WorldWideScience

Sample records for facilitated sexual assault

  1. Drug facilitated sexual assault with lethal outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehling, Lena-Maria; Johansen, Sys Stybe; Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    A very serious case of DFSA (drug facilitated sexual assault) is presented, in which a six-year-old girl died following sedation with γ-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB). She had been sexually abused by a relative. Samples of cardiac blood, bile, vitreous humour, liver, kidney, brain tissues and hair were...... segments of hair - up to 12 cm distant from the hair scalp - GHB concentrations were higher than the overall found endogenous range of 2-3 ng/mg. Police investigations revealed that the uncle had also administered GHB to the older half-sister. Therefore, a sample of her hair was analysed accordingly......, but unremarkable results were obtained. Comparing our toxicological results with police investigations and the offender's statements it can be assumed that the 6-year-old girl had ingested GHB. By exclusion of other causes of death a lethal intoxication with GHB could be confirmed....

  2. The Use of GHB to Facilitate Sexual Assault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinetti, L; Montgomery, M A

    2010-01-01

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) and its metabolic precursors, γ-butyrolactone (GBL) and 1,4-butanediol (1,4-BD), may be among the most favored drugs used to commit drug-facilitated sexual assault (DFSA). In fact, federal legislation was enacted in the form of the Hillory J. Farias and Samantha Reid Date-Rape Drug Prohibition Act of 2000 to control and penalize use and distribution of GHB, GBL, and 1,4-BD. Unfortunately, solid proof of their use in many cases is difficult to obtain because GHB, GBL, and 1,4-BD have strong sedative and memory-impairing effects and are rapidly eliminated after ingestion. To further complicate the matter, GHB is a metabolite of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a naturally occurring neurotransmitter in humans. This review focuses on the chemistry and pharmacology of these drugs and their use in DFSA. An overview of analytical techniques used to identify their presence is provided, as well as guidance on the toxicological interpretation of findings of GHB in biological specimens.

  3. Sexual Assault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexual assault is any sexual activity to which you haven't freely given your consent. This includes completed or attempted sex acts that are against ... is unable to consent. It also includes abusive sexual contact. It can happen to men, women or ...

  4. Sexual assault

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, M-L; Hilden, M; Lidegaard, Ø

    2015-01-01

    .4-2.2) or anogenital lesion (OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.1-2.0). Women aged 45 years or older were more likely to sustain a physical injury (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.2-3.2) or an anogenital lesion (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.4-3.2). CONCLUSIONS: Our results challenge the typical stereotype of a violent rape attack by a stranger, which......OBJECTIVE: To describe the victims of sexual assault and the circumstances in which the assaults occur. DESIGN: Descriptive case study. SETTING: Centre for Victims of Sexual Assault (CVSA), Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. POPULATION OR SAMPLE: A total of 2541 women attending CVSA from 2001...... to 2010. METHODS: All women attending CVSA underwent a standardised data collection procedure. Descriptive bivariate analysis and logistic regression analysis were performed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Associations between different assault characteristics and (1) the age of the victim and (2...

  5. [Sexual assaults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosset, Didier; Hédouin, Valéry

    2002-04-01

    Examining a victim of sexual assault is a medico-legal emergency. It has to be performed within 72 h, in appropriate conditions. A recent laceration of the hymen does not necessarily indicate a rape, and conversely absence of trauma to a rape victim does not negate the validity of her claim to rape. A normal clinical examination does not exclude the possibility of a sexual abuse. Unlawful sexual intercourse is defined by a sexual penetration without valid consent. Specimen collection, to be considered as an evidence, must be sealed. Toxicological samples have to be performed to search a rape under influence.

