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Sample records for factor binding kinetics

  1. Kinetic properties of a single nucleotide binding site on chloroplast coupling factor 1 (CF1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, S; Huchzermeyer, B

    1998-12-01

    The kinetics of nucleotide binding to spinach chloroplast coupling factor CF1 in a fully inhibited state were investigated by stopped-flow experiments using the fluorescent trinitrophenyl analogue (NO2)3Ph-ADP. The CF1 was in a state in which two of the three binding sites on the beta subunits were irreversibly blocked with ADP, Mg2+ and fluoroaluminate, while the three binding sites on the alpha subunits were occupied by nucleotides [Garin, J., Vincon, M., Gagnon, J. & Vignais, P. V. (1994) Biochemistry 33, 3772-3777)]. Thus, it was possible to characterise a single nucleotide-binding site without superimposed nucleotide exchange or binding to an additional site. (NO2)3Ph-ADP binding to the remaining site on the third beta subunit was characterised by a high dissociation rate of 15 s(-1), leading to a very low affinity (dissociation constant higher than 150 microM). Subsequent to isolation, CF1 preparations contained two endogenously bound nucleotides. Pre-loading with ATP yielded CF1 with five tightly bound nucleotides and one free nucleotide-binding site on a beta subunit. Pre-loading with ADP, however, resulted in a CF1 preparation containing four tightly bound nucleotides and two free nucleotide binding sites. One of the two free binding sites was located on a beta subunit, while the other was probably located on an alpha subunit.

  2. Probing the electrostatics and pharmacological modulation of sequence-specific binding by the DNA-binding domain of the ETS family transcription factor PU.1: a binding affinity and kinetics investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munde, Manoj; Poon, Gregory M K; Wilson, W David

    2013-05-27

    Members of the ETS family of transcription factors regulate a functionally diverse array of genes. All ETS proteins share a structurally conserved but sequence-divergent DNA-binding domain, known as the ETS domain. Although the structure and thermodynamics of the ETS-DNA complexes are well known, little is known about the kinetics of sequence recognition, a facet that offers potential insight into its molecular mechanism. We have characterized DNA binding by the ETS domain of PU.1 by biosensor-surface plasmon resonance (SPR). SPR analysis revealed a striking kinetic profile for DNA binding by the PU.1 ETS domain. At low salt concentrations, it binds high-affinity cognate DNA with a very slow association rate constant (≤10(5)M(-)(1)s(-)(1)), compensated by a correspondingly small dissociation rate constant. The kinetics are strongly salt dependent but mutually balance to produce a relatively weak dependence in the equilibrium constant. This profile contrasts sharply with reported data for other ETS domains (e.g., Ets-1, TEL) for which high-affinity binding is driven by rapid association (>10(7)M(-)(1)s(-)(1)). We interpret this difference in terms of the hydration properties of ETS-DNA binding and propose that at least two mechanisms of sequence recognition are employed by this family of DNA-binding domain. Additionally, we use SPR to demonstrate the potential for pharmacological inhibition of sequence-specific ETS-DNA binding, using the minor groove-binding distamycin as a model compound. Our work establishes SPR as a valuable technique for extending our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of ETS-DNA interactions as well as developing potential small-molecule agents for biotechnological and therapeutic purposes.

  3. Kinetic characterization of factor Xa binding using a quenched fluorescent substrate based on the reactive site of factor Xa inhibitor from Bauhinia ungulata seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, M L V; Andrade, S A; Juliano, M A; Sallai, R C; Torquato, R J; Sampaio, M U; Pott, V J; Sampaio, C A M

    2003-07-01

    The specific Kunitz Bauhinia ungulata factor Xa inhibitor (BuXI) and the Bauhinia variegata trypsin inhibitor (BvTI) blocked the activity of trypsin, chymotrypsin, plasmin, plasma kallikrein and factor XIIa, and factor Xa inhibition was achieved only by BuXI (K(i) 14 nM). BuXI and BvTI are highly homologous (70%). The major differences are the methionine residues at BuXI reactive site, which are involved in the inhibition, since the oxidized protein no longer inhibits factor Xa but maintains the trypsin inhibition. Quenched fluorescent substrates based on the reactive site sequence of the inhibitors were synthesized and the kinetic parameters of the hydrolysis were determined using factor Xa and trypsin. The catalytic efficiency k(cat)/K(m) 4.3 x 10(7) M(-1)sec(>-1) for Abz-VMIAALPRTMFIQ-EDDnp (lead peptide) hydrolysis by factor Xa was 10(4)-fold higher than that of Boc-Ile-Glu-Gly-Arg-AMC, widely used as factor Xa substrate. Lengthening of the substrate changed its susceptibility to factor Xa hydrolysis. Both methionine residues in the substrate influence the binding to factor Xa. Serine replacement of threonine (P(1)') decreases the catalytic efficiency by four orders of magnitude. Factor Xa did not hydrolyze the substrate containing the reactive site sequence of BvTI, that inhibits trypsin inhibitor but not factor Xa. Abz-VMIAALPRTMFIQ-EDDnp prolonged both the prothrombin time and the activated partial thromboplastin time, and the other modified substrates used in this experiment altered blood-clotting assays.

  4. Kinetics of binding and geometry of cells on molecular biochips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chechetkin, V.R. [Theoretical Department of Division for Perspective Investigations, Troitsk Institute of Innovation and Thermonuclear Investigations (TRINITI), Troitsk 142190, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: chechet@biochip.ru

    2007-07-02

    We examine how the shape of cells and the geometry of experiment affect the reaction-diffusion kinetics at the binding between target and probe molecules on molecular biochips. In particular, we compare the binding kinetics for the probes immobilized on surface of the hemispherical and flat circular cells, the limit of thin slab of analyte solution over probe cell as well as hemispherical gel pads and cells printed in gel slab over a substrate. It is shown that hemispherical geometry provides significantly faster binding kinetics and ensures more spatially homogeneous distribution of local (from a pixel) signals over a cell in the transient regime. The advantage of using thin slabs with small volume of analyte solution may be hampered by the much longer binding kinetics needing the auxiliary mixing devices. Our analysis proves that the shape of cells and the geometry of experiment should be included to the list of essential factors at biochip designing.

  5. Neptunium Binding Kinetics with Arsenazo(III)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Leigh R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Johnson, Aaron T. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mezyk, Stephen P. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-08-01

    This document has been prepared to meet FCR&D level 2 milestone M2FT-14IN0304021, “Report on the results of actinide binding kinetics with aqueous phase complexants” This work was carried out under the auspices of the Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Advanced Separations Systems FCR&D work package. The report details kinetics experiments that were performed to measure rates of aqueous phase complexation for pentavalent neptunium with the chromotropic dye Arsenazo III (AAIII). The studies performed were designed to determine how pH, ionic strength and AAIII concentration may affect the rate of the reaction. A brief comparison with hexavalent neptunium is also made. It was identified that as pH was increased the rate of reaction also increased, however increasing the ionic strength and concentration of AAIII had the opposite effect. Interestingly, the rate of reaction of Np(VI) with AAIII was found to be slower than that of the Np(V) reaction.

  6. Conformation-controlled binding kinetics of antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanti, Marta; Fanelli, Duccio; Piazza, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies are large, extremely flexible molecules, whose internal dynamics is certainly key to their astounding ability to bind antigens of all sizes, from small hormones to giant viruses. In this paper, we build a shape-based coarse-grained model of IgG molecules and show that it can be used to generate 3D conformations in agreement with single-molecule Cryo-Electron Tomography data. Furthermore, we elaborate a theoretical model that can be solved exactly to compute the binding rate constant of a small antigen to an IgG in a prescribed 3D conformation. Our model shows that the antigen binding process is tightly related to the internal dynamics of the IgG. Our findings pave the way for further investigation of the subtle connection between the dynamics and the function of large, flexible multi-valent molecular machines.

  7. Insights into Coupled Folding and Binding Mechanisms from Kinetic Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shammas, Sarah L; Crabtree, Michael D; Dahal, Liza; Wicky, Basile I M; Clarke, Jane

    2016-03-25

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are characterized by a lack of persistent structure. Since their identification more than a decade ago, many questions regarding their functional relevance and interaction mechanisms remain unanswered. Although most experiments have taken equilibrium and structural perspectives, fewer studies have investigated the kinetics of their interactions. Here we review and highlight the type of information that can be gained from kinetic studies. In particular, we show how kinetic studies of coupled folding and binding reactions, an important class of signaling event, are needed to determine mechanisms.

  8. Endothelial nanoparticle binding kinetics are matrix and size dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiron, Amber L; Clark, Brendan; Rinker, Kristina D

    2011-12-01

    Nanoparticles are increasingly important in medical research for application to areas such as drug delivery and imaging. Understanding the interactions of nanoparticles with cells in physiologically relevant environments is vital for their acceptance, and cell-particle interactions likely vary based on the design of the particle including its size, shape, and surface chemistry. For this reason, the kinetic interactions of fluorescent nanoparticles of sizes 20, 100, 200, and 500 nm with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were determined by (1) measuring nanoparticles per cell at 37 and 4°C (to inhibit endocytosis) and (2) modeling experimental particle uptake data with equations describing particle attachment, detachment, and internalization. Additionally, the influence of cell substrate compliance on nanoparticle attachment and uptake was investigated. Results show that the number of binding sites per cell decreased with increasing nanoparticle size, while the attachment coefficient increased. By comparing HUVEC grown on either a thin coating of collagen or on top of three-dimensional collagen hydrogel, nanoparticle attachment and internalization were shown to be influenced significantly by the substrate on which the cells are cultured. This study concludes that both particle size and cell culture substrate compliance appreciably influence the binding of nanoparticles; important factors in translating in vitro studies of nanoparticle interactions to in vivo studies focused on therapeutic or diagnostic applications.

  9. Application of a fluorescent cobalamin analogue for analysis of the binding kinetics. A study employing recombinant human transcobalamin and intrinsic factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedosov, Sergey N; Grissom, Charles B; Fedosova, Natalya U;

    2006-01-01

    this behaviour. The most stable component had K(d) = 1.5 x 10(-13) m, which guarantees the binding of CBC to IF under physiological conditions. The specific intestinal receptor cubilin bound both IF-CBC and IF-Cbl with equal affinity. In conclusion, the fluorescent analogue CBC can be used as a reporting agent...

  10. Quantifying cell binding kinetics mediated by surface-bound blood type B antigen to immobilized antibodies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI BaoXia; CHEN Juan; LONG Mian

    2008-01-01

    Cell adhesion is crucial to many biological processes, such as inflammatory responses, tumor metastasis and thrombosis formation. Recently a commercial surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based BIAcore biosensor has been extended to determine cell binding mediated by surface-bound biomolecular interactions. How such cell binding is quantitatively governed by kinetic rates and regulating factors, however, has been poorly understood. Here we developed a novel assay to determine the binding kinetics of surface-bound biomolecular interactions using a commercial BIAcore 3000 biosensor. Human red blood cells (RBCs) presenting blood group B antigen and CM5 chip bearing immobilized anti-B monoclonal antibody (mAb) were used to obtain the time courses of response unit, or sensorgrams, when flowing RBCs over the chip surface. A cellular kinetic model was proposed to correlate the sensorgrams with kinetic rates. Impacts of regulating factors, such as cell concentration,flow duration and rate, antibody-presenting level, as well as Ph value and osmotic pressure of suspending medium were tested systematically, which imparted the confidence that the approach can be applied to kinetic measurements of cell adhesion mediated by surface-bound biomolecular interactions.These results provided a new insight into quantifying cell binding using a commercial SPR-based BIAcore biosensor.

  11. Synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, Louis A.; Zamora, Paul; Lin, Xinhua; Glass, John D.

    2007-01-23

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain that binds a heparin-binding growth factor receptor, covalently bound to a hydrophobic linker, which is in turn covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  12. Mechanics, thermodynamics, and kinetics of ligand binding to biopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarillo, Javier; Morín, José A; Beltrán-Heredia, Elena; Villaluenga, Juan P G; Ibarra, Borja; Cao, Francisco J

    2017-01-01

    Ligands binding to polymers regulate polymer functions by changing their physical and chemical properties. This ligand regulation plays a key role in many biological processes. We propose here a model to explain the mechanical, thermodynamic, and kinetic properties of the process of binding of small ligands to long biopolymers. These properties can now be measured at the single molecule level using force spectroscopy techniques. Our model performs an effective decomposition of the ligand-polymer system on its covered and uncovered regions, showing that the elastic properties of the ligand-polymer depend explicitly on the ligand coverage of the polymer (i.e., the fraction of the polymer covered by the ligand). The equilibrium coverage that minimizes the free energy of the ligand-polymer system is computed as a function of the applied force. We show how ligands tune the mechanical properties of a polymer, in particular its length and stiffness, in a force dependent manner. In addition, it is shown how ligand binding can be regulated applying mechanical tension on the polymer. Moreover, the binding kinetics study shows that, in the case where the ligand binds and organizes the polymer in different modes, the binding process can present transient shortening or lengthening of the polymer, caused by changes in the relative coverage by the different ligand modes. Our model will be useful to understand ligand-binding regulation of biological processes, such as the metabolism of nucleic acid. In particular, this model allows estimating the coverage fraction and the ligand mode characteristics from the force extension curves of a ligand-polymer system.

  13. Effect of DNA binding on geminate CO recombination kinetics in CooA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Karunakaran, Venugopal; Youn, Hwan; Poulos, Thomas; Champion, Paul

    2012-02-01

    CooA proteins are heme-based CO-sensing transcription factors. Here we study the ultrafast dynamics of geminate CO rebinding to RrCooA. The effects of DNA binding and the truncation of the DNA binding domain on the CO geminate recombination kinetics were investigated. The CO rebinding kinetics in these CooA complexes takes place on ultrafast timescales but remains non-exponential over many decades in time. We show that this non-exponential kinetic response is due to a quenched enthalpic barrier distribution resulting from a distribution of heme geometries that is frozen or slowly evolving on the timescale of CO rebinding. We also show that, upon CO binding, the distal pocket of the heme in RrCooA relaxes to form a very efficient hydrophobic trap for CO. DNA binding further tightens the narrow distal pocket and slightly weakens the iron-proximal histidine bond. Analysis of our data reveals that the uncomplexed and inherently flexible DNA binding domain adds additional structural heterogeneity to the heme doming coordinate. When CooA forms a complex with DNA, the flexibility of the DNA-binding domain decreases and the distribution of the conformations available in the heme domain becomes restricted.

  14. Synthetic heparin-binding factor analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, Louis A.; Zamora, Paul O.; Lin, Xinhua; Glass, John D.

    2010-04-20

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain, and preferably two peptide chains branched from a dipeptide branch moiety composed of two trifunctional amino acid residues, which peptide chain or chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a linker, which may be a hydrophobic linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  15. Integrating folding kinetics and protein function: biphasic kinetics and dual binding specificity in a WW domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanicolas, John; Brooks, Charles L

    2004-03-09

    Because of the association of beta-sheet formation with the initiation and propagation of amyloid diseases, model systems have been sought to further our understanding of this process. WW domains have been proposed as one such model system. Whereas the folding of the WW domains from human Yes-associated protein (YAP) and Pin have been shown to obey single-exponential kinetics, the folding of the WW domain from formin-binding protein (FBP) 28 has been shown to proceed via biphasic kinetics. From an analysis of free-energy landscapes from atomic-level molecular dynamics simulations, the biphasic folding kinetics observed in the FBP WW domain may be traced to the ability of this WW domain to adopt two slightly different forms of packing in its hydrophobic core. This conformational change is propagated along the peptide backbone and affects the position of a tryptophan residue shown in other WW domains to play a key role in binding. The WW domains of Pin and YAP do not support more than one type of packing each, leading to monophasic folding kinetics. The ability of the FBP WW domain to assume two different types of packing may, in turn, explain the capacity of this WW domain to bind two classes of ligand, a property that is not shared by other WW domains. These findings lead to the hypothesis that lability with respect to conformations separated by an observable barrier as a requirement for function is incompatible with the ability of a protein to fold via single-exponential kinetics.

  16. RNA-protein binding kinetics in an automated microfluidic reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgeway, William K; Seitaridou, Effrosyni; Phillips, Rob; Williamson, James R

    2009-11-01

    Microfluidic chips can automate biochemical assays on the nanoliter scale, which is of considerable utility for RNA-protein binding reactions that would otherwise require large quantities of proteins. Unfortunately, complex reactions involving multiple reactants cannot be prepared in current microfluidic mixer designs, nor is investigation of long-time scale reactions possible. Here, a microfluidic 'Riboreactor' has been designed and constructed to facilitate the study of kinetics of RNA-protein complex formation over long time scales. With computer automation, the reactor can prepare binding reactions from any combination of eight reagents, and is optimized to monitor long reaction times. By integrating a two-photon microscope into the microfluidic platform, 5-nl reactions can be observed for longer than 1000 s with single-molecule sensitivity and negligible photobleaching. Using the Riboreactor, RNA-protein binding reactions with a fragment of the bacterial 30S ribosome were prepared in a fully automated fashion and binding rates were consistent with rates obtained from conventional assays. The microfluidic chip successfully combines automation, low sample consumption, ultra-sensitive fluorescence detection and a high degree of reproducibility. The chip should be able to probe complex reaction networks describing the assembly of large multicomponent RNPs such as the ribosome.

  17. Adaptive evolution of transcription factor binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berg Johannes

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The regulation of a gene depends on the binding of transcription factors to specific sites located in the regulatory region of the gene. The generation of these binding sites and of cooperativity between them are essential building blocks in the evolution of complex regulatory networks. We study a theoretical model for the sequence evolution of binding sites by point mutations. The approach is based on biophysical models for the binding of transcription factors to DNA. Hence we derive empirically grounded fitness landscapes, which enter a population genetics model including mutations, genetic drift, and selection. Results We show that the selection for factor binding generically leads to specific correlations between nucleotide frequencies at different positions of a binding site. We demonstrate the possibility of rapid adaptive evolution generating a new binding site for a given transcription factor by point mutations. The evolutionary time required is estimated in terms of the neutral (background mutation rate, the selection coefficient, and the effective population size. Conclusions The efficiency of binding site formation is seen to depend on two joint conditions: the binding site motif must be short enough and the promoter region must be long enough. These constraints on promoter architecture are indeed seen in eukaryotic systems. Furthermore, we analyse the adaptive evolution of genetic switches and of signal integration through binding cooperativity between different sites. Experimental tests of this picture involving the statistics of polymorphisms and phylogenies of sites are discussed.

  18. Statistics for Transcription Factor Binding Sites

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) play a key role in gene regulation. They interact with specific binding sites or motifs on the DNA sequence and regulate expression of genes downstream of these binding sites. In silico prediction of potential binding of a TF to a binding site is an important task in computational biology. From a statistical point of view, the DNA sequence is a long text consisting of four different letters ('A','C','G', and 'T'). The binding of a TF to the sequence corresponds to ...

  19. Single Molecule Kinetics of ENTH Binding to Lipid Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozovsky, Sharon [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Forstner, Martin B. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States); Sondermann, Holger [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Groves, Jay T. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-04-03

    Transient recruitment of proteins to membranes is a fundamental mechanism by which the cell exerts spatial and temporal control over proteins’ localization and interactions. Thus, the specificity and the kinetics of peripheral proteins’ membrane residence are an attribute of their function. In this article, we describe the membrane interactions of the interfacial epsin N-terminal homology (ENTH) domain with its target lipid phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P2). The direct visualization and quantification of interactions of single ENTH molecules with supported lipid bilayers is achieved using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) with a time resolution of 13 ms. This enables the recording of the kinetic behavior of ENTH interacting with membranes with physiologically relevant concentrations of PtdIns(4,5)P2 despite the low effective binding affinity. Subsequent single fluorophore tracking permits us to build up distributions of residence times and to measure ENTH dissociation rates as a function of membrane composition. In addition, due to the high time resolution, we are able to resolve details of the motion of ENTH associated with a simple, homogeneous membrane. In this case ENTH’s diffusive transport appears to be the result of at least three different diffusion processes.

  20. Kinetics characterization of c-Src binding to lipid membranes: Switching from labile to persistent binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux, Anabel-Lise; Busquets, Maria Antònia; Sagués, Francesc; Pons, Miquel

    2016-02-01

    Cell signaling by the c-Src proto-oncogen requires the attachment of the protein to the inner side of the plasma membrane through the myristoylated N-terminal region, known as the SH4 domain. Additional binding regions of lower affinity are located in the neighbor intrinsically disordered Unique domain and the structured SH3 domain. Here we present a surface plasmon resonance study of the binding of a myristoylated protein including the SH4, Unique and SH3 domains of c-Src to immobilized liposomes. Two distinct binding processes were observed: a fast and a slow one. The second process lead to a persistently bound form (PB) with a slower binding and a much slower dissociation rate than the first one. The association and dissociation of the PB form could be detected using an anti-SH4 antibody. The kinetic analysis revealed that binding of the PB form follows a second order rate law suggesting that it involves the formation of c-Src dimers on the membrane surface. A kinetically equivalent PB form is observed in a myristoylated peptide containing only the SH4 domain but not in a construct including the three domains but with a 12-carbon lauroyl substituent instead of the 14-carbon myristoyl group. The PB form is observed with neutral lipids but its population increases when the immobilized liposomes contain negatively charged lipids. We suggest that the PB form may represent the active signaling form of c-Src while the labile form provides the capacity for fast 2D search of the target signaling site on the membrane surface.

  1. Hydrolysis kinetics of atrazine and influence factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The hydrolysis kinetics of atrazine in distilled water and leaching water from soil, and their influence factors were studied by incubation at 35℃ and HPLC analysis method in this paper. The kinetic process of atrazine hydrolysis can be described by the first-order reaction law. The results showed that the hydrolysis rate constants k in leaching water and distilled water were 1.606x10-3/d and 1.055x10-3/d, respectively; the half-life of atrazine hydrolysis in distilled water at pH 3, pH 4.5 and pH 8 were 373 days, 522 days and 657 days respectively. The results also showed that the proton in reaction solution can catalyze the atrazine hydrolysis; humic acid and NH4+ etc. substances in aqueous solution can facilitate atrazine hydrolysis; rate constants of atrazine hydrolysis with humic acid and NH4NO3 were 2.431x10-3/d and 1.498x10-3/d respectively which were 2.3 and 1.42 times of control(1.055x10-3/d); anion NO3- can inhibit catalysis of humic acid to atrazine hydrolysis.

  2. Factor VIIa binding and internalization in hepatocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortoe, G; Sorensen, B B; Petersen, L C

    2005-01-01

    The liver is believed to be the primary clearance organ for coagulation proteases, including factor VIIa (FVIIa). However, at present, clearance mechanisms for FVIIa in liver are unknown. To obtain information on the FVIIa clearance mechanism, we investigated the binding and internalization...

  3. Comparison of Transcription Factor Binding Site Models

    KAUST Repository

    Bhuyan, Sharifulislam

    2012-05-01

    Modeling of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) and TFBS prediction on genomic sequences are important steps to elucidate transcription regulatory mechanism. Dependency of transcription regulation on a great number of factors such as chemical specificity, molecular structure, genomic and epigenetic characteristics, long distance interaction, makes this a challenging problem. Different experimental procedures generate evidence that DNA-binding domains of transcription factors show considerable DNA sequence specificity. Probabilistic modeling of TFBSs has been moderately successful in identifying patterns from a family of sequences. In this study, we compare performances of different probabilistic models and try to estimate their efficacy over experimental TFBSs data. We build a pipeline to calculate sensitivity and specificity from aligned TFBS sequences for several probabilistic models, such as Markov chains, hidden Markov models, Bayesian networks. Our work, containing relevant statistics and evaluation for the models, can help researchers to choose the most appropriate model for the problem at hand.

  4. Quartz crystal microbalance for the cardiac markers/antibodies binding kinetic measurements in the plasma samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agafonova, L. E.; Shumyantseva, V. V.; Archakov, A. I.

    2014-06-01

    The quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) was exploited for cardiac markers detection and kinetic studies of immunochemical reaction of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) and human heart fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) with the corresponding monoclonal antibodies in undiluted plasma (serum) and standard solutions. The QCM technique allowed to dynamically monitor the kinetic differences in specific interactions and nonspecific sorption, without multiple labeling procedures and separation steps. The affinity binding process was characterized by the association (ka) and the dissociation (kd) kinetic constants and the equilibrium association (K) constant, all of which were obtained from experimental data.

  5. Enzyme-catalyzed and binding reaction kinetics determined by titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Lee D; Transtrum, Mark K; Quinn, Colette; Demarse, Neil

    2016-05-01

    Isothermal calorimetry allows monitoring of reaction rates via direct measurement of the rate of heat produced by the reaction. Calorimetry is one of very few techniques that can be used to measure rates without taking a derivative of the primary data. Because heat is a universal indicator of chemical reactions, calorimetry can be used to measure kinetics in opaque solutions, suspensions, and multiple phase systems and does not require chemical labeling. The only significant limitation of calorimetry for kinetic measurements is that the time constant of the reaction must be greater than the time constant of the calorimeter which can range from a few seconds to a few minutes. Calorimetry has the unique ability to provide both kinetic and thermodynamic data. This article describes the calorimetric methodology for determining reaction kinetics and reviews examples from recent literature that demonstrate applications of titration calorimetry to determine kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed and ligand binding reactions. A complete model for the temperature dependence of enzyme activity is presented. A previous method commonly used for blank corrections in determinations of equilibrium constants and enthalpy changes for binding reactions is shown to be subject to significant systematic error. Methods for determination of the kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed reactions and for simultaneous determination of thermodynamics and kinetics of ligand binding reactions are reviewed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. New Insights into Cooperative Binding of Homeodomain Transcription Factors PREP1 and PBX1 to DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchelli, Chiara; Ferrari, Elena; Blasi, Francesco; Musco, Giovanna; Bruckmann, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    PREP1 and PBX1 are homeodomain (HD) transcription factors that play crucial roles in embryonic development. Here, we present the first biophysical characterization of a PREP1 HD, and the NMR spectroscopic study of its DNA binding pocket. The data show that residues flanking the HD participate in DNA binding. The kinetic parameters for DNA binding of individual PREP1 and PBX1 HDs, and of their combination, show that isolated PREP1 and PBX1 HDs bind to DNA in a cooperative manner. A novel PREP1 motif, flanking the HD at the C-terminus, is required for cooperativity. PMID:28094776

  7. Surface Plasmon Resonance Analysis of Antifungal Azoles Binding to CYP3A4 with Kinetic Resolution of Multiple Binding Orientations†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Josh T.; Hill, John J.; Swank, Jennifer; Isoherranen, Nina; Kunze, Kent L.; Atkins, William M.

    2008-01-01

    The heme-containing Cytochrome P450s (CYPs) are a major enzymatic determinant of drug clearance and drug-drug interactions. The CYP3A4 isoform is inhibited by antifungal imidazoles or triazoles, which form low spin heme iron complexes via formation of a nitrogen-ferric iron coordinate bond. However, CYP3A4 also slowly oxidizes the antifungal itraconazole (ITZ) at a site that is ∼ 25 Å from the triazole nitrogens, suggesting that large antifungal azoles can adopt multiple orientations within the CYP3A4 active site. Here, we report a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis with kinetic resolution of two binding modes of ITZ, and the related drug ketoconazole (KTZ). SPR reveals a very slow off-rate for one binding orientation. Multiphasic binding kinetics are observed and one of the two binding components resolved by curve-fitting exhibits ‘equilibrium overshoot’. Pre-loading of CYP3A4 with the heme ligand imidazole abolishes this component of the antifungal azole binding trajectories, and it eliminates the conspicuously slow off-rate. The fractional populations of CYP3A4 complexes corresponding to different drug orientations can be manipulated by altering the duration of the pulse of drug exposure. UV-vis difference absorbance titrations yield low spin spectra and KD values that are consistent with the high affinity complex resolved by SPR. These results demonstrate that ITZ and KTZ bind in multiple orientations, including a catalytically productive mode and a slowly-dissociating inhibitory mode. Most importantly, they provide the first example of an SPR-based method for the kinetic characterization of drug binding to any human CYP, including mechanistic insight not available from other methods. PMID:16700545

  8. Kinetics of the Attachment of Intrinsic Factor-Bound Cobamides to Ileal Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathan, V. I.; Babior, Bernard M.; Donaldson, Robert M.

    1974-01-01

    To determine whether the molecular configuration of vitamin B12 influences the attachment of intrinsic factor-vitamin B12 complex to ileal microvillous membrane receptor sites, we have examined the kinetics of uptake of intrinsic factor-bound cyanocobalamin by brush borders and microvillous membranes isolated from guinea pig ileum, and have compared this uptake with that of intrinsic factor alone and with that of intrinsic factor complexed with various analogs of cyanocobalamin. We first studied the kinetics of binding of cyanocobalamin and other cobamides to human gastric intrinsic factor. The binding of cyanocobalamin showed saturation kinetics and, at relatively high concentrations of cyanocobalamin, a Scatchard plot of binding was linear. The dissociation constant for the intrinsic factor-cyanocobalamin complex was 0.066 nM. When the binding of various vitamin B12 analogs to intrinsic factor was determined by competition experiments, the analogs could be separated into two categories: those with affinities similar to that of cyanocobalamin and those with affinities much lower than that of cyanocobalamin. The affinity of cyanocobalamin for intrinsic factor was not altered by various substitutions at the -CN position, while removal of a single amido group on the corrin ring of substitution of the dimethylbenzimidazole base greatly reduced affinity. Removal of the base totally abolished binding. These findings, confirming those reported by others, are consistent with the concept that the cyanocobalamin molecule fits into a “pocket” in the intrinsic factor molecule, with the nucleotide base facing inward and the -CN side of the planar corrin ring facing outward. We then investigated the attachment of intrinsic factor-bound cyanocobalamin to ileal receptor. Attachment to microvillous membranes showed saturation kinetics with a dissociation constant of 0.25 nM. Attachment was rapid and was 70% complete within 5 min; the second-order rate constant for attachment

  9. Binding kinetics of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands: Molecular dynamics simulations and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jinglei; Xu, Guang-Kui; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Weikl, Thomas R

    2015-12-28

    The adhesion of biological membranes is mediated by the binding of membrane-anchored receptor and ligand proteins. Central questions are how the binding kinetics of these proteins is affected by the membranes and by the membrane anchoring of the proteins. In this article, we (i) present detailed data for the binding of membrane-anchored proteins from coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations and (ii) provide a theory that describes how the binding kinetics depends on the average separation and thermal roughness of the adhering membranes and on the anchoring, lengths, and length variations of the proteins. An important element of our theory is the tilt of bound receptor-ligand complexes and transition-state complexes relative to the membrane normals. This tilt results from an interplay of the anchoring energy and rotational entropy of the complexes and facilitates the formation of receptor-ligand bonds at membrane separations smaller than the preferred separation for binding. In our simulations, we have considered both lipid-anchored and transmembrane receptor and ligand proteins. We find that the binding equilibrium constant and binding on-rate constant of lipid-anchored proteins are considerably smaller than the binding constant and on-rate constant of rigid transmembrane proteins with identical binding domains.

  10. Surface plasmon resonance characterization of calspermin-calmodulin binding kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Andrew J; Kemp, Fred; Love, John

    2008-05-01

    We cloned, expressed, and purified a chimeric fusion between a soluble green fluorescent protein (smGFP) and the calmodulin binding protein calspermin. We have shown that the fusion protein, labeled smGN, has a K(i) in the calmodulin-dependent cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase activity assay of 1.97 nM, i.e., 3800 times smaller than that of the commonly used calmodulin inhibitor W7. Association and dissociation rate constants (k(a) and k(d)) and the dissociation equilibrium constant (K(D)) of smGN for calmodulin were determined using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The k(a)=1.24 x 10(6)M(-1)s(-1), the k(d)=5.49 x 10(-3)s(-1), and the K(D)=4.42 x 10(-9)M. We also found that the GFP moiety was important for successfully binding calspermin to the surface of the CM5 flow cell at a sufficiently high concentration for SPR, and that this procedure may be used for SPR analysis of other acidic polypeptides, whose pIliquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, indicating a high level of specificity. We conclude that the high affinity and specific binding between smGN and calmodulin make it an easily localized recombinant alternative to chemical calmodulin inhibitors.

  11. Kinetic analyses of phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated eIFiso4E binding to mRNA cap analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mateen A; Goss, Dixie J

    2017-08-08

    Phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factors was previously shown to interact with m(7)G cap and play an important role in the regulation of translation initiation of protein synthesis. To gain further insight into the phosphorylation process of plant protein synthesis, the kinetics of phosphorylated wheat eIFiso4E binding to m(7)G cap analogues were examined. Phosphorylation of wheat eIFiso4E showed similar kinetic effects to human eIF4E binding to m(7)-G cap. Phosphorylation of eIFiso4E decreased the kinetic rate (2-fold) and increased the dissociation rate (2-fold) as compared to non-phosphorylated eIFiso4E binding to both mono- and di-nucleotide analogues at 22°C. Phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated eIFiso4E-m(7)G cap binding rates were found to be independent of concentration, suggesting conformational changes were rate limiting. Rate constant for phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated eIFiso4E binding to m(7)-G cap increased with temperature. Phosphorylation of eIFiso4E decreased (2-fold) the activation energy for both m(7)-G cap analogues binding as compared to non-phosphorylated eIFiso4E. The reduced energy barrier for the formation of eIFiso4E-m(7)-G cap complex suggests a more stable platform for further initiation complex formation and possible means of adapting variety of environmental conditions. Furthermore, the formation of phosphorylated eIFiso4E-cap complex may contribute to modulation of the initiation of protein synthesis in plants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Theoretical estimates of exposure timescales of protein binding sites on DNA regulated by nucleosome kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Jyotsana J; Das, Dibyendu; Padinhateeri, Ranjith

    2016-02-29

    It is being increasingly realized that nucleosome organization on DNA crucially regulates DNA-protein interactions and the resulting gene expression. While the spatial character of the nucleosome positioning on DNA has been experimentally and theoretically studied extensively, the temporal character is poorly understood. Accounting for ATPase activity and DNA-sequence effects on nucleosome kinetics, we develop a theoretical method to estimate the time of continuous exposure of binding sites of non-histone proteins (e.g. transcription factors and TATA binding proteins) along any genome. Applying the method to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we show that the exposure timescales are determined by cooperative dynamics of multiple nucleosomes, and their behavior is often different from expectations based on static nucleosome occupancy. Examining exposure times in the promoters of GAL1 and PHO5, we show that our theoretical predictions are consistent with known experiments. We apply our method genome-wide and discover huge gene-to-gene variability of mean exposure times of TATA boxes and patches adjacent to TSS (+1 nucleosome region); the resulting timescale distributions have non-exponential tails.

  13. Ligand-receptor binding kinetics in surface plasmon resonance cells: A Monte Carlo analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Carroll, Jacob; Forsten-Williams, Kimberly; Täuber, Uwe C

    2016-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) chips are widely used to measure association and dissociation rates for the binding kinetics between two species of chemicals, e.g., cell receptors and ligands. It is commonly assumed that ligands are spatially well mixed in the SPR region, and hence a mean-field rate equation description is appropriate. This approximation however ignores the spatial fluctuations as well as temporal correlations induced by multiple local rebinding events, which become prominent for slow diffusion rates and high binding affinities. We report detailed Monte Carlo simulations of ligand binding kinetics in an SPR cell subject to laminar flow. We extract the binding and dissociation rates by means of the techniques frequently employed in experimental analysis that are motivated by the mean-field approximation. We find major discrepancies in a wide parameter regime between the thus extracted rates and the known input simulation values. These results underscore the crucial quantitative importance of s...

  14. Thermodynamics and kinetics of inhibitor binding to human equilibrative nucleoside transporter subtype-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehan, Shahid; Ashok, Yashwanth; Nanekar, Rahul; Jaakola, Veli-Pekka

    2015-12-15

    Many nucleoside transport inhibitors are in clinical use as anti-cancer, vasodilator and cardioprotective drugs. However, little is known about the binding energetics of these inhibitors to nucleoside transporters (NTs) due to their low endogenous expression levels and difficulties in the biophysical characterization of purified protein with ligands. Here, we present kinetics and thermodynamic analyses of inhibitor binding to the human equilibrative nucleoside transporter-1 (hENT1), also known as SLC29A1. Using a radioligand binding assay, we obtained equilibrium binding and kinetic rate constants of well-known NT inhibitors--[(3)H]nitrobenzylmercaptopurine ribonucleoside ([(3)H]NBMPR), dilazep, and dipyridamole--and the native permeant, adenosine, to hENT1. We observed that the equilibrium binding affinities for all inhibitors decreased whereas, the kinetic rate constants increased with increasing temperature. Furthermore, we found that binding is enthalpy driven and thus, an exothermic reaction, implying that the transporter does not discriminate between its inhibitors and substrates thermodynamically. This predominantly enthalpy-driven binding by four chemically distinct ligands suggests that the transporter may not tolerate diversity in the type of interactions that lead to high affinity binding. Consistent with this, the measured activation energy of [(3)H]NBMPR association was relatively large (20 kcal mol(-1)) suggesting a conformational change upon inhibitor binding. For all three inhibitors the enthalpy (ΔH°) and entropy (ΔS°) contributions to the reaction energetics were determined by van't Hoff analysis to be roughly similar (25-75% ΔG°). Gains in enthalpy with increasing polar surface area of inhibitors suggest that the binding is favored by electrostatic or polar interactions between the ligands and the transporter.

  15. The binding of bovine factor XII to kaolin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, E P; McDevitt, P J

    1983-04-01

    Purified bovine factor XII was radiolabeled with iodine-125 and its binding to kaolin studied. Binding was rapid and was not readily reversible upon adding unlabeled factor XII. The optimum pH for binding was in the region of pH 5-7. The isoelectric point of factor XII was pH 5.7. High concentrations of urea or increasing the ionic strength of the medium did not inhibit binding. Polyvalent macromolecules, such as Polybrene and polylysine, were effective inhibitors of factor XII binding to kaolin. Polylysine caused the release of factor XII that had bound to the kaolin surface.

  16. Kinetics of fatty acid binding ability of glycated human serum albumin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Eiji Yamazaki; Minoru Inagaki; Osamu Kurita; Tetsuji Inoue

    2005-09-01

    Kinetics of fatty acid binding ability of glycated human serum albumin (HSA) were investigated by fluorescent displacement technique with 1-anilino-8-naphtharene sulphonic acid (ANS method), and photometric detection of nonesterified-fatty-acid (NEFA method). Changing of binding affinities of glycated HSA toward oleic acid, linoleic acid, lauric acid, and caproic acid, were not observed by the ANS method. However, decreases of binding capacities after 55 days glycation were confirmed by the NEFA method in comparison to control HSA. The decrease in binding affinities was: oleic acid (84%), linoleic acid (84%), lauric acid (87%), and caproic acid (90%), respectively. The decreases were consistent with decrease of the intact lysine residues in glycated HSA. The present observation indicates that HSA promptly loses its binding ability to fatty acid as soon as the lysine residues at fatty acid binding sites are glycated.

  17. Kinetic and thermodynamic evaluation of phosphate ions binding onto sevelamer hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsiddig, Reem; Hughes, Helen; Owens, Eleanor; O' Reilly, Niall J; O'Grady, David; McLoughlin, Peter

    2014-10-20

    Sevelamer hydrochloride is the first non-aluminium, non-calcium-based phosphate binder developed for the management of hyperphosphatemia in end stage renal diseases. It is a synthetic ion-exchange polymer which binds and removes phosphate ions due to the high content of cationic charge associated with protonated amine groups on the polymer matrix. This is the first in-depth study investigating phosphate removal in vitro from aqueous solutions using commercially available sevelamer hydrochloride at physiological conditions of phosphate level, pH and temperature. The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of phosphate binding onto the sevelamer hydrochloride particles were evaluated in order to define the binding process. A series of kinetic studies were carried out in order to delineate the effect of initial phosphate concentration, absorbent dose and temperature on the rate of binding. The results were analysed using three kinetic models with the best-fit of the experimental data obtained using a pseudo-second order model. Thermodynamic parameters provide in-depth information on inherent energetic changes that are associated with binding. Free energy ΔG°, enthalpy ΔH°, and entropy ΔS° changes were calculated in this study in order to assess the relationship of these parameters to polymer morphology. The binding reaction was found to be a spontaneous endothermic process with increasing entropy at the solid-liquid interface.

  18. Acute treatment with pentobarbital alters the kinetics of in vivo receptor binding in the mouse brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakiyama, Yojiro [Division of Clinical Research, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Inage-ku, Chibashi 263-8555 (Japan)]. E-mail: yojiro.sakiyama@pfizer.com; Saito, Masao [Department of Medical Science, Institute of Medical Electronics, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Inoue, Osamu [Department of Medical Physics, School of Allied Health Science, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2006-05-15

    The effect of pentobarbital, a sedative-hypnotic barbiturate, on the in vivo binding of benzodiazepine receptors in the mouse brain was investigated. Dose-related changes in the apparent binding of [{sup 3}H]Ro15-1788 ([{sup 3}H]flumazenil) in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum and pons-medulla were observed by pretreatment with pentobarbital. For quantification of the kinetic properties of the in vivo binding of [{sup 3}H]Ro15-1788, time courses of radioactivity following its injection were examined, and kinetic analysis was performed using the compartment model. The time courses of radioactivity following injection of [{sup 3}H]Ro15-1788 with 3 mg/kg Ro15-1788 were used as input function. In all regions studied, rate constants between input compartment and specific binding compartment were significantly decreased by pentobarbital. However, no significant alterations in the binding potential (BP=K {sub 3}/K {sub 4}) of benzodiazepine receptors by pentobarbital were observed in any of the regions. A saturation experiment indicated that the decrease in the input rate constant (K {sub 3}), which includes both the association rate constant (k {sub on}) and the number of binding sites available (B {sub max}), was mainly due to decrease in k {sub on}. These results suggest that apparent increases in binding at 20 min after tracer injection were due to the decrease in the association and dissociation rates of binding in vivo.

  19. Physical factors affecting chloroquine binding to melanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, R L; Pendleton, P; Gerber, J P

    2015-10-01

    Chloroquine is an antimalarial drug but is also prescribed for conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. Long-term users risk toxic side effects, including retinopathy, thought to be caused by chloroquine accumulation on ocular melanin. Although the binding potential of chloroquine to melanin has been investigated previously, our study is the first to demonstrate clear links between chloroquine adsorption by melanin and system factors including temperature, pH, melanin type, and particle size. In the current work, two Sepia melanins were compared with bovine eye as a representative mammalian melanin. Increasing the surface anionic character due to a pH change from 4.7 to 7.4 increased each melanin's affinity for chloroquine. Although the chloroquine isotherms exhibited an apparently strong interaction with each melanin, isosteric heat analysis indicated a competitive interaction. Buffer solution cations competed effectively at low surface coverage; chloroquine adsorption occurs via buffer cation displacement and is promoted by temperature-influenced secondary structure swelling.

  20. The kinetics of binding carbon dioxide in magnesium carbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butt, D.P.; Lackner, K.S.; Wendt, C.H.; Vaidya, R.; Pile, D.L.; Park, Y.; Holesinger, T.; Harradine, D.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Nomura, Koji [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Div.]|[Chichibu Onada Cement Co., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-08-01

    Humans currently consume about 6 Gigatons of carbon annually as fossil fuel. In some sense, the coal industry has a unique advantage over many other anthropogenic and natural emitters of CO{sub 2} in that it owns large point sources of CO{sub 2} from which this gas could be isolated and disposed of. If the increased energy demands of a growing world population are to be satisfied from coal, the implementation of sequestration technologies will likely be unavoidable. The authors` method of sequestration involves binding carbon dioxide as magnesium carbonate, a thermodynamically stable solid, for safe and permanent disposal, with minimal environmental impact. The technology is based on extracting magnesium hydroxide from common ultramafic rock for thermal carbonation and subsequent disposition. The economics of the method appear to be promising, however, many details of the proposed process have yet to be optimized. Realization of a cost effective method requires development of optimal technologies for efficient extraction and thermal carbonation.

  1. Solvent fluctuations induce non-Markovian kinetics in hydrophobic pocket-ligand binding

    CERN Document Server

    Weiß, R Gregor; Dzubiella, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the impact of water fluctuations on the key-lock association kinetics of a hydrophobic ligand (key) binding to a hydrophobic pocket (lock) by means of a minimalistic stochastic model system. It describes the collective hydration behavior of the pocket by bimodal fluctuations of a water-pocket interface that dynamically couples to the diffusive motion of the approaching ligand via the hydrophobic interaction. This leads to a set of overdamped Langevin equations in 2D-coordinate-space, that is Markovian in each dimension. Numerical simulations demonstrate locally increased friction of the ligand, decelerated binding kinetics, and local non-Markovian (memory) effects in the ligand's reaction coordinate as found previously in explicit-water molecular dynamics studies of model hydrophobic pocket-ligand binding [1,2]. Our minimalistic model elucidates the origin of effectively enhanced friction in the process that can be traced back to long-time decays in the force-autocorrelation function induced by...

  2. Tenascin C promiscuously binds growth factors via its fifth fibronectin type III-like domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura De Laporte

    Full Text Available Tenascin C (TNC is an extracellular matrix protein that is upregulated during development as well as tissue remodeling. TNC is comprised of multiple independent folding domains, including 15 fibronectin type III-like (TNCIII domains. The fifth TNCIII domain (TNCIII5 has previously been shown to bind heparin. Our group has shown that the heparin-binding fibronectin type III domains of fibronectin (FNIII, specifically FNIII12-14, possess affinity towards a large number of growth factors. Here, we show that TNCIII5 binds growth factors promiscuously and with high affinity. We produced recombinant fragments of TNC representing the first five TNCIII repeats (TNCIII1-5, as well as subdomains, including TNCIII5, to study interactions with various growth factors. Multiple growth factors of the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF family, the fibroblast growth factor (FGF family, the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β superfamily, the insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGF-BPs, and neurotrophins were found to bind with high affinity to this region of TNC, specifically to TNCIII5. Surface plasmon resonance was performed to analyze the kinetics of binding of TNCIII1-5 with TGF-β1, PDGF-BB, NT-3, and FGF-2. The promiscuous yet high affinity of TNC for a wide array of growth factors, mediated mainly by TNCIII5, may play a role in multiple physiological and pathological processes involving TNC.

  3. Dual chain synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Paul O.; Pena, Louis A.; Lin, Xinhua

    2009-10-06

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having two peptide chains each branched from a branch moiety, such as trifunctional amino acid residues, the branch moieties separated by a first linker of from 3 to about 20 backbone atoms, which peptide chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a second linker, which may be a hydrophobic second linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  4. Dual chain synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamora, Paul O. (Gaithersburg, MD); Pena, Louis A. (Poquott, NY); Lin, Xinhua (Plainview, NY)

    2012-04-24

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having two peptide chains each branched from a branch moiety, such as trifunctional amino acid residues, the branch moieties separated by a first linker of from 3 to about 20 backbone atoms, which peptide chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a second linker, which may be a hydrophobic second linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  5. Binding site turnover produces pervasive quantitative changes in transcription factor binding between closely related Drosophila species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K Bradley

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Changes in gene expression play an important role in evolution, yet the molecular mechanisms underlying regulatory evolution are poorly understood. Here we compare genome-wide binding of the six transcription factors that initiate segmentation along the anterior-posterior axis in embryos of two closely related species: Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila yakuba. Where we observe binding by a factor in one species, we almost always observe binding by that factor to the orthologous sequence in the other species. Levels of binding, however, vary considerably. The magnitude and direction of the interspecies differences in binding levels of all six factors are strongly correlated, suggesting a role for chromatin or other factor-independent forces in mediating the divergence of transcription factor binding. Nonetheless, factor-specific quantitative variation in binding is common, and we show that it is driven to a large extent by the gain and loss of cognate recognition sequences for the given factor. We find only a weak correlation between binding variation and regulatory function. These data provide the first genome-wide picture of how modest levels of sequence divergence between highly morphologically similar species affect a system of coordinately acting transcription factors during animal development, and highlight the dominant role of quantitative variation in transcription factor binding over short evolutionary distances.

  6. Quantitative ultrasound molecular imaging by modeling the binding kinetics of targeted contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, Simona; Tardy, Isabelle; Frinking, Peter; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2017-03-21

    Ultrasound molecular imaging (USMI) is an emerging technique to monitor diseases at the molecular level by the use of novel targeted ultrasound contrast agents (tUCA). These consist of microbubbles functionalized with targeting ligands with high-affinity for molecular markers of specific disease processes, such as cancer-related angiogenesis. Among the molecular markers of angiogenesis, the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) is recognized to play a major role. In response, the clinical-grade tUCA BR55 was recently developed, consisting of VEGFR2-targeting microbubbles which can flow through the entire circulation and accumulate where VEGFR2 is over-expressed, thus causing selective enhancement in areas of active angiogenesis. Discrimination between bound and free microbubbles is crucial to assess cancer angiogenesis. Currently, this is done non-quantitatively by looking at the late enhancement, about 10 min after injection, or by calculation of the differential targeted enhancement, requiring the application of a high-pressure ultrasound (US) burst to destroy all the microbubbles in the acoustic field and isolate the signal coming only from bound microbubbles. In this work, we propose a novel method based on mathematical modeling of the binding kinetics during the tUCA first pass, thus reducing the acquisition time and with no need for a destructive US burst. Fitting time-intensity curves measured with USMI by the proposed model enables the assessment of cancer angiogenesis at both the vascular and molecular levels. This is achieved by estimation of quantitative parameters related to the microvascular architecture and microbubble binding. The proposed method was tested in 11 prostate-tumor bearing rats by performing USMI after injection of BR55, and showed good agreement with current USMI methods. The novel information provided by the proposed method, possibly combined with the current non-quantitative methods, may bring deeper insight into

  7. Quantitative ultrasound molecular imaging by modeling the binding kinetics of targeted contrast agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, Simona; Tardy, Isabelle; Frinking, Peter; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasound molecular imaging (USMI) is an emerging technique to monitor diseases at the molecular level by the use of novel targeted ultrasound contrast agents (tUCA). These consist of microbubbles functionalized with targeting ligands with high-affinity for molecular markers of specific disease processes, such as cancer-related angiogenesis. Among the molecular markers of angiogenesis, the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) is recognized to play a major role. In response, the clinical-grade tUCA BR55 was recently developed, consisting of VEGFR2-targeting microbubbles which can flow through the entire circulation and accumulate where VEGFR2 is over-expressed, thus causing selective enhancement in areas of active angiogenesis. Discrimination between bound and free microbubbles is crucial to assess cancer angiogenesis. Currently, this is done non-quantitatively by looking at the late enhancement, about 10 min after injection, or by calculation of the differential targeted enhancement, requiring the application of a high-pressure ultrasound (US) burst to destroy all the microbubbles in the acoustic field and isolate the signal coming only from bound microbubbles. In this work, we propose a novel method based on mathematical modeling of the binding kinetics during the tUCA first pass, thus reducing the acquisition time and with no need for a destructive US burst. Fitting time-intensity curves measured with USMI by the proposed model enables the assessment of cancer angiogenesis at both the vascular and molecular levels. This is achieved by estimation of quantitative parameters related to the microvascular architecture and microbubble binding. The proposed method was tested in 11 prostate-tumor bearing rats by performing USMI after injection of BR55, and showed good agreement with current USMI methods. The novel information provided by the proposed method, possibly combined with the current non-quantitative methods, may bring deeper insight into

  8. High resolution genome wide binding event finding and motif discovery reveals transcription factor spatial binding constraints.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuchun Guo

    Full Text Available An essential component of genome function is the syntax of genomic regulatory elements that determine how diverse transcription factors interact to orchestrate a program of regulatory control. A precise characterization of in vivo spacing constraints between key transcription factors would reveal key aspects of this genomic regulatory language. To discover novel transcription factor spatial binding constraints in vivo, we developed a new integrative computational method, genome wide event finding and motif discovery (GEM. GEM resolves ChIP data into explanatory motifs and binding events at high spatial resolution by linking binding event discovery and motif discovery with positional priors in the context of a generative probabilistic model of ChIP data and genome sequence. GEM analysis of 63 transcription factors in 214 ENCODE human ChIP-Seq experiments recovers more known factor motifs than other contemporary methods, and discovers six new motifs for factors with unknown binding specificity. GEM's adaptive learning of binding-event read distributions allows it to further improve upon previous methods for processing ChIP-Seq and ChIP-exo data to yield unsurpassed spatial resolution and discovery of closely spaced binding events of the same factor. In a systematic analysis of in vivo sequence-specific transcription factor binding using GEM, we have found hundreds of spatial binding constraints between factors. GEM found 37 examples of factor binding constraints in mouse ES cells, including strong distance-specific constraints between Klf4 and other key regulatory factors. In human ENCODE data, GEM found 390 examples of spatially constrained pair-wise binding, including such novel pairs as c-Fos:c-Jun/USF1, CTCF/Egr1, and HNF4A/FOXA1. The discovery of new factor-factor spatial constraints in ChIP data is significant because it proposes testable models for regulatory factor interactions that will help elucidate genome function and the

  9. High resolution genome wide binding event finding and motif discovery reveals transcription factor spatial binding constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuchun; Mahony, Shaun; Gifford, David K

    2012-01-01

    An essential component of genome function is the syntax of genomic regulatory elements that determine how diverse transcription factors interact to orchestrate a program of regulatory control. A precise characterization of in vivo spacing constraints between key transcription factors would reveal key aspects of this genomic regulatory language. To discover novel transcription factor spatial binding constraints in vivo, we developed a new integrative computational method, genome wide event finding and motif discovery (GEM). GEM resolves ChIP data into explanatory motifs and binding events at high spatial resolution by linking binding event discovery and motif discovery with positional priors in the context of a generative probabilistic model of ChIP data and genome sequence. GEM analysis of 63 transcription factors in 214 ENCODE human ChIP-Seq experiments recovers more known factor motifs than other contemporary methods, and discovers six new motifs for factors with unknown binding specificity. GEM's adaptive learning of binding-event read distributions allows it to further improve upon previous methods for processing ChIP-Seq and ChIP-exo data to yield unsurpassed spatial resolution and discovery of closely spaced binding events of the same factor. In a systematic analysis of in vivo sequence-specific transcription factor binding using GEM, we have found hundreds of spatial binding constraints between factors. GEM found 37 examples of factor binding constraints in mouse ES cells, including strong distance-specific constraints between Klf4 and other key regulatory factors. In human ENCODE data, GEM found 390 examples of spatially constrained pair-wise binding, including such novel pairs as c-Fos:c-Jun/USF1, CTCF/Egr1, and HNF4A/FOXA1. The discovery of new factor-factor spatial constraints in ChIP data is significant because it proposes testable models for regulatory factor interactions that will help elucidate genome function and the implementation of combinatorial

  10. Temperature Gradient Approach for Rapidly Assessing Sensor Binding Kinetics and Thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Caleb E; Macedo, Lucyano J A; Opdahl, Aric

    2015-08-01

    We report a highly resolved approach for quantitatively measuring the temperature dependence of molecular binding in a sensor format. The method is based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging measurements made across a spatial temperature gradient. Simultaneous recording of sensor response over the range of temperatures spanned by the gradient avoids many of the complications that arise in the analysis of SPR measurements where temperature is varied. In addition to simplifying quantitative analysis of binding interactions, the method allows the temperature dependence of binding to be monitored as a function of time, and provides a straightforward route for calibrating how temperature varies across the gradient. Using DNA hybridization as an example, we show how the gradient approach can be used to measure the temperature dependence of binding kinetics and thermodynamics (e.g., melt/denaturation profile) in a single experiment.

  11. Thyrotropin binding to porcine thyroid plasma membranes: kinetic and thermodynamic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltiel, A R; Thomas, C G; Nayfeh, S N

    1982-01-01

    Evaluation of TSH binding to plasma membranes of porcine thyroid revealed unique sensitivity to pH and temperature. Analysis of apparent equilibrium binding yielded a linear Scatchard plot at the optimal pH of 6.0, indicating one class of binding sites. At physiological pH 7.4 a curvilinear Scatchard plot was obtained, resolved by computer analysis into two classes of binding sites of different affinities and capacities. Treatment of membranes with phospholipase C resulted in a 20% decrease in the number of high affinity sites, but no change occurred in binding affinity. In contrast, low affinity sites were not altered. To evaluate the significance of the curvilinear Scatchard plot, the kinetics of association were examined. The intrinsic Kd (kd/ka) was 0.20 nM, a value essentially equivalent to that of the high affinity binding component. The 'negative cooperativity' model of hormone binding was evaluated by examining the effect of excess unlabeled TSH on dissociation rate. Dissociation of bound 125I-labeled TSH was biphasic, and was enhanced by unlabeled hormone, regardless of whether the membranes were prelabeled at pH 6.0 or 7.4. This effect was not correlated with curvilinear Scatchard plots, and therefore not proof of negative cooperativity. Binding sites for TSH were further distinguished by their sensitivity to temperature. A van't Hoff plot of temperature dependence of the apparent Kd of the high affinity site was linear from 4 to 37 degrees C. In contrast, the apparent Kd of low affinity binding did not vary with respect to temperature. These results demonstrate that there are at least two independent binding sites for TSH on porcine thyroid plasma membranes, distinguishable by their equilibrium binding properties.

  12. Role of DNA binding sites and slow unbinding kinetics in titration-based oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karapetyan, Sargis; Buchler, Nicolas E.

    2015-12-01

    Genetic oscillators, such as circadian clocks, are constantly perturbed by molecular noise arising from the small number of molecules involved in gene regulation. One of the strongest sources of stochasticity is the binary noise that arises from the binding of a regulatory protein to a promoter in the chromosomal DNA. In this study, we focus on two minimal oscillators based on activator titration and repressor titration to understand the key parameters that are important for oscillations and for overcoming binary noise. We show that the rate of unbinding from the DNA, despite traditionally being considered a fast parameter, needs to be slow to broaden the space of oscillatory solutions. The addition of multiple, independent DNA binding sites further expands the oscillatory parameter space for the repressor-titration oscillator and lengthens the period of both oscillators. This effect is a combination of increased effective delay of the unbinding kinetics due to multiple binding sites and increased promoter ultrasensitivity that is specific for repression. We then use stochastic simulation to show that multiple binding sites increase the coherence of oscillations by mitigating the binary noise. Slow values of DNA unbinding rate are also effective in alleviating molecular noise due to the increased distance from the bifurcation point. Our work demonstrates how the number of DNA binding sites and slow unbinding kinetics, which are often omitted in biophysical models of gene circuits, can have a significant impact on the temporal and stochastic dynamics of genetic oscillators.

  13. Role of DNA binding sites and slow unbinding kinetics in titration-based oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karapetyan, Sargis; Buchler, Nicolas E

    2015-12-01

    Genetic oscillators, such as circadian clocks, are constantly perturbed by molecular noise arising from the small number of molecules involved in gene regulation. One of the strongest sources of stochasticity is the binary noise that arises from the binding of a regulatory protein to a promoter in the chromosomal DNA. In this study, we focus on two minimal oscillators based on activator titration and repressor titration to understand the key parameters that are important for oscillations and for overcoming binary noise. We show that the rate of unbinding from the DNA, despite traditionally being considered a fast parameter, needs to be slow to broaden the space of oscillatory solutions. The addition of multiple, independent DNA binding sites further expands the oscillatory parameter space for the repressor-titration oscillator and lengthens the period of both oscillators. This effect is a combination of increased effective delay of the unbinding kinetics due to multiple binding sites and increased promoter ultrasensitivity that is specific for repression. We then use stochastic simulation to show that multiple binding sites increase the coherence of oscillations by mitigating the binary noise. Slow values of DNA unbinding rate are also effective in alleviating molecular noise due to the increased distance from the bifurcation point. Our work demonstrates how the number of DNA binding sites and slow unbinding kinetics, which are often omitted in biophysical models of gene circuits, can have a significant impact on the temporal and stochastic dynamics of genetic oscillators.

  14. Kinetic behavior of the general modifier mechanism of Botts and Morales with non-equilibrium binding

    CERN Document Server

    Jia, Chen; Qian, Min-Ping; Jiang, Da-Quan; Zhang, Yu-Ping

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we thoroughly investigate the kinetic behavior of the general modifier mechanism of Botts and Morales at both equilibrium steady state assuming equilibrium substrate- and modifier-binding steps and non-equilibrium steady state (NESS) without assuming equilibrium binding steps. We introduce the net flux into discussion and propose a method which gains a strong advantage over early approaches involving King-Atman method and even the numerical computations in dealing with the cyclic reaction systems. Using this new approach, the expression of product rate at NESS gives clear biophysical significance. Moreover, we classify the kinetic behavior of the modifier into three categories, namely hyperbolic behavior, bell-shaped behavior, and switching behavior. It turns out that a modifier cannot be regarded as overall activator or inhibitor when the reaction system is not at equilibrium. The switching-behaved modifier may convert between activator and inhibitor via the general modifier mechanism when the...

  15. Performance of non-conventional factorization approaches for neutron kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulla, S.; Nervo, M. [Politecnico di Torino, Dipartimento Energia, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi, 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2013-07-01

    The use of factorization techniques provides a interesting option for the simulation of the time-dependent behavior of nuclear systems with a reduced computational effort. While point kinetics neglects all spatial and spectral effects, quasi-statics and multipoint kinetics allow to produce results with a higher accuracy for transients involving relevant modifications of the neutron distribution. However, in some conditions these methods can not work efficiently. In this paper, we discuss some possible alternative formulations for the factorization process for neutron kinetics, leading to mathematical models of reduced complications that can allow an accurate simulation of transients involving spatial and spectral effects. The performance of these innovative approaches are compared to standard techniques for some test cases, showing the benefits and shortcomings of the method proposed. (authors)

  16. Resolving the fast kinetics of cooperative binding: Ca2+ buffering by calretinin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido C Faas

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Cooperativity is one of the most important properties of molecular interactions in biological systems. It is the ability to influence ligand binding at one site of a macromolecule by previous ligand binding at another site of the same molecule. As a consequence, the affinity of the macromolecule for the ligand is either decreased (negative cooperativity or increased (positive cooperativity. Over the last 100 years, O2 binding to hemoglobin has served as the paradigm for cooperative ligand binding and allosteric modulation, and four practical models were developed to quantitatively describe the mechanism: the Hill, the Adair-Klotz, the Monod-Wyman-Changeux, and the Koshland-Némethy-Filmer models. The predictions of these models apply under static conditions when the binding reactions are at equilibrium. However, in a physiological setting, e.g., inside a cell, the timing and dynamics of the binding events are essential. Hence, it is necessary to determine the dynamic properties of cooperative binding to fully understand the physiological implications of cooperativity. To date, the Monod-Wyman-Changeux model was applied to determine the kinetics of cooperative binding to biologically active molecules. In this model, cooperativity is established by postulating two allosteric isoforms with different binding properties. However, these studies were limited to special cases, where transition rates between allosteric isoforms are much slower than the binding rates or where binding and unbinding rates could be measured independently. For all other cases, the complex mathematical description precludes straightforward interpretations. Here, we report on calculating for the first time the fast dynamics of a cooperative binding process, the binding of Ca2+ to calretinin. Calretinin is a Ca2+-binding protein with four cooperative binding sites and one independent binding site. The Ca2+ binding to calretinin was assessed by measuring the decay of free Ca2

  17. Second Harmonic Correlation Spectroscopy: Theory and Principles for Determining Surface Binding Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sly, Krystal L; Conboy, John C

    2017-06-01

    A novel application of second harmonic correlation spectroscopy (SHCS) for the direct determination of molecular adsorption and desorption kinetics to a surface is discussed in detail. The surface-specific nature of second harmonic generation (SHG) provides an efficient means to determine the kinetic rates of adsorption and desorption of molecular species to an interface without interference from bulk diffusion, which is a significant limitation of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). The underlying principles of SHCS for the determination of surface binding kinetics are presented, including the role of optical coherence and optical heterodyne mixing. These properties of SHCS are extremely advantageous and lead to an increase in the signal-to-noise (S/N) of the correlation data, increasing the sensitivity of the technique. The influence of experimental parameters, including the uniformity of the TEM00 laser beam, the overall photon flux, and collection time are also discussed, and are shown to significantly affect the S/N of the correlation data. Second harmonic correlation spectroscopy is a powerful, surface-specific, and label-free alternative to other correlation spectroscopic methods for examining surface binding kinetics.

  18. The role of DNA binding sites and slow unbinding kinetics in titration-based oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Karapetyan, Sargis

    2015-01-01

    Genetic oscillators, such as circadian clocks, are constantly perturbed by molecular noise arising from the small number of molecules involved in gene regulation. One of the strongest sources of stochasticity is the binary noise that arises from the binding of a regulatory protein to a promoter in the chromosomal DNA. In this study, we focus on two minimal oscillators based on activator titration and repressor titration to understand the key parameters that are important for oscillations and for overcoming binary noise. We show that the rate of unbinding from the DNA, despite traditionally being considered a fast parameter, needs to be slow to broaden the space of oscillatory solutions. The addition of multiple, independent DNA binding sites further expands the oscillatory parameter space for the repressor-titration oscillator and lengthens the period of both oscillators. This effect is a combination of increased effective delay of the unbinding kinetics due to multiple binding sites and increased promoter ul...

  19. Kinetics of leptin binding to the Q223R leptin receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Verkerke

    Full Text Available Studies in human populations and mouse models of disease have linked the common leptin receptor Q223R mutation to obesity, multiple forms of cancer, adverse drug reactions, and susceptibility to enteric and respiratory infections. Contradictory results cast doubt on the phenotypic consequences of this variant. We set out to determine whether the Q223R substitution affects leptin binding kinetics using surface plasmon resonance (SPR, a technique that allows sensitive real-time monitoring of protein-protein interactions. We measured the binding and dissociation rate constants for leptin to the extracellular domain of WT and Q223R murine leptin receptors expressed as Fc-fusion proteins and found that the mutant receptor does not significantly differ in kinetics of leptin binding from the WT leptin receptor. (WT: ka 1.76×106±0.193×106 M-1 s-1, kd 1.21×10-4±0.707×10-4 s-1, KD 6.47×10-11±3.30×10-11 M; Q223R: ka 1.75×106±0.0245×106 M-1 s-1, kd 1.47×10-4±0.0505×10-4 s-1, KD 8.43×10-11±0.407×10-11 M. Our results support earlier findings that differences in affinity and kinetics of leptin binding are unlikely to explain mechanistically the phenotypes that have been linked to this common genetic variant. Future studies will seek to elucidate the mechanism by which this mutation influences susceptibility to metabolic, infectious, and malignant pathologies.

  20. DNA-binding specificities of human transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolma, Arttu; Yan, Jian; Whitington, Thomas; Toivonen, Jarkko; Nitta, Kazuhiro R; Rastas, Pasi; Morgunova, Ekaterina; Enge, Martin; Taipale, Mikko; Wei, Gonghong; Palin, Kimmo; Vaquerizas, Juan M; Vincentelli, Renaud; Luscombe, Nicholas M; Hughes, Timothy R; Lemaire, Patrick; Ukkonen, Esko; Kivioja, Teemu; Taipale, Jussi

    2013-01-17

    Although the proteins that read the gene regulatory code, transcription factors (TFs), have been largely identified, it is not well known which sequences TFs can recognize. We have analyzed the sequence-specific binding of human TFs using high-throughput SELEX and ChIP sequencing. A total of 830 binding profiles were obtained, describing 239 distinctly different binding specificities. The models represent the majority of human TFs, approximately doubling the coverage compared to existing systematic studies. Our results reveal additional specificity determinants for a large number of factors for which a partial specificity was known, including a commonly observed A- or T-rich stretch that flanks the core motifs. Global analysis of the data revealed that homodimer orientation and spacing preferences, and base-stacking interactions, have a larger role in TF-DNA binding than previously appreciated. We further describe a binding model incorporating these features that is required to understand binding of TFs to DNA.

  1. The kinetics of slow-binding and slow, tight-binding inhibition: the effects of substrate depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waley, S G

    1993-08-15

    Inhibitors with dissociation constants in the micromolar to nanomolar range are important, but hard to characterize kinetically, especially when the substrate concentration in the assay is less than Km. When inhibition increases during the course of the assay (slow-binding inhibition) the concentration of substrate may decrease appreciably. Methods that take substrate depletion into account are described for analysing experiments in which the initial substrate concentration is below Km. Fitting progress curves gives the rate constants for the second (slow) step in a two-step mechanism. An approximate value for the overall dissociation constant may be determined from measurements of rates when the reaction is treated as a first-order process. When the concentrations of inhibitor and enzyme are comparable numerical methods are required. Procedures, suitable for implementation on a microcomputer, for the solution of the differential equations and the fitting of progress curves are described.

  2. Inhibition of α-Synuclein Fibril Elongation by Hsp70 Is Governed by a Kinetic Binding Competition between α-Synuclein Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprile, Francesco A; Arosio, Paolo; Fusco, Giuliana; Chen, Serene W; Kumita, Janet R; Dhulesia, Anne; Tortora, Paolo; Knowles, Tuomas P J; Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Christopher M; Cremades, Nunilo

    2017-03-07

    The Hsp70 family of chaperones plays an essential role in suppressing protein aggregation in the cell. Here we investigate the factors controlling the intrinsic ability of human Hsp70 to inhibit the elongation of amyloid fibrils formed by the Parkinson's disease-related protein α-synuclein. Using kinetic analysis, we show that Hsp70 binds preferentially to α-synuclein fibrils as a consequence of variations in the association and dissociation rate constants of binding to the different aggregated states of the protein. Our findings illustrate the importance of the kinetics of binding of molecular chaperones, and also of potential therapeutic molecules, in the efficient suppression of specific pathogenic events linked to neurodegeneration.

  3. IL-8-induced L-selectin shedding regulates its binding kinetics to PSGL-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA XiaoLing; CHEN Juan; LONG Mian

    2009-01-01

    L-selectin plays a crucial role in inflammation cascade by initiating the tethering and rolling of leukocytes on endothelium wall.While many L-selectin molecules are rapidly shed from the cell surface upon activation,the remaining membrane-anchored L-selectin may still play an important role in regulating leukocyte rolling and adhesion with different binding kinetics.Here we developed an in vitro model to activate Jurkat cells via interlukin-8 (IL-8) and quantified the two-dimensional (2D) binding kinetics,using a micropipette aspiration assay,of membrane-anchored L-selectin to P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1 (PSGL-1) ligand coupled onto human red blood cells (RBCs).The data indicated that L-selectin shedding reduced the amount of membrane-anchored L-selecUn and lowered both its reverse and forward rates.These results suggested that the rolling dynamics of activated leukocytes was determined by two opposite impacts:reducing the surface presentation would enhance the rolling but lowering the kinetic rates would decrease the rolling.This finding provides a new insight into understanding how L-selectin shedding regulates leukocyte rolling and adhesion.

