WorldWideScience

Sample records for facilities experimental center

  1. Transonic Experimental Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Transonic Experimental Research Facility evaluates aerodynamics and fluid dynamics of projectiles, smart munitions systems, and sub-munitions dispensing systems;...

  2. Advanced reactor experimental facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amri, A.; Papin, J.; Uhle, J.; Vitanza, C.

    2010-01-01

    For many years, the NEA has been examining advanced reactor issues and disseminating information of use to regulators, designers and researchers on safety issues and research needed. Following the recommendation of participants at an NEA workshop, a Task Group on Advanced Reactor Experimental Facilities (TAREF) was initiated with the aim of providing an overview of facilities suitable for carrying out the safety research considered necessary for gas-cooled reactors (GCRs) and sodium fast reactors (SFRs), with other reactor systems possibly being considered in a subsequent phase. The TAREF was thus created in 2008 with the following participating countries: Canada, the Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Korea and the United States. In a second stage, India provided valuable information on its experimental facilities related to SFR safety research. The study method adopted entailed first identifying high-priority safety issues that require research and then categorizing the available facilities in terms of their ability to address the safety issues. For each of the technical areas, the task members agreed on a set of safety issues requiring research and established a ranking with regard to safety relevance (high, medium, low) and the status of knowledge based on the following scale relative to full knowledge: high (100%-75%), medium (75 - 25%) and low (25-0%). Only the issues identified as being of high safety relevance and for which the state of knowledge is low or medium were included in the discussion, as these issues would likely warrant further study. For each of the safety issues, the TAREF members identified appropriate facilities, providing relevant information such as operating conditions (in- or out-of reactor), operating range, description of the test section, type of testing, instrumentation, current status and availability, and uniqueness. Based on the information collected, the task members assessed prospects and priorities

  3. Engineering test facility design center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    The vehicle by which the fusion program would move into the engineering testing phase of fusion power development is designated the Engineering Test Facility (ETF). The ETF would provide a test bed for reactor components in the fusion environment. In order to initiate preliminary planning for the ETF decision, the Office of Fusion Energy established the ETF Design Center activity to prepare the design of the ETF. This section describes the status of this design

  4. SIGMA Experimental Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivarola, Martin; Florido, Pablo; Gonzalez, Jose; Brasnarof, Daniel; Orellano, Pablo; Bergallo, Juan

    2000-01-01

    The SIGMA ( Separacion Isotopica Gaseosa por Metodos Avanzados) concept is outlined.The old gaseous diffusion process to enrich uranium has been updated to be economically competitive for small production volumes.Major innovations have been introduced in the membrane design and in the integrated design of compressors and diffusers.The use of injectors and gas turbines has been also adopted.The paper describes the demonstration facility installed by the Argentine Atomic Energy Commission

  5. Multi-Directional Experimental Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The ATLSS Multi-directional Experimental Laboratory was constructed in 1987 under funding from the National Science Foundation to be a major facility for large-scale...

  6. Destruction of the BETA experimental facility for core meltdown experiments in the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center on 21 March 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feige, K.D.

    1992-01-01

    The BETA experiment V 6.2 was intended to yield information on the processes involved in a lateral containment meltdown starting in a concrete wall with external water cooling. The unexpected overpressure that caused the explosion occurred 1896 seconds after the melt had been fed into the crucible, inducing the melt-water interaction. The explosion destroyed only the inner space of the facility. (orig.) [de

  7. The experimental sodium facility NAVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langenbrunner, H.; Grunwald, G.; May, R.

    1976-01-01

    Within the framework of preparations for the introduction of sodium cooled fast breeder reactors an experimental sodium facility was installed at the Central Institute of Nuclear Research at Rossendorf. Design, engineering aspects and operation of this facility are described; operating experience is briefly discussed. (author)

  8. Experimental facilities and simulation means

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper and its associated series of slides review the experimental facilities and the simulation means used for the development of nuclear reactors in France. These experimental facilities include installations used for the measurement and qualification of nuclear data (mainly cross-sections) like EOLE reactor and Minerve zero power reactor, installations like material testing reactors, installations dedicated to reactor safety experiments like Cabri reactor, and other installations like accelerators (Jannus accelerator, GANIL for instance) that are complementary to neutron irradiations in experimental reactors. The simulation means rely on a series of advanced computer codes: Tripoli-Apollo for neutron transport, Numodis for irradiation impact on materials, Neptune and Cathare for 2-phase fluid dynamics, Europlexus for mechanical structures, and Pleiades (with Alcyone) for nuclear fuels. (A.C.)

  9. Overview of the Neutron experimental facilities at LANSCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mocko, Michal [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-30

    This presentation gives an overview of the neutron experimental facilities at LANSCE. The layout is mentioned in detail, with a map of the south-side experimental facilities, information on Target-4 and the Lujan Center. Then it goes into detail about neutron sources, specifically continuous versus pulsed. Target 4 is then discussed. In conclusion, we have introduced the south-side experimental facilities in operation at LANSCE. 1L target and Target 4 provide complementary neutron energy spectra. Two spallation neutron sources taken together cover more than 11 orders of magnitude in neutron energy.

  10. SIGMA Experimental Facility; Facilidad Experimental SIGMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivarola, Martin; Florido, Pablo; Gonzalez, Jose; Brasnarof, Daniel; Orellano, Pablo; Bergallo, Juan [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Centro Atomico Bariloche, Grupo de Disenos Avanzados y Evaluacion Economica, Complejo Tecnologico Pilcaniyeu (Argentina)

    2000-07-01

    The SIGMA ( Separacion Isotopica Gaseosa por Metodos Avanzados) concept is outlined.The old gaseous diffusion process to enrich uranium has been updated to be economically competitive for small production volumes.Major innovations have been introduced in the membrane design and in the integrated design of compressors and diffusers.The use of injectors and gas turbines has been also adopted.The paper describes the demonstration facility installed by the Argentine Atomic Energy Commission.

  11. Lewis Research Center R and D Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) defines and develops advanced technology for high priority national needs. The work of the Center is directed toward new propulsion, power, and communications technologies for application to aeronautics and space, so that U.S. leadership in these areas is ensured. The end product is knowledge, usually in a report, that is made fully available to potential users--the aircraft engine industry, the energy industry, the automotive industry, the space industry, and other NASA centers. In addition to offices and laboratories for almost every kind of physical research in such fields as fluid mechanics, physics, materials, fuels, combustion, thermodynamics, lubrication, heat transfer, and electronics, LeRC has a variety of engineering test cells for experiments with components such as compressors, pumps, conductors, turbines, nozzles, and controls. A number of large facilities can simulate the operating environment for a complete system: altitude chambers for aircraft engines; large supersonic wind tunnels for advanced airframes and propulsion systems; space simulation chambers for electric rockets or spacecraft; and a 420-foot-deep zero-gravity facility for microgravity experiments. Some problems are amenable to detection and solution only in the complete system and at essentially full scale. By combining basic research in pertinent disciplines and generic technologies with applied research on components and complete systems, LeRC has become one of the most productive centers in its field in the world. This brochure describes a number of the facilities that provide LeRC with its exceptional capabilities.

  12. Nuclear Criticality Experimental Research Center (NCERC) Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goda, Joetta Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Grove, Travis Justin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hayes, David Kirk [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Myers, William L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sanchez, Rene Gerardo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-03

    The mission of the National Criticality Experiments Research Center (NCERC) at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) is to conduct experiments and training with critical assemblies and fissionable material at or near criticality in order to explore reactivity phenomena, and to operate the assemblies in the regions from subcritical through delayed critical. One critical assembly, Godiva-IV, is designed to operate above prompt critical. The Nuclear Criticality Experimental Research Center (NCERC) is our nation’s only general-purpose critical experiments facility and is only one of a few that remain operational throughout the world. This presentation discusses the history of NCERC, the general activities that makeup work at NCERC, and the various government programs and missions that NCERC supports. Recent activities at NCERC will be reviewed, with a focus on demonstrating how NCERC meets national security mission goals using engineering fundamentals. In particular, there will be a focus on engineering theory and design and applications of engineering fundamentals at NCERC. NCERC activities that relate to engineering education will also be examined.

  13. Hot Experimental Facility reference flowsheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    North, E.D.

    1982-01-01

    This paper is a useful set of background information of HEF flowsheets, although many changes have been made in the past three years. The HEF reference flowsheet is a modified high-acid PUREX flowsheet capable of operating in the coprocessing mode or with full partitioning of U and Pu. Adequate decontamination factors are provided to purify high-burnup, fast breeder-reactor fuels to levels required for recycle back to a fuel fabrication facility. Product streams are mixed U-Pu oxide and uranium oxide. No contaminated liquid wastes are intentionally discharged to the environment. All wastes are solidified and packaged for appropriate disposal. Acid and water are recovered for internal recycle. Excess water is treated and discharged from the plant stack. Several changes have been made in the reference flowsheet since that time, and these are noted briefly

  14. Experimental facilities of Valduc critical station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangin, D.; Maubert, L.

    1975-01-01

    The critical facility of Valduc and its experimentation possibilities are described. The different experimental programs carried out since 1962 are briefly reviewed. The last program involving a plutonium nitrate solution (18.9wt% 240 Pu) in a large parallelepipedic tank is presented and main results given [fr

  15. Plan of ITER remote experimentation center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozeki, T., E-mail: ozeki.takahisa@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-166 Obuchi Rokkasho, Kitakami-gun, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Clement, S.L. [Fusion for Energy, Torres Diagonal Litoral, B3, 13/03, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Nakajima, N. [National Institute for Fusion Science and Project Leader of IFERC, 2-166 Obuchi, Rokkasho, Kamikita-gun, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan)

    2014-05-15

    Plan of ITER remote experimentation center (REC) based on the broader approach (BA) activity of the joint program of Japan and Europe (EU) is described. Objectives of REC activity are (1) to identify the functions and solve the technical issues for the construction of the REC for ITER at Rokkasho, (2) to develop the remote experiment system and verify the functions required for the remote experiment by using the Satellite Tokamak (JT-60SA) facilities in order to make the future experiments of ITER and JT-60SA effectively and efficiently implemented, and (3) to test the functions of REC and demonstrate the total system by using JT-60SA and existing other facilities in EU. Preliminary identified items to be developed are (1) Functions of the remote experiment system, such as setting of experiment parameters, shot scheduling, real time data streaming, communication by video-conference between the remote-site and on-site, (2) Effective data transfer system that is capable of fast transfer of the huge amount of data between on-site and off-site and the network connecting the REC system, (3) Storage system that can store/access the huge amount of data, including database management, (4) Data analysis software for the data viewing of the diagnostic data on the storage system, (5) Numerical simulation for preparation and estimation of the shot performance and the analysis of the plasma shot. Detailed specifications of the above items will be discussed and the system will be made in these four years in collaboration with tokamak facilities of JT-60SA and EU tokamak, experts of informatics, activities of plasma simulation and ITER. Finally, the function of REC will be tested and the total system will be demonstrated by the middle of 2017.

  16. Large experimental facilities of the UKAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hills, P.R.

    1987-10-01

    This list of UKAEA capital equipment was first assembled for the Interdepartmental Committee on Large Experimental Facilities as a contribution to a directory of national installations with a replacement value of Pound 1M or more. It is now being circulated in report form within the Authority, to assist staff to demonstrate to customers the wide range of facilities the Authority has available to carry out contract work, and to help them identify where customers' work can best be placed. (author)

  17. Experimental Fuels Facility Re-categorization Based on Facility Segmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiss, Troy P.; Andrus, Jason

    2016-07-01

    The Experimental Fuels Facility (EFF) (MFC-794) at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) located on the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site was originally constructed to provide controlled-access, indoor storage for radiological contaminated equipment. Use of the facility was expanded to provide a controlled environment for repairing contaminated equipment and characterizing, repackaging, and treating waste. The EFF facility is also used for research and development services, including fuel fabrication. EFF was originally categorized as a LTHC-3 radiological facility based on facility operations and facility radiological inventories. Newly planned program activities identified the need to receive quantities of fissionable materials in excess of the single parameter subcritical limit in ANSI/ANS-8.1, “Nuclear Criticality Safety in Operations with Fissionable Materials Outside Reactors” (identified as “criticality list” quantities in DOE-STD-1027-92, “Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports,” Attachment 1, Table A.1). Since the proposed inventory of fissionable materials inside EFF may be greater than the single parameter sub-critical limit of 700 g of U-235 equivalent, the initial re-categorization is Hazard Category (HC) 2 based upon a potential criticality hazard. This paper details the facility hazard categorization performed for the EFF. The categorization was necessary to determine (a) the need for further safety analysis in accordance with LWP-10802, “INL Facility Categorization,” and (b) compliance with 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 830, Subpart B, “Safety Basis Requirements.” Based on the segmentation argument presented in this paper, the final hazard categorization for the facility is LTHC-3. Department of Energy Idaho (DOE-ID) approval of the final hazard categorization determined by this hazard assessment document (HAD) was required per the

  18. Solar Energy Research Center Instrumentation Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Thomas, J.; Papanikolas, John, P.

    2011-11-11

    SOLAR ENERGY RESEARCH CENTER INSTRUMENTATION FACILITY The mission of the Solar Energy Research Center (UNC SERC) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH) is to establish a world leading effort in solar fuels research and to develop the materials and methods needed to fabricate the next generation of solar energy devices. We are addressing the fundamental issues that will drive new strategies for solar energy conversion and the engineering challenges that must be met in order to convert discoveries made in the laboratory into commercially available devices. The development of a photoelectrosynthesis cell (PEC) for solar fuels production faces daunting requirements: (1) Absorb a large fraction of sunlight; (2) Carry out artificial photosynthesis which involves multiple complex reaction steps; (3) Avoid competitive and deleterious side and reverse reactions; (4) Perform 13 million catalytic cycles per year with minimal degradation; (5) Use non-toxic materials; (6) Cost-effectiveness. PEC efficiency is directly determined by the kinetics of each reaction step. The UNC SERC is addressing this challenge by taking a broad interdisciplinary approach in a highly collaborative setting, drawing on expertise across a broad range of disciplines in chemistry, physics and materials science. By taking a systematic approach toward a fundamental understanding of the mechanism of each step, we will be able to gain unique insight and optimize PEC design. Access to cutting-edge spectroscopic tools is critical to this research effort. We have built professionally-staffed facilities equipped with the state-of the-art instrumentation funded by this award. The combination of staff, facilities, and instrumentation specifically tailored for solar fuels research establishes the UNC Solar Energy Research Center Instrumentation Facility as a unique, world-class capability. This congressionally directed project funded the development of two user facilities: TASK 1: SOLAR

  19. Experimental equipment for an advanced ISOL facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baktash, C.; Lee, I.Y.; Rehm, K.E.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the proceedings and recommendations of the Workshop on the Experimental Equipment for an Advanced ISOL Facility which was held at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory on July 22--25, 1998. The purpose of this workshop was to discuss the performance requirements, manpower and cost estimates, as well as a schedule of the experimental equipment needed to fully exploit the new physics which can be studied at an advanced ISOL facility. An overview of the new physics opportunities that would be provided by such a facility has been presented in the White Paper that was issued following the Columbus Meeting. The reactions and experimental techniques discussed in the Columbus White Paper served as a guideline for the formulation of the detector needs at the Berkeley Workshop. As outlined a new ISOL facility with intense, high-quality beams of radioactive nuclei would provide exciting new research opportunities in the areas of: the nature of nucleonic matter; the origin of the elements; and tests of the Standard Model. After an introductory section, the following equipment is discussed: gamma-ray detectors; recoil separators; magnetic spectrographs; particle detectors; targets; and apparatus using non-accelerated beams

  20. Shock Tube and Ballistic Range Facilities at NASA Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinstead, Jay H.; Wilder, Michael C.; Reda, Daniel C.; Cornelison, Charles J.; Cruden, Brett A.; Bogdanoff, David W.

    2010-01-01

    The Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility and the Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility (HFFAF) at NASA Ames Research Center are described. These facilities have been in operation since the 1960s and have supported many NASA missions and technology development initiatives. The facilities have world-unique capabilities that enable experimental studies of real-gas aerothermal, gas dynamic, and kinetic phenomena of atmospheric entry.

  1. Experimental measurements at the MASURCA facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assal, W.; Bosq, J.C.; Mellier, F.

    2012-01-01

    Dedicated to the neutronics studies of fast and semi-fast reactor lattices, MASURCA (meaning 'mock-up facility for fast breeder reactor studies at Cadarache') is an airflow cooled fast reactor operating at a maximum power of 5 kW playing an important role in the CEA research activities. At this facility, a lot of neutron integral experimental programs were undertaken. The purpose of this poster is to show a panorama of the facility from this experimental measurement point of view. A hint at the forthcoming refurbishment will be included. These programs include various experimental measurements (reactivity, distributions of fluxes, reaction rates), performed essentially with fission chambers, in accordance with different methods (noise methods, radial or axial traverses, rod drops) and involving several devices systems (monitors, fission chambers, amplifiers, power supplies, data acquisition systems). For this purpose are implemented electronics modules to shape the signals sent from the detectors in various mode (fluctuation, pulse, current). All the electric and electronic devices needed for these measurements and the relating wiring will be fully explained through comprehensive layouts. Data acquired during counting performed at the time of startup phase or rod drops are analyzed by the mean of a Neutronic Measurement Treatment (TMN in French) programmed on the basis of the MATLAB software. This toolbox gives the opportunity of data files management, reactivity valuation from neutronics measurements and transient or divergence simulation at zero power. Particular TMN using at MASURCA will be presented. (authors)

  2. Experimental Measurements at the MASURCA Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assal, W.; Bosq, J. C.; Mellier, F.

    2012-12-01

    Dedicated to the neutronics studies of fast and semi-fast reactor lattices, MASURCA (meaning “mock-up facility for fast breeder reactor studies at CADARACHE”) is an airflow cooled fast reactor operating at a maximum power of 5 kW playing an important role in the CEA research activities. At this facility, a lot of neutron integral experimental programs were undertaken. The purpose of this poster is to show a panorama of the facility from this experimental measurement point of view. A hint at the forthcoming refurbishment will be included. These programs include various experimental measurements (reactivity, distributions of fluxes, reaction rates), performed essentially with fission chambers, in accordance with different methods (noise methods, radial or axial traverses, rod drops) and involving several devices systems (monitors, fission chambers, amplifiers, power supplies, data acquisition systems ...). For this purpose are implemented electronics modules to shape the signals sent from the detectors in various mode (fluctuation, pulse, current). All the electric and electronic devices needed for these measurements and the relating wiring will be fully explained through comprehensive layouts. Data acquired during counting performed at the time of startup phase or rod drops are analyzed by the mean of a Neutronic Measurement Treatment (TMN in French) programmed on the basis of the MATLAB software. This toolbox gives the opportunity of data files management, reactivity valuation from neutronics measurements and transient or divergence simulation at zero power. Particular TMN using at MASURCA will be presented.

  3. Experimental measurements at the Masurca facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AssaI, W.; Bosq, J. C.; Mellier, F.

    2009-01-01

    Dedicated to the neutronics studies of fast and semi-fast reactor lattices, Masurca (meaning 'mock-up facility for fast breeder reactor studies at Cadarache') is an airflow cooled fast reactor operating at a maximum power of 5 kW playing an important role in the CEA research activities. At this facility, a lot of neutron integral experimental programs were undertaken. The purpose of this poster is to show a panorama of the facility from this experimental measurement point of view. A hint at the forthcoming refurbishment will be included. These programs include various experimental measurements (reactivity, distributions of fluxes, reaction rates), performed essentially with fission chambers, in accordance with different methods (noise methods, radial or axial traverses, rod drops) and involving several devices systems (monitors, fission chambers, amplifiers, power supplies, data acquisition systems...). For this purpose electronics modules are implemented to shape the signals sent from the detectors in various mode (fluctuation, pulse, current). All the electrical and electronic devices needed for these measurements and the relating wiring will be fully explained through comprehensive layouts. Data acquired during counting performed at the time of startup phase or rod drops are analyzed by the mean of a Neutronic Measurement Treatment (TMN in French) programmed on the basis of the MATLAB software. This toolbox gives the opportunity of data files management, reactivity valuation from neutronics measurements and transient or divergence simulation at zero power. Particular TMN using at Masurca will be presented. (authors)

  4. Lewis Research Center space station electric power system test facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birchenough, Arthur G.; Martin, Donald F.

    1988-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center facilities were developed to support testing of the Space Station Electric Power System. The capabilities and plans for these facilities are described. The three facilities which are required in the Phase C/D testing, the Power Systems Facility, the Space Power Facility, and the EPS Simulation Lab, are described in detail. The responsibilities of NASA Lewis and outside groups in conducting tests are also discussed.

  5. Experimental Facilities at the High Energy Frontier

    CERN Document Server

    Jenni, P.

    2016-01-01

    The main theme of the lectures covered the experimental work at hadron colliders, with a clear focus on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and on the roadmap that led finally to the discovery of the Higgs boson. The lectures were not a systematic course on machine and detector technologies, but rather tried to give a physics-motivated overview of many experimental aspects that were all relevant for making the discovery. The actual lectures covered a much broader scope than what is documented here in this write- up. The successful concepts for the experiments at the LHC have benefitted from the experience gained with previous generations of detectors at lower- energy machines. The lectures included also an outlook to the future experimental programme at the LHC, with its machine and experiments upgrades, as well as a short discussion of possible facilities at the high energy frontier beyond LHC.

  6. J-PARC Transmutation Experimental Facility Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasa, T.; Takei, H.; Saito, S.; Obayashi, H.; Nishihara, K.; Sugawara, T.; Iwamoto, H.; Yamaguchi, K.; Tsujimoto, K.; Oigawa, H.

    2015-01-01

    Since the Fukushima accident, nuclear transmutation is considered as an option for waste management. Japan Atomic Energy Agency proposes the transmutation of minor actinides (MA) in accelerator-driven system (ADS) using lead-bismuth eutectic alloy (LBE) as a spallation target and a coolant of subcritical core. To obtain the data required for ADS design, we plan the building of a transmutation experimental facility (TEF) is planned within the J-PARC project. TEF consists of an ADS target test facility (TEF-T), which will be installed 400 MeV-250 kW LBE spallation target for material irradiations, and a transmutation physics experimental facility (TEF-P), which set up a fast critical/subcritical assembly driven by low power proton beam with MA fuel to study ADS neutronics. At TEF-T, various research plans to use emitted neutrons from LBE target are discussed. The paper summarises a road-map to establish the ADS transmuter and latest design activities for TEF construction. (authors)

  7. Compressed Gas Safety for Experimental Fusion Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee C. Cadwallader

    2004-09-01

    Experimental fusion facilities present a variety of hazards to the operators and staff. There are unique or specialized hazards, including magnetic fields, cryogens, radio frequency emissions, and vacuum reservoirs. There are also more general industrial hazards, such as a wide variety of electrical power, pressurized air, and cooling water systems in use, there are crane and hoist loads, working at height, and handling compressed gas cylinders. This paper outlines the projectile hazard assoicated with compressed gas cylinders and mthods of treatment to provide for compressed gas safety. This information should be of interest to personnel at both magnetic and inertial fusion experiments.

  8. The AWAKE Experimental Facility at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Gschwendtner, E; Bracco, C; Butterworth, A; Cipiccia, S; Doebert, S; Fedosseev, V; Feldbaumer, E; Hessler, C; Hofle, W; Martyanov, M; Meddahi, M; Osborne, J; Pardons, A; Petrenko, A; Vincke, H

    2014-01-01

    AWAKE, an Advanced Wakefield Experiment is launched at CERN to verify the proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration concept. Proton bunches at 400 GeV/c will be extracted from the CERN SPS and sent along a 750 m long proton line to a plasma cell, a Rubidium vapour source, where the proton beam drives wakefields reaching accelerating gradients of several gigavolts per meter. A high power laser pulse will copropagate within the proton bunch creating the plasma by ionizing the (initially) neutral gas. An electron beam will be injected into the plasma cell to probe the accelerating wakefield. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the CNGS facility. First proton beam to the plasma cell is expected by end 2016. The installation planning and the baseline parameters of the experiment are shown. The design of the experimental area and the integration of the new beam-lines as well as the experimental equipment are presented. The needed modifications of the infrastructure in the facility and a few challenges are h...

  9. Experimental program at the LOTUS facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azam, S.; Haldy, P.A.; Kumar, A.; Leo, W.R.; Sahraoui, C.; Schneeberger, J.P.; Tsang, F.; Green, L.

    1986-01-01

    The objectives of the LOTUS experimental program are to study, from a neutronics point of view, blanket modules having features representative of conceptual fusion reactor blanket designs. Such small-scale generic experiments should help to eliminate possible blind alleys, and thus save much time and money later when commercial-size devices will be constructed. At present, two different types of blanket designs are being studied at the LOTUS facility. The first one represents a hybrid fission-suppressed blanket developed at IGA. It is a parallelepiped-shaped assembly, with a fissile breeding zone made of aluminum-clad thorium oxide rods, and a tritium breeding zone simulated by lithium carbonate compressed powder in aluminum boxes. The second blanket that is currently being tested at IGA is the Lithium Blanket Module (LBM) developed by PPPL under the sponsorship of the Electric Power Research Institute. Essentially, the same kind of experiments will be carried out in all the blanket modules. Measurement of foil activities as well as tritium production in the blanket are the primary diagnostic means in the current LOTUS experimental program. Preanalyses of the experimental data have been carried out at IGA with the help of the two-dimensional discrete ordinates transport code DOT3.5 coupled to the GRTUNCL first collision routine. For the experiments described above, the agreement between experimental and computed results is generally fair

  10. New Equipment Training Center-Satellite Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The ARDEC Satellite Facility is a 24-hour on-site military satellite transmission and downlink capability to Southwest Asia and all other military OCONUS and CONUS...

  11. Experimental facilities for Generation IV reactors research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krecanova, E.; Di Gabriele, F.; Berka, J.; Zychova, M.; Macak, J.; Vojacek, A.

    2013-06-01

    Centrum Vyzkumu Rez (CVR) is research and development Company situated in Czech Republic and member of the UJV group. One of its major fields is material research for Generation IV reactor concepts, especially supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR), very high temperature/gas-cooled fast reactor (VHTR/GFR) and lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR). The CVR is equipped by and is building unique experimental facilities which simulate the environment in the active zones of these reactor concepts and enable to pre-qualify and to select proper constructional materials for the most stressed components of the facility (cladding, vessel, piping). New infrastructure is founded within the Sustainable Energy project focused on implementation the Generation IV and fusion experimental facilities. The research of SCWR concept is divided to research and development of the constructional materials ensured by SuperCritical Water Loop (SCWL) and fuel components research on Fuel Qualification Test loop (SCWL-FQT). SCWL provides environment of the primary circuits of European SCWR, pressure 25 MPa, temperature 600 deg. C and its major purpose is to simulate behavior of the primary medium and candidate constructional materials. On-line monitoring system is included to collect the operational data relevant to experiment and its evaluation (pH, conductivity, chemical species concentration). SCWL-FQT is facility focused on the behavior of cladding material and fuel at the conditions of so-called preheater, the first pass of the medium through the fuel (in case of European SCWR concept). The conditions are 450 deg. C and 25 MPa. SCWL-FQT is unique facility enabling research of the shortened fuel rods. VHTR/GFR research covers material testing and also cleaning methods of the medium in primary circuit. The High Temperature Helium Loop (HTHL) enables exposure of materials and simulates the VHTR/GFR core environment to analyze the behavior of medium, especially in presence of organic compounds and

  12. MANUAL OF STANDARDS FOR REHABILITATION CENTERS AND FACILITIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CANIFF, CHARLES E.; AND OTHERS

    A 5-YEAR PROJECT TO SPECIFY STANDARDS OF REHABILITATION CENTERS AND FACILITIES RESULTED IN THREE PUBLICATIONS. THIS MANUAL INCLUDES THE CHARACTERISTICS AND GOALS OF REHABILITATION FACILITIES. THE STANDARDS FOR ORGANIZATION, SERVICES THAT SHOULD BE PROVIDED, PERSONNEL INCLUDED, RECORDS AND REPORTS, FISCAL MANAGEMENT, AND THE PHYSICAL PLANT ARE…

  13. Experimental facility and void fraction calibration methods for impedance probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Fernando L. de; Rocha, Marcelo S., E-mail: floliveira@ipen.br, E-mail: msrocha@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    An experimental facility was designed and constructed with aims of to calibrate a capacitance probe for gas-liquid flow void fraction measurements. The facility is composed of a metallic hack with a vertical 2,300 mm high glass tube with 38 mm ID with stagnant water and compressed air bubbling system simulating the gas phase (vapor). At the lower part, a mixing section with a porous media element releases the air bubbles into the water, and the compressed air flow is measured by two calibrated rotameters. At the upper part a stagnant water tank separates the liquid and gas. Two pressure taps are located near the lower and upper sides of the glass tube for pressure difference measurement. The pressure difference is used for low void fraction values (0-15%) calibration methods, as described in the work. Two electrically controlled quick closing valves are installed between the porous media element and the upward separation tank for high void fraction values measurement (15-50%) used to calibrate the capacitance probe. The experimental facility design, construction, capacitance probe calibration methods and results, as well as flow pattern visualization, are presented. Finally, the capacitance probe will be installed on a natural circulation circuit mounted at the Nuclear Engineering Center (CEN/IPEN/CNEN-SP) for measurement of the instantaneous bulk void. Instantaneous signals generated by the capacitance probe will allow the determination of natural circulation loop global energy balance. (author)

  14. Experimental facility and void fraction calibration methods for impedance probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Fernando L. de; Rocha, Marcelo S.

    2013-01-01

    An experimental facility was designed and constructed with aims of to calibrate a capacitance probe for gas-liquid flow void fraction measurements. The facility is composed of a metallic hack with a vertical 2,300 mm high glass tube with 38 mm ID with stagnant water and compressed air bubbling system simulating the gas phase (vapor). At the lower part, a mixing section with a porous media element releases the air bubbles into the water, and the compressed air flow is measured by two calibrated rotameters. At the upper part a stagnant water tank separates the liquid and gas. Two pressure taps are located near the lower and upper sides of the glass tube for pressure difference measurement. The pressure difference is used for low void fraction values (0-15%) calibration methods, as described in the work. Two electrically controlled quick closing valves are installed between the porous media element and the upward separation tank for high void fraction values measurement (15-50%) used to calibrate the capacitance probe. The experimental facility design, construction, capacitance probe calibration methods and results, as well as flow pattern visualization, are presented. Finally, the capacitance probe will be installed on a natural circulation circuit mounted at the Nuclear Engineering Center (CEN/IPEN/CNEN-SP) for measurement of the instantaneous bulk void. Instantaneous signals generated by the capacitance probe will allow the determination of natural circulation loop global energy balance. (author)

  15. Experimental support at proton--proton colliding beam facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, K.

    1977-01-01

    Proton--proton colliding beam facilities have a number of special features which increase the importance of support for experiments when compared to fixed target accelerators: (1) the laboratory system is very close to the center-of-mass system; this affects the geometry and general size of the experiments; (2) the primary p--p interaction is inaccessible, that is, it takes place in an ultrahigh vacuum chamber; and (3) the experiment detection system is necessarily inside the machine structure and becomes very closely linked to it in many respects. An overall picture is given of experimental support based on experience at the CERN ISR under the following headings: Experimental Areas, Scheduling, Intersection Vacuum Chambers, Machine Background, and Magnets for Experiments. The first two of these topics concern the requirements in space and time of an experiment, while the last three are all related to the close interaction between experiment and machine

  16. Enclosed Small and Medium Caliber Firing Experimental Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility conducts completely instrumented terminal ballistics experimental tests with small and medium-caliber tungsten alloy penetrators against advanced armor...

  17. Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) Nuclear Science Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Ronald Owen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wender, Steve [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-06-19

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) facilities for Nuclear Science consist of a high-energy "white" neutron source (Target 4) with 6 flight paths, three low-energy nuclear science flight paths at the Lujan Center, and a proton reaction area. The neutron beams produced at the Target 4 complement those produced at the Lujan Center because they are of much higher energy and have shorter pulse widths. The neutron sources are driven by the 800-MeV proton beam of the LANSCE linear accelerator. With these facilities, LANSCE is able to deliver neutrons with energies ranging from a milli-electron volt to several hundreds of MeV, as well as proton beams with a wide range of energy, time and intensity characteristics. The facilities, instruments and research programs are described briefly.

  18. External events analysis for experimental fusion facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1990-01-01

    External events are those off-normal events that threaten facilities either from outside or inside the building. These events, such as floods, fires, and earthquakes, are among the leading risk contributors for fission power plants, and the nature of fusion facilities indicates that they may also lead fusion risk. This paper gives overviews of analysis methods, references good analysis guidance documents, and gives design tips for mitigating the effects of floods and fires, seismic events, and aircraft impacts. Implications for future fusion facility siting are also discussed. Sites similar to fission plant sites are recommended. 46 refs

  19. Unique life sciences research facilities at NASA Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulenburg, G. M.; Vasques, M.; Caldwell, W. F.; Tucker, J.

    1994-01-01

    The Life Science Division at NASA's Ames Research Center has a suite of specialized facilities that enable scientists to study the effects of gravity on living systems. This paper describes some of these facilities and their use in research. Seven centrifuges, each with its own unique abilities, allow testing of a variety of parameters on test subjects ranging from single cells through hardware to humans. The Vestibular Research Facility allows the study of both centrifugation and linear acceleration on animals and humans. The Biocomputation Center uses computers for 3D reconstruction of physiological systems, and interactive research tools for virtual reality modeling. Psycophysiological, cardiovascular, exercise physiology, and biomechanical studies are conducted in the 12 bed Human Research Facility and samples are analyzed in the certified Central Clinical Laboratory and other laboratories at Ames. Human bedrest, water immersion and lower body negative pressure equipment are also available to study physiological changes associated with weightlessness. These and other weightlessness models are used in specialized laboratories for the study of basic physiological mechanisms, metabolism and cell biology. Visual-motor performance, perception, and adaptation are studied using ground-based models as well as short term weightlessness experiments (parabolic flights). The unique combination of Life Science research facilities, laboratories, and equipment at Ames Research Center are described in detail in relation to their research contributions.

  20. The SwissFEL Experimental Laser facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erny, Christian; Hauri, Christoph Peter

    2016-09-01

    The hard X-ray laser SwissFEL at the Paul Scherrer Institute is currently being commissioned and will soon become available for users. In the current article the laser facility is presented, an integral part of the user facility, as most time-resolved experiments will require a versatile optical laser infrastructure and precise information about the relative delay between the X-ray and optical pulse. The important key parameters are a high availability and long-term stability while providing advanced laser performance in the wavelength range from ultraviolet to terahertz. The concept of integrating a Ti:sapphire laser amplifier system with subsequent frequency conversion stages and drift compensation into the SwissFEL facility environment for successful 24 h/7 d user operation is described.

  1. The NASA Lewis Research Center Internal Fluid Mechanics Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porro, A. R.; Hingst, W. R.; Wasserbauer, C. A.; Andrews, T. B.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental facility specifically designed to investigate internal fluid duct flows is described. It is built in a modular fashion so that a variety of internal flow test hardware can be installed in the facility with minimal facility reconfiguration. The facility and test hardware interfaces are discussed along with design constraints of future test hardware. The plenum flow conditioning approach is also detailed. Available instrumentation and data acquisition capabilities are discussed. The incoming flow quality was documented over the current facility operating range. The incoming flow produces well behaved turbulent boundary layers with a uniform core. For the calibration duct used, the boundary layers approached 10 percent of the duct radius. Freestream turbulence levels at the various operating conditions varied from 0.64 to 0.69 percent of the average freestream velocity.

  2. Work in Progress : Learner-Centered Online Learning Facility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pantic, M.; Zwitserloot, R.; De Weerdt, M.M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a novel, learner-centered technology for authoring web lectures. Besides seamless integration of video and audio feeds, Microsoft PowerPoint slides, and web-pages, the proposed Online Learning Facility (OLF) also facilitates online interactive testing and review of covered

  3. Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility: experimental capabilities and test matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opperman, E.K.

    1982-01-01

    This report describes the experimental capabilities of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility (FMIT) and reference material specimen test matrices. The description of the experimental capabilities and the test matrices has been updated to match the current single test cell facility ad assessed experimenter needs. Sufficient detail has been provided so that the user can plan irradiation experiments and conceptual hardware. The types of experiments, irradiation environment and support services that will be available in FMIT are discussed

  4. The Design of HVAC System in the Conventional Facility of Proton Accelerator Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, G. P.; Kim, J. Y.; Choi, B. H.

    2007-01-01

    The HVAC systems for conventional facility of Proton Accelerator Research Center consist of 3 systems : accelerator building HVAC system, beam application building HVAC system and miscellaneous HVAC system. We designed accelerator building HVAC system and beam application research area HVAC system in the conventional facilities of Proton Accelerator research center. Accelerator building HVAC system is divided into accelerator tunnel area, klystron area, klystron gallery area, accelerator assembly area. Also, Beam application research area HVAC system is divided into those of beam experimental hall, accelerator control area, beam application research area and Ion beam application building. In this paper, We described system design requirements and explained system configuration for each systems. We presented operation scenario of HVAC system in the Conventional Facility of Proton Accelerator Research Center

  5. Irradiation and experimental facilities at Dhruva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakrabarty, Kunal; Mondal, Samir

    2006-01-01

    Research reactors are utilized to produce radioisotopes and offer irradiation facilities for testing various nuclear materials such as fuel and structural materials. Apart from providing large volume of neutron source for carrying out a variety of experiments, the research reactor forms the basic training ground for grooming up scientists and engineers for the various aspects of nuclear programme. Dhruva one of the high flux research reactors offers a maximum neutron flux level of 1.8 x 10 14 n/cm 2 /sec. It uses natural metallic uranium fuel with aluminium cladding and heavy water as coolant, moderator and reflector

  6. Experimental Facilities for Performance Evaluation of Fast Reactor Components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandramouli, S.; Kumar, V.A. Suresh; Shanmugavel, M.; Vijayakumar, G.; Vinod, V.; Noushad, I.B.; Babu, B.; Kumar, G. Padma; Nashine, B.K.; Rajan, K.K.

    2013-01-01

    Brief details about various experimental facilities catering to the testing and performance evaluation requirements of fast reactor components have been brought out. These facilities have been found to be immensely useful to continue research and development activities in the areas of component development and testing, sodium technology, thermal hydraulics and sodium instrumentation for the SFR’s. In addition new facilities which have been planned will be of great importance for the developmental activities related to future SFR’s

  7. Status of proton treatment facility at National Cancer Center, Kashiwa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachikawa, T.; Kohmura, I.; Kataoka, S.; Nonaka, H.; Kimura, T.; Sato, T.; Nishio, T.; Shimbo, M.; Ogino, T.; Ikeda, H.

    2001-01-01

    Proton treatment facility at National Cancer Center Hospital East (Kashiwa) has two rotating gantry ports and one horizontal fixed port. In order to provide the same dose distribution at different gantry angles, the beam optics from the accelerator (235 MeV cyclotron) to the entrance of nozzle is specially tuned. Recently developed automatic tuning method of beam alignment can realize a sequential treatment at three irradiation ports. (author)

  8. STACY and TRACY: nuclear criticality experimental facilities under construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, I.; Takeshita, I.; Yanagisawa, H.; Tsujino, T.

    1992-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute is constructing a Nuclear Fuel Cycle Safety Engineering Research Facility, NUCEF, where the following research themes essential for evaluating safety problems relating to back-end technology in nuclear fuel cycle facilities will be studied: nuclear criticality safety research; research on advanced reprocessing processes and partitioning; and research on transuranic waste treatment and disposal. To perform nuclear criticality safety research related to the reprocessing of light water reactor spent fuels, two criticality experimental facilities, STACY and TRACY, are under construction. STACY (Static Criticality Facility) will be used for the study of criticality conditions of solution fuels, uranium, plutonium and their mixtures. TRACY (Transient Criticality Facility) will be used to investigate criticality accident phenomena with uranium solutions. The construction progress and experimental programmes are described in this Paper. (author)

  9. Do poison center triage guidelines affect healthcare facility referrals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, B E; Smith, C A; McKinney, P E; Litovitz, T L; Tandberg, W D

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which poison center triage guidelines influence healthcare facility referral rates for acute, unintentional acetaminophen-only poisoning and acute, unintentional adult formulation iron poisoning. Managers of US poison centers were interviewed by telephone to determine their center's triage threshold value (mg/kg) for acute iron and acute acetaminophen poisoning in 1997. Triage threshold values and healthcare facility referral rates were fit to a univariate logistic regression model for acetaminophen and iron using maximum likelihood estimation. Triage threshold values ranged from 120-201 mg/kg (acetaminophen) and 16-61 mg/kg (iron). Referral rates ranged from 3.1% to 24% (acetaminophen) and 3.7% to 46.7% (iron). There was a statistically significant inverse relationship between the triage value and the referral rate for acetaminophen (p variability in poison center triage values and referral rates for iron and acetaminophen poisoning. Guidelines can account for a meaningful proportion of referral variation. Their influence appears to be substance dependent. These data suggest that efforts to determine and utilize the highest, safe, triage threshold value could substantially decrease healthcare costs for poisonings as long as patient medical outcomes are not compromised.

  10. Los Alamos Experimental Engineering Waste Burial Facility: design considerations and preliminary experimental plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DePoorter, G.L.

    1981-01-01

    The Experimental Engineered Waste Burial Facility is a field test site where generic experiments can be performed on several scales to get the basic information necessary to understand the processes occurring in low-level waste disposal facilities. The experiments include hydrological, chemical, mechanical, and biological factors. In order to separate these various factors in the experiments and to extrapolate the experimental results to actual facilities, experiments will be performed on several different scales

  11. Technology requirements to be addressed by the NASA Lewis Research Center Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydelott, J. C.; Rudland, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center is responsible for the planning and execution of a scientific program which will provide advance in space cryogenic fluid management technology. A number of future space missions were identified that require or could benefit from this technology. These fluid management technology needs were prioritized and a shuttle attached reuseable test bed, the cryogenic fluid management facility (CFMF), is being designed to provide the experimental data necessary for the technology development effort.

  12. Development of a fault test experimental facility model using Matlab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Iraci Martinez; Moraes, Davi Almeida, E-mail: martinez@ipen.br, E-mail: dmoraes@dk8.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The Fault Test Experimental Facility was developed to simulate a PWR nuclear power plant and is instrumented with temperature, level and pressure sensors. The Fault Test Experimental Facility can be operated to generate normal and fault data, and these failures can be added initially small, and their magnitude being increasing gradually. This work presents the Fault Test Experimental Facility model developed using the Matlab GUIDE (Graphical User Interface Development Environment) toolbox that consists of a set of functions designed to create interfaces in an easy and fast way. The system model is based on the mass and energy inventory balance equations. Physical as well as operational aspects are taken into consideration. The interface layout looks like a process flowchart and the user can set the input variables. Besides the normal operation conditions, there is the possibility to choose a faulty variable from a list. The program also allows the user to set the noise level for the input variables. Using the model, data were generated for different operational conditions, both under normal and fault conditions with different noise levels added to the input variables. Data generated by the model will be compared with Fault Test Experimental Facility data. The Fault Test Experimental Facility theoretical model results will be used for the development of a Monitoring and Fault Detection System. (author)

  13. Development of a fault test experimental facility model using Matlab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Iraci Martinez; Moraes, Davi Almeida

    2015-01-01

    The Fault Test Experimental Facility was developed to simulate a PWR nuclear power plant and is instrumented with temperature, level and pressure sensors. The Fault Test Experimental Facility can be operated to generate normal and fault data, and these failures can be added initially small, and their magnitude being increasing gradually. This work presents the Fault Test Experimental Facility model developed using the Matlab GUIDE (Graphical User Interface Development Environment) toolbox that consists of a set of functions designed to create interfaces in an easy and fast way. The system model is based on the mass and energy inventory balance equations. Physical as well as operational aspects are taken into consideration. The interface layout looks like a process flowchart and the user can set the input variables. Besides the normal operation conditions, there is the possibility to choose a faulty variable from a list. The program also allows the user to set the noise level for the input variables. Using the model, data were generated for different operational conditions, both under normal and fault conditions with different noise levels added to the input variables. Data generated by the model will be compared with Fault Test Experimental Facility data. The Fault Test Experimental Facility theoretical model results will be used for the development of a Monitoring and Fault Detection System. (author)

  14. Spa-Wellness Center as Part of the Hotel Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milica Rančić

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decades “wellness spa” industry has experienced a boom around the world. The word “Wellness” has been formed by merging two words: “Well Being” + “fitness”, and appeared in the thirties of the last century in the United States. The primary objective of this movement is an ancient philosophy, according to which there ́s no fulfilled life without the assent of the physical and mental, also physical and spiritual. Hotel guests, today more than ever, want higher quality offer for their money. This means that wellness is today a very important criterion by which customers select hotels. For this reason it is necessary to pay great attention to the planning, design and construction of this part of the hotel facility. The subject of this paper is wellness and spa centers as part of the hotel facility. The task is to investigate and analyze elements of this space, to determine spatial areas of wellness center, as well as their relationships and spatial organization, in order to reach the goal - getting useful guidelines for planning quality wellness center. To all of this could be achieved, we must first go back to distant history where dating back the beginnings of wellness.

  15. Sodium cleaning and disposal methods in experimental facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajan, K.K.; Gurumoorthy, K.; Rajan, M.; Kale, R.D.

    1997-01-01

    At Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, major sodium facilities are designed and operated at Engineering Development Group as a part of development programme towards experimental and Prototype Fast Reactor. After the test programme many equipment and components were removed from the sodium facilities and sodium removal and disposal was carried out. The experience gained in different cleaning methods and waste sodium disposal are discussed. (author)

  16. Russian Federal nuclear center facilities for nuclear spectroscopy investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilkaev, R.I.; Punin, V.T.; Abramovich, S.N.

    2001-01-01

    Russian Federal Nuclear Center facilities for Spectroscopy investigation in the field of nuclear spectroscopy are described. Here are discussed basic properties of used radiation sources, facilities and technologies for target material production and manufacture of targets from rare, high-toxic or radioactive materials. Here are also reported basic features of complex detector systems and technologies for manufacture of scintillation detectors with special properties VNIIEF was founded as a weapons laboratory. The development of nuclear and thermonuclear bombs was followed by a wide complex of nuclear-physics investigations. Naturally, data on nuclear-physics properties of active and structure materials being part of nuclear weapons were of greatest interest.At the initial stage of work on the development of nuclear weapons the information on nuclear constants of materials including the most important neutron ones was rather scant. Data published in scientific literature had low exactness and were insecure. Results of measurements sometimes differed greatly by various groups of investigators. At the same time it was clear that, for example, a 1,5-times mistake in the fission cross-section could cause a several times mistake in the choice of uranium or plutonium mass, which is necessary for the bomb development. These circumstances determined importance of the nuclear-physics investigations. Demands on knowledge of process details occurring inside the nuclei conditioned by a problem of developing and improving of nuclear weapons and atomic power are rather limited. However, the further development of nuclear industry has proved a well-known point that this knowledge being accumulated forms a critical mass that leads to an explosive situation in the elaboration both of ideological and technological aspects of these problems. It is the tendency of inside development of nuclear science that has conditioned preparedness of knowledge about intranuclear processes for

  17. AMS data production facilities at science operations center at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choutko, V.; Egorov, A.; Eline, A.; Shan, B.

    2017-10-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is a high energy physics experiment on the board of the International Space Station (ISS). This paper presents the hardware and software facilities of Science Operation Center (SOC) at CERN. Data Production is built around production server - a scalable distributed service which links together a set of different programming modules for science data transformation and reconstruction. The server has the capacity to manage 1000 paralleled job producers, i.e. up to 32K logical processors. Monitoring and management tool with Production GUI is also described.

  18. 41 CFR 102-192.135 - Must we have a mail center manager at our facility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... center manager at our facility? 102-192.135 Section 102-192.135 Public Contracts and Property Management... PROGRAMS 192-MAIL MANAGEMENT Mail Center Manager Requirements § 102-192.135 Must we have a mail center manager at our facility? Yes, every facility that has more than two full time people dedicated to...

  19. Experimental facilities for gas-cooled reactor safety studies. Task group on Advanced Reactor Experimental Facilities (TAREF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    In 2007, the NEA Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) completed a study on Nuclear Safety Research in OECD Countries: Support Facilities for Existing and Advanced Reactors (SFEAR) which focused on facilities suitable for current and advanced water reactor systems. In a subsequent collective opinion on the subject, the CSNI recommended to conduct a similar exercise for Generation IV reactor designs, aiming to develop a strategy for ' better preparing the CSNI to play a role in the planned extension of safety research beyond the needs set by current operating reactors'. In that context, the CSNI established the Task Group on Advanced Reactor Experimental Facilities (TAREF) in 2008 with the objective of providing an overview of facilities suitable for performing safety research relevant to gas-cooled reactors and sodium fast reactors. This report addresses gas-cooled reactors; a similar report covering sodium fast reactors is under preparation. The findings of the TAREF are expected to trigger internationally funded CSNI projects on relevant safety issues at the key facilities identified. Such CSNI-sponsored projects constitute a means for efficiently obtaining the necessary data through internationally co-ordinated research. This report provides an overview of experimental facilities that can be used to carry out nuclear safety research for gas-cooled reactors and identifies priorities for organizing international co-operative programmes at selected facilities. The information has been collected and analysed by a Task Group on Advanced Reactor Experimental Facilities (TAREF) as part of an ongoing initiative of the NEA Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) which aims to define and to implement a strategy for the efficient utilisation of facilities and resources for Generation IV reactor systems. (author)

  20. Marshall Space Flight Center's Impact Testing Facility Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finchum, Andy; Hubbs, Whitney; Evans, Steve

    2008-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center s (MSFC) Impact Testing Facility (ITF) serves as an important installation for space and missile related materials science research. The ITF was established and began its research in spacecraft debris shielding in the early 1960s, then played a major role in the International Space Station debris shield development. As NASA became more interested in launch debris and in-flight impact concerns, the ITF grew to include research in a variety of impact genres. Collaborative partnerships with the DoD led to a wider range of impact capabilities being relocated to MSFC as a result of the closure of Particle Impact Facilities in Santa Barbara, California. The Particle Impact Facility had a 30 year history in providing evaluations of aerospace materials and components during flights through rain, ice, and solid particle environments at subsonic through hypersonic velocities. The facility s unique capabilities were deemed a "National Asset" by the DoD. The ITF now has capabilities including environmental, ballistic, and hypervelocity impact testing utilizing an array of air, powder, and two-stage light gas guns to accommodate a variety of projectile and target types and sizes. Numerous upgrades including new instrumentation, triggering circuitry, high speed photography, and optimized sabot designs have been implemented. Other recent research has included rain drop demise characterization tests to obtain data for inclusion in on-going model development. The current and proposed ITF capabilities range from rain to micrometeoroids allowing the widest test parameter range possible for materials investigations in support of space, atmospheric, and ground environments. These test capabilities including hydrometeor, single/multi-particle, ballistic gas guns, exploding wire gun, and light gas guns combined with Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics Code (SPHC) simulations represent the widest range of impact test capabilities in the country.

  1. Cable systems for experimental facilities in JAERI TANDEM ACCELERATOR BUILDING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tukihashi, Yoshihiro; Yoshida, Tadashi; Takekoshi, Eiko

    1979-03-01

    Measuring cable systems for experimental facilities in JAERI TANDEM ACCELERATOR BUILDING were completed recently. Measures are taken to prevent penetration of noises into the measuring systems. The cable systems are described in detail, including power supplies and grounding for the measuring systems. (author)

  2. Some existing Experimental Facilities for Fast Neutron Systems at KIT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litfin, K.

    2013-01-01

    An overview is given of: • Liquid Metal Loops at the Karlsruhe Liquid Metal Laboratory (KALLA) of KIT; • THESYS: Technologies for HEavy metal SYStems; • Thermal Hydraulic experiments in THESYS; • THEADES: THErmalhydraulics and Ads DESign; • Thermal Hydraulic experiments in THEADES; • CORRIDA: CORRosion In Dynamic lead Alloys; • Experimental stagnant facilities at KALLA; • INR Liquid metal research

  3. Solar energy facility at North Hampton Recreation Center, Dallas, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    The solar energy facility located at the North Hampton Park Recreation and Health Center, Dallas, Texas is presented. The solar energy system is installed in a single story (two heights), 16,000 sq ft building enclosing a gymnasium, locker area, and health care clinic surrounded by a recreational area and athletic field. The solar energy system is designed to provide 80 percent of the annual space heating, 48 percent of the annual space cooling, and 90 percent of the domestic hot water requirements. The system's operation modes and performance data acquisition system are described. The system's performance during the months of June, July, August, September, and October of 1979 are presented and show a negative savings of energy. Experience to date indicates however that the system concept has promise of acceptable performance. It is concluded that if proper control and sequencing components was maintained, then the system performance would improve to an acceptable level.

  4. TOP 01-1-011B Vehicle Test Facilities at Aberdeen Test Center and Yuma Test Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-12

    Test Center 400 Colleran Road Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5059 U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground Yuma Test Center 301 C. Street Yuma, AZ...22 2.6 Munson Test Area (MTA) ..................................................... 24 2.7 Land Vehicle Maintenance Facility...127 3.6 Maintenance Facilities ........................................................... 143

  5. Introduction of hot cell facility in research center Rez - Poster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrickova, A.; Srba, O.; Miklos, M.; Svoboda, P.

    2015-01-01

    This poster presents the hot cell facility which is being constructed as part of the SUSEN project at the Rez research center (Czech Republic). Within this project a new complex of 10 hot cells and one semi-hot cell will be built. There will be 8 gamma hot cells and 2 alpha hot cells. In each hot cell a hermetic, removable box made of stainless steel will home different type of devices. The hot cells and semi hot cell will be equipped with devices for processing samples (cutting, welding, drilling, machining) as well as equipment for testing (sample preparation area, stress testing machine, fatigue machine, electromechanical creep machine, high frequency resonance pulsator...) and equipment for studying material microstructure (nano-indenter with nano-scratch tester and scanning electron microscope). An autoclave with water loop, installed in a cell will allow mechanical testing in control environment of water, pressure and temperature. A scheme shows the equipment of each cell. This hot laboratory will be able to cover all the process to study radioactive materials: receiving the material, the preparation of the samples, mechanical testing and microstructure observation. Our hot cells will be close to the research nuclear reactor LVR-15 and new irradiation facility (high irradiation by cobalt source) is planned to be built within the SUSEN project

  6. Summary on experimental facilities and future developments at SINQ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, G S [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1996-11-01

    With 13 experimental facilities under construction to become available during the first year of SINQ operation, a nearly complete suite of options for users will be made available to carry out research with neutrons at PSI. Three more facilities are under design and will come on line somewhat later. To complete the suite, three more specialized instruments are being evaluated. SINQ being a novel neutron source concept, significant scope for improvement is also seen on the source side. It is a major goal of PSI to exploit these opportunities and to make - among others - use of neutron instruments to carry out the necessary research. (author) 9 figs., 1 tab., 11 refs.

  7. Hazards assessment for the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calley, M.B.; Jones, J.L. Jr.

    1994-09-19

    This report documents the hazards assessment for the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, which is operated by EG&G Idaho, Inc., for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The hazards assessment was performed to ensure that this facility complies with DOE and company requirements pertaining to emergency planning and preparedness for operational emergencies. DOE Order 5500.3A requires that a facility-specific hazards assessment be performed to provide the technical basis for facility emergency planning efforts. This hazards assessment was conducted in accordance with DOE Headquarters and DOE Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) guidance to comply with DOE Order 5500.3A. The hazards assessment identifies and analyzes hazards that are significant enough to warrant consideration in a facility`s operational emergency management program. This hazards assessment describes the WERF, the area surrounding WERF, associated buildings and structures at WERF, and the processes performed at WERF. All radiological and nonradiological hazardous materials stored, used, or produced at WERF were identified and screened. Even though the screening process indicated that the hazardous materials could be screened from further analysis because the inventory of radiological and nonradiological hazardous materials were below the screening thresholds specified by DOE and DOE-ID guidance for DOE Order 5500.3A, the nonradiological hazardous materials were analyzed further because it was felt that the nonradiological hazardous material screening thresholds were too high.

  8. Monitoring system for an experimental facility using GMDH methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Iraci Martinez; Moraes, Davi Almeida [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Bueno, Elaine Inacio, E-mail: martinez@ipen.br, E-mail: dmoraes@dk8.com.br, E-mail: ebueno@ifsp.edu.br [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Sao Paulo (IFSP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    This work presents a Monitoring System developed based on the GMDH - Group Method of Data Handling methodology to be used in an Experimental Test Facility. GMDH is a combinatorial multi-layer algorithm in which a network of layers and nodes is generated using a number of inputs from the data stream being evaluated. The GMDH network topology has been traditionally determined using a layer by layer pruning process based on a pre-selected criterion of what constitutes the best nodes at each level. The traditional GMDH method is based on an underlying assumption that the data can be modeled by using an approximation of the Volterra Series or Kolmorgorov-Gabor polynomial. The Fault Test Experimental Facility was designed to simulate a PWR nuclear power plant and is composed by elements that correspond to the pressure vessel, steam generator, pumps of the primary and secondary reactor loops. The nuclear reactor core is represented by an electrical heater with different values of power. The experimental plant will be fully instrumented with sensors and actuators, and the data acquisition system will be constructed in order to enable the details of the temporal analysis of process variables. The Fault Test Experimental Facility can be operated to generate normal and fault data. These failures can be added initially with small magnitude, and their magnitude being increasing gradually in a controlled way. The database will interface with the plant supervisory system SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) that provides the data through standard interface. (author)

  9. Monitoring system for an experimental facility using GMDH methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Iraci Martinez; Moraes, Davi Almeida; Bueno, Elaine Inacio

    2017-01-01

    This work presents a Monitoring System developed based on the GMDH - Group Method of Data Handling methodology to be used in an Experimental Test Facility. GMDH is a combinatorial multi-layer algorithm in which a network of layers and nodes is generated using a number of inputs from the data stream being evaluated. The GMDH network topology has been traditionally determined using a layer by layer pruning process based on a pre-selected criterion of what constitutes the best nodes at each level. The traditional GMDH method is based on an underlying assumption that the data can be modeled by using an approximation of the Volterra Series or Kolmorgorov-Gabor polynomial. The Fault Test Experimental Facility was designed to simulate a PWR nuclear power plant and is composed by elements that correspond to the pressure vessel, steam generator, pumps of the primary and secondary reactor loops. The nuclear reactor core is represented by an electrical heater with different values of power. The experimental plant will be fully instrumented with sensors and actuators, and the data acquisition system will be constructed in order to enable the details of the temporal analysis of process variables. The Fault Test Experimental Facility can be operated to generate normal and fault data. These failures can be added initially with small magnitude, and their magnitude being increasing gradually in a controlled way. The database will interface with the plant supervisory system SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) that provides the data through standard interface. (author)

  10. Scientist, Single Cell Analysis Facility | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Research Technology Program (CRTP) develops and implements emerging technology, cancer biology expertise and research capabilities to accomplish NCI research objectives.  The CRTP is an outward-facing, multi-disciplinary hub purposed to enable the external cancer research community and provides dedicated support to NCI’s intramural Center for Cancer Research (CCR).  The dedicated units provide electron microscopy, protein characterization, protein expression, optical microscopy and nextGen sequencing. These research efforts are an integral part of CCR at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR).  CRTP scientists also work collaboratively with intramural NCI investigators to provide research technologies and expertise. KEY ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES We are seeking a highly motivated Scientist II to join the newly established Single Cell Analysis Facility (SCAF) of the Center for Cancer Research (CCR) at NCI. The SCAF will house state of the art single cell sequencing technologies including 10xGenomics Chromium, BD Genomics Rhapsody, DEPPArray, and other emerging single cell technologies. The Scientist: Will interact with close to 200 laboratories within the CCR to design and carry out single cell experiments for cancer research Will work on single cell isolation/preparation from various tissues and cells and related NexGen sequencing library preparation Is expected to author publications in peer reviewed scientific journals

  11. Experimental facility of innovative types as the laboratory analog of research reactor experimental device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androsenko, A.A.; Androsenko, P.A.; Zabud'ko, A.N.; Kremenetskij, A.K.; Nikolaev, A.N.; Trykov, L.A.

    1991-01-01

    The paper analyses capability of creating laboratory analogs of complex experimental facilities at research reactors utilizing power radionuclide neutron sources fabricated in industrial conditions. Some experimental and calculational investigations of neutron-physical characteristics are presented, which have been attained at the RIZ research reactor laboratory analog. Experimental results are supplemented by calculational investigations, fulfilled by means of the BRAND three-dimensional computational complex and the ROZ-6 one-dimensional program. 4 refs.; 3 figs

  12. Experimental area plans for an advanced hadron facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, E.W.; Macek, R.J.; Tschalear, C.

    1986-01-01

    A brief overview is presented of the current plans for an experimental area for a new advanced hadron facility for the exploration of nuclear and particle physics. The facility, LAMPF II, is presently visualized as consisting of the LAMPF linac sending 800 MeV protons to a 6 GeV booster ring followed by a 45 GeV main ring. Two experimental areas area planned. The first is intended to provide neutrinos via a pair of pulsed focusing horns. The other is designed to accommodate secondary beams that span the range of useful energies up to GeV/c. Beam specification goals are discussed with respect to source brightness, beam purity, and beam-line acceptance and length. The various beam lines are briefly described. Production cross sections and rates are estimated for antiproton production. Problems of thermal energy deposition in both components and targets and of effectiveness of particle separators are discussed. 9 refs. (LEW)

  13. Experimental area plans for an advanced hadron facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, E.W.; Macek, R.J.; Tschalear, C.