  6. [A prospective study of drug-facilitated sexual assault in Barcelona].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xifró-Collsamata, Alexandre; Pujol-Robinat, Amadeo; Barbería-Marcalain, Eneko; Arroyo-Fernández, Amparo; Bertomeu-Ruiz, Antonia; Montero-Núñez, Francisco; Medallo-Muñiz, Jordi

    2015-05-08

    To determine the frequency and characteristics of suspected drug-facilitated sexual assault (DFSA) among the victims of sexual assault in Barcelona. Prospective study of every adult consulting an emergency service because of alleged sexual assault and receiving forensic assessment in the city of Barcelona in 2011. A total of 35 of 114 cases (30.7%) met suspected DFSA criteria. Compared with the other victims, suspected DFSA cases were more likely to experience amnesia, to have been assaulted by night, after a social situation and by a recently acquainted man, to have used alcohol before the assault and to be foreigners. In this group ethanol was detected in blood or urine in 48.4% of analyzed cases; their mean back calculated blood alcohol concentration was 2.29g/l (SD 0.685). Also, at least one central nervous system drug other than ethanol was detected in 60,6%, mainly stimulant drugs of abuse. Suspected DFSA is frequent among victims of alleged sexual assault in Barcelona nowadays. The depressor substance most commonly encountered is alcohol, which contributes to victims' vulnerability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Drug-facilitated sexual assault in Ontario, Canada: toxicological and DNA findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Mont, Janice; Macdonald, Sheila; Rotbard, Nomi; Bainbridge, Deidre; Asllani, Eriola; Smith, Norman; Cohen, Marsha M

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine which persons reporting sexual assault to a hospital-based treatment centre may have been covertly drugged and to provide information about whether a sexual assault may have occurred. Each consecutive adolescent and adult presenting at a sexual assault treatment centre was screened for drug-facilitated sexual assault (DFSA). Urine was collected and tested for central nervous system active drugs. Oral, vaginal, and/or rectal swabs were tested for male DNA. Unexpected drugs were defined as those not reported as having been voluntarily consumed within the previous 72 h. Positive swabs for unexpected DNA were determined by whether the person reported having had consensual intercourse in the previous week. A total of 184 of 882 eligible participants met suspected DFSA criteria. Mean age was 25.8 years (SD=8.5), 96.2% were female and 64.7% White. Urine samples were positive for drugs in 44.9% of cases, alcohol in 12.9%, and both drugs and alcohol in 18.0%. The drugs found on toxicological screening were unexpected in 87 of the 135 (64.4%) cases with a positive drug finding and included cannabinoids (40.2%), cocaine (32.2%), amphetamines (13.8%), MDMA (9.2%), ketamine (2.3%), and GHB (1.1%). Male DNA was unexpected in 30 (46.9%) of 64 cases where it was found. Among those persons presenting to a sexual assault treatment centre with a suspicion of DFSA, the presence of unexpected drugs and male DNA was common, lending support for their contention that they had been intentionally drugged and sexually assaulted. Most unexpected drugs found were not those typically described as 'date rape drugs'.

  8. Drug Facilitated Sexual Assault and That the Problems in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabi Kantarcı

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The assailants of sexuel assault to serve this purpose to the victims of many different drug can use. These drugs can be applied together with alcohol, soft drinks, water and other drinks can be given together. Most of these drugs tasteless and odorless. In a few minutes after ingestion chemical effect of drugs can start. Victims the conscious reduction and limitation of the physical move occur. Drug drinking from the pass the time until impact memory loss can occur. For this purpose the main benzodiazepines (Diazepam, flunitrazepam, lorazepam, etc., hypnotics (Zopiclone, zolpidem, anesthetics (Gama-hydroxybutyrate, ketamine, amphetamines (Metylendioxymetamphetamine=ecstasy, opiats (Cocaine, cannabis=marihuana and alcohols such as ethanol substances used. However in study frequently encountered in the literature; cocaine, cannabis, metylendioxymetamphetamine, zolpidem, ketamine hydrochloride, zopiclone, gamma hydroxybutirate, diazepam, flunitrazepam and the effects of these substances after oral ingestion were evaluated and the approach to victims.

  9. A review of drug-facilitated sexual assault evidence: an Irish perspective.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McBrierty, Dermot

    2013-05-01

    Drug-facilitated sexual assault (DFSA) is prevalent in Western society. There is a significant degree of confusion regarding the definition and prevalence of DFSA. It is a subject with medical, scientific and legal aspects. These facets are explored in this review through a detailed examination of published data. The legal issues are defined in the context of the Irish judicial system. Several key case-law studies are presented to aid in understanding unresolved difficulties that persist in this complex field of forensics. The aim of this paper is to aid individuals from disparate disciplines to increase their evidence base in the complex and evolving issue of DFSA.