  4. Thyrotropin receptors in normal human thyroid. Nonclassical binding kinetics not explained by the negative cooperativity model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell-Jones, C H; Thomas, C G; Nayfeh, S N

    1980-05-10

    Saturation analysis of equilibrium binding of iodinated thyrotropin (125I-TSH) to normal human thyroid preparations yielded linear Scatchard plots under non-physiological conditions of pH 6.0 or 20 mM Tris/acetate buffer, pH 7.4. The apparent equilibrium dissociation constant of this binding was approximately 10(-8) M. By contrast, nonlinear plots were obtained under standard conditions of pH 7.4 and 40 mM Tris/acetate buffer. Resolution of the components of these curves by computer analysis revealed the presence of at least two classes of binding sites, one of which is of a low capacity and high affinity (approximately 10(-10) M) consistent with receptor binding. The other component is of a high capacity and lower affinity. Binding to non-target tissues of muscle, parathyroid, mammary carcinoma, and placenta was only demonstrable at pH 6.0 or in 20 mM Tris/acetate buffer, pH 7.4, yielding linear Scatchard plots with similar binding affinity (approximately 10(-8)M) to normal thyroid but much reduced capacity. Preincubation of thyroid tissue at 50 degrees C resulted in an apparent selective loss of the high affinity component of binding measured under standard conditions. Kinetic experiments on the dissociation of bound 125I-TSH were undertaken to determine whether the non-linearity of Scatchard plots was due to two or more classes of binding sites or negative cooperativity. It was found that the experimental determinant that is presently ascribed to a negative cooperativity phenomenon regulating receptor affinity (i.e. an enhanced dilution-induced dissociation rate in the presence of excess native hormone), although apparently hormone-specific, was demonstrated under nonphysiological binding conditions and in non-target tissue. Significantly, the phenomenon was found under conditions of pH 6.0 or 20 mM Tris where a linear Scatchard plot was obtained. The evidence thus suggests that 125I-TSH binds to heterogeneous binding sites (of which the high affinity is

  5. Modulation of DNA binding by gene-specific transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleif, Robert F

    2013-10-01

    The transcription of many genes, particularly in prokaryotes, is controlled by transcription factors whose activity can be modulated by controlling their DNA binding affinity. Understanding the molecular mechanisms by which DNA binding affinity is regulated is important, but because forming definitive conclusions usually requires detailed structural information in combination with data from extensive biophysical, biochemical, and sometimes genetic experiments, little is truly understood about this topic. This review describes the biological requirements placed upon DNA binding transcription factors and their consequent properties, particularly the ways that DNA binding affinity can be modulated and methods for its study. What is known and not known about the mechanisms modulating the DNA binding affinity of a number of prokaryotic transcription factors, including CAP and lac repressor, is provided.

  6. Invariant Aspartic Acid in Muscle Nicotinic Receptor Contributes Selectively to the Kinetics of Agonist Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won Yong; Sine, Steven M.

    2004-01-01

    We examined functional contributions of interdomain contacts within the nicotinic receptor ligand binding site using single channel kinetic analyses, site-directed mutagenesis, and a homology model of the major extracellular region. At the principal face of the binding site, the invariant αD89 forms a highly conserved interdomain contact near αT148, αW149, and αT150. Patch-clamp recordings show that the mutation αD89N markedly slows acetylcholine (ACh) binding to receptors in the resting closed state, but does not affect rates of channel opening and closing. Neither αT148L, αT150A, nor mutations at both positions substantially affects the kinetics of receptor activation, showing that hydroxyl side chains at these positions are not hydrogen bond donors for the strong acceptor αD89. However substituting a negative charge at αT148, but not at αT150, counteracts the effect of αD89N, demonstrating that a negative charge in the region of interdomain contact confers rapid association of ACh. Interpreted within the structural framework of ACh binding protein and a homology model of the receptor ligand binding site, these results implicate main chain amide groups in the domain harboring αW149 as principal hydrogen bond donors for αD89. The specific effect of αD89N on ACh association suggests that interdomain hydrogen bonding positions αW149 for optimal interaction with ACh. PMID:15504901

  7. Kinetic analysis of [11C]vorozole binding in the human brain with positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Jean; Kim, Sung Won; Pareto, Deborah; Telang, Frank; Wang, Gene-Jack; Fowler, Joanna S; Biegon, Anat

    2014-01-01

    Using positron emission tomography, we investigated the kinetics of [11C]vorozole ([11C]VOR), a radiotracer for the enzyme aromatase that catalyzes the last step in estrogen biosynthesis. Six subjects were scanned under baseline conditions followed by retest 2 weeks later. The retest was followed by a blocking study with 2.5 mg of the aromatase inhibitor letrozole. The binding potential (BP(A)ND) was estimated from a Lassen plot using the total tissue distribution volume (VT) for baseline and blocked. for the thalamus was found to be 15 times higher than that for the cerebellum. From the letrozole studies, we found that [11C]VOR exhibits a slow binding compartment (small k4) that has a nonspecific and a blockable component. Because of the sensitivity of VT to variations in k4, a common value was used for the four highest binding regions. We also considered the tissue uptake to plasma ratio for 60 to 90 minutes as an outcome measure. Using the ratio method, the difference between the highest and lowest was 2.4 compared to 3.5 for the VT. The ratio method underestimates the high regions but is less variable and may be more suitable for patient studies. Because of its kinetics and distribution, this tracer is not a candidate for a bolus infusion or reference tissue methods.

  8. DNA-Binding Kinetics Determines the Mechanism of Noise-Induced Switching in Gene Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Margaret J; Chu, Brian K; Roy, Mahua; Read, Elizabeth L

    2015-10-20

    Gene regulatory networks are multistable dynamical systems in which attractor states represent cell phenotypes. Spontaneous, noise-induced transitions between these states are thought to underlie critical cellular processes, including cell developmental fate decisions, phenotypic plasticity in fluctuating environments, and carcinogenesis. As such, there is increasing interest in the development of theoretical and computational approaches that can shed light on the dynamics of these stochastic state transitions in multistable gene networks. We applied a numerical rare-event sampling algorithm to study transition paths of spontaneous noise-induced switching for a ubiquitous gene regulatory network motif, the bistable toggle switch, in which two mutually repressive genes compete for dominant expression. We find that the method can efficiently uncover detailed switching mechanisms that involve fluctuations both in occupancies of DNA regulatory sites and copy numbers of protein products. In addition, we show that the rate parameters governing binding and unbinding of regulatory proteins to DNA strongly influence the switching mechanism. In a regime of slow DNA-binding/unbinding kinetics, spontaneous switching occurs relatively frequently and is driven primarily by fluctuations in DNA-site occupancies. In contrast, in a regime of fast DNA-binding/unbinding kinetics, switching occurs rarely and is driven by fluctuations in levels of expressed protein. Our results demonstrate how spontaneous cell phenotype transitions involve collective behavior of both regulatory proteins and DNA. Computational approaches capable of simulating dynamics over many system variables are thus well suited to exploring dynamic mechanisms in gene networks.

  9. Effects of Heat Stress on Yeast Heat Shock Factor-Promoter Binding In Vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning LI; Le-Min ZHANG; Ke-Qin ZHANG; Jing-Shi DENG; Ralf PR(A)NDL; Fritz SCH(O)FFL

    2006-01-01

    Heat shock factor-DNA interaction is critical for understanding the regulatory mechanisms of stress-induced gene expression in eukaryotes. In this study, we analyzed the in vivo binding of yeast heat shock factor (HSF) to the promoters of target genes ScSSA1, ScSSA4, HSP30 and HSP104, using chromatin immunoprecipitation. Previous work suggested that yeast HSF is constitutively bound to DNA at all temperatures. Expression of HSF target genes is regulated at the post-transcriptional level. However, our results indicated that HSF does not bind to the promoters of ScSSA4 and HSP30 at normal temperature (23 ℃). Binding to these promoters is rapidly induced by heat stress at 39 ℃. HSF binds to ScSSA1 and HSP104 promoters under non-stress conditions, but at a low level. Heat stress rapidly leads to a notable increase in the binding of HSF to these two genes. The kinetics of the level of HSF-promoter binding correlate well with the expression of target genes, suggesting that the expression of HSF target genes is at least partially the result of HSF-promoter binding stability and subsequent transcription stimulation.

  10. A universal homogeneous assay for high-throughput determination of binding kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiele, Felix; Ayaz, Pelin; Fernández-Montalván, Amaury

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing demand for assay technologies that enable accurate, cost-effective, and high-throughput measurements of drug-target association and dissociation rates. Here we introduce a universal homogeneous kinetic probe competition assay (kPCA) that meets these requirements. The time-resolved fluorescence energy transfer (TR-FRET) procedure combines the versatility of radioligand binding assays with the advantages of homogeneous nonradioactive techniques while approaching the time resolution of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and related biosensors. We show application of kPCA for three important target classes: enzymes, protein-protein interactions, and G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). This method is capable of supporting early stages of drug discovery with large amounts of kinetic information.

  11. Stepwise binding of tylosin and erythromycin to Escherichia coli ribosomes, characterized by kinetic and footprinting analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropoulos, Alexandros D; Kouvela, Ekaterini C; Dinos, George P; Kalpaxis, Dimitrios L

    2008-02-22

    Erythromycin and tylosin are 14- and 16-membered lactone ring macrolides, respectively. The current work shows by means of kinetic and chemical footprinting analysis that both antibiotics bind to Escherichia coli ribosomes in a two-step process. The first step established rapidly, involves a low-affinity binding site placed at the entrance of the exit tunnel in the large ribosomal subunit, where macrolides bind primarily through their hydrophobic portions. Subsequently, slow conformational changes mediated by the antibiotic hydrophilic portion push the drugs deeper into the tunnel, in a high-affinity site. Compared with erythromycin, tylosin shifts to the high-affinity site more rapidly, due to the interaction of the mycinose sugar of the drug with the loop of H35 in domain II of 23 S rRNA. Consistently, mutations of nucleosides U2609 and U754 implicated in the high-affinity site reduce the shift of tylosin to this site and destabilize, respectively, the final drug-ribosome complex. The weak interaction between tylosin and the ribosome is Mg2+ independent, unlike the tight binding. In contrast, both interactions between erythromycin and the ribosome are reduced by increasing concentrations of Mg2+ ions. Polyamines attenuate erythromycin affinity for the ribosome at both sequential steps of binding. In contrast, polyamines facilitate the initial binding of tylosin, but exert a detrimental, more pronounced, effect on the drug accommodation at its final position. Our results emphasize the role of the particular interactions that side chains of tylosin and erythromycin establish with 23 S rRNA, which govern the exact binding process of each drug and its response to the ionic environment.

  12. Kinetic versus thermodynamic factors in calcium renal lithiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grases, F; Costa-Bauzá, A; Königsberger, E; Königsberger, L C

    2000-01-01

    Calcium renal lithiasis formation depends on the balance between thermodynamic (supersaturation) and kinetic (inhibitors, nucleants) factors. In this paper, the importance of both groups was evaluated using (a) the complete urine analysis data obtained from 32 healthy volunteers and 141 active stone-formers, and (b) a comprehensive computer model to calculate the supersaturation values of calcium oxalate monohydrate, hydroxyapatite and brushite in each urine sample. The results of this evaluation were used to assess the possible effectiveness of a given pharmacological treatment.

  13. Kinetic Mechanism of Uracil Phosphoribosyltransferase from Escherichia coli and Catalytic Importance of the Conserved Proline in the PRPP Binding Site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundegaard, Claus; Jensen, Kaj Frank

    1999-01-01

    catalytic properties with the properties of the wild-type protein. We found that UPRTase of E. coli obeyed the kinetics of a sequential mechanism with the binding of PRPP preceding the binding of uracil. The basic kinetic constants were derived from initial velocity measurements, product inhibition......, and ligand binding assays. The change of Pro 131 to Asp caused a 50-60-fold reduction of the catalytic rate (kcat) in both directions of the reaction and approximately a 100-fold increase in the KM for uracil. The KM for PRPP was strongly diminished by the mutation, but kcat/KM,PRPP and the dissociation...... constant (KD,PRPP) were nearly unaffected. We conclude that the proline in the PRPP binding site of UPRTase is of only little importance for binding of PRPP to the free enzyme, but is critical for binding of uracil to the enzyme-PRPP complex and for the catalytic rate....

  14. Potentiometric sensors doped with biomolecules as a new approach to small molecule/biomolecule binding kinetics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daems, D; De Wael, K; Vissenberg, K; Van Camp, G; Nagels, L

    2014-04-15

    The most successful binding kinetics analysis systems at this moment include surface plasmon resonance (SPR), quartz microcrystal balance (QMB) and surface acoustic wave (SAW). Although these are powerful methods, they generally are complex, expensive and require the use of monolayers. Here, we report on potentiometric sensors as an inexpensive and simple alternative to do binding kinetics analysis between small molecules in solution and biomolecules (covalently) attached in a biopolymer sensor coating layer. As an example, dopamine and an anti-dopamine aptamer were used as the small molecule and the biomolecule respectively. Binding between both follows a Langmuir adsorption type model and creates a surface potential. The system operates in Flow Injection Analysis mode (FIA). Besides being an interesting new binding kinetics tool, the approach allows systematic design of potentiometric biosensors (in the present study a dopamine sensor), and gives new insights into the functioning of ion-selective electrodes (ISE's).

  15. A phospholipase A2 kinetic and binding assay using phospholipid-coated hydrophobic beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y; Lichtenbergova, L; Snitko, Y; Cho, W

    1997-07-15

    A novel kinetic and membrane-binding assay for phospholipase A2 (PLA2) has been developed utilizing phospholipid-coated hydrophobic styrene-divinylbenzene beads (5.2 +/- 0.3 microm diameter). Phospholipids formed a stable monolayer film on styrene-divinylbenzene beads with average surface packing density of (1.3 +/- 0.2) x 10(-2) molecule/A2. Secretory PLA2 readily hydrolyzed 1-palmitoyl-2-[3H]-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol coated on styrene-divinylbenzene beads which could be easily monitored by measuring the radioactivity of fatty acid released to solution in the presence of bovine serum albumin. For human cytosolic PLA2 with high specificity for sn-2 arachidonyl group, styrene-divinylbenzene beads coated with 1-stearoyl-2-[14C]-arachidonyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and dioleoylglycerol (7:3, mol/mol) were used as substrate. PLA2 activity was linearly proportional to the enzyme concentration in the range from 1 to 150 nM for human class II secretory PLA2 and from 1 to 20 nM for cytosolic PLA2; the specific activity was 1.6 and 1.7 micromol/min/mg, respectively. Finally, styrene-divinylbenzene beads coated with polymerized 1,2-bis[12-(lipoyloxy) dodecanoyl]-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol were used to measure the membrane binding affinity of PLA2, which in conjunction with kinetic data provides important insights into how PLA2 interacts with membranes.

  16. Multiscale Estimation of Binding Kinetics Using Brownian Dynamics, Molecular Dynamics and Milestoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Votapka, Lane W; Amaro, Rommie E

    2015-10-01

    The kinetic rate constants of binding were estimated for four biochemically relevant molecular systems by a method that uses milestoning theory to combine Brownian dynamics simulations with more detailed molecular dynamics simulations. The rate constants found using this method agreed well with experimentally and theoretically obtained values. We predicted the association rate of a small charged molecule toward both a charged and an uncharged spherical receptor and verified the estimated value with Smoluchowski theory. We also calculated the kon rate constant for superoxide dismutase with its natural substrate, O2-, in a validation of a previous experiment using similar methods but with a number of important improvements. We also calculated the kon for a new system: the N-terminal domain of Troponin C with its natural substrate Ca2+. The kon calculated for the latter two systems closely resemble experimentally obtained values. This novel multiscale approach is computationally cheaper and more parallelizable when compared to other methods of similar accuracy. We anticipate that this methodology will be useful for predicting kinetic rate constants and for understanding the process of binding between a small molecule and a protein receptor.

  17. Multiscale Estimation of Binding Kinetics Using Brownian Dynamics, Molecular Dynamics and Milestoning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lane W Votapka

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The kinetic rate constants of binding were estimated for four biochemically relevant molecular systems by a method that uses milestoning theory to combine Brownian dynamics simulations with more detailed molecular dynamics simulations. The rate constants found using this method agreed well with experimentally and theoretically obtained values. We predicted the association rate of a small charged molecule toward both a charged and an uncharged spherical receptor and verified the estimated value with Smoluchowski theory. We also calculated the kon rate constant for superoxide dismutase with its natural substrate, O2-, in a validation of a previous experiment using similar methods but with a number of important improvements. We also calculated the kon for a new system: the N-terminal domain of Troponin C with its natural substrate Ca2+. The kon calculated for the latter two systems closely resemble experimentally obtained values. This novel multiscale approach is computationally cheaper and more parallelizable when compared to other methods of similar accuracy. We anticipate that this methodology will be useful for predicting kinetic rate constants and for understanding the process of binding between a small molecule and a protein receptor.

  18. Coupled folding and binding kinetics in the intrinsically disordered peptide IA3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Ranjani; Ganesh, Omjoy; Edison, Arthur; Hagen, Stephen

    2008-03-01

    IA3 is an intrinsically disordered 68 residue peptide and is an endogenous inhibitor of yeast proteinase A (YPrA). X-ray crystallography of the IA3.YPrA complex [Li et al, Nat. Struct. Biol. (7), 113-117 (2000)] indicates that the N-terminus of IA3 adopts an alpha-helical fold when it is bound to the YPrA active site. We have used equilibrium circular dichroism and multi-wavelength, nanosecond time-resolved laser temperature-jump spectroscopy to study the coupled folding and binding interaction of IA3 with YPrA. Our initial measurements of the rate of helix formation in free IA3 indicate mono-exponential folding kinetics that extrapolate to kF˜ 10^5/s at room temperature in aqueous solutions. By comparing this rate to the kinetics we observe for IA3 interacting with YPrA, we can assess possible mechanisms for the coupled folding and binding of IA3.

  19. Determination of multivalent protein-ligand binding kinetics by second-harmonic correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sly, Krystal L; Conboy, John C

    2014-11-18

    Binding kinetics of the multivalent proteins peanut agglutinin (PnA) and cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) to a GM1-doped 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) lipid bilayer were investigated by both second-harmonic correlation spectroscopy (SHCS) and a traditional equilibrium binding isotherm. Adsorption and desorption rates, as well as binding affinity and binding free energy, for three bulk protein concentrations were determined by SHCS. For PnA binding to GM1, the measured adsorption rate decreased with increasing bulk PnA concentration from (3.7 ± 0.3) × 10(6) M(-1)·s(-1) at 0.43 μM PnA to (1.1 ± 0.1) × 10(5) M(-1)·s(-1) at 12 μM PnA. CTB-GM1 exhibited a similar trend, decreasing from (1.0 ± 0.1) × 10(9) M(-1)·s(-1) at 0.5 nM CTB to (3.5 ± 0.2) × 10(6) M(-1)·s(-1) at 240 nM CTB. The measured desorption rates in both studies did not exhibit any dependence on initial protein concentration. As such, 0.43 μM PnA and 0.5 nM CTB had the strongest measured binding affinities, (3.7 ± 0.8) × 10(9) M(-1) and (2.8 ± 0.5) × 10(13) M(-1), respectively. Analysis of the binding isotherm data suggests there is electrostatic repulsion between protein molecules when PnA binds GM1, while CTB-GM1 demonstrates positive ligand-ligand cooperativity. This study provides additional insight into the complex interactions between multivalent proteins and their ligands and showcases SHCS for examining these complex yet technologically important protein-ligand complexes used in biosensors, immunoassays, and other biomedical diagnostics.

  20. Genome Binding and Gene Regulation by Stem Cell Transcription Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Brandsma (Johan)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractNearly all cells of an individual organism contain the same genome. However, each cell type transcribes a different set of genes due to the presence of different sets of cell type-specific transcription factors. Such transcription factors bind to regulatory regions such as promoters

  1. Thermodynamic and kinetic characterization of ligand binding to the purine riboswitch aptamer domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Sunny D; Stoddard, Colby D; Wise, Sarah J; Batey, Robert T

    2006-06-09

    Riboswitches are cis-acting genetic regulatory elements found commonly in bacterial mRNAs that consist of a metabolite-responsive aptamer domain coupled to a regulatory switch. Purine riboswitches respond to intracellular concentrations of either adenine or guanine/hypoxanthine to control gene expression. The aptamer domain of the purine riboswitch contains a pyrimidine residue (Y74) that forms a Watson-Crick base-pairing interaction with the bound purine nucleobase ligand that discriminates between adenine and guanine. We sought to understand the structural basis of this specificity and the mechanism of ligand recognition by the purine riboswitch. Here, we present the 2,6-diaminopurine-bound structure of a C74U mutant of the xpt-pbuX guanine riboswitch, along with a detailed thermodynamic and kinetic analysis of nucleobase recognition by both the native and mutant riboswitches. These studies demonstrate clearly that the pyrimidine at position 74 is the sole determinant of purine riboswitch specificity. In addition, the mutant riboswitch binds adenine and adenine derivatives well compared with the guanine-responsive riboswitch. Under our experimental conditions, 2,6-diaminopurine binds the RNA with DeltaH=-40.3 kcal mol(-1), DeltaS=-97.6 cal mol(-1)K(-1), and DeltaG=-10.73 kcal mol(-1). A kinetic determination of the slow rate (0.15 x 10(5)M(-1)s(-1) and 2.1 x 10(5)mM(-1)s(-1) for 2-aminopurine binding the adenine-responsive mutant riboswitch and 7-deazaguanine-binding guanine riboswitch, respectively) of association under varying experimental conditions allowed us to propose a mechanism for ligand recognition by the purine riboswitch. A conformationally dynamic unliganded state for the binding pocket is stabilized first by the Watson-Crick base pairing between the ligand and Y74, and by the subsequent ordering of the J2/3 loop, enclosing the ligand within the three-way junction.

  2. Kinetic Model for Signal Binding to the Quorum Sensing Regulator LasR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesper Ferkinghoff-Borg

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We propose a kinetic model for the activation of the las regulon in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The model is based on in vitro data and accounts for the LasR dimerization and consecutive activation by binding of two OdDHL signal molecules. Experimentally, the production of the active LasR quorum-sensing regulator was studied in an Escherichia coli background as a function of signal molecule concentration. The functional activity of the regulator was monitored via a GFP reporter fusion to lasB expressed from the native lasB promoter. The new data shows that the active form of the LasR dimer binds two signal molecules cooperatively and that the timescale for reaching saturation is independent of the signal molecule concentration. This favors a picture where the dimerized regulator is protected against proteases and remains protected as it is activated through binding of two successive signal molecules. In absence of signal molecules, the dimerized regulator can dissociate and degrade through proteolytic turnover of the monomer. This resolves the apparent contradiction between our data and recent reports that the fully protected dimer is able to “degrade” when the induction of LasR ceases.

  3. Interplay between binding affinity and kinetics in protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huaiqing; Huang, Yongqi; Liu, Zhirong

    2016-07-01

    To clarify the interplay between the binding affinity and kinetics of protein-protein interactions, and the possible role of intrinsically disordered proteins in such interactions, molecular simulations were carried out on 20 protein complexes. With bias potential and reweighting techniques, the free energy profiles were obtained under physiological affinities, which showed that the bound-state valley is deep with a barrier height of 12 - 33 RT. From the dependence of the affinity on interface interactions, the entropic contribution to the binding affinity is approximated to be proportional to the interface area. The extracted dissociation rates based on the Arrhenius law correlate reasonably well with the experimental values (Pearson correlation coefficient R = 0.79). For each protein complex, a linear free energy relationship between binding affinity and the dissociation rate was confirmed, but the distribution of the slopes for intrinsically disordered proteins showed no essential difference with that observed for ordered proteins. A comparison with protein folding was also performed. Proteins 2016; 84:920-933. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Kinetic mechanism of phenylalanine hydroxylase: intrinsic binding and rate constants from single-turnover experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Kenneth M; Pavon, Jorge Alex; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2013-02-12

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PheH) catalyzes the key step in the catabolism of dietary phenylalanine, its hydroxylation to tyrosine using tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) and O(2). A complete kinetic mechanism for PheH was determined by global analysis of single-turnover data in the reaction of PheHΔ117, a truncated form of the enzyme lacking the N-terminal regulatory domain. Formation of the productive PheHΔ117-BH(4)-phenylalanine complex begins with the rapid binding of BH(4) (K(d) = 65 μM). Subsequent addition of phenylalanine to the binary complex to form the productive ternary complex (K(d) = 130 μM) is approximately 10-fold slower. Both substrates can also bind to the free enzyme to form inhibitory binary complexes. O(2) rapidly binds to the productive ternary complex; this is followed by formation of an unidentified intermediate, which can be detected as a decrease in absorbance at 340 nm, with a rate constant of 140 s(-1). Formation of the 4a-hydroxypterin and Fe(IV)O intermediates is 10-fold slower and is followed by the rapid hydroxylation of the amino acid. Product release is the rate-determining step and largely determines k(cat). Similar reactions using 6-methyltetrahydropterin indicate a preference for the physiological pterin during hydroxylation.

  5. Frequent gain and loss of functional transcription factor binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott W Doniger

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Cis-regulatory sequences are not always conserved across species. Divergence within cis-regulatory sequences may result from the evolution of species-specific patterns of gene expression or the flexible nature of the cis-regulatory code. The identification of functional divergence in cis-regulatory sequences is therefore important for both understanding the role of gene regulation in evolution and annotating regulatory elements. We have developed an evolutionary model to detect the loss of constraint on individual transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs. We find that a significant fraction of functionally constrained binding sites have been lost in a lineage-specific manner among three closely related yeast species. Binding site loss has previously been explained by turnover, where the concurrent gain and loss of a binding site maintains gene regulation. We estimate that nearly half of all loss events cannot be explained by binding site turnover. Recreating the mutations that led to binding site loss confirms that these sequence changes affect gene expression in some cases. We also estimate that there is a high rate of binding site gain, as more than half of experimentally identified S. cerevisiae binding sites are not conserved across species. The frequent gain and loss of TFBSs implies that cis-regulatory sequences are labile and, in the absence of turnover, may contribute to species-specific patterns of gene expression.

  6. Measuring binding kinetics of aromatic thiolated molecules with nanoparticles via surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devetter, Brent M.; Mukherjee, Prabuddha; Murphy, Catherine J.; Bhargava, Rohit

    2015-05-01

    Colloidal plasmonic nanomaterials, consisting of metals such as gold and silver, are excellent candidates for advanced optical probes and devices, but precise control over surface chemistry is essential for realizing their full potential. Coupling thiolated (R-SH) molecules to nanoprobe surfaces is a convenient and established route to tailor surface properties. The ability to dynamically probe and monitor the surface chemistry of nanoparticles in solution is essential for rapidly manufacturing spectroscopically tunable nanoparticles. In this study, we report the development of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) as a method to monitor the kinetics of gold-thiolate bond formation on colloidal gold nanoparticles. A theoretical model combining SERS enhancement with the Beer-Lambert law is proposed to explain ensemble scattering and absorption effects in colloids during chemisorption. In order to maximize biological relevance and signal reproducibility, experiments used to validate the model focused on maintaining nanoparticle stability after the addition of water-soluble aromatic thiolated molecules. Our results indicate that ligand exchange on gold nanoparticles follow a first-order Langmuir adsorption model with rate constants on the order of 0.01 min-1. This study demonstrates an experimental spectroscopic method and theoretical model for monitoring binding kinetics that may prove useful for designing novel probes.Colloidal plasmonic nanomaterials, consisting of metals such as gold and silver, are excellent candidates for advanced optical probes and devices, but precise control over surface chemistry is essential for realizing their full potential. Coupling thiolated (R-SH) molecules to nanoprobe surfaces is a convenient and established route to tailor surface properties. The ability to dynamically probe and monitor the surface chemistry of nanoparticles in solution is essential for rapidly manufacturing spectroscopically tunable nanoparticles. In this

  7. Identifying differential transcription factor binding in ChIP-seq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai-Ying eWu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available ChIP seq is a widely used assay to measure genome-wide protein binding. The decrease in costs associated with sequencing has led to a rise in the number of studies that investigate protein binding across treatment conditions or cell lines. In addition to the identification of binding sites, new studies evaluate the variation in protein binding between conditions. A number of approaches to study differential transcription factor binding have recently been developed. Several of these methods build upon established methods from RNA-seq to quantify differences in read counts. We compare how these new approaches perform on different data sets from the ENCODE project to illustrate the impact of data processing pipelines under different study designs. The performance of normalization methods for differential ChIP-seq depends strongly on the variation in total amount of protein bound between conditions, with total read count outperforming effective library size, or variants thereof, when a large variation in binding was studied. Use of input subtraction to correct for non-specific binding showed a relatively modest impact on the number of differential peaks found and the fold change accuracy to biological validation, however a larger impact might be expected for samples with more extreme copy number variations between them. Still, it did identify a small subset of novel differential regions while excluding some differential peaks in regions with high background signal.These results highlight proper scaling for between-sample data normalization as critical for differential transcription factor binding analysis and suggest bioinformaticians need to know about the variation in level of total protein binding between conditions to select the best analysis method. At the same time, validation using fold-change estimates from qRT-PCR suggests there is still room for further method improvement.

  8. Identifying differential transcription factor binding in ChIP-seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dai-Ying; Bittencourt, Danielle; Stallcup, Michael R; Siegmund, Kimberly D

    2015-01-01

    ChIP seq is a widely used assay to measure genome-wide protein binding. The decrease in costs associated with sequencing has led to a rise in the number of studies that investigate protein binding across treatment conditions or cell lines. In addition to the identification of binding sites, new studies evaluate the variation in protein binding between conditions. A number of approaches to study differential transcription factor binding have recently been developed. Several of these methods build upon established methods from RNA-seq to quantify differences in read counts. We compare how these new approaches perform on different data sets from the ENCODE project to illustrate the impact of data processing pipelines under different study designs. The performance of normalization methods for differential ChIP-seq depends strongly on the variation in total amount of protein bound between conditions, with total read count outperforming effective library size, or variants thereof, when a large variation in binding was studied. Use of input subtraction to correct for non-specific binding showed a relatively modest impact on the number of differential peaks found and the fold change accuracy to biological validation, however a larger impact might be expected for samples with more extreme copy number variations between them. Still, it did identify a small subset of novel differential regions while excluding some differential peaks in regions with high background signal. These results highlight proper scaling for between-sample data normalization as critical for differential transcription factor binding analysis and suggest bioinformaticians need to know about the variation in level of total protein binding between conditions to select the best analysis method. At the same time, validation using fold-change estimates from qRT-PCR suggests there is still room for further method improvement.

  9. Microbes bind complement inhibitor factor H via a common site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Meri

    Full Text Available To cause infections microbes need to evade host defense systems, one of these being the evolutionarily old and important arm of innate immunity, the alternative pathway of complement. It can attack all kinds of targets and is tightly controlled in plasma and on host cells by plasma complement regulator factor H (FH. FH binds simultaneously to host cell surface structures such as heparin or glycosaminoglycans via domain 20 and to the main complement opsonin C3b via domain 19. Many pathogenic microbes protect themselves from complement by recruiting host FH. We analyzed how and why different microbes bind FH via domains 19-20 (FH19-20. We used a selection of FH19-20 point mutants to reveal the binding sites of several microbial proteins and whole microbes (Haemophilus influenzae, Bordetella pertussis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus pneumonia, Candida albicans, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Borrelia hermsii. We show that all studied microbes use the same binding region located on one side of domain 20. Binding of FH to the microbial proteins was inhibited with heparin showing that the common microbial binding site overlaps with the heparin site needed for efficient binding of FH to host cells. Surprisingly, the microbial proteins enhanced binding of FH19-20 to C3b and down-regulation of complement activation. We show that this is caused by formation of a tripartite complex between the microbial protein, FH, and C3b. In this study we reveal that seven microbes representing different phyla utilize a common binding site on the domain 20 of FH for complement evasion. Binding via this site not only mimics the glycosaminoglycans of the host cells, but also enhances function of FH on the microbial surfaces via the novel mechanism of tripartite complex formation. This is a unique example of convergent evolution resulting in enhanced immune evasion of important pathogens via utilization of a "superevasion site."

  10. Kinetics and thermodynamics of small molecule binding to pincer-PCP rhodium(I) complexes

    KAUST Repository

    Doherty, Mark D.

    2013-04-15

    The kinetics and thermodynamics of the binding of several small molecules, L (L = N2, H2, D2, and C2H 4), to the coordinatively unsaturated pincer-PCP rhodium(I) complexes Rh[tBu2PCH2(C6H3)CH 2PtBu2] (1) and Rh[tBu 2P(CH2)2(CH)(CH2)2P tBu2] (2) in organic solvents (n-heptane, toluene, THF, and cyclohexane-d12) have been investigated by a combination of kinetic flash photolysis methods, NMR equilibrium studies, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Using various gas mixtures and monitoring by NMR until equilibrium was established, the relative free energies of binding of N2, H2, and C2H4 in cyclohexane-d12 were found to increase in the order C 2H4 < N2 < H2. Time-resolved infrared (TRIR) and UV-vis transient absorption spectroscopy revealed that 355 nm excitation of 1-L and 2-L results in the photoejection of ligand L. The subsequent mechanism of binding of L to 1 and 2 to regenerate 1-L and 2-L is determined by the structure of the PCP ligand framework and the nature of the solvent. In both cases, the primary transient is a long-lived, unsolvated species (τ = 50-800 ns, depending on L and its concentration in solution). For 2, this so-called less-reactive form (LRF) is in equilibrium with a more-reactive form (MRF), which reacts with L at diffusion-controlled rates to regenerate 2-L. These two intermediates are proposed to be different conformers of the three-coordinate (PCP)Rh fragment. For 1, a similar mechanism is proposed to occur, but the LRF to MRF step is irreversible. In addition, a parallel reaction pathway was observed that involves the direct reaction of the LRF of 1 with L, with second-order rate constants that vary by almost 3 orders of magnitude, depending on the nature of L (in n-heptane, k = 6.7 × 10 5 M-1 s-1 for L = C2H4; 4.0 × 106 M-1 s-1 for L = N2; 5.5 × 108 M-1 s-1 for L = H2). Experiments in the more coordinating solvent, THF, revealed the binding of THF to 1 to generate 1-THF, and its subsequent reaction with L, as a

  11. Design of meningococcal factor H binding protein mutant vaccines that do not bind human complement factor H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajon, Rolando; Beernink, Peter T; Granoff, Dan M

    2012-08-01

    Meningococcal factor H binding protein (fHbp) is a human species-specific ligand for the complement regulator, factor H (fH). In recent studies, fHbp vaccines in which arginine at position 41 was replaced by serine (R41S) had impaired fH binding. The mutant vaccines elicited bactericidal responses in human fH transgenic mice superior to those elicited by control fHbp vaccines that bound human fH. Based on sequence similarity, fHbp has been classified into three variant groups. Here we report that although R41 is present in fHbp from variant groups 1 and 2, the R41S substitution eliminated fH binding only in variant group 1 proteins. To identify mutants in variant group 2 with impaired fH binding, we generated fHbp structural models and predicted 63 residues influencing fH binding. From these, we created 11 mutants with one or two amino acid substitutions in a variant group 2 protein and identified six that decreased fH binding. Three of these six mutants retained conformational epitopes recognized by all six anti-fHbp monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) tested and elicited serum complement-mediated bactericidal antibody titers in wild-type mice that were not significantly different from those obtained with the control vaccine. Thus, fHbp amino acid residues that affect human fH binding differ across variant groups. This result suggests that fHbp sequence variation induced by immune selection also affects fH binding motifs via coevolution. The three new fHbp mutants from variant group 2, which do not bind human fH, retained important epitopes for eliciting bactericidal antibodies and may be promising vaccine candidates.

  12. Glucosidase II from rat liver microsomes. Kinetic model for binding and hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, J M; Santa-Cecilia, A; Calvo, P

    1991-01-01

    Glucosidase II is an enzyme involved in glycoprotein biosynthesis, releasing both alpha-1,3-linked glucose residues from the protein-linked oligosaccharide Glc2Man9GlcNAc2-R in the processing of N-glycans. We studied the kinetic properties of the enzyme, purified to homogeneity and, for the first time, we have been able to demonstrate the occurrence of two active sites in this enzyme and to establish the mechanisms of binding and hydrolysis of the physiological substrate at its active site(s). The analyses of data fitting to single and double hyperbolic equations and the Eadie-Hofstee profile, together with the inhibition kinetics, demonstrate that the enzyme has two different active sites. The Km and Vmax. values for the high-affinity site (site 1) were 0.78 mM and 437 munits/mg respectively, whereas the values for the low-affinity site (site 2) were 481 mM and 13797 munits/mg respectively, for the p-nitrophenyl alpha-D-glucopyranoside substrate. The Vmax./Km ratios, which indicate the efficacy of an active site for a substrate, were 560 and 28.7 ml/min per g for active sites 1 and 2, respectively. The inhibition type, with respect to site 1, for glucose, maltose, D-glucone-delta-lactone, CaCl2 and MgCl2 was pure-competitive, partial-competitive, parabolic, non-competitive and non-competitive respectively. Ki values for glucose, maltose, CaCl2 and MgCl2 were 6.75, 2.05, 10.60 and 14.20 mM respectively. Thus glucose would bind to active site 1, maltose to site 2 (and near to site 1) and D-glucone-delta-lactone to either site 1 or 2. The following hydrolysis mechanism for the physiological substrate (Glc2Man9GlcNAc2-protein) of glucosidase II may be concluded from all the foregoing kinetic evidence: the external glucose would be the first released residue, at active site 2, thereafter producing Glc1Man9GlcNAc2-protein; the remaining glucose would be released at active site 1, delivering the Man9GlcNAc2-protein product, which would leave the enzyme. PMID:1898361

  13. Adsorption-desorption of oxytetracycline on marine sediments: Kinetics and influencing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Zhang, Hua

    2016-12-01

    To reveal the kinetics and mechanisms of antibiotic adsorption/desorption processes, batch and stirred flow chamber (SFC) experiments were carried out with oxytetracycline (OTC) on two marine sediments. The OTC adsorption capacities of the marine sediments were relatively weak and related to their organic carbon (OC) and contents of fine particles. Sorption isotherms of OTC on marine sediment can be well described by both the Langmuir and Freundlich models. Langmuir adsorption maxima (qmax) and Freundlich distribution coefficients (Kf) increased with the decrease of salinity and pH, which indicated the importance of variable charged sites on sediment surfaces. A second order kinetic model successfully described adsorption and desorption kinetics of OTC and well reproduced the concentration change during stop-flow. The adsorption kinetic rates (ka) for OTC under different experimental conditions ranged from 2.00 × 10(-4) to 1.97 × 10(-3) L (mg min)(-1). Results of SFC experiments indicated that diffusive mass transfer was the dominant mechanism of the time-dependent adsorption of OTC and its release from marine sediment was mildly hysteretic. The high desorption percentage (43-75% for LZB and 58-75% for BHB) implied that binding strength of OTC on two marine sediments was weak. In conclusion, marine sediment characteristics and environmental factors such as salinity, pH, and flow rate are critical factors determine extent of OTC sorption on marine sediment and need to be incorporated in modeling fate and transport of OTC in marine environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Measurement of Small Molecule Binding Kinetics on a Protein Microarray by Plasmonic-Based Electrochemical Impedance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    We report on a quantitative study of small molecule binding kinetics on protein microarrays with plasmonic-based electrochemical impedance microscopy (P-EIM). P-EIM measures electrical impedance optically with high spatial resolution by converting a surface charge change to a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) image intensity change, and the signal is not scaled to the mass of the analyte. Using P-EIM, we measured binding kinetics and affinity between small molecule drugs (imatinib and SB202190) and their target proteins (kinases Abl1 and p38-α). The measured affinity values are consistent with reported values measured by an indirect competitive binding assay. We also found that SB202190 has weak bindings to ABL1 with KD > 10 μM, which is not reported in the literature. Furthermore, we found that P-EIM is less prone to nonspecific binding, a long-standing issue in SPR. Our results show that P-EIM is a novel method for high-throughput measurement of small molecule binding kinetics and affinity, which is critical to the understanding of small molecules in biological systems and discovery of small molecule drugs. PMID:25153794

  15. Insights into ligand binding to a glutathione S-transferase from mango: Structure, thermodynamics and kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela-Chavira, Ignacio; Contreras-Vergara, Carmen A; Arvizu-Flores, Aldo A; Serrano-Posada, Hugo; Lopez-Zavala, Alonso A; García-Orozco, Karina D; Hernandez-Paredes, Javier; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Stojanoff, Vivian; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R; Islas-Osuna, Maria A

    2017-04-01

    We studied a mango glutathione S-transferase (GST) (Mangifera indica) bound to glutathione (GSH) and S-hexyl glutathione (GSX). This GST Tau class (MiGSTU) had a molecular mass of 25.5 kDa. MiGSTU Michaelis-Menten kinetic constants were determined for their substrates obtaining a Km, Vmax and kcat for CDNB of 0.792 mM, 80.58 mM min(-1) and 68.49 s(-1) respectively and 0.693 mM, 105.32 mM min(-1) and 89.57 s(-1), for reduced GSH respectively. MiGSTU had a micromolar affinity towards GSH (5.2 μM) or GSX (7.8 μM). The crystal structure of the MiGSTU in apo or bound to GSH or GSX generated a model that explains the thermodynamic signatures of binding and showed the importance of enthalpic-entropic compensation in ligand binding to Tau-class GST enzymes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  16. Protein nanoparticle interaction: A spectrophotometric approach for adsorption kinetics and binding studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaishanav, Sandeep K.; Chandraker, Kumudini; Korram, Jyoti; Nagwanshi, Rekha; Ghosh, Kallol K.; Satnami, Manmohan L.

    2016-08-01

    Investigating the protein nanoparticle interaction is crucial to understand how to control the biological interactions of nanoparticles. In this work, Model protein Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used to evaluate the process of protein adsorption to the gold nanoparticles (GNPs) surface. The binding of a model protein (BSA) to GNPs was investigated through fluorescence quenching measurements. The strong affinities of BSA for GNPs were confirmed by the high value of binding constant (Ks) which was calculated to be 2.2 × 1011 L/mol. In this consequence, we also investigated the adsorption behavior of BSA on GNPs surface via UV-Vis spectroscopy. The effect of various operational parameters such as pH, contact time, initial BSA concentration, and temperature on adsorption of BSA was investigated using batch adsorption experiments. Kinetics of adsorption was found to follow the pseudo-second order rate equation. The suitability of Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption models to the equilibrium data was investigated. The equilibrium adsorption was well described by the Freundlich isotherm model. The maximum adsorption capacity for BSA adsorbed on GNPs was 58.71 mg/g and equilibrium constant was 0.0058 calculated by the Langmuir model at 298 K and pH = 11.0. Thermodynamic parameters showed that the adsorption of BSA onto GNPs was feasible, spontaneous, and exothermic.

  17. Binding of Cimetidine to Balb/C Mouse Liver Catalase; Kinetics and Conformational Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangirvand, Mahboubeh; Minai-Tehrani, Dariush; Yazdi, Fatemeh; Minai-Tehrani, Arash; Razmi, Nematollah

    2016-01-01

    Catalase is responsible for converting hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) into water and oxygen in cells. This enzyme has high affinity for hydrogen peroxide and can protect the cells from oxidative stress damage. Catalase is a tetramer protein and each monomer contains a heme group. Cimetidine is a histamine H2 receptor blocker which inhibits acid release from stomach and is used for gasterointestinal diseases. In this research, effect of cimetidine on the activity of liver catalase was studied and the kinetic parameters of this enzyme and its conformational changes were investigated. Cell free extract of mouse liver was used for the catalase assay. The activity of the catalase was detected in the absence and presence of cimetidine by monitoring hydrogen peroxide reduction absorbance at 240 nm. The purified enzyme was used for conformational studies by Fluorescence spectrophotometry. The data showed that cimetidine could inhibit the enzyme in a non-competitive manner. Ki and IC50 values of the drug were determined to be about 0.75 and 0.85 uM, respectively. The Arrhenius plot showed that activation energy was 6.68 and 4.77 kJ/mol in the presence and absence of the drug, respectively. Fluorescence spectrophotometry revealed that the binding of cimetidine to the purified enzyme induced hyperchromicity and red shift which determined the conformational change on the enzyme. Cimetidine could non-competitively inhibit the liver catalase with high affinity. Binding of cimetidine to the enzyme induced conformational alteration in the enzyme.

  18. High Quality Factor Platinum Silicide Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Szypryt, P; Ulbricht, G; Bumble, B; Meeker, S R; Bockstiegel, C; Walter, A B

    2016-01-01

    We report on the development of Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) using platinum silicide as the sensor material. MKIDs are an emerging superconducting detector technology, capable of measuring the arrival times of single photons to better than two microseconds and their energies to around ten percent. Previously, MKIDs have been fabricated using either sub-stoichiometric titanium nitride or aluminum, but TiN suffers from spatial inhomogeneities in the superconducting critical temperature and Al has a low kinetic inductance fraction, causing low detector sensitivity. To address these issues, we have instead fabricated PtSi microresonators with superconducting critical temperatures of 944$\\pm$12~mK and high internal quality factors ($Q_i \\gtrsim 10^6$). These devices show typical quasiparticle lifetimes of $\\tau_{qp} \\approx 30$--$40~\\mu$s and spectral resolution, $R = \\lambda / \\Delta \\lambda$, of 8 at 406.6~nm. We compare PtSi MKIDs to those fabricated with TiN and detail the substantial advanta...

  19. Kinetics of carbon monoxide binding to monomeric hemoproteins. Role of the proximal histidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coletta, M; Ascenzi, P; Traylor, T G; Brunori, M

    1985-04-10

    The effect of pH on (i) the second-order rate constant for CO binding and (ii) the spectral properties of the deoxygenated derivative of several monomeric hemoproteins has been investigated in the pH range between 2.3 and 9.0. As in the case of 3-[1-imidazolyl]-propylamide monomethyl ester mesoheme, the rate constant for CO binding to sperm whale, horse, Dermochelys coriacea, Coryphaena hippurus, and Aplysia limacina myoglobins (the latter only in the presence of acetate/acetic acid mixture) increases, as the pH is lowered, to a value at least 1 order of magnitude higher than at pH 7.0. Such an effect is not observed in A. limacina myoglobin (in the absence of the acetate/acetic acid mixture) and Chironomus thummi thummi erythrocruorin. Moreover, the absorption spectrum, in the visible region, of the deoxy derivative of all these monomeric hemoproteins (with the exception of A. limacina myoglobin in the absence of the acetate/acetic acid mixture) undergoes a transition as the pH is lowered, an effect observed previously with 3-[1-imidazolyl]-propylamide monomethyl ester protoheme. On the basis of analogous spectroscopic and kinetic properties of chelated heme model compounds we attribute this behavior to the protonation of the N epsilon of the proximal imidazole involved in the bond with the iron atom. On the basis of this model the movement of the iron atom to the heme plane appears as a crucial step for CO binding, the activation free energy of the process amounting to approximately 2 kcal/mol.

  20. Kinetic studies of proton transfer in the microenvironment of a binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutman, M; Huppert, D; Nachliel, E

    1982-01-01

    Excitation of 8-hydroxypyrene 1,3,6-trisulfonate to its first electronic singlet state converts the compound from weak base (pK degrees = 7.7) into a strong acid (pK* = 0.5). The dissociation of the proton in water or dilute salt solution is a very fast reaction, K12 = 1 X 10(10) S-1. In concentrated salt solutions the dissociation is slowed as an exponential function of the chemical activity of the water in the solution. This kinetic parameter has been used to gauge the properties of the microenvironment of the binding sites of bovine serum albumin at which this compound is bound. Time-resolved fluorometry reveals two distinct steps: a rapid dissociation of the proton with tau = 300 +/- 40 ps which lasts approximately 0.5 ns, followed by a slower reaction with tau = 3.3 ns. The first rapid phase represents proton dissociation taking place in the binding site. From the rate constant K = 3.3 X 10(9) s-1 we estimate that the ability of the water molecules in the site to hydrate the ejected proton is equivalent to a salt solution with water activity of 0.85. The slow phase represents the escape of the proton from the binding site. The rate of the escape, 1.4 X 10(8) s-1, is significantly slower than diffusion-controlled dissociation. It is concluded that the shape of the site or its lowered proton conductivity do not allow a rapid escape of the proton to the bulk. Still it should be remembered that the escape of the proton is 10(5)-10(6)-times faster than a typical turnover of an enzyme.U

  1. Structural Fingerprints of Transcription Factor Binding Site Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Willett

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Fourier transforms are a powerful tool in the prediction of DNA sequence properties, such as the presence/absence of codons. We have previously compiled a database of the structural properties of all 32,896 unique DNA octamers. In this work we apply Fourier techniques to the analysis of the structural properties of human chromosomes 21 and 22 and also to three sets of transcription factor binding sites within these chromosomes. We find that, for a given structural property, the structural property power spectra of chromosomes 21 and 22 are strikingly similar. We find common peaks in their power spectra for both Sp1 and p53 transcription factor binding sites. We use the power spectra as a structural fingerprint and perform similarity searching in order to find transcription factor binding site regions. This approach provides a new strategy for searching the genome data for information. Although it is difficult to understand the relationship between specific functional properties and the set of structural parameters in our database, our structural fingerprints nevertheless provide a useful tool for searching for function information in sequence data. The power spectrum fingerprints provide a simple, fast method for comparing a set of functional sequences, in this case transcription factor binding site regions, with the sequences of whole chromosomes. On its own, the power spectrum fingerprint does not find all transcription factor binding sites in a chromosome, but the results presented here show that in combination with other approaches, this technique will improve the chances of identifying functional sequences hidden in genomic data.

  2. Mechanistic models enable the rational use of in vitro drug-target binding kinetics for better drug effects in patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witte, W.E.; Wong, Y.C.; Nederpelt, I.; Heitman, L.H.; Danhof, M.; Graaf, van der P.H.; Gilissen, R.A.; de, Lange E.C.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Drug-target binding kinetics are major determinants of the time course of drug action for several drugs, as clearly described for the irreversible binders omeprazole and aspirin. This supports the increasing interest to incorporate newly developed high-throughput assays for drug-target

  3. Experimental strategies for studying transcription factor-DNA binding specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geertz, Marcel; Maerkl, Sebastian J

    2010-12-01

    Specific binding of transcription factors (TFs) determines in a large part the connectivity of gene regulatory networks as well as the quantitative level of gene expression. A multiplicity of both experimental and computational methods is currently used to discover and characterize the underlying TF-DNA interactions. Experimental methods can be further subdivided into in vitro- and in vivo-based approaches, each accenting different aspects of TF-binding events. In this review we summarize the flexibility and performance of a selection of both types of experimental methods. In conclusion, we argue that a serial combination of methods with different throughput and data type constitutes an optimal experimental strategy.

  4. Effect of bioceramic functional groups on drug binding and release kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Christopher

    Bioceramics have been studied extensively as drug delivery systems (DDS). Those studies have aimed to tailor the drug binding and release kinetics to successfully treat infections and other diseases. This research suggests that the drug binding and release kinetics are predominantly driven by the functional groups available on the surface of a bioceramic. The goal of the present study is to explain the role of silicate and phosphate functional groups in drug binding to and release kinetics from bioceramics. alpha-cristobalite (Cris; SiO2) particles (90-150 microm) were prepared and doped with 0 microg (P-0), 39.1 microg (P-39.1), 78.2 microg (P-78.2), 165.5 microg (P-165.5) or 331 microg (P-331) of P 2O5 per gram Cris, using 85% orthophosphoric (H3PO 4) acid and thermal treatment. The material structure was analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD) with Rietveld Refinement and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy with Gaussian fitting. XRD demonstrated an increase from sample P-0 (170.5373 A3) to P-331 (170.6466 A 3) in the unit cell volume as the P2O5 concentration increased in the material confirming phosphate silicate substitution in Cris. Moreover, FTIR showed the characteristic bands of phosphate functional groups of nu4 PO4/O-P-O bending, P-O-P stretching, P-O-P bending, P=O stretching, and P-O-H bending in doped Cris indicating phosphate incorporation in the silicate structure. Furthermore, FTIR showed that the nu4 PO4/O-P-O bending band around 557.6 cm-1 and P=O stretching band around 1343.9 cm-1 increased in area for samples P-39.1 to P-331 from 3.5 to 10.5 and from 10.1 to 22.4, respectively due to phosphate doping. In conjunction with the increase of the nu4 PO4/O-P-O bending band and P=O stretching band, a decrease in area of the O-Si-O bending bands around 488.1 and 629.8 cm-1 was noticed for samples P-39.1 to P-331 from 5 to 2 and from 11.8 to 5.4, respectively. Furthermore, Cris samples (200 mg, n=5 for each sample) were immersed separately in

  5. Effect of phospholipid hydrolysis by phospholipase A2 on the kinetics of antagonist binding to cardiac muscarinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, B; Niroomand, F; Messineo, F C; Weis, A; Kübler, W; Hasselbach, W

    1994-09-15

    Activation of phospholipases during prolonged myocardial ischemia could contribute to the functional derangement of myocardial cells by altering the phospholipid environment of a number of membrane bound proteins including receptors. The present study examined the kinetics of muscarinic receptor antagonist [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate binding ([3H]QNB) to muscarinic receptors of highly purified sarcolemmal membranes under control conditions and after treatment with phospholipase A2 (PLA2; EC 3.1.1.4). Initial binding rates of QNB exhibited saturation kinetics, when plotted against the ligand concentration in control and PLA2 treated sarcolemmal membranes. This kinetic behaviour of QNB-binding is consistent with at least a two step binding mechanism. According to this two step binding hypothesis an unstable intermediate receptor-QNB complex (R*QNB) forms rapidly, and this form undergoes a slow conversion to the high affinity ligand-receptor complex R-QNB. The Michaelis constant Km of R-QNB formation was 1.8 nM, whereas the dissociation constant Kd obtained from equilibrium measurements was 0.062 nM. After 5 min exposure of sarcolemmal membranes to PLA2QNB binding capacity (Bmax) was reduced by 62%, and the affinity of the remaining receptor sites was decreased by 47% (Kd = 0.116 nM). This PLA2-induced increase of Kd was accompanied by a corresponding increase of Km, whereas the rate constants k2 and k-2 of the hypothetical slow conversion step (second reaction step) remained unchanged. These results suggest that binding of QNB to cardiac muscarinic receptors induces a transition in the receptor-ligand configuration, which is necessary for the formation of the final high affinity R-QNB complex. PLA2-induced changes of the lipid environment result in the inability of a part of the receptor population to undergo this transition, thereby inhibiting high affinity QNB-binding.

  6. Kinetic study of coniferyl alcohol radical binding to the (+)-pinoresinol forming dirigent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halls, Steven C; Davin, Laurence B; Kramer, David M; Lewis, Norman G

    2004-03-01

    An essential step in lignan and lignin formation in planta is one electron oxidation of (E)-coniferyl alcohol (CA) to generate the radical intermediate (CA(*)), which can then undergo directed radical-radical couplings in vivo. For lignan formation in vitro and in vivo, stereoselective coupling of CA(*) only occurs to afford (+)-pinoresinol in the additional presence of (+)-pinoresinol forming dirigent protein (DP). Presented herein is a kinetic and thermodynamic study which reveals the central mechanistic details of the coupling process involved in DP-mediated coupling. DP activity was maximal between pH 4.25 and pH 6.0, with activity being maintained at temperatures below 33 degrees C. Equilibrium binding assays revealed that coniferyl alcohol was only weakly bound to the DP, with a K(D) of 370 +/- 65 microM. On the other hand, the enantiomeric excess of (+)-pinoresinol formed was dependent on both DP concentration and rate of CA oxidation and, thus, on apparent steady-state [CA(*)]. The data obtained could best be explained using a kinetic model where radical-radical coupling via DP competes with that occurring in open solution. Using this model, an apparent K(M) of about 10 nM was estimated from the saturation behavior of (+)-pinoresinol formation with respect to apparent steady-state [CA(*)]. These data strongly suggest that CA(*), rather than CA, is the substrate for DP, in agreement with earlier predictions. A mechanism of directed radical-radical coupling, where two coniferyl alcohol radical substrates are bound per protein dimer, is proposed.

  7. Structural and Kinetic Analyses of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Active Site Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crichlow, G.; Lubetsky, J; Leng, L; Bucala, R; Lolis, E

    2009-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a secreted protein expressed in numerous cell types that counters the antiinflammatory effects of glucocorticoids and has been implicated in sepsis, cancer, and certain autoimmune diseases. Interestingly, the structure of MIF contains a catalytic site resembling the tautomerase/isomerase sites of microbial enzymes. While bona fide physiological substrates remain unknown, model substrates have been identified. Selected compounds that bind in the tautomerase active site also inhibit biological functions of MIF. It had previously been shown that the acetaminophen metabolite, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI), covalently binds to the active site of MIF. In this study, kinetic data indicate that NAPQI inhibits MIF both covalently and noncovalently. The structure of MIF cocrystallized with NAPQI reveals that the NAPQI has undergone a chemical alteration forming an acetaminophen dimer (bi-APAP) and binds noncovalently to MIF at the mouth of the active site. We also find that the commonly used protease inhibitor, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), forms a covalent complex with MIF and inhibits the tautomerase activity. Crystallographic analysis reveals the formation of a stable, novel covalent bond for PMSF between the catalytic nitrogen of the N-terminal proline and the sulfur of PMSF with complete, well-defined electron density in all three active sites of the MIF homotrimer. Conclusions are drawn from the structures of these two MIF-inhibitor complexes regarding the design of novel compounds that may provide more potent reversible and irreversible inhibition of MIF.

  8. Variable structure motifs for transcription factor binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, John E; Evans, Kenneth J; Dyer, Nigel; Wernisch, Lorenz; Ott, Sascha

    2010-01-14

    Classically, models of DNA-transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) have been based on relatively few known instances and have treated them as sites of fixed length using position weight matrices (PWMs). Various extensions to this model have been proposed, most of which take account of dependencies between the bases in the binding sites. However, some transcription factors are known to exhibit some flexibility and bind to DNA in more than one possible physical configuration. In some cases this variation is known to affect the function of binding sites. With the increasing volume of ChIP-seq data available it is now possible to investigate models that incorporate this flexibility. Previous work on variable length models has been constrained by: a focus on specific zinc finger proteins in yeast using restrictive models; a reliance on hand-crafted models for just one transcription factor at a time; and a lack of evaluation on realistically sized data sets. We re-analysed binding sites from the TRANSFAC database and found motivating examples where our new variable length model provides a better fit. We analysed several ChIP-seq data sets with a novel motif search algorithm and compared the results to one of the best standard PWM finders and a recently developed alternative method for finding motifs of variable structure. All the methods performed comparably in held-out cross validation tests. Known motifs of variable structure were recovered for p53, Stat5a and Stat5b. In addition our method recovered a novel generalised version of an existing PWM for Sp1 that allows for variable length binding. This motif improved classification performance. We have presented a new gapped PWM model for variable length DNA binding sites that is not too restrictive nor over-parameterised. Our comparison with existing tools shows that on average it does not have better predictive accuracy than existing methods. However, it does provide more interpretable models of motifs of variable

  9. Variable structure motifs for transcription factor binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wernisch Lorenz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Classically, models of DNA-transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs have been based on relatively few known instances and have treated them as sites of fixed length using position weight matrices (PWMs. Various extensions to this model have been proposed, most of which take account of dependencies between the bases in the binding sites. However, some transcription factors are known to exhibit some flexibility and bind to DNA in more than one possible physical configuration. In some cases this variation is known to affect the function of binding sites. With the increasing volume of ChIP-seq data available it is now possible to investigate models that incorporate this flexibility. Previous work on variable length models has been constrained by: a focus on specific zinc finger proteins in yeast using restrictive models; a reliance on hand-crafted models for just one transcription factor at a time; and a lack of evaluation on realistically sized data sets. Results We re-analysed binding sites from the TRANSFAC database and found motivating examples where our new variable length model provides a better fit. We analysed several ChIP-seq data sets with a novel motif search algorithm and compared the results to one of the best standard PWM finders and a recently developed alternative method for finding motifs of variable structure. All the methods performed comparably in held-out cross validation tests. Known motifs of variable structure were recovered for p53, Stat5a and Stat5b. In addition our method recovered a novel generalised version of an existing PWM for Sp1 that allows for variable length binding. This motif improved classification performance. Conclusions We have presented a new gapped PWM model for variable length DNA binding sites that is not too restrictive nor over-parameterised. Our comparison with existing tools shows that on average it does not have better predictive accuracy than existing methods. However, it does

  10. Leveraging cross-species transcription factor binding site patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claussnitzer, Melina; Dankel, Simon N; Klocke, Bernward

    2014-01-01

    to disease susceptibility. We show that integrative computational analysis of phylogenetic conservation with a complexity assessment of co-occurring transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) can identify cis-regulatory variants and elucidate their mechanistic role in disease. Analysis of established type 2...... diabetes risk loci revealed a striking clustering of distinct homeobox TFBS. We identified the PRRX1 homeobox factor as a repressor of PPARG2 expression in adipose cells and demonstrate its adverse effect on lipid metabolism and systemic insulin sensitivity, dependent on the rs4684847 risk allele...... that triggers PRRX1 binding. Thus, cross-species conservation analysis at the level of co-occurring TFBS provides a valuable contribution to the translation of genetic association signals to disease-related molecular mechanisms....

  11. Kinetic and structural insights into the binding of histone deacetylase 1 and 2 (HDAC1, 2) inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Florence F; Weïwer, Michel; Steinbacher, Stefan; Schomburg, Adrian; Reinemer, Peter; Gale, Jennifer P; Campbell, Arthur J; Fisher, Stewart L; Zhao, Wen-Ning; Reis, Surya A; Hennig, Krista M; Thomas, Méryl; Müller, Peter; Jefson, Martin R; Fass, Daniel M; Haggarty, Stephen J; Zhang, Yan-Ling; Holson, Edward B

    2016-09-15

    The structure-activity and structure-kinetic relationships of a series of novel and selective ortho-aminoanilide inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACs) 1 and 2 are described. Different kinetic and thermodynamic selectivity profiles were obtained by varying the moiety occupying an 11Å channel leading to the Zn(2+) catalytic pocket of HDACs 1 and 2, two paralogs with a high degree of structural similarity. The design of these novel inhibitors was informed by two ligand-bound crystal structures of truncated hHDAC2. BRD4884 and BRD7232 possess kinetic selectivity for HDAC1 versus HDAC2. We demonstrate that the binding kinetics of HDAC inhibitors can be tuned for individual isoforms in order to modulate target residence time while retaining functional activity and increased histone H4K12 and H3K9 acetylation in primary mouse neuronal cell culture assays. These chromatin modifiers, with tuned binding kinetic profiles, can be used to define the relation between target engagement requirements and the pharmacodynamic response of HDACs in different disease applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of chemical modifications of heme on kinetics of carbon monoxide binding to free home

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sono, M.; McCray, J.A.; Asakura, T.

    1977-11-10

    The rates of carbon monoxide recombination to six different kinds of chemically modified heme with various substituents at positions 2 and 4 have been studied in the protein-free state (free heme) by the laser flash photolysis method in a mixture of ethylene glycol and 0.02 N NaOH (80:20, v/v) (80% ethylene glycol). The carbon monoxide combination rate constants to the various free hemes obtained in 80% ethylene glycol at 22/sup 0/ were 1.4, 2.1, 2.1, 3.7, 4.5, and 6.4 x 10/sup 7/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/ for 2,4-diformyl-, spirographis (2-formyl-4-vinyl-), isospirographis (2-vinyl-4-formyl-) proto-(2,4-divinyl-), deutero-(2,4-dihydrogen-), and meso-(2,4-diethyl-), hemes, respectively. This order of increase in carbon monoxide combination rate constants for these hemes correlates exactly with decrease in electron attractivity of heme side chains (i.e., increase in pK/sub 3/, basicity of nitrogen base of prophyrin) and is completely opposite to that obtained for carbon monoxide binding to these hemes reconstituted with apomyoglobin. Contrary to the results for myoglobin, the two isomers of monoformyl-monovinylheme exhibited similar optical properties and the same combination rate constant indicating that the differences in the optical and kinetic results observed in myoglobin are due to different interactions of these isomeric hemes with protein.

  13. Discrete TCR Binding Kinetics Control Invariant NKT Cell Selection and Central Priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz Tleugabulova, Mayra; Escalante, Nichole K; Deng, Shenglou; Fieve, Stephanie; Ereño-Orbea, June; Savage, Paul B; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Mallevaey, Thierry

    2016-11-15

    Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells develop and differentiate in the thymus, segregating into iNKT1/2/17 subsets akin to Th1/2/17 classical CD4(+) T cells; however, iNKT TCRs recognize Ags in a fundamentally different way. How the biophysical parameters of iNKT TCRs influence signal strength in vivo and how such signals affect the development and differentiation of these cells are unknown. In this study, we manipulated TCRs in vivo to generate clonotypic iNKT cells using TCR retrogenic chimeras. We report that the biophysical properties of CD1d-lipid-TCR interactions differentially impacted the development and effector differentiation of iNKT cells. Whereas selection efficiency strongly correlated with TCR avidity, TCR signaling, cell-cell conjugate formation, and iNKT effector differentiation correlated with the half-life of CD1d-lipid-TCR interactions. TCR binding properties, however, did not modulate Ag-induced iNKT cytokine production. Our work establishes that discrete TCR interaction kinetics influence iNKT cell development and central priming. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  14. Roles of cell and microvillus deformation and receptor-ligand binding kinetics in cell rolling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Parag; Jadhav, Sameer; Eggleton, Charles D; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2008-10-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) recruitment to sites of inflammation is initiated by selectin-mediated PMN tethering and rolling on activated endothelium under flow. Cell rolling is modulated by bulk cell deformation (mesoscale), microvillus deformability (microscale), and receptor-ligand binding kinetics (nanoscale). Selectin-ligand bonds exhibit a catch-slip bond behavior, and their dissociation is governed not only by the force but also by the force history. Whereas previous theoretical models have studied the significance of these three "length scales" in isolation, how their interplay affects cell rolling has yet to be resolved. We therefore developed a three-dimensional computational model that integrates the aforementioned length scales to delineate their relative contributions to PMN rolling. Our simulations predict that the catch-slip bond behavior and to a lesser extent bulk cell deformation are responsible for the shear threshold phenomenon. Cells bearing deformable rather than rigid microvilli roll slower only at high P-selectin site densities and elevated levels of shear (>or=400 s(-1)). The more compliant cells (membrane stiffness=1.2 dyn/cm) rolled slower than cells with a membrane stiffness of 3.0 dyn/cm at shear rates >50 s(-1). In summary, our model demonstrates that cell rolling over a ligand-coated surface is a highly coordinated process characterized by a complex interplay between forces acting on three distinct length scales.

  15. Cooperative binding of transcription factors promotes bimodal gene expression response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo S Gutierrez

    Full Text Available In the present work we extend and analyze the scope of our recently proposed stochastic model for transcriptional regulation, which considers an arbitrarily complex cis-regulatory system using only elementary reactions. Previously, we determined the role of cooperativity on the intrinsic fluctuations of gene expression for activating transcriptional switches, by means of master equation formalism and computer simulation. This model allowed us to distinguish between two cooperative binding mechanisms and, even though the mean expression levels were not affected differently by the acting mechanism, we showed that the associated fluctuations were different. In the present generalized model we include other regulatory functions in addition to those associated to an activator switch. Namely, we introduce repressive regulatory functions and two theoretical mechanisms that account for the biphasic response that some cis-regulatory systems show to the transcription factor concentration. We have also extended our previous master equation formalism in order to include protein production by stochastic translation of mRNA. Furthermore, we examine the graded/binary scenarios in the context of the interaction energy between transcription factors. In this sense, this is the first report to show that the cooperative binding of transcription factors to DNA promotes the "all-or-none" phenomenon observed in eukaryotic systems. In addition, we confirm that gene expression fluctuation levels associated with one of two cooperative binding mechanism never exceed the fluctuation levels of the other.

  16. Comprehensive human transcription factor binding site map for combinatory binding motifs discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnoldo J Müller-Molina

    Full Text Available To know the map between transcription factors (TFs and their binding sites is essential to reverse engineer the regulation process. Only about 10%-20% of the transcription factor binding motifs (TFBMs have been reported. This lack of data hinders understanding gene regulation. To address this drawback, we propose a computational method that exploits never used TF properties to discover the missing TFBMs and their sites in all human gene promoters. The method starts by predicting a dictionary of regulatory "DNA words." From this dictionary, it distills 4098 novel predictions. To disclose the crosstalk between motifs, an additional algorithm extracts TF combinatorial binding patterns creating a collection of TF regulatory syntactic rules. Using these rules, we narrowed down a list of 504 novel motifs that appear frequently in syntax patterns. We tested the predictions against 509 known motifs confirming that our system can reliably predict ab initio motifs with an accuracy of 81%-far higher than previous approaches. We found that on average, 90% of the discovered combinatorial binding patterns target at least 10 genes, suggesting that to control in an independent manner smaller gene sets, supplementary regulatory mechanisms are required. Additionally, we discovered that the new TFBMs and their combinatorial patterns convey biological meaning, targeting TFs and genes related to developmental functions. Thus, among all the possible available targets in the genome, the TFs tend to regulate other TFs and genes involved in developmental functions. We provide a comprehensive resource for regulation analysis that includes a dictionary of "DNA words," newly predicted motifs and their corresponding combinatorial patterns. Combinatorial patterns are a useful filter to discover TFBMs that play a major role in orchestrating other factors and thus, are likely to lock/unlock cellular functional clusters.

