WorldWideScience

Sample records for facilities phase

  1. HYTEST Phase I Facility Commissioning and Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee P. Shunn; Richard D. Boardman; Shane J. Cherry; Craig G. Rieger

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this document is to report the first year accomplishments of two coordinated Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) projects that utilize a hybrid energy testing laboratory that couples various reactors to investigate system reactance behavior. This work is the first phase of a series of hybrid energy research and testing stations - referred to hereafter as HYTEST facilities – that are planned for construction and operation at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A HYTEST Phase I facility was set up and commissioned in Bay 9 of the Bonneville County Technology Center (BCTC). The purpose of this facility is to utilize the hydrogen and oxygen that is produced by the High Temperature Steam Electrolysis test reactors operating in Bay 9 to support the investigation of kinetic phenomena and transient response of integrated reactor components. This facility provides a convenient scale for conducting scoping tests of new reaction concepts, materials performance, new instruments, and real-time data collection and manipulation for advance process controls. An enclosed reactor module was assembled and connected to a new ventilation system equipped with a variable-speed exhaust blower to mitigate hazardous gas exposures, as well as contract with hot surfaces. The module was equipped with a hydrogen gas pump and receiver tank to supply high quality hydrogen to chemical reactors located in the hood.

  2. Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility. Phase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, J.B.; Hudson, E.D.; Lord, R.S.; Johnson, J.W.; Martin, J.A.; McNeilly, G.S.; Milner, W.T.; Mosko, S.W.; Sayer, R.O.; Robinson, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    The Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility, with the completion of Phase I in late 1979, will include the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC) and associated research areas, the new 25 MV tandem accelerator with new research areas for tandem beams, and modifications to utilize the ORIC as a booster accelerator. The combination of the tandem and ORIC will provide beam energies of 25 MeV/A for light heavy ions and 6 MeV/A up to A = 160. This paper discusses plans for a Phase II expansion of the facility to include an isochronous cyclotron with superconducting magnet and reconfiguration of the existing research areas and the ORIC vault to handle the higher energy beams from the new cyclotron. The new booster cyclotron is a low-flutter high-spiral design patterned after the MSU K = 800 design, with a central magnetic field of about 5 tesla and an extraction radius of 1 meter. The new beam transport system will incorporate an rf beam-splitter system that will be able to deliver successive beam pulses to two or three experiment areas

  3. Booster Applications Facility report, Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thieberger, P. (ed.)

    1991-06-01

    This report summarizes studies and planning performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) personnel at the request of NASA for the design, construction and operation of experimental areas and facilities for utilization of ion beams from the BNL Booster synchrotron particle accelerator. These facilities would be primarily utilized to simulate space radiation for radiobiological research, shielding studies and detector calibrations. The feasibility of such a project has been established, preliminary designs and cost estimates have been developed and a formal proposal can be submitted pending DOE concurrence. The main body of this report consists of the material presented by BNL during the meeting with a NASA appointed Panel on December 10 and 11, 1990. The individual speakers have provided brief summaries of their talks and explanations of their figures. In addition there are two appendices. One, contains detailed discussion of the shared mode of operation and the corresponding beam compatibility tables. The second appendix contains cost estimate details. An executive summary on budgets and schedules has been added, containing possible phased construction and outfitting scenarios and the corresponding expense and commitment profiles as well as new operational cost estimates. Material contained in the executive summary reflects the correction of some errors and new studies performed in response to the NASA Panel suggestions.

  4. Radiological Control Technician: Phase 4, Facility practical training attachment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    At DOE sites with more than one facility, and where RCT tasks at each facility may differ, site and facility tasks should be separated. The tasks that are common to all the facilities on the site should be included in Phase II training with the core tasks. Tasks unique to a facility should be added to the training program qualification standard, as an attachment, as Phase IV training. Not all the DOE sites will include Phase IV training in their programs. Phase IV training allows each site to qualify technicians to a select facility. Since the core training for the technicians is standardized, the transfer of technicians between facilities requires that only facility tasks be taught, provided the core qualification is current

  5. Manual for operation of the multipurpose thermalhydraulic test facility TOPFLOW (Transient Two Phase Flow Test Facility)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, M.; Carl, H.; Schuetz, H.; Pietruske, H.; Lenk, S.

    2004-07-01

    The Forschungszentrum Rossendorf (FZR) e. V. is constructing a new large-scale test facility, TOPFLOW, for thermalhydraulic single effect tests. The acronym stands for transient two phase flow test facility. It will mainly be used for the investigation of generic and applied steady state and transient two phase flow phenomena and the development and validation of models of computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes. The manual of the test facility must always be available for the staff in the control room and is restricted condition during operation of personnel and also reconstruction of the facility. (orig./GL)

  6. Design for the second phase Rokkasho LLW burial facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumata, Tadamasa

    1997-01-01

    Rokkasho Low Level radioactive Waste management center of Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited (hereafter called JNFL) has been operating for five years and about 90,000 (200 liter) drums have already been buried. Currently, JNFL is planning the 2nd phase of the burial program. The basic design of the new facility has been completed and applied for license additionally. Wastes buried in the 2nd phase facility are mainly dry active wastes from nuclear power plants. Inflammable wastes except for plastics are incinerated before they are disposed, because organic materials can generate gas and their degraded materials affect the distribution coefficients of the radionuclides. Most of the aluminum wastes which can generate hydrogen gas by corrosion are also removed from the waste. The 2nd phase facility accepts metal, plastics and non-flammable wastes. These are solidified with mortar in the 200 liter drums at the power plants. The radioactive inventory of the 2nd phase facility is considered to be as much as that of the 1st phase facility. (author)

  7. Construction of the two-phase critical flow test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, C. H.; Chang, S. K.; Park, H. S.; Min, K. H.; Choi, N. H.; Kim, C. H.; Lee, S. H.; Kim, H. C.; Chang, M. H.

    2002-03-01

    The two-phase critical test loop facility has been constructed in the KAERI engineering laboratory for the simulation of small break loss of coolant accident entrained with non-condensible gas of SMART. The test facility can operate at 12 MPa of pressure and 0 to 60 C of sub-cooling with 0.5 kg/s of non- condensible gas injection into break flow, and simulate up to 20 mm of pipe break. Main components of the test facility were arranged such that the pressure vessel containing coolant, a test section simulating break and a suppression tank inter-connected with pipings were installed vertically. As quick opening valve opens, high pressure/temperature coolant flows through the test section forming critical two-phase flow into the suppression tank. The pressure vessel was connected to two high pressure N2 gas tanks through a control valve to control pressure in the pressure vessel. Another N2 gas tank was also connected to the test section for the non-condensible gas injection. The test facility operation was performed on computers supported with PLC systems installed in the control room, and test data such as temperature, break flow rate, pressure drop across test section, gas injection flow rate were all together gathered in the data acquisition system for further data analysis. This test facility was classified as a safety related high pressure gas facility in law. Thus the loop design documentation was reviewed, and inspected during construction of the test loop by the regulatory body. And the regulatory body issued permission for the operation of the test facility

  8. Physics Detector Simulation Facility Phase II system software description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scipioni, B.; Allen, J.; Chang, C.; Huang, J.; Liu, J.; Mestad, S.; Pan, J.; Marquez, M.; Estep, P.

    1993-05-01

    This paper presents the Physics Detector Simulation Facility (PDSF) Phase II system software. A key element in the design of a distributed computing environment for the PDSF has been the separation and distribution of the major functions. The facility has been designed to support batch and interactive processing, and to incorporate the file and tape storage systems. By distributing these functions, it is often possible to provide higher throughput and resource availability. Similarly, the design is intended to exploit event-level parallelism in an open distributed environment

  9. Waste Management Effluent Treatment Facility: Phase I. CAC basic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gemar, D.W.; O'Leary, C.D.

    1984-01-01

    In order to expedite design and construction of the Waste Management Effluent Treatment Facility (WMETF), the project has been divided into two phases. Phase I consists of four storage basins and the associated transfer lines, diversion boxes, and control rooms. The design data pertaining to Phase I of the WMETF project are presented together with general background information and objectives for both phases. The project will provide means to store and decontaminate wastewater streams that are currently discharged to the seepage basins in F Area and H Area. This currently includes both routine process flows sent directly to the seepage basins and diversions of contaminated cooling water or storm water runoff that are stored in the retention basins before being pumped to the seepage basins

  10. Out-of-phase flashing induced instabilities in CIRCUS facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian Pablo Marcel; Van der Hagen, T.H.J.J. [Interfaculty Reactor Institute, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Flashing-induced instabilities are very important during the startup phase of natural-circulation boiling water reactors. To study this type of instability an axial fully scaled facility named CIRCUS was constructed. Experiments at low power and low pressure (typical startup conditions) are carried out on this steam/water natural circulation loop with two parallel risers. A detailed measurement of the void-fraction profile is possible by using needle-probes and the use of glass tubes for the riser and core sections allow to use optical techniques for velocity measurements. The flashing and the mechanism of flashing-induced instabilities are analyzed paying special attention on the strong coupling effect between the two riser channels. It is clear from the experiments that the out-of-phase instability is much more susceptible to occur than the in-phase instability in a system with two parallel risers. The instability region is found as soon as the operational boundary between single-phase and two-phase operation is crossed. The relation between the period of the oscillations and the fluid transient time is also investigated. The stability map constructed using this experimental data is also discussed. (authors)

  11. Childhood leukaemia around Canadian nuclear facilities. Phase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, E.A.; McLaughlin, J.; Anderson, T.W.

    1989-05-01

    A ninefold excess risk of leukaemia, as observed in vicinity of the Sellafield facility, was not observed amongst children born to mothers residing in the areas around nuclear research facilities and uranium mining, milling and refining facilities in Ontario. In the vicinity of nuclear research facilities, the rate of leukaemia was, in fact, less than expected. In the areas around the uranium mining, milling and refining facilities; leukaemia occurred slightly more frequently than expected; however, due to small frequencies these results may have risen by chance. A slightly greater than expected occurrence of leukaemia was also detected, which may well have been due to chance, in an exploratory study of the areas around nuclear power generating stations in Ontario

  12. Childhood leukaemia around Canadian nuclear facilities. Phase 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, E.A.; McLaughlin, J.; Anderson, T.W.

    1991-06-01

    Prompted by findings of increased occurrence of childhood leukaemia in the vicinity of some nuclear facilities in the United Kingdom, this study aimed to investigate whether the frequency of leukaemia among children born to mothers living near nuclear facilities in Ontario differed from the provincial average. The Ontario Cancer Registry was used to identify 1894 children aged 0 to 14 years who died from leukaemia between 1950 and 1987, and 1814 children who were diagnosed with leukaemia between 1964 and 1986. Residence at birth and death was obtained from birth and death certificates. Analyses were performed separately for nuclear research and development facilities; uranium mining, milling and refining facilities; and, nuclear generating stations; and for areas within the same county as the facility and 'nearby' - within a 25-km radius of the facility. Risk estimates were calculated as the ratio of the observed (O) number of events over the expected (E) number. In the vicinity of nuclear research and development facilities the rate of leukaemia was less than expected and within the bound of chance variation. In the areas around the uranium mining, milling and refining facilities and nuclear power plants leukaemia occurred slightly more frequently than expected, but due to small frequencies these differences may have arisen due to chance. Large differences between observed and expected rates were not detected around any of the Ontario facilities. This study was large enough to detect excess risks of the magnitude reported in the United Kingdom, but it was not large enough to discriminate between the observed relative risks and a chance finding. Levels of leukaemia detected near nuclear generating stations indicate the need for further investigation. (20 tabs., 15 figs., 32 refs.)

  13. Space Facility for Orbital Remote Manufacturing (SPACEFORM), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To address NASA need in continued cost efficient International Space Station (ISS) exploration FOMS Inc. proposes to develop and deploy Space Facility for Orbital...

  14. Botany facility, phase A study. Part 1: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, B.; Frey, A.; Schiller, P.

    1983-10-01

    A facility for spaceborne botany experiments to be flown on the European Retrievable Carrier (EURECA) is proposed. Configuration and design, thermal control, electronics, subsystem design, add-on concepts and ground support equipment are described. The facility has 16 sample-containers at microgravity and 8 on the centrifuge. Containers are 50 x 50 x 150 mm and are observed by video and optical cine cameras. A controlled environment can be assured during 6 month operation.

  15. F/H Area Effluent Treatment Facility. Phase II. CAC basic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, W.W.; O'Leary, C.D.

    1984-01-01

    Project objectives and requirements are listed for both Phase I and II. Schedule is listed with startup targeted for 1989. Storage facilities will be provided for both chemical and radioactive effluents. 8 figs., 19 tabs

  16. National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). Project definition study: Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagunas-Solar, M.C.

    1995-02-15

    This report describes a five-year plan for the construction and commissioning of a reliable and versatile NBTF facility for the production of high-quality, high-yield radioisotopes for research, biomedical, and industrial applications. The report is organized in nine sections providing, in consecutive order, responses to the nine questions posed by the U.S. Department of Energy in its solicitation for the NBTF Project Definition Study. In order to preserve direct correspondence (e.g., Sec. 3 = 3rd item), this Introduction is numbered {open_quotes}0.{close_quotes} Accelerator and facility designs are covered in Section 1 (Accelerator Design) and Section 2 (Facility Design). Preliminary estimates of capital costs are detailed in Section 3 (Design and Construction Costs). Full licensing requirements, including federal, state, and local ordinances, are discussed in Section 4 (Permits). A plan for the management of hazardous materials to be generated by NBTF is presented in Section 5 (Waste Management). An evaluation of NBTF`s economic viability and its potential market impact is detailed in Section 6(Business Plan), and is complemented by the plans in Section 7 (Operating Plan) and Section 8 (Radioisotope Plan). Finally, a plan for NBTF`s research, education, and outreach programs is presented in Section 9 (Research and Education Programs).

  17. Encapsulation plant preliminary design, phase 2. Repository connected facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukkola, T.

    2006-12-01

    The disposal facility of the spent nuclear fuel will be located in Olkiluoto. The encapsulation plant is a part of the disposal facility. In this report, an independent encapsulation plant is located above the underground repository. In the encapsulation plant, the spent fuel is received and treated for disposal. In the fuel handling cell, the spent fuel assemblies are unloaded from the spent fuel transport casks and loaded into the disposal canisters. The gas atmosphere of the disposal canister is changed, the bolted inner canister lid is closed, and the electron beam welding method is used to close the lid of the outer copper canister. The disposal canisters are cleaned and transferred into the buffer store after the machining and inspection of the copper lid welds. From the buffer store, the disposal canisters are transferred into the repository spaces by help of the canister lift. All needed stages of operation are to be performed safely without any activity releases or remarkable personnel doses. The bentonite block interim storage is associated with the encapsulation plant. The bentonite blocks are made from bentonite powder. The bentonite blocks are used as buffer material around the disposal canister in the deposition hole. The average production rate of the encapsulation plant is 40 canisters per year. The nominal maximum production capacity is 100 canisters per year in one shift operation. (orig.)

  18. Feasibility study: Assess the feasibility of siting a monitored retrievable storage facility. Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, J.W.

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of phase one of this study are: To understand the waste management system and a monitored retrievable storage facility; and to determine whether the applicant has real interest in pursuing the feasibility assessment process. Contents of this report are: Generating electric power; facts about exposure to radiation; handling storage, and transportation techniques; description of a proposed monitored retrievable storage facility; and benefits to be received by host jurisdiction.

  19. Advanced conceptual design report solid waste retrieval facility, phase I, project W-113

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, K.E.

    1994-01-01

    Project W-113 will provide the equipment and facilities necessary to retrieve suspect transuranic (TRU) waste from Trench 04 of the 218W-4C burial ground. As part of the retrieval process, waste drums will be assayed, overpacked, vented, head-gas sampled, and x-rayed prior to shipment to the Phase V storage facility in preparation for receipt at the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP). Advanced Conceptual Design (ACD) studies focused on project items warranting further definition prior to Title I design and areas where the potential for cost savings existed. This ACD Report documents the studies performed during FY93 to optimize the equipment and facilities provided in relation to other SWOC facilities and to provide additional design information for Definitive Design

  20. Results of the RAMI analyses performed for the IFMIF accelerator facility in the engineering design phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bargalló, Enric, E-mail: enric.bargallo@esss.se [Fusion Energy Engineering Laboratory (FEEL), Technical University of Catalonia (UPC) Barcelona-Tech, Barcelona (Spain); Arroyo, Jose Manuel [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión por Confinamiento Magnético – CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Abal, Javier; Dies, Javier; De Blas, Alfredo; Tapia, Carlos [Fusion Energy Engineering Laboratory (FEEL), Technical University of Catalonia (UPC) Barcelona-Tech, Barcelona (Spain); Moya, Joaquin; Ibarra, Angel [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión por Confinamiento Magnético – CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • RAMI methodology used for IFMIF accelerator facility is presented. • Availability analyses and results are shown. • Main accelerator design changes are proposed. • Consequences and conclusions of the RAMI analyses are described. - Abstract: This paper presents a summary of the RAMI (Reliability Availability Maintainability Inspectability) analyses done for the IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility) Accelerator facility in the Engineering Design Phase. The methodology followed, the analyses performed, the results obtained and the conclusions drawn are described. Moreover, the consequences of the incorporation of the RAMI studies in the IFMIF design are presented and the main outcomes of these analyses are shown.

  1. Results of the RAMI analyses performed for the IFMIF accelerator facility in the engineering design phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bargalló, Enric; Arroyo, Jose Manuel; Abal, Javier; Dies, Javier; De Blas, Alfredo; Tapia, Carlos; Moya, Joaquin; Ibarra, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • RAMI methodology used for IFMIF accelerator facility is presented. • Availability analyses and results are shown. • Main accelerator design changes are proposed. • Consequences and conclusions of the RAMI analyses are described. - Abstract: This paper presents a summary of the RAMI (Reliability Availability Maintainability Inspectability) analyses done for the IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility) Accelerator facility in the Engineering Design Phase. The methodology followed, the analyses performed, the results obtained and the conclusions drawn are described. Moreover, the consequences of the incorporation of the RAMI studies in the IFMIF design are presented and the main outcomes of these analyses are shown.

  2. Overview of the IFMIF test facility design in IFMIF/EVEDA phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Kuo; Abou-Sena, Ali; Arbeiter, Frederik; García, Ángela; Gouat, Philippe; Heidinger, Roland; Heinzel, Volker; Ibarra, Ángel; Leysen, Willem; Mas, Avelino; Mittwollen, Martin; Möslang, Anton; Theile, Jürgen; Yamamoto, Michiyoshi; Yokomine, Takehiko

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • This paper summarizes the current design status of IFMIF EVEDA test facility. • The principle functions of the test facility and key components are described. • The brief specifications of the systems and key components are addressed. - Abstract: The test facility (TF) is one of the three major facilities of the International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF). Engineering designs of TF main systems and key components have been initiated and developed in the IFMIF EVEDA (Engineering Validation and Engineering Design Activities) phase since 2007. The related work covers the designs of a test cell which is the meeting point of the TF and accelerator facility and lithium facility, a series of test modules for experiments under different irradiation conditions, an access cell to accommodate remote handling systems, four test module handling cells for test module processing and assembling, and test facility ancillary systems for engineering support on energy, media, and control infrastructure. This paper summarizes the principle functions, brief specifications, and the current design status of the above mentioned IFMIF TF systems and key components.

  3. Evaluation of mercury in liquid waste processing facilities - Phase I report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, V. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Occhipinti, J. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Shah, H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Wilmarth, W. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Edwards, R. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This report provides a summary of Phase I activities conducted to support an Integrated Evaluation of Mercury in Liquid Waste System (LWS) Processing Facilities. Phase I activities included a review and assessment of the liquid waste inventory and chemical processing behavior of mercury using a system by system review methodology approach. Gaps in understanding mercury behavior as well as action items from the structured reviews are being tracked. 64% of the gaps and actions have been resolved.

  4. Evaluation of Mercury in Liquid Waste Processing Facilities - Phase I Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, V. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Occhipinti, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Shah, H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Wilmarth, B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Edwards, R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This report provides a summary of Phase I activities conducted to support an Integrated Evaluation of Mercury in Liquid Waste System (LWS) Processing Facilities. Phase I activities included a review and assessment of the liquid waste inventory and chemical processing behavior of mercury using a system by system review methodology approach. Gaps in understanding mercury behavior as well as action items from the structured reviews are being tracked. 64% of the gaps and actions have been resolved.

  5. Safety analysis report for the cold vacuum drying facility, phase 1, supporting civil/structural construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pili-Vincens, C.

    1998-01-01

    The Cold Vacuum Drying Facility is a subproject of the overall Spent Nuclear Fuel Project. This Phase 2 Safety Analysis Report incorporates the CVD systems design and will update the SAR per DOE Order 5480.23 for manual and other Hanford infrastructure changes

  6. Phase I feasibility study for the Canyon disposition initiative (221-U facility)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-08-01

    The objective of the Phase I Feasibility Study (FS) presented in this document is to provide decision makers sufficient information on the remedial alternatives specific to the disposition of the 221-U Canyon Building (221-U Facility) located at the Hanford Site, and to determine which alternatives are viable for further detailed analysis

  7. A facile way to control phase of tin selenide flakes by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhigang; Pang, Fei

    2018-06-01

    Although two-dimensional (2D) tin selenides are attracting intense attentions, studies on its phase transition are still relatively few. Here we report a facile way to control the phase growth of tin selenide flakes on mica and SiO2/Si by only adjusting nominal Sn:Se ratio, which refers to the amount of loaded SnO2 and Se precursors. High normal Sn:Se ratio induced SnSe flakes, conversely SnSe2 flakes formed. It could be used as a practical guide to selectively synthesize pure phase of single crystalline 2D layered chalcogenide materials similar to tin selenides.

  8. Preparation of Phased and Merged Safety Analysis Reports for New DOE Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BISHOP, G.E.

    2000-01-01

    The Spent Nuclear Fuels Project (SNFP) is charged with moving to storage 2,100 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel elements left over from plutonium production at DOE'S Hanford site in Washington state. Two new facilities, the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) and the Canister Storage Building (CSB) are in final construction. In order to meet aggressive schedule commitments, the SNFP chose to prepare the safety analysis reports (SAR's) in phases that covered only specific portions of each facility's design as it was built. Each SAR also merged the preliminary and final safety analysis reports into a single SAR, thereby covering all aspects of design, construction, and operation for that portion (phase) of the facility. A policy of ''NRC equivalency'' was also implemented in parallel with this effort, with the goal of achieving a rigor of safety analysis equivalent to that of NRC-licensed fuel processing facilities. DOE Order 5480.23. ''Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports'' allows preparation of both a phased and a merged SAR to accelerate construction schedules. However, project managers must be aware that such acceleration is not guaranteed. Managers considering this approach for their project should be cognizant of numerous obstacles that will be encountered. Merging and phasing SAR's will create new, unique, and unanticipated difficulties which may actually slow construction unless expeditiously and correctly managed. Pitfalls to be avoided and good practices to be implemented in preparing phased and merged SAR's are presented. The value of applying NRC requirements to the DOE safety analysis process is also discussed. As of December, 1999, the SNFP has completed and approved a SAR for the CVDF. Approval of the SAR for the CSB is pending

  9. IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility) key element technology phase interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Hiroo; Ida, Mizuho; Sugimoto, Masayoshi; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Yutani, Toshiaki (eds.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-03-01

    Activities of International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) have been performed under an IEA collaboration since 1995. IFMIF is an accelerator-based deuteron (D{sup +})-lithium (Li) neutron source designed to produce an intense neutron field (2 MW/m{sup 2}, 20 dpa/year for Fe) in a volume of 500 cm{sup 3} for testing candidate fusion materials. In 2000, a 3 year Key Element technology Phase (KEP) of IFMIF was started to reduce the key technology risk factors. This interim report summarizes the KEP activities until mid 2001 in the major project work-breakdown areas of accelerator, target, test facilities and design integration. (author)

  10. IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility) key element technology phase interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hiroo; Ida, Mizuho; Sugimoto, Masayoshi; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Yutani, Toshiaki

    2002-03-01

    Activities of International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) have been performed under an IEA collaboration since 1995. IFMIF is an accelerator-based deuteron (D + )-lithium (Li) neutron source designed to produce an intense neutron field (2 MW/m 2 , 20 dpa/year for Fe) in a volume of 500 cm 3 for testing candidate fusion materials. In 2000, a 3 year Key Element technology Phase (KEP) of IFMIF was started to reduce the key technology risk factors. This interim report summarizes the KEP activities until mid 2001 in the major project work-breakdown areas of accelerator, target, test facilities and design integration. (author)

  11. Measuring Dirac CP-violating phase with intermediate energy beta beam facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhti, P.; Farzan, Y.

    2014-02-01

    Taking the established nonzero value of , we study the possibility of extracting the Dirac CP-violating phase by a beta beam facility with a boost factor . We compare the performance of different setups with different baselines, boost factors, and detector technologies. We find that an antineutrino beam from He decay with a baseline of km has a very promising CP-discovery potential using a 500 kton water Cherenkov detector. Fortunately this baseline corresponds to the distance between FermiLAB to Sanford underground research facility in South Dakota.

  12. Nasreya: a treatment and disposal facility for industrial hazardous waste in Alexandria, Egypt: phase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Adham R; Kock, Per; Nadim, Amani

    2005-04-01

    A facility for the treatment and disposal of industrial hazardous waste has been established in Alexandria, Egypt. Phase I of the facility encompassing a secure landfill and solar evaporation ponds is ready to receive waste, and Phase II encompassing physico-chemical treatment, solidification, and interim storage is underway. The facility, the Nasreya Centre, is the first of its kind in Egypt, and represents the nucleus for the integration, improvement and further expansion of different hazardous waste management practices and services in Alexandria. It has been developed within the overall legal framework of the Egyptian Law for the Environment, and is expected to improve prospects for enforcement of the regulatory requirements specified in this law. It has been developed with the overall aim of promoting the establishment of an integrated industrial hazardous waste management system in Alexandria, serving as a demonstration to be replicated elsewhere in Egypt. For Phase I, the Centre only accepts inorganic industrial wastes. In this respect, a waste acceptance policy has been developed, which is expected to be reviewed during Phase II, with an expansion of the waste types accepted.

  13. Preliminary study on X-ray phase contrast imaging using synchrotron radiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Zhuang; Wang Jianhua; Yu Yongqiang; Jiang Shiping; Chen Yang; Tian Yulian

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the methodology of X-ray phase contrast imaging using synchrotron radiation, and evaluate the quality of phase contrast images. Methods: Several experiments to obtain phase contrast images and absorption contrast images of various biological samples were conducted in Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF), and then these images were interpreted to find out the difference between the two kinds of imaging methods. Results: Satisfactory phase contrast images of these various samples were obtained, and the quality of these images was superior to that obtained with absorption contrast imaging. The phase contrast formation is based on the phenomenon of fresnel diffraction which transforms phase shifts into intensity variations upon a simple act of free-space propagation, so it requires highly coherent X-rays and appropriate distance between sample and detector. This method of imaging is very useful in imaging of low-absorption objects or objects with little absorption variation, and its resolution is far higher than that of the conventional X-ray imaging. The photographs obtained showed very fine inner microstructure of the biological samples, and the smallest microstructure to be distinguished is within 30-40 μm. There is no doubt that phase contrast imaging has a practical applicability in medicine. Moreover, it improves greatly the efficiency and the resolution of the existing X-ray diagnostic techniques. Conclusions: X-ray phase contrast imaging can be performed with synchrotron radiation source and has some advantages over the conventional absorption contrast imaging. (authors)

  14. Phase 1 sampling and analysis plan for the 304 Concretion Facility closure activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, J.G.

    1994-01-01

    This document provides guidance for the initial (Phase 1) sampling and analysis activities associated with the proposed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) clean closure of the 304 Concretion Facility. Over its service life, the 304 Concretion Facility housed the pilot plants associated with cladding uranium cores, was used to store engineering equipment and product chemicals, was used to treat low-level radioactive mixed waste, recyclable scrap uranium generated during nuclear fuel fabrication, and uranium-titanium alloy chips, and was used for the repackaging of spent halogenated solvents from the nuclear fuels manufacturing process. The strategy for clean closure of the 304 Concretion Facility is to decontaminate, sample (Phase 1 sampling), and evaluate results. If the evaluation indicates that a limited area requires additional decontamination for clean closure, the limited area will be decontaminated, resampled (Phase 2 sampling), and the result evaluated. If the evaluation indicates that the constituents of concern are below action levels, the facility will be clean closed. Or, if the evaluation indicates that the constituents of concern are present above action levels, the condition of the facility will be evaluated and appropriate action taken. There are a total of 37 sampling locations comprising 12 concrete core, 1 concrete chip, 9 soil, 11 wipe, and 4 asphalt core sampling locations. Analysis for inorganics and volatile organics will be performed on the concrete core and soil samples. Separate concrete core samples will be required for the inorganic and volatile organic analysis (VOA). Analysis for inorganics only will be performed on the concrete chip, wipe, and asphalt samples

  15. A facility for liquid-phase radiation experiments on heavy ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuglik, Z; Zvara, I; Yakushev, A B; Timokhin, S N [Flerov Lab. of Nuclear Reactions, Dubna (Russian Federation). Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research

    1994-05-01

    The facility for liquid-phase radiation experiments installed on the beam line of the U-400 cyclotron in the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, JINR, Dubna, is described. The accelerator provides intermediate energy (some 10 MeV/nucleon) beams of ions ranging from Li to Xe. Preliminary results on the radiolysis of the Fricke solution and malachite green in ethanol by {sup 11}B, {sup 24}Mg and {sup 40}Ca ions are presented. (author).

  16. A facility for the experimental investigation of single substance two phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeder, P.F.; Dickinson, D.A.; Nikitopoulos, D.E.; DiPippo, R.

    1985-01-01

    The paper describes a research facility dedicated to single-substance two-phase flow. The working fluid is dichlorotetrafluoroethane (or refrigerant R-114), allowing both operation at manageable pressures, temperatures and flowrates, and application of results to practical situations through similarity. Operation is in the blowdown mode. The control and data acquisition systems are fully automated and computer controlled. A range of flow conditions from predominantly liquid flow to high velocity, high void fraction choked flow can be attained

  17. Environmental Restoration Program pollution prevention checklist guide for the facility characterization project phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    A facility characterization (FC) is conducted to determine the nature and extent contamination at a potential hazardous facility waste site. The information gathered during an FC includes (1) data on the volume and chemical nature of the waste, (2) information on the extent of contamination and the migration potential of the contaminants, (3) preliminary information on evaluation of alternative concepts that can or cannot be considered, and (4)supportive technical and cost data. For the purposes of identification, the following operational phases will be used for definition for this phase of the decommissioning and decontamination process (1) facility characterization before clean up, (2) characterization during clean up, (3) characterization of waste materials, and (4) site characterization after clean up. A key consideration in this process is the prevention of any waste to be generated from these characterization activities. The purpose of this checklist guide is to assist users with incorporating pollution prevention/waste minimization (PP/WM) in all FC phase projects of the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program. This guide will help users document PP/WM activities for technology transfer and reporting requirements. Automated computer screens will be created from the checklist data to assist users with implementing and evaluating waste reduction

  18. DOE final report phase one startup, Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jasen, W.G.

    1998-01-01

    This document is to validate that the WRAP facility is physically ready to start up phase 1, and that the managers and operators are prepared to safely manage and operate the facility when all pre-start findings have been satisfactorily corrected. The DOE Readiness Assessment (RA) team spent a week on-site at Waste Receiving and Processing Module 1 (WRAP-1) to validate the readiness for phase 1 start up of facility. The Contractor and DOE staff were exceptionally cooperative and contributed significantly to the overall success of the RA. The procedures and Conduct of Operations areas had significant discrepancies, many of which should have been found by the contractor review team. In addition the findings of the contractor review team should have led the WRAP-1 management team to correcting the root causes of the findings prior to the DOE RA team review. The findings and observations include many issues that the team believes should have been found by the contractor review and corrective actions taken. A significantly improved Operational Readiness Review (ORR) process and corrective actions of root causes must be fully implemented by the contractor prior to the performance of the contractor ORR for phase 2 operations. The pre-start findings as a result of this independent DOE Readiness Assessment are presented

  19. The accomplishments of lithium target and test facility validation activities in the IFMIF/EVEDA phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbeiter, Frederik; Baluc, Nadine; Favuzza, Paolo; Gröschel, Friedrich; Heidinger, Roland; Ibarra, Angel; Knaster, Juan; Kanemura, Takuji; Kondo, Hiroo; Massaut, Vincent; Saverio Nitti, Francesco; Miccichè, Gioacchino; O'hira, Shigeru; Rapisarda, David; Sugimoto, Masayoshi; Wakai, Eiichi; Yokomine, Takehiko

    2018-01-01

    As part of the engineering validation and engineering design activities (EVEDA) phase for the international fusion materials irradiation facility IFMIF, major elements of a lithium target facility and the test facility were designed, prototyped and validated. For the lithium target facility, the EVEDA lithium test loop was built at JAEA and used to test the stability (waves and long term) of the lithium flow in the target, work out the startup procedures, and test lithium purification and analysis. It was confirmed by experiments in the Lifus 6 plant at ENEA that lithium corrosion on ferritic martensitic steels is acceptably low. Furthermore, complex remote handling procedures for the remote maintenance of the target in the test cell environment were successfully practiced. For the test facility, two variants of a high flux test module were prototyped and tested in helium loops, demonstrating their good capabilities of maintaining the material specimens at the desired temperature with a low temperature spread. Irradiation tests were performed for heated specimen capsules and irradiation instrumentation in the BR2 reactor at SCK-CEN. The small specimen test technique, essential for obtaining material test results with limited irradiation volume, was advanced by evaluating specimen shape and test technique influences.

  20. Phase II Investigation at the Former CCC/USDA Grain Storage Facility in Savannah, Missouri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Environmental Science Division. Applied Geosciences and Environmental Management Section

    2012-05-01

    contamination potentially associated with a number of former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities in Missouri. The site characterization at Savannah is being conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The investigation is being conducted in phases, so that information obtained and interpretations developed during each incremental stage can be used most effectively to guide subsequent phases of the program. Phase II objectives: Investigate the more detailed characteristics of groundwater flow in the vicinity of the former CCC/USDA facility and the contaminated Morgan and MoDOT private wells; Obtain additional information on the vertical and lateral distribution and concentrations of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater in the vicinity of the former CCC/USDA facility and the contaminated Morgan and MoDOT private wells; Investigate further for possible evidence of carbon tetrachloride in the subsurface (vadose zone) and deeper soils beneath the former CCC/USDA facility, as well as in the vicinity of the contaminated MoDOT private well.

  1. Safety analysis report for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, phase 1, supporting civil/structural construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pili-Vincens, C.

    1997-01-01

    The US Department of Energy established the K Basins Spent Nuclear Fuel Project to address safety and environmental concerns associated with deteriorating spent nuclear fuel presently stored under water in the Hanford Site's K Basins, which are located near the Columbia River. Recommendations for a series of aggressive projects to construct and operate systems and facilities to manage the safe removal of K Basins fuel were made in WHC-EP-0830, Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Recommended Path Forward,' and its subsequent update, WHC-SD-SNF-SP-005, Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Integrated Process Strategy for K Basins Fuel. The integrated process strategy recommendations include the following process steps: fuel preparation activities at the K Basins, including removing the fuel elements from their K Basin canisters, separating fuel particulate from fuel elements and fuel fragments greater than 0.6 cm (0.25 in.) in any dimension, removing excess sludge from the fuel and fuel fragments by means of flushing, as necessary, and packaging the fuel into multicanister overpacks; removal of free water by draining and vacuum drying at the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF), a new facility in the 100 K Area of the Hanford Site. This report is contains the safety analysis for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, Phase 1

  2. Beam position and phase measurements of microampere beams at the Michigan State University REA3 facility

    CERN Document Server

    Crisp, J; Durickovic, B; Kiupel, G; Krause, S; Leitner, D; Nash, S; Rodriguez, J A; Russo, T; Webber, R; Wittmer, W; Eddy, N; Briegel, C; Fellenz, B; Slimmer, D; Wendt, M

    2013-01-01

    A high power CW, heavy ion linac will be the driver accelerator for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) being designed at Michigan State University (MSU). The linac requires a Beam Position Monitoring (BPM) system with better than 100 micron resolution at 100 microamperes beam current. A low beam current test of the candidate technology, button pick-ups and direct digital down-conversion signal processing, was conducted in the ReA3 re-accelerated beam facility at Michigan State University. The test is described. Beam position and phase measurement results, demonstrating ~250 micron and ~1.5 degree resolution in a 45 kHz bandwidth for a 1.0 microampere beam current, are reported.

  3. IFMIF-KEP. International fusion materials irradiation facility key element technology phase report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-03-01

    The International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is an accelerator-based D-Li neutron source designed to produce an intense neutron field that will simulate the neutron environment of a D-T fusion reactor. IFMIF will provide a neutron flux equivalent to 2 MW/m{sup 2}, 20 dpa/y in Fe, in a volume of 500 cm{sup 3} and will be used in the development and qualification of materials for fusion systems. The design activities of IFMIF are performed under an IEA collaboration which began in 1995. In 2000, a three-year Key Element Technology Phase (KEP) of IFMIF was undertaken to reduce the key technology risk factors. This KEP report describes the results of the three-year KEP activities in the major project areas of accelerator, target, test facilities and design integration. (author)

  4. IFMIF-KEP. International fusion materials irradiation facility key element technology phase report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-03-01

    The International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is an accelerator-based D-Li neutron source designed to produce an intense neutron field that will simulate the neutron environment of a D-T fusion reactor. IFMIF will provide a neutron flux equivalent to 2 MW/m 2 , 20 dpa/y in Fe, in a volume of 500 cm 3 and will be used in the development and qualification of materials for fusion systems. The design activities of IFMIF are performed under an IEA collaboration which began in 1995. In 2000, a three-year Key Element Technology Phase (KEP) of IFMIF was undertaken to reduce the key technology risk factors. This KEP report describes the results of the three-year KEP activities in the major project areas of accelerator, target, test facilities and design integration. (author)

  5. Definition of a facility for experimental studies of two-phase flows and heat transfer in porous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reda, D.C.; Eaton, R.R.

    1981-01-01

    A facility-development effort is currently underway at Sandia National Laboratories in order to create an experimental capability for the study of two-phase, steam/water flows through a variety of porous media. The facility definition phase of this project is described. Equations are derived for the steady, adiabatic, macroscopically-linear two-phase flow of a single-component fluid through a porous medium, including energy transfer both by convection and conduction. These equations are then solved to give relative permeabilities for the steam and water phases as functions of known and/or measurable quantities. A viable experimental approach was thereby formulated, leading to the definition of facility components and instrumentation requirements, including the application of gamma-beam densitometry for the measurement of liquid-saturation distributions in porous media. Finally, a state-of-the-art computer code was utilized to numerically simulate the proposed experiments, providing an estimate of the facility operating envelope

  6. Development and Validation of Methodology to Model Flow in Ventilation Systems Commonly Found in Nuclear Facilities - Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strons, Philip [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bailey, James L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Davis, John [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Grudzinski, James [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hlotke, John [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-03-01

    In this report we present the results of the Phase II analysis and testing of the flow patterns encountered in the Alpha Gamma Hot Cell Facility (AGHCF), as well as the results from an opportunity to expand upon field test work from Phase I by the use of a Class IIIb laser. The addition to the Phase I work is covered before proceeding to the results of the Phase II work, followed by a summary of findings.

  7. A Facile, Choline Chloride/Urea Catalyzed Solid Phase Synthesis of Coumarins via Knoevenagel Condensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosanagara N. Harishkumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of choline chloride/urea ionic liquid in solid phase on the Knoevenagel condensation is demonstrated. The active methylene compounds such as meldrum’s acid, diethylmalonate, ethyl cyanoacetate, dimethylmalonate, were efficiently condensed with various salicylaldehydes in presence of choline chloride/urea ionic liquid without using any solvents or additional catalyst. The reaction is remarkably facile because of the air and water stability of the catalyst, and needs no special precautions. The reactions were completed within 1hr with excellent yields (95%. The products formed were sufficiently pure, and can be easily recovered. The use of ionic liquid choline chloride/urea in solid phase offered several significant advantages such as low cost, greater selectivity and easy isolation of products.

  8. Reliability and safety program plan outline for the operational phase of a waste isolation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammer, H.G.; Wood, D.E.

    1977-01-01

    A Reliability and Safety Program plan outline has been prepared for the operational phase of a Waste Isolation Facility. The program includes major functions of risk assessment, technical support activities, quality assurance, operational safety, configuration monitoring, reliability analysis and support and coordination meetings. Detailed activity or task descriptions are included for each function. Activities are time-phased and presented in the PERT format for scheduling and interactions. Task descriptions include manloading, travel, and computer time estimates to provide data for future costing. The program outlined here will be used to provide guidance from a reliability and safety standpoint to design, procurement, construction, and operation of repositories for nuclear waste. These repositories are to be constructed under the National Waste Terminal Storage program under the direction of the Office of Waste Isolation, Union Carbide Corp. Nuclear Division

  9. Radiation safety study for conventional facility and siting pre project phase of International Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanami, Toshiya; Ban, Syuichi; Sasaki, Shin-ichi

    2015-01-01

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) is a proposed high-energy collider consisting of two linear accelerators, two dumping rings, electron and positron sources, and a single colliding hall with two detectors. The total length and CMS energy of the ILC will be 31 km and 500 GeV, respectively (and 50 km and 1 TeV after future upgrade). The design of the ILC has entered the pre-project phase, which includes site-dependent design. Radiation safety design for the ILC is on-going as a part of conventional facility and siting activities of the pre-project phase. The thickness of a central wall of normal concrete is designed to be 3.5 m under a pessimistic assumption of beam loss. The beam loss scenario is under discussion. Experience and knowledge relating to shielding design and radiation control operational work at other laboratories are required. (authors)

  10. Development of a Beam-based Phase Feedforward Demonstration at the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3)

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2083344; Christian, Glenn

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a proposal for a future linear electron--positron collider that could achieve collision energies of up to 3~TeV. In the CLIC concept the main high energy beam is accelerated using RF power extracted from a high intensity drive beam, achieving an accelerating gradient of 100~MV/m. This scheme places strict tolerances on the drive beam phase stability, which must be better than $0.2^\\circ$ at 12~GHz. To achieve the required phase stability CLIC proposes a high bandwidth (${>}17.5$~MHz), low latency drive beam ``phase feedforward'' (PFF) system. In this system electromagnetic kickers, powered by 500~kW amplifiers, are installed in a chicane and used to correct the phase by deflecting the beam on to longer or shorter trajectories. A prototype PFF system has been installed at the CLIC Test Facility, CTF3; the design, operation and commissioning of which is the focus of this work. Two kickers have been installed in the pre-existing chicane in the TL2 transfer line at CTF3 for t...

  11. IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility) key element technology phase task description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ida, M.; Nakamura, H.; Sugimoto, M.; Yutani, T.; Takeuchi, H. [eds.] [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai Research Establishment, Fusion Neutron Laboratory, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-08-01

    In 2000, a 3 year Key Element technology Phase (KEP) of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) has been initiated to reduce the key technology risk factors needed to achieve continuous wave (CW) beam with the desired current and energy and to reach the corresponding power handling capabilities in the liquid lithium target system. In the KEP, the IFMIF team (EU, Japan, Russian Federation, US) will perform required tasks. The contents of the tasks are described in the task description sheet. As the KEP tasks, the IFMIF team have proposed 27 tasks for Test Facilities, 12 tasks for Target, 26 tasks for Accelerator and 18 tasks for Design Integration. The task description by RF is not yet available. The task items and task descriptions may be added or revised with the progress of KEP activities. These task description sheets have been compiled in this report. After 3 years KEP, the results of the KEP tasks will be reviewed. Following the KEP, 3 years Engineering Validation Phase (EVP) will continue for IFMIF construction. (author)

  12. Hydrazine blending and storage facility, interim response action, draft implementation document for rinsewater transfer, phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-08-09

    This Draft Implementation Document (ID) for Rinsewater Transfer has been prepared as a requirement for conducting and completing the Interim Response Action (IRA) at the Hydrazine Blending and Storage Facility (HBSF) located at Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA) in Commerce City, Colorado. This document has been prepared in accordance with requirements set forth in the October 1988 Final Decision Document for the HBSF IRA (Peer, 1988) and the Amendment to the Final Decision Document (HLA, 1991). The HBSF IRA task was separated into two phases that comprise complete decommissioning of the HBSF as cited in the Federal Facility Agreement. The design portion of Phase I of the HBSF IRA included analytical methods development and laboratory certification for analysis of hydrazine fuel compounds (hydrazine, monomethyl hydrazine) (MMH), and unsymmetrical dimethyl hydrazine (UDMH) and n-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) in HBSF rinsewater, chemical characterization of hydrazine rinsewater, bench- and pilot-scale testing of ultraviolet (UV) light/chemical oxidation treatment systems for treatment of hydrazine rinsewater, full-scale startup testing of a UV light/chemical oxidation treatment system, and air monitoring during startup testing as described in the Draft Final Treatment Report (HLA, 1991).