  10. Drug facilitated sexual assault with lethal outcome: GHB intoxication in a six-year-old girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehling, Lena-Maria; Johansen, Sys Stybe; Wang, Xin; Doberentz, Elke; Madea, Burkhard; Hess, Cornelius

    2016-02-01

    A very serious case of DFSA (drug facilitated sexual assault) is presented, in which a six-year-old girl died following sedation with γ-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB). She had been sexually abused by a relative. Samples of cardiac blood, bile, vitreous humour, liver, kidney, brain tissues and hair were analysed by a LC-MS/MS method. The following GHB concentrations were determined: cardiac blood: 150 mg/l; bile: 292mg/l; vitreous humour: 58mg/l; liver: 100 mg/kg; kidney: 124.5 mg/kg, brain: 110 mg/kg. Very high GHB levels were found in the proximal part of the hair sample (about 40.9 ng/mg). In distal segments of hair - up to 12 cm distant from the hair scalp - GHB concentrations were higher than the overall found endogenous range of 2-3 ng/mg. Police investigations revealed that the uncle had also administered GHB to the older half-sister. Therefore, a sample of her hair was analysed accordingly, but unremarkable results were obtained. Comparing our toxicological results with police investigations and the offender's statements it can be assumed that the 6-year-old girl had ingested GHB. By exclusion of other causes of death a lethal intoxication with GHB could be confirmed.

  11. The sexual assault examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargot, L A

    1985-04-01

    The sexual assault examination poses many problems for physicians. They must deal not only with the patient's physical and emotional trauma, but also collect forensic evidence, and provide proper treatment and follow-up. Patient management has been simplified and improved in Ontario by a standardized sexual assault examination kit. It has been used at McMaster University's Regional Sexual Assault Centre since its establishment in 1979. The first step in managing victims is ensuring their wellbeing, and treating them sympathetically. The kit provides information on consent, taking the sexual assault history, recording the patient's emotional status, and treatment guidelines. It also contains equipment and instructions on collecting clothing and body evidence, and on the genital and anal examination. The collection of good forensic evidence can decrease the need for doctors and nurses to testify in court.

  12. SEXUAL ASSAULT ON WOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dara Durga

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Our India is a vast nation with rich cultural heritage and social diversity. We have been respecting women in the highest form as Goddesses since ages. There have been several laws to protect women from many centuries in this ancient country. Yet our country is still facing difficulties in achieving women safety. And the situation is no different in the rest of the world. The prevailing situation, laws and suggestions to prevent atrocities were discussed. AIM: The current situations of women hardships around the world were mentioned. The current legal situation and recent legal changes were described. The mammoth task ahead of us to achieve the desired social objective of women safety and respect were discussed. MATERIAL & METHODS: various news articles, police journals, legal textbooks and forensic medicine text books. CONCLUSION: Many things were done to prevent sexual assaults on women, yet the true goal is still a mirage. It’s time to look into the issue from its true grass root levels, i.e., from the psycho-social view apart from legal measures, to achieve the much desired objective of prevention of sexual assaults on women.

  13. GHB Abuse Trends and Use in Drug-Facilitated Sexual Assault: Implications for Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Laura

    2003-01-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) has become increasingly popular on the campuses of American colleges and universities. In this paper, the characteristics of GHB and the effects of both voluntary and involuntary abuse are described. Further, implications for prevention efforts related to involuntary GHB ingestion and GHB-facilitated rape are…

