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Sample records for facilitates microtubule bundling

  1. Torsional Behavior of Axonal Microtubule Bundles

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    Lazarus, Carole; Soheilypour, Mohammad; Mofrad, Mohammad R.K.

    2015-01-01

    Axonal microtubule (MT) bundles crosslinked by microtubule-associated protein (MAP) tau are responsible for vital biological functions such as maintaining mechanical integrity and shape of the axon as well as facilitating axonal transport. Breaking and twisting of MTs have been previously observed in damaged undulated axons. Such breaking and twisting of MTs is suggested to cause axonal swellings that lead to axonal degeneration, which is known as “diffuse axonal injury”. In particular, overstretching and torsion of axons can potentially damage the axonal cytoskeleton. Following our previous studies on mechanical response of axonal MT bundles under uniaxial tension and compression, this work seeks to characterize the mechanical behavior of MT bundles under pure torsion as well as a combination of torsional and tensile loads using a coarse-grained computational model. In the case of pure torsion, a competition between MAP tau tensile and MT bending energies is observed. After three turns, a transition occurs in the mechanical behavior of the bundle that is characterized by its diameter shrinkage. Furthermore, crosslink spacing is shown to considerably influence the mechanical response, with larger MAP tau spacing resulting in a higher rate of turns. Therefore, MAP tau crosslinking of MT filaments protects the bundle from excessive deformation. Simultaneous application of torsion and tension on MT bundles is shown to accelerate bundle failure, compared to pure tension experiments. MAP tau proteins fail in clusters of 10–100 elements located at the discontinuities or the ends of MT filaments. This failure occurs in a stepwise fashion, implying gradual accumulation of elastic tensile energy in crosslinks followed by rupture. Failure of large groups of interconnecting MAP tau proteins leads to detachment of MT filaments from the bundle near discontinuities. This study highlights the importance of torsional loading in axonal damage after traumatic brain injury

  2. Buckling behavior of individual and bundled microtubules.

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    Soheilypour, Mohammad; Peyro, Mohaddeseh; Peter, Stephen J; Mofrad, Mohammad R K

    2015-04-07

    As the major structural constituent of the cytoskeleton, microtubules (MTs) serve a variety of biological functions that range from facilitating organelle transport to maintaining the mechanical integrity of the cell. Neuronal MTs exhibit a distinct configuration, hexagonally packed bundles of MT filaments, interconnected by MT-associated protein (MAP) tau. Building on our previous work on mechanical response of axonal MT bundles under uniaxial tension, this study is focused on exploring the compression scenarios. Intracellular MTs carry a large fraction of the compressive loads sensed by the cell and therefore, like any other column-like structure, are prone to substantial bending and buckling. Various biological activities, e.g., actomyosin contractility and many pathological conditions are driven or followed by bending, looping, and buckling of MT filaments. The coarse-grained model previously developed in our lab has been used to study the mechanical behavior of individual and bundled in vivo MT filaments under uniaxial compression. Both configurations show tip-localized, decaying, and short-wavelength buckling. This behavior highlights the role of the surrounding cytoplasm and MAP tau on MT buckling behavior, which allows MT filaments to bear much larger compressive forces. It is observed that MAP tau interconnections improve this effect by a factor of two. The enhanced ability of MT bundles to damp buckling waves relative to individual MT filaments, may be interpreted as a self-defense mechanism because it helps axonal MTs to endure harsher environments while maintaining their function. The results indicate that MT filaments in a bundle do not buckle simultaneously implying that the applied stress is not equally shared among the MT filaments, that is a consequence of the nonuniform distribution of MAP tau proteins along the bundle length. Furthermore, from a pathological perspective, it is observed that axonal MT bundles are more vulnerable to failure in

  3. Interplay between microtubule bundling and sorting factors ensures acentriolar spindle stability during C. elegans oocyte meiosis.

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    Timothy J Mullen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In many species, oocyte meiosis is carried out in the absence of centrioles. As a result, microtubule organization, spindle assembly, and chromosome segregation proceed by unique mechanisms. Here, we report insights into the principles underlying this specialized form of cell division, through studies of C. elegans KLP-15 and KLP-16, two highly homologous members of the kinesin-14 family of minus-end-directed kinesins. These proteins localize to the acentriolar oocyte spindle and promote microtubule bundling during spindle assembly; following KLP-15/16 depletion, microtubule bundles form but then collapse into a disorganized array. Surprisingly, despite this defect we found that during anaphase, microtubules are able to reorganize into a bundled array that facilitates chromosome segregation. This phenotype therefore enabled us to identify factors promoting microtubule organization during anaphase, whose contributions are normally undetectable in wild-type worms; we found that SPD-1 (PRC1 bundles microtubules and KLP-18 (kinesin-12 likely sorts those bundles into a functional orientation capable of mediating chromosome segregation. Therefore, our studies have revealed an interplay between distinct mechanisms that together promote spindle formation and chromosome segregation in the absence of structural cues such as centrioles.

  4. Tau can switch microtubule network organizations: from random networks to dynamic and stable bundles.

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    Prezel, Elea; Elie, Auréliane; Delaroche, Julie; Stoppin-Mellet, Virginie; Bosc, Christophe; Serre, Laurence; Fourest-Lieuvin, Anne; Andrieux, Annie; Vantard, Marylin; Arnal, Isabelle

    2018-01-15

    In neurons, microtubule networks alternate between single filaments and bundled arrays under the influence of effectors controlling their dynamics and organization. Tau is a microtubule bundler that stabilizes microtubules by stimulating growth and inhibiting shrinkage. The mechanisms by which tau organizes microtubule networks remain poorly understood. Here, we studied the self-organization of microtubules growing in the presence of tau isoforms and mutants. The results show that tau's ability to induce stable microtubule bundles requires two hexapeptides located in its microtubule-binding domain and is modulated by its projection domain. Site-specific pseudophosphorylation of tau promotes distinct microtubule organizations: stable single microtubules, stable bundles, or dynamic bundles. Disease-related tau mutations increase the formation of highly dynamic bundles. Finally, cryo-electron microscopy experiments indicate that tau and its variants similarly change the microtubule lattice structure by increasing both the protofilament number and lattice defects. Overall, our results uncover novel phosphodependent mechanisms governing tau's ability to trigger microtubule organization and reveal that disease-related modifications of tau promote specific microtubule organizations that may have a deleterious impact during neurodegeneration. © 2018 Prezel, Elie, et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  5. Expansion and Polarity Sorting in Microtubule-Dynein Bundles(WHAT IS LIFE? THE NEXT 100 YEARS OF YUKAWA'S DREAM)

    OpenAIRE

    Assaf, ZEMEL; Alex, MOGILNER; Department of Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior, University of California; Department of Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior, University of California

    2008-01-01

    Interactions of multiple molecular motors with dynamic polymers, such as actin and microtubules, form the basis for many processes in the cell cytoskeleton. One example is the active 'sorting' of microtubule bundles by dynein molecular motors into aster-like arrays of microtubules; in these bundles dynein motors cross-link and slide neighboring microtubules apart. A number of models have been suggested to quantify the active dynamics of cross-linked bundles of polar filaments. In the case of ...

  6. CYK4 promotes antiparallel microtubule bundling by optimizing MKLP1 neck conformation.

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    Tim Davies

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Centralspindlin, a constitutive 2:2 heterotetramer of MKLP1 (a kinesin-6 and the non-motor subunit CYK4, plays important roles in cytokinesis. It is crucial for the formation of central spindle microtubule bundle structure. Its accumulation at the central antiparallel overlap zone is key for recruitment and regulation of downstream cytokinesis factors and for stable anchoring of the plasma membrane at the midbody. Both MKLP1 and CYK4 are required for efficient microtubule bundling. However, the mechanism by which CYK4 contributes to this is unclear. Here we performed structural and functional analyses of centralspindlin using high-speed atomic force microscopy, Fӧrster resonance energy transfer analysis, and in vitro reconstitution. Our data reveal that CYK4 binds to a globular mass in the atypically long MKLP1 neck domain between the catalytic core and the coiled coil and thereby reconfigures the two motor domains in the MKLP1 dimer to be suitable for antiparallel microtubule bundling. Our work provides insights into the microtubule bundling during cytokinesis and into the working mechanisms of the kinesins with non-canonical neck structures.

  7. Influence of carbon nanotubes on the buckling of microtubule bundles in viscoelastic cytoplasm using nonlocal strain gradient theory

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    A. Farajpour

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes are a new class of microtubule-stabilizing agents since they interact with protein microtubules in living cells, interfering with cell division and inducing apoptosis. In the present work, a modified beam model is developed to investigate the effect of carbon nanotubes on the buckling of microtubule bundles in living cell. A realistic interaction model is employed using recent experimental data on the carbon nanotube-stabilized microtubules. Small scale and surface effects are taken into account applying the nonlocal strain gradient theory and surface elasticity theory. Pasternak model is used to describe the normal and shearing effects of enclosing filament matrix on the buckling behavior of the system. An exact solution is obtained for the buckling growth rates of the mixed bundle in viscoelastic surrounding cytoplasm. The present results are compared with those reported in the open literature for single microtubules and an excellent agreement is found. Finally, the effects of different parameters such as the size, chirality, position and surface energy of carbon nanotubes on the buckling growth rates of microtubule bundles are studied. It is found that the buckling growth rate may increase or decrease by adding carbon nanotubes, depending on the diameter and chirality of carbon nanotubes. Keywords: Microtubules, Carbon nanotubes, Buckling, Size effects

  8. Mechanical splitting of microtubules into protofilament bundles by surface-bound kinesin-1.

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    VanDelinder, Virginia; Adams, Peter G; Bachand, George D

    2016-12-21

    The fundamental biophysics of gliding microtubule (MT) motility by surface-tethered kinesin-1 motor proteins has been widely studied, as well as applied to capture and transport analytes in bioanalytical microdevices. In these systems, phenomena such as molecular wear and fracture into shorter MTs have been reported due the mechanical forces applied on the MT during transport. In the present work, we show that MTs can be split longitudinally into protofilament bundles (PFBs) by the work performed by surface-bound kinesin motors. We examine the properties of these PFBs using several techniques (e.g., fluorescence microscopy, SEM, AFM), and show that the PFBs continue to be mobile on the surface and display very high curvature compared to MT. Further, higher surface density of kinesin motors and shorter kinesin-surface tethers promote PFB formation, whereas modifying MT with GMPCPP or higher paclitaxel concentrations did not affect PFB formation.

  9. Polyamine sharing between tubulin dimers favours microtubule nucleation and elongation via facilitated diffusion.

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    Alain Mechulam

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We suggest for the first time that the action of multivalent cations on microtubule dynamics can result from facilitated diffusion of GTP-tubulin to the microtubule ends. Facilitated diffusion can promote microtubule assembly, because, upon encountering a growing nucleus or the microtubule wall, random GTP-tubulin sliding on their surfaces will increase the probability of association to the target sites (nucleation sites or MT ends. This is an original explanation for understanding the apparent discrepancy between the high rate of microtubule elongation and the low rate of tubulin association at the microtubule ends in the viscous cytoplasm. The mechanism of facilitated diffusion requires an attraction force between two tubulins, which can result from the sharing of multivalent counterions. Natural polyamines (putrescine, spermidine, and spermine are present in all living cells and are potent agents to trigger tubulin self-attraction. By using an analytical model, we analyze the implication of facilitated diffusion mediated by polyamines on nucleation and elongation of microtubules. In vitro experiments using pure tubulin indicate that the promotion of microtubule assembly by polyamines is typical of facilitated diffusion. The results presented here show that polyamines can be of particular importance for the regulation of the microtubule network in vivo and provide the basis for further investigations into the effects of facilitated diffusion on cytoskeleton dynamics.

  10. A Genome-wide RNAi Screen for Microtubule Bundle Formation and Lysosome Motility Regulation in Drosophila S2 Cells

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    Amber L. Jolly

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-distance intracellular transport of organelles, mRNA, and proteins (“cargo” occurs along the microtubule cytoskeleton by the action of kinesin and dynein motor proteins, but the vast network of factors involved in regulating intracellular cargo transport are still unknown. We capitalize on the Drosophila melanogaster S2 model cell system to monitor lysosome transport along microtubule bundles, which require enzymatically active kinesin-1 motor protein for their formation. We use an automated tracking program and a naive Bayesian classifier for the multivariate motility data to analyze 15,683 gene phenotypes and find 98 proteins involved in regulating lysosome motility along microtubules and 48 involved in the formation of microtubule filled processes in S2 cells. We identify innate immunity genes, ion channels, and signaling proteins having a role in lysosome motility regulation and find an unexpected relationship between the dynein motor, Rab7a, and lysosome motility regulation.

  11. CLIP-170 facilitates the formation of kinetochore-microtubule attachments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanenbaum, ME; Galjart, N; van Vugt, MATM; Medema, RH

    2006-01-01

    CLIP-170 is a microtubule 'plus end tracking' protein involved in several microtubule-dependent processes in interphase. At the onset of mitosis, CLIP-170 localizes to kinetochores, but at metaphase, it is no longer detectable at kinetochores. Although RNA interference (RNAi) experiments have

  12. Direct binding of NuMA to tubulin is mediated by a novel sequence motif in the tail domain that bundles and stabilizes microtubules.

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    Haren, Laurence; Merdes, Andreas

    2002-05-01

    In mitosis, NuMA localises to spindle poles where it contributes to the formation and maintenance of focussed microtubule arrays. Previous work has shown that NuMA is transported to the poles by dynein and dynactin. So far, it is unclear how NuMA accumulates at the spindle poles following transport and how it remains associated throughout mitosis. We show here that NuMA can bind to microtubules independently of dynein/dynactin. We characterise a 100-residue domain located within the C-terminal tail of NuMA that mediates a direct interaction with tubulin in vitro and that is necessary for NuMA association with tubulin in vivo. Moreover, this domain induces bundling and stabilisation of microtubules when expressed in cultured cells and leads to formation of abnormal mitotic spindles with increased microtubule asters or multiple poles. Our results suggest that NuMA organises the poles by stable crosslinking of the microtubule fibers.

  13. TIPsy tour guides: How microtubule plus-end tracking proteins (+TIPs facilitate axon guidance

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    Elizabeth A Bearce

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The growth cone is a dynamic cytoskeletal vehicle, which drives the end of a developing axon. It serves to interpret and navigate through the complex landscape and guidance cues of the early nervous system. The growth cone’s distinctive cytoskeletal organization offers a fascinating platform to study how extracellular cues can be translated into mechanical outgrowth and turning behaviors. While many studies of cell motility highlight the importance of actin networks in signaling, adhesion, and propulsion, both seminal and emerging works in the field have highlighted a unique and necessary role for microtubules in growth cone navigation. Here, we focus on the role of singular pioneer microtubules, which extend into the growth cone periphery and are regulated by a diverse family of microtubule plus-end tracking proteins (+TIPs. These +TIPs accumulate at the dynamic ends of microtubules, where they are well-positioned to encounter and respond to key signaling events downstream of guidance receptors, catalyzing immediate changes in microtubule stability and actin cross-talk, that facilitate both axonal outgrowth and turning events.

  14. PACSIN1, a Tau-interacting protein, regulates axonal elongation and branching by facilitating microtubule instability.

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    Liu, Yingying; Lv, Kaosheng; Li, Zenglong; Yu, Albert C H; Chen, Jianguo; Teng, Junlin

    2012-11-16

    Tau is a major member of the neuronal microtubule-associated proteins. It promotes tubulin assembly and stabilizes axonal microtubules. Previous studies have demonstrated that Tau forms cross-bridges between microtubules, with some particles located on cross-bridges, suggesting that some proteins interact with Tau and might be involved in regulating Tau-related microtubule dynamics. This study reports that PACSIN1 interacts with Tau in axon. PACSIN1 blockade results in impaired axonal elongation and a higher number of primary axonal branches in mouse dorsal root ganglia neurons, which is induced by increasing the binding ability of Tau to microtubules. In PACSIN1-blocked dorsal root ganglia neurons, a greater amount of Tau is inclined to accumulate in the central domain of growth cones, and it promotes the stability of the microtubule network. Taken together, these results suggest that PACSIN1 is an important Tau binding partner in regulating microtubule dynamics and forming axonal plasticity.

  15. Complement protective epitopes and CD55-microtubule complexes facilitate the invasion and intracellular persistence of uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

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    Rana, Tanu; Hasan, Rafia J; Nowicki, Stella; Venkatarajan, Mathura S; Singh, Rajbir; Urvil, Petri T; Popov, Vsevolod; Braun, Werner A; Popik, Waldemar; Goodwin, J Shawn; Nowicki, Bogdan J

    2014-04-01

     Escherichia coli-bearing Dr-adhesins (Dr+ E. coli) cause chronic pyelonephritis in pregnant women and animal models. This chronic renal infection correlates with the capacity of bacteria to invade epithelial cells expressing CD55. The mechanism of infection remains unknown.  CD55 amino acids in the vicinity of binding pocket-Ser155 for Dr-adhesin were mutated to alanine and subjected to temporal gentamicin-invasion/gentamicin-survival assay in Chinese hamster ovary cells. CD55/microtubule (MT) responses were studied using confocal/electron microscopy, and 3-dimensional structure analysis.  Mutant analysis revealed that complement-protective CD55-Ser165 and CD55-Phe154 epitopes control E. coli invasion by coregulating CD55-MT complex expression. Single-point CD55 mutations changed E. coli to either a minimally invasive (Ser165Ala) or a hypervirulent pathogen (Phe154Ala). Thus, single amino acid modifications with no impact on CD55 structure and bacterial attachment can have a profound impact on E. coli virulence. While CD55-Ser165Ala decreased E. coli invasion and led to dormant intracellular persistence, intracellular E. coli in CD55-Phe154Ala developed elongated forms (multiplying within vacuoles), upregulated CD55-MT complexes, acquired CD55 coat, and escaped phagolysosomal fusion.  E. coli target complement-protective CD55 epitopes for invasion and exploit CD55-MT complexes to escape phagolysosomal fusion, leading to a nondestructive parasitism that allows bacteria to persist intracellularly.

  16. Barriers and facilitators towards implementing the Sepsis Six care bundle (BLISS-1): a mixed methods investigation using the theoretical domains framework.

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    Roberts, Neil; Hooper, Guy; Lorencatto, Fabiana; Storr, Wendell; Spivey, Michael

    2017-09-19

    The 'Sepsis 6', a care bundle of basic, but vital, measures (e.g. intravenous fluid, antibiotics) has been implemented to improve sepsis treatment. However, uptake has been variable. Tools from behavioral sciences, such as the Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) may be used to understand and address such implementation issues. This study used a behavioral science approach to identify barriers and facilitators towards Sepsis Six implementation at a case study hospital. Semi-structured interviews based on the TDF were conducted with a sample group of consultants, junior doctors and nurses from Emergency Department, Medical and Surgical Admissions, to explore barriers/facilitators to Sepsis Six performance. Transcripts were analyzed following the combined principles of content and framework analysis. Emerging themes informed a questionnaire to explore generalizability and importance across a sample of 261 stakeholders. Median importance and agreement ratings for each theme were calculated overall and for each role and clinical area. These were used to identify important barriers and important facilitators as targets for performance improvement. No new belief statements were discovered and data saturation was deemed achieved after 10 interviews. 1699 utterances were coded into 64 belief statements, then collated into a 51-item questionnaire. 113 questionnaire responses were obtained (44.3% response rate). Important barriers included insufficient audit and feedback, poor teamwork and communication, concerns about using the Sepsis Six in certain patients, insufficient training, and resource concerns. Facilitators included confidence in knowledge and skills, beliefs in overall benefits of the bundle, beliefs that identification and management of septic patients fell within everyone's role, and that regular use of the bundle made it easier to remember. Some beliefs were applicable for the entire group, others were specific to particular staff groups. A range of barriers

  17. Solution structure of the microtubule-targeting COS domain of MID1.

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    Wright, Katharine M; Du, Haijuan; Dagnachew, Mesgana; Massiah, Michael A

    2016-08-01

    The human MID1 protein is required for the proper development during embryogenesis. Mutations of MID1 are associated with X-linked Opitz G syndrome, characterized by midline anomalies. MID1 associates with the microtubules and functions as an ubiquitin E3 ligase, targeting protein phosphatase 2A for ubiquitin-mediated regulation. The mechanism of microtubule association is not known. Recently, a 60-amino acid region termed the C-terminal subgroup One Signature (COS) box/domain was identified at the C-terminal end of the coiled-coil (CC) domain that facilitates microtubule localization. Insertion of the MID1 COS domain at the C-terminal end of the CC domain of a nonmicrotubule-associated TRIM protein confers microtubule localization. Here, we report the solution structure of the COS domain of MID1. The domain adopts a helix-loop-helix structure in which the N- and C-terminal ends are in close proximity. Hydrophobic residues stabilizing the interaction of the two α-helices form a central hydrophobic core. The loop separating the α-helices is structured, with two of its hydrophobic residues making contact with the central core. On the outer surface, positively charged residues form a distinct basic patch near the termini that we postulate is important for microtubule binding. A model of the structure of the preceding coiled-coil and COS domains (CC-COS) show that the COS domain forms a helical bundle at the C-terminal end of the CC domain similar to the spectrin-like fold observed with some known microtubule-binding proteins. Interestingly, the CC-COS domains bind to microtubules, demonstrating for the first time that MID1 can directly associate with the microtubules. Structural data are available in PDB database under the accession number 5IM8. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  18. Interactions between the Translation Machinery and Microtubules.

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    Chudinova, E M; Nadezhdina, E S

    2018-01-01

    Microtubules are components of eukaryotic cytoskeleton that are involved in the transport of various components from the nucleus to the cell periphery and back. They also act as a platform for assembly of complex molecular ensembles. Ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes, such as ribosomes and mRNPs, are transported over significant distances (e.g. to neuronal processes) along microtubules. The association of RNPs with microtubules and their transport along these structures are essential for compartmentalization of protein biosynthesis in cells. Microtubules greatly facilitate assembly of stress RNP granules formed by accumulation of translation machinery components during cell stress response. Microtubules are necessary for the cytoplasm-to-nucleus transport of proteins, including ribosomal proteins. At the same time, ribosomal proteins and RNA-binding proteins can influence cell mobility and cytoplasm organization by regulating microtubule dynamics. The molecular mechanisms underlying the association between the translation machinery components and microtubules have not been studied systematically; the results of such studies are mostly fragmentary. In this review, we attempt to fill this gap by summarizing and discussing the data on protein and RNA components of the translation machinery that directly interact with microtubules or microtubule motor proteins.

  19. Ferritin associates with marginal band microtubules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infante, Anthony A.; Infante, Dzintra; Chan, M.-C.; How, P.-C.; Kutschera, Waltraud; Linhartova, Irena; Muellner, Ernst W.; Wiche, Gerhard; Propst, Friedrich

    2007-01-01

    We characterized chicken erythrocyte and human platelet ferritin by biochemical studies and immunofluorescence. Erythrocyte ferritin was found to be a homopolymer of H-ferritin subunits, resistant to proteinase K digestion, heat stable, and contained iron. In mature chicken erythrocytes and human platelets, ferritin was localized at the marginal band, a ring-shaped peripheral microtubule bundle, and displayed properties of bona fide microtubule-associated proteins such as tau. Red blood cell ferritin association with the marginal band was confirmed by temperature-induced disassembly-reassembly of microtubules. During erythrocyte differentiation, ferritin co-localized with coalescing microtubules during marginal band formation. In addition, ferritin was found in the nuclei of mature erythrocytes, but was not detectable in those of bone marrow erythrocyte precursors. These results suggest that ferritin has a function in marginal band formation and possibly in protection of the marginal band from damaging effects of reactive oxygen species by sequestering iron in the mature erythrocyte. Moreover, our data suggest that ferritin and syncolin, a previously identified erythrocyte microtubule-associated protein, are identical. Nuclear ferritin might contribute to transcriptional silencing or, alternatively, constitute a ferritin reservoir

  20. Facilitering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ib

    2012-01-01

    Facilitering (af latin facilis: gørbart, let at gøre) er den teknik at gøre det lettere for en forsamlet gruppe mennesker at udrette det, den ønsker. Facilitator er en slags mødeleder eller ordstyrer, der bistår gruppen ved at styre formen på deltagernes samtale og interaktion snarere end indholdet...

  1. Combing and self-assembly phenomena in dry films of Taxol-stabilized microtubules

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    Rose Franck

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractMicrotubules are filamentous proteins that act as a substrate for the translocation of motor proteins. As such, they may be envisioned as a scaffold for the self-assembly of functional materials and devices. Physisorption, self-assembly and combing are here investigated as a potential prelude to microtubule-templated self-assembly. Dense films of self-assembled microtubules were successfully produced, as well as patterns of both dendritic and non-dendritic bundles of microtubules. They are presented in the present paper and the mechanism of their formation is discussed.

  2. Modeling microtubule oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jobs, E.; Wolf, D.E.; Flyvbjerg, H.

    1997-01-01

    Synchronization of molecular reactions in a macroscopic volume may cause the volume's physical properties to change dynamically and thus reveal much about the reactions. As an example, experimental time series for so-called microtubule oscillations are analyzed in terms of a minimal model for thi...

  3. Electrodynamic effects on microtubules

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kučera, Ondřej; Havelka, Daniel; Deriu, M.A.; Cifra, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 44, Jul (2015), s. 169-169 ISSN 0175-7571. [10th European-Biophysical-Societies-Association (EBSA) European Biophysics Congress. 18.07.2015-22.07.2015, Dresden] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-17102S Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Microtubules * Electric al polarity Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electric al Engineering

  4. Microtubule's conformational cap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, H.

    1999-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that allow elongation of the unstable microtubule lattice remain unclear. It is usually thought that the GDP-liganded tubulin lattice is capped by a small layer of GTP- or GDP-P(i)-liganded molecules, the so called "GTP-cap". Here, we point-out that the elastic properties...

  5. Strategic Aspects of Bundling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podesta, Marion

    2008-01-01

    The increase of bundle supply has become widespread in several sectors (for instance in telecommunications and energy fields). This paper review relates strategic aspects of bundling. The main purpose of this paper is to analyze profitability of bundling strategies according to the degree of competition and the characteristics of goods. Moreover, bundling can be used as price discrimination tool, screening device or entry barriers. In monopoly case bundling strategy is efficient to sort consumers in different categories in order to capture a maximum of surplus. However, when competition increases, the profitability on bundling strategies depends on correlation of consumers' reservations values. (author)

  6. Plant microtubule cytoskeleton complexity: microtubule arrays as fractals.

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    Gardiner, John; Overall, Robyn; Marc, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Biological systems are by nature complex and this complexity has been shown to be important in maintaining homeostasis. The plant microtubule cytoskeleton is a highly complex system, with contributing factors through interactions with microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs), expression of multiple tubulin isoforms, and post-translational modification of tubulin and MAPs. Some of this complexity is specific to microtubules, such as a redundancy in factors that regulate microtubule depolymerization. Plant microtubules form partial helical fractals that play a key role in development. It is suggested that, under certain cellular conditions, other categories of microtubule fractals may form including isotropic fractals, triangular fractals, and branched fractals. Helical fractal proteins including coiled-coil and armadillo/beta-catenin repeat proteins and the actin cytoskeleton are important here too. Either alone, or in combination, these fractals may drive much of plant development.

  7. Adaptive braking by Ase1 prevents overlapping microtubules from sliding completely apart.

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    Braun, Marcus; Lansky, Zdenek; Fink, Gero; Ruhnow, Felix; Diez, Stefan; Janson, Marcel E

    2011-09-04

    Short regions of overlap between ends of antiparallel microtubules are central elements within bipolar microtubule arrays. Although their formation requires motors, recent in vitro studies demonstrated that stable overlaps cannot be generated by molecular motors alone. Motors either slide microtubules along each other until complete separation or, in the presence of opposing motors, generate oscillatory movements. Here, we show that Ase1, a member of the conserved MAP65/PRC1 family of microtubule-bundling proteins, enables the formation of stable antiparallel overlaps through adaptive braking of Kinesin-14-driven microtubule-microtubule sliding. As overlapping microtubules start to slide apart, Ase1 molecules become compacted in the shrinking overlap and the sliding velocity gradually decreases in a dose-dependent manner. Compaction is driven by moving microtubule ends that act as barriers to Ase1 diffusion. Quantitative modelling showed that the molecular off-rate of Ase1 is sufficiently low to enable persistent overlap stabilization over tens of minutes. The finding of adaptive braking demonstrates that sliding can be slowed down locally to stabilize overlaps at the centre of bipolar arrays, whereas sliding proceeds elsewhere to enable network self-organization.

  8. Cep169, a Novel Microtubule Plus-End-Tracking Centrosomal Protein, Binds to CDK5RAP2 and Regulates Microtubule Stability.

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    Yusuke Mori

    Full Text Available The centrosomal protein, CDK5RAP2, is a microcephaly protein that regulates centrosomal maturation by recruitment of a γ-tubulin ring complex (γ-TuRC onto centrosomes. In this report, we identified a novel human centrosomal protein, Cep169, as a binding partner of CDK5RAP2, a member of microtubule plus-end-tracking proteins (+TIPs. Cep169 interacts directly with CDK5RAP2 through CM1, an evolutionarily conserved domain, and colocalizes at the pericentriolar matrix (PCM around centrioles with CDK5RAP2. In addition, Cep169 interacts with EB1 through SxIP-motif responsible for EB1 binding, and colocalizes with CDK5RAP2 at the microtubule plus-end. EB1-binding-deficient Cep169 abolishes EB1 interaction and microtubule plus-end attachment, indicating Cep169 as a novel member of +TIPs. We further show that ectopic expression of either Cep169 or CDK5RAP2 induces microtubule bundling and acetylation in U2OS cells, and depletion of Cep169 induces microtubule depolymerization in HeLa cells, although Cep169 is not required for assembly of γ-tubulin onto centrosome by CDK5RAP2. These results show that Cep169 targets microtubule tips and regulates stability of microtubules with CDK5RAP2.

  9. Linking cortical microtubule attachment and exocytosis [version 1; referees: 2 approved

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    Ivar Noordstra

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Exocytosis is a fundamental cellular process whereby secreted molecules are packaged into vesicles that move along cytoskeletal filaments and fuse with the plasma membrane. To function optimally, cells are strongly dependent on precisely controlled delivery of exocytotic cargo. In mammalian cells, microtubules serve as major tracks for vesicle transport by motor proteins, and thus microtubule organization is important for targeted delivery of secretory carriers. Over the years, multiple microtubule-associated and cortical proteins have been discovered that facilitate the interaction between the microtubule plus ends and the cell cortex. In this review, we focus on mammalian protein complexes that have been shown to participate in both cortical microtubule capture and exocytosis, thereby regulating the spatial organization of secretion. These complexes include microtubule plus-end tracking proteins, scaffolding factors, actin-binding proteins, and components of vesicle docking machinery, which together allow efficient coordination of cargo transport and release.

  10. Identification of a TPX2-like microtubule-associated protein in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gohta Goshima

    Full Text Available Chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis relies on the spindle and the functions of numerous microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs. One of the best-studied spindle MAPs is the highly conserved TPX2, which has been reported to have characteristic intracellular dynamics and molecular activities, such as nuclear localisation in interphase, poleward movement in the metaphase spindle, microtubule nucleation, microtubule stabilisation, microtubule bundling, Aurora A kinase activation, kinesin-5 binding, and kinesin-12 recruitment. This protein has been shown to be essential for spindle formation in every cell type analysed so far. However, as yet, TPX2 homologues have not been found in the Drosophila genome. In this study, I found that the Drosophila protein Ssp1/Mei-38 has significant homology to TPX2. Sequence conservation was limited to the putative spindle microtubule-associated region of TPX2, and intriguingly, D-TPX2 (Ssp1/Mei-38 lacks Aurora A- and kinesin-5-binding domains, which are highly conserved in other animal and plant species, including many insects such as ants and bees. D-TPX2 uniformly localised to kinetochore microtubule-enriched regions of the metaphase spindle in the S2 cell line, and it had microtubule binding and bundling activities in vitro. In comparison with other systems, the contribution of D-TPX2 to cell division seems to be minor; live cell imaging of microtubules and chromosomes after RNAi knockdown identified significant delay in chromosome congression in only 18% of the cells. Thus, while this conserved spindle protein is present in Drosophila, other mechanisms may largely compensate for its spindle assembly and chromosome segregation functions.

  11. Microtubules and control of macronuclear 'amitosis' in Paramecium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, J B; Beisson, J; Roche, D L; Cohen, J

    1980-08-01

    The 'amitotic' division of the macronucleus during binary fission in P. tetraurelia includes a detailed sequence of shape changes that are temporally coordinated with the adoption of a series of well-defined positions and orientations inside the cell. The deployment of nucleoplasmic microtubules that is spatially correlated with the shaping ritual is more complex and precise than has been reported previously. Macronuclear division is not amitotic. It is not a simple constriction into two halves. As a dividing macronucleus starts to elongate it becomes dorsoventrally flattened against the dorsal cortex of the organism and assumes an elliptical shape. Concurrently, an elliptical marginal band of intranuclear microtubules assembles that has the same spatial relationship to nuclear shape as the marginal microtubules assembles that has the same spatial relationship to nuclear shape as the marginal microtubule bands of certain elliptical vertebrate blood cells have to cell shape. The band breaks down as further elongation occurs and the nucleus adopts the shape of a straight and slender sausage. Most of the intranuclear microtubules assemble as elongation starts and break down shortly after elongation is completed; the majority are oriented parallel to the longitudinal axis of the nucleus throughout elongation. Some of them are attached to nucleoli and are coated with granules which are almost certainly derived from the cortices of nucleoli. The peripheral concentration, interconnexion, orientation, and overlapping arrangement of microtubules, and the reduction in microtubule number per nuclear cross-section as elongation proceeds at a rate of about 40 micrometers min-1, are all compatible with the provision of a microtubule sliding mechanism as the main skeletal basis for elongation. There are indications that this mechanism is augmented by anchorage and/or active propulsion of nucleoli that may perhaps facilitate fairly equitable segregation of chromosomal material to

  12. Nuclear fuel bundle disassembly and assembly tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yates, J.; Long, J.W.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear power reactor fuel bundle is described which has a plurality of tubular fuel rods disposed in parallel array between two transverse tie plates. It is secured against disassembly by one or more locking forks which engage slots in tie rods which position the transverse plates. Springs mounted on the fuel and tie rods are compressed when the bundle is assembled thereby maintaining a continual pressure against the locking forks. Force applied in opposition to the springs permits withdrawal of the locking forks so that one tie plate may be removed, giving access to the fuel rods. An assembly and disassembly tool facilitates removal of the locking forks when the bundle is to be disassembled and the placing of the forks during assembly of the bundle. (U.S.)

  13. Teamwork in microtubule motors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, Roop; Rai, Arpan K; Barak, Pradeep; Rai, Ashim; Kunwar, Ambarish

    2013-11-01

    Diverse cellular processes are driven by the collective force from multiple motor proteins. Disease-causing mutations cause aberrant function of motors, but the impact is observed at a cellular level and beyond, therefore necessitating an understanding of cell mechanics at the level of motor molecules. One way to do this is by measuring the force generated by ensembles of motors in vivo at single-motor resolution. This has been possible for microtubule motor teams that transport intracellular organelles, revealing unexpected differences between collective and single-molecule function. Here we review how the biophysical properties of single motors, and differences therein, may translate into collective motor function during organelle transport and perhaps in other processes outside transport. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Tokyo Guidelines 2018: management bundles for acute cholangitis and cholecystitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mayumi, Toshihiko; Okamoto, Kohji; Takada, Tadahiro; Strasberg, Steven M.; Solomkin, Joseph S.; Schlossberg, David; Pitt, Henry A.; Yoshida, Masahiro; Gomi, Harumi; Miura, Fumihiko; Garden, O. James; Kiriyama, Seiki; Yokoe, Masamichi; Endo, Itaru; Asbun, Horacio J.; Iwashita, Yukio; Hibi, Taizo; Umezawa, Akiko; Suzuki, Kenji; Itoi, Takao; Hata, Jiro; Han, Ho-Seong; Hwang, Tsann-Long; Dervenis, Christos; Asai, Koji; Mori, Yasuhisa; Huang, Wayne Shih-Wei; Belli, Giulio; Mukai, Shuntaro; Jagannath, Palepu; Cherqui, Daniel; Kozaka, Kazuto; Baron, Todd H.; de Santibañes, Eduardo; Higuchi, Ryota; Wada, Keita; Gouma, Dirk J.; Deziel, Daniel J.; Liau, Kui-Hin; Wakabayashi, Go; Padbury, Robert; Jonas, Eduard; Supe, Avinash Nivritti; Singh, Harjit; Gabata, Toshifumi; Chan, Angus C. W.; Lau, Wan Yee; Fan, Sheung Tat; Chen, Miin-Fu; Ker, Chen-Guo; Yoon, Yoo-Seok; Choi, In-Seok; Kim, Myung-Hwan; Yoon, Dong-Sup; Kitano, Seigo; Inomata, Masafumi; Hirata, Koichi; Inui, Kazuo; Sumiyama, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Masakazu

    2018-01-01

    Management bundles that define items or procedures strongly recommended in clinical practice have been used in many guidelines in recent years. Application of these bundles facilitates the adaptation of guidelines and helps improve the prognosis of target diseases. In Tokyo Guidelines 2013 (TG13),

  15. A Case for Microtubule Vulnerability in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: Altered Dynamics During Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayden A Clark

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is an aggressive multifactorial disease converging on a common pathology: the degeneration of motor neurons, their axons and neuromuscular synapses. This vulnerability and dysfunction of motor neurons highlights the dependency of these large cells on their intracellular machinery. Neuronal microtubules are an intracellular structure that facilitates a myriad of vital neuronal functions, including activity dependent axonal transport. In ALS it is becoming increasingly apparent that microtubules are likely to be a critical component of this disease. Not only are disruptions in this intracellular machinery present in the vast majority of seemingly sporadic cases, recent research has revealed that mutation to a microtubule protein, the tubulin isoform TUBA4A, is sufficient to cause a familial, albeit rare, form of disease. In both sporadic and familial disease, studies have provided evidence that microtubule mediated deficits in axonal transport are the tipping point for motor neuron survivability. Axonal transport deficits would lead to abnormal mitochondrial recycling, decreased vesicle and mRNA transport and limited signalling of key survival factors from the neurons peripheral synapses, causing the characteristic peripheral ‘die back’. This disruption to microtubule dependant transport in ALS has been shown to result from alterations in the phenomenon of microtubule dynamic instability: the rapid growth and shrinkage of microtubule polymers. This is accomplished primarily due to aberrant alterations to microtubule associated proteins (MAPS that regulate microtubule stability. Indeed, the current literature would argue that microtubule stability, particularly alterations in their dynamics, may be the initial driving force behind many familial and sporadic insults in ALS. Pharmacological stabilisation of the microtubule network offers an attractive therapeutic strategy in ALS; indeed it has shown promise in

  16. Microtubule patterning in the presence of moving motor proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, D; de Vries, G; Martin, J; Dawes, A

    2015-10-07

    Cytoskeletal polymers such as microtubules (MTs) interact with motor proteins to form higher-order structures. In vitro experiments have shown that MT patterns such as asters, bundles, and vortices can form under the influence of a single type of dynamic motor protein. MTs also can form anti-parallel bundles, similar to bundles that form the mitotic spindle during cell division, under the influence of two types of moving motors with opposite directionality. Despite the importance of MT structures, their mechanism of formation is not yet understood. We develop an integro-partial differential equation model to describe the dynamic interactions between MTs and moving motor proteins. Our model takes into account motor protein speed, processivity, density, and directionality, as well as MT treadmilling and reorganization due to interactions with motors. Simulation results show that plus-end directed motor proteins can form vortex patterns at low motor density, while minus-end directed motor proteins form aster patterns at similar densities. Also, motor proteins with opposite directionality are able to organize MTs into anti-parallel bundles. Our model is able to provide a quantitative and qualitative description of MT patterning, providing insights into possible mechanisms of spindle formation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Microtubule organization during human parthenogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Yukihiro; Hasegawa, Hisataka; Ugajin, Tomohisa; Murakami, Takashi; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Okamura, Kunihiro

    2009-04-01

    In human fertilization, the sperm centrosome plays a crucial role as a microtubule organizing center (MTOC). We studied microtubule organization during human parthenogenesis, which occurs when a human egg undergoes cleavage without a sperm centrosome. Multiple cytoplasmic asters were organized in the human oocyte after parthenogenetic activation, indicating that multiple MTOC are present in the human oocyte cytoplasm and function like a human sperm centrosome during parthenogenesis.

  18. The ABCDEF Implementation Bundle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annachiara Marra

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Long-term morbidity, long-term cognitive impairment and hospitalization-associated disability are common occurrence in the survivors of critical illness, with significant consequences for patients and for the caregivers. The ABCDEF bundle represents an evidence-based guide for clinicians to approach the organizational changes needed for optimizing ICU patient recovery and outcomes. The ABCDEF bundle includes: Assess, Prevent, and Manage Pain, Both Spontaneous Awakening Trials (SAT and Spontaneous Breathing Trials (SBT, Choice of analgesia and sedation, Delirium: Assess, Prevent, and Manage, Early mobility and Exercise, and Family engagement. The purpose of this review is to describe the core features of the ABCDEF bundle.

  19. Bundle Branch Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2015. Bundle branch block Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  20. Centriolar CPAP/SAS-4 Imparts Slow Processive Microtubule Growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharma, Ashwani; Aher, Amol; Dynes, Nicola J; Frey, Daniel; Katrukha, Eugene A; Jaussi, Rolf; Grigoriev, Ilya; Croisier, Marie; Kammerer, Richard A; Akhmanova, Anna; Gönczy, Pierre; Steinmetz, Michel O

    2016-01-01

    Centrioles are fundamental and evolutionarily conserved microtubule-based organelles whose assembly is characterized by microtubule growth rates that are orders of magnitude slower than those of cytoplasmic microtubules. Several centriolar proteins can interact with tubulin or microtubules, but how

  1. Microtubule and Actin Interplay Drive Intracellular c-Src Trafficking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Arnette

    Full Text Available The proto-oncogene c-Src is involved in a variety of signaling processes. Therefore, c-Src spatiotemporal localization is critical for interaction with downstream targets. However, the mechanisms regulating this localization have remained elusive. Previous studies have shown that c-Src trafficking is a microtubule-dependent process that facilitates c-Src turnover in neuronal growth cones. As such, microtubule depolymerization lead to the inhibition of c-Src recycling. Alternatively, c-Src trafficking was also shown to be regulated by RhoB-dependent actin polymerization. Our results show that c-Src vesicles primarily exhibit microtubule-dependent trafficking; however, microtubule depolymerization does not inhibit vesicle movement. Instead, vesicular movement becomes both faster and less directional. This movement was associated with actin polymerization directly at c-Src vesicle membranes. Interestingly, it has been shown previously that c-Src delivery is an actin polymerization-dependent process that relies on small GTPase RhoB at c-Src vesicles. In agreement with this finding, microtubule depolymerization induced significant activation of RhoB, together with actin comet tail formation. These effects occurred downstream of GTP-exchange factor, GEF-H1, which was released from depolymerizing MTs. Accordingly, GEF-H1 activity was necessary for actin comet tail formation at the Src vesicles. Our results indicate that regulation of c-Src trafficking requires both microtubules and actin polymerization, and that GEF-H1 coordinates c-Src trafficking, acting as a molecular switch between these two mechanisms.

  2. The kinesin-13 KLP10A motor regulates oocyte spindle length and affects EB1 binding without altering microtubule growth rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin K. Do

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Kinesin-13 motors are unusual in that they do not walk along microtubules, but instead diffuse to the ends, where they remove tubulin dimers, regulating microtubule dynamics. Here we show that Drosophila kinesin-13 klp10A regulates oocyte meiosis I spindle length and is haplo-insufficient – KLP10A, reduced by RNAi or a loss-of-function P element insertion mutant, results in elongated and mispositioned oocyte spindles, and abnormal cortical microtubule asters and aggregates. KLP10A knockdown by RNAi does not significantly affect microtubule growth rates in oocyte spindles, but, unexpectedly, EB1 binding and unbinding are slowed, suggesting a previously unobserved role for kinesin-13 in mediating EB1 binding interactions with microtubules. Kinesin-13 may regulate spindle length both by disassembling subunits from microtubule ends and facilitating EB1 binding to plus ends. We also observe an increased number of paused microtubules in klp10A RNAi knockdown spindles, consistent with a reduced frequency of microtubule catastrophes. Overall, our findings indicate that reduced kinesin-13 decreases microtubule disassembly rates and affects EB1 interactions with microtubules, rather than altering microtubule growth rates, causing spindles to elongate and abnormal cortical microtubule asters and aggregates to form.

  3. Shaping plant microtubule networks via overlap formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijzer, de Jeroen

    2017-01-01

    Microtubules are long filaments made up from protein building blocks and ubiquitously employed by eukaryotic cells for a wide range of often essential cellular processes. To perform these functions, microtubules are virtually always organized into higher order networks. Microtubule networks in

  4. Right bundle branch block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bussink, Barbara E; Holst, Anders Gaarsdal; Jespersen, Lasse

    2013-01-01

    AimsTo determine the prevalence, predictors of newly acquired, and the prognostic value of right bundle branch block (RBBB) and incomplete RBBB (IRBBB) on a resting 12-lead electrocardiogram in men and women from the general population.Methods and resultsWe followed 18 441 participants included.......5%/2.3% in women, P Right bundle branch block was associated with significantly...... increased all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in both genders with age-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) of 1.31 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.11-1.54] and 1.87 (95% CI, 1.48-2.36) in the gender pooled analysis with little attenuation after multiple adjustment. Right bundle branch block was associated...

  5. Flow in rod bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazi, G.; Mayer, G.

    2005-01-01

    For power upgrading VVER-440 reactors we need to know exactly how the temperature measured by the thermocouples is related to the average outlet temperature of the fuel assemblies. Accordingly, detailed knowledge on mixing process in the rod bundles and in the fuel assembly head have great importance. Here we study the hydrodynamics of rod bundles based on the results of direct numerical and large eddy simulation of flows in subchannels. It is shown that secondary flow and flow pulsation phenomena can be observed using both methodologies. Some consequences of these observations are briefly discussed. (author)

  6. Standard-model bundles

    CERN Document Server

    Donagi, Ron; Pantev, Tony; Waldram, Dan; Donagi, Ron; Ovrut, Burt; Pantev, Tony; Waldram, Dan

    2002-01-01

    We describe a family of genus one fibered Calabi-Yau threefolds with fundamental group ${\\mathbb Z}/2$. On each Calabi-Yau $Z$ in the family we exhibit a positive dimensional family of Mumford stable bundles whose symmetry group is the Standard Model group $SU(3)\\times SU(2)\\times U(1)$ and which have $c_{3} = 6$. We also show that for each bundle $V$ in our family, $c_{2}(Z) - c_{2}(V)$ is the class of an effective curve on $Z$. These conditions ensure that $Z$ and $V$ can be used for a phenomenologically relevant compactification of Heterotic M-theory.

  7. Effect of axonal micro-tubules on the morphology of retinal nerve fibers studied by second-harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyungsik; Danias, John

    2012-11-01

    Many studies suggest that the degradation of microtubules in the retinal ganglion cells may be an early event in the progression of glaucoma. Because reflectance and birefringence of the retinal nerve fibers arise primarily from microtubules, the optical properties have been intensively studied for early detection of the disease. We previously reported a novel nonlinear optical signal from axonal microtubules for visualizing the retinal nerve fibers, namely second-harmonic generation (SHG). We demonstrate the use of axonal SHG to investigate the effect of microtubules on the morphology of the retinal nerve fiber bundles. Time-lapse SHG imaging of ex vivo rat retinal flat mounts was performed during pharmacological treatment of nocodazole, and the intensity of axonal SHG and the changes in nerve fiber bundle morphology were monitored. We found that the microtubule disruption does not lead to immediate modification in the morphology of the nerve fibers. Our results indicate that microtubular SHG may provide a useful means for sensitive detection of axonal injuries. Since the intrinsic radiation depends on the regular architecture of the cytoskeleton element as maintained by active cellular regulations, the intensity of signal reflects the health of the retinal ganglion cell axons.

  8. Optomechanical proposal for monitoring microtubule mechanical vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzanjeh, Sh.; Salari, V.; Tuszynski, J. A.; Cifra, M.; Simon, C.

    2017-07-01

    Microtubules provide the mechanical force required for chromosome separation during mitosis. However, little is known about the dynamic (high-frequency) mechanical properties of microtubules. Here, we theoretically propose to control the vibrations of a doubly clamped microtubule by tip electrodes and to detect its motion via the optomechanical coupling between the vibrational modes of the microtubule and an optical cavity. In the presence of a red-detuned strong pump laser, this coupling leads to optomechanical-induced transparency of an optical probe field, which can be detected with state-of-the art technology. The center frequency and line width of the transparency peak give the resonance frequency and damping rate of the microtubule, respectively, while the height of the peak reveals information about the microtubule-cavity field coupling. Our method opens the new possibilities to gain information about the physical properties of microtubules, which will enhance our capability to design physical cancer treatment protocols as alternatives to chemotherapeutic drugs.

  9. Griseofulvin-induced aggregation of microtubule protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roobol, A; Gull, K; Pogson, C I

    1977-01-01

    Griseofulvin (7-chloro-2',4,6-trimethoxy-6'-methylspiro[benzofuran-2(3H),1'-[2]cyclohexene]-3,4'-dione) induces aggregation of microtubule protein at 0 degrees C. This aggregate contains approx. 90% of the microtubule-associated proteins originally present in the microtubule protein. The supernatant obtained after removal of the griseofulvin-induced aggregate does not form microtubules on warming at 37 degrees C. Addition of the griseofulvin-aggregated protein to this supernatant and warming to 37 degrees C gives rise to a limited amount of microtubule assembly. The possible involvement of griseofulvin-induced aggregation of microtubule protein at 0 degrees C in the inhibition by griseofulvin of microtubule assembly in vitro is discussed. Images PLATE 1 PLATE 2 PMID:588267

  10. ALUMINUM BOX BUNDLING PRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iosif DUMITRESCU

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In municipal solid waste, aluminum is the main nonferrous metal, approximately 80- 85% of the total nonferrous metals. The income per ton gained from aluminum recuperation is 20 times higher than from glass, steel boxes or paper recuperation. The object of this paper is the design of a 300 kN press for aluminum box bundling.

  11. Irradiated fuel bundle counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, J.W.; Todd, J.L.

    1975-01-01

    The design of a prototype safeguards instrument for determining the number of irradiated fuel assemblies leaving an on-power refueled reactor is described. Design details include radiation detection techniques, data processing and display, unattended operation capabilities and data security methods. Development and operating history of the bundle counter is reported. (U.S.)

  12. The Logic of Bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, John; Yang, Taewon

    2015-12-01

    Since the work of Crown (J. Natur. Sci. Math. 15(1-2), 11-25 1975) in the 1970's, it has been known that the projections of a finite-dimensional vector bundle E form an orthomodular poset ( omp) {P}(E). This result lies in the intersection of a number of current topics, including the categorical quantum mechanics of Abramsky and Coecke (2004), and the approach via decompositions of Harding (Trans. Amer. Math. Soc. 348(5), 1839-1862 1996). Moreover, it provides a source of omps for the quantum logic program close to the Hilbert space setting, and admitting a version of tensor products, yet having important differences from the standard logics of Hilbert spaces. It is our purpose here to initiate a basic investigation of the quantum logic program in the vector bundle setting. This includes observations on the structure of the omps obtained as {P}(E) for a vector bundle E, methods to obtain states on these omps, and automorphisms of these omps. Key theorems of quantum logic in the Hilbert setting, such as Gleason's theorem and Wigner's theorem, provide natural and quite challenging problems in the vector bundle setting.

  13. Microtubule-microtubule sliding by kinesin-1 is essential for normal cytoplasmic streaming in Drosophila oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wen; Winding, Michael; Lakonishok, Margot; Wildonger, Jill; Gelfand, Vladimir I

    2016-08-23

    Cytoplasmic streaming in Drosophila oocytes is a microtubule-based bulk cytoplasmic movement. Streaming efficiently circulates and localizes mRNAs and proteins deposited by the nurse cells across the oocyte. This movement is driven by kinesin-1, a major microtubule motor. Recently, we have shown that kinesin-1 heavy chain (KHC) can transport one microtubule on another microtubule, thus driving microtubule-microtubule sliding in multiple cell types. To study the role of microtubule sliding in oocyte cytoplasmic streaming, we used a Khc mutant that is deficient in microtubule sliding but able to transport a majority of cargoes. We demonstrated that streaming is reduced by genomic replacement of wild-type Khc with this sliding-deficient mutant. Streaming can be fully rescued by wild-type KHC and partially rescued by a chimeric motor that cannot move organelles but is active in microtubule sliding. Consistent with these data, we identified two populations of microtubules in fast-streaming oocytes: a network of stable microtubules anchored to the actin cortex and free cytoplasmic microtubules that moved in the ooplasm. We further demonstrated that the reduced streaming in sliding-deficient oocytes resulted in posterior determination defects. Together, we propose that kinesin-1 slides free cytoplasmic microtubules against cortically immobilized microtubules, generating forces that contribute to cytoplasmic streaming and are essential for the refinement of posterior determinants.

  14. A Mechanism for Cytoplasmic Streaming: Kinesin-Driven Alignment of Microtubules and Fast Fluid Flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteith, Corey E; Brunner, Matthew E; Djagaeva, Inna; Bielecki, Anthony M; Deutsch, Joshua M; Saxton, William M

    2016-05-10

    The transport of cytoplasmic components can be profoundly affected by hydrodynamics. Cytoplasmic streaming in Drosophila oocytes offers a striking example. Forces on fluid from kinesin-1 are initially directed by a disordered meshwork of microtubules, generating minor slow cytoplasmic flows. Subsequently, to mix incoming nurse cell cytoplasm with ooplasm, a subcortical layer of microtubules forms parallel arrays that support long-range, fast flows. To analyze the streaming mechanism, we combined observations of microtubule and organelle motions with detailed mathematical modeling. In the fast state, microtubules tethered to the cortex form a thin subcortical layer and undergo correlated sinusoidal bending. Organelles moving in flows along the arrays show velocities that are slow near the cortex and fast on the inward side of the subcortical microtubule layer. Starting with fundamental physical principles suggested by qualitative hypotheses, and with published values for microtubule stiffness, kinesin velocity, and cytoplasmic viscosity, we developed a quantitative coupled hydrodynamic model for streaming. The fully detailed mathematical model and its simulations identify key variables that can shift the system between disordered (slow) and ordered (fast) states. Measurements of array curvature, wave period, and the effects of diminished kinesin velocity on flow rates, as well as prior observations on f-actin perturbation, support the model. This establishes a concrete mechanistic framework for the ooplasmic streaming process. The self-organizing fast phase is a result of viscous drag on kinesin-driven cargoes that mediates equal and opposite forces on cytoplasmic fluid and on microtubules whose minus ends are tethered to the cortex. Fluid moves toward plus ends and microtubules are forced backward toward their minus ends, resulting in buckling. Under certain conditions, the buckling microtubules self-organize into parallel bending arrays, guiding varying directions

  15. Friction on MAP determines its traveling direction on microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Sadanori; Goshima, Gohta

    2014-04-14

    Microtubule networks generate various forces, and the forces are applied to microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs). Forth et al. (2014) show in a recent issue of Cell that asymmetric frictional force between MAPs and microtubules leads to directional movement of MAPs along microtubules, providing insight into the mechanism of microtubule network self-organization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Bundling harvester; Nippukorjausharvesteri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koponen, K. [Eko-Log Oy, Kuopio (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    The staring point of the project was to design and construct, by taking the silvicultural point of view into account, a harvesting and processing system especially for energy-wood, containing manually driven bundling harvester, automatizing of the harvester, and automatized loading. The equipment forms an ideal method for entrepreneur`s-line harvesting. The target is to apply the system also for owner`s-line harvesting. The profitability of the system promotes the utilization of the system in both cases. The objectives of the project were: to construct a test equipment and prototypes for all the project stages, to carry out terrain and strain tests in order to examine the usability and durability, as well as the capacity of the machine, to test the applicability of the Eko-Log system in simultaneous harvesting of energy and pulp woods, and to start the marketing and manufacturing of the products. The basic problems of the construction of the bundling harvester have been solved using terrain-tests. The prototype machine has been shown to be operable. Loading of the bundles to form sufficiently economically transportable loads has been studied, and simultaneously, the branch-biomass has been tried to be utilized without loosing the profitability of transportation. The results have been promising, and will promote the profitable utilization of wood-energy

  17. Microtubule dynamics: Caps, catastrophes, and coupled hydrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, H.; Holy, T.E.; Leibler, S.

    1996-01-01

    individual tubulin dimers, an ignored. In this cap model, GTP hydrolysis is assumed to be stochastic and uncoupled to microtubule growth. Different rates of hydrolysis are assumed for GTP in the cap's interior and for GTP at its boundary with hydrolyzed parts of the microtubule. Expectation values...... and probability distributions relating to available experimental data are derived. Caps are found to be short and the total rate of hydrolysis at a microtubule end is found to be dynamically coupled to growth. The so-called catastrophe rate is a simple function of the microtubule growth rare and fits experimental...... of microtubule growth before dilution. The GTP content of microtubules is found and its rare of hydrolysis is determined under the circumstances created in an experiment designed to measure this GTP content. It is concluded that this experiment's failure to register any GTP content is consistent with the model...

  18. Bundled payments in orthopedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushnell, Brandon D

    2015-02-01

    As a result of reading this article, physicians should be able to: 1. Describe the concept of bundled payments and the potential applications of bundled payments in orthopedic surgery. 2. For specific situations, outline a clinical episode of care, determine the participants in a bundling situation, and define care protocols and pathways. 3. Recognize the importance of resource utilization management, quality outcome measurement, and combined economic-clinical value in determining the value of bundled payment arrangements. 4. Identify the implications of bundled payments for practicing orthopedists, as well as the legal issues and potential future directions of this increasingly popular alternative payment method. Bundled payments, the idea of paying a single price for a bundle of goods and services, is a financial concept familiar to most American consumers because examples appear in many industries. The idea of bundled payments has recently gained significant momentum as a financial model with the potential to decrease the significant current costs of health care. Orthopedic surgery as a field of medicine is uniquely positioned for success in an environment of bundled payments. This article reviews the history, logistics, and implications of the bundled payment model relative to orthopedic surgery. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. The Atiyah bundle and connections on a principal bundle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    be the fiber bundle constructed as in (1.1) for the universal principal G-bundle. In a work in progress, we hope to show that the universal G-connection can be realized as a fiber bundle over C(EG). Turning this around, we hope to get an alternative construction of the universal G-connection. Also, this approach may yield a ...