  13. Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory project. Plans of investigations during shaft and drift excavation (Construction of underground facilities: Phase II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-06-01

    Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory Project is planned for over 20 years to establish the scientific and technical basis for the underground disposal of high-level radioactive wastes in Japan. The investigations are conducted by JNC in three phases, from the surface (Phase I), during the construction of the underground facilities (Phase II), and using the facilities (Phase III). This report concerns the investigation plans for Phase II. During excavation of shafts and drifts, detailed geological and borehole investigation will be conducted and the geological model constructed in Phase I is evaluated and revised by newly acquired data of geophysical and geological environment. Detailed in-situ experiments, as well as the effects of shaft excavation, are also done to study long-term changes, rock properties, groundwater flow and chemistry to ensure the reliability of repository technology and establish safety assessment methodology. (S. Ohno)

  14. Results from phase 2 of the radioiodine test facility experimental program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, J.M.; Kupferschmid, W.C.H.; Wren, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    A series of intermediate-scale experiments were conducted in the Radioiodine Test Facility (RTF) in a vinyl-painted, zinc-primer coated, carbon steel vessel in order to assess the effects of vinyl surfaces on iodine volatility in both the presence and absence of radiation. This test series, Phase 2 of a larger, comprehensive program assessing a variety of containment surfaces, also examined the effects of organic (i.e., methyl ethyl ketone) and inorganic (i.e., hydrazine) additives, pH, and venting on the aqueous chemistry and volatility of solutions initially containing cesium iodide. These tests have clearly demonstrated that organics are released to the aqueous phase from the vinyl coating and that, under radiation conditions, these organics can have a significant effect on the formation of volatile iodine species. In particular, the RTF results suggest that radiolytic decomposition of the released organics results in dramatic reductions in pH and dissolved oxygen concentration, which in turn are responsible for increased formation of molecular iodine and organic iodides. When the pH was maintained at 10 (Test 3), much lower iodine volatility was observed; low iodine volatility was also observed in the absence of radiation. This test series also demonstrated that vinyl surfaces, particularly those in contact with the gas phase, were a sink for iodine. (author) 4 figs., 6 tabs., 17 refs

  15. Results from phase 2 of the radioiodine test facility experimental program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, J M; Kupferschmid, W C.H.; Wren, J C [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, MB (Canada). Whiteshell Labs.

    1996-12-01

    A series of intermediate-scale experiments were conducted in the Radioiodine Test Facility (RTF) in a vinyl-painted, zinc-primer coated, carbon steel vessel in order to assess the effects of vinyl surfaces on iodine volatility in both the presence and absence of radiation. This test series, Phase 2 of a larger, comprehensive program assessing a variety of containment surfaces, also examined the effects of organic (i.e., methyl ethyl ketone) and inorganic (i.e., hydrazine) additives, pH, and venting on the aqueous chemistry and volatility of solutions initially containing cesium iodide. These tests have clearly demonstrated that organics are released to the aqueous phase from the vinyl coating and that, under radiation conditions, these organics can have a significant effect on the formation of volatile iodine species. In particular, the RTF results suggest that radiolytic decomposition of the released organics results in dramatic reductions in pH and dissolved oxygen concentration, which in turn are responsible for increased formation of molecular iodine and organic iodides. When the pH was maintained at 10 (Test 3), much lower iodine volatility was observed; low iodine volatility was also observed in the absence of radiation. This test series also demonstrated that vinyl surfaces, particularly those in contact with the gas phase, were a sink for iodine. (author) 4 figs., 6 tabs., 17 refs.

  16. SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT PHASE 1 SLUDGE STORAGE OPTIONS. ASSESSMENT OF T PLANT VERSUS ALTERNATE STORAGE FACILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutherford, W.W.; Geuther, W.J.; Strankman, M.R.; Conrad, E.A.; Rhoadarmer, D.D.; Black, D.M.; Pottmeyer, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has recommended to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) a two phase approach for removal and storage (Phase 1) and treatment and packaging for offsite shipment (Phase 2) of the sludge currently stored within the 105-K West Basin. This two phased strategy enables early removal of sludge from the 105-K West Basin by 2015, allowing remediation of historical unplanned releases of waste and closure of the 100-K Area. In Phase 1, the sludge currently stored in the Engineered Containers and Settler Tanks within the 105-K West Basin will be transferred into sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs). The STSCs will be transported to an interim storage facility. In Phase 2, sludge will be processed (treated) to meet shipping and disposal requirements and the sludge will be packaged for final disposal at a geologic repository. The purpose of this study is to evaluate two alternatives for interim Phase 1 storage of K Basin sludge. The cost, schedule, and risks for sludge storage at a newly-constructed Alternate Storage Facility (ASF) are compared to those at T Plant, which has been used previously for sludge storage. Based on the results of the assessment, T Plant is recommended for Phase 1 interim storage of sludge. Key elements that support this recommendation are the following: (1) T Plant has a proven process for storing sludge; (2) T Plant storage can be implemented at a lower incremental cost than the ASF; and (3) T Plant storage has a more favorable schedule profile, which provides more float, than the ASF. Underpinning the recommendation of T Plant for sludge storage is the assumption that T Plant has a durable, extended mission independent of the K Basin sludge interim storage mission. If this assumption cannot be validated and the operating costs of T Plant are borne by the Sludge Treatment Project, the conclusions and recommendations of this study would change. The following decision-making strategy, which is

  17. SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT PHASE 1 SLUDGE STORAGE OPTIONS ASSESSMENT OF T PLANT VERSUS ALTERNATE STORAGE FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RUTHERFORD WW; GEUTHER WJ; STRANKMAN MR; CONRAD EA; RHOADARMER DD; BLACK DM; POTTMEYER JA

    2009-04-29

    The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has recommended to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) a two phase approach for removal and storage (Phase 1) and treatment and packaging for offsite shipment (Phase 2) of the sludge currently stored within the 105-K West Basin. This two phased strategy enables early removal of sludge from the 105-K West Basin by 2015, allowing remediation of historical unplanned releases of waste and closure of the 100-K Area. In Phase 1, the sludge currently stored in the Engineered Containers and Settler Tanks within the 105-K West Basin will be transferred into sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs). The STSCs will be transported to an interim storage facility. In Phase 2, sludge will be processed (treated) to meet shipping and disposal requirements and the sludge will be packaged for final disposal at a geologic repository. The purpose of this study is to evaluate two alternatives for interim Phase 1 storage of K Basin sludge. The cost, schedule, and risks for sludge storage at a newly-constructed Alternate Storage Facility (ASF) are compared to those at T Plant, which has been used previously for sludge storage. Based on the results of the assessment, T Plant is recommended for Phase 1 interim storage of sludge. Key elements that support this recommendation are the following: (1) T Plant has a proven process for storing sludge; (2) T Plant storage can be implemented at a lower incremental cost than the ASF; and (3) T Plant storage has a more favorable schedule profile, which provides more float, than the ASF. Underpinning the recommendation of T Plant for sludge storage is the assumption that T Plant has a durable, extended mission independent of the K Basin sludge interim storage mission. If this assumption cannot be validated and the operating costs of T Plant are borne by the Sludge Treatment Project, the conclusions and recommendations of this study would change. The following decision-making strategy, which is

  18. Results of Washington's phase two study on closure requirements for the Hanford commercial low-level waste facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.C.; Hana, S.L.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on the closure design objectives and cover alternatives resulting from the state of Washington's phase two study on closure and long-term care for the Hanford commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal facility. Four approaches to dealing with subsidence and two cover design alternatives are discussed in this paper, along with information on each layer of each cover. Objectives for closure of the Hanford low-level waste facility are also discussed

  19. Simulations of a phase corrector plate for the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, W. H. LLNL

    1998-01-01

    Simulations are presented on the effect of placing a static phase corrector plate in each beamline of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to assist the adaptive optic in correcting beam phase aberrations. Results indicate such a plate could significantly improve the focal spot, reducing a 3ω, 80% spot half-angle from 21 to 8 microrad for poorer-qualtiy optics, and 17 to 7 for better optics. Such a plate appears to be within the range of current fabrication technologies. It would have an alignment requiremnt of ±0.5 mm, if placed in the front end. In NIF operation, the occasional replacement of laser slabs would slowly degrade the beam quality for a fixed corrector plate, with the spot size increasing from 8 to 15 microrad after four new slabs for poorer optics, and 7 to 12 microrad for better optics. The energy fraciton clipped on the injection pinhole (±100 microrad) would be <0.5% due to this pre-correction

  20. The optimum operating conditions of the phased double-rotor facility at the ET-RR-1 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naguib, K.; Habib, N.; Wahba, M.; Kilany, M.; Adib, M. [National Research Centre, Cairo (Egypt). Reactor and Neutron Physics Dept.

    1997-02-07

    A pulsed neutron polyenergetic thermal beam at ET-RR-1 is produced by a phased double-rotor facility. One of the rotors has two diametrically opposite curved slots, while the second is designed to operate as a rotating collimator. The dimensions of the phased rotating collimator are selected to match the curved slot rotor. The calculated collimator transmissions at different operating conditions are found to be in good agreement with the experimental ones. The optimum operating conditions of the double-rotor facility are deduced. The calculations were carried out using a computer program RCOL. The RCOL was designed in FORTRAN-77 to operate on PCs. (author).

  1. The optimum operating conditions of the phased double-rotor facility at the ET-RR-1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naguib, K.; Habib, N.; Wahba, M.; Kilany, M.; Adib, M.

    1997-01-01

    A pulsed neutron polyenergetic thermal beam at ET-RR-1 is produced by a phased double-rotor facility. One of the rotors has two diametrically opposite curved slots, while the second is designed to operate as a rotating collimator. The dimensions of the phased rotating collimator are selected to match the curved slot rotor. The calculated collimator transmissions at different operating conditions are found to be in good agreement with the experimental ones. The optimum operating conditions of the double-rotor facility are deduced. The calculations were carried out using a computer program RCOL. The RCOL was designed in FORTRAN-77 to operate on PCs. (author)

  2. Assessment of the MARS Code Using the Two-Phase Natural Circulation Experiments at a Core Catcher Test Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Hun Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A core catcher has been developed to maintain the integrity of nuclear reactor containment from molten corium during a severe accident. It uses a two-phase natural circulation for cooling molten corium. Flow in a typical core catcher is unique because (i it has an inclined cooling channel with downwards-facing heating surface, of which flow processes are not fully exploited, (ii it is usually exposed to a low-pressure condition, where phase change causes dramatic changes in the flow, and (iii the effects of a multidimensional flow are very large in the upper part of the core catcher. These features make computational analysis more difficult. In this study, the MARS code is assessed using the two-phase natural circulation experiments that had been conducted at the CE-PECS facility to verify the cooling performance of a core catcher. The code is a system-scale thermal-hydraulic (TH code and has a multidimensional TH component. The facility was modeled by using both one- and three-dimensional components. Six experiments at the facility were selected to investigate the parametric effects of heat flux, pressure, and form loss. The results show that MARS can predict the two-phase flow at the facility reasonably well. However, some limitations are obviously revealed.

  3. Facile room-temperature solution-phase synthesis of a spherical covalent organic framework for high-resolution chromatographic separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng-Xiong; Liu, Chang; Cao, Yi-Meng; Yan, Xiu-Ping

    2015-08-07

    A simple and facile room-temperature solution-phase synthesis was developed to fabricate a spherical covalent organic framework with large surface area, good solvent stability and high thermostability for high-resolution chromatographic separation of diverse important industrial analytes including alkanes, cyclohexane and benzene, α-pinene and β-pinene, and alcohols with high column efficiency and good precision.

  4. Final report on the public involvement process phase 1, Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility Feasibility Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, L.; Shanteau, C.

    1992-12-01

    This report summarizes the pubic involvement component of Phase 1 of the Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility (NM) Feasibility Study in San Juan County, Utah. Part of this summary includes background information on the federal effort to locate a voluntary site for temporary storage of nuclear waste, how San Juan County came to be involved, and a profile of the county. The heart of the report, however, summarizes the activities within the public involvement process, and the issues raised in those various forums. The authors have made every effort to reflect accurately and thoroughly all the concerns and suggestions expressed to us during the five month process. We hope that this report itself is a successful model of partnership with the citizens of the county -- the same kind of partnership the county is seeking to develop with its constituents. Finally, this report offers some suggestions to both county officials and residents alike. These suggestions concern how decision-making about the county's future can be done by a partnership of informed citizens and listening decision-makers. In the Appendix are materials relating to the public involvement process in San Juan County

  5. Final report on the public involvement process phase 1, Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, L.; Shanteau, C.

    1992-12-01

    This report summarizes the pubic involvement component of Phase 1 of the Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility (NM) Feasibility Study in San Juan County, Utah. Part of this summary includes background information on the federal effort to locate a voluntary site for temporary storage of nuclear waste, how San Juan County came to be involved, and a profile of the county. The heart of the report, however, summarizes the activities within the public involvement process, and the issues raised in those various forums. The authors have made every effort to reflect accurately and thoroughly all the concerns and suggestions expressed to us during the five month process. We hope that this report itself is a successful model of partnership with the citizens of the county -- the same kind of partnership the county is seeking to develop with its constituents. Finally, this report offers some suggestions to both county officials and residents alike. These suggestions concern how decision-making about the county's future can be done by a partnership of informed citizens and listening decision-makers. In the Appendix are materials relating to the public involvement process in San Juan County.

  6. Final report on the public involvement process phase 1, Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, L.; Shanteau, C.

    1992-12-01

    This report summarizes the pubic involvement component of Phase 1 of the Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility (NM) Feasibility Study in San Juan County, Utah. Part of this summary includes background information on the federal effort to locate a voluntary site for temporary storage of nuclear waste, how San Juan County came to be involved, and a profile of the county. The heart of the report, however, summarizes the activities within the public involvement process, and the issues raised in those various forums. The authors have made every effort to reflect accurately and thoroughly all the concerns and suggestions expressed to us during the five month process. We hope that this report itself is a successful model of partnership with the citizens of the county -- the same kind of partnership the county is seeking to develop with its constituents. Finally, this report offers some suggestions to both county officials and residents alike. These suggestions concern how decision-making about the county`s future can be done by a partnership of informed citizens and listening decision-makers. In the Appendix are materials relating to the public involvement process in San Juan County.

  7. Phase space measurements at non-accessible point on the beam path of an accelerator facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, A.

    2004-01-01

    The optimization of beam lines for particles extracted from accelerator facilities requires the knowledge of beam parameters. A method for the measurement of phase space and beam intensity distribution is represented. This method depends on the setting of quadrupole lenses that allows the imaging of beam profiles at arbitrary positions along the beam path on the same multi-wire proportional chamber, where the intensity distribution can be evaluated. The necessary focusing powers for a certain imaging task are calculated in a thin lens approximation. The corresponding focusing power for thick quadrupole lenses are calculated using the PC transport program. A comparison of the calculated focusing powers for thin and thick lenses reveals deviations at the highest field strengths, due to saturation effect. The position of the beam waist in normal and angular space is directly calculated and visualized. The horizontal and vertical waist positions are found to be rather independent of the beam energy. Extensive calculation was done to study the effect of a reduced aperture on the maximum beam emittances aa x and aa y of the extracted particles. The main result shows that the maximum emittance passing through depends on the waist distant and the diameter of the reduced aperture. (orig.)

  8. Direct ECC bypass phenomena in the MIDAS test facility during LBLOCA reflood phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, B. J.; Kweon, T. S.; Ah, D. J.; Ju, I. C.; Song, C. H.; Park, J. K.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the experimental results of ECC Direct Bypass Phenomena in the downcomer during the late reflood phase of LBLOCA of the reactor that adopts Direct Vessel Injection as a ECC system. The experiments have been performed in MIDAS test facility using superheated steam and water. The test condition was determined, based on the preliminary analysis of TRAC code, from modified linear scaling method of 1/4.93 length scale. To measure the direct bypass fraction according to the nozzle location, separate effect tests have been performed in case of DVI-4(farthest from broken cold leg) injection, DVI-2(closest to broken cold leg) injection, and DVI-2 and 4 injection, respectively. Also the test was carried out varying the steam flow rate greatly to investigate the effect of steam flow rate on the direct bypass fraction of ECC water. Test results show that the direct bypass fraction of ECC water depends significantly on the injected steam mass flow rate. DVI-4 tests show that the direct bypass fraction increases drastically as the steam flow rate increases. However, in DVI-2 test most of the injected ECC water penetrates into lower downcomer. The direct bypass characteristic in each of DVI-2 and DVI-4 tests is reflected into the direct bypass characteristic curve of DVI-2 and 4 test. The steam condensation reaches to the theoretically allowable maximum value

  9. Design Development of SMART ECC Water Asymmetric Two-phase choking test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Young Il; Cho, Seok; Ko, Yung Joo; Shin, Yong Cheol; Kwon, Tae Soon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    SMART pressurized water reactor type is different from the existing integral NSSS commercial pressurized water reactor system which is equipped with the main features. In addition RCS piping is removed and the feature of the SBLOCA is a major design break accident. The TASS / SMR code is analyzed SMART SBLOCA. In order to verify analysis code, SMART analysis for verification of conservatism is promoting using data for experiments with Integral Effect Test and Separate Effect. In this paper, the design feature of the SWAT (SMART ECC Water Asymmetric Two-phase choking test facility) is described. SWAT is linearly reduced to a 1/5 ratio while the geometrical shape is conserved. In major shape of SMART ECC injection performance test, distortions which caused by gravitational effects are minimized. Because both the emergency core cooling water injection nozzle height and the break nozzle height match the RCP Suction Nozzle height in test section of the main forms. The main part of the test section is SG-side upper down-comer. The boundary conditions are saturated steam and water flow condition and drain flow rate to control the collapsed water level in the down-comer

  10. 6D Phase Space Measurements at the SLAC Gun Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Schmerge, J

    2003-01-01

    Proposed fourth generation light sources using SASE FELs to generate short pulse, coherent X-rays require demonstration of high brightness electron sources. The Gun Test Facility (GTF) at SLAC was built to test high brightness sources for the proposed Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC. The GTF is composed of an Sband photocathode rf gun with a Cu cathode, emittance compensating solenoid, single 3 m SLAC linac section and e-beam diagnostic section with a UV drive laser system. The longitudinal emittance exiting the gun has been determined by measuring the energy spectrum downstream of the linac as a function of the linac phase. The e-beam pulse width, correlated and uncorrelated energy spread at the linac entrance have been fit to the measured energy spectra using a least square error fitting routine. The fit yields a pulse width of 2.9 ps FWHM for a 4.3 ps FWHM laser pulse width and 2% rms correlated energy spread with 0.07% rms uncorrelated energy spread. The correlated energy spread is enhanced in the lin...

  11. Concerning control of radiation exposure to workers in nuclear reactor facilities for testing and nuclear reactor facilities in research and development phase (fiscal 1987)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    A nuclear reactor operator is required by the Nuclear Reactor Control Law to ensure that the radiation dose to workers engaged in the operations of his nuclear reactor is controlled below the permissible exposure doses that are specified in notifications issued based on the Law. The present note briefly summarizes the data given in the Reports on Radiation Control, which have been submitted according to the Nuclear Reactor Control Law by the operators of nuclear reactor facilities for testing and those in the research and development phase, and the Reports on Control of Radiation Exposure to Workers submitted in accordance with the applicable administrative notices. According to these reports, the measured exposure to workers in 1987 were below the above-mentioned permissible exposure doses in all these nuclear facilities. The 1986 and 1987 measurements of radiation exposure dose to workers in nuclear reactor facilities for testing are tabulated. The measurements cover dose distribution among the facilities' personnel and workers of contractors. They also cover the total exposure dose for all workers in each of four plants operated under the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. (N.K.)

  12. Experiments on hydraulically-compensated Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) system using large-diameter vertical pipe two-phase flow test facility: test facility and test procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtsu, Iwao; Murata, Hideo; Kukita, Yutaka; Kumamaru, Hiroshige.

    1996-07-01

    JAERI, the University of Tokyo, the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry and Shimizu Corporation jointing performed and experimental study on two-phase flow in the hydraulically-compensated Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) system with a large-diameter vertical pipe two-phase flow test facility from 1993 to 1995. A hydraulically-compensated CAES system is a proposed, conceptual energy storage system where energy is stored in the form of compressed air in an underground cavern which is sealed by a deep (several hundred meters) water shaft. The shaft water head maintains a constant pressure in the cavern, of several mega Pascals, even during loading or unloading of the cavern with air. The dissolved air in the water, however, may create voids in the shaft when the water rises through the shaft during the loading, being forced by the air flow into the cavern. The voids may reduce the effective head of the shaft, and thus the seal may fail, if significant bubbling should occur in the shaft. This bubbling phenomenon (termed 'Champaign effect') and potential failure of the water seal ('blowout') are simulated in a scaled-height, scaled-diameter facility. Carbon dioxide is used to simulate high solubility of air in the full-height, full-pressure system. This report describes the expected and potential two-phase flow phenomena in a hydraulically-compensated CAES system, the test facility and the test procedure, a method to estimate quantities which are not directly measured by using measured quantities and hydrodynamic basic equations, and desirable additional instrumentation. (author)

  13. Inventory of closed mine waste facilities in Northern Ireland. Phase 1, data collection and categorisation

    OpenAIRE

    Palumbo-Roe, B.; Linley, K.; Cameron, D.; Mankelow, J.

    2013-01-01

    This mid-project report is a required deliverable for a BGS project commissioned by the Northern Ireland Department of the Environment (DoENI) to assist in their implementation of the EU Mine Waste Directive (MWD) with regards to Article 20 − Inventory of closed waste facilities. The objective of this project is to address the requirement of the EU Directive for an inventory of closed waste facilities, including abandoned facilities, which cause or could potentially cause serious negative env...

  14. Computational Modeling in Support of High Altitude Testing Facilities, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Simulation technology plays an important role in propulsion test facility design and development by assessing risks, identifying failure modes and predicting...

  15. Computational Modeling in Support of High Altitude Testing Facilities, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Simulation technology plays an important role in rocket engine test facility design and development by assessing risks, identifying failure modes and predicting...

  16. Baseline concentrations of radionuclides and heavy metals in soils and vegetation around the DARHT facility: Construction phase (1997). Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fresquez, P.R.; Haagenstad, H.T.; Naranjo, L. Jr.

    1998-06-01

    As part of the Department of Energy's Mitigation Action Plan for the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), baseline concentrations of radionuclides ( 3 H, 137 Cs, 90 Sr, 238 Pu, 239,240 Pu, 241 Am, and tot U) and heavy metals (Ag, As, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, and Tl) in soil, sediment, and vegetation (overstory and understory) around the DARHT facility during the construction phase in 1997 were determined. Most radionuclides and heavy metals in soils, sediments, and vegetation, with the exception of 90 Sr in soils and sediments, were within upper (95%) limit background concentrations. Although the levels of 90 Sr in soils and sediments around the DARHT facility were higher than background, they were below LANL screening action levels ( -1 dry) and are of no concern

  17. Baseline concentrations of radionuclides and heavy metals in soils and vegetation around the DARHT facility: Construction phase (1996)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fresquez, P.R.; Haagenstad, H.T.; Naranjo, L. Jr.

    1997-04-01

    As part of the Department of Energy's Mitigation Action Plan for the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), baseline concentrations of radionuclides ( 3 H, 137 Cs, 90 Sr, 238 Pu, 239 Pu, 241 Am, total U), and heavy metals (Ag, As, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se and Tl) in soil, sediment, and vegetation (overstory and understory) around the DARHT facility during the construction phase in 1996 were determined. Also, U and Be concentrations in soil samples collected in 1993 from within the proposed DARHT facility area are reported. Most radionuclides in soils, sediments, and vegetation were within current background and/or long-term regional statistical reference levels

  18. Implementation of the DYMAC system at the new Los Alamos Plutonium Processing Facility. Phase II report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malanify, J.J.; Amsden, D.C.

    1982-08-01

    The DYnamic Materials ACcountability System - called DYMAC - performs accountability functions at the new Los Alamos Plutonium Processing Facility where it began operation when the facility opened in January 1978. A demonstration program, DYMAC was designed to collect and assess inventory information for safeguards purposes. It accomplishes 75% of its design goals. DYMAC collects information about the physical inventory through deployment of nondestructive assay instrumentation and video terminals throughout the facility. The information resides in a minicomputer where it can be immediately sorted and displayed on the video terminals or produced in printed form. Although the capability now exists to assess the collected data, this portion of the program is not yet implemented. DYMAC in its present form is an excellent tool for process and quality control. The facility operator relies on it exclusively for keeping track of the inventory and for complying with accountability requirements of the US Department of Energy.

  19. Implementation of the DYMAC system at the new Los Alamos Plutonium Processing Facility. Phase II report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malanify, J.J.; Amsden, D.C.

    1982-08-01

    The DYnamic Materials ACcountability System - called DYMAC - performs accountability functions at the new Los Alamos Plutonium Processing Facility where it began operation when the facility opened in January 1978. A demonstration program, DYMAC was designed to collect and assess inventory information for safeguards purposes. It accomplishes 75% of its design goals. DYMAC collects information about the physical inventory through deployment of nondestructive assay instrumentation and video terminals throughout the facility. The information resides in a minicomputer where it can be immediately sorted and displayed on the video terminals or produced in printed form. Although the capability now exists to assess the collected data, this portion of the program is not yet implemented. DYMAC in its present form is an excellent tool for process and quality control. The facility operator relies on it exclusively for keeping track of the inventory and for complying with accountability requirements of the US Department of Energy

  20. Study on the characterization of the neutron radiography facility in HANARO for two-phase flow research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, I. C.; Seo, C. G.; Jeong, J. H.; Lee, B. H.; Choi, Y. S.

    2001-01-01

    For the application of dynamic neutron radiography to the two-phase flow research using HANARO, several experimental items to which the radiography technique is beneficial were identified through the review of the outputs from the related researches and the discussions with experts. Also, the investigation of the equipments including the beam port, camera and converter was made and a hardware and a software for image processing were equipped. It was confirmed that the calibration curve for the attenuation of neutron beam in fluid which is required for the two-phase flow experiment could be obtained by the computer code calculation. Based on the investigation results on the equipment and the results from the measurement of BNCT beam characteristics, a high speed camera and an image intensifier will be purchased. Then, the high speed dynamic neutron radiography facility for two-phase flow experiments will be fully equipped

  1. Study on the characterization of the neutron radiography facility in HANARO for two-phase flow research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, I. C.; Seo, C. G.; Jeong, J. H.; Lee, B. H.; Choi, Y. S

    2001-01-01

    For the application of dynamic neutron radiography to the two-phase flow research using HANARO, several experimental items to which the radiography technique is beneficial were identified through the review of the outputs from the related researches and the discussions with experts. Also, the investigation of the equipments including the beam port, camera and converter was made and a hardware and a software for image processing were equipped. It was confirmed that the calibration curve for the attenuation of neutron beam in fluid which is required for the two-phase flow experiment could be obtained by the computer code calculation. Based on the investigation results on the equipment and the results from the measurement of BNCT beam characteristics, a high speed camera and an image intensifier will be purchased. Then, the high speed dynamic neutron radiography facility for two-phase flow experiments will be fully equipped.

  2. Analyses in Support of Risk-Informed Natural Gas Vehicle Maintenance Facility Codes and Standards: Phase II.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaylock, Myra L.; LaFleur, Chris Bensdotter; Muna, Alice Baca; Ehrhart, Brian David

    2018-03-01

    Safety standards development for maintenance facilities of liquid and compressed natural gas fueled vehicles is required to ensure proper facility design and operating procedures. Standard development organizations are utilizing risk-informed concepts to develop natural gas vehicle (NGV) codes and standards so that maintenance facilities meet acceptable risk levels. The present report summarizes Phase II work for existing NGV repair facility code requirements and highlights inconsistencies that need quantitative analysis into their effectiveness. A Hazardous and Operability study was performed to identify key scenarios of interest using risk ranking. Detailed simulations and modeling were performed to estimate the location and behavior of natural gas releases based on these scenarios. Specific code conflicts were identified, and ineffective code requirements were highlighted and resolutions proposed. These include ventilation rate basis on area or volume, as well as a ceiling offset which seems ineffective at protecting against flammable gas concentrations. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The authors gratefully acknowledge Bill Houf (SNL -- Retired) for his assistance with the set-up and post-processing of the numerical simulations. The authors also acknowledge Doug Horne (retired) for his helpful discussions. We would also like to acknowledge the support from the Clean Cities program of DOE's Vehicle Technology Office.

  3. Facile synthesis of aliphatic isothiocyanates and thioureas on solid phase using peptide coupling reagents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boas, Ulrik; Andersen, Heidi Gertz; Christensen, Jørn B.

    2004-01-01

    Peptide coupling reagents can be used as versatile reagents for the formation of aliphatic isothiocyanates and thioureas on solid phase from the corresponding solid-phase anchored aliphatic primary amines. The formation of the thioureas is fast and highly chemoselective, and proceeds via formatio...

  4. Conceptual design report for immobilized high-level waste interim storage facility (Phase 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgard, K.C.

    1998-01-01

    The Hanford Site Canister Storage Building (CSB Bldg. 212H) will be utilized to interim store Phase 1 HLW products. Project W-464, Immobilized High-Level Waste Interim Storage, will procure an onsite transportation system and retrofit the CSB to accommodate the Phase 1 HLW products. The Conceptual Design Report establishes the Project W-464 technical and cost basis

  5. Conceptual design report for immobilized high-level waste interim storage facility (Phase 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgard, K.C.

    1998-04-09

    The Hanford Site Canister Storage Building (CSB Bldg. 212H) will be utilized to interim store Phase 1 HLW products. Project W-464, Immobilized High-Level Waste Interim Storage, will procure an onsite transportation system and retrofit the CSB to accommodate the Phase 1 HLW products. The Conceptual Design Report establishes the Project W-464 technical and cost basis.

  6. Safety analysis report for the cold vacuum drying facility, phase 2, supporting installation of process systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pili-Vincens, C.

    1998-01-01

    SNF Project emergencies span the spectrum of identified emergencies for SNF Project facilities, from worker injury to general emergencies with potential public impact. Facility events include fire and/or explosion, radioactive material release, chlorine gas release, hazardous material release, loss of water in the fuel basins, and loss of electrical power. Natural events include seismic events, high winds, range fires, flooding, lightning strikes, tornado, and an aircraft crash. Security contingencies include bomb threat and/or explosive device, sabotage, and hostage situation and/or armed intruder as described in DOE/RL-94-02 (DOE 1997 b). This Chapter 15.0 applies to all operations, facilities, and personnel, including subcontractors, vendors, visitors, and any non-contractor tenants in SNF Project-controlled facilities. The EPP addresses both individual and organizational graded responses to the spectrum of emergencies, which includes hypothetical accidents with very low occurrence frequencies. The planning, accomplished in the EPP and the BEPs, provides the response actions for these emergencies. This chapter links the SNF Project EPP to DOE/RL-94-02 (DOE 1997 b), which provides the link to subsequent state and local off site EPPs. Integration of these programs links potential onsite events with onsite and offsite impacts. This integration assists in mitigation and recovery and provides for protection of the health and safety of the workers, the public, and the environment

  7. Phase 1 Testing Results of Immobilization of WTP Effluent Management Facility Evaporator Bottoms Core Simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cozzi, Alex D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McCabe, Daniel J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-01-05

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Melter Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream during full WTP operations is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility. However, during the Direct Feed LAW (DFLAW) scenario, planned disposition of this stream is to evaporate it in a new evaporator in the Effluent Management Facility (EMF) and then return it to the LAW melter. It is important to understand the composition of the effluents from the melter and new evaporator so that the disposition of these streams can be accurately planned and accommodated. Furthermore, alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable less integrated operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Alternate disposition would also eliminate this stream from recycling within WTP when it begins operations and would decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. This LAW Melter Off-Gas Condensate stream will contain components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form, such as halides and sulfate, along with entrained, volatile, and semi-volatile metals, such as Hg, As, and Se. Because this stream will recycle within WTP, these components accumulate in the Melter Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Diverting the stream reduces the halides and sulfate that get recycled to the melter, and is a key objective of this work. This overall program examines the potential treatment and immobilization of this stream to enable alternative disposal. The objective of earlier tasks was to formulate and prepare a

  8. Innovative Ultra-High Efficiency Cryogenic Actuators for Rocket Test Facilities, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SBIR Phase I project will develop advanced ultra-high efficiency cryogenic actuators for NASA cryogenic fluid transfer application. The actuator will have low...

  9. Fiber Optic Mass Flow Gauge for Liquid Cryogenic Fuel Facilities Monitoring and Control, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I proposal describes a fiber optic mass flow gauge that will aid in managing liquid hydrogen and oxygen fuel storage and transport. The increasing...

  10. In situ Laser Diagnostics for Arc-Jet Facilities, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this SBIR Phase I effort, Los Gatos Research (LGR) proposes to develop novel instrumentation based on laser absorption spectroscopy techniques for ultrasensitive...

  11. Conceptual design of the test facility for the two-phase critical flow with non-condensable gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Seok Kyu; Chung, Chang Hwan

    2000-12-01

    The two-phase critical flow test with non-condensible gas is for the simulation of the critical flow phenomena which can be occurred during SB-LOCA on SMART reactor. The requirements of the critical flow test are 7{approx}20mm pipe break dia., 7{approx}12MPa stagnation pressure, 0{approx}60 deg C subcooling degree and 0{approx}0.5kg/s N2 gas flow rate. For the satisfaction of these requirements on the test facility, critical flow rates were calculated with various models. With the selected reference pressure vessel(1.3m{sup 3}), the conceptual design of the test facility was performed. The important components of the test facility are the pressure vessel which has main circulation line, the test section attached to the bottom of the pressure vessel, suppression tank, the N2 gas supply tanks for maintaining the system pressure and N2 gas flow rate at test section and the auxiliary N2 gas converting system. For the measurements of the critical flow rate, flowmeter and level gauge is installed at the upstream of the test section and the pressure vessel, respectively. The realtime pressure control system is installed at the entrance of the pressure vessel for maintaining the system pressure and the N2 gas flow regulating system is also installed at the upstream of the test section. The design of the control and monitoring system for the operation of the test facility and the DAS for acquiring the test data were also performed. The conceptual operating process of the test facility was determined.

  12. Conceptual design of the test facility for the two-phase critical flow with non-condensable gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Seok Kyu; Chung, Chang Hwan

    2000-12-01

    The two-phase critical flow test with non-condensible gas is for the simulation of the critical flow phenomena which can be occurred during SB-LOCA on SMART reactor. The requirements of the critical flow test are 7∼20mm pipe break dia., 7∼12MPa stagnation pressure, 0∼60 deg C subcooling degree and 0∼0.5kg/s N2 gas flow rate. For the satisfaction of these requirements on the test facility, critical flow rates were calculated with various models. With the selected reference pressure vessel(1.3m 3 ), the conceptual design of the test facility was performed. The important components of the test facility are the pressure vessel which has main circulation line, the test section attached to the bottom of the pressure vessel, suppression tank, the N2 gas supply tanks for maintaining the system pressure and N2 gas flow rate at test section and the auxiliary N2 gas converting system. For the measurements of the critical flow rate, flowmeter and level gauge is installed at the upstream of the test section and the pressure vessel, respectively. The realtime pressure control system is installed at the entrance of the pressure vessel for maintaining the system pressure and the N2 gas flow regulating system is also installed at the upstream of the test section. The design of the control and monitoring system for the operation of the test facility and the DAS for acquiring the test data were also performed. The conceptual operating process of the test facility was determined

  13. Phase Equilibrium Studies of Savannah River Tanks and Feed Streams for the Salt Waste Processing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, C.F.

    2001-06-19

    A chemical equilibrium model is developed and used to evaluate supersaturation of tanks and proposed feed streams to the Salt Waste Processing Facility. The model uses Pitzer's model for activity coefficients and is validated by comparison with a variety of thermodynamic data. The model assesses the supersaturation of 13 tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS), indicating that small amounts of gibbsite and or aluminosilicate may form. The model is also used to evaluate proposed feed streams to the Salt Waste Processing Facility for 13 years of operation. Results indicate that dilutions using 3-4 M NaOH (about 0.3-0.4 L caustic per kg feed solution) should avoid precipitation and reduce the Na{sup +} ion concentration to 5.6 M.

  14. Cost calculations for decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear research facilities, Phase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Inga; Backe, S.; Iversen, Klaus; Lindskog, S; Salmenhaara, S.; Sjoeblom, R.

    2006-11-01

    Today, it is recommended that planning of decommission should form an integral part of the activities over the life cycle of a nuclear facility. However, no actual international guideline on cost calculations exists at present. Intuitively, it might be tempting to regard costs for decommissioning of a nuclear facility as similar to those of any other plant. However, the presence of radionuclide contamination may imply that the cost is one or more orders of magnitude higher as compared to a corresponding inactive situation, the actual ratio being highly dependent on the level of contamination as well as design features and use of the facility in question. Moreover, the variations in such prerequisites are much larger than for nuclear power plants. This implies that cost calculations cannot be performed with any accuracy or credibility without a relatively detailed consideration of the radiological and other prerequisites. Application of inadequate methodologies especially at early stages has often lead to large underestimations. The goals of the project and the achievements described in the report are as follows: 1) Advice on good practice with regard to: 1a) Strategy and planning; 1b) Methodology selection; 1c) Radiological surveying; 1d) Uncertainty analysis; 2) Techniques for assessment of costs: 2a) Cost structuring; 2b) Cost estimation methodologies; 3) Compilation of data for plants, state of planning, organisations, etc.; 3a) General descriptions of relevant features of the nuclear research facilities; 3b) General plant specific data; 3c) Example of the decommissioning of the R1 research reactor in Sweden; 3d) Example of the decommissioning of the DR1 research reactor in Denmark. In addition, but not described in the present report, is the establishment of a Nordic network in the area including an internet based expert system. It should be noted that the project is planned to exist for at least three years and that the present report is an interim one

  15. Cost calculations for decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear research facilities, Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Inga [StudsvikNuclear AB (Sweden); Backe, S. [Institute for Energy Technology (Norway); Iversen, Klaus [Danish Decommissioning (Denmark); Lindskog, S [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (Sweden); Salmenhaara, S. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland); Sjoeblom, R. [Tekedo AB (Sweden)

    2006-11-15

    Today, it is recommended that planning of decommission should form an integral part of the activities over the life cycle of a nuclear facility. However, no actual international guideline on cost calculations exists at present. Intuitively, it might be tempting to regard costs for decommissioning of a nuclear facility as similar to those of any other plant. However, the presence of radionuclide contamination may imply that the cost is one or more orders of magnitude higher as compared to a corresponding inactive situation, the actual ratio being highly dependent on the level of contamination as well as design features and use of the facility in question. Moreover, the variations in such prerequisites are much larger than for nuclear power plants. This implies that cost calculations cannot be performed with any accuracy or credibility without a relatively detailed consideration of the radiological and other prerequisites. Application of inadequate methodologies especially at early stages has often lead to large underestimations. The goals of the project and the achievements described in the report are as follows: 1) Advice on good practice with regard to: 1a) Strategy and planning; 1b) Methodology selection; 1c) Radiological surveying; 1d) Uncertainty analysis; 2) Techniques for assessment of costs: 2a) Cost structuring; 2b) Cost estimation methodologies; 3) Compilation of data for plants, state of planning, organisations, etc.; 3a) General descriptions of relevant features of the nuclear research facilities; 3b) General plant specific data; 3c) Example of the decommissioning of the R1 research reactor in Sweden; 3d) Example of the decommissioning of the DR1 research reactor in Denmark. In addition, but not described in the present report, is the establishment of a Nordic network in the area including an internet based expert system. It should be noted that the project is planned to exist for at least three years and that the present report is an interim one

  16. Facile preparation of an alternating copolymer-based high molecular shape-selective organic phase for reversed-phase liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, Abul K; Noguchi, Hiroki; Rahman, Mohammed Mizanur; Takafuji, Makoto; Ihara, Hirotaka

    2018-06-22

    chromatography (SEC) before grafting onto silica surface. Moreover, both of the monomers were commercially available. Therefore, the technique of preparation was very facile and better separation was achieved with the Sil-alt-T phase compared to the ODS, C 30 and other previously reported alternating copolymer-based columns. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Baseline concentrations of radionuclides and heavy metals in soils and vegetation around the DARHT facility: Construction phase (1997). Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fresquez, P.R.; Haagenstad, H.T.; Naranjo, L. Jr.

    1998-06-01

    As part of the Department of Energy`s Mitigation Action Plan for the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), baseline concentrations of radionuclides ({sup 3}H, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, {sup 241}Am, and {sup tot}U) and heavy metals (Ag, As, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, and Tl) in soil, sediment, and vegetation (overstory and understory) around the DARHT facility during the construction phase in 1997 were determined. Most radionuclides and heavy metals in soils, sediments, and vegetation, with the exception of {sup 90}Sr in soils and sediments, were within upper (95%) limit background concentrations. Although the levels of {sup 90}Sr in soils and sediments around the DARHT facility were higher than background, they were below LANL screening action levels (<4.4 pCi g{sup {minus}1} dry) and are of no concern.

  18. A similarity score-based two-phase heuristic approach to solve the dynamic cellular facility layout for manufacturing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ravi; Singh, Surya Prakash

    2017-11-01

    The dynamic cellular facility layout problem (DCFLP) is a well-known NP-hard problem. It has been estimated that the efficient design of DCFLP reduces the manufacturing cost of products by maintaining the minimum material flow among all machines in all cells, as the material flow contributes around 10-30% of the total product cost. However, being NP hard, solving the DCFLP optimally is very difficult in reasonable time. Therefore, this article proposes a novel similarity score-based two-phase heuristic approach to solve the DCFLP optimally considering multiple products in multiple times to be manufactured in the manufacturing layout. In the first phase of the proposed heuristic, a machine-cell cluster is created based on similarity scores between machines. This is provided as an input to the second phase to minimize inter/intracell material handling costs and rearrangement costs over the entire planning period. The solution methodology of the proposed approach is demonstrated. To show the efficiency of the two-phase heuristic approach, 21 instances are generated and solved using the optimization software package LINGO. The results show that the proposed approach can optimally solve the DCFLP in reasonable time.

  19. The development of coal-based technologies for Department of Defense facilities: Phase 1 final report. Volume 1: Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, B.G.; Morrison, J.L.; Pisupati, S.V. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Energy and Fuels Research Center] [and others

    1997-01-31

    The first phase of a three-phase project investigating the development of coal-based technologies for Department of Defense facilities has been completed. The objectives of the project are to: decrease DOD`s dependence on foreign oil and increase its use of coal; promote public and private sector deployment of technologies for utilizing coal-based fuels in oil-designed combustion equipment; and provide a continuing environment for research and development of coal-based fuel technologies for small-scale applications at a time when market conditions in the US are not favorable for the introduction of coal-fired equipment in the commercial and industrial capacity ranges. The Phase 1 activities were focused on developing clean, coal-based combustion technologies for the utilization of both micronized coal-water mixtures (MCWMs) and dry, micronized coal (DMC) in fuel oil-designed industrial boilers. The specific objective in Phase 1 was to deliver fully engineered retrofit options for a fuel oil-designed watertube boiler located on a DOD installation to fire either MCWM or DMC. This was achieved through a project consisting of fundamental, pilot-sale, and demonstration-scale activities investigating coal beneficiation and preparation, and MCWM and DMC combustion performance. In addition, detailed engineering designs and an economic analysis were conducted for a boiler located at the Naval Surface Warfare Center, near Crane, Indiana. Results are reported on MCWM and DMC combustion performance evaluation; engineering design; and cost/economic analysis.

  20. A facility for liquid-phase radiation experiments on heavy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuglik, Z.; Zvara, I.; Yakushev, A.B.; Timokhin, S.N.

