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); S. Cummings (Shelly); N. Tung (Nadine); F.J. Couch (Fergus); W.D. Foulkes (William); S.M. Domchek (Susan); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); R. Gershoni-Baruch (Ruth); D. Horsman (David); H. Saal (Howard); E. Warner (Ellen); W. Meschino (Wendy); K. Offit (Kenneth); A. Trivedi (Amber); M. Robson (Mark); M. Osborne (Michael); D. Gilchrist (Dawna); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); W. McKinnon (Wendy); M. Wood (Marie); C. Maugard (Christine); B. Pasini (Barbara); T. Wagner (Teresa); K. Sweet; B. Pasche (Boris); T. Fallen (Taya); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); C. Eng (Charis); R.N. Kurz; S. Armel (Susan); A. Tulman (Anna); P.J. Ainsworth (Peter); E. Lemire (Edmond); J. McLennan; G. Evans (Gareth); T. Byrski (Tomas); T. Huzarski (Tomas); L. Shulman (Lee)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Hormone therapy (HT) is commonly given to women to alleviate the climacteric symptoms associated with menopause. There is concern that this treatment may increase the risk of breast cancer. The potential association of HT and breast cancer risk is of particular interest to

  13. Hormone replacement therapy and risk of breast cancer: the role of progestins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahlberg, Claudia Irene; Pederson, Anette Tønnes; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2003-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown an increased risk of breast cancer associated with the use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT). This notion is mostly based on studies from the USA. During the last decades unopposed estrogen treatment has been used to a lesser extent, whereas the combined estr...

  14. Incidence of thrombophilia and venous thrombosis in transsexuals under cross-sex hormone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Johannes; Kaufmann, Ulrike; Bentz, Eva-Katrin; Huber, Johannes C; Tempfer, Clemens B

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate the incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in transsexual patients and the value of screening for thrombophilia in this population. Retrospective cohort study. Academic research institution. Two hundred fifty-one transsexuals (162 male-to-female [MtF] and 89 female-to-male [FtM] transsexuals). Screening for activated protein C (aPC) resistance, antithrombin III, free protein S antigen, and protein C deficiency. Incidence of thrombophilic defects and VTE during cross-sex hormone therapy. Activated protein C resistance was detected in 18/251 patients (7.2%), and protein C deficiency was detected in one patient (0.4%). None of the patients developed VTE under cross-sex hormone therapy during a mean of 64.2 +/- 38.0 months. There was no difference in the incidence of thrombophilia comparing MtF and FtM transsexuals (8.0% [13/162] vs. 5.6% [5/89], respectively). VTE during cross-sex hormone therapy is rare. General screening for thrombophilic defects in transsexual patients is not recommended. Cross-sex hormone therapy is feasible in MtF as well as in FtM patients with aPC resistance. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Raloxifene and hormone replacement therapy increase arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic levels in postmenopausal women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giltay, E.J.; Duschek, E.J.J.; Katan, M.B.; Neele, S.J.; Netelenbos, J.C.; Zock, P.L.

    2004-01-01

    Estrogens may affect the essential n-6 and n-3 fatty acids arachidonic acid (AA; C20:4n-6) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; C22:6n-3). Therefore, we investigated the long-term effects of hormone replacement therapy and raloxifene, a selective estrogen-receptor modulator, in two randomized,

  16. Should we start and continue growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy in adults with GH deficiency?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Maaten, JC

    2000-01-01

    During the last decade, growth hormone deficiency (GHD) in adults has been described as a clinical syndrome. Central features of this entity include increased fat mass, reduced muscle and bone mass, as well as impaired exercise capacity and quality of life. GH replacement therapy has been initiated

  17. HIV-1 genotypic resistance profile of patients failing antiretroviral therapy in Paraná, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Virginia Michelon Toledo

    Full Text Available Antiretroviral therapy (ART has reduced morbidity and mortality related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection, but in spite of this advance, HIV mutations decrease antiretroviral susceptibility, thus contributing to treatment failure in patients. Genotyping HIV-1 allows the selection of new drugs after initial drug failure. This study evaluated the genotypic profile of HIV-1 isolates from treated (drug-experienced patients in Paraná, Brazil. The prevalence of mutations in reverse transcriptase (RT and protease (PR genes were assessed. We analyzed 467 genotypes of patients with HIV-1 viral loads above 1,000 copies/mL. Mutations at HIV-1 RT and PR genes and previously used ART regimens were recorded. The most prevalent RT mutations were: 184V (68.31%, 215YF (51.6%, 103NS (46%, 41L (39.4%, 67N (38.54%, 210W (23.5%, 190ASE (23.2%, and 181C (17.4%. PR mutations were 90M (33.33%, 82ATFS (29%, 46I (26.8% and 54V (22.2%. The prevalence of mutations was in line with previous national and international reports, except to nonnucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors related mutations, which were more prevalent in this study. Previous exposure to antiretroviral drugs was associated with genotypic resistance to specific drugs, leading to treatment failure in HIV patients.

  18. New dolutegravir resistance pattern identified in a patient failing antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carganico, Andreas; Dupke, Stefan; Ehret, Robert; Berg, Thomas; Baumgarten, Axel; Obermeier, Martin; Walter, Hauke

    2014-01-01

    The most recently approved antiretroviral, the integrase inhibitor dolutegravir (DTG), is described to be a very potent drug with a unique resistance profile, but a certain degree of cross-resistance to RAL or EVG induced drug resistance, which is mediated mainly by integrase mutations at positions 140 and 148. The impact of a single N155H mutation to DTG resistance is described to be minor. However, there is only rare data available about the impact of N155H in the context of secondary site integrase mutations. Here, we present a case of virological failure in a DTG treated patient based on N155H mutation background. Therapy monitoring of an HIV-HCV co-infected patient harbouring already an omni-drug-class resistant HIV-1 in consequence of more than 20 years ART history. Drug susceptibility testing was performed by RT-PCR from plasma and subsequent Sanger sequencing. Tropism testing was done from proviral DNA with FPR cut-offs according to the German recommendations. In 2013, the patient harbouring a virus with high level resistance to all RTI and PI received a regimen containing FTC, TDF, DRV/r, RPV, T20, and RAL to handle a viral load of 5000 RNA copies/mL, but never achieved fully suppressed viral load. In June 2013, after S119R, N155H and E157Q mutations in viral integrase were detected, the patient received DTG, and RAL was stopped. One month later, when viral load was undetectable for the first time since 2007, ART was de-escalated by removing T20. Since February 2014, low-level viral load was re-detectable. Two new mutations T97A and S147G in the integrase and no other new resistance associated mutations in protease and reverse transcriptase in comparison to the sample analyzed in June 2013 were detected. Highly resistant HIV-1 strains have been a common problem in the past. Their frequencies were pushed back by highly potent ART, but the virus is still able to become resistant against all available antiretrovirals at once. The here documented strain became

  19. Factors Associated with Gender-Affirming Surgery and Age of Hormone Therapy Initiation Among Transgender Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckwith, Noor; Reisner, Sari L.; Zaslow, Shayne; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Keuroghlian, Alex S.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Gender-affirming surgeries and hormone therapy are medically necessary treatments to alleviate gender dysphoria; however, significant gaps exist in the research and clinical literature on surgery utilization and age of hormone therapy initiation among transgender adults. Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of electronic health record data from a random sample of 201 transgender patients of ages 18–64 years who presented for primary care between July 1, 2010 and June 30, 2015 (inclusive) at an urban community health center in Boston, MA. Fifty percent in our analyses were trans masculine (TM), 50% trans feminine, and 24% reported a genderqueer/nonbinary gender identity. Regression models were fit to assess demographic, gender identity-related, sexual history, and mental health correlates of gender-affirming surgery and of age of hormone therapy initiation. Results: Overall, 95% of patients were prescribed hormones by their primary care provider, and the mean age of initiation of masculinizing or feminizing hormone prescriptions was 31.8 years (SD=11.1). Younger age of initiation of hormone prescriptions was associated with being TM, being a student, identifying as straight/heterosexual, having casual sexual partners, and not having past alcohol use disorder. Approximately one-third (32%) had a documented history of gender-affirming surgery. Factors associated with increased odds of surgery were older age, higher income levels, not identifying as bisexual, and not having a current psychotherapist. Conclusion: This study extends our understanding of prevalence and factors associated with gender-affirming treatments among transgender adults seeking primary care. Findings can inform future interventions to expand delivery of clinical care for transgender patients. PMID:29159310

  20. Ovarian morphology and function during growth hormone therapy of short girls born small for gestational age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tinggaard, Jeanette; Jensen, Rikke; Sundberg, Karin

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of growth hormone (GH) treatment on ovarian and uterine morphology and function in short, prepubertal small-for-gestational-age (SGA) girls.DESIGN: A multinational, randomized controlled trial on safety and efficacy of GH therapy in short, prepubertal children born...... multicystic ovaries.CONCLUSION(S): GH treatment was associated with statistically significant growth of the internal genitalia, but remained within the normal range. As altered pubertal development and ovarian morphology were found in 2 of 18 girls, monitoring of puberty and ovarian function during GH therapy......(S): Data on anthropometrics, reproductive hormones, and ultrasonographic examination of the internal genitalia were collected during 36 months of GH treatment.RESULT(S): Uterine and ovarian volume increased significantly during 3 years of treatment (64% and 110%, respectively) but remained low within...

  1. Promotion and marketing of bioidentical hormone therapy on the internet: a content analysis of websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuksel, Nese; Treseng, Laetitia; Malik, Bushra; Ogbogu, Ubaka

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the quality of information presented and claims made on websites offering bioidentical hormone therapy (BHT) products or services. A quantitative content analysis was completed on 100 websites promoting or offering BHT products or services. Websites were identified through Google search engine from September to October 2013. Search terms included "bioidentical hormone therapy" or "bioidentical progesterone," accompanied by "purchase or buy," "service," or "doctors." The Brief DISCERN instrument was used to determine the quality of the health information. Websites were from Canada (59%), United States (38%), and other countries (3%). Almost half of the websites originated from medical clinics (47%), and healthcare professionals offering BHT services included physicians (50%), pharmacists (19%), and naturopaths (16%). Majority of websites promoted BHT as custom-compounded formulations (62%), with only 27% indicating that BHT is also commercially available. Websites overall claimed that BHT had less risk compared with conventional hormone therapy (62%). BHT was described as having less breast cancer risk (40%), whereas over a quarter of websites described BHT as "protective" for breast cancer. Websites mainly targeted women (99%), with males mentioned in 62% of websites. Product descriptors used to promote BHT included individualization (77%), natural (70%), hormone imbalance (56%), and antiaging (50%). The mean Brief DISCERN score was 15, indicating lower quality of information. Claims made about BHT on the internet are misleading and not consistent with current professional organizations' recommendations. Understanding how BHT may be promoted on the internet can help healthcare professionals when educating patients.

  2. A case report of spontaneous pregnancy during hormonal replacement therapy for premature ovarian failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahbod Ebrahimi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Premature ovarian failure (POF is a common condition; its incidence is estimated to be as great as 1 in 100 by the age of 40 years. Physiologic replacement of ovarian steroid hormones seems rational until the age of normal menopause. Temporary return of ovarian function and pregnancy may occur rarely in women with POF. We report a case of POF who conceived during hormone replacement therapy.Case: A 30 years-old woman with confirmed POF after pelvic surgery and sever emotional stress conceived spontaneously.Conclusion: Return of ovarian function and achievement of pregnancy is possible in women with POF.

  3. A case report of spontaneous pregnancy during hormonal replacement therapy for premature ovarian failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari Asbagh, Firoozeh; Ebrahimi, Mahbod

    2011-01-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is a common condition; its incidence is estimated to be as great as 1 in 100 by the age of 40 years. Physiologic replacement of ovarian steroid hormones seems rational until the age of normal menopause. Temporary return of ovarian function and pregnancy may occur rarely in women with POF. We report a case of POF who conceived during hormone replacement therapy. A 30 years-old woman with confirmed POF after pelvic surgery and sever emotional stress conceived spontaneously. Return of ovarian function and achievement of pregnancy is possible in women with POF.

  4. Influence of modified transdermal hormone replacement therapy on the concentrations of hormones, growth factors, and bone mineral density in women with osteopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanosz, Staniaław; Zochowska, Ewa; Safranow, Krzysztof; Sieja, Krzysztof; Stanosz, Małgorzta

    2009-01-01

    The metabolic and therapeutic action of estrogens depends on their type, dosage, form, route of administration, and treatment-free interval during the therapeutic cycle. Hormone therapy is generally subclassified into 2 forms that differ in the type of hormones. In hormonal replacement therapy (HRT), estrogens and progesterone components do not differ in chemical structure and molecular mass from those naturally produced by the female organism. In hormonal supplementary therapy (HST), the estrogen and progestagen components do differ from the natural hormones in structure and mass. The aim of the study was to compare 2 kinds of hormonal therapy in early postmenopausal women with osteopenia. These forms of therapy are modified transdermal HRT and orally given HST. The objective of this study was the estimation of sex hormone, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), prolactin (PRL), osteocalcin, and procollagen concentration in serum as well as the degree of mineralization of the lumbar spine in women in the early postmenopausal period with osteopenia under different kinds of hormonal therapy. The study was conducted in 75 women with an average age of 52.4 +/- 3.5 years and with primary osteopenia, in the early postmenopausal period, who were randomly assigned to 3 groups depending on the form and route of administration of therapy: Group I (n = 25, control) was receiving placebo in the form of patches. Group II (n = 25) was treated with modified transdermal HRT. This group obtained micronized 17beta-estradiol at increasing-decreasing doses and progesterone in the second phase of the therapeutic cycle. Group III (n = 25) was receiving orally given HST and obtained Cyclo-Menorette (Wyeth, Munster, Germany). The therapeutic cycle in each group lasted 21 days, followed by a 7-day medication-free interval. Estradiol concentration in serum was increased 5-fold and estrone (E(1)) was increased about 11-fold in the group of women receiving orally given HST (P hormone was

  5. Impacto da terapia hormonal sobre o peso corpóreo Impact of hormone replacement therapy on body weight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Palmira Martins Almeida

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar o efeito da terapêutica hormonal (TH no peso de mulheres na peri-menopausa, assim como o efeito de diferentes regimes terapêuticos no referido parâmetro. MÉTODOS: estudo retrospectivo de 139 mulheres, com menopausa há menos de 2 anos, acompanhadas na consulta de climatério do nosso departamento. Obtiveram-se dois grupos: mulheres a quem se iniciou TH (n=89 e outro, grupo controle, sem terapia hormonal (n=50. Em cada grupo, foi avaliada a modificação ponderal no intervalo de 1 ano após a primeira consulta. Nas submetidas a TH, avaliou-se esse mesmo parâmetro em função de diferentes regimes terapêuticos preconizados: estrogênio isolado vs estroprogestagênio e dose standard vs baixa dosagem. A análise estatística foi realizada com recurso ao programa SPSS®, adotando-se como nível de significância valores pPURPOSE: to evaluate the effect of hormone replacement therapy (HT on the weight on perimenopausal women as well as the effect of different treatment regimens on this parameter. METHODS: a retrospective study of 139 women with menopause for less than 2 years, who were monitored with periodical visits in our department. We compared two groups: women who started HT (n=89 with women who had no hormonal treatment (n=50 and in the two groups, we evaluated the changes in body weight over a 1-year period. In the first group, we assessed the same parameter as a function of different treatment regimens: estrogen alone versus estrogen combined with progestin and standard dose versus low dose. The SPSS® program was used for statistical analysis, with the level of significance set at p<0.05. RESULTS: the groups were similar with respect to demographic and baseline characteristics; weight gain was higher in the untreated group (434 vs 76 g, but the difference observed was not significant (p = 0.406; among HT users, those taking estrogen alone had an increased weight gain compared to women taking estrogen with progestin

  6. Phytoestrogens as alternative hormone replacement therapy in menopause: What is real, what is unknown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Ana C; Silva, Ana M; Santos, Maria S; Sardão, Vilma A

    2014-09-01

    Menopause is characterized by an altered hormonal status and by a decrease in life quality due to the appearance of uncomfortable symptoms. Nowadays, with increasing life span, women spend one-third of their lifetime under menopause. Understanding menopause-associated pathophysiology and developing new strategies to improve the treatment of menopausal-associated symptoms is an important topic in the clinic. This review describes physiological and hormone alterations observed during menopause and therapeutic strategies used during this period. We critically address the benefits and doubts associated with estrogen/progesterone-based hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and discuss the use of phytoestrogens (PEs) as a possible alternative. These relevant plant-derived compounds have structural similarities to estradiol, interacting with cell proteins and organelles, presenting several advantages and disadvantages versus traditional HRT in the context of menopause. However, a better assessment of PEs safety/efficacy would warrant a possible widespread clinical use. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Premenstrual Exacerbation of Life-Threatening Asthma: Effect of Gonadotrophin Releasing Hormone Analogue Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alun L Edwards

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Variability in the severity of asthma during various phases of the menstrual cycle has been frequently suspected. However, the hormonal changes that might affect mediators of bronchospasm have yet to be elucidated. The case of a 41-year-old woman suffering from longstanding asthma with life-threatening exacerbations is reported. The patient was treated with buserelin, a gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH analogue, which created a temporary chemical menopause and thus permitted diagnosis of a premenstrual exacerbation of asthma and offered insight into potential therapy. GnRH analogues may therefore be of value in assessing women with severe asthma suspected to vary with the menstrual cycle. The addition of estrogens and progestins at the same time as treatment with GnRH analogue may be of value in determining the role of these hormones in the pathogenesis of menstrually related exacerbations of asthma.

  8. HIV type 1 drug resistance patterns among patients failing first and second line antiretroviral therapy in Nairobi, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koigi, Peter; Ngayo, Musa Otieno; Khamadi, Samoel; Ngugi, Caroline; Nyamache, Anthony Kebira

    2014-12-09

    The ever-expanding rollout of antiretroviral therapy in poor resource settings without routine virological monitoring has been accompanied with development of drug resistance that has resulted in limited treatment success. A cross-sectional study with one time viral load was conducted during the period between 2012 and 2013 to determine treatment failure and drug resistance mutations among adults receiving first-line (44) (3TC_d4T/AZT_NVP/EFV) and second-line (20) (3TC/AZT/LPV/r) in Nairobi, Kenya. HIV-1 pol-RT genotyping for drug resistance was performed using an in-house protocol. A total of 64 patients were recruited (mean age 36.9 yrs.) during the period between 2012 and 2013 of the 44 adult patients failing first-line 24 (40.9%) had drug resistance mutations. Eight (8) patients had NRTI resistance mutations with NAMS M184V (54.2%) and K65R (8.4%) mutations being the highest followed by TAMs T215Y and K70R (12.5%). In addition, among patients failing second-line (20), six patients (30%) had NNRTI resistance; two patients on K103N and G190A mutations while V106A, Y184V, A98G, Y181C mutations per patient were also detected. However, for NRTI two patients had TAM T215Y. M184V mutation occurred in one patient. The study findings showed that HIV-1 drug resistance was significantly high in the study population. The detected accumulated resistance strains show that emergence of HIV drug resistance will continue to be a big challenge and should be given more attention as the scale up of treatment in the country continues.

  9. Biochemical relapse for prostate cancer following radical prostatectomy: salvage radiotherapy without hormonal therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fede, Angelo B.S. [Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo Andre, SP (Brazil); Jacinto, Alexandre Arthur; Fagundes, Livia A.; Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio Assis; Novaes, Paulo Eduardo Ribeiro dos Santos; Arruda, Gustavo Viani; Castilho, Marcus Simoes; Maia, Maria Aparecida Conte; Silva, Maria Leticia Gobo; Fogaroli, Ricardo Cesar; Salvajoli, Joao Victor [Hospital A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. of Radiation Oncology]. E-mail: aajacinto@yahoo.com.br

    2006-07-01

    Objectives: This paper aims to study biochemical control, hormonal therapy-free survival, and prognostic factors related to salvage radiation for prostate cancer patients submitted to radical prostatectomy (RP) without hormonal therapy (HT) before or during radiation. Materials and Methods: from August 2002 to July 2004, 39 prostate cancer patients submitted to RP presented biochemical failure after achieving PSA nadir (<0.2 ng/ml). All patients were submitted to three-dimensional conformal external beam radiation therapy (3 DC-EBRT) and no patients had received HT. Median age was 62 years, median preoperative PSA was 9.4 ng/ml, median Gleason Score was 7. We defined PSA rise above 0.2 as biochemical failure after surgery. Median 3 DC-EBRT dose was 70 Gy, and biochemical failure after EBRT was defined as three consecutive rises in PSA or a single rise sufficient to trigger HT. Results: Biochemical non-evidence of disease (BNED) in 3 years was 72%. PSA doubling time (PSADT) lower than 4 months (p=0.04), and delay to salvage EBRT (p=0.05) were associated to worse chance of successful salvage therapy. Late morbidity was acceptable. Conclusion: Expressive PSA control (72% BNED / 3 years) could be achieved with salvage radiotherapy in well-selected patients. The importance of PSADT was confirmed, and radiotherapy should be started as early as possible. Follow-up is somewhat short, but it is possible to conclude that it is possible to achieve a long interval free from hormonal therapy with low rate of toxicity, avoiding or at least delaying morbidity related to hormonal treatment radiotherapy. (author)

  10. Positive impact of hormone replacement therapy on the fibrinolytic system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, J S; Kristensen, S R; Gram, J

    2003-01-01

    = 248) were randomized to HRT (n = 122) or no substitution (n = 126) 5 years prior to investigation. RESULTS: Significantly higher values of t-PA activity and lower values of PAI-1 activity and PAI-1 antigen were found in the HRT group compared with the control group. This effect was independent...... of smoking and without influence from the two common polymorphisms PAI-1 -675(4G/5G) and t-PA intron8ins311. Furthermore, no difference between opposed estrogen (with norethisterone acetate as the gestagen component) and unopposed estrogen therapy was found. Both an intention-to-treat and a per...... effect, and no influence of the two common polymorphisms PAI-1-675(4G/5G) and t-PA intron8ins311 was found. This effect of HRT on fibrinolytic capacity may be one of the beneficial effects of HRT in relation to cardiovascular diseases....

  11. A boy with Prader-Willi syndrome: unmasking precocious puberty during growth hormone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Natasha G; Radaeli, Rafael F; Silva, Mariana M X; Romero, Camila M; Carrilho, Alexandre J F; Bessa, Danielle; Macedo, Delanie B; Oliveira, Maria L; Latronico, Ana Claudia; Mazzuco, Tânia L

    2016-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a genetic disorder frequently characterized by obesity, growth hormone deficiency, genital abnormalities, and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Incomplete or delayed pubertal development as well as premature adrenarche are usually found in PWS, whereas central precocious puberty (CPP) is very rare. This study aimed to report the clinical and biochemical follow-up of a PWS boy with CPP and to discuss the management of pubertal growth. By the age of 6, he had obesity, short stature, and many clinical criteria of PWS diagnosis, which was confirmed by DNA methylation test. Therapy with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) replacement (0.15 IU/kg/day) was started. Later, he presented psychomotor agitation, aggressive behavior, and increased testicular volume. Laboratory analyses were consistent with the diagnosis of CPP (gonadorelin-stimulated LH peak 15.8 IU/L, testosterone 54.7 ng/dL). The patient was then treated with gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog (GnRHa). Hypothalamic dysfunctions have been implicated in hormonal disturbances related to pubertal development, but no morphologic abnormalities were detected in the present case. Additional methylation analysis (MS-MLPA) of the chromosome 15q11 locus confirmed PWS diagnosis. We presented the fifth case of CPP in a genetically-confirmed PWS male. Combined therapy with GnRHa and rhGH may be beneficial in this rare condition of precocious pubertal development in PWS.

  12. The role of menopausal hormone therapy in the management of osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Villiers, T J

    2015-01-01

    It is now 75 years since Fuller Albright published his observations on the causal relationship between menopausal estrogen deficiency and osteoporosis. He introduced the concept of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) for the prevention of osteoporosis. Most of his remarkable observations have stood the test of time and scientific scrutiny. Unfortunately, the uptake of MHT for the prevention of osteoporosis and related fractures remains very low. This can be ascribed to several factors. The availability of new drugs, supported by randomized clinical trials, has increased therapeutic options and created the impression that all new drugs are better compared to MHT. Confusion exists as to the benefit/risk profile of menopausal hormone therapy, limitations on the age of initiation of treatment, limitations on the length of treatment, and the need for treatment in the young menopausal woman with low bone density.

  13. Re-framing the representation of women in advertisements for hormone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, R

    1998-06-01

    This article examines and presents examples of contemporary advertising within the medical and health professions that continue the process and organisation of knowledge about women and their reproductive bodies. It draws on feminist and poststructural perspectives to inform a critical evaluation of the visual representations of menopausal women and hormone replacement therapy. These representations work to construct certain definitions of the feminine that sustain and support existing contradictory cultural meanings and values about menopause. I argue that the images continue to misrepresent and define what forms of femininity and sexual gender are desirable and acceptable for menopausal women. The article addresses the problems of gender discrimination and bias within the advertising industry, and illustrates the ways in which readers of visual texts may be influenced by stereotypic assumptions concerning a woman's lived experience of menopause. It illustrates how specific symbolic images directed towards men and women for hormone replacement therapy, testosterone deficiency and sexual dysfunction influence the viewer's decision making and action responses.

  14. [The influence of sequential hormonal therapy on biochemical and cardiovascular indices in menopause].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosić, Semso; Kendić, Sulejman; Bećirević, Alma

    2008-01-01

    This study follows 94 patients, age 45 to 60, by controlled, random and prospective studies in time period of six months. Out of total number of patients, 53 were divided into research group and treated with hormonal therapy (2 mg of estradiol and 0,5 mg of norgestrel), 41 patients were divided into control group and treated with refemin (Cimicifuga recemosa). Results were statistically processed using Student test and ANOVA, giving us following results: use of HNL resulted with statistically significant changes--increase of heart frequency (*pchanges--increase of diastolic pressure(*p=0,01), increase of body mass index (BMI) (*p=0,01) and endometrial thickness decrease (*p=0,05). By testing research and controlled group with ANOVA test, we have determined that there is statistical difference in operating between recovered hormone therapy and Cimicifuge recemose within parameters of hearth frequency and diastolic pressure.

  15. Growth hormone inhibition causes increased selenium levels in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: a possible new approach to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collipp, P J; Kelemen, J; Chen, S Y; Castro-Magana, M; Angulo, M; Derenoncourt, A

    1984-01-01

    Nine children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy were given Sanorex (mazindol), a growth hormone inhibitor, daily for 6 months. There was no significant change in their muscle function, but there was a significant reduction in weight gain and in levels of growth hormone, somatomedin C, hair zinc, serum zinc, and serum LDH. Selenium and glutathione peroxidase in the serum increased significantly. Thirteen other children with growth hormone deficiency had a significant reduction in hair selenium following growth hormone administration. These results show a significant relationship between growth hormone and selenium nutritional status and confirm our previous reports indicating an effect of growth hormone on zinc nutritional status. It is possible that prolonged therapy with a growth hormone inhibitor would attenuate the course and improve the longevity of patients with muscular dystrophy. PMID:6492089

  16. Doubling in the use of thyroid hormone replacement therapy in Denmark: association to iodization of salt?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cerqueira, Charlotte; Knudsen, Nils; Ovesen, Lars

    2011-01-01

    of salt was initiated in 1998 because of mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the raised iodine intake on the nationwide incident use of thyroid hormone replacement therapy (levothyroxine) to treat hypothyroidism. Data on all use of levothyroxine...... for caution when initiating iodine fortification programs to keep the intake within the optimal range, and the need for continuous monitoring....

  17. Prevalence of hormone replacement therapy in a sample of middle-aged women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, S H; Jeune, B

    1988-01-01

    A survey based on a postal questionnaire sent to a random sample of Danish women aged 40-59 yr living on the island of Fünen (n = 401, response rate = 79%) revealed that the overall prevalence of the use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) was 16%, the highest rate being in the 50-54 age group (......, approximately one third reporting a positive and one-third a negative attitude....

  18. Growth hormone therapy in a girl with Turner syndrome and diabetes type 1 - case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara-Moszynska, Monika; Banaszak, Magdalena; Niedziela, Marek

    2015-01-01

    The studies indicate the complex etiology of abnormal glucose metabolism in the Turner syndrome (TS). In the light of these carbohydrate disorders a therapy with recombinant growth hormone (rGH) in TS may be associated with complications, as growth hormone has a diabetogenic potential. Perinatal history is unknown since the patient was adopted at the age of 4 years. At 11 years old, due to typical phenotype, TS was diagnosed. The karyotype was 45,X[43]/46,X,i(X)(q10)[7]. At the same age, basing on laboratory results, insulin dependent diabetes was diagnosed and the conventional insulin therapy was initiated. During the hospitalization, at the age of 12 years, the patient was 123.5cm (-4.4SD). At the same age rGH tre-atment was initiated, with the dose 0.045 mg/kg/d. After 3 months of therapy the height velocity rose to 8.2 cm/ year. At the age of 13 years, substitution with 17β-estradiol was started. After 3 years and 4 months the growth hormone treatment was stopped because of poor height velocity. The final height of the patient was 140 cm (-4,OSD). Two years after the end of rGH treatment the height was 141.2 cm. After termination of rGH treatment the need for daily insulin dose decreased from 50-60U/d to 38-44U/d. The decision of rGH therapy in TS with diabetes is certainly difficult. While starting the growth hormone treatment the clinician must keep in mind the risk of metabolic complications, but also the awareness that gives the patient a chance to improve the final height. In terms of the proper psycho-emotional development the reduction of growth deficit is very important. © Polish Society for Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology.

  19. Effects of growth hormone deficiency and recombinant growth hormone therapy on postprandial gallbladder motility and cholecystokinin release.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moschetta, A.; Twickler, M.; Rehfeld, J.F.; Ooteghem, N.A. van; Castro Cabezas, M.; Portincasa, P.; Berge-Henegouwen, G.P. van; Erpecum, K.J. van

    2004-01-01

    In addition to cholecystokinin, other hormones have been suggested to be involved in regulation of postprandial gallbladder contraction. We aimed to evaluate effects of growth hormone (GH) on gallbladder contractility and cholecystokinin release. Gallbladder and gastric emptying (by ultrasound) and

  20. [Changes of mammographic and ultrasound image of breast in women undergoing hormonal substitution therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houserková, D; Matlochová, J

    2004-07-01

    Evaluation of changes in mammographic and ultrasound images of the breast in women using hormonal substitution therapy (HST). Retrospective clinical study. A cohort of 430 women with menopause, who have been using hormonal substitution therapy (HST) for 2-10 years, and the control population of 150 women with menopause not using HST were selected for the study. 304 women used combined HST (an oestrogen and a progestogen combination) and 126 women with surgical menopause used oestrogen hormonal substitution (EST). The mammographic and ultrasound image changes were monitored separately in the women's population with combined and oestrogen hormonal substitution and also in relation to the individual types of breast and relative to the application form of the hormonal preparation. In 105 women with HST, the ultrasound image changes were monitored as well. In women with menopause using HST, there was a statistically significant increase of mammographic image density recorded. It was twice as frequent in the women using the combined HST as in the women using oestrogen monotherapy. In the women using oestrogen substitution, there was a monitorable mammographic density increase in a greater percentage of women with orally used preparation in comparison with the women with intradermal oestrogen administration. The mammographic density increase was more significant in both groups and more frequent in women with a prevalence of fatty breast tissue (type II and III according to Tabár). In ultrasound examination, in women with HST, the incidence of new and enlargement of earlier existing benign formations in the breast was recorded. These ultrasound image changes were twice as frequent in the women with oestrogen monotherapy in comparison with the women with the combined hormonal substitution. Only one woman was diagnosed with carcinoma during HST use. In the women using the combined as well as oestrogen hormonal substitution, a statistically significant mammographic density

  1. Change in the use of hormone replacement therapy and the incidence of fracture in Oslo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, H E; Lofthus, C M; Søgaard, A J; Falch, J A

    2009-05-01

    Fracture incidence in Oslo decreased from the 1970s to the 1990s in younger postmenopausal women, but not in older women or in men. Concurrently, hormone replacement therapy increased considerably. Using data from the Oslo Health Study, we estimated that roughly half the decline might be attributed hormone replacement therapy. Between the late 1970s and the late 1990s, the incidence of hip fracture and distal forearm fracture decreased in younger postmenopausal women in Oslo, but not in elderly women or in men. The purpose of this report is to evaluate whether the decreased incidence was coherent with trends in use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Data on estrogens were collected from official drug statistics, data on fractures from published studies and data on bone mineral density (BMD) from the Oslo Health Study. The sale of all estrogens increased 22 times from 1979 to 1999, and the sub-category estradiol combined with progestin increased 35 times. In the corresponding period the incidence of distal forearm fracture in women aged 50-64 years decreased by 33% and hip fracture by 39%. Based on differences in BMD between users and non-users of HRT, we estimated that up to half of this decline might be due to HRT. The reduction in fracture incidence in postmenopausal women in Oslo occurred in a period with a substantial increase in the use of HRT. Future surveillance will reveal whether the last years' decline in use of HRT will be translated into increasing fracture rates.

  2. [Social and healthy circumstances of women's decision about applying hormonal replacement therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zołnierczuk-Kieliszek, Dorota U; Kulik, Teresa B; Pacian, Anna B; Stefanowicz, Agata

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the frequency of hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) application among Polish women aged 40-65, patients of five selected health care institutions located in south-eastern Poland and to determine the most significant factors that influence women's decision to initiate HRT. The next purpose was to establish how the women learned about the possibility of receiving HRT. Women, who never decided to take sex hormones, were asked about the reasons of such decision. The study comprised a group of 1033 women aged 40-65 years living in south-eastern Poland, the patients of various hospital wards and outpatient clinics. The study was conducted from January 2003 to December 2004 using categorized interview technique. The interview questionnaire was constructed by the authors. The statistical analysis was performed on the basis of the chi2 test of independence; log-linear analysis and Pareto's analysis were also used. Research result analysis proves that 30.5% of the examined women have used HRT currently or in the past. The sociodemographic and healthy variables that showed positive correlation with receiving hormonal treatment by midlife women were: age 51-65 years, the presence of climacteric ailments, the absence of monthly bleedings, possessing of permanent life partner and good self-estimation of one's financial status. It was not revealed that better educated women more frequently decide to take HRT. The main sources of women's knowledge about HRT were the mass media and health service employees. Among the reasons for not taking up hormonal treatment the most significant were: lack or small intensification of menopausal ailments as well as the fear of side effects of hormonal replacement therapy.

  3. Building a better hormone therapy? How understanding the rapid effects of sex steroid hormones could lead to new therapeutics for age-related memory decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Karyn M

    2012-02-01

    A wealth of data collected in recent decades has demonstrated that ovarian sex-steroid hormones, particularly 17β-estradiol (E2), are important trophic factors that regulate the function of cognitive regions of the brain such as the hippocampus. The loss of hormone cycling at menopause is associated with cognitive decline and dementia in women, and the onset of memory decline in animal models. However, hormone therapy is not currently recommended to prevent or treat cognitive decline, in part because of its detrimental side effects. In this article, it is proposed that investigations of the rapid effects of E2 on hippocampal function be used to further the design of new drugs that mimic the beneficial effects of E2 on memory without the side effects of current therapies. A conceptual model is presented for elucidating the molecular and biochemical mechanisms through which sex-steroid hormones modulate memory, and a specific hypothesis is proposed to account for the rapid memory-enhancing effects of E2. Empirical support for this hypothesis is discussed as a means of stimulating the consideration of new directions for the development of hormone-based therapies to preserve memory function in menopausal women.

  4. Shared decision making and patient choice for growth hormone therapy: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George B

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Belinda George, Vageesh Ayyar Department of Endocrinology, St. John’s Medical College Hospital, Bangalore, Karnataka, India Abstract: Growth hormone has now been available in medical practice for close to 50 years. Its use has provided dramatic results in patients with growth hormone deficiency and it is associated with an overall favorable safety profile. Over the years, the utility of growth hormone has expanded to include treatment for short stature associated with conditions other than growth hormone deficiency, and this situation warrants greater involvement of the child and parents in the shared decision-making process. Shared decision making is in good conformance to the principle of informed consent, and it also improves the compliance and adherence to therapy as the patient fully understands the benefit and safety of the treatment. In the pediatric-care setting, the decision-making interactions usually occur between the health care provider, patient, and parents. The process may range from an autonomous decision-making pattern, where the patient or parents are fully responsible for the decision taken, to the paternalistic decision-making pattern, where the health care provider assumes full responsibility for the decision taken. However, the ideal situation is one where a truly shared decision-making process happens, in which the doctor and patient/parents work together to choose an evidence-based option, in line with the patient’s preferences and wishes. The limited data available on shared decision making with regard to growth hormone replacement, however, is not very encouraging and suggests that the actual involvement of the parents as perceived by them is less than optimal. Introduction of a simple structured model for a shared decision-making process that can be easily incorporated into clinical practice and familiarization of health care providers with the same is essential to improve our shared decision-making practices

  5. Plasma fibrin clot properties in postmenopausal women: effects of hormone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piróg, Magdalena M; Milewicz, Tomasz; Jach, Robert; Undas, Anetta

    2016-05-01

    Postmenopausal women are at risk of thromboembolic events. It is unclear whether menopause alters fibrin clot properties. The aim of our study was to assess the effects of menopause and hormone therapy on clot characteristics. Ex vivo plasma clot permeability, turbidity, and susceptibility to lysis were determined in 70 premenopausal and 70 postmenopausal women (a case-control study). From the postmenopausal group, 30 women were randomly assigned (1:1) to a 24-week oral or transdermal treatment with 17β-estradiol, combined with norethisterone acetate (2 mg + 1 mg/d or 0.05 mg + 5 mg/d, respectively). Compared with premenopausal women (aged 29.2 ± 2.60 y), postmenopausal women (aged 49.7 ± 3.4 y; P = 0.009) were characterized by higher fibrinogen levels (by 36.8%), lower C-reactive protein levels (by 36.9%), and lower clot permeability (by 10.5%); also after adjustment for fibrinogen (all P hormone therapy, 24-week oral therapy was associated with higher absorbency of plasma clots by 16% (P Menopause age is associated with the formation of denser fibrin clots. Estrogen plus progestogen therapy has a minor effect on plasma fibrin properties, but leads to the formation of thicker and more branched fibrin fibers, particularly during oral administration.

  6. The effect of hormone therapy on women's quality of life in the first year of the Estonian Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veerus Piret

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For postmenopausal women, the main reason to start hormone therapy (HT is to reduce menopausal symptoms and to improve quality of life (QOL. The aim of this study was to analyse the impact of HT on different aspects of symptom experience and QOL during a randomised trial. A total of 1823 postmenopausal women were recruited into the Estonian Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy (EPHT trial in 1999–2001. Women were randomised to blind HT, open-label HT, placebo or non-treatment arm. After one year in the trial, a questionnaire was mailed and 1359 women (75% responded, 686 in the HT arms and 673 in the non-HT arms. Mean age at filling in the questionnaire was 59.8 years. The questionnaire included Women's Health Questionnaire (WHQ to assess menopause specific QOL of middle-aged women together with a 17-item questionnaire on symptoms related to menopause, a question about painful intercourse, and a question about women's self-rated health. Results After one year in the trial, fewer women in the HT arms reported hot flashes, trouble sleeping, and sweating on the symptom questionnaire. According to WHQ, women in the HT arms had fewer vasomotor symptoms, sleep problems, and problems with sexual behaviour, but more menstrual symptoms; HT had no effect on depression, somatic symptoms, memory, attractiveness, or anxiety. A smaller proportion of women reported painful intercourse in the HT arms. There were no significant differences between the trial arms in women’s self-rated subjective health. Conclusions The results from the EPHT trial confirm that HT is not justified for treating symptoms, other than vasomotor symptoms, among postmenopausal women. WHQ proved to be a useful and sensitive tool to assess QOL in this age group of women.

  7. Optimal systemic therapy for premenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowitz, Rachel C; McGuire, Kandace P; Davidson, Nancy E

    2013-08-01

    Although systemic therapy is one of the cornerstones of therapy for premenopausal women with early stage breast cancer, there remain many unknowns regarding its optimal use. By accident of clinical trial design, much clinical investigation in premenopausal women has focused on chemotherapy. More recently the value of endocrine therapy (tamoxifen and ovarian suppression/ablation via surgery, LHRH agonists, or chemotherapy-induced menopause) has become apparent, and some form of endocrine therapy is viewed as standard for virtually all premenopausal women with early stage invasive breast cancer that expresses estrogen and/or progesterone receptor. Critical open questions include type and duration of endocrine therapy and the development of prognostic/predictive markers to help identify patients who are likely to benefit from chemotherapy in addition to endocrine therapy. For some years, five years of tamoxifen has been viewed as the standard endocrine therapy for premenopausal hormone-responsive breast cancer, although the ATLAS trial suggests that an additional five years of tamoxifen can be considered. The MA17 trial also suggests that an additional five years of an aromatase inhibitor can be considered for women who become postmenopausal during tamoxifen therapy. Information about the value of ovarian suppression continues to emerge, most recently with the demonstration of excellent outcome with goserelin plus tamoxifen in the ABCSG12 trial. The SOFT and TEXT trials, whose accrual is now complete, should help to define optimal endocrine therapy. In addition, use of the 21-gene recurrence score assay may help to delineate the additional value of chemotherapy for patients with node-negative breast cancer, and its utility in the setting of women with 1-3 positive lymph nodes is under study in the RxPONDER trial. Nonetheless, the need for other predictive biomarkers to select appropriate therapy remains real. Finally, attention to long term benefits and side effects

  8. Pattern Alopecia during Hormonal Anticancer Therapy in Patients with Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin; Kim, Ju-Ik; Yun, Seok-Kweon; Kim, Han-Uk; Ihm, Chull-Wan

    2014-12-01

    We report five cases of pattern alopecia in female patients who are undergoing hormonal anticancer therapy for the prevention of recurrence of breast cancer after surgery. Three patients demonstrated male pattern alopecia with receding frontal hairlines, and two patients demonstrated female pattern alopecia without receding hairlines. The detailed clinical history showed that the pattern alopecia of the patients developed after the full recovery of global hair loss of the entire scalp due to previous cytotoxic chemotherapy. All of the adjuvant hormonal anticancer drugs that were used in the patients are antiestrogenic agents, either aromatase inhibitors or selective estrogen receptor modulators. Considering androgen effect on the hair follicles of the fronto-parietal scalp, the androgen-estrogen imbalance caused by the drugs was thought to be the reason for the onset of pattern alopecia in the patients. In general, alopecia that develops during cytotoxic chemotherapy is well known to both physicians and patients; however, the diagnosis of pattern alopecia during hormonal anticancer therapy in breast cancer patients seems to be overlooked.