    1986-01-01

    A brief overview is presented of the current plans for an experimental area for a new advanced hadron facility for the exploration of nuclear and particle physics. The facility, LAMPF II, is presently visualized as consisting of the LAMPF linac sending 800 MeV protons to a 6 GeV booster ring followed by a 45 GeV main ring. Two experimental areas area planned. The first is intended to provide neutrinos via a pair of pulsed focusing horns. The other is designed to accommodate secondary beams that span the range of useful energies up to GeV/c. Beam specification goals are discussed with respect to source brightness, beam purity, and beam-line acceptance and length. The various beam lines are briefly described. Production cross sections and rates are estimated for antiproton production. Problems of thermal energy deposition in both components and targets and of effectiveness of particle separators are discussed. 9 refs

  14. Performance analysis of small-scale experimental facility of TWDEC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawana, Ryoh; Ishikawa, Motoo; Takeno, Hiromasa; Yamamoto, Takayoshi; Yasaka, Yasuyoshi

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present paper is to analyze small-scale experimental facilities of TWDEC (Travelling Wave type Direct Energy Converter) and to propose a modification in regard to a measuring device of the facilities by means of numerical simulation with the axisymmetrical two-dimensional approximation (a PIC method). The numerical simulation has given the following results: (1) tendency of the numerical results agree with the experimental results on the measured deceleration efficiency, (2) the deceleration efficiency measured in the experiment will increase if the radius of Faraday cup installed in the experiment increases and (3) the wave of condensation and rarefaction of measured electric charge density, which is averaged in the r-direction below the radius of Faraday cup, is not formed enough with a small radius of Faraday cup because of the r component of electric field which is induced by the electrode geometry

  15. In-pile experimental facility needs for LMFR safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawata, Norio; Niwa, Hajime

    1994-01-01

    Although the achievement of the safety research during the past years has been significant, there still exists a strong need for future research, especially when there is prospect for future LMFR commercialization. In this paper, our current views are described on future research needs especially with a new in-pile experimental facility. The basic ideas and progress are outlined of a preliminary feasibility study. (author)

  16. Elise: a new facility for unprecedented experimental nuclear fission studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taieb, J.; Belier, G.; Chatillon, A.; Granier, T.; Kelic, A.; Ricciardi, V.; Schmidt, K.H.; Voss, B.; Coste-Delclaux, M.; Diop, C.; Jouanne, C.; Schmitt, C.; Aiche, M.; Czajkowski, S.; Jurado, B.; Audouin, L.; Peyre, J.; Rosier, P.; Tassan-Got, L.; Bertoumieux, E.; Dore, D.; Dupont, E.; Letourneau, A.; Panebianco, S.

    2009-01-01

    A novel experimental program aiming to study the properties of fragments and neutrons emitted in the fission process has been initiated. The experiment will be held at the ELISe electron-ion collider to be constructed at GSI, Darmstadt in the framework of the FAIR extension of the facility. The experiment will take advantage of the inverse kinematics allowing, in particular, a total mass and charge resolution for all fission fragments. (authors)

  17. Hazards assessment for the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calley, M.B.; Jones, J.L. Jr.

    1994-01-01

    This report documents the hazards assessment for the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, which is operated by EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc., for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The hazards assessment was performed to ensure that this facility complies with DOE and company requirements pertaining to emergency planning and preparedness for operational emergencies. DOE Order 5500.3A requires that a facility-specific hazards assessment be performed to provide the technical basis for facility emergency planning efforts. This hazards assessment was conducted in accordance with DOE Headquarters and DOE Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) guidance to comply with DOE Order 5500.3A. The hazards assessment identifies and analyzes hazards that are significant enough to warrant consideration in a facility's operational emergency management program. This hazards assessment describes the WERF, the area surrounding WERF, associated buildings and structures at WERF, and the processes performed at WERF. All radiological and nonradiological hazardous materials stored, used, or produced at WERF were identified and screened. Even though the screening process indicated that the hazardous materials could be screened from further analysis because the inventory of radiological and nonradiological hazardous materials were below the screening thresholds specified by DOE and DOE-ID guidance for DOE Order 5500.3A, the nonradiological hazardous materials were analyzed further because it was felt that the nonradiological hazardous material screening thresholds were too high

  18. The Hayabusa Curation Facility at Johnson Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolensky, M.; Bastien, R.; McCann, B.; Frank, D.; Gonzalez, C.; Rodriguez, M.

    2013-01-01

    The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Hayabusa spacecraft made contact with the asteroid 25143 Itokawa and collected regolith dust from Muses Sea region of smooth terrain [1]. The spacecraft returned to Earth with more than 10,000 grains ranging in size from just over 300 µm to less than 10 µm [2, 3]. These grains represent the only collection of material returned from an asteroid by a spacecraft. As part of the joint agreement between JAXA and NASA for the mission, 10% of the Hayabusa grains are being transferred to NASA for parallel curation and allocation. In order to properly receive process and curate these samples, a new curation facility was established at Johnson Space Center (JSC). Since the Hayabusa samples within the JAXA curation facility have been stored free from exposure to terrestrial atmosphere and contamination [4], one of the goals of the new NASA curation facility was to continue this treatment. An existing lab space at JSC was transformed into a 120 sq.ft. ISO class 4 (equivalent to the original class 10 standard) clean room. Hayabusa samples are stored, observed, processed, and packaged for allocation inside a stainless steel glove box under dry N2. Construction of the clean laboratory was completed in 2012. Currently, 25 Itokawa particles are lodged in NASA's Hayabusa Lab. Special care has been taken during lab construction to remove or contain materials that may contribute contaminant particles in the same size range as the Hayabusa grains. Several witness plates of various materials are installed around the clean lab and within the glove box to permit characterization of local contaminants at regular intervals by SEM and mass spectrometry, and particle counts of the lab environment are frequently acquired. Of particular interest is anodized aluminum, which contains copious sub-mm grains of a multitude of different materials embedded in its upper surface. Unfortunately the use of anodized aluminum was necessary in the construction

  19. Data base of reactor physics experimental results in Kyoto University critical assembly experimental facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichihara, Chihiro; Fujine, Shigenori; Hayashi, Masatoshi

    1986-01-01

    The Kyoto University critical assembly experimental facilities belong to the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, and are the versatile critical assembly constructed for experimentally studying reactor physics and reactor engineering. The facilities are those for common utilization by universities in whole Japan. During more than ten years since the initial criticality in 1974, various experiments on reactor physics and reactor engineering have been carried out using many experimental facilities such as two solidmoderated cores, a light water-moderated core and a neutron generator. The kinds of the experiment carried out were diverse, and to find out the required data from them is very troublesome, accordingly it has become necessary to make a data base which can be processed by a computer with the data accumulated during the past more than ten years. The outline of the data base, the data base CAEX using personal computers, the data base supported by a large computer and so on are reported. (Kako, I.)

  20. Population-based geographic access to parent and satellite National Cancer Institute Cancer Center Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onega, Tracy; Alford-Teaster, Jennifer; Wang, Fahui

    2017-09-01

    Satellite facilities of National Cancer Institute (NCI) cancer centers have expanded their regional footprints. This study characterized geographic access to parent and satellite NCI cancer center facilities nationally overall and by sociodemographics. Parent and satellite NCI cancer center facilities, which were geocoded in ArcGIS, were ascertained. Travel times from every census tract in the continental United States and Hawaii to the nearest parent and satellite facilities were calculated. Census-based population attributes were used to characterize measures of geographic access for sociodemographic groups. From the 62 NCI cancer centers providing clinical care in 2014, 76 unique parent locations and 211 satellite locations were mapped. The overall proportion of the population within 60 minutes of a facility was 22% for parent facilities and 32.7% for satellite facilities. When satellites were included for potential access, the proportion of some racial groups for which a satellite was the closest NCI cancer center facility increased notably (Native Americans, 22.6% with parent facilities and 39.7% with satellite facilities; whites, 34.8% with parent facilities and 50.3% with satellite facilities; and Asians, 40.0% with parent facilities and 54.0% with satellite facilities), with less marked increases for Hispanic and black populations. Rural populations of all categories had dramatically low proportions living within 60 minutes of an NCI cancer center facility of any type (1.0%-6.6%). Approximately 14% of the population (n = 43,033,310) lived more than 180 minutes from a parent or satellite facility, and most of these individuals were Native Americans and/or rural residents (37% of Native Americans and 41.7% of isolated rural residents). Racial/ethnic and rural populations showed markedly improved geographic access to NCI cancer center care when satellite facilities were included. Cancer 2017;123:3305-11. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American

  1. A study on the establishment of severe accident experimental facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Kun Joong; Kim, Sang Baek; Kim, In Sik; Nho, Ki Man; Bark, Rae Joon; Park, Chun Kyeong; Sim, Seok Koo; Lee, Seong Jae; Chung, Moon Ki; Cho, Yeong Ro; Chun, Shee Yeong

    1994-07-01

    Significant progress has been achieved during this year of the project. Planned DCH experiments on the sensitivity of the cavity geometry factors and the cavity capture volume effects were performed using the HPME facility for Kori-1/2 and YGN-3/4 cavity scale models. The Crust Formation Test Facility has been completed. Preliminary calculations were performed to predict test results. The experiments of the crust formation on the simulant and its heat transfer characteristic were performed to investigate the effects of coolant injection methods, bottom heating boundary surface temperatures, coolant temperatures and coolant flow rates. The design of the FCI Test Facility has been completed and the procurement of the materials is in progress. Also, the steam condensation experiment on the vertical containment walls and the research on the development of measuring techniques of the particle sizes and velocities are in progress as planned. Through international research collaboration with USNRC and CEA Cadarache, information of the experimental research on the severe fuel damage has been gathered and analyzed. Preliminary planning of the second phase tests has been launched this year. This study proposes the scope of the second phase and the strategy to implement the proposed second phase experimental program. This study also proposes a strategy to establish building blocks and infrastructure for the severe accident research in Korea. (Author)

  2. Analysis of Elektrogorsk 108 test facility experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbonas, R.

    2001-01-01

    In the paper an evaluation of experimental data obtained at Russian Elektrogorsk 108 (E-108) test facility is presented. E-108 facility is a scaled model of Russian RBMK design reactor. An attempt to validate state-of-the-art thermal hydraulic codes on the basis of E-108 test facility was made. Originally these codes were developed and validated for BWRs and PWRs. Since state-of-art thermal hydraulic codes are widely used for simulation of RBMK reactors further codes' implementation and validation is required. The facility was modelled by employing RELAP5 (INEEL, USA) thermal hydraulic system analysis best estimate code. The results show dependence from number of nodes used in the heated channels, frictional and form losses employed. The obtained oscillatory behaviour is resulted by density wave and critical heat flux. It is shown that codes are able to predict thermal hydraulic instability and sudden heat structure temperature excursion, when critical heat flux is approached, well. In addition, an uncertainty analysis of one of the experiments was performed by employing GRS developed System for Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis (SUSA). It was one of the first attempts to use this statistic-based methodology in Lithuania.(author)

  3. An experimental facility for studying delayed neutron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dermendzhiev, E.; Nazarov, V.M.; Pavlov, S.S.; Ruskov, Iv.; Zamyatin, Yu.S.

    1993-01-01

    A new experimental facility for studying delayed neutron emission has been designed and tested. A method based on utilization of the Dubna IBR-2 pulsed reactor, has been proposed and realized for periodical irradiation of targets composed of fissionable isotopes. Such a powerful pulsed neutron source in combination with a slow neutron chopper synchronized with the reactor bursts makes possible variation of the exposure duration and effective suppression of the fast neutron background due to delay neutrons emitted from the reactor core. Detection of delayed neutrons from the target is carried out by a high-efficiency multicounter neutron detector with a near-4π geometry. Some test measurements and results are briefly described. Possible use of the facility for other tasks is also discussed. 14 refs.; 14 figs

  4. Experimental testing facilities for ultrasonic measurements in heavy liquid metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cojocaru, V.; Ionescu, V.; Nicolescu, D.; Nitu, A.

    2016-01-01

    The thermo-physical properties of Heavy Liquid Metals (HLM), like lead or its alloy, Lead Bismuth Eutectic (LBE), makes them attractive as coolant candidates in advanced nuclear systems. The opaqueness, that is common to all liquid metals, disables all optical methods. For this reason ultrasound waves are used in different applications in heavy liquid metal technology, for example for flow and velocity measurements and for inspection techniques. The practical use of ultrasound in heavy liquid metals still needs to be demonstrated by experiments. This goal requires heavy liquid metal technology facility especially adapted to this task. In this paper is presented an experimental testing facility for investigations of Heavy Liquid Metals acoustic properties, designed and constructed in RATEN ICN. (authors)

  5. Experimental Facilities Division. Progress report 1996-97

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the activities of the Experimental Facilities Division (XFD) in support of the users of the Advanced Photon Source (APS), primarily focusing on the past year of operations. In September 1996, the APS began operations as a national user facility serving the US community of x-ray researchers from private industry, academic institutions, and other research organizations. The start of operations was about three months ahead of the baseline date established in 1988. This report is divided into the following sections: (1) overview; (2) user operations; (3) user administration and technical support; (4) R and D in support of view operations; (5) collaborative research; and (6) long-term strategic plans for XFD

  6. Experimental Facilities Division progress report 1996--97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the activities of the Experimental Facilities Division (XFD) in support of the users of the Advanced Photon Source (APS), primarily focusing on the past year of operations. In September 1996, the APS began operations as a national user facility serving the US community of x-ray researchers from private industry, academic institutions, and other research organizations. The start of operations was about three months ahead of the baseline date established in 1988. This report is divided into the following sections: (1) overview; (2) user operations; (3) user administration and technical support; (4) R and D in support of view operations; (5) collaborative research; and (6) long-term strategic plans for XFD.

  7. The FENIX [Fusion ENgineering International EXperimental] test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slack, D.S.; Patrick, R.E.; Chaplin, M.R.; Miller, J.R.; Shen, S.S.; Summers, L.T.; Kerns, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    The Fusion ENgineering International EXperimental Magnet Facility (FENIX), under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), is a significant step forward in meeting the testing requirements necessary for the development of superconductor for large-scale, superconducting magnets. A 14-T, transverse field over a test volume of 150 x 60 x 150 mm in length will be capable of testing conductors the size of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Proposed conductors for ITER measure ∼35 mm on one side and will operate at currents of up to 40 kA at fields of ∼14 T. The testing of conductors and associated components, such as joints, will require large-bore, high-field magnet facilities. FENIX is being constructed using the existing A 2o and A 2i magnets from the idle MFTF. The east and west A 2 pairs will be mounted together to form a split-pair solenoid. The pairs of magnets will be installed in a 4.0-m cryostat vessel located in the HFTF building at LLNL. Each magnet is enclosed in its own cryostat, the existing 4.0-m vessel serving only as a vacuum chamber. 4 refs., 8 figs

  8. The BNL Accelerator Test Facility and experimental program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Zvi, I.; State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY

    1992-01-01

    The Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at BNL is a users' facility for experiments in Accelerator and Beam Physics. The ATF provides high brightness electron beams and high-power laser pulses synchronized to the electron beam, suitable for studies of new methods of high-gradient acceleration and state-of-the-art Free-Electron Lasers. The electrons are produced by a laser photocathode rf gun and accelerated to 50 MeV by two traveling wave accelerator sections. The lasers include a 10 mJ, 10 ps ND:YAG laser and a 500 mJ, 10 to 100 ps C0 2 laser. A number of users from National Laboratories, universities and industry take part in experiments at the ATF. The experimental program includes various laser acceleration schemes, Free-Electron Laser experiments and a program on the development of high-brightness electron beams. The ATF's experimental program commenced in early 1991 at an energy of about 4 MeV. The full program, with 50 MeV and the high-power laser will begin operation this year

  9. The BNL Accelerator Test Facility and experimental program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Zvi, I.; State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY

    1991-01-01

    The Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at BNL is a users' facility for experiments in Accelerator and Beam Physics. The ATF provides high brightness electron beams and high power laser pulses synchronized to the electron beam, suitable for studies of new methods of high gradient acceleration and state of the art free electron lasers. The electrons are produced by a laser photocathode rf gun and accelerated to 50 to 100 MeV by two traveling wave accelerator sections. The lasers include a 10 mJ, 10 ps Nd:YAG laser and a 100 mJ, 10 ps CO 2 laser. A number of users from National Laboratories, universities and industry take part in experiments at the ATF. The experimental program includes various acceleration schemes, Free-Electron Laser experiments and a program on the development of high brightness electron beams. The AFT's experimental program commenced in early 1991 at an energy of about 4 MeV. The full program, with 50 MeV and the High power laser will begin operation this year. 28 refs., 4 figs

  10. West Valley Demonstration Project facilities utilization plan for the existing facilities at the Western New York Nuclear Service Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skillern, C.G.

    1986-05-01

    In 1980, Congress passed Public Law 96-368, the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) Act. As a primary objective, the Act authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to solidify the high-level waste (HLW) stored at the Western New York Nuclear Service Center (WNYNSC) into a form suitable for transportation and disposal in a federal repository. This report will describe how WVDP proposes to use the existing WNYNSC Facilities in an efficient and technically effective manner to comply with Public Law 96-368. In support of the above cited law, the DOE has entered into a ''Cooperative agreement between the United States Department of Energy and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority on the Western New York Nuclear Service Center at West Valley, New York.'' The state-owned areas turned over to the DOE for use are as follows: Process Plant, Waste Storage, Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility, Service Facilities, Plant Security, and Additional Facilities. The Facilities Utilization Plan (FUP) describes how the state-owned facilities will be utilized to complete the Project; it is divided into five sections as follows: Executive Summary - an overview; Introduction - the WVDP approach to utilizing the WNYNSC Facilities; WVDP Systems - a brief functional description of the system, list of equipment and components to be used and decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) support; WVDP Support Facilities; and Caveats that could effect or change the potential usage of a particular area

  11. Upgrade of the experimental facilities of the ORPHEE reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farnoux, B.; Breant, P.

    1993-01-01

    At the time of the design, the ORPHEE reactor has been equipped with a set of up-to-date experimental facilities such as nine tangential and horizontal beam holes, one hot source, two hydrogen cold sources and six neutron guides. After more than ten years of operations, all the neutron beams are now used by about twenty five spectrometers. A modernisation program is under progress with a two fold aim: upgrade of the existing facilities and creation of new beams. Some details of the six following points will be described: 1) replacement of the flat cold source cell by an hollow cylinder in order first to increase the cold neutron flux and secondly to facilitate the extraction of new cold neutron beams. 2) replacement of the old neutron guide elements coated with natural nickel by new elements with isotopic nickel or super mirror coating. 3) modification of the curvature of some existing neutron guides in order to increase the wavelength band transmission. 4) creation of new cold neutron beams by installation of benders on the existing neutron guides. 5) design of new cold neutron guides and a new guide hall. 6) design of a thermal neutron guide. The two last points will made extensive use of super mirrors allowed by new technical developments done at the Laboratoire LEON BRILLOUIN in connection with industry. (author)

  12. European Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR): the new international center for fundamental physics and its research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortov, Vladimir E; Sharkov, Boris Yu; Stöker, H

    2012-01-01

    The Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) accelerator center at Darmstadt, Germany, will provide the international scientific community with unique experimental opportunities of a scope and scale out of reach for any other large-scale facility in the world. With its staff of over 2500, it is expected to fundamentally expand our knowledge of hadron, nuclear, and atomic physics and their application to cosmology, astrophysics, and technology. In this review, the design details of the accelerator complex are discussed and the experimental research program for FAIR is presented. Particular attention is paid to experiments on the extreme state of matter arising from the isochoric heating of a material by heavy-ion beams. One of the largest facilities of its kind in Europe, FAIR is a part of the strategic development roadmap for the European Strategic Forum on Research Infrastructures (ESFRI). (physics of our days)

  13. MYRRHA. An experimental ADS Facility for Research and Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ait Abderrahim, H.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Since 1998, SCK-CEN in partnership with IBA s.a. and many European research laboratories, is designing a multipurpose ADS for R and D applications MYRRHA - and is conducting an associated R and D support programme. MYRRHA is an Accelerator Driven System (ADS) under development at Mol in Belgium and aiming to serve as a basis for the European experimental ADS to provide protons and neutrons for various R and D applications. It consists of a proton accelerator delivering a 350 MeV * 5 mA proton beam to a liquid Pb-Bi spallation target that in turn couples to a Pb-Bi cooled, subcritical fast core. In a first stage, the project focuses mainly on demonstration of the ADS concept, safety research on sub-critical systems and nuclear waste transmutation studies. In a later stage, the device will also be dedicated to research on structural materials, nuclear fuel, liquid metal technology and associated aspects and on sub-critical reactor physics. Subsequently, it will be used as fast spectrum irradiation facility and as radioisotope production facility. Along the above design features, the MYRRHA project team is developing the MYRRHA project as a multipurpose irradiation facility for R and D applications on the basis of an Accelerator Driven System (ADS). The project is intended to fit into the European strategy towards an ADS Demo facility for nuclear waste transmutation as described in the PDS-XADS FP5 Project. As such it should serve the following task catalogue: ADS concept demonstration, Safety studies for ADS, MA transmutation studies, LLFP transmutation studies, Medical radioisotopes, Material research, Fuel research. A first preliminary conceptual design file of MYRRHA was completed by the end of 2001 and has been reviewed by an International Technical Guidance Committee that concluded that there are no show stoppers in the project even thought some topics such as the safety studies and the fuel qualification need to be addressed

  14. Experimental facilities for plate-out investigations and future work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muenchow, K.; Dederichs, H.; Iniotakis, N.; Sackmann, B.

    1981-01-01

    The safety of HTR under normal operation and accident conditions, the possibility of inspection, maintenance and repair or decontamination of single primary components as well as the safety of maintenance personnel are essentially determined by the transport- and deposition behaviour of the non gaseous fission - and activation products in the primary loop of the reactor. A comprehensive program has been started in 1969 in KFA in collaboration with various industrial firms and foreign institutions to investigate these problems. The program includes in-pile and out-pile experiments, simulating reactor conditions and also different laboratory experiments and extensive theoretical investigations. The aim of these efforts is to test experimentally the models and computercodes, which are used for prediction of transport and deposition behaviour of fission products for HTR's as well under normal as under accident conditions. Further more a verified dataset is to be established. In this paper a survey is given of the experimental facilities carried out by KFA or in cooperation with KFA

  15. Technical and economic feasibility study for the reactivation of the integral test facility of IPEN/CNEN Nuclear Engineering Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biaty, Flávia P.; Rocha, Marcelo da S.; Oliveira, Otávio L. de, E-mail: flavia.biaty@usp.br, E-mail: msrocha@ipen.br, E-mail: otavioluis@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The Integral Test Facility of Nuclear Engineering Center (CEN/IPEN/CNEN-SP), known as 'Loop 70', is a semi-industrial thermal-hydraulic test facility and can operate as a BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) or a PWR (Pressurizing Water Reactor) mode. Designed and built in the 1980's, it is currently disabled. The experimental circuits ('test loop') are facilities that reproduce the thermohydraulic and fluid dynamic conditions that occur inside a reactor and are used to simulate the practical reality which it is not possible to be obtained through mathematical models. In this context, this research project aims the development of a Business Plan to analyze the technical and economic feasibility related to the reactivation of the facility. This methodology (adapted to the government sector) is a decision-making tool that will offer a wide perspective of the project, set the guidelines and actions that will define the future of the facility and provide a general rule to make investments on it. This paper presents the historic aspects to better understand the Loop 70's current situation. It also presents information about similar facilities around the world, services that can be offered (thermal-hydraulics parameters measurements, equipment qualification and transient analysis due accident situations), results of the strategic analysis (SWOT) performed, specific goals for each critical success or failure factor of the facility, financial aspects related to the reactivation and an overview of the facility's perspectives. (author)

  16. Technical and economic feasibility study for the reactivation of the integral test facility of IPEN/CNEN Nuclear Engineering Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biaty, Flávia P.; Rocha, Marcelo da S.; Oliveira, Otávio L. de

    2017-01-01

    The Integral Test Facility of Nuclear Engineering Center (CEN/IPEN/CNEN-SP), known as 'Loop 70', is a semi-industrial thermal-hydraulic test facility and can operate as a BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) or a PWR (Pressurizing Water Reactor) mode. Designed and built in the 1980's, it is currently disabled. The experimental circuits ('test loop') are facilities that reproduce the thermohydraulic and fluid dynamic conditions that occur inside a reactor and are used to simulate the practical reality which it is not possible to be obtained through mathematical models. In this context, this research project aims the development of a Business Plan to analyze the technical and economic feasibility related to the reactivation of the facility. This methodology (adapted to the government sector) is a decision-making tool that will offer a wide perspective of the project, set the guidelines and actions that will define the future of the facility and provide a general rule to make investments on it. This paper presents the historic aspects to better understand the Loop 70's current situation. It also presents information about similar facilities around the world, services that can be offered (thermal-hydraulics parameters measurements, equipment qualification and transient analysis due accident situations), results of the strategic analysis (SWOT) performed, specific goals for each critical success or failure factor of the facility, financial aspects related to the reactivation and an overview of the facility's perspectives. (author)

  17. Environmental assessment of the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    This Environmental Assessment has been prepared to determine if the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center (the Center), or its alternatives would have significant environmental impacts that must be analyzed in an Environmental Impact Statement. DOE's proposed action is to continue funding the Center. While DOE is not funding construction of the planned Center facility, operation of that facility is dependent upon continued funding. To implement the proposed action, the Center would initially construct a facility of approximately 2,300 square meters (25,000 square feet). The Phase 1 laboratory facilities and parking lot will occupy approximately 1.2 hectares (3 acres) of approximately 8.9 hectares (22 acres) of land which were donated to New Mexico State University (NMSU) for this purpose. The facility would contain laboratories to analyze chemical and radioactive materials typical of potential contaminants that could occur in the environment in the vicinity of the DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site or other locations. The facility also would have bioassay facilities to measure radionuclide levels in the general population and in employees of the WIPP. Operation of the Center would meet the DOE requirement for independent monitoring and assessment of environmental impacts associated with the planned disposal of transuranic waste at the WIPP

  18. Environmental assessment of the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    This Environmental Assessment has been prepared to determine if the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center (the Center), or its alternatives would have significant environmental impacts that must be analyzed in an Environmental Impact Statement. DOE`s proposed action is to continue funding the Center. While DOE is not funding construction of the planned Center facility, operation of that facility is dependent upon continued funding. To implement the proposed action, the Center would initially construct a facility of approximately 2,300 square meters (25,000 square feet). The Phase 1 laboratory facilities and parking lot will occupy approximately 1.2 hectares (3 acres) of approximately 8.9 hectares (22 acres) of land which were donated to New Mexico State University (NMSU) for this purpose. The facility would contain laboratories to analyze chemical and radioactive materials typical of potential contaminants that could occur in the environment in the vicinity of the DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site or other locations. The facility also would have bioassay facilities to measure radionuclide levels in the general population and in employees of the WIPP. Operation of the Center would meet the DOE requirement for independent monitoring and assessment of environmental impacts associated with the planned disposal of transuranic waste at the WIPP.

  19. Development of a EUV Test Facility at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Edward; Pavelitz, Steve; Kobayashi, Ken; Robinson, Brian; Cirtain, Johnathan; Gaskin, Jessica; Winebarger, Amy

    2011-01-01

    This paper will describe a new EUV test facility that is being developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to test EUV telescopes. Two flight programs, HiC - high resolution coronal imager (sounding rocket) and SUVI - Solar Ultraviolet Imager (GOES-R), set the requirements for this new facility. This paper will discuss those requirements, the EUV source characteristics, the wavelength resolution that is expected and the vacuum chambers (Stray Light Facility, Xray Calibration Facility and the EUV test chamber) where this facility will be used.

  20. Technical Meeting on Existing and Proposed Experimental Facilities for Fast Neutron Systems. Working Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the TM on “Existing and proposed experimental facilities for fast neutron systems” was threefold: 1) presenting and exchanging information about existing and planned experimental facilities in support of the development of innovative fast neutron systems; 2) allow creating a catalogue of existing and planned experimental facilities currently operated/developed within national or international fast reactors programmes; 3) once a clear picture of the existing experimental infrastructures is defined, new experimental facilities are discussed and proposed, on the basis of the identified R&D needs

  1. Technical Meeting on Existing and Proposed Experimental Facilities for Fast Neutron Systems. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the TM on “Existing and proposed experimental facilities for fast neutron systems” is threefold: first, it is intended for presenting and exchanging information about existing and planned experimental facilities in support of the development of innovative fast neutron systems; second, it will allow to create a catalogue of existing and planned experimental facilities currently operated/developed within national or international fast reactors programmes; third, once a clear picture of the existing experimental infrastructures is defined, new experimental facilities will be discussed and proposed, on the basis of the identified R&D needs

  2. Demonstration test operation of Feed Materials Production Center Biodenitrification Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benear, A.K.; Patton, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    A fluidized-bed biological denitrification (BDN) system was used to treat high-nitrate wastewater streams from a DOE owned uranium processing plant. A two-column system was used to demonstrate BDN operation on a production scale. In a continuous 200 hour rate determination period, the BDN processed over 1.6 million gallons that contained over 4700 kilograms of nitrate and nitrite nitrogen. The BDN removed an average 97% of the incoming nitrate and nitrite. The BDN effluent was discharged to the FMPC sewage treatment plant where it caused increased levels of TOD, TSS and fecal coliforms in the STP discharge. This indicated the BDN effluent will require treatment prior to discharge to the environment. Preliminary chemical consumption rates and associated costs of operation were determined. Several modifications and additions to the system were identified as necessary for the permanent production facility. 3 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Facility Design Program Requirements for National Science Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-09-01

    a turn of the century structure and secondhand furniture to display exhibit items, to the Ontario Science Center in Canada which is a 10-year-old...mothers should be considered. 1.3 Visitors Coat Storage Areas 550 sq ft Pigeon hole or other storage cabinets for children’s school books , coats, and...1.4.4 Work Area (200 sq ft) 1.4.5 Office for Assistant Museum Shop Manager (75 sq ft) Function: Area for sale of books , posters, cards, slides, games

  4. Field Lysimeter Test Facility for protective barriers: Experimental plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkham, R.R.; Gee, G.W.; Downs, J.L.

    1987-12-01

    This document was first written in October 1986 and has been used to guide the design of the Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) and to promote discussions between research and engineering staff regarding the selection of barrier treatments for inclusion in the FLTF. The construction of the lysimeter facility was completed June 28, 1987. This document describes the facility, the treatments placed in each lysimeter, types of measurements made in each lysimeter, and a brief discussion of project activities related to quality assurance, safety, and funding requirements. The treatment description and figures have been updated to reflect the lysimeter facility as constructed. 12 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs

  5. Wound center facility billing: A retrospective analysis of time, wound size, and acuity scoring for determining facility level of service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fife, Caroline E; Walker, David; Farrow, Wade; Otto, Gordon

    2007-01-01

    Outpatient wound center facility reimbursement for Medicare beneficiaries can be a challenge to determine and obtain. To compare methods of calculating facility service levels for outpatient wound centers and to demonstrate the advantages of an acuity-based billing system (one that incorporates components of facility work that is non-reimbursable by procedure codes and that represents an activity-based costing approach to medical billing), a retrospective study of 5,098 patient encounters contained in a wound care-specific electronic medical record database was conducted. Approximately 500 patient visits to the outpatient wound center of a Texas regional hospital between April 2003 and November 2004 were categorized by service level in documentation and facility management software. Visits previously billed using a time-based system were compared to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' proposed three-tiered wound size-based system. The time-based system also was compared to an acuity-based scoring system. The Pearson correlation coefficient between billed level of service by time and estimated level of service by acuity was 0.442 and the majority of follow-up visits were billed as Level 3 and above (on a time level of 1 to 5) , confirming that time is not a surrogate for actual work performed. Wound size also was found to be unrelated to service level (Pearson correlation = 0.017) and 97% of wound areas were billings than extremes; no other method produced this distribution. Hospital-based outpatient wound centers should develop, review, and refine acuity score-based models on which to determine billed level of service.

  6. Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research (JASPER) Facility Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrad, C. H.; Miller, J.; Cowan, M.; Martinez, M.; Whitcomb, B.

    2003-01-01

    The JASPER Facility utilizes a Two-Stage Light Gas Gun to conduct equation-of-state(EOS) experiments on plutonium and other special nuclear materials. The overall facility will be discussed with emphasis on the Two-Stage Light Gas Gun characteristics and control interfaces and containment. The containment systems that were developed for this project will be presented

  7. Experimental evidence of body centered cubic iron in Earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrubiak, R.; Meng, Y.; Shen, G.

    2017-12-01

    The Earth's core is mainly composed of iron. While seismic evidence has shown a liquid outer core and a solid inner core, the crystalline nature of the solid iron at the core condition remains debated, largely due to the difficulties in experimental determination of exact polymorphs at corresponding pressure-temperature conditions. We have examined crystal structures of iron up to 220 GPa and 6000 K with x-ray diffraction using a double-sided laser heating system at HPCAT, Advanced Photon Source. The iron sample is confined in a small chamber surrounded by single crystal MgO. The laser power can be modulated together with temperature measurements. The modulated heating of iron in an MgO single crystal matrix allows for microstructure analysis during heating and after the sample is quenched. We present experimental evidence of a body-centered-cubic (BCC) iron from about 100 GPa and 3000 K to at least 220 GPa and 4000 K. The observed BCC phase may be consistent with a theoretically predicted BCC phase that is dynamically stable in similar pressure-temperature conditions [1]. We will discuss the stability region of the BCC phase and the melting curve of iron and their implications in the nature of the Earth's inner core. References: A. B. Belonoshko et al., Nat. Geosci., 1-6 (2017).

  8. Profile of European proton and carbon ion therapy centers assessed by the EORTC facility questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Damien C; Abrunhosa-Branquinho, André; Bolsi, Alessandra; Kacperek, Andrzej; Dendale, Rémi; Geismar, Dirk; Bachtiary, Barbara; Hall, Annika; Heufelder, Jens; Herfarth, Klaus; Debus, Jürgen; Amichetti, Maurizio; Krause, Mechthild; Orecchia, Roberto; Vondracek, Vladimir; Thariat, Juliette; Kajdrowicz, Tomasz; Nilsson, Kristina; Grau, Cai

    2017-08-01

    We performed a survey using the modified EORTC Facility questionnaire (pFQ) to evaluate the human, technical and organizational resources of particle centers in Europe. The modified pFQ consisted of 235 questions distributed in 11 sections accessible on line on an EORTC server. Fifteen centers from 8 countries completed the pFQ between May 2015 and December 2015. The average number of patients treated per year and per particle center was 221 (range, 40-557). The majority (66.7%) of centers had pencil beam or raster scanning capability. Four (27%) centers were dedicated to eye treatment only. An increase in the patients-health professional FTE ratio was observed for eye tumor only centers when compared to other centers. All centers treated routinely chordomas/chondrosarcomas, brain tumors and sarcomas but rarely breast cancer. The majority of centers treated pediatric cases with particles. Only a minority of the queried institutions treated non-static targets. As the number of particle centers coming online will increase, the experience with this treatment modality will rise in Europe. Children can currently be treated in these facilities in a majority of cases. The majority of these centers provide state of the art particle beam therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The experimental facility of Tournemire; La station experimentale de Tournemire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-10-01

    This document presents the underground facility of Tournemire (Aveyron, France). The Tournemire abandoned railway tunnel gives access to a 250 m thick Jurassic clay bed covered with 250 m of limestones. The main goal of the Tournemire project is the study of the mechanical properties and fracturing of a clay formation and of its ability to be used as a deep underground storage facility for radioactive wastes. The document comprises a general presentation brochure and a description of the geologic, tectonic, geomechanical and hydro-geochemical surveys carried out in the facility. (J.S.)

  10. An experimental facility for microwave induced plasma processing of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, D.S.; Ramachandran, K.; Bhide, A.L.; Venkatramani, N.

    1997-01-01

    Microwave induced plasma processing offers many advantages over conventional processes. However this technology is in the development stage. This report gives a detailed information about a microwave plasma processing facility (2.45 GHz, 700 W) set up in the Laser and Plasma Technology Division. The equipment details and the results obtained on deposition of diamond like carbon (DLC) thin films and surface modification of polymer PET (polyethylene terephthalate) using this facility are given in this report. (author)

  11. Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research (JASPER) Facility Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konrad, C.H.; Braddy, R.W.; Martinez, Mark

    2001-01-01

    The JASPER Facility will utilize a Two-Stage Light Gas Gun to conduct equation-of-state (EOS) experiments of plutonium and other special nuclear materials. The overall facility will be discussed with emphasis on the Two-Stage Light Gas Gun characteristics and mission. The primary and secondary containment systems that were developed for this project will be presented. Primary gun diagnostics and timing will also be discussed

  12. Development of Experimental Facilities for Advanced Spent Fuel Management Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, G. S.; Jung, W. M.; Ku, J. H. [and others

    2004-07-01

    The advanced spent fuel management process(ACP), proposed to reduce the overall volume of the PWR spent fuel and improve safety and economy of the long-term storage of spent fuel, is under research and development. This technology convert spent fuels into pure metal-base uranium with removing the highly heat generating materials(Cs, Sr) efficiently and reducing of the decay heat, volume, and radioactivity from spent fuel by 1/4. In the next phase(2004{approx}2006), the demonstration of this technology will be carried out for verification of the ACP in a laboratory scale. For this demonstration, the hot cell facilities of {alpha}-{gamma} type and auxiliary facilities are required essentially for safe handling of high radioactive materials. As the hot cell facilities for demonstration of the ACP, a existing hot cell of {beta}-{gamma} type will be refurbished to minimize construction expenditures of hot cell facility. In this study, the design requirements are established, and the process detail work flow was analysed for the optimum arrangement to ensure effective process operation in hot cell. And also, the basic and detail design of hot cell facility and process, and safety analysis was performed to secure conservative safety of hot cell facility and process.

  13. An Overview of the Antenna Measurement Facilities at the NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Kevin M.; Anzic, Godfrey; Zakrajsek, Robert J.; Zaman, Afroz J.

    2002-10-01

    For the past twenty years, the NASA Glenn Research Center (formerly Lewis Research Center) in Cleveland, Ohio, has developed and maintained facilities for the evaluation of antennas. This effort has been in support of the work being done at the center in the research and development of space communication systems. The wide variety of antennas that have been considered for these systems resulted in a need for several types of antenna ranges at the Glenn Research Center. Four ranges, which are part of the Microwave Systems Laboratory, are the responsibility of the staff of the Applied RF Technology Branch. A general description of these ranges is provided in this paper.

  14. Decommissioning of the Nuclear Licensed Facilities at the Fontenay aux Roses CEA Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeanjacques, Michel; Piketty, Laurence; Mandard, Lionel; Pedron, Guy; Boissonneau, Jean Francois; Fouquereau, Alain; Pichereau, Eric; Lethuaire, Nathalie; Estivie, David; Binet, Cedric; Meden, Igor

    2008-01-01

    This is a summary of the program for the decommissioning of all the CEA's facilities in Fontenay aux Roses. The particularity of this center is that it is located in a built-up area. Taking into account the particularities of the various buildings and the levels of radioactivity in them, it was possible to devise a coherent, optimized program for the CEA-FAR licensed nuclear facility decommissioning operations

  15. 20 CFR 638.306 - Protection and maintenance of contract center facilities owned or leased by Job Corps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Protection and maintenance of contract center... Funding, Site Selection, and Facilities Management § 638.306 Protection and maintenance of contract center... and maintenance of contract center facilities owned or leased by Job Corps which shall be consistent...

  16. MCNPCX calculations of dose rates and spectra in experimental channels of the CTEx irradiating facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Renato G.; Rebello, Wilson F.; Vellozo, Sergio O.; Junior, Luis M.; Vital, Helio C.; Rusin, Tiago; Silva, Ademir X.

    2013-01-01

    MCNPX simulations have been performed in order to calculate dose rates as well as spectra along the four experimental channels of the gamma irradiating facility at the Technology Center of the Brazilian Army (CTEx). Safety, operational and research requirements have led to the need to determine both the magnitude and spectra of the leaking gamma fluxes. The CTEx experimental facility is cavity type with a moveable set of 28 horizontally positioned rods, filled with Cesium-137 chloride and doubly encased in stainless steel that yields an approximately plane 42 kCi-source that provides a maximum dose rate of about 1.5 kG/h into two irradiating chambers. The channels are intended for irradiation tests outside facility. They would allow larger samples to be exposed to lower gamma dose rates under controlled conditions. Dose rates have been calculated for several positions inside the channels as well as at their exits. In addition, for purposes related to the safety of operators and personnel, the angles submitted by the exiting beams have also been evaluated as they spread when leaving the channels. All calculations have been performed by using a computational model of the CTEx facility that allows its characteristics and operation to be accurately simulated by using the Monte Carlo Method. Virtual dosimeters filled with Fricke (ferrous sulfate) were modeled and positioned throughout 2 vertical channels (top and bottom) and 2 horizontal ones (front and back) in order to map dose rates and gamma spectrum distributions. The calculations revealed exiting collimated beams in the order of tenths of Grays per minute as compared to the maximum 25 Gy / min dose rate in the irradiator chamber. In addition, the beams leaving the two vertical channels were found to exhibit a widespread cone-shaped distribution with aperture angle ranging around 85 deg. The data calculated in this work are intended for use in the design of optimized experiments (better positioning of samples and

  17. Experimental facility for determining plasma characteristics in ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abroyan, M.A.; Kagan, Yu.M.; Kolokolov, N.B.; Lavrov, B.P.

    A facility for optical and electrical measurements of the plasma parameters in the arc plasma ion sources is described. The potentialities of the system are demonstrated on the basis of the electron concentration, the electron energy distribution function, and the radial population distribution of the excited states of hydrogen atoms in the arc plasma of the duoplasmatron. (U.S.)

  18. Refurbishment and Automation of the Thermal/Vacuum Facilities at the Goddard Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohue, John T.; Johnson, Chris; Ogden, Rick; Sushon, Janet

    1998-01-01

    The thermal/vacuum facilities located at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) have supported both manned and unmanned space flight since the 1960s. Of the 11 facilities, currently 10 of the systems are scheduled for refurbishment and/or replacement as part of a 5-year implementation. Expected return on investment includes the reduction in test schedules, improvements in the safety of facility operations, reduction in the complexity of a test and the reduction in personnel support required for a test. Additionally, GSFC will become a global resource renowned for expertise in thermal engineering, mechanical engineering and for the automation of thermal/vacuum facilities and thermal/vacuum tests. Automation of the thermal/vacuum facilities includes the utilization of Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) and the use of Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems. These components allow the computer control and automation of mechanical components such as valves and pumps. In some cases, the chamber and chamber shroud require complete replacement while others require only mechanical component retrofit or replacement. The project of refurbishment and automation began in 1996 and has resulted in the computer control of one Facility (Facility #225) and the integration of electronically controlled devices and PLCs within several other facilities. Facility 225 has been successfully controlled by PLC and SCADA for over one year. Insignificant anomalies have occurred and were resolved with minimal impact to testing and operations. The amount of work remaining to be performed will occur over the next four to five years. Fiscal year 1998 includes the complete refurbishment of one facility, computer control of the thermal systems in two facilities, implementation of SCADA and PLC systems to support multiple facilities and the implementation of a Database server to allow efficient test management and data analysis.

  19. Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) Fuel-Performance Test Facility (FPTF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardini, J.A.; Brubaker, R.C.; Veith, D.J.; Giorgis, G.C.; Walker, D.E.; Seim, O.S.

    1982-01-01

    The Fuel-Performance Test Facility (FPTF) is the latest in a series of special EBR-II instrumented in-core test facilities. A flow control valve in the facility is programmed to vary the coolant flow, and thus the temperature, in an experimental-irradiation subassembly beneath it and coupled to it. In this way, thermal transients can be simulated in that subassembly without changing the temperatures in surrounding subassemblies. The FPTF also monitors sodium flow and temperature, and detects delayed neutrons in the sodium effluent from the experimental-irradiation subassembly beneath it. This facility also has an acoustical detector (high-temperature microphone) for detecting sodium boiling

  20. Presentations for the 1st muon science experimental facility advisory committee meeting (MuSAC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-03-01

    The J-PARC Muon Science Advisory Committee, so called 'MuSAC', is organized under the J-PARC Project Director during construction period, in order to discuss the following items related to the Muon Science Facility at J-PARC and to report to the Project Director and Muon Science Facility construction team. The committee will review and advise the following subjects: 1) Project definition of the experimental facility to be constructed in Materials and Life Science Facility of J-PARC, 2) Content of the 1st phase experimental program. This issue is the collection of the documents presented at the title meeting. (J.P.N.)

  1. 20 CFR 670.210 - How are center facility improvements and new construction handled?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How are center facility improvements and new construction handled? 670.210 Section 670.210 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR THE JOB CORPS UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Site Selection and Protection...

  2. 20 CFR 670.220 - Are we responsible for the protection and maintenance of center facilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Are we responsible for the protection and maintenance of center facilities? 670.220 Section 670.220 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR THE JOB CORPS UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Site Selection...

  3. Identification and selection of initiating events for experimental fusion facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the current approaches used in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) to identify and select accident initiating events for study in either probabilistic safety analysis or PRA. Current methods directly apply to fusion facilities as well as other types of industries, such as chemical processing and nuclear fission. These identification and selection methods include the Master Logic Diagram, historical document review, system level Failure Modes and Effects Analysis, and others. A combination of the historical document review, such as Safety Analysis Reports and fusion safety studies, and the Master Logic Diagram with appropriate quality assurance reviews, is suggested for standardizing US fusion PRA effects. A preliminary set of generalized initiating events applicable to fusion facilities derived from safety document review is presented as a framework to start from for the historical document review and Master Logic Diagram approach. Fusion designers should find this list useful for their design reviews. 29 refs., 2 tabs

  4. Identification and selection of initiating events for experimental fusion facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the current approaches used in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) to identify and select accident initiating events for study in either probabilistic safety analysis or PRA. Current methods directly apply to fusion facilities as well as other types of industries, such as chemical processing and nuclear fission. These identification and selection methods include the Master Logic Diagram, historical document review, system level Failure Modes and Effects Analysis, and others. A combination of the historical document review, such as Safety Analysis Reports and fusion safety studies, and the Master Logic Diagram with appropriate quality assurance reviews, is suggested for standardizing U.S. fusion PRA efforts. A preliminary set of generalized initiating events applicable to fusion facilities derived from safety document review is presented as a framework to start from for the historical document review and Master Logic Diagram approach. Fusion designers should find this list useful for their design reviews. 29 refs., 1 tab

  5. NWFSC OA facility water chemistry - Ocean acidification species exposure experimental facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — We have developed a unique facility for conducting high-quality experiments on marine organisms in seawater with controlled carbon chemistry conditions. The...

  6. Design and construction of low level radioactive waste disposal facility at Rokkasho storage center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, K.; Itoh, H.; Iimura, H.; Shimoda, H.

    1992-01-01

    Japan Nuclear Fuel Industries Co., Inc. (JNFI) which has been established to dispose through burial the low-level radioactive waste (LLW) produced by nuclear power stations over the country is now constructing Rokkasho LLW Storage Center at Rokkasho Village,Aomori Prefecture. At this storage center JNFI plans to bury about 200,000m 3 , of LLW (equivalent to about one million drums each with a 200 liter capacity), and ultimately plans to bury about 600,000m 3 about 3 million drums of LLW. About the construction of the burial facilities for the first-stage LLW equivalent to 200,000 drums (each with a 200-liter capacity) we obtained the government's permit in November, 1990 and set out the construction work from the same month, which has since been promoted favorably. The facilities are scheduled to start operation from December, 1992. This paper gives an overview of at these facilities

  7. Remote Experimental Site: A command and analysis center for ''Big Physics'' experimentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casper, T.A.; Lennon, W.J.

    1991-09-01

    The next generation of tokamaks, ITER or BPX, will be characterized by an even greater emphasis on joint operation and experimentation. With anticipation of an increased number and diversity of collaborations, we are preparing for such shared facilities by developing a systematic approach to remote, joint physics operation involving experimental teams at several locations. The local area network of computers used for control and data acquisition on present and future experiments can be extended over a wide area network to provide a mechanism for remote operation of subsystems required for physics experiments. The technology required for high bandwidth (≥45Mbps) connections between multiple sites either exists or will be available over the next few years. With the rapid development of high performance workstations, network interfaces, distributed computing, and video conferencing, we can proceed with the development of a system of control and analysis sites to provide for consistent, efficient, and continuing collaborations. Early establishment of such sites could also enhance existing joint design and development efforts. 2 refs., 3 figs

  8. Experimental monitoring of ozone production in a PET cyclotron facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanibellato, L.; Cicoria, G.; Pancaldi, D.; Boschi, S.; Mostacci, D.; Marengo, M.

    2010-01-01

    Ozone produced from radiolytic processes was investigated as a possible health hazard in the working environment at the University Hospital 'S.Orsola-Malpighi' PET facility. Intense radiation fields can generate ozone, known to be the most toxic gas produced by ionizing radiation around a particle accelerator. To evaluate ozone concentration in air, two different measurement campaigns were conducted with passive diffusion detectors. Comparison of the results with the concentration limits recommended by American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) demonstrated that ozone poses no health hazard to workers around a biomedical cyclotron.

  9. Effects of person-centered care on residents and staff in aged-care facilities: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brownie S

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sonya Brownie, Susan NancarrowSchool of Health and Human Sciences, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW, AustraliaBackground: Several residential aged-care facilities have replaced the institutional model of care to one that accepts person-centered care as the guiding standard of practice. This culture change is impacting the provision of aged-care services around the world. This systematic review evaluates the evidence for an impact of person-centered interventions on aged-care residents and nursing staff.Methods: We searched Medline, Cinahl, Academic Search Premier, Scopus, Proquest, and Expanded Academic ASAP databases for studies published between January 1995 and October 2012, using subject headings and free-text search terms (in UK and US English spelling including person-centered care, patient-centered care, resident-oriented care, Eden Alternative, Green House model, Wellspring model, long-term care, and nursing homes.Results: The search identified 323 potentially relevant articles. Once duplicates were removed, 146 were screened for inclusion in this review; 21 were assessed for methodological quality, resulting in nine articles (seven studies that met our inclusion criteria. There was only one randomized, controlled trial. The majority of studies were quasi-experimental pre-post test designs, with a control group (n = 4. The studies in this review incorporated a range of different outcome measures (ie, dependent variables to evaluate the impact of person-centered interventions on aged-care residents and staff. One person-centered intervention, ie, the Eden Alternative, was associated with significant improvements in residents' levels of boredom and helplessness. In contrast, facility-specific person-centered interventions were found to impact nurses' sense of job satisfaction and their capacity to meet the individual needs of residents in a positive way. Two studies found that person-centered care was actually associated with an

  10. LASL experimental engineered waste burial facility: design considerations and preliminary plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DePoorter, G.L.

    1980-01-01

    The LASL Experimental Engineered Waste Burial Facility is a part of the National Low-Level Waste Management Program on Shallow-Land Burial Technology. It is a test facility where basic information can be obtained on the processes that occur in shallow-land burial operations and where new concepts for shallow-land burial can be tested on an accelerated basis on an appropriate scale. The purpose of this paper is to present some of the factors considered in the design of the facility and to present a preliminary description of the experiments that are initially planned. This will be done by discussing waste management philosophies, the purposes of the facility in the context of the waste management philosophy for the facility, and the design considerations, and by describing the experiments initially planned for inclusion in the facility, and the facility site

  11. Technologies and experimental approaches in the NIH Botanical Research Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Stephen; Birt, Diane F; Cassileth, Barrie R; Cefalu, William T; Chilton, Floyd H; Farnsworth, Norman R; Raskin, Ilya; van Breemen, Richard B; Weaver, Connie M

    2009-01-01

    There are many similarities between research on combinatorial chemistry and natural products and research on dietary supplements and botanicals in the NIH Botanical Research Centers. The technologies in the centers are similar to those used by other NIH-sponsored investigators. All centers rigorously examine the authenticity of botanical dietary supplements and determine the composition and concentrations of the phytochemicals therein, most often by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. Several of the centers specialize in fractionation and high-throughput evaluation to identify the individual bioactive agent or a combination of agents. Some centers are using DNA microarray analyses to determine the effects of botanicals on gene transcription with the goal of uncovering the important biochemical pathways they regulate. Other centers focus on bioavailability and uptake, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of the phytochemicals as for all xenobiotics. Because phytochemicals are often complex molecules, synthesis of isotopically labeled forms is carried out by plant cells in culture, followed by careful fractionation. These labeled phytochemicals allow the use of accelerator mass spectrometry to trace the tissue distribution of 14C-labeled proanthocyanidins in animal models of disease. State-of-the-art proteomics and mass spectrometry are also used to identify proteins in selected tissues whose expression and posttranslational modification are influenced by botanicals and dietary supplements. In summary, the skills needed to carry out botanical centers’ research are extensive and may exceed those practiced by most NIH investigators. PMID:18258642

  12. Investigation of analytical and experimental behavior of nuclear facility ventilation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.R.; Ricketts, C.I.; Andrae, R.W.; Bolstad, J.W.; Horak, H.L.; Martin, R.A.; Tang, P.K.; Gregory, W.S.

    1979-01-01

    The behavior of nuclear facility ventilation systems subjected to both natural and man-caused accidents is being investigated. The purpose of the paper is to present a program overview and highlight recent results of the investigations. The program includes both analytical and experimental investigations. Computer codes for predicting accident-induced gas dynamics and test facilities to obtain supportive experimental data to define structural integrity and confinement effectiveness of ventilation system components are described. A unique test facility and recently obtained structural limits for high efficiency particulate air filters are reported

  13. Experimental studies on helium release and stratification within the AIHMS facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhakar, Aneesh; Agrawal, Nilesh; Raghavan, V.; Das, Sarit K.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen is generated during core meltdown accidents in nuclear power plants. The study of hydrogen release and mixing within the containment is an important area of safety research. An experimental setup called the AERB-IIT Madras Hydrogen Mixing Studies (AIHMS) facility is setup at IIT Madras to study the distribution of helium (an inert surrogate to hydrogen) subsequent to release as a jet. The present paper gives details of the design, fabrication and instrumentation of the AIHMS facility. It then compares the features of the facility with respect to other facilities existing for hydrogen mitigation studies. Then it gives details of the experiments on concentration build-up studies as a result of injection of gases (air and helium) performed in this experimental facility. (author)

  14. Nuclear engineering experiments at experimental facilities of JNC in graduate course of Tokyo Institute of Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashizaki, Noriyosu; Takahashi, Minoru; Aoyama, Takafumi; Onose, Shoji

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear engineering experiments using outside facilities of the campus have been offered for graduate students in the nuclear engineering course in Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech.). The experiments are managed with the collaboration of Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC), Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University (KUR). This report presents the new curriculum of the nuclear engineering experiments at JNC since 2002. The change is due to the shutdown of Deuterium Criticality Assembly Facility (DCA) that was used as an experimental facility until 2001. Reactor physics experiment using the training simulator of the experimental fast reactor JOYO is continued from the previous curriculum with the addition of the criticality approach experiment and control rods calibration. A new experimental subject is an irradiated material experiment at the Material Monitoring Facility (MMF). As a result, both are acceptable as the student experiments on the fast reactor. (author)

  15. 2 MV injector as the Elise front-end and as an experimental facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, S.S.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Peters, C.; Reginato, L.; Tauschwitz, A.; Grote, D.; Deadrick, F.

    1996-01-01

    We report on progress in the preparation of the 2 MV injector at LBNL as the front end of Elise and as a multipurpose experimental facility for heavy ion fusion beam dynamics studies. Recent advances in the performance and understanding of the injector are described, and some of the ongoing experimental activities are summarized. (orig.)

  16. Future aerospace ground test facility requirements for the Arnold Engineering Development Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, Mark E.; Baron, Judson R.; Bogdonoff, Seymour M.; Carter, Donald I.; Couch, Lana M.; Fanning, Arthur E.; Heiser, William H.; Koff, Bernard L.; Melnik, Robert E.; Mercer, Stephen C.

    1992-01-01

    Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) was conceived at the close of World War II, when major new developments in flight technology were presaged by new aerodynamic and propulsion concepts. During the past 40 years, AEDC has played a significant part in the development of many aerospace systems. The original plans were extended through the years by some additional facilities, particularly in the area of propulsion testing. AEDC now has undertaken development of a master plan in an attempt to project requirements and to plan for ground test and computational facilities over the coming 20 to 30 years. This report was prepared in response to an AEDC request that the National Research Council (NRC) assemble a committee to prepare guidance for planning and modernizing AEDC facilities for the development and testing of future classes of aerospace systems as envisaged by the U.S. Air Force.

  17. Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System Test Facility at Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Darlene

    1989-01-01

    Different aspects of Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) testing are currently taking place at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Unique to this testing is the variety of test areas and the fact that all are located in one building. The north high bay of building 4755, the Core Module Integration Facility (CMIF), contains the following test areas: the Subsystem Test Area, the Comparative Test Area, the Process Material Management System (PMMS), the Core Module Simulator (CMS), the End-use Equipment Facility (EEF), and the Pre-development Operational System Test (POST) Area. This paper addresses the facility that supports these test areas and briefly describes the testing in each area. Future plans for the building and Space Station module configurations will also be discussed.

  18. STRESSFUL SITUATIONS IN THE WORK OF A MULTIPROFILE PEDIATRIC MEDICAL FACILITY'S CALL CENTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Spivak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stressful situations in the work of a pediatric medical facility's call center are associated with patients' violation of social communication norms and aggressive behavior, as well as the operator's professional/maternal conflict. The following psychological resources facilitate better stress resistance of operators: self-confidence, mature and rational attitude, personal activity, inner satisfaction, optimism, emotional breadth and emotional colleague support. 

  19. Experimental program for the Fast Breeder Blanket Facility, FBBF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, K.O.; Clikeman, F.M.; Johnson, R.H.; Borg, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    The work performed in the reporting period was primarily concerned with the development of the experimental program (Task A) and with the pre-analysis of future loadings and the impact upon the permanent loading of the two converter regions, which contain 4.8 percent enriched UO 2 rods. It appears necessary that a neutron poison (B 4 C) be placed in the converter (transformer) regions in order to hold, also for future loadings, the k/sub eff/ of a hypothetically flooded FBBF well below 1. Since it is planned to use the same welded converter regions for all experiments, the required B 4 C loading needs to be determined prior to the first blanket loading. Further the equipment needs have been identified (Task D), the 252 Cf-source has been requested on a loan basis (Task E). First discussions with ANL on blanket experiments have been initiated

  20. Power supply control system for experimental physical facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelepukin, S.A.; Osipov, Eh.V.; Petrov, V.S.; Sergeev, V.A.; Uglekov, V.Ya.

    1979-01-01

    A multichannel (to 1024 channels) system for control of power supply voltage is descrited. The system consists of an analog commulator, a digital voltmeter and a special controller. The controller serves at the same time as an interface for connecting the system as a ''unit'' of the VECTOR and SUMMA unified electronic systems. The system has been realized for control of the photomultiplier power supply voltage of the MARK multipurpose experimental device (256 channels, the measurement accuracy is 0.2%, the measuring time is 500 ms per point). Software devised for the HP-2100 computer permits automatical comparison of photomultiplier power supply voltages with sample ones in the mode of continuous control of a single voltage or in the mode of programmed selection of voltages to provide the control in arbitrary order or automatic scanning

  1. An assessment of cultural values and resident-centered culture change in U.S. nursing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaszak-Holl, Jane; Castle, Nicholas G; Lin, Michael; Spreitzer, Gretchen

    2013-01-01

    Culture change initiatives propose to improve care by addressing the lack of managerial supports and prevalent stressful work environments in the industry; however, little is known about how culture change facilities differ from facilities in the industry that have not chosen to affiliate with the resident-centered care movements. The aim of this study was to evaluate representation of organizational culture values within a random sample of U.S. nursing home facilities using the competing values framework and to determine whether organizational values are related to membership in resident-centered culture change initiatives. We collected reports of cultural values using a well-established competing values framework instrument in a random survey of facility administrators and directors of nursing within all states. We received responses from 57% of the facilities that were mailed the survey. Directors of nursing and administrators did not differ significantly in their reports of culture and facility measures combined their responses. Nursing facilities favored market-focused cultural values on average, and developmental values, key to innovation, were the least common across all nursing homes. Approximately 17% of the facilities reported that all cultural values were strong within their facilities. Only high developmental cultural values were linked to participation in culture change initiatives. Culture change facilities were not different from non-culture change facilities in the promotion of employee focus as organizational culture, as emphasized in group culture values. Likewise, culture change facilities were also not more likely to have hierarchical or market foci than non-culture change facilities. Our results counter the argument that culture change facilities have a stronger internal employee focus than facilities more generally but do show that culture change facilities report stronger developmental cultures than non-culture change facilities, which

  2. The Hobbs Oil and Water Experimental Facility of the Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, F.D.; Bretz, R.E.; Bowman, R.S.; Kieft, T.L.; Cadena, F.