    1992-01-01

    The title facility is described, installed on a beam line of the 4-meter U-400 cyclotron in the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, JINR, Dubna. The accelerator provides intermediate energy (some 10 MeV/nucleon) beams of ions from Li to Xe. Preliminary results on the radiolysis of two liquid systems -Fricke solution and malachite green in ethanol - by 11 B, 24 Mg, and 40 Ca ions are presented. Some experimental problems and uncertainities faced at the quantitative evaluation of the data are discussed. 62 refs.; 5 figs.; 2 tabs

  1. A facility for liquid-phase radiation experiments on heavy ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuglik, Z; Zvara, I; Yakushev, A B; Timokhin, S N

    1993-12-31

    The title facility is described, installed on a beam line of the 4-meter U-400 cyclotron in the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, JINR, Dubna. The accelerator provides intermediate energy (some 10 MeV/nucleon) beams of ions from Li to Xe. Preliminary results on the radiolysis of two liquid systems -Fricke solution and malachite green in ethanol - by {sup 11}B, {sup 24}Mg, and {sup 40}Ca ions are presented. Some experimental problems and uncertainities faced at the quantitative evaluation of the data are discussed. 62 refs.; 5 figs.; 2 tabs.

  2. Spent nuclear fuel project-criteria document Cold Vacuum Drying Facility phase 2 safety analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garvin, L.J.

    1998-01-01

    The criteria document provides the criteria and guidance for developing the SNF CVDF Phase 2 SAR. This SAR will support the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office decision to authorize the procurement, installation, and installation acceptance testing of the CVDF systems

  3. Photoelectrochemical properties of orthorhombic and metastable phase SnS nanocrystals synthesized by a facile colloidal method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Po-Chia [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan, ROC (China); Huang, Jow-Lay [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National University of Kaohsiung, Kaohsiung 81148, Taiwan, ROC (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan, ROC (China); Wang, Sheng-Chang; Shaikh, Muhammad Omar [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Southern Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Tainan 710, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lin, Chia-Yu [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2015-12-01

    SnS of orthorhombic (OR) and metastable (SnS) phases were synthesized by using a simple and facile colloidal method. The tin precursor was synthesized using tin oxide (SnO) and oleic acid (OA), while the sulfur precursor was prepared using sulfur powder (S) and oleyamine (OLA). The sulfur precursor was injected into the tin precursor and the prepared SnS nanocrystals were precipitated at a final reaction temperature of 180 °C. The results show that hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) can be successfully used as a surfactant to synthesize monodisperse 20 nm metastable SnS nanoparticles, while OR phase SnS nanosheets were obtained without HMDS. The direct bandgap observed for the metastable SnS phase is higher (1.66 eV) as compared to the OR phase (1.46 eV). The large blueshift in the direct bandgap of metastable SnS is caused by the difference in crystal structure. The blueshift in the direct band gap value for OR-SnS could be explained by quantum confinement in two dimensions in the very thin nanosheets. SnS thin films used as a photo anode in a photoelectrochemical (PEC) cell were prepared by spin coating on the fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) substrates. The photocurrent density of the SnS (metastable SnS)/FTO and SnS (OR)/FTO are 191.8 μA/cm{sup 2} and 57.61 μA/cm{sup 2} at an applied voltage of − 1 V at 150 W, respectively. These narrow band gap and low cost nanocrystals can be used for applications in future optoelectronic devices. - Highlights: • A facile method to synthesize two different phases of SnS having different morphological and optical properties. • The phases and morphologies of SnS nanocrystal can be controlled by adding capping surfactant hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS). • As we know, this is the first metastable SnS photoanode for application in a photoelectrochemical cell.

  4. Phase 2 testing results of immobilization of WTP effluent management facility vaporator bottoms simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reigel, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Cozzi, A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McCabe, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-09-08

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Melter Off-Gas Condensate) from the primary off-gas system. This work examined three waste form formulations based on previous testing with related simulants: 8 wt% ordinary portland cement (OPC), 47 wt% blast furnace slag (BFS), 45 wt% fly ash (FA) known as Cast Stone formulation; 20 wt% Aquaset® II-GH and 80 wt% BFS; 20 wt% OPC and 80 wt% BFS. These tests successfully produced one waste form that set within five days (Cast Stone formulation); however the other two formulations, Aquaset® II-GH/BFS and OPC/BFS, took approximately eight and fourteen days to set, respectively.

  5. Phase I Investigations at the Former CCC/USDA Grain Storage Facility in Montgomery City, Missouri, in 2010-2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Environmental Science Division. Applied Geoscience and Environmental Restoration Program

    2012-11-01

    This report presents the technical findings of Phase I of Argonne’s studies. The Phase I field investigation was initiated on October 18, 2010. The work was conducted in accord with (1) the final site-specific Phase I Work Plan for Montgomery City (Argonne 2010; approved by the MDNR [2010]); (2) applicable Missouri regulations; and (3) the standard operating procedures, quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) measures, and general health and safety policies outlined in the Master Work Plan (Argonne 2002) for operations in Kansas, which was reviewed by the MDNR and accepted for current use. A draft master plan specific to work in Missouri and a set of draft standard operating procedures are in review with the MDNR. The site-specific Work Plan for Montgomery City (Argonne 2010) (1) summarizes the pre-existing knowledge base for the Montgomery City investigation site compiled by Argonne and (2) describes the site-specific technical objectives and the intended scope of work developed for the first phase of the investigation. Three primary technical objectives were identified for the Phase I studies, as follows: 1. Update the presently identified inventory and status of private and public drinking water wells in the immediate vicinity of the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility, and sample the identified wells for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and geochemical analyses. In conjunction with this effort, determine the present sources(s) of drinking water for all residents in an approximate 0.5-mi radius of the former CCC/USDA facility. 2. Investigate for possible evidence of a soil source of carbon tetrachloride contamination in the unconsolidated sediments beneath the former CCC/USDA facility that might affect the underlying bedrock aquifer units. 3. Obtain preliminary information on the site-specific lithologic and hydrologic characteristics of the unconsolidated sediments overlying bedrock at the former CCC/USDA grain storage location. Section 2 of this report

  6. Containment and recovery of a light non-aqueous phase liquid plume at a woodtreating facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crouse, D.; Powell, G.; Hawthorn, S.; Weinstock, S.

    1997-01-01

    A woodtreating site in Montana used a formulation (product) of 5 percent pentachlorophenol and 95 percent diesel fuel as a carrier liquid to pressure treat lumber. Through years of operations approximately 378,500 liters of this light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) product spilled onto the ground and soaked into the groundwater. A plume of this LNAPL product flowed in a northerly direction toward a stream located approximately 410 meters from the pressure treatment building. A 271-meter long high density polyethylene (HDPE) containment cutoff barrier wall was installed 15 meters from the stream to capture, contain, and prevent the product from migrating off site. This barrier was extended to a depth of 3.7 meters below ground surface and allowed the groundwater to flow beneath it. Ten product recovery wells, each with a dual-phase pumping system, were installed within the plume, and a groundwater model was completed to indicate how the plume would be contained by generating a cone of influence at each recovery well. The model indicated that the recovery wells and cutoff barrier wall would contain the plume and prevent further migration. To date, nearly 3 1/2 year's later, approximately 106,000 liters of product have been recovered

  7. Cold vacuum drying facility: Phase 1 FMEA/FMECA session report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitkoff, C.

    1998-01-01

    The mission of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project is to remove the fuel currently located in the K-Basins 100 Area to provide safe handling and interim storage of the fuel. The spent nuclear fuel will be repackaged in multi-canister overpacks, partially dried in the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF), and then transported to the Canister Storage Building (CSB) for further processing and interim storage. The CVDF, a subproject to the SNF Project, will be constructed in the 100K area. The CVDF will remove free water and vacuum dry the spent nuclear fuel, making it safer to transport and store at the CSB. At present, the CVDF is approximately 90% complete with definitive design. Part of the design process is to conduct Failure Modes, Effects, and Criticality Analysis (FMECA). A four-day FMECA session was conducted August 18 through 21, 1997. The purpose of the session was to analyze 16 subsystems and operating modes to determine consequences of normal, upset, emergency, and faulted conditions with respect to production and worker safety. During this process, acceptable and unacceptable risks, needed design or requirement changes, action items, issues/concerns, and enabling assumptions were identified and recorded. Additionally, a path forward consisting of recommended actions would be developed to resolve any unacceptable risks. The team consisted of project management, engineering, design authority, design agent, safety, operations, and startup personnel. The report summarizes potential problems with the designs, design requirements documentation, and other baseline documentation

  8. Experimental planning phase-study of the reproducibility of cementation in lab and facility scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haucz, Maria Judite Afonso; Tello, Cledola Cassia Oliveira, E-mail: shauczmj@cdtn.br, E-mail: tellocc@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    In Nuclear Technology Development Center - CDTN/CNEN several activities are carried out, in which are produced low-level radioactive wastes, among them stand out the aqueous ones. The treatment used for these wastes is volume reduction, adding chemicals substances to concentrate the radionuclides present in the waste into an insoluble form, producing a sludge that is incorporated in cement and after poured in drums. These activities are carried out in the Facility of Chemical Treatment and Cementation, ITQC. Quality control of this process and the final product is done by means of laboratory tests evaluating the setting time, the viscosity and density of the paste and the solidified product compressive strength, resistance to leaching and density. In the laboratory cementation - LABCIM are defined the mixing process, the amount and type of materials best suited to ensure a final product that meets the requirements of CNEN regulation. During the evaluation of historical data some differences were detected in the characteristic of pastes and solidified products. Evaluated the historical data and differences were observed in the characteristics of the pastes and solidified products obtained in the two systems - LABCIM and IQC, pointing to the need to use statistical tools. (author)

  9. Experimental planning phase-study of the reproducibility of cementation in lab and facility scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haucz, Maria Judite Afonso; Tello, Cledola Cassia Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    In Nuclear Technology Development Center - CDTN/CNEN several activities are carried out, in which are produced low-level radioactive wastes, among them stand out the aqueous ones. The treatment used for these wastes is volume reduction, adding chemicals substances to concentrate the radionuclides present in the waste into an insoluble form, producing a sludge that is incorporated in cement and after poured in drums. These activities are carried out in the Facility of Chemical Treatment and Cementation, ITQC. Quality control of this process and the final product is done by means of laboratory tests evaluating the setting time, the viscosity and density of the paste and the solidified product compressive strength, resistance to leaching and density. In the laboratory cementation - LABCIM are defined the mixing process, the amount and type of materials best suited to ensure a final product that meets the requirements of CNEN regulation. During the evaluation of historical data some differences were detected in the characteristic of pastes and solidified products. Evaluated the historical data and differences were observed in the characteristics of the pastes and solidified products obtained in the two systems - LABCIM and IQC, pointing to the need to use statistical tools. (author)

  10. Self-Generated Magnetic Fields in the Stagnation Phase of Indirect-Drive Implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, C. A.; Chittenden, J. P.; McGlinchey, K.; Niasse, N. P. L.; Appelbe, B. D.

    2017-04-01

    Three-dimensional extended-magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the stagnation phase of inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments at the National Ignition Facility are presented, showing self-generated magnetic fields over 104 T . Angular high mode-number perturbations develop large magnetic fields, but are localized to the cold, dense hot-spot surface, which is hard to magnetize. When low-mode perturbations are also present, the magnetic fields are injected into the hot core, reaching significant magnetizations, with peak local thermal conductivity reductions greater than 90%. However, Righi-Leduc heat transport effectively cools the hot spot and lowers the neutron spectra-inferred ion temperatures compared to the unmagnetized case. The Nernst effect qualitatively changes the results by demagnetizing the hot-spot core, while increasing magnetizations at the edge and near regions of large heat loss.

  11. Results from the CDE phase activity on neutron dosimetry for the international fusion materials irradiation facility test cell

    CERN Document Server

    Esposito, B; Maruccia, G; Petrizzi, L; Bignon, G; Blandin, C; Chauffriat, S; Lebrun, A; Recroix, H; Trapp, J P; Kaschuck, Y

    2000-01-01

    The international fusion materials irradiation facility (IFMIF) project deals with the study of an accelerator-based, deuterium-lithium source, producing high energy neutrons at sufficient intensity and irradiation volume to test samples of candidate materials for fusion energy reactors. IFMIF would also provide calibration and validation of data from fission reactor and other accelerator based irradiation tests. This paper describes the activity on neutron/gamma dosimetry (necessary for the characterization of the specimens' irradiation) performed in the frame of the IFMIF conceptual design evaluation (CDE) neutronics tasks. During the previous phase (conceptual design activity (CDA)) the multifoil activation method was proposed for the measurement of the neutron fluence and spectrum and a set of suitable foils was defined. The cross section variances and covariances of this set of foils have now been used for tests on the sensitivity of the IFMIF neutron spectrum determination to cross section uncertainties...

  12. Basic design of the test facility for the two-phase critical flow with non-condensable gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Seok Kyu; Kim, Chang Hwe; Chung, Chang Hwan

    2000-12-01

    The two-phase critical flow test with non-condensible gas is for the simulation of the critical flow phenomena which can be occurred during SB-LOCA on SMART reactor. The basic design of the test facility for the actual installation is performed from the basis of the previous conceptual design according to the test requirements. The 1.3m 3 pressure vessel has the circulation pipeline which contains pump(5m 3 /hr), main heater(150KW) and cooler for heating the working fluid to the test temperature within 6 hours. The N2 gas, water supply line are attached to the upper part and test section, flowmeter and various sensors are installed at the lower part of the pressure vessel. The suppression tank is for the storage and cooling of the discharged water. The N2 gas storage tank provides the system pressure to the pressure vessel during the test. The 0.7m 3 N2 gas injection tank supplies the required N2 gas to the entrance of the test section. Since these N2 supply systems require much amount of gas during short period, multistage valve systems and optimal control logics are needed and applied. For the filling of the N2 gas to the N2 storage tank, 5m 3 LN2 tank and related gas converting system were designed. The operating mode of the test facility can be classified to the starting, steady, main test and cooling modes and the proper monitoring and control logics are developed for each operating mode. The operation of the test facility is performed through the PLC and the acquisition of the test data is done with DAS

  13. The scrounge-atron: a phased approach to the advanced hydrotest facility utilizing proton radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alford, O.J.; Barnes, P.D. Jr.; Chargin, A.K.; Dekin, W.D.; Hartouni, E.P.; Hockman, J.; Hockman, J.N.; Ladran, A.S.; Libkind, M.A.; Moore, T.L.; Ohnuma, S.; Pastrnak, J.W.; Pico, R.E.; Ruggiero, A.G.; Souza, R.J.; Stoner, J.M.; Wilson, J.H.

    1999-01-01

    The Department of Energy has initiated its Stockpile Stewardship and Management Program (SSMP) to provide a single, integrated technical program for maintaining the continued safety and reliability of the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile in the absence of nuclear testing. Consistent with the SSMP, the Advanced Hydrotest Facility (AHF) has been conceived to provide improved radiographic imaging with multiple axes and multiple time frames. The AHF would be used to better understand the evolution of nuclear weapon primary implosion shape under normal and accident scenarios. There are three fundamental technologies currently under consideration for use on the AHF. These include linear induction acceleration, inductive-adder pulsed-power technology (both technologies using high current electron beams to produce an intense X-ray beam) and high-energy proton accelerators to produce a proton beam. The Scrounge-atron (a proton synchrotron) was conceived to be a relatively low cost demonstration of the viability of the third technology using bursts of energetic protons, magnetic lenses, and particle detectors to produce the radiographic image. In order for the Scrounge-atron to provide information useful for the AHF technology decision, the accelerator would have to be built as quickly and as economically as possible. These conditions can be met by scrounging parts from decommissioned accelerators across the country, especially the Main Ring at Fermilab. The Scrounge-atron is designed to meet the baseline parameters for single axis proton radiography: a 20 GeV proton beam of ten pulses, 10 11 protons each, spaced 250 ns apart

  14. Data analysis phase-study of the reproducibility of cementation in Lab and facility scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haucz, Maria Judite Afonso; Tello, Cledola Cassia Oliveira de, E-mail: hauczmj@cdtn.br, E-mail: tellocc@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nucelar (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    In Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN) several activities are carried out in the nuclear research area, generating low-level radioactive waste, including aqueous one. The treatment used for these wastes in the CDTN is their volume reduction by the addition of chemicals, in order to concentrate the radionuclides in the waste to an insoluble form, generating sludge. This sludge is incorporated into cement in the Cementation Facility (ICIME) of CDTN, with a mixing system outside the drum and a batch capacity of 200 liters. As these wastes come from different research works, the chemical characteristics are also different, and therefore laboratory studies are necessary to define the process parameters of the cementation for each type of waste. This determination and the quality of the cemented waste product are performed in the Cementation Laboratory (LABCIM), where 2 liters of pastes containing wastes are prepared with a household mixer with circular motion. In LABCIM, tests are done to determinate the viscosity, the setting time and the density in the paste, as well as the compressive and the tensile strength, the density, the homogeneity and the presence of free water in the product. The tests are carried out to verify if the solidified waste product, generated in CDTN, meets the acceptance criteria for safe disposal in the repository established in the standard CNEN NN 6:09. In a previous analysis Haucz et al., comparing the test results of pastes and waste products, which were obtained at LABCIM and ICIME, it was observed that there were statistical differences among them. In order to evaluate these differences and to select the best LABCIM mixing system, it was proposed a design of experiments (DOE), using the applicable statistical tools. Then at LABCIM, pastes were prepared with the same procedure using three different mixers, different types of cement, different times of mixing and different water:cement ratio. Then one formulation was selected, and

  15. Data analysis phase-study of the reproducibility of cementation in Lab and facility scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haucz, Maria Judite Afonso; Tello, Cledola Cassia Oliveira de

    2015-01-01

    In Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN) several activities are carried out in the nuclear research area, generating low-level radioactive waste, including aqueous one. The treatment used for these wastes in the CDTN is their volume reduction by the addition of chemicals, in order to concentrate the radionuclides in the waste to an insoluble form, generating sludge. This sludge is incorporated into cement in the Cementation Facility (ICIME) of CDTN, with a mixing system outside the drum and a batch capacity of 200 liters. As these wastes come from different research works, the chemical characteristics are also different, and therefore laboratory studies are necessary to define the process parameters of the cementation for each type of waste. This determination and the quality of the cemented waste product are performed in the Cementation Laboratory (LABCIM), where 2 liters of pastes containing wastes are prepared with a household mixer with circular motion. In LABCIM, tests are done to determinate the viscosity, the setting time and the density in the paste, as well as the compressive and the tensile strength, the density, the homogeneity and the presence of free water in the product. The tests are carried out to verify if the solidified waste product, generated in CDTN, meets the acceptance criteria for safe disposal in the repository established in the standard CNEN NN 6:09. In a previous analysis Haucz et al., comparing the test results of pastes and waste products, which were obtained at LABCIM and ICIME, it was observed that there were statistical differences among them. In order to evaluate these differences and to select the best LABCIM mixing system, it was proposed a design of experiments (DOE), using the applicable statistical tools. Then at LABCIM, pastes were prepared with the same procedure using three different mixers, different types of cement, different times of mixing and different water:cement ratio. Then one formulation was selected, and

  16. Facile Fabrication of Superhydrophobic Paper with Excellent Water Repellency and Moisture Resistance by Phase Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A simple but effective method of fabricating superhydrophobic paper with excellent moisture resistance was developed by precipitating carnauba wax onto the surface of cellulose fibers using a phase separation method. Response surface methodology (RSM was used to optimize the effects of the preparation variables on the water contact angle (WCA of the paper surface. The four independent variables were carnauba wax concentration, immersion time, coagulation bath ratio (water/ethanol, and coagulation bath time. The optimal treatment conditions were as follows: wax concentration, 3.78% (wax/chloroform, w/v; immersion time, 1.46 h; coagulation bath ratio, 13/87 (water/ethanol, v/v; and coagulation bath time, 2.63 h. Under these conditions, the experimental WCA reached 152.7°, which agreed closely with the predicted value of 154.1°. The surface morphology of the superhydrophobic paper was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM, and the images showed that cluster-like carnauba wax aggregation completely covered the fiber surface, resulting in increased roughness. Moreover, the moisture resistance of the obtained superhydrophobic paper was evaluated. The results demonstrated that under high relative humidity conditions, the moisture resistance of the superhydrophobic paper significantly improved, and its tensile strength remained high.

  17. The optimum operating conditions of the phased double-rotor facility at the et-R R-1 reactor. Vol. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naguib, K; Habib, N; Kilany, M; Adib, M [Reactor and Neutron Physics Department, Nuclear Research Center, AEA., Cairo (Egypt); Wahba, M [Dept. of Engineering Physics and Mathematics, Faculty of Engineering, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    The pulsed neutron polyenergetic thermal beam at ET-R R-1 is produced by a phased double-rotor facility. One of the rotors has two diametrically opposite curved slots, while the second is designed to operate as a rotating collimator, the dimensions of the phased rotating collimator are selected to match the curved slot rotor. The calculated collimator transmissions at different operating conditions are found to be in good agreement with the experimental ones. The optimum operating conditions of double-rotor facility are deduced. The calculations were carried out using a computer programme RCOL. The RCOL was designed in Fortran-77 to operate on PCs. 6 figs.

  18. The optimum operating conditions of the phased double-rotor facility at the et-R R-1 reactor. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naguib, K.; Habib, N.; Kilany, M.; Adib, M.; Wahba, M.

    1996-01-01

    The pulsed neutron polyenergetic thermal beam at ET-R R-1 is produced by a phased double-rotor facility. One of the rotors has two diametrically opposite curved slots, while the second is designed to operate as a rotating collimator, the dimensions of the phased rotating collimator are selected to match the curved slot rotor. The calculated collimator transmissions at different operating conditions are found to be in good agreement with the experimental ones. The optimum operating conditions of double-rotor facility are deduced. The calculations were carried out using a computer programme RCOL. The RCOL was designed in Fortran-77 to operate on PCs. 6 figs

  19. Science design for two shafts in phase 1a of the proposed rock characterisation facility at Sellafield, UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledingham, P.; Proughten, A.J.; Saulnier, G.J. Jr.

    1998-01-01

    In 1997, United Kingdom Nirex planned to begin construction of an underground Rock Characterisation Facility (RCF) at Sellafield as part of it's ongoing assessment of the suitability of the site as a host for a deep radioactive waste repository. The RCF was to have addressed issues relating to the geology, hydrogeology and geomechanical behaviour of the site by collecting data for testing predictive models and acquiring information only available from an underground situation. In March 1997, the UK Government refused permission for Nirex to begin construction and work at Sellafield was wound down. However, the science design for Phase 1a of the RCF, two vertical access shafts, was completed to provide a set of conceptual designs which address the issues identified by Nirex. By using Sellafield as an example, the designs contribute to a series of reports which demonstrate an approach to validation using an underground facility. This paper describes the Science Design for data collection during shaft construction, which began with the information requirements specified by Nirex on the basis of it's conceptual models and predictive work. It describes the scientific measurements designed to acquire this information and the process of combining the individual measurements into test plans for each shaft. Measurements were planned in the shafts themselves and in boreholes drilled from the shafts. They were designed to provide data on formation porosity and permeability, the geochemistry of formation water and the nature of the fresh-water salt-water interface, shaft inflow, the influence of geological structures on performance, and geomechanical responses to shaft excavation. A key element of the design process was the development of test plans, requiring the co-ordination and integration of the construction and science activities so that both could be carried out in a timely and cost-effective manner

  20. Characterization of the transverse phase space at the photo-injector test facility in DESY, Zeuthen site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staykov, Lazar

    2012-10-15

    High brightness electron beams with charge of 1 nC and low transverse emittance are necessary for the functioning of advanced light sources such as the Free-electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) and the European X-ray FEL (XFEL). The photo-injector test facility at DESY, Zeuthen site (PITZ) is dedicated to the optimization of such electron beams. At PITZ the electrons are produced using an RF gun cavity operated at accelerating gradients of up to 60 MV/m. The gun is equipped with a pair of solenoids for the compensation of the emittance growth due to linear space charge forces. This solenoid compensation scheme is enhanced with a properly matched TESLA type normal conducting booster cavity. The main tool for the characterization of the transverse phase space of the electron beam at PITZ is the emittance measurement system (EMSY). It employs the single slit method for the measurement of the transverse phase space distribution of the electron beam. In this thesis, the performance of the EMSY was optimized for measurement of low emittances in a wide range of photo-injector parameters including such that result in electron beams close to the XFEL specifications. First results on the characterization of the PITZ photo-injector with a gun operated at maximum accelerating gradient of 60 MV/m are presented. This includes scans of the solenoid focusing strength, the initial beam size and the booster gradient. A comparison between results obtained at lower accelerating gradients is made with emphasize on the benefit of higher accelerating gradient.

  1. Characterization of the transverse phase space at the photo-injector test facility in DESY, Zeuthen site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staykov, Lazar

    2012-10-01

    High brightness electron beams with charge of 1 nC and low transverse emittance are necessary for the functioning of advanced light sources such as the Free-electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) and the European X-ray FEL (XFEL). The photo-injector test facility at DESY, Zeuthen site (PITZ) is dedicated to the optimization of such electron beams. At PITZ the electrons are produced using an RF gun cavity operated at accelerating gradients of up to 60 MV/m. The gun is equipped with a pair of solenoids for the compensation of the emittance growth due to linear space charge forces. This solenoid compensation scheme is enhanced with a properly matched TESLA type normal conducting booster cavity. The main tool for the characterization of the transverse phase space of the electron beam at PITZ is the emittance measurement system (EMSY). It employs the single slit method for the measurement of the transverse phase space distribution of the electron beam. In this thesis, the performance of the EMSY was optimized for measurement of low emittances in a wide range of photo-injector parameters including such that result in electron beams close to the XFEL specifications. First results on the characterization of the PITZ photo-injector with a gun operated at maximum accelerating gradient of 60 MV/m are presented. This includes scans of the solenoid focusing strength, the initial beam size and the booster gradient. A comparison between results obtained at lower accelerating gradients is made with emphasize on the benefit of higher accelerating gradient.

  2. Facile fabrication of ultrathin hybrid membrane for highly flexible supercapacitors via in-situ phase separation of polyethersulfone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaoning; Ran, Fen; Shen, Kuiwen; Yang, Yunlong; Wu, Jiayu; Niu, Xiaoqin; Kong, Lingbin; Kang, Long; Chen, Shaowei

    2016-10-01

    In this article, a facile method based on in-situ phase-separation was developed for the fabrication of ultrathin hybrid membranes for highly flexible supercapacitors. The structures and morphologies of the prepared electrodes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) measurements; and the electrochemical behaviors were examined in 2 M KOH solution. SEM and FTIR characterizations reveal that activated carbon was imbedded into the polymer membrane of polyethersulfone to form a uniform and flexible hybrid membrane. When the thin polymer-carbon membrane (PCM) was used as an electrode material for supercapacitor, a high specific capacitance of 169.4 Fg-1 was obtained at a current density of 0.5 Ag-1 along with good long-term cycle life of 94.6% capacity retention after 2000 charging-discharging cycles. Benefiting from these merits, the as-fabricated PCM//PCM cell shows an excellent electrochemical property. These results suggest a promising route towards the fabrication of highly flexible electrodes for high-performance supercapacitors.

  3. Results of tests and studies of American materials in the channel of the MHD facility U-02 (Phase III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burenkov, D.K.; Borodina, T.I.; Vysotsky, D.A.; Zalkind, V.I.; Kirillov, V.V.; Romanov, A.I.; Telegin, G.P.; Strekalov, N.V.

    1978-10-01

    In accordance with the US--USSR Cooperative Program in MHD joint US--USSR tests were conducted in May 1978 at the U-02 facility of an MHD generator section consisting of U.S.-built electrode blocks and USSR-built insulating walls. The main purpose of the experiment was to conduct continuous 100-hour duration tests of materials and structures of electrode blocks; in particular, to study the behavior of ceramic electrodes and insulators in operating conditions of an MHD generator, the electro-physical and thermal characteristics of the working section as a whole and electrodes in particular, and to analyze the change in the phase composition and structure of materials during the test. The main thrust of the experiment was a study of electrode material behavior. Six varieties of electrodes based on doped lanthanum chromite were tested and investigated. The electrodes were made of fine grained, hot-pressed mass (the porosity of the ceramic was 2 to 3%). The interelectrode insulators were made of magnesial and magnesial-spinel ceramic also manufactured by the hot pressing method. Results are presented and discussed

  4. Lessons learnt during the design, construction and start-up phase of a molten salt testing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodríguez-García, Margarita-Manuela; Herrador-Moreno, Miguel; Zarza Moya, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, CIEMAT (Centro de investigaciones energéticas medioambientales y tecnológicas) signed a turn-key contract to have an experimental plant for thermal storage using molten salts at its PSA (Plataforma Solar de Almeria) facilities. This plant was designed to evaluate components, instrumentation and operation strategies and to give support to the industry in the qualification and evaluation of components. During the design, construction and start-up phases of this plant, many different aspects regarding design, construction and commissioning have been learnt and these will contribute to the improvement of other plants. Among other tips explained in the paper, we recommend the use of venting valves to eliminate the water present in the system after the pressure test or released by the salts during the first melting. The selection of instrumentation with no electronic components near a heat source, thus preventing them from overheating, is also advisable. The heat exchanger design and dimensioning should take into account not only the thermal losses to the atmosphere and through pipes and supports, but any possible reduction in the heat exchange surface that could have detrimental consequences in the thermal performance. Special attention must be paid when dimensioning and installing the EHT and insulation because both components are decisive in the avoidance of plug formation. Its correct installation in valves and supports and the proper positioning of the temperature control sensors, i.e. where no other heat source can distort the readings, are crucial. Recommendations and strategies for the operation and shutdown of this experimental plant are being gathered for a future paper. -- Highlights: • Description of the experimental molten salt storage system built at CIEMAT. • Design technical considerations for an experimental molten salt storage plant. • Hints for piping and heat exchangers design and thermal losses calculation. • Recommendations for

  5. Results from the CDE phase activity on neutron dosimetry for the international fusion materials irradiation facility test cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esposito, B. E-mail: esposito@frascati.enea.it; Bertalot, L.; Maruccia, G.; Petrizzi, L.; Bignan, G.; Blandin, C.; Chauffriat, S.; Lebrun, A.; Recroix, H.; Trapp, J.P.; Kaschuck, Y

    2000-11-01

    The international fusion materials irradiation facility (IFMIF) project deals with the study of an accelerator-based, deuterium-lithium source, producing high energy neutrons at sufficient intensity and irradiation volume to test samples of candidate materials for fusion energy reactors. IFMIF would also provide calibration and validation of data from fission reactor and other accelerator based irradiation tests. This paper describes the activity on neutron/gamma dosimetry (necessary for the characterization of the specimens' irradiation) performed in the frame of the IFMIF conceptual design evaluation (CDE) neutronics tasks. During the previous phase (conceptual design activity (CDA)) the multifoil activation method was proposed for the measurement of the neutron fluence and spectrum and a set of suitable foils was defined. The cross section variances and covariances of this set of foils have now been used for tests on the sensitivity of the IFMIF neutron spectrum determination to cross section uncertainties. The analysis has been carried out using the LSL-M2 code, which optimizes the neutron spectrum by means of a least-squares technique taking into account the variance and covariance files. In the second part of the activity, the possibility of extending to IFMIF the use of existing on-line in-core neutron/gamma monitors (to be located at several positions inside the IFMIF test cell for beam control, safety and diagnostic purposes) has been studied. A feasibility analysis of the modifications required to adapt sub-miniature fission chambers (recently developed by CEA-Cadarache) to the high flux test module of the test cell has been carried out. The verification of this application pertinence and a gross definition of the in-core detector characteristics are described. The option of using self-powered neutron detectors (SPNDs) is also discussed.

  6. How women are treated during facility-based childbirth: development and validation of measurement tools in four countries - phase 1 formative research study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Joshua P; Bohren, Meghan A; Tunçalp, Özge; Oladapo, Olufemi T; Adanu, Richard M; Baldé, Mamadou Diouldé; Maung, Thae Maung; Fawole, Bukola; Adu-Bonsaffoh, Kwame; Dako-Gyeke, Phyllis; Maya, Ernest Tei; Camara, Mohamed Campell; Diallo, Alfa Boubacar; Diallo, Safiatou; Wai, Khin Thet; Myint, Theingi; Olutayo, Lanre; Titiloye, Musibau; Alu, Frank; Idris, Hadiza; Gülmezoglu, Metin A

    2015-07-22

    Every woman has the right to dignified, respectful care during childbirth. Recent evidence has demonstrated that globally many women experience mistreatment during labour and childbirth in health facilities, which can pose a significant barrier to women attending facilities for delivery and can contribute to poor birth experiences and adverse outcomes for women and newborns. However there is no clear consensus on how mistreatment of women during childbirth in facilities is defined and measured. We propose using a two-phased, mixed-methods study design in four countries to address these research gaps. This protocol describes the Phase 1 qualitative research activities. We will employ qualitative research methodologies among women, healthcare providers and administrators in the facility catchment areas of two health facilities in each country: Ghana, Guinea, Myanmar and Nigeria. In-depth interviews (IDIs) and focus group discussions (FGDs) will be conducted among women of reproductive age (15-49 years) to explore their perceptions and experiences of facility-based childbirth care, focused on how they were treated by healthcare workers and perceived factors affecting how they were treated. IDIs will also be conducted with healthcare providers of different cadres (e.g.: nurses, midwives, medical officers, specialist obstetricians) and facility administrators working in the selected facilities to explore healthcare providers' perceptions and experiences of facility-based childbirth care and how staff are treated, colleagues and supervisors. Audio recordings will be transcribed and translated to English. Textual data will be analysed using a thematic framework approach and will consist of two levels of analysis: (1) conduct of local analysis workshops with the research assistants in each country; and (2) line-by-line coding to develop a thematic framework and coding scheme. This study serves several roles. It will provide an in-depth understanding of how women are

  7. Future proton and mixed-field irradiation facilities with slow extraction for LHC operation phase and for LHC upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    Assmann, Ralph Wolfgang; Brugger, Markus; Efthymiopoulos, Ilias; Feldbaumer, Eduard; Garrido, Mar Capeans; Glaser, Maurice; Kramer, Daniel; Linssen, Lucie; Losito, Roberto; Moll, Michael; Rembser, Christoph; Silari, Marco; Thurel, Yves; Tsesmelis, Emmanuel; Vincke, Helmut; CERN. Geneva. The LHC experiments Committee; LHCC

    2010-01-01

    In the present proposal we present the need for improved proton and mixed-field irradiation facilities with slow beam extraction at CERN. Strong needs are expressed by both the detector and accelerator communities and concern the LHC operation era as well as the upgrades of machine and experiments. The current facilities and test areas have a number of limitations and drawbacks. Preliminary studies indicate that there are possibilities for a coherent and cost-effective approach towards improved facilities for the future. The aim of this document is to inform the LHCC and seek its recognition for the need of such facilities. In addition we would appreciate the support of the LHCC for pursuing further implementation studies at a PS East Hall location.

  8. Data gathering in support of phase O program for waste heat utilization from nuclear enrichment facilities, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The gathering of demographic, community development, and economic data for the region impacted by the Pikeville (Ohio) Nuclear Enrichment Facility is described. These data are to be used for establishing possible community uses, e.g., space heating, domestic water heating, and industrial uses, of waste heat from the facility. It was concluded that although the economic feasibility of such waste heat utilization remains to be proven, the community would cooperate in a feasibility demonstration program

  9. Work Plan: Phase II Investigation at the Former CCC/USDA Grain Storage Facility in Montgomery City, Missouri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2012-05-01

    From September 1949 until September 1966, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) leased property at the southeastern end of Montgomery City, Missouri, for the operation of a grain storage facility. During this time, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were commonly used by the CCC/USDA and the private grain storage industry to preserve grain in their facilities.

  10. Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California -- Phase I Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lekov, Alex; Thompson, Lisa; McKane, Aimee; Song, Katherine; Piette, Mary Ann

    2009-04-01

    This report summarizes the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory?s research to date in characterizing energy efficiency and automated demand response opportunities for wastewater treatment facilities in California. The report describes the characteristics of wastewater treatment facilities, the nature of the wastewater stream, energy use and demand, as well as details of the wastewater treatment process. It also discusses control systems and energy efficiency and automated demand response opportunities. In addition, several energy efficiency and load management case studies are provided for wastewater treatment facilities.This study shows that wastewater treatment facilities can be excellent candidates for open automated demand response and that facilities which have implemented energy efficiency measures and have centralized control systems are well-suited to shift or shed electrical loads in response to financial incentives, utility bill savings, and/or opportunities to enhance reliability of service. Control technologies installed for energy efficiency and load management purposes can often be adapted for automated demand response at little additional cost. These improved controls may prepare facilities to be more receptive to open automated demand response due to both increased confidence in the opportunities for controlling energy cost/use and access to the real-time data.

  11. A study of thermal stratification in the cold legs during the subcooled blowdown phase of a loss of coolant accident in the OSU APEX thermal hydraulic testing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachs, D. M.

    1998-01-01

    Thermal stratification, which has been linked to the occurrence of pressurized thermal shock (PTS), is observed to occur during the early stages of simulated loss of coolant accidents (LOCAS) in the Oregon State University Advanced Plant Experiment (OSU APEX) Thermal Hydraulic Test Facility. The OSU APEX Test Facility is a scaled model of the Westinghouse AP600 nuclear power plant. Analysis of the OSU APEX facility data has allowed the determination of an onset criteria for thermal stratification and has provided support for the postulated mechanisms leading to thermal stratification. CFX 4.1, a computational fluid dynamics code, was used to generate a model of the cold legs and the downcomer that described the phenomena occurring within them. Some mixing phenomena were predicted that lead to non-uniformity between the two cold legs attached to the steam generator on the side of the facility containing the Passive Residual Heat Removal (PRHR) injection system. The stratification was found to be two phase and unlikely to be a factor in PTS

  12. Experimental facility with two-phase flow and with high concentration of non-condensable gases for research and development of emergency cooling system of advanced nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macedo, Luiz Alberto; Baptista Filho, Benedito Dias

    2006-01-01

    The development of emergency cooling passive systems of advanced nuclear reactors requires the research of some relative processes to natural circulation, in two-phase flow conditions involving condensation processes in the presence of non-condensable gases. This work describes the main characteristics of the experimental facility called Bancada de Circulacao Natural (BCN), designed for natural circulation experiments in a system with a hot source, electric heater, a cold source, heat exchanger, operating with two-phase flow and with high concentration of noncondensable gas, air. The operational tests, the data acquisition system and the first experimental results in natural circulation are presented. The experiments are transitory in natural circulation considering power steps. The distribution of temperatures and the behavior of the flow and of the pressure are analyzed. The experimental facility, the instrumentation and the data acquisition system demonstrated to be adapted for the purposes of research of emergency cooling passive systems, operating with two-phase flow and with high concentration of noncondensable gases. (author)

  13. Quantitative kHz to MHz Frame Rate Flow Diagnostics for Aerodynamic Ground Test Facilities, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed Phase I SBIR program will study the feasibility of building next-generation burst-mode laser diagnostics that will enable unparalleled planar imaging...

  14. Shielding analysis in the design phase of the new Emergency Operation Facility for Tihange Nuclear Power Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Genard Gilles; Portal Romain; Bouchat Virginie; Vanderperre Serge

    2017-01-01

    In the framework of the design studies for a new Emergency Operation Facility (EOF) for Tihange NPP, radiation protection analyses are needed to comply with effective dose rate criteria. In this aim, the shielding performed by, at the one hand, external walls and roof of the building and, on the other hand, internal walls, has been sized by means of MicroShield calculations. This paper explains how the calculations for external walls, doors, roof, floor and internal walls are made. The assump...

  15. Component Test Facility (Comtest) Phase 1 Engineering For 760°C (1400°F) Advanced Ultrasupercritical (A-USC) Steam Generator Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weitzel, Paul [Babcock & Wilcox Power Generation Group, Inc., Barberton, OH (United States)

    2016-05-13

    The Babcock & Wilcox Company (B&W) performed a Pre-Front End Engineering Design (Pre-FEED) of an A-USC steam superheater for a proposed component test program achieving 760°C (1400°F) steam temperature. This would lead to follow-on work in a Phase 2 and Phase 3 that would involve detail design, manufacturing, construction and operation of the ComTest. Phase 1 results have provided the engineering data necessary for proceeding to the next phase of ComTest. The steam generator superheater would subsequently supply the steam to an A-USC prototype intermediate pressure steam turbine. The ComTest program is important in that it will place functioning A-USC components in operation and in coordinated boiler and turbine service. It is also important to introduce the power plant operation and maintenance personnel to the level of skills required and provide the first background experience with hands-on training. The project will provide a means to exercise the complete supply chain events required in order to practice and perfect the process for A-USC power plant design, supply, manufacture, construction, commissioning, operation and maintenance. Representative participants will then be able to transfer knowledge and recommendations to the industry. ComTest is conceived in the manner of using a separate standalone plant facility that will not jeopardize the host facility or suffer from conflicting requirements in the host plant’s mission that could sacrifice the nickel alloy components and not achieve the testing goals. ComTest will utilize smaller quantities of the expensive materials and reduce the risk in the first operational practice for A-USC technology in the United States. Components at suitable scale in ComTest provide more assurance before putting them into practice in the full size A-USC demonstration plant.

  16. Phase 1 RCRA Facility Investigation/Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for Single-Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MCCARTHY, M.M.

    1999-01-01

    This document is the master work plan for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) Corrective Action Program (RCAP) for single-shell tank (SST) farms at the US. Department of Energy's (DOE'S) Hanford Site. The DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) initiated the RCAP to address the impacts of past and potential future tank waste releases to the environment. This work plan defines RCAP activities for the four SST waste management areas (WMAs) at which releases have contaminated groundwater. Recognizing the potential need for future RCAP activities beyond those specified in this master work plan, DOE has designated the currently planned activities as ''Phase 1.'' If a second phase of activities is needed for the WMAs addressed in Phase 1, or if releases are detected at other SST WMAs, this master work plan will be updated accordingly

  17. Phase 1 RCRA Facility Investigation & Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for Single Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCCARTHY, M.M.

    1999-08-01

    This document is the master work plan for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) Corrective Action Program (RCAP) for single-shell tank (SST) farms at the US. Department of Energy's (DOE'S) Hanford Site. The DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) initiated the RCAP to address the impacts of past and potential future tank waste releases to the environment. This work plan defines RCAP activities for the four SST waste management areas (WMAs) at which releases have contaminated groundwater. Recognizing the potential need for future RCAP activities beyond those specified in this master work plan, DOE has designated the currently planned activities as ''Phase 1.'' If a second phase of activities is needed for the WMAs addressed in Phase 1, or if releases are detected at other SST WMAs, this master work plan will be updated accordingly.

  18. A facile approach to pure-phase Bi{sub 2}Fe{sub 4}O{sub 9} nanoparticles sensitive to visible light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, X., E-mail: xiongwang@njust.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 3, 117543 (Singapore); Zhang, M.; Tian, P. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Chin, W.S. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 3, 117543 (Singapore); Zhang, C.M. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China)

    2014-12-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Pure-phase Bi{sub 2}Fe{sub 4}O{sub 9} nanoparticles were prepared by a facile and environmentally benign sol–gel method. • The multiband characteristic of the nanoparticles greatly expands the visible light absorption. • The visible-light-driven photocatalytic activity of the obtained nanoparticles was improved by 30-fold as compared to the bulk. - Abstract: Pure-phase Bi{sub 2}Fe{sub 4}O{sub 9} nanoparticles with mullite-type structure were successfully fabricated through a facile and environmentally benign sol–gel process. According to the UV–Vis diffuse reflection spectrum, the multiband structure and the band edge position of the nanoparticles were confirmed, indicating the prominent absorption in the expanded visible-light region. As compared to the bulk, the visible-light-driven photocatalytic activity of the obtained nanoparticles was improved by 30-fold. The much improved photocatalytic efficiency of the sample mainly owed to the small crystal size and the multiband characteristic as well as the adding of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} as electron scavenger and a source of hydroxide free radicals instead of Fenton-like reaction, leading to a low recombination of the photogenerated e{sup −}/h{sup +} pairs.

  19. An ecological quarter in Neuchatel, Switzerland. Phase 3: two new educational facilities; Deux ecoles pour le quartier Ecoparc. En quete d'harmonie durable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schafer, L.

    2009-07-01

    This richly illustrated article reports on the phase 3 of the construction of an ecological quarter in the city of Neuchatel, Switzerland. In this urban area of 4 hectares, new buildings are replacing former industrial buildings. The architects and the city authorities put the emphasis on energy conservation and efficiency, together with ecological considerations and modern appropriate architecture. The area is located near the city railway station and includes (i) the Swiss Federal Office of Statistics, (ii) eight residential buildings, (iii) two educational facilities for 1700 students and (iv) one commercial and office building. The article is focused on phase 3 and is supplemented by an interview of the principal architect. The two educational facilities - a music academy and a business school - are located in a single 193 m long building adjacent to the railway tracks. Synergies have been used to create common rooms like library and concert/conference hall. Highly efficient artificial lighting has been developed with the appliances' manufacturer. Dessicant cooling is used to cool the large rooms of the building. Heat is provided for cooling, space heating and hot water by wood chips boilers. There is plenty of wood available from the surrounding forests, which are insufficiently renewed so far. In the interview the architect explains how a compromise was found between ecological requirements and investment cost, leading to a sustainable development of the area.