  14. Drug Facilitated Sexual Assault: Detection and Stability of Benzodiazepines in Spiked Drinks Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Lata; Sharratt, Sarah D.; Cole, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Benzodiazepines are detected in a significant number of drug facilitated sexual assaults (DFSA). Whilst blood and urine from the victim are routinely analysed, due to the delay in reporting DFSA cases and the short half lives of most of these drugs in blood and urine, drug detection in such samples is problematic. Consideration of the drinks involved and analysis for drugs may start to address this. Here we have reconstructed the ‘spiking’ of three benzodiazepines (diazepam, flunitrazepam and temazepam) into five drinks, an alcopop (flavoured alcoholic drink), a beer, a white wine, a spirit, and a fruit based non-alcoholic drink (J2O) chosen as representative of those drinks commonly used by women in 16–24 year old age group. Using a validated GC-MS method for the simultaneous detection of these drugs in the drinks we have studied the storage stability of the benzodiazepines under two different storage conditions, uncontrolled room temperature and refrigerator (4°C) over a 25 day period. All drugs could be detected in all beverages over this time period. Diazepam was found to be stable in all of the beverages, except the J2O, under both storage conditions. Flunitrazepam and temazepam were found not to be stable but were detectable (97% loss of temazepam and 39% loss of flunitrazepam from J2O). The recommendations from this study are that there should be a policy change and that drinks thought to be involved in DFSA cases should be collected and analysed wherever possible to support other evidence types. PMID:24586489

  15. Drug facilitated sexual assault: detection and stability of benzodiazepines in spiked drinks using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lata Gautam

    Full Text Available Benzodiazepines are detected in a significant number of drug facilitated sexual assaults (DFSA. Whilst blood and urine from the victim are routinely analysed, due to the delay in reporting DFSA cases and the short half lives of most of these drugs in blood and urine, drug detection in such samples is problematic. Consideration of the drinks involved and analysis for drugs may start to address this. Here we have reconstructed the 'spiking' of three benzodiazepines (diazepam, flunitrazepam and temazepam into five drinks, an alcopop (flavoured alcoholic drink, a beer, a white wine, a spirit, and a fruit based non-alcoholic drink (J2O chosen as representative of those drinks commonly used by women in 16-24 year old age group. Using a validated GC-MS method for the simultaneous detection of these drugs in the drinks we have studied the storage stability of the benzodiazepines under two different storage conditions, uncontrolled room temperature and refrigerator (4°C over a 25 day period. All drugs could be detected in all beverages over this time period. Diazepam was found to be stable in all of the beverages, except the J2O, under both storage conditions. Flunitrazepam and temazepam were found not to be stable but were detectable (97% loss of temazepam and 39% loss of flunitrazepam from J2O. The recommendations from this study are that there should be a policy change and that drinks thought to be involved in DFSA cases should be collected and analysed wherever possible to support other evidence types.

  16. Drug facilitated sexual assault: detection and stability of benzodiazepines in spiked drinks using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Lata; Sharratt, Sarah D; Cole, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Benzodiazepines are detected in a significant number of drug facilitated sexual assaults (DFSA). Whilst blood and urine from the victim are routinely analysed, due to the delay in reporting DFSA cases and the short half lives of most of these drugs in blood and urine, drug detection in such samples is problematic. Consideration of the drinks involved and analysis for drugs may start to address this. Here we have reconstructed the 'spiking' of three benzodiazepines (diazepam, flunitrazepam and temazepam) into five drinks, an alcopop (flavoured alcoholic drink), a beer, a white wine, a spirit, and a fruit based non-alcoholic drink (J2O) chosen as representative of those drinks commonly used by women in 16-24 year old age group. Using a validated GC-MS method for the simultaneous detection of these drugs in the drinks we have studied the storage stability of the benzodiazepines under two different storage conditions, uncontrolled room temperature and refrigerator (4°C) over a 25 day period. All drugs could be detected in all beverages over this time period. Diazepam was found to be stable in all of the beverages, except the J2O, under both storage conditions. Flunitrazepam and temazepam were found not to be stable but were detectable (97% loss of temazepam and 39% loss of flunitrazepam from J2O). The recommendations from this study are that there should be a policy change and that drinks thought to be involved in DFSA cases should be collected and analysed wherever possible to support other evidence types.

  17. Sexual assault against female Nigerian students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullima, Abubakar Ali; Kawuwa, Mohammed Bello; Audu, Bala Mohammed; Mairiga, Abdulkarim G; Bukar, Mohammed

    2010-09-01

    Sexual assault is a common social disorder among students in our tertiary institutions. This study ascertains the extent and effect of sexual assault among Nigerian students. Two hundred and Sixty Eight structured questionnaires were distributed to randomly selected students in 4 tertiary institutions, information on socio demography, sexual history and consequences of their exposure were obtained for analysis and interpretation. Thirty seven (13.8%) of the respondents were sexually assaulted as a student and 19 (7.1%) were assaulted by their lecturers and fellow students, Younger age at coitarche, history of forced coitarche, marriage, coitarche with relations and unknown persons, significantly influenced subsequent risks of sexual assault. Improve security, moral behaviours enforcing dress code and stiffer penalties were suggested ways to prevent sexual assault among the students. Sexual assault is still a common finding in our institutions; effort should be made by all stake holders to prevent this social embarrassment.