  17. Incorporating evolution of transcription factor binding sites into annotated alignments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abha S Bais; Steffen Grossmann; Martin Vingron

    2007-08-01

    Identifying transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) is essential to elucidate putative regulatory mechanisms. A common strategy is to combine cross-species conservation with single sequence TFBS annotation to yield ``conserved TFBSs”. Most current methods in this field adopt a multi-step approach that segregates the two aspects. Again, it is widely accepted that the evolutionary dynamics of binding sites differ from those of the surrounding sequence. Hence, it is desirable to have an approach that explicitly takes this factor into account. Although a plethora of approaches have been proposed for the prediction of conserved TFBSs, very few explicitly model TFBS evolutionary properties, while additionally being multi-step. Recently, we introduced a novel approach to simultaneously align and annotate conserved TFBSs in a pair of sequences. Building upon the standard Smith-Waterman algorithm for local alignments, SimAnn introduces additional states for profiles to output extended alignments or annotated alignments. That is, alignments with parts annotated as gaplessly aligned TFBSs (pair-profile hits) are generated. Moreover, the pair-profile related parameters are derived in a sound statistical framework. In this article, we extend this approach to explicitly incorporate evolution of binding sites in the SimAnn framework. We demonstrate the extension in the theoretical derivations through two position-specific evolutionary models, previously used for modelling TFBS evolution. In a simulated setting, we provide a proof of concept that the approach works given the underlying assumptions, as compared to the original work. Finally, using a real dataset of experimentally verified binding sites in human-mouse sequence pairs, we compare the new approach (eSimAnn) to an existing multi-step tool that also considers TFBS evolution. Although it is widely accepted that binding sites evolve differently from the surrounding sequences, most comparative TFBS identification

  18. Kinetic studies show that Ca2+ and Tb3+ have different binding preferences toward the four Ca2+-binding sites of calmodulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C L; Leavis, P C; Gergely, J

    1984-12-18

    The stepwise addition of Tb3+ to calmodulin yields a large tyrosine-sensitized Tb3+ luminescence enhancement as the third and fourth ions bind to the protein [Wang, C.-L. A., Aquaron, R. R., Leavis, P. C., & Gergely, J. (1982) Eur. J. Biochem. 124, 7-12]. Since the only tyrosine residues in calmodulin are located within binding sites III and IV, these results suggest that Tb3+ binds first to sites I and II. Recent NMR studies have provided evidence that Ca2+, on the other hand, binds preferentially to sites III and IV. Kinetic studies using a stopped-flow apparatus also show that the preferential binding of Ca2+ and lanthanide ions is different. Upon rapid mixing of 2Ca-calmodulin with two Tb3+ ions, there was a small and rapid tyrosine fluorescence change, but no Tb3+ luminescence was observed, indicating that Tb3+ binds to sites I and II but not sites III and IV. When two Tb3+ ions are mixed with 2Dy-calmodulin, Tb3+ luminescence rises rapidly as Tb3+ binds to the empty sites III and IV, followed by a more gradual decrease (k = 0.4 s-1 as the ions redistribute themselves over the four sites. These results indicate that (i) both Tb3+ and Dy3+ prefer binding to sites I and II of calmodulin and (ii) the binding of Tb3+ to calmodulin is not impeded by the presence of two Ca2+ ions initially bound to the protein. Thus, the Ca2+ and lanthanide ions must exhibit opposite preferences for the four sites of calmodulin: sites III and IV are the high-affinity sites for Ca2+, whereas Tb3+ and Dy3+ prefer sites I and II.

  19. A systems biology approach to transcription factor binding site prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The elucidation of mammalian transcriptional regulatory networks holds great promise for both basic and translational research and remains one the greatest challenges to systems biology. Recent reverse engineering methods deduce regulatory interactions from large-scale mRNA expression profiles and cross-species conserved regulatory regions in DNA. Technical challenges faced by these methods include distinguishing between direct and indirect interactions, associating transcription regulators with predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs, identifying non-linearly conserved binding sites across species, and providing realistic accuracy estimates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We address these challenges by closely integrating proven methods for regulatory network reverse engineering from mRNA expression data, linearly and non-linearly conserved regulatory region discovery, and TFBS evaluation and discovery. Using an extensive test set of high-likelihood interactions, which we collected in order to provide realistic prediction-accuracy estimates, we show that a careful integration of these methods leads to significant improvements in prediction accuracy. To verify our methods, we biochemically validated TFBS predictions made for both transcription factors (TFs and co-factors; we validated binding site predictions made using a known E2F1 DNA-binding motif on E2F1 predicted promoter targets, known E2F1 and JUND motifs on JUND predicted promoter targets, and a de novo discovered motif for BCL6 on BCL6 predicted promoter targets. Finally, to demonstrate accuracy of prediction using an external dataset, we showed that sites matching predicted motifs for ZNF263 are significantly enriched in recent ZNF263 ChIP-seq data. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Using an integrative framework, we were able to address technical challenges faced by state of the art network reverse engineering methods, leading to significant improvement in direct

  20. Key factors of combustion from kinetics to gas dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Rubtsov, Nikolai M

    2017-01-01

    This book summarizes the main advances in the mechanisms of combustion processes. It focuses on the analysis of kinetic mechanisms of gas combustion processes and experimental investigation into the interrelation of kinetics and gas dynamics in gas combustion. The book is complimentary to the one previously published, The Modes of Gaseous Combustion.

  1. Kinetics of carbon monoxide binding to phenobarbital-induced cytochrome P-450 from rat liver microsomes: a simple bimolecular process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oertle, M; Richter, C; Winterhalter, K H; Di Iorio, E E

    1985-01-01

    The kinetics of carbon monoxide binding to phenobarbital-induced cytochrome P-450 (P-450PB) and to its enzymatically inactive form P-420PB have been investigated by both stopped-flow and flash-photolysis spectrophotometry. When the simultaneous presence of both forms of the enzyme is taken into account, the binding of CO to these two proteins can be described in terms of two bimolecular processes with rate constants of 4.5 X 10(6) M-1.S-1 and 4.7 X 10(5) M-1.S-1 for P-450PB and 1.7 X 10(7) M-1.S-1 and 1.5 X 10(6) M-1.S-1 for P-420PB. From kinetic studies of the binding of CO to P-450PB under different experimental conditions, investigations of the homogeneity of our P-450PB preparations, and comparative kinetic investigations of P-450s from different sources, we conclude that CO binding to reduced P-450PB is a simple bimolecular process and that the observed biphasic traces are due to heterogeneity of the proteins. This conclusion is in contrast with previous reports of complex reaction mechanisms for the binding of CO to P-450PB. Optical spectroscopy studies indicate the existence of an equilibrium between P-450PB and P-420PB, at least for the reduced carbonyl derivatives of the enzymes. The interconversion is strongly influenced by the aggregation state of the protein. Large differences between the CO binding properties of P-450PB and those of P-420PB are found. These are discussed in terms of possible effects of the proximal ligation state of the iron on heme reactivity. PMID:3860832

  2. Imputation for transcription factor binding predictions based on deep learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Qian

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the cell-specific binding patterns of transcription factors (TFs) is fundamental to studying gene regulatory networks in biological systems, for which ChIP-seq not only provides valuable data but is also considered as the gold standard. Despite tremendous efforts from the scientific community to conduct TF ChIP-seq experiments, the available data represent only a limited percentage of ChIP-seq experiments, considering all possible combinations of TFs and cell lines. In this study, we demonstrate a method for accurately predicting cell-specific TF binding for TF-cell line combinations based on only a small fraction (4%) of the combinations using available ChIP-seq data. The proposed model, termed TFImpute, is based on a deep neural network with a multi-task learning setting to borrow information across transcription factors and cell lines. Compared with existing methods, TFImpute achieves comparable accuracy on TF-cell line combinations with ChIP-seq data; moreover, TFImpute achieves better accuracy on TF-cell line combinations without ChIP-seq data. This approach can predict cell line specific enhancer activities in K562 and HepG2 cell lines, as measured by massively parallel reporter assays, and predicts the impact of SNPs on TF binding. PMID:28234893

  3. Development of a Surface Plasmon Resonance Assay for the Characterization of Small-Molecule Binding Kinetics and Mechanism of Binding to Kynurenine 3-Monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poda, Suresh B; Kobayashi, Masakazu; Nachane, Ruta; Menon, Veena; Gandhi, Adarsh S; Budac, David P; Li, Guiying; Campbell, Brian M; Tagmose, Lena

    2015-10-01

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO), a pivotal enzyme in the kynurenine pathway, was identified as a potential therapeutic target for treating neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. In this article, we describe a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay that delivers both kinetics and the mechanism of binding (MoB) data, enabling a detailed characterization of KMO inhibitors for the enzyme in real time. SPR assay development included optimization of the protein construct and the buffer conditions. The stability and inhibitor binding activity of the immobilized KMO were significantly improved when the experiments were performed at 10°C using a buffer containing 0.05% n-dodecyl-β-d-maltoside (DDM) as the detergent. The KD values of the known KMO inhibitors (UPF648 and RO61-8048) from the SPR assay were in good accordance with the biochemical LC/MS/MS assay. Also, the SPR assay was able to differentiate the binding kinetics (k(a) and k(d)) of the selected unknown KMO inhibitors. For example, the inhibitors that showed comparable IC50 values in the LC/MS/MS assay displayed differences in their residence time (τ = 1/k(d)) in the SPR assay. To better define the MoB of the inhibitors to KMO, an SPR-based competition assay was developed, which demonstrated that both UPF648 and RO61-8048 bound to the substrate-binding site. These results demonstrate the potential of the SPR assay for characterizing the affinity, the kinetics, and the MoB profiles of the KMO inhibitors.

  4. Understanding variation in transcription factor binding by modeling transcription factor genome-epigenome interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chieh-Chun Chen

    Full Text Available Despite explosive growth in genomic datasets, the methods for studying epigenomic mechanisms of gene regulation remain primitive. Here we present a model-based approach to systematically analyze the epigenomic functions in modulating transcription factor-DNA binding. Based on the first principles of statistical mechanics, this model considers the interactions between epigenomic modifications and a cis-regulatory module, which contains multiple binding sites arranged in any configurations. We compiled a comprehensive epigenomic dataset in mouse embryonic stem (mES cells, including DNA methylation (MeDIP-seq and MRE-seq, DNA hydroxymethylation (5-hmC-seq, and histone modifications (ChIP-seq. We discovered correlations of transcription factors (TFs for specific combinations of epigenomic modifications, which we term epigenomic motifs. Epigenomic motifs explained why some TFs appeared to have different DNA binding motifs derived from in vivo (ChIP-seq and in vitro experiments. Theoretical analyses suggested that the epigenome can modulate transcriptional noise and boost the cooperativity of weak TF binding sites. ChIP-seq data suggested that epigenomic boost of binding affinities in weak TF binding sites can function in mES cells. We showed in theory that the epigenome should suppress the TF binding differences on SNP-containing binding sites in two people. Using personal data, we identified strong associations between H3K4me2/H3K9ac and the degree of personal differences in NFκB binding in SNP-containing binding sites, which may explain why some SNPs introduce much smaller personal variations on TF binding than other SNPs. In summary, this model presents a powerful approach to analyze the functions of epigenomic modifications. This model was implemented into an open source program APEG (Affinity Prediction by Epigenome and Genome, http://systemsbio.ucsd.edu/apeg.

  5. Understanding variation in transcription factor binding by modeling transcription factor genome-epigenome interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chieh-Chun; Xiao, Shu; Xie, Dan; Cao, Xiaoyi; Song, Chun-Xiao; Wang, Ting; He, Chuan; Zhong, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Despite explosive growth in genomic datasets, the methods for studying epigenomic mechanisms of gene regulation remain primitive. Here we present a model-based approach to systematically analyze the epigenomic functions in modulating transcription factor-DNA binding. Based on the first principles of statistical mechanics, this model considers the interactions between epigenomic modifications and a cis-regulatory module, which contains multiple binding sites arranged in any configurations. We compiled a comprehensive epigenomic dataset in mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells, including DNA methylation (MeDIP-seq and MRE-seq), DNA hydroxymethylation (5-hmC-seq), and histone modifications (ChIP-seq). We discovered correlations of transcription factors (TFs) for specific combinations of epigenomic modifications, which we term epigenomic motifs. Epigenomic motifs explained why some TFs appeared to have different DNA binding motifs derived from in vivo (ChIP-seq) and in vitro experiments. Theoretical analyses suggested that the epigenome can modulate transcriptional noise and boost the cooperativity of weak TF binding sites. ChIP-seq data suggested that epigenomic boost of binding affinities in weak TF binding sites can function in mES cells. We showed in theory that the epigenome should suppress the TF binding differences on SNP-containing binding sites in two people. Using personal data, we identified strong associations between H3K4me2/H3K9ac and the degree of personal differences in NFκB binding in SNP-containing binding sites, which may explain why some SNPs introduce much smaller personal variations on TF binding than other SNPs. In summary, this model presents a powerful approach to analyze the functions of epigenomic modifications. This model was implemented into an open source program APEG (Affinity Prediction by Epigenome and Genome, http://systemsbio.ucsd.edu/apeg).

  6. Titration kinetics of Asp-85 in bacteriorhodopsin: exclusion of the retinal pocket as the color-controlling cation binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, X; Bressler, S; Ottolenghi, M; Eliash, T; Friedman, N; Sheves, M

    1997-10-20

    The spectrum (the purple blue transition) and function of the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin are determined by the state of protonation of the Asp-85 residue located in the vicinity of the retinal chromophore. The titration of Asp-85 is controlled by the binding/unbinding of one or two divalent metal cations (Ca2+ or Mg2+). The location of such metal binding site(s) is approached by studying the kinetics of the cation-induced titration of Asp-85 using metal ions and large molecular cations, such as quaternary ammonium ions, R4N+ (R = Et, Pr, a divalent 'bolaform ion' [Et3N+-(CH2)4-N+Et3] and the 1:3 molecular complex formed between Fe2+ and 1,10-phenanthroline (OP). The basic multi-component kinetic features of the titration, extending from 10(-2) to 10(4) s, are unaffected by the charge and size of the cation. This indicates that cation binding to bR triggers the blue --> purple titration in a fast step, which is not rate-determining. In view of the size of the cations involved, these observations indicate that the cation binding site is in an exposed location on, or close to, the membrane surface. This excludes previous models, which placed the color-controlling Ca2+ ion in the retinal binding pocket.

  7. The human enhancer blocker CTC-binding factor interacts with the transcription factor Kaiso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defossez, Pierre-Antoine; Kelly, Kevin F; Filion, Guillaume J P; Pérez-Torrado, Roberto; Magdinier, Frédérique; Menoni, Hervé; Nordgaard, Curtis L; Daniel, Juliet M; Gilson, Eric

    2005-12-30

    CTC-binding factor (CTCF) is a DNA-binding protein of vertebrates that plays essential roles in regulating genome activity through its capacity to act as an enhancer blocker. We performed a yeast two-hybrid screen to identify protein partners of CTCF that could regulate its activity. Using full-length CTCF as bait we recovered Kaiso, a POZ-zinc finger transcription factor, as a specific binding partner. The interaction occurs through a C-terminal region of CTCF and the POZ domain of Kaiso. CTCF and Kaiso are co-expressed in many tissues, and CTCF was specifically co-immunoprecipitated by several Kaiso monoclonal antibodies from nuclear lysates. Kaiso is a bimodal transcription factor that recognizes methylated CpG dinucleotides or a conserved unmethylated sequence (TNGCAGGA, the Kaiso binding site). We identified one consensus unmethylated Kaiso binding site in close proximity to the CTCF binding site in the human 5' beta-globin insulator. We found, in an insulation assay, that the presence of this Kaiso binding site reduced the enhancer-blocking activity of CTCF. These data suggest that the Kaiso-CTCF interaction negatively regulates CTCF insulator activity.

  8. LASAGNA: A novel algorithm for transcription factor binding site alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Scientists routinely scan DNA sequences for transcription factor (TF) binding sites (TFBSs). Most of the available tools rely on position-specific scoring matrices (PSSMs) constructed from aligned binding sites. Because of the resolutions of assays used to obtain TFBSs, databases such as TRANSFAC, ORegAnno and PAZAR store unaligned variable-length DNA segments containing binding sites of a TF. These DNA segments need to be aligned to build a PSSM. While the TRANSFAC database provides scoring matrices for TFs, nearly 78% of the TFs in the public release do not have matrices available. As work on TFBS alignment algorithms has been limited, it is highly desirable to have an alignment algorithm tailored to TFBSs. Results We designed a novel algorithm named LASAGNA, which is aware of the lengths of input TFBSs and utilizes position dependence. Results on 189 TFs of 5 species in the TRANSFAC database showed that our method significantly outperformed ClustalW2 and MEME. We further compared a PSSM method dependent on LASAGNA to an alignment-free TFBS search method. Results on 89 TFs whose binding sites can be located in genomes showed that our method is significantly more precise at fixed recall rates. Finally, we described LASAGNA-ChIP, a more sophisticated version for ChIP (Chromatin immunoprecipitation) experiments. Under the one-per-sequence model, it showed comparable performance with MEME in discovering motifs in ChIP-seq peak sequences. Conclusions We conclude that the LASAGNA algorithm is simple and effective in aligning variable-length binding sites. It has been integrated into a user-friendly webtool for TFBS search and visualization called LASAGNA-Search. The tool currently stores precomputed PSSM models for 189 TFs and 133 TFs built from TFBSs in the TRANSFAC Public database (release 7.0) and the ORegAnno database (08Nov10 dump), respectively. The webtool is available at http://biogrid.engr.uconn.edu/lasagna_search/. PMID:23522376

  9. Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins 4-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Leon A

    2015-10-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) 4-6 have important roles as modulators of IGF actions. IGFBP-4 and IGFBP-6 predominantly inhibit IGF actions, whereas IGFBP-5 may enhance these actions under some circumstances. IGFBP-6 is unique among the IGFBPs for its marked IGF-II binding preference. IGFBPs 4-6 are found in the circulation as binary complexes with IGFs that can enter tissues. Additionally, about half of the circulating IGFBP-5 is found in ternary complexes with IGFs and an acid labile subunit; this high molecular complex cannot leave the circulation and acts as an IGF reservoir. IGFBPs 4-6 also have IGF-independent actions. These IGFBPs are regulated in a cell-specific manner and their dysregulation may play a role in a range of diseases including cancer. However, there is no clear clinical indication for measuring serum levels of these IGFBPs at present. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Revealing kinetics and state-dependent binding properties of IKur-targeting drugs that maximize atrial fibrillation selectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellinwood, Nicholas; Dobrev, Dobromir; Morotti, Stefano; Grandi, Eleonora

    2017-09-01

    The KV1.5 potassium channel, which underlies the ultra-rapid delayed-rectifier current (IKur) and is predominantly expressed in atria vs. ventricles, has emerged as a promising target to treat atrial fibrillation (AF). However, while numerous KV1.5-selective compounds have been screened, characterized, and tested in various animal models of AF, evidence of antiarrhythmic efficacy in humans is still lacking. Moreover, current guidelines for pre-clinical assessment of candidate drugs heavily rely on steady-state concentration-response curves or IC50 values, which can overlook adverse cardiotoxic effects. We sought to investigate the effects of kinetics and state-dependent binding of IKur-targeting drugs on atrial electrophysiology in silico and reveal the ideal properties of IKur blockers that maximize anti-AF efficacy and minimize pro-arrhythmic risk. To this aim, we developed a new Markov model of IKur that describes KV1.5 gating based on experimental voltage-clamp data in atrial myocytes from patient right-atrial samples in normal sinus rhythm. We extended the IKur formulation to account for state-specificity and kinetics of KV1.5-drug interactions and incorporated it into our human atrial cell model. We simulated 1- and 3-Hz pacing protocols in drug-free conditions and with a [drug] equal to the IC50 value. The effects of binding and unbinding kinetics were determined by examining permutations of the forward (kon) and reverse (koff) binding rates to the closed, open, and inactivated states of the KV1.5 channel. We identified a subset of ideal drugs exhibiting anti-AF electrophysiological parameter changes at fast pacing rates (effective refractory period prolongation), while having little effect on normal sinus rhythm (limited action potential prolongation). Our results highlight that accurately accounting for channel interactions with drugs, including kinetics and state-dependent binding, is critical for developing safer and more effective pharmacological anti

  11. Colloidal nanoparticle size control: experimental and kinetic modeling investigation of the ligand–metal binding role in controlling the nucleation and growth kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozaffari, Saeed; Li, Wenhui; Thompson, Coogan B.; Ivanov, Sergei; Siefert, Soenke; Lee, Byeongdu; Kovarik, Libor; Karim, Ayman M.

    2017-09-04

    Despite the major advancements in colloidal metal nanoparticles synthesis, a quantitative mechanistic treatment of the ligand’s role in controlling the rates of nucleation and growth still remains elusive. In this work, we conducted a mechanistic investigation and kinetic modeling of the role of trioctylphosphine (TOP) in controlling the size of Pd nanoparticles in different solvents using in-situ small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). In both pyridine and toluene, slow nucleation which overlapped fast growth was observed under various synthetic conditions demonstrating the significant deviation of the particle formation pathway from the classical LaMer mechanism. We developed a novel kinetic model that, for the first time, accounts for both the nucleation and growth events through simultaneous fitting of number of nanoparticles (nucleation event) and their diameter (increase in number of atoms in nanoparticles from both nucleation and growth events) measured from in-situ SAXS. We show that the binding of TOP to both the Pd precursor and surface of Pd nanoparticles controls the nucleation and growth rates and is necessary to capture the evolution of diameter and number of particles during synthesis. The kinetic model was used to predict the synthetic conditions to control the Pd nanoparticle size from 1.1 to 4.6 nm, and the experimental results showed an excellent quantitative agreement. Additionally, our model was used to quantitatively explain the effect of ligand/metal ratio on the final size of Pd and Au nanoparticles reported in the literature. More importantly, we demonstrate that the final nanoparticle size can be determined using a single unique kinetic descriptor: Growth-to-Nucleation rate ratio to the power of 1/3, which is model independent, and remarkably applies to all the conditions studied in this work and several results from the literature despite the very different ligands, solvents and concentrations used. Our kinetic model, while simple, can

  12. Characterization of Binding Sites of Eukaryotic Transcription Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Qian; Jimmy Lin; Donald J. Zack

    2006-01-01

    To explore the nature of eukaryotic transcription factor (TF) binding sites and determine how they differ from surrounding DNA sequences, we examined four features associated with DNA binding sites: G+C content, pattern complexity,palindromic structure, and Markov sequence ordering. Our analysis of the regulatory motifs obtained from the TRANSFAC database, using yeast intergenic sequences as background, revealed that these four features show variable enrichment in motif sequences. For example, motif sequences were more likely to have palindromic structure than were background sequences. In addition, these features were tightly localized to the regulatory motifs, indicating that they are a property of the motif sequences themselves and are not shared by the general promoter "environment" in which the regulatory motifs reside. By breaking down the motif sequences according to the TF classes to which they bind, more specific associations were identified. Finally, we found that some correlations, such as G+C content enrichment, were species-specific, while others, such as complexity enrichment, were universal across the species examined. The quantitative analysis provided here should increase our understanding of protein-DNA interactions and also help facilitate the discovery of regulatory motifs through bioinformatics.

  13. Kinetics of Cation and Oxyanion Adsorption and Desorption on Ferrihydrite: Roles of Ferrihydrite Binding Sites and a Unified Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Lei [School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510006, People’s Republic of China; The Key Lab of Pollution Control and Ecosystem Restoration in Industry; Shi, Zhenqing [School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510006, People’s Republic of China; The Key Lab of Pollution Control and Ecosystem Restoration in Industry; Lu, Yang [School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510006, People’s Republic of China; The Key Lab of Pollution Control and Ecosystem Restoration in Industry; Dohnalkova, Alice C. [Environmental; Lin, Zhang [School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510006, People’s Republic of China; The Key Lab of Pollution Control and Ecosystem Restoration in Industry; Dang, Zhi [School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510006, People’s Republic of China; The Key Lab of Pollution Control and Ecosystem Restoration in Industry

    2017-08-29

    Understanding the kinetics of toxic ion reactions with ferrihydrite is crucial for predicting the dynamic behavior of contaminants in soil environments. In this study, the kinetics of As(V), Cr(VI), Cu, and Pb adsorption and desorption on ferrihydrite were investigated with a combination of laboratory macroscopic experiments, microscopic investigation and mechanistic modeling. The rates of As(V), Cr(VI), Cu, and Pb adsorption and desorption on ferrihydrite, as systematically studied using a stirred-flow method, was highly dependent on the reaction pH and metal concentrations and varied significantly among four metals. Spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-STEM) showed, at sub-nano scales, all four metals were distributed within the ferrihydrite particle aggregates homogeneously after adsorption reactions, with no evidence of surface diffusion-controlled processes. Based on experimental results, we developed a unifying kinetics model for both cation and oxyanion adsorption/desorption on ferrihydrite based on the mechanistic-based equilibrium model CD-MUSIC. Overall, the model described the kinetic results well, and we quantitatively demonstrated how the equilibrium properties of the cation and oxyanion binding to various ferrihydrite sites affected the adsorption and desorption rates. Our results provided a unifying quantitative modeling method for the kinetics of both cation and oxyanion adsorption/desorption on iron minerals.

  14. Clumping factor A, von Willebrand factor-binding protein and von Willebrand factor anchor Staphylococcus aureus to the vessel wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, J; Liesenborghs, L; Peetermans, M; Veloso, T R; Missiakas, D; Schneewind, O; Mancini, S; Entenza, J M; Hoylaerts, M F; Heying, R; Verhamme, P; Vanassche, T

    2017-02-09

    Essentials Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) binds to endothelium via von Willebrand factor (VWF). Secreted VWF-binding protein (vWbp) mediates S. aureus adhesion to VWF under shear stress. vWbp interacts with VWF and the Sortase A-dependent surface protein Clumping factor A (ClfA). VWF-vWbp-ClfA anchor S. aureus to vascular endothelium under shear stress.

  15. SEEKR: Simulation Enabled Estimation of Kinetic Rates, A Computational Tool to Estimate Molecular Kinetics and Its Application to Trypsin-Benzamidine Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Votapka, Lane W; Jagger, Benjamin R; Heyneman, Alexandra L; Amaro, Rommie E

    2017-04-20

    We present the Simulation Enabled Estimation of Kinetic Rates (SEEKR) package, a suite of open-source scripts and tools designed to enable researchers to perform multiscale computation of the kinetics of molecular binding, unbinding, and transport using a combination of molecular dynamics, Brownian dynamics, and milestoning theory. To demonstrate its utility, we compute the kon, koff, and ΔGbind for the protein trypsin with its noncovalent binder, benzamidine, and examine the kinetics and other results generated in the context of the new software, and compare our findings to previous studies performed on the same system. We compute a kon estimate of (2.1 ± 0.3) × 10(7) M(-1) s(-1), a koff estimate of 83 ± 14 s(-1), and a ΔGbind of -7.4 ± 0.1 kcal·mol(-1), all of which compare closely to the experimentally measured values of 2.9 × 10(7) M(-1) s(-1), 600 ± 300 s(-1), and -6.71 ± 0.05 kcal·mol(-1), respectively.

  16. Optical Biosensing: Kinetics of Protein A-IGG Binding Using Biolayer Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jo Leanna; Scott, Israel M.; McMurry, Jonathan L.

    2010-01-01

    An undergraduate biochemistry laboratory experiment has been developed using biolayer interferometry (BLI), an optical biosensing technique similar to surface plasmon resonance (SPR), in which students obtain and analyze kinetic data for a protein-protein interaction. Optical biosensing is a technique of choice to determine kinetic and affinity…

  17. Identification of a Kinetically Significant Anion Binding (KISAB) Site in the N-Lobe of Human Serum Transferrin†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Shaina L.; Steere, Ashley N.; Chasteen, N. Dennis; Mason, Anne B.

    2011-01-01

    Human serum transferrin (hTF) binds two ferric iron ions which are delivered to cells in a transferrin receptor (TFR) mediated process. Critical to the delivery of iron to cells is the binding of hTF to the TFR and the efficient release of iron orchestrated by the interaction. Within the endosome, iron release from hTF is also aided by lower pH, the presence of anions, and a chelator yet to be identified. We have recently shown that three of the four residues comprising a loop in the N-lobe (Pro142, Lys144, and Pro145) are critical to the high-affinity interaction of hTF with the TFR. In contrast, Arg143 in this loop does not participate in the binding isotherm. In the current study, the kinetics of iron release from alanine mutants of each of these four residues (placed into both diferric and monoferric N-lobe backgrounds) have been determined ± the TFR. The R143A mutation greatly retards the rate of iron release from the N-lobe in the absence of the TFR but has considerably less of an effect in its presence. Our data definitively show that Arg143 serves as a kinetically significant anion binding (KISAB) site that is, by definition, sensitive to salt concentration and critical to the conformational change necessary to induce iron release from the N-lobe of hTF (in the absence of the TFR). This is the first identification of an authentic KISAB site in the N-lobe of hTF. The effect of the single R143A mutation on the kinetic profile of iron release provides a dramatic illustration of the dynamic nature of hTF. PMID:20397659

  18. Identification of a kinetically significant anion binding (KISAB) site in the N-lobe of human serum transferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Shaina L; Steere, Ashley N; Chasteen, N Dennis; Mason, Anne B

    2010-05-18

    Human serum transferrin (hTF) binds two ferric iron ions which are delivered to cells in a transferrin receptor (TFR) mediated process. Critical to the delivery of iron to cells is the binding of hTF to the TFR and the efficient release of iron orchestrated by the interaction. Within the endosome, iron release from hTF is also aided by lower pH, the presence of anions, and a chelator yet to be identified. We have recently shown that three of the four residues comprising a loop in the N-lobe (Pro142, Lys144, and Pro145) are critical to the high-affinity interaction of hTF with the TFR. In contrast, Arg143 in this loop does not participate in the binding isotherm. In the current study, the kinetics of iron release from alanine mutants of each of these four residues (placed into both diferric and monoferric N-lobe backgrounds) have been determined +/- the TFR. The R143A mutation greatly retards the rate of iron release from the N-lobe in the absence of the TFR but has considerably less of an effect in its presence. Our data definitively show that Arg143 serves as a kinetically significant anion binding (KISAB) site that is, by definition, sensitive to salt concentration and critical to the conformational change necessary to induce iron release from the N-lobe of hTF (in the absence of the TFR). This is the first identification of an authentic KISAB site in the N-lobe of hTF. The effect of the single R143A mutation on the kinetic profile of iron release provides a dramatic illustration of the dynamic nature of hTF.

  19. Kinetic analysis of ligand binding to the Ehrlich cell nucleoside transporter: Pharmacological characterization of allosteric interactions with the sup 3 Hnitrobenzylthioinosine binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammond, J.R. (Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Western Ontario, London (Canada))

    1991-06-01

    Kinetic analysis of the binding of {sup 3}Hnitrobenzylthioinosine ({sup 3}H NBMPR) to Ehrlich ascites tumor cell plasma membranes was conducted in the presence and absence of a variety of nucleoside transport inhibitors and substrates. The association of {sup 3}H NBMPR with Ehrlich cell membranes occurred in two distinct phases, possibly reflecting functional conformation changes in the {sup 3}HNBMPR binding site/nucleoside transporter complex. Inhibitors of the equilibrium binding of {sup 3}HNBMPR, tested at submaximal inhibitory concentrations, generally decreased the rate of association of {sup 3}HNBMPR, but the magnitude of this effect varied significantly with the agent tested. Adenosine and diazepam had relatively minor effects on the association rate, whereas dipyridamole and mioflazine slowed the rate dramatically. Inhibitors of nucleoside transport also decreased the rate of dissociation of {sup 3}HNBMPR, with an order of potency significantly different from their relative potencies as inhibitors of the equilibrium binding of {sup 3}HNBMPR. Dilazep, dipyridamole, and mioflazine were effective inhibitors of both {sup 3}HNBMPR dissociation and equilibrium binding. The lidoflazine analogue R75231, on the other hand, had no effect on the rate of dissociation of {sup 3}HNBMPR at concentrations below 300 microM, even though it was one of the most potent inhibitors of {sup 3}HNBMPR binding tested (Ki less than 100 nM). In contrast, a series of natural substrates for the nucleoside transport system enhanced the rate of dissociation of {sup 3}HNBMPR with an order of effectiveness that paralleled their relative affinities for the permeant site of the transporter. The most effective enhancers of {sup 3}HNBMPR dissociation, however, were the benzodiazepines diazepam, chlordiazepoxide, and triazolam.

  20. High molecular weight kininogen binds to laminin--characterization and kinetic analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, Inger; Nystrøm, Birthe

    2009-01-01

    proteins laminin, but not to vitronectin or fibronectin coated on microtiter plates. The binding to laminin was Zn2+ independent. However, at low but not at high concentrations of albumin, Zn2+ increased the affinity for the binding by abolishing an inhibitory effect of Ca2+. Recombinant human kininostatin...... encompassing the amino acid sequence, Arg439-Ser532 but not the endothelial cell binding peptide sequence (His479-His498; HKH20) within kininostatin inhibited the binding of HKa to laminin. This established that the amino acid sequence Arg439-Lys478 in domain 5 of HK is of importance for its binding to laminin....... Extensive proteolytic cleavage of HK and HKa with kallikrein abolished the binding to laminin, releasing a 12 kDa anti-kininostatin reacting peptide. On the basis of these results, we propose that the binding of HK to laminin is a primary event, which secures proper localization of the cleavage products...

  1. Heterogeneity in rhesus macaque complement factor H binding to meningococcal factor H binding protein (FHbp) informs selection of primates to assess immunogenicity of FHbp-based vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beernink, Peter T; Shaughnessy, Jutamas; Stefek, Heather; Ram, Sanjay; Granoff, Dan M

    2014-11-01

    Neisseria meningitidis causes disease only in humans. An important mechanism underlying this host specificity is the ability of the organism to resist complement by recruiting the complement downregulator factor H (FH) to the bacterial surface. In previous studies, binding of FH to one of the major meningococcal FH ligands, factor H binding protein (FHbp), was reported to be specific for human FH. Here we report that sera from 23 of 73 rhesus macaques (32%) tested had high FH binding to FHbp. Similar to human FH, binding of macaque FH to the meningococcal cell surface inhibited the complement alternative pathway by decreasing deposition of C3b. FH contains 20 domains (or short consensus repeats), with domains 6 and 7 being responsible for binding of human FH to FHbp. DNA sequence analyses of FH domains 6 and 7 from macaques with high or low FH binding showed a polymorphism at residue 352 in domain 6, with Tyr being associated with high binding and His with low binding. A recombinant macaque FH 6,7/Fc fragment with Tyr352 showed higher binding to FHbp than the corresponding fragment with His352. In previous studies in human FH transgenic mice, binding of FH to FHbp vaccines decreased protective antibody responses, and mutant FHbp vaccines with decreased FH binding elicited serum antibodies with greater protective activity. Thus, macaques with high FH binding to FHbp represent an attractive nonhuman primate model to investigate further the effects of FH binding on the immunogenicity of FHbp vaccines.

  2. Prediction of nucleosome positioning based on transcription factor binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianfu Yi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The DNA of all eukaryotic organisms is packaged into nucleosomes, the basic repeating units of chromatin. The nucleosome consists of a histone octamer around which a DNA core is wrapped and the linker histone H1, which is associated with linker DNA. By altering the accessibility of DNA sequences, the nucleosome has profound effects on all DNA-dependent processes. Understanding the factors that influence nucleosome positioning is of great importance for the study of genomic control mechanisms. Transcription factors (TFs have been suggested to play a role in nucleosome positioning in vivo. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, the minimum redundancy maximum relevance (mRMR feature selection algorithm, the nearest neighbor algorithm (NNA, and the incremental feature selection (IFS method were used to identify the most important TFs that either favor or inhibit nucleosome positioning by analyzing the numbers of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs in 53,021 nucleosomal DNA sequences and 50,299 linker DNA sequences. A total of nine important families of TFs were extracted from 35 families, and the overall prediction accuracy was 87.4% as evaluated by the jackknife cross-validation test. CONCLUSIONS: Our results are consistent with the notion that TFs are more likely to bind linker DNA sequences than the sequences in the nucleosomes. In addition, our results imply that there may be some TFs that are important for nucleosome positioning but that play an insignificant role in discriminating nucleosome-forming DNA sequences from nucleosome-inhibiting DNA sequences. The hypothesis that TFs play a role in nucleosome positioning is, thus, confirmed by the results of this study.

  3. Heterogeneity in Rhesus Macaque Complement Factor H Binding to Meningococcal Factor H Binding Protein (FHbp) Informs Selection of Primates To Assess Immunogenicity of FHbp-Based Vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis causes disease only in humans. An important mechanism underlying this host specificity is the ability of the organism to resist complement by recruiting the complement downregulator factor H (FH) to the bacterial surface. In previous studies, binding of FH to one of the major meningococcal FH ligands, factor H binding protein (FHbp), was reported to be specific for human FH. Here we report that sera from 23 of 73 rhesus macaques (32%) tested had high FH binding to FHbp....

  4. Effects of cytosine methylation on transcription factor binding sites

    KAUST Repository

    Medvedeva, Yulia A

    2014-03-26

    Background: DNA methylation in promoters is closely linked to downstream gene repression. However, whether DNA methylation is a cause or a consequence of gene repression remains an open question. If it is a cause, then DNA methylation may affect the affinity of transcription factors (TFs) for their binding sites (TFBSs). If it is a consequence, then gene repression caused by chromatin modification may be stabilized by DNA methylation. Until now, these two possibilities have been supported only by non-systematic evidence and they have not been tested on a wide range of TFs. An average promoter methylation is usually used in studies, whereas recent results suggested that methylation of individual cytosines can also be important.Results: We found that the methylation profiles of 16.6% of cytosines and the expression profiles of neighboring transcriptional start sites (TSSs) were significantly negatively correlated. We called the CpGs corresponding to such cytosines " traffic lights" We observed a strong selection against CpG " traffic lights" within TFBSs. The negative selection was stronger for transcriptional repressors as compared with transcriptional activators or multifunctional TFs as well as for core TFBS positions as compared with flanking TFBS positions.Conclusions: Our results indicate that direct and selective methylation of certain TFBS that prevents TF binding is restricted to special cases and cannot be considered as a general regulatory mechanism of transcription. 2013 Medvedeva et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  5. Kinetic mechanism for HIV-1 neutralization by antibody 2G12 entails reversible glycan binding that slows cell entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Emily J; Gomes, Michelle M; Kabat, David

    2012-05-15

    Despite structural knowledge of broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (NMAbs) complexed to HIV-1 gp120 and gp41 envelope glycoproteins, virus inactivation mechanisms have been difficult to prove, in part because neutralization assays are complex and were previously not understood. Concordant with recent evidence that HIV-1 titers are determined by a race between entry of cell-attached virions and competing inactivation processes, we show that NMAb 2G12, which binds to gp120 N-glycans with α (1, 2)-linked mannose termini and inhibits replication after passive transfer into patients, neutralizes by slowing entry of adsorbed virions. Accordingly, apparent neutralization is attenuated when a kinetically competing virus inactivation pathway is blocked. Moreover, removing 2G12 from media causes its dissociation from virions coupled to accelerated entry and restored infectivity, demonstrating the reversibility of neutralization. A difference between 2G12 dissociation and infectivity recovery rates implies that the inhibited complexes at virus-cell junctions contain several 2G12's that must dissociate before entry commences. Quantitative microscopy of 2G12 binding and dissociation from single virions and studies using a split CCR5 coreceptor suggest that 2G12 competitively inhibits interactions between gp120's V3 loop and the tyrosine sulfate-containing CCR5 amino terminus, thereby reducing assembly of complexes that catalyze entry. These results reveal a unique reversible kinetic mechanism for neutralization by an antibody that binds near a critical V3 region in the glycan shield of gp120.

  6. Trigger Factor Binds to Ribosome-Signal-Recognition Particle (SRP) Complexes and Is Excluded by Binding of the SRP Receptor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Iwona Buskiewicz; Elke Deuerling; Shan-Qing Gu; Johannes Jöckel; Marina V. Rodnina; Bernd Bukau; Wolfgang Wintermeyer; Thomas A. Steitz

    2004-01-01

    Trigger factor (TF) and signal recognition particle (SRP) bind to the bacterial ribosome and are both crosslinked to protein L23 at the peptide exit, where they interact with emerging nascent peptide chains...

  7. MONKEY: Identifying conserved transcription-factor binding sitesin multiple alignments using a binding site-specific evolutionarymodel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Pollard, Daniel A.; Iyer, VenkyN.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2004-10-28

    We introduce a method (MONKEY) to identify conserved transcription-factor binding sites in multispecies alignments. MONKEY employs probabilistic models of factor specificity and binding site evolution, on which basis we compute the likelihood that putative sites are conserved and assign statistical significance to each hit. Using genomes from the genus Saccharomyces, we illustrate how the significance of real sites increases with evolutionary distance and explore the relationship between conservation and function.

  8. Binding kinetics of aptamers to gp120 derived from HIV-1 subtype C

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Millroy, L

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are artificial nucleic acid ligands that can be engineered to bind with high specificity to a macromolecule. Their binding specificity and small size allow for a range of therapeutic applications. One avenue of research is to develop...

  9. The kinetics of the hydrogen/deuterium exchange of epidermal growth factor receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iloro, Ibon; Narváez, Daniel; Guillén, Nancy; Camacho, Carlos M; Guillén, Lalisse; Cora, Elsa; Pastrana-Ríos, Belinda

    2008-05-15

    Five highly homologous epidermal growth factor receptor ligands were studied by mass spectral analysis, hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange via attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, and two-dimensional correlation analysis. These studies were performed to determine the order of events during the exchange process, the extent of H/D exchange, and associated kinetics of exchange for a comparative analysis of these ligands. Furthermore, the secondary structure composition of amphiregulin (AR) and heparin-binding-epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF) was determined. All ligands were found to have similar contributions of 3(10)-helix and random coil with varying contributions of beta-sheets and beta-turns. The extent of exchange was 40%, 65%, 55%, 65%, and 98% for EGF, transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha), AR, HB-EGF, and epiregulin (ER), respectively. The rate constants were determined and classified as fast, intermediate, and slow: for EGF the 0.20 min(-1) (Tyr), 0.09 min(-1) (Arg, beta-turns), and 1.88 x 10(-3) min(-1) (beta-sheets and 3(10)-helix); and for TGF-alpha 0.91 min(-1) (Tyr), 0.27 min(-1) (Arg, beta-turns), and 1.41 x 10(-4) min(-1) (beta-sheets). The time constants for AR 0.47 min(-1) (Tyr), 0.04 min(-1) (Arg), and 1.00 x 10(-4) min(-1) (buried 3(10)-helix, beta-turns, and beta-sheets); for HB-EGF 0.89 min(-1) (Tyr), 0.14 min(-1) (Arg and 3(10)-helix), and 1.00 x 10(-3) min(-1) (buried 3(10)-helix, beta-sheets, and beta-turns); and for epiregulin 0.16 min(-1) (Tyr), 0.03 min(-1) (Arg), and 1.00 x 10(-4) min(-1) (3(10)-helix and beta-sheets). These results provide essential information toward understanding secondary structure, H/D exchange kinetics, and solvation of these epidermal growth factor receptor ligands in their unbound state.

  10. Kinetic mechanism and order of substrate binding for sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase from squash (Cucurbita moschata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayman, Matthew W; Fawcett, Tony; Slabas, Antoni R

    2002-03-13

    sn-Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (G3PAT, EC 2.3.1.15), a component of glycerolipid biosynthesis, is an important enzyme in chilling sensitivity in plants. The three-dimensional structure of the enzyme from squash (Cucurbita moschata), without bound substrate, has been determined [Turnbull et al. (2001) Acta Crystallogr. D 57, 451-453; Turnbull et al. (2001) Structure 9, 347-353]. Here we report the kinetic mechanism of plastidial G3PAT from squash and the order of substrate binding using acyl-acyl carrier protein (acyl-ACP) substrates. The reaction proceeds via a compulsory-ordered ternary complex with acyl-ACP binding before glycerol-3-phosphate. We have also determined that the reaction will proceed with C(4:0)-CoA, C(6:0)-CoA and C(12:0)-ACP substrates, allowing a wider choice of acyl groups for future co-crystallisation studies.

  11. Kinetics of membrane binding and dissociation of 5-fluorouracil by pulsed-field-gradient 19F NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshii, Noriyuki; Okamura, Emiko

    2009-06-01

    The kinetics of membrane binding and dissociation of an anticancer drug, 5-fluorouracil (5FU) is quantified by high resolution NMR with the pulsed-field-gradient technique. The 19F NMR signal of 5FU is analyzed at 293-313 K by the solution of Bloch equation with exchange terms. The rate constants of 5FU binding and dissociation are 0.2 and 4.1 s -1 at 303 K. The 5FU motion in the vertical direction to the membrane surface is restricted as compared with the lateral diffusion, judging from the activation energy (57 kJ/mol) larger than the lateral diffusion in membrane (26 kJ/mol [E. Okamura, N. Yoshii, J. Chem. Phys. 129 (2008) 215102]).

  12. Mutations and binding sites of human transcription factors

    KAUST Repository

    Kamanu, Frederick Kinyua

    2012-06-01

    Mutations in any genome may lead to phenotype characteristics that determine ability of an individual to cope with adaptation to environmental challenges. In studies of human biology, among the most interesting ones are phenotype characteristics that determine responses to drug treatments, response to infections, or predisposition to specific inherited diseases. Most of the research in this field has been focused on the studies of mutation effects on the final gene products, peptides, and their alterations. Considerably less attention was given to the mutations that may affect regulatory mechanism(s) of gene expression, although these may also affect the phenotype characteristics. In this study we make a pilot analysis of mutations observed in the regulatory regions of 24,667 human RefSeq genes. Our study reveals that out of eight studied mutation types, insertions are the only one that in a statistically significant manner alters predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs). We also find that 25 families of TFBSs have been altered by mutations in a statistically significant manner in the promoter regions we considered. Moreover, we find that the related transcription factors are, for example, prominent in processes related to intracellular signaling; cell fate; morphogenesis of organs and epithelium; development of urogenital system, epithelium, and tube; neuron fate commitment. Our study highlights the significance of studying mutations within the genes regulatory regions and opens way for further detailed investigations on this topic, particularly on the downstream affected pathways. 2012 Kamanu, Medvedeva, Schaefer, Jankovic, Archer and Bajic.

  13. Factor XII binding to endothelial cells depends on caveolae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, Inger; Thomsen, Peter; van Deurs, Bo

    2004-01-01

    to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) has never been shown to be localized to these specialized membrane structures. Using microscopical techniques, we here report that FXII binds to specific patches of the HUVEC plasma membrane with a high density of caveolae. Further investigations of FXII...... lipid rafts. Accordingly, cholesterol-depleted cells were found to bind significantly reduced amounts of FXII. These observations, combined with the presence of a minority of u-PAR in caveolae concomitant with FXII binding, indicate that FXII binding to u-PAR may be secondary and depends upon...... the structural elements within caveolae. Thus, FXII binding to HUVEC depends on intact caveolae on the cellular surface....

  14. Osmotic Stress Regulates the Strength and Kinetics of Sugar Binding to Maltoporin Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnev, Philip A; Harries, Daniel; Parsegian, V Adrian; Bezrukov, Sergey M

    2011-01-01

    We study the effect of osmotic stress, exerted by salts, on carbohydrate binding to the sugar-specific bacterial channel maltoporin. When the channel is reconstituted into planar lipid bilayers, single events of its occlusion by sugar are seen as transient interruptions in the flow of small ions. We find that, for most salts, changes in the free energy of maltoporin-sugar binding vary linearly with solution osmotic pressure. Such a change in binding with solution osmolarity indicates that for each salt a constant number of salt-excluding water molecules is released upon sugar-maltoporin association at all salt concentrations. We find that larger numbers of water molecules are released upon binding of the cyclic carbohydrate β-cyclodextrin (CD) than upon binding of the corresponding linear homologue maltoheptaose (m7). Remarkably, the extent to which salts affect the binding constant depends sensitively on the type of salt; dehydration in solutions of different anions corresponds to the Hofmeister series. In sodium sulfate solutions, CD and m7 respectively release about 120 and 35 water molecules; in sodium chloride solutions, 35 and 15 waters. No water release is observed with sodium bromide. Finally, by adding adamantane, known to form an inclusion complex with CD, we can infer that CD not only dehydrates but also undergoes a conformational change upon binding to the channel. Our results demonstrate how osmotic stress can improve single-molecule detection of different solutes using protein-based nanopores. PMID:21339598

  15. Osmotic stress regulates the strength and kinetics of sugar binding to the maltoporin channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnev, Philip A; Harries, Daniel; Parsegian, V Adrian; Bezrukov, Sergey M

    2010-11-17

    We study the effect of osmotic stress, exerted by salts, on carbohydrate binding to the sugar-specific bacterial channel maltoporin. When the channel is reconstituted into planar lipid bilayers, single events of its occlusion by sugar are seen as transient interruptions in the flow of small ions. We find that, for most salts, changes in the free energy of maltoporin-sugar binding vary linearly with solution osmotic pressure. Such a change in binding with solution osmolarity indicates that for each salt a constant number of salt-excluding water molecules is released upon sugar-maltoporin association at all salt concentrations. We find that larger numbers of water molecules are released upon binding of the cyclic carbohydrate β-cyclodextrin (CD) than upon binding of the corresponding linear homologue maltoheptaose (m7). Remarkably, the extent to which salts affect the binding constants and rates depends sensitively on the type of salt; dehydration in solutions of different anions corresponds to the Hofmeister series. In sodium sulfate solutions, CD and m7 respectively release about 120 and 35 salt-excluding water molecules; in sodium chloride solutions, 35 and 15 waters. No water release is observed with sodium bromide. Finally, by adding adamantane, known to form an inclusion complex with CD, we can infer that CD not only dehydrates but also undergoes a conformational change upon binding to the channel. As a practical outcome, our results also demonstrate how osmotic stress can improve single-molecule detection of different solutes using protein-based nanopores.

  16. Kinetics of Antibody Binding to Membranes of Living Bacteria Measured by a Photonic Crystal-Based Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostova, Ekaterina; Ben Adiba, Carine; Dietler, Giovanni; Sekatskii, Sergey K.

    2016-01-01

    Optical biosensors based on photonic crystal surface waves (PC SWs) offer a possibility to study binding interactions with living cells, overcoming the limitation of rather small evanescent field penetration depth into a sample medium that is characteristic for typical optical biosensors. Besides this, simultaneous excitation of s- and p-polarized surface waves with different penetration depths is realized here, permitting unambiguous separation of surface and volume contributions to the measured signal. PC-based biosensors do not require a bulk signal correction, compared to widely used surface plasmon resonance-based devices. We developed a chitosan-based protocol of PC chip functionalization for bacterial attachment and performed experiments on antibody binding to living bacteria measured in real time by the PCSW-based biosensor. Data analysis reveals specific binding and gives the value of the dissociation constant for monoclonal antibodies (IgG2b) against bacterial lipopolysaccharides equal to KD = 6.2 ± 3.4 nM. To our knowledge, this is a first demonstration of antibody-binding kinetics to living bacteria by a label-free optical biosensor. PMID:27727183

  17. Kinetics of Antibody Binding to Membranes of Living Bacteria Measured by a Photonic Crystal-Based Biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostova, Ekaterina; Ben Adiba, Carine; Dietler, Giovanni; Sekatskii, Sergey K

    2016-10-11

    Optical biosensors based on photonic crystal surface waves (PC SWs) offer a possibility to study binding interactions with living cells, overcoming the limitation of rather small evanescent field penetration depth into a sample medium that is characteristic for typical optical biosensors. Besides this, simultaneous excitation of s- and p-polarized surface waves with different penetration depths is realized here, permitting unambiguous separation of surface and volume contributions to the measured signal. PC-based biosensors do not require a bulk signal correction, compared to widely used surface plasmon resonance-based devices. We developed a chitosan-based protocol of PC chip functionalization for bacterial attachment and performed experiments on antibody binding to living bacteria measured in real time by the PCSW-based biosensor. Data analysis reveals specific binding and gives the value of the dissociation constant for monoclonal antibodies (IgG2b) against bacterial lipopolysaccharides equal to KD = 6.2 ± 3.4 nM. To our knowledge, this is a first demonstration of antibody-binding kinetics to living bacteria by a label-free optical biosensor.

  18. Kinetics of Antibody Binding to Membranes of Living Bacteria Measured by a Photonic Crystal-Based Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Rostova

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Optical biosensors based on photonic crystal surface waves (PC SWs offer a possibility to study binding interactions with living cells, overcoming the limitation of rather small evanescent field penetration depth into a sample medium that is characteristic for typical optical biosensors. Besides this, simultaneous excitation of s- and p-polarized surface waves with different penetration depths is realized here, permitting unambiguous separation of surface and volume contributions to the measured signal. PC-based biosensors do not require a bulk signal correction, compared to widely used surface plasmon resonance-based devices. We developed a chitosan-based protocol of PC chip functionalization for bacterial attachment and performed experiments on antibody binding to living bacteria measured in real time by the PCSW-based biosensor. Data analysis reveals specific binding and gives the value of the dissociation constant for monoclonal antibodies (IgG2b against bacterial lipopolysaccharides equal to KD = 6.2 ± 3.4 nM. To our knowledge, this is a first demonstration of antibody-binding kinetics to living bacteria by a label-free optical biosensor.

  19. The DNA Binding Activity of p53 Displays Reaction-Diffusion Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinow, Peter; Rogers, Carl E.; Barbieri, Christopher E.; Pietenpol, Jennifer A.; Kenworthy, Anne K.; DiBenedetto, Emmanuele

    2006-01-01

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 plays a key role in maintaining the genomic stability of mammalian cells and preventing malignant transformation. In this study, we investigated the intracellular diffusion of a p53-GFP fusion protein using confocal fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. We show that the diffusion of p53-GFP within the nucleus is well described by a mathematical model for diffusion of particles that bind temporarily to a spatially homogeneous immobile structure with binding and release rates k1 and k2, respectively. The diffusion constant of p53-GFP was estimated to be Dp53-GFP = 15.4 μm2 s−1, significantly slower than that of GFP alone, DGFP = 41.6 μm2 s−1. The reaction rates of the binding and unbinding of p53-GFP were estimated as k1 = 0.3 s−1 and k2 = 0.4 s−1, respectively, values suggestive of nonspecific binding. Consistent with this finding, the diffusional mobilities of tumor-derived sequence-specific DNA binding mutants of p53 were indistinguishable from that of the wild-type protein. These data are consistent with a model in which, under steady-state conditions, p53 is latent and continuously scans DNA, requiring activation for sequence-specific DNA binding. PMID:16603489

  20. Antigen-antibody selective recognition using LiTaO3 SH-SAW sensors: investigations on macromolecules effects on binding kinetic constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergaoui, Y.; Zerrouki, C.; Fourati, N.; Fougnion, J. M.; Abdelghani, A.

    2011-10-01

    A gravimetric surface acoustic wave (SAW) biosensor, based on the biotin-streptavidin and antistreptavidin-streptavidin recognitions, has been carried out. A network analyser and a pulse excitation technique were used to monitor both amplitude and phase changes. The SAW biosensor presented a total selective recognition of streptavidin-antistreptavidin and HRPstreptavidin-antistreptavidin. The presence of HRP (Horseradish peroxidase) affects neither the selectivity nor the sensitivity (of order of 0.25°/nM) of the biosensor, nevertheless, it causes a reduction of binding kinetics by a factor ranging between 2 to 5, as well as a diminution of antistreptavidin saturation concentration (of 40%). Results showed that equilibrium constants can be different, depending on evaluation method (from saturation values or from linear part of the output signal variation according to solution concentration).

  1. Mechanisms of in vivo binding site selection of the hematopoietic master transcription factor PU.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Thu-Hang; Minderjahn, Julia; Schmidl, Christian; Hoffmeister, Helen; Schmidhofer, Sandra; Chen, Wei; Längst, Gernot; Benner, Christopher; Rehli, Michael

    2013-07-01

    The transcription factor PU.1 is crucial for the development of many hematopoietic lineages and its binding patterns significantly change during differentiation processes. However, the 'rules' for binding or not-binding of potential binding sites are only partially understood. To unveil basic characteristics of PU.1 binding site selection in different cell types, we studied the binding properties of PU.1 during human macrophage differentiation. Using in vivo and in vitro binding assays, as well as computational prediction, we show that PU.1 selects its binding sites primarily based on sequence affinity, which results in the frequent autonomous binding of high affinity sites in DNase I inaccessible regions (25-45% of all occupied sites). Increasing PU.1 concentrations and the availability of cooperative transcription factor interactions during lineage differentiation both decrease affinity thresholds for in vivo binding and fine-tune cell type-specific PU.1 binding, which seems to be largely independent of DNA methylation. Occupied sites were predominantly detected in active chromatin domains, which are characterized by higher densities of PU.1 recognition sites and neighboring motifs for cooperative transcription factors. Our study supports a model of PU.1 binding control that involves motif-binding affinity, PU.1 concentration, cooperativeness with neighboring transcription factor sites and chromatin domain accessibility, which likely applies to all PU.1 expressing cells.

  2. Chlamydial entry involves TARP binding of guanine nucleotide exchange factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Josh Lane

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis attachment to cells induces the secretion of the elementary body-associated protein TARP (Translocated Actin Recruiting Protein. TARP crosses the plasma membrane where it is immediately phosphorylated at tyrosine residues by unknown host kinases. The Rac GTPase is also activated, resulting in WAVE2 and Arp2/3-dependent recruitment of actin to the sites of chlamydia attachment. We show that TARP participates directly in chlamydial invasion activating the Rac-dependent signaling cascade to recruit actin. TARP functions by binding two distinct Rac guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs, Sos1 and Vav2, in a phosphotyrosine-dependent manner. The tyrosine phosphorylation profile of the sequence YEPISTENIYESI within TARP, as well as the transient activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K, appears to determine which GEF is utilized to activate Rac. The first and second tyrosine residues, when phosphorylated, are utilized by the Sos1/Abi1/Eps8 and Vav2, respectively, with the latter requiring the lipid phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate. Depletion of these critical signaling molecules by siRNA resulted in inhibition of chlamydial invasion to varying degrees, owing to a possible functional redundancy of the two pathways. Collectively, these data implicate TARP in signaling to the actin cytoskeleton remodeling machinery, demonstrating a mechanism by which C.trachomatis invades non-phagocytic cells.

  3. Base-sequence specificity of Hoechst 33258 and DAPI binding to five (A/T)4 DNA sites with kinetic evidence for more than one high-affinity Hoechst 33258-AATT complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breusegem, Sophia Y; Clegg, Robert M; Loontiens, Frank G

    2002-02-01

    The binding of Hoechst 33258 and DAPI to five different (A/T)4 sequences in a stable DNA hairpin was studied exploiting the substantial increase in dye fluorescence upon binding. The two dyes have comparable affinities for the AATT site (e.g. association constant K(a)=5.5 x 10(8) M(-1) for DAPI), and their affinities decrease in the series AATT > TAAT approximately equal to ATAT > TATA approximately equal to TTAA. The extreme values of K(a) differ by a factor of 200 for Hoechst 33258 but only 30 for DAPI. The binding kinetics of Hoechst 33258 were measured by stopped-flow under pseudo-first order conditions with an (A/T)4 site in excess. The lower-resolution experiments can be well represented by single exponential processes, corresponding to a single-step binding mechanism. The calculated association-rate parameters for the five (A/T)4 sites are similar (2.46 x 10(8) M(-1) s(-1) to 0.86 x 10(8) M(-1) s(-1)) and nearly diffusion-controlled, while the dissociation-rate parameters vary from 0.42 s(-1) to 96 s(-1). Thus the association constants are kinetically controlled and are close to their equilibrium-determined values. However, when obtained with increased signal-to-noise ratio, the kinetic traces for Hoechst 33258 binding at the AATT site reveal two components. The concentration dependencies of the two time constants and amplitudes are consistent with two different kinetically equivalent two-step models. In the first model, fast bimolecular binding is followed by an isomerization of the initial complex. In the second model, two single-step associations form two complexes that mutually exclude each other. For both models the four reaction-rate parameters are calculated. Finally, specific dissociation kinetics, using poly[d(A-5BrU)], show that the kinetics are even more complex than either two-step model. We correlate our results with the different binding orientations and locations of Hoechst 33258 in the DNA minor groove found in several structural studies in

  4. Binding kinetics of Clostridium difficile toxins A and B to intestinal brush border membranes from infant and adult hamsters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolfe, R.D. (Texas Tech Univ. Health Sciences Center, Lubbock (USA))

    1991-04-01

    This study was undertaken to determine if the relative resistance of neonates and infants to Clostridium difficile-associated intestinal disease can be related to age-dependent differences in intestinal receptors for C. difficile toxins A and B. Brush border membranes (BBMs) from the small intestines of adult and infant hamsters were examined for their ability to bind radiolabeled toxins A and B. (125I)toxin A bound to both infant and adult hamster BBMs at physiological temperature, whereas (125I)toxin B did not bind to the BBMs under any of the conditions examined. The number of (125I)toxin A molecules bound at saturation was approximately 4 x 10(10) per micrograms of membrane protein for adult BBMs and 1 x 10(11) per micrograms of membrane protein for infant BBMs. Scatchard plot analysis suggested the presence of a single class of toxin A binding sites on both infant and adult hamster BBMs. Maximal binding capacity and Kd values were 0.63 pmol/mg of protein and 66.7 nM, respectively, for the infant BBMs, and 0.24 pmol/mg of protein and 27 nM, respectively, for the adult BBMs. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic analyses of extracted BBM proteins revealed differences in the proteins of infant and adult BBMs. However, there were not any detectable differences in the protein bands which bound (125I)toxin A between infant and adult hamsters. The results from these investigations indicate that differences in the binding kinetics of toxins A and/or B to infant and adult hamster BBMs do not account for the observed differences in their susceptibility to C. difficile-associated intestinal disease.

  5. Effects of the binding of a dextran derivative on fibroblast growth factor 2: secondary structure and receptor-binding studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittoun, P; Bagheri-Yarmand, R; Chaubet, F; Crépin, M; Jozefonvicz, J; Fermandjian, S

    1999-06-15

    CMDB (carboxymethyldextran-benzylamide) are dextrans statistically substituted with carboxymethyl and benzylamide groups which can mimick some of the biological properties of heparin. It has previously been shown that CMDB inhibit autocrine growth of breast tumor cells (Bagheri-Yarmand et al., Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 239: 424-428, 1997) and selectively displace fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) from its receptor. Here, we used circular dichroism and fluorescence anisotropy measurements to show that the conformation of FGF-2 was significantly altered upon its binding to CMDB and to short CMDB fragments prepared within this study. CMDB and fragments formed a stable 1:1 complex with FGF-2, with affinities being estimated as 20+/-10 nM from fluorescence anisotropy analysis. No such a complex was formed with insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) or epidermal growth factor (EGF). CMDB competed with the FGF-2 receptor for binding to FGF-2 but did not disturb the binding of IGF-1 and EGF to their receptors. Thus, our results highlight the selectivity of CMDB and their fragments towards FGF-2. Heparin, however, competes with CMDB and their fragments for binding to FGF-2. The carboxymethyl and benzylamide groups of these molecules likely interact directly with a heparin-binding region of FGF-2. The resulting change in conformation disturbs the binding of FGF-2 to its receptor and consecutively its mitogenic activity.

  6. Recombinant human nerve growth factor is biologically active and labels novel high-affinity binding sites in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altar, C.A.; Burton, L.E.; Bennett, G.L.; Dugich-Djordjevic, M. (Genentech, Inc., South San Francisco, CA (USA))

    1991-01-01

    Iodinated recombinant human nerve growth factor (125I-rhNGF) stimulated neurite formation in PC12 cell cultures with a half-maximal potency of 35-49 pg/ml, compared with 39-52 pg/ml for rhNGF. In quantitative ligand autoradiography, the in vitro equilibrium binding of 125I-rhNGF to brain sections showed a 10-fold regional variation in density and was saturable, reversible, and specifically displaced by up to 74% with rhNGF or murine NGF (muNGF). At equilibrium, 125I-rhNGF bound to these sites with high affinity and low capacity (Bmax less than or equal to 13.2 fmol/mg of protein). Calculation of 125I-rhNGF binding affinity by kinetic methods gave average Kd values of 24 and 31 pM. Computer-generated maps revealed binding in brain regions not identified previously with 125I-muNGF, including hippocampus; dentate gyrus; amygdala; paraventricular thalamus; frontal, parietal, occipital, and cingulate cortices; nucleus accumbens; olfactory tubercle; subiculum; pineal gland; and medial geniculate nucleus. NGF binding sites were distributed in a 2-fold increasing medial-lateral gradient in the caudate-putamen and a 2-fold lateral-medial gradient in the nucleus accumbens. 125I-rhNGF binding sites were also found in most areas labeled by 125I-muNGF, including the interpedunucular nucleus, cerebellum, forebrain cholinergic nuclei, caudoventral caudate-putamen, and trigeminal nerve nucleus. 125I-rhNGF binding sites were absent from areas replete with low-affinity NGF binding sites, including circumventricular organs, myelinated fiber bundles, and choroid plexus. The present analysis provides an anatomical differentiation of high-affinity 125I-rhNGF binding sites and greatly expands the number of brain structures that may respond to endogenous NGF or exogenously administered rhNGF.

  7. Kinetics of the interactions between yeast elongation factors 1A and 1Balpha, guanine nucleotides, and aminoacyl-tRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gromadski, Kirill B; Schümmer, Tobias; Strømgaard, Anne

    2007-01-01

    The interactions of elongation factor 1A (eEF1A) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae with elongation factor 1Balpha (eEF1Balpha), guanine nucleotides, and aminoacyl-tRNA were studied kinetically by fluorescence stopped-flow. eEF1A has similar affinities for GDP and GTP, 0.4 and 1.1 microm, respectively....... Dissociation of nucleotides from eEF1A in the absence of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor is slow (about 0.1 s(-1)) and is accelerated by eEF1Balpha by 320-fold and 250-fold for GDP and GTP, respectively. The rate constant of eEF1Balpha binding to eEF1A (10(7)-10(8) M (-1) s(-1)) is independent...... of guanine nucleotides. At the concentrations of nucleotides and factors prevailing in the cell, the overall exchange rate is expected to be in the range of 6 s(-1), which is compatible with the rate of protein synthesis in the cell. eEF1A.GTP binds Phe-tRNA(Phe) with a K(d) of 3 nm, whereas eEF1A.GDP shows...

  8. Universal Bound on the Fano Factor in Enzyme Kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Barato, Andre C

    2015-01-01

    The Fano factor, an observable quantifying fluctuations of product generation by a single enzyme, can reveal information about the underlying reaction scheme. A lower bound on this Fano factor that depends on the thermodynamic affinity driving the transformation from substrate to product constrains the number of intermediate states of an enzymatic cycle. So far, this bound has been proven only for a unicyclic network of states. We show that the bound can be extended to arbitrary multicyclic networks, with the Fano factor constraining the largest value of the effective length, which is the ratio between the number of states and the number of products, among all cycles.

  9. Factors Affecting the Binding of a Recombinant Heavy Metal-Binding Domain (CXXC motif Protein to Heavy Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamala Boonyodying

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A number of heavy metal-binding proteins have been used to study bioremediation. CXXC motif, a metal binding domain containing Cys-X-X-Cys motif, has been identified in various organisms. These proteins are capable of binding various types of heavy metals. In this study, heavy metal binding domain (CXXC motif recombinant protein encoded from mcsA gene of S. aureus were cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The factors involved in the metal-binding activity were determined in order to analyze the potential of recombinant protein for bioremediation. A recombinant protein can be bound to Cd2+, Co2+, Cu2+ and Zn2+. The thermal stability of a recombinant protein was tested, and the results showed that the metal binding activity to Cu2+ and Zn2+ still exist after treating the protein at 85ºC for 30 min. The temperature and pH that affected the metal binding activity was tested and the results showed that recombinant protein was still bound to Cu2+ at 65ºC, whereas a pH of 3-7 did not affect the metal binding E. coli harboring a pRset with a heavy metal-binding domain CXXC motif increased the resistance of heavy metals against CuCl2 and CdCl2. This study shows that metal binding domain (CXXC motif recombinant protein can be effectively bound to various types of heavy metals and may be used as a potential tool for studying bioremediation.

  10. Ligand Binding Kinetics of the Quorum Sensing Regulator PqsR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welch, Martin; Hodgkinson, James T.; Gross, Jeremy;

    2013-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa quinolone signal (PQS) is a quorum sensing molecule that plays an important role in regulating the virulence of this organism. We have purified the ligand binding domain of the receptor PqsRLBD for PQS and have used Förster resonance energy transfer fluorimetry...

  11. Kinetic mechanism and energetics of binding of phosphoryl group acceptors to Mycobacterium tuberculosis cytidine monophosphate kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaskulski, Léia; Rosado, Leonardo A; Rostirolla, Diana C; Timmers, Luis F S M; de Souza, Osmar N; Santos, Diogenes S; Basso, Luiz A

    2013-08-01

    Cytidine monophosphate kinase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtCMK) likely plays a role in supplying precursors for nucleic acid synthesis. MtCMK catalyzes the ATP-dependent phosphoryl group transfer preferentially to CMP and dCMP. Initial velocity studies and Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) measurements showed that MtCMK follows a random-order mechanism of substrate (CMP and ATP) binding, and an ordered mechanism for product release, in which ADP is released first followed by CDP. The thermodynamic signatures of CMP and CDP binding to MtCMK showed favorable enthalpy and unfavorable entropy, and ATP binding was characterized by favorable changes in enthalpy and entropy. The contribution of linked protonation events to the energetics of MtCMK:phosphoryl group acceptor binary complex formation suggested a net gain of protons. Values for the pKa of a likely chemical group involved in proton exchange and for the intrinsic binding enthalpy were calculated. The Asp187 side chain of MtCMK is suggested as the likely candidate for the protonation event. Data on thermodynamics of binary complex formation were collected to evaluate the contribution of 2'-OH group to intermolecular interactions. The data are discussed in light of functional and structural comparisons between CMP/dCMP kinases and UMP/CMP ones.

  12. Hepatitis C virus induces epidermal growth factor receptor activation via CD81 binding for viral internalization and entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Jingyu; Pantua, Homer; Ngu, Hai; Komuves, Laszlo; Diehl, Lauri; Schaefer, Gabriele; Kapadia, Sharookh B

    2012-10-01

    While epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been shown to be important in the entry process for multiple viruses, including hepatitis C virus (HCV), the molecular mechanisms by which EGFR facilitates HCV entry are not well understood. Using the infectious cell culture HCV model (HCVcc), we demonstrate that the binding of HCVcc particles to human hepatocyte cells induces EGFR activation that is dependent on interactions between HCV and CD81 but not claudin 1. EGFR activation can also be induced by antibody mediated cross-linking of CD81. In addition, EGFR ligands that enhance the kinetics of HCV entry induce EGFR internalization and colocalization with CD81. While EGFR kinase inhibitors inhibit HCV infection primarily by preventing EGFR endocytosis, antibodies that block EGFR ligand binding or inhibitors of EGFR downstream signaling have no effect on HCV entry. These data demonstrate that EGFR internalization is critical for HCV entry and identify a hitherto-unknown association between CD81 and EGFR.