  20. Shielding analysis in the design phase of the new Emergency Operation Facility for Tihange Nuclear Power Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genard, Gilles; Portal, Romain; Bouchat, Virginie; Vanderperre, Serge

    2017-09-01

    In the framework of the design studies for a new Emergency Operation Facility (EOF) for Tihange NPP, radiation protection analyses are needed to comply with effective dose rate criteria. In this aim, the shielding performed by, at the one hand, external walls and roof of the building and, on the other hand, internal walls, has been sized by means of MicroShield calculations. This paper explains how the calculations for external walls, doors, roof, floor and internal walls are made. The assumptions on the source terms and on the source geometry as well as the way the shielding is determined and the results of the sizing are presented.

  1. Shielding analysis in the design phase of the new Emergency Operation Facility for Tihange Nuclear Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genard Gilles

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of the design studies for a new Emergency Operation Facility (EOF for Tihange NPP, radiation protection analyses are needed to comply with effective dose rate criteria. In this aim, the shielding performed by, at the one hand, external walls and roof of the building and, on the other hand, internal walls, has been sized by means of MicroShield calculations. This paper explains how the calculations for external walls, doors, roof, floor and internal walls are made. The assumptions on the source terms and on the source geometry as well as the way the shielding is determined and the results of the sizing are presented.

  2. Industrial Processes to Reduce Generation of Hazardous Waste at DoD facilities. Phase Report. Appendix A

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-01

    by CLEMCO, Pauli & helps to stress - releive the surfaces, Griffin, CAB Systems and Royce does not heal cracks in aluminum and Mechanical Systems are now...Generation of HlazardOuIs Waste at DoD Facilities- 1.S)3 Re.port 2 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Ia lYE OF REPOR I Jb TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF REPORT (Year...105 miles from Hill AFB on the north slope. of the Ulntah Mountains. (For military and family members and retired military and family members only

  3. Final work plan : Phase I investigation of potential contamination at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Savannah, Missouri.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-10-12

    . This work will be performed in accord with the Intergovernmental Agreement established between the Farm Service Agency of the USDA and MoDNR, to address carbon tetrachloride contamination potentially associated with a number of former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities in Missouri. The investigative activities at Savannah will be conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The CCC/USDA has entered into an agreement with the DOE, under which Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at its former grain storage facilities. The site characterization at Savannah will take place in phases. This approach is recommended by the CCC/USDA and Argonne, so that information obtained and interpretations developed during each incremental stage of the investigation can be used most effectively to guide subsequent phases of the program. This site-specific Work Plan outlines the specific technical objectives and scope of work proposed for Phase I of the Savannah investigation. This Work Plan also includes the community relations plan to be followed throughout the CCC/USDA program at the Savannah site. Argonne is developing a Master Work Plan specific to operations in the state of Missouri. In the meantime, Argonne will issue a Provisional Master Work Plan (PMWP; Argonne 2007) that will be submitted to the MoDNR for review and approval. The agency has already reviewed and approved (with minor changes) the present Master Work Plan (Argonne 2002) under which Argonne currently operates in Kansas. The PMWP (Argonne 2007) will provide detailed information and guidance on the investigative technologies, analytical methodologies, quality assurance-quality control measures, and general health and safety policies to be employed by

  4. Final work plan : phase I investigation of potential contamination at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Montgomery City, Missouri.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-08-16

    former grain storage facility, the CCC/USDA will conduct investigations to (1) characterize the source(s), extent, and factors controlling the possible subsurface distribution and movement of carbon tetrachloride at the Montgomery City site and (2) evaluate the health and environmental threats potentially represented by the contamination. This work will be performed in accord with the Intergovernmental Agreement established between the Farm Service Agency of the USDA and the MoDNR, to address carbon tetrachloride contamination potentially associated with a number of former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities in Missouri. The investigations at Montgomery City will be conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The CCC/USDA has entered into an agreement with DOE, under which Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at its former grain storage facilities. The site characterization at Montgomery City will take place in phases. This approach is recommended by the CCC/USDA and Argonne, so that information obtained and interpretations developed during each incremental stage of the investigation can be used most effectively to guide subsequent phases of the program. This site-specific Work Plan outlines the specific technical objectives and scope of work proposed for Phase I of the Montgomery City investigation. This Work Plan also includes the community relations plan to be followed throughout the CCC/USDA program at the Montgomery City site. Argonne is developing a Master Work Plan specific to operations in the state of Missouri. In the meantime, Argonne has issued a Provisional Master Work Plan (PMWP; Argonne 2007) that has been reviewed and approved by the MoDNR for current use. The PMWP (Argonne 2007) provides

  5. State of Washington Department of Health Radioactive air emissions notice of construction phase 1 for spent nuclear fuel project - cold vacuum drying facility, project W-441

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turnbaugh, J.E.

    1996-08-15

    This notice of construction (NOC) provides information regarding the source and the estimated annual possession quantity resulting from operation of the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). Additional details on emissions generated by the operation of the CVDF will be discussed again in the Phase 11 NOC. This document serves as a NOC pursuant to the requirements of WAC 246-247-060 for the completion of Phase I NOC, defined as the pouring of concrete for the foundation flooring, construction of external walls, and construction of the building excluding the installation of CVDF process equipment. A Phase 11 NOC will be submitted for approval prior to installing and is defined as the completion of the CVDF, which consisted installation of process equipment, air emissions control, and emission monitoring equipment. About 80 percent of the U.S. Department of Energy`s spent nuclear fuel (SNF) inventory is stored under water in the Hanford Site K Basins. Spent nuclear fuel in the K West Basin is contained in closed canisters while the SNF in the K East Basin is in open canisters, which allow free release of corrosion products to the K East Basin water.

  6. Derivation of quantitative acceptance criteria for disposal of radioactive waste to near surface facilities: Development and implementation of an approach for the post-closure phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, C.

    2000-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency has established a project to develop and illustrate, through practical examples, an approach that allows the derivation of quantitative waste acceptance criteria for near surface disposal of radioactive waste. The first phase focussed on the derivation of example post-closure safety waste acceptance criteria through the use of a safety assessment approach that allows for the derivation of values in a clear and well documented manner. The approach consists of five steps: the specification of the assessment context; the description of the disposal system; the development and justification of scenarios; the formulation and implementation of models; and the calculation and derivation of example values. The approach has been successfully used to derive activity values for the disposal of radioactive waste to illustrative near surface facilities. (author)

  7. National Institutes of Health–Sponsored Clinical Islet Transplantation Consortium Phase 3 Trial: Manufacture of a Complex Cellular Product at Eight Processing Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balamurugan, A.N.; Szot, Gregory L.; Kin, Tatsuya; Liu, Chengyang; Czarniecki, Christine W.; Barbaro, Barbara; Bridges, Nancy D.; Cano, Jose; Clarke, William R.; Eggerman, Thomas L.; Hunsicker, Lawrence G.; Kaufman, Dixon B.; Khan, Aisha; Lafontant, David-Erick; Linetsky, Elina; Luo, Xunrong; Markmann, James F.; Naji, Ali; Korsgren, Olle; Oberholzer, Jose; Turgeon, Nicole A.; Brandhorst, Daniel; Chen, Xiaojuan; Friberg, Andrew S.; Lei, Ji; Wang, Ling-jia; Wilhelm, Joshua J.; Willits, Jamie; Zhang, Xiaomin; Hering, Bernhard J.; Posselt, Andrew M.; Stock, Peter G.; Shapiro, A.M. James

    2016-01-01

    Eight manufacturing facilities participating in the National Institutes of Health–sponsored Clinical Islet Transplantation (CIT) Consortium jointly developed and implemented a harmonized process for the manufacture of allogeneic purified human pancreatic islet (PHPI) product evaluated in a phase 3 trial in subjects with type 1 diabetes. Manufacturing was controlled by a common master production batch record, standard operating procedures that included acceptance criteria for deceased donor organ pancreata and critical raw materials, PHPI product specifications, certificate of analysis, and test methods. The process was compliant with Current Good Manufacturing Practices and Current Good Tissue Practices. This report describes the manufacturing process for 75 PHPI clinical lots and summarizes the results, including lot release. The results demonstrate the feasibility of implementing a harmonized process at multiple facilities for the manufacture of a complex cellular product. The quality systems and regulatory and operational strategies developed by the CIT Consortium yielded product lots that met the prespecified characteristics of safety, purity, potency, and identity and were successfully transplanted into 48 subjects. No adverse events attributable to the product and no cases of primary nonfunction were observed. PMID:27465220

  8. Facile fabrication of multilayer separators for lithium-ion battery via multilayer coextrusion and thermal induced phase separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yajie; Pu, Hongting

    2018-04-01

    Polypropylene (PP)/polyethylene (PE) multilayer separators with cellular-like submicron pore structure for lithium-ion battery are efficiently fabricated by the combination of multilayer coextrusion (MC) and thermal induced phase separation (TIPS). The as-prepared separators, referred to as MC-TIPS PP/PE, not only show efficacious thermal shutdown function and wider shutdown temperature window, but also exhibit higher thermal stability than the commercial separator with trilayer construction of PP and PE (Celgard® 2325). The dimensional shrinkage of MC-TIPS PP/PE can be negligible until 160 °C. In addition, compared to the commercial separator, MC-TIPS PP/PE exhibits higher porosity and electrolyte uptake, leading to higher ionic conductivity and better battery performances. The above-mentioned fascinating characteristics with the convenient preparation process make MC-TIPS PP/PE a promising candidate for the application as high performance lithium-ion battery separators.

  9. The US Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor and the Fast Flux Test Facility Phase IIA passive safety tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, P.K.; Harris, R.A.; Campbell, L.R.; Dautel, W.A.; Dubberley, A.E.; Gluekler, E.L.

    1992-07-01

    This report discusses the safety approach of the Advanced Liquid Metal reactor program, sponsored by the US Department of Energy, which relies upon passive reactor responses to off-normal condition to limit power and temperature excursions to levels that allow safety margins. Gas expansion modules (GEM) have included in the design to provide negative reactivity to enhance these margins in the extremely unlikely event that pumping power is lost and the highly reliable scram system fails to operate. The feasibility and beneficial features of these devices were first demonstrated in the core of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) in 1986. Preapplication safety evaluations by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission have identified areas that must be addressed if these devices are to be relied on. One of these areas is the response of the reactor when it is critical and the pumps are turned on, resulting in positive reactivity being added to the core. Tests to examine such transients have been performed as part of the continuing FFTF program to confirm the passive safety characteristics of liquid metal reactors (LMR). The primary tests consisted of starting the main coolant pumps, which forced sodium coolant into the GEMS, decreasing neutron leakage and adding positive reactivity. The resulting transients were shown to be benign and easily mitigated by the reactivity feedbacks inherent in the FFTF and all LMRs. Steady-state auxiliary tests of the GEM and feedback reactivity worths accurately predicted the transient results. The auxiliary GEM worth tests also demonstrated that the worth can be determined at a subcritical state, which allows for a verification of the GEM's availability prior to ascending to power

  10. First clinical results from the EORTC phase I Trial ''postoperative treatment of glioblastoma with BNCT at the Petten irradiation facility''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauerwein, W.; Hideghety, K.; Rassow, J.; Devries, M.J.; Goetz, C.; Paquis, P.; Grochulla, F.; Wolbers, J.G.; Haselsberger, K.; Turowski, B.; Moss, R.L.; Stecher-Rasmussen, F.; Touw, D.; Wiestler, O.D.; Frankhauser, H.; Gabel, D.

    2001-01-01

    Based on the pre-clinical work of the European Collaboration on Boron Neutron Capture Therapy a study protocol was prepared in 1995 to initiate Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in patients at the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten. Bio-distribution and pharmacokinetics data of the boron drug Na 2 B 12 H 11 SH (BSH) as well as the radiobiological effects of BNCT with BSH in healthy brain tissue of dogs were considered in designing the strategy for this clinical Phase I trial. The primary goal of the radiation dose escalation study is the investigation of possible adverse events due to BNCT; i.e. to establish the dose limiting toxicity and the maximal tolerated dose. The treatment is delivered in 4 fractions at a defined average boron concentration in blood. Cohorts of 10 patients are treated per dose group. The starting dose was set at 80% of the dose at which neurological symptoms occurred in preclinical dog experiments following a single fraction. After an observation period of at least 6 months, the dose is increased by 10% for the next cohort if less then three severe side effects related to the treatment occurred. The results of the first cohort are presented here. The evaluated dose level can be considered safe. (author)

  11. Facile and low energy consumption synthesis of microencapsulated phase change materials with hybrid shell for thermal energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Zhao, Liang; Chen, Lijie; Song, Guolin; Tang, Guoyi

    2017-12-01

    We designed a photocurable pickering emulsion polymerization to create microencapsulated phase change materials (MicroPCM) with polymer-silica hybrid shell. The emulsion was stabilized by modified SiO2 particles without any surfactant or dispersant. The polymerization process can be carried out at ambient temperature only for 5 min ultraviolet radiation, which is a low-energy procedure. The resultant capsules were shown a good core-shell structure and uniform in size. The surface of the microcapsules was covered by SiO2 particles. According to the DSC and TGA examinations, the microcapsules has good thermal energy storage-release performance, enhanced thermal reliability and thermal stability. When ratio of MMA/n-octadecane was 1.5/1.5. The encapsulation efficiency of the microcapsules reached 62.55%, accompanied with 122.31 J/g melting enthalpy. The work is virtually applicable to the construction of a wide variety of organic-inorganic hybrid shell MicroPCM. Furthermore, with the application of this method, exciting opportunities may arise for realizing rapid, continuous and large-scale industrial preparation of MicroPCM.

  12. The first phase epidemiological study on the workers engaged in radiation business in facilities for atomic power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Tamiko; Kumatori, Toshiyuki

    1996-01-01

    Recently, the influence of long-lasting exposure to low-dose radiation on human bodies, especially on carcinogenesis have been attracting considerable attentions, however, there are few data available for the estimation of such risks. An epidemiological survey study on the workers for radiation business in atomic power stations was started in 1990 and its first phase study (1990-1994) was finished. This report describes the outlines of the results from the study, which has been made public by the Science and Technology Agency. The correlation between the exposure dose and carcinogenicity was observed only for the cancer in pancreas, but not in other organs. But, the previous studies in other countries and the data from the persons exposed to atomic bomb indicated that there was no significant correlation between the radiation and the incidence of pancreatic cancer. This causal relation found should be coped with carefully. The standardized mortality ratio, SMR for all kinds of death cause in the subjects was 0.89 (95% CI: 0.82-0.96), significantly lower than that in all Japanese men. This fact was consistent with the data in other countries, suggesting that the decreased SMR compared with the whole people would be due to so called 'healthy worker's effects'. (M.N.)

  13. First clinical results from the EORTC phase I Trial ''postoperative treatment of glioblastoma with BNCT at the Petten irradiation facility''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauerwein, W; Hideghety, K; Rassow, J [Department of Radiotherapy, University of Essen (Germany); Devries, M J [NDDO Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Goetz, C [Neurochirurgische Klinik, Klinikum Grosshadern Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Paquis, P [Dept. de Neurochirurgie, Hopital Pasteur, Nice (France); Grochulla, F [Klinik fuer Neurochirurgie, Zentralkrankenhaus Bremen (Germany); Wolbers, J G [Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital ' ' Vrije Universiteit' ' , Amsterdam (Netherlands); Haselsberger, K [Klinik fuer Neurochirurgie, Karl-Franzens-Universitaet, Graz (Austria); Turowski, B [Institut fuer Neuroradiologie, Johann-Wolfgang-von-Goethe-Universitaet, Frankfurt (Germany); Moss, R L [HFR Unit, Joint Research Centre, European Commission, Petten (Netherlands); Stecher-Rasmussen, F [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group NRG, Petten (Netherlands); Touw, D [Pharmacy, University/Academic Hospital ' ' Vrije Universiteit' ' , Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wiestler, O D [Department of Neuropathology, German Brain Tumour Reference Centre, Universitaetsklinikum Bonn (Germany); Frankhauser, H [Service de Neurochirurgie CHUV, Lausanne (Switzerland); Gabel, D [Chemistry Department, University of Bremen (Germany)

    2001-05-01

    Based on the pre-clinical work of the European Collaboration on Boron Neutron Capture Therapy a study protocol was prepared in 1995 to initiate Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in patients at the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten. Bio-distribution and pharmacokinetics data of the boron drug Na{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 11}SH (BSH) as well as the radiobiological effects of BNCT with BSH in healthy brain tissue of dogs were considered in designing the strategy for this clinical Phase I trial. The primary goal of the radiation dose escalation study is the investigation of possible adverse events due to BNCT; i.e. to establish the dose limiting toxicity and the maximal tolerated dose. The treatment is delivered in 4 fractions at a defined average boron concentration in blood. Cohorts of 10 patients are treated per dose group. The starting dose was set at 80% of the dose at which neurological symptoms occurred in preclinical dog experiments following a single fraction. After an observation period of at least 6 months, the dose is increased by 10% for the next cohort if less then three severe side effects related to the treatment occurred. The results of the first cohort are presented here. The evaluated dose level can be considered safe. (author)

  14. Joint U. S. --U. S. S. R. test of U. S. MHD electrode systems in U. S. S. R. U-02 MHD facility (phase I). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosler, W R [ed.

    1976-01-01

    The first (Phase I) joint U.S.-U.S.S.R. test of U.S. electrode materials was carried out in Moscow between September 25 and October 8, 1975 in the Soviet U-02 MHD facility. The test procedure followed closely a predetermined work plan designed to test five different zirconia based materials and the cathode and anode electrode wall modules under MHD operating conditions. The materials which were selected were 88Zr0/sub 2/-12Y/sub 2/0/sub 3/, 82Zr0/sub 2/-18Ce02, 50Zr0/sub 2/-50Ce0/sub 2/, 25Zr0/sub 2/-75Ce0/sub 2/ and 20Zr0/sub 2/-78Ce0/sub 2/-2Ta/sub 2/0/sub 5/. The electrode modules were constructed by Westinghouse Research and Development Laboratory. Each of the five electrode materials had four different current densities established between the anode and cathode during the experiment which lasted a total of 127 hours. There were four main phases in the test schedule: (1) start-up of the channel over a specific heating period. No seed (K/sub 2/C0/sub 3/) introduction - 18 hours. (2) Electrical tests at operating temperature to investigate electro-physical characteristics of the channel and electrodes - 6 hours. (3) Operating life test - 94 hours. (4) Shut-down of the channel over a specific cool down period - 9 hours. All except six electrode pairs performed satisfactorily during the entire test. These were the pairs which were designated to carry maximum or near maximum current density. Five pairs failed early in the life test and the sixth pair failed in the last several hours. Failure was not due to the electrode materials, however, but due to lead-out melting caused by joule heating in the platinum wires. The U-02 facility is described and the operational parameters are given for each phase of the test. The electrode and insulating walls are described and the appropriate parameters that are used to predict the performance of the module are given.

  15. Evaluation of RELAP5 MOD 3.1.1 code with GIRAFFE Test Facility: Phase 1, Step 2 nitrogen venting tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, B.D.; Slovik, G.C.; Rohatgl, U.S.

    1995-01-01

    The Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) proposed by General Electric (GE) is an advanced light water reactor (ALWR) design that utilizes passive safety systems. The PCCS is a series of heat exchangers submerged in water and open to the containment. Since the containment is inerted with nitrogen during normal operation, the PCCS must condense the steam in the presence of noncondensable gases during an accident. To model the transient behavior of the SBWR with a system code, the code should properly simulate the expected phenomena. To validate the applicability of RELAP5 MOD 3.1.1, the data from three Phase 1, Step 2 nitrogen venting tests at Toshiba's Gravity-Driven Integral Full-Height Test for Passive Heat Removal facility and RELAP5 calculations of these tests were compared. The comparison of the GIRAFFE data against the results from the RELAP5 calculations showed that it can predict condensation and gas purging phenomena occurring in the long-term decay heat rejection phase. In this phase of the transient, condensation in the PCCS is the only means to reject heat from the SBWR containment. In the two tests where the nitrogen purge vent line was at its deepest submergence in the Suppression Pool (SIP), the RELAP5 results mirrored the behavior of the containment pressures and of the water levels in the Horizontal Vent (HV) and the nitrogen purge line tube of the GIRAFFE data. However, in the test with the shallowest purge line submergence, there was appreciable direct contact condensation on the pool surface of the HV despite modeling efforts to deter these phenomena. This surface condensation, unobserved in the GIRAFFE tests, was a major cause of RELAP5 predicting early containment depressurization and the subsequent early rise in HV and nitrogen purge line water levels. The present RELAP5 MOD3.1.1 interfacial heat and mass transfer model does not properly degrade direct contact steam condensation in the presence of noncondensable gases sitting on a pool

  16. WHC-SD-W252-FHA-001, Rev. 0: Preliminary fire hazard analysis for Phase II Liquid Effluent Treatment and Disposal Facility, Project W-252

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barilo, N.F.

    1995-01-01

    A Fire Hazards Analysis was performed to assess the risk from fire and other related perils and the capability of the facility to withstand these hazards. This analysis will be used to support design of the facility

  17. Airborne & Field Sensors Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — RTTC facilities include an 800' x 60' paved UAV operational area, clearapproach/departure zone, concrete pads furnished with 208VAC, 3 phase,200 amp power, 20,000 sq...

  18. Results of tests and studies of American materials in the channel of the MHD facility U-02 (Phase III). [LaCrO/sub 3/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burenkov, D.K.; Borodina, T.I.; Vysotsky, D.A.; Zalkind, V.I.; Kirillov, V.V.; Romanov, A.I.; Telegin, G.P.; Strekalov, N.V.

    1978-10-01

    In accordance with the US--USSR Cooperative Program in MHD joint US--USSR tests were conducted in May 1978 at the U-02 facility of an MHD generator section consisting of U.S.-built electrode blocks and USSR-built insulating walls. The main purpose of the experiment was to conduct continuous 100-hour duration tests of materials and structures of electrode blocks; in particular, to study the behavior of ceramic electrodes and insulators in operating conditions of an MHD generator, the electro-physical and thermal characteristics of the working section as a whole and electrodes in particular, and to analyze the change in the phase composition and structure of materials during the test. The main thrust of the experiment was a study of electrode material behavior. Six varieties of electrodes based on doped lanthanum chromite were tested and investigated. The electrodes were made of fine grained, hot-pressed mass (the porosity of the ceramic was 2 to 3%). The interelectrode insulators were made of magnesial and magnesial-spinel ceramic also manufactured by the hot pressing method. Results are presented and discussed.

  19. Environmental, Health and Safety Assessment: ATS 7H Program (Phase 3R) Test Activities at the GE Power Systems Gas Turbine Manufacturing Facility, Greenville, SC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1998-11-17

    International Technology Corporation (IT) was contracted by General Electric Company (GE) to assist in the preparation of an Environmental, Health and Safety (HI&3) assessment of the implementation of Phase 3R of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) 7H program at the GE Gas Turbines facility located in Greenville, South Carolina. The assessment was prepared in accordance with GE's contractual agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (GE/DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC21-95MC3 1176) and supports compliance with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1970. This report provides a summary of the EH&S review and includes the following: General description of current site operations and EH&S status, Description of proposed ATS 7H-related activities and discussion of the resulting environmental, health, safety and other impacts to the site and surrounding area. Listing of permits and/or licenses required to comply with federal, state and local regulations for proposed 7H-related activities. Assessment of adequacy of current and required permits, licenses, programs and/or plans.

  20. Economics of reusable facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antia, D.D.J.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper some of the different economic development strategies that can be used for reusable facilities in the UK, Norway, Netherlands and in some production sharing contracts are outlined. These strategies focus on an integrated decision analysis approach which considers development phasing, reservoir management, tax planning and where appropriate facility purchase, leasing, or sale and leaseback decisions

  1. Facilities & Leadership

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The facilities web service provides VA facility information. The VA facilities locator is a feature that is available across the enterprise, on any webpage, for the...

  2. Biochemistry Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Biochemistry Facility provides expert services and consultation in biochemical enzyme assays and protein purification. The facility currently features 1) Liquid...

  3. Dance Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Dudley, Ed.; Irey, Charlotte, Ed.

    This booklet represents an effort to assist teachers and administrators in the professional planning of dance facilities and equipment. Three chapters present the history of dance facilities, provide recommended dance facilities and equipment, and offer some adaptations of dance facilities and equipment, for elementary, secondary and college level…

  4. Long-Term Management Strategy for Dredged Material Disposal for Naval Facilities at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii Phase III - Analysis of Alternatives and Development of an LTMS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Palermo, Michael

    2000-01-01

    This report documents Phase III of a three-phase study to develop a Long-Term Management Study for disposal of dredged material unsuitable for ocean disposal from Pearl Harbor Naval Complex for the next 30 years...

  5. PUREX facility preclosure work plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelmann, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    This preclosure work plan presents a description of the PUREX Facility, the history of the waste managed, and addresses transition phase activities that position the PUREX Facility into a safe and environmentally secure configuration. For purposes of this documentation, the PUREX Facility does not include the PUREX Storage Tunnels (DOE/RL-90/24). Information concerning solid waste management units is discussed in the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, General Information Portion (DOE/RL-91-28, Appendix 2D)

  6. Waste Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This dataset was developed from the Vermont DEC's list of certified solid waste facilities. It includes facility name, contact information, and the materials...

  7. Health Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, ... psychiatric care centers. When you choose a health facility, you might want to consider How close it ...

  8. Fabrication Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Fabrication Facilities are a direct result of years of testing support. Through years of experience, the three fabrication facilities (Fort Hood, Fort Lewis, and...

  9. Phase 2 sampling and analysis plan, Quality Assurance Project Plan, and environmental health and safety plan for the Clinch River Remedial Investigation: An addendum to the Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, R.B.; Adams, S.M.; Beauchamp, J.J.; Bevelhimer, M.S.; Blaylock, B.G.; Brandt, C.C.; Etnier, E.L.; Ford, C.J.; Frank, M.L.; Gentry, M.J.; Greeley, M.S.; Halbrook, R.S.; Harris, R.A.; Holladay, S.K.; Hook, L.A.; Howell, P.L.; Kszos, L.A.; Levine, D.A.; Skiles, J.L.; Suter, G.W.

    1992-12-01

    This document contains a three-part addendum to the Clinch River Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation Plan. The Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation began in 1989, as part of the comprehensive remediation of facilities on the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The ORR was added to the National Priorities List in December 1989. The regulatory agencies have encouraged the adoption of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) terminology; therefore, the Clinch River activity is now referred to as the Clinch River Remedial Investigation (CRRI), not the Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation. Part 1 of this document is the plan for sampling and analysis (S A) during Phase 2 of the CRRI. Part 2 is a revision of the Quality Assurance Project Plan for the CRRI, and Part 3 is a revision of the Environmental Health and Safety Plan for the CRRI. The Clinch River RI (CRRI) is designed to address the transport, fate, and distribution of waterborne contaminants (radionuclides, metals, and organic compounds) released from the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and to assess potential risks to human health and the environment associated with these contaminants. Primary areas of investigation are Melton Hill Reservoir, the Clinch River from Melton Hill Dam to its confluence with the Tennessee River, Poplar Creek, and Watts Bar Reservoir. The contaminants identified in the Clinch River/Watts Bar Reservoir (CR/WBR) downstream of the ORR are those associated with the water, suspended particles, deposited sediments, aquatic organisms, and wildlife feeding on aquatic organisms. The purpose of the Phase 2 S A Plan is to describe the proposed tasks and subtasks developed to meet the primary objectives of the CRRI.

  10. Phase 2 sampling and analysis plan, Quality Assurance Project Plan, and environmental health and safety plan for the Clinch River Remedial Investigation: An addendum to the Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, R.B.; Adams, S.M.; Beauchamp, J.J.; Bevelhimer, M.S.; Blaylock, B.G.; Brandt, C.C.; Etnier, E.L.; Ford, C.J.; Frank, M.L.; Gentry, M.J.; Greeley, M.S.; Halbrook, R.S.; Harris, R.A.; Holladay, S.K.; Hook, L.A.; Howell, P.L.; Kszos, L.A.; Levine, D.A.; Skiles, J.L.; Suter, G.W.

    1992-12-01

    This document contains a three-part addendum to the Clinch River Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation Plan. The Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation began in 1989, as part of the comprehensive remediation of facilities on the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The ORR was added to the National Priorities List in December 1989. The regulatory agencies have encouraged the adoption of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) terminology; therefore, the Clinch River activity is now referred to as the Clinch River Remedial Investigation (CRRI), not the Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation. Part 1 of this document is the plan for sampling and analysis (S ampersand A) during Phase 2 of the CRRI. Part 2 is a revision of the Quality Assurance Project Plan for the CRRI, and Part 3 is a revision of the Environmental Health and Safety Plan for the CRRI. The Clinch River RI (CRRI) is designed to address the transport, fate, and distribution of waterborne contaminants (radionuclides, metals, and organic compounds) released from the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and to assess potential risks to human health and the environment associated with these contaminants. Primary areas of investigation are Melton Hill Reservoir, the Clinch River from Melton Hill Dam to its confluence with the Tennessee River, Poplar Creek, and Watts Bar Reservoir. The contaminants identified in the Clinch River/Watts Bar Reservoir (CR/WBR) downstream of the ORR are those associated with the water, suspended particles, deposited sediments, aquatic organisms, and wildlife feeding on aquatic organisms. The purpose of the Phase 2 S ampersand A Plan is to describe the proposed tasks and subtasks developed to meet the primary objectives of the CRRI

  11. Animal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz, T.E.; Angerman, J.M.; Keenan, W.G.; Linsley, J.G.; Poole, C.M.; Sallese, A.; Simkins, R.C.; Tolle, D.

    1981-01-01

    The animal facilities in the Division are described. They consist of kennels, animal rooms, service areas, and technical areas (examining rooms, operating rooms, pathology labs, x-ray rooms, and 60 Co exposure facilities). The computer support facility is also described. The advent of the Conversational Monitor System at Argonne has launched a new effort to set up conversational computing and graphics software for users. The existing LS-11 data acquisition systems have been further enhanced and expanded. The divisional radiation facilities include a number of gamma, neutron, and x-ray radiation sources with accompanying areas for related equipment. There are five 60 Co irradiation facilities; a research reactor, Janus, is a source for fission-spectrum neutrons; two other neutron sources in the Chicago area are also available to the staff for cell biology studies. The electron microscope facilities are also described

  12. Auxiliary analyses in support of performance assessment of a hypothetical low-level waste facility: Two-phase flow and contaminant transport in unsaturated soils with application to low-level radioactive waste disposal. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binning, P.; Celia, M.A.; Johnson, J.C.

    1995-05-01

    A numerical model of multiphase air-water flow and contaminant transport in the unsaturated zone is presented. The multiphase flow equations are solved using the two-pressure, mixed form of the equations with a modified Picard linearization of the equations and a finite element spatial approximation. A volatile contaminant is assumed to be transported in either phase, or in both phases simultaneously. The contaminant partitions between phases with an equilibrium distribution given by Henry's Law or via kinetic mass transfer. The transport equations are solved using a Galerkin finite element method with reduced integration to lump the resultant matrices. The numerical model is applied to published experimental studies to examine the behavior of the air phase and associated contaminant movement under water infiltration. The model is also used to evaluate a hypothetical design for a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility. The model has been developed in both one and two dimensions; documentation and computer codes are available for the one-dimensional flow and transport model

  13. [Efficiency of medical and economic activities of a sanatorium-and-spa facility in the active phase of the public health system reform under macroeconomic instability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poliakov, B A; Kizeev, M V

    2010-01-01

    Results of a comprehensive study have demonstrated that the reform of the public health system currently underway in this country provides conditions for the extension of medical care based at sanatorium-and-spa facilities with simultaneous rise in relevant expenses. Bearing in mind the unstable macroeconomic situation, this requires thorough monitoring medical and economic activities of health resorts for the purpose of enhancing cost efficiency. The goal of optimization can be achieved by increasing competitive capacity based on strict control of expenditures and income redistribution for financing the most promising projects.

  14. Long-Term Management Strategy for Dredged Material Disposal for Naval Facilities at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Phase II - Evaulation of Alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-03-01

    phytoremediation , or soil amendments. The levels of uptake pose insignificant environmental concern during the service life of the facility because plant growth...adsorption, degradation, dilution, or other means. Ammonia, copper, lead, mercury , nickel, silver, DDT, dieldrin, and PCB-1 260 exceed the Hawaii...0.755 Copper 2.9 588 44.7 15.4 Lead 5.6 150 209. 37.4 Mercury 0.025 1.18 1.65 65.8 Nickel 8.3 74.3 21.9 2.64 Selenium 71 2.0 9.6 0.135 Silver 0.92 1.87

  15. Facilities Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullis, Robert V.

    1992-01-01

    A procedure for physical facilities management written 17 years ago is still worth following today. Each of the steps outlined for planning, organizing, directing, controlling, and evaluating must be accomplished if school facilities are to be properly planned and constructed. However, lessons have been learned about energy consumption and proper…

  16. Nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2000-01-01

    Here is given the decree (2000-1065) of the 25. of October 2000 reporting the publication of the convention between the Government of the French Republic and the CERN concerning the safety of the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) and the SPS (Proton Supersynchrotron) facilities, signed in Geneva on July 11, 2000. By this convention, the CERN undertakes to ensure the safety of the LHC and SPS facilities and those of the operations of the LEP decommissioning. The French legislation and regulations on basic nuclear facilities (concerning more particularly the protection against ionizing radiations, the protection of the environment and the safety of facilities) and those which could be decided later on apply to the LHC, SPS and auxiliary facilities. (O.M.)

  17. Facile solid-phase ruthenium assisted azide-alkyne cycloaddition (RuAAC) utilizing the Cp*RuCl(COD)-catalyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engholm, Ebbe; sgz228, sgz228; Blixt, Klas Ola

    2017-01-01

    The ruthenium assisted azide-alkyne cycloaddition (RuAAC) reaction is a well-established method for the generation of 1,5- and 1,4,5-substituted 1,2,3-triazoles, which we have extended to the solid-phase synthesis of 1,2,3-triazole-peptides. The 1,2,3-triazole moieties were formed upon the reacti...

  18. Facile synthesis of high-temperature (1000 °C) phase-stable rice-like anatase TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Lizhen [Capital Normal University, Beijing Key Laboratory for Optical Materials and Photonic Devices, Department of Chemistry (China); Chen, Qirong [Beijing Center for Physical and Chemical Analysis (BCPCA) (China); Liu, Xiuyun; Wang, Miaomiao; Meng, Xiangfu, E-mail: xfmeng@cnu.edu.cn [Capital Normal University, Beijing Key Laboratory for Optical Materials and Photonic Devices, Department of Chemistry (China)

    2015-05-15

    High-temperature phase-stable rice-like anatase TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals were synthesized by one-pot solvothermal method using soluble titania xerogel and isopropyl alcohol (IPA) as the precursor and the solvent, respectively. Sample characterization was carried out by powder X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscope, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption isotherms. The results showed that TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals had rice-like shapes with an average size of 5 nm in width and 35 nm in length. The BET surface area was 153 m{sup 2}/g. Unexpectedly, the rice-like TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals exhibited high-temperature phase stability, which could remain as pure anatase phase after calcinations at 1000 °C. Growth mechanism investigation revealed that the IPA solvent played a key role in nucleation and growth of rice-like anatase TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals. The photodegradation of rhodamine B demonstrated that rice-like anatase TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals exhibited enhanced photocatalytic activity under visible light irradiation.

  19. Facile synthesis of high-temperature (1000 °C) phase-stable rice-like anatase TiO2 nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Lizhen; Chen, Qirong; Liu, Xiuyun; Wang, Miaomiao; Meng, Xiangfu

    2015-05-01

    High-temperature phase-stable rice-like anatase TiO2 nanocrystals were synthesized by one-pot solvothermal method using soluble titania xerogel and isopropyl alcohol (IPA) as the precursor and the solvent, respectively. Sample characterization was carried out by powder X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscope, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms. The results showed that TiO2 nanocrystals had rice-like shapes with an average size of 5 nm in width and 35 nm in length. The BET surface area was 153 m2/g. Unexpectedly, the rice-like TiO2 nanocrystals exhibited high-temperature phase stability, which could remain as pure anatase phase after calcinations at 1000 °C. Growth mechanism investigation revealed that the IPA solvent played a key role in nucleation and growth of rice-like anatase TiO2 nanocrystals. The photodegradation of rhodamine B demonstrated that rice-like anatase TiO2 nanocrystals exhibited enhanced photocatalytic activity under visible light irradiation.

  20. Using sound to modify fish behavior at power-production and water-control facilities: A workshop. Phase 2: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, T.J.; Popper, A.N.

    1997-06-01

    A workshop on ''''Use of Sound for Fish Protection at Power-Production and Water-Control Facilities'''' was held in Portland, Oregon on December 12--13, 1995. This workshop convened a 22-member panel of international experts from universities, industry, and government to share knowledge, questions, and ideas about using sound for fish guidance. Discussions involved in a broad range of indigenous migratory and resident fish species and fish-protection issues in river systems, with particular focus on the Columbia River Basin. Because the use of sound behavioral barriers for fish is very much in its infancy, the workshop was designed to address the many questions being asked by fishery managers and researchers about the feasibility and potential benefits of using sound to augment physical barriers for fish protection in the Columbia River system

  1. Using Sound to Modify Fish Behavior at Power-Production and Water-Control Facilities: A Workshop December 12-13, 1995. Phase II: Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Thomas J. [ed.] [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Popper, Arthur N. [ed.] [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    1997-06-01

    A workshop on ``Use of Sound for Fish Protection at Power-Production and Water-Control Facilities`` was held in Portland, Oregon on December 12--13, 1995. This workshop convened a 22-member panel of international experts from universities, industry, and government to share knowledge, questions, and ideas about using sound for fish guidance. Discussions involved in a broad range of indigenous migratory and resident fish species and fish-protection issues in river systems, with particular focus on the Columbia River Basin. Because the use of sound behavioral barriers for fish is very much in its infancy, the workshop was designed to address the many questions being asked by fishery managers and researchers about the feasibility and potential benefits of using sound to augment physical barriers for fish protection in the Columbia River system.

  2. Mammography Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Mammography Facility Database is updated periodically based on information received from the four FDA-approved accreditation bodies: the American College of...

  3. Canyon Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — B Plant, T Plant, U Plant, PUREX, and REDOX (see their links) are the five facilities at Hanford where the original objective was plutonium removal from the uranium...

  4. Use of Sound for Fish Protection at Power Facilities : A Historical Perspective of the State of the Art : Phase 1 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Thomas J.

    1994-11-01

    This paper summarizes the current state of the knowledge of fish hearing, i.e., what is known about fish response to sound, and provides a starting place for investigation into the use of sonic behavior modification to help solve pressing problems in the maintenance and recovery of anadromous and resident fish stocks of the Columbia River Basin. The challenge for scientists and engineers is to understand (1) how and what fish hear, and (2) how to use this knowledge to influence fish behavior or to factor fish sensory systems and behavior into the design of fish protection devices at power-production and water-control facilities. The sections that follow are a studied response to this challenge. In many respects, the search for effective and economical ways to modify fish behavior without physical intervention is one of the grails of fish management, particularly (although not exclusively), relative to electric power production. Within the Columbia River Basin and elsewhere, water is put to many uses not conducive to the health of indigenous fish. Irrigation, impoundment, and hydropower production frequently modify the riverine environment to the detriment of indigenous stocks while creating productive environments for competing or predatory species. The mechanisms of impact are numerous. Water project managers, when faced with the need to reduce impacts of their operations on fish health, generally attempt to divert fish from high-risk to lower-risk regions or manage the environment in such a way as to increase the survival prospects of impacted species. Almost without exception, risk reduction is accomplished by using physical barriers of one form or another. Unfortunately, physical barriers at water projects have several drawbacks, e.g., reducing available water flow for energy production and incurring high maintenance costs. In addition, recent studies (Sale et al. 1991) have documented that once these barriers are installed, they are rarely evaluated for

  5. Installation of a Synchrotron Radiation Beamline Facility at the J. Bennett Johnston Sr. Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices for the Science and Engineering Alliance. Phase I and II. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gooden, R.

    2000-01-01

    The Johnston Center presents a unique opportunity for scientists and engineers at southern institutions to initiate and carry out original research using synchrotron radiation ranging from visible light to hard x-rays. The Science and Engineering Alliance proposes to carry out a comprehensive new synchrotron radiation research initiative at CAMD in carefully phased steps of increasing risks. (1) materials research on existing CAMD beam lines and end stations; (2) design, construction and installation of end stations on existing CAMD beam lines, and research with this new instrumentation; (3) design, construction and operation of dedicated synchrotron radiation beam lines that covers the full spectral range of the CAMD storage ring and expanded research in the new facility

  6. TIARA electrostatic accelerator facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, Satoshi; Takada, Isao; Mizuhashi, Kiyoshi; Uno, Sadanori; Ohkoshi, Kiyonori; Nakajima, Yoshinori; Saitoh, Yuichi; Ishii, Yasuyuki; Kamiya, Tomihiro

    1996-07-01

    In order to promote the Advanced Radiation Technology Project, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute constructed TIARA facility composed of four ion accelerators at Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment for the period from 1988 to 1993. A 3MV tandem accelerator and an AVF cycrotron were completed in 1991 as the first phase of the construction, and a 3MV single-ended accelerator and a 400kV ion implanter were completed in 1993 as the second phase. Three electrostatic accelerators, the tandem, the single-ended and the implanter, were installed in the Multiple-beam facility of TIARA and have been operated for various experiments with using single, dual and triple beams without any serious trouble. This report describes the constructive works, machine performances, control systems, safety systems and accessory equipments of the electrostatic accelerators. (author)

  7. Design of the PISCES-Upgrade facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waganer, L.M.; Doerner, R.

    1994-01-01

    The PISCES-Upgrade facility is currently in the design and fabrication phases for the University of California. McDonnell Douglas is under contract to develop this experimental facility in order to enhance the capability for investigation of fusion materials erosion-redeposition and edge plasma behaviors. The advance in facility capability requires innovative design approaches and application of sophisticated analysis techniques

  8. The engineering test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, D.; Becraft, W.R.; Sager, P.H.

    1981-01-01

    The vehicle by which the fusion program would move into the engineering testing phase of fusion power development is designated the Engineering Test Facility (ETF). The ETF would provide a test-bed for reactor components in the fusion environment. In order to initiate preliminary planning for the ETF decision, the Office of Fusion Energy established the ETF Design Center activity to prepare the design of the ETF. This paper describes the design status of the ETF. (orig.)

  9. Engineering test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, D.; Becraft, W.R.; Sager, P.H.

    1981-01-01

    The vehicle by which the fusion program would move into the engineering testing phase of fusion power development is designated the Engineering Test Facility (ETF). The ETF would provide a test-bed for reactor components in the fusion environment. In order to initiate preliminary planning for the ETF decision, the Office of Fusion Energy established the ETF Design Center activity to prepare the design of the ETF. This paper described the design status of the ETF

  10. International Mapping of Antenna-Measurement Facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boccia, Luigi; Breinbjerg, Olav; Di Massa, Giuseppe

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive international mapping of antenna-measurement facilities. This initiative, conducted within the framework of the Antenna Centre of Excellence (ACE) of the European Union, is oriented toward all institutions having research, development, or operational activities...... measurements, in particular from the wireless communication industry, to identify and contact antenna-measurement facilities. The first phase of the mapping showed a significant and encouraging reaction to this initiative, with more than 50 European facilities currently registered. The next phase aims...

  11. Facile synthesis of magnetic carbon nitride nanosheets and its application in magnetic solid phase extraction for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in edible oil samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hao-Bo; Ding, Jun; Zheng, Shu-Jian; Zhu, Gang-Tian; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we proposed a method to fabricate magnetic carbon nitride (CN) nanosheets by simple physical blending. Low-cost CN nanosheets prepared by urea possessed a highly π-conjugated structure; therefore the obtained composites were employed as magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) sorbent for extraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in edible oil samples. Moreover, sample pre-treatment time could be carried out within 10 min. Thus, a simple and cheap method for the analysis of PAHs in edible oil samples was established by coupling magnetic CN nanosheets-based MSPE with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis. Limits of quantitation (LOQs) for eight PAHs ranged from 0.4 to 0.9 ng/g. The intra- and inter-day relative standard deviations (RSDs) were less than 15.0%. The recoveries of PAHs for spiked soybean oil samples ranged from 91.0% to 124.1%, with RSDs of less than 10.2%. Taken together, the proposed method offers a simple and cost-effective option for the convenient analysis of PAHs in oil samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Advanced reactor experimental facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amri, A.; Papin, J.; Uhle, J.; Vitanza, C.