  18. 25 CFR 11.407 - Sexual assault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sexual assault. 11.407 Section 11.407 Indians BUREAU OF... Criminal Offenses § 11.407 Sexual assault. (a) A person who has sexual contact with another person not his or her spouse, or causes such other person to have sexual contact with him or her, is guilty of...

  19. Rape (sexual assault) - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... HIV. The process is called post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP). Treat the person who was raped for other ... 67. Workowski KA, Bolan GA; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Sexually transmitted diseases treatment guidelines, 2015. ...

  20. Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Program Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    are sexually assaulted. Ensure care is consistent with established community standards for healthcare for victims of sexual assault and the collection...MHS with clinical privileges in adult health, family health, midwifery , women’s health, and/or privileged to perform pelvic examinations...clinical standards set in the community shall include The United States Department of Justice National Protocol for Sexual Assault Medical Forensic

  1. Needs of Sexual Assault Advocates in Campus-Based Sexual Assault Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmody, Dianne; Ekhomu, Jessica; Payne, Brian K.

    2009-01-01

    Most campuses have sexual assault crisis centers that are designed to assist victims and educate the college community about this crime. While much is known about sexual assault victimization patterns on college campuses, there is still a lack of understanding about the needs of those working to prevent sexual assault. In the current study, campus…

  2. Sexism, Sexual Harassment and Sexual Assault: Toward Conceptual Clarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    SEXISM , SEXUAL HARASSMENT AND SEXUAL ASSAULT: TOWARD CONCEPTUAL CLARITY Dr. Richard Harris Department of Social Work and Center for Policy...00-2007 to 00-00-2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sexism , Sexual Harassment and Sexual Assault: Toward Conceptual Clarity 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...Sexual Harassment .........................................................................................2 Sexism

  3. Service Academy 2005 Sexual Harassment and Assault Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-30

    by Experience of Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment Women Men Effectiveness of Experience of Experience of Experience ofSeul saut peinc f Sexual...Experience of Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment Women Men Effectiveness of Experience of Experience ofSeul saut in f Sexual Experience of Exerieneao...Women Men Effectiveness of Experience of xperience of Experience ofSeul saut Epeinc f Sexual Experience of xerieneao Sexual Assault Sexual Assault

  4. Neuropsychological performance of sexual assaulters and pedophiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, M L; Cole, J K; McKay, S E; Golden, C J; Liggett, K R

    1984-10-01

    Persons who had been arrested for sexual assault were administered the Luria-Nebraska Neuropsychological Battery and the results compared to a group of normal controls. The sexual assaulters performed significantly worse on 7 of the 14 scales of the battery. The data were then broken down into three groups: (1) those who had forcibly assaulted postpubescent victims, (2) those subjects who had sexually molested a prepubescent child, and (3) normal controls. A discriminant analysis correctly classified 68% of the subjects on the basis of their neuropsychological performance alone.

  5. The Survivor Master Narrative in Sexual Assault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muldoon, Shane D; Taylor, S Caroline; Norma, Caroline

    2016-04-01

    This article is based on data drawn from 90 Victoria Police operational files covering the period 2004-2008. Several thematic responses by sexual assault survivors are described as forming a master narrative of "identity shock." It is argued that the "minor/serious" sexual assault legal distinction is meaningless to survivors and conceals a shared felt experience. It is also argued that sexual assault is fundamentally a "public issue" of betrayal of citizen trust--not just a collection of "private troubles"--and that effective resolutions require more than individualized therapeutic and criminal justice measures.