  13. Probabilistic inference of transcription factor binding from multiple data sources.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harri Lähdesmäki

    Full Text Available An important problem in molecular biology is to build a complete understanding of transcriptional regulatory processes in the cell. We have developed a flexible, probabilistic framework to predict TF binding from multiple data sources that differs from the standard hypothesis testing (scanning methods in several ways. Our probabilistic modeling framework estimates the probability of binding and, thus, naturally reflects our degree of belief in binding. Probabilistic modeling also allows for easy and systematic integration of our binding predictions into other probabilistic modeling methods, such as expression-based gene network inference. The method answers the question of whether the whole analyzed promoter has a binding site, but can also be extended to estimate the binding probability at each nucleotide position. Further, we introduce an extension to model combinatorial regulation by several TFs. Most importantly, the proposed methods can make principled probabilistic inference from multiple evidence sources, such as, multiple statistical models (motifs of the TFs, evolutionary conservation, regulatory potential, CpG islands, nucleosome positioning, DNase hypersensitive sites, ChIP-chip binding segments and other (prior sequence-based biological knowledge. We developed both a likelihood and a Bayesian method, where the latter is implemented with a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm. Results on a carefully constructed test set from the mouse genome demonstrate that principled data fusion can significantly improve the performance of TF binding prediction methods. We also applied the probabilistic modeling framework to all promoters in the mouse genome and the results indicate a sparse connectivity between transcriptional regulators and their target promoters. To facilitate analysis of other sequences and additional data, we have developed an on-line web tool, ProbTF, which implements our probabilistic TF binding prediction method using multiple

  14. Assessment of algorithms for inferring positional weight matrix motifs of transcription factor binding sites using protein binding microarray data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaron Orenstein

    Full Text Available The new technology of protein binding microarrays (PBMs allows simultaneous measurement of the binding intensities of a transcription factor to tens of thousands of synthetic double-stranded DNA probes, covering all possible 10-mers. A key computational challenge is inferring the binding motif from these data. We present a systematic comparison of four methods developed specifically for reconstructing a binding site motif represented as a positional weight matrix from PBM data. The reconstructed motifs were evaluated in terms of three criteria: concordance with reference motifs from the literature and ability to predict in vivo and in vitro bindings. The evaluation encompassed over 200 transcription factors and some 300 assays. The results show a tradeoff between how the methods perform according to the different criteria, and a dichotomy of method types. Algorithms that construct motifs with low information content predict PBM probe ranking more faithfully, while methods that produce highly informative motifs match reference motifs better. Interestingly, in predicting high-affinity binding, all methods give far poorer results for in vivo assays compared to in vitro assays.

  15. Study of antibody/antigen binding kinetics by total internal reflection ellipsometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baleviciute, Ieva; Balevicius, Zigmas; Makaraviciute, Asta; Ramanaviciene, Almira; Ramanavicius, Arunas

    2013-01-15

    Total internal reflection ellipsometry (TIRE) has been applied for the investigation of (i) kinetics of biosensing layer formation, which was based on the immobilization of fragmented and intact antibodies, and (ii) kinetics of antigen interaction with the immobilized antibodies. It has been demonstrated that ellipsometric parameter Δ(t) showed much higher sensitivity at the initial phase of Au-protein and protein-protein interaction, while the parameter Ψ(t) was more sensitive when the steady-state conditions were established. A new method, which taking into consideration this feature and nonlinear change of Δ(t) and Ψ(t) parameters during various stages of biological layer formation process, was used for the calculation of antibody and antigen adsorption/interaction kinetics. The obtained results were analyzed using a model, which took into account partial reversibility during the formation of both antibody and antigen based monolayers. It was shown that the immobilization rate of antibody during the preparation of the sensing layer was similar for the formation of both intact and fragmented antibody based layers; however, the residence time was 25 times longer for intact antibody based layer formation in comparison to that of fragmented antibody based layer formation. On the contrary, residence time of antigen interaction with immobilized antibodies was about 8 times longer for the sensor based on fragmented antibodies. Moreover, it has been determined that the structural differences of immobilized antibodies (fragmented or intact) significantly influence antibody-antigen interaction rate, the major difference being in the residence time of antigen interaction with both types of immobilized antibodies.

  16. Influence of donor substrate on kinetic parameters of thiamine diphosphate binding to transketolase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ospanov, R V; Kochetov, G A; Kurganov, B I

    2007-01-01

    The two-step mechanism of interaction of thiamine diphosphate (ThDP) with transketolase (TK) has been studied: TK + ThDP TK...ThDP TK*-ThDP. The scheme involves the formation of inactive intermediate complex TK...ThDP followed by its transformation into catalytically active holoenzyme, TK*-ThDP. The dissociation and kinetic constants for individual stages of this process have been determined. The values of forward and backward rate constants change in the presence of the donor substrate hydroxypyruvate. This finally leads to an increase in the overall affinity of the coenzyme to TK.

  17. Transcriptome Profiling of Pediatric Core Binding Factor AML.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hao Hsu

    Full Text Available The t(8;21 and Inv(16 translocations disrupt the normal function of core binding factors alpha (CBFA and beta (CBFB, respectively. These translocations represent two of the most common genomic abnormalities in acute myeloid leukemia (AML patients, occurring in approximately 25% pediatric and 15% of adult with this malignancy. Both translocations are associated with favorable clinical outcomes after intensive chemotherapy, and given the perceived mechanistic similarities, patients with these translocations are frequently referred to as having CBF-AML. It remains uncertain as to whether, collectively, these translocations are mechanistically the same or impact different pathways in subtle ways that have both biological and clinical significance. Therefore, we used transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq to investigate the similarities and differences in genes and pathways between these subtypes of pediatric AMLs. Diagnostic RNA from patients with t(8;21 (N = 17, Inv(16 (N = 14, and normal karyotype (NK, N = 33 were subjected to RNA-seq. Analyses compared the transcriptomes across these three cytogenetic subtypes, using the NK cohort as the control. A total of 1291 genes in t(8;21 and 474 genes in Inv(16 were differentially expressed relative to the NK controls, with 198 genes differentially expressed in both subtypes. The majority of these genes (175/198; binomial test p-value < 10(-30 are consistent in expression changes among the two subtypes suggesting the expression profiles are more similar between the CBF cohorts than in the NK cohort. Our analysis also revealed alternative splicing events (ASEs differentially expressed across subtypes, with 337 t(8;21-specific and 407 Inv(16-specific ASEs detected, the majority of which were acetylated proteins (p = 1.5 x 10(-51 and p = 1.8 x 10(-54 for the two subsets. In addition to known fusions, we identified and verified 16 de novo fusions in 43 patients, including three fusions involving NUP98 in six

  18. Detection and properties of A-factor-binding protein from Streptomyces griseus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyake, K.; Horinouchi, S.; Yoshida, M.; Chiba, N.; Mori, K.; Nogawa, N.; Morikawa, N.; Beppu, T. (Univ. of Tokyo (Japan))

    1989-08-01

    The optically active form of tritium-labeled A-factor (2-isocapryloyl-3R-hydroxymethyl-gamma-butyrolactone), a pleiotropic autoregulator responsible for streptomycin production, streptomycin resistance, and sporulation in Streptomyces griseus, was chemically synthesized. By using the radioactive A-factor, a binding protein for A-factor was detected in the cytoplasmic fraction of this organism. The binding protein had an apparent molecular weight of approximately 26,000, as determined by gel filtration. Scatchard analysis suggested that A-factor bound the protein in the molar ratio of 1:1 with a binding constant, Kd, of 0.7 nM. The number of the binding protein was roughly estimated to be 37 per genome. The inducing material virginiae butanolide C (VB-C), which has a structure very similar to that of A-factor and is essential for virginiamycin production in Streptomyces virginiae, did not inhibit binding. In addition, no protein capable of specifically binding {sup 3}H-labeled VB-C was found in S. griseus. Together with the observation that VB-C had almost no biological activity on the restoration of streptomycin production or sporulation in an A-factor-deficient mutant of S. griseus, these results indicated that the binding protein had a strict ligand specificity. Examination for an A-factor-binding protein in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) and Streptomyces lividans showed the absence of any specifically binding protein.

  19. Using TESS to predict transcription factor binding sites in DNA sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schug, Jonathan

    2008-03-01

    This unit describes how to use the Transcription Element Search System (TESS). This Web site predicts transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in DNA sequence using two different kinds of models of sites, strings and positional weight matrices. The binding of transcription factors to DNA is a major part of the control of gene expression. Transcription factors exhibit sequence-specific binding; they form stronger bonds to some DNA sequences than to others. Identification of a good binding site in the promoter for a gene suggests the possibility that the corresponding factor may play a role in the regulation of that gene. However, the sequences transcription factors recognize are typically short and allow for some amount of mismatch. Because of this, binding sites for a factor can typically be found at random every few hundred to a thousand base pairs. TESS has features to help sort through and evaluate the significance of predicted sites.

  20. Genome-scale study of the importance of binding site context for transcription factor binding and gene regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronne Hans

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rate of mRNA transcription is controlled by transcription factors that bind to specific DNA motifs in promoter regions upstream of protein coding genes. Recent results indicate that not only the presence of a motif but also motif context (for example the orientation of a motif or its location relative to the coding sequence is important for gene regulation. Results In this study we present ContextFinder, a tool that is specifically aimed at identifying cases where motif context is likely to affect gene regulation. We used ContextFinder to examine the role of motif context in S. cerevisiae both for DNA binding by transcription factors and for effects on gene expression. For DNA binding we found significant patterns of motif location bias, whereas motif orientations did not seem to matter. Motif context appears to affect gene expression even more than it affects DNA binding, as biases in both motif location and orientation were more frequent in promoters of co-expressed genes. We validated our results against data on nucleosome positioning, and found a negative correlation between preferred motif locations and nucleosome occupancy. Conclusion We conclude that the requirement for stable binding of transcription factors to DNA and their subsequent function in gene regulation can impose constraints on motif context.

  1. Pleiotropic virulence factor - Streptococcus pyogenes fibronectin-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Masaya; Terao, Yutaka; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2013-04-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes causes a broad spectrum of infectious diseases, including pharyngitis, skin infections and invasive necrotizing fasciitis. The initial phase of infection involves colonization, followed by intimate contact with the host cells, thus promoting bacterial uptake by them. S. pyogenes recognizes fibronectin (Fn) through its own Fn-binding proteins to obtain access to epithelial and endothelial cells in host tissue. Fn-binding proteins bind to Fn to form a bridge to α5 β1 -integrins, which leads to rearrangement of cytoskeletal actin in host cells and uptake of invading S. pyogenes. Recently, several structural analyses of the invasion mechanism showed molecular interactions by which Fn converts from a compact plasma protein to a fibrillar component of the extracellular matrix. After colonization, S. pyogenes must evade the host innate immune system to spread into blood vessels and deeper organs. Some Fn-binding proteins contribute to evasion of host innate immunity, such as the complement system and phagocytosis. In addition, Fn-binding proteins have received focus as non-M protein vaccine candidates, because of their localization and conservation among different M serotypes.Here, we review the roles of Fn-binding proteins in the pathogenesis and speculate regarding possible vaccine antigen candidates. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Kinetic and physiological effects of alterations in homologous isocitrate-binding sites of yeast NAD(+)-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, A P; McCammon, M T; McAlister-Henn, L

    2001-11-27

    Yeast NAD(+)-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase is an allosterically regulated octameric enzyme composed of four each of two homologous but nonidentical subunits designated IDH1 and IDH2. Models based on the crystallographic structure of Escherichia coli isocitrate dehydrogenase suggest that both yeast subunits contain isocitrate-binding sites. Identities in nine residue positions are predicted for the IDH2 site whereas four of the nine positions differ between the IDH1 and bacterial enzyme sites. Thus, we speculate that the IDH2 site is catalytic and that the IDH1 site may bind but not catalytically alter isocitrate. This was examined by kinetic analyses of enzymes with independent and concerted replacement of residues in each yeast IDH subunit site with the residues that differ in the other subunit site. Mutant enzymes were expressed in a yeast strain containing disrupted IDH1 and IDH2 loci and affinity-purified for kinetic analyses. The primary effects of various residue replacements in IDH2 were reductions of 30->300-fold in V(max) values, consistent with the catalytic function of this subunit. In contrast, replacement of all four residues in IDH1 produced a 17-fold reduction in V(max) under the same assay conditions, suggesting that the IDH1 site is not the primary catalytic site. However, single or multiple residue replacements in IDH1 uniformly increased half-saturation concentrations for isocitrate, implying that isocitrate can be bound at this site. Both subunits appear to contribute to cooperativity with respect to isocitrate, but AMP activation is lost only with residue replacements in IDH1. Overall, results are consistent with isocitrate binding by IDH2 for catalysis and with isocitrate binding by IDH1 being a prerequisite for allosteric activation by AMP. The effects of residue substitutions on enzyme function in vivo were assessed by analysis of various growth phenotypes. Results indicate a positive correlation between the level of IDH catalytic

  3. Fast kinetics of nucleotide binding to Clostridium perfringens family II pyrophosphatase containing CBS and DRTGG domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jämsen, J; Baykov, A A; Lahti, R

    2012-02-01

    We earlier described CBS-pyrophosphatase of Moorella thermoacetica (mtCBS-PPase) as a novel phosphohydrolase that acquired a pair of nucleotide-binding CBS domains during evolution, thus endowing the protein with the capacity to be allosterically regulated by adenine nucleotides (Jämsen, J., Tuominen, H., Salminen, A., Belogurov, G. A., Magretova, N. N., Baykov, A. A., and Lahti, R. (2007) Biochem. J., 408, 327-333). We herein describe a more evolved type of CBS-pyrophosphatase from Clostridium perfringens (cpCBS-PPase) that additionally contains a DRTGG domain between the two CBS domains in the regulatory part. cpCBS-PPase retained the ability of mtCBS-PPase to be inhibited by micromolar concentrations of AMP and ADP and activated by ATP and was additionally activated by diadenosine polyphosphates (AP(n)A) with n > 2. Stopped-flow measurements using a fluorescent nucleotide analog, 2'(3')-O-(N-methylanthranoyl)-AMP, revealed that cpCBS-PPase interconverts through two different conformations with transit times on the millisecond scale upon nucleotide binding. The results suggest that the presence of the DRTGG domain affords greater flexibility to the regulatory part, allowing it to more rapidly undergo conformational changes in response to binding.

  4. Phase-plane analysis of the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process with binding kinetics and switching between antiparallel lanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Hui-Shun; Betterton, Meredith D.

    2016-01-01

    Motor protein motion on biopolymers can be described by models related to the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP). Inspired by experiments on the motion of kinesin-4 motors on antiparallel microtubule overlaps, we analyze a model incorporating the TASEP on two antiparallel lanes with binding kinetics and lane switching. We determine the steady-state motor density profiles using phase-plane analysis of the steady-state mean field equations and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. We focus on the density-density phase plane, where we find an analytic solution to the mean field model. By studying the phase-space flows, we determine the model’s fixed points and their changes with parameters. Phases previously identified for the single-lane model occur for low switching rate between lanes. We predict a multiple coexistence phase due to additional fixed points that appear as the switching rate increases: switching moves motors from the higher-density to the lower-density lane, causing local jamming and creating multiple domain walls. We determine the phase diagram of the model for both symmetric and general boundary conditions. PMID:27627345

  5. Phase-plane analysis of the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process with binding kinetics and switching between antiparallel lanes

    CERN Document Server

    Kuan, Hui-Shun

    2016-01-01

    Motor protein motion on biopolymers can be described by models related to the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP). Inspired by experiments on the motion of kinesin-4 motors on antiparallel microtubule overlaps, we analyze a model incorporating the TASEP on two antiparallel lanes with binding kinetics and lane switching. We determine the steady-state motor density profiles using phase plane analysis of the steady-state mean field equations and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. We focus on the the density-density phase plane, where we find an analytic solution to the mean-field model. By studying the phase space flows, we determine the model's fixed points and their changes with parameters. Phases previously identified for the single-lane model occur for low switching rate between lanes. We predict a new multiple coexistence phase due to additional fixed points that appear as the switching rate increases: switching moves motors from the higher-density to the lower-density lane, causing local jamm...

  6. Probing kinetic drug binding mechanism in voltage-gated sodium ion channel: open state versus inactive state blockers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Krishnendu; Gangopadhyay, Gautam

    2015-01-01

    The kinetics and nonequilibrium thermodynamics of open state and inactive state drug binding mechanisms have been studied here using different voltage protocols in sodium ion channel. We have found that for constant voltage protocol, open state block is more efficient in blocking ionic current than inactive state block. Kinetic effect comes through peak current for mexiletine as an open state blocker and in the tail part for lidocaine as an inactive state blocker. Although the inactivation of sodium channel is a free energy driven process, however, the two different kinds of drug affect the inactivation process in a different way as seen from thermodynamic analysis. In presence of open state drug block, the process initially for a long time remains entropy driven and then becomes free energy driven. However in presence of inactive state block, the process remains entirely entropy driven until the equilibrium is attained. For oscillating voltage protocol, the inactive state blocking is more efficient in damping the oscillation of ionic current. From the pulse train analysis it is found that inactive state blocking is less effective in restoring normal repolarisation and blocks peak ionic current. Pulse train protocol also shows that all the inactive states behave differently as one inactive state responds instantly to the test pulse in an opposite manner from the other two states.

  7. QCM Biosensor Based on Polydopamine Surface for Real-Time Analysis of the Binding Kinetics of Protein-Protein Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunli Wu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A quartz crystal microbalance (QCM biosensor based on polydopamine (PDA surface was developed for real-time analysis of the binding kinetics of protein-protein interactions. The biosensor was fabricated by simply immersing the gold sensor chip into an aqueous dopamine solution at pH 8.5 leading to a spontaneous deposition of PDA film onto the sensor chip surface, which was followed by incubation with the protein to immobilize it onto the PDA-coated sensor chip surface via Michael addition and/or Schiff base reactions. In this paper, the interaction between monoclonal anti-myoglobin 7005 antibody (IgG1 and its antigen human cardiac myoglobin was used as a model system for real-time analysis of biomolecule interactions on the biosensor surface. The kinetic parameters of the interaction between anti-myoglobin 7005 and myoglobin were studied on the biosensor surface, which were consistent with the results obtained via amine coupling. The biosensor based on PDA surface has excellent regenerability, reproducibility, and specificity. Compared with the most frequently/typically used amine coupling method for immobilization of proteins on carboxylated substrates, the modification methodology presented in this paper is simple, mild and is not subjected to the limitations of the isoelectric point (pI of the protein. In addition, the PDA biosensor chip can be easily reused, which makes QCM biosensor analysis more efficient and cost effective.

  8. Real-time reliable determination of binding kinetics of DNA hybridization using a multi-channel graphene biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shicai; Zhan, Jian; Man, Baoyuan; Jiang, Shouzhen; Yue, Weiwei; Gao, Shoubao; Guo, Chengang; Liu, Hanping; Li, Zhenhua; Wang, Jihua; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2017-03-01

    Reliable determination of binding kinetics and affinity of DNA hybridization and single-base mismatches plays an essential role in systems biology, personalized and precision medicine. The standard tools are optical-based sensors that are difficult to operate in low cost and to miniaturize for high-throughput measurement. Biosensors based on nanowire field-effect transistors have been developed, but reliable and cost-effective fabrication remains a challenge. Here, we demonstrate that a graphene single-crystal domain patterned into multiple channels can measure time- and concentration-dependent DNA hybridization kinetics and affinity reliably and sensitively, with a detection limit of 10 pM for DNA. It can distinguish single-base mutations quantitatively in real time. An analytical model is developed to estimate probe density, efficiency of hybridization and the maximum sensor response. The results suggest a promising future for cost-effective, high-throughput screening of drug candidates, genetic variations and disease biomarkers by using an integrated, miniaturized, all-electrical multiplexed, graphene-based DNA array.

  9. Real-time reliable determination of binding kinetics of DNA hybridization using a multi-channel graphene biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shicai; Zhan, Jian; Man, Baoyuan; Jiang, Shouzhen; Yue, Weiwei; Gao, Shoubao; Guo, Chengang; Liu, Hanping; Li, Zhenhua; Wang, Jihua; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2017-01-01

    Reliable determination of binding kinetics and affinity of DNA hybridization and single-base mismatches plays an essential role in systems biology, personalized and precision medicine. The standard tools are optical-based sensors that are difficult to operate in low cost and to miniaturize for high-throughput measurement. Biosensors based on nanowire field-effect transistors have been developed, but reliable and cost-effective fabrication remains a challenge. Here, we demonstrate that a graphene single-crystal domain patterned into multiple channels can measure time- and concentration-dependent DNA hybridization kinetics and affinity reliably and sensitively, with a detection limit of 10 pM for DNA. It can distinguish single-base mutations quantitatively in real time. An analytical model is developed to estimate probe density, efficiency of hybridization and the maximum sensor response. The results suggest a promising future for cost-effective, high-throughput screening of drug candidates, genetic variations and disease biomarkers by using an integrated, miniaturized, all-electrical multiplexed, graphene-based DNA array. PMID:28322227

  10. Phase-plane analysis of the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process with binding kinetics and switching between antiparallel lanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Hui-Shun; Betterton, Meredith D.

    2016-08-01

    Motor protein motion on biopolymers can be described by models related to the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP). Inspired by experiments on the motion of kinesin-4 motors on antiparallel microtubule overlaps, we analyze a model incorporating the TASEP on two antiparallel lanes with binding kinetics and lane switching. We determine the steady-state motor density profiles using phase-plane analysis of the steady-state mean field equations and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. We focus on the density-density phase plane, where we find an analytic solution to the mean field model. By studying the phase-space flows, we determine the model's fixed points and their changes with parameters. Phases previously identified for the single-lane model occur for low switching rate between lanes. We predict a multiple coexistence phase due to additional fixed points that appear as the switching rate increases: switching moves motors from the higher-density to the lower-density lane, causing local jamming and creating multiple domain walls. We determine the phase diagram of the model for both symmetric and general boundary conditions.

  11. Comparative study of binding constants from Love wave surface acoustic wave and surface plasmon resonance biosensors using kinetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangdae; Kim, Yong-Il; Kim, Ki-Bok

    2013-11-01

    Biosensors are used in a variety of fields for early diagnosis of diseases, measurement of toxic contaminants, quick detection of pathogens, and separation of specific proteins or DNA. In this study, we fabricated and evaluated the capability of a high sensitivity Love wave surface acoustic wave (SAW) biosensor. The experimental setup was composed of the fabricated 155-MHz Love wave SAW biosensor, a signal measurement system, a liquid flow system, and a temperature-control system. Subsequently, we measured the lower limit of detection (LOD) of the 155-MHz Love wave SAW biosensor, and calculated the association and dissociation constants between protein G and anti-mouse IgG using kinetic analysis. We compared these results with those obtained using a commercial surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor. We found that the LOD of the SAW biosensor for anti-mouse IgG and mouse IgG was 0.5 and 1 microg/ml, respectively, and the resultant equilibrium association and dissociation constants were similar to the corresponding values obtaining using the commercial SPR biosensor. Thus, we conclude that the fabricated 155-MHz Love wave SAW biosensor exhibited the high sensitivity of the commercial SPR biosensor and was able to analyze the binding properties of the ligand and receptor by kinetic analysis similarly to the commercial SPR biosensor.

  12. Arabidopsis sigma factor binding proteins are activators of the WRKY33 transcription factor in plant defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zhibing; Li, Ying; Wang, Fei; Cheng, Yuan; Fan, Baofang; Yu, Jing-Quan; Chen, Zhixiang

    2011-10-01

    Necrotrophic pathogens are important plant pathogens that cause many devastating plant diseases. Despite their impact, our understanding of the plant defense response to necrotrophic pathogens is limited. The WRKY33 transcription factor is important for plant resistance to necrotrophic pathogens; therefore, elucidation of its functions will enhance our understanding of plant immunity to necrotrophic pathogens. Here, we report the identification of two WRKY33-interacting proteins, nuclear-encoded SIGMA FACTOR BINDING PROTEIN1 (SIB1) and SIB2, which also interact with plastid-encoded plastid RNA polymerase SIGMA FACTOR1. Both SIB1 and SIB2 contain an N-terminal chloroplast targeting signal and a putative nuclear localization signal, suggesting that they are dual targeted. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation indicates that WRKY33 interacts with SIBs in the nucleus of plant cells. Both SIB1 and SIB2 contain a short VQ motif that is important for interaction with WRKY33. The two VQ motif-containing proteins recognize the C-terminal WRKY domain and stimulate the DNA binding activity of WRKY33. Like WRKY33, both SIB1 and SIB2 are rapidly and strongly induced by the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Resistance to B. cinerea is compromised in the sib1 and sib2 mutants but enhanced in SIB1-overexpressing transgenic plants. These results suggest that dual-targeted SIB1 and SIB2 function as activators of WRKY33 in plant defense against necrotrophic pathogens.

  13. Discovery and information-theoretic characterization of transcription factor binding sites that act cooperatively

    CERN Document Server

    Clifford, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factor binding to the surface of DNA regulatory regions is one of the primary causes of regulating gene expression levels. A probabilistic approach to model protein-DNA interactions at the sequence level is through Position Weight Matrices (PWMs) that estimate the joint probability of a DNA binding site sequence by assuming positional independence within the DNA sequence. Here we construct conditional PWMs that depend on the motif signatures in the flanking DNA sequence, by conditioning known binding site loci on the presence or absence of additional binding sites in the flanking sequence of each site's locus. Pooling known sites with similar flanking sequence patterns allows for the estimation of the conditional distribution function over the binding site sequences. We apply our model to the Dorsal transcription factor binding sites active in patterning the Dorsal-Ventral axis of Drosophila development. We find that those binding sites that cooperate with nearby Twist sites on average contain a...

  14. Kinetics and equilibria for the axial ligation of bromomethyl (aqua)cobaloxime with pyridines - Isolation characterization and DNA binding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kotha Laxma Reddy; K Ashwini Kumar; N Ravi Kumar Reddy; Penumaka Nagababu; A Panasa Reddy; S Satyanarayana

    2009-11-01

    The kinetics and equilibria for the axial ligation of pyridine and substituted pyridines to bromomethyl(aqua)cobaloxime have been measured spectrophotometrically in aqueous solutions of ionic strength 1.0 M (KC1) at 25°C as a function of H. The binding constants and rate of formation increase in the order 4-NH2Py 4-EtPy > 4-MePy > Py > 2-NH2Py > 2-EtPy. The data have been interpreted based on the basicity of the ligand, -back bonding from Co(III) → L and hard and soft interactions. The rate of substitution of H2O varies with the pKa of the incoming ligand, thus establishing the existence of nucleophilic participation of the ligand in the transition state. We have investigated the DNA binding of bromomethyl(aqua)cobaloxime with DNA. Bromomethyl(ligand)cobaloximes were isolated and characterized by elemental analysis, IR and NMR (1H, 13C) spectra.

  15. Induction of CYP1A1 and CYP2E1 in rat liver by histamine: binding and kinetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávila-Borja, Víctor M; Belmont, Javier A; Espinosa, J Javier; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Albores, Arnulfo; Montero, Regina D

    2007-10-01

    Histamine (HA) may bind to cytochrome P450 (CYP450) in rat liver microsomes. The CYP450-HA complex seems to regulate some cellular processes such as proliferation. In the present work, it is shown that HA increases the activity and protein level of CYP1A1 and CYP2E1, in vivo. CYP1A1 is associated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-mediated carcinogenesis and CYP2E1 with liver damage by oxidative stress. Studies of enzyme kinetics and binding with rat liver microsomes and supersomes were carried out to determine whether HA is a substrate of CYP1A1 and/or CYP2E1. The lack of NADPH oxidation in the presence of HA showed that it is not a substrate for CYP1A1. Activity measurements using the O-dealkylation of ethoxyresorufin indicated that HA is a mixed-type inhibitor of CYP1A1 in both microsomes and supersomes. On the other hand, HA induced a significant NADPH oxidation catalyzed by CYP2E1 supersomes, strongly suggesting that HA is a substrate for this isoform. Furthermore, HA is consumed in the presence of CYP2E1-induced microsomes and supersomes, as determined by o-phtalaldehyde complexes with HA by HPLC. The present findings may contribute to understand better the physiological function of CYP450 in relation with inflammation and other physiological processes in which HA may have a relevant role.

  16. Heterogeneous dynamics in DNA site discrimination by the structurally homologous DNA-binding domains of ETS-family transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Gaofei; Tolic, Ana; Bashkin, James K; Poon, Gregory M K

    2015-04-30

    The ETS family of transcription factors exemplifies current uncertainty in how eukaryotic genetic regulators with overlapping DNA sequence preferences achieve target site specificity. PU.1 and Ets-1 represent archetypes for studying site discrimination by ETS proteins because their DNA-binding domains are the most divergent in sequence, yet they share remarkably superimposable DNA-bound structures. To gain insight into the contrasting thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA recognition by these two proteins, we investigated the structure and dynamics of site discrimination by their DNA-binding domains. Electrophoretic mobilities of complexes formed by the two homologs with circularly permuted binding sites showed significant dynamic differences only for DNA complexes of PU.1. Free solution measurements by dynamic light scattering showed PU.1 to be more dynamic than Ets-1; moreover, dynamic changes are strongly coupled to site discrimination by PU.1, but not Ets-1. Interrogation of the protein/DNA interface by DNA footprinting showed similar accessibility to dimethyl sulfate for PU.1/DNA and Ets-1/DNA complexes, indicating that the dynamics of PU.1/DNA complexes reside primarily outside that interface. An information-based analysis of the two homologs' binding motifs suggests a role for dynamic coupling in PU.1's ability to enforce a more stringent sequence preference than Ets-1 and its proximal sequence homologs. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. Global analysis of ion dependence unveils hidden steps in DNA binding and bending by integration host factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivas, Paula; Velmurugu, Yogambigai; Kuznetsov, Serguei V.; Rice, Phoebe A.; Ansari, Anjum

    2013-09-01

    Proteins that recognize and bind to specific sites on DNA often distort the DNA at these sites. The rates at which these DNA distortions occur are considered to be important in the ability of these proteins to discriminate between specific and nonspecific sites. These rates have proven difficult to measure for most protein-DNA complexes in part because of the difficulty in separating the kinetics of unimolecular conformational rearrangements (DNA bending and kinking) from the kinetics of bimolecular complex association and dissociation. A notable exception is the Integration Host Factor (IHF), a eubacterial architectural protein involved in chromosomal compaction and DNA recombination, which binds with subnanomolar affinity to specific DNA sites and bends them into sharp U-turns. The unimolecular DNA bending kinetics has been resolved using both stopped-flow and laser temperature-jump perturbation. Here we expand our investigation by presenting a global analysis of the ionic strength dependence of specific binding affinity and relaxation kinetics of an IHF-DNA complex. This analysis enables us to obtain each of the underlying elementary rates (DNA bending/unbending and protein-DNA association/dissociation), and their ionic strength dependence, even under conditions where the two processes are coupled. Our analysis indicates interesting differences in the ionic strength dependence of the bi- versus unimolecular steps. At moderate [KCl] (100-500 mM), nearly all the ionic strength dependence to the overall equilibrium binding affinity appears in the bimolecular association/dissociation of an initial, presumably weakly bent, encounter complex, with a slope SKbi ≈ 8 describing the loglog-dependence of the equilibrium constant to form this complex on [KCl]. In contrast, the unimolecular equilibrium constant to form the fully wrapped specific complex from the initial complex is nearly independent of [KCl], with SKuni water molecules, which is osmotically favored by

  18. Kinetic studies on the activation of human factor X. The role of metal ions on the reaction catalyzed by the venom coagulant protein of Viper russelli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, S; Robey, F A; Kosow, D P

    1978-07-10

    The effect of Ca2+, Mg2+, and Mn2+ on the initial rate of activation of human Factor X by the venom coagulant protein of Vipera russelli has been investigated. Neither Mg2+ nor Mn2+ alone support the reaction. Ca2+ is an essential activator and exhibits cooperative kinetics. Both Mg2+ and Mn2+ enhance the reaction cooperatively when Ca2+ is present at suboptimal concentrations. Similarly, Ca2+ quenches the intrinsic fluorescence of human Factor X in a cooperative manner. While neither Mg2+ nor Mn2+ by themselves affect the fluorescence of human Factor X, they decrease the cooperativity of the Ca2+ binding to the protein as judged by Hill plots of the Ca2+ -induced fluoresence quenching. EPR measurements indicate that there are three high affinity Mn2+ binding sites on human Factor X which can also bind Ca2+. Positive cooperativity was not observed for Mn2+ binding. These data indicate that Ca2+ can cause a conformational change of the Factor X molecule which allows the activation reaction to proceed. We propose that Mn2+ does not support the activation of human Factor X because it cannot induce a necessary conformational change in the absence of Ca2+.

  19. Insulinlike growth factor-binding protein proteolysis an emerging paradigm in insulinlike growth factor physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowlkes, J L

    1997-10-01

    In biologic fluids, insulinlike growth factors (IGF-I and IGF-II) are bound to high-affinity insulinlike growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) of which seven have now been identified (IGFBPs 1-7). In a variety of biologic fluids, several IGFBPs undergo proteolytic degradation. Such degradation can lead to increased IGF bioavailability at the cell surface, facilitating receptor interactions. Herein, recent data identifying several IGFBP-degrading proteinases and their effects on IGF bioactivity is reviewed, and how IGFBP proteolysis is regulated by IGFs and IGFBPs, as well as how IGFBP cleavage analysis provides insights into the structure and function of IGFBPs, is explored. (Trends Endocrinol Metab 1997;8:299-306). (c) 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  20. Binding of kinetically inert metal ions to RNA: the case of platinum(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Erich G; Hostetter, Alethia A; Osborn, Maire F; Miller, Amanda L; DeRose, Victoria J

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter several aspects of Pt(II) are highlighted that focus on the properties of Pt(II)-RNA adducts and the possibility that they influence RNA-based processes in cells. Cellular distribution of Pt(II) complexes results in significant platination of RNA, and localization studies find Pt(II) in the nucleus, nucleolus, and a distribution of other sites in cells. Treatment with Pt(II) compounds disrupts RNA-based processes including enzymatic processing, splicing, and translation, and this disruption may be indicative of structural changes to RNA or RNA-protein complexes. Several RNA-Pt(II) adducts have been characterized in vitro by biochemical and other methods. Evidence for Pt(II) binding in non-helical regions and for Pt(II) cross-linking of internal loops has been found. Although platinated sites have been identified, there currently exists very little in the way of detailed structural characterization of RNA-Pt(II) adducts. Some insight into the details of Pt(II) coordination to RNA, especially RNA helices, can be gained from DNA model systems. Many RNA structures, however, contain complex tertiary folds and common, purine-rich structural elements that present suitable Pt(II) nucleophiles in unique arrangements which may hold the potential for novel types of platinum-RNA adducts. Future research aimed at structural characterization of platinum-RNA adducts may provide further insights into platinum-nucleic acid binding motifs, and perhaps provide a rationale for the observed inhibition by Pt(II) complexes of splicing, translation, and enzymatic processing.

  1. Deciphering the kinetic binding mechanism of dimeric ligands using a potent plasma-stable dimeric inhibitor of postsynaptic density protein-95 as an example

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Celestine N; Bach, Anders; Gottschalk, Marie

    2010-01-01

    addressed the kinetic mechanism of interaction of such bivalent ligands. We have investigated the binding interaction of a recently identified potent plasma-stable dimeric pentapeptide and PDZ1-2 of postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) using protein engineering in combination with fluorescence...

  2. Oxygen equilibria and ligand binding kinetics of erythrocruorins from two burrowing polychaetes of different modes of life, Marphysa sanguinea and Diopatra cuprea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Roy E.; Bonaventura, J.; Sullivan, B.;

    1978-01-01

    Oxygen equilibria, ligand-binding kinetics and some other physicochemical properties are reported for erythrocruorins of two intertidal polychaetes:Marphysa sanguinea, which inhabits simple, relatively stagnant burrows, andDiopatra cuprea, which inhabits impermeable, parchment-like tubes that are...

  3. Growth factors, glucose and insulin kinetics after low dose growth hormone in HIV - lipodystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ove; Flyvbjerg, Allan

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Low-dose growth hormone (GH) administration has been suggested as a treatment for HIV-lipodystrophy. METHODS: Postglucose GH-secretion, kinetics of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), insulin, and glucose metabolism were examined in six male HIV-infected lipodystrophic patients (two...... on circulating IGF-I, glucose metabolism, and insulin kinetics, 0.7 mg/day of GH may be expedient for treatment of HIV-infected males with lipodystrophy. Whether the patients' glucose metabolic status matters for the IGF-response to low-dose GH-therapy awaits further investigation....

  4. Functional comparison of the binding of factor H short consensus repeat 6 (SCR 6) to factor H binding protein from Neisseria meningitidis and the binding of factor H SCR 18 to 20 to Neisseria gonorrhoeae porin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaughnessy, Jutamas; Lewis, Lisa A; Jarva, Hanna; Ram, Sanjay

    2009-05-01

    Both Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae recruit the alternative pathway complement inhibitory protein factor H (fH) to their surfaces to evade complement-dependent killing. Meningococci bind fH via fH binding protein (fHbp), a surface-exposed lipoprotein that is subdivided into three variant families based on one classification scheme. Chimeric proteins that comprise contiguous domains of fH fused to murine Fc were used to localize the binding site for all three fHbp variants on fH to short consensus repeat 6 (SCR 6). As expected, fH-like protein 1 (FHL-1), which contains fH SCR 6, also bound to fHbp-expressing meningococci. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we identified histidine 337 and histidine 371 in SCR 6 as important for binding to fHbp. These findings may provide the molecular basis for recent observations that demonstrated human-specific fH binding to meningococci. Differences in the interactions of fHbp variants with SCR 6 were evident. Gonococci bind fH via their porin (Por) molecules (PorB.1A or PorB.1B); sialylation of lipooligosaccharide enhances fH binding. Both sialylated PorB.1B- and (unsialylated) PorB.1A-bearing gonococci bind fH through SCR 18 to 20; PorB.1A can also bind SCR 6, but only weakly, as evidenced by a low level of binding of FHL-1 relative to that of fH. Using isogenic strains expressing either meningococcal fHbp or gonococcal PorB.1B, we discovered that strains expressing gonococcal PorB.1B in the presence of sialylated lipooligosaccharide bound more fH, more effectively limited C3 deposition, and were more serum resistant than their isogenic counterparts expressing fHbp. Differences in fH binding to these two related pathogens may be important for modulating their individual responses to host immune attack.

  5. Insulin-like growth factors, insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins, insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 protease, and growth hormone-binding protein in lipodystrophic human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ove; Hansen, Birgitte Rønde;

    2004-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-lipodystrophy is associated with impaired growth hormone (GH) secretion. It remains to be elucidated whether insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs), IGFBP-3 protease, and GH-binding protein (GHBP) are abnormal in HIV-lipodystrophy....... These parameters were measured in overnight fasting serum samples from 16 Caucasian males with HIV-lipodystrophy (LIPO) and 15 Caucasian HIV-infected males without lipodystrophy (NONLIPO) matched for age, weight, duration of HIV infection, and antiretroviral therapy. In LIPO, abdominal fat mass and insulin...... of bioactive IGF-I in HIV-lipodystrophy....

  6. Real-time and label free determination of ligand binding-kinetics to primary cancer tissue specimens; a novel tool for the assessment of biomarker targeting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Thomas Mandel; Ayres Pereira, Marina; Oo, Htoo Zarni;

    2016-01-01

    In clinical oncology, diagnosis and evaluation of optimal treatment strategies are mostly based on histopathological examination combined with immunohistochemical (IHC) expression analysis of cancer-associated antigens in formalin fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue biopsies. However, informative...... of epitopes available, this readout offers a quantitative and unbiased readout for in situ binding-avidity and amount of binding epitopes. In summary, this method adds a new and important dimension to classical IHC-based molecular pathology by adding information about the binding characteristics...... IHC analysis depends on both the specificity and affinity of the binding reagent, which are inherently difficult to quantify in situ. Here we describe a label-free method that allows for the direct and real-time assessment of molecular binding kinetics in situ on FFPE tissue specimens using quartz...

  7. Kinetics of carboplatin-DNA binding in genomic DNA and bladder cancer cells as determined by accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hah, S S; Stivers, K M; Vere White, R; Henderson, P T

    2005-12-29

    Cisplatin and carboplatin are platinum-based drugs that are widely used in cancer chemotherapy. The cytotoxicity of these drugs is mediated by platinum-DNA monoadducts and intra- and interstrand diadducts, which are formed following uptake of the drug into the nucleus of cells. The pharmacodynamics of carboplatin display fewer side effects than for cisplatin, albeit with less potency, which may be due to differences in rates of DNA adduct formation. We report the use of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), a sensitive detection method often used for radiocarbon quantitation, to measure both the kinetics of [{sup 14}C]carboplatin-DNA adduct formation with genomic DNA and drug uptake and DNA binding in T24 human bladder cancer cells. Only carboplatin-DNA monoadducts contain radiocarbon in the platinated DNA, which allowed for calculation of kinetic rates and concentrations within the system. The percent of radiocarbon bound to salmon sperm DNA in the form of monoadducts was measured by AMS over 24 h. Knowledge of both the starting concentration of the parent carboplatin and the concentration of radiocarbon in the DNA at a variety of time points allowed calculation of the rates of Pt-DNA monoadduct formation and conversion to toxic cross-links. Importantly, the rate of carboplatin-DNA monoadduct formation was approximately 100-fold slower than that reported for the more potent cisplatin analogue, which may explain the lower toxicity of carboplatin. T24 human bladder cancer cells were incubated with a subpharmacological dose of [{sup 14}C]carboplatin, and the rate of accumulation of radiocarbon in the cells and nuclear DNA was measured by AMS. The lowest concentration of radiocarbon measured was approximately 1 amol/10 {micro}g of DNA. This sensitivity may allow the method to be used for clinical applications.

  8. Discovery and information-theoretic characterization of transcription factor binding sites that act cooperatively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Jacob; Adami, Christoph

    2015-09-02

    Transcription factor binding to the surface of DNA regulatory regions is one of the primary causes of regulating gene expression levels. A probabilistic approach to model protein-DNA interactions at the sequence level is through position weight matrices (PWMs) that estimate the joint probability of a DNA binding site sequence by assuming positional independence within the DNA sequence. Here we construct conditional PWMs that depend on the motif signatures in the flanking DNA sequence, by conditioning known binding site loci on the presence or absence of additional binding sites in the flanking sequence of each site's locus. Pooling known sites with similar flanking sequence patterns allows for the estimation of the conditional distribution function over the binding site sequences. We apply our model to the Dorsal transcription factor binding sites active in patterning the Dorsal-Ventral axis of Drosophila development. We find that those binding sites that cooperate with nearby Twist sites on average contain about 0.5 bits of information about the presence of Twist transcription factor binding sites in the flanking sequence. We also find that Dorsal binding site detectors conditioned on flanking sequence information make better predictions about what is a Dorsal site relative to background DNA than detection without information about flanking sequence features.

  9. Novel experimental design for steady-state processes: a systematic Bayesian approach for enzymes, drug transport, receptor binding, continuous culture and cell transport kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabbe, M James C; Murphy, Emma F; Gilmour, Steven G

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate that a Bayesian approach (the use of prior knowledge) to the design of steady-state experiments can produce major gains quantifiable in terms of information, productivity and accuracy of each experiment. Developing the use of Bayesian utility functions, we have used a systematic method to identify the optimum experimental designs for a number of kinetic model data sets. This has enabled the identification of trends between kinetic model types, sets of design rules and the key conclusion that such designs should be based on some prior knowledge of the kinetic model. We suggest an optimal and iterative method for selecting features of the design such as the substrate range, number of measurements and choice of intermediate points. The final design collects data suitable for accurate modelling and analysis and minimises the error in the parameters estimated. It is equally applicable to enzymes, drug transport, receptor binding, microbial culture and cell transport kinetics.

  10. Transcription factor binding site positioning in yeast: proximal promoter motifs characterize TATA-less promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erb, Ionas; van Nimwegen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The availability of sequence specificities for a substantial fraction of yeast's transcription factors and comparative genomic algorithms for binding site prediction has made it possible to comprehensively annotate transcription factor binding sites genome-wide. Here we use such a genome-wide annotation for comprehensively studying promoter architecture in yeast, focusing on the distribution of transcription factor binding sites relative to transcription start sites, and the architecture of TATA and TATA-less promoters. For most transcription factors, binding sites are positioned further upstream and vary over a wider range in TATA promoters than in TATA-less promoters. In contrast, a group of 6 'proximal promoter motifs' (GAT1/GLN3/DAL80, FKH1/2, PBF1/2, RPN4, NDT80, and ROX1) occur preferentially in TATA-less promoters and show a strong preference for binding close to the transcription start site in these promoters. We provide evidence that suggests that pre-initiation complexes are recruited at TATA sites in TATA promoters and at the sites of the other proximal promoter motifs in TATA-less promoters. TATA-less promoters can generally be classified by the proximal promoter motif they contain, with different classes of TATA-less promoters showing different patterns of transcription factor binding site positioning and nucleosome coverage. These observations suggest that different modes of regulation of transcription initiation may be operating in the different promoter classes. In addition we show that, across all promoter classes, there is a close match between nucleosome free regions and regions of highest transcription factor binding site density. This close agreement between transcription factor binding site density and nucleosome depletion suggests a direct and general competition between transcription factors and nucleosomes for binding to promoters.

  11. Transcription factor binding site positioning in yeast: proximal promoter motifs characterize TATA-less promoters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionas Erb

    Full Text Available The availability of sequence specificities for a substantial fraction of yeast's transcription factors and comparative genomic algorithms for binding site prediction has made it possible to comprehensively annotate transcription factor binding sites genome-wide. Here we use such a genome-wide annotation for comprehensively studying promoter architecture in yeast, focusing on the distribution of transcription factor binding sites relative to transcription start sites, and the architecture of TATA and TATA-less promoters. For most transcription factors, binding sites are positioned further upstream and vary over a wider range in TATA promoters than in TATA-less promoters. In contrast, a group of 6 'proximal promoter motifs' (GAT1/GLN3/DAL80, FKH1/2, PBF1/2, RPN4, NDT80, and ROX1 occur preferentially in TATA-less promoters and show a strong preference for binding close to the transcription start site in these promoters. We provide evidence that suggests that pre-initiation complexes are recruited at TATA sites in TATA promoters and at the sites of the other proximal promoter motifs in TATA-less promoters. TATA-less promoters can generally be classified by the proximal promoter motif they contain, with different classes of TATA-less promoters showing different patterns of transcription factor binding site positioning and nucleosome coverage. These observations suggest that different modes of regulation of transcription initiation may be operating in the different promoter classes. In addition we show that, across all promoter classes, there is a close match between nucleosome free regions and regions of highest transcription factor binding site density. This close agreement between transcription factor binding site density and nucleosome depletion suggests a direct and general competition between transcription factors and nucleosomes for binding to promoters.

  12. Thermodynamics and kinetic studies in the binding interaction of cyclic naphthalene diimide derivatives with double stranded DNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Monirul; Fujii, Satoshi; Sato, Shinobu; Okauchi, Tatsuo; Takenaka, Shigeori

    2015-08-01

    Previously, we reported our investigations of the interaction between a cyclic naphthalene diimide derivative (cNDI 1) and double stranded DNA (dsDNA) (Bioorg. Med. Chem.2014, 22, 2593). Here, we report the synthesis of the novel cNDI 2, which has shorter linker chains than cNDI 1. We performed comparative investigations of the interactions of both cNDI 1 and cNDI 2 with different types of dsDNA, including analysis of their thermodynamics and kinetics. Interactions between the cNDIs and calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA), poly[d(A-T)]2, or poly[d(G-C)]2 were explored by physicochemical and biochemical methods, including UV-Vis spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, stopped-flow kinetics, and a topoisomerase I assay. Upon addition of cNDIs to CT-DNA, the existence of an induced CD signal at approximately the wavelength of the naphthalene diimide chromophore and unwinding of the DNA duplex, as detected by the topoisomerase I assay, revealed that cNDIs bound to the DNA duplex. As indicated by the steric constraint in the formation of the complex, bis-threading intercalation was the more favorable binding mode. UV-Vis spectroscopic titration of the cNDIs with DNA duplexes showed affinities on the order of 10(5)-10(6)M(-1), with a stoichiometry of one cNDI molecule per four DNA base pairs. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔG, ΔH, and ΔS) based on the van't Hoff equation indicated that exothermic and entropy-dependent hydrophobic interactions played a major role in the reaction. Stopped-flow association and dissociation analysis showed that cNDI interactions with poly[d(G-C)]2 were more stable and had a slower dissociation rate than their interactions with poly[d(A-T)]2 and CT-DNA. Measurement of ionic strength indicated that electrostatic attraction is also an important component of the interaction between cNDIs and CT-DNA. Because of its longer linker chain, cNDI 1 showed higher binding selectivity, a more entropically favorable interaction, and much slower dissociation

  13. The DNA-binding factor Ctcf critically controls gene expression in macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Nikolic (Tatjana); D. Movita (Dowty); M.E.H. Lambers (Margaretha); C. Ribeiro de Almeida (Claudia); P.J. Biesta (Paula); K. Kreefft (Kim); M.J.W. de Bruijn (Marjolein); I.M. Bergen (Ingrid); N.J. Galjart (Niels); P.A. Boonstra (André); R.W. Hendriks (Rudi)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractMacrophages play an important role in immunity and homeostasis. Upon pathogen recognition via specific receptors, they rapidly induce inflammatory responses. This process is tightly controlled at the transcriptional level. The DNA binding zinc-finger protein CCCTC-binding factor (Ctcf) i

  14. CRITERIA FOR AN UPDATED CLASSIFICATION OF HUMAN TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR DNA-BINDING DOMAINS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wingender, Edgar

    2013-01-01

    By binding to cis-regulatory elements in a sequence-specific manner, transcription factors regulate the activity of nearby genes. Here, we discuss the criteria for a comprehensive classification of human TFs based on their DNA-binding domains. In particular, classification of basic leucine zipper (b

  15. CRITERIA FOR AN UPDATED CLASSIFICATION OF HUMAN TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR DNA-BINDING DOMAINS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wingender, Edgar

    By binding to cis-regulatory elements in a sequence-specific manner, transcription factors regulate the activity of nearby genes. Here, we discuss the criteria for a comprehensive classification of human TFs based on their DNA-binding domains. In particular, classification of basic leucine zipper

  16. DNA-binding specificity and molecular functions of NAC transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Addie Nina; Ernst, Heidi Asschenfeldt; Lo Leggio, Leila;

    2005-01-01

    The family of NAC (NAM/ATAF1,2/CUC2) transcription factors has been implicated in a wide range of plant processes, but knowledge on the DNA-binding properties of the family is limited. Using a reiterative selection procedure on random oligonucleotides, we have identified consensus binding sites f...

  17. Evolving Transcription Factor Binding Site Models From Protein Binding Microarray Data

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2016-02-02

    Protein binding microarray (PBM) is a high-throughput platform that can measure the DNA binding preference of a protein in a comprehensive and unbiased manner. In this paper, we describe the PBM motif model building problem. We apply several evolutionary computation methods and compare their performance with the interior point method, demonstrating their performance advantages. In addition, given the PBM domain knowledge, we propose and describe a novel method called kmerGA which makes domain-specific assumptions to exploit PBM data properties to build more accurate models than the other models built. The effectiveness and robustness of kmerGA is supported by comprehensive performance benchmarking on more than 200 datasets, time complexity analysis, convergence analysis, parameter analysis, and case studies. To demonstrate its utility further, kmerGA is applied to two real world applications: 1) PBM rotation testing and 2) ChIP-Seq peak sequence prediction. The results support the biological relevance of the models learned by kmerGA, and thus its real world applicability.

  18. Statistical Mechanics of Transcription-Factor Binding Site Discovery Using Hidden Markov Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Pankaj; Schwab, David J.; Sengupta, Anirvan M.

    2011-04-01

    Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) are a commonly used tool for inference of transcription factor (TF) binding sites from DNA sequence data. We exploit the mathematical equivalence between HMMs for TF binding and the "inverse" statistical mechanics of hard rods in a one-dimensional disordered potential to investigate learning in HMMs. We derive analytic expressions for the Fisher information, a commonly employed measure of confidence in learned parameters, in the biologically relevant limit where the density of binding sites is low. We then use techniques from statistical mechanics to derive a scaling principle relating the specificity (binding energy) of a TF to the minimum amount of training data necessary to learn it.

  19. Statistical Mechanics of Transcription-Factor Binding Site Discovery Using Hidden Markov Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Pankaj; Schwab, David J; Sengupta, Anirvan M

    2011-04-01

    Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) are a commonly used tool for inference of transcription factor (TF) binding sites from DNA sequence data. We exploit the mathematical equivalence between HMMs for TF binding and the "inverse" statistical mechanics of hard rods in a one-dimensional disordered potential to investigate learning in HMMs. We derive analytic expressions for the Fisher information, a commonly employed measure of confidence in learned parameters, in the biologically relevant limit where the density of binding sites is low. We then use techniques from statistical mechanics to derive a scaling principle relating the specificity (binding energy) of a TF to the minimum amount of training data necessary to learn it.

  20. Position specific variation in the rate of evolution intranscription factor binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Kellis, Manolis; Lander, EricS.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2003-08-28

    The binding sites of sequence specific transcription factors are an important and relatively well-understood class of functional non-coding DNAs. Although a wide variety of experimental and computational methods have been developed to characterize transcription factor binding sites, they remain difficult to identify. Comparison of non-coding DNA from related species has shown considerable promise in identifying these functional non-coding sequences, even though relatively little is known about their evolution. Here we analyze the genome sequences of the budding yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. bayanus, S. paradoxus and S. mikataeto study the evolution of transcription factor binding sites. As expected, we find that both experimentally characterized and computationally predicted binding sites evolve slower than surrounding sequence, consistent with the hypothesis that they are under purifying selection. We also observe position-specific variation in the rate of evolution within binding sites. We find that the position-specific rate of evolution is positively correlated with degeneracy among binding sites within S. cerevisiae. We test theoretical predictions for the rate of evolution at positions where the base frequencies deviate from background due to purifying selection and find reasonable agreement with the observed rates of evolution. Finally, we show how the evolutionary characteristics of real binding motifs can be used to distinguish them from artifacts of computational motif finding algorithms. As has been observed for protein sequences, the rate of evolution in transcription factor binding sites varies with position, suggesting that some regions are under stronger functional constraint than others. This variation likely reflects the varying importance of different positions in the formation of the protein-DNA complex. The characterization of the pattern of evolution in known binding sites will likely contribute to the effective use of comparative

  1. Insulin-like growth factors, insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins, insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 protease, and growth hormone-binding protein in lipodystrophic human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ove; Hansen, Birgitte R;

    2004-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-lipodystrophy is associated with impaired growth hormone (GH) secretion. It remains to be elucidated whether insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs), IGFBP-3 protease, and GH-binding protein (GHBP) are abnormal in HIV-lipodystrophy. The......Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-lipodystrophy is associated with impaired growth hormone (GH) secretion. It remains to be elucidated whether insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs), IGFBP-3 protease, and GH-binding protein (GHBP) are abnormal in HIV......-lipodystrophy. These parameters were measured in overnight fasting serum samples from 16 Caucasian males with HIV-lipodystrophy (LIPO) and 15 Caucasian HIV-infected males without lipodystrophy (NONLIPO) matched for age, weight, duration of HIV infection, and antiretroviral therapy. In LIPO, abdominal fat mass and insulin...... study groups, including suppressed GH, and increased GHBP in LIPO, argue against GH resistance of GH-sensitive tissues in LIPO compared with NONLIPO; however, this notion awaits examination in dose-response studies. Furthermore, our data suggest that IGFBP-3 protease is a significant regulator...

  2. Application of robotics to steady state enzyme kinetics: analysis of tight-binding inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aiying; Huang, Yanting; Taunk, Prakash; Magnin, David R; Ghosh, Krishnendu; Robertson, James G

    2003-10-15

    Using available commercial robotics and instrumentation, we developed a fully automated and rigorous steady state enzyme kinetic assay for dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV; E.C. 3.4.14.5). The automated assay was validated with isoleucyl thiazolidide, a potent inhibitor of DPP IV with K(is)=110nM. Signal window analysis indicated that the assay had a 98% probability of detecting an inhibitor yielding 15% inhibition, with a predicted false positive rate of 0.13%. A mechanistic inhibition version of the automated assay was validated with isoleucyl 4-cyanothiazolidide, a very potent inhibitor of DPP IV. Isoleucyl 4-cyanothiazolidide was a competitive inhibitor of purified porcine DPP IV with K(is)=1 nM. Similar K(is) values were obtained for purified rat DPP IV and for DPP IV activity in human plasma from normal and diabetic donors. The pH dependence of K(is) for isoleucyl 4-cyanothiazolidide yielded a bell-shaped profile, with pK(a)=5.0 and pK(b)=7.6. To date, over 100,000 data points have been generated in profiling targeted compound libraries and in the analysis of tight-binding inhibitors of DPP IV. The data also show that robotic analysis is capable of producing full mechanistic inhibition analysis in a timely fashion to support drug discovery.

  3. Chemical Editing of Macrocyclic Natural Products and Kinetic Profiling Reveal Slow, Tight-Binding Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors with Picomolar Affinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitir, Betül; Maolanon, Alex R; Ohm, Ragnhild G; Colaço, Ana R; Fristrup, Peter; Madsen, Andreas S; Olsen, Christian A

    2017-09-26

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are validated targets for treatment of certain cancer types and play numerous regulatory roles in biology, ranging from epigenetics to metabolism. Small molecules are highly important as tool compounds for probing these mechanisms as well as for the development of new medicines. Therefore, detailed mechanistic information and precise characterization of the chemical probes used to investigate the effects of HDAC enzymes are vital. We interrogated Nature's arsenal of macrocyclic nonribosomal peptide HDAC inhibitors by chemical synthesis and evaluation of more than 30 natural products and analogues. This furnished surprising trends in binding affinities for the various macrocycles, which were then exploited for the design of highly potent class I and IIb HDAC inhibitors. Furthermore, thorough kinetic investigation revealed unexpected inhibitory mechanisms of important tool compounds as well as the approved drug Istodax (romidepsin). This work provides novel inhibitors with varying potencies, selectivity profiles, and mechanisms of inhibition and, importantly, affords insight into known tool compounds that will improve the interpretation of their effects in biology and medicine.

  4. The impact of DNA intercalators on DNA and DNA-processing enzymes elucidated through force-dependent binding kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biebricher, Andreas S.; Heller, Iddo; Roijmans, Roel F. H.; Hoekstra, Tjalle P.; Peterman, Erwin J. G.; Wuite, Gijs J. L.

    2015-01-01

    DNA intercalators are widely used as fluorescent probes to visualize DNA and DNA transactions in vivo and in vitro. It is well known that they perturb DNA structure and stability, which can in turn influence DNA-processing by proteins. Here we elucidate this perturbation by combining single-dye fluorescence microscopy with force spectroscopy and measuring the kinetics of DNA intercalation by the mono- and bis-intercalating cyanine dyes SYTOX Orange, SYTOX Green, SYBR Gold, YO-PRO-1, YOYO-1 and POPO-3. We show that their DNA-binding affinity is mainly governed by a strongly tension-dependent dissociation rate. These rates can be tuned over a range of seven orders of magnitude by changing DNA tension, intercalating species and ionic strength. We show that optimizing these rates minimizes the impact of intercalators on strand separation and enzymatic activity. These new insights provide handles for the improved use of intercalators as DNA probes with minimal perturbation and maximal efficacy. PMID:26084388

  5. Structural Basis for Negative Cooperativity in Growth Factor Binding to an EGF Receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarado, Diego; Klein, Daryl E.; Lemmon, Mark A. (UPENN-MED)

    2010-09-27

    Transmembrane signaling by the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) involves ligand-induced dimerization and allosteric regulation of the intracellular tyrosine kinase domain. Crystallographic studies have shown how ligand binding induces dimerization of the EGFR extracellular region but cannot explain the high-affinity and low-affinity classes of cell-surface EGF-binding sites inferred from curved Scatchard plots. From a series of crystal structures of the Drosophila EGFR extracellular region, we show here how Scatchard plot curvature arises from negatively cooperative ligand binding. The first ligand-binding event induces formation of an asymmetric dimer with only one bound ligand. The unoccupied site in this dimer is structurally restrained, leading to reduced affinity for binding of the second ligand, and thus negative cooperativity. Our results explain the cell-surface binding characteristics of EGF receptors and suggest how individual EGFR ligands might stabilize distinct dimeric species with different signaling properties.

  6. Kinetics as a tool to assess the immobilization of soil trace metals by binding phase amendments for in situ remediation purposes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varrault, Gilles, E-mail: varrault@u-pec.fr [Universite Paris-Est, Leesu, UMR-MA102-AgroParisTech, 61 avenue du General de Gaulle, 94010 Creteil Cedex (France); Bermond, Alain [AgroParisTech, Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique, 16 rue Claude Bernard, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2011-08-30

    Highlights: {yields} Assessment of the efficiency of soil remediation method by binding phase amendment. {yields} Use of a kinetic fractionation method to assess trace metal mobility in amended soils. {yields} Vernadite amendments are effective for lead and cadmium remediation. {yields} IHA amendments are only effective for copper remediation. {yields} Advantages of kinetic fractionation vs. extraction schemes performed at equilibrium. - Abstract: Many soil remediation techniques consist in decreasing the mobility of trace metals by means of adding trace metal binding phases. For this study, whose aim is to assess the efficiency of soil remediation method by binding phase amendment, a kinetic fractionation method that provides the labile and slowly labile trace metal amounts in soil has been introduced. Manganese oxides (vernadite) and insolubilized humic acids (IHA) have been used as binding phases for the remediation of four heavily polluted soils. Vernadite amendments are effective for lead and cadmium remediation, whereas IHA amendments are only effective for copper remediation. In most cases, the labile metal fractions decrease dramatically in amended soils (up to 50%); on the other hand, the amounts of total extracted metal near the point of thermodynamic equilibrium often show no significant difference between the amended soil and the control soil. These results highlight the utility of kinetic fractionation in assessing the efficiency of soil remediation techniques and, more generally, in evaluating trace metal mobility in soils and its potential advantages compared to extraction schemes performed under equilibrium conditions. In the future, this kinetic method could be considerably simplified so as to consume much less time allowing its routine use.

  7. rVISTA for Comparative Sequence-Based Discovery of Functional Transcription Factor Binding Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loots, Gabriela G.; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Pachter, Lior; Dubchak, Inna; Rubin, Edward M.

    2002-03-08

    Identifying transcriptional regulatory elements represents a significant challenge in annotating the genomes of higher vertebrates. We have developed a computational tool, rVISTA, for high-throughput discovery of cis-regulatory elements that combines transcription factor binding site prediction and the analysis of inter-species sequence conservation. Here, we illustrate the ability of rVISTA to identify true transcription factor binding sites through the analysis of AP-1 and NFAT binding sites in the 1 Mb well-annotated cytokine gene cluster1 (Hs5q31; Mm11). The exploitation of orthologous human-mouse data set resulted in the elimination of 95 percent of the 38,000 binding sites predicted upon analysis of the human sequence alone, while it identified 87 percent of the experimentally verified binding sites in this region.

  8. Binding characteristics of brain-derived neurotrophic factor to its receptors on neurons from the chick embryo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Tebar, A.; Barde, Y.A.

    1988-09-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a protein known to support the survival of embryonic sensory neurons and retinal ganglion cells, was derivatized with 125I-Bolton-Hunter reagent and obtained in a biologically active, radioactive form (125I-BDNF). Using dorsal root ganglion neurons from chick embryos at 9 d of development, the basic physicochemical parameters of the binding of 125I-BDNF with its receptors were established. Two different classes of receptors were found, with dissociation constants of 1.7 x 10(-11) M (high-affinity receptors) and 1.3 x 10(-9) M (low-affinity receptors). Unlabeled BDNF competed with 125I-BDNF for binding to the high-affinity receptors with an inhibition constant essentially identical to the dissociation constant of the labeled protein: 1.2 x 10(-11) M. The association and dissociation rates from both types of receptors were also determined, and the dissociation constants calculated from these kinetic experiments were found to correspond to the results obtained from steady-state binding. The number of high-affinity receptors (a few hundred per cell soma) was 15 times lower than that of low-affinity receptors. No high-affinity receptors were found on sympathetic neurons, known not to respond to BDNF, although specific binding of 125I-BDNF to these cells was detected at a high concentration of the radioligand. These results are discussed and compared with those obtained with nerve growth factor on the same neuronal populations.

  9. ProteDNA: a sequence-based predictor of sequence-specific DNA-binding residues in transcription factors

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the design of a sequence-based predictor named ProteDNA for identifying the sequence-specific binding residues in a transcription factor (TF). Concerning protein–DNA interactions, there are two types of binding mechanisms involved, namely sequence-specific binding and nonspecific binding. Sequence-specific bindings occur between protein sidechains and nucleotide bases and correspond to sequence-specific recognition of genes. Therefore, sequence-specific bindings are esse...

  10. Kinetic and thermodynamic consequences of the substitution of SMe for OMe substituents of cryptophane hosts on the binding of neutral and cationic guests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Chantal; Humilière, Delphine; Riva, Nathalie; Collet, André; Dutasta, Jean-Pierre

    2003-06-21

    To investigate the origin of the high selectivity of cryptophane-E (1) towards Me3NH+, Me4N+, and CHCl3, and particularly to discriminate the different contributions that stabilize the supramolecular complexes, we have synthesized the new cryptophane 2 bearing six MeS groups instead of MeO groups in 1. This led to a decrease of the negative charge density in the equatorial region of 2 without affecting notably the size of the molecular cavity. The binding properties of 1 and 2 towards the three guests were examined in solution and showed a slight decrease of the deltaGa favoring the complexes of 1, accompanied by a significant modification of the deltaHa vs. deltaSa balance. The binding of the ammonium guests to 1 and 2 was strongly entropy driven, while that of CHCl3 was purely enthalpy driven. A combination of spectroscopic and computational techniques was used to assign the main intermolecular interactions that occurred during the inclusion process. The neutral CHCl3 molecule is more stabilized in the less negatively charged CTV cap of 1. The different behavior towards the ammonium cations can be explained in term of interactions with the electronegative heteroatoms and cation-pi interactions. Moreover, this study revealed a considerable slowing down of the guest exchange kinetics with host 2, for which the association and dissociation rates are reduced by a factor 10(3) to 10(4) with respect to 1. For example, at room temperature, the Me4N+@2 complex exhibits a half-life of ca. 2 years, instead of a few hours for the corresponding complex of 1.

  11. An AP1 binding site upstream of the kappa immunoglobulin intron enhancer binds inducible factors and contributes to expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanke, J T; Marcuzzi, A; Podzorski, R P; Van Ness, B

    1994-01-01

    Expression of the kappa immunoglobulin light chain gene requires developmental- and tissue-specific regulation by trans-acting factors which interact with two distinct enhancer elements. A new protein-DNA interaction has been identified upstream of the intron enhancer, within the matrix-associated region of the J-C intron. The binding activity is greatly inducible in pre-B cells by bacterial lipopolysaccharide and interleukin-1 but specific complexes are found at all stages of B cell development tested. The footprinted binding site is homologous to the consensus AP1 motif. The protein components of this complex are specifically competed by an AP1 consensus motif and were shown by supershift to include c-Jun and c-Fos, suggesting that this binding site is an AP1 motif and that the Jun and Fos families of transcription factors play a role in the regulation of the kappa light chain gene. Mutation of the AP1 motif in the context of the intron enhancer was shown to decrease enhancer-mediated activation of the promoter in both pre-B cells induced with LPS and constitutive expression in mature B cells. Images PMID:7816634

  12. Photochemically enhanced binding of small molecules to the tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 inhibits the binding of TNF-[alpha

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, Percy H.; Scherle, Peggy A.; Muckelbauer, Jodi K.; Voss, Matthew E.; Liu, Rui-qin; Thompson III, Lorin A.; Xu, Meizhong; Lo, Yvonne C.; Li, Zhong; Strzemienski, Paul; Yang, Gengjie; Falahatpishen, Nikoo; Farrow, Neil A.; Tebben, Andrew J.; Underwood, Denis; Trzaskos, James M.; Friedman, Steven M.; Newton, Robert C.; Decicco, Carl P. (DuPont)

    2010-03-05

    The binding of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-{alpha}) to the type-1 TNF receptor (TNFRc1) plays an important role in inflammation. Despite the clinical success of biologics (antibodies, soluble receptors) for treating TNF-based autoimmune conditions, no potent small molecule antagonists have been developed. Our screening of chemical libraries revealed that N-alkyl 5-arylidene-2-thioxo-1,3-thiazolidin-4-ones were antagonists of this protein-protein interaction. After chemical optimization, we discovered IW927, which potently disrupted the binding of TNF-{alpha} to TNFRc1 (IC{sub 50} = 50 nM) and also blocked TNF-stimulated phosphorylation of I{kappa}-B in Ramos cells (IC{sub 50} = 600 nM). This compound did not bind detectably to the related cytokine receptors TNFRc2 or CD40, and did not display any cytotoxicity at concentrations as high as 100 {micro}M. Detailed evaluation of this and related molecules revealed that compounds in this class are 'photochemically enhanced' inhibitors, in that they bind reversibly to the TNFRc1 with weak affinity (ca. 40-100 mM) and then covalently modify the receptor via a photochemical reaction. We obtained a crystal structure of IV703 (a close analog of IW927) bound to the TNFRc1. This structure clearly revealed that one of the aromatic rings of the inhibitor was covalently linked to the receptor through the main-chain nitrogen of Ala-62, a residue that has already been implicated in the binding of TNF-{alpha} to the TNFRc1. When combined with the fact that our inhibitors are reversible binders in light-excluded conditions, the results of the crystallography provide the basis for the rational design of nonphotoreactive inhibitors of the TNF-{alpha}-TNFRc1 interaction.