  20. [Masquerading bundle branch block].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukla, Piotr; Baranchuk, Adrian; Jastrzębski, Marek; Bryniarski, Leszek

    2014-01-01

    We here describe a surface 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) of a 72-year-old female with a prior history of breast cancer and chemotherapy-induced cardiomyopathy. An echocardiogram revealed left ventricular dysfunction, ejection fraction of 23%, with mild enlarged left ventricle. The 12-lead ECG showed atrial fibrillation with a mean heart rate of about 100 bpm, QRS duration 160 ms, QT interval 400 ms, right bundle branch block (RBBB) and left anterior fascicular block (LAFB). The combination of RBBB features in the precordial leads and LAFB features in the limb leads is known as ''masquerading bundle branch block''. In most cases of RBBB and LAFB, the QRS axis deviation is located between - 80 to -120 degrees. Rarely, when predominant left ventricular forces are present, the QRS axis deviation is near about -90 degrees, turning the pattern into an atypical form. In a situation of RBBB associated with LAFB, the S wave can be absent or very small in lead I. Such a situation is the result of not only purely LAFB but also with left ventricular hypertrophy and/or focal block due to scar (extensive anterior myocardial infarction) or fibrosis (cardiomyopathy). Sometimes, this specific ECG pattern is mistaken for LBBB. RBBB with LAFB may imitate LBBB either in the limb leads (known as 'standard masquerading' - absence of S wave in lead I), or in the precordial leads (called 'precordial masquerading' - absence of S wave in leads V₅ and V₆). Our ECG showed both these types of masquerading bundle branch block - absence of S wave in lead I and in leads V₅ and V₆.

  1. Kernel bundle EPDiff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Stefan Horst; Lauze, Francois Bernard; Nielsen, Mads

    2011-01-01

    In the LDDMM framework, optimal warps for image registration are found as end-points of critical paths for an energy functional, and the EPDiff equations describe the evolution along such paths. The Large Deformation Diffeomorphic Kernel Bundle Mapping (LDDKBM) extension of LDDMM allows scale space...... information to be automatically incorporated in registrations and promises to improve the standard framework in several aspects. We present the mathematical foundations of LDDKBM and derive the KB-EPDiff evolution equations, which provide optimal warps in this new framework. To illustrate the resulting...

  2. Managing bundled payments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, Andrew

    2011-04-01

    Results of Medicare's ACE demonstration project and Geisinger Health System's ProvenCare initiative provide insight into the challenges hospitals will face as bundled payment proliferates. An early analysis of these results suggests that hospitals would benefit from bringing full automation using clinical IT tools to bear in their efforts to meet these challenges. Other important factors contributing to success include board and physician leadership, organizational structure, pricing methodology for bidding, evidence-based medical practice guidelines, supply cost management, process efficiency management, proactive and aggressive case management, business development and marketing strategy, and the financial management system.

  3. Handtool assists in bundling cables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringer, E. J.

    1980-01-01

    Simple tool makes it possible to bundle electrical cables in channel or "tray" without requiring cables be lifted out. Procedure for bundling is faster and less awkward than lifting method. Used with commercially-available plastic ribbons that tie cables together, tool guides ribbon along tray wall, through bracket at bottom of tray, and up opposite wall. One end of ribbon locks in other end, securing cable bundle.

  4. Infinitesimal bundles and projective relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, G.T.

    1973-01-01

    An intrinsic and global presentation of five-dimensional relativity theory is developed, in which special coordinate conditions are replaced by conditions of Lie invariance. The notion of an infinitesimal bundle is introduced, and the theory of connexions on principal bundles is extended to infinitesimal bundles. Global aspects of projective relativity are studied: it is shown that projective relativity can describe almost any space-time. In particular, it is not necessary to assume that the electromagnetic field have a global potential. (author)

  5. Muon bundles from the Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kankiewicz P.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently the CERN ALICE experiment, in its dedicated cosmic ray run, observed muon bundles of very high multiplicities, thereby confirming similar findings from the LEP era at CERN (in the CosmoLEP project. Significant evidence for anisotropy of arrival directions of the observed high multiplicity muonic bundles is found. Estimated directionality suggests their possible extragalactic provenance. We argue that muonic bundles of highest multiplicity are produced by strangelets, hypothetical stable lumps of strange quark matter infiltrating our Universe.

  6. Muon bundles from the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankiewicz, P.; Rybczyński, M.; Włodarczyk, Z.; Wilk, G.

    2018-02-01

    Recently the CERN ALICE experiment, in its dedicated cosmic ray run, observed muon bundles of very high multiplicities, thereby confirming similar findings from the LEP era at CERN (in the CosmoLEP project). Significant evidence for anisotropy of arrival directions of the observed high multiplicity muonic bundles is found. Estimated directionality suggests their possible extragalactic provenance. We argue that muonic bundles of highest multiplicity are produced by strangelets, hypothetical stable lumps of strange quark matter infiltrating our Universe.

  7. Simulation of finite size effects of the fiber bundle model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Da-Peng; Tang, Gang; Xun, Zhi-Peng; Xia, Hui; Han, Kui

    2018-01-01

    In theory, the macroscopic fracture of materials should correspond with the thermodynamic limit of the fiber bundle model. However, the simulation of a fiber bundle model with an infinite size is unrealistic. To study the finite size effects of the fiber bundle model, fiber bundle models of various size are simulated in detail. The effects of system size on the constitutive behavior, critical stress, maximum avalanche size, avalanche size distribution, and increased step number of external load are explored. The simulation results imply that there is no feature size or cut size for macroscopic mechanical and statistical properties of the model. The constitutive curves near the macroscopic failure for various system size can collapse well with a simple scaling relationship. Simultaneously, the introduction of a simple extrapolation method facilitates the acquisition of more accurate simulation results in a large-limit system, which is better for comparison with theoretical results.

  8. MAVEN SWIA Calibrated Data Bundle

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This bundle contains fully calibrated MAVEN SWIA data, including ion velocity distributions, energy spectra, and density, temperature, and velocity moments from...

  9. The Atiyah bundle and connections on a principal bundle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    correspond to the connections on EG. The pull back of EG to C(EG) has a tautological connection. We investigate the curvature of this tautological connection. Keywords. Principal bundle; connection; Atiyah bundle. 1. Introduction. Fix a Lie group G. Its Lie algebra will be denoted by g. Let M be a connected C. ∞ manifold.

  10. Microtubule and cortical forces determine platelet size during vascular platelet production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thon, Jonathan N; Macleod, Hannah; Begonja, Antonija Jurak; Zhu, Jie; Lee, Kun-Chun; Mogilner, Alex; Hartwig, John H; Italiano, Joseph E

    2012-05-22

    Megakaryocytes release large preplatelet intermediates into the sinusoidal blood vessels. Preplatelets convert into barbell-shaped proplatelets in vitro to undergo repeated abscissions that yield circulating platelets. These observations predict the presence of circular-preplatelets and barbell-proplatelets in blood, and two fundamental questions in platelet biology are what are the forces that determine barbell-proplatelet formation, and how is the final platelet size established. Here we provide insights into the terminal mechanisms of platelet production. We quantify circular-preplatelets and barbell-proplatelets in human blood in high-resolution fluorescence images, using a laser scanning cytometry assay. We demonstrate that force constraints resulting from cortical microtubule band diameter and thickness determine barbell-proplatelet formation. Finally, we provide a mathematical model for the preplatelet to barbell conversion. We conclude that platelet size is limited by microtubule bundling, elastic bending, and actin-myosin-spectrin cortex forces.

  11. Perceptions of Workload Burden and Adherence to ABCDE Bundle Among Intensive Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Leanne M; Dietrich, Mary S; Vasilevskis, Eduard E; Wells, Nancy; Pandharipande, Pratik; Ely, E Wesley; Mion, Lorraine C

    2017-07-01

    Use of the interprofessional Awakening and Breathing Coordination, Delirium Monitoring and Management, and Early Mobility (ABCDE) bundle is recommended practice in intensive care, but its adoption remains limited. To examine the relationship between intensive care unit provider attitudes regarding the ABCDE bundle and ABCDE bundle adherence. A 1-time survey of 268 care providers in 10 intensive care units across the country who had worked at least 4 shifts per month to examine their attitudes toward workload burden, difficulty carrying out the bundle, perceived safety, confidence, and perceived strength of evidence. Logistic regression models were used to examine the relationship of unit-level provider attitudes with ABCDE bundle adherence in 101 patients, adjusted for patients' age, severity of illness, and comorbidity. For every unit increase in workload burden, adherence to the ABCDE bundle decreased 53% (odds ratio [OR], 0.47; 95% CI, 0.28-0.79; P = .004). Bundle difficulty (OR, 0.29; 95% CI, 0.08-1.07), perceived safety (OR, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.10-2.65), confidence (OR, 0.37, 95% CI, 0.10-1.35), and perceived strength of evidence (OR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.14-3.35) were not associated with ABCDE bundle adherence. For every unit increase in perceived difficulty carrying out the bundle, adherence with early mobility was reduced 59% (OR, 0.41; 95% CI, 0.19-0.90; P = .03). In addition, ABCDE bundle adherence (ie, ventilator bundle) was less than DE bundle adherence (ie, ventilator-free bundle) (97% vs 72%, z = 5.47; P < .001). Focusing interventions on workload burden and factors influencing bundle difficulty may facilitate ABCDE bundle adherence. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  12. Autoinhibition of TBCB regulates EB1-mediated microtubule dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Gerardo; Castaño, Raquel; Fanarraga, Mónica L; Villegas, Juan Carlos; Gonçalves, João; Soares, Helena; Avila, Jesus; Marenchino, Marco; Campos-Olivas, Ramón; Montoya, Guillermo; Zabala, Juan Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Tubulin cofactors (TBCs) participate in the folding, dimerization, and dissociation pathways of the tubulin dimer. Among them, TBCB and TBCE are two CAP-Gly domain-containing proteins that together efficiently interact with and dissociate the tubulin dimer. In the study reported here we showed that TBCB localizes at spindle and midzone microtubules during mitosis. Furthermore, the motif DEI/M-COO(-) present in TBCB, which is similar to the EEY/F-COO(-) element characteristic of EB proteins, CLIP-170, and α-tubulin, is required for TBCE-TBCB heterodimer formation and thus for tubulin dimer dissociation. This motif is responsible for TBCB autoinhibition, and our analysis suggests that TBCB is a monomer in solution. Mutants of TBCB lacking this motif are derepressed and induce microtubule depolymerization through an interaction with EB1 associated with microtubule tips. TBCB is also able to bind to the chaperonin complex CCT containing α-tubulin, suggesting that it could escort tubulin to facilitate its folding and dimerization, recycling or degradation.

  13. CANFLEX fuel bundle impact test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Seok Kyu; Chung, C. H.; Park, J. S.; Hong, S. D.; Kim, B. D.

    1997-08-01

    This document outlines the test results for the impact test of the CANFLEX fuel bundle. Impact test is performed to determine and verify the amount of general bundle shape distortion and defect of the pressure tube that may occur during refuelling. The test specification requires that the fuel bundles and the pressure tube retain their integrities after the impact test under the conservative conditions (10 stationary bundles with 31kg/s flow rate) considering the pressure tube creep. The refuelling simulator operating with pneumatic force and simulated shield plug were fabricated and the velocity/displacement transducer and the high speed camera were also used in this test. The characteristics of the moving bundle (velocity, displacement, impacting force) were measured and analyzed with the impact sensor and the high speed camera system. The important test procedures and measurement results were discussed as follows. 1) Test bundle measurements and the pressure tube inspections 2) Simulated shield plug, outlet flange installation and bundle loading 3) refuelling simulator, inlet flange installation and sensors, high speed camera installation 4) Perform the impact test with operating the refuelling simulator and measure the dynamic characteristics 5) Inspections of the fuel bundles and the pressure tube. (author). 8 refs., 23 tabs., 13 figs.

  14. Bundle Security Protocol for ION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burleigh, Scott C.; Birrane, Edward J.; Krupiarz, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    This software implements bundle authentication, conforming to the Delay-Tolerant Networking (DTN) Internet Draft on Bundle Security Protocol (BSP), for the Interplanetary Overlay Network (ION) implementation of DTN. This is the only implementation of BSP that is integrated with ION.

  15. Sasakian and Parabolic Higgs Bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Indranil; Mj, Mahan

    2018-03-01

    Let M be a quasi-regular compact connected Sasakian manifold, and let N = M/ S 1 be the base projective variety. We establish an equivalence between the class of Sasakian G-Higgs bundles over M and the class of parabolic (or equivalently, ramified) G-Higgs bundles over the base N.

  16. Twisted vector bundles on pointed nodal curves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Motivated by the quest for a good compactification of the moduli space of -bundles on a nodal curve we establish a striking relationship between Abramovich's and Vistoli's twisted bundles and Gieseker vector bundles.

  17. Twisted Vector Bundles on Pointed Nodal Curves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Motivated by the quest for a good compactification of the moduli space of -bundles on a nodal curve we establish a striking relationship between Abramovich's and Vistoli's twisted bundles and Gieseker vector bundles.

  18. Normal mammary epithelial cells promote carcinoma basement membrane invasion by inducing microtubule-rich protrusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Meng-Horng; Wu, Pei-Hsun; Gilkes, Daniele; Aifuwa, Ivie; Wirtz, Denis

    2015-10-20

    Recent work suggests that the dissemination of tumor cells may occur in parallel with, and even preceed, tumor growth. The mechanism for this early invasion is largely unknown. Here, we find that mammary epithelial cells (MECs) induce neighboring breast carcinoma cells (BCCs) to cross the basement membrane by secreting soluble laminin. Laminin continuously produced by MECs induce long membrane cellular protrusions in BCCs that promote their contractility and invasion into the surrounding matrix. These protrusions depend on microtubule bundles assembled de novo through laminin-integrin β1 signaling. These results describe how non-cancerous MECs can actively participate in the invasive process of BCCs.

  19. Mechanical and geometrical constraints control kinesin-based microtubule guidance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doodhi, Harinath; Katrukha, Eugene; Kapitein, Lukas; Akhmanova, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Proper organization of microtubule networks depends on microtubule-associated proteins and motors that use different spatial cues to guide microtubule growth [1–3]. For example, it has been proposed that the uniform minus-end-out microtubule organization in dendrites of Drosophila neurons is

  20. Modified 37-element bundle dryout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahir, A., E-mail: ab.tahir@amec.com [AMEC NSS Ltd., Fuel and Fuel Channel Safety Analysis, Ontario (Canada); Parlatan, Y., E-mail: yuksel.parlatan@opg.com [Ontario Power Generation Inc., Nuclear Safety Projects, Ontario (Canada); Kwee, M., E-mail: marc.kwee@brucepower.com [Bruce Power., Nuclear Safety Analysis and Support, Ontario (Canada); Liauw, W., E-mail: wie.kiong.liauw@opg.com [Ontario Power Generation Inc., Nuclear Safety Projects, Ontario (Canada); Hadaller, G.; Fortman, R., E-mail: ghadaller@sternlab.com, E-mail: rfortman@sternlab.com [Stern Labs Inc., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    The Heat Transport Systems (HTS) of the Canadian nuclear reactors are ageing. One of the effects of ageing is the non-uniform change in the dimension of the reactor pressure tubes through the mechanism of diametral creep. The mechanism has the global effect of increasing channel flows and decreasing the reactor header-to-header pressure drop. However, the increased flow is not distributed uniformly through the fuel bundle cross-section because the bundle tends to settle at the bottom of the pressure tube leaving a crescent shaped space on the top. This portion experiences the bulk of the increased flow, as it offers the path of least hydraulic resistance. As a result of this flow bypass, the coolant flows through some of the interior-subchannels of the fuel bundle are reduced. For a given flow, inlet temperature and exit pressure, flow bypass in the top of the channel reduces flow from the interior subchannels and consequently reduces the Critical Heat Flux (CHF). To recover some of the reduction in dryout power, OPG started a program in 2004 to examine possible modifications to the reference 37-element bundles that may result in an increase in dryout powers for the uncrept and crept pressure tube. Under accident conditions, where CHF is a concern, the ideal design is one where all fuel elements reach dryout at the same time. The ASSERT subchannel code was used to explore potential modifications to the 37-element bundle that may result in increased dryout powers in an uncrept and crept pressure tube. In addition analysis of post-dryout tests in 37-element bundle were examined to explore the potential of increasing the dryout power of the reference 37-element bundle by slightly modifying the bundle geometry. A small reduction of the centre element in the bundle was selected as an approach to enhance the dryout power of the bundle. CHF tests of the modified bundle were performed. The measurement confirmed that the modified bundle has higher dryout powers than the

  1. Kinetochore–microtubule attachment throughout mitosis potentiated by the elongated stalk of the kinetochore kinesin CENP-E

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitre, Benjamin; Gudimchuk, Nikita; Borda, Ranier; Kim, Yumi; Heuser, John E.; Cleveland, Don W.; Grishchuk, Ekaterina L.

    2014-01-01

    Centromere protein E (CENP-E) is a highly elongated kinesin that transports pole-proximal chromosomes during congression in prometaphase. During metaphase, it facilitates kinetochore–microtubule end-on attachment required to achieve and maintain chromosome alignment. In vitro CENP-E can walk processively along microtubule tracks and follow both growing and shrinking microtubule plus ends. Neither the CENP-E–dependent transport along microtubules nor its tip-tracking activity requires the unusually long coiled-coil stalk of CENP-E. The biological role for the CENP-E stalk has now been identified through creation of “Bonsai” CENP-E with significantly shortened stalk but wild-type motor and tail domains. We demonstrate that Bonsai CENP-E fails to bind microtubules in vitro unless a cargo is contemporaneously bound via its C-terminal tail. In contrast, both full-length and truncated CENP-E that has no stalk and tail exhibit robust motility with and without cargo binding, highlighting the importance of CENP-E stalk for its activity. Correspondingly, kinetochore attachment to microtubule ends is shown to be disrupted in cells whose CENP-E has a shortened stalk, thereby producing chromosome misalignment in metaphase and lagging chromosomes during anaphase. Together these findings establish an unexpected role of CENP-E elongated stalk in ensuring stability of kinetochore–microtubule attachments during chromosome congression and segregation. PMID:24920822

  2. Evaluating big deal journal bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstrom, Theodore C; Courant, Paul N; McAfee, R Preston; Williams, Michael A

    2014-07-01

    Large commercial publishers sell bundled online subscriptions to their entire list of academic journals at prices significantly lower than the sum of their á la carte prices. Bundle prices differ drastically between institutions, but they are not publicly posted. The data that we have collected enable us to compare the bundle prices charged by commercial publishers with those of nonprofit societies and to examine the types of price discrimination practiced by commercial and nonprofit journal publishers. This information is of interest to economists who study monopolist pricing, librarians interested in making efficient use of library budgets, and scholars who are interested in the availability of the work that they publish.

  3. MAVEN SWEA Calibrated Data Bundle

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This bundle contains fully calibrated electron energy/angle (3D) distributions, pitch angle distributions, and omni-directional energy spectra. Tables of sensitivity...

  4. Left bundle-branch block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risum, Niels; Strauss, David; Sogaard, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between myocardial electrical activation by electrocardiogram (ECG) and mechanical contraction by echocardiography in left bundle-branch block (LBBB) has never been clearly demonstrated. New strict criteria for LBBB based on a fundamental understanding of physiology have recently...

  5. Bundling ecosystem services in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turner, Katrine Grace; Odgaard, Mette Vestergaard; Bøcher, Peder Klith

    2014-01-01

    We made a spatial analysis of 11 ecosystem services at a 10 km × 10 km grid scale covering most of Denmark. Our objective was to describe their spatial distribution and interactions and also to analyze whether they formed specific bundle types on a regional scale in the Danish cultural landscape....... We found clustered distribution patterns of ecosystem services across the country. There was a significant tendency for trade-offs between on the one hand cultural and regulating services and on the other provisioning services, and we also found the potential of regulating and cultural services...... to form synergies. We identified six distinct ecosystem service bundle types, indicating multiple interactions at a landscape level. The bundle types showed specialized areas of agricultural production, high provision of cultural services at the coasts, multifunctional mixed-use bundle types around urban...

  6. Line bundles and flat connections

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    0344-5. Line bundles and flat connections. INDRANIL BISWAS1,∗ and GEORG SCHUMACHER2. 1School of Mathematics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road,. Mumbai 400 005, India. 2Fachbereich Mathematik und ...

  7. MAVEN LPW Calibrated Data Bundle

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This bundle contains fully calibrated, science quality data produced by the LPW instrument. The data include spacecraft potential, electric field waveforms and wave...

  8. MAVEN EUV Modelled Data Bundle

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This bundle contains solar irradiance spectra in 1-nm bins from 0-190 nm. The spectra are generated based upon the Flare Irradiance Spectra Model - Mars (FISM-M)...

  9. MAVEN SEP Calibrated Data Bundle

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The maven.sep.calibrated Level 2 Science Data Bundle contains fully calibrated SEP data, as well as the raw count data from which they are derived, and ancillary...

  10. Atrio-His bundle tracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brechenmacher, C

    1975-01-01

    The atrio-His bundle tracts are very rare; only two have been found in 687 hearts studied histologically. These tracts have a similar appearance to those of the atrioventricular bundle and form a complete bypass of the atrioventricular node. In their presence the electrocardiogram may show a short or normal PR interval. They may be responsible for some cases of very rapid ventricular response to supraventricular arrhythmias. Images PMID:1191446

  11. Bacterial Tubulins A and B Exhibit Polarized Growth, Mixed-Polarity Bundling, and Destabilization by GTP Hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Celis, César; Risca, Viviana I; Hurtado, Felipe; Polka, Jessica K; Hansen, Scott D; Maturana, Daniel; Lagos, Rosalba; Mullins, R Dyche; Monasterio, Octavio

    2017-10-01

    Bacteria of the genus Prosthecobacter express homologs of eukaryotic α- and β-tubulin, called BtubA and BtubB (BtubA/B), that have been observed to assemble into filaments in the presence of GTP. BtubA/B polymers are proposed to be composed in vitro by two to six protofilaments in contrast to that in vivo , where they have been reported to form 5-protofilament tubes named bacterial microtubules (bMTs). The btubAB genes likely entered the Prosthecobacter lineage via horizontal gene transfer and may be derived from an early ancestor of the modern eukaryotic microtubule (MT). Previous biochemical studies revealed that BtubA/B polymerization is reversible and that BtubA/B folding does not require chaperones. To better understand BtubA/B filament behavior and gain insight into the evolution of microtubule dynamics, we characterized in vitro BtubA/B assembly using a combination of polymerization kinetics assays and microscopy. Like eukaryotic microtubules, BtubA/B filaments exhibit polarized growth with different assembly rates at each end. GTP hydrolysis stimulated by BtubA/B polymerization drives a stochastic mechanism of filament disassembly that occurs via polymer breakage and/or fast continuous depolymerization. We also observed treadmilling (continuous addition and loss of subunits at opposite ends) of BtubA/B filament fragments. Unlike MTs, polymerization of BtubA/B requires KCl, which reduces the critical concentration for BtubA/B assembly and induces it to form stable mixed-orientation bundles in the absence of any additional BtubA/B-binding proteins. The complex dynamics that we observe in stabilized and unstabilized BtubA/B filaments may reflect common properties of an ancestral eukaryotic tubulin polymer. IMPORTANCE Microtubules are polymers within all eukaryotic cells that perform critical functions; they segregate chromosomes, organize intracellular transport, and support the flagella. These functions rely on the remarkable range of tunable dynamic

  12. Holomorphic bundles over elliptic manifolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, J.W.

    2000-01-01

    In this lecture we shall examine holomorphic bundles over compact elliptically fibered manifolds. We shall examine constructions of such bundles as well as (duality) relations between such bundles and other geometric objects, namely K3-surfaces and del Pezzo surfaces. We shall be dealing throughout with holomorphic principal bundles with structure group GC where G is a compact, simple (usually simply connected) Lie group and GC is the associated complex simple algebraic group. Of course, in the special case G = SU(n) and hence GC = SLn(C), we are considering holomorphic vector bundles with trivial determinant. In the other cases of classical groups, G SO(n) or G = Sympl(2n) we are considering holomorphic vector bundles with trivial determinant equipped with a non-degenerate symmetric, or skew symmetric pairing. In addition to these classical cases there are the finite number of exceptional groups. Amazingly enough, motivated by questions in physics, much interest centres around the group E8 and its subgroups. For these applications it does not suffice to consider only the classical groups. Thus, while often first doing the case of SU(n) or more generally of the classical groups, we shall extend our discussions to the general semi-simple group. Also, we shall spend a good deal of time considering elliptically fibered manifolds of the simplest type, namely, elliptic curves

  13. The spectraplakin Short stop is an essential microtubule regulator involved in epithelial closure in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takács, Zsanett; Vilmos, Péter; Lénárt, Péter; Röper, Katja; Erdélyi, Miklós

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dorsal closure of the Drosophila embryonic epithelium provides an excellent model system for the in vivo analysis of molecular mechanisms regulating cytoskeletal rearrangements. In this study, we investigated the function of the Drosophila spectraplakin Short stop (Shot), a conserved cytoskeletal structural protein, during closure of the dorsal embryonic epithelium. We show that Shot is essential for the efficient final zippering of the opposing epithelial margins. By using isoform-specific mutant alleles and genetic rescue experiments with truncated Shot variants, we demonstrate that Shot functions as an actin–microtubule cross-linker in mediating zippering. At the leading edge of epithelial cells, Shot regulates protrusion dynamics by promoting filopodia formation. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analysis and in vivo imaging of microtubule growth revealed that Shot stabilizes dynamic microtubules. The actin- and microtubule-binding activities of Shot are simultaneously required in the same molecule, indicating that Shot is engaged as a physical crosslinker in this process. We propose that Shot-mediated interactions between microtubules and actin filaments facilitate filopodia formation, which promotes zippering by initiating contact between opposing epithelial cells. PMID:28062848

  14. Designing cooperatively folded abiotic uni- and multimolecular helix bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    de, Soumen; Chi, Bo; Granier, Thierry; Qi, Ting; Maurizot, Victor; Huc, Ivan

    2018-01-01

    Abiotic foldamers, that is foldamers that have backbones chemically remote from peptidic and nucleotidic skeletons, may give access to shapes and functions different to those of peptides and nucleotides. However, design methodologies towards abiotic tertiary and quaternary structures are yet to be developed. Here we report rationally designed interactional patterns to guide the folding and assembly of abiotic helix bundles. Computational design facilitated the introduction of hydrogen-bonding functionalities at defined locations on the aromatic amide backbones that promote cooperative folding into helix-turn-helix motifs in organic solvents. The hydrogen-bond-directed aggregation of helices not linked by a turn unit produced several thermodynamically and kinetically stable homochiral dimeric and trimeric bundles with structures that are distinct from the designed helix-turn-helix. Relative helix orientation within the bundles may be changed from parallel to tilted on subtle solvent variations. Altogether, these results prefigure the richness and uniqueness of abiotic tertiary structure behaviour.

  15. Microtubule plus-end tracking of end-binding protein 1 (EB1) is regulated by CDK5 regulatory subunit-associated protein 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Ka-Wing; Au, Franco K C; Jia, Yue; Yang, Shaozhong; Zhou, Liying; Qi, Robert Z

    2017-05-05

    Microtubules are polar cytoskeleton filaments that extend via growth at their plus ends. Microtubule plus-end-tracking proteins (+TIPs) accumulate at these growing plus ends to control microtubule dynamics and attachment. The +TIP end-binding protein 1 (EB1) and its homologs possess an autonomous plus-end-tracking mechanism and interact with other known +TIPs, which then recruit those +TIPs to the growing plus ends. A major +TIP class contains the S X IP (Ser- X -Ile-Pro, with X denoting any amino acid residue) motif, known to interact with EB1 and its homologs for plus-end tracking, but the role of S X IP in regulating EB1 activities is unclear. We show here that an interaction of EB1 with the S X IP-containing +TIP CDK5 regulatory subunit-associated protein 2 (CDK5RAP2) regulates several EB1 activities, including microtubule plus-end tracking, dynamics at microtubule plus ends, microtubule and α/β-tubulin binding, and microtubule polymerization. The S X IP motif fused with a dimerization domain from CDK5RAP2 significantly enhanced EB1 plus-end-tracking and microtubule-polymerizing and bundling activities, but the S X IP motif alone failed to do so. An S X IP-binding-deficient EB1 mutant displayed significantly lower microtubule plus-end tracking than the wild-type protein in transfected cells. These results suggest that EB1 cooperates with CDK5RAP2 and perhaps other S X IP-containing +TIPs in tracking growing microtubule tips. We also generated plus-end-tracking chimeras of CDK5RAP2 and the adenomatous polyposis coli protein (APC) and found that overexpression of the dimerization domains interfered with microtubule plus-end tracking of their respective S X IP-containing chimeras. Our results suggest that disruption of S X IP dimerization enables detailed investigations of microtubule plus-end-associated functions of individual S X IP-containing +TIPs. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Variable recruitment in bundles of miniature pneumatic artificial muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLaHunt, Sylvie A; Pillsbury, Thomas E; Wereley, Norman M

    2016-09-13

    The natural compliance and force generation properties of pneumatic artificial muscles (PAMs) allow them to operate like human muscles in anthropomorphic robotic manipulators. Traditionally, manipulators use a single PAM or multiple PAMs actuated in unison in place of a human muscle. However, these standard manipulators can experience significant efficiency losses when operated outside their target performance ranges at low actuation pressures. This study considers the application of a variable recruitment control strategy to a parallel bundle of miniature PAMs as an attempt to mimic the selective recruitment of motor units in a human muscle. Bundles of miniature PAMs are experimentally characterized, their actuation behavior is modeled, and the efficiency gains and losses associated with the application of a variable recruitment control strategy are assessed. This bio-inspired control strategy allows muscle bundles to operate the fewest miniature PAMs necessary to achieve a desired performance objective, improving the muscle bundle's operating efficiency over larger ranges of force generation and displacement. The study also highlights the need for improved PAM fabrication techniques to facilitate the production of identical miniature PAMs for inclusion in muscle bundles.

  17. Microtubule binding distinguishes dystrophin from utrophin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanto, Joseph J.; Mader, Tara L.; Eckhoff, Michael D.; Strandjord, Dana M.; Banks, Glen B.; Gardner, Melissa K.; Lowe, Dawn A.; Ervasti, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Dystrophin and utrophin are highly similar proteins that both link cortical actin filaments with a complex of sarcolemmal glycoproteins, yet localize to different subcellular domains within normal muscle cells. In mdx mice and Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients, dystrophin is lacking and utrophin is consequently up-regulated and redistributed to locations normally occupied by dystrophin. Transgenic overexpression of utrophin has been shown to significantly improve aspects of the disease phenotype in the mdx mouse; therefore, utrophin up-regulation is under intense investigation as a potential therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Here we biochemically compared the previously documented microtubule binding activity of dystrophin with utrophin and analyzed several transgenic mouse models to identify phenotypes of the mdx mouse that remain despite transgenic utrophin overexpression. Our in vitro analyses revealed that dystrophin binds microtubules with high affinity and pauses microtubule polymerization, whereas utrophin has no activity in either assay. We also found that transgenic utrophin overexpression does not correct subsarcolemmal microtubule lattice disorganization, loss of torque production after in vivo eccentric contractions, or physical inactivity after mild exercise. Finally, our data suggest that exercise-induced inactivity correlates with loss of sarcolemmal neuronal NOS localization in mdx muscle, whereas loss of in vivo torque production after eccentric contraction-induced injury is associated with microtubule lattice disorganization. PMID:24706788

  18. Microtubules in health and degenerative disease of the nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matamoros, Andrew J; Baas, Peter W

    2016-09-01

    Microtubules are essential for the development and maintenance of axons and dendrites throughout the life of the neuron, and are vulnerable to degradation and disorganization in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. Microtubules, polymers of tubulin heterodimers, are intrinsically polar structures with a plus end favored for assembly and disassembly and a minus end less favored for these dynamics. In the axon, microtubules are nearly uniformly oriented with plus ends out, whereas in dendrites, microtubules have mixed orientations. Microtubules in developing neurons typically have a stable domain toward the minus end and a labile domain toward the plus end. This domain structure becomes more complex during neuronal maturation when especially stable patches of polyaminated tubulin become more prominent within the microtubule. Microtubules are the substrates for molecular motor proteins that transport cargoes toward the plus or minus end of the microtubule, with motor-driven forces also responsible for organizing microtubules into their distinctive polarity patterns in axons and dendrites. A vast array of microtubule-regulatory proteins impart direct and indirect changes upon the microtubule arrays of the neuron, and these include microtubule-severing proteins as well as proteins responsible for the stability properties of the microtubules. During neurodegenerative diseases, microtubule mass is commonly diminished, and the potential exists for corruption of the microtubule polarity patterns and microtubule-mediated transport. These ill effects may be a primary causative factor in the disease or may be secondary effects, but regardless, therapeutics capable of correcting these microtubule abnormalities have great potential to improve the status of the degenerating nervous system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Stabilization of anaphase midzone microtubules is regulated by Rho during cytokinesis in human fibrosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanada, Masamitsu; Nagasaki, Akira; Uyeda, Taro Q P

    2009-10-01

    The dynamics of astral and midzone microtubules (MTs) must be separately regulated during cell division, but the mechanism of selective stabilization of midzone MTs is poorly understood. Here we show that, in HT1080 cells, activation of Rho is required to stabilize midzone MTs, and to maintain the midzone structures after anaphase onset or during cytokinesis. Ect2-depleted cells undergoing conventional cytokinesis (cytokinesis A) or contractile ring-independent cytokinesis (cytokinesis B) formed abnormally thin bundles of midzone MTs. C3-loaded mitotic cells with inactivated Rho showed similar but more severe disorganization of midzone MTs. In addition, the bundles of astral MTs were abnormally abundant along the cell periphery in both Ect2-depleted and C3-loaded mitotic cells. Mitotic kinesin-like protein 1 (MKLP1), a component of the spindle midzone required for bundling of MTs, was localized only in the narrower equatorial regions in Ect2-depleted cells, and disappeared from the midzone accompanying the progression of the mitotic phase in C3-loaded cells. Stabilization of MTs by taxol was sufficient to maintain the midzone structures in C3-loaded mitotic cells. These results, when combined with a preceding analysis on another, microtubule-associated Rho GEF (C.J. Bakal, D. Finan, J. LaRose, C.D. Wells, G. Gish, S. Kulkarni, P. DeSepulveda, A. Wilde, R. Rottapel, The Rho GTP exchange factor Lfc promotes spindle assembly in early mitosis, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 102 (2005) 9529-9534), suggest that mammalian cells have two potential steps that require active Rho for the stabilization of midzone MTs during mitosis and cytokinesis.

  20. Dynamics of microtubules: highlights of recent computational and experimental investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsegov, Valeri; Ross, Jennifer L.; Dima, Ruxandra I.

    2017-11-01

    Microtubules are found in most eukaryotic cells, with homologs in eubacteria and archea, and they have functional roles in mitosis, cell motility, intracellular transport, and the maintenance of cell shape. Numerous efforts have been expended over the last two decades to characterize the interactions between microtubules and the wide variety of microtubule associated proteins that control their dynamic behavior in cells resulting in microtubules being assembled and disassembled where and when they are required by the cell. We present the main findings regarding microtubule polymerization and depolymerization and review recent work about the molecular motors that modulate microtubule dynamics by inducing either microtubule depolymerization or severing. We also discuss the main experimental and computational approaches used to quantify the thermodynamics and mechanics of microtubule filaments.

  1. The evolution and diversification of plant microtubule-associated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, John

    2013-07-01

    Plant evolution is marked by major advances in structural characteristics that facilitated the highly successful colonization of dry land. Underlying these advances is the evolution of genes encoding specialized proteins that form novel microtubular arrays of the cytoskeleton. This review investigates the evolution of plant families of microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) through the recently sequenced genomes of Arabidopsis thaliana, Oryza sativa, Selaginella moellendorffii, Physcomitrella patens, Volvox carteri and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The families of MAPs examined are AIR9, CLASP, CRIPT, MAP18, MOR1, TON, EB1, AtMAP70, SPR2, SPR1, WVD2 and MAP65 families (abbreviations are defined in the footnote to Table 1). Conjectures are made regarding the evolution of MAPs in plants in relation to the evolution of multicellularity, oriented cell division and vasculature. Angiosperms in particular have high numbers of proteins that are involved in promotion of helical growth or its suppression, and novel plant microtubular structures may have acted as a catalyst for the development of novel plant MAPs. Comparisons of plant MAP gene families with those of animals show that animals may have more flexibility in the structure of their microtubule cytoskeletons than plants, but with both plants and animals possessing many MAP splice variants. © 2013 The Author The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Principal bundles the classical case

    CERN Document Server

    Sontz, Stephen Bruce

    2015-01-01

    This introductory graduate level text provides a relatively quick path to a special topic in classical differential geometry: principal bundles.  While the topic of principal bundles in differential geometry has become classic, even standard, material in the modern graduate mathematics curriculum, the unique approach taken in this text presents the material in a way that is intuitive for both students of mathematics and of physics. The goal of this book is to present important, modern geometric ideas in a form readily accessible to students and researchers in both the physics and mathematics communities, providing each with an understanding and appreciation of the language and ideas of the other.

  3. KATNAL1 regulation of sertoli cell microtubule dynamics is essential for spermiogenesis and male fertility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee B Smith

    Full Text Available Spermatogenesis is a complex process reliant upon interactions between germ cells (GC and supporting somatic cells. Testicular Sertoli cells (SC support GCs during maturation through physical attachment, the provision of nutrients, and protection from immunological attack. This role is facilitated by an active cytoskeleton of parallel microtubule arrays that permit transport of nutrients to GCs, as well as translocation of spermatids through the seminiferous epithelium during maturation. It is well established that chemical perturbation of SC microtubule remodelling leads to premature GC exfoliation demonstrating that microtubule remodelling is an essential component of male fertility, yet the genes responsible for this process remain unknown. Using a random ENU mutagenesis approach, we have identified a novel mouse line displaying male-specific infertility, due to a point mutation in the highly conserved ATPase domain of the novel KATANIN p60-related microtubule severing protein Katanin p60 subunit A-like1 (KATNAL1. We demonstrate that Katnal1 is expressed in testicular Sertoli cells (SC from 15.5 days post-coitum (dpc and that, consistent with chemical disruption models, loss of function of KATNAL1 leads to male-specific infertility through disruption of SC microtubule dynamics and premature exfoliation of spermatids from the seminiferous epithelium. The identification of KATNAL1 as an essential regulator of male fertility provides a significant novel entry point into advancing our understanding of how SC microtubule dynamics promotes male fertility. Such information will have resonance both for future treatment of male fertility and the development of non-hormonal male contraceptives.

  4. One-parameter nonrelativistic supersymmetry for microtubules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosu, H.C.; Moran-Mirabal, J.M.; Cornejo, O.

    2003-01-01

    The one-parameter nonrelativistic supersymmetry of Mielnik [J. Math. Phys. 25 (1984) 3387] is applied to the simple supersymmetric model of Caticha [Phys. Rev. A 51 (1995) 4264] in the form used by Rosu [Phys. Rev. E 55 (1997) 2038] for microtubules. By this means, we introduce Montroll double-well potentials with singularities that move along the positive or negative traveling direction depending on the sign of the free parameter of Mielnik's method. Possible interpretations of the singularity are either microtubule associated proteins (motors) or structural discontinuities in the arrangement of the tubulin molecules

  5. Microtubules: A network for solitary waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdravković Slobodan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper we deal with nonlinear dynamics of microtubules. The structure and role of microtubules in cells are explained as well as one of models explaining their dynamics. Solutions of the crucial nonlinear differential equation depend on used mathematical methods. Two commonly used procedures, continuum and semi-discrete approximations, are explained. These solutions are solitary waves usually called as kink solitons, breathers and bell-type solitons. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. III45010

  6. Mmb1p binds mitochondria to dynamic microtubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chuanhai; Jain, Deeptee; Costa, Judite; Velve-Casquillas, Guilhem; Tran, Phong T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Mitochondria form a dynamics tubular network within the cell. Proper mitochondria movement and distribution are critical for their localized function in cell metabolism, growth, and survival. In mammalian cells, mechanisms of mitochondria positioning appear dependent on the microtubule cytoskeleton, with kinesin or dynein motors carrying mitochondria as cargos and distributing them throughout the microtubule network. Interestingly, the timescale of microtubule dynamics occurs in seconds, and the timescale of mitochondria distribution occurs in minutes. How does the cell couple these two time constants? Results Fission yeast also relies on microtubules for mitochondria distribution. We report here a new microtubule-dependent but motor-independent mechanism for proper mitochondria positioning in fission yeast. We identify the protein mmb1p, which binds to mitochondria and microtubules. Mmb1p attaches the tubular mitochondria to the microtubule lattice at multiple discrete interaction sites. Mmb1 deletion causes mitochondria to aggregate, with the long-term consequence of defective mitochondria distribution and cell death. Mmb1p decreases microtubule dynamicity. Conclusion Mmb1p is a new microtubule-mitochondria binding protein. We propose that mmb1p act to couple long-term mitochondria distribution to short-term microtubule dynamics by attenuating microtubule dynamics, thus enhancing the mitochondria-microtubule interaction time. PMID:21856157

  7. Exploring Bundling Theory with Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckalbar, John C.

    2006-01-01

    The author shows how instructors might successfully introduce students in principles and intermediate microeconomic theory classes to the topic of bundling (i.e., the selling of two or more goods as a package, rather than separately). It is surprising how much students can learn using only the tools of high school geometry. To be specific, one can…

  8. Line bundles and flat connections

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The degree of a torsionfree coherent analytic sheaf F on X is defined as degree(F ) = ∫. X ch. 1(det F) ∧ ωδ−1 .... [9] Kobayashi S, Differential geometry of complex vector bundles, Publications of the Math. Society of Japan 15 (1987) (Iwanami Shoten Publishers and Princeton University Press). [10] Lackenby M, Some ...

  9. Line bundles and flat connections

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We prove that there are cocompact lattices Γ in S L ( 2 , C ) with the property that there are holomorphic line bundles L on S L ( 2 , C ) / Γ with c 1 ( L ) = 0 such that L does not admit any unitary flat connection. Author Affiliations. INDRANIL BISWAS1 GEORG SCHUMACHER2. School of Mathematics, Tata Institute of ...

  10. Electrostatically biased binding of kinesin to microtubules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry J Grant

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The minimum motor domain of kinesin-1 is a single head. Recent evidence suggests that such minimal motor domains generate force by a biased binding mechanism, in which they preferentially select binding sites on the microtubule that lie ahead in the progress direction of the motor. A specific molecular mechanism for biased binding has, however, so far been lacking. Here we use atomistic Brownian dynamics simulations combined with experimental mutagenesis to show that incoming kinesin heads undergo electrostatically guided diffusion-to-capture by microtubules, and that this produces directionally biased binding. Kinesin-1 heads are initially rotated by the electrostatic field so that their tubulin-binding sites face inwards, and then steered towards a plus-endwards binding site. In tethered kinesin dimers, this bias is amplified. A 3-residue sequence (RAK in kinesin helix alpha-6 is predicted to be important for electrostatic guidance. Real-world mutagenesis of this sequence powerfully influences kinesin-driven microtubule sliding, with one mutant producing a 5-fold acceleration over wild type. We conclude that electrostatic interactions play an important role in the kinesin stepping mechanism, by biasing the diffusional association of kinesin with microtubules.

  11. Analysis of microtubule assembly kinetics using turbidimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Felicia

    2011-01-01

    Turbidity measurements are rapid and reliable methods to follow the effects of drugs, proteins, nucleotides, metals, and other factors on the assembly kinetics of tubulin into microtubules in vitro and have been in use since 1974. Improvements in spectrophotometers and software have resulted in the use of less protein, and more curves can be analyzed continuously and almost simultaneously.

  12. CLASPs link focal adhesion-associated microtubule capture to localized exocytosis and adhesion site turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stehbens, Samantha J.; Paszek, Matthew; Pemble, Hayley; Ettinger, Andreas; Gierke, Sarah; Wittmann, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    Turnover of integrin-based focal adhesions (FAs) with the extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for coordinated cell movement. In collectively migrating human keratinocytes, FAs assemble near the leading edge, grow and mature as a result of contractile forces, and disassemble underneath the advancing cell body. We report that clustering of microtubule-associated CLASP1 and CLASP2 proteins around FAs temporally correlates with FA turnover. CLASPs and LL5β, which recruits CLASPs to FAs, facilitate FA disassembly. CLASPs are further required for FA-associated ECM degradation, and matrix metalloprotease inhibition slows FA disassembly similar to CLASP or LL5β depletion. Finally, CLASP-mediated microtubuletethering at FAs establishes a FA-directed transport pathway for delivery, docking and localized fusion of exocytic vesicles near FAs. We propose that CLASPs couple microtubule organization, vesicle transport and cell interactions with the ECM, establishing a local secretion pathway that facilitates FA turnover by severing cell-matrix connections. PMID:24859005

  13. Strategic and welfare implications of bundling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, Stephen

    1999-01-01

    A standard oligopoly model of bundling shows that bundling by a firm with a monopoly over one product has a strategic effect because it changes the substitution relationships between the goods among which consumers choose. Bundling in appropriate proportions is privately profitable, reduces rivals...

  14. Principal G-bundles on nodal curves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Springer Verlag Heidelberg #4 2048 1996 Dec 15 10:16:45

    If Y is reducible these notions depend on parameters a = (a1,...,aI ). The study of G-bundles on Y is done by extending the notion of (generalized) parabolic vector bundles [U1] to generalized parabolic principal G-bundles (called GPGs in short) on the curve C and using the correspondence between them and principal ...

  15. Integrin-linked kinase regulates interphase and mitotic microtubule dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simin Lim

    Full Text Available Integrin-linked kinase (ILK localizes to both focal adhesions and centrosomes in distinct multiprotein complexes. Its dual function as a kinase and scaffolding protein has been well characterized at focal adhesions, where it regulates integrin-mediated cell adhesion, spreading, migration and signaling. At the centrosomes, ILK regulates mitotic spindle organization and centrosome clustering. Our previous study showed various spindle defects after ILK knockdown or inhibition that suggested alteration in microtubule dynamics. Since ILK expression is frequently elevated in many cancer types, we investigated the effects of ILK overexpression on microtubule dynamics. We show here that overexpressing ILK in HeLa cells was associated with a shorter duration of mitosis and decreased sensitivity to paclitaxel, a chemotherapeutic agent that suppresses microtubule dynamics. Measurement of interphase microtubule dynamics revealed that ILK overexpression favored microtubule depolymerization, suggesting that microtubule destabilization could be the mechanism behind the decreased sensitivity to paclitaxel, which is known to stabilize microtubules. Conversely, the use of a small molecule inhibitor selective against ILK, QLT-0267, resulted in suppressed microtubule dynamics, demonstrating a new mechanism of action for this compound. We further show that treatment of HeLa cells with QLT-0267 resulted in higher inter-centromere tension in aligned chromosomes during mitosis, slower microtubule regrowth after cold depolymerization and the presence of a more stable population of spindle microtubules. These results demonstrate that ILK regulates microtubule dynamics in both interphase and mitotic cells.

  16. Loop formation of microtubules during gliding at high density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Lynn; Ross, Jennifer L; Tuezel, Erkan

    2011-01-01

    The microtubule cytoskeleton, including the associated proteins, forms a complex network essential to multiple cellular processes. Microtubule-associated motor proteins, such as kinesin-1, travel on microtubules to transport membrane bound vesicles across the crowded cell. Other motors, such as cytoplasmic dynein and kinesin-5, are used to organize the cytoskeleton during mitosis. In order to understand the self-organization processes of motors on microtubules, we performed filament-gliding assays with kinesin-1 motors bound to the cover glass with a high density of microtubules on the surface. To observe microtubule organization, 3% of the microtubules were fluorescently labeled to serve as tracers. We find that microtubules in these assays are not confined to two dimensions and can cross one other. This causes microtubules to align locally with a relatively short correlation length. At high density, this local alignment is enough to create 'intersections' of perpendicularly oriented groups of microtubules. These intersections create vortices that cause microtubules to form loops. We characterize the radius of curvature and time duration of the loops. These different behaviors give insight into how crowded conditions, such as those in the cell, might affect motor behavior and cytoskeleton organization.

  17. Strong fascin expression promotes metastasis independent of its F-actin bundling activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Lisa S; Muhs, Stefanie; Schiewek, Johanna; Grüb, Saskia; Nalaskowski, Marcus; Lin, Yuan-Na; Wikman, Harriet; Oliveira-Ferrer, Leticia; Lange, Tobias; Wellbrock, Jasmin; Konietzny, Anja; Mikhaylova, Marina; Windhorst, Sabine

    2017-12-15

    High expression of the actin bundling protein Fascin increases the malignancy of tumor cells. Here we show that fascin expression is up-regulated in more malignant sub-cell lines of MDA-MB-231 cells as compared to parental cells. Since also parental MDA-MB-231 cells exhibit high fascin levels, increased fascin expression was termed as "hyperexpression". To examine the effect of fascin hyperexpression, fascin was hyperexpressed in parental MDA-MB-231 cells and metastasis was analyzed in NOD scid gamma (NSG) mice. In addition, the effect of fascin mutants with inactive or constitutively active actin bundling activity was examined. Unexpectedly, we found that hyperexpression of both, wildtype (wt) and mutant fascin strongly increased metastasis in vivo , showing that the effect of fascin hyperexpression did not depend on its actin bundling activity. Cellular assays revealed that hyperexpression of wt and mutant fascin increased adhesion of MDA-MB-231 cells while transmigration and proliferation were not affected. Since it has been shown that fascin controls adhesion by directly interacting with microtubules ( MTs), we analyzed if fascin hyperexpression affects MT dynamics. We found that at high concentrations fascin significantly increased MT dynamics in cells and in cell-free approaches. In summary our data show that strong expression of fascin in breast cancer cells increases metastasis independent of its actin bundling activity. Thus, it seems that the mechanism of fascin-stimulated metastasis depends on its concentration.

  18. Measuring the Dynamic Parameters of MCF7 Cell Microtubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winton, Carly; Shojania Feizabadi, Mitra

    2013-03-01

    Microtubules are the key component of the cytoskeleton. They are intrinsically dynamic displaying dynamic instability in which they randomly switch between a phase of growing and shrinking, both in vitro and in vivo. This dynamic is specified by the following parameters: growing rate, shrinking rate, frequency of catastrophe, and frequency of rescue. In this work, we will present our primary results in which we measured the dynamic parameters of a single microtubule polymerized from MCF7 tubulin in vitro. The results are significant since the MCF7 microtubules are non-neural mammalian consisting of different beta tubulin isotypes in their structures as compared to neural mammalian microtubules, such as bovine brain. The unique dynamic parameters of individual MCF7 microtubules in vitro, which are reported for the first time, indicate that non-neural microtubules can be fundamentally different from neural microtubules.

  19. Mathematical modeling of microtubule dynamics: insights into physiology and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxton, Gavin A; Siedlak, Sandra L; Perry, George; Smith, Mark A

    2010-12-01

    Computer models of microtubule dynamics have provided the basis for many of the theories on the cellular mechanics of the microtubules, their polymerization kinetics, and the diffusion of tubulin and tau. In the three-dimensional model presented here, we include the effects of tau concentration and the hydrolysis of GTP-tubulin to GDP-tubulin and observe the emergence of microtubule dynamic instability. This integrated approach simulates the essential physics of microtubule dynamics in a cellular environment. The model captures the structure of the microtubules as they undergo steady state dynamic instabilities in this simplified geometry, and also yields the average number, length, and cap size of the microtubules. The model achieves realistic geometries and simulates cellular structures found in degenerating neurons in disease states such as Alzheimer disease. Further, this model can be used to simulate microtubule changes following the addition of antimitotic drugs which have recently attracted attention as chemotherapeutic agents. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Higher order jet prolongations type gauge natural bundles over vector bundles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kurek

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Let $rgeq 3$ and $mgeq 2$ be natural numbers and $E$ be a vector bundle with $m$-dimensional basis. We find all gauge natural bundles ``similar" to the $r$-jet prolongation bundle $J^rE$ of $E$. We also find all gauge natural bundles ``similar" to the vector $r$-tangent bundle $(J^r_{fl}(E,R_0^*$ of $E$.

  1. Fluid structure interaction in tube bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brochard, D.; Jedrzejewski, F.; Gibert, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    A lot of industrial components contain tube bundles immersed in a fluid. The mechanical analysis of such systems requires the study of the fluid structure interaction in the tube bundle. Simplified methods, based on homogenization methods, have been developed to analyse such phenomenon and have been validated through experimental results. Generally, these methods consider only the fluid motion in a plan normal to the bundle axis. This paper will analyse, in a first part, the fluid structure interaction in a tube bundle through a 2D finite element model representing the bundle cross section. The influence of various parameters like the bundle size, and the bundle confinement will be studied. These results will be then compared with results from homogenization methods. Finally, the influence of the 3D fluid motion will be investigated, in using simplified methods. (authors). 11 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs

  2. The Microtubule Regulatory Protein Stathmin Is Required to Maintain the Integrity of Axonal Microtubules in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason E Duncan

    Full Text Available Axonal transport, a form of long-distance, bi-directional intracellular transport that occurs between the cell body and synaptic terminal, is critical in maintaining the function and viability of neurons. We have identified a requirement for the stathmin (stai gene in the maintenance of axonal microtubules and regulation of axonal transport in Drosophila. The stai gene encodes a cytosolic phosphoprotein that regulates microtubule dynamics by partitioning tubulin dimers between pools of soluble tubulin and polymerized microtubules, and by directly binding to microtubules and promoting depolymerization. Analysis of stai function in Drosophila, which has a single stai gene, circumvents potential complications with studies performed in vertebrate systems in which mutant phenotypes may be compensated by genetic redundancy of other members of the stai gene family. This has allowed us to identify an essential function for stai in the maintenance of the integrity of axonal microtubules. In addition to the severe disruption in the abundance and architecture of microtubules in the axons of stai mutant Drosophila, we also observe additional neurological phenotypes associated with loss of stai function including a posterior paralysis and tail-flip phenotype in third instar larvae, aberrant accumulation of transported membranous organelles in stai deficient axons, a progressive bang-sensitive response to mechanical stimulation reminiscent of the class of Drosophila mutants used to model human epileptic seizures, and a reduced adult lifespan. Reductions in the levels of Kinesin-1, the primary anterograde motor in axonal transport, enhance these phenotypes. Collectively, our results indicate that stai has an important role in neuronal function, likely through the maintenance of microtubule integrity in the axons of nerves of the peripheral nervous system necessary to support and sustain long-distance axonal transport.

  3. The Microtubule Regulatory Protein Stathmin Is Required to Maintain the Integrity of Axonal Microtubules in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Jason E.; Lytle, Nikki K.; Zuniga, Alfredo; Goldstein, Lawrence S. B.

    2013-01-01

    Axonal transport, a form of long-distance, bi-directional intracellular transport that occurs between the cell body and synaptic terminal, is critical in maintaining the function and viability of neurons. We have identified a requirement for the stathmin (stai) gene in the maintenance of axonal microtubules and regulation of axonal transport in Drosophila . The stai gene encodes a cytosolic phosphoprotein that regulates microtubule dynamics by partitioning tubulin dimers between pools of soluble tubulin and polymerized microtubules, and by directly binding to microtubules and promoting depolymerization. Analysis of stai function in Drosophila , which has a single stai gene, circumvents potential complications with studies performed in vertebrate systems in which mutant phenotypes may be compensated by genetic redundancy of other members of the stai gene family. This has allowed us to identify an essential function for stai in the maintenance of the integrity of axonal microtubules. In addition to the severe disruption in the abundance and architecture of microtubules in the axons of stai mutant Drosophila , we also observe additional neurological phenotypes associated with loss of stai function including a posterior paralysis and tail-flip phenotype in third instar larvae, aberrant accumulation of transported membranous organelles in stai deficient axons, a progressive bang-sensitive response to mechanical stimulation reminiscent of the class of Drosophila mutants used to model human epileptic seizures, and a reduced adult lifespan. Reductions in the levels of Kinesin-1, the primary anterograde motor in axonal transport, enhance these phenotypes. Collectively, our results indicate that stai has an important role in neuronal function, likely through the maintenance of microtubule integrity in the axons of nerves of the peripheral nervous system necessary to support and sustain long-distance axonal transport. PMID:23840848

  4. Kinetochore-microtubule attachment throughout mitosis potentiated by the elongated stalk of the kinetochore kinesin CENP-E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitre, Benjamin; Gudimchuk, Nikita; Borda, Ranier; Kim, Yumi; Heuser, John E; Cleveland, Don W; Grishchuk, Ekaterina L

    2014-08-01

    Centromere protein E (CENP-E) is a highly elongated kinesin that transports pole-proximal chromosomes during congression in prometaphase. During metaphase, it facilitates kinetochore-microtubule end-on attachment required to achieve and maintain chromosome alignment. In vitro CENP-E can walk processively along microtubule tracks and follow both growing and shrinking microtubule plus ends. Neither the CENP-E-dependent transport along microtubules nor its tip-tracking activity requires the unusually long coiled-coil stalk of CENP-E. The biological role for the CENP-E stalk has now been identified through creation of "Bonsai" CENP-E with significantly shortened stalk but wild-type motor and tail domains. We demonstrate that Bonsai CENP-E fails to bind microtubules in vitro unless a cargo is contemporaneously bound via its C-terminal tail. In contrast, both full-length and truncated CENP-E that has no stalk and tail exhibit robust motility with and without cargo binding, highlighting the importance of CENP-E stalk for its activity. Correspondingly, kinetochore attachment to microtubule ends is shown to be disrupted in cells whose CENP-E has a shortened stalk, thereby producing chromosome misalignment in metaphase and lagging chromosomes during anaphase. Together these findings establish an unexpected role of CENP-E elongated stalk in ensuring stability of kinetochore-microtubule attachments during chromosome congression and segregation. © 2014 Vitre, Gudimchuk, et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  5. Bundling in Place: Translating the NGSS into Place-Based Earth-System Science Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semken, S. C.