  9. Aging-induced alterations in female rat colon smooth muscle: the protective effects of hormonal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascua, P; Camello-Almaraz, C; Pozo, M J; Martin-Cano, F E; Vara, E; Fernández-Tresguerres, J A; Camello, P J

    2012-06-01

    Aging is associated to oxidative damage and alterations in inflammatory and apoptotic pathways. Aging impairs secretion of several hormones, including melatonin and estrogens. However, the mechanisms involved in aging of smooth muscle are poorly known. We have studied the changes induced by aging in the colonic smooth muscle layer of female rats and the protective effect of hormonal therapy. We used young, aged, and ovariectomized aged female rats. Two groups of ovariectomized rats (22 months old) were treated either with melatonin or with estrogen for 10 weeks before sacrifice. Aging induced oxidative imbalance, evidenced by H(2)O(2) accumulation, lipid peroxidation, and decreased catalase activity. The oxidative damage was enhanced by ovariectomy. In addition, aged colonic muscle showed enhanced expression of the pro-inflammatory enzyme cyclooxygenase 2. Expression of the activated forms of caspases 3 and 9 was also enhanced in aged colon. Melatonin and estrogen treatment prevented the oxidative damage and the activation of caspases. In conclusion, aging of colonic smooth muscle induces oxidative imbalance and activation of apoptotic and pro-inflammatory pathways. Hormonal therapy has beneficial effects on the oxidative and apoptotic changes associated to aging in this model.

  10. АBNORMAL UTERINE BLEEDING DURING МENOPAUSAL HORMONAL THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya. Z. Zaydieva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Postmenopausal women using continuous combined estrogen/progestin therapy are likely to have irregular bleedings or spotting. Up to now, their causes remain unclear. Most investigators believe that a potential mechanism of abnormal bleedings during menopausal hormonal therapy could be a change in the ratio of pro- and anti-angiogenic factors, namely, of vascular endothelial growth factor to thrombospondin-1; alterations in metalloproteinases and their tissue inhibitors; changes in a tissue factor that is a mediator of endometrial hemostasis; as well as an increased number of endometrial leukocytes with predominance of uterine natural killer cells. As long as no link between bleeding discharge during continuous combined hormonal treatment and any of these  actors has been established, each and every of them is the subject of in vivo and in vitro investigations. At present, there are no  herapeutic methods to correct this complication of hormonal treatment. Patient monitoring to exclude neoplastic abnormalities in endometrium are of paramount importance.

  11. High frequency of antiviral drug resistance and non-b subtypes in HIV-1 patients failing antiviral therapy in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouri, Vivian; Alemán, Yoan; Pérez, Lissette; Pérez, Jorge; Fonseca, Carlos; Correa, Consuelo; Aragonés, Carlos; Campos, Jorge; Alvarez, Delmis; Schrooten, Yoeri; Vinken, Lore; Limia, Celia; Soto, Yudira; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Van Laethem, Kristel

    2014-01-01

    Emergence of HIV-1 drug resistance may limit the sustained benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in settings with limited laboratory monitoring and drug options. The objective is to implement the surveillance of drug resistance and subtypes in HIV-1 patients failing ART in Cuba. This study compiled clinical and genotypic drug resistance data 588 ART-experienced HIV-1 patients attending a clinical center in Havana in 2009-2013. Drug resistance testing was performed as part of routine clinical care. Drug resistance mutations and levels were determined using Rega version 8.0.2. Eighty-three percent received solely ART containing at least three drugs. Patients from 2009 to 2010 were longer treated (median: 4.9 vs 2.7 years) and exposed to more ART regimens (median: 4 vs 2 regimens) compared to patients from 2011-2013. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI), non-nucleoside RTI (NNRTI) and PI mutations were present in 83.5, 77.4 and 52.0%. Full-class resistance (FCR) to NRTI, NNRTI, PI and multidrug resistance (MDR) were detected in 25.0, 33.7, 11.4 and 6.3%. FCR to NRTI, NNRTI, PI and MDR were present in 12.8, 28.7, 0 and 0% after first-line failure (164 patients) and in 23.1, 34.6, 3.8 and 3.1% after second-line failure (130 patients). Subtype B (32.5%), BG recombinants (19.6%) and CRF19_cpx (16.2%) were the most prevalent genetic forms. Subtype distribution did not change significantly between 2009-2010 and 2011-2013, except for BG recombinants that increased from 12.2 to 21.3% (p=0.002). Our study found a high prevalence of drug resistance and supports the need for appropriate laboratory monitoring in clinical practice and access to drug options in case of virological failure.

  12. An open-label pilot study of pulsed electromagnetic field therapy in the treatment of failed back surgery syndrome pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harper WL

    2014-12-01

    nonresponders reported clinically meaningful improvement in overall well-being on the Patient Global Impression of Change scale.Keywords: failed back surgery syndrome, pain management, pulsed electromagnetic field therapy, PEMF

  13. Hormone therapy and radiotherapy for early prostate cancer: A utility-adjusted number needed to treat (NNT) analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jani, Ashesh B.; Kao, Johnny; Heimann, Ruth; Hellman, Samuel

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify, using the number needed to treat (NNT) methodology, the benefit of short-term (≤6 months) hormone therapy adjuvant to radiotherapy in the group of patients with early (clinical stage T1-T2c) prostate cancer. Methods and materials: The absolute biochemical control benefit for the use of hormones adjuvant to radiotherapy in early-stage disease was determined by literature review. A model was developed to estimate the utility-adjusted survival detriment due to the side effects of hormone therapy. The NNTs before and after the incorporation of hormone sequelae were computed; the sign and magnitude of the NNTs were used to gauge the effect of the hormones. Results: The absolute NNT analysis, based on summarizing the results of 8 reports including a total of 3652 patients, demonstrated an advantage to the addition of hormones for the general early-stage prostate cancer population as well as for all prognostic groups. After adjustment for hormone-induced functional loss, the advantage of hormones remained considerable in the high- and intermediate-risk groups, with the utility-adjusted NNT becoming weakened in the low-risk group when the utility compromise from complications of hormones was assumed to be considerable. Conclusions: Short-term hormone therapy seems to be beneficial for selected early-stage prostate cancer patients. The advantage seems to be greatest in the intermediate- and high-risk groups; with current follow-up, the side effects of hormones may outweigh their benefit in certain clinical situations in the favorable group. The present investigation demonstrates the significant role of the NNT technique for oncologic and radiotherapeutic management decisions when treatment complications need to be considered and balanced with the beneficial effects of the treatment

  14. What is the influence of hormone therapy on homocysteine and crp levels in postmenopausal women?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli Marcelo Lakryc

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of estrogen therapy and estrogen-progestin therapy on homocysteine and C-reactive protein levels in postmenopausal women. METHODS: In total, 99 postmenopausal women were included in this double-blind, randomized clinical trial and divided into three groups: Group A used estrogen therapy alone (2.0 mg of 17β-estradiol, Group B received estrogen-progestin therapy (2.0 mg of 17 β-estradiol +1.0 mg of norethisterone acetate and Group C received a placebo (control. The length of treatment was six months. Serum measurements of homocysteine and C-reactive protein were carried out prior to the onset of treatment and following six months of therapy. RESULTS: After six months of treatment, there was a 20.7% reduction in homocysteine levels and a 100.5% increase in C-reactive protein levels in the group of women who used estrogen therapy. With respect to the estrogen-progestin group, there was a 12.2% decrease in homocysteine levels and a 93.5% increase in C-reactive protein levels. CONCLUSION: Our data suggested that hormone therapy (unopposed estrogen or estrogen associated with progestin may have a positive influence on decreasing cardiovascular risk due to a significant reduction in homocysteine levels.

  15. Long-term Effects on Cognitive Trajectories of Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy in Two Age Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espeland, Mark A; Rapp, Stephen R; Manson, JoAnn E; Goveas, Joseph S; Shumaker, Sally A; Hayden, Kathleen M; Weitlauf, Julie C; Gaussoin, Sarah A; Baker, Laura D; Padula, Claudia B; Hou, Lifang; Resnick, Susan M

    2017-06-01

    Postmenopausal hormone therapy may have long-term effects on cognitive function depending on women's age. Postintervention follow-up was conducted with annual cognitive assessments of two randomized controlled clinical trial cohorts, beginning an average of 6-7 years after study medications were terminated: 1,376 women who had enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative when aged 50-54 years and 2,880 who had enrolled when aged 65-79 years. Women had been randomly assigned to 0.625mg/d conjugated equine estrogens (CEE) for those with prior hysterectomy (mean 7.1 years), CEE with 2.5mg/d medroxyprogesterone acetate for those without prior hysterectomy (mean 5.4 years), or matching placebos. Hormone therapy, when prescribed to women aged 50-54 years, had no significant long-term posttreatment effects on cognitive function and on changes in cognitive function. When prescribed to older women, it was associated with long-term mean (SE) relative decrements (standard deviation units) in global cognitive function of 0.081 (0.029), working memory of 0.070 (0.025), and executive function of 0.054 (0.023), all p therapy regimen, prior use, or years from last menstrual period. Mean intervention effects were small; however, the largest were comparable in magnitude to those seen during the trial's active intervention phase. CEE-based hormone therapy delivered near the time of menopause provides neither cognitive benefit nor detriment. If administered in older women, it results in small decrements in several cognitive domains that remain for many years. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. [Perception of adverse reactions of chemotherapy and hormone therapy by women treated for breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jodar, Maud; Jacquin, Jean-Philippe; Vallée, Josette

    2016-06-01

    In Europe, breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. His treatment (TTT) can have a significant impact on daily life. Explore the experienced short-term side effects (SE) of chemotherapy and hormonal therapy by women themselves, the information delivered and the place of the general practitioner (GP). Qualitative study by individual interview, conducted from January to May 2015, with 14 women followed for no metastatic breast cancer after chemotherapy and possible initiation of hormone therapy, at the Cancer Institute of the Loire (France). The SE of chemotherapy, except vomiting, have appeared very trying (fatigue, pains oral and cutaneous involvement), punctuated and accentuated by the cures. They were resounding on daily life, requiring family or professional assistance. Falling dander, considered stigmatizing, violated the person and femininity. The women have estimated to be well informed. They had appreciated the initial response of the pivot nurse. The least expected SE of hormone therapy, hot flashes and articular pains might limit activities. To counteract these side effects, mostly accepted to prevent recidivism, a remedy for complementary therapies was frequent. The GP was solicited for some SE, sometimes for complementary medicine (CM). Over the cures, women suggested support meetings, a more sustainable action of the pivot nurse, a better attention to their complaints and a more personalized information. The development of TTT less EI provider was desired. The effect of CM on SE should be explored. Copyright © 2016 Société française de pharmacologie et de thérapeutique. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Ovarian morphology and function during growth hormone therapy of short girls born small for gestational age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinggaard, Jeanette; Jensen, Rikke Beck; Sundberg, Karin; Birkebæk, Niels; Christiansen, Peter; Ellermann, Annie; Holm, Kirsten; Jeppesen, Eva Mosfeldt; Kremke, Britta; Marcinski, Pawel; Pedersen, Carsten; Saurbrey, Nina; Thisted, Ebbe; Main, Katharina M; Juul, Anders

    2014-12-01

    To study the effect of growth hormone (GH) treatment on ovarian and uterine morphology and function in short, prepubertal small-for-gestational-age (SGA) girls. A multinational, randomized controlled trial on safety and efficacy of GH therapy in short, prepubertal children born SGA. Not applicable. A subgroup of 18 Danish girls born SGA included in North European SGA Study (NESGAS). One year of GH treatment (67 μg/kg/day) followed by 2 years of randomized GH treatment (67 μg/kg/day, 35 μg/kg/day, or IGF-I titrated). Data on anthropometrics, reproductive hormones, and ultrasonographic examination of the internal genitalia were collected during 36 months of GH treatment. Uterine and ovarian volume increased significantly during 3 years of treatment (64% and 110%, respectively) but remained low within normal reference ranges. Ovarian follicles became visible in 58% after 1 year compared with 28% before GH therapy. Anti-Müllerian hormone increased significantly during the 3 years of GH therapy but remained within the normal range. Precocious puberty was observed in one girl; another girl developed multicystic ovaries. GH treatment was associated with statistically significant growth of the internal genitalia, but remained within the normal range. As altered pubertal development and ovarian morphology were found in 2 of 18 girls, monitoring of puberty and ovarian function during GH therapy in SGA girls is prudent. Altogether, the findings are reassuring. However, long-term effects of GH treatment on adult reproductive function remain unknown. EudraCT 2005-001507-19. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Recombinant growth hormone therapy for cystic fibrosis in children and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaker, Vidhu; Haagensen, Alexandra L; Carter, Ben; Fedorowicz, Zbys; Houston, Brian W

    2015-05-20

    Cystic fibrosis is an inherited condition causing disease most noticeably in the lungs, digestive tract and pancreas. People with cystic fibrosis often have malnutrition and growth delay. Adequate nutritional supplementation does not improve growth optimally and hence an anabolic agent, recombinant growth hormone, has been proposed as a potential intervention. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of recombinant human growth hormone therapy in improving lung function, quality of life and clinical status of children and young adults with cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Trials Register comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. Date of latest search: 11 February 2015.We conducted a search of relevant endocrine journals and proceedings of the Endocrinology Society meetings using Scopus and Proceedings First. Date of latest search: 04 March 2015. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials of all preparations of recombinant growth hormone compared to either no treatment, or placebo, or each other at any dose (high-dose and low-dose) or route and for any duration, in children or young adults aged up to 25 years diagnosed with cystic fibrosis (by sweat test or genetic testing). Two authors independently screened papers, extracted trial details and assessed their risk of bias. Four controlled trials were included in this review (with 161 participants in total), each with an unclear risk of bias. Analysis of data obtained from these trials shows improvement in height for all comparisons, but improvements in weight and lean tissue mass were only reported in the comparison of standard dose recombinant growth hormone versus no treatment. One study showed moderate improvement at one time point in one parameter of pulmonary function tests, forced vital capacity (per cent predicted) when

  19. Breast cancer with different prognostic characteristics developing in Danish women using hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahlberg, Claudia; Pedersen, A T; Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic

    2004-01-01

    of receptor-negative breast cancer, relative risk (RR) 3.29 (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.27-4.77) and RR 0.99 (95% CI: 0.42-2.36), respectively (P for difference=0.013). The risk of being diagnosed with low histological malignancy grade was higher than high malignancy grade with RR 4.13 (95% CI: 2......The aim of this study is to investigate the risk of developing prognostic different types of breast cancer in women using hormone replacement therapy (HRT). A total of 10 874 postmenopausal Danish Nurses were followed since 1993. Incident breast cancer cases and histopathological information were...... retrieved through the National Danish registries. The follow-up ended on 31 December 1999. Breast cancer developed in 244 women, of whom 172 were invasive ductal carcinomas. Compared to never users, current users of HRT had an increased risk of a hormone receptor-positive breast cancer, but a neutral risk...

  20. Effects of hormone therapy with estrogen and/or progesterone on sleep pattern in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachul, Helena; Bittencourt, Lia R A; Andersen, Monica L; Haidar, Mauro A; Baracat, Edmund C; Tufik, Sergio

    2008-12-01

    To investigate the effects of estrogen and progesterone on sleep in postmenopausal women. The 33 participants were randomly assigned to an estrogen or placebo group after undergoing clinical and hormonal assessments and a polysomnogram, and they underwent the same tests again after 12 weeks. Then, while still taking estrogen or placebo, they all received progesterone for another 12 weeks and underwent a final polysomnogram. Estrogen plus progesterone was more effective than estrogen alone in decreasing the prevalence of periodic limb movement (PLM) (8.1% vs 2.8%), hot flashes (14.2% vs 0%), and bruxism (11.1% vs 0%) at night, or somnolence and attention difficulty during the day. The prevalences of breathing irregularities, arousal from sleep, anxiety, and memory impairment were decreased in both groups following progesterone treatment. While not significantly affecting sleep quality, hormone therapy decreased the prevalence of arousal in both groups and that of PLM in the group treated with estrogen plus progesterone.

  1. The immune system in menopause: pros and cons of hormone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Mimi; Rodriguez-Garcia, Marta; Wira, Charles R

    2014-07-01

    With aging, a general decline in immune function is observed leading to immune-senescence. Several of these changes are gender specific affecting postmenopausal women. Menopause is a normal part of a woman's lifecycle and consists of a series of body changes that can last from one to ten years. It is known that loss of sex hormones due to aging results in a reduction of immune functions. However, there remains a major gap in our understanding regarding the loss of immune functions particularly in the female reproductive tract (FRT) following menopause and the role of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) in protecting against immune senescence. The current review presents an overview of changes in the immune system due to aging, focusing on genital tract immunity in menopausal women and the risks and benefits of using MHT. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Menopause'. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical relevance of "withdrawal therapy" as a form of hormonal manipulation for breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson John FR

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been shown in in-vitro experiments that "withdrawal" of tamoxifen inhibits growth of tumor cells. However, evidence is scarce when this is extrapolated into clinical context. We report our experience to verify the clinical relevance of "withdrawal therapy". Methods Breast cancer patients since 1998 who fulfilled the following criteria were selected from the departmental database and the case-notes were retrospectively reviewed: (1 estrogen receptor positive, operable primary breast cancer in elderly (age > 70 years, locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer; (2 disease deemed suitable for treatment by hormonal manipulation; (3 disease assessable by UICC criteria; (4 received "withdrawal" from a prior endocrine agent as a form of therapy; (5 on "withdrawal therapy" for ≥ 6 months unless they progressed prior. Results Seventeen patients with median age of 84.3 (53.7-92.5 had "withdrawal therapy" as second to tenth line of treatment following prior endocrine therapy using tamoxifen (n = 10, an aromatase inhibitor (n = 5, megestrol acetate (n = 1 or fulvestrant (n = 1. Ten patients (58.8% had clinical benefit (CB (complete response/partial response/stable disease ≥ 6 months with a median duration of Clinical Benefit (DoCB of 10+ (7-27 months. Two patients remain on "withdrawal therapy" at the time of analysis. Conclusion "Withdrawal therapy" appears to produce sustained CB in a significant proportion of patients. This applies not only to "withdrawal" from tamoxifen, but also from other categories of endocrine agents. "Withdrawal" from endocrine therapy is, therefore, a viable intercalating option between endocrine agents to minimise resistance and provide additional line of therapy. It should be considered as part of the sequencing of endocrine therapy.

  3. Cardiovascular Disease Among Transgender Adults Receiving Hormone Therapy: A Narrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streed, Carl G; Harfouch, Omar; Marvel, Francoise; Blumenthal, Roger S; Martin, Seth S; Mukherjee, Monica

    2017-08-15

    Recent reports estimate that 0.6% of adults in the United States, or approximately 1.4 million persons, identify as transgender. Despite gains in rights and media attention, the reality is that transgender persons experience health disparities, and a dearth of research and evidence-based guidelines remains regarding their specific health needs. The lack of research to characterize cardiovascular disease (CVD) and CVD risk factors in transgender populations receiving cross-sex hormone therapy (CSHT) limits appropriate primary and specialty care. As with hormone therapy in cisgender persons (that is, those whose sex assigned at birth aligns with their gender identity), existing research in transgender populations suggests that CVD risk factors are altered by CSHT. Currently, systemic hormone replacement for cisgender adults requires a nuanced discussion based on baseline risk factors and age of administration of exogenous hormones because of concern regarding an increased risk for myocardial infarction and stroke. For transgender adults, CSHT has been associated with the potential for worsening CVD risk factors (such as blood pressure elevation, insulin resistance, and lipid derangements), although these changes have not been associated with increases in morbidity or mortality in transgender men receiving CSHT. For transgender women, CSHT has known thromboembolic risk, and lower-dose transdermal estrogen formulations are preferred over high-dose oral formulations. In addition, many studies of transgender adults focus predominantly on younger persons, limiting the generalizability of CSHT in older transgender adults. The lack of randomized controlled trials comparing various routes and formulations of CSHT, as well as the paucity of prospective cohort studies, limits knowledge of any associations between CSHT and CVD.

  4. A Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study in Transgender Persons on Cross-Sex Hormone Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Sven C; Landré, Lionel; Wierckx, Katrien; T'Sjoen, Guy

    2017-01-01

    To date, research findings are inconsistent about whether the neuroanatomy in transgender persons resembles that of their natal sex or their gender identity. Moreover, few studies have examined the effects of long-term cross-sex hormonal treatment on neuroanatomy in this cohort. The purpose of the present study was to examine neuroanatomical differences in transgender persons after prolonged cross-sex hormone therapy. Eighteen transgender men (female-to-male), 17 transgender women (male-to-female), 30 nontransgender men (natal men), and 27 nontransgender women (natal women) completed a high-resolution structural magnetic resonance imaging scan at 3 T. Eligibility criteria for transgender persons were gender-affirming surgery and at least 2 years of cross-sex hormone therapy. Exclusion criteria for nontransgender persons were presence of psychiatric or neurological disorders. The mean neuroanatomical volume for the amygdala, putamen, and corpus callosum differed between transgender women and natal women but not between transgender women and natal men. Differences between transgender men and natal men were found in several brain structures, including the medial temporal lobe structures and cerebellum. Differences between transgender men and natal women were found in the medial temporal lobe, nucleus accumbens, and 3rd ventricle. Sexual dimorphism between nontransgender men and women included larger cerebellar volumes and a smaller anterior corpus callosum in natal men than in natal women. The results remained stable after correcting for additional factors including age, total intracranial volume, anxiety, and depressive symptoms. Neuroanatomical differences were region specific between transgender persons and their natal sex as well as their gender identity, raising the possibility of a localized influence of sex hormones on neuroanatomy. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Sustained long-term immune responses after in situ gene therapy combined with radiotherapy and hormonal therapy in prostate cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Tetsuo; Teh, Bin S.; Timme, Terry L.; Mai, W.-Y.; Satoh, Takefumi; Kusaka, Nobuyuki; Naruishi, Koji; Fattah, Elmoataz Abdel; Aguilar-Cordova, Estuardo; Butler, E. Brian; Thompson, Timothy C.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To explore long-term immune responses after combined radio-gene-hormonal therapy. Methods and Materials: Thirty-three patients with prostate specific antigen 10 or higher or Gleason score of 7 or higher or clinical stage T2b to T3 were treated with gene therapy that consisted of 3 separate intraprostatic injections of AdHSV-tk on Days 0, 56, and 70. Each injection was followed by 2 weeks of valacyclovir. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy was delivered 2 days after the second AdHSV-tk injection for 7 weeks. Hormonal therapy was initiated on Day 0 and continued for 4 months or 2.3 years. Blood samples were taken before, during, and after treatment. Lymphocytes were analyzed by fluorescent antibody cell sorting (FACS). Results: Median follow-up was 26 months (range, 4-48 months). The mean percentages of DR + CD8 + T cells were increased at all timepoints up to 8 months. The mean percentages of DR + CD4 + T cells were increased later and sustained longer until 12 months. Long-term (2.3 years) use of hormonal therapy did not affect the percentage of any lymphocyte population. Conclusions: Sustained long-term (up to 8 to 12 months) systemic T-cell responses were noted after combined radio-gene-hormonal therapy for prostate cancer. Prolonged use of hormonal therapy does not suppress this response. These results suggest the potential for sustained activation of cell-mediated immune responses against cancer

  6. Luteinizing hormone pulsatility in females following radiation therapy for central nervous system malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brasacchio, R.A.; Constine, L.S.; Woolf, P.; Raubertas, R.F.; Veldhuis, J.D.; Muhs, A.G.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Females incidentally irradiated to the hypothalamic-pituitary axis (H/P-A) during radiation therapy (RT) for brain tumors may become oligoamenorrheic. We previously demonstrated that these women are hypoestrogenemic but frequently have near normal or only moderately decreased basal luteinizing hormone (LH) levels and maintain appropriate peak pituitary responses to exogenous gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH). We postulated that hypothalamic injury resulting in abnormal LH pulsatility could explain this complex of findings. This investigation intended to characterize this hypothalamic injury and test two potentially corrective pharmacologic interventions. Catecholamines (specifically dopamine) and opiates are known to suppress pituitary LH release through inhibition of the pituitary gonadotropes or of the GnRH neuronal terminals in the hypothalamus. Radiation-induced dysfunction of the catecholaminergic or opiate control mechanisms might translate into an increase in dopamine or opiate release or receptor responsiveness, which in turn would inhibit pulsatile gonadotropin secretion, leading to reduced LH pulsatility and to gonadal dysfunction. We therefore determined the pattern of LH release in normal controls and in patients, at baseline as well as after administration of the dopamine receptor antagonist metoclopramide (MCP), and the opiate-receptor antagonist naloxone (NAL). Methods: Patient eligibility criteria included RT to the H/P-A for a non-H/P-A CNS tumor, usually astrocytoma, with subsequent hypoestrogenemia and oligo-amenorrhea. Patients and normal volunteers were studied first under control conditions and then using MCP and NAL in a randomized cross-over manner at monthly intervals. Serum samples for LH determination were taken every 10 minutes for 12 hours during an overnight hospital stay. MCP (10 mg) was administered as an IV bolus every 4.5 hours, and NAL was administered as a continuous infusion (1.6 mg/hour). The following morning each

  7. Predictive factors for relapse of epileptic spasms after adrenocorticotropic hormone therapy in West syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yumiko; Yoshinaga, Harumi; Akiyama, Tomoyuki; Endoh, Fumika; Ohtsuka, Yoko; Kobayashi, Katsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    To investigate whether serial electroencephalographic (EEG) findings can predict relapse of epileptic spasms after synthetic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) therapy in patients with West syndrome (WS). Thirty-nine WS patients (8 cryptogenic and 31 symptomatic) were included in this study. These patients received ACTH therapy for the first time and were regularly followed up for more than three years at our hospital. Sixteen patients (41.0%) showed seizure relapse (relapse group) and 23 patients (59.0%) did not show relapse (non-relapse group). We used survival analysis to investigate the influence of etiology and presence of epileptic discharges after the ACTH therapy on seizure outcome. Immediately after the ACTH therapy, etiology was associated with seizure outcome (p=0.003). In the early stage (1 month after the ACTH therapy), only the presence of epileptic discharges (p=0.001) had a significant association with seizure outcome, regardless of etiology. Because all relapsed patients were in the symptomatic group, we performed the same statistical analysis on symptomatic WS patient data only. We found that the group with no epileptic discharges on EEG showed a significantly higher seizure-free rate than those with epileptic discharges in the early stage (p=0.0091). This study demonstrated that serial EEG findings after ACTH therapy are significantly related to relapse of epileptic spasms. Copyright © 2015 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Adjuvant chemo- and hormonal therapy in locally advanced breast cancer: a randomized clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaake-Koning, C.; van der Linden, E.H.; Hart, G.; Engelsman, E.

    1985-01-01

    Between 1977 and 1980, 118 breast cancer patients with locally advanced disease, T3B-4, any N, M0 or T1-3, tumor positive axillary apex biopsy, were randomized to one of three arms: I: radiotherapy (RT) to the breast and adjacent lymph node areas; II: RT followed by 12 cycles of cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, 5 fluorouracil (CMF) and tamoxifen during the chemotherapy period; III: 2 cycles of adriamycin and vincristine (AV), alternated with 2 cycles of CMF, then RT, followed by another 4 cycles of AV, alternated with 4 CMF; tamoxifen during the entire treatment period. The median follow-up period was 5 1/2 years. The adjuvant chemo- and hormonal therapy did not improve the overall survival; the 5-year survival was 37% for all three treatment arms. There was no statistically significant difference in RFS between the three modalities, nor when arm I was compared to arm II and III together. LR was not statistically different over the three treatment arms. In 18 of the 24 patients with LR, distant metastases appeared within a few months from the local recurrence. The menopausal status did not influence the treatment results. Dose reduction in more than 4 cycles of chemotherapy was accompanied by better results. In conclusion: adjuvant chemo- and hormonal therapy did not improve RFS and overall survival. These findings do not support the routine use of adjuvant chemo- and endocrine therapy for inoperable breast cancer

  9. Radiotherapy combined with hormonal therapy in prostate cancer: the state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Milecki

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Piotr Milecki1,2, Piotr Martenka1, Andrzej Antczak3, Zbigniew Kwias31Department of Radiotherapy, Greater Poland Cancer Center, Poznan, Poland; 2Department of Electroradiology, Medical University, Poznan, Poland; 3Chair of Urology, Medical University, Poznan, PolandAbstract: Androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT is used routinely in combination with definitive external beam radiation therapy (EBRT in patients with high-risk clinically localized or locally advanced disease. The combined treatment (ADT–EBRT also seems to play a significant role in improving treatment results in the intermediate-risk group of prostate cancer patients. On the other hand, there is a growing body of evidence that treatment with ADT can be associated with serious and lifelong adverse events including osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and many others. Almost all ADT adverse events are time dependant and tend to increase in severity with prolongation of hormonal manipulation. Therefore, it is crucial to clearly state the optimal schedule for ADT in combination with EBRT, that maintaining the positive effect on treatment efficacy would keep the adverse events risk at reasonable level. To achieve this goal, treatment schedule may have to be highly individualized on the basis of the patient-specific potential vulnerability to adverse events. In this study, the concise and evidence-based review of current literature concerning the general rationales for combining radiotherapy and hormonal therapy, its mechanism, treatment results, and toxicity profile is presented.Keywords: prostate cancer, radiotherapy, androgen deprivation, combined treatment

  10. A Mathematical Model of Prostate Tumor Growth Under Hormone Therapy with Mutation Inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Youshan; Guo, Qian; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2010-04-01

    This paper extends Jackson’s model describing the growth of a prostate tumor with hormone therapy to a new one with hypothetical mutation inhibitors. The new model not only considers the mutation by which androgen-dependent (AD) tumor cells mutate into androgen-independent (AI) ones but also introduces inhibition which is assumed to change the mutation rate. The tumor consists of two types of cells (AD and AI) whose proliferation and apoptosis rates are functions of androgen concentration. The mathematical model represents a free-boundary problem for a nonlinear system of parabolic equations, which describe the evolution of the populations of the above two types of tumor cells. The tumor surface is a free boundary, whose velocity is equal to the cell’s velocity there. Global existence and uniqueness of solutions of this model is proved. Furthermore, explicit formulae of tumor volume at any time t are found in androgen-deprived environment under the assumption of radial symmetry, and therefore the dynamics of tumor growth under androgen-deprived therapy could be predicted by these formulae. Qualitative analysis and numerical simulation show that controlling the mutation may improve the effect of hormone therapy or delay a tumor relapse.

  11. Hormonal crises following receptor radionuclide therapy with the radiolabeled somatostatin analogue [177Lu-DOTA0,Tyr 3]octreotate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. de Keizer (Bart); M.O. van Aken (Maarten); R.A. Feelders (Richard); W.W. de Herder (Wouter); B.L. Kam (Boen); M. van Essen (Martijn); E.P. Krenning (Eric); D. Kwekkeboom (Dik)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Receptor radionuclide therapy is a promising treatment modality for patients with neuroendocrine tumors for whom alternative treatments are limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of hormonal crises after therapy with the radiolabeled somatostatin

  12. Trimegestone in a low-dose, continuous-combined hormone therapy regimen prevents bone loss in osteopenic postmenopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warming, Lise; Ravn, Pernille; Spielman, Danièle

    2004-01-01

    bone-specific alkaline phosphatase revealed a more retarded decrease of 40% and 33%, respectively. Of the women receiving hormone therapy, 75% had amenorrhea from the first cycle, and 5% withdrew prematurely due to metrorrhagia or mastalgia. CONCLUSION: This new estrogen + progestogen therapy...

  13. Influence of Previous Failed Antispasticity Therapy on the Efficacy and Tolerability of THC:CBD Oromucosal Spray for Multiple Sclerosis Spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haupts, Michael; Vila, Carlos; Jonas, Anna; Witte, Kerstin; Álvarez-Ossorio, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    Sativex® (THC:CBD oromucosal spray) is indicated as add-on treatment for patients with moderate to severe multiple sclerosis (MS) spasticity. We aimed to determine whether antispasticity treatment history influenced the efficacy and safety of add-on THC:CBD oromucosal spray in MS spasticity patients. Post hoc analysis of an enriched-design clinical trial of THC:CBD oromucosal spray versus placebo, using records of patients under previous and current ineffective antispasticity therapies. Subgroups were patients with at least 1 failed therapy attempt with either baclofen or tizanidine (Group 1) or at least 2 failed therapy attempts with both baclofen and tizanidine (Group 2). Of 241 patients in the intent-to-treat population, 162 and 57 patients met the criteria for Groups 1 and 2, respectively. In all groups, response on the spasticity 0-10 Numerical Rating Scale was significantly greater with THC:CBD oromucosal spray versus placebo, for minimal clinically important difference (MCID ≥18% improvement vs. baseline) and clinically important difference (CID, ≥30% improvement vs. baseline). THC:CBD oromucosal spray improved spasticity-related symptoms such as sleep quality and timed 10-meter walk independent of the number of prior failed therapy attempts. Tolerability was not influenced by pre-treatment history. THC:CBD oromucosal spray provided consistent relief with good tolerability in MS spasticity patients irrespective of their antispasticity pre-treatment history. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Menopausia, hipertensión arterial y terapia de reemplazo hormonal Menopause, blood hypertension and hormone replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daysi Navarro Despaigne

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Para evaluar la influencia de la terapia de reemplazo hormonal (THR sobre el síndrome climatérico (SC y los niveles de tensión arterial en mujeres posmenopáusicas con hipertensión arterial (HTA, se realizó un ensayo terapéutico abierto, el cual incluyó 45 mujeres no obesas con HTA ligera/moderada. En cada mujer se evaluó la evolución de los síntomas climatéricos y de los niveles de tensión arterial, así como los efectos indeseables a la THR. Como medicamento las pacientes recibieron Estradiol 2mg + Levonorgestrel 1 mg por día durante 12 meses. Durante la THR disminuyeron los síntomas climatéricos, en particular los vasomotores (de 86,6 a 10 % y los genitourinarios (de 56,7 a 15 %. En la totalidad de las mujeres existió estabilidad en los niveles de tensión arterial. En 5 mujeres hubo necesidad de incrementar la dosis de medicamentos antihipertensivos. En el resto esta se mantuvo o disminuyó. Como efectos indeseables se reportó sangramiento vaginal, mastodinia, cefalea, vasculitis e isquemia del quinto dedo del pie. Las dos últimas pacientes debieron suspender el tratamiento y se presentaron al sexto mes de haber iniciado la THR. En conclusión, en mujeres de edad mediana con hipertensión arterial la THR mejora el síndrome climatérico sin empeorar los niveles de tensión arterial.To evaluate the influence of hormone replacement therapy on the climateric syndrome (CS and the blood pressure values in postmenopausal women with hypertension, an open therapeutic assay was carried out, which included 45 non-obese women with slight/moderate hypertension. The course of the climateric symptoms and the blood pressure levels as well as the adverse effects of HRT were evaluated in every woman. The patients took Estradiol 2mg plus Levonorgestrel 1 mg per day for 12 months as drug therapy. During the application of the HRT, the climateric symptoms, particularly vasomotor (from 86,6 to 10% and genitourinary (from 56,7 to 15% decreased

  15. Changes in the thyroid hormone level and blood profile after radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogbac, R.V.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Exacerbation of hyperthyroidism has been reported to occur as early as 3 days after administration of radioiodine (I-131) therapy. The hematological effects of radioiodine also have been reported but mainly confined in thyroid cancer cases wherein high doses are administered. This study was undertaken to determine the possible acute changes in the thyroid hormone concentration and blood picture of patients one week after therapy. Twelve hyperthyroid patients (8 females, 4 males), with ages ranging from 27-56 years, were followed with measurements of serum thyroid hormone levels and blood profile a week after I-131 therapy. All patients were pretreated with antithyroid medications. Radioiodine doses given ranged from 8 mCi up to 16 mCi, all based from the computed dose of 160 uCi/g. Only two out of twelve (2/12) exhibited an increase in FT3 level. Two patients showed a decrease while the remaining 8 patients showed no significant difference. Six out of 12 (50%) exhibited an increase in FT4 level. Five patients showed a decrease while only one had no significant difference. Hematologically, there were 5/12, 1/12, 3/12, 5/12 and 1/12 patients who showed a decrease in hemoglobin, hematocrit, RBC, WBC and platelet counts, respectively. Four out of 12, 2/12, and 1/12 patients, however, showed an increase in hemoglobin, RBC and platelet, respectively. The rest exhibited no significant change. FT4 level was observed to be more affected than FT3 levels but there was no consistent pattern established. A significant decrease in WBC count was observed. Although a high percentage of decreased hemoglobin was noted, no pattern was established. Radioiodine therapy caused no significant increase of serum FT3 and FT4 concentrations in the majority of patients after one week of therapy. In the followup of patients, determination of complete blood count of patients is also important. (author)

  16. Influence of hormone substitution therapy on postmenopausal uterus; Einfluss einer Hormonsubstitution auf den postmenopausalen Uterus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otte, A.; Ruedisueli, A.; Goetze, M.; Leibundgut, U.; Mueller-Brand, J. [Inst. fuer Nuklearmedizin, Kantonsspital, Universitaetskliniken, Basel (Switzerland); Nitzsche, E.U. [Abt. Nuklearmedizin, Radiologische Universitaetsklinik, Freiburg (Germany)

    1997-12-01

    In a 58-year-old postmenopausal woman blood flow and blood pool images of bone scintigraphy showed a focus of increased activity in the right pelvic region. Computed tomography and ultrasound exhibited no abnormalities in the abdomen; especially the uterus and ovaries were normal. Careful anamnestic evaluation revealed that the patient received a long-term peroral estrogen/gestagen replacement therapy for the prevention of osteoporosis, but did not have menstruation-like bleedings for the last twelve months of therapy. At time of admission, the patient was on day 25 of hormone replacement therapy, and the uterus wash, therefore, in a premenstrual stage. Hence, despite cessation of bleedings in postmenopausal women, one should think of hormone replacement therapy as an explanation for vascular pelvic tumors seen by the first two phases of bone scintigraphy, before further diagnostic steps are undertaken. (orig.) [Deutsch] Bei der Skelettszintigraphie einer 58jaehrigen postmenopausalen Frau erkannte man in der Perfusions- und Blood-pool-Phase einen unklaren Fokus erhoehter Aktivitaet im rechten Becken. Computertomographie und Sonographie des Abdomens, insbesondere des Uterus und der Ovarien, waren unauffaellig. Nach eingehender anamnestischer Befragung stellte sich heraus, dass die Patientin unter einer mehrjaehrigen peroralen Oestrogen-/Gestagen-Hormonsubstitutionstherapie zur Osteoporose-Prophylaxe stand, jedoch seit den letzten zwoelf Monaten der Therapie ueber keine menstruationsaehnlichen Abbruchblutungen mehr berichten konnte. Bei ihrer Zuweisung befand sich die Patientin am 25. Tag der Hormonsubstitutionstherapie und ihr Uterus somit in einem praemenstruellen Stadium. Trotz Ausbleibens der Blutung bei postmenopausalen Frauen sollte somit an die Moeglichkeit der Hormonsubstitution gedacht und danach gefragt werden, wenn in den ersten beiden Phasen der Skelettszintigraphie eine unklare, gut vaskularisierte Struktur im kleinen Becken gefunden wird, bevor weitere

  17. Hormone therapy affects plasma measures of factor VII-activating protease in younger postmenopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, Jørn Sidelmann; Skouby, S.O.; Vitzthum, F.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Current reviews indicate that hormone therapy (HT) has a protective role in coronary heart disease (CHD) in younger postmenopausal women, whereas HT contributes to CHD in older women Factor VII-activating protease (FSAP) is a serine protease that accumulates in unstable atherosclerotic...... for the determination of FSAP antigen and FSAP activity. Results The FSAP measures were comparable at baseline. No significant changes were observed in the control group after 12 months. HT in general induced a significant increase in FSAP antigen (7.7 mu g/ml at baseline and 8.0 mu g/ml after 12 months, p = 0...

  18. Increased risk of breast cancer following different regimens of hormone replacement therapy frequently used in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahlberg, Claudia; Pedersen, Anette Tønnes; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2004-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have shown an increased risk of breast cancer following hormone replacement therapy (HRT). The aim of this study was to investigate whether different treatment regimens or the androgenecity of progestins influence the risk of breast cancer differently. The Danish Nurse Cohort...... were ascertained using nationwide registries. The follow-up ended on 31 December 1999. Women with former cancer diagnoses, women with missing information on HRT, surgical menopause, premenopausal, as well as hysterectomized women were excluded, leaving 10,874 for analyses. Statistical analyses were...