  13. Photochemically enhanced binding of small molecules to the tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 inhibits the binding of TNF-alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, P H; Scherle, P A; Muckelbauer, J K; Voss, M E; Liu, R Q; Thompson, L A; Tebben, A J; Solomon, K A; Lo, Y C; Li, Z; Strzemienski, P; Yang, G; Falahatpisheh, N; Xu, M; Wu, Z; Farrow, N A; Ramnarayan, K; Wang, J; Rideout, D; Yalamoori, V; Domaille, P; Underwood, D J; Trzaskos, J M; Friedman, S M; Newton, R C; Decicco, C P; Muckelbauer, J A

    2001-10-09

    The binding of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) to the type-1 TNF receptor (TNFRc1) plays an important role in inflammation. Despite the clinical success of biologics (antibodies, soluble receptors) for treating TNF-based autoimmune conditions, no potent small molecule antagonists have been developed. Our screening of chemical libraries revealed that N-alkyl 5-arylidene-2-thioxo-1,3-thiazolidin-4-ones were antagonists of this protein-protein interaction. After chemical optimization, we discovered IW927, which potently disrupted the binding of TNF-alpha to TNFRc1 (IC(50) = 50 nM) and also blocked TNF-stimulated phosphorylation of Ikappa-B in Ramos cells (IC(50) = 600 nM). This compound did not bind detectably to the related cytokine receptors TNFRc2 or CD40, and did not display any cytotoxicity at concentrations as high as 100 microM. Detailed evaluation of this and related molecules revealed that compounds in this class are "photochemically enhanced" inhibitors, in that they bind reversibly to the TNFRc1 with weak affinity (ca. 40-100 microM) and then covalently modify the receptor via a photochemical reaction. We obtained a crystal structure of IV703 (a close analog of IW927) bound to the TNFRc1. This structure clearly revealed that one of the aromatic rings of the inhibitor was covalently linked to the receptor through the main-chain nitrogen of Ala-62, a residue that has already been implicated in the binding of TNF-alpha to the TNFRc1. When combined with the fact that our inhibitors are reversible binders in light-excluded conditions, the results of the crystallography provide the basis for the rational design of nonphotoreactive inhibitors of the TNF-alpha-TNFRc1 interaction.

  14. Binding equilibrium and kinetics of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands in cell adhesion: Insights from computational model systems and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weikl, Thomas R; Hu, Jinglei; Xu, Guang-Kui; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2016-09-02

    The adhesion of cell membranes is mediated by the binding of membrane-anchored receptor and ligand proteins. In this article, we review recent results from simulations and theory that lead to novel insights on how the binding equilibrium and kinetics of these proteins is affected by the membranes and by the membrane anchoring and molecular properties of the proteins. Simulations and theory both indicate that the binding equilibrium constant [Formula: see text] and the on- and off-rate constants of anchored receptors and ligands in their 2-dimensional (2D) membrane environment strongly depend on the membrane roughness from thermally excited shape fluctuations on nanoscales. Recent theory corroborated by simulations provides a general relation between [Formula: see text] and the binding constant [Formula: see text] of soluble variants of the receptors and ligands that lack the membrane anchors and are free to diffuse in 3 dimensions (3D).

  15. Hybrid incompatibility arises in a sequence-based bioenergetic model of transcription factor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulchinsky, Alexander Y; Johnson, Norman A; Watt, Ward B; Porter, Adam H

    2014-11-01

    Postzygotic isolation between incipient species results from the accumulation of incompatibilities that arise as a consequence of genetic divergence. When phenotypes are determined by regulatory interactions, hybrid incompatibility can evolve even as a consequence of parallel adaptation in parental populations because interacting genes can produce the same phenotype through incompatible allelic combinations. We explore the evolutionary conditions that promote and constrain hybrid incompatibility in regulatory networks using a bioenergetic model (combining thermodynamics and kinetics) of transcriptional regulation, considering the bioenergetic basis of molecular interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and their binding sites. The bioenergetic parameters consider the free energy of formation of the bond between the TF and its binding site and the availability of TFs in the intracellular environment. Together these determine fractional occupancy of the TF on the promoter site, the degree of subsequent gene expression and in diploids, and the degree of dominance among allelic interactions. This results in a sigmoid genotype-phenotype map and fitness landscape, with the details of the shape determining the degree of bioenergetic evolutionary constraint on hybrid incompatibility. Using individual-based simulations, we subjected two allopatric populations to parallel directional or stabilizing selection. Misregulation of hybrid gene expression occurred under either type of selection, although it evolved faster under directional selection. Under directional selection, the extent of hybrid incompatibility increased with the slope of the genotype-phenotype map near the derived parental expression level. Under stabilizing selection, hybrid incompatibility arose from compensatory mutations and was greater when the bioenergetic properties of the interaction caused the space of nearly neutral genotypes around the stable expression level to be wide. F2's showed higher

  16. Multiplexed massively parallel SELEX for characterization of human transcription factor binding specificities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolma, Arttu; Kivioja, Teemu; Toivonen, Jarkko; Cheng, Lu; Wei, Gonghong; Enge, Martin; Taipale, Mikko; Vaquerizas, Juan M.; Yan, Jian; Sillanpää, Mikko J.; Bonke, Martin; Palin, Kimmo; Talukder, Shaheynoor; Hughes, Timothy R.; Luscombe, Nicholas M.; Ukkonen, Esko; Taipale, Jussi

    2010-01-01

    The genetic code—the binding specificity of all transfer-RNAs—defines how protein primary structure is determined by DNA sequence. DNA also dictates when and where proteins are expressed, and this information is encoded in a pattern of specific sequence motifs that are recognized by transcription factors. However, the DNA-binding specificity is only known for a small fraction of the ∼1400 human transcription factors (TFs). We describe here a high-throughput method for analyzing transcription factor binding specificity that is based on systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) and massively parallel sequencing. The method is optimized for analysis of large numbers of TFs in parallel through the use of affinity-tagged proteins, barcoded selection oligonucleotides, and multiplexed sequencing. Data are analyzed by a new bioinformatic platform that uses the hundreds of thousands of sequencing reads obtained to control the quality of the experiments and to generate binding motifs for the TFs. The described technology allows higher throughput and identification of much longer binding profiles than current microarray-based methods. In addition, as our method is based on proteins expressed in mammalian cells, it can also be used to characterize DNA-binding preferences of full-length proteins or proteins requiring post-translational modifications. We validate the method by determining binding specificities of 14 different classes of TFs and by confirming the specificities for NFATC1 and RFX3 using ChIP-seq. Our results reveal unexpected dimeric modes of binding for several factors that were thought to preferentially bind DNA as monomers. PMID:20378718

  17. Having it both ways: transcription factors that bind DNA and RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassiday, Laura A; Maher, L James

    2002-10-01

    Multifunctional proteins challenge the conventional 'one protein-one function' paradigm. Here we note apparent multifunctional proteins with nucleic acid partners, tabulating eight examples. We then focus on eight additional cases of transcription factors that bind double-stranded DNA with sequence specificity, but that also appear to lead alternative lives as RNA-binding proteins. Exemplified by the prototypic Xenopus TFIIIA protein, and more recently by mammalian p53, this list of transcription factors includes WT-1, TRA-1, bicoid, the bacterial sigma(70) subunit, STAT1 and TLS/FUS. The existence of transcription factors that bind both DNA and RNA provides an interesting puzzle. Little is known concerning the biological roles of these alternative protein-nucleic acid interactions, and even less is known concerning the structural basis for dual nucleic acid specificity. We discuss how these natural examples have motivated us to identify artificial RNA sequences that competitively inhibit a DNA-binding transcription factor not known to have a natural RNA partner. The identification of such RNAs raises the possibility that RNA binding by DNA-binding proteins is more common than currently appreciated.

  18. DNA-MATRIX: a tool for constructing transcription factor binding sites Weight matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Prakash Singh,

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite considerable effort to date, DNA transcription factor binding sites prediction in whole genome remains a challenge for the researchers. Currently the genome wide transcription factor binding sites prediction tools required either direct pattern sequence or weight matrix. Although there are known transcription factor binding sites pattern databases and tools for genome level prediction but no tool for weight matrix construction. Considering this, we developed a DNA-MATRIX tool for searching putative transcription factor binding sites in genomic sequences. DNA-MATRIX uses the simple heuristic approach for weight matrix construction, which can be transformed into different formats as per the requirement of researcher’s for further genome wide prediction and therefore provides the possibility to identify the conserved known DNA binding sites in the coregulated genes and also to search for a great variety of different regulatory binding patterns. The user may construct and save specific weight or frequency matrices in different formats derived through user selected set of known motif sequences.

  19. Collagen and Stretch Modulate Autocrine Secretion of Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 and Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Proteins from Differentiated Skeletal Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Carmen E.; Fenwick-Smith, Daniela; Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    1995-01-01

    Stretch-induced skeletal muscle growth may involve increased autocrine secretion of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) since IGF-1 is a potent growth factor for skeletal muscle hypertrophy, and stretch elevates IGF-1 mRNA levels in vivo. In tissue cultures of differentiated avian pectoralis skeletal muscle cells, nanomolar concentrations of exogenous IGF-1 stimulated growth in mechanically stretched but not static cultures. These cultures released up to 100 pg of endogenously produced IGF-1/micro-g of protein/day, as well as three major IGF binding proteins of 31, 36, and 43 kilodaltons (kDa). IGF-1 was secreted from both myofibers and fibroblasts coexisting in the muscle cultures. Repetitive stretch/relaxation of the differentiated skeletal muscle cells stimulated the acute release of IGF-1 during the first 4 h after initiating mechanical activity, but caused no increase in the long-term secretion over 24-72 h of IGF-1, or its binding proteins. Varying the intensity and frequency of stretch had no effect on the long-term efflux of IGF-1. In contrast to stretch, embedding the differentiated muscle cells in a three-dimensional collagen (Type I) matrix resulted in a 2-5-fold increase in long-term IGF-1 efflux over 24-72 h. Collagen also caused a 2-5-fold increase in the release of the IGF binding proteins. Thus, both the extracellular matrix protein type I collagen and stretch stimulate the autocrine secretion of IGF-1, but with different time kinetics. This endogenously produced growth factor may be important for the growth response of skeletal myofibers to both types of external stimuli.

  20. Binding of factor VIII to von willebrand factor is enabled by cleavage of the von Willebrand factor propeptide and enhanced by formation of disulfide-linked multimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendetowicz, A V; Morris, J A; Wise, R J; Gilbert, G E; Kaufman, R J

    1998-07-15

    von Willebrand factor (vWF) is a multimeric adhesive glycoprotein with one factor VIII binding site/subunit. Prior reports suggest that posttranslational modifications of vWF, including formation of N-terminal intersubunit disulfide bonds and subsequent cleavage of the propeptide, influence availability and/or affinity of factor VIII binding sites. We found that deletion of the vWF propeptide produced a dimeric vWF molecule lacking N-terminal intersubunit disulfide bonds. This molecule bound fluorescein-labeled factor VIII with sixfold lower affinity than multimeric vWF in an equilibrium flow cytometry assay (approximate KDs, 5 nmol/L v 0.9 nmol/L). Coexpression of propeptide-deleted vWF with the vWF propeptide in trans yielded multimeric vWF that displayed increased affinity for factor VIII. Insertion of an alanine residue at the N-terminus of the mature vWF subunit destroyed binding to factor VIII, indicating that the native mature N-terminus is required for factor VIII binding. The requirement for vWF propeptide cleavage was shown by (1) a point mutation of the vWF propeptide cleavage site yielding pro-vWF that was defective in factor VIII binding and (2) correlation between efficiency of intracellular propeptide cleavage and factor VIII binding. Furthermore, in a cell-free system, addition of the propeptide-cleaving enzyme PACE/furin enabled factor VIII binding in parallel with propeptide cleavage. Our results indicate that high-affinity factor VIII binding sites are located on N-terminal disulfide-linked vWF subunits from which the propeptide has been cleaved.

  1. Efficient and cost-effective experimental determination of kinetic constants and data: the success of a Bayesian systematic approach to drug transport, receptor binding, continuous culture and cell transport kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Emma F; Gilmour, Steven G; Crabbe, M James C

    2004-01-02

    Details about the parameters of kinetic systems are crucial for progress in both medical and industrial research, including drug development, clinical diagnosis and biotechnology applications. Such details must be collected by a series of kinetic experiments and investigations. The correct design of the experiment is essential to collecting data suitable for analysis, modelling and deriving the correct information. We have developed a systematic and iterative Bayesian method and sets of rules for the design of enzyme kinetic experiments. Our method selects the optimum design to collect data suitable for accurate modelling and analysis and minimises the error in the parameters estimated. The rules select features of the design such as the substrate range and the number of measurements. We show here that this method can be directly applied to the study of other important kinetic systems, including drug transport, receptor binding, microbial culture and cell transport kinetics. It is possible to reduce the errors in the estimated parameters and, most importantly, increase the efficiency and cost-effectiveness by reducing the necessary amount of experiments and data points measured.

  2. Effects of calmodulin on DNA-binding activity of heat shock transcription factor in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The DNA-binding activity of heat shock transcription factor (HSF) was induced by heat shock (HS) of a whole cell extract. Addition of antiserum, specific to CaM, to a whole cell extract reduced bind of the HSF to the heat shock element (HSE) with maize, and the re-addition of CaM to the sample restored the activity of the HSF for binding to HSE. In addition, DNA-binding activity of the HSF was also induced by directly adding CaM to a whole cell extract at non-HS temperature with maize. Similar results were obtained with wheat and tomato. Our observations provide the first example of the involvement of CaM in regulation of the DNA-binding activity of the HSF.

  3. Study on a hidden protein-DNA binding in salmon sperm DNA sample by dynamic kinetic capillary isoelectric focusing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang Liang; Dou Peng; Dong Mingming; Ke Xiaokang; Bian Ningsheng [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Liu Zhen, E-mail: zhenliu@nju.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2009-09-14

    Nuclease P1 is an important enzyme that hydrolyzes RNA or single-stranded DNA into nucleotides, and complete digestion is an essential basis for assays based on this enzyme. To digest a doubled-stranded DNA, the enzyme is usually combined with heat denaturing, which breaks doubled-stranded DNA into single strands. This paper presents an un-expected phenomenon that nuclease P1, in combination with heat denaturing, fails to completely digest a DNA sample extracted from salmon sperm. Under the experimental conditions used, at which nuclease P1 can completely digest calf thymus DNA, the digestion yield of salmon sperm DNA was only 89.5%. Spectrometric measurement indicated that a total protein of 4.7% is present in the DNA sample. To explain the reason for this phenomenon, the dynamic kinetic capillary isoelectric focusing (DK-CIEF) approach proposed previously, which allows for the discrimination of different types of protein-DNA interactions and the measurement of the individual dissociation rate constants, was modified and applied to examine possible protein-DNA interactions involved. It was found that a non-specific DNA-protein binding occurs in the sample, the dissociation rate constant for which was measured to be 7.05 {+-} 0.83 x 10{sup -3} s{sup -1}. The formation of DNA-protein complex was suggested to be the main reason for the incomplete digestion of the DNA sample. The modified DK-CIEF approach can be applied as general DNA samples, with the advantages of fast speed and low sample consumption.

  4. Dopamine D2 receptors labeled with ( sup 3 H)raclopride in rat and rabbit brains. Equilibrium binding, kinetics, distribution and selectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewar, K.M.; Montreuil, B.; Grondin, L.; Reader, T.A. (Universite de Montreal, Quebec (Canada))

    1989-08-01

    The binding properties of the substituted benzamide raclopride to dopamine D2 receptors were studied with membrane preparations from rat and rabbit neostriatum. An analysis of the association kinetics suggested a single binding site but the data from the dissociation experiments were better described by a two-site model. Examination of saturation curves at equilibrium revealed a single class of binding sites in the neostriatum from both species (rat: maximum binding capacity (Bmax) = 247 fmol/mg of protein; rabbit: Bmax = 337 fmol/mg of protein). In cortical regions known to possess a distinct dopaminergic innervation (piriform-entorhinal areas and cingulate cortex) the Bmax values ranged between 9 and 22 fmol/mg of protein. ({sup 3}H)Raclopride binding sites (less than 12 fmol/mg of protein) were also detectable in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus as well as in the somatosensory and visual cortices. The selectivity in the neostriatum was examined by competition experiments with dopaminergic drugs. The rank of potency of agonists and antagonists to displace ({sup 3}H)raclopride binding revealed its selectivity for the dopamine D2 receptor and was essentially the same for both species. Antagonist competition curves could be fitted to a single site but inhibition by agonists was better described assuming a two-site model. The stereospecificity of binding was demonstrated by the use of the enantiomer pairs. These results validate the utilization of the novel benzamide ({sup 3}H)raclopride as a selective marker of dopamine D2 receptors.

  5. SELEX-Seq: A Method to Determine DNA Binding Specificities of Plant Transcription Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaczniak, Cezary; Angenent, Gerco C; Kaufmann, Kerstin

    2017-01-01

    Systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) is a method that allows isolating specific nucleotide sequences that interact with a DNA binding protein of choice. By using a transcription factor (TF) and a randomized pool of double-stranded DNA, this technique can be used to characterize TF DNA binding specificities and affinities. The method is based on protein-DNA complex immunoprecipitation with protein-specific antibodies and subsequent DNA selection and amplification. Application of massively parallel sequencing (-seq) at each cycle of SELEX allows determining the relative affinities to any DNA sequence for any transcription factor or TF complex. The resulting TF DNA binding motifs can be used to predict potential DNA binding sites in genomes and thereby direct target genes of TFs.

  6. Growth factors induce monocyte binding to vascular smooth muscle cells: implications for monocyte retention in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Qiangjun; Lanting, Linda; Natarajan, Rama

    2004-09-01

    Adhesive interactions between monocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) may contribute to subendothelial monocyte-macrophage retention in atherosclerosis. We investigated the effects of angiotensin II (ANG II) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB on VSMC-monocyte interactions. Treatment of human aortic VSMC (HVSMC) with ANG II or PDGF-BB significantly increased binding to human monocytic THP-1 cells and to peripheral blood monocytes. This was inhibited by antibodies to monocyte beta(1)- and beta(2)-integrins. The binding was also attenuated by blocking VSMC arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism by inhibitors of 12/15-lipoxygenase (12/15-LO) or cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Conversely, binding was enhanced by overexpression of 12/15-LO or COX-2. Direct treatment of HVSMC with AA or its metabolites also increased binding. Furthermore, VSMC derived from 12/15-LO knockout mice displayed reduced binding to mouse monocytic cells relative to genetic control mice. Using specific signal transduction inhibitors, we demonstrated the involvement of Src, phosphoinositide 3-kinase, and MAPKs in ANG II- or PDGF-BB-induced binding. Interestingly, after coculture with HVSMC, THP-1 cell surface expression of the scavenger receptor CD36 was increased. These results show for the first time that growth factors may play additional roles in atherosclerosis by increasing monocyte binding to VSMC via AA metabolism and key signaling pathways. This can lead to monocyte subendothelial retention, CD36 expression, and foam cell formation.

  7. Statistical Mechanics of Transcription-Factor Binding Site Discovery Using Hidden Markov Models

    OpenAIRE

    Mehta, Pankaj; Schwab, David J.; Sengupta, Anirvan M.

    2011-01-01

    Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) are a commonly used tool for inference of transcription factor (TF) binding sites from DNA sequence data. We exploit the mathematical equivalence between HMMs for TF binding and the "inverse" statistical mechanics of hard rods in a one-dimensional disordered potential to investigate learning in HMMs. We derive analytic expressions for the Fisher information, a commonly employed measure of confidence in learned parameters, in the biologically relevant limit where th...

  8. An information transmission model for transcription factor binding at regulatory DNA sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Mingfeng; Yu, Dong; Jin, Yuan; Dou, Lei; Li, Beiping; Wang, Yuelan; Yue, Junjie; Liang, Long

    2012-06-06

    Computational identification of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) is a rapid, cost-efficient way to locate unknown regulatory elements. With increased potential for high-throughput genome sequencing, the availability of accurate computational methods for TFBS prediction has never been as important as it currently is. To date, identifying TFBSs with high sensitivity and specificity is still an open challenge, necessitating the development of novel models for predicting transcription factor-binding regulatory DNA elements. Based on the information theory, we propose a model for transcription factor binding of regulatory DNA sites. Our model incorporates position interdependencies in effective ways. The model computes the information transferred (TI) between the transcription factor and the TFBS during the binding process and uses TI as the criterion to determine whether the sequence motif is a possible TFBS. Based on this model, we developed a computational method to identify TFBSs. By theoretically proving and testing our model using both real and artificial data, we found that our model provides highly accurate predictive results. In this study, we present a novel model for transcription factor binding regulatory DNA sites. The model can provide an increased ability to detect TFBSs.

  9. Kinetics of the activation of human prothrombin by human coagulation factor Xa. Initial rate studies in the presence of Ca2+ and phospholipid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosow, D P; Orthner, C L

    1979-10-10

    Steady state kinetic studies have been performed to investigate the formation of thrombin from prothrombin by human coagulation Factor Xa in the presence of Ca2+ and phospholipid. The concentration of ligand which gives 50% of the maximum velocity (K0.5) is 2.3 mM for Ca2+, 7.4 microM for phospholipid, and 0.006 microM for prothrombin. Hill plots of the Ca2+ enhancement of the reaction give a Hill coefficient of 3.1, indicating positive cooperativity. The initial velocity patterns are consistent with an ordered addition of reactants with phospholipid as the second reactant to bind to the enzyme. Although our results do not differentiate between Ca2+ or the prothrombin substrate as the first reactant to bind to Factor Xa, it is established that Ca2+ can bind to Factor Xa in the absence of the other reactants. Thus, the most probable order of addition of reactants is Ca2+, phospholipid, and the prothrombin substrate. Plots of (v)-1 versus (prothrombin)-1 or (v)-1 versus [(Ca2+)3]-1 at several constant concentrations of phospholipid indicate that the major effect of phospholipid is to increase the turnover number of Factor Xa.

  10. Combining transcription factor binding affinities with open-chromatin data for accurate gene expression prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Florian; Gasparoni, Nina; Gasparoni, Gilles; Gianmoena, Kathrin; Cadenas, Cristina; Polansky, Julia K; Ebert, Peter; Nordström, Karl; Barann, Matthias; Sinha, Anupam; Fröhler, Sebastian; Xiong, Jieyi; Dehghani Amirabad, Azim; Behjati Ardakani, Fatemeh; Hutter, Barbara; Zipprich, Gideon; Felder, Bärbel; Eils, Jürgen; Brors, Benedikt; Chen, Wei; Hengstler, Jan G; Hamann, Alf; Lengauer, Thomas; Rosenstiel, Philip; Walter, Jörn; Schulz, Marcel H

    2017-01-09

    The binding and contribution of transcription factors (TF) to cell specific gene expression is often deduced from open-chromatin measurements to avoid costly TF ChIP-seq assays. Thus, it is important to develop computational methods for accurate TF binding prediction in open-chromatin regions (OCRs). Here, we report a novel segmentation-based method, TEPIC, to predict TF binding by combining sets of OCRs with position weight matrices. TEPIC can be applied to various open-chromatin data, e.g. DNaseI-seq and NOMe-seq. Additionally, Histone-Marks (HMs) can be used to identify candidate TF binding sites. TEPIC computes TF affinities and uses open-chromatin/HM signal intensity as quantitative measures of TF binding strength. Using machine learning, we find low affinity binding sites to improve our ability to explain gene expression variability compared to the standard presence/absence classification of binding sites. Further, we show that both footprints and peaks capture essential TF binding events and lead to a good prediction performance. In our application, gene-based scores computed by TEPIC with one open-chromatin assay nearly reach the quality of several TF ChIP-seq data sets. Finally, these scores correctly predict known transcriptional regulators as illustrated by the application to novel DNaseI-seq and NOMe-seq data for primary human hepatocytes and CD4+ T-cells, respectively.

  11. Receptor binding sites for atrial natriuretic factor are expressed by brown adipose tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacay, A.C.; Mantyh, C.R.; Vigna, S.R.; Mantyh, P.W. (Wadsworth VA Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (USA))

    1988-09-01

    To explore the possibility that atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) is involved in thermoregulation we used quantitative receptor autoradiography and homogenate receptor binding assays to identify ANF bindings sites in neonatal rat and sheep brown adipose tissue, respectively. Using quantitative receptor autoradiography were were able to localize high levels of specific binding sites for {sup 125}I-rat ANF in neonatal rat brown adipose tissue. Homogenate binding assays on sheep brown fat demonstrated that the radioligand was binding to the membrane fraction and that the specific binding was not due to a lipophilic interaction between {sup 125}I-rat ANF and brown fat. Specific binding of {sup 125}I-rat ANF to the membranes of brown fat cells was inhibited by unlabeled rat ANF with a Ki of 8.0 x 10(-9) M, but not by unrelated peptides. These studies demonstrate that brown fat cells express high levels of ANF receptor binding sites in neonatal rat and sheep and suggest that ANF may play a role in thermoregulation.

  12. Combining transcription factor binding affinities with open-chromatin data for accurate gene expression prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Florian; Gasparoni, Nina; Gasparoni, Gilles; Gianmoena, Kathrin; Cadenas, Cristina; Polansky, Julia K.; Ebert, Peter; Nordström, Karl; Barann, Matthias; Sinha, Anupam; Fröhler, Sebastian; Xiong, Jieyi; Dehghani Amirabad, Azim; Behjati Ardakani, Fatemeh; Hutter, Barbara; Zipprich, Gideon; Felder, Bärbel; Eils, Jürgen; Brors, Benedikt; Chen, Wei; Hengstler, Jan G.; Hamann, Alf; Lengauer, Thomas; Rosenstiel, Philip; Walter, Jörn; Schulz, Marcel H.

    2017-01-01

    The binding and contribution of transcription factors (TF) to cell specific gene expression is often deduced from open-chromatin measurements to avoid costly TF ChIP-seq assays. Thus, it is important to develop computational methods for accurate TF binding prediction in open-chromatin regions (OCRs). Here, we report a novel segmentation-based method, TEPIC, to predict TF binding by combining sets of OCRs with position weight matrices. TEPIC can be applied to various open-chromatin data, e.g. DNaseI-seq and NOMe-seq. Additionally, Histone-Marks (HMs) can be used to identify candidate TF binding sites. TEPIC computes TF affinities and uses open-chromatin/HM signal intensity as quantitative measures of TF binding strength. Using machine learning, we find low affinity binding sites to improve our ability to explain gene expression variability compared to the standard presence/absence classification of binding sites. Further, we show that both footprints and peaks capture essential TF binding events and lead to a good prediction performance. In our application, gene-based scores computed by TEPIC with one open-chromatin assay nearly reach the quality of several TF ChIP-seq data sets. Finally, these scores correctly predict known transcriptional regulators as illustrated by the application to novel DNaseI-seq and NOMe-seq data for primary human hepatocytes and CD4+ T-cells, respectively. PMID:27899623

  13. Spatial distribution of predicted transcription factor binding sites in Drosophila ChIP peaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettie, Kade P; Dresch, Jacqueline M; Drewell, Robert A

    2016-08-01

    In the development of the Drosophila embryo, gene expression is directed by the sequence-specific interactions of a large network of protein transcription factors (TFs) and DNA cis-regulatory binding sites. Once the identity of the typically 8-10bp binding sites for any given TF has been determined by one of several experimental procedures, the sequences can be represented in a position weight matrix (PWM) and used to predict the location of additional TF binding sites elsewhere in the genome. Often, alignments of large (>200bp) genomic fragments that have been experimentally determined to bind the TF of interest in Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) studies are trimmed under the assumption that the majority of the binding sites are located near the center of all the aligned fragments. In this study, ChIP/chip datasets are analyzed using the corresponding PWMs for the well-studied TFs; CAUDAL, HUNCHBACK, KNIRPS and KRUPPEL, to determine the distribution of predicted binding sites. All four TFs are critical regulators of gene expression along the anterio-posterior axis in early Drosophila development. For all four TFs, the ChIP peaks contain multiple binding sites that are broadly distributed across the genomic region represented by the peak, regardless of the prediction stringency criteria used. This result suggests that ChIP peak trimming may exclude functional binding sites from subsequent analyses.

  14. Systematic dissection of genomic features determining transcription factor binding and enhancer function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Sharon R.; Zhang, Xiaolan; Wang, Li; Engreitz, Jesse; Melnikov, Alexandre; Rogov, Peter; Tewhey, Ryan; Isakova, Alina; Deplancke, Bart; Bernstein, Bradley E.; Mikkelsen, Tarjei S.; Lander, Eric S.

    2017-01-01

    Enhancers regulate gene expression through the binding of sequence-specific transcription factors (TFs) to cognate motifs. Various features influence TF binding and enhancer function—including the chromatin state of the genomic locus, the affinities of the binding site, the activity of the bound TFs, and interactions among TFs. However, the precise nature and relative contributions of these features remain unclear. Here, we used massively parallel reporter assays (MPRAs) involving 32,115 natural and synthetic enhancers, together with high-throughput in vivo binding assays, to systematically dissect the contribution of each of these features to the binding and activity of genomic regulatory elements that contain motifs for PPARγ, a TF that serves as a key regulator of adipogenesis. We show that distinct sets of features govern PPARγ binding vs. enhancer activity. PPARγ binding is largely governed by the affinity of the specific motif site and higher-order features of the larger genomic locus, such as chromatin accessibility. In contrast, the enhancer activity of PPARγ binding sites depends on varying contributions from dozens of TFs in the immediate vicinity, including interactions between combinations of these TFs. Different pairs of motifs follow different interaction rules, including subadditive, additive, and superadditive interactions among specific classes of TFs, with both spatially constrained and flexible grammars. Our results provide a paradigm for the systematic characterization of the genomic features underlying regulatory elements, applicable to the design of synthetic regulatory elements or the interpretation of human genetic variation. PMID:28137873

  15. Cell-type specificity of ChIP-predicted transcription factor binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Håndstad Tony

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Context-dependent transcription factor (TF binding is one reason for differences in gene expression patterns between different cellular states. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq identifies genome-wide TF binding sites for one particular context—the cells used in the experiment. But can such ChIP-seq data predict TF binding in other cellular contexts and is it possible to distinguish context-dependent from ubiquitous TF binding? Results We compared ChIP-seq data on TF binding for multiple TFs in two different cell types and found that on average only a third of ChIP-seq peak regions are common to both cell types. Expectedly, common peaks occur more frequently in certain genomic contexts, such as CpG-rich promoters, whereas chromatin differences characterize cell-type specific TF binding. We also find, however, that genotype differences between the cell types can explain differences in binding. Moreover, ChIP-seq signal intensity and peak clustering are the strongest predictors of common peaks. Compared with strong peaks located in regions containing peaks for multiple transcription factors, weak and isolated peaks are less common between the cell types and are less associated with data that indicate regulatory activity. Conclusions Together, the results suggest that experimental noise is prevalent among weak peaks, whereas strong and clustered peaks represent high-confidence binding events that often occur in other cellular contexts. Nevertheless, 30-40% of the strongest and most clustered peaks show context-dependent regulation. We show that by combining signal intensity with additional data—ranging from context independent information such as binding site conservation and position weight matrix scores to context dependent chromatin structure—we can predict whether a ChIP-seq peak is likely to be present in other cellular contexts.

  16. Mechanistic Heterogeneity in Site Recognition by the Structurally Homologous DNA-binding Domains of the ETS Family Transcription Factors Ets-1 and PU.1*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuo; Linde, Miles H.; Munde, Manoj; Carvalho, Victor D.; Wilson, W. David; Poon, Gregory M. K.

    2014-01-01

    ETS family transcription factors regulate diverse genes through binding at cognate DNA sites that overlap substantially in sequence. The DNA-binding domains of ETS proteins (ETS domains) are highly conserved structurally yet share limited amino acid homology. To define the mechanistic implications of sequence diversity within the ETS family, we characterized the thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA site recognition by the ETS domains of Ets-1 and PU.1, which represent the extremes in amino acid divergence among ETS proteins. Even though the two ETS domains bind their optimal sites with similar affinities under physiologic conditions, their nature of site recognition differs strikingly in terms of the role of hydration and counter ion release. The data suggest two distinct mechanisms wherein Ets-1 follows a “dry” mechanism that rapidly parses sites through electrostatic interactions and direct protein-DNA contacts, whereas PU.1 utilizes hydration to interrogate sequence-specific sites and form a long-lived complex relative to the Ets-1 counterpart. The kinetic persistence of the high affinity PU.1·DNA complex may be relevant to an emerging role of PU.1, but not Ets-1, as a pioneer transcription factor in vivo. In addition, PU.1 activity is critical to the development and function of macrophages and lymphocytes, which present osmotically variable environments, and hydration-dependent specificity may represent an important regulatory mechanism in vivo, a hypothesis that finds support in gene expression profiles of primary murine macrophages. PMID:24952944

  17. Transcription factor binding sites are highly enriched within microRNA precursor sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piriyapongsa Jittima

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription factors are thought to regulate the transcription of microRNA genes in a manner similar to that of protein-coding genes; that is, by binding to conventional transcription factor binding site DNA sequences located in or near promoter regions that lie upstream of the microRNA genes. However, in the course of analyzing the genomics of human microRNA genes, we noticed that annotated transcription factor binding sites commonly lie within 70- to 110-nt long microRNA small hairpin precursor sequences. Results We report that about 45% of all human small hairpin microRNA (pre-miR sequences contain at least one predicted transcription factor binding site motif that is conserved across human, mouse and rat, and this rises to over 75% if one excludes primate-specific pre-miRs. The association is robust and has extremely strong statistical significance; it affects both intergenic and intronic pre-miRs and both isolated and clustered microRNA genes. We also confirmed and extended this finding using a separate analysis that examined all human pre-miR sequences regardless of conservation across species. Conclusions The transcription factor binding sites localized within small hairpin microRNA precursor sequences may possibly regulate their transcription. Transcription factors may also possibly bind directly to nascent primary microRNA gene transcripts or small hairpin microRNA precursors and regulate their processing. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Guillaume Bourque (nominated by Jerzy Jurka, Dmitri Pervouchine (nominated by Mikhail Gelfand, and Yuriy Gusev.

  18. Functional diversification of paralogous transcription factors via divergence in DNA binding site motif and in expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry N Singh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gene duplication is a major driver of evolutionary innovation as it allows for an organism to elaborate its existing biological functions via specialization or diversification of initially redundant gene paralogs. Gene function can diversify in several ways. Transcription factor gene paralogs in particular, can diversify either by changes in their tissue-specific expression pattern or by changes in the DNA binding site motif recognized by their protein product, which in turn alters their gene targets. The relationship between these two modes of functional diversification of transcription factor paralogs has not been previously investigated, and is essential for understanding adaptive evolution of transcription factor gene families. FINDINGS: Based on a large set of human paralogous transcription factor pairs, we show that when the DNA binding site motifs of transcription factor paralogs are similar, the expressions of the genes that encode the paralogs have diverged, so in general, at most one of the paralogs is highly expressed in a tissue. Moreover, paralogs with diverged DNA binding site motifs tend to be diverged in their function. Conversely, two paralogs that are highly expressed in a tissue tend to have dissimilar DNA binding site motifs. We have also found that in general, within a paralogous family, tissue-specific decrease in gene expression is more frequent than what is expected by chance. CONCLUSIONS: While previous investigations of paralogous gene diversification have only considered coding sequence divergence, by explicitly quantifying divergence in DNA binding site motif, our work presents a new paradigm for investigating functional diversification. Consistent with evolutionary expectation, our quantitative analysis suggests that paralogous transcription factors have survived extinction in part, either through diversification of their DNA binding site motifs or through alterations in their tissue-specific expression

  19. A Fibrocontractive Mechanochemical Model of Dermal Wound Closure Incorporating Realistic Growth Factor Kinetics

    KAUST Repository

    Murphy, Kelly E.

    2012-01-13

    Fibroblasts and their activated phenotype, myofibroblasts, are the primary cell types involved in the contraction associated with dermal wound healing. Recent experimental evidence indicates that the transformation from fibroblasts to myofibroblasts involves two distinct processes: The cells are stimulated to change phenotype by the combined actions of transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) and mechanical tension. This observation indicates a need for a detailed exploration of the effect of the strong interactions between the mechanical changes and growth factors in dermal wound healing. We review the experimental findings in detail and develop a model of dermal wound healing that incorporates these phenomena. Our model includes the interactions between TGFβ and collagenase, providing a more biologically realistic form for the growth factor kinetics than those included in previous mechanochemical descriptions. A comparison is made between the model predictions and experimental data on human dermal wound healing and all the essential features are well matched. © 2012 Society for Mathematical Biology.

  20. Growth factors, glucose and insulin kinetics after low dose growth hormone in HIV - lipodystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ove; Flyvbjerg, Allan

    2006-01-01

    and temporary reduction in insulin sensitivity was caused by a reduction in non-oxidative glucose metabolism (n=5). GH-administration reduced hepatic extraction of insulin alleviating the demand for insulin secretion (n=5). No adverse effects of GH were detected. CONCLUSIONS: As judged from effects......OBJECTIVES: Low-dose growth hormone (GH) administration has been suggested as a treatment for HIV-lipodystrophy. METHODS: Postglucose GH-secretion, kinetics of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), insulin, and glucose metabolism were examined in six male HIV-infected lipodystrophic patients (two...

  1. Kinetic and structural studies reveal a unique binding mode of sulfite to the nickel center in urease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzei, Luca; Cianci, Michele; Benini, Stefano; Bertini, Leonardo; Musiani, Francesco; Ciurli, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Urease is the most efficient enzyme known to date, and catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea using two Ni(II) ions in the active site. Urease is a virulence factor in several human pathogens, while causing severe environmental and agronomic problems. Sporosarcina pasteurii urease has been used extensively in the structural characterization of the enzyme. Sodium sulfite has been widely used as a preservative in urease solutions to prevent oxygen-induced oxidation, but its role as an inhibitor has also been suggested. In the present study, isothermal titration microcalorimetry was used to establish sulfite as a competitive inhibitor for S. pasteurii urease, with an inhibition constant of 0.19mM at pH7. The structure of the urease-sulfite complex, determined at 1.65Å resolution, shows the inhibitor bound to the dinuclear Ni(II) center of urease in a tridentate mode involving bonds between the two Ni(II) ions in the active site and all three oxygen atoms of the inhibitor, supporting the observed competitive inhibition kinetics. This coordination mode of sulfite has never been observed, either in proteins or in small molecule complexes, and could inspire synthetic coordination chemists as well as biochemists to develop urease inhibitors based on this chemical moiety.

  2. Discovery and validation of information theory-based transcription factor and cofactor binding site motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ruipeng; Mucaki, Eliseos J; Rogan, Peter K

    2016-11-28

    Data from ChIP-seq experiments can derive the genome-wide binding specificities of transcription factors (TFs) and other regulatory proteins. We analyzed 765 ENCODE ChIP-seq peak datasets of 207 human TFs with a novel motif discovery pipeline based on recursive, thresholded entropy minimization. This approach, while obviating the need to compensate for skewed nucleotide composition, distinguishes true binding motifs from noise, quantifies the strengths of individual binding sites based on computed affinity and detects adjacent cofactor binding sites that coordinate with the targets of primary, immunoprecipitated TFs. We obtained contiguous and bipartite information theory-based position weight matrices (iPWMs) for 93 sequence-specific TFs, discovered 23 cofactor motifs for 127 TFs and revealed six high-confidence novel motifs. The reliability and accuracy of these iPWMs were determined via four independent validation methods, including the detection of experimentally proven binding sites, explanation of effects of characterized SNPs, comparison with previously published motifs and statistical analyses. We also predict previously unreported TF coregulatory interactions (e.g. TF complexes). These iPWMs constitute a powerful tool for predicting the effects of sequence variants in known binding sites, performing mutation analysis on regulatory SNPs and predicting previously unrecognized binding sites and target genes.

  3. Physiological levels of blood coagulation factors IX and X control coagulation kinetics in an in vitro model of circulating tissue factor

    OpenAIRE

    Tormoen, Garth W.; Khader, Ayesha; Gruber, András; McCarty, Owen J. T.

    2013-01-01

    Thrombosis significantly contributes to cancer morbidity and mortality. The mechanism behind thrombosis in cancer may be circulating tissue factor (TF), as levels of circulating TF are associated with thrombosis. However, circulating TF antigen level alone has failed to predict thrombosis in patients with cancer. We hypothesize that coagulation factor levels regulate the kinetics of circulating TF-induced thrombosis. Coagulation kinetics were measured as a function of individual coagulation f...

  4. Quantitative description of thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the platelet factor 4/heparin bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thi-Huong; Greinacher, Andreas; Delcea, Mihaela

    2015-05-01

    Heparin is the most important antithrombotic drug in hospitals. It binds to the endogenous tetrameric protein platelet factor 4 (PF4) forming PF4/heparin complexes which may cause a severe immune-mediated adverse drug reaction, so-called heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). Although new heparin drugs have been synthesized to reduce such a risk, detailed bond dynamics of the PF4/heparin complexes have not been clearly understood. In this study, single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) is utilized to characterize the interaction of PF4 with heparins of defined length (5-, 6-, 8-, 12-, and 16-mers). Analysis of the force-distance curves shows that PF4/heparin binding strength rises with increasing heparin length. In addition, two binding pathways in the PF4/short heparins (=8-mers) are identified. We provide a model for the PF4/heparin complexes in which short heparins bind to one PF4 tetramer, while long heparins bind to two PF4 tetramers. We propose that the interaction between long heparins and PF4s is not only due to charge differences as generally assumed, but also due to hydrophobic interaction between two PF4s which are brought close to each other by long heparin. This complicated interaction induces PF4/heparin complexes more stable than other ligand-receptor interactions. Our results also reveal that the boundary between antigenic and non-antigenic heparins is between 8- and 12-mers. These observations are particularly important to understand processes in which PF4-heparin interactions are involved and to develop new heparin-derived drugs.Heparin is the most important antithrombotic drug in hospitals. It binds to the endogenous tetrameric protein platelet factor 4 (PF4) forming PF4/heparin complexes which may cause a severe immune-mediated adverse drug reaction, so-called heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). Although new heparin drugs have been synthesized to reduce such a risk, detailed bond dynamics of the PF4/heparin complexes have not been clearly

  5. Drug-Target Kinetics in Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonge, Peter J

    2017-07-14

    The development of therapies for the treatment of neurological cancer faces a number of major challenges including the synthesis of small molecule agents that can penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Given the likelihood that in many cases drug exposure will be lower in the CNS than in systemic circulation, it follows that strategies should be employed that can sustain target engagement at low drug concentration. Time dependent target occupancy is a function of both the drug and target concentration as well as the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters that describe the binding reaction coordinate, and sustained target occupancy can be achieved through structural modifications that increase target (re)binding and/or that decrease the rate of drug dissociation. The discovery and deployment of compounds with optimized kinetic effects requires information on the structure-kinetic relationships that modulate the kinetics of binding, and the molecular factors that control the translation of drug-target kinetics to time-dependent drug activity in the disease state. This Review first introduces the potential benefits of drug-target kinetics, such as the ability to delineate both thermodynamic and kinetic selectivity, and then describes factors, such as target vulnerability, that impact the utility of kinetic selectivity. The Review concludes with a description of a mechanistic PK/PD model that integrates drug-target kinetics into predictions of drug activity.

  6. Genome-wide conserved consensus transcription factor binding motifs are hyper-methylated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Down Thomas A

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA methylation can regulate gene expression by modulating the interaction between DNA and proteins or protein complexes. Conserved consensus motifs exist across the human genome ("predicted transcription factor binding sites": "predicted TFBS" but the large majority of these are proven by chromatin immunoprecipitation and high throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq not to be biological transcription factor binding sites ("empirical TFBS". We hypothesize that DNA methylation at conserved consensus motifs prevents promiscuous or disorderly transcription factor binding. Results Using genome-wide methylation maps of the human heart and sperm, we found that all conserved consensus motifs as well as the subset of those that reside outside CpG islands have an aggregate profile of hyper-methylation. In contrast, empirical TFBS with conserved consensus motifs have a profile of hypo-methylation. 40% of empirical TFBS with conserved consensus motifs resided in CpG islands whereas only 7% of all conserved consensus motifs were in CpG islands. Finally we further identified a minority subset of TF whose profiles are either hypo-methylated or neutral at their respective conserved consensus motifs implicating that these TF may be responsible for establishing or maintaining an un-methylated DNA state, or whose binding is not regulated by DNA methylation. Conclusions Our analysis supports the hypothesis that at least for a subset of TF, empirical binding to conserved consensus motifs genome-wide may be controlled by DNA methylation.

  7. The Role of Genome Accessibility in Transcription Factor Binding in Bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio L C Gomes

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ChIP-seq enables genome-scale identification of regulatory regions that govern gene expression. However, the biological insights generated from ChIP-seq analysis have been limited to predictions of binding sites and cooperative interactions. Furthermore, ChIP-seq data often poorly correlate with in vitro measurements or predicted motifs, highlighting that binding affinity alone is insufficient to explain transcription factor (TF-binding in vivo. One possibility is that binding sites are not equally accessible across the genome. A more comprehensive biophysical representation of TF-binding is required to improve our ability to understand, predict, and alter gene expression. Here, we show that genome accessibility is a key parameter that impacts TF-binding in bacteria. We developed a thermodynamic model that parameterizes ChIP-seq coverage in terms of genome accessibility and binding affinity. The role of genome accessibility is validated using a large-scale ChIP-seq dataset of the M. tuberculosis regulatory network. We find that accounting for genome accessibility led to a model that explains 63% of the ChIP-seq profile variance, while a model based in motif score alone explains only 35% of the variance. Moreover, our framework enables de novo ChIP-seq peak prediction and is useful for inferring TF-binding peaks in new experimental conditions by reducing the need for additional experiments. We observe that the genome is more accessible in intergenic regions, and that increased accessibility is positively correlated with gene expression and anti-correlated with distance to the origin of replication. Our biophysically motivated model provides a more comprehensive description of TF-binding in vivo from first principles towards a better representation of gene regulation in silico, with promising applications in systems biology.

  8. Release kinetics of platelet-derived and plasma-derived growth factors from autologous plasma rich in growth factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitua, Eduardo; Zalduendo, Mari Mar; Alkhraisat, Mohammad Hamdan; Orive, Gorka

    2013-10-01

    Many studies have evaluated the biological effects of platelet rich plasma reporting the final outcomes on cell and tissues. However, few studies have dealt with the kinetics of growth factor delivery by plasma rich in growth factors. Venous blood was obtained from three healthy volunteers and processed with PRGF-Endoret technology to prepare autologous plasma rich in growth factors. The gel-like fibrin scaffolds were then incubated in triplicate, in a cell culture medium to monitor the release of PDGF-AB, VEGF, HGF and IGF-I during 8 days of incubation. A leukocyte-platelet rich plasma was prepared employing the same technology and the concentrations of growth factors and interleukin-1β were determined after 24h of incubation. After each period, the medium was collected, fibrin clot was destroyed and the supernatants were stored at -80°C until analysis. The growth factor delivery is diffusion controlled with a rapid initial release by 30% of the bioactive content after 1h of incubation and a steady state release when almost 70% of the growth factor content has been delivered. Autologous fibrin matrix retained almost 30% of the amount of the growth factors after 8 days of incubation. The addition of leukocytes to the formula of platelet rich plasma did not increase the concentration of the growth factors, while it drastically increased the presence of pro-inflammatory IL-1β. Further studies employing an in vitro inflammatory model would be interesting to study the difference in growth factors and pro-inflammatory cytokines between leukocyte-free and leukocyte-rich platelet rich plasma.

  9. How not to do kinetics: examples involving GTPases and guanine nucleotide exchange factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goody, Roger S

    2014-01-01

    Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) are crucial regulators of the action of GTPases in signal transduction and cellular regulation. Although their basic mechanism of action has been apparent for almost 20 years, there are still misconceptions concerning their properties, and these are confounded by superficial or incorrect interpretation of experimental results in individual cases. Here, an example is described in which an incorrect mechanism was derived because of an inadequate analysis of kinetic results. In a second example, a case is discussed where certain GTP analogs were erroneously described as being able to function as low molecular mass GEFs. In both cases, a lack of distinction between rates, rate constants, and apparent rate constants, together with a disregard of relative signal amplitudes, led to the misinterpretations. In a final example, it is shown how the lack of an appropriate kinetic investigation led to the false conclusion that a secreted protein from Legionella pneumophila can act not only as a GEF towards eukaryotic Rab1 but also as a factor that is able to actively dissociate the stable complex between Rab1 and GDP dissociation inhibitor.

  10. Copper(II) complexes with peptides based on the second cell binding site of fibronectin: metal coordination and ligand exchange kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzanelli, Silvia; Forte, Claudia; Pinzino, Calogero; Magrì, Antonio; La Mendola, Diego

    2016-02-07

    Copper(ii) complexes with short peptides based on the second cell binding site of fibronectin, PHSFN and PHSEN, have been characterized by potentiometric, UV-vis, CD, EPR and NMR spectroscopic methods. The histidine imidazole nitrogen is the anchoring site for the metal ion binding. Thermodynamic and spectroscopic evidence is given that the side chain oxygen donor atom of glutamyl residue in Ac-PHSEN-NH2 is also involved in the binding up to physiological pH. To determine ligand exchange kinetic parameters after the imidazole nitrogen anchoring, proton relaxation enhancement NMR data have been collected for the two hydrogen atoms of the imidazole ring in the temperature range 293-315 K at pH 5.2 and globally treated within different kinetic models for ligand exchange. The best fitting model involves two steps. In the first one, which is slow, a water molecule disengages a carbonyl or a carboxylate group coordinated to the metal ion in the complex formed by PHSFN or PHSEN, respectively. This stage is one order of magnitude slower for PHSEN, due to entropic effects. In the second step, which is fast, the complex just formed exchanges with the ligand. In this step, no appreciable differences are found for the two cases examined.

  11. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-I-6 expression in activated microglia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chesik, D.; Glazenburg, K.; Wilczak, N.; Geeraedts, Felix; De Keyser, J.

    2004-01-01

    In the CNS insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) enhances survival of neurons, promotes myelin synthesis and acts as a mitogen for microglia. The effects of IGF-1 are regulated by a family of 6 IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs). We investigated mRNA expression patterns of IGFBPs in primary rat microglia

  12. Structural Basis for DNA Binding Specificity by the Auxin-Dependent ARF Transcription Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, D.R.; Freire Rios, A.; Berg, van den W.A.M.; Saaki, T.; Manfield, I.W.; Kepinski, S.; López-Vidrieo, I.; Franco-Zorilla, J.M.; Vries, de S.C.; Solano, R.; Weijers, D.; Coll, M.

    2014-01-01

    Auxin regulates numerous plant developmental processes by controlling gene expression via a family of functionally distinct DNA-binding auxin response factors (ARFs), yet the mechanistic basis for generating specificity in auxin response is unknown. Here, we address this question by solving

  13. The neural cell adhesion molecule binds to fibroblast growth factor receptor 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus; Lauridsen, Jes B; Berezin, Vladimir;

    2006-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) can bind to and activate fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1). However, there are four major FGFR isoforms (FGFR1-FGFR4), and it is not known whether NCAM also interacts directly with the other three FGFR isoforms. In this study, we show by surface...

  14. Binding of the Covalent Flavin Assembly Factor to the Flavoprotein Subunit of Complex II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maklashina, Elena; Rajagukguk, Sany; Starbird, Chrystal A; McDonald, W Hayes; Koganitsky, Anna; Eisenbach, Michael; Iverson, Tina M; Cecchini, Gary

    2016-02-05

    Escherichia coli harbors two highly conserved homologs of the essential mitochondrial respiratory complex II (succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase). Aerobically the bacterium synthesizes succinate:quinone reductase as part of its respiratory chain, whereas under microaerophilic conditions, the quinol:fumarate reductase can be utilized. All complex II enzymes harbor a covalently bound FAD co-factor that is essential for their ability to oxidize succinate. In eukaryotes and many bacteria, assembly of the covalent flavin linkage is facilitated by a small protein assembly factor, termed SdhE in E. coli. How SdhE assists with formation of the covalent flavin bond and how it binds the flavoprotein subunit of complex II remain unknown. Using photo-cross-linking, we report the interaction site between the flavoprotein of complex II and the SdhE assembly factor. These data indicate that SdhE binds to the flavoprotein between two independently folded domains and that this binding mode likely influences the interdomain orientation. In so doing, SdhE likely orients amino acid residues near the dicarboxylate and FAD binding site, which facilitates formation of the covalent flavin linkage. These studies identify how the conserved SdhE assembly factor and its homologs participate in complex II maturation.

  15. JASPAR 2010: the greatly expanded open-access database of transcription factor binding profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Thongjuea, Supat; Kwon, Andrew T

    2009-01-01

    JASPAR (http://jaspar.genereg.net) is the leading open-access database of matrix profiles describing the DNA-binding patterns of transcription factors (TFs) and other proteins interacting with DNA in a sequence-specific manner. Its fourth major release is the largest expansion of the core database...

  16. Binding of von Willebrand factor and plasma proteins to the eggshell of Schistosoma mansoni

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dewalick, Saskia; Hensbergen, Paul J; Bexkens, Michiel L; Grosserichter-Wagener, Christina; Hokke, Cornelis H; Deelder, André M; de Groot, Philip G; Tielens, Aloysius G M; van Hellemond, Jaap J

    2014-01-01

    Schistosoma mansoni eggs have to cross the endothelium and intestinal wall to leave the host and continue the life cycle. Mechanisms involved in this essential step are largely unknown. Here we describe direct binding to the S. mansoni eggshell of von Willebrand factor and other plasma proteins invo

  17. Mapping Escherichia coli elongation factor Tu residues involved in binding of aminoacyl-tRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiborg, Ove; Andersen, C; Knudsen, Charlotte Rohde

    1996-01-01

    -tRNA, which suggested an important role of Lys-89 and Asn-90 in tRNA binding. Furthermore, our results indicate helix B to be an important target site for nucleotide exchange factor EF-Ts. Also the mutants His-66 to Ala and His-118 to either Ala or Glu were characterized in an in vitro translation assay...

  18. Binding of von Willebrand factor and plasma proteins to the eggshell of Schistosoma mansoni

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dewalick, Saskia; Hensbergen, Paul J; Bexkens, Michiel L; Grosserichter-Wagener, Christina; Hokke, Cornelis H; Deelder, André M; de Groot, Philip G; Tielens, Aloysius G M; van Hellemond, Jaap J

    Schistosoma mansoni eggs have to cross the endothelium and intestinal wall to leave the host and continue the life cycle. Mechanisms involved in this essential step are largely unknown. Here we describe direct binding to the S. mansoni eggshell of von Willebrand factor and other plasma proteins

  19. NMR studies of the GTP/GDP binding domain of translation initiation factor IF2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tishchenko, Evgeny Vladimirovich

    2005-01-01

    Translation Initiation Factor 2 (IF2) plays an important role in the initiation stage of bacterial protein biosynthesis. This protein binds both fMet-tRNA and 30S ribosomal subunit in the presence of GTP, and it stimulates the formation of the 70S initiation complex. The NMR samples of the 15N-, 15N

  20. The genome-wide binding profile of the Sulfolobus solfataricus transcription factor Ss-LrpB shows binding events beyond direct transcription regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Duc, Trong; van Oeffelen, Liesbeth; Song, Ningning; Hassanzadeh-Ghassabeh, Gholamreza; Muyldermans, Serge; Charlier, Daniel; Peeters, Eveline

    2013-11-25

    Gene regulatory processes are largely resulting from binding of transcription factors to specific genomic targets. Leucine-responsive Regulatory Protein (Lrp) is a prevalent transcription factor family in prokaryotes, however, little information is available on biological functions of these proteins in archaea. Here, we study genome-wide binding of the Lrp-like transcription factor Ss-LrpB from Sulfolobus solfataricus. Chromatin immunoprecipitation in combination with DNA microarray analysis (ChIP-chip) has revealed that Ss-LrpB interacts with 36 additional loci besides the four previously identified local targets. Only a subset of the newly identified binding targets, concentrated in a highly variable IS-dense genomic region, is also bound in vitro by pure Ss-LrpB. There is no clear relationship between the in vitro measured DNA-binding specificity of Ss-LrpB and the in vivo association suggesting a limited permissivity of the crenarchaeal chromatin for transcription factor binding. Of 37 identified binding regions, 29 are co-bound by LysM, another Lrp-like transcription factor in S. solfataricus. Comparative gene expression analysis in an Ss-lrpB mutant strain shows no significant Ss-LrpB-mediated regulation for most targeted genes, with exception of the CRISPR B cluster, which is activated by Ss-LrpB through binding to a specific motif in the leader region. The genome-wide binding profile presented here implies that Ss-LrpB is associated at additional genomic binding sites besides the local gene targets, but acts as a specific transcription regulator in the tested growth conditions. Moreover, we have provided evidence that two Lrp-like transcription factors in S. solfataricus, Ss-LrpB and LysM, interact in vivo.

  1. Recent Insights into Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 2 Transcriptional Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Minsang; Kang, Hye Suk; Park, Jae-Hyung; Bae, Jae-Hoon; Song, Dae-Kyu; Im, Seung-Soon

    2017-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) are major regulators of insulin-like growth factor bioavailability and activity in metabolic signaling. Seven IGFBP family isoforms have been identified. Recent studies have shown that IGFBPs play a pivotal role in metabolic signaling and disease, including the pathogenesis of obesity, diabetes, and cancer. Although many studies have documented the various roles played by IGFBPs, transcriptional regulation of IGFBPs is not well understood. ...

  2. Steady state kinetic model for the binding of substrates and allosteric effectors to Escherichia coli phosphoribosyl-diphosphate synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willemoës, Martin; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Larsen, Sine

    2000-01-01

    saturation with ribose 5-phosphate leads to the binding of Mg2+ and substrates via a slow pathway where Pi binds to the enzyme last. The random mechanism for Pi binding was further supported by studies with competitive inhibitors of Mg2+, MgATP, and ribose 5-phosphate that all appeared noncompetitive when...... varying Pi at either saturating or unsaturating ribose 5-phosphate concentrations. Furthermore, none of the inhibitors induced inhibition at increasing Pi concentrations. Results from ADP inhibition of Pi activation suggest that these effectors compete for binding to a common regulatory site....

  3. Conversion of MyoD to a Neurogenic Factor: Binding Site Specificity Determines Lineage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham P. Fong

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available MyoD and NeuroD2, master regulators of myogenesis and neurogenesis, bind to a “shared” E-box sequence (CAGCTG and a “private” sequence (CAGGTG or CAGATG, respectively. To determine whether private-site recognition is sufficient to confer lineage specification, we generated a MyoD mutant with the DNA-binding specificity of NeuroD2. This chimeric mutant gained binding to NeuroD2 private sites but maintained binding to a subset of MyoD-specific sites, activating part of both the muscle and neuronal programs. Sequence analysis revealed an enrichment for PBX/MEIS motifs at the subset of MyoD-specific sites bound by the chimera, and point mutations that prevent MyoD interaction with PBX/MEIS converted the chimera to a pure neurogenic factor. Therefore, redirecting MyoD binding from MyoD private sites to NeuroD2 private sites, despite preserved binding to the MyoD/NeuroD2 shared sites, is sufficient to change MyoD from a master regulator of myogenesis to a master regulator of neurogenesis.

  4. Arsenic Directly Binds to and Activates the Yeast AP-1-Like Transcription Factor Yap8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Nallani Vijay; Yang, Jianbo; Pillai, Jitesh K.; Rawat, Swati; Solano, Carlos; Kumar, Abhay; Grøtli, Morten; Stemmler, Timothy L.; Rosen, Barry P.; Tamás, Markus J.

    2015-12-28

    The AP-1-like transcription factor Yap8 is critical for arsenic tolerance in the yeastSaccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the mechanism by which Yap8 senses the presence of arsenic and activates transcription of detoxification genes is unknown. Here we demonstrate that Yap8 directly binds to trivalent arsenite [As(III)]in vitroandin vivoand that approximately one As(III) molecule is bound per molecule of Yap8. As(III) is coordinated by three sulfur atoms in purified Yap8, and our genetic and biochemical data identify the cysteine residues that form the binding site as Cys132, Cys137, and Cys274. As(III) binding by Yap8 does not require an additional yeast protein, and Yap8 is regulated neither at the level of localization nor at the level of DNA binding. Instead, our data are consistent with a model in which a DNA-bound form of Yap8 acts directly as an As(III) sensor. Binding of As(III) to Yap8 triggers a conformational change that in turn brings about a transcriptional response. Thus, As(III) binding to Yap8 acts as a molecular switch that converts inactive Yap8 into an active transcriptional regulator. This is the first report to demonstrate how a eukaryotic protein couples arsenic sensing to transcriptional activation.

  5. A Potential Structural Switch for Regulating DNA-Binding by TEAD Transcription Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Sun; Vonrhein, Clemens; Albarado, Diana; Raman, C S; Veeraraghavan, Sudha

    2016-06-19

    TEA domain (TEAD) transcription factors are essential for the normal development of eukaryotes and are the downstream effectors of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway. Whereas our earlier work established the three-dimensional structure of the highly conserved DNA-binding domain using solution NMR spectroscopy, the structural basis for regulating the DNA-binding activity remains unknown. Here, we present the X-ray crystallographic structure and activity of a TEAD mutant containing a truncated L1 loop, ΔL1 TEAD DBD. Unexpectedly, the three-dimensional structure of the ΔL1 TEAD DBD reveals a helix-swapped homodimer wherein helix 1 is swapped between monomers. Furthermore, each three-helix bundle in the domain-swapped dimer is a structural homolog of MYB-like domains. Our investigations of the DNA-binding activity reveal that although the formation of the three-helix bundle by the ΔL1 TEAD DBD is sufficient for binding to an isolated M-CAT-like DNA element, multimeric forms are deficient for cooperative binding to tandemly duplicated elements, indicating that the L1 loop contributes to the DNA-binding activity of TEAD. These results suggest that switching between monomeric and domain-swapped forms may regulate DNA selectivity of TEAD proteins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Sequence2Vec: A novel embedding approach for modeling transcription factor binding affinity landscape

    KAUST Repository

    Dai, Hanjun

    2017-07-26

    Motivation: An accurate characterization of transcription factor (TF)-DNA affinity landscape is crucial to a quantitative understanding of the molecular mechanisms underpinning endogenous gene regulation. While recent advances in biotechnology have brought the opportunity for building binding affinity prediction methods, the accurate characterization of TF-DNA binding affinity landscape still remains a challenging problem. Results: Here we propose a novel sequence embedding approach for modeling the transcription factor binding affinity landscape. Our method represents DNA binding sequences as a hidden Markov model (HMM) which captures both position specific information and long-range dependency in the sequence. A cornerstone of our method is a novel message passing-like embedding algorithm, called Sequence2Vec, which maps these HMMs into a common nonlinear feature space and uses these embedded features to build a predictive model. Our method is a novel combination of the strength of probabilistic graphical models, feature space embedding and deep learning. We conducted comprehensive experiments on over 90 large-scale TF-DNA data sets which were measured by different high-throughput experimental technologies. Sequence2Vec outperforms alternative machine learning methods as well as the state-of-the-art binding affinity prediction methods.

  7. The bZip transcription factor vitellogenin-binding protein is post transcriptional down regulated in chicken liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smidt, MP; Snippe, L; Van Keulen, G; Ab, G

    1998-01-01

    The vitellogenin-binding protein (VBP) is a member of the proline and acidic-region rich (PAR) family of bZip transcription factors. PAR is located N-terminally to the DNA-binding domain. VBP binds to specific sites within the 300-bp 5'-flanking region of the chicken-liver-specific estrogen-dependen

  8. Effect of positional dependence and alignment strategy on modeling transcription factor binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quader Saad

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many consensus-based and Position Weight Matrix-based methods for recognizing transcription factor binding sites (TFBS are not well suited to the variability in the lengths of binding sites. Besides, many methods discard known binding sites while building the model. Moreover, the impact of Information Content (IC and the positional dependence of nucleotides within an aligned set of TFBS has not been well researched for modeling variable-length binding sites. In this paper, we propose ML-Consensus (Mixed-Length Consensus: a consensus model for variable-length TFBS which does not exclude any reported binding sites. Methods We consider Pairwise Score (PS as a measure of positional dependence of nucleotides within an alignment of TFBS. We investigate how the prediction accuracy of ML-Consensus is affected by the incorporation of IC and PS with a particular binding site alignment strategy. We perform cross-validations for datasets of six species from the TRANSFAC public database, and analyze the results using ROC curves and the Wilcoxon matched-pair signed-ranks test. Results We observe that the incorporation of IC and PS in ML-Consensus results in statistically significant improvement in the prediction accuracy of the model. Moreover, the existence of a core region among the known binding sites (of any length is witnessed by the pairwise coexistence of nucleotides within the core length. Conclusions These observations suggest the possibility of an efficient multiple sequence alignment algorithm for aligning TFBS, accommodating known binding sites of any length, for optimal (or near-optimal TFBS prediction. However, designing such an algorithm is a matter of further investigation.

  9. Insulin-like growth factor-I and insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins in the nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feld, S M; Hirschberg, R

    1996-06-01

    Similar to findings in the nephrotic syndrome in humans, rats with the doxorubicin-induced nephrotic syndrome (which resembles minimal change disease) have reduced serum levels of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). This is mainly caused by glomerular ultrafiltration of IGF-I-containing binding protein complexes, primarily of a molecular weight of approximately 50 kilodaltons, and urinary losses of the peptide. Despite urinary excretion of IGF-binding protein (IGFBP)-2, serum levels are increased more than twofold in the nephrotic syndrome compared with controls, because of increased synthesis of this binding protein by the liver. In contrast, the liver synthesis of IGFBP-3, the predominant binding protein in normal serum, is unchanged in the nephrotic syndrome. However, binding and serum levels of IGFBP-3 are reduced in nephrotic rat serum, apparently due to proteolytic degradation of IGFBP-3. The glomerular ultrafiltration of IGF-I, which leads to biologically significant IGF-I concentrations of about 1.35 nM in proximal tubule fluid, may have metabolic consequences, such as increased tubular phosphate absorption. Hypothetically, tubule fluid IGF-I may also contribute to progressive tubulointerstitial fibrosis which is sometimes present in protractive nephrotic glomerulopathies. The profound changes in the IGF-I/IGFBP system in the nephrotic syndrome may also contribute to systemic metabolic abnormalities and growth failure.

  10. Core Binding Factor β Protects HIV, Type 1 Accessory Protein Viral Infectivity Factor from MDM2-mediated Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Yusuke; Shindo, Keisuke; Nagata, Kayoko; Yoshinaga, Noriyoshi; Shirakawa, Kotaro; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi

    2016-11-25

    HIV, type 1 overcomes host restriction factor apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3 (APOBEC3) proteins by organizing an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex together with viral infectivity factor (Vif) and a host transcription cofactor core binding factor β (CBFβ). CBFβ is essential for Vif to counteract APOBEC3 by enabling the recruitment of cullin 5 to the complex and increasing the steady-state level of Vif protein; however, the mechanisms by which CBFβ up-regulates Vif protein remains unclear. Because we have reported previously that mouse double minute 2 homolog (MDM2) is an E3 ligase for Vif, we hypothesized that CBFβ might protect Vif from MDM2-mediated degradation. Co-immunoprecipitation analyses showed that Vif mutants that do not bind to CBFβ preferentially interact with MDM2 and that overexpression of CBFβ disrupts the interaction between MDM2 and Vif. Knockdown of CBFβ reduced the steady-state level of Vif in MDM2-proficient cells but not in MDM2-null cells. Cycloheximide chase analyses revealed that Vif E88A/W89A, which does not interact with CBFβ, degraded faster than wild-type Vif in MDM2-proficient cells but not in MDM2-null cells, suggesting that Vif stabilization by CBFβ is mainly caused by impairing MDM2-mediated degradation. We identified Vif R93E as a Vif variant that does not bind to MDM2, and the virus with this substitution mutation was more resistant to APOBEC3G than the parental virus. Combinatory substitution of Vif residues required for CBFβ binding and MDM2 binding showed full recovery of Vif steady-state levels, supporting our hypothesis. Our data provide new insights into the mechanism of Vif augmentation by CBFβ.

  11. Liver-type fatty acid binding protein interacts with hepatocyte nuclear factor

    OpenAIRE

    McIntosh, Avery L.; Petrescu, Anca D.; Hostetler, Heather A.; Kier, Ann B.; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) regulates liver type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) gene expression. Conversely as shown herein, L-FABP structurally and functionally also interacts with HNF4α. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between Cy3-HNF4α (donor) and Cy5-L-FABP (acceptor) as well as FRET microscopy detected L-FABP in close proximity (~80 Å) to HNF4α, binding with high affinity Kd ~250–300 nM. Circular dichroism (CD) determined that the HNF4α/L-FABP interaction alte...

  12. Complement factor H binds malondialdehyde epitopes and protects from oxidative stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weismann, David; Hartvigsen, Karsten; Lauer, Nadine

    2011-01-01

    peroxidation product that accumulates in many pathophysiological processes, including AMD. Here we identify complement factor H (CFH) as a major MDA-binding protein that can block both the uptake of MDA-modified proteins by macrophages and MDA-induced proinflammatory effects in vivo in mice. The CFH...... polymorphism H402, which is strongly associated with AMD, markedly reduces the ability of CFH to bind MDA, indicating a causal link to disease aetiology. Our findings provide important mechanistic insights into innate immune responses to oxidative stress, which may be exploited in the prevention of and therapy...

  13. Deletion of Corticotropin-releasing Factor Binding Protein Selectively Impairs Maternal, but not Intermale Aggression

    OpenAIRE

    Gammie, Stephen C.; Seasholtz, Audrey F.; Stevenson, Sharon A.

    2008-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) binding protein (CRF-BP) is a secreted protein that acts to bind and limit the activity of the neuropeptides, CRF and urocortin (Ucn) 1. We previously selected for high maternal defense (protection of offspring) in mice and found CRF-BP to be elevated in the CNS of selected mice. We also previously determined that both CRF and Ucn 1 are potent inhibitors of offspring protection when administered centrally. Thus, elevated CRF-BP could promote defense by lim...

  14. Fibronectin Growth Factor-Binding Domains Are Required for Fibroblast Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fubao; Ren, Xiang-Dong; Pan, Zhi; Macri, Lauren; Zong, Wei-Xing; Tonnesen, Marcia G.; Rafailovich, Miriam; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Clark, Richard A.F.

    2011-01-01

    Fibronectin (FN) is required for embryogenesis, morphogenesis, and wound repair, and its Arg–Gly–Asp-containing central cell-binding domain (CCBD) is essential for mesenchymal cell survival and growth. Here, we demonstrate that FN contains three growth factor-binding domains (FN-GFBDs) that bind platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB), a potent fibroblast survival and mitogenic factor. These sites bind PDGF-BB with dissociation constants of 10–100 nm. FN-null cells cultured on recombinant CCBD (FNIII8–11) without a FN-GFBD demonstrated minimal metabolism and underwent autophagy at 24 hours, followed by apoptosis at 72 hours, even in the presence of PDGF-BB. In contrast, FN-null cells plated on FNIII8–11 contiguous with FN-GFBD survived without, and proliferated with, PDGF-BB. FN-null cell survival on FNIII8–11 and noncontiguous arrays of FN-GFBDs required these domains to be adsorbed on the same surface, suggesting the existence of a mesenchymal cell-extracellular matrix synapse. Thus, fibroblast survival required GF stimulation in the presence of a FN-GFBD, as well as adhesion to FN through the CCBD. The findings that fibroblast survival is dependent on FN-GFBD underscore the critical importance of pericellular matrix for cell survival and have significant implications for cutaneous wound healing and regeneration. PMID:20811396

  15. Energy-dependent fitness: a quantitative model for the evolution of yeast transcription factor binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustonen, Ville; Kinney, Justin; Callan, Curtis G; Lässig, Michael

    2008-08-26

    We present a genomewide cross-species analysis of regulation for broad-acting transcription factors in yeast. Our model for binding site evolution is founded on biophysics: the binding energy between transcription factor and site is a quantitative phenotype of regulatory function, and selection is given by a fitness landscape that depends on this phenotype. The model quantifies conservation, as well as loss and gain, of functional binding sites in a coherent way. Its predictions are supported by direct cross-species comparison between four yeast species. We find ubiquitous compensatory mutations within functional sites, such that the energy phenotype and the function of a site evolve in a significantly more constrained way than does its sequence. We also find evidence for substantial evolution of regulatory function involving point mutations as well as sequence insertions and deletions within binding sites. Genes lose their regulatory link to a given transcription factor at a rate similar to the neutral point mutation rate, from which we infer a moderate average fitness advantage of functional over nonfunctional sites. In a wider context, this study provides an example of inference of selection acting on a quantitative molecular trait.