    2016-12-01

    Bundling is the process of grouping Performance Expectations (PEs) from the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) into coherent units based on a defined topic, idea, question, or phenomenon. Bundling sorts the PEs for a given grade or grade band into a teachable narrative: a key stage in building curriculum, instruction, and assessment from the NGSS. To encourage and facilitate this, bundling guidelines have recently been released on the NGSS website (nextgenscience.org/glossary/bundlesbundling), and example bundles for different grade bands and disciplines are also being developed and posted there. According to these guidelines the iterative process of bundling begins with organization of PEs according to natural connections among them, and alignment of the three NGSS dimensions (Disciplinary Core Ideas, Cross-Cutting Concepts, and Science and Engineering Practices) that underpin each PE. Bundles are grouped by coherence and increasing complexity into courses, and courses into course sets that should encompass all PEs for a grade band. Bundling offers a natural way to translate the NGSS into highly contextualized curricula such as place-based (PB) teaching, which is situated in specific places or regions and focused on natural and cultural features, processes, phenomena, history, and challenges to sustainability therein. Attributes of place and our individual and collective connections to place (sense of place) directly inform PB curriculum, pedagogy, and assessment. PEs can be bundled by their relevance to these themes. Following the NGSS guidelines, I model the process for PB instruction by bundling PEs around the themes of Paleozoic geology and carbonate deposition and their relationships to mining and calcining of limestone in Anthropocene cement production for developing communities. The bundles integrate aspects of Earth history, the carbon cycle, mineral resources, climate change, and sustainability using specific local examples and narratives. They are

  6. Microtubules Growth Rate Alteration in Human Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina B. Alieva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand how microtubules contribute to the dynamic reorganization of the endothelial cell (EC cytoskeleton, we established an EC model expressing EB3-GFP, a protein that marks microtubule plus-ends. Using this model, we were able to measure microtubule growth rate at the centrosome region and near the cell periphery of a single human EC and in the EC monolayer. We demonstrate that the majority of microtubules in EC are dynamic, the growth rate of their plus-ends is highest in the internal cytoplasm, in the region of the centrosome. Growth rate of microtubule plus-ends decreases from the cell center toward the periphery. Our data suggest the existing mechanism(s of local regulation of microtubule plus-ends growth in EC. Microtubule growth rate in the internal cytoplasm of EC in the monolayer is lower than that of single EC suggesting the regulatory effect of cell-cell contacts. Centrosomal microtubule growth rate distribution in single EC indicated the presence of two subpopulations of microtubules with “normal” (similar to those in monolayer EC and “fast” (three times as much growth rates. Our results indicate functional interactions between cell-cell contacts and microtubules.

  7. The Role of Molecular Microtubule Motors and the Microtubule Cytoskeleton in Stress Granule Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen M. Bartoli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress granules (SGs are cytoplasmic foci that appear in cells exposed to stress-induced translational inhibition. SGs function as a triage center, where mRNAs are sorted for storage, degradation, and translation reinitiation. The underlying mechanisms of SGs dynamics are still being characterized, although many key players have been identified. The main components of SGs are stalled 48S preinitiation complexes. To date, many other proteins have also been found to localize in SGs and are hypothesized to function in SG dynamics. Most recently, the microtubule cytoskeleton and associated motor proteins have been demonstrated to function in SG dynamics. In this paper, we will discuss current literature examining the function of microtubules and the molecular microtubule motors in SG assembly, coalescence, movement, composition, organization, and disassembly.

  8. Regulatory roles of microtubule-associated proteins in neuronal morphogenesis. Involvement of the extracellular matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramírez G.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available As a result of recent investigations, the cytoskeleton can be viewed as a cytoplasmic system of interconnected filaments with three major integrative levels: self-assembling macromolecules, filamentous polymers, e.g., microtubules, intermediate filaments and actin filaments, and supramolecular structures formed by bundles of these filaments or networks resulting from cross-bridges between these major cytoskeletal polymers. The organization of this biological structure appears to be sensitive to fine spatially and temporally dependent regulatory signals. In differentiating neurons, regulation of cytoskeleton organization is particularly relevant, and the microtubule-associated protein (MAP tau appears to play roles in the extension of large neuritic processes and axons as well as in the stabilization of microtubular polymers along these processes. Within this context, tau is directly involved in defining neuronal polarity as well as in the generation of neuronal growth cones. There is increasing evidence that elements of the extracellular matrix contribute to the control of cytoskeleton organization in differentiating neurons, and that these regulations could be mediated by changes in MAP activity. In this brief review, we discuss the possible roles of tau in mediating the effects of extracellular matrix components on the internal cytoskeletal arrays and its organization in growing neurons.

  9. The 5 Clinical Pillars of Value for Total Joint Arthroplasty in a Bundled Payment Paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kelvin; Iorio, Richard

    2017-06-01

    Our large, urban, tertiary, university-based institution reflects on its 4-year experience with Bundled Payments for Care Improvement. We will describe the importance of 5 clinical pillars that have contributed to the early success of our bundled payment initiative. We are convinced that value-based care delivered through bundled payment initiatives is the best method to optimize patient outcomes while rewarding surgeons and hospitals for adapting to the evolving healthcare reforms. We summarize a number of experiences and lessons learned since the implementation of Bundled Payments for Care Improvement at our institution. Our experience has led to the development of more refined clinical pathways and coordination of care through evidence-based approaches. We have established that the success of the bundled payment program rests on the following 5 main clinical pillars: (1) optimizing patient selection and comorbidities; (2) optimizing care coordination, patient education, shared decision making, and patient expectations; (3) using a multimodal pain management protocol and minimizing narcotic use to facilitate rapid rehabilitation; (4) optimizing blood management, and standardizing venous thromboembolic disease prophylaxis treatment by risk standardizing patients and minimizing the use of aggressive anticoagulation; and (5) minimizing post-acute facility and resource utilization, and maximizing home resources for patient recovery. From our extensive experience with bundled payment models, we have established 5 clinical pillars of value for bundled payments. Our hope is that these principles will help ease the transition to value-based care for less-experienced healthcare systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Microtubules are organized independently of the centrosome in Drosophila neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Michelle M

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The best-studied arrangement of microtubules is that organized by the centrosome, a cloud of microtubule nucleating and anchoring proteins is clustered around centrioles. However, noncentrosomal microtubule arrays are common in many differentiated cells, including neurons. Although microtubules are not anchored at neuronal centrosomes, it remains unclear whether the centrosome plays a role in organizing neuronal microtubules. We use Drosophila as a model system to determine whether centrosomal microtubule nucleation is important in mature neurons. Results In developing and mature neurons, centrioles were not surrounded by the core nucleation protein γ-tubulin. This suggests that the centrioles do not organize functional centrosomes in Drosophila neurons in vivo. Consistent with this idea, centriole position was not correlated with a specific region of the cell body in neurons, and growing microtubules did not cluster around the centriole, even after axon severing when the number of growing plus ends is dramatically increased. To determine whether the centrosome was required for microtubule organization in mature neurons, we used two approaches. First, we used DSas-4 centriole duplication mutants. In these mutants, centrioles were present in many larval sensory neurons, but they were not fully functional. Despite reduced centriole function, microtubule orientation was normal in axons and dendrites. Second, we used laser ablation to eliminate the centriole, and again found that microtubule polarity in axons and dendrites was normal, even 3 days after treatment. Conclusion We conclude that the centrosome is not a major site of microtubule nucleation in Drosophila neurons, and is not required for maintenance of neuronal microtubule organization in these cells.

  11. Microtubule-Based Transport and the Distribution, Tethering, and Organization of Organelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlan, Kari; Gelfand, Vladimir I

    2017-05-01

    SUMMARYMicrotubules provide long tracks along which a broad range of organelles and vesicles are transported by kinesin and dynein motors. Motor protein complexes also tether cargoes to cytoskeletal filaments, helping facilitate their interaction and communication. The generation of biochemically distinct microtubule subpopulations allows subsets of motors to recognize a given microtubule identity, allowing further organization within the cytoplasm. Both transport and tethering are spatiotemporally regulated through multiple modes, including acute modification of both motor-cargo and motor-track associations by various physiological signals. Strict regulation of intracellular transport is particularly important in specialized cell types such as neurons. Here, we review general mechanisms by which cargo transport is controlled and also highlight examples of transport regulated by multiple mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  12. Job Management and Task Bundling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Evan; Jansen, Gustav R.; McElvain, Kenneth; Walker-Loud, André

    2018-03-01

    High Performance Computing is often performed on scarce and shared computing resources. To ensure computers are used to their full capacity, administrators often incentivize large workloads that are not possible on smaller systems. Measurements in Lattice QCD frequently do not scale to machine-size workloads. By bundling tasks together we can create large jobs suitable for gigantic partitions. We discuss METAQ and mpi_jm, software developed to dynamically group computational tasks together, that can intelligently backfill to consume idle time without substantial changes to users' current workflows or executables.

  13. Bundling and mergers in energy markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granier, Laurent; Podesta, Marion

    2010-01-01

    Does bundling trigger mergers in energy industries? We observe mergers between firms belonging to various energy markets, for instance between gas and electricity providers. These mergers enable firms to bundle. We consider two horizontally differentiated markets. In this framework, we show that bundling strategies in energy markets create incentives to form multi-market firms in order to supply bi-energy packages. Moreover, we find that this type of merger is detrimental to social welfare. (author)

  14. The nucleation of microtubules in Aspergillus nidulans germlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade-Monteiro Cristina de

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Microtubules are filaments composed of dimers of alpha- and beta-tubulins, which have a variety of functions in living cells. In fungi, the spindle pole bodies usually have been considered to be microtubule-organizing centers. We used the antimicrotubule drug Benomyl in block/release experiments to depolymerize and repolymerize microtubules in Aspergillus nidulans germlings to learn more about the microtubule nucleation process in this filamentous fungus. Twenty seconds after release from Benomyl short microtubules were formed from several bright (immunofluorescent dots distributed along the germlings, suggesting that microtubule nucleation is randomly distributed in A. nidulans germlings. Since nuclear movement is dependent on microtubules in A. nidulans we analyzed whether mutants defective in nuclear distribution along the growing hyphae (nud mutants have some obvious microtubule defect. Cytoplasmic, astral and spindle microtubules were present and appeared to be normal in all nud mutants. However, significant changes in the percentage of short versus long mitotic spindles were observed in nud mutants. This suggests that some of the nuclei of nud mutants do not reach the late stage of cell division at normal temperatures.

  15. Producing Conditional Mutants for Studying Plant Microtubule Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Cyr

    2009-09-29

    The cytoskeleton, and in particular its microtubule component, participates in several processes that directly affect growth and development in higher plants. Normal cytoskeletal function requires the precise and orderly arrangement of microtubules into several cell cycle and developmentally specific arrays. One of these, the cortical array, is notable for its role in directing the deposition of cellulose (the most prominent polymer in the biosphere). An understanding of how these arrays form, and the molecular interactions that contribute to their function, is incomplete. To gain a better understanding of how microtubules work, we have been working to characterize mutants in critical cytoskeletal genes. This characterization is being carried out at the subcellular level using vital microtubule gene constructs. In the last year of funding colleagues have discovered that gamma-tubulin complexes form along the lengths of cortical microtubules where they act to spawn new microtubules at a characteristic 40 deg angle. This finding complements nicely the finding from our lab (which was funded by the DOE) showing that microtubule encounters are angle dependent; high angles encounters results in catastrophic collisions while low angle encounters result in favorable zippering. The finding of a 40 deg spawn of new microtubules from extant microtubule, together with aforementioned rules of encounters, insures favorable co-alignment in the array. I was invited to write a New and Views essay on this topic and a PDF is attached (News and Views policy does not permit funding acknowledgments and so I was not allowed to acknowledge support from the DOE).

  16. Hydraulic characteristics of HANARO fuel bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, S.; Chung, H. J.; Chun, S. Y.; Yang, S. K.; Chung, M. K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    This paper presents the hydraulic characteristics measured by using LDV (Laser Doppler Velocimetry) in subchannels of HANARO, KAERI research reactor, fuel bundle. The fuel bundle consists of 18 axially finned rods with 3 spacer grids, which are arranged in cylindrical configuration. The effects of the spacer grids on the turbulent flow were investigated by the experimental results. Pressure drops for each component of the fuel bundle were measured, and the friction factors of fuel bundle and loss coefficients for the spacer grids were estimated from the measured pressure drops. Implications regarding the turbulent thermal mixing were discussed. Vibration test results measured by using laser vibrometer were presented. 9 refs., 12 figs. (Author)

  17. Emerging microtubule targets in glioma therapy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Katsetos, C.D.; Reginato, M.J.; Baas, P.W.; D'Agostino, L.; Legido, A.; Tuszynski, J. A.; Dráberová, Eduarda; Dráber, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 1 (2015), s. 49-72 ISSN 1071-9091 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12050; GA MZd NT14467 Grant - others:GA AV ČR M200521203PIPP; NIH(US) R01 NS028785; Philadelphia Health Education Corporation (PHEC)–St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children Reunified Endowment (C.D.K.)(US) 323256 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : glioma tumorigenesis * glioblastoma * tubulin * microtubules Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.303, year: 2015

  18. Optomechanical proposal for monitoring microtubule mechanical vibrations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Barzanjeh, Sh.; Salari, V.; Tuszynski, J. A.; Cifra, Michal; Simon, C.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 96, č. 1 (2017), č. článku 012404. ISSN 2470-0045 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-17102S Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) SAV-15-22 Program:Bilaterální spolupráce Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Vibrational modes * Microtubule * Resonance frequencies Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Laser s OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 2.366, year: 2016

  19. Optomechanical proposal for monitoring microtubule mechanical vibrations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Barzanjeh, Sh.; Salari, V.; Tuszynski, J. A.; Cifra, Michal; Simon, C.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 96, č. 1 (2017), č. článku 012404. ISSN 2470-0045 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-17102S Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) SAV-15-22 Program:Bilaterální spolupráce Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Vibrational modes * Microtubule * Resonance frequencies Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 2.366, year: 2016

  20. Wall pressure fluctuations in rod bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, S.V.

    1990-01-01

    Microphones and hot wires were applied for the measurement of wall pressure fluctuations and velocity fluctuations in rod bundles with several aspect ratios. By means of auto and cross spectral density functions their interdependence was investigated. Results show that the pressure fluctuations in rod bundles are mainly associated with the phenomenon of quasi-periodic flow pulsations between subchannels. (author)

  1. Anatomic Double-bundle ACL Reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreiber, Verena M.; van Eck, Carola F.; Fu, Freddie H.

    2010-01-01

    Rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most frequent forms of knee trauma. The traditional surgical treatment for ACL rupture is single-bundle reconstruction. However, during the past few years there has been a shift in interest toward double-bundle reconstruction to closely

  2. Structural microtubule cap: Stability, catastrophe, rescue, and third state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, H.; Chretien, D.; Janosi, I.M.

    2002-01-01

    Microtubules polymerize from GTP-liganded tubulin dinners, but are essentially made of GDP-liganded tubulin. We investigate the tug-of-war resulting from the fact that GDP-liganded tubulin favors a curved configuration, but is forced to remain in a straight one when part of a microtubule. We poin...

  3. Buckling of microtubules on elastic media via breakable bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrin, Tanjina; Kabir, Arif Md Rashedul; Sada, Kazuki; Kakugo, Akira; Nitta, Takahiro

    2016-11-04

    Buckling of microtubules observed in cells has been reconstructed on a two-dimensional elastic medium consisting of kinesins grafted over compressible substrates, enabling precise control of experimental conditions and quantitative analysis. However, interpretations of the observations have ambiguities due to inevitable experimental difficulties. In this study, with computer simulations, we investigated importance of the mode of interaction of microtubule with elastic medium in the buckling behavior of microtubule. By taking into consideration of forced-induced detachments of kinesins from microtubules, our simulations reproduced the previous experimental results, and showed deviations from predictions of the elastic foundation model. On the other hand, with hypothetical linkers permanently bound to microtubules, our simulation reproduced the predictions of the elastic foundation model. By analyzing the results of the simulations, we investigated as to why the difference arose. These findings indicate the importance of the mode of interaction of microtubule with the medium in the buckling behavior of microtubule. Our findings would bring new insights on buckling of microtubules in living cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Higgs bundles and four manifolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jae-Suk.

    2002-01-01

    It is known that the Seiberg-Witten invariants, derived from supersymmetric Yang-Mill theories in four dimensions, do not distinguish smooth structure of certain non-simply-connected four manifolds. We propose generalizations of Donaldson-Witten and Vafa-Witten theories on a Kaehler manifold based on Higgs bundles. We showed, in particular, that the partition function of our generalized Vafa-Witten theory can be written as the sum of contributions our generalized Donaldson-Witten invariants and generalized Seiberg-Witten invariants. The resulting generalized Seiberg-Witten invariants might have, conjecturally, information on smooth structure beyond the original Seiberg-Witten invariants for non-simply-connected case

  5. Phosphatase PP2A and microtubule-mediated pulling forces disassemble centrosomes during mitotic exit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J. Enos

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Centrosomes are microtubule-nucleating organelles that facilitate chromosome segregation and cell division in metazoans. Centrosomes comprise centrioles that organize a micron-scale mass of protein called pericentriolar material (PCM from which microtubules nucleate. During each cell cycle, PCM accumulates around centrioles through phosphorylation-mediated assembly of PCM scaffold proteins. During mitotic exit, PCM swiftly disassembles by an unknown mechanism. Here, we used Caenorhabditis elegans embryos to determine the mechanism and importance of PCM disassembly in dividing cells. We found that the phosphatase PP2A and its regulatory subunit SUR-6 (PP2ASUR-6, together with cortically directed microtubule pulling forces, actively disassemble PCM. In embryos depleted of these activities, ∼25% of PCM persisted from one cell cycle into the next. Purified PP2ASUR-6 could dephosphorylate the major PCM scaffold protein SPD-5 in vitro. Our data suggest that PCM disassembly occurs through a combination of dephosphorylation of PCM components and force-driven fragmentation of the PCM scaffold.

  6. Improving BWR fuel critical power without increasing bundle pressure drop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matzner, B.; Shiraishi, L.M.; Danielson, D.W.; Congdon, S.P.

    2004-01-01

    It has been almost axiomatic that BWR fuel bundle critical power performance could not be improved without an accompanying increase in bundle pressure drop. It appeared that in order to increase the bundle dryout resistance it was necessary to perturb the bundle coolant flow paths in some fashion. This resulted in an unacceptable bundle pressure drop increase. However, by adding part length rods to decrease bundle pressure drop and by inserting an extra spacer with rearranged spacer pitch and flow trippers on the channel wall at the top of the bundle to increase critical power it was possible to achieve the goal of increased bundle critical power without pressure drop increase. (author)

  7. Organizational Domains and Variation in Attitudes of Intensive Care Providers Toward the ABCDE Bundle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Leanne M; Vasilevskis, Eduard E; Dietrich, Mary S; Wells, Nancy; Ely, E Wesley; Pandharipande, Pratik; Mion, Lorraine C

    2017-05-01

    The ABCDE interprofessional bundle (Awakening and Breathing Coordination, Delirium monitoring and management, and Early mobility) reduces delirium and weakness in critically ill patients. To understand the relationship between organizational domains and provider attitudes. A 1-time electronic survey of 315 care providers in 10 intensive care units across the country to examine associations between organizational domains (policy/protocol factors, unit milieu, tasks, labor quality, labor quantity, and physical environment) and provider attitudes about perceived ease of completion, perceived safety, confidence, and perceived strength of evidence regarding the ABCDE bundle. Spearman correlations ( r s ) were used to examine the associations between organizational domains and provider attitude subscales ( r s ≥ 0.32 was considered clinically important). Protocol attributes ( r s = 0.37-0.58), role clarity ( r s = 0.38-0.59), training/understanding ( r s = 0.33-0.46), coordination ( r s = 0.32-0.46), and peer advocates ( r s = 0.37-0.48) were associated with less difficulty performing the bundle and better confidence, perceived safety, and strength of evidence. Participants also reported less difficulty carrying out the bundle when the team worked well together. Task autonomy was associated with better perceived safety ( r s = 0.35) and confidence ( r s = 0.47) related to the bundle. Focusing interventions on policy and protocol factors, unit milieu, and task autonomy, which have the strongest associations with providers' attitudes, may facilitate ABCDE bundle uptake. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  8. Opposing microtubule motors drive robust nuclear dynamics in developing muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Meredith H; Holzbaur, Erika L F

    2012-09-01

    Dynamic interactions with the cytoskeleton drive the movement and positioning of nuclei in many cell types. During muscle cell development, myoblasts fuse to form syncytial myofibers with nuclei positioned regularly along the length of the cell. Nuclear translocation in developing myotubes requires microtubules, but the mechanisms involved have not been elucidated. We find that as nuclei actively translocate through the cell, they rotate in three dimensions. The nuclear envelope, nucleoli and chromocenters within the nucleus rotate together as a unit. Both translocation and rotation require an intact microtubule cytoskeleton, which forms a dynamic bipolar network around nuclei. The plus- and minus-end-directed microtubule motor proteins, kinesin-1 and dynein, localize to the nuclear envelope in myotubes. Kinesin-1 localization is mediated at least in part by interaction with klarsicht/ANC-1/Syne homology (KASH) proteins. Depletion of kinesin-1 abolishes nuclear rotation and significantly inhibits nuclear translocation, resulting in the abnormal aggregation of nuclei at the midline of the myotube. Dynein depletion also inhibits nuclear dynamics, but to a lesser extent, leading to altered spacing between adjacent nuclei. Thus, oppositely directed motors acting from the surface of the nucleus drive nuclear motility in myotubes. The variable dynamics observed for individual nuclei within a single myotube are likely to result from the stochastic activity of competing motors interacting with a complex bipolar microtubule cytoskeleton that is also continuously remodeled as the nuclei move. The three-dimensional rotation of myotube nuclei may facilitate their motility through the complex and crowded cellular environment of the developing muscle cell, allowing for proper myonuclear positioning.

  9. Why (almost) all bundles are chiral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kost-Smith, Zachary V.; Blackwell, Robert A.; Glaser, Matthew A.

    2014-03-01

    We examine the self assembly of bundles of achiral hard rods with distributed, short-range attractive interactions. We show that in the majority of cases the equilibrium state of the bundle is chiral, with a double twist structure. We use biased Monte Carlo techniques and cell theory to compute the free energy as a function of an appropriately defined twist order parameter, and show that the formation of spontaneously chiral bundles is driven by maximization of orientational entropy. The finite curvature of the bundle boundary permits orientational escape, in which the circumferential angular range of motion of the rods is maximized for some finite average tilt. We map out the phase diagram of bundles in terms of the density, the ratio of rod length to bundle radius, L / R , and rod aspect ratio, L / D , and find transitions between untwisted, weakly twisted, and strongly twisted states. This work helps explain the common observation of twisted macroscopic bundles, and may provide insight into observations of twist in self-assembled membranes of colloidal rods.[2] This work funded by NSF MRSEC Grant DMR-0820579.

  10. Preliminary report: NIF laser bundle review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tietbohl, G.L.; Larson, D.W.; Erlandson, A.C.

    1995-01-01

    As requested in the guidance memo 1 , this committe determined whether there are compelling reasons to recommend a change from the NIF CDR baseline laser. The baseline bundle design based on a tradeoff between cost and technical risk, which is replicated four times to create the required 192 beams. The baseline amplifier design uses bottom loading 1x4 slab and flashlamp cassettes for amplifier maintenance and large vacuum enclosures (2.5m high x 7m wide in cross-section for each of the two spatial filters in each of the four bundles. The laser beams are arranged in two laser bays configured in a u-shape around the target area. The entire bundle review effort was performed in a very short time (six weeks) and with limited resources (15 personnel part-time). This should be compared to the effort that produced the CDR design (12 months, 50 to 100 personnel). This committee considered three alternate bundle configurations (2x2, 4x2, and 4x4 bundles), and evaluated each bundle against the baseline design using the seven requested issues in the guidance memo: Cost; schedule; performance risk; maintainability/operability; hardware failure cost exposure; activation; and design flexibility. The issues were reviewed to identify differences between each alternate bundle configuration and the baseline

  11. Validation of an automatic diagnosis of strict left bundle branch block criteria using 12-lead electrocardiograms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xia, Xiaojuan; Ruwald, Anne-Christine; Ruwald, Martin H

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: Strict left bundle branch block (LBBB) criteria were recently proposed to identify LBBB patients to benefit most from cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). The aim of our study was to automate identification of strict LBBB in order to facilitate its broader application. METHODS: We devel...

  12. Contraction of cross-linked actomyosin bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga, Natsuhiko; Marcq, Philippe

    2012-08-01

    Cross-linked actomyosin bundles retract when severed in vivo by laser ablation, or when isolated from the cell and micromanipulated in vitro in the presence of ATP. We identify the timescale for contraction as a viscoelastic time τ, where the viscosity is due to (internal) protein friction. We obtain an estimate of the order of magnitude of the contraction time τ ≈ 10-100 s, consistent with available experimental data for circumferential microfilament bundles and stress fibers. Our results are supported by an exactly solvable, hydrodynamic model of a retracting bundle as a cylinder of isotropic, active matter, from which the order of magnitude of the active stress is estimated.

  13. Fibre bundles. Monopoles and internal symmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvathy, P.A.; Rawnsley, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    Asymptotic monopole configurations are described in fibre-bundle terms. Bundle reduction -the geometric procedure for spontaneous symmetry breaking- is studied in detail: the monopole-bundle is reducible to a given subgroup K of the gauge group if and only if the Higgs charge satisfies a suitable constraint. The Yang-Mills connection reduces if and only if the non-Abelian charge vector belongs to the Lie algebra of K. The problem of ''global color'' can also be formulated in these terms. Our theory allows us to determine which subgroups K are internal symmetries of a given field configuration

  14. On muon bundles from the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankiewicz, P.; Rybczyński, M.; Włdarczyk, Z.; Wilk, G.

    2018-01-01

    Recently the CERN ALICE experiment, in its dedicated cosmic ray run, observed muon bundles of very high multiplicities, thereby confirming similar findings from the LEP era at CERN (in the CosmoLEP project). We found significant evidence for anisotropy of arrival directions of the observed high multiplicity muonic bundles. The distribution on celestial sphere and the estimated directionality suggests their possible extragalactic source. We argue that muonic bundles of highest multiplicity are produced by strangelets, hypothetical stable lumps of strange quark matter infiltrating our Universe.

  15. Geometry of Quantum Principal Bundles. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durdevic, M.

    1996-01-01

    A theory of principal bundles possessing quantum structure groups and classical base manifolds is presented. Structural analysis of such quantum principal bundles is performed. A differential calculus is constructed, combining differential forms on the base manifold with an appropriate differential calculus on the structure quantum group. Relations between the calculus on the group and the calculus on the bundle are investigated. A concept of (pseudo)tensoriality is formulated. The formalism of connections is developed. In particular, operators of horizontal projection, covariant derivative and curvature are constructed and analyzed. Generalizations of the first Structure Equation and of the Bianchi identity are found. Illustrative examples are presented. (orig.)

  16. Bundles of C*-categories and duality

    OpenAIRE

    Vasselli, Ezio

    2005-01-01

    We introduce the notions of multiplier C*-category and continuous bundle of C*-categories, as the categorical analogues of the corresponding C*-algebraic notions. Every symmetric tensor C*-category with conjugates is a continuous bundle of C*-categories, with base space the spectrum of the C*-algebra associated with the identity object. We classify tensor C*-categories with fibre the dual of a compact Lie group in terms of suitable principal bundles. This also provides a classification for ce...

  17. A thermodynamic model of microtubule assembly and disassembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard M A G Piette

    Full Text Available Microtubules are self-assembling polymers whose dynamics are essential for the normal function of cellular processes including chromosome separation and cytokinesis. Therefore understanding what factors effect microtubule growth is fundamental to our understanding of the control of microtubule based processes. An important factor that determines the status of a microtubule, whether it is growing or shrinking, is the length of the GTP tubulin microtubule cap. Here, we derive a Monte Carlo model of the assembly and disassembly of microtubules. We use thermodynamic laws to reduce the number of parameters of our model and, in particular, we take into account the contribution of water to the entropy of the system. We fit all parameters of the model from published experimental data using the GTP tubulin dimer attachment rate and the lateral and longitudinal binding energies of GTP and GDP tubulin dimers at both ends. Also we calculate and incorporate the GTP hydrolysis rate. We have applied our model and can mimic published experimental data, which formerly suggested a single layer GTP tubulin dimer microtubule cap, to show that these data demonstrate that the GTP cap can fluctuate and can be several microns long.

  18. Does usnic acid affect microtubules in human cancer cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA. O'Neill

    Full Text Available Usnic acid, a lichen metabolite, is known to exert antimitotic and antiproliferative activities against normal and malignant human cells. Many chemotherapy agents exert their activities by blocking cell cycle progression, inducing cell death through apoptosis. Microtubules, protein structure involved in the segregation of chromosomes during mitosis, serve as chemotherapeutical targets due to their key role in cellular division as well as apoptosis. The aim of this work was to investigate whether usnic acid affects the formation and/or stabilisation of microtubules by visualising microtubules and determining mitotic indices after treatment. The breast cancer cell line MCF7 and the lung cancer cell line H1299 were treated with usnic acid 29 µM for 24 hours and two positive controls: vincristine (which prevents the formation of microtubules or taxol (which stabilizes microtubules. Treatment of MCF7 and H1299 cells with usnic acid did not result in any morphological changes in microtubules or increase in the mitotic index. These results suggest that the antineoplastic activity of usnic acid is not related to alterations in the formation and/or stabilisation of microtubules.

  19. An improved quantitative analysis method for plant cortical microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi; Huang, Chenyang; Wang, Jia; Shang, Peng

    2014-01-01

    The arrangement of plant cortical microtubules can reflect the physiological state of cells. However, little attention has been paid to the image quantitative analysis of plant cortical microtubules so far. In this paper, Bidimensional Empirical Mode Decomposition (BEMD) algorithm was applied in the image preprocessing of the original microtubule image. And then Intrinsic Mode Function 1 (IMF1) image obtained by decomposition was selected to do the texture analysis based on Grey-Level Cooccurrence Matrix (GLCM) algorithm. Meanwhile, in order to further verify its reliability, the proposed texture analysis method was utilized to distinguish different images of Arabidopsis microtubules. The results showed that the effect of BEMD algorithm on edge preserving accompanied with noise reduction was positive, and the geometrical characteristic of the texture was obvious. Four texture parameters extracted by GLCM perfectly reflected the different arrangements between the two images of cortical microtubules. In summary, the results indicate that this method is feasible and effective for the image quantitative analysis of plant cortical microtubules. It not only provides a new quantitative approach for the comprehensive study of the role played by microtubules in cell life activities but also supplies references for other similar studies.

  20. Multiscale modeling and simulation of microtubule-motor-protein assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tong; Blackwell, Robert; Glaser, Matthew A.; Betterton, M. D.; Shelley, Michael J.

    2015-12-01

    Microtubules and motor proteins self-organize into biologically important assemblies including the mitotic spindle and the centrosomal microtubule array. Outside of cells, microtubule-motor mixtures can form novel active liquid-crystalline materials driven out of equilibrium by adenosine triphosphate-consuming motor proteins. Microscopic motor activity causes polarity-dependent interactions between motor proteins and microtubules, but how these interactions yield larger-scale dynamical behavior such as complex flows and defect dynamics is not well understood. We develop a multiscale theory for microtubule-motor systems in which Brownian dynamics simulations of polar microtubules driven by motors are used to study microscopic organization and stresses created by motor-mediated microtubule interactions. We identify polarity-sorting and crosslink tether relaxation as two polar-specific sources of active destabilizing stress. We then develop a continuum Doi-Onsager model that captures polarity sorting and the hydrodynamic flows generated by these polar-specific active stresses. In simulations of active nematic flows on immersed surfaces, the active stresses drive turbulent flow dynamics and continuous generation and annihilation of disclination defects. The dynamics follow from two instabilities, and accounting for the immersed nature of the experiment yields unambiguous characteristic length and time scales. When turning off the hydrodynamics in the Doi-Onsager model, we capture formation of polar lanes as observed in the Brownian dynamics simulation.

  1. Dietary antioxidant curcumin inhibits microtubule assembly through tubulin binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Kamlesh K; Bharne, Shubhada S; Rathinasamy, Krishnan; Naik, Nishigandha R; Panda, Dulal

    2006-12-01

    Curcumin, a component of turmeric, has potent antitumor activity against several tumor types. However, its molecular target and mechanism of antiproliferative activity are not clear. Here, we identified curcumin as a novel antimicrotubule agent. We have examined the effects of curcumin on cellular microtubules and on reconstituted microtubules in vitro. Curcumin inhibited HeLa and MCF-7 cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner with IC(50) of 13.8 +/- 0.7 microm and 12 +/- 0.6 microm, respectively. At higher inhibitory concentrations (> 10 microm), curcumin induced significant depolymerization of interphase microtubules and mitotic spindle microtubules of HeLa and MCF-7 cells. However, at low inhibitory concentrations there were minimal effects on cellular microtubules. It disrupted microtubule assembly in vitro, reduced GTPase activity, and induced tubulin aggregation. Curcumin bound to tubulin at a single site with a dissociation constant of 2.4 +/- 0.4 microm and the binding of curcumin to tubulin induced conformational changes in tubulin. Colchicine and podophyllotoxin partly inhibited the binding of curcumin to tubulin, while vinblastine had no effect on the curcumin-tubulin interactions. The data together suggested that curcumin may inhibit cancer cells proliferation by perturbing microtubule assembly dynamics and may be used to develop efficacious curcumin analogues for cancer chemotherapy.

  2. Structural insights into microtubule doublet interactions inaxonemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downing, Kenneth H.; Sui, Haixin

    2007-06-06

    Coordinated sliding of microtubule doublets, driven by dynein motors, produces periodic beating of the axoneme. Recent structural studies of the axoneme have used cryo-electron tomography to reveal new details of the interactions among some of the multitude of proteins that form the axoneme and regulate its movement. Connections among the several sets of dyneins, in particular, suggest ways in which their actions may be coordinated. Study of the molecular architecture of isolated doublets has provided a structural basis for understanding the doublet's mechanical properties that are related to the bending of the axoneme, and has also offered insight into its potential role in the mechanism of dynein activity regulation.

  3. Centrosome and microtubule instability in aging Drosophila cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatten, H.; Chakrabarti, A.; Hedrick, J.

    1999-01-01

    Several cytoskeletal changes are associated with aging which includes alterations in muscle structure leading to muscular atrophy, and weakening of the microtubule network which affects cellular secretion and maintenance of cell shape. Weakening of the microtubule network during meiosis in aging oocytes can result in aneuploidy or trisomic zygotes with increasing maternal age. Imbalances of cytoskeletal organization can lead to disease such as Alzheimer's, muscular disorders, and cancer. Because many cytoskeletal diseases are related to age we investigated the effects of aging on microtubule organization in cell cultures of the Drosophila cell model system (Schneider S-1 and Kc23 cell lines). This cell model is increasingly being used as an alternative system to mammalian cell cultures. Drosophila cells are amenable to genetic manipulations and can be used to identify and manipulate genes which are involved in the aging processes. Immunofluorescence, scanning, and transmission electron microscopy were employed for the analysis of microtubule organizing centers (centrosomes) and microtubules at various times after subculturing cells in fresh medium. Our results reveal that centrosomes and the microtubule network becomes significantly affected in aging cells after 5 days of subculture. At 5-14 days of subculture, 1% abnormal out of 3% mitoses were noted which were clearly distinguishable from freshly subcultured control cells in which 3% of cells undergo normal mitosis with bipolar configurations. Microtubules are also affected in the midbody during cell division. The midbody in aging cells becomes up to 10 times longer when compared with midbodies in freshly subcultured cells. During interphase, microtubules are often disrupted and disorganized, which may indicate improper function related to transport of cell organelles along microtubules. These results are likely to help explain some cytoskeletal disorders and diseases related to aging.

  4. Mitotic motors coregulate microtubule patterns in axons and dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shen; Liu, Mei; Mozgova, Olga I; Yu, Wenqian; Baas, Peter W

    2012-10-03

    Microtubules are nearly uniformly oriented in the axons of vertebrate neurons but are non-uniformly oriented in their dendrites. Studies to date suggest a scenario for establishing these microtubule patterns whereby microtubules are transported into the axon and nascent dendrites with plus-ends-leading, and then additional microtubules of the opposite orientation are transported into the developing dendrites. Here, we used contemporary tools to confirm that depletion of kinesin-6 (also called CHO1/MKLP1 or kif23) from rat sympathetic neurons causes a reduction in the appearance of minus-end-distal microtubules in developing dendrites, which in turn causes them to assume an axon-like morphology. Interestingly, we observed a similar phenomenon when we depleted kinesin-12 (also called kif15 or HKLP2). Both motors are best known for their participation in mitosis in other cell types, and both are enriched in the cell body and dendrites of neurons. Unlike kinesin-12, which is present throughout the neuron, kinesin-6 is barely detectable in the axon. Accordingly, depletion of kinesin-6, unlike depletion of kinesin-12, has no effect on axonal branching or navigation. Interestingly, depletion of either motor results in faster growing axons with greater numbers of mobile microtubules. Based on these observations, we posit a model whereby these two motors generate forces that attenuate the transport of microtubules with plus-ends-leading from the cell body into the axon. Some of these microtubules are not only prevented from moving into the axon but are driven with minus-ends-leading into developing dendrites. In this manner, these so-called "mitotic" motors coregulate the microtubule patterns of axons and dendrites.

  5. Broadcast scheduling with data bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fangfei; Pizzocaro, Diego; Johnson, Matthew P.; Bar-Noy, Amotz; Preece, Alun; La Porta, Thomas

    2011-06-01

    Broadcast scheduling has been extensively studied in wireless environments, where a base station broadcasts data to multiple users. Due to the sole wireless channel's limited bandwidth, only a subset of the needs may be satisfiable, and so maximizing total (weighted) throughput is a popular objective. In many realistic applications, however, data are dependent or correlated in the sense that the joint utility of a set of items is not simply the sum of their individual utilities. On the one hand, substitute data may provide overlapping information, so one piece of data item may have lower value if a second data item has already been delivered; on the other hand, complementary data are more valuable than the sum of their parts, if, for example, one data item is only useful in the presence of a second data item. In this paper, we define a data bundle to be a set of data items with possibly nonadditive joint utility, and we study a resulting broadcast scheduling optimization problem whose objective is to maximize the utility provided by the data delivered.

  6. MAVEN Insitu Key Parameters Data Bundle

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The insitu.calibrated level 2 science.data bundle contains selected fully calibrated (L2) data from the Particles and Fields package and NGIMS, together with...

  7. Einstein metrics on tangent bundles of spheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dancer, Andrew S [Jesus College, Oxford University, Oxford OX1 3DW (United Kingdom); Strachan, Ian A B [Department of Mathematics, University of Hull, Hull HU6 7RX (United Kingdom)

    2002-09-21

    We give an elementary treatment of the existence of complete Kaehler-Einstein metrics with nonpositive Einstein constant and underlying manifold diffeomorphic to the tangent bundle of the (n+1)-sphere.

  8. In-pool damaged fuel bundle recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piascik, T.G.; Patenaude, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    While preparing to rerack the Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station, GPU Nuclear had need to move a damaged fuel bundle. This bundle had no upper tie plate and could not be moved in the normal manner. GPU Nuclear formed a small, dedicated project team to disassemble, package, and move this damaged bundle. The team was composed of key personnel from GPU Nuclear Fuels Projects, OCNGS Operations and Proto-Power/Bisco, a specialty contractor who has fuel bundle reconstitution and rod consolidation experience, remote tooling, underwater video systems and experienced technicians. Proven tooling, clear procedures and a simple approach were important, but the key element was the spirit of teamwork and leadership exhibited by the people involved. In spite of several emergent problems which a task of this nature presents, this small, close knit utility/vendor team completed the work on schedule and within the exposure and cost budgets

  9. In-pool damaged fuel bundle recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piascik, T.G.; Patenaude, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    While preparing to rerack the Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station, GPU Nuclear had need to move a damaged fuel bundle. This bundle had no upper tie plate and could not be moved in the normal manner. GPU Nuclear formed a small, dedicated project team to disassemble, package and move this damaged bundle. The team was composed of key personnel from GPU Nuclear Fuels Projects, OCNGS Operations and Proto-Power / Bisco, a specialty contractor who has fuel bundle reconstitution and rod consolidation experience, remote tooling, underwater video systems and experienced technicians. Proven tooling, clear procedures and a simple approach were important, but the key element was the spirit of teamwork and leadership exhibited by the people involved

  10. Frobenius splitting of projective toric bundles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    He Xin

    2018-03-19

    Mar 19, 2018 ... Firstly it is easy to see that the image of s under the restriction map (2.5) falls in the χ-isotypical component of (Uσ , E), i.e. for all t ∈ T .... σ falls in the χ-isotypical component of (E,Uσ ). D. As mentioned in Remark 2.3, for a vector v .... The determinant of a toric bundle. LetE be a toric bundle on a toric variety X ...

  11. Principal bundles on the projective line

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Senthilkumar (Newgen Imaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    E-mail: vikram@math.tifr.res.in; subramnn@math.tifr.res.in. MS received 21 January 2002; revised 19 April 2002. Abstract. We classify principal G-bundles on the projective line over an arbitrary field k of characteristic = 2 or 3, where G is a reductive group. If such a bundle is trivial at a k-rational point, then the structure group ...

  12. Frobenius splitting of projective toric bundles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    11

    Similarly, for each integer m ≥ 1 and n ≤ r, where r is the rank of E, the symmetric product SmE and wedge product ∧nE are also toric bundles. The associated Klyachko data of these toric bundles are the families of filtrations on the vector spaces SmE and ∧nE described as follows. (SmE)α(i) = { ∏. 1≤j≤m ej | ej ∈ E, 1 ...

  13. Effects of the KIF2C neck peptide on microtubules: lateral disintegration of microtubules and β-structure formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Youské; Shimizu, Takashi; Nara, Masayuki; Kikumoto, Mahito; Kojima, Hiroaki; Morii, Hisayuki

    2013-04-01

    Members of the kinesin-13 sub-family, including KIF2C, depolymerize microtubules. The positive charge-rich 'neck' region extending from the N-terminus of the catalytic head is considered to be important in the depolymerization activity. Chemically synthesized peptides, covering the basic region (A182-E200), induced a sigmoidal increase in the turbidity of a microtubule suspension. The increase was suppressed by salt addition or by reduction of basicity by amino acid substitutions. Electron microscopic observations revealed ring structures surrounding the microtubules at high peptide concentrations. Using the peptide A182-D218, we also detected free thin straight filaments, probably protofilaments disintegrated from microtubules. Therefore, the neck region, even without the catalytic head domain, may induce lateral disintegration of microtubules. With microtubules lacking anion-rich C-termini as a result of subtilisin treatment, addition of the peptide induced only a moderate increase in turbidity, and rings and protofilaments were rarely detected, while aggregations, also thought to be caused by lateral disintegration, were often observed in electron micrographs. Thus, the C-termini are not crucial for the action of the peptides in lateral disintegration but contribute to structural stabilization of the protofilaments. Previous structural studies indicated that the neck region of KIF2C is flexible, but our IR analysis suggests that the cation-rich region (K190-A204) forms β-structure in the presence of microtubules, which may be of significance with regard to the action of the neck region. Therefore, the neck region of KIF2C is sufficient to cause disintegration of microtubules into protofilaments, and this may contribute to the ability of KIF2C to cause depolymerization of microtubules. © 2013 The Authors Journal compilation © 2013 FEBS.

  14. Chromosome Bridges Maintain Kinetochore-Microtubule Attachment throughout Mitosis and Rarely Break during Anaphase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pampalona, Judit; Roscioli, Emanuele; Silkworth, William T; Bowden, Brent; Genescà, Anna; Tusell, Laura; Cimini, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation during cell division is essential to maintain genome stability, and chromosome segregation errors are causally linked to genetic disorders and cancer. An anaphase chromosome bridge is a particular chromosome segregation error observed in cells that enter mitosis with fused chromosomes/sister chromatids. The widely accepted Breakage/Fusion/Bridge cycle model proposes that anaphase chromosome bridges break during mitosis to generate chromosome ends that will fuse during the following cell cycle, thus forming new bridges that will break, and so on. However, various studies have also shown a link between chromosome bridges and aneuploidy and/or polyploidy. In this study, we investigated the behavior and properties of chromosome bridges during mitosis, with the idea to gain insight into the potential mechanism underlying chromosome bridge-induced aneuploidy. We find that only a small number of chromosome bridges break during anaphase, whereas the rest persist through mitosis into the subsequent cell cycle. We also find that the microtubule bundles (k-fibers) bound to bridge kinetochores are not prone to breakage/detachment, thus supporting the conclusion that k-fiber detachment is not the cause of chromosome bridge-induced aneuploidy. Instead, our data suggest that while the microtubules bound to the kinetochores of normally segregating chromosomes shorten substantially during anaphase, the k-fibers bound to bridge kinetochores shorten only slightly, and may even lengthen, during anaphase. This causes some of the bridge kinetochores/chromosomes to lag behind in a position that is proximal to the cell/spindle equator and may cause the bridged chromosomes to be segregated into the same daughter nucleus or to form a micronucleus.

  15. Mechanisms to Avoid and Correct Erroneous Kinetochore-Microtubule Attachments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Lampson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In dividing vertebrate cells multiple microtubules must connect to mitotic kinetochores in a highly stereotypical manner, with each sister kinetochore forming microtubule attachments to only one spindle pole. The exact sequence of events by which this goal is achieved varies considerably from cell to cell because of the variable locations of kinetochores and spindle poles, and randomness of initial microtubule attachments. These chance encounters with the kinetochores nonetheless ultimately lead to the desired outcome with high fidelity and in a limited time frame, providing one of the most startling examples of biological self-organization. This chapter discusses mechanisms that contribute to accurate chromosome segregation by helping dividing cells to avoid and resolve improper microtubule attachments.

  16. Association of Ebola Virus Matrix Protein VP40 with Microtubules

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ruthel, Gordon; Demmin, Gretchen L; Kallstrom, George; Javid, Melodi P; Badie, Shirin S; Will, Amy B; Nelle, Timothy; Schokman, Rowena; Nguyen, Tam L; Carra, John H; Bavari, Sina; Aman, M. J

    2005-01-01

    Viruses exploit a variety of cellular components to complete their life cycles, and it has become increasingly clear that use of host cell microtubules is a vital part of the infection process for many viruses...

  17. Acentrosomal microtubule assembly in mitosis: the where, when, and how

    OpenAIRE

    Meunier, Sylvain; Vernos, Isabelle, 1959-

    2016-01-01

    In mitosis the cell assembles the bipolar spindle, a microtubule (MT)-based apparatus that segregates the duplicated chromosomes into two daughter cells. Most animal cells enter mitosis with duplicated centrosomes that provide an active source of dynamic MTs. However, it is now established that spindle assembly relies on the nucleation of acentrosomal MTs occurring around the chromosomes after nuclear envelope breakdown, and on pre-existing microtubules. Where chromosome-dependent MT nucleati...

  18. Nonlinear dynamics of C–terminal tails in cellular microtubules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekulic, Dalibor L., E-mail: dalsek@uns.ac.rs; Sataric, Bogdan M.; Sataric, Miljko V. [University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Technical Sciences, Novi Sad (Serbia); Zdravkovic, Slobodan [University of Belgrade, Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinca, Belgrade (Serbia); Bugay, Aleksandr N. [Laboratory of Radiation Biology, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-15

    The mechanical and electrical properties, and information processing capabilities of microtubules are the permanent subject of interest for carrying out experiments in vitro and in silico, as well as for theoretical attempts to elucidate the underlying processes. In this paper, we developed a new model of the mechano–electrical waves elicited in the rows of very flexible C–terminal tails which decorate the outer surface of each microtubule. The fact that C–terminal tails play very diverse roles in many cellular functions, such as recruitment of motor proteins and microtubule–associated proteins, motivated us to consider their collective dynamics as the source of localized waves aimed for communication between microtubule and associated proteins. Our approach is based on the ferroelectric liquid crystal model and it leads to the effective asymmetric double-well potential which brings about the conditions for the appearance of kink–waves conducted by intrinsic electric fields embedded in microtubules. These kinks can serve as the signals for control and regulation of intracellular traffic along microtubules performed by processive motions of motor proteins, primarly from kinesin and dynein families. On the other hand, they can be precursors for initiation of dynamical instability of microtubules by recruiting the proper proteins responsible for the depolymerization process.

  19. Ibuprofen regulation of microtubule dynamics in cystic fibrosis epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rymut, Sharon M; Kampman, Claire M; Corey, Deborah A; Endres, Tori; Cotton, Calvin U; Kelley, Thomas J

    2016-08-01

    High-dose ibuprofen, an effective anti-inflammatory therapy for the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF), has been shown to preserve lung function in a pediatric population. Despite its efficacy, few patients receive ibuprofen treatment due to potential renal and gastrointestinal toxicity. The mechanism of ibuprofen efficacy is also unclear. We have previously demonstrated that CF microtubules are slower to reform after depolymerization compared with respective wild-type controls. Slower microtubule dynamics in CF cells are responsible for impaired intracellular transport and are related to inflammatory signaling. Here, it is identified that high-dose ibuprofen treatment in both CF cell models and primary CF nasal epithelial cells restores microtubule reformation rates to wild-type levels, as well as induce extension of microtubules to the cell periphery. Ibuprofen treatment also restores microtubule-dependent intracellular transport monitored by measuring intracellular cholesterol transport. These effects are specific to ibuprofen as other cyclooxygenase inhibitors have no effect on these measures. Effects of ibuprofen are mimicked by stimulation of AMPK and blocked by the AMPK inhibitor compound C. We conclude that high-dose ibuprofen treatment enhances microtubule formation in CF cells likely through an AMPK-related pathway. These findings define a potential mechanism to explain the efficacy of ibuprofen therapy in CF. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Stability of Picard bundle over moduli space of stable vector bundles ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Springer Verlag Heidelberg #4 2048 1996 Dec 15 10:16:45

    E-mail: indranil@math.tifr.res.in; tomas@math.tifr.res.in. MS received 14 September 2000. Abstract. Answering a question of [BV] it is proved that the Picard bundle on the moduli space of stable vector bundles of rank two, on a Riemann surface of genus at least three, with fixed determinant of odd degree is stable. Keywords ...

  1. Stability of Picard bundle over moduli space of stable vector bundles ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Springer Verlag Heidelberg #4 2048 1996 Dec 15 10:16:45

    Stability of Picard bundle over moduli space of stable vector bundles of rank two over a curve. INDRANIL BISWAS and TOM ´AS L G ´OMEZ. School of Mathematics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road,. Mumbai 400 005, India. E-mail: indranil@math.tifr.res.in; tomas@math.tifr.res.in. MS received 14 ...

  2. Project JOINTS: what factors affect bundle adoption in a voluntary quality improvement campaign?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodyakov, Dmitry; Ridgely, M Susan; Huang, Christina; DeBartolo, Katherine O; Sorbero, Melony E; Schneider, Eric C

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion and adoption of effective evidence-based clinical practices can be slow, especially if complex changes are required to implement new practices. To examine how hospital adherence to quality improvement (QI) methods and hospital engagement with a large-scale QI campaign could facilitate the adoption of an enhanced prevention bundle designed to reduce surgical site infection (SSI) rates after orthopaedic surgery (hip and knee arthroplasty). We conducted telephone interviews with hospital QI leaders from 73 of the 109 hospitals (67% response rate) in five states that participated in Project JOINTS (Joining Organizations IN Tackling SSIs), a QI campaign run by Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI). Using QI methods grounded in the IHI Model for Improvement, this campaign encouraged hospitals to implement an enhanced SSI prevention bundle. Hospital QI leaders reported on their hospital's adherence to the Project JOINTS QI methods; their level of engagement with Project JOINTS activities; and adoption of the SSI prevention bundle components. Interview data were analysed quantitatively and qualitatively. Both adherence to the QI methods and hospital engagement were positively associated with complete bundle adoption. Hospital engagement, especially the use of project materials and tools, was also positively associated with the initiation of and improved adherence to individual bundle components. Our findings suggest that greater adherence to the QI methods and active hospital engagement in a QI campaign facilitate adoption of evidence-based patient safety bundles in orthopaedic practice. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  3. Crowding of molecular motors determines microtubule depolymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Louis; Melbinger, Anna; Frey, Erwin

    2011-11-02

    The assembly and disassembly dynamics of microtubules (MTs) is tightly controlled by MT-associated proteins. Here, we investigate how plus-end-directed depolymerases of the kinesin-8 family regulate MT depolymerization dynamics. Using an individual-based model, we reproduce experimental findings. Moreover, crowding is identified as the key regulatory mechanism of depolymerization dynamics. Our analysis reveals two qualitatively distinct regimes. For motor densities above a particular threshold, a macroscopic traffic jam emerges at the plus-end and the MT dynamics become independent of the motor concentration. Below this threshold, microscopic traffic jams at the tip arise that cancel out the effect of the depolymerization kinetics such that the depolymerization speed is solely determined by the motor density. Because this density changes over the MT length, length-dependent regulation is possible. Remarkably, motor cooperativity affects only the end-residence time of depolymerases and not the depolymerization speed. Copyright © 2011 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Reducing hospital-acquired pressure ulcers using bundle methodology in pediatric and neonatal patients receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy: An integrative review and call to action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtwright, Suzanne E; Mastro, Kari A; Preuster, Christa; Dardashti, Navid; McGill, Sandra; Madelon, Myrlene; Johnson, Donna

    2017-10-01

    This review focuses on identifying (1) evidence of the effectiveness of care bundle methodology to reduce hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPUs) in pediatric and neonatal patients receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) therapy and (2) barriers to implementing HAPU care bundles in this at-risk population. An integrative review was conducted and reported following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. A search of the scientific literature was performed. Studies included were published between January 2011 and February 2016. A total of seven articles met inclusion criteria. Data were extracted from each published article and analyzed to identify common themes, specifically bundle methodology and barriers to implementing HAPU bundles, in this population. There is limited research on effectiveness of care bundle methodology in reducing HAPUs in children, and no research specific to its effectiveness in pediatric or neonatal ECMO patients. No research was identified studying barriers to implementation of HAPU care bundles in this population. Nurses are well poised to test innovative strategies to prevent HAPUs. Nurses should consider implementing and testing bundle methodology to reduce HAPU in this at-risk population, and conduct research to identify any barriers to implementing this strategy. There is literature to support the use of nurses as unit-based skin care champions to facilitate teamwork and reliable use of the bundle, both critical components to the success of bundle methodology. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Deformations of the generalised Picard bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, I.; Brambila-Paz, L.; Newstead, P.E.

    2004-08-01

    Let X be a nonsingular algebraic curve of genus g ≥ 3, and let Mξ denote the moduli space of stable vector bundles of rank n ≥ 2 and degree d with fixed determinant ξ over X such that n and d are coprime. We assume that if g = 3 then n ≥ 4 and if g = 4 then n ≥ 3, and suppose further that n 0 , d 0 are integers such that n 0 ≥ 1 and nd 0 + n 0 d > nn 0 (2g - 2). Let E be a semistable vector bundle over X of rank n 0 and degree d 0 . The generalised Picard bundle W ξ (E) is by definition the vector bundle over M ξ defined by the direct image p M ξ *(U ξ x p X * E) where U ξ is a universal vector bundle over X x M ξ . We obtain an inversion formula allowing us to recover E from W ξ (E) and show that the space of infinitesimal deformations of W ξ (E) is isomorphic to H 1 (X, End(E)). This construction gives a locally complete family of vector bundles over M ξ parametrised by the moduli space M(n 0 ,d 0 ) of stable bundles of rank n 0 and degree d 0 over X. If (n 0 ,d 0 ) = 1 and W ξ (E) is stable for all E is an element of M(n 0 ,d 0 ), the construction determines an isomorphism from M(n 0 ,d 0 ) to a connected component M 0 of a moduli space of stable sheaves over M ξ . This applies in particular when n 0 = 1, in which case M 0 is isomorphic to the Jacobian J of X as a polarised variety. The paper as a whole is a generalisation of results of Kempf and Mukai on Picard bundles over J, and is also related to a paper of Tyurin on the geometry of moduli of vector bundles. (author)

  6. NIF laser bundle review. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tietbohl, G.L.; Larson, D.W.; Erlandson, A.C.

    1995-01-01

    We performed additional bundle review effort subsequent to the completion of the preliminary report and are revising our original recommendations. We now recommend that the NIF baseline laser bundle size be changed to the 4x2 bundle configuration. There are several 4x2 bundle configurations that could be constructed at a cost similar to that of the baseline 4x12 (from $11M more to about $11M less than the baseline; unescalated, no contingency) and provide significant system improvements. We recommend that the building cost estimates (particularly for the in-line building options) be verified by an architect/engineer (A/E) firm knowledgeable about building design. If our cost estimates of the in-line building are accurate and therefore result in a change from the baseline U-shaped building layout, the acceptability of the in-line configuration must be reviewed from an operations viewpoint. We recommend that installation, operation, and maintenance of all laser components be reviewed to better determine the necessity of aisles, which add to the building cost significantly. The need for beam expansion must also be determined since it affects the type of bundle packing that can be used and increases the minimum laser bay width. The U-turn laser architecture (if proven viable) offers a reduction in building costs since this laser design is shorter than the baseline switched design and requires a shorter laser bay

  7. Sperm Bundles in the Seminal Vesicle of the Crematogaster victima (Smith) Adult Males (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, C M; Moreira, J; Gomes, L F; Camargo-Mathias, M I; Lino-Neto, J

    2014-06-01

    This study establishes the presence of spermatodesm in the seminal vesicles of sexually mature males of Crematogaster victima (Smith). In this species, the spermatozoa are maintained together by an extracellular matrix in which the acrosomal regions are embedded. This characteristic has not yet been observed in any other Aculeata. However, the sperm morphology in this species is similar to that described for other ants. The spermatozoa measure on average 100 μm in length, and the number of sperm per bundle is up to 256. They are composed of a head formed by the acrosome and nucleus; this is followed by the flagellum, which is formed by the centriolar adjunct, an axoneme with a 9 + 9 + 2 microtubule pattern, two mitochondrial derivatives, and two accessory bodies. The acrosome is formed by the acrosomal vesicle and perforatorium. The nucleus is filled with compact chromatin with many areas of thick and non-compacted filaments. Both mitochondrial derivatives have the same shape and diameters. The presence of sperm bundles in sexually mature males differentiates C. victima from other ants; however, the similarities in the sperm ultrastructure support the monophyly of this insect group.