    1992-01-01

    The Hobbs Oil and Water Experimental (HOWE) Facility came on-line as a research component of the Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) when funding for the Consortium became official in late February 1990. As a support facility for WERC, which was established to expand the ability of this nation to manage hazardous, radioactive, and solid wastes through a multidisciplinary approach, HOWE can tap into the expertise that resides at three major New Mexico universities, on Native American community college, and two national laboratories. The intention of the HOWE is to provide education, as well as research and development programs, that reflect concerns of the petroleum industry in the United States. Personnel work to solve environmental problems and assess the impact to the industry of regulatory actions pertaining to those problems. Leadership for the program is provided from the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology at Socorro, NM, by Technical Leaders F.D. Martin, Director of the Petroleum Recovery Research Center, and Dr. R.E. Bretz of the petroleum engineering faculty. The HOWE site is administered by Mike DeMarco, Director of the Petroleum Technology Program at the New Mexico Junior College in Hobbs, NM. Currently, the HOWE laboratory is being provided with state-of-the-art equipment to support research projects or field demonstration activities. Programs include research pertaining to groundwater pollution transport processes, slurry-phase bioremediation of oilfield production pit sludges, and treatment of produced brines or contaminated waters. This paper introduces the HOWE and discusses the research programs relevant to the petroleum industry that are presently underway or planned. Future collaborative efforts with industry that are presently underway or planned. Future collaborative efforts with industry groups are being encouraged

  3. Texas Experimental Tokamak, a plasma research facility: Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootton, A.J.

    1995-08-01

    In the year just past, the authors made major progress in understanding turbulence and transport in both core and edge. Development of the capability for turbulence measurements throughout the poloidal cross section and intelligent consideration of the observed asymmetries, played a critical role in this work. In their confinement studies, a limited plasma with strong, H-mode-like characteristics serendipitously appeared and received extensive study though a diverted H-mode remains elusive. In the plasma edge, they appear to be close to isolating a turbulence drive mechanism. These are major advances of benefit to the community at large, and they followed from incremental improvements in diagnostics, in the interpretation of the diagnostics, and in TEXT itself. Their general philosophy is that the understanding of plasma physics must be part of any intelligent fusion program, and that basic experimental research is the most important part of any such program. The work here demonstrates a continuing dedication to the problems of plasma transport which continue to plague the community and are an impediment to the design of future devices. They expect to show here that they approach this problem consistently, systematically, and effectively

  4. Impact assessment of the forest fires on Oarai Research and Development Center Waste Treatment Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimomura, Yusuke; Kitamura, Ryoichi; Hanari, Akira; Sato, Isamu

    2016-03-01

    In response to new standards for regulating waste treatment facility ('new regulatory standards'; December 18, 2013 enforcement), it was carried out impact assessment of forest fires on the Waste Treatment Facility existed in Oarai Research and Development Center of Japan Atomic Energy Agency. At first, a fire spread scenario of forest fires was assumed. The intensity of forest fires was evaluated from field surveys, forest fire evaluation models and so on. As models of forest fire intensity evaluation, Rothermel Model and Canadian Forest Fire Behavior Prediction (FBP) System were used. Impact assessment of radiant heat to the facility was carried out, and temperature change of outer walls for the assumed forest fires was estimated. The outer wall temperature of facility was estimated around 160degC at the maximum, it was revealed that it doesn't reach allowable temperature limit. Consequently, it doesn't influence the strength of concrete. In addition, a probability of fire breach was estimated to be about 20%. This report illustrates an example of evaluation of forest fires for the new regulatory standards through impact assessment of the forest fires on the Waste Treatment Facility. (author)

  5. Gravity Plant Physiology Facility (GPPF) Team in the Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide, and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Featured is the Gravity Plant Physiology Facility (GPPF) team in the SL POCC during the IML-1 mission.

  6. Critical Point Facility (CPE) Group in the Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide, and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Featured is the Critical Point Facility (CPE) group in the SL POCC during STS-42, IML-1 mission.

  7. Target experimental area and systems of the Us national ignition facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobin, M.; Van Wonterghem, B.; MacGowan, B.J.; Hibbard, W.; Kalantar, D.; Lee, F.D.; Pittenger, L.; Wong, K.

    2000-01-01

    One of the major goals of the US National Ignition Facility is the demonstration of laser driven fusion ignition and burn of targets by inertial confinement and provide capability for a wide variety of high energy density physics experiments. The NIF target area houses the optical systems required to focus the 192 beamlets to a target precisely positioned at the center of the 10 meter diameter, 10-cm thick aluminum target chamber. The chamber serves as mounting surface for the 48 final optics assemblies, the target alignment and positioning equipment, and the target diagnostics. The internal surfaces of the chamber are protected by louvered steel beam dumps. The target area also provides the necessary shielding against target emission and environmental protection equipment. Despite its complexity, the design provides the flexibility to accommodate the needs of the various NIF user groups, such as direct and indirect drive irradiation geometries, modular final optics design, capability to handle cryogenic targets, and easily re-configurable diagnostic instruments. Efficient target area operations are ensured by using line-replaceable designs for systems requiring frequent inspection, maintenance and reconfiguration, such as the final optics, debris shields, phase plates and the diagnostic instruments. A precision diagnostic instrument manipulator (DIMS) allows fast removal and precise repositioning of diagnostic instruments. In addition we will describe several activities to enhance the target chamber availability, such as the target debris mitigation, the use of standard experimental configurations and the development of smart shot operations planning tools. (authors)

  8. Target experimental area and systems of the U.S. National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobin, M; Van Wonterghem, B; MacGowan, B J; Hibbard, W; Kalantar, D; Lee, F D; Pittenger, L; Wong, K

    1999-01-01

    One of the major goals of the US National Ignition Facility is the demonstration of laser driven fusion ignition and burn of targets by inertial confinement and provide capability for a wide variety of high energy density physics experiments. The NIF target area houses the optical systems required to focus the 192 beamlets to a target precisely positioned at the center of the 10 meter diameter, 10-cm thick aluminum target chamber. The chamber serves as mounting surface for the 48 final optics assemblies, the target alignment and positioning equipment, and the target diagnostics. The internal surfaces of the chamber are protected by louvered steel beam dumps. The target area also provides the necessary shielding against target emission and environmental protection equipment. Despite its complexity, the design provides the flexibility to accommodate the needs of the various NIF user groups, such as direct and indirect drive irradiation geometries, modular final optics design, capability to handle cryogenic targets, and easily re-configurable diagnostic instruments. Efficient target area operations are ensured by using line-replaceable designs for systems requiring frequent inspection, maintenance and reconfiguration, such as the final optics, debris shields, phase plates and the diagnostic instruments. A precision diagnostic instrument manipulator (DIMS) allows fast removal and precise repositioning of diagnostic instruments. In addition the authors describe several activities to enhance the target chamber availability, such as the target debris mitigation, the use of standard experimental configurations and the development of smart shot operations planning tools

  9. The Development of the Acoustic Design of NASA Glenn Research Center's New Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Mark E.; Hozman, Aron D.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is leading the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC s Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio. Benham Companies, LLC is currently constructing modal, base-shake sine and reverberant acoustic test facilities to support the future testing needs of NASA s space exploration program. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) will be approximately 101,000 ft3 in volume and capable of achieving an empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world s known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. The key to achieving the expected acoustic test spectra for a range of many NASA space flight environments in the RATF is the knowledge gained from a series of ground acoustic tests. Data was obtained from several NASA-sponsored test programs, including testing performed at the National Research Council of Canada s acoustic test facility in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and at the Redstone Technical Test Center acoustic test facility in Huntsville, Alabama. The majority of these tests were performed to characterize the acoustic performance of the modulators (noise generators) and representative horns that would be required to meet the desired spectra, as well as to evaluate possible supplemental gas jet noise sources. The knowledge obtained in each of these test programs enabled the design of the RATF sound generation system to confidently advance to its final acoustic design and subsequent on-going construction.

  10. Test program element II blanket and shield thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing, experimental facility survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A.G.; Longhurst, G.R.

    1981-12-01

    This report presents results of a survey conducted by EG and G Idaho to determine facilities available to conduct thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing for the Department of Energy Office of Fusion Energy First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Test Program. In response to EG and G queries, twelve organizations (in addition to EG and G and General Atomic) expressed interest in providing experimental facilities. A variety of methods of supplying heat is available

  11. Test program element II blanket and shield thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing, experimental facility survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ware, A.G.; Longhurst, G.R.

    1981-12-01

    This report presents results of a survey conducted by EG and G Idaho to determine facilities available to conduct thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing for the Department of Energy Office of Fusion Energy First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Test Program. In response to EG and G queries, twelve organizations (in addition to EG and G and General Atomic) expressed interest in providing experimental facilities. A variety of methods of supplying heat is available.

  12. Experimental research subject and renovation of chemical processing facility (CPF) for advanced fast reactor fuel reprocessing technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Tomozo; Shinozaki, Tadahiro; Nomura, Kazunori; Koma, Yoshikazu; Miyachi, Shigehiko; Ichige, Yoshiaki; Kobayashi, Tsuguyuki; Nemoto, Shin-ichi

    2002-01-01

    In order to enhance economical efficiency, environmental impact and nuclear nonproliferation resistance, the Advanced Reprocessing Technology, such as simplification and optimization of process, and applicability evaluation of the innovative technology that was not adopted up to now, has been developed for the reprocessing of the irradiated fuel taken out from a fast reactor. Renovation of the hot cell interior equipments, establishment and updating of glove boxes, installation of various analytical equipments, etc. in the Chemical Processing Facility (CPF) was done to utilize the CPF more positivity which is the center of the experimental field, where actual fuel can be used, for research and development towards establishment of the Advanced Reprocessing Technology development. The hot trials using the irradiated fuel pins of the experimental fast reactor 'JOYO' for studies on improved aqueous reprocessing technology, MA separation technology, dry process technology, etc. are scheduled to be carried out with these new equipments. (author)

  13. A new apparatus at hyper irradiation research facility at the Atomic Research Center, University of Tokyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, Hiromi; Iwai, Takeo; Narui, Makoto; Omata, Takao [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Research Center for Nuclear Science and Technology

    1996-12-01

    In the hyper irradiation research facility at the Atomic Research Center, the University of Tokyo, following apparatuses were newly installed for accelerator relating apparatus on 1995 fiscal year; (1) Hyper ion microbeam analysis apparatus, (2) Fourier conversion infrared microscopy, (3) Pico second two-dimensional fluorescence measuring apparatus, (4) Femto second wave-length reversible pulse laser radiation apparatus, and others. In addition to double irradiation, pulse beam irradiation experiment and so forth characteristic in conventional hyper irradiation research apparatus, upgrading of material irradiation experiments using these new apparatuses are intended. (G.K.)

  14. The neutron therapy facility at the University of Pennsylvania-Fox Chase Cancer Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloch, P.; Chu, J.; Larsen, R.

    1983-01-01

    The fusion of deuterium and tritium nuclei results in the formation of a helium-4 nucleus and a 14 MEV neutron. This reaction readily takes place when deuterium and tritium ions are accelerated to potentials between 150-200 kV. These energy ions can be obtained in a moderate size accelerator. A DT neutron facility has been installed in the radiation therapy department of the University of Pennsylvania Hospital-Fox Chase Cancer Center. The system is being commissioned in a hospital setting to test the efficacy of fast neutron radiotherapy

  15. A new apparatus at hyper irradiation research facility at the Atomic Research Center, University of Tokyo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Hiromi; Iwai, Takeo; Narui, Makoto; Omata, Takao

    1996-01-01

    In the hyper irradiation research facility at the Atomic Research Center, the University of Tokyo, following apparatuses were newly installed for accelerator relating apparatus on 1995 fiscal year; 1) Hyper ion microbeam analysis apparatus, 2) Fourier conversion infrared microscopy, 3) Pico second two-dimensional fluorescence measuring apparatus, 4) Femto second wave-length reversible pulse laser radiation apparatus, and others. In addition to double irradiation, pulse beam irradiation experiment and so forth characteristic in conventional hyper irradiation research apparatus, upgrading of material irradiation experiments using these new apparatuses are intended. (G.K.)

  16. Size-controlled fluorescent nanodiamonds: A facile method of fabrication and color-center counting

    KAUST Repository

    Mahfouz, Remi

    2013-01-01

    We present a facile method for the production of fluorescent diamond nanocrystals (DNCs) of different sizes and efficiently quantify the concentration of emitting defect color centers (DCCs) of each DNC size. We prepared the DNCs by ball-milling commercially available micrometer-sized synthetic (high pressure, high temperature (HPHT)) diamonds and then separated the as-produced DNCs by density gradient ultracentrifugation (DGU) into size-controlled fractions. A protocol to enhance the uniformity of the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in the diamonds was devised by depositing the DNCs as a dense monolayer on amino-silanized silicon substrates and then subjecting the monolayer to He+ beam irradiation. Using a standard confocal setup, we analyzed the average number of NV centers per crystal, and obtained a quantitative relationship between the DNC particle size and the NV number per crystal. This relationship was in good agreement with results from previous studies that used more elaborate setups. Our findings suggest that nanocrystal size separation by DGU may be used to control the number of defects per nanocrystal. The efficient approaches described herein to control and quantify DCCs are valuable to researchers as they explore applications for color centers and new strategies to create them. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  17. Jackson State University's Center for Spatial Data Research and Applications: New facilities and new paradigms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Bruce E.; Elliot, Gregory

    1989-01-01

    Jackson State University recently established the Center for Spatial Data Research and Applications, a Geographical Information System (GIS) and remote sensing laboratory. Taking advantage of new technologies and new directions in the spatial (geographic) sciences, JSU is building a Center of Excellence in Spatial Data Management. New opportunities for research, applications, and employment are emerging. GIS requires fundamental shifts and new demands in traditional computer science and geographic training. The Center is not merely another computer lab but is one setting the pace in a new applied frontier. GIS and its associated technologies are discussed. The Center's facilities are described. An ARC/INFO GIS runs on a Vax mainframe, with numerous workstations. Image processing packages include ELAS, LIPS, VICAR, and ERDAS. A host of hardware and software peripheral are used in support. Numerous projects are underway, such as the construction of a Gulf of Mexico environmental data base, development of AI in image processing, a land use dynamics study of metropolitan Jackson, and others. A new academic interdisciplinary program in Spatial Data Management is under development, combining courses in Geography and Computer Science. The broad range of JSU's GIS and remote sensing activities is addressed. The impacts on changing paradigms in the university and in the professional world conclude the discussion.

  18. Simulation of natural circulation on an integral type experimental facility, MASLWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Youngjong; Lim, Sungwon; Ha, Jaejoo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    The OSU MASLWR test facility was reconfigured to eliminate a recurring grounding problem and improve facility reliability in anticipation of conducting an IAEA International Collaborative Standard Problem (ICSP). The purpose of ICSP is to provide experimental data on flow instability phenomena under natural circulation conditions and coupled containment/reactor vessel behavior in integral-type reactors, and to evaluate system code capabilities to predict natural circulation phenomena for integral type PWR, by simulating an integrated experiment. A natural circulation in the primary side during various core powers is analyzed using TASS/SMR code for the integral type experimental facility. The calculation results show higher steady state primary flow than experiment. If it matches the initial flow with experiment, it shows lower primary flow than experiment according to the increase of power. The code predictions may be improved by applying a Reynolds number dependent form loss coefficient to accurately account for unrecoverable pressure losses.

  19. Disposition of TA-33-21, a plutonium contaminated experimental facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, E.J.; Garde, R.; Valentine, A.M.

    1975-01-01

    The report discusses the decontamination, demolition and disposal of a plutonium contaminated experimental physics facility which housed physics experiments with plutonium from 1951 until 1960. The results of preliminary decontamination efforts in 1960 are reported along with health physics, waste management, and environmental aspects of final disposition work accomplished during 1974 and 1975. (auth)

  20. Experimental data from a full-scale facility investigating radiant and convective terminals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Dreau, Jerome; Heiselberg, Per; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    The objective of this technical report is to provide information on the accuracy of the experiments performed in “the Cube” (part I, II and III). Moreover, this report lists the experimental data, which have been monitored in the test facility (part IV). These data are available online and can be...

  1. Experimental and Theoretical Progress of Linear Collider Final Focus Design and ATF2 Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Seryi, Andrei; Zimmermann, Frank; Kubo, Kiyoshi; Kuroda, Shigeru; Okugi, Toshiyuki; Tauchi, Toshiaki; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; Urakawa, Junji; White, Glen; Woodley, Mark; Angal-Kalinin, Deepa

    2014-01-01

    In this brief overview we will reflect on the process of the design of the linear collider (LC) final focus (FF) optics, and will also describe the theoretical and experimental efforts on design and practical realisation of a prototype of the LC FF optics implemented in the ATF2 facility at KEK, Japan, presently being commissioned and operated.

  2. Ecological Realism of U.S. EPA Experimental Stream Facility Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    The USEPA’s Experimental Stream Facility (ESF) conducts meso-scale ecotoxicology studies that account for both structural and functional responses of whole stream communities to contaminants or other stressors. The 16 mesocosms of ESF are indoors and consist of a tiled run sectio...

  3. Selected publications related to the experimental facilities of the Advanced Photon Source, 1987--1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This report contain papers on work related to the experimental facilities of the Advanced Photon Source. The general topics of these papers are: insertion devices; front ends; high heat load x-ray optics; novel optics and techniques; and radiation safety, interlocks, and personnel safety

  4. Structural Integrity Program for the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, J.W.; Nenni, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    This report documents the activities of the structural integrity program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center relevant to the high-level waste Calcined Solids Storage Facilities and associated equipment, as required by DOE M 435.1-1, ''Radioactive Waste Management Manual.'' Based on the evaluation documented in this report, the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities are not leaking and are structurally sound for continued service. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities

  5. Structural Integrity Program for the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffrey Bryant

    2008-01-01

    This report documents the activities of the structural integrity program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center relevant to the high-level waste Calcined Solids Storage Facilities and associated equipment, as required by DOE M 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual'. Based on the evaluation documented in this report, the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities are not leaking and are structurally sound for continued service. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities

  6. Experimental evaluation of ballistic hazards in imaging diagnostic center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpowicz, Jolanta; Gryz, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Serious hazards for human health and life and devices in close proximity to the magnetic resonance scanners (MRI scanners) include the effects of being hit by ferromagnetic objects attracted by static magnetic field (SMF) produced by scanner magnet – the so-called ballistic hazards classified among indirect electromagnetic hazards. International safety guidelines and technical literature specify different SMF threshold values regarding ballistic hazards – e.g. 3 mT (directive 2004/40/EC, EN 60601-2-33), and 30 mT (BMAS 2009, directive proposal 2011). Investigations presented in this article were performed in order to experimentally verify SMF threshold for ballistic hazards near MRI scanners used in Poland. Investigations were performed with the use of a laboratory source of SMF (0–30 mT) and MRI scanners of various types. The levels of SMF in which metal objects of various shapes and 0.4–500 g mass are moved by the field influence were investigated. The distance from the MRI scanners (0.2–3T) where hazards may occur were also investigated. Objects investigated under laboratory conditions were moved by SMF of 2.2–15 mT magnetic flux density when they were freely suspended, but were moved by the SMF of 5.6–22 mT when they were placed on a smooth surface. Investigated objects were moved in fields of 3.5–40 mT by MRI scanners. Distances from scanner magnet cover, where ballistic hazards might occur are: up to 0.5 m for 0.2–0.3T scanners; up to 1.3 m for 0.5T scanners; up to 2.0 m for 1.5T scanners and up to 2.5 m for 3T scanners (at the front and back of the magnet). It was shown that SMF of 3 mT magnetic flux density should be taken as the threshold for ballistic hazards. Such level is compatible with SMF limit value regarding occupational safety and health-protected areas/zones, where according to the Polish labor law the procedures of work environment inspection and prevention measures regarding indirect electromagnetic hazards should be applied

  7. Experimental evaluation of ballistic hazards in imaging diagnostic center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpowicz, Jolanta; Gryz, Krzysztof

    2013-04-01

    Serious hazards for human health and life and devices in close proximity to the magnetic resonance scanners (MRI scanners) include the effects of being hit by ferromagnetic objects attracted by static magnetic field (SMF) produced by scanner magnet - the so-called ballistic hazards classified among indirect electromagnetic hazards. International safety guidelines and technical literature specify different SMF threshold values regarding ballistic hazards - e.g. 3 mT (directive 2004/40/EC, EN 60601-2-33), and 30 mT (BMAS 2009, directive proposal 2011). Investigations presented in this article were performed in order to experimentally verify SMF threshold for ballistic hazards near MRI scanners used in Poland. Investigations were performed with the use of a laboratory source of SMF (0-30 mT) and MRI scanners of various types. The levels of SMF in which metal objects of various shapes and 0.4-500 g mass are moved by the field influence were investigated. The distance from the MRI scanners (0.2-3T) where hazards may occur were also investigated. Objects investigated under laboratory conditions were moved by SMF of 2.2-15 mT magnetic flux density when they were freely suspended, but were moved by the SMF of 5.6-22 mT when they were placed on a smooth surface. Investigated objects were moved in fields of 3.5-40 mT by MRI scanners. Distances from scanner magnet cover, where ballistic hazards might occur are: up to 0.5 m for 0.2-0.3T scanners; up to 1.3 m for 0.5T scanners; up to 2.0 m for 1.5T scanners and up to 2.5 m for 3T scanners (at the front and back of the magnet). It was shown that SMF of 3 mT magnetic flux density should be taken as the threshold for ballistic hazards. Such level is compatible with SMF limit value regarding occupational safety and health-protected areas/zones, where according to the Polish labor law the procedures of work environment inspection and prevention measures regarding indirect electromagnetic hazards should be applied. Presented results

  8. The national carbon capture center at the power systems development facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2012-09-01

    The Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) is a state-of-the-art test center sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and dedicated to the advancement of clean coal technology. In addition to the development of advanced coal gasification processes, the PSDF features the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) to study CO2 capture from coal-derived syngas and flue gas. The NCCC includes multiple, adaptable test skids that allow technology development of CO2 capture concepts using coal-derived syngas and flue gas in industrial settings. Because of the ability to operate under a wide range of flow rates and process conditions, research at the NCCC can effectively evaluate technologies at various levels of maturity. During the Budget Period Three reporting period, efforts at the NCCC/PSDF focused on testing of pre-combustion CO2 capture and related processes; commissioning and initial testing at the post-combustion CO2 capture facilities; and operating the gasification process to develop gasification related technologies and for syngas generation to test syngas conditioning technologies.

  9. THE NATIONAL CARBON CAPTURE CENTER AT THE POWER SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2011-05-11

    The Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) is a state-of-the-art test center sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and dedicated to the advancement of clean coal technology. In addition to the development of advanced coal gasification processes, the PSDF features the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) to study CO2 capture from coal-derived syngas and flue gas. The NCCC includes multiple, adaptable test skids that allow technology development of CO2 capture concepts using coal-derived syngas and flue gas in industrial settings. Because of the ability to operate under a wide range of flow rates and process conditions, research at the NCCC can effectively evaluate technologies at various levels of maturity. During the Budget Period Two reporting period, efforts at the PSDF/NCCC focused on new technology assessment and test planning; designing and constructing post-combustion CO2 capture facilities; testing of pre-combustion CO2 capture and related processes; and operating the gasification process to develop gasification related technologies and for syngas generation to test syngas conditioning technologies.

  10. The National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development Facility: Topical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2011-03-01

    The Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) is a state-of-the-art test center sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and dedicated to the advancement of clean coal technology. In addition to the development of advanced coal gasification processes, the PSDF features the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) to study CO2 capture from coal-derived syngas and flue gas. The newly established NCCC will include multiple, adaptable test skids that will allow technology development of CO2 capture concepts using coal-derived syngas and flue gas in industrial settings. Because of the ability to operate under a wide range of flow rates and process conditions, research at the NCCC can effectively evaluate technologies at various levels of maturity. During the Budget Period One reporting period, efforts at the PSDF/NCCC focused on developing a screening process for testing consideration of new technologies; designing and constructing pre- and post-combustion CO2 capture facilities; developing sampling and analytical methods; expanding fuel flexibility of the Transport Gasification process; and operating the gasification process for technology research and for syngas generation to test syngas conditioning technologies.

  11. NASA Johnson Space Center's Planetary Sample Analysis and Mission Science (PSAMS) Laboratory: A National Facility for Planetary Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, D. S.

    2016-01-01

    NASA Johnson Space Center's (JSC's) Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Division, part of the Exploration Integration and Science Directorate, houses a unique combination of laboratories and other assets for conducting cutting edge planetary research. These facilities have been accessed for decades by outside scientists, most at no cost and on an informal basis. ARES has thus provided substantial leverage to many past and ongoing science projects at the national and international level. Here we propose to formalize that support via an ARES/JSC Plane-tary Sample Analysis and Mission Science Laboratory (PSAMS Lab). We maintain three major research capa-bilities: astromaterial sample analysis, planetary process simulation, and robotic-mission analog research. ARES scientists also support planning for eventual human ex-ploration missions, including astronaut geological training. We outline our facility's capabilities and its potential service to the community at large which, taken together with longstanding ARES experience and expertise in curation and in applied mission science, enable multi-disciplinary planetary research possible at no other institution. Comprehensive campaigns incorporating sample data, experimental constraints, and mission science data can be conducted under one roof.

  12. The National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2014-12-30

    The National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) at the Power Systems Development Facility supports the Department of Energy (DOE) goal of promoting the United States’ energy security through reliable, clean, and affordable energy produced from coal. Work at the NCCC supports the development of new power technologies and the continued operation of conventional power plants under CO2 emission constraints. The NCCC includes adaptable slipstreams that allow technology development of CO2 capture concepts using coal-derived syngas and flue gas in industrial settings. Because of the ability to operate under a wide range of flow rates and process conditions, research at the NCCC can effectively evaluate technologies at various levels of maturity and accelerate their development path to commercialization. During its first contract period, from October 1, 2008, through December 30, 2014, the NCCC designed, constructed, and began operation of the Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Center (PC4). Testing of CO2 capture technologies commenced in 2011, and through the end of the contract period, more than 25,000 hours of testing had been achieved, supporting a variety of technology developers. Technologies tested included advanced solvents, enzymes, membranes, sorbents, and associated systems. The NCCC continued operation of the existing gasification facilities, which have been in operation since 1996, to support the advancement of technologies for next-generation gasification processes and pre-combustion CO2 capture. The gasification process operated for 13 test runs, supporting over 30,000 hours combined of both gasification and pre-combustion technology developer testing. Throughout the contract period, the NCCC incorporated numerous modifications to the facilities to accommodate technology developers and increase test capabilities. Preparations for further testing were ongoing to continue advancement of the most promising technologies for

  13. BAGHEERA: A new experimental facility at CEA / Valduc for actinides studies under high dynamic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, G.; Llorca, F.; Lanier, G.; Lamalle, S.; Beaulieu, J.; Antoine, P.; Martinuzzi, P.

    2006-08-01

    This paper is a technical presentation about a new experimental facility recently developed at CEA/Valduc, BAGHEERA, a French acronym for “Hopkinson And High Speed Experiments Glove Box”. This facility is used since mid-2003 to characterize the physical and mechanical behaviour of actinides under high dynamic loadings. For this purpose, four basic experimental devices are confined inside a single glove box: a 50 mm bore diameter single stage light gas gun, two compression and torsion split Hopkinson bars (SHPB and TSHB respectively) and a Taylor test device (TTD). Design and technical data on the experimental equipment are addressed, with a particular emphasis on the gas gun specific features due to actinide applications.

  14. Experimental programs and facilities for ASTRID development related to the Severe Accident Issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Journeau, C.; Suteau, C.; Trotignon, L.; Willermoz, G.; Ducros, G.; Courouau, J.L.; Ruggieri, J.M.; Serre, F.

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive experimental program has been launched in order to gain new data in support of the severe accident studies related to the ASTRID demonstrator. The main new issues with respect to the historic experimental database are mainly related to new design options: heterogeneous core with thick pins; new materials; new severe accident mitigation systems such as - corium discharge channels; - core-catcher with sacrificial materials; - some issues remaining open as Fuel Coolant Interaction. Experiments are needed both in-pile and out of pile: - Depending on the objectives, the out of pile experiments can be conducted - with simulant; - with prototypic corium; - or with irradiated fuel. A new large scale corium facility, FOURNAISE, must be built to fulfill this program. Already, experimental R&D started in existing facilities, such as VITI or CORRONA

  15. Specific schedule conditions for the formation of personnel of A or B category working in nuclear facilities. Option research center

    CERN Document Server

    Int. At. Energy Agency, Wien

    2002-01-01

    This document describes the specific dispositions relative to the Research Center, for the formation to the conventional and radiation risks prevention of personnel of A or B category working in nuclear facilities. The application domain, the applicable documents, the liability, the specificity of the Research Center and of the retraining, the Passerelle formation, are presented. (A.L.B.)

  16. Preoperational Subsurface Conditions at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Service Waste Disposal Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansley, Shannon Leigh

    2002-02-01

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Service Wastewater Discharge Facility replaces the existing percolation ponds as a disposal facility for the INTEC Service Waste Stream. A preferred alternative for helping decrease water content in the subsurface near INTEC, closure of the existing ponds is required by the INTEC Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Record of Decision (ROD) for Waste Area Group 3 Operable Unit 3-13 (DOE-ID 1999a). By August 2002, the replacement facility was constructed approximately 2 miles southwest of INTEC, near the Big Lost River channel. Because groundwater beneath the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is protected under Federal and State of Idaho regulations from degradation due to INEEL activities, preoperational data required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 were collected. These data include preexisting physical, chemical, and biological conditions that could be affected by the discharge; background levels of radioactive and chemical components; pertinent environmental and ecological parameters; and potential pathways for human exposure or environmental impact. This document presents specific data collected in support of DOE Order 5400.1, including: four quarters of groundwater sampling and analysis of chemical and radiological parameters; general facility description; site specific geology, stratigraphy, soils, and hydrology; perched water discussions; and general regulatory requirements. However, in order to avoid duplication of previous information, the reader is directed to other referenced publications for more detailed information. Documents that are not readily available are compiled in this publication as appendices. These documents include well and borehole completion reports, a perched water evaluation letter report, the draft INEEL Wellhead Protection Program Plan, and the Environmental Checklist.

  17. Preoperational Subsurface Conditions at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Service Wastewater Discharge Facility; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansley, Shannon L.

    2002-01-01

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Service Wastewater Discharge Facility replaces the existing percolation ponds as a disposal facility for the INTEC Service Waste Stream. A preferred alternative for helping decrease water content in the subsurface near INTEC, closure of the existing ponds is required by the INTEC Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Record of Decision (ROD) for Waste Area Group 3 Operable Unit 3-13 (DOE-ID 1999a). By August 2002, the replacement facility was constructed approximately 2 miles southwest of INTEC, near the Big Lost River channel. Because groundwater beneath the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is protected under Federal and State of Idaho regulations from degradation due to INEEL activities, preoperational data required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 were collected. These data include preexisting physical, chemical, and biological conditions that could be affected by the discharge; background levels of radioactive and chemical components; pertinent environmental and ecological parameters; and potential pathways for human exposure or environmental impact. This document presents specific data collected in support of DOE Order 5400.1, including: four quarters of groundwater sampling and analysis of chemical and radiological parameters; general facility description; site specific geology, stratigraphy, soils, and hydrology; perched water discussions; and general regulatory requirements. However, in order to avoid duplication of previous information, the reader is directed to other referenced publications for more detailed information. Documents that are not readily available are compiled in this publication as appendices. These documents include well and borehole completion reports, a perched water evaluation letter report, the draft INEEL Wellhead Protection Program Plan, and the Environmental Checklist

  18. Preoperational Subsurface Conditions at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Service Wastewater Discharge Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansley, Shannon L.

    2002-01-01

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Service Wastewater Discharge Facility replaces the existing percolation ponds as a disposal facility for the INTEC Service Waste Stream. A preferred alternative for helping decrease water content in the subsurface near INTEC, closure of the existing ponds is required by the INTEC Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Record of Decision (ROD) for Waste Area Group 3 Operable Unit 3-13 (DOE-ID 1999a). By August 2002, the replacement facility was constructed approximately 2 miles southwest of INTEC, near the Big Lost River channel. Because groundwater beneath the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is protected under Federal and State of Idaho regulations from degradation due to INEEL activities, preoperational data required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 were collected. These data include preexisting physical, chemical, and biological conditions that could be affected by the discharge; background levels of radioactive and chemical components; pertinent environmental and ecological parameters; and potential pathways for human exposure or environmental impact. This document presents specific data collected in support of DOE Order 5400.1, including: four quarters of groundwater sampling and analysis of chemical and radiological parameters; general facility description; site specific geology, stratigraphy, soils, and hydrology; perched water discussions; and general regulatory requirements. However, in order to avoid duplication of previous information, the reader is directed to other referenced publications for more detailed information. Documents that are not readily available are compiled in this publication as appendices. These documents include well and borehole completion reports, a perched water evaluation letter report, the draft INEEL Wellhead Protection Program Plan, and the Environmental Checklist

  19. SDG and E - ERDA Geothermal Loop Experimental Facility. Bi-monthly report, May 1975-August 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, H.K.; Bricarello, J.R.; Campbell, J.A.; Lombard, G.L.; Mulliner, D.K.; Swanson, C.R.

    1976-09-01

    A description of the Geothermal Loop Experimental Facility (GLEF) its construction problems, and a discussion of start-up testing are included. A history and description of the operation and maintenance with the brine injection pump for the facility are presented. The GLEF was divided into five separate sections: steam and condensate system, brine system, purge water system, vent gas system, and cooling water system. An insight into the chemistry of each system is provided by analysis of samples taken. Scaling and corrosion effects of brine, steam, gas, and water in these systems are described in detail. (MHR)

  20. Facilities for post-irradiation examination of experimental fuel elements at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizzan, E.; Chenier, R.J.

    1979-10-01

    Expansion of post-irradiation facilities at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories and steady improvement in hot-cell techniques and equipment are providing more support to Canada's reactor fuel development program. The hot-cell facility primarily used for examination of experimental fuels averages a quarterly throughput of 40 elements and 110 metallographic specimens. New developments in ultrasonic testing, metallographic sample preparation, active storage, active waste filtration, and fissile accountability are coming into use to increase the efficiency and safety of hot-cell operations. (author)

  1. Research on accelerator-driven transmutation and studies of experimental facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takizuka, Takakazu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-11-01

    JAERI is carrying out R and Ds on accelerator-driven transmutation systems under the national OMEGA Program that aims at development of the technology to improve efficiency and safety in the final disposal of radioactive waste. Research facilities for accelerator-driven transmutation experiments are proposed to construct within the framework of the planned JAERI Neutron Science Project. This paper describes the features of the proposed accelerator-driven transmutation systems and their technical issues to be solved. A research facility plan under examination is presented. The plan is divided in two phases. In the second phase, technical feasibility of accelerator-driven systems will be demonstrated with a 30-60 MW experimental integrated system and with a 7 MW high-power target facility. (author)

  2. Performance of the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator facility and initial experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gai, W.; Conde, M.; Cox, G.; Konecny, R.; Power, J.; Schoessow, P.; Simpson, J.; Barov, N.

    1996-01-01

    The Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) facility has begun its experimental program. This unique facility is designed to address advanced acceleration research which requires very short, intense electron bunches. The facility incorporates two photo-cathode based electron sources. One produces up to 100 nC, multi-kiloamp 'drive' bunches which are used to excite wakefields in dielectric loaded structures and in plasma. The second source produces much lower intensity 'witness' pulses which are used to probe the fields produced by the drive. The drive and witness pulses can be precisely timed as well as laterally positioned with respect to each other. We discuss commissioning, initial experiments, and outline plans for a proposed 1 GeV demonstration accelerator. (author)

  3. NRI experimental facility for the testing of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruscak, M.; Chvatal, P.; Zamboch, M.

    1998-01-01

    IASCC influencing reactor internals of both BWR and PWR reactors is a complex phenomenon covering influences of material structure, neutron fluence, neutron flux, chemistry of environment, gamma radiation and mechanical stress. To evaluate such degradation, tests should be performed under conditions similar to those in real structure. Nuclear Research Institute has built several experimental facilities in order to be able to test IASCC degradation of materials. Basically, reactor water loops, both PWR and BWR, could be used to model environmental conditions including gamma and neutron irradiation. Pre-irradiation can be done in irradiation channels under well controlled temperature conditions. During the experiment, in-pile conditions can be compared with those out of pile. It enables to clarify pure influence of irradiation. For testing of irradiated specimens, hot cell facility has been developed for slow strain rate tests. The paper will show all above mentioned facilities as well as some of the results observed with them. (author)

  4. Presentations for the 2nd Muon science experimental facility advisory committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-06-01

    This booklet is reporting a committee-report and materials presented at the Second J-PARC Muon-Science-Experimental-Facility Advisory Committee (MuSAC) held at KEK on February 19 and 20, 2004. Distinguished examples of deep considerations and discussions are the following three directions: 1) as for the facility construction, new high-radiation effect on graphite-production target was pointed out; 2) towards the first-beam experiment, more detailed instrumentations were proposed; 3) regarding financial and muon-power arrangements for the future facility operation, the concept of 'core-user' was introduced. The content included executive summary, introduction, response to recommendations from the 1st MuSAC meeting, review of J-PARC MSL construction plan, core funding issues, access to muon beams for Japanese physicists, conclusions and recommendations and appendices. (S.Y.)

  5. Specialized, multi-user computer facility for the high-speed, interactive processing of experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maples, C.C.

    1979-01-01

    A proposal has been made to develop a specialized computer facility specifically designed to deal with the problems associated with the reduction and analysis of experimental data. Such a facility would provide a highly interactive, graphics-oriented, multi-user environment capable of handling relatively large data bases for each user. By conceptually separating the general problem of data analysis into two parts, cyclic batch calculations and real-time interaction, a multi-level, parallel processing framework may be used to achieve high-speed data processing. In principle such a system should be able to process a mag tape equivalent of data, through typical transformations and correlations, in under 30 sec. The throughput for such a facility, assuming five users simultaneously reducing data, is estimated to be 2 to 3 times greater than is possible, for example, on a CDC7600

  6. Specialized, multi-user computer facility for the high-speed, interactive processing of experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maples, C.C.

    1979-05-01

    A proposal has been made at LBL to develop a specialized computer facility specifically designed to deal with the problems associated with the reduction and analysis of experimental data. Such a facility would provide a highly interactive, graphics-oriented, multi-user environment capable of handling relatively large data bases for each user. By conceptually separating the general problem of data analysis into two parts, cyclic batch calculations and real-time interaction, a multilevel, parallel processing framework may be used to achieve high-speed data processing. In principle such a system should be able to process a mag tape equivalent of data through typical transformations and correlations in under 30 s. The throughput for such a facility, for five users simultaneously reducing data, is estimated to be 2 to 3 times greater than is possible, for example, on a CDC7600. 3 figures

  7. Design of radiation shielding for the proton therapy facility at the National Cancer Center in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. W.; Kwon, J. W.; Lee, J.

    2005-01-01

    The design of radiation shielding was evaluated for a proton therapy facility being established at the National Cancer Center in Korea. The proton beam energy from a 230 MeV cyclotron is varied for therapy using a graphite target. This energy variation process produces high radiation and thus thick shielding walls surround the region. The evaluation was first carried out using analytical expressions at selected locations. Further detailed evaluations have been performed using the Monte Carlo method. Dose equivalent values were calculated to be compared with analytical results. The analytical method generally yielded more conservative values. With consideration of adequate occupancy factors annual dose equivalent rates are kept -1 in all areas. Construction of the building is expected to be completed near the end of 2004 and the installation of therapy equipments will begin a few months later. (authors)

  8. The National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosser, Morgan [Southern Company Services, Inc., Wilsonville, AL (United States)

    2012-12-31

    The Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) is a state-of-the-art test center sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and dedicated to the advancement of clean coal technology. In addition to the development of high efficiency coal gasification processes, the PSDF features the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) to promote new technologies for CO2 capture from coal-derived syngas and flue gas. The NCCC includes multiple, adaptable test skids that allow technology development of CO2 capture concepts using coal-derived syngas and flue gas in industrial settings. Because of the ability to operate under a wide range of flow rates and process conditions, research at the NCCC can effectively evaluate technologies at various levels of maturity and accelerate their development path to commercialization. During the calendar year 2012 portion of the Budget Period Four reporting period, efforts at the NCCC focused on testing of pre- and post-combustion CO2 capture processes and gasification support technologies. Preparations for future testing were on-going as well, and involved facility upgrades and collaboration with numerous technology developers. In the area of pre-combustion, testing was conducted on a new water-gas shift catalyst, a CO2 solvent, and gas separation membranes from four different technology developers, including two membrane systems incorporating major scale-ups. Post-combustion tests involved advanced solvents from three major developers, a gas separation membrane, and two different enzyme technologies. An advanced sensor for gasification operation was evaluated, operation with biomass co-feeding with coal under oxygen-blown conditions was achieved, and progress continued on refining several gasification support technologies.

  9. The National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2014-07-14

    The Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) is a state-of-the-art test center sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and dedicated to the advancement of clean coal technology. In addition to the development of high efficiency coal gasification processes, the PSDF features the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) to promote new technologies for CO2 capture from coal-derived flue gas and syngas. The NCCC includes multiple, adaptable test skids that allow technology development of CO2 capture concepts using coal-derived flue gas and syngas in industrial settings. Because of the ability to operate under a wide range of flow rates and process conditions, research at the NCCC can effectively evaluate technologies at various levels of maturity and accelerate their development paths to commercialization. During the calendar year 2013 portion of the Budget Period Four reporting period, efforts at the NCCC focused on post-combustion CO2 capture, gasification, and pre-combustion CO2 capture technology testing. Preparations for future testing were on-going as well, and involved facility upgrades and collaboration with numerous technology developers. In the area of post-combustion, testing was conducted on an enzyme-based technology, advanced solvents from two major developers, and a gas separation membrane. During the year, the gasification process was operated for three test runs, supporting development of water-gas shift and COS hydrolysis catalysts, a mercury sorbent, and several gasification support technologies. Syngas produced during gasification operation was also used for pre-combustion capture technologies, including gas separation membranes from three different technology developers, a CO2 sorbent, and CO2 solvents.

  10. Experimental measurements and theoretical simulations for neutron flux in self-serve facility of Dhruva reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rana, Y.S.; Mishra, Abhishek; Singh, Tej

    2016-06-01

    Dhruva is a 100 MW th tank type research reactor with natural metallic uranium as fuel and heavy water as coolant, moderator and reflector. The reactor is utilized for production of a large variety of radioisotopes for fulfilling growing demands of various applications in industrial, agricultural and medicinal sectors, and neutron beam research in condensed matter physics. The core consists of two on-power tray rods for radioisotope production and fifteen experimental beam holes for neutron beam research. Recently, a self-serve facility has also been commissioned in one of the through tubes in the reactor for carrying out short term irradiations. To get accurate information about neutron flux spectrum, measurements have been carried out in self-serve facility of Dhruva reactor. The present report describes measurement method, analysis technique and results. Theoretical estimations for neutron flux were also carried out and a comparison between theoretical and experimental results is made. (author)

  11. NASA Johnson Space Center Usability Testing and Analysis facility (UTAF) Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, Mihriban; Holden, Kritina L.

    2005-01-01

    The Usability Testing and Analysis Facility (UTAF) is part of the Space Human Factors Laboratory at the NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. The facility performs research for NASA's HumanSystems Integration Program, under the HumanSystems Research and Technology Division. Specifically, the UTAF provides human factors support for space vehicles, including the International Space Station, the Space Shuttle, and the forthcoming Crew Exploration Vehicle. In addition, there are ongoing collaborative research efforts with external corporations and universities. The UTAF provides human factors analysis, evaluation, and usability testing of crew interfaces for space applications. This includes computer displays and controls, workstation systems, and work environments. The UTAF has a unique mix of capabilities, with a staff experienced in both cognitive human factors and ergonomics. The current areas of focus are: human factors applications in emergency medical care and informatics; control and display technologies for electronic procedures and instructions; voice recognition in noisy environments; crew restraint design for unique microgravity workstations; and refinement of human factors processes and requirements. This presentation will provide an overview of ongoing activities, and will address how the UTAF projects will evolve to meet new space initiatives.

  12. NASA Johnson Space Center Usability Testing and Analysis Facility (WAF) Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, M.

    2004-01-01

    The Usability Testing and Analysis Facility (UTAF) is part of the Space Human Factors Laboratory at the NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. The facility provides support to the Office of Biological and Physical Research, the Space Shuttle Program, the International Space Station Program, and other NASA organizations. In addition, there are ongoing collaborative research efforts with external businesses and universities. The UTAF provides human factors analysis, evaluation, and usability testing of crew interfaces for space applications. This includes computer displays and controls, workstation systems, and work environments. The UTAF has a unique mix of capabilities, with a staff experienced in both cognitive human factors and ergonomics. The current areas of focus are: human factors applications in emergency medical care and informatics; control and display technologies for electronic procedures and instructions; voice recognition in noisy environments; crew restraint design for unique microgravity workstations; and refinement of human factors processes. This presentation will provide an overview of ongoing activities, and will address how the projects will evolve to meet new space initiatives.

  13. Comparison the Results of Numerical Simulation And Experimental Results for Amirkabir Plasma Focus Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudarzi, Shervin; Amrollahi, R.; Niknam Sharak, M.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper the results of the numerical simulation for Amirkabir Mather-type Plasma Focus Facility (16 kV, 36μF and 115 nH) in several experiments with Argon as working gas at different working conditions (different discharge voltages and gas pressures) have been presented and compared with the experimental results. Two different models have been used for simulation: five-phase model of Lee and lumped parameter model of Gonzalez. It is seen that the results (optimum pressures and current signals) of the Lee model at different working conditions show better agreement than lumped parameter model with experimental values.

  14. Comparison the results of numerical simulation and experimental results for Amirkabir plasma focus facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goudarzi, Shervin; Amrollahi, R; Sharak, M Niknam

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the results of the numerical simulation for Amirkabir Mather-type Plasma Focus Facility (16 kV, 36μF and 115 nH) in several experiments with Argon as working gas at different working conditions (different discharge voltages and gas pressures) have been presented and compared with the experimental results. Two different models have been used for simulation: five-phase model of Lee and lumped parameter model of Gonzalez. It is seen that the results (optimum pressures and current signals) of the Lee model at different working conditions show better agreement than lumped parameter model with experimental values.

  15. Calculation and experimental measurements in the Argonauta reactor subcritical and exponential facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voi, Dante L.; Furieri, Rosane C.A.A.; Renke, Carlos A.C.; Bastos, Wilma S.; Ferreira, Francisco J.O.

    1997-01-01

    Initial measurements were performed on the exponential and subcritical facility installed on the internal thermal column of the Argonauta reactor at IEN-CNEN-Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The measurements are include in the reactor physics experimental program for integral parameters determination, for both valid and confirmed theoretical models for reactor calculation. Gamma doses and neutron fluxes were measured with telescopic, proportional counters, wire and foil detectors. Experimental data were compared with results obtained by application of CITATION code. (author). 4 refs., 8 figs

  16. Fuel elements and fuel element materials. Experimental facilities for fission products lift-off tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, R.J.; Veyrat, J.F.

    1978-01-01

    One of the hypothetical accidents on the HTGR primary cooling circuits is the failure of a circuit resulting in a depressurization in the primary loops of the reactor. There is a risk of release of fission products in relation to the size of the failure. Experimental facilities for HTGR tests were developed: an in pile helium loop Comedie and an out of pile helium loop

  17. High Pressure Combustion Experimental Facility(HPCEF) for Studies on Combustion in Reactive Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-13

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 12. DISTRIBUTION AVAILIBILITY STATEMENT 6...Report: High Pressure Combustion Experimental Facility (HPCEF) for Studies on Combustion in Reactive Flows The views, opinions and/or findings... contained in this report are those of the author(s) and should not contrued as an official Department of the Army position, policy or decision, unless so

  18. Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories Reactor Physics Mk. III Experimental Programme. Description of facility and programme for 1971

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunn, R M; Waterson, R H; Young, J D

    1971-01-15

    Reactor physics experiments have been carried out at Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories during the past few years in support of the Civil Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactors (Mk. II) the Generating Board is building. These experiments are part of an overall programme whose objective is to assess the accuracy of the calculational methods used in the design and operation of these reactors. This report provides a description of the facility for the Mk. III experimental programme and the planned programme for 1971.

  19. D-Side: A Facility and Workforce Planning Group Multi-criteria Decision Support System for Johnson Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavana, Madjid

    2005-01-01

    "To understand and protect our home planet, to explore the universe and search for life, and to inspire the next generation of explorers" is NASA's mission. The Systems Management Office at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is searching for methods to effectively manage the Center's resources to meet NASA's mission. D-Side is a group multi-criteria decision support system (GMDSS) developed to support facility decisions at JSC. D-Side uses a series of sequential and structured processes to plot facilities in a three-dimensional (3-D) graph on the basis of each facility alignment with NASA's mission and goals, the extent to which other facilities are dependent on the facility, and the dollar value of capital investments that have been postponed at the facility relative to the facility replacement value. A similarity factor rank orders facilities based on their Euclidean distance from Ideal and Nadir points. These similarity factors are then used to allocate capital improvement resources across facilities. We also present a parallel model that can be used to support decisions concerning allocation of human resources investments across workforce units. Finally, we present results from a pilot study where 12 experienced facility managers from NASA used D-Side and the organization's current approach to rank order and allocate funds for capital improvement across 20 facilities. Users evaluated D-Side favorably in terms of ease of use, the quality of the decision-making process, decision quality, and overall value-added. Their evaluations of D-Side were significantly more favorable than their evaluations of the current approach. Keywords: NASA, Multi-Criteria Decision Making, Decision Support System, AHP, Euclidean Distance, 3-D Modeling, Facility Planning, Workforce Planning.

  20. Construction of an underground facility for ''in-situ'' experimentation in the boom clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonne, A.; Manfroy, P.; Van Haelewijn, R.; Heremans, R.

    1985-01-01

    The Belgian R and D Programme concerning the disposal of high-level and alpha-bearing radioactive waste in continental geological formations was launched by SCK/CEN, Mol in 1974. The programme is characterised by its site and formation specific approach, i.e. Mol and Boom clay. In the framework of site confirmation, an important issue is the ''in situ'' experimentation which should allow to determine with a higher degree of confidence the numerical value of the data needed for the evaluations, assessments and designs. The present report deals with the construction of an underground experimental facility, which was scheduled to be fully completed in mid 1984. Initially, the completion was scheduled for the end of 1983, but supplementary experiments related to geomechanics and mining capabilities and to be performed during the construction phase of the experimental facility delayed the completion of the underground facility. During the construction, a continuous observation was made of the behaviour of the clay mass and the structures. In this final contract-report, only the as-built structure, the time schedule and the ''in situ'' experiments launched or performed during the construction phase are dealt with

  1. Experimental facilities for PEC reactor design central channel test loop: CPC-1 - thermal shocks loop: CEDI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvaresi, C.; Moreschi, L.F.

    1983-01-01

    PEC (Prova Elementi di Combustibile: Fuel Elements Test) is an experimental fast sodium-cooled reactor with a power of 120 MWt. This reactor aims at studying the behaviour of fuel elements under thermal and neutron conditions comparable with those existing in fast power nuclear facilities. Given the particular structure of the core, the complex operations to be performed in the transfer cell and the strict operating conditions of the central channel, two experimental facilities, CPC-1 and CEDI, have been designed as a support to the construction of the reactor. CPC-1 is a 1:1 scale model of the channel, transfer-cell and loop unit of the channel, whereas CEDI is a sodium-cooled loop which enables to carry out tests of isothermal endurance and thermal shocks on the group of seven forced elements, by simulating the thermo-hydraulic and mechanical conditions existing in the reactor. In this paper some experimental test are briefy discussed and some facilities are listed, both for the CPC-1 and for the CEDI. (Auth.)

  2. Bagheera: A new experimental facility at Cea / Valduc for actinides studies under high dynamic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, G.; Llorca, F.; Lanier, G.; Lamalle, S.; Beaulieu, J.; Antoine, P.; Martinuzzi, P.

    2006-01-01

    This paper is a technical presentation about a new experimental facility recently developed at CEA/Valduc, BAGHEERA, a French acronym for 'Hopkinson And High Speed Experiments Glove Box'. This facility is used since mid-2003 to characterize the physical and mechanical behaviour of actinides under high dynamic loadings. For this purpose, four basic experimental devices are confined inside a single 10 m long, 3 m high and 1.5 m large glove box: a 50 mm bore diameter single stage light gas gun, two compression and torsion split Hopkinson bars (SHPB and TSHB respectively) and a Taylor test device (TTD). A unique highly automated system drives all devices. The overall architecture of the facility takes into account the useful ability to carry out symmetrical and reverse experiments with the gas gun, that is actinide to actinide impact and actinide to inert material impact. Design and technical data on the experimental equipment are addressed, with a particular emphasis on the gas gun specific features due to actinide applications

  3. Experimental platforms in support of the ASTRID program: existing and planned facilities - 15126

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastaldi, O.; Rodriguez, G.; Ayrault, L.; Collard, B.; Dumesnil, J.; Dujet, F.; Journeau, C.; Latge, C.; Sanseigne, E.; Serre, F.; Tkatschenko, I.; Willermoz, G.

    2015-01-01

    The sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR) French program currently focused on the design of the ASTRID (Advanced Sodium Technological Reactor for Industrial Demonstration) reactor in different fields: energy conversion system, instrumentation for continuous monitoring, In Service Inspection and Repair, core design, fuel handling, thermo hydraulic, severe accidents, large flow electromagnetic pumps... Even if the French experimental prototype implies the development of innovative techniques, concepts and feedback of operations of SFRs are important, the new challenges coming from the objectives to meet GEN-IV requirements need some research and development. To achieve this goal, the generation four French SFR program includes the development of technological platforms with experimental facilities to develop and evaluate innovative options and also qualify some ASTRID specific components. The needs in terms of development, validation and qualification of techniques, components or systems to be used on ASTRID have been reviewed exhaustively in 2014. It allowed to consolidate or to precise the experimental purposes of the four CEA platforms regrouping technological facilities with different strategy of erection. PAPIRUS platform (largely already constructed) is dedicated to in-sodium experimental testing; GISEH platform (also largely already constructed) is devoted to water and air tests in support to hydraulic, thermal-hydraulic and fluid-structure interaction studies; CHEOPS platform (detailed studies and realization contract launched in 2014 aiming at commissioning and start up in 2018) deals with in sodium research and development and some qualifications requiring large scale; and last, PLINIUS-2 platform (commissioning and start up in 2019) concerns prototypic corium behavior studies in severe accident conditions and mitigation device qualification. This paper presents the four platforms and for each of them the experimental needs which are covered by their facilities

  4. Evolution of the Building Management System in the INFN CNAF Tier-1 data center facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Pier Paolo; Donatelli, Massimo; Falabella, Antonio; Mazza, Andrea; Onofri, Michele

    2017-10-01

    The INFN CNAF Tier-1 data center is composed by two different main rooms containing IT resources and four additional locations that hosts the necessary technology infrastructures providing the electrical power and cooling to the facility. The power supply and continuity are ensured by a dedicated room with three 15,000 to 400 V transformers in a separate part of the principal building and two redundant 1.4MW diesel rotary uninterruptible power supplies. The cooling is provided by six free cooling chillers of 320 kW each with a N+2 redundancy configuration. Clearly, considering the complex physical distribution of the technical plants, a detailed Building Management System (BMS) was designed and implemented as part of the original project in order to monitor and collect all the necessary information and for providing alarms in case of malfunctions or major failures. After almost 10 years of service, a revision of the BMS system was somewhat necessary. In addition, the increasing cost of electrical power is nowadays a strong motivation for improving the energy efficiency of the infrastructure. Therefore the exact calculation of the power usage effectiveness (PUE) metric has become one of the most important factors when aiming for the optimization of a modern data center. For these reasons, an evolution of the BMS system was designed using the Schneider StruxureWare infrastructure hardware and software products. This solution proves to be a natural and flexible development of the previous TAC Vista software with advantages in the ease of use and the possibility to customize the data collection and the graphical interfaces display. Moreover, the addition of protocols like open standard Web services gives the possibility to communicate with the BMS from custom user application and permits the exchange of data and information through the Web between different third-party systems. Specific Web services SOAP requests has been implemented in our Tier-1 monitoring system in

  5. Experimental test of the postulate that continuous columnar pinning centers produce the highest Jc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinstein, Roy; Gandini, Alberto; Sawh, Ravi-Persad; Mayes, Bill; Parks, Drew

    2004-01-01

    Continuous columnar pinning centers, created by energetic ions, have been usefully studied theoretically and experimentally to investigate vortex physics in high T c superconductors. However, along the way, in error, their discontinuities have been downplayed, and they have been anointed as the way to produce high J c

  6. Experimental facility for development of high-temperature reactor technology: instrumentation needs and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabharwall Piyush

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A high-temperature, multi-fluid, multi-loop test facility is under development at the Idaho National Laboratory for support of thermal hydraulic materials, and system integration research for high-temperature reactors. The experimental facility includes a high-temperature helium loop, a liquid salt loop, and a hot water/steam loop. The three loops will be thermally coupled through an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX and a secondary heat exchanger (SHX. Research topics to be addressed include the characterization and performance evaluation of candidate compact heat exchangers such as printed circuit heat exchangers (PCHEs at prototypical operating conditions. Each loop will also include an interchangeable high-temperature test section that can be customized to address specific research issues associated with each working fluid. This paper also discusses needs and challenges associated with advanced instrumentation for the multi-loop facility, which could be further applied to advanced high-temperature reactors. Based on its relevance to advanced reactor systems, the new facility has been named the Advanced Reactor Technology Integral System Test (ARTIST facility. A preliminary design configuration of the ARTIST facility will be presented with the required design and operating characteristics of the various components. The initial configuration will include a high-temperature (750 °C, high-pressure (7 MPa helium loop thermally integrated with a molten fluoride salt (KF-ZrF4 flow loop operating at low pressure (0.2 MPa, at a temperature of ∼450 °C. The salt loop will be thermally integrated with the steam/water loop operating at PWR conditions. Experiment design challenges include identifying suitable materials and components that will withstand the required loop operating conditions. The instrumentation needs to be highly accurate (negligible drift in measuring operational data for extended periods of times, as data collected will be

  7. Experimental facility for development of high-temperature reactor technology: instrumentation needs and challenges - 15066

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabharwall, P.; O'Brien, J.E.; Yoon, S.J.; Sun, X.

    2015-01-01

    A high-temperature, multi-fluid, multi-loop test facility is under development at the Idaho National Laboratory for support of thermal hydraulic, materials, and system integration research for high-temperature reactors. The experimental facility includes a high-temperature helium loop, a liquid salt loop, and a hot water/steam loop. The 3 loops will be thermally coupled through an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) and a secondary heat exchanger (SHX). Research topics to be addressed include the characterization and performance evaluation of candidate compact heat exchangers such as printed circuits heat exchangers (PCHEs) at prototypical operating conditions. Each loop will also include an interchangeable high-temperature test section that can be customized to address specific research issues associated with each working fluid. This paper also discusses needs and challenges associated with advanced instrumentation for the multi-loop facility, which could be further applied to advanced high-temperature reactors. Based on its relevance to advanced reactor systems, the new facility has been named the Advanced Reactor Technology Integrated System Test (ARTIST) facility. A preliminary design configuration of the ARTIST facility will be presented with the required design and operating characteristics of the various components. The initial configuration will include a high-temperature (750 C. degrees), high-pressure (7 MPa) helium loop thermally integrated with a molten fluoride salt (KF-ZrF 4 ) flow loop operating at low pressure (0.2 MPa), at a temperature of ∼ 450 C. degrees. The salt loop will be thermally integrated with the steam/water loop operating at PWR conditions. Experiment design challenges include identifying suitable materials and components that will withstand the required loop operating conditions. The instrumentation needs to be highly accurate (negligible drift) in measuring operational data for extended periods of times, as data collected will be

  8. Feasibility study for a biomedical experimental facility based on LEIR at CERN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abler, Daniel; Garonna, Adriano; Carli, Christian; Dosanjh, Manjit; Peach, Ken

    2013-07-01

    In light of the recent European developments in ion beam therapy, there is a strong interest from the biomedical research community to have more access to clinically relevant beams. Beamtime for pre-clinical studies is currently very limited and a new dedicated facility would allow extensive research into the radiobiological mechanisms of ion beam radiation and the development of more refined techniques of dosimetry and imaging. This basic research would support the current clinical efforts of the new treatment centres in Europe (for example HIT, CNAO and MedAustron). This paper presents first investigations on the feasibility of an experimental biomedical facility based on the CERN Low Energy Ion Ring LEIR accelerator. Such a new facility could provide beams of light ions (from protons to neon ions) in a collaborative and cost-effective way, since it would rely partly on CERN's competences and infrastructure. The main technical challenges linked to the implementation of a slow extraction scheme for LEIR and to the design of the experimental beamlines are described and first solutions presented. These include introducing new extraction septa into one of the straight sections of the synchrotron, changing the power supply configuration of the magnets, and designing a new horizontal beamline suitable for clinical beam energies, and a low-energy vertical beamline for particular radiobiological experiments.