  16. G =  MAT: linking transcription factor expression and DNA binding data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Tretyakov

    Full Text Available Transcription factors are proteins that bind to motifs on the DNA and thus affect gene expression regulation. The qualitative description of the corresponding processes is therefore important for a better understanding of essential biological mechanisms. However, wet lab experiments targeted at the discovery of the regulatory interplay between transcription factors and binding sites are expensive. We propose a new, purely computational method for finding putative associations between transcription factors and motifs. This method is based on a linear model that combines sequence information with expression data. We present various methods for model parameter estimation and show, via experiments on simulated data, that these methods are reliable. Finally, we examine the performance of this model on biological data and conclude that it can indeed be used to discover meaningful associations. The developed software is available as a web tool and Scilab source code at http://biit.cs.ut.ee/gmat/.

  17. G = MAT: Linking Transcription Factor Expression and DNA Binding Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretyakov, Konstantin; Laur, Sven; Vilo, Jaak

    2011-01-01

    Transcription factors are proteins that bind to motifs on the DNA and thus affect gene expression regulation. The qualitative description of the corresponding processes is therefore important for a better understanding of essential biological mechanisms. However, wet lab experiments targeted at the discovery of the regulatory interplay between transcription factors and binding sites are expensive. We propose a new, purely computational method for finding putative associations between transcription factors and motifs. This method is based on a linear model that combines sequence information with expression data. We present various methods for model parameter estimation and show, via experiments on simulated data, that these methods are reliable. Finally, we examine the performance of this model on biological data and conclude that it can indeed be used to discover meaningful associations. The developed software is available as a web tool and Scilab source code at http://biit.cs.ut.ee/gmat/. PMID:21297945

  18. G =  MAT: linking transcription factor expression and DNA binding data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretyakov, Konstantin; Laur, Sven; Vilo, Jaak

    2011-01-31

    Transcription factors are proteins that bind to motifs on the DNA and thus affect gene expression regulation. The qualitative description of the corresponding processes is therefore important for a better understanding of essential biological mechanisms. However, wet lab experiments targeted at the discovery of the regulatory interplay between transcription factors and binding sites are expensive. We propose a new, purely computational method for finding putative associations between transcription factors and motifs. This method is based on a linear model that combines sequence information with expression data. We present various methods for model parameter estimation and show, via experiments on simulated data, that these methods are reliable. Finally, we examine the performance of this model on biological data and conclude that it can indeed be used to discover meaningful associations. The developed software is available as a web tool and Scilab source code at http://biit.cs.ut.ee/gmat/.

  19. Searching out the hydrogen absorption/desorption limiting reaction factors: Strategies allowing to increase kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeaiter, Ali, E-mail: ali.zeaiter@femto-st.fr; Chapelle, David; Nardin, Philippe

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • A macro scale thermodynamic model that simulates the response of a FeTi-X hydride tank is performed, and validated experimentally. • A sensibility study to identify the most influent input variables that can changes very largely the reaction rate. - Abstract: Hydrogen gas has become one of the most promising energy carriers. Main breakthrough concerns hydrogen solid storage, specially based on intermetallic material use. Regarding the raw material abundance and cost, the AB type alloy FeTi is an auspicious candidate to store hydrogen. Its absorption/desorption kinetics is a basic hindrance to common use, compared with more usual hydrides. First, discussions based on literature help us identifying the successive steps leading to metal hydriding, and allow to introduce the physical parameters which drive or limit the reaction. This analysis leads us to suggest strategies in order to increase absorption/desorption kinetics. Attention is then paid to a thermofluidodynamic model, allowing to describe a macroscopic solid storage reactor. Thus, we can achieve a simulation which describes the overall reaction inside the hydrogen reactor and, by varying the sub-mentioned parameters (thermal conductivity, the powder granularity, environment heat exchange…), we attempt to hierarchy the reaction limiting factors. These simulations are correlated to absorption/desorption experiments for which pressure, temperature and hydrogen flow are recorded.

  20. Interaction between wheat alpha-amylase/trypsin bi-functional inhibitor and mammalian digestive enzymes: Kinetic, equilibrium and structural characterization of binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuccioloni, Massimiliano; Mozzicafreddo, Matteo; Ali, Ishtiaq; Bonfili, Laura; Cecarini, Valentina; Eleuteri, Anna Maria; Angeletti, Mauro

    2016-12-15

    Alpha-amylase/trypsin bi-functional inhibitors (ATIs) are non-gluten protein components of wheat and other cereals that can hypersensitise the human gastrointestinal tract, eventually causing enteropathies in predisposed individuals. These inhibitory proteins can act both directly by targeting specific pro-inflammatory receptors, and indirectly by impairing the activity of digestive enzymes, the latter event causing the accumulation of undigested peptides with potential immunogenic properties. Herein, according to a concerted approach based on in vitro and in silico methods we characterized kinetics, equilibrium parameters and modes of binding of the complexes formed between wheat ATI and two representative mammalian digestive enzymes, namely trypsin and alpha-amylase. Interestingly, we demonstrated ATI to target both enzymes with independent binding sites and with moderately high affinity.

  1. Binding Mode Analysis of Zerumbone to Key Signal Proteins in the Tumor Necrosis Factor Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayesha Fatima

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the second most common cancer among women worldwide. Several signaling pathways have been implicated as causative and progression agents. The tumor necrosis factor (TNF α protein plays a dual role in promoting and inhibiting cancer depending largely on the pathway initiated by the binding of the protein to its receptor. Zerumbone, an active constituent of Zingiber zerumbet, Smith, is known to act on the tumor necrosis factor pathway upregulating tumour necrosis factor related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL death receptors and inducing apoptosis in cancer cells. Zerumbone is a sesquiterpene that is able to penetrate into the hydrophobic pockets of proteins to exert its inhibiting activity with several proteins. We found a good binding with the tumor necrosis factor, kinase κB (IKKβ and the Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB component proteins along the TNF pathway. Our results suggest that zerumbone can exert its apoptotic activities by inhibiting the cytoplasmic proteins. It inhibits the IKKβ kinase that activates the NF-κB and also binds to the NF-κB complex in the TNF pathway. Blocking both proteins can lead to inhibition of cell proliferating proteins to be downregulated and possibly ultimate induction of apoptosis.

  2. Kinetic and equilibrium studies of acrylonitrile binding to cytochrome c peroxidase and oxidation of acrylonitrile by cytochrome c peroxidase compound I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chinchilla, Diana, E-mail: Diana_Chinchilla@yahoo.com; Kilheeney, Heather, E-mail: raindropszoo@yahoo.com; Vitello, Lidia B., E-mail: lvitello@niu.edu; Erman, James E., E-mail: jerman@niu.edu

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) binds acrylonitrile in a pH-independent fashion. •The spectrum of the CcP/acrylonitrile complex is that of a 6c–ls ferric heme. •The acrylonitrile/CcP complex has a K{sub D} value of 1.1 ± 0.2 M. •CcP compound I oxidizes acrylonitrile with a maximum turnover rate of 0.61 min{sup −1}. -- Abstract: Ferric heme proteins bind weakly basic ligands and the binding affinity is often pH dependent due to protonation of the ligand as well as the protein. In an effort to find a small, neutral ligand without significant acid/base properties to probe ligand binding reactions in ferric heme proteins we were led to consider the organonitriles. Although organonitriles are known to bind to transition metals, we have been unable to find any prior studies of nitrile binding to heme proteins. In this communication we report on the equilibrium and kinetic properties of acrylonitrile binding to cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) as well as the oxidation of acrylonitrile by CcP compound I. Acrylonitrile binding to CcP is independent of pH between pH 4 and 8. The association and dissociation rate constants are 0.32 ± 0.16 M{sup −1} s{sup −1} and 0.34 ± 0.15 s{sup −1}, respectively, and the independently measured equilibrium dissociation constant for the complex is 1.1 ± 0.2 M. We have demonstrated for the first time that acrylonitrile can bind to a ferric heme protein. The binding mechanism appears to be a simple, one-step association of the ligand with the heme iron. We have also demonstrated that CcP can catalyze the oxidation of acrylonitrile, most likely to 2-cyanoethylene oxide in a “peroxygenase”-type reaction, with rates that are similar to rat liver microsomal cytochrome P450-catalyzed oxidation of acrylonitrile in the monooxygenase reaction. CcP compound I oxidizes acrylonitrile with a maximum turnover number of 0.61 min{sup −1} at pH 6.0.

  3. PhyloScan: identification of transcription factor binding sites using cross-species evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newberg Lee A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When transcription factor binding sites are known for a particular transcription factor, it is possible to construct a motif model that can be used to scan sequences for additional sites. However, few statistically significant sites are revealed when a transcription factor binding site motif model is used to scan a genome-scale database. Methods We have developed a scanning algorithm, PhyloScan, which combines evidence from matching sites found in orthologous data from several related species with evidence from multiple sites within an intergenic region, to better detect regulons. The orthologous sequence data may be multiply aligned, unaligned, or a combination of aligned and unaligned. In aligned data, PhyloScan statistically accounts for the phylogenetic dependence of the species contributing data to the alignment and, in unaligned data, the evidence for sites is combined assuming phylogenetic independence of the species. The statistical significance of the gene predictions is calculated directly, without employing training sets. Results In a test of our methodology on synthetic data modeled on seven Enterobacteriales, four Vibrionales, and three Pasteurellales species, PhyloScan produces better sensitivity and specificity than MONKEY, an advanced scanning approach that also searches a genome for transcription factor binding sites using phylogenetic information. The application of the algorithm to real sequence data from seven Enterobacteriales species identifies novel Crp and PurR transcription factor binding sites, thus providing several new potential sites for these transcription factors. These sites enable targeted experimental validation and thus further delineation of the Crp and PurR regulons in E. coli. Conclusion Better sensitivity and specificity can be achieved through a combination of (1 using mixed alignable and non-alignable sequence data and (2 combining evidence from multiple sites within an intergenic

  4. Allelic mutations in noncoding genomic sequences construct novel transcription factor binding sites that promote gene overexpression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Erming; Børset, Magne; Sawyer, Jeffrey R; Brede, Gaute; Våtsveen, Thea K; Hov, Håkon; Waage, Anders; Barlogie, Bart; Shaughnessy, John D; Epstein, Joshua; Sundan, Anders

    2015-11-01

    The growth and survival factor hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is expressed at high levels in multiple myeloma (MM) cells. We report here that elevated HGF transcription in MM was traced to DNA mutations in the promoter alleles of HGF. Sequence analysis revealed a previously undiscovered single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and crucial single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the promoters of myeloma cells that produce large amounts of HGF. The allele-specific mutations functionally reassembled wild-type sequences into the motifs that affiliate with endogenous transcription factors NFKB (nuclear factor kappa-B), MZF1 (myeloid zinc finger 1), and NRF-2 (nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2). In vitro, a mutant allele that gained novel NFKB-binding sites directly responded to transcriptional signaling induced by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) to promote high levels of luciferase reporter. Given the recent discovery by genome-wide sequencing (GWS) of numerous non-coding mutations in myeloma genomes, our data provide evidence that heterogeneous SNVs in the gene regulatory regions may frequently transform wild-type alleles into novel transcription factor binding properties to aberrantly interact with dysregulated transcriptional signals in MM and other cancer cells.

  5. A Novel DNA Binding Mechanism for maf Basic Region-Leucine Zipper Factors Inferred from a MafA-DNA Complex Structure and Binding Specificities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xun; Guanga, Gerald P; Wan, Cheng; Rose, Robert B [Z; (W Elec.); (NCSU)

    2012-11-13

    MafA is a proto-oncoprotein and is critical for insulin gene expression in pancreatic β-cells. Maf proteins belong to the AP1 superfamily of basic region-leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors. Residues in the basic helix and an ancillary N-terminal domain, the Extended Homology Region (EHR), endow maf proteins with unique DNA binding properties: binding a 13 bp consensus site consisting of a core AP1 site (TGACTCA) flanked by TGC sequences and binding DNA stably as monomers. To further characterize maf DNA binding, we determined the structure of a MafA–DNA complex. MafA forms base-specific hydrogen bonds with the flanking G–5C–4 and central C0/G0 bases, but not with the core-TGA bases. However, in vitro binding studies utilizing a pulse–chase electrophoretic mobility shift assay protocol revealed that mutating either the core-TGA or flanking-TGC bases dramatically increases the binding off rate. Comparing the known maf structures, we propose that DNA binding specificity results from positioning the basic helix through unique phosphate contacts. The EHR does not contact DNA directly but stabilizes DNA binding by contacting the basic helix. Collectively, these results suggest a novel multistep DNA binding process involving a conformational change from contacting the core-TGA to contacting the flanking-TGC bases.

  6. The repertoire of DNA-binding transcription factors in prokaryotes: functional and evolutionary lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Rueda, Ernesto; Martinez-Nuñez, Mario Alberto

    2012-01-01

    The capabilities of organisms to contend with environmental changes depend on their genes and their ability to regulate their expression. DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) play a central role in this process, because they regulate gene expression positively and/or negatively, depending on the operator context and ligand-binding status. In this review, we summarise recent findings regarding the function and evolution of TFs in prokaryotes. We consider the abundance of TFs in bacteria and archaea, the role of DNA-binding domains and their partner domains, and the effects of duplication events in the evolution of regulatory networks. Finally, a comprehensive picture for how regulatory networks have evolved in prokaryotes is provided.

  7. Identification and Structural Basis of Binding to Host Lung Glycogen by Streptococcal Virulence Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lammerts van Bueren,A.; Higgins, M.; Wang, D.; Burke, R.; Boraston, A.

    2007-01-01

    The ability of pathogenic bacteria to recognize host glycans is often essential to their virulence. Here we report structure-function studies of previously uncharacterized glycogen-binding modules in the surface-anchored pullulanases from Streptococcus pneumoniae (SpuA) and Streptococcus pyogenes (PulA). Multivalent binding to glycogen leads to a strong interaction with alveolar type II cells in mouse lung tissue. X-ray crystal structures of the binding modules reveal a novel fusion of tandem modules into single, bivalent functional domains. In addition to indicating a structural basis for multivalent attachment, the structure of the SpuA modules in complex with carbohydrate provides insight into the molecular basis for glycogen specificity. This report provides the first evidence that intracellular lung glycogen may be a novel target of pathogenic streptococci and thus provides a rationale for the identification of the streptococcal {alpha}-glucan-metabolizing machinery as virulence factors.

  8. A Common Structural Motif in the Binding of Virulence Factors to Bacterial Secretion Chaperones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilic,M.; Vujanac, M.; Stebbins, C.

    2006-01-01

    Salmonella invasion protein A (SipA) is translocated into host cells by a type III secretion system (T3SS) and comprises two regions: one domain binds its cognate type III secretion chaperone, InvB, in the bacterium to facilitate translocation, while a second domain functions in the host cell, contributing to bacterial uptake by polymerizing actin. We present here the crystal structures of the SipA chaperone binding domain (CBD) alone and in complex with InvB. The SipA CBD is found to consist of a nonglobular polypeptide as well as a large globular domain, both of which are necessary for binding to InvB. We also identify a structural motif that may direct virulence factors to their cognate chaperones in a diverse range of pathogenic bacteria. Disruption of this structural motif leads to a destabilization of several chaperone-substrate complexes from different species, as well as an impairment of secretion in Salmonella.

  9. Adhesion properties of Lactobacillus rhamnosus mucus-binding factor to mucin and extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Keita; Nakamata, Koichi; Ueno, Shintaro; Terao, Akari; Aryantini, Ni Putu Desy; Sujaya, I Nengah; Fukuda, Kenji; Urashima, Tadasu; Yamamoto, Yuji; Mukai, Takao

    2015-01-01

    We previously described potential probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains, isolated from fermented mare milk produced in Sumbawa Island, Indonesia, which showed high adhesion to porcine colonic mucin (PCM) and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Recently, mucus-binding factor (MBF) was found in the GG strain of L. rhamnosus as a mucin-binding protein. In this study, we assessed the ability of recombinant MBF protein from the FSMM22 strain, one of the isolates of L. rhamnosus from fermented Sumbawa mare milk, to adhere to PCM and ECM proteins by overlay dot blot and Biacore assays. MBF bound to PCM, laminin, collagen IV, and fibronectin with submicromolar dissociation constants. Adhesion of the FSMM22 mbf mutant strain to PCM and ECM proteins was significantly less than that of the wild-type strain. Collectively, these results suggested that MBF contribute to L. rhamnosus host colonization via mucin and ECM protein binding.

  10. Quantitative models of the mechanisms that control genome-wide patterns of transcription factor binding during early Drosophila development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommy Kaplan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factors that drive complex patterns of gene expression during animal development bind to thousands of genomic regions, with quantitative differences in binding across bound regions mediating their activity. While we now have tools to characterize the DNA affinities of these proteins and to precisely measure their genome-wide distribution in vivo, our understanding of the forces that determine where, when, and to what extent they bind remains primitive. Here we use a thermodynamic model of transcription factor binding to evaluate the contribution of different biophysical forces to the binding of five regulators of early embryonic anterior-posterior patterning in Drosophila melanogaster. Predictions based on DNA sequence and in vitro protein-DNA affinities alone achieve a correlation of ∼0.4 with experimental measurements of in vivo binding. Incorporating cooperativity and competition among the five factors, and accounting for spatial patterning by modeling binding in every nucleus independently, had little effect on prediction accuracy. A major source of error was the prediction of binding events that do not occur in vivo, which we hypothesized reflected reduced accessibility of chromatin. To test this, we incorporated experimental measurements of genome-wide DNA accessibility into our model, effectively restricting predicted binding to regions of open chromatin. This dramatically improved our predictions to a correlation of 0.6-0.9 for various factors across known target genes. Finally, we used our model to quantify the roles of DNA sequence, accessibility, and binding competition and cooperativity. Our results show that, in regions of open chromatin, binding can be predicted almost exclusively by the sequence specificity of individual factors, with a minimal role for protein interactions. We suggest that a combination of experimentally determined chromatin accessibility data and simple computational models of transcription

  11. Nanodiscs for immobilization of lipid bilayers and membrane receptors: kinetic analysis of cholera toxin binding to a glycolipid receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Jonas; Torta, Federico; Sligar, Stephen G;

    2008-01-01

    nanodiscs and their incorporated membrane receptors can be attached to surface plasmon resonance sensorchips and used to measure the kinetics of the interaction between soluble molecules and membrane receptors inserted in the bilayer of nanodiscs. Cholera toxin and its glycolipid receptor G(M1) constitute...... partner cholera toxin B subunit to the receptor with the sensorchip-based surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology. The measured stoichiometric and kinetic values of the interaction are in agreement with those reported by previous studies, thus providing proof-of-principle that nanodiscs can be employed...

  12. Cycle modulation of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 1 in human endometrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corleta H.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Endometrium is one of the fastest growing human tissues. Sex hormones, estrogen and progesterone, in interaction with several growth factors, control its growth and differentiation. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1 interacts with cell surface receptors and also with specific soluble binding proteins. IGF-binding proteins (IGF-BP have been shown to modulate IGF-1 action. Of six known isoforms, IGF-BP-1 has been characterized as a marker produced by endometrial stromal cells in the late secretory phase and in the decidua. In the current study, IGF-1-BP concentration and affinity in the proliferative and secretory phase of the menstrual cycle were measured. Endometrial samples were from patients of reproductive age with regular menstrual cycles and taking no steroid hormones. Cytosolic fractions were prepared and binding of 125I-labeled IGF-1 performed. Cross-linking reaction products were analyzed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (7.5% followed by autoradiography. 125I-IGF-1 affinity to cytosolic proteins was not statistically different between the proliferative and secretory endometrium. An approximately 35-kDa binding protein was identified when 125I-IGF-1 was cross-linked to cytosol proteins. Secretory endometrium had significantly more IGF-1-BP when compared to proliferative endometrium. The specificity of the cross-linking process was evaluated by the addition of 100 nM unlabeled IGF-1 or insulin. Unlabeled IGF-1 totally abolished the radioactivity from the band, indicating specific binding. Insulin had no apparent effect on the intensity of the labeled band. These results suggest that IGF-BP could modulate the action of IGF-1 throughout the menstrual cycle. It would be interesting to study this binding protein in other pathologic conditions of the endometrium such as adenocarcinomas and hyperplasia.

  13. Molecular determinants of epidermal growth factor binding: a molecular dynamics study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M Sanders

    Full Text Available The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is a member of the receptor tyrosine kinase family that plays a role in multiple cellular processes. Activation of EGFR requires binding of a ligand on the extracellular domain to promote conformational changes leading to dimerization and transphosphorylation of intracellular kinase domains. Seven ligands are known to bind EGFR with affinities ranging from sub-nanomolar to near micromolar dissociation constants. In the case of EGFR, distinct conformational states assumed upon binding a ligand is thought to be a determining factor in activation of a downstream signaling network. Previous biochemical studies suggest the existence of both low affinity and high affinity EGFR ligands. While these studies have identified functional effects of ligand binding, high-resolution structural data are lacking. To gain a better understanding of the molecular basis of EGFR binding affinities, we docked each EGFR ligand to the putative active state extracellular domain dimer and 25.0 ns molecular dynamics simulations were performed. MM-PBSA/GBSA are efficient computational approaches to approximate free energies of protein-protein interactions and decompose the free energy at the amino acid level. We applied these methods to the last 6.0 ns of each ligand-receptor simulation. MM-PBSA calculations were able to successfully rank all seven of the EGFR ligands based on the two affinity classes: EGF>HB-EGF>TGF-α>BTC>EPR>EPG>AR. Results from energy decomposition identified several interactions that are common among binding ligands. These findings reveal that while several residues are conserved among the EGFR ligand family, no single set of residues determines the affinity class. Instead we found heterogeneous sets of interactions that were driven primarily by electrostatic and Van der Waals forces. These results not only illustrate the complexity of EGFR dynamics but also pave the way for structure-based design of

  14. Measurement of immunotargeted plasmonic nanoparticles' cellular binding: a key factor in optimizing diagnostic efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Kun; Sun, Jiantang; Bickford, Lissett R.; Lin, Alex W. H.; Halas, Naomi J.; Yu, Tse-Kuan; Drezek, Rebekah A.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we use polarized light scattering to study immunotargeted plasmonic nanoparticles which bind to live SK-BR-3 human breast carcinoma cells. Gold nanoparticles can be conjugated to various biomolecules in order to target specific molecular signatures of disease. This specific targeting provides enhanced contrast in scattering-based optical imaging techniques. While there are papers which report the number of antibodies that bind per nanoparticle, there are almost no reports of the key factor which influences diagnostic or therapeutic efficacy using nanoparticles: the number of targeted nanoparticles that bind per cell. To achieve this goal, we have developed a 'negative' method of determining the binding concentration of those antibody/nanoparticle bioconjugates which are targeted specifically to breast cancer cells. Unlike previously reported methods, we collected unbound nanoparticle bioconjugates and measured the light scattering from dilute solutions of these particles so that quantitative binding information can be obtained. By following this process, the interaction effects of adjacent bound nanoparticles on the cell membrane can be avoided simply by measuring the light scattering from the unbound nanoparticles. Specifically, using nanoshells of two different sizes, we compared the binding concentrations of anti-HER2/nanoshell and anti-IgG/nanoshell bioconjugates targeted to HER2-positive SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells. The results indicate that, for anti-HER2/nanoshell bioconjugates, there are approximately 800-1600 nanoshells bound per cell; for anti-IgG/nanoshell bioconjugates, the binding concentration is significantly lower at nearly 100 nanoshells bound per cell. These results are also supported by dark-field microscopy images of the cells labeled with anti-HER2/nanoshell and anti-IgG/nanoshell bioconjugates.

  15. Measurement of immunotargeted plasmonic nanoparticles' cellular binding: a key factor in optimizing diagnostic efficacy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu Kun [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, MS-142, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Sun Jiantang [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, MS-142, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Bickford, Lissett R [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, MS-142, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Lin, Alex W H [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, MS-142, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Halas, Naomi J [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, MS-142, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Yu, T-K [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas, M D Anderson Cancer Center, Box 1202, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Drezek, Rebekah A [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, MS-142, Houston, TX 77005 (United States)

    2008-01-30

    In this study, we use polarized light scattering to study immunotargeted plasmonic nanoparticles which bind to live SK-BR-3 human breast carcinoma cells. Gold nanoparticles can be conjugated to various biomolecules in order to target specific molecular signatures of disease. This specific targeting provides enhanced contrast in scattering-based optical imaging techniques. While there are papers which report the number of antibodies that bind per nanoparticle, there are almost no reports of the key factor which influences diagnostic or therapeutic efficacy using nanoparticles: the number of targeted nanoparticles that bind per cell. To achieve this goal, we have developed a 'negative' method of determining the binding concentration of those antibody/nanoparticle bioconjugates which are targeted specifically to breast cancer cells. Unlike previously reported methods, we collected unbound nanoparticle bioconjugates and measured the light scattering from dilute solutions of these particles so that quantitative binding information can be obtained. By following this process, the interaction effects of adjacent bound nanoparticles on the cell membrane can be avoided simply by measuring the light scattering from the unbound nanoparticles. Specifically, using nanoshells of two different sizes, we compared the binding concentrations of anti-HER2/nanoshell and anti-IgG/nanoshell bioconjugates targeted to HER2-positive SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells. The results indicate that, for anti-HER2/nanoshell bioconjugates, there are approximately 800-1600 nanoshells bound per cell; for anti-IgG/nanoshell bioconjugates, the binding concentration is significantly lower at nearly 100 nanoshells bound per cell. These results are also supported by dark-field microscopy images of the cells labeled with anti-HER2/nanoshell and anti-IgG/nanoshell bioconjugates.

  16. Binding of insulin-like growth factors to Tera-2 human embryonal carcinoma cells during differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, J F; Sledge, G W; Benenati, S V; Frolik, C A; Roth, B J; Hirsch, K S

    1991-08-15

    Differentiation of Tera-2 human embryonal carcinoma cells by exposure to 2.1 mM alpha-difluoromethylornithine resulted in changes in morphology, a decrease in growth rate, and changes in the expression of SSEA-1 differentiation antigen. While the binding of 125I-insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) remained relatively constant during differentiation, binding of 125I-IGF-II increased 2-3-fold. Further, the binding of IGF-II was 87 times greater than IGF-I in both undifferentiated and differentiated cells. Undifferentiated Tera-2 cells exhibited a single class of binding sites for both IGF-I (KD = 1.2 nM, 7.0 x 10(3) sites/cell) and IGF-II (KD = 8.3 nM, 3.4 x 10(5) sites/cell). Following differentiation, IGF-I continued to bind to a single class of binding sites (KD 1.0 nM, 6.7 x 10(3) sites/cell) whereas IGF-II bound to both high-affinity sites (KDH 0.3 nM, 2.2 x 10(5) sites/cell) and low-affinity sites (KDL 15.1 nM, 1.6 x 10(7) sites/cell). The binding of iodinated IGF-II was blocked by unlabeled IGF-II but not IGF-I. In contrast, 125I-IGF-I binding was prevented by either IGF-I or IGF-II. Affinity cross-linking experiments demonstrated the presence of both type I and type II IGF receptors along with a number of IGF binding proteins. IGF-I failed to stimulate the incorporation of [3H]thymidine in both undifferentiated and differentiated cells. Although IGF-II caused a significant increase in [3H]thymidine incorporation in both undifferentiated and differentiated Tera-2 cells, the magnitude of the response and the sensitivity of the cells to IGF-II stimulation was diminished following differentiation. The observed changes in IGF-II binding, which occur in conjunction with cellular differentiation, may be an important feature of the expression of the differentiated phenotype by human germ cell tumors.

  17. Kinetic factors determining conducting filament formation in solid polymer electrolyte based planar devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Karthik; Aono, Masakazu; Tsuruoka, Tohru

    2016-08-01

    Resistive switching characteristics and conducting filament formation dynamics in solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) based planar-type atomic switches, with opposing active Ag and inert Pt electrodes, have been investigated by optimizing the device configuration and experimental parameters such as the gap distance between the electrodes, the salt inclusion in the polymer matrix, and the compliance current applied in current-voltage measurements. The high ionic conductivities of SPE enabled us to make scanning electron microscopy observations of the filament formation processes in the sub-micrometer to micrometer ranges. It was found that switching behaviour and filament growth morphology depend strongly on several kinetic factors, such as the redox reaction rate at the electrode-polymer interfaces, ion mobility in the polymer matrix, electric field strength, and the reduction sites for precipitation. Different filament formations, resulting from unidirectional and dendritic growth behaviours, can be controlled by tuning specified parameters, which in turn improves the stability and performance of SPE-based devices.

  18. Real-time and label free determination of ligand binding-kinetics to primary cancer tissue specimens; a novel tool for the assessment of biomarker targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Mandel Clausen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In clinical oncology, diagnosis and evaluation of optimal treatment strategies are mostly based on histopathological examination combined with immunohistochemical (IHC expression analysis of cancer-associated antigens in formalin fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissue biopsies. However, informative IHC analysis depends on both the specificity and affinity of the binding reagent, which are inherently difficult to quantify in situ. Here we describe a label-free method that allows for the direct and real-time assessment of molecular binding kinetics in situ on FFPE tissue specimens using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM enabled biosensor technology. We analysed the interaction between the rVAR2 protein and its placental-like chondroitin sulfate (pl-CS receptor in primary human placenta tissue and in breast and prostate tumour specimens in situ. rVAR2 interacted with FFPE human placenta and cancer tissue with an affinity in the nanomolar range, and showed no detectable interaction with pl-CS negative normal tissue. We further validated the method by including analysis with the androgen receptor N-20 antibody (anti-AR. As the KD value produced by this method is independent of the number of epitopes available, this readout offers a quantitative and unbiased readout for in situ binding-avidity and amount of binding epitopes. In summary, this method adds a new and important dimension to classical IHC-based molecular pathology by adding information about the binding characteristics in biologically relevant conditions. This can potentially be used to select optimal biologics for diagnostic and for therapeutic applications as well as guide the development of novel high affinity binding drugs.

  19. Identification of amino acids in the Dr adhesin required for binding to decay-accelerating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Loy, Cristina P; Sokurenko, Evgeni V; Samudrala, Ram; Moseley, Steve L

    2002-07-01

    Members of the Dr family of adhesins of Escherichia coli recognize as a receptor the Dr(a) blood-group antigen present on the complement regulatory and signalling molecule, decay-accelerating factor (DAF). One member of this family, the Dr haemagglutinin, also binds to a second receptor, type IV collagen. Structure/function information regarding these adhesins has been limited and domains directly involved in the interaction with DAF have not been determined. We devised a strategy to identify amino acids in the Dr haemagglutinin that are specifically involved in the interaction with DAF. The gene encoding the adhesive subunit, draE, was subjected to random mutagenesis and used to complement a strain defective for its expression. The resulting mutants were enriched and screened to obtain those that do not bind to DAF, but retain binding to type IV collagen. Individual amino acid changes at positions 10, 63, 65, 75, 77, 79 and 131 of the mature DraE sequence significantly reduced the ability of the DraE adhesin to bind DAF, but not collagen. Over half of the mutants obtained had substitutions within amino acids 63-81. Analysis of predicted structures of DraE suggest that these proximal residues may cluster to form a binding domain for DAF.

  20. Heparin binding preference and structures in the fibroblast growth factor family parallel their evolutionary diversification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chao; Wilkinson, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of a large number of extracellular proteins with heparan sulfate (HS) regulates their transport and effector functions, but the degree of molecular specificity underlying protein–polysaccharide binding is still debated. The 15 paracrine fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are one of the paradigms for this interaction. Here, we measure the binding preferences of six FGFs (FGF3, FGF4, FGF6, FGF10, FGF17, FGF20) for a library of modified heparins, representing structures in HS, and model glycosaminoglycans, using differential scanning fluorimetry. This is complemented by the identification of the lysine residues in the primary and secondary binding sites of the FGFs by a selective labelling approach. Pooling these data with previous sets provides good coverage of the FGF phylogenetic tree, deduced from amino acid sequence alignment. This demonstrates that the selectivity of the FGFs for binding structures in sulfated polysaccharides and the pattern of secondary binding sites on the surface of FGFs follow the phylogenetic relationship of the FGFs, and so are likely to be the result of the natural selection pressures that led to the expansion of the FGF family in the course of the evolution of more complex animal body plans. PMID:27030175

  1. Factors influencing adsorption and desorption of trimethoprim on marine sediments: mechanisms and kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Zhang, Hua

    2017-08-05

    Adsorption-desorption behavior of ionic antibiotics in natural aquatic environment is complex, especially in coastal or estuary area where influencing factors such as pH and salinity usually varied in a wide range. In this study, batch-type and stirred flow chamber (SFC) experiments were carried out to simulate the sorption-desorption behavior of trimethoprim (TMP) in seawater-sediment system. Equilibrium and kinetic modeling were carried out to determine the rate and extent of TMP sorption on two marine sediments with different properties. Sediment BHB (K d , 6.40 L kg(-1)) has a greater sorption capacity compared with sediment LZB (K d , 3.40 L kg(-1)), which is related to the higher content of organic carbon and clay of sediment BHB. Adsorption of TMP varied in the pH range of 6.9 to 8.1 with maximum adsorption at pH 7.4. Increasing salinity and presence of phosphate and nitrate led to decreased TMP sorption. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) analysis demonstrated the formation of hydrogen bond between TMP and marine sediments. Adsorption of TMP on marine sediments was a non-equilibrium process that can be described with second-order kinetic model. Our analysis suggested that chemical non-equilibrium was the rate controlling process and intraparticle diffusion was also involved in TMP adsorption. A moderate desorption percentage (16.4-22.8% for LZB and 32.5-42.0%for BHB) was observed. Overall, the results showed that environmental factors and time-dependent processes need to be considered in modeling the fate and transport of TMP in coastal/estuarine waters.

  2. Inactivation kinetics and factors of variability in the pulsed light treatment of Listeria innocua cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uesugi, Aaron R; Woodling, Sarah E; Moraru, Carmen I

    2007-11-01

    Pulsed light (PL) treatment can effectively reduce microbial populations in clear substrates and on surfaces, but its effectiveness varies as a function of substrate or treatment-related factors. For PL to be successfully adopted by the food industry, all factors of influence, as well as the inactivation kinetics for the microorganisms of concern, must be elucidated. In this study, the inactivation kinetics of Listeria innocua and the effect of inoculum size on PL inactivation were investigated. Stainless steel coupons (50.8 by 101.6 mm) of defined surface properties and transparent glass chamber slides (25.4 by 50.8 by 10 mm) were each inoculated with 1 ml of aqueous suspensions of L. innocua containing inoculum populations of up to 10(9) CFU. The thickness of the liquid layer in the glass slides was 1.16 mm. The inoculated substrates were exposed to PL treatment of up to 17 J/cm2 in a static PL chamber equipped with a pulsed Xenon lamp. Survivors were recovered and enumerated by both standard plate counting and most-probable-number procedures. The data indicated that in clear liquids, PL resulted in more than a 6-log reduction of L. innocua after a 12-J/cm2 treatment, regardless of the initial inoculum size. For the stainless steel surfaces, less than a 4-log reduction after a 12-J/cm2 treatment and a noticeable effect of substrate characteristics and inoculum size on inactivation were observed. The survivor curves showed pronounced tailing for all substrates used in the study. The Weibull model accurately predicted the survivor ratios for the PL treatment of L. innocua in clear liquids, with a shape and scale parameter of 0.33 and 3.01, respectively. The Weibull model resulted in significant overestimation of PL effectiveness for the stainless steel substrates, where the influence of various substrate properties and inoculum level on inactivation was significant.

  3. JASPAR 2016: a major expansion and update of the open-access database of transcription factor binding profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathelier, Anthony; Fornes, Oriol; Arenillas, David J;

    2016-01-01

    JASPAR (http://jaspar.genereg.net) is an open-access database storing curated, non-redundant transcription factor (TF) binding profiles representing transcription factor binding preferences as position frequency matrices for multiple species in six taxonomic groups. For this 2016 release, we...

  4. The human mitochondrial transcription factor A is a versatile G-quadruplex binding protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyonnais, Sébastien; Tarrés-Soler, Aleix; Rubio-Cosials, Anna; Cuppari, Anna; Brito, Reicy; Jaumot, Joaquim; Gargallo, Raimundo; Vilaseca, Marta; Silva, Cristina; Granzhan, Anton; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule; Eritja, Ramon; Solà, Maria

    2017-01-01

    The ability of the guanine-rich strand of the human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) to form G-quadruplex structures (G4s) has been recently highlighted, suggesting potential functions in mtDNA replication initiation and mtDNA stability. G4 structures in mtDNA raise the question of their recognition by factors associated with the mitochondrial nucleoid. The mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), a high-mobility group (HMG)-box protein, is the major binding protein of human mtDNA and plays a critical role in its expression and maintenance. HMG-box proteins are pleiotropic sensors of DNA structural alterations. Thus, we investigated and uncovered a surprising ability of TFAM to bind to DNA or RNA G4 with great versatility, showing an affinity similar than to double-stranded DNA. The recognition of G4s by endogenous TFAM was detected in mitochondrial extracts by pull-down experiments using a G4-DNA from the mtDNA conserved sequence block II (CSBII). Biochemical characterization shows that TFAM binding to G4 depends on both the G-quartets core and flanking single-stranded overhangs. Additionally, it shows a structure-specific binding mode that differs from B-DNA, including G4-dependent TFAM multimerization. These TFAM-G4 interactions suggest functional recognition of G4s in the mitochondria. PMID:28276514

  5. SNP2TFBS – a database of regulatory SNPs affecting predicted transcription factor binding site affinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunil; Ambrosini, Giovanna; Bucher, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    SNP2TFBS is a computational resource intended to support researchers investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying regulatory variation in the human genome. The database essentially consists of a collection of text files providing specific annotations for human single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), namely whether they are predicted to abolish, create or change the affinity of one or several transcription factor (TF) binding sites. A SNP's effect on TF binding is estimated based on a position weight matrix (PWM) model for the binding specificity of the corresponding factor. These data files are regenerated at regular intervals by an automatic procedure that takes as input a reference genome, a comprehensive SNP catalogue and a collection of PWMs. SNP2TFBS is also accessible over a web interface, enabling users to view the information provided for an individual SNP, to extract SNPs based on various search criteria, to annotate uploaded sets of SNPs or to display statistics about the frequencies of binding sites affected by selected SNPs. Homepage: http://ccg.vital-it.ch/snp2tfbs/. PMID:27899579

  6. Comparison of dynamic 2D and 3D brain PET for kinetic analysis of C-11 win 35,428 binding to dopamine transporters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Eun; Choi, Joon Young; Choi, Yong; Kim, Joon Young; Choe, Yearn Seong; Oh, Seung Jun; Kim, Byung Tae [College of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-07-01

    3D PET data acquisition is now being used for clinical FDG-PET brain studies. However, its validity for studying kinetics of receptor-ligand interaction has not been fully evaluated. To examine the feasibility and quantitative accuracy of dynamic 3D brain PET for kinetic analysis of radioligand binding, 4 healthy volunteers and 1 Parkinson's disease patient were studied. Each subject received two 555 MBq C-11 WIN 35,428 injections and a dynamic sequence of 31 scans were acquired until 90 min p.i. in 2D and 3D mode using a GE Advance PET scanner. Both 2D and 3D image sets were reconstructed employing a Hanning filter 4.5 mm and resulting axial resolution was about 7 mm for both 2D and 3D images. The 3D data were corrected for scatter employing a method using 2D fitted Gaussian functions. Attenuation correction was performed using a 20 min transmission scan. Tissue time-activity curves were generated in the striatum and cerebellum. The forward (k3) and dissociation (k4) rate constants were calculated in the striatum using a two-compartment model, which consists of free plus nonspecifically bound (cerebellar) and specifically bound (striatal-cerebellar) compartments. The 3D kinetic results were comparable to the 2D results and within the expected range. The 3D %SE was less than 2D %SE. Striatal-to-cerebellar ratios from 2D and 3D images showed excellent correlation and agreement (r=0.994, p<0.0001, slope=0.952). The plot of striatal-to-cerebellar ratios versus time showed a linearly increasing pattern, with significantly lower RMSE in 3D than in 2D studies in linear regression analysis (0.119{+-}0.025 vs. 0.276{+-}0.087, p=0.028). These preliminary data suggest that 3D PET provides more reliable tissue kinetic data for the analysis of C-11 WIN 35,428 kinetics. Improved sensitivity in 3D may allow more accurate receptor characterization, especially in small brain structures or in low specific binding areas.

  7. Asap: a framework for over-representation statistics for transcription factor binding sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marstrand, Troels T; Frellsen, Jes; Moltke, Ida

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In studies of gene regulation the efficient computational detection of over-represented transcription factor binding sites is an increasingly important aspect. Several published methods can be used for testing whether a set of hypothesised co-regulated genes share a common regulatory...... promoter sequences. Controlling all aspects of our input data we are able to identify the optimal statistics across multiple threshold values and for sequence sets containing different distributions of transcription factor binding sites. CONCLUSIONS: We show that our implementation is significantly faster...... than more naïve scanning algorithms when searching with many weight matrices in large sequence sets. When comparing the various statistics, we show that those based on binomial over-representation and Fisher's exact test performs almost equally good and better than the others. An online server...

  8. New Insights into the Functions of Transcription Factors that Bind the RNA Polymerase Secondary Channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenkin, Nikolay; Yuzenkova, Yulia

    2015-06-25

    Transcription elongation is regulated at several different levels, including control by various accessory transcription elongation factors. A distinct group of these factors interacts with the RNA polymerase secondary channel, an opening at the enzyme surface that leads to its active center. Despite investigation for several years, the activities and in vivo roles of some of these factors remain obscure. Here, we review the recent progress in understanding the functions of the secondary channel binding factors in bacteria. In particular, we highlight the surprising role of global regulator DksA in fidelity of RNA synthesis and the resolution of RNA polymerase traffic jams by the Gre factor. These findings indicate a potential link between transcription fidelity and collisions of the transcription and replication machineries.

  9. New Insights into the Functions of Transcription Factors that Bind the RNA Polymerase Secondary Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Zenkin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Transcription elongation is regulated at several different levels, including control by various accessory transcription elongation factors. A distinct group of these factors interacts with the RNA polymerase secondary channel, an opening at the enzyme surface that leads to its active center. Despite investigation for several years, the activities and in vivo roles of some of these factors remain obscure. Here, we review the recent progress in understanding the functions of the secondary channel binding factors in bacteria. In particular, we highlight the surprising role of global regulator DksA in fidelity of RNA synthesis and the resolution of RNA polymerase traffic jams by the Gre factor. These findings indicate a potential link between transcription fidelity and collisions of the transcription and replication machineries.

  10. Physiological levels of blood coagulation factors IX and X control coagulation kinetics in an in vitro model of circulating tissue factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tormoen, Garth W.; Khader, Ayesha; Gruber, András; McCarty, Owen J. T.

    2013-06-01

    Thrombosis significantly contributes to cancer morbidity and mortality. The mechanism behind thrombosis in cancer may be circulating tissue factor (TF), as levels of circulating TF are associated with thrombosis. However, circulating TF antigen level alone has failed to predict thrombosis in patients with cancer. We hypothesize that coagulation factor levels regulate the kinetics of circulating TF-induced thrombosis. Coagulation kinetics were measured as a function of individual coagulation factor levels and TF particle concentration. Clotting times increased when pooled plasma was mixed at or above a ratio of 4:6 with PBS. Clotting times increased when pooled plasma was mixed at or above a ratio of 8:2 with factor VII-depleted plasma, 7:3 with factor IX- or factor X-depleted plasmas, or 2:8 with factor II-, V- or VIII-depleted plasmas. Addition of coagulation factors VII, X, IX, V and II to depleted plasmas shortened clotting and enzyme initiation times, and increased enzyme generation rates in a concentration-dependent manner. Only additions of factors IX and X from low-normal to high-normal levels shortened clotting times and increased enzyme generation rates. Our results demonstrate that coagulation kinetics for TF particles are controlled by factor IX and X levels within the normal physiological range. We hypothesize that individual patient factor IX and X levels may be prognostic for susceptibility to circulating TF-induced thrombosis.

  11. Identification of human IgG1 variant with enhanced FcRn binding and without increased binding to rheumatoid factor autoantibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Atsuhiko; Iwayanagi, Yuki; Haraya, Kenta; Tachibana, Tatsuhiko; Nakamura, Genki; Nambu, Takeru; Esaki, Keiko; Hattori, Kunihiro; Igawa, Tomoyuki

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Various studies have demonstrated that Fc engineering to enhance neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) binding is effective for elongating half-life or increasing cellular uptake of IgG. A previous study has shown that a N434H mutation to enhance FcRn binding resulted in increased binding to rheumatoid factor (RF) autoantibody, which is not desirable for therapeutic use in autoimmune disease. In this study, we first showed that all the existing Fc variants with enhanced FcRn binding also show increased RF binding, and then identified specific mutations that could be introduced to those Fc variants to reduce the RF binding. Furthermore, we generated novel Fc variants that do not increase RF binding and show half-lives of 45 d in cynomolgus monkey, which is longer than those of previously reported Fc variants. In addition, we generated novel Fc variants with antigen sweeping activity that do not increase RF binding. We expect that these novel Fc variants will be useful as antibody therapeutics against autoimmune diseases. PMID:28387635

  12. Sperm and spermatids contain different proteins and bind distinct egg factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teperek, Marta; Miyamoto, Kei; Simeone, Angela; Feret, Renata; Deery, Michael J; Gurdon, John B; Jullien, Jerome

    2014-09-19

    Spermatozoa are more efficient at supporting normal embryonic development than spermatids, their immature, immediate precursors. This suggests that the sperm acquires the ability to support embryonic development during spermiogenesis (spermatid to sperm maturation). Here, using Xenopus laevis as a model organism, we performed 2-D Fluorescence Difference Gel Electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and mass spectrometry analysis of differentially expressed proteins between sperm and spermatids in order to identify factors that could be responsible for the efficiency of the sperm to support embryonic development. Furthermore, benefiting from the availability of egg extracts in Xenopus, we also tested whether the chromatin of sperm could attract different egg factors compared to the chromatin of spermatids. Our analysis identified: (1) several proteins which were present exclusively in sperm; but not in spermatid nuclei and (2) numerous egg proteins binding to the sperm (but not to the spermatid chromatin) after incubation in egg extracts. Amongst these factors we identified many chromatin-associated proteins and transcriptional repressors. Presence of transcriptional repressors binding specifically to sperm chromatin could suggest its preparation for the early embryonic cell cycles, during which no transcription is observed and suggests that sperm chromatin has a unique protein composition, which facilitates the recruitment of egg chromatin remodelling factors. It is therefore likely that the acquisition of these sperm-specific factors during spermiogenesis makes the sperm chromatin suitable to interact with the maternal factors and, as a consequence, to support efficient embryonic development.

  13. Reconstruction of adenovirus replication origins with a human nuclear factor I binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhya, S; Shneidman, P S; Hurwitz, J

    1986-03-05

    Nuclear factor I is a host-coded DNA-binding protein that stimulates initiation of adenovirus DNA replication. To understand the mechanism of action of nuclear factor I, we have constructed, by recombinant DNA techniques, origins of replication in which the adenovirus type 5 nuclear factor I binding site (FIB site) has been replaced by a FIB site isolated from human genomic DNA (Gronostajski, R. M., Nagata, K., and Hurwitz, J. (1984) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 81, 4013-4017). Assays of such recombinants for initiation and elongation in vitro showed that nuclear factor I was active only when the FIB site was relatively close to the DNA terminus, i.e. the FIB site was centered at nucleotides 30-36 from the end of the DNA. Nuclear factor I was active in either orientation within this distance range. The presence of one or two additional FIB sites in the downstream region had no effect. The implications of these results for the mechanism of nuclear factor I action are discussed.

  14. Complement factor H binds malondialdehyde epitopes and protects from oxidative stress

    OpenAIRE

    Weismann, David; Hartvigsen, Karsten; Lauer, Nadine; Keiryn L Bennett; Scholl, Hendrik P N; Issa, Peter Charbel; Cano, Marisol; Brandstätter, Hubert; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Skerka, Christine; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Handa, James T.; Zipfel, Peter F.; Witztum, Joseph L.; Binder, Christoph J.

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress and enhanced lipid peroxidation are linked to many chronic inflammatory diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD). AMD is the leading cause of blindness in Western societies, but its aetiology remains largely unknown. Malondialdehyde (MDA) is a common lipid peroxidation product that accumulates in many pathophysiological processes, including AMD. Here we identify complement factor H (CFH) as a major MDA-binding protein that can block both the uptake of MDA-mo...

  15. Quantitative Proteomics Identifies Serum Response Factor Binding Protein 1 as a Host Factor for Hepatitis C Virus Entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisa Gerold

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV enters human hepatocytes through a multistep mechanism involving, among other host proteins, the virus receptor CD81. How CD81 governs HCV entry is poorly characterized, and CD81 protein interactions after virus binding remain elusive. We have developed a quantitative proteomics protocol to identify HCV-triggered CD81 interactions and found 26 dynamic binding partners. At least six of these proteins promote HCV infection, as indicated by RNAi. We further characterized serum response factor binding protein 1 (SRFBP1, which is recruited to CD81 during HCV uptake and supports HCV infection in hepatoma cells and primary human hepatocytes. SRFBP1 facilitates host cell penetration by all seven HCV genotypes, but not of vesicular stomatitis virus and human coronavirus. Thus, SRFBP1 is an HCV-specific, pan-genotypic host entry factor. These results demonstrate the use of quantitative proteomics to elucidate pathogen entry and underscore the importance of host protein-protein interactions during HCV invasion.

  16. Structural basis of human transcription factor Sry-related box 17 binding to DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Nana; Jiang, Wei; Gao, Hai; Cheng, Zhong; Qian, Huolian; Si, Shuyi; Xie, Yong

    2013-04-01

    Sry-related box (Sox) transcription factors share a conserved high-mobility-group box domain (HMG-domain) that binds DNA in the minor groove and bends DNA for further assembly of transcriptional machineries. During organogenesis, each member of the Sox family triggers a specific cell lineage differentiation, indicating that their interactions with DNA are different from each other. Therefore, investigating structural rearrangement of each Sox transcription factor HMG-domain upon binding to DNA would help to elucidate the distinctive molecular mechanism by which they interact with DNA. Previous studies have determined the crystal structures of Sox2 HMG-domain/DNA, Sox4 HMGdomain/ DNA, Sox9 HMG-domain/DNA and Sox17 HMG-domain/DNA complexes. However, major gaps remain in the structural information on the Sox transcription factor HMG-domains. Here, we report the crystal structure of the human Sox17 HMG-domain alone at 2.4 A resolution. Comparing this structure and the structure of the mouse Sox17 HMGdomain/ DNA complex provides structural understanding of the mechanism of Sox17 binding to DNA. Specifically, after electrostatic interactions attract Sox17 to DNA, Asn73, Ser99, and Trp106 form hydrogen bonds with DNA, Arg70, Lys80, Arg83, His94, and Asn95 on Sox17 undergo conformational changes and form hydrogen bonds with DNA, contributing to the electrostatic interaction between Sox17 and DNA.

  17. FF domains of CA150 bind transcription and splicing factors through multiple weak interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew J; Kulkarni, Sarang; Pawson, Tony

    2004-11-01

    The human transcription factor CA150 modulates human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gene transcription and contains numerous signaling elements, including six FF domains. Repeated FF domains are present in several transcription and splicing factors and can recognize phosphoserine motifs in the C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). Using mass spectrometry, we identify a number of nuclear binding partners for the CA150 FF domains and demonstrate a direct interaction between CA150 and Tat-SF1, a protein involved in the coupling of splicing and transcription. CA150 FF domains recognize multiple sites within the Tat-SF1 protein conforming to the consensus motif (D/E)(2/5)-F/W/Y-(D/E)(2/5). Individual FF domains are capable of interacting with Tat-SF1 peptide ligands in an equivalent and noncooperative manner, with affinities ranging from 150 to 500 microM. Repeated FF domains therefore appear to bind their targets through multiple weak interactions with motifs comprised of negatively charged residues flanking aromatic amino acids. The RNAPII CTD represents a consensus FF domain-binding site, contingent on generation of the requisite negative charges by phosphorylation of serines 2 and 5. We propose that CA150, through the dual recognition of acidic motifs in proteins such as Tat-SF1 and the phosphorylated CTD, could mediate the recruitment of transcription and splicing factors to actively transcribing RNAPII.

  18. Amblyomma americanum tick saliva insulin-like growth factor binding protein-related protein 1 binds insulin but not insulin-like growth factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radulović, Ž M; Porter, L M; Kim, T K; Bakshi, M; Mulenga, A

    2015-10-01

    Silencing Amblyomma americanum insulin-like growth factor binding protein-related protein 1 (AamIGFBP-rP1) mRNA prevented ticks from feeding to repletion. In this study, we used recombinant (r)AamIGFBP-rP1 in a series of assays to obtain further insight into the role(s) of this protein in tick feeding regulation. Our results suggest that AamIGFBP-1 is an antigenic protein that is apparently exclusively expressed in salivary glands. We found that both males and females secrete AamIGFBP-rP1 into the host during feeding and confirmed that female ticks secrete this protein from within 24-48 h after attachment. Our data suggest that native AamIGFBP-rP1 is a functional insulin binding protein in that both yeast- and insect cell-expressed rAamIGFBP-rP1 bound insulin, but not insulin-like growth factors. When subjected to anti-blood clotting and platelet aggregation assays, rAamIGFBP-rP1 did not have any effect. Unlike human IGFBP-rP1, which is controlled by trypsinization, rAamIGFBP-rP1 is resistant to digestion, suggesting that the tick protein may not be under mammalian host control at the tick feeding site. The majority of tick-borne pathogens are transmitted 48 h after the tick has attached. Thus, the demonstrated antigenicity and secretion into the host within 24-48 h of the tick starting to feed makes AamIGFBP-rP1 an attractive target for antitick vaccine development.

  19. The relationship between transcription initiation RNAs and CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taft Ryan J

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription initiation RNAs (tiRNAs are nuclear localized 18 nucleotide RNAs derived from sequences immediately downstream of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII transcription start sites. Previous reports have shown that tiRNAs are intimately correlated with gene expression, RNA polymerase II binding and behaviors, and epigenetic marks associated with transcription initiation, but not elongation. Results In the present work, we show that tiRNAs are commonly found at genomic CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF binding sites in human and mouse, and that CTCF sites that colocalize with RNAPII are highly enriched for tiRNAs. To directly investigate the relationship between tiRNAs and CTCF we examined tiRNAs originating near the intronic CTCF binding site in the human tumor suppressor gene, p21 (cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A gene, also known as CDKN1A. Inhibition of CTCF-proximal tiRNAs resulted in increased CTCF localization and increased p21 expression, while overexpression of CTCF-proximal tiRNA mimics decreased CTCF localization and p21 expression. We also found that tiRNA-regulated CTCF binding influences the levels of trimethylated H3K27 at the alternate upstream p21 promoter, and affects the levels of alternate p21 (p21alt transcripts. Extending these studies to another randomly selected locus with conserved CTCF binding we found that depletion of tiRNA alters nucleosome density proximal to sites of tiRNA biogenesis. Conclusions Taken together, these data suggest that tiRNAs modulate local epigenetic structure, which in turn regulates CTCF localization.

  20. Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins increase intracellular calcium levels in two different cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Seurin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs are six related secreted proteins that share IGF-dependent and -independent functions. If the former functions begin to be well described, the latter are somewhat more difficult to investigate and to characterize. At the cellular level, IGFBPs were shown to modulate numerous processes including cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis. However, the molecular mechanisms implicated remain largely unknown. We previously demonstrated that IGFBP-3, but not IGFBP-1 or IGFBP-5, increase intracellular calcium concentration in MCF-7 cells (Ricort J-M et al. (2002 FEBS lett 527: 293-297. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We perform a global analysis in which we studied, by two different approaches, the binding of each IGFBP isoform (i.e., IGFBP-1 to -6 to the surface of two different cellular models, MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cells and C2 myoblast proliferative cells, as well as the IGFBP-induced increase of intracellular calcium concentration. Using both confocal fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry analysis, we showed that all IGFBPs bind to MCF-7 cell surface. By contrast, only four IGFBPs can bind to C2 cell surface since neither IGFBP-2 nor IGFBP-4 were detected. Among the six IGFBPs tested, only IGFBP-1 did not increased intracellular calcium concentration whatever the cellular model studied. By contrast, IGFBP-2, -3, -4 and -6, in MCF-7 cells, and IGFBP-3, -5 and -6, in C2 proliferative cells, induce a rapid and transient increase in intracellular free calcium concentration. Moreover, IGFBP-2 and -3 (in MCF-7 cells and IGFBP-5 (in C2 cells increase intracellular free calcium concentration by a pertussis toxin sensitive signaling pathway. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate that IGFBPs are able to bind to cell surface and increase intracellular calcium concentration. By characterizing the IGFBPs-induced cell responses and intracellular couplings, we highlight the cellular

  1. Interaction between Fibrinogen and Insulin-Like Growth Factor-Binding Protein-1 in Human Plasma under Physiological Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gligorijević, N; Nedić, O

    2016-02-01

    Fibrinogen is a plasma glycoprotein and one of the principle participants in blood coagulation. It interacts with many proteins during formation of a blood clot, including insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and their binding proteins (IGFBP). Fibrinogen complexes were found as minor fractions in fibrinogen preparations independently of the coagulation process, and their presence influences the kinetics of polymerization. The idea of this work was to investigate whether fibrinogen in human plasma interacts with IGFBPs independently of the tissue injury or coagulation process. The results have shown that fibrinogen forms complexes with IGFBP-1 under physiological conditions. Several experimental approaches have confirmed that complexes are co-isolated with fibrinogen from plasma, they are relatively stable, and they appear as a general feature of human plasma. Several other experiments excluded the possibility that alpha-2 macroglobulin/IGFBP-1 complexes or IGFBP-1 oligomers contributed to IGFBP-1 immunoreactivity. The role of fibrinogen/IGFBP-1 complexes is still unknown. Further investigation in individuals expressing both impaired glucose control and coagulopathy could contribute to identification and understanding of their possible physiological role.

  2. Fractal binding and dissociation kinetics of lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase (LCAT), a heart-related compound, on biosensor surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doke, Atul M.; Sadana, Ajit

    2006-05-01

    A fractal analysis is presented for the binding and dissociation of different heart-related compounds in solution to receptors immobilized on biosensor surfaces. The data analyzed include LCAT (lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase) concentrations in solution to egg-white apoA-I rHDL immobilized on a biosensor chip surface.1 Single- and dual- fractal models were employed to fit the data. Values of the binding and the dissociation rate coefficient(s), affinity values, and the fractal dimensions were obtained from the regression analysis provided by Corel Quattro Pro 8.0 (Corel Corporation Limited).2 The binding rate coefficients are quite sensitive to the degree of heterogeneity on the sensor chip surface. Predictive equations are developed for the binding rate coefficient as a function of the degree of heterogeneity present on the sensor chip surface and on the LCAT concentration in solution, and for the affinity as a function of the ratio of fractal dimensions present in the binding and the dissociation phases. The analysis presented provided physical insights into these analyte-receptor reactions occurring on different biosensor surfaces.

  3. Elementary steps in the reaction of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from pig heart. Kinetics of thiamine diphosphate binding to the complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sümegi, B; Alkonyi, I

    1983-11-02

    In the progress curve of the reaction of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, a lag phase was observed when the concentration of thiamin diphosphate was lower than usual (about 0.2-1 mM) in the enzyme assay. The length of the lag phase was dependent on thiamin diphosphate concentration, ranging from 0.2 min to 2 min as the thiamin diphosphate concentration varied from 800 nM to 22 nM. The lag phase was also observed in the elementary steps catalyzed by the pyruvate dehydrogenase component. A Km value of 107 nM was found for thiamin diphosphate with respect to the steady-state reaction rate following the lag phase. The pre-steady-state kinetic data indicate that the resulting lag phase was the consequence of a slow holoenzyme formation from apoenzyme and thiamin diphosphate. The thiamin diphosphate can bind to the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in the absence of pyruvate, but the presence of 2 mM pyruvate increases the rate constant of binding from 1.4 X 10(4) M-1 S-1 to 1.3 X 10(5) M-1 S-1 and decreases the rate constant of dissociation from 2.3 X 10(-2) S-1 to 4.1 X 10(-3) S-1. On the other hand, the effect of pyruvate on the thiamin diphosphate binding revealed the existence of a thiamin-diphosphate-independent pyruvate-binding site in the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. Direct evidence was also obtained with fluorescence techniques for the existence of this binding site and the dissociation constant of pyruvate was found to be 0.38 mM. On the basis of these data we have proposed a random mechanism for the binding of pyruvate and thiamin diphosphate to the complex. Binding of substrates to the enzyme complex caused an increase in the fluorescence of the dansylaziridine-labelled pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, showing that binding of substrates to the complex is accompanied by structural changes.

  4. Kinetic flow dichroism study of conformational changes in supercoiled DNA induced by ethidium bromide and noncovalent and covalent binding of benz[a]pyrene diol epoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, H; Swenberg, C E; Geacintov, N E

    1987-03-10

    The dynamic conformational changes due to the noncovalent intercalative binding of ethidium bromide and racemic trans-7,8-dihydroxy-anti-9,10-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo[a]pyrene (BPDE), and the covalent binding of BPDE to supercoiled phi X174 DNA, have been studied by gel electrophoresis and a novel application of a kinetic flow linear dichroism technique. The magnitude of the linear dichroism (delta A) of the DNA oriented in the flow gradient is sensitive to the hydrodynamic shape of the DNA molecule which is affected by the binding of the drug or the carcinogen BPDE. While the linear dichroism of ethidium bromide supercoiled DNA is time independent, the delta A spectra of BPDE-DNA reaction mixtures vary on time scales of minutes, which correspond to the reaction rate constant of BPDE to form 7,8,9,10-tetrahydroxytetrahydrobenzo[a]pyrene hydrolysis products and covalent DNA adducts. The rapid noncovalent intercalation of BPDE causes an initial large increase in delta A (up to 250%, corresponding to the dichroism observed with relaxed circular DNA), followed by a slower decrease in the linear dichroism signal. This decrease in delta A is attributed to the removal of intercalated diol epoxide molecules and the resulting reversible increase in the number of superhelical turns. The kinetic flow dichroism spectra indicate that the noncovalent BPDE-DNA complexes are intercalative in nature, while the covalent adducts are characterized by a very different conformation in which the long axes of the pyrenyl residues are oriented at a large angle with respect to the average orientation of the planes of the DNA bases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Storage of factor VIII variants with impaired von Willebrand factor binding in Weibel-Palade bodies in endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maartje van den Biggelaar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Point mutations resulting in reduced factor VIII (FVIII binding to von Willebrand factor (VWF are an important cause of mild/moderate hemophilia A. Treatment includes desmopressin infusion, which concomitantly increases VWF and FVIII plasma levels, apparently from storage pools containing both proteins. The source of these VWF/FVIII co-storage pools and the mechanism of granule biogenesis are not fully understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied intracellular trafficking of FVIII variants implicated in mild/moderate hemophilia A together with VWF in HEK293 cells and primary endothelial cells. The role of VWF binding was addressed using FVIII variants displaying reduced VWF interaction. Binding studies using purified FVIII proteins revealed moderate (Arg2150His, Del2201, Pro2300Ser to severe (Tyr1680Phe, Ser2119Tyr VWF binding defects. Expression studies in HEK293 cells and primary endothelial cells revealed that all FVIII variants were present within VWF-containing organelles. Quantitative studies showed that the relative amount of FVIII storage was independent of various mutations. Substantial amounts of FVIII variants are co-stored in VWF-containing storage organelles, presumably by virtue of their ability to interact with VWF at low pH. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that the potential of FVIII co-storage with VWF is not affected in mild/moderate hemophilia A caused by reduced FVIII/VWF interaction in the circulation. These data support the hypothesis that Weibel-Palade bodies comprise the desmopressin-releasable FVIII storage pool in vivo.

  6. Universality of Poisson indicator and Fano factor of transport event statistics in ion channels and enzyme kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, Srabanti; Cao, Jianshu; Sinitsyn, Nikolai A

    2013-01-17

    We consider a generic stochastic model of ion transport through a single channel with arbitrary internal structure and kinetic rates of transitions between internal states. This model is also applicable to describe kinetics of a class of enzymes in which turnover events correspond to conversion of substrate into product by a single enzyme molecule. We show that measurement of statistics of single molecule transition time through the channel contains only restricted information about internal structure of the channel. In particular, the most accessible flux fluctuation characteristics, such as the Poisson indicator (P) and the Fano factor (F) as function of solute concentration, depend only on three parameters in addition to the parameters of the Michaelis-Menten curve that characterizes average current through the channel. Nevertheless, measurement of Poisson indicator or Fano factor for such renewal processes can discriminate reactions with multiple intermediate steps as well as provide valuable information about the internal kinetic rates.

  7. Kinetics of H+ ion binding by the P+QA-state of bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers: rate limitation within the protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maróti, P; Wraight, C A

    1997-07-01

    The kinetics of flash-induced H+ ion binding by isolated reaction centers (RCs) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides, strain R-26, were measured, using pH indicators and conductimetry, in the presence of terbutryn to block electron transfer between the primary and secondary quinones (QA and QB), and in the absence of exogenous electron donors to the oxidized primary donor, P+, i.e., the P+QA-state. Under these conditions, proton binding by RCs is to the protein rather than to any of the cofactors. After light activation to form P+QA-, the kinetics of proton binding were monoexponential at all pH values studied. At neutral pH, the apparent bimolecular rate constant was close to the diffusional limit for proton transfer in aqueous solution (approximately 10(11) M-1 s-1), but increased significantly in the alkaline pH range (e.g., 2 x 10(13) M-1 s-1 at pH 10). The average slope of the pH dependence was -0.4 instead of -1.0, as might be expected for a H+ diffusion-controlled process. High activation energy (0.54 eV at pH 8.0) and weak viscosity dependence showed that H+ ion uptake by RCs is not limited by diffusion. The salt dependence of the H+ ion binding rate and the pK values of the protonatable amino acid residues of the reaction center implicated surface charge influences, and Gouy-Chapman theory provided a workable description of the ionic effects as arising from modulation of the pH at the surface of the RC. Incubation in D2O caused small increases in the pKs of the protonatable groups and a small, pH (pD)-dependent slowing of the binding rate. The salt, pH, temperature, viscosity, and D2O dependences of the proton uptake by RCs in the P+QA- state were accounted for by three considerations: 1) parallel pathways of H+ delivery to the RC, contributing to the observed (net) H+ disappearance; 2) rate limitation of the protonation of target groups within the protein by conformational dynamics; and 3) electrostatic influences of charged groups in the protein, via the surface pH.

  8. Kinetics of H+ ion binding by the P+QA-state of bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers: rate limitation within the protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maróti, P; Wraight, C A

    1997-01-01

    The kinetics of flash-induced H+ ion binding by isolated reaction centers (RCs) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides, strain R-26, were measured, using pH indicators and conductimetry, in the presence of terbutryn to block electron transfer between the primary and secondary quinones (QA and QB), and in the absence of exogenous electron donors to the oxidized primary donor, P+, i.e., the P+QA-state. Under these conditions, proton binding by RCs is to the protein rather than to any of the cofactors. After light activation to form P+QA-, the kinetics of proton binding were monoexponential at all pH values studied. At neutral pH, the apparent bimolecular rate constant was close to the diffusional limit for proton transfer in aqueous solution (approximately 10(11) M-1 s-1), but increased significantly in the alkaline pH range (e.g., 2 x 10(13) M-1 s-1 at pH 10). The average slope of the pH dependence was -0.4 instead of -1.0, as might be expected for a H+ diffusion-controlled process. High activation energy (0.54 eV at pH 8.0) and weak viscosity dependence showed that H+ ion uptake by RCs is not limited by diffusion. The salt dependence of the H+ ion binding rate and the pK values of the protonatable amino acid residues of the reaction center implicated surface charge influences, and Gouy-Chapman theory provided a workable description of the ionic effects as arising from modulation of the pH at the surface of the RC. Incubation in D2O caused small increases in the pKs of the protonatable groups and a small, pH (pD)-dependent slowing of the binding rate. The salt, pH, temperature, viscosity, and D2O dependences of the proton uptake by RCs in the P+QA- state were accounted for by three considerations: 1) parallel pathways of H+ delivery to the RC, contributing to the observed (net) H+ disappearance; 2) rate limitation of the protonation of target groups within the protein by conformational dynamics; and 3) electrostatic influences of charged groups in the protein, via the surface p

  9. Number of active transcription factor binding sites is essential for the Hes7 oscillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Angelis Martin

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is commonly accepted that embryonic segmentation of vertebrates is regulated by a segmentation clock, which is induced by the cycling genes Hes1 and Hes7. Their products form dimers that bind to the regulatory regions and thereby repress the transcription of their own encoding genes. An increase of the half-life of Hes7 protein causes irregular somite formation. This was shown in recent experiments by Hirata et al. In the same work, numerical simulations from a delay differential equations model, originally invented by Lewis, gave additional support. For a longer half-life of the Hes7 protein, these simulations exhibited strongly damped oscillations with, after few periods, severely attenuated the amplitudes. In these simulations, the Hill coefficient, a crucial model parameter, was set to 2 indicating that Hes7 has only one binding site in its promoter. On the other hand, Bessho et al. established three regulatory elements in the promoter region. Results We show that – with the same half life – the delay system is highly sensitive to changes in the Hill coefficient. A small increase changes the qualitative behaviour of the solutions drastically. There is sustained oscillation and hence the model can no longer explain the disruption of the segmentation clock. On the other hand, the Hill coefficient is correlated with the number of active binding sites, and with the way in which dimers bind to them. In this paper, we adopt response functions in order to estimate Hill coefficients for a variable number of active binding sites. It turns out that three active transcription factor binding sites increase the Hill coefficient by at least 20% as compared to one single active site. Conclusion Our findings lead to the following crucial dichotomy: either Hirata's model is correct for the Hes7 oscillator, in which case at most two binding sites are active in its promoter region; or at least three binding sites are active, in which

  10. SELMAP - SELEX affinity landscape MAPping of transcription factor binding sites using integrated microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dana; Orenstein, Yaron; Golodnitsky, Rada; Pellach, Michal; Avrahami, Dorit; Wachtel, Chaim; Ovadia-Shochat, Avital; Shir-Shapira, Hila; Kedmi, Adi; Juven-Gershon, Tamar; Shamir, Ron; Gerber, Doron

    2016-09-15

    Transcription factors (TFs) alter gene expression in response to changes in the environment through sequence-specific interactions with the DNA. These interactions are best portrayed as a landscape of TF binding affinities. Current methods to study sequence-specific binding preferences suffer from limited dynamic range, sequence bias, lack of specificity and limited throughput. We have developed a microfluidic-based device for SELEX Affinity Landscape MAPping (SELMAP) of TF binding, which allows high-throughput measurement of 16 proteins in parallel. We used it to measure the relative affinities of Pho4, AtERF2 and Btd full-length proteins to millions of different DNA binding sites, and detected both high and low-affinity interactions in equilibrium conditions, generating a comprehensive landscape of the relative TF affinities to all possible DNA 6-mers, and even DNA10-mers with increased sequencing depth. Low quantities of both the TFs and DNA oligomers were sufficient for obtaining high-quality results, significantly reducing experimental costs. SELMAP allows in-depth screening of hundreds of TFs, and provides a means for better understanding of the regulatory processes that govern gene expression.