    2010-01-01

    For many years, the NEA has been examining advanced reactor issues and disseminating information of use to regulators, designers and researchers on safety issues and research needed. Following the recommendation of participants at an NEA workshop, a Task Group on Advanced Reactor Experimental Facilities (TAREF) was initiated with the aim of providing an overview of facilities suitable for carrying out the safety research considered necessary for gas-cooled reactors (GCRs) and sodium fast reactors (SFRs), with other reactor systems possibly being considered in a subsequent phase. The TAREF was thus created in 2008 with the following participating countries: Canada, the Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Korea and the United States. In a second stage, India provided valuable information on its experimental facilities related to SFR safety research. The study method adopted entailed first identifying high-priority safety issues that require research and then categorizing the available facilities in terms of their ability to address the safety issues. For each of the technical areas, the task members agreed on a set of safety issues requiring research and established a ranking with regard to safety relevance (high, medium, low) and the status of knowledge based on the following scale relative to full knowledge: high (100%-75%), medium (75 - 25%) and low (25-0%). Only the issues identified as being of high safety relevance and for which the state of knowledge is low or medium were included in the discussion, as these issues would likely warrant further study. For each of the safety issues, the TAREF members identified appropriate facilities, providing relevant information such as operating conditions (in- or out-of reactor), operating range, description of the test section, type of testing, instrumentation, current status and availability, and uniqueness. Based on the information collected, the task members assessed prospects and priorities

  13. Facile synthesis of multifunctional attapulgite/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/polyaniline nanocomposites for magnetic dispersive solid phase extraction of benzoylurea insecticides in environmental water samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaoling; Qiao, Kexin; Ye, Yiren; Yang, Miyi; Li, Jing; Gao, Haixiang; Zhang, Sanbing; Zhou, Wenfeng; Lu, Runhua, E-mail: rhlu@cau.edu.cn

    2016-08-31

    In this study, the superparamagnetic attapulgite/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/polyaniline (ATP/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/PANI) nanocomposites were successfully synthesized by a one-pot method. Fe (III) was applied as both the oxidant for the oxidative polymerization of aniline and the single iron source of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} formed by the redox reaction between aniline and Fe (III). The ATP/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/PANI was used as sorbent for magnetic dispersive solid phase extraction (MDSPE) of benzoylurea insecticides (BUs) in environmental water samples. The as-prepared nanocomposite sorbents were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR), X Ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy(SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and vibrating sample magnetometry. Various experimental parameters affecting the ATP/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/PANI-based MDSPE procedure, including the composition of the nanocomposite sorbents, amount of ATP/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/PANI nanocomposites, vortex time, pH, and desorption conditions were investigated. Under the optimal conditions, a good linearity was observed for all target analytes, with correlation coefficients (r{sup 2}) ranging from 0.9985 to 0.9997; the limits of detection (LOD) were in the range of 0.02–0.43 μg L{sup −1}, and the recoveries of analytes using the proposed method ranged between 77.37% and 103.69%. The sorbents exhibited an excellent reproducibility in the range of 1.52–5.27% in extracting the five target analytes. In addition, the intra-day and inter-day precision values were found to be in the range of 0.78–6.86% and 1.66–8.41%, respectively. Finally, the proposed ATP/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/PANI-based MDSPE method was successfully applied to analyze river water samples by rapid preconcentration of BUs. - Highlights: • A novel superparamagnetic ATP/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/PANI nanocomposite was first introduced in MDSPE. • ATP/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/PANI nanocomposites exhibited fast adsorption and desorption

  14. Facile synthesis of multifunctional attapulgite/Fe3O4/polyaniline nanocomposites for magnetic dispersive solid phase extraction of benzoylurea insecticides in environmental water samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Xiaoling; Qiao, Kexin; Ye, Yiren; Yang, Miyi; Li, Jing; Gao, Haixiang; Zhang, Sanbing; Zhou, Wenfeng; Lu, Runhua

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the superparamagnetic attapulgite/Fe 3 O 4 /polyaniline (ATP/Fe 3 O 4 /PANI) nanocomposites were successfully synthesized by a one-pot method. Fe (III) was applied as both the oxidant for the oxidative polymerization of aniline and the single iron source of Fe 3 O 4 formed by the redox reaction between aniline and Fe (III). The ATP/Fe 3 O 4 /PANI was used as sorbent for magnetic dispersive solid phase extraction (MDSPE) of benzoylurea insecticides (BUs) in environmental water samples. The as-prepared nanocomposite sorbents were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR), X Ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy(SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and vibrating sample magnetometry. Various experimental parameters affecting the ATP/Fe 3 O 4 /PANI-based MDSPE procedure, including the composition of the nanocomposite sorbents, amount of ATP/Fe 3 O 4 /PANI nanocomposites, vortex time, pH, and desorption conditions were investigated. Under the optimal conditions, a good linearity was observed for all target analytes, with correlation coefficients (r 2 ) ranging from 0.9985 to 0.9997; the limits of detection (LOD) were in the range of 0.02–0.43 μg L −1 , and the recoveries of analytes using the proposed method ranged between 77.37% and 103.69%. The sorbents exhibited an excellent reproducibility in the range of 1.52–5.27% in extracting the five target analytes. In addition, the intra-day and inter-day precision values were found to be in the range of 0.78–6.86% and 1.66–8.41%, respectively. Finally, the proposed ATP/Fe 3 O 4 /PANI-based MDSPE method was successfully applied to analyze river water samples by rapid preconcentration of BUs. - Highlights: • A novel superparamagnetic ATP/Fe 3 O 4 /PANI nanocomposite was first introduced in MDSPE. • ATP/Fe 3 O 4 /PANI nanocomposites exhibited fast adsorption and desorption kinetics. • An excellent sorbent-to-sorbent reproducibility was demonstrated in the

  15. Argonne's new Wakefield Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    The first phase of a high current, short bunch length electron beam research facility, the AWA, is near completion at Argonne. At the heart of the facility is a photocathode based electron gun and accelerating sections designed to deliver 20 MeV pulses with up to 100 nC per pulse and with pulse lengths of approximately 15 ps (fw). Using a technique similar to that originated at Argonne's AATF facility, a separate weak probe pulse can be generated and used to diagnose wake effects produced by the intense pulses. Initial planned experiments include studies of plasma wakefields and dielectric wakefield devices, and expect to demonstrate large, useful accelerating gradients (> 100 MeV/m). Later phases of the facility will increase the drive bunch energy to more than 100 MeV to enable acceleration experiments up to the GeV range. Specifications, design details, and commissioning progress are presented

  16. Relativistic heavy ion facilities: worldwide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, L.S.

    1986-05-01

    A review of relativistic heavy ion facilities which exist, are in a construction phase, or are on the drawing boards as proposals is presented. These facilities span the energy range from fixed target machines in the 1 to 2 GeV/nucleon regime, up to heavy ion colliders of 100 GeV/nucleon on 100 GeV/nucleon. In addition to specifying the general features of such machines, an outline of the central physics themes to be carried out at these facilities is given, along with a sampling of the detectors which will be used to extract the physics. 22 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Support facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, F.S.; Blomquist, J.A.; Fox, C.A.

    1977-01-01

    Computer support is centered on the Remote Access Data Station (RADS), which is equipped with a 1000 lpm printer, 1000 cpm reader, and a 300 cps paper tape reader with 500-foot spools. The RADS is located in a data preparation room with four 029 key punches (two of which interpret), a storage vault for archival magnetic tapes, card files, and a 30 cps interactive terminal principally used for job inquiry and routing. An adjacent room provides work space for users, with a documentation library and a consultant's office, plus file storage for programs and their documentations. The facility has approximately 2,600 square feet of working laboratory space, and includes two fully equipped photographic darkrooms, sectioning and autoradiographic facilities, six microscope cubicles, and five transmission electron microscopes and one Cambridge scanning electron microscope equipped with an x-ray energy dispersive analytical system. Ancillary specimen preparative equipment includes vacuum evaporators, freeze-drying and freeze-etching equipment, ultramicrotomes, and assorted photographic and light microscopic equipment. The extensive physical plant of the animal facilities includes provisions for holding all species of laboratory animals under controlled conditions of temperature, humidity, and lighting. More than forty rooms are available for studies of the smaller species. These have a potential capacity of more than 75,000 mice, or smaller numbers of larger species and those requiring special housing arrangements. There are also six dog kennels to accommodate approximately 750 dogs housed in runs that consist of heated indoor compartments and outdoor exercise areas

  18. Facile preparation of multifunctional carbon nanotube/magnetite/polyaniline nanocomposite offering a strong option for efficient solid-phase microextraction coupled with GC-MS for the analysis of phenolic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafazoli, Zahra; Azar, Parviz Aberoomand; Tehrani, Mohammad Saber; Husain, Syed Waqif

    2018-04-20

    The aim of this study the synthesis of a highly efficient organic-inorganic nanocomposite. In this research, the carbon nanotube/magnetite/polyaniline nanocomposite was successfully prepared through a facile route. Monodisperse magnetite nanospheres were prepared through the coprecipitation route, and polyaniline nanolayer as a modified shell with a high surface area was synthesized by an in situ growth route and characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The prepared nanocomposite was immobilized on a stainless-steel wire for the fabrication of the solid-phase microextraction fiber. The combination of headspace solid-phase microextraction using carbon nanotube/magnetite/polyaniline nanocomposite fiber with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry can achieve a low limit of detection and can be applied to determine phenolic compounds in water samples. The effects of the extraction and desorption parameters including extraction temperature and time, ionic strength, stirring rate, pH, and desorption temperature and time have been studied. Under the optimum conditions, the dynamic linear range was 0.01-500 ng mL -1 and the limits of detection of phenol, 4-chlorophenol, 2,6-dichlorophenol, and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol were the lowest (0.008 ng mL -1 ) for three times. The coefficient of determination of all calibration curves was more than 0.990. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Pumps for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The guide describes how the Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) controls pumps and their motors at nuclear power plants and other nuclear facilities. The scope of the control is determined by the Safety Class of the pump in question. The various phases of the control are: (1) review of construction plan, (2) control of manufacturing, and construction inspection, (3) commissioning inspection, and (4) control during operation. STUK controls Safety Class 1, 2 and 3 pumps at nuclear facilities as described in this guide. STUK inspects Class EYT (non-nuclear) pumps separately or in connection with the commissioning inspections of the systems. This guide gives the control procedure and related requirements primarily for centrifugal pumps. However, it is also applied to the control of piston pumps and other pump types not mentioned in this guide

  20. Universal Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughery, Mike

    A universal test facility (UTF) for Space Station Freedom is developed. In this context, universal means that the experimental rack design must be: automated, highly marketable, and able to perform diverse microgravity experiments according to NASA space station requirements. In order to fulfill these broad objectives, the facility's customers, and their respective requirements, are first defined. From these definitions, specific design goals and the scope of the first phase of this project are determined. An examination is first made into what types of research are most likely to make the UTF marketable. Based on our findings, the experiments for which the UTF would most likely be used included: protein crystal growth, hydroponics food growth, gas combustion, gallium arsenide crystal growth, microorganism development, and cell encapsulation. Therefore, the UTF is designed to fulfill all of the major requirements for the experiments listed above. The versatility of the design is achieved by taking advantage of the many overlapping requirements presented by these experiments.

  1. The Rock Characterization Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, J.

    1994-01-01

    In 1989, UK Nirex began a programme of surface-based characterization of the geology and hydrogeology of a site at Sellafield to evaluate its suitability to host a deep repository for radioactive waste. The next major stage in site characterization will be the construction and operation of a Rock Characterization Facility (RCF). It will be designed to provide rock characterization information and scope for model validation to permit firmer assessment of long-term safety. It will also provide information needed to decide the detailed location, design and orientation of a repository and to inform repository construction methods. A three-phase programme is planned for the RCF. During each phase, testwork will steadily improve our geological, hydrogeological and geotechnical understanding of the site. The first phase will involve sinking two shafts. That will be preceded by the establishment of a network of monitoring boreholes to ensure that the impact of shaft sinking can be measured. This will provide valuable data for model validation. In phase two, initial galleries will be excavated, probably at a depth of 650 m below Ordnance datum, which will host a comprehensive suite of experiments. These galleries will be extended in phase three to permit access to most of the rock volume that would host the repository. (Author)

  2. Emission Facilities - Erosion & Sediment Control Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — An Erosion and Sediment Control Facility is a DEP primary facility type related to the Water Pollution Control program. The following sub-facility types related to...

  3. Integral Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Facility conceptual design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-09-01

    This document, Volume 5 Book 1, contains cost estimate summaries for a monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility. The cost estimate is based on the engineering performed during the conceptual design phase of the MRS Facility project

  4. Air Quality Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research FacilityFacilities with operating permits for Title V of the Federal Clean Air Act, as well as facilities required to submit an air emissions inventory, and other facilities...

  5. Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, R. N.; Bailey, W. J.

    1985-01-01

    The Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility is a reusable test bed which is designed to be carried within the Shuttle cargo bay to investigate the systems and technologies associated with the efficient management of cryogens in space. Cryogenic fluid management consists of the systems and technologies for: (1) liquid storage and supply, including capillary acquisition/expulsion systems which provide single-phase liquid to the user system, (2) both passive and active thermal control systems, and (3) fluid transfer/resupply systems, including transfer lines and receiver tanks. The facility contains a storage and supply tank, a transfer line and a receiver tank, configured to provide low-g verification of fluid and thermal models of cryogenic storage and transfer processes. The facility will provide design data and criteria for future subcritical cryogenic storage and transfer system applications, such as Space Station life support, attitude control, power and fuel depot supply, resupply tankers, external tank (ET) propellant scavenging, and ground-based and space-based orbit transfer vehicles (OTV).

  6. Nuclear Station Facilities Improvement Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooks, R. W.; Lunardini, A. L.; Zaben, O.

    1991-01-01

    An effective facilities improvement program will include a plan for the temporary relocation of personnel during the construction of an adjoining service building addition. Since the smooth continuation of plant operation is of paramount importance, the phasing plan is established to minimize the disruptions in day-to-day station operation and administration. This plan should consider the final occupancy arrangements and the transition to the new structure; for example, computer hookup and phase-in should be considered. The nuclear industry is placing more emphasis on safety and reliability of nuclear power plants. In order to do this, more emphasis is placed on operations and maintenance. This results in increased size of managerial, technical and maintenance staffs. This in turn requires improved office and service facilities. The facilities that require improvement may include training areas, rad waste processing and storage facilities, and maintenance facilities. This paper discusses an approach for developing an effective program to plan and implement these projects. These improvement projects can range in magnitude from modifying a simple system to building a new structure to allocating space for a future project. This paper addresses the planning required for the new structures with emphasis on site location, space allocation, and internal layout. Since facility planning has recently been completed by Sargent and Leyden at six U. S. nuclear stations, specific examples from some of those plants are presented. Site planning and the establishment of long-range goals are of the utmost importance when undertaking a facilities improvement program for a nuclear station. A plan that considers the total site usage will enhance the value of both the new and existing facilities. Proper planning at the beginning of the program can minimize costs and maximize the benefits of the program

  7. Computing facility at SSC for detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leibold, P.; Scipiono, B.

    1990-01-01

    A description of the RISC-based distributed computing facility for detector simulaiton being developed at the SSC Laboratory is discussed. The first phase of this facility is scheduled for completion in early 1991. Included is the status of the project, overview of the concepts used to model and define system architecture, networking capabilities for user access, plans for support of physics codes and related topics concerning the implementation of this facility

  8. TWRS HLW interim storage facility search and evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calmus, R.B., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-16

    The purpose of this study was to identify and provide an evaluation of interim storage facilities and potential facility locations for the vitrified high-level waste (HLW) from the Phase I demonstration plant and Phase II production plant. In addition, interim storage facilities for solidified separated radionuclides (Cesium and Technetium) generated during pretreatment of Phase I Low-Level Waste Vitrification Plant feed was evaluated.

  9. Sr{sub 1.98}Eu{sub 0.02}SiO{sub 4} luminescence whisker based on vapor-phase deposition: Facile synthesis, uniform morphology and enhanced luminescence properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Jian, E-mail: xujian@stu.xmu.edu.cn [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Hassan, Dhia A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Department of Chemistry, College of Education for Pure Science, University of Basrah, 61004 (Iraq); Zeng, Renjie; Peng, Dongliang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Fujian Key Lab of Advanced Special Material, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramic Fibers, Ministry of Education, Xiamen 361005 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • For the first time, it is possible to obtain Sr{sub 1.98}Eu{sub 0.02}SiO{sub 4} whisker. • The whiskers are smooth and uniform with L/D ratio over 50. • Durability and thermal stability of the whisker are enhanced. - Abstract: A high performance strontium silicate phosphor has been successfully synthesized though a facile vapor-phase deposition method. The product consists of single crystal whiskers which are smooth and uniform, and with a sectional equivalent diameter of around 5 μm; the aspect ratio is over 50 and no agglomeration can be observed. X-ray diffraction result confirmed that the crystal structure of the whisker was α’-Sr{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}. The exact chemical composition was Sr{sub 1.98}Eu{sub 0.02}SiO{sub 4} which was analyzed by energy dispersive spectrometer and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer. The whisker shows broad green emission with peak at 523 nm ranging from 470 to 600 nm (excited at 370 nm). Compared with traditional Sr{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}:Eu phosphor, durability (at 85% humidity and 85 °C) and thermal stability of the whisker are obviously improved. Moreover, growth mechanism of the Sr{sub 1.98}Eu{sub 0.02}SiO{sub 4} whiskers is Vapor–Liquid–Solid. On a macro-scale, the product is still powder which makes it suitable for the current packaging process of WLEDs.

  10. Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) project report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pope, R.B.; MacDonald, R.R.; Viebrock, J.M.; Mote, N.

    1995-09-01

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for developing the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) to accept spent nuclear fuel from commercial facilities. The objective of the Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) project was to assess the capability of each commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage facility, at which SNF is stored, to handle various SNF shipping casks. The purpose of this report is to present and analyze the results of the facility assessments completed within the FICA project. During Phase 1, the data items required to complete the facility assessments were identified and the database for the project was created. During Phase 2, visits were made to 122 facilities on 76 sites to collect data and information, the database was updated, and assessments of the cask-handling capabilities at each facility were performed. Each assessment of cask-handling capability contains three parts: the current capability of the facility (planning base); the potential enhanced capability if revisions were made to the facility licensing and/or administrative controls; and the potential enhanced capability if limited physical modifications were made to the facility. The main conclusion derived from the planning base assessments is that the current facility capabilities will not allow handling of any of the FICA Casks at 49 of the 122 facilities evaluated. However, consideration of potential revisions and/or modifications showed that all but one of the 49 facilities could be adapted to handle at least one of the FICA Casks. For this to be possible, facility licensing, administrative controls, and/or physical aspects of the facility would need to be modified

  11. Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) project report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, R.B. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); MacDonald, R.R. [ed.] [Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System, Vienna, VA (United States); Viebrock, J.M.; Mote, N. [Nuclear Assurance Corp., Norcross, GA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for developing the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) to accept spent nuclear fuel from commercial facilities. The objective of the Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) project was to assess the capability of each commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage facility, at which SNF is stored, to handle various SNF shipping casks. The purpose of this report is to present and analyze the results of the facility assessments completed within the FICA project. During Phase 1, the data items required to complete the facility assessments were identified and the database for the project was created. During Phase 2, visits were made to 122 facilities on 76 sites to collect data and information, the database was updated, and assessments of the cask-handling capabilities at each facility were performed. Each assessment of cask-handling capability contains three parts: the current capability of the facility (planning base); the potential enhanced capability if revisions were made to the facility licensing and/or administrative controls; and the potential enhanced capability if limited physical modifications were made to the facility. The main conclusion derived from the planning base assessments is that the current facility capabilities will not allow handling of any of the FICA Casks at 49 of the 122 facilities evaluated. However, consideration of potential revisions and/or modifications showed that all but one of the 49 facilities could be adapted to handle at least one of the FICA Casks. For this to be possible, facility licensing, administrative controls, and/or physical aspects of the facility would need to be modified.

  12. A negative ion source test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melanson, S.; Dehnel, M., E-mail: morgan@d-pace.com; Potkins, D.; Theroux, J.; Hollinger, C.; Martin, J.; Stewart, T.; Jackle, P.; Withington, S. [D-Pace, Inc., P.O. Box 201, Nelson, British Columbia V1L 5P9 (Canada); Philpott, C.; Williams, P.; Brown, S.; Jones, T.; Coad, B. [Buckley Systems Ltd., 6 Bowden Road, Mount Wellington, Auckland 1060 (New Zealand)

    2016-02-15

    Progress is being made in the development of an Ion Source Test Facility (ISTF) by D-Pace Inc. in collaboration with Buckley Systems Ltd. in Auckland, NZ. The first phase of the ISTF is to be commissioned in October 2015 with the second phase being commissioned in March 2016. The facility will primarily be used for the development and the commercialization of ion sources. It will also be used to characterize and further develop various D-Pace Inc. beam diagnostic devices.

  13. Reactor facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hiroaki; Murase, Michio; Yokomizo, Osamu.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a BWR type reactor facility capable of suppressing the amount of steams generated by the mutual effect of a failed reactor core and coolants upon occurrence of an imaginal accident, and not requiring spacial countermeasures for enhancing the pressure resistance of the container vessel. Namely, a means for supplying cooling water at a temperature not lower by 30degC than the saturated temperature corresponding to the inner pressure of the containing vessel upon occurrence of an accident is disposed to a lower dry well below the pressure vessel. As a result, upon occurrence of such an accident that the reactor core should be melted and flown downward of the pressure vessel, when cooling water at a temperature not lower than the saturated temperature, for example, cooling water at 100degC or higher is supplied to the lower dry well, abrupt generation of steams by the mutual effect of the failed reactor core and cooling water is scarcely caused compared with a case of supplying cooling water at a temperature lower than the saturation temperature by 30degC or more. Accordingly, the amount of steams to be generated can be suppressed, and special countermeasure is no more necessary for enhancing the pressure resistance of the container vessel is no more necessary. (I.S.)

  14. Nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2002-01-01

    During September and October 2001, 15 events were recorded on the first grade and 1 on the second grade of the INES scale. The second grade event is in fact a re-classification of an incident that occurred on the second april 2001 at Dampierre power plant. This event happened during core refueling, a shift in the operation sequence led to the wrong positioning of 113 assemblies. A preliminary study of this event shows that this wrong positioning could have led, in other circumstances, to the ignition of nuclear reactions. Even in that case, the analysis made by EDF shows that the consequences on the staff would have been limited. Nevertheless a further study has shown that the existing measuring instruments could not have detected the power increase announcing the beginning of the chain reaction. The investigation has shown that there were deficiencies in the control of the successive operations involved in refueling. EDF has proposed a series of corrective measures to be implemented in all nuclear power plants. The other 15 events are described in the article. During this period 121 inspections have been made in nuclear facilities. (A.C.)

  15. Lewis Research Center space station electric power system test facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birchenough, Arthur G.; Martin, Donald F.

    1988-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center facilities were developed to support testing of the Space Station Electric Power System. The capabilities and plans for these facilities are described. The three facilities which are required in the Phase C/D testing, the Power Systems Facility, the Space Power Facility, and the EPS Simulation Lab, are described in detail. The responsibilities of NASA Lewis and outside groups in conducting tests are also discussed.

  16. Generalized plotting facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burris, R.D.; Gray, W.H.

    1978-01-01

    A command which causes the translation of any supported graphics file format to a format acceptable to any supported device was implemented on two linked DECsystem-10s. The processing of the command is divided into parsing and translating phases. In the parsing phase, information is extracted from the command and augmented by default data. The results of this phase are saved on disk, and the appropriate translating routine is invoked. Twenty-eight translating programs were implemented in this system. They support four different graphics file formats, including the DISSPLA and Calcomp formats, and seven different types of plotters, including Tektronix, Calcomp, and Versatec devices. Some of the plotters are devices linked to the DECsystem-10s, and some are driven by IBM System/360 computers linked via a communications network to the DECsystem-10s. The user of this facility can use any of the supported packages to create a file of graphics data, preview the file on an on-line scope, and, when satisfied, cause the same data to be plotted on a hard-copy device. All of the actions utilize a single simple command format. 2 figures.

  17. Irradiation Facilities at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Gkotse, Blerina; Carbonez, Pierre; Danzeca, Salvatore; Fabich, Adrian; Garcia, Alia, Ruben; Glaser, Maurice; Gorine, Georgi; Jaekel, Martin, Richard; Mateu,Suau, Isidre; Pezzullo, Giuseppe; Pozzi, Fabio; Ravotti, Federico; Silari, Marco; Tali, Maris

    2017-01-01

    CERN provides unique irradiation facilities for applications in many scientific fields. This paper summarizes the facilities currently operating for proton, gamma, mixed-field and electron irradiations, including their main usage, characteristics and information about their operation. The new CERN irradiation facilities database is also presented. This includes not only CERN facilities but also irradiation facilities available worldwide.

  18. Research Facilities | Wind | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Facilities Research Facilities NREL's state-of-the-art wind research facilities at the Research Facilities Photo of five men in hard hards observing the end of a turbine blade while it's being tested. Structural Research Facilities A photo of two people silhouetted against a computer simulation of

  19. North Slope, Alaska ESI: FACILITY (Facility Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains data for oil field facilities for the North Slope of Alaska. Vector points in this data set represent oil field facility locations. This data...

  20. Facile and green synthesis of (La0.95Eu0.052O2S red phosphors with sulfate-ion pillared layered hydroxides as a new type of precursor: controlled hydrothermal processing, phase evolution and photoluminescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuejiao Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a facile and green route for the synthesis of (La0.95Eu0.052O2S red phosphors of controllable morphologies, with the sulfate-type layered hydroxides of Ln2(OH4SO4centerdot2H2O (Ln = La and Eu as a new type of precursor. The technique takes advantage of the fact that the precursor has had the exact Ln:S molar ratio of the targeted phosphor, thus saving the hazardous sulfurization reagents indispensable to traditional synthesis. Controlled hydrothermal processing at 120 °C yielded phase-pure Ln2(OH4SO4centerdot2H2O crystallites in the form of either nanoplates or microprisms, which can both be converted into Ln2O2S phosphor via a Ln2O2SO4 intermediate upon annealing in flowing H2 at a minimum temperature of ~ 700 °C. The nanoplates collapse into relatively rounded Ln2O2S particles while the microprisms retain well their initial morphologies at 1 200 °C, thus yielding two types of red phosphors. Photoluminescence excitation (PLE studies found two distinct charge transfer (CT excitation bands of O2− → Eu3+ at ~ 270 nm and S2− → Eu3+ at ~ 340 nm for the Ln2O2S phosphors, with the latter being stronger and both significantly stronger than the intrinsic intra-f transitions of Eu3+. The two types of phosphors share high similarities in the positions of PLE/PL (photoluminescence bands and both show the strongest red emission at 627 nm (5D0 → 7F2 transition of Eu3+ under S2− → Eu3+ CT excitation at 340 nm. The PLE/PL intensities show clear dependence on particle morphology and calcination temperature, which were investigated in detail. Fluorescence decay analysis reveals that the 627 nm red emission has a lifetime of ~ 0.5 ms for both types of the phosphors.

  1. Establishment and Operation of User Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kye Ryung; Park, B. S.; Lim, Y. K.; Lee, S. K.; Jung, J. P.

    2005-08-01

    The final goal of this project is to establish the proton beam user facility which can offer the suitable proton beam for the user's demand. In the first phase we developed the key technologies that were required for the establishment of 20MeV and 100MeV proton user facilities. The user's demand survey was also achieved, and the test user facility was established on the results of the demand survey. Using the test facility, the users performed their pilot studies. Now, we have finished the conceptual design for 20MeV proton user facility. During the first phase we performed the user's demand survey and produced many materials related to the proton beam utilizations in domestic or abroad. The survey results were reflected on the establishment of the test user facility and the conceptual design of 20MeV/100MeV proton beam user facilities. We have developed the key technologies which concern to beam energy control, flux control, uniform irradiation, dose and uniformity measurement, proton energy measurement, SOBP(Spread-out Bragg Peak) system using a rotating range modulator, and carried out the conceptual design of 20MeV proton user facility. The test user facility has been constructed and operated for both verifying the developed key technologies and performing the user's preliminary experiments. 45MeV low flux user facility was constructed in 2003 and has performed a lot of irradiation experiments. The development of 1.8MeV test user facility was completed. Also the low energy user facility that KAERI kept was upgraded and used for many users. Therefore, we provided our users with various beams. On the other hand, the following activities were carried out, such as, inviting the oversea researchers, giving support to users to use the beam in domestic and abroad, discussing the beam utilization technologies by visiting the foreign user facilities, etc

  2. Jupiter Laser Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Jupiter Laser Facility is an institutional user facility in the Physical and Life Sciences Directorate at LLNL. The facility is designed to provide a high degree...

  3. Basic Research Firing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Basic Research Firing Facility is an indoor ballistic test facility that has recently transitioned from a customer-based facility to a dedicated basic research...

  4. Assessment of Recreational Facilities in Federal Capital City, Abuja, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Kanayo Ezeamaka

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abuja Master Plan provided development of adequate Green Areas and other Recreational Facilities within the Federal Capital City (FCC, as part of its sustainability principles and provided for these recreational facilities within each neighborhood (FCDA, 1979. However, there have been several recent foul cries about the negative development of recreational facilities and the abuse of the Master Plan in the FCC.  The motivation for carrying out this study arose from the observation that recreational facilities in Phase 1 of the Federal Capital City Abuja are not clearly developed as intended by the policy makers and thus, the need to identify the recreational facilities in the Phase 1 of FCC and observe their level of development as well as usage. The field survey revealed that the Central Business District and Gazupe have higher numbers of recreational facilities with 45 and 56. While Wuse II (A08 and Wuse II (A07 Districts have lesser recreational facilities with 10 and 17. The field survey further revealed that all the districts in Phase 1 have over 35% cases of land use changes from recreational facilities to other use. The survey shows that over 65% of these recreational facilities are fully developed. The study also shows that just about 11% of the recreational sporting facilities were developed in line with the Abuja Master Plan in Phase 1. The study revealed that recreational facilities in Phase 1 of the FCC, Abuja has not being developed in compliance with the Abuja Master Plan.

  5. Aperture area measurement facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NIST has established an absolute aperture area measurement facility for circular and near-circular apertures use in radiometric instruments. The facility consists of...

  6. High Throughput Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Argonne?s high throughput facility provides highly automated and parallel approaches to material and materials chemistry development. The facility allows scientists...

  7. Licensed Healthcare Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The Licensed Healthcare Facilities point layer represents the locations of all healthcare facilities licensed by the State of California, Department of Health...

  8. Facility Registry Service (FRS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Facility Registry Service (FRS) provides an integrated source of comprehensive (air, water, and waste) environmental information about facilities across EPA,...

  9. Evaluation methods for hospital facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fronczek-Munter, Aneta

    2013-01-01

    according to focus areas and proposes which evaluation methods to use in different building phases of healthcare facilities. Hospital evaluations with experts and users are also considered; their subjective view on space, function, technology, usability and aesthetics. Results & solutions: This paper...... presents the different methods for evaluating buildings in use in a new model, the Evaluation Focus Flower, and proposes which evaluation methods are suitable for various aims and building phases, i.e. which is giving best input for the initial briefing process of new hospital facilities with ambition...... of creating buildings with enhanced usability. Additionally various evaluation methods used in hospital cases in Denmark and Norway are presented. Involvement of users is proposed, not just in defining requirements but also in co-creation/design and evaluation of solutions. The theories and preliminary...

  10. Engineering test facility design center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    The vehicle by which the fusion program would move into the engineering testing phase of fusion power development is designated the Engineering Test Facility (ETF). The ETF would provide a test bed for reactor components in the fusion environment. In order to initiate preliminary planning for the ETF decision, the Office of Fusion Energy established the ETF Design Center activity to prepare the design of the ETF. This section describes the status of this design

  11. Guide to research facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-01

    This Guide provides information on facilities at US Department of Energy (DOE) and other government laboratories that focus on research and development of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. These laboratories have opened these facilities to outside users within the scientific community to encourage cooperation between the laboratories and the private sector. The Guide features two types of facilities: designated user facilities and other research facilities. Designated user facilities are one-of-a-kind DOE facilities that are staffed by personnel with unparalleled expertise and that contain sophisticated equipment. Other research facilities are facilities at DOE and other government laboratories that provide sophisticated equipment, testing areas, or processes that may not be available at private facilities. Each facility listing includes the name and phone number of someone you can call for more information.

  12. Communication grounding facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gye Seong

    1998-06-01

    It is about communication grounding facility, which is made up twelve chapters. It includes general grounding with purpose, materials thermal insulating material, construction of grounding, super strength grounding method, grounding facility with grounding way and building of insulating, switched grounding with No. 1A and LCR, grounding facility of transmission line, wireless facility grounding, grounding facility in wireless base station, grounding of power facility, grounding low-tenton interior power wire, communication facility of railroad, install of arrester in apartment and house, install of arrester on introduction and earth conductivity and measurement with introduction and grounding resistance.

  13. AOV Facility Tool/Facility Safety Specifications -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Develop and maintain authorizing documents that are standards that facilities must follow. These standards are references of FAA regulations and are specific to the...

  14. Decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunning, W.H.

    1977-01-01

    Collaborative studies are in progress in the U.K. between the U.K.A.E.A., the Generating Boards and other outside bodies, to identify the development issues and practical aspects of decommissioning redundant nuclear facilities. The various types of U.K.A.E.A. experimental reactors (D.F.R., W.A.G.R , S.G.H.W.R.) in support of the nuclear power development programme, together with the currently operating commercial 26 Magnox reactors in 11 stations, totalling some 5 GW will be retired before the end of the century and attention is focussed on these. The actual timing of withdrawal from service will be dictated by development programme requirements in the case of experimental reactors and by commercial and technical considerations in the case of electricity production reactors. Decommissioning studies have so far been confined to technical appraisals including the sequence logic of achieving specific objectives and are based on the generally accepted three stage progression. Stage 1, which is essentially a defuelling and coolant removal operation, is an interim phase. Stage 2 is a storage situation, the duration of which will be influenced by environmental pressures or economic factors including the re-use of existing sites. Stage 3, which implies removal of all active and non-active waste material and returning the site to general use, must be the ultimate objective. The engineering features and the radioactive inventory of the system must be assessed in detail to avoid personnel or environmental hazards during Stage 2. These factors will also influence decisions on the degree of Stage 2 decommissioning and its duration, bearing in mind that for Stage 3 activation may govern the waste disposal route and the associated radiation man-rem exposure during dismantling. Ideally, planning for decommissioning should be considered at the design stage of the facility. An objective of present studies is to identify features which would assist decommissioning of future systems

  15. Cold Vacuum Drying Facility hazard analysis report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krahn, D.E.

    1998-02-23

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) hazard analysis to support the CVDF phase 2 safety analysis report (SAR), and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, and implements the requirements of US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.

  16. Cold Vacuum Drying Facility hazard analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krahn, D.E.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) hazard analysis to support the CVDF phase 2 safety analysis report (SAR), and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, and implements the requirements of US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports

  17. Radioactive wastes. Safety of storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devillers, Ch.

    2001-01-01

    A radioactive waste storage facility is designed in a way that ensures the isolation of wastes with respect to the biosphere. This function comprises the damping of the gamma and neutron radiations from the wastes, and the confinement of the radionuclides content of the wastes. The safety approach is based on two time scales: the safety of the insulation system during the main phase of radioactive decay, and the assessment of the radiological risks following this phase. The safety of a surface storage facility is based on a three-barrier concept (container, storage structures, site). The confidence in the safety of the facility is based on the quality assurance of the barriers and on their surveillance and maintenance. The safety of a deep repository will be based on the site quality, on the design and construction of structures and on the quality of the safety demonstration. This article deals with the safety approach and principles of storage facilities: 1 - recall of the different types of storage facilities; 2 - different phases of the life of a storage facility and regulatory steps; 3 - safety and radiation protection goals (time scales, radiation protection goals); 4 - safety approach and principles of storage facilities: safety of the isolation system (confinement system, safety analysis, scenarios, radiological consequences, safety principles), assessment of the radiation risks after the main phase of decay; 5 - safety of surface storage facilities: safety analysis of the confinement system of the Aube plant (barriers, scenarios, modeling, efficiency), evaluation of radiological risks after the main phase of decay; experience feedback of the Manche plant; variants of surface storage facilities in France and abroad (very low activity wastes, mine wastes, short living wastes with low and average activity); 6 - safety of deep geological disposal facilities: legal framework of the French research; international context; safety analysis of the confinement system

  18. Space station accommodations for life sciences research facilities. Phase 1: Conceptual design and programmatics studies for Missions SAAX0307, SAAX0302 and the transition from SAAX0307 to SAAX0302. Volume 2: Study results

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    Lockheed Missiles and Space Company's conceptual designs and programmatics for a Space Station Nonhuman Life Sciences Research Facility (LSRF) are presented. Conceptual designs and programmatics encompass an Initial Orbital Capability (IOC) LSRF, a growth or follow-on Orbital Capability (FOC), and the transitional process required to modify the IOC LSFR to the FOC LSFR. The IOC and FOC LSFRs correspond to missions SAAX0307 and SAAX0302 of the Space Station Mission Requirements Database, respectively.

  19. Lesotho - Health Facility Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — The main objective of the 2011 Health Facility Survey (HFS) was to establish a baseline for informing the Health Project performance indicators on health facilities,...

  20. Armament Technology Facility (ATF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Armament Technology Facility is a 52,000 square foot, secure and environmentally-safe, integrated small arms and cannon caliber design and evaluation facility....

  1. Projectile Demilitarization Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Projectile Wash Out Facility is US Army Ammunition Peculiar Equipment (APE 1300). It is a pilot scale wash out facility that uses high pressure water and steam...

  2. Rocketball Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This test facility offers the capability to emulate and measure guided missile radar cross-section without requiring flight tests of tactical missiles. This facility...

  3. Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Individual permits for municipal, industrial, and semi-public wastewater treatment facilities in Iowa for the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES)...

  4. Materiel Evaluation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — CRREL's Materiel Evaluation Facility (MEF) is a large cold-room facility that can be set up at temperatures ranging from −20°F to 120°F with a temperature change...

  5. Environmental Toxicology Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Fully-equipped facilities for environmental toxicology researchThe Environmental Toxicology Research Facility (ETRF) located in Vicksburg, MS provides over 8,200 ft...

  6. Dialysis Facility Compare

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Dialysis Facility Compare helps you find detailed information about Medicare-certified dialysis facilities. You can compare the services and the quality of care that...

  7. Energetics Conditioning Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Energetics Conditioning Facility is used for long term and short term aging studies of energetic materials. The facility has 10 conditioning chambers of which 2...

  8. Explosive Components Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The 98,000 square foot Explosive Components Facility (ECF) is a state-of-the-art facility that provides a full-range of chemical, material, and performance analysis...

  9. Facilities for US Radioastronomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaddeus, Patrick

    1982-01-01

    Discusses major developments in radioastronomy since 1945. Topics include proposed facilities, very-long-baseline interferometric array, millimeter-wave telescope, submillimeter-wave telescope, and funding for radioastronomy facilities and projects. (JN)

  10. Neighbourhood facilities for sustainability

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gibberd, Jeremy T

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available . In this paper these are referred to as ‘Neighbourhood Facilities for Sustainability’. Neighbourhood Facilities for Sustainability (NFS) are initiatives undertaken by individuals and communities to build local sustainable systems which not only improve...

  11. Cold Vacuum Drying Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Located near the K-Basins (see K-Basins link) in Hanford's 100 Area is a facility called the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF).Between 2000 and 2004, workers at the...

  12. Ouellette Thermal Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Thermal Test Facility is a joint Army/Navy state-of-the-art facility (8,100 ft2) that was designed to:Evaluate and characterize the effect of flame and thermal...

  13. Integrated Disposal Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Located near the center of the 586-square-mile Hanford Site is the Integrated Disposal Facility, also known as the IDF.This facility is a landfill similar in concept...

  14. Facility design: introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unger, W.E.

    1980-01-01

    The design of shielded chemical processing facilities for handling plutonium is discussed. The TRU facility is considered in particular; its features for minimizing the escape of process materials are listed. 20 figures

  15. Experimental facilities and simulation means

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper and its associated series of slides review the experimental facilities and the simulation means used for the development of nuclear reactors in France. These experimental facilities include installations used for the measurement and qualification of nuclear data (mainly cross-sections) like EOLE reactor and Minerve zero power reactor, installations like material testing reactors, installations dedicated to reactor safety experiments like Cabri reactor, and other installations like accelerators (Jannus accelerator, GANIL for instance) that are complementary to neutron irradiations in experimental reactors. The simulation means rely on a series of advanced computer codes: Tripoli-Apollo for neutron transport, Numodis for irradiation impact on materials, Neptune and Cathare for 2-phase fluid dynamics, Europlexus for mechanical structures, and Pleiades (with Alcyone) for nuclear fuels. (A.C.)

  16. CLEAR test facility

    CERN Multimedia

    Ordan, Julien Marius

    2017-01-01

    A new user facility for accelerator R&D, the CERN Linear Electron Accelerator for Research (CLEAR), started operation in August 2017. CLEAR evolved from the former CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3) used by the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). The new facility is able to host and test a broad range of ideas in the accelerator field.

  17. Facility or Facilities? That is the Question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viso, M.

    2018-04-01

    The management of the martian samples upon arrival on the Earth will require a lot of work to ensure a safe life detection and biohazard testing during the quarantine. This will induce a sharing of the load between several facilities.

  18. Emergency reactor container cooling facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention concerns an emergency cooling facility for a nuclear reactor container having a pressure suppression chamber, in which water in the suppression chamber is effectively used for cooling the reactor container. That is, the lower portion of a water pool in the pressure suppression chamber and the inside of the reactor container are connected by a pipeline. The lower end of the pipeline and a pressurized incombustible gas tank disposed to the outside of the reactor container are connected by a pipeline by way of valves. Then, when the temperature of the lower end of the pressure vessel exceeds a predetermined value, the valves are opened. If the valves are opened, the incombustible gas flows into the lower end of the pipeline connecting the lower portion of the water pool in the pressure suppression chamber and the inside of the reactor container. Since the inside of the pipeline is a two phase flow comprising a mixture of a gas phase and a liquid phase, the average density is decreased. Therefore, the water level of the two phase flow is risen by the level difference between the inside and the outside of the pipeline and, finally, the two phase mixture is released into the reactor container. As a result, the reactor container can be cooled by water in the suppression chamber by a static means without requiring pumps. (I.S.)