  9. Feasibility study for a biomedical experimental facility based on LEIR at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abler, Daniel; Garonna, Adriano; Carli, Christian; Dosanjh, Manjit; Peach, Ken

    2013-01-01

    In light of the recent European developments in ion beam therapy, there is a strong interest from the biomedical research community to have more access to clinically relevant beams. Beamtime for pre-clinical studies is currently very limited and a new dedicated facility would allow extensive research into the radiobiological mechanisms of ion beam radiation and the development of more refined techniques of dosimetry and imaging. This basic research would support the current clinical efforts of the new treatment centres in Europe (for example HIT, CNAO and MedAustron). This paper presents first investigations on the feasibility of an experimental biomedical facility based on the CERN Low Energy Ion Ring LEIR accelerator. Such a new facility could provide beams of light ions (from protons to neon ions) in a collaborative and cost-effective way, since it would rely partly on CERN's competences and infrastructure. The main technical challenges linked to the implementation of a slow extraction scheme for LEIR and to the design of the experimental beamlines are described and first solutions presented. These include introducing new extraction septa into one of the straight sections of the synchrotron, changing the power supply configuration of the magnets, and designing a new horizontal beamline suitable for clinical beam energies, and a low-energy vertical beamline for particular radiobiological experiments. (author)

  10. Beam studies and experimental facility for the AWAKE experiment at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bracco, Chiara; Gschwendtner, Edda; Petrenko, Alexey; Timko, Helga; Argyropoulos, Theodoros; Bartosik, Hannes; Bohl, Thomas; Esteban Müller, Juan; Goddard, Brennan; Meddahi, Malika; Pardons, Ans; Shaposhnikova, Elena; Velotti, Francesco M.; Vincke, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    A Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment has been proposed as an approach to eventually accelerate an electron beam to the TeV energy range in a single plasma section. To verify this novel technique, a proof of principle R and D experiment, AWAKE, is planned at CERN using 400 GeV proton bunches from the SPS. An electron beam will be injected into the plasma cell to probe the accelerating wakefield. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the CNGS facility profiting from existing infrastructure where only minor modifications need to be foreseen. The design of the experimental area and the proton and electron beam lines are shown. The achievable SPS proton bunch properties and their reproducibility have been measured and are presented. - Highlights: • A proton driven plasma wakefield experiment using the first time protons as drive beam is proposed. • The integration of AWAKE experiment, the proton, laser and electron beam line in an existing CERN facility is demonstrated. • The necessary modifications in the experimental facility are presented. • Proton beam optics and a new electron beam line are adapted to match with the required beam parameters. • Short high-intensity bunches were studied in the SPS to guide the design parameters of the AWAKE project

  11. Experimental characterization of HOTNES: A new thermal neutron facility with large homogeneity area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedogni, R., E-mail: roberto.bedogni@lnf.infn.it [INFN–LNF, via E. Fermi n. 40, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Sperduti, A. [INFN–LNF, via E. Fermi n. 40, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); ENEA C.R. Frascati, via E. Fermi n. 45, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Pietropaolo, A.; Pillon, M. [ENEA C.R. Frascati, via E. Fermi n. 45, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Pola, A. [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Energia, via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy); INFN–Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Gómez-Ros, J.M. [INFN–LNF, via E. Fermi n. 40, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2017-01-21

    A new thermal neutron irradiation facility, called HOTNES (HOmogeneous Thermal NEutron Source), was established in the framework of a collaboration between INFN-LNF and ENEA-Frascati. HOTNES is a polyethylene assembly, with about 70 cmx70 cm square section and 100 cm height, including a large, cylindrical cavity with diameter 30 cm and height 70 cm. The facility is supplied by a {sup 241}Am-B source located at the bottom of this cavity. The facility was designed in such a way that the iso-thermal-fluence surfaces, characterizing the irradiation volume, coincide with planes parallel to the cavity bottom. The thermal fluence rate across a given isofluence plane is as uniform as 1% on a disk with 30 cm diameter. Thermal fluence rate values from about 700 cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} to 1000 cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} can be achieved. The facility design, previously optimized by Monte Carlo simulation, was experimentally verified. The following techniques were used: gold activation foils to assess the thermal fluence rate, semiconductor-based active detector for mapping the irradiation volume, and Bonner Sphere Spectrometer to determine the complete neutron spectrum. HOTNES is expected to be attractive for the scientific community involved in neutron metrology, neutron dosimetry and neutron detector testing.

  12. Experimental study of heat transfer in the slotted channels at CTF facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asmolov, V.; Kobzar, L.; Nickulshin, V.; Strizhov, V.

    1999-01-01

    During core melt accident significant amount of core may relocate in the reactor pressure vessel lower head. During its cooling it may form cracks inside the corium and gap between corium and reactor vessel. Gap also may appear due to deformation of the lower head if its temperature exceed creep limit. Slotted channels ensure ingress of the cooling water into the corium, and exit of the generated steam. Study of the cool-down mechanism of the solid core debris in the lower head of the reactor vessel through gap and cracks is the objective of experimental work on the CTF facility. Thermal hydraulics in the heated channels closed from the bottom and flooded with the saturated water from the top of the channel, is characterized by the counterflow of the steam and water, attended by such specific phenomena as the dry out when boiling, flooding and overturning of the coming down flow of water at the certain flow rates of the steam going up, partial dry out of the channel, and reflooding from the top of the heated channel with the saturated water. The above phenomena may reveal independently or in different combinations depending on geometric parameters of the channel, heat release, and coolant parameters. Interchange of these processes with a certain cyclic sequence is possible. Experimental study was performed at the CTF (Coolability Test Facility) facility, which is a part of the thermohydraulic KC test facility in the RRC 'Kurchatov Institute'. Presented results are obtained at the CTF-1 test section which represents a vertical flat channel modeling a single crack in the solidified corium or the gap between the corium and reactor vessel

  13. Decommissioning of the nuclear licensed facilities at the Fontenay aux Roses CEA Center; cleanup of nuclear licensed facility 57 and monitoring of operations and operating feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estivie, D.; Bohar, M.P.; Jeanjacques, M.; Binet, C.; Bremond, M.P.; Poyau, C.; Mandard, L.; Boissonneau, J.F.; Fouquereau, A.; Pichereau, E.

    2008-01-01

    This is a summary of the program for the decommissioning of all the CEA Licensed Nuclear Facilities in Fontenay aux Roses. The particularity of this center is now it is located in a built-up area. It is presented like example the operations to clean up the equipment of the Nuclear Licensed Facility 57 (NLF 57). Due to the diversity of the research and development work carried out on the reprocessing of spent fuel in it, this installation is emblematic of many of the technical and organizational issues liable to be encountered in the final closure of nuclear facilities. It was developed a method applied to establish the multi-annual budget, monitor the progress of operations and integrate, as work continues, the operating feedback. (author)

  14. Seismic test facilities at the ENEA Casaccia Research Center; Prove sismiche con le tavole vibranti al centro ricerche Enea Casaccia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Canio, G. [ENEA, Divisione Servizi Tecnologici, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy)

    2000-07-01

    The main experimental facilities for seismic tests at the ENEA C.R. Casaccia laboratories consist of two high performance shake table for three axial seismic tests of structures up to 10 ton mass and 3g acceleration applied at the Center of Gravity at 1m from the base table. The activities are principally devoted to the dynamic characterization and vibration tests for mechanical and aero spatial structures, and the experimental analysis of innovative systems for the seismic isolation and retrofitting of civil, industrial, and historical buildings; together with the seismic tests of sub-structures and scaled mock-ups, in order to evaluate the isolation/dissipation performance of the anti-seismic devices, and the failure modes of the structural parts of the building. [Italian] Le principali attrezzature per le prove sismiche presso i laboratori del C.R. Casaccia consistono di due tavole vibranti triassali per prove su strutture fino a 10t di peso con una accelerazione di 3g applicata al centro di gravita' posto ad 1 m di altezza dal piano della tavola. Le principali attivita' riguardano: (a) test di caratterizzazione dinamica e prove di vibrazioni per strutture meccaniche ed aerospaziali; (b) l'analisi sperimentale di sistemi innovativi per l'isolamento sismico ed il consolidamento di strutture civili, industriali e storico monumentali, e le prove sismiche di elementi strutturali e di modelli in scala per la valutazione della capacita' di dissipazione dei dispositivi antisismici e le modalita' di formazione delle fratture.

  15. Fluidized column biodenitrification demonstration facility at the FMPC [Feed Materials Production Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patton, J.B.

    1987-02-01

    The mission of the Fernald Ohio Feed Materials Production Center, owned by DOE and operated by Westinghouse Materials Company of Ohio, is to produce uranium metal primarily for fuel in production reactors at Hanford, Washington, and Savannah River, South Carolina. Several waste streams result from production that are combined in the plant general sump and processed through settling basins prior to discharge. Individual streams have varying nitrate concentrations which, when combined, may range up to about 10,000 milligrams/liter. A fluidized-bed technology has been operated to demonstrate nitrate reduction by bacteriological denitrification on production scale. The system consists of two columns operating in series. The demonstration run will be considering: rate of biodenitrification; methyl alcohol consumption (bacterial substrate); sulfuric acid requirement (pH adjustment); accommodation of the biomass by the plant sewage treatment facility; flexibility of the system to receive a waste stream which varies in both volume and nitrate concentration; and modification and/or additions needed in the system to function as a permanent production operation. 8 figs

  16. Investigation and Development of Control Laws for the NASA Langley Research Center Cockpit Motion Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coon, Craig R.; Cardullo, Frank M.; Zaychik, Kirill B.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to develop highly advanced simulators is a critical need that has the ability to significantly impact the aerospace industry. The aerospace industry is advancing at an ever increasing pace and flight simulators must match this development with ever increasing urgency. In order to address both current problems and potential advancements with flight simulator techniques, several aspects of current control law technology of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center's Cockpit Motion Facility (CMF) motion base simulator were examined. Preliminary investigation of linear models based upon hardware data were examined to ensure that the most accurate models are used. This research identified both system improvements in the bandwidth and more reliable linear models. Advancements in the compensator design were developed and verified through multiple techniques. The position error rate feedback, the acceleration feedback and the force feedback were all analyzed in the heave direction using the nonlinear model of the hardware. Improvements were made using the position error rate feedback technique. The acceleration feedback compensator also provided noteworthy improvement, while attempts at implementing a force feedback compensator proved unsuccessful.

  17. Person-centered care and engagement via technology of residents with dementia in aged care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Anita M Y; Loi, Samantha M; Westphal, Alissa; Lautenschlager, Nicola T

    2017-12-01

    Touchscreen technology (TT) is a resource that can improve the quality of life of residents with dementia, and care staff, in residential aged care facilities (RACF) through a person-centered care approach. To enable the use of TTs to engage and benefit people with dementia in RACFs, education is needed to explore how these devices may be used, what facilitates use, and how to address barriers. We sought to provide education and explore RACF staff views and barriers on using TT to engage their residents with dementia. An educational session on using TT with residents with dementia was given to staff from three long-term RACFs in Melbourne, Australia. A cross-sectional convenience sample of 17 staff members (personal care attendants, registered nurses, enrolled nurses, allied health clinicians, and domestic staff) who attended were administered questionnaires pre- and post-sessions. As a result of the education seminar, they were significantly more confident in their ability to use TT devices with residents. TT, and education to staff about its use with residents with dementia, is a useful strategy to enhance RACF staff knowledge and confidence, thereby enhancing the use of technology in RACFs in order to improve care standards in people with dementia.

  18. The structural biology center at the APS: an integrated user facility for macromolecular crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbaum, G.; Westbrook, E.M.

    1997-01-01

    The Structural Biology Center (SBC) has developed and operates a sector (undulator and bending magnet) of the APS as a user facility for macromolecular crystallography. Crystallographically determined structures of proteins, nucleic acids and their complexes with proteins, viruses, and complexes between macromolecules and small ligands have become of central importance in molecular and cellular biology. Major design goals were to make the extremely high brilliance of the APS available for brilliance limited studies, and to achieve a high throughput of less demanding studies, as well as optimization for MAS-phasing. Crystal samples will include extremely small crystals, crystals with large unit cells (viruses, ribosomes, etc.) and ensembles of closely similar crystal structures for drug design, protein engineering, etc. Data are recorded on a 3000x3000 pixel CCD-area detector (optionally on image plates). The x-ray optics of both beamlines has been designed to produce a highly demagnified image of the source in order to match the focal size with the sizes of the sample and the resolution element of the detector. Vertical focusing is achieved by a flat, cylindrically bent mirror. Horizontal focusing is achieved by sagitally bending the second crystal of the double crystal monochromator. Monochromatic fluxes of 1.3 * 10 13 ph/s into focal sizes of 0.08 mm (horizontal)x0.04 mm (vertical) FWHM (flux density 3.5 * 10 15 ph/s/mm 2 ) have been recorded.copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  19. Production and quality assurance automation in the Goddard Space Flight Center Flight Dynamics Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, K. B.; Cox, C. M.; Thomas, C. W.; Cuevas, O. O.; Beckman, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    The Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) generates numerous products for NASA-supported spacecraft, including the Tracking and Data Relay Satellites (TDRS's), the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE), and the space shuttle. These products include orbit determination data, acquisition data, event scheduling data, and attitude data. In most cases, product generation involves repetitive execution of many programs. The increasing number of missions supported by the FDF has necessitated the use of automated systems to schedule, execute, and quality assure these products. This automation allows the delivery of accurate products in a timely and cost-efficient manner. To be effective, these systems must automate as many repetitive operations as possible and must be flexible enough to meet changing support requirements. The FDF Orbit Determination Task (ODT) has implemented several systems that automate product generation and quality assurance (QA). These systems include the Orbit Production Automation System (OPAS), the New Enhanced Operations Log (NEOLOG), and the Quality Assurance Automation Software (QA Tool). Implementation of these systems has resulted in a significant reduction in required manpower, elimination of shift work and most weekend support, and improved support quality, while incurring minimal development cost. This paper will present an overview of the concepts used and experiences gained from the implementation of these automation systems.

  20. A new laboratory-scale experimental facility for detailed aerothermal characterizations of volumetric absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Garcia, Fabrisio; Santiago, Sergio; Luque, Salvador; Romero, Manuel; Gonzalez-Aguilar, Jose

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes a new modular laboratory-scale experimental facility that was designed to conduct detailed aerothermal characterizations of volumetric absorbers for use in concentrating solar power plants. Absorbers are generally considered to be the element with the highest potential for efficiency gains in solar thermal energy systems. The configu-ration of volumetric absorbers enables concentrated solar radiation to penetrate deep into their solid structure, where it is progressively absorbed, prior to being transferred by convection to a working fluid flowing through the structure. Current design trends towards higher absorber outlet temperatures have led to the use of complex intricate geometries in novel ceramic and metallic elements to maximize the temperature deep inside the structure (thus reducing thermal emission losses at the front surface and increasing efficiency). Although numerical models simulate the conjugate heat transfer mechanisms along volumetric absorbers, they lack, in many cases, the accuracy that is required for precise aerothermal validations. The present work aims to aid this objective by the design, development, commissioning and operation of a new experimental facility which consists of a 7 kWe (1.2 kWth) high flux solar simulator, a radiation homogenizer, inlet and outlet collector modules and a working section that can accommodate volumetric absorbers up to 80 mm × 80 mm in cross-sectional area. Experimental measurements conducted in the facility include absorber solid temperature distributions along its depth, inlet and outlet air temperatures, air mass flow rate and pressure drop, incident radiative heat flux, and overall thermal efficiency. In addition, two windows allow for the direct visualization of the front and rear absorber surfaces, thus enabling full-coverage surface temperature measurements by thermal imaging cameras. This paper presents the results from the aerothermal characterization of a siliconized silicon

  1. Experimental subcritical facility driven by D-D/D-T neutron generator at BARC, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Amar, E-mail: image@barc.gov.in; Roy, Tushar; Kashyap, Yogesh; Ray, Nirmal; Shukla, Mayank; Patel, Tarun; Bajpai, Shefali; Sarkar, P.S.; Bishnoi, Saroj

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: •Experimental subcritical facility BRAHMMA coupled to D-D/D-T neutron generator. •Preliminary results of PNS experiments reported. •Feynman-alpha noise measurements explored with continuous source. -- Abstract: The paper presents design of an experimental subcritical assembly driven by D-D/D-T neutron and preliminary experimental measurements. The system has been developed for investigating the static and dynamic neutronic properties of accelerator driven sub-critical systems. This system is modular in design and it is first in the series of subcritical assemblies being designed. The subcritical core consists of natural uranium fuel with high density polyethylene as moderator and beryllium oxide as reflector. The fuel is embedded in high density polyethylene moderator matrix. Estimated k{sub eff} of the system is ∼0.89. One of the unique features of subcritical core is the use of Beryllium oxide (BeO) as reflector and HDPE as moderator making the assembly a compact modular system. The subcritical core is coupled to Purnima Neutron Generator which works in D-D and D-T mode with both DC and pulsed operation. It has facility for online source strength monitoring using neutron tagging and programmable source modulation. Preliminary experiments have been carried out for spatial flux measurement and reactivity estimation using pulsed neutron source (PNS) techniques with D-D neutrons. Further experiments are being planned to measure the reactivity and other kinetic parameters using noise methods. This facility would also be used for carrying out studies on effect of source importance and measurement of source multiplication factor k{sub s} and external neutron source efficiency φ{sup ∗} in great details. Experiments with D-T neutrons are also underway.

  2. Space Technology Demonstrations Using Low Cost, Short-Schedule Airborne and Range Facilities at the Dryden Flight Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, John; Kelly, John; Jones, Dan; Lee, James

    2013-01-01

    There is a national effort to expedite advanced space technologies on new space systems for both government and commercial applications. In order to lower risk, these technologies should be demonstrated in a relevant environment before being installed in new space systems. This presentation introduces several low cost, short schedule space technology demonstrations using airborne and range facilities available at the Dryden Flight Research Center.

  3. Experimental and Computational Instrumentation for Rotorcraft Noise and Vibration Control Research at the Penn State Rotorcraft Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smith, Edward

    2001-01-01

    A team of faculty at the Penn State Rotorcraft Center of Excellence has integrated five new facilities into a broad range of research and educational programs focused on rotorcraft noise and vibration control...

  4. Sizing and melting development activities using noncontaminated metal at the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, M.M.; Logan, J.A.

    1984-05-01

    EG and G Idaho, Inc., has established the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to develop the capability to reduce the volume that low-level beta/gamma wastes occupy at the disposal site. The work effort at WERF includes a waste sizing development activity (WSDA), a waste melting development activity (WMDA), and a waste incineration development activity (WIDA). This report describes work and developments to date in the WSDA and WMDA with noncontaminated metallic waste in preparation for operations at WERF involving beta/gamma-contaminated metal

  5. Integrated assessment of thermal hydraulic processes in W7-X fusion experimental facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaliatka, T., E-mail: tadas.kaliatka@lei.lt; Uspuras, E.; Kaliatka, A.

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • The model of Ingress of Coolant Event experiment facility was developed using the RELAP5 code. • Calculation results were compared with Ingress of Coolant Event experiment data. • Using gained experience, the numerical model of Wendelstein 7-X facility was developed. • Performed analysis approved pressure increase protection system for LOCA event. - Abstract: Energy received from the nuclear fusion reaction is one of the most promising options for generating large amounts of carbon-free energy in the future. However, physical and technical problems existing in this technology are complicated. Several experimental nuclear fusion devices around the world have already been constructed, and several are under construction. However, the processes in the cooling system of the in-vessel components, vacuum vessel and pressure increase protection system of nuclear fusion devices are not widely studied. The largest amount of radioactive materials is concentrated in the vacuum vessel of the fusion device. Vacuum vessel is designed for the vacuum conditions inside the vessel. Rupture of the in-vessel components of the cooling system pipe may lead to a sharp pressure increase and possible damage of the vacuum vessel. To prevent the overpressure, the pressure increase protection system should be designed and implemented. Therefore, systematic and detailed experimental and numerical studies, regarding the thermal-hydraulic processes in cooling system, vacuum vessel and pressure increase protection system, are important and relevant. In this article, the numerical investigation of thermal-hydraulic processes in cooling systems of in-vessel components, vacuum vessels and pressure increase protection system of fusion devices is presented. Using the experience gained from the modelling of “Ingress of Coolant Event” experimental facilities, the numerical model of Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) experimental fusion device was developed. The integrated analysis of the

  6. Operational readiness review for the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    An Operational Readiness Review (ORR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory's (INEL's) Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) was conducted by EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc., to verify the readiness of WERF to resume operations following a shutdown and modification period of more than two years. It is the conclusion of the ORR Team that, pending satisfactory resolution of all pre-startup findings, WERF has achieved readiness to resume unrestricted operations within the approved safety basis. ORR appraisal forms are included in this report

  7. Source term evaluation for accident transients in the experimental fusion facility ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virot, F.; Barrachin, M.; Cousin, F. [IRSN, BP3-13115, Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2015-03-15

    We have studied the transport and chemical speciation of radio-toxic and toxic species for an event of water ingress in the vacuum vessel of experimental fusion facility ITER with the ASTEC code. In particular our evaluation takes into account an assessed thermodynamic data for the beryllium gaseous species. This study shows that deposited beryllium dusts of atomic Be and Be(OH){sub 2} are formed. It also shows that Be(OT){sub 2} could exist in some conditions in the drain tank. (authors)

  8. Health Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, ... psychiatric care centers. When you choose a health facility, you might want to consider How close it ...

  9. Effects assessment of 10 functioning years on the main components of the molten salt PCS experimental facility of ENEA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaggioli, Walter; Di Ascenzi, Primo; Rinaldi, Luca; Tarquini, Pietro; Fabrizi, Fabrizio

    2016-05-01

    In the frame of the Solar Thermodynamic Laboratory, ENEA has improved CSP Parabolic Trough technologies by adopting new advanced solutions for linear tube receivers and by implementing a binary mixture of molten salt (60% NaNO3 and 40% KNO3) [1] as both heat transfer fluid and heat storage medium in solar field and in storage tanks, thus allowing the solar plants to operate at high temperatures up to 550°C. Further improvements have regarded parabolic mirror collectors, piping and process instrumentation. All the innovative components developed by ENEA, together with other standard parts of the plant, have been tested and qualified under actual solar operating conditions on the PCS experimental facility at the ENEA Casaccia Research Center in Rome (Italy). The PCS (Prova Collettori Solari, i.e. Test of Solar Collectors) facility is the main testing loop built by ENEA and it is unique in the world for what concerns the high operating temperature and the fluid used (mixture of molten salt). It consists in one line of parabolic trough collectors (test section of 100 m long life-size solar collectors) using, as heat transfer fluid, the aforesaid binary mixture of molten salt up to 10 bar, at high temperature in the range 270° and 550°C and a flow rate up to 6.5 kg/s. It has been working since early 2004 [2] till now; it consists in a unique closed loop, and it is totally instrumented. In this paper the effects of over ten years qualification tests on the pressurized tank will be presented, together with the characterization of the thermal losses of the piping of the molten salt circuit, and some observations performed on the PCS facility during its first ten years of operation.

  10. The Perspective of the Staff Regarding Facility Revitalization at Walter Reed Army Medical Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baker, Jimmy G

    2004-01-01

    ...). The response rate for the questionnaire was 40.69%, Analysis of collected data revealed that most respondents believe major facility revitalization must occur at WRAMC, staff awareness of the Master Facility Plan is lacking and staff education...

  11. Sandia National Laboratories Facilities Management and Operations Center Design Standards Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fattor, Steven [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The manual contains general requirements that apply to nonnuclear and nonexplosive facilities. For design and construction requirements for modifications to nuclear or explosive facilities, see the project-specific design requirements noted in the Design Criteria.

  12. The JAERI-KEK joint project on high intensity proton accelerator and overview of nuclear transmutation experimental facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Yujiro

    2001-01-01

    A status of the JAERI/KEK joint project on High Intensity Proton Accelerator is overviewed. It is highlighted that Experimental facilities for development of the accelerator driven system (ADS) for nuclear transmutation technology is proposed under the project. (author)

  13. Fermilab D-0 Experimental Facility: Energy conservation report and mechanical systems design optimization and cost analysis study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krstulovich, S.F.

    1987-01-01

    This report is developed as part of the Fermilab D-0 Experimental Facility Project Title II Design Documentation Update. As such, it concentrates primarily on HVAC mechanical systems design optimization and cost analysis

  14. Accelerator laboratories: development centers for experimental physics and technology in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazari, M.

    1989-01-01

    Three years ago in this Nuclear Center the author and Professor Graef expounded the inception and development of experimental physics and new techniques centered about laboratories and equipped in our country with positive ion accelerators. Extracted here is the information on the laboratories that have allowed professional training as well as the furtherance of scientific productivity in each group. An additional proposal as to how the technical groups knowledgeable in advanced technology might contribute significantly to adequate preparation of youth at the intermediate level able to generate innocuous micro industries in their own neighbourhood. (Author). 5 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  15. Development of Variational Guiding Center Algorithms for Parallel Calculations in Experimental Magnetic Equilibria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellison, C. Leland [PPPL; Finn, J. M. [LANL; Qin, H. [PPPL; Tang, William M. [PPPL

    2014-10-01

    Structure-preserving algorithms obtained via discrete variational principles exhibit strong promise for the calculation of guiding center test particle trajectories. The non-canonical Hamiltonian structure of the guiding center equations forms a novel and challenging context for geometric integration. To demonstrate the practical relevance of these methods, a prototypical variational midpoint algorithm is applied to an experimental magnetic equilibrium. The stability characteristics, conservation properties, and implementation requirements associated with the variational algorithms are addressed. Furthermore, computational run time is reduced for large numbers of particles by parallelizing the calculation on GPU hardware.

  16. Experimental investigations of the accelerator-driven transmutation technologies at the subcritical facility ''Yalina''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chigrinov, S.E.; Kiyavitskaya, H.I.; Serafimovich, I.G.; Rakhno, I.L.; Rutkovskaia, Ch.K.; Fokov, Y.; Khilmanovich, A.M.; Marstinkevich, B.A.; Bournos, V.V.; Korneev, S.V.; Mazanik, S.E.; Kulikovskaya, A.V.; Korbut, T.P.; Voropaj, N.K.; Zhouk, I.V.; Kievec, M.K.

    2002-01-01

    The investigations on accelerator-driven transmutation technologies (ADTT) focus on the reduction of the amount of long-lived wastes and the physics of a subcritical system driven with an external neutron source. This paper presents the experimental facility 'Yalina' which was designed and created at the Radiation Physics and Chemistry Problems Institute of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus in the framework of the ISTC project no. B-070 to study the peculiarities of ADTT in thermal spectrum. A detailed description of the assembly, neutron generator and a preliminary analysis of some calculated and experimental data (multiplication factor, neutron flux density distribution in the assembly, transmutation rates of some long-lived fission products and minor actinides) are presented. (authors)

  17. A Unique Outside Neutron and Gamma Ray Instrumentation Development Test Facility at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodnarik, J.; Evans, L.; Floyd, S.; Lim, L.; McClanahan, T.; Namkung, M.; Parsons, A.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.; Trombka, J.

    2010-01-01

    An outside neutron and gamma ray instrumentation test facility has been constructed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to evaluate conceptual designs of gamma ray and neutron systems that we intend to propose for future planetary lander and rover missions. We will describe this test facility and its current capabilities for operation of planetary in situ instrumentation, utilizing a l4 MeV pulsed neutron generator as the gamma ray excitation source with gamma ray and neutron detectors, in an open field with the ability to remotely monitor and operate experiments from a safe distance at an on-site building. The advantage of a permanent test facility with the ability to operate a neutron generator outside and the flexibility to modify testing configurations is essential for efficient testing of this type of technology. Until now, there have been no outdoor test facilities for realistically testing neutron and gamma ray instruments planned for solar system exploration

  18. Pressure suppression system (PSS) for nuclear ships. Experimental results obtained at the GKSS PSS-test-facillity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aust, E.; Niemann, H.R.; Schwan, H.; Vollbrandt, J.

    1978-01-01

    The PSS-test facility is shortly presented which was designed to show experimentally the operation of the pressure suppression containment for the NCS 80 concept. The results of the experimental LOCA-simulation tests in the PSS-test facility are illustrated by diagrams. The observed phenomena as chugging and pessure oscillations immediately after vent clearing are reported as well as the thermohydraulic loadings of the total system. Finally a short view is given on the future test program

  19. Feasibility study for a biomedical experimental facility based on LEIR at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Abler, Daniel; Carli, Christian; Dosanjh, Manjit; Peach, Ken; Orecchia, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    In light of the recent European developments in ion beam therapy, there is a strong interest from the biomedical research community to have more access to clinically relevant beams. Beamtime for pre-clinical studies is currently very limited and a new dedicated facility would allow extensive research into the radiobiological mechanisms of ion beam radiation and the development of more refined techniques of dosimetry and imaging. This basic research would support the current clinical efforts of the new treatment centres in Europe (for example HIT, CNAO and MedAustron). This paper presents first investigations on the feasibility of an experimental biomedical facility based on the CERN Low Energy Ion Ring LEIR accelerator. Such a new facility could provide beams of light ions (from protons to neon ions) in a collaborative and cost-effective way, since it would rely partly on CERN’s competences and infrastructure. The main technical challenges linked to the implementation of a slow extraction scheme for LEIR an...

  20. An Experimental Facility to Validate Ground Source Heat Pump Optimisation Models for the Australian Climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanshen Lu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ground source heat pumps (GSHPs are one of the most widespread forms of geothermal energy technology. They utilise the near-constant temperature of the ground below the frost line to achieve energy-efficiencies two or three times that of conventional air-conditioners, consequently allowing a significant offset in electricity demand for space heating and cooling. Relatively mature GSHP markets are established in Europe and North America. GSHP implementation in Australia, however, is limited, due to high capital price, uncertainties regarding optimum designs for the Australian climate, and limited consumer confidence in the technology. Existing GSHP design standards developed in the Northern Hemisphere are likely to lead to suboptimal performance in Australia where demand might be much more cooling-dominated. There is an urgent need to develop Australia’s own GSHP system optimisation principles on top of the industry standards to provide confidence to bring the GSHP market out of its infancy. To assist in this, the Queensland Geothermal Energy Centre of Excellence (QGECE has commissioned a fully instrumented GSHP experimental facility in Gatton, Australia, as a publically-accessible demonstration of the technology and a platform for systematic studies of GSHPs, including optimisation of design and operations. This paper presents a brief review on current GSHP use in Australia, the technical details of the Gatton GSHP facility, and an analysis on the observed cooling performance of this facility to date.

  1. Design of an Experimental Facility for Passive Heat Removal in Advanced Nuclear Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersano, Andrea

    With reference to innovative heat exchangers to be used in passive safety system of Gen- eration IV nuclear reactors and Small Modular Reactors it is necessary to study the natural circulation and the efficiency of heat removal systems. Especially in safety systems, as the decay heat removal system of many reactors, it is increasing the use of passive components in order to improve their availability and reliability during possible accidental scenarios, reducing the need of human intervention. Many of these systems are based on natural circulation, so they require an intense analysis due to the possible instability of the related phenomena. The aim of this thesis work is to build a scaled facility which can reproduce, in a simplified way, the decay heat removal system (DHR2) of the lead-cooled fast reactor ALFRED and, in particular, the bayonet heat exchanger, which transfers heat from lead to water. Given the thermal power to be removed, the natural circulation flow rate and the pressure drops will be studied both experimentally and numerically using the code RELAP5 3D. The first phase of preliminary analysis and project includes: the calculations to design the heat source and heat sink, the choice of materials and components and CAD drawings of the facility. After that, the numerical study is performed using the thermal-hydraulic code RELAP5 3D in order to simulate the behavior of the system. The purpose is to run pretest simulations of the facility to optimize the dimensioning setting the operative parameters (temperature, pressure, etc.) and to chose the most adequate measurement devices. The model of the system is continually developed to better simulate the system studied. High attention is dedicated to the control logic of the system to obtain acceptable results. The initial experimental tests phase consists in cold zero power tests of the facility in order to characterize and to calibrate the pressure drops. In future works the experimental results will be

  2. Experimental results of the SMART ECC injection performance with reduced scale of test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Young Il; Cho, Seok; Ko, Yung Joo; Shin, Yong Cheol; Kwon, Tae Soon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    SMART pressurized water reactor type is different from the existing integral NSSS commercial pressurized water reactor system which is equipped with the main features. In addition, RCS piping is removed and the feature of the SBLOCA is a major design break accident. SWAT (SMART ECC Water Asymmetric Two-phase choking test facility) test facility is to simulate the 2 inch SBLOCA of the SMART using with reduced scale. The Test was performed to produce experimental data for the validation of the TASS/SMR-S thermal hydraulic analysis code, and to investigate the related thermal hydraulic phenomena in the down-comer region during the 2 inch SBLOCA of the safety inject line. The particular phenomena for the observation are ECC bypass and multi-dimensional flow characteristics to verify the effectiveness and performance of the safety injection system. In this paper, the corresponding steady state test conditions, including initial and boundary conditions along with major measuring parameters, and related experimental results were described

  3. The experimental facility for investigation of MHD heat transfer in perspective coolants in nuclear energetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batenin, B. M.; Belyaev, I. A.; Birukov, D. A.; Frick, P. G.; Nikitina, I. S.; Manchkha, S. P.; Pyatnitskaya, N. Yu; Razuvanov, N. G.; Sviridov, E. V.; Sviridov, V. G.

    2017-11-01

    Paper presents the current results of work conducted by a joint research group of MPEI-JIHT RAS for experimental study of liquid metals heat transfer. The team of specialists of MPEI-JIHT RAS put into operation a new mercury MHD facility RK-3. The main components of this stand are: a unique electromagnet, created by specialists of the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP), and a sealed liquid-metal circuit. The facility will be explored lifting and standpipe flow of liquid metal in a transverse magnetic field in channels of different forms. For the experiments on the study of heat transfer and hydrodynamics of flows for measuring characteristics such as temperature, speed, pulse characteristics, probe method is used. Presents the first experimental results obtained for a pipe in a transverse magnetic field. During the experiments with various flow parameters data was obtained and processed with constructing temperature fields, dimensionless wall temperature distributions and heat transfer coefficients along the perimeter of the work area. Modes with low frequency pulsations of temperature were discovered. The boundaries where low frequency temperature fluctuations occur were defined in a circular tube.

  4. The Testing Behind The Test Facility: The Acoustic Design of the NASA Glenn Research Center's World-Class Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hozman, Aron D.; Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Mark E.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is leading the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC's Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, USA. Benham Companies, LLC is currently constructing modal, base-shake sine and reverberant acoustic test facilities to support the future testing needs of NASA's space exploration program. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) will be approximately 101,000 cu ft in volume and capable of achieving an empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world's known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. The key to achieving the expected acoustic test spectra for a range of many NASA space flight environments in the RATF is the knowledge gained from a series of ground acoustic tests. Data was obtained from several NASA-sponsored test programs, including testing performed at the National Research Council of Canada's acoustic test facility in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and at the Redstone Technical Test Center acoustic test facility in Huntsville, Alabama, USA. The majority of these tests were performed to characterize the acoustic performance of the modulators (noise generators) and representative horns that would be required to meet the desired spectra, as well as to evaluate possible supplemental gas jet noise sources. The knowledge obtained in each of these test programs enabled the design of the RATF sound generation system to confidently advance to its final acoustic design and subsequent on-going construction.

  5. Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests at SLAC (FACET) Conceptual Design Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amann, J.; Bane, K.

    2009-01-01

    This Conceptual Design Report (CDR) describes the design of FACET. It will be updated to stay current with the developing design of the facility. This CDR begins as the baseline conceptual design and will evolve into an 'as-built' manual for the completed facility. The Executive Summary, Chapter 1, gives an introduction to the FACET project and describes the salient features of its design. Chapter 2 gives an overview of FACET. It describes the general parameters of the machine and the basic approaches to implementation. The FACET project does not include the implementation of specific scientific experiments either for plasma wake-field acceleration for other applications. Nonetheless, enough work has been done to define potential experiments to assure that the facility can meet the requirements of the experimental community. Chapter 3, Scientific Case, describes the planned plasma wakefield and other experiments. Chapter 4, Technical Description of FACET, describes the parameters and design of all technical systems of FACET. FACET uses the first two thirds of the existing SLAC linac to accelerate the beam to about 20GeV, and compress it with the aid of two chicanes, located in Sector 10 and Sector 20. The Sector 20 area will include a focusing system, the generic experimental area and the beam dump. Chapter 5, Management of Scientific Program, describes the management of the scientific program at FACET. Chapter 6, Environment, Safety and Health and Quality Assurance, describes the existing programs at SLAC and their application to the FACET project. It includes a preliminary analysis of safety hazards and the planned mitigation. Chapter 7, Work Breakdown Structure, describes the structure used for developing the cost estimates, which will also be used to manage the project. The chapter defines the scope of work of each element down to level 3.

  6. Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests at SLAC (FACET) Conceptual Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amann, J.; Bane, K.; /SLAC

    2009-10-30

    This Conceptual Design Report (CDR) describes the design of FACET. It will be updated to stay current with the developing design of the facility. This CDR begins as the baseline conceptual design and will evolve into an 'as-built' manual for the completed facility. The Executive Summary, Chapter 1, gives an introduction to the FACET project and describes the salient features of its design. Chapter 2 gives an overview of FACET. It describes the general parameters of the machine and the basic approaches to implementation. The FACET project does not include the implementation of specific scientific experiments either for plasma wake-field acceleration for other applications. Nonetheless, enough work has been done to define potential experiments to assure that the facility can meet the requirements of the experimental community. Chapter 3, Scientific Case, describes the planned plasma wakefield and other experiments. Chapter 4, Technical Description of FACET, describes the parameters and design of all technical systems of FACET. FACET uses the first two thirds of the existing SLAC linac to accelerate the beam to about 20GeV, and compress it with the aid of two chicanes, located in Sector 10 and Sector 20. The Sector 20 area will include a focusing system, the generic experimental area and the beam dump. Chapter 5, Management of Scientific Program, describes the management of the scientific program at FACET. Chapter 6, Environment, Safety and Health and Quality Assurance, describes the existing programs at SLAC and their application to the FACET project. It includes a preliminary analysis of safety hazards and the planned mitigation. Chapter 7, Work Breakdown Structure, describes the structure used for developing the cost estimates, which will also be used to manage the project. The chapter defines the scope of work of each element down to level 3.

  7. Experimental study of high density foods for the Space Operations Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, S. M.

    1981-01-01

    The experimental study of high density foods for the Space Operations Center is described. A sensory evaluation of the high density foods was conducted first to test the acceptability of the products. A shelf-life study of the high density foods was also conducted for three different time lengths at three different temperatures. The nutritional analysis of the high density foods is at present incomplete.

  8. Thermal-hydraulically controlled blowdown tests in the experimental facility COSIMA to study PWR fuel behavior: experimental and theoretical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Class, G.; Hain, K.; Meyder, R.

    1978-01-01

    The fuel behavior in the blow-down phase of a LOCA is of importance for fuel rods with high internal pressure and high rod power, because of the effects on clad failure of the small cladding deformations occurring. The operating results of the COSIMA facility show that, on the basis of the new developments for measuring technique and fuel rod simulators performed, reactor relevant blow-down performances can be conducted in a controlled and reproduceable manner. The mechanical and thermal-hydraulic states occurring in the test bed may be subject to computational checking. This permits on one hand to improve the computing models and on the other yields a confirmation of the high state of development of the available computer codes. Therefore it appears that, with the results from COSIMA and the associated theoretical work in the field of the blow-down process, difficult to treat experimentally, an essential contribution to verifying the models for accident calculations is given. The work scheduled for the next about 1 1/2 years will serve to further support the rather preliminary results and to extend the range of then application. (orig.) [de

  9. Experimental Verification of a Simple Method for Accurate Center of Gravity Determination of Small Satellite Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Modenini

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a simple and relatively inexpensive method for determining the center of gravity (CoG of a small spacecraft. This method, which can be ascribed to the class of suspension techniques, is based on dual-axis inclinometer readings. By performing two consecutive suspensions from two different points, the CoG is determined, ideally, as the intersection between two lines which are uniquely defined by the respective rotations. We performed an experimental campaign to verify the method and assess its accuracy. Thanks to a quantitative error budget, we obtained an error distribution with simulations, which we verified through experimental tests. The retrieved experimental error distribution agrees well with the results predicted through simulations, which in turn lead to a CoG error norm smaller than 2 mm with 95% confidence level.

  10. Validation of PHITS Spallation Models from the Perspective of the Shielding Design of Transmutation Experimental Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Hiroki; Meigo, Shin-ichiro

    2017-09-01

    The impact of different spallation models implemented in the particle transport code PHITS on the shielding design of Transmutation Experimental Facility is investigated. For 400-MeV proton incident on a lead-bismuth eutectic target, an effective dose rate at the end of a thick radiation shield (3-m-thick iron and 3-m-thick concrete) calculated by the Liège intranuclear cascade (INC) model version 4.6 (INCL4.6) coupled with the GEMcode (INCL4.6/GEM) yields about twice as high as the Bertini INC model (Bertini/GEM). A comparison with experimental data for 500-MeV proton incident on a thick lead target suggest that the prediction accuracy of INCL4.6/GEM would be better than that of Bertini/GEM. In contrast, it is found that the dose rates in beam ducts in front of targets calculated by the INCL4.6/GEMare lower than those by the Bertini/GEM. Since both models underestimate the experimental results for neutron-production doubledifferential cross sections at 180° for 140-MeV proton incident on carbon, iron, and gold targets, it is concluded that it is necessary to allow a margin for uncertainty caused by the spallation models, which is a factor of two, in estimating the dose rate induced by neutron streaming through a beam duct.

  11. Experimental study of radioactive aerosols emission during the thermal degradation of organic materials in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, Yvette

    1993-01-01

    Radioactive products may be released during a fire in nuclear fuel cycles facilities. These products must be confined to avoid a contamination spread in the environment. It is therefore necessary to be able to predict the amount and the physico-chemical forms of radioactive material that may be airborne. The aim of this study is to determine experimentally the release of contamination aerosols in a typical fire scenario involving plutonium oxide in a glove box. Firstly, this phenomenon has been studied in a small scale test chamber where samples of polymethylmethacrylate (Plexiglas) contaminated by cerium oxide (used as a substitute for plutonium oxide) were submitted to thermal degradation (pyrolysis and combustion). The release of radioactive material is determined by the quantity of contaminant emitted, the kinetics of the release and the particle size distribution of aerosols. Secondly, the development of an experimental procedure allowed to realize large scale fires in more realistic conditions. The experimental tools developed in the course of this study allow to consider application to other scenarios. (author) [fr

  12. Joint Assessment of Renewable Energy and Water Desalination Research Center (REWDC) Program Capabilities and Facilities In Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bissani, M; Fischer, R; Kidd, S; Merrigan, J

    2006-01-01

    The primary goal of this visit was to perform a joint assessment of the Renewable Energy and Water Desalination Center's (REWDC) program in radioactive waste management. The visit represented the fourth technical and scientific interaction with Libya under the DOE/NNSA Sister Laboratory Arrangement. Specific topics addressed during the visit focused on Action Sheet P-05-5, ''Radioactive Waste Management''. The Team, comprised of Mo Bissani (Team Lead), Robert Fischer, Scott Kidd, and Jim Merrigan, consulted with REWDC management and staff. The team collected information, discussed particulars of the technical collaboration and toured the Tajura facility. The tour included the waste treatment facility, waste storage/disposal facility, research reactor facility, hot cells and analytical labs. The assessment team conducted the first phase of Task A for Action Sheet 5, which involved a joint assessment of the Radioactive Waste Management Program. The assessment included review of the facilities dedicated to the management of radioactive waste at the Tourja site, the waste management practices, proposed projects for the facility and potential impacts on waste generation and management

  13. Evaluation of alternatives for the future of facilities at the Western New York Nuclear Service Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-08-01

    Regulatory considerations are discussed. Alternatives for the continued operation or decommissioning of the state-licensed burial area, the low-level waste treatment facilities, and the NRC licensed burial area are evaluated. Radiological impact analyses were also performed for alternatives on other facilities

  14. Comparison of the socioeconomic impacts of international fuel service centers versus dispersed nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braid, R.B. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The paper investigates a variety of community impacts including: public services, fiscal issues, economic matters, land and water use, political and social cohesion, and legal considerations. Comparisons of socioeconomic impacts of colocated versus dispersed sites are made on the basis of the size of the impacted communities, the size and type of nuclear facility, and the facility's construction time frame. The paper concludes that, under similar circumstances, most of the socioeconomic impacts of colocated nuclear facilities would be somewhat less than the sum of the impacts associated with equivalent dispersed sites. While empirical data is non-existent, the paper contends, however, that because the socioeconomic impacts of colocated facilities are so great and readily identifiable to a public unskilled in making comparisons with the dispersed alternative, the facilities will likely generate so much public opposition that IFSCs will probably prove infeasible

  15. Survey of existing underground openings for in-situ experimental facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollenberg, H.; Graf, A.; Strisower, B.; Korbin, G.

    1981-07-01

    In an earlier project, a literature search identified 60 underground openings in crystalline rock capable of providing access for an in-situ experimental facility to develop geochemical and hydrological techniques for evaluating sites for radioactive waste isolation. As part of the current project, discussions with state geologists, owners, and operators narrowed the original group to 14. Three additional sites in volcanic rock and one site in granite were also identified. Site visits and application of technical criteria, including the geologic and hydrologic settings and depth, extent of the rock unit, condition, and accessibility of underground workings, determined four primary candidate sites: the Helms Pumped Storage Project in grandiodorite of the Sierra Nevada, California; the Tungsten Queen Mine in Precambrian granodiorite of the North Carolina Piedmont; the Mount Hope Mine in Precambrian granite and gneiss of northern New Jersey; and the Minnamax Project in the Duluth gabbro complex of northern Minnesota

  16. Performance of the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Facility and initial experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gai, W.; Conde, M.; Cox, G.; Konecny, R.; Power, J.; Schoessow, P.; Simpson, J.; Barov, N.

    1996-01-01

    The Argonne Wakefield Accelerator facility has begun its experimental program. It is designed to address advanced acceleration research requiring very short, intense electron bunches. It incorporates two photocathode based electron sources. One produces up to 100 nC, multi-kiloamp 'drive' bunches which are used to excite wakefields in dielectric loaded structures and in plasma. The second source produces much lower intensity 'witness' pulses which are used to probe the fields produced by the drive. The drive and witness pulses can be precisely timed as well as laterally positioned with respect to each other. This paper discusses commissioning, initial experiments, and outline plans for a proposed 1 GeV demonstration accelerator

  17. Beam studies and experimental facility for the AWAKE experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Bracco, Chiara; Petrenko, Alexey; Timko, Helga; Argyropoulos, Theodoros; Bartosik, Hannes; Bohl, Thomas; Esteban Müller, Juan; Goddard, Brennan; Meddahi, Malika; Pardons, Ans; Shaposhnikova, Elena; Velotti, Francesco M; Vincke, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    A Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment has been proposed as an approach to eventually accelerate an electron beam to the TeV energy range in a single plasma section. To verify this novel technique, a proof of principle R&D experiment, AWAKE, is planned at CERN using 400 GeV proton bunches from the SPS. An electron beam will be injected into the plasma cell to probe the accelerating wakefield. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the CNGS facility profiting from existing infrastructure where only minor modifications need to be foreseen. The design of the experimental area and the proton and electron beam lines are shown. The achievable SPS proton bunch properties and their reproducibility have been measured and are presented.

  18. Experimental Facility for Checking the Possibility to Obtain Super-High Temperature Due to Acoustic Cavitation

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, M B; Sobolev, Yu G; Kostenko, B F

    2004-01-01

    An experimental facility developed for checking the possibility to obtain super-high temperature sufficient for thermonuclear reaction D($d, n$)$^{3}$He in an acoustic cavitation is described. The acoustic part of the instrumentation consists of a resonator and a system exciting high amplitude of the acoustic field within the resonator. The cavitation process is controlled with the use of fast neutron pulses. The instrument includes a system of pumping out solute gases from the liquid (acetone enriched with deuterium up to 99{\\%}) without losses of matter. Measuring of the field is based on the calibration procedure including observation of sonoluminescence. The system of detection and identification of D($d, n$)$^{3}$He reaction is based on a scintillation detector of fast neutrons and a system of measuring multiparameter events by the correlation technique with separation of the neutrons from the $\\gamma $-radiation background (pulse shape discrimination).

  19. Experimental Program for the CLIC test facility 3 test beam line

    CERN Document Server

    Adli, E; Dobert, S; Olvegaard, M; Schulte, D; Syratchev, I; Lillestol, Reidar

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC Test Facility 3 Test Beam Line is the first prototype for the CLIC drive beam decelerator. Stable transport of the drive beam under deceleration is a mandatory component in the CLIC two-beam scheme. In the Test Beam Line more than 50% of the total energy will be extracted from a 150 MeV, 28 A electron drive beam, by the use of 16 power extraction and transfer structures. A number of experiments are foreseen to investigate the drive beam characteristics under deceleration in the Test Beam Line, including beam stability, beam blow up and the efficiency of the power extraction. General benchmarking of decelerator simulation and theory studies will also be performed. Specially designed instrumentation including precision BPMs, loss monitors and a time-resolved spectrometer dump will be used for the experiments. This paper describes the experimental program foreseen for the Test Beam Line, including the relevance of the results for the CLIC decelerator studies.

  20. Radiation monitoring program at nuclear scientific experimental and educational center - IRT-Sofia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mladenov, A.; Stankov, D.; Marinov, K.; Nonova, T.; Krezhov, K.

    2012-01-01

    Ensuring minimal risk of personnel exposure without exceeding the dose limits is the main task of the General Program for Radiation Monitoring of Nuclear Scientific Experimental and Education Centre (NSEEC) with research reactor IRT. Since 2006 the IRT-Sofia is equipped with a new and modern Radiation Monitoring System (RMS). All RMS detectors are connected to the server RAMSYS. They have online (real-time) visualization in two workstations with RAMVISION software. The RMS allows the implementation of technological and environmental monitoring at the nuclear facility site. Environmental monitoring with the RMS external system includes monitoring of dose rate; alpha and beta activity; radon activity; Po-218, Po-214, Po-212 activity; gamma control of vehicles. Technological control of reactor gases includes: Alpha beta particulate monitor; Iodine monitor; Noble gases monitor; Stack flow monitor. The General Program based on the radiation monitoring system allows real-time monitoring and control of radiation parameters in the controlled area and provides for a high level of radiation protection of IRT staff and users of its facilities. This paper presents the technical and functional parameters of the radiation monitoring system and radiation protection activities within the restricted zone in IRT facilities. (authors)

  1. Experimental facility design for study of fretting in steam generator tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balbiani, J.P.; Bergant, M.; Yawny, A.

    2012-01-01

    The design of an experimental facility for fretting wear testing of steam generator tubes under pressurized water up to 340 o C, is presented. The main component of the device consists in an autoclave which permits to recreate steam generator operating conditions. CAD CATIA V5R18, CAE ABAQUS and ASME Sec. VII Div. 1 (Rules for Construction of Pressure Vessels) were used along the design process. The design of the autoclave included the pressure vessel itself and the necessary flanges and nozzles. In addition, an axial dynamic sealing system was designed to allow for actuation from outside the pressure boundary. Complementary, typical tube - support contact conditions were analyzed and the principal variables affecting their mutual interaction determined. In addition, a simple device which allows performing fretting wear testing on steam generator tubes in air at room temperature was fabricated and the feasibility of a quantitative assessment of different aspects related with the fretting induced damage was explored. Characterization techniques available at Centro Atomico Bariloche, like light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive analysis of X-ray (EDAX) and surface damage analysis by optic profilometry were shown to be appropriate for this aim. The designed facility will allow evaluating fretting damage of tubes - support combinations that might be used on the steam generator of the prototype reactor CAREM-25. It is also expected it could be applied to characterize fretting severity in other applications (nuclear fuel elements) (author)

  2. Calculation of fast neutron flux in reactor pressure tubes and experimental facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, P. C. [Canadian General Electric (Canada)

    1968-07-15

    The computer program EPITHET was used to calculate the fast neutron flux (>1 MeV) in several reactor pressure tubes and experimental facilities in order to compare the fast neutron flux in the different cases and to provide a self-consistent set of flux values which may be used to relate creep strain to fast neutron flux . The facilities considered are shown below together with the calculated fast neutron flux (>1 MeV). Fast flux 10{sup 13} n/cm{sup 2}s: NPD 1.14, Douglas Point 2.66, Pickering 2.89, Gentilly 2.35, SGHWR 3.65, NRU U-1 and U-2 3.25'' pressure tube - 19 element fuel 3.05, NRU U-1 and U-2 4.07'' pressure tube - 28 element fuel 3.18, NRU U-1 and U-2 4.07'' pressure tube - 18 element fuel 2.90, NRX X-5 0.88, PRTR Mk I fuel 2.81, PRTR HPD fuel 3.52, WR-1 2.73, Mk IV creep machine (NRX) 0.85, Mk VI creep machine (NRU) 2.04, Biaxial creep insert (NRU U-49) 2.61.

  3. Subsonic Transonic Applied Refinements By Using Key Strategies - STARBUKS In the NASA Langley Research Center National Transonic Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paryz, Roman W.

    2014-01-01

    Several upgrade projects have been completed at the NASA Langley Research Center National Transonic Facility over the last 1.5 years in an effort defined as STARBUKS - Subsonic Transonic Applied Refinements By Using Key Strategies. This multi-year effort was undertaken to improve NTF's overall capabilities by addressing Accuracy and Validation, Productivity, and Reliability areas at the NTF. This presentation will give a brief synopsis of each of these efforts.

  4. Department of Energy’s ARM Climate Research Facility External Data Center Operations Plan Located At Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cialella, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gregory, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Lazar, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Liang, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ma, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tilp, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wagener, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The External Data Center (XDC) Operations Plan describes the activities performed to manage the XDC, located at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), for the Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility. It includes all ARM infrastructure activities performed by the Data Management and Software Engineering Group (DMSE) at BNL. This plan establishes a baseline of expectation within the ARM Operations Management for the group managing the XDC.

  5. A Measurement Management Technology for Improving Energy Efficiency in Data Centers and Telecommunication Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrik Hamann, Levente Klein

    2012-06-28

    Data center (DC) electricity use is increasing at an annual rate of over 20% and presents a concern for the Information Technology (IT) industry, governments, and the society. A large fraction of the energy use is consumed by the compressor cooling to maintain the recommended operating conditions for IT equipment. The most common way to improve the DC efficiency is achieved by optimally provisioning the cooling power to match the global heat dissipation in the DC. However, at a more granular level, the large range of heat densities of today's IT equipment makes the task of provisioning cooling power optimized to the level of individual computer room air conditioning (CRAC) units much more challenging. Distributed sensing within a DC enables the development of new strategies to improve energy efficiency, such as hot spot elimination through targeted cooling, matching power consumption at rack level with workload schedule, and minimizing power losses. The scope of Measurement and Management Technologies (MMT) is to develop a software tool and the underlying sensing technology to provide critical decision support and control for DC and telecommunication facilities (TF) operations. A key aspect of MMT technology is integration of modeling tools to understand how changes in one operational parameter affect the overall DC response. It is demonstrated that reduced ordered models for DC can generate, in less than 2 seconds computational time, a three dimensional thermal model in a 50 kft{sup 2} DC. This rapid modeling enables real time visualization of the DC conditions and enables 'what if' scenarios simulations to characterize response to 'disturbances'. One such example is thermal zone modeling that matches the cooling power to the heat generated at a local level by identifying DC zones cooled by a specific CRAC. Turning off a CRAC unit can be simulated to understand how the other CRAC utilization changes and how server temperature responds

  6. Theoretical study and experimental detection of cavitation phenomena in Liquid Lithium Target Facility for IFMIF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orco, G. Dell; Horiike, H.; Ida, M.; Nakamura, H.

    2006-01-01

    In the IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility) testing facility, the required high energy neutrons emission will be produced by reaction of two D + beams with a free surface liquid Lithium jet target flowing along concave back-wall at 20 m/s. The Lithium height in the experimental loop and its relevant static pressure, the high flow velocities and the presence of several devices for the flow control and the pressure reduction increase the risk of cavitation onset in the target system. Special attention has to be taken in the primary pump, in the flow straightener, in the nozzle and their interconnections where the local pressure decreases and/or velocity increases or flow separations could promote the emission of cavitation vapour bubbles. The successive bubble re-implosions, in the higher pressure liquid bulk, could activate material erosion and transportation of activated particulates. These bubbles, if emitted close to the free jet flow, could also procure hydraulic instability and disturbance of the neutron field in the D + beams-Lithium target zone. Therefore, the cavitation risk must be properly foreseen along the whole IFMIF Lithium target circuit and its occurrence at different operating condition should be also monitored by special instrumentation. ENEA, in close cooperation with JAEA, has demonstrated the capability to detect the onset of the cavitation noises in liquid Lithium, by using the ENEA patented accelerometric gauge called CASBA-2000, during hydraulic test campaigns carried-out at Osaka University Lithium facility on a straight mock-up of the IFMIF back plate target. Comparison with the Thoma' cavitation similitude criteria have also determined the critical threshold limit for the estimation of the onset. Theoretical study on the conditions of cavitations generation in the IFMIF Lithium Target Circuit were also launched between ENEA and JAEA aiming at analysing the risk of the cavitation occurrence in the Lithium flow by

  7. Scoping-level Probabilistic Safety Assessment of a complex experimental facility: Challenges and first results from the application to a neutron source facility (MEGAPIE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podofillini, L.; Dang, V.N.; Thomsen, K.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a scoping-level application of Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) to selected systems of a complex experimental facility. In performing a PSA for this type of facility, a number of challenges arise, mainly due to the extensive use of electronic and programmable components and of one-of-a-kind components. The experimental facility is the Megawatt Pilot Target Experiment (MEGAPIE), which was hosted at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). MEGAPIE demonstrated the feasibility of a liquid lead-bismuth target for spallation facilities at a proton beam power level of 1 MW. Given the challenges to estimate initiating event frequencies and failure event probabilities, emphasis is placed on the qualitative results obtainable from the PSA. Even though this does not allow a complete and appropriate characterization of the risk profile, some level of importance/significance evaluation was feasible, and practical and detailed recommendations on potential system improvements were derived. The second part of the work reports on a preliminary quantification of the facility risk. This provides more information on risk significance, which allows prioritizing the insights and recommendations obtained from the PSA. At the present stage, the limited knowledge on initiating and failure events is reflected in the uncertainties in their probabilities as well as in inputs quantified with bounding values. Detailed analyses to improve the quantification of these inputs, many of which turn out to be important contributors, were out of the scope of this study. Consequently, the reported results should be primarily considered as a demonstration of how quantification of the facility risk by a PSA can support risk-informed decisions, rather than precise figures of the facility risk

  8. Experimental investigation on the behaviour of pressure suppression containment systems by the SOPRE-1 facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerullo, N.; Delli Gatti, A.; Marinelli, M.; Mazzini, M.; Mazzoni, A.; Sbrana, A.; Todisco, P.

    1977-01-01

    The SOPRE-1 test facility is an integral model (scale 1:13) of a MARK II pressure suppression containment system. It was set up at the University of Pisa in order to study the pressure-temperature transient in pressure suppression containment systems during LOCAs. Knowledge of this transient is necessary to perform a correct structural analysis of reactor containment. The containment system behaviour is studied by changing the principal parameters which affect the transient (blow-down mass and energy release, suppression pool water temperature, vent pipe number and submergence heat transfer coefficients). The first series of tests involved: A) 13 tests with break area of 1.8 cm 2 , B) 8 tests with break area of 20.0 cm 2 . The following experimental conditions were changed: - position of the simulated break (from liquid or steam zone), - water pressure (20-85 Kgsub(p)/cm 2 ) and mass (45-70Kg) in the vessel model. Tests A): the CONTEMPT codes correctly forecast the pressure-temperature history, both in dry- and in wet-well. Tests B): the experimental runs have shown that increasing of blow-down flowrate produces dry-well pressure spatial differences and anomalous vent pipe behaviour. This results in damped oscillations of dry- and wet-well pressure, probably due to alterbating air bubble over-expansion and collapse, and in vent pipe opening and reclosing. (Auth.)

  9. Experimental platforms in support of the ASTRID program: existing and planned facilities at CEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastaldi, O.; Rodriguez, G.; Ayrault, L.; Tkaschenko, I.; Collard, B.; Sanseigne, E.; Dumesnil, J.; Dujet, F.; Serre, F.; Willermoz, G.

    2013-01-01

    Various experimental needs in different fields: • Thermohydraulics: • In water: Fuel subassemblies (single and multiple), hot plenum, control plug …; • In sodium: 3rd shutdown system qualification; • In gas with sodium aerosols (heat and mass transfer modelling in cover gas); – Instrumentation: • In sodium telemetry, defectometry and visualisation by acoustic means (techniques and transducer development and qualification); • Robotics and thigthness development for in sodium repair; – Aerosols behaviour; – Safety: severe accidents studies, dedicated instrumentation or systems; – Instrumentation: • Optical fiber development; • Eddy current flowmeter development; • O, H meters development ...; – Energy conversion system: • Development of sodium/gas compact heat exchangers; • Development of cleaning techniques for SGHE; – Materials: • Corrosion studies, • Tribology studies, … – Physico-chemistry: ACP mass transfer…; – Components development: EMP, valves,...; … – Behavior under irradiation … ⇒ Different facilities are needed with different features in term of: • Used fluids: simulant fluid or sodium; • Static or dynamic conditions; • Large, medium or small scale; • Level of temperature; • …; ⇒ CEA strategy relies on several experimental platforms

  10. System integration of RF based negative ion experimental facility at IPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, G.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Singh, M. J.; Gahlaut, A.; Soni, J.; Pandya, K.; Parmar, K. G.; Sonara, J.; Chakraborty, A.

    2010-02-01

    The setting up of RF based negative ion experimental facility shall witness the beginning of experiments on the negative ion source fusion applications in India. A 1 MHz RF generator shall launch 100 kW RF power into a single driver on the plasma source to produce a plasma of density ~5 × 1012 cm-3. The source can deliver a negative ion beam of ~10 A with a current density of ~30 mA/cm2 and accelerated to 35 kV through an electrostatic ion accelerator. The experimental system is similar to a RF based negative ion source, BATMAN, presently operating at IPP. The subsystems for source operation are designed and procured principally from indigenous resources, keeping the IPP configuration as a base line. The operation of negative ion source is supported by many subsystems e.g. vacuum pumping system with gate valves, cooling water system, gas feed system, cesium delivery system, RF generator, high voltage power supplies, data acquisition and control system, and different diagnostics. The first experiments of negative ion source are expected to start at IPR from the middle of 2009.

