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Sample records for factor scores structure

  1. The Factor Structure and Dimensional Scoring of the Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire for "DSM-IV"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodebaugh, Thomas L.; Holaway, Robert M.; Heimberg, Richard G.

    2008-01-01

    Despite favorable psychometric properties, the Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire for the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed.) (GAD-Q-IV) does not have a known factor structure, which calls into question use of its original weighted scoring system (usually referred to as the dimensional score).…

  2. Factor Structure of Scores from the Conners’ Rating Scales–Revised Among Nepali Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendergast, Laura L.; Vandiver, Beverly J.; Schaefer, Barbara A.; Cole, Pamela M.; Murray-Kolb, Laura M.; Christian, Parul

    2014-01-01

    This study used exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses to examine the structures of scores from the Conners’ Teacher and Parent Rating Scales–Revised (CTRS-R and CPRS-R, respectively; Conners, 1997). The scales were administered to 1,835 parents and 1,387 teachers of children in Nepal's Sarlahi district – a region where no other measures of child psychopathology have been studied. With a Nepali sample, the findings indicate that reduced two factor models for the Conners’ scales are superior to the models identified in the scale development research. The hyperactivity and inattention factors were comparable to what has been identified in prior research, while other factors (e.g., social problems) differed substantially. Implications for use of the Conners’ scales in Nepal and cross cultural issues in the assessment of ADHD symptoms are discussed. PMID:25574454

  3. Internal Structure of Mini-CEX Scores for Internal Medicine Residents: Factor Analysis and Generalizability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, David A.; Beckman, Thomas J.; Mandrekar, Jayawant N.; Pankratz, V. Shane

    2010-01-01

    The mini-CEX is widely used to rate directly observed resident-patient encounters. Although several studies have explored the reliability of mini-CEX scores, the dimensionality of mini-CEX scores is incompletely understood. Objective: Explore the dimensionality of mini-CEX scores through factor analysis and generalizability analysis. Design:…

  4. Internal Structure of Mini-CEX Scores for Internal Medicine Residents: Factor Analysis and Generalizability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, David A.; Beckman, Thomas J.; Mandrekar, Jayawant N.; Pankratz, V. Shane

    2010-01-01

    The mini-CEX is widely used to rate directly observed resident-patient encounters. Although several studies have explored the reliability of mini-CEX scores, the dimensionality of mini-CEX scores is incompletely understood. Objective: Explore the dimensionality of mini-CEX scores through factor analysis and generalizability analysis. Design:…

  5. Factor Structure of Scores from the Maslach Burnout Inventory: A Review and Meta-Analysis of 45 Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor-Analytic Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Jody A.; Vassar, Matt; Wheeler, Denna L.; Barnes, Laura L. B.

    2008-01-01

    This study provides a summary of 45 exploratory and confirmatory factor-analytic studies that examined the internal structure of scores obtained from the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). It highlights characteristics of the studies that account for differences in reporting of the MBI factor structure. This approach includes an examination of the…

  6. The Factor Structure of Preschool Learning Behaviors Scale Scores in Peruvian Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Kathryn R.; Schaefer, Barbara A.; Merino, Cesar; Worrell, Frank C.

    2009-01-01

    The factor structure of the Escala de Conductas de Aprendizaje Preescolar (ECAP), a Spanish translation of the Preschool Learning Behaviors Scale (PLBS), was examined in this study. Children aged 2 to 6 years (N = 328) enrolled in public and private preschools in the Republic of Peru were rated by classroom teachers on the frequency of observable,…

  7. The Factor Structure of Preschool Learning Behaviors Scale Scores in Peruvian Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Kathryn R.; Schaefer, Barbara A.; Merino, Cesar; Worrell, Frank C.

    2009-01-01

    The factor structure of the Escala de Conductas de Aprendizaje Preescolar (ECAP), a Spanish translation of the Preschool Learning Behaviors Scale (PLBS), was examined in this study. Children aged 2 to 6 years (N = 328) enrolled in public and private preschools in the Republic of Peru were rated by classroom teachers on the frequency of observable,…

  8. Quadratic prediction of factor scores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wansbeek, T

    1999-01-01

    Factor scores are naturally predicted by means of their conditional expectation given the indicators y. Under normality this expectation is linear in y but in general it is an unknown function of y. II is discussed that under nonnormality factor scores can be more precisely predicted by a quadratic

  9. CATTELL AND EYSENCK FACTOR SCORES RELATED TO COMREY PERSONALITY FACTORS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comrey, A L; Duffy, K E

    1968-10-01

    The Eysenck Personality Inventory, the Cattell 16 PF Inventory, and the Comrey Personality Inventory were administered to 272 volunteers. Eysenck and Cattell factor scores were correlated with scores over homogeneous item groups (FHIDs) which define the Comrey test factors. This matrix was factor analyzed to relate the Eysenck and Cattell factor scores to the factor structure underlying the Comrey test. The Eysenck Neuroticism, Comrey Neuroticism, and Cattell second-order Anxiety factors appeared to match. The Eysenck Introversion and the Comrey Shyness factors also matched. The 16 Cattell primary factors overlapped but did not match with the Comrey factors.

  10. Disclosure Risk from Factor Scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drechsler Jörg

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Remote access can be a powerful tool for providing data access for external researchers. Since the microdata never leave the secure environment of the data-providing agency, alterations of the microdata can be kept to a minimum. Nevertheless, remote access is not free from risk. Many statistical analyses that do not seem to provide disclosive information at first sight can be used by sophisticated intruders to reveal sensitive information. For this reason the list of allowed queries is usually restricted in a remote setting. However, it is not always easy to identify problematic queries. We therefore strongly support the argument that has been made by other authors: that all queries should be monitored carefully and that any microlevel information should always be withheld. As an illustrative example, we use factor score analysis, for which the output of interest - the factor loading of the variables - seems to be unproblematic. However, as we show in the article, the individual factor scores that are usually returned as part of the output can be used to reveal sensitive information. Our empirical evaluations based on a German establishment survey emphasize that this risk is far from a purely theoretical problem.

  11. The Construct Validity of Scores on the Ways of Coping Questionnaire: Confirmatory Analysis of Alternative Factor Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Jeffrey R.; O'Neill, Regina M.

    1998-01-01

    Confirmatory factor analysis was used to evaluate alternative factor structures, based on previous exploratory factor analyses and coping dimensions derived from the theory of R. Lazarus, for the Ways of Coping Questionnaire (S. Folkman and R. Lazarus, 1988). Results from responses of 654 college graduates provide little support for the factor…

  12. Examining the Factor Structure of the Self-Compassion Scale in Four Distinct Populations: Is the Use of a Total Scale Score Justified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, Kristin D; Whittaker, Tiffany A; Karl, Anke

    2017-01-31

    This study examined the factor structure of the Self-Compassion Scale (SCS) using a bifactor model, a higher order model, a 6-factor correlated model, a 2-factor correlated model, and a 1-factor model in 4 distinct populations: college undergraduates (N = 222), community adults (N = 1,394), individuals practicing Buddhist meditation (N = 215), and a clinical sample of individuals with a history of recurrent depression (N = 390). The 6-factor correlated model demonstrated the best fit across samples, whereas the 1- and 2-factor models had poor fit. The higher order model also showed relatively poor fit across samples, suggesting it is not representative of the relationship between subscale factors and a general self-compassion factor. The bifactor model, however, had acceptable fit in the student, community, and meditator samples. Although fit was suboptimal in the clinical sample, results suggested an overall self-compassion factor could still be interpreted with some confidence. Moreover, estimates suggested a general self-compassion factor accounted for at least 90% of the reliable variance in SCS scores across samples, and item factor loadings and intercepts were equivalent across samples. Results suggest that a total SCS score can be used as an overall mesure of self-compassion.

  13. Lower bounds to the reliabilities of factor score estimators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hessen, D.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/256041717

    2017-01-01

    Under the general common factor model, the reliabilities of factor score estimators might be of more interest than the reliability of the total score (the unweighted sum of item scores). In this paper, lower bounds to the reliabilities of Thurstone’s factor score estimators, Bartlett’s factor score

  14. RISK FACTOR DIAGNOSTIC SCORE IN DIABETIC FOOT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Shameem P. M

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Diabetic foot ulcers vary in their clinical presentation and nature of severity and therefore create a challenging problem to the treating surgeon regarding the prediction of the clinical course and the end result of the treatment. Clinical studies have shown that there are certain risk factors for the progression of foot ulcers in diabetics and it may therefore be possible to predict the course of an ulcer foot at presentation itself, thus instituting proper therapy without delay. Spoken otherwise clinical scoring may tell that this particular ulcer is having highest chance of amputation, then one may be able to take an early decision for the same and avoid the septic complications, inconvenience to the patient, long hospital stay and cost of treatments. AIM OF THE STUDY Aim of the study is to evaluate the above-mentioned scoring system in predicting the course the diabetic foot ulcers. MATERIALS AND METHODS 50 patients with Diabetic Foot attending the OPD of Department of Surgery of Government Hospital attached to Calicut Medical College are included in the present study. After thorough history taking and clinical examination, six risk factors like Age, pedal vessels, renal function, neuropathy, radiological findings and ulcers were observed in the patients by giving certain scoring points to each of them. The total number of points scored by the patients at the time of admission or OPD treatment was correlated with the final outcome in these patients, whether leading to amputation or conservative management. All the data was analysed using standard statistical methods. OBSERVATIONS AND RESULTS There were 12 females and 38 males with a female to male ratio 1:3.1. All were aged above 30 years. Twenty-four (48% of them were between 30-60 years and twenty six (52% were above 60 years. 10 patients were treated conservatively with risk score range: 10 to 35. Six had single toe loss with risk score: 25 to 35. Six had multiple toe loss

  15. Understanding and Using Factor Scores: Considerations for the Applied Researcher

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiStefano, Christine; Zhu, Min; Mindrila, Diana

    2009-01-01

    Following an exploratory factor analysis, factor scores may be computed and used in subsequent analyses. Factor scores are composite variables which provide information about an individual's placement on the factor(s). This article discusses popular methods to create factor scores under two different classes: refined and non-refined. Strengths and…

  16. A scoring framework for predicting protein structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xiaoqin

    2013-03-01

    We have developed a statistical mechanics-based iterative method to extract statistical atomic interaction potentials from known, non-redundant protein structures. Our method circumvents the long-standing reference state problem in deriving traditional knowledge-based scoring functions, by using rapid iterations through a physical, global convergence function. The rapid convergence of this physics-based method, unlike other parameter optimization methods, warrants the feasibility of deriving distance-dependent, all-atom statistical potentials to keep the scoring accuracy. The derived potentials, referred to as ITScore/Pro, have been validated using three diverse benchmarks: the high-resolution decoy set, the AMBER benchmark decoy set, and the CASP8 decoy set. Significant improvement in performance has been achieved. Finally, comparisons between the potentials of our model and potentials of a knowledge-based scoring function with a randomized reference state have revealed the reason for the better performance of our scoring function, which could provide useful insight into the development of other physical scoring functions. The potentials developed in the present study are generally applicable for structural selection in protein structure prediction.

  17. Influence of Biomedical Factors on the Five Viscera Score (FVS on Middle-Aged and Elderly Individuals: Application of Structural Equation Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taro Tomura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The five viscera score (FVS is a diagnostic scale for traditional Chinese medicine (TCM. The purposes of current study are to elucidate the characteristics of FVS obtained from middle-aged to elderly individuals and to investigate the validity of FVS using biological medical data of middle-aged and elderly individuals. Structural equation modeling (SEM was used to conduct assessments between FVS and medical data. Eighty men and 99 women participated in this study, whose mean ages (SD were 58 ± 7 years in both genders showing no significant difference. FVS of women was significantly higher than that of men in the spleen of the 50s (P=0.019 and liver of the 60s age group (P=0.030. By SEM, the following biomedical factors were found to influence viscera: gender, diastolic blood pressure, and HDL-C for the liver; GLU, GOT, and γ-GTP for the spleen; age, BMI, and HCRP for the lungs; and HbA1c and creatinine clearance for the kidneys. These results provide objective evidence that FVS can be used for TCM diagnosis in middle-aged and elderly individuals.

  18. Understanding and Using Factor Scores: Considerations for the Applied Researcher

    OpenAIRE

    Christine DiStefano; Min Zhu; Diana Mindrila

    2009-01-01

    Following an exploratory factor analysis, factor scores may be computed and used in subsequent analyses. Factor scores are composite variables which provide information about an individual's placement on the factor(s). This article discusses popular methods to create factor scores under two different classes: refined and non-refined. Strengths and considerations of the various methods, and for using factor scores in general, are discussed.

  19. Understanding and Using Factor Scores: Considerations for the Applied Researcher

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine DiStefano

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Following an exploratory factor analysis, factor scores may be computed and used in subsequent analyses. Factor scores are composite variables which provide information about an individual's placement on the factor(s. This article discusses popular methods to create factor scores under two different classes: refined and non-refined. Strengths and considerations of the various methods, and for using factor scores in general, are discussed.

  20. The Anxiety Sensitivity Index--Revised: Confirmatory Factor Analyses, Structural Invariance in Caucasian and African American Samples, and Score Reliability and Validity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnau, Randolph C.; Broman-Fulks, Joshua J.; Green, Bradley A.; Berman, Mitchell E.

    2009-01-01

    The most commonly used measure of anxiety sensitivity is the 36-item Anxiety Sensitivity Index--Revised (ASI-R). Exploratory factor analyses have produced several different factors structures for the ASI-R, but an acceptable fit using confirmatory factor analytic approaches has only been found for a 21-item version of the instrument. We evaluated…

  1. The Anxiety Sensitivity Index--Revised: Confirmatory Factor Analyses, Structural Invariance in Caucasian and African American Samples, and Score Reliability and Validity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnau, Randolph C.; Broman-Fulks, Joshua J.; Green, Bradley A.; Berman, Mitchell E.

    2009-01-01

    The most commonly used measure of anxiety sensitivity is the 36-item Anxiety Sensitivity Index--Revised (ASI-R). Exploratory factor analyses have produced several different factors structures for the ASI-R, but an acceptable fit using confirmatory factor analytic approaches has only been found for a 21-item version of the instrument. We evaluated…

  2. Structural Equation Modelling with Three Schemes Estimation of Score Factors on Partial Least Square (Case Study: The Quality Of Education Level SMA/MA in Sumenep Regency)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anekawati, Anik; Widjanarko Otok, Bambang; Purhadi; Sutikno

    2017-06-01

    Research in education often involves a latent variable. Statistical analysis technique that has the ability to analyze the pattern of relationship among latent variables as well as between latent variables and their indicators is Structural Equation Modeling (SEM). SEM partial least square (PLS) was developed as an alternative if these conditions are met: the theory that underlying the design of the model is weak, does not assume a certain scale measurement, the sample size should not be large and the data does not have the multivariate normal distribution. The purpose of this paper is to compare the results of modeling of the educational quality in high school level (SMA/MA) in Sumenep Regency with structural equation modeling approach partial least square with three schemes estimation of score factors. This paper is a result of explanatory research using secondary data from Sumenep Education Department and Badan Pusat Statistik (BPS) Sumenep which was data of Sumenep in the Figures and the District of Sumenep in the Figures for the year 2015. The unit of observation in this study were districts in Sumenep that consists of 18 districts on the mainland and 9 districts in the islands. There were two endogenous variables and one exogenous variable. Endogenous variables are the quality of education level of SMA/MA (Y1) and school infrastructure (Y2), whereas exogenous variable is socio-economic condition (X1). In this study, There is one improved model which represented by model from path scheme because this model is a consistent, all of its indicators are valid and its the value of R-square increased which is: Y1=0.651Y2. In this model, the quality of education influenced only by the school infrastructure (0.651). The socio-economic condition did not affect neither the school infrastructure nor the quality of education. If the school infrastructure increased 1 point, then the quality of education increased 0.651 point. The quality of education had an R2 of 0

  3. Proportion and factors associated with low fifth minute Apgar score ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Proportion and factors associated with low fifth minute Apgar score among ... with low Apgar scores are at an increased risk of perinatal morbidity and mortality. ... of meconium stained liquor, induced/ augmented labor and low birth weight.

  4. The Trait Structure of Cloze Test Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Lyle F.

    1982-01-01

    Presents study designed to examine trait structure of a cloze test using confirmatory factor analysis. Results suggest that a modified cloze passage, using rational deletions, is capable of measuring syntactic- and discourse-level relationships in a text, and this advantage may outweigh considerations of reduced redundancy which underlie random…

  5. Teaching Through Interactions in Secondary School Classrooms: Revisiting the Factor Structure and Practical Application of the Classroom Assessment Scoring System-Secondary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafen, Christopher A; Hamre, Bridget K; Allen, Joseph P; Bell, Courtney A; Gitomer, Drew H; Pianta, Robert C

    2015-06-01

    Valid measurement of how students' experiences in secondary school classrooms lead to gains in learning requires a developmental approach to conceptualizing classroom processes. This article presents a potentially useful theoretical model, the Teaching Through Interactions framework, which posits teacher-student interactions as a central driver for student learning and that teacher-student interactions can be organized into three major domains. Results from 1,482 classrooms provide evidence for distinct emotional, organizational, and instructional domains of teacher-student interaction. It also appears that a three-factor structure is a better fit to observational data than alternative one- and two-domain models of teacher-student classroom interactions, and that the three-domain structure is generalizable from 6th through 12th grade. Implications for practitioners, stakeholders, and researchers are discussed.

  6. Teaching Through Interactions in Secondary School Classrooms: Revisiting the Factor Structure and Practical Application of the Classroom Assessment Scoring System–Secondary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafen, Christopher A.; Hamre, Bridget K.; Allen, Joseph P.; Bell, Courtney A.; Gitomer, Drew H.; Pianta, Robert C.

    2017-01-01

    Valid measurement of how students’ experiences in secondary school classrooms lead to gains in learning requires a developmental approach to conceptualizing classroom processes. This article presents a potentially useful theoretical model, the Teaching Through Interactions framework, which posits teacher-student interactions as a central driver for student learning and that teacher-student interactions can be organized into three major domains. Results from 1,482 classrooms provide evidence for distinct emotional, organizational, and instructional domains of teacher-student interaction. It also appears that a three-factor structure is a better fit to observational data than alternative one- and two-domain models of teacher-student classroom interactions, and that the three-domain structure is generalizable from 6th through 12th grade. Implications for practitioners, stakeholders, and researchers are discussed.

  7. Longitudinal Factor Score Estimation Using the Kalman Filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oud, Johan H.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    How longitudinal factor score estimation--the estimation of the evolution of factor scores for individual examinees over time--can profit from the Kalman filter technique is described. The Kalman estimates change more cautiously over time, have lower estimation error variances, and reproduce the LISREL program latent state correlations more…

  8. QUASAR--scoring and ranking of sequence-structure alignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birzele, Fabian; Gewehr, Jan E; Zimmer, Ralf

    2005-12-15

    Sequence-structure alignments are a common means for protein structure prediction in the fields of fold recognition and homology modeling, and there is a broad variety of programs that provide such alignments based on sequence similarity, secondary structure or contact potentials. Nevertheless, finding the best sequence-structure alignment in a pool of alignments remains a difficult problem. QUASAR (quality of sequence-structure alignments ranking) provides a unifying framework for scoring sequence-structure alignments that aids finding well-performing combinations of well-known and custom-made scoring schemes. Those scoring functions can be benchmarked against widely accepted quality scores like MaxSub, TMScore, Touch and APDB, thus enabling users to test their own alignment scores against 'standard-of-truth' structure-based scores. Furthermore, individual score combinations can be optimized with respect to benchmark sets based on known structural relationships using QUASAR's in-built optimization routines.

  9. NCACO-score: An effective main-chain dependent scoring function for structure modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Xiaoxi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Development of effective scoring functions is a critical component to the success of protein structure modeling. Previously, many efforts have been dedicated to the development of scoring functions. Despite these efforts, development of an effective scoring function that can achieve both good accuracy and fast speed still presents a grand challenge. Results Based on a coarse-grained representation of a protein structure by using only four main-chain atoms: N, Cα, C and O, we develop a knowledge-based scoring function, called NCACO-score, that integrates different structural information to rapidly model protein structure from sequence. In testing on the Decoys'R'Us sets, we found that NCACO-score can effectively recognize native conformers from their decoys. Furthermore, we demonstrate that NCACO-score can effectively guide fragment assembly for protein structure prediction, which has achieved a good performance in building the structure models for hard targets from CASP8 in terms of both accuracy and speed. Conclusions Although NCACO-score is developed based on a coarse-grained model, it is able to discriminate native conformers from decoy conformers with high accuracy. NCACO is a very effective scoring function for structure modeling.

  10. Constrained Fisher Scoring for a Mixture of Factor Analyzers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    global appearance model across the entire sensor network. constrained maximum likelihood estimation, mixture of factor analyzers, Newton’s method...ARL-TR-7836• SEP 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Constrained Fisher Scoring for a Mixture of Factor Analyzers by Gene T Whipps, Emre Ertin, and...TR-7836• SEP 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Constrained Fisher Scoring for a Mixture of Factor Analyzers by Gene T Whipps Sensors and Electron

  11. Taking the Error Term of the Factor Model into Account: The Factor Score Predictor Interval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauducel, Andre

    2013-01-01

    The problem of factor score indeterminacy implies that the factor and the error scores cannot be completely disentangled in the factor model. It is therefore proposed to compute Harman's factor score predictor that contains an additive combination of factor and error variance. This additive combination is discussed in the framework of classical…

  12. Evaluating Academic Journals Using Impact Factor and Local Citation Score

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hye-Kyung

    2007-01-01

    This study presents a method for journal collection evaluation using citation analysis. Cost-per-use (CPU) for each title is used to measure cost-effectiveness with higher CPU scores indicating cost-effective titles. Use data are based on the impact factor and locally collected citation score of each title and is compared to the cost of managing…

  13. Exploratory Factor Analysis of African Self-Consciousness Scale Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagwat, Ranjit; Kelly, Shalonda; Lambert, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    This study replicates and extends prior studies of the dimensionality, convergent, and external validity of African Self-Consciousness Scale scores with appropriate exploratory factor analysis methods and a large gender balanced sample (N = 348). Viable one- and two-factor solutions were cross-validated. Both first factors overlapped significantly…

  14. Evaluation of prognostic factors and scoring system in colonic perforation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Atsushi Horiuchi; Yuji Watanabe; Takashi Doi; Kouichi Sato; Syungo Yukumi; Motohira Yoshida; Yuji Yamamoto; Hiroki Sugishita; Kanji Kawachi

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To study the significance of scoring systems assessing severity and prognostic factors in patients with colonic perforation.METHODS: A total of 26 patients (9 men, 17 women;mean age 72.7±11.6 years) underwent emergency operation for colorectal perforation in our institution between 1993 and 2005. Several clinical factors were measured preoperatively and 24 h postoperatively. Acute physiology and chronic health evaluationⅡ (APACHE Ⅱ),Mannheim peritonitis index (MPI) and peritonitis index of Altona (PIA Ⅱ) scores were calculated preoperatively.RESULTS: Overall postoperative mortality rate was 23.1% (6 patients). Compared with survivors, nonsurvivors displayed low blood pressure, low serum protein and high serum creatinine preoperatively, and low blood pressure, low white blood cell count, low pH,low PaO2/FiO2, and high serum creatinine postoperatively.APACHE Ⅱ score was significantly lower in survivors than in non-survivors (10.4±3.84 vs19.3±2.87, P= 0.00003). Non-survivors tended to display high MPI score and low PIA Ⅱ score, but no significant difference was identified.CONCLUSION: Pre- and postoperative blood pressure and serum creatinine level appear related to prognosis of colonic perforation. APACHE Ⅱ score is most associated with prognosis and scores ≥ 20 are associated with significantly increased mortality rate.

  15. Improving NCLEX scores with structured learning assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Arlene M

    2008-01-01

    Many faculty struggle to find the best way to prepare their nursing students for the NCLEX exam. Nursing faculty at Ferris State University identified, along with other issues, a lack of structured remediation throughout students' clinical courses. The author explains how NCLEX review was incorporated into an existing university-wide remediation program, resulting in an increase in our students' pass rates from 65% to 92%.

  16. Environmental structure and competitive scoring advantages in team competitions

    CERN Document Server

    Merritt, Sears

    2013-01-01

    In most professional sports, the structure of the environment is kept neutral so that scoring imbalances may be attributed to differences in team skill. It thus remains unknown what impact structural heterogeneities can have on scoring dynamics and producing competitive advantages. Applying a generative model of scoring dynamics to roughly 10 million team competitions drawn from an online game, we quantify the relationship between a competition's structure and its scoring dynamics. Despite wide structural variations, we find the same three-phase pattern in the tempo of events observed in many sports. Tempo and balance are highly predictable from a competition's structural features alone and teams exploit environmental heterogeneities for sustained competitive advantage. The most balanced competitions are associated with specific environmental heterogeneities, not from equally skilled teams. These results shed new light on the principles of balanced competition, and illustrate the potential of online game data...

  17. Spinal appearance questionnaire: factor analysis, scoring, reliability, and validity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreon, Leah Y; Sanders, James O; Polly, David W; Sucato, Daniel J; Parent, Stefan; Roy-Beaudry, Marjolaine; Hopkins, Jeffrey; McClung, Anna; Bratcher, Kelly R; Diamond, Beverly E

    2011-08-15

    Cross sectional. This study presents the factor analysis of the Spinal Appearance Questionnaire (SAQ) and its psychometric properties. Although the SAQ has been administered to a large sample of patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) treated surgically, its psychometric properties have not been fully evaluated. This study presents the factor analysis and scoring of the SAQ and evaluates its psychometric properties. The SAQ and the Scoliosis Research Society-22 (SRS-22) were administered to AIS patients who were being observed, braced or scheduled for surgery. Standard demographic data and radiographic measures including Lenke type and curve magnitude were also collected. Of the 1802 patients, 83% were female; with a mean age of 14.8 years and mean initial Cobb angle of 55.8° (range, 0°-123°). From the 32 items of the SAQ, 15 loaded on two factors with consistent and significant correlations across all Lenke types. There is an Appearance (items 1-10) and an Expectations factor (items 12-15). Responses are summed giving a range of 5 to 50 for the Appearance domain and 5 to 20 for the Expectations domain. The Cronbach's α was 0.88 for both domains and Total score with a test-retest reliability of 0.81 for Appearance and 0.91 for Expectations. Correlations with major curve magnitude were higher for the SAQ Appearance and SAQ Total scores compared to correlations between the SRS Appearance and SRS Total scores. The SAQ and SRS-22 Scores were statistically significantly different in patients who were scheduled for surgery compared to those who were observed or braced. The SAQ is a valid measure of self-image in patients with AIS with greater correlation to curve magnitude than SRS Appearance and Total score. It also discriminates between patients who require surgery from those who do not.

  18. Environmental structure and competitive scoring advantages in team competitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Sears; Clauset, Aaron

    2013-10-01

    In most professional sports, playing field structure is kept neutral so that scoring imbalances may be attributed to differences in team skill. It thus remains unknown what impact environmental heterogeneities can have on scoring dynamics or competitive advantages. Applying a novel generative model of scoring dynamics to roughly 10 million team competitions drawn from an online game, we quantify the relationship between the structure within a competition and its scoring dynamics, while controlling the impact of chance. Despite wide structural variations, we observe a common three-phase pattern in the tempo of events. Tempo and balance are highly predictable from a competition's structural features alone and teams exploit environmental heterogeneities for sustained competitive advantage. Surprisingly, the most balanced competitions are associated with specific environmental heterogeneities, not from equally skilled teams. These results shed new light on the design principles of balanced competition, and illustrate the potential of online game data for investigating social dynamics and competition.

  19. Environmental structure and competitive scoring advantages in team competitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Sears; Clauset, Aaron

    2013-10-29

    In most professional sports, playing field structure is kept neutral so that scoring imbalances may be attributed to differences in team skill. It thus remains unknown what impact environmental heterogeneities can have on scoring dynamics or competitive advantages. Applying a novel generative model of scoring dynamics to roughly 10 million team competitions drawn from an online game, we quantify the relationship between the structure within a competition and its scoring dynamics, while controlling the impact of chance. Despite wide structural variations, we observe a common three-phase pattern in the tempo of events. Tempo and balance are highly predictable from a competition's structural features alone and teams exploit environmental heterogeneities for sustained competitive advantage. Surprisingly, the most balanced competitions are associated with specific environmental heterogeneities, not from equally skilled teams. These results shed new light on the design principles of balanced competition, and illustrate the potential of online game data for investigating social dynamics and competition.

  20. Reliability of Summed Item Scores Using Structural Equation Modeling: An Alternative to Coefficient Alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Samuel B.; Yang, Yanyun

    2009-01-01

    A method is presented for estimating reliability using structural equation modeling (SEM) that allows for nonlinearity between factors and item scores. Assuming the focus is on consistency of summed item scores, this method for estimating reliability is preferred to those based on linear SEM models and to the most commonly reported estimate of…

  1. Scope Complexity Options Risks Excursions (SCORE) Factor Mathematical Description.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gearhart, Jared Lee [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Samberson, Jonell Nicole [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Shettigar, Subhasini [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jungels, John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Welch, Kimberly M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, Dean A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of the Scope, Complexity, Options, Risks, Excursions (SCORE) model is to estimate the relative complexity of design variants of future warhead options, resulting in scores. SCORE factors extend this capability by providing estimates of complexity relative to a base system (i.e., all design options are normalized to one weapon system). First, a clearly defined set of scope elements for a warhead option is established. The complexity of each scope element is estimated by Subject Matter Experts (SMEs), including a level of uncertainty, relative to a specific reference system. When determining factors, complexity estimates for a scope element can be directly tied to the base system or chained together via comparable scope elements in a string of reference systems that ends with the base system. The SCORE analysis process is a growing multi-organizational Nuclear Security Enterprise (NSE) effort, under the management of the NA-12 led Enterprise Modeling and Analysis Consortium (EMAC). Historically, it has provided the data elicitation, integration, and computation needed to support the out-year Life Extension Program (LEP) cost estimates included in the Stockpile Stewardship Management Plan (SSMP).

  2. Accelerated protein structure comparison using TM-score-GPU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ling-Hong; Samudrala, Ram

    2012-08-15

    Accurate comparisons of different protein structures play important roles in structural biology, structure prediction and functional annotation. The root-mean-square-deviation (RMSD) after optimal superposition is the predominant measure of similarity due to the ease and speed of computation. However, global RMSD is dependent on the length of the protein and can be dominated by divergent loops that can obscure local regions of similarity. A more sophisticated measure of structure similarity, Template Modeling (TM)-score, avoids these problems, and it is one of the measures used by the community-wide experiments of critical assessment of protein structure prediction to compare predicted models with experimental structures. TM-score calculations are, however, much slower than RMSD calculations. We have therefore implemented a very fast version of TM-score for Graphical Processing Units (TM-score-GPU), using a new and novel hybrid Kabsch/quaternion method for calculating the optimal superposition and RMSD that is designed for parallel applications. This acceleration in speed allows TM-score to be used efficiently in computationally intensive applications such as for clustering of protein models and genome-wide comparisons of structure. TM-score-GPU was applied to six sets of models from Nutritious Rice for the World for a total of 3 million comparisons. TM-score-GPU is 68 times faster on an ATI 5870 GPU, on average, than the original CPU single-threaded implementation on an AMD Phenom II 810 quad-core processor. The complete source, including the GPU code and the hybrid RMSD subroutine, can be downloaded and used without restriction at http://software.compbio.washington.edu/misc/downloads/tmscore/. The implementation is in C++/OpenCL.

  3. Preterm Birth: A Prominent Risk Factor for Low Apgar Scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Svenvik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine predictive risk factors for Apgar scores < 7 at 5 minutes at two hospitals providing tertiary care and secondary care, respectively. Methods. A retrospective registry cohort study of 21126 births (2006–2010 using data from digital medical records. Risk factors were analyzed by logistic regression analyses. Results.  AS5min⁡<7 was multivariately associated with the following: preterm birth; gestational week 32 + 0–36 + 6, OR=3.9 (95% CI 2.9–5.3; week 28 + 0–31 + 6, OR=8 (5–12; week < 28 + 0, OR=15 (8–29; postterm birth, OR=2.0 (1.7–2.3; multiple pregnancy, OR=3.53 (1.79–6.96; previous cesarean section, OR=3.67 (2.31–5.81; BMI 25–29, OR=1.30 (1.09–1.55; BMI≥30  OR=1.70 (1.20–2.41; nonnormal CTG at admission, OR=1.98 (1.48–2.66. ≥1-para was associated with a decreased risk for AS5min⁡<7, OR=0.34 (0.25–0.47. In the univariate logistic regression analysis AS5min⁡<7 was associated with tertiary level care, OR=1.48 (1.17–1.87; however, in the multivariate analysis there was no significant difference. Conclusion. A number of partially preventable risk factors were identified, preterm birth being the most evident. Further, no significant difference between the two hospital levels regarding the risk for low Apgar scores was detected.

  4. A new method for simultaneous estimation of the factor model parameters, factor scores, and unique parts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegeman, Alwin

    2016-01-01

    In the common factor model the observed data is conceptually split into a common covariance producing part and an uncorrelated unique part. The common factor model is fitted to the data itself and a new method is introduced for the simultaneous estimation of loadings, unique variances, factor scores

  5. Optimizing an emperical scoring function for transmembrane protein structure determination.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Malin M.; Sale, Kenneth L.; Gray, Genetha Anne; Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2003-10-01

    We examine the problem of transmembrane protein structure determination. Like many other questions that arise in biological research, this problem cannot be addressed by traditional laboratory experimentation alone. An approach that integrates experiment and computation is required. We investigate a procedure which states the transmembrane protein structure determination problem as a bound constrained optimization problem using a special empirical scoring function, called Bundler, as the objective function. In this paper, we describe the optimization problem and some of its mathematical properties. We compare and contrast results obtained using two different derivative free optimization algorithms.

  6. Optimizing an emperical scoring function for transmembrane protein structure determination.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Malin M.; Sale, Kenneth L.; Gray, Genetha Anne; Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2003-10-01

    We examine the problem of transmembrane protein structure determination. Like many other questions that arise in biological research, this problem cannot be addressed by traditional laboratory experimentation alone. An approach that integrates experiment and computation is required. We investigate a procedure which states the transmembrane protein structure determination problem as a bound constrained optimization problem using a special empirical scoring function, called Bundler, as the objective function. In this paper, we describe the optimization problem and some of its mathematical properties. We compare and contrast results obtained using two different derivative free optimization algorithms.

  7. Factors Predicting the Forgotten Joint Score After Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrend, Henrik; Zdravkovic, Vilijam; Giesinger, Johannes; Giesinger, Karlmeinrad

    2016-09-01

    We recently developed the forgotten joint score 12 (FJS-12), a tool to assess joint awareness in everyday life. It is unknown whether patient factors predicting the outcome of the FJS-12 after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) exist. Five hundred forty cases of TKA were analyzed. Objective clinical results were obtained for range of motion, stability, and alignment. Patient-reported outcome was assessed using the FJS-12. Baseline data and complications were recorded. Cluster analysis based on FJS-12, postoperative flexion, and age resulted in 3 groups: poor outcome (88 patients), good outcome (340 patients), and excellent outcome (118 patients). The characteristics of "poor" compared to "excellent" clusters were studied more closely using bivariate comparative tests and logistic regression. We could find that male patients around 63 years with a lower body mass index were most likely to be allocated to the cluster "excellent" (defined as high FJS-12 and high postoperative flexion). Preoperative extension and flexion, stability, varus/valgus alignment, surgery prior TKA, or comorbidities were not predictive for the FJS-12 at 1 year follow-up. We identified 3 preoperative patient-related factors that may predict the FJS-12 after TKA: body mass index, age, and gender. These findings can be used to guide decision-making and important preoperative discussions on expectations after TKA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Sex and Background Factors: Effect on ASAT Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Raymond J.

    1985-01-01

    Data sets from Australia were analyzed using a causal model to determine the possible causes of sex differences in ASAT scores. Observed differences could be explained in terms of differences in students' English scores, the time the students spent studying mathematics, and their confidence in success. (Author/MLW)

  9. The validity and structure of culture-level personality scores: data from ratings of young adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrae, Robert R; Terracciano, Antonio; De Fruyt, Filip; De Bolle, Marleen; Gelfand, Michele J; Costa, Paul T

    2010-06-01

    We examined properties of culture-level personality traits in ratings of targets (N=5,109) ages 12 to 17 in 24 cultures. Aggregate scores were generalizable across gender, age, and relationship groups and showed convergence with culture-level scores from previous studies of self-reports and observer ratings of adults, but they were unrelated to national character stereotypes. Trait profiles also showed cross-study agreement within most cultures, 8 of which had not previously been studied. Multidimensional scaling showed that Western and non-Western cultures clustered along a dimension related to Extraversion. A culture-level factor analysis replicated earlier findings of a broad Extraversion factor but generally resembled the factor structure found in individuals. Continued analysis of aggregate personality scores is warranted.

  10. Modified Framingham Risk Factor Score for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urowitz, Murray B; Ibañez, Dominique; Su, Jiandong; Gladman, Dafna D

    2016-05-01

    The traditional Framingham Risk Factor Score (FRS) underestimates the risk for coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We aimed to determine whether an adjustment to the FRS would more accurately reflect the higher prevalence of CAD among patients with SLE. Patients with SLE without a previous history of CAD or diabetes followed regularly at the University of Toronto Lupus Clinic were included. A modified FRS (mFRS) was calculated by multiplying the items by 1.5, 2, 3, or 4. In the first part of the study, using one-third of all eligible patients, we evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of the FRS and the different multipliers for the mFRS. In the second part of the study, using the remaining 2/3 of the eligible patients, we compared the predictive ability of the FRS to the mFRS. In the third part of the study, we assessed the prediction for CAD in a time-dependent analysis of the FRS and mFRS. There were 905 women (89.3%) with a total of 95 CAD events included. In part 1, we determined that a multiplier of 2 provided the best combination of sensitivity and specificity. In part 2, 2.4% of the patients were classified as moderate/high risk based on the classic FRS and 17.3% using the 2FRS (the FRS with a multiplier of 2). In part 3, a time-dependent covariate analysis for the prediction of the first CAD event revealed an HR of 3.22 (p = 0.07) for the classic FRS and 4.37 (p mFRS in which each item is multiplied by 2 more accurately predicts CAD in patients with SLE.

  11. The relationships between WAIS-IV factor index scores and educational level: A bifactor model approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad, Francisco J; Sorrel, Miguel A; Román, Francisco J; Colom, Roberto

    2016-08-01

    IQ summary scores may not involve equivalent psychological meaning for different educational levels. Ultimately, this relates to the distinction between constructs and measurements. Here, we explore this issue studying the standardization of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) for Spain. A representative sample of 743 individuals (374 females and 369 males) who completed the 15 subtests comprising this intelligence battery was considered. We analyzed (a) the best latent factor structure for modeling WAIS-IV subtest performance, (b) measurement invariance across educational levels, and (c) the relationships of educational level/attainment with latent factors, Full Scale IQ (FSIQ), and index factor scores. These were the main findings: (a) the bifactor model provides the best fit; (b) there is partial invariance, and therefore it is concluded that the battery is a proper measure of the constructs of interest for the educational levels analyzed (nevertheless, the relevance of g decreases at high educational levels); (c) at the latent level, g and, to a lesser extent, Verbal Comprehension and Processing Speed, are positively related to educational level/attainment; (d) despite the previous finding, we find that Verbal Comprehension and Processing Speed factor index scores have reduced incremental validity beyond FSIQ; and (e) FSIQ is a slightly biased measure of g. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Prognostic factors and scoring system for death from visceral leishmaniasis: an historical cohort study in Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendel Coura-Vital

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In Brazil, case-fatality rates attributable to visceral leishmaniasis (VL are high and knowledge of the risk factors associated with death may help reduce mortality. The aim of this study was to construct and validate a scoring system for prognosis of death from VL by using all cases reported in Brazil from 2007 to 2011.In this historical cohort study, 18,501 VL cases were analyzed; of these, 17,345 cases were cured and 1,156 cases caused death. The database was divided into two series: primary (two-thirds of cases, to develop the model score, and secondary (one-third of cases, to validate the scoring system. Multivariate logistic regression models were performed to identify factors associated with death from VL, and these were included in the scoring system.The factors associated with death from VL were: bleeding (score 3; splenomegaly (score 1; edema (score 1; weakness (score 1; jaundice (score 1; Leishmania-HIV co-infection (score 1; bacterial infection (score 1; and age (≤0.5 years [score 5]; >0.5 and ≤1 [score 2]; >19 and ≤50 [score 2]; >50 and <65 [score 3]; ≥65 [score 5]. It was observed that patients with a score of 4 had a probability of death of approximately 4.5% and had a worse prognosis. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of this score were 89.4, 51.2, and 53.5, respectively.The scoring system based on risk factors for death showed good performance in identifying patients with signs of severity at the time of clinical suspicion of VL and can contribute to improving the surveillance system for reducing case fatalities. The classification of patients according to their prognosis for death may assist decision-making regarding the transfer of the patients to hospitals more capable of handling their condition, admission to the intensive care unit, and adequate support and specific treatment.

  13. Diet scores and cardio-metabolic risk factors among Guatemalan young adults

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    We assessed the association of four diet quality scores with multiple cardio-metabolic outcomes among Guatemalan young adults experiencing the nutrition transition. We obtained cross-sectional dietary, demographic, anthropometric and cardio-metabolic risk factor data from 1220 Guatemalan adults (mean age 32·7 (SD 5·8) years) in 2002–4, and computed a Recommended Food Score (RFS), Not Recommended Food Score (NRFS), Food Variety Score (FVS) and the Dietary Quality Index-International (DQI-I). A...

  14. Framingham coronary heart disease risk score can be predicted from structural brain images in elderly subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Maryam Rondina

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent literature has presented evidence that cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF play an important role on cognitive performance in elderly individuals, both those who are asymptomatic and those who suffer from symptoms of neurodegenerative disorders. Findings from studies applying neuroimaging methods have increasingly reinforced such notion. Studies addressing the impact of CVRF on brain anatomy changes have gained increasing importance, as recent papers have reported gray matter loss predominantly in regions traditionally affected in Alzheimer’s disease (AD and vascular dementia in the presence of a high degree of cardiovascular risk. In the present paper, we explore the association between CVRF and brain changes using pattern recognition techniques applied to structural MRI and the Framingham score (a composite measure of cardiovascular risk largely used in epidemiological studies in a sample of healthy elderly individuals. We aim to answer the following questions: Is it possible to decode (i.e., to learn information regarding cardiovascular risk from structural brain images enabling individual predictions? Among clinical measures comprising the Framingham score, are there particular risk factors that stand as more predictable from patterns of brain changes? Our main findings are threefold: i we verified that structural changes in spatially distributed patterns in the brain enable statistically significant prediction of Framingham scores. This result is still significant when controlling for the presence of the APOE 4 allele (an important genetic risk factor for both AD and cardiovascular disease. ii When considering each risk factor singly, we found different levels of correlation between real and predicted factors; however, single factors were not significantly predictable from brain images when considering APOE4 allele presence as covariate. iii We found important gender differences, and the possible causes of that finding are discussed.

  15. [Internal structure and standardised scores of the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, Mercedes; Ferrándiz, Carmen; Bermejo, María R; Sánchez, Cristina; Parra, Joaquín; Prieto, María D

    2007-08-01

    The present work sets out to study the internal structure of the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking (TTCT) and to establish standardised scores that will enable the test to be used in both a diagnostic and educational context. 649 students (319 girls and 330 boys), aged 5 to 12 years from various schools in Murcia and Alicante (SE Spain), took part in the study. The findings suggest that the psychometric characteristics of TTCT are satisfactory, and its internal structure can be attributed to three factors that are responsible for a high percentage of the variance (73.8%). The standardised score tables, which are provided for first time in this context, will be useful in the evaluation of creativity and the identification of students with high intellectual abilities.

  16. Predicting brain structure in population-based samples with biologically informed genetic scores for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Auwera, Sandra; Wittfeld, Katharina; Shumskaya, Elena; Bralten, Janita; Zwiers, Marcel P; Onnink, A Marten H; Usberti, Niccolo; Hertel, Johannes; Völzke, Henry; Völker, Uwe; Hosten, Norbert; Franke, Barbara; Grabe, Hans J

    2017-04-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with brain structural abnormalities including gray and white matter volume reductions. Whether these alterations are caused by genetic risk variants for schizophrenia is unclear. Previous attempts to detect associations between polygenic factors for schizophrenia and structural brain phenotypes in healthy subjects have been negative or remain non-replicated. In this study, we used genetic risk scores that were based on the accumulated effect of selected risk variants for schizophrenia belonging to specific biological systems like synaptic function, neurodevelopment, calcium signaling, and glutamatergic neurotransmission. We hypothesized that this "biologically informed" approach would provide the missing link between genetic risk for schizophrenia and brain structural phenotypes. We applied whole-brain voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analyses in two population-based target samples and subsequent regions of interest (ROIs) analyses in an independent replication sample (total N = 2725). No consistent association between the genetic scores and brain volumes were observed in the investigated samples. These results suggest that in healthy subjects with a higher genetic risk for schizophrenia additional factors apart from common genetic variants (e.g., infection, trauma, rare genetic variants, or gene-gene interactions) are required to induce structural abnormalities of the brain. Further studies are recommended to test for possible gene-gene or gene-environment effects. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Generalizability of writing scores: an application of structural equation modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonen, R.

    2005-01-01

    The assessment of writing ability is notoriously difficult. Different facets of the assessment seem to influence its outcome. Besides the writer’s writing proficiency, the topic of the assignment, the features or traits scored (e.g., content or language use) and even the way in which these traits ar

  18. ADJUSTMENT FACTORS AND ADJUSTMENT STRUCTURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Benzao

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, adjustment factors J and R put forward by professor Zhou Jiangwen are introduced and the nature of the adjustment factors and their role in evaluating adjustment structure is discussed and proved.

  19. Modelo predictivo de "score" de calcio alto en pacientes con factores de riesgo cardiovascular Predictive model of high calcium score in patients with cardiovascular risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Franco

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: a través de múltiples estudios, se ha encontrado que el "score" de calcio coronario es un buen predictor de enfermedad coronaria, en individuos asintomáticos con uno o más factores de riesgo cardiovascular. Por ello sería ideal realizar esta prueba para estratificar su riesgo, pero esto no es posible en la mayoría de los casos por motivos de índole económica. El modelo que se presenta permite predecir la probabilidad de que un paciente tenga un score de calcio coronario alto, a partir de sus factores de riesgo cardiovascular. Lo novedoso del modelo es que también involucra factores "protectores" que disminuyen dicha probabilidad. Métodos: estudio de casos y controles, en pacientes asintomáticos con factores de riesgo cardiovascular, a quienes se les realizó un PCC. Los casos son pacientes con score de calcio coronario por encima del percentil 75 para su edad y género; la relación control:caso es 2:1. Resultados: las edades oscilaron entre 35 y 75 años; el 14,4% eran de género femenino, el 44,4% tenían historia familiar de CHD, el 34,4% eran hipertensos, el 38,9% colesterol total elevado, el 24,4% colesterol HDL por debajo de 40 mg/dL, el 33,3% colesterol LDL por encima de 160 mg/dL, el 25,6% fumaban, el 23,3% eran sedentarios, el 13,3% consumían licor periódicamente, el 15,6% eran obesos (IMC>30, el 18,9% realizaban ejercicio de manera periódica y 34,4% tomaba estatinas. Los factores de riesgo cardiovascular que se correlacionaron con el score de calcio coronario alto, se consignan en la tabla 1. En el modelo de regresión logística se incluyen los factores que tienen un valor de p tabla 2. La expresión para el modelo sería: Los valores de ci son 1, si el factor está presente y 0 si no lo está. Conclusiones: el anterior modelo no pretende reemplazar la estratificación con el modelo de Framingham, al contrario, es un complemento que permite orientar al médico tratante sobre si es recomendable realizar la

  20. A Study of Risk Factors and T- Score Variability in Romanian Women with Postmenopausal Osteoporosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodica TöRöK-Oance

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to analyse the prevalence of postmenopausal osteoporosis risk factors and to analyse the T-score variability in spine and hip according to the associated risk factors.This is a retrospective study (2003-2007 including 177 female patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis. The patients were separated in seven groups according to the number of risk factors per case. The T-score was compared between this groups using unpaired t-Student test.The most frequent risk factor was early menopause (44.63%, followed by low consumption of dairy products (37.29%, coffee consumption (25.99%, sedentary lifestyle (20.9%, smoking (19.21%, delayed menarche (15.25%, low body mass index (10.71%, nulliparity (7.91%, alcohol consumption (0.56%. The maximum number of risk factors per case was six. The T-score decreased with increasing number of risk factors. T-score differences are statistically significant when comparing cases with 6 risk factors to cases with 5 risk factors (P=0.0315 in spine; P=0.0088 in hip, 4 risk factors (P=0.0076 in spine; P=0.043 in hip, 3 risk factors (P<0.0001 in spine; P=0.0205 in hip, 2 risk factors (P=0.0012 in spine; P<0.0001 in hip, a single risk factor (P<0.001 in spine and hip and no risk factor (P=0.0075 in spine; P=0.0006 in hip.Association of several risk factors leads to decrease of T-score so being able to avoid any such factors may contribute to a better bone mineral density. This could be achieved by the education of female population regarding postmenopausal osteoporosis risk factors, followed by adopting an appropriate lifestyle and diet.

  1. Score region algebra : a flexible framework for structured information retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mihajlovic, Vojkan

    2006-01-01

    Approximately three decades ago researchers realized that they would have to structure data to be able to store and access large amounts of data streams that were produced each day. As a result, database management systems were designed and developed, used to keep the data in one place and for findi

  2. Demographic Correlates and Factor Structure of the Family Environment Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boake, Corwin; Salmon, Paul G.

    1983-01-01

    Factor analyzed the Family Environment Scale (FES) subscale scores of 204 families and correlated them with family demographic characteristics. The obtained factor structure showed two major factors similar to "control" and "acceptance-rejection" dimensions in previous research. Results support the FES as part of multimethod…

  3. Validity evidence based on internal structure of scores on the Spanish version of the Self-Description Questionnaire-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingles, Cándido J; Torregrosa, María S; Hidalgo, María D; Nuñez, Jose C; Castejón, Juan L; García-Fernández, Jose M; Valles, Antonio

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the reliability and validity evidence of scores on the Spanish version of Self-Description Questionnaire II (SDQ-II). The instrument was administered in a sample of 2022 Spanish students (51.1% boys) from grades 7 to 10. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to examine validity evidence based on internal structure drawn from the scores on the SDQ-II. CFA replicated the correlated II first-order factor structure. Furthermore, hierarchical confirmatory factor analysis (HCFA) was used to examine the hierarchical ordering of self-concept, as measured by scores on the Spanish version of the SDQ-II. Although a series of HCFA models were tested to assess academic and non-academic components organization, support for those hierarchical models was weaker than for the correlated 11 first-order factor structure. Results also indicated that scores on the Spanish version of the SDQ-II had internal consistency and test-retest reliability estimates within an acceptable range.

  4. Weighing of risk factors for penetrating keratoplasty graft failure: application of Risk Score System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdo Karim Tourkmani

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To analyze the relationship between the score obtained in the Risk Score System (RSS proposed by Hicks et al with penetrating keratoplasty (PKP graft failure at 1y postoperatively and among each factor in the RSS with the risk of PKP graft failure using univariate and multivariate analysis. METHODS: The retrospective cohort study had 152 PKPs from 152 patients. Eighteen cases were excluded from our study due to primary failure (10 cases, incomplete medical notes (5 cases and follow-up less than 1y (3 cases. We included 134 PKPs from 134 patients stratified by preoperative risk score. Spearman coefficient was calculated for the relationship between the score obtained and risk of failure at 1y. Univariate and multivariate analysis were calculated for the impact of every single risk factor included in the RSS over graft failure at 1y. RESULTS: Spearman coefficient showed statistically significant correlation between the score in the RSS and graft failure (P0.05 between diagnosis and lens status with graft failure. The relationship between the other risk factors studied and graft failure was significant (P<0.05, although the results for previous grafts and graft failure was unreliable. None of our patients had previous blood transfusion, thus, it had no impact. CONCLUSION: After the application of multivariate analysis techniques, some risk factors do not show the expected impact over graft failure at 1y.

  5. The Influences of Student and Standardized Patient Genders on Scoring an Objective Structured Clinical Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutala, Paul J.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A study investigating possible sex bias, concerning both student and standardized-patient genders, in an objective structured clinical examination found that neither men nor women were afforded an advantage by patient or test location. However, women's scores on tests administered by females were higher than corresponding men's scores. (MSE)

  6. The Reliability and Structure of the Classroom Assessment Scoring System in German Pre-Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuck, Andrea; Kammermeyer, Gisela; Roux, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the reliability and structure of the Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS; Pianta, R. C., K. M. La Paro, and B. K. Hamre. 2008. "Classroom Assessment Scoring System. Manual Pre-K." Baltimore, MD: Brookes) and the quality of interactional processes in a German pre-school setting, drawing on a sample of 390…

  7. Factors associated with fourth grade health education scores on the Maine Educational Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroble, L P

    1997-02-01

    Data collected in 1994 on the health section of the fourth grade Maine Educational Assessment (MEA) were analyzed in this study. Correlational studies and analyses of variance tested significance of community, school, and teacher variables. A multiple regression analysis with a path model determined significant factors associated with achievement in health. The most salient finding was that students' overall ability--represented by achievement in the other MEA content areas--related strongly to achievement in health. Community socioeconomic status emerged as another significant influence on health scores. Type of health education program did not make a difference in scores, but any method of delivering health education, in contrast to no health education affected health scores significantly. Up to 30 minutes of instruction per week yielded the highest mean scores. The teachers' rating of the health program emerged as a pivotal variable.

  8. Risk Factors and Scoring Systems for Patients with Candidemia at a Tertiary Hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mursinah, Mursinah; Ibrahim, Fera; Wahid, Mardiastuti H

    2016-07-01

    to identify the risk factors of candidemia and to develop a scoring system that could be implemented in Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital (RSCM), Jakarta, Indonesia. this study was a retrospective study with case control design using the medical records of patients since 2011 to 2014. All sepsis patients hospitalized in the RSCM with a positive blood culture for Candida were included in this study as a case group. The control group was all of the sepsis patients without candidemia. The ratio for case and control groups was equal (1:1). from 234 patients who were analyzed, the risk factors that influenced the study were length of stay of 8-14 days (OR 3.464; 95% CI 1.458-7.800), length of stay of more than 14 days (OR 6.844; 95% CI 3.0-15.330), severe sepsis (OR 16.407; 95% CI 1.458-7.800), and surgery (OR 3.03; 95% CI 1.492-6.152). The predictors for candidemia in RSCM were length of stay in hospital for 8-14 days (score 1), a length of stay ≥14 days (score 2), severe sepsis (score 3), and surgery (score 1), with a cut off score of 3.5. the results of this study have indicated that a scoring system in order to guide an empirical treatment for candidemia can be developed by using the risk factors for candidemia from patients who have been identified as patients with risk at Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital.

  9. The Impact of EuroSCORE II Risk Factors on Prediction of Long-Term Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barili, Fabio; Pacini, Davide; D'Ovidio, Mariangela; Dang, Nicholas C; Alamanni, Francesco; Di Bartolomeo, Roberto; Grossi, Claudio; Davoli, Marina; Fusco, Danilo; Parolari, Alessandro

    2016-10-01

    The European System for Cardiac Operation Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE) II has not been tested yet for predicting long-term mortality. This study was undertaken to evaluate the relationship between EuroSCORE II and long-term mortality and to develop a new algorithm based on EuroSCORE II factors to predict long-term survival after cardiac surgery. Complete data on 10,033 patients who underwent major cardiac surgery during a 7-year period were retrieved from three prospective institutional databases and linked with the Italian Tax Register Information System. Mortality at follow-up was analyzed with time-to-event analysis. The Kaplan-Meier estimates of survival at 1 and 5 were, respectively, 95.0% ± 0.2% and 84.7% ± 0.4%. Both discrimination and calibration of EuroSCORE II decreased in the prediction of 1-year and 5-year mortality. Nonetheless, EuroSCORE II was confirmed to be an independent predictor of long-term mortality with a nonlinear trend. Several EuroSCORE II variables were independent risk factors for long-term mortality in a regression model, most of all very low ejection fraction (less than 20%), salvage operation, and dialysis. In the final model, isolated mitral valve surgery and isolated coronary artery bypass graft surgery were associated with improved long-term survival. The EuroSCORE II cannot be considered a direct estimator of long-term risk of death, as its performance fades for mortality at follow-up longer than 30 days. Nonetheless, it is nonlinearly associated with long-term mortality, and most of its variables are risk factors for long-term mortality. Hence, they can be used in a different algorithm to stratify the risk of long-term mortality after surgery. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Incremental criterion validity of WAIS-IV factor index scores: relationships with WIAT-II and WIAT-III subtest and composite scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canivez, Gary L

    2013-06-01

    The present study examined the incremental validity of Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-4th Edition (WAIS-IV; Wechsler, 2008a) factor index scores in predicting academic achievement on the Wechsler Individual Achievement Test-2nd Edition (WIAT-II; Psychological Corporation, 2002a) and on the Wechsler Individual Achievement Test-3rd Edition (WIAT-III; Wechsler, 2009a) beyond that predicted by the WAIS-IV Full Scale IQ (FSIQ). As with previous intelligence test incremental validity studies, the WAIS-IV FSIQ accounted for statistically significant and generally large portions of WIAT-II and WIAT-III subtest and composite score variance. WAIS-IV factor index scores combined to provide statistically significant increments in variance accounted for in most WIAT-II and WIAT-III subtest and composite scores over and above the FSIQ score; however, the effect sizes ranged from trivial to medium as observed in investigations with other intelligence tests (i.e., Glutting, Watkins, Konold, & McDermott, 2006; Youngstrom, Kogos, & Glutting, 1999). Individually, the WAIS-IV factor index scores provided trivial to small unique contributions to predicting WIAT-II and WIAT-III scores. This finding indicated that the FSIQ should retain primacy and greatest interpretive weight in WAIS-IV interpretation, as previously indicated by WAIS-IV subtest variance partitions form hierarchical exploratory factor analyses (Canivez & Watkins, 2010a, 2012b). PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  11. Experimental Protein Structure Verification by Scoring with a Single, Unassigned NMR Spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Joseph M; Ye, Qing; Nesbitt, Anna E; Tang, Ming; Tuttle, Marcus D; Watt, Eric D; Nuzzio, Kristin M; Sperling, Lindsay J; Comellas, Gemma; Peterson, Joseph R; Morrissey, James H; Rienstra, Chad M

    2015-10-06

    Standard methods for de novo protein structure determination by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) require time-consuming data collection and interpretation efforts. Here we present a qualitatively distinct and novel approach, called Comparative, Objective Measurement of Protein Architectures by Scoring Shifts (COMPASS), which identifies the best structures from a set of structural models by numerical comparison with a single, unassigned 2D (13)C-(13)C NMR spectrum containing backbone and side-chain aliphatic signals. COMPASS does not require resonance assignments. It is particularly well suited for interpretation of magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectra, but also applicable to solution NMR spectra. We demonstrate COMPASS with experimental data from four proteins--GB1, ubiquitin, DsbA, and the extracellular domain of human tissue factor--and with reconstructed spectra from 11 additional proteins. For all these proteins, with molecular mass up to 25 kDa, COMPASS distinguished the correct fold, most often within 1.5 Å root-mean-square deviation of the reference structure.

  12. Diet scores and cardio-metabolic risk factors among Guatemalan young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Cria O; McCullough, Marjorie L; Ramirez-Zea, Manuel; Stein, Aryeh D

    2009-06-01

    We assessed the association of four diet quality scores with multiple cardio-metabolic outcomes among Guatemalan young adults experiencing the nutrition transition. We obtained cross-sectional dietary, demographic, anthropometric and cardio-metabolic risk factor data from 1220 Guatemalan adults (mean age 32.7 (sd 5.8) years) in 2002-4, and computed a Recommended Food Score (RFS), Not Recommended Food Score (NRFS), Food Variety Score (FVS) and the Dietary Quality Index-International (DQI-I). All four scores were correlated with energy intake (r 0.23-0.49; all P socio-demographic characteristics, lifestyle factors and nutrient intakes. None of the scores was inversely associated with the metabolic syndrome or its components; rather some were positively associated with risk factors. Among both men and women the DQI-I was positively associated with BMI (kg/m2; beta = 0.10, 95 % CI 0.003, 0.21 (men); beta = 0.07, 95 % CI 0.01, 0.14 (women)) and waist circumference (cm; beta = 0.02, 95 % CI 0.01, 0.03 (men); beta = 0.02, 95 % CI = 0.01, 0.02 (women)). Among men, the RFS was positively associated with TAG (mg/l; beta = 0.11, 95 % CI 0.02, 0.21) and glucose (mg/l; beta = 0.13: 95 % CI 0.03, 0.22). We conclude that indices of diet quality are not consistently associated with chronic disease risk factor prevalence in this population of Guatemalan young adults.

  13. An Inmate Classification System Based on PCL: SV Factor Scores in a Sample of Prison Inmates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wogan, Michael; Mackenzie, Marci

    2007-01-01

    Psychopaths represent a significant management challenge in a prison population. A sample of ninety-five male inmates from three medium security prisons was tested using the Hare Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version (PCL:SV). Using traditional criteria, 22% of the inmates were classified as psychopaths. Scores on the two factor dimensions of…

  14. An Inmate Classification System Based on PCL: SV Factor Scores in a Sample of Prison Inmates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wogan, Michael; Mackenzie, Marci

    2007-01-01

    Psychopaths represent a significant management challenge in a prison population. A sample of ninety-five male inmates from three medium security prisons was tested using the Hare Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version (PCL:SV). Using traditional criteria, 22% of the inmates were classified as psychopaths. Scores on the two factor dimensions of…

  15. The significance of the ProtDeform score for structure prediction and alignment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo Rocha

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: When a researcher uses a program to align two proteins and gets a score, one of her main concerns is how often the program gives a similar score to pairs that are or are not in the same fold. This issue was analysed in detail recently for the program TM-align with its associated TM-score. It was shown that because the TM-score is length independent, it allows a P-value and a hit probability to be defined depending only on the score. Also, it was found that the TM-scores of gapless alignments closely follow an Extreme Value Distribution (EVD. The program ProtDeform for structural protein alignment was developed recently and is characterised by the ability to propose different transformations of different protein regions. Our goal is to analyse its associated score to allow a researcher to have objective reasons to prefer one aligner over another, and carry out a better interpretation of the output. RESULTS: The study on the ProtDeform score reveals that it is length independent in a wider score range than TM-scores and that PD-scores of gapless (random alignments also approximately follow an EVD. On the CASP8 predictions, PD-scores and TM-scores, with respect to native structures, are highly correlated (0.95, and show that around a fifth of the predictions have a quality as low as 99.5% of the random scores. Using the Gold Standard benchmark, ProtDeform has lower probabilities of error than TM-align both at a similar speed. The analysis is extended to homology discrimination showing that, again, ProtDeform offers higher hit probabilities than TM-align. Finally, we suggest using three different P-values according to the three different contexts: Gapless alignments, optimised alignments for fold discrimination and that for superfamily discrimination. In conclusion, PD-scores are at the very least as valuable for prediction scoring as TM-scores, and on the protein classification problem, even more reliable.