  19. Facility transition instruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morton, M.R.

    1997-01-01

    The Bechtel Hanford, Inc. facility transition instruction was initiated in response to the need for a common, streamlined process for facility transitions and to capture the knowledge and experience that has accumulated over the last few years. The instruction serves as an educational resource and defines the process for transitioning facilities to long-term surveillance and maintenance (S and M). Generally, these facilities do not have identified operations missions and must be transitioned from operational status to a safe and stable configuration for long-term S and M. The instruction can be applied to a wide range of facilities--from process canyon complexes like the Plutonium Uranium Extraction Facility or B Plant, to stand-alone, lower hazard facilities like the 242B/BL facility. The facility transition process is implemented (under the direction of the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office [RL] Assistant Manager-Environmental) by Bechtel Hanford, Inc. management, with input and interaction with the appropriate RL division and Hanford site contractors as noted in the instruction. The application of the steps identified herein and the early participation of all organizations involved are expected to provide a cost-effective, safe, and smooth transition from operational status to deactivation and S and M for a wide range of Hanford Site facilities

  20. Facilities inventory protection for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, F.J.

    1989-01-01

    The fact that shut-down applications have been filed for nuclear power plants, suggests to have a scrutinizing look at the scopes of assessment and decision available to administrations and courts for the protection of facilities inventories relative to legal and constitutional requirements. The paper outlines the legal bases which need to be observed if purposeful calculation is to be ensured. Based on the different actual conditions and legal consequences, the author distinguishes between 1) the legal situation of facilities licenced already and 2) the legal situation of facilities under planning during the licencing stage. As indicated by the contents and restrictions of the pertinent provisions of the Atomic Energy Act and by the corresponding compensatory regulation, the object of the protection of facilities inventor in the legal position of the facility owner within the purview of the Atomic Energy Act, and the licensing proper. Art. 17 of the Atomic Energy Act indicates the legislators intent that, once issued, the licence will be the pivotal point for regulations aiming at protection and intervention. (orig./HSCH) [de

  1. Facilities projects performance measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erben, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    The two DOE-owned facilities at Hanford, the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF), and the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility (FMIT), are described. The performance measurement systems used at these two facilities are next described

  2. North Bay Aqueduct (Phase II Facilities), Solano County, California. Regulatory Permit Application Made by the California Department of Water Resources to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Public Notice 12950-58.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-01

    studies that may resolve some of the public concerns. 3. Development of more efficient and economical waste water treatment systems that can render the...cultural sequence for the region, which includes the Solano County locale, was established by Lillard, Heizer and Fenenga (1939) with the estimated date...framework for prehistoric archaeological data; the Heizer arid T’enenia ( 1939) chart is as follows 1800 A.D Late Horizon, Phase III (Hiistoric) 1700 A.D

  3. Instrumentation of the ESRF medical imaging facility

    CERN Document Server

    Elleaume, H; Berkvens, P; Berruyer, G; Brochard, T; Dabin, Y; Domínguez, M C; Draperi, A; Fiedler, S; Goujon, G; Le Duc, G; Mattenet, M; Nemoz, C; Pérez, M; Renier, M; Schulze, C; Spanne, P; Suortti, P; Thomlinson, W; Estève, F; Bertrand, B; Le Bas, J F

    1999-01-01

    At the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) a beamport has been instrumented for medical research programs. Two facilities have been constructed for alternative operation. The first one is devoted to medical imaging and is focused on intravenous coronary angiography and computed tomography (CT). The second facility is dedicated to pre-clinical microbeam radiotherapy (MRT). This paper describes the instrumentation for the imaging facility. Two monochromators have been designed, both are based on bent silicon crystals in the Laue geometry. A versatile scanning device has been built for pre-alignment and scanning of the patient through the X-ray beam in radiography or CT modes. An intrinsic germanium detector is used together with large dynamic range electronics (16 bits) to acquire the data. The beamline is now at the end of its commissioning phase; intravenous coronary angiography is intended to start in 1999 with patients and the CT pre-clinical program is underway on small animals. The first in viv...

  4. AECL's strategy for decommissioning Canadian nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joubert, W.M.; Pare, F.E.; Pratapagiri, G.

    1992-01-01

    The Canadian policy on decommissioning of nuclear facilities as defined in the Atomic Energy Control Act and Regulations is administered by the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB), a Federal Government agency. It requires that these facilities be decommissioned according to approved plans which are to be developed by the owner of the nuclear facility during its early stages of design and to be refined during its operating life. In this regulatory environment, Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL) has developed a decommissioning strategy for power stations which consists of three distinctive phases. After presenting AECL's decommissioning philosophy, its foundations are explained and it is described how it has and soon will be applied to various facilities. A brief summary is provided of the experience gained up to date on the implementation of this strategy. (author) 3 figs.; 1 tab

  5. 340 Facility compliance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    English, S.L.

    1993-10-01

    This study provides an environmental compliance evaluation of the RLWS and the RPS systems of the 340 Facility. The emphasis of the evaluation centers on compliance with WAC requirements for hazardous and mixed waste facilities, federal regulations, and Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) requirements pertinent to the operation of the 340 Facility. The 340 Facility is not covered under either an interim status Part A permit or a RCRA Part B permit. The detailed discussion of compliance deficiencies are summarized in Section 2.0. This includes items of significance that require action to ensure facility compliance with WAC, federal regulations, and WHC requirements. Outstanding issues exist for radioactive airborne effluent sampling and monitoring, radioactive liquid effluent sampling and monitoring, non-radioactive liquid effluent sampling and monitoring, less than 90 day waste storage tanks, and requirements for a permitted facility

  6. Trauma facilities in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weile, Jesper; Nielsen, Klaus; Primdahl, Stine C

    2018-01-01

    Background: Trauma is a leading cause of death among adults aged challenge. Evidence supports the centralization of trauma facilities and the use multidisciplinary trauma teams. Because knowledge is sparse on the existing distribution of trauma facilities...... and the organisation of trauma care in Denmark, the aim of this study was to identify all Danish facilities that care for traumatized patients and to investigate the diversity in organization of trauma management. Methods: We conducted a systematic observational cross-sectional study. First, all hospitals in Denmark...... were identified via online services and clarifying phone calls to each facility. Second, all trauma care manuals on all facilities that receive traumatized patients were gathered. Third, anesthesiologists and orthopedic surgeons on call at all trauma facilities were contacted via telephone...

  7. Synchrotron radiation facilities

    CERN Multimedia

    1972-01-01

    Particularly in the past few years, interest in using the synchrotron radiation emanating from high energy, circular electron machines has grown considerably. In our February issue we included an article on the synchrotron radiation facility at Frascati. This month we are spreading the net wider — saying something about the properties of the radiation, listing the centres where synchrotron radiation facilities exist, adding a brief description of three of them and mentioning areas of physics in which the facilities are used.

  8. Facility of aerosol filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duverger de Cuy, G; Regnier, J

    1975-04-18

    Said invention relates to a facility of aerosol filtration, particularly of sodium aerosols. Said facility is of special interest for fast reactors where sodium fires involve the possibility of high concentrations of sodium aerosols which soon clog up conventional filters. The facility intended for continuous operation, includes at the pre-filtering stage, means for increasing the size of the aerosol particles and separating clustered particles (cyclone separator).

  9. Now entering phase two...

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Building on the success of their feasibility phase, the CLIC test facility, CTF3, has just launched into a five-year project development phase. This will involve detailed performance optimisation studies, marking the project’s transition from pure research and development to prototyping and construction.   CLIC accelerator modules under construction at CERN. “With the feasibility phase now complete, we have established that CLIC can be built,” says Roberto Corsini, CLIC Collaboration spokesperson. “Now we want to be sure that it can provide the luminosity and energy performance needed. We will be looking at the engineering, performance and cost of a real CLIC machine also seeing if we can reduce it.” CTF3’s second phase will focus on selected performance-related research areas for further investigation. The largest of these involves the construction and testing of several authentic CLIC accelerator modules that are currently being ...

  10. Textiles Performance Testing Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Textiles Performance Testing Facilities has the capabilities to perform all physical wet and dry performance testing, and visual and instrumental color analysis...

  11. Geodynamics Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This GSL facility has evolved over the last three decades to support survivability and protective structures research. Experimental devices include three gas-driven...

  12. Materials Characterization Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Materials Characterization Facility enables detailed measurements of the properties of ceramics, polymers, glasses, and composites. It features instrumentation...

  13. Mobile Solar Tracker Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NIST's mobile solar tracking facility is used to characterize the electrical performance of photovoltaic panels. It incorporates meteorological instruments, a solar...

  14. Proximal Probes Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Proximal Probes Facility consists of laboratories for microscopy, spectroscopy, and probing of nanostructured materials and their functional properties. At the...

  15. Geospatial Data Analysis Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Geospatial application development, location-based services, spatial modeling, and spatial analysis are examples of the many research applications that this facility...

  16. Facility Environmental Management System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This is the Web site of the Federal Highway Administration's (FHWA's) Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center (TFHRC) facility Environmental Management System (EMS)....

  17. Heated Tube Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Heated Tube Facility at NASA GRC investigates cooling issues by simulating conditions characteristic of rocket engine thrust chambers and high speed airbreathing...

  18. Magnetics Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Magnetics Research Facility houses three Helmholtz coils that generate magnetic fields in three perpendicular directions to balance the earth's magnetic field....

  19. Transonic Experimental Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Transonic Experimental Research Facility evaluates aerodynamics and fluid dynamics of projectiles, smart munitions systems, and sub-munitions dispensing systems;...

  20. Engine Test Facility (ETF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Air Force Arnold Engineering Development Center's Engine Test Facility (ETF) test cells are used for development and evaluation testing of propulsion systems for...

  1. Target Assembly Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Target Assembly Facility integrates new armor concepts into actual armored vehicles. Featuring the capability ofmachining and cutting radioactive materials, it...

  2. Pavement Testing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Comprehensive Environmental and Structural AnalysesThe ERDC Pavement Testing Facility, located on the ERDC Vicksburg campus, was originally constructed to provide an...

  3. Composite Structures Manufacturing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Composite Structures Manufacturing Facility specializes in the design, analysis, fabrication and testing of advanced composite structures and materials for both...

  4. GPS Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Global Positioning System (GPS) Test Facility Instrumentation Suite (GPSIS) provides great flexibility in testing receivers by providing operational control of...

  5. Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The U.S. Department of Energy Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides a collaborative, shared infrastructure to...

  6. Surplus Facilities Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coobs, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    This is the second of two programs that are concerned with the management of surplus facilities. The facilities in this program are those related to commercial activities, which include the three surplus experimental and test reactors [(MSRE, HRE-2, and the Low Intensity Test Reactor (LITR)] and seven experimental loops at the ORR. The program is an integral part of the Surplus Facilities Management Program, which is a national program administered for DOE by the Richland Operations Office. Very briefly reported here are routine surveillance and maintenance of surplus radioactively contaminated DOE facilities awaiting decommissioning

  7. Imagery Data Base Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Imagery Data Base Facility supports AFRL and other government organizations by providing imagery interpretation and analysis to users for data selection, imagery...

  8. Neutron Therapy Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Neutron Therapy Facility provides a moderate intensity, broad energy spectrum neutron beam that can be used for short term irradiations for radiobiology (cells)...

  9. Universal Drive Train Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This vehicle drive train research facility is capable of evaluating helicopter and ground vehicle power transmission technologies in a system level environment. The...

  10. High Combustion Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At NETL's High-Pressure Combustion Research Facility in Morgantown, WV, researchers can investigate new high-pressure, high-temperature hydrogen turbine combustion...

  11. Catalytic Fuel Conversion Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility enables unique catalysis research related to power and energy applications using military jet fuels and alternative fuels. It is equipped with research...

  12. Flexible Electronics Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Flexible Electronics Research Facility designs, synthesizes, tests, and fabricates materials and devices compatible with flexible substrates for Army information...

  13. DUPIC facility engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J. J.; Lee, H. H.; Kim, K. H. and others

    2000-03-01

    The objectives of this study are (1) the refurbishment for PIEF(Post Irradiation Examination Facility) and M6 hot-cell in IMEF(Irradiated Material Examination Facility), (2) the establishment of the compatible facility for DUPIC fuel fabrication experiments which is licensed by government organization, and (3) the establishment of the transportation system and transportation cask for nuclear material between facilities. The report for this project describes following contents, such as objectives, necessities, scope, contents, results of current step, R and D plan in future and etc.

  14. Facility effluent monitoring plan determinations for the 400 Area facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickels, J.M.

    1991-09-01

    This Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determination resulted from an evaluation conducted for the Westinghouse Hanford Company 400 Area facilities on the Hanford Site. The Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations have been prepared in accordance with A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans. Two major Westinghouse Hanford Company facilities in the 400 Area were evaluated: the Fast Flux Test Facility and the Fuels Manufacturing and examination Facility. The determinations were prepared by Westinghouse Hanford Company. Of these two facilities, only the Fast Flux Test Facility will require a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan. 7 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  15. 8. High power laser and ignition facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayramian, A.J.; Beach, R.J.; Bibeau, C.

    2002-01-01

    This document gives a review of the various high power laser projects and ignition facilities in the world: the Mercury laser system and Electra (Usa), the krypton fluoride (KrF) laser and the HALNA (high average power laser for nuclear-fusion application) project (Japan), the Shenguang series, the Xingguang facility and the TIL (technical integration line) facility (China), the Vulcan peta-watt interaction facility (UK), the Megajoule project and its feasibility phase: the LIL (laser integration line) facility (France), the Asterix IV/PALS high power laser facility (Czech Republic), and the Phelix project (Germany). In Japan the 100 TW Petawatt Module Laser, constructed in 1997, is being upgraded to the world biggest peta-watt laser. Experiments have been performed with single-pulse large aperture e-beam-pumped Garpun (Russia) and with high-current-density El-1 KrF laser installation (Russia) to investigate Al-Be foil transmittance and stability to multiple e-beam irradiations. An article is dedicated to a comparison of debris shield impacts for 2 experiments at NIF (national ignition facility). (A.C.)

  16. New facility for testing LHC HTS power leads

    CERN Document Server

    Rabehl, Roger Jon; Fehér, S; Huang, Y; Orris, D; Pischalnikov, Y; Sylvester, C D; Tartaglia, M

    2005-01-01

    A new facility for testing HTS power leads at the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility has been designed and operated. The facility has successfully tested 19 pairs of HTS power leads, which are to be integrated into the Large Hadron Collider Interaction Region cryogenic feed boxes. This paper describes the design and operation of the cryogenics, process controls, data acquisition, and quench management systems. HTS power lead test results from the commissioning phase of the project are also presented.

  17. Present issues for centre de la Manche disposal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutzer, M.; Vervialle, J.P.; Charton, P.

    2006-01-01

    Centre de la Manche disposal facility officially entered its institutional control period in January 2003. Andra performs monitoring of the environment and of the capping system in order to prepare further phases that should become more and more passive. A detailed 'long term memory' has been established in order to provide future generations with the relevant information about the facility. (author)

  18. Phase Contrast Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menk, Ralf Hendrik

    2008-01-01

    All standard (medical) x-ray imaging technologies, rely primarily on the amplitude properties of the incident radiation, and do not depend on its phase. This is unchanged since the discovery by Roentgen that the intensity of an x-ray beam, as measured by the exposure on a film, was related to the relative transmission properties of an object. However, recently various imaging techniques have emerged which depend on the phase of the x-rays as well as the amplitude. Phase becomes important when the beam is coherent and the imaging system is sensitive to interference phenomena. Significant new advances have been made in coherent optic theory and techniques, which now promise phase information in medical imaging. The development of perfect crystal optics and the increasing availability of synchrotron radiation facilities have contributed to a significant increase in the application of phase based imaging in materials and life sciences. Unique source characteristics such as high intensity, monochromaticity, coherence and high collimating provide an ideal source for advanced imaging. Phase contrast imaging has been applied in both projection and computed tomography modes, and recent applications have been made in the field of medical imaging. Due to the underlying principle of X-ray detection conventional image receptors register only intensities of wave fields and not their phases. During the last decade basically five different methods were developed that translate the phase information into intensity variations. These methods are based on measuring the phase shift φ directly (using interference phenomena), the gradient ∇ φ , or the Laplacian ∇ 2 φ. All three methods can be applied to polychromatic X-ray sources keeping in mind that the native source is synchrotron radiation, featuring monochromatic and reasonable coherent X-ray beams. Due to the vast difference in the coefficients that are driven absorption and phase effects (factor 1,000-10,000 in the energy

  19. Design of the disposal facility 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saanio, T.; Ikonen, A.; Keto, P.; Kirkkomaeki, T.; Kukkola, T.; Nieminen, J.; Raiko, H.

    2013-11-01

    The spent nuclear fuel accumulated from the nuclear power plants in Olkiluoto in Eurajoki and in Haestholmen in Loviisa will be disposed of in Olkiluoto. A facility complex will be constructed at Olkiluoto, and it will include two nuclear waste facilities according to Government Degree 736/2008. The nuclear waste facilities are an encapsulation plant, constructed to encapsulate spent nuclear fuel and a disposal facility consisting of an underground repository and other underground rooms and above ground service spaces. The repository is planned to be excavated to a depth of 400 - 450 meters. Access routes to the disposal facility are an inclined access tunnel and vertical shafts. The encapsulated fuel is transferred to the disposal facility in the canister lift. The canisters are transferred from the technical rooms to the disposal area via central tunnel and deposited in the deposition holes which are bored in the floors of the deposition tunnels and are lined beforehand with compacted bentonite blocks. Two parallel central tunnels connect all the deposition tunnels and these central tunnels are inter-connected at regular intervals. The solution improves the fire safety of the underground rooms and allows flexible backfilling and closing of the deposition tunnels in stages during the operational phase of the repository. An underground rock characterization facility, ONKALO, is excavated at the disposal level. ONKALO is designed and constructed so that it can later serve as part of the repository. The goal is that the first part of the disposal facility will be constructed under the building permit phase in the 2010's and operations will start in the 2020's. The fuel from 4 operating reactors as well the fuel from the fifth nuclear power plant under construction, has been taken into account in designing the disposal facility. According to the information from TVO and Fortum, the amount of the spent nuclear fuel is 5,440 tU. The disposal facility is being excavated

  20. Green facility location

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velázquez Martínez, J.C.; Fransoo, J.C.; Bouchery, Y.; Corbett, C.J.; Fransoo, J.C.; Tan, T.

    2017-01-01

    Transportation is one of the main contributing factors of global carbon emissions, and thus, when dealing with facility location models in a distribution context, transportation emissions may be substantially higher than the emissions due to production or storage. Because facility location models

  1. A Remote WIRELESS Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kees Uiterwijk

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Continuing need for available distance learning facilities has led to the development of a remote lab facility focusing on wireless technology. In the field of engineering there is a student need of gaining experience in set-up, monitoring and maintenance of 802.11A/B/G based wireless LAN environments.

  2. Medical cyclotron facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-09-01

    This report examines the separate proposals from the Austin Hospital and the Australian Atomic Energy Commission for a medical cyclotron facility. The proponents have argued that a cyclotron facility would benefit Australia in areas of patient care, availability and export of radioisotopes, and medical research. Positron emission tomography (PET) and neutron beam therapy are also examined

  3. Global Environment Facility |

    Science.gov (United States)

    environment Countries pledge US$4.1 billion to the Global Environment Facility Ringtail lemur mom with two of paradise Nations rally to protect global environment Countries pledge US$4.1 billion to the Global Environment Facility Stockholm, Sweden birds-eye view Events GEF-7 Replenishment Trung Truong Son Landscapes

  4. Samarbejdsformer og Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, Kresten

    Resultater fra en surveyundersøgelse om fordele og ulemper ved forskellige samarbejdsformer indenfor Facilities Management fremlægges.......Resultater fra en surveyundersøgelse om fordele og ulemper ved forskellige samarbejdsformer indenfor Facilities Management fremlægges....

  5. DUPIC facility engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. J.; Lee, H. H.; Kim, K. H.

    2002-03-01

    With starting DUPIC fuel fabrication experiment by using spent fuels, 1) operation and refurbishment for DFDF (DUPIC fuel development facility), and 2) operation and improvement of transportation equipment for radioactive materials between facilities became the objectives of this study. This report describes objectives of the project, necessities, state of related technology, R and D scope, R and D results, proposal for application etc

  6. Nuclear physics accelerator facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    This paper describes many of the nuclear physics heavy-ion accelerator facilities in the US and the research programs being conducted. The accelerators described are: Argonne National Laboratory--ATLAS; Brookhaven National Laboratory--Tandem/AGS Heavy Ion Facility; Brookhaven National Laboratory--Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) (Proposed); Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory--Bevalac; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory--88-Inch Cyclotron; Los Alamos National Laboratory--Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF); Massachusetts Institute of Technology--Bates Linear Accelerator Center; Oak Ridge National Laboratory--Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility; Oak Ridge National Laboratory--Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator; Stanford Linear Accelerator Center--Nuclear Physics Injector; Texas AandM University--Texas AandM Cyclotron; Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL); University of Washington--Tandem/Superconducting Booster; and Yale University--Tandem Van de Graaff

  7. Outline of NUCEF facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeshita, Isao

    1996-01-01

    NUCEF is a multipurpose research facility in the field of safety and advanced technology of nuclear fuel cycle back-end. Various experiment facilities and its supporting installations, in which nuclear fuel materials, radio isotopes and TRU elements can be handled, are arranged in more than one hundred rooms of two experiment buildings. Its construction was completed in middle of 1994 and hot experiments have been started since then. NUCEF is located on the site (30,000 m 2 ) of southeastern part in the Tokai Research Establishment of JAERI facing to the Pacific Ocean. The base of Experiment Buildings A and B was directly founded on the rock existing at 10-15 m below ground level taking the aseismatic design into consideration. Each building is almost same sized and composed of one basement and three floors of which area is 17,500 m 2 in total. In the basement, there are exhaust facilities of ventilation system, treatment system of solution fuel and radioactive waste solution and storage tanks of them. Major experiment facilities are located on the first or the second floors in each building. An air-inlet facility of ventilation system for each building is equipped on the third floor. Most of experiment facilities for criticality safety research including two critical facilities: Static Experiment Critical Facility (STACY) and Transient Experiment Critical Facility (TRACY) are installed in Experiment Building A. Experiment equipments for research on advanced fuel reprocessing process and on TRU waste management, which are named BECKY (Back End Fuel Cycle Key Elements Research Facility), are installed in laboratories and a-g cells in Experiment Building B. (J.P.N.)

  8. Facile preparation of surface-exchangeable core@shell iron oxide@gold nanoparticles for magnetic solid-phase extraction: Use of gold shell as the intermediate platform for versatile adsorbents with varying self-assembled monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yaping [Beijing National Laboratory of Molecular Sciences, Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Living Biosystems, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Graduate School, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Qi, Li, E-mail: qili@iccas.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory of Molecular Sciences, Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Living Biosystems, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Shen, Ying [Beijing National Laboratory of Molecular Sciences, Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Living Biosystems, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Graduate School, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Ma, Huimin [Beijing National Laboratory of Molecular Sciences, Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Living Biosystems, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-02-06

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •The core@shell Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@Au nanoparticles functionalized with SAMs were successfully constructed. •The SAMs could be transformed from one kind to another via thiol exchange process. •The developed nanomaterials could be applied in mode switching MSPE. -- Abstract: The core@shell Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@Au nanoparticles (NPs) functionalized with exchangeable self-assembled monolayers have been developed for mode switching magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) using high performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection. The adsorbents were synthesized by chemical coprecipitation to prepare magnetic cores followed by sonolysis to produce gold shells. Functionalization of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@Au NPs surface was realized through self-assembly of commercially available low molecular weight thiol-containing ligands using gold shells as intermediate platform and the dynamic nature of Au–S chemistry allowed substituent of one thiol-containing ligand with another simply by thiol exchange process. The resultant adsorbents were characterized by transmission electronic microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, elemental analysis, contact angle measurement, and vibrating sample magnetometry. To evaluate the versatile performance of the developed MSPE adsorbents, they were applied for normal-phase SPE followed by reversed-phase SPE. A few kinds of diphenols and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were employed as model analytes, respectively. The predominant parameters affecting extraction efficiency were investigated and optimized. Under the optimum experimental conditions, wide dynamic linear range (6.25–1600 μg L{sup −1} for diphenols and 1.56–100 μg L{sup −1} for PAHs) with good linearity (r{sup 2} ≥ 0.989) and low detection limits (0.34–16.67 μg L{sup −1} for diphenols and 0.26–0.52 μg L{sup −1} for PAHs) were achieved. The advantage of the developed method is that the Fe{sub 3}O

  9. Facile synthesis of new nano sorbent for magnetic solid-phase extraction by self assembling of bis-(2,4,4-trimethyl pentyl)-dithiophosphinic acid on Fe3O4-Ag core-shell nanoparticles: Characterization and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahmasebi, Elham; Yamini, Yadollah

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Self assembling of bis-(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)-dithiophosphinic acid on Fe 3 O 4 -Ag core-shell nanoparticles and application of it for solid phase extraction of PAHs. Highlights: ► A novel sorbent for magnetic solid-phase extraction of PAHs was introduced. ► Silver was coated on Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles (MNPs) by reduction of AgNO 3 with NaBH 4 . ► Bis-(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)-dithiophosphinic acid self-assembled on silver coated MNPs. ► Size, morphology, composition and properties of the nanoparticles were characterized. ► Extraction efficiency of the sorbent was investigated by extraction of five PAHs. - Abstract: A novel sorbent for magnetic solid-phase extraction by self-assembling of organosulfur compound, (bis-(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)-dithiophosphinic acid), onto the silver-coated Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles was introduced. Due to the formation of covalent bond of S-Ag, the new coating on the silver surface was very stable and showed high thermal stability (up to 320 °C). The size, morphology, composition, and properties of the prepared nanoparticles have also been characterized and determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray analyzer (EDX), dynamic light scattering (DLS), Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). Extraction efficiency of the new sorbent was investigated by extraction of five polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as model compounds. The optimum extraction conditions for PAHs were obtained as of extraction time, 20 min; 50 mg sorbent from 100 mL of the sample solution, and elution with 100 μL of 1-propanol under fierce vortex for 2 min. Under the optimal conditions, the calibration curves were obtained in the range of 0.05–100 μg L −1 (R 2 > 0.9980) and the LODs (S/N = 3) were obtained in the range of 0.02–0.10 μg L −1 . Relative standard deviations (RSDs) for intra- and inter-day precision were 2.6–4.2% and 3.6–8

  10. DUPIC facility engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J S; Choi, J W; Go, W I; Kim, H D; Song, K C; Jeong, I H; Park, H S; Im, C S; Lee, H M; Moon, K H; Hong, K P; Lee, K S; Suh, K S; Kim, E K; Min, D K; Lee, J C; Chun, Y B; Paik, S Y; Lee, E P; Yoo, G S; Kim, Y S; Park, J C

    1997-09-01

    In the early stage of the project, a comprehensive survey was conducted to identify the feasibility of using available facilities and of interface between those facilities. It was found out that the shielded cell M6 interface between those facilities. It was found out that the shielded cell M6 of IMEF could be used for the main process experiments of DUPIC fuel fabrication in regard to space adequacy, material flow, equipment layout, etc. Based on such examination, a suitable adapter system for material transfer around the M6 cell was engineered. Regarding the PIEF facility, where spent PWR fuel assemblies are stored in an annex pool, disassembly devices in the pool are retrofitted and spent fuel rod cutting and shipping system to the IMEF are designed and built. For acquisition of casks for radioactive material transport between the facilities, some adaptive refurbishment was applied to the available cask (Padirac) based on extensive analysis on safety requirements. A mockup test facility was newly acquired for remote test of DUPIC fuel fabrication process equipment prior to installation in the M6 cell of the IMEF facility. (author). 157 refs., 57 tabs., 65 figs.

  11. DUPIC facility engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. S.; Choi, J. W.; Go, W. I.; Kim, H. D.; Song, K. C.; Jeong, I. H.; Park, H. S.; Im, C. S.; Lee, H. M.; Moon, K. H.; Hong, K. P.; Lee, K. S.; Suh, K. S.; Kim, E. K.; Min, D. K.; Lee, J. C.; Chun, Y. B.; Paik, S. Y.; Lee, E. P.; Yoo, G. S.; Kim, Y. S.; Park, J. C.

    1997-09-01

    In the early stage of the project, a comprehensive survey was conducted to identify the feasibility of using available facilities and of interface between those facilities. It was found out that the shielded cell M6 interface between those facilities. It was found out that the shielded cell M6 of IMEF could be used for the main process experiments of DUPIC fuel fabrication in regard to space adequacy, material flow, equipment layout, etc. Based on such examination, a suitable adapter system for material transfer around the M6 cell was engineered. Regarding the PIEF facility, where spent PWR fuel assemblies are stored in an annex pool, disassembly devices in the pool are retrofitted and spent fuel rod cutting and shipping system to the IMEF are designed and built. For acquisition of casks for radioactive material transport between the facilities, some adaptive refurbishment was applied to the available cask (Padirac) based on extensive analysis on safety requirements. A mockup test facility was newly acquired for remote test of DUPIC fuel fabrication process equipment prior to installation in the M6 cell of the IMEF facility. (author). 157 refs., 57 tabs., 65 figs

  12. STAR facility tritium accountancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawelko, R. J.; Sharpe, J. P.; Denny, B. J.

    2008-01-01

    The Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility has been established to provide a laboratory infrastructure for the fusion community to study tritium science associated with the development of safe fusion energy and other technologies. STAR is a radiological facility with an administrative total tritium inventory limit of 1.5 g (14,429 Ci) [1]. Research studies with moderate tritium quantities and various radionuclides are performed in STAR. Successful operation of the STAR facility requires the ability to receive, inventory, store, dispense tritium to experiments, and to dispose of tritiated waste while accurately monitoring the tritium inventory in the facility. This paper describes tritium accountancy in the STAR facility. A primary accountancy instrument is the tritium Storage and Assay System (SAS): a system designed to receive, assay, store, and dispense tritium to experiments. Presented are the methods used to calibrate and operate the SAS. Accountancy processes utilizing the Tritium Cleanup System (TCS), and the Stack Tritium Monitoring System (STMS) are also discussed. Also presented are the equations used to quantify the amount of tritium being received into the facility, transferred to experiments, and removed from the facility. Finally, the STAR tritium accountability database is discussed. (authors)

  13. Sustainable Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev; Elle, Morten; Hoffmann, Birgitte

    2004-01-01

    The Danish public housing sector has more than 20 years of experience with sustainable facilities management based on user involvement. The paper outlines this development in a historical perspective and gives an analysis of different approaches to sustainable facilities management. The focus...... is on the housing departments and strateies for the management of the use of resources. The research methods used are case studies based on interviews in addition to literature studies. The paper explores lessons to be learned about sustainable facilities management in general, and points to a need for new...

  14. WORKSHOPS: Hadron facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    'Hadron facilities' – high intensity (typically a hundred microamps), medium energy (30-60 GeV) machines producing intense secondary beams of pions, kaons, etc., are being widely touted as a profitable research avenue to supplement what is learned through the thrust for higher and higher energies. This interest was reflected at an International Workshop on Hadron Facility Technology, held in Santa Fe, New Mexico. As well as invited talks describing the various projects being pushed in the US, Europe and Japan, the meeting included working groups covering linacs, beam dynamics, hardware, radiofrequency, polarized beams and experimental facilities

  15. Radioactive facilities classification criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briso C, H.A.; Riesle W, J.

    1992-01-01

    Appropriate classification of radioactive facilities into groups of comparable risk constitutes one of the problems faced by most Regulatory Bodies. Regarding the radiological risk, the main facts to be considered are the radioactive inventory and the processes to which these radionuclides are subjected. Normally, operations are ruled by strict safety procedures. Thus, the total activity of the radionuclides existing in a given facility is the varying feature that defines its risk. In order to rely on a quantitative criterion and, considering that the Annual Limits of Intake are widely accepted references, an index based on these limits, to support decisions related to radioactive facilities, is proposed. (author)

  16. Wind Energy Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurie, Carol

    2017-02-01

    This book takes readers inside the places where daily discoveries shape the next generation of wind power systems. Energy Department laboratory facilities span the United States and offer wind research capabilities to meet industry needs. The facilities described in this book make it possible for industry players to increase reliability, improve efficiency, and reduce the cost of wind energy -- one discovery at a time. Whether you require blade testing or resource characterization, grid integration or high-performance computing, Department of Energy laboratory facilities offer a variety of capabilities to meet your wind research needs.

  17. Test and User Facilities | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Test and User Facilities Test and User Facilities Our test and user facilities are available to | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z B Battery Thermal and Life Test Facility Biochemical Conversion Pilot Plant C Controllable Grid Interface Test System D Dynamometer Test Facilities

  18. Facility Description 2012. Summary report of the encapsulation plant and disposal facility designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palomaeki, J.; Ristimaeki, L.

    2013-10-01

    license. Operating phase begins in the beginning of 2020s after obtaining an operating license. More deposition and central tunnels are excavated as the disposal proceeds. The spent nuclear fuel from interim storages is encapsulated into canisters in an encapsulation plant and then transferred into the underground disposal facility with a canister lift. According to the current design, the repository layout is based on one-storey layout alternative at the level of -400...-450m. The underground disposal facility is accessed by the access tunnel and a personnel shaft, which is located in a hoist building. Other alternatives for the design and operation of the nuclear facilities are described at the end of the report. (orig.)

  19. Aviation Flight Support Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility consists of a 75' x 200' hanger with two adjacent helicopter pads located at Felker Army Airfield on Fort Eustis. A staff of Government and contractor...

  20. Field Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Field Research Facility (FRF) located in Duck, N.C. was established in 1977 to support the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' coastal engineering mission. The FRF is...

  1. Air Data Calibration Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility is for low altitude subsonic altimeter system calibrations of air vehicles. Mission is a direct support of the AFFTC mission. Postflight data merge is...

  2. Robotics Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This 60 feet x 100 feet structure on the grounds of the Fort Indiantown Gap Pennsylvania National Guard (PNG) Base is a mixed-use facility comprising office space,...

  3. Ballistic Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Ballistic Test Facility is comprised of two outdoor and one indoor test ranges, which are all instrumented for data acquisition and analysis. Full-size aircraft...

  4. Concrete Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This is a 20,000-sq ft laboratory that supports research on all aspects of concrete and materials technology. The staff of this facility offer wide-ranging expertise...

  5. Climatic Environmental Test Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — RTTC has an extensive suite of facilities for supporting MIL-STD-810 testing, toinclude: Temperature/Altitude, Rapid Decompression, Low/High Temperature,Temperature...

  6. HNF - Helmholtz Nano Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Albrecht

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The Helmholtz Nano Facility (HNF is a state-of-the-art cleanroom facility. The cleanroom has ~1100 m2 with cleanroom classes of DIN ISO 1-3. HNF operates according to VDI DIN 2083, Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP and aquivalent to Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA standards. HNF is a user facility of Forschungszentrum Jülich and comprises a network of facilities, processes and systems for research, production and characterization of micro- and nanostructures. HNF meets the basic supply of micro- and nanostructures for nanoelectronics, fluidics. micromechanics, biology, neutron and energy science, etc.. The task of HNF is rapid progress in nanostructures and their technology, offering efficient access to infrastructure and equipment. HNF gives access to expertise and provides resources in production, synthesis, characterization and integration of structures, devices and circuits. HNF covers the range from basic research to application oriented research facilitating a broad variety of different materials and different sample sizes.

  7. Advanced Microscopy Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides a facility for high-resolution studies of complex biomolecular systems. The goal is an understanding of how to engineer biomolecules for various...

  8. Electra Laser Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: The Electra Laser Facility is used to develop the science and technology needed to develop a reliable, efficient, high-energy, repetitively pulsed krypton...

  9. Mark 1 Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Mark I Test Facility is a state-of-the-art space environment simulation test chamber for full-scale space systems testing. A $1.5M dollar upgrade in fiscal year...

  10. Coastal Harbors Modeling Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Coastal Harbors Modeling Facility is used to aid in the planning of harbor development and in the design and layout of breakwaters, absorbers, etc.. The goal is...

  11. Corrosion Testing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Corrosion Testing Facility is part of the Army Corrosion Office (ACO). It is a fully functional atmospheric exposure site, called the Corrosion Instrumented Test...

  12. Skilled Nursing Facility PPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Section 4432(a) of the Balanced Budget Act (BBA) of 1997 modified how payment is made for Medicare skilled nursing facility (SNF) services. Effective with cost...

  13. Frost Effects Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Full-scale study in controlled conditionsThe Frost Effects Research Facility (FERF) is the largest refrigerated warehouse in the United States that can be used for a...

  14. GPS Satellite Simulation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The GPS satellite simulation facility consists of a GPS satellite simulator controlled by either a Silicon Graphics Origin 2000 or PC depending upon unit under test...

  15. VT Telecommunication Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) The UtilityTelecom_TELEFAC data layer contains points which are intended to represent the location of telecommunications facilities (towers and/or...

  16. Laser Guidance Analysis Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility, which provides for real time, closed loop evaluation of semi-active laser guidance hardware, has and continues to be instrumental in the development...

  17. The Birmingham Irradiation Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Dervan, P; Hodgson, P; Marin-Reyes, H; Wilson, J

    2013-01-01

    At the end of 2012 the proton irradiation facility at the CERN PS [1] will shut down for two years. With this in mind, we have been developing a new ATLAS scanning facility at the University of Birmingham Medical Physics cyclotron. With proton beams of energy approximately 30 MeV, fluences corresponding to those of the upgraded Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) can be reached conveniently. The facility can be used to irradiate silicon sensors, optical components and mechanical structures (e.g. carbon fibre sandwiches) for the LHC upgrade programme. Irradiations of silicon sensors can be carried out in a temperature controlled cold box that can be scanned through the beam. The facility is described in detail along with the first tests carried out with mini (1 x 1 cm^2 ) silicon sensors.

  18. Advanced Microanalysis Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Microanalysis Facility fully integrates capabilities for chemical and structural analysis of electronic materials and devices for the U.S. Army and DoD....

  19. The Birmingham Irradiation Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dervan, P.; French, R.; Hodgson, P.; Marin-Reyes, H.; Wilson, J.

    2013-01-01

    At the end of 2012 the proton irradiation facility at the CERN PS will shut down for two years. With this in mind, we have been developing a new ATLAS scanning facility at the University of Birmingham Medical Physics cyclotron. With proton beams of energy approximately 30 MeV, fluences corresponding to those of the upgraded Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) can be reached conveniently. The facility can be used to irradiate silicon sensors, optical components and mechanical structures (e.g. carbon fibre sandwiches) for the LHC upgrade programme. Irradiations of silicon sensors can be carried out in a temperature controlled cold box that can be scanned through the beam. The facility is described in detail along with the first tests carried out with mini (1×1 cm 2 ) silicon sensors

  20. Decontamination of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Thirty-seven papers were presented at this conference in five sessions. Topics covered include regulation, control and consequences of decontamination; decontamination of components and facilities; chemical and non-chemical methods of decontamination; and TMI decontamination experience

  1. Pit Fragment Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility contains two large (20 foot high by 20 foot diameter) double walled steel tubs in which experimental munitions are exploded while covered with sawdust....

  2. Joint Computing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Raised Floor Computer Space for High Performance ComputingThe ERDC Information Technology Laboratory (ITL) provides a robust system of IT facilities to develop and...

  3. Coastal Inlet Model Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Coastal Inlet Model Facility, as part of the Coastal Inlets Research Program (CIRP), is an idealized inlet dedicated to the study of coastal inlets and equipped...

  4. Wind Tunnel Testing Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NASA Ames Research Center is pleased to offer the services of our premier wind tunnel facilities that have a broad range of proven testing capabilities to customers...

  5. Space Power Facility (SPF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Space Power Facility (SPF) houses the world's largest space environment simulation chamber, measuring 100 ft. in diameter by 122 ft. high. In this chamber, large...

  6. Airborne Evaluation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — AFRL's Airborne Evaluation Facility (AEF) utilizes Air Force Aero Club resources to conduct test and evaluation of a variety of equipment and concepts. Twin engine...

  7. Pittsburgh City Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Pittsburgh City FacilitiesIncludes: City Administrative Buildings, Police Stations, Fire Stations, EMS Stations, DPW Sites, Senior Centers, Recreation Centers, Pool...

  8. Combustion Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — For more than 30 years The Combustion Research Facility (CRF) has served as a national and international leader in combustion science and technology. The need for a...

  9. Treated Effluent Disposal Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Treated non-hazardous and non-radioactive liquid wastes are collected and then disposed of through the systems at the Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF). More...

  10. Plutonium metal burning facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausburg, D.E.; Leebl, R.G.

    1977-01-01

    A glove-box facility was designed to convert plutonium skull metal or unburned oxide to an oxide acceptable for plutonium recovery and purification. A discussion of the operation, safety aspects, and electrical schematics are included

  11. Geophysical Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Geophysical Research Facility (GRF) is a 60 ft long × 22 ft wide × 7 ft deep concrete basin at CRREL for fresh or saltwater investigations and can be temperature...

  12. Mass Properties Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility is used to acquire accurate weight, 3 axis center of gravity and 3 axis moment of inertia measurements for air launched munitions and armament equipment.

  13. Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF) is a blow-down, non-vitiated (clean air) free-jet wind tunnel capable of testing large-scale, propulsion systems at Mach 5, 6,...

  14. Powder Metallurgy Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The facility is uniquely equipped as the only laboratory within DA to conduct PM processing of refractory metals and alloys as well as the processing of a wide range...

  15. Environmental Test Facility (ETF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Environmental Test Facility (ETF) provides non-isolated shock testing for stand-alone equipment and full size cabinets under MIL-S-901D specifications. The ETF...

  16. Dialysis Facility Compare Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — These are the official datasets used on the Medicare.gov Dialysis Facility Compare Website provided by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. These data...

  17. Wind Tunnel Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This ARDEC facility consists of subsonic, transonic, and supersonic wind tunnels to acquire aerodynamic data. Full-scale and sub-scale models of munitions are fitted...

  18. Structural Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Provides a wide variety of testing equipment, fixtures and facilities to perform both unique aviation component testing as well as common types of materials testing...

  19. Liquid Effluent Retention Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF) is located in the central part of the Hanford Site. LERF is permitted by the State of Washington and has three liquid...

  20. Decommissioning nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, K.M.; Jenkins, C.E.; Waite, D.A.; Brooksbank, R.E.; Lunis, B.C.; Nemec, J.F.

    1976-01-01

    This paper describes the currently accepted alternatives for decommissioning retired light water reactor fuel cycle facilities and the current state of decommissioning technology. Three alternatives are recognized: Protective Storage; Entombment; and Dismantling. Application of these alternatives to the following types of facilities is briefly described: light water reactors; fuel reprocessing plants, and mixed oxide fuel fabrication plants. Brief descriptions are given of decommissioning operations and results at a number of sites, and recent studies of the future decommissioning of prototype fuel cycle facilities are reviewed. An overview is provided of the types of operations performed and tools used in common decontamination and decommissioning techniques and needs for improved technology are suggested. Planning for decommissioning a nuclear facility is dependent upon the maximum permitted levels of residual radioactive contamination. Proposed guides and recently developed methodology for development of site release criteria are reviewed. 21 fig, 32 references

  1. Water Tunnel Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NETL’s High-Pressure Water Tunnel Facility in Pittsburgh, PA, re-creates the conditions found 3,000 meters beneath the ocean’s surface, allowing scientists to study...

  2. Hanford Facility contingency plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutton, L.N.; Miskho, A.G.; Brunke, R.C.

    1993-10-01

    The Hanford Facility Contingency Plan, together with each TSD unit-specific contingency plan, meets the WAC 173-303 requirements for a contingency plan. This plan includes descriptions of responses to a nonradiological hazardous materials spill or release at Hanford Facility locations not covered by TSD unit-specific contingency plans or building emergency plans. This plan includes descriptions of responses for spills or releases as a result of transportation activities, movement of materials, packaging, and storage of hazardous materials

  3. Auditing radiation sterilization facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Jeffrey A.

    The diversity of radiation sterilization systems available today places renewed emphasis on the need for thorough Quality Assurance audits of these facilities. Evaluating compliance with Good Manufacturing Practices is an obvious requirement, but an effective audit must also evaluate installation and performance qualification programs (validation_, and process control and monitoring procedures in detail. The present paper describes general standards that radiation sterilization operations should meet in each of these key areas, and provides basic guidance for conducting QA audits of these facilities.

  4. The DOE/EM facility transition program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bixby, W.

    1994-01-01

    The mission of EM-60 is to plan, implement, and manage receipt of surplus facilities resulting from downsizing of the DOE Weapons Complex facilities and DOE operating program offices to EM, and to ensure prompt deactivation of such facilities in order to reach a minimum surveillance and maintenance condition. The revised organizational structure of EM-60 into four offices (one at headquarters, and the other three at field sites), reflects increased operating functions associated with deactivation, surveillance, and maintenance of facilities. EM-60's deactivation and transition role concerns technical, socioeconomic, institutional, and administrative issues. The primary objective of the deactivation process is to put facilities in the lowest surveillance and maintenance condition safely and quickly by driving down the open-quotes mortgageclose quotes costs of maintaining them until final disposition. EM-60's three key activities are: (1) Inventory of surplus facilities - The 1993 Surplus Facility Inventory and Assessment (SFIA) serves as a planning tool to help the Department and EM-60 determine optimal transition phasing, with safety and cost-effectiveness remaining a priority. (2) Management of accelerated facility life cycle transition - Transitions currently underway illustrate site issues. These include addressing the interests of federal and state regulatory agencies as well as interests of local stakeholders, safe management of large amounts of production residues, and options for treatment, storage, transportation, and disposal. Of equal importance in the transition process is planning the optimal transition of the labor force. (3) Economic development - to address the socio-economic impacts on affected communities of the severe and rapid downsizing of the DOE Weapons Complex, DOE is pursuing an approach that uses the land, equipment, technology assets, and highly skilled local workforces as a basis for alternative economic development

  5. Electron Holography: phases matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichte, Hannes

    2013-06-01

    Essentially, all optics is wave optics, be it with light, X-rays, neutrons or electrons. The information transfer from the object to the image can only be understood in terms of waves given by amplitude and phase. However, phases are difficult to measure: for slowly oscillating waves such as sound or low-frequency electromagnetic waves, phases can be measured directly; for high frequencies this has to be done by heterodyne detection, i.e. superposition with a reference and averaging over time. In optics, this is called interferometry. Because interference is mostly very difficult to achieve, phases have often been considered 'hidden variables' seemingly pulling the strings from backstage, only visible by their action on the image intensity. This was almost the case in conventional Electron Microscopy with the phase differences introduced by an object. However, in the face of the urgent questions from solid state physics and materials science, these phases have to be determined precisely, because they encode the most dominant object properties, such as charge distributions and electromagnetic fields. After more than six decades of very patient advancement, electron interferometry and holography offer unprecedented analytical facilities down to an atomic scale. Akira Tonomura has prominently contributed to the present state.