  11. System integration of RF based negative ion experimental facility at IPR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bansal, G; Bandyopadhyay, M; Singh, M J; Gahlaut, A; Soni, J; Pandya, K; Parmar, K G; Sonara, J; Chakraborty, A

    2010-01-01

    The setting up of RF based negative ion experimental facility shall witness the beginning of experiments on the negative ion source fusion applications in India. A 1 MHz RF generator shall launch 100 kW RF power into a single driver on the plasma source to produce a plasma of density ∼5 x 10 12 cm -3 . The source can deliver a negative ion beam of ∼10 A with a current density of ∼30 mA/cm 2 and accelerated to 35 kV through an electrostatic ion accelerator. The experimental system is similar to a RF based negative ion source, BATMAN, presently operating at IPP. The subsystems for source operation are designed and procured principally from indigenous resources, keeping the IPP configuration as a base line. The operation of negative ion source is supported by many subsystems e.g. vacuum pumping system with gate valves, cooling water system, gas feed system, cesium delivery system, RF generator, high voltage power supplies, data acquisition and control system, and different diagnostics. The first experiments of negative ion source are expected to start at IPR from the middle of 2009.

  12. Experimental facility and methodology for systematic studies of cold startability in direct injection Diesel engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, J. V.; García-Oliver, J. M.; Pastor, J. M.; Ramírez-Hernández, J. G.

    2009-09-01

    Cold start at low temperatures in current direct injection (DI) Diesel engines is a problem which has not yet been properly solved and it becomes particularly critical with the current trend to reduce the engine compression ratio. Although it is clear that there are some key factors whose control leads to a proper cold start process, their individual relevance and relationships are not clearly understood. Thus, efforts on optimization of the cold start process are mainly based on a trial-and-error procedure in climatic chambers at low ambient temperature, with serious limitations in terms of measurement reliability during such a transient process, low repeatability and experimental cost. This paper presents a novel approach for an experimental facility capable of simulating real engine cold start, at room temperature and under well-controlled low speed and low temperature conditions. It is based on an optical single cylinder engine adapted to reproduce in-cylinder conditions representative of those of a real engine during start at cold ambient temperatures (of the order of -20 °C). Such conditions must be realistic, controlled and repeatable in order to perform systematic studies in the borderline between ignition success and misfiring. An analysis methodology, combining optical techniques and heat release analysis of individual cycles, has been applied.

  13. Experimental facility and methodology for systematic studies of cold startability in direct injection Diesel engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastor, J V; García-Oliver, J M; Pastor, J M; Ramírez-Hernández, J G

    2009-01-01

    Cold start at low temperatures in current direct injection (DI) Diesel engines is a problem which has not yet been properly solved and it becomes particularly critical with the current trend to reduce the engine compression ratio. Although it is clear that there are some key factors whose control leads to a proper cold start process, their individual relevance and relationships are not clearly understood. Thus, efforts on optimization of the cold start process are mainly based on a trial-and-error procedure in climatic chambers at low ambient temperature, with serious limitations in terms of measurement reliability during such a transient process, low repeatability and experimental cost. This paper presents a novel approach for an experimental facility capable of simulating real engine cold start, at room temperature and under well-controlled low speed and low temperature conditions. It is based on an optical single cylinder engine adapted to reproduce in-cylinder conditions representative of those of a real engine during start at cold ambient temperatures (of the order of −20 °C). Such conditions must be realistic, controlled and repeatable in order to perform systematic studies in the borderline between ignition success and misfiring. An analysis methodology, combining optical techniques and heat release analysis of individual cycles, has been applied

  14. Proton beam characterization in the experimental room of the Trento Proton Therapy facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommasino, F.; Rovituso, M.; Fabiano, S.; Piffer, S.; Manea, C.; Lorentini, S.; Lanzone, S.; Wang, Z.; Pasini, M.; Burger, W. J.; La Tessa, C.; Scifoni, E.; Schwarz, M.; Durante, M.

    2017-10-01

    As proton therapy is becoming an established treatment methodology for cancer patients, the number of proton centres is gradually growing worldwide. The economical effort for building these facilities is motivated by the clinical aspects, but might be also supported by the potential relevance for the research community. Experiments with high-energy protons are needed not only for medical physics applications, but represent also an essential part of activities dedicated to detector development, space research, radiation hardness tests, as well as of fundamental research in nuclear and particle physics. Here we present the characterization of the beam line installed in the experimental room of the Trento Proton Therapy Centre (Italy). Measurements of beam spot size and envelope, range verification and proton flux were performed in the energy range between 70 and 228 MeV. Methods for reducing the proton flux from typical treatments values of 106-109 particles/s down to 101-105 particles/s were also investigated. These data confirm that a proton beam produced in a clinical centre build by a commercial company can be exploited for a broad spectrum of experimental activities. The results presented here will be used as a reference for future experiments.

  15. Experimental study on gas-injection enhanced circulation performed with the CIRCE facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benamati, G.; Foletti, C.; Forgione, N.; Oriolo, F.; Scaddozzo, G.; Tarantino, M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the results of an experimental campaign concerning the possibility of achieving a steady state circulation by gas-injection in a pool containing lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) as working fluid. The activity was aimed at gaining information about the basic mechanisms of the gas injection enhanced circulation intended as a pumping system for a liquid metal cooled reactor. In particular, the paper is focused on the experimental work performed in the CIRCE large-scale facility, installed at the ENEA Brasimone Centre for studying the fluid-dynamic and operating behaviour of ADS reactor plants cooled by LBE. The gas enhanced circulation tests were carried out for different LBE temperatures (from 200 to 320 deg. C), under isothermal conditions and with a wide range of argon injected flow rates (from 0.5 to 7.0 Nl/s). The gas is injected from the bottom of the riser, by means of an appropriate nozzle, and the liquid metal flow rate is measured by a Venturi-Nozzle flow meter installed in the single phase part of the test section. The obtained results allowed formulating a characteristic curve of the system and evaluating the void fraction distribution along the riser path by means differential pressure measurements, which play an important role to generating the driving force for the circulation

  16. Definition of a facility for experimental studies of two-phase flows and heat transfer in porous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reda, D.C.; Eaton, R.R.

    1981-01-01

    A facility-development effort is currently underway at Sandia National Laboratories in order to create an experimental capability for the study of two-phase, steam/water flows through a variety of porous media. The facility definition phase of this project is described. Equations are derived for the steady, adiabatic, macroscopically-linear two-phase flow of a single-component fluid through a porous medium, including energy transfer both by convection and conduction. These equations are then solved to give relative permeabilities for the steam and water phases as functions of known and/or measurable quantities. A viable experimental approach was thereby formulated, leading to the definition of facility components and instrumentation requirements, including the application of gamma-beam densitometry for the measurement of liquid-saturation distributions in porous media. Finally, a state-of-the-art computer code was utilized to numerically simulate the proposed experiments, providing an estimate of the facility operating envelope

  17. The consolidation of the Bariloche Atomic Center: an approach from the development of the experimental physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Marisa C.; Reising, Ailin M.

    2002-01-01

    The paper investigates the origins of the Center and of the Institute of Physics 'Jose Antonio Balseiro' from the reconstruction of the experimental research programs that were developed between the years 1955 and 1962 in those organizations of the Argentine Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA). Within that intention the paper analyzes the scientific policy of the Institute of Physics and its relations with the CNEA as well as the strategy of resolution of the economic and institutional crisis that affected them between 1958 and 1959. Its incidence in the consolidation of the research programs is also examined

  18. Index of National Aviation Facilities Experimental Center Technical Reports 1972-1977.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-01

    EVALUATION OF DIGITAL ALTIMETER SETTING INDICATORS Robert Frack , Ernest E. Sch’atter and Jack Bernstein Final, August 1975 55 P. (RD-75-81) (AD A013 994...runway would change the surface friction of that runway. The method consisted of jetting water at high velocity to hydraulically remove the rubber from...77-49 Erikson, Robert H. 74-17 Feher, Ray E. 76-53; 77-22 Fisher, Donald A. 74-24; 75-48; 76-15 Fisher, John J. 73-41 Frack , Robert 74-46 Gallagher

  19. FENIX [Fusion ENgineering International eXperimental]: A test facility for ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor] and other new superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slack, D.S.; Patrick, R.E.; Miller, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    The Fusion ENgineering International eXperimental (FENIX) Test Facility which is nearing completion at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is a 76-t set of superconducting magnets housed in a 4-m-diameter cryostat. It represents a significant step toward meeting the testing needs for the development of superconductors appropriate for large-scale magnet applications such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The magnet set is configured to allow radial access to the 0.4-m-diameter high-field region where maximum fields up to 14 T will be provided. The facility is fitted with a thermally isolated test well with a port to the high-field region that allows insertion and removal of test conductors without disturbing the cryogenic environment of the magnets. It is expected that the facility will be made available to magnet developers internationally, and this paper discusses its general design features, its construction, and its capabilities

  20. Cost analysis of a disaster facility at an apex tertiary care trauma center of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheetal Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: For the Commonwealth Games 2010, Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma Centre (JPNATC of India had been directed by the Director General Health Services and Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India, to set up a specialized unit for the definitive management of the injured/unwell athletes, officials, and related personnel coming for the Commonwealth Games in October 2010. The facility included a 20-bedded fully equipped ward, six ICU beds with ventilator capacity, one very very important person observation area, one perioperative management cubicle, and one fully modular and integrated operating room. Objective: The objective of this study was to calculate the cost of disaster facility at JPNATC, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi. Methodology: Traditional (average or gross costing methodology was used to arrive at the cost for the provisioning of these services by this facility. Results: The annual cost of providing services at disaster facility at JPNATC, New Delhi, was calculated to be INR 61,007,334.08 (US$ 983,989.258 while the per hour cost was calculated to be INR 7061.03 of the total cost toward the provisioning of services by disaster facility where 26% was the capital cost and 74% was the operating cost. Human resource caters to maximum chunk of the expenditures (47%. Conclusion: The results of this costing study will help in the future planning of resource allocation within the financial constraints (US$ 1 = INR 62 in the year 2013.

  1. Cost analysis of a disaster facility at an apex tertiary care trauma center of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sheetal; Gupta, Shakti; Daga, Anoop; Siddharth, Vijaydeep; Wundavalli, LaxmiTej

    2016-01-01

    For the Commonwealth Games 2010, Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma Centre (JPNATC) of India had been directed by the Director General Health Services and Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India, to set up a specialized unit for the definitive management of the injured/unwell athletes, officials, and related personnel coming for the Commonwealth Games in October 2010. The facility included a 20-bedded fully equipped ward, six ICU beds with ventilator capacity, one very very important person observation area, one perioperative management cubicle, and one fully modular and integrated operating room. The objective of this study was to calculate the cost of disaster facility at JPNATC, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi. Traditional (average or gross) costing methodology was used to arrive at the cost for the provisioning of these services by this facility. The annual cost of providing services at disaster facility at JPNATC, New Delhi, was calculated to be INR 61,007,334.08 (US$ 983,989.258) while the per hour cost was calculated to be INR 7061.03 of the total cost toward the provisioning of services by disaster facility where 26% was the capital cost and 74% was the operating cost. Human resource caters to maximum chunk of the expenditures (47%). The results of this costing study will help in the future planning of resource allocation within the financial constraints (US$ 1 = INR 62 in the year 2013).

  2. Technical Meeting on Existing and Proposed Experimental Facilities for Fast Neutron Systems. Working Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The discussion which followed the different presentations highlighted the following points: • All the Member States representatives participating in the technical meeting welcomed this IAEA initiative and expressed their potential interest in contributing to the catalogue; • Not all the countries with a fast reactor programme were represented at the meeting. In particular, it was noted that there was no participation from China, the Russian Federation and the USA. Even contribution from Sweden and Spain would be beneficial. It will be a task of the IAEA Secretariat to try involving also these countries in the preparation of the catalogue; • The catalogue will focus only on experimental facilities supporting development of liquid metal cooled fast reactors (Sodium, Lead and Lead-Bismuth). For the time being, facilities in support of GFR and MSR research will not be included; • As for countries involved in HLM technology research, only European countries were participating at the meeting, i.e. Belgium, France, Italy and Germany. In order to avoid duplication of the work performed within the European project ADRIANA, representatives from these countries underlined that a condition for their contribution to the IAEA catalogue is the involvement of non-European countries with HLM research programmes; • The advice from the Member States is fundamental to clearly define scope, objectives and content of the catalogue. The plan for its drafting has also to be further discussed with Member States representatives; • The catalogue is also intended to identify gaps and future needs that require further R&D initiatives; • The catalogue will be a useful tool to set up international collaboration

  3. CATHARE-2 prediction of large primary to secondary leakage (PRISE) at PSB-VVER experimental facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabotinov, L.; Chevrier, P. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, 92 - Fontenay aux Roses (France)

    2007-07-01

    The large primary to secondary leakage (PRISE) is a specific loss-of-coolant accident in VVER reactors, related to the break of the steam generator collector cover, leading to loss of primary mass inventory and possible direct radioactive release to atmosphere. The best estimate thermal-hydraulic computer code CATHARE-2 Version 2.5-1 was used for post-test analysis of a PRISE experiment, conducted at the large scale test facility PSB-VVER in Russia. The PSB rig is 1:300 scaled model of VVER-1000 NPP. The accident is calculated with a 1.4% break size, which corresponds to 100 mm leak from primary to secondary side in the real NPP. A computer model has been developed for CATHARE-2 V2.5-1, taking into account all important components of the PSB facility: reactor model (lower plenum, core, bypass, upper plenum, downcomer), 4 separate loops, pressurizer, horizontal multi-tube steam generators, break section. The secondary side is presented by recirculation model. A large number of sensitivity calculations has been performed regarding break modeling, reactor pressure vessel modeling, counter current flow modeling, hydraulic losses, heat losses, steam generator level regulation. Comparison between calculated and experimental results shows good prediction of the basic thermal-hydraulic phenomena and parameters such as primary and secondary pressures, temperatures, loop flows, etc. Some discrepancies were observed in the calculations of primary mass inventory and loop seal clearance. Nevertheless the final core heat up, which is one of the most important safety criteria, was correctly predicted. (authors)

  4. Experimental planning phase-study of the reproducibility of cementation in lab and facility scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haucz, Maria Judite Afonso; Tello, Cledola Cassia Oliveira, E-mail: shauczmj@cdtn.br, E-mail: tellocc@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    In Nuclear Technology Development Center - CDTN/CNEN several activities are carried out, in which are produced low-level radioactive wastes, among them stand out the aqueous ones. The treatment used for these wastes is volume reduction, adding chemicals substances to concentrate the radionuclides present in the waste into an insoluble form, producing a sludge that is incorporated in cement and after poured in drums. These activities are carried out in the Facility of Chemical Treatment and Cementation, ITQC. Quality control of this process and the final product is done by means of laboratory tests evaluating the setting time, the viscosity and density of the paste and the solidified product compressive strength, resistance to leaching and density. In the laboratory cementation - LABCIM are defined the mixing process, the amount and type of materials best suited to ensure a final product that meets the requirements of CNEN regulation. During the evaluation of historical data some differences were detected in the characteristic of pastes and solidified products. Evaluated the historical data and differences were observed in the characteristics of the pastes and solidified products obtained in the two systems - LABCIM and IQC, pointing to the need to use statistical tools. (author)

  5. Experimental planning phase-study of the reproducibility of cementation in lab and facility scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haucz, Maria Judite Afonso; Tello, Cledola Cassia Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    In Nuclear Technology Development Center - CDTN/CNEN several activities are carried out, in which are produced low-level radioactive wastes, among them stand out the aqueous ones. The treatment used for these wastes is volume reduction, adding chemicals substances to concentrate the radionuclides present in the waste into an insoluble form, producing a sludge that is incorporated in cement and after poured in drums. These activities are carried out in the Facility of Chemical Treatment and Cementation, ITQC. Quality control of this process and the final product is done by means of laboratory tests evaluating the setting time, the viscosity and density of the paste and the solidified product compressive strength, resistance to leaching and density. In the laboratory cementation - LABCIM are defined the mixing process, the amount and type of materials best suited to ensure a final product that meets the requirements of CNEN regulation. During the evaluation of historical data some differences were detected in the characteristic of pastes and solidified products. Evaluated the historical data and differences were observed in the characteristics of the pastes and solidified products obtained in the two systems - LABCIM and IQC, pointing to the need to use statistical tools. (author)

  6. Experimental Comparison of 56 Gbit/s PAM-4 and DMT for Data Center Interconnect Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiselt, Nicklas; Dochhan, Annika; Griesser, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Four-level pulse amplitude modulation (PAM-4) and discrete multi-tone transmission (DMT) in combination with intensity modulation and direct-detection are two promising approaches for a low-power and low-cost solution for the next generation of data center interconnect applications. We experiment......Four-level pulse amplitude modulation (PAM-4) and discrete multi-tone transmission (DMT) in combination with intensity modulation and direct-detection are two promising approaches for a low-power and low-cost solution for the next generation of data center interconnect applications. We...... experimentally investigate and compare both modulation formats at a data rate of 56 Gb/s and a transmission wavelength of 1544 nm using the same experimental setup. We show that PAM-4 outperforms double sideband DMT and also vestigial sideband DMT for the optical back-to-back (b2b) case and also...... for a transmission distance of 80 km SSMF in terms of required OSNR at a FEC-threshold of 3.8e-3. However, it is also pointed out that both versions of DMT do not require any optical dispersion compensation to transmit over 80 km SSMF while this is essential for PAM-4. Thus, implementation effort and cost may...

  7. Remediation of radioactively contaminated facilities and the site of Russian Research Center Kurchatov Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velikhov, E.P.; Ponomarev-Stepnoj, N.N.; Volkov, V.G.

    2007-01-01

    One discusses the efforts to rehabilitate the radiation hazard installations and to remediate the contaminated territory of the Kurchatov Institute RSC undertaken in 2006-2007 in terms of the Remediation Project. The old radwaste storage facilities constructed at the site when the Institute was involved in activities to elaborate both war and civil nuclear technologies were the basic objects of the rehabilitation efforts. Paper describes the structure of the storage facilities covering the volume and the characteristics of the stored radwaste. Paper discusses the storage facility site layout parameters taken into consideration in the course of the remediation efforts. Paper describes the procedures, the sequence of the remediation efforts and the peculiar features of the planning and engineering approaches. Paper dwells upon the results of the rehabilitation and the remediation efforts [ru

  8. Experimental and theoretical study of large scale debris bed reflood in the PEARL facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chikhi, Nourdine, E-mail: nourdine.chikhi@irsn.fr; Fichot, F.

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Five reflooding tests have been carried out with an experimental bed, 500 mm in height and 500 mm in diameter, made of 4 mm stainless steel balls. • For the first time, such a large bed was heated practically homogenously. • The quench front velocity was determined according to thermocouple measurements inside the bed. • An analytical model, assuming a quasi-steady progression of the quench front, allows to predict the conversion ratio in most cases. • It appears that the efficiency of cooling can be increased only up to a certain limit when increasing the inlet water flow rate. - Abstract: During a severe accident in a nuclear power plant, the degradation of fuel rods and melting of materials lead to the accumulation of core materials, which are commonly, called “debris beds”. To stop core degradation and avoid the reactor vessel rupture, the main accident management procedure consists in injecting water. In the case of debris bed, the reflooding models used for Loss of Coolant Accident are not applicable. The IRSN has launched an experimental program on debris bed reflooding to develop new models and to validate severe accident codes. The PEARL facility has been designed to perform, for the first time, the reflooding of large scale debris bed (Ø540 mm, h = 500 mm and 500 kg of steel debris) in a pressurized containment. The bed is heated by means of an induction system. A specific instrumentation has been developed to measure the debris bed temperature, pressure drop inside the bed and the steam flow rate during the reflooding. In this paper, the results of the first integral reflooding tests performed in the PEARL facility at atmospheric pressure up to 700 °C are presented. Focus is made on the quench front propagation and on the steam flow rate during reflooding. The effect of water injection flow rate, debris initial temperature and residual power are also discussed. Finally, an analytical model providing the steam flow rate and

  9. Liquid blanket MHD effects experimental results from LMEL facility at SWIP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Zengyu; Pan Chuanjie; Liu Yong; Pan Chuanhong; Reed, C.B.

    2007-01-01

    The self-cooled /helium-cooled liquid metal blanket concept is an attractive ITER and DEMO blanket candidate as it has low operating pressure, simplicity, and a convenient tritium breeding cycle. But MHD pressure drop remains a key issue, especially in ducts with flow channel inserts (FCI), where the reduction in MHD pressure drop is difficult to predict with existing tools, and there are no available experimental data to check current predictions. To understand well various kinds of MHD effects, it is important for us to analyze and understand FCI effects. In this paper, we present measurements of the MHD effects due to off normal power shutdown, two-dimensional effects due to channel velocity profiles, three-dimensional effects caused by manifolds, and surface/bulk instability effects as a result of insulator coating imperfections. These results were collected from the Liquid Metal Experimental Loop (LMEL) facility at Southwestern Institute of Physics, China and in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory, US under an umbrella of the People's Republic of China/United States program of cooperation in magnetic fusion. Some results were observed for the first time, such as two dimensional effects and instabilities due to insulator coating imperfections. The experiments were conducted under the following conditions: a uniform magnetic field volume of 80 x 170 x 740 mm and a maximum value of magnetic field, B 0 , of 2 Tesla. The mean flow velocity v 0 was measured with an electromagnetic (EM) flow meter (error of 1.2%); a Liquid-metal Electro-magnetic Velocity Instrument (LEVI) was provided by Argonne National Laboratory. The flow was driven by two Electro-magnetic (EM) pumps (6.5+11.6 m3/h); the operating temperature was 85 centigrade degree due to self-heating by the EM pump and friction of the fluid against the loop piping. Experimental parameters were: Hartmann number, M, up to 3500, velocity v 0 up to 1.2 m/s under magnetic field, and B 0 =1.95 Tesla

  10. Spent fuel storage facility at science and technical center 'Sosny': Experience of ten years activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chigrinov, S.; Goulo, V.; Lunev, A.; Belousov, N.; Salnikov, L.; Boiko, L.

    2000-01-01

    Spent fuel storage of the Academic Science and Technical Center in Minsk is in operation already more then 10 years. In the paper aspects of its design, operation practice, problems and decisions for future are discussed. (author)

  11. Decommissioning of the nuclear licensed facilities at the Fontenay aux Roses CEA center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeanjacques, Michel; Piketty, Laurence; Letuhaire, Nathalie; Mandard, Lionel; Meden, Igor; Estivie, David; Boissonneau, Jean Francois; Fouquereau, Alain; Pichereau, Eric; Binet, Cedric

    2007-01-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) center at Fontenay aux Roses (CEN-FAR) is the Commission's oldest center is located in the southern suburbs of Paris. It was opened on 26 March 1946 to host the first French nuclear reactor ZOE that went critical on 12 December 1946. The first laboratories were installed in existing buildings on the site. (authors)

  12. An economic benefit analysis on the cobalt-60 irradiation facility of Beijing Radiation Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Binlin

    1995-01-01

    The peculiarity, the investment and annual operating cost of the 3.7 x 10 16 Bq (MCi) cobalt-60 irradiation facility at Beijing Radiation Application Research Centre are described. Its economic benefits each year are analyzed according to several year operating practice. Some related questions on carrying out radiation processing are raised and discussed. (author)

  13. Molten Core - Concrete interactions in nuclear accidents. Theory and design of an experimental facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevon, T.

    2005-11-01

    In a hypothetical severe accident in a nuclear power plant, the molten core of the reactor may flow onto the concrete floor of containment building. This would cause a molten core . concrete interaction (MCCI), in which the heat transfer from the hot melt to the concrete would cause melting of the concrete. In assessing the safety of nuclear reactors, it is important to know the consequences of such an interaction. As background to the subject, this publication includes a description of the core melt stabilization concept of the European Pressurized water Reactor (EPR), which is being built in Olkiluoto in Finland. The publication includes a description of the basic theory of the interaction and the process of spalling or cracking of concrete when it is heated rapidly. A literature survey and some calculations of the physical properties of concrete and corium. concrete mixtures at high temperatures have been conducted. In addition, an equation is derived for conservative calculation of the maximum possible concrete ablation depth. The publication also includes a literature survey of experimental research on the subject of the MCCI and discussion of the results and deficiencies of the experiments. The main result of this work is the general design of an experimental facility to examine the interaction of molten metals and concrete. The main objective of the experiments is to assess the probability of spalling, or cracking, of concrete under pouring of molten material. A program of five experiments has been designed, and pre-test calculations of the experiments have been conducted with MELCOR 1.8.5 accident analysis program and conservative analytic calculations. (orig.)

  14. Experimental investigation on the behavior of pressure suppression containment systems by the SOPRE-1 facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerullo, N.; Delli Gatti, A.; Marinelli, M.; Mazzini, M.; Mazzoni, A.; Sbrana, A.; Todisco, P.

    1977-01-01

    The SOPRE-1 test facility is an integral model (scale 1:13) of a MARK II pressure suppression containment system. It was set up at the University of Pisa in order to study the pressure-temperature transient in pressure suppression containment systems during LOCAs. Knowledge of this transient is necessary to perform a correct structural analysis of reactor containment. The containment system behavior is studied by changing the principal parameters which affect the transient (blow-down mass and energy release, suppression pool water temperature, vent pipe number and submergence, heat transfer coefficients). The first series of tests involved: A) 13 tests with break area of 1.8 cm 2 , B) 8 tests with break area of 20.0 cm 2 . The following experimental conditions were changed: position of the simulated break (from liquid or steam zone), water pressure (20-85 Kg/cm 2 ) and mass (45-70 Kg) in the vessel model. Tests A): the CONTEMPT codes correctly forecast the pressure-temperature history, both in dry- and in wet-well. Tests B): the experimental runs have shown that increasing of blow-down flowrate produces dry-well pressure spatial differences and anomalous vent pipe behavior. This results in damped oscillations of dry- and wet-well pressure, probably due to alternating air bubble over-expansion and collapse, and in vent pipe opening and reclosing. Dry-well pressure maxima at the end of blow-down are greater than those forecasted by currently applied codes: these codes use an homogeneous model, and do not take into account the above mentioned dynamic phenomena. In some tests other interesting phenomena were observed, such as some local pressure peaks in the suppression pool greater than dry-well pessure maxima at the end of blow-down. At present, all these phenomena are under study; they could be important for the structural analysis of containment systems

  15. The estimation of the amount of radioactive waste from decommissioning of the nuclear facilities in Oarai Engineering Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanimoto, Kenichi; Aihara, Nagafumi; Imai, Katutomo; Tobita, Kazunori; Nemoto, Masaaki; Imahori, Shinji; Noguchi, Kouichi; Hasegawa, Makoto

    1998-11-01

    The estimation of the amount of radioactive waste produced from nuclear facilities in Oarai Engineering Center was performed for the purpose of using it for countermeasure of decommissioning planning. The conditions and the result of the estimation are as follows; (1) The total amount of occurrence of radioactive waste is 18,820 tons. As the items of the amount in radioactive level, the amount of 1 GBq/t and over is 820 tons and that of under 1 GBq/t is 18,000 tons. (2) The amount of metal waste is 5,820 tons and the amount of concrete is 13,000 tons. (3) Above calculation was based on related specifications, complete drawings, and visual observation. (4) To dismantle facilities, if must exfoliate the surface of wall. As for the polluted zone and the zone with possibility of pollution, it decided to exfoliate 5 cm in thickness from the surface of the wall. And, as for the zone that fundamentally pollution was not there, it decided to exfoliate surface 1 cm in thickness from the surface of the wall. (5) Using the suitable decontamination technology and exfoliation technology can reduce the amount of radioactive waste. (6) In the facilities dealing with sealed source judging from the past record of operation, there is no contact with the radioactive material, etc. Therefore, it can be disposed of all the waste that comes out from the facilities as non-radioactive waste. (author)

  16. The National Criticality Experiments Research Center at the Device Assembly Facility, Nevada National Security Site: Status and Capabilities, Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bragg-Sitton, S.; Bess, J.; Werner, J.

    2011-01-01

    The National Criticality Experiments Research Center (NCERC) was officially opened on August 29, 2011. Located within the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), the NCERC has become a consolidation facility within the United States for critical configuration testing, particularly those involving highly enriched uranium (HEU). The DAF is a Department of Energy (DOE) owned facility that is operated by the National Nuclear Security Agency/Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). User laboratories include the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Personnel bring their home lab qualifications and procedures with them to the DAF, such that non-site specific training need not be repeated to conduct work at DAF. The NNSS Management and Operating contractor is National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec) and the NNSS Safeguards and Security contractor is Wackenhut Services. The complete report provides an overview and status of the available laboratories and test bays at NCERC, available test materials and test support configurations, and test requirements and limitations for performing sub-critical and critical tests. The current summary provides a brief summary of the facility status and the method by which experiments may be introduced to NCERC.

  17. Interactive radiopharmaceutical facility between Yale Medical Center and Brookhaven National Laboratory. Progress report, October 1976-June 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottschalk, A.

    1979-01-01

    DOE Contract No. EY-76-S-02-4078 was started in October 1976 to set up an investigative radiochemical facility at the Yale Medical Center which would bridge the gap between current investigation with radionuclides at the Yale School of Medicine and the facilities in the Chemistry Department at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. To facilitate these goals, Dr. Mathew L. Thakur was recruited who joined the Yale University faculty in March of 1977. This report briefly summarizes our research accomplishments through the end of June 1979. These can be broadly classified into three categories: (1) research using indium-111 labelled cellular blood components; (2) development of new radiopharmaceuticals; and (3) interaction with Dr. Alfred Wolf and colleagues in the Chemistry Department of Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  18. Interactive radiopharmaceutical facility between Yale Medical Center and Brookhaven National Laboratory. Progress report, October 1976-June 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottschalk, A.

    1979-01-01

    DOE Contract No. EY-76-S-02-4078 was started in October 1976 to set up an investigative radiochemical facility at the Yale Medical Center which would bridge the gap between current investigation with radionuclides at the Yale School of Medicine and the facilities in the Chemistry Department at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. To facilitate these goals, Dr. Mathew L. Thakur was recruited who joined the Yale University faculty in March of 1977. This report briefly summarizes our research accomplishments through the end of June 1979. These can be broadly classified into three categories: (1) research using indium-111 labelled cellular blood components; (2) development of new radiopharmaceuticals; and (3) interaction with Dr. Alfred Wolf and colleagues in the Chemistry Department of Brookhaven National Laboratory

  19. A Proof-of-Concept for Semantically Interoperable Federation of IoT Experimentation Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, Jorge; Sanchez, Luis; Gomez, David; Elsaleh, Tarek; Steinke, Ronald; Cirillo, Flavio

    2016-06-29

    The Internet-of-Things (IoT) is unanimously identified as one of the main pillars of future smart scenarios. The potential of IoT technologies and deployments has been already demonstrated in a number of different application areas, including transport, energy, safety and healthcare. However, despite the growing number of IoT deployments, the majority of IoT applications tend to be self-contained, thereby forming application silos. A lightweight data centric integration and combination of these silos presents several challenges that still need to be addressed. Indeed, the ability to combine and synthesize data streams and services from diverse IoT platforms and testbeds, holds the promise to increase the potentiality of smart applications in terms of size, scope and targeted business context. In this article, a proof-of-concept implementation that federates two different IoT experimentation facilities by means of semantic-based technologies will be described. The specification and design of the implemented system and information models will be described together with the practical details of the developments carried out and its integration with the existing IoT platforms supporting the aforementioned testbeds. Overall, the system described in this paper demonstrates that it is possible to open new horizons in the development of IoT applications and experiments at a global scale, that transcend the (silo) boundaries of individual deployments, based on the semantic interconnection and interoperability of diverse IoT platforms and testbeds.

  20. A Proof-of-Concept for Semantically Interoperable Federation of IoT Experimentation Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Lanza

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Internet-of-Things (IoT is unanimously identified as one of the main pillars of future smart scenarios. The potential of IoT technologies and deployments has been already demonstrated in a number of different application areas, including transport, energy, safety and healthcare. However, despite the growing number of IoT deployments, the majority of IoT applications tend to be self-contained, thereby forming application silos. A lightweight data centric integration and combination of these silos presents several challenges that still need to be addressed. Indeed, the ability to combine and synthesize data streams and services from diverse IoT platforms and testbeds, holds the promise to increase the potentiality of smart applications in terms of size, scope and targeted business context. In this article, a proof-of-concept implementation that federates two different IoT experimentation facilities by means of semantic-based technologies will be described. The specification and design of the implemented system and information models will be described together with the practical details of the developments carried out and its integration with the existing IoT platforms supporting the aforementioned testbeds. Overall, the system described in this paper demonstrates that it is possible to open new horizons in the development of IoT applications and experiments at a global scale, that transcend the (silo boundaries of individual deployments, based on the semantic interconnection and interoperability of diverse IoT platforms and testbeds.

  1. Experimental neutron capture data of $^{58}$Ni from the CERN n_TOF facility

    CERN Document Server

    Žugec, P.; Colonna, N.; Bosnar, D.; Altstadt, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Bécares, V.; Bečvář, F.; Belloni, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Billowes, J.; Boccone, V.; Brugger, M.; Calviani, M.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Carrapiço, C.; Cerutti, F.; Chiaveri, E.; Chin, M.; Cortés, G.; Cortés-Giraldo, M.A.; Diakaki, M.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Duran, I.; Dzysiuk, N.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Ferrari, A.; Fraval, K.; Ganesan, S.; García, A.R.; Giubrone, G.; Gómez-Hornillos, M.B.; Gonçalves, I.F.; González-Romero, E.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Gurusamy, P.; Jenkins, D.G.; Jericha, E.; Kadi, Y.; Käppeler, F.; Karadimos, D.; Koehler, P.; Kokkoris, M.; Krtička, M.; Kroll, J.; Langer, C.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Leong, L.S.; Losito, R.; Manousos, A.; Marganiec, J.; Martìnez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.F.; Mastromarco, M.; Meaze, M.; Mendoza, E.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P.M.; Mingrone, F.; Mirea, M.; Mondalaers, W.; Paradela, C.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Pignatari, M.; Plompen, A.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J.M.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Riego, A.; Roman, F.; Rubbia, C.; Sarmento, R.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Schmidt, S.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J.L.; Tarrío, D.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tsinganis, A.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Versaci, R.; Vermeulen, M.J.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Wallner, A.; Ware, T.; Weigand, M.; Weiß, C.; Wright, T.

    2013-01-01

    The $^{58}$Ni $(n,\\gamma)$ cross section has been measured at the neutron time of flight facility n_TOF at CERN, in the energy range from 27 meV up to 400 keV. In total, 51 resonances have been analyzed up to 122 keV. Maxwellian averaged cross sections (MACS) have been calculated for stellar temperatures of kT$=$5-100 keV with uncertainties of less than 6%, showing fair agreement with recent experimental and evaluated data up to kT = 50 keV. The MACS extracted in the present work at 30 keV is 34.2$\\pm$0.6$_\\mathrm{stat}\\pm$1.8$_\\mathrm{sys}$ mb, in agreement with latest results and evaluations, but 12% lower relative to the recent KADoNIS compilation of astrophysical cross sections. When included in models of the s-process nucleosynthesis in massive stars, this change results in a 60% increase of the abundance of $^{58}$Ni, with a negligible propagation on heavier isotopes. The reason is that, using both the old or the new MACS, 58Ni is efficiently depleted by neutron captures.

  2. An aerial radiological survey of the Saxton Nuclear Experimental Corporation facility and surrounding area, Saxton, Pennsylvania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoover, R.A.

    1991-10-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted during the period July 5 to 22, 1989, over an 83-square kilometer (32-square-mile) area surrounding the Saxton Nuclear Experimental Corporation (SNEC) facility which is owned by General Public Utilities and located near Saxton, Pennsylvania. The survey was conducted at a nominal altitude of 61 meters (200 feet) with line spacings of 91 meters (300 feet). A contour map of the terrestrial gamma exposure rate extrapolated to 1 meter above ground level (AGL) was prepared and overlaid on an aerial photograph and a set of United States Geological Survey (USGS) topographic maps of the area. The terrestrial exposure rates varied from about 9 to 11 microroentgens per hour (μR/h) over most of the survey area. The levels over the SNEC family did not differ from the exposure rates seen over the entire survey area. Cesium-137 (Cs-137) levels typical of worldwide fallout deposition were detected throughout the surveyed area. No other trends of Cs-137 were observed. Soil samples and pressurized ion chamber measurements were obtained at six locations within the survey boundaries to support the aerial data

  3. Experimental study on imploding characteristics of wire-array Z pinches on Qiangguang-1 facility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Zhen; Xu Rong-Kun; Yang Jian-Lun; Hua Xin-Sheng; Li Lin-Bo; Xu Ze-Ping; Ning Jia-Min; Song Feng-Jun

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the imploding characteristics of cylindrical wire array,experiments with load current varying from 1.5MA to 1.7MA were carried out on the Qiangguang-1 facility.The complicated temporal-spatial distribution of x-ray radiation was measured by the one-dimensional (1D) x-ray imaging system.Other diagnostic equipments including the x-ray power meter(XRPM) and the time-integrated pinhole camera were used to record time-resolved x-ray power pulse and pinhole x-ray images.Analysis shows that the fast leading edge of the local x-ray radiation pulse is of primary importance in sharpening x-ray power pulse rather than the temporal synchrony and the spatial uniformity of implosion.Experimental results indicated that the better axial imploding synchrony,the faster the increase of X-ray power for an array consisting of 32 tungsten wires of 5μm diameter than for the others,and the higher the x-ray radiation power with maximal convergence ratio (r0/r1) of 10.5.A 'zipper-like' effect of x-ray radiation extending from the cathode Was also observed.

  4. Aerosols from metal cutting techniques typical of decommissioning nuclear facilities - experimental system for collection and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, G.J.; Hoover, M.D.; Barr, E.B.; Wong, B.A.; Ritter, P.D.

    1982-01-01

    Decommissioning of radioactively contaminated sites has the potential for creating radioactive and other potentially toxic aerosols. We describe an experimental system to collect and characterize aerosols from metal cutting activities typical of those used in decommissioning of nuclear facilities. A special enclosure was designed for the experiment and consisted of a 2-in. x 4-in. stud frame with double walls of flame retardant polyethylene film. Large plexiglass windows allowed the cutting operations to be directed and filmed. Ventilation was 8500 L/min (300 CFM) exhausted through HEPA filters. Seven cutting techniques were evaluated: pipe cutter, reciprocating saw, band saw, chop saw, oxy-acetylene torch, electric arc cut rod and plasma torch. Two grinding tools were also evaluated. Materials cut were 2-, 3- and 4-in. dia schedule 40, 80 and 180 type 304L stainless steel pipe. Basic studies were done on uncontaminated pipe. Four-inch-diameter sections of schedule 180 type 304L stainless steel pipe with radioactively contaminated internal surfaces were also cut. The experiments controlled important variables including tools, cutting technique, and type and thickness of material. 15 references, 4 figures, 2 tables

  5. Experimental engineering section off-gas decontamination facility's fractionator column: installation and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilliam, T.M.; Fowler, V.L.; Inman, D.J.

    1978-03-01

    A detailed description of the third column recently installed in the Experimental Engineering Section Off-Gas Decontamination Facility (EES-ODF) is presented. The EES-ODF is being used to provide engineering-scale experiments (nominal gas and liquid flows of 5 scfm and 0.5 gpm, respectively) in the development of the Krypton Absorption in Liquid CO 2 (KALC) process. A detailed discussion of the column's construction is provided. This discussion includes the peripherals associated with the column, such as refrigeration, heat exchangers, instrumentation, etc. The compressibility of Goodloe packing (the packing in the other columns) and the possible reduced throughput due to this compression have revealed the desirablility of a random (i.e., noncompressible) packing. Toward this end, the third column is packed with a new random packing (PRO-PAK). A preliminary comparison between this packing and the woven wire mesh packing (Goodloe) used in the other two columns has been made. Experiments comparing the throughput capacity indicate that the PRO-PAK packing has approximately 60% the capacity of Goodloe for a CO 2 system. When used as a fractionator or stripper with the basic O 2 -Kr-CO 2 KALC system, the PRO-PAK column produced HTU values less than or equal to the GOODLOE columns under similar operating conditions

  6. Experimental performance evaluation of two stack sampling systems in a plutonium facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glissmeyer, J.A.

    1992-04-01

    The evaluation of two routine stack sampling systems at the Z-Plant plutonium facility operated by Rockwell International for USERDA is part of a larger study, sponsored by Rockwell and conducted by Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, of gaseous effluent sampling systems. The gaseous effluent sampling systems evaluated are located at the main plant ventilation stack (291-Z-1) and at a vessel vent stack (296-Z-3). A preliminary report, which was a paper study issued in April 1976, identified many deficiencies in the existing sampling systems and made recommendations for corrective action. The objectives of this experimental evaluation of those sampling systems were as follows: Characterize the radioactive aerosols in the stack effluents; Develop a tracer aerosol technique for validating particulate effluent sampling system performance; Evaluate the performance of the existing routine sampling systems and their compliance with the sponsor's criteria; and Recommend corrective action where required. The tracer aerosol approach to sampler evaluation was chosen because the low concentrations of radioactive particulates in the effluents would otherwise require much longer sampling times and thus more time to complete this evaluation. The following report describes the sampling systems that are the subject of this study and then details the experiments performed. The results are then presented and discussed. Much of the raw and finished data are included in the appendices

  7. EXPERIMENTAL AND COMPUTATIONAL ACTIVITIES AT THE OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY NEES TSUNAMI RESEARCH FACILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.C. Yim

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A diverse series of research projects have taken place or are underway at the NEES Tsunami Research Facility at Oregon State University. Projects range from the simulation of the processes and effects of tsunamis generated by sub-aerial and submarine landslides (NEESR, Georgia Tech., model comparisons of tsunami wave effects on bottom profiles and scouring (NEESR, Princeton University, model comparisons of wave induced motions on rigid and free bodies (Shared-Use, Cornell, numerical model simulations and testing of breaking waves and inundation over topography (NEESR, TAMU, structural testing and development of standards for tsunami engineering and design (NEESR, University of Hawaii, and wave loads on coastal bridge structures (non-NEES, to upgrading the two-dimensional wave generator of the Large Wave Flume. A NEESR payload project (Colorado State University was undertaken that seeks to improve the understanding of the stresses from wave loading and run-up on residential structures. Advanced computational tools for coupling fluid-structure interaction including turbulence, contact and impact are being developed to assist with the design of experiments and complement parametric studies. These projects will contribute towards understanding the physical processes that occur during earthquake generated tsunamis including structural stress, debris flow and scour, inundation and overland flow, and landslide generated tsunamis. Analytical and numerical model development and comparisons with the experimental results give engineers additional predictive tools to assist in the development of robust structures as well as identification of hazard zones and formulation of hazard plans.

  8. A theoretical and experimental dose rate study at a multipurpose gamma irradiation facility in Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackey, Tracey A.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation dose rate monitoring out at the Radiation Technology Centre (RTC) of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC) to establish the safety or otherwise of staff at the occupied areas is presented. The facility operates a rectangular source of Co-60 gamma with an having activity of 27.4kCi as at March 2015 and has 14 workers. The aim of the research was determine by means of practical and theoretical evaluations shielding effectiveness of the irradiation chamber. This was to ensure that occupationally exposed workers are not over exposed or their exposures do not exceed the regulatory limits of 7.5μSv/h or 50mSv per annum. The study included dose rate measurements at controlled areas, evaluation of personnel dose history, comparison of experimental and theoretical values and determination of whether the shielding can support a. 18.5PBq (500kCi) Co-60 source. Practical dose rate measurements when the source was in the irradiation position was carried out using a Thermo Scientific Rad-Eye Gamma Survey Meter in the controlled areas of the facility which included the control room, electric room, deionizer room, on top of the roof of irradiation chamber (specifically above the roof plugs) and the two entrances to the irradiation chamber; the personnel door and the goods door. Background reading was found to be 0.08±0.01μSv/h whilst the average dose rates at the two entrances to the irradiation chamber (i e.,- the personnel door and the goods door) were measured to be 0.090μSv/h and 0.109μSv/h respectively. Practical measurements at the roof plugs produced average values of 0.135μSv/h. A particular point on the roof marked as plug-3 produced a relatively higher dose rate of 8.151μSv/h due probably to leakage along the cable to the drive motor. Measurements in the control room, electrical room and deionizer room had average readings of 0.116μSv/h, 0.089μSv/h and 0.614μSv/h respectively. All these average values were below the regulatory limits of 7.5

  9. Neutronics analysis of the TRIGA Mark II reactor core and its experimental facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, R.

    2010-01-01

    core into a complete mixed core. To analyze the current core, a good knowledge of burned fuel material composition is essential. Because of the complications of experimental methods for measuring each FE, the ORIGEN2 computer code is selected for burn up and relevant material composition calculation. These calculations are verified by measuring the Cesium isotope (Cs-137) for six spent FE(s). Modifying the confirmed ORIGEN2 model for 104 and 110 (FLIP) FE(s), the burn up calculations of all 83 FE(s) of the current core are completed and applied to the already developed MCNP model. The detailed MCNP model of the burned core is verified by three local consistent experiments performed in June 2009. The criticality experiment confirms the model that the current core achieves its criticality on addition of 78th FE. The five FE(s) from different ring positions are measured to confirm the theoretical results. The percent deviation between MCNP predictions and experimental observations ranges from 3 to 19 %. The radial and axial neutron flux density distribution experiment verifies the MCNP theoretical results in the core. The theoretical and experimental perturbation study in the Central Irradiation Channel (CIR) of the core is performed. The reactivity effect of three small cylindrical samples (void, Cadmium and heavy water) are measured and compared with the MCNP predictions for verification. Applying the current core MCNP model, the void coefficient of reactivity is calculated as 11 cents per %-void. To perform the calculation in the experimental facilities outside the reactor core, the MCNP model is extended to the thermal column, radiographic collimator, four beam tubes and biological shielding. The MCNP results are verified in the thermal column and the beam tube A region. The percent difference between the simulated and experimental neutron diffusion length is 13 %. (author) [de

  10. Planned experimental studies on natural-circulation and stability performance of boiling water reactors in four experimental facilities and first results (NACUSP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruijf, W.J.M. de E-mail: kruijf@iri.tudelft.nl; Ketelaar, K.C.J.; Avakian, G.; Gubernatis, P.; Caruge, D.; Manera, A.; Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der; Yadigaroglu, G.; Dominicus, G.; Rohde, U.; Prasser, H.-M.; Castrillo, F.; Huggenberger, M.; Hennig, D.; Munoz-Cobo, J.L.; Aguirre, C

    2003-04-01

    Within the 5th Euratom framework programme the NACUSP project focuses on natural-circulation and stability characteristics of Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs). This paper gives an overview of the research to be performed. Moreover, it shows the first results obtained by one of the four experimental facilities involved. Stability boundaries are given for the low-power low-pressure operating range, measured in the CIRCUS facility. The experiments are meant to serve as a future validation database for thermohydraulic system codes to be applied for the design and operation of BWRs.

  11. Planned experimental studies on natural-circulation and stability performance of boiling water reactors in four experimental facilities and first results (NACUSP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruijf, W.J.M. de; Ketelaar, K.C.J.; Avakian, G.; Gubernatis, P.; Caruge, D.; Manera, A.; Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der; Yadigaroglu, G.; Dominicus, G.; Rohde, U.; Prasser, H.-M.; Castrillo, F.; Huggenberger, M.; Hennig, D.; Munoz-Cobo, J.L.; Aguirre, C.

    2003-01-01

    Within the 5th Euratom framework programme the NACUSP project focuses on natural-circulation and stability characteristics of Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs). This paper gives an overview of the research to be performed. Moreover, it shows the first results obtained by one of the four experimental facilities involved. Stability boundaries are given for the low-power low-pressure operating range, measured in the CIRCUS facility. The experiments are meant to serve as a future validation database for thermohydraulic system codes to be applied for the design and operation of BWRs

  12. A heat transport benchmark problem for predicting the impact of measurements on experimental facility design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacuci, Dan Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Predictive Modeling of Coupled Multi-Physics Systems (PM_CMPS) methodology is used. • Impact of measurements for reducing predicted uncertainties is highlighted. • Presented thermal-hydraulics benchmark illustrates generally applicable concepts. - Abstract: This work presents the application of the “Predictive Modeling of Coupled Multi-Physics Systems” (PM_CMPS) methodology conceived by Cacuci (2014) to a “test-section benchmark” problem in order to quantify the impact of measurements for reducing the uncertainties in the conceptual design of a proposed experimental facility aimed at investigating the thermal-hydraulics characteristics expected in the conceptual design of the G4M reactor (GEN4ENERGY, 2012). This “test-section benchmark” simulates the conditions experienced by the hottest rod within the conceptual design of the facility's test section, modeling the steady-state conduction in a rod heated internally by a cosinus-like heat source, as typically encountered in nuclear reactors, and cooled by forced convection to a surrounding coolant flowing along the rod. The PM_CMPS methodology constructs a prior distribution using all of the available computational and experimental information, by relying on the maximum entropy principle to maximize the impact of all available information and minimize the impact of ignorance. The PM_CMPS methodology then constructs the posterior distribution using Bayes’ theorem, and subsequently evaluates it via saddle-point methods to obtain explicit formulas for the predicted optimal temperature distributions and predicted optimal values for the thermal-hydraulics model parameters that characterized the test-section benchmark. In addition, the PM_CMPS methodology also yields reduced uncertainties for both the model parameters and responses. As a general rule, it is important to measure a quantity consistently with, and more accurately than, the information extant prior to the measurement. For

  13. CFD analysis and experimental investigation associated with the design of the Los Alamos nuclear materials storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardin, J.D.; Hopkins, S.; Gregory, W.S.; Martin, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is being renovated for long-term storage of canisters designed to hold heat-generating nuclear materials, such as powders, ingots, and other components. The continual heat generation within the canisters necessitates a reliable cooling scheme of sufficient magnitude which maintains the stored material temperatures within acceptable limits. The primary goal of this study was to develop both an experimental facility and a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of a subsection of the NMSF which could be used to observe general performance trends of a proposed passive cooling scheme and serve as a design tool for canister holding fixtures. Comparisons of numerical temperature and velocity predictions with empirical data indicate that the CFD model provides an accurate representation of the NMSF experimental facility. Minor modifications in the model geometry and boundary conditions are needed to enhance its accuracy, however, the various fluid and thermal models correctly capture the basic physics

  14. The Marshall Space Flight Center Low-Energy Ion Facility: a preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biddle, A.P.; Reynolds, J.W.; Chisholm, W.L. Jr.; Hunt, R.D.

    1983-10-01

    The Low-Energy Ion Facility (LEIF) is designed for laboratory research of low-energy ion beams similar to those present in the magnetosphere. In addition, it provides the ability to develop and calibrate low-energy, less than 50 eV, plasma instrumentation over its full range of energy, mass, flux, and arrival angle. The current status of this evolving resource is described. It also provides necessary information to allow users to utilize it most efficiently

  15. Density functional theory calculations establish the experimental evidence of the DX center atomic structure in CdTe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lany, Stephan; Wolf, Herbert; Wichert, Thomas

    2004-06-04

    The In DX center and the DX-like configuration of the Cd host atom in CdTe are investigated using density functional theory. The simultaneous calculation of the atomic structure and the electric field gradient (EFG) allows one to correlate the theoretically predicted structure of the DX center with an experimental observable, namely, the EFG obtained from radioactive 111In/111Cd probe atoms in In doped CdTe. In this way, the experimental identification of the DX center structure is established.

  16. Report of the ANS Project Feasibility Workshop for a High Flux Isotope Reactor-Center for Neutron Research Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peretz, F.J.; Booth, R.S.

    1995-07-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Conceptual Design Report (CDR) and its subsequent updates provided definitive design, cost, and schedule estimates for the entire ANS Project. A recent update to this estimate of the total project cost for this facility was $2.9 billion, as specified in the FY 1996 Congressional data sheet, reflecting a line-item start in FY 1995. In December 1994, ANS management decided to prepare a significantly lower-cost option for a research facility based on ANS which could be considered during FY 1997 budget deliberations if DOE or Congressional planners wished. A cost reduction for ANS of about $1 billion was desired for this new option. It was decided that such a cost reduction could be achieved only by a significant reduction in the ANS research scope and by maximum, cost-effective use of existing High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and ORNL facilities to minimize the need for new buildings. However, two central missions of the ANS -- neutron scattering research and isotope production-were to be retained. The title selected for this new option was High Flux Isotope Reactor-Center for Neutron Research (HFIR-CNR) because of the project's maximum use of existing HFIR facilities and retention of selected, central ANS missions. Assuming this shared-facility requirement would necessitate construction work near HFIR, it was specified that HFIR-CNR construction should not disrupt normal operation of HFIR. Additional objectives of the study were that it be highly credible and that any material that might be needed for US Department of Energy (DOE) and Congressional deliberations be produced quickly using minimum project resources. This requirement made it necessary to rely heavily on the ANS design, cost, and schedule baselines. A workshop methodology was selected because assessment of each cost and/or scope-reduction idea required nearly continuous communication among project personnel to ensure that all ramifications of propsed changes

  17. Modelling of atmosphere mixing and stratification in the Tosqan experimental facility with the CFX code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kljenak, I.; Babic, M.; Mavko, B.; Bajsic, I.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: During the course of a severe accident in a Light Water Reactor nuclear power plant, large amounts of hydrogen would presumably be generated and released into the containment. The integrity of the containment could be threatened due to hydrogen combustion. The prediction of hydrogen behaviour at severe accident conditions is thus important for devising adequate accident management procedures. Lately, investigations about the possible application of so-called Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes for this purpose have been started within the nuclear community. These investigations are complemented by adequate experiments. In the proposed work, the CFD code CFX4.4 was used to simulate an experiment in the TOSQAN facility, which is located at the Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN) in Saclay (France). The facility consists of a cylindrical vessel (volume: 7 m3), in which gases are injected. The temperature of the vessel walls may be controlled. Steam may condense on some parts of the walls, where the controlled temperature is maintained at sufficiently low levels. In the considered experiment, which was also proposed for the OECD/NEA International Standard Problem No.47, air was initially present in the vessel, and steam, air and helium were injected during different phases of the experiment at various mass flow rates. The thermal-hydraulic behaviour was determined by the dominant physical phenomena: gas injection, steam condensation, heat transfer and buoyant flow. During certain phases of the experiment, steady states were reached when the steam condensation rate became equal to the steam injection rate, with all boundary conditions (wall temperatures and injection rates) remaining constant. In the proposed work, three intermediate steady states, which were obtained with different boundary conditions, were simulated independently. The main purpose was to reproduce the non-homogeneous temperature, species

  18. Test facilities for radioactive materials transport packages (Transportation Technology Center Inc., Pueblo, Colorado, USA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conlon, P.C.L.

    2001-01-01

    Transportation Technology Center, Inc. is capable of conducting tests on rail vehicle systems designed for transporting radioactive materials including low level waste debris, transuranic waste, and spent nuclear fuel and high level waste. Services include rail vehicle dynamics modelling, on-track performance testing, full scale structural fatigue testing, rail vehicle impact tests, engineering design and technology consulting, and emergency response training. (author)

  19. Sandia National Laboratories Facilities Management and Operations Center Design Standards Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Timothy L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    At Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico (SNL/NM), the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of facilities is guided by industry standards, a graded approach, and the systematic analysis of life cycle benefits received for costs incurred. The design of the physical plant must ensure that the facilities are "fit for use," and provide conditions that effectively, efficiently, and safely support current and future mission needs. In addition, SNL/NM applies sustainable design principles, using an integrated whole-building design approach, from site planning to facility design, construction, and operation to ensure building resource efficiency and the health and productivity of occupants. The safety and health of the workforce and the public, any possible effects on the environment, and compliance with building codes take precedence over project issues, such as performance, cost, and schedule. These design standards generally apply to all disciplines on all SNL/NM projects. Architectural and engineering design must be both functional and cost-effective. Facility design must be tailored to fit its intended function, while emphasizing low-maintenance, energy-efficient, and energy-conscious design. Design facilities that can be maintained easily, with readily accessible equipment areas, low maintenance, and quality systems. To promote an orderly and efficient appearance, architectural features of new facilities must complement and enhance the existing architecture at the site. As an Architectural and Engineering (A/E) professional, you must advise the Project Manager when this approach is prohibitively expensive. You are encouraged to use professional judgment and ingenuity to produce a coordinated interdisciplinary design that is cost-effective, easily contractible or buildable, high-performing, aesthetically pleasing, and compliant with applicable building codes. Close coordination and development of civil, landscape, structural, architectural, fire

  20. Overview of Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) project and Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility (MLF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Yujiro

    2008-01-01

    The J-PARC project has been conducted jointly by JAERI and KEK since 2001. This paper reports an overview and current status of the project. The high intensity proton accelerator consists of a 400 MeV Linac, a 3 GeV synchrotron and 50 GeV synchrotron to deliver MW level pulsed proton beam to experimental facilities. The MW proton power will provide an advanced scientific experimental research complex aiming at making breakthroughs in materials and life science with neutron and muon, nuclear and elementary physics, etc. Regarding the project being close to its completion in 2008, this paper describes the overview of J-PARC project with emphasis of the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility, in which the MW pulsed neutron and muon sources, are placed to provide high quality neutron and muon beams to the world wide users. (author)

  1. The Design of Compressed air system in the Conventional Facility of Proton Accelerator Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, G. P.; Kim, J. Y.; Cho, S. W.; Min, Y. S.; Mun, K. J.; Cho, J. S.; Nam, J. M.; Park, S. S.; Jo, J. H.

    2012-01-01

    The Compressed Air System (CA) supplies compressed air for all air operated devices and instruments, pneumatic equipment and other miscellaneous air user points in the Conventional Facilities of Proton Engineering Frontier Project. CA System consist of the Instrument Air System and the Service air System. The Instrument Air System supplies oil-free, dried, filtered, and compressed instrument air for the air operated control devices and instruments in the Accelerator and Beam Application Building, Ion Beam Application Building, Utility Building and etc.. The Service air System supplies compressed air for pneumatic equipment and other services

  2. Operation of the Nuclear Radiation Center as an all-university facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinman, G.W.

    1972-01-01

    The TRIGA at WSU is part of an all university research unit and its structure and work organization are presented. The facility seeks users from the university and from outside the university. In many cases projects are jointly sponsored by NRC faculty together with faculty from elsewhere on campus. In other cases neutrons or free use of other equipment is provided. The promotional efforts are rather sharply focused on environmental and health related problems. The effects of the institutional arrangement on the operation of the Centre are discussed

  3. Ideas and Approaches on “Construction of High Level Simulation Experimental Teaching Center of Virtual Chemical Laboratory”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunshen

    2017-11-01

    With the spiritual guidance of the Circular on the Construction of National Virtual Simulation Experimental Teaching Center by the National Department of Education, according to the requirements of construction task and work content, and based on the reality of the simulation experimental teaching center of virtual chemical laboratory at Tianjin University, this paper mainly strengthens the understanding of virtual simulation experimental teaching center from three aspects, and on this basis, this article puts forward specific construction ideas, which refer to the “four combinations, five in one, the optimization of the resources and school-enterprise cooperation”, and on this basis, this article has made effective explorations. It also shows the powerful functions of the virtual simulation experimental teaching platform in all aspects by taking the synthesis and analysis of organic compounds as an example.

  4. Bioregenerative Life Support Experiment for 90-days in a Closed Integrative Experimental Facility LUNAR PALACE 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong

    A 90-day bioregenerative life support experiment with three-member crew was carried out in the closed integrative experimental facility, LUNAR PALACE 1 regenerating basic living necessities and disposing wastes to provide life support for crew. It was composed of higher plant module, animal module, and waste treatment module. The higher plant module included wheat, chufa, pea, carrot and green leafy vegetables, with aim to satisfy requirement of 60% plant food and 100% O2 and water for crew. The yellow mealworm was selected as animal module to provide partial animal protein for crew, and reared on plant inedible biomass. The higher plant and yellow mealworm were both cultivated and harvested in the conveyor-type manner. The partial plant inedible biomass and human feces were mixed and co- fermented in the waste treatment module for preparation of soil-like substrate by bioconversion, maintaining gas balance and increasing closure degree. Meanwhile, in the waste treatment module, the water and partial nitrogen from human urine were recovered by physical-chemical means. Circulation of O2 and water as well as food supply from crops cultivated in the LUNAR PALACE 1 were investigated and calculated, and simultaneously gas exchange, mass flow among different components and system closure degree were also analyzed, respectively. Furthermore, the system robustness with respect to internal variation was tested and evaluated by sensitivity analysis of the aggregative index consisting of key performance indicators like crop yield, gaseous equilibrium concentration, microbial community composition, biogenic elements dynamics, etc., and comprehensively evaluating the operating state, to number change of crew from 2 to 4 during the 90-day closed experiment period.