  16. A Comparison of Factor Score Estimation Methods in the Presence of Missing Data: Reliability and an Application to Nicotine Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estabrook, Ryne; Neale, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Factor score estimation is a controversial topic in psychometrics, and the estimation of factor scores from exploratory factor models has historically received a great deal of attention. However, both confirmatory factor models and the existence of missing data have generally been ignored in this debate. This article presents a simulation study…

  17. [Risk factors of ISUP Modified Gleason score upgrading after radical prostatectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-dong; Qu, Gen-yi; Xu, Ning; Xue, Xue-yi; Wei, Yong; Zheng, Qing-shui; Li, Jun-feng; Cai, Hai; Lin, Yun-zhi

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the factors upgrading the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Gleason score using the specimens from preoperative prostatic biopsy and radical prostatectomy. A total of 164 patients diagnosed with prostate cancer by biopsy underwent radical prostatectomy. We retrospectively analyzed their age, prostate volume, preoperative PSA level, PSA density (PSAD) , the time interval between biopsy and surgery, the number of positive punctures, positive surgical margin, seminal vesicle invasion, lymphatic invasion, and Gleason scores from biopsy and prostatectomy. We also determined the predictors of Gleason score upgrading by logistic regression analysis. Of the 164 cases analyzed, 95 (57.93% ) showed a consistency between the Gleason score of preoperative prostatic biopsy and that after radical prostatectomy, 55 (33.54% ) increased and 14 (8.52%) decreased after prostatectomy as compared with preoperative biopsy. The prostate volume (P 60 ml group (P < 0.05). Low Gleason score of biopsy (≤ 6) and small prostate volume (≤ 40 ml) may be the predictors of Gleason score upgrading after radical prostatectomy.

  18. Diet scores and cardio-metabolic risk factors among Guatemalan young adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Cria O.; McCullough, Marjorie L.; Ramirez-Zea, Manuel; Stein, Aryeh D.

    2013-01-01

    We assessed the association of four diet quality scores with multiple cardio-metabolic outcomes among Guatemalan young adults experiencing the nutrition transition. We obtained cross-sectional dietary, demographic, anthropometric and cardio-metabolic risk factor data from 1220 Guatemalan adults (mean age 32·7 (SD 5·8) years) in 2002–4, and computed a Recommended Food Score (RFS), Not Recommended Food Score (NRFS), Food Variety Score (FVS) and the Dietary Quality Index-International (DQI-I). All four scores were correlated with energy intake (r 0·23–0·49; all P4 (women)) and waist circumference (cm; β = 0·02, 95 % CI 0·01, 0·03 (men); β = 0·02, 95 % CI = 0·01, 0·02 (women)). Among men, the RFS was positively associated with TAG (mg/l; β = 0·11, 95 % CI 0·02, 0·21) and glucose (mg/l; β = 0·13: 95 % CI 0·03, 0·22). We conclude that indices of diet quality are not consistently associated with chronic disease risk factor prevalence in this population of Guatemalan young adults. PMID:19025721

  19. Glasgow coma score and tumor necrosis factor α as predictive criteria for initial poor graft function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novelli, G; Morabito, V; Lai, Q; Levi Sandri, G B; Melandro, F; Pugliese, F; Novelli, S; Rossi, M; Berloco, P B

    2012-09-01

    Initial poor graft function (IPGF) is a major factor influencing the clinical outcome after liver transplantation (LT), but there is no reliable method to assess and predict graft dysfunction. To help clinicians determine prognosis in the early postoperative period, individual parameters and complex scoring systems have been suggested, but most of them are inaccurate because of the multifactorial nature of transplantation courses. Therefore, the aim of our study was to retrospectively evaluate predictive criteria for retransplantation. Forty-two patients were enrolled in this study: 18 who experienced primary non-function (PNF) and 24 with delayed graft function (DGF). All of the patients were treated with the Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System (MARS). They were into 3 subgroups: patients who survived without LT (n = 20; 47.7%); patients who underwent LT (n = 16; 37%), and patients who died before transplantation (n = 6; 14%). Stepwise multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed with the intent to find the risk factors for LT or death after MARS treatment (second analysis). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were performed on significant variables in the logistic regression model with the intent to individually predict variables for LT or death. After a stepwise multivariable logistic regression analysis enrolling all of the previously reported features only 2 variables, tumor necrosis factor (TFN)-α and Glasgow coma score (GCS) score, were statistically significant. TNF-α was an unique independent risk factor for retransplantation or death after MARS treatment (odds ratio [OR] 1.235; P = .013). Conversely, GCS score was protective against retransplantation or death (OR 0.150; P = .003). Starting from these assumptions, a predictive model was created using these 2 variables. On ROC analysis, the combined score showed an area under the curve greater than that of the 2 variables considered separately. Validating these results with a

  20. Exploratory study of factors related to educational scores of first preclinical year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitticharoon, Chantacha; Srisuma, Sorachai; Kanavitoon, Sawita; Summachiwakij, Sarayut

    2014-03-01

    The relationships among the scores of major subjects taught in the first preclinical year of a Thai medical school, previous academic achievements, and daily life activities are rarely explored. We therefore performed an exploratory study identifying various factors possibly related to the educational scores of these medical students. Questionnaires were sent out to all first preclinical year medical students, with 79.8% being returned (245/307 questionnaires). Positive correlations were revealed between the premedical year grade point average (pre-MD GPA) and anatomy, physiology, and biochemistry scores (R = 0.664, 0.521, and 0.653, respectively, P < 0.001 for all) by Pearson's method. Using multiple linear regression analysis, anatomy scores could be predicted by pre-MD GPA, student satisfaction with anatomy, the percentage of expected reading, monthly earnings, reading after class and near exam time, and duration of sleeping periods near exam time (R = 0.773, R(2) = 0.598, P < 0.001). Physiology scores could be estimated by pre-MD GPA, the percentage of expected reading, monthly earnings, and percentage of those who fell asleep during class and near exam time (R = 0.722, R(2) = 0.521, P < 0.001). Biochemistry scores could be calculated by pre-MD GPA, the percentage of expected reading, motivation to study medicine, student satisfaction with biochemistry, and exam performance expectations (R = 0.794, R(2) = 0.630, P < 0.001). In conclusion, pre-MD GPA and the percentage of expected reading are factors involved in producing good academic results in the first preclinical year. Anatomy and biochemistry, but not physiology, scores are influenced by satisfaction.

  1. A new method for simultaneous estimation of the factor model parameters, factor scores, and unique parts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegeman, Alwin

    In the common factor model the observed data is conceptually split into a common covariance producing part and an uncorrelated unique part. The common factor model is fitted to the data itself and a new method is introduced for the simultaneous estimation of loadings, unique variances, factor

  2. A new scoring function for protein-protein docking that identifies native structures with unprecedented accuracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreira, Irina S.; da Silva Martins, João Miguel; Coimbra, João T.S.

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein (P-P) 3D structures are fundamental to structural biology and drug discovery. However, most of them have never been determined. Many docking algorithms were developed for that purpose, but they have a very limited accuracy in generating native-like structures and identifying...... the most correct one, in particular when a single answer is asked for. With such a low success rate it is difficult to point out one docked structure as being native-like. Here we present a new, high accuracy, scoring method to identify the 3D structure of P-P complexes among a set of trial poses...... the trial structures and identifies the native-like structures with unprecedented accuracy (∼94%), providing the correct P-P 3D structures that biochemists and molecular biologists need to pursue their studies. With such a success rate, the bottleneck of protein-protein docking moves from the scoring...

  3. Protein structural model selection by combining consensus and single scoring methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiquan He

    Full Text Available Quality assessment (QA for predicted protein structural models is an important and challenging research problem in protein structure prediction. Consensus Global Distance Test (CGDT methods assess each decoy (predicted structural model based on its structural similarity to all others in a decoy set and has been proved to work well when good decoys are in a majority cluster. Scoring functions evaluate each single decoy based on its structural properties. Both methods have their merits and limitations. In this paper, we present a novel method called PWCom, which consists of two neural networks sequentially to combine CGDT and single model scoring methods such as RW, DDFire and OPUS-Ca. Specifically, for every pair of decoys, the difference of the corresponding feature vectors is input to the first neural network which enables one to predict whether the decoy-pair are significantly different in terms of their GDT scores to the native. If yes, the second neural network is used to decide which one of the two is closer to the native structure. The quality score for each decoy in the pool is based on the number of winning times during the pairwise comparisons. Test results on three benchmark datasets from different model generation methods showed that PWCom significantly improves over consensus GDT and single scoring methods. The QA server (MUFOLD-Server applying this method in CASP 10 QA category was ranked the second place in terms of Pearson and Spearman correlation performance.

  4. A metabolic syndrome severity score: A tool to quantify cardio-metabolic risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Joshua F; Carrington, Melinda J

    2016-07-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of cardio-metabolic risk factors and is associated with increased mortality. There is no standard, validated way to assess the severity of aggregated metabolic syndrome risk factors. Cardiovascular and diabetes risk factor data came from two studies conducted in Australia from 2006 to 2010 in adults aged 18 or above. In medication free adults, sex-specific clinical thresholds and Principal Component Analysis were used to develop a formula to calculate a metabolic syndrome severity score (MetSSS). These scores were compared to scores derived using the same process in subgroups by sex, age, medication status, and time. We also examined the MetSSS in relation to other known risk factors. In 2125 adults (57.6±14.7years of age), the MetSSS ranged from 0 to 8.7 with a mean of 2.6. There were strong correlations (.95-.99) between the MetSSS in medication free adults and the MetSSS calculated from subgroups. MetSSS predicted medication initiation for hypertension, hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia over six months (OR=1.31, 95% CI [1.00-1.70], per MetSSS unit, p=.043). Lower education, medication prescription, history of smoking and age were associated with higher MetSSS (all p<.05). Higher physical but not mental health quality of life was associated with lower MetSSS (p<.001). A standardized formula to measure cardio-metabolic risk factor severity was constructed and demonstrated expected relations with known risk factors. The use of the MetSSS is recommended as a measure of change within individuals in cardio-metabolic risk factors and to guide treatment and management.

  5. Sensitivity and specificity of WAIS-III/WMS-III demographically corrected factor scores in neuropsychological assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, M J; Heaton, R K

    2001-11-01

    This study explored the neurodiagnostic utility of 6 factor scores identified by recent exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses of the WAIS-III and WMS-III: Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Organization, Processing Speed, Working Memory, Auditory Memory and Visual Memory. Factor scores were corrected for age. education, sex and ethnicity to minimize their influences on diagnostic accuracy. Cut-offs at 1, 1.5 and 2 standard deviations (SDs) below the standardization sample mean were applied to data from the overlapping test normative samples (N = 1073) and 6 clinical samples described in the WAIS-III/WMS-III Technical Manual (N = 126). The analyses suggest that a I SD cut-off yields the most balanced levels of sensitivity and specificity; more strict (1.5 or 2 SD) cut-offs generally result in trading modest gains in specificity for larger losses in sensitivity. Finally, using combinations of WAIS-III/WMS-III factors together as test batteries, we explored the sensitivity and specificity implications of varying diagnostic decision rules (e.g.,1 vs. 2 impaired factors = "impairment"). For most of the disorders considered here, even a small (e.g., 3 factor) WAIS-III/WMS-III battery provides quite good overall diagnostic accuracy.

  6. Characterization of the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire scores of a young French cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesdéma, Aurélie; Fromentin, Gilles; Daudin, Jean-Jacques; Arlotti, Agathe; Vinoy, Sophie; Tome, Daniel; Marsset-Baglieri, Agnès

    2012-10-01

    The aims of our study were to characterize the psychological dimensions of eating behaviour of young French adults as measured by the Three Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ) and to analyze the association between the 3 TFEQ mean scores (main scales and subscales) and gender, Body Mass Index (BMI) and socio-demographic data in this population. An online TFEQ questionnaire was used with a nationally representative sample of 1000 young French people (aged 20-39yrs). The average scores were 6.3±0.1 (sem) for dietary restraint, 6.0±0.1 for disinhibition and 5.0±0.1 for hunger. Compared to the limit commonly used in human food studies, young French adults were characterized by low restraint and low disinhibition levels. There was a significant gender effect on both restraint and disinhibition scores, with women showing significantly higher scores than men. Concerning the link between TFEQ scores and BMI, there was a significant effect of the BMI category on cognitive restraint, disinhibition and hunger. Disinhibition was the factor most strongly associated to BMI, independently of gender. Our results highlight both the importance of taking into account not only disinhibition but also cognitive restraint and the usefulness of subscales when studying eating behaviour and its link to body weight. We characterize the eating behaviour of a French cohort with criteria often chosen for healthy volunteers in human food studies. Consequently, we suggest new TFEQ limits (6 for cognitive restraint and disinhibition, 5 for hunger) lower than those traditionally used for this category of the population in clinical food studies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Risk factors of incomplete Apgar score and umbilical cord blood gas analysis: a retrospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tetering, Anne A C; van de Ven, Joost; Fransen, Annemarie F; Dieleman, Jeanne P; van Runnard Heimel, Pieter J; Oei, S Guid

    2017-11-01

    To investigate whether incomplete umbilical cord blood gas (UCBG) analysis occurs more often than the incomplete reporting of the Apgar score, and risk factors associated with the incomplete values. A total of 8824 infants born alive after 26 weeks' gestation between January 2009 and April 2013 were included. We extracted data on five-minute Apgar score, UCBG analysis, gestational age, mode of delivery, time of delivery and multiple pregnancy. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed. Five-minute Apgar score was incomplete in 15 cases (0.2%) and UCBG analysis in 1960 cases (22.2%), p < 0.05. Incomplete UCBG analysis was significantly more likely to occur in situations with Apgar score below seven (Odds ratio (OR) 1.68, 95% CI;1.29-2.19), gestational age between 26 to 27 6/7 and 28 to 31 6/7 weeks (OR 3.14, 95% CI; 2.13-4.62 and OR 1.91, 95% CI; 1.57-2.32), cesarean section (OR 1.31, 95% CI; 1.11-1.55), and multiple pregnancy (OR 2.02, 95% CI; 1.69-2.43). Deliveries during night time had a lower risk of incomplete UCBG analysis (OR 0.78, 95% CI; 0.69-0.88). Measuring five-minute Apgar score generated less incomplete data compared with UCBG analysis. The risk factors associated with incomplete UCBG analysis were noted. Study outcomes with UCBG analysis as neonatal assessment tool should be interpreted with caution.

  8. SDS, a structural disruption score for assessment of missense variant deleteriousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanawadee ePreeprem

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a novel structure-based evaluation for missense variants that explicitly models protein structure and amino acid properties to predict the likelihood that a variant disrupts protein function. A structural disruption score (SDS is introduced as a measure to depict the likelihood that a case variant is functional. The score is constructed using characteristics that distinguish between causal and neutral variants within a group of proteins. The SDS score is correlated with standard sequence-based deleteriousness, but shows promise for improving discrimination between neutral and causal variants at less conserved sites.The prediction was performed on 3-dimentional structures of 57 gene products whose homozygous SNPs were identified as case-exclusive variants in an exome sequencing study of epilepsy disorders. We contrasted the candidate epilepsy variants with scores for likely benign variants found in the EVS database, and for positive control variants in the same genes that are suspected to promote a range of diseases. To derive a characteristic profile of damaging SNPs, we transformed continuous scores into categorical variables based on the score distribution of each measurement, collected from all possible SNPs in this protein set, where extreme measures were assumed to be deleterious. A second epilepsy dataset was used to replicate the findings. Causal variants tend to receive higher sequence-based deleterious scores, induce larger physico-chemical changes between amino acid pairs, locate in protein domains, buried sites or on conserved protein surface clusters, and cause protein destabilization, relative to negative controls. These measures were agglomerated for each variant. A list of nine high-priority putative functional variants for epilepsy was generated. Our newly developed SDS protocol facilitates SNP prioritization for experimental validation.

  9. Evaluating Transcription Factor Activity Changes by Scoring Unexplained Target Genes in Expression Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berchtold, Evi; Csaba, Gergely; Zimmer, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Several methods predict activity changes of transcription factors (TFs) from a given regulatory network and measured expression data. But available gene regulatory networks are incomplete and contain many condition-dependent regulations that are not relevant for the specific expression measurement. It is not known which combination of active TFs is needed to cause a change in the expression of a target gene. A method to systematically evaluate the inferred activity changes is missing. We present such an evaluation strategy that indicates for how many target genes the observed expression changes can be explained by a given set of active TFs. To overcome the problem that the exact combination of active TFs needed to activate a gene is typically not known, we assume a gene to be explained if there exists any combination for which the predicted active TFs can possibly explain the observed change of the gene. We introduce the i-score (inconsistency score), which quantifies how many genes could not be explained by the set of activity changes of TFs. We observe that, even for these minimal requirements, published methods yield many unexplained target genes, i.e. large i-scores. This holds for all methods and all expression datasets we evaluated. We provide new optimization methods to calculate the best possible (minimal) i-score given the network and measured expression data. The evaluation of this optimized i-score on a large data compendium yields many unexplained target genes for almost every case. This indicates that currently available regulatory networks are still far from being complete. Both the presented Act-SAT and Act-A* methods produce optimal sets of TF activity changes, which can be used to investigate the difficult interplay of expression and network data. A web server and a command line tool to calculate our i-score and to find the active TFs associated with the minimal i-score is available from https://services.bio.ifi.lmu.de/i-score. PMID:27723775

  10. Factors associated with dietary diversity score among individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiew, Kee Fong; Chan, Yoke Mun; Lye, Munn Sann; Loke, Seng Cheong

    2014-12-01

    Studies on diet quality among individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are scarce. This crosssectional study aimed to assess the diet quality and to determine its associated factors among individuals with T2DM at the Medical Outpatients Department, Serdang Hospital, Selangor, Malaysia, from July 2010 to March 2011. Subjects were interviewed for sociodemographic data. Diabetes history was retrieved from the hospital's e-database. Usual dietary intake was measured using a food frequency questionnaire, from which a dietary diversity score was obtained with two measures: Food Group Score and Serving Score were constructed based on the Malaysian Dietary Guidelines. Food Group Score was computed from the number of food groups consumed from five major food groups (grains, vegetables, fruits, meat, and dairy products) whereas Serving Score was computed from the number of servings consumed from the various food groups. Anthropometric measures, including weight, height, waist- and hip-circumference were examined. For data analyses, descriptive statistics, simple and multiple linear regression were conducted using IBM SPSS Statis- tics 20.0. A total of 113 subjects (50.4% female), with mean?SD age of 54.05 +/- 10.30 years and duration of diabetes of 11.25?9.05 years were studied. The mean Food Group Score and Serving Score were 4.12 +/- 0.79 and 12.75+3.50 respectively. Slightly more than one-third of the subjects achieved five food groups a day while less than 2% consumed a desirable number of servings from all food groups. Among the five food groups, dairy, and fruits were the least-frequently consumed foods. Lower education, lower personal income, working, non-insulin, overweight and obese subjects had significantly lower Food Group Score than their counterparts [F (6,106)=4.924, pnational dietary guidelines. The importance of taking a well-balanced diet in accordance with the guidelines should be emphasized, especially among those with lower educational level

  11. Predicting College Success: The Relative Contributions of Five Social/Personality Factors, Five Cognitive/Learning Factors, and SAT Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, Brenda

    2014-01-01

    To-date, studies have examined simultaneously the relative predictive powers of two or three factors on GPA. The present study examines the relative powers of five social/personality factors, five cognitive/learning factors, and SAT scores to predict freshmen and non-freshmen (sophomores, juniors, seniors) academic success (i.e., GPA). The results revealed many significant predictors of GPA for both freshmen and non-freshmen. However, subsequent regressions showed that only academic self-efficacy, epistemic belief of learning, and high-knowledge integration explained unique variance in GPA (19%-freshmen, 23.2%-non-freshmen). Further for freshmen, SAT scores explained an additional unique 10.6% variance after the influences attributed to these three predictors was removed whereas for non-freshmen, SAT scores failed to explain any additional variance. These results highlight the unique and important contributions of academic self-efficacy, epistemic belief of learning and high-knowledge integration to GPA beyond other previously-identified predictors. PMID:25568884

  12. Predicting College Success: The Relative Contributions of Five Social/Personality Factors, Five Cognitive/Learning Factors, and SAT Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, Brenda

    2014-10-01

    To-date, studies have examined simultaneously the relative predictive powers of two or three factors on GPA. The present study examines the relative powers of five social/personality factors, five cognitive/learning factors, and SAT scores to predict freshmen and non-freshmen (sophomores, juniors, seniors) academic success (i.e., GPA). The results revealed many significant predictors of GPA for both freshmen and non-freshmen. However, subsequent regressions showed that only academic self-efficacy, epistemic belief of learning, and high-knowledge integration explained unique variance in GPA (19%-freshmen, 23.2%-non-freshmen). Further for freshmen, SAT scores explained an additional unique 10.6% variance after the influences attributed to these three predictors was removed whereas for non-freshmen, SAT scores failed to explain any additional variance. These results highlight the unique and important contributions of academic self-efficacy, epistemic belief of learning and high-knowledge integration to GPA beyond other previously-identified predictors.

  13. Jury-Contestant Bipartite Competition Network: Identifying Biased Scores and Their Impact on Network Structure Inference

    CERN Document Server

    Jeon, Gyuhyeon

    2016-01-01

    A common form of competition is one where judges grade contestants' performances which are then compiled to determine the final ranking of the contestants. Unlike in another common form of competition where two contestants play a head-to-head match to produce a winner as in football or basketball, the objectivity of judges are prone to be questioned, potentially undermining the public's trust in the fairness of the competition. In this work we show, by modeling the judge--contestant competition as a weighted bipartite network, how we can identify biased scores and measure their impact on our inference of the network structure. Analyzing the prestigious International Chopin Piano Competition of 2015 with a well-publicized scoring controversy as an example, we show that even a single statistically uncharacteristic score can be enough to gravely distort our inference of the community structure, demonstrating the importance of detecting and eliminating biases. In the process we also find that there does not exist...

  14. The Adjustment of Offspring of Within-Group and Interracial/Intercultural Marriages: A Comparison of Personality Factor Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ronald C.; Nagoshi, Craig T.

    1986-01-01

    Results indicated offspring of within-group versus across-racial/ethnic marriages did not differ in personality test scores. As compared with offspring of within-group marriages, male offspring of across-group marriages scored higher on a factor measuring socially desirable traits and lower on a factor measuring intraception, while female…

  15. Lack of physical activity in young children is related to higher composite risk factor score for cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanha, Tina; Wollmer, Per; Thorsson, Ola

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluates whether accelerometer-measured physical activity is related to higher composite risk factor scores for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in children.......This study evaluates whether accelerometer-measured physical activity is related to higher composite risk factor scores for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in children....

  16. Tissue Factor Structure and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saulius Butenas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue factor (TF is an integral membrane protein that is essential to life. It is a component of the factor VIIa-TF complex enzyme and plays a primary role in both normal hemostasis and thrombosis. With a vascular injury, TF becomes exposed to blood and binds plasma factor VIIa, and the resulting complex initiates a series of enzymatic reactions leading to clot formation and vascular sealing. Many cells, both healthy, and tumor cells, produce detectable amounts of TF, especially when they are stimulated by various agents. Despite the relative simplicity and small size of TF, there are numerous contradictory reports about the synthesis and presentation of TF on blood cells and circulation in normal blood either on microparticles or as a soluble protein. Another subject of controversy is related to the structure/function of TF. It has been almost commonly accepted that cell-surface-associated TF has low (if any activity, that is, is “encrypted” and requires specific conditions/reagents to become active, that is, “decrypted.” However there is a lack of agreement related to the mechanism and processes leading to alterations in TF function. In this paper TF structure, presentation, and function, and controversies concerning these features are discussed.

  17. A global machine learning based scoring function for protein structure prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraggi, Eshel; Kloczkowski, Andrzej

    2014-05-01

    We present a knowledge-based function to score protein decoys based on their similarity to native structure. A set of features is constructed to describe the structure and sequence of the entire protein chain. Furthermore, a qualitative relationship is established between the calculated features and the underlying electromagnetic interaction that dominates this scale. The features we use are associated with residue-residue distances, residue-solvent distances, pairwise knowledge-based potentials and a four-body potential. In addition, we introduce a new target to be predicted, the fitness score, which measures the similarity of a model to the native structure. This new approach enables us to obtain information both from decoys and from native structures. It is also devoid of previous problems associated with knowledge-based potentials. These features were obtained for a large set of native and decoy structures and a back-propagating neural network was trained to predict the fitness score. Overall this new scoring potential proved to be superior to the knowledge-based scoring functions used as its inputs. In particular, in the latest CASP (CASP10) experiment our method was ranked third for all targets, and second for freely modeled hard targets among about 200 groups for top model prediction. Ours was the only method ranked in the top three for all targets and for hard targets. This shows that initial results from the novel approach are able to capture details that were missed by a broad spectrum of protein structure prediction approaches. Source codes and executable from this work are freely available at http://mathmed.org/#Software and http://mamiris.com/.

  18. A structured interview guide for global impressions: increasing reliability and scoring accuracy for CNS trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Targum Steven D

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The clinical global impression of severity (CGI-S scale is a frequently used rating instrument for the assessment of global severity of illness in Central Nervous System (CNS trials. Although scoring guidelines have been proposed to anchor these scores, the collection of sufficient documentation to support the derived score is not part of any standardized interview procedure. It is self evident that the absence of a standardized, documentary format can affect inter-rater reliability and may adversely affect the accuracy of the resulting data. Method We developed a structured interview guide for global impressions (SIGGI and evaluated the instrument in a 2-visit study of ambulatory patients with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD or schizophrenia. Blinded, site-independent raters listened to audio recorded SIGGI interviews administered by site-based CGI raters. We compared SIGGI-derived CGI-S scores between the two separate site-based raters and the site-independent raters. Results We found significant intraclass correlations (p = 0.001 on all SIGGI-derived CGI-S scores between two separate site-based CGI raters with each other (r = 0.768 and with a blinded, site-independent rater (r = 0.748 and r = 0.706 respectively and significant Pearson’s correlations between CGI-S scores with all MADRS validity comparisons for MDD and PANSS comparisons for schizophrenia (p- 0.001 in all cases. Compared to site-based raters, the site-independent raters gave identical “dual” CGI-S scores to 67.6% and 68.2% of subjects at visit 1 and 77.1% at visit 2. Conclusion We suggest that the SIGGI may improve the inter-rater reliability and scoring precision of the CGI-S and have broad applicability in CNS clinical trials.

  19. Structural and Discriminant Validity of the Career Factors Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Josephine; Tokar, David M.

    2004-01-01

    Using a sample of 350 college students, this study examined the structural and discriminant validity of the Career Factors Inventory (CFI; Chartrand, Robbins, Morrill, & Boggs, 1990), a multidimensional measure of career indecision intended to be scored for two informational indecision components (Need for Career Information and Need for…

  20. TAP score: torsion angle propensity normalization applied to local protein structure evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Battistutta Roberto

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experimentally determined protein structures may contain errors and require validation. Conformational criteria based on the Ramachandran plot are mainly used to distinguish between distorted and adequately refined models. While the readily available criteria are sufficient to detect totally wrong structures, establishing the more subtle differences between plausible structures remains more challenging. Results A new criterion, called TAP score, measuring local sequence to structure fitness based on torsion angle propensities normalized against the global minimum and maximum is introduced. It is shown to be more accurate than previous methods at estimating the validity of a protein model in terms of commonly used experimental quality parameters on two test sets representing the full PDB database and a subset of obsolete PDB structures. Highly selective TAP thresholds are derived to recognize over 90% of the top experimental structures in the absence of experimental information. Both a web server and an executable version of the TAP score are available at http://protein.cribi.unipd.it/tap/. Conclusion A novel procedure for energy normalization (TAP has significantly improved the possibility to recognize the best experimental structures. It will allow the user to more reliably isolate problematic structures in the context of automated experimental structure determination.

  1. What factors predict improvements in outcomes scores and reoperations after the Bernese periacetabular osteotomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulé, Paul E; Dowding, Chris; Parker, Gillian; Ryu, Jae-Jin

    2015-02-01

    The Bernese periacetabular osteotomy (PAO) has entered its fourth decade and is frequently used for corrective osteotomy in patients with acetabular dysplasia. Although our capacity to preserve the joint after corrective osteotomy is excellent, gaining a better understanding on how well patients function after this surgery is important as well. (1) What changes in patient-reported outcomes scores occur in patients treated with PAO for hip dysplasia in the setting of a single-surgeon practice? (2) What are the predictors of clinical function and survivorship? All 67 patients presenting to a single surgeon's clinic with hip dysplasia treated with PAO between October 2005 and January 2013 were prospectively followed. Baseline demographic data as well as pre- and postoperative radiographic and functional measurements were obtained with a minimum of 1-year followup. Radiographic criteria included Tönnis grade, Tönnis angle, minimum joint space width, center-edge angle, presence of crossover sign, medial translation of the hip center, and alpha angle. We also used validated outcome measures including the WOMAC, the UCLA Activity Scale, and the SF-12. Multiple regression analysis was used to determine predictors of functional outcome scores. There were increases in WOMAC, UCLA, and SF-12 Physical scores. Higher preoperative alpha angle was associated with a lower postoperative WOMAC score (β=-0.47; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.92 to -0.02; R2=0.08; p=0.04). The 5-year Kaplan-Meier survivorship was 94.1% (95% CI, 90.7-97.5) with reoperation (ie, hip arthroscopy and/or total hip arthroplasty) used as the endpoint for failure. With the limited numbers available, we could not identify any demographic or radiographic factors associated with reoperation. Overall survivorship for the PAO at our center at 5 years is comparable to other clinical series with overall functional scores improving. A greater alpha angle preoperatively was associated with poorer patient

  2. Correlations in a Mozart's music score (K-73x) with palindromic and upside-down structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagdug, Leonardo; Alvarez-Ramirez, Jose; Lopez, Carlos; Moreno, Rodolfo; Hernandez-Lemus, Enrique

    2007-09-01

    In this work, we study long-range correlations in a “Scherzo-Duetto di Mozart” score (K-73x) for two violins. This is a fascinating piece, as the second violin part is upside down on the same sheet below the first violin, and some parts are like a palindrome. Given such ingenious structure, it is expected the existence of long-range correlations in the score structure. In order to quantify long-range correlations, we considered the music score as a sequence of integer numbers, each of them corresponding to last common denominator units of note. By using detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), correlations are quantified by means of the scaling exponent that reflects the type of correlations for a given distance between neighbors note. The following conclusions can be drawn from the analysis: (a) For about 10-25 neighbor note distances, correlations are similar to 1/f-noise. This is an interesting finding since it has been shown that pleasant sounds for humans display a behavior similar to 1/f noise. (b) As the neighbor note distance increases, the long-range correlations decays continuously. For some score sections, the music score behaves like non-correlated (i.e., purely random) noise. Summing up, the results show that the studied Mozart's score contains a certain degree of correlation for relatively small note distances, and becomes close to non-correlated behavior for long note distances. We considered also the sequence constructed by considering the distance between the simultaneously played notes of the two violins. Interestingly, for relatively small neighbor note distances, a scaling behavior similar to that found for individual violins is also displayed. In some sense, this is an expression of the specific structure (palindromes plus upside down construction) used by Mozart in the composition of this music score. Although we focused on a particular high-art music score, our results suggest that modern methods borrowed from statistical physics can be

  3. Adding multiple risk factors improves Framingham coronary heart disease risk scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guizhou; Root, Martin; Duncan, Ashlee W

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of the Framingham Risk Score (FRS), numerous versions of coronary heart disease (CHD) prediction models have claimed improvement over the FRS. Tzoulaki et al challenged the validity of these claims by illustrating methodology deficiencies among the studies. However, the question remains: Is it possible to create a new CHD model that is better than FRS while overcoming the noted deficiencies? To address this, a new CHD prediction model was developed by integrating additional risk factors, using a novel modeling process. Using the National Health Nutritional Examination Survey III data set with CHD-specific mortality outcomes and the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities data set with CHD incidence outcomes, two FRSs (FRSv1 from 1998 and FRSv2 from National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III), along with an additional risk score in which the high density lipoprotein (HDL) component of FRSv1 was ignored (FRSHDL), were compared with a new CHD model (NEW-CHD). This new model contains seven elements: the original Framingham equation, FRSv1, and six additional risk factors. Discrimination, calibration, and reclassification improvements all were assessed among models. Discrimination was improved for NEW-CHD in both cohorts when compared with FRSv1 and FRSv2 (Prisk assessment when compared with the FRSs, comparable to the improvement of adding HDL to the FRS.

  4. Prognostic Factors for Open Globe Injuries and Correlation of Ocular Trauma Score in Tianjin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yu; Yan, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate prognostic factors that influence the final visual acuity (VA) and to correlate the ocular trauma score (OTS) with the final VA in open globe injuries. Methods. A retrospective review of 298 patients with open globe injuries admitted to Tianjin Medical University General Hospital was carried out from January 1, 2010, till December 31, 2014. Prognostic factors influencing the final VA in patients with open globe injuries and the correlation between OTS and the final VA were examined. Results. Three hundred and fourteen eyes from 298 patients with open globe injuries were analyzed. Males had a higher rate of open globe injury than females (83.56% versus 16.44%). Mean age was 45.46 ± 17.48 years (5–95 years). In a univariate analysis, prognostic factors influencing the final VA included initial VA, relative afferent papillary defect (RAPD), vitreous hemorrhage, lens injury, endophthalmitis, hyphema, retinal detachment, and the zone of injury. In a multiple logistic regression analysis, initial VA, RAPD, and the zone of injury were considered to be independent risk factors. The OTS correlated with final VA (r = 0.988, p = 0.000). Conclusion. In our study, the most important prognostic factors influencing the final VA were initial VA, RAPD, and the zone of injury. The OTS was of great importance for patients and ophthalmologists. PMID:26491549

  5. Prognostic Factors for Open Globe Injuries and Correlation of Ocular Trauma Score in Tianjin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Meng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate prognostic factors that influence the final visual acuity (VA and to correlate the ocular trauma score (OTS with the final VA in open globe injuries. Methods. A retrospective review of 298 patients with open globe injuries admitted to Tianjin Medical University General Hospital was carried out from January 1, 2010, till December 31, 2014. Prognostic factors influencing the final VA in patients with open globe injuries and the correlation between OTS and the final VA were examined. Results. Three hundred and fourteen eyes from 298 patients with open globe injuries were analyzed. Males had a higher rate of open globe injury than females (83.56% versus 16.44%. Mean age was 45.46 ± 17.48 years (5–95 years. In a univariate analysis, prognostic factors influencing the final VA included initial VA, relative afferent papillary defect (RAPD, vitreous hemorrhage, lens injury, endophthalmitis, hyphema, retinal detachment, and the zone of injury. In a multiple logistic regression analysis, initial VA, RAPD, and the zone of injury were considered to be independent risk factors. The OTS correlated with final VA (r=0.988, p=0.000. Conclusion. In our study, the most important prognostic factors influencing the final VA were initial VA, RAPD, and the zone of injury. The OTS was of great importance for patients and ophthalmologists.

  6. Clinical Correlates of Hachinski Ischemic Score and Vascular Factors in Cognitive Function of Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youn Ho Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between Hachinski ischemic score (HIS and vascular factors as well as between HIS and the cognitive function in elderly community. Demographic characteristics, such as sex, age, education, history of drinking and smoking, family history of dementia and stroke, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, cardiovascular disease, stroke, and dementia, were surveyed. Neurological examination was administered to every subject and HIS was checked by a neurologist. From a total of 392 participants aged 65 and over in a rural community, 348 completed the survey and were finally enrolled. Among the vascular factors, history of hypertension (P=0.008, history of stroke (P<0.001, family history of dementia (P=0.01, and history of cardiac diseases (P=0.012 showed a significant relationship with HIS. In the cognitive function tests, both Korean version of the Mini-Mental State Examination and the Clinical Dementia Rating (Global and Sum of Boxes had a significant relationship with HIS. Our study suggested HIS may have an association with some vascular factors and cognitive scales in community dwelling elderly. In this study, the HIS seemed to contribute to the evaluation of the quantity of vascular factors and to the prediction of status of cognitive function.

  7. Evaluation of Factors Affecting Continuous Performance Test Identical Pairs Version Score of Schizophrenic Patients in a Japanese Clinical Sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayoshi Koide

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Cognitive impairment in schizophrenia strongly relates to social outcome and is a good candidate for endophenotypes. When we accurately measure drug efficacy or effects of genes or variants relevant to schizophrenia on cognitive impairment, clinical factors that can affect scores on cognitive tests, such as age and severity of symptoms, should be considered. To elucidate the effect of clinical factors, we conducted multiple regression analysis using scores of the Continuous Performance Test Identical Pairs Version (CPT-IP, which is often used to measure attention/vigilance in schizophrenia. Methods. We conducted the CPT-IP (4-4 digit and examined clinical information (sex, age, education years, onset age, duration of illness, chlorpromazine-equivalent dose, and Positive and Negative Symptom Scale (PANSS scores in 126 schizophrenia patients in Japanese population. Multiple regression analysis was used to evaluate the effect of clinical factors. Results. Age, chlorpromazine-equivalent dose, and PANSS-negative symptom score were associated with mean d′ score in patients. These three clinical factors explained about 28% of the variance in mean d′ score. Conclusions. As conclusion, CPT-IP score in schizophrenia patients is influenced by age, chlorpromazine-equivalent dose and PANSS negative symptom score.

  8. Evaluation of factors affecting continuous performance test identical pairs version score of schizophrenic patients in a Japanese clinical sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koide, Takayoshi; Aleksic, Branko; Kikuchi, Tsutomu; Banno, Masahiro; Kohmura, Kunihiro; Adachi, Yasunori; Kawano, Naoko; Iidaka, Tetsuya; Ozaki, Norio

    2012-01-01

    Aim. Cognitive impairment in schizophrenia strongly relates to social outcome and is a good candidate for endophenotypes. When we accurately measure drug efficacy or effects of genes or variants relevant to schizophrenia on cognitive impairment, clinical factors that can affect scores on cognitive tests, such as age and severity of symptoms, should be considered. To elucidate the effect of clinical factors, we conducted multiple regression analysis using scores of the Continuous Performance Test Identical Pairs Version (CPT-IP), which is often used to measure attention/vigilance in schizophrenia. Methods. We conducted the CPT-IP (4-4 digit) and examined clinical information (sex, age, education years, onset age, duration of illness, chlorpromazine-equivalent dose, and Positive and Negative Symptom Scale (PANSS) scores) in 126 schizophrenia patients in Japanese population. Multiple regression analysis was used to evaluate the effect of clinical factors. Results. Age, chlorpromazine-equivalent dose, and PANSS-negative symptom score were associated with mean d' score in patients. These three clinical factors explained about 28% of the variance in mean d' score. Conclusions. As conclusion, CPT-IP score in schizophrenia patients is influenced by age, chlorpromazine-equivalent dose and PANSS negative symptom score.

  9. Integrative Approach to Quality Assessment of Medical Journals Using Impact Factor, Eigenfactor, and Article Influence Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizkallah, Jacques; Sin, Don D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Impact factor (IF) is a commonly used surrogate for assessing the scientific quality of journals and articles. There is growing discontent in the medical community with the use of this quality assessment tool because of its many inherent limitations. To help address such concerns, Eigenfactor (ES) and Article Influence scores (AIS) have been devised to assess scientific impact of journals. The principal aim was to compare the temporal trends in IF, ES, and AIS on the rank order of leading medical journals over time. Methods The 2001 to 2008 IF, ES, AIS, and number of citable items (CI) of 35 leading medical journals were collected from the Institute of Scientific Information (ISI) and the http://www.eigenfactor.org databases. The journals were ranked based on the published 2008 ES, AIS, and IF scores. Temporal score trends and variations were analyzed. Results In general, the AIS and IF values provided similar rank orders. Using ES values resulted in large changes in the rank orders with higher ranking being assigned to journals that publish a large volume of articles. Since 2001, the IF and AIS of most journals increased significantly; however the ES increased in only 51% of the journals in the analysis. Conversely, 26% of journals experienced a downward trend in their ES, while the rest experienced no significant changes (23%). This discordance between temporal trends in IF and ES was largely driven by temporal changes in the number of CI published by the journals. Conclusion The rank order of medical journals changes depending on whether IF, AIS or ES is used. All of these metrics are sensitive to the number of citable items published by journals. Consumers should thus consider all of these metrics rather than just IF alone in assessing the influence and importance of medical journals in their respective disciplines. PMID:20419115

  10. Could symptoms and risk factors diagnose COPD? Development of a Diagnosis Score for COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salameh P

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Pascale Salameh,1 Georges Khayat,2 Mirna Waked31Faculties of Pharmacy and of Public Health, Lebanese University, Beirut, 2Faculty of Medicine, Hôtel Dieu de France Hospital, Beirut and Saint Joseph University, Beirut, 3Faculty of Medicine, Saint George Hospital, Beirut and Balamand University, Beirut, LebanonBackground: Diagnosing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD without spirometry is still a challenge. Our objective in this study was to develop a scale for diagnosis of COPD.Methods: Data were taken from a cross-sectional epidemiological study. After reducing chronic respiratory symptoms, a logistic regression was used to select risk factors for and symptoms of COPD. The rounded coefficients generated a Diagnosis Score for COPD (DS-COPD, which was dichotomized and differentiated between COPD and other individuals with respiratory symptoms.Results: We constructed a tool for COPD diagnosis with good properties, comprising 12 items. The area under the curve was 0.849; the positive predictive value was 76% if the DS-COPD was >20 and the negative predictive value was 97% if the DS-COPD was <10. A DS-COPD of 10–19 represented a zone mostly suggestive of no COPD (77%. The score was also inversely correlated with forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity.Conclusion: In this study, a tool for diagnosis of COPD was constructed with good properties for use in the epidemiological setting, mainly in cases of low or high scoring. It would be of particular interest in the primary care setting, where spirometry may not be available. Prospective studies and application in clinical settings would be necessary to validate this scale further.Keywords: diagnosis, scale, development, spirometry

  11. Koppitz Bender Gestalt Scores in First-Grade Children as Related to Ethnocultural Background, Socioeconomic Class, and Sex Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuelzer, Margot B.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    This study investigated whether Koppitz Bender Gestalt Scores were related to ethnocultural, socioeconomic and sex factors when statistical controls for intelligence were used. When intelligence was controlled for, it eliminated many effects for these variables. Results are discussed. (NG)

  12. A propensity score approach to correction for bias due to population stratification using genetic and non-genetic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huaqing; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Mitra, Nandita

    2009-12-01

    Confounding due to population stratification (PS) arises when differences in both allele and disease frequencies exist in a population of mixed racial/ethnic subpopulations. Genomic control, structured association, principal components analysis (PCA), and multidimensional scaling (MDS) approaches have been proposed to address this bias using genetic markers. However, confounding due to PS can also be due to non-genetic factors. Propensity scores are widely used to address confounding in observational studies but have not been adapted to deal with PS in genetic association studies. We propose a genomic propensity score (GPS) approach to correct for bias due to PS that considers both genetic and non-genetic factors. We compare the GPS method with PCA and MDS using simulation studies. Our results show that GPS can adequately adjust and consistently correct for bias due to PS. Under no/mild, moderate, and severe PS, GPS yielded estimated with bias close to 0 (mean=-0.0044, standard error=0.0087). Under moderate or severe PS, the GPS method consistently outperforms the PCA method in terms of bias, coverage probability (CP), and type I error. Under moderate PS, the GPS method consistently outperforms the MDS method in terms of CP. PCA maintains relatively high power compared to both MDS and GPS methods under the simulated situations. GPS and MDS are comparable in terms of statistical properties such as bias, type I error, and power. The GPS method provides a novel and robust tool for obtaining less-biased estimates of genetic associations that can consider both genetic and non-genetic factors.

  13. Individual structural differences in left inferior parietal area are associated with schoolchildrens’ arithmetic scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongxin eLi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Arithmetic skill is of critical importance for academic achievement, professional success and everyday life, and childhood is the key period to acquire this skill. Neuroimaging studies have identified that left parietal regions are a key neural substrate for representing arithmetic skill. Although the relationship between functional brain activity in left parietal regions and arithmetic skill has been studied in detail, it remains unclear about the relationship between arithmetic achievement and structural properties in left inferior parietal area in schoolchildren. The current study employed a combination of voxel-based morphometry (VBM for high-resolution T1-weighted images and fiber tracking on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI to examine the relationship between structural properties in the inferior parietal area and arithmetic achievement in 10-year-old schoolchildren. VBM of the T1-weighted images revealed that individual differences in arithmetic scores were significantly and positively correlated with the grey matter (GM volume in the left intraparietal sulcus (IPS. Fiber tracking analysis revealed that the forceps major, left superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF, bilateral inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF were the primary pathways connecting the left IPS with other brain areas. Furthermore, the regression analysis of the probabilistic pathways revealed a significant and positive correlation between the fractional anisotropy (FA values in the left SLF, ILF and bilateral IFOF and arithmetic scores. The brain structure-behavior correlation analyses indicated that the GM volumes in the left IPS and the FA values in the tract pathways connecting left IPS were both related to children’s arithmetic achievement. The present findings provide evidence that individual structural differences in the left IPS are associated with arithmetic scores in schoolchildren.

  14. The coronary calcium score is a more accurate predictor of significant coronary stenosis than conventional risk factors in symptomatic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicoll, R; Wiklund, U; Zhao, Y;

    2016-01-01

    risk factor assessment, computed tomographic coronary angiogram (CTCA) or conventional angiography and a CT scan for coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring. 1539 (27.9%) patients had significant stenosis, 5.5% of whom had zero CAC. In 5074 patients, multiple binary regression showed the most important...... predictor of significant stenosis to be male gender (B=1.07) followed by diabetes mellitus (B=0.70) smoking, hypercholesterolaemia, hypertension, family history of CAD and age but not obesity. When the log transformed CAC score was included, it became the most powerful predictor (B=1.25), followed by male...... gender (B=0.48), diabetes, smoking, family history and age but hypercholesterolaemia and hypertension lost significance. The CAC score is a more accurate predictor of >50% stenosis than risk factors regardless of the means of assessment of stenosis. The sensitivity of risk factors, CAC score...

  15. Guiding automated NMR structure determination using a global optimization metric, the NMR DP score

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yuanpeng Janet, E-mail: yphuang@cabm.rutgers.edu; Mao, Binchen; Xu, Fei; Montelione, Gaetano T., E-mail: gtm@rutgers.edu [Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, and Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium (United States)

    2015-08-15

    ASDP is an automated NMR NOE assignment program. It uses a distinct bottom-up topology-constrained network anchoring approach for NOE interpretation, with 2D, 3D and/or 4D NOESY peak lists and resonance assignments as input, and generates unambiguous NOE constraints for iterative structure calculations. ASDP is designed to function interactively with various structure determination programs that use distance restraints to generate molecular models. In the CASD–NMR project, ASDP was tested and further developed using blinded NMR data, including resonance assignments, either raw or manually-curated (refined) NOESY peak list data, and in some cases {sup 15}N–{sup 1}H residual dipolar coupling data. In these blinded tests, in which the reference structure was not available until after structures were generated, the fully-automated ASDP program performed very well on all targets using both the raw and refined NOESY peak list data. Improvements of ASDP relative to its predecessor program for automated NOESY peak assignments, AutoStructure, were driven by challenges provided by these CASD–NMR data. These algorithmic improvements include (1) using a global metric of structural accuracy, the discriminating power score, for guiding model selection during the iterative NOE interpretation process, and (2) identifying incorrect NOESY cross peak assignments caused by errors in the NMR resonance assignment list. These improvements provide a more robust automated NOESY analysis program, ASDP, with the unique capability of being utilized with alternative structure generation and refinement programs including CYANA, CNS, and/or Rosetta.

  16. Comparing Factor Structures of Adolescent Psychopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verona, Edelyn; Javdani, Shabnam; Sprague, Jenessa

    2011-01-01

    Research on the structure of adolescent psychopathology can provide information on broad factors that underlie different forms of maladjustment in youths. Multiple studies from the literature on adult populations suggest that 2 factors, Internalizing and Externalizing, meaningfully comprise the factor structure of adult psychopathology (e.g.,…

  17. Comparing Factor Structures of Adolescent Psychopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verona, Edelyn; Javdani, Shabnam; Sprague, Jenessa

    2011-01-01

    Research on the structure of adolescent psychopathology can provide information on broad factors that underlie different forms of maladjustment in youths. Multiple studies from the literature on adult populations suggest that 2 factors, Internalizing and Externalizing, meaningfully comprise the factor structure of adult psychopathology (e.g.,…

  18. Three-dimensional contrast enhanced ultrasound score and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging score in evaluating breast tumor angiogenesis: Correlation with biological factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Wan-Ru, E-mail: jiawanru@126.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Chai, Wei-Min, E-mail: chai_weimin@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiology, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Tang, Lei, E-mail: jessietang1003@163.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Wang, Yi, E-mail: xiatian.0602@163.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Fei, Xiao-Chun, E-mail: xcf0222@163.com [Department of Pathology, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Han, Bao-San, E-mail: hanbaosan@126.com [Department of Comprehensive Breast Health Center, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Chen, Man, E-mail: lucyjia1370@126.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China)

    2014-07-15

    Objective: To explore the clinical value of three-dimensional contrast enhanced ultrasound (3D-CEUS) and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) score systems in evaluating breast tumor angiogenesis by comparing their diagnostic efficacy and correlation with biological factors. Methods: 3D-CEUS was performed in 183 patients with breast tumors by Esaote Mylab90 with SonoVue (Bracco, Italy), DCE-MRI was performed on a dedicated breast magnetic resonance imaging (DBMRI) system (Aurora Dedicated Breast MRI Systems, USA) with a dedicated breast coil. 3D-CEUS and DCE-MRI score systems were created based on tumor perfusion and vascular characteristics. Microvessel density (MVD), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2, MMP-9) expression were measured by immunohistochemistry. Results: Pathological results showed 35 benign and 148 malignant breast tumors. MVD (P = 0.000, r = 0.76), VEGF (P = 0.000, r = 0.55), MMP-2 (P = 0.000, r = 0.39) and MMP-9 (P = 0.000, r = 0.41) expression were all significantly different between benignity and malignancy. Regarding 3D-CEUS 4 points as cutoff value, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 85.1%, 94.3% and 86.9%, respectively, and correlated well with MVD (P = 0.000, r = 0.50), VEGF (P = 0.000, r = 0.50), MMP-2 (P = 0.000, r = 0.50) and MMP-9 (P = 0.000, r = 0.66). Taking DCE-MRI 5 points as cutoff value, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 86.5%, 94.3% and 88.0%, respectively and also correlated well with MVD (P = 0.000, r = 0.52), VEGF (P = 0.000, r = 0.44), MMP-2 (P = 0.000, r = 0.42) and MMP-9 (P = 0.000, r = 0.35). Conclusions: 3D-CEUS score system displays inspiring diagnostic performance and good agreement with DCE-MRI scoring. Moreover, both score systems correlate well with MVD, VEGF, MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression, and thus have great potentials in tumor angiogenesis evaluation.

  19. Structure of RIASEC Scores in China: A Structural Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Lirong; Tracey, Terence J. G.

    2006-01-01

    A structural meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the fit of four different representations of the relations among RIASEC types, Holland's (1985, 1997) circular order model, Gati's (1991) three-group partition model, Rounds and Tracey's (1996) alternative three-group partition model, and Liu and Rounds' (2003) modified octant model, on 29…

  20. Adding multiple risk factors improves Framingham coronary heart disease risk scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu G

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Guizhou Hu,1 Martin Root,2 Ashlee W Duncan1 1BioSignia, Inc., Durham, NC, USA; 2Department of Nutrition and Health Care Management, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC, USA Purpose: Since the introduction of the Framingham Risk Score (FRS, numerous versions of coronary heart disease (CHD prediction models have claimed improvement over the FRS. Tzoulaki et al challenged the validity of these claims by illustrating methodology deficiencies among the studies. However, the question remains: Is it possible to create a new CHD model that is better than FRS while overcoming the noted deficiencies? To address this, a new CHD prediction model was developed by integrating additional risk factors, using a novel modeling process. Methods: Using the National Health Nutritional Examination Survey III data set with CHD-specific mortality outcomes and the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities data set with CHD incidence outcomes, two FRSs (FRSv1 from 1998 and FRSv2 from National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III, along with an additional risk score in which the high density lipoprotein (HDL component of FRSv1 was ignored (FRSHDL, were compared with a new CHD model (NEW-CHD. This new model contains seven elements: the original Framingham equation, FRSv1, and six additional risk factors. Discrimination, calibration, and reclassification improvements all were assessed among models. Results: Discrimination was improved for NEW-CHD in both cohorts when compared with FRSv1 and FRSv2 (P<0.05 and was similar in magnitude to the improvement of FRSv1 over FRSHDL. NEW-CHD had a similar calibration to FRSv2 and was improved over FRSv1. Net reclassification for NEW-CHD was substantially improved over both FRSv1 and FRSv2, for both cohorts, and was similar in magnitude to the improvement of FRSv1 over FRSHDL. Conclusion: While overcoming several methodology deficiencies reported by earlier authors, the NEW-CHD model improved CHD risk assessment when

  1. Language Learner Strategies and Linguistic Competence as Factors Affecting Achievement Test Scores in English for Specific Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurkovic, Violeta

    2010-01-01

    The article examines the effect of two factors on achievement test scores in English as a foreign language for specific purposes in higher education: preexisting linguistic competence and frequency of use of language learner strategies. The rationale for the analysis of language learner strategies as a factor affecting achievement test outcomes is…

  2. Factor structure of the Disability and Impact Profile in patients with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cohen, J. L.; Pouwer, F; Pfennings, L E

    1999-01-01

    and their complementary weighted scores share common variance? What is the factor structure of the weighted scores? To what extent do disease-related information and information from psychological questionnaires offer concurrent validity for the factors? Correlations between impairment ratings and the weighted item...... to sensory-cognitive intactness and a psychological well-being factor. A two-factor solution provides a first factor identical to that of the three-factor solution and a second factor representing psychological well-being. The two factors correlate well with instruments measuring disability...

  3. Development and validation of a bedside risk score for MRSA among patients hospitalized with complicated skin and skin structure infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zilberberg Marya D

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is a frequent cause of complicated skin and skin structure infections (cSSSI. Patients with MRSA require different empiric treatment than those with non-MRSA infections, yet no accurate tools exist to aid in stratifying the risk for a MRSA cSSSI. We sought to develop a simple bedside decision rule to tailor empiric coverage more accurately. Methods We conducted a large multicenter (N=62 hospitals retrospective cohort study in a US-based database between April 2005 and March 2009. All adult initial admissions with ICD-9-CM codes specific to cSSSI were included. Patients admitted with MRSA vs. non-MRSA were compared with regard to baseline demographic, clinical and hospital characteristics. We developed and validated a model to predict the risk of MRSA, and compared its performance via sensitivity, specificity and other classification statistics to the healthcare-associated (HCA infection risk factors. Results Of the 7,183 patients with cSSSI, 2,387 (33.2% had MRSA. Factors discriminating MRSA from non-MRSA were age, African-American race, no evidence of diabetes mellitus, cancer or renal dysfunction, and prior history of cardiac dysrhythmia. The score ranging from 0 to 8 points exhibited a consistent dose–response relationship. A MRSA score of 5 or higher was superior to the HCA classification in all characteristics, while that of 4 or higher was superior on all metrics except specificity. Conclusions MRSA is present in 1/3 of all hospitalized cSSSI. A simple bedside risk score can help discriminate the risk for MRSA vs. other pathogens with improved accuracy compared to the HCA definition.

  4. Evaluation of the Apgar score and its Related Factors in Neonates Born in Hospitals of Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Fallah

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Newborns should be evaluated immediately after birth and the traditional way of assessing is to use the Apgar score. The aim of this study was to estimate the Apgar score and evaluate the first 24 hour- clinical outcome of babies born at Yazd hospitals. Methods: In a descriptive cross-sectional study, Apgar score was assessed for 462 newborns at the 4 centers of Afshar, Madar, Kargar and Bahman of Yazd. 262 out of 462 babies were born by vaginal delivery and the other 200 babies were delivered by cesarean section. The data was analyzed by using both parametric and non parametric tests. Apgar score of 7 and less was considered as abnormal. Results: In this study, the type of delivery (cesarean section or vaginal delivery, method of anesthesia (epidural or general and gender of newborn had no impact on Apgar score, but prematurity, low birth weight, premature rupture of membranes, inadequate prenatal care and the level of maternal education had influence on reduction of the Apgar score. Those babies who were in good condition and were kept beside their mothers had the highest Apgar score. Conclusion: Apgar score is a useful measure to assess the general condition of the newborns at birth and for the prediction of their morbidity, mortality and neurologic impairment.

  5. Factor structure of emotional intelligence in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Chung; Wynn, Jonathan K; Hellemann, Gerhard; Green, Michael F

    2012-08-01

    Social cognition, which includes emotional intelligence, is impaired in schizophrenia. The Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) is a widely-used assessment of emotional intelligence, with a four-factor structure in healthy individual. However, a recent factor analysis in schizophrenia patients revealed a two-factor structure of the MSCEIT. The current study aimed to replicate this finding in a larger, more diverse, schizophrenia sample (n=194). Our findings revealed an identical two-factor structure as in the previously-reported study, indicating that emotional intelligence is organized in a different manner in schizophrenia than it is in healthy controls.

  6. Latent factor structure of a behavioral economic marijuana demand curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aston, Elizabeth R; Farris, Samantha G; MacKillop, James; Metrik, Jane

    2017-08-01

    Drug demand, or relative value, can be assessed via analysis of behavioral economic purchase task performance. Five demand indices are typically obtained from drug purchase tasks. The goal of this research was to determine whether metrics of marijuana reinforcement from a marijuana purchase task (MPT) exhibit a latent factor structure that efficiently characterizes marijuana demand. Participants were regular marijuana users (n = 99; 37.4% female, 71.5% marijuana use days [5 days/week], 15.2% cannabis dependent) who completed study assessments, including the MPT, during a baseline session. Principal component analysis was used to examine the latent structure underlying MPT indices. Concurrent validity was assessed via examination of relationships between latent factors and marijuana use, past quit attempts, and marijuana expectancies. A two-factor solution was confirmed as the best fitting structure, accounting for 88.5% of the overall variance. Factor 1 (65.8% variance) reflected "Persistence," indicating sensitivity to escalating marijuana price, which comprised four MPT indices (elasticity, O max, P max, and breakpoint). Factor 2 (22.7% variance) reflected "Amplitude," indicating the amount consumed at unrestricted price (intensity). Persistence factor scores were associated with fewer past marijuana quit attempts and lower expectancies of negative use outcomes. Amplitude factor scores were associated with more frequent use, dependence symptoms, craving severity, and positive marijuana outcome expectancies. Consistent with research on alcohol and cigarette purchase tasks, the MPT can be characterized with a latent two-factor structure. Thus, demand for marijuana appears to encompass distinct dimensions of price sensitivity and volumetric consumption, with differential relations to other aspects of marijuana motivation.

  7. Assessor-related factors and score differences between ethnically diverse Dutch police applicants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.A.L. de Meijer (Lonneke); M.Ph. Born (Marise); H. van Loon (Heleen); H.T. van der Molen (Henk)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe present study examined the effects of demographic and perceived similarity between assessors and applicants on assessors’ evaluations of Dutch ethnic majority and minority applicants. Results showed that demographic similarity did not explain score differences between ethnic groups.

  8. Eysenck Personality Inventory Item Factor Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comrey, Andrew L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Three methods were used to test the factor structure of the Eysenck Personality Inventory administered to 583 Australians. The preferred method was to extract factors by the minimum residual method, use the Tandem Criteria Method, and then rotate that number of factors by the Tandem Criteria I method. (SLD)

  9. Factors related to agreement between self-reported and conventional Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, E M; Hays, R D; Myers, L W; Ellison, G W; Beckstrand, M; Vickrey, B G

    2001-12-01

    Although the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) remains a widely used scale for evaluating impairments in people with multiple sclerosis (MS), EDSS assessments are infeasible in certain situations. A self-administered version of the EDSS would be potentially useful if it yielded similar results as the conventional physician-based version. We developed a self-administered patient questionnaire to obtain ratings of neurologic impairments, and developed algorithms to estimate EDSS scores. We mailed the questionnaires to all new consecutive patients scheduled to be seen at an MS clinic. Questionnaires were completed prior to the visit and traditional EDSS ratings were made by one of two neurologists at the visit. One hundred and forty-six pairs of patient questionnaires and physician EDSS assessments were obtained. Kappa values for agreement between the physician's EDSS scores and the questionnaire-derived scores were 0.13 (for exact agreement), 0.39 (+/-0.5 EDSS steps), and 0.56 (+/-1.0 EDSS steps). A scatterplot showed that agreement was best at EDSS scores 5.0. Better agreement was obtained when patients had a higher level of education, and when the physician was more certain of the diagnosis of MS. While the self-assessed EDSS scores do not agree highly enough to take the place of conventional EDSS scores, they may be sufficient for MS trial screening or for assessing outcomes across broad categories of disability.

  10. Further insights on the French WISC-IV factor structure through Bayesian structural equation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golay, Philippe; Reverte, Isabelle; Rossier, Jérôme; Favez, Nicolas; Lecerf, Thierry

    2013-06-01

    The interpretation of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children--Fourth Edition (WISC-IV) is based on a 4-factor model, which is only partially compatible with the mainstream Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) model of intelligence measurement. The structure of cognitive batteries is frequently analyzed via exploratory factor analysis and/or confirmatory factor analysis. With classical confirmatory factor analysis, almost all cross-loadings between latent variables and measures are fixed to zero in order to allow the model to be identified. However, inappropriate zero cross-loadings can contribute to poor model fit, distorted factors, and biased factor correlations; most important, they do not necessarily faithfully reflect theory. To deal with these methodological and theoretical limitations, we used a new statistical approach, Bayesian structural equation modeling (BSEM), among a sample of 249 French-speaking Swiss children (8-12 years). With BSEM, zero-fixed cross-loadings between latent variables and measures are replaced by approximate zeros, based on informative, small-variance priors. Results indicated that a direct hierarchical CHC-based model with 5 factors plus a general intelligence factor better represented the structure of the WISC-IV than did the 4-factor structure and the higher order models. Because a direct hierarchical CHC model was more adequate, it was concluded that the general factor should be considered as a breadth rather than a superordinate factor. Because it was possible for us to estimate the influence of each of the latent variables on the 15 subtest scores, BSEM allowed improvement of the understanding of the structure of intelligence tests and the clinical interpretation of the subtest scores. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  11. CLIF-SOFA score and SIRS are independent prognostic factors in patients with hepatic encephalopathy due to alcoholic liver cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jin Hee; Park, In Sung; Kim, Dong Hoon; Kim, Seong Chun; Kang, Changwoo; Lee, Soo Hoon; Kim, Tae Yun; Lee, Sang Bong

    2016-06-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a complication associated with worst prognosis in decompensated liver cirrhosis (LC) patients. Previous studies have identified prognostic factors for HE, and recent studies reported an association between systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and liver disease. This study aimed to identify prognostic factors for 30-day mortality in alcoholic LC patients with HE who visited the emergency department (ED).This was a retrospective study of alcoholic LC patients with HE from January 1, 2010, to April 30, 2015. The baseline characteristics, complications of portal hypertension, laboratory values, Child-Pugh class, Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) score, chronic liver failure-sequential organ failure assessment (CLIF-SOFA) score, and SIRS criteria were assessed. The presence of 2 or more SIRS criteria was considered SIRS. The primary outcomes were 30-day mortality and prognostic factors for patients with HE visiting the ED.In total, 105 patients who met the inclusion criteria were analyzed. Overall, the 30-day mortality rate was 6.7% (7 patients).Significant variables were hepatorenal syndrome, international normalized ratio, white blood cell count, total bilirubin level, MELD score CLIF-SOFA score, and SIRS in univariate analysis. CLIF-SOFA score and SIRS were the significant factors in the multivariate analysis (hazard ratio 5.56, 15.98; 95% confidence interval 1.18-26.18, 1.58-161.37; P = 0.03, P = 0.02). The mortality rates differed according to the CLIF-SOFA score (P SIRS in alcoholic LC patients with HE visiting the ED are independent predictors of 30-day mortality.