  8. Association between microtubules and Golgi vesicles isolated from rat parotid glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffe, G; Raymond, M N

    1990-01-01

    We report an isolation procedure of trans-Golgi vesicles (GVs) from rat parotid glands. Various organelle markers were used, particularly galactosyl transferase as a trans-Golgi marker, to test the purity of the GV fraction. A quantitative in vitro binding assay between microtubules and GVs is described. The vesicles were incubated with taxol-induced microtubules, layered between 50% and 43% sucrose cushions and subjected to centrifugation. Unlike free microtubules which were sedimented, the GV-bound microtubules co-migrated upward with GVs. Quantification of these bound microtubules was carried out by densitometric scanning of Coomassie blue-stained gels. The association between microtubules and GVs followed a saturation curve, with a plateau value of 20 micrograms of microtubule protein bound to 500 micrograms of GV fraction. The half-saturation of the GV sites was obtained with a microtubule concentration of 20 micrograms/ml. Electron microscopy of negatively stained re-floated material showed numerous microtubule-vesicle complexes. Coating of microtubules with an excess of brain microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) abolished binding. In the absence of exogenous microtubules, we showed that the GV fraction was already interacting with a class of endogenous rat parotid microtubules. This class of colcemid and cold-stable microtubules represents 10-20% of the total tubulin content of the parotid cell.

  9. Electric fields generated by synchronized oscillations of microtubules, centrosomes and chromosomes regulate the dynamics of mitosis and meiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Yue

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Super-macromolecular complexes play many important roles in eukaryotic cells. Classical structural biological studies focus on their complicated molecular structures, physical interactions and biochemical modifications. Recent advances concerning intracellular electric fields generated by cell organelles and super-macromolecular complexes shed new light on the mechanisms that govern the dynamics of mitosis and meiosis. In this review we synthesize this knowledge to provide an integrated theoretical model of these cellular events. We suggest that the electric fields generated by synchronized oscillation of microtubules, centrosomes, and chromatin fibers facilitate several events during mitosis and meiosis, including centrosome trafficking, chromosome congression in mitosis and synapsis between homologous chromosomes in meiosis. These intracellular electric fields are generated under energy excitation through the synchronized electric oscillations of the dipolar structures of microtubules, centrosomes and chromosomes, three of the super-macromolecular complexes within an animal cell.

  10. Fibre bundle framework for quantum fault tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lucy Liuxuan; Gottesman, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    We introduce a differential geometric framework for describing families of quantum error-correcting codes and for understanding quantum fault tolerance. In particular, we use fibre bundles and a natural projectively flat connection thereon to study the transformation of codewords under unitary fault-tolerant evolutions. We'll explain how the fault-tolerant logical operations are given by the monodromy group for the bundles with projectively flat connection, which is always discrete. We will discuss the construction of the said bundles for two examples of fault-tolerant families of operations, the string operators in the toric code and the qudit transversal gates. This framework unifies topological fault tolerance and fault tolerance based on transversal gates, and is expected to apply for all unitary quantum fault-tolerant protocols.

  11. Cortactin Adopts a Globular Conformation and Bundles Actin into Sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowieson, Nathan P.; King, Gordon; Cookson, David; Ross, Ian; Huber, Thomas; Hume, David A.; Kobe, Bostjan; Martin, Jennifer L. (Queensland); (Aust. Synch.)

    2008-08-21

    Cortactin is a filamentous actin-binding protein that plays a pivotal role in translating environmental signals into coordinated rearrangement of the cytoskeleton. The dynamic reorganization of actin in the cytoskeleton drives processes including changes in cell morphology, cell migration, and phagocytosis. In general, structural proteins of the cytoskeleton bind in the N-terminal region of cortactin and regulatory proteins in the C-terminal region. Previous structural studies have reported an extended conformation for cortactin. It is therefore unclear how cortactin facilitates cross-talk between structural proteins and their regulators. In the study presented here, circular dichroism, chemical cross-linking, and small angle x-ray scattering are used to demonstrate that cortactin adopts a globular conformation, thereby bringing distant parts of the molecule into close proximity. In addition, the actin bundling activity of cortactin is characterized, showing that fully polymerized actin filaments are bundled into sheet-like structures. We present a low resolution structure that suggests how the various domains of cortactin interact to coordinate its array of binding partners at sites of actin branching.

  12. The feasibility of coherent energy transfer in microtubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, Travis John Adrian; Friesen, Douglas; Mane, Jonathan; Hameroff, Stuart; Tuszynski, Jack A.

    2014-01-01

    It was once purported that biological systems were far too ‘warm and wet’ to support quantum phenomena mainly owing to thermal effects disrupting quantum coherence. However, recent experimental results and theoretical analyses have shown that thermal energy may assist, rather than disrupt, quantum coherent transport, especially in the ‘dry’ hydrophobic interiors of biomolecules. Specifically, evidence has been accumulating for the necessary involvement of quantum coherent energy transfer between uniquely arranged chromophores in light harvesting photosynthetic complexes. The ‘tubulin’ subunit proteins, which comprise microtubules, also possess a distinct architecture of chromophores, namely aromatic amino acids, including tryptophan. The geometry and dipolar properties of these aromatics are similar to those found in photosynthetic units indicating that tubulin may support coherent energy transfer. Tubulin aggregated into microtubule geometric lattices may support such energy transfer, which could be important for biological signalling and communication essential to living processes. Here, we perform a computational investigation of energy transfer between chromophoric amino acids in tubulin via dipole excitations coupled to the surrounding thermal environment. We present the spatial structure and energetic properties of the tryptophan residues in the microtubule constituent protein tubulin. Plausibility arguments for the conditions favouring a quantum mechanism of signal propagation along a microtubule are provided. Overall, we find that coherent energy transfer in tubulin and microtubules is biologically feasible. PMID:25232047

  13. The feasibility of coherent energy transfer in microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, Travis John Adrian; Friesen, Douglas; Mane, Jonathan; Hameroff, Stuart; Tuszynski, Jack A

    2014-11-06

    It was once purported that biological systems were far too 'warm and wet' to support quantum phenomena mainly owing to thermal effects disrupting quantum coherence. However, recent experimental results and theoretical analyses have shown that thermal energy may assist, rather than disrupt, quantum coherent transport, especially in the 'dry' hydrophobic interiors of biomolecules. Specifically, evidence has been accumulating for the necessary involvement of quantum coherent energy transfer between uniquely arranged chromophores in light harvesting photosynthetic complexes. The 'tubulin' subunit proteins, which comprise microtubules, also possess a distinct architecture of chromophores, namely aromatic amino acids, including tryptophan. The geometry and dipolar properties of these aromatics are similar to those found in photosynthetic units indicating that tubulin may support coherent energy transfer. Tubulin aggregated into microtubule geometric lattices may support such energy transfer, which could be important for biological signalling and communication essential to living processes. Here, we perform a computational investigation of energy transfer between chromophoric amino acids in tubulin via dipole excitations coupled to the surrounding thermal environment. We present the spatial structure and energetic properties of the tryptophan residues in the microtubule constituent protein tubulin. Plausibility arguments for the conditions favouring a quantum mechanism of signal propagation along a microtubule are provided. Overall, we find that coherent energy transfer in tubulin and microtubules is biologically feasible. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  14. Microtubule–microtubule sliding by kinesin-1 is essential for normal cytoplasmic streaming in Drosophila oocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wen; Winding, Michael; Lakonishok, Margot; Wildonger, Jill

    2016-01-01

    Cytoplasmic streaming in Drosophila oocytes is a microtubule-based bulk cytoplasmic movement. Streaming efficiently circulates and localizes mRNAs and proteins deposited by the nurse cells across the oocyte. This movement is driven by kinesin-1, a major microtubule motor. Recently, we have shown that kinesin-1 heavy chain (KHC) can transport one microtubule on another microtubule, thus driving microtubule–microtubule sliding in multiple cell types. To study the role of microtubule sliding in oocyte cytoplasmic streaming, we used a Khc mutant that is deficient in microtubule sliding but able to transport a majority of cargoes. We demonstrated that streaming is reduced by genomic replacement of wild-type Khc with this sliding-deficient mutant. Streaming can be fully rescued by wild-type KHC and partially rescued by a chimeric motor that cannot move organelles but is active in microtubule sliding. Consistent with these data, we identified two populations of microtubules in fast-streaming oocytes: a network of stable microtubules anchored to the actin cortex and free cytoplasmic microtubules that moved in the ooplasm. We further demonstrated that the reduced streaming in sliding-deficient oocytes resulted in posterior determination defects. Together, we propose that kinesin-1 slides free cytoplasmic microtubules against cortically immobilized microtubules, generating forces that contribute to cytoplasmic streaming and are essential for the refinement of posterior determinants. PMID:27512034

  15. DP-THOT - a calculational tool for bundle-specific decay power based on actual irradiation history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, S.; Morrison, C.A.; Albasha, H.; Arguner, D.

    2005-01-01

    . Information on the operating state of the core is calculated and recorded at regular intervals using the SORO fuel management code. To retrieve the complete history of an individual bundle requires tracking the bundle back from its current location, through all previously occupied locations in the core, to the fuelling operation at which the bundle first entered the core. Taking account of all intervening core states, including periods of shutdown or reduced reactor power, a histogram can then be constructed representing the entire power history of the bundle up to any subsequent point during its residence within the core. Existing capability within the SORO auxiliary suite of codes was built upon to facilitate the process of retrieving the complete irradiation history of a bundle specified in terms of its current location in the core. An interfacing routine was written to automate the process of obtaining input from the user, retrieving the bundle power history from SORO files, providing the history in the format needed for input to the decay power calculation module, executing the decay power program, and directing output back to the user. Information supplied by the user comprises identification of the reactor unit and bundles or channels which are of interest, the time and date of shutdown subsequent to which decay powers are to be calculated, as well as the associated decay time intervals. Where the decay power for complete channels is requested, the calculation is completed on a bundle by bundle basis, and then the resulting bundle decay powers are summed to yield the overall decay power for the channel. When a core scan is requested, the calculation is undertaken for every channel and bundle in the core. The tool has been extensively tested and results from its application are presented. (author)

  16. A note on the tangent bundle of G/P

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . 39–50. [3] Donaldson S K, Infinite determinants, stable bundles, and curvature, Duke Math. J. 54. (1987) 231–247. [4] Kobayashi S, Differential geometry of complex vector bundles (NJ: Princeton University. Press, Princeton; Tokyo: Iwanami ...

  17. Vibrations in bundles with cross flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibert, R.J.; Villard, B.; Sagner, V.

    1979-01-01

    The studies just presented provide much information on the aero and hydroelastic phenomena encountered in the bundles with cross flows, particularly on the lock-in phenomena and the aeroelastic instability for which a tabulation of the typical constant has been made [fr

  18. Meromorphic connections on vector bundles over curves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Descartes,. 67084 Strasbourg Cedex, France. *Correspond author. E-mail: indranil@math.tifr.res.in; heu@math.unistra.fr. MS received 17 July 2013; revised 20 October 2013. Abstract. We give a criterion for filtered vector bundles over curves to admit a ...

  19. Abelian conformal field theory and determinant bundles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jørgen Ellegaard; Ueno, K.

    2007-01-01

    are up to a scale the same as the curvature of the connections constructed in [14, 16]. We study the sewing construction for nodal curves and its explicit relation to the constructed connections. Finally we construct preferred holomorphic sections of these line bundles and analyze their behaviour near...

  20. Optimization of a bundle divertor for FED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hively, L.M.; Rothe, K.E.; Minkoff, M.

    1982-01-01

    Optimal double-T bundle divertor configurations have been obtained for the Fusion Engineering Device (FED). On-axis ripple is minimized, while satisfying a series of engineering constraints. The ensuing non-linear optimization problem is solved via a sequence of quadratic programming subproblems, using the VMCON algorithm. The resulting divertor designs are substantially improved over previous configurations

  1. Jacobi bundles and the BFV-complex

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Le, Hong-Van; Tortorella, A. G.; Vitagliano, L.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 121, November (2017), s. 347-377 ISSN 0393-0440 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : Jacobi manifold * Jacobi bundle * coisotropic submanifolds Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 0.819, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0393044017301948

  2. Irradiation behavior of Phenix fuel pin bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marbach, G.; Millet, P.; Blanchard, P.; Huillery, R.

    1979-01-01

    A complete Phenix assembly was coated and cut into sections after irradiation. The examination of these sections reveals the effects of mechanical interaction in the bundle (ovalizing and inter-cladding contact). From the analysis of the sections through which the sodium passed, the irrigation of the fuel rods as a whole is homogeneous [fr

  3. Graph Bundling by Kernel Density Estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hurter, C.; Ersoy, O.; Telea, A.

    We present a fast and simple method to compute bundled layouts of general graphs. For this, we first transform a given graph drawing into a density map using kernel density estimation. Next, we apply an image sharpening technique which progressively merges local height maxima by moving the convolved

  4. Who Needs Microtubules? Myogenic Reorganization of MTOC, Golgi Complex and ER Exit Sites Persists Despite Lack of Normal Microtubule Tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaal, Kristien J. M.; Reid, Ericka; Mousavi, Kambiz; Zhang, Tan; Mehta, Amisha; Bugnard, Elisabeth; Sartorelli, Vittorio; Ralston, Evelyn

    2011-01-01

    A wave of structural reorganization involving centrosomes, microtubules, Golgi complex and ER exit sites takes place early during skeletal muscle differentiation and completely remodels the secretory pathway. The mechanism of these changes and their functional implications are still poorly understood, in large part because all changes occur seemingly simultaneously. In an effort to uncouple the reorganizations, we have used taxol, nocodazole, and the specific GSK3-β inhibitor DW12, to disrupt the dynamic microtubule network of differentiating cultures of the mouse skeletal muscle cell line C2. Despite strong effects on microtubules, cell shape and cell fusion, none of the treatments prevented early differentiation. Redistribution of centrosomal proteins, conditional on differentiation, was in fact increased by taxol and nocodazole and normal in DW12. Redistributions of Golgi complex and ER exit sites were incomplete but remained tightly linked under all circumstances, and conditional on centrosomal reorganization. We were therefore able to uncouple microtubule reorganization from the other events and to determine that centrosomal proteins lead the reorganization hierarchy. In addition, we have gained new insight into structural and functional aspects of the reorganization of microtubule nucleation during myogenesis. PMID:22216166

  5. CENTROSOMES AND MICROTUBULES DURING MEIOSIS IN THE MUSHROOM BOLETUS RUBINELLUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, David J.

    1971-01-01

    The double centrosome in the basidium of Boletus rubinellus has been observed in three planes with the electron microscope at interphase preceding nuclear fusion, at prophase I, and at interphase I. It is composed of two components connected by a band-shaped middle part. At anaphase I a single, enlarged centrosome is found at the spindle pole, which is attached to the cell membrane. Microtubules mainly oriented parallel to the longitudinal axis of the basidium are present at prefusion, prophase I and interphase I. Cytoplasmic microtubules are absent when the spindle is present. The relationship of the centrosome in B. rubinellus to that in other organisms and the role of the cytoplasmic microtubules are discussed. PMID:4329156

  6. A Cdk1 phosphomimic mutant of MCAK impairs microtubule end recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah R. Belsham

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The microtubule depolymerising kinesin-13, MCAK, is phosphorylated at residue T537 by Cdk1. This is the only known phosphorylation site within MCAK’s motor domain. To understand the impact of phosphorylation by Cdk1 on microtubule depolymerisation activity, we have investigated the molecular mechanism of the phosphomimic mutant T537E. This mutant significantly impairs microtubule depolymerisation activity and when transfected into cells causes metaphase arrest and misaligned chromosomes. We show that the molecular mechanism underlying the reduced depolymerisation activity of this phosphomimic mutant is an inability to recognise the microtubule end. The microtubule-end residence time is reduced relative to wild-type MCAK, whereas the lattice residence time is unchanged by the phosphomimic mutation. Further, the microtubule-end specific stimulation of ADP dissociation, characteristic of MCAK, is abolished by this mutation. Our data shows that T537E is unable to distinguish between the microtubule end and the microtubule lattice.

  7. Autocatalytic microtubule nucleation determines the size and mass of Xenopus laevis egg extract spindles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Franziska; Oriola, David; Dalton, Benjamin; Brugués, Jan

    2018-01-11

    Regulation of size and growth is a fundamental problem in biology. A prominent example is the formation of the mitotic spindle, where protein concentration gradients around chromosomes are thought to regulate spindle growth by controlling microtubule nucleation. Previous evidence suggests that microtubules nucleate throughout the spindle structure. However, the mechanisms underlying microtubule nucleation and its spatial regulation are still unclear. Here, we developed an assay based on laser ablation to directly probe microtubule nucleation events in Xenopus laevis egg extracts. Combining this method with theory and quantitative microscopy, we show that the size of a spindle is controlled by autocatalytic growth of microtubules, driven by microtubule-stimulated microtubule nucleation. The autocatalytic activity of this nucleation system is spatially regulated by the limiting amounts of active microtubule nucleators, which decrease with distance from the chromosomes. This mechanism provides an upper limit to spindle size even when resources are not limiting. © 2018, Decker et al.

  8. RecA bundles mediate homology pairing between distant sisters during DNA break repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesterlin, Christian; Ball, Graeme; Schermelleh, Lothar; Sherratt, David J.

    2014-02-01

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair by homologous recombination has evolved to maintain genetic integrity in all organisms. Although many reactions that occur during homologous recombination are known, it is unclear where, when and how they occur in cells. Here, by using conventional and super-resolution microscopy, we describe the progression of DSB repair in live Escherichia coli. Specifically, we investigate whether homologous recombination can occur efficiently between distant sister loci that have segregated to opposite halves of an E. coli cell. We show that a site-specific DSB in one sister can be repaired efficiently using distant sister homology. After RecBCD processing of the DSB, RecA is recruited to the cut locus, where it nucleates into a bundle that contains many more RecA molecules than can associate with the two single-stranded DNA regions that form at the DSB. Mature bundles extend along the long axis of the cell, in the space between the bulk nucleoid and the inner membrane. Bundle formation is followed by pairing, in which the two ends of the cut locus relocate at the periphery of the nucleoid and together move rapidly towards the homology of the uncut sister. After sister locus pairing, RecA bundles disassemble and proteins that act late in homologous recombination are recruited to give viable recombinants 1-2-generation-time equivalents after formation of the initial DSB. Mutated RecA proteins that do not form bundles are defective in sister pairing and in DSB-induced repair. This work reveals an unanticipated role of RecA bundles in channelling the movement of the DNA DSB ends, thereby facilitating the long-range homology search that occurs before the strand invasion and transfer reactions.

  9. Functional aspects of His bundle physiology and pathophysiology: Clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherlag, Benjamin J; Lazzara, Ralph

    In this review we present evidence from many experimental studies which challenge the concept of predestination of His bundle fibers. Using both intra- and extracellular His bundle pacing in the context of atrio-ventricular block and the development of bundle branch blocks these experimental studies provide the underlying mechanisms for the recent clinical findings showing the benefits of permanent His bundle pacing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Fiber bundles in non-relativistic quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moylan, P.

    1979-11-01

    The problem of describing a quantum-mechanical system with symmetry by a fiber bundle is considered. The quantization of a fiber bundle is introduced. Fiber bundles for the Kepler problem and the rotator are constructed. The fiber bundle concept provides a new model for a physical system: it provides a model for an elementary particle with extension having integral values of spin. 5 figures

  11. Septins localize to microtubules during nutritional limitation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vázquez de Aldana Carlos R

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, nutrient limitation stimulates diploid cells to undergo DNA replication and meiosis, followed by the formation of four haploid spores. Septins are a family of proteins that assemble a ring structure at the mother-daughter neck during vegetative growth, where they control cytokinesis. In sporulating cells, the septin ring disassembles and septins relocalize to the prospore membrane. Results Here, we demonstrate that nutrient limitation triggers a change in the localization of at least two vegetative septins (Cdc10 and Cdc11 from the bud neck to the microtubules. The association of Cdc10 and Cdc11 with microtubules persists into meiosis, and they are found associated with the meiotic spindle until the end of meiosis II. In addition, the meiosis-specific septin Spr28 displays similar behavior, suggesting that this is a common feature of septins. Septin association to microtubules is a consequence of the nutrient limitation signal, since it is also observed when haploid cells are incubated in sporulation medium and when haploid or diploid cells are grown in medium containing non-fermentable carbon sources. Moreover, during meiosis II, when the nascent prospore membrane is formed, septins moved from the microtubules to this membrane. Proper organization of the septins on the membrane requires the sporulation-specific septins Spr3 and Spr28. Conclusion Nutrient limitation in S. cerevisiae triggers the sporulation process, but it also induces the disassembly of the septin bud neck ring and relocalization of the septin subunits to the nucleus. Septins remain associated with microtubules during the meiotic divisions and later, during spore morphogenesis, they are detected associated to the nascent prospore membranes surrounding each nuclear lobe. Septin association to microtubules also occurs during growth in non-fermentable carbon sources.

  12. Interplanetary Overlay Network Bundle Protocol Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burleigh, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    The Interplanetary Overlay Network (ION) system's BP package, an implementation of the Delay-Tolerant Networking (DTN) Bundle Protocol (BP) and supporting services, has been specifically designed to be suitable for use on deep-space robotic vehicles. Although the ION BP implementation is unique in its use of zero-copy objects for high performance, and in its use of resource-sensitive rate control, it is fully interoperable with other implementations of the BP specification (Internet RFC 5050). The ION BP implementation is built using the same software infrastructure that underlies the implementation of the CCSDS (Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems) File Delivery Protocol (CFDP) built into the flight software of Deep Impact. It is designed to minimize resource consumption, while maximizing operational robustness. For example, no dynamic allocation of system memory is required. Like all the other ION packages, ION's BP implementation is designed to port readily between Linux and Solaris (for easy development and for ground system operations) and VxWorks (for flight systems operations). The exact same source code is exercised in both environments. Initially included in the ION BP implementations are the following: libraries of functions used in constructing bundle forwarders and convergence-layer (CL) input and output adapters; a simple prototype bundle forwarder and associated CL adapters designed to run over an IPbased local area network; administrative tools for managing a simple DTN infrastructure built from these components; a background daemon process that silently destroys bundles whose time-to-live intervals have expired; a library of functions exposed to applications, enabling them to issue and receive data encapsulated in DTN bundles; and some simple applications that can be used for system checkout and benchmarking.

  13. Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene ISW2 encodes a microtubule-interacting protein required for premeiotic DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trachtulcová, P; Janatová, I; Kohlwein, S D; Hasek, J

    2000-01-15

    A molecular genetic characterization of the ORF YOR304W (ISW2), identified in a screen of a yeast lambdagt11 library using a monoclonal antibody that reacts with a 210 kDa mammalian microtubule-interacting protein, is presented in this paper. The protein encoded by the ORF YOR304W is 50% identical to the Drosophila nucleosome remodelling factor ISWI and is therefore a new member of the SNF2 protein family and has been recently entered into SDG as ISW2. Although not essential for vegetative growth, we found that the ISW2 gene is required for early stages in sporulation. The isw2 homozygous deletant diploid strain was blocked in the G(1) phase of the cell cycle, unable to execute the premeiotic DNA replication and progress through the nuclear meiotic division cycle. ISW2 expression from a multicopy plasmid had the same effect as deletion, but ISW2 expression from a centromeric plasmid rescued the deletion phenotype. In vegetatively growing diploid cells, the Isw2 protein was preferentially found in the cytoplasm, co-localizing with microtubules. An accumulation of the Isw2 protein within the nucleus was observed in cells entering sporulation. Together with data published very recently by Tsukiyama et al. (1999), we propose a role for the Isw2 protein in facilitating chromatin accessibility for transcriptional factor(s) that positively regulate meiosis/sporulation-specific genes. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Cell Microtubules as Cavities Quantum Coherence and Energy Transfer?

    CERN Document Server

    Mavromatos, Nikolaos E

    2000-01-01

    A model is presented for dissipationless energy transfer in cell microtubules due to quantum coherent states. The model is based on conjectured (hydrated) ferroelectric properties of microtubular arrangements. Ferroelectricity is essential in providing the necessary isolation against thermal losses in thin interior regions, full of ordered water, near the tubulin dimer walls of the microtubule. These play the role of cavity regions, which are similar to electromagnetic cavities of quantum optics. As a result, the formation of (macroscopic) quantum coherent states of electric dipoles on the tubulin dimers may occur. Some experiments, inspired by quantum optics, are suggested for the falsification of this scenario.

  15. Regulation of microtubule nucleation mediated by gamma-tubulin complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sulimenko, Vadym; Hájková, Zuzana; Klebanovych, Anastasiya; Dráber, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 254, č. 3 (2017), s. 1187-1199 ISSN 0033-183X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD13015 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : mitotic spindle formation * ring complex * fission yeast * organizing centers * protein complex * golgi-complex * cell -cycle * pole body * augmin * centrosome * Centrosomes * Microtubule nucleation * Microtubule-organizing centers * Non-centrosomal nucleation sites * Spindle pole bodies * gamma-Tubulin complexes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Cell biology Impact factor: 2.870, year: 2016

  16. Turkish and Native English Academic Writers' Use of Lexical Bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Yusuf; Köse, Gül Durmusoglu

    2016-01-01

    Lexical bundles such as "on the other hand" and "as a result of" are extremely common and important in academic discourse. The appropriate use of lexical bundles typical of a specific academic discipline is important for writers and the absence of such bundles may not sound fluent and native-like. Recent studies (e.g. Adel…

  17. Compactifications of reductive groups as moduli stacks of bundles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martens, Johan; Thaddeus, Michael

    Let G be a reductive group. We introduce the moduli problem of "bundle chains" parametrizing framed principal G-bundles on chains of lines. Any fan supported in a Weyl chamber determines a stability condition on bundle chains. Its moduli stack provides an equivariant toroidal compactification of G...

  18. Quillen bundle and geometric prequantization of non-abelian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    prequantum line bundle whose curvature is proportional to this symplectic form. The prequantum ..... The fiber over Ua/G is the equivalence class of this fiber. Like this we can define the line bundle on A/G. 3.2 Quillen metric. Using the Hermitian structure on E (the vector bundle on the Riemann surface ) and therefore the ...

  19. Quillen bundle and geometric prequantization of non-abelian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper we prequantize the moduli space of non-abelian vortices. We explicitly calculate the symplectic form arising from 2 metric and we construct a prequantum line bundle whose curvature is proportional to this symplectic form. The prequantum line bundle turns out to be Quillen's determinant line bundle with a ...

  20. S. pombe kinesins-8 promote both nucleation and catastrophe of microtubules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel Erent

    Full Text Available The kinesins-8 were originally thought to be microtubule depolymerases, but are now emerging as more versatile catalysts of microtubule dynamics. We show here that S. pombe Klp5-436 and Klp6-440 are non-processive plus-end-directed motors whose in vitro velocities on S. pombe microtubules at 7 and 23 nm s(-1 are too slow to keep pace with the growing tips of dynamic interphase microtubules in living S. pombe. In vitro, Klp5 and 6 dimers exhibit a hitherto-undescribed combination of strong enhancement of microtubule nucleation with no effect on growth rate or catastrophe frequency. By contrast in vivo, both Klp5 and Klp6 promote microtubule catastrophe at cell ends whilst Klp6 also increases the number of interphase microtubule arrays (IMAs. Our data support a model in which Klp5/6 bind tightly to free tubulin heterodimers, strongly promoting the nucleation of new microtubules, and then continue to land as a tubulin-motor complex on the tips of growing microtubules, with the motors then dissociating after a few seconds residence on the lattice. In vivo, we predict that only at cell ends, when growing microtubule tips become lodged and their growth slows down, will Klp5/6 motor activity succeed in tracking growing microtubule tips. This mechanism would allow Klp5/6 to detect the arrival of microtubule tips at cells ends and to amplify the intrinsic tendency for microtubules to catastrophise in compression at cell ends. Our evidence identifies Klp5 and 6 as spatial regulators of microtubule dynamics that enhance both microtubule nucleation at the cell centre and microtubule catastrophe at the cell ends.

  1. Electrostatic differences: A possible source for the functional differences between MCF7 and brain microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feizabadi, Mitra Shojania; Rosario, Brandon; Hernandez, Marcos A V

    2017-11-04

    Recent studies suggested a link between diversity of beta tubulin isotypes in microtubule structures and the regulatory roles that they play not only on microtubules' intrinsic dynamic, but also on the translocation characteristics of some of the molecular motors along microtubules. Remarkably, unlike porcine brain microtubules, MCF7 microtubules are structured from a different beta tubulin distribution. These types of cancer microtubules show a relatively stable and slow dynamic. In addition, the translocation parameters of some molecular motors are distinctly different along MCF7 as compared to those parameters on brain microtubules. It is known that the diversity of beta tubulin isotypes differ predominantly in the specifications and the electric charge of their carboxy-terminal tails. A key question is to identify whether the negative electrostatic charge of tubulin isotypes and, consequently, microtubules, can potentially be considered as one of the sources of functional differences in MCF7 vs. brain microtubules. We tested this possibility experimentally by monitoring the electro-orientation of these two types of microtubules inside a uniform electric field. Through this evaluation, we quantified and compared the average normalized polarization coefficient of MCF7 vs. Porcine brain microtubules. The higher value obtained for the polarization of MCF7 microtubules, which is associated to the higher negative charge of these types of microtubules, is significant as it can further explain the slow intrinsic dynamic that has been recently reported for single MCF7 microtubules in vitro. Furthermore, it can be potentially considered as a factor that can directly impact the translocation parameters of some molecular motors along MCF7 microtubules, by altering the mutual electrostatic interactions between microtubules and molecular motors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Sliding of microtubules by a team of dynein motors: Understanding the effect of spatial distribution of motor tails and mutual exclusion of motor heads on microtubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Hanumant Pratap; Takshak, Anjneya; Mall, Utkarsh; Kunwar, Ambarish

    2016-06-01

    Molecular motors are natural nanomachines that use the free energy released from ATP hydrolysis to generate mechanical forces. Cytoplasmic dynein motors often work collectively as a team to drive important processes such as axonal growth, proplatelet formation and mitosis, as forces generated by single motors are insufficient. A large team of dynein motors is used to slide cytoskeletal microtubules with respect to one another during the process of proplatelet formation and axonal growth. These motors attach to a cargo microtubule via their tail domains, undergo the process of detachment and reattachment of their head domains on another track microtubule, while sliding the cargo microtubule along the track. Traditional continuum/mean-field approaches used in the past are not ideal for studying the sliding mechanism of microtubules, as they ignore spatial and temporal fluctuations due to different possible distributions of motor tails on cargo filament, as well as binding/unbinding of motors from their track. Therefore, these models cannot be used to address important questions such as how the distribution of motor tails on microtubules, or how the mutual exclusion of motor heads on microtubule tracks affects the sliding velocity of cargo microtubule. To answer these, here we use a computational stochastic model where we model each dynein motor explicitly. In our model, we use both random as well as uniform distributions of dynein motors on cargo microtubule, as well as mutual exclusion of motors on microtubule tracks. We find that sliding velocities are least affected by the distribution of motor tails on microtubules, whereas they are greatly affected by mutual exclusion of motor heads on microtubule tracks. We also find that sliding velocity depends on the length of cargo microtubule if mutual exclusion among motor heads is considered.

  3. Facilitating innovations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buurma, J.S.; Visser, A.J.; Migchels, G.

    2011-01-01

    Many innovations involve changes which transcend the individual business or are only achievable when various businesses and/or interested parties take up the challenge together. In System Innovation Programmes, the necessary innovations are facilitated by means of workshops related to specific areas

  4. Microtubule protein ADP-ribosylation in vitro leads to assembly inhibition and rapid depolymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaife, R.M. (Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States)); Wilson, L. (Univ. of California, Santa Barbara (United States)); Purich, D.L. (Univ. of Florida, Gainesville (United States))

    1992-01-14

    Bovine brain microtubule protein, containing both tubulin and microtubule-associated proteins, undergoes ADP-ribosylation in the presence of ({sup 14}C)NAD{sup +} and a turkey erythrocyte mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase in vitro. The modification reaction could be demonstrated in crude brain tissue extracts where selective ADP-ribosylation of both the {alpha} and {beta} chains of tubulin and of the high molecular weight microtubule-associated protein MAP-2 occurred. In experiments with purified microtubule protein, tubulin dimer, the high molecular weight microtubule-associated protein MAP-2, and another high molecular weight microtubule-associated protein which may be a MAP-1 species were heavily labeled. Tubulin and MAP-2 incorporated ({sup 14}C)ADP-ribose to an average extent of approximately 2.4 and 30 mol of ADP-ribose/mol of protein, respectively. Assembly of microtubule protein into microtubules in vitro was inhibited by ADP-ribosylation, and incubation of assembled steady-state microtubules with ADP-ribosyltransferase and NAD{sup +} resulted in rapid depolymerization of the microtubules. Thus, the eukaryotic enzyme can ADP-ribosylate tubulin and microtubule-associated proteins to much greater extents than previously observed with cholera and pertussis toxins, and the modification can significantly modulate microtubule assembly and disassembly.

  5. Bundling of harvesting residues and whole-trees and the treatment of bundles; Hakkuutaehteiden ja kokopuiden niputus ja nippujen kaesittely

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaipainen, H.; Seppaenen, V.; Rinne, S.

    1996-12-31

    The conditions on which the bundling of the harvesting residues from spruce regeneration fellings would become profitable were studied. The calculations showed that one of the most important features was sufficient compaction of the bundle, so that the portion of the wood in the unit volume of the bundle has to be more than 40 %. The tests showed that the timber grab loader of farm tractor was insufficient for production of dense bundles. The feeding and compression device of the prototype bundler was constructed in the research and with this device the required density was obtained.The rate of compaction of the dry spruce felling residues was about 40 % and that of the fresh residues was more than 50 %. The comparison between the bundles showed that the calorific value of the fresh bundle per unit volume was nearly 30 % higher than that of the dry bundle. This means that the treatment of the bundles should be done of fresh felling residues. Drying of the bundles succeeded well, and the crushing and chipping tests showed that the processing of the bundles at the plant is possible. The treatability of the bundles was also excellent. By using the prototype, developed in the research, it was possible to produce a bundle of the fresh spruce harvesting residues, the diameter of which was about 50 cm and the length about 3 m, and the rate of compaction over 50 %. By these values the reduction target of the costs is obtainable

  6. The Drosophila Microtubule-Associated Protein Mars Stabilizes Mitotic Spindles by Crosslinking Microtubules through Its N-Terminal Region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Gang; Beati, Hamze; Nilsson, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    Correct segregation of genetic material relies on proper assembly and maintenance of the mitotic spindle. How the highly dynamic microtubules (MTs) are maintained in stable mitotic spindles is a key question to be answered. Motor and non-motor microtubule associated proteins (MAPs) have been...... reported to stabilize the dynamic spindle through crosslinking adjacent MTs. Mars, a novel MAP, is essential for the early development of Drosophila embryos. Previous studies showed that Mars is required for maintaining an intact mitotic spindle but did not provide a molecular mechanism for this function...

  7. Triviality and Split of Vector Bundles on Rationally Connected Varieties

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Xuanyu

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we give a simple proof of a triviality criterion due to I.Biswas and J.Pedro and P.Dos Santos. We also prove a vector bundle on a homogenous space is trivial if and only if the restrictions of the vector bundle to Schubert lines are trivial. Using this result and Chern classes of vector bundles, we give a general criterion of a uniform vector bundle on a homogenous space to be splitting. As an application, we prove a uniform vector bundle on classical Grassmannians and quadrics...

  8. Playing facilitator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houmøller, Ellen; Marchetti, Emanuela

    2015-01-01

    workshops based on two classic role-play games: The Silent Game (Brandt, 2006) and The Six Thinking Hats (de Bono, 1985). These games were created to support students in learning design thinking in groups and are assigned positive values in literature, hence we expected a smooth process. However, our......t: This paper presents reflections on the role of teachers as facilitators, in a context of role-play targeting learning of design thinking skills. Our study was conducted according to the method of visual ethnography. We acted as facilitators for 50 students through the yearly six-day competitive...... event called InnoEvent, addressed to students in the fields of multimedia and healthcare. Being interested in studying games and role-play as tools to support independent learning in the field of design thinking and team-building, following Dewey’s (1938) theory of learning experience, we ran two...

  9. Microtubules Accelerate the Kinase Activity of Aurora-B by a Reduction in Dimensionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noujaim, Michael; Bechstedt, Susanne; Wieczorek, Michal; Brouhard, Gary J.

    2014-01-01

    Aurora-B is the kinase subunit of the Chromosome Passenger Complex (CPC), a key regulator of mitotic progression that corrects improper kinetochore attachments and establishes the spindle midzone. Recent work has demonstrated that the CPC is a microtubule-associated protein complex and that microtubules are able to activate the CPC by contributing to Aurora-B auto-phosphorylation in trans. Aurora-B activation is thought to occur when the local concentration of Aurora-B is high, as occurs when Aurora-B is enriched at centromeres. It is not clear, however, whether distributed binding to large structures such as microtubules would increase the local concentration of Aurora-B. Here we show that microtubules accelerate the kinase activity of Aurora-B by a “reduction in dimensionality.” We find that microtubules increase the kinase activity of Aurora-B toward microtubule-associated substrates while reducing the phosphorylation levels of substrates not associated to microtubules. Using the single molecule assay for microtubule-associated proteins, we show that a minimal CPC construct binds to microtubules and diffuses in a one-dimensional (1D) random walk. The binding of Aurora-B to microtubules is salt-dependent and requires the C-terminal tails of tubulin, indicating that the interaction is electrostatic. We show that the rate of Aurora-B auto-activation is faster with increasing concentrations of microtubules. Finally, we demonstrate that microtubules lose their ability to stimulate Aurora-B when their C-terminal tails are removed by proteolysis. We propose a model in which microtubules act as scaffolds for the enzymatic activity of Aurora-B. The scaffolding activity of microtubules enables rapid Aurora-B activation and efficient phosphorylation of microtubule-associated substrates. PMID:24498282

  10. Microtubules accelerate the kinase activity of Aurora-B by a reduction in dimensionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noujaim, Michael; Bechstedt, Susanne; Wieczorek, Michal; Brouhard, Gary J

    2014-01-01

    Aurora-B is the kinase subunit of the Chromosome Passenger Complex (CPC), a key regulator of mitotic progression that corrects improper kinetochore attachments and establishes the spindle midzone. Recent work has demonstrated that the CPC is a microtubule-associated protein complex and that microtubules are able to activate the CPC by contributing to Aurora-B auto-phosphorylation in trans. Aurora-B activation is thought to occur when the local concentration of Aurora-B is high, as occurs when Aurora-B is enriched at centromeres. It is not clear, however, whether distributed binding to large structures such as microtubules would increase the local concentration of Aurora-B. Here we show that microtubules accelerate the kinase activity of Aurora-B by a "reduction in dimensionality." We find that microtubules increase the kinase activity of Aurora-B toward microtubule-associated substrates while reducing the phosphorylation levels of substrates not associated to microtubules. Using the single molecule assay for microtubule-associated proteins, we show that a minimal CPC construct binds to microtubules and diffuses in a one-dimensional (1D) random walk. The binding of Aurora-B to microtubules is salt-dependent and requires the C-terminal tails of tubulin, indicating that the interaction is electrostatic. We show that the rate of Aurora-B auto-activation is faster with increasing concentrations of microtubules. Finally, we demonstrate that microtubules lose their ability to stimulate Aurora-B when their C-terminal tails are removed by proteolysis. We propose a model in which microtubules act as scaffolds for the enzymatic activity of Aurora-B. The scaffolding activity of microtubules enables rapid Aurora-B activation and efficient phosphorylation of microtubule-associated substrates.

  11. Microtubules accelerate the kinase activity of Aurora-B by a reduction in dimensionality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Noujaim

    Full Text Available Aurora-B is the kinase subunit of the Chromosome Passenger Complex (CPC, a key regulator of mitotic progression that corrects improper kinetochore attachments and establishes the spindle midzone. Recent work has demonstrated that the CPC is a microtubule-associated protein complex and that microtubules are able to activate the CPC by contributing to Aurora-B auto-phosphorylation in trans. Aurora-B activation is thought to occur when the local concentration of Aurora-B is high, as occurs when Aurora-B is enriched at centromeres. It is not clear, however, whether distributed binding to large structures such as microtubules would increase the local concentration of Aurora-B. Here we show that microtubules accelerate the kinase activity of Aurora-B by a "reduction in dimensionality." We find that microtubules increase the kinase activity of Aurora-B toward microtubule-associated substrates while reducing the phosphorylation levels of substrates not associated to microtubules. Using the single molecule assay for microtubule-associated proteins, we show that a minimal CPC construct binds to microtubules and diffuses in a one-dimensional (1D random walk. The binding of Aurora-B to microtubules is salt-dependent and requires the C-terminal tails of tubulin, indicating that the interaction is electrostatic. We show that the rate of Aurora-B auto-activation is faster with increasing concentrations of microtubules. Finally, we demonstrate that microtubules lose their ability to stimulate Aurora-B when their C-terminal tails are removed by proteolysis. We propose a model in which microtubules act as scaffolds for the enzymatic activity of Aurora-B. The scaffolding activity of microtubules enables rapid Aurora-B activation and efficient phosphorylation of microtubule-associated substrates.

  12. Out of pile testing of the PHWR fuel bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahender Dev; Raghunathan, S.; Agarwal, G.K.; Patel, R.J.; Agarwal, R.G.

    2002-01-01

    In PHWRs fuel bundle resides in the form of a string in the coolant channels. These fuel bundles are required to be replaced periodically with the help of fuelling machine and spent fuel is discharged to the spent-fuel bay through fuel transfer system. During complete refuelling operation, and during residence in channel fuel bundle experiences various kinds of loads like drag force, impact force, force applied by Fuelling Machine ram and force applied by various actuators in fuel transfer system. These fuel bundles are manufactured indigenously and require out of pile testing for qualification of design as well as manufacturing process. In 220 MWe PHWRs, 19-element split spacer fuel bundle is used whereas in 500 MWe PHWRs 37-element fuel bundle will be used. A comprehensive programme was conducted to generate, basic data like estimation of loads coming on fuel bundles, experimental data generation about friction factor and pressure drop and carrying out of pile testing of 19-element fuel bundles in Integral Thermal Facility at Hall-7. The 37-element fuel bundles were tested in fuel locator test facility at simulated reactor conditions for pressure drop test, endurance test and cross flow test. The 37-element bundles have also been tested for flow-induced vibration during residence in the reactor. The paper describes the experimental techniques and setups, for simulating the reactor condition and determining the effect of those conditions on the fuel bundles. (author)

  13. Microtubule depolymerization induces traction force increase through two distinct pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rape, Andrew; Guo, Wei-hui; Wang, Yu-li

    2011-01-01

    Traction forces increase after microtubule depolymerization; however, the signaling mechanisms underlying this, in particular the dependence upon myosin II, remain unclear. We investigated the mechanism of traction force increase after nocodazole-induced microtubule depolymerization by applying traction force microscopy to cells cultured on micropatterned polyacrylamide hydrogels to obtain samples of homogeneous shape and size. Control cells and cells treated with a focal adhesion kinase (FAK) inhibitor showed similar increases in traction forces, indicating that the response is independent of FAK. Surprisingly, pharmacological inhibition of myosin II did not prevent the increase of residual traction forces upon nocodazole treatment. This increase was abolished upon pharmacological inhibition of FAK. These results suggest two distinct pathways for the regulation of traction forces. First, microtubule depolymerization activates a myosin-II-dependent mechanism through a FAK-independent pathway. Second, microtubule depolymerization also enhances traction forces through a myosin-II-independent, FAK-regulated pathway. Traction forces are therefore regulated by a complex network of complementary signals and force-generating mechanisms. PMID:22193960

  14. Spaceflight alters microtubules and increases apoptosis in human lymphocytes (Jurkat)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, M. L.; Reynolds, J. L.; Cubano, L. A.; Hatton, J. P.; Lawless, B. D.; Piepmeier, E. H.

    1998-01-01

    Alteration in cytoskeletal organization appears to underlie mechanisms of gravity sensitivity in space-flown cells. Human T lymphoblastoid cells (Jurkat) were flown on the Space Shuttle to test the hypothesis that growth responsiveness is associated with microtubule anomalies and mediated by apoptosis. Cell growth was stimulated in microgravity by increasing serum concentration. After 4 and 48 h, cells filtered from medium were fixed with formalin. Post-flight, confocal microscopy revealed diffuse, shortened microtubules extending from poorly defined microtubule organizing centers (MTOCs). In comparable ground controls, discrete microtubule filaments radiated from organized MTOCs and branched toward the cell membrane. At 4 h, 30% of flown, compared to 17% of ground, cells showed DNA condensation characteristic of apoptosis. Time-dependent increase of the apoptosis-associated Fas/ APO-1 protein in static flown, but not the in-flight 1 g centrifuged or ground controls, confirmed microgravity-associated apoptosis. By 48 h, ground cultures had increased by 40%. Flown populations did not increase, though some cells were cycling and actively metabolizing glucose. We conclude that cytoskeletal alteration, growth retardation, and metabolic changes in space-flown lymphocytes are concomitant with increased apoptosis and time-dependent elevation of Fas/APO-1 protein. We suggest that reduced growth response in lymphocytes during spaceflight is linked to apoptosis.

  15. Lamin A and microtubules collaborate to maintain nuclear morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq, Zeshan; Zhang, Haoyue; Chia-Liu, Alexander; Shen, Yang; Gete, Yantenew; Xiong, Zheng-Mei; Tocheny, Claire; Campanello, Leonard; Wu, Di; Losert, Wolfgang; Cao, Kan

    2017-07-04

    Lamin A (LA) is a critical structural component of the nuclear lamina. Mutations within the LA gene (LMNA) lead to several human disorders, most striking of which is Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS), a premature aging disorder. HGPS cells are best characterized by an abnormal nuclear morphology known as nuclear blebbing, which arises due to the accumulation of progerin, a dominant mutant form of LA. The microtubule (MT) network is known to mediate changes in nuclear morphology in the context of specific events such as mitosis, cell polarization, nucleus positioning and cellular migration. What is less understood is the role of the microtubule network in determining nuclear morphology during interphase. In this study, we elucidate the role of the cytoskeleton in regulation and misregulation of nuclear morphology through perturbations of both the lamina and the microtubule network. We found that LA knockout cells exhibit a crescent shape morphology associated with the microtubule-organizing center. Furthermore, this crescent shape ameliorates upon treatment with MT drugs, Nocodazole or Taxol. Expression of progerin, in LA knockout cells also rescues the crescent shape, although the response to Nocodazole or Taxol treatment is altered in comparison to cells expressing LA. Together these results describe a collaborative effort between LA and the MT network to maintain nuclear morphology.

  16. EWSR1 regulates mitosis by dynamically influencing microtubule acetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Long; Chen, Hui; Zhan, Yi-Qun; Yin, Rong-Hua; Li, Chang-Yan; Ge, Chang-Hui; Yu, Miao; Yang, Xiao-Ming

    2016-08-17

    EWSR1, participating in transcription and splicing, has been identified as a translocation partner for various transcription factors, resulting in translocation, which in turn plays crucial roles in tumorigenesis. Recent studies have investigated the role of EWSR1 in mitosis. However, the effect of EWSR1 on mitosis is poorly understood. Here, we observed that depletion of EWSR1 resulted in cell cycle arrest in the mitotic phase, mainly due to an increase in the time from nuclear envelope breakdown to metaphase, resulting in a high percentage of unaligned chromosomes and multipolar spindles. We also demonstrated that EWSR1 is a spindle-associated protein that interacts with α-tubulin during mitosis. EWSR1 depletion increased the cold-sensitivity of spindle microtubules, and decreased the rate of spindle assembly. EWSR1 regulated the level of microtubule acetylation in the mitotic spindle; microtubule acetylation was rescued in EWSR1-depleted mitotic cells following suppression of HDAC6 activity by its specific inhibitor or siRNA treatment. In summary, these results suggest that EWSR1 regulates the acetylation of microtubules in a cell cycle-dependent manner through its dynamic location on spindle MTs, and may be a novel regulator for mitosis progress independent of its translocation.

  17. CUBu: Universal Real-Time Bundling for Large Graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zwan, Matthew; Codreanu, Valeriu; Telea, Alexandru

    2016-12-01

    Visualizing very large graphs by edge bundling is a promising method, yet subject to several challenges: speed, clutter, level-of-detail, and parameter control. We present CUBu, a framework that addresses the above problems in an integrated way. Fully GPU-based, CUBu bundles graphs of up to a million edges at interactive framerates, being over 50 times faster than comparable state-of-the-art methods, and has a simple and intuitive control of bundling parameters. CUBu extends and unifies existing bundling techniques, offering ways to control bundle shapes, separate bundles by edge direction, and shade bundles to create a level-of-detail visualization that shows both the graph core structure and its details. We demonstrate CUBu on several large graphs extracted from real-life application domains.

  18. On stability of Kummer surfaces' tangent bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozhkov, Y.D.

    1988-10-01

    In this paper we propose an explicit approximation of the Kaehler-Einstein-Calabi-Yau metric on the Kummer surfaces, which are manifolds of type K3. It is constructed by gluing 16 pieces of the Eguchi-Hanson metric and 16 pieces of the Euclidean metric. Two estimates on its curvature are proved. Then we prove an estimate on the first eigenvalue of a covariant differential operator of second order. This enables us to apply Taubes' iteration procedure to obtain that there exists an anti-self-dual connection on the considered Kummer surface. In fact, it is a Hermitian-Einstein connection from which we conclude that Kummer surfaces' co-tangent bundle is stable and therefore their tangent bundle is stable too. (author). 40 refs

  19. Reactor application of an improved bundle divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, T.F.; Ruck, G.W.; Lee, A.Y.; Smeltzer, G.; Prevenslik, T.

    1978-11-01

    A Bundle Divertor was chosen as the impurity control and plasma exhaust system for the beam driven Demonstration Tokamak Hybrid Reactor - DTHR. In the context of a preconceptual design study of the reactor and associated facility a bundle divertor concept was developed and integrated into the reactor system. The overall system was found feasible and scalable for reactors with intermediate torodial field strengths on axis. The important design characteristics are: the overall average current density of the divertor coils is 0.73 kA for each tesla of toroidal field on axis; the divertor windings are made from super-conducting cables supported by steel structures and are designed to be maintainable; the particle collection assembly and auxiliary cryosorption vacuum pump are dual systems designed such that they can be reactivated alterntively to allow for continuous reactor operation; and the power requirement for energizing and operating the divertor is about 5 MW

  20. Tube bundle vibrations in transversal flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibert, R.J.; Sagner, M.

    1978-01-01

    This study gives important information concerning characteristic parameters about lock-in and whirling instability phenomena, in the case of tube arrays. The work is mainly an experimental one though models are also developed: 1) an equilateral pitch bundle (p=1,5 D with D=tube diameter) is tested. Tube damping (epsilon) and first eigenfrequency (f), flow velocity are explored in a large domain. Vibratory level of the tubes are measured and critical points are ploted on the fluidelastic parameters diagram. Several bundles with various usual pitches and arrangements (in line or staggered) are tested. Critical velocities are measured and the whirling instability characteristic coefficient is tabulated. A complementary experiment is made on tube rows with various pitches. This gives valuable informations concerning the look-in domain in VR and A'R diagram. Furthermore this puts in evidence the important effect of a frequency difference between two adjacent tubes on the whirling critical velocity

  1. Rod bundle burnout data and correlation comparisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoder, G.L.; Morris, D.G.; Mullins, C.B.

    1985-01-01

    Rod bundle burnout data from 30 steady-state and 3 transient tests were obtained from experiments performed in the Thermal Hydraulic Test Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The tests covered a parameter range relevant to intact core reactor accidents ranging from large break to small break loss-ofcoolant conditions. Instrumentation within the 64-rod test section indicated that burnout occurred over an axial range within the bundle. The distance from the point where the first dry rod was detected to the point where all rods were dry was up to 60 cm in some of the tests. The burnout data should prove useful in developing new correlations for use in reactor thermalhydraulic codes. Evaluation of several existing critical heat flux correlations using the data show that three correlations, the Barnett, Bowring, and Katto correlations, perform similarly and correlate the data better than the Biasi correlation

  2. Fiber Bundle Model Under Heterogeneous Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Subhadeep; Goswami, Sanchari

    2018-03-01

    The present work deals with the behavior of fiber bundle model under heterogeneous loading condition. The model is explored both in the mean-field limit as well as with local stress concentration. In the mean field limit, the failure abruptness decreases with increasing order k of heterogeneous loading. In this limit, a brittle to quasi-brittle transition is observed at a particular strength of disorder which changes with k. On the other hand, the model is hardly affected by such heterogeneity in the limit where local stress concentration plays a crucial role. The continuous limit of the heterogeneous loading is also studied and discussed in this paper. Some of the important results related to fiber bundle model are reviewed and their responses to our new scheme of heterogeneous loading are studied in details. Our findings are universal with respect to the nature of the threshold distribution adopted to assign strength to an individual fiber.

  3. Type IIB flux compactifications on twistor bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imaanpur, Ali, E-mail: aimaanpu@modares.ac.ir

    2014-02-05

    We construct a U(1) bundle over N(1,1), usually considered as an SO(3) bundle on CP{sup 2}, and show that type IIB supergravity can be consistently compactified over it. With the five form flux turned on, there is a solution for which the metric becomes Einstein. We further turn on 3-form fluxes and show that there is a one parameter family of solutions. In particular, there is a limiting solution of large 3-form fluxes for which two U(1) fiber directions of the metric shrink to zero size. We also discuss compactifications over N(1,1) to AdS{sub 3}. All solutions turn out to be non-supersymmetric.

  4. Uncovering ecosystem service bundles through social preferences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Martín-López

    Full Text Available Ecosystem service assessments have increasingly been used to support environmental management policies, mainly based on biophysical and economic indicators. However, few studies have coped with the social-cultural dimension of ecosystem services, despite being considered a research priority. We examined how ecosystem service bundles and trade-offs emerge from diverging social preferences toward ecosystem services delivered by various types of ecosystems in Spain. We conducted 3,379 direct face-to-face questionnaires in eight different case study sites from 2007 to 2011. Overall, 90.5% of the sampled population recognized the ecosystem's capacity to deliver services. Formal studies, environmental behavior, and gender variables influenced the probability of people recognizing the ecosystem's capacity to provide services. The ecosystem services most frequently perceived by people were regulating services; of those, air purification held the greatest importance. However, statistical analysis showed that socio-cultural factors and the conservation management strategy of ecosystems (i.e., National Park, Natural Park, or a non-protected area have an effect on social preferences toward ecosystem services. Ecosystem service trade-offs and bundles were identified by analyzing social preferences through multivariate analysis (redundancy analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis. We found a clear trade-off among provisioning services (and recreational hunting versus regulating services and almost all cultural services. We identified three ecosystem service bundles associated with the conservation management strategy and the rural-urban gradient. We conclude that socio-cultural preferences toward ecosystem services can serve as a tool to identify relevant services for people, the factors underlying these social preferences, and emerging ecosystem service bundles and trade-offs.

  5. Uncovering ecosystem service bundles through social preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-López, Berta; Iniesta-Arandia, Irene; García-Llorente, Marina; Palomo, Ignacio; Casado-Arzuaga, Izaskun; Amo, David García Del; Gómez-Baggethun, Erik; Oteros-Rozas, Elisa; Palacios-Agundez, Igone; Willaarts, Bárbara; González, José A; Santos-Martín, Fernando; Onaindia, Miren; López-Santiago, Cesar; Montes, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Ecosystem service assessments have increasingly been used to support environmental management policies, mainly based on biophysical and economic indicators. However, few studies have coped with the social-cultural dimension of ecosystem services, despite being considered a research priority. We examined how ecosystem service bundles and trade-offs emerge from diverging social preferences toward ecosystem services delivered by various types of ecosystems in Spain. We conducted 3,379 direct face-to-face questionnaires in eight different case study sites from 2007 to 2011. Overall, 90.5% of the sampled population recognized the ecosystem's capacity to deliver services. Formal studies, environmental behavior, and gender variables influenced the probability of people recognizing the ecosystem's capacity to provide services. The ecosystem services most frequently perceived by people were regulating services; of those, air purification held the greatest importance. However, statistical analysis showed that socio-cultural factors and the conservation management strategy of ecosystems (i.e., National Park, Natural Park, or a non-protected area) have an effect on social preferences toward ecosystem services. Ecosystem service trade-offs and bundles were identified by analyzing social preferences through multivariate analysis (redundancy analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis). We found a clear trade-off among provisioning services (and recreational hunting) versus regulating services and almost all cultural services. We identified three ecosystem service bundles associated with the conservation management strategy and the rural-urban gradient. We conclude that socio-cultural preferences toward ecosystem services can serve as a tool to identify relevant services for people, the factors underlying these social preferences, and emerging ecosystem service bundles and trade-offs.

  6. Uncovering Ecosystem Service Bundles through Social Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-López, Berta; Iniesta-Arandia, Irene; García-Llorente, Marina; Palomo, Ignacio; Casado-Arzuaga, Izaskun; Amo, David García Del; Gómez-Baggethun, Erik; Oteros-Rozas, Elisa; Palacios-Agundez, Igone; Willaarts, Bárbara; González, José A.; Santos-Martín, Fernando; Onaindia, Miren; López-Santiago, Cesar; Montes, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Ecosystem service assessments have increasingly been used to support environmental management policies, mainly based on biophysical and economic indicators. However, few studies have coped with the social-cultural dimension of ecosystem services, despite being considered a research priority. We examined how ecosystem service bundles and trade-offs emerge from diverging social preferences toward ecosystem services delivered by various types of ecosystems in Spain. We conducted 3,379 direct face-to-face questionnaires in eight different case study sites from 2007 to 2011. Overall, 90.5% of the sampled population recognized the ecosystem’s capacity to deliver services. Formal studies, environmental behavior, and gender variables influenced the probability of people recognizing the ecosystem’s capacity to provide services. The ecosystem services most frequently perceived by people were regulating services; of those, air purification held the greatest importance. However, statistical analysis showed that socio-cultural factors and the conservation management strategy of ecosystems (i.e., National Park, Natural Park, or a non-protected area) have an effect on social preferences toward ecosystem services. Ecosystem service trade-offs and bundles were identified by analyzing social preferences through multivariate analysis (redundancy analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis). We found a clear trade-off among provisioning services (and recreational hunting) versus regulating services and almost all cultural services. We identified three ecosystem service bundles associated with the conservation management strategy and the rural-urban gradient. We conclude that socio-cultural preferences toward ecosystem services can serve as a tool to identify relevant services for people, the factors underlying these social preferences, and emerging ecosystem service bundles and trade-offs. PMID:22720006

  7. Twisted vector bundles on pointed nodal curves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    other hand, as shown in [6], the notion of Gieseker vector bundles leads to the construction of the stack of stable maps into ..... residue field R/m = k. Let be a cyclic group of order e prime to the characteristic of k and let γ ∈ be a generator. Assume that acts on R such that the induced action on k is trivial. Let M be a trivial ...