  11. Kinetics and mechanisms of the oxidation of alcohols and hydroxylamines by hydrogen peroxide, catalyzed by methyltrioxorhenium, MTO, and the oxygen binding properties of cobalt Schiff base complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zauche, Timothy [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1999-02-12

    Catalysis is a very interesting area of chemistry, which is currently developing at a rapid pace. A great deal of effort is being put forth by both industry and academia to make reactions faster and more productive. One method of accomplishing this is by the development of catalysts. Enzymes are an example of catalysts that are able to perform reactions on a very rapid time scale and also very specifically; a goal for every man-made catalyst. A kinetic study can also be carried out for a reaction to gain a better understanding of its mechanism and to determine what type of catalyst would assist the reaction. Kinetic studies can also help determine other factors, such as the shelf life of a chemical, or the optimum temperature for an industrial scale reaction. An area of catalysis being studied at this time is that of oxygenations. Life on this earth depends on the kinetic barriers for oxygen in its various forms. If it were not for these barriers, molecular oxygen, water, and the oxygenated materials in the land would be in a constant equilibrium. These same barriers must be overcome when performing oxygenation reactions on the laboratory or industrial scale. By performing kinetic studies and developing catalysts for these reactions, a large number of reactions can be made more economical, while making less unwanted byproducts. For this dissertation the activation by transition metal complexes of hydrogen peroxide or molecular oxygen coordination will be discussed.

  12. Early kinetic intermediate in the folding of acyl-CoA binding protein detected by fluorescence labeling and ultrarapid mixing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilum, Kaare; Maki, Kosuke; Kragelund, Birthe B

    2002-01-01

    Early conformational events during folding of acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP), an 86-residue alpha-helical protein, were explored by using a continuous-flow mixing apparatus with a dead time of 70 micros to measure changes in intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and tryptophan-dansyl fluorescence en...

  13. Mechanistic heterogeneity in site recognition by the structurally homologous DNA-binding domains of the ETS family transcription factors Ets-1 and PU.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuo; Linde, Miles H; Munde, Manoj; Carvalho, Victor D; Wilson, W David; Poon, Gregory M K

    2014-08-01

    ETS family transcription factors regulate diverse genes through binding at cognate DNA sites that overlap substantially in sequence. The DNA-binding domains of ETS proteins (ETS domains) are highly conserved structurally yet share limited amino acid homology. To define the mechanistic implications of sequence diversity within the ETS family, we characterized the thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA site recognition by the ETS domains of Ets-1 and PU.1, which represent the extremes in amino acid divergence among ETS proteins. Even though the two ETS domains bind their optimal sites with similar affinities under physiologic conditions, their nature of site recognition differs strikingly in terms of the role of hydration and counter ion release. The data suggest two distinct mechanisms wherein Ets-1 follows a "dry" mechanism that rapidly parses sites through electrostatic interactions and direct protein-DNA contacts, whereas PU.1 utilizes hydration to interrogate sequence-specific sites and form a long-lived complex relative to the Ets-1 counterpart. The kinetic persistence of the high affinity PU.1 · DNA complex may be relevant to an emerging role of PU.1, but not Ets-1, as a pioneer transcription factor in vivo. In addition, PU.1 activity is critical to the development and function of macrophages and lymphocytes, which present osmotically variable environments, and hydration-dependent specificity may represent an important regulatory mechanism in vivo, a hypothesis that finds support in gene expression profiles of primary murine macrophages. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. The actinobacterial transcription factor RbpA binds to the principal sigma subunit of RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabib-Salazar, Aline; Liu, Bing; Doughty, Philip; Lewis, Richard A; Ghosh, Somadri; Parsy, Marie-Laure; Simpson, Peter J; O'Dwyer, Kathleen; Matthews, Steve J; Paget, Mark S

    2013-06-01

    RbpA is a small non-DNA-binding transcription factor that associates with RNA polymerase holoenzyme and stimulates transcription in actinobacteria, including Streptomyces coelicolor and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. RbpA seems to show specificity for the vegetative form of RNA polymerase as opposed to alternative forms of the enzyme. Here, we explain the basis of this specificity by showing that RbpA binds directly to the principal σ subunit in these organisms, but not to more diverged alternative σ factors. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed that, although differing in their requirement for structural zinc, the RbpA orthologues from S. coelicolor and M. tuberculosis share a common structural core domain, with extensive, apparently disordered, N- and C-terminal regions. The RbpA-σ interaction is mediated by the C-terminal region of RbpA and σ domain 2, and S. coelicolor RbpA mutants that are defective in binding σ are unable to stimulate transcription in vitro and are inactive in vivo. Given that RbpA is essential in M. tuberculosis and critical for growth in S. coelicolor, these data support a model in which RbpA plays a key role in the σ cycle in actinobacteria.

  15. A structural-based strategy for recognition of transcription factor binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beisi Xu

    Full Text Available Scanning through genomes for potential transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs is becoming increasingly important in this post-genomic era. The position weight matrix (PWM is the standard representation of TFBSs utilized when scanning through sequences for potential binding sites. However, many transcription factor (TF motifs are short and highly degenerate, and methods utilizing PWMs to scan for sites are plagued by false positives. Furthermore, many important TFs do not have well-characterized PWMs, making identification of potential binding sites even more difficult. One approach to the identification of sites for these TFs has been to use the 3D structure of the TF to predict the DNA structure around the TF and then to generate a PWM from the predicted 3D complex structure. However, this approach is dependent on the similarity of the predicted structure to the native structure. We introduce here a novel approach to identify TFBSs utilizing structure information that can be applied to TFs without characterized PWMs, as long as a 3D complex structure (TF/DNA exists. This approach utilizes an energy function that is uniquely trained on each structure. Our approach leads to increased prediction accuracy and robustness compared with those using a more general energy function. The software is freely available upon request.

  16. Kinetic factors determining conducting filament formation in solid polymer electrolyte based planar devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Karthik; Aono, Masakazu; Tsuruoka, Tohru

    2016-07-01

    Resistive switching characteristics and conducting filament formation dynamics in solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) based planar-type atomic switches, with opposing active Ag and inert Pt electrodes, have been investigated by optimizing the device configuration and experimental parameters such as the gap distance between the electrodes, the salt inclusion in the polymer matrix, and the compliance current applied in current-voltage measurements. The high ionic conductivities of SPE enabled us to make scanning electron microscopy observations of the filament formation processes in the sub-micrometer to micrometer ranges. It was found that switching behaviour and filament growth morphology depend strongly on several kinetic factors, such as the redox reaction rate at the electrode-polymer interfaces, ion mobility in the polymer matrix, electric field strength, and the reduction sites for precipitation. Different filament formations, resulting from unidirectional and dendritic growth behaviours, can be controlled by tuning specified parameters, which in turn improves the stability and performance of SPE-based devices.Resistive switching characteristics and conducting filament formation dynamics in solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) based planar-type atomic switches, with opposing active Ag and inert Pt electrodes, have been investigated by optimizing the device configuration and experimental parameters such as the gap distance between the electrodes, the salt inclusion in the polymer matrix, and the compliance current applied in current-voltage measurements. The high ionic conductivities of SPE enabled us to make scanning electron microscopy observations of the filament formation processes in the sub-micrometer to micrometer ranges. It was found that switching behaviour and filament growth morphology depend strongly on several kinetic factors, such as the redox reaction rate at the electrode-polymer interfaces, ion mobility in the polymer matrix, electric field strength

  17. Identification of potential nuclear reprogramming and differentiation factors by a novel selection method for cloning chromatin-binding proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiuWang; AihuaZheng; LingYi; ChongrenXu; MingxiaoDing; HongkuiDeng

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear reprogramming is critical for animal cloning and stem cell creation through nuclear transfer, which requires extensive remodeling of chromosomal architecture involving dramatic changes in chromatin-binding proteins. To understand the mechanism of nuclear reprogramming, it is critical to identify chromatin-binding factors specify the reprogramming process. In this report, we have developed a high-throughput selection method, based on T7 phage display and chromatin immunoprecipitation, to isolate chromatin-binding factors expressed in mouse embryonic stem cells using primary mouse embryonic fibroblast chromatin. Seven chromatin-binding proteins have been isolated by this method. We have also isolated several chromatin-binding proteins involved in hepatocyte differentiation. Our method provides a powerful tool to rapidly and selectively identify chromatin-binding proteins. The method can be used to study epigenetic modification of chromatin during nuclear reprogramming, cell differentiation, and transdifferentiation.

  18. Screening of stimulatory effects of dietary risk factors on mouse intestinal cell kinetics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pooja Shivshankar; Shyamala C. S. Devi

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Although epidemiological and experimental studies validate influence of genetic, environmental and dietary factors in the causation of various types of cancers including colon, results from all these sources are inconclusive.Hypothesizing that high fat diet and obesity are among the major predisposing factors in the incidence of colon cancer,we evaluated the role of diet constituted with food material derived from a tropical plant, Tamarindus indica Linn (TI).METHODS: A two part randomized double-blind study was conducted employing inbred Swiss albino mice from a single generation for the whole investigation. One day-old neonates (n = 12) were subcutaneously administered with monosodium glutamate (MSG) to induce obesity (OB). At weaning these animals were maintained on modified AIN-76 diet supplemented with 10% TI and 10% fat bolus (w/w, TIFB) for 8 wk. Subsequently, in the second part of study, four groups of animals belonging to the same generation, age and gender (n = 12 per group), were maintained on: AIN-76 control diet (CD); AIN-76 mixed with 10% TI extract (TI); and, mixed with 10% TI and 10% FB (TIFB) for 8 wk, to determine intestinal crypt cell proliferation, functionally-specific enzyme activities,fermentation profile, and energy preferences.RESULTS: We observed a significant increase in the crypt cell production rate in distal colonic segment of experimental animals when compared with the controls. This segment also contained significantly low butyrate levels compared to control and TIFB groups. All the experimental groups showed a gross decrease in the enzyme activities viz.,succinate dehydrogenase, acid-galactosidase and dipeptidyl amino peptidase Ⅳ demonstrating pathological stress caused by the test regimens, and an altered metabolic flux in the cellular environment.CONCLUSION: We have demonstrated a cumulative response to the three dietary factors, one of which (TI) is reported, herein, for the first time to modulate kinetics of large

  19. Binding of vitronectin and Factor H to Hic contributes to immune evasion of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Sylvia; Hallström, Teresia; Singh, Birendra; Riesbeck, Kristian; Spartà, Giuseppina; Zipfel, Peter F; Hammerschmidt, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 3 strains are highly resistant to opsonophagocytosis due to recruitment of the complement inhibitor Factor H via Hic, a member of the pneumococcal surface protein C (PspC) family. In this study, we demonstrated that Hic also interacts with vitronectin, a fluid-phase regulator involved in haemostasis, angiogenesis, and the terminal complement cascade as well as a component of the extracellular matrix. Blocking of Hic by specific antiserum or genetic deletion significantly reduced pneumococcal binding to soluble and immobilised vitronectin and to Factor H, respectively. In parallel, ectopic expression of Hic on the surface of Lactococcus lactis conferred binding to soluble and immobilised vitronectin as well as Factor H. Molecular analyses with truncated Hic fragments narrowed down the vitronectin-binding site to the central core of Hic (aa 151-201). This vitronectin-binding region is separate from that of Factor H, which binds to the N-terminus of Hic (aa 38-92). Binding of pneumococcal Hic was localised to the C-terminal heparin-binding domain (HBD3) of vitronectin. However, an N-terminal region to HBD3 was further involved in Hic-binding to immobilised vitronectin. Finally, vitronectin bound to Hic was functionally active and inhibited formation of the terminal complement complex. In conclusion, Hic interacts with vitronectin and simultaneously with Factor H, and both human proteins may contribute to colonisation and invasive disease caused by serotype 3 pneumococci.

  20. Promiscuous stimulation of ParF protein polymerization by heterogeneous centromere binding factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machón, Cristina; Fothergill, Timothy J G; Barillà, Daniela; Hayes, Finbarr

    2007-11-16

    The segrosome is the nucleoprotein complex that mediates accurate segregation of bacterial plasmids. The segrosome of plasmid TP228 comprises ParF and ParG proteins that assemble on the parH centromere. ParF, which exemplifies one clade of the ubiquitous ParA superfamily of segregation proteins, polymerizes extensively in response to ATP binding. Polymerization is modulated by the ParG centromere binding factor (CBF). The segrosomes of plasmids pTAR, pVT745 and pB171 include ParA homologues of the ParF subgroup, as well as diverse homodimeric CBFs with no primary sequence similarity to ParG, or each other. Centromere binding by these analogues is largely specific. Here, we establish that the ParF homologues of pTAR and pB171 filament modestly with ATP, and that nucleotide hydrolysis is not required for this polymerization, which is more prodigious when the cognate CBF is also present. By contrast, the ParF homologue of plasmid pVT745 did not respond appreciably to ATP alone, but polymerized extensively in the presence of both its cognate CBF and ATP. The co-factors also stimulated nucleotide-independent polymerization of cognate ParF proteins. Moreover, apart from the CBF of pTAR, the disparate ParG analogues promoted polymerization of non-cognate ParF proteins suggesting that filamentation of the ParF proteins is enhanced by a common mechanism. Like ParG, the co-factors may be modular, possessing a centromere-specific interaction domain linked to a flexible region containing determinants that promiscuously stimulate ParF polymerization. The CBFs appear to function as bacterial analogues of formins, microtubule-associated proteins or related ancillary factors that regulate eucaryotic cytoskeletal dynamics.

  1. Divergence of Pumilio/fem-3 mRNA binding factor (PUF) protein specificity through variations in an RNA-binding pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Chen; Kershner, Aaron; Wang, Yeming; Holley, Cynthia P; Wilinski, Daniel; Keles, Sunduz; Kimble, Judith; Wickens, Marvin; Hall, Traci M Tanaka

    2012-02-24

    mRNA control networks depend on recognition of specific RNA sequences. Pumilio-fem-3 mRNA binding factor (PUF) RNA-binding proteins achieve that specificity through variations on a conserved scaffold. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Puf3p achieves specificity through an additional binding pocket for a cytosine base upstream of the core RNA recognition site. Here we demonstrate that this chemically simple adaptation is prevalent and contributes to the diversity of RNA specificities among PUF proteins. Bioinformatics analysis shows that mRNAs associated with Caenorhabditis elegans fem-3 mRNA binding factor (FBF)-2 in vivo contain an upstream cytosine required for biological regulation. Crystal structures of FBF-2 and C. elegans PUF-6 reveal binding pockets structurally similar to that of Puf3p, whereas sequence alignments predict a pocket in PUF-11. For Puf3p, FBF-2, PUF-6, and PUF-11, the upstream pockets and a cytosine are required for maximal binding to RNA, but the quantitative impact on binding affinity varies. Furthermore, the position of the upstream cytosine relative to the core PUF recognition site can differ, which in the case of FBF-2 originally masked the identification of this consensus sequence feature. Importantly, other PUF proteins lack the pocket and so do not discriminate upstream bases. A structure-based alignment reveals that these proteins lack key residues that would contact the cytosine, and in some instances, they also present amino acid side chains that interfere with binding. Loss of the pocket requires only substitution of one serine, as appears to have occurred during the evolution of certain fungal species.

  2. In Vitro Whole Genome DNA Binding Analysis of the Bacterial Replication Initiator and Transcription Factor DnaA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet L Smith

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available DnaA, the replication initiation protein in bacteria, is an AAA+ ATPase that binds and hydrolyzes ATP and exists in a heterogeneous population of ATP-DnaA and ADP-DnaA. DnaA binds cooperatively to the origin of replication and several other chromosomal regions, and functions as a transcription factor at some of these regions. We determined the binding properties of Bacillus subtilis DnaA to genomic DNA in vitro at single nucleotide resolution using in vitro DNA affinity purification and deep sequencing (IDAP-Seq. We used these data to identify 269 binding regions, refine the consensus sequence of the DnaA binding site, and compare the relative affinity of binding regions for ATP-DnaA and ADP-DnaA. Most sites had a slightly higher affinity for ATP-DnaA than ADP-DnaA, but a few had a strong preference for binding ATP-DnaA. Of the 269 sites, only the eight strongest binding ones have been observed to bind DnaA in vivo, suggesting that other cellular factors or the amount of available DnaA in vivo restricts DnaA binding to these additional sites. Conversely, we found several chromosomal regions that were bound by DnaA in vivo but not in vitro, and that the nucleoid-associated protein Rok was required for binding in vivo. Our in vitro characterization of the inherent ability of DnaA to bind the genome at single nucleotide resolution provides a backdrop for interpreting data on in vivo binding and regulation of DnaA, and is an approach that should be adaptable to many other DNA binding proteins.

  3. SELEX-seq, a method for characterizing the complete repertoire of binding site preferences for transcription factor complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Todd R.; Slattery, Matthew; Abe, Namiko; Rastogi, Chaitanya; Mann, Richard; Bussemaker, Harmen

    2014-01-01

    Summary The closely related members of the Hox family of homeodomain transcription factors have similar DNA-binding preferences as monomers, yet carry out distinct functions in vivo. Transcription factors often bind DNA as multiprotein complexes, raising the possibility that complex formation might modify their DNA binding specificities. To test this hypothesis we developed a new experimental and computational platform, termed SELEX-seq, to characterize DNA binding specificities of Hox-based multiprotein complexes. We found that complex formation with the same cofactor reveals latent specificities that are not observed for monomeric Hox factors. The findings from this in vitro platform are consistent with in vivo data, and the ‘latent specificity’ concept serves as a precedent for how the specificities of similar transcription factors might be distinguished in vivo. Importantly, the SELEX-seq platform is flexible and can be used to determine the relative affinities to any DNA sequence for any transcription factor or multiprotein complex. PMID:25151169

  4. The extraordinary specificity of xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase from Bacillus subtilis elucidated by reaction kinetics, ligand binding, and crystallography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arent, Susan; Kadziola, Anders; Larsen, Sine

    2006-01-01

    (X)GPRTases with respect to sequence, PRPP binding motif, and oligomeric structure. They are more related with the PurR repressor of Gram-positive bacteria, the adenine PRTase, and orotate PRTase. The catalytic function and high specificity for xanthine of B. subtilis XPRTase were investigated by ligand binding studies...... related to a few key residues in the active site. Asn27 can in different orientations form hydrogen bonds to an amino group or an oxo group at the 2-position of the purine base, and Lys156 is positioned to make a hydrogen bond with N7. This and the absence of a catalytic carboxylate group near the N7......Xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (XPRTase) from Bacillus subtilis is a representative of the highly xanthine specific XPRTases found in Gram-positive bacteria. These XPRTases constitute a distinct subclass of 6-oxopurine PRTases, which deviate strongly from the major class of H...

  5. Transcription Factors Bind Thousands of Active and InactiveRegions in the Drosophila Blastoderm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiao-Yong; MacArthur, Stewart; Bourgon, Richard; Nix, David; Pollard, Daniel A.; Iyer, Venky N.; Hechmer, Aaron; Simirenko, Lisa; Stapleton, Mark; Luengo Hendriks, Cris L.; Chu, Hou Cheng; Ogawa, Nobuo; Inwood, William; Sementchenko, Victor; Beaton, Amy; Weiszmann, Richard; Celniker, Susan E.; Knowles, David W.; Gingeras, Tom; Speed, Terence P.; Eisen, Michael B.; Biggin, Mark D.

    2008-01-10

    Identifying the genomic regions bound by sequence-specific regulatory factors is central both to deciphering the complex DNA cis-regulatory code that controls transcription in metazoans and to determining the range of genes that shape animal morphogenesis. Here, we use whole-genome tiling arrays to map sequences bound in Drosophila melanogaster embryos by the six maternal and gap transcription factors that initiate anterior-posterior patterning. We find that these sequence-specific DNA binding proteins bind with quantitatively different specificities to highly overlapping sets of several thousand genomic regions in blastoderm embryos. Specific high- and moderate-affinity in vitro recognition sequences for each factor are enriched in bound regions. This enrichment, however, is not sufficient to explain the pattern of binding in vivo and varies in a context-dependent manner, demonstrating that higher-order rules must govern targeting of transcription factors. The more highly bound regions include all of the over forty well-characterized enhancers known to respond to these factors as well as several hundred putative new cis-regulatory modules clustered near developmental regulators and other genes with patterned expression at this stage of embryogenesis. The new targets include most of the microRNAs (miRNAs) transcribed in the blastoderm, as well as all major zygotically transcribed dorsal-ventral patterning genes, whose expression we show to be quantitatively modulated by anterior-posterior factors. In addition to these highly bound regions, there are several thousand regions that are reproducibly bound at lower levels. However, these poorly bound regions are, collectively, far more distant from genes transcribed in the blastoderm than highly bound regions; are preferentially found in protein-coding sequences; and are less conserved than highly bound regions. Together these observations suggest that many of these poorly-bound regions are not involved in early

  6. Transcription factors bind thousands of active and inactive regions in the Drosophila blastoderm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-yong Li

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Identifying the genomic regions bound by sequence-specific regulatory factors is central both to deciphering the complex DNA cis-regulatory code that controls transcription in metazoans and to determining the range of genes that shape animal morphogenesis. We used whole-genome tiling arrays to map sequences bound in Drosophila melanogaster embryos by the six maternal and gap transcription factors that initiate anterior-posterior patterning. We find that these sequence-specific DNA binding proteins bind with quantitatively different specificities to highly overlapping sets of several thousand genomic regions in blastoderm embryos. Specific high- and moderate-affinity in vitro recognition sequences for each factor are enriched in bound regions. This enrichment, however, is not sufficient to explain the pattern of binding in vivo and varies in a context-dependent manner, demonstrating that higher-order rules must govern targeting of transcription factors. The more highly bound regions include all of the over 40 well-characterized enhancers known to respond to these factors as well as several hundred putative new cis-regulatory modules clustered near developmental regulators and other genes with patterned expression at this stage of embryogenesis. The new targets include most of the microRNAs (miRNAs transcribed in the blastoderm, as well as all major zygotically transcribed dorsal-ventral patterning genes, whose expression we show to be quantitatively modulated by anterior-posterior factors. In addition to these highly bound regions, there are several thousand regions that are reproducibly bound at lower levels. However, these poorly bound regions are, collectively, far more distant from genes transcribed in the blastoderm than highly bound regions; are preferentially found in protein-coding sequences; and are less conserved than highly bound regions. Together these observations suggest that many of these poorly bound regions are not involved in

  7. Resolving two-dimensional kinetics of the integrin αIIbβ3-fibrinogen interactions using binding-unbinding correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinov, Rustem I; Mekler, Andrey; Shuman, Henry; Bennett, Joel S; Barsegov, Valeri; Weisel, John W

    2012-10-12

    Using a combined experimental and theoretical approach named binding-unbinding correlation spectroscopy (BUCS), we describe the two-dimensional kinetics of interactions between fibrinogen and the integrin αIIbβ3, the ligand-receptor pair essential for platelet function during hemostasis and thrombosis. The methodology uses the optical trap to probe force-free association of individual surface-attached fibrinogen and αIIbβ3 molecules and forced dissociation of an αIIbβ3-fibrinogen complex. This novel approach combines force clamp measurements of bond lifetimes with the binding mode to quantify the dependence of the binding probability on the interaction time. We found that fibrinogen-reactive αIIbβ3 pre-exists in at least two states that differ in their zero force on-rates (k(on1) = 1.4 × 10(-4) and k(on2) = 2.3 × 10(-4) μm(2)/s), off-rates (k(off1) = 2.42 and k(off2) = 0.60 s(-1)), and dissociation constants (K(d)(1) = 1.7 × 10(4) and K(d)(2) = 2.6 × 10(3) μm(-2)). The integrin activator Mn(2+) changed the on-rates and affinities (K(d)(1) = 5 × 10(4) and K(d)(2) = 0.3 × 10(3) μm(-2)) but did not affect the off-rates. The strength of αIIbβ3-fibrinogen interactions was time-dependent due to a progressive increase in the fraction of the high affinity state of the αIIbβ3-fibrinogen complex characterized by a faster on-rate. Upon Mn(2+)-induced integrin activation, the force-dependent off-rates decrease while the complex undergoes a conformational transition from a lower to higher affinity state. The results obtained provide quantitative estimates of the two-dimensional kinetic rates for the low and high affinity αIIbβ3 and fibrinogen interactions at the single molecule level and offer direct evidence for the time- and force-dependent changes in αIIbβ3 conformation and ligand binding activity, underlying the dynamics of fibrinogen-mediated platelet adhesion and aggregation.

  8. Direct Detection of Thrombin Binding to 8-Bromodeoxyguanosine-Modified Aptamer: Effects of Modification on Affinity and Kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shou Goji

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The affinity of an 8-bromodeoxyguanosine- (8-BrdG- substituted thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA-Br, which has the 1st and 10th guanosine residues replaced with 8-BrdG, was estimated using reflectometric interference spectroscopy (RIfS. When comparing TBA-Br with unmodified TBA (TBA-H, it was demonstrated that the modification effectively improved the affinity of TBA; dissociation constants (KD of TBA-H and TBA-Br were 45.4 nM and 1.99 nM, respectively. These values, which were obtained by direct observation of thrombin binding using RIfS, have the same order of magnitude as those obtained in our previous study utilizing conformational changes in TBA to detect thrombin binding, thus confirming the validity of the obtained KD values. RIfS measurements also revealed that the 8-BrdG modification resulted in a lower dissociation rate constant (kd, which suggests that the enhancement of affinity can be attributed to the stabilization of the G-quadruplex structure on introduction of 8-BrdG.

  9. In vitro characterization of luseogliflozin, a potent and competitive sodium glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor: Inhibition kinetics and binding studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Saeko; Mitani, Akiko; Gunji, Emi; Takahashi, Teisuke; Yamamoto, Koji

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we evaluated an inhibition model of luseogliflozin on sodium glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2). We also analyzed the binding kinetics of the drug to SGLT2 protein using [(3)H]-luseogliflozin. Luseogliflozin competitively inhibited human SGLT2 (hSGLT2)-mediated glucose uptake with a Ki value of 1.10 nM. In the absence of glucose, [(3)H]-luseogliflozin exhibited a high affinity for hSGLT2 with a Kd value of 1.3 nM. The dissociation half-time was 7 h, suggesting that luseogliflozin dissociates rather slowly from hSGLT2. These profiles of luseogliflozin might contribute to the long duration of action of this drug.

  10. DNA-binding factor CTCF and long-range gene interactions in V(D)J recombination and oncogene activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Ribeiro de Almeida (Claudia); R. Stadhouders (Ralph); S. Thongjuea (Supat); E. Soler (Eric); R.W. Hendriks (Rudi)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractRegulation of V(D)J recombination events at immunoglobulin (Ig) and T-cell receptor loci in lymphoid cells is complex and achieved via changes in substrate accessibility. Various studies over the last year have identified the DNA-binding zinc-finger protein CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) as

  11. Dwarfism and impaired gut development in insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 1-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas V O; Hammer, Niels A; Nielsen, Jacob

    2004-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 1 (IMP1) belongs to a family of RNA-binding proteins implicated in mRNA localization, turnover, and translational control. Mouse IMP1 is expressed during early development, and an increase in expression occurs around embryonic day 12.5 (E12.5). T...

  12. The nucleotide-binding site of bacterial translation initiation factor 2 (IF2) as a metabolic sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milon, P.; Tischenko, E.V.; Tomsic, J.; Caserta, E.; Folkers, G.E.; La Teana, A.; Rodnina, M.V.; Pon, C.L.; Boelens, R.; Gualerzi, C.O.

    2006-01-01

    Translational initiation factor 2 (IF2) is a guanine nucleotide-binding protein that can bind guanosine 3′,5′-(bis) diphosphate (ppGpp), an alarmone involved in stringent response in bacteria. In cells growing under optimal conditions, the GTP concentration is very high, and that of ppGpp very low.

  13. The binding of quinone to the photosynthetic reaction centers: kinetics and thermodynamics of reactions occurring at the QB-site in zwitterionic and anionic liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavelli, Fabio; Trotta, Massimo; Ciriaco, Fulvio; Agostiano, Angela; Giotta, Livia; Italiano, Francesca; Milano, Francesco

    2014-07-01

    Liposomes represent a versatile biomimetic environment for studying the interaction between integral membrane proteins and hydrophobic ligands. In this paper, the quinone binding to the QB-site of the photosynthetic reaction centers (RC) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides has been investigated in liposomes prepared with either the zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine (PC) or the negatively charged phosphatidylglycerol (PG) to highlight the role of the different phospholipid polar heads. Quinone binding (K Q) and interquinone electron transfer (L AB) equilibrium constants in the two type of liposomes were obtained by charge recombination reaction of QB-depleted RC in the presence of increasing amounts of ubiquinone-10 over the temperature interval 6-35 °C. The kinetic of the charge recombination reactions has been fitted by numerically solving the ordinary differential equations set associated with a detailed kinetic scheme involving electron transfer reactions coupled with quinone release and uptake. The entire set of traces at each temperature was accurately fitted using the sole quinone release constants (both in a neutral and a charge separated state) as adjustable parameters. The temperature dependence of the quinone exchange rate at the QB-site was, hence, obtained. It was found that the quinone exchange regime was always fast for PC while it switched from slow to fast in PG as the temperature rose above 20 °C. A new method was introduced in this paper for the evaluation of constant K Q using the area underneath the charge recombination traces as the indicator of the amount of quinone bound to the QB-site.

  14. Kinetic interaction analysis of human interleukin 5 receptor alpha mutants reveals a unique binding topology and charge distribution for cytokine recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishino, Tetsuya; Pasut, Gianfranco; Scibek, Jeffery; Chaiken, Irwin

    2004-03-05

    Human interleukin 5 receptor alpha (IL5Ralpha) comprises three fibronectin type III domains (D1, D2, and D3) in the extracellular region. Previous results have indicated that residues in the D1D2 domains are crucial for high affinity interaction with human interleukin 5 (IL5). Yet, it is the D2D3 domains that have sequence homology with the classic cytokine recognition motif that is generally assumed to be the minimum cytokine-recognizing unit. In the present study, we used kinetic interaction analysis of alanine-scanning mutational variants of IL5Ralpha to define the residues involved in IL5 recognition. Soluble forms of IL5Ralpha variants were expressed in S2 cells, selectively captured via their C-terminal V5 tag by anti-V5 tag antibody immobilized onto the sensor chip and examined for IL5 interaction by using a sandwich surface plasmon resonance biosensor method. Marked effects on the interaction kinetics were observed not only in D1 (Asp(55), Asp(56), and Glu(58)) and D2 (Lys(186) and Arg(188)) domains, but also in the D3 (Arg(297)) domain. Modeling of the tertiary structure of IL5Ralpha indicated that these binding residues fell into two clusters. The first cluster consists of D1 domain residues that form a negatively charged patch, whereas the second cluster consists of residues that form a positively charged patch at the interface of D2 and D3 domains. These results suggest that the IL5 x IL5Ralpha system adopts a unique binding topology, in which the cytokine is recognized by a D2D3 tandem domain combined with a D1 domain, to form an extended cytokine recognition interface.

  15. Statistical reconstruction of transcription factor activity using Michaelis-Menten kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanin, R; Vinciotti, V; Mersinias, V; Smith, C P; Wit, E

    2007-09-01

    The basic building block of a gene regulatory network consists of a gene encoding a transcription factor (TF) and the gene(s) it regulates. Considerable efforts have been directed recently at devising experiments and algorithms to determine TFs and their corresponding target genes using gene expression and other types of data. The underlying problem is that the expression of a gene coding for the TF provides only limited information about the activity of the TF, which can also be controlled posttranscriptionally. In the absence of a reliable technology to routinely measure the activity of regulators, it is of great importance to understand whether this activity can be inferred from gene expression data. We here develop a statistical framework to reconstruct the activity of a TF from gene expression data of the target genes in its regulatory module. The novelty of our approach is that we embed the deterministic Michaelis-Menten model of gene regulation in this statistical framework. The kinetic parameters of the gene regulation model are inferred together with the profile of the TF regulator. We also obtain a goodness-of-fit test to verify the fit of the model. The model is applied to a time series involving the Streptomyces coelicolor bacterium. We focus on the transcriptional activator cdaR, which is partly responsible for the production of a particular type of antibiotic. The aim is to reconstruct the activity profile of this regulator. Our approach can be extended to include more complex regulatory relationships, such as multiple regulatory factors, competition, and cooperativity.

  16. Regulation of Nucleosome Architecture and Factor Binding Revealed by Nuclease Footprinting of the ESC Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainer, Sarah J; Fazzio, Thomas G

    2015-10-06

    Functional interactions between gene regulatory factors and chromatin architecture have been difficult to directly assess. Here, we use micrococcal nuclease (MNase) footprinting to probe the functions of two chromatin-remodeling complexes. By simultaneously quantifying alterations in small MNase footprints over the binding sites of 30 regulatory factors in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs), we provide evidence that esBAF and Mbd3/NuRD modulate the binding of several regulatory proteins. In addition, we find that nucleosome occupancy is reduced at specific loci in favor of subnucleosomes upon depletion of esBAF, including sites of histone H2A.Z localization. Consistent with these data, we demonstrate that esBAF is required for normal H2A.Z localization in ESCs, suggesting esBAF either stabilizes H2A.Z-containing nucleosomes or promotes subnucleosome to nucleosome conversion by facilitating H2A.Z deposition. Therefore, integrative examination of MNase footprints reveals insights into nucleosome dynamics and functional interactions between chromatin structure and key gene-regulatory factors.

  17. Regulation of Nucleosome Architecture and Factor Binding Revealed by Nuclease Footprinting of the ESC Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J. Hainer

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Functional interactions between gene regulatory factors and chromatin architecture have been difficult to directly assess. Here, we use micrococcal nuclease (MNase footprinting to probe the functions of two chromatin-remodeling complexes. By simultaneously quantifying alterations in small MNase footprints over the binding sites of 30 regulatory factors in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs, we provide evidence that esBAF and Mbd3/NuRD modulate the binding of several regulatory proteins. In addition, we find that nucleosome occupancy is reduced at specific loci in favor of subnucleosomes upon depletion of esBAF, including sites of histone H2A.Z localization. Consistent with these data, we demonstrate that esBAF is required for normal H2A.Z localization in ESCs, suggesting esBAF either stabilizes H2A.Z-containing nucleosomes or promotes subnucleosome to nucleosome conversion by facilitating H2A.Z deposition. Therefore, integrative examination of MNase footprints reveals insights into nucleosome dynamics and functional interactions between chromatin structure and key gene-regulatory factors.

  18. GTRD: a database of transcription factor binding sites identified by ChIP-seq experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yevshin, Ivan; Sharipov, Ruslan; Valeev, Tagir; Kel, Alexander; Kolpakov, Fedor

    2017-01-01

    GTRD—Gene Transcription Regulation Database (http://gtrd.biouml.org)—is a database of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) identified by ChIP-seq experiments for human and mouse. Raw ChIP-seq data were obtained from ENCODE and SRA and uniformly processed: (i) reads were aligned using Bowtie2; (ii) ChIP-seq peaks were called using peak callers MACS, SISSRs, GEM and PICS; (iii) peaks for the same factor and peak callers, but different experiment conditions (cell line, treatment, etc.), were merged into clusters; (iv) such clusters for different peak callers were merged into metaclusters that were considered as non-redundant sets of TFBSs. In addition to information on location in genome, the sets contain structured information about cell lines and experimental conditions extracted from descriptions of corresponding ChIP-seq experiments. A web interface to access GTRD was developed using the BioUML platform. It provides: (i) browsing and displaying information; (ii) advanced search possibilities, e.g. search of TFBSs near the specified gene or search of all genes potentially regulated by a specified transcription factor; (iii) integrated genome browser that provides visualization of the GTRD data: read alignments, peaks, clusters, metaclusters and information about gene structures from the Ensembl database and binding sites predicted using position weight matrices from the HOCOMOCO database. PMID:27924024

  19. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor-binding antagonist activity of Malaysian medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantan, I; Rafi, I A A; Jalil, J

    2005-01-01

    Forty-nine methanol extracts of 37 species of Malaysian medicinal plants were investigated for their inhibitory effects on platelet-activating factor (PAF) binding to rabbit platelets, using 3H-PAF as a ligand. Among them, the extracts of six Zingiberaceae species (Alpinia galanga Swartz., Boesenbergia pandurata Roxb., Curcuma ochorrhiza Val., C. aeruginosa Roxb., Zingiber officinale Rosc. and Z. zerumbet Koenig.), two Cinnamomum species (C. altissimum Kosterm. and C. pubescens Kochummen.), Goniothalamus malayanus Hook. f. Momordica charantia Linn. and Piper aduncum L. are potential sources of new PAF antagonists, as they showed significant inhibitory effects with IC50 values ranging from 1.2 to 18.4 microg ml(-1).

  20. Treatment strategies in patients with core-binding factor acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, Erick Crespo

    2011-10-01

    Core-binding factor acute myeloid leukemias (CBF AML) are characterized by sensitivity to high-dose cytarabine. Due to good prognosis in CBF AML patients, it is important to determine the optimal treatment. Long-term RFS (relapse-free survival) is reported among 40-60%. Experience with FA/FLAG vs. IA/IAG as front-line chemotherapy has been reported by some authors. Other studies, regarding treatment strategies such as high-dose daunorubicin, do not determine survival curves in this precise subgroup of patients. Preliminary data with gemtuzumab ozogamicin plus FLAG has been reported. There are not studies with FLAG using oral fludarabine in acute leukemia patients.

  1. HOCOMOCO: A comprehensive collection of human transcription factor binding sites models

    KAUST Repository

    Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.

    2012-11-21

    Transcription factor (TF) binding site (TFBS) models are crucial for computational reconstruction of transcription regulatory networks. In existing repositories, a TF often has several models (also called binding profiles or motifs), obtained from different experimental data. Having a single TFBS model for a TF is more pragmatic for practical applications. We show that integration of TFBS data from various types of experiments into a single model typically results in the improved model quality probably due to partial correction of source specific technique bias. We present the Homo sapiens comprehensive model collection (HOCOMOCO, http://autosome.ru/HOCOMOCO/, http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/ hocomoco/) containing carefully hand-curated TFBS models constructed by integration of binding sequences obtained by both low- and high-throughput methods. To construct position weight matrices to represent these TFBS models, we used ChIPMunk software in four computational modes, including newly developed periodic positional prior mode associated with DNA helix pitch. We selected only one TFBS model per TF, unless there was a clear experimental evidence for two rather distinct TFBS models. We assigned a quality rating to each model. HOCOMOCO contains 426 systematically curated TFBS models for 401 human TFs, where 172 models are based on more than one data source. The Author(s) 2012.

  2. Selective influence of Sox2 on POU transcription factor binding in embryonic and neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistri, Tapan Kumar; Devasia, Arun George; Chu, Lee Thean; Ng, Wei Ping; Halbritter, Florian; Colby, Douglas; Martynoga, Ben; Tomlinson, Simon R; Chambers, Ian; Robson, Paul; Wohland, Thorsten

    2015-09-01

    Embryonic stem cell (ESC) identity is orchestrated by co-operativity between the transcription factors (TFs) Sox2 and the class V POU-TF Oct4 at composite Sox/Oct motifs. Neural stem cells (NSCs) lack Oct4 but express Sox2 and class III POU-TFs Oct6, Brn1 and Brn2. This raises the question of how Sox2 interacts with POU-TFs to transcriptionally specify ESCs versus NSCs. Here, we show that Oct4 alone binds the Sox/Oct motif and the octamer-containing palindromic MORE equally well. Sox2 binding selectively increases the affinity of Oct4 for the Sox/Oct motif. In contrast, Oct6 binds preferentially to MORE and is unaffected by Sox2. ChIP-Seq in NSCs shows the MORE to be the most enriched motif for class III POU-TFs, including MORE subtypes, and that the Sox/Oct motif is not enriched. These results suggest that in NSCs, co-operativity between Sox2 and class III POU-TFs may not occur and that POU-TF-driven transcription uses predominantly the MORE cis architecture. Thus, distinct interactions between Sox2 and POU-TF subclasses distinguish pluripotent ESCs from multipotent NSCs, providing molecular insight into how Oct4 alone can convert NSCs to pluripotency.

  3. Mitochondrial transcription termination factor 2 binds to entire mitochondrial DNA and negatively regulates mitochondrial gene expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weiwei Huang; Min Yu; Yang Jiao; Jie Ma; Mingxing Ma; Zehua Wang; Hong Wu; Deyong Tan

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcription termination factor 2 (mTERF2) is a mitochondriai matrix protein that binds to the mitochondriai DNA.Previous studies have shown that overexpression of mTERF2 can inhibit cell proliferation, but the mechanism has not been well defined so far.This study aimed to present the binding pattern of mTERF2 to the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in vivo, and investigated the biological function of mTERF2 on the replication of mtDNA, mRNA transcription, and protein translation.The mTERF2 binding to entire mtDNA was identified via the chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis.The mtDNA replication efficiency and expression levels of mitochondria genes were significantly inhibited when the mTERF2 was overexpressed in HeLa cells.The inhibition level of mtDNA content was the same with the decreased levels of mRNA and mitochondrial protein expression.Overall, the mTERF2 might be a cell growth inhibitor based on its negative effect on mtDNA replication, which eventually own-regulated all of the oxidative phosphorylation components in the mitochondria that were essential for the cell's energy metabolism.

  4. The Influence of Adnectin Binding on the Extracellular Domain of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacob, Roxana E.; Chen, Guodong; Ahn, Joomi; Houel, Stephane; Wei, Hui; Mo, Jingjie; Tao, Li; Cohen, Daniel; Xie, Dianlin; Lin, Zheng; Morin, Paul E.; Doyle, Michael L.; Tymiak, Adrienne A.; Engen, John R.

    2014-12-01

    The precise and unambiguous elucidation and characterization of interactions between a high affinity recognition entity and its cognate protein provides important insights for the design and development of drugs with optimized properties and efficacy. In oncology, one important target protein has been shown to be the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) through the development of therapeutic anticancer antibodies that are selective inhibitors of EGFR activity. More recently, smaller protein derived from the 10th type III domain of human fibronectin termed an adnectin has also been shown to inhibit EGFR in clinical studies. The mechanism of EGFR inhibition by either an adnectin or an antibody results from specific binding of the high affinity protein to the extracellular portion of EGFR (exEGFR) in a manner that prevents phosphorylation of the intracellular kinase domain of the receptor and thereby blocks intracellular signaling. Here, the structural changes induced upon binding were studied by probing the solution conformations of full length exEGFR alone and bound to a cognate adnectin through hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX MS). The effects of binding in solution were identified and compared with the structure of a bound complex determined by X-ray crystallography.

  5. A chemokine-binding domain in the tumor necrosis factor receptor from variola (smallpox) virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejo, Alí; Ruiz-Argüello, M Begoña; Ho, Yin; Smith, Vincent P; Saraiva, Margarida; Alcami, Antonio

    2006-04-11

    Variola virus (VaV) is the causative agent of smallpox, one of the most devastating diseases encountered by man, that was eradicated in 1980. The deliberate release of VaV would have catastrophic consequences on global public health. However, the mechanisms that contribute to smallpox pathogenesis are poorly understood at the molecular level. The ability of viruses to evade the host defense mechanisms is an important determinant of viral pathogenesis. Here we show that the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) homologue CrmB encoded by VaV functions not only as a soluble decoy TNFR but also as a highly specific binding protein for several chemokines that mediate recruitment of immune cells to mucosal surfaces and the skin, sites of virus entry and viral replication at late stages of smallpox. CrmB binds chemokines through its C-terminal domain, which is unrelated to TNFRs, was named smallpox virus-encoded chemokine receptor (SECRET) domain and uncovers a family of poxvirus chemokine inhibitors. An active SECRET domain was found in another viral TNFR (CrmD) and three secreted proteins encoded by orthopoxviruses. These findings identify a previously undescribed chemokine-binding and inhibitory domain unrelated to host chemokine receptors and a mechanism of immune modulation in VaV that may influence smallpox pathogenesis.

  6. Self-assembly and DNA binding of the blocking factor in x chromosome inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Nicodemi

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available X chromosome inactivation (XCI is the phenomenon occurring in female mammals whereby dosage compensation of X-linked genes is obtained by transcriptional silencing of one of their two X chromosomes, randomly chosen during early embryo development. The earliest steps of random X-inactivation, involving counting of the X chromosomes and choice of the active and inactive X, are still not understood. To explain "counting and choice," the longstanding hypothesis is that a molecular complex, a "blocking factor" (BF, exists. The BF is present in a single copy and can randomly bind to just one X per cell which is protected from inactivation, as the second X is inactivated by default. In such a picture, the missing crucial step is to explain how the molecular complex is self-assembled, why only one is formed, and how it binds only one X. We answer these questions within the framework of a schematic Statistical Physics model, investigated by Monte Carlo computer simulations. We show that a single complex is assembled as a result of a thermodynamic process relying on a phase transition occurring in the system which spontaneously breaks the symmetry between the X's. We discuss, then, the BF interaction with X chromosomes. The thermodynamics of the mechanism that directs the two chromosomes to opposite fates could be, thus, clarified. The insights on the self-assembling and X binding properties of the BF are used to derive a quantitative scenario of biological implications describing current experimental evidences on "counting and choice."

  7. DNA-binding mechanism of the Hippo pathway transcription factor TEAD4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Z; He, F; Chen, M; Hua, L; Wang, W; Jiao, S; Zhou, Z

    2017-07-27

    TEA domain (TEAD) family transcription factors are key regulators in development, tissue homeostasis and cancer progression. TEAD4 acts as a critical downstream effector of the evolutionarily conserved Hippo signaling pathway. The well-studied oncogenic protein YAP forms a complex with TEAD4 to regulate gene transcription; so does the tumor suppressor VGLL4. Although it is known that TEAD proteins can bind promoter regions of target genes through the TEA domain, the specific and detailed mechanism of DNA recognition by the TEA domain remains partially understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of TEAD4 TEA domain in complex with a muscle-CAT DNA element. The structure revealed extensive interactions between the TEA domain and the DNA duplex involving both the major and minor grooves of DNA helix. The DNA recognition helix, α3 helix, determines the specificity of the TEA domain binding to DNA sequence. Structure-guided biochemical analysis identified two major binding sites on the interface of the TEA domain-DNA complex. Mutation of TEAD4 at either site substantially decreases its occupancy on the promoter region of target genes, and largely impaired YAP-induced TEAD4 transactivation and target gene transcription, leading to inhibition of growth and colony formation of gastric cancer cell HGC-27. Collectively, our work provides a structural basis for understanding the regulatory mechanism of TEAD-mediated gene transcription.

  8. HOCOMOCO: a comprehensive collection of human transcription factor binding sites models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.; Medvedeva, Yulia A.; Schaefer, Ulf; Kasianov, Artem S.; Vorontsov, Ilya E.; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Makeev, Vsevolod J.

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factor (TF) binding site (TFBS) models are crucial for computational reconstruction of transcription regulatory networks. In existing repositories, a TF often has several models (also called binding profiles or motifs), obtained from different experimental data. Having a single TFBS model for a TF is more pragmatic for practical applications. We show that integration of TFBS data from various types of experiments into a single model typically results in the improved model quality probably due to partial correction of source specific technique bias. We present the Homo sapiens comprehensive model collection (HOCOMOCO, http://autosome.ru/HOCOMOCO/, http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/hocomoco/) containing carefully hand-curated TFBS models constructed by integration of binding sequences obtained by both low- and high-throughput methods. To construct position weight matrices to represent these TFBS models, we used ChIPMunk software in four computational modes, including newly developed periodic positional prior mode associated with DNA helix pitch. We selected only one TFBS model per TF, unless there was a clear experimental evidence for two rather distinct TFBS models. We assigned a quality rating to each model. HOCOMOCO contains 426 systematically curated TFBS models for 401 human TFs, where 172 models are based on more than one data source. PMID:23175603

  9. Theory on the mechanisms of combinatorial binding of transcription factors with DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Murugan, R

    2016-01-01

    We develop a theoretical framework on the mechanism of combinatorial binding of transcription factors (TFs) with their specific binding sites on DNA. We consider three possible mechanisms viz. monomer, hetero-oligomer and coordinated recruitment pathways. In the monomer pathway, combinatorial TFs search for their targets in an independent manner and the protein-protein interactions among them will be insignificant. The protein-protein interactions are very strong so that the hetero-oligomer complex of TFs as a whole searches for the cognate sites in case of hetero-oligomer pathway. The TF which arrived first will recruit the adjacent TFs in a sequential manner in the recruitment pathway. The free energy released from the protein-protein interactions among TFs will be in turn utilized to stabilize the TFs-DNA complex. Such coordinated binding of TFs in fact emerges as the cooperative effect. Monomer and hetero-oligomer pathways are efficient only when few TFs are involved in the combinatorial regulation. Detai...

  10. Free energy simulations of a GTPase: GTP and GDP binding to archaeal initiation factor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satpati, Priyadarshi; Clavaguéra, Carine; Ohanessian, Gilles; Simonson, Thomas

    2011-05-26

    Archaeal initiation factor 2 (aIF2) is a protein involved in the initiation of protein biosynthesis. In its GTP-bound, "ON" conformation, aIF2 binds an initiator tRNA and carries it to the ribosome. In its GDP-bound, "OFF" conformation, it dissociates from tRNA. To understand the specific binding of GTP and GDP and its dependence on the ON or OFF conformational state of aIF2, molecular dynamics free energy simulations (MDFE) are a tool of choice. However, the validity of the computed free energies depends on the simulation model, including the force field and the boundary conditions, and on the extent of conformational sampling in the simulations. aIF2 and other GTPases present specific difficulties; in particular, the nucleotide ligand coordinates a divalent Mg(2+) ion, which can polarize the electronic distribution of its environment. Thus, a force field with an explicit treatment of electronic polarizability could be necessary, rather than a simpler, fixed charge force field. Here, we begin by comparing a fixed charge force field to quantum chemical calculations and experiment for Mg(2+):phosphate binding in solution, with the force field giving large errors. Next, we consider GTP and GDP bound to aIF2 and we compare two fixed charge force fields to the recent, polarizable, AMOEBA force field, extended here in a simple, approximate manner to include GTP. We focus on a quantity that approximates the free energy to change GTP into GDP. Despite the errors seen for Mg(2+):phosphate binding in solution, we observe a substantial cancellation of errors when we compare the free energy change in the protein to that in solution, or when we compare the protein ON and OFF states. Finally, we have used the fixed charge force field to perform MDFE simulations and alchemically transform GTP into GDP in the protein and in solution. With a total of about 200 ns of molecular dynamics, we obtain good convergence and a reasonable statistical uncertainty, comparable to the force

  11. Multiple DNA-binding modes for the ETS family transcription factor PU.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esaki, Shingo; Evich, Marina G; Erlitzki, Noa; Germann, Markus W; Poon, Gregory M K

    2017-09-29

    The eponymous DNA-binding domain of ETS (E26 transformation-specific) transcription factors binds a single sequence-specific site as a monomer over a single helical turn. Following our previous observation by titration calorimetry that the ETS member PU.1 dimerizes sequentially at a single sequence-specific DNA-binding site to form a 2:1 complex, we have carried out an extensive spectroscopic and biochemical characterization of site-specific PU.1 ETS complexes. Whereas 10 bp of DNA was sufficient to support PU.1 binding as a monomer, additional flanking bases were required to invoke sequential dimerization of the bound protein. NMR spectroscopy revealed a marked loss of signal intensity in the 2:1 complex, and mutational analysis implicated the distal surface away from the bound DNA as the dimerization interface. Hydroxyl radical DNA footprinting indicated that the site-specifically bound PU.1 dimers occupied an extended DNA interface downstream from the 5'-GGAA-3' core consensus relative to its 1:1 counterpart, thus explaining the apparent site size requirement for sequential dimerization. The site-specifically bound PU.1 dimer resisted competition from nonspecific DNA and showed affinities similar to other functionally significant PU.1 interactions. As sequential dimerization did not occur with the ETS domain of Ets-1, a close structural homolog of PU.1, 2:1 complex formation may represent an alternative autoinhibitory mechanism in the ETS family at the protein-DNA level. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Identification of factors in human urine that inhibit the binding of Escherichia coli adhesins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkkinen, J; Virkola, R; Korhonen, T K

    1988-10-01

    Earlier studies on the binding of Escherichia coli adhesins to the human urinary tract have indicated that the ability to recognize binding sites on the urinary tract epithelial cells is not a characteristic for P fimbriae only, but is also shared by some other adhesins that are not associated with pyelonephritis, especially S fimbriae. In the present study we have investigated whether human urine contains inhibitors of the binding of E. coli adhesins. Normal human urine was found to inhibit hemagglutination by S and type 1 fimbriae but not P fimbriae. The major inhibitor of S fimbriae in normal urine was identified as Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein, and the interaction with S fimbriae is probably mediated by its sialyloligosaccharide chains. No significant variation was observed in the inhibitory effect of T-H glycoprotein preparations originating from different individuals. In contrast to S fimbriae, the major inhibitors of type 1 fimbriae in urine were identified as low-molecular-weight compounds. Gel filtration and ion-exchange chromatography and alpha-mannosidase treatment indicated that they were neutral alpha-mannosides, probably manno-oligosaccharides with three to five saccharides. Studies of urine samples collected from several individuals indicated the common occurrence of these inhibitory alpha-mannosides. Type 1 fimbriae bound to immobilized T-H glycoprotein, but, unlike S fimbriae, their binding was poorly inhibited by soluble T-H glycoprotein. Some urine samples were also found to contain low-molecular-weight inhibitors for the O75X adhesin of E. coli. These results emphasize that to function as a virulence factor in human urinary tract infections, an adhesin must evidently recognize such receptor structures at the infection sites that are not excreted in soluble form in urine. This prerequisite is filled by P fimbriae but not by type 1 or S fimbriae.

  13. Binding structure and kinetics of surfactin monolayer formed at the air/water interface to counterions: A molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, Hongze; Liu, Jinfeng; Mu, Bozhong

    2015-10-01

    The binding structure and kinetics of ionized surfactin monolayer formed at the air/water interface to five counterions, Li+, Na+, K+, Ca2+, and Ba2+ (molar ratios of surfactin to monovalent and divalent counterions are 1:2 and 1:1 respectively), have been studied using molecular dynamics simulation. The results show that surfactin exhibits higher binding affinity to divalent counterions, Ca2+, and Ba2+, and smaller monovalent counterion, Li+, than Na+ and K+. Both carboxyl groups in surfactin are accessible for counterions, but the carboxyl group in Glu1 is easier to access by counterions than Asp5. Salt bridges are widely built between carboxyl groups by counterions, and the probability of the formation of intermolecular salt bridge is markedly larger than that of intramolecular salt bridge. Divalent counterions perform well in forming salt bridges between carboxyl groups. The salt bridges mediated by Ca2+ are so rigid that the lifetimes are about 0.13 ns, and the break rates of these salt bridges are 1-2 orders of magnitude smaller than those mediated by K+ which is about 5 ps in duration. The positions of the hydration layer of carboxyl groups are independent of counterions, but the bound counterions induce the dehydration of carboxyl groups and disturb the hydrogen bonds built between carboxyl group and hydration water.

  14. Exchanging murine and human immunoglobulin constant chains affects the kinetics and thermodynamics of antigen binding and chimeric antibody autoreactivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Torres

    Full Text Available Mouse-human chimeric antibodies composed of murine variable (V and human (C chains are useful therapeutic reagents. Consequently, we investigated whether heterologous C-regions from mice and humans affected specificity and affinity, and determined the contribution of C(H glycosylation to antigen binding. The interaction of a 12-mer peptide mimetic with monoclonal antibody (mAb 18B7 to Cryptococcus neoformans glucuronoxylomannan, and its chimeric (ch and deglycosylated forms were studied by surface plasmon resonance. The equilibrium and rate association constants for the chAb were higher than for mAb 18B7. V region affinity was not affected by C(H region glycosylation whereas heterologous C region of the same isotype altered the Ab binding affinity and the specificity for self-antigens. Structural models displayed local differences that implied changes on the connectivity of residues. These findings suggest that V region conformational changes can be dictated by the C(H domains through an allosteric effect involving networks of highly connected amino acids.

  15. Tuftsin binds neuropilin-1 through a sequence similar to that encoded by exon 8 of vascular endothelial growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Wronski, Mathew A; Raju, Natarajan; Pillai, Radhakrishna; Bogdan, Nancy J; Marinelli, Edmund R; Nanjappan, Palaniappa; Ramalingam, Kondareddiar; Arunachalam, Thangavel; Eaton, Steve; Linder, Karen E; Yan, Feng; Pochon, Sibylle; Tweedle, Michael F; Nunn, Adrian D

    2006-03-03

    Tuftsin, Thr-Lys-Pro-Arg (TKPR), is an immunostimulatory peptide with reported nervous system effects as well. We unexpectedly found that tuftsin and a higher affinity antagonist, TKPPR, bind selectively to neuropilin-1 and block vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) binding to that receptor. Dimeric and tetrameric forms of TKPPR had greatly increased affinity for neuropilin-1 based on competition binding experiments. On endothelial cells tetrameric TKPPR inhibited the VEGF(165)-induced autophosphorylation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) even though it did not directly inhibit VEGF binding to VEGFR-2. Homology between exon 8 of VEGF and TKPPR suggests that the sequence coded for by exon 8 may stabilize VEGF binding to neuropilin-1 to facilitate signaling through VEGFR-2. Given the overlap between processes involving neuropilin-1 and tuftsin, we propose that at least some of the previously reported effects of tuftsin are mediated through neuropilin-1.

  16. Promoter-proximal transcription factor binding is transcriptionally active when coupled with nucleosome repositioning in immediate vicinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vinod Kumar; Thakur, Ram Krishna; Eckloff, Bruce; Baral, Aradhita; Singh, Ankita; Halder, Rashi; Kumar, Akinchan; Alam, Mohammad Parwez; Kundu, Tapas K.; Pandita, Raj; Pandita, Tej K.; Wieben, Eric D.; Chowdhury, Shantanu

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have analyzed patterns of transcription, transcription factor (TF) binding or mapped nucleosome occupancy across the genome. These suggest that the three aspects are genetically connected but the cause and effect relationships are still unknown. For example, physiologic TF binding studies involve many TFs, consequently, it is difficult to assign nucleosome reorganization to the binding site occupancy of any particular TF. Therefore, several aspects remain unclear: does TF binding influence nucleosome (re)organizations locally or impact the chromatin landscape at a more global level; are all or only a fraction of TF binding a result of reorganization in nucleosome occupancy and do all TF binding and associated changes in nucleosome occupancy result in altered gene expression? With these in mind, following characterization of two states (before and after induction of a single TF of choice) we determined: (i) genomic binding sites of the TF, (ii) promoter nucleosome occupancy and (iii) transcriptome profiles. Results demonstrated that promoter-proximal TF binding influenced expression of the target gene when it was coupled to nucleosome repositioning at or close to its binding site in most cases. In contrast, only in few cases change in target gene expression was found when TF binding occurred without local nucleosome reorganization. PMID:25081206

  17. Clinical outcome, proteome kinetics and angiogenic factors in serum after thermoablation of colorectal liver metastases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wertenbroek, Marieke W. J. L. A. E.; Schepers, Marianne; Kamminga-Rasker, Hannetta J.; Bottema, Jan T.; Kobold, Anneke C. Muller; Roelofsen, Han; de Jong, Koert P.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Thermoablation is used to treat patients with unresectable colorectal liver metastases (CRLM). We analyze clinical outcome, proteome kinetics and angiogenic markers in patients treated by cryosurgical ablation (CSA) or radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Methods: 205 patients underwent CSA (n

  18. Clinical outcome, proteome kinetics and angiogenic factors in serum after thermoablation of colorectal liver metastases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wertenbroek, Marieke W. J. L. A. E.; Schepers, Marianne; Kamminga-Rasker, Hannetta J.; Bottema, Jan T.; Kobold, Anneke C. Muller; Roelofsen, Han; de Jong, Koert P.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Thermoablation is used to treat patients with unresectable colorectal liver metastases (CRLM). We analyze clinical outcome, proteome kinetics and angiogenic markers in patients treated by cryosurgical ablation (CSA) or radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Methods: 205 patients underwent CSA (n

  19. A general pairwise interaction model provides an accurate description of in vivo transcription factor binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Santolini

    Full Text Available The identification of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs on genomic DNA is of crucial importance for understanding and predicting regulatory elements in gene networks. TFBS motifs are commonly described by Position Weight Matrices (PWMs, in which each DNA base pair contributes independently to the transcription factor (TF binding. However, this description ignores correlations between nucleotides at different positions, and is generally inaccurate: analysing fly and mouse in vivo ChIPseq data, we show that in most cases the PWM model fails to reproduce the observed statistics of TFBSs. To overcome this issue, we introduce the pairwise interaction model (PIM, a generalization of the PWM model. The model is based on the principle of maximum entropy and explicitly describes pairwise correlations between nucleotides at different positions, while being otherwise as unconstrained as possible. It is mathematically equivalent to considering a TF-DNA binding energy that depends additively on each nucleotide identity at all positions in the TFBS, like the PWM model, but also additively on pairs of nucleotides. We find that the PIM significantly improves over the PWM model, and even provides an optimal description of TFBS statistics within statistical noise. The PIM generalizes previous approaches to interdependent positions: it accounts for co-variation of two or more base pairs, and predicts secondary motifs, while outperforming multiple-motif models consisting of mixtures of PWMs. We analyse the structure of pairwise interactions between nucleotides, and find that they are sparse and dominantly located between consecutive base pairs in the flanking region of TFBS. Nonetheless, interactions between pairs of non-consecutive nucleotides are found to play a significant role in the obtained accurate description of TFBS statistics. The PIM is computationally tractable, and provides a general framework that should be useful for describing and predicting

  20. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirman, Irena; Whelan, Richard Larry; Jain, Suvinit;

    2005-01-01

    Epithelial cell growth regulation has been reported to be altered in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. The cell growth regulatory factor, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3), may be partly responsible for this phenomenon. So far, IGFBP-3 levels have been assessed...... as values of total protein, which is a sum of bioactive intact 43- to 45-kDa protein and its inactive proteolytic cleavage fragments. We aimed to assess the levels of intact IGFBP-3 and its cleaving protease MMP-9 in IBD. Patients with IBD and controls were included. Total plasma IGFBP-3 concentration...... and MMP-9 levels were determined in ELISA. The concentration of intact IGFBP-3 was significantly decreased in patients with moderate to severe IBD activity compared to those in remission or controls. Of note, a dramatic depletion of intact IGFBP-3 was found in 7.4% of patients with IBD. Zymography...

  1. Discovery, optimization and validation of an optimal DNA-binding sequence for the Six1 homeodomain transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yubing; Nandi, Soumyadeep; Martel, André; Antoun, Alen; Ioshikhes, Ilya; Blais, Alexandre

    2012-09-01

    The Six1 transcription factor is a homeodomain protein involved in controlling gene expression during embryonic development. Six1 establishes gene expression profiles that enable skeletal myogenesis and nephrogenesis, among others. While several homeodomain factors have been extensively characterized with regards to their DNA-binding properties, relatively little is known of the properties of Six1. We have used the genomic binding profile of Six1 during the myogenic differentiation of myoblasts to obtain a better understanding of its preferences for recognizing certain DNA sequences. DNA sequence analyses on our genomic binding dataset, combined with biochemical characterization using binding assays, reveal that Six1 has a much broader DNA-binding sequence spectrum than had been previously determined. Moreover, using a position weight matrix optimization algorithm, we generated a highly sensitive and specific matrix that can be used to predict novel Six1-binding sites with highest accuracy. Furthermore, our results support the idea of a mode of DNA recognition by this factor where Six1 itself is sufficient for sequence discrimination, and where Six1 domains outside of its homeodomain contribute to binding site selection. Together, our results provide new light on the properties of this important transcription factor, and will enable more accurate modeling of Six1 function in bioinformatic studies.

  2. HOCOMOCO: expansion and enhancement of the collection of transcription factor binding sites models

    KAUST Repository

    Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.

    2015-11-19

    Models of transcription factor (TF) binding sites provide a basis for a wide spectrum of studies in regulatory genomics, from reconstruction of regulatory networks to functional annotation of transcripts and sequence variants. While TFs may recognize different sequence patterns in different conditions, it is pragmatic to have a single generic model for each particular TF as a baseline for practical applications. Here we present the expanded and enhanced version of HOCOMOCO (http://hocomoco.autosome.ru and http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/hocomoco10), the collection of models of DNA patterns, recognized by transcription factors. HOCOMOCO now provides position weight matrix (PWM) models for binding sites of 601 human TFs and, in addition, PWMs for 396 mouse TFs. Furthermore, we introduce the largest up to date collection of dinucleotide PWM models for 86 (52) human (mouse) TFs. The update is based on the analysis of massive ChIP-Seq and HT-SELEX datasets, with the validation of the resulting models on in vivo data. To facilitate a practical application, all HOCOMOCO models are linked to gene and protein databases (Entrez Gene, HGNC, UniProt) and accompanied by precomputed score thresholds. Finally, we provide command-line tools for PWM and diPWM threshold estimation and motif finding in nucleotide sequences.

  3. Dynamic nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of an Arabidopsis SR splicing factor: role of the RNA-binding domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rausin, Glwadys; Tillemans, Vinciane; Stankovic, Nancy; Hanikenne, Marc; Motte, Patrick

    2010-05-01

    Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are essential nuclear-localized splicing factors. We have investigated the dynamic subcellular distribution of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) RSZp22 protein, a homolog of the human 9G8 SR factor. Little is known about the determinants underlying the control of plant SR protein dynamics, and so far most studies relied on ectopic transient overexpression. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of the RSZp22 expression profile and describe its nucleocytoplasmic shuttling properties in specific cell types. Comparison of transient ectopic- and stable tissue-specific expression highlights the advantages of both approaches for nuclear protein dynamic studies. By site-directed mutagenesis of RSZp22 RNA-binding sequences, we show that functional RNA recognition motif RNP1 and zinc-knuckle are dispensable for the exclusive protein nuclear localization and speckle-like distribution. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging also revealed that these motifs are implicated in RSZp22 molecular interactions. Furthermore, the RNA-binding motif mutants are defective for their export through the CRM1/XPO1/Exportin-1 receptor pathway but retain nucleocytoplasmic mobility. Moreover, our data suggest that CRM1 is a putative export receptor for mRNPs in plants.

  4. Role of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-4 in prevention of colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seifalian Alexander M

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs are important for the proliferation of cancer cells. One of their binding proteins, known as insulin-like growth factor binding protein -4 (IGFBP-4 is well known for its inhibitory action on IGFs in vitro. We assessed the effect of IGFBP-4 in prevention of development of colon cancer in vivo. Methods Nude mice were subcutaneously inoculated with HT-29 colon cancer cells and they were also simultaneously injected either gene construct containing mammalian expression vector pcDNA3 with or without IGFBP-4 gene or phosphate buffered saline. The effect was assessed 4 weeks later by evaluating the tumours for mitosis, necrosis, apoptosis, and expressions of IGFBP-4, Bcl-2 and Bax proteins. Results The results showed that the IGFBP-4 gene therapy did not prevent the tumour establishment but it increased the tumour apoptosis which was associated with an increase in Bcl-2 and Bax expressions. The IGFBP-4 protein was low in tumours which received IGFBP-4 gene construct which may be due to a feed back mechanism of IGFBP-4 upon its own cells. Conclusion IGFBP-4 gene therapy in the form localised gene transfer did not prevent colon cancer initiation and establishment but it resulted in increased apoptosis and Bax protein expression and a decrease in tumour cellular mitosis

  5. Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein 7 Mediates Glioma Cell Growth and Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Jiang

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7 (IGFBP-7 is the only member of the IGFBP superfamily that binds strongly to insulin, suggesting that IGFBP-7 may have different functions from other IGFBPs. Unlike other IGFBPs, the expression and functions of IGFBP-7 in glioma tumors have not been reported. Using cDNA microarray analysis, we found that expression of IGFBP-7 correlated with the grade of glioma tumors and the overall patient survival. This finding was further validated by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. We used RNAi to examine the role of IGFBP-7 in glioma cells, inhibiting IGFBP-7 expression by short interfering RNA transfection. Cell proliferation was suppressed after IGFBP-7 expression was inhibited for 5 days, and glioma cell growth was stimulated consistently by the addition of recombinant IGFBP-7 protein. Moreover, glioma cell migration was attenuated by IGFBP-7 depletion but enhanced by IGFBP-7 overexpression and addition. Overexpression of AKT1 in IGFBP-7-overxpressed cells attenuated the IGFBP-7-promoted migration and further enhanced inhibition of IGFBP-7 depletion on the migration. Phosphorylation of AKT and Erk1/2 was also inversely regulated by IGFBP-7 expression. These two factors together suggest that IGFBP-7 can regulate glioma cell migration through the AKT-ERK pathway, thereby playing an important role in glioma growth and migration.