  12. Applicant and Method Factors Related to Ethnic Score Differences in Personnel Selection: A Study at the Dutch Police

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.A.L. de Meijer (Lonneke); M.Ph. Born (Marise); G. Terlouw (Gert); H.T. van der Molen (Henk)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of this study was to examine applicant and method factors related to ethnic score differences on a cognitive ability test, a personality test, an assessment center (AC), an employment interview, and a final employment recommendation in the context of police officer selection (N =

  13. Derivation of factors to estimate daily fat, protein, and somatic cell score from one milking of cows milked twice daily

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective was to derive factors to predict daily fat (F) and protein (P) yield or somatic cell score (SCS) when milk is sampled once for cows milked twice per d. Milk samples were collected for each milking on test-day by Dairy Herd Improvement personnel from herds recording milking times and m...

  14. Applicant and Method Factors Related to Ethnic Score Differences in Personnel Selection: A Study at the Dutch Police

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.A.L. de Meijer (Lonneke); M.Ph. Born (Marise); G. Terlouw (Gert); H.T. van der Molen (Henk)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of this study was to examine applicant and method factors related to ethnic score differences on a cognitive ability test, a personality test, an assessment center (AC), an employment interview, and a final employment recommendation in the context of police officer selection (N =

  15. The comparison of cardiovascular risk scores using two methods of substituting missing risk factor data in patient medical records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Dalton

    2011-07-01

    Conclusions A simple method of substituting missing risk factor data can produce reliable estimates of CVD risk scores. Targeted screening for high CVD risk, using pre-existing electronic medical record data, does not require multiple imputation methods in risk estimation.

  16. Factor Structure of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children--Fourth Edition among Referred Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Marley W.; Wilson, Sharise M.; Kotz, Kasey M.; Carbone, Maria C.; Babula, Teresa

    2006-01-01

    Factor analysis was applied to the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children--Fourth Edition (WISC-IV) scores of 432 Pennsylvania students referred for evaluation for special education services to determine the factor structure of the WISC-IV with this population. A first-order, four-factor oblique solution that mirrored that found in the WISC-IV…

  17. Evaluation of a risk factor scoring model in screening for undiagnosed diabetes in China population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-jun DONG; Neng-jun LOU; Jia-jun ZHAO; Zhong-wen ZHANG; Lu-lu QIU; Ying ZHOU; Lin LIAO

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To develop a risk scoring model for screening for undiagnosed type 2 diabetes in Chinese population.Methods:A total of 5348 subjects from two districts of Jinan City,Shandong Province,China were enrolled.Group A (2985) included individuals from east of the city and Group B (2363) from west of the city.Screening questionnaires and a standard oral glucose tolerance test (OGTr) were completed by all subjects.Based on the stepwise logistic regression analysis of Group A,variables were selected to establish the risk scoring model.The validity and effectiveness of this model were evaluated in Group B.Results:Based on stepwise logistic regression analysis performed with data of Group A,variables including age,body mass index (BMI),waist-to-hip ratio (WHR),systolic pressure,diastolic pressure,heart rate,family history of diabetes,and history of high glucose were accepted into the risk scoring model.The risk for having diabetes increased along with aggregate scores.When Youden index was closest to 1,the optimal cutoff value was set up at 51.At this point,the diabetes risk scoring model could identify diabetes patients with a sensitivity of 83.3% and a specificity of 66.5%,making the positive predictive value 12.83%and negative predictive value 98.53%.We compared our model with the Finnish and Danish model and concluded that our model has superior validity in Chinese population.Conclusions:Our diabetes risk scoring model has satisfactory sensitivity and specificity for identifying undiagnosed diabetes in our population,which might be a simple and practical tool suitable for massive diabetes screening.

  18. The Factor Structure in Equity Options

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter; Fournier, Mathieu; Jacobs, Kris

    Principal component analysis of equity options on Dow-Jones firms reveals a strong factor structure. The first principal component explains 77% of the variation in the equity volatility level, 77% of the variation in the equity option skew, and 60% of the implied volatility term structure across...... equities. Furthermore, the first principal component has a 92% correlation with S&P500 index option volatility, a 64% correlation with the index option skew, and a 80% correlation with the index option term structure. We develop an equity option valuation model that captures this factor structure...

  19. Factor structure of intelligence test battery KOG9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazarević Ljiljana B.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Authors of Cybernetic model of cognitive functioning designed a battery of tests (KOG9, based on the model in order to assess cognitive efficiency. Authors assert that scale's factor structure comprises the three factors: perceptive, serial and parallel processing. Results of the previous research as well as the logical analysis of the origin and content of the tests suggested the possibility that more parsimonious two-factor solution can explain the structure of the correlations among them equally well. KOG9 battery was administered to 1116 students of Faculty of sport and physical education and students from Department of Psychology in order to study its latent structure. In spite of the fact that factor congruence analyses suggested higher robustness (cross-sample stability of the two-factor solution, results of both EFA and CFA spoke in favor of the three-factor solution. The problem of the lack of stability of the three-factor solution was located in not particularly well targeted choice of the markers of the efficacy of perceptual processing. The suggestion is to preserve the calculation of all three group scores, with some corrections. First of all, tests CF2 and/or GT7 should be replaced by some other perceptual test/tests of lower cognitive complexity. Some of the tests tapping parallel processing should be replaced by those more in line with the logic of the model.

  20. A comparison of likelihood ratio tests and Rao's score test for three separable covariance matrix structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipiak, Katarzyna; Klein, Daniel; Roy, Anuradha

    2017-01-01

    The problem of testing the separability of a covariance matrix against an unstructured variance-covariance matrix is studied in the context of multivariate repeated measures data using Rao's score test (RST). The RST statistic is developed with the first component of the separable structure as a first-order autoregressive (AR(1)) correlation matrix or an unstructured (UN) covariance matrix under the assumption of multivariate normality. It is shown that the distribution of the RST statistic under the null hypothesis of any separability does not depend on the true values of the mean or the unstructured components of the separable structure. A significant advantage of the RST is that it can be performed for small samples, even smaller than the dimension of the data, where the likelihood ratio test (LRT) cannot be used, and it outperforms the standard LRT in a number of contexts. Monte Carlo simulations are then used to study the comparative behavior of the null distribution of the RST statistic, as well as that of the LRT statistic, in terms of sample size considerations, and for the estimation of the empirical percentiles. Our findings are compared with existing results where the first component of the separable structure is a compound symmetry (CS) correlation matrix. It is also shown by simulations that the empirical null distribution of the RST statistic converges faster than the empirical null distribution of the LRT statistic to the limiting χ(2) distribution. The tests are implemented on a real dataset from medical studies. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Development and preliminary validation of the spondyloarthritis research consortium of Canada magnetic resonance imaging sacroiliac joint structural score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maksymowych, Walter P; Wichuk, Stephanie; Chiowchanwisawakit, Praveena

    2015-01-01

    on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the Spondyloarthritis Research Consortium of Canada (SPARCC) SIJ Structural Score (SSS). METHODS: The SSS method for assessment of structural lesions is based on T1-weighted spin echo MRI, validated lesion definitions, slice selection according to well-defined anatomical...... in scores, and was highest for fat metaplasia when both ICC and SDC values were compared. CONCLUSION: The new SPARCC MRI SSS method can detect structural changes in the SIJ with acceptable reliability over a 1-2-year timeframe, and should be further validated in patients with SpA....

  2. Analysis of Grid-Scored Sandwich Structures of Different Curvatures and Grid Sizes For Wind Turbine Blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Steffen; Thomsen, Ole Thybo; Lund, Erik;

    2012-01-01

    The stress and strain field developed locally in-situ the core of grid-scored sandwich structures in wind turbine blades is investigated. Due to the many singularities occurring from the “tri-material corners”, a full 3D analysis of the sandwich structure in terms of the Finite Element Method...

  3. 7 CFR 52.777 - Ascertaining the rating for the factors which are scored.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... THEREOF, AND CERTAIN OTHER PROCESSED FOOD PRODUCTS 1 United States Standards for Grades of Canned Red Tart Pitted Cherries 1 Factors of Quality § 52.777 Ascertaining the rating for the factors which are...

  4. Analyzing Factor of Time of Scoring Goal in Success of Football (Case Study: South Africa World Cup 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafiee Shahram

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Goal of this research is to study Factor of Time of Scoring Goal in South Africa World Cup 2010 and its relationship with successful results for teams participating in this tournament. Research method is descriptive-analytical and its information was collected observationally and with a VCD, a 32-inch television set and datasheet. Statistical population and sample were considered equal to each other (N=n and included study of 64 competitions held during tournament. Information was analyzed with SPSS.18 software and indices of descriptive statistics and inferential statistics tests such as binomial and chi square were analyzed. Results showed that there was significant difference between two halves of competitions in terms of the number of scored goals. Increase of attack in the second 45 min led to more goals for teams. No significant difference was found between the scored goals and every 15 min and teams competed with opponents until the final minutes of competition. There was significant difference between positive results for the teams which scored the first goal and the teams which scored the first goal had more chance of victory. On the other hand, all teams which were ahead of the opponent in one goal in the final 30 min won at the end (P≤0/05.

  5. Factors affecting morbidity and mortality in traumatic colorectal injuries and reliability and validity of trauma scoring systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ay, Nurettin; Alp, Vahhaç; Aliosmanoğlu, İbrahim; Sevük, Utkan; Kaya, Şafak; Dinç, Bülent

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to determine the factors that affect morbidity and mortality in colon and rectum injuries related with trauma, the use of trauma scoring systems in predicting mortality and morbidity. Besides patient demographic characteristics, the mechanism of injury, the time between injury and surgery, accompanying body injuries, admittance Glasgow coma scale (GCS), findings at surgery and treatment methods were also recorded. With the obtained data, the abbreviated injury scale (AIS), injury severity score (ISS), revised trauma score (RTS) and trauma-ISS (TRISS) scores of each patient were calculated by using the 2008 revised AIS. Of the patients, 172 (88.7 %) were male, 22 (11.3 %) were female and the mean age was 29.15 ± 12.392 (15-89) years. The morbidity of our patients were 32 % and mortality were 12.4 %. ISS (p TSI, p TSI (OR 5.3; CI 95 % 1.5-18.8; p = 0.01) on morbidity were found to be significant. Predicting mortality by using scoring systems and close postoperative follow up of patients in the risk group may ensure decreases in the rates of morbidity and mortality.

  6. Fr-TM-align: a new protein structural alignment method based on fragment alignments and the TM-score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skolnick Jeffrey

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein tertiary structure comparisons are employed in various fields of contemporary structural biology. Most structure comparison methods involve generation of an initial seed alignment, which is extended and/or refined to provide the best structural superposition between a pair of protein structures as assessed by a structure comparison metric. One such metric, the TM-score, was recently introduced to provide a combined structure quality measure of the coordinate root mean square deviation between a pair of structures and coverage. Using the TM-score, the TM-align structure alignment algorithm was developed that was often found to have better accuracy and coverage than the most commonly used structural alignment programs; however, there were a number of situations when this was not true. Results To further improve structure alignment quality, the Fr-TM-align algorithm has been developed where aligned fragment pairs are used to generate the initial seed alignments that are then refined using dynamic programming to maximize the TM-score. For the assessment of the structural alignment quality from Fr-TM-align in comparison to other programs such as CE and TM-align, we examined various alignment quality assessment scores such as PSI and TM-score. The assessment showed that the structural alignment quality from Fr-TM-align is better in comparison to both CE and TM-align. On average, the structural alignments generated using Fr-TM-align have a higher TM-score (~9% and coverage (~7% in comparison to those generated by TM-align. Fr-TM-align uses an exhaustive procedure to generate initial seed alignments. Hence, the algorithm is computationally more expensive than TM-align. Conclusion Fr-TM-align, a new algorithm that employs fragment alignment and assembly provides better structural alignments in comparison to TM-align. The source code and executables of Fr-TM-align are freely downloadable at: http://cssb.biology.gatech.edu/skolnick/files/FrTMalign/.

  7. Higher order factor structure of the WISC-IV in a clinical neuropsychological sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodin, Doug; Pardini, Dustin A; Burns, Thomas G; Stevens, Abigail B

    2009-09-01

    A confirmatory factor analysis was conducted examining the higher order factor structure of the WISC-IV scores for 344 children who participated in neuropsychological evaluations at a large children's hospital. The WISC-IV factor structure mirrored that of the standardization sample. The second order general intelligence factor (g) accounted for the largest proportion of variance in the first-order latent factors and in the individual subtests, especially for the working memory index. The first-order processing speed factor exhibited the most unique variance beyond the influence of g. The results suggest that clinicians should not ignore the contribution of g when interpreting the first-order factors.

  8. Medical student selection: which matriculation scores and personality factors are important?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan-Ob, T; Boonyanaruthee, V

    1999-06-01

    Sixty-five from a total of 160 medical students were administered the California Psychological Inventory (CPI) to identify which of all 18 scales can be used as a predictor for academic performance. The entrance examination scores of six subjects were also combined with the CPI variables for the purpose of the study. Students' performances were determined by Grade Point Average (GPA) collected between 1993-1997 (year 1 to year 5). Data was analyzed by descriptive and stepwise method of multiple linear regression analysis. The results showed that mathematics, biology and English language were positively correlated with all year GPAs-r2 value was 10-18 per cent. Scales of "dominance", "flexibility" and "socialization" were positively correlated to the GPA, while "sociability" and "sense of well-being" were negatively correlated. R2 value was increased to 16-59 per cent as prediction of GPA when the CPI variables were combined with scores of entrance examination. A comparison of this finding with other studies was conducted.

  9. What does my patient's coronary artery calcium score mean? Combining information from the coronary artery calcium score with information from conventional risk factors to estimate coronary heart disease risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pletcher Mark J

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The coronary artery calcium (CAC score is an independent predictor of coronary heart disease. We sought to combine information from the CAC score with information from conventional cardiac risk factors to produce post-test risk estimates, and to determine whether the score may add clinically useful information. Methods We measured the independent cross-sectional associations between conventional cardiac risk factors and the CAC score among asymptomatic persons referred for non-contrast electron beam computed tomography. Using the resulting multivariable models and published CAC score-specific relative risk estimates, we estimated post-test coronary heart disease risk in a number of different scenarios. Results Among 9341 asymptomatic study participants (age 35–88 years, 40% female, we found that conventional coronary heart disease risk factors including age, male sex, self-reported hypertension, diabetes and high cholesterol were independent predictors of the CAC score, and we used the resulting multivariable models for predicting post-test risk in a variety of scenarios. Our models predicted, for example, that a 60-year-old non-smoking non-diabetic women with hypertension and high cholesterol would have a 47% chance of having a CAC score of zero, reducing her 10-year risk estimate from 15% (per Framingham to 6–9%; if her score were over 100, however (a 17% chance, her risk estimate would be markedly higher (25–51% in 10 years. In low risk scenarios, the CAC score is very likely to be zero or low, and unlikely to change management. Conclusion Combining information from the CAC score with information from conventional risk factors can change assessment of coronary heart disease risk to an extent that may be clinically important, especially when the pre-test 10-year risk estimate is intermediate. The attached spreadsheet makes these calculations easy.

  10. LoCo: a novel main chain scoring function for protein structure prediction based on local coordinates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samudrala Ram

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Successful protein structure prediction requires accurate low-resolution scoring functions so that protein main chain conformations that are close to the native can be identified. Once that is accomplished, a more detailed and time-consuming treatment to produce all-atom models can be undertaken. The earliest low-resolution scoring used simple distance-based "contact potentials," but more recently, the relative orientations of interacting amino acids have been taken into account to improve performance. Results We developed a new knowledge-based scoring function, LoCo, that locates the interaction partners of each individual residue within a local coordinate system based only on the position of its main chain N, Cα and C atoms. LoCo was trained on a large set of experimentally determined structures and optimized using standard sets of modeled structures, or "decoys." No structure used to train or optimize the function was included among those used to test it. When tested against 29 other published main chain functions on a group of 77 commonly used decoy sets, our function outperformed all others in Cα RMSD rank of the best-scoring decoy, with statistically significant p-values Conclusions Our function demonstrates an unmatched combination of accuracy, speed, and simplicity and shows excellent promise for protein structure prediction. Broader applications may include protein-protein interactions and protein design.

  11. Extending Structural Analyses of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale to Consider Criterion-Related Validity: Can Composite Self-Esteem Scores Be Good Enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnellan, M Brent; Ackerman, Robert A; Brecheen, Courtney

    2016-01-01

    Although the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) is the most widely used measure of global self-esteem in the literature, there are ongoing disagreements about its factor structure. This methodological debate informs how the measure should be used in substantive research. Using a sample of 1,127 college students, we test the overall fit of previously specified models for the RSES, including a newly proposed bifactor solution (McKay, Boduszek, & Harvey, 2014 ). We extend previous work by evaluating how various latent factors from these structural models are related to a set of criterion variables frequently studied in the self-esteem literature. A strict unidimensional model poorly fit the data, whereas models that accounted for correlations between negatively and positively keyed items tended to fit better. However, global factors from viable structural models had similar levels of association with criterion variables and with the pattern of results obtained with a composite global self-esteem variable calculated from observed scores. Thus, we did not find compelling evidence that different structural models had substantive implications, thereby reducing (but not eliminating) concerns about the integrity of the self-esteem literature based on overall composite scores for the RSES.

  12. On R factors for dynamic structure crystallography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coppens, Philip; Kaminski, Radoslaw; Schmøkel, Mette Stokkebro

    2010-01-01

    In studies of dynamic changes in crystals in which induced metastable species may have lifetimes of microseconds or less, refinements are most sensitive if based on the changes induced in the measured intensities. Agreement factors appropriate for such refinements, based on the ratios of the inte...... of the intensities before and after the external perturbation is applied, are discussed and compared with R factors commonly applied in static structure crystallography....

  13. Predicting structure in nonsymmetric sparse matrix factorizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, J.R. (Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, CA (United States)); Ng, E.G. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1992-10-01

    Many computations on sparse matrices have a phase that predicts the nonzero structure of the output, followed by a phase that actually performs the numerical computation. We study structure prediction for computations that involve nonsymmetric row and column permutations and nonsymmetric or non-square matrices. Our tools are bipartite graphs, matchings, and alternating paths. Our main new result concerns LU factorization with partial pivoting. We show that if a square matrix A has the strong Hall property (i.e., is fully indecomposable) then an upper bound due to George and Ng on the nonzero structure of L + U is as tight as possible. To show this, we prove a crucial result about alternating paths in strong Hall graphs. The alternating-paths theorem seems to be of independent interest: it can also be used to prove related results about structure prediction for QR factorization that are due to Coleman, Edenbrandt, Gilbert, Hare, Johnson, Olesky, Pothen, and van den Driessche.

  14. Factor structure of Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices

    OpenAIRE

    Muniz, Monalisa; Gomes, Cristiano Mauro Assis; Pasian, Sonia Regina

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study's objective was to verify the factor structure of Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices (CPM). The database used included the responses of 1,279 children, 50.2% of which were males with an average age of 8.48 years old and a standard deviation of 1.49 yrs. Confirmatory factor analyses were run to test seven models based on CPM theory and on a Brazilian study addressing the test's structure. The results did not confirm the CPM theoretical proposition concerning the scales b...

  15. Catechins decrease neurological severity score through apoptosis and neurotropic factor pathway in rat traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Retty Ratnawati

    2017-08-01

    Administration of catechins decreased NSS through inhibiting inflammation and apoptosis, as well as induced the neurotrophic factors in rat brain injury. Catechins may serve as a potential intervention for TBI.

  16. Factor Structure of the Rorschach Prognostic Rating Scale and Its Relation to Therapeutic Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, Stephen M.; Edinger, Jack D.

    1976-01-01

    This study evaluated the factor structure of the Rorschach Prognostic Rating Scale (RPRS) in order to: (a) test the assumption that the RPRS represents a unitary response system and (b) determine the efficacy of employing population specific factor scores as predictors of therapy outcome. (Author/NG)

  17. Structural studies on leukaemia inhibitory factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norton, R.S.; Maurer, T.; Smith, D.K. [Biomolecular Research Institute, Parville (Australia); Nicola, N.A. [Institute of Medical Research, Melbourne (Australia)

    1994-12-01

    Leukaemia Inhibitory Factor (LIF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that acts on a wide range of target cells, including mega-karyocytes, osteoblasts, hepatocytes, adipocytes, neurons, embryonic stem cells, and primordial germ cells. Many of its activities are shared with other cytokines, particularly interleukin-6, oncostatin-M, ciliary neurotrophic factor, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Although secreted in vivo as a glycoprotein, nonglycosylated recombinant protein expressed in E. coli is fully active and has been used in our nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of the three-dimensional structure and structure-function relationships of LIF. With 180 amino acids and a molecular mass of about 20 kDa, OF is too large for direct structure determination by two-dimensional and three-dimensional {sup 1}HNMR. It is necessary to label the protein with the stable isotopes {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C and employ heteronuclear three-dimensional NMR in order to resolve and interpret the spectral information required for three-dimensional structure determination. This work has been undertaken with both human LIF and a mouse-human chimaera that binds to the human LIF receptor with the same affinity as the human protein and yet expresses in E. coli at much higher levels. Sequence-specific resonance assignments and secondary structure elements for these proteins will be presented and progress towards determination of their three-dimensional structures described.

  18. Structural equation modeling of factors contributing to quality of life in Japanese patients with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kikuchi Hiromi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To improve quality of life (QOL in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS, it is important to decrease disability and prevent relapse. The aim of this study was to examine the causal and mutual relationships contributing to QOL in Japanese patients with MS, develop path diagrams, and explore interventions with the potential to improve patient QOL. Methods Data of 163 Japanese MS patients were obtained using the Functional Assessment of MS (FAMS and Nottingham Adjustment Scale-Japanese version (NAS-J tests, as well as four additional factors that affect QOL (employment status, change of income, availability of disease information, and communication with medical staff. Data were then used in structural equation modeling to develop path diagrams for factors contributing to QOL. Results The Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS score had a significant effect on the total FAMS score. Although EDSS negatively affected the FAMS symptom score, NAS-J subscale scores of anxiety/depression and acceptance were positively related to the FAMS symptom score. Changes in employment status after MS onset negatively affected all NAS-J scores. Knowledge of disease information improved the total NAS-J score, which in turn improved many FAMS subscale scores. Communication with doctors and nurses directly and positively affected some FAMS subscale scores. Conclusions Disability and change in employment status decrease patient QOL. However, the present findings suggest that other factors, such as acquiring information on MS and communicating with medical staff, can compensate for the worsening of QOL.

  19. Structural equation modeling of factors contributing to quality of life in Japanese patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Hiromi; Mifune, Nobuhiro; Niino, Masaaki; Kira, Jun-Ichi; Kohriyama, Tatsuo; Ota, Kohei; Tanaka, Masami; Ochi, Hirofumi; Nakane, Shunya; Kikuchi, Seiji

    2013-01-22

    To improve quality of life (QOL) in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), it is important to decrease disability and prevent relapse. The aim of this study was to examine the causal and mutual relationships contributing to QOL in Japanese patients with MS, develop path diagrams, and explore interventions with the potential to improve patient QOL. Data of 163 Japanese MS patients were obtained using the Functional Assessment of MS (FAMS) and Nottingham Adjustment Scale-Japanese version (NAS-J) tests, as well as four additional factors that affect QOL (employment status, change of income, availability of disease information, and communication with medical staff). Data were then used in structural equation modeling to develop path diagrams for factors contributing to QOL. The Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score had a significant effect on the total FAMS score. Although EDSS negatively affected the FAMS symptom score, NAS-J subscale scores of anxiety/depression and acceptance were positively related to the FAMS symptom score. Changes in employment status after MS onset negatively affected all NAS-J scores. Knowledge of disease information improved the total NAS-J score, which in turn improved many FAMS subscale scores. Communication with doctors and nurses directly and positively affected some FAMS subscale scores. Disability and change in employment status decrease patient QOL. However, the present findings suggest that other factors, such as acquiring information on MS and communicating with medical staff, can compensate for the worsening of QOL.

  20. Structural equation modeling of factors contributing to quality of life in Japanese patients with multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background To improve quality of life (QOL) in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), it is important to decrease disability and prevent relapse. The aim of this study was to examine the causal and mutual relationships contributing to QOL in Japanese patients with MS, develop path diagrams, and explore interventions with the potential to improve patient QOL. Methods Data of 163 Japanese MS patients were obtained using the Functional Assessment of MS (FAMS) and Nottingham Adjustment Scale-Japanese version (NAS-J) tests, as well as four additional factors that affect QOL (employment status, change of income, availability of disease information, and communication with medical staff). Data were then used in structural equation modeling to develop path diagrams for factors contributing to QOL. Results The Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score had a significant effect on the total FAMS score. Although EDSS negatively affected the FAMS symptom score, NAS-J subscale scores of anxiety/depression and acceptance were positively related to the FAMS symptom score. Changes in employment status after MS onset negatively affected all NAS-J scores. Knowledge of disease information improved the total NAS-J score, which in turn improved many FAMS subscale scores. Communication with doctors and nurses directly and positively affected some FAMS subscale scores. Conclusions Disability and change in employment status decrease patient QOL. However, the present findings suggest that other factors, such as acquiring information on MS and communicating with medical staff, can compensate for the worsening of QOL. PMID:23339479

  1. Attributable fractions, modifiable risk factors and risk stratification using a risk score for peri-implant pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo Nobre, Miguel; Mano Azul, António; Rocha, Evangelista; Maló, Paulo; Salvado, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to estimate the impact of risk factors for peri-implant pathology, to identify potentially modifiable factors, and to evaluate the accuracy of the risk algorithm, risk scores and risk stratification. This retrospective case-control study with 1275 patients (255 cases; 1020 controls) retrieved a model according to the predictors: history of Periodontitis, bacterial plaque, bleeding, bone level, lack of passive fit or non-optimal screw joint, metal-ceramic restoration, proximity to other implants/teeth, and smoking habits. Outcome measures were the attributable fraction; the positive and negative likelihood ratios at different disease cut-off points illustrated by the area under the curve statistic. Six predictors may be modified or controlled directly by either the patient or the clinician, accounting for a reduction in up to 95% of the peri-implant pathology cases. The positive and negative likelihood ratios were 9.69 and 0.13, respectively; the area under the curve was 0.96; a risk score was developed, making the complex statistical model useful to clinicians. Based on the results, six predictors for the incidence of peri-implant pathology can be modified to significantly improve the outcome. It was possible to stratify patients per risk category according to the risk score, providing a tool for clinicians to support their decision-making process. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Protein Alpha Shape (PAS) Dock: A new gaussian-based score function suitable for docking in homology modelled protein structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tøndel, Kristin; Anderssen, Endre; Drabløs, Finn

    2006-03-01

    Protein Alpha Shape (PAS) Dock is a new empirical score function suitable for virtual library screening using homology modelled protein structures. Here, the score function is used in combination with the geometry search method Tabu search. A description of the protein binding site is generated using gaussian property fields like in Protein Alpha Shape Similarity Analysis (PASSA). Gaussian property fields are also used to describe the ligand properties. The overlap between the receptor and ligand hydrophilicity and lipophilicity fields is maximised, while minimising steric clashes. Gaussian functions introduce a smoothing of the property fields. This makes the score function robust against small structural variations, and therefore suitable for use with homology models. This also makes it less critical to include protein flexibility in the docking calculations. We use a fast and simplified version of the score function in the geometry search, while a more detailed version is used for the final prediction of the binding free energies. This use of a two-level scoring makes PAS-Dock computationally efficient, and well suited for virtual screening. The PAS-Dock score function is trained on 218 X-ray structures of protein- ligand complexes with experimental binding affinities. The performance of PAS-Dock is compared to two other docking methods, AutoDock and MOE-Dock, with respect to both accuracy and computational efficiency. According to this study, PAS-Dock is more computationally efficient than both AutoDock and MOE-Dock, and gives a better prediction of the free energies of binding. PAS-Dock is also more robust against structural variations than AutoDock.

  3. Splitting statistical potentials into meaningful scoring functions: Testing the prediction of near-native structures from decoy conformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliva Baldo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent advances on high-throughput technologies have produced a vast amount of protein sequences, while the number of high-resolution structures has seen a limited increase. This has impelled the production of many strategies to built protein structures from its sequence, generating a considerable amount of alternative models. The selection of the closest model to the native conformation has thus become crucial for structure prediction. Several methods have been developed to score protein models by energies, knowledge-based potentials and combination of both. Results Here, we present and demonstrate a theory to split the knowledge-based potentials in scoring terms biologically meaningful and to combine them in new scores to predict near-native structures. Our strategy allows circumventing the problem of defining the reference state. In this approach we give the proof for a simple and linear application that can be further improved by optimizing the combination of Zscores. Using the simplest composite score ( we obtained predictions similar to state-of-the-art methods. Besides, our approach has the advantage of identifying the most relevant terms involved in the stability of the protein structure. Finally, we also use the composite Zscores to assess the conformation of models and to detect local errors. Conclusion We have introduced a method to split knowledge-based potentials and to solve the problem of defining a reference state. The new scores have detected near-native structures as accurately as state-of-art methods and have been successful to identify wrongly modeled regions of many near-native conformations.

  4. Long-term alterations of cytokines and growth factors expression in irradiated tissues and relation with histological severity scoring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrice Gallet

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Beside its efficacy in cancer treatment, radiotherapy induces degeneration of healthy tissues within the irradiated area. The aim of this study was to analyze the variations of proinflammatory (IL-1α, IL-2, IL-6, TNF-α, IFN-γ, profibrotic (TGF-β1, proangiogneic (VEGF and stem cell mobilizing (GM-CSF cytokines and growth factors in an animal model of radiation-induced tissue degeneration. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 24 rats were irradiated unilaterally on the hindlimb at a monodose of 30 Gy. Six weeks (n=8, 6 months (n=8 and 1 year (n=8 after irradiation the mediators expression in skin and muscle were analyzed using Western blot and the Bio-Plex® protein array (BPA technology. Additional histological severity for fibrosis, inflammation, vascularity and cellularity alterations scoring was defined from histology and immnunohistochemistry analyses. RESULTS: A significant increase of histological severity scoring was found in irradiated tissue. Skin tissues were more radio-sensitive than muscle. A high level of TGF-β1 expression was found throughout the study and a significant relation was evidenced between TGF-β1 expression and fibrosis scoring. Irradiated tissue showed a chronic inflammation (IL-2 and TNF-α significantly increased. Moreover a persistent expression of GM-CSF and VEGF was found in all irradiated tissues. The vascular score was related to TGF-β1 expression and the cellular alterations score was significantly related with the level of IL-2, VEGF and GM-CSF. CONCLUSION: The results achieved in the present study underline the complexity and multiplicity of radio-induced alterations of cytokine network. It offers many perspectives of development, for the comprehension of the mechanisms of late injuries or for the histological and molecular evaluation of the mode of action and the efficacy of rehabilitation techniques.

  5. Exploring the factor structure of the Food Cravings Questionnaire-Trait in Cuban adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Martín, Boris C; Molerio-Pérez, Osana

    2014-01-01

    Food cravings refer to an intense desire to eat specific foods. The Food Cravings Questionnaire-Trait (FCQ-T) is the most commonly used instrument to assess food cravings as a multidimensional construct. Its 39 items have an underlying nine-factor structure for both the original English and Spanish version; but subsequent studies yielded fewer factors. As a result, a 15-item version of the FCQ-T with one-factor structure has been proposed (FCQ-T-reduced; see this Research Topic). The current study aimed to explore the factor structure of the Spanish version for both the FCQ-T and FCQ-T-reduced in a sample of 1241 Cuban adults. Results showed a four-factor structure for the FCQ-T, which explained 55% of the variance. Factors were highly correlated. Using the items of the FCQ-T-reduced only showed a one-factor structure, which explained 52% of the variance. Both versions of the FCQ-T were positively correlated with body mass index (BMI), scores on the Food Thoughts Suppression Inventory and weight cycling. In addition, women had higher scores than men and restrained eaters had higher scores than unrestrained eaters. To summarize, results showed that (1) the FCQ-T factor structure was significantly reduced in Cuban adults and (2) the FCQ-T-reduced may represent a good alternative to efficiently assess food craving on a trait level.

  6. Exploring the factor structure of the Food Cravings Questionnaire-Trait in Cuban adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris C. Rodríguez-Martín

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Food cravings refer to an intense desire to eat specific foods. The Food Cravings Questionnaire-Trait (FCQ-T is the most commonly used instrument to assess food cravings as a multidimensional construct. Its 39 items have an underlying nine-factor structure for both the original English and Spanish version; but subsequent studies yielded fewer factors. As a result, a 15-item version of the FCQ-T with one-factor structure has been proposed (FCQ-T-reduced; see this Research Topic. The current study aimed to explore the factor structure of the Spanish version for both the FCQ-T and FCQ-T-reduced in a sample of 1241 Cuban adults. Results showed a four-factor structure for the FCQ-T, which explained 55 % of the variance. Factors were highly correlated. Using the items of the FCQ-T-reduced only showed a one-factor structure, which explained 52% of the variance. Both versions of the FCQ-T were positively correlated with body mass index, scores on the Food Thoughts Suppression Inventory and weight cycling. In addition, women had higher scores than men and restrained eaters had higher scores than unrestrained eaters. To summarize, results showed that 1 the FCQ-T factor structure was significantly reduced in Cuban adults and 2 the FCQ-T-reduced may represent a good alternative to efficiently assess food craving on a trait level.

  7. Assessment of identity disturbance: Factor structure and validation of the Personality Structure Questionnaire in an Italian sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrios, Raul; Kellett, Stephen; Fiorani, Christina; Poggioli, Marisa

    2016-04-01

    There are few brief measures of identity disturbance for use in clinical practice that have been subject to any cross-cultural validation. This study investigated the construct validity of the Personality Structure Questionnaire (PSQ) in Italian clinical (N = 237) and community (N = 296) samples. Confirmatory factor analysis was conducted to investigate the internal structure of the PSQ. A 3-factor structure (i.e., differing self-states, mood variability, and behavioral loss of control) including a second-order factor provided the best fit to the data. This structure was demonstrated to be invariant across sex and clinical diagnosis, with clinical diagnosis significantly predicting increased PSQ scores. A global PSQ score of between 26 and 28 was found to be an appropriate cutoff for assisting in diagnostic processes. The clinical implication of the study is that quantitative assessment of identity disturbance can be rapidly achieved via the PSQ, usefully supplementing necessary diagnostic and formulation work. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved.

  8. A new size-independent score for pairwise protein structure alignment and its application to structure classification and nucleic-acid binding prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuedong; Zhan, Jian; Zhao, Huiying; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2012-08-01

    A structure alignment program aligns two structures by optimizing a scoring function that measures structural similarity. It is highly desirable that such scoring function is independent of the sizes of proteins in comparison so that the significance of alignment across different sizes of the protein regions aligned is comparable. Here, we developed a new score called SP-score that fixes the cutoff distance at 4 Å and removed the size dependence using a normalization prefactor. We further built a program called SPalign that optimizes SP-score for structure alignment. SPalign was applied to recognize proteins within the same structure fold and having the same function of DNA or RNA binding. For fold discrimination, SPalign improves sensitivity over TMalign for the chain-level comparison by 12% and over DALI for the domain-level comparison by 13% at the same specificity of 99.6%. The difference between TMalign and SPalign at the chain level is due to the inability of TMalign to detect single domain similarity between multidomain proteins. For recognizing nucleic acid binding proteins, SPalign consistently improves over TMalign by 12% and DALI by 31% in average value of Mathews correlation coefficients for four datasets. SPalign with default setting is 14% faster than TMalign. SPalign is expected to be useful for function prediction and comparing structures with or without domains defined. The source code for SPalign and the server are available at http://sparks.informatics.iupui.edu.

  9. Among perinatal factors, only the Apgar score is associated with specific language impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diepeveen, F.B.; Kroon, M.L. De; Dusseldorp, E.; Snik, A.F.M.

    2013-01-01

    AIM: The purpose of this study was to assess the relation of perinatal risk factors with later development of specific language impairment (SLI). METHOD: In a case-control study, 179 children attending special needs schools for SLI were matched with non-affected children attending mainstream schools

  10. Among perinatal factors, only the Apgar score is associated with specific language impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diepeveen, F.B.; Kroon, M.L. de; Dusseldorp, E.; Snik, A.F.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the relation of perinatal risk factors with later development of specific language impairment (SLI). METHOD: In a case-control study, 179 children attending special needs schools for SLI were matched with non-affected children attending mainstream schools. Bot

  11. Information theory-based scoring function for the structure-based prediction of protein-ligand binding affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulharia, Mahesh; Goody, Roger S; Jackson, Richard M

    2008-10-01

    The development and validation of a new knowledge based scoring function (SIScoreJE) to predict binding energy between proteins and ligands is presented. SIScoreJE efficiently predicts the binding energy between a small molecule and its protein receptor. Protein-ligand atomic contact information was derived from a Non-Redundant Data set (NRD) of over 3000 X-ray crystal structures of protein-ligand complexes. This information was classified for individual "atom contact pairs" (ACP) which is used to calculate the atomic contact preferences. In addition to the two schemes generated in this study we have assessed a number of other common atom-type classification schemes. The preferences were calculated using an information theoretic relationship of joint entropy. Among 18 different atom-type classification schemes "ScoreJE Atom Type set2" (SATs2) was found to be the most suitable for our approach. To test the sensitivity of the method to the inclusion of solvent, Single-body Solvation Potentials (SSP) were also derived from the atomic contacts between the protein atom types and water molecules modeled using AQUARIUS2. Validation was carried out using an evaluation data set of 100 protein-ligand complexes with known binding energies to test the ability of the scoring functions to reproduce known binding affinities. In summary, it was found that a combined SSP/ScoreJE (SIScoreJE) performed significantly better than ScoreJE alone, and SIScoreJE and ScoreJE performed better than GOLD::GoldScore, GOLD::ChemScore, and XScore.

  12. Improving the Factor Structure of Psychological Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xijuan; Savalei, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Many psychological scales written in the Likert format include reverse worded (RW) items in order to control acquiescence bias. However, studies have shown that RW items often contaminate the factor structure of the scale by creating one or more method factors. The present study examines an alternative scale format, called the Expanded format, which replaces each response option in the Likert scale with a full sentence. We hypothesized that this format would result in a cleaner factor structure as compared with the Likert format. We tested this hypothesis on three popular psychological scales: the Rosenberg Self-Esteem scale, the Conscientiousness subscale of the Big Five Inventory, and the Beck Depression Inventory II. Scales in both formats showed comparable reliabilities. However, scales in the Expanded format had better (i.e., lower and more theoretically defensible) dimensionalities than scales in the Likert format, as assessed by both exploratory factor analyses and confirmatory factor analyses. We encourage further study and wider use of the Expanded format, particularly when a scale’s dimensionality is of theoretical interest. PMID:27182074

  13. Prevalence of and risk factors for equine obesity in Great Britain based on owner-reported body condition scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, C A; Ireland, J L; Wylie, C E; Collins, S N; Verheyen, K L P; Newton, J R

    2015-03-01

    Few data are available on the prevalence of obesity in the general equine population of Great Britain (GB), and its associated risk factors. To estimate the prevalence of owner-reported obesity in veterinary-registered horses and ponies in GB, and identify factors associated with obesity. A cross-sectional survey of horse/pony owners in GB was undertaken using a postal questionnaire. Thirty veterinary practices randomly selected horse/pony owners to complete a self-administered postal questionnaire. Owners estimated body condition score using a modified Carroll and Huntington method (1-6 scale), and animals were classified as obese if they were scored as either 5 (fat) or 6 (very fat). Factors associated with obesity were assessed using logistic regression analysis. Prevalence of obesity was 31.2% (n = 247/792; 95% confidence interval [CI] 27.9-34.2%). Factors associated with increased odds of obesity were breed (Pobese. Animals described as 'good doers' were more likely to be obese than those described as readily maintaining normal weight (OR 3.7; 95% CI 2.6-5.3). Compared to competition animals, animals used for pleasure riding (OR 2.5; 95% CI 1.4-4.4) and nonridden animals (OR 2.9; 95% CI 1.5-5.5) were more likely to be obese. Identification of at-risk breeds and other horse- and management-level risk factors for obesity will enable optimal targeting of owner education regarding management strategies to reduce the frequency of equine obesity. © 2014 EVJ Ltd.

  14. Overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor as a prognostic factor in colorectal cancer on the basis of the Allred scoring system

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    Rokita M

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Marta Rokita,1 Rafal Stec,1 Lubomir Bodnar,1 Radoslaw Charkiewicz,2 Jan Korniluk,1 Marta Smoter,1 Marzena Cichowicz,3 Lech Chyczewski,4 Jacek Nikliński,2 Wojciech Kozłowski,3 Cezary Szczylik11Department of Oncology, Military Institute of Medicine, Central Teaching Hospital, Warsaw, Poland; 2Department of Clinical Molecular Biology, Medical University of Bialystok, Bialystok, Poland; 3Department of Pathology, Military Institute of the Health Services in Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland; 4Department of Clinical Pathology, Medical University of Bialystok, Bialystok, PolandBackground: Overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is found in many types of neoplasms. The aim of the study was to evaluate EGFR expression in colorectal cancer (CRC specimens and to determine whether EGFR expression correlates with clinicopathological data and overall survival.Patients and methods: Tissue specimens from 181 consecutive CRC patients treated at the Military Institute of Medicine in 2006–2010 were collected and examined for EGFR expression, by immunohistochemistry staining. The staining intensity and percentage of cells with membranous EGFR expression were scored and then grouped according to the parameters of the Allred Scoring system. Cutoff values were subjected to further statistical analysis. Univariate tests and a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model were used in data analysis.Results: EGFR was overexpressed in 96 of 181 CRC specimens (53%. EGFR expression was not correlated with other clinicopathological variables. On univariate analysis, overexpression of EGFR, determined by PS (percentage score (>3 and total score (sum of PS and intensity score (>4, was associated with poor overall survival. On multivariate analysis, EGFR overexpression (PS > 3 was an independent adverse prognostic factor (hazard ratio [HR] 1.62; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.03–2.53. Elevated carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA serum concentration before treatment

  15. Unique Contributions of Body Diagram Scores and Psychosocial Factors to Pain Intensity and Disability in Patients With Musculoskeletal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhon, Daniel I; Lentz, Trevor A; George, Steven Z

    2017-02-01

    Study Design Retrospective cross-sectional cohort of military patients with musculoskeletal pain. Background Body diagrams are used to document symptoms and can also serve as a proxy to assess psychological influence. However, literature to support this is conflicting. Objectives To (1) examine the unique contribution of pain and nonpain symptom distribution to magnitude of self-reported pain intensity and disability, and (2) assess the moderating influence of psychological factors and body diagram score on concurrent pain intensity and disability. Methods Pain, numbness, and tingling were denoted on a body diagram at initial evaluation. Fear-avoidance beliefs, pain catastrophizing, and region-specific self-reported disability measures were collected. The contributions of pain and nonpain symptom distribution to pain intensity and disability were assessed to determine which body diagram symptom scoring method (pain only, nonpain, or composite) was appropriate for subsequent analyses. Hierarchical linear regression analyses were then used to determine the moderating effects of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale and Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire and the body diagram score on concurrent pain and disability. Results The Pain Catastrophizing Scale and Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire explained between 16% and 17% of the variance in pain intensity, and 8% of variance in disability (all, Pintensity (all, Pintensity. The positive relationship between composite symptom score and concurrent pain intensity is stronger for patients with low catastrophizing. Conclusion The clinical utility of body diagrams with low symptom distribution may be improved by concomitant assessment of pain catastrophizing and warrants further longitudinal investigation. Level of Evidence Symptom prevalence, level 2b. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(2):88-96. Epub 5 Nov 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.6778.

  16. Assessing the discriminating power of item and test scores in the linear factor-analysis model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pere J. Ferrando

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Las propuestas rigurosas y basadas en un modelo psicométrico para estudiar el impreciso concepto de "capacidad discriminativa" son escasas y generalmente limitadas a los modelos no-lineales para items binarios. En este artículo se propone un marco general para evaluar la capacidad discriminativa de las puntuaciones en ítems y tests que son calibrados mediante el modelo de un factor común. La propuesta se organiza en torno a tres criterios: (a tipo de puntuación, (b rango de discriminación y (c aspecto específico que se evalúa. Dentro del marco propuesto: (a se discuten las relaciones entre 16 medidas, de las cuales 6 parecen ser nuevas, y (b se estudian las relaciones entre ellas. La utilidad de la propuesta en las aplicaciones psicométricas que usan el modelo factorial se ilustra mediante un ejemplo empírico.

  17. PHOENIX: a scoring function for affinity prediction derived using high-resolution crystal structures and calorimetry measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yat T; Marshall, Garland R

    2011-02-28

    Binding affinity prediction is one of the most critical components to computer-aided structure-based drug design. Despite advances in first-principle methods for predicting binding affinity, empirical scoring functions that are fast and only relatively accurate are still widely used in structure-based drug design. With the increasing availability of X-ray crystallographic structures in the Protein Data Bank and continuing application of biophysical methods such as isothermal titration calorimetry to measure thermodynamic parameters contributing to binding free energy, sufficient experimental data exists that scoring functions can now be derived by separating enthalpic (ΔH) and entropic (TΔS) contributions to binding free energy (ΔG). PHOENIX, a scoring function to predict binding affinities of protein-ligand complexes, utilizes the increasing availability of experimental data to improve binding affinity predictions by the following: model training and testing using high-resolution crystallographic data to minimize structural noise, independent models of enthalpic and entropic contributions fitted to thermodynamic parameters assumed to be thermodynamically biased to calculate binding free energy, use of shape and volume descriptors to better capture entropic contributions. A set of 42 descriptors and 112 protein-ligand complexes were used to derive functions using partial least-squares for change of enthalpy (ΔH) and change of entropy (TΔS) to calculate change of binding free energy (ΔG), resulting in a predictive r2 (r(pred)2) of 0.55 and a standard error (SE) of 1.34 kcal/mol. External validation using the 2009 version of the PDBbind "refined set" (n = 1612) resulted in a Pearson correlation coefficient (R(p)) of 0.575 and a mean error (ME) of 1.41 pK(d). Enthalpy and entropy predictions were of limited accuracy individually. However, their difference resulted in a relatively accurate binding free energy. While the development of an accurate and applicable

  18. Structural Factors Affecting Health Examination Behavioral Intention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui-Ting; Kuo, Yu-Ming; Wang, Shiang-Ru; Wang, Chia-Fen; Tsai, Chung-Hung

    2016-04-01

    Disease screening instruments used for secondary prevention can facilitate early determination and treatment of pathogenic factors, effectively reducing disease incidence, mortality rates, and health complications. Therefore, people should be encouraged to receive health examinations for discovering potential pathogenic factors before symptoms occur. Here, we used the health belief model as a foundation and integrated social psychological factors and investigated the factors influencing health examination behavioral intention among the public in Taiwan. In total, 388 effective questionnaires were analyzed through structural model analysis. Consequently, this study yielded four crucial findings: (1) The established extended health belief model could effectively predict health examination behavioral intention; (2) Self-efficacy was the factor that most strongly influenced health examination behavioral intention, followed by health knowledge; (3) Self-efficacy substantially influenced perceived benefits and perceived barriers; (4) Health knowledge and social support indirectly influenced health examination behavioral intention. The preceding results can effectively increase the acceptance and use of health examination services among the public, thereby facilitating early diagnosis and treatment and ultimately reducing disease and mortality rates.

  19. Predisposing factors of pneumothorax in percutaneous transthoracic fine needle aspiration biopsy: comparison between CT emphysema score and pulmonary function test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Ho; Park, Kyung Joo; Park, Dong Won; Jung, Kyung Il; Suh, Jung Ho [Ajou Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-11-01

    To compare the CT emphysema score with various factors of pulmonary function test by simple spirometry and to use the result as a predictor of pneumothorax in percutaneous transthoracic fine needle aspiration biopsy. The CT scans of 106 patients who had undergone percutaneous transthoracic fine needle aspiration biopsy of lung lesions within the previous 18 months were retrospectively reviewed. In 75 of these 106 cases, the results of the pulmonary function test were also reviewed. On plain chest radiography, pneumothorax was noted in 20 cases (19%). Emphysema was blindly evaluated. We divided each lung into four segments and determined the severity and involved volume of emphysema, as seen on CT. Severity was classified as one of four grades, as follow : absence of emphysema=0 ; low attenuation area of less than 5mm=1 ; low attenuation area of more than 5mm, and vascular pruning with normal lung intervening=2 ; and diffuse low attenuation without intervening normal lung, and larger confluent low attenuation with vascular pruning and distortion of branching pattern occupying all or almost all the involved parenchyma=3. The involved area was also classified as one of four grades : less than 25%=1 ; 25 - 49%=2 ; 51 - 74%=3 ; and more than 75%=4. The CT emphysema score was defined as the average of the grade of severity multiplied by the grade of involved area. Pulmonary function tests, consisting of simple spirometry and a pulmonologist's interpretation, were evaluated. We also evaluated depth and size of lesion as known predisposing factors in postbioptic pneumothorax. Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square test, Wilcoxon ranks sum W test and the student t test. A comparison between the two groups of occurrence(with or without pneumothorax) showed the emphysema scores to be 1.69{+-}2.0 and 1.11{+-}2.9, respectively ; there was thus no significant difference between the two groups (z= - 0.048, p>0.10). Nor were differences revealed by the

  20. Incremental validity of WISC-IV(UK) factor index scores with a referred Irish sample: predicting performance on the WIAT-II(UK.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canivez, Gary L; Watkins, Marley W; James, Trevor; Good, Rebecca; James, Kate

    2014-12-01

    Subtest and factor scores have typically provided little incremental predictive validity beyond the omnibus IQ score. This study examined the incremental validity of Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children - Fourth UK Edition (WISC-IV(UK) ; Wechsler, 2004a, Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children - Fourth UK Edition, Harcourt Assessment, London, UK) and factor index scores in predicting academic achievement on the Wechsler Individual Achievement Test - Second UK Edition (WIAT-II(UK) ; Wechsler, 2005a, Wechsler Individual Achievement Test-Second UK Edition, Pearson, London, UK), beyond that predicted by the WISC-IV(UK) FSIQ. The sample included 1,014 Irish children (ages 6-0 to 16-9) who were referred for evaluation of learning difficulties. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were used with the WISC-IV(UK) FSIQ (Block 1) and factor index scores (Block 2) as predictors and WIAT-II(UK) subtest and composite scores as dependent variables. The WISC-IV(UK) FSIQ accounted for statistically significant and generally large portions of WIAT-II(UK) subtest and composite score variance. WISC-IV(UK) factor index scores combined to provide statistically significant increments in prediction of most WIAT-II(UK) subtest and composite scores over and above the FSIQ; however, the effect sizes were mostly small as previously observed (i.e., Canivez, 2013a, Psychol. Assess., 25, 484; Glutting et al., 2006, J. Spec. Educ., 40, 103; Nelson et al., 2013, Psychol. Assess., 25, 618). Individually, the WISC-IV(UK) factor index scores provided small unique contributions to predicting WIAT-II(UK) scores. This, in combination with studies of apportioned variance from bifactor confirmatory factor analysis (Watkins et al., 2013, Int. J. Sch. Educ. Psychol., 1, 102), indicated that the WISC-IV(UK) FSIQ should retain the greatest weight in WISC-IV(UK) interpretation. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  1. Incremental Validity of WISC-IV[superscript UK] Factor Index Scores with a Referred Irish Sample: Predicting Performance on the WIAT-II[superscript UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canivez, Gary L.; Watkins, Marley W.; James, Trevor; Good, Rebecca; James, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Background: Subtest and factor scores have typically provided little incremental predictive validity beyond the omnibus IQ score. Aims: This study examined the incremental validity of Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth UK Edition (WISC-IV[superscript UK]; Wechsler, 2004a, "Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth UK…

  2. Incremental Validity of WISC-IV[superscript UK] Factor Index Scores with a Referred Irish Sample: Predicting Performance on the WIAT-II[superscript UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canivez, Gary L.; Watkins, Marley W.; James, Trevor; Good, Rebecca; James, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Background: Subtest and factor scores have typically provided little incremental predictive validity beyond the omnibus IQ score. Aims: This study examined the incremental validity of Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth UK Edition (WISC-IV[superscript UK]; Wechsler, 2004a, "Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth UK…

  3. P10: Is the OctreoScan score a predictive factor of response to somatostatin analogs treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiano, Vincenzo; Ottaviano, Margaret; Del Vecchio, Silvana; Segreto, Sabrina; Tucci, Irene; von Arx, Claudia; Palumbo, Giuliano; Pellegrino, Sara; De Placido, Sabino; Marino, Mirella; Palmieri, Giovannella

    2015-01-01

    Background The somatostatin receptor expression in thymic neoplasms is assessed in vivo imaging by 111In-octreotide SPECT (OctreoScan). This retrospective study aimed to verify the predictive role of intensity expression of OctreoScan to somatostatin analogues treatment. Methods We evaluated 28 patients (14 male and 14 female with a median age of 54 years, range, 27–78 years) with thymic tumors candidated to somatostatine analogs therapy as second or third line of treatment or maintenance treatment. For this reason all of them performed OctreoScan of the thorax and tumor-to-background ratio was determined on the 24-h coronal sections. Thymic tumors were classified by WHO 2004 and staged according to Masaoka-Koga system. Specifically, AB three patients; B1 two patients; B2 five patients; B3 nine patients; B2/B3 three patients; thymic carcinoma five patients; B3/thymic carcinoma one patient. All the patients had a III of IV stage of disease. Lesions with pathologically increased tracer uptake were categorized according to the following 3-pointscore: equivocal, probably pathologic, and definitely pathologic. Results All patients were OctreoScan positive, four with an equivocal point score, nineteen and five with a probably and definitely pathological score respectively. Somatostatin analogs were administrated as second or third line of therapy in 10 patients, as maintenance therapy in 16 patients and as both of modality in two patients. Median time to progression was 16 months (range, 6–77 months) and it was not influenced by uptake pathological score. Conclusions The intensity of uptake of Indium-111-DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide in thymic tumors is not a predictive factor of response to somatostatin analogues treatment. The OctreoScan positivity is the best rationale for treating thymic epithelial tumors (TETs) with somatostatin analogs.

  4. Does von Willebrand factor improve the predictive ability of current risk stratification scores in patients with atrial fibrillation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Fernández, Amaya; Roldán, Vanessa; Rivera-Caravaca, José Miguel; Hernández-Romero, Diana; Valdés, Mariano; Vicente, Vicente; Lip, Gregory Y. H.; Marín, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Von Willebrand factor (vWF) is a biomarker of endothelial dysfunction. We investigated its role on prognosis in anticoagulated atrial fibrillation (AF) patients and determined whether its addition to clinical risk stratification schemes improved event-risk prediction. Consecutive outpatients with non-valvular AF were recruited and rates of thrombotic/cardiovascular events, major bleeding and mortality were recorded. The effect of vWF on prognosis was calculated using a Cox regression model. Improvements in predictive accuracy over current scores were determined by calculating the integrated discrimination improvement (IDI), net reclassification improvement (NRI), comparison of receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) curves and Decision Curve Analysis (DCA). 1215 patients (49% males, age 76 (71–81) years) were included. Follow-up was almost 7 years. Significant associations were found between vWF and cardiovascular events, stroke, mortality and bleeding. Based on IDI and NRI, addition of vWF to CHA2DS2-VASc statistically improved its predictive value, but c-indexes were not significantly different. For major bleeding, the addition of vWF to HAS-BLED improved the c-index but not IDI or NRI. DCA showed minimal net benefit. vWF acts as a simple prognostic biomarker in AF and, whilst its addition to current scores statistically improves prediction for some endpoints, absolute changes and impact on clinical decision-making are marginal. PMID:28134282

  5. The factor structure of six salutogenic constructs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marita Breed

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to investigate the factor structure of six salutogenic constructs, namely sense of coherence, hardiness, learned resourcefulness, potency, internal locus of control and self-efficacy. Measurement with a sample of 935 part-time students did not fit the conceptualisation of salutogenesis. A different factor structure for Whites versus Others occurred. For Whites, all six constructs more or less contributed towards the general salutogenic factor and for Others all but learned resourcefulness contributed. For Whites, salutogenesis consisted of two clear dimensions (a global positive orientation; specific behavioural skills and for Others one dimension (an optimistic life view. Confirmatory factor analysis performed on the data for both groups, indicated a weak fit. It was recommended that salutogenesis be further explored within an overall personality theory. Opsomming Die doel van hierdie navorsing was om die faktorstruktuur van ses salutogeniese konstrukte te ondersoek, naamlik sin vir koherensie, gehardheid, aangeleerde vindingrykheid, potensie, interne lokus van beheer en selfgenoegsaamheid. Meting met ‘n steekproef van 935 deeltydse studente het nie ‘n passing getoon met die konseptualisering van salutogenese nie. ‘n Eiesoortige faktorstruktuur vir Wit studente versus Ander studente het voorgekom. Vir Wittes, het al ses die konstrukte meer of minder bygedra tot die algemene salutugeniese faktor en vir Andere het almal behalwe aangeleerde vindingrykheid bygedra. Vir Wittes bestaan salutogenese uit twee duidelike dimensies (‘n globale positiewe lewensorientasie; spesifieke gedrags vaardighede en vir Andere uit een dimensie (‘n optimistiese lewensbeskouing. Bevestigende faktor ontleding uitgevoer op die data van beide groepe, het ‘n swak passing getoon. Daar is aanbeveel dat salutogenese verder ondersoek word binne ‘n oorkoepelende persoonlikheidsteorie.

  6. The network structure of human personality according to the NEO-PI-R: matching network community structure to factor structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutger Goekoop

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Human personality is described preferentially in terms of factors (dimensions found using factor analysis. An alternative and highly related method is network analysis, which may have several advantages over factor analytic methods. AIM: To directly compare the ability of network community detection (NCD and principal component factor analysis (PCA to examine modularity in multidimensional datasets such as the neuroticism-extraversion-openness personality inventory revised (NEO-PI-R. METHODS: 434 healthy subjects were tested on the NEO-PI-R. PCA was performed to extract factor structures (FS of the current dataset using both item scores and facet scores. Correlational network graphs were constructed from univariate correlation matrices of interactions between both items and facets. These networks were pruned in a link-by-link fashion while calculating the network community structure (NCS of each resulting network using the Wakita Tsurumi clustering algorithm. NCSs were matched against FS and networks of best matches were kept for further analysis. RESULTS: At facet level, NCS showed a best match (96.2% with a 'confirmatory' 5-FS. At item level, NCS showed a best match (80% with the standard 5-FS and involved a total of 6 network clusters. Lesser matches were found with 'confirmatory' 5-FS and 'exploratory' 6-FS of the current dataset. Network analysis did not identify facets as a separate level of organization in between items and clusters. A small-world network structure was found in both item- and facet level networks. CONCLUSION: We present the first optimized network graph of personality traits according to the NEO-PI-R: a 'Personality Web'. Such a web may represent the possible routes that subjects can take during personality development. NCD outperforms PCA by producing plausible modularity at item level in non-standard datasets, and can identify the key roles of individual items and clusters in the network.

  7. Validity Evidence based on Internal Structure of Scores of the Emotional Quotient-Inventory: Youth Version Short (EQ-i: YV-S) in a Spanish Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esnaola, Igor; Freeman, John; Sarasa, Marta; Fernández-Zabala, Arantza; Axpe, Inge

    2016-03-14

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the reliability and validity evidence of scores on the Spanish version of EQ-i: YV-S in Spanish adolescents. The total sample was comprised of 508 participants from Grades 7 to 12, 241 males (47.4%) and 267 females (52.6%), each of whom completed the questionnaires on two separate occasions. Three [intrapersonal (α = .83, CR = .86, and McDonald Omega = .86), stress management (α = .83, CR = .86, and McDonald Omega = .85) and adaptability (α = .82, CR = .85, and McDonald Omega = .85)] of the four scales had acceptable internal consistency. Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) and Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) were used with FACTOR and EQS version 6.1 software to examine validity evidence based on internal structure drawn from the scores on the EQ-i: YV-S, supporting the multidimensionality of the questionnaire. Three models were tested; the best fit to the data was the hierarchical model (S-Bχ2 / df = 2.11, CFI = .93 and RMSEA = .047), which hypothesized that the four specific factors (interpersonal, intrapersonal, stress management, and adaptability) were explained with a second-order factor, Emotional-Social-Intelligence (ESI). Finally, significant positive correlations were found between general self-concept and EQ-i: YV-S [interpersonal (r = .153, p < .001), intrapersonal (r = .235, p < .001), stress management (r = .145, p < .001), adaptability (r = .311, p < .001) and ESI (r = .360, p < .001)]; ESI showed significant direct power prediction of the general self-concept (.52) as demonstrated through structural equation modeling.

  8. Disease and treatment factors associated with lower quality of life scores in adults with multiple endocrine neoplasia type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Sneha; Peipert, Benjamin J; Helenowski, Irene; Yount, Susan E; Sturgeon, Cord

    2017-09-14

    Physical and psychosocial morbidity of multiple endocrine neoplasia type-1 is ill-defined. How disease and treatment-related factors relate to patient-reported outcomes including health-related quality of life is unknown. We hypothesized that disease and treatment burden negatively impacts health-related quality of life in adults with multiple endocrine neoplasia type-1. Adults (≥18 years) with multiple endocrine neoplasia type-1 completed an online survey of demographics, disease features, treatments, and Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System 29-item profile measure, and scores were compared with normative US data. Multivariable modeling was performed to evaluate factors associated with decreased health-related quality of life. Multiple endocrine neoplasia type-1 patients (n = 207) reported worse health-related quality of life compared with US normative data in all health-related quality of life domains (P 50 miles for doctor appointments and ≥20 doctor appointments/year (P < .05) were associated with worse health-related quality of life. History of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors was not associated with worse health-related quality of life. This is the largest study to assess clinical and treatment factors associated with health-related quality of life in multiple endocrine neoplasia type-1. Persistent hyperparathyroidism, increased travel distance and frequency of doctor appointments were all associated with worse health-related quality of life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. GARN: Sampling RNA 3D Structure Space with Game Theory and Knowledge-Based Scoring Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudard, Mélanie; Bernauer, Julie; Barth, Dominique; Cohen, Johanne; Denise, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Cellular processes involve large numbers of RNA molecules. The functions of these RNA molecules and their binding to molecular machines are highly dependent on their 3D structures. One of the key challenges in RNA structure prediction and modeling is predicting the spatial arrangement of the various structural elements of RNA. As RNA folding is generally hierarchical, methods involving coarse-grained models hold great promise for this purpose. We present here a novel coarse-grained method for sampling, based on game theory and knowledge-based potentials. This strategy, GARN (Game Algorithm for RNa sampling), is often much faster than previously described techniques and generates large sets of solutions closely resembling the native structure. GARN is thus a suitable starting point for the molecular modeling of large RNAs, particularly those with experimental constraints. GARN is available from: http://garn.lri.fr/.