  6. Responding to Indigenous Australian Sexual Assault

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janya McCalman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Indigenous Australians experience a high prevalence of sexual assault, yet a regional sexual assault service found few Indigenous Australians accessed their services. This prompted exploration of how its services might be improved. A resultant systematic search of the literature is reported in this article. Seven electronic databases and seven websites were systematically searched for peer reviewed and gray literature documenting responses to the sexual assault of Indigenous Australians. These publications were then classified by response type and study type. Twenty-three publications met the inclusion criteria. They included studies of legal justice, media, and community-based and mainstream service responses for Indigenous survivors and perpetrators. We located program descriptions, measurement, and descriptive research, but no intervention studies. There is currently insufficient evidence to confidently prescribe what works to effectively respond to Indigenous Australian sexual assault. The study revealed an urgent need for researchers, Indigenous communities, and services to work together to develop the evidence base.

  7. The role of the sexual assault centre.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Eogan, Maeve

    2013-02-01

    Sexual Assault Centres provide multidisciplinary care for men and women who have experienced sexual crime. These centres enable provision of medical, forensic, psychological support and follow-up care, even if patients chose not to report the incident to the police service. Sexual Support Centres need to provide a ring-fenced, forensically clean environment. They need to be appropriately staffed and available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to allow prompt provision of medical and supportive care and collection of forensic evidence. Sexual Assault Centres work best within the context of a core agreed model of care, which includes defined multi-agency guidelines and care pathways, close links with forensic science and police services, and designated and sustainable funding arrangements. Additionally, Sexual Assault Centres also participate in patient, staff and community education and risk reduction. Furthermore, they contribute to the development, evaluation and implementation of national strategies on domestic, sexual and gender-based violence.

  8. Agresión sexual Sexual assault

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lapeña

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Los delitos contra la agresión sexual constituyen uno de los temas de mayor interés en el momento actual y en diferentes campos sociales (judicial, médico, policial, criminológico.... La importancia radica en la frecuencia de los mismos y las repercusiones legales, físicas y psicológicas que conllevan. Debido a ello es importante tener clara la pauta de actuación en urgencias frente a tales delitos, siendo minucioso en la realización del informe ginecológico y en la toma de muestras, ofertando profilaxis de enfermedades de transmisión sexual y embarazos no deseados y prestando apoyo psicológico.Offences involving sexual assault are an issue of the greatest current interest in different social fields (legal, medical, police, criminological.... They are significant due to their frequency and to the legal, physical and psychological repercussions involved. It is therefore important to clearly understand the pattern of action in Accidents and Emergencies facing such cases. Great detail is required in the gynaecological report and the taking of samples, prophylaxes for sexually transmitted diseases and unwanted pregnancies must be given and psychological support provided.

  9. Prevention of victimization following sexual assaults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bodil Maria; Sidenius, Katrine

    2004-01-01

    Centre for Victims of Sexual Assault in Copenhagen is a centre for interdisciplinary research and practice. Goals of the centre are to contribute to the documentation of victimization and to prevent further victimization. Research at the centre aims at the examination of the diversity of conditions...... of women exposed to sexualized coercion and the diversity of perspectives on the events....

  10. 77 FR 4239 - Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-27

    ... of the Secretary 32 CFR Part 103 Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) Program AGENCY...) policy and assigns responsibilities for the SAPR Program on prevention, response, and oversight to sexual assault. It is DoD policy to establish a culture free of sexual assault by providing an environment of...

  11. Correlates of Disclosure Cessation After Sexual Assault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, Emily R; Allen, Nicole

    2016-11-10

    Contacts with responders after sexual assault may influence further disclosure, but this possibility has not been explored empirically. Thus, this study investigates associations between survivors' contacts with responders and their decisions to discontinue disclosure. Fifty-four college students with a history of unwanted sexual experiences described 94 ordered contacts with responders. Results indicate that survivors' perceptions of responsiveness were not associated with continued disclosure, but survivors were more likely to continue disclosing when they perceived more rape myth acceptance from responders and when the assault was more recent. These findings highlight survivors' tenacity in meeting their needs, even after problematic responses.

  12. A&E management of sexual assault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, M

    The care of women who have been raped or sexually assaulted tends to be poorly managed in accident and emergency departments. In 1991, a special suite was established at Hillingdon Hospital for the care of such women. This article discusses the process of setting up the unit and looks at what has been achieved so far.