  5. Environmental Assessment for a Global Reach Deployment Center and Ancillary Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-07-07

    akali milkvetch (Astragalus tener var. tener), Contra Costa goldfields (Lasthenia conjugens), and the San Joaquin spearscale (Atriplex joaquiniana... Costa goldfields (Lasthenia conjugens), a federally listed plant species. Building the Center at this site would also involve building within the land...AFB. Contra Costa goldfields is listed as federally endangered. Vernal pools are found throughout the Base. These sites vary in size from 1 acre

  6. Introduction of radiation protection and dosimetry in new hot cell facility in research center Rez

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svrcula, P.; Petrickova, A.; Srba, O.; Miklos, M.; Svoboda, P.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the poster is to present radiation protection and dosimetry in the new hot cell facility being constructed as part of the SUSEN project. The hot cell facility is composed of 10 hot cells and 1 semi-hot cell. All shielding is made from steel, the outer wall shielding has thickness of 500 mm, internal wall between hot cells 300 mm with the possibility to extension to 500 mm. The ceiling shielding has a thickness of 400 mm and the floor shielding is 300 mm wide. Shielded windows allow direct view into the hot cells. Their shielding effect is equivalent to 500 mm of steel. The dimension of the window in the control room is 800 mm x 600 mm with a thickness of 900 mm. All important operating data are collected in the central system of hot cells. The system monitors under-pressure level and temperature in each chamber. If necessary it can directly control the ventilation system. Each hot cell is equipped with dose rate probes. The system also measures and evaluates airborne radioactivity in the building

  7. Counterpart experimental study of ISP-42 PANDA tests on PUMA facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jun; Choi, Sung-Won; Lim, Jaehyok; Lee, Doo-Yong; Rassame, Somboon; Hibiki, Takashi; Ishii, Mamoru

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Counterpart tests were performed on two large-scale BWR integral facilities. ► Similarity of post-LOCA system behaviors observed between two tests. ► Passive core and containment cooling systems work as design in both tests. -- Abstract: A counterpart test to the Passive Nachwärmeabfuhr und Druckabbau Test Anlage (Passive Decay Heat Removal and Depressurization Test Facility, PANDA) International Standard Problem (ISP)-42 test was conducted at the Purdue University Multi-Dimensional Integral Test Assembly (PUMA) facility. Aimed to support code validation on a range of light water reactor (LWR) containment issues, the ISP-42 test consists of six sequential phases (Phases A–F) with separately defined initial and boundary conditions, addressing different stages of anticipated accident scenario and system responses. The counterpart test was performed from Phases A to D, which are within the scope of the normal integral tests performed on the PUMA facility. A scaling methodology was developed by using the PANDA facility as prototype and PUMA facility as test model, and an engineering scaling has been applied to the PUMA facility. The counterpart test results indicated that functions of passive safety systems, such as passive containment cooling system (PCCS) start-up, gravity-driven cooling system (GDCS) discharge, PCCS normal operation and overload function were confirmed in both the PANDA and PUMA facilities with qualitative similarities

  8. Application of an experimental irradiation facility type K-120 for the radiation treatment of agricultural products in large quantity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenger, V.; Foeldiak, G.; Horvath, I.; Hargittai, P.; Bartfai, Cs.

    1979-01-01

    During experimental and pilot irradiation carried out by the 60 Co irradiation facility type K-120 of the Institute of Isotopes of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences an irradiation technology for the treatment of agricultural and food products of considerable density has been developed. Applying transport containers of commercial size the intermittent radiation treatment of great quantity products was made possible with homogeneous dose distribution. The radiation technical characteristics, the utilization coefficient and the capacity of the facility for every agricultural product were calculated. (author)

  9. The structural innovative design of DN400 experimental facility with inversed U-shaped twin tower for uranium ion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Geng; Lei Ze'nan; Liu Qing

    2012-01-01

    A DN400 experimental facility with inversed U-shaped twin towers for uranium ion exchange is designed and developed to solve the existing problems in ion exchange equipment, such as easy agglomeration on the upper layer of resin bed, much resin abrasion, high sensitiveness for mud and sand, and difficulty in producing ideal plug flow in back-wash process. The facility combined with the valve control principle, cross flow type sieve plate and the unique inlet and outlet structures can solve the above problems, and the efficiency of uranium extraction can be improved significantly. (authors)

  10. The Oral Health Care Manager in a Patient-Centered Health Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theile, Cheryl Westphal; Strauss, Shiela M; Northridge, Mary Evelyn; Birenz, Shirley

    2016-06-01

    The dental hygienist team member has an opportunity to coordinate care within an interprofessional practice as an oral health care manager. Although dental hygienists are currently practicing within interprofessional teams in settings such as pediatric offices, hospitals, nursing homes, schools, and federally qualified health centers, they often still assume traditional responsibilities rather than practicing to the full extent of their training and licenses. This article explains the opportunity for the dental hygiene professional to embrace patient-centered care as an oral health care manager who can facilitate integration of oral and primary care in a variety of health care settings. Based on an innovative model of collaboration between a college of dentistry and a college of nursing, an idea emerged among several faculty members for a new management method for realizing continuity and coordination of comprehensive patient care. Involved faculty members began working on the development of an approach to interprofessional practice with the dental hygienist serving as an oral health care manager who would address both oral health care and a patient's related primary care issues through appropriate referrals and follow-up. This approach is explained in this article, along with the results of several pilot studies that begin to evaluate the feasibility of a dental hygienist as an oral health care manager. A health care provider with management skills and leadership qualities is required to coordinate the interprofessional provision of comprehensive health care. The dental hygienist has the opportunity to lead closer integration of oral and primary care as an oral health care manager, by coordinating the team of providers needed to implement comprehensive, patient-centered care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Reliability Centered Maintenance for Savannah River Site`s interim waste management facilities. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauer, K.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Wilson, J.F. [PRC, Inc. (US)

    1992-06-01

    The application of Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) has been shown to be an effective means to optimize maintenance programs or to establish new programs. The key to success of any RCM program is to customize the methodology to meet the specific needs of the implementing organization. This paper discusses how RCM is being used to establish the preventive maintenance program and how the resulting system data is being used to support the Technical Baseline reconstitution effort for the interim Waste Management Division of Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC).

  12. Reliability Centered Maintenance for Savannah River Site's interim waste management facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauer, K.A. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Wilson, J.F. (PRC, Inc. (US))

    1992-01-01

    The application of Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) has been shown to be an effective means to optimize maintenance programs or to establish new programs. The key to success of any RCM program is to customize the methodology to meet the specific needs of the implementing organization. This paper discusses how RCM is being used to establish the preventive maintenance program and how the resulting system data is being used to support the Technical Baseline reconstitution effort for the interim Waste Management Division of Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC).

  13. Reliability Centered Maintenance for Savannah River Site's interim waste management facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauer, K.A.; Wilson, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    The application of Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) has been shown to be an effective means to optimize maintenance programs or to establish new programs. The key to success of any RCM program is to customize the methodology to meet the specific needs of the implementing organization. This paper discusses how RCM is being used to establish the preventive maintenance program and how the resulting system data is being used to support the Technical Baseline reconstitution effort for the interim Waste Management Division of Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC)

  14. Conceptual structure design of experimental facility for advanced spent fuel conditioning process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, J. S.; Koo, J. H.; Jung, W. M.; Jo, I. J.; Kook, D. H.; Yoo, K. S.

    2003-01-01

    A study on the advanced spent fuel conditioning process (ACP) is carring out for the effective management of spent fuels of domestic nuclear power plants. This study presents basic shielding design, modification of IMEF's reserve hot cell facility which reserved for future usage, conceptual and structural architecture design of ACP hot cell and its contents, etc. considering the characteristics of ACP. The results of this study will be used for the basic and detail design of ACP demonstration facility, and utilized as basic data for the safety evaluation as essential data for the licensing of the ACP facility

  15. Real Time Data for Seismology at the IRIS Data Management Center, AN Nsf-Sponsored Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, R. B.; Ahern, T. K.; Trabant, C.; Weertman, B. R.; Casey, R.; Stromme, S.; Karstens, R.

    2012-12-01

    When IRIS was incorporated in 1984, it committed to provide long-term support for the science of seismology. It first upgraded analog networks by installing observatory grade digital seismic recording equipment (by constructing the Global Seismic Network to upgrade the World Wide Standardized Seismographic Network) that became the backbone of the International Federation of Digital Seismic Networks (FDSN), and in 1990 constructed a state-of-the-art data center that would allow free and open access to data to everyone. For the first decade, IRIS leveraged a complicated system of telemetry which laid the foundation for delivering (relatively) high rate and continuous seismic time series data to the IRIS Data Management Center, which was designed to accept data that arrived with highly variable latencies and on many media formats. This meant that science had to often wait until data became complete, which at the time was primarily related to studying earthquakes or similar events. During the 1990's, numerous incremental but small improvements were made to get data into the hands of users with less latency, leveraging dialup, satellite telemetry, and a variety of Internet protocols. But beginning in 2000, the IRIS Data Management Center began the process of accumulating data comprehensively in real time. It was first justified because it eliminated the time-consuming transcription and manual data handling on various media formats, like magnetic tapes, CD's and DVD's. However, the switch to real-time telemetry proved to be a major improvement technologically because it not only simplified data transfer, it opened access to a large volume of previously inaccessible data (local resource limitations), and many networks began willingly providing their geophysical data to the broad research community. It also enabled researchers the ability to process data in different and streamlined ways, by incorporating data directly into workflows and processing packages. Any network on

  16. Systems Design and Experimental Evaluation of a High-Altitude Relight Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Brendan

    Novel advances in gas turbine engine combustor technology, led by endeavors into fuel efficiency and demanding environmental regulations, have been fraught with performance and safety concerns. While the majority of low emissions gas turbine engine combustor technology has been necessary for power generation applications, the push for ultra-low NOx combustion in aircraft jet engines has been ever present. Recent state-of-the-art combustor designs notably tackle historic emissions challenges by operating at fuel-lean conditions, which are characterized by an increase in the amount of air flow sent to the primary combustion zone. While beneficial in reducing NOx emissions, the fuel-lean mechanisms that characterize these combustor designs rely heavily upon high-energy and high-velocity air flows to sufficiently mix and atomize fuel droplets, ultimately leading to flame stability concerns during low-power operation. When operating at high-altitude conditions, these issues are further exacerbated by the presence of low ambient air pressures and temperatures, which can lead to engine flame-out situations and hamper engine relight attempts. To aid academic and industrial research ventures into improving the high-altitude lean blow-out and relight performance of modern gas turbine engine combustor technologies, the High-Altitude Relight Test Facility (HARTF) was designed and constructed at the University of Cincinnati (UC) Combustion and Fire Research Laboratory (CFRL). Following its construction, an experimental evaluation of its abilities to facilitate optically-accessible ignition, combustion, and spray testing for gas turbine engine combustor hardware at simulated high-altitude conditions was performed. In its evaluation, performance limit references were established through testing of the HARTF vacuum and cryogenic air-chilling capabilities. These tests were conducted with regard to end-user control---the creation and the maintenance of a realistic high

  17. Experimental Facilities Division/User Program Division technical progress report 1999-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    In October 1999, the two divisions of the Advanced Photon Source (APS), the Accelerator Systems Division (ASD) and the Experimental Facilities Division (XFD), were reorganized into four divisions (see high-level APS organizational chart, Fig. 1.1). In addition to ASD and XFD, two new divisions were created, the APS Operations Division (AOD), to oversee APS operations, and the User Program Division (UPD), to serve the APS user community by developing and maintaining the highest quality user technical and administration support. Previous XFD Progress Reports (ANL/APS/TB-30 and ANL/APS/TB-34) covered a much broader base, including APS user administrative support and what was previously XFD operations (front ends, interlocks, etc.) This Progress Report summarizes the main scientific and technical activities of XFD, and the technical support, research and development (R and D) activities of UPD from October 1998 through November 2000. The report is divided into four major sections, (1) Introduction, (2) SRI-CAT Beamlines, Technical Developments, and Scientific Applications, (3) User Technical Support, and (4) Major Plans for the Future. Sections 2 and 3 describe the technical activities and research accomplishments of the XFD and UPD personnel in supporting the synchrotron radiation instrumentation (SRI) collaborative access team (CAT) and the general APS user community. Also included in this report is a comprehensive list of publications (Appendix 1) and presentations (Appendix 2) by XFD and UPD staff during the time period covered by this report. The organization of section 2, SRI CAT Beamlines, Technical Developments, and Scientific Applications has been made along scientific techniques/disciplines and not ''geographical'' boundaries of the sectors in which the work was performed. Therefore items under the subsection X-ray Imaging and Microfocusing could have been (and were) performed on several different beamlines by staff in different divisions. The management of

  18. CIRCUS and DESIRE: Experimental facilities for research on natural-circulation-cooled boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruijf, W.J.M. de; Haden, T.H.J.J. van der; Zboray, R.; Manera, A.; Mudde, R.F.

    2002-01-01

    At the Delft University of Technology two thermohydraulic test facilities are being used to study the characteristics of Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) with natural circulation core cooling. The focus of the research is on the stability characteristics of the system. DESIRE is a test facility with freon-12 as scaling fluid in which one fuel bundle of a natural-circulation BWR is simulated. The neutronic feedback can be simulated artificially. DESIRE is used to study the stability of the system at nominal and beyond nominal conditions. CIRCUS is a full-height facility with water, consisting of four parallel fuel channels and four parallel bypass channels with a common riser or with parallel riser sections. It is used to study the start-up characteristics of a natural-circulation BWR at low pressures and low power. In this paper a description of both facilities is given and the research items are presented. (author)

  19. Earth Systems Questions in Experimental Climate Change Science: Pressing Questions and Necessary Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osmond, B.

    2002-05-20

    Sixty-four scientists from universities, national laboratories, and other research institutions worldwide met to evaluate the feasibility and potential of the Biosphere2 Laboratory (B2L) as an inclusive multi-user scientific facility (i.e., a facility open to researchers from all institutions, according to agreed principles of access) for earth system studies and engineering research, education, and training relevant to the mission of the United States Department of Energy (DOE).

  20. An experimental investigation of 1% SBLOCA on PSB-VVER test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipatov, I.A.; Dremin, G.I.; Galtchanskaia, S.A.; Gorbunov, Yu.S. [Electrogorsk Research and Engineering Center, EREC, Electrogorsk (Russian Federation); Elkin, I.V. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2001-07-01

    The paper presents the results of the three tests carried out in the PSB-VVER large-scale integral test facility. The PSB-VVER test facility is a four loop, full pressure scaled down model bearing structural similarities to the primary system of the NRP with VVER-1000 Russian design reactor. Volume-power scale is 1/300 while elevation scale is 1/1. (orig.)

  1. A method for development of efficient 3D models for neutronic calculations of ASTRA critical facility using experimental information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balanin, A. L.; Boyarinov, V. F.; Glushkov, E. S.; Zimin, A. A.; Kompaniets, G. V.; Nevinitsa, V. A., E-mail: Neviniza-VA@nrcki.ru; Moroz, N. P.; Fomichenko, P. A.; Timoshinov, A. V. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Volkov, Yu. N. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    The application of experimental information on measured axial distributions of fission reaction rates for development of 3D numerical models of the ASTRA critical facility taking into account azimuthal asymmetry of the assembly simulating a HTGR with annular core is substantiated. Owing to the presence of the bottom reflector and the absence of the top reflector, the application of 2D models based on experimentally determined buckling is impossible for calculation of critical assemblies of the ASTRA facility; therefore, an alternative approach based on the application of the extrapolated assembly height is proposed. This approach is exemplified by the numerical analysis of experiments on measurement of efficiency of control rods mockups and protection system (CPS).

  2. A method for development of efficient 3D models for neutronic calculations of ASTRA critical facility using experimental information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balanin, A. L.; Boyarinov, V. F.; Glushkov, E. S.; Zimin, A. A.; Kompaniets, G. V.; Nevinitsa, V. A.; Moroz, N. P.; Fomichenko, P. A.; Timoshinov, A. V.; Volkov, Yu. N.

    2016-01-01

    The application of experimental information on measured axial distributions of fission reaction rates for development of 3D numerical models of the ASTRA critical facility taking into account azimuthal asymmetry of the assembly simulating a HTGR with annular core is substantiated. Owing to the presence of the bottom reflector and the absence of the top reflector, the application of 2D models based on experimentally determined buckling is impossible for calculation of critical assemblies of the ASTRA facility; therefore, an alternative approach based on the application of the extrapolated assembly height is proposed. This approach is exemplified by the numerical analysis of experiments on measurement of efficiency of control rods mockups and protection system (CPS).

  3. Experimental aspects of hypernuclear physics at CEBAF [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mecking, B.A.

    1987-01-01

    The general features of the electromagnetic excitation of hypernuclei are outlined. Experimental aspects of investigating these reactions at CEBAF are discussed. Two specific experimental set-ups are compared. 17 refs., 6 figs

  4. Statistical properties of SASE FEL radiation: experimental results from the VUV FEL at the TESLA test facility at DESY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yurkov, M.V.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of the statistical properties of the radiation from a SASE FEL. The experiments were performed at the TESLA Test Facility VUV SASE FEL at DESY operating in a high-gain linear regime with a gain of about 10 6 . It is shown that fluctuations of the output radiation energy follows a gamma-distribution. We also measured for the first time the probability distribution of SASE radiation energy after a narrow-band monochromator. The experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical predictions, the energy fluctuations after the monochromator follow a negative exponential distribution

  5. Whole-Pin Furnace system: An experimental facility for studying irradiated fuel pin behavior under potential reactor accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.Y.; Tsai, H.C.; Donahue, D.A.; Pushis, D.O.; Savoie, F.E.; Holland, J.W.; Wright, A.E.; August, C.; Bailey, J.L.; Patterson, D.R.

    1990-05-01

    The whole-pin furnace system is a new in-cell experimental facility constructed to investigate how irradiated fuel pins may fail under potential reactor accident conditions. Extensive checkouts have demonstrated excellent performance in remote operation, temperature control, pin breach detection, and fission gas handling. The system is currently being used in testing of EBIR-II-irradiated Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) metal fuel pins; future testing will include EBR-II-irradiated mixed-oxide fuel pins. 7 refs., 4 figs

  6. Wind refrigeration : design and results of an experimental facility; Refrigeracion eolica: Diseno y resultados de una instalacion experimental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltran, R. G.; Talero, A.

    2004-07-01

    This article describes the experimental setup used to obtain design parameters for a wind driven refrigeration equipment. The system compressor is directly coupled to the wind mill and will provide refrigeration to a community located in La Guajira in northern Colombia. The testing on the experimental installation assessed the refrigeration capacity that could be provided by an open type commercial compressor coupled to the wind mill axis. Power and torque requirements have been evaluated for different wind mill rotational speeds. An assessment of the local conditions relating to wind speed, frequency and preferred direction for the installation site has been made based on measurements by the Meteorological National Institute and independent data from other sources. (Author)

  7. The E-3 Test Facility at Stennis Space Center: Research and Development Testing for Cryogenic and Storable Propellant Combustion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, John T.; Chandler, Craig A.; Raines, Nickey G.

    2009-01-01

    This paper will provide the reader a broad overview of the current upgraded capabilities of NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center E-3 Test Facility to perform testing for rocket engine combustion systems and components using liquid and gaseous oxygen, gaseous and liquid methane, gaseous hydrogen, hydrocarbon based fuels, hydrogen peroxide, high pressure water and various inert fluids. Details of propellant system capabilities will be highlighted as well as their application to recent test programs and accomplishments. Data acquisition and control, test monitoring, systems engineering and test processes will be discussed as part of the total capability of E-3 to provide affordable alternatives for subscale to full scale testing for many different requirements in the propulsion community.

  8. Preliminary analysis of the results and description of the meteorological experiments I and II performed at Aramar Experimental Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molnary, L. de

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the experimental program in Applied Meteorology that has been developed at Aramar Experimental Center (CEA) located in Ipero, S.P - Brazil. The program intends to study the meteorological systems and the regional circulation around Aramar to use the information in atmospheric transport and diffusion of radionuclides studies, as soon, analysis of impacts on the environment at Aramar site. The results collected during the first and second Meteorological Experiment are examined. (author)

  9. THAI test facility for experimental research on hydrogen and fission product behaviour in light water reactor containments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, S., E-mail: gupta@becker-technologies.com [Becker Technologies GmbH, Koelner Strasse 6, 65760 Eschborn (Germany); Schmidt, E.; Laufenberg, B. von; Freitag, M.; Poss, G. [Becker Technologies GmbH, Koelner Strasse 6, 65760 Eschborn (Germany); Funke, F. [AREVA GmbH, P.O. Box 1109, 91001 Erlangen (Germany); Weber, G. [Gesellschaft für Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH, Forschungszentrum, Boltzmannstraße 14, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • Large scale facility for investigating representative LWR severe accident scenarios. • Coupled effect tests in the field of thermal-hydraulics, hydrogen, aerosol and iodine. • Measurement techniques improved and adapted for severe accident conditions. • Testing of passive mitigation systems (e.g. PAR) under accident conditions. • THAI data application for validation and development of CFD and LP codes. - Abstract: The test facility THAI (thermal-hydraulics, hydrogen, aerosol, and iodine) aims at addressing open questions concerning gas distribution, behaviour of hydrogen, iodine and aerosols in the containment of light water reactors during severe accidents. Main component of the facility is a 60 m{sup 3} stainless steel vessel, 9.2 m high and 3.2 m in diameter, with exchangeable internals for multi-compartment investigations. The maximal design pressure of the vessel is 14 bar which allows H{sub 2} combustion experiments at a severe accident relevant H{sub 2} concentration level. The facility is approved for the use of low-level radiotracer I-123 which enables the measurement of time resolved iodine behaviour. The THAI test facility allows investigating various accident scenarios, ranging from turbulent free convection to stagnant stratified containment atmospheres and can be combined with simultaneous use of hydrogen, iodine and aerosol issues. THAI experimental research also covers investigations related to mitigation systems employed in light water reactor containments by performing experiments on, e.g. pressure suppression pool hydrodynamics, performance behaviour of passive autocatalytic recombiners, and spray interaction with hydrogen–steam–air flames in phenomenon orientated and coupled-effects experiments. The THAI experimental data have been widely used for the validation and further development of Lumped Parameter and Computational Fluid Dynamics codes with 3D capabilities, e.g. International Standard Problems ISP-47 (thermal

  10. The RIB facility EXOTIC and its experimental program at INFN-LNL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parascandolo, Concetta

    2018-05-01

    In this contribution, I will present a review about the EXOTIC facility and the research field accessible by using its Radioactive Ion Beams. The EXOTIC facility, installed at the INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, is devoted to the in-flight production of light Radioactive Ion Beams in the energy range between 3-5 MeV/nucleon. The scientific activity performed at EXOTIC concerns different aspects of nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics, such as, the investigation of reaction mechanisms and nuclear structure, resonant scattering experiments and measurements of nuclear reaction cross sections of astrophysical interest.

  11. Experimental Seismic Event-screening Criteria at the Prototype International Data Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisk, M. D.; Jepsen, D.; Murphy, J. R.

    - Experimental seismic event-screening capabilities are described, based on the difference of body-and surface-wave magnitudes (denoted as Ms:mb) and event depth. These capabilities have been implemented and tested at the prototype International Data Center (PIDC), based on recommendations by the IDC Technical Experts on Event Screening in June 1998. Screening scores are presented that indicate numerically the degree to which an event meets, or does not meet, the Ms:mb and depth screening criteria. Seismic events are also categorized as onshore, offshore, or mixed, based on their 90% location error ellipses and an onshore/offshore grid with five-minute resolution, although this analysis is not used at this time to screen out events.Results are presented of applications to almost 42,000 events with mb>=3.5 in the PIDC Standard Event Bulletin (SEB) and to 121 underground nuclear explosions (UNE's) at the U.S. Nevada Test Site (NTS), the Semipalatinsk and Novaya Zemlya test sites in the Former Soviet Union, the Lop Nor test site in China, and the Indian, Pakistan, and French Polynesian test sites. The screening criteria appear to be quite conservative. None of the known UNE's are screened out, while about 41 percent of the presumed earthquakes in the SEB with mb>=3.5 are screened out. UNE's at the Lop Nor, Indian, and Pakistan test sites on 8 June 1996, 11 May 1998, and 28 May 1998, respectively, have among the lowest Ms:mb scores of all events in the SEB.To assess the validity of the depth screening results, comparisons are presented of SEB depth solutions to those in other bulletins that are presumed to be reliable and independent. Using over 1600 events, the comparisons indicate that the SEB depth confidence intervals are consistent with or shallower than over 99.8 percent of the corresponding depth estimates in the other bulletins. Concluding remarks are provided regarding the performance of the experimental event-screening criteria, and plans for future

  12. Waste Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This dataset was developed from the Vermont DEC's list of certified solid waste facilities. It includes facility name, contact information, and the materials...

  13. Effects of Experimentally Imposed Noise on Task Performance of Black Children Attending Day Care Centers Near Elevated Subway Trains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambrick-Dixon, Priscilla Janet

    1986-01-01

    Investigates whether an experimentally imposed 80dB (A) noise affected psychomotor, serial memory words and pictures, incidental memory, visual recall, paired associates, perceptual learning, and coding performance of five-year-old Black children attending day care centers near and far from elevated subways. (HOD)

  14. Experimental test of the postulate that continuous columnar pinning centers produce the highest J{sub c}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinstein, Roy [Texas Center for Superconductivity and Advanced Materials, and Physics Department, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5005 (United States)]. E-mail: weinstein@uh.edu; Gandini, Alberto [Texas Center for Superconductivity and Advanced Materials, and Physics Department, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5005 (United States); Sawh, Ravi-Persad [Texas Center for Superconductivity and Advanced Materials, and Physics Department, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5005 (United States); Mayes, Bill [Texas Center for Superconductivity and Advanced Materials, and Physics Department, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5005 (United States); Parks, Drew [Texas Center for Superconductivity and Advanced Materials, and Physics Department, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5005 (United States)

    2004-10-18

    Continuous columnar pinning centers, created by energetic ions, have been usefully studied theoretically and experimentally to investigate vortex physics in high T{sub c} superconductors. However, along the way, in error, their discontinuities have been downplayed, and they have been anointed as the way to produce high J{sub c}.

  15. Hazards Analysis for the Spent Nuclear Fuel L-Experimental Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, A.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this Hazard Analysis (HA) is to identify and assess potential hazards associated with the operations of the Spent Nuclear Fuels (SNF) Treatment and Storage Facility LEF. Additionally, this HA will be used for identifying and assessing potential hazards and specifying functional attributes of SSCs for the LEF project

  16. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Studies of a scintillator-bar detector for a neutron wall at an external target facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yu-Hong; Xu, Hua-Gen; Xu, Hu-Shan; Zhan, Wen-Long; Sun, Zhi-Yu; Guo, Zhong-Yan; Hu, Zheng-Guo; Wang, Jian-Song; Chen, Jun-Ling; Zheng, Chuan

    2009-07-01

    To achieve a better time resolution of a scintillator-bar detector for a neutron wall at the external target facility of HIRFL-CSR, we have carried out a detailed study of the photomultiplier, the wrapping material and the coupling media. The timing properties of a scintillator-bar detector have been studied in detail with cosmic rays using a high and low level signal coincidence. A time resolution of 80 ps has been achieved in the center of the scintillator-bar detector.

  17. Gas-cooled fast reactors. Motivation and presentation of the ENIGMA program in the MASURCA experimental critical facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tommasi, Jean; Jacqmin, Robert; Mellier, Frederic

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a new experimental physics program in support of gas cooled fast reactor (GCFR) design studies, called ENIGMA, to be performed in the MASURCA critical facility at CEA-Cadarache, France. The prospective GCFR design studies at CEA are presented, as well as the specific neutronics features needing an extension of the validation of calculation tools and nuclear data. The relevant existing experiments are briefly reviewed and the need for new experimental data is pointed out. The first phase of the proposed new experiments includes a reference core with a representative spectrum, and a series of central core substitutions involving spectrum shifts, streaming studies, low-grade Pu substitutions, innovative material (Si, Zr) substitutions. Reflector substitution zones will include elements foreseen for the reflectors (Si, Zr, C). Subsequent phases will involve larger amounts of low-grade Pu or innovative materials, and configurations representative of experimental and demonstration GCFRs. (author)

  18. Impact of state-of-the-art instrumentation on safety-related experimental studies proposed in containment studies facility (CSF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gole, N.V.; Markandeya, S.G.; Subramaniam, K.; Ghosh, A.K.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Conducting an experimental program for safety related studies for nuclear power plants (NPPs) is an extremely laborious and time-consuming task due to several reasons. Requirement for frequent replacements, testing and recalibration of a large number of instruments is one of them. Off-line analysis leading to identification of errors is another. A particular test may have to be abandoned based on such analysis. Following the rapid advances in instrumentation, a larger number of options are now available, which make experimentation easy. CSF is one of the upcoming facilities wherein deployment of state-of-the art became inevitable. This paper discusses in detail the design intent of instrumentation, the state-of-the-art instrumentation provisions made to fulfill it the overall impact of this on successful experimentation

  19. Application of the New Decommissioning Regulation to the Nuclear Licensed Facilities (NLF) at Fontenay-aux-Roses's Nuclear Center (CEA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauret, Josiane; Piketty, Laurence; Jeanjacques, Michel

    2008-01-01

    This abstract describes the application of the new decommissioning regulation on all Nuclear Licensed Facilities (NLF is to say INB in French) at Fontenay-aux-Roses's Center (CEA/FAR). The decommissioning process has been applied in six buildings which are out of the new nuclear perimeter proposed (buildings no 7, no 40, no 94, no 39, no 52/1 and no 32) and three buildings have been reorganized (no 54, no 91 and no 53 instead of no 40 and no 94) in order to increase the space for temporary nuclear waste disposal and to reduce the internal transports of nuclear waste on the site. The advantages are the safety and radioprotection improvements and a lower operating cost. A global safety file was written in 2002 and 2003 and was sent to the French Nuclear Authority on November 2003. The list of documents required is given in the paragraph I of this paper. The main goals were two ministerial decrees (one decree for each NLF) getting the authorization to modify the NLF perimeter and to carry out cleaning and dismantling activities leading to the whole decommissioning of all NLF. Some specific authorizations were necessary to carry out the dismantling program during the decommissioning procedure. They were delivered by the French Nuclear Safety Authority (FNSA) or with limited delegation by the General Executive Director (GED) on the CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses's Center, called internal authorization. Some partial dismantling or decontamination examples are given below: - evaporator for the radioactive liquid waste treatment station (building no 53): FNSA authorization: phase realised in 2002/2003. - disposal tanks for the radioactive liquid waste treatment station (building no 53) FNSA authorization: phase realised in 2004, - incinerator for the radioactive solid waste treatment station (building no 07): FNSA authorization: operation realised in 2004, - research equipments in the building no. 54 and building no. 91: internal authorization ; realised in 2005, - sample

  20. Nuclear Facilities Management Section Mutsu Office, Aomori Research and Development Center operations report. FY 2012 and 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, Yoshihiro; Kuwabara, Jun; Oyokawa, Atsushi; Kabuto, Shoji; Araya, Naoyuki; Kikuchi, Kaoru; Miyamoto, Shingo; Nemoto, Hideyuki; Ohe, Osamu

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear Facilities Management Section implements the operation, maintenance and decommissioning of the first nuclear ship “MUTSU” and the operation and maintenance of the liquid waste facility and the solid waste facility where a small amount of nuclear fuel is used. This is the report on the operations of the Nuclear Facilities Management Section for FY 2012 and FY 2013. (author)

  1. Experimental data report for transient flow calibration facility tests IIB101, IIB102 and IIB201

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wambach, J.L.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal-hydraulic response data are presented for the transient performance tests of a pitot tube rake (IIB201) and a modular drag disc-turbine transducer (DTT) rake (IIB101, IIB102). The tests were conducted in a system which provided full scale simulation of the pressure vessel and broken loop hot leg piping of the Loss of Fluid Test Facility (LOFT). A load cell system was used to provide a reference mass flow rate measurement

  2. A facility for the experimental investigation of single substance two phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeder, P.F.; Dickinson, D.A.; Nikitopoulos, D.E.; DiPippo, R.

    1985-01-01

    The paper describes a research facility dedicated to single-substance two-phase flow. The working fluid is dichlorotetrafluoroethane (or refrigerant R-114), allowing both operation at manageable pressures, temperatures and flowrates, and application of results to practical situations through similarity. Operation is in the blowdown mode. The control and data acquisition systems are fully automated and computer controlled. A range of flow conditions from predominantly liquid flow to high velocity, high void fraction choked flow can be attained

  3. Basic Design of Experimental Facility for Measuring Pressure Drop of IHX in a SFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Yung-Joo; Eoh, Jae-Hyuk; Kim, Hyungmo; Lee, Dong-Won; Jeong, Ji-Young; Lee, Hyeong-Yeon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Eok [Kyungpook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The conceptual design of the Prototype gen-IV SFR (PGSFR) with a 150 MWe capacity was commenced in 2012 through the national long-term R and D program by KAERI. Then, PGSFR is now being designed with the defense in depth concept with active, passive and inherent safety features to acquire design approval for PGSFR from the Korean regulatory authority by 2020. PGSFR is a sodium-cooled pool-type fast reactor with all primary components including the primary heat transport system (PHTS) pumps and IHXs are located inside a sodium pool. The heat produced due to fission in the core is transported by primary sodium to secondary sodium in a sodium to sodium intermediate heat exchanger (IHX), which in turn is transferred to water in a steam generator (SG). Basic design of the IHX flow characteristic test facility, WEIPA was conducted based on the three-level scaling methodology in order to preserve the flow characteristics of the IHX in PGSFR. This test facility is intended to measure a high precision pressure drop at the shell-side of the IHX. This paper describes the aspects of the current design features of the IHX in PGSFR, scaling and basic design features of the facility.

  4. An experimental test facility to support development of the fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoder, Graydon L.; Aaron, Adam; Cunningham, Burns; Fugate, David; Holcomb, David; Kisner, Roger; Peretz, Fred; Robb, Kevin; Wilgen, John; Wilson, Dane

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • • A forced convection test loop using FLiNaK salt was constructed to support development of the FHR. • The loop is built of alloy 600, and operating conditions are prototypic of expected FHR operation. • The initial test article is designed to study pebble bed heat transfer cooled by FLiNaK salt. • The test facility includes silicon carbide test components as salt boundaries. • Salt testing with silicon carbide and alloy 600 confirmed acceptable loop component lifetime. - Abstract: The need for high-temperature (greater than 600 °C) energy transport systems is significantly increasing as the world strives to improve energy efficiency and develop alternatives to petroleum-based fuels. Liquid fluoride salts are one of the few energy transport fluids that have the capability of operating at high temperatures in combination with low system pressures. The fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature reactor design uses fluoride salt to remove core heat and interface with a power conversion system. Although a significant amount of experimentation has been performed with these salts, specific aspects of this reactor concept will require experimental confirmation during the development process. The experimental facility described here has been constructed to support the development of the fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature reactor concept. The facility is capable of operating at up to 700 °C and incorporates a centrifugal pump to circulate FLiNaK salt through a removable test section. A unique inductive heating technique is used to apply heat to the test section, allowing heat transfer testing to be performed. An air-cooled heat exchanger removes added heat. Supporting loop infrastructure includes a pressure control system, a trace heating system, and a complement of instrumentation to measure salt flow, temperatures, and pressures around the loop. The initial experiment is aimed at measuring fluoride-salt heat transfer inside a heated pebble bed

  5. Consequences of the conversion of research reactor cores on experimental facilities at the example of a cold neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roegler, H.-J.; Goebs, H.; Stroemich, A.

    1985-01-01

    The consequences for and specifically the potential reduction of the performance of research reactors have been in discussions very often within the last five years as one of the draw-backs which has to be paid for the reduction of the proliferation risk at research reactor plants. Up to now and up to our knowledge the available results are restricted to unperturbated fluxes. Thus, this contribution makes the attempt to demonstrate the consequence of core conversion on an example of a real experimental facility and - at the same time - on one that is going to be used in the next decade a lot, i.e. a cold neutron source (CNS). (author)

  6. Airborne release fractions/rates and respirable fractions for nonreactor nuclear facilities. Volume 1, Analysis of experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    This handbook contains (1) a systematic compilation of airborne release and respirable fraction experimental data for nonreactor nuclear facilities, (2) assessments of the data, and (3) values derived from assessing the data that may be used in safety analyses when the data are applicable. To assist in consistent and effective use of this information, the handbook provides: identification of a consequence determination methodology in which the information can be used; discussion of the applicability of the information and its general technical limits; identification of specific accident phenomena of interest for which the information is applicable; and examples of use of the consequence determination methodology and airborne release and respirable fraction information

  7. Tests of the space gamma spectrometer prototype at the JINR experimental facility with different types of neutron generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvak, M. L.; Vostrukhin, A. A.; Golovin, D. V.; Dubasov, P. V.; Zontikov, A. O.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Krylov, A. R.; Krylov, V. A.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Mokrousov, M. I.; Repkin, A. N.; Timoshenko, G. N.; Udovichenko, K. V.; Shvetsov, V. N.

    2017-07-01

    The results of the tests of the HPGe gamma spectrometer performed with a planetary soil model and different types of pulse neutron generators are presented. All measurements have been performed at the experimental nuclear planetary science facility (Joint Institute for Nuclear Research) for the physical calibration of active gamma and neutron spectrometers. The aim of the study is to model a space experiment on determining the elemental composition of Martian planetary matter by neutron-induced gamma spectroscopy. The advantages and disadvantages of a gas-filled neutron generator in comparison with a vacuum-tube neutron generator are examined.

  8. Modeling of the charge-state separation at ITEP experimental facility for material science based on a Bernas ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barminova, H Y; Saratovskyh, M S

    2016-02-01

    The experiment automation system is supposed to be developed for experimental facility for material science at ITEP, based on a Bernas ion source. The program CAMFT is assumed to be involved into the program of the experiment automation. CAMFT is developed to simulate the intense charged particle bunch motion in the external magnetic fields with arbitrary geometry by means of the accurate solution of the particle motion equation. Program allows the consideration of the bunch intensity up to 10(10) ppb. Preliminary calculations are performed at ITEP supercomputer. The results of the simulation of the beam pre-acceleration and following turn in magnetic field are presented for different initial conditions.

  9. Initial design for an experimental investigation of strongly coupled plasma behavior in the Atlas facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munson, C.P.; Benage, J.F. Jr.; Taylor, A.J.; Trainor, R.J. Jr.; Wood, B.P.; Wysocki, F.J.

    1999-01-01

    Atlas is a high current (approximately 30 MA peak, with a current risetime approximately 4.5 microsec), high energy (E stored = 24 MJ, E load = 3--6 MJ), pulsed power facility which is being constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory with a scheduled completion date in the year 2000. When operational, this facility will provide a platform for experiments in high pressure shocks (> 20 Mbar), adiabatic compression (ρ/ρ 0 > 5, P > 10 Mbar), high magnetic fields (approximately 2,000 T), high strain and strain rates (var e psilon > 200%, dvar e psilon/dt approximately 10 4 to 10 6 s -1 ), hydrodynamic instabilities of materials in turbulent regimes, magnetized target fusion, equation of state, and strongly coupled plasmas. For the strongly coupled plasma experiments, an auxiliary capacitor bank will be used to generate a moderate density (< 0.1 solid), relatively cold (approximately 1 eV) plasma by ohmic heating of a conducting material of interest such as titanium. This stargate plasma will be compressed against a central column containing diagnostic instrumentation by a cylindrical conducting liner that is driven radially inward by current from the main Atlas capacitor bank. The plasma is predicted to reach densities of approximately 1.1 times solid, achieve ion and electron temperatures of approximately 10 eV, and pressures of approximately 4--5 Mbar. This is a density/temperature regime which is expected to experience strong coupling, but only partial degeneracy. X-ray radiography is planned for measurements of the material density at discrete times during the experiments; diamond Raman measurements are anticipated for determination of the pressure. In addition, a neutron resonance spectroscopic technique is being evaluated for possible determination of the temperature (through low percentage doping of the titanium with a suitable resonant material). Initial target plasma formation experiments are being planned on an existing pulsed power facility at LANL and

  10. Proceedings of the workshop on experiments and experimental facilities at SIS/ESR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-04-01

    The present proceedings contain the abstracts of the proposals and letters of intent prepared by the authors for general distribution. The abstracts are organized according to the sessions in which they were presented at the workshop. The program of the workshop is also included as is the list of attendees. In addition we have included two recent descriptions of the accelerator facilities providing information on the latest status of the expected beam schedule for SIS and performance characteristics of the ESR. (orig./HSI)

  11. Superconducting levitated systems: first results with the experimental facility at Erlangen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrecht, C.; Elsel, W.; Franksen, H.; Parsch, C.P.; Wilhelm, K.

    1974-01-01

    The electrodynamic levitation system is being investigated in Western Germany by a development group consisting of AEG, BBC and Siemens together with Linde and other companies. A test carrier of 12t has made the first operational runs at 55km/h in the rolling mode. This paper reviews the technical features of the main non-cryogenic components such as track, power supply, current collector, linear induction motor, vehicle body and control centre, and then describes the superconducting magnet system together with a stationary cryogenic supply facility. (author)

  12. The calculation and estimation of wastes generated by decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Tokai works and Ningyo-toge Environmental Engineering Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayame, Y.; Tanabe, T.; Takahashi, K.; Takeda, S.

    2001-07-01

    This investigation was conducted as a part of planning the low-level radioactive waste management program (LLW management program). The aim of this investigation was contributed to compile the radioactive waste database of JNC's LLW management program. All nuclear facilities of the Tokai works and Ningyo-toge Environmental Engineering Center were investigated in this work. The wastes generated by the decommissioning of each nuclear facility were classified into radioactive waste and others (exempt waste and non-radioactive waste), and the amount of the wastes was estimated. The estimated amounts of radioactive wastes generated by decommissioning of the nuclear facilities are as follows. (1) Tokai works: The amount of waste generated by decommissioning of nuclear facilities of the Tokai works is about 1,079,100 ton. The amount of radioactive waste is about 15,400 ton. The amount of exempt waste and non-radioactive waste is about 1,063,700 ton. (2) Ningyo-toge Environmental Engineering Center: The amount of waste generated by decommissioning of nuclear facilities of Ningyo-toge Environmental Engineering Center is about 112,500 ton. The amount of radioactive waste is about 7,800 ton. The amount of exempt waste and non-radioactive waste is about 104,700 ton. (author)

  13. The Brotherhood Medical Center: Collaborative Foundation of Maternity and Children’s Healthcare Facility for Displaced Syrians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aburas, Rahma; Najeeb, Amina; Baageel, Laila; Mackey, Tim K.

    2018-01-01

    The United Nations has declared the Syrian conflict, with more than 50% of Syria’s population currently displaced, as the worst humanitarian crisis of the twenty-first century. The Syrian conflict has led to a collapse of infrastructure, including access to critical and lifesaving healthcare services. Women and children account for approximately 75% of internally displaced Syrians and refugees. This population is also particularly vulnerable to poor health outcomes, a condition worsened by lack of access to maternal and child health services. In response to this crisis, a partnership of Saudi and Syrian physicians established a non-profit healthcare facility named the Brotherhood Medical Center (BMC) to serve women and children within a safe area near the Syrian–Turkish border. The project began in September 2014 and was implemented in three phases of establishment, phased construction and formal launch and operation. Currently, the BMC is working at about 70% of its capacity and is run in partnership with the Syrian Expatriate Medical Association. Although there was strong initial support from donors, the BMC continues to face many financial and operational challenges, including difficulties in transferring money to Syria, shortage of medical supplies, and lack of qualified medical personnel. Despite these challenges, the BMC represents a critical model and an important case study of the challenges of delivering healthcare services to underserved populations during an ongoing conflict. However, more robust support from the international community is needed to ensure it continues its important health and humanitarian mission. PMID:29721489

  14. An assessment of the secondary neutron dose in the passive scattering proton beam facility of the national cancer center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sang Eun [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Gyuseong [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Se Byeong [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The purpose of this study is to assess the additional neutron effective dose during passive scattering proton therapy. Monte Carlo code (Monte Carlo N-Particle 6) simulation was conducted based on a precise modeling of the National Cancer Center's proton therapy facility. A three-dimensional neutron effective dose profile of the interior of the treatment room was acquired via a computer simulation of the 217.8-MeV proton beam. Measurements were taken with a 3He neutron detector to support the simulation results, which were lower than the simulation results by 16% on average. The secondary photon dose was about 0.8% of the neutron dose. The dominant neutron source was deduced based on flux calculation. The secondary neutron effective dose per proton absorbed dose ranged from 4.942 ± 0.031 mSv/Gy at the end of the field to 0.324 ± 0.006 mSv/Gy at 150 cm in axial distance.

  15. The Brotherhood Medical Center: Collaborative Foundation of Maternity and Children’s Healthcare Facility for Displaced Syrians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahma Aburas

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The United Nations has declared the Syrian conflict, with more than 50% of Syria’s population currently displaced, as the worst humanitarian crisis of the twenty-first century. The Syrian conflict has led to a collapse of infrastructure, including access to critical and lifesaving healthcare services. Women and children account for approximately 75% of internally displaced Syrians and refugees. This population is also particularly vulnerable to poor health outcomes, a condition worsened by lack of access to maternal and child health services. In response to this crisis, a partnership of Saudi and Syrian physicians established a non-profit healthcare facility named the Brotherhood Medical Center (BMC to serve women and children within a safe area near the Syrian–Turkish border. The project began in September 2014 and was implemented in three phases of establishment, phased construction and formal launch and operation. Currently, the BMC is working at about 70% of its capacity and is run in partnership with the Syrian Expatriate Medical Association. Although there was strong initial support from donors, the BMC continues to face many financial and operational challenges, including difficulties in transferring money to Syria, shortage of medical supplies, and lack of qualified medical personnel. Despite these challenges, the BMC represents a critical model and an important case study of the challenges of delivering healthcare services to underserved populations during an ongoing conflict. However, more robust support from the international community is needed to ensure it continues its important health and humanitarian mission.

  16. Theoretical and experimental investigations into natural circulation behaviour in a simulated facility of the Indian PHWR under reduced inventory conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satish Kumar, N.V.; Nayak, A.K.; Vijayan, P.K.; Pal, A.K.; Saha, D.; Sinha, R.K.

    2004-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation has been carried out to study natural circulation characteristics of an Indian PHWR under reduced inventory conditions. The theoretical model incorporates a quasi-steady state analysis of natural circulation at different system inventories. It predicts the system flow rate under single-phase and two-phase conditions and the inventory at which reflux condensation occurs. The model predictions were compared with test data obtained from FISBE (facility for integral system behaviour experiments), which simulates the thermal hydraulic behaviour of the Indian 220 MWe PHWR. The experimental results were found to be in close agreement with the predictions. It was also found that the natural circulation could be oscillatory under reduced inventory conditions. (orig.)

  17. Simulation of experiment on aerosol behaviour at severe accident conditions in the LACE experimental facility with the ASTEC CPA code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kljenak, I.; Mavko, B.

    2007-01-01

    The experiment LACE LA4 on thermal-hydraulics and aerosol behavior in a nuclear power plant containment, which was performed in the LACE experimental facility, was simulated with the ASTEC CPA module of the severe accident computer code ASTEC V1.2. The specific purpose of the work was to assess the capability of the module (code) to simulate thermal-hydraulic conditions and aerosol behavior in the containment of a light-water-reactor nuclear power plant at severe accident conditions. The test was simulated with boundary conditions, described in the experiment report. Results of thermal-hydraulic conditions in the test vessel, as well as dry aerosol concentrations in the test vessel atmosphere, are compared to experimental results and analyzed. (author)

  18. Physical and Experimental Background of the Design of the ELISE Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franzen, P.; Fantz, U.; Kraus, W.; Falter, H.; Heinemann, B.; Nocentini, R.

    2009-01-01

    In 2007 the IPP RF driven negative hydrogen ion source was chosen by the ITER board as the new reference source for the ITER neutral beam system. In order to support the design of the Neutral Beam Test Facility in Padua and its commissioning and operating phases, IPP is presently constructing a new test facility ELISE (Extraction from a Large Ion Source Experiment) for a large-scale extraction from a half-size ITER RF source. Plasma operation of up to one hour is foreseen; but due to the limits of the IPP HV system, pulsed extraction only is possible. The extraction system is designed for acceleration of negative ions of up to 60 kV. The start of the ELISE operation is planned for middle of 2010. The aim of the design of the ELISE source and extraction system was to be as close as possible to the ITER design; it has however some modifications allowing a better diagnostic access as well as more flexibility for exploring open questions. The design was also supported by diagnostics and modeling efforts of the processes leading to negative ion production and extraction in a RF source.

  19. Initial design for an experimental investigation of strongly coupled plasma behavior in the ATLAS facility

    CERN Document Server

    Munson, C P; Taylor, A J; Trainor, R J; Wood, B P; Wysocki, F J

    1999-01-01

    Summary form only given. Atlas is a high current (~30 MA peak, with a current risetime ~4.5 mu sec), high energy (E/sub stored/=24 MJ, E /sub load/=3-6 MJ), pulsed power facility which is being constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory with a scheduled completion date in the year 2000. When operational, this facility will provide a platform for experiments in high pressure shocks (>20 Mbar), adiabatic compression ( rho / rho /sub 0/>5, P>10 Mbar), high magnetic fields (~2000 T), high strain and strain rates ( epsilon >200, d epsilon /dt~10/sup 4/ to 10/sup 6/ s/sup -1/), hydrodynamic instabilities of materials in turbulent regimes, magnetized target fusion, equation of state, and strongly coupled plasmas. For the strongly coupled plasma experiments, an auxiliary capacitor bank will be used to generate a moderate density (<0.1 solid), relatively cold (~1 eV) plasma by ohmic heating of a conducting material of interest such as titanium. This target plasma will be compressed against a central column conta...

  20. TIT reactor laboratory course using JAERI and PNC large experimental facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimoto, Hiroshi; Obara, Toru; Ohtani, Nobuo.

    1995-01-01

    This report is presented on a reactor laboratory course for graduate students using large facilities in national laboratories in Japan. A reactor laboratory course is offered every summer since 1990 for all graduate students in the Nuclear Engineering Course in Tokyo Institute of Technology (TIT), where the students can choose one of the experiments prepared at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) and Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University (KUR). Both JAERI and PNC belong to Science and Technology Agency (STA). This is the first university curriculum of nuclear engineering using the facilities owned by the STA laboratories. This type of collaboration is promoted in the new Long-Term Program for Research, Development and Utilization of Nuclear Energy adopted by Atomic Energy Commission. Most students taking this course reported that they could learn so much about reactor physics and engineering in this course and the experiment done in large laboratory was a very good experience for them. (author)

  1. Failure of PWR-RHRS under cold shutdown conditions: Experimental results from the PKL test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandl, R.M.; Umminger, K.J.; Logt, J.V.D.

    1991-01-01

    The Residual Heat Removal System (RHRS) of a PWR is designed to transfer thermal energy from the core after plant shutdown and maintain the plant in cold shutdown or refuelling conditions for extended periods of time. Initial reactor cooling after shutdown is achieved by dissipating heat through the steam generators (SGs) and discharging steam to the condenser by means of the Turbine Bypass System (TBS). When the reactor coolant temperature has dropped to about 160C and pressure has been reduced to 30 bar the RHRS is placed into operation. it reduces the coolant temperature to 50C within 20 hours after shutdown. The time margin for establishing alternate methods of heat removal following a failure of the RHRS depends on the Reactor Coolant System (RCS) temperature, the decay heat rate and the amount of RCS inventory. During some shutdown operations the RCS may be partially drained (e. g. to perform SG inspections). Decreased primary system inventory can significantly reduce the time available to recover the RHRS's function prior to bulk boiling and possible core uncovery. In the PKL test facility, which simulates a 1,300 MWe 4-loop PWR on a scale 1:145, a failure of RHRS under cold shutdown conditions was performed. This presentation gives a brief description of the test facility followed by the test objectives and results of this experiment

  2. La instrumentación virtual aplicada a un banco experimental de centraje de aeronaves. // Virtual instrumentation applied to an experimental bank for centering diameter of airships.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Cabrera Pedroso

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available En el artículo se analizan los métodos para la elaboración de sistemas basados en macros abiertos de trabajo, para larealización de mediciones del centro de gravedad de aeronaves utilizando herramientas virtuales de análisis yprocesamientos a través de un sistema de adquisición de datos. Los diferentes tópicos abordados dan a los interesados unaidea global del desarrollo de esta tecnología computacional y su aplicación a ramas de la mecánica, así como lametodología seguida para medir el centro de gravedad de aeronaves. Estos métodos pueden ser adaptados y extendidos aotras ramas dentro de la mecánica, si se poseen los medios tecnológicos para el diseño experimental de medición, con elobjetivo de medir no-solo el centro de gravedad, sino elementos como los momentos de inercia de los cuerpos nohomogéneos, las deformaciones elásticas de determinados cuerpos, etc. También se expone aspectos generales del soportede software utilizado para el desarrollo del instrumento virtual diseñado al efecto, los cuales proveen a científicos eingenieros de herramientas para satisfacer necesidades propias de instrumentación y automatización.Palabras claves: Diámetro central de aeronaves, instrumento virtual, centro de gravedad, centro de masas,medición experimental.__________________________________________________________________________Abstract:In this paper the methods for the elaboration of systems based on open macros and the realization of mensurations of center ofgravity of airships by using virtual tools of analysis and prosecutions through a system of data acquisition. The different topicsapproached give the interested parties a global idea of the development of this computacional technology and their application tobranches of mechanics, as well as the followed methodology to measure the center of gravity of airships. These methods can beadapted and extended to other branches inside the mechanics, if the technological means are

  3. On the use of fuzzy logics in the operator support system of an experimental facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozhaev, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    Problems of consrtuction of the computerized operator support system of the experimental device are considered on the basis of the imitation decision-making model which uses the fuzzy logic apparatus for a formal description of the decision-making process. 22 refs.; 4 figs.; 2 tabs

  4. The Lead Ion accelerating facility and the relative experimental program at CERN SPS fixed target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riccati, L.

    1995-01-01

    The status of the lead beam construction and commissioning is reviewed. A very wide experimental program with heavy nuclei was approved at the CERN SPS for a dedicated study of ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. An arbitrary and very short summary of the advantages and motivations for the use of heavier nuclei in the quark-gluon plasma search will be presented. ((orig.))

  5. Experimental observation of a multi-dimensional mixing behavior of steam-water flow in the MIDAS test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kweon, T. S.; Yun, B. J.; Ah, D. J.; Ju, I. C.; Song, C. H.; Park, J. K.

    2001-01-01

    Multi-dimensional thermal-hydraulic hehavior, such as ECC (Emergency Core Cooling) bypass, ECC penetration, steam-water condensation and accumulated water level, in an annular downcomer of a PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) reactor vessel with a DVI(Direct Vessel Injection) injection mode is presented based on the experimental observations in the MIDAS (Multi-dimensional Investigation in Downcomer Annulus Simulation) steam-water facility. From the steady-state tests to similate a late reflood phase of LBLOCA (Large Break Loss-of-Coolant Accidents), major thermal-hydraulic phenomena in the downcomer are quantified under a wide range of test conditions. Especially, isothermal lines show well multi-dimensional phenomena of phase interaction between steam and water in the annulus downcomer. Overall test results show that multi-dimensional thermal-hydraulic behaviors occur in the downcomer annulus region as expected. The MIDAS test facility is a steam-water separate effect test facility, which is 1/4.93 linearly scaled-down of a 1400 MWe PWR type of nuclear reactor, with focusing on understanding multi-dimensional thermal-hydraulic phenomena in annulus downcomer with various types of safety injection location during refill or reflood phase of a LBLOCA in PWR

  6. Surplus Facilities Management Program. Post-remedial-action survey report for SNAP-8 Experimental Reactor Facility, Building 010 site, Santa Susana Field Laboratories, Rockwell International, Ventura County, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Mayes, C.B.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

    1984-04-01

    Based on the results of the radiological assessment, the Argonne National Laboratory Radiological Survey Group arrived at the following conclusions: (1) soil contaminated with the radionuclides 60 Co and 152 Eu of undetermined origin was detected in the southwest quadrant of the Building 010 site. 60 Co was also detected in one environmental sample taken from an area northwest of the site and in a borehole sample taken from the area that previously held the radioactive gas hold-up tanks. Uranium was detected in soil from a hole in the center of the building site and in a second hole southwest of the building site. In all cases, the radionuclide levels encountered in the soil were well below the criteria set by DOE for this site; and (2) the direct instrument readings at the surface of the site were probably the result of natural radiation (terrestrial and celestial), as well as shine from the material being stored at the nearby RMDF facility. There was no evidence that the contaminated soil under the asphalt pad contributed detectable levels to the total background readings

  7. Initial design for an experimental investigation of strongly coupled plasma behavior in the Atlas facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munson, C.P.; Benage, J.F. Jr.; Taylor, A.J.; Trainor, R.J. Jr.; Wood, B.P.; Wysocki, F.J.

    1999-07-01

    Atlas is a high current ({approximately} 30 MA peak, with a current risetime {approximately} 4.5 {micro}sec), high energy (E{sub stored} = 24 MJ, E{sub load} = 3--6 MJ), pulsed power facility which is being constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory with a scheduled completion date in the year 2000. When operational, this facility will provide a platform for experiments in high pressure shocks (> 20 Mbar), adiabatic compression ({rho}/{rho}{sub 0} > 5, P > 10 Mbar), high magnetic fields ({approximately} 2,000 T), high strain and strain rates ({var_epsilon} > 200%, d{var_epsilon}/dt {approximately} 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 6} s{sup {minus}1}), hydrodynamic instabilities of materials in turbulent regimes, magnetized target fusion, equation of state, and strongly coupled plasmas. For the strongly coupled plasma experiments, an auxiliary capacitor bank will be used to generate a moderate density (< 0.1 solid), relatively cold ({approximately} 1 eV) plasma by ohmic heating of a conducting material of interest such as titanium. This stargate plasma will be compressed against a central column containing diagnostic instrumentation by a cylindrical conducting liner that is driven radially inward by current from the main Atlas capacitor bank. The plasma is predicted to reach densities of {approximately} 1.1 times solid, achieve ion and electron temperatures of {approximately} 10 eV, and pressures of {approximately} 4--5 Mbar. This is a density/temperature regime which is expected to experience strong coupling, but only partial degeneracy. X-ray radiography is planned for measurements of the material density at discrete times during the experiments; diamond Raman measurements are anticipated for determination of the pressure. In addition, a neutron resonance spectroscopic technique is being evaluated for possible determination of the temperature (through low percentage doping of the titanium with a suitable resonant material). Initial target plasma formation experiments are

  8. Post-Test Analysis of 11% Break at PSB-VVER Experimental Facility using Cathare 2 Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabotinov, Luben; Chevrier, Patrick

    The best estimate French thermal-hydraulic computer code CATHARE 2 Version 2.5_1 was used for post-test analysis of the experiment “11% upper plenum break”, conducted at the large-scale test facility PSB-VVER in Russia. The PSB rig is 1:300 scaled model of VVER-1000 NPP. A computer model has been developed for CATHARE 2 V2.5_1, taking into account all important components of the PSB facility: reactor model (lower plenum, core, bypass, upper plenum, downcomer), 4 separated loops, pressurizer, horizontal multitube steam generators, break section. The secondary side is represented by recirculation model. A large number of sensitivity calculations has been performed regarding break modeling, reactor pressure vessel modeling, counter current flow modeling, hydraulic losses, heat losses. The comparison between calculated and experimental results shows good prediction of the basic thermal-hydraulic phenomena and parameters such as pressures, temperatures, void fractions, loop seal clearance, etc. The experimental and calculation results are very sensitive regarding the fuel cladding temperature, which show a periodical nature. With the applied CATHARE 1D modeling, the global thermal-hydraulic parameters and the core heat up have been reasonably predicted.

  9. Experimental Study on the Natural Circulation Characteristics in the Primary Loop of the SMART Reactor by using the VISTA Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyun-Sik; Choi, Ki-Yong; Cho, Seok; Yi, Sung-Jae; Park, Choon-Kyung; Chung, Moon-Ki

    2007-01-01

    The SMART uses a two-phase natural circulation in the PRHRS loop to remove the heat from the steam generators to the PRHRS heat exchangers, while a single phase natural circulation occurs in the primary loop to transfer the decay heat from the core to the steam generator. Natural circulation operation with a power range of 20 ∼ 25% was considered for SMART and nowadays the possibility of increasing the power level during the natural circulation operation is being investigated. Previously Park et al. performed several experiments by using the VISTA facility on the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the PRHRS for the SMART-P, which includes a single-phase natural circulation in the primary loop. From the analysis with the TASS-SMR code it was shown that the reference temperature for the primary steam generator inlet temperature should be increased in order to compensate for the decreased core flow. To investigate the possibility of an increase of the power and reference temperature, it is necessary to get experimental data to characterize the natural circulation phenomena in the primary loop of the SMART. In this paper, the characteristics of natural circulation in the primary loop are experimentally investigated during various operational conditions by using the VISTA facility

  10. IOTA (Integrable Optics Test Accelerator): facility and experimental beam physics program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antipov, S.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Bruhwiler, D.; Edstrom, D.; Harms, E.; Lebedev, V.; Leibfritz, J.; Nagaitsev, S.; Park, C. S.; Piekarz, H.; Piot, P.; Prebys, E.; Romanov, A.; Ruan, J.; Sen, T.; Stancari, G.; Thangaraj, C.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Valishev, A.; Shiltsev, V.

    2017-03-01

    The Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) is a storage ring for advanced beam physics research currently being built and commissioned at Fermilab. It will operate with protons and electrons using injectors with momenta of 70 and 150 MeV/c, respectively. The research program includes the study of nonlinear focusing integrable optical beam lattices based on special magnets and electron lenses, beam dynamics of space-charge effects and their compensation, optical stochastic cooling, and several other experiments. In this article, we present the design and main parameters of the facility, outline progress to date and provide the timeline of the construction, commissioning and research. The physical principles, design, and hardware implementation plans for the major IOTA experiments are also discussed.