  10. Association between Knee Osteoarthritis, Cardiovascular Risk Factors, and the Framingham Risk Score in South Koreans: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ho Sun; Shin, Joon-Shik; Lee, Jinho; Lee, Yoon Jae; Kim, Me-riong; Bae, Young-Hyeon; Park, Ki Byung; Lee, Eun-Jung; Kim, Joo-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis is a significant burden on personal health and for social cost, and its prevalence is rising. Recent research has revealed an association between osteoarthritis and cardiovascular disease, and this study uses the Framingham risk score (FRS), which is widely used as a composite index of cardiovascular risk factors, to investigate the association between osteoarthritis and various cardiovascular risk factors. Methods A total 9,514 participants aged 50 years or older who received knee X-ray diagnosis of the 5th Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (total surveyees = 24,173) released by the Korean Centers for Disease Control and Prevention was included for analysis. Knee osteoarthritis patients were defined as participants with K-L grade ≥2 on knee X-ray regardless of knee pain. The association between major cardiovascular risk factors (blood pressure, diabetes, cholesterol, and smoking habits), FRS, and knee osteoarthritis was analyzed, adjusting for various covariates. Results Prevalence of knee osteoarthritis in Koreans aged ≥50 years was 36.6%, and higher in women (men: 24.9%, women: 45.4%). Prevalence of knee osteoarthritis in participants with hypertension was significantly higher than those without hypertension (fully adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.26; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08–1.48). Knee osteoarthritis prevalence was also higher in participants with impaired fasting glucose or diabetes than those without (age, sex adjusted OR 1.19; 95% CI 1.00–1.41). Also, OR values increased statistically significantly with FRS as a continuous variable (fully adjusted OR 1.007; 95% CI 1.00–1.01). Conclusions Prevalence of knee osteoarthritis was associated with hypertension and diabetes, which are major cardiovascular risk factors, and the FRS. Further studies on FRS pertaining to its relationship with osteoarthritis are warranted. PMID:27764239

  11. Seismic force modification factor for ductile structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TONG Gen-shu; HUANG Jin-qiao

    2005-01-01

    The earthquake forces used in design codes of buildings should be theoretically determinable. This work examines the seismic force modification factor R based on elastic-plastic time-history earthquake analysis of SDOF systems, wherein the hysteresis models are elastic-perfectly-plastic (EPP), elastic-linearly-hardening (ELH), shear-slipped and bilinear-elastic. The latter two models are analysed for separating the effect of the ductility and the energy-dissipating capacity. Three-hundred eighty-eight earthquake records from different site conditions are used in analysis. The ductility is taken to be 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6, with the damping ratio being 0.02, 0.035 and 0.05 respectively. The post-yield stiffness ratios 0.0, 0.1 and 0.2 are used in the analysis. The R spectra are standardized by the characteristic period of the earthquake records, which leads to a much smaller scatter in averaged numerical results. It was found that the most important factor determining R is the ductility. R increases more than linearly with ductility. The energy-dissipating capacity, damping and the post-yield stiffness are the less important factors. The energy dissipating capacity is important only for structures with short period and moderate period (0.3≤T/Tg<5.0). For EPP and ELH models, R for 0.05 damping is 10% to 15% smaller than for 0.02 damping. For EPP and ELH models, greater post-yield stiffness leads to greater R, but the influence of post-yield stiffness is obvious only when the post-yield stiffness is less than 10% of the initial stiffness. By means of statistical regression analysis the relation of the seismic force modification factor R with the natural period of the system and ductility for EPP and ELH models were established for each site and soil condition.

  12. Discriminating the native structure from decoys using scoring functions based on the residue packing in globular proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadur, Ranjit Prasad; Chakrabarti, Pinak

    2009-12-28

    Setting the rules for the identification of a stable conformation of a protein is of utmost importance for the efficient generation of structures in computer simulation. For structure prediction, a considerable number of possible models are generated from which the best model has to be selected. Two scoring functions, Rs and Rp, based on the consideration of packing of residues, which indicate if the conformation of an amino acid sequence is native-like, are presented. These are defined using the solvent accessible surface area (ASA) and the partner number (PN) (other residues that are within 4.5 A) of a particular residue. The two functions evaluate the deviation from the average packing properties (ASA or PN) of all residues in a polypeptide chain corresponding to a model of its three-dimensional structure. While simple in concept and computationally less intensive, both the functions are at least as efficient as any other energy functions in discriminating the native structure from decoys in a large number of standard decoy sets, as well as on models submitted for the targets of CASP7. Rs appears to be slightly more effective than Rp, as determined by the number of times the native structure possesses the minimum value for the function and its separation from the average value for the decoys. Two parameters, Rs and Rp, are discussed that can very efficiently recognize the native fold for a sequence from an ensemble of decoy structures. Unlike many other algorithms that rely on the use of composite scoring function, these are based on a single parameter, viz., the accessible surface area (or the number of residues in contact), but still able to capture the essential attribute of the native fold.

  13. Effects of Students’ Effort Scores in a Structured Inquiry Unit on Long-Term Recall Abilities of Content Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Schmid

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of students’ investment and perception during participation in structured inquiry-based learning on their long-term retention was analyzed to gain more insights into the underlying reasons for long-term retention through structured inquiry learning. Therefore achievement was correlated to effort, lesson rating and perceived competence for learning (PCL, and subject grades. 126 ninth graders participating in a structured inquiry-based interdisciplinary Biology and Physics module were analyzed. Students’ knowledge was even measured four times: 2 weeks before, directly after, and six and 12 weeks after module participation. Effort, usefulness, and PCL were observed once, directly after module participation. The invested effort during the lesson correlated positively with the knowledge score measured six weeks and twelve weeks after the lesson. Thus, high effort individuals achieved high knowledge scores at the medium and the long-term measurement. Therefore, effort is a variable that seems to be linked to long-term achievement. Furthermore, Biology and Physics grades reflected individual abilities to acquire long-term knowledge, while a high preknowledge level did not. This result indicates learning strategies as possible core concept underlying individual achievement levels.

  14. The p Factor: One General Psychopathology Factor in the Structure of Psychiatric Disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspi, Avshalom; Houts, Renate M.; Belsky, Daniel W.; Goldman-Mellor, Sidra J.; Harrington, HonaLee; Israel, Salomon; Meier, Madeline H.; Ramrakha, Sandhya; Shalev, Idan; Poulton, Richie; Moffitt, Terrie E.

    2013-01-01

    Mental disorders traditionally have been viewed as distinct, episodic, and categorical conditions. This view has been challenged by evidence that many disorders are sequentially comorbid, recurrent/chronic, and exist on a continuum. Using the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study, we examined the structure of psychopathology, taking into account dimensionality, persistence, co-occurrence, and sequential comorbidity of mental disorders across 20 years, from adolescence to midlife. Psychiatric disorders were initially explained by three higher-order factors (Internalizing, Externalizing, and Thought Disorder) but explained even better with one General Psychopathology dimension. We have called this dimension the p factor because it conceptually parallels a familiar dimension in psychological science: the g factor of general intelligence. Higher p scores are associated with more life impairment, greater familiality, worse developmental histories, and more compromised early-life brain function. The p factor explains why it is challenging to find causes, consequences, biomarkers, and treatments with specificity to individual mental disorders. Transdiagnostic approaches may improve research. PMID:25360393

  15. Impact of biased scores on ranking in bipartite competition networks and inference of modular structure via generalized modularity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Gyuhyeon; Park, Juyong

    2017-02-01

    In the common jury-contestant competition format, a jury consisting of multiple judges grade contestants on their performances to determine their ranking. Unlike in another common competition format where two contestants play a head-to-head match to produce the winner such as in football or basketball, the objectivity of judges are often called into question, potentially undermining the public's trust in the fairness of the competition. In this work we show, by modeling the jury-contestant competition format as a weighted bipartite network, how one can identify biased scores and how they impact the competition and its structure. Analyzing the prestigious International Chopin Piano Competition of 2015 as an example with a well-publicized scoring controversy, we show that the presence of even a very small fraction of biased edges can gravely distort our inference of the network structure —in the example a single biased edge is shown to lead to an incorrect “solution” that also wrongly appears to be robust exclusively, dominating other reasonable solutions— highlighting the importance of bias detection and elimination in network inference. In the process our work also presents a modified modularity measure for the one-mode projection of weighted complete bipartite networks.

  16. Identifying native-like protein structures with scoring functions based on all-atom ECEPP force fields, implicit solvent models and structure relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnautova, Yelena A; Vorobjev, Yury N; Vila, Jorge A; Scheraga, Harold A

    2009-10-01

    Availability of energy functions which can discriminate native-like from non-native protein conformations is crucial for theoretical protein structure prediction and refinement of low-resolution protein models. This article reports the results of benchmark tests for scoring functions based on two all-atom ECEPP force fields, that is, ECEPP/3 and ECEPP05, and two implicit solvent models for a large set of protein decoys. The following three scoring functions are considered: (i) ECEPP05 plus a solvent-accessible surface area model with the parameters optimized with a set of protein decoys (ECEPP05/SA); (ii) ECEPP/3 plus the solvent-accessible surface area model of Ooi et al. (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1987;84:3086-3090) (ECEPP3/OONS); and (iii) ECEPP05 plus an implicit solvent model based on a solution of the Poisson equation with an optimized Fast Adaptive Multigrid Boundary Element (FAMBEpH) method (ECEPP05/FAMBEpH). Short Monte Carlo-with-Minimization (MCM) simulations, following local energy minimization, are used as a scoring method with ECEPP05/SA and ECEPP3/OONS potentials, whereas energy calculation is used with ECEPP05/FAMBEpH. The performance of each scoring function is evaluated by examining its ability to distinguish between native-like and non-native protein structures. The results of the tests show that the new ECEPP05/SA scoring function represents a significant improvement over the earlier ECEPP3/OONS version of the force field. Thus, it is able to rank native-like structures with C(alpha) root-mean-square-deviations below 3.5 A as lowest-energy conformations for 76% and within the top 10 for 87% of the proteins tested, compared with 69 and 80%, respectively, for ECEPP3/OONS. The use of the FAMBEpH solvation model, which provides a more accurate description of the protein-solvent interactions, improves the discriminative ability of the scoring function to 89%. All failed tests in which the native-like structures cannot be discriminated as those with low

  17. Anti-epidermal or anti-vascular endothelial growth factor as first-line metastatic colorectal cancer in modified Glasgow prognostic score 2' patients

    OpenAIRE

    Dréanic, Johann; Dhooge, Marion; Barret, Maximilien; Brezault, Catherine; Mir, Olivier; Chaussade, Stanislas; Coriat, Romain

    2015-01-01

    Background In metastatic colorectal cancer, the modified Glasgow prognostic score (mGPS) has been approved as an independent prognostic indicator of survival. No data existed on poor prognosis patients treated with molecular-targeted agents. Methods From January 2007 to February 2012, patients with metastatic colorectal cancer and poor predictive survival score (mGPS = 2), treated with 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy in addition to an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) or anti-vas...

  18. Injustice Experience Questionnaire, Japanese Version: Cross-Cultural Factor-Structure Comparison and Demographics Associated with Perceived Injustice

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Objective The Injustice Experience Questionnaire (IEQ) assesses injury-related perceived injustice. This study aimed to (1) develop a Japanese version (IEQ-J), (2) examine its factor structure, validity, and reliability, and (3) discover which demographic variable(s) positively contributed to prediction of IEQ-J scores. Methods Data from 71 patients (33 male, 38 female; age = 20+) with injury pain were employed to investigate factor structure by exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. C...

  19. A propensity score matched analysis of obesity as an independent risk factor for postoperative complications in reduction mammaplasty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    James D Goggin; Stacy Wong; Jessica E Pruszynski; Jon P Ver Halen

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Reduction mammaplasty is a commonly performed procedure for the treatment of symptomatic macromastia and is increasingly desired by the obese population. With the increasing prevalence obesity in the population, it is imperative to understand its effect on postoperative outcomes. The purpose of this study is to evaluate obesity as an independent risk factor for postoperative complications in breast reduction surgery using 1:1 patient matching through propensity scores between obese patients and non-obese controls.Methods: Between 2005 and 2013, the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program dataset identified a total of 6,016 patients as having undergone primary reduction mammaplasty with 30-day postoperative follow-up. Patients were divided into obese [body mass index (BMI) of 30 or more] vs. not obese (BMI below 30). Patients were initially analyzed using standard multivariable analysis. Using propensity scores obtained from a logistic regression model, patients were subsequently matched 1:1 according to preoperative and operative variables to truly isolate the effect of obesity on surgical outcomes. Outcomes were compared between the matched cohorts using McNemar’s test and the Wilcoxon signed rank test.Results: In unmatched multivariable analysis, rates of overall complications (7.2%vs. 5.3%,P = 0.0024), wound complications (5.5%vs. 3.6%,P = 0.0004), superficial surgical site infection (4.1%vs. 2.8%,P = 0.0050), and wound dehiscence (0.3%vs. 1.1%,P = 0.0005) were found to be statistically different between obesevs. non-obese, respectively. However, when comparing 1:1 matched obese and non-obese patients, only wound complications (4.6%vs. 3.1%,P = 0.0334) were significantly increased in the obese cohort.Conclusion: Using the most robust statistical tools available, obesity was determined to affect wound complications after breast reduction without increased detriment on other major complications when compared to the non-obese. Obesity should be a

  20. The Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale: factor structure, reliability, and validity with older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, M; Scogin, F; Chaplin, W F

    2004-03-01

    The Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale Form A (DAS-A), a self-report measure of depression-related attitudes, has been used in numerous depression studies. The DAS-A has a two-factor structure that has been found consistently with college student samples and clinically depressed samples of middle-aged adults, but it has not been validated with older adults. The present study examined the factor structure with a sample of 100 depressed older adults (average age = 68.19; average initial Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression [HRSD] score = 16.72) who participated in a depression treatment study. Results indicated the factor structure established with younger adults was not replicated with older adults. Furthermore, the factor structure with older adults was uncertain: a single factor structure, two-factor structure, and three-factor structure were essentially of equal validity. The uncertainty of the latent structure of the DAS-A suggests that it should be interpreted with caution whenever used with older adults.

  1. Gravitational form factors and nucleon spin structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teryaev, O. V.

    2016-10-01

    Nucleon scattering by the classical gravitational field is described by the gravitational (energy-momentum tensor) form factors (GFFs), which also control the partition of nucleon spin between the total angular momenta of quarks and gluons. The equivalence principle (EP) for spin dynamics results in the identically zero anomalous gravitomagnetic moment, which is the straightforward analog of its electromagnetic counterpart. The extended EP (ExEP) describes its (approximate) validity separately for quarks and gluons and, in turn, results in equal partition of the momentum and total angular momentum. It is violated in quantum electrodynamics and perturbative quantum chromodynamics (QCD), but may be restored in nonperturbative QCD because of confinement and spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking, which is supported by models and lattice QCD calculations. It may, in principle, be checked by extracting the generalized parton distributions from hard exclusive processes. The EP for spin-1 hadrons is also manifested in inclusive processes (deep inelastic scattering and the Drell-Yan process) in sum rules for tensor structure functions and parton distributions. The ExEP may originate in either gravity-proof confinement or in the closeness of the GFF to its asymptotic values in relation to the mediocrity principle. The GFFs in time-like regions reveal some similarity between inflation and annihilation.

  2. Structural integration in hypoxia-inducible factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Dalei; Potluri, Nalini; Lu, Jingping; Kim, Youngchang; Rastinejad, Fraydoon

    2015-08-20

    The hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) coordinate cellular adaptations to low oxygen stress by regulating transcriptional programs in erythropoiesis, angiogenesis and metabolism. These programs promote the growth and progression of many tumours, making HIFs attractive anticancer targets. Transcriptionally active HIFs consist of HIF-alpha and ARNT (also called HIF-1 beta) subunits. Here we describe crystal structures for each of mouse HIF-2 alpha-ARNT and HIF-1 alpha-ARNT heterodimers in states that include bound small molecules and their hypoxia response element. A highly integrated quaternary architecture is shared by HIF-2 alpha-ARNT and HIF-1 alpha-ARNT, wherein ARNT spirals around the outside of each HIF-alpha subunit. Five distinct pockets are observed that permit small-molecule binding, including PAS domain encapsulated sites and an interfacial cavity formed through subunit heterodimerization. The DNA-reading head rotates, extends and cooperates with a distal PAS domain to bind hypoxia response elements. HIF-alpha mutations linked to human cancers map to sensitive sites that establish DNA binding and the stability of PAS domains and pockets.

  3. Evening types among german university students score higher on sense of humor after controlling for big five personality factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randler, Christoph

    2008-10-01

    Humor research has focused on relationships between humor and various personality traits. As personality and morningness-eveningness, as well as personality and humor, are related based on genetics and neurobehavioral function, one might also expect a relationship between humor and chronotype. 197 students responded to the Composite Scale of Morningness as a measure of chronotype, the Sense of Humor Questionnaire and a 10-item version of the Big Five Inventory. Individuals scoring as evening types reported a greater sense of humor than morning individuals, with higher morningness scores. In a stepwise linear regression, Extraversion, Agreeableness, Openness, and Chronotype each accounted for a significant amount of variance in sense of Humor scores. That is, the relationship between scores on Sense of Humor and evening orientation was significant after controlling for personality dimensions. Eveningness was related to sense of Humor scores in women but not in men. Social but not cognitive humor was predicted by eveningness.

  4. Factors contributing to the variability of a predictive score for cranial cruciate ligament deficiency in Labrador Retrievers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Devin P; Mostafa, Ayman A; Gordan-Evans, Wanda J; Boudrieau, Randy J; Griffon, Dominique J

    2017-08-14

    We recently reported that a conformation score derived from the tibial plateau angle (TPA) and the femoral anteversion angle (FAA), best discriminates limbs predisposed to, or affected by cranial cruciate ligament disease (CCLD), from those that are at low risk for CCLD. The specificity and sensitivity of this score were high enough to support further investigations toward its use for large-scale screening of dogs by veterinarians. The next step, which is the objective of the current study, is to determine inter-observer variability of that CCLD score in a large population of Labrador Retrievers. A total of 167 Labradors were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Limbs of normal dogs over 6 years of age with no history of CCLD were considered at low risk for CCLD. Limbs of dogs with CCLD were considered at high risk for CCLD. Tibial plateau and femoral anteversion angles were measured independently by two investigators to calculate a CCLD score for each limb. Kappa statistics were used to determine the extent of agreement between investigators. Pearson's correlation and intraclass coefficients were calculated to evaluate the correlation between investigators and the relative contribution of each measurement to the variability of the CCLD score. The correlation between CCLD scores calculated by investigators was good (correlation coefficient = 0.68 p fair (kappa value = 0.28), with 37% of limbs being assigned divergent classifications. Variations in CCLD scores correlated best with those of TPA, which was the least consistent parameter between investigators. Absolute interobserver differences were two times greater for FAAs (4.19° ± 3.15) than TPAs (2.23° ± 1.91). The reproducibility of the CCLD score between investigators is fair, justifying caution when interpreting individual scores. Future studies should focus on improving the reproducibility of TPA and FAA measurements, as strategies to improve the agreement between CCLD scores.

  5. Using estimated factor scores from a bifactor analysis to examine the unique effects of the latent variables measured by the WAIS-IV on academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranzler, John H; Benson, Nicholas; Floyd, Randy G

    2015-12-01

    This study used estimated factor scores from a bifactor analysis of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) to examine the unique effects of its latent variables on academic achievement. In doing so, we addressed the potential limitation of multicollinearity in previous studies of the incremental validity of the WAIS-IV. First, factor scores representing psychometric g and 4 group factors representing the WAIS-IV index scales were computed from a bifactor model. Subtest and composite scores for the Wechsler Individual Achievement Test-Third Edition (WIAT-II) were then predicted from these estimated factor scores in simultaneous multiple regression. Results of this study only partially replicated the findings of previous research on the incremental validity of scores that can be derived from performance on the WAIS-IV. Although we found that psychometric g is the most important underlying construct measured by the WAIS-IV for the prediction of academic achievement in general, results indicated that the unique effect of Verbal Comprehension is also important for predicting achievement in reading, spelling, and oral communication skills. Based on these results, measures of both psychometric g and Verbal Comprehension could be cautiously interpreted when considering high school students' performance in these areas of achievement.

  6. Apgar score

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003402.htm Apgar score To use the sharing features on this page, ... birth. Virginia Apgar, MD (1909-1974) introduced the Apgar score in 1952. How the Test is Performed The ...

  7. In silico structure-based screening of versatile P-glycoprotein inhibitors using polynomial empirical scoring functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shityakov, Sergey; Förster, Carola

    2014-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is an ATP (adenosine triphosphate)-binding cassette transporter that causes multidrug resistance of various chemotherapeutic substances by active efflux from mammalian cells. P-gp plays a pivotal role in limiting drug absorption and distribution in different organs, including the intestines and brain. Thus, the prediction of P-gp-drug interactions is of vital importance in assessing drug pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. To find the strongest P-gp blockers, we performed an in silico structure-based screening of P-gp inhibitor library (1,300 molecules) by the gradient optimization method, using polynomial empirical scoring (POLSCORE) functions. We report a strong correlation (r (2)=0.80, F=16.27, n=6, P<0.0157) of inhibition constants (Kiexp or pKiexp; experimental Ki or negative decimal logarithm of Kiexp) converted from experimental IC50 (half maximal inhibitory concentration) values with POLSCORE-predicted constants (KiPOLSCORE or pKiPOLSCORE), using a linear regression fitting technique. The hydrophobic interactions between P-gp and selected drug substances were detected as the main forces responsible for the inhibition effect. The results showed that this scoring technique might be useful in the virtual screening and filtering of databases of drug-like compounds at the early stage of drug development processes.

  8. Return to Work: A Cut-Off of FIM Gain with Montebello Rehabilitation Factor Score in Order to Identify Predictive Factors in Subjects with Acquired Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschini, Marco; Massimiani, Maria Pia; Paravati, Stefano; Agosti, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Return to work (RTW) for people with acquired brain injury (ABI) represents a main objective of rehabilitation: this work presents a strong correlation between personal well-being and quality of life. The aim of this study is to investigate the prognostic factors that can predict RTW after ABI (traumatic or non- traumatic aetiology) in patients without disorders of consciousness (e.g. coma, vegetative or minimally conscious state) at the beginning of their admission to rehabilitation. At the end of a 6-month follow-up after discharge, data were successfully collected in 69 patients. The rehabilitation effectiveness (functional Recovery) between admission and discharge was assessed by Functional Independent Measure (FIM) gain, through the Montebello Rehabilitation Factor Score (MRFS), which was obtained as follows: (discharge FIM-admission FIM)/(Maximum possible FIM-Admission FIM) x 100. The cut-off value (criterion) deriving from MRFS, which helped identify RTW patients, resulted in .659 (sn 88.9%; sp 52.4%). Considering the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and the MRFS data, the multivariable binary logistic regression analysis presented 62.96% of correct RTW classification cases, 80.95% of non-RTW leading to an overall satisfactory predictability of 73.91%. The results of the present study suggest that occupational therapy intervention could modify cut-off in patients with an MFRS close to target at the end of an in-hospital rehabilitative program thus developing their capabilities and consequently surpassing cut-off itself.

  9. Identification of dietary patterns by factor analysis and study of the relationship with nutritional status of rural adolescents using factor scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkaiah, Kodavalla; Brahmam, Ginnela Narsimhachary Veera; Vijayaraghavan, Kamasamudram

    2015-05-01

    Study was undertaken to know food and nutrient consumption patterns and their relationship with nutritional status among rural adolescents in Orissa. It was a Community based cross sectional study, conducted at district level in the State of Orissa. Data on 686 adolescent boys and 689 adolescent girls were utilized. Factor analysis was used to find dietary pattern and discriminate analysis and its relationship with undernutrition. The study revealed that among adolescent boys, there existed six patterns among food-groups and three patterns among nutrients explaining 52% and 76% of total variation. Similarly among adolescent girls, seven patterns among food groups and three patterns among nutrients, explaining 67% and 80% of total variation. The discriminate analysis using the factor scores revealed overall 56% of adolescent boys, and 53% of girls were correctly classified. About 46% of boys who were actually thin were predicted as normal, while, 40% who were normal were predicted as thin. Among girls 50% who were actually thin were predicted as normal, while, 36% who were normal were predicted as thin. In conclusions, there exists considerable relationship between dietary patterns and nutritional status among rural adolescents.

  10. Structural Factors Affecting Health Examination Behavioral Intention

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Huang, Hui-Ting; Kuo, Yu-Ming; Wang, Shiang-Ru; Wang, Chia-Fen; Tsai, Chung-Hung

    2016-01-01

    .... Here, we used the health belief model as a foundation and integrated social psychological factors and investigated the factors influencing health examination behavioral intention among the public in Taiwan...

  11. Iterative Knowledge-Based Scoring Functions Derived from Rigid and Flexible Decoy Structures: Evaluation with the 2013 and 2014 CSAR Benchmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chengfei; Grinter, Sam Z; Merideth, Benjamin Ryan; Ma, Zhiwei; Zou, Xiaoqin

    2016-06-27

    In this study, we developed two iterative knowledge-based scoring functions, ITScore_pdbbind(rigid) and ITScore_pdbbind(flex), using rigid decoy structures and flexible decoy structures, respectively, that were generated from the protein-ligand complexes in the refined set of PDBbind 2012. These two scoring functions were evaluated using the 2013 and 2014 CSAR benchmarks. The results were compared with the results of two other scoring functions, the Vina scoring function and ITScore, the scoring function that we previously developed from rigid decoy structures for a smaller set of protein-ligand complexes. A graph-based method was developed to evaluate the root-mean-square deviation between two conformations of the same ligand with different atom names and orders due to different file preparations, and the program is freely available. Our study showed that the two new scoring functions developed from the larger training set yielded significantly improved performance in binding mode predictions. For binding affinity predictions, all four scoring functions showed protein-dependent performance. We suggest the development of protein-family-dependent scoring functions for accurate binding affinity prediction.

  12. Effect of Serum Growth Differentiation Factor-15 and the Syntax Score on 2-Year Outcomes in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez-Rodriguez, Alberto; Abreu-Gonzalez, Pedro; Avanzas, Pablo; Consuegra-Sanchez, Luciano

    2016-05-15

    Growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15) is produced by cardiomyocytes and atherosclerotic lesions under stress conditions, but little is known about its relation with severity and complexity of coronary lesions. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between GDF-15 and the syntax score for risk prediction of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) at 2-year follow-up in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTEACS). This is a prospective cohort study of 502 patients with NSTEACS. The syntax score was calculated from baseline coronary angiography. Blood samples were obtained at study entry for the assessment of GDF-15 and high-sensitivity C reactive protein. One hundred and three patients (20.5%) showed MACE at 2-year follow-up. Patients who developed MACE had greater GDF-15 concentrations and syntax score (p syntax score (ρ = 0.45, p syntax score (p syntax score. In conclusion, in patients with NSTEACS, levels of GDF-15 at admission were correlated with the syntax score and independently associated with an increased risk of MACE during 2-year follow-up.

  13. Immunohistochemical expression of Ets-related gene-transcriptional factor in adenocarcinoma prostate and its correlation with Gleason score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Mannan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prostate carcinoma is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in males worldwide. The burden is expected to grow 1.7 million new cases and 499,000 new deaths by 2030. In developing countries such as India, prostate carcinoma will show an increase by 140% in the next few years. Although the diagnosis of prostate carcinoma can usually be made on histological features, now a days many immunohistochemical (IHC markers are used to distinguish it from benign mimickers as well as in predicting prognosis and treatment. Out of these markers, Ets-related gene (ERG product is a proto-oncogene which participates in chromosomal translocations and is frequently over expressed in prostate carcinoma which harbors ERG-transmembrane protease, serine 2 fusion. Materials and Methods: Fifty cases of carcinoma prostate diagnosed in needle biopsies and prostatic chips, in the Department of Pathology of a tertiary care teaching hospital in Punjab, India, were included in the present study. The slides were observed under the light microscope, and Gleason scoring was done using the 2005 International Society of Urological Pathology modified Gleason system. IHC study for ERG expression was done on all the cases, for which anti-ERG monoclonal rabbit clone antibody EP111 (Dako, Denmark was used. Lymphocytes and endothelial cells were taken as in built positive controls for staining. The intensity of ERG positivity was scored as no staining (0, weak staining (+1, moderate staining (+2 and intense staining (+3. The H score was then calculated by multiplying the intensity of the stain with the percentage (0-100 of the cells showing that staining intensity. The H-score has a range of 0-300. The relationship between IHC expression and clinico-pathological parameters was compared and analyzed using Chi-square test. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Majority of patients included in the study were in the age group of 61-80 (84% of the

  14. Understanding latent structures of clinical information logistics: A bottom-up approach for model building and validating the workflow composite score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esdar, Moritz; Hübner, Ursula; Liebe, Jan-David; Hüsers, Jens; Thye, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    Clinical information logistics is a construct that aims to describe and explain various phenomena of information provision to drive clinical processes. It can be measured by the workflow composite score, an aggregated indicator of the degree of IT support in clinical processes. This study primarily aimed to investigate the yet unknown empirical patterns constituting this construct. The second goal was to derive a data-driven weighting scheme for the constituents of the workflow composite score and to contrast this scheme with a literature based, top-down procedure. This approach should finally test the validity and robustness of the workflow composite score. Based on secondary data from 183 German hospitals, a tiered factor analytic approach (confirmatory and subsequent exploratory factor analysis) was pursued. A weighting scheme, which was based on factor loadings obtained in the analyses, was put into practice. We were able to identify five statistically significant factors of clinical information logistics that accounted for 63% of the overall variance. These factors were "flow of data and information", "mobility", "clinical decision support and patient safety", "electronic patient record" and "integration and distribution". The system of weights derived from the factor loadings resulted in values for the workflow composite score that differed only slightly from the score values that had been previously published based on a top-down approach. Our findings give insight into the internal composition of clinical information logistics both in terms of factors and weights. They also allowed us to propose a coherent model of clinical information logistics from a technical perspective that joins empirical findings with theoretical knowledge. Despite the new scheme of weights applied to the calculation of the workflow composite score, the score behaved robustly, which is yet another hint of its validity and therefore its usefulness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland

  15. Lesion Mapping the Four-Factor Structure of Emotional Intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Thomas Operskalski

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Emotional intelligence refers to an individual’s ability to process and respond to emotions, including recognizing the expression of emotions in others, using emotions to enhance thought and decision making, and regulating emotions to drive effective behaviors. Despite their importance for goal-directed social behavior, little is known about the neural mechanisms underlying specific facets of emotional intelligence. Here, we report findings from a study investigating the neural bases of these specific components for emotional intelligence in a sample of 130 combat veterans with penetrating traumatic brain injury. We examined the neural mechanisms underlying experiential (perceiving and using emotional information and strategic (understanding and managing emotions facets of emotional intelligence. Factor scores were submitted to voxel-based lesion symptom mapping to elucidate their neural substrates. The results indicate that two facets of emotional intelligence (perceiving and managing emotions engage common and distinctive neural systems, with shared dependence on the social knowledge network, and selective engagement of the orbitofrontal and parietal cortex for strategic aspects of emotional information processing. The observed pattern of findings suggests that sub-facets of experiential and strategic emotional intelligence can be characterized as separable but related processes that depend upon a core network of brain structures within frontal, temporal and parietal cortex.

  16. Lesion Mapping the Four-Factor Structure of Emotional Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Operskalski, Joachim T.; Paul, Erick J.; Colom, Roberto; Barbey, Aron K.; Grafman, Jordan

    2015-01-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) refers to an individual’s ability to process and respond to emotions, including recognizing the expression of emotions in others, using emotions to enhance thought and decision making, and regulating emotions to drive effective behaviors. Despite their importance for goal-directed social behavior, little is known about the neural mechanisms underlying specific facets of EI. Here, we report findings from a study investigating the neural bases of these specific components for EI in a sample of 130 combat veterans with penetrating traumatic brain injury. We examined the neural mechanisms underlying experiential (perceiving and using emotional information) and strategic (understanding and managing emotions) facets of EI. Factor scores were submitted to voxel-based lesion symptom mapping to elucidate their neural substrates. The results indicate that two facets of EI (perceiving and managing emotions) engage common and distinctive neural systems, with shared dependence on the social knowledge network, and selective engagement of the orbitofrontal and parietal cortex for strategic aspects of emotional information processing. The observed pattern of findings suggests that sub-facets of experiential and strategic EI can be characterized as separable but related processes that depend upon a core network of brain structures within frontal, temporal and parietal cortex. PMID:26858627

  17. Lesion Mapping the Four-Factor Structure of Emotional Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Operskalski, Joachim T; Paul, Erick J; Colom, Roberto; Barbey, Aron K; Grafman, Jordan

    2015-01-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) refers to an individual's ability to process and respond to emotions, including recognizing the expression of emotions in others, using emotions to enhance thought and decision making, and regulating emotions to drive effective behaviors. Despite their importance for goal-directed social behavior, little is known about the neural mechanisms underlying specific facets of EI. Here, we report findings from a study investigating the neural bases of these specific components for EI in a sample of 130 combat veterans with penetrating traumatic brain injury. We examined the neural mechanisms underlying experiential (perceiving and using emotional information) and strategic (understanding and managing emotions) facets of EI. Factor scores were submitted to voxel-based lesion symptom mapping to elucidate their neural substrates. The results indicate that two facets of EI (perceiving and managing emotions) engage common and distinctive neural systems, with shared dependence on the social knowledge network, and selective engagement of the orbitofrontal and parietal cortex for strategic aspects of emotional information processing. The observed pattern of findings suggests that sub-facets of experiential and strategic EI can be characterized as separable but related processes that depend upon a core network of brain structures within frontal, temporal and parietal cortex.

  18. Derivation of factors to estimate daily, fat, protein, and somatic cell score from one milking of cows milked three times daily

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective was to derive factors to predict daily fat (F) and protein (P) yield and somatic cell score (SCS) when milk is sampled once per d for cows milked three times (3x) per d. Daily milk weights were recorded automatically and samples were collected from 8 herds for each milking on test-day ...

  19. Factor Structure of the Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornick, Jessica E.

    2015-01-01

    The current study utilized exercise self-efficacy ratings from undergraduate students to assess the factor structure of the Self-Efficacy to Regulate Exercise Scale (Bandura, 1997, 2006). An exploratory factor analysis (n = 759) indicated a two-factor model solution and three separate confirmatory factor analyses (n = 1,798) supported this…

  20. Factor structure and psychometric properties of the Body Appreciation Scale-2 in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atari, Mohammad

    2016-09-01

    Tylka and Wood-Barcalow (2015b) developed the Body Appreciation Scale-2 (BAS-2) as a psychometrically robust measure that is conceptually consistent with recent findings on positive body image. The present study aimed to examine the factor structure and psychometric properties of the BAS-2 in Iran. Participants were 568 men and 525 women from seven universities in Tehran, Iran. Two exploratory factor analyses were performed on data from women and men separately. Similar to the original English version, the Persian BAS-2 had a one-factor solution. Persian BAS-2 scores had satisfactory convergent validity (indexed by significantly correlations with self-esteem and life satisfaction) and internal consistency. Men had significantly higher scores on BAS-2 compared to women. The present study suggests that the Persian BAS-2 has adequate psychometric properties to assess body appreciation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Examining the factor structure of the Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Shawn M; Li, Jian; Rumrill, Phillip D; Merchant, William; Bishop, Malachy

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the factor structure of the Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale (MSIS-29) to assess its suitability for modeling the impact of MS on a nation-wide sample of individuals from the United States. Investigators completed a Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) to examine the two-factor structure proposed by Hobart et al. [17]. Although the original MSIS-29 factor structure did not fit the data exactly, the hypothesized two-factor model was partially supported in the current data. Implications for future instrument development and rehabilitation practice are discussed.

  2. Low frontal assessment battery score as a risk factor for falling in patients with Hoehn-Yahr Stage III Parkinson's disease: a 2-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Noriyuki; Saeki, Keigo; Kiriyama, Takao; Ueno, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we evaluated factors responsible for falling, including walking speed evaluated with the use of originally designed, suddenly narrowed paths, in patients with Hoehn-Yahr stage III PD. We prospectively studied the same cohort of patients with PD who were followed up for 2 years, to determine predictors of future falls. We performed clinical assessments and evaluated balance in 26 patients. A total of 19 variables including PD-related independent variables, balance investigation-related independent variables and gait independent-related variables were evaluated. The Frontal Assessment Battery (FAB) score (p = 0.002), Tinetti balance (p = 0.009), and gait velocity (p = 0.001) were higher in fallers than in non-fallers. On multiple logistic regression analysis, the FAB score was related to falling (odds ratio = 3.328, p = 0.033, 95% confidence interval = 1.104-10.03). On the FAB, the scores of 'inhibitory control' and 'sensitivity to interference' were significantly lower in fallers than in non-fallers. The use of the originally designed, suddenly narrowed path was the primary reason for demonstrating for the first time that a low FAB score is a risk factor for future falls. Calculation of the FAB score may be useful for predicting the risk of future falls. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Validation and Factor Structure of the French-Language Version of the Emotional Appetite Questionnaire (EMAQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdier, Léna; Lalanne, Christophe; Morvan, Yannick; Kern, Laurence; Romo, Lucia; Berthoz, Sylvie

    2017-01-01

    The concept of Emotional Eating (EE) is increasingly considered to be implicated in overeating and obesity, and in different subtypes of eating disorders. Among the self-report questionnaires assessing EE, the Emotional Appetite Questionnaire (EMAQ) includes recent advances in this area: it evaluates a broad range of emotions and situations both positive and negative, and the way they modulate food intake (decrease, stability, or increase). The main objective of our study was to further investigate the psychometric properties of the French version of the EMAQ in a large sample of students. Participants completed the EMAQ (n = 679), the DEBQ (Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire) (n = 75) and the CIDI-eating disorders screening (Composite International Diagnostic Interview) (n = 604). Factorial structure, reliability, and validity of the EMAQ were tested. Factorial analyses supported a two-factor (Positive and Negative) structure. The internal consistency indices were satisfactory and results suggest good test–retest reliability for the scale. Convergent and discriminant validity were confirmed from the significant correlations observed between the EMAQ scores and the DEBQ-EE subscale scores. Regarding associations with weight, whereas EMAQ negative scores were positively correlated with BMI, EMAQ positive scores were negatively correlated with BMI. Finally, EMAQ scores differed significantly depending on gender and risk for bulimia nervosa. This study supports the validity and the reliability of the EMAQ, which appears to be a promising instrument to better understand individual differences that could modulate food intake. PMID:28386243

  4. Prognostic factors for open globe injuries and correlation of ocular trauma score at a tertiary referral eye care centre in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Rupesh; Wei, Ho Sue; Teoh, Stephen

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate the factors influencing final vision outcome after surgical repair of open globe injuries and to correlate the Ocular trauma score. Retrospective case analysis of patients with open globe injuries at a tertiary referral eye care centre in Singapore was performed. Pre-operative factors affecting final vision outcome in patients with open globe injury and correlation of ocular trauma score in our study with international ocular trauma scoring system was performed. Case records of 172 eyes with open globe injury were analyzed. Mean age was 36. 67 years. Mean follow up was 12.26 m. Males were pre-dominantly affected. Initial visual acuity was ≥ 20/40, 20/50 < 20/200, 20/200- CF, HM- PL and NLP in 24 (14%), 39 (22.7%), 16 (9.3%), 66 (38.4%) and 27 (15.7%) eyes respectively. Final visual acuity was ≤ 20/40, 20/50 < 20/200, 20/200- 1/200, HM- PL and NLP in 76 (44.2%), 28 (16.3%), 11 (6.4%), 30 (17.4%) and 27 (15.7%) eyes respectively. Ocular trauma score in our study correlates with international ocular trauma scoring system. The present study showed pre-operative variables such as mode of injury, pre-operative visual acuity, traumatic cataract, hyphaema, relative afferent papillary defect, vitreous lossand vitreous hemorrhage to be adversely affecting the final vision outcome. Our study showed a good synchrony with international ocular trauma score (OTS) and based on this study we were able to validate application of OTS in Singapore population. Recognizing these factors can help the surgeon in evidence based counseling.

  5. Prognostic factors for open globe injuries and correlation of Ocular Trauma Score at a tertiary referral eye care centre in Singapore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupesh Agrawal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the factors influencing final vision outcome after surgical repair of open globe injuries and to correlate the Ocular trauma score. Materials and Methods: Retrospective case analysis of patients with open globe injuries at a tertiary referral eye care centre in Singapore was performed. Pre-operative factors affecting final vision outcome in patients with open globe injury and correlation of ocular trauma score in our study with international ocular trauma scoring system was performed. Results: Case records of 172 eyes with open globe injury were analyzed. Mean age was 36. 67 years. Mean follow up was 12.26 m. Males were pre-dominantly affected. Initial visual acuity was ≥20/40, 20/50 < 20/200, 20/200- CF, HM- PL and NLP in 24 (14%, 39 (22.7%, 16 (9.3%, 66 (38.4% and 27 (15.7% eyes respectively. Final visual acuity was ≤20/40, 20/50 < 20/200, 20/200- 1/200, HM- PL and NLP in 76 (44.2%, 28 (16.3%, 11 (6.4%, 30 (17.4% and 27 (15.7% eyes respectively. Ocular trauma score in our study correlates with international ocular trauma scoring system. Conclusion: The present study showed pre-operative variables such as mode of injury, pre-operative visual acuity, traumatic cataract, hyphaema, relative afferent papillary defect, vitreous lossand vitreous hemorrhage to be adversely affecting the final vision outcome. Our study showed a good synchrony with international ocular trauma score (OTS and based on this study we were able to validate application of OTS in Singapore population. Recognizing these factors can help the surgeon in evidence based counseling.

  6. Factor structure underlying components of allostatic load.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanne M McCaffery

    Full Text Available Allostatic load is a commonly used metric of health risk based on the hypothesis that recurrent exposure to environmental demands (e.g., stress engenders a progressive dysregulation of multiple physiological systems. Prominent indicators of response to environmental challenges, such as stress-related hormones, sympatho-vagal balance, or inflammatory cytokines, comprise primary allostatic mediators. Secondary mediators reflect ensuing biological alterations that accumulate over time and confer risk for clinical disease but overlap substantially with a second metric of health risk, the metabolic syndrome. Whether allostatic load mediators covary and thus warrant treatment as a unitary construct remains to be established and, in particular, the relation of allostatic load parameters to the metabolic syndrome requires elucidation. Here, we employ confirmatory factor analysis to test: 1 whether a single common factor underlies variation in physiological systems associated with allostatic load; and 2 whether allostatic load parameters continue to load on a single common factor if a second factor representing the metabolic syndrome is also modeled. Participants were 645 adults from Allegheny County, PA (30-54 years old, 82% non-Hispanic white, 52% female who were free of confounding medications. Model fitting supported a single, second-order factor underlying variance in the allostatic load components available in this study (metabolic, inflammatory and vagal measures. Further, this common factor reflecting covariation among allostatic load components persisted when a latent factor representing metabolic syndrome facets was conjointly modeled. Overall, this study provides novel evidence that the modeled allostatic load components do share common variance as hypothesized. Moreover, the common variance suggests the existence of statistical coherence above and beyond that attributable to the metabolic syndrome.

  7. Apgar Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stages Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Apgar Scores Page Content Article Body As soon as your ... the syringe, but is blue; her one minute Apgar score would be 8—two points off because she ...

  8. Is calcium scoring of the coronary arteries necessary for proper management of asymptomatic subjects with classic risk factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard Conti, C

    2010-11-01

    In 2000, I wrote an editorial entitled, "Detecting Coronary Calcium."1 For the past several years there have been numerous publications on this subject. Recently, an article by Min et al, provided some important information about patients with a normal coronary calcium scan and the conversion from a zero calcium score to greater than zero. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. An Analysis of Peer-Reviewed Scores and Impact Factors with Different Citation Time Windows: A Case Study of 28 Ophthalmologic Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xue-Li; Gai, Shuang-Shuang; Zhang, Shi-Le; Wang, Pu

    2015-01-01

    An important attribute of the traditional impact factor was the controversial 2-year citation window. So far, several scholars have proposed using different citation time windows for evaluating journals. However, there is no confirmation whether a longer citation time window would be better. How did the journal evaluation effects of 3IF, 4IF, and 6IF comparing with 2IF and 5IF? In order to understand these questions, we made a comparative study of impact factors with different citation time windows with the peer-reviewed scores of ophthalmologic journals indexed by Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE) database. The peer-reviewed scores of 28 ophthalmologic journals were obtained through a self-designed survey questionnaire. Impact factors with different citation time windows (including 2IF, 3IF, 4IF, 5IF, and 6IF) of 28 ophthalmologic journals were computed and compared in accordance with each impact factor's definition and formula, using the citation analysis function of the Web of Science (WoS) database. An analysis of the correlation between impact factors with different citation time windows and peer-reviewed scores was carried out. Although impact factor values with different citation time windows were different, there was a high level of correlation between them when it came to evaluating journals. In the current study, for ophthalmologic journals' impact factors with different time windows in 2013, 3IF and 4IF seemed the ideal ranges for comparison, when assessed in relation to peer-reviewed scores. In addition, the 3-year and 4-year windows were quite consistent with the cited peak age of documents published by ophthalmologic journals. Our study is based on ophthalmology journals and we only analyze the impact factors with different citation time window in 2013, so it has yet to be ascertained whether other disciplines (especially those with a later cited peak) or other years would follow the same or similar patterns. We designed the survey questionnaire

  10. Clinical study on HAT and SEDAN score scales and related risk factors for predicting hemorrhagic transformation following thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng WEI

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the value of HAT and SEDAN score scales in predicting hemorrhagic transformation (HT following the recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA intravenous thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke patients and risk factors affecting HT.  Methods A total of 143 patients with acute ischemic stroke underwent rt-PA intravenous thrombolysis within 4.50 h of onset and their clinical data were collected. According to head CT after thrombolysis, patients were divided into HT group (18 cases and non-HT group (125 cases. Single factor analysis was used to assess differences in HAT and SEDAN score scales and related risk factors of ischemic stroke in 2 groups, and further Logistic regression analysis was used to investigate independent predictors of HT. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve was used to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of HAT and SEDAN score scales in predicting HT.  Results Univariate Logistic regression analysis showed that history of atrial fibrillation (AF, admission systolic blood pressure (SBP, admission blood glucose level, early low density of head CT, thrombolytic time window, National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS, HAT and SEDAN scores were all risk factors for HT after thrombolysis (P < 0.05, for all. Multivariate Logistic regression analysis showed that history of AF (OR = 1.677, 95% CI: 1.332-2.111; P = 0.000, admission SBP (OR = 1.102, 95% CI: 1.009-1.204; P = 0.031, admission blood glucose level (OR = 1.870, 95% CI: 1.119-3.125; P = 0.017, thrombolysis time window (OR = 1.030, 95%CI: 1.009-1.052; P = 0.005, NIHSS score (OR = 1.574, 95%CI: 1.186-2.090; P = 0.002, HAT score (OR = 2.515, 95%CI: 1.273-4.970;P = 0.008 and SEDAN score (OR = 2.413, 95%CI: 1.123-5.185; P = 0.024 were risk factors for HT after thrombolysis. ROC curve analysis showed that HAT score could predict HT with 94.40% sensitivity and 41.60% specificity, and area under curve (AUC was 0.70. SEDAN

  11. NAC transcription factors: structurally distinct, functionally diverse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Addie Nina; Ernst, Heidi A; Leggio, Leila Lo;

    2005-01-01

    NAC proteins constitute one of the largest families of plant-specific transcription factors, and the family is present in a wide range of land plants. Here, we summarize the biological and molecular functions of the NAC family, paying particular attention to the intricate regulation of NAC protei...

  12. A Study of Quasicrystal Structure Factors by Using Quantitative CBED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The procedure of simulating convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) pattern of quasicrystals by dynamical theory is described. The simulated patterns are generally coincide with the experimental patterns. The variations of intensity distribution in CBED pattern with the amplitude and phase of the structure factor of quasicrystai are caiculated with dynamical theory. The sensitivity of intensity distribution to the structure factor is investigated.

  13. The Structure of Multidimensional Perfectionism: Support for a Bifactor Model With a Dominant General Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Martin M; Saklofske, Donald H

    2016-08-05

    Evidence suggests perfectionism is a multidimensional construct composed of 2 higher order factors: perfectionistic strivings and perfectionistic concerns. However, the substantial overlap between perfectionistic strivings and perfectionistic concerns is problematic, as are the unanswered questions regarding the structure of perfectionism following removal of common variance. This research addressed this through bifactor modeling. Three student samples (N = 742) completed Hewitt and Flett's ( 1991 ) Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale, Frost, Marten, Lahart, and Rosenblate's ( 1990 ) Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale, and Slaney, Rice, Mobley, Trippi, and Ashby's ( 2001 ) Almost Perfect Scale-Revised. Greater support was consistently found for the bifactor model, relative to the 2-factor model. Results suggest the bifactor model best represents the structure of perfectionism and provide preliminary support for the use of a general factor score. Researchers are cautioned that removal of general variance may render the reliability of specific factors (i.e., perfectionistic strivings and perfectionistic concerns) suspect.

  14. Structural Genomics of Bacterial Virulence Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    structure of pXO1-118 shown in its 2fo-fc electron density map. Arginine 74 and the two visible conformations of Phenylalanine 19 are shown. B...the methane monooxygenase hydroxylase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath): implications for substrate gating and component interac- tions. Proteins

  15. Effect of environmental factors on body condition score of Taggar goats under dry land farming in western Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Bushara

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Effects of type of supplementation, season of kidding and litter size on body condition score (BCS at kidding and at weaning time were evaluated in Taggar goats in extensive management under dry land farm. The supplemented groups (2 and 3 had (P0.05 for higher BCS at kidding compared with single and triplet kidders. At weaning time triplets kidder had slightly lower (P<0.05 body condition compared to single and twin kidders.

  16. Regression-Based Norms for a Bi-factor Model for Scoring the Brief Test of Adult Cognition by Telephone (BTACT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnani, Ashita S; John, Samantha E; Gavett, Brandon E

    2015-05-01

    The current study developed regression-based normative adjustments for a bi-factor model of the The Brief Test of Adult Cognition by Telephone (BTACT). Archival data from the Midlife Development in the United States-II Cognitive Project were used to develop eight separate linear regression models that predicted bi-factor BTACT scores, accounting for age, education, gender, and occupation-alone and in various combinations. All regression models provided statistically significant fit to the data. A three-predictor regression model fit best and accounted for 32.8% of the variance in the global bi-factor BTACT score. The fit of the regression models was not improved by gender. Eight different regression models are presented to allow the user flexibility in applying demographic corrections to the bi-factor BTACT scores. Occupation corrections, while not widely used, may provide useful demographic adjustments for adult populations or for those individuals who have attained an occupational status not commensurate with expected educational attainment. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Regression-Based Norms for a Bi-factor Model for Scoring the Brief Test of Adult Cognition by Telephone (BTACT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnani, Ashita S.; John, Samantha E.; Gavett, Brandon E.

    2015-01-01

    The current study developed regression-based normative adjustments for a bi-factor model of the The Brief Test of Adult Cognition by Telephone (BTACT). Archival data from the Midlife Development in the United States-II Cognitive Project were used to develop eight separate linear regression models that predicted bi-factor BTACT scores, accounting for age, education, gender, and occupation-alone and in various combinations. All regression models provided statistically significant fit to the data. A three-predictor regression model fit best and accounted for 32.8% of the variance in the global bi-factor BTACT score. The fit of the regression models was not improved by gender. Eight different regression models are presented to allow the user flexibility in applying demographic corrections to the bi-factor BTACT scores. Occupation corrections, while not widely used, may provide useful demographic adjustments for adult populations or for those individuals who have attained an occupational status not commensurate with expected educational attainment. PMID:25724515

  18. Factor Structure of the TOEFL Internet-Based Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawaki, Yasuyo; Stricker, Lawrence J.; Oranje, Andreas H.

    2009-01-01

    This construct validation study investigated the factor structure of the Test of English as a Foreign Language[TM] Internet-based test (TOEFL[R] iBT). An item-level confirmatory factor analysis was conducted for a test form completed by participants in a field study. A higher-order factor model was identified, with a higher-order general factor…

  19. The Five-Factor Narcissism Inventory (FFNI): a test of the convergent, discriminant, and incremental validity of FFNI scores in clinical and community samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Joshua D; Few, Lauren R; Wilson, Lauren; Gentile, Brittany; Widiger, Thomas A; Mackillop, James; Keith Campbell, W

    2013-09-01

    The five-factor narcissism inventory (FFNI) is a new self-report measure that was developed to assess traits associated with narcissistic personality disorder (NPD), as well as grandiose and vulnerable narcissism from a five-factor model (FFM) perspective. In the current study, the FFNI was examined in relation to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text rev.; DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 2000) NPD, DSM-5 (http://www.dsm5.org) NPD traits, grandiose narcissism, and vulnerable narcissism in both community (N = 287) and clinical samples (N = 98). Across the samples, the FFNI scales manifested good convergent and discriminant validity such that FFNI scales derived from FFM neuroticism were primarily related to vulnerable narcissism scores, scales derived from FFM extraversion were primarily related to grandiose scores, and FFNI scales derived from FFM agreeableness were related to both narcissism dimensions, as well as the DSM-IV and DSM-5 NPD scores. The FFNI grandiose and vulnerable narcissism composites also demonstrated incremental validity in the statistical prediction of these scores, above and beyond existing measures of DSM NPD, grandiose narcissism, and vulnerable narcissism, respectively. The FFNI is a promising measure that provides a comprehensive assessment of narcissistic pathology while maintaining ties to the significant general personality literature on the FFM.

  20. Lord-Wingersky Algorithm Version 2.0 for Hierarchical Item Factor Models with Applications in Test Scoring, Scale Alignment, and Model Fit Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Li

    2015-06-01

    Lord and Wingersky's (Appl Psychol Meas 8:453-461, 1984) recursive algorithm for creating summed score based likelihoods and posteriors has a proven track record in unidimensional item response theory (IRT) applications. Extending the recursive algorithm to handle multidimensionality is relatively simple, especially with fixed quadrature because the recursions can be defined on a grid formed by direct products of quadrature points. However, the increase in computational burden remains exponential in the number of dimensions, making the implementation of the recursive algorithm cumbersome for truly high-dimensional models. In this paper, a dimension reduction method that is specific to the Lord-Wingersky recursions is developed. This method can take advantage of the restrictions implied by hierarchical item factor models, e.g., the bifactor model, the testlet model, or the two-tier model, such that a version of the Lord-Wingersky recursive algorithm can operate on a dramatically reduced set of quadrature points. For instance, in a bifactor model, the dimension of integration is always equal to 2, regardless of the number of factors. The new algorithm not only provides an effective mechanism to produce summed score to IRT scaled score translation tables properly adjusted for residual dependence, but leads to new applications in test scoring, linking, and model fit checking as well. Simulated and empirical examples are used to illustrate the new applications.

  1. Unascertained Factor Method of Dynamic Characteristic Analysis for Antenna Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Zeng-qing; LIANG Zhen-tao; CHEN Jian-jun

    2008-01-01

    The dynamic characteristic analysis model of antenna structures is built, in which the structural physical parameters and geometrical dimensions are all considered as unascertained variables, And a structure dynamic characteristic analysis method based on the unascertained factor method is given. The computational expression of structural characteristic is developed by the mathematics expression of unascertained factor and the principles of unascertained rational numbers arithmetic. An example is given, in which the possible values and confidence degrees of the unascertained structure characteristics are obtained. The calculated results show that the method is feasible and effective.

  2. Maslach Burnout Inventory: factor structures for pharmacists in health maintenance organizations and comparison with normative data for USA pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupchup, G V; Lively, B T; Holiday-Goodman, M; Siganga, W W; Black, C D

    1994-06-01

    This study compared the factor structure and burnout scores obtained on the Maslach Burnout Inventory from 84 pharmacists in Health Maintenance Organizations (HMO) with the normative data for USA pharmacists. Results provided empirical support for the reliability and validity of the inventory to measure burnout within the profession of pharmacy. Values of Cronbach coefficient alpha for subscales of Emotional Exhaustion, Depersonalization, and Personal Accomplishment were similar to those obtained with the normative sample. Factor analysis was conducted to yield the best three-factor solution. Derived factor loadings matched the three hypothesized subscales. On Personal Accomplishment the mean subscale score for HMO pharmacists was significantly higher than the normative score. Given limitations of the small sample, research is indicated to substantiate use of the inventory among HMO pharmacists.

  3. Posttraumatic growth inventory: factor structure in Spanish-speaking people living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido-Hernansaiz, Helena; Rodríguez-Rey, Rocío; Alonso-Tapia, Jesús

    2017-10-01

    This cross-sectional study analyzed the factorial structure of the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI) in a sample of 304 Spanish-speaking HIV-positive adults. Participants completed the PTGI and a socio-demographic questionnaire. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was carried out through structural equations modeling, with a Varimax rotation. Factors with eigenvalues greater than 1 were extracted, and items with loadings higher than .5 on a factor and lower than .4 on the rest were retained. Two confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) were performed to test a hierarchical model and a bifactor model. Reliability analyses were conducted. EFA suggested a three-factor model keeping 11 of the original 21 items. The three factors that emerged were changes in philosophy of life, in the self and in interpersonal relationships. CFAs suggested that only the bifactor model fitted the data. The three factors as well as the global scale showed good reliability. The factor structure of PTGI's scores in our data is consistent with the three dimensions theorized by Tedeschi and Calhoun, which speaks in favor of the construct validity of this measure.

  4. Identification of the underlying factor structure of the Derriford Appearance Scale 24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Timothy P; Lawson, Victoria; White, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background. The Derriford Appearance Scale24 (DAS24) is a widely used measure of distress and dysfunction in relation to self-consciousness of appearance. It has been used in clinical and research settings, and translated into numerous European and Asian languages. Hitherto, no study has conducted an analysis to determine the underlying factor structure of the scale. Methods. A large (n = 1,265) sample of community and hospital patients with a visible difference were recruited face to face or by post, and completed the DAS24. Results. A two factor solution was generated. An evaluation of the congruence of the factor solutions on each of the the hospital and the community samples using Tucker's Coefficient of Congruence (rc = .979) and confirmatory factor analysis, which demonstrated a consistent factor structure. A main factor, general self consciousness (GSC), was represented by 18 items. Six items comprised a second factor, sexual and body self-consciousness (SBSC). The SBSC scale demonstrated greater sensitivity and specificity in identifying distress for sexually significant areas of the body. Discussion. The factor structure of the DAS24 facilitates a more nuanced interpretation of scores using this scale. Two conceptually and statistically coherent sub-scales were identified. The SBSC sub-scale offers a means of identifying distress and dysfunction around sexually significant areas of the body not previously possible with this scale.

  5. Identification of the underlying factor structure of the Derriford Appearance Scale 24

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy P. Moss

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. The Derriford Appearance Scale24 (DAS24 is a widely used measure of distress and dysfunction in relation to self-consciousness of appearance. It has been used in clinical and research settings, and translated into numerous European and Asian languages. Hitherto, no study has conducted an analysis to determine the underlying factor structure of the scale.Methods. A large (n = 1,265 sample of community and hospital patients with a visible difference were recruited face to face or by post, and completed the DAS24.Results. A two factor solution was generated. An evaluation of the congruence of the factor solutions on each of the the hospital and the community samples using Tucker’s Coefficient of Congruence (rc = .979 and confirmatory factor analysis, which demonstrated a consistent factor structure. A main factor, general self consciousness (GSC, was represented by 18 items. Six items comprised a second factor, sexual and body self-consciousness (SBSC. The SBSC scale demonstrated greater sensitivity and specificity in identifying distress for sexually significant areas of the body.Discussion. The factor structure of the DAS24 facilitates a more nuanced interpretation of scores using this scale. Two conceptually and statistically coherent sub-scales were identified. The SBSC sub-scale offers a means of identifying distress and dysfunction around sexually significant areas of the body not previously possible with this scale.

  6. Cardiac risk factors and risk scores vs cardiac computed tomography angiography: a prospective cohort study for triage of ED patients with acute chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Ethan J; Deutsch, Jacob P; Hannaway, Maria M; Estepa, Adrian T; Kenia, Anand S; Neuburger, Kenneth J; Levin, David C

    2013-10-01

    The objective of the study is to evaluate cardiac risk factors and risk scores for prediction of coronary artery disease (CAD) and adverse outcomes in an emergency department (ED) population judged to be at low to intermediate risk for acute coronary syndrome. Informed consent was obtained from consecutive ED patients who presented with chest pain and were evaluated with coronary computed tomography angiography (cCTA). Cardiac risk factors, clinical presentation, electrocardiogram, and laboratory studies were recorded; the Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) scores were tabulated. Coronary computed tomography angiography findings were rated on a 6-level plaque burden scale and classified for significant CAD (stenosis ≥50%). Adverse cardiovascular outcomes were recorded at 30 days. Among 250 patients evaluated by cCTA, 143 (57%) had no CAD, 64 (26%) demonstrated minimal plaque (70% stenosis). Six patients developed adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Among traditional cardiac risk factors, only age (older) and sex (male) were significant independent predictors of CAD. Correlation with CAD was poor for the TIMI (r = 0.12) and GRACE (r = 0.09-0.23) scores. The TIMI and GRACE scores were not useful to predict adverse outcomes. Coronary computed tomography angiography identified severe CAD in all subjects with adverse outcomes. Among ED patients who present with chest pain judged to be at low to intermediate risk for acute coronary syndrome, traditional risk factors are not useful to stratify risk for CAD and adverse outcomes. Coronary computed tomography angiography is an excellent predictor of CAD and outcome. © 2013.

  7. Factor structure of PTSD, and relation with gender in trauma survivors from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruby Charak

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The factor structure of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD has been extensively studied in Western countries. Some studies have assessed its factor structure in Asia (China, Sri Lanka, and Malaysia, but few have directly assessed the factor structure of PTSD in an Indian adult sample. Furthermore, in a largely patriarchal society in India with strong gender roles, it becomes imperative to assess the association between the factors of PTSD and gender. Objective: The purpose of the present study was to assess the factor structure of PTSD in an Indian sample of trauma survivors based on prevailing models of PTSD defined in the DSM-IV-TR (APA, 2000, and to assess the relation between PTSD factors and gender. Method: The sample comprised of 313 participants (55.9% female from Jammu and Kashmir, India, who had experienced a natural disaster (N=200 or displacement due to cross-border firing (N=113. Results: Three existing PTSD models—two four-factor models (Emotional Numbing and Dysphoria, and a five-factor model (Dysphoric Arousal—were tested using Confirmatory Factor Analysis with addition of gender as a covariate. The three competing models had similar fit indices although the Dysphoric Arousal model fit significantly better than Emotional Numbing and Dysphoria models. Gender differences were found across the factors of Re-experiencing and Anxious arousal. Conclusions: Findings indicate that the Dysphoric Arousal model of PTSD was the best model; albeit the fit indices of all models were fairly similar. Compared to males, females scored higher on factors of Re-experiencing and Anxious arousal. Gender differences found across two factors of PTSD are discussed in light of the social milieu in India.

  8. Use of factor scores for predicting body weight from linear body measurements in three South African indigenous chicken breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malomane, Dorcus Kholofelo; Norris, David; Banga, Cuthbert B; Ngambi, Jones W

    2014-02-01

    Body weight and weight of body parts are of economic importance. It is difficult to directly predict body weight from highly correlated morphological traits through multiple regression. Factor analysis was carried out to examine the relationship between body weight and five linear body measurements (body length, body girth, wing length, shank thickness, and shank length) in South African Venda (VN), Naked neck (NN), and Potchefstroom koekoek (PK) indigenous chicken breeds, with a view to identify those factors that define body conformation. Multiple regression was subsequently performed to predict body weight, using orthogonal traits derived from the factor analysis. Measurements were obtained from 210 chickens, 22 weeks of age, 70 chickens per breed. High correlations were obtained between body weight and all body measurements except for wing length in PK. Two factors extracted after varimax rotation explained 91, 95, and 83% of total variation in VN, NN, and PK, respectively. Factor 1 explained 73, 90, and 64% in VN, NN, and PK, respectively, and was loaded on all body measurements except for wing length in VN and PK. In a multiple regression, these two factors accounted for 72% variation in body weight in VN, while only factor 1 accounted for 83 and 74% variation in body weight in NN and PK, respectively. The two factors could be used to define body size and conformation of these breeds. Factor 1 could predict body weight in all three breeds. Body measurements can be better selected jointly to improve body weight in these breeds.