  19. Parity, infertility, oral contraceptives, and hormone replacement therapy and the risk of ovarian serous borderline tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Emma L Kaderly; Hannibal, Charlotte Gerd; Dehlendorff, Christian

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Few studies have examined the risk of an ovarian serous borderline tumor (SBT) associated with parity, infertility, oral contraceptives (OCs), or hormone replacement therapy (HRT), which was the study aim. METHODS: This nationwide case-control study included all women with an SBT...... or salpingo-oophorectomy were excluded. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: We found a strongly decreased risk of SBTs among parous women which decreased with increasing number of children (p

  20. The Effects of Hormone Therapy Decision Support for Women with Mobility Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Heather; Stuifbergen, Alexa K.; Dormire, Sharon L.

    2009-01-01

    Deciding about hormone therapy (HT) use is particularly complex for women with mobility impairments. While HT controls menopausal symptoms, the potential increased risk of blood clots resulting from physical inactivity can contraindicate HT use. These women, therefore, may benefit from interventions to help them tailor standard information about HT. We randomly assigned women to receive either a tailored decision support intervention or standard menopausal information. Both groups (n=176) significantly decreased their decisional conflict and uncertainty, and increased knowledge after receiving the treatment materials. We interpret the findings in the context of limited medical information about HT for women with disabilities. PMID:19657820

  1. Effect of hormone replacement therapy on lipids and coagulation factors in postmenopausal women smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatović-Babić Danijela

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Postmenopause and smoking impair lipid profile, induce hypercoagulability and reduce fibrinolytic capacity [1, 2]. Postmenopause induced lipid changes can be reversed by oestrogen replacement [3]. Oestrogens also reduce fibrino-gen level [4] and have beneficial effects on endothelium [5]. Although several studies showed that hormone replacement therapy may increase the risk of thromboembolic diseases, procoagulant oestrogen activity has not clearly been demonstrated. It is well known that smoking accelerates oestrogen metabolism [6, 7], which may attenuate its beneficial effects. The present study was undertaken to determine if there is difference in beneficial effects of oestrogens between smokers and non-smokers in terms of coagulation process and lipids. The examination was a longitudinal one-year, before/after therapeutic study, which included healthy postmenopausal women (FSH levels at least 40 U/l, 30 smokers and 32 non-smokers who were under 55 years of age and postmenopausal period shorter than 5 years. Women with surgically induced menopause received unopposed oral oestrogens, while those with spontaneous menopause were treated with combined oral oestrogen/progestogen therapy. Before entering the study and in three-months intervals total LDL, HDL cholesterol, triglycérides and VLDL were determined, as well School of Medicine, Belgrade as plasma fibrinogen prothrombin time, and activated partial thromboplastin time. Neither beneficial nor adverse effects of oestrogens on lipids and coagulation were observed during one-year follow-up in smokers, although subjects with longer smoking history had higher triglycérides levels after 12 months of therapy. On the contrary, oestrogen replacement reduced total and LDL cholesterol and increased HDL cholesterol in non-smokers, with no change in triglycérides and VLDL level. A decrease in fibrinogen levels and coagulation activity, expressed by protrombin time and partial thromboplastin time, were

  2. Progestational effects of combinations of gestodene on the postmenopausal endometrium during hormone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrjalsen, I; Bjarnason, N H; Christiansen, C

    1999-03-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the dose-response effects on the postmenopausal endometrium of 3 sequential combined hormone replacement regimens and 1 continuous combined hormone replacement regimen of estradiol and gestodene. In this 2-year double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 278 healthy postmenopausal women received either 2 mg estradiol sequentially combined with 50 microg or 25 microg gestodene, 1 mg estradiol sequentially or continuously combined with 25 microg gestodene, or placebo. All 4 hormone treatment regimens produced a safe endometrial histologic appearance. The regimens that were based on the lower dose of 1 mg estradiol was associated with less uterine bleeding than were those that were based on 2 mg estradiol. For sequentially opposing the 2 mg dose of estradiol, the dose of 25 microg gestodene was less efficient in producing secretory activity than was the dose of 50 microg gestodene. The measurement of placental protein 14 in serum reflected the secretory transformation of the endometrial buildup. The reduction in bleeding episodes associated with regimens with lower estradiol doses may lead to improved long-term therapy compliance by menopausal women. The potency of progestogens can be assessed by measuring the serum concentration of placental protein 14.

  3. Hormone replacement therapy, oral contraceptive use, and distal large bowel cancer: a population-based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Millie D; Martin, Christopher F; Galanko, Joseph A; Sandler, Robert S

    2010-08-01

    Lower incidence rates of distal large bowel cancer in women when compared with men support the protective role of female hormones. We aimed to determine the associations between hormone replacement therapy, oral contraceptive use, and distal large bowel cancer. We conducted a population-based case-control study of incident distal large bowel cancer in North Carolina between 2001 and 2006. Data on hormone replacement therapy, oral contraceptive use, demographics, and risk factors were obtained through in-person interviews. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the associations between oral contraceptive use, hormone replacement therapy, and distal large bowel cancer were estimated through unconditional logistic regression models overall, by duration of use, and within strata of race. There were a total of 443 women with distal large bowel cancer and 405 controls. Ever use of hormone replacement therapy was strongly associated with a reduced risk of distal large bowel cancer (OR 0.52, 95% CI 0.38-0.72). Further reduction of distal large bowel cancer risk occurred with increased duration of use (or=15 years (OR 0.34, 95% CI 0.20-0.58)). Ever use of oral contraceptives was not associated with reduced incidence of distal large bowel cancer (OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.67-1.34) nor was duration of use. There were no differences by race. Hormone replacement therapy is associated with a lower risk of distal large bowel cancer. This risk is further reduced with increased duration of use. Hormone replacement therapy may be partially responsible for the reduced incidence of distal large bowel cancer in women compared with men.

  4. The use of hormone therapy for the maintenance of urogynecological and sexual health post WHI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nappi, R E; Davis, S R

    2012-06-01

    The loss of estrogen at menopause and the gradual decline in testosterone with age are associated with urogenital atrophy and, as a result, urogenital tract symptoms, including lower urinary tract symptoms and dyspareunia. These symptoms will persist unless treated. To review the prevalence of urogenital tract symptoms and sexual health problems associated with menopause and the role in the use of hormone therapy for the treatment of symptomatic women, with a specific focus on what has been learned since the first publication of the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) estrogen and estrogen + progestin studies. Studies support the use of local estrogen therapy, but not systemic estrogen therapy, for the treatment of urge urinary incontinence, overactive bladder and to reduce the number of urinary tract infections. The current evidence does not favor a beneficial effect on stress urinary incontinence. Local estrogen therapy is effective for the treatment of dyspareunia caused by vulvovaginal atrophy. Preliminary studies suggest a potential role for both intravaginal dehydroepiandrosterone and testosterone in the treatment of dyspareunia secondary to vulvovaginal atrophy, however, confirmatory studies are required before either therapy can be recommended. Post WHI, there is a need for medical practitioners to proactively raise the topic of urogynecological and sexual health in order to discuss the most suitable treatment option.

  5. Influence of growth hormone therapy on selected dental and skeletal system parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partyka, Małgorzata; Chałas, Renata; Dunin-Wilczyńska, Izabella; Drohomyretska, Myroslava; Klatka, Maria

    2018-03-14

    Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) is one of the main indications for growth hormone therapy. One characteristic of this disease is bone age delay in relation to the chronological age. Pituitary dysfunction negatively affects the growth and development of the jaws and teeth of the child. The secretion of endocrine glands regulates growth, development, and gender differentiation. It also controls the growth of bones and teeth, regulates metabolism of calcium and phosphate, proteins, lipids and carbohydrates. The primary role in the endocrine system is played by the pituitary gland which is responsible for the production of somatotropin [1]. Dysfunction of the pituitary gland has a negative effect on the growth and development of long bones in the body, and may have an adverse effect on the development of maxilla, mandible and dentition of a child. There is some information in the literature that dental age is delayed in short stature children; the replacement of deciduous teeth by permanent teeth is also delayed, and newly erupted permanent teeth often require orthodontic treatment. Applying hormonal therapy positively affects the process of replacement of dentition [2, 3, 4, 5, 6]. The aim of the study was to assess bone and dental age, as well as analyze the state of dentition in children diagnosed with GH deficiency treated with growth hormone, depending on the duration of treatment. The study material consisted of 110 children (27 males, 83 females), hospitalized for somatotropin hypopituitarism in the Department of Paediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology at the Medical University of Lublin, Poland. The mean birth age was 13 years (156 months) with a standard deviation of 2 years and 6 months (30 months). 47 children (43%) started treatment with the growth hormone (group starting treatment) and 63 children (57%) whose treatment was started 2-3 years previously (group in the course of treatment). The control group consisted of 41 generally healthy children (15males

  6. Growth hormone secretion in children after therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawlaczyk, B.; Krause, W.

    1990-01-01

    In eight children, after the termination of therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) the secretion of growth hormone (GH) was determined by the stimulation test with clonidine. The children were treated in the period from 1983 till 1988 and they were administered chemotherapy, intrathecal methotrexate therapy and cranial 60 Co irradiation in a dose of 1800 rads. In one case a complete GH deficiency was found, in three cases there was a partial deficiency and in the remaining cases the secretion was regular. No correlation was found between the biochemical values of GH and the clinical stature. There was also no interrelation between the duration of chemotherapy and the degree of pituitary gland failure. We have compared the results of GH output in children treated for ALL with those of 44 children in whom short stature was diagnosed. The age in both groups was similar. (author)

  7. Sources of information influencing the state-of-the-science gap in hormone replacement therapy usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Fiona; Wu, Xianwei

    2017-01-01

    Medical reviews and research comprise a key information source for news media stories on medical therapies and innovations as well as for physicians in updating their practice. The present study examined medical review journal articles, physician surveys and news media coverage of hormone replacement therapy (HT) to assess the relationship between the three information sources and whether/if they contributed to a state-of-the-science gap (a condition when the evaluation of a medical condition or therapy ascertained by the highest standards of investigation is incongruent with the science-in-practice such as physician recommendations and patient actions). We content-analyzed 177 randomly sampled HT medical reviews between 2002 and 2014, and HT news valence in three major TV networks, newspapers and magazines/internet sites in 2002-2003, 2008-2009 and 2012-14. The focus in both analyses was whether HT benefits outweighed risks, risks outweighed benefits or both risks and benefits were presented. We also qualitatively content-analyzed all 19 surveys of US physicians' HT recommendations from 2002 to 2009, and 2012 to 2014. Medical reviews yielded a mixed picture about HT (40.1% benefits, 26.0% risks, and 33.9% both benefits and risks). While a majority of physician surveys were pro-HT 10/19), eight showed varied attitudes and one was negative. Newspaper and television coverage reflected a pro and con balance while magazine stories were more positive in the later reporting period. Medical journal review articles, physicians, and media reports all provide varying view points towards hormone therapy use thus leading to limited knowledge about the actual risks and benefits of HT among peri- and menopausal women and a state-of-the-science gap.

  8. Sources of information influencing the state-of-the-science gap in hormone replacement therapy usage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona Chew

    Full Text Available Medical reviews and research comprise a key information source for news media stories on medical therapies and innovations as well as for physicians in updating their practice. The present study examined medical review journal articles, physician surveys and news media coverage of hormone replacement therapy (HT to assess the relationship between the three information sources and whether/if they contributed to a state-of-the-science gap (a condition when the evaluation of a medical condition or therapy ascertained by the highest standards of investigation is incongruent with the science-in-practice such as physician recommendations and patient actions.We content-analyzed 177 randomly sampled HT medical reviews between 2002 and 2014, and HT news valence in three major TV networks, newspapers and magazines/internet sites in 2002-2003, 2008-2009 and 2012-14. The focus in both analyses was whether HT benefits outweighed risks, risks outweighed benefits or both risks and benefits were presented. We also qualitatively content-analyzed all 19 surveys of US physicians' HT recommendations from 2002 to 2009, and 2012 to 2014.Medical reviews yielded a mixed picture about HT (40.1% benefits, 26.0% risks, and 33.9% both benefits and risks. While a majority of physician surveys were pro-HT 10/19, eight showed varied attitudes and one was negative. Newspaper and television coverage reflected a pro and con balance while magazine stories were more positive in the later reporting period.Medical journal review articles, physicians, and media reports all provide varying view points towards hormone therapy use thus leading to limited knowledge about the actual risks and benefits of HT among peri- and menopausal women and a state-of-the-science gap.

  9. Does fasting during Ramadan trigger non-adherence to oral hormonal therapy in breast cancer patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeeneldin, Ahmed Abdelmabood; Gaber, Ayman Abdelsamee; Taha, Fatma Mohamed

    2012-09-01

    To estimate the effect of fasting during Ramadan (the ninth lunar month) on adherence to oral hormonal therapies (OHT) among breast cancer (BC) patients. During Ramadan 2010, 139 BC patients were interviewed at the Egyptian National Cancer Institute. They were asked about fasting as well as intake of OHT in Ramadan and in the preceding month. The median age was 50years and most patients were postmenopausal with good performance status and non-metastatic disease. The median number of fasting days was 18% and 93% of patients were fasting 80% or more of Ramadan. Tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors were used in 64% and 36%, respectively. Adherence to OHT during Ramadan and its preceding month were 94.2% and 95.7%, respectively (p=0.77). In univariate analysis, non-adherence prior to Ramadan and shorter duration of OHT were predictors of non-adherence during Ramadan (PFasting, age, performance status, presence of metastases and type of hormonal therapy were not good predictors of adherence. While most of patients receiving OHT for BC are fasting during Ramadan, this does not negatively impact compliance with treatment. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Modification of blood pressure in postmenopausal women: role of hormone replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cannoletta M

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Marianna Cannoletta, Angelo Cagnacci Institute of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences of the Mother, Child and Adult, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena and Reggio Emilia, Emilia-Romagna, Italy Abstract: The rate of hypertension increases after menopause. Whether estrogen and progesterone deficiency associated with menopause play a role in determining a worst blood pressure (BP control is still controversial. Also, studies dealing with the administration of estrogens or hormone therapy (HT have reported conflicting evidence. In general it seems that, despite some negative data on subgroups of later postmenopausal women obtained with oral estrogens, in particular conjugated equine estrogens (CEE, most of the data indicate neutral or beneficial effects of estrogen or HT administration on BP control of both normotensive and hypertensive women. Data obtained with ambulatory BP monitoring and with transdermal estrogens are more convincing and concordant in defining positive effect on BP control of both normotensive and hypertensive postmenopausal women. Overall progestin adjunct does not hamper the effect of estrogens. Among progestins, drospirenone, a spironolactone-derived molecule, appears to be the molecule with the best antihypertensive properties. Keywords: hormone replacement therapy, estrogen, progestin, blood pressure, menopause, hypertension 

  11. Management of acne vulgaris with hormonal therapies in adult female patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husein-ElAhmed, Husein

    2015-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a very common condition affecting up of 93% of adolescents. Although rare, this disease may persist in adulthood. In adult women with acne (those older than 25 years old), this condition is particularly relevant because of the refractory to conventional therapies, which makes acne a challenge for dermatologists in this group of patients. In order to its potential risk for chronicity and the involvement of visible anatomical sites such as face and upper torso, acne has been associated with a wide spectrum of psychological and social dysfunction such as depression, anxiety, suicidal ideation, somatization, and social inhibition. In particular, adult women with acne have been shown to be adversely impacted by the effect of acne on their quality of life. For the last four decades, dermatologists have used hormonal therapies for the management of acne vulgaris in adult women, which are considered a rational choice given the severity and chronicity of this condition in this group of patients. The aim of this work is to review the hormonal drugs for management of acne. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Failing Decision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Recently the Danish subway trains have begun to announce “on time” when they arrive at a station on time. This action reflects a worrying acceptance of the normality of failure. If trains were generally expected to be on time, there would be no reason to – triumphantly – announce it. This chapter...... as a controlled cost for achieving organizational goals. Decisions must fail so the organization can succeed. This chapter uses two cases to elaborate on these ideas. By way of introduction, I will reflect on the notion of ‘failing decisions’ within organization and decision theory. This chapter is also propelled...

  13. The 2017 hormone therapy position statement of The North American Menopause Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    The 2017 Hormone Therapy Position Statement of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) updates the 2012 Hormone Therapy Position Statement of The North American Menopause Society and identifies future research needs. An Advisory Panel of clinicians and researchers expert in the field of women's health and menopause was recruited by NAMS to review the 2012 Position Statement, evaluate new literature, assess the evidence, and reach consensus on recommendations, using the level of evidence to identify the strength of recommendations and the quality of the evidence. The Panel's recommendations were reviewed and approved by the NAMS Board of Trustees.Hormone therapy (HT) remains the most effective treatment for vasomotor symptoms (VMS) and the genitourinary syndrome of menopause (GSM) and has been shown to prevent bone loss and fracture. The risks of HT differ depending on type, dose, duration of use, route of administration, timing of initiation, and whether a progestogen is used. Treatment should be individualized to identify the most appropriate HT type, dose, formulation, route of administration, and duration of use, using the best available evidence to maximize benefits and minimize risks, with periodic reevaluation of the benefits and risks of continuing or discontinuing HT.For women aged younger than 60 years or who are within 10 years of menopause onset and have no contraindications, the benefit-risk ratio is most favorable for treatment of bothersome VMS and for those at elevated risk for bone loss or fracture. For women who initiate HT more than 10 or 20 years from menopause onset or are aged 60 years or older, the benefit-risk ratio appears less favorable because of the greater absolute risks of coronary heart disease, stroke, venous thromboembolism, and dementia. Longer durations of therapy should be for documented indications such as persistent VMS or bone loss, with shared decision making and periodic reevaluation. For bothersome GSM symptoms not

  14. Lifestyle risk management--a qualitative analysis of women's descriptions of taking hormone therapy following surgically induced menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Marie; Burrell, Beverly; Whitehead, Lisa

    2012-08-01

    This article is a report of a study that examined how women describe their decisions in relation to the use of menopausal hormone therapy following surgical menopause. Women who have had a surgically induced menopause generally experience more intense menopausal symptoms than natural menopause and are regularly prescribed menopausal hormone therapy. Since 2002 the risks associated with this therapy have been widely reported. This study is a qualitative analysis of semi-structured interviews between March and May 2009 with 30 participants who had experienced surgical menopause and were, or had in the past, taken menopausal hormone therapy. This was a community sample recruited in Christchurch, New Zealand. A risk management theoretical approach underpinned the analysis. The womens' descriptions of managing the risks associated with menopausal therapy fell into two main themes: Life has to go on and Waiting for someone to tell me. All these women had either made an active decision to continue on treatment because of the impact of menopausal symptoms or took their doctor's advice to continue. A less dominant theme but one that was also evident was Relying on my body to get me through in which the women had decided to discontinue treatment because they regarded it as unnatural. The study provided insights into how women utilize an experiential reasoning process to manage the health and lifestyle risks associated with taking menopausal hormone therapy. Nurses need to be aware of how this process influences women's reasoning processes when working with women following surgical menopause. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Evolution of drug resistance in HIV-infected patients remaining on a virologically failing combination antiretroviral therapy regimen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Phillips, Andrew N; Ruiz, Lidia

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the extent of drug resistance accumulation in patients kept on a virologically failing regimen and its determinants in the clinical setting. DESIGN: The study focused on 110 patients of EuroSIDA on an unchanged regimen who had two genotypic tests performed at two time points...

  16. Immunohistochemical Ki67 after short-term hormone therapy identifies low-risk breast cancers as reliably as genomic markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Takayuki; Katagiri, Toyomasa; Niikura, Naoki; Miyoshi, Yuichiro; Kochi, Mariko; Nogami, Tomohiro; Shien, Tadahiko; Motoki, Takayuki; Taira, Naruto; Omori, Masako; Tokuda, Yutaka; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Doihara, Hiroyoshi; Gyorffy, Balazs; Matsuoka, Junji

    2017-04-18

    The purpose of this study was to test whether immunohistochemical (IHC) Ki67 levels after short-term preoperative hormone therapy (post-Ki67) predict similar numbers of patients with favorable prognoses as genomic markers. Thirty paired cases (60 samples) were enrolled in this study. Post-Ki67 levels were significantly lower than pre-treatment Ki67 levels (P Ki67 predicted more low-risk cases (83.3%, 25/30) than pre-genomic surrogate signature(GSS) (66.7%: 20/30), but the difference in predictive power was not significant (P = 0.233). Proliferation (MKI67, STK15, Survivin, CCNB1, and MYBL2) and estrogen (ER, PGR, BCL2, and SCUBE2) related signatures were significantly downregulated after therapy (P breast cancer were collected at Okayama University Hospital from hormone receptor-positive and human epidermal growth factor 2-negative patients that subsequently received two weeks of neoadjuvant hormone therapy. Paired post-treatment specimens from surgical samples were also collected. IHC Ki67 levels and GSS were compared between pre- and post-hormone treatment samples. Changes of gene expression pattern in short-term hormone therapy were also assessed. IHC based post-Ki67 levels may have distinct predictive power compared with the naïve IHC Ki67. Future studies with larger cohorts and longer follow-up periods may be needed to validate our results.

  17. Contracepção hormonal e anti-retrovirais em mulheres infectadas pelo HIV Hormonal contraception and antiretroviral therapy among HIV-infected women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Amaral

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Há controvérsia sobre a relação entre o uso de contraceptivos hormonais e o risco de adquirir o vírus da imunodeficiência humana (HIV, e pouco se sabe sobre os efeitos da contracepção hormonal em mulheres infectadas (efeitos colaterais, distúrbios menstruais, progressão da doença, interações com terapias anti-retrovirais. O objetivo deste artigo foi revisar os dados disponíveis quanto à vulnerabilidade ao HIV e à sua transmissibilidade na vigência do uso de contraceptivos hormonais bem como as conseqüências potenciais do uso desses contraceptivos por mulheres HIV-positivas sob terapia anti-retroviral (TARV, com ênfase nas interações medicamentosas. Concluiu-se que ainda não é possível elaborar recomendações, baseadas em evidências, sobre a contracepção hormonal em mulheres portadoras do HIV sob TARV. Assim, os infectologistas e os ginecologistas devem estar atentos às interações potenciais que possam representar aumento de efeitos adversos, individualizando a orientação sobre os esteróides contraceptivos, suas doses e vias de administração, considerando a TARV em uso.There is much controversy regarding the realtionship between the use of hormonal contraceptives and the risk of acquiring human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, and little is known about the effects of hormonal contraception in HIV-infected women (adverse events, menstrual disorders, disease progression, antiretroviral therapy interactions. The aim of the present study was to review available data regarding HIV vulnerability and transmission associated with hormonal contraceptives and the use of these contraceptives by women on antiretroviral therapy, with emphasis on drug interactions. In conclusion, it was not possible to offer evidence-based recommendations for the use of hormonal contraceptives among HIV-infected women under antiretroviral therapy. Infectious disease specialists and gynecologists providing care should be cautious about potential

  18. Growth hormone therapy for Prader-willi syndrome: challenges and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugni, Graziano; Sartorio, Alessandro; Crinò, Antonino

    2016-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is characterized by a dysregulation of growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor I axis, as the consequence of a complex hypothalamic involvement. PWS' clinical picture seems to resemble the classic non-PWS GH deficiency (GHD), including short stature, excessive body fat, decreased muscle mass, and impaired quality of life. GH therapy is able to ameliorate the phenotypic appearance of the syndrome, as well as to improve body composition, physical strength, and cognitive level. In this regard, however, some pathophysiologic and clinical questions still remain, representing a challenge to give the most appropriate care to PWS patients. Data about the prevalence of GHD in PWS children are not unequivocal, ranging from 40% to 100%. In this context, to establish whether the presence (or not) of GHD may have a different effect on clinical course during GH therapy may be helpful. In addition, the comparison of GH effects in PWS children diagnosed as small for gestational age with those obtained in subjects born appropriate for gestational age is of potential interest for future trials. Emerging information seems to demonstrate the maintenance of beneficial effects of GH therapy in PWS subjects after adolescent years. Thus, GH retesting after achievement of final height should be taken into consideration for all PWS patients. However, it is noteworthy that GH administration exerts positive effects both in PWS adults with and without GHD. Another critical issue is to clarify whether the genotype-phenotype correlations may be relevant to specific outcome measures related to GH therapy. Moreover, progress of our understanding of the role of GH replacement and concomitant therapies on bone characteristics of PWS is required. Finally, a long-term surveillance of benefits and risks of GH therapy is strongly recommended for PWS population, since most of the current studies are uncontrolled and of short duration.

  19. Serum uric acid levels and hormone therapy type: a retrospective cohort study of postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jae H; Song, Gwan G; Lee, Young H; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Hyun, Myung H; Choi, Sung J

    2018-01-01

    Serum uric acid levels increase in postmenopausal women, but decrease when hormone therapy (HT) is administered. No study has, however, evaluated the effects of different types of HT on serum uric acid levels. We therefore examined whether estrogen therapy (ET), estrogen plus progestogen therapy (EPT), and tibolone use affected serum uric acid levels in this population. We performed a retrospective cohort study of postmenopausal women. From 2005 to 2015, postmenopausal women who had undergone blood uric acid-level testing at least twice were enrolled. Participants were grouped according to HT regimen: ET, EPT, or tibolone. The nonhormone therapy group did not receive HT. Differences in serum uric acid levels were examined in each group. Our analysis was adjusted to accommodate different follow-up intervals for individual participants. Multiple variables were adjusted using the Tukey-Kramer method. Age, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, estimated glomerular filtration rate, alcohol consumption, smoking status, and comedications were also adjusted. After adjusting for multiple variables, the serum uric acid level increased to 0.87 ± 0.27 mg/dL (least squares mean ± standard error) in the nonhormone therapy group, and serum uric levels in the EPT group were found to be significantly lower (-0.38 ± 0.29 mg/dL, P uric acid levels in the ET and tibolone groups did not, however, differ significantly from the nonhormone therapy group level. We attribute our findings to the effects of progestogen, rather than estrogen.

  20. Cardiovascular risk factors in a cohort of Danish women born in 1936 prior to use of hormone therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, Ellen; Eplov, Lene Falgaard; Køster, Anne

    2005-01-01

    Many observational studies suggest hormone therapy protects against coronary heart disease in contrast to findings from large randomised clinical trials and an observational Danish study. A potential bias in the observational literature concerning the cardiovascular risk and benefits associated...... with use of hormone therapy is the so-called 'healthy user' phenomenon, i.e. self-selection to HT use is associated with healthier cardiovascular risk profile. This study investigates whether a random sample of Danish women using HT was characterised by a favourable cardiovascular risk profile prior...... to menopause....

  1. Hormone replacement therapy use and plasma levels of sex hormones in the Norwegian Women and Cancer Postgenome Cohort – a cross-sectional analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olsen Karina S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hormone replacement therapy use (HRT is associated with increased breast cancer risk. Our primary objective was to explore hormone levels in plasma according to HRT use, body mass index (BMI and menopausal status. A secondary objective was to validate self-reported questionnaire information on menstruation and HRT use in the Norwegian Women and Cancer postgenome cohort (NOWAC. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study of sex hormone levels among 445 women aged 48–62 who answered an eight-page questionnaire in 2004 and agreed to donate a blood sample. The samples were drawn at the women's local general physician's offices in the spring of 2005 and sent by mail to NOWAC, Tromsø, together with a two-page questionnaire. Plasma levels of sex hormones and Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG were measured by immunometry. 20 samples were excluded, leaving 425 hormone measurements. Results 20% of postmenopausal women were HRT users. The plasma levels of estradiol (E2 increased with an increased E2 dose, and use of systemic E2-containing HRT suppressed the level of Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH. SHBG levels increased mainly among users of oral E2 preparations. Vaginal E2 application did not influence hormone levels. There was no difference in BMI between HRT users and non-users. Increased BMI was associated with increased E2 and decreased FSH and SHBG levels among non-users. Menopausal status defined by the two-page questionnaire showed 92% sensitivity (95% CI 89–96% and 73% specificity (95% CI 64–82%, while the eight-page questionnaire showed 88% sensitivity (95% CI 84–92% and 87% specificity (95% CI 80–94%. Current HRT use showed 100% specificity and 88% of the HRT-users had plasma E2 levels above the 95% CI of non-users. Conclusion Users of systemic E2-containing HRT preparations have plasma E2 and FSH levels comparable to premenopausal women. BMI has an influence on hormone levels among non-users. NOWAC

  2. Role of integrated approach of yoga therapy in a failed post-total knee replacement of bilateral knees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Ebnezar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OA Knee is the most common arthritis. Knee replacement Surgeries are being done increasingly in the present times. This has led to the violation of the standard indications and when knees are replaced ignoring other co - musculoskeletal conditions it results in the surgery failing early. This is about a patient who encountered a failed TKR due to improper selection as patient had bilateral OA Hip that was ignored in the initial stages. To overcome the problem she was advised bilateral hip replacement which would leave her with four replacements in the lower limb. She refused surgery and was told there are no alternative treatment options. This patient underwent a 3 week integrated course of IAYT at our center and she made a remarkable recovery. IAYT is a good non-surgical treatment that can be affective both before and after knee replacement and it should be considered as the first choice of treatment before surgery.

  3. Standard and Low-dose Hormone Therapy for Postmenopausal Women—Focus on the Breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-Hui Wang

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Menopause occurs naturally when the ovary ceases folliculogenesis, or artificially by surgical and/or medical ablation of the ovarian function. Menopause is a hypoestrogenic state, which may adversely affect estrogen target tissues, such as the brain, skeleton and skin, as well as the cardiovascular and genitourinary systems, with resultant frequency and severity of climacteric symptoms. The climacteric symptoms, however, vary significantly among women. For decades, hormone therapy (HT has been the mainstay and is considered the most effective for managing menopausal symptoms. The prolonged use of either single estrogen therapy or a combination therapy of estrogen and progestogen (EPT might be associated with a slightly increased risk of breast cancer and many resultant adverse events, such as coronary heart disease, stroke and venous thromboembolism. Perhaps because the clear benefits are limited to these end points of HT in treating menopausal women, the relatively significant adverse event profiles of these women may not be enough to trigger primary care physicians to be more aggressive than they have been to date in treating climacteric symptoms of postmenopausal women. However, severe climacteric symptoms really disturb the woman's life. Some epidemiologic studies have shown that the increased risk for breast cancer after 5 years of combined EPT is similar in magnitude to other lifestyle variables, such as 10-year delayed menopause, fewer pregnancies and reduced breastfeeding, postmenopausal obesity, excessive alcohol or cigarette use, and lack of regular exercise. Furthermore, elevated serum concentrations of either endogenous or exogenous (replaced by HT sex hormone in either pre- or postmenopausal women are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. Finally, the increased breast cancer risk diminishes soon after discontinuing hormones, and largely disappears by 5 years after cessation. Taken together, low-dose conventional HT

  4. Effect of oxandrolone therapy on adult height in Turner syndrome patients treated with growth hormone: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheanon, Nicole M; Backeljauw, Philippe F

    2015-01-01

    Turner syndrome is a chromosomal abnormality in which there is complete or partial absence of the X chromosome. Turner syndrome effects 1 in every 2000 live births. Short stature is a cardinal feature of Turner Syndrome and the standard treatment is recombinant human growth hormone. When growth hormone is started at an early age a normal adult height can be achieved. With delayed diagnosis young women with Turner Syndrome may not reach a normal height. Adjuvant therapy with oxandrolone is used but there is no consensus on the optimal timing of treatment, the duration of treatment and the long term adverse effects of treatment. The objective of this review and meta-analysis is to examine the effect of oxandrolone on adult height in growth hormone treated Turner syndrome patients. Eligible trials were identified by a literature search using the terms: Turner syndrome, oxandrolone. The search was limited to English language randomized-controlled trials after 1980. Twenty-six articles were reviewed and four were included in the meta-analysis. A random effects model was used to calculate an effect size and confidence interval. The pooled effect size of 2.0759 (95 % CI 0.0988 to 4.0529) indicates that oxandrolone has a positive effect on adult height in Turner syndrome when combined with growth hormone therapy. In conclusion, the addition of oxandrolone to growth hormone therapy for treatment of short stature in Turner syndrome improves adult height. Further studies are warranted to investigate if there is a subset of Turner syndrome patients that would benefit most from growth hormone plus oxandrolone therapy, and to determine the optimal timing and duration of such therapy.

  5. The conundrum of estrogen receptor oscillatory activity in the search for an appropriate hormone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Torre, Sara; Biserni, Andrea; Rando, Gianpaolo; Monteleone, Giuseppina; Ciana, Paolo; Komm, Barry; Maggi, Adriana

    2011-06-01

    By the use of in vivo imaging, we investigated the dynamics of estrogen receptor (ER) activity in intact, ovariectomized, and hormone-replaced estrogen response element-luciferase reporter mice. The study revealed the existence of a long-paced, noncircadian oscillation of ER transcriptional activity. Among the ER-expressing organs, this oscillation was asynchronous and its amplitude and period were tissue dependent. Ovariectomy affected the amplitude but did not suppress ER oscillations, suggesting the presence of tissue endogenous oscillators. Long-term administration of raloxifene, bazedoxifene, combined estrogens alone or with basedoxifene to ovariectomized estrogen response element-luciferase mice showed that each treatment induced a distinct spatiotemporal profile of ER activity, demonstrating that the phasing of ER activity among tissues may be regulated by the chemical nature and the concentration of circulating estrogen. This points to the possibility of a hierarchical organization of the tissue-specific pacemakers. Conceivably, the rhythm of ER transcriptional activity translates locally into the activation of specific gene networks enabling ER to significantly change its physiological activity according to circulating estrogens. In reproductive and nonreproductive organs this hierarchical regulation may provide ER with the signaling plasticity necessary to drive the complex metabolic changes occurring at each female reproductive status. We propose that the tissue-specific oscillatory activity here described is an important component of ER signaling necessary for the full hormone action including the beneficial effects reported for nonreproductive organs. Thus, this mechanism needs to be taken in due consideration to develop novel, more efficacious, and safer hormone replacement therapies.

  6. [Using an ovarian drilling by hydrolaparoscopy or recombinant follicle stimulating hormone plus metformin to treat polycystic ovary syndrome: Why a randomized controlled trial fail?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, H; Cedrin-Durnerin, I; Gallot, V; Rongieres, C; Watrelot, A; Mayenga-Mankezi, J-M; Arnoux, A

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate pregnancy rates after randomized controlled trial (RCT) between ovarian drilling by fertiloscopy or ovarian hyperstimulation+insemination+metformine after clomifène citrate (cc) treatment fails. Randomized controlled trial with 126 patients in each arm in 9 university centers. After 6-9 months of stimulation by cc, 2 groups were randomized: group 1, ovarian drilling with bipolar energy versus group 2: 3 months treatment by metformine followed by 3 hyperstimulation by FSH+insemination. The success rate was pregnancy rate above 12 weeks. RCT was stopped after the screening of 40 patients. In spite of the low number of patients, the pregnancy rate is significantly higher in medical group 8/16 versus 3/18 (p=0.04). The causes of fail of RCT were in relationship with difficulties of inclusion, with absence of final agreement by team included. Moreover, RCT between medical and surgical management is often root of difficulties for patients who decline surgical strategy. However, medical treatment appeared better than drilling in this RCT. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. The 2012 hormone therapy position statement of: The North American Menopause Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    This position statement aimed to update the evidence-based position statement published by The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) in 2010 regarding recommendations for hormone therapy (HT) for postmenopausal women. This updated position statement further distinguishes the emerging differences in the therapeutic benefit-risk ratio between estrogen therapy (ET) and combined estrogen-progestogen therapy (EPT) at various ages and time intervals since menopause onset. An Advisory Panel of expert clinicians and researchers in the field of women's health was enlisted to review the 2010 NAMS position statement, evaluate new evidence, and reach consensus on recommendations. The Panel's recommendations were reviewed and approved by the NAMS Board of Trustees as an official NAMS position statement. Current evidence supports the use of HT for perimenopausal and postmenopausal women when the balance of potential benefits and risks is favorable for the individual woman. This position statement reviews the effects of ET and EPT on many aspects of women's health and recognizes the greater safety profile associated with ET. Recent data support the initiation of HT around the time of menopause to treat menopause-related symptoms and to prevent osteoporosis in women at high risk of fracture. The more favorable benefit-risk ratio for ET allows more flexibility in extending the duration of use compared with EPT, where the earlier appearance of increased breast cancer risk precludes a recommendation for use beyond 3 to 5 years.

  8. Evaluation Of Low Level Laser Therapy On Body Constitution And Leptin Hormone By Radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, S.S.Y.

    2012-01-01

    Asymmetric fat distribution with excessive fat accumulation in particular areas often affects a person's self-image, self esteem, and overall quality of life. Purpose of the study: to investigate the efficacy of the low level laser therapy (LLLT) on body constitution and leptin hormone by radioimmunoassay. Methods: Twenty women were included in this study. Their ages ranged from 30- 40 years. They were divided into two groups of equal number. Procedures: -Group A (Overweight group): included 10 women with BMI ≥ 25- 29.9-Group B (Obese group): included 10 women with BMI ≥ 30.both groups received LLLT, for 30 minutes, 2 times per week for 8 weeks as a total period of treatment. BMI, WC, HC, WHR, serum Leptin, cholesterol and triglyceride level were measured before and after finishing the study. Results: There was significant improvement in anthropometric measurements( on both abdomen and thigh fats) of both groups treated with low level laser therapy, decrease in serum leptin level in over weight group and increase in triglyceride serum level in both groups within normal level Conclusion: low level laser therapy is effective as a noninvasive and safe method of body contouring .

  9. Low-dose growth hormone therapy reduces inflammation in HIV-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindboe, Johanne Bjerre; Langkilde, Anne; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) has drastically increased the life expectancy of HIV-infected patients. However, HIV-infected patients exhibit increased inflammation and 33-58% exhibit a characteristic fat re-distribution termed HIV-associated lipodystrophy syndrome (HALS...... to investigate the impact of low-dose rhGH therapy on inflammation in HIV-infected patients. METHODS: Forty-six cART-treated HIV-infected men were included in the HIV-GH low-dose (HIGH/Low) study: a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded trial. Subjects were randomized 3:2 to 0.7 mg/day rhGH, or placebo......). Recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) has been tested as treatment of HALS. Low-dose rhGH therapy improves thymopoiesis and fat distribution in HIV-infected patients and appears to be well tolerated. However, since high-dose rhGH is associated with adverse events related to inflammation, we wanted...

  10. The 2012 Hormone Therapy Position Statement of The North American Menopause Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Objective This position statement aimed to update the evidence-based position statement published by The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) in 2010 regarding recommendations for hormone therapy (HT) for postmenopausal women. This updated position statement further distinguishes the emerging differences in the therapeutic benefit-risk ratio between estrogen therapy (ET) and combined estrogen-progestogen therapy (EPT) at various ages and time intervals since menopause onset. Methods An Advisory Panel of expert clinicians and researchers in the field of women’s health was enlisted to review the 2010 NAMS position statement, evaluate new evidence, and reach consensus on recommendations. The Panel’s recommendations were reviewed and approved by the NAMS Board of Trustees as an official NAMS position statement. Results Current evidence supports the use of HT for perimenopausal and postmenopausal women when the balance of potential benefits and risks is favorable for the individual woman. This position statement reviews the effects of ET and EPT on many aspects of women’s health and recognizes the greater safety profile associated with ET. Conclusions Recent data support the initiation of HT around the time of menopause to treat menopause-related symptoms and to prevent osteoporosis in women at high risk of fracture. The more favorable benefit-risk ratio for ET allows more flexibility in extending the duration of use compared with EPT, where the earlier appearance of increased breast cancer risk precludes a recommendation for use beyond 3 to 5 years. PMID:22367731

  11. Orthodontic treatment for a mandibular prognathic girl of short stature under growth hormone therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Yun Pan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This report presents a case of a 12-year-old girl with maxillary deficiency, mandibular prognathism, and facial asymmetry, undergoing growth hormone (GH therapy due to idiopathic short stature. Children of short stature with or without GH deficiency have a deviating craniofacial morphology with overall smaller dimensions; facial retrognathism, especially mandibular retrognathism; and increased facial convexity. However, a complete opposite craniofacial pattern was presented in our case of a skeletal Class III girl with idiopathic short stature. The orthodontic treatment goal was to inhibit or change the direction of mandibular growth and stimulate the maxillary growth of the girl during a course of GH therapy. Maxillary protraction and mandibular retraction were achieved using occipitomental anchorage (OMA orthopedic appliance in the first stage of treatment. In the second stage, the patient was treated with a fixed orthodontic appliance using a modified multiple-loop edgewise archwire technique of asymmetric mechanics and an active retainer of vertical chin-cup. The treatment led to an acceptable facial profile and obvious facial asymmetry improvement. Class I dental occlusion and coincident dental midline were also achieved. A 3½-year follow-up of the girl at age 18 showed a stable result of the orthodontic and dentofacial orthopedic treatment. Our case shows that the OMA orthopedic appliance of maxillary protraction combined with mandibular retraction is effective for correcting skeletal Class III malocclusion with midface deficiency and mandibular prognathism in growing children with idiopathic short stature undergoing GH therapy.

  12. Pharmaceutical intervention in menopausal patients with hormone replacement therapy in a community pharmacy from Antofagasta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandrina Alucema

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Context: Hormone replacement therapy (HRT is the most widely used treatment for controlling the effects of menopause. This type of therapy causes some drug-related problems (DRP, which requires monitoring to control the negative effects and ensure patient adherence to therapy. Aims: Perform a pharmacotherapeutic monitoring and educate to menopausal patients in HRT of a community pharmacy from the city of Antofagasta. Methods: A 98-menopausal patients underwent a pharmaceutical intervention to identify the PRM and its resolution. It was applied to them a survey before and after educational activities about this disease and HRT to determine the knowledge on the subject. Results: During the pharmacotherapeutic monitoring was determined that 55% of patients using combined HRT. 62 DRPs were detected, of which 43 were resolved (69%; the most were Patient-Pharmacist (73%. The better resolution DRP were DRP 4(b “frequency of inadequate administration” and DRP 2(a “no medical indication”. At baseline, 90% had an inadequate level of knowledge about the disease and THR, 8% intermediate, and only 2% adequate. After the implementation of the education strategy, the level of knowledge increased, achieving at the end of the study only intermediate (10% and adequate (90% levels. Conclusions: The results confirm the importance of pharmaceutical intervention for the identification and resolution of DRP and the requirement to establish educational strategies to increase the knowledge about menopause and HRT in menopausal patients.