  11. IOTA (Integrable Optics Test Accelerator): Facility and experimental beam physics program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antipov, Sergei; Broemmelsiek, Daniel; Bruhwiler, David; Edstrom, Dean; Harms, Elvin

    2017-01-01

    The Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) is a storage ring for advanced beam physics research currently being built and commissioned at Fermilab. It will operate with protons and electrons using injectors with momenta of 70 and 150 MeV/c, respectively. The research program includes the study of nonlinear focusing integrable optical beam lattices based on special magnets and electron lenses, beam dynamics of space-charge effects and their compensation, optical stochastic cooling, and several other experiments. In this article, we present the design and main parameters of the facility, outline progress to date and provide the timeline of the construction, commissioning and research. Finally, the physical principles, design, and hardware implementation plans for the major IOTA experiments are also discussed.

  12. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis on probabilistic safety assessment of an experimental facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgazzi, L.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this work is to perform an uncertainty and sensitivity analysis on the probabilistic safety assessment of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), in order to assess the effect on the final risk values of the uncertainties associated with the generic data used for the initiating events and component reliability and to identify the key quantities contributing to this uncertainty. The analysis is conducted on the expected frequency calculated for the accident sequences, defined through the event tree (ET) modeling. This is in order to increment credit to the ET model quantification, to calculate frequency distributions for the occurrence of events and, consequently, to assess if sequences have been correctly selected on the probability standpoint and finally to verify the fulfillment of the safety conditions. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis are performed using respectively Monte Carlo sampling and an importance parameter technique. (author)

  13. Experimental facility for containment sump reliability studies (Generic Task A-43)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durgin, W.W.; Padmanabhan, M.; Janik, C.R.

    1980-12-01

    On July 3, 1979, Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) contracted the Alden Research Laboratory (ARL) to conduct tests on unresolved safety issues associated with containment sump performance during the recirculation mode (Generic Task A-43). This report describes the test facility constructed and completed under Phase I, Task III of the contract. Sump performance is determined through the observation of vortex formation in the main tank and the measurement of swirl, pressure gradient, and entrained air in the suction pipes. The use of electrically operated valves and a sophisticated data acquisition system, with computer interface, allows the test flow parameters to be set and test data to be taken (with the exception of vortex observations) from a single central office

  14. Summaries of FY16 LANL experimental campaigns at the OMEGA and EP Laser Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loomis, Eric Nicholas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Merritt, Elizabeth Catherine [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Montgomery, David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kim, Yong Ho [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Murphy, Thomas Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Johns, Heather Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kline, John L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Shah, Rahul C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zylstra, Alex [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Herrmann, Hans W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Schmitt, Mark J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Flippo, Kirk Adler [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rasmus, Alexander Martin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-10-25

    In FY16, Los Alamos National Laboratory carried out 22 shot days on the OMEGA and OMEGA- EP laser facilities in the areas of High Energy Density (HED) Science and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). In HED our focus areas were on radiation flow, hydrodynamic turbulent mix and burn, warm dense matter equations of state, and coupled Kelvin-­Helmholtz (KH)/Richtmyer-­ Meshkov (RM) instability growth. For ICF our campaigns focused on the Priority Research Directions (PRD) of implosion phase mix and stagnation and burn, specifically as they pertain to Laser Direct Drive (LDD). We also had several focused shot days on transport properties in the kinetic regime. We continue to develop advanced diagnostics such as Neutron Imaging, Gamma Reaction History, and Gas Cherenkov Detectors. Below are a summary of our campaigns, their motivation, and main results from this year.

  15. Texas Experimental Tokamak: A plasma research facility. Technical progress report, November 1, 1993--October 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wootton, A.J.

    1994-07-01

    The purpose is to operate and maintain TEXT Upgrade as a complete facility for applied tokamak physics in order to elucidate the mechanisms of working gas, impurity, and thermal transport in tokamaks and in particular to understand the role of turbulence. So that they can continue to study the physics that is most relevant to the fusion program, TEXT completed a significant device upgrade this year. The new capabilities of the device and new and innovative diagnostics were exploited in all main program areas including: (1) configuration studies; (2) electron cyclotron heating physics; (3) improved confinement modes; (4) edge physics/impurity studies; (5) central turbulence and transport; and (6) transient transport. Details of the progress in each of the research areas are described.

  16. Texas Experimental Tokamak: A plasma research facility. Technical progress report, November 1, 1993--October 31, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootton, A.J.

    1994-07-01

    The purpose is to operate and maintain TEXT Upgrade as a complete facility for applied tokamak physics in order to elucidate the mechanisms of working gas, impurity, and thermal transport in tokamaks and in particular to understand the role of turbulence. So that they can continue to study the physics that is most relevant to the fusion program, TEXT completed a significant device upgrade this year. The new capabilities of the device and new and innovative diagnostics were exploited in all main program areas including: (1) configuration studies; (2) electron cyclotron heating physics; (3) improved confinement modes; (4) edge physics/impurity studies; (5) central turbulence and transport; and (6) transient transport. Details of the progress in each of the research areas are described

  17. Software systems for processing and analysis of experimental data at the Nova laser facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auerbach, J.M.; McCauley, E.W.; Stone, G.F.; Montgomery, D.S.

    1986-01-01

    A typical laser-plasma interaction experiment at the Nova laser facility produces in excess of 20 megabytes of digitized data. Extensive processing and analysis of this raw data from a wide variety of instruments is necessary to produce data that can be readily used to interpret the experiment. The authors describe how using VAX based computer hardware, a software system has been set up to convert the digitized instrument output to physics quantities describing the experiment. A relational data base management system is used to coordinate all levels of processing and analysis. Extensive data bases of instrument response and set-up parameters are used at all levels of processing and archiving. An extensive set of programs is used to handle the large amounts of X, Y, Z data recorded on film by the bulk of Nova diagnostics. Software development emphasizes structured design, flexibility, automation and ease of use

  18. The multipurpose thermalhydraulic test facility TOPFLOW: an overview on experimental capabilities, instrumentation and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasser, H.M.; Beyer, M.; Carl, H.; Manera, A.; Pietruske, H.; Schuetz, P.; Weiss, F.P.

    2006-01-01

    A new multipurpose thermalhydraulic test facility TOPFLOW (TwO Phase FLOW) was built and put into operation at Forschungszentrum Rossendorf in 2002 and 2003. Since then, it has been mainly used for the investigation of generic and applied steady state and transient two phase flow phenomena and the development and validation of models of computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes in the frame of the German CFD initiative. The advantage of TOPFLOW consists in the combination of a large scale of the test channels with a wide operational range both of the flow velocities as well as of the system pressures and temperatures plus finally the availability of a special instrumentation that is capable in high spatial and temporal resolving two phase flow phenomena, for example the wire-mesh sensors. (orig.)

  19. Experimental results from magnetized-jet experiments executed at the Jupiter Laser Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, M. J.-E.; Kuranz, C. C.; Rasmus, A. M.; Klein, S. R.; MacDonald, M. J.; Trantham, M. R.; Fein, J. R.; Belancourt, P. X.; Young, R. P.; Keiter, P. A.; Drake, R. P.; Pollock, B. B.; Park, J.; Hazi, A. U.; Williams, G. J.; Chen, H.

    2015-12-01

    Recent experiments at the Jupiter Laser Facility investigated magnetization effects on collimated plasma jets. Laser-irradiated plastic-cone-targets produced collimated, millimeter-scale plasma flows as indicated by optical interferometry. Proton radiography of these jets showed no indication of strong, self-generated magnetic fields, suggesting a dominantly hydrodynamic collimating mechanism. Targets were placed in a custom-designed solenoid capable of generating field strengths up to 5 T. Proton radiographs of the well-characterized B-field, without a plasma jet, suggested an external source of trapped electrons that affects proton trajectories. The background magnetic field was aligned with the jet propagation direction, as is the case in many astrophysical systems. Optical interferometry showed that magnetization of the plasma results in disruption of the collimated flow and instead produces a hollow cavity. This result is a topic of ongoing investigation.

  20. Experimental neutron capture data of 58Ni from the CERN n_TOF facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žugec P.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The neutron capture cross section of 58Ni was measured at the neutron time of flight facility n_TOF at CERN, from 27 meV to 400 keV neutron energy. Special care has been taken to identify all the possible sources of background, with the so-called neutron background obtained for the first time using high-precision GEANT4 simulations. The energy range up to 122 keV was treated as the resolved resonance region, where 51 resonances were identified and analyzed by a multilevel R-matrix code SAMMY. Above 122 keV the code SESH was used in analyzing the unresolved resonance region of the capture yield. Maxwellian averaged cross sections were calculated in the temperature range of kT = 5 – 100 keV, and their astrophysical implications were investigated.

  1. French experimental facilities for measurements of transverse flows and assessment of the corresponding risk of vibrations in heterogeneous cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Borgne, E.; Mattei, A.; Oceraies, Y.; Fardeau, P.

    1994-01-01

    Due to insertion of a limited number of new assemblies at each cycle, the cores in Pressurized Water Reactors are not homogeneous. Referring only to the impact on coolant flow, these differences can range from variable hydraulic resistances in the assembly, which depend on the geometric changes occurring during preceding cycles, to coexistence of assemblies with new design structures. Deviations in resistance between neighboring fuel assemblies causes the flow rates to be distributed differently between the assembly rods. This results in development of transverse flows from the main axial flow, and changes in the axial velocity gradients. These particularities of coolant flow have an effect on both vibration levels and cooling of the fuel rods, and also on the axial forces exerted on the assemblies in the core cavity. Since 1985, French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) has gradually acquired experimental and measuring facilities that have allowed it to engage in research and development programs in these areas, in cooperation with industry partners in the nuclear field. Two complementary test loops have been constructed, called ARIANE and HERMES T. Use of these experimental facilities allows to obtain complete and detailed information on the hydraulic and vibratory phenomena specific to heterogeneous cores. In particular it is possible to establish a direct assessment of the actual compatibility between two different assemblies. By making a few specific changes, these facilities can also be used as a unique tool for assembly behaviour studies under seismic conditions with simulation of the flow effects. Also, a source of information in thus made available for qualification of computation codes for vibratory mechanics and multidimensional fluid mechanics under development at CEA and also used in the field of nuclear fuel. (authors). 6 figs., 1 ref

  2. Critical heat flux experimental facility using Freon R-134a fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sung Deok; Chung, C. H.; Kim, B. D. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-02-01

    A CHF experimental loop using Freon R-134a as a working fluid has been designed and built to facilitate modeling of high pressure/temperature water CHF experiments. This loop was designed to operate at 4 MPa, 100 deg C with the maximum flow rate of 2.5 kg/s. The detailed technical specification and operating procedure of the loop are described together with comments on the performance and limitations of the loop. A series of CHF experiment was carried out in a vertical round tube and the fluid-to-fluid modeling techniques are applied for it's validity for the high temperature/pressure reactor conditions. The experimental range covered all the application ranges of CHF correlations developed for both PWR and PHWR. 28 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs. (Author)

  3. Cold Climate Foundation Retrofit Experimental Hygrothermal Performance. Cloquet Residential Research Facility Laboratory Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, Louise F. [NorthernSTAR, St. Paul, MN (United States); Harmon, Anna C. [NorthernSTAR, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    2015-04-09

    This project was funded jointly by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ORNL focused on developing a full basement wall system experimental database to enable others to validate hygrothermal simulation codes. NREL focused on testing the moisture durability of practical basement wall interior insulation retrofit solutions for cold climates. The project has produced a physically credible and reliable long-term hygrothermal performance database for retrofit foundation wall insulation systems in zone 6 and 7 climates that are fully compliant with the performance criteria in the 2009 Minnesota Energy Code. These data currently span the period from November 10, 2012 through May 31, 2014 and are anticipated to be extended through November 2014. The experimental data were configured into a standard format that can be published online and that is compatible with standard commercially available spreadsheet and database software.

  4. Experimental facilities for research of properties and behaviour of fluoride salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosnedl, P.; Jilek, M.; Kroc, V.; Pedal, L.; Valenta, V.; Vodicka, J.

    1999-01-01

    SKODA JS s.r.o. (Czech leading nuclear technology manufacturer) prepared and manufactured experimental loops for research and verification of properties and behaviour of fluoride salts for primary and secondary circuit, construction materials and ADTT systems technological components for the operation in the Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc fluorine chemistry laboratory. This paper presents charts and experimental program for molten fluoride salts experimental loops with natural circulation. Further on, the paper describes extension of the loops for research with forced circulation and next works for steam generator model verification and connection with the loop of Energovyzkum Brno. The loops are designed and constructed to obtain a sufficient amount of experience on ADTT technology. The research and utilisation program covers questions of corrosion and intergranular corrosion of structural materials, research of material properties and welding, research of fluoride fluid properties, measuring of thermo-hydraulic properties of molten salt fluoride fluids, heat transfer and hydraulics, development and tests of some plant components (steam generators, heat exchangers, pumps, valves) and other engineering issues. Two electrolyzers have been manufactured for the research of fuel/coolant fluoride salts mixture purification. One for the production of hydrogen fluoride, and the other for the research of salts purification. (author)

  5. Experimental demonstration of software defined data center optical networks with Tbps end-to-end tunability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yongli; Zhang, Jie; Ji, Yuefeng; Li, Hui; Wang, Huitao; Ge, Chao

    2015-10-01

    The end-to-end tunability is important to provision elastic channel for the burst traffic of data center optical networks. Then, how to complete the end-to-end tunability based on elastic optical networks? Software defined networking (SDN) based end-to-end tunability solution is proposed for software defined data center optical networks, and the protocol extension and implementation procedure are designed accordingly. For the first time, the flexible grid all optical networks with Tbps end-to-end tunable transport and switch system have been online demonstrated for data center interconnection, which are controlled by OpenDayLight (ODL) based controller. The performance of the end-to-end tunable transport and switch system has been evaluated with wavelength number tuning, bit rate tuning, and transmit power tuning procedure.

  6. Program for upgrading nuclear materials protection, control, and accounting at all facilities within the All-Russian Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuferev, V.; Zhikharev, S.; Yakimov, Y.

    1998-01-01

    As part of the Department of Energy-Russian program for strengthening nuclear material protection, control, and accounting (MPC and A), plans have now been formulated to install an integrated MPC and A system at all facilities containing large quantities of weapons-usable nuclear material within the All-Russian Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF, Arzamas-16) complex. In addition to storage facilities, the complex houses a number of critical facilities used to conduct nuclear physics research and facilities for developing procedures for disassembly of nuclear weapons

  7. Three-dimensional simulations of National Ignition Facility implosions: Insight into experimental observables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spears, Brian K.; Munro, David H.; Sepke, Scott; Caggiano, Joseph; Clark, Daniel; Hatarik, Robert; Kritcher, Andrea; Sayre, Daniel; Yeamans, Charles; Knauer, James; Hilsabeck, Terry; Kilkenny, Joe

    2015-01-01

    We simulate in 3D both the hydrodynamics and, simultaneously, the X-ray and neutron diagnostic signatures of National Ignition Facility (NIF) implosions. We apply asymmetric radiation drive to study the impact of low mode asymmetry on diagnostic observables. We examine X-ray and neutron images as well as neutron spectra for these perturbed implosions. The X-ray images show hot spot evolution on small length scales and short time scales, reflecting the incomplete stagnation seen in the simulation. The neutron images show surprising differences from the X-ray images. The neutron spectra provide additional measures of implosion asymmetry. Flow in the hot spot alters the neutron spectral peak, namely, the peak location and width. The changes in the width lead to a variation in the apparent temperature with viewing angle that signals underlying hot spot asymmetry. We compare our new expectations based on the simulated data with NIF data. We find that some recent cryogenic layered experiments show appreciable temperature anisotropy indicating residual flow in the hot spot. We also find some trends in the data that do not reflect our simulation and theoretical understanding

  8. Results from phase 2 of the radioiodine test facility experimental program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, J.M.; Kupferschmid, W.C.H.; Wren, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    A series of intermediate-scale experiments were conducted in the Radioiodine Test Facility (RTF) in a vinyl-painted, zinc-primer coated, carbon steel vessel in order to assess the effects of vinyl surfaces on iodine volatility in both the presence and absence of radiation. This test series, Phase 2 of a larger, comprehensive program assessing a variety of containment surfaces, also examined the effects of organic (i.e., methyl ethyl ketone) and inorganic (i.e., hydrazine) additives, pH, and venting on the aqueous chemistry and volatility of solutions initially containing cesium iodide. These tests have clearly demonstrated that organics are released to the aqueous phase from the vinyl coating and that, under radiation conditions, these organics can have a significant effect on the formation of volatile iodine species. In particular, the RTF results suggest that radiolytic decomposition of the released organics results in dramatic reductions in pH and dissolved oxygen concentration, which in turn are responsible for increased formation of molecular iodine and organic iodides. When the pH was maintained at 10 (Test 3), much lower iodine volatility was observed; low iodine volatility was also observed in the absence of radiation. This test series also demonstrated that vinyl surfaces, particularly those in contact with the gas phase, were a sink for iodine. (author) 4 figs., 6 tabs., 17 refs

  9. Results from phase 2 of the radioiodine test facility experimental program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, J M; Kupferschmid, W C.H.; Wren, J C [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, MB (Canada). Whiteshell Labs.

    1996-12-01

    A series of intermediate-scale experiments were conducted in the Radioiodine Test Facility (RTF) in a vinyl-painted, zinc-primer coated, carbon steel vessel in order to assess the effects of vinyl surfaces on iodine volatility in both the presence and absence of radiation. This test series, Phase 2 of a larger, comprehensive program assessing a variety of containment surfaces, also examined the effects of organic (i.e., methyl ethyl ketone) and inorganic (i.e., hydrazine) additives, pH, and venting on the aqueous chemistry and volatility of solutions initially containing cesium iodide. These tests have clearly demonstrated that organics are released to the aqueous phase from the vinyl coating and that, under radiation conditions, these organics can have a significant effect on the formation of volatile iodine species. In particular, the RTF results suggest that radiolytic decomposition of the released organics results in dramatic reductions in pH and dissolved oxygen concentration, which in turn are responsible for increased formation of molecular iodine and organic iodides. When the pH was maintained at 10 (Test 3), much lower iodine volatility was observed; low iodine volatility was also observed in the absence of radiation. This test series also demonstrated that vinyl surfaces, particularly those in contact with the gas phase, were a sink for iodine. (author) 4 figs., 6 tabs., 17 refs.

  10. Status and Plans for the National Spherical Torus Experimental Research Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, M.; Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.E.; Bialek, J.M.; Bigelow, T.; Bitter, M.

    2005-01-01

    An overview of the research capabilities and the future plans on the MA-class National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton is presented. NSTX research is exploring the scientific benefits of modifying the field line structure from that in more conventional aspect ratio devices, such as the tokamak. The relevant scientific issues pursued on NSTX include energy confinement, MHD stability at high beta, non-inductive sustainment, solenoid-free start-up, and power and particle handling. In support of the NSTX research goal, research tools are being developed by the NSTX team. In the context of the fusion energy development path being formulated in the US, an ST-based Component Test Facility (CTF) and, ultimately a high beta Demo device based on the ST, are being considered. For these, it is essential to develop high performance (high beta and high confinement), steady-state (non-inductively driven) ST operational scenarios and an efficient solenoid-free start-up concept. We will also briefly describe the Next-Step-ST (NSST) device being designed to address these issues in fusion-relevant plasma conditions

  11. Three-dimensional simulations of National Ignition Facility implosions: Insight into experimental observables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spears, Brian K., E-mail: spears9@llnl.gov; Munro, David H.; Sepke, Scott; Caggiano, Joseph; Clark, Daniel; Hatarik, Robert; Kritcher, Andrea; Sayre, Daniel; Yeamans, Charles [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States); Knauer, James [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, 250 E. River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1212 (United States); Hilsabeck, Terry; Kilkenny, Joe [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    We simulate in 3D both the hydrodynamics and, simultaneously, the X-ray and neutron diagnostic signatures of National Ignition Facility (NIF) implosions. We apply asymmetric radiation drive to study the impact of low mode asymmetry on diagnostic observables. We examine X-ray and neutron images as well as neutron spectra for these perturbed implosions. The X-ray images show hot spot evolution on small length scales and short time scales, reflecting the incomplete stagnation seen in the simulation. The neutron images show surprising differences from the X-ray images. The neutron spectra provide additional measures of implosion asymmetry. Flow in the hot spot alters the neutron spectral peak, namely, the peak location and width. The changes in the width lead to a variation in the apparent temperature with viewing angle that signals underlying hot spot asymmetry. We compare our new expectations based on the simulated data with NIF data. We find that some recent cryogenic layered experiments show appreciable temperature anisotropy indicating residual flow in the hot spot. We also find some trends in the data that do not reflect our simulation and theoretical understanding.

  12. Status and plans for the national spherical torus experimental research facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Masayuki; Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.E.

    2005-01-01

    An overview of the research capabilities and the future plans on the MA-class National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton is presented. NSTX research is exploring the scientific benefits of modifying the field line structure from that in more conventional aspect ratio devices, such as the tokamak. The relevant scientific issues pursued on NSTX include energy confinement, MHD stability at high β, non-inductive sustainment, solenoid-free start-up, and power and particle handling. In support of the NSTX research goal, research tools are being developed by the NSTX team. In the context of the fusion energy development path being formulated in the US, an ST-based Component Test Facility (CTF) and, ultimately a high β Demo device based on the ST, are being considered. For these, it is essential to develop high performance (high β and high confinement), steady-state (non-inductively driven) ST operational scenarios and an efficient solenoid-free start-up concept. We will also briefly describe the Next-Step-ST (NSST) device being designed to address these issues in fusion-relevant plasma conditions. (author)

  13. Barriers to physical activity in chronic hemodialysis patients: a single-center pilot study in an Italian dialysis facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiaccadori, Enrico; Sabatino, Alice; Schito, Franco; Angella, Francesca; Malagoli, Martina; Tucci, Marco; Cupisti, Adamasco; Capitanini, Alessandro; Regolisti, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    In patients on chronic dialysis a sedentary lifestyle is a strong, yet potentially modifiable, predictor of mortality. The present single-center pilot study evaluated social, psychological and clinical barriers that may hinder physical activity in this population. We explored the association between barriers to physical activity and sedentarism in adult patients at a chronic dialysis facility in Parma, Italy. We used different questionnaries exploring participation in physical activity, physical functioning, patient attitudes and preferences, and barriers to physical activity perceived by either patients or dialysis doctors and nurses. We enrolled 104 patients, (67 males, 65%), mean age 69 years (79% of patients older than 60 years); median dialysis vintage 60 months (range 8-440); mean Charlson score 5.55, ADL (Activities of Daily Living) score 5.5. Ninety-two participants (88.5%) reported at least one barrier to physical activity. At multivariable analysis, after adjusting for age and sex, feeling to have too many medical problems (OR 2.99, 95% CI 1.27 to 7.07; P=0.012), chest pain (OR 10.78, 95% CI 1.28 to 90.28; P=0.029) and sadness (OR 2.59, 95% CI 1.10 to 6.09; P=0.030) were independently associated with physical inactivity. Lack of time for exercise counseling and the firm belief about low compliance/interest by the patients toward exercise were the most frequent barriers reported by doctors and nurses. We identified a number of patient-related and health personnel-related barriers to physical activity in patients on chronic dialysis. Solutions for these barriers should be addressed in future studies aimed at increasing the level of physical activity in this population. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Status of Activities on Rehabilitation Of Radioactively Contaminated Facilities and the Site of Russian Research Center ''Kurchatov Institute''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, V. G.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N. N.; Melkov, E. S; Ryazantsev, E. P.; Dikarev, V. S.; Gorodetsky, G. G.; Zverkov, Yu. A.; Kuznetsov, V. V.; Kuznetsova, T. I.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the program, the status, and the course of activities on rehabilitation of radioactively contaminated facilities and the territory of temporary radioactive waste (radwaste) disposal at the Russian Research Center ''Kurchatov Institute'' (RRC KI) in Moscow as performed in 2001-2002. The accumulation of significant amounts of radwaste at RRC KI territory is shown to be the inevitable result of Institute's activity performed in the days of former USSR nuclear weapons project and multiple initial nuclear power projects (performed from 1950's to early 1970's). A characterization of RRC KI temporary radwaste disposal site is given. Described is the system of radiation control and monitoring as implemented on this site. A potential hazard of adverse impacts on the environment and population of the nearby housing area is noted, which is due to possible spread of the radioactive plume by subsoil waters. A description of the concept and project of the RRC KI temporary radwaste disposal site is presented. Specific nature of the activities planned and performed stems from the nearness of housing area. This paper describes main stages of the planned activities for rehabilitation, their expected terms and sources of funding, as well as current status of the project advancement. Outlined are the problems faced in the performance and planning of works. The latter include: diagnostics of the concrete-grouted repositories, dust-suppression technologies, packaging of the fragmented ILW and HLW, soil clean-up, radioactive plume spread prevention, broad radiation monitoring of the work zone and environment in the performance of rehabilitation works. Noted is the intention of RRC KI to establish cooperation with foreign, first of all, the U.S. partners for the solution of problems mentioned above

  15. Calculation of dose rate in escape channel of Research Irradiating Facility Army Technology Center using code MCNPX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Renato G.; Rebello, Wilson F.; Vellozo, Sergio O.; Moreira Junior, Luis; Vital, Helio C.; Rusin, Tiago; Silva, Ademir X.

    2013-01-01

    In order to evaluate new lines of research in the area of irradiation of materials external to the research irradiating facility Army Technology Center (CTEx), it is necessary to study security parameters and magnitude of the dose rates from their channels of escape. The objective was to calculate, with the code MCNPX, dose rates (Gy / min) on the interior and exterior of the four-channel leakage gamma irradiator. The channels were designed to leak radiation on materials properly disposed in the area outside the irradiator larger than the expected volume of irradiation chambers (50 liters). This study aims to assess the magnitude of dose rates within the channels, as well as calculate the angle of beam output range outside the channel for analysis as to its spread, and evaluation of safe conditions of their operators (protection radiological). The computer simulation was performed by distributing virtual dosimeter ferrous sulfate (Fricke) in the longitudinal axis of the vertical drain channels (anterior and posterior) and horizontal (top and bottom). The results showed a collimating the beams irradiated on each of the channels to the outside, with values of the order of tenths of Gy / min as compared to the maximum amount of operation of the irradiator chamber (33 Gy / min). The external beam irradiation in two vertical channels showed a distribution shaped 'trunk pyramid', not collimated, so scattered, opening angle 83 ° in the longitudinal direction and 88 in the transverse direction. Thus, the cases allowed the evaluation of materials for irradiation outside the radiator in terms of the magnitude of the dose rates and positioning of materials, and still be able to take the necessary care in mounting shield for radiation protection by operators, avoiding exposure to ionizing radiation. (author)

  16. A Study of Mars Dust Environment Simulation at NASA Johnson Space Center Energy Systems Test Area Resource Conversion Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuan-Liang Albert

    1999-01-01

    The dust environment on Mars is planned to be simulated in a 20 foot thermal-vacuum chamber at the Johnson Space Center, Energy Systems Test Area Resource Conversion Test Facility in Houston, Texas. This vacuum chamber will be used to perform tests and study the interactions between the dust in Martian air and ISPP hardware. This project is to research, theorize, quantify, and document the Mars dust/wind environment needed for the 20 foot simulation chamber. This simulation work is to support the safety, endurance, and cost reduction of the hardware for the future missions. The Martian dust environment conditions is discussed. Two issues of Martian dust, (1) Dust Contamination related hazards, and (2) Dust Charging caused electrical hazards, are of our interest. The different methods of dust particles measurement are given. The design trade off and feasibility were studied. A glass bell jar system is used to evaluate various concepts for the Mars dust/wind environment simulation. It was observed that the external dust source injection is the best method to introduce the dust into the simulation system. The dust concentration of 30 Mg/M3 should be employed for preparing for the worst possible Martian atmosphere condition in the future. Two approaches thermal-panel shroud for the hardware conditioning are discussed. It is suggested the wind tunnel approach be used to study the dust charging characteristics then to be apply to the close-system cyclone approach. For the operation cost reduction purpose, a dehumidified ambient air could be used to replace the expensive CO2 mixture for some tests.

  17. Online optimal experimental re-design in robotic parallel fed-batch cultivation facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz Bournazou, M N; Barz, T; Nickel, D B; Lopez Cárdenas, D C; Glauche, F; Knepper, A; Neubauer, P

    2017-03-01

    We present an integrated framework for the online optimal experimental re-design applied to parallel nonlinear dynamic processes that aims to precisely estimate the parameter set of macro kinetic growth models with minimal experimental effort. This provides a systematic solution for rapid validation of a specific model to new strains, mutants, or products. In biosciences, this is especially important as model identification is a long and laborious process which is continuing to limit the use of mathematical modeling in this field. The strength of this approach is demonstrated by fitting a macro-kinetic differential equation model for Escherichia coli fed-batch processes after 6 h of cultivation. The system includes two fully-automated liquid handling robots; one containing eight mini-bioreactors and another used for automated at-line analyses, which allows for the immediate use of the available data in the modeling environment. As a result, the experiment can be continually re-designed while the cultivations are running using the information generated by periodical parameter estimations. The advantages of an online re-computation of the optimal experiment are proven by a 50-fold lower average coefficient of variation on the parameter estimates compared to the sequential method (4.83% instead of 235.86%). The success obtained in such a complex system is a further step towards a more efficient computer aided bioprocess development. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 610-619. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Cold Climate Foundation Retrofit Experimental Hygrothermal Performance: Cloquet Residential Research Facility Laboratory Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, Louise F. [NorthernSTAR, St. Paul, MN (United States); Harmon, Anna C. [NorthernSTAR, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Thermal and moisture problems in existing basements create a unique challenge because the exterior face of the wall is not easily or inexpensively accessible. This approach addresses thermal and moisture management from the interior face of the wall without disturbing the exterior soil and landscaping. the interior and exterior environments. This approach has the potential for improving durability, comfort, and indoor air quality. This project was funded jointly by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ORNL focused on developing a full basement wall system experimental database to enable others to validate hygrothermal simulation codes. NREL focused on testing the moisture durability of practical basement wall interior insulation retrofit solutions for cold climates. The project has produced a physically credible and reliable long-term hygrothermal performance database for retrofit foundation wall insulation systems in zone 6 and 7 climates that are fully compliant with the performance criteria in the 2009 Minnesota Energy Code. The experimental data were configured into a standard format that can be published online and that is compatible with standard commercially available spreadsheet and database software.

  19. Processing and analyses of the pulsed-neutron experimental data of the YALINA facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Y.; Gohar, Y.; Smith, D.; Talamo, A.; Zhong, Z.; Kiyavitskaya, H.; Bournos, V.; Fokov, Y.; Routkovskaya, C.; Sadovich, S.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: The YALINA subcritical assembly of the Joint Institute for Power and Nuclear Research (JIPNR)-Sosny, Belarus has been utilized to study the physics parameters of accelerator driven systems (ADS) with high intensity Deuterium-Tritium and Deuterium-Deuterium pulsed neutron sources. In particular, with the fast and thermal neutron zones of the YALINA-Booster subcritical assembly, the pulsed neutron experiments have been utilized to evaluate the pulsed neutron methods for determining the reactivity of the subcritical system. In this paper, the pulsed-neutron experiments performed in the YALINA-Booster 1141 configuration with 90% U 235 fuel and 1185 configuration with 36% and 21% U fuel are examined and analized. The Sjo:strand area-ratio method is utilized to determine the reactivities of the subcritical assembly configurations. The linear regression method is applied to obtain the prompt neutron decay constants from the pulsed-neutron experimental data. The reactivity values obtained from experimental data are shown to be dependent on the detector locations and also on the detector types. The large discrepancies between the reactivity values given by the detectors in the fast neutron zone was reduced by spatial correction methods, and the estimated reactivity after the spatial corrections are almost spatially independent.

  20. Review of nuclear data improvement needs for nuclear radiation measurement techniques used at the CEA experimental reactor facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Destouches Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The constant improvement of the neutron and gamma calculation codes used in experimental nuclear reactors goes hand in hand with that of the associated nuclear data libraries. The validation of these calculation schemes always requires the confrontation with integral experiments performed in experimental reactors to be completed. Nuclear data of interest, straight as cross sections, or elaborated ones such as reactivity, are always derived from a reaction rate measurement which is the only measurable parameter in a nuclear sensor. So, in order to derive physical parameters from the electric signal of the sensor, one needs specific nuclear data libraries. This paper presents successively the main features of the measurement techniques used in the CEA experimental reactor facilities for the on-line and offline neutron/gamma flux characterizations: reactor dosimetry, neutron flux measurements with miniature fission chambers and Self Power Neutron Detector (SPND and gamma flux measurements with chamber ionization and TLD. For each technique, the nuclear data necessary for their interpretation will be presented, the main identified needs for improvement identified and an analysis of their impact on the quality of the measurement. Finally, a synthesis of the study will be done.

  1. Design and construction of a low-level waste shallow land burial experimental facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boegly, W.J. Jr.; Davis, E.C.

    1983-11-01

    The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been investigating improved shallow land burial (SLB) practices for disposing of low-level radioactive wastes in humid environments. Two improvements currently being studied are the use of a cement-bentonite grout applied to waste trenches before they are covered and the use of an impermeable Hypalon fabric liner, which completely surrounds the waste in a trench. A field-scale demonstration site, known as the Engineered Test Facility (ETF), has been established for these studies in the complex geologic setting typical of the Oak Ridge area. Design of the ETF was initiated in 1980 for purposes of (1) evaluating the ability of the grouted and lined trench treatments to minimize water contact and concurrent waste leaching, (2) evaluating selected waste disposal site characterization criteria, (3) integrating site characterization data into model development, and (4) validating the ETF site model and using it to predict long-term site performance. A total of nine trenches (six treated and three control) were excavated at the site in June of 1981. Bales of ORNL compacted waste were used to fill the 3m x 3m x 3m trenches, and, after treatment, all trenches were closed (backfilled and covered) according to current practice. Evaluation of the trench treatments is in progress using a series of inorganic and organic tracer tests designed to monitor water movement in three regions of interest: the trenches, the unsaturated zone around the trenches, and the saturated zone below the site. A successful demonstration of reduced waste leaching resulting from either of these two trench modifications described in this design and construction report will have immediate application to larger disposal sites having similar water-related problems. 9 references, 14 figures, 3 tables

  2. Initial experimental results from the Laboratory Biosphere closed ecological system facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, M; Dempster, W F; Alling, A; Allen, J P; Rasmussen, R; Silverstone, S; Van Thillo, M

    2003-01-01

    An initial experiment in the Laboratory Biosphere facility, Santa Fe, New Mexico, was conducted May-August 2002 using a soil-based system with light levels (at 12 h per day) of 58-mol m-2 d-1. The crop tested was soybean, cultivar Hoyt, which produced an aboveground biomass of 2510 grams. Dynamics of a number of trace gases showed that methane, nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen gas had initial increases that were substantially reduced in concentration by the end of the experiment. Methane was reduced from 209 ppm to 11 ppm, and nitrous oxide from 5 ppm to 1.4 ppm in the last 40 days of the closure experiment. Ethylene was at elevated levels compared to ambient during the flowering/fruiting phase of the crop. Soil respiration from the 5.37 m2 (1.46 m3) soil component was estimated at 23.4 ppm h-1 or 1.28 g CO2 h-1 or 5.7 g CO2 m-2 d-1. Phytorespiration peaked near the time of fruiting at about 160 ppm h-1. At the height of plant growth, photosynthesis CO2 draw down was as high as 3950 ppm d-1, and averaged 265 ppm h-1 (whole day averages) during lighted hours with a range of 156-390 ppm h-1. During this period, the chamber required injections of CO2 to continue plant growth. Oxygen levels rose along with the injections of carbon dioxide. Upon several occasions, CO2 was allowed to be drawn down to severely limiting levels, bottoming at around 150 ppm. A strong positive correlation (about 0.05 ppm h-1 ppm-1 with r2 about 0.9 for the range 1000-5000 ppm) was observed between atmospheric CO2 concentration and the rate of fixation up to concentrations of around 8800 ppm CO2. c2003 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Experimental room temperature hohlraum performance study on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralph, J. E.; Strozzi, D.; Ma, T.; Moody, J. D.; Hinkel, D. E.; Callahan, D. A.; MacGowan, B. J.; Michel, P.; Kline, J. L.; Glenzer, S. H.; Albert, F.; Benedetti, L. R.; Divol, L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Pak, A.; Rygg, J. R.; Schneider, M. B.; Town, R. P. J.; Widmann, K.; Hsing, W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2016-12-01

    Room temperature or "warm" (273 K) indirect drive hohlraum experiments have been conducted on the National Ignition Facility with laser energies up to 1.26 MJ and compared to similar cryogenic or "cryo" (˜20 K) experiments. Warm experiments use neopentane (C5H12) as the low pressure hohlraum fill gas instead of helium, and propane (C3H8) to replace the cryogenic DT or DHe3 capsule fill. The increased average Z of the hohlraum fill leads to increased inverse bremsstrahlung absorption and an overall hotter hohlraum plasma in simulations. The cross beam energy transfer (CBET) from outer laser beams (pointed toward the laser entrance hole) to inner beams (pointed at the equator) was inferred indirectly from measurements of Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS). These experiments show that a similar hot spot self-emission shape can be produced with less CBET in warm hohlraums. The measured inner cone SRS reflectivity (as a fraction of incident power neglecting CBET) is ˜2.5 × less in warm than cryo shots with similar hot spot shapes, due to a less need for CBET. The measured outer-beam stimulated the Brillouin scattering power that was higher in the warm shots, leading to a ceiling on power to avoid the optics damage. These measurements also show that the CBET induced by the flow where the beams cross can be effectively mitigated by a 1.5 Å wavelength shift between the inner and outer beams. A smaller scale direct comparison indicates that warm shots give a more prolate implosion than cryo shots with the same wavelength shift and pulse shape. Finally, the peak radiation temperature was found to be between 5 and 7 eV higher in the warm than the corresponding cryo experiments after accounting for differences in backscatter.

  4. Beam calorimetry at the large negative ion source test facility ELISE: Experimental setup and latest results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nocentini, Riccardo; Bonomo, Federica; Ricci, Marina; Pimazzoni, Antonio; Fantz, Ursel; Heinemann, Bernd; Riedl, Rudolf; Wünderlich, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • ELISE is the first step in the European roadmap for the development of the ITER NBI. • Several beam diagnostic tools have been installed, the latest results are presented. • A gaussian fit procedure has been implemented to characterize the large ion beam. • Average beamlet group inhomogeneity is maximum 13%, close to the ITER target of 10%. • Beam divergence measured by calorimeter agrees with the BES measurements within 30%. - Abstract: The test facility ELISE is the first step within the European roadmap for the development of the ITER NBI system. ELISE is equipped with a 1 × 0.9 m"2 radio frequency negative ion source (half the ITER source size) and an ITER-like 3-grid extraction system which can extract an H"− or D"− beam for 10 s every 3 min (limited by available power supplies) with a total acceleration voltage of up to 60 kV. In the beam line of ELISE several beam diagnostic tools have been installed with the aim to evaluate beam intensity, divergence and uniformity. A copper diagnostic calorimeter gives the possibility to measure the beam power density profile with high resolution. The measurements are performed by an IR micro-bolometer camera and 48 thermocouples embedded in the calorimeter. A gaussian fit procedure has been implemented in order to characterize the large negative ion beam produced by ELISE. The latest results obtained from the beam calorimetry at ELISE show that the average beamlet group inhomogeneity is maximum 13%. The measured beam divergence agrees with the one measured by beam emission spectroscopy within 30%.

  5. Experimental facilities for large-scale and full-scale study of hydrogen accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merilo, E.; Groethe, M.; Colton, J. [SRI International, Poulter Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Chiba, S. [SRI Japan, Tokyo (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    This paper summarized some of the work that has been performed at SRI International over the past 5 years that address safety issues for the hydrogen-based economy. Researchers at SRI International have conducted experiments at the Corral Hollow Experiment Site (CHES) near Livermore California to obtain fundamental data on hydrogen explosions for risk assessment. In particular, large-scale hydrogen tests were conducted using homogeneous mixtures of hydrogen in volumes from 5.3 m{sup 3} to 300 m{sup 3} to represent scenarios involving fuel cell vehicles as well as transport and storage facilities. Experiments have focused on unconfined deflagrations of hydrogen and air, and detonations of hydrogen in a semi-open space to measure free-field blast effects; the use of blast walls as a mitigation technique; turbulent enhancement of hydrogen combustion due to obstacles within the mixture, and determination of when deflagration-to-detonation transition occurs; the effect of confined hydrogen releases and explosions that could originate from an interconnecting hydrogen pipeline; and, large and small accidental releases of hydrogen. The experiments were conducted to improve the prediction of hydrogen explosions and the capabilities for performing risk assessments, and to develop mitigation techniques. Measurements included hydrogen concentration; flame speed; blast overpressure; heat flux; and, high-speed, standard, and infrared video. The data collected in these experiments is used to correlate computer models and to facilitate the development of codes and standards. This work contributes to better safety technology by evaluating the effectiveness of different blast mitigation techniques. 13 refs., 13 figs.

  6. AGOR: A superconducting cyclotron for light and heavy ions plans for experimental facilities and physics program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gales, S.

    1991-01-01

    The construction of the K600 superconducting cyclotron AGOR, a joint undertaking of the KVI Groningen and the Institut de Physique Nucleaire at Orsay, has reached the stage where the assembly of major subsystems is underway. Field measurements are scheduled to start in the fall of this year, beam tests should start at Orsay by the end of 1992 before AGOR final installation at Groningen. The beam guiding system, the location and equipments of the main experimental areas are currently being designed. Taking advantage of the broad range of ions and energies that AGOR will made available (from 200 MeV protons to 100 MeV/A α down to 6 MeV/A Pb ions), the first ideas about the physics research to be done will be presented. (author) 28 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Present status of the ETL electron linac and associated experimental facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomimasu, T.

    1983-01-01

    The 500-MeV electron linac ''TELL'' is operated since Dec. 1980. The main features of TELL are high efficiency, high current - high power acceleration and economical beam sharing to four experimental rooms at the same time. The available beam current is 240 mA (--180 μA ) at 300 MeV at present. A pion channel ( QQDQ ) with solid angle larger than 0.15 sr is under construction. Research on establishing spectro-dosimetric standards of high energy - high intensity electrons, X-rays and pions are in progress. The 600-MeV storage ring ''TERAS'' is operated since Oct. 1981. The circumference is 31.45 m and lambdasub(p) is 22 A. The maximum stored current is 150 mA and 1/e lifetime is 1.5 hours at present. Studies on photometry and soft X ray standards, electronic materials and lithography technology are in progress using synchrotron radiation. (author)

  8. A new experimental facility for studying aerosol sampling in workplace environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fauvel, S.; Witstchger, O.

    2000-01-01

    The european council directive 96/29/EURATOM requires its implementation into national regulations. This directive lays down basic safety standards for the protection of the health of workers and the general public against the dangers arising from ionizing radiations. This directive allows to use aerosol characteristics (particle size distribution, airborne concentration, morphology and chemical composition) measured in workplace to assess the effective radiation dose of workers resulting from the intake by inhalation of airborne radionuclides. Tests of performances of instruments used for the health-related sampling of particles in workplace are usually carried out in a wind tunnel or a calm air chamber. In these test conditions, instruments are exposed to uniform wind and steady homogeneous aerosol. In a real workplace situation, these instruments are usually exposed to highly non-uniform airflows and local emissions of particles. Moreover, it is not clear how differences in airflow pattern, proximity of the localised contamination source, worker location or activity would affect the personal/static measurement ratio. The objective of our experimental work is to investigate the relevant parameters that affect the aerosol characteristics in the microenvironment of a worker (including breathing zone) and in the workplace. The first part of that study was to design and built an experimental room CEPIA (french acronym for room for studying personal and area samplers). The ventilated chamber (volume 36 m 3 ) is equipped with an air delivery system to insure different ventilation patterns and flowrates. The CEPIA chamber should offer possibilities for performing experiments in situations representing a workplace environment, with airflows and aerosol parameters well controlled and characterised. (authors)

  9. Experimental Demonstration of 32 Gbaud 4-PAM for Data Center Interconnections of up to 320 km

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peter; Suhr, Lau Frejstrup; Clausen, Anders

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results demonstrating a 64 Gbps 4-PAM transmission over a 320 km SSMF span employing standard 80 km fiber spans for metro links. The receiver consists of a LPF and a DFE utilizing the DD-LMS algorithm.......This paper presents experimental results demonstrating a 64 Gbps 4-PAM transmission over a 320 km SSMF span employing standard 80 km fiber spans for metro links. The receiver consists of a LPF and a DFE utilizing the DD-LMS algorithm....

  10. Guide to making time-lapse graphics using the facilities of the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computing Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munro, J.K. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    The advent of large, fast computers has opened the way to modeling more complex physical processes and to handling very large quantities of experimental data. The amount of information that can be processed in a short period of time is so great that use of graphical displays assumes greater importance as a means of displaying this information. Information from dynamical processes can be displayed conveniently by use of animated graphics. This guide presents the basic techniques for generating black and white animated graphics, with consideration of aesthetic, mechanical, and computational problems. The guide is intended for use by someone who wants to make movies on the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computing Center (NMFECC) CDC-7600. Problems encountered by a geographically remote user are given particular attention. Detailed information is given that will allow a remote user to do some file checking and diagnosis before giving graphics files to the system for processing into film in order to spot problems without having to wait for film to be delivered. Source listings of some useful software are given in appendices along with descriptions of how to use it. 3 figures, 5 tables

  11. Hyper-velocity impacts on the molten silica of the LMJ facility: experimental results and related simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertron, I.; Chevalier, J.M.; Malaise, F.; Barrio, A.; Courchinoux, R.

    2003-01-01

    This work presents a damaging study of the molten silica splinter-guards of the experiment chamber of the Megajoule laser facility. Damaging is due to the impact of hyper-velocity particulates coming from the interaction between X-rays and the diagnostic supports. Experiments have been carried out with the light-gas dual-stage launcher MICA in parallel with numerical simulations using a silica fragmentation and fissuring model embedded in the HESIONE code. First tests concern hyper-velocity impacts of steel balls of 550 μm diameter on silica samples. Samples are expertized to measure the craters and damaging characteristics generated by the impact. Experimental results are compared to numerical simulations in order to check the capability of the model to reproduce the effect of hyper-velocity impacts on molten silica. The final goal is to evaluate the lifetime of splinter-guards. (J.S.)

  12. Aspects of welding of zircaloy thin tube to end plugin the experimental welding facility of fuel element fabrication laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafy, M.; El-Hakim, E.

    1997-01-01

    The work was achieved within the scope of developing egyptian nuclear fuel fabrication laboratory in inshas. It showed the results of developing a welding facility for performing a qualified zircaloy-2 and 4 thin tubes to end weld joints. The welding chamber design was developed to get qualified weld for both PWR and CANDU fuel rod configurations. Experimental works for optimizing the welding parameters of tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding and electron beam (EB) welding processes were achieved. The ld penetration deeper than the wall tube thickness can be obtained for qualified end plug weld joints. It recommended to use steel compensating block for radiographic inspection of end plug weld joints. The predominate defects that can be expected in end plug weld joints, are lack of penetration and cavity. The microstructure of the fusion zone and heat affected zones are Widmanstaetten structure and its grain size is drastically sensible to the heat generation and removal of arc welding. 16 figs

  13. Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility (MLF at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex II: Neutron Scattering Instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Nakajima

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The neutron instruments suite, installed at the spallation neutron source of the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility (MLF at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC, is reviewed. MLF has 23 neutron beam ports and 21 instruments are in operation for user programs or are under commissioning. A unique and challenging instrumental suite in MLF has been realized via combination of a high-performance neutron source, optimized for neutron scattering, and unique instruments using cutting-edge technologies. All instruments are/will serve in world-leading investigations in a broad range of fields, from fundamental physics to industrial applications. In this review, overviews, characteristic features, and typical applications of the individual instruments are mentioned.

  14. Experimental validation of control strategies for a microgrid test facility including a storage system and renewable generation sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baccino, Francesco; Marinelli, Mattia; Silvestro, Federico

    2012-01-01

    The paper is aimed at describing and validating some control strategies in the SYSLAB experimental test facility characterized by the presence of a low voltage network with a 15 kW-190 kWh Vanadium Redox Flow battery system and a 11 kW wind turbine. The generation set is connected to the local...... network and is fully controllable by the SCADA system. The control strategies, implemented on a local pc interfaced to the SCADA, are realized in Matlab-Simulink. The main purpose is to control the charge/discharge action of the storage system in order to present at the point of common coupling...... the desired power or energy profiles....

  15. Experimental possibilities and fast neutron dose map of the fast neutron fields at the RB reactor facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokcic-Kostic, M.; Pesic, M.; Antic, D.; Ninkovic, M.

    1993-01-01

    The RB is an unshielded, zero power nuclear facility with natural and enriched uranium fuel (2% and 80%) and D 2 O as moderator. It is possible to create different configurations of non-reflected and partially reflected critical systems and to make experiments in the fields of thermal neutrons. The fields of fast neutrons with 'softened' fission spectrum are made by modifying the system: modified experimental fuel channel EFC, coupled fast-thermal system in two configurations CFTS-1 and CFTS-2, coupled fast-thermal core HERBE. The intermediate and fast neutron absorbed doses in fast neutron fields are given. In first configuration of RB reactor it was almost impossible to perform dosimetric and other experiments. By creating these fields, with in our circumstances available fuel elements, the possibilities for different experiments are greatly improved. Now we can irradiate food samples, soil samples, electronic devices, study material properties, perform various dosimetry experiments, etc. (1 tab.)

  16. Design-development and operation of the Experimental Boiling-Water Reactor (EBWR) facility, 1955--1967

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boing, L.E.; Wimunc, E.A.; Whittington, G.A.

    1990-11-01

    The Experimental Boiling-Water Reactor (EBWR) was designed, built, and operated to provide experience and engineering data that would demonstrate the feasibility of the direct-cycle, boiling-water reactor and be applicable to improved, larger nuclear power stations; and was based on information obtained in the first test boiling-water reactors, the BORAX series. EBWR initially produced 20 MW(t), 5 MW(e); later modified and upgraded, as described and illustrated, it was operated at up to 100 MW(t). The facility fulfilled its primary mission -- demonstrating the practicality of the direct-boiling concept -- and, in fact, was the prototype of some of the first commercial plants and of reactor programs in some other countries. After successful completion of the Water-Cooled Reactor Program, EBWR was utilized in the joint Argonne-Hanford Plutonium Recycle Program to develop data for the utilization of plutonium as a fuel in light- water thermal systems. Final shutdown of the EBWR facility followed the termination of the latter program. 13 refs., 12 figs

  17. The new real-time control and data acquisition system for an experimental tritium removal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefan, Iuliana; Stefan, Liviu; Retevoi, Carmen; Balteanu, Ovidiu; Bucur, Ciprian

    2006-01-01

    Full text: The purpose of the paper is to present a real-time control and data acquisition system based on virtual instrumentation (LabView, compact I/O) applicable to an experimental heavy water detritiation plant. The initial data acquisition system based on analogue instruments is now upgraded to a fully digital system, this because of greater flexibility and capability than analogue hardware what allows easy modifications of the control system. Virtual instrumentation became lately much used for monitoring and controlling the operational parameters in plants. In the specific case of ETRF there are a lot of process parameters which have to be monitored and controlled. The essential improvement in the new system is the collection of all signals and control functions by a PC, what makes any changes in configuration easy. The system hardware-PC with embedded controllers is selected, as most cost effective. The LabView platform provides faster program development with a convenient user interface. The system provides independent digital control of each parameters and records data of the process. The system is flexible and has the advantage of further extension. (authors)

  18. Development of a single ion micro-irradiation facility for experimental radiobiology at cell level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barberet, Ph.

    2003-10-01

    A micro-irradiation device has been developed for radiobiology applications at the scale of the cell. This device is based on an upgrade of an existing micro-beam line that was already able to deliver a 1 to 3 MeV proton or alpha beam of low intensity and whose space resolution is lower than 1 micrometer in vacuum. The important part of this work has been the development of an irradiation stage designed to fit on the micro-probe and able to deliver ions in the air with an absolute accuracy of a few micrometers. A program has been set up to monitor the complete irradiation line in testing and in automatic irradiation operating phases. Simulation tools based on Monte-Carlo calculations have been validated through comparisons with experimental data particularly in the field of spatial resolution and of the number of ions delivered. The promising results show the possibility in a near future to use this tool to study the response of cells to very low irradiation doses down to the extreme limit of one ion per cell

  19. Burn-center quality improvement: are burn outcomes dependent on admitting facilities and is there a volume-outcome "sweet-spot"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hranjec, Tjasa; Turrentine, Florence E; Stukenborg, George; Young, Jeffrey S; Sawyer, Robert G; Calland, James F

    2012-05-01

    Risk factors of mortality in burn patients such as inhalation injury, patient age, and percent of total body surface area (%TBSA) burned have been identified in previous publications. However, little is known about the variability of mortality outcomes between burn centers and whether the admitting facilities or facility volumes can be recognized as predictors of mortality. De-identified data from 87,665 acute burn observations obtained from the National Burn Repository between 2003 and 2007 were used to estimate a multivariable logistic regression model that could predict patient mortality with reference to the admitting burn facility/facility volume, adjusted for differences in age, inhalation injury, %TBSA burned, and an additional factor, percent full thickness burn (%FTB). As previously reported, all three covariates (%TBSA burned, inhalation injury, and age) were found to be highly statistically significant risk factors of mortality in burn patients (P value improve the multivariable model. The treatment/admitting facility was found to be an independent mortality predictor, with certain hospitals having increased odds of death and others showing a protective effect (decreased odds ratio). Hospitals with high burn volumes had the highest risk of mortality. Mortality outcomes of patients with similar risk factors (%TBSA burned, inhalation injury, age, and %FTB) are significantly affected by the treating facility and their admission volumes.

  20. Experimental evidence of zone-center optical phonon softening by accumulating holes in thin Ge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoichi Kabuyanagi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the impact of free carriers on the zone-center optical phonon frequency in germanium (Ge. By taking advantage of the Ge-on-insulator structure, we measured the Raman spectroscopy by applying back-gate bias. Phonon softening by accumulating holes in Ge film was clearly observed. This fact strongly suggests that the phonon softening in heavily-doped Ge is mainly attributed to the free carrier effect rather than the dopant atom counterpart. Furthermore, we propose that the free carrier effect on phonon softening is simply understandable from the viewpoint of covalent bonding modification by free carriers.

  1. Analysis of Consequences in the Loss-of-Coolant Accident in Wendelstein 7-X Experimental Nuclear Fusion Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uspuras, E., E-mail: algis@mail.lei.lt [Laboratory of Nuclear Installations Safety, Lithuanian Energy Institute, Kaunas (Lithuania)

    2012-09-15

    Full text: Fusion is the energy production technology, which could potentially solve problems with growing energy demand of population in the future. Starting 2007, Lithuanian energy institute (LEI) is a member of European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA) organization. LEI is cooperating with Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics (IPP, Germany) in the frames of EFDA project by performing safety analysis of fusion device W7-X. Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) is an experimental stellarator facility currently being built in Greifswald, Germany, which shall demonstrate that in the future energy could be produced in such type of fusion reactors. The W7-X facility divertor cooling system consists of two coolant circuits: the main cooling circuit and the so-called 'baking' circuit. Before plasma operation, the divertor and other invessel components must be heated up in order to 'clean' the surfaces by thermal desorption and the subsequent pumping out of the released volatile molecules. The rupture of pipe, providing water for the divertor targets during the 'baking' regime is one of the critical failure events, since primary and secondary steam production leads to a rapid increase of the inner pressure in the plasma (vacuum) vessel. Such initiating event could lead to the loss of vacuum condition up to overpressure of the plasma vessel, damage of in-vessel components and bellows of the ports. In this paper the safety analysis of 40 mm inner diameter coolant pipe rupture in cooling circuit and discharge of steam-water mixture through the leak into plasma vessel during the W7-X no-plasma 'baking' operation mode is presented. For the analysis the model of W7-X cooling system (pumps, valves, pipes, hydro-accumulators, and heat exchangers) and plasma vessel was developed by employing system thermal-hydraulic state-of-the-art RELAP5 Mod 3.3 code. This paper demonstrated, that the developed RELAP5 model allows to analyze the processes in divertor cooling system and plasma vessel

  2. Study on critical heat flux in narrow rectangular channel with repeated-rib roughness. 1. Experimental facility and preliminary experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Hidetaka; Terada, Atsuhiko; Kaminaga, Masanori; Hino, Ryutaro

    2001-10-01

    In the design of a spallation target system, the water cooling system, for example a proton beam window and a safety hull, is used with narrow channels, in order to remove high heat flux and prevent lowering of system performance by absorption of neutron. And in narrow channel, heat transfer enhancement using 2-D rib is considered for reduction the cost of cooling component and decrease inventory of water in the cooling system, that is, decrease of the amount of irradiated water. But few studies on CHF with rib have been carried out. Experimental and analytical studies with rib-roughened test section, in 10:1 ratio of pitch to height, are being carried out in order to clarify the CHF in rib-roughened channel. This paper presents the review of previous researches on heat transfer in channel with rib roughness, overview of the test facility and the preliminary experimental and analytical results. As a result, wall friction factors were about 3 times as large as that of smooth channel, and heat transfer coefficients are about 2 times as large as that of smooth channel. The obtained CHF was as same as previous mechanistic model by Sudo. (author)

  3. Comparisons of RELAP5-3D Analyses to Experimental Data from the Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucknor, Matthew; Hu, Rui; Lisowski, Darius; Kraus, Adam

    2016-04-17

    The Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) is an important passive safety system being incorporated into the overall safety strategy for high temperature advanced reactor concepts such as the High Temperature Gas- Cooled Reactors (HTGR). The Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility (NSTF) at Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) reflects a 1/2-scale model of the primary features of one conceptual air-cooled RCCS design. The project conducts ex-vessel, passive heat removal experiments in support of Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Advanced Reactor Technology (ART) program, while also generating data for code validation purposes. While experiments are being conducted at the NSTF to evaluate the feasibility of the passive RCCS, parallel modeling and simulation efforts are ongoing to support the design, fabrication, and operation of these natural convection systems. Both system-level and high fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses were performed to gain a complete understanding of the complex flow and heat transfer phenomena in natural convection systems. This paper provides a summary of the RELAP5-3D NSTF model development efforts and provides comparisons between simulation results and experimental data from the NSTF. Overall, the simulation results compared favorably to the experimental data, however, further analyses need to be conducted to investigate any identified differences.

  4. The Development of the Multi-Center Traffic Management Advisor (MCTMA): Traffic Flow Management Research in a Multi-Facility Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Katharine K.; Davis, Thomas J.; Levin, Kerry M.; Rowe, Dennis W.

    2001-01-01

    The Traffic Management Advisor (TMA) is a decision-support tool for traffic managers and air traffic controllers that provides traffic flow visualization and other flow management tools. TMA creates an efficiently sequenced and safely spaced schedule for arrival traffic that meets but does not exceed specified airspace system constraints. TMA is being deployed at selected facilities throughout the National Airspace System in the US as part of the FAA's Free Flight Phase 1 program. TMA development and testing, and its current deployment, focuses on managing the arrival capacity for single major airports within single terminal areas and single en route centers. The next phase of development for this technology is the expansion of the TMA capability to complex facilities in which a terminal area or airport is fed by multiple en route centers, thus creating a multicenter TMA functionality. The focus of the multi-center TMA (McTMA) development is on the busy facilities in the Northeast comdor of the US. This paper describes the planning and development of McTMA and the challenges associated with adapting a successful traffic flow management tool for a very complex airspace.

  5. Overview of research and therapy facilities for radiobiological experimental work in particle therapy. Report from the European Particle Therapy Network radiobiology group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosanjh, Manjit; Jones, Bleddyn; Pawelke, Jörg; Pruschy, Martin; Sørensen, Brita Singers

    2018-04-24

    Particle therapy (PT) as cancer treatment, using protons or heavier ions, can provide a more favorable dose distribution compared to X-rays. While the physical characteristics of particle radiation have been the aim of intense research, less focus has been placed on the actual biological responses arising from particle irradiation. One of the biggest challenges for proton radiobiology is the RBE, with an increasing concern that the clinically-applied generic RBE-value of 1.1 is an approximation, as RBE is a complex quantity, depending on both biological and physical parameters, such as dose, LET, cellular and tissue radiobiological characteristics, as well as the endpoints being studied. Most of the available RBE data derive from in vitro experiments, with very limited in vivo data available, especially in late-reacting tissues, which provide the main constraints and influence the quality of life endpoints in radiotherapy. There is a need for systematic, large-scale studies to thoroughly establish the biology of particle radiation in a number of different experimental models in order to refine biophysical mathematical models that can potentially be used to guide PT. The overall objective of the European Particle Therapy Network (EPTN) WP6 is to form a network of research and therapy facilities in order to coordinate and standardize the radiobiological experiments, to obtain more accurate predictive parameters than in the past. Coordinated research is required in order to obtain the most appropriate experimental data. The aim in this paper is to describe the available radiobiology infrastructure of the centers involved in EPTN WP6. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Experimental Study on a Self-Centering Earthquake-Resistant Masonry Pier with a Structural Concrete Column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Niu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a slotting construction strategy to avoid shear behavior of multistory masonry buildings. The aspect ratio of masonry piers increases via slotting between spandrels and piers, so that the limit state of piers under an earthquake may be altered from shear to rocking. Rocking piers with a structural concrete column (SCC form a self-centering earthquake-resistant system. The in-plane lateral rocking behavior of masonry piers subjected to an axial force is predicted, and an experimental study is conducted on two full-scale masonry piers with an SCC, which consist of a slotting pier and an original pier. Meanwhile, a comparison of the rocking modes of masonry piers with an SCC and without an SCC was conducted in the paper. Experimental verification indicates that the slotting strategy achieves a change of failure modes from shear to rocking, and this resistant system with an SCC incorporates the self-centering and high energy dissipation properties. For the slotting pier, a lateral story drift ratio of 2.5% and a high displacement ductility of approximately 9.7 are obtained in the test, although the lateral strength decreased by 22.3% after slotting. The predicted lateral strength of the rocking pier with an SCC has a margin of error of 5.3%.