  8. Principal bundles on the projective line

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Senthilkumar (Newgen Imaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    LetX be a complete nonsingular curve over the algebraic closurek ofk andGa reductive group over k. Let E → X be a principal G-bundle on X. E is said to be semistable if, for every reduction of structure group EP ⊂ E to a maximal parabolic subgroup P of G, we have degree EP (p) ≤ 0, where p is the Lie algebra of P and EP ...

  9. Meromorphic connections on vector bundles over curves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    satisfying the Leibniz rule which says that D(f ·s) = s ⊗df +f ·D(s) for any holomorphic function f ∈ OX(U) and any holomorphic section s of E|U , where U is any open subset of X. According to Weil's criterion, E admits a holomorphic connection if and only if E is a direct sum of indecomposable vector bundles of degree zero [1, ...

  10. Spanning forests and the vector bundle Laplacian

    OpenAIRE

    Kenyon, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The classical matrix-tree theorem relates the determinant of the combinatorial Laplacian on a graph to the number of spanning trees. We generalize this result to Laplacians on one- and two-dimensional vector bundles, giving a combinatorial interpretation of their determinants in terms of so-called cycle rooted spanning forests (CRSFs). We construct natural measures on CRSFs for which the edges form a determinantal process. ¶ This theory gives a natural generalization of the spanning tre...

  11. Bundling harvester; Harvennuspuun automaattisen nippukorjausharvesterin kehittaeminen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koponen, K. [Eko-Log Oy, Kuopio (Finland)

    1997-12-01

    The starting point of the project was to design and construct, by taking the silvicultural point of view into account, a harvesting and processing system especially for energy-wood, containing manually driven bundling harvester, automating of the harvester, and automated loading. The equipment forms an ideal method for entrepreneur`s-line harvesting. The target is to apply the system also for owner`s-line harvesting. The profitability of the system promotes the utilisation of the system in both cases. The objectives of the project were: to construct a test equipment and prototypes for all the project stages, to carry out terrain and strain tests in order to examine the usability and durability, as well as the capacity of the machine, to test the applicability of the Eko-Log system in simultaneous harvesting of energy and pulp woods, and to start the marketing and manufacturing of the products. The basic problems of the construction of the bundling harvester have been solved using terrain-tests. The prototype machine has been shown to be operable. Loading of the bundles to form sufficiently economically transportable loads has been studied, and simultaneously, the branch-biomass has been tried to be utilised without loosing the profitability of transportation. The results have been promising, and will promote the profitable utilisation of wood-energy. (orig.)

  12. EB1 recognizes the nucleotide state of tubulin in the microtubule lattice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Zanic

    Full Text Available Plus-end-tracking proteins (+TIPs are localized at the fast-growing, or plus end, of microtubules, and link microtubule ends to cellular structures. One of the best studied +TIPs is EB1, which forms comet-like structures at the tips of growing microtubules. The molecular mechanisms by which EB1 recognizes and tracks growing microtubule ends are largely unknown. However, one clue is that EB1 can bind directly to a microtubule end in the absence of other proteins. Here we use an in vitro assay for dynamic microtubule growth with two-color total-internal-reflection-fluorescence imaging to investigate binding of mammalian EB1 to both stabilized and dynamic microtubules. We find that under conditions of microtubule growth, EB1 not only tip tracks, as previously shown, but also preferentially recognizes the GMPCPP microtubule lattice as opposed to the GDP lattice. The interaction of EB1 with the GMPCPP microtubule lattice depends on the E-hook of tubulin, as well as the amount of salt in solution. The ability to distinguish different nucleotide states of tubulin in microtubule lattice may contribute to the end-tracking mechanism of EB1.

  13. Cell edges accumulate gamma tubulin complex components and nucleate microtubules following cytokinesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Ambrose

    Full Text Available Microtubules emanate from distinct organizing centers in fungal and animal cells. In plant cells, by contrast, microtubules initiate from dispersed sites in the cell cortex, where they then self-organize into parallel arrays. Previous ultrastructural evidence suggested that cell edges participate in microtubule nucleation but so far there has been no direct evidence for this. Here we use live imaging to show that components of the gamma tubulin nucleation complex (GCP2 and GCP3 localize at distinct sites along the outer periclinal edge of newly formed crosswalls, and that microtubules grow predominantly away from these edges. These data confirm a role for cell edges in microtubule nucleation, and suggest that an asymmetric distribution of microtubule nucleation factors contributes to cortical microtubule organization in plants, in a manner more similar to other kingdoms than previously thought.

  14. Unidirectional transport of a bead on a single microtubule immobilized in a submicrometre channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokokawa, Ryuji; Yoshida, Yumi; Takeuchi, Shoji; Kon, Takahide; Fujita, Hiroyuki

    2006-01-01

    Artificial nano-scale transportation is demonstrated by reconstructing the intracellular transport in a living cell. The transport system is established on two novel techniques: one is the introduction of a single microtubule filament with controlled polarity in a microfabricated submicrometre channel; the other is the immobilization technique of microtubules by a mercury lamp. To transport a kinesin-coated bead in a designated direction, each microtubule filament is polarly oriented by in vitro gliding assay, in which microtubules are carried by the movement of kinesin immobilized on the channel surface. Then, microtubules are immobilized by exposing kinesin to the mercury lamp, which inactivates kinesin but not microtubules. A kinesin-coated bead is newly introduced and carried on the microtubule from one end of the channel to the other as designed. This is an essential component to build up an integrated nano-scale transport system driven by motor proteins.

  15. Hooks and comets: The story of microtubule polarity orientation in the neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baas, Peter W; Lin, Shen

    2011-06-01

    It is widely believed that signature patterns of microtubule polarity orientation within axons and dendrites underlie compositional and morphological differences that distinguish these neuronal processes from one another. Axons of vertebrate neurons display uniformly plus-end-distal microtubules, whereas their dendrites display non-uniformly oriented microtubules. Recent studies on insect neurons suggest that it is the minus-end-distal microtubules that are the critical feature of the dendritic microtubule array, whether or not they are accompanied by plus-end-distal microtubules. Discussed in this article are the history of these findings, their implications for the regulation of neuronal polarity across the animal kingdom, and potential mechanisms by which neurons establish the distinct microtubule polarity patterns that define axons and dendrites. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Dissecting the molecular mechanism underlying the intimate relationship between cellulose microfibrils and cortical microtubules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei eLei

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A central question in plant cell development is how the cell wall determines directional cell expansion and therefore the final shape of the cell. As the major load-bearing component of the cell wall, cellulose microfibrils are laid down transversely to the axis of elongation, thus forming a spring-like structure that reinforces the cell laterally and while favoring longitudinal expansion in most growing cells. Mounting evidence suggests that cortical microtubules organize the deposition of cellulose microfibrils, but the precise molecular mechanisms linking microtubules to cellulose organization have remained unclear until the recent discovery of CSI1, a linker protein between the cortical microtubules and the cellulose biosynthesizing machinery. In this review, we will focus on the intimate relationship between cellulose microfibrils and cortical microtubules, in particular, we will discuss microtubule arrangement and cell wall architecture, the linkage between cellulose synthase complexes and microtubules, and the feedback mechanisms between cell wall and microtubules.

  17. A small-molecule activator of kinesin-1 drives remodeling of the microtubule network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Thomas S; Yip, Yan Y; Wallock-Richards, Daynea J; Pfisterer, Karin; Sanger, Anneri; Ficek, Weronika; Steiner, Roberto A; Beavil, Andrew J; Parsons, Maddy; Dodding, Mark P

    2017-12-26

    The microtubule motor kinesin-1 interacts via its cargo-binding domain with both microtubules and organelles, and hence plays an important role in controlling organelle transport and microtubule dynamics. In the absence of cargo, kinesin-1 is found in an autoinhibited conformation. The molecular basis of how cargo engagement affects the balance between kinesin-1's active and inactive conformations and roles in microtubule dynamics and organelle transport is not well understood. Here we describe the discovery of kinesore, a small molecule that in vitro inhibits kinesin-1 interactions with short linear peptide motifs found in organelle-specific cargo adaptors, yet activates kinesin-1's function of controlling microtubule dynamics in cells, demonstrating that these functions are mechanistically coupled. We establish a proof-of-concept that a microtubule motor-cargo interface and associated autoregulatory mechanism can be manipulated using a small molecule, and define a target for the modulation of microtubule dynamics.

  18. Altered microtubule dynamics in neurodegenerative disease: Therapeutic potential of microtubule-stabilizing drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunden, Kurt R; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Smith, Amos B; Trojanowski, John Q; Ballatore, Carlo

    2017-09-01

    Many neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by deficiencies in neuronal axonal transport, a process in which cellular cargo is shuttled with the aid of molecular motors from the cell body to axonal termini and back along microtubules (MTs). Proper axonal transport is critical to the normal functioning of neurons, and impairments in this process could contribute to the neuronal damage and death that is characteristic of neurodegenerative disease. Although the causes of axonal transport abnormalities may vary among the various neurodegenerative conditions, in many cases it appears that the transport deficiencies result from a diminution of axonal MT stability. Here we review the evidence of MT abnormalities in a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and traumatic brain injury, and highlight the potential benefit of MT-stabilizing agents in improving axonal transport and nerve function in these diseases. Moreover, we discuss the challenges associated with the utilization of MT-stabilizing drugs as therapeutic candidates for neurodegenerative conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Influence of Bundle Diameter and Attachment Point on Kinematic Behavior in Double Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using Computational Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh Soo Kwon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A protocol to choose the graft diameter attachment point of each bundle has not yet been determined since they are usually dependent on a surgeon’s preference. Therefore, the influence of bundle diameters and attachment points on the kinematics of the knee joint needs to be quantitatively analyzed. A three-dimensional knee model was reconstructed with computed tomography images of a 26-year-old man. Based on the model, models of double bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction were developed. The anterior tibial translations for the anterior drawer test and the internal tibial rotation for the pivot shift test were investigated according to variation of bundle diameters and attachment points. For the model in this study, the knee kinematics after the double bundle ACL reconstruction were dependent on the attachment point and not much influenced by the bundle diameter although larger sized anterior-medial bundles provided increased stability in the knee joint. Therefore, in the clinical setting, the bundle attachment point needs to be considered prior to the bundle diameter, and the current selection method of graft diameters for both bundles appears justified.

  20. Three-Dimensional Printing for In Vivo Visualization of His Bundle Pacing Leads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauch, Terry; Vijayaraman, Pugazhendhi; Dandamudi, Gopi; Ellenbogen, Kenneth

    2015-08-01

    Transvenous pacing leads have been implicated in tricuspid valve dysfunction, and our group has adopted routine use of His bundle pacing to mitigate this effect. Three-dimensional (3D) printing technology holds great promise for advancing medicine, but the high start-up costs can be a deterrent. Seeking confirmation of optimal lead placement relative to the tricuspid annulus, we used low-cost commercial and public domain technologies to generate 3D-printed hearts from selected patients with His bundle pacing leads. Our models successfully demonstrated that such lead placements avoided interference with the tricuspid valve apparatus in these cases. Future applications of 3D printing include facilitating research to minimize lead-valve interactions, understand complex cardiac anatomy, and plan complex surgical procedures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Analytical prediction of turbulent friction factor for a rod bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Jun Ho; Park, Joo Hwan

    2011-01-01

    An analytical calculation has been performed to predict the turbulent friction factor in a rod bundle. For each subchannel constituting a rod bundle, the geometry parameters are analytically derived by integrating the law of the wall over each subchannel with the consideration of a local shear stress distribution. The correlation equations for a local shear stress distribution are supplied from a numerical simulation for each subchannel. The explicit effect of a subchannel shape on the geometry parameter and the friction factor is reported. The friction factor of a corner subchannel converges to a constant value, while the friction factor of a central subchannel steadily increases with a rod distance ratio. The analysis for a rod bundle shows that the friction factor of a rod bundle is largely affected by the characteristics of each subchannel constituting a rod bundle. The present analytic calculations well predict the experimental results from the literature with rod bundles in circular, hexagonal, and square channels.

  2. Trivalent Cation Induced Bundle Formation of Filamentous fd Phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz Zirpel, Nuriye; Park, Eun Jin

    2015-09-01

    Bacteriophages are filamentous polyelectrolyte viral rods infecting only bacteria. In this study, we investigate the bundle formation of fd phages with trivalent cations having different ionic radii (Al(3+) , La(3+) and Y(3+) ) at various phage and counterion concentrations, and at varying bundling times. Aggregated phage bundles were detected at relatively low trivalent counterion concentrations (1 mM). Although 10 mM and 100 mM Y(3+) and La(3+) treatments formed larger and more intertwined phage bundles, Al(3+) and Fe(3+) treatments lead to the formation of networking filaments. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analyses confirmed the presence of C, N and O peaks on densely packed phage bundles. Immunofluorescence labelling and ELISA analyses with anti-p8 antibodies showed the presence of phage filaments after bundling. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. A Tannakian approach to dimensional reduction of principal bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Cónsul, Luis; Biswas, Indranil; García-Prada, Oscar

    2017-08-01

    Let P be a parabolic subgroup of a connected simply connected complex semisimple Lie group G. Given a compact Kähler manifold X, the dimensional reduction of G-equivariant holomorphic vector bundles over X × G / P was carried out in Álvarez-Cónsul and García-Prada (2003). This raises the question of dimensional reduction of holomorphic principal bundles over X × G / P. The method of Álvarez-Cónsul and García-Prada (2003) is special to vector bundles; it does not generalize to principal bundles. In this paper, we adapt to equivariant principal bundles the Tannakian approach of Nori, to describe the dimensional reduction of G-equivariant principal bundles over X × G / P, and to establish a Hitchin-Kobayashi type correspondence. In order to be able to apply the Tannakian theory, we need to assume that X is a complex projective manifold.

  4. MTB-3, a microtubule plus-end tracking protein (+TIP of Neurospora crassa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa R Mouriño-Pérez

    Full Text Available The microtubule (MT "plus end" constitutes the platform for the accumulation of a structurally and functionally diverse group of proteins, collectively called "MT plus-end tracking proteins" (+TIPs. +TIPs control MT dynamics and link MTs to diverse sub-cellular structures. Neurospora crassaMicroTubule Binding protein-3 (MTB-3 is the homolog of yeast EB1, a highly conserved +TIP. To address the function of MTB-3, we examined strains with mtb-3 deletions, and we tagged MTB-3 with GFP to assess its dynamic behavior. MTB-3-GFP was present as comet-like structures distributed more or less homogeneously within the hyphal cytoplasm, and moving mainly towards the apex at speeds up to 4× faster than the normal hyphal elongation rates. MTB-3-GFP comets were present in all developmental stages, but were most abundant in mature hyphae. MTB-3-GFP comets were observed moving in anterograde and retrograde direction along the hypha. Retrograde movement was also observed as originating from the apical dome. The integrity of the microtubular cytoskeleton affects the presence and dynamics of MTB-3-GFP comets, while actin does not seem to play a role. The size of MTB-3-GFP comets is affected by the absence of dynactin and conventional kinesin. We detected no obvious morphological phenotypes in Δmtb-3 mutants but there were fewer MTs in Δmtb-3, MTs were less bundled and less organized. Compared to WT, both MT polymerization and depolymerization rates were significantly decreased in Δmtb-3. In summary, the lack of MTB-3 affects overall growth and morphological phenotypes of N. crassa only slightly, but deletion of mtb-3 has strong effect on MT dynamics.

  5. Global properties of systems quantized via bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doebner, H.D.; Werth, J.E.

    1978-03-01

    Take a smooth manifold M and a Lie algebra action (g-ation) theta on M as the geometrical arena of a physical system moving on M with momenta given by theta. It is proposed to quantize the system with a Mackey-like method via the associated vector bundle xisub(rho) of a principal bundle xi=(P,π,M,H) with model dependent structure group H and with g-action phi on P lifted from theta on M. This (quantization) bundle xisub(rho) gives the Hilbert space equal to L 2 (xisub(rho),ω) of the system as the linear space of sections in xisub(rho) being square integrable with respect to a volume form ω on M; the usual position operators are obtained; phi leads to a vector field representation D(phisub(rho),theta) of g in an hence Hilbert space to momentum operators. So Hilbert space carries the quantum kinematics. In this quantuzation the physically important connection between geometrical properties of the system, e.g. quasi-completeness of theta and G-maximality of phisub(rho), and global properties of its quantized kinematics, e.g. skew-adjointness of the momenta and integrability of D(phisub(rho), theta) can easily be studied. The relation to Nelson's construction of a skew-adjoint non-integrable Lie algebra representation and to Palais' local G-action is discussed. Finally the results are applied to actions induced by coverings as examples of non-maximal phisub(rho) on Esub(rho) lifted from maximal theta on M which lead to direct consequences for the corresponding quantum kinematics

  6. Historical dynamics in ecosystem service bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Delphine; Rhemtulla, Jeanine M; Bennett, Elena M

    2015-10-27

    Managing multiple ecosystem services (ES), including addressing trade-offs between services and preventing ecological surprises, is among the most pressing areas for sustainability research. These challenges require ES research to go beyond the currently common approach of snapshot studies limited to one or two services at a single point in time. We used a spatiotemporal approach to examine changes in nine ES and their relationships from 1971 to 2006 across 131 municipalities in a mixed-use landscape in Quebec, Canada. We show how an approach that incorporates time and space can improve our understanding of ES dynamics. We found an increase in the provision of most services through time; however, provision of ES was not uniformly enhanced at all locations. Instead, each municipality specialized in providing a bundle (set of positively correlated ES) dominated by just a few services. The trajectory of bundle formation was related to changes in agricultural policy and global trends; local biophysical and socioeconomic characteristics explained the bundles' increasing spatial clustering. Relationships between services varied through time, with some provisioning and cultural services shifting from a trade-off or no relationship in 1971 to an apparent synergistic relationship by 2006. By implementing a spatiotemporal perspective on multiple services, we provide clear evidence of the dynamic nature of ES interactions and contribute to identifying processes and drivers behind these changing relationships. Our study raises questions about using snapshots of ES provision at a single point in time to build our understanding of ES relationships in complex and dynamic social-ecological systems.

  7. Hydrodynamic behavior of a bare rod bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartzis, J.G.; Todreas, N.E.

    1977-06-01

    The temperature distribution within the rod bundle of a nuclear reactor is of major importance in nuclear reactor design. However temperature information presupposes knowledge of the hydrodynamic behavior of the coolant which is the most difficult part of the problem due to complexity of the turbulence phenomena. In the present work a 2-equation turbulence model--a strong candidate for analyzing actual three dimensional turbulent flows--has been used to predict fully developed flow of infinite bare rod bundle of various aspect ratios (P/D). The model has been modified to take into account anisotropic effects of eddy viscosity. Secondary flow calculations have been also performed although the model seems to be too rough to predict the secondary flow correctly. Heat transfer calculations have been performed to confirm the importance of anisotropic viscosity in temperature predictions. All numerical calculations for flow and heat have been performed by two computer codes based on the TEACH code. Experimental measurements of the distribution of axial velocity, turbulent axial velocity, turbulent kinetic energy and radial Reynolds stresses were performed in the developing and fully developed regions. A 2-channel Laser Doppler Anemometer working on the Reference mode with forward scattering was used to perform the measurements in a simulated interior subchannel of a triangular rod array with P/D = 1.124. Comparisons between the analytical results and the results of this experiment as well as other experimental data in rod bundle array available in literature are presented. The predictions are in good agreement with the results for the high Reynolds numbers

  8. TgICMAP1 is a novel microtubule binding protein in Toxoplasma gondii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoife T Heaslip

    Full Text Available The microtubule cytoskeleton provides essential structural support for all eukaryotic cells and can be assembled into various higher order structures that perform drastically different functions. Understanding how microtubule-containing assemblies are built in a spatially and temporally controlled manner is therefore fundamental to understanding cell physiology. Toxoplasma gondii, a protozoan parasite, contains at least five distinct tubulin-containing structures, the spindle pole, centrioles, cortical microtubules, the conoid, and the intra-conoid microtubules. How these five structurally and functionally distinct sets of tubulin containing structures are constructed and maintained in the same cell is an intriguing problem. Previously, we performed a proteomic analysis of the T. gondii apical complex, a cytoskeletal complex located at the apical end of the parasite that is composed of the conoid, three ring-like structures, and the two short intra-conoid microtubules. Here we report the characterization of one of the proteins identified in that analysis, TgICMAP1. We show that TgICMAP1 is a novel microtubule binding protein that can directly bind to microtubules in vitro and stabilizes microtubules when ectopically expressed in mammalian cells. Interestingly, in T. gondii, TgICMAP1 preferentially binds to the intra-conoid microtubules, providing us the first molecular tool to investigate the intra-conoid microtubule assembly process during daughter construction.

  9. The non-catalytic domains of Drosophila katanin regulate its abundance and microtubule-disassembly activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle D Grode

    Full Text Available Microtubule severing is a biochemical reaction that generates an internal break in a microtubule and regulation of microtubule severing is critical for cellular processes such as ciliogenesis, morphogenesis, and meiosis and mitosis. Katanin is a conserved heterodimeric ATPase that severs and disassembles microtubules, but the molecular determinants for regulation of microtubule severing by katanin remain poorly defined. Here we show that the non-catalytic domains of Drosophila katanin regulate its abundance and activity in living cells. Our data indicate that the microtubule-interacting and trafficking (MIT domain and adjacent linker region of the Drosophila katanin catalytic subunit Kat60 cooperate to regulate microtubule severing in two distinct ways. First, the MIT domain and linker region of Kat60 decrease its abundance by enhancing its proteasome-dependent degradation. The Drosophila katanin regulatory subunit Kat80, which is required to stabilize Kat60 in cells, conversely reduces the proteasome-dependent degradation of Kat60. Second, the MIT domain and linker region of Kat60 augment its microtubule-disassembly activity by enhancing its association with microtubules. On the basis of our data, we propose that the non-catalytic domains of Drosophila katanin serve as the principal sites of integration of regulatory inputs, thereby controlling its ability to sever and disassemble microtubules.

  10. Assembly mechanism for nuclear fuel bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, J.W.; Flora, B.S.; Ford, K.L.

    1980-01-01

    The invention relates to a nuclear power reactor fuel bundle of the type wherein several rods are mounted in parallel array between two tie plates which secure the fuel rods in place and are maintained in assembled position by means of a number of tie rods secured to both of the end plates. Improved apparatus is provided for attaching the tie rods to the upper tie plate by the use of locking lugs fixed to rotatable sleeves which engage the upper tie plate. (auth)

  11. Thermal hydraulic stability experiments in rod bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enomoto, T.; Muto, S.; Ishizuka, T.; Tanabe, A.; Mitsutake, T.; Sakurai, M.

    1985-01-01

    Thermal hydraulic stability tests have been performed on electrically heated bundles to simulate Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuels in a parallel channel test-loop. The test facility used is for the study of the steady state and transient characteristics of various thermal hydraulic conditions encountered in BWR operation, such as flow- high power operation, abnormal transient conditions and post boiling transition, including thermal hydraulic stability. Moreover, steady state and transient void behavior can be measured using an additional test section for this facility

  12. Vector bundles on complex projective spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Okonek, Christian; Spindler, Heinz

    1980-01-01

    This expository treatment is based on a survey given by one of the authors at the Séminaire Bourbaki in November 1978 and on a subsequent course held at the University of Göttingen. It is intended to serve as an introduction to the topical question of classification of holomorphic vector bundles on complex projective spaces, and can easily be read by students with a basic knowledge of analytic or algebraic geometry. Short supplementary sections describe more advanced topics, further results, and unsolved problems.

  13. Bundling Products and Services Through Modularization Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bask, Anu; Hsuan, Juliana; Rajahonka, Mervi

    2012-01-01

    Modularity has been recognized as a powerful tool in improving the efficiency and management of product design and manufacturing. However, the integrated view on covering both, product and service modularity for product-service systems (PSS), is under researched. Therefore, in this paper our...... objective is to contribute to the PSS modularity. Thus, we describe configurations of PSSs and the bundling of products and services through modularization strategies. So far there have not been tools to analyze and determine the correct combinations of degrees of product and service modularities....

  14. Real parabolic vector bundles over a real curve

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    by Seshadri [4] and their moduli studied in [2]. Here we consider real vector bundles over a real curve and define parabolic structures on real vector bundles. By a real curve, we mean a pair (X,σX ), where X is a compact Riemann surface and. σX is an anti-holomorphic involution on X. A real vector bundle over a real curve ...

  15. Heat Transfer Analysis in Wire Bundles for Aerospace Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickman, S. L.; Iamello, C. J.

    2016-01-01

    Design of wiring for aerospace vehicles relies on an understanding of "ampacity" which refers to the current carrying capacity of wires, either, individually or in wire bundles. Designers rely on standards to derate allowable current flow to prevent exceedance of wire temperature limits due to resistive heat dissipation within the wires or wire bundles. These standards often add considerable margin and are based on empirical data. Commercial providers are taking an aggressive approach to wire sizing which challenges the conventional wisdom of the established standards. Thermal modelling of wire bundles may offer significant mass reduction in a system if the technique can be generalized to produce reliable temperature predictions for arbitrary bundle configurations. Thermal analysis has been applied to the problem of wire bundles wherein any or all of the wires within the bundle may carry current. Wire bundles present analytical challenges because the heat transfer path from conductors internal to the bundle is tortuous, relying on internal radiation and thermal interface conductance to move the heat from within the bundle to the external jacket where it can be carried away by convective and radiative heat transfer. The problem is further complicated by the dependence of wire electrical resistivity on temperature. Reduced heat transfer out of the bundle leads to higher conductor temperatures and, hence, increased resistive heat dissipation. Development of a generalized wire bundle thermal model is presented and compared with test data. The steady state heat balance for a single wire is derived and extended to the bundle configuration. The generalized model includes the effects of temperature varying resistance, internal radiation and thermal interface conductance, external radiation and temperature varying convective relief from the free surface. The sensitivity of the response to uncertainties in key model parameters is explored using Monte Carlo analysis.

  16. Early Results of Anatomic Double Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Demet Pepele

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The goal in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) is to restore the normal anatomic structure and function of the knee. In the significant proportion of patients after the traditional single-bundle ACLR, complaints of instability still continue. Anatomic double bundle ACLR may provide normal kinematics in knees, much closer to the natural anatomy. The aim of this study is to clinically assess the early outcomes of our anatomical double bundle ACLR. Material and Method: In our ...

  17. Analytic convergence of harmonic metrics for parabolic Higgs bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Semin; Wilkin, Graeme

    2018-04-01

    In this paper we investigate the moduli space of parabolic Higgs bundles over a punctured Riemann surface with varying weights at the punctures. We show that the harmonic metric depends analytically on the weights and the stable Higgs bundle. This gives a Higgs bundle generalisation of a theorem of McOwen on the existence of hyperbolic cone metrics on a punctured surface within a given conformal class, and a generalisation of a theorem of Judge on the analytic parametrisation of these metrics.

  18. Microtubule-Organizing Centers: Towards a Minimal Parts List.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz, Joel; Lüders, Jens

    2018-03-01

    Despite decades of molecular analysis of the centrosome, an important microtubule-organizing center (MTOC) of animal cells, the molecular basis of microtubule organization remains obscure. A major challenge is the sheer complexity of the interplay of the hundreds of proteins that constitute the centrosome. However, this complexity owes not only to the centrosome's role as a MTOC but also to the requirements of its duplication cycle and to various other functions such as the formation of cilia, the integration of various signaling pathways, and the organization of actin filaments. Thus, rather than using the parts lists to reconstruct the centrosome, we propose to identify the subset of proteins minimally needed to assemble a MTOC and to study this process at non-centrosomal sites. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Discontinuous conduction in mouse bundle branches is caused by bundle-branch architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veen, Toon A. B.; van Rijen, Harold V. M.; van Kempen, Marjan J. A.; Miquerol, Lucile; Opthof, Tobias; Gros, Daniel; Vos, Marc A.; Jongsma, Habo J.; de Bakker, Jacques M. T.

    2005-01-01

    Background - Recordings of the electrical activity of mouse bundle branches ( BBs) suggest reduced conduction velocity ( CV) in the midseptal compared with the proximal part of the BB. The present study was performed to elucidate the mechanism responsible for this slowing of conduction. Methods and

  20. Vibrations of microtubules: Physics that has not met biology yet

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kučera, Ondřej; Havelka, Daniel; Cifra, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 72, 1 July (2017), s. 13-22 ISSN 0165-2125 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-17102S Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) SAV-15-22 Program:Bilaterální spolupráce Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Models * Vibrations * Microtubules Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics OBOR OECD: Biophysics Impact factor: 1.575, year: 2016

  1. Enthalpy and void distributions in subchannels of PHWR fuel bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J. W.; Choi, H.; Rhee, B. W. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    Two different types of the CANDU fuel bundles have been modeled for the ASSERT-IV code subchannel analysis. From calculated values of mixture enthalpy and void fraction distribution in the fuel bundles, it is found that net buoyancy effect is pronounced in the central region of the DUPIC fuel bundle when compared with the standard CANDU fuel bundle. It is also found that the central region of the DUPIC fuel bundle can be cooled more efficiently than that of the standard fuel bundle. From the calculated mixture enthalpy distribution at the exit of the fuel channel, it is found that the mixture enthalpy and void fraction can be highest in the peripheral region of the DUPIC fuel bundle. On the other hand, the enthalpy and the void fraction were found to be highest in the central region of the standard CANDU fuel bundle at the exit of the fuel channel. This study shows that the subchannel analysis is very useful in assessing thermal behavior of the fuel bundle that could be used in CANDU reactors. 10 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs. (Author)

  2. Experimental and numerical investigations of BWR fuel bundle inlet flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoashi, E; Morooka, S; Ishitori, T; Komita, H; Endo, T; Honda, H; Yamamoto, T; Kato, T; Kawamura, S

    2009-01-01

    We have been studying the mechanism of the flow pattern near the fuel bundle inlet of BWR using both flow visualization test and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. In the visualization test, both single- and multi-bundle test sections were used. The former test section includes only a corner orifice facing two support beams and the latter simulates 16 bundles surrounded by four beams. An observation window is set on the side of the walls imitating the support beams upstream of the orifices in both test sections. In the CFD simulation, as well as the visualization test, the single-bundle model is composed of one bundle with a corner orifice and the multi-bundle model is a 1/4 cut of the test section that includes 4 bundles with the following four orifices: a corner orifice facing the corner of the two neighboring support beams, a center orifice at the opposite side from the corner orifice, and two side orifices. Twin-vortices were observed just upstream of the corner orifice in the multi-bundle test as well as the single-bundle test. A single-vortex and a vortex filament were observed at the side orifice inlet and no vortex was observed at the center orifice. These flow patterns were also predicted in the CFD simulation using Reynolds Stress Model as a turbulent model and the results were in good agreement with the test results mentioned above. (author)

  3. Restriction Theorem for Principal bundles in Arbitrary Characteristic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gurjar, Sudarshan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to prove two basic restriction theorem for principal bundles on smooth projective varieties in arbitrary characteristic generalizing the analogues theorems of Mehta-Ramanathan for vector bundles. More precisely, let G be a reductive algebraic group over an algebraically...... closed field k and let X be a smooth, projective variety over k together with a very ample line bundle O(1). The main result of the paper is that if E is a semistable (resp. stable) principal G-bundle on X w.r.t O(1), then the restriction of E to a general, high multi-degree, complete-intersection curve...

  4. The differential geometry of higher order jets and tangent bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Leon, M.; Rodrigues, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    This chapter is devoted to the study of basic geometrical notions required for the development of the main object of the text. Some facts about Jet theory are reviewed. A particular case of Jet manifolds is considered: the tangent bundle of higher order. It is shown that this jet bundle possesses in a canonical way a certain kind of geometric structure, the so called almost tangent structure of higher order, and which is a generalization of the almost tangent geometry of the tangent bundle. Another important fact examined is the extension of the notion of 'spray' to higher order tangent bundles. (Auth.)

  5. GIT1 enhances neurite outgrowth by stimulating microtubule assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-sheng Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available GIT1, a G-protein-coupled receptor kinase interacting protein, has been reported to be involved in neurite outgrowth. However, the neurobiological functions of the protein remain unclear. In this study, we found that GIT1 was highly expressed in the nervous system, and its expression was maintained throughout all stages of neuritogenesis in the brain. In primary cultured mouse hippocampal neurons from GIT1 knockout mice, there was a significant reduction in total neurite length per neuron, as well as in the average length of axon-like structures, which could not be prevented by nerve growth factor treatment. Overexpression of GIT1 significantly promoted axon growth and fully rescued the axon outgrowth defect in the primary hippocampal neuron cultures from GIT1 knockout mice. The GIT1 N terminal region, including the ADP ribosylation factor-GTPase activating protein domain, the ankyrin domains and the Spa2 homology domain, were sufficient to enhance axonal extension. Importantly, GIT1 bound to many tubulin proteins and microtubule-associated proteins, and it accelerated microtubule assembly in vitro. Collectively, our findings suggest that GIT1 promotes neurite outgrowth, at least partially by stimulating microtubule assembly. This study provides new insight into the cellular and molecular pathogenesis of GIT1-associated neurological diseases.

  6. Bundled tungsten oxide nanowires under thermal processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Shibin; Zhao Yimin; Xia Yongde; Zhu Yanqiu; Zou Zengda; Min Guanghui

    2008-01-01

    Ultra-thin W 18 O 49 nanowires were initially obtained by a simple solvothermal method using tungsten chloride and cyclohexanol as precursors. Thermal processing of the resulting bundled nanowires has been carried out in air in a tube furnace. The morphology and phase transformation behavior of the as-synthesized nanowires as a function of annealing temperature have been characterized by x-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. The nanostructured bundles underwent a series of morphological evolution with increased annealing temperature, becoming straighter, larger in diameter, and smaller in aspect ratio, eventually becoming irregular particles with size up to 5 μm. At 500 deg. C, the monoclinic W 18 O 49 was completely transformed to monoclinic WO 3 phase, which remains stable at high processing temperature. After thermal processing at 400 deg. C and 450 deg. C, the specific surface areas of the resulting nanowires dropped to 110 m 2 g -1 and 66 m 2 g -1 respectively, compared with that of 151 m 2 g -1 for the as-prepared sample. This study may shed light on the understanding of the geometrical and structural evolution occurring in nanowires whose working environment may involve severe temperature variations

  7. Development boiling to sprinkled tube bundle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kracík, Petr; Pospíšil, Jiří

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents results of a studied heat transfer coefficient at the surface of a sprinkled tube bundle where boiling occurs. Research in the area of sprinkled exchangers can be divided into two major parts. The first part is research on heat transfer and determination of the heat transfer coefficient at sprinkled tube bundles for various liquids, whether boiling or not. The second part is testing of sprinkle modes for various tube diameters, tube pitches and tube materials and determination of individual modes' interface. All results published so far for water as the falling film liquid apply to one to three tubes for which the mentioned relations studied are determined in rigid laboratory conditions defined strictly in advance. The sprinkled tubes were not viewed from the operational perspective where there are more tubes and various modes may occur in different parts with various heat transfer values. The article focuses on these processes. The tube is located in a low-pressure chamber where vacuum is generated using an exhauster via ejector. The tube consists of smooth copper tubes of 12 mm diameter placed horizontally one above another.

  8. Development boiling to sprinkled tube bundle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kracík Petr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of a studied heat transfer coefficient at the surface of a sprinkled tube bundle where boiling occurs. Research in the area of sprinkled exchangers can be divided into two major parts. The first part is research on heat transfer and determination of the heat transfer coefficient at sprinkled tube bundles for various liquids, whether boiling or not. The second part is testing of sprinkle modes for various tube diameters, tube pitches and tube materials and determination of individual modes’ interface. All results published so far for water as the falling film liquid apply to one to three tubes for which the mentioned relations studied are determined in rigid laboratory conditions defined strictly in advance. The sprinkled tubes were not viewed from the operational perspective where there are more tubes and various modes may occur in different parts with various heat transfer values. The article focuses on these processes. The tube is located in a low-pressure chamber where vacuum is generated using an exhauster via ejector. The tube consists of smooth copper tubes of 12 mm diameter placed horizontally one above another.

  9. The Drosophila Microtubule-Associated Protein Mars Stabilizes Mitotic Spindles by Crosslinking Microtubules through Its N-Terminal Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gang; Beati, Hamze; Nilsson, Jakob; Wodarz, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Correct segregation of genetic material relies on proper assembly and maintenance of the mitotic spindle. How the highly dynamic microtubules (MTs) are maintained in stable mitotic spindles is a key question to be answered. Motor and non-motor microtubule associated proteins (MAPs) have been reported to stabilize the dynamic spindle through crosslinking adjacent MTs. Mars, a novel MAP, is essential for the early development of Drosophila embryos. Previous studies showed that Mars is required for maintaining an intact mitotic spindle but did not provide a molecular mechanism for this function. Here we show that Mars is able to stabilize the mitotic spindle in vivo. Both in vivo and in vitro data reveal that the N-terminal region of Mars functions in the stabilization of the mitotic spindle by crosslinking adjacent MTs. PMID:23593258

  10. The Drosophila microtubule-associated protein mars stabilizes mitotic spindles by crosslinking microtubules through its N-terminal region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gang; Beati, Hamze; Nilsson, Jakob; Wodarz, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Correct segregation of genetic material relies on proper assembly and maintenance of the mitotic spindle. How the highly dynamic microtubules (MTs) are maintained in stable mitotic spindles is a key question to be answered. Motor and non-motor microtubule associated proteins (MAPs) have been reported to stabilize the dynamic spindle through crosslinking adjacent MTs. Mars, a novel MAP, is essential for the early development of Drosophila embryos. Previous studies showed that Mars is required for maintaining an intact mitotic spindle but did not provide a molecular mechanism for this function. Here we show that Mars is able to stabilize the mitotic spindle in vivo. Both in vivo and in vitro data reveal that the N-terminal region of Mars functions in the stabilization of the mitotic spindle by crosslinking adjacent MTs.

  11. The Drosophila microtubule-associated protein mars stabilizes mitotic spindles by crosslinking microtubules through its N-terminal region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Zhang

    Full Text Available Correct segregation of genetic material relies on proper assembly and maintenance of the mitotic spindle. How the highly dynamic microtubules (MTs are maintained in stable mitotic spindles is a key question to be answered. Motor and non-motor microtubule associated proteins (MAPs have been reported to stabilize the dynamic spindle through crosslinking adjacent MTs. Mars, a novel MAP, is essential for the early development of Drosophila embryos. Previous studies showed that Mars is required for maintaining an intact mitotic spindle but did not provide a molecular mechanism for this function. Here we show that Mars is able to stabilize the mitotic spindle in vivo. Both in vivo and in vitro data reveal that the N-terminal region of Mars functions in the stabilization of the mitotic spindle by crosslinking adjacent MTs.

  12. Gamma-tubulin is required for bipolar spindle assembly and for proper kinetochore microtubule attachments during prometaphase I in Drosophila oocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacie E Hughes

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In many animal species the meiosis I spindle in oocytes is anastral and lacks centrosomes. Previous studies of Drosophila oocytes failed to detect the native form of the germline-specific γ-tubulin (γTub37C in meiosis I spindles, and genetic studies have yielded conflicting data regarding the role of γTub37C in the formation of bipolar spindles at meiosis I. Our examination of living and fixed oocytes carrying either a null allele or strong missense mutation in the γtub37C gene demonstrates a role for γTub37C in the positioning of the oocyte nucleus during late prophase, as well as in the formation and maintenance of bipolar spindles in Drosophila oocytes. Prometaphase I spindles in γtub37C mutant oocytes showed wide, non-tapered spindle poles and disrupted positioning. Additionally, chromosomes failed to align properly on the spindle and showed morphological defects. The kinetochores failed to properly co-orient and often lacked proper attachments to the microtubule bundles, suggesting that γTub37C is required to stabilize kinetochore microtubule attachments in anastral spindles. Although spindle bipolarity was sometimes achieved by metaphase I in both γtub37C mutants, the resulting chromosome masses displayed highly disrupted chromosome alignment. Therefore, our data conclusively demonstrate a role for γTub37C in both the formation of the anastral meiosis I spindle and in the proper attachment of kinetochore microtubules. Finally, multispectral imaging demonstrates the presences of native γTub37C along the length of wild-type meiosis I spindles.

  13. Evaluation of Single-Bundle versus Double-Bundle PCL Reconstructions with More Than 10-Year Follow-Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masataka Deie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL injuries are not rare in acute knee injuries, and several recent anatomical studies of the PCL and reconstructive surgical techniques have generated improved patient results. Now, we have evaluated PCL reconstructions performed by either the single-bundle or double-bundle technique in a patient group followed up retrospectively for more than 10 years. Methods. PCL reconstructions were conducted using the single-bundle (27 cases or double-bundle (13 cases method from 1999 to 2002. The mean age at surgery was 34 years in the single-bundle group and 32 years in the double-bundle group. The mean follow-up period was 12.5 years. Patients were evaluated by Lysholm scoring, the gravity sag view, and knee arthrometry. Results. The Lysholm score after surgery was 89.1±5.6 points for the single-bundle group and 91.9±4.5 points for the double-bundle group. There was no significant difference between the methods in the side-to-side differences by gravity sag view or knee arthrometer evaluation, although several cases in both groups showed a side-to-side difference exceeding 5 mm by the latter evaluation method. Conclusions. We found no significant difference between single- and double-bundle PCL reconstructions during more than 10 years of follow-up.

  14. Real-time wavelet-based inline banknote-in-bundle counting for cut-and-bundle machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petker, Denis; Lohweg, Volker; Gillich, Eugen; Türke, Thomas; Willeke, Harald; Lochmüller, Jens; Schaede, Johannes

    2011-03-01

    Automatic banknote sheet cut-and-bundle machines are widely used within the scope of banknote production. Beside the cutting-and-bundling, which is a mature technology, image-processing-based quality inspection for this type of machine is attractive. We present in this work a new real-time Touchless Counting and perspective cutting blade quality insurance system, based on a Color-CCD-Camera and a dual-core Computer, for cut-and-bundle applications in banknote production. The system, which applies Wavelet-based multi-scale filtering is able to count banknotes inside a 100-bundle within 200-300 ms depending on the window size.

  15. Polo-like kinase 1 regulates Nlp, a centrosome protein involved in microtubule nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casenghi, Martina; Meraldi, Patrick; Weinhart, Ulrike; Duncan, Peter I; Körner, Roman; Nigg, Erich A

    2003-07-01

    In animal cells, most microtubules are nucleated at centrosomes. At the onset of mitosis, centrosomes undergo a structural reorganization, termed maturation, which leads to increased microtubule nucleation activity. Centrosome maturation is regulated by several kinases, including Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1). Here, we identify a centrosomal Plk1 substrate, termed Nlp (ninein-like protein), whose properties suggest an important role in microtubule organization. Nlp interacts with two components of the gamma-tubulin ring complex and stimulates microtubule nucleation. Plk1 phosphorylates Nlp and disrupts both its centrosome association and its gamma-tubulin interaction. Overexpression of an Nlp mutant lacking Plk1 phosphorylation sites severely disturbs mitotic spindle formation. We propose that Nlp plays an important role in microtubule organization during interphase, and that the activation of Plk1 at the onset of mitosis triggers the displacement of Nlp from the centrosome, allowing the establishment of a mitotic scaffold with enhanced microtubule nucleation activity.

  16. Energetic funnel facilitates facilitated diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cencini, Massimo; Pigolotti, Simone

    2018-01-25

    Transcription factors (TFs) are able to associate to their binding sites on DNA faster than the physical limit posed by diffusion. Such high association rates can be achieved by alternating between three-dimensional diffusion and one-dimensional sliding along the DNA chain, a mechanism-dubbed facilitated diffusion. By studying a collection of TF binding sites of Escherichia coli from the RegulonDB database and of Bacillus subtilis from DBTBS, we reveal a funnel in the binding energy landscape around the target sequences. We show that such a funnel is linked to the presence of gradients of AT in the base composition of the DNA region around the binding sites. An extensive computational study of the stochastic sliding process along the energetic landscapes obtained from the database shows that the funnel can significantly enhance the probability of TFs to find their target sequences when sliding in their proximity. We demonstrate that this enhancement leads to a speed-up of the association process. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. Intrinsic synergistic-topological mechanism versus synergistic-topological matrix in microtubule self-organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buljan Vlado A

    2014-12-01

    Overall our data indicate that under crowded conditions in vitro, the self-organization of a microtubule fiber is governed by an intrinsic synergistic-topological mechanism, which in conjunction with the topological changes, GTP-tubulin depletion, and cooperative motion of fiber constituting microtubules, may generate and maintain a ‘synergistic-topological matrix’. Failure of the mechanism to form biologically feasible microtubule synergistic-topological matrix may, per se, precondition tumorigenesis.

  18. Dynamic instabilities in the kinetics of growth and disassembly of microtubules

    OpenAIRE

    Katrukha, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic instability of microtubules is considered using frameworks of non-linear thermodynamics and non-equilibrium reaction-diffusion systems. Stochastic assembly/disassembly phases in the polymerization dynamics of microtubules are treated as a result of collective clusterization of microdefects (holes in structure). The model explains experimentally observed power law dependence of catastrophe frequency from the microtubule growth rate. Additional reaction-diffusion-precipitation model is ...

  19. A mutation of the fission yeast EB1 overcomes negative regulation by phosphorylation and stabilizes microtubules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iimori, Makoto; Ozaki, Kanako [Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake cho, Sakyo ku, Kyoto, 606-8502 (Japan); Chikashige, Yuji [Kobe Advanced ICT Research Center, National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, Kobe, 651-2492 (Japan); Habu, Toshiyuki [Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake cho, Sakyo ku, Kyoto, 606-8502 (Japan); Radiation Biology Center, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Konoe cho, Sakyo ku, Kyoto, 606-8501 (Japan); Hiraoka, Yasushi [Kobe Advanced ICT Research Center, National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, Kobe, 651-2492 (Japan); Graduate School of Frontier Biosciences, Osaka University, 1-3 Yamadaoka, Suita, 565-0871 (Japan); Maki, Takahisa; Hayashi, Ikuko [Graduate School of Nanobioscience, Yokohama City University, Tsurumi, Yokohama, 230-0045 (Japan); Obuse, Chikashi [Graduate School of Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 001-0021 (Japan); Matsumoto, Tomohiro, E-mail: tmatsumo@house.rbc.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake cho, Sakyo ku, Kyoto, 606-8502 (Japan); Radiation Biology Center, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Konoe cho, Sakyo ku, Kyoto, 606-8501 (Japan)

    2012-02-01

    Mal3 is a fission yeast homolog of EB1, a plus-end tracking protein (+ TIP). We have generated a mutation (89R) replacing glutamine with arginine in the calponin homology (CH) domain of Mal3. Analysis of the 89R mutant in vitro has revealed that the mutation confers a higher affinity to microtubules and enhances the intrinsic activity to promote the microtubule-assembly. The mutant Mal3 is no longer a + TIP, but binds strongly the microtubule lattice. Live cell imaging has revealed that while the wild type Mal3 proteins dissociate from the tip of the growing microtubules before the onset of shrinkage, the mutant Mal3 proteins persist on microtubules and reduces a rate of shrinkage after a longer pausing period. Consequently, the mutant Mal3 proteins cause abnormal elongation of microtubules composing the spindle and aster. Mal3 is phosphorylated at a cluster of serine/threonine residues in the linker connecting the CH and EB1-like C-terminal motif domains. The phosphorylation occurs in a microtubule-dependent manner and reduces the affinity of Mal3 to microtubules. We propose that because the 89R mutation is resistant to the effect of phosphorylation, it can associate persistently with microtubules and confers a stronger stability of microtubules likely by reinforcing the cylindrical structure. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We characterize a mutation (mal3-89R) in fission yeast homolog of EB1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mutation enhances the activity to assemble microtubules. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mal3 is phosphorylated in a microtubule-dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The phosphorylation negatively regulates the Mal3 activity.

  20. A mutation of the fission yeast EB1 overcomes negative regulation by phosphorylation and stabilizes microtubules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iimori, Makoto; Ozaki, Kanako; Chikashige, Yuji; Habu, Toshiyuki; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Maki, Takahisa; Hayashi, Ikuko; Obuse, Chikashi; Matsumoto, Tomohiro

    2012-01-01

    Mal3 is a fission yeast homolog of EB1, a plus-end tracking protein (+ TIP). We have generated a mutation (89R) replacing glutamine with arginine in the calponin homology (CH) domain of Mal3. Analysis of the 89R mutant in vitro has revealed that the mutation confers a higher affinity to microtubules and enhances the intrinsic activity to promote the microtubule-assembly. The mutant Mal3 is no longer a + TIP, but binds strongly the microtubule lattice. Live cell imaging has revealed that while the wild type Mal3 proteins dissociate from the tip of the growing microtubules before the onset of shrinkage, the mutant Mal3 proteins persist on microtubules and reduces a rate of shrinkage after a longer pausing period. Consequently, the mutant Mal3 proteins cause abnormal elongation of microtubules composing the spindle and aster. Mal3 is phosphorylated at a cluster of serine/threonine residues in the linker connecting the CH and EB1-like C-terminal motif domains. The phosphorylation occurs in a microtubule-dependent manner and reduces the affinity of Mal3 to microtubules. We propose that because the 89R mutation is resistant to the effect of phosphorylation, it can associate persistently with microtubules and confers a stronger stability of microtubules likely by reinforcing the cylindrical structure. -- Highlights: ► We characterize a mutation (mal3-89R) in fission yeast homolog of EB1. ► The mutation enhances the activity to assemble microtubules. ► Mal3 is phosphorylated in a microtubule-dependent manner. ► The phosphorylation negatively regulates the Mal3 activity.

  1. Cytoplasmic Dynein Transports Axonal Microtubules in a Polarity-Sorting Manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand N. Rao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Axonal microtubules are predominantly organized into a plus-end-out pattern. Here, we tested both experimentally and with computational modeling whether a motor-based polarity-sorting mechanism can explain this microtubule pattern. The posited mechanism centers on cytoplasmic dynein transporting plus-end-out and minus-end-out microtubules into and out of the axon, respectively. When cytoplasmic dynein was acutely inhibited, the bi-directional transport of microtubules in the axon was disrupted in both directions, after which minus-end-out microtubules accumulated in the axon over time. Computational modeling revealed that dynein-mediated transport of microtubules can establish and preserve a predominantly plus-end-out microtubule pattern as per the details of the experimental findings, but only if a kinesin motor and a static cross-linker protein are also at play. Consistent with the predictions of the model, partial depletion of TRIM46, a protein that cross-links axonal microtubules in a manner that influences their polarity orientation, leads to an increase in microtubule transport.

  2. Msd1/SSX2IP-dependent microtubule anchorage ensures spindle orientation and primary cilia formation

    OpenAIRE

    Hori, Akiko; Ikebe, Chiho; Tada, Masazumi; Toda, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Anchoring microtubules to the centrosome is critical for cell geometry and polarity, yet the molecular mechanism remains unknown. Here we show that the conserved human Msd1/SSX2IP is required for microtubule anchoring. hMsd1/SSX2IP is delivered to the centrosome in a centriolar satellite-dependent manner and binds the microtubule-nucleator ?-tubulin complex. hMsd1/SSX2IP depletion leads to disorganised interphase microtubules and misoriented mitotic spindles with reduced length and intensity....

  3. Estimating microtubule distributions from 2D immunofluorescence microscopy images reveals differences among human cultured cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieyue Li

    Full Text Available Microtubules are filamentous structures that are involved in several important cellular processes, including cell division, cellular structure and mechanics, and intracellular transportation. Little is known about potential differences in microtubule distributions within and across cell lines. Here we describe a method to estimate information pertaining to 3D microtubule distributions from 2D fluorescence images. Our method allows for quantitative comparisons of microtubule distribution parameters (number of microtubules, mean length between different cell lines. Among eleven cell lines compared, some showed differences that could be accounted for by differences in the total amount of tubulin per cell while others showed statistically significant differences in the balance between number and length of microtubules. We also observed that some cell lines that visually appear different in their microtubule distributions are quite similar when the model parameters are considered. The method is expected to be generally useful for comparing microtubule distributions between cell lines and for a given cell line after various perturbations. The results are also expected to enable analysis of the differences in gene expression underlying the observed differences in microtubule distributions among cell types.

  4. The prostate-derived sterile 20-like kinase (PSK) regulates microtubule organization and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsopoulos, Costas; Zihni, Ceniz; Garg, Ritu; Ridley, Anne J; Morris, Jonathan D H

    2003-05-16

    Sterile 20 (STE20) protein kinases, which include germinal center kinases and p21-activated protein kinases, are known to activate mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways (c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase, p38, or extracellular signal-regulated kinase), leading to changes in gene transcription. Some STE20s can also regulate the cytoskeleton, and we have shown that the germinal center kinase-like kinase prostate-derived STE20-like kinase (PSK) affects actin cytoskeletal organization. Here, we demonstrate that PSK colocalizes with microtubules; and that this localization is disrupted by the microtubule depolymerizing agent nocodazole. The association of PSK with microtubules results in the production of stabilized perinuclear microtubule cables that are nocodazole-resistant and contain increased levels of acetylated alpha-tubulin. Kinase-defective PSK (K57A) or the C terminus of PSK (amino acids 745-1235) lacking the kinase domain are sufficient for microtubule binding and stabilization, demonstrating that the catalytic activity of the protein is not required. The localization of PSK to microtubules occurs via its C terminus, and PSK binds and phosphorylates alpha- and beta-tubulin in vitro. The N terminus of PSK (1-940) is unable to bind or stabilize microtubules, demonstrating that PSK must associate with microtubules for their reorganization to occur. These results demonstrate that PSK interacts with microtubules and affects their organization and stability independently of PSK kinase activity.

  5. Hair bundles are specialized for ATP delivery via creatine kinase.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shin, J.B.; Streijger, F.; Beynon, A.J.; Peters, T.; Gadzala, L.; McMillen, D.; Bystrom, C.; Zee, C.E.E.M. van der; Wallimann, T.; Gillespie, P.G.

    2007-01-01

    When stimulated strongly, a hair cell's mechanically sensitive hair bundle may consume ATP too rapidly for replenishment by diffusion. To provide a broad view of the bundle's protein complement, including those proteins participating in energy metabolism, we used shotgun mass spectrometry methods to

  6. Infinite Grassmannian and moduli space of G-bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, S.; Ramanathan, A.

    1993-03-01

    Let C be a smooth irreducible projective curve and G a simply connected simple affine algebraic group of C. We study in this paper the relationship between the space of vacua defined in Conformal Field Theory and the space of sections of a line bundle on the moduli space of G-bundles over C. (author). 33 refs

  7. An integral Riemann-Roch theorem for surface bundles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ib Henning

    2010-01-01

    This paper is a response to a conjecture by T. Akita about an integral Riemann–Roch theorem for surface bundles.......This paper is a response to a conjecture by T. Akita about an integral Riemann–Roch theorem for surface bundles....

  8. Sensory transduction: the 'swarm intelligence' of auditory hair bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Jörg

    2011-08-23

    In vertebrate hair cells, the hair bundle is responsible for the conversion of mechanical vibrations into electrical signals. In a combined experimental and computational tour de force, a group of researchers now presents a quantitative model that explains how the bundle's specific microarchitecture gives rise to its exquisite mechanosensory properties. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Stability of Picard Bundle Over Moduli Space of Stable Vector ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Answering a question of [BV] it is proved that the Picard bundle on the moduli space of stable vector bundles of rank two, on a Riemann surface of genus at least three, with fixed determinant of odd degree is stable.

  10. Phase Space Reduction of Star Products on Cotangent Bundles.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kowalzig, N.; Neumaier, N.; Pflaum, M.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we construct star products on Marsden-Weinstein reduced spaces in case both the original phase space and the reduced phase space are (symplectomorphic to) cotangent bundles. Under the assumption that the original cotangent bundle $T^*Q$ carries a symplectic structure of form

  11. Implementing the care bundle approach in the ICU

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-11-19

    Nov 19, 2007 ... Intensive care standards can only be maintained by quality control of ICU facilities, activities ... The care bundle approach provides a practical tool to implement evidence-based practice in critical care. Care bundles ... algorithm provides a useful bedside tool in the practical implementation of the guideline.

  12. Computational imaging through a fiber-optic bundle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodhi, Muhammad A.; Dumas, John Paul; Pierce, Mark C.; Bajwa, Waheed U.

    2017-05-01

    Compressive sensing (CS) has proven to be a viable method for reconstructing high-resolution signals using low-resolution measurements. Integrating CS principles into an optical system allows for higher-resolution imaging using lower-resolution sensor arrays. In contrast to prior works on CS-based imaging, our focus in this paper is on imaging through fiber-optic bundles, in which manufacturing constraints limit individual fiber spacing to around 2 μm. This limitation essentially renders fiber-optic bundles as low-resolution sensors with relatively few resolvable points per unit area. These fiber bundles are often used in minimally invasive medical instruments for viewing tissue at macro and microscopic levels. While the compact nature and flexibility of fiber bundles allow for excellent tissue access in-vivo, imaging through fiber bundles does not provide the fine details of tissue features that is demanded in some medical situations. Our hypothesis is that adapting existing CS principles to fiber bundle-based optical systems will overcome the resolution limitation inherent in fiber-bundle imaging. In a previous paper we examined the practical challenges involved in implementing a highly parallel version of the single-pixel camera while focusing on synthetic objects. This paper extends the same architecture for fiber-bundle imaging under incoherent illumination and addresses some practical issues associated with imaging physical objects. Additionally, we model the optical non-idealities in the system to get lower modelling errors.

  13. Moduli space of Parabolic vector bundles over hyperelliptic curves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    27

    MODULI SPACE OF PARABOLIC VECTOR BUNDLES OVER. HYPERELLIPTIC CURVES. SURATNO BASU AND SARBESWAR PAL. Abstract. Let X be a smooth projective hyperelliptic curve of arbitrary genus g. In this short article we will classify the rank 2 stable vector bundles with parabolic structure along a reduced ...

  14. Rigidity of minimal submanifolds with flat normal bundle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    normal bundle. We prove that if the second fundamental form of M satisfies some decay conditions, then M is an affine plane or a catenoid in some Euclidean subspace. Keywords. Catenoid; minimal submanifolds; flat normal bundle. 1. Introduction. Let Mn be an n-dimensional complete minimal immersed submanifold in R.