  13. Effect of transdermal hormone therapy on platelet haemostasis in menopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachowiak, Grzegorz; Pertyński, Tomasz; Pertyńska-Marczewska, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Despite the undeniably positive effect on the quality of life of menopausal women, menopausal hormone therapy (HT) also has negative side-effects, which include, among others, thromboembolic complications. To assess the effect of a popular type of this therapy - transdermal HT on platelet hemostasis, which plays a significant role in intravascular coagulation. The study group consisted of 92 postmenopausal women: 1) group G1 (n=30), treated with transdermal HT (17β-estradiol 50 μg/day plus NETA 170 μg/day); 2) group G2 (n=31), treated with the above transdermal HT and low dosage of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA); 3) control group P (n=31). All the women qualified for the study had two or more risk factors for arterial thrombosis, such as: smoking, hypertension, visceral obesity, hypercholesterolaemia, hypertriglyceridaemia, elevated levels of PAI-1, and increased fibrinogen, increased activity of coagulation factor VII. After three months of therapy, in the G1 group there was a decrease in platelet count (p = 0.004) and a decrease in GP IIb/IIIa - a platelet receptor for fibrinogen (p = 0.022). In the G2 group, no changes in the tested parameters were observed. 1) Transdermal HT in the form of combined, estrogen-progestogen patches favourably modifies platelets haemostasis, reversing the adverse effects that occur after menopause. 2) The use of low ASA doses as a thromboprophylaxis in short-term transdermal HT is not necessary.

  14. INFLUENCES OF HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY ON OLFACTORY AND COGNITIVE FUNCTION IN THE MENOPAUSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Richard L.; Tourbier, Isabelle; Ng, Victoria; Neff, Jessica; Armstrong, Deborah; Battistini, Michelle; Sammel, Mary D.; Gettes, David; Evans, Dwight L.; Mirza, Natasha; Moberg, Paul J.; Connolly, Tim; Sondheimer, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Olfactory dysfunction can be an early sign of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Since hormone replacement therapy (HRT) may protect against developing AD in postmenopausal women, the question arises as to whether it also protects against olfactory dysfunction in such women. Three olfactory and 12 neurocognitive tests were administered to 432 healthy postmenopausal women with varied HRT histories. Serum levels of reproductive hormones were obtained for all subjects; APOE-ε4 haplotype was determined for 77. National Adult Reading Test and Odor Memory/Discrimination Test (OMT) scores were positively influenced by HRT. Odor identification and OMT test scores were lower for women who scored poorly on a delayed recall test, a surrogate for mild cognitive impairment. WAIS-R NI Spatial Span Backwards Test scores were higher in women receiving estrogen plus progestin HRT and directly correlated with serum testosterone levels, the latter implying a positive effect of testosterone on spatial memory. APOE-ε4 was associated with poorer odor threshold test scores. These data suggest that HRT positively influences a limited number of olfactory and cognitive measures in the menopause. PMID:25850354

  15. [Plastic surgery for the treatment of gynaecomastia following hormone therapy in prostate carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryssel, H; Germann, G; Köllensperger, E; Riedel, K

    2008-04-01

    Gynecomastia is a potential side effect of hormone therapy for prostate cancer. In large, randomized, placebo controlled studies approximately 50% or more of patients with prostate cancer experienced gynecomastia attributable to various mechanisms. Although it is mostly reported as mild to moderate, gynecomastia is one of the reasons most frequently cited for premature discontinuation of such treatment. Prophylactic radiotherapy and prophylactic tamoxifen have been shown to decrease the incidence of hormone-induced gynecomastia; nevertheless, there are still cases of refractory gynecomastia, and in these plastic surgery is needed for correction. Gynecomastia is a benign enlargement of the male breast, requiring no treatment unless it is a source of embarrassment and/or distress for the adolescent or man affected. The indications for surgical treatment of gynecomastia are founded on two main objectives: restoration of the male chest shape and diagnostic evaluation of suspected breast lesions. The authors believe that the complete circumareolar technique with no further scarring creates the best aesthetic results with fewer complications. When this is used in combination with liposuction very pleasing aesthetic results can be achieved.

  16. Prevalence of hormone replacement therapy in a sample of middle-aged women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, S H; Jeune, B

    1988-01-01

    A survey based on a postal questionnaire sent to a random sample of Danish women aged 40-59 yr living on the island of Fünen (n = 401, response rate = 79%) revealed that the overall prevalence of the use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) was 16%, the highest rate being in the 50-54 age group (21......%). Among post-menopausal women the rate was 21% and it was highest of all (37%) in those who had undergone an artificial menopause. The median age at the start of treatment was 44.3 yr among the artificial menopause and 48.9 yr among the natural menopause subjects. About half of the women were treated...

  17. [Puberty-delaying hormone therapy in adolescents with gender identity disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsuka, Mikiya

    2013-01-01

    The guideline for the treatment of people with gender identity disorder (GID) of the Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology was revised in January 2012. The guideline eased restrictions for the endocrine treatment of transsexual adolescents. A medical specialist can start treating transsexual adolescents at the age of 15 after the diagnosis of GID. It recommends that transsexual adolescents (Tanner stage 2 [mainly 12-13 years of age]) are treated by endocrinologists to suppress puberty with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists until the age of 15 years old, after which cross-sex hormones may be given. Female-to-male transsexuals do not necessarily want to start androgen therapy before presenting female secondary sexual characteristics because androgen can easily stop menstruation, cause beard growth, and lower the voice. On the contrary, male-to-female transsexuals want to start estrogen therapy before presenting male secondary sexual characteristics because estrogen cannot alter the beard and low voice. It is important to identify children with gender dysphoria in school and help them receive medical advice. However, approximately half of school teachers think that children with gender dysphoria are very rare and they do not know of the notification from Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, JAPAN, which aims to help children with gender dysphoria. The revision of the guideline for the treatment of transsexual people and endocrine treatment of transsexual adolescents by medical specialists may prevent them from attempting suicide, being depressive, and refusing to attend school. Furthermore, the treatment may help avoid mental disorders, aid being employed with the desired sexuality, and, subsequently, getting married and having children.

  18. Utilization of gynecologic services in women with breast cancer receiving hormonal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Jason D; Desai, Vrunda B; Chen, Ling; Burke, William M; Tergas, Ana I; Hou, June Y; Accordino, Melissa; Ananth, Cande V; Neugut, Alfred I; Hershman, Dawn L

    2017-07-01

    The selective estrogen receptor modulator tamoxifen is now widely used for the treatment and prevention of breast cancer. Tamoxifen use has been associated with a variety of gynecologic problems. Despite the frequency with which hormonal therapy is used for the treatment of breast cancer, limited population-level data are available to describe the occurrence of gynecologic conditions and the use of surveillance testing in women receiving tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors. We performed a population-based analysis among women with breast cancer receiving hormonal therapy with tamoxifen, a drug commonly used in premenopausal and sometimes postmenopausal women, to determine the frequency of gynecologic abnormalities and use of diagnostic and surveillance testing. We compared these findings to women treated with aromatase inhibitors, agents commonly used in postmenopausal women. The MarketScan database was used to identify women diagnosed with breast cancer from 2009 through 2013 who underwent mastectomy or lumpectomy. Women receiving tamoxifen (age gynecologic symptoms and diseases (vaginal bleeding, endometrial polyps, endometrial hyperplasia, and endometrial cancer) and gynecologic procedures and interventions (transvaginal ultrasound, endometrial biopsy, hysteroscopy/dilation and curettage, and hysterectomy). Time-dependent analyses were performed to examine symptoms and testing. A total of 75,170 women, including 15,735 (20.9%) age gynecologic symptom or pathologic diagnosis during the study period was 20.2%, 12.3%, and 3.5%, respectively (P gynecologic procedure or intervention during the study period was 34.2%, 20.9%, and 9.0%, respectively (P gynecologic symptoms, procedures, and pathology are higher for both premenopausal and postmenopausal women with breast cancer on tamoxifen. Increased efforts to curb use of gynecologic interventions in asymptomatic women are needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Skeletal response of male mice to anabolic hormone therapy in the absence of the Igfals gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Oran D; Sun, Hui; Wu, Yingjie; Courtland, Hayden-William; Williams, Garry A; Cardoso, Luis; Basta-Pljakic, Jelena; Schaffler, Mitchell B; Yakar, Shoshana

    2014-03-01

    IGF-I is a critical regulator of skeletal acquisition, which acts in endocrine and autocrine/paracrine modes. In serum, IGF-I is carried by the IGF-binding proteins in binary complexes. Further stabilization of these complexes is achieved by binding to the acid labile subunit (ALS) in a ternary complex (of IGF-I-IGF-binding protein 3/5-ALS). Ablation of the Igfals gene in humans (ALS deficiency) and mice (ALS knockout [ALSKO]) leads to markedly decreased serum IGF-I levels, growth retardation, and impaired skeletal acquisition. To investigate whether hormonal replacement therapy would improve the skeletal phenotype in cases of Igfals gene ablation, we treated male ALSKO mice with GH, IGF-I, or a combination of both. Treatments were administered to animals between 4 and 16 weeks of age or from 8 to 16 weeks of age. Although all treatment groups showed an increase (20%) in serum IGF-I levels, there was no increase in body weight, weight gain, or bone length in either age group. Despite the blunted linear growth in response to hormone therapy, ALSKO mice treated with GH showed radial bone growth, which contributed to bone strength tested by 4-point bending. We found that ALSKO mice treated with GH showed increased total cross-sectional area, cortical bone area, and cortical thickness by microtomography. Dynamic histomorphometry showed that although GH and double treatment groups resulted in trends towards increased bone formation parameters, these did not reach significance. However, bone resorption parameters were significantly increased in all treatment groups. ALSKO mice treated between 4 and 16 weeks of age showed minor differences in bone traits compared with vehicle-treated mice. In conclusion, treatment with GH and IGF-I do not work synergistically to rescue the stunted growth found in mice lacking the Igfals gene. Although GH alone appears to increase bone parameters slightly, it does not affect body weight or linear growth.

  20. Markers of bone metabolism are affected by renal function and growth hormone therapy in children with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doyon, Anke; Fischer, Dagmar Christiane; Bayazit, Aysun Karabay

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The extent and relevance of altered bone metabolism for statural growth in children with chronic kidney disease is controversial. We analyzed the impact of renal dysfunction and recombinant growth hormone therapy on a panel of serum markers of bone metabolism in a large pediatric...... turnover state in children with chronic kidney disease. Growth hormone induces an osteoanabolic pattern and normalizes osteocyte activity. The osteocyte markers cFGF23 and sclerostin are associated with standardized height, and the markers of bone turnover predict height velocity......./min/ 1.73m2. 41 children receiving recombinant growth hormone therapy were compared to an untreated matched control group. Results: Standardized levels of BAP, TRAP5b and cFGF-23 were increased whereas sclerostin was reduced. BAP was correlated positively and cFGF-23 inversely with eGFR. Intact serum...

  1. Gonadal suppressive and cross-sex hormone therapy for gender dysphoria in adolescents and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Katherine P; Madison, Christina M; Milne, Nikki M

    2014-12-01

    Individuals with gender dysphoria experience distress associated with incongruence between their biologic sex and their identified gender. Gender dysphoric natal males receive treatment with antiandrogens and estrogens to become feminized (transsexual females), whereas natal females with gender dysphoria receive treatment with androgens to become masculinized (transsexual males). Because of the permanence associated with cross-sex hormone therapy (CSHT), adolescents diagnosed with gender dysphoria receive gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs to suppress puberty. High rates of depression and suicide are linked to social marginalization and barriers to care. Behavior, emotional problems, depressive symptoms, and global functioning improve in adolescents receiving puberty suppression therapy. Gender dysphoria, psychological symptoms, quality of life, and sexual function improve in adults who receive CSHT. Within the first 6 months of CSHT, changes in transsexual females include breast growth, decreased testicular volume, and decreased spontaneous erections, and changes in transsexual males include cessation of menses, breast atrophy, clitoral enlargement, and voice deepening. Both transsexual females and males experience changes in body fat redistribution, muscle mass, and hair growth. Desired effects from CSHT can take between 3 and 5 years; however, effects that occur during puberty, such as voice deepening and skeletal structure changes, cannot be reversed with CSHT. Decreased sexual desire is a greater concern in transsexual females than in transsexual males, with testosterone concentrations linked to sexual desire in both. Regarding CSHT safety, bone mineral density is preserved with adequate hormone supplementation, but long-term fracture risk has not been studied. The transition away from high-dose traditional regimens is tied to a lower risk of venous thromboembolism and cardiovascular disease, but data quality is poor. Breast cancer has been reported in

  2. Hormonal crises following receptor radionuclide therapy with the radiolabeled somatostatin analogue [177Lu-DOTA0,Tyr3]octreotate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keizer, Bart de; Kam, Boen L.R.; Essen, Martijn van; Krenning, Eric P.; Kwekkeboom, Dik J.; Aken, Maarten O. van; Feelders, Richard A.; Herder, Wouter W. de

    2008-01-01

    Receptor radionuclide therapy is a promising treatment modality for patients with neuroendocrine tumors for whom alternative treatments are limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of hormonal crises after therapy with the radiolabeled somatostatin analogue [ 177 Lu-DOTA 0 ,Tyr 3 ]octreotate ( 177 Lu-octreotate). All 177 Lu-octreotate treatments between January 2000 and January 2007 were investigated. Four hundred seventy-six patients with gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors and three patients with metastatic pheochromocytoma were included for analysis. Four hundred seventy-nine patients received a total of 1,693 administrations of 177 Lu-octreotate. Six of 479 patients (1%) developed severe symptoms because of massive release of bioactive substances after the first cycle of 177 Lu-octreotate. One patient had a metastatic hormone-producing small intestinal carcinoid; two patients had metastatic, hormone-producing bronchial carcinoids; two patients had vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-producing pancreatic endocrine tumors (VIPomas); and one patient had a metastatic pheochromocytoma. With adequate treatment, all patients eventually recovered. Hormonal crises after 177 Lu-octreotate therapy occur in 1% of patients. Generally, 177 Lu-octreotate therapy is well tolerated. (orig.)

  3. Hormone replacement therapy: changes in frequency and type of prescription by Dutch GPs during the last decade of the millenium.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donker, G.A.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Bartelds, A.I.M.; Velden, K. van der; Foets, M.

    2000-01-01

    Objective: The present study was conducted in order to determine the change of frequency and type of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) regimen newly prescribed by Dutch GPs. Methods: A comparison was made of two data sets (multi-stage random samples) collected in 1987/88 and from 1995 to 1998

  4. Hormonal replacement therapy reduces forearm fracture incidence in recent postmenopausal women - results of the Danish Osteoporosis Prevention Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosekilde, Leif; Beck-Nielsen, H.; Sørensen, O.H.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the fracture reducing potential of hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) in recent postmenopausal women in a primary preventive scenario. METHODS: Prospective controlled comprehensive cohort trial: 2016 healthy women aged 45-58 years, from three to 24 months past last menstrual...

  5. Risk of low-energy hip, wrist, and upper arm fractures among current and previous users of hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hundrup, Yrsa Andersen; Høidrup, Susanne; Ekholm, Ola

    2004-01-01

    To examine the effect of oestrogen alone and in combination with progestin on the risk of low-energy, hip, wrist, and upper arm fractures. Additionally, to examine to what extent previous use, duration of use as well as recency of discontinuation of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) influences...

  6. Menopausal hormone therapy and breast cancer risk : impact of different treatments. The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakken, Kjersti; Fournier, Agnes; Lund, Eiliv; Waaseth, Marit; Dumeaux, Vanessa; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Fabre, Alban; Hemon, Bertrand; Rinaldi, Sabina; Chajes, Veronique; Slimani, Nadia; Allen, Naomi E.; Reeves, Gillian K.; Bingham, Sheila; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Olsen, Anja; Tjonneland, Anne; Rodriguez, Laudina; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Amiano Etxezarreta, Pilar; Ardanaz, Eva; Tormo, Maria-Jose; Peeters, Petra H.; van Gils, Carla H.; Steffen, Annika; Schulz, Mandy; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Kaaks, Rudolf; Tumino, Rosario; Gallo, Valentina; Norat, Teresa; Riboli, Elio; Panico, Salvatore; Masala, Giovanna; Gonzalez, Carlos A.; Berrino, Franco

    2011-01-01

    Menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) is characterized by use of different constituents, regimens and routes of administration. We investigated the association between the use of different types of MHT and breast cancer risk in the EPIC cohort study. The analysis is based on data from 133,744

  7. Growth Hormone (GH) and Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH) in the Central Nervous System: A Potential Neurological Combinatory Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Moreno, Carlos G; Calderón-Vallejo, Denisse; Harvey, Steve; Arámburo, Carlos; Quintanar, José Luis

    2018-01-26

    This brief review of the neurological effects of growth hormone (GH) and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in the brain, particularly in the cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, hippocampus, cerebellum, spinal cord, neural retina, and brain tumors, summarizes recent information about their therapeutic potential as treatments for different neuropathologies and neurodegenerative processes. The effect of GH and GnRH (by independent administration) has been associated with beneficial impacts in patients with brain trauma and spinal cord injuries. Both GH and GnRH have demonstrated potent neurotrophic, neuroprotective, and neuroregenerative action. Positive behavioral and cognitive effects are also associated with GH and GnRH administration. Increasing evidence suggests the possibility of a multifactorial therapy that includes both GH and GnRH.

  8. Does hormonal therapy influence sexual function in men receiving 3D conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Christopher T.; Valicenti, Richard K.; Lu Jiandong; Derose, Troy; Dicker, Adam P.; Strup, Stephen E.; Mulholland, S. Grant; Hirsch, Irvin H.; McGinnis, David E.; Gomella, Leonard G.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the effect of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) with or without hormonal therapy (HT) on sexual function (SF) in prostate cancer patients whose SF was known before all treatment. Methods and Materials: Between March 1996 and March 1999, 144 patients received 3D-CRT (median dose = 70.2 Gy, range 66.6-79.2 Gy) for prostate cancer and had pre- and post-therapy SF data. All SF data were obtained with the O'Leary Brief SF Inventory, a self-administered, multidimensional, validated instrument. We defined total sexual potency as erections firm enough for penetration during intercourse. Mean follow-up time was 21 months (SD ± 11 months). The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to test for significance of the change from baseline. Results: Before 3D-CRT, 87 (60%) of 144 men were totally potent as compared to only 47 (47%) of 101 at 1-year follow-up. Of the 60 men totally potent at baseline and followed for at least 1 year, 35 (58%) remained totally potent. These changes corresponded to a significant reduction in SF (p<0.05). Patients who had 3D-CRT alone were more likely to be totally potent at 1 year than those receiving 3D-CRT with HT (56% vs. 31%, p=0.012); however, they were also more likely to be potent at baseline (71% vs. 44%, p=0.001). Although these two groups had a significant reduction in SF from baseline, their change was not significantly different from each other. Conclusion: These data indicate that 3D-CRT causes a significant reduction in total sexual potency as compared to pretreatment baseline. The addition of HT does not appear to increase the risk of sexual dysfunction

  9. Effect of adjuvant levosimendan therapy on neuroendocrine hormones and cytokines in elderly patients with chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lei

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To discuss the effect of adjuvant levosimendan therapy on neuroendocrine hormones and cytokines in elderly patients with chronic heart failure. Methods: A total of 100 elderly patients with chronic heart failure who were treated in the hospital between March 2014 and March 2017 were divided into control group and levosimendan group by random number table, each with 50 cases. Control group received clinical routine therapy for chronic heart failure, and levosimendan group received routine therapy combined with adjuvant levosimendan therapy. The differences in serum levels of RAAS indexes, thyroid hormones, myocardial damage indexes and endothelial function indexes were compared between the two groups before and after treatment. Results: At T0, there was no statistically significant difference in serum levels of RAAS indexes, thyroid hormones, myocardial damage indexes and endothelial function indexes between the two groups. At T1, serum RAAS indexes PRA, AngⅡ and ALD levels of levosimendan group were lower than those of control group; serum thyroid hormones TT3, TT4, FT3 and FT4 levels of levosimendan group were higher than those of control group; serum myocardial damage indexes cTnⅠ, H-FABP and NT-proBNP levels of levosimendan group were lower than those of control group; serum endothelial function index NO level of levosimendan group was higher than that of control group while ET-1 level was lower than that of control group. Conclusion: Adjuvant levosimendan therapy for elderly patients with chronic heart failure can effectively adjust the secretion of neuroendocrine hormones and reduce the myocardial and vascular endothelial damage.

  10. Limited regression of central giant cell granuloma by interferon alpha after failed calcitonin therapy: a report of 2 cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Lange, J.; van den Akker, H.P.; van den Berg, H.; Richel, D.J.; Gortzak, R.A.T.

    2006-01-01

    Central giant cell granuloma (CGCG) is a benign lesion of the jaws with a sometimes locally aggressive behaviour. The most common therapy is surgical curettage which has a high recurrence rate, especially in lesions with aggressive signs and symptoms (i.e. pain, paresthesia, root-resorption and

  11. A Treatment-Refractory Case of Social Anxiety Disorder: Lessons Learned from a Failed Course of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brozovich, Faith A.; Heimberg, Richard G.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past 25 years researchers have made enormous strides in the implementation of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for social anxiety disorder (SAD), although considerable work remains to be done. The present paper discusses a treatment refractory case seen in our clinic. The young man presented numerous interrelated obstacles, such as low…

  12. 2016 IMS Recommendations on women's midlife health and menopause hormone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baber, R J; Panay, N; Fenton, A

    2016-04-01

    The International Menopause Society (IMS) has produced these new 2016 recommendations on women's midlife health and menopause hormone therapy (MHT) to help guide health-care professionals in optimizing their management of women in the menopause transition and beyond. The term MHT has been used to cover therapies including estrogens, progestogens and combined regimens. For the first time, the 2016 IMS recommendations now include grades of recommendations, levels of evidence and 'good practice points', in addition to section-specific references. Where possible, the recommendations are based on and linked to the evidence that supports them, unless good-quality evidence is absent. Particular attention has been paid to published evidence from 2013 onwards, the last time the IMS recommendations were updated. Databases have been extensively searched for relevant publications using key terms specific to each specialist area within menopause physiology and medicine. Information has also been drawn from international consensus statements published by bodies such as the IMS, the European Menopause and Andropause Society and the North American Menopause Society. The recommendations have been produced by experts derived mainly from the IMS, with the assistance of key collaborators where deemed advantageous. In preparing these international recommendations, experts have taken into account geographical variations in medical care, prevalence of diseases, and country-specific attitudes of the public, medical community and health authorities towards menopause management. The variation in availability and licensing of MHT and other products has also been considered.

  13. Hormone Replacement Therapy and Menopause: A Review of Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chueh Chang

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Hormone replacement therapy (HRT is frequently prescribed to healthy women to ameliorate menopausal symptoms. HRT is used long term (≥ 1 year to prevent chronic disease in older women. The objective of this study was to review the benefits and risks of HRT and studies of menopause or HRT in Taiwan via a MEDLINE search. Recommendations are provided for future HRT research in Taiwan. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials are considered the gold standard of scientific evidence. A MEDLINE literature search (January 1966-July 2002 identified 23 papers on trials (≥ 1 year that met the inclusion criteria. The results showed that various HRT regimens used for more than 1 year caused more harm than good in healthy menopausal women and that there was no benefit for women with coronary artery disease, Alzheimer's disease, hysterectomy, hysterosalpingooophorectomy, and ischemic stroke. None of this research was conducted in Taiwan. A MEDLINE search using the key words “estrogen replacement therapy and menopause in Taiwan” identified 16 studies. There was only one, short-term, HRT trial. No evidence suggested benefits from long-term HRT in menopausal women in Taiwan.

  14. Evolution of drug resistance in HIV-infected patients remaining on a virologically failing combination antiretroviral therapy regimen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Phillips, Andrew N; Ruiz, Lidia

    2007-01-01

    (t0 and t1) when viral load was > 400 copies/ml. METHODS: Accumulation of resistance between t0 and t1 was measured using genotypic susceptibility scores (GSS) obtained by counting the total number of active drugs (according to the Rega system v6.4.1) among all licensed antiretrovirals as of 1...... to the failing regimen were still receiving benefit from treatment. An overall 6-monthly increase of 1.96 (SD, 2.23) International Aids Society-mutations and an average loss of 1.25 (SD, 1.81) active drugs were estimated. In comparison with patients with GSS_f-t0 = 0, the number of active drugs lost was -1...

  15. Effects of thyroid hormone withdrawal on natriuretic peptides during radioactive iodine therapy in female patients with differentiated thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanciu, Adina Elena; Hurduc, Anca Elena; Stanciu, Marcel Marian

    2016-12-01

    We aimed to investigate the effects of thyroid hormone withdrawal on N-terminal prohormone forms of atrial natriuretic peptide (NT-proANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) during radioiodine therapy in female patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). Serum concentrations of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free triiodothyronine (FT3), NT-proANP and NT-proBNP were measured in 51 female patients with DTC (48.7 ± 4.2 years) at three time-points: day of radioiodine therapy (t1 - under acute hypothyroidism), 5 days after radioiodine (t2 - under acute hypothyroidism) and 3 months after radioiodine (t3 - under TSH suppression). Thirty healthy euthyroid women served as controls (42.8 ± 5.6 years). At t1/t2/t3, median NT-proANP was 5.2/1.7/487 pmol/L vs. 297.7 pmol/L in control group (p thyroid hormone effects than NT-proBNP. Thyroid hormone-dependent hemodynamic effects seem to be overlapped on the direct stimulatory effect of thyroid hormones on NT-proANP secretion by cardiac myocytes.

  16. Imbalance in the blood antioxidant system in growth hormone-deficient children before and after 1 year of recombinant growth hormone therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria S. Pankratova

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to examine the effects of 12-month therapy with recombinant growth hormone (rGH on the blood antioxidant system in children with growth hormone deficiency (GHD. Total antioxidant capacity (TAC of plasma was measured by FRAP (ferric reducing antioxidant power or ferric reducing ability of plasma; activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT in erythrocytes were assessed; non-protein thiols (NT and ceruloplasmin (CP levels were also measured. These parameters were determined before and after 12 month of rGH treatment. Eleven treatment-naive prepubertal children with growth hormone deficiency were included in the study. Another 11 prepubertal children comprised a control group. Before rGH treatment, TAC of plasma and NT level in the control group were significantly lower (726 ± 196 vs. 525 ± 166 µmol/L, P = 0.0182 and 0.92 ± 0.18 vs. 0.70 ± 0.22 µmol/ml, P = 0.0319, before and after the therapy, respectively. The only parameter that significantly (19.6 ± 4.7 vs. 14.5 ± 3.4 Units/g Hb, P = 0.0396 exceeded the same in the control group after rGH therapy was SOD activity. However, none of the measured parameters of antioxidant system in GHD children, except for TAC (525 ± 166 vs. 658 ± 115 µmol/L, P = 0.0205, exhibited significant improvement toward the end of the 12-month treatment period, although non-significant changes in CAT activity and CP level were also observed. This work has demonstrated that some parameters of the blood antioxidant system are out of balance and even impaired in GHD children. A 12-month treatment with rGH resulted in a partial improvement of the antioxidant system.

  17. The effect of long-term thyroid-stimulating hormone suppressive therapy on the gonadal steroid hormones of patients with thyroid carcinoma after surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoli; Zhou, Ying; Liang, Nan; Hong, Yang; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Sun, Hui

    2017-10-01

    To analyze the effect of long-term thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) suppressive therapy on the gonadal hormones and related symptoms in patients after surgery. From 2008 to 2011, totally 238 patients were recruited, who underwent thyroid surgery and subsequent TSH suppression treatment in Department of thyroid Surgery, China-Japan Union hospital, Jilin University. Then their postoperative follow-up data (3-8 years) were collected, including operational method, pathological diagnosis, whether processed radioiodine therapy and the period/dose of TSH suppression treatment. In addition, the menstrual cycle, menstruation quantity, whether accompanied with dysmenorrheal and menstrual disorder or not, date of last menstrual period, ages of menopause and so on were also collected. (I) Neither the level nor the duration of TSH treatment had any function on estradiol (E2) and testosterone (T) in male patients; (II) in the subgroup of patients with TSH treatment for 3-5 years, patients who took high dose of TSH (TSH ≥0.5 U/L) obtained the lower T level compared with the group of medium dose (1.08±0.34 vs. 1.36±0.46 nmol/L, P=0.001); (III) in the medium dose (0.1 IU/L ≤ TSH hormone (FSH) did not show any change in terms of the dose and the duration of TSH treatment; (V) the menstrual volume, dysmenorrhea condition, menstrual cycle and menopause related indicators did not show any difference in terms of doses and duration of TSH treatment (P=0.701, 0.412 and 0.507 respectively). The long term of TSH repressive therapy after surgery did not affect T and E2 level in male patients. As for female patients, the impact was mainly reflected in the T and E2 levels especially in female sexual maturity but not FSH level. In addition, TSH treatment did not play any role on menstruation or menopause.

  18. The history of hormone therapy use and recent controversy related to heart disease and breast cancer arising from prevention trial outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Ivy M

    2012-01-01

    The reasons for hormone therapy use have changed dramatically over time from being very popular for the purpose of preserving youth in women to menopause-related symptom management, disease prevention, and now back to menopause-related symptom management. Over time, several important risks associated with the use of hormone therapy have become evident, causing dramatic reductions in the use of hormone therapy for periods of time following identification of these risks. Most recently, randomized controlled prevention trials that evaluated hormone therapy for the purpose of reducing or preventing coronary heart disease among women have found that hormone therapy is associated with increased rather than decreased risks for coronary heart disease. The most recent of these trials again identified increased risks for breast cancer associated with estrogen plus progestogen therapy. The evolving evidence base from these randomized controlled prevention trials is complicated and in some cases contradictory. Specifically, the data suggest that the timing of when hormone therapy is initiated once a woman is postmenopausal may influence her risk for developing heart disease and breast cancer. In this article, contradictory evidence is carefully sifted so risks and benefits can be weighed by clinicians when partnering with women to individualize decisions about using hormone therapy. © 2012 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  19. Does menopausal hormone therapy reduce myocardial infarction risk if initiated early after menopause? A population-based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasquilla, Germán D; Berglund, Anita; Gigante, Bruna; Landgren, Britt-Marie; de Faire, Ulf; Hallqvist, Johan; Leander, Karin

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to assess whether the timing of menopausal hormone therapy initiation in relation to onset of menopause and hormone therapy duration is associated with myocardial infarction risk. This study was based on the Stockholm Heart Epidemiology Program, a population-based case-control study including 347 postmenopausal women who had experienced a nonfatal myocardial infarction and 499 female control individuals matched for age and residential area. Odds ratios (with 95% CIs) for myocardial infarction were calculated using logistic regression. Early initiation of hormone therapy (within 10 y of onset of menopause or before age 60 y), compared with never use, was associated with an odds ratio of 0.87 (95% CI, 0.58-1.30) after adjustments for lifestyle factors, body mass index, and socioeconomic status. For late initiation of hormone therapy, the corresponding odds ratio was 0.97 (95% CI, 0.53-1.76). For hormone therapy duration of 5 years or more, compared with never use, the adjusted odds ratio was 0.64 (95% CI, 0.35-1.18). For hormone therapy duration of less than 5 years, the odds ratio was 0.97 (95% CI, 0.63-1.48). Neither the timing of hormone therapy initiation nor the duration of therapy is significantly associated with myocardial infarction risk.

  20. Thyroid hormone therapy in the management of 63,593 brain-dead organ donors: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novitzky, Dimitri; Mi, Zhibao; Sun, Qing; Collins, Joseph F; Cooper, David K C

    2014-11-27

    Hormonal therapy to the brain-dead potential organ donor can include thyroid hormone (triiodothyronine [T3] or levothyroxine [T4]), corticosteroids, antidiuretic hormone, and insulin. Data on 66,629 donors (2000-2009) were retrospectively reviewed. Documentation on T3/T4 was available in 63,593 (study 1), but 23,469 had incomplete documentation of other hormones. In 40,124, details of all four hormones were recorded (study 2). In this cohort, group A (received T3/T4) consisted of 23,022, and group B (no T3/T4) consisted of 17,102 donors. A multivariate analysis was performed to determine whether age, sex, ethnicity, cause of death, body mass index, Organ Procurement Organization region, or other hormonal therapy influenced procurement. Posttransplantation organ graft survival at 1 and 12 months was compared. In study 1, 30,962 (48.69%) received T3/T4, providing a mean of 3.35 organs per donor, and 32,631 (51.31%) did not receive T3/T4, providing a mean of 2.97 organs per donor, an increase of 12.8% of organs from T3/T4-treated donors (Porgans per donor and group B provided a mean of 2.87 organs per donor, an increase of 15.3% in group A (Pdonor was associated with improved posttransplantation graft survival or no difference in survival, except for pancreas recipient (but not graft) survival at 12 months in study 2. T3/T4 therapy results in more transplantable organs, with no detriment to posttransplantation graft survival.

  1. Factors Associated with the Development of Drug Resistance Mutations in HIV-1 Infected Children Failing Protease Inhibitor-Based Antiretroviral Therapy in South Africa.

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    Theresa M Rossouw

    Full Text Available Limited data are available from the developing world on antiretroviral drug resistance in HIV-1 infected children failing protease inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy, especially in the context of a high tuberculosis burden. We describe the proportion of children with drug resistance mutations after failed protease inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy as well as associated factors.Data from children initiated on protease inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy with subsequent virological failure referred for genotypic drug resistance testing between 2008 and 2012 were retrospectively analysed. Frequencies of drug resistance mutations were determined and associations with these mutations identified through logistic regression analysis.The study included 65 young children (median age 16.8 months [IQR 7.8; 23.3] with mostly advanced clinical disease (88.5% WHO stage 3 or 4 disease, severe malnutrition (median weight-for-age Z-score -2.4 [IQR -3.7;-1.5]; median height-for-age Z-score -3.1 [IQR -4.3;-2.4], high baseline HIV viral load (median 6.04 log10, IQR 5.34;6.47 and frequent tuberculosis co-infection (66% at antiretroviral therapy initiation. Major protease inhibitor mutations were found in 49% of children and associated with low weight-for-age and height-for-age (p = 0.039; p = 0.05; longer duration of protease inhibitor regimens and virological failure (p = 0.001; p = 0.005; unsuppressed HIV viral load at 12 months of antiretroviral therapy (p = 0.001; tuberculosis treatment at antiretroviral therapy initiation (p = 0.048 and use of ritonavir as single protease inhibitor (p = 0.038. On multivariate analysis, cumulative months on protease inhibitor regimens and use of ritonavir as single protease inhibitor remained significant (p = 0.008; p = 0.033.Major protease inhibitor resistance mutations were common in this study of HIV-1-infected children, with the timing of tuberculosis treatment and subsequent protease inhibitor dosing strategy

  2. Radiotherapy and hormone therapy in intermediate risk prostate cancer: a critical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, Rejane Carolina; Souhami, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The standard treatment for patients with high risk prostate cancer is the combined use of radiation therapy (RT ) and hormone therapy (HT). In regards to patients stratified as intermediate risk, the use of HT associated with RT remains controversial, and its use should be carefully planned and based on available evidence. Objective: To critically assess results of randomized studies published in the literature that associated the use of HT of short duration with an average period of 6 months with RT in the treatment of patients with localized prostate cancer classified as intermediate risk. Method: Only randomized studies comparing these treatments were eligible for this review. A structured search through 'PubMed' was carried out using the terms 'androgen suppression therapy', 'radiotherapy', 'randomized trials', 'phase 3 trials', 'prostate cancer' and 'intermediate risk'. Results: Four randomized studies comparing RT alone to RT plus short course HT were found and selected. The majority of the trials had a mixed population of intermediate and high risk disease and did not include patients with only intermediate risk. Despite that, there appears to be a significant benefit for the combined approach regarding disease-free survival, biochemical free survival and overall survival. Conclusion: The randomized studies published so far suggest improved outcomes for the group of patients receiving RT and short course HT. Data from randomized trials comparing RT alone to RT and short course HT in patients with intermediate risk only are forthcoming. (author)

  3. Continuation rate of hormone replacement therapy in Hong Kong public health sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, K Y; Ling, M; Tang, G W K

    2004-12-10

    To assess the 1-year continuation rate of HRT prescribed in Hong Kong public health sector and to identify factors affecting this continuation rate. All women who received at least one dispensed prescription of estrogens between January 1998 and December 2000 from 36 specialist outpatient clinics of the Hospital Authority were selected, and observed for at least 2 years and at most 3 years. The duration of use and variables including age, types of hormones, routes of delivery, dose of estrogen, and prescribing specialty were retrieved from the central prescription database of the Hospital Authority. Of 12,711 incident users of HRT, more than half were aged 50-59. Most (78.5%) of the users took conjugated equine estrogens (CEE) 0.625 mg or related products. Only a small proportion (3.0%) of women used CEE 0.3 mg. Initial estrogen prescriptions were written by gynaecologists in 86.7%. The overall 1-year continuation rate was 68.3%. The highest and lowest continuation rates were observed in women aged 40-49 and the two extreme age groups (35-39 and 70-79), respectively. Better continuation rate was observed in women taking estrogen-only therapy such as CEE or estradiol (overall 76.3%) than in women using continuous combined therapy (58.6%), sequential combined therapy (64.8%), or transdermal estrogen (60.6%). In the age group 60-69, the use of CEE 0.3 mg was associated with better continuation rate than CEE 0.625 mg. Better continuation rate at 1 year was associated with age younger than 60, oral route of HRT and hysterectomy.

  4. Hemostatic markers in healthy postmenopausal women during intranasal and oral hormone therapy: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemelaar, Majoie; Kenemans, Peter; Hack, C Erik; Klipping, Christine; van der Mooren, Marius J

    2008-01-01

    To study changes in the hemostatic balance during intranasal compared with oral administration of 17beta-estradiol (E2) and norethisterone (NET) or NET acetate in postmenopausal women. A wide range of markers of coagulation and fibrinolysis associated with coronary artery disease was tested. In a two-center, randomized, double-blind, comparative trial, 90 healthy postmenopausal women (aged 56.6 +/- 4.7 y) received daily continuous combined hormone therapy, either E2/NET 175 microg/275 mug intranasally as a spray (n = 47) or E2/NET acetate 1 mg/0.5 mg orally as a capsule (n = 43) for 1 year. Hemostatic markers were measured in blood samples taken at baseline and after 12, 24, and 52 weeks of treatment. After 52 weeks of treatment, changes in the intranasal group in markers of coagulation-fibrinogen (-1.3%), factor VII activity (-14.0%), and prothrombin fragment 1 + 2 (+5.8%)-were significantly less (P < 0.05) than the changes in the oral group for these parameters (-6.5%, -20.3%, and +19.0%, respectively). Changes in activated factor VII did not differ between the groups. Neither group showed significant changes in thrombin-antithrombin complex. In the intranasal group, decreases in markers of fibrinolysis-tissue-type plasminogen activator (-10.4%) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 antigen (-13.8%)-were significantly less (P < 0.05) than the decreases in the oral group (-17.8% and -38.0%, respectively). A decrease in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity and increases in D-dimer and plasmin-alpha2-antiplasmin complex did not differ between the groups. No differences were found between the groups in homocysteine, which overall was unaltered in both groups. During intranasal E2/NET therapy, changes in the coagulatory and fibrinolytic markers were to some extent less than those observed during oral therapy.

  5. Use of hormone therapy and isoflavones and mammographic density in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isidoro, Beatriz; Lope, Virginia; Whelan, Denis; Pedraz, Carmen; Sánchez-Contador, Carmen; Santamariña, Carmen; Moreo, Pilar; Vidal, Carmen; Salas-Trejo, Dolores; Ederra, María; Aragonés, Nuria; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Pollán, Marina

    2016-05-01

    The use of some forms of hormone therapy (HT) is associated with an increase in mammographic density-a major risk factor for breast cancer. The role of isoflavones, however, is unclear. Here, we quantify the prevalence of HT and isoflavone use among postmenopausal Spanish women, determine associated risk factors, and explore the relationship between these therapies and mammographic density. This cross-sectional study included 2,754 postmenopausal women who underwent breast cancer screening in seven geographical areas. Mammographic density was evaluated using Boyd's semiquantitative scale. Multinomial logistic regression models were adjusted to assess risk factors associated with both therapies. Ordinal regression models were fitted to study the association between HT and isoflavone consumption with mammographic density. The prevalence of ever-use of HT was 12%, whereas that of the current use was 2.3%. Isoflavone lifetime prevalence was 3.7%, and current use was 1.7%. The most common HT types were tibolone and estrogens. Surgical menopause, oral contraceptive use, educational level, population density, and years since menopause were positively associated with HT, whereas body mass index and parity were inversely associated. Mammographic density was not associated with current or past HT use. However, women who reported having consumed isoflavones in the past and those who started their use after menopause had a higher mammographic density when compared with never-users (odds ratio 1.98, 95% CI 1.21-3.25, P = 0.007; and odds ratio 1.60, 95% CI 1.01-2.53, P = 0.045 respectively). Our results show a low prevalence of HT and isoflavone use in postmenopausal Spanish women. In this population, HT use was not associated with mammographic density, whereas some categories of isoflavone users had higher density.