  9. Psychopathy and violence: Does antisocial cognition mediate the relationship between the PCL: YV factor scores and violent offending?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Glenn D; DeLisi, Matt

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether proactive and reactive antisocial cognition mediate the effect of Factors 1 (core personality features) and 2 (behavioral deviance) of the Psychopathy Checklist: Youth Version (PCL: YV; Forth, Kosson, & Hare, 2003) on violent offending. In this study Bandura et al.'s (1996) Moral Disengagement (MD) scale and the Impulse Control (IC) scale of the Weinberger Adjustment Inventory (WAI; Weinberger & Schwartz, 1990) served as proxies for proactive and reactive antisocial cognition, respectively. It was hypothesized that proactive antisocial cognition (MD) would mediate the Factor 1-violence relationship and that both proactive antisocial cognition and reactive antisocial cognition (IC) would mediate the Factor 2-violence relationship. A 3-wave path analysis of data from 1,354 adjudicated delinquents produced results consistent with the first part of the hypothesis (i.e., proactive antisocial mediation of the Factor 1-violence relationship) but inconsistent with the second part of the hypothesis (i.e., only proactive antisocial cognition mediated the Factor 2-violence relationship). Whereas the direct path from Factor 1 to violent offending was no longer significant when MD and IC were taken into account, the direct path from Factor 2 to violent offender remained significant even after MD and IC were included as mediators. This suggests that whereas proactive antisocial cognition plays a major role in mediating the Factor 1-violence relationship, the Factor 2-violence relationship is mediated by proactive antisocial cognition and variables not included or not adequately covered in the current study.

  10. On the Mathematical Relationship Between Latent Change Score and Autoregressive Cross-Lagged Factor Approaches: Cautions for Inferring Causal Relationship Between Variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usami, Satoshi; Hayes, Timothy; McArdle, John J

    2015-01-01

    The present paper focuses on the relationship between latent change score (LCS) and autoregressive cross-lagged (ARCL) factor models in longitudinal designs. These models originated from different theoretical traditions for different analytic purposes, yet they share similar mathematical forms. In this paper, we elucidate the mathematical relationship between these models and show that the LCS model is reduced to the ARCL model when fixed effects are assumed in the slope factor scores. Additionally, we provide an applied example using height and weight data from a gerontological study. Throughout the example, we emphasize caution in choosing which model (ARCL or LCS) to apply due to the risk of obtaining misleading results concerning the presence and direction of causal precedence between two variables. We suggest approaching model specification not only by comparing estimates and fit indices between the LCS and ARCL models (as well as other models) but also by giving appropriate weight to substantive and theoretical considerations, such as assessing the justifiability of the assumption of random effects in the slope factor scores.

  11. Revisiting the Leadership Scale for Sport: Examining Factor Structure Through Exploratory Structural Equation Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Weisheng; Rodriguez, Fernando M; Won, Doyeon

    2016-10-01

    This study examines the factor structure of the shortened version of the Leadership Scale for Sport, through a survey of 201 collegiate swimmers at National Collegiate Athletic Association Division II and III institutions, using both exploratory structural equation modeling and confirmatory factor analysis. Both exploratory structural equation modeling and confirmatory factor analysis showed that a five-factor solution fit the data adequately. The sizes of factor loadings on target factors substantially differed between the confirmatory factor analysis and exploratory structural equation modeling solutions. In addition, the inter-correlations between factors of the Leadership Scale for Sport and the correlations with athletes' satisfaction were found to be inflated in the confirmatory factor analysis solution. Overall, the findings provide evidence of the factorial validity of the shortened Leadership Scale for Sport.

  12. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1-regulated protein expression and oligodendroglioma patient outcome: comparison with established biomarkers and preoperative UCSF low-grade scoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Shirley; Hu, Nan; Jensen, Randy

    2012-07-01

    Methods for predicting outcome for patients with oligodendrogliomas and anaplastic oligodendrogliomas (AOs) are limited. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) controls many proteins involved in glycolysis and angiogenesis including VEGF, Glut-1, and CA-IX. We examined whether expression of HIF-1α and other hypoxia-regulated molecules (HRM) can predict overall (OS) and progression-free (PFS) survival. We correlated these data with more established biomarkers and a published preoperative scoring system. We prospectively collected tissue samples and followed outcomes of 50 patients with oligodendrogliomas and 32 with AOs. Tumor tissues were stained for measures of proliferative index, microvascular density, IDH-1 mutational status, and HRMs. We retrospectively analyzed preoperative imaging and clinical data based on the UCSF Scoring System (good prognostic indicators: Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) score > 80, age oligodendrogliomas. Both 1p19q codeletion and IDH-1 mutation predict outcome of patients with both oligodendroglioma and AO. The UCSF score is a strong predictor for oligodendrogliomas patient outcome and is strengthened by IDH-1 and 1p19q status. Glut-1 may be useful in predicting PFS in AOs. Proliferation index >5 for oligodendrogliomas and KPS ≤ 80 for AOs predict a worse prognosis. Immunohistochemical markers of HRMs show a significantly higher expression in anaplastic variants of oligodendrogliomas and may contribute to the prediction of survival in these patients.

  13. Importance of prostate-specific antigen (PSA as a predictive factor for concordance between the Gleason scores of prostate biopsies and RADICAL prostatectomy specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Gianni de Lima

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the concordance between the Gleason scores of prostate biopsies and radical prostatectomy specimens, thereby highlighting the importance of the prostate-specific antigen (PSA level as a predictive factor of concordance. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 253 radical prostatectomy cases performed between 2006 and 2011. The patients were divided into 4 groups for the data analysis and dichotomized according to the preoperative PSA, <10 ng/mL and ≥10 ng/mL. A p-score <0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS: The average patient age was 63.3±7.8 years. The median PSA level was 9.3±4.9 ng/mL. The overall concordance between the Gleason scores was 52%. Patients presented preoperative PSA levels <10 ng/mL in 153 of 235 cases (65% and ≥10 ng/mL in 82 of 235 cases (35%. The Gleason scores were identical in 86 of 153 cases (56% in the <10 ng/mL group and 36 of 82 (44% cases in the ≥10 ng/mL group (p = 0.017. The biopsy underestimated the Gleason score in 45 (30% patients in the <10 ng/mL group and 38 (46% patients in the ≥10 ng/mL (p = 0.243. Specifically, the patients with Gleason 3 + 3 scores according to the biopsies demonstrated global concordance in 56 of 110 cases (51%. In this group, the patients with preoperative PSA levels <10 ng/dL had higher concordance than those with preoperative PSA levels ≥10 ng/dL (61% x 23%, p = 0.023, which resulted in 77% upgrading after surgery in those patients with PSA levels ≥10 ng/dl. CONCLUSION: The Gleason scores of needle prostate biopsies and those of the surgical specimens were concordant in approximately half of the global sample. The preoperative PSA level was a strong predictor of discrepancy and might improve the identification of those patients who tended to be upgraded after surgery, particularly in patients with Gleason scores of 3 + 3 in the prostate biopsy and preoperative PSA levels ≥10 ng/mL.

  14. Methodological comparison of marginal structural model, time-varying Cox regression, and propensity score methods : the example of antidepressant use and the risk of hip fracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, M Sanni; Groenwold, Rolf H H; Belitser, S.; Souverein, Patrick C; Martín, Elisa; Gatto, Nicolle M; Huerta, Consuelo; Gardarsdottir, Helga; Roes, Kit C B; Hoes, Arno W; de Boer, Anthonius; Klungel, Olaf H

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Observational studies including time-varying treatments are prone to confounding. We compared time-varying Cox regression analysis, propensity score (PS) methods, and marginal structural models (MSMs) in a study of antidepressant [selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs)] use and

  15. Sequential Temporal Dependencies in Associations between Symptoms of Depression and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: An Application of Bivariate Latent Difference Score Structural Equation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Daniel W.; King, Lynda A.; McArdle, John J.; Shalev, Arieh Y.; Doron-LaMarca, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are highly comorbid conditions that may arise following exposure to psychological trauma. This study examined their temporal sequencing and mutual influence using bivariate latent difference score structural equation modeling. Longitudinal data from 182 emergency room patients revealed level of…

  16. 'Mum never loved me.' How structural factors influence adolescent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    How structural factors influence adolescent sexual and reproductive health ... Research in high income countries shows parent–child connectedness to be ... to young people's low self-esteem and risky sexual behaviour while unplanned ...

  17. Maximum Likelihood Factor Structure of the Family Environment Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Patrick C.

    1981-01-01

    Presents the maximum likelihood factor structure of the Family Environment Scale. The first bipolar dimension, "cohesion v conflict," measures relationship-centered concerns, while the second unipolar dimension is an index of "organizational and control" activities. (Author)

  18. Matrix factorization method for the Hamiltonian structure of integrable systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Ghosh; B Talukdar; S Chakraborti

    2003-07-01

    We demonstrate that the process of matrix factorization provides a systematic mathematical method to investigate the Hamiltonian structure of non-linear evolution equations characterized by hereditary operators with Nijenhuis property.

  19. Bacterial Sigma Factors and Anti-Sigma Factors: Structure, Function and Distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Paget, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Sigma factors are multi-domain subunits of bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) that play critical roles in transcription initiation, including the recognition and opening of promoters as well as the initial steps in RNA synthesis. This review focuses on the structure and function of the major sigma-70 class that includes the housekeeping sigma factor (Group 1) that directs the bulk of transcription during active growth, and structurally-related alternative sigma factors (Groups 2–4) that control ...

  20. Conceptualizing schizotypal ambivalence: factor structure and its relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacAulay, Rebecca K; Brown, Laura S; Minor, Kyle S; Cohen, Alex S

    2014-11-01

    Ambivalence is an important facet of pathology that has received limited attention despite its importance in understanding negative emotionality within schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Central to understanding the role of ambivalence in schizophrenia is characterizing its manifestation within schizotypal individuals-those with the purported genetic liability for schizophrenia. The present study used the Schizotypal Ambivalence Scale (SAS) to examine the nature of ambivalence. An exploratory factor analysis of SAS scores revealed three factors: interpersonal, indecision, and contradictory feelings of ambivalence. Group differences in SAS scores were found such that psychometrically defined schizotypal individuals reported higher levels of ambivalence than controls, and different schizotypy traits exhibited different relationships with SAS factors and quality of life. The inclusion of implicit and explicit measures of positive and negative attitudes revealed that individuals with schizotypy might lack insight into their affective experiences as suggested by the incongruence between our explicit and implicit measures of social attitudes. As hypothesized, the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire trait dimensions associated with greater SAS ambivalence and the different trait dimensions of schizotypy showed both common and disparate relationships with the ambivalence factors. The current results support the notion that schizotypal ambivalence is a multifaceted construct that not only is affective but also reflects broader processes that dynamically interact with one another to influence functional outcomes.

  1. Investigating the factor structure of the Questionnaire on Smoking Urges-Brief (QSU-Brief).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toll, Benjamin A; Katulak, Nicole A; McKee, Sherry A

    2006-07-01

    This study was designed to investigate the proposed two-factor structure of the 10-item Questionnaire on Smoking Urges-Brief (QSU-Brief) and to provide evidence for the psychometric properties of this questionnaire using the seven-point scoring set from the original QSU study [Tiffany, S.T., Drobes, D.J. (1991). The development and initial validation of a questionnaire on smoking urges. British Journal of Addiction, 86, 1467-1476.]. The study sample (N=576) was comprised of smokers presenting for treatment. Although an initial exploratory factor analysis appeared to replicate the original factor analytic findings of Cox et al. [Cox, L.S., Tiffany, S.T., Christen, A.G. (2001). Evaluation of the brief questionnaire of smoking urges (QSU-Brief) in laboratory and clinical settings. Nicotine and Tobacco Research, 3, 7-16.], when subjected to confirmatory factor analyses, a five-item, two-factor model using the most robust items from the original QSU-Brief factor analysis was the best explanation of the data in the present study. Good internal consistency reliability estimates were also obtained with this model. These results suggest that this shortened form of the QSU-Brief can be used with the original seven-point scoring set as a reliable assessment of the dual nature of smoking urges in a treatment-seeking population.

  2. Score Correlation

    OpenAIRE

    Fabián, Z. (Zdeněk)

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we study a distribution-dependent correlation coefficient based on the concept of scalar score. This new measure of association of continuous random variables is compared by means of simulation experiments with the Pearson, Kendall and Spearman correlation coefficients.

  3. Structure factor determination of amorphous materials by neutron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuello, Gabriel J [Institut Laue Langevin, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP 156, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)], E-mail: cuello@ill.eu

    2008-06-18

    An introduction is given to structure factor determination by means of neutron diffraction. The method of isotopic substitution, which allows us to separate the partial correlation functions, is also presented. Suitable instruments, the experimental procedures, and corrections are described. Other less-conventional techniques such as isomorphic substitution and anomalous dispersion are also discussed. Finally, examples of the structure factor determination in chalcogenide, molecular, telluride and phosphate glasses are discussed in order to illustrate the usefulness of the neutron diffraction technique.

  4. Electroluminescence and Photoluminescence from Scored Si-Rich SiO2 Film/p-Si Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冉广照; 孙永科; 陈源; 戴伦; 崔晓明; 张伯蕊; 乔永平; 马振昌; 宗婉华; 秦国刚

    2003-01-01

    Electroluminescence (EL) is observed from the Au/Si-rich SiO2 film/p-Si diodes, in which the Si-rich SiO2 films are scored deliberately by a diamond tip. The EL intensity of the scored diode annealed at 800°C is about 6times of that of the unscored counterpart. The EL spectrum of the unscored diode could be decomposed into two Gaussian luminescence bands with peaks at about 1.83 and 2.23 eV, while for the EL spectrum of the scored diode, an additional Gaussian band at about 3.0eV appears, and the 1.83-eV peak increases significantly in intensity. The photoluminescence (PL) spectrum of an unscored Si-rich SiO2 film has only one band peaking at about 1.48eV, whereas the PL spectrum of the scored one has two bands at about 1.48 and 1.97eV. We consider that the high-density defect regions produced by the scoring provide new luminescence centres and become some types of nonradiative centres in the Si oxide layer, which thus result in changes of the EL and PL spectra.

  5. Electroluminescence and Photoluminescence from Scored Si-Rich SiO2 Film/p-Si Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Guang-Zhao; Sun, Yong-Ke; Chen, Yuan; Dai, Lun; Cui, Xiao-Ming; Zhang, Bo-Rui; Qiao, Yong-Ping; Ma, Zhen-Chang; Zong, Wan-Hua; Qin, Guo-Gang

    2003-02-01

    Electroluminescence (EL) is observed from the Au/Si-rich SiO2 film/p-Si diodes, in which the Si-rich SiO2 films are scored deliberately by a diamond tip. The EL intensity of the scored diode annealed at 800°C is about 6 times of that of the unscored counterpart. The EL spectrum of the unscored diode could be decomposed into two Gaussian luminescence bands with peaks at about 1.83 and 2.23 eV, while for the EL spectrum of the scored diode, an additional Gaussian band at about 3.0 eV appears, and the 1.83-eV peak increases significantly in intensity. The photoluminescence (PL) spectrum of an unscored Si-rich SiO2 film has only one band peaking at about 1.48 eV, whereas the PL spectrum of the scored one has two bands at about 1.48 and 1.97 eV. We consider that the high-density defect regions produced by the scoring provide new luminescence centres and become some types of nonradiative centres in the Si oxide layer, which thus result in changes of the EL and PL spectra.

  6. Factor Structure of Social Cognition in Schizophrenia: Is Empathy Preserved?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Corbera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Social cognitive impairments are core features of schizophrenia and are closely associated with poor functional outcome. This study sought to identify specific aspects of social cognition and their relationships to measures of social function, quality of life, and neurocognition. Principal component analysis was performed using social cognitive measures in patients with schizophrenia and healthy matched controls and revealed three factors: Interpersonal Discomfort, Basic Social Cognition, and Empathy. Patients had higher scores on Interpersonal Discomfort and lower scores on Basic Social Cognition than controls, but the two groups were the same on Empathy. Lower social performance was significantly correlated with poor Basic Social Cognition in patients and with high Interpersonal Discomfort in controls. While neurocognition was significantly associated with Basic Social Cognition in both groups, it was not associated with Empathy. Social cognitive interventions should emphasize improving basic social cognitive processing deficits, managing Interpersonal Discomfort, and utilizing preserved capacity for empathy as a potential strength in social interactions.

  7. Structure and regulatory function of plant transcription factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The expression of inducible genes in plants is regulated byspecific transcription factors at the transcriptional level. A typical transcription factor usually contains a DNA-binding domain, a transcription regulation domain, a dimerization site and a nuclear localization domain. These functional domains define the characteristic, localization and regulatory role of a transcription factor. Transcription factors recognize and bind to specific cis-acting elements or interact with other proteins, and then activate or repress the transcription of target genes by their functional domains. In recent years, elucidation on the structure and function of transcription factors has become an important subject in plant molecular biology.

  8. A propensity score analysis of prehospital factors and directness of transport of major trauma patients to a level I trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garwe, Tabitha; Cowan, Linda D; Neas, Barbara R; Sacra, John C; Albrecht, Roxie M; Rich, Katy M

    2011-01-01

    Indications for direct transport may be strongly related to risk of future health outcomes, and these indications may not be adequately controlled by considering only in-hospital variables. This study was designed to identify prehospital factors associated with directness of transport. The study included 2,062 patients treated at a Level I trauma center between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2007. The outcome of interest was directness of transport to a Level I trauma center. A propensity score analysis was used to identify demographic, clinical, distance, and other injury scene-related variables associated with the probability of direct transport. A total of 1,459 patients were directly transported to the Level I trauma center and 603 were transferred from lower level facilities. Patients were more likely to be transported directly if they had lower Glasgow Comma Scale scores, had penetrating injuries, were involved in traffic-related injuries, were closer to a Level IV or I trauma center, and if an advanced life support emergency medical service agency transported them from the scene. Patients were more likely to initially stop if they required advanced airway management, met at least one anatomic criterion, were further away from a Level I trauma center, or closer to an intermediate facility. Confounding due to unadjusted prehospital factors may be present in studies evaluating the impact of directness of transport on short-term mortality outcomes. Propensity score analysis of treatment indications provides an additional and efficient method to reduce this bias.

  9. Exploring the factor structure of neurocognitive measures in older individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Nadine Correia; Costa, Patrício Soares; Amorim, Liliana; Moreira, Pedro Silva; Cunha, Pedro; Cotter, Jorge; Sousa, Nuno

    2015-01-01

    Here we focus on factor analysis from a best practices point of view, by investigating the factor structure of neuropsychological tests and using the results obtained to illustrate on choosing a reasonable solution. The sample (n=1051 individuals) was randomly divided into two groups: one for exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and principal component analysis (PCA), to investigate the number of factors underlying the neurocognitive variables; the second to test the "best fit" model via confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). For the exploratory step, three extraction (maximum likelihood, principal axis factoring and principal components) and two rotation (orthogonal and oblique) methods were used. The analysis methodology allowed exploring how different cognitive/psychological tests correlated/discriminated between dimensions, indicating that to capture latent structures in similar sample sizes and measures, with approximately normal data distribution, reflective models with oblimin rotation might prove the most adequate.

  10. Exploring the factor structure of neurocognitive measures in older individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Correia Santos

    Full Text Available Here we focus on factor analysis from a best practices point of view, by investigating the factor structure of neuropsychological tests and using the results obtained to illustrate on choosing a reasonable solution. The sample (n=1051 individuals was randomly divided into two groups: one for exploratory factor analysis (EFA and principal component analysis (PCA, to investigate the number of factors underlying the neurocognitive variables; the second to test the "best fit" model via confirmatory factor analysis (CFA. For the exploratory step, three extraction (maximum likelihood, principal axis factoring and principal components and two rotation (orthogonal and oblique methods were used. The analysis methodology allowed exploring how different cognitive/psychological tests correlated/discriminated between dimensions, indicating that to capture latent structures in similar sample sizes and measures, with approximately normal data distribution, reflective models with oblimin rotation might prove the most adequate.

  11. Factor Structure of Japanese Versions of Two Emotional Intelligence Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Eriko; Saklofske, Donald H.; Tamaoka, Katsuo; Fung, Tak Shing; Miyaoka, Yayoi; Kiyama, Sachiko

    2011-01-01

    This article reports the psychometric properties of two emotional intelligence measures translated into Japanese. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was conducted to examine the factor structure of a Japanese version of the Wong and Law Emotional Intelligence Scale (WLEIS) completed by 310 Japanese university students. A second study employed CFA…

  12. Children's Depression Inventory: A unidimensional factor structure for American Indian and Alaskan native youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Walter D; Clapp, Joshua; Mileviciute, Inga; Mousseau, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    Given that American Indian and Alaskan Native (AI/AN) youth are at increased risk for a variety of depression-related outcomes and may experience depression uniquely, the fact that the factor structure of the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI; Kovacs, 1992) is unknown for these populations represents a significant obstacle. In Study 1 with an AI youth sample, we conducted confirmatory factor analyses and failed to find support for either of the 2 predominant CDI multifactor models (Craighead, Smucker, Craighead, & Ilardi, 1998; Kovacs, 1992). In subsequent exploratory structural equation modeling, we found the most support for a unidimensional factor structure. In Study 2, using confirmatory modeling with independent AI/AN youth samples, we found further support for this unidimensional model. Finally, in Study 3, we found support across AI/AN groups varying in gender and age for measurement invariance with respect to both factor structure and factor loadings. Overall, for these AI/AN youth populations, our findings support the practice of calculating total CDI scores, and they suggest a unique construction of the depression experience.

  13. 英语B级成绩的影响因素研究%Study of Factors Affecting PRETCO-B Score

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄昌媛

    2014-01-01

    以英语B级考试117名大专学生为研究对象,采用描述统计、t检验、相关分析和回归分析,探讨高考英语成绩和学习者的情感因素对B级成绩的影响。结果表明:(1)学生在考试之前,外语自我效能感处于一个中等水平,英语考试焦虑和计算机使用焦虑水平较高;(2)B级考试及格学生和不及格学生的高考英语成绩和英语考试焦虑存在显著差异;(3)B级考试成绩和高考英语成绩、自我效能感显著正相关,与英语考试焦虑成显著负相关,与计算机使用焦虑的相关性不显著;(4)高考英语成绩和英语考试焦虑为B级考试成绩的显著预测变量。%The present study examined the effect of NCEE (National) College Entrance Examination Score and learners’ emotional factors, including English test anxiety, Computer anxiety and English self-efficacy, on PRETCO-B score. The results indicated: (1) Before the examination, student’s English self-efficacy was in a medium level, while the English Test Anxiety level and Computer Anxiety level were in a high level. (2) The NCEE Score and English Test Anxiety level of PRETCO-B passed students were significantly different from those failed. (3) The PRETCO-B score was positively and significantly correlated with NCEE Score and English self-efficacy, and negatively significantly correlated with English Test Anxiety, while it was not significantly correlated with Computer Anxiety. (4) NCEE Score and English Test Anxiety were predictors of PRETCO-B score.

  14. Influence of environmental factors on corrosion damage of aircraft structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Corrosion is one of the important structural integrity concerns of aging aircraft, and it is estimated that a significant portion of airframe maintenance budgets is directed towards corrosion-related problems for both military and commercial aircraft. In order to better understand how environmental factors influence the corrosion damage initiation and propagation on aircraft structure and to predict pre-corrosion test pieces of fatigue life and structural integrity of an effective approach, this paper uses ...

  15. Risk Adjustment for Congenital Heart Surgery Score as a Risk Factor for Candidemia in Children Undergoing Congenital Heart Defect Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araujo Motta, Fabio; Dalla-Costa, Libera Maria; Dominguez Muro, Marisol; Lenzi, Andrea; Picharski, Gledson Luiz; Burger, Marion

    2016-11-01

    Candida species are the primary cause of invasive fungal infection in hospitalized children. There are few data on risk factors for postoperative candidemia in pediatric patients with congenital heart defects. This study aimed to identify risk factors for candidemia in patients with congenital heart defects who underwent cardiac surgery. This was a case-control study conducted in patients admitted to a pediatric cardiology intensive care unit from January 2006 to December 2013. Candidemia cases were matched with control patients without candidemia. Multivariate analyses were conducted to determine predictive probabilities for the incidence of candidemia at a risk higher than 10%. Thirty patients diagnosed with candidemia (incidence: 0.7 cases/1000 patient days) were matched with 75 controls. Risk factors independently associated with candidemia included Risk Adjustment for Congenital Heart Surgery (RACHS-1) category ≥3 [odds ratio (OR) = 3.165, 95% confidence interval: 1.377-8.467], use of acid suppression therapy (OR = 1.9, 95% confidence interval: 0.949-3.979) and thrombocytopenia (OR = 2.2, 95% confidence interval: 1.2-4.2). Predictive probabilities ranged from 11% (only in RACHS-1 category ≥3) to 58% (combined RACHS-1 ≥3, thrombocytopenia and acid suppression therapy use). The case fatality rate within 30 days after candidemia was 50%. This is the first report using the RACHS-1 category as a risk factor for invasive candidiasis in patients with congenital heart defects in the pediatric intensive care unit. Further studies must be conducted to validate the risk factors for candidemia in this pediatric population.

  16. Factor structure of functional state of primary school age children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davidenko O.V.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The examination of primary school children to determine the ranking of significant factors that determine the structure of their functional state depending on the level of physical health. It is shown that the main factor in the structure of the functional state of younger schoolchildren in low-and lower-middle level of physical fitness is selected morpho-functional status, which characterizes the functions of the body at rest. For children with average or above average level of physical fitness is a leading factor in physical fitness of schoolchildren.

  17. Analyzing the Factorial Structure of the Classroom Assessment Scoring System-Secondary Using a Bayesian Hierarchical Multivariate Ordinal Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Kun; McCaffrey, Daniel F.; Savitsky, Terrance D.

    2013-01-01

    Standardized teaching observation protocols have become increasingly popular in evaluating teaching in recent years. One of such protocols that has gained substantial interest from researchers and practitioners is the Classroom Assessment Scoring System-Secondary (CLASSS). According to the developer, CLASS-S has three domains of teacher-student…

  18. Molecular and structural advances in tissue factor-dependent coagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchhofer, D; Banner, D W

    1997-11-01

    The tissue factor:factor VIIa (TF-F.VIIa) complex is considered the physiological initiator of blood coagulation. Besides its role in normal hemostasis, this enzyme complex has been found to play an important role in various thrombotic disorders and thus has become an attractive target for the development of new anticoagulants. Recently, significant progress has been made in regard to structural and molecular aspects of TF-VIIa-initiated coagulation. A rather complete picture on how tissue factor binds to factor VIIa has emerged and is discussed in detail in this review. Also, the combined data of the TF-F.VIIa crystal structure, of naturally occurring F.VII variants, and of mutagenesis studies provide a framework to discuss molecular aspects of the tissue factor-mediated enhancement of F.VIIa catalytic efficiency and the recognition of macromolecular substrates. F.VIIa as a member of the serine protease family has an active site homologous to other coagulation factors. The release of the coordinates of the crystal structures of F.X and F.IX, together with the earlier determined thrombin structure, now allows a detailed comparison of these active centers with respect to the development of specific and potent active site inhibitors. This structural and molecular information about the TF-F.VIIa complex and other coagulation enzymes adds to our understanding of blood coagulation and should further the development of new classes of anticoagulants. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1997;7:316-324). © 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  19. Description and factors of variation of the overall health score in French dairy cattle herds using the Welfare Quality(®) assessment protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coignard, M; Guatteo, R; Veissier, I; de Boyer des Roches, A; Mounier, L; Lehébel, A; Bareille, N

    2013-11-01

    Extensive information is available in the literature on the specific risk factors of the main health disorders afflicting dairy cattle herds. However, it remains difficult to manage a herd's overall health because measures to control one risk factor can exacerbate the risk of another disease. To achieve and maintain good overall herd health, livestock systems and management practices need to simultaneously take into account all of the main health disorders. We aimed to identify the characteristics of systems and practices conducive to good herd health using the Welfare Quality(®) assessment protocol for cattle. This protocol allows an assessment of the level of health and welfare at the herd level according to the opinion of a selected group of 13 experts from animal sciences. Our objectives were to (i) describe the distribution of dairy herds' health scores in a representative sample of French dairy cattle herds, and (ii) to investigate systems (housing system, milking system, herd size, breed, farm location) and management practices associated with variations of the overall health score of dairy herds. This protocol was carried out on 130 farms between December 2010 and March 2011. A multivariable analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed to investigate the factors of variation of the overall health score at the herd level. The overall health scores of the farms in the sample were classified as moderate for the vast majority of farms (95.4%) (mainly due to subclinical mastitis, dystocia and pain induced by disbudding/dehorning) and varied little between farms. Some livestock systems were associated with a higher overall health score: straw yards and milking parlors (P<0.0001), highland vs. lowland locations (P=0.013), Montbeliarde rather than Holstein breeds (P=0.006). Some management practices also were associated with a higher level of health: medium herd average parity (P=0.03), low proportion of dirty cows (P=0.002) and low proportion of cows with abnormal

  20. Factor Structure in Commodity Futures Return and Volatility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter; Lunde, Asger; Olesen, Kasper Vinther

    Using data on more than 750 million futures trades during 2004-2013, we analyze eight stylized facts of commodity price and volatility dynamics in the post financialization period. We pay particular attention to the factor structure in returns and volatility and to commodity market integration...... with the equity market. We find evidence of a factor structure in daily commodity futures returns. However, the factor structure in daily commodity futures volatility is even stronger than in returns. When computing model-free realized commodity betas with the stock market we find that they were high during 2008......-2010 but have since returned to the pre-crisis level close to zero. The common factor in commodity volatility is nevertheless clearly related to stock market volatility. We conclude that, while commodity markets appear to again be segmented from the equity market when only returns are considered, commodity...

  1. A New Look at the Big Five Factor Structure through Exploratory Structural Equation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Herbert W.; Ludtke, Oliver; Muthen, Bengt; Asparouhov, Tihomir; Morin, Alexandre J. S.; Trautwein, Ulrich; Nagengast, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    NEO instruments are widely used to assess Big Five personality factors, but confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs) conducted at the item level do not support their a priori structure due, in part, to the overly restrictive CFA assumptions. We demonstrate that exploratory structural equation modeling (ESEM), an integration of CFA and exploratory…

  2. Comparative study of factor structure of Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtke, A; Schaller, S

    1980-12-01

    The Raven Coloured Progressive Matrices were administered on group or individual bases to children ranging in age from 4 yr. 9 mo. to 11 yr. 0 mo. (N = 728). Factor analysis yielded three factors: 1. Perceptual closure involving complex figures and patterns with heterogeneous inner structures, 2. Concrete and abstract reasoning, 3. Completion of homogeneous patterns and recognition of given elements. Factor matrix comparisons across age groups resulted in a mean similarity coefficient of .75. Comparisons of data with earlier analyses also resulted in high similarity. This supports the hypothesis of a three-factor structure rather than a four-factor solution or a simple dual classification into items which can be solved by perceptual processes and those which require conceptual solutions.

  3. Bacterial Sigma Factors and Anti-Sigma Factors: Structure, Function and Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paget, Mark S

    2015-06-26

    Sigma factors are multi-domain subunits of bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) that play critical roles in transcription initiation, including the recognition and opening of promoters as well as the initial steps in RNA synthesis. This review focuses on the structure and function of the major sigma-70 class that includes the housekeeping sigma factor (Group 1) that directs the bulk of transcription during active growth, and structurally-related alternative sigma factors (Groups 2-4) that control a wide variety of adaptive responses such as morphological development and the management of stress. A recurring theme in sigma factor control is their sequestration by anti-sigma factors that occlude their RNAP-binding determinants. Sigma factors are then released through a wide variety of mechanisms, often involving branched signal transduction pathways that allow the integration of distinct signals. Three major strategies for sigma release are discussed: regulated proteolysis, partner-switching, and direct sensing by the anti-sigma factor.

  4. Decrypting cryptogenic hepatocellular carcinoma: clinical manifestations, prognostic factors and long-term survival by propensity score model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Yang Hsu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The clinical aspects of cryptogenic hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, defined as HCC in patients without hepatitis B, C or alcoholism, are not clear. We investigated its clinical presentations, long-term survival and prognostic predictors. METHODS: A total of 2645 HCC patients were studied. One-to-one matched pairs between viral/alcoholic and cryptogenic HCC patients were generated by using the propensity model. The survival analysis was performed with the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test, and hazard ratios were calculated with Cox proportional hazards model. RESULTS: Among 366 (14% patients with cryptogenic HCC, 34% of patients were presented with abdominal discomfort, and 31% of patients were identified incidentally. Compared to patients with viral/alcoholic HCC, cryptogenic HCC patients were significantly older (p<0.0001, with poorer performance status (p = 0.0031 and less often underwent curative treatment (p = 0.0041. They also had larger tumor burden (p<0.0001, poorer renal function (p<0.0001, lower α-fetoprotein level (p<0.0001, and more advanced Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer stages (p<0.0001. With propensity score model, 366 pairs of similar HCC patients were selected and similar long-term survival between the two groups of patients was found (p = 0.1038. For cryptogenic HCC patients, α-fetoprotein ≧49 ng/mL (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.955, p = 0.0002, Child-Turcotte-Pugh class B/C (HR: 2.798, p<0.0001, performance status ≧1 (HR: 2.463, p<0.0001 and vascular invasion (HR: 1.608, p = 0.0257 were independent predictors of poor prognosis. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with cryptogenic HCC are usually diagnosed with poor general condition at late stages. However, cryptogenic HCC patients have similar prognostic predictors and long-term survival compared with viral/alcoholic HCC patients. Diagnosis at an early stage may improve their clinical outcomes.

  5. Investigating the factor structure of the Questionnaire on Smoking Urges-Brief (QSU-Brief)

    OpenAIRE

    Toll, Benjamin A.; Katulak, Nicole A.; McKee, Sherry A.

    2005-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the proposed two-factor structure of the 10-item Questionnaire on Smoking Urges-Brief (QSU-Brief) and to provide evidence for the psychometric properties of this questionnaire using the seven-point scoring set from the original QSU study [Tiffany, S.T., Drobes, D.J. (1991). The development and initial validation of a questionnaire on smoking urges. British Journal of Addiction 86, 1467–1476.]. The study sample (N =576) was comprised of smokers presenting...

  6. Psychometric properties of the Spanish version of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy: making sense of the total score through a second order confirmatory factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira-Valente, Alexandra; Costa, Patrício; Elorduy, Marta; Virumbrales, Montserrat; Costa, Manuel J; Palés, Jorge

    2016-09-19

    Empathy is a key aspect of the physician-patient interactions. The Jefferson Scale of Empathy (JSE) is one of the most used empathy measures of medical students. The development of cross-cultural empathy studies depends on valid and reliable translations of the JSE. This study sought to: (1) adapt and assess the psychometric properties in Spanish students of the Spanish JSE validated in Mexican students; (2) test a second order latent factor model. The Spanish JSE was adapted from the Spanish JSE-S, resulting in a final version of the measure. A non-probabilistic sample of 1104 medical students of two Spanish medical schools completed a socio-demographic and the Spanish JSE-S. Descriptive statistics, along with a confirmatory factor analysis, the average variance extracted (AVE), Cronbach's alphas and composite reliability (CR) coefficients were computed. An independent samples t-test was performed to access sex differences. The Spanish JSE-S demonstrated acceptable to good sensitivity (individual items - except for item 2 - and JSE-S total score: -2.72 factor analysis supported the three-factor solution and the second order latent factor model. The findings provide support for the sensitivity, construct validity and reliability of the adapted Spanish JSE-S with Spanish medical students. Data confirm the hypothesized second order latent factor model. This version may be useful in future research examining empathy in Spanish medical students, as well as in cross-cultural studies.

  7. Factor structure and psychometric evaluation of the Connor-Davidson resilience scale in a new employee population of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lei; Tan, Yan; Liu, Yan

    2017-02-02

    In order to find a suitable instrument to evaluate psychological resilience in Chinese new employee population, we intended to propose a possible factorial structure of Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC). Furthermore, we administered to explore its reliability and validity in the present population. Participants were derived from the male new employees who had started working in the last 2-3 months from 12 machinery factories across 8 different provinces of China. Chinese version of CD-RISC was used to assess the resilience of the study participants. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was conducted to assess the possible factor structure, and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to determine which factor structure was the most suitable among the present study sample. The present 4-factor model (tolerance for stress, tenacity, and goal orientation; adaptability and acceptance of change; optimism and sense of security; and trust in one's instinct) of CD-RISC showed good internal consistency, concurrent validity and consistent structure validity, and had presented better data fit than the original 5-factor and the Chinese 3-factor patterns. Each of the present 4-factor structure and the total score of CD-RISC were negatively and significantly associated with Global Severity Index T score and Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire-4+ score. The measure of resilience is useful in screening high-risk employees who are vulnerable to stress. Optimal and tailored interventions can be further applied to avoid potential adverse events in this population. Longitudinal research should be required to determine whether aging and long-term health events can change the nature of resilience.

  8. Is chronic kidney disease an adverse factor in lung cancer clinical outcome? A propensity score matching study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ming‐Shian; Chen, Miao‐Fen; Lin, Chien‐Chao; Tseng, Yuan‐Hsi; Huang, Yao‐Kuang; Liu, Hui‐Ping

    2017-01-01

    Background Comorbidity has a great impact on lung cancer survival. Renal function status may affect treatment decisions and drug toxicity. The survival outcome in lung cancer patients with coexisting chronic kidney disease (CKD) has not been fully evaluated. We hypothesized that CKD is an independent risk factor for mortality in patients with lung cancer. Methods A retrospective, propensity‐matched study of 434 patients diagnosed between June 2004 and May 2012 was conducted. CKD was defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate cancer and coexisting CKD patients were matched 1:1 to patients with lung cancer without CKD. Results Age, gender, smoking status, histology, and lung cancer stage were not statistically significantly different between the CKD and non‐CKD groups. Kaplan–Meier survival analysis demonstrated a median survival of 7.26 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 6.06–8.46) in the CKD group compared with 7.82 months (95% CI 6.33–9.30) in the non‐CKD group (P = 0.41). Lung cancer stage‐specific survival is not affected by CKD. Although lung cancer patients with CKD presented with an increased risk of death of 6%, this result was not statistically significant (hazard ratio 1.06, 95% CI 0.93–1.22; P = 0.41). Conclusion According to our limited experience, CKD is not an independent risk factor for survival in lung cancer patients. Clinicians should not be discouraged to treat lung cancer patients with CKD. PMID:28207203

  9. Investigating the influence of social desirability on personality factor structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellingson, J E; Smith, D B; Sackett, P R

    2001-02-01

    This study provides a comprehensive investigation into whether social desirability alters the factor structure of personality measures. The study brought together 4 large data sets wherein different organizational samples responded to different personality measures. This facilitated conducting 4 separate yet parallel investigations. Within each data set, individuals identified through a social desirability scale as responding in an honest manner were grouped together, and individuals identified as responding in a highly socially desirable manner were grouped together. Using various analyses, the fit of higher order factor structure models was compared across the 2 groups. Results were the same for each data set. Social desirability had little influence on the higher order factor structures that characterized the relationships among the scales of the personality measures.

  10. Using Multilevel Factor Analysis with Clustered Data: Investigating the Factor Structure of the Positive Values Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Francis L.; Cornell, Dewey G.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in multilevel modeling techniques now make it possible to investigate the psychometric properties of instruments using clustered data. Factor models that overlook the clustering effect can lead to underestimated standard errors, incorrect parameter estimates, and model fit indices. In addition, factor structures may differ depending on…

  11. Tissue factor activates allosteric networks in factor VIIa through structural and dynamic changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jesper Jonasson; Persson, E.; Olsen, O. H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tissue factor (TF) promotes colocalization of enzyme (factorVIIa) and substrate (FX or FIX), and stabilizes the active conformation of FVIIa. Details on how TF induces structural and dynamic changes in the catalytic domain of FVIIa to enhance its efficiency remain elusive. Objective...

  12. Identifying the factor structure of the SOCRATES in a sample of Latino adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrow-Sanchez, Jason J

    2014-03-01

    The Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES) is a frequently used measure to assess client motivation to change an alcohol use problem. The factor structure of this measure has most extensively been studied in samples of adult clients with alcohol use disorders with very little research conducted with adolescents or ethnic minority participants. The purpose of the current study is to determine if the factor structure of the SOCRATES (Version 8A-Alcohol) found in prior research can be generalized to a sample of Latino adolescents with substance use disorders. Latino adolescents (N = 106) were administered the SOCRATES and assessed for alcohol use at a pretreatment baseline assessment as part of a larger study. Competing factor models were tested and results via confirmatory factor analysis indicated that a 14-item two factor model best fit the data for the Latino adolescents in this sample. In addition, scores on the Taking Steps factor predicted alcohol use variables. Implications for these results and suggestions for further research are discussed.

  13. A Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Structure of Abbreviated Math Anxiety Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahman Farrokhi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available "nObjective: The aim of this study is to explore the confirmatory factor analysis results of the Persian adaptation of Abbreviated Math Anxiety Scale (AMAS, proposed by Hopko, Mahadevan, Bare & Hunt. "nMethod: The validity and reliability assessments of the scale were performed on 298 college students chosen randomly from Tabriz University in Iran. The confirmatory factor analysis (CFA was carried out to determine the factor structures of the Persian version of AMAS. "nResults: As expected, the two-factor solution provided a better fit to the data than a single factor. Moreover, multi-group analyses showed that this two-factor structure was invariant across sex. Hence, AMAS provides an equally valid measure for use among college students. "nConclusions:  Brief AMAS demonstrates adequate reliability and validity. The AMAS scores can be used to compare symptoms of math anxiety between male and female students. The study both expands and adds support to the existing body of math anxiety literature.

  14. The structure of musical preferences: a five-factor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentfrow, Peter J; Goldberg, Lewis R; Levitin, Daniel J

    2011-06-01

    Music is a cross-cultural universal, a ubiquitous activity found in every known human culture. Individuals demonstrate manifestly different preferences in music, and yet relatively little is known about the underlying structure of those preferences. Here, we introduce a model of musical preferences based on listeners' affective reactions to excerpts of music from a wide variety of musical genres. The findings from 3 independent studies converged to suggest that there exists a latent 5-factor structure underlying music preferences that is genre free and reflects primarily emotional/affective responses to music. We have interpreted and labeled these factors as (a) a Mellow factor comprising smooth and relaxing styles; (b) an Unpretentious factor comprising a variety of different styles of sincere and rootsy music such as is often found in country and singer-songwriter genres; (c) a Sophisticated factor that includes classical, operatic, world, and jazz; (d) an Intense factor defined by loud, forceful, and energetic music; and (e) a Contemporary factor defined largely by rhythmic and percussive music, such as is found in rap, funk, and acid jazz. The findings from a fourth study suggest that preferences for the MUSIC factors are affected by both the social and the auditory characteristics of the music.

  15. Factor structure of the Japanese version of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale in the postpartum period.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chika Kubota

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS is a widely used screening tool for postpartum depression (PPD. Although the reliability and validity of EPDS in Japanese has been confirmed and the prevalence of PPD is found to be about the same as Western countries, the factor structure of the Japanese version of EPDS has not been elucidated yet. METHODS: 690 Japanese mothers completed all items of the EPDS at 1 month postpartum. We divided them randomly into two sample sets. The first sample set (n = 345 was used for exploratory factor analysis, and the second sample set was used (n = 345 for confirmatory factor analysis. RESULTS: The result of exploratory factor analysis indicated a three-factor model consisting of anxiety, depression and anhedonia. The results of confirmatory factor analysis suggested that the anxiety and anhedonia factors existed for EPDS in a sample of Japanese women at 1 month postpartum. The depression factor varies by the models of acceptable fit. CONCLUSIONS: We examined EPDS scores. As a result, "anxiety" and "anhedonia" exist for EPDS among postpartum women in Japan as already reported in Western countries. Cross-cultural research is needed for future research.

  16. Structural Fingerprints of Transcription Factor Binding Site Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Willett

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Fourier transforms are a powerful tool in the prediction of DNA sequence properties, such as the presence/absence of codons. We have previously compiled a database of the structural properties of all 32,896 unique DNA octamers. In this work we apply Fourier techniques to the analysis of the structural properties of human chromosomes 21 and 22 and also to three sets of transcription factor binding sites within these chromosomes. We find that, for a given structural property, the structural property power spectra of chromosomes 21 and 22 are strikingly similar. We find common peaks in their power spectra for both Sp1 and p53 transcription factor binding sites. We use the power spectra as a structural fingerprint and perform similarity searching in order to find transcription factor binding site regions. This approach provides a new strategy for searching the genome data for information. Although it is difficult to understand the relationship between specific functional properties and the set of structural parameters in our database, our structural fingerprints nevertheless provide a useful tool for searching for function information in sequence data. The power spectrum fingerprints provide a simple, fast method for comparing a set of functional sequences, in this case transcription factor binding site regions, with the sequences of whole chromosomes. On its own, the power spectrum fingerprint does not find all transcription factor binding sites in a chromosome, but the results presented here show that in combination with other approaches, this technique will improve the chances of identifying functional sequences hidden in genomic data.

  17. Neurotrophic factor-related gene polymorphisms and adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) score in a high-risk male population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, Alex C; Kissling, Christian; Hodges, Edward; Hünnerkopf, Regina; Clement, R Marc; Dudley, Edward; Freitag, Christine M; Rösler, Michael; Retz, Wolfgang; Thome, Johannes

    2008-12-05

    Adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a widely under-reported but nevertheless common condition with a clear heritable component. Several genes have been proposed to play a role in the childhood onset of this neurodevelopmental disorder; however, association studies of persistence of ADHD into adulthood have rarely been performed. Neurotrophic factors (NTFs) are known to be involved in several aspects of neuronal development and neural plasticity in adults. They have also been linked, particularly through brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) interaction with dopamine transport, to the pathophysiology of ADHD. This study compares the genotypes of six different single nucleotide polymorphisms of genes within the neurotrophin system and their possible association with adult ADHD score in 143 high-risk male subjects referred to a forensic psychiatric unit. The genes included NTF3, NTRK2 (TrkB), NTRK3 (TrkC), BDNF, and p75(NTR). While none of the SNPs showed significant association with ADHD symptoms, one polymorphism within the exon of NTF3 (rs6332) showed a trend toward an association between the A-allele and increased scores using both the retrospective childhood analysis Wender-Utah Rating Scale (WURS-k) (P = 0.05) and the adult ADHD assessment Wender-Reimherr interview (P = 0.03). This SNP is a silent mutation which might be in linkage disequilibrium with a functional risk variant for ADHD. As the association was only suggestive, however, this finding needs replication in a larger study with higher power.

  18. Impact of clinical, psychological, and social factors on decreased Tinetti test score in community-living elderly subjects: a prospective study with two-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manckoundia, Patrick; Thomas, Frédérique; Buatois, Séverine; Guize, Louis; Jégo, Bertrand; Aquino, Jean-Pierre; Benetos, Athanase

    2008-06-01

    Balance and gait are essential to maintain physical autonomy, particularly in elderly people. Thus the detection of risk factors of balance and gait impairment appears necessary in order to prevent falls and dependency. The objective of this study was to analyze the impact of demographic, social, clinical, psychological, and biological parameters on the decline in balance and gait assessed by the Tinetti test (TT) after a two-year follow-up. This prospective study was conducted among community-living, young elderly volunteers in the centre "Investigations Preventives et Cliniques" and "Observatoire De l'Age" (Paris, France). Three hundred and forty-four participants aged 63.5 on average were enrolled and performed the TT twice, once at inclusion and again two years later. After the two-year follow-up, two groups were constituted according to whether or not there was a decrease in the TT score: the "TT no-deterioration" group comprised subjects with a decrease of less than two points and the "TT deterioration" group comprised those with a decrease of two points or more. Selected demographic, social, clinical, psychological, and biological parameters for the two groups were then compared. Statistical analysis showed that female sex, advanced age, high body mass index, osteoarticular pain, and a high level of anxiety all have a negative impact on TT score. Knowledge of predictive factors of the onset or worsening of balance and gait disorders could allow clinicians to detect young elderly people who should benefit from a specific prevention program.

  19. Factor-structure of economic growth in E-commerce

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴隽; 刘洪久; 栾天行

    2003-01-01

    In order to analyze the factors having effect on economic growth of E-commerce, the economic growthprocess of E-commerce is divided into three stages; growth stage, stabilization stage and re-growth stage. Thesethree different stages are analysed using several economic growth theories, a set of factor-structure is proposedfor each stage of the economic growth process of E-commerce.

  20. Web-based toolkits for topology prediction of transmembrane helical proteins, fold recognition, structure and binding scoring, folding-kinetics analysis and comparative analysis of domain combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongyi; Zhang, Chi; Liu, Song; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2005-07-01

    We have developed the following web servers for protein structural modeling and analysis at http://theory.med.buffalo.edu: THUMBUP, UMDHMM(TMHP) and TUPS, predictors of transmembrane helical protein topology based on a mean-burial-propensity scale of amino acid residues (THUMBUP), hidden Markov model (UMDHMM(TMHP)) and their combinations (TUPS); SPARKS 2.0 and SP3, two profile-profile alignment methods, that match input query sequence(s) to structural templates by integrating sequence profile with knowledge-based structural score (SPARKS 2.0) and structure-derived profile (SP3); DFIRE, a knowledge-based potential for scoring free energy of monomers (DMONOMER), loop conformations (DLOOP), mutant stability (DMUTANT) and binding affinity of protein-protein/peptide/DNA complexes (DCOMPLEX & DDNA); TCD, a program for protein-folding rate and transition-state analysis of small globular proteins; and DOGMA, a web-server that allows comparative analysis of domain combinations between plant and other 55 organisms. These servers provide tools for prediction and/or analysis of proteins on the secondary structure, tertiary structure and interaction levels, respectively.

  1. Structure of Plasmodium falciparum ADP-ribosylation factor 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, William J.; Smith, Craig D.; Senkovich, Olga; Holder, Anthony A.; Chattopadhyay, Debasish (UAB); (NIMR)

    2011-09-26

    Vesicular trafficking may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis and survival of the malaria parasite. ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs) are among the major components of vesicular trafficking pathways in eukaryotes. The crystal structure of ARF1 GTPase from Plasmodium falciparum has been determined in the GDP-bound conformation at 2.5 {angstrom} resolution and is compared with the structures of mammalian ARF1s.

  2. Body Appreciation Scale: Evaluation of the Factor Structure and Psychometric Properties among Male and Female Turkish University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orkide BAKALIM

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Body Appreciation Scale (BAS was developed by Avalos, Tylka & Wood-Barcalow (2005 to determine body appreciation. The present study examined the factor structure of the BAS among Turkish women and men university students. For this purpose, confirmatory factor analysis (competing model analysis was conducted to evaluate the factor structure the BAS. Results from the confirmatory factor analysis on 741 university student (431 women; 310 men suggested that a two-factor model with four items deleted represents an adequate description of the data, and best of the factor model proposed. In terms of convergent validity of the scale a negative and significant correlation was found between body appreciation and social appearance anxiety for women and men samples. The Turkish version of the BAS demonstrated adequate internal consistency and composite reliability. Finally, findings from t-test analysis showed that the BAS scores did not differ according to gender.

  3. Factor structure of the SOCRATES in a sample of primary care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisto, S A; Conigliaro, J; McNeil, M; Kraemer, K; O'Connor, M; Kelley, M E

    1999-01-01

    Motivation or readiness to change has been studied intensively in recent years in research on the use of brief interventions to change alcohol problems in the primary care setting. The purpose of this study was to investigate the factor structure and concurrent and predictive evidence for validity of the short Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES), a 19-item self-report instrument developed to measure readiness to change alcohol problems in individuals presenting for specialized alcohol treatment. The participants were 210 men and 91 women who were identified as "at-risk" drinkers in 13 community primary care clinics. These individuals completed the SOCRATES and a number of other assessments as part of a preintervention evaluation. A principal components analysis of the SOCRATES data revealed a two-factor structure: a confirmatory factor analysis showed that this structure was a better fit to the data than the three-factor structure that Miller and Tonigan (1996) identified for the SOCRATES. The two factors (9 and 6 items, respectively), seemed to measure perceived degree of severity of an existing alcohol problem (called "Amrec" because it consisted of Miller and Tonigan's ambivalence and recognition items) and taking action to change or to maintain changes in one that exists (called "Taking Steps"). Predictions of significant and nonsignificant correlations between the two derived factors and other baseline variables (alcohol consumption, related problems and symptoms, and demographic factors) generally were confirmed. In addition, baseline Amrec scores were related in predicted directions to 6-month alcohol consumption and related problems data, but the magnitude of these relationships were reduced when other variables that correlated with Amrec or when the 6-month data were taken into account. In general, Taking Steps showed little or no relationship to the 6-month data. The results are compared to previous work with the SOCRATES

  4. A Confirmatory Analysis of the Factor Structure and Cross-Age Invariance of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taub, Gordon E.; McGrew, Kevin S.; Witta, E. Lea

    2004-01-01

    In the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III; D. Wechsler, 1997), the manual reports several confirmatory factor analyses in support of the instrument's latent factor structure. In practice, examiners frequently compare an examinee's score from a current administration of the WAIS-III with the results from a previous test…

  5. [Structure and function of the factor VIII/von Willebrand factor complex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, G

    1990-03-01

    In the blood plasma factor VIII is bound to the von Willebrand factor. The primary structure of the two proteins were clarified by gene clonation. Factor VIII descends from a precursor protein with 2,351 amino acids by splitting of 19 amino acid residues and is activated by partial proteolysis. In the blood coagulation factor VIII acts as co-factor for the activation of factor X by factor IX in the presence of phospholipids and Ca++ within the intrinsic coagulation system. The formation of the von Willebrand factor takes place by splitting of 22 and 741 amino acid residues, respectively, from pre-pro-von Willebrand factor via pro-von Willebrand factor. The subunits of the von Willebrand factor consist od 2,050 amino acid residues. In the blood plasma the von Willebrand factor is existing as a mixture of multimeres. Receptors of the von Willebrand factor on the thrombocytic membrane are the glycoproteins GPIb and GPIIb/GPIIIa, by means of which the adhesion of thrombocytes at the subendoethelium of the vascular wall and the aggregation of thrombocytes are mediated.

  6. Personality correlates of the Five-Factor Model for a sample of business owners/managers: associations with scores on Self-Monitoring, Type A Behavior, Locus of Control, and Subjective Well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, K A

    1997-02-01

    Bivariate relationships were examined between scores on the Five-Factor Model of personality and four personality dimensions including Self-monitoring, Locus of Control, Type A Behavior, and Subjective Well-being. Data were collected from 307 franchise business owner/managers from four different industries. Scores for Self-monitoring were positively related to those on Extraversion; Self-monitoring was the only personality measure significantly correlated with scores on Openness to Experience. Scores for Type A Behavior, measured by the Jenkins Activity Survey, were negatively correlated with Agreeableness and positively correlated with those for Extraversion. Somewhat surprisingly, the score for Type A Behavior had a relatively low correlation with the score for Conscientiousness. Scores for Subjective Well-being and Locus of Control were most strongly correlated with the positive pole of Neuroticism (Emotional Stability), Conscientiousness, and Extraversion. Possible explanations for the observed relationships are discussed.

  7. Hierarchical Factor Structure of the Turkish Version of the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory in a Normal Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mucahit Kagan

    2012-10-01

    equation modeling that three-factor structure was valid for the Turkish version of the PTGI. After computing second-order factor loadings, we detected that general factor accounted for 64 percentage of the total variance. Three subscales of the measure were the Changes in Self-Perception, Changes in Philosophy of Life, and Changes in Relationship. Internal consistency for the Changes in Self-Perception subscale was 0.88, for the Changes in Philosophy of Life subscale was 0.78, for the Changes in Relationship was 0.77, and for the overall items was 0.92. 15-day test-retest intra-correlation for the composite scores was 0.83 and intra-correlations for the subscale scores ranged from 0.70 to 0.85. Conclusion: Turkish version of the measure revealed a three-factor first-order structure. However, it seems that the concept of posttraumatic benefits measured by the PTGI has a tendency to represent a unidimensional psychological construct in Turkish sample. Since the three-factor structure was validated, three-subscales may also be used to make an extensive assessment instead of composite scores. The PTGI is a valid and reliable measure to be used in research purposes among Turkish individuals. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(5.000: 617-624

  8. The structure of the nucleon: Elastic electromagnetic form factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punjabi, V. [Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA (United States); Perdrisat, C.F.; Carlson, C.E. [The College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Jones, M.K. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Brash, E.J. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Christopher Newport University, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Precise proton and neutron form factor measurements at Jefferson Lab, using spin observables, have recently made a significant contribution to the unraveling of the internal structure of the nucleon. Accurate experimental measurements of the nucleon form factors are a test-bed for understanding how the nucleon's static properties and dynamical behavior emerge from QCD, the theory of the strong interactions between quarks. There has been enormous theoretical progress, since the publication of the Jefferson Lab proton form factor ratio data, aiming at reevaluating the picture of the nucleon. We will review the experimental and theoretical developments in this field and discuss the outlook for the future. (orig.)

  9. An empirical examination of the factor structure of compassion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jenny; Cavanagh, Kate; Baer, Ruth

    2017-01-01

    Compassion has long been regarded as a core part of our humanity by contemplative traditions, and in recent years, it has received growing research interest. Following a recent review of existing conceptualisations, compassion has been defined as consisting of the following five elements: 1) recognising suffering, 2) understanding the universality of suffering in human experience, 3) feeling moved by the person suffering and emotionally connecting with their distress, 4) tolerating uncomfortable feelings aroused (e.g., fear, distress) so that we remain open to and accepting of the person suffering, and 5) acting or being motivated to act to alleviate suffering. As a prerequisite to developing a high quality compassion measure and furthering research in this field, the current study empirically investigated the factor structure of the five-element definition using a combination of existing and newly generated self-report items. This study consisted of three stages: a systematic consultation with experts to review items from existing self-report measures of compassion and generate additional items (Stage 1), exploratory factor analysis of items gathered from Stage 1 to identify the underlying structure of compassion (Stage 2), and confirmatory factor analysis to validate the identified factor structure (Stage 3). Findings showed preliminary empirical support for a five-factor structure of compassion consistent with the five-element definition. However, findings indicated that the ‘tolerating’ factor may be problematic and not a core aspect of compassion. This possibility requires further empirical testing. Limitations with items from included measures lead us to recommend against using these items collectively to assess compassion. Instead, we call for the development of a new self-report measure of compassion, using the five-element definition to guide item generation. We recommend including newly generated ‘tolerating’ items in the initial item pool, to

  10. Latent Factor Structure of DSM-5 Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentes, Emily; Dennis, Paul A.; Kimbrel, Nathan A.; Kirby, Angela C.; Hair, Lauren P.; Beckham, Jean C.; Calhoun, Patrick S.

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined the latent factor structure of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) based on DSM-5 criteria in a sample of participants (N = 374) recruited for studies on trauma and health. Confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) were used to compare the fit of the previous 3-factor DSM-IV model of PTSD to the 4-factor model specified in DSM-5 as well as to a competing 4-factor “dysphoria” model (Simms, Watson, & Doebbeling, 2002) and a 5-factor (Elhai et al., 2011) model of PTSD. Results indicated that the Elhai 5-factor model (re-experiencing, active avoidance, emotional numbing, dysphoric arousal, anxious arousal) provided the best fit to the data, although substantial support was demonstrated for the DSM-5 4-factor model. Low factor loadings were noted for two of the symptoms in the DSM-5 model (psychogenic amnesia and reckless/self-destructive behavior), which raises questions regarding the adequacy of fit of these symptoms with other core features of the disorder. Overall, the findings from the present research suggest the DSM-5 model of PTSD is a significant improvement over the previous DSM-IV model of PTSD. PMID:26366290

  11. Latent Factor Structure of DSM-5 Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentes, Emily; Dennis, Paul A; Kimbrel, Nathan A; Kirby, Angela C; Hair, Lauren P; Beckham, Jean C; Calhoun, Patrick S

    The current study examined the latent factor structure of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) based on DSM-5 criteria in a sample of participants (N = 374) recruited for studies on trauma and health. Confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) were used to compare the fit of the previous 3-factor DSM-IV model of PTSD to the 4-factor model specified in DSM-5 as well as to a competing 4-factor "dysphoria" model (Simms, Watson, & Doebbeling, 2002) and a 5-factor (Elhai et al., 2011) model of PTSD. Results indicated that the Elhai 5-factor model (re-experiencing, active avoidance, emotional numbing, dysphoric arousal, anxious arousal) provided the best fit to the data, although substantial support was demonstrated for the DSM-5 4-factor model. Low factor loadings were noted for two of the symptoms in the DSM-5 model (psychogenic amnesia and reckless/self-destructive behavior), which raises questions regarding the adequacy of fit of these symptoms with other core features of the disorder. Overall, the findings from the present research suggest the DSM-5 model of PTSD is a significant improvement over the previous DSM-IV model of PTSD.

  12. Crystal Structure of Human Factor VIII: Implications for the Formation of the Factor IXa-Factor VIIIa Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngo, J.C.; Huang, M.; Roth, D.A.; Furie, B.C.; Furie, B. (Wyeth); (MBL)

    2008-06-03

    Factor VIII is a procofactor that plays a critical role in blood coagulation, and is missing or defective in hemophilia A. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of B domain-deleted human factor VIII. This protein is composed of five globular domains and contains one Ca{sup 2+} and two Cu{sup 2+} ions. The three homologous A domains form a triangular heterotrimer where the A1 and A3 domains serve as the base and interact with the C2 and C1 domains, respectively. The structurally homologous C1 and C2 domains reveal membrane binding features. Based on biochemical studies, a model of the factor IXa-factor VIIIa complex was constructed by in silico docking. Factor IXa wraps across the side of factor VIII, and an extended interface spans the factor VIII heavy and light chains. This model provides insight into the activation of factor VIII and the interaction of factor VIIIa with factor IXa on the membrane surface.

  13. Crystal Structure of Human Factor VIII: Implications for the Formation of the Factor IXa-Factor VIIIa Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi Ki Ngo,J.; Huang, M.; Roth, D.; Furie, B.; Furie, B.

    2008-01-01

    Factor VIII is a procofactor that plays a critical role in blood coagulation, and is missing or defective in hemophilia A. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of B domain-deleted human factor VIII. This protein is composed of five globular domains and contains one Ca(2+) and two Cu(2+) ions. The three homologous A domains form a triangular heterotrimer where the A1 and A3 domains serve as the base and interact with the C2 and C1 domains, respectively. The structurally homologous C1 and C2 domains reveal membrane binding features. Based on biochemical studies, a model of the factor IXa-factor VIIIa complex was constructed by in silico docking. Factor IXa wraps across the side of factor VIII, and an extended interface spans the factor VIII heavy and light chains. This model provides insight into the activation of factor VIII and the interaction of factor VIIIa with factor IXa on the membrane surface.