  15. Interprofessional Perspectives on ABCDE Bundle Implementation: A Focus Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Leanne M; Vasilevskis, Eduard E; Mion, Lorraine C

    The ABCDE bundle is a multifaceted, interprofessional intervention that is associated with reduced ventilator and delirium days as well as increased likelihood of mobility in intensive care. The aim of this study is to describe organizational domains that contribute to variation in ABCDE bundle implementation as reported by intensive care unit providers and to examine the capability of a conceptual framework for identifying variation in ABCDE bundle implementation. We conducted 2 separate focus groups that included nurses, respiratory therapists, occupational and physical therapists (N = 16) from the surgical and medical intensive care units at 1 academic medical center. All participants had experience performing ABCDE bundle activities. Variation in how the ABCDE bundle was interpreted and executed within and across disciplines was noted. Organizational facets, the physical environment, labor quantity and quality, task burden, provider attitudes, and patient characteristics were noted to influence ABCDE bundle execution. The difficulty coordinating and implementing early mobility was emphasized. The number of disciplines required to perform an activity and individual component complexity was reported to influence ABCDE bundle implementation. Nurses repeatedly described challenges with coordinating care across disciplines. Small tests of change, adequate staffing, interprofessional training and protocol development efforts, and role modeling may be effective methods for successful ABCDE bundle implementation.

  16. Weak point property and sections of Picard bundles on a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Contemp. Math., 465 (2008) (Providence, RI: Amer. Math. Soc.) pp. 45–50. [7] Ein L and Lazarsfeld R, Stability and restrictions of Picard bundles with an application to the normal bundles of elliptic curves, in: Complex projective geometry (ed) Ellingsrud,. Peskine et al LMS 179 (1992) (Cambridge University Press). [8] Fulton ...

  17. Balanced metrics for vector bundles and polarised manifolds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia Fernandez, Mario; Ross, Julius

    2012-01-01

    We consider a notion of balanced metrics for triples (X, L, E) which depend on a parameter α, where X is smooth complex manifold with an ample line bundle L and E is a holomorphic vector bundle over X. For generic choice of α, we prove that the limit of a convergent sequence of balanced metrics...

  18. Implementing a pressure ulcer prevention bundle into practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downie, Fiona; Perrin, Anne-Marie; Kiernan, Martin

    The implementation of a care bundle approach to delivering fundamental care in practice is now a recognised and effective way of translating research into practice, offering consistent care with resulting positive outcomes for the patient. A care bundle consists ofa relatively small number of interventions for every patient to whom the bundle is applied. However, there must be evidence behind each individual intervention to indicate, if delivered, how it will reduce the risk to the patient. This paper reports on a strategy for developing and implementing a pressure ulcer (PU) combined prevention care bundle/ care plan into practice. The effectiveness of the care bundle can be measured when it is in use in the practice setting with an audit tool.

  19. Development of nuclear fuel. Development of CANDU advanced fuel bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suk, Ho Chun; Hwang, Woan; Jeong, Young Hwan; Jung, Sung Hoon

    1991-07-01

    In order to develop CANDU advanced fuel, the agreement of the joint research between KAERI and AECL was made on February 19, 1991. AECL conceptual design of CANFLEX bundle for Bruce reactors was analyzed and then the reference design and design drawing of the advanced fuel bundle with natural uranium fuel for CANDU-6 reactor were completed. The CANFLEX fuel cladding was preliminarily investigated. The fabricability of the advanced fuel bundle was investigated. The design and purchase of the machinery tools for the bundle fabrication for hydraulic scoping tests were performed. As a result of CANFLEX tube examination, the tubes were found to be meet the criteria proposed in the technical specification. The dummy bundles for hydraulic scoping tests have been fabricated by using the process and tools, where the process parameters and tools have been newly established. (Author)

  20. CFD modeling of secondary flows in fuel rod bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baglietto, Emilio; Ninokata, Hisashi

    2004-01-01

    An optimized non-linear eddy viscosity model is introduced, for calculations of detailed coolant velocity distribution in a tight lattice fuel bundle. The low Reynolds formulation has been optimized based on DNS data for channel flow. The non-linear stress-strain relationship has been modified in the coefficients to model the flow anisotropy, which causes the formation of turbulence driven secondary flows inside the bundle subchannels. Predictions of the model are first compared to experimental measurements of secondary flows in a triangularly arrayed rod bundle with p/d=1.3. Subsequently wall shear stress and velocity predictions are compared with different experimental data for a rod bundle with p/d=1.17. The model shows to be able to correctly reproduce the scale of the secondary motion, and to accurately reproduce both wall shear stress and velocity distributions inside the rod bundle subchannels. (author)

  1. Superconductivity in an Inhomogeneous Bundle of Metallic and Semiconducting Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilya Grigorenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Using Bogoliubov-de Gennes formalism for inhomogeneous systems, we have studied superconducting properties of a bundle of packed carbon nanotubes, making a triangular lattice in the bundle's transverse cross-section. The bundle consists of a mixture of metallic and doped semiconducting nanotubes, which have different critical transition temperatures. We investigate how a spatially averaged superconducting order parameter and the critical transition temperature depend on the fraction of the doped semiconducting carbon nanotubes in the bundle. Our simulations suggest that the superconductivity in the bundle will be suppressed when the fraction of the doped semiconducting carbon nanotubes will be less than 0.5, which is the percolation threshold for a two-dimensional triangular lattice.

  2. Bundles over Quantum RealWeighted Projective Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Brzeziński

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The algebraic approach to bundles in non-commutative geometry and the definition of quantum real weighted projective spaces are reviewed. Principal U(1-bundles over quantum real weighted projective spaces are constructed. As the spaces in question fall into two separate classes, the negative or odd class that generalises quantum real projective planes and the positive or even class that generalises the quantum disc, so do the constructed principal bundles. In the negative case the principal bundle is proven to be non-trivial and associated projective modules are described. In the positive case the principal bundles turn out to be trivial, and so all the associated modules are free. It is also shown that the circle (coactions on the quantum Seifert manifold that define quantum real weighted projective spaces are almost free.

  3. Implementing the ABCDE Bundle into Everyday Care: Opportunities, Challenges and Lessons Learned for Implementing the ICU Pain, Agitation and Delirium (PAD) Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balas, Michele C.; Burke, William J.; Gannon, David; Cohen, Marlene Z.; Colburn, Lois; Bevil, Catherine; Franz, Doug; Olsen, Keith M.; Ely, E. Wesley; Vasilevskis, Eduard E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The Awakening and Breathing Coordination, Delirium monitoring/management and Early exercise/mobility (ABCDE) bundle is an evidence-based, interprofessional, multicomponent strategy for minimizing sedative exposure, reducing duration of mechanical ventilation and managing intensive care unit (ICU) acquired delirium and weakness. The purpose of this study was to identify facilitators and barriers to ABCDE bundle adoption and to evaluate the extent to which bundle implementation was effective, sustainable, and conducive to dissemination. Design Prospective, before-after, mixed-methods study. Setting Five adult ICUs, 1 step-down unit, and a special care unit located in a 624 bed, academic medical center Subjects Interprofessional ICU team members at participating institution. Interventions and Measurements In collaboration with the participating institution, we developed, implemented, and refined an ABCDE bundle policy. Over the course of an 18 month period, all ICU team members were offered the opportunity to participate in numerous, multimodal educational efforts. Three focus group sessions, 3 online surveys, and 1 educational evaluation were administered in an attempt to identify facilitators and barriers to bundle adoption. Main Results Factors believed to facilitate bundle implementation included: 1) the performance of daily, interdisciplinary, rounds, 2) engagement of key implementation leaders, 3) sustained and diverse educational efforts, and 4) the bundle's quality and strength. Barriers identified included: 1) intervention related issues (e.g. timing of trials, fear of adverse events), 2) communication and care coordination challenges, 3) knowledge deficits, 4) workload concerns, and 5) documentation burden. Despite these challenges, participants believed implementation ultimately benefited patients, improved interdisciplinary communication, and empowered nurses and other ICU team members. Conclusions In this study of the implementation of the ABCDE

  4. Simulation of the response of the inner hair cell stereocilia bundle to an acoustical stimulus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonya T Smith

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian hearing relies on a cochlear hydrodynamic sensor embodied in the inner hair cell stereocilia bundle. It is presumed that acoustical stimuli induce a fluid shear-driven motion between the tectorial membrane and the reticular lamina to deflect the bundle. It is hypothesized that ion channels are opened by molecular gates that sense tension in tip-links, which connect adjacent stepped rows of stereocilia. Yet almost nothing is known about how the fluid and bundle interact. Here we show using our microfluidics model how each row of stereocilia and their associated tip links and gates move in response to an acoustical input that induces an orbital motion of the reticular lamina. The model confirms the crucial role of the positioning of the tectorial membrane in hearing, and explains how this membrane amplifies and synchronizes the timing of peak tension in the tip links. Both stereocilia rotation and length change are needed for synchronization of peak tip link tension. Stereocilia length change occurs in response to accelerations perpendicular to the oscillatory fluid shear flow. Simulations indicate that nanovortices form between rows to facilitate diffusion of ions into channels, showing how nature has devised a way to solve the diffusive mixing problem that persists in engineered microfluidic devices.

  5. Vision, healing brush, and fiber bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Todor

    2005-03-01

    The Healing Brush is a tool introduced for the first time in Adobe Photoshop (2002) that removes defects in images by seamless cloning (gradient domain fusion). The Healing Brush algorithms are built on a new mathematical approach that uses Fibre Bundles and Connections to model the representation of images in the visual system. Our mathematical results are derived from first principles of human vision, related to adaptation transforms of von Kries type and Retinex theory. In this paper we present the new result of Healing in arbitrary color space. In addition to supporting image repair and seamless cloning, our approach also produces the exact solution to the problem of high dynamic range compression of17 and can be applied to other image processing algorithms.

  6. Cyclic hardening in bundled actin networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmoller, K M; Fernández, P; Arevalo, R C; Blair, D L; Bausch, A R

    2010-01-01

    Nonlinear deformations can irreversibly alter the mechanical properties of materials. Most soft materials, such as rubber and living tissues, display pronounced softening when cyclically deformed. Here we show that, in contrast, reconstituted networks of crosslinked, bundled actin filaments harden when subject to cyclical shear. As a consequence, they exhibit a mechano-memory where a significant stress barrier is generated at the maximum of the cyclic shear strain. This unique response is crucially determined by the network architecture: at lower crosslinker concentrations networks do not harden, but soften showing the classic Mullins effect known from rubber-like materials. By simultaneously performing macrorheology and confocal microscopy, we show that cyclic shearing results in structural reorganization of the network constituents such that the maximum applied strain is encoded into the network architecture.

  7. Advanced tube-bundle rocket thrust chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazaroff, John M.; Pavli, Albert J.

    1990-01-01

    An advanced rocket thrust chamber for future space application is described along with an improved method of fabrication. Potential benefits of the concept are improved cyclic life, reusability, and performance. Performance improvements are anticipated because of the enhanced heat transfer into the coolant which will enable higher chamber pressure in expander cycle engines. Cyclic life, reusability and reliability improvements are anticipated because of the enhanced structural compliance inherent in the construction. The method of construction involves the forming of the combustion chamber with a tube-bundle of high conductivity copper or copper alloy tubes, and the bonding of these tubes by an electroforming operation. Further, the method of fabrication reduces chamber complexity by incorporating manifolds, jackets, and structural stiffeners while having the potential for thrust chamber cost and weight reduction.

  8. Color Space Axioms and Fiber Bundles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edoardo Provenzi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In 1974, H. L. Resnkikoff published an inspiring paper about the use of differential geometry to study, among others, the intrinsic shape of the space of perceived colors and the Riemannian metrics on it. The mathematical techniques that he used is shared with modern theories of theoretical physics, which are far from being a common background for scientists in color vision and processing. Due to this, Resnikoff’s paper remained unnoticed for decades. In this brief contribution, some insights about how to update Resnikoff’s ideas will be given and discussed in relationship with a modern theory of color spaces and to the mathematical concept of principal fiber bundle.

  9. Critical Power Performance of Tight Lattice Bundle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yasushi; Hiraiwa, Kouji; Morooka, Shinichi; Abe, Nobuaki

    An innovative fuel cycle system concept named BARS (BWR with an Advanced Recycle System) has been proposed as a future fuel cycle option aiming at enhanced utilization of uranium resources and reduction of radioactive wastes. In BARS, the spent fuel from conventional light water reactors (LWRs) is recycled as a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel for a BWR core with the fast neutron spectrum by means of oxide dry-processing and vibro-packing fuel fabrication. The fast neutron spectrum is obtained by means of triangular tight fuel lattice. Further study on BARS, especially on tight lattice MOX fuel, has been initiated as a joint study by Toshiba and Gifu University. The objective of this paper is to show the latest progress of the study on BARS, especially concerning the thermal-hydraulics measurements for tight lattice bundle.

  10. Framework for shape analysis of white matter fiber bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glozman, Tanya; Bruckert, Lisa; Pestilli, Franco; Yecies, Derek W; Guibas, Leonidas J; Yeom, Kristen W

    2018-02-15

    Diffusion imaging coupled with tractography algorithms allows researchers to image human white matter fiber bundles in-vivo. These bundles are three-dimensional structures with shapes that change over time during the course of development as well as in pathologic states. While most studies on white matter variability focus on analysis of tissue properties estimated from the diffusion data, e.g. fractional anisotropy, the shape variability of white matter fiber bundle is much less explored. In this paper, we present a set of tools for shape analysis of white matter fiber bundles, namely: (1) a concise geometric model of bundle shapes; (2) a method for bundle registration between subjects; (3) a method for deformation estimation. Our framework is useful for analysis of shape variability in white matter fiber bundles. We demonstrate our framework by applying our methods on two datasets: one consisting of data for 6 normal adults and another consisting of data for 38 normal children of age 11 days to 8.5 years. We suggest a robust and reproducible method to measure changes in the shape of white matter fiber bundles. We demonstrate how this method can be used to create a model to assess age-dependent changes in the shape of specific fiber bundles. We derive such models for an ensemble of white matter fiber bundles on our pediatric dataset and show that our results agree with normative human head and brain growth data. Creating these models for a large pediatric longitudinal dataset may improve understanding of both normal development and pathologic states and propose novel parameters for the examination of the pediatric brain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Bundling of elastic filaments induced by hydrodynamic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Yi; Page, William; Poole, Robert J.; Lauga, Eric

    2017-12-01

    Peritrichous bacteria swim in viscous fluids by rotating multiple helical flagellar filaments. As the bacterium swims forward, all its flagella rotate in synchrony behind the cell in a tight helical bundle. When the bacterium changes its direction, the flagellar filaments unbundle and randomly reorient the cell for a short period of time before returning to their bundled state and resuming swimming. This rapid bundling and unbundling is, at its heart, a mechanical process whereby hydrodynamic interactions balance with elasticity to determine the time-varying deformation of the filaments. Inspired by this biophysical problem, we present in this paper what is perhaps the simplest model of bundling whereby two or more straight elastic filaments immersed in a viscous fluid rotate about their centerline, inducing rotational flows which tend to bend the filaments around each other. We derive an integrodifferential equation governing the shape of the filaments resulting from mechanical balance in a viscous fluid at low Reynolds number. We show that such equation may be evaluated asymptotically analytically in the long-wavelength limit, leading to a local partial differential equation governed by a single dimensionless bundling number. A numerical study of the dynamics predicted by the model reveals the presence of two configuration instabilities with increasing bundling numbers: first to a crossing state where filaments touch at one point and then to a bundled state where filaments wrap along each other in a helical fashion. We also consider the case of multiple filaments and the unbundling dynamics. We next provide an intuitive physical model for the crossing instability and show that it may be used to predict analytically its threshold and adapted to address the transition to a bundling state. We then use a macroscale experimental implementation of the two-filament configuration in order to validate our theoretical predictions and obtain excellent agreement. This long

  12. Restriction of Preferences to the Set of Consumption Bundles, In a Model with Production and Consumption Bundles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalk, S.

    1999-01-01

    In contrast to the neo-classical theory of Arrow and Debreu, a model of a private ownership economy is presented, in which production and consumption bundles are treated separately. Each of the two types of bundles is assumed to establish a con- vex cone. Production technologies can convert

  13. Single-Bundle Versus Double-Bundle Reconstruction for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Rupture: A Meta-Analysis-Does Anatomy Matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eck, Carola F. Van; Kopf, Sebastian; Irrgang, James J.; Blankevoort, Leendert; Bhandari, Mohit; Fu, Freddie H.; Poolman, Rudolf W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction leads to better restoration of anterior and rotational laxity and range of motion than single-bundle reconstruction. Methods: A search was performed in the Medline, Embase, CINAHL, and Cochrane databases. All

  14. Katanin localization requires triplet microtubules in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica M Esparza

    Full Text Available Centrioles and basal bodies are essential for a variety of cellular processes that include the recruitment of proteins to these structures for both centrosomal and ciliary function. This recruitment is compromised when centriole/basal body assembly is defective. Mutations that cause basal body assembly defects confer supersensitivity to Taxol. These include bld2, bld10, bld12, uni3, vfl1, vfl2, and vfl3. Flagellar motility mutants do not confer sensitivity with the exception of mutations in the p60 (pf19 and p80 (pf15 subunits of the microtubule severing protein katanin. We have identified additional pf15 and bld2 (ε-tubulin alleles in screens for Taxol sensitivity. Null pf15 and bld2 alleles are viable and are not essential genes in Chlamydomonas. Analysis of double mutant strains with the pf15-3 and bld2-6 null alleles suggests that basal bodies in Chlamydomonas may recruit additional proteins beyond katanin that affect spindle microtubule stability. The bld2-5 allele is a hypomorphic allele and its phenotype is modulated by nutritional cues. Basal bodies in bld2-5 cells are missing proximal ends. The basal body mutants show aberrant localization of an epitope-tagged p80 subunit of katanin. Unlike IFT proteins, katanin p80 does not localize to the transition fibers of the basal bodies based on an analysis of the uni1 mutant as well as the lack of colocalization of katanin p80 with IFT74. We suggest that the triplet microtubules are likely to play a key role in katanin p80 recruitment to the basal body of Chlamydomonas rather than the transition fibers that are needed for IFT localization.

  15. Genetic analysis of a Drosophila microtubule-associated protein

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    The 205-kD microtubule-associated protein (205K MAP) is one of the principal MAPs in Drosophila. 205K MAP is similar to the HeLa 210K/MAP4 family of MAPs since it shares the following biochemical properties: it is present in several isoforms, has a molecular mass of approximately 200 kD, and is thermostable. Furthermore, immuno-crossreactivity has been observed between mouse MAP4, HeLa 210K, and Drosophila 205K MAP. Currently, there is little information concerning the biological function of ...

  16. Analysis of Soybean Microtubule Persistence Length; New Evidence on the Correlation between Structural Composition and Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojania Feizabadi, Mitra; Winton, Carly; Barrientos, Jimmy

    2012-02-01

    Recent studies on microtubules composed of different β tubulin isotypes indicate their different functionality in terms of their dynamical behavior or the mechanism of their interaction with chemotherapeutic drugs. Along these lines, the result of our recent study measuring the rigidity of neural and non-neural samples of microtubules with different β tubulin isotype compositions suggests that the distinguished mechanical properties of microtubules, such as rigidity, may also be associated with the different distribution of their β tubulin isotypes. In our current study, we have reported the persistence length of a single soybean microtubule. This plant microtubule has a structural composition different from that of mammalian microtubules. Under the same experimental methods of measurement, the soybean microtubules showed a different persistence length as compared to the value of the persistence length that we estimated in the study of both single Bovine Brain and MCF7 microtubules.

  17. Reaction-diffusion model of hair-bundle morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobo, Adrian; Hudspeth, A J

    2014-10-28

    The hair bundle, an apical specialization of the hair cell composed of several rows of regularly organized stereocilia and a kinocilium, is essential for mechanotransduction in the ear. Its precise organization allows the hair bundle to convert mechanical stimuli to electrical signals; mutations that alter the bundle's morphology often cause deafness. However, little is known about the proteins involved in the process of morphogenesis and how the structure of the bundle arises through interactions between these molecules. We present a mathematical model based on simple reaction-diffusion mechanisms that can reproduce the shape and organization of the hair bundle. This model suggests that the boundary of the cell and the kinocilium act as signaling centers that establish the bundle's shape. The interaction of two proteins forms a hexagonal Turing pattern--a periodic modulation of the concentrations of the morphogens, sustained by local activation and long-range inhibition of the reactants--that sets a blueprint for the location of the stereocilia. Finally we use this model to predict how different alterations to the system might impact the shape and organization of the hair bundle.

  18. Two-categorical bundles and their classifying spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baas, Nils A.; Bökstedt, M.; Kro, T.A.

    2012-01-01

    -category is a classifying space for the associated principal 2-bundles. In the process of proving this we develop a lot of powerful machinery which may be useful in further studies of 2-categorical topology. As a corollary we get a new proof of the classification of principal bundles. A calculation based......For a 2-category 2C we associate a notion of a principal 2C-bundle. In case of the 2-category of 2-vector spaces in the sense of M.M. Kapranov and V.A. Voevodsky this gives the the 2-vector bundles of N.A. Baas, B.I. Dundas and J. Rognes. Our main result says that the geometric nerve of a good 2...... on the main theorem shows that the principal 2-bundles associated to the 2-category of 2-vector spaces in the sense of J.C. Baez and A.S. Crans split, up to concordance, as two copies of ordinary vector bundles. When 2C is a cobordism type 2-category we get a new notion of cobordism-bundles which turns out...

  19. A ROP2-RIC1 pathway fine-tunes microtubule reorganization for salt tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changjiang; Lu, Hanmei; Li, Wei; Yuan, Ming; Fu, Ying

    2017-07-01

    The reorganization of microtubules induced by salt stress is required for Arabidopsis survival under high salinity conditions. RIC1 is an effector of Rho-related GTPase from plants (ROPs) and a known microtubule-associated protein. In this study, we demonstrated that RIC1 expression decreased with long-term NaCl treatment, and ric1-1 seedlings exhibited a higher survival rate under salt stress. We found that RIC1 reduced the frequency of microtubule transition from shortening to growing status and knockout of RIC1 improved the reassembly of depolymerized microtubules caused by either oryzalin treatment or salt stress. Further investigation showed that constitutively active ROP2 promoted the reassembly of microtubules and the survival of seedlings under salt stress. A rop2-1 ric1-1 double mutant rescued the salt-sensitive phenotype of rop2-1, indicating that ROP2 functions in salt tolerance through RIC1. Although ROP2 did not regulate RIC1 expression upon salt stress, a quick but mild increase of ROP2 activity was induced, led to reduction of RIC1 on microtubules. Collectively, our study reveals an ROP2-RIC1 pathway that fine-tunes microtubule dynamics in response to salt stress in Arabidopsis. This finding not only reveals a new regulatory mechanism for microtubule reorganization under salt stress but also the importance of ROP signalling for salinity tolerance. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Microtubules in legume root hairs: cell polarity and response to rhizobial signal molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieberer, B.

    2005-01-01

    Microtubules, which occur as hollow protein tubes with a diameter of 25 nanometers, are an important compound of the cytoskeleton and occur in plant cells as a highly organized and dynamic array, which actual arrangement will depend on its tasks during the cell cycle. Microtubules play a key-role in

  1. Conserved mechanisms of microtubule-stimulated ADP release, ATP binding, and force generation in transport kinesins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, Joseph; Farabella, Irene; Yu, I-Mei; Rosenfeld, Steven S; Houdusse, Anne; Topf, Maya; Moores, Carolyn A

    2014-09-10

    Kinesins are a superfamily of microtubule-based ATP-powered motors, important for multiple, essential cellular functions. How microtubule binding stimulates their ATPase and controls force generation is not understood. To address this fundamental question, we visualized microtubule-bound kinesin-1 and kinesin-3 motor domains at multiple steps in their ATPase cycles--including their nucleotide-free states--at ∼ 7 Å resolution using cryo-electron microscopy. In both motors, microtubule binding promotes ordered conformations of conserved loops that stimulate ADP release, enhance microtubule affinity and prime the catalytic site for ATP binding. ATP binding causes only small shifts of these nucleotide-coordinating loops but induces large conformational changes elsewhere that allow force generation and neck linker docking towards the microtubule plus end. Family-specific differences across the kinesin-microtubule interface account for the distinctive properties of each motor. Our data thus provide evidence for a conserved ATP-driven mechanism for kinesins and reveal the critical mechanistic contribution of the microtubule interface.

  2. Four-stranded mini microtubules formed byProsthecobacterBtubAB show dynamic instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xian; Fink, Gero; Bharat, Tanmay A M; He, Shaoda; Kureisaite-Ciziene, Danguole; Löwe, Jan

    2017-07-18

    Microtubules, the dynamic, yet stiff hollow tubes built from αβ-tubulin protein heterodimers, are thought to be present only in eukaryotic cells. Here, we report a 3.6-Å helical reconstruction electron cryomicroscopy structure of four-stranded mini microtubules formed by bacterial tubulin-like Prosthecobacter dejongeii BtubAB proteins. Despite their much smaller diameter, mini microtubules share many key structural features with eukaryotic microtubules, such as an M-loop, alternating subunits, and a seam that breaks overall helical symmetry. Using in vitro total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, we show that bacterial mini microtubules treadmill and display dynamic instability, another hallmark of eukaryotic microtubules. The third protein in the btub gene cluster, BtubC, previously known as "bacterial kinesin light chain," binds along protofilaments every 8 nm, inhibits BtubAB mini microtubule catastrophe, and increases rescue. Our work reveals that some bacteria contain regulated and dynamic cytomotive microtubule systems that were once thought to be only useful in much larger and sophisticated eukaryotic cells.

  3. Synthesis and biological evaluation of structurally simplified noscapine analogues as microtubule binding agents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ghaly, P.E.; Churchill, C.D.M.; Abou El-Magd, R.M.; Hájková, Zuzana; Dráber, Pavel; West, F.G.; Tuszyński, J.A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 95, č. 6 (2017), s. 649-655 ISSN 0008-4042 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-22194S Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : noscapine * microtubule * tubulin * cytotoxicity * microtubule dynamics * docking Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 1.080, year: 2016

  4. Microtubules can bear enhanced compressive loads in living cells because of lateral reinforcement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brangwynne, C. P.; Mac Kintosh, F.C.; Kumar, S.B.; Geisse, N. A.; Talbot, J.; Mahadevan, L.; Parker, K.; Ingber, D. E.; Weitz, D. A.

    2006-01-01

    Cytoskeletal microtubules have been proposed to influence cell shape and mechanics based on their ability to resist large-scale compressive forces exerted by the surrounding contractile cytoskeleton. Consistent with this, cytoplasmic microtubules are often highly curved and appear buckled because of

  5. The XMAP215-family protein DdCP224 is required for cortical interactions of microtubules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hestermann Andrea

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interactions of peripheral microtubule tips with the cell cortex are of crucial importance for nuclear migration, spindle orientation, centrosome positioning and directional cell movement. Microtubule plus end binding proteins are thought to mediate interactions of microtubule tips with cortical actin and membrane proteins in a dynein-dependent manner. XMAP215-family proteins are main regulators of microtubule plus end dynamics but so far they have not been implicated in the interactions of microtubule tips with the cell cortex. Results Here we show that overexpression of an N-terminal fragment of DdCP224, the Dictyostelium XMAP215 homologue, caused a collapse of the radial microtubule cytoskeleton, whereby microtubules lost contact with the cell cortex and were dragged behind like a comet tail of an unusually motile centrosome. This phenotype was indistinguishable from mutants overexpressing fragments of the dynein heavy chain or intermediate chain. Moreover, it was accompanied by dispersal of the Golgi apparatus and reduced cortical localization of the dynein heavy chain indicating a disrupted dynein/dynactin interaction. The interference of DdCP224 with cortical dynein function is strongly supported by the observations that DdCP224 and its N-terminal fragment colocalize with dynein and coimmunoprecipitate with dynein and dynactin. Conclusions Our data show that XMAP215-like proteins are required for the interaction of microtubule plus ends with the cell cortex in interphase cells and strongly suggest that this function is mediated by dynein.

  6. Moduli of Parabolic Higgs Bundles and Atiyah Algebroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Logares, Marina; Martens, Johan

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we study the geometry of the moduli space of (non-strongly) parabolic Higgs bundles over a Riemann surface with marked points. We show that this space possesses a Poisson structure, extending the one on the dual of an Atiyah algebroid over the moduli space of parabolic vector bundles....... By considering the case of full flags, we get a Grothendieck–Springer resolution for all other flag types, in particular for the moduli spaces of twisted Higgs bundles, as studied by Markman and Bottacin and used in the recent work of Laumon–Ngô. We discuss the Hitchin system, and demonstrate that all...

  7. Endoplasmic-reticulum-mediated microtubule alignment governs cytoplasmic streaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Kenji; Mamane, Alexandre; Sasaki, Tohru; Sato, Kohta; Takagi, Jun; Niwayama, Ritsuya; Hufnagel, Lars; Shimamoto, Yuta; Joanny, Jean-François; Uchida, Seiichi; Kimura, Akatsuki

    2017-04-01

    Cytoplasmic streaming refers to a collective movement of cytoplasm observed in many cell types. The mechanism of meiotic cytoplasmic streaming (MeiCS) in Caenorhabditis elegans zygotes is puzzling as the direction of the flow is not predefined by cell polarity and occasionally reverses. Here, we demonstrate that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network structure is required for the collective flow. Using a combination of RNAi, microscopy and image processing of C. elegans zygotes, we devise a theoretical model, which reproduces and predicts the emergence and reversal of the flow. We propose a positive-feedback mechanism, where a local flow generated along a microtubule is transmitted to neighbouring regions through the ER. This, in turn, aligns microtubules over a broader area to self-organize the collective flow. The proposed model could be applicable to various cytoplasmic streaming phenomena in the absence of predefined polarity. The increased mobility of cortical granules by MeiCS correlates with the efficient exocytosis of the granules to protect the zygotes from osmotic and mechanical stresses.

  8. Microtubules restrict plastid sedimentation in protonemata of the moss Ceratodon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwuchow, J.; Sack, F. D.

    1994-01-01

    Apical cells of protonemata of the moss Ceratodon purpureus are unusual among plant cells with sedimentation in that only some amyloplasts sediment and these do not fall completely to the bottom of vertical cells. To determine whether the cytoskeleton restricts plastid sedimentation, the effects of amiprophos-methyl (APM) and cytochalasin D (CD) on plastid position were quantified. APM treatments of 30-60 min increased the plastid sedimentation that is normally seen along the length of untreated or control cells. Longer APM treatments often resulted in more dramatic plastid sedimentation, and in some cases almost all plastids sedimented to the lowermost point in the cell. In contrast, the microfilament inhibitor CD did not affect longitudinal plastid sedimentation compared to untreated cells, although it did disturb or eliminate plastid zonation in the tip. These data suggest that microtubules restrict the sedimentation of plastids along the length of the cell and that microtubules are load-bearing for all the plastids in the apical cell. This demonstrates the importance of the cytoskeleton in maintaining organelle position and cell organization against the force of gravity.

  9. Kindlin1 regulates microtubule function to ensure normal mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Hitesh; Stavrou, Ifigeneia; Shrestha, Roshan L; Draviam, Viji; Frame, Margaret C; Brunton, Valerie G

    2016-08-01

    Loss of Kindlin 1 (Kin1) results in the skin blistering disorder Kindler Syndrome (KS), whose symptoms also include skin atrophy and reduced keratinocyte proliferation. Kin1 binds to integrins to modulate their activation and more recently it has been shown to regulate mitotic spindles and cell survival in a Plk1-dependent manner. Here we report that short-term Kin1 deletion in mouse skin results in impaired mitosis, which is associated with reduced acetylated tubulin (ac-tub) levels and cell proliferation. In cells, impaired mitosis and reduced ac-tub levels are also accompanied by reduced microtubule stability, all of which are rescued by HDAC6 inhibition. The ability of Kin1 to regulate HDAC6-dependent cellular ac-tub levels is dependent on its phosphorylation by Plk1. Taken together, these data define a novel role for Kin1 in microtubule acetylation and stability and offer a mechanistic insight into how certain KS phenotypes, such as skin atrophy and reduced cell proliferation, arise. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Journal of Molecular Cell Biology, IBCB, SIBS, CAS.

  10. Localization of a microtubule organizing center by kinesin motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arita, Chikashi; Bosche, Jonas; Lück, Alexander; Santen, Ludger

    2017-12-01

    Molecular motors are proteins which bind to a polarized cytoskeletal filament and move steadily along it. Molecular motors of the kinesin family move along microtubules (MTs), which are a component of the cytoskeleton. A very processive kinesin motor Kip3p, is known to promote catastrophes and pausing of MT, in particular on cortical contact. These properties play an important role in positioning the mitotic spindle in budding yeast. We present a theoretical approach to positioning of MT networks under confinement. In order to explore a localization mechanism of a microtubule organizing center (MTOC), we introduce an idealized system of two MTs connected by a MTOC. The dynamics of Kip3p is modeled by interacting stochastic particles, which allows us to study the effects of motor-induced depolymerization in a finite volume. We find that localization in the middle of the cavity is realized in a parameter regime where the motor densities on the MTs are increasing with the distance from the MTOC. Localization at an asymmetric position is also possible by tuning model parameters.

  11. Centriole triplet microtubules are required for stable centriole formation and inheritance in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jennifer T; Kong, Dong; Hoerner, Christian R; Loncarek, Jadranka; Stearns, Tim

    2017-09-14

    Centrioles are composed of long-lived microtubules arranged in nine triplets. However, the contribution of triplet microtubules to mammalian centriole formation and stability is unknown. Little is known of the mechanism of triplet microtubule formation, but experiments in unicellular eukaryotes indicate that delta-tubulin and epsilon-tubulin, two less-studied tubulin family members, are required. Here, we report that centrioles in delta-tubulin and epsilon-tubulin null mutant human cells lack triplet microtubules and fail to undergo centriole maturation. These aberrant centrioles are formed de novo each cell cycle, but are unstable and do not persist to the next cell cycle, leading to a futile cycle of centriole formation and disintegration. Disintegration can be suppressed by paclitaxel treatment. Delta-tubulin and epsilon-tubulin physically interact, indicating that these tubulins act together to maintain triplet microtubules and that these are necessary for inheritance of centrioles from one cell cycle to the next.

  12. Implications for kinetochore-microtubule attachment from the structure of an engineered Ndc80 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciferri, Claudio; Pasqualato, Sebastiano; Screpanti, Emanuela; Varetti, Gianluca; Santaguida, Stefano; Dos Reis, Gabriel; Maiolica, Alessio; Polka, Jessica; De Luca, Jennifer G; De Wulf, Peter; Salek, Mogjiborahman; Rappsilber, Juri; Moores, Carolyn A; Salmon, Edward D; Musacchio, Andrea

    2008-05-02

    Kinetochores are proteinaceous assemblies that mediate the interaction of chromosomes with the mitotic spindle. The 180 kDa Ndc80 complex is a direct point of contact between kinetochores and microtubules. Its four subunits contain coiled coils and form an elongated rod structure with functional globular domains at either end. We crystallized an engineered "bonsai" Ndc80 complex containing a shortened rod domain but retaining the globular domains required for kinetochore localization and microtubule binding. The structure reveals a microtubule-binding interface containing a pair of tightly interacting calponin-homology (CH) domains with a previously unknown arrangement. The interaction with microtubules is cooperative and predominantly electrostatic. It involves positive charges in the CH domains and in the N-terminal tail of the Ndc80 subunit and negative charges in tubulin C-terminal tails and is regulated by the Aurora B kinase. We discuss our results with reference to current models of kinetochore-microtubule attachment and centromere organization.

  13. Microtubules Nonlinear Models Dynamics Investigations through the exp(−Φ(ξ-Expansion Method Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Alam

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this research article, we present exact solutions with parameters for two nonlinear model partial differential equations(PDEs describing microtubules, by implementing the exp(−Φ(ξ-Expansion Method. The considered models, describing highly nonlinear dynamics of microtubules, can be reduced to nonlinear ordinary differential equations. While the first PDE describes the longitudinal model of nonlinear dynamics of microtubules, the second one describes the nonlinear model of dynamics of radial dislocations in microtubules. The acquired solutions are then graphically presented, and their distinct properties are enumerated in respect to the corresponding dynamic behavior of the microtubules they model. Various patterns, including but not limited to regular, singular kink-like, as well as periodicity exhibiting ones, are detected. Being the method of choice herein, the exp(−Φ(ξ-Expansion Method not disappointing in the least, is found and declared highly efficient.

  14. Using product bundling as facilitator of the adoption process of radical innovations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, M.J.; Frambach, R.T.; Schoormans, J.

    2010-01-01

    Generally, radical innovations are not easily adopted in the market. Potential adopters experience difficulties to comprehend and evaluate radical innovations due to their newness in terms of technology and benefits offered. Consequently, adoption intentions may remain low. This paper proposes

  15. Cytomagnetometric study of interactions between microfilaments and microtubules by measuring the energy imparted to magnetic particles within the cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemoto, Iku [Tokyo Denki University School of Information Environment 2-1200, Muzai-Gakuendai, Inzai, Chiba 270-1382 (Japan)]. E-mail: nemoto@sie.dendai.ac.jp; Kawamura, Kazuhisa [Tokyo Denki University School of Science and Engineering Hatoyama, Saitama 350-0394 (Japan)

    2005-05-15

    Cytomagnetometric measurements of the energy imparted to intracellular organelles were made to study the relationship between microtubules and microfilaments. Depolymerization of microtubules by colchicine resulted in an increase in the energy suggesting that microtubules in control condition suppress the activity of microfilaments.

  16. Interactive domains in the molecular chaperone human alphaB crystallin modulate microtubule assembly and disassembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joy G Ghosh

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Small heat shock proteins regulate microtubule assembly during cell proliferation and in response to stress through interactions that are poorly understood.Novel functions for five interactive sequences in the small heat shock protein and molecular chaperone, human alphaB crystallin, were investigated in the assembly/disassembly of microtubules and aggregation of tubulin using synthetic peptides and mutants of human alphaB crystallin.The interactive sequence (113FISREFHR(120 exposed on the surface of alphaB crystallin decreased microtubule assembly by approximately 45%. In contrast, the interactive sequences, (131LTITSSLSSDGV(142 and (156ERTIPITRE(164, corresponding to the beta8 strand and the C-terminal extension respectively, which are involved in complex formation, increased microtubule assembly by approximately 34-45%. The alphaB crystallin peptides, (113FISREFHR(120 and (156ERTIPITRE(164, inhibited microtubule disassembly by approximately 26-36%, and the peptides (113FISREFHR(120 and (131LTITSSLSSDGV(142 decreased the thermal aggregation of tubulin by approximately 42-44%. The (131LTITSSLSSDGV(142 and (156ERTIPITRE(164 peptides were more effective than the widely used anti-cancer drug, Paclitaxel, in modulating tubulinmicrotubule dynamics. Mutagenesis of these interactive sequences in wt human alphaB crystallin confirmed the effects of the alphaB crystallin peptides on microtubule assembly/disassembly and tubulin aggregation. The regulation of microtubule assembly by alphaB crystallin varied over a narrow range of concentrations. The assembly of microtubules was maximal at alphaB crystallin to tubulin molar ratios between 1:4 and 2:1, while molar ratios >2:1 inhibited microtubule assembly.Interactive sequences on the surface of human alphaB crystallin collectively modulate microtubule assembly through a dynamic subunit exchange mechanism that depends on the concentration and ratio of alphaB crystallin to tubulin. These are the first

  17. Assembly mechanism for nuclear fuel bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, J.W.; Flora, B.S.

    1977-01-01

    A method of securing a fuel bundle to permit easy remote disassembly is described. Fuel rods are held loosely between end plates, each end of the rods fitting into holes in the end plates. At the upper end of each fuel rod there is a spring pressing against the end plate. Tie rods are used to hold the end plates together securely. The lower end of each tie rod is screwed into the lower end plate; the upper end of each tie rod is attached to the upper end plate by means of a locking assembly described in the patent. In order to remove the upper tie plate during the disassembly process, it is necessary only to depress the tie plate against the pressure of the springs surrounding the fuel rods and then to rotate each locking sleeve on the tie rods from its locked to its unlocked position. It is then possible to remove the tie plate without disassembling the locking assembly. (LL)

  18. Bundled automobile insurance coverage and accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chu-Shiu; Liu, Chwen-Chi; Peng, Sheng-Chang

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the characteristics of automobile accidents by taking into account two types of automobile insurance coverage: comprehensive vehicle physical damage insurance and voluntary third-party liability insurance. By using a unique data set in the Taiwanese automobile insurance market, we explore the bundled automobile insurance coverage and the occurrence of claims. It is shown that vehicle physical damage insurance is the major automobile coverage and affects the decision to purchase voluntary liability insurance coverage as a complement. Moreover, policyholders with high vehicle physical damage insurance coverage have a significantly higher probability of filing vehicle damage claims, and if they additionally purchase low voluntary liability insurance coverage, their accident claims probability is higher than those who purchase high voluntary liability insurance coverage. Our empirical results reveal that additional automobile insurance coverage information can capture more driver characteristics and driving behaviors to provide useful information for insurers' underwriting policies and to help analyze the occurrence of automobile accidents. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Increased acetylation of microtubules rescues human tau-induced microtubule defects and neuromuscular junction abnormalities in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-Xi Mao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Tau normally associates with and stabilizes microtubules (MTs, but is hyperphosphorylated and aggregated into neurofibrillary tangles in Alzheimer's disease and related neurodegenerative diseases, which are collectively known as tauopathies. MTs are regulated by different forms of post-translational modification, including acetylation; acetylated MTs represent a more stable microtubule population. In our previous study, we showed that inhibition of histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6, which deacetylates tubulin at lysine 40, rescues defects in MTs and in neuromuscular junction growth caused by tau overexpression. However, HDAC6 also acts on other proteins that are involved in distinct biological processes unrelated to tubulins. In order to examine directly the role of increased tubulin acetylation against tau toxicity, we generated a site-directed α-tubulinK40Q mutation by CRISPR/Cas9 technology to mimic the acetylated MTs and found that acetylation-mimicking α-tubulin rescued tau-induced MT defects and neuromuscular junction developmental abnormalities. We also showed that late administration of ACY-1215 and tubastatin A, two potent and selective inhibitors of HDAC6, rescued the tau-induced MT defects after the abnormalities had already become apparent. Overall, our results indicate that increasing MT acetylation by either genetic manipulations or drugs might be used as potential strategies for intervention in tauopathies.

  20. Stability of the plasma in a bundle divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, T.F.; Callen, J.D.

    1979-02-01

    Due to the pressure and magnetic field gradients and curvature of the magnetic field lines in a bundle divertor of a tokamak device, the plasma may be unstable to local interchange modes. Turbulent transport could be quite large and lead to a thick scrape-off layer which is as large as the radius of curvature of the diverted flux bundle. Such turbulence would be beneficial for lowering the energy and particle fluxes on the collector in a bundle divertor. The effect of a bundle divertor on the β limit resulting from the ballooning modes of instability in the central plasma is also estimated. The critical β is reduced by less than one percent

  1. Devices for investigation and intervention on steam generators tubes bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Launay, J.P.; Sort, M.

    1986-01-01

    After a brief recall on the French regulation concerning pressure vessels, the authors describe the experience and the devices used by Framatome for closing, repairing, sleeving and shot peening for steam generators tubes bundles [fr

  2. Introductory lectures on fibre bundles and topology for physicists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, G.H.

    1978-05-01

    These lectures may provide useful background material for understanding gauge theories, particularly the nonperturbative effects such as instantons and monopoles. The mathematical language of topology and fibre bundles is introduced

  3. Design and synthesis of DNA four-helix bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangnekar, Abhijit; Gothelf, Kurt V; LaBean, Thomas H

    2011-01-01

    The field of DNA nanotechnology has evolved significantly in the past decade. Researchers have succeeded in synthesizing tile-based structures and using them to form periodic lattices in one, two and three dimensions. Origami-based structures have also been used to create nanoscale structures in two and three dimensions. Design and construction of DNA bundles with fixed circumference has added a new dimension to the field. Here we report the design and synthesis of a DNA four-helix bundle. It was found to be extremely rigid and stable. When several such bundles were assembled using appropriate sticky-ends, they formed micrometre-long filaments. However, when creation of two-dimensional sheet-like arrays of the four-helix bundles was attempted, nanoscale rings were observed instead. The exact reason behind the nanoring formation is yet to be ascertained, but it provides an exciting prospect for making programmable circular nanostructures using DNA.

  4. Absorber rod bundle actuator in a pressurized water nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.; Peletan, R.

    1984-01-01

    The invention concerns an absorber rod bundle actuator in a pressurized water reactor with spectral shift control. The device comprises two coaxial control bars. The inner bar is integral with the absorber rod bundle; it has an enlarged zone which acts as a proton under pressure difference across an annular seal which can be radially expanded, the pressure difference allowing to the absorber rod bundles actuating on the piston. When a pressure difference is applied, the seal expands radially by a sufficient amount to make sealing contact with the zone of larger diameter in the outer bar. The invention applies more particularly to reactors with spectral shift control using bundles of fertile rods [fr

  5. CANFLEX fuel bundle cross-flow endurance test (test report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Sung Deok; Chung, C. H.; Chang, S. K.; Kim, B. D.

    1997-04-01

    As part of the normal refuelling sequence of CANDU nuclear reactor, both new and irradiated bundles can be parked in the cross-flow region of the liner tubes. This situation occurs normally for a few minutes. The fuel bundle which is subjected to the cross-flow should be capable of withstanding the consequences of cross flow for normal periods, and maintain its mechanical integrity. The cross-flow endurance test was conducted for CANFLEX bundle, latest developed nuclear fuel, at CANDU-Hot Test Loop. The test was carried out during 4 hours at the inlet cross-flow region. After the test, the bundle successfully met all acceptance criteria after the 4 hours cross-flow test. (author). 2 refs., 3 tabs

  6. On induced hermitian metrics for holomorphic vector bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoang Le Minh.

    1989-09-01

    An explicit computation of induced hermitian metrics on holomorphic vector bundles is given. As an example the Fubini-Study metrics for complex projective spaces and Grassmannians are considered. (author). 5 refs

  7. On the classification of complex vector bundles of stable rank

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    , the tuples of cohomology classes on a compact, complex manifold, corresponding to the Chern classes of a complex vector bundle of stable rank. This classification becomes more effective on generalized flag manifolds, where the Lie ...

  8. CANFLEX fuel bundle cross-flow endurance test (test report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sung Deok; Chung, C. H.; Chang, S. K.; Kim, B. D.

    1997-04-01

    As part of the normal refuelling sequence of CANDU nuclear reactor, both new and irradiated bundles can be parked in the cross-flow region of the liner tubes. This situation occurs normally for a few minutes. The fuel bundle which is subjected to the cross-flow should be capable of withstanding the consequences of cross flow for normal periods, and maintain its mechanical integrity. The cross-flow endurance test was conducted for CANFLEX bundle, latest developed nuclear fuel, at CANDU-Hot Test Loop. The test was carried out during 4 hours at the inlet cross-flow region. After the test, the bundle successfully met all acceptance criteria after the 4 hours cross-flow test. (author). 2 refs., 3 tabs.

  9. Preparations of Nanostructured Silicide Bundles and Oxide Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Tatsuoka

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A variety of nanostructured silicide bundles and oxide nanowire arrays with abundant, non-toxic materials we are prepared. The CrSi2 nanowire and Mg2Si/MgO composite nanowire bundles were synthesized using a Si substrate and a SiOx nanofiber bundle, respectively. The hexagonal MoSi2 nanosheet bundles were also synthesized using a MoS2 layered material as a template. In addition, ZnO, CuO/Cu2O and α-Fe2O3 nanowire arrays were prepared on semiconductor or metallic substrates. The growth phenomena and the structural properties of the nanostructured materials awere investigated. In addition, the preparations of axial and radial nanowire structures weare examined. 

  10. Bundles of Norms About Teen Sex and Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollborn, Stefanie; Sennott, Christie

    2015-09-01

    Teen pregnancy is a cultural battleground in struggles over morality, education, and family. At its heart are norms about teen sex, contraception, pregnancy, and abortion. Analyzing 57 interviews with college students, we found that "bundles" of related norms shaped the messages teens hear. Teens did not think their communities encouraged teen sex or pregnancy, but normative messages differed greatly, with either moral or practical rationalizations. Teens readily identified multiple norms intended to regulate teen sex, contraception, abortion, childbearing, and the sanctioning of teen parents. Beyond influencing teens' behavior, norms shaped teenagers' public portrayals and post hoc justifications of their behavior. Although norm bundles are complex to measure, participants could summarize them succinctly. These bundles and their conflicting behavioral prescriptions create space for human agency in negotiating normative pressures. The norm bundles concept has implications for teen pregnancy prevention policies and can help revitalize social norms for understanding health behaviors. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Bundle Pricing Decisions for Fresh Products with Quality Deterioration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Fang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available How to sell fresh products quickly to decrease the storage cost and to meet customer quality requirement is of vital importance in the food supply chain. Bundling fresh products is an efficient strategy to promote sales and reduce storage pressure of retailers. In this paper, we consider the bundle pricing decisions for homogeneous fresh products with quality deterioration. The value of fresh products with quality deterioration is approximated as an exponential function based on which customer’s reservation prices are calculated. A nonlinear mixed integer programming model is used to formulate the bundle pricing problem for fresh products. By adding auxiliary decision variables, this model is converted into a mixed integer linear program. Numerical experiments and sensitive analysis are conducted to provide managerial insights for bundling fresh products with quality deterioration.

  12. Design and synthesis of DNA four-helix bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangnekar, Abhijit; Gothelf, Kurt V [Department of Chemistry, Centre for DNA Nanotechnology (CDNA) and Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); LaBean, Thomas H, E-mail: kvg@chem.au.dk, E-mail: thl@cs.duke.edu [Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States)

    2011-06-10

    The field of DNA nanotechnology has evolved significantly in the past decade. Researchers have succeeded in synthesizing tile-based structures and using them to form periodic lattices in one, two and three dimensions. Origami-based structures have also been used to create nanoscale structures in two and three dimensions. Design and construction of DNA bundles with fixed circumference has added a new dimension to the field. Here we report the design and synthesis of a DNA four-helix bundle. It was found to be extremely rigid and stable. When several such bundles were assembled using appropriate sticky-ends, they formed micrometre-long filaments. However, when creation of two-dimensional sheet-like arrays of the four-helix bundles was attempted, nanoscale rings were observed instead. The exact reason behind the nanoring formation is yet to be ascertained, but it provides an exciting prospect for making programmable circular nanostructures using DNA.

  13. Isotopy Classification of Engel Structures on Circle Bundles

    OpenAIRE

    Klukas, Mirko; Sahamie, Bijan

    2012-01-01

    We call two Engel structures isotopic if they are homotopic through Engel structures by a homotopy that fixes the characteristic line field. In the present paper we define an isotopy invariant of Engel structures on oriented circle bundles over closed oriented three-manifolds and apply it to give an isotopy classification of Engel structures on circle bundles with characteristic line field tangent to the fibers.

  14. Cryopreservation of sperm bundles (spermatozeugmata) from endangered livebearing goodeids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yue; Torres, Leticia; Tiersch, Terrence R

    2018-04-14

    More than half of fishes in the family Goodeidae are considered to be endangered, threatened, or vulnerable. Sperm cryopreservation is an effective tool for conserving genetic resources of imperiled populations, but development of protocols with livebearing fishes faces numerous challenges including the natural packaging of sperm into bundles. In this study the cryopreservation of sperm bundles (spermatozeugmata) of three goodeids species was evaluated. Sperm quality was evaluated by activation with NaCl-NaOH solution (at 300 mOsmol/kg and pH 11.8), and analysis of dissociable bundles and dissociation duration. Using Redtail Splitfin (Xenotoca eiseni) as a model, the effects of cryoprotectants (dimethyl sulfoxide, methanol, and glycerol) with different concentrations (5-15% v/v %), equilibration exposure times (1-60 min), cooling rates (5-40 °C/min), concentrations (4 × 10 4 -4 × 10 6 bundles/ml), buffers (HBSS, PBS and NaCl), and buffer osmolalities (200-400 mOsmol/kg) were investigated. After cooling and thawing, sperm bundles maintained their packed form. A specific protocol was developed (10% dimethyl sulfoxide, 20-min equilibration, 10 °C/min cooling rate, 4 × 10 6 bundles/ml, and 300 mOsmol/kg HBSS). This protocol yielded 89 ± 5% of post-thaw dissociable bundles with 209 ± 10 s of dissociation duration for X. eiseni, 96 ± 9% with 814 ± 14 s for Blackfin Goodea (Goodea atripinni), and 66 ± 2% with 726 ± 25 s for Striped Goodeid (Ataeniobius toweri). This is the first study of cryopreservation of sperm within bundles for livebearing fishes and provides a basis for establishment of germplasm repositories for goodeids and other livebearers. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. CHF prediction in rod bundles using round tube data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Wallen F.; Veloso, Maria A.F.; Pereira, Cláubia; Costa, Antonella L., E-mail: wallenfds@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: mdora@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    The present work concerns the use of 1995 CHF table for uniformly heated round tubes, developed jointly by Canadian and Russian researchers, for the prediction of critical heat fluxes in rod bundles geometries. Comparisons between measured and calculated critical heat fluxes indicate that this table could be applied to rod bundles provided that a suitable correction factor is employed. The tolerance limits associated with the departure from nucleate boiling ratio (DNBR) are evaluated by using statistical analysis. (author)

  16. Page 1 Moduli for bundles over curves - 325 through the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    through the openimmersion (LX &,)(C) s (L x é,)(C). Therefore L x , has a reduction to P and hence seSer. 3.23. Lemma. Let : – S x X be a family of semistable G-bundles. Suppose there exist. (i) a dense open subset T of S. (ii) a reductive subgroup Mo of G of maximal rank and. (iii) a stable Mo-bundle Eo with the following ...

  17. Design and verification of the 'GURI 01' bundle model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benito, G.D.

    1990-01-01

    This work presents a general description of the 'GURI 01' bundle model, designed by INVAP S.E., under international radioactive material transportation regulations, as a B(U) type bundle for international transportation up to a maximum of 350000 Ci of Co60. Moreover, the methodologies used and the results obtained from the structural evaluation of the mechanic essay and from the evaluation of the thermal behaviour under normal or accident conditions are briefly discussed. (Author) [es

  18. Bundle Pricing Decisions for Fresh Products with Quality Deterioration

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, Yan; Jiang, Yiping; Han, Xingxing

    2018-01-01

    How to sell fresh products quickly to decrease the storage cost and to meet customer quality requirement is of vital importance in the food supply chain. Bundling fresh products is an efficient strategy to promote sales and reduce storage pressure of retailers. In this paper, we consider the bundle pricing decisions for homogeneous fresh products with quality deterioration. The value of fresh products with quality deterioration is approximated as an exponential function based on which custome...

  19. On the classification of complex vector bundles of stable rank

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    a classification of all rank r complex vector bundles on X, for stable rank r ≥ n/2. A few partial answers to this question are known. For instance, a classical result of. Wu asserts that any couple of cohomology classes (c1,c2) ∈ H2(X, Z) × H4(X, Z) coincides with c(E) for a vector bundle E, on a basis X of dimension less than ...

  20. NAT10, a nucleolar protein, localizes to the midbody and regulates cytokinesis and acetylation of microtubules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Qi; Zheng, Xingzheng; McNutt, Michael A.; Guang, Lizhao; Sun, Ying; Wang, Jiaochen; Gong, Yilei; Hou, Lin; Zhang, Bo

    2009-01-01

    The midbody is a structural organelle formed in late phase mitosis which is responsible for completion of cytokinesis. Although various kinds of proteins have been found to distribute or immigrate to this organelle, their functions have still not been completely worked out. In this study, we demonstrated that NAT10 (N-acetyltransferase 10, NAT10) is not only predominantly distributed in the nucleolus in interphase, but is also concentrated in the mitotic midbody during telophase. The domain in N-terminal residues 549-834 of NAT10 specifically mediated its subcellular localization. Treatment with genotoxic agents or irradiation increased concentration of NAT10 in both the nucleolus and midbody. Moreover, DNA damage induced increase of NAT10 in the midbody apparently accompanied by in situ elevation of the level of acetylated α-tubulin, suggesting that it plays a role in maintaining or enhancing stability of α-tubulin. The depletion of NAT10 induced defects in nucleolar assembly, cytokinesis and decreased acetylated α-tubulin, leading to G2/M cell cycle arrest or delay of mitotic exit. In addition, over-expression of NAT10 was found in a variety of soft tissue sarcomas, and correlated with tumor histological grading. These results indicate that NAT10 may play an important role in cell division through facilitating reformation of the nucleolus and midbody in the late phase of cell mitosis, and stabilization of microtubules.

  1. PP2A regulates kinetochore-microtubule attachment during meiosis I in oocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, An; Shi, Peiliang; Song, Anying; Zou, Dayuan; Zhou, Yue; Gu, Pengyu; Huang, Zan; Wang, Qinghua; Lin, Zhaoyu; Gao, Xiang

    2016-06-02

    Studies using in vitro cultured oocytes have indicated that the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a major serine/threonine protein phosphatase, participates in multiple steps of meiosis. Details of oocyte maturation regulation by PP2A remain unclear and an in vivo model can provide more convincing information. Here, we inactivated PP2A by mutating genes encoding for its catalytic subunits (PP2Acs) in mouse oocytes. We found that eliminating both PP2Acs caused female infertility. Oocytes lacking PP2Acs failed to complete 1(st) meiotic division due to chromosome misalignment and abnormal spindle assembly. In mitosis, PP2A counteracts Aurora kinase B/C (AurkB/C) to facilitate correct kinetochore-microtubule (KT-MT) attachment. In meiosis I in oocyte, we found that PP2Ac deficiency destabilized KT-MT attachments. Chemical inhibition of AurkB/C in PP2Ac-null oocytes partly restored the formation of lateral/merotelic KT-MT attachments but not correct KT-MT attachments. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that PP2Acs are essential for chromosome alignments and regulate the formation of correct KT-MT attachments in meiosis I in oocytes.