  6. Effect of transdermal hormone therapy on platelet haemostasis in menopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Stachowiak

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available [b]Introduction[/b]. Despite the undeniably positive effect on the quality of life of menopausal women, menopausal hormone therapy (HT also has negative side-effects, which include, among others, thromboembolic complications. [b]objective[/b]. To assess the effect of a popular type of this therapy – transdermal HT on platelet hemostasis, which plays a significant role in intravascular coagulation. [b]Materials and method[/b]. The study group consisted of 92 postmenopausal women: 1 group G1 (n=30, treated with transdermal HT (17β-estradiol 50 μg/day plus NETA 170 μg/day; 2 group G2 (n=31, treated with the above transdermal HT and low dosage of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA; 3 control group P (n=31. All the women qualified for the study had two or more risk factors for arterial thrombosis, such as: smoking, hypertension, visceral obesity, hypercholesterolaemia, hypertriglyceridaemia, elevated levels of PAI-1, and increased fibrinogen, increased activity of coagulation factor VII. Results. After three months of therapy, in the G1 group there was a decrease in platelet count (p = 0.004 and a decrease in GP IIb/IIIa – a platelet receptor for fibrinogen (p = 0.022. In the G2 group, no changes in the tested parameters were observed. conclusions. 1 Transdermal HT in the form of combined, estrogen-progestogen patches favourably modifies platelets haemostasis, reversing the adverse effects that occur after menopause. 2 The use of low ASA doses as a thromboprophylaxis in short-term transdermal HT is not necessary.

  7. A review of the physical and metabolic effects of cross-sex hormonal therapy in the treatment of gender dysphoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, Leighton J

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on the effect that cross-gender sex steroid therapy has on metabolic and hormonal parameters. There is an emphasis on those changes that result in significant clinical effects such as the positive effects of the development of secondary sexual characteristics and negative effects such as haemostatic effects and thromboembolism in transwomen or dyslipidaemia in transmen. There is also a description of the current hormonal regimens used at the largest UK gender identity clinic. The overall safety of these treatments in the context of long-term outcome data is reviewed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Benign Phyllodes Tumor Mimicking a Malignancy in a Turner Syndrome Woman with Hormone Replacement Therapy: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Woong Jae; Chong, Se Min; Pang, Jae Choon; Seo, Jae Seung; Byun, Jun Soo; Seok, Ju Won [Chung-Ang University Medical Center, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Hee Jung; Gong, Gyung Yub [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Mdeicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    Phyllodes tumor of the breast is a relatively rare fibroepithelial tumor. Turner syndrome is a condition that affects approximately 50 per 100,000 females and includes total or partial absence of one X chromosome in all or part of the cells, reduced final height, absence of female sex hormone, and infertility. In this case report, we describe the first case of a benign phyllodes tumor mimicking a malignancy at breast US in a 26-year-old woman with Turner syndrome who had been undergoing hormone replacement therapy

  9. Vigabatrin Therapy for Infantile Spasms in a Case of Cardiofaciocutaneous Syndrome with Cardiac Hypertrophy Developing during Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatori, Takayuki; Sugiyama, Yohei; Yamashita, Shinichiro; Hirakubo, Yuka; Nonaka, Kazuhito; Ichihashi, Ko

    2016-01-01

    In a patient with cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome complicated by intractable infantile spasms (West syndrome), cardiac hypertrophy developed during adrenocorticotropic hormone treatment. Various types of antiepileptic drugs, intravenous immunoglobulin, thyrotropin releasing hormone, and a ketogenic diet were ineffective in this case. However, vigabatrin both decreased clinical seizures and improved electroencephalogram findings. Although vigabatrin has not been approved for use in Japan, the results in the present case suggest that this drug should be considered as an alternative therapy for cases of infantile spasms associated with syndromes involving cardiomyopathy or its potential risk factors, such as cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome.

  10. Clinical application of thyroid hormone in diagnosis and therapy on cardiovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Weiyuan; Yang Yongqing

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study clinical application of sera thyroid hormone in diagnosis and therapy on cornary heart disease (CHD) heart failure, acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and pulmonary heart disease. Methods: Determined the changes of serum triiodothyronine (T 3 ), tetraiodothyronine (T 4 ), free triiodothyronine (FT 3 ), free tetraiodothyronine (FT 4 ), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), reverse triiodothyronine (rT 3 ) and T 3 /rT 3 levels in 150 cases patients with CHD heart failure, 86 cases patients with AMI, 103 cases patients with pulmonary heart disease and 47 cases normal controls by chemiluminescent measurement. Results: The serum levels of T 3 , T 4 , FT 3 , FT 4 , TSH, rT 3 and T 3 /rT 3 in CHD heart failure, AMI pulmonary heart disease were compared with normal controls. Serum T 4 , FT 4 and TSH levels were not different between above patients and normal controls (t=2.130, 2.214, 4.356, P 3 , FT 3 and T 3 /rT 3 were significantly decreased than those of normal controls (t=2.256, 4.416, 4.512, P 3 levels were significantly increased those of than normal controls (t=1.781, 1.813, 1.754, P>0.05). The serum T 3 , FT 3 and T 3 /rT 3 levels were significantly decreased in patient with CHD heart failure severity. But the serum rT 3 levels was significantly increased. Conclusion: The present study showed that change of serum T 3 , FT 3 and T 3 /rT 3 levels in patients with CHD heart failure, AMI and pulmonary heart disease were inpartant marker and could reflect the severity of disease and used as diagnostic or treatment indicators. (authors)

  11. Partisan perspectives in the medical literature: a study of high frequency editorialists favoring hormone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsioni, Athina; Siontis, George C M; Ioannidis, John P A

    2010-09-01

    Unfavorable results of major studies have led to a large shrinkage of the market for hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in the last 6 years. Some scientists continue to strongly support the use of HRT. We analyzed a sample of partisan editorializing articles on HRT to examine their arguments, the reporting of competing interests, the journal venues and their sponsoring societies. Through Thomson ISI database, we selected articles without primary data written by the five most prolific editorialists that addressed clinical topics pertaining to HRT and that were published in regular journal issues in 2002-2008. We recorded the number of articles with a partisan stance and their arguments, the number of partisan articles that reported conflicting interests, and the journal venues and their sponsoring societies publishing the partisan editorials. We analyzed 114 eligible articles (58 editorials, 16 guidelines, 37 reviews, 3 letters), of which 110 (96%) had a partisan stance favoring HRT. Typical arguments were benefits for menopausal and related symptoms (64.9%), criticism of unfavorable studies (78.9%), preclinical data that showed favorable effects of HRT (50%), and benefits for major outcomes such as osteoporosis and fractures (49.1%), cardiovascular disease (31.6%), dementia (24.6%) or colorectal cancer (20.2%), but also even breast cancer (4.4%). All 5 prolific editorialists had financial relationships with hormone manufacturers, but these were reported in only 6 of the 110 partisan articles. Four journals published 15-37 partisan articles each. The medical societies of these journals reported on their websites that several pharmaceutical companies sponsored them or their conferences. There is a considerable body of editorializing articles favoring HRT use and very few of these articles report conflicts of interest. Full disclosure of conflicts of interest is needed, especially for articles without primary data.

  12. Long-term effects on cognitive function of postmenopausal hormone therapy prescribed to women aged 50 to 55 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espeland, Mark A; Shumaker, Sally A; Leng, Iris; Manson, JoAnn E; Brown, Candice M; LeBlanc, Erin S; Vaughan, Leslie; Robinson, Jennifer; Rapp, Stephen R; Goveas, Joseph S; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Stefanick, Marcia L; Li, Wenjun; Resnick, Susan M

    2013-08-12

    Postmenopausal hormone therapy with conjugated equine estrogens (CEEs) may adversely affect older women’s cognitive function. It is not known whether this extends to younger women. To test whether prescribing CEE-based hormone therapy to postmenopausal women aged 50 to 55 years has longer-term effects on cognitive function. Trained, masked staff assessed participants with an annual telephone-administered cognitive battery that included measures of global and domain-specific cognitive functions. Cognitive testing was conducted an average of 7.2 years after the trials ended, when women had a mean age of 67.2 years, and repeated 1 year later. Enrollment occurred from 1996 through 1999. Forty academic research centers. The study population comprised 1326 postmenopausal women, who had begun treatment in 2 randomized placebo-controlled clinical trials of hormone therapy when aged 50 to 55 years. The clinical trials in which the women had participated had compared 0.625 mg CEE with or without 2.5 mg medroxyprogesterone acetate over a mean of 7.0 years. The primary outcome was global cognitive function. Secondary outcomes were verbal memory, attention, executive function, verbal fluency, and working memory. Global cognitive function scores from women who had been assigned to CEE-based therapies were similar to those from women assigned to placebo: mean (95% CI) intervention effect of 0.02 (−0.08 to 0.12) standard deviation units (P = .66). Similarly, no overall differences were found for any individual cognitive domain (all P > .15). Prespecified subgroup analyses found some evidence that CEE-based therapies may have adversely affected verbal fluency among women who had prior hysterectomy or prior use of hormone therapy: mean treatment effects of −0.17 (−0.33 to −0.02) and −0.25 (−0.42 to −0.08), respectively; however, this may be a chance finding. CEE-based therapies produced no overall sustained benefit or risk to cognitive function when administered to

  13. Effects of 1-year growth hormone replacement therapy on thyroid volume and function of the children and adolescents with idiopathic growth hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Meliksah; Bayramoglu, Elvan; Aycan, Zehra

    2017-10-26

    There are different opinions about the effects of growth hormone replacement therapy (GHRT) on thyroid function and volume. This study aimed to assess the effects of GHRT on thyroid volume and function in the children and adolescents with growth hormone (GH) deficiency. A total of 29 patients diagnosed with GH deficiency were enrolled in the study. The control group consisted of 29 cases matched for age, gender and pubertal period with the patients. Thyroid function tests and insulin-like growth factor levels were measured, simultaneously thyroid volumes were assessed by ultrasonography at the initiation period and at the end of GHRT. Thyroid volumes of the patient group was -0.55±1.1 standard deviations (SDs) initially; whereas at the end of 1 year it was found to be -0.29±1.29 SDs and both SDs of thyroid volumes did not differ significantly. The SDs of thyroid volume of the control group was -0.85±1.03 SDs initially and -0.72±0.85 SDs at the end of 1 year; and they did not differ significantly. On the other hand, after GHRT of 1 year, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and free thyroxine (T4) levels decreased. It was observed that SDs of thyroid gland volumes did not change in GH deficient children and adolescents after GHRT.

  14. HIV drug resistance testing among patients failing second line antiretroviral therapy. Comparison of in-house and commercial sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimukangara, Benjamin; Varyani, Bhavini; Shamu, Tinei; Mutsvangwa, Junior; Manasa, Justen; White, Elizabeth; Chimbetete, Cleophas; Luethy, Ruedi; Katzenstein, David

    2017-05-01

    HIV genotyping is often unavailable in low and middle-income countries due to infrastructure requirements and cost. We compared genotype resistance testing in patients with virologic failure, by amplification of HIV pol gene, followed by "in-house" sequencing and commercial sequencing. Remnant plasma samples from adults and children failing second-line ART were amplified and sequenced using in-house and commercial di-deoxysequencing, and analyzed in Harare, Zimbabwe and at Stanford, U.S.A, respectively. HIV drug resistance mutations were determined using the Stanford HIV drug resistance database. Twenty-six of 28 samples were amplified and 25 were successfully genotyped. Comparison of average percent nucleotide and amino acid identities between 23 pairs sequenced in both laboratories were 99.51 (±0.56) and 99.11 (±0.95), respectively. All pairs clustered together in phylogenetic analysis. Sequencing analysis identified 6/23 pairs with mutation discordances resulting in differences in phenotype, but these did not impact future regimens. The results demonstrate our ability to produce good quality drug resistance data in-house. Despite discordant mutations in some sequence pairs, the phenotypic predictions were not clinically significant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. When the CA-TIMS therapy fails: the over-enthusiastic, the mixed-up, and the stubborn zircon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corfu, F.

    2009-12-01

    Mattinson’s CA-TIMS technique has proven to be highly successful in efficiently removing disturbed domains of zircon, thus enabling the determination of precise and accurate ages in a variety of geological situations. The method generally produces equal or better results than mechanical abrasion. There are, however, cases where CA-TIMS fails to achieve perfect concordance, and occasionally actually increases the degree of discordance. Such a behaviour (the over-reaction) is observed for example in U-rich (>1000 ppm) but texturally homogeneous zircon, a type quite common in highly differentiated portions of mafic intrusions, in granitic pegmatites, and in some metamorphic rocks. Because of their internal uniformity, such zircons do not exhibit large contrasts in crystallinity and solubility and after the baking stage of the CA-TIMS procedure they will either totally dissolve in the first HF attack, or produce discordant results. By contrast, mechanical abrasion of this type of zircon can isolate alteration-free zircon domains that yield concordant and reproducible data. This is due to the homogeneity of the crystals, the lack of zoning limiting contrasts in the degrees of metamictization and brittleness and preventing fracturing. The absence of fractures helps to confine alteration of zircon to the marginal domains, and these can be removed very efficiently by mechanical abrasion. This behaviour is exemplified by zircon populations from 252.0 Ma and 182.5 Ma mafic sills in Siberia and the Karoo basin. Another class of zircons that in general does not, or only partially comply with CA-TIMS includes populations from metamorphic and poly-orogenic rocks, typical of many Proterozoic orogens. The metamorphic reprocessing of zircon into low-U domains can freeze-in old Pb-loss patterns that cannot be undone by any technique. New metamorphic zircon growth can also create mixtures of different aged domains that cannot be resolved by CA-TIMS. In favourable circumstances

  16. The effects of a novel hormonal breast cancer therapy, endoxifen, on the mouse skeleton.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Gingery

    Full Text Available Endoxifen has recently been identified as the predominant active metabolite of tamoxifen and is currently being developed as a novel hormonal therapy for the treatment of endocrine sensitive breast cancer. Based on past studies in breast cancer cells and model systems, endoxifen classically functions as an anti-estrogenic compound. Since estrogen and estrogen receptors play critical roles in mediating bone homeostasis, and endoxifen is currently being implemented as a novel breast cancer therapy, we sought to comprehensively characterize the in vivo effects of endoxifen on the mouse skeleton. Two month old ovariectomized C57BL/6 mice were treated with vehicle or 50 mg/kg/day endoxifen hydrochloride via oral gavage for 45 days. Animals were analyzed by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, peripheral quantitative computed tomography, micro-computed tomography and histomorphometry. Serum from control and endoxifen treated mice was evaluated for bone resorption and bone formation markers. Gene expression changes were monitored in osteoblasts, osteoclasts and the cortical shells of long bones from endoxifen treated mice and in a human fetal osteoblast cell line. Endoxifen treatment led to significantly higher bone mineral density and bone mineral content throughout the skeleton relative to control animals. Endoxifen treatment also resulted in increased numbers of osteoblasts and osteoclasts per tissue area, which was corroborated by increased serum levels of bone formation and resorption markers. Finally, endoxifen induced the expression of osteoblast, osteoclast and osteocyte marker genes. These studies are the first to examine the in vivo and in vitro impacts of endoxifen on bone and our results demonstrate that endoxifen increases cancellous as well as cortical bone mass in ovariectomized mice, effects that may have implications for postmenopausal breast cancer patients.

  17. Quality of life of breast cancer survivors: the impact of hormonal replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durna, E M; Crowe, S M; Leader, L R; Eden, J A

    2002-09-01

    The aims of this non-randomized qualitative study were to compare the quality of life (QOL) of breast cancer survivors who received hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and those who did not, and to describe the impact of breast cancer on their social, physical, psychological and spiritual domains. A QOL self-evaluation questionnaire was used to determine the most important concerns and changes described by women that affected, or were likely to affect, their QOL as a result of breast cancer. In total, 220 patients who had finished treatment for breast cancer were contacted; 190 agreed to participate, of whom 123 (64.8%) completed and returned their questionnaires, which comprised demographic data, Quality of Life Breast Cancer Version Questionnaire and Quality of Life Self Evaluation Questionnaire. The results for women taking HRT were compared with results for those who were not. There were no significant differences in time between surgery for breast cancer and the survey, age at last birthday, number of pregnancies and live births, employment, breast cancer surgery and adjuvant therapy between HRT and non-HRT groups. No differences were found in the social, physical, psychological and spiritual domains between the two groups; however, significant differences were found between survival time and quality of life in some domains. During the study, none of the 123 women developed a recurrence of their breast cancer. There were no significant differences in any demographic variables between the users of HRT and the non-users. The same level of QOL was observed between HRT and non-HRT groups in the four domains of well-being. The majority of women with breast cancer recovered to a near normal level of QOL after a 4-year adjustment period, and lead fulfilling lives. This adjustment period cannot be quantified, as individual factors such as emotional, social and financial concerns will differ for each individual.

  18. Are women who are taking Hormone Replacement Therapy doing so with informed consent?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, E.M.

    2003-01-01

    Just over half the population in Britain today are women, and each is likely to spend over one-third of her life in the post menopausal state. The number of post-war 'Baby Boomers' is having a profound effect on interest in the menopause and increasing awareness of Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT). Patients are no longer prepared to passively accept the advice of their doctor, and should make an informed decision over its use, after having been given up-to-date information. Some of the claimed benefits of taking HRT are not fully proven and the risks and disadvantages must be considered, notably the increased risk of breast cancer and the effect on the sensitivity and specificity of the mammographic image. The long-term benefits are still uncertain. Available information needs to be comprehensible, credible, and up to date. Whether to initiate the taking of HRT is one of the most important decisions a woman entering mid-life will make, so she needs to be given information she can understand in order to make an informed decision. HRT and informed consent are topics relevant to mammography, which was the rationale in writing this paper as part of a Post Graduate Certificate in Mammographic Studies

  19. Laser Printing of PCL/Progesterone Tablets for Drug Delivery Applications in Hormone Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmoria, G. V.; Klauss, P.; Kanis, L. A.

    2017-09-01

    In this study, polycaprolactone (PCL) and progesterone (PG) tablets were produced by selective laser sintering (SLS) using different particle sizes and laser energy. The sintered PCL/PG tablets presented uniform morphology, coalescence of particles and interconnected pores distributed in the polymeric matrix. The EDS analysis confirmed the presence of progesterone recrystallized on the surface of the porous PCL matrix. The crystallinity values for the PCL/PG tablets were lower than that for the pure PCL, suggesting the interaction of components at the molecular level. The PCL/PG tablets fabricated with small particles and high laser energy presented a higher value for the flexural modulus compared with the other specimens. The glass transition temperature (Tg) was -37 °C for the PCL/PG tablet with a high degree of sintering. The fatigue test showed that the PCL/PG blend tablets have high fatigue strength. The drug release mechanism of all tablets studied followed a zero-order kinetics, and drug release rates were dependent on sintering degree and, consequently, on matrix erosion, showing a potential application to controlled drug delivery in hormone cancer therapy.

  20. Transgenic Studies with a Keratin Promoter-Driven Growth Hormone Transgene: Prospects for Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoming; Zinkel, Sandra; Polonsky, Kenneth; Fuchs, Elaine

    1997-01-01

    Keratinocytes are potentially appealing vehicles for the delivery of secreted gene products because they can be transferred to human skin by the relatively simple procedure of grafting. Adult human keratinocytes can be efficiently propagated in culture with sufficient proliferative capacity to produce enough epidermis to cover the body surface of an average adult. However, the feasibility of delivering secreted proteins through skin grafting rests upon (i) the strength of the promoter in keratinocytes and (ii) the efficiency of protein transport through the basement membrane of the stratified epithelium and into the bloodstream. In this paper, we use transgenic technology to demonstrate that the activity of the human keratin 14 promoter remains high in adult skin and that keratinocyte-derived human growth hormone (hGH) can be produced, secreted, and transported to the bloodstream of mice with efficiency that is sufficient to exceed by an order of magnitude the circulating hGH concentration in growing children. Transgenic skin grafts from these adults continue to produce and secrete hGH stably, at ≈ 1/10 physiological levels in the bloodstream of nontransgenic recipient mice. These studies underscore the utility of the keratin 14 promoter for expressing foreign transgenes in keratinocytes and demonstrate that keratinocytes can be used as effective vehicles for transporting factors to the bloodstream and for eliciting metabolic changes. These findings have important implications for considering the keratinocyte as a possible vehicle for gene therapy.

  1. Are women who are taking Hormone Replacement Therapy doing so with informed consent?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, E.M

    2003-11-01

    Just over half the population in Britain today are women, and each is likely to spend over one-third of her life in the post menopausal state. The number of post-war 'Baby Boomers' is having a profound effect on interest in the menopause and increasing awareness of Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT). Patients are no longer prepared to passively accept the advice of their doctor, and should make an informed decision over its use, after having been given up-to-date information. Some of the claimed benefits of taking HRT are not fully proven and the risks and disadvantages must be considered, notably the increased risk of breast cancer and the effect on the sensitivity and specificity of the mammographic image. The long-term benefits are still uncertain. Available information needs to be comprehensible, credible, and up to date. Whether to initiate the taking of HRT is one of the most important decisions a woman entering mid-life will make, so she needs to be given information she can understand in order to make an informed decision. HRT and informed consent are topics relevant to mammography, which was the rationale in writing this paper as part of a Post Graduate Certificate in Mammographic Studies.

  2. Effects of Hormone Therapy on Oxidative Stress in Postmenopausal Women with Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha A. Sánchez-Rodríguez

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effect of oral hormone therapy (HT on oxidative stress (OS in postmenopausal women with metabolic syndrome (MetS. A randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial was carried out. We formed four groups of 25 women each; healthy (HW and MetS women (MSW were assigned to HT (1 mg/day of estradiol valerate plus 5 mg/10 day of medroxiprogesterone or placebo. We measured plasma lipoperoxides, erythrocyte superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, total plasma antioxidant status and uric acid, as OS markers. Alternative cut-off values of each parameter were defined and a stress score (SS ranging from 0 to 7 was used as total OS. MetS was defined according to National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATPIII criteria. Participants were seen at baseline, 3 and 6 months. After 6 months, MetS decreased in MSW-HT (48%, their triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c improved; in the other groups no difference was found. SS in MSW-HT decreased (3.8 ± 0.3 to 1.7 ± 0.3, p < 0.05 and OS was also reduced (44%, this effect was evident since 3 mo. HW-HT with high OS also decreased (40%. In placebo groups there was no change. Our findings suggest that HT improve lipids and OS associated to MetS in postmenopausal women.

  3. Postmenopausal hormone therapy initiation before and after the Women's Health Initiative in two French cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Agnès; Kernaleguen, Céline; Panjo, Henri; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Ringa, Virgine

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the evolution of hormone therapy (HT) initiation among newly postmenopausal women after the release of the first results from the Women's Health Initiative trial (July 2002). We used data from two French prospective cohorts, E3N and GAZEL. We identified 3,364 women with natural menopause onset occurring before 2002 and 1,880 women with menopause onset occurring after 2002. After 2002, the age-standardized rate of HT initiation (no later than 1 y after menopause onset) in newly postmenopausal women fell by 69.9% (67.9% and 74.8% in the E3N and GAZEL cohorts, respectively). There were also changes in the distribution of both the route of administration of estrogen and the type of associated progestogen, which made transdermal estrogen plus progesterone the predominant HT type initiated after 2002 (43.6% of the initiated HT, 44.0% and 42.2% in the Étude Épidémiologique auprès de femmes de l'Éducation Nationale and GAZEL cohorts, respectively). The evolution of HT initiation was similar in these two French cohorts, with a substantial drop in HT initiation rate accompanied by changes in the types of HT used.

  4. Hormone Replacement Therapy and Risk of Breast Cancer in Korean Women: A Quantitative Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Myon Bae

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The epidemiological characteristics of breast cancer incidence by age group in Korean women are unique. This systematic review aimed to investigate the association between hormone replacement therapy (HRT and breast cancer risk in Korean women. Methods: We searched electronic databases such as KoreaMed, KMbase, KISS, and RISS4U as well as PubMed for publications on Korean breast cancer patients. We also conducted manual searching based on references and citations in potential papers. All of the analytically epidemiologic studies that obtained individual data on HRT exposure and breast cancer occurrence in Korean women were selected. We restricted the inclusion of case-control studies to those that included age-matched controls. Estimates of summary odds ratio (SOR with 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated using random effect models. Results: One cohort and five case-control studies were finally selected. Based on the heterogeneity that existed among the six studies (I-squared=70.2%, a random effect model was applied. The summary effect size of HRT history from the six articles indicated no statistical significance in breast cancer risk (SOR, 0.983; 95% CI, 0.620 to 1.556. Conclusions: These facts support no significant effect of HRT history in the risk of breast cancer in Korean women. It is necessary to conduct a pooled analysis.

  5. Changes in hemostatic parameters after oral hormone therapy in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowiecka, Marta; Polac, Ireneusz; Nowak, Pawel; Radwan, Pawel; Ponczek, Michal B; Wachowicz, Barbara

    2010-12-01

    Oral hormone therapy (HT) and menopausal age are both prothrombotic risk factors. The aim of our study was to compare the hemostatic parameters in plasma of postmenopausal women after 6 months of oral HT with parameters of control (without treatment) postmenopausal women. Twenty-seven postmenopausal women were treated with 17β-estradiol (1 mg) and dydrogesterone (5 mg) daily for 6 months. The control group (27 women) did not receive any HT. Hemostatic factors, such as fibrinogen (FG) concentration, activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), platelet (PLT) count, maximum velocity of clot formation, and fibrin lysis half-time were estimated. The hemostatic parameters in both groups differ significantly. After 6 months oral HT, APTT and the level of FG were higher than in the control group (APTT 30.08 seconds vs. 28.18 seconds, p = 0.02; FG 4.14 g/L vs. 3.03 g/L, p women treated with oral HT. Six months of oral combined HT (17β-estradiol and dydrogesterone) caused increased initial velocity of clot formation and inhibition of fibrinolysis. The increased level of FG and its higher polymerization may help explain the increase in venous thrombosis and cardiovascular events reported after the use of oral HT.

  6. Failed Switching off in the MIBI-Parathyroid Scintigraphy in a Dialyzed Patient with Secondary Hyperparathyroidism Responsive to Cinacalcet Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piergiorgio Bolasco

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of your case report is to show the predictivity of Tc99m-sestamibi (MIBI scintigraphy and doppler ultrasound imaging on secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT in a patient responsive to calcimimetic treatment. Moreover, it has been reported that calcimimetic has great potential in reducing the volume of the parathyroid gland. On the other hand, the MIBI scintigraphy is considered a crucial diagnostic procedure to monitor the response to therapy in terms of turnover and cellular metabolism; whereas, ultrasound to monitor the volume variation in response to treatment. It is described the case of a 73-year-old man on hemodialysis from 1995 for ESRD. Within 2 years the patient gradually developed SHPT with progressively increased iPTH up to 1,000 ρg/ml. The ultrasound, highlighted the presence of two parathyroid hyperplasia, confirmed by scintigraphy, showing focal increase uptake of sestamibi in the same anatomical areas. As a result of the patient's refusal to perform a parathyroidectomy, cinacalcet, was administered (65 mg overage daily dose. After a year of treatment, there was a striking decrease of iPTH (from 1300 to 57 ρg/ml, −95%; but, on the contrary to expectations, this positive metabolic outcome, was not followed by parathyroid changes in ultrasound and scintigraphic findings.

  7. Auxologic parameters and response to 2-year therapy with recombinant human growth hormone in growth hormone deficient children with an ectopic posterior pituitary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalina, Maria; Kalina-Faska, Barbara; Gruszczyńska, Katarzyna; Baron, Jan; Cisowska, Anita; Morawiec, Karolina; Biel-Lewandowska, Paulina; Małecka-Tendera, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Structural defects of the hypothalamic-pituitary area in MRI are suggested as being a more accurate marker of growth hormone deficiency (GHD) than laboratory assays. To compare auxological characteristics in GHD children with normal pituitary (NP) function and with ectopic posterior pituitary (EPP), prior to therapy with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH), extending the follow-up to two years following treatment. Eighty-six (86) GHD patients were divided into two groups depending on the pituitary MRI: the EPP (23 children, 3.2-16.8 years old) and the NP group (63 children, 3.3-14.8 years old). Height deficits in the population (hSD) and parents (hSD-mpSD) and the change of hSD and bone/chronological age ratio were assessed before and after 12 and 24 months of rhGH therapy. Height deficits before treatment were significantly greater in EPP compared to NP [median -4.07 (-7.06, -2.75) vs -3.15 (-4.9, -2.35) for hSD, and -3.65 (-7.06, -1.21) vs -1.83 (-4.31, -0.28) for hSD-mpSD; pvs 0.75 (0.21, 0.71); pNP [ΔhSD=1.2 (0.42, 2.69) vs 0.74 (0.05, 1.48); pvs -1.1 (0.98, -0.07); pNP children, as well as beneficial effects of rhGH therapy in both groups.

  8. Shifts in endocrine homeostasis and preventive hormone replacement therapy: extending the Women’s Health Initiative globally

    OpenAIRE

    Ball, Jacob D.; Chen, Xinguang

    2016-01-01

    Background Reducing disease risk for women after menopause is global health issue. A major portion of the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) consisted of two clinical trials involving 161,809 post-menopausal women aged 50–79 that tested the effect of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on reducing cardiovascular disease and other secondary outcomes. Previous analyses of the data reveal that HRT should not be recommended for post-menopausal women, but show potential benefits for younger women. Thus...

  9. Effect of hormone replacement therapy on the bone mass and urinary excretion of pyridinium cross-links

    OpenAIRE

    Pardini,Dolores Perovano; Sabino,Anibal Tagliaferri; Meneses,Ana Maria; Kasamatsu,Teresa; Vieira,José Gilberto Henriques

    2000-01-01

    CONTEXT: The menopause accelerates bone loss and is associated with an increased bone turnover. Bone formation may be evaluated by several biochemical markers. However, the establishment of an accurate marker for bone resorption has been more difficult to achieve. OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on bone mass and on the markers of bone resorption: urinary excretion of pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline. DESIGN: Cohort correlational study. SETTING: Academic...

  10. Long-term results of hypofractionated radiotherapy and hormonal therapy without surgery for breast cancer in elderly patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courdi, Adel; Ortholan, Cecile; Hannoun-Levi, Jean-Michel; Ferrero, Jean-Marc; Largillier, Remy; Balu-Maestro, Catherine; Chapellier, Claire; Ettore, Francette; Birtwisle-Peyrottes, Isabelle

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate early and late reactions, local control, disease-free survival, cause-specific survival, and overall survival of elderly breast cancer patients treated with definitive once-a-week hypofractionated radiotherapy together with hormonal therapy. Patients and methods: Between 1987 and 1999, 115 patients with a median age of 83 presenting with 124 non-metastatic breast carcinoma were treated with definitive once weekly hypofractionated radiotherapy associated with hormonal therapy. The main reasons for adopting this schedule were patient refusal of surgery, very old age, locally advanced case, and/or comorbid disease. Radiation was delivered as once-a-week, 6.5 Gy for a total breast dose of 32.5 Gy in five fractions, followed with 1-3 fractions of 6.5 Gy to the tumour site. The median follow-up was 41 months. Results: Neoadjuvant hormonal therapy led to 56% reduction of the tumour volume. Late reactions occurred in 46 patients; they were mild to moderate in 87% of these patients. The Kaplan-Meier rate was 52% of patients, with 6% experiencing grade 3 reactions. The 5-year local progression-free rate was 78%. The corresponding cause-specific survival was 71%, and was influenced by T classification, nodal status, oestrogen receptors and the total dose. The first three factors retained an independent prognostic impact on multivariate analysis. The 5-year overall survival was 38%. It was affected by the T classification, lymph node involvement and the performance status (PS). Using a multivariate analysis, only T classification and PS were identified as independent factors regarding overall survival. Conclusions: Definitive hypofractionated radiotherapy allows a good local control, with acceptable toxicity. This schedule associated with hormonal therapy is a good alternative to surgery in non-operable old patients and in case of patient refusal to surgery and to standard fractionation

  11. Assessment of Psychosocial Status among Short-stature Children with and without Growth Hormone Therapy and Their Parents

    OpenAIRE

    Naiki, Yasuhiro; Horikawa, Reiko; Tanaka, Toshiaki

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the psychosocial status of short children with and without growth hormone therapy (GHT) and that of their parents, self-administered questionnaires were collected from patients and parents who regularly visit the outpatient clinics participating in the Child Health and Development Network. Completed questionnaires were received for one hundred and thirteen patients with GHT and 67 patients without GHT. According to the parents, both children with GHT and without GHT have no diffic...

  12. [Carbohydrate metabolism in patients with Turner syndrome. The effect of therapy with growth hormone, oxandrolone and a combination of both].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starzyk, Jerzy

    2005-01-01

    Insulin resistance or the impairment of insulin capability to decrease blood glucose levels is seen in approximately 25% of girls with Turner syndrome (TS). Growth hormone (hGH), especially when administered at pharmacological doses, may additionally negatively affect the carbohydrate metabolism in TS girls, changing the response of peripheral tissues to insulin. The aim of the report was the assessment of glucose and insulin release and the prevalence of insulin resistance in physiological conditions (baseline and post-standard meal values), as well as after oral and IV glucose tolerance test in patients with Turner syndrome after a 6-month therapy with growth hormone, oxandrolone (Ox) and a combination of these two agents (hGH+Ox). The authors also evaluated the effect of these three therapeutic methods on carbohydrate metabolism, attempting to define the risk of glucose intolerance, type 2 diabetes and hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance. The analysis of individual results in all the patients revealed that laboratory criteria for diagnosis type 2 diabetes (glycemia at 120 min OGTT >12.2 mmol/l) were met by one patient subjected to a combined therapy. Glucose intolerance (IGT) in OGTT, normally seen in 12.5% of untreated girls, was not intensified following a 6-month hGH or Ox therapy, but was more pronounced in patients on the combined treatment. A tendency was seen towards fasting hyperinsulinism (>25 uLI/ml) in patients on hGH and hGH+Ox, with more pronounced insulin resistance (IR15) in girls on the combined therapy. Combined treatment with growth hormone and oxandrolone results in a significant increase of insulin secretion and increased insulin resistance. In view of the effects of insulin resistance, one should analyze the advisability of combined treatment with growth hormone and oxandrolone in girls with Turner syndrome.

  13. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone targeted superparamagnetic gold nanoshells for a combination therapy of hyperthermia and controlled drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Faruq; Al-Lohedan, Hamad A

    2017-07-01

    In this, we developed superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) to be appropriate for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer cells by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetically controlled hyperthermia/drug delivery (respectively). For the preparation of composite, we started with SPIONs, followed by its coating with gold to form SPIONs@Au, which further conjugated with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) protein by making use of the cysteamine (Cyst) space linker and finally loaded with 5-Fluororacil (5-Fu) anticancer drug to form SPIONs@Au-Cyst-LHRH_5-Fu composite. Thus formed composite was thoroughly characterized by making use of the instrumental analysis such as HRTEM, EDAX, DLS, TGA, XPS, UV-vis, FTIR, HPLC and SQUID magnetics. We found from the analysis that the particles are spherical in shape, monodispersed with a size distribution of around 6.9nm in powdered dry form, while in solution phase it is 8.7nm. The UV-vis, FTIR, and HPLC studies confirmed for the loading of the 5-Fu drug onto the surface of SPIONs core and the maximum amount of drug that got adsorbed to be about 42%. The SQUID magnetic studies provided the information for the superparamagnetic behavior of the drug loaded SPIONs and the saturation magnetization (Ms) values observed to be about 11emu/g and the blocking temperature (T B ) of 348K. On testing the particles to see the effects of magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) due to some changes in the solvent medium and oscillating frequency, the material seems to be highly active in aqueous medium and the activity gets increased with respect to the applied frequency of oscillation (430Hz>230Hz>44Hz). From the heat release studies, the calculated specific power loss (SPL) values for the SPIONs@Au-Cyst-LHRH_5-Fu composite are at the highest of 1068W/g in water (430Hz) vs the least of 68W/g in toluene (44Hz). Further, the drug release studies tested under the influence of magnetic field provided the information that

  14. Evolution of glycated haemoglobin in adults on growth hormone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrea Parra R, Paola; Barquiel A, Beatriz; Fernández M, Alberto; Pérez F, Laura; Lecumberri S, Beatriz; Gaby Llaro C, Mary; Álvarez-Escolá, Cristina

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the effects of GH replacement therapy (GHR) for 3 years on glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and on the presence of dysglycaemia at any time during follow-up in Spanish adult patients with growth hormone deficiency (GHD). A retrospective study of 41 patients with GHD was conducted using baseline and long-term data. Changes in HbA1c values during the first 3 years of GHR were studied in both the overall population and patients with or without dysglycaemia during follow-up. Dysglycaemia was defined as FPG ≥ 100 mg/dl and/or HbA1c ≥ 5.7%. Mean HbA1c value (5.4 ± 0.4% at baseline) increased during the first and second years of GHR (HbA1c 5.5 ± 0.4%, p=0.05, and 5.5 ± 0.4%, p=0.006 respectively). This increase was not maintained during the third year (HbA1c 5.4 ± 0.3%, p=0.107) of GHR. Twenty-eight patients (68.2%) had dysglycaemia during follow-up, 9 of them since baseline. In the 19 patients without baseline dysglycaemia, HbA1c increased during the first year and remained stable in the next 2 years (mean HbA1c 5.2 ± 0.4% at baseline; 5.5 ± 0.4% at 1 year, p<0.050; 5.4 ± 0.4% at 2 years, p=0.004, and 5.4 ± 0.4% at 3 years, p=0.016). In the 9 patients with baseline dysglycaemia, HbA1c did not significantly change during the 3 years of GHR therapy. HbA1c values increased during the first 2 years of GHR therapy. In patients with no dysglycaemia before treatment, HbA1c steadily increased over the 3 years. However, it did not change in patients with baseline dysglycaemia. Copyright © 2014 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. [Spermatogenesis of pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone infusion versus gonadotropin therapy in male idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bingkun; Mao, Jiangfeng; Xu, Hongli; Wang, Xi; Liu, Zhaoxiang; Nie, Min; Wu, Xueyan

    2015-05-26

    To compare the efficacies of pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) versus human chorionic gonadotropin/human menopausal gonadotropin (HCG/HMG) for spermatogenesis in male idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH). For this retrospective study, a total of 92 male IHH outpatients from May 2010 to October 2014 were recruited and categorized into GnRH (n = 40) and HCG/HMG (n = 52) groups. Each subject selected one specific therapy voluntarily. The gonadotropin levels were measured in the first week and monthly post-treatment in GnRH group. And serum total testosterone (TT), testicular volume (TV) and rate of spermatogenesis were observed monthly post-treatment in two groups. Spermatogenesis, TT and TV were compared between two groups. All IHH patients were treated for over 3 months. The median follow-up periods in GnRH and HCG/HMG groups was 8.2 (3.0-18.4) and 9.2 (3.0-18.6) months respectively (P = 0.413). In GnRH group, LH ((0.5 ± 0.6) vs (3.4 ± 2.4) U/L, P < 0.01) and FSH ((1.3 ± 1.1) vs (5.8 ± 3.8) U/L, P < 0.01) increased after 1-week treatment. In GnRH group, at the end of follow-up, TT ((1.0 ± 1.0) vs (7.4 ± 5.2) nmol/L, P < 0.01) and TV ((2.3 ± 1.5) vs (8.1 ± 4.0) ml, P < 0.01) significantly increased compared to baseline. In HCG/HMG group, TT ((0.8 ± 0.6) vs (14.4 ± 8.0) nmol/L, P < 0.01) and TV ((2.3 ± 2.1) vs (7.6 ± 4.2) ml, P < 0.01) significantly increased after therapy. The success rate of spermatogenesis was 50.0% (20/40) in GnRH group versus 28.8% (15/52) in HCG/HMG group (P = 0.038). GnRH group required a shorter treatment time for initial sperm appearance than HCG/HMG group ((6.5 ± 3.1) vs (10.8 ± 3.7) months, P = 0.001). Pulsatile GnRH requires a shorter time for initiation of spermatogenesis than gonadotropin therapy in IHH male patients.