  14. Framingham Risk Score underestimates cardiovascular disease risk in severe psoriatic patients: implications in cardiovascular risk factors management and primary prevention of cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Tiago; Sales, Rita; Vasconcelos, Carlos; Martins da Silva, Berta; Selores, Manuela

    2013-11-01

    Severe psoriasis has been associated with increase cardiovascular mortality, due to a higher prevalence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and premature atherosclerosis, as a consequence of its systemic inflammation. Recently, it has been estimated that severe psoriasis may confer an increased 6.2% on long-term risk of cardiovascular disease based on Framingham Risk Score, which can have practical implications in the treatment of cardiovascular risk factors and primary prevention of cardiovascular disease, as treatment guidelines account for the risk of cardiovascular disease in treatment goals. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of the attributable risk of severe psoriasis on long-term risk of cardiovascular disease and its implication on the correct treatment of cardiovascular risk factors and primary prevention of cardiovascular disease on a real-world cohort of patients. One hundred severe psoriasis patients without psoriatic arthritis or previous cardiovascular disease were evaluated and it was found that more than half of the patients were reclassified to a higher cardiovascular risk category with important clinical implications on the correct management of their cardiovascular risk factors and primary prevention of cardiovascular disease, as a considerable proportion of patients with hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and coronary heart disease equivalent risk were not being correctly managed.

  15. Development, factor structure and application of the Dog Obesity Risk and Appetite (DORA questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleanor Raffan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Dogs are compelling models in which to study obesity since the condition shares many characteristics between humans and dogs. Differences in eating behaviour are recognised to contribute to obesity susceptibility in other species but this has not been systematically studied in dogs.Aim. To develop and validate an owner-reported measure of canine eating behaviour and owner or dog related factors which can alter the development of obesity. Further, to then test variation in food-motivation in dogs and its association with obesity and owner management.Methods. Owner interviews, a literature review and existing human appetite scales were used to identify relevant topics and generate items for the questionnaire. Following a pilot phase, a 75 item online questionnaire was distributed via social media. Responses from 302 dog/owner dyads were analysed and factor structure and descriptive statistics calculated. Results were compared with descriptions of dog behaviour and management from a subset of respondents during semi-structured interviews. The optimum questions were disseminated as a 34 item final questionnaire completed by 213 owners, with a subset of respondents repeating the questionnaire 3 weeks later to assess test–retest reliability.Results. Analysis of responses to the final questionnaire relating to 213 dog/owner dyads showed a coherent factor structure and good test–retest reliability. There were three dog factors (food responsiveness and satiety, lack of selectivity, Interest in food, four owner factors (owner motivation to control dog weight, owner intervention to control dog weight, restriction of human food, exercise taken and two dog health factors (signs of gastrointestinal disease, current poor health. Eating behaviour differed between individuals and between breed groups. High scores on dog factors (high food-motivation and low scores on owner factors (less rigorous control of diet/exercise were associated with

  16. Development, factor structure and application of the Dog Obesity Risk and Appetite (DORA) questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffan, Eleanor; Smith, Stephen P; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Wardle, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Background. Dogs are compelling models in which to study obesity since the condition shares many characteristics between humans and dogs. Differences in eating behaviour are recognised to contribute to obesity susceptibility in other species but this has not been systematically studied in dogs. Aim. To develop and validate an owner-reported measure of canine eating behaviour and owner or dog related factors which can alter the development of obesity. Further, to then test variation in food-motivation in dogs and its association with obesity and owner management. Methods. Owner interviews, a literature review and existing human appetite scales were used to identify relevant topics and generate items for the questionnaire. Following a pilot phase, a 75 item online questionnaire was distributed via social media. Responses from 302 dog/owner dyads were analysed and factor structure and descriptive statistics calculated. Results were compared with descriptions of dog behaviour and management from a subset of respondents during semi-structured interviews. The optimum questions were disseminated as a 34 item final questionnaire completed by 213 owners, with a subset of respondents repeating the questionnaire 3 weeks later to assess test-retest reliability. Results. Analysis of responses to the final questionnaire relating to 213 dog/owner dyads showed a coherent factor structure and good test-retest reliability. There were three dog factors (food responsiveness and satiety, lack of selectivity, Interest in food), four owner factors (owner motivation to control dog weight, owner intervention to control dog weight, restriction of human food, exercise taken) and two dog health factors (signs of gastrointestinal disease, current poor health). Eating behaviour differed between individuals and between breed groups. High scores on dog factors (high food-motivation) and low scores on owner factors (less rigorous control of diet/exercise) were associated with obesity. Owners of

  17. Relativistic Effects on X-ray Structure Factors

    CERN Document Server

    Batke, Kilian

    2015-01-01

    X-ray structure factors from four-component molecular wave functions have been calculated for the model systems $M$(C$_2$H$_2$) ($M$= Ni, Pd, Pt). Relativistic effects on the structure factors are investigated by the comparison to results obtained from a non-relativistic reference and in order to systematically analyse the effect of different quasi-relativistic approximations, we also included the DKH2 and the ZORA Hamiltonian in our study. We show, that the overall effects of relativity on the structure factors on average amount to 0.47, 0.80 and 1.27% for the three model systems under investigation, but that for individual reflections or reflection series the effects can be orders of magnitude larger. Employing the DKH2 or ZORA Hamiltonian takes these effects into account to a large extend, reducing the according differences by one order of magnitude. In order to determine the experimental significance of the results, the magnitude of the relativistic effects on the structure factors is compared to the acco...

  18. Macro factors and the Term Structure of Interest Rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.D.R. Dewachter (Hans); M. Lyrio (Marco)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThis paper presents an essentially affine model of the term structure of interest rates making use of macroeconomic factors and their long-run expectations. The model extends the approach pioneered by Kozicki and Tinsley (2001) by modeling consistently long-run inflation expectations

  19. Factor Structure in Commodity Futures Return and Volatility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter; Lunde, Asger; Olesen, Kasper Vinther

    Using data on more than 750 million futures trades during 2004-2013, we analyze eight stylized facts of commodity price and volatility dynamics in the post financialization period. We pay particular attention to the factor structure in returns and volatility and to commodity market integration...... volatility indicates a nontrivial degree of market integration....

  20. Corporate financial structure, misallocation and total factor productivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uras, R.B.

    2014-01-01

    This paper studies the quantitative relevance of the cross-sectional dispersion of corporate financial structure in explaining the intra-industry allocation efficiency of productive factors. I solve a heterogeneous firms model with financial constraints and distortions to the marginal rental-rate of

  1. Structural uncertainty in air mass factor calculation for NO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorente Delgado, Alba; Folkert Boersma, K.; Yu, Huan; Dörner, Steffen; Hilboll, Andreas; Richter, Andreas; Liu, Mengyao; Lamsal, Lok N.; Barkley, Michael; Smedt, De Isabelle; Roozendael, Van Michel; Wang, Yang; Wagner, Thomas; Beirle, Steffen; Lin, Jin Tai; Krotkov, Nickolay; Stammes, Piet; Wang, Ping; Eskes, Henk J.; Krol, Maarten

    2017-01-01

    Air mass factor (AMF) calculation is the largest source of uncertainty in NO2 and HCHO satellite retrievals in situations with enhanced trace gas concentrations in the lower troposphere. Structural uncertainty arises when different retrieval methodologies are applied within the scientific community

  2. Impact factors of fractal analysis of porous structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Characterization of pore structure is one of the key problems for fabrication and application research on porous materials. But, complexity of pore structure makes it difficult to characterize pore structure by Euclidean geometry and traditional experimental methods. Fractal theory has been proved effective to characterize the complex pore structure. The box dimension method based on fractal theory was applied to characterizing the pore structure of fiber porous materials by analyzing the electronic scanning microscope (SEM) images of the porous materials in this paper. The influences of image resolution, threshold value, and image magnification on fractal analysis were investigated. The results indicate that such factors greatly affect fractal analysis process and results. The appropriate magnification threshold and fractal analysis are necessary for fractal analysis.

  3. Factors influencing injury severity score regarding Thai military personnel injured in mass casualty incident April 10, 2010: lessons learned from armed conflict casualties: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boonthep Nuttapong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Political conflicts in Bangkok, Thailand have caused mass casualties, especially the latest event April 10, 2010, in which many military personnel were injured. Most of them were transferred to Phramongkutklao Hospital, the largest military hospital in Thailand. The current study aimed to assess factors influencing Injury Severity Score (ISS regarding Thai military personnel injured in the mass casualty incident (MCI April 10, 2010. Methods A total of 728 injured soldiers transferred to Phramongkutklao Hospital were reviewed. Descriptive statistics was used to display characteristics of the injuries, relationship between mechanism of injury and injured body regions. Multiple logistic regressions were used to calculate the adjusted odds ratio (adjusted OR of ISS comparing injured body region categories. Results In all, 153 subjects defined as major data category were enrolled in this study. Blast injury was the most common mechanism of injury (90.2%. These victims displayed 276 injured body regions. The most common injured body region was the extremities (48.5%. A total of 18 patients (11.7% had an ISS revealing more than 16 points. Three victims who died were expected to die due to high Trauma and Injury Severity Score (TRISS. However, one with high TRISS survived. Factors influencing ISS were age (p = 0.04, abdomen injury (adjusted OR = 29.9; 95% CI, 5.8-153.5; P P P Conclusions Blast injury was the most common mechanism of injury among Thai military personnel injured in the MCI April 10, 2010. Age and injured body region such as head & neck, chest and abdomen significantly influenced ISS. These factors should be investigated for effective medical treatment and preparing protective equipment to prevent such injuries in the future.

  4. Factor Structure of the Conflict Tactics Scale 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori Baba

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Conflict Tactics Scale 1 (CTS1 is a widely used self-report measure of abusive attitudes of parents towards children. The factor structure of the CTS1 still remains to be clarified. The aim of this study was to examine the factor structure of the Japanese version of the CTS1 for postpartum women in community settings. Method: The data in this study came from the Okayama and Kumamoto’s study. These were part of a larger survey using longitudinal questionnaire studies conducted in Japan from 2001 to 2002 and in 2011, respectively. In both study sites, the participant mothers were asked to fill in the CTS1 one month after delivery when they attended for check-up at the out-patient clinic. Results: A total of 1,150 questionnaires were collected, excluding the participants with missing values in the CTS1. Finally, 1,078 were included in the statistical analyses. Data of 1,078 women were divided into two parts. In the first halved sample (n=578, an exploratory factor analysis was conducted for the CTS1 items after exluding nine items with extremely low prevalence. It revealed 2-factor or 3-factor models. Then, we conducted a model comparison with the second halved sample (n=500, using confirmatory factor analysis. In terms of goodness-of-fit indeces, the 2-factor model was superior. Its subscales were Reasoning and Psycholosical Aggression. Conclusion: The 2-factor model of the CTS1 consisting of Reasoning and Psychological Aggression was superior to the 3-factor model. This is not inconsistent with the original authors’ theoretical model.

  5. Factor Structure of Subjective Well-Being in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshanloo, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Subjective well-being is predominantly conceived as having 3 components: life satisfaction, positive affect, and negative affect. This article reports 2 studies that seek to investigate the factor structure of subjective well-being in Iran. One-, two-, and three-factor models of subjective well-being were evaluated using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and exploratory structural equation modeling (ESEM). The results of Study 1 (N = 2,197) and Study 2 (N = 207) show that whereas the 1- and 2-factor models do not fit the data well, the 3-factor model provides an adequate fit. These results indicate that the 3 components of subjective well-being constitute 3 interrelated, yet distinct, factors. The analyses demonstrate how traditional CFA and ESEM can be combined to obtain a clear picture of the measurement model of subjective well-being and generate new insights about individual items and cross-loadings needed to derive more parsimonious measures. Nuances relating to the assessment of subjective well-being in more collectivist and Muslim countries are discussed.

  6. Using Factor Analysis to Investigate the Impact of Accommodations on the Scores of Students with Disabilities on a Reading Comprehension Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Linda; Eignor, Daniel; Steinberg, Jonathan; Sawaki, Yasuyo; Cline, Frederick

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of a read-aloud test change administered with the Gates-MacGinitie Reading Test (GMRT) on the underlying constructs measured by the Comprehension subtest. The study evaluated the factor structures for the Level 4 Comprehension subtest given to a sample of New Jersey fourth-grade students with…

  7. Influencing factors of SYNTAX score in patients with coronary heart disease%冠状动脉病变SYNTAX积分影响因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    盛建龙; 王晓晨; 许邦龙; 吴继雄; 王敏; 胡章乐

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨冠心病患者冠状动脉(冠脉)病变SYNTAX积分的影响因素.方法:选取101例接受择期冠脉造影并行经皮冠脉内支架植入术治疗的冠心病患者(包括稳定型心绞痛和不稳定型心绞痛患者),通过相关性分析及单因素方差分析其冠脉病变SYNTAX积分的影响因素.结果:101例患者SYNTAX积分为(11.38±6.61),相关性分析发现SYNTAX积分与总胆固醇(r=0.279,P=0.005)、低密度脂蛋白胆固醇(r=0.247,P=0.013)、载脂蛋白B(r=0.270,P=0.006)、载脂蛋白B/载脂蛋白A1比值(r=0.246,P=0.013)存在正相关性.与高密度脂蛋白胆固醇、载脂蛋白A1无统计学相关性.未发现性别、高血压、糖尿病、吸烟史、脑血管病史、冠脉造影术前应用阿司匹林应用超过1个月等因素对冠脉SYNTAX积分有影响.结论:冠脉病变复杂程度与总胆固醇、低密度脂蛋白胆固醇、载脂蛋白B、载脂蛋白B/载脂蛋白A1比值水平有关,而与高密度脂蛋白胆固醇和载脂蛋白A1水平无明显相关性.%Objective:To investigate the influencing factors of SYNTAX scores in patients with coronary heart disease.Method:One hundred and one patients with coronary heart disease (including stable angina and unstable angina) underwent elective coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary stent implantation were participated.The influencing factors of SYNTAX score was analyzed by single-factor ANOVA analysis.Result:The SYNTAX score of 101 patients was 11.38 ± 6.61.Correlation analysis showed that there was a positive correlation between SYNTAX score and total cholesterol (r=0.279,P=0.005),low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r=0.247,P=0.013),apolipoprotein B (r =0.270,P =0.006),apolipoprotein B / apolipoprotein A1 ratio (r =0.246,P =0.013).There was no statistical correlation between SYNTAX score and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol,apolipoprotein A1.Conclusion:The complexity of coronary artery correlates with the levels of total

  8. Factor selection and structural identification in the interaction ANOVA model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Justin B; Bondell, Howard D

    2013-03-01

    When faced with categorical predictors and a continuous response, the objective of an analysis often consists of two tasks: finding which factors are important and determining which levels of the factors differ significantly from one another. Often times, these tasks are done separately using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) followed by a post hoc hypothesis testing procedure such as Tukey's Honestly Significant Difference test. When interactions between factors are included in the model the collapsing of levels of a factor becomes a more difficult problem. When testing for differences between two levels of a factor, claiming no difference would refer not only to equality of main effects, but also to equality of each interaction involving those levels. This structure between the main effects and interactions in a model is similar to the idea of heredity used in regression models. This article introduces a new method for accomplishing both of the common analysis tasks simultaneously in an interaction model while also adhering to the heredity-type constraint on the model. An appropriate penalization is constructed that encourages levels of factors to collapse and entire factors to be set to zero. It is shown that the procedure has the oracle property implying that asymptotically it performs as well as if the exact structure were known beforehand. We also discuss the application to estimating interactions in the unreplicated case. Simulation studies show the procedure outperforms post hoc hypothesis testing procedures as well as similar methods that do not include a structural constraint. The method is also illustrated using a real data example.

  9. Factor Selection and Structural Identification in the Interaction ANOVA Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Justin B.; Bondell, Howard D.

    2013-01-01

    Summary When faced with categorical predictors and a continuous response, the objective of analysis often consists of two tasks: finding which factors are important and determining which levels of the factors differ significantly from one another. Often times these tasks are done separately using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) followed by a post-hoc hypothesis testing procedure such as Tukey’s Honestly Significant Difference test. When interactions between factors are included in the model the collapsing of levels of a factor becomes a more difficult problem. When testing for differences between two levels of a factor, claiming no difference would refer not only to equality of main effects, but also equality of each interaction involving those levels. This structure between the main effects and interactions in a model is similar to the idea of heredity used in regression models. This paper introduces a new method for accomplishing both of the common analysis tasks simultaneously in an interaction model while also adhering to the heredity-type constraint on the model. An appropriate penalization is constructed that encourages levels of factors to collapse and entire factors to be set to zero. It is shown that the procedure has the oracle property implying that asymptotically it performs as well as if the exact structure were known beforehand. We also discuss the application to estimating interactions in the unreplicated case. Simulation studies show the procedure outperforms post hoc hypothesis testing procedures as well as similar methods that do not include a structural constraint. The method is also illustrated using a real data example. PMID:23323643

  10. Factors Contributing to Discrepancy Between Visual Acuity Fractions Derived From a Snellen Chart and Letter Scores on the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study Chart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fred K; Agelis, Lillian Evangelia; Peh, Khaik K; Teong, Joanne; Wong, Evan Norman Xi Ming

    2014-01-01

    To report factors influencing the relationship between visual acuity (VA) fractions measured on Snellen chart and letter scores on the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) chart. This was a retrospective review from a single ophthalmology outpatient clinic. All patients had routine consecutive VA testing in the right eye using a Snellen chart (1-6 m) and the ETDRS chart (4 m and/or 1 m), by the same optometrist, using a standardized testing protocol for each chart. Both acuity fractions and letter scores were converted to their equivalent logarithm of minimum angle of resolution (logMAR) for comparison. Multiple regression analysis was performed. A total of 237 patients with a wide range of ocular disease and VAs were enrolled. Mean age was 63 years (range, 18-95 years). Recorded VA (logMAR) was better on Snellen chart by a mean (95% limits of agreement) of -0.07 (-0.33 to +0.18, P Snellen and ETDRS charts was nonuniform across VA range. This has implications on interpretation of published studies converting Snellen fractions to logMAR for analysis and reporting of VA outcomes.

  11. The latent structure of loneliness: testing competing factor models of the UCLA Loneliness Scale in a large adolescent sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevlin, Mark; Murphy, Siobhan; Murphy, Jamie

    2015-04-01

    This study assessed the dimensional structure of the UCLA Loneliness Scale ([UCLA-LS], UCLA-3). Data from the Northern Ireland Young Life and Times Survey (2011), a survey of 1,434 16-year-olds, was used to examine the underlying factor structure of the scale. Confirmatory factor analysis was employed to compare alternative factor analytical models that can inform the scoring of the measure and determine the degree to which different factors provided unique predictive utility. Fit statistics indicated that the best fitting model comprised three correlated factors: Isolation, Related Connectedness, and Collective Connectedness. These findings were consistent with previous findings that identified the multidimensional nature of the UCLA-LS. The study also found evidence that the subscales were differentially associated with psychiatric morbidity as measured by the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) and provides a more reliable and comprehensive framework to assess the clinical significance of loneliness.

  12. The Holyoake Codependency Index: investigation of the factor structure and psychometric properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dear, G E; Roberts, C M

    2000-12-01

    The Holyoake Codependency Index is being developed to measure the extent to which a person endorses codependent beliefs and attributions. A 28-item pilot version was administered to 39 male and 268 female clients of a family counseling agency. Factor analysis, used to identify the shortest version with acceptable reliability, yielded a 13-item final version comprising three subscales (external focus, self-sacrifice, and reactivity). The subscales correspond to key themes within the literature on codependency. Scores on each subscale correlated significantly in the predicted direction with relevant measures of psychological functioning; providing initial evidence of construct validity. The 13-item scale was administered to a general community sample of 303 women and the factor structure was fully replicated. Internal consistency of the subscales ranged from .74 to .84 with the family counseling sample and from .73 to .83 with the general community sample.

  13. The Factor Structure for Mental Rotations of Three-Dimensional Structures Represented in Diagrams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddon, G. M.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Determined the factor structure of tasks which require students to visualize how diagrams should be drawn to represent effects of rotating three-dimensional structures about the three Cartesian axes. Results obtained from 149 English and 231 Singapore students show that visualization about X-, Y-, and Z-axes are factorially distinct. (DH)

  14. Psychometric Structure of a Comprehensive Objective Structured Clinical Examination: A Factor Analytic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkan, Kevin; Simon, Steven R.; Baker, Harley; Todres, I. David

    2004-01-01

    Problem Statement and Background: While the psychometric properties of Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) have been studied, their latent structures have not been well characterized. This study examines a factor analytic model of a comprehensive OSCE and addresses implications for measurement of clinical performance. Methods: An…

  15. Insulin-like growth factor (IgF-I, IgF binding protein-3, and prostate cancer: correlation with gleason score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lívia L. Corrêa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Non-androgenic growth factors are involved in the growth regulation of prostate cancer (PCa. Objective This is the first Brazilian study to correlate, in a population of patients operated for PCa, PSA, total testosterone, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3 with Gleason score and to compare with a control group with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH. Materials and Methods This retrospective single-center study included 49 men with previously diagnosed PCa and 45 with previously diagnosed BPH. PSA, testosterone, IGF-I, IGFBP-3 were determined in both groups. Results PSA and IGFBP-3 levels were significantly higher in the PCa group as compared to the BPH group (p<0.001 and p=0.004, respectively. There was a significant difference when we compared the PSA before surgery (p<0.001 and at the inclusion in the study (p<0.001 and IGFBP3 (0.016 among patients with Gleason <7, ≥7 and BPH. In the PCa group, PSA, testosterone, IGF-I and IGFBP-3 levels were comparable between Gleason <7 and ≥7. Conclusions Our data suggest that in localized PCa, the quantification of PSA and, not of IGF-1, may provide independent significant information in the aggressiveness. IGFBP-3 could be a biochemical marker of disease control in PCa patients.

  16. Structure factors in granular experiments with homogeneous fluidization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puglisi, Andrea; Gnoli, Andrea; Gradenigo, Giacomo; Sarracino, Alessandro; Villamaina, Dario

    2012-01-07

    Velocity and density structure factors are measured over a hydrodynamic range of scales in a horizontal quasi-2D fluidized granular experiment, with packing fractions φ ∈ [10%, 40%]. The fluidization is realized by vertically vibrating a rough plate, on top of which particles perform a Brownian-like horizontal motion in addition to inelastic collisions. On one hand, the density structure factor is equal to that of elastic hard spheres, except in the limit of large length-scales, as it occurs in the presence of an effective interaction. On the other hand, the velocity field shows a more complex structure which is a genuine expression of a non-equilibrium steady state and which can be compared to a recent fluctuating hydrodynamic theory with non-equilibrium noise. The temporal decay of velocity modes autocorrelations is compatible with linear hydrodynamic equations with rates dictated by viscous momentum diffusion, corrected by a typical interaction time with the thermostat. Equal-time velocity structure factors display a peculiar shape with a plateau at large length-scales and another one at small scales, marking two different temperatures: the "bath" temperature T(b), depending on shaking parameters, and the "granular" temperature T(g) < T(b), which is affected by collisions. The two ranges of scales are separated by a correlation length which grows with φ, after proper rescaling with the mean free path.

  17. Modeling Image Structure with Factorized Phase-Coupled Boltzmann Machines

    CERN Document Server

    Cadieu, Charles F

    2010-01-01

    We describe a model for capturing the statistical structure of local amplitude and local spatial phase in natural images. The model is based on a recently developed, factorized third-order Boltzmann machine that was shown to be effective at capturing higher-order structure in images by modeling dependencies among squared filter outputs (Ranzato and Hinton, 2010). Here, we extend this model to $L_p$-spherically symmetric subspaces. In order to model local amplitude and phase structure in images, we focus on the case of two dimensional subspaces, and the $L_2$-norm. When trained on natural images the model learns subspaces resembling quadrature-pair Gabor filters. We then introduce an additional set of hidden units that model the dependencies among subspace phases. These hidden units form a combinatorial mixture of phase coupling distributions, concentrated in the sum and difference of phase pairs. When adapted to natural images, these distributions capture local spatial phase structure in natural images.

  18. [Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire-Brief - Likert format: Factor structure analysis in general population in France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferchiou, A; Todorov, L; Lajnef, M; Baudin, G; Pignon, B; Richard, J-R; Leboyer, M; Szöke, A; Schürhoff, F

    2016-09-16

    The main objective of the study was to explore the factorial structure of the French version of the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire-Brief (SPQ-B) in a Likert format, in a representative sample of the general population. In addition, differences in the dimensional scores of schizotypy according to gender and age were analyzed. As the study in the general population of schizotypal traits and its determinants has been recently proposed as a way toward the understanding of aetiology and pathophysiology of schizophrenia, consistent self-report tools are crucial to measure psychometric schizotypy. A shorter version of the widely used Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire (SPQ-Brief) has been extensively investigated in different countries, particularly in samples of students or clinical adolescents, and more recently, a few studies used a Likert-type scale format which allows partial endorsement of items and reduces the risk of defensive answers. A sample of 233 subjects representative of the adult population from an urban area near Paris (Créteil) was recruited using the "itinerary method". They completed the French version of the SPQ-B with a 5-point Likert-type response format (1=completely disagree; 5=completely agree). We examined the dimensional structure of the French version of the SPQ-B with a Principal Components Analysis (PCA) followed by a promax rotation. Factor selection was based on Eigenvalues over 1.0 (Kaiser's criterion), Cattell's Scree-plot test, and interpretability of the factors. Items with loadings greater than 0.4 were retained for each dimension. The internal consistency estimate of the dimensions was calculated with Cronbach's α. In order to study the influence of age and gender, we carried out a simple linear regression with the subscales as dependent variables. Our sample was composed of 131 women (mean age=52.5±18.2 years) and 102 men (mean age=53±18.1 years). SPQ-B Likert total scores ranged from 22 to 84 points (mean=43.6

  19. Factor structure and psychometric properties of the Anxiety Sensitivity Index-3 in an Italian community sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta eGhisi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety Sensitivity (AS is defined as the fear of anxiety and of arousal-related bodily sensations, arising from erroneous beliefs that these sensations will have adverse consequences. AS plays a key role both in the onset and in the maintenance of several disorders, particularly anxiety disorders. To date, only two studies on American samples have examined the bifactor structure of the Anxiety Sensitivity Index-3 (ASI-3; therefore, findings on different cultures are needed. The main purpose of the present study was to assess the factor structure and psychometric properties of the ASI-3 in an Italian community sample. Participants were recruited from the general population (N=1507. The results of a series of confirmatory factor analyses indicated that the bifactor structure fitted the data better than the most commonly accepted structure for the measure and that it was invariant across gender. Moreover, the current study provided evidence regarding the ASI-3’s reliability and its convergent and divergent validity. Lastly, results pertaining incremental validity of the ASI-3 Physical and Cognitive Concerns subscales above and beyond the total showed that the former was not associated with a measure of physiological anxiety, whereas the latter was weakly associated with a measure of worry.Findings suggest that the ASI-3 is comprised of a dominant general factor and three specific independent factors; given the dominance of the general factor, the use of the ASI-3 total score as a measure of the general fear of anxiety is recommended in both clinical and research settings.

  20. Bacterial Sigma Factors and Anti-Sigma Factors: Structure, Function and Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S. Paget

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Sigma factors are multi-domain subunits of bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP that play critical roles in transcription initiation, including the recognition and opening of promoters as well as the initial steps in RNA synthesis. This review focuses on the structure and function of the major sigma-70 class that includes the housekeeping sigma factor (Group 1 that directs the bulk of transcription during active growth, and structurally-related alternative sigma factors (Groups 2–4 that control a wide variety of adaptive responses such as morphological development and the management of stress. A recurring theme in sigma factor control is their sequestration by anti-sigma factors that occlude their RNAP-binding determinants. Sigma factors are then released through a wide variety of mechanisms, often involving branched signal transduction pathways that allow the integration of distinct signals. Three major strategies for sigma release are discussed: regulated proteolysis, partner-switching, and direct sensing by the anti-sigma factor.

  1. Factor structure of the SOCRATES questionnaire in hospitalized medical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertholet, Nicolas; Dukes, Kim; Horton, Nicholas J; Palfai, Tibor P; Pedley, Alison; Saitz, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES), a 19-item instrument developed to assess readiness to change alcohol use among individuals presenting for specialized alcohol treatment, has been used in various populations and settings. Its factor structure and concurrent validity has been described for specialized alcohol treatment settings and primary care. The purpose of this study was to determine the factor structure and concurrent validity of the SOCRATES among medical inpatients with unhealthy alcohol use not seeking help for specialized alcohol treatment. The subjects were 337 medical inpatients with unhealthy alcohol use, identified during their hospital stay. Most of them had alcohol dependence (76%). We performed an Alpha Factor Analysis (AFA) and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of the 19 SOCRATES items, and forced 3 factors and 2 components, in order to replicate findings from Miller and Tonigan (Miller, W. R., & Tonigan, J. S., (1996). Assessing drinkers' motivations for change: The Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES). Psychology of Addictive Behavior, 10, 81-89.) and Maisto et al. (Maisto, S. A., Conigliaro, J., McNeil, M., Kraemer, K., O'Connor, M., & Kelley, M. E., (1999). Factor structure of the SOCRATES in a sample of primary care patients. Addictive Behavior, 24(6), 879-892.). Our analysis supported the view that the 2 component solution proposed by Maisto et al. (Maisto, S.A., Conigliaro, J., McNeil, M., Kraemer, K., O'Connor, M., & Kelley, M.E., (1999). Factor structure of the SOCRATES in a sample of primary care patients. Addictive Behavior, 24(6), 879-892.) is more appropriate for our data than the 3 factor solution proposed by Miller and Tonigan (Miller, W. R., & Tonigan, J. S., (1996). Assessing drinkers' motivations for change: The Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES). Psychology of Addictive Behavior, 10, 81-89.). The first component measured

  2. A preliminary factor analytic investigation into the firstorder factor structure of the Fifteen Factor Plus (15FQ+ on a sample of Black South African managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seretse Moyo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The Fifteen Factor Questionnaire Plus (15FQ+ is a prominent personality questionnaire that organisations frequently use in personnel selection in South Africa.Research purpose: The primary objective of this study was to undertake a factor analytic investigation of the first-order factor structure of the 15FQ+.Motivation for the study: The construct validity of the 15FQ+, as a measure of personality, is necessary even though it is insufficient to justify its use in personnel selection.Research design, approach and method: The researchers evaluated the fit of the measurement model, which the structure and scoring key of the 15FQ+ implies, in a quantitative study that used an ex post facto correlation design through structural equation modelling. They conducted a secondary data analysis. They selected a sample of 241 Black South African managers from a large 15FQ+ database.Main findings: The researchers found good measurement model fit. The measurement model parameter estimates were worrying. The magnitude of the estimated model parameters suggests that the items generally do not reflect the latent personality dimensions the designers intended them to with a great degree of precision. The items are reasonably noisy measures of the latent variables they represent.Practical/managerial implications: Organisations should use the 15FQ+ carefully on Black South African managers until further local research evidence becomes available.Contribution/value-add: The study is a catalyst to trigger the necessary additional research we need to establish convincingly the psychometric credentials of the 15FQ+ as a valuable assessment tool in South Africa.

  3. Ambient air quality measurements from a continuously moving mobile platform: Estimation of area-wide, fuel-based, mobile source emission factors using absolute principal component scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Timothy; Gould, Timothy; Riley, Erin A.; Austin, Elena; Fintzi, Jonathan; Sheppard, Lianne; Yost, Michael; Simpson, Christopher

    2017-03-01

    We have applied the absolute principal component scores (APCS) receptor model to on-road, background-adjusted measurements of NOx, CO, CO2, black carbon (BC), and particle number (PN) obtained from a continuously moving platform deployed over nine afternoon sampling periods in Seattle, WA. Two Varimax-rotated principal component features described 75% of the overall variance of the observations. A heavy-duty vehicle feature was correlated with black carbon and particle number, whereas a light-duty feature was correlated with CO and CO2. NOx had moderate correlation with both features. The bootstrapped APCS model predictions were used to estimate area-wide, average fuel-based emission factors and their respective 95% confidence limits. The average emission factors for NOx, CO, BC and PN (14.8, 18.9, 0.40 g/kg, and 4.3 × 1015 particles/kg for heavy duty vehicles, and 3.2, 22.4, 0.016 g/kg, and 0.19 × 1015 particles/kg for light-duty vehicles, respectively) are consistent with previous estimates based on remote sensing, vehicle chase studies, and recent dynamometer tests. Information on the spatial distribution of the concentrations contributed by these two vehicle categories relative to background during the sampling period was also obtained.

  4. Insulin-like growth factor II mRNA binding protein 3 (IMP3 is overexpressed in prostate cancer and correlates with higher Gleason scores

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    Mortezavi Ashkan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The oncofetal protein insulin-like growth factor II mRNA binding protein 3 (IMP3 is an important factor for cell-migration and adhesion in malignancies. Recent studies have shown a remarkable overexpression of IMP3 in different human malignant neoplasms and also revealed it as an important prognostic marker in some tumor entities. To our knowledge, IMP3 expression has not been investigated in prostate carcinomas so far. Methods Immunohistochemical stainings for IMP3 were performed on tissue microarray (TMA organized samples from 507 patients: 31 normal prostate tissues, 425 primary carcinomas and 51 prostate cancer metastases or castration-resistant prostate cancers (CRPC. IMP3 immunoreactivity was semiquantitatively scored and correlated with clinical-pathologic parameters including survival. Results IMP3 is significantly stronger expressed in prostate carcinomas compared to normal prostate tissues (p Conclusions Although IMP3 is overexpressed in a significant proportion of prostate cancer cases, which might be of importance for novel therapeutic approaches, it does not appear to possess any immediate diagnostic or prognostic value, limiting its potential as a tissue biomarker for prostate cancer. These results might be corroborated by the fact, that two independent tumor cohorts were separately reviewed.

  5. Gender- and Race-Specific Metabolic Score and Cardiovascular Disease Mortality in Adults: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach—United States, 1988–2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado, Carla I.; Yang, Quanhe; Ford, Earl S.; Gregg, Edward; Valderrama, Amy L.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Consider all metabolic syndrome (MetS) components [systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressures, waist circumference, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides (TG), and fasting glucose] and gender/race differential risk when assessing cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Methods We estimated a gender- and race-specific continuous MetS score using structural equation modeling and tested its association with CVD mortality using data from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III linked with the National Death Index. Cox proportional hazard regression tested the association adjusted for sociodemographic and behavior characteristics. Results For men, continuous MetS components associated with CVD mortality were SBP (hazard ratio =1.50, 95% confidence interval =1.14–1.96), DBP (1.48, 1.16–1.90), and TG (1.15, 1.12–1.16). In women, SBP (1.44, 1.27–1.63) and DBP (1.24, 1.02–1.51) were associated with CVD mortality. MetS score was not significantly associated with CVD mortality in men; but significant associations were found for all women (1.34, 1.06–1.68), non-Hispanic white women (1.29, 1.01–1.64), non-Hispanic black women (2.03, 1.12–3.69), and Mexican-American women (3.57, 2.21–5.76). Goodness-of-fit and concordance were overall better for models with the MetS score than MetS (yes/no). Conclusions When assessing CVD mortality risk, MetS score provided additional information than MetS (yes/no). PMID:26308480

  6. Assessment of the clinical utility of adding common single nucleotide polymorphism genetic scores to classical risk factor algorithms in coronary heart disease risk prediction in UK men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaney, Katherine E; Cooper, Jackie A; Drenos, Fotios; Humphries, Steve E

    2017-08-28

    Risk prediction algorithms for coronary heart disease (CHD) are recommended for clinical use. However, their predictive ability remains modest and the inclusion of genetic risk may improve their performance. QRISK2 was used to assess CHD risk using conventional risk factors (CRFs). The performance of a 19 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) gene score (GS) for CHD including variants identified by genome-wide association study and candidate gene studies (weighted using the results from the CARDIoGRAMplusC4D meta-analysis) was assessed using the second Northwick Park Heart Study (NPHSII) of 2775 healthy UK men (284 cases). To improve the GS, five SNPs with weak evidence of an association with CHD were removed and replaced with seven robustly associated SNPs - giving a 21-SNP GS. The weighted 19 SNP GS was associated with lipid traits (p<0.05) and CHD after adjustment for CRFs, (OR=1.31 per standard deviation, p=0.03). Addition of the 19 SNP GS to QRISK2 showed improved discrimination (area under the receiver operator characteristic curve 0.68 vs. 0.70 p=0.02), a positive net reclassification index (0.07, p=0.04) compared to QRISK2 alone and maintained good calibration (p=0.17). The 21-SNP GS was also associated with CHD after adjustment for CRFs (OR=1.39 per standard deviation, 1.42×10-3), but the combined QRISK2 plus GS score was poorly calibrated (p=0.03) and showed no improvement in discrimination (p=0.55) or reclassification (p=0.10) compared to QRISK2 alone. The 19-SNP GS is robustly associated with CHD and showed potential clinical utility in the UK population.

  7. [The development of the Japanese version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the examination of the factor structure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashiguchi, K; Morikawa, Y; Miura, K; Nishijo, M; Tabata, M; Yoshita, K; Sagara, T; Nakagawa, H

    1998-07-01

    This article presents an evaluation of the factor structures of the Japanese version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). The MBI is a widely used psychometric instrument for measuring 'burnout' developed by Maslach and her co-workers. The MBI consists of four subscales: Emotional Exhaustion, Personal Accomplishment, Depersonalization, and Involvement. The MBI was translated into Japanese along with a back-translation and was administered to a sample of 267 nurses. Various psychometric analyses showed that the Japanese version of the MBI has high reliability for the 22 items scored for the frequency dimension. The factor analysis using principal factoring with an oblique rotation resulted in three factor structures that had different implications from the MBI: Emotional Exhaustion/Depersonalization, Personal Accomplishment, and Physical Exhaustion. The correlationship between the MBI and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ), measures of depression, showed that burnout was a unique phenomenon.

  8. Higher neonatal growth rate and body condition score at 7 months are predictive factors of obesity in adult female Beagle dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, Lucie; Thorin, Chantal; Flanagan, John; Biourge, Vincent; Serisier, Samuel; Nguyen, Patrick

    2017-04-13

    The risks during early growth on becoming overweight in adulthood are widely studied in humans. However, early-life predictive factors for canine adult overweight and obesity have not yet been studied. To identify factors that may help explain the development of overweight and obesity at adulthood in dogs, a longitudinal study of 2 years was conducted in 24 female Beagle dogs of the same age, sexual status, and raised under identical environmental conditions. By means of a hierarchical classification on principal components with the following quantitative values: fat-free mass (FFM), percentage fat mass and pelvic circumference at 2 years of age, three groups of dogs were established and were nominally named: ideal weight (IW, n = 9), slightly overweight (OW1, n = 6) and overweight (OW2, n = 9). With the aim of identifying predictive factors of development of obesity at adulthood parental characteristics, growth pattern, energy balance and plasma factors were analysed by logistic regression analysis. At 24 months, the group compositions were in line with the body condition scores (BCS 1-9) values of the IW (5 or 6/9), the OW1 (6/9) and the OW2 (7 or 8/9) groups. Logistic regression analysis permitted the identification of neonatal growth rate during the first 2 weeks of life (GR2W) and BCS at 7 months as predictors for the development of obesity at adulthood. Seventy percent of dogs with either GR2W >125% or with BCS > 6/9 at 7 months belonged to the OW2 group. Results from energy intake and expenditure, corrected for FFM, showed that there was a greater positive energy imbalance between 7 and 10 months for the OW2, compared to the IW group. This study expands the understanding of previously reported risk factors for being overweight or obese in dogs, establishing that (i) 15 out of 24 of the studied dogs became overweight and (ii) GR2W and BCS at 7 months of age could be used as predictive factors as overweight adult dogs in the OW2 group

  9. The Reliability and Validity of Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory Scores in Academically Talented Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worrell, Frank C.; Mello, Zena R.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined the reliability, structural validity, and concurrent validity of Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI) scores in a group of 815 academically talented adolescents. Reliability estimates of the purported factors' scores were in the low to moderate range. Exploratory factor analysis supported a five-factor…

  10. Loss Factor of Tapered Structures for Short Bunches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blednykh, A.

    2011-03-28

    Using the electromagnetic simulation code ECHO, we have found a simple phenomenological formula that accurately describes the loss factor for short bunches traversing an axisymmetric tapered collimator. In this paper, we consider tapered collimators with rectangular cross-section and use the GdfidL code to calculate the loss factor dependence on the geometric parameters for short bunches. The results for both axisymmetric and rectangular collimators are discussed. The behaviour of the impedance of tapered structures for very short bunches in the optical regime has been determined in refs. [10,11]. Here, for the loss factors for two particular geometries, we have studied the departure from the optical regime behaviour as bunch length is increased. In both cases, the ratio of the loss factor for the tapered collimator to the loss factor in the optical regime is a function only of the scaling parameter {sigma}L/d{sup 2}. The fact that the bunch length a and the taper length L appear as a product is consistent with the recent scaling derived by Stupakov in ref. [12], since there is only a weak dependence on g. One noteworthy fact that is not a priori expected is that only the larger radius or vertical half-aperture d appears. The reduction factor is independent of b. Moreover, it is striking that the specific form involving the arctan given in Eq. (5) holds for both geometries, with only the coefficient {mu} differing by a factor of {approx}2 for flat vs round. This suggests that there may be a useful phenomenological form for more general geometries which may follow from natural extensions of Eq. (5). This possibility is presently being investigated.

  11. Metacognition Assessment Interview: Instrument description and factor structure

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    Giovanni Pellecchia

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Metacognition is a multi-component psychological construct, characterised by the ability to identify and describe one’s own mental states and those of others. Evidence has been found for an association between deficits in metacognitive abilities and poor social functioning, low quality of life, psychopathology, and symptoms in Personality Disorders (PDs. However, to date, there are few psychometrically validated instruments available for assessing the different components of metacognition. A semi-structured interview, the Metacognition Assessment Interview (MAI, has been developed to evaluate different domains of metacognition. In the present study, we investigated the psychometric properties of the MAI in an outpatient clinical sample. Method: The MAI was administered to a clinical population of 306 outpatients attending a private clinical centre. Exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis and correlation with instruments assessing alexithymia and interpersonal problems were carried out to examine the dimensionality and validity of the MAI. Result: Explorative and confirmatory factor analyses revealed a good fit for both a two-factor model and a four-factor model of metacognition. The two-factor model yielded two main dimensions, which we named: Self domain, defined as self-reflection, and Other domain, defined as critical distancing from one’s own mental state and that of others. The four-factor solution is composed of four sub-domains: monitoring, integration, differentiation and decentration. Moreover, the MAI showed good convergent validity, with significant correlations with both alexithymia and interpersonal problems. Conclusions: These results confirm that the MAI is a reliable instrument for measuring metacognition and its different sub-domains. In particular, the MAI represents a useful and flexible instrument for the assessment of metacognition impairments in different psychopathologies and it can provide

  12. Employee motivation in Ghana: A factor structure and measurement tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. B. Puplampu

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper reports research on the factor structure of employee motivation as well as provides a tool for measuring the level of employee motivation in Ghanaian organisations. Methodology: The study was designed as exploratory, comparative and cross-sectional. 260 respondents drawn from across the gender, status and job grade hierarchy of 19 organisations participated. The organisations were matched in terms of tenure (over 5years, number of employees (50 or more and geographic location (headquartered in Accra. A 41-item questionnaire on the Level of Motivation (LoM; Characteristics of Employee Motivation (CEM; aspects of Organisational Citizenship Behaviour (OCB; Managerial Assumptions about employee behaviour (MA; Contextual Institutional Analysis (IAN and Organisational Leadership Issues (Le was developed and used. The instrument combined fixed response format on a 3-point scale with open-ended responses. Findings: Exploratory Factor Analyses (Varimax Rotation, converging in 26 iterations yielded 6 factors, which account for 60% of the variance. Thematic analyses of both interview and open-ended questionnaire data support the emergent factor structure, providing some tentative indication that employee motivation in the Ghanaian (or indeed African context should be looked at more in an integrated manner rather than in terms of the limiting confines of any one theory of motivation. The 3 items hypothesised to constitute the measure of level of employee motivation loaded neatly onto Factor 6. One-way ANOVA demonstrated no differences in the level of motivation across the organisational samples; this was confirmed by the interview data. Implications/Originality/Value: The implications and value of this research are: that motivation research in Africa does need to focus more on developing an integrated model of employee motivation; also, a simple 3-item but novel tool for measuring the level of employee motivation as well as its

  13. Factor structure of the Beck Depression Inventory-II among South Africans receiving antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagee, Ashraf; Nel, Adriaan; Saal, Wylene

    2014-02-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that mood disturbance is common among patients living with HIV and may be an important barrier to anti-retroviral therapy (ART) adherence. Thus the assessment of depressed mood is an important and necessary aspect of the experience of persons living with HIV as it may impact the health status of individuals directly and indirectly. We sought to determine the factor structure of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) among a sample of 185 South Africans living with HIV and receiving ART. The mean BDI score was 16.5 (SD 12.15) with a range from 0-50 (out of a possible 63), indicating on average moderate levels of depression. Cronbach's alpha for the total scale was 0.90. Although the four factors had eigenvalues that were technically above 1.0, only three factors could logically be extracted, the combination of which accounted for 47.29% of the variance. These three factors were Cognitive, Affective and Somatic. The results indicate that the BDI-II is a reliable measure of symptoms of depression among persons living with HIV. The factor structure among South Africans receiving ART is similar to that of other samples, although surprisingly, the item assessing appetite disturbance did not load on any factor. The results of the study suggest that the BDI-II is a useful measure among South Africans living with HIV. In the context of the need to rapidly identify depressed mood among persons receiving ART in public health clinics, the BDI may be a useful instrument. We end the paper with certain cautions associated with routine screening.

  14. Factor structure and reliability of the 12-item Sinhala version of General Health Questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrishantha Abeysena

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The General Health Questionnaire (GHQ is widely used to detect common psychiatric disorders. Even though the GHQ 12 has been validated for many countries, psychometric properties in relation to the Sinhala speaking Sri Lankan population lack conclusive evidence. Objective: To determine the factor structure and the reliability of the Sinhala version of GHQ 12. Methods: This was a descriptive study including 385 patients with in the age range of 18 to 75 years, attending the Out Patient Department of Colombo North Teaching Hospital, Ragama, Sri Lanka, between June 2009 to September 2010. Sinhala version of GHQ-12 was completed by the participants. Each item of the GHQ was rated on a four-point scale (0-1-2-3. Factor analyses were performed by applying Generalized Least Squares method using oblimin rotation. The internal consistency was assessed by calculating Cronbach’s α coefficient.Results: Median age of the study population was 32.5 years (IQR= 21years and the median GHQ score was 9 (IQR=7. The GHQ 12 yielded two factor solutions. Factor I (Depression and Anxiety accounted for 88% of the total explained variance and Factor II (Social dysfunction 12%. Forty five percent (45% of the total variance could be explained by the two extracted factors. There was a clear distinction between the items that loaded on the two factors. The correlation coefficient between the factors I and II was 0.65. The Cronbach's alpha of GHQ 12 was 0.88, which indicated satisfactory internal consistency. Conclusions: GHQ 12 displays adequate reliability and validity for use in the Sinhala speaking primary care attendees of Colombo North Teaching Hospital for assessing psychiatric disorders.

  15. Feelings about culture scales: development, factor structure, reliability, and validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffini, Cara S; Wong, Y Joel

    2015-04-01

    Although measures of cultural identity, values, and behavior exist in the multicultural psychological literature, there is currently no measure that explicitly assesses ethnic minority individuals' positive and negative affect toward culture. Therefore, we developed 2 new measures called the Feelings About Culture Scale--Ethnic Culture and Feelings About Culture Scale--Mainstream American Culture and tested their psychometric properties. In 6 studies, we piloted the measures, conducted factor analyses to clarify their factor structure, and examined reliability and validity. The factor structure revealed 2 dimensions reflecting positive and negative affect for each measure. Results provided evidence for convergent, discriminant, criterion-related, and incremental validity as well as the reliability of the scales. The Feelings About Culture Scales are the first known measures to examine both positive and negative affect toward an individual's ethnic culture and mainstream American culture. The focus on affect captures dimensions of psychological experiences that differ from cognitive and behavioral constructs often used to measure cultural orientation. These measures can serve as a valuable contribution to both research and counseling by providing insight into the nuanced affective experiences ethnic minority individuals have toward culture.

  16. INVESTIGATING THE FACTOR STRUCTURE OF THE BLOG ATTITUDE SCALE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra SHAHSAVAR

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to the wide application of advanced technology in education, many attitude scales have been developed to evaluate learners’ attitudes toward educational tools. However, with the rapid development of emerging technologies, using blogs as one of the Web 2.0 tools is still in its infancy and few blog attitude scales have been developed yet. In view of this need, a lot of researchers like to design a new scale based on their conceptual and theoretical framework of their own study rather than using available scales. The present study reports the design and development of a blog attitude scale (BAS. The researchers developed a pool of items to capture the complexity of the blog attitude trait, selected 29 items in the content analysis, and assigned the scale comprising 29 items to 216 undergraduate students to explore the underlying structure of the BAS. In exploratory factor analysis, three factors were discovered: blog anxiety, blog desirability, and blog self-efficacy; 14 items were excluded. The extracted items were subjected to a confirmatory factor analysis which lent further support to the BAS underpinning structure.

  17. Structure-based modelling, scoring, screening, and in vitro kinase assay of anesthetic pkc inhibitors against a natural medicine library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, B X; Chen, F R; Sun, X

    2017-02-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is an intracellular effector of the inositol phosphate-mediated signal transduction pathway. Evidence is emerging that certain general anaesthetics can influence the activity of PKC by interacting with the regulatory domain of the enzyme, and targeting PKC kinase domain is considered as a strategy to modulate the anaesthetic effects. Here, an integrated method was used to perform virtual screening against a large library of natural compounds for the discovery of new and potent PKC modulators. A number of hits were identified and their inhibitory activity against PKC kinase domain was measured by using a standard kinase assay protocol. Three and five compounds were determined to have high and moderate activities with IC50 values at nanomolar and micromolar levels, respectively. These compounds can be considered as promising lead molecular entities to develop efficacious anaesthetic modulators. Structural examination revealed a variety of nonbonded interactions such as hydrogen bonds, cation-π contacts, and hydrophobic forces across the complex interface of PKC with the identified compounds. This study helps to establish an integrative approach to rational kinase inhibitor discovery by efficiently exploiting various existing natural products.

  18. The potential ecotoxicological impact of pharmaceutical and personal care products on humans and freshwater, based on USEtox™ characterization factors. A Spanish case study of toxicity impact scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz de García, Sheyla; García-Encina, Pedro A; Irusta-Mata, Rubén

    2017-07-26

    Pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) are being increasingly included in Life Cycle Assessment studies (LCAs) since they have brought into evidence both human and ecological adverse effects due to their presence in different environmental compartments, wastewater facilities and industry. Therefore, the main goal of this research was to estimate the characterization factors (CFs) of 27 PPCPs widely used worldwide in order to incorporate their values into Life Cycle Impact Assessment studies (LCIA) or to generate a toxicity impact score ranking. Physicochemical properties, degradation rates, bioaccumulation, ecotoxicity and human health effects were collected from experimental data, recognized databases or estimated using EPI Suite™ and the USEtox™ software, and were subsequently used for estimating CFs. In addition, a Spanish toxicity impact score ranking was carried out for 49 PPCPs using the 27 newly calculated CFs, and 22 CFs already available in the literature, besides the data related to the occurrence of PPCPs in the environment in Spain. It has been highlighted that emissions into the continental freshwater compartment showed the highest CFs values for human effects (ranging from 10(-9) to 10(-3)Cases·kg(-1)), followed by emissions into the air (10(-9) to 10(-5)Cases·kg(-1)), soil (10(-11) to 10(5)Cases·kg(-1)) and seawater (10(-12) to 10(-4)Cases·kg(-1)). CFs regarding the affectation of freshwater aquatic environments were the highest of those proceeding from emissions into continental freshwater (between 1 to 10(4)PAF·m(3)·day·kgemission(-1)) due to the direct contact between the source of emission and the compartment affected, followed by soil (among 10(-1) to 10(4)PAF·m(3)·day·kgemission(-1)), and air (among 10(-2) to 10(4)PAF·m(3)·day·kgemission(-1)) while the lowest were the CFs of continental seawater (among 10(-28) to 10(-3)PAF·m(3)·day·kgemission(-1)). Freshwater aquatic ecotoxicological CFs are much higher than human

  19. Factor structure of social fears: The Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safren, S A; Heimberg, R G; Horner, K J; Juster, H R; Schneier, F R; Liebowitz, M R

    1999-01-01

    In the assessment of social anxiety, investigators often differentiate between social interactional anxiety and performance anxiety. The Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS), a clinician-administered measure of social anxiety and avoidance, was originally developed with separate subscales for the assessment of fear and avoidance of situations involving social interaction and performance/observation by others. Separate confirmatory factor analyses of the LSAS fear and avoidance ratings demonstrated that this two-factor model did not provide an adequate fit to the data, suggesting the need to further investigate the underlying structure of the LSAS. Separate exploratory common factor analyses of the fear and avoidance ratings yielded four similar factors for each: (1) social interaction, (2) public speaking, (3) observation by others, and (4) eating and drinking in public, which demonstrated convergent and discriminant validity with other measures of social anxiety. These findings suggest that there are four global categories of social fear assessed by the LSAS, and that while social interaction anxiety appears to be unifactorial, fear of performance/observation situations may be multifactorial.

  20. UCLA Loneliness Scale (Version 3): reliability, validity, and factor structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, D W

    1996-02-01

    In this article I evaluated the psychometric properties of the UCLA Loneliness Scale (Version 3). Using data from prior studies of college students, nurses, teachers, and the elderly, analyses of the reliability, validity, and factor structure of this new version of the UCLA Loneliness Scale were conducted. Results indicated that the measure was highly reliable, both in terms of internal consistency (coefficient alpha ranging from .89 to .94) and test-retest reliability over a 1-year period (r = .73). Convergent validity for the scale was indicated by significant correlations with other measures of loneliness. Construct validity was supported by significant relations with measures of the adequacy of the individual's interpersonal relationships, and by correlations between loneliness and measures of health and well-being. Confirmatory factor analyses indicated that a model incorporating a global bipolar loneliness factor along with two method factor reflecting direction of item wording provided a very good fit to the data across samples. Implications of these results for future measurement research on loneliness are discussed.

  1. Bacterial sigma factors: a historical, structural, and genomic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feklístov, Andrey; Sharon, Brian D; Darst, Seth A; Gross, Carol A

    2014-01-01

    Transcription initiation is the crucial focal point of gene expression in prokaryotes. The key players in this process, sigma factors (σs), associate with the catalytic core RNA polymerase to guide it through the essential steps of initiation: promoter recognition and opening, and synthesis of the first few nucleotides of the transcript. Here we recount the key advances in σ biology, from their discovery 45 years ago to the most recent progress in understanding their structure and function at the atomic level. Recent data provide important structural insights into the mechanisms whereby σs initiate promoter opening. We discuss both the housekeeping σs, which govern transcription of the majority of cellular genes, and the alternative σs, which direct RNA polymerase to specialized operons in response to environmental and physiological cues. The review concludes with a genome-scale view of the extracytoplasmic function σs, the most abundant group of alternative σs.

  2. Crystal Structure of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence Factor Regulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordes, Timothy J.; Worzalla, Gregory A.; Ginster, Aaron M.; Forest, Katrina T. (UW)

    2012-09-07

    Virulence factor regulator (Vfr) enhances Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogenicity through its role as a global transcriptional regulator. The crystal structure of Vfr shows that it is a winged-helix DNA-binding protein like its homologue cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP). In addition to an expected primary cyclic AMP-binding site, a second ligand-binding site is nestled between the N-terminal domain and the C-terminal helix-turn-helix domain. Unlike CRP, Vfr is a symmetric dimer in the absence of DNA. Removal of seven disordered N-terminal residues of Vfr prvents the growth of P. aeruginosa.

  3. Partial structure factors in star polymer/colloid mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Stellbrink, J; Richter, D; Moussaid, A; Schofield, A B; Poon, W C K; Pusey, P N; Lindner, P; Dzubiella, J; Likos, C N; Löwen, H

    2002-01-01

    Addition of polymer to colloidal suspensions induces an attractive part to the colloid pair potential, which is of purely entropic origin (''depletion interaction''). We investigated the influence of polymer branching on depletion forces by studying mixtures of hard sphere colloids and star polymers with increasing arm number f=2-32, but constant R sub g approx 500 A. We found a pronounced effect of branching on the position of the gas/liquid demixing transition. Using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) we were able to measure partial structure factors in star polymer/colloid mixtures. The relative distance to the demixing transition is reflected in our scattering data. (orig.)

  4. Dynamical Structure Factors of quasi-one-dimensional antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemans, Rob; Caux, Jean-Sébastien; Maillet, Jean Michel

    2007-03-01

    For a long time it has been impossible to accurately calculate the dynamical structure factors (spin-spin correlators as a function of momentum and energy) of quasi-one-dimensional antiferromagnets. For integrable Heisenberg chains, the recently developed ABACUS method (a first-principles computational approach based on the Bethe Ansatz) now yields highly accurate (over 99% of the sum rule) results for the DSF for finite chains, allowing for a very precise description of neutron-scattering data over the full momentum and energy range. We show remarkable agreement between results obtained with ABACUS and experiment.

  5. Variable structure motifs for transcription factor binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, John E; Evans, Kenneth J; Dyer, Nigel; Wernisch, Lorenz; Ott, Sascha

    2010-01-14

    Classically, models of DNA-transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) have been based on relatively few known instances and have treated them as sites of fixed length using position weight matrices (PWMs). Various extensions to this model have been proposed, most of which take account of dependencies between the bases in the binding sites. However, some transcription factors are known to exhibit some flexibility and bind to DNA in more than one possible physical configuration. In some cases this variation is known to affect the function of binding sites. With the increasing volume of ChIP-seq data available it is now possible to investigate models that incorporate this flexibility. Previous work on variable length models has been constrained by: a focus on specific zinc finger proteins in yeast using restrictive models; a reliance on hand-crafted models for just one transcription factor at a time; and a lack of evaluation on realistically sized data sets. We re-analysed binding sites from the TRANSFAC database and found motivating examples where our new variable length model provides a better fit. We analysed several ChIP-seq data sets with a novel motif search algorithm and compared the results to one of the best standard PWM finders and a recently developed alternative method for finding motifs of variable structure. All the methods performed comparably in held-out cross validation tests. Known motifs of variable structure were recovered for p53, Stat5a and Stat5b. In addition our method recovered a novel generalised version of an existing PWM for Sp1 that allows for variable length binding. This motif improved classification performance. We have presented a new gapped PWM model for variable length DNA binding sites that is not too restrictive nor over-parameterised. Our comparison with existing tools shows that on average it does not have better predictive accuracy than existing methods. However, it does provide more interpretable models of motifs of variable

  6. Variable structure motifs for transcription factor binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wernisch Lorenz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Classically, models of DNA-transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs have been based on relatively few known instances and have treated them as sites of fixed length using position weight matrices (PWMs. Various extensions to this model have been proposed, most of which take account of dependencies between the bases in the binding sites. However, some transcription factors are known to exhibit some flexibility and bind to DNA in more than one possible physical configuration. In some cases this variation is known to affect the function of binding sites. With the increasing volume of ChIP-seq data available it is now possible to investigate models that incorporate this flexibility. Previous work on variable length models has been constrained by: a focus on specific zinc finger proteins in yeast using restrictive models; a reliance on hand-crafted models for just one transcription factor at a time; and a lack of evaluation on realistically sized data sets. Results We re-analysed binding sites from the TRANSFAC database and found motivating examples where our new variable length model provides a better fit. We analysed several ChIP-seq data sets with a novel motif search algorithm and compared the results to one of the best standard PWM finders and a recently developed alternative method for finding motifs of variable structure. All the methods performed comparably in held-out cross validation tests. Known motifs of variable structure were recovered for p53, Stat5a and Stat5b. In addition our method recovered a novel generalised version of an existing PWM for Sp1 that allows for variable length binding. This motif improved classification performance. Conclusions We have presented a new gapped PWM model for variable length DNA binding sites that is not too restrictive nor over-parameterised. Our comparison with existing tools shows that on average it does not have better predictive accuracy than existing methods. However, it does

  7. Comparisons of American, Israeli, Italian and Mexican physicians and nurses on the total and factor scores of the Jefferson scale of attitudes toward physician-nurse collaborative relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojat, Mohammadreza; Gonnella, Joseph S; Nasca, Thomas J; Fields, Sylvia K; Cicchetti, Americo; Lo Scalzo, Alessandra; Taroni, Francesco; Amicosante, Anna Maria Vincenza; Macinati, Manuela; Tangucci, Massimo; Liva, Carlo; Ricciardi, Gualtiero; Eidelman, Shmuel; Admi, Hanna; Geva, Hana; Mashiach, Tanya; Alroy, Gideon; Alcorta-Gonzalez, Adelina; Ibarra, David; Torres-Ruiz, Antonio

    2003-05-01

    This cross-cultural study was designed to compare the attitudes of physicians and nurses toward physician-nurse collaboration in the United States, Israel, Italy and Mexico. Total participants were 2522 physicians and nurses who completed the Jefferson Scale of Attitudes Toward Physician-Nurse Collaboration (15 Likert-type items, (Hojat et al., Evaluation and the Health Professions 22 (1999a) 208; Nursing Research 50 (2001) 123). They were compared on the total scores and four factors of the Jefferson Scale (shared education and team work, caring as opposed to curing, nurses, autonomy, physicians' dominance). Results showed inter- and intra-cultural similarities and differences among the study groups providing support for the social role theory (Hardy and Conway, Role Theory: Perspectives for Health Professionals, Appelton-Century-Crofts, New York, 1978) and the principle of least interest (Waller and Hill, The Family: A Dynamic Interpretation, Dryden, New York, 1951) in inter-professional relationships. Implications for promoting physician-nurse education and inter-professional collaboration are discussed.

  8. Coronary calcium score in 12-year breast cancer survivors after adjuvant radiotherapy with low to moderate heart exposure - Relationship to cardiac radiation dose and cardiovascular risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjessem, Kristin Holm; Bosse, Gerhard; Fosså, Kristian; Reinertsen, Kristin V; Fosså, Sophie D; Johansen, Safora; Fosså, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    We explored the relation between coronary artery calcium (CAC) and cardiac radiation doses in breast cancer survivors (BCS) treated with radiotherapy (RT). Additionally, we examined the impact of other risk factors and biomarkers of coronary artery disease (CAD). 236 BCS (median age 51years [range 30-70], median observation time 12years [9.2-15.7]), treated with 4-field RT of 50GY, were included and examined in 2004 (T1), 2007 (T2) and 2011 (T3) with clinical examination, blood tests and questionnaires. At T3, cardiac computed tomography was performed with quantification of CAC using Agatston score (AS). For 106 patients cardiac dose volume histograms were available. The cohort-based median of the mean cardiac dose was 2.5 (range 0.5-7.0) Gy. There was no correlation between measures of cardiac dose and AS. AS was correlated with high cholesterol at T1/T2 (p=0.022), high proBNP at T1/T2 (p<0.022) and T3 (p<0.022) and high HbA1c at T3 (p=0.022). In addition, a high AS was significantly associated with hypertension (p=0.022). Age (p<0.001) and cholesterol at T1/T2 (p=0.001) retained significant associations in multivariate analysis. Traditional, modifiable risk factors of CAD correlate with CAC and may be important for the long term risk of CAD after RT. With low to moderate cardiac radiation exposure, a contribution of radiation dose to CAC could not be demonstrated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Skyrocketing Scores: An Urban Legend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krashen, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    A new urban legend claims, "As a result of the state dropping bilingual education, test scores in California skyrocketed." Krashen disputes this theory, pointing out that other factors offer more logical explanations of California's recent improvements in SAT-9 scores. He discusses research on the effects of California's Proposition 227,…

  10. Investigating Experimental Effects within the Framework of Structural Equation Modeling: An Example with Effects on Both Error Scores and Reaction Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Karl

    2008-01-01

    Structural equation modeling provides the framework for investigating experimental effects on the basis of variances and covariances in repeated measurements. A special type of confirmatory factor analysis as part of this framework enables the appropriate representation of the experimental effect and the separation of experimental and…

  11. Factor Structure of the Student-Teacher Relationship Scale for Norwegian School-Age Children Explored with Confirmatory Factor Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drugli, May Britt; Hjemdal, Odin

    2013-01-01

    The validity of the Student-Teacher Relationship Scale (STRS) was examined in a national sample of 863 Norwegian schoolchildren in grades 1-7 (aged 6-13). The original factor structure of the STRS was tested by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). The CFA results did not support the original three-factor structure of the STRS. Subsequent CFA of the…

  12. The prediction of the in-hospital mortality of acutely ill medical patients by electrocardiogram (ECG) dispersion mapping compared with established risk factors and predictive scores--a pilot study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kellett, John

    2011-08-01

    ECG dispersion mapping (ECG-DM) is a novel technique that analyzes low amplitude ECG oscillations and reports them as the myocardial micro-alternation index (MMI). This study compared the ability of ECG-DM to predict in-hospital mortality with traditional risk factors such as age, vital signs and co-morbid diagnoses, as well as three predictive scores: the Simple Clinical Score (SCS)--based on clinical and ECG findings, and two Medical Admission Risk System scores--one based on vital signs and laboratory data (MARS), and one only on laboratory data (LD).