  7. Experimental investigation of using ambient energy to cool Internet Data Center with thermosyphon heat exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, F.; Tian, X.; Ma, G. [Beijing Univ. of Technology, Beijing (China). College of Environmental and Energy Engineering

    2010-07-01

    The energy consumption of the air-conditioning system at the Internet Data Center (IDC) in Beijing comprises 40 per cent of the building's total energy consumption. Of all the energy energy management strategies available at the IDC, the most unique one is the use of ambient energy to cool the IDC by the thermosyphon heat exchanger. Atmospheric energy can reduce the air conditioner's running time while maintaining the humidity and cleanliness of the IDC. In this study, an IDC test model was set up to analyze the heat dissipating characteristics and the energy consumption of the thermosyphon heat exchanger and the air conditioner in the IDC for winter conditions. The heat dissipating capacity of the building envelope was measured and calculated. The energy consumption of the air conditioner was compared under different indoor and outdoor temperatures. The study showed that the heat dissipating need of the IDC cannot be met just by the heat dissipation of the building envelope in winter conditions. The heat dissipating capacity of the IDC building envelope comprises 19.5 per cent of the total heat load. The average energy consumption of the air conditioner is 3.5 to 4 kWh per day. The temperature difference between indoor and outdoor temperature in the IDC with the thermosyphon heat exchanger was less than 20 degrees C, and the energy consumption of the thermosyphon heat exchanger comprised only 41 per cent of that of the air conditioner. 8 refs., 1 tab., 8 figs.

  8. Reducing Data Center Loads for a Large-Scale, Low-Energy Office Building: NREL's Research Support Facility (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheppy, M.; Lobato, C.; Van Geet, O.; Pless, S.; Donovan, K.; Powers, C.

    2011-12-01

    This publication detailing the design, implementation strategies, and continuous performance monitoring of NREL's Research Support Facility data center. Data centers are energy-intensive spaces that facilitate the transmission, receipt, processing, and storage of digital data. These spaces require redundancies in power and storage, as well as infrastructure, to cool computing equipment and manage the resulting waste heat (Tschudi, Xu, Sartor, and Stein, 2003). Data center spaces can consume more than 100 times the energy of standard office spaces (VanGeet 2011). The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reported that data centers used 61 billion kilowatt-hours (kWh) in 2006, which was 1.5% of the total electricity consumption in the U.S. (U.S. EPA, 2007). Worldwide, data centers now consume more energy annually than Sweden (New York Times, 2009). Given their high energy consumption and conventional operation practices, there is a potential for huge energy savings in data centers. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is world renowned for its commitment to green building construction. In June 2010, the laboratory finished construction of a 220,000-square-foot (ft{sup 2}), LEED Platinum, Research Support Facility (RSF), which included a 1,900-ft{sup 2} data center. The RSF will expand to 360,000 ft{sup 2} with the opening of an additional wing December, 2011. The project's request for proposals (RFP) set a whole-building demand-side energy use requirement of a nominal 35 kBtu/ft{sup 2} per year. On-site renewable energy generation will offset the annual energy consumption. To support the RSF's energy goals, NREL's new data center was designed to minimize its energy footprint without compromising service quality. Several implementation challenges emerged during the design, construction, and first 11 months of operation of the RSF data center. This document highlights these challenges and describes in detail how NREL successfully

  9. HILL: The High-Intensity Laser Laboratory Core Team's Reply to Questions from the NNSA Experimental Facilities Panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albright, B.J.

    2012-01-01

    Question 1 - The type of physics regimes that HILL can access for weapons studies is quite interesting. The question that arises for the proposal team is what priority does this type of experimental data have versus data that can be obtained with NIF, and Z. How does HILL rank in priority compared to MARIE 1.0 in terms of the experimental data it will provide? We reiterate that isochoric heating experiments to be conducted with HILL are complementary to the high energy density physics experiments at NIF and Z and uniquely access states of matter that neither other facility can access. It is our belief that HILL will enable several important questions, e.g., as related to mix morphology, radiation transfer from corrugated surfaces, and equations of state, to be run to ground through carefully diagnosed, 'unit-physics' experiments. Such experiments will substantially improve confidence in our computer models and provide a rigorous science basis for certification. Question 2 - A secondary question relates to the interests of LLNL and SNL in the physics that HILL can address. This should be spelled out clearly. I would like to see the other labs be part of the discussion regarding how important this capability would be if built. Both sister Labs have a keen interest in the physics enabled by high-intensity, high-energy lasers, as evinced by the Z Petawatt and NIF ARC upgrades to their signature facilities. LANL scientists have teamed with scientists from both Laboratories in high-intensity laser 'first experiments' envisioned for HILL and we fully intend to continue these profitable discussions going forward. In the preparation of the HILL proposal, feedback was solicited from the broader HEDP and weapons science communities. The consensus view was that HILL filled a critical gap and that there was a need for a facility like HILL to address outstanding questions in weapons science. It was recognized that co-location of HILL with a facility such as MaRIE 1.0, Z, NIF, or

  10. Analysis of the accident with the coolant discharge into the plasma vessel of the W7-X fusion experimental facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ušpuras, E.; Kaliatka, A.; Kaliatka, T., E-mail: tadas@mail.lei.lt

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: • The accident with water ingress into the plasma vessel in Wendelstein nuclear fusion device W7-X was analyzed. • The analysis of the processes in the plasma vessel and ventilation system was performed using thermal-hydraulic RELAP5 Mod3.3 code. • The suitability of pressure increase prevention system was assessed. • All analyses results will be used for the optimization of W7-X design and to ensure safe operation of this nuclear fusion device. -- Abstract: Fusion is the energy production technology, which could potentially solve problems with growing energy demand of population in the future. Starting 2007, Lithuanian Energy Institute (LEI) is a member of European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA) organization. LEI is cooperating with Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics (IPP, Germany) in the frames of EFDA project by performing safety analysis of fusion device W7-X. Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) is an experimental stellarator facility currently being built in Greifswald, Germany, which shall demonstrate that in the future energy could be produced in such type of fusion reactors. In this paper the safety analysis of 40 mm inner diameter coolant pipe rupture in cooling circuit and discharge of steam–water mixture through the leak into plasma vessel during the W7-X no-plasma “baking” operation mode is presented. For the analysis the model of W7-X cooling system (pumps, valves, pipes, hydro-accumulators, and heat exchangers) and plasma vessel was developed by employing system thermal-hydraulic state-of-the-art RELAP5 Mod3.3 code. This paper demonstrated that the developed RELAP5 model enables to analyze the processes in divertor cooling system and plasma vessel. The results of analysis demonstrated that the proposed burst disc, connecting the plasma vessel with venting system, opens and pressure inside plasma vessel does not exceed the limiting 1.1 × 10{sup 5} Pa absolute pressure. Thus, the plasma vessel remains intact after loss

  11. Soil and river sediments radionuclides monitoring at Aramar Experimental Center: an historical overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segre, Nadia; Fagundes, Rosane Correa, E-mail: nadia.segre@ctmsp.mar.mil.br [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha (CTM-SP/CEA/LARE), Ipero, SP (Brazil). Centro Experimental Aramar. Lab. Radioecologico; Moraes, Marco Antonio P.V. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    In order to evaluate possible effects to the environment resulting from the implementation of the Centro Tecnologico da Marinha - Centro Experimental Aramar (CTMSP-CEA) at Ipero in Sao Paulo state, Brazil, which came into operation in 1989, an Environmental Monitoring Program (PMA) was established in October, 1987. One of the aims of this program is to monitor the soil and river sediments radionuclides levels at CEA and beyond its boundary. The utilization of statistical tools to evaluate the results of radiometric environmental monitoring is a procedure required by National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN). The box plot is a simple statistical tool for displaying data. The central tendency and dispersion of the results as well as the observation of unusual results (outliers) in the dataset are easily visualized. Control chart is a graph that maps data and provides a picture of how a process is performing over time. A control chart always has a central line for the mean, an upper line for the upper control limit and a lower line for the lower control limit. Box plots and control charts were used to visualize the annual amount of natural uranium, lead-214, actinium-228 and lead-212 in soil and river sediment detected between 1987 and 2011, considering the measurements of all monitored places each year. This historical observation shows that, in average, the results obtained are below than the 1987-1988 levels (CEA's pre-operational) or below than the backgrounds radionuclides values. (author)

  12. Soil and river sediments radionuclides monitoring at Aramar Experimental Center: an historical overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segre, Nadia; Fagundes, Rosane Correa

    2013-01-01

    In order to evaluate possible effects to the environment resulting from the implementation of the Centro Tecnologico da Marinha - Centro Experimental Aramar (CTMSP-CEA) at Ipero in Sao Paulo state, Brazil, which came into operation in 1989, an Environmental Monitoring Program (PMA) was established in October, 1987. One of the aims of this program is to monitor the soil and river sediments radionuclides levels at CEA and beyond its boundary. The utilization of statistical tools to evaluate the results of radiometric environmental monitoring is a procedure required by National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN). The box plot is a simple statistical tool for displaying data. The central tendency and dispersion of the results as well as the observation of unusual results (outliers) in the dataset are easily visualized. Control chart is a graph that maps data and provides a picture of how a process is performing over time. A control chart always has a central line for the mean, an upper line for the upper control limit and a lower line for the lower control limit. Box plots and control charts were used to visualize the annual amount of natural uranium, lead-214, actinium-228 and lead-212 in soil and river sediment detected between 1987 and 2011, considering the measurements of all monitored places each year. This historical observation shows that, in average, the results obtained are below than the 1987-1988 levels (CEA's pre-operational) or below than the backgrounds radionuclides values. (author)

  13. Research on the improvement of nuclear safety -A study on the establishment of severe accident experimental facility-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Kune Yull; Ryu, Keon Joong; Park, Chang Kyu; Sim, Seok Ku; Kim, Sang Baek; Nho, Ki Mann; Bang, Kwang Hyun; Park, Rae Jun; Lee, Seong Jae; Kang, Kyung Ho; Jo, Young Ro; Hong, Sung Wan; Jeong, Moon Ki; Park, Chun Kyung; Cheon, Se Young; Kim, In Sik; Moon, Sang Ki; Kim, Jong Hwan; Kim, Seong Ho; Sin, Ki Yeol; Cho, Jae Sun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    For the first phase (1992-1995) of the current research program under nuclear reactor safety enhancement project, the primary objective was placed on the development of an improved cavity design and on the improvement of theoretical models of the separate effects for major severe accident phenomena occurring in the reactor cavity. Also, during the fourth year of this project, small-scale experiments were performed to visualize the fundamental phenomena of boiling in narrow spaces that may exist between the debris crust and the reactor vessel lower head in preparation for the large-scale in-vessel cooling experiment planned for the second phase of the project (1996-2001). Separate effect tests have been performed during the first phase spanning the high pressure melt ejection (HPME) resulting in the direct containment heating (DCH), crust formation during cooling of the high temperature melt, fuel coolant interaction (FCI) in the process of injecting coolant onto the reactor cavity, and the molten core concrete interaction (MCCI). Some research programs were subcontracted with universities. Steam condensation on the containment inner wall was investigated by the POSTECH, while the experimental technique for the simultaneous measurement of particle size and velocity was developed by the KAIST. The second phase experimental projects center about the in-vessel accident management tests SONATA-IV (Simulation of Naturally Arrested Thermal Attack in Vessel) and ex-vessel accident management tests TOCATA-XV (Tests on Cavity Arrested Thermal Attack ex Vessel). In preparation for the second phase in-vessel experimental program, one of our research staff has participated in the PHEBUS-FP program in CEA Cadarache, France. Small-scale scoping tests were performed for the study of in-vessel cooling of debris in the lower head. (Abstract Truncated)

  14. Assessment Of Market Facilities And Locational Effects On Adjoining Neighborhoods In Nigerian Urban Centers Empirical Evidence From Akure Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeyinka S. A.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available There is the need for people to buy and sell and transact their businesses in a way that life can go on normally. This study examined the markets facilities level and locational effects on adjoining neighbourhoods in Akure Township. Both primary and secondary data types were employed in the study primary data were collected through the administration of questionnaire on traders and patronsbuyers in the markets and residents of adjoining neighbourhoods and personal observation. Secondary data were collected from government publications. Data collected were analysed using descriptive statistical methods which included frequency counts and Likerts scale to analyse the satisfaction of traders and patrons on the facilities in the markets and severity of locational effects on residents of adjoining neighbourhoods. Findings from the study showed that facilities such as parking spaces fire extinguishers circulation spaces within the markets trading spaces safe area for children perimeter fencing and loading and off-loading bay were inadequately provided. While on-street display of goods traffic congestion air pollution on-street parking due to inadequate parking spaces were the severely perceived locational effects. The study concluded that facilities in the markets were inadequate and that markets constitute nuisances to the adjoining areas. It hereby recommends that markets in the study area be provided with the required level of facilities to prevent future urban problems.

  15. Experimental Fabrication Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Provides aviation fabrication support to special operations aircraft residing at Fort Eustis and other bases in the United States. Support is also provided to AATD...

  16. Upgrade of general control system employed for Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility of J-PARC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Akihiko; Sakai, Kenji; Ooi, Motoki; Meigo, Shin-ichiro; Takada, Hiroshi

    2013-11-01

    The General Control System (GCS) of the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility (MLF) of J-PARC controls various devices of a pulsed spallation neutron source and a muon target which are driven by proton beams with energy of 3 GeV and a power of 1 MW, neutron instruments of 23 neutron beam lines and muon instruments of 4 secondary muon beam lines under a network of the control system of accelerators. The current GCS has performed its function as designed since operating MLF was started in 2008. However, it has a weakness that it costs very much in the maintenance because of its poor flexibility on Operating System (OS) and software versions. For example, all computers composed of the GCS must be replaced when the OS is upgraded. For improving the potential flexibility of the GCS in maintenance in view of sustainable long-term operation, therefore, we have re-examined the framework software and those employed for individual functions of GCS under the condition of current functions so as to control all local control panels by plural exclusive PCs, and acquire, store and distribute operation data over 7000 items in the suitable data format. Furthermore, we have made a prototype of an upgraded GCS and evaluated its concrete performances with true data/information such as data transmission speed from PLCs, control functions from operating windows, storage capability of data server and long-term stability/reliability of the system. In conclusion, we decided to adopt following softwares for the upgraded GCS: Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) as framework software, Takebishi-made OPC server as data input/output module, Control System Studio (CSS) as user interface window and PostgreSQL as the data storage server. (author)

  17. [STRATEGY OF USE AND MAINTENANCE OF CLINICAL HOSPITAL CENTER RIJEKA IN ACCORDANCE WITH KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS FOR STRATEGIC HEALTHCARE FACILITIES MAINTENANCE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjekavica, Mariela; Haller, Herman; Cerić, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Building usage is the phase in the building life cycle that is most time-consuming, most functional, most significant due to building purpose and often systematically ignored. Maintenance is the set of activities that ensure the planned duration of facility exploitation phase in accordance with the requirements for quality maintenance of a large number of important building features as well as other elements immanent to the nature of facilities' life. The aim of the study is to show the analysis of the current state of organized, planned and comprehensive managerial approach in hospital utilization and maintenance in the Republic of Croatia, given on the case study of Clinical hospital center in Rijeka. The methodology used consists of relevant literature section of theory of facility utilization, maintenance and management in general, hospital buildings especially, display of practice on case study, and comparison of key performance indicators values obtained through interview with those that author Igal M. Shohet defined in his study by field surveys and statistical analyses. Despite many positive indicators of Clinical hospital center Rijeka maintenance, an additional research is needed in order to define a more complete national hospital maintenance strategy.

  18. Practices And Opinions On In-Center Food Consumption Across 1,223 Facilities In The United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Benner

    2012-06-01

    The top reasons for facility practices that allowed eating during dialysis were: prevention of hypoglycemia on dialysis, improved kcal intake on dialysis days, and the opportunity to provide counseling on food products currently chosen by the patient. The top reasons for facility practices not permitting eating during dialysis included: potential adverse events associated with hypotension, GI symptoms, choking, infection, pest control, and spills. Further analyses are warranted to determine whether there is a correlation between allowing patients to eat during dialysis treatment and an improvement in the nutritional status of the patients.

  19. Historical records of the electric power and cooling water systems for the experimental facilities in the I.P.P. (1964-1983)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitajima, Miyoshi.

    1984-01-01

    Twenty years have passed, since experimental studies began in the IPP. This is a status report on the electric power and cooling water systems in this Institute. Historical records on consumption of the electric power and cooling water for experimental facilities are summarized, also. Valuable stories obtained through operation, control and periodic inspection of these systems are described, which will be helpful for construction of new systems in future. Finally problems on safety, reliability, and economy are commented. (author)

  20. Outpatient and Ambulatory Surgery Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (OAS CAHPS) survey for ambulatory surgical centers - Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of ambulatory surgical center ratings for the Outpatient and Ambulatory Surgery Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (OAS CAHPS) survey....

  1. Experimental facilities for calibrations at the dosimetry facility of group 6.5 'Neutron dosimetry' at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strzelczyk, H.

    1986-07-01

    The mechanical and electrical layout of the ''Dosimetriemessplatz'', a low scattering target area at the accelerator facility is described. Monoenergetic neutrons are generated at the irradiation facility for the research on neutron detectors and dosimeters for radiation protection. The report is aimed to inform dosimetry in particular for those guest's coming from other laboratories. For that purpose a detailed description is given of the mechanical construction, of cable connections and of the monitor system. The feasibitity of data transfer from the system at the target position to the user's system and the mode of acceptance of external data are explained. (orig./HP) [de

  2. Construction and operation of a 10 MeV electron accelerator and associated experimental facilities at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York. Environmental assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of this environmental impact statement is to determine whether there would be significant environmental impacts associated with the construction of an experimental facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory for radiation chemistry research and operation of the 10-MeV electron accelerator proposed for it. The document describes the need for action, alternative actions, the affected environment, and potential environmental impacts

  3. Composting system for waste treatment coca leaf with the addition of three biological activators in the Experimental Center Kallutaca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apaza-Condori Emma Eva

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the composting process waste coca leaf with the addition of three biological activators (yogurt, whey and yeast. This work was carried out Kallutaca Experimental Center, Biofertilizers module Career Agricultural Engineering at the Public University of El Alto, La Paz municipality of Laja. Posed treatments were: T1 (+ Yogurt Coca wastes; T2 (Coca wastes + whey; T3 (Coca wastes + yeast and T4 (Control. The design was completely randomized with 4 treatments and 3 repetitions. The values in N are classified medium and high levels the quantities of P, K are classified as middle levels. The value obtained 7.9 pH, EC 12950 µS/cm and 61% organic matter belong to treatment T1. The decomposition time was a period of 105 days corresponds to treatment T3.

  4. Experimental study of Rayleigh scattering with a ruby laser beam: relative variation of scattered light with the number of scattering center and the gases nature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayer, Charles

    1973-06-01

    The experimental variation of the scattered light with the number of scattering centers and with the refraction index of gases is in agreement with the theoretical Rayleigh scattering. A direct calibration System gives the absolute value of the Rayleigh ratio. The experimental value appears to be half of the theoretical one. (author) [fr

  5. Contingent post-closure plan, hazardous waste management units at selected maintenance facilities, US Army National Training Center, Fort Irwin, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The National Training Center (NTC) at Fort Irwin, California, is a US Army training installation that provides tactical experience for battalion/task forces and squadrons in a mid- to high-intensity combat scenario. Through joint exercises with US Air Force and other services, the NTC also provides a data source for improvements of training doctrines, organization, and equipment. To meet the training and operational needs of the NTC, several maintenance facilities provide general and direct support for mechanical devices, equipment, and vehicles. Maintenance products used at these facilities include fuels, petroleum-based oils, lubricating grease, various degreasing solvents, antifreeze (ethylene glycol), transmission fluid, brake fluid, and hydraulic oil. Used or spent petroleum-based products generated at the maintenance facilities are temporarily accumulated in underground storage tanks (USTs), collected by the NTC hazardous waste management contractor (HAZCO), and stored at the Petroleum, Oil, and Lubricant (POL) Storage Facility, Building 630, until shipped off site to be recovered, reused, and/or reclaimed. Spent degreasing solvents and other hazardous wastes are containerized and stored on-base for up to 90 days at the NTC's Hazardous Waste Storage Facility, Building 703. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) performed an inspection and reviewed the hazardous waste management operations of the NTC. Inspections indicated that the NTC had violated one or more requirements of Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and as a result of these violations was issued a Notice of Noncompliance, Notice of Necessity for Conference, and Proposed Compliance Schedule (NON) dated October 13, 1989. The following post-closure plan is the compliance-based approach for the NTC to respond to the regulatory violations cited in the NON

  6. Mini-channel flow experiments and CFD validation analyses with the IFMIF Thermo- Hydraulic Experimental facility (ITHEX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbeiter, F.; Heinzel, V.; Leichtle, D.; Stratmanns, E.; Gordeev, S.

    2006-01-01

    The design of the IFMIF High Flux Test Module (HFTM) is based on the predictions for the heat transfer in narrow channels conducting helium flow of 50 o C inlet temperature at 0.3 MPa. The emerging helium flow conditions are in the transition regime of laminar to turbulent flow. The rectangular cooling channels are too short for the full development of the coolant flow. Relaminarization along the cooling passage is expected. At the shorter sides of the channels secondary flow occurs, which may have an impact on the temperature field inside the irradiation specimen's stack. As those conditions are not covered by available experimental data, the dedicated gas loop ITHEX has been constructed to operate up to a pressure of 0.42 MPa and temperatures of 200 o C. It's objective is to conduct experiments for the validation of the STAR-CD CFD code used for the design of the HFTM. As a first stage, two annular test-sections with hydraulic diameter of 1.2 mm have been used, where the experiments have been varied with respect to gas species (N 2 , He), inlet pressure, dimensionless heating span and Reynolds number encompassing the range of operational parameters of the HFTM. Local friction factors and Nusselt numbers have been obtained giving evidence that the transition regime will extend to Reynolds 10,000. For heating rates comparable to the HFTM filled with RAFM steels, local heat transfer coefficients are in consistence with the measured friction data. To validate local velocity profiles the ITHEX facility was further equipped with a flat rectangular test-section and a Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) system. An appropriate optical system has been developed and tested for the tiny observation volume of 40 μm diameter. Velocity profiles as induced by the transition of a wide inlet plenum to the flat mini-channels have been measured. Whereas the CFD models were able to reproduce the patterns far away from the nozzle, they show some disagreement for the conditions at the

  7. Test of the core design methods for the THTR 300 with experimental results from the critical facility KAHTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, K.; Huebner, A.; Brandes, S.; Krings, F.

    1974-10-15

    At the Kernforschungsanlage Juelich, core physics experiments with core 1 and core 2 of the critical facility for high temperature reactors KAHTER were carried out in 1973. Core 2 corresponds to the THTR initial core in its moderation ratio S = 7500. Selected experimental results on the critical mass, on control rod worths, and reaction rate distributions were used for testing the most important procedures for the THTR core physics design. The zero-dimensional spectrum program MUPO with its cross section library and the and neutron flux calculations in two-dimensional diffusion approximation by CRAM are of central importance. It proved to be important to introduce modifications specific to the KAHTER plant into the standard models. Thus the void effect (void above the pebble bed) was investigated with DOT-2 by transport theory and a correction was introduced for the critical masses calculated by diffusion theory. Another feature already contained in the standard procedure, the increase of the diffusion constants for the hollow spaces between the spheres, results in a correction of 3.8% < delta-k for KAHTER, whereas in the THTR 300 it only amounts to several tenths % delta-k. Critical masses are predicted with accuracies of < 1.5 % or with regard to reactivity < 0.65 % delta-k. The calculated values for the radial neutron flux distributions deviate from the measured values in the core area by approximately lo %. In the case of the axial profiles, deviations are observed at the pebble bed surface which can be explained by the upper void, which cannot be satisfactorily represented by the diffusion theory. Control rod worths are predicted quite well, i.e., to within +/- 5%. An exception is the bank of 4 reflector rods, where the applied model of the "grey curtain" is not accurate because of the large distances between rods. The calculated control rod worths for that case were found to be too low, which does, however, not result in a safety problem.

  8. Current construction status of Korea Wolsong Nuclear Environment Management Center (low and intermediate level radioactive waste disposal facility)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Yasuo

    2010-01-01

    Through the RANDEC delegation tour to Korea in Nov. 2009, we have earned new information on recent development of the radioactive waste management in Korea. In this report, we will introduce such development in Korea, focusing on the current construction status of Korean LILW (low and intermediate level radioactive waste) disposal site, now called, Wolsong Nuclear Environment Management Center. (author)

  9. The effects of small-scale, homelike facilities for older people with dementia on residents, family caregivers and staff: design of a longitudinal, quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeek, Hilde; van Rossum, Erik; Zwakhalen, Sandra M G; Ambergen, Ton; Kempen, Gertrudis I J M; Hamers, Jan P H

    2009-01-20

    Small-scale and homelike facilities for older people with dementia are rising in current dementia care. In these facilities, a small number of residents live together and form a household with staff. Normal, daily life and social participation are emphasized. It is expected that these facilities improve residents' quality of life. Moreover, it may have a positive influence on staff's job satisfaction and families involvement and satisfaction with care. However, effects of these small-scale and homelike facilities have hardly been investigated. Since the number of people with dementia increases, and institutional long-term care is more and more organized in small-scale and homelike facilities, more research into effects is necessary. This paper presents the design of a study investigating effects of small-scale living facilities in the Netherlands on residents, family caregivers and nursing staff. A longitudinal, quasi-experimental study is carried out, in which 2 dementia care settings are compared: small-scale living facilities and regular psychogeriatric wards in traditional nursing homes. Data is collected from residents, their family caregivers and nursing staff at baseline and after 6 and 12 months of follow-up. Approximately 2 weeks prior to baseline measurement, residents are screened on cognition and activities of daily living (ADL). Based on this screening profile, residents in psychogeriatric wards are matched to residents living in small-scale living facilities. The primary outcome measure for residents is quality of life. In addition, neuropsychiatric symptoms, depressive symptoms and social engagement are assessed. Involvement with care, perceived burden and satisfaction with care provision are primary outcome variables for family caregivers. The primary outcomes for nursing staff are job satisfaction and motivation. Furthermore, job characteristics social support, autonomy and workload are measured. A process evaluation is performed to investigate to

  10. Solving multi-objective facility location problem using the fuzzy analytical hierarchy process and goal programming: a case study on infectious waste disposal centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narong Wichapa

    Full Text Available The selection of a suitable location for infectious waste disposal is one of the major problems in waste management. Determining the location of infectious waste disposal centers is a difficult and complex process because it requires combining social and environmental factors that are hard to interpret, and cost factors that require the allocation of resources. Additionally, it depends on several regulations. Based on the actual conditions of a case study, forty hospitals and three candidate municipalities in the sub-Northeast region of Thailand, we considered multiple factors such as infrastructure, geological and social & environmental factors, calculating global priority weights using the fuzzy analytical hierarchy process (FAHP. After that, a new multi-objective facility location problem model which combines FAHP and goal programming (GP, namely the FAHP-GP model, was tested. The proposed model can lead to selecting new suitable locations for infectious waste disposal by considering both total cost and final priority weight objectives. The novelty of the proposed model is the simultaneous combination of relevant factors that are difficult to interpret and cost factors, which require the allocation of resources. Keywords: Multi-objective facility location problem, Fuzzy analytic hierarchy process, Infectious waste disposal centers

  11. The ORION Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noble, Robert

    2003-01-01

    ORION will be a user-oriented research facility for understanding the physics and developing the technology for future high-energy particle accelerators, as well as for research in related fields. The facility has as its centerpiece the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The NLCTA will be modified with the addition of a new, high-brightness photoinjector, its drive laser, an S-band rf power system, a user laser room, a low-energy experimental hall supplied with electron beams up to 60 MeV in energy, and a high-energy hall supplied with beams up to 350 MeV. The facility design and parameters are described here along with highlights from the 2nd ORION Workshop held in February 2003

  12. Pittsburgh City Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Pittsburgh City FacilitiesIncludes: City Administrative Buildings, Police Stations, Fire Stations, EMS Stations, DPW Sites, Senior Centers, Recreation Centers, Pool...

  13. Status report on sample preparation facilities for {sup 14}C analysis at the new CologneAMS center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rethemeyer, J., E-mail: janet.rethemeyer@uni-koeln.de [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, University of Cologne, 50674 Cologne (Germany); Fueloep, R.-H.; Hoefle, S. [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, University of Cologne, 50674 Cologne (Germany); Wacker, L. [Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zuerich, 8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Heinze, S. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, University of Cologne, 50674 Cologne (Germany); Hajdas, I. [Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zuerich, 8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Patt, U.; Koenig, S.; Stapper, B. [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, University of Cologne, 50674 Cologne (Germany); Dewald, A. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, University of Cologne, 50674 Cologne (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    The new AMS facility at University of Cologne (CologneAMS), Germany, was established in 2010 with the delivery of the HVE 6 MV Tandetron AMS, which will be used for {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 41}Ca, {sup 129}I, {sup 239}U and {sup 244}Pu analyses. Parallel to the AMS installation the radiocarbon group has started to set up and test sample preparation methods and instruments for different materials. We present first results of reference and standard materials that have been processed and graphitized in our lab and measured at the ETH and CologneAMS facilities. The graphitization blank and its influence on small samples sizes processed with an automated graphitization system have been determined. Work on isolation of individual organic compounds with a preparative gas chromatography system has been started. The focus of our future work will be on reducing process blank levels and sample sizes as well as on the application of compound-specific radiocarbon analyses in (paleo-) environmental research.

  14. Status report on sample preparation facilities for 14C analysis at the new CologneAMS center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rethemeyer, J.; Fülöp, R.-H.; Höfle, S.; Wacker, L.; Heinze, S.; Hajdas, I.; Patt, U.; König, S.; Stapper, B.; Dewald, A.

    2013-01-01

    The new AMS facility at University of Cologne (CologneAMS), Germany, was established in 2010 with the delivery of the HVE 6 MV Tandetron AMS, which will be used for 14 C, 26 Al, 36 Cl, 41 Ca, 129 I, 239 U and 244 Pu analyses. Parallel to the AMS installation the radiocarbon group has started to set up and test sample preparation methods and instruments for different materials. We present first results of reference and standard materials that have been processed and graphitized in our lab and measured at the ETH and CologneAMS facilities. The graphitization blank and its influence on small samples sizes processed with an automated graphitization system have been determined. Work on isolation of individual organic compounds with a preparative gas chromatography system has been started. The focus of our future work will be on reducing process blank levels and sample sizes as well as on the application of compound-specific radiocarbon analyses in (paleo-) environmental research.

  15. Theory-Informed Interventions to Improve the Quality of Tuberculosis Evaluation at Ugandan Health Centers: A Quasi-Experimental Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lelia H Chaisson

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB remains under-diagnosed in many countries, in part due to poor evaluation practices at health facilities. Theory-informed strategies are needed to improve implementation of TB evaluation guidelines. We aimed to evaluate the impact of performance feedback and same-day smear microscopy on the quality of TB evaluation at 6 health centers in rural Uganda.We tested components of a multi-faceted intervention to improve adherence to the International Standards for Tuberculosis Care (ISTC: performance feedback and same-day smear microscopy. The strategies were selected based on a qualitative assessment guided by the Theory of Planned Behavior and the PRECEDE model. We collected patient data 6 months before and after the introduction of each intervention component, and compared ISTC adherence in the pre- and post-intervention periods for adults with cough ≥ 2 weeks' duration.The performance feedback evaluation included 1,446 adults; 838 (58% were evaluated during the pre-intervention period and 608 (42% during the post-intervention period. Performance feedback resulted in a 15% (95%CI +10% to +20%, p<0.001 increase in the proportion of patients receiving ISTC-adherent care. The same-day microscopy evaluation included 1,950 adults; 907 (47% were evaluated during the pre-intervention period and 1,043 (53% during the post-intervention period. Same-day microscopy was associated with a 14% (95%CI +10% to +18%, p<0.001 increase in the proportion of patients receiving ISTC-adherent care.Performance feedback and same-day microscopy should be considered along with ISTC training as part of a multi-faceted intervention to improve the quality of TB evaluation in other high TB burden countries.

  16. Theory-Informed Interventions to Improve the Quality of Tuberculosis Evaluation at Ugandan Health Centers: A Quasi-Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaisson, Lelia H; Katamba, Achilles; Haguma, Priscilla; Ochom, Emmanuel; Ayakaka, Irene; Mugabe, Frank; Miller, Cecily; Vittinghoff, Eric; Davis, J Lucian; Handley, Margaret A; Cattamanchi, Adithya

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains under-diagnosed in many countries, in part due to poor evaluation practices at health facilities. Theory-informed strategies are needed to improve implementation of TB evaluation guidelines. We aimed to evaluate the impact of performance feedback and same-day smear microscopy on the quality of TB evaluation at 6 health centers in rural Uganda. We tested components of a multi-faceted intervention to improve adherence to the International Standards for Tuberculosis Care (ISTC): performance feedback and same-day smear microscopy. The strategies were selected based on a qualitative assessment guided by the Theory of Planned Behavior and the PRECEDE model. We collected patient data 6 months before and after the introduction of each intervention component, and compared ISTC adherence in the pre- and post-intervention periods for adults with cough ≥ 2 weeks' duration. The performance feedback evaluation included 1,446 adults; 838 (58%) were evaluated during the pre-intervention period and 608 (42%) during the post-intervention period. Performance feedback resulted in a 15% (95%CI +10% to +20%, pISTC-adherent care. The same-day microscopy evaluation included 1,950 adults; 907 (47%) were evaluated during the pre-intervention period and 1,043 (53%) during the post-intervention period. Same-day microscopy was associated with a 14% (95%CI +10% to +18%, pISTC-adherent care. Performance feedback and same-day microscopy should be considered along with ISTC training as part of a multi-faceted intervention to improve the quality of TB evaluation in other high TB burden countries.

  17. Experimental characterization of the Advanced Liquid Hydrogen Cold Neutron Source spectrum of the NBSR reactor at the NIST Center for Neutron Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, J.C.; Barker, J.G.; Rowe, J.M.; Williams, R.E. [NIST Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Mail Stop 6100, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-6100 (United States); Gagnon, C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Lindstrom, R.M. [Scientist Emeritus, Chemical Sciences Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Mail Stop 8395, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8395 (United States); Ibberson, R.M.; Neumann, D.A. [NIST Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Mail Stop 6100, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-6100 (United States)

    2015-08-21

    The recent expansion of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Center for Neutron Research facility has offered a rare opportunity to perform an accurate measurement of the cold neutron spectrum at the exit of a newly-installed neutron guide. Using a combination of a neutron time-of-flight measurement, a gold foil activation measurement, and Monte Carlo simulation of the neutron guide transmission, we obtain the most reliable experimental characterization of the Advanced Liquid Hydrogen Cold Neutron Source brightness to date. Time-of-flight measurements were performed at three distinct fuel burnup intervals, including one immediately following reactor startup. Prior to the latter measurement, the hydrogen was maintained in a liquefied state for an extended period in an attempt to observe an initial radiation-induced increase of the ortho (o)-hydrogen fraction. Since para (p)-hydrogen has a small scattering cross-section for neutron energies below 15 meV (neutron wavelengths greater than about 2.3 Å), changes in the o- p hydrogen ratio and in the void distribution in the boiling hydrogen influence the spectral distribution. The nature of such changes is simulated with a continuous-energy, Monte Carlo radiation-transport code using 20 K o and p hydrogen scattering kernels and an estimated hydrogen density distribution derived from an analysis of localized heat loads. A comparison of the transport calculations with the mean brightness function resulting from the three measurements suggests an overall o- p ratio of about 17.5(±1) % o- 82.5% p for neutron energies<15 meV, a significantly lower ortho concentration than previously assumed.

  18. Experimental characterization of the Advanced Liquid Hydrogen Cold Neutron Source spectrum of the NBSR reactor at the NIST Center for Neutron Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, J. C.; Barker, J. G.; Rowe, J. M.; Williams, R. E.; Gagnon, C.; Lindstrom, R. M.; Ibberson, R. M.; Neumann, D. A.

    2015-08-01

    The recent expansion of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Center for Neutron Research facility has offered a rare opportunity to perform an accurate measurement of the cold neutron spectrum at the exit of a newly-installed neutron guide. Using a combination of a neutron time-of-flight measurement, a gold foil activation measurement, and Monte Carlo simulation of the neutron guide transmission, we obtain the most reliable experimental characterization of the Advanced Liquid Hydrogen Cold Neutron Source brightness to date. Time-of-flight measurements were performed at three distinct fuel burnup intervals, including one immediately following reactor startup. Prior to the latter measurement, the hydrogen was maintained in a liquefied state for an extended period in an attempt to observe an initial radiation-induced increase of the ortho (o)-hydrogen fraction. Since para (p)-hydrogen has a small scattering cross-section for neutron energies below 15 meV (neutron wavelengths greater than about 2.3 Å), changes in the o- p hydrogen ratio and in the void distribution in the boiling hydrogen influence the spectral distribution. The nature of such changes is simulated with a continuous-energy, Monte Carlo radiation-transport code using 20 K o and p hydrogen scattering kernels and an estimated hydrogen density distribution derived from an analysis of localized heat loads. A comparison of the transport calculations with the mean brightness function resulting from the three measurements suggests an overall o- p ratio of about 17.5(±1) % o- 82.5% p for neutron energies<15 meV, a significantly lower ortho concentration than previously assumed.

  19. Meson facility. Powerful new research tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobashev, V.M.; Tavkhelidze, A.N.

    A meson facility is being built at the Institute of Nuclear Research, USSR Academy of Sciences, in Troitsk, where the Scientific Center, USSR Academy of Sciences is located. The facility will include a linear accelerator for protons and negative hydrogen ions with 600 MeV energy and 0.5-1 mA beam current. Some fundamental studies that can be studied at a meson facility are described in the areas of elementary particles, neutron physics, solid state physics, and applied research. The characteristics of the linear accelerator are given and the meson facility's experimental complex is described

  20. Active Living: development and quasi-experimental evaluation of a school-centered physical activity intervention for primary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Kann, Dave H H; Jansen, M W J; de Vries, S I; de Vries, N K; Kremers, S P J

    2015-12-29

    The worldwide increase in the rates of childhood overweight and physical inactivity requires successful prevention and intervention programs for children. The aim of the Active Living project is to increase physical activity and decrease sedentary behavior of Dutch primary school children by developing and implementing tailored, multicomponent interventions at and around schools. In this project, school-centered interventions have been developed at 10 schools in the south of the Netherlands, using a combined top-down and bottom-up approach in which a research unit and a practice unit continuously interact. The interventions consist of a combination of physical and social interventions tailored to local needs of intervention schools. The process and short- and long-term effectiveness of the interventions will be evaluated using a quasi-experimental study design in which 10 intervention schools are matched with 10 control schools. Baseline and follow-up measurements (after 12 and 24 months) have been conducted in grades 6 and 7 and included accelerometry, GPS, and questionnaires. Primary outcome of the Active Living study is the change in physical activity levels, i.e. sedentary behavior (SB), light physical activity (LPA), moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), and counts-per-minute (CPM). Multilevel regression analyses will be used to assess the effectiveness of isolated and combined physical and social interventions on children's PA levels. The current intervention study is unique in its combined approach of physical and social environmental PA interventions both at school(yard)s as well as in the local neighborhood around the schools. The strength of the study lies in the quasi-experimental design including objective measurement techniques, i.e. accelerometry and GPS, combined with more subjective techniques, i.e. questionnaires, implementation logbooks, and neighborhood observations. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN25497687 (registration date 21

  1. Geohydrologic conditions at the Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Plant and Waste-Management Facilities at the western New York Nuclear Service Center, Cattaraugus County, New York

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergeron, M.P.; Kappel, W.M.; Yager, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    A nuclear-fuel reprocessing plant, a high-level radioactive liquid-waste tank complex, and related waste facilities occupy 100 hectares (ha) within the Western New York Nuclear Service Center near West Valley, NY. The facilities are underlain by glacial and postglacial deposits that fill an ancestral bedrock valley. The main plant facilities are on an elevated plateau referred to as the north plateau. Groundwater on the north plateau moves laterally within a surficial sand and gravel from the main plant building to areas northeast, east, and southeast of the facilities. The sand and gravel ranges from 1 to 10 m thick and has a hydraulic conductivity ranging from 0.1 to 7.9 m/day. Two separate burial grounds, a 4-ha area for low-level radioactive waste disposal and a 2.9-ha area for disposal of higher-level waste are excavated into a clay-rich till that ranges from 22 to 28 m thick. Migration of an organic solvent from the area of higher level waste at shallow depth in the till suggests that a shallow, fractured, oxidized, and weathered till is a significant pathway for lateral movement of groundwater. Below this zone, groundwater moves vertically downward through the till to recharge a lacustrine silt and fine sand. Within the saturated parts of the lacustrine unit, groundwater moves laterally to the northeast toward Buttermilk Creek. Hydraulic conductivity of the till, based on field and laboratory analyses, ranges from 0.000018 to 0.000086 m/day

  2. Liquid Methane Conditioning Capabilities Developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center's Small Multi- Purpose Research Facility (SMiRF) for Accelerated Lunar Surface Storage Thermal Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamberger, Helmut H.; Robinson, R. Craig; Jurns, John M.; Grasl, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    Glenn Research Center s Creek Road Cryogenic Complex, Small Multi-Purpose Research Facility (SMiRF) recently completed validation / checkout testing of a new liquid methane delivery system and liquid methane (LCH4) conditioning system. Facility checkout validation was conducted in preparation for a series of passive thermal control technology tests planned at SMiRF in FY10 using a flight-like propellant tank at simulated thermal environments from 140 to 350K. These tests will validate models and provide high quality data to support consideration of LCH4/LO2 propellant combination option for a lunar or planetary ascent stage.An infrastructure has been put in place which will support testing of large amounts of liquid methane at SMiRF. Extensive modifications were made to the test facility s existing liquid hydrogen system for compatibility with liquid methane. Also, a new liquid methane fluid conditioning system will enable liquid methane to be quickly densified (sub-cooled below normal boiling point) and to be quickly reheated to saturation conditions between 92 and 140 K. Fluid temperatures can be quickly adjusted to compress the overall test duration. A detailed trade study was conducted to determine an appropriate technique to liquid conditioning with regard to the SMiRF facility s existing infrastructure. In addition, a completely new roadable dewar has been procured for transportation and temporary storage of liquid methane. A new spherical, flight-representative tank has also been fabricated for integration into the vacuum chamber at SMiRF. The addition of this system to SMiRF marks the first time a large-scale liquid methane propellant test capability has been realized at Glenn.This work supports the Cryogenic Fluid Management Project being conducted under the auspices of the Exploration Technology Development Program, providing focused cryogenic fluid management technology efforts to support NASA s future robotic or human exploration missions.

  3. Predesign of an experimental (5 to 10 MWt) disk MHD facility and prospects of commercial (1,000 MWt) MHD/steam systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-07-01

    Experimental disk MHD facilities are predesigned, and commercial-scale (1,000 MWt) MHD/steam systems are investigated. The predesigns of the disk MHD facilities indicate that enthalpy extraction is 8.7% for a 10 MWt open cycle MHD generator, and increases to 37% for a 5 MWt closed cycle MHD generator. Commercial (1,000 MWt) MHD/steam systems are studied for 4 types. Of these types, the open cycle disk MHD generator shows the lowest efficiency of 42.8%, while the closed cycle disk MHD generator the highest efficiency of 50.0%. The open cycle linear generator, although showing an efficiency of 49.4%, may be the lowest-cost type, when the necessary heat source, heat exchangers and the like are taken into consideration. For the design of superconducting magnet, it is necessary to further investigate whether the one for the test facility is applicable to the commercial systems. (NEDO)

  4. Proposal of experimental facilities for studies of nuclear data and radiation engineering in the Intense Proton Accelerator Project

    CERN Document Server

    Baba, M; Nagai, Y; Ishibashi, K

    2003-01-01

    A proposal is given on the facilities and experiments in the Intense Proton Accelerator Project (J-PARC) relevant to the nuclear data and radiation engineering, nuclear astrophysics, nuclear transmutation, accelerator technology and space technology and so on. (3 refs).

  5. Interactive radiopharmaceutical facility between Yale Medical Center and Brookhaven National Laboratory. Progress report, June 1981-July 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottschalk, A

    1982-01-01

    Progress is reported in the following research areas: (1) evaluation of /sup 14/C-labelled carboxyethyl ester 2-cardoxy methyl ester of arachidonic acid; (2) the effects of drug intervention on cardiac inflammatory response following experimental myocardial infarction using indium-111 labeled autologous leukoyctes; (3) the evaluation of /sup 97/Ru-oxine to label human platelets in autologous plasma; and (4) the specific in vitro radiolabeling of human neutrophils. (ACR)

  6. The experimental teaching reform in biochemistry and molecular biology for undergraduate students in Peking University Health Science Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaohan; Sun, Luyang; Zhao, Ying; Yi, Xia; Zhu, Bin; Wang, Pu; Lin, Hong; Ni, Juhua

    2015-01-01

    Since 2010, second-year undergraduate students of an eight-year training program leading to a Doctor of Medicine degree or Doctor of Philosophy degree in Peking University Health Science Center (PKUHSC) have been required to enter the "Innovative talent training project." During that time, the students joined a research lab and participated in some original research work. There is a critical educational need to prepare these students for the increasing accessibility of research experience. The redesigned experimental curriculum of biochemistry and molecular biology was developed to fulfill such a requirement, which keeps two original biochemistry experiments (Gel filtration and Enzyme kinetics) and adds a new two-experiment component called "Analysis of anti-tumor drug induced apoptosis." The additional component, also known as the "project-oriented experiment" or the "comprehensive experiment," consists of Western blotting and a DNA laddering assay to assess the effects of etoposide (VP16) on the apoptosis signaling pathways. This reformed laboratory teaching system aims to enhance the participating students overall understanding of important biological research techniques and the instrumentation involved, and to foster a better understanding of the research process all within a classroom setting. Student feedback indicated that the updated curriculum helped them improve their operational and self-learning capability, and helped to increase their understanding of theoretical knowledge and actual research processes, which laid the groundwork for their future research work. © 2015 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  7. Water spray interaction with air-steam mixtures under containment spray conditions: experimental study in the TOSQAN facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porcheron, E.; Lemaitre, P.; Malet, J.; Nuboer, A.; Brun, P.; Bouilloux, L.; Vendel, J. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Direction de la Surete des Usines, des laboratoires, des transports et des dechets, Saclay, BP 68 - 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: During the course of an hypothetical severe accident in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR), hydrogen can be produced by the reactor core oxidation and distributed into the reactor containment according to convection flows and steam wall condensation. In order to assess the risk of detonation generated by a high local hydrogen concentration, hydrogen distribution in the containment has to be known. The TOSQAN experimental program has been created to simulate typical accidental thermal hydraulic flow conditions in the reactor containment. The present work is devoted to study the interaction of a water spray injection used as a mitigation mean in order to reduce containment pressure and to produce a mixing of air, steam and hydrogen induced by spray entrainment and condensation on droplet. In order to have a better understanding of physical phenomena, we need to make a detailed characterization of the spray and the gas. The TOSQAN facility that is highly instrumented with non-intrusive diagnostics consists in a closed cylindrical vessel (7 m{sup 3} volume, 4 m high, 1.5 m i.d.) into which steam is injected. Water droplets size is measured in the vessel by the Interferometric Laser Imaging for Droplet Sizing technique. Droplet velocity is obtained by Particle Image Velocimetry and Laser Doppler Velocimetry, and droplet temperature is measured by global rainbow refractometry. Gas concentration measurements are performed by Spontaneous Raman Scattering. The walls of the vessel are thermostatically controlled by heated oil circulation. Inner spray system that is located on the top of the enclosure on the vertical axis, is composed of a single nozzle producing a full cone water spray. Spray test scenario consists of water spray injection in TOSQAN that is first pressurized with a steam injection (steam injection is stopped before spray injection). Water spray falling into the sump is removed to avoid accumulation and evaporation

  8. Measurement of the radon concentration in an underground public facility and dose assessment. Fukuoka Tenjin Shopping Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narazaki, Yukinori; Tokonami, Shinji; Sanada, Tetsuya; Kanno, Nobuyuki; Yamada, Yuji

    2000-01-01

    Radon concentrations were measured with a passive radon detector from April 1998 through June 1999 in the Fukuoka Tenjin Underground Shopping Center to assess the dose affecting workers because of radon progeny inhalation. The radon concentration during the period was distributed from a range of 1.9 to 13.6 Bq/m 3 . The arithmetic average concentration was estimated to be 6.9±2.4 Bq/ 3 . The radon level was lower than that in dwellings in Japan and other countries. No spatial distribution of radon concentration was found in that area. From continuous measurement, the radon concentration was found to be high from midnight to noon and low in the afternoon. Little difference was noted between the daily average radon concentration and that during working hours. There was no seasonal variation. The equilibrium factor of 0.21±0.10 was obtained during working hours. The activity-weighted size distribution of radon progeny was evaluated by using the number distribution of ambient aerosols and the classical attachment theory. Consequently, the activity median diameter was 150 nm. The unattached fraction of radon progeny was estimated to be 0.025 with an empirical equation. The annual effective dose of workers at the Tenjin center was calculated with the dose conversion factor from the UNSCEAR 1993 report and estimated to be 0.024 mSv/y. (author)

  9. The Effect of Dining Room Physical Environmental Renovations on Person-Centered Care Practice and Residents' Dining Experiences in Long-Term Care Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Lillian; Chaudhury, Habib; Rust, Tiana

    2016-12-01

    This qualitative study evaluated the effect of dining room physical environmental changes on staff practices and residents' mealtime experiences in two units of a long-term care facility in Edmonton, Canada. Focus groups with staff (n = 12) and individual interviews with unit managers (n = 2) were conducted. We also developed and used the Dining Environment Assessment Protocol (DEAP) to conduct a systematic physical environmental evaluation of the dining rooms. Four themes emerged on the key influences of the renovations: (a) supporting independence and autonomy, (b) creating familiarity and enjoyment, (c) providing a place for social experience, and (d) challenges in supporting change. Feedback from the staff and managers provided evidence on the importance of physical environmental features, as well as the integral nature of the role of the physical environment and organizational support to provide person-centered care for residents. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Intensive archaeological survey of the proposed Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Conference Center and Educational Facility, Savannah River Site, Aiken County, South Carolina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephenson, K.; Crass, D.C.; Sassaman, K.E.

    1993-02-01

    Documented in this report are the methods and results of an intensive archaeological survey for the proposed University of Georgia Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) Conference Center and Educational Facility on the DOE Savannah River Site (SRS). Archaeological investigations conducted by the Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP) on the 70-acre project area and associated rights-of-way consisted of subsurface testing at two previously recorded sites and the discovery of one previously unrecorded site. The results show that 2 sites contain archaeological remains that may yield significant information about human occupations in the Aiken Plateau and are therefore considered eligible for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places. Adverse impacts to these sites can be mitigated through avoidance.

  11. U.S.– India Joint Center for Building Energy Research and Development (CBERD) Caring for the Energy Health of Healthcare Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Reshma [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Mathew, Paul [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Granderson, Jessica [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Srivastava, Rohini [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Shukla, Rash [Center for Environmental Planning and Technology (India)

    2016-03-01

    The U.S.-India Joint Center for Building Energy Research & Development (CBERD), created through the Partnership to Accelerate Clean Energy (PACE) agreement between the United States and India, is a research and development (R&D) center with over 30 institutional and industry partners from both nations. This five-year presidential initiative is jointly funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the Government of India. CBERD aims to build upon a foundation of collaborative knowledge, tools, and technologies, and human capabilities that will increase development of high-performance buildings. To reach this goal, the R&D focuses on energy use reduction throughout the entire life cycle of buildings—i.e., design, construction, and operations. During the operations phase of buildings, even with best-practice energy-efficient design, actual energy use can be much higher than the design intent. Every day, much of the energy consumed by buildings serves no purpose (Roth et al. 2005). Building energy information systems (EIS) are commercially available systems that building owners and facility managers use to assess their building operations, measure, visualize, analyze, and report energy cost and consumption. Energy information systems can enable significant energy savings by tracking energy use, identifying consumption patterns, and benchmarking performance against similar buildings, thereby identifying improvement opportunities. The CBERD team has identified potential energy savings of approximately 2 quads of primary energy in the United States, while industry building energy audits in India have indicated potential energy savings of up to 30 percent in commercial buildings such as offices. Additionally, the CBERD team has identified healthcare facilities (e.g., hospitals, clinics), hotels, and offices as the three of the highest-growth sectors in India that have significant energy consumption, and that would benefit the most from implementation of EIS.

  12. Methodological Proposal for Identification and Evaluation of Environmental Aspects and Impacts of IPEN Nuclear Facilities: A Case Study Applied to the Nuclear Fuel Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattos, Luis A. Terribile de; Filho, Tufic Madi; Meldonian, Nelson Leon

    2013-06-01

    This work presents an application of Failure Mode Effect Analysis (FMEA) to the process of identification of environmental aspects and impacts as a part of implementation and maintenance of an Environmental Management System (EMS) in accordance with the ISO 14001 standard. Also, it can contribute, as a complement, to the evaluation and improvement of safety of the installation focused. The study was applied to the Nuclear Fuel Center (CCN) of Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN), situated at the Campus of University of Sao Paulo, Brazil. The CCN facility has the objective of promoting scientific research and of producing nuclear fuel elements for the IEA-R1 Research Reactor. To identify the environmental aspects of the facility activities, products, and services, a systematic data collection was carried out by means of personal interviews, documents, reports and operation data records consulting. Furthermore, the processes and their interactions, failure modes, besides their causes and effects to the environment, were identified. As a result of a careful evaluation of these causes it was possible to identify and to classify the major potential environmental impacts, in order to set up and put in practice an Environmental Control Plan for the installation under study. The results have demonstrated the validity of the FMEA application to nuclear facility processes, identifying environmental aspects and impacts, whose controls are critical to achieve compliance with the environmental requirements of the Integrated Management System of IPEN. It was demonstrated that the methodology used in this work is a powerful management tool for resolving issues related to the conformity with applicable regulatory and legal requirements of the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) and the Brazilian Institute of Environment (IBAMA). (authors)

  13. Large-scale experimental facility for emergency condition investigation of a new generation NPP WWER-640 reactor with passive safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aniskevich, Y.N.; Vasilenko, V.A.; Zasukha, V.K.; Migrov, Y.A.; Khabensky, V.B.

    1997-01-01

    The creation of the large-scale integral experimental facility (KMS) is specified by the programme of the experimental investigations to justify the engineering decisions on the safety of the design of the new generation NPP with the reactor WWER-640. The construction of KMS in a full volume will allow to conduct experimental investigations of all physical phenomena and processes, practically, occurring during the accidents on the NPPs with the reactor of WWER type and including the heat - mass exchange processes with low rates of the coolant, which is typical during the utilization of the passive safety systems, process during the accidents with a large leak, and also the complex intercommunicated processes in the reactor unit, passive safety systems and in the containment with the condition of long-term heat removal to the final absorber. KMS is being constructed at the Research Institute of Technology (NITI), Sosnovy Bor, Leningrad region, Russia. (orig.)

  14. Large-scale experimental facility for emergency condition investigation of a new generation NPP WWER-640 reactor with passive safety systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aniskevich, Y.N.; Vasilenko, V.A.; Zasukha, V.K.; Migrov, Y.A.; Khabensky, V.B. [Research Inst. of Technology NITI (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    The creation of the large-scale integral experimental facility (KMS) is specified by the programme of the experimental investigations to justify the engineering decisions on the safety of the design of the new generation NPP with the reactor WWER-640. The construction of KMS in a full volume will allow to conduct experimental investigations of all physical phenomena and processes, practically, occurring during the accidents on the NPPs with the reactor of WWER type and including the heat - mass exchange processes with low rates of the coolant, which is typical during the utilization of the passive safety systems, process during the accidents with a large leak, and also the complex intercommunicated processes in the reactor unit, passive safety systems and in the containment with the condition of long-term heat removal to the final absorber. KMS is being constructed at the Research Institute of Technology (NITI), Sosnovy Bor, Leningrad region, Russia. (orig.). 5 refs.

  15. Large-scale experimental facility for emergency condition investigation of a new generation NPP WWER-640 reactor with passive safety systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aniskevich, Y N; Vasilenko, V A; Zasukha, V K; Migrov, Y A; Khabensky, V B [Research Inst. of Technology NITI (Russian Federation)

    1998-12-31

    The creation of the large-scale integral experimental facility (KMS) is specified by the programme of the experimental investigations to justify the engineering decisions on the safety of the design of the new generation NPP with the reactor WWER-640. The construction of KMS in a full volume will allow to conduct experimental investigations of all physical phenomena and processes, practically, occurring during the accidents on the NPPs with the reactor of WWER type and including the heat - mass exchange processes with low rates of the coolant, which is typical during the utilization of the passive safety systems, process during the accidents with a large leak, and also the complex intercommunicated processes in the reactor unit, passive safety systems and in the containment with the condition of long-term heat removal to the final absorber. KMS is being constructed at the Research Institute of Technology (NITI), Sosnovy Bor, Leningrad region, Russia. (orig.). 5 refs.

  16. Study on a conceptual design of a data acquisition and instrument control system for experimental suites at materials and life science facility (MLF) of J-PARC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Kenji; Nakatani, Takeshi; Torii, Shuki; Higemoto, Wataru; Otomo, Toshiya

    2006-02-01

    The JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency)-KEK (High Energy Accelerator Research Organization) joint project, Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC), is now under construction. Materials and Life Science Facility (MLF) is one of planned facilities in this research complex. The neutron and muon sources will be installed at MLF and world's highest class intensive beam, which is utilized for variety of scientific research subject, will be delivered. To discuss the necessary computing environments for neutron and muon instruments at J-PARC, the MLF computing environment group (MLF-CEG) has been organized. We, members of the DAQ subgroup (DAQ-SG) are responsible for considering data acquisition and instrument control systems for the experimental suites at MLF. In the framework of the MLF-CEG, we are surveying the computer resources which is required for data acquisition and instrument control at future instruments, current situation of existing facilities and possible solutions those we can achieve. We are discussing the most suitable system that can bring out full performance of our instruments. This is the first interim report of the DAQ-SG, in which our activity of 2003-2004 is summarized. In this report, a conceptual design of the software, the related a data acquisition and instrument control system for experimental instruments at MLF are proposed. (author)

  17. Large coil test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelms, L.W.; Thompson, P.B.

    1980-01-01

    Final design of the facility is nearing completion, and 20% of the construction has been accomplished. A large vacuum chamber, houses the test assembly which is coupled to appropriate cryogenic, electrical, instrumentation, diagnostc systems. Adequate assembly/disassembly areas, shop space, test control center, offices, and test support laboratories are located in the same building. Assembly and installation operations are accomplished with an overhead crane. The major subsystems are the vacuum system, the test stand assembly, the cryogenic system, the experimental electric power system, the instrumentation and control system, and the data aquisition system

  18. Thermo-hydraulic instability of natural circulation BWRs at low pressure star-up. Experimental estimation of instability region with test facility considering scaling law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inada, F.; Furuya, M.; Yasuo, A.; Tabata, H.; Yoshioka, Y.; Kim, H.T.

    1995-01-01

    In natural circulation BWRs developed for advanced light water reactors with simplified passive safety systems, thermo-hydraulic stability should be confirmed especially at low pressure start-up. In this paper, nondimensional parameters to estimate the hydrodynamic stability to reactors at low pressure start-up were obtained by transformation of the basic equations of drift-flux model in the two-phase region into nondimensional form. A test facility based on these parameters was then constructed. The height of the test facility is 70% of SBWR and many nondimensional test facility parameters are almost the same as those of the reactor. Reactor stability was estimated experimentally. Stability maps below 0.5MPa were obtained on the heat flux - channel inlet subcooling place. It was found that there were two stability boundaries, between which the flow became unstable. Flow was stable in the high and low channel inlet subcooling regions. Typical conditions of SBWR at low pressure start-up were noted in the high channel inlet subcooling stable region. The heat flux at typical SBWR start-up was about one fifth that of the stability boundary. Though some nondimensional parameters of the test facility did not exactly agree with those of SBWR, it was suggested that the flow in SBWR was stable below 0.5MPa because of the large margin. (author)

  19. Experimental Determination of Effectiveness of an Individual Information-Centered Approach in Recovering Step-Count Missing Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Minsoo; Zhu, Weimo; Tudor-Locke, Catrine; Ainsworth, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    Missing values are a common phenomenon in physical activity research, which has a negative impact on the quality of the data collected. The purpose of this study was to determine empirically the effectiveness of an individual information-centered (II-centered) approach in recovering step-count missing values by comparing the performance of the…

  20. Integrated Disposal Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Located near the center of the 586-square-mile Hanford Site is the Integrated Disposal Facility, also known as the IDF.This facility is a landfill similar in concept...