  16. Phase I/II trial evaluating combined radiotherapy and in situ gene therapy with or without hormonal therapy in the treatment of prostate cancer--A preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teh, Bin S.; Aguilar-Cordova, Estuardo; Kernen, Kenneth; Chou, C.-C.; Shalev, Moshe; Vlachaki, Maria T.; Miles, Brian; Kadmon, Dov; Mai, W.-Y.; Caillouet, James; Davis, Maria; Ayala, Gustavo; Wheeler, Thomas; Brady, Jett; Carpenter, L. Steve; Lu, Hsin H.; Chiu, J. Kam; Woo, Shiao Y.; Thompson, Timothy; Butler, E. Brian

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To report the preliminary results of a Phase I/II study combining radiotherapy and in situ gene therapy (adenovirus/herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene/valacyclovir) with or without hormonal therapy in the treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Arm A: low-risk patients (T1-T2a, Gleason score <7, pretreatment PSA <10) were treated with combined radio-gene therapy. A mean dose of 76 Gy was delivered to the prostate with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Arm B: high-risk patients (T2b-T3, Gleason score ≥7, pretreatment PSA ≥10) were treated with combined radio-gene therapy and hormonal therapy. Hormonal therapy was comprised of a 4-month leuprolide injection and 2-week use of flutamide. Arm C: Stage D1 (positive pelvic lymph node) patients received the same regimen as Arm B, with the additional 45 Gy to the pelvic lymphatics. Treatment-related toxicity was assessed using Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program common toxicity score and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity score. Results: Thirty patients (13 in Arm A, 14 in Arm B, and 3 in Arm C) completed the trial. Median follow-up was 5.5 months. Eleven patients (37%) developed flu-like symptoms (Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program Grade 1) of fatigue and chills/rigors after gene therapy injection but recovered within 24 h. Four patients (13%) and 2 patients (7%) developed Grade 1 and 2 fever, respectively. There was no patient with weight loss. One patient in Arm B developed Grade 3 elevation in liver enzyme, whereas 11 and 2 patients developed Grade 1 and 2 abnormal liver function tests. There was no Grade 2 or above hematologic toxicity. Three patients had transient rise in creatinine. There was no RTOG Grade 3 or above lower gastrointestinal toxicity. Toxicity levels were as follows: 4 patients (13%), Grade 2; 6 patients (20%), Grade 1; and 20 patients (67%), no toxicity. There was 1 patient with RTOG Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity, 12 patients (40%) with Grade 2, 8 patients

  17. Iliac Vein Interrogation Augments Venous Ulcer Healing in Patients Who Have Failed Standard Compression Therapy along with Pathological Venous Closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, Albeir Y; Broce, Mike; Yacoub, Michael; AbuRahma, Ali F

    2016-07-01

    Treatment of venous ulcers is demanding for patients, as well as clinicians, and the investigation of underlying venous hypertension is the cornerstone of therapy. We propose that occult iliac vein stenosis should be ruled out by iliac vein interrogation (IVI) in patients with advanced venous stasis. We conducted a systematic retrospective analysis of a consecutive series of patients who presented with CEAP (clinical, etiological, anatomical, and pathophysiological) 6 venous disease. All patients had great saphenous vein ablation, compressive treatment, wound care (including Unna boot compression), and perforator closure using ablation therapy. Iliac vein stenosis was defined as ≥50% stenosis in cross-sectional surface area on intravascular ultrasound. Primary outcomes include time of venous ulcer healing and/or measurable change in the Venous Clinical Severity Score. Twenty-two patients with CEAP 6 venous disease met the inclusion criteria (active ulcers >1.5 cm in diameter). The average age and body mass index were 62.2 ± 9.2 years and 41.7 ± 16.7, respectively. The majority were female (72.7%) with common comorbidities, such as hyperlipidemia (54.5%), hypertension (36.4%), and diabetes mellitus (27.3%). Twenty-nine ulcers with an average diameter of 3.4 ± 1.9 cm and a depth of 2.2 ± 0.5 mm were treated. The majority of the ulcers occurred on the left limb (n = 17, 58.6%). Average perforator venous reflux was 3.6 ± 0.8 sec, while common femoral reflux was 1.8 ± 1.6. The majority (n = 19, 64.5%) of the perforator veins were located at the base of the ulcer, while the remainder (n = 10, 34.5%) were within 2 cm from the base. Of the 13 patients who underwent IVI, 8 patients (61.5%) had stenosis >50% that was corrected with iliac vein angioplasty and stenting (IVAS). There was a strong trend toward shorter healing time in the IVI group (7.9 ± 9.5 weeks) than for patients in the no iliac vein interrogation (NIVI) group (20.2 ± 15

  18. When is it safe to switch from oral contraceptives to hormonal replacement therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castracane, V D; Gimpel, T; Goldzieher, J W

    1995-12-01

    Women may continue to use oral contraceptives (OCs) into their 40's and 50's, but to date no method has been evaluated to ascertain their ovarian status, i.e., whether fertility and estrogen production have diminished sufficiently so they could be safely switched to hormonal replacement therapy. A group of 12 postmenopausal women who had been, for long periods of time, on a regimen of 3 back-to-back packages (i.e., 63 days on, 7 days off) of low-dose oral contraceptives have been studied. Secondly, a group of 9 perimenopausal women aged 36 to 47 were examined in the same manner. The third group consisted of early reproductive age women (arbitrarily divided into subsets aged 17-25 and 26-35 using low-dose OCs in the customary regimen) as normal controls. Blood samples were obtained on the last day of a pill cycle and at 7 days off the pill. In some menopausal women, blood samples were obtained at both 7 and 14 days off OCs. Serum was assayed by RIA for estradiol, FSH and LH. As expected in the young reproductive age women, estradiol levels increase at one week off the pill, together with a rebound in FSH and LH to follicular phase levels. In the perimenopausal group, there was a sharp distinction based on age. The women over 40 showed a more marked rise in FSH while those aged 36-40 showed a distinctly lesser response. Estradiol levels were variable, but tended to show some age grouping. Little diagnostic separation was observed for LH. In postmenopausal women, FSH levels were not always elevated at one week post-pill, and even in a second trial with sampling at one and two weeks off the OC, not all postmenopausal women showed a "menopausal" increase in FSH. The more uniform feature was that estradiol levels never increased above basal values. The study found that serum estradiol levels increase after a week off the pill in controls, but are unchanged at one and two weeks in the menopausal group. FSH levels rebound normally in reproductive age women and usually, but

  19. Transgender women, hormonal therapy and HIV treatment: a comprehensive review of the literature and recommendations for best practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radix, Asa; Sevelius, Jae; Deutsch, Madeline B

    2016-01-01

    Studies have shown that transgender women (TGW) are disproportionately affected by HIV, with an estimated HIV prevalence of 19.1% among TGW worldwide. After receiving a diagnosis, HIV-positive TGW have challenges accessing effective HIV treatment, as demonstrated by lower rates of virologic suppression and higher HIV-related mortality. These adverse HIV outcomes have been attributed to the multiple sociocultural and structural barriers that negatively affect their engagement within the HIV care continuum. Guidelines for feminizing hormonal therapy among TGW recommend combinations of oestrogens and androgen blockers. Pharmacokinetic studies have shown that certain antiretroviral therapy (ART) agents, such as protease inhibitors (PIs), non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) and cobicistat, interact with ethinyl estradiol, the key oestrogen component of oral contraceptives (OCPs). The goal of this article is to provide an overview of hormonal regimens used by TGW, to summarize the known drug-drug interactions (DDIs) between feminizing hormonal regimens and ART, and to provide clinical care recommendations. The authors identified English language articles examining DDIs between oestrogen therapy, androgen blockers and ART published between 1995 and 2015 using PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature and EBSCOhost. Published articles predominantly addressed interactions between ethinyl estradiol and NNRTIs and PIs. No studies examined interactions between ART and the types and doses of oestrogens found in feminizing regimens. DDIs that may have the potential to result in loss of virologic suppression included ethinyl estradiol and amprenavir, unboosted fosamprenavir and stavudine. No clinically significant DDIs were noted with other anti-retroviral agents or androgen blockers. There are insufficient data to address DDIs between ART and feminizing hormone regimens used by TGW. There is an urgent need for further research in this

  20. Comparison of dual-hormone artificial pancreas, single-hormone artificial pancreas, and conventional insulin pump therapy for glycaemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes: an open-label randomised controlled crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidar, Ahmad; Legault, Laurent; Messier, Virginie; Mitre, Tina Maria; Leroux, Catherine; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi

    2015-01-01

    The artificial pancreas is an emerging technology for the treatment of type 1 diabetes and two configurations have been proposed: single-hormone (insulin alone) and dual-hormone (insulin and glucagon). We aimed to delineate the usefulness of glucagon in the artificial pancreas system. We did a randomised crossover trial of dual-hormone artificial pancreas, single-hormone artificial pancreas, and conventional insulin pump therapy (continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion) in participants aged 12 years or older with type 1 diabetes. Participants were assigned in a 1:1:1:1:1:1 ratio with blocked randomisation to the three interventions and attended a research facility for three 24-h study visits. During visits when the patient used the single-hormone artificial pancreas, insulin was delivered based on glucose sensor readings and a predictive dosing algorithm. During dual-hormone artificial pancreas visits, glucagon was also delivered during low or falling glucose. During conventional insulin pump therapy visits, patients received continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. The study was not masked. The primary outcome was the time for which plasma glucose concentrations were in the target range (4·0-10·0 mmol/L for 2 h postprandially and 4·0-8·0 mmol/L otherwise). Hypoglycaemic events were defined as plasma glucose concentration of less than 3·3 mmol/L with symptoms or less than 3·0 mmol/L irrespective of symptoms. Analysis was by modified intention to treat, in which we included data for all patients who completed at least two visits. A p value of less than 0·0167 (0·05/3) was regarded as significant. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01754337. The mean proportion of time spent in the plasma glucose target range over 24 h was 62% (SD 18), 63% (18), and 51% (19) with single-hormone artificial pancreas, dual-hormone artificial pancreas, and conventional insulin pump therapy, respectively. The mean difference in time spent in the target

  1. Self-perception of voice in transgender persons during cross-sex hormone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bultynck, Charlotte; Pas, Charlotte; Defreyne, Justine; Cosyns, Marjan; den Heijer, Martin; T'Sjoen, Guy

    2017-12-01

    Self-perception of voice has a significant psychosocial impact on transgender persons. Research about the evolution of self-perception of voice during cross-sex hormone therapy (CSHT) is lacking. The aim of this study was to examine if self-perception of voice changes during CSHT, and if a change of serum testosterone levels as a result of CSHT can predict a change of self-perception of voice. Prospective longitudinal study. The Transsexual Voice Questionnaire (TVQ), consisting of three factors-anxiety and avoidance (AA), gender identity (GI), and voice quality (VQ)-was used. Transgender persons completed the TVQ at baseline (80 trans men and 103 trans women), after 3 and 12 months of CSHT follow-up. Trans men: From 0 to 3 months, 0 to 12 months, and 3 to 2 months of CSHT, the AA and GI scores improved. From 0 to 3 months of CSHT, the increasing testosterone level was predictive for the improvements of AA and GI scores. Trans women: From 0 to 3 months, the GI score improved. From 0 to 12 months, the AA, GI, and VQ scores improved. Improvements of self-perception of voice could not be predicted by changing serum testosterone levels. During CSHT, self-perception of voice improves in both trans men and trans women. In trans men only, the improving self-perception of voice during the first 3 months can be attributed to the CSHT. For trans women, this study supports that testosterone has acted irreversibly virializing to the voice before CSHT, if they already went through male puberty. 4. Laryngoscope, 127:2796-2804, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  2. Donor hormone and vasopressor therapy: closing the gap in a transplant organ shortage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plurad, David S; Bricker, Scott; Falor, Ann; Neville, Angela; Bongard, Frederic; Putnam, Brant

    2012-09-01

    Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use for donors with hemodynamic instability is common. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of HRT in donors without significant cardiovascular dysfunction and examine outcomes according to vasopressor exposure. All successfully procured donors admitted between January 1, 2006, and March 31, 2011, were included. HRT group I were donors without significant hemodynamic instability at the initiation of HRT. Comparison was made to all other donors receiving HRT (HRT group II). Vasopressor use was also examined and compared. High-yield procurement was the successful recovery of ≥ 4 organs. Forty-seven donors were studied. Most were male (36 [76.6%]) and trauma (41% [87.2%]) predominated. Twenty-two (46.8%) patients were in HRT group I. There were no differences in gender, admission diagnosis, or complications; however, HRT group I had a significantly greater number of organs recovered (4.73 ± 1.42 vs. 3.08 ± 1.19, p < 0.001). Differences in rates for the heart (68.2% vs. 24%, p = 0.002) and lung (40.9% vs. 8.0%, p = 0.008) were marked. HRT group I was more likely managed on a single agent (45.5% vs. 8.0%, p = 0.003). Norepinephrine was associated with a decreased rate of high-yield procurement (48.0% vs. 77.3%, p = 0.039), while vasopressin exposure was associated with an absolute increase (72.0% vs. 59.1%, p = 0.351). After adjusting for differences between groups (particularly age), HRT group I status was independently associated with high-yield procurement. A more liberal strategy of HRT seems to significantly increase procurement rates. Vasopressor selection favoring vasopressin as opposed to norepinephrine may also play a role. Therapeutic study, level III.

  3. Breast cancer risk by breast density, menopause, and postmenopausal hormone therapy use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerlikowske, Karla; Cook, Andrea J; Buist, Diana S M; Cummings, Steve R; Vachon, Celine; Vacek, Pamela; Miglioretti, Diana L

    2010-08-20

    We determined whether the association between breast density and breast cancer risk and cancer severity differs according to menopausal status and postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) use. We collected data on 587,369 women who underwent 1,349,027 screening mammography examinations; 14,090 women were diagnosed with breast cancer. We calculated 5-year breast cancer risk from a survival model for subgroups of women classified by their Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS) breast density, age, menopausal status, and current HT use, assuming a body mass index of 25 kg/m(2). Odds of advanced (ie, IIb, III, IV) versus early (ie, I, IIa) stage invasive cancer was calculated according to BIRADS density. Breast cancer risk was low among women with low density (BIRADS-1): women age 55 to 59 years, 5-year risk was 0.8% (95% CI, 0.6 to 0.9%) for non-HT users and 0.9% (95% CI, 0.7% to 1.1%) for estrogen and estrogen plus progestin users. Breast cancer risk was high among women with very high density (BIRADS-4), particularly estrogen plus progestin users: women age 55 to 59 years, 5-year risk was 2.4% (95% CI, 2.0% to 2.8%) for non-HT users, 3.0% (95% CI, 2.6% to 3.5%) for estrogen users, and 4.2% (95% CI, 3.7% to 4.6%) for estrogen plus progestin users. Advanced-stage breast cancer risk was increased 1.7-fold for postmenopausal HT users who had very high density (BIRADS-4) compared to those with average density (BIRADS-2). Postmenopausal women with high breast density are at increased risk of breast cancer and should be aware of the added risk of taking HT, especially estrogen plus progestin.

  4. Changes of the prescription of hormone therapy in menopausal women: An observational study in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao Fei-Yuan

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the impact of the 2002 Women's Health Initiative (WHI study results on the prescription of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT to treat menopause-related symptoms in Taiwan. Methods This retrospective study participant data collected from women interviewed in 2001 Taiwan's National Health Interview Survey (NHIS and the National Health Insurance (NHI outpatient claims for women being treated for menopause-related symptoms. We compared prescriptions made for MHI to women seeking outpatient treatment for menopause-related symptoms before and after the publication of the 2002 WHI to study its effect of prescription behavior in Taiwan. There was one dichotomous outcome variable, which was whether MHT was prescribed or not in an outpatient visit to treat menopause-related symptoms. Results Our study included 504 women 45 years old or above whose outpatient visits for menopause-related symptoms were covered by National Health Insurance in 2002. In total, these 504 women made 2549 outpatient visits to be treated for these symptoms. The proportion of outpatient visits in which MHT was prescribed dropped from 83.0% (n = 1,155 before WHI to 73.0% (n = 844 after WHI. We found a decrease in likelihood that women would be prescribed MHT for menopause-related symptoms after the release of the WHI report (OR = 0.36, 95%CI = 0.25 to 0.52, p Conclusion The WHI report caused a substantial decline in the use of MHT to treat menopause-related symptoms in Taiwan. It was found to exert most of its influence in patients with higher educations, physicians with specialties other than gynecologists and obstetricians, and academic medical centers.

  5. Dietary Boron and Hormone Replacement Therapy as Risk Factors for Lung Cancer in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahabir, S.; Spitz, M. R.; Barrera, S. L.; Dong, Y. Q.; Eastham, C.; Forman, M. R.

    2012-01-01

    Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) may reduce lung cancer risk. Dietary boron may have actions similar to those of HRT; however, no previous study has reported the associations between dietary boron intake and lung cancer risk or the joint effects of boron intake and HRT use on lung cancer risk. The authors examined the associations between boron intake and the joint effects of boron intake and HRT on lung cancer risk in women. In an ongoing case-control study in Houston, Texas (July 1995 through April 2005, end date for this analysis), 763 women were diagnosed with lung cancer, and 838 were matched healthy controls with data on both diet and HRT. Multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess the associations between dietary boron and HRT with lung cancer risk. After adjustment for potential confounders, the odds ratios for lung cancer with decreasing quartiles of dietary boron intake were 1.0, 1.39 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02, 1.90), 1.64 (95% CI: 1.20, 2.24), and 1.95 (95% CI: 1.42, 2.68) mg/day, respectively, for all women (ptrend boron intake who used HRT, the odds ratio for lung cancer for low dietary boron intake and no HRT use was 2.07 (95% CI: 1.53, 2.81). Boron intake was inversely associated with lung cancer in women, whereas women who consumed low boron and did not use HRT were at substantial increased odds. PMID:18343880

  6. [Utilization of hormone replacement therapy in Spain: Trends in the period 2000-2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baladé Martínez, Laura; Montero Corominas, Dolores; Macías Saint-Gerons, Diego

    2016-10-07

    The objective of the study was to describe the trends of utilization, supply and prevalence of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in Spain during the period 2000-2014. Annual prevalence of HRT use including the 95% CI was calculated for women aged≥40 using individual data from the national population-based database BIFAP. Annual and total-period consumptions were expressed in defined daily doses (DDD) per 1,000 inhabitants per day and were obtained from the databases of medications dispensed in community pharmacies and charged through official prescriptions to the Spanish National Health System. In the year 2000, overall HRT consumption was 33.12 DDDs/1000 inhabitans/day: 19.81 for oestrogen only, 6.88 for tibolone and 6.44 for combined oestrogen and progestagen. In 2014 overall HRT consumption was 5.32 DDDs/1000 inhabitans/day: 1.08 for oestrogen only, 1.61 for tibolone and 2.62 for combinations of oestrogen and progestagen. The marketed presentations of HRT decreased by 46.9%. Prevalence of HRT use in women aged≥40 in BIFAP was 7.19% (95% CI 6.97-7.40) in 2001 and 0.21% (95% CI 0.20-0.22) in 2014. Women aged 40-45 registered the highest prevalence of use in 2014: 0.71% (95% CI 0.66-0.76). A sharp decline in the consumption and prevalence of HRT has been observed in Spain since the publication of the Women's Health Initiative and Million Women Study and the regulatory measures taken restricting conditions of use, showing a similar trend to that of other western countries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Estradiol-based postmenopausal hormone therapy and risk of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkola, Tomi S; Tuomikoski, Pauliina; Lyytinen, Heli; Korhonen, Pasi; Hoti, Fabian; Vattulainen, Pia; Gissler, Mika; Ylikorkala, Olavi

    2015-09-01

    Data on the health benefits and risks of postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) are derived mainly from the use of conjugated equine estrogens. Estradiol-based regimens may have a different risk-benefit profile. We evaluated the risk of death caused by coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, or any disease among users of estradiol-based HT regimens in a nationwide study in Finland. A total of 489,105 women who used HT from 1994 to 2009 (3.3 million HT exposure years), as indicated in the nationwide reimbursement register and the national Cause of Death Register, were followed. A total of 28,734 HT users died during follow-up; among the deaths, 3,843 were caused by CHD and 2,464 were caused by stroke. Mortality risk in HT users with varying duration of exposure (≤1 y, >1 to 3 y, >3 to 5 y, >5 to 10 y, or >10 y) was compared with that in an age-matched background population. Risk of CHD death was significantly reduced by 18% to 54% in HT users and was positively related to HT exposure time. Risk of stroke death was also reduced by 18% to 39%, but this reduction was not clearly related to HT exposure time. Risk of all-cause mortality was reduced in HT users by 12% to 38%, almost in linear relationship with duration of exposure. All these risk reductions were comparable in women initiating HT before age 60 years and women initiating HT at age 60 years or older. In absolute terms, the risk reductions mean 19 fewer CHD deaths and 7 fewer stroke deaths per 1,000 women using any HT for at least 10 years.

  8. Peripheral neuropathy in HIV patients in sub-Saharan Africa failing first-line therapy and the response to second-line ART in the EARNEST trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas-Pinto, Alejandro; Thompson, Jennifer; Musoro, Godfrey; Musana, Hellen; Lugemwa, Abbas; Kambugu, Andrew; Mweemba, Aggrey; Atwongyeire, Dickens; Thomason, Margaret J; Walker, A Sarah; Paton, Nicholas I

    2016-02-01

    Sensory peripheral neuropathy (PN) remains a common complication in HIV-positive patients despite effective combination anti-retroviral therapy (ART). Data on PN on second-line ART is scarce. We assessed PN using a standard tool in patients failing first-line ART and for 96 weeks following a switch to PI-based second-line ART in a large Randomised Clinical Trial in Sub-Saharan Africa. Factors associated with PN were investigated using logistic regression. Symptomatic PN (SPN) prevalence was 22% at entry (N = 1,251) and was associated (p therapy across all treatment groups, but we did not find any advantage to the NRTI-free regimens. The increase of APN and stability of PN-signs regardless of symptoms suggest an underlying trend of neuropathy progression that may be masked by reduction of symptoms accompanying general health improvement induced by second-line ART. SPN was strongly associated with isoniazid given for TB treatment.

  9. Melanoma Therapy with Rhenium-Cyclized Alpha Melanocyte Stimulating Hormone Peptide Analogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas P Quinn

    2005-11-22

    Malignant melanoma is the 6th most commonly diagnosed cancer with increasing incidence in the United States. It is estimated that 54,200 cases of malignant melanoma will be newly diagnosed and 7,600 cases of death will occur in the United States in the year 2003 (1). At the present time, more than 1.3% of Americans will develop malignant melanoma during their lifetime (2). The average survival for patients with metastatic melanoma is about 6-9 months (3). Moreover, metastatic melanoma deposits are resistant to conventional chemotherapy and external beam radiation therapy (3). Systematic chemotherapy is the primary therapeutic approach to treat patients with metastatic melanoma. Dacarbazine is the only single chemotherapy agent approved by FDA for metastatic melanoma treatment (5). However, the response rate to Dacarbazine is only approximately 20% (6). Therefore, there is a great need to develop novel treatment approaches for metastatic melanoma. The global goal of this research program is the rational design, characterization and validation of melanoma imaging and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. Significant progress has been made in the design and characterization of metal-cyclized radiolabeled alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptides. Therapy studies with {sup 188}Re-CCMSH demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of the receptor-targeted treatment in murine and human melanoma bearing mice (previous progress report). Dosimetry calculations, based on biodistribution data, indicated that a significant dose was delivered to the tumor. However, {sup 188}Re is a very energetic beta-particle emitter. The longer-range beta-particles theoretically would be better for larger tumors. In the treatment of melanoma, the larger primary tumor is usually surgically removed leaving metastatic disease as the focus of targeted radiotherapy. Isotopes with lower beta-energies and/or shorter particle lengths should be better suited for targeting metastases. The {sup 177}Lu

  10. Melanome Therapy with Rhenium Cyclized Alpha Melanocyte Stimulating Hormone Peptide Analogs. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinn, Thomas P.

    2005-01-01

    Malignant melanoma is the 6th most commonly diagnosed cancer with increasing incidence in the United States. It is estimated that 54,200 cases of malignant melanoma will be newly diagnosed and 7,600 cases of death will occur in the United States in the year 2003 (1). At the present time, more than 1.3% of Americans will develop malignant melanoma during their lifetime (2). The average survival for patients with metastatic melanoma is about 6-9 months (3). Moreover, metastatic melanoma deposits are resistant to conventional chemotherapy and external beam radiation therapy (3). Systematic chemotherapy is the primary therapeutic approach to treat patients with metastatic melanoma. Dacarbazine is the only single chemotherapy agent approved by FDA for metastatic melanoma treatment (5). However, the response rate to Dacarbazine is only approximately 20% (6). Therefore, there is a great need to develop novel treatment approaches for metastatic melanoma. The global goal of this research program is the rational design, characterization and validation of melanoma imaging and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. Significant progress has been made in the design and characterization of metal-cyclized radiolabeled alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptides. Therapy studies with 188 Re-CCMSH demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of the receptor-targeted treatment in murine and human melanoma bearing mice (previous progress report). Dosimetry calculations, based on biodistribution data, indicated that a significant dose was delivered to the tumor. However, 188 Re is a very energetic beta-particle emitter. The longer-range beta-particles theoretically would be better for larger tumors. In the treatment of melanoma, the larger primary tumor is usually surgically removed leaving metastatic disease as the focus of targeted radiotherapy. Isotopes with lower beta-energies and/or shorter particle lengths should be better suited for targeting metastases. The 177 Lu-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH and

  11. Effect of growth hormone therapy and puberty on bone and body composition in children with idiopathic short stature and growth hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Högler, Wolfgang; Briody, Julie; Moore, Bin; Lu, Pei Wen; Cowell, Christopher T

    2005-11-01

    The state of bone health and the effect of growth hormone (GH) therapy on bone and body composition in children with idiopathic short stature (ISS) are largely unknown. A direct role of GH deficiency (GHD) on bone density is controversial. Using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, this study measured total body bone mineral content (TB BMC), body composition, and volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) at the lumbar spine (LS) and femoral neck (FN) in 77 children (aged 3-17 years) with ISS (n = 57) and GHD (n = 20). Fifty-five children (GHD = 13) receiving GH were followed over 24 months including measurement of bone turnover. At diagnosis, size-corrected TB BMC SDS was greater (P bone relation, as assessed by the BMC/lean mass (LTM) ratio SDS was not different between groups. During GH therapy, prepubertal GHD children gained more height (1.58 [0.9] SDS) and LTM (0.87 [0.63] SDS) compared to prepubertal ISS children (0.75 [0.27] and 0.17 [0.25] SDS, respectively). Percent body fat decreased in GHD (-5.94% [4.29]) but not in ISS children. Total body BMC accrual was less than predicted in all groups accompanied by an increase in bone turnover. Puberty led to the greatest absolute, but not relative, increments in weight, LTM, BMI, bone mass, and LSvBMD. Our results show that children with ISS and GHD differ in their response to GH therapy in anthropometry, body composition, and bone measures. Despite low vBMD values at diagnosis in both prepubertal groups, size-corrected regional or TB bone data were generally within the normal range and did not increase during GH therapy in GHD or ISS children. Growth hormone had great effects on the growth plate and body composition with subsequent gains in height, LTM, bone turnover, and bone mass accrual, but no benefit for volumetric bone density over 2 years.

  12. The use of manual therapy post-hip arthroscopy when an exercise-based therapy approach has failed: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBeau, Robert T; Nho, Shane J

    2014-09-01

    Case report. Although there is a growing body of literature on both surgical intervention and postsurgical rehabilitation of acetabular labral repairs and femoroacetabular impingement, there is a paucity of information on how to manage individuals who show a lack of progress postsurgery. A 30-year-old woman underwent surgical labral repair with femoroacetabular impingement osteochondroplasty. Postsurgery, she was initially treated with an exercise-based approach, but experienced an increase in hip pain and further decline in function. Her primary functional deficits were difficulty standing and pain (6/10) with ambulation. A combination of soft tissue mobilization and trigger point dry needling was used to address perceived muscle dysfunction, and nonthrust manipulation was used to address perceived hip joint hypomobility. Following 12 therapy sessions over 120 days, the patient returned to her demanding occupation with minimal residual symptoms. By the end of the period of care, the patient's Harris hip score had improved from 56 to 96 and her Lower Extremity Functional Scale score had improved from 26 to 70. This case describes a multimodal manual therapy approach and the health outcomes of a patient following labral repair with femoroacetabular impingement decompression who did not respond to an initial exercise-based postsurgical rehabilitation approach. Level of Evidence Therapy, level 4.

  13. A retrospective review of pituitary MRI findings in children on growth hormone therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Sarah L.; Lawrence, Sarah; Laffan, Eoghan

    2012-01-01

    Patients with congenital hypopituitarism might have the classic triad of pituitary stalk interruption syndrome, which consists of: (1) an interrupted or thin pituitary stalk, (2) an absent or ectopic posterior pituitary (EPP), and (3) anterior pituitary hypoplasia or aplasia. To examine the relationship between pituitary anatomy and the degree of hormonal dysfunction. This study involved a retrospective review of MRI findings in all children diagnosed with congenital growth hormone deficiency from 1988 to 2010 at a tertiary-level pediatric hospital. Of the 52 MRIs reviewed in 52 children, 26 children had normal pituitary anatomy and 26 had one or more elements of the classic triad. Fourteen of fifteen children with multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies had structural anomalies on MRI. Twelve of 37 children with isolated growth hormone deficiency had an abnormal MRI. Children with multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies were more likely to have the classic triad than children with isolated growth hormone deficiency. A normal MRI was the most common finding in children with isolated growth hormone deficiency. (orig.)

  14. Efecto de la terapia hormonal de reemplazo sobre la mamografía: nuestra experiencia Effect of replacement hormone therapy on mammography: our experience in this field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daysi Navarro Despaigne

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio retrospectivo, cuyo objetivo fue describir el efecto de la terapia hormonal de reemplazo (THR sobre las mamografías de mujeres de edad mediana que asistieron a la Clínica de Climaterio y Osteoporosis (ClimOs entre enero de 1998 y diciembre de 2003. A cada mujer se le realizó mamografía (Mx inicial y durante el uso de la THR, las cuales fueron informadas como: 1 mamografías sin alteraciones, 2 con cambios menores [densidad irregular y microcalcificaciones] y 3 con cambios mayores [nódulos, quistes u otra alteración]. Como tratamiento recibieron estrógenos solos (E, estrógenos y progestagenos combinados continuos (EP y terapia no estrogénica (fitoestrógenos, tibolona. La muestra estuvo constituida por 112 mujeres, con edades entre 34 y 59 años. La Mx inicial mostró: no alteraciones en el 85,5 %, cambios menores en el 9,1 y cambios mayores en el 5,4. En la posTHR (tiempo promedio entre ambos estudios: 2,5 años, el 66 % continuó con mamografías normales, en el 29,0 hubo cambios menores (pA retrospective study was conducted, with the objective of describing the effect of hormone replacement therapy (HRT on mammography performed on middle-aged females, who had been seen at climacterics and osteoporosis clinics from January 1998 to December 2003. Mammography had been performed on each woman at the beginning and during the use of the HRT, being the results as follows: 1 mammography showing no changes; 2 mammography with slight changes irregular density and microcalcification and 3 mammography with major changes nodules, cysts or any other change . As a treatment, they received estrogen (E, continuos combined estrogen and progestagen (EP and nonestrogen therapy (phytoestrogen, tibolone. The sample was composed of 112 women aged 34 to 59 years. The initial Mx showed no changes in 85,5 %, slight changes in 9,1 and major changes in 5,4 of females. After the application of HRT (average time between both mammographic

  15. Influence of sex hormone levels on gingival enlargement in adolescent patients undergoing fixed orthodontic therapy: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Hosadurga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sex hormones may be a modifying factor in the periodontal disease pathogenesis. Aim: The association between gingival enlargement and sex hormone levels in adolescent patients undergoing fixed orthodontic therapy needs to be determined. Settings and Design: This study was conducted in the Department of Periodontology in association with the Department of Orthodontics, Yenepoya Dental College, Yenepoya University, Mangaluru. Materials and Methods: A pilot study was conducted on 21 adolescent patients between the age group of 13–19 years, who had undergone fixed orthodontic therapy for at least 3 months. Apicocoronally, the gingival enlargement was assessed by the index described by Miller and Damm. Miranda and Brunet index was used to assess gingival overgrowth in the buccal–lingual direction in the interdental papilla. Furthermore, the patients were assigned to two groups - Group 1-GE and Group 2-non-GE. Sex hormones assessed were estradiol and progesterone in females and testosterone in males in both groups. Results: 57.1% of the study population had enlargement of the gingiva. The mean plaque score was 0.59 and 0.56, respectively, in both groups. A statistically significant relationship was found between estradiol and testosterone levels with gingival enlargement. However, a significant relationship was not obtained for progesterone levels with the gingival enlargement. Conclusion: Direct correlation between estradiol, testosterone, and gingival enlargement was seen.

  16. Effects of exercise on bone mineral density in calcium-replete postmenopausal women with and without hormone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Going, Scott; Lohman, Timothy; Houtkooper, Linda; Metcalfe, Lauve; Flint-Wagner, Hilary; Blew, Robert; Stanford, Vanessa; Cussler, Ellen; Martin, Jane; Teixeira, Pedro; Harris, Margaret; Milliken, Laura; Figueroa-Galvez, Arturo; Weber, Judith

    2003-08-01

    Osteoporosis is a major public health concern. The combination of exercise, hormone replacement therapy, and calcium supplementation may have added benefits for improving bone mineral density compared to a single intervention. To test this notion, 320 healthy, non-smoking postmenopausal women, who did or did not use hormone replacement therapy (HRT), were randomized within groups to exercise or no exercise and followed for 12 months. All women received 800 mg calcium citrate supplements daily. Women who exercised performed supervised aerobic, weight-bearing and weight-lifting exercise, three times per week in community-based exercise facilities. Regional bone mineral density (BMD) was assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Women who used HRT, calcium, and exercised increased femoral neck, trochanteric and lumbar spine bone mineral density by approximately 1-2%. Trochanteric BMD was also significantly increased by approximately 1.0% in women who exercised and used calcium without HRT compared to a negligible change in women who used HRT and did not exercise. The results demonstrate that regional BMD can be improved with aerobic, weight-bearing activity combined with weight lifting at clinically relevant sites in postmenopausal women. The response was significant at more sites in women who used HRT, suggesting a greater benefit with hormone replacement and exercise compared to HRT alone.

  17. Use of compounded hormone therapy in the United States: report of The North American Menopause Society Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gass, Margery L S; Stuenkel, Cynthia A; Utian, Wulf H; LaCroix, Andrea; Liu, James H; Shifren, Jan L

    2015-12-01

    A national survey was conducted to determine the extent of use of compounded hormone therapy (C-HT) and to characterize the differences between C-HT users and users of hormone therapy approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA-HT users). This Internet survey enrolled 3,725 women aged 40 to 84 years who were postmenopausal or experiencing the menopause transition. The sample was weighted slightly by age, region, education, and race to reflect population attributes based on US Census data. Overall, 9% of women were current users of HT, and 28% of all respondents were ever-users of HT. C-HT users represented 31% of ever-users of HT, 35% of current users of HT, and 41% of ever-users aged 40 to 49 years. Approximately 13% of ever-users indicated current or past use of testosterone. The most cited reason for using HT was vasomotor symptoms (∼70%). Nonapproved indications for using HT were selected more often by C-HT users. There were four reports of endometrial cancer among the 326 C-HT users compared with none reported among the 738 FDA-HT users. Significance was not determined because of small numbers. This survey indicates substantial use of C-HT across the country and the possibility of higher rates of endometrial side effects with such products. There is a need for standardized data collection on the extent of use of compounded hormones and their potential risks.

  18. Response to long-term growth hormone therapy in patients affected by RASopathies and growth hormone deficiency: Patterns of growth, puberty and final height data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburrino, Federica; Gibertoni, Dino; Rossi, Cesare; Scarano, Emanuela; Perri, Annamaria; Montanari, Francesca; Fantini, Maria Pia; Pession, Andrea; Tartaglia, Marco; Mazzanti, Laura

    2015-11-01

    RASopathies are developmental disorders caused by heterozygous germline mutations in genes encoding proteins in the RAS-MAPK signaling pathway. Reduced growth is a common feature. Several studies generated data on growth, final height (FH), and height velocity (HV) after growth hormone (GH) treatment in patients with these disorders, particularly in Noonan syndrome, the most common RASopathy. These studies, however, refer to heterogeneous cohorts in terms of molecular information, GH status, age at start and length of therapy, and GH dosage. This work reports growth data in 88 patients affected by RASopathies with molecularly confirmed diagnosis, together with statistics on body proportions, pubertal pattern, and FH in 33, including 16 treated with GH therapy for proven GH deficiency. Thirty-three patients showed GH deficiency after pharmacological tests, and were GH-treated for an average period of 6.8 ± 4.8 years. Before starting therapy, HV was -2.6 ± 1.3 SDS, and mean basal IGF1 levels were -2.0 ± 1.1 SDS. Long-term GH therapy, starting early during childhood, resulted in a positive height response compared with untreated patients (1.3 SDS in terms of height-gain), normalizing FH for Ranke standards but not for general population and Target Height. Pubertal timing negatively affected pubertal growth spurt and FH, with IGF1 standardized score increased from -2.43 to -0.27 SDS. During GH treatment, no significant change in bone age velocity, body proportions, or cardiovascular function was observed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Malignant mixed Mullerian tumour of uterus secondary to tamoxifen therapy for hormone responsive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Mayank; Kiruthiga, Kala Gnanasekaran

    2015-06-29

    Tamoxifen is used in the treatment of hormone responsive breast cancer because of its antiestrogenic effect. However, it also has an estrogenic effect on the uterus, thereby increasing the risk of endometrial hyperplasia, endometrial polyp and endometrial neoplasms such as endometrial adenocarcinoma and malignant mixed Mullerian tumour (MMMT). This case describes the possible pathogenesis and risk of developing MMMT due to long-term tamoxifen intake in hormone responsive breast cancer. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  20. GrowthHormone Research Society workshop summary: consensus guidelines for recombinant human growth hormone therapy in Prader-Willi syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deal, Cheri L; Tony, Michèle; Höybye, Charlotte; Allen, David B; Tauber, Maïthé; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl

    2013-06-01

    Recombinant human GH (rhGH) therapy in Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) has been used by the medical community and advocated by parental support groups since its approval in the United States in 2000 and in Europe in 2001. Its use in PWS represents a unique therapeutic challenge that includes treating individuals with cognitive disability, varied therapeutic goals that are not focused exclusively on increased height, and concerns about potential life-threatening adverse events. The aim of the study was to formulate recommendations for the use of rhGH in children and adult patients with PWS. We performed a systematic review of the clinical evidence in the pediatric population, including randomized controlled trials, comparative observational studies, and long-term studies (>3.5 y). Adult studies included randomized controlled trials of rhGH treatment for ≥ 6 months and uncontrolled trials. Safety data were obtained from case reports, clinical trials, and pharmaceutical registries. Forty-three international experts and stakeholders followed clinical practice guideline development recommendations outlined by the AGREE Collaboration (www.agreetrust.org). Evidence was synthesized and graded using a comprehensive multicriteria methodology (EVIDEM) (http://bit.ly.PWGHIN). Following a multidisciplinary evaluation, preferably by experts, rhGH treatment should be considered for patients with genetically confirmed PWS in conjunction with dietary, environmental, and lifestyle interventions. Cognitive impairment should not be a barrier to treatment, and informed consent/assent should include benefit/risk information. Exclusion criteria should include severe obesity, uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, untreated severe obstructive sleep apnea, active cancer, or psychosis. Clinical outcome priorities should vary depending upon age and the presence of physical, mental, and social disability, and treatment should be continued for as long as demonstrated benefits outweigh the risks.

  1. Markers of bone metabolism are affected by renal function and growth hormone therapy in children with chronic kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke Doyon

    Full Text Available The extent and relevance of altered bone metabolism for statural growth in children with chronic kidney disease is controversial. We analyzed the impact of renal dysfunction and recombinant growth hormone therapy on a panel of serum markers of bone metabolism in a large pediatric chronic kidney disease cohort.Bone alkaline phosphatase (BAP, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRAP5b, sclerostin and C-terminal FGF-23 (cFGF23 normalized for age and sex were analyzed in 556 children aged 6-18 years with an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR of 10-60 ml/min/1.73 m2. 41 children receiving recombinant growth hormone therapy were compared to an untreated matched control group.Standardized levels of BAP, TRAP5b and cFGF-23 were increased whereas sclerostin was reduced. BAP was correlated positively and cFGF-23 inversely with eGFR. Intact serum parathormone was an independent positive predictor of BAP and TRAP5b and negatively associated with sclerostin. BAP and TRAP5B were negatively affected by increased C-reactive protein levels. In children receiving recombinant growth hormone, BAP was higher and TRAP5b lower than in untreated controls. Sclerostin levels were in the normal range and higher than in untreated controls. Serum sclerostin and cFGF-23 independently predicted height standard deviation score, and BAP and TRAP5b the prospective change in height standard deviation score.Markers of bone metabolism indicate a high-bone turnover state in children with chronic kidney disease. Growth hormone induces an osteoanabolic pattern and normalizes osteocyte activity. The osteocyte markers cFGF23 and sclerostin are associated with standardized height, and the markers of bone turnover predict height velocity.

  2. Markers of bone metabolism are affected by renal function and growth hormone therapy in children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyon, Anke; Fischer, Dagmar-Christiane; Bayazit, Aysun Karabay; Canpolat, Nur; Duzova, Ali; Sözeri, Betül; Bacchetta, Justine; Balat, Ayse; Büscher, Anja; Candan, Cengiz; Cakar, Nilgun; Donmez, Osman; Dusek, Jiri; Heckel, Martina; Klaus, Günter; Mir, Sevgi; Özcelik, Gül; Sever, Lale; Shroff, Rukshana; Vidal, Enrico; Wühl, Elke; Gondan, Matthias; Melk, Anette; Querfeld, Uwe; Haffner, Dieter; Schaefer, Franz

    2015-01-01

    The extent and relevance of altered bone metabolism for statural growth in children with chronic kidney disease is controversial. We analyzed the impact of renal dysfunction and recombinant growth hormone therapy on a panel of serum markers of bone metabolism in a large pediatric chronic kidney disease cohort. Bone alkaline phosphatase (BAP), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRAP5b), sclerostin and C-terminal FGF-23 (cFGF23) normalized for age and sex were analyzed in 556 children aged 6-18 years with an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of 10-60 ml/min/1.73 m2. 41 children receiving recombinant growth hormone therapy were compared to an untreated matched control group. Standardized levels of BAP, TRAP5b and cFGF-23 were increased whereas sclerostin was reduced. BAP was correlated positively and cFGF-23 inversely with eGFR. Intact serum parathormone was an independent positive predictor of BAP and TRAP5b and negatively associated with sclerostin. BAP and TRAP5B were negatively affected by increased C-reactive protein levels. In children receiving recombinant growth hormone, BAP was higher and TRAP5b lower than in untreated controls. Sclerostin levels were in the normal range and higher than in untreated controls. Serum sclerostin and cFGF-23 independently predicted height standard deviation score, and BAP and TRAP5b the prospective change in height standard deviation score. Markers of bone metabolism indicate a high-bone turnover state in children with chronic kidney disease. Growth hormone induces an osteoanabolic pattern and normalizes osteocyte activity. The osteocyte markers cFGF23 and sclerostin are associated with standardized height, and the markers of bone turnover predict height velocity.