  2. Fuel temperature characteristics of the 37-element and CANFLEX fuel bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Jun Ho; Rho, Gyu Hong; Park, Joo Hwan

    2009-10-01

    This report describes the fuel temperature characteristics of CANFLEX fuel bundles and 37-element fuel bundles for a different burnup of fuel. The program was consisted for seeking the fuel temperature of fuel bundles of CANFLEX fuel bundles and 37-element fuel bundles by using the method in NUCIRC. Fuel temperature has an increasing pattern with the burnup of fuel for CANFLEX fuel bundles and 37-element fuel bundles. For all the case of burnup, the fuel temperature of CANFLEX fuel bundles has a lower value than that of 37-element fuel bundles. Especially, for the high power channel, the CANFLEX fuel bundles show a lower fuel temperature as much as about 75 degree, and the core averaged fuel temperature has a lower fuel temperature of about 50 degree than that of 37-element fuel bundles. The lower fuel temperature of CANFLEX fuel bundles is expected to enhance the safety by reducing the fuel temperature coefficient. Finally, for each burnup of CANFLEX fuel bundles and 37-element fuel bundles, the equation was present for predicting the fuel temperature of a bundle in terms of a coolant temperature and bundle power

  3. Laser speckle imaging of atherosclerotic plaques through optical fiber bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadkarni, Seemantini K.; Bouma, Brett E.; Yelin, Dvir; Gulati, Amneet; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2009-01-01

    Laser speckle imaging (LSI), a new technique that measures an index of plaque viscoelasticity, has been investigated recently to characterize atherosclerotic plaques. These prior studies demonstrated the diagnostic potential of LSI for detecting high-risk plaques and were conducted ex vivo. To conduct intracoronary LSI in vivo, the laser speckle pattern must be transmitted from the coronary wall to the image detector in the presence of cardiac motion. Small-diameter, flexible optical fiber bundles, similar to those used in coronary angioscopy, may be incorporated into an intravascular catheter for this purpose. A key challenge is that laser speckle is influenced by inter-fiber leakage of light, which may be exacerbated during bundle motion. In this study, we tested the capability of optical fiber bundles to transmit laser speckle patterns obtained from atherosclerotic plaques and evaluated the influence of motion on the diagnostic accuracy of fiber bundle-based LSI. Time-varying helium-neon laser speckle images of aortic plaques were obtained while cyclically moving the flexible length of the bundle to mimic coronary motion. Our results show that leached fiber bundles may reliably transmit laser speckle images in the presence of cardiac motion, providing a viable option to conduct intracoronary LSI. PMID:19021396

  4. BiSet: Semantic Edge Bundling with Biclusters for Sensemaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Maoyuan; Mi, Peng; North, Chris; Ramakrishnan, Naren

    2016-01-01

    Identifying coordinated relationships is an important task in data analytics. For example, an intelligence analyst might want to discover three suspicious people who all visited the same four cities. Existing techniques that display individual relationships, such as between lists of entities, require repetitious manual selection and significant mental aggregation in cluttered visualizations to find coordinated relationships. In this paper, we present BiSet, a visual analytics technique to support interactive exploration of coordinated relationships. In BiSet, we model coordinated relationships as biclusters and algorithmically mine them from a dataset. Then, we visualize the biclusters in context as bundled edges between sets of related entities. Thus, bundles enable analysts to infer task-oriented semantic insights about potentially coordinated activities. We make bundles as first class objects and add a new layer, "in-between", to contain these bundle objects. Based on this, bundles serve to organize entities represented in lists and visually reveal their membership. Users can interact with edge bundles to organize related entities, and vice versa, for sensemaking purposes. With a usage scenario, we demonstrate how BiSet supports the exploration of coordinated relationships in text analytics.

  5. Full bundle mechanical cleaning of pressurized water reactor steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhardt, M.; Lewis, G.

    1998-01-01

    An improved system for cleaning the upper bundle region of pressurized water reactor steam generators is now available. This system employs high pressure water jets to remove sludge and scale from tube and support plate surfaces and from the broach holes throughout the upper bundle region of steam generators. Benefits of sludge removal can include mitigation of the corrosion process, improvement of plant performance and increased operational stability. The cleaning equipment is installed through existing handholes in the tubesheet region and accesses the upper bundle through flow slots in the tube support plates. The system includes a Bulk Cleaning Head which directs high pressure water jets into the tube bundle, a Vertical Deployment System which delivers and positions the head at the desired locations in the upper bundle region, and a high pressure water pumping and sludge processing system. This paper describes the system, several key components, overall system operation, safety issues, and field use chronology. Specific performance issues that are discussed include the cleaning coverage achieved, the time required to clean a steam generator, and cleaning effectiveness. The Upper Bundle Hydraulic Cleaning System described in this paper is available for use in several types of steam generators

  6. Altered nucleotide-microtubule coupling and increased mechanical output by a kinesin mutant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Lei Liu

    Full Text Available Kinesin motors hydrolyze ATP to produce force and do work in the cell--how the motors do this is not fully understood, but is thought to depend on the coupling of ATP hydrolysis to microtubule binding by the motor. Transmittal of conformational changes from the microtubule- to the nucleotide-binding site has been proposed to involve the central β-sheet, which could undergo large structural changes important for force production. We show here that mutation of an invariant residue in loop L7 of the central β-sheet of the Drosophila kinesin-14 Ncd motor alters both nucleotide and microtubule binding, although the mutated residue is not present in either site. Mutants show weak-ADP/tight-microtubule binding, instead of tight-ADP/weak-microtubule binding like wild type--they hydrolyze ATP faster than wild type, move faster in motility assays, and assemble long spindles with greatly elongated poles, which are also produced by simulations of assembly with tighter microtubule binding and faster sliding. The mutated residue acts like a mechanochemical coupling element--it transmits changes between the microtubule-binding and active sites, and can switch the state of the motor, increasing mechanical output by the motor. One possibility, based on our findings, is that movements by the residue and the loop that contains it could bend or distort the central β-sheet, mediating free energy changes that lead to force production.

  7. Long astral microtubules and RACK-1 stabilize polarity domains during maintenance phase in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkang Ai

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Cell polarity is a very well conserved process important for cell differentiation, cell migration, and embryonic development. After the establishment of distinct cortical domains, polarity cues have to be stabilized and maintained within a fluid and dynamic membrane to achieve proper cell asymmetry. Microtubules have long been thought to deliver the signals required to polarize a cell. While previous studies suggest that microtubules play a key role in the establishment of polarity, the requirement of microtubules during maintenance phase remains unclear. In this study, we show that depletion of Caenorhabditis elegans RACK-1, which leads to short astral microtubules during prometaphase, specifically affects maintenance of cortical PAR domains and Dynamin localization. We then investigated the consequence of knocking down other factors that also abolish astral microtubule elongation during polarity maintenance phase. We found a correlation between short astral microtubules and the instability of PAR-6 and PAR-2 domains during maintenance phase. Our data support a necessary role for astral microtubules in the maintenance phase of cell polarity.

  8. Clostridium difficile toxin CDT induces formation of microtubule-based protrusions and increases adherence of bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Schwan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile causes antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis by production of the Rho GTPase-glucosylating toxins A and B. Recently emerging hypervirulent Clostridium difficile strains additionally produce the binary ADP-ribosyltransferase toxin CDT (Clostridium difficile transferase, which ADP-ribosylates actin and inhibits actin polymerization. Thus far, the role of CDT as a virulence factor is not understood. Here we report by using time-lapse- and immunofluorescence microscopy that CDT and other binary actin-ADP-ribosylating toxins, including Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin and Clostridium perfringens iota toxin, induce redistribution of microtubules and formation of long (up to >150 microm microtubule-based protrusions at the surface of intestinal epithelial cells. The toxins increase the length of decoration of microtubule plus-ends by EB1/3, CLIP-170 and CLIP-115 proteins and cause redistribution of the capture proteins CLASP2 and ACF7 from microtubules at the cell cortex into the cell interior. The CDT-induced microtubule protrusions form a dense meshwork at the cell surface, which wrap and embed bacterial cells, thereby largely increasing the adherence of Clostridia. The study describes a novel type of microtubule structure caused by less efficient microtubule capture and offers a new perspective for the pathogenetic role of CDT and other binary actin-ADP-ribosylating toxins in host-pathogen interactions.

  9. Probing a self-assembled fd virus membrane with a microtubule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Sheng; Pelcovits, Robert A; Hagan, Michael F

    2016-06-01

    The self-assembly of highly anisotropic colloidal particles leads to a rich variety of morphologies whose properties are just beginning to be understood. This article uses computer simulations to probe a particle-scale perturbation of a commonly studied colloidal assembly, a monolayer membrane composed of rodlike fd viruses in the presence of a polymer depletant. Motivated by experiments currently in progress, we simulate the interaction between a microtubule and a monolayer membrane as the microtubule "pokes" and penetrates the membrane face-on. Both the viruses and the microtubule are modeled as hard spherocylinders of the same diameter, while the depletant is modeled using ghost spheres. We find that the force exerted on the microtubule by the membrane is zero either when the microtubule is completely outside the membrane or when it has fully penetrated the membrane. The microtubule is initially repelled by the membrane as it begins to penetrate but experiences an attractive force as it penetrates further. We assess the roles played by translational and rotational fluctuations of the viruses and the osmotic pressure of the polymer depletant. We find that rotational fluctuations play a more important role than the translational ones. The dependence on the osmotic pressure of the depletant of the width and height of the repulsive barrier and the depth of the attractive potential well is consistent with the assumed depletion-induced attractive interaction between the microtubule and viruses. We discuss the relevance of these studies to the experimental investigations.

  10. Microtubule capture by mitotic kinesin centromere protein E (CENP-E).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardar, Harjinder S; Gilbert, Susan P

    2012-07-20

    Centromere protein E, CENP-E, is a kinetochore-associated kinesin-7 that establishes the microtubule-chromosome linkage and transports monooriented chromosomes to the spindle equator along kinetochore fibers of already bioriented chromosomes. As a processive kinesin, CENP-E uses a hand-over-hand mechanism, yet a number of studies suggest that CENP-E exhibits mechanistic differences from other processive kinesins that may be important for its role in chromosome congression. The results reported here show that association of CENP-E with the microtubule is unusually slow at 0.08 μM(-1) s(-1) followed by slow ADP release at 0.9 s(-1). ATP binding and hydrolysis are fast with motor dissociation from the microtubule at 1.4 s(-1), suggesting that CENP-E head detachment from the microtubule, possibly controlled by phosphate release, determines the rate of stepping during a processive run because the rate of microtubule gliding corresponds to 1.4 steps/s. We hypothesize that the unusually slow CENP-E microtubule association step favors CENP-E binding of stable microtubules over dynamic ones, a mechanism that would bias CENP-E binding to kinetochore fibers.

  11. Structural differences between yeast and mammalian microtubules revealed by cryo-EM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howes, Stuart C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Biophysics Graduate Group; Geyer, Elisabeth A. [Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States). Dept. of Biophysics; Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry; LaFrance, Benjamin [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Molecular and Cell Biology Graduate Program; Zhang, Rui [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Howard Hughes Medical Inst.; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging Division; Kellogg, Elizabeth H. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Howard Hughes Medical Inst.; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging Division; Westermann, Stefan [Univ. of Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany). Dept. of Molecular Genetics, Center for Medical Biotechnology; Rice, Luke M. [Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States). Dept. of Biophysics; Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry; Nogales, Eva [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Howard Hughes Medical Inst.; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Molecular Biology and California Inst. for Quantitative Biosciences; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging Division

    2017-06-26

    Microtubules are polymers of αβ-tubulin heterodimers essential for all eukaryotes. Despite sequence conservation, there are significant structural differences between microtubules assembled in vitro from mammalian or budding yeast tubulin. Yeast MTs were not observed to undergo compaction at the interdimer interface as seen for mammalian microtubules upon GTP hydrolysis. Lack of compaction might reflect slower GTP hydrolysis or a different degree of allosteric coupling in the lattice. The microtubule plus end–tracking protein Bim1 binds yeast microtubules both between αβ-tubulin heterodimers, as seen for other organisms, and within tubulin dimers, but binds mammalian tubulin only at interdimer contacts. At the concentrations used in cryo-electron microscopy, Bim1 causes the compaction of yeast microtubules and induces their rapid disassembly. In conclusion, our studies demonstrate structural differences between yeast and mammalian microtubules that likely underlie their differing polymerization dynamics. These differences may reflect adaptations to the demands of different cell size or range of physiological growth temperatures.

  12. Targeting Toxoplasma Tubules: Tubulin, Microtubules, and Associated Proteins in a Human Pathogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that causes serious opportunistic infections, birth defects, and blindness in humans. Microtubules are critically important components of diverse structures that are used throughout the Toxoplasma life cycle. As in other eukaryotes, spindle microtubules are required for chromosome segregation during replication. Additionally, a set of membrane-associated microtubules is essential for the elongated shape of invasive “zoites,” and motility follows a spiral trajectory that reflects the path of these microtubules. Toxoplasma zoites also construct an intricate, tubulin-based apical structure, termed the conoid, which is important for host cell invasion and associates with proteins typically found in the flagellar apparatus. Last, microgametes specifically construct a microtubule-containing flagellar axoneme in order to fertilize macrogametes, permitting genetic recombination. The specialized roles of these microtubule populations are mediated by distinct sets of associated proteins. This review summarizes our current understanding of the role of tubulin, microtubule populations, and associated proteins in Toxoplasma; these components are used for both novel and broadly conserved processes that are essential for parasite survival. PMID:25380753

  13. Variational Principles for Buckling of Microtubules Modeled as Nonlocal Orthotropic Shells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarp Adali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A variational principle for microtubules subject to a buckling load is derived by semi-inverse method. The microtubule is modeled as an orthotropic shell with the constitutive equations based on nonlocal elastic theory and the effect of filament network taken into account as an elastic surrounding. Microtubules can carry large compressive forces by virtue of the mechanical coupling between the microtubules and the surrounding elastic filament network. The equations governing the buckling of the microtubule are given by a system of three partial differential equations. The problem studied in the present work involves the derivation of the variational formulation for microtubule buckling. The Rayleigh quotient for the buckling load as well as the natural and geometric boundary conditions of the problem is obtained from this variational formulation. It is observed that the boundary conditions are coupled as a result of nonlocal formulation. It is noted that the analytic solution of the buckling problem for microtubules is usually a difficult task. The variational formulation of the problem provides the basis for a number of approximate and numerical methods of solutions and furthermore variational principles can provide physical insight into the problem.

  14. Buckling analysis of orthotropic protein microtubules under axial and radial compression based on couple stress theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beni, Yaghoub Tadi; Zeverdejani, M Karimi; Mehralian, Fahimeh

    2017-10-01

    Protein microtubules (MTs) are one of the important intercellular components and have a vital role in the stability and strength of the cells. Due to applied external loads, protein microtubules may be involved buckling phenomenon. Due to impact of protein microtubules in cell reactions, it is important to determine their critical buckling load. Considering nature of protein microtubules, various parameters are effective on microtubules buckling. The small size of microtubules and also lack of uniformity of MTs properties in different directions caused the necessity of accuracy in the analysis of these bio-structure. In fact, microtubules must be considered as a size dependent cylinder, which behave as an orthotropic material. Hence, in the present work using first-order shear deformation model (FSDT), the buckling equations of anisotropic MTs are derived based on new modified couple stress theory (NMCST). After solving the stability equations, the influences of various parameters are measured on the MTs critical buckling load. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Native kinesin-1 does not bind preferentially to GTP-tubulin-rich microtubules in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiaochu; King, Stephen J; Xu, Jing

    2017-09-01

    Molecular motors such as kinesin-1 work in small teams to actively shuttle cargos in cells, for example in polarized transport in axons. Here, we examined the potential regulatory role of the nucleotide state of tubulin on the run length of cargos carried by multiple kinesin motors, using an optical trapping-based in vitro assay. Based on a previous report that kinesin binds preferentially to GTP-tubulin-rich microtubules, we anticipated that multiple-kinesin cargos would run substantially greater distances along GMPCPP microtubules than along GDP microtubules. Surprisingly, we did not uncover any significant differences in run length between microtubule types. A combination of single-molecule experiments, comparison with previous theory, and classic microtubule affinity pulldown assays revealed that native kinesin-1 does not bind preferentially to GTP-tubulin-rich microtubules. The apparent discrepancy between our observations and the previous report likely reflects differences in post-translational modifications between the native motors used here and the recombinant motors examined previously. Future investigations will help shed light on the interplay between the motor's post-translational modification and the microtubule's nucleotide-binding state for transport regulation in vivo. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Microtubules CLASP to Adherens Junctions in epidermal progenitor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahbazi, Marta N; Perez-Moreno, Mirna

    2014-01-01

    Cadherin-mediated cell adhesion at Adherens Junctions (AJs) and its dynamic connections with the microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton are important regulators of cellular architecture. However, the functional relevance of these interactions and the molecular players involved in different cellular contexts...... and cellular compartments are still not completely understood. Here, we comment on our recent findings showing that the MT plus-end binding protein CLASP2 interacts with the AJ component p120-catenin (p120) specifically in progenitor epidermal cells. Absence of either protein leads to alterations in MT...... dynamics and AJ functionality. These findings represent a novel mechanism of MT targeting to AJs that may be relevant for the maintenance of proper epidermal progenitor cell homeostasis. We also discuss the potential implication of other MT binding proteins previously associated to AJs in the wider context...

  17. The Role of Microtubule End Binding (EB) Proteins in Ciliogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Jacob Morville

    centrosomal MT array and abnormally long centriole-associated rootlet filaments. Cells lacking EB1 also had stumpy cilia and a disorganized centrosomal MT array, but rootlet filaments appeared normal. Further, live imaging revealed increased release frequency of MTs from the centrosome upon EB1 or EB3......EB1 is a small microtubule (MT)-binding protein that associates preferentially with MT plus ends. EB1 plays a role in regulating MT dynamics, localizing other MT-associated proteins to the plus end, and in regulating interactions of MTs with the cell cortex, mitotic kinetochores and different......, are required for assembly of primary cilia in cultured human cells. The EB3 - siRNA ciliary phenotype could be rescued by GFP-EB1 expression, and GFP-EB3 over expression resulted in elongated cilia. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that EB3-depleted cells possess stumpy cilia, a disorganized...

  18. STIM1-Directed Reorganization of Microtubules in Activated Mast Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hájková, Zuzana; Bugajev, Viktor; Dráberová, Eduarda; Vinopal, Stanislav; Dráberová, Lubica; Janáček, Jiří; Dráber, Petr; Dráber, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 186, č. 2 (2011), s. 913-923 ISSN 0022-1767 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GD204/09/H084; GA ČR GA204/09/1777; GA ČR GA301/09/1826; GA ČR GAP302/10/1759; GA MŠk LC545; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063; GA AV ČR KAN200520701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514; CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : STIM1 * bonemarrow-derived mast cells * microtubules Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.788, year: 2011

  19. STIM1-Directed Reorganization of Microtubules in Activated Mast Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hájková, Zuzana; Bugajev, Viktor; Dráberová, Eduarda; Vinopal, Stanislav; Dráberová, Lubica; Janáček, Jiří; Dráber, Petr; Dráber, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 186, č. 2 (2011), s. 913-923 ISSN 0022-1767 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GD204/09/H084; GA ČR GA204/09/1777; GA ČR GA301/09/1826; GA ČR GAP302/10/1759; GA MŠk LC545; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063; GA AV ČR KAN200520701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514; CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : STIM1 * bone marrow-derived mast cells * microtubules Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.788, year: 2011

  20. Regulation of long-distance transport of mitochondria along microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melkov, Anna; Abdu, Uri

    2018-01-01

    Mitochondria are cellular organelles of crucial importance, playing roles in cellular life and death. In certain cell types, such as neurons, mitochondria must travel long distances so as to meet metabolic demands of the cell. Mitochondrial movement is essentially microtubule (MT) based and is executed by two main motor proteins, Dynein and Kinesin. The organization of the cellular MT network and the identity of motors dictate mitochondrial transport. Tight coupling between MTs, motors, and the mitochondria is needed for the organelle precise localization. Two adaptor proteins are involved directly in mitochondria-motor coupling, namely Milton known also as TRAK, which is the motor adaptor, and Miro, which is the mitochondrial protein. Here, we discuss the active mitochondria transport process, as well as motor-mitochondria coupling in the context of MT organization in different cell types. We focus on mitochondrial trafficking in different cell types, specifically neurons, migrating cells, and polarized epithelial cells.

  1. An ELMO2-RhoG-ILK network modulates microtubule dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Bradley C; Ivanova, Iordanka A; Dagnino, Lina

    2015-07-15

    ELMO2 belongs to a family of scaffold proteins involved in phagocytosis and cell motility. ELMO2 can simultaneously bind integrin-linked kinase (ILK) and RhoG, forming tripartite ERI complexes. These complexes are involved in promoting β1 integrin-dependent directional migration in undifferentiated epidermal keratinocytes. ELMO2 and ILK have also separately been implicated in microtubule regulation at integrin-containing focal adhesions. During differentiation, epidermal keratinocytes cease to express integrins, but ERI complexes persist. Here we show an integrin-independent role of ERI complexes in modulation of microtubule dynamics in differentiated keratinocytes. Depletion of ERI complexes by inactivating the Ilk gene in these cells reduces microtubule growth and increases the frequency of catastrophe. Reciprocally, exogenous expression of ELMO2 or RhoG stabilizes microtubules, but only if ILK is also present. Mechanistically, activation of Rac1 downstream from ERI complexes mediates their effects on microtubule stability. In this pathway, Rac1 serves as a hub to modulate microtubule dynamics through two different routes: 1) phosphorylation and inactivation of the microtubule-destabilizing protein stathmin and 2) phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK-3β, which leads to the activation of CRMP2, promoting microtubule growth. At the cellular level, the absence of ERI species impairs Ca(2+)-mediated formation of adherens junctions, critical to maintaining mechanical integrity in the epidermis. Our findings support a key role for ERI species in integrin-independent stabilization of the microtubule network in differentiated keratinocytes. © 2015 Jackson et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  2. Alteramide B is a microtubule antagonist of inhibiting Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yanjiao; Li, Yaoyao; Li, Zhenyu; Zhang, Juanli; Lu, Chunhua; Wang, Haoxin; Shen, Yuemao; Du, Liangcheng

    2016-10-01

    Alteramide B (ATB), isolated from Lysobacter enzymogenes C3, was a new polycyclic tetramate macrolactam (PTM). ATB exhibited potent inhibitory activity against several yeasts, particularly Candida albicans SC5314, but its antifungal mechanism is unknown. The structure of ATB was established by extensive spectroscopic analyses, including high-resolution mass spectrometry, 1D- and 2D-NMR, and CD spectra. Flow cytometry, fluorescence microscope, transmission electron microscope, molecular modeling, overexpression and site-directed mutation studies were employed to delineate the anti-Candida molecular mechanism of ATB. ATB induced apoptosis in C. albicans through inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by disrupting microtubules. Molecular dynamics studies revealed the binding patterns of ATB to the β-tubulin subunit. Overexpression of the wild type and site-directed mutants of the β-tubulin gene (TUBB) changed the sensitivity of C. albicans to ATB, confirming the binding of ATB to β-tubulin, and indicating that the binding sites are L215, L217, L273, L274 and R282. In vivo, ATB significantly improved the survival of the candidiasis mice and reduced fungal burden. The molecular mechanism underlying the ATB-induced apoptosis in C. albicans is through inhibiting tubulin polymerization that leads to cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase. The identification of ATB and the study of its activity provide novel mechanistic insights into the mode of action of PTMs against the human pathogen. This study shows that ATB is a new microtubule inhibitor and a promising anti-Candida lead compound. The results also support β-tubulin as a potential target for anti-Candida drug discovery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Functional role of ɛ-tubulin in the assembly of the centriolar microtubule scaffold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis-Williams, Pascale; Fleury-Aubusson, Anne; de Loubresse, Nicole Garreau; Geoffroy, Hélène; Vayssié, Laurence; Galvani, Angélique; Espigat, Aude; Rossier, Jean

    2002-01-01

    Centrioles and basal bodies fascinate by their spectacular architecture, featuring an arrangement of nine microtubule triplets into an axial symmetry, whose biogenesis relies on yet elusive mechanisms. However, the recent discovery of new tubulins, such as δ-, ɛ-, or η-tubulin, could constitute a breakthrough for deciphering the assembly steps of this unconventional microtubule scaffold. Here, we report the functional analysis in vivo of ɛ-tubulin, based on gene silencing in Paramecium, which demonstrates that this protein, which localizes at the basal bodies, is essential for the assembly and anchorage of the centriolar microtubules. PMID:12356863

  4. Histones bundle F-actin filaments and affect actin structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edna Blotnick

    Full Text Available Histones are small polycationic proteins complexed with DNA located in the cell nucleus. Upon apoptosis they are secreted from the cells and react with extracellular polyanionic compounds. Actin which is a polyanionic protein, is also secreted from necrotic cells and interacts with histones. We showed that both histone mixture (histone type III and the recombinant H2A histone bundles F-actin, increases the viscosity of the F-actin containing solution and polymerizes G-actin. The histone-actin bundles are relatively insensitive to increase of ionic strength, unlike other polycation, histatin, lysozyme, spermine and LL-37 induced F-actin bundles. The histone-actin bundles dissociate completely only in the presence of 300-400 mM NaCl. DNA, which competes with F-actin for histones, disassembles histone induced actin bundles. DNase1, which depolymerizes F- to G-actin, actively unbundles the H2A histone induced but slightly affects the histone mixture induced actin bundles. Cofilin decreases the amount of F-actin sedimented by low speed centrifugation, increases light scattering and viscosity of F-actin-histone mixture containing solutions and forms star like superstructures by copolymerizing G-actin with H2A histone. The results indicate that histones are tightly attached to F-actin by strong electrostatic and hydrophobic forces. Since both histones and F-actin are present in the sputum of patients with cystic fibrosis, therefore, the formation of the stable histone-actin bundles can contribute to the pathology of this disease by increasing the viscosity of the sputum. The actin-histone interaction in the nucleus might affect gene expression.

  5. Histones bundle F-actin filaments and affect actin structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blotnick, Edna; Sol, Asaf; Muhlrad, Andras

    2017-01-01

    Histones are small polycationic proteins complexed with DNA located in the cell nucleus. Upon apoptosis they are secreted from the cells and react with extracellular polyanionic compounds. Actin which is a polyanionic protein, is also secreted from necrotic cells and interacts with histones. We showed that both histone mixture (histone type III) and the recombinant H2A histone bundles F-actin, increases the viscosity of the F-actin containing solution and polymerizes G-actin. The histone-actin bundles are relatively insensitive to increase of ionic strength, unlike other polycation, histatin, lysozyme, spermine and LL-37 induced F-actin bundles. The histone-actin bundles dissociate completely only in the presence of 300-400 mM NaCl. DNA, which competes with F-actin for histones, disassembles histone induced actin bundles. DNase1, which depolymerizes F- to G-actin, actively unbundles the H2A histone induced but slightly affects the histone mixture induced actin bundles. Cofilin decreases the amount of F-actin sedimented by low speed centrifugation, increases light scattering and viscosity of F-actin-histone mixture containing solutions and forms star like superstructures by copolymerizing G-actin with H2A histone. The results indicate that histones are tightly attached to F-actin by strong electrostatic and hydrophobic forces. Since both histones and F-actin are present in the sputum of patients with cystic fibrosis, therefore, the formation of the stable histone-actin bundles can contribute to the pathology of this disease by increasing the viscosity of the sputum. The actin-histone interaction in the nucleus might affect gene expression.

  6. TREAT Neutronics Analysis of Water-Loop Concept Accommodating LWR 9-rod Bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Connie M.; Woolstenhulme, Nicolas E.; Parry, James R.; Bess, John D.; Housley, Gregory K.

    2016-09-01

    TREAT fuel elements to facilitate the experiment will not inhibit the ability to successfully simulate a RIA for the 2-pin or 3-pin bundle. This new water loop design leaves room for accommodating a larger fuel pin bundle than previously analyzed. The 7-pin fuel bundle in a hexagonal array with similar spacing of fuel pins in a SFR fuel assembly was considered the minimum needed for one central fuel pin to encounter the most correct thermal conditions. The 9-rod fuel bundle in a square array similar in spacing to pins in a LWR fuel assembly would be considered the LWR equivalent. MCNP analysis conducted on a preliminary LWR 9-rod bundle design shows that sufficient energy deposition into the central pin can be achieved well within range to investigate fuel and cladding performance in a simulated RIA. This is achieved by surrounding the flow channel with an additional annulus of water. Findings also show that a highly significant increase in TREAT to specimen power coupling factor (PCF) within the central pin can be achieved by surrounding the experiment with one to two rings of TREAT upgrade fuel assemblies. The experiment design holds promise for the performance evaluation of PWR fuel at extremely high burnup under similar reactor environment conditions.

  7. CLAMP/Spef1 regulates planar cell polarity signaling and asymmetric microtubule accumulation in the Xenopus ciliated epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun K; Zhang, Siwei; Werner, Michael E; Brotslaw, Eva J; Mitchell, Jennifer W; Altabbaa, Mohamed M; Mitchell, Brian J

    2018-03-07

    Most epithelial cells polarize along the axis of the tissue, a feature known as planar cell polarity (PCP). The initiation of PCP requires cell-cell signaling via the noncanonical Wnt/PCP pathway. Additionally, changes in the cytoskeleton both facilitate and reflect this polarity. We have identified CLAMP/Spef1 as a novel regulator of PCP signaling. In addition to decorating microtubules (MTs) and the ciliary rootlet, a pool of CLAMP localizes at the apical cell cortex. Depletion of CLAMP leads to the loss of PCP protein asymmetry, defects in cilia polarity, and defects in the angle of cell division. Additionally, depletion of CLAMP leads to a loss of the atypical cadherin-like molecule Celrs2, suggesting that CLAMP facilitates the stabilization of junctional interactions responsible for proper PCP protein localization. Depletion of CLAMP also affects the polarized organization of MTs. We hypothesize that CLAMP facilitates the establishment of cell polarity and promotes the asymmetric accumulation of MTs downstream of the establishment of proper PCP. © 2018 Kim et al.

  8. An in vitro biomechanical comparison of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: single bundle versus anatomical double bundle techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Umeda Sasaki

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Anterior cruciate ligament ruptures are frequent, especially in sports. Surgical reconstruction with autologous grafts is widely employed in the international literature. Controversies remain with respect to technique variations as continuous research for improvement takes place. One of these variations is the anatomical double bundle technique, which is performed instead of the conventional single bundle technique. More recently, there has been a tendency towards positioning the two bundles through double bone tunnels in the femur and tibia (anatomical reconstruction. OBJECTIVES: To compare, through biomechanical tests, the practice of anatomical double bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with a patellar graft to conventional single bundle reconstruction with the same amount of patellar graft in a paired experimental cadaver study. METHODS: Nine pairs of male cadaver knees ranging in age from 44 to 63 years were randomized into two groups: group A (single bundle and group B (anatomical reconstruction. Each knee was biomechanically tested under three conditions: intact anterior cruciate ligament, reconstructed anterior cruciate ligament, and injured anterior cruciate ligament. Maximum anterior dislocation, rigidity, and passive internal tibia rotation were recorded with knees submitted to a 100 N horizontal anterior dislocation force applied to the tibia with the knees at 30, 60 and 90 degrees of flexion. RESULTS: There were no differences between the two techniques for any of the measurements by ANOVA tests. CONCLUSION: The technique of anatomical double bundle reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament with bone-patellar tendon-bone graft has a similar biomechanical behavior with regard to anterior tibial dislocation, rigidity, and passive internal tibial rotation.

  9. Pressure Loss across Tube Bundles in Two-phase Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, Woo Gun; Banzragch, Dagdan

    2016-01-01

    An analytical model was developed by Sim to estimate the two-phase damping ratio for upward two-phase flow perpendicular to horizontal tube bundles. The parameters of two-phase flow, such as void fraction and pressure loss evaluated in the model, were calculated based on existing experimental formulations. However, it is necessary to implement a few improvements in the formulations for the case of tube bundles. For the purpose of the improved formulation, we need more information about the two-phase parameters, which can be found through experimental test. An experiment is performed with a typical normal square array of cylinders subjected to the two-phase flow of air-water in the tube bundles, to calculate the two-phase Euler number and the two-phase friction multiplier. The pitch-to-diameter ratio is 1.35 and the diameter of cylinder is 18mm. Pressure loss along the flow direction in the tube bundles is measured with a pressure transducer and data acquisition system to calculate the two-phase Euler number and the two-phase friction multiplier. The void fraction model by Feenstra et al. is used to estimate the void fraction of the two-phase flow in tube bundles. The experimental results of the two phase friction multiplier and two-phase Euler number for homogeneous and non-homogeneous two-phase flows are compared and evaluated against the analytical results given by Sim's model

  10. Reaction–diffusion model of hair-bundle morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobo, Adrian; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2014-01-01

    The hair bundle, an apical specialization of the hair cell composed of several rows of regularly organized stereocilia and a kinocilium, is essential for mechanotransduction in the ear. Its precise organization allows the hair bundle to convert mechanical stimuli to electrical signals; mutations that alter the bundle’s morphology often cause deafness. However, little is known about the proteins involved in the process of morphogenesis and how the structure of the bundle arises through interactions between these molecules. We present a mathematical model based on simple reaction–diffusion mechanisms that can reproduce the shape and organization of the hair bundle. This model suggests that the boundary of the cell and the kinocilium act as signaling centers that establish the bundle’s shape. The interaction of two proteins forms a hexagonal Turing pattern—a periodic modulation of the concentrations of the morphogens, sustained by local activation and long-range inhibition of the reactants—that sets a blueprint for the location of the stereocilia. Finally we use this model to predict how different alterations to the system might impact the shape and organization of the hair bundle. PMID:25313064

  11. CANDU fuel bundle deformation modelling with COMSOL multiphysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, J.S.; Lewis, B.J.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The deformation behaviour of a CANDU fuel bundle was modelled. ► The model has been developed on a commercial finite-element platform. ► Pellet/sheath interaction and end-plate restraint effects were considered. ► The model was benchmarked against the BOW code and a variable-load experiment. - Abstract: A model to describe deformation behaviour of a CANDU 37-element bundle has been developed under the COMSOL Multiphysics finite-element platform. Beam elements were applied to the fuel elements (composed of fuel sheaths and pellets) and endplates in order to calculate the bowing behaviour of the fuel elements. This model is important to help assess bundle-deformation phenomena, which may lead to more restrictive coolant flow through the sub-channels of the horizontally oriented bundle. The bundle model was compared to the BOW code for the occurrence of a dry-out patch, and benchmarked against an out-reactor experiment with a variable load on an outer fuel element.

  12. Kinesin-Binding Protein Controls Microtubule Dynamics and Cargo Trafficking by Regulating Kinesin Motor Activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kevenaar, Josta T|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/338771042; Bianchi, Sarah; van Spronsen, Myrrhe|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/337616655; Olieric, Natacha; Lipka, Joanna|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/369403142; Frias, Cátia P; Mikhaylova, Marina; Harterink, Martin|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304075655; Keijzer, Nanda; Wulf, Phebe S; Hilbert, Manuel; Kapitein, Lukas C|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/298806630; de Graaff, Esther|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/148374646; Akhmanova, Anna|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/156410591; Steinmetz, Michel O; Hoogenraad, Casper C|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/227263502

    2016-01-01

    Kinesin motor proteins play a fundamental role for normal neuronal development by controlling intracellular cargo transport and microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton organization. Regulating kinesin activity is important to ensure their proper functioning, and their misregulation often leads to severe human

  13. Protein friction limits diffusive and directed movements of kinesin motors on microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormuth, Volker; Varga, Vladimir; Howard, Jonathon; Schäffer, Erik

    2009-08-14

    Friction limits the operation of macroscopic engines and is critical to the performance of micromechanical devices. We report measurements of friction in a biological nanomachine. Using optical tweezers, we characterized the frictional drag force of individual kinesin-8 motor proteins interacting with their microtubule tracks. At low speeds and with no energy source, the frictional drag was related to the diffusion coefficient by the Einstein relation. At higher speeds, the frictional drag force increased nonlinearly, consistent with the motor jumping 8 nanometers between adjacent tubulin dimers along the microtubule, and was asymmetric, reflecting the structural polarity of the microtubule. We argue that these frictional forces arise from breaking bonds between the motor domains and the microtubule, and they limit the speed and efficiency of kinesin.

  14. Katanin: A Sword Cutting Microtubules for Cellular, Developmental, and Physiological Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Luptovčiak

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available KATANIN is a well-studied microtubule severing protein affecting microtubule organization and dynamic properties in higher plants. By regulating mitotic and cytokinetic and cortical microtubule arrays it is involved in the progression of cell division and cell division plane orientation. KATANIN is also involved in cell elongation and morphogenesis during plant growth. In this way KATANIN plays critical roles in diverse plant developmental processes including the development of pollen, embryo, seed, meristem, root, hypocotyl, cotyledon, leaf, shoot, and silique. KATANIN-dependent microtubule regulation seems to be under the control of plant hormones. This minireview provides an overview on available KATANIN mutants and discusses advances in our understanding of KATANIN biological roles in plants.

  15. Proper microtubule structure is vital for timely progression through meiosis in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Yamashita

    Full Text Available Cells of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe normally reproduce by mitotic division in the haploid state. When subjected to nutrient starvation, two haploid cells fuse and undergo karyogamy, forming a diploid cell that initiates meiosis to form four haploid spores. Here, we show that deletion of the mal3 gene, which encodes a homolog of microtubule regulator EB1, produces aberrant asci carrying more than four spores. The mal3 deletion mutant cells have a disordered cytoplasmic microtubule structure during karyogamy and initiate meiosis before completion of karyogamy, resulting in twin haploid meiosis in the zygote. Treatment with anti-microtubule drugs mimics this phenotype. Mutants defective in karyogamy or mutants prone to initiate haploid meiosis exaggerate the phenotype of the mal3 deletion mutant. Our results indicate that proper microtubule structure is required for ordered progression through the meiotic cycle. Furthermore, the results of our study suggest that fission yeast do not monitor ploidy during meiosis.

  16. Non-linear dynamics in biological microtubules: solitons and dissipation-free energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavromatos, Nick E.

    2017-08-01

    I review some recent developments concerning soliton solutions in biological microtubules and their significance in transferring energy without dissipation. I discuss various types of soliton solutions, as well as ‘spikes’, of the associated non-linear Lagrange equations describing the dynamics of a ‘pseudo-spin non-linear σ-model’ that models the dynamics of a microtubule system with dipole-dipole interactions. These results will hopefully contribute to a better understanding of the functional properties of microtubules, including the motor protein dynamics and the information transfer processes. With regards to the latter we also speculate on the use of microtubules as ‘logical’ gates. Our considerations are classical, but the soliton solutions may have a microscopic quantum origin, which we briefly touch upon.

  17. A prospective comparative study of clinical and functional outcomes between anatomic double bundle and single bundle hamstring grafts for arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morey, Vivek M; Nag, Hira Lal; Chowdhury, Buddhadev; Sankineani, Sukesh Rao; Naranje, Sameer M

    2015-09-01

    Despite a number of studies comparing postoperative stability and function after anatomic single bundle and double bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, it remains unclear whether double bundle reconstruction has better functional outcome than single bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. To compare the subjective functional outcome as well as clinical stability in patients treated with either anatomic single bundle or anatomic double bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. We hypothesized that there would be no difference in the postoperative functional outcome and clinical stability between anatomical double bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions when compared to single bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions. We prospectively followed 40 patients out of which, 20 patients were operated for anatomic single bundle ACL reconstruction and other 20 patients underwent anatomic double bundle ACL reconstruction. Patient evaluation using the laxity tests and outcome scales was done preoperatively and at 12, 24 and 48 months after the surgery. Clinical stability was assessed by Lachman test, Pivot shift test and Delhi active test. Functional outcome was assessed by International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), Lysholm and Modified Cincinnati scores. Patients in both groups were evaluated at regular intervals for a minimum period of 48 months (mean 51 months, range 48-56 months). For all subjective scores, double bundle group patients reported statistically significant higher scores compared to single bundle group patients. Graded stability results of the Lachman, and Pivot shift tests were significantly higher in the anatomically reconstructed double bundle patient group. We suggest that functional outcome and clinical stability may be better with anatomical double bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction as compared to anatomical single bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Copyright

  18. Survivin counteracts the therapeutic effect of microtubule de-stabilizers by stabilizing tubulin polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh Hsing-Pang

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Survivin is a dual function protein. It inhibits the apoptosis of cells by inhibiting caspases, and also promotes cell growth by stabilizing microtubules during mitosis. Over-expression of survivin has been demonstrated to induce drug-resistance to various chemo-therapeutic agents such as cisplatin (DNA damaging agent and paclitaxel (microtubule stabilizer in cancers. However, survivin-induced resistance to microtubule de-stabilizers such as Vinca alkaloids and Combretastatin A-4 (CA-4-related compounds were seldom demonstrated in the past. Furthermore, the question remains as to whether survivin plays a dominant role in processing cytokinesis or inhibiting caspases activity in cells treated with anti-mitotic compounds. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of survivin on the resistance and susceptibility of human cancer cells to microtubule de-stabilizer-induced cell death. Results BPR0L075 is a CA-4 analog that induces microtubule de-polymerization and subsequent caspase-dependent apoptosis. To study the relationship between the expression of survivin and the resistance to microtubule de-stabilizers, a KB-derived BPR0L075-resistant cancer cell line, KB-L30, was generated for this study. Here, we found that survivin was over-expressed in the KB-L30 cells. Down-regulation of survivin by siRNA induced hyper-sensitivity to BPR0L075 in KB cells and partially re-stored sensitivity to BPR0L075 in KB-L30 cells. Western blot analysis revealed that down-regulation of survivin induced microtubule de-stabilization in both KB and KB-L30 cells. However, the same treatment did not enhance the down-stream caspase-3/-7 activities in BPR0L075-treated KB cells. Translocation of a caspase-independent apoptosis-related molecule, apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF, from cytoplasm to the nucleus was observed in survivin-targeted KB cells under BPR0L075 treatment. Conclusion In this study, survivin plays an important role in the

  19. Kar3Vik1 uses a minus-end directed powerstroke for movement along microtubules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Cope

    Full Text Available We have used cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM and helical averaging to examine the 3-D structure of the heterodimeric kinesin-14 Kar3Vik1 complexed to microtubules at a resolution of 2.5 nm. 3-D maps were obtained at key points in Kar3Vik1's nucleotide hydrolysis cycle to gain insight into the mechanism that this motor uses for retrograde motility. In all states where Kar3Vik1 maintained a strong interaction with the microtubule, we found, as observed by cryo-EM, that the motor bound with one head domain while the second head extended outwards. 3-D reconstructions of Kar3Vik1-microtubule complexes revealed that in the nucleotide-free state, the motor's coiled-coil stalk points toward the plus-end of the microtubule. In the ATP-state, the outer head is shown to undergo a large rotation that reorients the stalk ∼75° to point toward the microtubule minus-end. To determine which of the two heads binds to tubulin in each nucleotide state, we employed specific Nanogold®-labeling of Vik1. The resulting maps confirmed that in the nucleotide-free, ATP and ADP+Pi states, Kar3 maintains contact with the microtubule surface, while Vik1 extends away from the microtubule and tracks with the coiled-coil as it rotates towards the microtubule minus-end. While many previous investigations have focused on the mechanisms of homodimeric kinesins, this work presents the first comprehensive study of the powerstroke of a heterodimeric kinesin. The stalk rotation shown here for Kar3Vik1 is highly reminiscent of that reported for the homodimeric kinesin-14 Ncd, emphasizing the conservation of a mechanism for minus-end directed motility.

  20. Myosin-Va and Dynamic Actin Oppose Microtubules to Drive Long-Range Organelle Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Richard D.; Robinson, Christopher; Briggs, Deborah A.; Tooth, David J.; Ramalho, Jose S.; Cantero, Marta; Montoliu, Lluis; Patel, Shyamal; Sviderskaya, Elena V.; Hume, Alistair N.

    2014-01-01

    Summary In animal cells, microtubule and actin tracks and their associated motors (dynein, kinesin, and myosin) are thought to regulate long- and short-range transport, respectively [1–8]. Consistent with this, microtubules extend from the perinuclear centrosome to the plasma membrane and allow bidirectional cargo transport over long distances (>1 μm). In contrast, actin often comprises a complex network of short randomly oriented filaments, suggesting that myosin motors move cargo short distances. These observations underpin the “highways and local roads” model for transport along microtubule and actin tracks [2]. The “cooperative capture” model exemplifies this view and suggests that melanosome distribution in melanocyte dendrites is maintained by long-range transport on microtubules followed by actin/myosin-Va-dependent tethering [5, 9]. In this study, we used cell normalization technology to quantitatively examine the contribution of microtubules and actin/myosin-Va to organelle distribution in melanocytes. Surprisingly, our results indicate that microtubules are essential for centripetal, but not centrifugal, transport. Instead, we find that microtubules retard a centrifugal transport process that is dependent on myosin-Va and a population of dynamic F-actin. Functional analysis of mutant proteins indicates that myosin-Va works as a transporter dispersing melanosomes along actin tracks whose +/barbed ends are oriented toward the plasma membrane. Overall, our data highlight the role of myosin-Va and actin in transport, and not tethering, and suggest a new model in which organelle distribution is determined by the balance between microtubule-dependent centripetal and myosin-Va/actin-dependent centrifugal transport. These observations appear to be consistent with evidence coming from other systems showing that actin/myosin networks can drive long-distance organelle transport and positioning [10, 11]. PMID:25065759

  1. Enhanced stability of microtubules contributes in the development of colchicine resistance in MCF-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Ankit; Kapoor, Sonia; Naaz, Afsana; Kumar Santra, Manas; Panda, Dulal

    2017-05-15

    Understanding the mechanism of resistance to tubulin-targeted anticancer drugs is important for improved chemotherapy. In this work, a colchicine-resistant MCF-7 cell line (MCF-7 Col30 ) was generated by the gradual increment of colchicine treatment and the MCF-7 Col30 showed ∼8-fold resistance towards colchicine. MCF-7 Col30 cells showed ∼2.5-fold resistance against microtubule depolymerizing agents, vinblastine, and nocodazole. In contrast, it displayed more sensitivity towards paclitaxel, a microtubule-polymerizing agent. MCF-7 and MCF-7 Col30 cells showed similar sensitivity towards cisplatin. Further, the level of P-glycoprotein did not increase in MCF-7 Col30 cells. MCF-7 Col30 cells resisted the microtubule depolymerizing effects of colchicine. The time-lapse imaging of individual microtubules in live cells showed that the dynamics of microtubules in MCF-7 Col30 cells was suppressed as compared to the parent MCF-7 cells. The levels of tubulin acetylation and glutamylation increased in MCF-7 Col30 cells than the parent MCF-7 cells suggesting that microtubules are stabilized in MCF-7 Col30 cells. Interestingly, the level of βIII tubulin was increased by 2.3 folds whereas that of βII and βIV tubulin was decreased by 55 and 150%, respectively in MCF-7 Col30 cells. The results suggested that the changes in the level of β-tubulin isoforms and the post-translational modifications of microtubules altered the stability and dynamics of microtubules and contributed to the development of colchicine-resistance in MCF-7 cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Vimentin intermediate filaments template microtubule networks to enhance persistence in cell polarity and directed migration

    OpenAIRE

    Gan, Zhuo; Ding, Liya; Burckhardt, Christoph J.; Lowery, Jason; Zaritsky, Assaf; Sitterley, Karlyndsay; Mota, Andressa; Costigliola, Nancy; Starker, Colby G.; Voytas, Daniel F.; Tytell, Jessica; Goldman, Robert D.; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2016-01-01

    Increased expression of vimentin intermediate filaments (VIF) enhances directed cell migration, but the mechanism behind VIF’s effect on motility is not understood. VIF interact with microtubules, whose organization contributes to polarity maintenance in migrating cells. Here we characterize the dynamic coordination of VIF and microtubule networks in wounded monolayers of Retinal Pigment Epithelial cells. By genome editing we fluorescently labelled endogenous vimentin and α-...

  3. A detailed, hierarchical study of Giardia lamblia's ventral disc reveals novel microtubule-associated protein complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindi L Schwartz

    Full Text Available Giardia lamblia is a flagellated, unicellular parasite of mammals infecting over one billion people worldwide. Giardia's two-stage life cycle includes a motile trophozoite stage that colonizes the host small intestine and an infectious cyst form that can persist in the environment. Similar to many eukaryotic cells, Giardia contains several complex microtubule arrays that are involved in motility, chromosome segregation, organelle transport, maintenance of cell shape and transformation between the two life cycle stages. Giardia trophozoites also possess a unique spiral microtubule array, the ventral disc, made of approximately 50 parallel microtubules and associated microribbons, as well as a variety of associated proteins. The ventral disc maintains trophozoite attachment to the host intestinal epithelium. With the help of a combined SEM/microtome based slice and view method called 3View® (Gatan Inc., Pleasanton, CA, we present an entire trophozoite cell reconstruction and describe the arrangement of the major cytoskeletal elements. To aid in future analyses of disc-mediated attachment, we used electron-tomography of freeze-substituted, plastic-embedded trophozoites to explore the detailed architecture of ventral disc microtubules and their associated components. Lastly, we examined the disc microtubule array in three dimensions in unprecedented detail using cryo-electron tomography combined with internal sub-tomogram volume averaging of repetitive domains. We discovered details of protein complexes stabilizing microtubules by attachment to their inner and outer wall. A unique tri-laminar microribbon structure is attached vertically to the disc microtubules and is connected to neighboring microribbons via crossbridges. This work provides novel insight into the structure of the ventral disc microtubules, microribbons and associated proteins. Knowledge of the components comprising these structures and their three-dimensional organization is

  4. Effects of tertiary amine local anesthetics on the assembly and disassembly of brain microtubules in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genna, J M; Coffe, G; Pudles, J

    1980-09-01

    From kinetic and electron microscopy studies on the effects of procaine, tetracaine and dibucaine on the polymerization and depolymerization of the microtubules isolated from pig and rat brains the following results were obtained. 1. Procaine or tetracaine, at the concentration range of 0.5--20 mM and of 0.5--5 mM respectively, increases the rate of tubulin polymerization (24 degrees C or 37 degrees C) and of microtubule depolymerization (4 degrees C) as a linear function of the concentration of the anesthetics, while identical amounts of microtubules are formed. In the absence of microtubule-associated proteins the polymerization of tubulin is not induced by 10 mM procaine, furthermore, the critical concentration of microtubule proteins necessary for assembly into microtubules is not affected at this concentration level of the anesthetic. This suggests that procaine affects not the nucleation, but rather the elongation process. 2. Dibucaine, from 0.5 mM to 3 mM increases the lag time of the polymerization reaction, while from 0.5 mM to 2 mM it linearly decreases both tubulin polymerization (24 degrees C) and microtubule depolymerization (4 degrees C) rates. Dibucaine, up to mM concentration, does not affect the extent of tubulin polymerization; however, above this concentration it induces the formation of amorphous aggregates. 3. Procaine or tetracaine enhances the depolymerizing effect of calcium on microtubules. The half-maximal values for the depolymerizing effect of calcium were 0.96, 0.71 and 0.51 mM for the control, in the presence of 10 mM procaine and 5 mM tetracaine respectively.

  5. Dynamic release of nuclear RanGTP triggers TPX2-dependent microtubule assembly during the apoptotic execution phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, David K; Wilde, Andrew; Lane, Jon D

    2009-03-01

    During apoptosis, the interphase microtubule network is dismantled then later replaced by a novel, non-centrosomal microtubule array. These microtubules assist in the peripheral redistribution of nuclear fragments in the apoptotic cell; however, the regulation of apoptotic microtubule assembly is not understood. Here, we demonstrate that microtubule assembly depends upon the release of nuclear RanGTP into the apoptotic cytoplasm because this process is blocked in apoptotic cells overexpressing dominant-negative GDP-locked Ran (T24N). Actin-myosin-II contractility provides the impetus for Ran release and, consequently, microtubule assembly is blocked in blebbistatin- and Y27632-treated apoptotic cells. Importantly, the spindle-assembly factor TPX2 (targeting protein for Xklp2), colocalises with apoptotic microtubules, and siRNA silencing of TPX2, but not of the microtubule motors Mklp1 and Kid, abrogates apoptotic microtubule assembly. These data provide a molecular explanation for the assembly of the apoptotic microtubule network, and suggest important similarities with the process of RanGTP- and TPX2-mediated mitotic spindle formation.

  6. MAP6-F is a temperature sensor that directly binds to and protects microtubules from cold-induced depolymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delphin, Christian; Bouvier, Denis; Seggio, Maxime; Couriol, Emilie; Saoudi, Yasmina; Denarier, Eric; Bosc, Christophe; Valiron, Odile; Bisbal, Mariano; Arnal, Isabelle; Andrieux, Annie

    2012-10-12

    Microtubules are dynamic structures that present the peculiar characteristic to be ice-cold labile in vitro. In vivo, microtubules are protected from ice-cold induced depolymerization by the widely expressed MAP6/STOP family of proteins. However, the mechanism by which MAP6 stabilizes microtubules at 4 °C has not been identified. Moreover, the microtubule cold sensitivity and therefore the needs for microtubule stabilization in the wide range of temperatures between 4 and 37 °C are unknown. This is of importance as body temperatures of animals can drop during hibernation or torpor covering a large range of temperatures. Here, we show that in the absence of MAP6, microtubules in cells below 20 °C rapidly depolymerize in a temperature-dependent manner whereas they are stabilized in the presence of MAP6. We further show that in cells, MAP6-F binding to and stabilization of microtubules is temperature- dependent and very dynamic, suggesting a direct effect of the temperature on the formation of microtubule/MAP6 complex. We also demonstrate using purified proteins that MAP6-F binds directly to microtubules through its Mc domain. This binding is temperature-dependent and coincides with progressive conformational changes of the Mc domain as revealed by circular dichroism. Thus, MAP6 might serve as a temperature sensor adapting its conformation according to the temperature to maintain the cellular microtubule network in organisms exposed to temperature decrease.

  7. Tubulin cofactor B regulates microtubule densities during microglia transition to the reactive states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanarraga, M.L.; Villegas, J.C.; Carranza, G.; Castano, R.; Zabala, J.C.

    2009-01-01

    Microglia are highly dynamic cells of the CNS that continuously survey the welfare of the neural parenchyma and play key roles modulating neurogenesis and neuronal cell death. In response to injury or pathogen invasion parenchymal microglia transforms into a more active cell that proliferates, migrates and behaves as a macrophage. The acquisition of these extra skills implicates enormous modifications of the microtubule and actin cytoskeletons. Here we show that tubulin cofactor B (TBCB), which has been found to contribute to various aspects of microtubule dynamics in vivo, is also implicated in microglial cytoskeletal changes. We find that TBCB is upregulated in post-lesion reactive parenchymal microglia/macrophages, in interferon treated BV-2 microglial cells, and in neonate amoeboid microglia where the microtubule densities are remarkably low. Our data demonstrate that upon TBCB downregulation both, after microglia differentiation to the ramified phenotype in vivo and in vitro, or after TBCB gene silencing, microtubule densities are restored in these cells. Taken together these observations support the view that TBCB functions as a microtubule density regulator in microglia during activation, and provide an insight into the understanding of the complex mechanisms controlling microtubule reorganization during microglial transition between the amoeboid, ramified, and reactive phenotypes

  8. Aspergillus myosin-V supports polarized growth in the absence of microtubule-based transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    Full Text Available In the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans, both microtubules and actin filaments are important for polarized growth at the hyphal tip. Less clear is how different microtubule-based and actin-based motors work together to support this growth. Here we examined the role of myosin-V (MYOV in hyphal growth. MYOV-depleted cells form elongated hyphae, but the rate of hyphal elongation is significantly reduced. In addition, although wild type cells without microtubules still undergo polarized growth, microtubule disassembly abolishes polarized growth in MYOV-depleted cells. Thus, MYOV is essential for polarized growth in the absence of microtubules. Moreover, while a triple kinesin null mutant lacking kinesin-1 (KINA and two kinesin-3s (UNCA and UNCB undergoes hyphal elongation and forms a colony, depleting MYOV in this triple mutant results in lethality due to a severe defect in polarized growth. These results argue that MYOV, through its ability to transport secretory cargo, can support a significant amount of polarized hyphal tip growth in the absence of any microtubule-based transport. Finally, our genetic analyses also indicate that KINA (kinesin-1 rather than UNCA (kinesin-3 is the major kinesin motor that supports polarized growth in the absence of MYOV.

  9. Emerging roles for microtubules in angiosperm pollen tube growth highlight new research cues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra eMoscatelli

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In plants, actin filaments have an important role in organelle movement and cytoplasmic streaming. Otherwise microtubules have a role in restricting organelles to specific areas of the cell and in maintaining organelle morphology. In somatic plant cells, microtubules also participate in cell division and morphogenesis, allowing cells to take their definitive shape in order to perform specific functions. In the latter case, microtubules influence assembly of the cell wall, controlling the delivery of enzymes involved in cellulose synthesis and of wall modulation material to the proper sites.In angiosperm pollen tubes, organelle movement is generally attributed to the acto-myosin system, the main role of which is in distributing organelles in the cytoplasm and in carrying secretory vesicles to the apex for polarized growth. Recent data on membrane trafficking suggests a role of microtubules in fine delivery and repositioning of vesicles to sustain pollen tube growth. This review examines the role of microtubules in secretion and endocytosis, highlighting new research cues regarding cell wall construction and pollen tube-pistil crosstalk, that help unravel the role of microtubules in polarized growth.

  10. Actin and microtubule networks contribute differently to cell response for small and large strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubitschke, H.; Schnauss, J.; Nnetu, K. D.; Warmt, E.; Stange, R.; Kaes, J.

    2017-09-01

    Cytoskeletal filaments provide cells with mechanical stability and organization. The main key players are actin filaments and microtubules governing a cell’s response to mechanical stimuli. We investigated the specific influences of these crucial components by deforming MCF-7 epithelial cells at small (≤5% deformation) and large strains (>5% deformation). To understand specific contributions of actin filaments and microtubules, we systematically studied cellular responses after treatment with cytoskeleton influencing drugs. Quantification with the microfluidic optical stretcher allowed capturing the relative deformation and relaxation of cells under different conditions. We separated distinctive deformational and relaxational contributions to cell mechanics for actin and microtubule networks for two orders of magnitude of drug dosages. Disrupting actin filaments via latrunculin A, for instance, revealed a strain-independent softening. Stabilizing these filaments by treatment with jasplakinolide yielded cell softening for small strains but showed no significant change at large strains. In contrast, cells treated with nocodazole to disrupt microtubules displayed a softening at large strains but remained unchanged at small strains. Stabilizing microtubules within the cells via paclitaxel revealed no significant changes for deformations at small strains, but concentration-dependent impact at large strains. This suggests that for suspended cells, the actin cortex is probed at small strains, while at larger strains; the whole cell is probed with a significant contribution from the microtubules.