  6. JRR-3 neutron radiography facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsubayashi, M.; Tsuruno, A.

    1992-01-01

    JRR-3 neutron radiography facility consists of thermal neutron radiography facility (TNRF) and cold neutron radiography facility (CNRF). TNRF is installed in JRR-3 reactor building. CNRF is installed in the experimental beam hall adjacent to the reactor building. (author)

  7. National Solar Thermal Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) is the only test facility in the United States of its type. This unique facility provides experimental engineering...

  8. The CUTLASS database facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jervis, P.; Rutter, P.

    1988-09-01

    The enhancement of the CUTLASS database management system to provide improved facilities for data handling is seen as a prerequisite to its effective use for future power station data processing and control applications. This particularly applies to the larger projects such as AGR data processing system refurbishments, and the data processing systems required for the new Coal Fired Reference Design stations. In anticipation of the need for improved data handling facilities in CUTLASS, the CEGB established a User Sub-Group in the early 1980's to define the database facilities required by users. Following the endorsement of the resulting specification and a detailed design study, the database facilities have been implemented as an integral part of the CUTLASS system. This paper provides an introduction to the range of CUTLASS Database facilities, and emphasises the role of Database as the central facility around which future Kit 1 and (particularly) Kit 6 CUTLASS based data processing and control systems will be designed and implemented. (author)

  9. Mound facility physical characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonne, W.R.; Alexander, B.M.; Cage, M.R.; Hase, E.H.; Schmidt, M.J.; Schneider, J.E.; Slusher, W.; Todd, J.E.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a baseline physical characterization of Mound`s facilities as of September 1993. The baseline characterizations are to be used in the development of long-term future use strategy development for the Mound site. This document describes the current missions and alternative future use scenarios for each building. Current mission descriptions cover facility capabilities, physical resources required to support operations, current safety envelope and current status of facilities. Future use scenarios identify potential alternative future uses, facility modifications required for likely use, facility modifications of other uses, changes to safety envelope for the likely use, cleanup criteria for each future use scenario, and disposition of surplus equipment. This Introductory Chapter includes an Executive Summary that contains narrative on the Functional Unit Material Condition, Current Facility Status, Listing of Buildings, Space Plans, Summary of Maintenance Program and Repair Backlog, Environmental Restoration, and Decontamination and Decommissioning Programs. Under Section B, Site Description, is a brief listing of the Site PS Development, as well as Current Utility Sources. Section C contains Site Assumptions. A Maintenance Program Overview, as well as Current Deficiencies, is contained within the Maintenance Program Chapter.

  10. ATLAS facility fabrication and assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Ballard, E O; Davis, H A; Nielsen, K E; Parker, G V; Parsons, W M

    2001-01-01

    Summary form only given. Atlas is a pulsed-power facility recently completed at Los Alamos National Laboratory to drive hydrodynamic experiments. This new generation pulsed-power machine consists of a radial array of 24, 240-kV Marx modules and transmission lines supplying current to the load region at the machine center. The transmission lines, powered by the Marx modules, consist of cable headers, load protection switches and tri-plates interfacing to the center transition section through detachable current joints. A conical power-flow-channel attaches to the transition section providing an elevated interface to attach the experimental loads for diagnostic access. Fabrication and assembly of all components for the Atlas machine was completed in August 2000. The machine has also progressed through a test phase where the Marx module/transmission line units were fired, individually, into a test load. Progression continued with eight and sixteen lines being fired. Subsequently, an overall machine test was condu...

  11. The ISOLDE Facility: Radioactive beams at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    The Isope Separation On-Line (ISOL) technique evolved from chemical techniques used to separate radioactive isotopes off-line from irradiated "targets". The ISOL targets of today, used at e.g. ISOLDE, can be of many different types and in different phases but the isotopes are always delivered at very low energies making the technique ideal for study of ground state properties and collections for other applications such as solid state physics and medical physics. The possibility of accelerating these low energy beams for nuclear structure studies, and in the long term future for neutrino physics, is now being explored at first generation radioactive beam facilities. The upgrade towards HIE-ISOLDE aim to consolidate ISOLDE's position as a world leading radioactive nuclear beam facility and it will be a pre-cursor to a future all European ISOL facility, EURISOL, with order of magnitudes higher radioactive beam intensities and energies. Prerequisite knowledge and references: None

  12. Defense waste processing facility precipitate hydrolysis process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doherty, J.P.; Eibling, R.E.; Marek, J.C.

    1986-03-01

    Sodium tetraphenylborate and sodium titanate are used to assist in the concentration of soluble radionuclide in the Savannah River Plant's high-level waste. In the Defense Waste Processing Facility, concentrated tetraphenylborate/sodium titanate slurry containing cesium-137, strontium-90 and traces of plutonium from the waste tank farm is hydrolyzed in the Salt Processing Cell forming organic and aqueous phases. The two phases are then separated and the organic phase is decontaminated for incineration outside the DWPF building. The aqueous phase, containing the radionuclides and less than 10% of the original organic, is blended with the insoluble radionuclides in the high-level waste sludge and is fed to the glass melter for vitrification into borosilicate glass. During the Savannah River Laboratory's development of this process, copper (II) was found to act as a catalyst during the hydrolysis reactions, which improved the organic removal and simplified the design of the reactor

  13. Distributed Energy Resources Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NREL's Distributed Energy Resources Test Facility (DERTF) is a working laboratory for interconnection and systems integration testing. This state-of-the-art facility...

  14. Criticality safety considerations. Integral Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-09-01

    This report summarizes the criticality analysis performed to address criticality safety concerns and to support facility design during the conceptual design phase of the Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Facility. The report addresses the criticality safety concerns, the design features of the facility relative to criticality, and the results of the analysis of both normal operating and hypothetical off-normal conditions. Key references are provided (Appendix C) if additional information is desired by the reader. The MRS Facility design was developed and the related analysis was performed in accordance with the MRS Facility Functional Design Criteria and the Basis for Design. The detailed description and calculations are documented in the Integral MRS Facility Conceptual Design Report. In addition to the summary portion of this report, explanatary notes for various terms, calculation methodology, and design parameters are presented in Appendix A. Appendix B provides a brief glossary of technical terms

  15. The challenge of logistics facilities development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, James R.

    1987-01-01

    The paper discusses the experiences of a group of engineers and logisticians at John F. Kennedy Space center in the design, construction and activation of a consolidated logistics facility for support of Space Transportation System ground operations and maintenance. The planning, methodology and processes are covered, with emphasis placed on unique aspects and lessons learned. The project utilized a progressive design, baseline and build concept for each phase of construction, with the Government exercising funding and configuration oversight.

  16. Comprehensive facilities plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory`s Comprehensive Facilities Plan (CFP) document provides analysis and policy guidance for the effective use and orderly future development of land and capital assets at the Berkeley Lab site. The CFP directly supports Berkeley Lab`s role as a multiprogram national laboratory operated by the University of California (UC) for the Department of Energy (DOE). The CFP is revised annually on Berkeley Lab`s Facilities Planning Website. Major revisions are consistent with DOE policy and review guidance. Facilities planing is motivated by the need to develop facilities for DOE programmatic needs; to maintain, replace and rehabilitate existing obsolete facilities; to identify sites for anticipated programmatic growth; and to establish a planning framework in recognition of site amenities and the surrounding community. The CFP presents a concise expression of the policy for the future physical development of the Laboratory, based upon anticipated operational needs of research programs and the environmental setting. It is a product of the ongoing planning processes and is a dynamic information source.

  17. Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldhagen, P.; Marino, S.A.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Hall, E.J.

    1986-01-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which can be used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology and radiological physics. It is part of the Radiological Research Laboratory (RRL), and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy. RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis, with priorities based on the recommendations of a Scientific Advisory Committee. Facilities and services are provided to users, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. This chapter presents a brief description of current experiments being carried out at RARAF and of the operation of the Facility from January through June, 1986. Operation of the Facility for all of 1985 was described in the 1985 Progress Report for RARAF. The experiments described here were supported by various Grants and Contracts from NIH and DOE and by the Statens Stralskyddsinstitut of Sweden

  18. European Synchrotron Radiation Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buras, B.

    1985-01-01

    How a European Synchrotron Radiation Facility has developed into a detailed proposal recently accepted as the basis for construction of the facility at Grenoble is discussed. In November 1977, the General Assembly of the European Science Foundation (ESF) approved the report of the ESF working party on synchrotron radiation entitled Synchrotron Radiation - a Perspective View for Europe. This report contained as one of its principal recommendations that work should commence on a feasibility study for a European synchrotron radiation laboratory having a dedicated hard X-ray storage ring and appropriate advanced instrumentation. In order to prepare a feasibility study the European Science Foundation set up the Ad-hoc Committee on Synchrotron Radiation, which in turn formed two working groups: one for the machine and another for instrumentation. This feasibility study was completed in 1979 with the publication of the Blue Book describing in detail the so called 1979 European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The heart of the facility was a 5 GeV electron storage ring and it was assumed that mainly the radiation from bending magnets will be used. The facility is described

  19. Berkeley Low Background Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Smith, A. R.; Poon, A. W. P.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.

    2015-01-01

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility (BLBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory on the surface at LBNL and at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products; active screening via neutron activation analysis for U,Th, and K as well as a variety of stable isotopes; and neutron flux/beam characterization measurements through the use of monitors. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities will be presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be described including an overview of the recently installed counting system at SURF (recently relocated from Oroville, CA in 2014), the installation of a second underground counting station at SURF in 2015, and future plans. The BLBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects

  20. Power Systems Development Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    The objective of the PSDF would be to provide a modular facility which would support the development of advanced, pilot-scale, coal-based power systems and hot gas clean-up components. These pilot-scale components would be designed to be large enough so that the results can be related and projected to commercial systems. The facility would use a modular approach to enhance the flexibility and capability for testing; consequently, overall capital and operating costs when compared with stand-alone facilities would be reduced by sharing resources common to different modules. The facility would identify and resolve technical barrier, as well as-provide a structure for long-term testing and performance assessment. It is also intended that the facility would evaluate the operational and performance characteristics of the advanced power systems with both bituminous and subbituminous coals. Five technology-based experimental modules are proposed for the PSDF: (1) an advanced gasifier module, (2) a fuel cell test module, (3) a PFBC module, (4) a combustion gas turbine module, and (5) a module comprised of five hot gas cleanup particulate control devices. The final module, the PCD, would capture coal-derived ash and particles from both the PFBC and advanced gasifier gas streams to provide for overall particulate emission control, as well as to protect the combustion turbine and the fuel cell

  1. The Burning Plasma Experiment conventional facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Commander, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    The Burning Program Plasma Experiment (BPX) is phased to start construction of conventional facilities in July 1994, in conjunction with the conclusion of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) project. This paper deals with the conceptual design of the BPX Conventional Facilities, for which Functional and Operational Requirements (F ampersand ORs) were developed. Existing TFTR buildings and utilities will be adapted and used to satisfy the BPX Project F ampersand ORs to the maximum extent possible. However, new conventional facilities will be required to support the BPX project. These facilities include: The BPX building; Site improvements and utilities; the Field Coil Power Conversion (FCPC) building; the TFTR modifications; the Motor Generation (MG) building; Liquid Nitrogen (LN 2 ) building; and the associated Instrumentation and Control (I ampersand C) systems. The BPX building will provide for safe and efficient shielding, housing, operation, handling, maintenance and decontamination of the BPX and its support systems. Site improvements and utilities will feature a utility tunnel which will provide a space for utility services--including pulse power duct banks and liquid nitrogen coolant lines. The FCPC building will house eight additional power supplied for the Toroidal Field (TF) coils. The MG building will house the two MG sets larger than the existing TFTR MG sets. This paper also addresses the conventional facility cost estimating methodology and the rationale for the construction schedule developed. 6 figs., 1 tab

  2. Compact Ignition Tokamak conventional facilities optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Commander, J.C.; Spang, N.W.

    1987-01-01

    A high-field ignition machine with liquid-nitrogen-cooled copper coils, designated the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT), is proposed for the next phase of the United States magnetically confined fusion program. A team of national laboratory, university, and industrial participants completed the conceptual design for the CIT machine, support systems and conventional facilities. Following conceptual design, optimization studies were conducted with the goal of improving machine performance, support systems design, and conventional facilities configuration. This paper deals primarily with the conceptual design configuration of the CIT conventional facilities, the changes that evolved during optimization studies, and the revised changes resulting from functional and operational requirements (F and ORs). The CIT conventional facilities conceptual design is based on two premises: (1) satisfaction of the F and ORs developed in the CIT building and utilities requirements document, and (2) the assumption that the CIT project will be sited at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) in order that maximum utilization can be made of existing Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) buildings and utilities. The optimization studies required reevaluation of the F and ORs and a second look at TFTR buildings and utilities. Some of the high-cost-impact optimization studies are discussed, including the evaluation criteria for a change from the conceptual design baseline configuration. The revised conventional facilities configuration are described and the estimated cost impact is summarized

  3. SERC Central Laser Facility annual report 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    In this 1992 Annual Report to the Laser Facility Committee of the Science and Engineering Research Council, the Central Laser Facility at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, technical progress is described and mid-term organizational goals outlined. Outstanding among recent achievements is the work on plasma heating being undertaken on the Sprite facility using the ultra-bright KrF laser pumped Raman beams. Two-beam operation at power levels approaching 2 TW in 10 ps are hoped for. On a four year timescale the Titania system will provide four Raman beams of exceptional brightness and power up to 20TW in 10ps. The other high power laser facility, Vulcan is also producing exciting work. Progress in nanosecond studies using Raman spectroscopy have produced the first Raman spectrum of solvated Buckmister fullerene and direct observation of the separation of germinate ion pairs, as well as information on the behaviour of a single base in an oligonuclide chain. Phase boundaries for the solidification of a two dimensional electron fluid have been determined in a Gallium Arsenide heterojunction. Despite staff number attrition, operation and development of the facilities have continued successfully. (UK)

  4. Operation of spent fuel storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This Safety Guide was prepared as part of the IAEA's programme on safety of spent fuel storage. This is for interim spent fuel storage facilities that are not integral part of an operating nuclear power plant. Following the introduction, Section 2 describes key activities in the operation of spent fuel storage facilities. Section 3 lists the basic safety considerations for storage facility operation, the fundamental safety objectives being subcriticality, heat removal and radiation protection. Recommendations for organizing the management of a facility are contained in Section 4. Section 5 deals with aspects of training and qualification; Section 6 describes the phases of the commissioning of a spent fuel storage facility. Section 7 describes operational limits and conditions, while Section 8 deals with operating procedures and instructions. Section 9 deals with maintenance, testing, examination and inspection. Section 10 presents recommendations for radiation and environmental protection. Recommendations for the quality assurance (QA) system are presented in Section 11. Section 12 describes the aspects of safeguards and physical protection to be taken into account during operations; Section 13 gives guidance for decommissioning. 15 refs, 5 tabs

  5. UHV facility at pelletron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, S.K.; Hattangadi, V.A.

    1993-01-01

    One of the important requirements of a heavy ion accelerator is the maintenance of a clean, ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) environment in the accelerating tubes as well as in the beamlines. This becomes necessary in order to minimise transmission losses of the ion beam due to charge exchange or scattering during collisions with the residual gas atoms. In view of these considerations, as an essential ancillary facility, a UHV laboratory with all required facilities has been set up for the pelletron accelerator and the work done in this laboratory is described. First the pelletron accelerator vacuum system is described in brief. The UHV laboratory facilities are described. Our operational experience with the accelerator vacuum system is discussed. The development of accelerator components carried out by the UHV laboratory is also discussed. (author)

  6. FACILITIES MANAGEMENT AT CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Recently we have been confronted with difficulties concerning services which are part of a new contract for facilities management. Please see below for some information about this contract. Following competitive tendering and the Finance Committee decision, the contract was awarded to the Swiss firm 'Facilities Management Network (FMN)'. The owners of FMN are two companies 'M+W Zander' and 'Avireal', both very experienced in this field of facilities management. The contract entered into force on 1st July 2002. CERN has grouped together around 20 different activities into this one contract, which was previously covered by separate contracts. The new contract includes the management and execution of many activities, in particular: Guards and access control; cleaning; operation and maintenance of heating plants, cooling and ventilation equipment for buildings not related to the tunnel or the LHC; plumbing; sanitation; lifts; green areas and roads; waste disposal; and includes a centralised helpdesk for these act...

  7. The ORION Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noble, Robert

    2003-01-01

    ORION will be a user-oriented research facility for understanding the physics and developing the technology for future high-energy particle accelerators, as well as for research in related fields. The facility has as its centerpiece the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The NLCTA will be modified with the addition of a new, high-brightness photoinjector, its drive laser, an S-band rf power system, a user laser room, a low-energy experimental hall supplied with electron beams up to 60 MeV in energy, and a high-energy hall supplied with beams up to 350 MeV. The facility design and parameters are described here along with highlights from the 2nd ORION Workshop held in February 2003

  8. Applications of microtron facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanjeev, Ganesh

    2013-01-01

    An 8 MeV Microtron accelerator installed and commissioned in Mangalore University to strengthen research activities in the area of Radiation Physics and allied sciences is also being used extensively for coordinated research programs in basic and applied areas of science and technology involving researchers from national laboratories and sister universities of the region. The electron accelerator with its versatile features extends energetic electrons, intense photons and neutrons of moderate flux to cater to the needs of the users of the facility. A brief view of this 'first of its kind' facility in the country and the R and D programs with some sample results is presented. (author)

  9. Bevalac Radiotherapy Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, J.R.; Howard, J.; Criswell, T.

    1979-03-01

    Patient Treatment Room at the Bevalac is now in full operation. In the design of this facility, emphasis has been placed on creating an atmosphere appropriate to a clinical facility; the usual features of an irradiation cave have been hidden behind carpets, curtains and paint. Patient positioning is done with a Philips Ram-style couch, with additional fixtures to accommodate a patient in the seated or standing, as well as the supine, position. Dosimetry apparatus, collimators, ion chambers and the beam flattening system used to produce the highly uniform 20 cm diameter therapy field are described

  10. Line facilities outline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-08-01

    This book deals with line facilities. The contents of this book are outline line of wire telecommunication ; development of line, classification of section of line and theory of transmission of line, cable line ; structure of line, line of cable in town, line out of town, domestic cable and other lines, Optical communication ; line of optical cable, transmission method, measurement of optical communication and cable of the sea bottom, Equipment of telecommunication line ; telecommunication line facilities and telecommunication of public works, construction of cable line and maintenance and Regulation of line equipment ; regulation on technique, construction and maintenance.

  11. Robotics for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Akira; Nakayama, Ryoichi; Kubo, Katsumi

    1988-01-01

    It is highly desirable that automatic or remotely controlled machines perform inspection and maintenance tasks in nuclear facilities. Toshiba has been working to develop multi-functional robots, with one typical example being a master-slave manipulator for use in reprocessing facilities. At the same time, the company is also working on the development of multi-purpose intelligent robots. One such device, an automatic inspection robot, to be deployed along a monorail, performs inspection by means of image processing technology, while and advanced intelligent maintenance robot is equipped with a special wheel-locomotion mechanism and manipulator and is designed to perform maintenance tasks. (author)

  12. Next generation storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlesser, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    With diminishing requirements for plutonium, a substantial quantity of this material requires special handling and ultimately, long-term storage. To meet this objective, we at Los Alamos, have been involved in the design of a storage facility with the goal of providing storage capabilities for this and other nuclear materials. This paper presents preliminary basic design data, not for the structure and physical plant, but for the container and arrays which might be configured within the facility, with strong emphasis on criticality safety features

  13. Bevalac Radiotherapy Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, J.R.; Howard, J.; Criswell, T.

    1979-03-01

    Patient Treatment Room at the Bevalac is now in full operation. In the design of this facility, emphasis has been placed on creating an atmosphere appropriate to a clinical facility; the usual features of an irradiation cave have been hidden behind carpets, curtains and paint. Patient positioning is done with a Philips Ram-style couch, with additional fixtures to accommodate a patient in the seated or standing, as well as the supine, position. Dosimetry apparatus, collimators, ion chambers and the beam flattening system used to produce the highly uniform 20 cm diameter therapy field are described.

  14. RCRA facility stabilization initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-02-01

    The RCRA Facility Stabilization Initiative was developed as a means of implementing the Corrective Action Program's management goals recommended by the RIS for stabilizing actual or imminent releases from solid waste management units that threaten human health and the environment. The overall goal of stabilization is to, as situations warrant, control or abate threats to human health and/or the environment from releases at RCRA facilities, and/or to prevent or minimize the further spread of contamination while long-term remedies are pursued. The Stabilization initiative is a management philosophy and should not be confused with stabilization technologies

  15. Exhaust gas processing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terada, Shin-ichi.

    1995-01-01

    The facility of the present invention comprises a radioactive liquid storage vessel, an exhaust gas dehumidifying device for dehumidifying gases exhausted from the vessel and an exhaust gas processing device for reducing radioactive materials in the exhaust gases. A purified gas line is disposed to the radioactive liquid storage vessel for purging exhaust gases generated from the radioactive liquid, then dehumidified and condensed liquid is recovered, and exhaust gases are discharged through an exhaust gas pipe disposed downstream of the exhaust gas processing device. With such procedures, the scale of the exhaust gas processing facility can be reduced and exhaust gases can be processed efficiently. (T.M.)

  16. TMX, a new facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, S.R. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    As a mirror fusion facility, the Tandem Mirror Experiment (TMX) at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) is both new and different. It utilizes over 23,000 ft 2 of work area in three buildings and consumes over 14 kWh of energy with each shot. As a systems design, the facility is broken into discreet functional regions. Among them are a mechanical vacuum pumping system, a liquid-nitrogen system, neutral-beam and magnet power supplies, tiered structures to support these supplies, a neutron-shielded vacuum vessel, a control area, and a diagnostics area. Constraints of space, time, and cost have all affected the design

  17. Simulation Facilities and Test Beds for Galileo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlarmann, Bernhard Kl.; Leonard, Arian

    2002-01-01

    Galileo is the European satellite navigation system, financed by the European Space Agency (ESA) and the European Commission (EC). The Galileo System, currently under definition phase, will offer seamless global coverage, providing state-of-the-art positioning and timing services. Galileo services will include a standard service targeted at mass market users, an augmented integrity service, providing integrity warnings when fault occur and Public Regulated Services (ensuring a continuity of service for the public users). Other services are under consideration (SAR and integrated communications). Galileo will be interoperable with GPS, and will be complemented by local elements that will enhance the services for specific local users. In the frame of the Galileo definition phase, several system design and simulation facilities and test beds have been defined and developed for the coming phases of the project, respectively they are currently under development. These are mainly the following tools: Galileo Mission Analysis Simulator to design the Space Segment, especially to support constellation design, deployment and replacement. Galileo Service Volume Simulator to analyse the global performance requirements based on a coverage analysis for different service levels and degrades modes. Galileo System Simulation Facility is a sophisticated end-to-end simulation tool to assess the navigation performances for a complete variety of users under different operating conditions and different modes. Galileo Signal Validation Facility to evaluate signal and message structures for Galileo. Galileo System Test Bed (Version 1) to assess and refine the Orbit Determination &Time Synchronisation and Integrity algorithms, through experiments relying on GPS space infrastructure. This paper presents an overview on the so called "G-Facilities" and describes the use of the different system design tools during the project life cycle in order to design the system with respect to

  18. PROMPT DOSE ANALYSIS FOR THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khater, H.; Dauffy, L.; Sitaraman, S.; Brereton, S.

    2008-01-01

    Detailed 3-D modeling of the NIF facility is developed to accurately understand the prompt radiation environment within NIF. Prompt dose values are calculated for different phases of NIF operation. Results of the analysis were used to determine the final thicknesses of the Target Bay (TB) and secondary doors as well as the required shield thicknesses for all unused penetrations. Integrated dose values at different locations within the facility are needed to formulate the personnel access requirements within different parts of the facility. The conclusions of this presentation are: (1) The current NIF facility model includes all important features of the Target Chamber, shielding system, and building configuration; (2) All shielding requirements for Phase I operation are met; (3) Negligible dose values (a fraction of mrem) are expected in normally occupied areas during Phase I; (4) In preparation for the Ignition Campaign and Phase IV of operation, all primary and secondary shield doors will be installed; (5) Unused utility penetrations in the Target Bay and Switchyard walls (∼50%) will be shielded by 1 foot thick concrete to reduce prompt dose inside and outside the NIF facility; (6) During Phase IV, a 20 MJ shot will produce acceptable dose levels in the occupied areas as well as at the nearest site boundary; (7) A comprehensive radiation monitoring plan will be put in place to monitor dose values at large number of locations; and (8) Results of the dose monitoring will be used to modify personnel access requirements if needed

  19. Facility effluent monitoring plan determinations for the 200 Area facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickels, J.M.

    1991-11-01

    The following facility effluent monitoring plan determinations document the evaluations conducted for the Westinghouse Hanford Company 200 Area facilities (chemical processing, waste management, 222-S Laboratory, and laundry) on the Hanford Site in south central Washington State. These evaluations determined the need for facility effluent monitoring plans for the 200 Area facilities. The facility effluent monitoring plan determinations have been prepared in accordance with A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438 (WHC 1991). The Plutonium/Uranium Extraction Plant and UO 3 facility effluent monitoring plan determinations were prepared by Los Alamos Technical Associates, Richland, Washington. The Plutonium Finishing Plant, Transuranic Waste Storage and Assay Facility, T Plant, Tank Farms, Low Level Burial Grounds, and 222-S Laboratory determinations were prepared by Science Applications International Corporation of Richland, Washington. The B Plant Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan Determination was prepared by ERCE Environmental Services of Richland, Washington

  20. Mineral facilities of Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almanzar, Francisco; Baker, Michael S.; Elias, Nurudeen; Guzman, Eric

    2010-01-01

    This map displays over 1,700 records of mineral facilities within the countries of Europe and western Eurasia. Each record represents one commodity and one facility type at a single geographic location. Facility types include mines, oil and gas fields, and plants, such as refineries, smelters, and mills. Common commodities of interest include aluminum, cement, coal, copper, gold, iron and steel, lead, nickel, petroleum, salt, silver, and zinc. Records include attributes, such as commodity, country, location, company name, facility type and capacity (if applicable), and latitude and longitude geographical coordinates (in both degrees-minutes-seconds and decimal degrees). The data shown on this map and in table 1 were compiled from multiple sources, including (1) the most recently available data from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook (Europe and Central Eurasia volume), (2) mineral statistics and information from the USGS Minerals Information Web site (http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/country/europe.html), and (3) data collected by the USGS minerals information country specialists from sources, such as statistical publications of individual countries, annual reports and press releases of operating companies, and trade journals. Data reflect the most recently published table of industry structure for each country at the time of this publication. Additional information is available from the country specialists listed in table 2.

  1. CERN IRRADIATION FACILITIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzi, Fabio; Garcia Alia, Ruben; Brugger, Markus; Carbonez, Pierre; Danzeca, Salvatore; Gkotse, Blerina; Richard Jaekel, Martin; Ravotti, Federico; Silari, Marco; Tali, Maris

    2017-09-28

    CERN provides unique irradiation facilities for applications in dosimetry, metrology, intercomparison of radiation protection devices, benchmark of Monte Carlo codes and radiation damage studies to electronics. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Shared Facilities Canadian Style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galonski, Mark A.

    1998-01-01

    Describes two projects arising from an Ontario (Canada) Ministry of Education initiative that combined school and nonschool capital funds to build joint facilities. The Stratford Education and Recreation Centre and the Humberwood Community Centre demonstrate that government agencies can cooperate to benefit the community. Success depends on having…

  3. Facility effluent monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gleckler, B.P.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the facility effluent monitoring programs and provides an evaluation of effluent monitoring data. These evaluations are useful in assessing the effectiveness of effluent treatment and control systems, as well as management practices.

  4. Facility Management Innovation (FMI)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mobach, Mark P.; Nardelli, Giulia; Kok, Herman; Konkol, Jennifer; Alexander, Keith; Alexander, Keith

    2014-01-01

    This current green paper deals with innovation in facility management (FM), a subject which is at the heart of Working Group 3, in benefit of the EuroFM Research Network. It aims to stimulate discussion and further collaborative work, and to generate new knowledge for the European FM community. We

  5. PFP Wastewater Sampling Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirzel, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    This test report documents the results obtained while conducting operational testing of the sampling equipment in the 225-WC building, the PFP Wastewater Sampling Facility. The Wastewater Sampling Facility houses equipment to sample and monitor the PFP's liquid effluents before discharging the stream to the 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF). The majority of the streams are not radioactive and discharges from the PFP Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC). The streams that might be contaminated are processed through the Low Level Waste Treatment Facility (LLWTF) before discharging to TEDF. The sampling equipment consists of two flow-proportional composite samplers, an ultrasonic flowmeter, pH and conductivity monitors, chart recorder, and associated relays and current isolators to interconnect the equipment to allow proper operation. Data signals from the monitors are received in the 234-5Z Shift Office which contains a chart recorder and alarm annunciator panel. The data signals are also duplicated and sent to the TEDF control room through the Local Control Unit (LCU). Performing the OTP has verified the operability of the PFP wastewater sampling system. This Operability Test Report documents the acceptance of the sampling system for use

  6. Toroid magnet test facility

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Because of its exceptional size, it was not feasible to assemble and test the Barrel Toroid - made of eight coils - as an integrated toroid on the surface, prior to its final installation underground in LHC interaction point 1. It was therefore decided to test these eight coils individually in a dedicated test facility.

  7. Facilities of Environmental Distinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascopella, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Three of nine school buildings that have won the latest Educational Facility Design Awards from the American Institute of Architects (AIA) Committee on Architecture for Education stand out from the crowd of other school buildings because they are sustainable and are connected to the nature that surrounds them. They are: (1) Thurston Elementary…

  8. Improved Emission Spectrographic Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goergen, C.R.; Lethco, A.J.; Hosken, G.B.; Geckeler, D.R.

    1980-10-01

    The Savannah River Plant's original Emission Spectrographic Laboratory for radioactive samples had been in operation for 25 years. Due to the deteriorated condition and the fire hazard posed by the wooden glove box trains, a project to update the facility was funded. The new laboratory improved efficiency of operation and incorporated numerous safety and contamination control features

  9. Dismantling of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallec, M.; Kus, J.P.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear facilities have a long estimable lifetime but necessarily limited in time. At the end of their operation period, basic nuclear installations are the object of cleansing operations and transformations that will lead to their definitive decommissioning and then to their dismantling. Because each facility is somewhere unique, cleansing and dismantling require specific techniques. The dismantlement consists in the disassembly and disposing off of big equipments, in the elimination of radioactivity in all rooms of the facility, in the demolition of buildings and eventually in the reconversion of all or part of the facility. This article describes these different steps: 1 - dismantling strategy: main de-construction guidelines, expected final state; 2 - industries and sites: cleansing and dismantling at the CEA, EDF's sites under de-construction; 3 - de-construction: main steps, definitive shutdown, preparation of dismantling, electromechanical dismantling, cleansing/decommissioning, demolition, dismantling taken into account at the design stage, management of polluted soils; 4 - waste management: dismantlement wastes, national policy of radioactive waste management, management of dismantlement wastes; 5 - mastery of risks: risk analysis, conformability of risk management with reference documents, main risks encountered at de-construction works; 6 - regulatory procedures; 7 - international overview; 8 - conclusion. (J.S.)

  10. Maintenance, repair and operation (MRO) of shutdown facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenny, S.

    2006-01-01

    What level of maintenance does one apply to a shutdown facility? Well it depends on who you ask. Operations staff sees facilities that have completed their useful life cycle as a cost drain while Decommissioning staff sees this as the start of a new life cycle. Based on the decommissioning plan for the particular facility the building could complete another full life cycle while under decommissioning whether it is in storage with surveillance mode or under active decommissioning. This paper will explore how you maintain a facility and systems for many years after its useful life until final decommissioning is completed. When a building is declared redundant, who looks after it until the final decommissioning end state is achieved? At the AECL, Chalk River Labs site the safe shutdown and turnover process is one key element that initiates the decommissioning process. The real trick is orchestrating maintenance, repair and operation plans for a facility that has been poorly invested in during its last years of useful life cycle. To add to that usually shutdowns are prolonged for many years beyond the expected turnover period. During this presentation I will cover what AECL is doing to ensure that the facilities are maintained in a proper state until final decommissioning can be completed. All facilities or systems travel through the same life cycle, design, construction, commissioning, operation, shutdown and demolition. As we all know, nuclear facilities add one more interesting twist to this life cycle called Decommissioning that lands between shutdown and demolition. As a facility nears the shutdown phase, operations staff loose interest in the facility and stop investing in upgrades, repairs and maintenance but continue to invest and focus on maximizing operations. Facility maintenance standards produced by the International Facility Maintenance Association (IFMA) based on a survey done every year state that 2.2% of the total operating costs for the site should be

  11. Spent nuclear fuel project cold vacuum drying facility operations manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IRWIN, J.J.

    1999-01-01

    This document provides the Operations Manual for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). The Manual was developed in conjunction with HNF-SD-SNF-SAR-002, Safety Analysis Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, Phase 2, Supporting Installation of Processing Systems (Garvin 1998) and, the HNF-SD-SNF-DRD-002, 1997, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Requirements, Rev. 3a. The Operations Manual contains general descriptions of all the process, safety and facility systems in the CVDF, a general CVD operations sequence, and has been developed for the SNFP Operations Organization and shall be updated, expanded, and revised in accordance with future design, construction and startup phases of the CVDF until the CVDF final ORR is approved

  12. Phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Sole, Ricard V; Solé, Ricard V; Solé, Ricard V; Sol, Ricard V; Solé, Ricard V

    2011-01-01

    Phase transitions--changes between different states of organization in a complex system--have long helped to explain physics concepts, such as why water freezes into a solid or boils to become a gas. How might phase transitions shed light on important problems in biological and ecological complex systems? Exploring the origins and implications of sudden changes in nature and society, Phase Transitions examines different dynamical behaviors in a broad range of complex systems. Using a compelling set of examples, from gene networks and ant colonies to human language and the degradation of diverse ecosystems, the book illustrates the power of simple models to reveal how phase transitions occur. Introductory chapters provide the critical concepts and the simplest mathematical techniques required to study phase transitions. In a series of example-driven chapters, Ricard Solé shows how such concepts and techniques can be applied to the analysis and prediction of complex system behavior, including the origins of ...

  13. Radiation protection studies for the SHiP facility

    CERN Document Server

    Strabel, Claudia Christina; Vincke, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    The enlarged scope of the recently proposed experiment to search for Heavy Neutral Leptons, SPSC-EOI-010, is a general purpose fixed target facility which in the initial phase is aimed at a general Search for Hidden Particles (SHiP) as well as tau neutrino physics. This report summarizes radiation protection considerations for the SHiP facility and the primary beam extraction for SHiP.

  14. The BLAIRR Irradiation Facility Hybrid Spallation Target Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simos N.; Hanson A.; Brown, D.; Elbakhshawn, M.

    2016-04-11

    BLAIRR STUDY STATUS OVERVIEW Beamline Complex Evaluation/Assessment and Adaptation to the Goals Facility Radiological Constraints ? Large scale analyses of conventional facility and integrated shield (concrete, soil)Target Optimization and Design: Beam-target interaction optimization Hadronic interaction and energy deposition limitations Single phase and Hybrid target concepts Irradiation Damage Thermo-mechanical considerations Spallation neutron fluence optimization for (a) fast neutron irradiation damage (b) moderator/reflector studies, (c) NTOF potential and optimization (d) mono-energetic neutron beam

  15. A Regulators Systematic Approach to Physical Protection for Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayer, Stephan; Doulgeris, Nicholas; Leask, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    This paper outlines the framework for a physical protection regime which needs to be incorporated into the design and construction phases of nuclear facility. The need for physical protection considerations at the outset of the design of nuclear facilities is explained. It also discusses about the consequences of malicious activity and the management of risk. Various risk and consequences evaluations are undertaken, notably using design basis threat methodology. (author)

  16. Novel Instrumentation for Lunar Regolith Oxygen Production Facilities, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this SBIR effort, Los Gatos Research (LGR) proposes to develop, test and deploy three novel compact, rugged and easy-to-use multi-gas analysis instruments, based...

  17. Autonomous Facility Health-Enabled Test Instrumentation, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The combination of smart devices and embedded metadata and networked (wire and wireless) technologies present real opportunities for significant improvements in...

  18. Cell/Tissue Culture Radiation Exposure Facility, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose the development of automated systems to improve radiobiology research capabilities at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National...

  19. Implementation phase – Strengthening community to health facility ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Home · What we do ... Access to quality sexual and reproductive health information, services, prenatal services, and delivery services is ... should contribute to strengthening and improving the quality of provincial maternal health services.

  20. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): Facility Interests Dataset - Intranet

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service consists of location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for all sites that are available in...

  1. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): Facility Interests Dataset - Intranet Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This downloadable data package consists of location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for all sites that are...

  2. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): Facility Interests Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service consists of location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for all sites that are available in...

  3. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): Facility Interests Dataset Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This downloadable data package consists of location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for all sites that are...

  4. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): Facility Interests Dataset - Intranet Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service consists of location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for all sites that are available in...

  5. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): AIRS_AFS Sub Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Air Facility System (AFS) contains compliance and permit data for stationary sources regulated by EPA, state and local air pollution agencies. The sub facility...

  6. Fast Flux Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munn, W.I.

    1981-01-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), located on the Hanford site a few miles north of Richland, Washington, is a major link in the chain of development required to sustain and advance Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) technology in the United States. This 400 MWt sodium cooled reactor is a three loop design, is operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy, and is the largest research reactor of its kind in the world. The purpose of the facility is three-fold: (1) to provide a test bed for components, materials, and breeder reactor fuels which can significantly extend resource reserves; (2) to produce a complete body of base data for the use of liquid sodium in heat transfer systens; and (3) to demonstrate inherent safety characteristics of LMFBR designs

  7. World Class Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmstrøm, Ole Emil; Jensen, Per Anker

    2013-01-01

    Alle der med entusiasme arbejder med Facilities Management drømmer om at levere World Class. DFM drømmer om at skabe rammer og baggrund for, at vi i Danmark kan bryste os at være blandt de førende på verdensplan. Her samles op på, hvor tæt vi er på at nå drømmemålet.......Alle der med entusiasme arbejder med Facilities Management drømmer om at levere World Class. DFM drømmer om at skabe rammer og baggrund for, at vi i Danmark kan bryste os at være blandt de førende på verdensplan. Her samles op på, hvor tæt vi er på at nå drømmemålet....

  8. The ISOLDE facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catherall, R.; Andreazza, W.; Breitenfeldt, M.; Dorsival, A.; Focker, G. J.; Gharsa, T. P.; J, Giles T.; Grenard, J.-L.; Locci, F.; Martins, P.; Marzari, S.; Schipper, J.; Shornikov, A.; Stora, T.

    2017-09-01

    The ISOLDE facility has undergone numerous changes over the last 17 years driven by both the physics and technical community with a common goal to improve on beam variety, beam quality and safety. Improvements have been made in civil engineering and operational equipment while continuing developments aim to ensure operations following a potential increase in primary beam intensity and energy. This paper outlines the principal technical changes incurred at ISOLDE by building on a similar publication of the facility upgrades by Kugler (2000 Hyperfine Interact. 129 23-42). It also provides an insight into future perspectives through a brief summary issues addressed in the HIE-ISOLDE design study Catherall et al (2013 Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. B 317 204-207).

  9. Separations canyon decontamination facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hershey, J.H.

    1975-01-01

    Highly radioactive process equipment is decontaminated at the Savannah River Plant in specially equipped areas of the separations canyon building so that direct mechanical repairs or alterations can be made. Using these facilities it is possible to decontaminate and repair equipment such as 10- x 11-ft storage tanks, 8- x 8-ft batch evaporator pots and columns, 40-in. Bird centrifuges, canyon pumps and agitators, and various canyon piping systems or ''jumpers.'' For example, centrifuge or evaporator pots can be decontaminated and rebuilt for about 60 percent of the 1974 replacement cost. The combined facilities can decontaminate and repair 6 to 10 pieces of major equipment per year. Decontamination time varies with type of equipment and radioactivity levels encountered

  10. Separations canyon decontamination facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hershey, J.H.

    1975-05-01

    Highly radioactive process equipment is decontaminated at the Savannah River Plant in specially equipped areas of the separations canyon buildings so that direct mechanical repairs or alterations can be made. Using these facilities it is possible to decontaminate and repair equipment such as 10- x 11-ft storage tanks, 8- x 8-ft batch evaporator pots and columns, 40-in. Bird centrifuges, canyon pumps and agitators, and various canyon piping systems or ''jumpers.'' For example, centrifuge or evaporator pots can be decontaminated and rebuilt for about 60 percent of the 1974 replacement cost. The combined facilities can decontaminate and repair 6 to 10 pieces of major equipment per year. Decontamination time varies with type of equipment and radioactivity levels encountered. (U.S.)

  11. Facilities evaluation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sloan, P.A.; Edinborough, C.R.

    1992-04-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) is a program of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development whose mission is to evaluate different new and existing technologies and determine how well they address DOE community waste remediation problems. Twenty-three Technical Task Plans (TTPs) have been identified to support this mission during FY-92; 10 of these have identified some support requirements when demonstrations take place. Section 1 of this report describes the tasks supported by BWID, determines if a technical demonstration is proposed, and if so, identifies the support requirements requested by the TTP Principal Investigators. Section 2 of this report is an evaluation identifying facility characteristics of existing Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) facilities that may be considered for use in BWID technology demonstration activities

  12. The NOKO/TOPFLOW facility for natural convection flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicken, E.F.; Jaegers, H.; Schaffrath, A.; Weiss, F.-P.

    2002-01-01

    For the study of the effectiveness of passive safety systems a high pressure (up to 7 MPa) and high power (up to 4 MW) test facility - named NOKO - has been constructed and operated at the Forschungszentrum Juelich. From 1996-1998 this facility was used for a project within the 4th FP of the EU 'European BWR R and D Cluster for Innovative Passive Safety Systems'. An overview and selected results are given for the tests with two bundles of the emergency condenser, with the building and plate condenser, with 4 different passive initiators, with a passive flooding system and with decay heat removal tests during shutdown. It has been decided to decrease substantially the safety research at the Forschungszentrum Juelich; to maintain the experimental competence for two-phase flow the NOKO facility will be transferred to the Forschungszentrum Rossendorf by the end of the year 2000 up to the beginning of the year 2001. The facility will be named TOPFLOW; the main objectives of future tests will be oriented towards more generic research: investigation of steady state and transient two-phase flow phenomena especially transient two-phase flow patterns, the development of two-phase flow instrumentation, the generation of a data basis for Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD)-Code validation and testing of heat exchangers and safety systems. An overview will be given about the modifications and improvements related to the test facility and the planned tests. (author)

  13. Large mass storage facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peskin, Arnold M.

    1978-08-01

    This is the final report of a study group organized to investigate questions surrounding the acquisition of a large mass storage facility. The programatic justification for such a system at Brookhaven is reviewed. Several candidate commercial products are identified and discussed. A draft of a procurement specification is developed. Some thoughts on possible new directions for computing at Brookhaven are also offered, although this topic was addressed outside of the context of the group's deliberations. 2 figures, 3 tables.

  14. Proton beam therapy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    It is proposed to build a regional outpatient medical clinic at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois, to exploit the unique therapeutic characteristics of high energy proton beams. The Fermilab location for a proton therapy facility (PTF) is being chosen for reasons ranging from lower total construction and operating costs and the availability of sophisticated technical support to a location with good access to patients from the Chicago area and from the entire nation. 9 refs., 4 figs., 26 tabs

  15. Facility decontamination technology workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-10-01

    Purpose of the meeting was to provide a record of experience at nuclear facilities, other than TMI-2, of events and incidents which have required decontamination and dose reduction activities, and to furnish GPU and others involved in the TMI-2 cleanup with the results of that decontamination and dose reduction technology. Separate abstracts were prepared for 24 of the 25 papers; the remaining paper had been previously abstracted

  16. Proton beam therapy facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-10-09

    It is proposed to build a regional outpatient medical clinic at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois, to exploit the unique therapeutic characteristics of high energy proton beams. The Fermilab location for a proton therapy facility (PTF) is being chosen for reasons ranging from lower total construction and operating costs and the availability of sophisticated technical support to a location with good access to patients from the Chicago area and from the entire nation. 9 refs., 4 figs., 26 tabs.