  3. Outcomes of screening mammography by frequency, breast density, and postmenopausal hormone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerlikowske, Karla; Zhu, Weiwei; Hubbard, Rebecca A; Geller, Berta; Dittus, Kim; Braithwaite, Dejana; Wernli, Karen J; Miglioretti, Diana L; O'Meara, Ellen S

    2013-05-13

    Controversy exists about the frequency women should undergo screening mammography and whether screening interval should vary according to risk factors beyond age. To compare the benefits and harms of screening mammography frequencies according to age, breast density, and postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) use. Prospective cohort. Data collected January 1994 to December 2008 from mammography facilities in community practice that participate in the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) mammography registries. Data were collected prospectively on 11,474 women with breast cancer and 922,624 without breast cancer who underwent mammography at facilities that participate in the BCSC. We used logistic regression to calculate the odds of advanced stage (IIb, III, or IV) and large tumors (>20 mm in diameter) and 10-year cumulative probability of a false-positive mammography result by screening frequency, age, breast density, and HT use. The main predictor was screening mammography interval. Mammography biennially vs annually for women aged 50 to 74 years does not increase risk of tumors with advanced stage or large size regardless of women's breast density or HT use. Among women aged 40 to 49 years with extremely dense breasts, biennial mammography vs annual is associated with increased risk of advanced-stage cancer (odds ratio [OR], 1.89; 95% CI, 1.06-3.39) and large tumors (OR, 2.39; 95% CI, 1.37-4.18). Cumulative probability of a false-positive mammography result was high among women undergoing annual mammography with extremely dense breasts who were either aged 40 to 49 years (65.5%) or used estrogen plus progestogen (65.8%) and was lower among women aged 50 to 74 years who underwent biennial or triennial mammography with scattered fibroglandular densities (30.7% and 21.9%, respectively) or fatty breasts (17.4% and 12.1%, respectively). Women aged 50 to 74 years, even those with high breast density or HT use, who undergo biennial screening mammography have

  4. Systemic administration of mesenchymal stem cells combined with parathyroid hormone therapy synergistically regenerates multiple rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn Yakubovich, Doron; Sheyn, Dmitriy; Bez, Maxim; Schary, Yeshai; Yalon, Eran; Sirhan, Afeef; Amira, May; Yaya, Alin; De Mel, Sandra; Da, Xiaoyu; Ben-David, Shiran; Tawackoli, Wafa; Ley, Eric J; Gazit, Dan; Gazit, Zulma; Pelled, Gadi

    2017-03-09

    A devastating condition that leads to trauma-related morbidity, multiple rib fractures, remain a serious unmet clinical need. Systemic administration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been shown to regenerate various tissues. We hypothesized that parathyroid hormone (PTH) therapy would enhance MSC homing and differentiation, ultimately leading to bone formation that would bridge rib fractures. The combination of human MSCs (hMSCs) and a clinically relevant PTH dose was studied using immunosuppressed rats. Segmental defects were created in animals' fifth and sixth ribs. The rats were divided into four groups: a negative control group, in which animals received vehicle alone; the PTH-only group, in which animals received daily subcutaneous injections of 4 μg/kg teriparatide, a pharmaceutical derivative of PTH; the hMSC-only group, in which each animal received five injections of 2 × 10 6 hMSCs; and the hMSC + PTH group, in which animals received both treatments. Longitudinal in vivo monitoring of bone formation was performed biweekly using micro-computed tomography (μCT), followed by histological analysis. Fluorescently-dyed hMSCs were counted using confocal microscopy imaging of histological samples harvested 8 weeks after surgery. PTH significantly augmented the number of hMSCs that homed to the fracture site. Immunofluorescence of osteogenic markers, osteocalcin and bone sialoprotein, showed that PTH induced cell differentiation in both exogenously administered cells and resident cells. μCT scans revealed a significant increase in bone volume only in the hMSC + PTH group, beginning by the 4 th week after surgery. Eight weeks after surgery, 35% of ribs in the hMSC + PTH group had complete bone bridging, whereas there was complete bridging in only 6.25% of ribs (one rib) in the PTH-only group and in none of the ribs in the other groups. Based on the μCT scans, biomechanical analysis using the micro-finite element method demonstrated that

  5. Abnormal imaging findings of the breast related to hormone replacement therapy: analysis of surgically excised cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Woo Kyung; Cha, Joo Hee; Cho, Kyung Soo; Choi, Een Wan; Lee, Yu Jin; Im, Jung Gi [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung Seok [Wooridul Spine Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Sun Yang [Bundang CHA General Hospital, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Nariya [Gil Medical Center, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-02-01

    To correlate the mammographic and ultrasonographic findings with the pathologic results in women undergoing hormone replacement therapy (HRT), and to determine the characteristic clinical, mammographic or histologic findings of breast cancer in these patients. Twenty-five breast lesions in 25 patients aged 44-65 (mean, 55.5) years undergoing HRT were surgically removed due to abnormal mammographic findings or the presence of palpable masses. Mammograms in all patients and ultrasonograms in 23 were retrospectively analyzed in terms of the shape and margin of the mass, and microcalcifications, and the imaging findings were correlated with the pathologic results. As a control group, 45 cancer patients not undergoing HRT were selected. Using the student t test, detection methods, tumor size, mammographic findings, and the proportion of intraductal cancers were compared between to two groups. Surgical excision revealed ten benign lesions (four fibroadenomas and six cases of fibrocystic change) and 15 cancers (three intraductal and twelve invasive ductal cancers). Abnormal findings at mammography were a mass in 16 cases, clustered microcalcifications in seven, and a mass with microcalcifications in two. Mammography showed that all four circumscribed masses were benign. Five of seven ill-defined masses (71%) and all six spiculated masses were malignant. Three of seven cases (43%) with microcalcifications, and both with a mass and microcalcification, were malignant. In two cases in which ultrasonography revealed cystic lesions, histologic examination showed that fibrocystic change had occurred. Compared to non-HRT-related cancers, HRT-related cancers were more often detected by mammography (60% vs 16%; p<0.001), smaller (17 mm vs 24 mm, p<0.01), showed microcalcification only (20% vs 13%; p<0.05), and were intraductal (20% vs 7%; p<0.01). In patients with HRT, mammographic findings of an ill-defined or spiculated mass, or one with microcalcifications, were associated with

  6. Electrodiagnostic studies in presumptive primary hypothyroidism and polyneuropathy in dogs with reevaluation during hormone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giza, Elżbieta Gabriela; Płonek, Marta; Nicpoń, Józef Marian; Wrzosek, Marcin Adam

    2016-05-21

    Peripheral neuropathy is the most common neurological manifestation of canine hypothyroidism. Data concerning electrodiagnostic studies in hypothyroid associated polyneuropathy in dogs are very limited and usually lack a reevaluation after hormone replacement therapy. The objective of this study was to perform a detailed, retrospective analysis of electromyographic (EMG), motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV), F-wave and brainstem auditory evoked response (BAER) findings in 24 dogs with presumptive primary hypothyroidism and polyneuropathy with a comparison of the results before and after initiation of levothyroxine treatment with the assessment of the clinical outcome. The results obtained from hypothyroid dogs showed a significant reduction in MNCV at a proximal-distal and middle-distal stimulation, decreased amplitudes of compound muscle action potentials (CMAP), an increased CMAP duration and a prolonged distal latency prior to treatment. Fifty percent of the dogs had an increased F-wave latency. A normal BAER recording was found in 78 % of the hypothyroid patients without vestibular impairment. Bilaterally increased peak V latencies and increased interpeak I-V latencies were found in the remaining individuals. Dogs with concurrent vestibular impairment had ipsilaterally increased peak latencies with normal interpeak latencies and decreased amplitudes of wave I and II. A comparison of the findings before and after 2 months of treatment revealed a decrease in the pathological activity on EMG, an improvement of proximal, middle and distal CMAP amplitudes and an increase in the proximal-distal conduction velocity in all dogs. F-wave latency improved in 38 % of dogs. The BAER reexamination revealed a persistent prolongation of peak I, II, III and V latencies and decreased wave I amplitude on the affected side in all dogs manifesting vestibular signs. Conversely, in dogs without vestibular signs, the peak V and interpeak I-V latencies decreased to normal values

  7. Digital versus screen-film mammography: impact of mammographic density and hormone therapy on breast cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarelli, Anna M; Prummel, Maegan V; Muradali, Derek; Shumak, Rene S; Majpruz, Vicky; Brown, Patrick; Jiang, Hedy; Done, Susan J; Yaffe, Martin J

    2015-11-01

    Most studies that have examined the effects of mammographic density and hormone therapy use on breast cancer detection have included screen-film mammography. This study further examines this association in post-menopausal women screened by digital mammography. Approved by the University of Toronto Research Ethics Board, this study identified 688,418 women of age 50-74 years screened with digital or screen-film mammography from 2008 to 2009 within the Ontario Breast Screening Program. Of 2993 eligible women with invasive breast cancer, 2450 were contacted and 1421 participated (847 screen-film mammography, 574 digital direct radiography). Mammographic density was measured by study radiologists using the standard BI-RADS classification system and by a computer-assisted method. Information on hormone therapy use was collected by a telephone-administered questionnaire. Logistic regression and two-tailed tests for significance evaluated associations between factors and detection method by mammography type. Women with >75 % radiologist-measured mammographic density compared to those with mammography (OR = 2.41, 95 % CI 0.67-8.58) and aged 50-64 years screened with screen-film mammography (OR = 10.86, 95 % CI 2.96-39.57). Recent former hormone therapy users were also at an increased risk of having an interval cancer with the association being significant for women screened with digital mammography (OR = 2.08, 95 % CI 1.17-3.71). Breast screening using digital mammography lowers the risk of having an interval cancer for post-menopausal women aged 50-64 with greater mammographic density.

  8. Serum estrogen and SHBG levels and breast cancer incidence among users and never users of hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Würtz, Anne Mette Lund; Tjønneland, Anne; Christensen, Jane

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Levels of endogenous estrogen and SHBG are associated with risk of breast cancer among women who have never used hormone replacement therapy (HRT). We investigated these associations in both never and baseline users of HRT. METHODS: A nested case-control study was conducted within...... logistic regression yielded incidence rate ratios and 95 % confidence intervals for exposures analyzed continuously and categorically in models adjusted for potential confounders. RESULTS: Modest direct associations were identified between estrogen levels and breast cancer incidence among both never...

  9. Cognitive effects of hormone therapy continuation or discontinuation in a sample of women at risk for Alzheimer’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Wroolie, Tonita E.; Kenna, Heather A.; Williams, Katherine E.; Rasgon, Natalie L.

    2015-01-01

    Use of estrogen-based hormone therapy (HT), as a protection from cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease, is controversial although cumulative data supports HT use when initiated close to menopause onset with estrogen formulations containing 17β-estradiol (17β-E) being preferable to conjugated equine estrogen formulations. Little is known regarding specific populations of women who may derive benefit from HT. Women with heightened risk for AD (aged 49-69), all of whom were taking HT for at ...

  10. Predicting the Need for Third-Line Antiretroviral Therapy by Identifying Patients at High Risk for Failing Second-Line Antiretroviral Therapy in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoya, Dorina; Nattey, Cornelius; Budgell, Eric; van den Berg, Liudmyla; Maskew, Mhairi; Evans, Denise; Hirasen, Kamban; Long, Lawrence C; Fox, Matthew P

    2017-05-01

    Although third-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) is available in South Africa's public sector, its cost is substantially higher than first and second line. Identifying risk factors for failure on second-line treatment remains crucial to reduce the need for third-line drugs. We conducted a case-control study including 194 adult patients (≥18 years; 70 cases and 124 controls) who initiated second-line ART in Johannesburg, South Africa. Unconditional logistic regression was used to assess predictors of virologic failure (defined as 2 consecutive viral load measures ≥1000 copies/mL, ≥3 months after switching to second line). Variables included a social instability index, ART adherence, self-reported as well as diagnosed adverse drug reactions (ADRs), HIV disclosure, depression, and factors affecting access to HIV clinics. Overall 60.0% of cases and 54.0% of controls were female. Mean ages of cases and controls were 41.8 ± 9.6 and 43.3 ± 8.0, respectively. Virologic failure was predicted by ART adherence third-line regimens.

  11. An update on hormone therapy in postmenopausal women: mini-review for the basic scientist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Virginia M; Harman, S Mitchell

    2017-11-01

    The worlds of observational, clinical, and basic science collided in 2002 with the publication of results of the Women's Health Initiative (WHI), a large-scale, prospective, blinded, randomized-controlled trial designed to provide evidence regarding use of hormone treatment to prevent cardiovascular disease in menopausal women. The results of the WHI dramatically changed clinical practice, negatively impacted funding for hormone research, and left scientists to unravel the "why" of the results. Now over a decade and a half since the initial publication of the WHI results, basic and clinical scientists often do not interpret the results of the WHI with the precision needed to move the science forward. This review will 1 ) describe the historical background leading up to the WHI, 2 ) list the outcomes from the WHI, and put them in perspective with results of subsequent analysis of the WHI data and results from other prospective menopausal hormone treatment trials addressing cardiovascular effects of menopausal hormone use, and 3 ) articulate how the collective results are influencing current clinical care with the intent to provide guidance for designing and evaluating relevant new hormonal studies. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Response to three years of growth hormone therapy in girls with Turner syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Kyu Park

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available PurposeShort stature is the most common finding in patients with Turner syndrome. Improving the final adult height in these patients is a challenge both for the patients and physicians. We investigated the clinical response of patients to growth hormone treatment for height improvement over the period of three years.MethodsReview of medical records from 27 patients with Turner syndrome treated with recombinant human growth hormone for more than 3 years was done. Differences in the changes of height standard deviation scores according to karyotype were measured and factors influencing the height changes were analyzed.ResultsThe response to recombinant human growth hormone was an increase in the height of the subjects to a mean value of 1.1 standard deviation for subjects with Turner syndrome at the end of the 3-year treatment. The height increment in the first year was highest. The height standard deviation score in the third year was negatively correlated with the age at the beginning of the recombinant human growth hormone treatment. Different karyotypes in subjects did not seem to affect the height changes.ConclusionEarly growth hormone administration in subjects with Turner syndrome is helpful to improve height response to the treatment.

  13. Support not corresponding to transition to a new treatment: Women's perceptions of support provided by their male partners during hormonal therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sena Yamamoto

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Women with breast cancer receive support from their partners to deal with the side effects of therapies over the cancer trajectory. Hormonal therapy (HT is usually given after completing other treatments, and women receiving HT reclaim their normal life. This may lead to changes in support from their partners. Therefore, we explored women's perceptions of the support provided by their male partners in managing the side effects of adjuvant HT. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 10 women who received HT and recognized their partners as a main source of support. An interview guide was used to explore their experiences of treatment side effects, the contents of support received from their partners, their need for support, and their overall relationship with their partners. Interviews were analysed by content analysis. A theme on how participants perceived support from their partners was formulated as “Support not corresponding to transition to a new treatment” with the following categories: “Shrinking support,” “Primacy of partner,” and “Solitary new treatment.” Participants felt lack of support from their partners because their partners did not understand their experience of the side effects induced by HT. Unlike the side effects of past treatments such as surgery and chemotherapy, side effects of HT cannot be observed and are highly subjective. Their partners often failed to notice these symptoms and provided little support. Nevertheless, participants aimed to accept the existing support without asking for more. They were left alone in the continuing trajectory of breast cancer. After starting HT, women entered a new treatment phase in which less understanding and support was provided by partners. Educational support for couples may enable sharing of subjective symptoms that are not obvious to partners and improve outcomes by facilitating partner engagement and support.

  14. Long-term safety of growth hormone replacement therapy after childhood medulloblastoma and PNET: it is time to set aside old concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indini, Alice; Schiavello, Elisabetta; Biassoni, Veronica; Bergamaschi, Luca; Magni, Maria Chiara; Puma, Nadia; Chiaravalli, Stefano; Pallotti, Federica; Seregni, Ettore; Diletto, Barbara; Pecori, Emilia; Gandola, Lorenza; Poggi, Geraldina; Massimino, Maura

    2017-01-01

    To assess the long-term safety of administering growth hormone (GH) in patients with GH deficiency due to treatment for childhood medulloblastoma and primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET). Data were retrospectively retrieved on children receiving GH supplementation, assessing their disease-free and overall survival outcomes and risk of secondary malignancies using Kaplan-Meier and Cox models. Overall 65 children were consecutively collected from May 1981 to April 2013. All patients had undergone craniospinal irradiation (total dose 18-39 Gy), and subsequently received GH for a median (interquartile range, IQR) of 81 (50.6-114.9) months. At a median (IQR) of 122.4 months (74.4-149.5) after the end of their adjuvant cancer treatment, two patients (3 %) experienced recurrent disease and 8 (12.3 %) developed secondary malignancies, all but one of them (an osteosarcoma) related to radiation exposure and occurring within the radiation fields. There was no apparent correlation between the administration of GH replacement therapy (or its duration) and primary tumor relapse or the onset of secondary malignancies [HR: 1.01 (95 % CI: 0.98, 1.03) for every additional 12 months of GH supplementation; p = 0.36). At univariate analysis, the large cell or anaplastic medulloblastoma subtype, metastases and myeloablative chemotherapy correlated with a higher risk of secondary malignancies (p < 0.1), but multivariate analysis failed to identify any factors independently associated with this risk. Our data supports once more the safety of long-term GH replacement therapy in children treated for medulloblastoma/PNET, previously reported in larger data sets. The neurooncology community now need to warrant large-scale meta-analyses or international prospective trials in order to consolidate our knowledge of factors other than GH, such as genetic predisposition, high-grade/metastatic disease, high-dose chemotherapy and era of treatment, in promoting the occurrence of

  15. Outpatient overnight glucose control with dual-hormone artificial pancreas, single-hormone artificial pancreas, or conventional insulin pump therapy in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes: an open-label, randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidar, Ahmad; Legault, Laurent; Matteau-Pelletier, Laurence; Messier, Virginie; Dallaire, Maryse; Ladouceur, Martin; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi

    2015-08-01

    Additional benefits of the dual-hormone (insulin and glucagon) artificial pancreas compared with the single-hormone (insulin alone) artificial pancreas have not been assessed in young people in outpatient unrestricted conditions. We evaluated the efficacy of three systems for nocturnal glucose control in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. We did a randomised, three-way, crossover trial in children aged 9-17 years with type 1 diabetes attending a diabetes camp in Canada. With use of sealed envelopes, children were randomly assigned in a 1:1:1:1:1:1 ratio with blocks of six to different sequences of the three interventions (single-hormone artificial pancreas, dual-hormone artificial pancreas, and conventional continuous subcutaneous insulin pump therapy). Each intervention was applied for 3 consecutive nights. Participants, study staff, and endpoint assessors were not masked. The primary outcome was the percentage of time spent with glucose concentrations lower than 4·0 mmol/L from 2300 h to 0700 h. Analysis was by intention to treat. A p value of less than 0·0167 was regarded as significant. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02189694. Between June 30, 2014, and Aug 9, 2014, we enrolled 33 children of mean age 13·3 years (SD 2·3; range 9-17). The time spent at a glucose concentration lower than 4·0 mmol/L was median 0% (IQR 0·0-2·4) during nights with the dual-hormone artificial pancreas, 3·1% (0·0-6·9) during nights with the single-hormone artificial pancreas (p=0·032), and 3·4% (0-11·0) during nights with conventional pump therapy (p=0·0048 compared with dual-hormone artificial pancreas and p=0·32 compared with single-hormone artificial pancreas). 15 hypoglycaemic events (pump therapy compared with four events with the single-hormone system and no events with the dual-hormone system. None of the assessed outcomes varied with the order in which children and young adults were assigned interventions. The dual-hormone

  16. Parathyroid hormone therapy mollifies radiation-induced biomechanical degradation in murine distraction osteogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Sagar S; Gallagher, Katherine K; Donneys, Alexis; Tchanque-Fossuo, Catherine N; Sarhaddi, Deniz; Nelson, Noah S; Chepeha, Douglas B; Buchman, Steven R

    2013-07-01

    Descriptions of mandibular distraction osteogenesis for tissue replacement after oncologic resection or for defects caused by osteoradionecrosis have been limited. Previous work demonstrated radiation decreases union formation, cellularity and mineral density in mandibular distraction osteogenesis. The authors posit that intermittent systemic administration of parathyroid hormone will serve as a stimulant to cellular function, reversing radiation-induced damage and enhancing bone regeneration. Twenty male Lewis rats were randomly assigned to three groups: group 1 (radiation and distraction osteogenesis, n = 7) and group 2 (radiation, distraction osteogenesis, and parathyroid hormone, n = 5) received a human-equivalent dose of 35 Gy of radiation (human bioequivalent, 70 Gy) fractionated over 5 days. All groups, including group 3 (distraction osteogenesis, n = 8), underwent a left unilateral mandibular osteotomy with bilateral external fixator placement. Distraction osteogenesis was performed at a rate of 0.3 mm every 12 hours to reach a gap of 5.1 mm. Group 2 was injected with parathyroid hormone (60 µg/kg) subcutaneously daily for 3 weeks after the start of distraction osteogenesis. On postoperative day 40, all left hemimandibles were harvested. Biomechanical response parameters were generated. Statistical significance was considered at p ≤ 0.05. Parathyroid hormone-treated mandibles had significantly higher failure load and higher yield than did untreated mandibles. However, these values were still significantly lower than those of nonirradiated mandibles. The authors have successfully demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of parathyroid hormone to stimulate and enhance bone regeneration in their irradiated murine mandibular model of distraction osteogenesis. Anabolic regimens of parathyroid hormone, a U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved drug on formulary, significantly improve outcomes in a model of postoncologic craniofacial reconstruction.

  17. Effects of Calcium, Vitamin D, and Hormone Therapy on Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in the Women's Health Initiative: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnatz, Peter F; Jiang, Xuezhi; Aragaki, Aaron K; Nudy, Matthew; OʼSullivan, David M; Williams, Mark; LeBlanc, Erin S; Martin, Lisa W; Manson, JoAnn E; Shikany, James M; Johnson, Karen C; Stefanick, Marcia L; Payne, Martha E; Cauley, Jane A; Howard, Barbara V; Robbins, John

    2017-01-01

    To analyze the treatment effect of calcium+vitamin D supplementation, hormone therapy, both, and neither on cardiovascular disease risk factors. We conducted a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial among Women's Health Initiative (WHI) participants. The predefined primary outcome was low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). Between September 1993 and October 1998, a total of 68,132 women aged 50-79 years were recruited and randomized to the WHI-Dietary Modification (n=48,835) and WHI-Hormone Therapy trials (n=27,347). Subsequently, 36,282 women from WHI-Hormone Therapy (16,089) and WHI-Dietary Modification (n=25,210) trials were randomized in the WHI-Calcium+Vitamin D trial to 1,000 mg elemental calcium carbonate plus 400 international units vitamin D3 daily or placebo. Our study group included 1,521 women who participated in both the hormone therapy and calcium+vitamin D trials and were in the 6% subsample of trial participants with blood sample collections at baseline and years 1, 3, and 6. The average treatment effect with 95% confidence interval, for LDL-C, compared with placebo, was -1.6, (95% confidence interval [CI] -5.5 to 2.2) mg/dL for calcium+vitamin D alone, -9.0 (95% CI -13.0 to -5.1) mg/dL for hormone therapy alone, and -13.8 (95% CI -17.8 to -9.8) mg/dL for the combination. There was no evidence of a synergistic effect of calcium+vitamin D+hormone therapy on LDL-C (P value for interaction=.26) except in those with low total intakes of vitamin D, for whom there was a significant synergistic effect on LDL (P value for interaction=.03). Reductions in LDL-C were greater among women randomized to both calcium+vitamin D and hormone therapy than for those randomized to either intervention alone or to placebo. The treatment effect observed in the calcium+vitamin D+hormone therapy combination group may be additive rather than synergistic. For clinicians and patients deciding to begin calcium+vitamin D supplementation, current use

  18. Hormone receptor densities in relation to 10B neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hechter, O.; Schwartz, I.L.

    1982-01-01

    This presentation is a theoretical discussion of the possibility that appropriate steroid-carborane derivatives might be used to selectively deliver boron-10 ( 10 B) to tumor cells with sex-hormone receptors in sufficient concentration for effective neutron capture theory (NCT) of hormone-dependent mammary and prostatic cancer. The results indicate the concentrations of androgen receptors (AR) and progesterone receptors (PR) in malignant prostatic cells or of estrogen receptors (ER) in malignant mammary cells are two low to achieve nuclear 10 B concentrations of 1 + g per g of tumor by using a steroid ligand coupled to a single carborane cage

  19. Temporal changes in clinic and ambulatory blood pressure during cyclic post-menopausal hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M B; Rasmussen, Verner; Jensen, Gorm Boje

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Post-menopausal hormone replacement (HRT) might protect against cardiovascular disease, possibly by arterial vasodilation and reduced blood pressure. Progestogens are needed to avoid endometrial disease but vascular effects are controversial. The objective was to assess temporal changes...... in blood pressure (BP) by two measurement techniques during a cyclic hormone replacement regimen. DESIGN AND METHODS: Sixteen healthy and normotensive post-menopausal women (age 55 +/- 3 years) were studied in a placebo-controlled, randomized crossover study, and were randomized to 17beta-oestradiol plus...

  20. Resumption of menstruation and pituitary response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone in functional hypothalamic amenorrhea subjects undertaking estrogen replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Z Q; Xu, J J; Lin, J F

    2013-11-01

    Functional hypothalamic amenorrhea (FHA) refers to a functional menstrual disorder with various causes and presentations. Recovery of menstrual cyclicity is common in long-term follow-up but the affecting factors remain unknown. To explore factors affecting the menstrual resumption and to evaluate the pituitary response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in FHA. Thirty cases with FHA were recruited. All subjects were put on continuous 1 mg/day estradiol valerate orally and followed up monthly. Recovery was defined as the occurrence of at least three consecutive regular cycles. Responder referred to those who recovered within two years of therapy. Gonadotropin response to the 50 μg GnRH challenge was tested every three months. Nineteen (63.3%) subjects recovered with a mean time to recovery of 26.8 months. Time to recovery was negatively correlated with body mass index (BMI) before and by amenorrhea. Twentyone cases had undertaken therapy for more than two years and 10 of them recovered. BMI before and by amenorrhea were negatively correlated with the recovery. Significant increase of serum luteinizing hormone (LH) and LH response to GnRH were noted after recovery. Menstrual resumption was common in FHA undertaking estrogen replacement therapy (ERT). The likelihood of recovery was affected by their BMI before and by amenorrhea but not by the weight gain during therapy. Low serum LH and attenuated LH response to GnRH were the main features of pituitary deficiency in FHA. The menstrual resumption in FHA was accompanied by the recovery of serum LH and the LH response to GnRH.

  1. Effect of hormone replacement therapy on the bone mass and urinary excretion of pyridinium cross-links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardini, D P; Sabino, A T; Meneses, A M; Kasamatsu, T; Vieira, J G

    2000-01-06

    The menopause accelerates bone loss and is associated with an increased bone turnover. Bone formation may be evaluated by several biochemical markers. However, the establishment of an accurate marker for bone resorption has been more difficult to achieve. To study the effect of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on bone mass and on the markers of bone resorption: urinary excretion of pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline. Cohort correlational study. Academic referral center. 53 post-menopausal women, aged 48-58 years. Urinary pyr and d-pyr were measured in fasting urine samples by spectrofluorometry after high performance liquid chromatography and corrected for creatinine excretion measured before treatment and after 1, 2, 4 and 12 months. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) before treatment and after 12 months of HRT. The BMD after HRT was about 4.7% (P < 0.0004); 2% (P < 0.002); and 3% (P < 0. 01) higher than the basal values in lumbar spine, neck and trochanter respectively. There were no significant correlations between pyridinium cross-links and age, weight, menopause duration and BMD. The decrease in pyr and d-pyr was progressive after HRT, reaching 28.9% (P < 0.0002), and 42% (P < 0.0002) respectively after 1 year. Urinary pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline excretion decreases early in hormone replacement therapy, reflecting a decrease in the bone resorption rate, and no correlation was observed with the bone mass evaluated by densitometry.

  2. Hormone replacement therapy increases levels of antibodies against heat shock protein 65 and certain species of oxidized low density lipoprotein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uint L.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Hormone replacement therapy (HRT reduces cardiovascular risks, although the initiation of therapy may be associated with transient adverse ischemic and thrombotic events. Antibodies against heat shock protein (Hsp and oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL have been found in atherosclerotic lesions and plasma of patients with coronary artery disease and may play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of HRT on the immune response by measuring plasma levels of antibodies against Hsp 65 and LDL with a low and high degree of copper-mediated oxidative modification of 20 postmenopausal women before and 90 days after receiving orally 0.625 mg equine conjugate estrogen plus 2.5 mg medroxyprogesterone acetate per day. HRT significantly increased antibodies against Hsp 65 (0.316 ± 0.03 vs 0.558 ± 0.11 and against LDL with a low degree of oxidative modification (0.100 ± 0.01 vs 0.217 ± 0.02 (P<0.05 and P<0.001, respectively, ANOVA. The hormone-mediated immune response may trigger an inflammatory response within the vessel wall and potentially increase plaque burden. Whether or not this immune response is temporary or sustained and deleterious requires further investigation.

  3. The presence and role of progesterone receptor in the ovaries of postmenopausal women who have not applied hormone replacement therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Piasecka

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available At present, not much is known about progesterone receptor (PR expression and localization in postmenopausal women ovaries. In the ovaries of reproductive age women, PR is localized in internal theca and granulosa cells, corpus luteum, ovary surface epithelium (OSE and in stroma. PR expression depends on the serum concentration of progesterone, estrogen, gonadotropin and androgen. The goal of the conducted studies was to examine PR localization and expression in the ovaries of postmenopausal women who have not applied hormone replacement therapy so far. Also, the correlation was examined between PR expression and localization in the ovaries, steroid and gonadotropin hormone serum concentrations, and influence of the time from the last menstruation. The material came from 50 postmenopausal women who had their ovaries removed due to non-neoplastic diseases. The women were divided into 3 groups (A, B, C depending on the time from the last menstruation. The follitropin (FSH, luteotropin (LH, estradiol (E2, testosterone (T, androstendione (A and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS concentrations in blood plasma were measured. Monoclonal mouse anti-human PR antibody was used for immunohistochemical detection (examination involved 50 postmenopausal ovaries. Between particular groups, E2 serum concentrations did not differ, but FSH, LH, T, A, DHEAS serum concentrations were significantly different. Immunohistochemical nuclear localization of PR in postmenopausal women ovaries was observed. PR expression was similar in all three groups (A, B, C. PR expression was observed in OSE nuclei and invaginations cysts deriving from the isolation of invaginated epithelium and metaplastic columnar epithelium and in stroma. In the ovaries of postmenopausal women who have not applied hormone replacement therapy so far, PR was detected in all three groups. Its expression did not depend on the time from menopause and was similar in all examined groups. FSH, LH, T, A

  4. [Fertility preservation, contraception and menopause hormone therapy in women treated for rare ovarian tumors: Guidelines from the French national network dedicated to rare gynaecological cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousset-Jablonski, Christine; Selle, Fréderic; Adda-Herzog, Elodie; Planchamp, François; Selleret, Lise; Pomel, Christophe; Chabbert-Buffet, Nathalie; Daraï, Emile; Pautier, Patricia; Trémollières, Florence; Guyon, Frederic; Rouzier, Roman; Laurence, Valérie; Chopin, Nicolas; Faure-Conter, Cécile; Bentivegna, Enrica; Vacher-Lavenu, Marie-Cécile; Lhomme, Catherine; Floquet, Anne; Treilleux, Isabelle; Lecuru, Fabrice; Gouy, Sébastien; Kalbacher, Elsa; Genestie, Catherine; de la Motte Rouge, Thibault; Ferron, Gwenael; Devouassoux-Shisheboran, Mojgan; Kurtz, Jean-Emmanuel; Namer, Moise; Joly, Florence; Pujade-Lauraine, Eric; Grynberg, Michael; Querleu, Denis; Morice, Philippe; Gompel, Anne; Ray-Coquard, Isabelle

    2018-03-01

    Rare ovarian tumors include complex borderline ovarian tumors, sex-cord tumors, germ cell tumors, and rare epithelial tumors. Indications and modalities of fertility preservation, infertility management and contraindications for hormonal contraception or menopause hormone therapy are frequent issues in clinical practice. A panel of experts from the French national network dedicated to rare gynaecological cancers, and of experts in reproductive medicine and gynaecology have worked on guidelines about fertility preservation, contraception and menopause hormone therapy in women treated for ovarian rare tumors. A panel of 39 experts from different specialties contributed to the preparation of the guidelines, following the DELPHI method (formal consensus method). Statements were drafted after a systematic literature review, and then rated through two successive rounds. Thirty-five recommendations were selected, and concerned indications for fertility preservation, contraindications for ovarian stimulation (in the context of fertility preservation or for infertility management), contraceptive options (especially hormonal ones), and menopause hormone therapy for each tumor type. Overall, prudence has been recommended in the case of potentially hormone-sensitive tumors such as sex cord tumors, serous and endometrioid low-grade adenocarcinomas, as well as for high-risk serous borderline ovarian tumors. In the context of a scarce literature, a formal consensus method allowed the elaboration of guidelines, which will help clinicians in the management of these patients. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in Turner syndrome: effect of therapy with growth hormone, oxandrolone, and a combination of both.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, D M; Frane, J W; Sherman, B; Johanson, A J; Hintz, R L; Rosenfeld, R G

    1988-02-01

    To evaluate the effects of growth-promoting therapy on carbohydrate metabolism in girls with Turner syndrome, we determined glucose and insulin concentrations during oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) at baseline and after 5 days, 2 months, and 12 months of treatment with growth hormone (GH), oxandrolone, or a combination of GH and oxandrolone, or after the same intervals with no therapy. Before therapy, subjects had a significantly greater glucose response during OGTT than published normal control values. There were no significant changes in mean fasting glucose, cholesterol, or triglyceride concentrations in any of the treatment groups. The integrated glucose concentrations rose significantly over baseline values in the oxandrolone group at 2 and 12 months and in the combination group at 5 days. There were significant increases in the mean integrated insulin concentrations at 2 and 12 months for the group receiving oxandrolone alone and at all three times for the group receiving combination therapy. Thus oxandrolone, alone or in combination with GH, had significant effects on carbohydrate metabolism in subjects with Turner syndrome, whereas GH alone did not.

  6. Comparison between the growth response to growth hormone (GH) therapy in children with partial GH insensitivity or mild GH deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Daniela F; Martinelli, Carlos Eduardo; Campos, Viviane C; Gomes, Elenilde S; Rocha, Ivina E S; Oliveira, Carla R P; Vicente, Taisa A R; Pereira, Rossana M C; Pereira, Francisco A; Cartaxo, Carla K A; Milani, Soraya L S; Oliveira, Mario C P; Melo, Enaldo V; Oliveira, Andre L P; Aguiar-Oliveira, Manuel H

    2014-02-01

    GH therapy is still controversial, except in severe GH deficiency (SGHD). The objective of this study was to compare the response to growth hormone (GH) therapy in children with partial GH insensitivity (PGHIS) and mild GH deficiency (MGHD) with those with SGHD. Fifteen PGHIS, 11 MGHD, and 19 SGHD subjects, followed up for more than one year in the Brazilian public care service, were evaluated regarding anthropometric and laboratory data at the beginning of treatment, after one year (1st year) on treatment, and at the last assessment (up to ten years in SGHD, up to four years in MGHD, and up to eight years in PGHIS). Initial height standard deviation score (SDS) in SGHD was lower than in MGHD and PGHIS. Although the increase in 1 st year height SDS in comparison to initial height SDS was not different among the groups, height-SDS after the first year of treatment remained lower in SGHD than in MGHD. There was no difference in height-SDS at the last assessment of the children among the three groups. GH therapy, in the entire period of observation, caused a trend towards lower increase in height SDS in PGHIS than SGHD but similar increases were observed in MGHD and SGHD. GH therapy increases height in PGHIS and produces similar height effects in MGHD and SGHD.

  7. Different effects of paliperidone and risperidone therapy on blood lipid and Hcy metabolism as well as endocrine hormones in patients with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bei-Fang Fan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the different effects of paliperidone and risperidone therapy on blood lipid and Hcy metabolism as well as endocrine hormones in patients with schizophrenia. Methods: A total of 118 patients with schizophrenia who were treated in the hospital between December 2014 and February 2017 were collected as the research subjects and divided into control group and study group by random number table, each group with 59 cases. Control group received risperidone therapy, observation group received paliperidone therapy, and the differences in the levels of blood lipid indexes, Hcy metabolism indexes and endocrine hormones were compared between the two groups before and after treatment. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in the levels of blood lipid indexes, Hcy and endocrine hormones between the two groups before treatment. After treatment, lipid indexes TG and TC levels in peripheral blood of study group were lower than those of control group while HDL-C content was higher than that of control group; Hcy level in serum of study group was lower than that of control group; endocrine hormones FT3, FT4, T and E2 levels in serum of study group were higher than those of control group. Conclusion: paliperidone therapy for schizophrenia can be more effective than risperidone in regulating blood lipid metabolism, Hcy metabolism and endocrine hormones.

  8. Health care factors associated with survival among women with breast cancer on hormone therapy in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 2004 – 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia de Brito

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives To better understand the role that health care plays in breast cancer survival by investigating the effects that hormone therapy adherence and other select health care variables, adjusted for clinical and sociodemographic factors, had among a population of women in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Methods This was a longitudinal study based on secondary data of 5 861 women treated with hormone therapy (tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors at the National Cancer Institute of Brazil (INCA, from 1 January 2004 – 29 October 2010. Four different sources of data were integrated for analysis: INCA Pharmacy Sector Dispensation System; Hospital-based Cancer Registry; Integrated Hospital System and INCA Absolute System; and Mortality Information System. Analyses explored the effects of adherence to hormone therapy, disease care aspects, and sociodemographic, behavioral, and clinical variables, on the time of survival, using Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards models. Results The general survival rate was 94% in the first year after initiation of hormone therapy, and 71% in the fifth year. The Cox model indicated a higher hazard of death among women smokers, with more hospitalizations, more exams, and, among those who used, who used only aromatase inhibitors, as hormone therapy modality. The hazard was lower among women with a partner (stable relationship, a high school or college education a family history of cancer, and those who were treated by a mastologist, oncologist, and/or psychotherapist, who underwent surgery, and who adhered to hormone therapy. Conclusions The study indicated more vulnerable sub-groups and the aspects of care that provide best results, bringing new knowledge to improve assistance to this group of women.

  9. Temporal changes in clinic and ambulatory blood pressure during cyclic post-menopausal hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M B; Rasmussen, Verner; Jensen, Gorm Boje

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Post-menopausal hormone replacement (HRT) might protect against cardiovascular disease, possibly by arterial vasodilation and reduced blood pressure. Progestogens are needed to avoid endometrial disease but vascular effects are controversial. The objective was to assess temporal changes...... in blood pressure (BP) by two measurement techniques during a cyclic hormone replacement regimen. DESIGN AND METHODS: Sixteen healthy and normotensive post-menopausal women (age 55 +/- 3 years) were studied in a placebo-controlled, randomized crossover study, and were randomized to 17beta-oestradiol plus...... and in the ninth weeks of treatment in both periods. RESULTS: Clinic systolic and diastolic BP were reduced after 10 days of oestradiol (-5.1 and -3.2 mmHg respectively, P

  10. Circulating levels of pegvisomant and endogenous growth hormone during prolonged pegvisomant therapy in patients with acromegaly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Michael; Fisker, Sanne; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    correlated with baseline growth hormone levels, whereas no associations between serum pegvisomant and either dose, gender, age or body weight were found. CONCLUSIONS: (1) Serum GH levels increased initially, but remained stable during prolonged pegvisomant treatment in patients with acromegaly, (2) serum...... pegvisomant levels predicted the reduction in serum IGF-I during treatment and (3) the interindividual variation in serum pegvisomant levels seems not predicted by either age, gender or body composition.......OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether pegvisomant treatment in acromegaly induces gradual elevations in endogenous serum growth hormone (GH) levels and whether serum pegvisomant levels predict the therapeutic outcome. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Seventeen patients (6 women), mean age 46·3 years (range: 23...

  11. Sex hormone therapy and progression of cardiovascular disease in menopausal women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhurani, Rabe E.; Chahal, C. Anwar A.; Ahmed, Ahmed T.; Mohamed, Essa A.; Miller, Virginia M.

    2017-01-01

    One of the most controversial health decisions facing women is deciding upon the use of hormonal treatments for symptoms of menopause. This brief review focuses on the historical context of use of menopausal hormone treatments (MHT), summarizes results of major observational, primary and secondary prevention studies of MHT and cardiovascular (CV) outcomes, provides evidence for how sex steroids modulate CV function and identifies challenges for future research. As medicine enters an era of personalization of treatment options, additional research into sex differences in the aetiology of CV diseases will lead to better risk identification for CV disease in women and identify whether a woman might receive CV benefit from specific formulations and doses of MHT. PMID:27215679

  12. Comparison of piascledine (avocado and soybean oil) and hormone replacement therapy in menopausal-induced hot flashing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panahi, Yunes; Beiraghdar, Fatemeh; Kashani, Nafise; Baharie Javan, Nika; Dadjo, Yahya

    2011-01-01

    Different symptoms in Climacteric period, includes hot flash. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is common therapy for relief of menopausal symptoms but has possible contraindications and side effects. Recently Piascledine (combination of Avocado oil with Soybean oil) showed effects in reducing hot flash severity. Present study designed to compare the effects of HRT with Piascledine in treatment of hot flash. The cases of this study were sixty-six women at the age range of 40 to 70 years and complaints of menopause-induced hot flashing, whose last menstruation dated at least 6 months prior to the beginning of the study. The patients in this open label clinical trial, randomized to receive Piascledine capsule 1 mg or HRT (0.625 mg oral daily Conjugated Estrogen tablets, plus 2.5 mg continuous oral daily Medroxyprogesterone Acetate tablets) for 2 month. Hot flash property and severity was assessed via a daily check list and Visual analog scale. Climacteric symptom was measured before and after intervention using Greene Climacteric Scale (GCS) and Blatt-kupperman Menopausal Index (BKMI). Thirty-three eligible patients were allocated in each group. From the Piascledine group, one patient and from the HRT group, 16 patients weren›t willing to attend the study; therefore, 32 and 17 woman received treatment in Piascledine and HRT groups. 4 patients were withdrawn for vaginal bleeding and one for breast tenderness from HTR group. Hot flash severity in both groups decreased during the time similarly. With regard to GCS (p = 0.571) and BMKI (p = 0.891), the outcome was similar among the two groups. Due to low HRT compliance and its possible risks in long period of time and considering the same activity of soybean supplement and HRT in relieving the hot flash as menopausal symptoms in women, it seems that soybean supplements can be an alternative therapy to hormone.