  13. Parallel structural evolution of auxin response factors in the angiosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finet, Cédric; Fourquin, Chloé; Vinauger, Marion; Berne-Dedieu, Annick; Chambrier, Pierre; Paindavoine, Sandrine; Scutt, Charles P

    2010-09-01

    Here we analyze the structural evolution of the paralogous transcription factors ETTIN (ETT/ARF3) and AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 4 (ARF4), which control the development of floral organs and leaves in the model angiosperm Arabidopsis. ETT is truncated at its C terminus, and consequently lacks two regulatory domains present in most other ARFs, including ARF4. Our analysis indicates ETT and ARF4 to have been generated by the duplication of a non-truncated ARF gene prior to the radiation of the extant angiosperms. We furthermore show that either ETT or ARF4 orthologs have become modified to encode truncated ARF proteins, lacking C-terminal regulatory domains, in representatives of three groups that separated early in angiosperm evolution: Amborellales, Nymphaeales and the remaining angiosperm clade. Interestingly, the production of truncated ARF4 transcripts in Amborellales occurs through an alternative splicing mechanism, rather than through a permanent truncation, as in the other groups studied. To gain insight into the potential functional significance of truncations to ETT and ARF4, we tested the capacity of native, truncated and chimeric coding sequences of these genes to restore a wild-type phenotype to Arabidopsis ett mutants. We discuss the results of this analysis in the context of the structural evolution of ARF genes in the angiosperms. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. The structure of personality disorders: comparing the DSM-IV-TR Axis II classification with the five-factor model framework using structural equation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastiaansen, Leen; Rossi, Gina; Schotte, Christiaan; De Fruyt, Filip

    2011-06-01

    Earlier factor analytical studies on the empirical validity of the DSM-IV-TR (American Psychological Association, 2000) Axis II classification have offered little support for the current three-cluster structure. In his large-scale meta-analysis of previously published personality disorder correlation matrices, O'Connor (2005) found four factors, corresponding to the neuroticism, extraversion, agreeableness, and conscientiousness domains of the five-factor model of personality. In the present study, this dimensional four-factor model and the categorical DSM three-cluster structure were fitted to the Assessment of DSM-IV Personality Disorders questionnaire (ADP-IV; Schotte & De Doncker, 1994) scale scores using structural equation modelling. The results strongly favored the dimensional model, which also resembled other well-founded four-factor proposals (Livesley, Jang, & Vernon, 1998; Widiger & Simonsen, 2005). Moreover, a multigroup confirmatory factor analysis showed that this model was highly invariant and thus generalizable across two large clinical (n = 1,029) and general population (n = 659) samples.

  15. Factors effective on survival after radical prostatectomy: To what extent is pre-operative biopsy Gleason scoring is confident in predicting the prognosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Açıkgöz, Onur; Gazel, Eymen; Kasap, Yusuf; Yığman, Metin; Güneş, Zeki Ender; Ölçücüoğlu, Erkan

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the effect of different grades on independent survival from the biochemical relapse was investigated through comparison of the histological grades of the biopsy and prostatectomy materials in patients undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP). A total of 152 patients undergoing RP following biopsy were retrospectively investigated in an attempt to reveal the effect of discordance between needle biopsy Gleason score and RP Gleason score on prostate specific antigen relapse-free survival. Accordingly, while 58.3% (14/24) survival was seen in the patients in Group 1 (high-graded) with Gleason score 7, 93.7% (15/16) survival has been seen in the patients in Group 2 (low-graded) and Group 3 (same Gleason scores) with Gleason score 7. The difference in-between has been statically found significant (P < 0.001). Similarly, while a 10% (1/10) survival is seen in the patients in Group 1 with Gleason score 8 and above, 75% (3/4) survival has been observed in the patients in Group 2 and 3 with Gleason score 8 and above. Also in this comparison, the difference in-between has been statically found significant (P = 0.041). Eventually, different grading, particularly determination of Gleason score higher than the RP specimen biopsy also bring about bad pathologic parameters and shortened survival periods.

  16. Factors effective on survival after radical prostatectomy: To what extent is pre-operative biopsy Gleason scoring is confident in predicting the prognosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur Açikgöz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the effect of different grades on independent survival from the biochemical relapse was investigated through comparison of the histological grades of the biopsy and prostatectomy materials in patients undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP. A total of 152 patients undergoing RP following biopsy were retrospectively investigated in an attempt to reveal the effect of discordance between needle biopsy Gleason score and RP Gleason score on prostate specific antigen relapse-free survival. Accordingly, while 58.3% (14/24 survival was seen in the patients in Group 1 (high-graded with Gleason score 7, 93.7% (15/16 survival has been seen in the patients in Group 2 (low-graded and Group 3 (same Gleason scores with Gleason score 7. The difference in-between has been statically found significant (P < 0.001. Similarly, while a 10% (1/10 survival is seen in the patients in Group 1 with Gleason score 8 and above, 75% (3/4 survival has been observed in the patients in Group 2 and 3 with Gleason score 8 and above. Also in this comparison, the difference in-between has been statically found significant (P = 0.041. Eventually, different grading, particularly determination of Gleason score higher than the RP specimen biopsy also bring about bad pathologic parameters and shortened survival periods.

  17. Factor structure and item level psychometrics of the Social Problem Solving Inventory-Revised: Short Form in traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chih-Ying; Waid-Ebbs, Julia; Velozo, Craig A; Heaton, Shelley C

    2016-01-01

    Social problem-solving deficits characterise individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI), and poor social problem solving interferes with daily functioning and productive lifestyles. Therefore, it is of vital importance to use the appropriate instrument to identify deficits in social problem solving for individuals with TBI. This study investigates factor structure and item-level psychometrics of the Social Problem Solving Inventory-Revised: Short Form (SPSI-R:S), for adults with moderate and severe TBI. Secondary analysis of 90 adults with moderate and severe TBI who completed the SPSI-R:S was performed. An exploratory factor analysis (EFA), principal components analysis (PCA) and Rasch analysis examined the factor structure and item-level psychometrics of the SPSI-R:S. The EFA showed three dominant factors, with positively worded items represented as the most definite factor. The other two factors are negative problem-solving orientation and skills; and negative problem-solving emotion. Rasch analyses confirmed the three factors are each unidimensional constructs. It was concluded that the total score interpretability of the SPSI-R:S may be challenging due to the multidimensional structure of the total measure. Instead, we propose using three separate SPSI-R:S subscores to measure social problem solving for the TBI population.

  18. A structured approach to control of Salmonella Dublin in 10 Danish dairy herds based on risk scoring and test-and-manage procedures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Liza Rosenbaum; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose

    2012-01-01

    stock and adult cattle in 10 case herds that were followed for more than three years. The five steps in the structured approach were: 1) risk scoring to determine transmission routes within the herd and into the herd; 2) determining a plan of action; 3) performing management changes to close important...... routes of infection; 4) interpretation of repeated testing of individual animals to detect high-risk animals for special hygienic management or culling; and 5) diagnostic testing of different age groups and bulk tank milk to evaluate progress of control over time. Serology, true prevalence estimates...... and changes in herd classification in the Danish surveillance programme for Salmonella Dublin were used to assess the progress in the herds during and after the control period. Effective control of Salmonella Dublin was achieved in all participating herds through management that focused on closing infection...

  19. Factor structure and clinical utility of the Beck depression inventory in patients with binge eating disorder and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udo, Tomoko; McKee, Sherry A; Grilo, Carlos M

    2015-01-01

    The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) is often used to assess depression symptoms, but its factor structure and its clinical utility have not been evaluated in patients with binge eating disorder (BED) and obesity. A total of 882 treatment-seeking obese patients with BED were administered structured interviews (Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition Axis I Disorders) and completed self-report questionnaires. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses supported a brief 16-item BDI version with a three-factor structure (affective, attitudinal and somatic). Both 21- and 16-item versions showed excellent internal consistency (both α=0.89) and had significant correlation patterns with different aspects of eating disorder psychopathology; three factors showed significant but variable associations with eating disorder psychopathology. Area under the curves (AUC) for both BDI versions were significant in predicting major depressive disorder (MDD; AUC=0.773 [16-item], 73.5% sensitivity/70.2% specificity, AUC=0.769 [21-item], 79.5% sensitivity/64.1% specificity) and mood disorders (AUC=0.763 [16-item], 67.1% sensitivity/71.5% specificity, AUC=0.769 [21-item], 84.2% sensitivity/55.7% specificity). The 21-item BDI (cutoff score ≥16) showed higher negative predictive values (94.0% vs. 93.0% [MDD]; 92.4% vs. 88.3% [mood disorders]) than the brief 16-item BDI (cutoff score ≥13). Both BDI versions demonstrated moderate performance as a screening instrument for MDD/mood disorders in obese patients with BED. Advantages and disadvantages for both versions are discussed. A three-factor structure has potential to inform the conceptualization of depression features. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Factors influencing protein tyrosine nitration--structure-based predictive models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayden, Alexander S; Yakovlev, Vasily A; Graves, Paul R; Mikkelsen, Ross B; Kellogg, Glen E

    2011-03-15

    Models for exploring tyrosine nitration in proteins have been created based on 3D structural features of 20 proteins for which high-resolution X-ray crystallographic or NMR data are available and for which nitration of 35 total tyrosines has been experimentally proven under oxidative stress. Factors suggested in previous work to enhance nitration were examined with quantitative structural descriptors. The role of neighboring acidic and basic residues is complex: for the majority of tyrosines that are nitrated the distance to the heteroatom of the closest charged side chain corresponds to the distance needed for suspected nitrating species to form hydrogen bond bridges between the tyrosine and that charged amino acid. This suggests that such bridges play a very important role in tyrosine nitration. Nitration is generally hindered for tyrosines that are buried and for those tyrosines for which there is insufficient space for the nitro group. For in vitro nitration, closed environments with nearby heteroatoms or unsaturated centers that can stabilize radicals are somewhat favored. Four quantitative structure-based models, depending on the conditions of nitration, have been developed for predicting site-specific tyrosine nitration. The best model, relevant for both in vitro and in vivo cases, predicts 30 of 35 tyrosine nitrations (positive predictive value) and has a sensitivity of 60/71 (11 false positives). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Recovery of weak factor loadings when adding the mean structure in confirmatory factor analysis: A simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen eXiménez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article extends previous research on the recovery of weak factor loadings in confirmatory factor analysis by exploring the effects of adding the mean structure. This issue has not been examined in previous research. This study is based on the framework of Yung and Bentler (1999 and aims to examine the conditions that affect the recovery of weak factor loadings when the model includes the mean structure, compared to analyzing the covariance structure alone. A simulation study was conducted in which several constraints were defined for one-, two-, and three-factor models. Results show that adding the mean structure improves the recovery of weak factor loadings and reduces the asymptotic variances for the factor loadings, particularly for the models with a smaller number of factors and a small sample size. Therefore, under certain circumstances, modeling the means should be seriously considered for covariance models containing weak factor loadings.

  2. Nucleon Structure and Hyperon Form Factors from Lattice QCD.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin,H.W.

    2007-06-11

    In this work, I report the latest lattice QCD calculations of nucleon and hyperon structure from chiral fermions in 2+1-flavor dynamical simulations. All calculations are done with a chirally symmetric fermion action, domain-wall fermions, for valence quarks. I begin with the latest lattice results on the nucleon structure, focusing on results from RBC/UKQCD using 2+1-flavor chiral fermion actions. We find the chiral-extrapolated axial coupling constant at physical pion mass point. to be 1.23(5), consistent with experimental value. The renormalization constants for the structure functions are obtained from RI/MOM-scheme non-perturbative renormalization. We find first moments of the polarized and unpolarized nucleon structure functions at zero transfer momentum to be 0.133(13) and 0.203(23) respectively, using continuum chiral extrapolation. These are consistent with the experimental values, unlike previous calculations which have been 50% larger. We also have a prediction for the transversity, which we find to be 0.56(4). The twist-3 matrix element is consistent with zero which agrees with the prediction of the Wandzura-Wilczek relation. In the second half of this work, I report an indirect dynamical estimation of the strangeness proton magnetic moments using mixed actions. With the analysis of hyperon form factors and using charge symmetry, the strangeness of proton is found to be -0.066(2G), consistent with the Adelaide-JLab Collaboration's result. The hyperon {Sigma} and {Xi} axial coupling constants are also performed for the first time in a lattice calculation, g{sub {Sigma}{Sigma}} = 0.441(14) and g{sub {Xi}{Xi}} = -0.277(11).

  3. Nucleon Structure and hyperon form factors from lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Huey-Wen

    2007-06-11

    In this work, I report the latest lattice QCD calculations of nucleon and hyperon structure from chiral fermions in 2+1-flavor dynamical simulations. All calculations are done with a chirally symmetric fermion action, domain-wall fermions, for valence quarks. I begin with the latest lattice results on the nucleon structure, focusing on results from RBC/UKQCD using 2+1-flavor chiral fermion actions. We find the chiral-extrapolated axial coupling constant at physical pion mass point to be 1.23(5), consistant with experimental value. The renormalization constants for the structure functions are obtained from RI/MOM-scheme non-perturbative renormalization. We find first moments of the polarized and unpolarized nucleon structure functions at zero transfer momentum to be 0.133(13) and 0.203(23) respectively, using continuum chiral extrapolation. These are consistent with the experimental values, unlike previous calculations which have been 50% larger. We also have a prediction for the transversity, which we find to be 0.56(4). The twist-3 matrix element is consistent with zero which agrees with the prediction of the Wandzura-Wilczek relation. In the second half of this work, I report an indirect dynamical estimation of the strangeness proton magnetic moments using mixed actions. With the analysis of hyperon form factors and using charge symmetry, the strangeness of proton is found to be -0.066(26), consistent with the Adelaide-JLab Collaboration's result. The hyperon Sigma and Xi axial coupling constants are also performed for the first time in a lattice calculation, g_SigmaSigma = 0.441(14) and g_XiXi = -0.277(11).

  4. Trends in Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factor Prevalence and Estimated 10-Year Cardiovascular Risk Scores in a Large Untreated French Urban Population: The CARVAR 92 Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carma Karam

    Full Text Available Surveys measuring effectiveness of public awareness campaigns in reducing cardiovascular disease (CVD incidence have yielded equivocal findings. The aim of this study was to describe cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs changes over the years in an untreated population-based study.Between 2007 and 2012, we conducted a screening campaign for CVRFs in men aged 40 to 65 yrs and women aged 50 to 70 yrs in the western suburbs of Paris. Data were complete for 20,324 participants of which 14,709 were untreated.The prevalence trend over six years was statistically significant for hypertension in men from 25.9% in 2007 to 21.1% in 2012 (p=0.002 and from 23% in 2007 to 12.7% in 2012 in women (p<0.0001. The prevalence trend of tobacco smoking decreased from 38.6% to 27.7% in men (p=0.0001 and from 22.6% to 16.8% in women (p=0.113. The Framingham 10-year risk for CVD decreased from 13.3 ± 8.2 % in 2007 to 11.7 ± 9.0 % in 2012 in men and from 8.0 ± 4.1 % to 5.9 ± 3.4 % in women. The 10-year risk of fatal CVD based on the European Systematic COronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE decreased in men and in women (p <0.0001.Over a 6-year period, several CVRFs have decreased in our screening campaign, leading to decrease in the 10-year risk for CVD and the 10-year risk of fatal CVD. Cardiologists should recognize the importance of community prevention programs and communication policies, particularly tobacco control and healthier diets to decrease the CVRFs in the general population.

  5. Hormonal profile in children with isolated hypospadias associates better with comprehensive score of local anatomical factors as compared to meatal location or degree of chordee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simmi K Ratan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To evaluate if hormonal profile of children with isolated hypospadias (IH associates better with comprehensive local anatomical factor score (LAFS than with clinically adjudged urethral meatus location or severity of chordee/k.j. Material and Methods: Ninety-nine children with IH were enrolled, as per inclusion criteria. Meatal location was recorded at first clinical examination in OPD; while LAFS was computed per-operatively using indigenously devised scale, except for neonates. Hypospadiacs were first classified into three standard meatal based groups and subsequently into LAFS based two groups (≤19, >19. For all participants, pre HCG and post HCG (96 hour post- injection estimation of serum gonadotropins, DHEA-S, estrogen (E, progesterone (P, testosterone (T and Dihydrotestosterone (DHT was done. Statistical tests were applied to assess significance of hormonal levels with respect to meatal location, chordee and LAFS. Results: Only FSH levels differed significantly among meatal based groups; while among LAFS groups, multiple hormonal differences were noted; with poor LAFS associated significantly with higher FSH, LH and lower E, T/DHT. Children with severe degree of chordee had poorer T output and a significantly lower LAFS as compared to those with moderate/mild chordee. Conclusion: Serotoli cell dysfunction, indirectly indicated by high FSH was found among midpenile hypospadiacs and those with poorer LAFS. Since groups based on LAFS revealed multiple intergroup hormonal differences than what was seen for meatal/chordee based groups; LAFS should be considered a better guide for prognostication and for deciding about hormonal supplementation. Lower androgenic output was particularly noted in children with severe chordee.

  6. Untrained consumer assessment of the eating quality of European beef: 2. Demographic factors have only minor effects on consumer scores and willingness to pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonny, S P F; Gardner, G E; Pethick, D W; Allen, P; Legrand, I; Wierzbicki, J; Farmer, L J; Polkinghorne, R J; Hocquette, J-F

    2017-08-01

    The beef industry must become more responsive to the changing market place and consumer demands. An essential part of this is quantifying a consumer's perception of the eating quality of beef and their willingness to pay for that quality, across a broad range of demographics. Over 19 000 consumers from Northern Ireland, Poland, Ireland and France each tasted seven beef samples and scored them for tenderness, juiciness, flavour liking and overall liking. These scores were weighted and combined to create a fifth score, termed the Meat Quality 4 score (MQ4) (0.3×tenderness, 0.1×juiciness, 0.3×flavour liking and 0.3×overall liking). They also allocated the beef samples into one of four quality grades that best described the sample; unsatisfactory, good-every-day, better-than-every-day or premium. After the completion of the tasting panel, consumers were then asked to detail, in their own currency, their willingness to pay for these four categories which was subsequently converted to a proportion relative to the good-every-day category (P-WTP). Consumers also answered a short demographic questionnaire. The four sensory scores, the MQ4 score and the P-WTP were analysed separately, as dependant variables in linear mixed effects models. The answers from the demographic questionnaire were included in the model as fixed effects. Overall, there were only small differences in consumer scores and P-WTP between demographic groups. Consumers who preferred their beef cooked medium or well-done scored beef higher, except in Poland, where the opposite trend was found. This may be because Polish consumers were more likely to prefer their beef cooked well-done, but samples were cooked medium for this group. There was a small positive relationship with the importance of beef in the diet, increasing sensory scores by about 4% in Poland and Northern Ireland. Men also scored beef about 2% higher than women for most sensory scores in most countries. In most countries, consumers were

  7. Comparison of three prognostic scoring systems in a series of 146 cases of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML): MD Anderson prognostic score (MDAPS), CMML-specific prognostic scoring system (CPSS) and Mayo prognostic model. A detailed review of prognostic factors in CMML.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Xavier; Nomdedeu, Meritxell; Santacruz, Rodrigo; Martínez, Núria; Costa, Dolors; Pereira, Arturo; Estrada, Natalia; Xicoy, Blanca; Esteve, Jordi; Nomdedeu, Benet

    2015-07-23

    Although specific prognostic models for chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) exist, few are based on large series of patients. MD Anderson prognostic score (MDAPS) has been the most useful for CMML risk assessment. Due to recent emergence of CMML-specific prognostic scoring system (CPSS) and Mayo prognostic model, we compared the three scores. One hundred forty-six CMML patients diagnosed between 1998 and 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. Univariate analysis was performed to assess prognostic impact on overall survival (OS) and leukemia-free survival (LFS) of the variables composing the scores and all items showed prognostic value on OS with the exception of the presence of circulating immature myeloid cells. Regarding LFS, only CPSS variables, bone marrow blast ≥10% and an absolute monocyte count >10×10(9)/L had an impact. When the scores were applied, all showed an impact on OS and retained their significance in multivariate analysis. By using ROC curves and C-index, CPSS showed a slightly better predictive value for mortality and leukemia transformation. Variables composing the three indexes were compared in multivariate analysis and only CPSS parameters and platelets<100×10(9)/L retained their significance. Based on these findings, by adding platelet count to CPSS, a new score was implemented (CPSS-P) showing the best risk prediction capability in our series. This study reinforces the validity of the tested scores.

  8. Individual- and Structural-Level Risk Factors for Suicide Attempts Among Transgender Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Brumer, Amaya; Hatzenbuehler, Mark L; Oldenburg, Catherine E; Bockting, Walter

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed individual (ie, internalized transphobia) and structural forms of stigma as risk factors for suicide attempts among transgender adults. Internalized transphobia was assessed through a 26-item scale including four dimensions: pride, passing, alienation, and shame. State-level structural stigma was operationalized as a composite index, including density of same-sex couples; proportion of Gay-Straight Alliances per public high school; 5 policies related to sexual orientation discrimination; and aggregated public opinion toward homosexuality. Multivariable logistic generalized estimating equation models assessed associations of interest among an online sample of transgender adults (N = 1,229) representing 48 states and the District of Columbia. Lower levels of structural stigma were associated with fewer lifetime suicide attempts (AOR 0.96, 95% CI 0.92-0.997), and a higher score on the internalized transphobia scale was associated with greater lifetime suicide attempts (AOR 1.18, 95% CI 1.04-1.33). Addressing stigma at multiple levels is necessary to reduce the vulnerability of suicide attempts among transgender adults.

  9. An efficient block variant of robust structured multifrontal factorization method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zuo Xian-Yu; Mo Ze-Yao; Gu Tong-Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Based on the two-dimensional three-temperature (2D3T) radiation diffusion equations and its discrete system,using the block diagonal structure of the three-temperature matrix,the reordering and symbolic decomposition parts of the RSMF method are replaced with corresponding block operation in order to improve the solution efficiency.We call this block form method block RSMF (in brief,BRSMF) method.The new BRSMF method not only makes the reordering and symbolic decomposition become more effective,but also keeps the cost of numerical factorization from increasing and ensures the precision of solution very well.The theoretical analysis of the computation complexity about the new BRSMF method shows that the solution efficiency about the BRSMF method is higher than the original RSMF method.The numerical experiments also show that the new BRSMF method is more effective than the original RSMF method.

  10. Portuguese validation of the Short Health Anxiety Inventory: Factor structure, reliability, and factor invariance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Alexandra; Reis, Sibília; Espada, José P; Orgilés, Mireia

    2016-09-01

    The Short Health Anxiety Inventory is a brief instrument to assess health anxiety widely used across countries; however, no validated version is available for Portuguese-speaking population. Factorial structure, reliability, and equivalency factor with the Spanish version were analyzed with Portuguese adolescents aged 14-18 years. A Portuguese adolescent cohort ( N = 629) and a comparative Spanish adolescent cohort ( N = 1502) were evaluated. The original two-factor version was the best fitting model for the Portuguese version. The reliability was excellent. Complete measurement invariance across both countries was supported. The Portuguese version of the Short Health Anxiety Inventory is a valid screening inventory to assess health anxiety in adolescents.

  11. Eating Behaviour in the General Population: An Analysis of the Factor Structure of the German Version of the Three-Factor-Eating-Questionnaire (TFEQ and Its Association with the Body Mass Index.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje Löffler

    Full Text Available The Three-Factor-Eating-Questionnaire (TFEQ is an established instrument to assess eating behaviour. Analysis of the TFEQ-factor structure was based on selected, convenient and clinical samples so far. Aims of this study were (I to analyse the factor structure of the German version of the TFEQ and (II--based on the refined factor structure--to examine the association between eating behaviour and the body mass index (BMI in a general population sample of 3,144 middle-aged and older participants (40-79 years of the ongoing population based cohort study of the Leipzig Research Center for Civilization Diseases (LIFE Health Study. The factor structure was examined in a split-half analysis with both explorative and confirmatory factor analysis. Associations between TFEQ-scores and BMI values were tested with multiple regression analyses controlled for age, gender, and education. We found a three factor solution for the TFEQ with an 'uncontrolled eating', a 'cognitive restraint' and an 'emotional eating' domain including 29 of the original 51 TFEQ-items. Scores of the 'uncontrolled eating domain' showed the strongest correlation with BMI values (partial r = 0.26. Subjects with scores above the median in both 'uncontrolled eating' and 'emotional eating' showed the highest BMI values (mean = 29.41 kg/m², subjects with scores below the median in all three domains showed the lowest BMI values (mean = 25.68 kg/m²; F = 72.074, p<0.001. Our findings suggest that the TFEQ is suitable to identify subjects with specific patterns of eating behaviour that are associated with higher BMI values. Such information may help health care professionals to develop and implement more tailored interventions for overweight and obese individuals.

  12. DYNAMIC CHARACTERISTIC ANALYSIS OF FUZZY- STOCHASTIC TRUSS STRUCTURES BASED ON FUZZY FACTOR METHOD AND RANDOM FACTOR METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Juan; CHEN Jian-jun; XU Ya-lan; JIANG Tao

    2006-01-01

    A new fuzzy stochastic finite element method based on the fuzzy factor method and random factor method is given and the analysis of structural dynamic characteristic for fuzzy stochastic truss structures is presented. Considering the fuzzy randomness of the structural physical parameters and geometric dimensions simultaneously, the structural stiffness and mass matrices are constructed based on the fuzzy factor method and random factor method; from the Rayleigh's quotient of structural vibration, the structural fuzzy random dynamic characteristic is obtained by means of the interval arithmetic;the fuzzy numeric characteristics of dynamic characteristic are then derived by using the random variable's moment function method and algebra synthesis method. Two examples are used to illustrate the validity and rationality of the method given. The advantage of this method is that the effect of the fuzzy randomness of one of the structural parameters on the fuzzy randomness of the dynamic characteristic can be reflected expediently and objectively.

  13. Factor structure of the Perceived Stress Scale-10 (PSS) across English and Spanish language responders in the HCHS/SOL Sociocultural Ancillary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Marisa J; Brintz, Carrie E; Birnbaum-Weitzman, Orit; Penedo, Frank J; Gallo, Linda C; Gonzalez, Patricia; Gouskova, Natalia; Isasi, Carmen R; Navas-Nacher, Elena L; Perreira, Krista M; Roesch, Scott C; Schneiderman, Neil; Llabre, Maria M

    2017-03-01

    Despite widespread use, psychometric investigation of the original English and translated Spanish versions of the 10-item Perceived Stress Scale (PSS; Cohen, Kamarck, & Mermelstein, 1983) has been limited among the U.S. Hispanic/Latino population. The present study examined the factor structure, factorial invariance, and reliability and validity of PSS scores from English and Spanish versions using data from 5,176 Hispanics/Latinos who participated in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Sociocultural Ancillary Study. The total sample and language multigroup confirmatory factor analyses supported a bifactor model with all 10 PSS items loading on a general perceived stress factor, and the 4 reverse-worded items also loading on a reverse-worded factor. Internal consistency ranged from .68 to .78, and it was indicated that reliable variance exists beyond the general perceived stress factor. The model displayed configural, metric, scalar, and residual invariance across language groups. Convergent validity analyses indicated that both the general perceived stress factor and the reverse-worded factor were related to scores of depression, anxiety, and anger in the expected directions. The reverse-worded factor added to the validity of the PSS beyond the general perceived stress factor. The total computed score of the PSS can be recommended for use with Hispanics/Latinos in the United States that complete the measure in English or Spanish and the reverse-worded factor can enhance prediction. (PsycINFO Database Record

  14. Fetal Biophysical Profile Scoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.R. HaghighatKhah

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available   "nFetal biophysical profile scoring is a sonographic-based method of fetal assessment first described by Manning and Platt in 1980. "nThe biophysical profile score was developed as a method to integrate real-time observations of the fetus and his/her intrauterine environment in order to more comprehensively assess the fetal condition. These findings must be evaluated in the context of maternal/fetal history (i.e., chronic hypertension, post-dates, intrauterine growth restriction, etc, fetal structural integrity (presence or absence of congenital anomalies, and the functionality of fetal support structures (placental and umbilical cord. For example, acute asphyxia due to placental abruption may result in an absence of the acute variables of the biophysical profile score (fetal breathing movements, fetal movement, fetal tone, and fetal heart rate reactivity with a normal amniotic fluid volume. With post maturity the asphyxial event may be intermittent and chronic resulting in a decrease in amniotic fluid volume, but with the acute variables remaining normal. "nWhile the 5 components of the biophysical profile score have remained unchanged since 1980 (Manning, 1980, the definitions of a normal and abnormal parameter have evolved with increasing experience. "nIn 1984 the definition of oligohydramnios was increased from < 1cm pocket of fluid to < 2.0 x 1.0 cm pocket. Oligohydramnios is now defined as a pocket of amniotic fluid < 2.0 x 2.0 cm (Manning, 1995a "nIf the four ultrasound variables are normal, the accuracy of the biophysical profile score was not found to be significantly improved by adding the non-stress test. As a result, in 1987 the profile score was modified to incorporate the non-stress test only when one of the ultrasound variables was abnormal (Manning 1987. Table 1 outlines the current definitions for quantifying a variable as present or absent. "nEach of the 5 components of the biophysical profile score does not have equal

  15. Structural Analysis of the Factors Influencing the Financing of Forestry Enterprises Based on Interpretive Structural Modeling(ISM)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen; WANG; Weiping; LIU; Xiaomin; JIANG

    2015-01-01

    Through the collection of related literature,we point out the six major factors influencing China’s forestry enterprises’ financing: insufficient national support; regulations and institutional environmental factors; narrow channels of financing; inappropriate existing mortgagebacked approach; forestry production characteristics; forestry enterprises’ defects. Then,we use interpretive structural modeling( ISM) from System Engineering to analyze the structure of the six factors and set up ladder-type structure. We put three factors including forestry production characteristics,shortcomings of forestry enterprises and regulatory,institutional and environmental factors as basic factors and put other three factors as important factors. From the perspective of the government and enterprises,we put forward some personal advices and ideas based on the basic factors and important factors to ease the financing difficulties of forestry enterprises.

  16. Fibroblast Growth Factor-23 in Obese, Normotensive Adolescents is Associated with Adverse Cardiac Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Farah N.; Falkner, Bonita; Gidding, Samuel S.; Price, Heather E.; Keith, Scott W.; Langman, Craig B.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23) is a biomarker for cardiovascular (CV) disease. Obesity may promote FGF23 production in the absence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). We sought to determine among normotensive African American adolescents, whether FGF23 levels are higher in obese compared with normal weight African American adolescents; and to determine the relationship of FGF23 with markers of cardiac structure and insulin resistance. Study design Cross-sectional data were obtained from a cohort of 130 normotensive, African American adolescents aged 13-18 years old without CKD; 74 were obese; 56 were normal weight. Plasma C-terminal FGF23, fasting glucose and insulin, and hsCRP were measured; participants underwent M-mode echocardiography. Results FGF23 was skewed and approximately normally distributed after natural log transformation (logFGF23). FGF23 levels were higher in obese versus normal weight participants (geometric mean 43 vs. 23 RU/mL, p<0.01). FGF23 values were significantly higher in participants with eccentric or concentric cardiac hypertrophy compared with those without hypertrophy (p<0.01). LogFGF23 directly correlated with BMI, BMI z-score, waist circumference, fasting insulin levels, and HOMA scores. Regression models adjusted for age, sex, and hsCRP suggest that each 10% increase in FGF23 is associated with 1.31 unit increase in LVM (p<0.01), 0.29 unit increase in LVMI (p<0.01), and 0.01 unit increase in left atrial dimension indexed to height (p=0.02). Conclusions In this sample of obese African American adolescents, FGF23 blood levels were associated with abnormal cardiac structure. We postulate that FGF23 may be an early marker of cardiac injury in obese but otherwise healthy African American adolescents. PMID:25063724

  17. Score evaluation based on factor analysis and variable weight synthesizing%基于因子分析和变权综合的成绩评价方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓朝阳

    2011-01-01

    结合因子分析和TOPSIS评价,提出了一种新的成绩评价方法.对某班级考试成绩进行实证分析.实验表明:这种方法可以有效得挖掘出影响学习成绩的能力因子.对能力因子的TOPSIS评价可以得到科学的排名,客观反映了学生各方面能力均衡发展的情况.%A new way for score evaluation is proposed based on factor analysis and TOPSIS evaluation.The method is used to evaluate the students' scores for illustration.The result shows that the method can help find factors that have direct influences on scores,and

  18. Analysis of causal relationships by structural equation modeling to determine the factors influencing cognitive function in elderly people in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Daisuke; Nakatani, Ken; Takeda, Tokunori; Fujita, Takashi; Sunahara, Nobuyuki; Inoue, Katsumi; Notoya, Masako

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify a potentiality factor that is a preventive factor for decline in cognitive function. Additionally, this study pursues to clarify the causal relationship between the each potential factor and its influence on cognitive function. Subjects were 366 elderly community residents (mean age 73.7 ± 6.4, male 51, female 315) who participated in the Taketoyo Project from 2007 to 2011. Factor analysis was conducted to identify groupings within mental, social, life, physical and cognitive functions. In order to detect clusters of 14 variables, the item scores were subjected to confirmatory factor analysis. We performed Structural Equation Modeling analysis to calculate the standardization coefficient and correlation coefficient for every factor. The cause and effect hypothesis model was used to gather two intervention theory hypotheses for dementia prevention (direct effect, indirect effect) in one system. Finally, we performed another Structural Equation Modeling analysis to calculate the standardization of the cause and effect hypothesis model. Social participation was found to be activated by the improvement of four factors, and in turn, activated "Social participation" acted on cognitive function.

  19. Factorial Structure of the Career Decision Scale: Incremental Validity of the Five-Factor Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldt, Ronald C.; Ferry, Ashley; Bullock, Melinda; Camarotti-Carvalho, Ana; Collingwood, Melinda; Eilers, Scott; Meyer, Luke; Nurre, Emily; Woelfel, Cheryl

    2010-01-01

    For comparison of one-, three-, and four-factor structures of the Indecision scale of the Career Decision Scale, results of confirmatory factor analysis (N = 686) indicated the best fit for the three-factor structure. Multiple regression analysis results indicated incremental validity of the five-factor model for predicting dimensions of career…

  20. Factorial Structure of the Career Decision Scale: Incremental Validity of the Five-Factor Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldt, Ronald C.; Ferry, Ashley; Bullock, Melinda; Camarotti-Carvalho, Ana; Collingwood, Melinda; Eilers, Scott; Meyer, Luke; Nurre, Emily; Woelfel, Cheryl

    2010-01-01

    For comparison of one-, three-, and four-factor structures of the Indecision scale of the Career Decision Scale, results of confirmatory factor analysis (N = 686) indicated the best fit for the three-factor structure. Multiple regression analysis results indicated incremental validity of the five-factor model for predicting dimensions of career…

  1. Factors associated with medical student test anxiety in objective structured clinical examinations: a preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate attributes of medical students associated with their test anxiety on Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs). Methods A cross-sectional study using a self-administered questionnaire was conducted of all Year 3 and 4 students at a private medical school in South Korea in 2014. This 53-item questionnaire consisted of factors pertaining to test anxiety on the OSCE identified from a review of relevant literature, which included students’ motivational beliefs and achievement emotions, perceived values of the OSCE, and attitude and orientation towards patients. Participants’ test anxiety levels were measured using the Korean Achievement Emotions Questionnaire. Participants rated their responses using a five-point Likert-type scale. Univariate analysis was performed to examine relationships between the variables. Results A total of 94 students completed the questionnaire (a 93% response rate). No differences in the participants’ test anxiety scores were observed across genders, entry-levels, or years in medical school. Participants’ test anxiety on the OSCE showed moderate association with their class-related achievement emotions (i.e., anxiety and boredom), where r = 0.46 and 0.32, p OSCE (r = -0.21, p OSCE. These findings have implications for developing effective educational interventions for helping students cope with such a stress by enhancing our understanding of the various factors that influence their test anxiety in OSCEs. PMID:28035056

  2. Factors associated with medical student test anxiety in objective structured clinical examinations: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyong-Jee

    2016-12-29

    To investigate attributes of medical students associated with their test anxiety on Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs). A cross-sectional study using a self-administered questionnaire was conducted of all Year 3 and 4 students at a private medical school in South Korea in 2014. This 53-item questionnaire consisted of factors pertaining to test anxiety on the OSCE identified from a review of relevant literature, which included students' motivational beliefs and achievement emotions, perceived values of the OSCE, and attitude and orientation towards patients. Participants' test anxiety levels were measured using the Korean Achievement Emotions Questionnaire. Participants rated their responses using a five-point Likert-type scale. Univariate analysis was performed to examine relationships between the variables. A total of 94 students completed the questionnaire (a 93% response rate). No differences in the participants' test anxiety scores were observed across genders, entry-levels, or years in medical school. Participants' test anxiety on the OSCE showed moderate association with their class-related achievement emotions (i.e., anxiety and boredom), where r = 0.46 and 0.32, p anxiety on the OSCE. These findings have implications for developing effective educational interventions for helping students cope with such a stress by enhancing our understanding of the various factors that influence their test anxiety in OSCEs.

  3. Effect of transforming growth factor-beta1 on embryonic and posthatch muscle growth and development in normal and low score normal chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X; Velleman, S G

    2009-02-01

    During skeletal muscle development, transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) is a potent inhibitor of muscle cell proliferation and differentiation. The TGF-beta1 signal is carried by Smad proteins into the cell nucleus, inhibiting the expression of key myogenic regulatory factors including MyoD and myogenin. However, the molecular mechanism by which TGF-beta1 inhibits muscle cell proliferation and differentiation has not been well documented in vivo. The present study investigated the effect of TGF-beta1 on in vivo skeletal muscle growth and development. A chicken line, Low Score Normal (LSN) with reduced muscling and upregulated TGF-beta1 expression, was used and compared to a normal chicken line. The injection of TGF-beta1 at embryonic day (ED) 3 significantly reduced the pectoralis major (p. major) muscle weight in the normal birds at 1 wk posthatch, whereas no significant difference was observed in the LSN birds. The difference between normal and LSN birds in response to TGF-beta1 is likely due to different levels of endogenous TGF-beta1 where the LSN birds have increased TGF-beta1 expression in their p. major muscle at both 17 ED and 6 wk posthatch. Smad3 expression was reduced by TGF-beta1 from 10 ED to 1 wk posthatch in normal p. major muscle. Unlike Smad3, Smad7 expression was not significantly affected by TGF-beta1 until posthatch in both normal and LSN p. major muscle. Expression of MyoD was reduced 35% by TGF-beta1 during embryonic development in normal p. major muscle, whereas LSN p. major muscle showed a delayed decrease at 1 d posthatch in MyoD expression in response to the TGF-beta1 treatment. Myogenin expression was reduced 29% by TGF-beta1 after hatch in normal p. major muscle. In LSN p. major muscle, TGF-beta1 treatment significantly decreased myogenin expression by 43% at 1 d posthatch and 32% at 1 wk posthatch. These data suggested that TGF-beta1 reduced p. major muscle growth by inhibiting MyoD and myogenin expression during both embryonic

  4. Factor Structure of Quality of Life: The Lehman Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Marianne; Hull, James W.; Terkelsen, Kenneth G.; Smith, Thomas E.; Anthony, Donna

    1997-01-01

    This study of 67 chronically mentally ill outpatients examined subjective Quality of Life Scores from A. Lehman's Quality of Life Interview. Results suggest a model of life satisfaction in which instrumental and affiliative needs comprise significant portions of life satisfaction. Implications for other quality of life and life satisfaction…

  5. Factor Structure of Quality of Life: The Lehman Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Marianne; Hull, James W.; Terkelsen, Kenneth G.; Smith, Thomas E.; Anthony, Donna

    1997-01-01

    This study of 67 chronically mentally ill outpatients examined subjective Quality of Life Scores from A. Lehman's Quality of Life Interview. Results suggest a model of life satisfaction in which instrumental and affiliative needs comprise significant portions of life satisfaction. Implications for other quality of life and life satisfaction…

  6. Fingerprinting of music scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irons, Jonathan; Schmucker, Martin

    2004-06-01

    Publishers of sheet music are generally reluctant in distributing their content via the Internet. Although online sheet music distribution's advantages are numerous the potential risk of Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) infringement, e.g. illegal online distributions, disables any innovation propensity. While active protection techniques only deter external risk factors, additional technology is necessary to adequately treat further risk factors. For several media types including music scores watermarking technology has been developed, which ebeds information in data by suitable data modifications. Furthermore, fingerprinting or perceptual hasing methods have been developed and are being applied especially for audio. These methods allow the identification of content without prior modifications. In this article we motivate the development of watermarking and fingerprinting technologies for sheet music. Outgoing from potential limitations of watermarking methods we explain why fingerprinting methods are important for sheet music and address potential applications. Finally we introduce a condept for fingerprinting of sheet music.

  7. Factor structure and reliability of the depression, anxiety and stress scales in a large Portuguese community sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos-Raposo, José; Fernandes, Helder Miguel; Teixeira, Carla M

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the factor structure and reliability of the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales (DASS-21) in a large Portuguese community sample. Participants were 1020 adults (585 women and 435 men), with a mean age of 36.74 (SD = 11.90) years. All scales revealed good reliability, with Cronbach's alpha values between .80 (anxiety) and .84 (depression). The internal consistency of the total score was .92. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the best-fitting model (*CFI = .940, *RMSEA = .038) consisted of a latent component of general psychological distress (or negative affectivity) plus orthogonal depression, anxiety and stress factors. The Portuguese version of the DASS-21 showed good psychometric properties (factorial validity and reliability) and thus can be used as a reliable and valid instrument for measuring depression, anxiety and stress symptoms.

  8. The factor structure and use of the Demoralization Scale (DS-IT) in Italian cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Luigi; Costantini, Anna; Kissane, David; Brunetti, Serena; Caruso, Rosangela; Piazza, Giulia; Marchetti, Paolo; Sabato, Silvana; Nanni, Maria Giulia

    2017-03-06

    Demoralization is a commonly observed syndrome in cancer patients, deserving to be carefully assessed in cross-cultural contexts. To examine the factor structure and concurrent and divergent validity of the Italian version of the Demoralization Scale (DS-IT) in cancer patients. The sample included 194 Italian cancer outpatients who were assessed by using the DS-IT and the Diagnostic Criteria of Psychosomatic Research-Demoralization module to examine demoralization. The Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) to explore depression and the Mini-Mental Adjustment-to-Cancer-Hopelessness/Helplessness scale (Mini-MAC-HH) to explore maladaptive coping were also administered. Four factors were extracted by exploratory factor analysis on the DS-IT (disheartenment, α = .87; sense of failure, α = .77; dysphoria, α = .73; loss of meaning/purpose, α = .72; total = 0.91), accounting for 57.1% of the variance. The DS-IT factors shared between 17% and 36% of the variance. Patients reporting a diagnosis of demoralization on the Diagnostic Criteria of Psychosomatic Research-Demoralization module (23.7%) had higher scores on DS-IT loss of meaning/purpose, sense of failure, dysphoria, and DS-IT total. About half of those who were highly demoralized were not depressed and among those who had moderate or moderately severe demoralization, about 80% were not depressed on the PHQ-9. The DS-IT was significantly associated with PHQ-9 and Mini-MAC-HH. The study presents further evidence that demoralization is a significant clinical condition and that the DS-IT demonstrates satisfactory levels of validity and reliability to support its use in patients in the ambulatory cancer setting. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. A structured elicitation method to identify key direct risk factors for the management of natural resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael; Wallace, Ken; Lewis, Loretta; Wagner, Christian

    2015-11-01

    The high level of uncertainty inherent in natural resource management requires planners to apply comprehensive risk analyses, often in situations where there are few resources. In this paper, we demonstrate a broadly applicable, novel and structured elicitation approach to identify important direct risk factors. This new approach combines expert calibration and fuzzy based mathematics to capture and aggregate subjective expert estimates of the likelihood that a set of direct risk factors will cause management failure. A specific case study is used to demonstrate the approach; however, the described methods are widely applicable in risk analysis. For the case study, the management target was to retain all species that characterise a set of natural biological elements. The analysis was bounded by the spatial distribution of the biological elements under consideration and a 20-year time frame. Fourteen biological elements were expected to be at risk. Eleven important direct risk factors were identified that related to surrounding land use practices, climate change, problem species (e.g., feral predators), fire and hydrological change. In terms of their overall influence, the two most important risk factors were salinisation and a lack of water which together pose a considerable threat to the survival of nine biological elements. The described approach successfully overcame two concerns arising from previous risk analysis work: (1) the lack of an intuitive, yet comprehensive scoring method enabling the detection and clarification of expert agreement and associated levels of uncertainty; and (2) the ease with which results can be interpreted and communicated while preserving a rich level of detail essential for informed decision making.

  10. Dynamic-structure-factor measurements on a model Lorentz gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egelstaff, P. A.; Eder, O. J.; Glaser, W.; Polo, J.; Renker, B.; Soper, A. K.

    1990-02-01

    A model system for the Lorentz gas can be made [Eder, Chen, and Egelstaff, Proc. Phys. Soc. London 89, 833 (1966); McPherson and Egelstaff, Can. J. Phys. 58, 289 (1980)] by mixing small quantities of hydrogen with an argon host. For neutron-scattering experiments the large H-to-Ar cross section ratio (~200) makes the argon relatively invisible. Dynamic-structure-factor [S(Q,ω) for H2] measurements at room temperature have been made on this system using the IN4 spectrometer at the Institute Laue Langevin, Grenoble, France. Argon densities between 1.9 and 10.5 atoms/nm3 were used for 0.4

  11. Lord-Wingersky Algorithm Version 2.0 for Hierarchical Item Factor Models with Applications in Test Scoring, Scale Alignment, and Model Fit Testing. CRESST Report 830

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Li

    2013-01-01

    Lord and Wingersky's (1984) recursive algorithm for creating summed score based likelihoods and posteriors has a proven track record in unidimensional item response theory (IRT) applications. Extending the recursive algorithm to handle multidimensionality is relatively simple, especially with fixed quadrature because the recursions can be defined…

  12. Online Social Presence: Score Validity of the Computer-Mediated Communication Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Cherng-Jyh

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a confirmatory factor analysis of the Computer-Mediated Communication Questionnaire scores, using structural equation modeling, to assess the consistency between the empirical data and the hypothesized factor structure of the CMCQ in the proposed models, which is stipulated by the theoretical framework and…

  13. Scoring ordinal variables for constructing composite indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marica Manisera

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to provide composite indicators of latent variables, for example of customer satisfaction, it is opportune to identify the structure of the latent variable, in terms of the assignment of items to the subscales defining the latent variable. Adopting the reflective model, the impact of four different methods of scoring ordinal variables on the identification of the true structure of latent variables is investigated. A simulation study composed of 5 steps is conducted: (1 simulation of population data with continuous variables measuring a two-dimensional latent variable with known structure; (2 draw of a number of random samples; (3 discretization of the continuous variables according to different distributional forms; (4 quantification of the ordinal variables obtained in step (3 according to different methods; (5 construction of composite indicators and verification of the correct assignment of variables to subscales by the multiple group method and the factor analysis. Results show that the considered scoring methods have similar performances in assigning items to subscales, and that, when the latent variable is multinormal, the distributional form of the observed ordinal variables is not determinant in suggesting the best scoring method to use.

  14. Classification of current scoring functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Wang, Renxiao

    2015-03-23

    Scoring functions are a class of computational methods widely applied in structure-based drug design for evaluating protein-ligand interactions. Dozens of scoring functions have been published since the early 1990s. In literature, scoring functions are typically classified as force-field-based, empirical, and knowledge-based. This classification scheme has been quoted for more than a decade and is still repeatedly quoted by some recent publications. Unfortunately, it does not reflect the recent progress in this field. Besides, the naming convention used for describing different types of scoring functions has been somewhat jumbled in literature, which could be confusing for newcomers to this field. Here, we express our viewpoint on an up-to-date classification scheme and appropriate naming convention for current scoring functions. We propose that they can be classified into physics-based methods, empirical scoring functions, knowledge-based potentials, and descriptor-based scoring functions. We also outline the major difference and connections between different categories of scoring functions.

  15. Test Scoring [book review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Rob R.

    2003-01-01

    This book discusses how to obtain test scores and, in particular, how to obtain test scores from tests that consist of a combination of multiple choice and open-ended questions. The strength of the book is that scoring solutions are presented for a diversity of real world scoring problems. (SLD)

  16. Factor Structure of the Brief Multidimensional Measure of Religiousness/Spirituality in US and Indian Samples with Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Brick; Bhushan, Braj; Hanks, Robin; Yoon, Dong Pil; Cohen, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this paper was to determine the factor structure of the Brief Multidimensional Measure of Religiousness/Spirituality (BMMRS) based on a sample of individuals from diverse cultures (i.e., USA, India), ethnicities (i.e., Caucasian, African-American, South Asian), and religions (i.e., Christian, Muslim, Hindu). A total of 109 individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI) were included. Participants completed the BMMRS as part of a broader study on spirituality, religion, prosocial behaviors, and neuropsychological function. A principal components factor analysis with varimax rotation and Kaiser normalization identified a six-factor solution accounting for 72% of the variance in scores. Five of the factors were deemed to be interpretable and were labeled based on face validity as: (1) Positive Spirituality/Religious Practices; (2) Positive Congregational Support; (3) Negative Spirituality/Negative Congregational Support; (4) Organizational Religion; and (5) Forgiveness. The results were generally consistent with previous studies, suggesting the existence of universal religious, spiritual, and congregational support factors across different cultures and faith traditions. For health outcomes research, it is suggested that the BMMRS factors may be best conceptualized as measuring the following general domains: (a) emotional connectedness with a higher power (i.e., spirituality, positive/negative); (b) culturally based behavioral practices (i.e., religion); and (c) social support (i.e., positive/negative). The results indicate that factor relationships may differ among spiritual, religious, and congregational support variables according to culture and/or religious tradition.

  17. Examining the Factor Structure and Hierarchical Nature of the Quality of Life Construct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mian; Schalock, Robert L.; Verdugo, Miguel A.; Jenaro, Christina

    2010-01-01

    There is considerable debate in the area of individual quality of life research regarding the factor structure and hierarchical nature of the quality of life construct. Our purpose in this study was to test via structural equation modeling an a priori quality of life model consisting of eight first-order factors and one second-order factor. Data…

  18. Cross-cultural invariance of the factor structure of the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire across Spanish and American college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca-Pedrero, Eduardo; Compton, Michael T; Tone, Erin B; Ortuño-Sierra, Javier; Paino, Mercedes; Fumero, Ascensión; Lemos-Giráldez, Serafín

    2014-12-30

    The main goal of this study was to examine the cross-cultural invariance of the factor structure of the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire (SPQ) (Raine, 1991) in two large samples of Spanish and American young adults. The final sample was made up of 2313 college students (508 men, 22%). Their mean age was 20.5 years (S.D.=3.2). The results indicated that the Stefanis et al. (2004) four-factor model yielded the best goodness-of-fit indices compared to alternative models. Moreover, the results support configural, metric, and partial measurement invariance of the covariances of the SPQ across the two samples. The finding of measurement equivalence across cultures provides essential evidence of construct validity for the schizotypy dimensions and of the cross-cultural validity of SPQ scores. The finding of comparable dimensional structures in cross-cultural samples lends further support to the continuum model of schizotypy and schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Future studies should continue to examine the validity of scores on the SPQ and other schizotypy measures and their variation or consistency across cultures.

  19. Factor Structure and Validity of the Body Parts Satisfaction Scale: Results from the 1972 Psychology Today Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Frederick

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In 1972, the first major national study on body image was conducted under the auspices of Psychology Today. Body image was assessed with the Body Parts Satisfaction Scale, which examined the dissatisfaction people experienced with 24 aspects of their bodies. Despite the continued reliance on this scale and reference to the study, data on the factor structure of this measure in a sample of adults have never been published, and citations of the original scale have relied on an unpublished manuscript (Bohrnstedt, 1977. An exploratory factor analysis conducted on 2,013 adults revealed factors for men (Face, Sex Organ, Height, Lower Body, Mid Torso, Upper Torso, Height and women (Face, Sex Organ, Height, Lower Torso, Mid Torso, Extremities, Breast. The factors were weakly to moderately intercorrelated, suggesting the scale can be analyzed by items, by subscales, or by total score. People who reported more dissatisfaction with their body also tended to report lower self-esteem and less comfort interacting with members of the other sex. The analyses provide a useful comparison point for researchers looking to examine gender differences in dissatisfaction with specific aspects of the body, as well as the factor structures linking these items.

  20. Empirical evaluation of scoring functions for Bayesian network model selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhifa; Malone, Brandon; Yuan, Changhe

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we empirically evaluate the capability of various scoring functions of Bayesian networks for recovering true underlying structures. Similar investigations have been carried out before, but they typically relied on approximate learning algorithms to learn the network structures. The suboptimal structures found by the approximation methods have unknown quality and may affect the reliability of their conclusions. Our study uses an optimal algorithm to learn Bayesian network structures from datasets generated from a set of gold standard Bayesian networks. Because all optimal algorithms always learn equivalent networks, this ensures that only the choice of scoring function affects the learned networks. Another shortcoming of the previous studies stems from their use of random synthetic networks as test cases. There is no guarantee that these networks reflect real-world data. We use real-world data to generate our gold-standard structures, so our experimental design more closely approximates real-world situations. A major finding of our study suggests that, in contrast to results reported by several prior works, the Minimum Description Length (MDL) (or equivalently, Bayesian information criterion (BIC)) consistently outperforms other scoring functions such as Akaike's information criterion (AIC), Bayesian Dirichlet equivalence score (BDeu), and factorized normalized maximum likelihood (fNML) in recovering the underlying Bayesian network structures. We believe this finding is a result of using both datasets generated from real-world applications rather than from random processes used in previous studies and learning algorithms to select high-scoring structures rather than selecting random models. Other findings of our study support existing work, e.g., large sample sizes result in learning structures closer to the true underlying structure; the BDeu score is sensitive to the parameter settings; and the fNML performs pretty well on small datasets. We also

  1. Factor Structure and Reliability of the Revised Conflict Tactics Scales' (CTS2) 10-Factor Model in a Community-Based Female Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Sung Hyun

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated the factor structure and reliability of the revised Conflict Tactics Scales' (CTS2) 10-factor model in a community-based female sample (N = 261). The underlying factor structure of the 10-factor model was tested by the confirmatory multiple group factor analysis, which demonstrated complex factor cross-loadings…

  2. Versión breve de la escala de satisfacción laboral: evaluación estructural y distribucional de sus puntajes / Brief version of the job satisfaction scale: structural and distributive evaluation of their scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Boluarte Carbajal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN La evaluación de la satisfacción laboral permite conocer y explicar varios resultados conductuales del trabajador, como su desempeño laboral. El presente estudio analiza la estructura interna de la versión breve de la Escala de Satisfacción Laboral de Warr, Cook y Wall (1979, que se orienta a medir unidimensionalmente el constructo de satisfacción laboral con ítems relacionados con la satisfacción intrínseca y extrínseca. La muestra estuvo compuesta por 88 profesionales de una institución de rehabilitación ubicada en Lima Metropolitana, a los que se les administró la versión completa del instrumento (16 ítems para examinar la versión abreviada y derivar una nueva. Se realizó un análisis factorial confirmatorio (AFC para evaluar la estructura factorial, mediante el modelamiento de ecuaciones estructurales. Se halló que una dimensión latente es válida para el instrumento completo, y se obtuvo una nueva versión breve con diferentes ítems, mayor varianza explicada y cargas factoriales elevadas. Las estimaciones de confiabilidad fueron aceptables. La distribución del puntaje fue inusualmente ajustada a un modelo Wakeby. Se discute los resultados en el contexto del uso de esta nueva versión y de la distribución de los puntajes. ABSTRACT The job satisfaction evaluation allows us to know and explain several behavioral results of a worker such as his job performance. This study analyzes the internal structure of the brief version by Warr, Cook and Wall’s Job Satisfaction Scale (1979, which is designed to unidimensionaly measure the job satisfaction construct with items related to intrinsic and extrinsic satisfaction. The sample was composed by 88 professionals from a rehabilitation institution located in Metropolitan Lima, who were given the full version of the instrument (16 items, to examine the abbreviated version and derive a new one. We performed a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA to evaluate the factorial

  3. Validation of the Penn Inventory of Scrupulosity (PIOS) in scrupulous and nonscrupulous patients: Revision of factor structure and psychometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppert, Jonathan D; Fradkin, Isaac

    2016-06-01

    Scrupulosity, or obsessive-compulsive symptoms related to religiosity or religion, is a common presentation of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), and it is important to elucidate its phenomenology and measurement. Today, the most widespread questionnaire for the assessment of scrupulosity is the Penn Inventory of Scrupulosity (PIOS). The current study examines the psychometric properties of the PIOS in outpatient, treatment-seeking patients. Results of a confirmatory factor analysis suggested an unsatisfactory fit for previously suggested factor structures. A follow-up exploratory factor analysis suggested that a bifactor model was the most suitable solution. In addition, the scores of the PIOS and its revised subscales were found to have moderate-good concurrent validity; however, its scores discriminated poorly between patients with scrupulous obsessions and patients with OCD and other repugnant obsessions. Group differences and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analyses both indicated that the PIOS is more suitable in discriminating scrupulous obsessions in Christian patients but not in other religious groups (i.e., Jews, nonreligious patients). Additional analyses revealed that the co-occurrence of scrupulous and other repugnant obsessions is also moderated by religious affiliation. These results raise questions in terms of grouping scrupulosity with other repugnant obsessions and suggest for the need of culturally sensitive instruments of scrupulosity. (PsycINFO Database Record

  4. Developing Score Reports for Cognitive Diagnostic Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Mary Roduta; Gierl, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a framework to provide a structured approach for developing score reports for cognitive diagnostic assessments ("CDAs"). Guidelines for reporting and presenting diagnostic scores are based on a review of current educational test score reporting practices and literature from the area of information design. A sample diagnostic…

  5. A combined structural dynamics approach identifies a putative switch in factor VIIa employed by tissue factor to initiate blood coagulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Ole H; Rand, Kasper D; Østergaard, Henrik;

    2007-01-01

    Coagulation factor VIIa (FVIIa) requires tissue factor (TF) to attain full catalytic competency and to initiate blood coagulation. In this study, the mechanism by which TF allosterically activates FVIIa is investigated by a structural dynamics approach that combines molecular dynamics (MD...

  6. Modeling associated protein-DNA pattern discovery with unified scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tak-Ming; Lo, Leung-Yau; Sze-To, Ho-Yin; Leung, Kwong-Sak; Xiao, Xinshu; Wong, Man-Hon

    2013-01-01

    Understanding protein-DNA interactions, specifically transcription factor (TF) and transcription factor binding site (TFBS) bindings, is crucial in deciphering gene regulation. The recent associated TF-TFBS pattern discovery combines one-sided motif discovery on both the TF and the TFBS sides. Using sequences only, it identifies the short protein-DNA binding cores available only in high-resolution 3D structures. The discovered patterns lead to promising subtype and disease analysis applications. While the related studies use either association rule mining or existing TFBS annotations, none has proposed any formal unified (both-sided) model to prioritize the top verifiable associated patterns. We propose the unified scores and develop an effective pipeline for associated TF-TFBS pattern discovery. Our stringent instance-level evaluations show that the patterns with the top unified scores match with the binding cores in 3D structures considerably better than the previous works, where up to 90 percent of the top 20 scored patterns are verified. We also introduce extended verification from literature surveys, where the high unified scores correspond to even higher verification percentage. The top scored patterns are confirmed to match the known WRKY binding cores with no available 3D structures and agree well with the top binding affinities of in vivo experiments.

  7. Factor structure of the Private Self-Consciousness Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, E M; Bohon, L M; Berrigan, L P

    1996-02-01

    Several issues concerning the factors of the Private Self-Consciousness Scale (PRSC) of Fenigstein et al. (1975) are examined, including possible artifactuality and appropriate conceptualization. Findings confirm the existence of the 2 factors reported in previous research (Burnkrant & Page, 1984; Lennox, Welch, Wolfe, Zimmerman, & Dixon, 1987; Mittal & Balasubramanian, 1987; Piliavin & Charng, 1988) and suggest that these factors are substantive, not artifactual, in nature. One factor was found to be associated with mild levels of psychopathology, whereas the other was not. In addition to providing a clearer conception of the nature of these factors, our results may help to resolve apparently contradictory findings in the PRSC literature. Implications for research on self-focused attention are also discussed.

  8. Investigation of Factors Influencing Turkey's PISA 2006 Science Achievement with Structural Equation Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anil, Duygu

    2011-01-01

    This study aims, in line with PISA (Programmes for International Students' Achievement Evaluation) 2006, at constructing a structural equation model between variables considered to be associated with 15 year old Turkish students' science achievement scores and their responses to students questionnaire. In this sense, this is a relational research…

  9. Time-dependent confidence factor for structures with degradation caused by fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiz-Gómez Sonia E.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available An approach to evaluate the confidence factor for structures at the end of an interval of time is proposed. The confidence factor indicates the adequacy of the performance level of a structure subjected to external loads. The factor considers the uncertainties implicit in the structural capacity and in the structural demand. The formulation is made in accordance with the Demand and Capacity Factor Design Format. Four scenarios are compared: a structural capacity deteriorates over a time interval, while structural demand remains constant, b only structural demand (for a given intensity varies in time, c both structural capacity and structural demand vary simultaneously in time, and d the effect of structural deterioration is neglected. The approach is applied to an offshore jacket platform. Deterioration is taken into account by analyzing the growth of fatigue cracks in both ends of several critical structural elements. It is concluded that for the evaluation of the confidence factor over an interval of interest, for the case analyzed, it is more significant to consider the variation in time of the structural capacity rather than that of the structural demand; however, it is recommended to consider both (structural capacity and structural demand in the analysis.