  17. SIGMA Experimental Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivarola, Martin; Florido, Pablo; Gonzalez, Jose; Brasnarof, Daniel; Orellano, Pablo; Bergallo, Juan

    2000-01-01

    The SIGMA ( Separacion Isotopica Gaseosa por Metodos Avanzados) concept is outlined.The old gaseous diffusion process to enrich uranium has been updated to be economically competitive for small production volumes.Major innovations have been introduced in the membrane design and in the integrated design of compressors and diffusers.The use of injectors and gas turbines has been also adopted.The paper describes the demonstration facility installed by the Argentine Atomic Energy Commission

  18. Facility decontamination technology workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-10-01

    Purpose of the meeting was to provide a record of experience at nuclear facilities, other than TMI-2, of events and incidents which have required decontamination and dose reduction activities, and to furnish GPU and others involved in the TMI-2 cleanup with the results of that decontamination and dose reduction technology. Separate abstracts were prepared for 24 of the 25 papers; the remaining paper had been previously abstracted. (DLC)

  19. ORNL calibrations facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, C.D.; Gupton, E.D.; Lane, B.H.; Miller, J.H.; Nichols, S.W.

    1982-08-01

    The ORNL Calibrations Facility is operated by the Instrumentation Group of the Industrial Safety and Applied Health Physics Division. Its primary purpose is to maintain radiation calibration standards for calibration of ORNL health physics instruments and personnel dosimeters. This report includes a discussion of the radioactive sources and ancillary equipment in use and a step-by-step procedure for calibration of those survey instruments and personnel dosimeters in routine use at ORNL

  20. Japan hadron facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, Tokushi [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    JHF aims at promoting the variety of research fields using various secondary beams produced by high-intensity proton beams. The accelerator of JHF will be an accelerator complex of a 200 MeV LINAC, a 3 GeV booster proton synchrotron, and a 50 GeV proton synchrotron. The four main experimental facilities of K-Arena, M-Arena, N-Arena, and E-Arena are planed. The outline of the project is presented. (author)

  1. Project assembling and commissioning of a rewetting test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezende, H.C.

    1985-08-01

    A test facility (ITR - Instalacao de Testes de Remolhamento) has been erected at the Thermal-hydraulics Laboratory of CDTN, dedicated to the investigation of the basic phenomena that can occur during the reflood phase of a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR), utilizing tubular and annular test sections. The present work consists in a presentation of the facility design and a report of its commissioning. The mechanical aspects of the facility, its power supply system and its instrumentation are described. The results of the instruments calibration and two operational tests are presented and a comparison is done with calculations perfomed usign a computer code. (Author) [pt

  2. Natural circulation in an integral CANDU test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingham, P.J.; Sanderson, T.V.; Luxat, J.C.; Melnyk, A.J.

    2000-01-01

    Over 70 single- and two-phase natural circulation experiments have been completed in the RD-14M facility, an integral CANDU thermalhydraulic test loop. This paper describes the RD-14M facility and provides an overview of the impact of key parameters on the results of natural circulation experiments. Particular emphasis will be on phenomena which led to heat up at high system inventories in a small subset of experiments. Clarification of misunderstandings in a recently published comparison of the effectiveness of natural circulation flows in RD-14M to integral facilities simulating other reactor geometries will also be provided. (author)

  3. Bevalac Minibeam Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schimmerling, W.; Alonso, J.; Morgado, R.; Tobias, C.A.; Grunder, H.; Upham, F.T.; Windsor, A.; Armer, R.A.; Yang, T.C.H.; Gunn, J.T.

    1977-03-01

    The Minibeam Facility is a biomedical heavy-ion beam area at the Bevalac designed to satisfy the following requirements: (1) provide a beam incident in a vertical plane for experiments where a horizontal apparatus significantly increases the convenience of performing an experiment or even determines its feasibility; (2) provide an area that is well shielded with respect to electronic interference so that microvolt signals can be detected with acceptable signal-to-noise ratios; (3) provide a beam of small diameter, typically a few millimeters or less, for various studies of cellular function; and (4) provide a facility for experiments that require long setup and preparation times and apparatus that must be left relatively undisturbed between experiments and that need short periods of beam time. The design of such a facility and its main components is described. In addition to the above criteria, the design was constrained by the desire to have inexpensive, simple devices that work reliably and can be easily upgraded for interfacing to the Biomedical PDP 11/45 computer

  4. Description of pelletizing facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vojin Cokorilo; Dinko Knezevic; Vladimir Milisavljevic [University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia). Faculty of Mining and Geology

    2006-07-01

    A lot of electrical energy in Serbia was used for heating, mainly for domestics. As it is the most expensive source for heating the government announced a National Program of Energy Efficiency with only one aim, to reduce the consumption of electric energy for the heating. One of the contributions to mentioned reduction is production of coal pellets from the fine coal and its use for domestic heating but also for heating of schools, hospitals, military barracks etc. Annual production of fine coal in Serbia is 300,000 tons. The stacks of fine coal present difficulties at each deep mine because of environmental pollution, spontaneous combustion, low price, smaller market etc. To overcome the difficulties and to give the contribution to National Program of Energy Efficiency researchers from the Department of Mining Engineering, the University of Belgrade designed and realized the project of fine coal pelletizing. This paper describes technical aspect of this project. Using a CPM machine Model 7900, a laboratory facility, then a semi-industrial pelletizing facility followed by an industrial facility was set up and produced good quality pellets. The plant comprised a coal fines hopper, conveyor belt, hopper for screw conveyor, screw conveyor, continuous mixer conditioner, binder reservoir, pump and pipelines, pellet mill, product conveyor belt and product hopper. 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. ATLAS Facility Description Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Kyoung Ho; Moon, Sang Ki; Park, Hyun Sik; Cho, Seok; Choi, Ki Yong

    2009-04-01

    A thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility, ATLAS (Advanced Thermal-hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation), has been constructed at KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute). The ATLAS has the same two-loop features as the APR1400 and is designed according to the well-known scaling method suggested by Ishii and Kataoka to simulate the various test scenarios as realistically as possible. It is a half-height and 1/288-volume scaled test facility with respect to the APR1400. The fluid system of the ATLAS consists of a primary system, a secondary system, a safety injection system, a break simulating system, a containment simulating system, and auxiliary systems. The primary system includes a reactor vessel, two hot legs, four cold legs, a pressurizer, four reactor coolant pumps, and two steam generators. The secondary system of the ATLAS is simplified to be of a circulating loop-type. Most of the safety injection features of the APR1400 and the OPR1000 are incorporated into the safety injection system of the ATLAS. In the ATLAS test facility, about 1300 instrumentations are installed to precisely investigate the thermal-hydraulic behavior in simulation of the various test scenarios. This report describes the scaling methodology, the geometric data of the individual component, and the specification and the location of the instrumentations in detail

  6. Hot Hydrogen Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    W. David Swank

    2007-01-01

    The core in a nuclear thermal rocket will operate at high temperatures and in hydrogen. One of the important parameters in evaluating the performance of a nuclear thermal rocket is specific impulse, ISp. This quantity is proportional to the square root of the propellant's absolute temperature and inversely proportional to square root of its molecular weight. Therefore, high temperature hydrogen is a favored propellant of nuclear thermal rocket designers. Previous work has shown that one of the life-limiting phenomena for thermal rocket nuclear cores is mass loss of fuel to flowing hydrogen at high temperatures. The hot hydrogen test facility located at the Idaho National Lab (INL) is designed to test suitability of different core materials in 2500 C hydrogen flowing at 1500 liters per minute. The facility is intended to test non-uranium containing materials and therefore is particularly suited for testing potential cladding and coating materials. In this first installment the facility is described. Automated Data acquisition, flow and temperature control, vessel compatibility with various core geometries and overall capabilities are discussed

  7. A new polarized neutron interferometry facility at the NCNR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahi, C.B. [Physics and Engineering Physics Department, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70188 (United States); Arif, M. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Cory, D.G. [Department of Chemistry, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, ON, Canada N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Institute for Quantum Computing, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 1Z8 (Canada); Mineeva, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 1Z8 (Canada); Nsofini, J.; Sarenac, D. [Institute for Quantum Computing, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Williams, C.J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Huber, M.G., E-mail: michael.huber@nist.gov [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Pushin, D.A., E-mail: dmitry.pushin@uwaterloo.ca [Institute for Quantum Computing, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2016-03-21

    A new monochromatic beamline and facility has been installed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Center for Neutron Research (NCNR) devoted to neutron interferometry in the research areas of spin control, spin manipulation, quantum mechanics, quantum information science, spintronics, and material science. This facility is possible in part because of advances in decoherence free subspace interferometer designs that have demonstrated consistent contrast in the presence of vibrational noise; a major environmental constraint that has prevented neutron interferometry from being applied at other neutron facilities. Neutron interferometry measures the phase difference between a neutron wave function propagating along two spatially separated paths. It is a practical example of self interference and due to its modest path separation of a few centimeters allows the insertion of samples and macroscopic neutron spin rotators. Phase shifts can be caused by gravitational, magnetic and nuclear interactions as well as purely quantum mechanical effects making interferometer a robust tool in neutron research. This new facility is located in the guide hall of the NCNR upstream of the existing Neutron Interferometry and Optics Facility (NIOF) and has several advantages over the NIOF including higher incident flux, better neutron polarization, and increased accessibility. The long term goal for the new facility is to be a user supported beamline and makes neutron interferometer more generally available to the scientific community. This paper addresses both the capabilities and characteristics of the new facility.

  8. GRI testing facility available for pipeline inspection devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    As part of a program to help improve detection and characterization of defects that may occur in pipelines, the Gas Research Institute has announced the completion of the first phase of a testing facility for the evaluation of new and existing pipeline inspection technologies. GRI is a private, not-for-profit membership organization based in Chicago. The first phase of the facility consists of a pull rig which includes four 300-foot lengths of pipe with diameters of 12, 24, 30, and 36 inches. NDE inspection devices can be pulled through these pipe segments by a winch at speeds up to 25 miles per hour

  9. Indoor Lighting Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, Koji; Saito, Yoshinori; Ichikawa, Shigenori; Kawauchi, Takao; Tanaka, Tsuneo; Hirano, Rika; Tazuke, Fuyuki

    According to the statistics by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport, the total floor space of all building construction started was 188.87 million m2 (1.5% increase y/y), marking the fourth straight year of increase. Many large-scale buildings under construction in central Tokyo become fully occupied by tenants before completion. As for office buildings, it is required to develop comfortable and functional office spaces as working styles are becoming more and more diversified, and lighting is also an element of such functionalities. The total floor space of construction started for exhibition pavilions, multipurpose halls, conference halls and religious architectures decreased 11.1% against the previous year. This marked a decline for 10 consecutive years and the downward trend continues. In exhibition pavilions, the light radiation is measured and adjusted throughout the year so as not to damage the artworks by lighting. Hospitals, while providing higher quality medical services and enhancing the dwelling environment of patients, are expected to meet various restrictions and requirements, including the respect for privacy. Meanwhile, lighting designs for school classrooms tend to be homogeneous, yet new ideas are being promoted to strike a balance between the economical and functional aspects. The severe economic environment continues to be hampering the growth of theaters and halls in both the private and public sectors. Contrary to the downsizing trend of such facilities, additional installations of lighting equipment were conspicuous, and the adoption of high efficacy lighting appliances and intelligent function control circuits are becoming popular. In the category of stores/commercial facilities, the construction of complex facilities is a continuing trend. Indirect lighting, high luminance discharge lamps with excellent color rendition and LEDs are being effectively used in these facilities, together with the introduction of lighting designs

  10. Phase field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radhakrishnan, B.; Gorti, S.B.; Clarno, K.; Tonks, M.R.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the phase-field method and its application to microstructure evolution in reactor fuel and clad are discussed. The examples highlight the capability of the phase-field method to capture evolution processes that are influenced by both thermal and elastic stress fields that are caused by microstructural changes in the solid-state. The challenges that need to be overcome before the technique can become predictive and material-specific are discussed. (authors)

  11. Carbon Fiber Technology Facility (CFTF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Functionally within the MDF, ORNL operates DOE’s unique Carbon Fiber Technology Facility (CFTF)—a 42,000 ft2 innovative technology facility and works with leading...

  12. Shock Thermodynamic Applied Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Shock Thermodynamic Applied Research Facility (STAR) facility, within Sandia’s Solid Dynamic Physics Department, is one of a few institutions in the world with a...

  13. Emission Facilities - Air Emission Plants

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — Represents the Primary Facility type Air Emission Plant (AEP) point features. Air Emissions Plant is a DEP primary facility type related to the Air Quality Program....

  14. Skilled nursing or rehabilitation facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000435.htm Skilled nursing or rehabilitation facilities To use the sharing features on this page, ... to go to a Skilled Nursing or Rehabilitation Facility? Your health care provider may determine that you ...

  15. Tier II Chemical Storage Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research FacilityFacilities that store hazardous chemicals above certain quantities must submit an annual emergency and hazardous chemical inventory on a Tier II form. This is a...

  16. Nitramine Drying & Fine Grinding Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Nitramine Drying and Fine Grinding Facility provides TACOM-ARDEC with a state-of-the-art facility capable of drying and grinding high explosives (e.g., RDX and...

  17. Tandem Van de Graaff facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Completed in 1970, the Tandem Van de Graaff facility was for many years the world's largest electrostatic accelerator facility. It can provide researchers with beams...

  18. New Ideas on Facilities Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, James C.

    1986-01-01

    Examines trends in facilities management relating to products and people. Reviews new trends in products, including processes, techniques, and programs that are being expounded by business and industry. Discusses the "people factors" involved in facilities management. (ABB)

  19. Arc Heated Scramjet Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Arc Heated Scramjet Test Facility is an arc heated facility which simulates the true enthalpy of flight over the Mach number range of about 4.7 to 8 for free-jet...

  20. Environmentally Regulated Facilities in Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — A unique record for each facility site with an environmental interest by DNR (such as permits). This brings together core environmental information in one place for...

  1. The TOPFLOW multi-purpose thermohydraulic test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaffrath, Andreas; Kruessenberg, A.-K.; Weiss, F.-P.; Prasser, H.-M.

    2002-01-01

    The TOPFLOW (Transient Two Phase Flow Test Facility) multi-purpose thermohydraulic test facility is being built for studies of steady-state and transient flow phenomena in two-phase flows, and for the development and validation of the models contained in CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) codes. The facility is under construction at the Institute for Safety Research of the Rossendorf Research Center (FZR). It will be operated together with the Dresden Technical University and the Zittau/Goerlitz School for Technology, Economics and Social Studies within the framework of the Nuclear Technology Competence Preservation Program. TOPFLOW, with its test sections and its flexible concept, is available as an attractive facility also to users from all European countries. Experiments are planned in these fields, among others: - Transient two-phase flows in vertical and horizontal pipes and pipes of any inclination as well as in geometries typical of nuclear reactors (annulus, hot leg). - Boiling in large vessels and water pools (measurements of steam generation, 3D steam content distribution, turbulence, temperature stratification). - Test of passive components and safety systems. - Condensation in horizontal pipes in the absence and presence of non-condensable gases. The construction phase of TOPFLOW has been completed more or less on schedule. Experiments can be started after a commissioning phase in the 3rd quarter of 2002. (orig.) [de

  2. Facility planning and site development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reisman, R.C.; Handmaker, H.

    1986-01-01

    Planning for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) facility should provide for the efficient operation of current and future MRI devices and must also take into consideration a broad range of general planning principles. Control of budgeted facility costs and construction schedules is of increasing importance due to the magnitude of expense of MRI facility development as well as the need to protect institutional or entrepreneurial investment. In a competitive environment facility costs may be the determining factor in a project's success

  3. Usability: managing facilities for social outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexander, Keith; Blakstad, Siri; Hansen, Geir

    2013-01-01

    The paper argues for the development of usability concepts, methodologies and tools, in considering the effects of the built environment from a user, organisational and community perspective, in order to have a positive influence on social outcomes. Since it was formed over ten years ago, the CIB W......111 on Usability has been exploring concepts, methods and tools, developed in the evaluation of all kinds of consumer products, applied to the built environment. In the most recent phase of this work, conducted over the past three years, an international network of partners has collaborated to focus...... properties of a workplace, they could better manage and design the facilities for improved social outcomes. Interpretation and analysis of the built environment (and support services) based on how it is socially constructed will enable integration of organisational use and the facilities provided to arrive...

  4. SULTAN test facility: Summary of recent results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanov, Boris; Bruzzone, Pierluigi; Sedlak, Kamil; Croari, Giancarlo

    2013-01-01

    The test campaigns of the ITER conductors in the SULTAN test facility re-started in December 2011 after three months break. The main focus of the activities is about the qualification tests of the Central Solenoid (CS) conductors, with three different samples for a total six variations of strand suppliers and cable layouts. In 2012, five Toroidal Field (TF) conductor samples have also been tested as part of the supplier and process qualification phase of the European, Korean, Chinese and Russian Federation Agencies. A summary of the test results for all the ITER samples tested in the last period is presented, including an updated statistics of the broad transition, the performance degradation and the impact of layout variations. The role of SULTAN test facility during the ITER construction is reviewed, and the load of work for the next three years is anticipated

  5. Target Visualization at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potter, Daniel Abraham [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    As the National Ignition Facility continues its campaign to achieve ignition, new methods and tools will be required to measure the quality of the targets used to achieve this goal. Techniques have been developed to measure target surface features using a phase-shifting diffraction interferometer and Leica Microsystems confocal microscope. Using these techniques we are able to produce a detailed view of the shell surface, which in turn allows us to refine target manufacturing and cleaning processes. However, the volume of data produced limits the methods by which this data can be effectively viewed by a user. This paper introduces an image-based visualization system for data exploration of target shells at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. It aims to combine multiple image sets into a single visualization to provide a method of navigating the data in ways that are not possible with existing tools.

  6. Engineering Phase 2 and Phase 3 certification programs -- PUREX deactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walser, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    This document describes the training programs required to become a Phase 2 and Phase 3 certified engineer at PUREX during deactivation. With the change in mission, the PUREX engineering/certification training program is being revamped as discussed below. The revised program will be administered by PUREX Technical Training using existing courses and training materials. The program will comply with the requirements of the Department of Energy (DOE) order 5480.20A, ''Personnel Selection, Qualification, Training, and Staffing Requirements at DOE Reactor and Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities.''

  7. Engineering Phase 2 and Phase 3 certification programs -- PUREX deactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walser, R.L.

    1994-12-13

    This document describes the training programs required to become a Phase 2 and Phase 3 certified engineer at PUREX during deactivation. With the change in mission, the PUREX engineering/certification training program is being revamped as discussed below. The revised program will be administered by PUREX Technical Training using existing courses and training materials. The program will comply with the requirements of the Department of Energy (DOE) order 5480.20A, ``Personnel Selection, Qualification, Training, and Staffing Requirements at DOE Reactor and Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities.``

  8. Eccentric Coil Test Facility (ECTF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burn, P.B.; Walstrom, P.L.; Anderson, W.C.; Marguerat, E.F.

    1975-01-01

    The conceptual design of a facility for testing superconducting coils under some conditions peculiar to tokamak systems is given. A primary element of the proposed facility is a large 25 MJ background solenoid. Discussions of the mechanical structure, the stress distribution and the thermal stability for this coil are included. The systems for controlling the facility and diagnosing test coil behavior are also described

  9. Hot cell verification facility update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titzler, P.A.; Moffett, S.D.; Lerch, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    The Hot Cell Verification Facility (HCVF) provides a prototypic hot cell mockup to check equipment for functional and remote operation, and provides actual hands-on training for operators. The facility arrangement is flexible and assists in solving potential problems in a nonradioactive environment. HCVF has been in operation for six years, and the facility is a part of the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory

  10. Capital Ideas for Facilities Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golding, Stephen T.; Gordon, Janet; Gravina, Arthur

    2001-01-01

    Asserting that just like chief financial officers, higher education facilities specialists must maximize the long-term performance of assets under their care, describes strategies for strategic facilities management. Discusses three main approaches to facilities management (insourcing, cosourcing, and outsourcing) and where boards of trustees fit…

  11. CLIC Drive Beam Phase Stabilisation

    CERN Document Server

    Gerbershagen, Alexander; Schulte, Daniel

    The thesis presents phase stability studies for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) and focuses in particular on CLIC Drive Beam longitudinal phase stabilisation. This topic constitutes one of the main feasibility challenges for CLIC construction and is an essential component of the current CLIC stabilisation campaign. The studies are divided into two large interrelated sections: the simulation studies for the CLIC Drive Beam stability, and measurements, data analysis and simulations of the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) Drive Beam phase errors. A dedicated software tool has been developed for a step-by-step analysis of the error propagation through the CLIC Drive Beam. It uses realistic RF potential and beam loading amplitude functions for the Drive and Main Beam accelerating structures, complete models of the recombination scheme and compressor chicane as well as of further CLIC Drive Beam modules. The tool has been tested extensively and its functionality has been verified. The phase error propagation at CLIC h...

  12. Licensee Performance Evaluation: Phase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakoff, H.E.; Speaker, D.M.; Thompson, S.R.; Cohen, S.C.

    1979-08-01

    This report details work performed during the second phase of a two-phase contract to develop methodology for Licensee Performance Evaluation. The Phase I report, NUREG/CR-0110 details initial efforts on the contract. The model developed in Phase I was used to evaluate nine additional facilities for this report. Performance indicators from noncompliance data were also evaluated. Methodology was developed employing the noncompliance indicators and used for 12 case studies. It was found that licensee event report indicators could be more easily identified and utilized than noncompliance indicators based on presently available data systems. However, noncompliance data, appropriately related to cause, could provide real insight into why performance was what it was

  13. Australian national proton facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, M.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Proton therapy has been in use since 1954 and over 25,000 patients have been treated worldwide. Until recently most patients were treated at physics research facilities and apart from the Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory and some low energy machines for eye treatment, only small numbers of patients were treated in each centre and conditions were less than optimal. Limited beam time and lack of support facilities restricted the type of patient treated and conventional fractionation could not be used. The initial clinical experience was mainly with small tumours and other lesions close to critical organs. Large numbers of eye tumours have also been treated. Protons have a well-defined role in these situations and are now being used in the treatment of more common cancers. Since the development of hospital-based facilities, such as the one in Loma Linda in California, over 2,500 patients with prostate cancer have been treated using a simple technique which gives results at least as good as radical surgery, external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy. Importantly, the incidence of severe complications is very low. There are encouraging results in many disease sites including lung, liver, soft tissue sarcomas and oesophagus. As proton therapy becomes more widely available, randomised trials comparing it with conventional radiotherapy or intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) will be possible. In most situations the use of protons will enable a higher dose to be given safely but in situations where local control rates are already satisfactory, protons are expected to produce less complications than conventional treatment. The initial costs of a proton facility are high but the recurrent costs are similar to other forms of high technology radiotherapy. Simple treatment techniques with only a few fields are usually possible and proton therapy avoids the high integral doses associated with IMRT. This reduction in the low dose volume is likely to be particularly

  14. Shiva target irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manes, K.R.; Ahlstrom, H.G.; Coleman, L.W.; Storm, E.K.; Glaze, J.A.; Hurley, C.A.; Rienecker, F.; O'Neal, W.C.

    1977-01-01

    The first laser/plasma studies performed with the Shiva laser system will be two sided irradiations extending the data obtained by other LLL lasers to higher powers. The twenty approximately 1 TW laser pulses will reach the target simultaneously from above and below in nested pentagonal clusters. The upper and lower clusters of ten beams each are radially polarized so that they strike the target in p-polarization and maximize absorption. This geometry introduces laser system isolation problems which will be briefly discussed. The layout and types of target diagnostics will be described and a brief status report on the facility given

  15. Filters in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, K.H.; Wilhelm, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    The topics of the nine papers given include the behavior of HEPA filters during exposure to air flows of high humidity as well as of high differential pressure, the development of steel-fiber filters suitable for extreme operating conditions, and the occurrence of various radioactive iodine species in the exhaust air from boiling water reactors. In an introductory presentation the German view of the performance requirements to be met by filters in nuclear facilities as well as the present status of filter quality assurance are discussed. (orig.) [de

  16. Decommissioning nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buck, S.

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear facilities present a number of problems at the end of their working lives. They require dismantling and removal but public and environmental protection remain a priority. The principles and strategies are outlined. Experience of decommissioning in France and the U.K. had touched every major stage of the fuel cycle by the early 1990's. Decommissioning projects attempt to restrict waste production and proliferation as waste treatment and disposal are costly. It is concluded that technical means exist to deal with present civil plant and costs are now predictable. Strategies for decommissioning and future financial provisions are important. (UK)

  17. CLIC Test Facility 3

    CERN Multimedia

    Kossyvakis, I; Faus-golfe, A

    2007-01-01

    The design of CLIC is based on a two-beam scheme, where short pulses of high power 30 GHz RF are extracted from a drive beam running parallel to the main beam. The 3rd generation CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) will demonstrate the generation of the drive beam with the appropriate time structure, the extraction of 30 GHz RF power from this beam, as well as acceleration of a probe beam with 30 GHz RF cavities. The project makes maximum use of existing equipment and infrastructure of the LPI complex, which became available after the closure of LEP.

  18. Power source facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Kinoshita, Shoichiro

    1998-09-29

    The present invention concerns a power plant, in which power is supplied from an ordinary system battery to an ordinary DC bus system when all of the AC power sources should be lost and a generator is driven by a steam turbine. A generator is connected with an ordinary system battery charger by way of a channel. If all of power sources should be lost, the ordinary system battery charger is driven by using emergency steam turbine generator facilities, and reactor steams are supplied thereby enabling to supply power to the ordinary system DC bus system for a long period of time. (N.H.)

  19. Nuclear reactor facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wampole, N.C.

    1978-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of manitenance and inspections it is proposed for a nuclear reactor facility with a primary circuit containing liquid metal to provide a thermally insulated chamber, within which are placed a number of components of the primary circuit, as e.g. valves, recirculation pump, heat exchangers. The isolated placement permit controlled preheating on one hand, but prevents undesirable heating of adjacent load-bearing elements on the other. The chamber is provided with heating devices and, on the outside, with cooling devices; it is of advantage to fill it with an inert gas. (UWI) 891 HP [de

  20. LEGS data acquisition facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeVine, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    The data acquisition facility for the LEGS medium energy photonuclear beam line is composed of an auxiliary crate controller (ACC) acting as a front-end processor, loosely coupled to a time-sharing host computer based on a UNIX-like environment. The ACC services all real-time demands in the CAMAC crate: it responds to LAMs generated by data acquisition modules, to keyboard commands, and it refreshes the graphics display at frequent intervals. The host processor is needed only for printing histograms and recording event buffers on magnetic tape. The host also provides the environment for software development. The CAMAC crate is interfaced by a VERSAbus CAMAC branch driver

  1. Large coil test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelms, L.W.; Thompson, P.B.

    1980-01-01

    Final design of the facility is nearing completion, and 20% of the construction has been accomplished. A large vacuum chamber, houses the test assembly which is coupled to appropriate cryogenic, electrical, instrumentation, diagnostc systems. Adequate assembly/disassembly areas, shop space, test control center, offices, and test support laboratories are located in the same building. Assembly and installation operations are accomplished with an overhead crane. The major subsystems are the vacuum system, the test stand assembly, the cryogenic system, the experimental electric power system, the instrumentation and control system, and the data aquisition system

  2. Development of a water detritiation facility for JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perevezentsev, A.N.; Bell, A.C.; Brennan, P.D.; Hemmerich, J.L.

    2002-01-01

    A water detritiation facility, based on a world-wide adopted combined electrolysis catalytic exchange (CECE) process, for the JET active gas handling plant is described. A research and development programme is presented. The programme includes the testing of structured inert packing with an incorporated hydrophobic catalyst for increased throughput of a liquid phase catalytic exchange (LPCE) column, a vapour phase catalytic exchange (VPCE) process for reduction of tritium inventory in the alkali electrolyser and a column of high effectiveness for alkali retention

  3. Evaluation of mercury in the liquid waste processing facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Vijay [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Shah, Hasmukh [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Occhipinti, John E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Wilmarth, William R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, Richard E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-08-13

    This report provides a summary of Phase I activities conducted to support an Integrated Evaluation of Mercury in Liquid Waste System (LWS) Processing Facilities. Phase I activities included a review and assessment of the liquid waste inventory and chemical processing behavior of mercury using a system by system review methodology approach. Gaps in understanding mercury behavior as well as action items from the structured reviews are being tracked. 64% of the gaps and actions have been resolved.

  4. Natural circulation in a scaled PWR integral test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiang, R.L.; Jeuck, P.R. III

    1987-01-01

    Natural circulation is an important mechanism for cooling a nuclear power plant under abnormal operating conditions. To study natural circulation, we modeled a type of pressurized water reactor (PWR) that incorporates once-through steam generators. We conducted tests of single-phase natural circulations, two-phase natural circulations, and a boiler condenser mode. Because of complex geometry, the natural circulations observed in this facility exhibit some phenomena not commonly seen in a simple thermosyphon loop

  5. Status and Prospect of Safeguards By Design for Pyroprocessing Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ho-Dong; Shin, H.S.; Ahn, S.K.

    2010-01-01

    The concept of Safeguards-By-Design (SBD), which is proposed and developed by the United States and the IAEA, is now widely acknowledged as a fundamental consideration for the effective and efficient implementation of safeguards. The application of a SBD concept is of importance especially for developmental nuclear facilities which have new technological features and relevant challenges to their safeguards approach. At this point of time, the examination of the applicability of SBD on a pyroprocessing facility, which has been being developed in the Republic of Korea (ROK), would be meaningful. The ROK developed a safeguards system with the concept of SBD for Advanced spent fuel Conditioning Process Facility (ACPF) and DUPIC Fuel Development Facility (DFDF) before the SBD concept was formally suggested. Currently. The PRIDE (PyRoprocess Integrated Inactive Demonstration) facility for the demonstration of pyroprocess using 10 ton of non-radioactive nuclear materials per year is being constructed in the ROK. The safeguards system for the facility has been designed in cooperation with a facility designer from the design phase, and the safeguards system would be established according to the future construction schedule. In preparing the design of Engineering Scale Pyroprocess Facility (ESPF), which will use spent fuels in an engineering scale and be constructed in 2016, a research on the safeguards system for this facility is also being conducted. In this connection, a project to support for development of safeguards approach for a reference pyroprocessing facility has been carried out by KAERI in cooperation with KINAC and the IAEA through an IAEA Member State Support Program (MSSP). When this MSSP project is finished in August, 2011, a safeguards system model and safeguards approach for a reference pyroprocessing facility would be established. Maximizing these early experiences and results, a safeguards system of ESPF based on the concept of SBD would be designed and

  6. Technical Merits and Leadership in Facility Management

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shoemaker, Jerry

    1997-01-01

    .... The document is divided into six chapters; the introduction, facility management and leadership, building systems, facility operations, facility maintenance strategies, and the conclusion and final analysis...

  7. Synchrotron radiation research facility conceptual design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-06-01

    A report is presented to define, in general outline, the extent and proportions, the type of construction, the schedule for accomplishment, and the estimated cost for a new Synchrotron Radiation Facility, as proposed to the Energy Research and Development Administration by the Brookhaven National Laboratory. The report is concerned only indirectly with the scientific and technological justification for undertaking this project; the latter is addressed explicitly in separate documents. The report does consider user requirements, however, in order to establish a basis for design development. Preliminary drawings, outline specifications, estimated cost data, and other descriptive material are included as supporting documentation on the current status of the project in this preconstruction phase

  8. Grout Facilities standby plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claghorn, R.D.; Kison, P.F.; Nunamaker, D.R.; Yoakum, A.K.

    1994-09-29

    This plan defines how the Grout Facilities will be deactivated to meet the intent of the recently renegotiated Tri-Party Agreement (TPA). The TPA calls for the use of the grout process as an emergency option only in the event that tank space is not available to resolve tank safety issues. The availability of new tanks is expected by 1997. Since a grout startup effort would take an estimated two years, a complete termination of the Grout Disposal Program is expected in December 1995. The former Tank Waste Remediation (TWRS) Strategy, adopted in 1988, called for the contents of Hanford`s 28 newer double-shell waste tanks to be separated into high-level radioactive material to be vitrified and disposed of in a geologic repository; low-level wastes were to be sent to the Grout Facility to be made into a cement-like-mixture and poured into underground vaults at Hanford for disposal. The waste in the 149 older single-shell tanks (SST) were to undergo further study and analysis before a disposal decision was made.

  9. Underground Facilities, Technological Challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Spooner, N

    2010-01-01

    This report gives a summary overview of the status of international under- ground facilities, in particular as relevant to long-baseline neutrino physics and neutrino astrophysics. The emphasis is on the technical feasibility aspects of creating the large underground infrastructures that will be needed in the fu- ture to house the necessary detectors of 100 kton to 1000 kton scale. There is great potential in Europe to build such a facility, both from the technical point of view and because Europe has a large concentration of the necessary engi- neering and geophysics expertise. The new LAGUNA collaboration has made rapid progress in determining the feasibility for a European site for such a large detector. It is becoming clear in fact that several locations are technically fea- sible in Europe. Combining this with the possibility of a new neutrino beam from CERN suggests a great opportunity for Europe to become the leading centre of neutrino studies, combining both neutrino astrophysics and neutrino beam stu...

  10. Tritium Systems Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cafasso, F.A.; Maroni, V.A.; Smith, W.H.; Wilkes, W.R.; Wittenberg, L.J.

    1978-01-01

    This TSTF proposal has two principal objectives. The first objective is to provide by mid-FY 1981 a demonstration of the fuel cycle and tritium containment systems which could be used in a Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor for operation in the mid-1980's. The second objective is to provide a capability for further optimization of tritium fuel cycle and environmental control systems beyond that which is required for the EPR. The scale and flow rates in TSTF are close to those which have been projected for a prototype experimental power reactor (PEPR/ITR) and will permit reliable extrapolation to the conditions found in an EPR. The fuel concentrations will be the same as in an EPR. Demonstrations of individual components of the deuterium-tritium fuel cycle and of monitoring, accountability and containment systems and of a maintenance methodology will be achieved at various times in the FY 1979-80 time span. Subsequent to the individual component demonstrations--which will proceed from tests with hydrogen (and/or deuterium) through tracer levels of tritium to full operational concentrations--a complete test and demonstration of the integrated fuel processing and tritium containment facility will be performed. This will occur near the middle of FY 1981. Two options were considered for the TSTF: (1) The modification of an existing building and (2) the construction of a new facility

  11. PUREX facility hazards assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutton, L.N.

    1994-01-01

    This report documents the hazards assessment for the Plutonium Uranium Extraction Plant (PUREX) located on the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. Operation of PUREX is the responsibility of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). This hazards assessment was conducted to provide the emergency planning technical basis for PUREX. DOE Order 5500.3A requires an emergency planning hazards assessment for each facility that has the potential to reach or exceed the lowest level emergency classification. In October of 1990, WHC was directed to place PUREX in standby. In December of 1992 the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management authorized the termination of PUREX and directed DOE-RL to proceed with shutdown planning and terminal clean out activities. Prior to this action, its mission was to reprocess irradiated fuels for the recovery of uranium and plutonium. The present mission is to establish a passively safe and environmentally secure configuration at the PUREX facility and to preserve that condition for 10 years. The ten year time frame represents the typical duration expended to define, authorize and initiate follow-on decommissioning and decontamination activities

  12. Released radioactivity reducing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Takeaki.

    1992-01-01

    Upon occurrence of a reactor accident, penetration portions of a reactor container, as a main leakage source from a reactor container, are surrounded by a plurality of gas-tight chambers, the outside of which is surrounded by highly gas-tightly buildings. Branched pipelines of an emergency gas processing system are introduced to each of the gas-tight chambers and they are joined and in communication with an emergency gas processing device. With such a constitution, radioactive materials are prevented from leaking directly from the buildings. Further, pipeline openings of the emergency gas processing facility are disposed in the plurality highly gas-tight penetration chambers. If the radioactive materials are leaked from the reactor to elevate the pressure in the penetration chambers, the radioactive materials are introduced to a filter device in the emergency gas processing facility by way of the branched pipelines, filtered and then released to the atmosphere. Accordingly, the reliability and safety of the system can be improved. (T.M.)

  13. Mixed Waste Management Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brummond, W.; Celeste, J.; Steenhoven, J.

    1993-08-01

    The DOE has developed a National Mixed Waste Strategic Plan which calls for the construction of 2 to 9 mixed waste treatment centers in the Complex in the near future. LLNL is working to establish an integrated mixed waste technology development and demonstration system facility, the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF), to support the DOE National Mixed Waste Strategic Plan. The MWMF will develop, demonstrate, test, and evaluate incinerator-alternatives which will comply with regulations governing the treatment and disposal of organic mixed wastes. LLNL will provide the DOE with engineering data for design and operation of new technologies which can be implemented in their mixed waste treatment centers. MWMF will operate under real production plant conditions and process samples of real LLNL mixed waste. In addition to the destruction of organic mixed wastes, the development and demonstration will include waste feed preparation, material transport systems, aqueous treatment, off-gas treatment, and final forms, thus making it an integrated ''cradle to grave'' demonstration. Technologies from offsite as well as LLNL's will be tested and evaluated when they are ready for a pilot scale demonstration, according to the needs of the DOE

  14. Reactor feedwater facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Tadashi; Kinoshita, Shoichiro; Akatsu, Jun-ichi

    1996-04-30

    In a reactor feedwater facility in which one stand-by system and at least three ordinary systems are disposed in parallel, each of the feedwater pumps is driven by an electromotor, and has substantially the same capacity. At least two systems among the ordinary systems have a pump rotation number variable means. Since the volume of each of the feedwater pump of each system is determined substantially equal, standardization is enabled to facilitate the production. While the number of electromotors is increased, since they are driven by electromotors, turbines, steam pipelines and valves for driving feed water pumps can be eliminated. Therefore, the feedwater pumps can be disposed to a region of low radiation dose being separated from a main turbine and a main condensator, to improve the degree of freedom in view of the installation. In addition, accessibility to equipments during operation is improved to improve the maintenance of feed water facilities. The number of parts for equipments can be reduced compared with that in a turbine-driving system thereby capable of reducing the operation amount for the maintenance and inspection. (N.H.)

  15. The Torbay fog facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    A series of lighting sources are needed to help helicopters in their approaches to offshore oil platforms. The Torbay fog facility in Newfoundland was created in May 1998 and has been instrumental in studying different light sources. The facility has been used for fog characterization studies to determine the transmission of various light sources through fog up to a distance of 980 meters and correlating this with fog droplet size and concentration. The most cost effective method of increasing visibility is through high intensity searchlights. In this study, a 150 watt searchlight was set up on the south side of Torbay Bay and fog droplet size and concentration were measured. The main objective of the study was to characterize fog and precipitation (rain and snow) to enable daylight approaches to be made to the Hibernia platform in low visibility conditions. Different methods of measuring visibility were investigated to define a suitable sensor/detector which, when installed on the Hibernia platform, will allow a prediction of visibility to be made for flight operational purposes. 2 figs

  16. Grout Facilities standby plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claghorn, R.D.; Kison, P.F.; Nunamaker, D.R.; Yoakum, A.K.

    1994-01-01

    This plan defines how the Grout Facilities will be deactivated to meet the intent of the recently renegotiated Tri-Party Agreement (TPA). The TPA calls for the use of the grout process as an emergency option only in the event that tank space is not available to resolve tank safety issues. The availability of new tanks is expected by 1997. Since a grout startup effort would take an estimated two years, a complete termination of the Grout Disposal Program is expected in December 1995. The former Tank Waste Remediation (TWRS) Strategy, adopted in 1988, called for the contents of Hanford's 28 newer double-shell waste tanks to be separated into high-level radioactive material to be vitrified and disposed of in a geologic repository; low-level wastes were to be sent to the Grout Facility to be made into a cement-like-mixture and poured into underground vaults at Hanford for disposal. The waste in the 149 older single-shell tanks (SST) were to undergo further study and analysis before a disposal decision was made

  17. FRACTURING FLUID CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subhash Shah

    2000-08-01

    Hydraulic fracturing technology has been successfully applied for well stimulation of low and high permeability reservoirs for numerous years. Treatment optimization and improved economics have always been the key to the success and it is more so when the reservoirs under consideration are marginal. Fluids are widely used for the stimulation of wells. The Fracturing Fluid Characterization Facility (FFCF) has been established to provide the accurate prediction of the behavior of complex fracturing fluids under downhole conditions. The primary focus of the facility is to provide valuable insight into the various mechanisms that govern the flow of fracturing fluids and slurries through hydraulically created fractures. During the time between September 30, 1992, and March 31, 2000, the research efforts were devoted to the areas of fluid rheology, proppant transport, proppant flowback, dynamic fluid loss, perforation pressure losses, and frictional pressure losses. In this regard, a unique above-the-ground fracture simulator was designed and constructed at the FFCF, labeled ''The High Pressure Simulator'' (HPS). The FFCF is now available to industry for characterizing and understanding the behavior of complex fluid systems. To better reflect and encompass the broad spectrum of the petroleum industry, the FFCF now operates under a new name of ''The Well Construction Technology Center'' (WCTC). This report documents the summary of the activities performed during 1992-2000 at the FFCF.

  18. The LLNL AMS facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, M.L.; Bench, G.S.; Brown, T.A.

    1996-05-01

    The AMS facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) routinely measures the isotopes 3 H, 7 Be, 10 Be, 14 C, 26 Al, 36 Cl, 41 Ca, 59,63 Ni, and 129 I. During the past two years, over 30,000 research samples have been measured. Of these samples, approximately 30% were for 14 C bioscience tracer studies, 45% were 14 C samples for archaeology and the geosciences, and the other isotopes constitute the remaining 25%. During the past two years at LLNL, a significant amount of work has gone into the development of the Projectile X-ray AMS (PXAMS) technique. PXAMS uses induced characteristic x-rays to discriminate against competing atomic isobars. PXAMS has been most fully developed for 63 Ni but shows promise for the measurement of several other long lived isotopes. During the past year LLNL has also conducted an 129 I interlaboratory comparison exercise. Recent hardware changes at the LLNL AMS facility include the installation and testing of a new thermal emission ion source, a new multianode gas ionization detector for general AMS use, re-alignment of the vacuum tank of the first of the two magnets that make up the high energy spectrometer, and a new cryo-vacuum system for the AMS ion source. In addition, they have begun design studies and carried out tests for a new high-resolution injector and a new beamline for heavy element AMS

  19. TESLA Test Facility. Status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aune, B.

    1996-01-01

    The TESLA Test Facility (TTF), under construction at DESY by an international collaboration, is an R and D test bed for the superconducting option for future linear e+/e-colliders. It consists of an infrastructure to process and test the cavities and of a 500 MeV linac. The infrastructure has been installed and is fully operational. It includes a complex of clean rooms, an ultra-clean water plant, a chemical etching installation and an ultra-high vacuum furnace. The linac will consist of four cryo-modules, each containing eight 1 meter long nine-cell cavities operated at 1.3 GHz. The base accelerating field is 15 MV/m. A first injector will deliver a low charge per bunch beam, with the full average current (8 mA in pulses of 800 μs). A more powerful injector based on RF gun technology will ultimately deliver a beam with high charge and low emittance to allow measurements necessary to qualify the TESLA option and to demonstrate the possibility of operating a free electron laser based on the Self-Amplified-Spontaneous-Emission principle. Overview and status of the facility will be given. Plans for the future use of the linac are presented. (R.P.)

  20. Geothermal energy conversion facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutscher, C.F.

    1997-12-31

    With the termination of favorable electricity generation pricing policies, the geothermal industry is exploring ways to improve the efficiency of existing plants and make them more cost-competitive with natural gas. The Geothermal Energy Conversion Facility (GECF) at NREL will allow researchers to study various means for increasing the thermodynamic efficiency of binary cycle geothermal plants. This work has received considerable support from the US geothermal industry and will be done in collaboration with industry members and utilities. The GECF is being constructed on NREL property at the top of South Table Mountain in Golden, Colorado. As shown in Figure 1, it consists of an electrically heated hot water loop that provides heating to a heater/vaporizer in which the working fluid vaporizes at supercritical or subcritical pressures as high as 700 psia. Both an air-cooled and water-cooled condenser will be available for condensing the working fluid. In order to minimize construction costs, available equipment from the similar INEL Heat Cycle Research Facility is being utilized.