  13. Informing women on menopause and hormone therapy: Know The Menopause a multidisciplinary project involving local healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, Serena; Satolli, Roberto; Colombo, Cinzia; Senatore, Sabrina; Cotichini, Rodolfo; Da Cas, Roberto; Spila Alegiani, Stefania; Mosconi, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Hormone therapy (HT) in the menopause is still a tricky question among healthcare providers, women and mass media. Informing women about hormone replacement therapy was a Consensus Conference (CC) organized in 2008: the project Know the Menopause has been launched to shift out the results to women and healthcare providers and to assess the impact of the cc's statement. And Findings: The project, aimed at women aged 45-60 years, was developed in four Italian Regions: Lombardy, Tuscany, Lazio, Sicily, each with one Local Health Unit (LHU) as "intervention" and one as "control". Activities performed were: survey on the press; training courses for health professionals; educational materials for target populations; survey aimed at women, general practitioners (GPs), and gynaecologists; data analysis on HT drugs' prescription. Local activities were: training courses; public meetings; dissemination on mass media. About 3,700 health professionals were contacted and 1,800 participated in the project. About 146,500 printed leaflets on menopause were distributed to facilitate the dialogue among women and health care professionals. Training courses and educational cascade-process activities: participation ranged 25- 72% of GPs, 17-71% of gynaecologists, 14-78% of pharmacists, 34-85% of midwives. 1,281 women interviewed. More than 90% believed menopause was a normal phase in life. More than half did not receive information about menopause and therapies. HT prescription analysis: prevalence fell from 6% to 4% in five years. No differences in time trends before-after the intervention. Major limitations are: organizational difficulties met by LHU, too short time for some local activities. A huge amount of information was spread through health professionals and women. The issue of menopause was also used to discuss women's wellbeing. This project offered an opportunity to launch a multidisciplinary, multimodal approach to menopause looking not only at pharmacological aspects, but

  14. PSA Response to Lenalidomide Therapy in a Pre-Treated Patient with Metastatic Prostate Cancer Refractory to Hormones and Chemotherapy: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Manel Gasent Blesa

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Hormone-resistant prostate cancer (HRPC occurs when prostate cancer is no longer responsive to hormone therapy. Treatment options are limited, and there is a clear necessity for therapies that improve outcome. Preclinical and clinical evidence supports the role of the immunomodulatory agent lenalidomide in HRPC. In this paper, we report that lenalidomide showed antitumoral activity in a patient with HRPC and bone metastases pre-treated with chemotherapy, decreased the PSA level and improved the patient’s health status for the first 5 months. It is important to emphasize that it was not associated with hematologic toxicity.

  15. Use of menopausal hormone therapy and risk of ductal and lobular breast cancer among women 55–74 years of age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Christopher I.; Daling, Janet R.; Haugen, Kara L.; Tang, Mei Tzu Chen; Porter, Peggy L.; Malone, Kathleen E.

    2014-01-01

    Background The Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) randomized trials found that use of combined estrogen and progestin menopausal hormone therapy (CHT) increases breast cancer risk, but use of unopposed estrogen hormone therapy (EHT) does not. However, several questions regarding the impact of hormone use on risk of different types of breast cancer and what thresholds of use confer elevations in risk remain. Methods We conducted a population-based case-control study among women 55–74 years of age to assess the association between menopausal hormone use and risk of invasive ductal and invasive lobular breast carcinomas. Associations were evaluated using polytomous logistic regression and analyses included 880 ductal cases, 1,027 lobular cases, and 856 controls. Results Current EHT and CHT use were associated with 1.6-fold [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.1–2.2] and 2.3-fold (95% CI: 1.7–3.2) increased risks of lobular breast cancer, respectively, but neither was associated with risk of ductal cancer. Lobular cancer risk was increased after nine years of EHT use, but after only three years of CHT use. Discussion Evidence across more than a dozen studies indicates that lobular carcinoma is the type of breast cancer most strongly influenced by menopausal hormones. Here we characterize what thresholds of duration of use of both EHT and CHT that confer elevations in risk. Impact Despite the rapid decline in hormone therapy use the WHI results were published, study of the hazards associated with these medications remains relevant given the estimated 38 million hormone therapy prescriptions that are still filled in the United States annually. PMID:24748570

  16. Effects of substitution and high-dose thyroid hormone therapy on deiodination, sulfoconjugation, and tissue thyroid hormone levels in prolonged critically ill rabbits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Debaveye (Yves); B. Ellger (Björn); L. Mebis (Liese); T.J. Visser (Theo); V.M. Darras (Veerle); G. van den Berghe (Greet)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractTo delineate the metabolic fate of thyroid hormone in prolonged critically ill rabbits, we investigated the impact of two dose regimes of thyroid hormone on plasma 3,3′-diiodothyronine (T2) and T4S, deiodinase type 1 (D1) and D3 activity, and tissue iodothyronine levels in liver and

  17. Effects of a soy-based dietary supplement compared with low-dose hormone therapy on the urogenital system: a randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmignani, Lucio O; Pedro, Adriana Orcesi; Montemor, Eliana B; Arias, Victor A; Costa-Paiva, Lucia H; Pinto-Neto, Aarão M

    2015-07-01

    This study aims to compare the effects of a soy-based dietary supplement, low-dose hormone therapy (HT), and placebo on the urogenital system in postmenopausal women. In this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, 60 healthy postmenopausal women aged 40 to 60 years (mean time since menopause, 4.1 y) were randomized into three groups: a soy dietary supplement group (90 mg of isoflavone), a low-dose HT group (1 mg of estradiol plus 0.5 mg of norethisterone), and a placebo group. Urinary, vaginal, and sexual complaints were evaluated using the urogenital subscale of the Menopause Rating Scale. Vaginal maturation value was calculated. Transvaginal sonography was performed to evaluate endometrial thickness. Genital bleeding pattern was assessed. Statistical analysis was performed using χ(2) test, Fisher's exact test, paired Student's t test, Kruskal-Wallis test, Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric test, and analysis of variance. For intergroup comparisons, Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric test (followed by Mann-Whitney U test) was used. Vaginal dryness improved significantly in the soy and HT groups (P = 0.04). Urinary and sexual symptoms did not change with treatment in the three groups. After 16 weeks of treatment, there was a significant increase in maturation value only in the HT group (P < 0.01). Vaginal pH decreased only in this group (P < 0.01). There were no statistically significant differences in endometrial thickness between the three groups, and the adverse effects evaluated were similar. This study shows that a soy-based dietary supplement used for 16 weeks fails to exert estrogenic action on the urogenital tract but improves vaginal dryness.

  18. Daily or intermittent calcitriol administration during growth hormone therapy in rats with renal failure and advanced secondary hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Cheryl P; He, Yu-Zhu

    2005-04-01

    Growth hormone (GH) improves growth in children with chronic renal failure. The response to GH may be affected by the degree of secondary hyperparathyroidism and concurrent treatment with vitamin D. Forty-six rats underwent 5/6 nephrectomy (Nx) and were given a high-phosphorus diet (Nx-Phos) to induce advanced secondary hyperparathyroidism and divided into the following groups: (1) Nx-Phos (n = 10) received saline, (2) GH at 10 IU/kg per d (Nx-Phos+GH; n = 9), (3) GH and daily calcitriol (D) at 50 ng/kg per d (Nx-Phos+GH+daily D; n = 8), (4) GH and intermittent D (three times weekly) at 350 ng/kg per wk (Nx-Phos+GH+int D; n = 9), and (5) intact-control (n = 10). Serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels were elevated in Nx-Phos, but IGF-I levels did not change with growth hormone. Body length, tibial length, and growth plate width did not increase with either GH or calcitriol. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen staining, PTH/PTHrP receptor, bone morphogenetic protein-7, and fibroblast growth factor receptor-3 expression increased with GH alone or with intermittent calcitriol but were slightly diminished during daily calcitriol administration. GH enhanced IGF-I, IGF binding receptor-3, and GH receptor but declined with daily and intermittent calcitriol. Overall, there was no improvement in body length, tibial length, and growth plate width at the end of GH therapy, but selected markers of chondrocyte proliferation and chondrocyte differentiation increased, although these changes were attenuated by calcitriol. The combination of GH and calcitriol that is frequently used in children with renal failure and secondary hyperparathyroidism require further studies to evaluate the optimal dose and frequency of administration to increase linear growth and prevent bone disease.

  19. Maintenance therapy with dienogest following gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist treatment for endometriosis-associated pelvic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitawaki, Jo; Kusuki, Izumi; Yamanaka, Kaoruko; Suganuma, Izumi

    2011-08-01

    To examine whether long-term administration of dienogest following gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRH-a) therapy would prolong the relief of pelvic pain while reducing the amount of irregular uterine bleeding. This was a prospective, non-randomized clinical trial. Among the patients suffering from chronic pelvic pain associated with recurrent endometriosis, Group G (n=38) received GnRH-a for 4-6 months and then dienogest (1 mg/day) for 12 months. The dose of dienogest was increased to 1.5 or 2 mg/day when a patient had uncontrollable uterine bleeding {n=15 (39%)}. Group D (n=33) received only dienogest (2 mg/day) for 12 months. Pelvic pain was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). Uterine bleeding was semi-quantified using a pictorial blood loss assessment chart (PBAC). In Group G, GnRH-a significantly reduced the VAS score for pelvic pain, and alleviation was maintained during the 12-month therapy with dienogest. There was no significant difference in pain reduction between Group G and Group D. The PBAC score during the first 6 months on dienogest was significantly smaller in Group G than in Group D. Treatment with a GnRH-a followed by long-term dienogest therapy maintains the relief of endometriosis-associated pelvic pain achieved with GnRH-a therapy for at least 12 months. This regimen reduces the amount of irregular uterine bleeding that often occurs during the early phase of dienogest therapy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Associations of hormonal contraceptive use with measures of HIV disease progression and antiretroviral therapy effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, Maura K; Jeng, Gary; Samarina, Anna; Akatova, Natalia; Martirosyan, Margarita; Kissin, Dmitry M; Curtis, Kathryn M; Marchbanks, Polly A; Hillis, Susan D; Mandel, Michele G; Jamieson, Denise J

    2016-01-01

    To examine the associations between hormonal contraceptive use and measures of HIV disease progression and antiretroviral treatment (ART) effectiveness. A prospective cohort study of women with prevalent HIV infection in St. Petersburg, Russia, was conducted. After contraceptive counseling, participants chose to use combined oral contraceptives (COCs), depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA), a copper intrauterine device (IUD) or male condoms for pregnancy prevention. Among participants not using ART at enrollment, we used multivariate Cox regression to assess the association between current (time-varying) contraceptive use and disease progression, measured by the primary composite outcome of CD4 decline to contraceptive method. During a total of 5233 months follow-up among participants not using ART with enrollment CD4 ≥350 cells/mm(3) (n=315), 97 experienced disease progression. Neither current use of COCs [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 0.91, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.56-1.48] nor DMPA (aHR 1.28, 95% CI 0.71-2.31) was associated with a statistically significant increased risk for disease progression compared with use of nonhormonal methods (IUD or condoms). Among participants using ART at enrollment (n=77), we found no statistically significant differences in the predicted mean changes in CD4 cell count comparing current use of COCs (p=.1) or DMPA (p=.3) with nonhormonal methods. Hormonal contraceptive use was not significantly associated with measures of HIV disease progression or ART effectiveness among women with prevalent HIV infection. Hormonal contraceptive use was not significantly associated with measures of HIV disease progression or ART effectiveness among women with prevalent HIV infection. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Associations of hormonal contraceptive use with measures of HIV disease progression and antiretroviral therapy effectiveness☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, Maura K.; Jeng, Gary; Samarina, Anna; Akatova, Natalia; Martirosyan, Margarita; Kissin, Dmitry M.; Curtis, Kathryn M.; Marchbanks, Polly A.; Hillis, Susan D.; Mandel, Michele G.; Jamieson, Denise J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the associations between hormonal contraceptive use and measures of HIV disease progression and antiretroviral treatment (ART) effectiveness. Study design A prospective cohort study of women with prevalent HIV infection in St. Petersburg, Russia, was conducted. After contraceptive counseling, participants chose to use combined oral contraceptives (COCs), depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA), a copper intrauterine device (IUD) or male condoms for pregnancy prevention. Among participants not using ART at enrollment, we used multivariate Cox regression to assess the association between current (time-varying) contraceptive use and disease progression, measured by the primary composite outcome of CD4 decline to contraceptive method. Results During a total of 5233 months follow-up among participants not using ART with enrollment CD4 ≥ 350 cells/mm3 (n=315), 97 experienced disease progression. Neither current use of COCs [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 0.91, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.56–1.48] nor DMPA (aHR 1.28, 95% CI 0.71–2.31) was associated with a statistically significant increased risk for disease progression compared with use of nonhormonal methods (IUD or condoms). Among participants using ART at enrollment (n=77), we found no statistically significant differences in the predicted mean changes in CD4 cell count comparing current use of COCs (p=.1) or DMPA (p=.3) with nonhormonal methods. Conclusion Hormonal contraceptive use was not significantly associated with measures of HIV disease progression or ART effectiveness among women with prevalent HIV infection. Implications Hormonal contraceptive use was not significantly associated with measures of HIV disease progression or ART effectiveness among women with prevalent HIV infection. PMID:26197261

  2. The timing hypothesis: Do coronary risks of menopausal hormone therapy vary by age or time since menopause onset?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassuk, Shari S; Manson, JoAnn E

    2016-05-01

    The Women's Health Initiative (WHI), a landmark randomized trial of menopausal hormone therapy (HT) for prevention of chronic disease in postmenopausal women aged 50-79, established that such therapy neither prevents coronary heart disease (CHD) nor yields a favorable balance of benefits and risks in such women as a whole. However, a nuanced look at the data from this trial, considered alongside other evidence, suggests that timing of HT initiation affects the relation between such therapy and coronary risk, as well as its overall benefit-risk balance. Estrogen may have a beneficial effect on the heart if started in early menopause, when a woman's arteries are likely to be relatively healthy, but a harmful effect if started in late menopause, when those arteries are more likely to show signs of atherosclerotic disease. However, even if HT-associated relative risks are constant across age or time since menopause onset, the low absolute risk of CHD in younger or recently menopausal women translates into low attributable risks in this group. Thus, HT initiation for relief of moderate to severe vasomotor symptoms in early menopausal patients who have a favorable coronary profile remains a viable option. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Association of perceived tinnitus with duration of hormone replacement therapy in Korean postmenopausal women: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong-Su; Han, Kyung-do; Joo, Young-Hoon

    2017-07-10

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and tinnitus in South Korea using data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (KNHANES) (2010-2012). Cross-sectional analysis of a nationwide health survey. KNHANES is a nationally representative cross-sectional survey of South Korea population. Only postmenopausal women aged 19-65 years were included in the study (n=2736). Auditory function was evaluated using pure-tone audiometric testing according to established KNHANES protocols. Subjects were questioned about their experience with tinnitus. Exogenous hormone-related factors included the starting age and duration of HRT. The overall prevalence of tinnitus was 22.2% among postmenopausal women. (1) Tinnitus severity was significantly higher in women using HRT (p=0.0024) and (2) significantly lower in women who breast fed their children (p=0.0386). (3) According to logistic regression models, the longer duration of HRT was significantly associated with increasing tinnitus (OR=1.323, 95% CI 1.007 to 1.737, p=0.0441). A longer duration of HRT was associated with developing tinnitus in Korean postmenopausal women. Further experimental and epidemiological researches are needed to elucidate the causal relationship between HRT and tinnitus. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. Increased risk of stroke in hypertensive women using hormone therapy: analyses based on the Danish Nurse Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, Ellen; Jovanovic, Zorana; Heitmann, Berit L

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent randomized clinical trials suggest an increased risk of stroke with hormone therapy (HT), whereas observational studies have suggested mixed results. Differences in design, definitions of HT exposure, and stroke outcome may explain these discrepancies. Little attention has been.......0% of the 13 122 were current HT users, 14.3% were past users, and 57.7% were never users. Overall, HT exposure was not consistently associated with stroke. However, subdivision based on the presence of hypertension showed a significantly increased risk of stroke among hypertensive women. Compared...... with hypertensive never HT users, an increased risk of total stroke was found with current use (hazard ratio, 2.35; 95% confidence interval, 1.16-4.74) and especially with current use of estrogen-progestin (hazard ratio, 3.00; 95% confidence interval, 1.33-6.76). Normotensive women had no increased risk of stroke...

  5. Effects of different progestin regimens in hormone replacement therapy on blood coagulation factor VII and tissue factor pathway inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bladbjerg, E-M; Skouby, S O.; Andersen, L F

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-term hormone replacement therapy (HRT) reduces cardiovascular risk, but an early increased risk was reported in women with coronary heart disease. In such women the arterial intima can express tissue factor, and changes in coagulation factor VII (factor VII) and tissue factor...... pathway inhibitor (TFPI) may be deleterious. METHODS: We measured factor VII clotting activity, activated factor VII, and concentrations of factor VII and TFPI during 12 months in healthy post-menopausal women randomized to: (i). cyclic oral estrogen/progestin (n = 25); (ii). long-cycle oral estrogen...... after progestin intake. The integrated response, AUC, for TFPI was significantly lower in the HRT groups compared with the reference group. CONCLUSION: The observed changes may increase the early thrombotic risk associated with HRT use. Udgivelsesdato: 2002-Dec...

  6. Continuation of growth hormone (GH) therapy in GH-deficient patients during transition from childhood to adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørrelund, Helene; Vahl, N; Juul, A

    2000-01-01

    fat and increased fat-free mass [M-value (mg/kg x min), 5.1 +/- 0.7 (placebo) vs. 3.4 +/- 1.0 (open), P = 0.09]. In the group randomized to continued GH treatment almost all hormonal and metabolic parameters remained unchanged during the study. In conclusion, 1) discontinuation of GH therapy for 1 yr......The appropriate management of GH-deficient patients during transition from childhood to adulthood has not been reported in controlled trials, even though there is evidence to suggest that this phase is associated with specific problems in relation to GH sensitivity. An issue of particular interest...... is the impact of GH substitution on insulin sensitivity, which normally declines during puberty. We, therefore, evaluated insulin sensitivity (euglycemic glucose clamp) and substrate metabolism in 18 GH-deficient patients (6 females and 12 males; age, 20 +/- 1 yr; body mass index, 25 +/- 1 kg/m2) in a placebo...

  7. The growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor axis during testosterone replacement therapy in GH-treated hypopituitary males

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, Sidse; Nørrelund, Helene; Juul, A

    2001-01-01

    -independent effect on IGF-I and related parameters. Eight adult hypopituitary men (39.9 +/- 5.7 years) receiving growth hormone (GH) and testosterone replacement therapy (250 mg testosterone enantate every fourth week) participated in this prospective study. Frequent blood samples were drawn over a 5 week period......-labile subunit decreased (ANOVA, P = 0.04 and P = 0.02 respectively) but post hoc analysis did not reveal a particular difference between days. IGFBP-1 increased following testosterone administration (ANOVA, P = 0.05), whereas GH binding protein levels tended to decrease following testosterone administration...... (ANOVA, P = 0.08). Prostate-specific antigen tended slightly to increase after each testosterone injection (ANOVA, P = 0.08, post hoc, NS). We conclude that major changes in total IGF-I are not induced during conventional intramuscular testosterone replacement in GH-treated hypopituitary males...

  8. The growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor axis during testosterone replacement therapy in GH-treated hypopituitary males

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, Sidse; Nørrelund, Helene; Juul, A

    2001-01-01

    Several studies suggest a direct effect of sex steroids on insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) production. Oestrogen has been hypothesized directly to inhibit hepatic IGF-I production, but the role of androgens is not clarified. We aimed to investigate whether testosterone exerts a pituitary......-independent effect on IGF-I and related parameters. Eight adult hypopituitary men (39.9 +/- 5.7 years) receiving growth hormone (GH) and testosterone replacement therapy (250 mg testosterone enantate every fourth week) participated in this prospective study. Frequent blood samples were drawn over a 5 week period...... in relation to two testosterone injections. Mean baseline IGF-I levels were 352 +/- 135 microg/L, and they remained unaltered during the study period (analysis of variance (ANOVA), P = 0.88). Free IGF-I levels did not change either (ANOVA, P = 0.35). Serum IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) and acid...

  9. Massage Therapy for Reducing Stress Hormones and Enhancing Immune Function in Breast Cancer Survivors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tronson, Gail

    2000-01-01

    The objectives and specific aims of the ongoing study are to evaluate massage and relaxation therapies for an ethnically diverse group of women with early stages of breast cancer (Stages 1 and 2) for (1...

  10. Massage Therapy for Reducing Stress Hormones and Enhancing Immune Function in Breast Cancer Survivors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ironson, Gail

    2001-01-01

    The objectives and specific aims of the ongoing study are to evaluate massage and relaxation therapies for an ethnically diverse group of women with early stages of breast cancer (Stages 1 and 2) for 1...

  11. Effect of hormone replacement therapy on the bone mass and urinary excretion of pyridinium cross-links

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolores Perovano Pardini

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: The menopause accelerates bone loss and is associated with an increased bone turnover. Bone formation may be evaluated by several biochemical markers. However, the establishment of an accurate marker for bone resorption has been more difficult to achieve. OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of hormone replacement therapy (HRT on bone mass and on the markers of bone resorption: urinary excretion of pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline. DESIGN: Cohort correlational study. SETTING: Academic referral center. SAMPLE: 53 post-menopausal women, aged 48-58 years. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: Urinary pyr and d-pyr were measured in fasting urine samples by spectrofluorometry after high performance liquid chromatography and corrected for creatinine excretion measured before treatment and after 1, 2, 4 and 12 months. Bone mineral density (BMD was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA before treatment and after 12 months of HRT. RESULTS: The BMD after HRT was about 4.7% (P < 0.0004; 2% (P < 0.002; and 3% (P < 0.01 higher than the basal values in lumbar spine, neck and trochanter respectively. There were no significant correlations between pyridinium cross-links and age, weight, menopause duration and BMD. The decrease in pyr and d-pyr was progressive after HRT, reaching 28.9% (P < 0.0002, and 42% (P < 0.0002 respectively after 1 year. CONCLUSIONS: Urinary pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline excretion decreases early in hormone replacement therapy, reflecting a decrease in the bone resorption rate, and no correlation was observed with the bone mass evaluated by densitometry.

  12. Hormone replacement therapy in menopause as a risk factor for developing breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Firmino Souto

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Analisar a produção científica envolvendo o uso da terapia de reposição hormonal no climatério como um fator de risco para desenvolvimento de câncer de mama. Método: Realizou-se uma revisão integrativa da literatura. Utilizamos as bases de dados BDENF, LILACS e SciELO. Identificamos 71 artigos, dos quais 24 compuseram nossa amostra. Resultados: Observamos que o Brasil foi o país com mais publicações e o idioma mais requisitado foi o português. Em relação à escolha do delineamento do estudo, 50% dos estudos possuíam abordagem metodológica do tipo qualitativa e o método de coleta de dados por meio de documentos foi o mais utilizado. Conclusão: A enfermagem como profissional da saúde deve orientar as mulheres em idade perimenopausa sobre os riscos e benefícios do uso da terapia de reposição hormonal a fim de auxiliá-las na adesão ou não a esse tratamento.

  13. Kidney growth and renal functions under the growth hormone replacement therapy in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ece, Aydın; Çetinkaya, Semra; Ekşioğlu, Seçil; Şenel, Saliha; Özkasap, Serdar; Giniş, Tayfur; Sen, Velat; Şahin, Cahit

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the kidney growth and renal functions in children receiving recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) treatment. A total of 37 children who received rhGH for 1.5 years before the study was started and 48 healthy controls were included at first evaluation. Hormone levels were determined and kidney sizes were measured by ultrasound. Kidney functions were assessed by serum creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). After 3 years of first evaluation, 23 patients were re-assessed. Kidney sizes were found to be lower in rhGH received children compared with controls at first evaluation (p0.05). Although no abnormal renal function test results were found at first and second evaluations; rhGH received children had significantly lower eGFR, at first evaluation, compared with controls; however, renal functions significantly increased after 3 years of follow-up (pgrowth is parallel to growth in body height and other visceral organs. A 3-years rhGH treatment resulted in significant increases in renal functions.

  14. Second-Line Hormonal Therapy for Men With Chemotherapy-Naïve, Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Provisional Clinical Opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgo, Katherine S; Basch, Ethan; Loblaw, D Andrew; Oliver, Thomas K; Rumble, R Bryan; Carducci, Michael A; Nordquist, Luke; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Winquist, Eric; Singer, Eric A

    2017-06-10

    Purpose ASCO provisional clinical opinions (PCOs) offer direction to the ASCO membership after publication or presentation of potential practice-changing data. This PCO addresses second-line hormonal therapy for chemotherapy-naïve men with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) who range from being asymptomatic with only biochemical evidence of CRPC to having documented metastases but minimal symptoms. Clinical Context The treatment goal for CRPC is palliation. Despite resistance to initial androgen deprivation therapy, most men respond to second-line hormonal therapies. However, guidelines have neither addressed second-line hormonal therapy for nonmetastatic CRPC nor provided specific guidance with regard to the chemotherapy-naïve population. Recent Data Six phase III randomized controlled trials and expert consensus opinion inform this PCO. Provisional Clinical Opinion For men with CRPC, a castrate state should be maintained indefinitely. Second-line hormonal therapy (eg, antiandrogens, CYP17 inhibitors) may be considered in patients with nonmetastatic CRPC at high risk for metastatic disease (rapid prostate-specific antigen doubling time or velocity) but otherwise is not suggested. In patients with radiographic evidence of metastases and minimal symptoms, enzalutamide or abiraterone plus prednisone should be offered after discussion with patients about potential harms, benefits, costs, and patient preferences. Radium-223 and sipuleucel-T also are options. No evidence provides guidance about the optimal order of hormonal therapies for CRPC beyond second-line treatment. Prostate-specific antigen testing every 4 to 6 months is reasonable for men without metastases. Routine radiographic restaging generally is not suggested but can be considered for patients at risk for metastases or who exhibit symptoms or other evidence of progression. Additional information is available at www.asco.org/genitourinary-cancer-guidelines and www.asco.org/guidelineswiki .

  15. Long-Term Follow-up of a Case with Proprotein Convertase 1/3 Deficiency: Transient Diabetes Mellitus with Intervening Diabetic Ketoacidosis During Growth Hormone Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gönç, E. Nazlı; Özön, Alev; Alikaşifoğlu, Ayfer; Kandemir, Nurgün

    2017-09-01

    Proprotein convertase 1/3 (PC1/3) deficiency is a very rare disease characterized by severe intractable diarrhea in the first years of life, followed by obesity and several hormonal deficiencies later. Diabetes mellitus requiring insulin treatment and diabetic ketoacidosis have not been reported in this disorder. We herein present a girl with PC1/3 deficiency who has been followed from birth to 17 years of age. She developed deficiencies of all pituitary hormones over time as well as diabetes mellitus while receiving growth hormone (GH) therapy. She was complicated with diabetic ketoacidosis during dietary management of diabetes mellitus, thus insulin treatment was initiated. Insulin requirement to regulate hyperglycemia was short-lived. Repeat oral glucose tolerance test five years later was normal. The findings of this patient show that diabetes mellitus can develop at any time during follow-up of cases with proportein convertase 1/3 deficiency especially under GH therapy.

  16. Changes in remnant and high-density lipoproteins associated with hormone therapy and progression of coronary artery disease in postmenopausal women

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of hormone therapy (HT) on the plasma concentration of remnant lipoprotein cholesterol (RLP-C) and high density lipoprotein (HDL) subpopulations and the contribution of HT-related changes in these lipoproteins to the progression of coronary heart disease (CHD) were examined in 256 postmen...

  17. The effects of GH and hormone replacement therapy on serum concentrations of mannan-binding lectin, surfactant protein D and vitamin D binding protein in Turner syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg; Leth-Larsen, Rikke; Lauridsen, Anna Lis

    2004-01-01

    function. In the present study we examined whether GH or hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in Turner syndrome (TS) influence the serum concentrations of MBL and two other proteins partaking in the innate immune defence, surfactant protein D (SP-D) and vitamin D binding protein (DBP). DESIGN: Study 1...

  18. Remarkable change in age-specific breast cancer incidence in the Swiss canton of Geneva and its possible relation with the use of hormone replacement therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchardy, Christine; Morabia, Alfredo; Verkooijen, Helena M; Fioretta, Gérald; Wespi, Yves; Schäfer, Peter

    2006-01-01

    This article aims to explain the reasons for the remarkable change in age of breast cancer occurrence in the Swiss canton of Geneva. We used population-based data from the Geneva cancer registry, which collects information on method of detection, stage and tumour characteristics since 1975. For patients diagnosed between 1997–2003, we obtained additional information on use of hormone replacement therapy from a large prospective study on breast cancer. Using generalized log linear regression analysis, we compared age-specific incidence rates with respect to period, stage, oestrogen receptor status, method of detection and use of hormone replacement therapy. In the periods 1975–1979 and 1985–1989, breast cancer risk increased with age, showing the highest incidence rates among women aged ≥ 85 years. From 1997, the age-specific incidence curve changed completely (p < 0.0001), showing an incidence peak at 60–64 years and a reduced incidence among elderly women. This incidence peak concerned mainly early stage and oestrogen positive cancers and was exclusively observed among women who ever used hormone replacement therapy, regardless whether the tumour was screen-detected or not. The increasing prevalence of hormone replacement therapy use during the 1990s could explain the important change in age-specific breast cancer incidence, not only by increasing breast cancer risk, but also by revealing breast cancer at an earlier age

  19. Genetic variation in estrogen receptor, C-reactive protein and fibrinogen does not predict the plasma levels of inflammation markers after longterm hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Maat, Moniek P M; Madsen, Jonna Skov; Langdahl, Bente

    2007-01-01

    Markers of inflammation, such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and fibrinogen, are associated with the risk of atherothrombosis. Plasma levels of these markers of inflammation are affected by hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and modulated by smoking. We studied whether genetic variation in the estrog...

  20. Salvage radiotherapy for biochemical relapse after complete PSA response following radical prostatectomy: outcome and prognostic factors for patients who have never received hormonal therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novaes Paulo ERS

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives To evaluate the results of salvage conformal radiation therapy (3DC-EBRT for patients submitted to radical prostatectomy (RP who have achieved complete PSA response and who have never been treated with hormonal therapy (HT. To present the results of biochemical control, a period free from hormonal therapy and factors related to its prognosis. Materials and methods from August 2002 to December 2004, 43 prostate cancer patients submitted to RP presented biochemical failure after achieving a PSA Results 3-year biochemical non-evidence of disease (BNED was 71%. PSA doubling time lower than 4 months (p = 0.01 and time from recurrence to salvage EBRT (p = 0.04 were associated with worse chance of biochemical control. Biochemical control of 76% was achieved when RT had been introduced with a PSA lower than 1 ng/ml vs. 48% with a PSA higher than 1 (p = 0.19. Late toxicity was acceptable. Conclusion 70% of biochemical control in 3 years can be achieved with salvage radiotherapy in selected patients. The importance of PSADT was confirmed in this study and radiotherapy should be started as early as possible. Longer follow up is necessary, but it is possible to conclude that a long interval free from hormonal therapy was achieved with low rate of toxicity avoiding or at least delaying several important adverse effects related to hormonal treatment.

  1. Low bone mass is prevalent in male-to-female transsexual persons before the start of cross-sex hormonal therapy and gonadectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Caenegem, E; Taes, Y; Wierckx, K; Vandewalle, S; Toye, K; Kaufman, J-M; Schreiner, T; Haraldsen, I; T'Sjoen, G

    2013-05-01

    Cross-sex hormonal therapy and sex reassignment surgery (including gonadectomy) in transsexual persons has an impact on body composition and bone mass and size. However, it is not clear whether baseline differences in bone and body composition between transsexual persons and controls before cross-sex hormonal therapy play a role. A cross-sectional study with 25 male-to-female transsexual persons (transsexual women) before cross-gender sex steroid exposure (median age 30 years) in comparison with 25 age-matched control men and a male reference population of 941 men. Areal and volumetric bone parameters using respectively dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT), body composition (DXA), grip strength (hand dynamometer), Baecke physical activity questionnaire, serum testosterone and 25-OH vitamin D. Transsexual women before cross-sex hormonal therapy presented with less muscle mass (p≤0.001) and strength (p≤0.05) and a higher prevalence of osteoporosis (16%) with a lower aBMD at the hip, femoral neck, total body (all ptranssexual women vs. control men. Serum testosterone was comparable in all 3 groups, but 25-OH vitamin D was lower in transsexual women (p≤0.001). Transsexual women before the start of hormonal therapy appear to have lower muscle mass and strength and lower bone mass compared with control men. These baseline differences in bone mass might be related to a less active lifestyle. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The influence of hormone replacement therapy on the aging-related change in cognitive performance. Analysis based on a Danish cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, E; Pedersen, A T; Laursen, P

    2002-01-01

    A maintenance and/or improvement of cognitive performance with postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is biological plausible. The objectives of this study were to analyze the impact of HRT on aging-related changes in cognitive performances, and to assess whether women who choose HRT have...... better cognitive performance prior to HRT....

  3. EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTS OF HORMONAL SUBSTITUTION THERAPY UPON THE PERIODONTAL STATUS IN FEMALE PATIENTS DURING PRE- AND POST-MENOPAUSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Ursărescu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Scope of the study. To evaluate the bone mass loss in women, during menopause and post-menopause (a period associated with a deficit of estrogen and the effect of the substitution hormonal therapy. Materials and method. The experimental group included 46 female subjects, evaluated in the beginning of menopause and also at post-menopause, with and without hormonal substitution therapy (in the moment of the consultation. The periodontal clinical (probing depth, CPITN, index of gingival recession, index of dental mobility, index of furcation involvement and radiological indices were evaluated, on following the evolution of the periodontal status from the first consultation in the 3 years. Results. It has been demonstrated that, in patients with periodontitis, early onset menopause and the estrogen deficit, the frequency of gingival bleeding on probing and the clinical loss of attachment were higher, comparatively with the patients having followed a hormonal substitution therapy. Discussion. Apparently, estrogen has a protecting effect upon the periodontium and also upon the severity of the periodontal disease. More than that, the alveolar bone that may be affected by osteoporosis also contributes to the benefic effects of HT, in preventing osteoporosis, the risk of suffering the negative effects of edentation in postmenopause women who receive HT being lower. Conclusions. The present study evidenced the increased incidence of both gingivitis and periodontal pathology, of the ratio of edentation in women at menopause, while the absence of the hormonal substitution therapy seems to be associated with the severity of the periodontal disease.

  4. Effects of Growth Hormone Therapy on Bone Mass, Metabolic Balance, and Well-Being in Young Adult Survivors of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heijkant, Silvia; Hoorweg-Nijman, Gera; Huisman, Jaap; Drent, Madeleine; van der Pal, Heleen; Kaspers, Gert-Jan; Delemarre-van de Waal, Henriette

    2011-01-01

    Growth hormone deficiency (GHD), mostly after cranial radiotherapy (CRT), may lead to several negative effects. Young adult survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) could benefit from GH therapy in different ways. Twenty ALL survivors (17.1 +/- 4.3 y after diagnosis) with low bone mineral

  5. Effect of Long-Term Hormonal Therapy (vs Short-Term Hormonal Therapy): A Secondary Analysis of Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients Treated on NRG Oncology RTOG 9202.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirhadi, Amin J; Zhang, Qiang; Hanks, Gerald E; Lepor, Herbert; Grignon, David J; Peters, Christopher A; Rosenthal, Seth A; Zeitzer, Kenneth; Radwan, John S; Lawton, Colleen; Parliament, Matthew B; Reznik, Robert S; Sandler, Howard M

    2017-03-01

    NRG Oncology RTOG 9202 was a randomized trial testing long-term adjuvant androgen deprivation (LTAD) versus initial androgen deprivation only (STAD) with external beam radiation therapy (RT) in mostly high-risk and some intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients. RTOG 9408 found an overall survival (OS) advantage in patients with cT1b-T2b disease and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) risk patients. It was still unknown whether intermediate-risk patients would experience an additional survival benefit with LTAD; thus, we performed a secondary analysis to explore whether LTAD had any incremental benefit beyond STAD among the intermediate-risk subset of RTOG 9202. The study endpoints were OS, disease-specific survival (DSS), and PSA failure (PSAF). An analysis was performed for all patients enrolled in RTOG 9202 defined as intermediate-risk (cT2 disease, PSArisk subset in this study. Whereas the subset was relatively small, treatment assignment was randomly applied, and a trend in favor of LTAD would have been of interest. Given the small number of disease-specific deaths observed and lack of benefit with respect to our endpoints, this secondary analysis does not suggest that exploration of longer hormonal therapy is worth testing in the intermediate-risk prostate cancer subset. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Terapia hormonal de reemplazo en prevención cardiovascular: ¿Dónde estamos parados? Hormone replacement therapy and cardiovascular prevention: Where are we now?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Lermna

    2008-06-01

    of physiological mechanisms suggesting that estrogens could be responsible for this cardiovascular protection, and retrospective analysis of clinical studies showed that post menopausal women who had used hormonal replacement therapy (HRT suffered less cardiovascular events. These observations stimulated the execution of several prospective, randomized clinical trials (some of them with a large number of patients and prolonged follow-up in post menopausal women, with the aim of proving the hypothesis that HRT could prevent major cardiovascular events. Such hypothesis could not be demonstrated in any of those studies because HRT was not beneficial, and in several cases it was even deleterious in some aspects. Criticism has arisen over some of the methodological aspects of those prospective trials, basically regarding the age of the included patients and the timing of the beginning of HRT. There are also biological reasons that can explain the contradiction. A new hypothesis, also based on experimental and clinical observations, suggests the possibility that beginning HRT in younger women and earlier after menopause could yield different results.

  7. Growth Hormone and Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-08-01

    given to children or Growth hormone (GH) is a peptide containing adolescents as substitution therapy to treat is 191 aminoacids that is secreted by the...thyroid hormones and sexual hormones time on an evident beneficial action of GH together with an appropiate nutrition , therapy has been obtained in...of GH (Tresguerres 1996) reduction in muscular and bone mass together IGFI is a peptide of 70 aminoacids that shows with an increase in body fat

  8. Engaging Future Failing States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-23

    military missions in the Middle East, the Balkans, Africa, Asia , and South America. There is an increasing proliferation of failed and failing states...disparity, overpopulation , food security, health services availability, migration pressures, environmental degradation, personal and 22 community

  9. Iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease following human growth hormone therapy: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caboclo Luís Otávio Sales Ferreira

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 41-year-old man with iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD acquired after the use of growth hormone (GH obtained from a number of pituitary glands sourced from autopsy material. The incubation period of the disease (from the midpoint of treatment to the onset of clinical symptoms was rather long (28 years. Besides the remarkable cerebellar and mental signs, the patient exhibited sleep disturbance (excessive somnolence from the onset of the symptoms, with striking alteration of the sleep architecture documented by polysomnography. 14-3-3 protein was detected in the CSF, and MRI revealed increased signal intensity bilaterally in the striatum, being most evident in diffusion-weighted (DW-MRI sequences. This is the second case of iatrogenic CJD associated with the use of GH reported in Brazil.

  10. Iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease following human growth hormone therapy: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caboclo, Luís Otávio Sales Ferreira; Huang, Nancy; Lepski, Guilherme Alves; Livramento, José Antônio; Buchpiguel, Carlos Alberto; Porto, Cláudia Sellitto; Nitrini, Ricardo

    2002-06-01

    We report the case of a 41-year-old man with iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) acquired after the use of growth hormone (GH) obtained from a number of pituitary glands sourced from autopsy material. The incubation period of the disease (from the midpoint of treatment to the onset of clinical symptoms) was rather long (28 years). Besides the remarkable cerebellar and mental signs, the patient exhibited sleep disturbance (excessive somnolence) from the onset of the symptoms, with striking alteration of the sleep architecture documented by polysomnography. 14-3-3 protein was detected in the CSF, and MRI revealed increased signal intensity bilaterally in the striatum, being most evident in diffusion-weighted (DW-MRI) sequences. This is the second case of iatrogenic CJD associated with the use of GH reported in Brazil.

  11. Epigenetics of Estrogen Receptor Signaling: Role in Hormonal Cancer Progression and Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Monica; Cortez, Valerie [Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, UTHSCSA, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Vadlamudi, Ratna K., E-mail: vadlamudi@uthscsa.edu [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, UTHSCSA, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States)

    2011-03-29

    Estrogen receptor (ERα) signaling plays a key role in hormonal cancer progression. ERα is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that modulates gene transcription via recruitment to the target gene chromatin. Emerging evidence suggests that ERα signaling has the potential to contribute to epigenetic changes. Estrogen stimulation is shown to induce several histone modifications at the ERα target gene promoters including acetylation, phosphorylation and me