  10. 19. The HUman Micro Nucleus project. International Date Base Comparison for results with the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay in human lymphocytes. Ⅰ. Effect of laboratory protocol, scoring criteria, and host factors on the frequency of micronuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The first results of an analysis of pooled data from laboratories using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay in human lymphocytes and participating in the HUMN (HUman MicroNucleus project) international collaborative study are presented. The effects of laboratory protocol, scoring criteria, and host factors on baseline micronucleus(MN) frequency are evaluated, and a reference range of “normal” values against which future studies may be compared is provided. Primary data from historical records were submitted by 25 laboratories distributed in 16 countries. This resulted in a database of nearly 7000 subjects. Potentially significant differences were present in the methods used by participating laboratories, such as in the type of culture medium, the concentration of Cytochalasin-B, the percentage of fetal calf serum, and in the culture method. Differences in criteria for scoring MN were also evident. The overall median MN frequency in non-exposed(i.e., normal) subjects was 6.5‰ and the interquartile range was between 3‰ and 12‰. An increase in MN frequency with age was evident in all but two laboratories. The effect of gender, although not so evident in all databases, was also present, with females having a 19% higher level of MN (95% C.I.:14-24%). Statistical analyses were performed using random-effects models for correlated data. Our best model, which included exposure to genotoxic factors, host factors, methods, and scoring criteria, explained 75% of the total variance, with the largest contribution attributable to laboratory methods.

  11. [Effect of 21-gene recurrence score on chemotherapy decisions for patients with estrogen receptor-positive, epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative and lymph node-negative early stage-breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Y; Chen, X S; Liang, Y; Wu, J Y; Huang, O; Zong, Y; Fang, Q; He, J R; Zhu, L; Chen, W G; Li, Y F; Lin, L; Fei, X C; Shen, K W

    2017-07-23

    Objective: To investigate the effect of 21-gene recurrence score on adjuvant chemotherapy decisions for patients with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive, epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2)-negative and lymph node (LN)-negative early stage-breast cancer. Methods: One hundred and forty-eight patients with ER+ , HER-2- and LN- early stage breast cancer were recruited in the Ruijin hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine. The 21-gene recurrence score (RS)assay was performed and systemic therapeutic decisions were made before and after knowing the RS results under multidisciplinary discussion. The effects of RS assay and the other influential factors on adjuvant chemotherapy decision were further analyzed. Results: After knowing the RS results, treatment decisions were changed in 26 out of 148 patients(17.6%). Among them, 9 out of 26 patients were not recommended for chemotherapy; 16 of 26 had treatment recommendation changed to chemotherapy, and chemotherapy regimen was changed in the last one patient. Multivariate analysis showed that RS, age and histological grade were independent factors of decision-making for adjuvant chemotherapy. Conclusion: Our results suggest that 21-gene recurrence score significantly influences decision making for adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with ER+ , HER-2- and LN- early stage breast cancer.

  12. Factors related to the capital structure of small new ventures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harms, Rainer; Breitenecker, R.; Schwartz, E.J.; Wdowiak, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    In the literature, there exists evidence on the capital structure determinants for small ventures, but empirical research for new ventures is limited. We seek to address this gap by presenting a confirmatory analysis of determinants of capital structure of a sample of small new ventures in Austria.

  13. Study on Influencing Factors of Capital Structure of Energy Listed Companies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Guo-liang; LI Qiang

    2005-01-01

    Based on the determinative factors school of capital structure theory, this paper uses the data of 35 Chinese energy listed companies from 2000 to 2003, and adopts multi-variable regression method to make an empirical study of the influencing factors of their capital structure. The results indicate that the factors of size, income volatility, and the concentration of owner's equity have positive relation with the capital structure, while the relation between profitability and capital structure is negative. It is also found that the influencing of growth and secured asset on the capital structure are relatively insignificant.

  14. Subgroup Balancing Propensity Score

    OpenAIRE

    DONG, JING; Zhang, Junni L; Li, Fan

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the estimation of subgroup treatment effects with observational data. Existing propensity score matching and weighting methods are mostly developed for estimating overall treatment effect. Although the true propensity score should balance covariates for the subgroup populations, the estimated propensity score may not balance covariates for the subgroup samples. We propose the subgroup balancing propensity score (SBPS) method, which selects, for each subgroup, to use either the ...

  15. Oral health behavior among 25-year-old-Norwegian adults: factor structure, factorial invariance over time and trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astrøm, Anne Nordrehaug

    2009-08-01

    Exploratory factor-analytical studies suggest that health behaviors are multidimensional, leading to hypotheses that such behaviors are bi- or tri-dimensional. This study applies confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), to semi-longitudinal data and provides new information about the factor structure of oral health-related behaviors among 25-year-old Norwegians. The purposes of the study were to (1) evaluate the factor structure of oral health behaviors and its invariance over time, (2) assess temporal changes in patterns of oral health behaviors and in their socioeconomic distribution between 1997 and 2007. Simple random samples of 1190 residents born in 1972 and 8000 residents born in 1982 were drawn from the populations of three counties in Western Norway in 1997 and 2007. Structured questionnaires were mailed to the eligible participants. After one reminder, 735 (58% women, response rate 62%) and 1509 (63.3% women, response rate 19%) replied. A correlated three-factor model with cross-loadings showed a better fit than a two-factor model to both the 1997 sample: chi(2)/df = 2.1, CFI = 0.95, RMSEA = 0.03 and the 2007 sample: chi2/df = 3.1, CFA = 0.95, RMSEA = 0.04. Multiple-group CFA showed an acceptable fit for the unconstrained model, CFA = 0.95, RMSEA = 0.03, and no statistically significant difference in fit between the unconstrained and constrained models (P = 0.739). Multiple binary logistic regression with three sum scores based on the behavioral factors sugar intake, drug use and oral health-enhancing behavior revealed that the odds ratios for frequent sugar intake (OR = 0.6, 95% CI: 0.5-0.8) and oral health-enhancing behavior (OR = 0.6, 95% CI: 0.5-0.7) were less in 2007 than in 1997. Drug use remained stable over time (OR = 0.9, 95% CI: 0.7-1.1). Educational differences in sugar intake observed in 1997 had leveled off in 2007. A three-factor structure fitted the data in 1997 and 2007 and the factor structure was invariant over time. This suggests that oral

  16. Fatigue of Chinese railway employees and its influential factors: Structural equation modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Liuxing; Chang, Jing; Ma, Liang

    2017-07-01

    Fatigue is an identifiable and preventable cause of accidents in transport operations. Regarding the railway sector, incident logs and simulation studies show that employee fatigue leads to lack of alertness, impaired performance, and occurrence of incidents. China has one of the largest rail systems in the world, and Chinese railway employees work under high fatigue risks; therefore, it is important to assess their fatigue level and find the major factors leading to fatigue. We designed a questionnaire that uses Multidimensional Fatigue Instrument (MFI-20), NASA-TLX and subjective rating of work overtime feelings to assess employee fatigue. The contribution of each influential factor of fatigue was analysed using structural equation modelling. In total, 297 employees from the rail maintenance department and 227 employees from the locomotive department returned valid responses. The average scores and standard deviations for the five subscales of MFI-20, namely General Fatigue, Physical Fatigue, Reduced Activity, Reduced Motivation, and Mental Fatigue, were 2.9 (0.8), 2.8 (0.8), 2.5 (0.8), 2.5 (0.7), and 2.4 (0.8) among the rail maintenance employees and 3.5 (0.8), 3.5 (0.7), 3.3 (0.7), 3.0 (0.6), and 3.1 (0.7), respectively, among the locomotive employees. The fatigue of the locomotive employees was influenced by feelings related to working overtime (standardized r = 0.22) and workload (standardized r = 0.27). The work overtime control and physical working environment significantly influenced subjective feelings (standardized r = -0.25 and 0.47, respectively), while improper work/rest rhythms and an adverse physical working environment significantly increased the workload (standardized r = 0.48 and 0.33, respectively). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Methodological comparison of marginal structural model, time-varying Cox regression, and propensity score methods: the example of antidepressant use and the risk of hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M Sanni; Groenwold, Rolf H H; Belitser, Svetlana V; Souverein, Patrick C; Martín, Elisa; Gatto, Nicolle M; Huerta, Consuelo; Gardarsdottir, Helga; Roes, Kit C B; Hoes, Arno W; de Boer, Antonius; Klungel, Olaf H

    2016-03-01

    Observational studies including time-varying treatments are prone to confounding. We compared time-varying Cox regression analysis, propensity score (PS) methods, and marginal structural models (MSMs) in a study of antidepressant [selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs)] use and the risk of hip fracture. A cohort of patients with a first prescription for antidepressants (SSRI or tricyclic antidepressants) was extracted from the Dutch Mondriaan and Spanish Base de datos para la Investigación Farmacoepidemiológica en Atención Primaria (BIFAP) general practice databases for the period 2001-2009. The net (total) effect of SSRI versus no SSRI on the risk of hip fracture was estimated using time-varying Cox regression, stratification and covariate adjustment using the PS, and MSM. In MSM, censoring was accounted for by inverse probability of censoring weights. The crude hazard ratio (HR) of SSRI use versus no SSRI use on hip fracture was 1.75 (95%CI: 1.12, 2.72) in Mondriaan and 2.09 (1.89, 2.32) in BIFAP. After confounding adjustment using time-varying Cox regression, stratification, and covariate adjustment using the PS, HRs increased in Mondriaan [2.59 (1.63, 4.12), 2.64 (1.63, 4.25), and 2.82 (1.63, 4.25), respectively] and decreased in BIFAP [1.56 (1.40, 1.73), 1.54 (1.39, 1.71), and 1.61 (1.45, 1.78), respectively]. MSMs with stabilized weights yielded HR 2.15 (1.30, 3.55) in Mondriaan and 1.63 (1.28, 2.07) in BIFAP when accounting for censoring and 2.13 (1.32, 3.45) in Mondriaan and 1.66 (1.30, 2.12) in BIFAP without accounting for censoring. In this empirical study, differences between the different methods to control for time-dependent confounding were small. The observed differences in treatment effect estimates between the databases are likely attributable to different confounding information in the datasets, illustrating that adequate information on (time-varying) confounding is crucial to prevent bias. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Factors mediating the restoration of structurally degraded soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Moldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per;

    with the ability of soils to perform these functions. The present study examines the roles of clay mineralogy, native organic matter, and exogenous organic material on the restoration of structurally degraded soils. Totally seven soils from Denmark and Ghana - five soils dominated by illites, one kaolinitic soil......Soil structure is essential for sustained provision of ecosystem services such as water filtering and storage, waste disposal, carbon sequestration and many more. Structural degradation/disaggregation of soils emanating from human activities such as mining, grading and filling interferes...... and lowest for the smectitic soil. Among the illitic soils, aggregate workability increased with native organic matter content. Addition of exogenous organic material showed little effect on soil physical properties. Results points to the possibility of regenerating the structure of physically degraded soils...

  19. Comparing the factor structure of the Wisconsin Schizotypy Scales and the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Georgina M; Mellin, Juliann; Silvia, Paul J; Barrantes-Vidal, Neus; Kwapil, Thomas R

    2014-10-01

    Schizotypy is a multidimensional construct that captures the expression of schizophrenic symptoms and impairment from subclinical levels to full-blown psychosis. The present study examined the comparability of the factor structure of 2 leading psychometric measures of schizotypy: the Wisconsin Schizotypy Scales (WSS) and the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire (SPQ). Both the SPQ and WSS purportedly capture the multidimensional structure of schizotypy; however, whether they are measuring comparable factors has not been empirically demonstrated. This study provided support for a 2-factor model with positive and negative factors underlying the WSS; however, contrary to previous findings, the best fit for the SPQ was for a 4-factor model using confirmatory factor analysis, and a 2-factor model using exploratory factor analysis. The WSS factors were relatively distinct, whereas those underlying the SPQ showed high overlap. The WSS positive and SPQ cognitive-perceptual factors appeared to tap comparable constructs. However, the WSS negative and SPQ interpersonal factors appeared to tap somewhat different constructs based on their correlation and their patterns of associations with other schizotypy dimensions and the Five-Factor Model-suggesting that the SPQ interpersonal factor may not adequately tap negative or deficit schizotypy. Although the SPQ offers the advantage over the WSS of having a disorganization factor, it is not clear that this SPQ factor is actually distinct from positive schizotypy. Existing measures should be used with caution and new measures based on a priori theories are necessary to further understand the factor structure of schizotypy.

  20. Structured plant metabolomics for the simultaneous exploration of multiple factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilev, Nikolay; Boccard, Julien; Lang, Gerhard; Grömping, Ulrike; Fischer, Rainer; Goepfert, Simon; Rudaz, Serge; Schillberg, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Multiple factors act simultaneously on plants to establish complex interaction networks involving nutrients, elicitors and metabolites. Metabolomics offers a better understanding of complex biological systems, but evaluating the simultaneous impact of different parameters on metabolic pathways that have many components is a challenging task. We therefore developed a novel approach that combines experimental design, untargeted metabolic profiling based on multiple chromatography systems and ionization modes, and multiblock data analysis, facilitating the systematic analysis of metabolic changes in plants caused by different factors acting at the same time. Using this method, target geraniol compounds produced in transgenic tobacco cell cultures were grouped into clusters based on their response to different factors. We hypothesized that our novel approach may provide more robust data for process optimization in plant cell cultures producing any target secondary metabolite, based on the simultaneous exploration of multiple factors rather than varying one factor each time. The suitability of our approach was verified by confirming several previously reported examples of elicitor–metabolite crosstalk. However, unravelling all factor–metabolite networks remains challenging because it requires the identification of all biochemically significant metabolites in the metabolomics dataset. PMID:27853298

  1. The Apgar Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The Apgar score provides an accepted and convenient method for reporting the status of the newborn infant immediately after birth and the response to resuscitation if needed. The Apgar score alone cannot be considered as evidence of, or a consequence of, asphyxia; does not predict individual neonatal mortality or neurologic outcome; and should not be used for that purpose. An Apgar score assigned during resuscitation is not equivalent to a score assigned to a spontaneously breathing infant. The American Academy of Pediatrics and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists encourage use of an expanded Apgar score reporting form that accounts for concurrent resuscitative interventions.

  2. Isolation, subunit structure, and proteolytic modification of bovine factor VIII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legaz, M E; Weinstein, M J; Heldebrant, C M; Davie, E W

    1975-01-20

    A new method has been described for the isolation of factor VIII. The method results in a high yield of factor VIII that is homogeneous by several different criteria. The purified protein is very stable and is not dissociated in the presence of 1 M NaCl or 0.25 M CaCl2. The highly purified protein is readily activated and inactivated by various proteolytic enzymes, such as thrombin, plasmin, and trypsin. The molecular events that lead to the activation reaction, however, have not been established.

  3. Structural and functional characterization of human complement factor P

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    The complement system is of great importance for the innate immune response, which can lead to opsonization and removal of invading pathogens, as well as immune complexes and damaged self-cells. Factor P (FP), also known as properdin, acts as a positive regulator of the alternative pathway...

  4. Guide to Three Dimensional Structure and Motion Factorization

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Guanghui

    2011-01-01

    The problem of structure and motion recovery from image sequences is an important theme in computer vision. Considerable progress has been made in this field during the past two decades, resulting in successful applications in robot navigation, augmented reality, industrial inspection, medical image analysis, and digital entertainment, among other areas. However, many of these methods work only for rigid objects and static scenes. The study of non-rigid structure from motion is not only of academic significance, but also has important practical applications in real-world, nonrigid or dynamic s

  5. Factor Structure and Psychometric Properties of the Injection Phobia Scale-Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olatunji, Bunmi O.; Sawchuk, Craig N.; Moretz, Melanie W.; David, Bieke; Armstrong, Thomas; Ciesielski, Bethany G.

    2010-01-01

    The present investigation examined the factor structure and psychometric properties of the Injection Phobia Scale-Anxiety (IPS-Anx). Principal components analysis of IPS-Anx items in Study 1 (n = 498) revealed a 2-factor structure consisting of Distal Fear and Contact Fear. However, CFA results in Study 2 (n = 567) suggest that a 1-factor…

  6. Determination of pair-structure factor of scattering potential of a collection of particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Zhao, Daomu

    2010-02-01

    The method of determination of the pair-structure factor of a collection of particles has been discussed. It is shown that the pair-structure factor of scattering potential of the collection of particles can be determined from the cross-spectral density function of the scattered field.

  7. Four-Factor Structure of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Symptoms in Children, Adolescents, and Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, S. Evelyn; Rosario, Maria C.; Baer, Lee; Carter, Alice S.; Brown, Timothy A.; Scharf, Jeremiah M.; Illmann, Cornelia; Leckman, James F.; Sukhodolsky, Denis; Katsovich, Lilya; Rasmussen, Steven; Goodman, Wayne; Delorme, Richard; Leboyer, Marion; Chabane, Nadia; Jenike, Michael A.; Geller, Daniel A.; Pauls, David L.

    2008-01-01

    A study was conducted to establish the efficacy of four-factor obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) symptom structure for use in child, adolescent and adult groups. Results indicated that the four-factor OCD structure is inadequate for use in children, adolescent and adult age groups.

  8. How social structure changes in Chinese global cities: Synthesizing globalization, migration and institutional factors in Beijing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shi, Q.; Liu, T.; Musterd, S.; Cao, G.

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies on the social structural change in global cities have recognized globalization, migration, and institutional factors as three main forces underlying this process. However, effects of these factors have rarely been synthetically examined and the social structure of emerging Chinese

  9. Factor Structure and Psychometric Properties of the Injection Phobia Scale-Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olatunji, Bunmi O.; Sawchuk, Craig N.; Moretz, Melanie W.; David, Bieke; Armstrong, Thomas; Ciesielski, Bethany G.

    2010-01-01

    The present investigation examined the factor structure and psychometric properties of the Injection Phobia Scale-Anxiety (IPS-Anx). Principal components analysis of IPS-Anx items in Study 1 (n = 498) revealed a 2-factor structure consisting of Distal Fear and Contact Fear. However, CFA results in Study 2 (n = 567) suggest that a 1-factor…

  10. Confirming the Factor Structure of the Cognitive Test Anxiety Scale: Comparing the Utility of Three Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassady, Jerrell C.; Finch, W. Holmes

    2014-01-01

    This study validated the factor structure of a popular assessment of learner's cognitive test anxiety. Following recent findings in a study with Argentinean students' use of the Spanish version of the Cognitive Test Anxiety Scale (CTAS), this study tested the factor structure using data from 742 students who completed the original English version…

  11. Structure Factors of Berly for the Use in Dynamical Diffraction Studies with X-rays

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshimura, Junichi; Okamura, Mitsuru; Taki, Sadao

    1985-01-01

    For the use in dynamical diffraction works with X-rays, structure factors corresponding to the real and imaginary parts, respectively, of atomic scattering factors were calculated for beryl (Be_3Al_2Si_6O_) from previously reported structural data.

  12. A note on the long rate in factor models of the term structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kort, Jan

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we consider factor models of the term structure based on a Brownian filtration. We show that the existence of a nondeterministic long rate in a factor model of the term structure implies, as a consequence of the Dybvig–Ingersoll–Ross theorem, that the model has an equivalent

  13. Safety factors for structural design-history and developments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straalen, IJ.J. van

    2000-01-01

    The design of structures is concemed with the generation of solutions and the verification of the reliability. potential design solutions are a result of a process of problem formulation, definition of objeciive functions, conceptual design and optimization. To control this process, many strategies

  14. Family Structure, Psychosocial Factors, and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in the NHLBI CARDIA Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-21

    24) found that for men, having preschool aged children negatively impacted health while having a preschool aged child had protective functions for...2   Psychosocial Factors in the Development of CAD and...177 billion in 2011 (1). Therefore, the study of the contributing factors involved in the development of CAD may ultimately lead to development of

  15. Thermal calculation of ground contact structures: Correction factors of environment- and structure-dependent effects on the heat transfer coefficient

    OpenAIRE

    Nagy, Balázs

    2015-01-01

    The heat loss at ground contact structures is taken into consideration in building heat loss calculations. However, the heat loss through the ground depends not only the soil and the building structure, but the environment as well. New calculation methods based on parametrized transient finite element thermal modelling are introduced in the preceding research article [3]. This paper is the further demonstration of the methods’ environment- or structure-depending correction factors which descr...

  16. Investigating the Reliability and Factor Structure of Kalichman's "Survey 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Søren; Hofmann, Bjørn

    2017-01-01

    A precondition for reducing scientific misconduct is evidence about scientists' attitudes. We need reliable survey instruments, and this study investigates the reliability of Kalichman's "Survey 2: research misconduct" questionnaire. The study is a post hoc analysis of data from three surveys among...... biomedical doctoral students in Scandinavia (2010-2015). We perform reliability analysis, and exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis using a split-sample design as a partial validation. The results indicate that a reliable 13-item scale can be formed (Cronbach's α = .705), and factor analysis indicates...... that there are four reliable subscales each tapping a different construct: (a) general attitude to misconduct (α = .768), (b) attitude to personal misconduct (α = .784), (c) attitude to whistleblowing (α = .841), and (d) attitude to blameworthiness/punishment (α = .877). A full validation of the questionnaire...

  17. Independent effects of age-related changes in waist circumference and BMI z scores in predicting cardiovascular disease risk factors in a prospective cohort of adolescent females

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Cross-sectional data indicate that central adiposity is associated with cardiovascular disease risk, independent of total adiposity. The use of longitudinal data to investigate the relation between changes in fat distribution and the emergence of risk factors is limited. OBJECTIVE: We ...

  18. Prognostic Value of Risk Factors, Calcium Score, Coronary CTA, Myocardial Perfusion Imaging, and Invasive Coronary Angiography in Kidney Transplantation Candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Simon; Svensson, My; Jørgensen, Hanne Skou

    2017-01-01

    , but only CACS predicted MACE. Combining risk factors with CACS identified a very-low-risk cohort with a MACE event rate of 2.1%, and a 1.0% mortality rate per year. Of the diagnostic modalities, coronary CTA and ICA significantly predicted MACE, but only coronary CTA predicted death. In contrast, SPECT...

  19. The relationship between second-year medical students' OSCE scores and USMLE Step 1 scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Steven R; Volkan, Kevin; Hamann, Claus; Duffey, Carol; Fletcher, Suzanne W

    2002-09-01

    The relationship between objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) and standardized tests is not well known. We linked second-year medical students' physical diagnosis OSCE scores from 1998, 1999 and 2000 (n = 355) with demographic information, Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) scores, and United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 1 scores. The correlation coefficient for the total OSCE score with USMLE Step 1 score was 0.41 (p USMLE Step 1 score. OSCE station scores accounted for approximately 22% of the variability in USMLE Step 1 scores. A second-year OSCE in physical diagnosis is correlated with scores on the USMLE Step 1 exam, with skills that foreshadow the clinical clerkships most predictive of USMLE scores. This correlation suggests predictive validity of this OSCE and supports the use of OSCEs early in medical school.

  20. Examination of the Factor Structure and Concurrent Validity of the Langer Mindfulness/Mindlessness Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haigh, Emily A. P.; Moore, Michael T.; Kashdan, Todd B.; Fresco, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Langer's theory of mindfulness proposes that a mindful person seeks out and produces novelty, is attentive to context, and is flexible in thought and behavior. In three independent studies, the factor structure of the Langer Mindfulness/Mindlessness Scale was examined. Confirmatory factor analysis failed to replicate the four-factor model and a…

  1. Factor B structure provides insights into activation of the central protease of the complement system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milder, F.J.; Gomes, L.; Schouten, A.; Janssen, B.J.C.; Huizinga, E.G.; Romijn, R.A.; Hemrika, W.; Roos, A; Daha, M.R.; Gros, P.

    2007-01-01

    Factor B is the central protease of the complement system of immune defense. Here, we present the crystal structure of human factor B at 2.3-A° resolution, which reveals how the five-domain proenzyme is kept securely inactive. The canonical activation helix of the Von Willebrand factor A (VWA) domai

  2. Social cognition in schizophrenia: Factor structure of emotion processing and theory of mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Julia; Penn, David L; Raykov, Tenko; Pinkham, Amy E; Kelsven, Skylar; Buck, Benjamin; Harvey, Philip D

    2016-08-30

    Factor analytic studies examining social cognition in schizophrenia have yielded inconsistent results most likely due to the varying number and quality of measures. With the recent conclusion of Phase 3 of the Social Cognition Psychometric Evaluation (SCOPE) Study, the most psychometrically sound measures of social cognition have been identified. Therefore, the aims of the present study were to: 1) examine the factor structure of social cognition in schizophrenia through the utilization of psychometrically sound measures, 2) examine the stability of the factor structure across two study visits, 3) compare the factor structure of social cognition in schizophrenia to that in healthy controls, and 4) examine the relationship between the factors and relevant outcome measures including social functioning and symptoms. Results supported a one-factor model for the patient and healthy control samples at both visits. This single factor was significantly associated with negative symptoms in the schizophrenia sample and with social functioning in both groups at both study visits.

  3. The development of the Metacognition Assessment interview: instrument description, factor structure and reliability in a non-clinical sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semerari, Antonio; Cucchi, Michele; Dimaggio, Giancarlo; Cavadini, Daniele; Carcione, Antonino; Battelli, Vittoria; Nicolò, Giuseppe; Pedone, Roberto; Siccardi, Tomaso; D'Angerio, Stefania; Ronchi, Paolo; Maffei, Cesare; Smeraldi, Enrico

    2012-12-30

    Metacognition is a multi-facet psychological construct; deficits in metacognitive abilities are associated to low social functioning, low quality of life, psychopathology, and symptoms. The aim of this study was to describe and develop a valid and reliable interview for assessing metacognition. The semi-structured interview, based on the author's theory model of the metacognition construct, is described. The Metacognition Assessment Interview (MAI) is an adaptation of the Metacognition Assessment Scale (MAS) and evaluates how the subject is interviewed used metacognition during his own real life experiences elicited by the interviewer. A user manual was developed to assist the interview and scoring procedure. Exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis revealed preliminary evidence of a two factor-hierarchical structure, with two lower-order scales, representing the two main theoretical domains of the metacognitive function, "the Self" and "the Other", and one single higher-order scale that we labelled metacognition. Contrary to the authors' prediction the existence of the four distinct dimensions under the two domains was not confirmed. The MAI and its two domains demonstrated acceptable levels of inter-rater reliability and internal consistency. The MAI appears to be a promising instrument for assessing metacognition. Future psychometric validation steps and clinical directions are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Static and Dynamic Structure Factors with Account of the Ion Structure for High-temperature Alkali and Alkaline Earth Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Sadykova, S P; Tkachenko, I M

    2010-01-01

    The $e-e$, $e-i$, $i-i$ and charge-charge static structure factors are calculated for alkali and Be$^{2+}$ plasmas using the method described by Gregori et al. in \\cite{bibGreg2006}. The dynamic structure factors for alkali plasmas are calculated using the method of moments \\cite{bibAdam83}, \\cite{bibAdam93}. In both methods the screened Hellmann-Gurskii-Krasko potential, obtained on the basis of Bogolyubov's method, has been used taking into account not only the quantum-mechanical effects but also the ion structure \\cite{bib73}. PACS: 52.27.Aj (Alkali and alkaline earth plasmas, Static and dynamic structure factors), 52.25.Kn (Thermodynamics of plasmas), 52.38.Ph (X-ray scattering)

  5. The factor structure and psychometric properties of the Spanish version of the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Garcia, Manuel; Extremera, Natalio; Fernandez-Berrocal, Pablo

    2016-11-01

    This research examined evidence regarding the reliability and validity of scores on the Spanish version of the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test, Version 2.0 (MSCEIT; Mayer, Salovey, & Caruso, 2002). In Study 1, we found a close convergence of the Spanish consensus scores and the general and expert consensus scores determined with Mayer, Salovey, Caruso, and Sitarenios (2003) data. The MSCEIT also demonstrated adequate evidence of reliability of test scores as estimated by internal consistency and test-retest correlation after 12 weeks. Confirmatory factor analysis supported a 3-level higher factor model with 8 manifest variables (task scores), 4 first-level factors (corresponding to the 4-branch model of Mayer & Salovey [1997], with 2 tasks for each branch), 2 second-level factors (experiential and strategic areas, with 2 branches for each area), and 1 third-level factor (overall emotional intelligence [EI]), and multigroup analyses supported MSCEIT cross-gender invariance. Study 2 found evidence for the discriminant validity of scores on the MSCEIT subscales, which were differentially related to personality and self-reported EI. Study 3 provided evidence of the incremental validity of scores on the MSCEIT, which added significant variance to the prospective prediction of psychological well-being after controlling for personality traits. The psychometric properties of the Spanish MSCEIT are similar to those of the original English version, supporting its use for assessing emotional abilities in the Spanish population. (PsycINFO Database Record

  6. The effect of geometric structure on stiffness and damping factor of wood applicable to machine tool structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susilo Adi Widyanto

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Stiffness and vibration damping capability are important criteria in design of machine tool structure. In other sides, the weight of machine tool structure must be reduced to increase  the handling capability. This paper presents  an analysis of the effect of geometric structure on stiffness and vibration damping of wood structure.  The stiffness was analysed  using numerical method, so called finite element method (FEM, while the vibration damping capability was experimentally tested. Vibration testing was also performed to wood structures with sand powder filled  into  its rectangular hole to observe the its effect on damping factor. Simulation results show  that the cross ribs structure yielded minimum mass reduction ratio compared to the three square holes as well as the single rectangular hole structures. While the vibration test results explained that the damping factor of Shorea laevis wood was higher than that Hevea braziiensis wood. The use of sand powder as vibrating  mass in closed-box structure effectively increased the damping capability, for single rectangular hole structure the damping factor was increased from 0.048 to 0.079doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.12777/ijse.4.2.2013.57-60[How to cite the article: Widyanto, S. A., Widodo, A., Nugroho, S., & Siahaan, D. (2013. The effect of geometric structure on stiffness and damping factor of wood applicable to machine tool structure. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING, 4(2, 57-60. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.12777/ijse.4.2.2013.57-60

  7. Stored electromagnetic energy and quality factor of radiating structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capek, Miloslav; Jelinek, Lukas; Vandenbosch, Guy A. E.

    2016-04-01

    This paper deals with the old yet unsolved problem of defining and evaluating the stored electromagnetic energy-a quantity essential for calculating the quality factor, which reflects the intrinsic bandwidth of the considered electromagnetic system. A novel paradigm is proposed to determine the stored energy in the time domain leading to the method, which exhibits positive semi-definiteness and coordinate independence, i.e. two key properties actually not met by the contemporary approaches. The proposed technique is compared with an up-to-date frequency domain method that is extensively used in practice. Both concepts are discussed and compared on the basis of examples of varying complexity.

  8. The design value method and adjusted partial factor approach for existing structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caspeele, R.; Sykora, M.; Allaix, D.L.; Steenbergen, R.D.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to the design of new structures, the assessment of existing structures often relies on the subjective judgement of the investigating engineer. An objective verification format for existing structures based on alternative partial factors is however feasible, enabling a rather simple and s

  9. Biologic and structural differences of thrombopoietic growth factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begley, C G; Basser, R L

    2000-04-01

    The search for a thrombopoietic agent has resulted in the identification of numerous cytokines and growth factors with thrombopoietic activity. However, with the exception of interleukin (IL)-11 and thrombopoietin (TPO), the megakaryopoietic activity of most of these molecules has not produced clearly identifiable clinical benefits. Despite the relatively modest effect of IL-11 on megakaryocyte and platelet production in vitro and in vivo, it does reduce the need for platelet transfusions in specialized clinical settings. In contrast, the c-Mpl ligand TPO has been shown to be a potent stimulator of megakaryocyte and platelet production both in vitro and in vivo. Clinical studies are being conducted with two different preparations of the c-Mpl ligand: recombinant human thrombopoietin (rhTPO) and pegylated recombinant human megakaryocyte growth and development factor (PEG-rHuMGDF). A recombinant form of the complete human molecule, rhTPO is glycosylated and produced in mammalian cells. PEG-rHuMGDF consists of only the receptor-binding domain linked to a polyethylene glycol (PEG) moiety and is generated in Escherichia coil. Although c-Mpl ligands are still being evaluated, preliminary evidence indicates that these molecules can elevate platelet counts and may be useful in a range of clinical contexts. This report discusses aspects of the biology behind the clinical actions of IL-11 and the c-Mpl ligands.

  10. Contingency factors that influence the design of organizational structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Alejandro Flores Castro

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Con la aplicación y el uso de los principios de la teoría de la empresa basada en los recursos y capacidades(RBV, se han identificado nuevos aspectos y factores de contingencia que inciden en el diseño de las estructurasorganizacionales de las empresas. Las características de un entorno global, dinámico y, cada vez, más competitivoen el que se desenvuelven las organizaciones hoy en día, exigen que las empresas encuentren nuevos modelosy esquemas para estructurar sus procesos, lograr una mayor flexibilidad en sus operaciones, otorgar un mayorgrado de empoderamiento a los colaboradores y reducir los niveles de jerarquía con el fin de facilitar lacomunicación y la toma de decisiones. Ante este escenario, los directivos de las empresas deben ser capacesde iniciar los procesos de reestructuración y proponer nuevos modelos de empresa, cada vez más horizontales,más virtuales y con colaboradores con mayor conocimiento, talento y capacidades para poder tomar decisiones.En este ensayo, los factores de contingencia estudiados están vinculados a la flexibilidad que se debe procuraren las organizaciones para alcanzar una posición de ventaja ante la competencia.

  11. Orthogonal Higher Order Structure and Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the French Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS-III)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golay, Philippe; Lecerf, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    According to the most widely accepted Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) model of intelligence measurement, each subtest score of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Adults (3rd ed.; WAIS-III) should reflect both 1st- and 2nd-order factors (i.e., 4 or 5 broad abilities and 1 general factor). To disentangle the contribution of each factor, we applied a…

  12. The factor structure of the Maslach Burnout Inventory in two Swedish human service organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderfeldt, M; Söderfeldt, B; Warg, L E; Ohlson, C G

    1996-12-01

    The Maslach Burnout Inventory, MBI, is a well established measure of burnout. Its validity outside the USA is, however, uncertain. The aim of the present study was therefore to apply the MBI on personnel in two Swedish human service organizations, comparing factor solutions and scoring norms to the original results. The population consisted of 5730 employees in the Social Insurance Organization (SIO) and the Individual and Family Care section (IFC) of the social welfare agencies. Principal components analysis, principal axes and alpha factor analyses were performed, all with varimax rotation. The suggested three factor solution showed to be remarkably stable irrespective of type of analysis. Score levels were somewhat lower on two subscales in the Swedish population. The conclusion is that the psychometric properties of the MBI seem to be very satisfactory and stable, at least in comparison between Sweden and USA. It is suggested that the dimensionality of MBI is rather invariant, but that the score levels covary with national, cultural, or professional contexts within the human services.

  13. A structural dynamic factor model for the effects of monetary policy estimated by the EM algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork, Lasse

    This paper applies the maximum likelihood based EM algorithm to a large-dimensional factor analysis of US monetary policy. Specifically, economy-wide effects of shocks to the US federal funds rate are estimated in a structural dynamic factor model in which 100+ US macroeconomic and financial time...... series are driven by the joint dynamics of the federal funds rate and a few correlated dynamic factors. This paper contains a number of methodological contributions to the existing literature on data-rich monetary policy analysis. Firstly, the identification scheme allows for correlated factor dynamics...... as opposed to the orthogonal factors resulting from the popular principal component approach to structural factor models. Correlated factors are economically more sensible and important for a richer monetary policy transmission mechanism. Secondly, I consider both static factor loadings as well as dynamic...

  14. A structural dynamic factor model for the effects of monetary policy estimated by the EM algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork, Lasse

    This paper applies the maximum likelihood based EM algorithm to a large-dimensional factor analysis of US monetary policy. Specifically, economy-wide effects of shocks to the US federal funds rate are estimated in a structural dynamic factor model in which 100+ US macroeconomic and financial time...... series are driven by the joint dynamics of the federal funds rate and a few correlated dynamic factors. This paper contains a number of methodological contributions to the existing literature on data-rich monetary policy analysis. Firstly, the identification scheme allows for correlated factor dynamics...... as opposed to the orthogonal factors resulting from the popular principal component approach to structural factor models. Correlated factors are economically more sensible and important for a richer monetary policy transmission mechanism. Secondly, I consider both static factor loadings as well as dynamic...

  15. Credit Scoring Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siana Halim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is generally easier to predict defaults accurately if a large data set (including defaults is available for estimating the prediction model. This puts not only small banks, which tend to have smaller data sets, at disadvantage. It can also pose a problem for large banks that began to collect their own historical data only recently, or banks that recently introduced a new rating system. We used a Bayesian methodology that enables banks with small data sets to improve their default probability. Another advantage of the Bayesian method is that it provides a natural way for dealing with structural differences between a bank’s internal data and additional, external data. In practice, the true scoring function may differ across the data sets, the small internal data set may contain information that is missing in the larger external data set, or the variables in the two data sets are not exactly the same but related. Bayesian method can handle such kind of problem.

  16. Factorization and infrared properties of non-perturbative contributions to DIS structure functions

    CERN Document Server

    Ermolaev, B I; Troyan, S I

    2010-01-01

    Analytical expressions for the non-perturbative components of the hadronic scattering amplitudes and the DIS structure functions are not usually obtained from theoretical considerations, but are introduced phenomenologically by fitting the data. We derive some restrictions for such contributions from the general concepts of factorization and integrability. These restrictions are obtained in the context of both k_T and collinear factorizations. We also show that the use of the collinear factorization basically makes the DIS structure functions be dependent on the factorization scale. Our analysis shows that singular factors of the type x^{-a} in the initial parton densities can be used for the singlet component of the structure function F_1, provided a <1, but excludes the use of them for the other structure functions. The restrictions for the non-perturbative contributions we obtain can also be applied to other QCD reactions at high energies.

  17. Spin structure factors of Heisenberg spin chain in the presence of anisotropy and magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezania, H.

    2017-02-01

    We have theoretically studied the spin structure factors of spin chain in the presence of longitudinal field and transverse anisotropy. The possible effects of easy axis magnetization are investigated in terms of anisotropy in the Heisenberg interactions. This anisotropy is considered for exchange coupling constants perpendicular to magnetic field direction. The original spin model hamiltonian is mapped to a bosonic model via a hard core bosonic transformation where an infinite hard core repulsion is imposed to constrain one boson occupation per site. Using Green's function approach, the energy spectrum of quasiparticle excitation has been obtained. The spectrum of the bosonic gas has been implemented in order to obtain two particle propagator which corresponds to spin structure factor of original Heisenberg chain model Hamiltonian. The results show the position of peak in the longitudinal structure factor at fixed value for anisotropy moves to higher frequency with magnetic field. Also the intensity of dynamical structure factor decreases with magnetic field. A small dependence of longitudinal dynamical spin structure factor on the anisotropy is observed for fixed value of magnetic field. Our results show longitudinal static structure factor is found to be monotonically increasing with magnetic field due to increase of spins aligning along magnetic field. Furthermore the dispersion behaviors of static longitudinal and transverse structure factors for different magnetic fields and anisotropy parameters are addressed.

  18. Variability of Compet itive Factors in Air Transportation and Improving Customer Satisfaction with Service Innovation: A New "Mile + Time Score" Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Süleyman Can Yıldırır

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available As in all the world, airlines transportation in our country is increasing every day. Rapid transport, reasonable price and high quality service is the reaso n for this increase. Both local and foreign airline companies have accelerated their activities as result of this rapid growth in air transportation sector. Over the time, these enterprises reached a level to go head to head with each other about the quality, price, transport network and they have begun to use similar applications as element of competition. The aim of this study is; to determinate the factors that influence to the customer’s preferences about airline companies and to be a source for enter prises to increase customer satisfaction. For this reason, in addition to “bonus miles” application which is used of almost all airline companies, example of “miles+time score” application was made and evaluated the impact of eliminating in terms of custom er victimization. As a result of the survey applied to 444 people; it is also identified that the impact of the “miles + time” application at the preferences of customers as well as positive and negative factors affecting the enterprises of preferences.

  19. Non-negative matrix factorization and term structure of interest rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Hellinton H.; Stern, Julio M.

    2015-01-01

    Non-Negative Matrix Factorization (NNMF) is a technique for dimensionality reduction with a wide variety of applications from text mining to identification of concentrations in chemistry. NNMF deals with non-negative data and results in non-negative factors and factor loadings. Consequently, it is a natural choice when studying the term structure of interest rates. In this paper, NNMF is applied to obtain factors from the term structure of interest rates and the procedure is compared with other very popular techniques: principal component analysis and Nelson-Siegel model. The NNMF approximation for the term structure of interest rates is better in terms of fitting. From a practitioner point of view, the NNMF factors and factor loadings obtained possess straightforward financial interpretations due to their non-negativeness.

  20. Postpartum Bonding Disorder: Factor Structure, Validity, Reliability and a Model Comparison of the Postnatal Bonding Questionnaire in Japanese Mothers of Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukiko Ohashi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Negative attitudes of mothers towards their infant is conceptualized as postpartum bonding disorder, which leads to serious health problems in perinatal health care. However, its measurement still remains to be standardized. Our aim was to examine and confirm the psychometric properties of the Postnatal Bonding Questionnaire (PBQ in Japanese mothers. We distributed a set of questionnaires to community mothers and studied 392 mothers who returned the questionnaires at 1 month after childbirth. Our model was compared with three other models derived from previous studies. In a randomly halved sample, an exploratory factor analysis yielded a three-factor structure: Anger and Restrictedness, Lack of Affection, and Rejection and Fear. This factor structure was cross-validated by a confirmatory factor analysis using the other halved sample. The three subscales showed satisfactory internal consistency. The three PBQ subscale scores were correlated with depression and psychological abuse scores. Their test–retest reliability between day 5 and 1 month after childbirth was measured by intraclass correlation coefficients between 0.76 and 0.83. The Akaike Information Criteria of our model was better than the original four-factor model of Brockington. The present study indicates that the PBQ is a reliable and valid measure of bonding difficulties of Japanese mothers with neonates.

  1. Postpartum Bonding Disorder: Factor Structure, Validity, Reliability and a Model Comparison of the Postnatal Bonding Questionnaire in Japanese Mothers of Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Yukiko; Kitamura, Toshinori; Sakanashi, Kyoko; Tanaka, Tomoko

    2016-08-02

    Negative attitudes of mothers towards their infant is conceptualized as postpartum bonding disorder, which leads to serious health problems in perinatal health care. However, its measurement still remains to be standardized. Our aim was to examine and confirm the psychometric properties of the Postnatal Bonding Questionnaire (PBQ) in Japanese mothers. We distributed a set of questionnaires to community mothers and studied 392 mothers who returned the questionnaires at 1 month after childbirth. Our model was compared with three other models derived from previous studies. In a randomly halved sample, an exploratory factor analysis yielded a three-factor structure: Anger and Restrictedness, Lack of Affection, and Rejection and Fear. This factor structure was cross-validated by a confirmatory factor analysis using the other halved sample. The three subscales showed satisfactory internal consistency. The three PBQ subscale scores were correlated with depression and psychological abuse scores. Their test-retest reliability between day 5 and 1 month after childbirth was measured by intraclass correlation coefficients between 0.76 and 0.83. The Akaike Information Criteria of our model was better than the original four-factor model of Brockington. The present study indicates that the PBQ is a reliable and valid measure of bonding difficulties of Japanese mothers with neonates.

  2. The factor structure of the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire and participants of vocational rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, P P; Hawkins, W E

    2000-08-01

    This study investigated the factor structure of the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire when used by individuals with psychiatric disabilities who are participating in vocational rehabilitation. The sample consisted of 87 respondents recruited from Columbus, Ohio, in 1996 who worked in noncompetitive employment. Factor analyses with varimax rotation conducted on the short-form of the questionnaire indicated three factors, an intrinsic factor and an extrinsic factor (as proposed by the Herzberg two-factor theory) as well as another pertaining to satisfaction derived from participating in vocational rehabilitation.

  3. SCORE - A DESCRIPTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SLACK, CHARLES W.

    REINFORCEMENT AND ROLE-REVERSAL TECHNIQUES ARE USED IN THE SCORE PROJECT, A LOW-COST PROGRAM OF DELINQUENCY PREVENTION FOR HARD-CORE TEENAGE STREET CORNER BOYS. COMMITTED TO THE BELIEF THAT THE BOYS HAVE THE POTENTIAL FOR ETHICAL BEHAVIOR, THE SCORE WORKER FOLLOWS B.F. SKINNER'S THEORY OF OPERANT CONDITIONING AND REINFORCES THE DELINQUENT'S GOOD…

  4. Examination of the Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale-Version 2 and the Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale-Straightforward Items Factor Structure in a Sample of U.S. College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liu; Lowe, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    The current study examined the factor structure of the Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation-Straightforward Items (BFNE-S) and the Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation-Version 2 (BFNE-II) among 151 college students from the United States. Results indicated that the BFNE-S and the BFNE-II scores demonstrated excellent internal consistency reliability.…

  5. The Eysenck Personality Questionnaire Brief Version: factor structure and reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Toru

    2005-11-01

    The short scale of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised (EPQR-S; H. J. Eysenck & S. B. G. Eysenck, 1992) is a 48-item personality questionnaire primarily designed to measure an individual's level of extraversion (vs. introversion) and neuroticism. Although L. J. Francis, L. B. Brown, and R. Philipchalk (1992) created the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire Revised-Abbreviated (EPQR-A), an even briefer version of the EPQR-S, the reliability coefficients of some of the measures have been less than satisfactory (S. Forrest, C. A. Lewis, & M. Shevlin, 2000). Because brevity and reliability are both extremely important, the author of the present study created a briefer version of the EPQR-S, more reliable than the EPQR-A, by making slight alterations in the item content as well as the response format of the EPQR-S. Two hundred and sixty eight participants completed the original EPQR-S and the 24-item newly revised briefer version of the EPQR-S (EPQ-BV) twice. The findings revealed that the EPQ-BV has good internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and concurrent validity. A principal component analysis revealed a solution with factor loadings that accurately reflected the primary measures of the EPQR-S. These findings are discussed in relation to the psychometric properties of the EPQR-A and the original version of the EPQR-S.

  6. The importance of building construction materials relative to other factors affecting structure survival during wildfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syphard, Alexandra D.; Brennan, Teresa J.; Keeley, Jon E.

    2017-01-01

    Structure loss to wildfire is a serious problem in wildland-urban interface areas across the world. Laboratory experiments suggest that fire-resistant building construction and design could be important for reducing structure destruction, but these need to be evaluated under real wildfire conditions, especially relative to other factors. Using empirical data from destroyed and surviving structures from large wildfires in southern California, we evaluated the relative importance of building construction and structure age compared to other local and landscape-scale variables associated with structure survival. The local-scale analysis showed that window preparation was especially important but, in general, creating defensible space adjacent to the home was as important as building construction. At the landscape scale, structure density and structure age were the two most important factors affecting structure survival, but there was a significant interaction between them. That is, young structure age was most important in higher-density areas where structure survival overall was more likely. On the other hand, newer-construction structures were less likely to survive wildfires at lower density. Here, appropriate defensible space near the structure and accessibility to major roads were important factors. In conclusion, community safety is a multivariate problem that will require a comprehensive solution involving land use planning, fire-safe construction, and property maintenance.

  7. Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) scores generated from the MMPI-2 and MMPI-2-RF test booklets: internal structure comparability in a sample of criminal defendants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarescavage, Anthony M; Alosco, Michael L; Ben-Porath, Yossef S; Wood, Arcangela; Luna-Jones, Lynn

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the internal structure comparability of Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) scores derived from the MMPI-2 and MMPI-2-RF booklets in a sample of 320 criminal defendants (229 males and 54 females). After exclusion of invalid protocols, the final sample consisted of 96 defendants who were administered the MMPI-2-RF booklet and 83 who completed the MMPI-2. No statistically significant differences in MMPI-2-RF invalidity rates were observed between the two forms. Individuals in the final sample who completed the MMPI-2-RF did not statistically differ on demographics or referral question from those who were administered the MMPI-2 booklet. Independent t tests showed no statistically significant differences between MMPI-2-RF scores generated with the MMPI-2 and MMPI-2-RF booklets on the test's substantive scales. Statistically significant small differences were observed on the revised Variable Response Inconsistency (VRIN-r) and True Response Inconsistency (TRIN-r) scales. Cronbach's alpha and standard errors of measurement were approximately equal between the booklets for all MMPI-2-RF scales. Finally, MMPI-2-RF intercorrelations produced from the two forms yielded mostly small and a few medium differences, indicating that discriminant validity and test structure are maintained. Overall, our findings reflect the internal structure comparability of MMPI-2-RF scale scores generated from MMPI-2 and MMPI-2-RF booklets. Implications of these results and limitations of these findings are discussed. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Structural factors of solar system cluster ground coupled storage rationalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor V. Wysochin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The computational investigations of unsteady heat transfer in seasonal solar heat storage system were conducted. This storage system consists of nine ground heat exchangers. The investigations were made for periodical diurnal cycle charging during summer season. The heat exchanger is presented as vertical probe with concentric tubes arrangement. Aim: The aim of the work is the optimization of cluster ground coupled storage – the probes quantity in cluster, their lengths and interval – using high precision mathematical model. Materials and Methods: The mathematical model of conjugate solar system functioning and ground coupled storage involves differential equations describing the incoming and conversion of solar energy in solar collector. Also it includes the heat exchange in ground heat exchangers and three-dimensional soil mass. Results: The need of mutual influence accounting of the solar collector and the ground heat exchanger size ranges is shown. One more thing – capability of effectiveness improvement of the collector based on reasonable step size selection for cluster and selection of active heat exchangers quantity in requisite construction. Conclusions: The recommendations for organization of heat exchangers of the collector work are offered. The five-probe structure is the most effective one for cluster arrangement of seasonal heat storage. The recommended interval between probes is 4 meters.

  9. Factor structure of a multidimensional gender identity scale in a sample of Chinese elementary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lu; Xie, Dong; Shek, Daniel T L

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the factor structure of a scale based on the four-dimensional gender identity model (Egan and Perry, 2001) in 726 Chinese elementary school students. Exploratory factor analyses suggested a three-factor model, two of which corresponded to "Felt Pressure" and "Intergroup Bias" in the original model. The third factor "Gender Compatibility" appeared to be a combination of "Gender Typicality" and "Gender Contentment" in the original model. Follow-up confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) indicated that, relative to the initial four-factor structure, the three-factor model fits the current Chinese sample better. These results are discussed in light of cross-cultural similarities and differences in development of gender identity.

  10. Factor Structure of a Multidimensional Gender Identity Scale in a Sample of Chinese Elementary School Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Yu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the factor structure of a scale based on the four-dimensional gender identity model (Egan and Perry, 2001 in 726 Chinese elementary school students. Exploratory factor analyses suggested a three-factor model, two of which corresponded to “Felt Pressure” and “Intergroup Bias” in the original model. The third factor “Gender Compatibility” appeared to be a combination of “Gender Typicality” and “Gender Contentment” in the original model. Follow-up confirmatory factor analysis (CFA indicated that, relative to the initial four-factor structure, the three-factor model fits the current Chinese sample better. These results are discussed in light of cross-cultural similarities and differences in development of gender identity.

  11. Effectiveness of Structured Teaching Programme on Knowledge regarding Risk factors and Prevention of Suicidal Behaviour among Adolescents in a selected College, Salem, Tamil Nadu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Loganathan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: The aim of this study is to assess the knowledge regarding risk factors and prevention of suicidal behavior, to evaluate the effectiveness of structured teaching programme on knowledge regarding risk factors and prevention of suicidal behaviour among Adolescents, and to associate the pre-test knowledge regarding risk factors and prevention of suicidal behaviour among adolescents with their selected demographic variables.Materials & Methods: A quantitative evaluative approach with a pre-experimental (one group pre test- post test design was adopted; the setting of the study was Sri Vidya Mandir College, Salem, Tamilnadu. A Structured Self-administered questionnaire was used to assess the knowledge of the adolescents. The systematic random sampling technique was used and 60 adolescents involved on Structured Teaching Programme regarding Risk factors and prevention of Suicidal Behaviour by using a Power-point slide presentation followed with pre-test. On 7th day, the post test was conducted. The data collection period of the study was 09.12.2014 to 15.12.2014.Results: The study findings revealed that during Pre-test, the knowledge regarding risk factors and prevention of suicidal behaviour among adolescents, 45(75% had inadequate knowledge, 15(25% had moderately adequate knowledge and none of them had adequate knowledge. During post test, 23 adolescents (38.33% had adequate knowledge, 37(61.67% had moderately adequate knowledge and none of them had inadequate knowledge. The mean score during pre-test was 9.9±3.88 and the mean score during post test was 17.03±4.12. The paired ‘t’ value was 16.84 which were significant at p<0.05 level. Thus it shows that the structured teaching programme was effective in improving knowledge regarding risk factors and prevention of suicidal behaviour among adolescents. There was no significant association found between the pre-test scores on knowledge regarding risk factors and

  12. Calibration of unified Parkinson's disease rating scale scores to Movement Disorder Society-unified Parkinson's disease rating scale scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Christopher G; Stebbins, Glenn T; Tilley, Barbara C

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to develop formulas to convert the UPDRS to Movement Disorder Society (MDS)-UPDRS scores. The MDS-UPDRS is a revision of the UPDRS with sound clinimetric properties. Reliable formulas to recalculate UPDRS scores into MDS-UPDRS equivalents are pivotal to the practical transition and definitive adoption of the MDS-UPDRS. UPDRS and MDS-UPDRS scores were collected on 875 PD patients. A developmental sample was used to regress UPDRS scores on corresponding MDS-UPDRS scores based on three H & Y groupings (I/II, III, and IV/V). Regression weighting factors and intercept terms provided formulas for UPDRS conversions to be tested in a validation sample. Concordance between the true MDS-UPDRS Part scores and those derived from the formulas was compared using Bland-Altman's plots and Lin's concordance coefficient (LCC). Significant concordance between UPDRS-estimated MDS-UPDRS scores was achieved for Parts II (Motor Experiences of Daily Living) (LCC = 0.93) and III (Motor Examination) (LCC = 0.97). The formulas resulted in mean differences between the true MDS-UPDRS and estimated MDS-UPDRS scores of less than 1 point for both Parts II and III. Concordance was not achieved for Parts I and IV (Non-motor Experiences of Daily Living and Complications of Therapy). Formulas allow archival UPDRS Parts II and III individual patient data to be accurately transferred to MDS-UPDRS scores. Because Part I collects data on much more extensive information than the UPDRS, and because Part IV is structured differently in the two versions, old ratings for these parts cannot be converted. © 2012 Movement Disorder Society.

  13. Four-factor structure of obsessive-compulsive disorder symptoms in children, adolescents, and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, S Evelyn; Rosario, Maria C; Baer, Lee; Carter, Alice S; Brown, Timothy A; Scharf, Jeremiah M; Illmann, Cornelia; Leckman, James F; Sukhodolsky, Denis; Katsovich, Lilya; Rasmussen, Steven; Goodman, Wayne; Delorme, Richard; Leboyer, Marion; Chabane, Nadia; Jenike, Michael A; Geller, Daniel A; Pauls, David L

    2008-07-01

    To determine whether the four-factor category-based obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) symptom structure from a previous confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) may be appropriately used in child, adolescent, and adult groups. Symptom dimensions are increasingly used as quantitative traits in genetic, neuroimaging, and treatment studies of OCD across all ages. Identification of a category-based OCD symptom dimension structure that is validated for use across child, adolescent, and adult age groups is necessary to guide ongoing translational research. Four OCD samples comprising 356 individuals were divided into child, adolescent, and adult groups. The fit of the only CFA-defined four-factor model was compared across these independent age group samples. Multiple-group CFA using maximum likelihood estimation assessed adequacy of fit comparing unconstrained and measurement weight-constrained models. The fit of previous exploratory factor analysis-defined three- and five-factor models on adults was also examined using CFA. A four-factor solution provided adequate but imperfect fit across age groups, with comparable indices to the only previous OCD CFA: factor 1 (aggressive/sexual/religious/somatic/checking); factor 2 (symmetry/ordering/counting/repeating); factor 3 (contamination/cleaning), and factor 4 (hoarding). Models in which factor loadings were constrained and unconstrained across the three age groups yielded comparable model fit. Factors were highly correlated and were not mutually exclusive. The four-factor solution provided an improved fit to both three- and five-factor solutions using CFA across the three age groups. A four-factor, CFA-defined, category-based model of OCD symptom dimensions is adequate for use in children, adolescents, and adult age groups. The factor structure of this multiple age group sample has limitations and is imperfect, but current findings support the comparability of the defined latent OCD dimensions across age groups. Further work is

  14. The Network Structure of Human Personality According to the NEO-PI-R: Matching Network Community Structure to Factor Structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goekoop, R.; Goekoop, J.G.; Scholte, H.S.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Human personality is described preferentially in terms of factors (dimensions) found using factor analysis. An alternative and highly related method is network analysis, which may have several advantages over factor analytic methods. Aim: To directly compare the ability of network comm

  15. The Bandim tuberculosis score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolf, Frauke; Joaquim, Luis Carlos; Vieira, Cesaltina

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study was carried out in Guinea-Bissau ’ s capital Bissau among inpatients and outpatients attending for tuberculosis (TB) treatment within the study area of the Bandim Health Project, a Health and Demographic Surveillance Site. Our aim was to assess the variability between 2...... physicians in performing the Bandim tuberculosis score (TBscore), a clinical severity score for pulmonary TB (PTB), and to compare it to the Karnofsky performance score (KPS). Method : From December 2008 to July 2009 we assessed the TBscore and the KPS of 100 PTB patients at inclusion in the TB cohort and...

  16. 根治性前列腺切除术后Gleason评分升级的危险因素分析%Influence of clinical factors on Gleason score upgrade in patients undergoing radical prostatectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张桂铭; 秦晓健; 韩成涛; 顾成元; 万方宁; 瞿元元; 顾伟杰; 马春光; 朱耀

    2015-01-01

    目的 探讨影响前列腺癌患者行根治性前列腺切除术(RP术)后Gleason评分升级的因素.方法 回顾性分析2012年1月至2013年12月在复旦大学附属肿瘤医院泌尿外科行RP术的322例前列腺癌患者资料,统计其穿刺Gleason评分及RP术后Gleason评分的差异,将其分为Gleason评分升级组和未升级组.回顾性分析年龄、体重指数(BMI)、前列腺特异性抗原(PSA)、前列腺体积、穿刺的阳性比例、临床分期及术后病理特征等临床病理资料.采用t检验或x2检验比较两组患者的临床病理特征的差异.Logistic回归分析评估各临床因素对GS升级的影响.结果 共有107例患者出现Gleason评分升级,发生率为33.2%.升级患者的年龄、BMI和临床分期与未出现升级的患者相比无明显差异.两组患者PSA水平、前列腺体积和穿刺的阳性比例存在显著差异,与未升级患者相比,Gleason评分升级患者PSA为10.0~ 19.9 μg/L及≥20.0 μg/L的比例明显更高(x2=6.740,P =0.034),前列腺体积明显减小(t=3.481,P=0.002),且穿刺阳性比例明显升高(t=-2.097,P =0.037).此外,升级的患者中淋巴结转移(x2=4.193,P=0.041)和包膜外侵犯(x2=4.747,P=0.029)的发生率高于非升级患者.Logistic回归分析则显示,PSA水平(OR=2.451,95% CI:1.290 ~4.660)、前列腺体积(OR=0.982,95%CI:0.969 ~0.995)和穿刺阳性比例(OR=2.756,95% CI:1.033~7.357)是Gleason评分升级的独立危险因素.结论 PSA、前列腺体积和穿刺阳性比例是影响Gleason评分升级的重要因素.%Objective To evaluate clinical factors affecting Gleason score upgrade in patients receiving radical prostatectomy (RP).Methods A total of 322 patients with prostate cancer who received RP from January 2012 to December 2013 at Department of Urology at Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center were included,and their data of age,body mass index (BMI),prostate-specific antigen (PSA),prostate volume,percentage core

  17. Factor structure of the STAXI-2-AX and its relationship to burnout in housewives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moral de la Rubia, José; González Ramírez, Mónica Teresa; Landero Hernández, René

    2010-05-01

    This study was conducted in order to determine factor structure and reliability of STAXI-2-AX/EX (Spielberger, 1999) and to calculate the correlation between STAXI-2-AX/EX and the Housewives Burnout Questionnaire (CUBAC). The study sample included 226 housewives. Dimensional structure was estimated using exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. Factor analysis results of STAXI-2-AX/EX showed that a four related factors model had an adequate goodness of fit, eliminating three items. Regarding the CUBAC, a two related factors structure presented the best goodness of fit, which improve if five items were eliminated. Finally, as we expected, the correlation between the two scales was positive (r = .38). We suggest that this study should be replicated in other countries.

  18. Factor Structure of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children: Fourth Edition in Children with ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Nicholas S; Barchard, Kimberly A; Parke, Elyse; Jones, W Paul; Etcoff, Lewis M; Allen, Daniel N

    2015-12-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the factor structure of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth Edition (WISC-IV) is better explained by a five-factor model rather than the four-factor model in the standardization sample. The current study examined the WISC-IV's factor structure in a sample of children with ADHD. Participants included 314 children and adolescents who were diagnosed with ADHD. Confirmatory factor analysis was conducted on the 10 core subtests of the WISC-IV, and three models were examined including two based on Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) theory. A five-factor model consisting of Gc, Gf, Gv, Gsm, and Gs factors provided the best fit for the data. The Perceptual Reasoning factor identified in the original four-factor model split into the two CHC factors, Gf and Gv, and cross-loaded the Symbol Search subtest onto the Gv factor. A five-factor model based on CHC theory provided superior fit for the WISC-IV in children with ADHD, as has been found with the standardization sample. © The Author(s) 2012.

  19. Reporting Valid and Reliable Overall Scores and Domain Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lihua

    2010-01-01

    In educational assessment, overall scores obtained by simply averaging a number of domain scores are sometimes reported. However, simply averaging the domain scores ignores the fact that different domains have different score points, that scores from those domains are related, and that at different score points the relationship between overall…

  20. Factor Structure, Reliability and Measurement Invariance of the Alberta Context Tool and the Conceptual Research Utilization Scale, for German Residential Long Term Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoben, Matthias; Estabrooks, Carole A.; Squires, Janet E.; Behrens, Johann

    2016-01-01

    We translated the Canadian residential long term care versions of the Alberta Context Tool (ACT) and the Conceptual Research Utilization (CRU) Scale into German, to study the association between organizational context factors and research utilization in German nursing homes. The rigorous translation process was based on best practice guidelines for tool translation, and we previously published methods and results of this process in two papers. Both instruments are self-report questionnaires used with care providers working in nursing homes. The aim of this study was to assess the factor structure, reliability, and measurement invariance (MI) between care provider groups responding to these instruments. In a stratified random sample of 38 nursing homes in one German region (Metropolregion Rhein-Neckar), we collected questionnaires from 273 care aides, 196 regulated nurses, 152 allied health providers, 6 quality improvement specialists, 129 clinical leaders, and 65 nursing students. The factor structure was assessed using confirmatory factor models. The first model included all 10 ACT concepts. We also decided a priori to run two separate models for the scale-based and the count-based ACT concepts as suggested by the instrument developers. The fourth model included the five CRU Scale items. Reliability scores were calculated based on the parameters of the best-fitting factor models. Multiple-group confirmatory factor models were used to assess MI between provider groups. Rather than the hypothesized ten-factor structure of the ACT, confirmatory factor models suggested 13 factors. The one-factor solution of the CRU Scale was confirmed. The reliability was acceptable (>0.7 in the entire sample and in all provider groups) for 10 of 13 ACT concepts, and high (0.90–0.96) for the CRU Scale. We could demonstrate partial strong MI for both ACT models and partial strict MI for the CRU Scale. Our results suggest that the scores of the German ACT and the CRU Scale for nursing