  11. Direct Microtubule-Binding by Myosin-10 Orients Centrosomes toward Retraction Fibers and Subcortical Actin Clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Mijung; Bagonis, Maria; Danuser, Gaudenz; Pellman, David

    2015-08-10

    Positioning of centrosomes is vital for cell division and development. In metazoan cells, spindle positioning is controlled by a dynamic pool of subcortical actin that organizes in response to the position of retraction fibers. These actin "clouds" are proposed to generate pulling forces on centrosomes and mediate spindle orientation. However, the motors that pull astral microtubules toward these actin structures are not known. Here, we report that the unconventional myosin, Myo10, couples actin-dependent forces from retraction fibers and subcortical actin clouds to centrosomes. Myo10-mediated centrosome positioning requires its direct microtubule binding. Computational image analysis of large microtubule populations reveals a direct effect of Myo10 on microtubule dynamics and microtubule-cortex interactions. Myo10's role in centrosome positioning is distinct from, but overlaps with, that of dynein. Thus, Myo10 plays a key role in integrating the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons to position centrosomes and mitotic spindles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Hypothesis: NDL Proteins Function in Stress Responses by Regulating Microtubule Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha eKhatri

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available N-MYC DOWNREGULATED-LIKE proteins (NDL, members of the alpha/beta hydrolase superfamily were recently rediscovered as interactors of G-protein signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana. Although the precise molecular function of NDL proteins is still elusive, in animals these proteins play protective role in hypoxia and expression is induced by hypoxia and nickel, indicating role in stress. Homology of NDL1 with animal counterpart NDRG suggests similar functions in animals and plants. It is well established that stress responses leads to the microtubule depolymerization and reorganization which is crucial for stress tolerance. NDRG is a microtubule-associated protein (MAP which mediates the microtubule organization in animals by causing acetylation and increases the stability of α-tubulin. As NDL1 is highly homologous to NDRG, involvement of NDL1 in the microtubule organization during plant stress can also be expected. Discovery of interaction of NDL with protein kinesin light chain- related 1, enodomembrane family protein 70, syntaxin-23, tubulin alpha-2 chain, as a part of G protein interactome initiative encourages us to postulate microtubule stabilizing functions for NDL family in plants. Our search for NDL interactors in G protein interactome also predicts the role of NDL proteins in abiotic stress tolerance management. Based on published report in animals and predicted interacting partners for NDL in G protein interactome lead us to hypothesize involvement of NDL in the microtubule organization during abiotic stress management in plants.

  13. The Characteristics of Force Production of Kinesin-5 on MCF7 Microtubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojania Feizabadi, Mitra

    Unlike neural mammalian microtubules with class II of beta tubulin as the major beta tubulin in their compositions, MCF7 microtubules composed of 0% class II beta tubulin isotype, 39.1% class I beta tubulin isotype, 2.5% class III beta tubulin isotype and 58.4% class IV beta tubulin isotype. Recent studies have revealed that function of some of motor proteins can be affected by the structural composition of microtubules. In this work, we will show how the function of mitotic kinesin (Kin-5) under external load changed when moving along bovine versus MCF7 microtubules. Along MCF7 microtubules, the detachment force was reduced and the force-velocity curve was different as compared to those related to bovine brain. We will also show that the elimination of the C-terminal tails made the transport almost similar to the two sets of microtubules. This suggests that the C-terminal tails of tubulin plays a regulatory role in Kinesin-5's function.

  14. Rheology of semiflexible bundle networks with transient linkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Kei W; Bruinsma, Robijn F; Lieleg, Oliver; Bausch, Andreas R; Wall, Wolfgang A; Levine, Alex J

    2014-06-13

    We present a theoretical and computational analysis of the rheology of networks made up of bundles of semiflexible filaments bound by transient cross-linkers. Such systems are ubiquitous in the cytoskeleton and can be formed in vitro using filamentous actin and various cross-linkers. We find that their high-frequency rheology is characterized by a scaling behavior that is quite distinct from that of networks of the well-studied single semiflexible filaments. This regime can be understood theoretically in terms of a length-scale-dependent bending modulus for bundles. Next, we observe new dissipative dynamics associated with the shear-induced disruption of the network at intermediate frequencies. Finally, at low frequencies, we encounter a region of non-Newtonian rheology characterized by power-law scaling. This regime is dominated by bundle dissolution and large-scale rearrangements of the network driven by equilibrium thermal fluctuations.

  15. Single-Phase Bundle Flows Including Macroscopic Turbulence Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Jun; Yoon, Han Young [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Seok Jong; Cho, Hyoung Kyu [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    To deal with various thermal hydraulic phenomena due to rapid change of fluid properties when an accident happens, securing mechanistic approaches as much as possible may reduce the uncertainty arising from improper applications of the experimental models. In this study, the turbulence mixing model, which is well defined in the subchannel analysis code such as VIPRE, COBRA, and MATRA by experiments, is replaced by a macroscopic k-e turbulence model, which represents the aspect of mathematical derivation. The performance of CUPID with macroscopic turbulence model is validated against several bundle experiments: CNEN 4x4 and PNL 7x7 rod bundle tests. In this study, the macroscopic k-e model has been validated for the application to subchannel analysis. It has been implemented in the CUPID code and validated against CNEN 4x4 and PNL 7x7 rod bundle tests. The results showed that the macroscopic k-e turbulence model can estimate the experiments properly.

  16. Criticality calculation for cluster fuel bundles using grey Dancoff factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyeong Heon Kim; Nam Zin Cho

    1999-01-01

    This paper applies the grey Dancoff factor calculated by Monte Carlo method to the criticality calculation for cluster fuel bundles. Dancoff factors for five symmetrically different pin positions of CANDU37 and CANFLEX fuel bundles in full three-dimensional geometry are calculated by Monte Carlo method. The concept of equivalent Dancoff factor is introduced to use the grey Dancoff factor in the resonance calculation based on equivalence theorem. The equivalent Dancoff factor which is based on the realistic model produces an exact fuel collision probability and can be used in the resonance calculation just as the black Dancoff factor. The infinite multiplication factors based on the black Dancoff factors calculated by collision probability or Monte Carlo method are overestimated by about 2 mk for normal condition and 4 mk for void condition of CANDU37 and CANFLEX fuel bundles in comparison with those based on the equivalent Dancoff factors

  17. Symposium on Singularities, Representation of Algebras, and Vector Bundles

    CERN Document Server

    Trautmann, Günther

    1987-01-01

    It is well known that there are close relations between classes of singularities and representation theory via the McKay correspondence and between representation theory and vector bundles on projective spaces via the Bernstein-Gelfand-Gelfand construction. These relations however cannot be considered to be either completely understood or fully exploited. These proceedings document recent developments in the area. The questions and methods of representation theory have applications to singularities and to vector bundles. Representation theory itself, which had primarily developed its methods for Artinian algebras, starts to investigate algebras of higher dimension partly because of these applications. Future research in representation theory may be spurred by the classification of singularities and the highly developed theory of moduli for vector bundles. The volume contains 3 survey articles on the 3 main topics mentioned, stressing their interrelationships, as well as original research papers.

  18. Stress generation by myosin minifilaments in actin bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasanayake, Nilushi L; Carlsson, Anders E

    2013-06-01

    Forces and stresses generated by the action of myosin minifilaments are analyzed in idealized computer-generated actin bundles, and compared to results for isotropic actin networks. The bundles are generated as random collections of actin filaments in two dimensions with constrained orientations, crosslinked and attached to two fixed walls. Myosin minifilaments are placed on actin filament pairs and allowed to move and deform the network so that it exerts forces on the walls. The vast majority of simulation runs end with contractile minifilament stress, because minifilaments rotate into energetically stable contractile configurations. This process is aided by the bending and stretching of actin filaments, which accomodate minifilament rotation. Stresses for bundles are greater than those for isotropic networks, and antiparallel filaments generate more tension than parallel filaments. The forces transmitted by the actin network to the walls of the simulation cell often exceed the tension in the minifilament itself.

  19. Betti numbers of graded modules and cohomology of vector bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenbud, David; Schreyer, Frank-Olaf

    2009-07-01

    In the remarkable paper Graded Betti numbers of Cohen-Macaulay modules and the multiplicity conjecture, Mats Boij and Jonas Soederberg conjectured that the Betti table of a Cohen-Macaulay module over a polynomial ring is a positive linear combination of Betti tables of modules with pure resolutions. We prove a strengthened form of their conjectures. Applications include a proof of the Multiplicity Conjecture of Huneke and Srinivasan and a proof of the convexity of a fan naturally associated to the Young lattice. With the same tools we show that the cohomology table of any vector bundle on projective space is a positive rational linear combination of the cohomology tables of what we call supernatural vector bundles. Using this result we give new bounds on the slope of a vector bundle in terms of its cohomology.

  20. System for supporting bundled tube segments within a combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melton, Patrick Benedict

    2016-03-01

    A system for supporting bundled tube segments within a combustor includes an annular sleeve that extends circumferentially and axially within the combustor, a support lug that extends radially inward from the annular sleeve and an annular support frame that is disposed within the annular sleeve. The annular support frame includes an inner ring portion, an outer ring portion and a plurality of spokes that extend radially between the inner and outer ring portions. The inner ring portion, the outer ring portion and the plurality of spokes define an annular array of openings for receiving a respective bundled tube segment. The inner ring portion is connected to each bundled tube segment and the outer ring portion is coupled to the support lug.

  1. The Analysis of SBWR Critical Power Bundle Using Cobrag Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohannes Sardjono

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The coolant mechanism of SBWR is similar with the Dodewaard Nuclear Power Plant (NPP in the Netherlands that first went critical in 1968. The similarity of both NPP is cooled by natural convection system. These coolant concept is very related with same parameters on fuel bundle design especially fuel bundle length, core pressure drop and core flow rate as well as critical power bundle. The analysis was carried out by using COBRAG computer code. COBRAG computer code is GE Company proprietary. Basically COBRAG computer code is a tool to solve compressible three-dimensional, two fluid, three field equations for two phase flow. The three fields are the vapor field, the continuous liquid field, and the liquid drop field. This code has been applied to analyses model flow and heat transfer within the reactor core. This volume describes the finitevolume equations and the numerical solution methods used to solve these equations. This analysis of same parameters has been done i.e.; inlet sub cooling 20 BTU/lbm and 40 BTU/lbm, 1000 psi pressure and R-factor is 1.038, mass flux are 0.5 Mlb/hr.ft2, 0.75 Mlb/hr.ft2, 1.00 Mlb/hr.ft2 and 1.25 Mlb/hr.ft2. Those conditions based on history operation of some type of the cell fuel bundle line at GE Nuclear Energy. According to the results, it can be concluded that SBWR critical power bundle is 10.5 % less than current BWR critical power bundle with length reduction of 12 ft to 9 ft.

  2. Reaction–diffusion model of hair-bundle morphogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobo, Adrian; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2014-01-01

    Our senses of hearing and balance rest upon the activity of hair cells, the ear’s sensory receptors. Each hair cell detects mechanical stimuli with its hair bundle, an organelle comprising 10–300 cylindrical, actin-filled stereocilia. A bundle’s structure is highly stereotyped: the stereocilia stand erect in a regular, hexagonal array and display a monotonic gradient in length along one axis. This precise organization is key to the operation of the hair bundle: mutations that disturb the morp...

  3. Some Remarks on Group Bundles and C*-dynamical systems

    OpenAIRE

    Vasselli, Ezio

    2003-01-01

    We introduce the notion of fibred action of a group bundle on a C(X)-algebra. By using such a notion, a characterization in terms of induced C*-bundles is given for C*-dynamical systems such that the relative commutant of the fixed-point algebra is minimal (i.e., it is generated by the centre of the given C*-algebra and the centre of the fixed-point algebra). A class of examples in the setting of the Cuntz algebra is given, and connections with superselection structures with nontrivial centre...

  4. Some Remarks on Group Bundles and C* Dynamical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasselli, Ezio

    2007-08-01

    We introduce the notion of fibred action of a group bundle on a C(X)-algebra. By using such a notion, a characterization in terms of induced C*-bundles is given for C*-dynamical systems such that the relative commutant of the fixed-point C*-algebra is minimal (i.e., it is generated by the centre of the given C*-algebra and the centre of the fixed-point C*-algebra). A class of examples in the setting of the Cuntz algebra is given, and connections with superselection structures with nontrivial centre are discussed.

  5. Cellulosic Fibers: Effect of Processing on Fiber Bundle Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Anders; Madsen, Bo; Thomsen, Anne Belinda

    2011-01-01

    A range of differently processed cellulosic fibers from flax and hemp plants were investigated to study the relation between processing of cellulosic fibers and fiber bundle strength. The studied processing methods are applied for yarn production and include retting, scutching, carding, and cotto......A range of differently processed cellulosic fibers from flax and hemp plants were investigated to study the relation between processing of cellulosic fibers and fiber bundle strength. The studied processing methods are applied for yarn production and include retting, scutching, carding...

  6. Microtubule length dependence of motor traffic in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunxin

    2012-10-01

    Motor proteins in living cells, such as kinesin and dynein, can move processively along the microtubule (MT), and can also detach from or attach to MT stochastically. Experiments found that the traffic of motors along MT may be jammed; thus various theoretical models were designed to understand this process. However, previous studies mainly focused on motor attachment/detachment rate dependent properties. Leduc et al. recently found that the traffic jam of motor protein Kip3 depends on MT length (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 109, 6100 (2012)). Therefore, this study discusses the MT length-dependent properties of motor traffic. The results showed that MT length has one critical value N(c); a traffic jam occurs only when MT length N > N(c). The jammed MT length increases with total MT length N , whereas the non-jammed MT length may not change monotonically with N . The critical value N(c) increases with motor detachment rate from MT, but decreases with motor attachment rate to MT. Therefore, the traffic of motors will be more likely to be jammed when the MT is long, motor detachment rate is high, and motor detachment rate is low.

  7. Augmented stress fiber arrays after cytopharmacologic disassembly of microtubules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godman, G.C.; Tannenbaum, J.; Brett, J.B.

    1986-03-01

    Disruption of microtubules (mt) of bovine aortic endothelial (BAE) cells, and normal and transformed fibroblasts, by exposure to 2.5 ..mu..M colchicine; 12 ..mu..M vinblastine; or 1 ..mu..M nocodazole, for 5 or 20 hrs results in aggregation of vimentin-intermediate filament (IF) and the development of markedly augmented stress fiber (SF) arrays. After disassembly of mt, confluent BAE, with circumferential marginal microfilament bands and few central SF, develop dense ribbon-like SF arrays, and spontaneously transformed fibroblasts (tHmf-e), which before treatment are apolar or epithelioid and have few or no SF, acquire extensive organized SF arrays. The axially oriented SF span the entire cell length and terminate in vinculin-containing adhesion plaques, polarizing these cells. The visible increase in SF associated actin is not accompanied by an increase either in actin synthesis (determined from electropherograms after pulse labeling with (/sup 35/S)methionine), or content (DNAse I assay for total cell actin). The reorganization of actin into SF and the development of vinculin adhesion plaques is independent of protein synthesis and occurs in the presence of cycloheximide (10 ..mu..g/ml). These results suggest a role for mt and IF in the regulation of the organizational state of the actin-based cytoskeleton.

  8. Effects of microtubule mechanics on hydrolysis and catastrophes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Müller, N; Kierfeld, J

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a model for microtubule (MT) mechanics containing lateral bonds between dimers in neighboring protofilaments, bending rigidity of dimers, and repulsive interactions between protofilaments modeling steric constraints to investigate the influence of mechanical forces on hydrolysis and catastrophes. We use the allosteric dimer model, where tubulin dimers are characterized by an equilibrium bending angle, which changes from 0 ∘ to 22 ∘ by hydrolysis of a dimer. This also affects the lateral interaction and bending energies and, thus, the mechanical equilibrium state of the MT. As hydrolysis gives rise to conformational changes in dimers, mechanical forces also influence the hydrolysis rates by mechanical energy changes modulating the hydrolysis rate. The interaction via the MT mechanics then gives rise to correlation effects in the hydrolysis dynamics, which have not been taken into account before. Assuming a dominant influence of mechanical energies on hydrolysis rates, we investigate the most probable hydrolysis pathways both for vectorial and random hydrolysis. Investigating the stability with respect to lateral bond rupture, we identify initiation configurations for catastrophes along the hydrolysis pathways and values for a lateral bond rupture force. If we allow for rupturing of lateral bonds between dimers in neighboring protofilaments above this threshold force, our model exhibits avalanche-like catastrophe events. (papers)

  9. Calmodulin immunolocalization to cortical microtubules is calcium independent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, D.D.; Cyr, R.J.

    1992-12-31

    Calcium affects the stability of cortical microtubules (MTs) in lysed protoplasts. This calmodulin (CaM)-mediated interaction may provide a mechanism that serves to integrate cellular behavior with MT function. To test the hypothesis that CaM associates with these MTs, monoclonal antibodies were produced against CaM, and one (designated mAb1D10), was selected for its suitability as an immunocytochemical reagent. It is shown that CaM associates with the cortical Mats of cultured carrot (Daucus carota L.) and tobacco (Nicotiana tobacum L.) cells. Inasmuch as CaM interacts with calcium and affects the behavior of these Mats, we hypothesized that calcium would alter this association. To test this, protoplasts containing taxol-stabilized Mats were lysed in the presence of various concentrations of calcium and examined for the association of Cam with cortical Mats. At 1 {mu}M calcium, many protoplasts did not have CaM in association with the cortical Mats, while at 3.6 {mu}M calcium, this association was completely abolished. The results are discussed in terms of a model in which CaM associates with Mats via two types of interactions; one calcium dependent and one independent.

  10. Calmodulin immunolocalization to cortical microtubules is calcium independent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, D.D.; Cyr, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    Calcium affects the stability of cortical microtubules (MTs) in lysed protoplasts. This calmodulin (CaM)-mediated interaction may provide a mechanism that serves to integrate cellular behavior with MT function. To test the hypothesis that CaM associates with these MTs, monoclonal antibodies were produced against CaM, and one (designated mAb1D10), was selected for its suitability as an immunocytochemical reagent. It is shown that CaM associates with the cortical Mats of cultured carrot (Daucus carota L.) and tobacco (Nicotiana tobacum L.) cells. Inasmuch as CaM interacts with calcium and affects the behavior of these Mats, we hypothesized that calcium would alter this association. To test this, protoplasts containing taxol-stabilized Mats were lysed in the presence of various concentrations of calcium and examined for the association of Cam with cortical Mats. At 1 [mu]M calcium, many protoplasts did not have CaM in association with the cortical Mats, while at 3.6 [mu]M calcium, this association was completely abolished. The results are discussed in terms of a model in which CaM associates with Mats via two types of interactions; one calcium dependent and one independent.

  11. Halogenated auxins affect microtubules and root elongation in Lactuca sativa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, N.; Hasenstein, K. H.

    2000-01-01

    We studied the effect of 4,4,4-trifluoro-3-(indole-3-)butyric acid (TFIBA), a recently described root growth stimulator, and 5,6-dichloro-indole-3-acetic acid (DCIAA) on growth and microtubule (MT) organization in roots of Lactuca sativa L. DCIAA and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) inhibited root elongation and depolymerized MTs in the cortex of the elongation zone, inhibited the elongation of stele cells, and promoted xylem maturation. Both auxins caused the plane of cell division to shift from anticlinal to periclinal. In contrast, TFIBA (100 micromolar) promoted elongation of primary roots by 40% and stimulated the elongation of lateral roots, even in the presence of IBA, the microtubular inhibitors oryzalin and taxol, or the auxin transport inhibitor naphthylphthalamic acid. However, TFIBA inhibited the formation of lateral root primordia. Immunostaining showed that TFIBA stabilized MTs orientation perpendicular to the root axis, doubled the cortical cell length, but delayed xylem maturation. The data indicate that the auxin-induced inhibition of elongation and swelling of roots results from reoriented phragmoplasts, the destabilization of MTs in elongating cells, and promotion of vessel formation. In contrast, TFIBA induced promotion of root elongation by enhancing cell length, prolonging transverse MT orientation, delaying cell and xylem maturation.

  12. MTBindingSim: simulate protein binding to microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Julia T; Pence, Charles H; Goodson, Holly V

    2012-02-01

    Many protein-protein interactions are more complex than can be accounted for by 1:1 binding models. However, biochemists have few tools available to help them recognize and predict the behaviors of these more complicated systems, making it difficult to design experiments that distinguish between possible binding models. MTBindingSim provides researchers with an environment in which they can rapidly compare different models of binding for a given scenario. It is written specifically with microtubule polymers in mind, but many of its models apply equally well to any polymer or any protein-protein interaction. MTBindingSim can thus both help in training intuition about binding models and with experimental design. MTBindingSim is implemented in MATLAB and runs either within MATLAB (on Windows, Mac or Linux) or as a binary without MATLAB (on Windows or Mac). The source code (licensed under the GNU General Public License) and binaries are freely available at http://mtbindingsim.googlecode.com. jphilip@nd.edu; cpence@nd.edu.

  13. Microtubule modification influences cellular response to amyloid-β exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Shamitko-Klingensmith

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available During the normal aging process, cytoskeletal changes such as a reduction in density or disruption of cytoskeletal components occur that can affect neuronal function. As aging is the biggest risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD, this study sought to determine how microtubule (MT modification influences cellular response upon exposure to β-amyloid1-42 (Aβ1-42, which is implicated in AD. The MT networks of hypothalamic GT1-7 neurons were modified by common disrupting or stabilizing drugs, and then the physical and mechanical properties of the modified neurons were determined. The MT modified neurons were then exposed to Aβ1-42 and the ability of the neurons to cope with this exposure was determined by a variety of biochemical assays. Flow cytometry studies indicated that MT disruption reduced the binding of Aβ1-42 to the plasma membrane by 45% per cell compared to neurons with stabilized or unaltered MTs. Although the cells with disrupted MTs experienced less peptide-membrane binding, they experienced similar or increased levels of cytotoxicity caused by the Aβ1-42 exposure. In contrast, MT stabilization delayed toxicity caused by Aβ1-42. These results demonstrate that MT modification significantly influences the ability of neurons to cope with toxicity induced by Aβ1-42.

  14. Buckling of Microtubules on a 2D Elastic Medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, Arif Md Rashedul; Inoue, Daisuke; Afrin, Tanjina; Mayama, Hiroyuki; Sada, Kazuki; Kakugo, Akira

    2015-11-24

    We have demonstrated compression stress induced mechanical deformation of microtubules (MTs) on a two-dimensional elastic medium and investigated the role of compression strain, strain rate, and a MT-associated protein in the deformation of MTs. We show that MTs, supported on a two-dimensional substrate by a MT-associated protein kinesin, undergo buckling when they are subjected to compression stress. Compression strain strongly affects the extent of buckling, although compression rate has no substantial effect on the buckling of MTs. Most importantly, the density of kinesin is found to play the key role in determining the buckling mode of MTs. We have made a comparison between our experimental results and the 'elastic foundation model' that theoretically predicts the buckling behavior of MTs and its connection to MT-associated proteins. Taking into consideration the role of kinesin in altering the mechanical property of MTs, we are able to explain the buckling behavior of MTs by the elastic foundation model. This work will help understand the buckling mechanism of MTs and its connection to MT-associated proteins or surrounding medium, and consequently will aid in obtaining a meticulous scenario of the compression stress induced deformation of MTs in cells.

  15. Microtubule-Targeting Agents Enter the Central Nervous System (CNS): Double-edged Swords for Treating CNS Injury and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Eun-Mi; Lee, Byoung Dae

    2014-12-01

    Microtubules have been among the most successful targets in anticancer therapy and a large number of microtubule-targeting agents (MTAs) are in various stages of clinical development for the treatment of several malignancies. Given that injury and diseases in the central nervous system (CNS) are accompanied by acute or chronic disruption of the structural integrity of neurons and that microtubules provide structural support for the nervous system at cellular and intracellular levels, microtubules are emerging as potential therapeutic targets for treating CNS disorders. It has been postulated that exogenous application of MTAs might prevent the breakdown or degradation of microtubules after injury or during neurodegeneration, which will thereby aid in preserving the structural integrity and function of the nervous system. Here we review recent evidence that supports this notion and also discuss potential risks of targeting microtubules as a therapy for treating nerve injury and neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. Structure of Dynamic, Taxol-Stabilized, and GMPPCP-Stabilized Microtubule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, Avi; Shemesh, Asaf; Millgram, Abigail; Dharan, Raviv; Levi-Kalisman, Yael; Ringel, Israel; Raviv, Uri

    2017-09-14

    Microtubule (MT) is made of αβ-tubulin heterodimers that dynamically assemble into a hollow nanotube composed of straight protofilaments. MT dynamics is facilitated by hydrolysis of guanosine-5'-triphosphate (GTP) and can be inhibited by either anticancer agents like taxol or the nonhydrolyzable GTP analogues like GMPPCP. Using high-resolution synchrotron X-ray scattering, we have measured and analyzed the scattering curves from solutions of dynamic MT (in other words, in the presence of excess GTP and free of dynamic-inhibiting agents) and examined the effect of two MT stabilizers: taxol and GMPPCP. Previously, we have analyzed the structure of dynamic MT by docking the atomic model of tubulin dimer onto a 3-start left handed helical lattice, derived from the PDB ID 3J6F . 3J6F corresponds to a MT with 14 protofilaments. In this paper, we took into account the possibility of having MT structures containing between 12 and 15 protofilaments. MTs with 12 protofilaments were never observed. We determined the radii, the pitch, and the distribution of protofilament number that best fit the scattering data from dynamic MT or stabilized MT by taxol or GMPPCP. We found that the protofilament number distribution shifted when the MT was stabilized. Taxol increased the mass fraction of MT with 13 protofilaments and decreased the mass fraction of MT with 14 protofilaments. GMPPCP reduced the mass fraction of MT with 15 protofilaments and increased the mass fraction of MT with 14 protofilaments. The pitch, however, remained unchanged regardless of whether the MT was dynamic or stabilized. Higher tubulin concentrations increased the fraction of dynamic MT with 14 protofilaments.

  17. Dynactin binding to tyrosinated microtubules promotes centrosome centration in C. elegans by enhancing dynein-mediated organelle transport

    OpenAIRE

    Barbosa, Daniel J.; Duro, Joana; Prevo, Bram; Cheerambathur, Dhanya K.; Carvalho, Ana X.; Gassmann, Reto

    2017-01-01

    Author summary Animal cells rely on molecular motor proteins to distribute intracellular components and organize their cytoplasmic content. The motor cytoplasmic dynein 1 (dynein) uses microtubule filaments as tracks to transport cargo from the cell periphery to the cell center, where the microtubule minus ends are embedded at the centrosome. Conversely, when dynein is anchored at the cell cortex or on organelles in the cytoplasm, the motor can pull on microtubules to position centrosomes wit...

  18. Role of the microtubule-targeting drug vinflunine on cell-cell adhesions in bladder epithelial tumour cells

    OpenAIRE

    Aparicio, Luis A; Castosa, Raquel; Haz-Conde, Mar; Rodríguez, Marta; Blanco, Moisés; Valladares, Manuel; Figueroa, Angélica

    2014-01-01

    Background Vinflunine (VFL) is a microtubule-targeting drug that suppresses microtubule dynamics, showing anti-metastatic properties both in vitro and in living cancer cells. An increasing body of evidence underlines the influence of the microtubules dynamics on the cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesions. E-cadherin is a marker of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and a tumour suppressor; its reduced levels in carcinoma are associated with poor prognosis. In this report, we investiga...

  19. Aβ-mediated spine changes in the hippocampus are microtubule-dependent and can be reversed by a subnanomolar concentration of the microtubule-stabilizing agent epothilone D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penazzi, Lorène; Tackenberg, Christian; Ghori, Adnan; Golovyashkina, Nataliya; Niewidok, Benedikt; Selle, Karolin; Ballatore, Carlo; Smith, Amos B.; Bakota, Lidia; Brandt, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spines represent the major postsynaptic input of excitatory synapses. Loss of spines and changes in their morphology correlate with cognitive impairment in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and are thought to occur early during pathology. Therapeutic intervention at a preclinical stage of AD to modify spine changes might thus be warranted. To follow the development and to potentially interfere with spine changes over time, we established a long term ex vivo model from organotypic cultures of the hippocampus from APP transgenic and control mice. The cultures exhibit spine loss in principal hippocampal neurons, which closely resembles the changes occurring in vivo, and spine morphology progressively changes from mushroom-shaped to stubby. We demonstrate that spine changes are completely reversed within few days after blocking amyloid-β (Aβ) production with the gamma-secretase inhibitor DAPT. We show that the microtubule disrupting drug nocodazole leads to spine loss similar to Aβ expressing cultures and suppresses DAPT-mediated spine recovery in slices from APP transgenic mice. Finally, we report that epothilone D (EpoD) at a subnanomolar concentration, which slightly stabilizes microtubules in model neurons, completely reverses Aβ-induced spine loss and increases thin spine density. Taken together the data indicate that Aβ causes spine changes by microtubule destabilization and that spine recovery requires microtubule polymerization. Moreover, our results suggest that a low, subtoxic concentration of EpoD is sufficient to reduce spine loss during the preclinical stage of AD. PMID:26772969

  20. The plant formin AtFH4 interacts with both actin and microtubules, and contains a newly identified microtubule-binding domain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Deeks, M.J.; Fendrych, Matyáš; Smertenko, A.; Bell, K.S.; Oparka, K.; Cvrčková, F.; Žárský, Viktor; Hussey, P.J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 123, č. 8 (2010), s. 1209-1215 ISSN 0021-9533 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004; GA ČR GAP305/10/0433 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Actin regulating proteins * Membrane * Microtubule Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.290, year: 2010

  1. EXTERNAL VERIFICATION OF THE BUNDLE ADJUSTMENT IN PHOTOGRAMMETRIC SOFTWARE USING THE DAMPED BUNDLE ADJUSTMENT TOOLBOX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Börlin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to investigate whether the Matlab-based Damped Bundle Adjustment Toolbox (DBAT can be used to provide independent verification of the BA computation of two popular software—PhotoModeler (PM and PhotoScan (PS. For frame camera data sets with lens distortion, DBAT is able to reprocess and replicate subsets of PM results with high accuracy. For lens-distortion-free data sets, DBAT can furthermore provide comparative results between PM and PS. Data sets for the discussed projects are available from the authors. The use of an external verification tool such as DBAT will enable users to get an independent verification of the computations of their software. In addition, DBAT can provide computation of quality parameters such as estimated standard deviations, correlation between parameters, etc., something that should be part of best practice for any photogrammetric software. Finally, as the code is free and open-source, users can add computations of their own.

  2. Multicell slug flow heat transfer analysis of finite LMFBR bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeung, M.K.; Wolf, L.

    1978-12-01

    An analytical two-dimensional, multi-region, multi-cell technique has been developed for the thermal analysis of LMFBR rod bundles. Local temperature fields of various unit cells were obtained for 7, 19, and 37-rod bundles of different geometries and power distributions. The validity of the technique has been verified by its excellent agreement with the THTB calculational result. By comparing the calculated fully-developed circumferential clad temperature distribution with those of the experimental measurements, an axial correction factor has been derived to account for the entrance effect for practical considerations. Moreover, the knowledge of the local temperature field of the rod bundle leads to the determination of the effective mixing lengths L/sub ij/ for adjacent subchannels of various geometries. It was shown that the implementation of the accurately determined L/sub ij/ into COBRA-IIIC calculations has fairly significant effects on intersubchannel mixing. In addition, a scheme has been proposed to couple the 2-D distributed and lumped parameter calculation by COBRA-IIIC such that the entrance effect can be implanted into the distributed parameter analysis. The technique has demonstrated its applicability for a 7-rod bundle and the results of calculation were compared to those of three-dimensional analyses and experimental measurements.

  3. Rigidity of minimal submanifolds with flat normal bundle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Let M n ( n ≥ 3 ) be an -dimensional complete immersed n − 2 n -superstable minimal submanifold in an ( n + p ) -dimensional Euclidean space R n + p with flat normal bundle. We prove that if the second fundamental form of satisfies some decay conditions, then is an affine plane or a catenoid in some Euclidean ...

  4. Vranceanu connections and foliations with bundle-like metrics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences; Volume 118; Issue 1. Vrănceanu Connections and Foliations with Bundle-Like Metrics. Aurel Bejancu ... Author Affiliations. Aurel Bejancu1 Hani Reda Farran1. Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Kuwait University, P. O. Box 5969, Safat 13060, Kuwait ...

  5. Quillen bundle and geometric prequantization of non-abelian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Toepliz operators out of projections to holomorphic sections of the prequatum line bundle. (when the latter makes sense) and Berezin–Toeplitz deformation quantization has been carried out by Andersen in [1, 2]. The non-abelian vortices were first introduced in the literature perhaps by Bradlow [8]. The non-abelian vortex ...

  6. Hydraulic testing of accelerator-production-of-tritium rod bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spatz, T.L.; Siebe, D.A.

    1999-01-01

    Hydraulic tests have been performed on small pitch-to-diameter-ratio rod bundles using light water (1.7 Tr < 13,000). Also presented is the comparison of the overall rung pressure drop to a solution based on hydraulic-resistance handbook calculations

  7. Self-adjointness of the Gaffney Laplacian on Vector Bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandara, Lashi; Milatovic, Ognjen

    2015-01-01

    We study the Gaffney Laplacian on a vector bundle equipped with a compatible metric and connection over a Riemannian manifold that is possibly geodesically incomplete. Under the hypothesis that the Cauchy boundary is polar, we demonstrate the self-adjointness of this Laplacian. Furthermore, we show that negligible boundary is a necessary and sufficient condition for the self-adjointness of this operator

  8. Frobenius Pull Backs of Vector Bundles in Higher Dimensions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We prove that for a smooth projective variety of arbitrary dimension and for a vector bundle over , the Harder–Narasimhan filtration of a Frobenius pull back of is a refinement of the Frobenius pull back of the Harder–Narasimhan filtration of , provided there is a lower bound on the characteristic (in terms of rank of ...

  9. On the classification of complex vector bundles of stable rank

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This classification becomes more effective on generalized flag manifolds, where the Lie algebra formalism and concrete integrability conditions describe in constructive terms the Chern classes of a vector bundle. ... Since deceased; Mathematics Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA ...

  10. Frobenius pull backs of vector bundles in higher dimensions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... of a Frobenius pull back of is a refinement of the Frobenius pull back of the Harder–Narasimhan filtration of , provided there is a lower bound on the characteristic (in terms of rank of and the slope of the destabilizing sheaf of the cotangent bundle of ). We also recall some examples, due to Raynaud and Monsky, ...

  11. MYOCARDIAL DEFORMATION AND COMPLETE LEFT BUNDLE BRANCH BLOCK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Pavlyukova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Tissue Doppler imaging is evolving as a useful echocardiographic tool for quantitative assessment of left ventricular systolic and diastolic function. Over the last 10 years, myocardial deformation imaging has become possible initially with tissue Doppler , and more recently with myocardial speckle-tracking using 2D echocardiography. Unlike simple tissue velocity measurements, deformation measurements are specific for the region of interest. Strain rate or strain measurements have been used as sensitive indicators for subclinical diseases, and it is the most widely used tool to assess mechanical dyssynchrony. Left bundle branch block is a frequent, etiologically heterogeneous, clinically hostile and diagnostically challenging entity. About 2% of patients underwent cardiac stress testing show stable or intermittent left bundle branch block. Presence of left bundle branch block is associated with a lower and slower diastolic coronary flow velocity especially during hyperemia. Stress echocardiography is the best option for the diagnosis of ischemic heart disease, albeit specificity and sensitivity reduce in patients with left bundle branch block in the territory of left anterior descending artery in presence of initial septum dyskinesia.

  12. Vibrations of turbine blades bundles model with rubber damping elements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Půst, Ladislav; Pešek, Luděk

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 1 (2014), s. 45-52 ISSN 1802-1484 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/09/1166 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : mathematical model * bundle of five blades * rubber damping elements * eigenmodes Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics http://www.engineeringmechanics.cz/obsahy.html?R=21&C=1

  13. Geometric Description of Fibre Bundle Surface for Birkhoff System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li-Mei, Cao; Hua-Fei, Sun; Zhen-Ning, Zhang

    2009-01-01

    A fibre bundle surface for the Birkhoff system is constructed. The metric and the Riemannian connection of the surface are defined and the representation of the Gaussian curvature of this surface is presented. Finally, three examples for the Birkhoff system are given to illustrate our results. (general)

  14. A novel microbond bundle pullout technique to evaluate the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present investigation, the interfacialproperties of carbon fibre/epoxy composites viz., matrix shrinkage pressure, interfacial frictional stress, interfacial shear stress and coefficient of friction were evaluated through a novel microbond bundle pullout test. This test is different from the single fibre pull out, fibre fragmentation ...

  15. Subanalytic Bundles and Tubular Neighbourhoods of Zero-Loci

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We introduce the natural and fairly general notion of a subanalytic bundle (with a finite dimensional vector space of sections) on a subanalytic subset of a real analytic manifold , and prove that when is compact, there is a Baire subset of sections in whose zero-loci in have tubular neighbourhoods, ...

  16. Assembly and operation experience of EVA II steam reforming bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niessen, H.F.; Harth, R.; Kesel, W.

    1984-01-01

    The main test component of the experimental facility EVA-II/ADAM-II is a helium heated steam reformer bundle with 30 tubes. The tubes are filled with a catalyst of raschig ring type. The main test of the component were related to the power dependence. A series of experiment dealt with the influence of steam/methane ratio on the carbon deposit formation

  17. Anatomic Double-Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofbauer, Marcus; Muller, Bart; Wolf, Megan; Forsythe, Brian; Fu, Freddie H.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, intense research of the function of the 2 distinct bundles, the anteromedial and posterolateral, of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has led to pronounced changes in the technical concepts of ACL reconstruction. Recently, the renewed focus of ACL reconstruction has been to

  18. The fibre bundle anatomy of human cruciate ligaments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mommersteeg, T. J.; Kooloos, J. G.; Blankevoort, L.; Kauer, J. M.; Huiskes, R.; Roeling, F. Q.

    1995-01-01

    The cruciate ligaments of the knee consist of numerous fascicles, groups of which comprise fibre bundles. The stabilising function of these ligaments is established by changes in the lengths and orientations of the fascicles. Understanding the function of knee ligaments thus requires an

  19. Incremental implicit learning of bundles of statistical patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Ting; Jaeger, T Florian; Aslin, Richard N

    2016-12-01

    Forming an accurate representation of a task environment often takes place incrementally as the information relevant to learning the representation only unfolds over time. This incremental nature of learning poses an important problem: it is usually unclear whether a sequence of stimuli consists of only a single pattern, or multiple patterns that are spliced together. In the former case, the learner can directly use each observed stimulus to continuously revise its representation of the task environment. In the latter case, however, the learner must first parse the sequence of stimuli into different bundles, so as to not conflate the multiple patterns. We created a video-game statistical learning paradigm and investigated (1) whether learners without prior knowledge of the existence of multiple "stimulus bundles" - subsequences of stimuli that define locally coherent statistical patterns - could detect their presence in the input and (2) whether learners are capable of constructing a rich representation that encodes the various statistical patterns associated with bundles. By comparing human learning behavior to the predictions of three computational models, we find evidence that learners can handle both tasks successfully. In addition, we discuss the underlying reasons for why the learning of stimulus bundles occurs even when such behavior may seem irrational. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The Roach muscle bundle and umbilical cord coiling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Laat, Monique W. M.; Nikkels, Peter G. J.; Franx, Arie; Visser, Gerard H. A.

    2007-01-01

    To determine if presence of the Roach muscle, a small muscle bundle lying just beside the umbilical artery, contributes to umbilical cord coiling. 251 umbilical cords were examined. The umbilical coiling index (UCI) was calculated as the number of coils divided by the cord length in cm. Cords were

  1. Signal Integrity Analysis in Single and Bundled Carbon Nanotube Interconnects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumder, M.K.; Pandya, N.D.; Kaushik, B.K.; Manhas, S.K.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CN T) can be considered as an emerging interconnect material in current nano scale regime. They are more promising than other interconnect materials such as Al or Cu because of their robustness to electromigration. This research paper aims to address the crosstalk-related issues (signal integrity) in interconnect lines. Different analytical models of single- (SWCNT), double- (DWCNT), and multiwalled CNTs (MWCNT) are studied to analyze the crosstalk delay at global interconnect lengths. A capacitively coupled three-line bus architecture employing CMOS driver is used for accurate estimation of crosstalk delay. Each line in bus architecture is represented with the equivalent RLC models of single and bundled SWCNT, DWCNT, and MWCNT interconnects. Crosstalk delay is observed at middle line (victim) when it switches in opposite direction with respect to the other two lines (aggressors). Using the data predicted by ITRS 2012, a comparative analysis on the basis of crosstalk delay is performed for bundled SWCNT/DWCNT and single MWCNT interconnects. It is observed that the overall crosstalk delay is improved by 40.92% and 21.37% for single MWCNT in comparison to bundled SWCNT and bundled DWCNT interconnects, respectively.

  2. Metallic/semiconducting ratio of carbon nanotubes in a bundle ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SWCNTs) in a bundle by resonant Raman spectroscopy. The calculation has been done for the three peak positions in radial breathing mode (RBM) spectra obtained by using a laser excitation wavelength () of 633 nm from He–Ne laser on ...

  3. Parabolic bundles on algebraic surfaces I – The Donaldson ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    [17] and [18]) that the underlying geometry and topology of the moduli space of parabolic bundles of rank two and trivial determinant have very interesting applications arising out of a generalization of Donaldson polynomials defined from these moduli spaces. These moduli spaces and their compactifications were studied.

  4. Self-organization of myosin II in reconstituted actomyosin bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachowiak, Matthew R; McCall, Patrick M; Thoresen, Todd; Balcioglu, Hayri E; Kasiewicz, Lisa; Gardel, Margaret L; O'Shaughnessy, Ben

    2012-09-19

    Cells assemble a variety of bundled actomyosin structures in the cytoskeleton for activities such as cell-shape regulation, force production, and cytokinesis. Although these linear structures exhibit varied architecture, two common organizational themes are a punctate distribution of myosin II and distinct patterns of actin polarity. The mechanisms that cells use to assemble and maintain these organizational features are poorly understood. To study these, we reconstituted actomyosin bundles in vitro that contained only actin filaments and myosin II. Upon addition of ATP, the bundles contracted and the uniformly distributed myosin spontaneously reorganized into discrete clusters. We developed a mathematical model in which the motion of myosin II filaments is governed by the polarities of the actin filaments with which they interact. The model showed that the assembly of myosins into clusters is driven by their tendency to migrate to locations with zero net actin filament polarity. With no fitting parameters, the predicted distribution of myosin cluster separations was in close agreement with our experiments, including a -3/2 power law decay for intermediate length scales. Thus, without an organizing template or accessory proteins, a minimal bundle of actin and myosin has the inherent capacity to self-organize into a heterogeneous banded structure. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Semifinite Bundles and the Chevalley-Weil Formula

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    34

    ) of finite bundles on X and he proved that it is a neutral Tannakian category over k together with a neutral fiber functor ωx : E ↦→ x. ∗. E induced by a rational point x ∈ X(k) [2]. By Tannaka duality, there exists an affine group scheme πN.

  6. Local heat transfer coefficient for turbulent flow in rod bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez y Fernandez, E.; Carajilescov, P.

    1983-03-01

    The correlation of the local heat transfer coefficients in heated triangular array of rod bundles, in terms of the flow hydrodynamic parameters is presented. The analysis is made first for fluid with Prandtl numbers varying from moderated to high (Pr>0.2), and then extended to fluids with low Prandtl numbers (0.004 [pt

  7. Bohr--Sommerfeld Lagrangians of moduli spaces of Higgs bundles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biswas, Indranil; Gammelgaard, Niels Leth; Logares, Marina

    Let $X$ be a compact connected Riemann surface of genus at least two. Let $M_H(r,d)$ denote the moduli space of semistable Higgs bundles on $X$ of rank $r$ and degree $d$. We prove that the compact complex Bohr-Sommerfeld Lagrangians of $M_H(r,d)$ are precisely the irreducible components of the n...

  8. Chlorpyrifos, chlorpyrifos-oxon, and diisopropylfluorophosphate inhibit kinesin-dependent microtubule motility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gearhart, Debra A.; Sickles, Dale W.; Buccafusco, Jerry J.; Prendergast, Mark A.; Terry, Alvin V.

    2007-01-01

    Diisopropylfluorophosphate, originally developed as a chemical warfare agent, is structurally similar to nerve agents, and chlorpyrifos has extensive worldwide use as an agricultural pesticide. While inhibition of cholinesterases underlies the acute toxicity of these organophosphates, we previously reported impaired axonal transport in the sciatic nerves from rats treated chronically with subthreshold doses of chlorpyrifos. Those data indicate that chlorpyrifos (and/or its active metabolite, chlorpyrifos-oxon) might directly affect the function of kinesin and/or microtubules-the principal proteins that mediate anterograde axonal transport. The current report describes in vitro assays to assess the concentration-dependent effects of chlorpyrifos (0-10 μM), chlorpyrifos-oxon (0-10 μM), and diisopropylfluorophosphate (0-0.59 nM) on kinesin-dependent microtubule motility. Preincubating bovine brain microtubules with the organophosphates did not alter kinesin-mediated microtubule motility. In contrast, preincubation of bovine brain kinesin with diisopropylfluorophosphate, chlorpyrifos, or chlorpyrifos-oxon produced a concentration-dependent increase in the number of locomoting microtubules that detached from the kinesin-coated glass cover slip. Our data suggest that the organophosphates-chlorpyrifos-oxon, chlorpyrifos, and diisopropylfluorophosphate-directly affect kinesin, thereby disrupting kinesin-dependent transport on microtubules. Kinesin-dependent movement of vesicles, organelles, and other cellular components along microtubules is fundamental to the organization of all eukaryotic cells, especially in neurons where organelles and proteins synthesized in the cell body must move down long axons to pre-synaptic sites in nerve terminals. We postulate that disruption of kinesin-dependent intracellular transport could account for some of the long-term effects of organophosphates on the peripheral and central nervous system

  9. Localized buckling of a microtubule surrounded by randomly distributed cross linkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, M Z; Ru, C Q

    2013-07-01

    Microtubules supported by surrounding cross linkers in eukaryotic cells can bear a much higher compressive force than free-standing microtubules. Different from some previous studies, which treated the surroundings as a continuum elastic foundation or elastic medium, the present paper develops a micromechanics numerical model to examine the role of randomly distributed discrete cross linkers in the buckling of compressed microtubules. First, the proposed numerical approach is validated by reproducing the uniform multiwave buckling mode predicted by the existing elastic-foundation model. For more realistic buckling of microtubules surrounded by randomly distributed cross linkers, the present numerical model predicts that the buckling mode is localized at one end in agreement with some known experimental observations. In particular, the critical force for localized buckling, predicted by the present model, is insensitive to microtubule length and can be about 1 order of magnitude lower than those given by the elastic-foundation model, which suggests that the elastic-foundation model may have overestimated the critical force for buckling of microtubules in vivo. In addition, unlike the elastic-foundation model, the present model can capture the effect of end conditions on the critical force and wavelength of localized buckling. Based on the known data of spacing and elastic constants of cross linkers available in literature, the critical force and wavelength of the localized buckling mode, predicted by the present model, are compared to some experimental data with reasonable agreement. Finally, two empirical formulas are proposed for the critical force and wavelength of the localized buckling of microtubules surrounded by cross linkers.

  10. Taking directions: the role of microtubule-bound nucleation in the self-organization of the plant cortical array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deinum, Eva E; Tindemans, Simon H; Mulder, Bela M

    2011-01-01

    The highly aligned cortical microtubule array of interphase plant cells is a key regulator of anisotropic cell expansion. Recent computational and analytical work has shown that the non-equilibrium self-organization of this structure can be understood on the basis of experimentally observed collisional interactions between dynamic microtubules attached to the plasma membrane. Most of these approaches assumed that new microtubules are homogeneously and isotropically nucleated on the cortical surface. Experimental evidence, however, shows that nucleation mostly occurs from other microtubules and under specific relative angles. Here, we investigate the impact of directed microtubule-bound nucleations on the alignment process using computer simulations. The results show that microtubule-bound nucleations can increase the degree of alignment achieved, decrease the timescale of the ordering process and widen the regime of dynamic parameters for which the system can self-organize. We establish that the major determinant of this effect is the degree of co-alignment of the nucleations with the parent microtubule. The specific role of sideways branching nucleations appears to allow stronger alignment while maintaining a measure of overall spatial homogeneity. Finally, we investigate the suggestion that observed persistent rotation of microtubule domains can be explained through a handedness bias in microtubule-bound nucleations, showing that this is possible only for an extreme bias and over a limited range of parameters

  11. Lower complication rates for cranioplasty with peri-operative bundle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Catherine; Guppy, Kern H; Axelrod, Yekaterina V; Hawk, Mark W; Silverthorn, James; Inacio, Maria C; Akins, Paul T

    2014-05-01

    The overall benefits of craniectomy must include procedural risks from cranioplasty. Cranioplasty carries a high risk of surgical site infections (SSI) particularly with antibiotic resistant bacteria. The goal of this study was to measure the effect of a cranioplasty bundle on peri-operative complications. The authors queried a prospective, inpatient neurosurgery database at Kaiser Sacramento Medical Center for craniectomy and cranioplasty over a 7 year period. 57 patients who underwent cranioplasties were identified. A retrospective chart review was completed for complications, including surgical complications such as SSI, wound dehiscence, and re-do cranioplasty. We measured cranioplasty complication rates before and after implementation of a peri-operative bundle, which consisted of peri-operative vancomycin (4 doses), a barrier dressing through post-operative day (POD) 3, and de-colonization of the surgical incision using topical chlorhexidine from POD 4 to 7. The rate of MRSA colonization in cranioplasty patients is three times higher than the average seen on ICU admission screening (19% vs. 6%). The cranioplasty surgical complication rate was 22.8% and SSI rate was 10.5%. The concurrent SSI rate for craniectomy was 1.9%. Organisms isolated were methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (4), methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (1), Propionibacterium acnes (1), and Escherichia coli (1). Factors associated with SSI were peri-operative vancomycin (68.6% vs. 16.7%, p=0.0217). Complication rates without (n=21) and with (n=36) the bundle were: SSI (23.8% vs. 2.8%, p=0.0217) and redo cranioplasty (19% vs. 0%, p=0.0152). Bundle use did not affect rates for superficial wound dehiscence, seizures, or hydrocephalus. The cranioplasty bundle was associated with reduced SSI rates and the need for re-do cranioplasties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Early Results of Anatomic Double Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demet Pepele

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The goal in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR is to restore the normal anatomic structure and function of the knee. In the significant proportion of patients after the traditional single-bundle ACLR, complaints of instability still continue. Anatomic double bundle ACLR may provide normal kinematics in knees, much closer to the natural anatomy. The aim of this study is to clinically assess the early outcomes of our anatomical double bundle ACLR. Material and Method: In our clinic between June 2009 and March 2010, performed the anatomic double bundle ACLR with autogenous hamstring grafts 20 patients were evaluated prospectively with Cincinnati, IKDC and Lysholm scores and in clinically for muscle strength and with Cybex II dynamometer. Results: The mean follow-up is 17.8 months (13-21 months. Patients%u2019 scores of Cincinnati, IKDC and Lysholm were respectively, preoperative 18.1, 39.3 and 39.8, while the post-op increased to 27.2, 76.3 and 86.3. In their last check, 17 percent of the patients according to IKDC scores (85% A (excellent and B (good group and 3 patients took place as C (adequate group. The power measurements of quadriceps and hamstring muscle groups of patients who underwent surgery showed no significant difference compared with the intact knees. Discussion: Double-bundle ACL reconstruction is a satisfactory method. There is a need comparative, long-term studies in large numbers in order to determine improving clinical outcome, preventing degeneration and restoring the knee biomechanics better.

  13. Novel microtubule-targeting agents – the epothilones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R Budman

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Kit L Cheng, Thomas Bradley, Daniel R Budman1Monter Cancer Center, North Shore – LIJ Health Systems, Lake Success, New York, USAAbstract: Epothilones are a new class of antimicrotubule agents currently in clinical trials. Their chemical structures are distinct from taxanes and are more amenable to synthetic modification. Six epothilones have been studied in preclinical and clinical trials: patupilone (epothilone B, ixabepilone (BMS247550, BMS 310705, sagopilone (ZK-EPO, KOS-862 (epothilone D, and KOS-1584. In vitro data have shown increased potency in taxane-sensitive and taxane-resistant cancer cell lines. This enhanced cytotoxic effect has been attributed to epothilone being a poor substrate for p-glycoprotein drug resistance protein and having high affinity to the various β tubulin isoforms. Phase I clinical data have shown different dose-limiting toxicities for each of the epothilones. These effects are drug specific, dose specific, and schedule of administration specific. While diarrhea and myelosuppression are the dose-limiting toxicities for patupilone and BMS 310705, respectively, neurologic toxicity, as seen with taxanes, is the dose-limiting toxicity of ixabepilone, sagopilone, and KOS-862. In an effort to decrease neurologic toxicity, investigators have modified dosing schedules with limited success. Ixabepilone has the most mature clinical results with published phase II and III data, and regulatory approval for clinical use in the treatment of breast cancer. Ixabepilone has also been combined with other anticancer agents and has regulatory approval in combination with capecitabine for heavily treated breast cancer.Keywords: microtubule-targeting agents, epothilones, taxanes, ixabepilone

  14. Multiscale modeling of the nanomechanics of microtubule protofilaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theisen, Kelly E; Zhmurov, Artem; Newberry, Maycee E; Barsegov, Valeri; Dima, Ruxandra I

    2012-07-26

    Large-size biomolecular systems that spontaneously assemble, disassemble, and self-repair by controlled inputs play fundamental roles in biology. Microtubules (MTs), which play important roles in cell adhesion and cell division, are a prime example. MTs serve as ″tracks″ for molecular motors, and their biomechanical functions depend on dynamic instability-a stochastic switching between periods of rapid growing and shrinking. This process is controlled by many cellular factors so that growth and shrinkage periods are correlated with the life cycle of a cell. Resolving the molecular basis for the action of these factors is of paramount importance for understanding the diverse functions of MTs. We employed a multiscale modeling approach to study the force-induced MT depolymerization by analyzing the mechanical response of a MT protofilament to external forces. We carried out self-organized polymer (SOP) model based simulations accelerated on Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). This approach enabled us to follow the mechanical behavior of the molecule on experimental time scales using experimental force loads. We resolved the structural details and determined the physical parameters that characterize the stretching and bending modes of motion of a MT protofilament. The central result is that the severing action of proteins, such as katanin and kinesin, can be understood in terms of their mechanical coupling to a protofilament. For example, the extraction of tubulin dimers from MT caps by katanin can be achieved by pushing the protofilament toward the axis of the MT cylinder, while the removal of large protofilaments curved into ″ram's horn″ structures by kinesin is the result of the outward bending of the protofilament. We showed that, at the molecular level, these types of deformations are due to the anisotropic, but homogeneous, micromechanical properties of MT protofilaments.

  15. Microtubule-stabilizing agents as potential therapeutics for neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunden, Kurt R; Trojanowski, John Q; Smith, Amos B; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Ballatore, Carlo

    2014-09-15

    Microtubules (MTs), cytoskeletal elements found in all mammalian cells, play a significant role in cell structure and in cell division. They are especially critical in the proper functioning of post-mitotic central nervous system neurons, where MTs serve as the structures on which key cellular constituents are trafficked in axonal projections. MTs are stabilized in axons by the MT-associated protein tau, and in several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal lobar degeneration, and Parkinson's disease, tau function appears to be compromised due to the protein dissociating from MTs and depositing into insoluble inclusions referred to as neurofibrillary tangles. This loss of tau function is believed to result in alterations of MT structure and function, resulting in aberrant axonal transport that likely contributes to the neurodegenerative process. There is also evidence of axonal transport deficiencies in other neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Huntington's disease, which may result, at least in part, from MT alterations. Accordingly, a possible therapeutic strategy for such neurodegenerative conditions is to treat with MT-stabilizing agents, such as those that have been used in the treatment of cancer. Here, we review evidence of axonal transport and MT deficiencies in a number of neurodegenerative diseases, and summarize the various classes of known MT-stabilizing agents. Finally, we highlight the growing evidence that small molecule MT-stabilizing agents provide benefit in animal models of neurodegenerative disease and discuss the desired features of such molecules for the treatment of these central nervous system disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Standardization of Type 2 Diabetes Outpatient Expenditure with Bundled Payment Method in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Chao Xu

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: We argued that it is feasible to implement bundled payment on type 2 diabetes outpatient services. Bundled payment is effective to control the increase of outpatient expenditure. Further improvements are needed for the implementation of bundled payment reimbursement standards, together with relevant policies and measures.

  17. Solutions of the Strominger System via Stable Bundles on Calabi-Yau Threefolds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreas, Björn; Garcia Fernandez, Mario

    2012-01-01

    We prove that a given Calabi-Yau threefold with a stable holomorphic vector bundle can be perturbed to a solution of the Strominger system provided that the second Chern class of the vector bundle is equal to the second Chern class of the tangent bundle. If the Calabi-Yau threefold has strict SU(...

  18. The determinant bundle on the moduli space of stable triples over a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Abstract. We construct a holomorphic Hermitian line bundle over the moduli space of stable triples of the form (E1,E2,φ), where E1 and E2 are holomorphic vector bundles over a fixed compact Riemann surface X, and φ : E2 −→ E1 is a holomorphic vector bundle homomorphism. The curvature of the Chern connection of ...

  19. Lexical Bundles in Chinese Undergraduate Academic Writing at an English Medium University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Zhoulin

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of lexical bundles in Chinese students' academic writing across different levels of studies at an English medium university. Frequency-based bundles were retrieved from a corpus of student academic texts written at four points of time between Year 1 and Year 4, and the structures and functions of the bundles were…

  20. KIF5C S176 Phosphorylation Regulates Microtubule Binding and Transport Efficiency in Mammalian Neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur ePadzik

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Increased phosphorylation of the KIF5 anterograde motor is associated with impaired axonal transport and neurodegeneration, but paradoxically also with normal transport, though the details are not fully defined. JNK phosphorylates KIF5C on S176 in the motor domain; a site that we show is phosphorylated in brain. Microtubule pelleting assays demonstrate that phosphomimetic KIF5C(1-560S176D associates weakly with microtubules compared to KIF5C(1-560WT. Consistent with this, 50% of KIF5C(1-560S176D shows diffuse movement in neurons. However the remaining 50% remains microtubule bound and displays decreased pausing and increased bidirectional movement. The same directionality switching is observed with KIF5C(1-560WT in the presence of an active JNK chimera, MKK7-JNK. Yet, in cargo trafficking assays where peroxisome cargo is bound, KIF5C(1-560S176D-GFP-FRB transports normally to microtubule plus ends. We also find that JNK increases the ATP hydrolysis of KIF5C in vitro. These data suggest that phosphorylation of KIF5C-S176 primes the motor to either disengage entirely from microtubule tracks as previously observed in response to stress, or to display improved efficiency. The final outcome may depend on cargo load and motor ensembles.