  6. Alpha-bungarotoxin binding to hippocampal interneurons: immunocytochemical characterization and effects on growth factor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, R; Wetmore, C; Strömberg, I; Leonard, S; Olson, L

    1993-05-01

    The nicotinic cholinergic antagonist alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BT) binds throughout the rat hippocampal formation. The binding is displaceable by d-tubocurarine. The most heavily labeled cells are GABA-containing interneurons in the dentate and in Ammon's horn. These neurons have several different morphologies and contain several neuropeptides. alpha-BT-labeled interneurons in the dentate are small cells between the granular and molecular layers that often contain neuropeptide Y. alpha-BT-labeled interneurons in CA1 are medium-sized interneurons, occasionally found in stratum pyramidale, but more often found in stratum radiatum and stratum lacunosum moleculare. These neurons often contain cholecystokinin. The largest alpha-BT-labeled interneurons are found in CA3, in both stratum radiatum and stratum lucidum. These neurons are multipolar and frequently are autofluorescent. They often contain somatostatin or cholecystokinin. These large interneurons have been found to receive medial septal innervation and may also have projections that provide inhibitory feedback directly to the medial septal nucleus. The cholinergic innervation of the hippocampus from the medial septal nucleus is under the trophic regulation of NGF and brain-derived neurotrophic factor, even in adult life. Expression of mRNA for both these factors is increased in CA3 and the dentate after intraventricular administration of alpha-BT, but not after administration of the muscarinic antagonist atropine. alpha-BT-sensitive cholinergic receptors on inhibitory interneurons may be critical to medial septal regulation of the hippocampal activity, including the habituation of response to sensory input.

  7. Evolutionarily conserved binding of translationally controlled tumor protein to eukaryotic elongation factor 1B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huiwen; Gong, Weibin; Yao, Xingzhe; Wang, Jinfeng; Perrett, Sarah; Feng, Yingang

    2015-04-03

    Translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) is an abundant protein that is highly conserved in eukaryotes. However, its primary function is still not clear. Human TCTP interacts with the metazoan-specific eukaryotic elongation factor 1Bδ (eEF1Bδ) and inhibits its guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity, but the structural mechanism remains unknown. The interaction between TCTP and eEF1Bδ was investigated by NMR titration, structure determination, paramagnetic relaxation enhancement, site-directed mutagenesis, isothermal titration calorimetry, and HADDOCK docking. We first demonstrated that the catalytic GEF domain of eEF1Bδ is not responsible for binding to TCTP but rather a previously unnoticed central acidic region (CAR) domain in eEF1Bδ. The mutagenesis data and the structural model of the TCTP-eEF1Bδ CAR domain complex revealed the key binding residues. These residues are highly conserved in eukaryotic TCTPs and in eEF1B GEFs, including the eukaryotically conserved eEF1Bα, implying the interaction may be conserved in all eukaryotes. Interactions were confirmed between TCTP and the eEF1Bα CAR domain for human, fission yeast, and unicellular photosynthetic microalgal proteins, suggesting that involvement in protein translation through the conserved interaction with eEF1B represents a primary function of TCTP. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Human vascular smooth muscle cells both express and respond to heparin-binding growth factor I (endothelial cell growth factor)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkles, J.A.; Friesel, R.; Burgess, W.H.; Howk, R.; Mehlman, T.; Weinstein, R.; Maciag, T.

    1987-10-01

    The control of vascular endothelial and muscle cell proliferation is important in such processes as tumor angiogenesis, wound healing, and the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Class I heparin-binding growth factor (HBGF-I) is a potent mitogen and chemoattractant for human endothelial cells in vitro and will induce angiogenesis in vivo. RNA gel blot hybridization experiments demonstrate that cultured human vascular smooth muscle cells, but not human umbilical cells also synthesize an HBGF-I mRNA. Smooth muscle cells also synthesize an HBGF-I-like polypeptide since (i) extract prepared from smooth muscle cells will compete with /sup 125/I-labeled HBGF-I for binding to the HBGF-I cell surface receptor, and (ii) the competing ligand is eluted from heparin-Sepharose affinity resin at a NaCl concentration similar to that required by purified bovine brain HBGF-I and stimulates endothelial cell proliferation in vitro. Furthermore, like endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells possess cell-surface-associated HBGF-I receptors and respond to HBGF-I as a mitogen. These results indicate the potential for an additional autocrine component of vascular smooth muscle cell growth control and establish a vessel wall source of HBGF-I for endothelial cell division in vivo.

  9. DPI-ELISA: a fast and versatile method to specify the binding of plant transcription factors to DNA in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaban Christina

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background About 10% of all genes in eukaryote genomes are predicted to encode transcription factors. The specific binding of transcription factors to short DNA-motifs influences the expression of neighbouring genes. However, little is known about the DNA-protein interaction itself. To date there are only a few suitable methods to characterise DNA-protein-interactions, among which the EMSA is the method most frequently used in laboratories. Besides EMSA, several protocols describe the effective use of an ELISA-based transcription factor binding assay e.g. for the analysis of human NFκB binding to specific DNA sequences. Results We provide a unified protocol for this type of ELISA analysis, termed DNA-Protein-Interaction (DPI-ELISA. Qualitative analyses with His-epitope tagged plant transcription factors expressed in E. coli revealed that EMSA and DPI-ELISA result in comparable and reproducible data. The binding of AtbZIP63 to the C-box and AtWRKY11 to the W2-box could be reproduced and validated by both methods. We next examined the physical binding of the C-terminal DNA-binding domains of AtWRKY33, AtWRKY50 and AtWRKY75 to the W2-box. Although the DNA-binding domain is highly conserved among the WRKY proteins tested, the use of the DPI-ELISA discloses differences in W2-box binding properties between these proteins. In addition to these well-studied transcription factor families, we applied our protocol to AtBPC2, a member of the so far uncharacterised plant specific Basic Pentacysteine transcription factor family. We could demonstrate binding to GA/TC-dinucleotide repeat motifs by our DPI-ELISA protocol. Different buffers and reaction conditions were examined. Conclusions We successfully applied our DPI-ELISA protocol to investigate the DNA-binding specificities of three different classes of transcription factors from Arabidopsis thaliana. However, the analysis of the binding affinity of any DNA-binding protein to any given DNA

  10. Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) binding protein: a novel regulator of CRF and related peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behan, D P; De Souza, E B; Lowry, P J; Potter, E; Sawchenko, P; Vale, W W

    1995-10-01

    A 37-kDa corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) binding protein (CRF-BP) was purified from human plasma by repeated affinity purification and subsequently sequenced and cloned. The human and rat CRF-BP cDNAs encode proteins of 322 amino acids with one putative signal sequence, one N-glycosylation site, and 10 conserved cysteines. Human CRF-BP binds human CRF with high affinity but has low affinity for the ovine peptide. In contrast, sheep CRF-BP binds human and ovine CRF with high affinity. The CRF-BP gene consists of seven exons and six introns and is located on chromosome 13 and loci 5q of the mouse and human genomes, respectively. CRF-BP inhibits the adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) releasing properties of CRF in vitro. CRF-BP dimerizes after binding CRF and clears the peptide from blood. This clearance mechanism protects the maternal pituitary gland from elevated plasma CRF levels found during the third trimester of human pregnancy. CRF-BP is expressed in the brains of all species so far tested but is uniquely expressed in human liver and placenta. In brain, CRF-BP is membrane associated and is predominantly expressed in the cerebral cortex and subcortical limbic structures. In some brain areas CRF-BP colocalizes with CRF and CRF receptors. The protein is also present in pituitary corticotropes, where it is under positive glucocorticoid control, and is likely to locally modulate CRF-induced ACTH secretion. The ligand requirements of the CRF receptor and the CRF-BP can be distinguished in that central human CRF fragments, such as CRF (6-33) and CRF (9-33), have high affinity for CRF-BP but low affinity for the CRF receptor. The binding protein's ability to inhibit CRF-induced ACTH secretion can be reversed by CRF (6-33) and CRF (9-33), suggesting that ligand inhibitors may have utility in elevating free CRF levels in disease states associated with decreased CRF. Thus, by controlling the amount of free CRF which activates CRF receptors, it is likely that the CRF

  11. The kinetics of antibody binding to Plasmodium falciparum VAR2CSA PfEMP1 antigen and modelling of PfEMP1 antigen packing on the membrane knobs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, Lars M; Salanti, Ali; Dobrilovic, Tina

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Infected humans make protective antibody responses to the PfEMP1 adhesion antigens exported by Plasmodium falciparum parasites to the erythrocyte membrane, but little is known about the kinetics of this antibody-receptor binding reaction or how the topology of PfEMP1 on the ...

  12. Analysis of Specific Binding and Subcellular Localization of Wheat ERF Transcription Factor W17

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yun-xiang; LIU Pei; XU Zhao-shi; CHEN Ming; LI Lian-cheng; CHEN Yao-feng; XIONG Xiang-jin; MA You-zhi

    2008-01-01

    The study aims to detect the subcellular localization of ERF (ethylene-responsive element binding factor) transcription factor W17 protein, the interaction between W17 and cis-acting regulatory elements GCC-box and DRE in vitro, the binding and transactivating ability in vivo, and the role of W17 in higher plant stress-signal pathway. Recombinant plasmid W17/163hGFP was introduced into onion epidermal cells by the particle bombardment method with a PDS1000/He. Transformed cells were incubated for 24h at 22℃ in the dark and green fluorescence was monitored under a confocal microscope. The gene W17 was fused N-terminus of GST (glutathione-S-transferase) in prokaryotic expression vector pGEX-4T-1 and then transformed into E. coli strain BL21 (DE3). IPTG (0.5mmol L-1) was added to induce the expression of recombinant GST/W17 for 3h. The fused proteins were purified by GST purification columns, and then subjected to gel retardation assay with a 32P-labeled GCC or DRE sequence. The different reporter and effector plasmids were introduced into tobacco leaves through agroinfiltration, then transformed leaves stained by X-Gluc, faded with 75% alcohol and monitored under a Stereozooming microscope. The GFP fused with W17 protein was localized in the nuclei; SDS-PAGE assay demonstrated that the fused protein GST/W17 could be induced and purified with molecular weight at around 42.2kD under the induction of IPTG. Purified fused protein was able to specifically bind to both the wild-type GCC-box and DRE element, but had no interaction with either the mutant DRE or GCC-box; W17 protein can bind to GCC-box and transactive downstream GUS gene in vivo. W17 can localize into the nuclei, and it may be involved not only in biotic stresses controlled by GCC-box, but also in abiotic stresses (e. g., salt-) induced signaling pathway.

  13. Binding specificities and potential roles of isoforms of eukaryotic initiation factor 4E in Leishmania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoffe, Yael; Zuberek, Joanna; Lerer, Asaf; Lewdorowicz, Magdalena; Stepinski, Janusz; Altmann, Michael; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Shapira, Michal

    2006-12-01

    The 5' cap structure of trypanosomatid mRNAs, denoted cap 4, is a complex structure that contains unusual modifications on the first four nucleotides. We examined the four eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) homologues found in the Leishmania genome database. These proteins, denoted LeishIF4E-1 to LeishIF4E-4, are located in the cytoplasm. They show only a limited degree of sequence homology with known eIF4E isoforms and among themselves. However, computerized structure prediction suggests that the cap-binding pocket is conserved in each of the homologues, as confirmed by binding assays to m(7)GTP, cap 4, and its intermediates. LeishIF4E-1 and LeishIF4E-4 each bind m(7)GTP and cap 4 comparably well, and only these two proteins could interact with the mammalian eIF4E binding protein 4EBP1, though with different efficiencies. 4EBP1 is a translation repressor that competes with eIF4G for the same residues on eIF4E; thus, LeishIF4E-1 and LeishIF4E-4 are reasonable candidates for serving as translation factors. LeishIF4E-1 is more abundant in amastigotes and also contains a typical 3' untranslated region element that is found in amastigote-specific genes. LeishIF4E-2 bound mainly to cap 4 and comigrated with polysomal fractions on sucrose gradients. Since the consensus eIF4E is usually found in 48S complexes, LeishIF4E-2 could possibly be associated with the stabilization of trypanosomatid polysomes. LeishIF4E-3 bound mainly m(7)GTP, excluding its involvement in the translation of cap 4-protected mRNAs. It comigrates with 80S complexes which are resistant to micrococcal nuclease, but its function is yet unknown. None of the isoforms can functionally complement the Saccharomyces cerevisiae eIF4E, indicating that despite their structural conservation, they are considerably diverged.

  14. Cryptic DNA-binding domain in the C terminus of RNA polymerase II general transcription factor RAP30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S; Garrett, K P; Conaway, R C; Conaway, J W

    1994-10-11

    The C terminus of mammalian transcription factor RAP30 has been found to be a cryptic DNA-binding domain strikingly similar to the C-terminal DNA-binding domain present in conserved region 4 of members of the sigma 70 family of bacterial sigma factors. This RAP30 domain shares strongest sequence similarity with the DNA-binding domain present in region 4 of Bacillus subtilis sporulation-specific sigma K. Like the region 4 DNA-binding activity of Escherichia coli sigma 70, the RAP30 C-terminal DNA binding activity is masked in intact RAP30 but is readily detectable when the RAP30 C terminus is expressed as a fusion protein. Consistent with a role for RAP30 DNA-binding activity in transcription, mutations that abolish DNA binding also abolish transcription. Therefore, RAP30 may function at least in part through the action of an evolutionarily ancient DNA-binding domain that first appeared prior to the divergence of bacteria and eukaryotes.

  15. A new real-time method for investigation of affinity properties and binding kinetics of magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlov, Alexey V. [Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 38 Vavilov St, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Nikitin, Maxim P. [Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 38 Vavilov St, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Shemyakin–Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, 16/10 Miklukho-Maklaya St, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, 9 Institutskii per., Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region 141700 (Russian Federation); Bragina, Vera A.; Znoyko, Sergey L.; Zaikina, Marina N.; Ksenevich, Tatiana I.; Gorshkov, Boris G. [Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 38 Vavilov St, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Nikitin, Petr I., E-mail: nikitin@kapella.gpi.ru [Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 38 Vavilov St, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), 31 Kashirskoe shosse, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-15

    A method for quantitative investigation of affinity constants of receptors immobilized on magnetic nanoparticles (MP) is developed based on spectral correlation interferometry (SCI). The SCI records with a picometer resolution the thickness changes of a layer of molecules or nanoparticles due to a biochemical reaction on a cover slip, averaged over the sensing area. The method is compatible with other types of sensing surfaces employed in biosensing. The measured values of kinetic association constants of magnetic nanoparticles are 4 orders of magnitude higher than those of molecular antibody association with antigen. The developed method also suggests highly sensitive detection of antigens in a wide dynamic range. The limit of detection of 92 pg/ml has been demonstrated for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) with 50-nm MP employed as labels, which produce 3-order amplification of the SCI signals. The calibration curve features high sensitivity (slope) of 3-fold signal raise per 10-fold increase of PSA concentration within 4-order dynamic range, which is an attractive compromise for precise quantitative and highly sensitive immunoassay. The proposed biosensing technique offers inexpensive disposable sensor chips of cover slips and represents an economically sound alternative to traditional immunoassays for disease diagnostics, detection of pathogens in food and environmental monitoring. - Highlights: • Method for study of affinity constants of magnetic nanoparticles with receptors is proposed. • Association constants of such particles are 4 orders higher than for biomolecules. • Method is compatible with widely used biosensor surfaces and affordable consumables. • It has high sensitivity: 3-fold signal increasing per 10-fold of PSA concentration. • Limit of detection for PSA is 92 pg/ml, dynamic range – 4 orders of concentration.

  16. Lyso-Sulfatide Binds Factor Xa and Inhibits Thrombin Generation by the Prothrombinase Complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanian Yegneswaran

    Full Text Available Blood coagulation reactions are strongly influenced by phospholipids, but little is known about the influence of sphingolipids on coagulation mechanisms. Lysosulfatide (lyso-SF (sulfogalactosyl sphingosine prolonged factor Xa (fXa 1-stage plasma clotting assays, showing it had robust anticoagulant activity. In studies using purified clotting factors, lyso-SF inhibited >90% of prothrombin (II activation for reaction mixtures containing fXa/factor Va (fVa/II, and also inhibited II activation generation by fXa/ phospholipids and by Gla-domainless-fXa/fVa/phospholipids. When lyso-SF analogs were tested, results showed that N-acetyl-sulfatide was not anticoagulant, implying that the free amine group was essential for the anticoagulant effects of lyso-SF. Lyso-SF did not inhibit fXa enzymatic hydrolysis of small peptide substrates, showing it did not directly inhibit the fXa activity. In surface plasmon resonance studies, lyso-SF bound to immobilized inactivated fXa as well as inactivated Gla-domainless-fXa. Confirming this lyso-SF:fXa interaction, fluorescence studies showed that fluorescently-labeled-fXa in solution bound to lyso-SF. Thus, lyso-SF is an anticoagulant lipid that inhibits fXa when this enzyme is bound to either phospholipids or to fVa. Mechanisms for inhibition of procoagulant activity are likely to involve lyso-SF binding to fXa domain(s that are distinct from the fXa Gla domain. This suggests that certain sphingolipids, including lyso-SF and some of its analogs, may down-regulate fXa activity without inhibiting the enzyme's active site or binding to the fXa Gla domain.

  17. Recognition rules for binding of Zn-Cys2His2 transcription factors to operator DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polozov, R V; Sivozhelezov, V S; Chirgadze, Yu N; Ivanov, V V

    2015-01-01

    The molecules of Zn-finger transcription factors consist of several similar small protein units. We analyzed the crystal structures 46 basic units of 22 complexes of Zn-Cys2His2 family with the fragments of operator DNA. We showed that the recognition of DNA occurs via five protein contacts. The canonical binding positions of the recognizing α-helix were -1, 3, 6, and 7, which make contacts with the tetra-nucleotide sequence ZXYZ of the coding DNA strand; here the canonical binding triplet is underlined. The non-coding DNA strand forms only one contact at α-helix position 2. We have discovered that there is a single highly conservative contact His7α with the phosphate group of nucleotide Z, which precedes each triplet XYZ of the coding DNA chain. This particular contact is invariant for the all Zn-Cys2His2 family with high frequency of occurrence 83%, which we considered as an invariant recognition rule. We have also selected a previously unreported Zn-Cys2His2-Arg subfamily of 21 Zn-finger units bound with DNA triplets, which make two invariant contacts with residues Arg6α and His7α with the coding DNA chain. These contacts show frequency of occurrence 100 and 90%, and are invariant recognition rule. Three other variable protein-DNA contacts are formed mainly with the bases and specify the recognition patterns of individual factor units. The revealed recognition rules are inherent for the Zn-Cys2His2 family and Zn-Cys2His2-Arg subfamily of different taxonomic groups and can distinguish members of these families from any other family of transcription factors.

  18. Wide-scale analysis of human functional transcription factor binding reveals a strong bias towards the transcription start site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuval Tabach

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transcription factors (TF regulate expression by binding to specific DNA sequences. A binding event is functional when it affects gene expression. Functionality of a binding site is reflected in conservation of the binding sequence during evolution and in over represented binding in gene groups with coherent biological functions. Functionality is governed by several parameters such as the TF-DNA binding strength, distance of the binding site from the transcription start site (TSS, DNA packing, and more. Understanding how these parameters control functionality of different TFs in different biological contexts is a must for identifying functional TF binding sites and for understanding regulation of transcription. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We introduce a novel method to screen the promoters of a set of genes with shared biological function (obtained from the functional Gene Ontology (GO classification against a precompiled library of motifs, and find those motifs which are statistically over-represented in the gene set. More than 8,000 human (and 23,000 mouse genes, were assigned to one of 134 GO sets. Their promoters were searched (from 200 bp downstream to 1,000 bp upstream the TSS for 414 known DNA motifs. We optimized the sequence similarity score threshold, independently for every location window, taking into account nucleotide heterogeneity along the promoters of the target genes. The method, combined with binding sequence and location conservation between human and mouse, identifies with high probability functional binding sites for groups of functionally-related genes. We found many location-sensitive functional binding events and showed that they clustered close to the TSS. Our method and findings were tested experimentally. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We identified reliably functional TF binding sites. This is an essential step towards constructing regulatory networks. The promoter region proximal to the TSS is of central

  19. FISim: A new similarity measure between transcription factor binding sites based on the fuzzy integral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cano Carlos

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regulatory motifs describe sets of related transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs and can be represented as position frequency matrices (PFMs. De novo identification of TFBSs is a crucial problem in computational biology which includes the issue of comparing putative motifs with one another and with motifs that are already known. The relative importance of each nucleotide within a given position in the PFMs should be considered in order to compute PFM similarities. Furthermore, biological data are inherently noisy and imprecise. Fuzzy set theory is particularly suitable for modeling imprecise data, whereas fuzzy integrals are highly appropriate for representing the interaction among different information sources. Results We propose FISim, a new similarity measure between PFMs, based on the fuzzy integral of the distance of the nucleotides with respect to the information content of the positions. Unlike existing methods, FISim is designed to consider the higher contribution of better conserved positions to the binding affinity. FISim provides excellent results when dealing with sets of randomly generated motifs, and outperforms the remaining methods when handling real datasets of related motifs. Furthermore, we propose a new cluster methodology based on kernel theory together with FISim to obtain groups of related motifs potentially bound by the same TFs, providing more robust results than existing approaches. Conclusion FISim corrects a design flaw of the most popular methods, whose measures favour similarity of low information content positions. We use our measure to successfully identify motifs that describe binding sites for the same TF and to solve real-life problems. In this study the reliability of fuzzy technology for motif comparison tasks is proven.

  20. An Allosteric Pathway Revealed in the Ribosome Binding Stress Factor BipA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makanji, H.; deLivron, M; Robinson, V

    2009-01-01

    BipA is a highly conserved prokaryotic GTPase that functions as a master regulator of stress and virulence processes in bacteria. It is a member of the translational factor family of GTPases along with EF-G, IF-2 and LepA. Structural and biochemical data suggest that ribosome binding specificity for each member of this family lies in an effector domain. As with other bacterial GTPases, the ribosome binding and GTPase activities of this protein are tightly coupled. However, the mechanism by which this occurs is still unknown. A series of experiments have been designed to probe structural features of the protein to see if we can pinpoint specific areas of BipA, perhaps even individual residues, which are important to its association with the ribosome. Included in the list are the C-terminal effector domain of the protein, which is distinct to the BipA family of proteins, and amino acid residues in the switch I and II regions of the G domain. Using sucrose density gradients, we have shown that the C-terminal domain is required in order for BipA to bind to the ribosome. Moreover, deletion of this domain increases the GTP hydrolysis rates of the protein, likely through relief of inhibitory contacts. Additional evidence has revealed an allosteric connection between the conformationally flexible switch II region and the C-terminal domain of BipA. Site directed mutagenesis, sucrose gradients and malachite green assays are being used to elucidate the details of this coupling.

  1. Cloning and structure of a yeast gene encoding a general transcription initiation factor TFIID that binds to the TATA box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikoshi, M; Wang, C K; Fujii, H; Cromlish, J A; Weil, P A; Roeder, R G

    1989-09-28

    The TATA sequence-binding factor TFIID plays a central role both in promoter activation by RNA polymerase II and other common initiation factors, and in promoter regulation by gene-specific factors. The sequence of yeast TFIID, which seems to be encoded by a single gene, contains interesting structural motifs that are possibly involved in these functions, and is similar to sequences of bacterial sigma factors.

  2. Characterization of the in vitro binding and inhibition kinetics of primary amine oxidase/vascular adhesion protein-1 by glucosamine.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Olivieri, Aldo

    2012-04-01

    Primary-amine oxidase (PrAO) catalyzes the oxidative deamination of endogenous and exogenous primary amines and also functions, in some tissues, as an inflammation-inducible endothelial factor, known as vascular adhesion protein-1. VAP-1 mediates the slow rolling and adhesion of lymphocytes to endothelial cells in a number of inflammatory conditions, including inflammation of the synovium.

  3. msCentipede: Modeling Heterogeneity across Genomic Sites and Replicates Improves Accuracy in the Inference of Transcription Factor Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Anil; Shim, Heejung; Gilad, Yoav; Pritchard, Jonathan K; Stephens, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Understanding global gene regulation depends critically on accurate annotation of regulatory elements that are functional in a given cell type. CENTIPEDE, a powerful, probabilistic framework for identifying transcription factor binding sites from tissue-specific DNase I cleavage patterns and genomic sequence content, leverages the hypersensitivity of factor-bound chromatin and the information in the DNase I spatial cleavage profile characteristic of each DNA binding protein to accurately infer functional factor binding sites. However, the model for the spatial profile in this framework fails to account for the substantial variation in the DNase I cleavage profiles across different binding sites. Neither does it account for variation in the profiles at the same binding site across multiple replicate DNase I experiments, which are increasingly available. In this work, we introduce new methods, based on multi-scale models for inhomogeneous Poisson processes, to account for such variation in DNase I cleavage patterns both within and across binding sites. These models account for the spatial structure in the heterogeneity in DNase I cleavage patterns for each factor. Using DNase-seq measurements assayed in a lymphoblastoid cell line, we demonstrate the improved performance of this model for several transcription factors by comparing against the Chip-seq peaks for those factors. Finally, we explore the effects of DNase I sequence bias on inference of factor binding using a simple extension to our framework that allows for a more flexible background model. The proposed model can also be easily applied to paired-end ATAC-seq and DNase-seq data. msCentipede, a Python implementation of our algorithm, is available at http://rajanil.github.io/msCentipede.

  4. msCentipede: Modeling Heterogeneity across Genomic Sites and Replicates Improves Accuracy in the Inference of Transcription Factor Binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Raj

    Full Text Available Understanding global gene regulation depends critically on accurate annotation of regulatory elements that are functional in a given cell type. CENTIPEDE, a powerful, probabilistic framework for identifying transcription factor binding sites from tissue-specific DNase I cleavage patterns and genomic sequence content, leverages the hypersensitivity of factor-bound chromatin and the information in the DNase I spatial cleavage profile characteristic of each DNA binding protein to accurately infer functional factor binding sites. However, the model for the spatial profile in this framework fails to account for the substantial variation in the DNase I cleavage profiles across different binding sites. Neither does it account for variation in the profiles at the same binding site across multiple replicate DNase I experiments, which are increasingly available. In this work, we introduce new methods, based on multi-scale models for inhomogeneous Poisson processes, to account for such variation in DNase I cleavage patterns both within and across binding sites. These models account for the spatial structure in the heterogeneity in DNase I cleavage patterns for each factor. Using DNase-seq measurements assayed in a lymphoblastoid cell line, we demonstrate the improved performance of this model for several transcription factors by comparing against the Chip-seq peaks for those factors. Finally, we explore the effects of DNase I sequence bias on inference of factor binding using a simple extension to our framework that allows for a more flexible background model. The proposed model can also be easily applied to paired-end ATAC-seq and DNase-seq data. msCentipede, a Python implementation of our algorithm, is available at http://rajanil.github.io/msCentipede.

  5. The TRA-1 transcription factor binds TRA-2 to regulate sexual fates in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shanping; Kimble, Judith

    2001-01-01

    The tra-1 and tra-2 sex-determining genes promote female fates in Caenorhabditis elegans. Classical genetic studies placed tra-1 as the terminal regulator of the pathway with tra-2 acting upstream as a regulator of regulators of tra-1. Here we report the surprising result that the TRA-1 transcription factor binds the intracellular domain of the TRA-2 membrane protein. This binding is dependent on the MX regulatory domain, a region of the TRA-2 intracellular domain shown previously to be critical for the onset of hermaphrodite spermatogenesis. The functional importance of the TRA-1–TRA-2 physical interaction is supported by genetic interactions between tra-1(0) and tra-2(mx) mutations: a reduction of tra-1 gene dose from two copies to one copy enhances the tra-2(mx) feminization phenotype, but has no apparent somatic effect. In Caenorhabditis briggsae, we also find an MX-dependent interaction between Cb-TRA-1 and Cb-TRA-2, but intriguingly, no cross-species interactions are seen. The conservation of the TRA-1– TRA-2 interaction underscores its importance in sex determination. PMID:11250902

  6. In vitro RNA-binding assay for studying trans-factors for RNA editing in chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikanai, Toshiharu; Okuda, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    In plant organelles, specific C residues are modified to U by RNA editing. Short RNA sequences surrounding the target site (i.e., cis-elements) are recognized by trans-factors, which were recently shown to be pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins. PPR proteins consist of tandem arrays of a highly degenerate unit of 35 (pentatrico) amino acids, and PPR motifs are believed to recognize specific RNA sequences. In Arabidopsis thaliana, more than 450 sites are edited in mitochondria and plastids, and a similar number of PPR proteins are encoded in the nuclear genome. To study how the tandem array of a PPR motif facilitates the recognition of RNA sequences, an efficient biochemical strategy is an in vitro binding assay of recombinant PPR proteins with target RNA. This analysis is especially powerful with a combination of in vivo analyses based on the phenotypes of mutants and transgenic plants. In this chapter, we describe methods for the expression of recombinant PPR proteins in Escherichia coli, preparation of probe RNAs, and RNA gel shift assays. These methods can also be utilized for other RNA-binding proteins.

  7. Bidirectional Transcription Arises from Two Distinct Hubs of Transcription Factor Binding and Active Chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scruggs, Benjamin S; Gilchrist, Daniel A; Nechaev, Sergei; Muse, Ginger W; Burkholder, Adam; Fargo, David C; Adelman, Karen

    2015-06-18

    Anti-sense transcription originating upstream of mammalian protein-coding genes is a well-documented phenomenon, but remarkably little is known about the regulation or function of anti-sense promoters and the non-coding RNAs they generate. Here we define at nucleotide resolution the divergent transcription start sites (TSSs) near mouse mRNA genes. We find that coupled sense and anti-sense TSSs precisely define the boundaries of a nucleosome-depleted region (NDR) that is highly enriched in transcription factor (TF) motifs. Notably, as the distance between sense and anti-sense TSSs increases, so does the size of the NDR, the level of signal-dependent TF binding, and gene activation. We further discover a group of anti-sense TSSs in macrophages with an enhancer-like chromatin signature. Interestingly, this signature identifies divergent promoters that are activated during immune challenge. We propose that anti-sense promoters serve as platforms for TF binding and establishment of active chromatin to further regulate or enhance sense-strand mRNA expression.

  8. Effects of hyperthermia on binding, internalization, and degradation of epidermal growth factor. [/sup 125/I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magun, B.E.; Fennie, C.W.

    1981-04-01

    /sup 125/I-epidermal growth factor was used as a molecular probe to study the effects of hyperthermia and local anesthetics on cultured Rat-1 cells. Heating cells at 45/sup 0/C for times up to 1 h caused a continuous decrease in EGF binding. Scatchard analysis showed that the decreased binding resulted from a decrease in the affinity of the EGF receptors rather than from a decrease in receptor number. Exposure to 42/sup 0/C had no effect on degradation. We compared the effects of heat to those caused by the local anesthetics procaine the lidocaine, which have been shown to prevent EGF degradation. Because procaine and lidocaine have been shown by others to potentiate the killing effects of hyperthermia on tumors and in cultured cells, we suggest that hyperthermia and the local anesthetics may act at the same cellular site. By inhibiting the action of lysosomes, hyperthermia and local anesthetics may permit potentially toxic materials to enter the cell by endocytosis, where they would accumulate and induce lethal damage.

  9. Neuroplastin-55 binds to and signals through the fibroblast growth factor receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owczarek, Sylwia; Kiryushko, Darya; Hald Larsen, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    Neuroplastin (Np) is a glycoprotein belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) and existing in two isoforms, Np55 and Np65, named according to their molecular weights. The extracellular part of Np65 contains three immunoglobulin (Ig)-like modules (Ig1, Ig2, and Ig......3), whereas Np55 lacks the Ig1 module. Of these two isoforms, only Np65 is involved in homophilic interactions resulting in cell adhesion, whereas the role of Np55 is poorly understood. The present study reports for the first time the crystal structure of the ectodomain of Np55 at 1.95-A resolution...... and demonstrates that Np55 binds to and activates the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1). Furthermore, we identify a sequence motif in the Ig2 module of Np55 interacting with FGFR1 and show that a synthetic peptide encompassing this motif, termed narpin, binds to and activates FGFR1. We show that both Np...

  10. Analysis of the DNA-binding and dimerization activities of Neurospora crassa transcription factor NUC-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg, Y; Metzenberg, R L

    1994-12-01

    NUC-1, a positive regulatory protein of Neurospora crassa, controls the expression of several unlinked target genes involved in phosphorus acquisition. The carboxy-terminal end of the NUC-1 protein has sequence similarity to the helix-loop-helix family of transcription factors. Bacterially expressed and in vitro-synthesized proteins, which consist of the carboxy-terminal portion of NUC-1, bind specifically to upstream sequences of two of its target genes, pho2+ and pho-4+. These upstream sequences contain the core sequence, CACGTG, a target for many helix-loop-helix proteins. A large loop region (47 amino acids) separates the helix I and helix II domains. Mutations and deletion within the loop region did not interfere with the in vitro or in vivo functions of the protein. Immediately carboxy-proximal to the helix II domain, the NUC-1 protein contains an atypical zipper domain which is essential for function. This domain consists of a heptad repeat of alanine and methionine rather than leucine residues. Analysis of mutant NUC-1 proteins suggests that the helix II and the zipper domains are essential for the protein dimerization, whereas the basic and the helix I domains are involved in DNA binding. The helix I domain, even though likely to participate in dimer formation while NUC-1 is bound to DNA, is not essential for in vitro dimerization.

  11. Composite organization of the cobalamin binding and cubilin recognition sites of intrinsic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedosov, Sergey N; Fedosova, Natalya U; Berglund, Lars; Moestrup, Søren K; Nexø, Ebba; Petersen, Torben E

    2005-03-08

    Intrinsic factor (IF(50)) is a cobalamin (Cbl)-transporting protein of 50 kDa, which can be cleaved into two fragments: the 30 kDa N-terminal peptide IF(30) and the 20 kDa C-terminal glycopeptide IF(20). Experiments on binding of Cbl to IF(30), IF(20), and IF(50) revealed comparable association rate constants (k(+)(Cbl) = 4 x 10(6), 14 x 10(6), and 26 x 10(6) M(-1) s(-1), respectively), but the equilibrium dissociation constants were essentially different (K(Cbl) = 200 microM, 0.2 microM, and cubilin in the presence or absence of Cbl. Neither apo nor holo forms of IF(20) and IF(30) were recognized by the receptor. When two fragments were mixed and incubated with Cbl, they associated into a stable complex, IF(30+20).Cbl, which bound to cubilin as well as the noncleaved IF(50).Cbl complex. We suggest that formation of the cubilin recognition site on IF is caused by assembly of two distant domains, which allows the saturated protein to be recognized by the receptor. The obtained parameters for ligand and receptor binding indicate that both full-length IF(50) and the fragments may be involved in Cbl assimilation.

  12. Targeted protein footprinting: where different transcription factors bind to RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traviglia, S L; Datwyler, S A; Yan, D; Ishihama, A; Meares, C F

    1999-11-30

    Gene transcription is regulated through the interactions of RNA polymerase (RNAP) with transcription factors, such as the bacterial sigma proteins. We have devised a new strategy that relies on targeted protein footprinting to make an extensive survey of proximity to the protein surface. This involves attaching cutting reagents randomly to lysine residues on the surface of a protein such as sigma. The lysine-labeled sigma protein is then used to cleave the polypeptide backbones of the RNAP proteins at exposed residues adjacent to the sigma binding site. We used targeted protein footprinting to compare the areas near which sigma(70), sigma(54), sigma(38), sigma(E), NusA, GreA, and omega bind to the protein subunits of Escherichia coli RNAP. The sigma proteins and NusA cut sites in similar regions of the two large RNAP subunits, beta and beta', outlining a common surface. GreA cuts a larger set of sites, whereas omega shows no overlap with the others, cutting only the beta' subunit at a unique location.

  13. Using DNA duplex stability information for transcription factor binding site discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordân, Raluca; Hartemink, Alexander J

    2008-01-01

    Transcription factor (TF) binding site discovery is an important step in understanding transcriptional regulation. Many computational tools have already been developed, but their success in detecting TF motifs is still limited. We believe one of the main reasons for the low accuracy of current methods is that they do not take into account the structural aspects of TF-DNA interaction. We have previously shown that knowledge about the structural class of the TF and information about nucleosome occupancy can be used to improve motif discovery. Here, we demonstrate the benefits of using information about the DNA double-helical stability for motif discovery. We notice that, in general, the energy needed to destabilize the DNA double helix is higher at TF binding sites than at random DNA sites. We use this information to derive informative positional priors that we incorporate into a motif finding algorithm. When applied to yeast ChIP-chip data, the new informative priors improve the performance of the motif finder significantly when compared to priors that do not use the energetic stability information.

  14. Kinetic and structural studies reveal a unique binding mode of sulfite to the nickel center in urease

    OpenAIRE

    Mazzei, Luca; Cianci, Michele; Benini, Stefano; Bertini, Leonardo; Musiani, Francesco; Ciurli, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Urease is the most efficient enzyme known to date, and catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea using two Ni(II) ions in the active site. Urease is a virulence factor in several human pathogens, while causing severe environmental and agronomic problems. Sporosarcina pasteurii urease has been used extensively in the structural characterization of the enzyme. Sodium sulfite has been widely used as a preservative in urease solutions to prevent oxygen-induced oxidation, but its role as an inhibitor has a...

  15. A DNA-binding-site landscape and regulatory network analysis for NAC transcription factors in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindemose, Søren; Jensen, Michael Krogh; de Velde, Jan Van

    2014-01-01

    regulatory networks of 12 NAC transcription factors. Our data offer specific single-base resolution fingerprints for most TFs studied and indicate that NAC DNA-binding specificities might be predicted from their DNA-binding domain's sequence. The developed methodology, including the application...... of complementary functional genomics filters, makes it possible to translate, for each TF, protein binding microarray data into a set of high-quality target genes. With this approach, we confirm NAC target genes reported from independent in vivo analyses. We emphasize that candidate target gene sets together......Target gene identification for transcription factors is a prerequisite for the systems wide understanding of organismal behaviour. NAM-ATAF1/2-CUC2 (NAC) transcription factors are amongst the largest transcription factor families in plants, yet limited data exist from unbiased approaches to resolve...

  16. Predicting Polymerase Ⅱ Core Promoters by Cooperating Transcription Factor Binding Sites in Eukaryotic Genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Tu MA; Min-Ping QIAN; Hai-Xu TANG

    2004-01-01

    Several discriminate functions for predicting core promoters that based on the potential cooperation between transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) are discussed. It is demonstrated that the promoter predicting accuracy is improved when the cooperation among TFBSs is taken into consideration.The core promoter region of a newly discovered gene CKLFSF1 is predicted to locate more than 1.5 kb far away from the 5′ end of the transcript and in the last intron of its upstream gene, which is experimentally confirmed later. The core promoters of 3402 human RefSeq sequences, obtained by extending the mRNAs in human genome sequences, are predicted by our algorithm, and there are about 60% of the predicted core promoters locating within the ± 500 bp region relative to the annotated transcription start site.

  17. Novel Strategy for Discrimination of Transcription Factor Binding Motifs Employing Mathematical Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Asuka; Sumi, Takuya; Kang, Jiyoung; Tateno, Masaru

    2017-07-01

    Recognition in biological macromolecular systems, such as DNA-protein recognition, is one of the most crucial problems to solve toward understanding the fundamental mechanisms of various biological processes. Since specific base sequences of genome DNA are discriminated by proteins, such as transcription factors (TFs), finding TF binding motifs (TFBMs) in whole genome DNA sequences is currently a central issue in interdisciplinary biophysical and information sciences. In the present study, a novel strategy to create a discriminant function for discrimination of TFBMs by constituting mathematical neural networks (NNs) is proposed, together with a method to determine the boundary of signals (TFBMs) and noise in the NN-score (output) space. This analysis also leads to the mathematical limitation of discrimination in the recognition of features representing TFBMs, in an information geometrical manifold. Thus, the present strategy enables the identification of the whole space of TFBMs, right up to the noise boundary.

  18. Insulin-like growth factor II: complexity of biosynthesis and receptor binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammeltoft, S; Christiansen, Jan; Nielsen, F C

    1991-01-01

    , Man-6-P induces cellular responses. We have studied rat brain neuronal precursor cells where Man-6-P acted as a mitogen suggesting that phosphomannosylated proteins may act as growth factors via the Man-6-P/IGF-II receptor. In conclusion, the gene expression and mechanism of action of IGF-II is very...... and the mannose-6-phosphate (Man-6-P)/IGF-II receptor. There is consensus that the cellular effects of IGF-II are mediated by the IGF-I receptor via activation of its intrinsic tyrosine kinase. The Man-6-P/IGF-II receptor is involved in endocytosis of lysosomal enzymes and IGF-II. In selected cell types, however...... complex suggesting that its biological actions can be regulated at different levels including the transcription, translation, posttranslational processing, receptor binding and intracellular signalling....

  19. Allele frequencies of variants in ultra conserved elements identify selective pressure on transcription factor binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toomas Silla

    Full Text Available Ultra-conserved genes or elements (UCGs/UCEs in the human genome are extreme examples of conservation. We characterized natural variations in 2884 UCEs and UCGs in two distinct populations; Singaporean Chinese (n = 280 and Italian (n = 501 by using a pooled sample, targeted capture, sequencing approach. We identify, with high confidence, in these regions the abundance of rare SNVs (MAF5% are more often found in relatively less-conserved nucleotides within UCEs, compared to rare variants. Moreover, prevalent variants are less likely to overlap transcription factor binding site. Using SNPfold we found no significant influence of RNA secondary structure on UCE conservation. All together, these results suggest UCEs are not under selective pressure as a stretch of DNA but are under differential evolutionary pressure on the single nucleotide level.

  20. A Nonradioactive Method for Detecting DNA-binding Activity of Nuclear Transcription Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宁; 徐永健; 张珍祥; 熊维宁

    2003-01-01

    To determine the feasibility of a nonradioactive electrophoresis mobility shift assay fordetecting nuclear transcription factor, double-stranded oligonucleotides encoding the consensus tar-get sequence of NF-κB were labled with DIG by terminal transferase. After nuclear protein stimula-ted with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) or PMA and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDT C)electrophoresed on 8 % nondenaturing poliacrylamide gel together with oligeonucleotide probe, theywere electro-blotted nylon membrane positively charged. Anti-DIG-AP antibody catalyzed chemilu-minescent substrate CSPD to image on X-film. The results showed that nuclear proteins binded spe-cifically to the NF-κB consensus sequence in the EMSA by chemiluminescent technique method andthe activity of NF-κB in PMA group was more than that in PMA+PDTC group. It is suggestedthat detection of NF-κB by EMSA with chemiluminescent technique is feasible and simple, whichcan be performed in ordinary laboratories.

  1. BaalChIP: Bayesian analysis of allele-specific transcription factor binding in cancer genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Santiago, Ines; Liu, Wei; Yuan, Ke; O'Reilly, Martin; Chilamakuri, Chandra Sekhar Reddy; Ponder, Bruce A J; Meyer, Kerstin B; Markowetz, Florian

    2017-02-24

    Allele-specific measurements of transcription factor binding from ChIP-seq data are key to dissecting the allelic effects of non-coding variants and their contribution to phenotypic diversity. However, most methods of detecting an allelic imbalance assume diploid genomes. This assumption severely limits their applicability to cancer samples with frequent DNA copy-number changes. Here we present a Bayesian statistical approach called BaalChIP to correct for the effect of background allele frequency on the observed ChIP-seq read counts. BaalChIP allows the joint analysis of multiple ChIP-seq samples across a single variant and outperforms competing approaches in simulations. Using 548 ENCODE ChIP-seq and six targeted FAIRE-seq samples, we show that BaalChIP effectively corrects allele-specific analysis for copy-number variation and increases the power to detect putative cis-acting regulatory variants in cancer genomes.

  2. Pituitary tumor-transforming gene and its binding factor in endocrine cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Vicki E; Franklyn, Jayne A; McCabe, Christopher J

    2010-12-03

    The pituitary tumor-transforming gene (PTTG1) encodes a multifunctional protein (PTTG) that is overexpressed in numerous tumours, including pituitary, thyroid, breast and ovarian carcinomas. PTTG induces cellular transformation in vitro and tumourigenesis in vivo, and several mechanisms by which PTTG contributes to tumourigenesis have been investigated. Also known as the human securin, PTTG is involved in cell cycle regulation, controlling the segregation of sister chromatids during mitosis. This review outlines current information regarding PTTG structure, expression, regulation and function in the pathogenesis of neoplasia. Recent progress concerning the use of PTTG as a prognostic marker or therapeutic target will be considered. In addition, the PTTG binding factor (PBF), identified through its interaction with PTTG, has also been established as a proto-oncogene that is upregulated in several cancers. Current knowledge regarding PBF is outlined and its role both independently and alongside PTTG in endocrine and related cancers is discussed.

  3. ECRbase: Database of Evolutionary Conserved Regions, Promoters, and Transcription Factor Binding Sites in Vertebrate Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loots, G; Ovcharenko, I

    2006-08-08

    Evolutionary conservation of DNA sequences provides a tool for the identification of functional elements in genomes. We have created a database of evolutionary conserved regions (ECRs) in vertebrate genomes entitled ECRbase that is constructed from a collection of pairwise vertebrate genome alignments produced by the ECR Browser database. ECRbase features a database of syntenic blocks that recapitulate the evolution of rearrangements in vertebrates and a collection of promoters in all vertebrate genomes presented in the database. The database also contains a collection of annotated transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in all ECRs and promoter elements. ECRbase currently includes human, rhesus macaque, dog, opossum, rat, mouse, chicken, frog, zebrafish, and two pufferfish genomes. It is freely accessible at http://ECRbase.dcode.org.

  4. A binding site for the transcription factor Grainyhead/Nuclear transcription factor-1 contributes to regulation of the Drosophila proliferating cell nuclear antigen gene promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Y; Yamagishi, M; Nishimoto, Y; Taguchi, O; Matsukage, A; Yamaguchi, M

    1999-12-03

    The Drosophila proliferating cell nuclear antigen promoter contains multiple transcriptional regulatory elements, including upstream regulatory element (URE), DNA replication-related element, E2F recognition sites, and three common regulatory factor for DNA replication and DNA replication-related element-binding factor genes recognition sites. In nuclear extracts of Drosophila embryos, we detected a protein factor, the URE-binding factor (UREF), that recognizes the nucleotide sequence 5'-AAACCAGTTGGCA located within URE. Analyses in Drosophila Kc cells and transgenic flies revealed that the UREF-binding site plays an important role in promoter activity both in cultured cells and in living flies. A yeast one-hybrid screen using URE as a bait allowed isolation of a cDNA encoding a transcription factor, Grainyhead/nuclear transcription factor-1 (GRH/NTF-1). The nucleotide sequence required for binding to GRH was indistinguishable from that for UREF detected in embryo nuclear extracts. Furthermore, a specific antibody to GRH reacted with UREF in embryo nuclear extracts. From these results we conclude that GRH is identical to UREF. Although GRH has been thought to be involved in regulation of differentiation-related genes, this study demonstrates, for the first time, involvement of a GRH-binding site in regulation of the DNA replication-related proliferating cell nuclear antigen gene.

  5. Expression and Critical Role of Interleukin Enhancer Binding Factor 2 in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaobing Cheng

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin enhancer binding factor 2 (ILF2, a transcription factor, regulates cell growth by inhibiting the stabilization of mRNA. Currently, its role has gained recognition as a factor in the tumorigenic process. However, until now, little has been known about the detailed role ILF2 plays in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. In this study, we investigated the expression levels of ILF2 in HCC tissue with Western blot and immunohistochemical assays. To examine the effect of ILF2 on liver cancer cell growth and apoptosis, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs targeting ILF2 were recombined to create lentiviral overexpression vectors. Our results showed higher expression levels of ILF2 mRNA and ILF2 protein in HCC tissue compared with matched peritumoral tissue. Expression of ILF2 may regulate cell growth and apoptosis in liver cancer cells via regulation of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2, Bcl-2 related ovarian killer (Bok, Bcl-2-associated X protein (BAX, and cellular inhibitor of apoptosis 1 (cIAP1. Moreover, we inoculated nude mice with liver cancer cells to investigate the effect of ILF2 on tumorigenesis in vivo. As expected, a rapid growth was observed in cancer cells inoculated with a lentiviral vector coding Flag-ILF2 (Lenti-ILF2 compared with the control cells. Hence, these results promote a better understanding of ILF2’s potential role as a therapeutic target in HCC.

  6. Transcription factor binding sites are genetic determinants of retroviral integration in the human genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Felice

    Full Text Available Gamma-retroviruses and lentiviruses integrate non-randomly in mammalian genomes, with specific preferences for active chromatin, promoters and regulatory regions. Gene transfer vectors derived from gamma-retroviruses target at high frequency genes involved in the control of growth, development and differentiation of the target cell, and may induce insertional tumors or pre-neoplastic clonal expansions in patients treated by gene therapy. The gene expression program of the target cell is apparently instrumental in directing gamma-retroviral integration, although the molecular basis of this phenomenon is poorly understood. We report a bioinformatic analysis of the distribution of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs flanking >4,000 integrated proviruses in human hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells. We show that gamma-retroviral, but not lentiviral vectors, integrate in genomic regions enriched in cell-type specific subsets of TFBSs, independently from their relative position with respect to genes and transcription start sites. Analysis of sequences flanking the integration sites of Moloney leukemia virus (MLV- and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-derived vectors carrying mutations in their long terminal repeats (LTRs, and of HIV vectors packaged with an MLV integrase, indicates that the MLV integrase and LTR enhancer are the viral determinants of the selection of TFBS-rich regions in the genome. This study identifies TFBSs as differential genomic determinants of retroviral target site selection in the human genome, and suggests that transcription factors binding the LTR enhancer may synergize with the integrase in tethering retroviral pre-integration complexes to transcriptionally active regulatory regions. Our data indicate that gamma-retroviruses and lentiviruses have evolved dramatically different strategies to interact with the host cell chromatin, and predict a higher risk in using gamma-retroviral vs. lentiviral vectors for human

  7. Crystal structure of the DNA-binding domain of Myelin-gene Regulatory Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Xiangkai; Li, Bowen; Hu, Fen; Yan, Shufeng; Meloni, Gabriele; Li, Huiliang; Shi, Ning

    2017-06-16

    Myelin-gene Regulatory Factor (MyRF) is one of the master transcription factors controlling myelin formation and development in oligodendrocytes which is crucial for the powerful brain functions. The N-terminal of MyRF, which contains a proline-rich region and a DNA binding domain (DBD), is auto-cleaved from the ER membrane, and then enters the nucleus to participate in transcription regulation of the myelin genes. Here we report the crystal structure of MyRF DBD. It shows an Ig-fold like architecture which consists of two antiparallel β-sheets with 7 main strands, packing against each other, forming a β-sandwich. Compared to its homolog, Ndt80, MyRF has a smaller and less complex DBD lacking the helices and the big loops outside the core. Structural alignment reveals that MyRF DBD possess less interaction sites with DNA than Ndt80 and may bind only at the major groove of DNA. Moreover, the structure reveals a trimeric assembly, agreeing with the previous report that MyRF DBD functions as a trimer. The mutant that we designed based on the structure disturbed trimer formation, but didn't affect the auto-cleavage reaction. It demonstrates that the activation of self-cleavage reaction of MyRF is independent of the presence of its N-terminal DBD homotrimer. The structure reported here will help to understand the molecular mechanism underlying the important roles of MyRF in myelin formation and development.

  8. Microrespirometric determination of the effectiveness factor and biodegradation kinetics of aerobic granules degrading 4-chlorophenol as the sole carbon source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vital-Jacome, Miguel [Department of Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (Cinvestav-IPN), Av. IPN 2508, 07360 México DF, México (Mexico); Buitrón, Germán; Moreno-Andrade, Ivan; Garcia-Rea, Victor [Laboratory for Research on Advanced Process for Water Treatment, Unidad Académica Juriquilla, Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Blvd. Juriquilla 3001, Querétaro 76320, México (Mexico); Thalasso, Frederic, E-mail: thalasso@cinvestav.mx [Department of Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (Cinvestav-IPN), Av. IPN 2508, 07360 México DF, México (Mexico)

    2016-08-05

    Highlights: • Microrespirometry was used to characterize aerobic granules. • Kinetic parameters for 4-chorophenol degradation were determined. • Intrinsic and apparent kinetic parameters were quantified and contrasted. • Aerobic granules presented lower μ{sub max} and higher K{sub S} than disaggregated granules. • Microrespirometry can be useful in model development and calibration. - Abstract: In this study, a microrespirometric method was used, i.e., pulse respirometry in microreactors, to characterize mass transfer and biodegradation kinetics in aerobic granules. The experimental model was an aerobic granular sludge in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) degrading synthetic wastewater containing 4-chlorophenol as the sole carbon source. After 15 days of acclimation, the SBR process degraded 4-chlorophenol at a removal rate of up to 0.9 kg COD m{sup −3} d{sup −1}, and the degradation kinetics were well described by the Haldane model. The microrespirometric method consisted of injecting pulses of 4-chlorophenol into the 24 wells of a microreactor system containing the SBR samples. From the respirograms obtained, the following five kinetic parameters were successfully determined during reactor operation: (i) Maximum specific oxygen uptake rate, (ii) substrate affinity constant, (iii) substrate inhibition constant, (iv) maximum specific growth rate, and (v) cell growth yield. Microrespirometry tests using granules and disaggregated granules allowed for the determination of apparent and intrinsic parameters, which in turn enabled the determination of the effectiveness factor of the granular sludge. It was concluded that this new high-throughput method has the potential to elucidate the complex biological and physicochemical processes of aerobic granular biosystems.

  9. Kinome-wide Selectivity Profiling of ATP-competitive Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Inhibitors and Characterization of Their Binding Kinetics*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingsong; Kirubakaran, Sivapriya; Hur, Wooyoung; Niepel, Mario; Westover, Kenneth; Thoreen, Carson C.; Wang, Jinhua; Ni, Jing; Patricelli, Matthew P.; Vogel, Kurt; Riddle, Steve; Waller, David L.; Traynor, Ryan; Sanda, Takaomi; Zhao, Zheng; Kang, Seong A.; Zhao, Jean; Look, A. Thomas; Sorger, Peter K.; Sabatini, David M.; Gray, Nathanael S.

    2012-01-01

    An intensive recent effort to develop ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitors has resulted in several potent and selective molecules such as Torin1, PP242, KU63794, and WYE354. These inhibitors are being widely used as pharmacological probes of mTOR-dependent biology. To determine the potency and specificity of these agents, we have undertaken a systematic kinome-wide effort to profile their selectivity and potency using chemical proteomics and assays for enzymatic activity, protein binding, and disruption of cellular signaling. Enzymatic and cellular assays revealed that all four compounds are potent inhibitors of mTORC1 and mTORC2, with Torin1 exhibiting ∼20-fold greater potency for inhibition of Thr-389 phosphorylation on S6 kinases (EC50 = 2 nm) relative to other inhibitors. In vitro biochemical profiling at 10 μm revealed binding of PP242 to numerous kinases, although WYE354 and KU63794 bound only to p38 kinases and PI3K isoforms and Torin1 to ataxia telangiectasia mutated, ATM and Rad3-related protein, and DNA-PK. Analysis of these protein targets in cellular assays did not reveal any off-target activities for Torin1, WYE354, and KU63794 at concentrations below 1 μm but did show that PP242 efficiently inhibited the RET receptor (EC50, 42 nm) and JAK1/2/3 kinases (EC50, 780 nm). In addition, Torin1 displayed unusually slow kinetics for inhibition of the mTORC1/2 complex, a property likely to contribute to the pharmacology of this inhibitor. Our results demonstrated that, with the exception of PP242, available ATP-competitive compounds are highly selective mTOR inhibitors when applied to cells at concentrations below 1 μm and that the compounds may represent a starting point for medicinal chemistry efforts aimed at developing inhibitors of other PI3K kinase-related kinases. PMID:22223645

  10. Factors affecting N immobilisation/mineralisation kinetics for cellulose-, glucose- and straw-amended sandy soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vinten, A.J.A.; Whitmore, A.P.; Bloem, J.; Howard, R.; Wright, F.

    2002-01-01

    The kinetics of nitrogen immobilization/mineralization for cellulose-, glucose- and straw-amended sandy soils were investigated in a series of laboratory incubations. Three Scottish soils expected to exhibit a range of biological activity were used: aloamy sand, intensively cropped horticultural soi

  11. Photocatalytic degradation kinetics of naphthenic acids in oil sands process-affected water: Multifactorial determination of significant factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshuk, Tim; de Oliveira Livera, Diogo; Peru, Kerry M; Headley, John V; Vijayaraghavan, Sucharita; Wong, Timothy; Gu, Frank

    2016-12-01

    Oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) is generated as a byproduct of bitumen extraction in Canada's oil sands. Due to the water's toxicity, associated with dissolved acid extractable organics (AEO), especially naphthenic acids (NAs), along with base-neutral organics, OSPW may require treatment to enable safe discharge to the environment. Heterogeneous photocatalysis is a promising advanced oxidation process (AOP) for OSPW remediation, however, predicting treatment efficacy can be challenging due to the unique water chemistry of OSPW from different tailings ponds. The objective of this work was to study various factors affecting the kinetics of photocatalytic AEO degradation in OSPW. The rate of photocatalytic treatment varied significantly in two different OSPW sources, which could not be accounted for by differences in AEO composition, as studied by high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). The effects of inorganic water constituents were investigated using factorial and response surface experiments, which revealed that hydroxyl (HO) radical scavenging by iron (Fe(3+)) and bicarbonate (HCO3(-)) inhibited the NA degradation rate. The effects of NA concentration and temperature on the treatment kinetics were also evaluated in terms of Langmuir-Hinshelwood and Arrhenius models; pH and temperature were identified as weak factors, while dissolved oxygen (DO) was critical to the photo-oxidation reaction. Accounting for all of these variables, a general empirical kinetic expression is proposed, enabling prediction of photocatalytic treatment performance in diverse sources of OSPW.

  12. Meningococcal factor H binding proteins in epidemic strains from Africa: implications for vaccine development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolando Pajon

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Factor H binding protein (fHbp is an important antigen for vaccines against meningococcal serogroup B disease. The protein binds human factor H (fH, which enables the bacteria to resist serum bactericidal activity. Little is known about the vaccine-potential of fHbp for control of meningococcal epidemics in Africa, which typically are caused by non-group B strains.We investigated genes encoding fHbp in 106 serogroup A, W-135 and X case isolates from 17 African countries. We determined complement-mediated bactericidal activity of antisera from mice immunized with recombinant fHbp vaccines, or a prototype native outer membrane vesicle (NOMV vaccine from a serogroup B mutant strain with over-expressed fHbp. Eighty-six of the isolates (81% had one of four prevalent fHbp sequence variants, ID 4/5 (serogroup A isolates, 9 (W-135, or 74 (X in variant group 1, or ID 22/23 (W-135 in variant group 2. More than one-third of serogroup A isolates and two-thirds of W-135 isolates tested had low fHbp expression while all X isolates tested had intermediate or high expression. Antisera to the recombinant fHbp vaccines were generally bactericidal only against isolates with fHbp sequence variants that closely matched the respective vaccine ID. Low fHbp expression also contributed to resistance to anti-fHbp bactericidal activity. In contrast to the recombinant vaccines, the NOMV fHbp ID 1 vaccine elicited broad anti-fHbp bactericidal activity, and the antibodies had greater ability to inhibit binding of fH to fHbp than antibodies elicited by the control recombinant fHbp ID 1 vaccine.NOMV vaccines from mutants with increased fHbp expression elicit an antibody repertoire with greater bactericidal activity than recombinant fHbp vaccines. NOMV vaccines are promising for prevention of meningococcal disease in Africa and could be used to supplement coverage conferred by a serogroup A polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccine recently introduced in some sub

  13. Identification of Receptor and Heparin Binding Sites in Fibroblast Growth Factor 4 by Structure-Based Mutagenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Bellosta, Paola; Iwahori, Akiyo; Plotnikov, Alexander N.; Eliseenkova, Anna V.; Basilico, Claudio; Mohammadi, Moosa

    2001-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) comprise a large family of multifunctional, heparin-binding polypeptides that show diverse patterns of interaction with a family of receptors (FGFR1 to -4) that are subject to alternative splicing. FGFR binding specificity is an essential mechanism in the regulation of FGF signaling and is achieved through primary sequence differences among FGFs and FGFRs and through usage of two alternative exons, IIIc and IIIb, for the second half of immunoglobulin-like doma...

  14. Stable Binding of the Conserved Transcription Factor Grainy Head to its Target Genes Throughout Drosophila melanogaster Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevil, Markus; Bondra, Eliana R; Schulz, Katharine N; Kaplan, Tommy; Harrison, Melissa M

    2017-02-01

    It has been suggested that transcription factor binding is temporally dynamic, and that changes in binding determine transcriptional output. Nonetheless, this model is based on relatively few examples in which transcription factor binding has been assayed at multiple developmental stages. The essential transcription factor Grainy head (Grh) is conserved from fungi to humans, and controls epithelial development and barrier formation in numerous tissues. Drosophila melanogaster, which possess a single grainy head (grh) gene, provide an excellent system to study this conserved factor. To determine whether temporally distinct binding events allow Grh to control cell fate specification in different tissue types, we used a combination of ChIP-seq and RNA-seq to elucidate the gene regulatory network controlled by Grh during four stages of embryonic development (spanning stages 5-17) and in larval tissue. Contrary to expectations, we discovered that Grh remains bound to at least 1146 genomic loci over days of development. In contrast to this stable DNA occupancy, the subset of genes whose expression is regulated by Grh varies. Grh transitions from functioning primarily as a transcriptional repressor early in development to functioning predominantly as an activator later. Our data reveal that Grh binds to target genes well before the Grh-dependent transcriptional program commences, suggesting it sets the stage for subsequent recruitment of additional factors that execute stage-specific Grh functions. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  15. Role of intrinsic DNA binding specificity in defining target genes of the mammalian transcription factor PDX1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberzon, Arthur; Ridner, Gabriela; Walker, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    PDX1 is a homeodomain transcription factor essential for pancreatic development and mature beta cell function. Homeodomain proteins typically recognize short TAAT DNA motifs in vitro: this binding displays paradoxically low specificity and affinity, given the extremely high specificity of action of these proteins in vivo. To better understand how PDX1 selects target genes in vivo, we have examined the interaction of PDX1 with natural and artificial binding sites. Comparison of PDX1 binding sites in several target promoters revealed an evolutionarily conserved pattern of nucleotides flanking the TAAT core. Using competitive in vitro DNA binding assays, we defined three groups of binding sites displaying high, intermediate and low affinity. Transfection experiments revealed a striking correlation between the ability of each sequence to activate transcription in cultured beta cells, and its ability to bind PDX1 in vitro. Site selection from a pool of oligonucleotides (sequence NNNTAATNNN) revealed a non-random preference for particular nucleotides at the flanking locations, resembling natural PDX1 binding sites. Taken together, the data indicate that the intrinsic DNA binding specificity of PDX1, in particular the bases adjacent to TAAT, plays an important role in determining the spectrum of target genes. PMID:14704343

  16. Energetics of Glutathione Binding to Human Eukaryotic Elongation Factor 1 Gamma: Isothermal Titration Calorimetry and Molecular Dynamics Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tshabalala, Thabiso N; Tomescu, Mihai-Silviu; Prior, Allan; Balakrishnan, Vijayakumar; Sayed, Yasien; Dirr, Heini W; Achilonu, Ikechukwu

    2016-12-01

    The energetics of ligand binding to human eukaryotic elongation factor 1 gamma (heEF1γ) was investigated using reduced glutathione (GSH), oxidised glutathione (GSSG), glutathione sulfonate and S-hexylglutathione as ligands. The experiments were conducted using isothermal titration calorimetry, and the findings were supported using computational studies. The data show that the binding of these ligands to heEF1γ is enthalpically favourable and entropically driven (except for the binding of GSSG). The full length heEF1γ binds GSSG with lower affinity (K d = 115 μM), with more hydrogen-bond contacts (ΔH = -73.8 kJ/mol) and unfavourable entropy (-TΔS = 51.7 kJ/mol) compared to the glutathione transferase-like N-terminus domain of heEF1γ, which did not show preference to any specific ligand. Computational free binding energy calculations from the 10 ligand poses show that GSSG and GSH consistently bind heEF1γ, and that both ligands bind at the same site with a folded bioactive conformation. This study reveals the possibility that heEF1γ is a glutathione-binding protein.

  17. General formulation of rovibrational kinetic energy operators and matrix elements in internal bond-angle coordinates using factorized Jacobians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Wassja A.; Leonhard, Kai

    2016-12-01

    We show how inverse metric tensors and rovibrational kinetic energy operators in terms of internal bond-angle coordinates can be obtained analytically following a factorization of the Jacobian worked out by Frederick and Woywod. The structure of these Jacobians is exploited in two ways: On one hand, the elements of the metric tensor as well as its determinant all have the form ∑rmsin (αn) cos (βo) . This form can be preserved by working with the adjugate metric tensor that can be obtained without divisions. On the other hand, the adjugate can be obtained with less effort by exploiting the lower triangular structure of the Jacobians. Together with a suitable choice of the wavefunction, we avoid singularities and show how to obtain analytical expressions for the rovibrational kinetic energy matrix elements.

  18. In silico cloning and characterization of the TGA (TGACG MOTIF-BINDING FACTOR) transcription factors subfamily in Carica papaya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrovo Espín, Fabio Marcelo; Peraza-Echeverria, Santy; Fuentes, Gabriela; Santamaría, Jorge M

    2012-05-01

    The TGA transcription factors belong to the subfamily of bZIP group D that play a major role in disease resistance and development. Most of the TGA identified in Arabidopsis interact with the master regulator of SAR, NPR1 that controls the expression of PR genes. As a first approach to determine the possible involvement of these transcription factors in papaya defense, we characterized Arabidopsis TGA orthologs from the genome of Carica papaya cv. SunUp. Six orthologs CpTGA1 to CpTGA6, were identified. The predicted CpTGA proteins were highly similar to AtTGA sequences and probably share the same DNA binding properties and transcriptional regulation features. The protein sequences alignment evidenced the presence of conserved domains, characteristic of this group of transcription factors. The phylogeny showed that CpTGA evolved into three different subclades associated with defense and floral development. This is the first report of basal expression patterns assessed by RT-PCR, from the whole subfamily of CpTGA members in different tissues from papaya cv. Maradol mature plants. Overall, CpTGA1, CpTGA3 CpTGA6 and CpTGA4 showed a basal expression in all tissues tested; CpTGA2 expressed strongly in all tissues except in petioles while CpTGA5 expressed only in petals and to a lower extent in petioles. Although more detailed studies in anthers and other floral structures are required, we suggest that CpTGA5 might be tissue-specific, and it might be involved in papaya floral development. On the other hand, we report here for the first time, the expression of the whole family of CpTGA in response to salicylic acid (SA). The expression of CpTGA3, CpTGA4 and CpTGA6 increased in response to SA, what would suggest its involvement in the SAR response in papaya.

  19. [Rbf1 (RPG-box binding factor), a transcription factor involved in yeast-hyphal transition of Candida albicans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Y; Ishii, N; Watanabe, M; Yoshihara, F; Arisawa, M

    1998-01-01

    The major fungal pathogen for fungal diseases which have become a major medical problem in the last few years is Candida albicans, which can grow both in yeast and hyphae forms. This ability of C. albicans is thought to contribute to its colonization and dissemination within host tissues. In a recent few years, accompanying the introduction of molecular biological tools into C. albicans organism, several factors involved in the signal transduction pathway for yeast-hyphal transition have been identified. One MAP kinase pathway in C. albicans, similar to that leading to STE12 activation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has been reported. C. albicans strains mutant in these genes show retarded filamentous growth on a solid media but no impairment of filamentous growth in mice. These results suggest two scenarios that a kinase signaling cascade plays a part in stimulating the morphological transition in C. albicans, and that there would be another signaling pathway effective in animals. In this latter true hyphal pathway, although some candidate proteins, such as Efg1 (transcription factor), Int1 (integrin-like membrane protein), or Phr1 (pH-regulated membrane protein), have been identified, it is still too early to say that we understand the whole picture of that cascade. We have cloned a C. albicans gene encoding a novel DNA binding protein, Rbf1, that predominantly localizes in the nucleus, and shows transcriptional activation capability. Disruption of the functional RBF1 genes of C. albicans induced the filamentous growth on all solid and liquid media tested, suggesting that Rbf1 might be another candidate for the true hyphal pathway. Relationships with other factors described above, and the target (regulated) genes of Rbf1 is under investigation.

  20. Tracing the evolution of lineage-specific transcription factor binding sites in a birth-death framework.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Daigoro Yokoyama

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Changes in cis-regulatory element composition that result in novel patterns of gene expression are thought to be a major contributor to the evolution of lineage-specific traits. Although transcription factor binding events show substantial variation across species, most computational approaches to study regulatory elements focus primarily upon highly conserved sites, and rely heavily upon multiple sequence alignments. However, sequence conservation based approaches have limited ability to detect lineage-specific elements that could contribute to species-specific traits. In this paper, we describe a novel framework that utilizes a birth-death model to trace the evolution of lineage-specific binding sites without relying on detailed base-by-base cross-species alignments. Our model was applied to analyze the evolution of binding sites based on the ChIP-seq data for six transcription factors (GATA1, SOX2, CTCF, MYC, MAX, ETS1 along the lineage toward human after human-mouse common ancestor. We estimate that a substantial fraction of binding sites (∼58-79% for each factor in humans have origins since the divergence with mouse. Over 15% of all binding sites are unique to hominids. Such elements are often enriched near genes associated with specific pathways, and harbor more common SNPs than older binding sites in the human genome. These results support the ability of our method to identify lineage-specific regulatory elements and help understand their roles in shaping variation in gene regulation across species.

  1. Oxidative stress effect on progesterone-induced blocking factor (PIBF) binding to PIBF-receptor in lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Haba, Carlos; Palacio, José R; Palkovics, Tamas; Szekeres-Barthó, Júlia; Morros, Antoni; Martínez, Paz

    2014-01-01

    Receptor-ligand binding is an essential interaction for biological function. Oxidative stress can modify receptors and/or membrane lipid dynamics, thus altering cell physiological functions. The aim of this study is to analyze how oxidative stress may alter receptor-ligand binding and lipid domain distribution in the case of progesterone-induced blocking factor/progesterone-induced blocking factor-receptor. For membrane fluidity regionalization analysis of MEC-1 lymphocytes, two-photon microscopy was used in individual living cells. Lymphocytes were also double stained with AlexaFluor647/progesterone-induced blocking factor and Laurdan