  13. Family Violence & Sexual Assault Bulletin, 1997.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Family Violence & Sexual Assault Bulletin, 1997

    1997-01-01

    These two issues contain reviews of legal/legislative issues, research and treatment issues, book and video materials, and on-line resources and websites relating to family violence and sexual assault. The first issue, contains "Empowering African American Children To Become Resilient: Early Success in Overcoming Violent Families and Communities…

  14. Sexual Assault of Older Women by Strangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, Susan J.; Hunt, Laura; Shaw, Steve

    2011-01-01

    This study examines victim, offender, and offence characteristics associated with sexual assaults by strangers of older women compared to those against younger women. Cases are obtained from the Serious Crime Analysis Section of the United Kingdom National Policing Improvement Agency (NPIA; formerly Centrex). All possible cases of rape, attempted…

  15. "Fresh" Thoughts on Studying Sexual Assault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Jeanette

    2011-01-01

    When the author started graduate school in the late 1970s, she was drawn to studying sexual assault. She had been a declared feminist since high school as the Women's Movement even reached the coal region of eastern Pennsylvania! Attending college in New York City, with its myriad opportunities for more exposure to what feminists were up to, made…

  16. Prior Substance Abuse and Related Treatment History Reported by Recent Victims of Sexual Assault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Heidi S.; Walsh, Kate; Schumacher, Julie A.; Kilpatrick, Dean G.; Acierno, Ron

    2013-01-01

    To inform intervention approaches, the current study examined prevalence and comorbidity of recent use and history of abuse of alcohol, marijuana, and other illicit drugs as well as history of substance treatment among a sample of female victims of sexual assault seeking post-assault medical care. Demographic variables and prior history of assault were also examined to further identify factors relevant to treatment or prevention approaches. Participants were 255 women and adolescent girls seeking post sexual assault medical services who completed an initial follow-up assessment on average within 3 months post-assault. The majority (72.9%) reported recent substance use prior to assault, approximately 40% reported prior substance abuse history, and 12.2% reported prior substance treatment history. Prior history of assault was associated with recent drug use and history of drug abuse as well as substance treatment. Among those with prior histories of substance abuse and assault, assault preceded substance abuse onset in the majority of cases. Almost all those with prior treatment history reported recent drug or alcohol use. A portion of sexual assault survivors seen for acute medical services may benefit from facilitated referral for substance abuse treatment in addition to counseling at the time of screening. Assessment and intervention approaches should target alcohol, marijuana, and other illicit drug use and abuse. Substance use and associated impairment may serve as a rape tactic by perpetrators of assault. Substance use at the time of assault does not imply blame on the part of assault victims. Previous findings indicate that rape poses high risk of PTSD particularly among women with prior history of assault. Screening and intervention related to substance abuse should be done with recognition of the increased vulnerability it may pose with regard to assault and the high risk of PTSD within this population. PMID:23396174

  17. Mediators of Sexual Revictimization Risk in Adult Sexual Assault Victims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullman, Sarah E.; Vasquez, Amanda L.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined sexual risk behaviors and sexual refusal assertiveness in relationship to child sexual abuse (CSA), emotion dysregulation, and adult sexual revictimization. Path analyses of 1,094 survivors who had sex in the past year were done to examine sexual risk behavior, and sexual refusal assertiveness mediational pathways by which CSA severity and emotion dysregulation may affect revictimization over one year in adult female sexual assault survivors. Exchanging sex for money and sexual refusal assertiveness were significantly associated with emotion dysregulation, whereas exchanging sex for money, and not sexual refusal assertiveness, was only significantly related to CSA severity. Both exchanging sex for money and sex refusal assertiveness mediated the relationship between emotion dysregulation and adult sexual revictimization. Exchanging sex for money mediated the CSA severity-revictimization relationship. These findings demonstrate the importance of considering both risky and protective sexual behaviors in research and prevention programming that address sexual revictimization in women. PMID:25942287

  18. The Role of Sexual Assault and Sexual Dysfunction in Alcohol and Other Drug Use Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjuan, Pilar M.; Langenbucher, James W.; Labouvie, Erich [UNIFESP

    2006-01-01

    Many women with sexual assault histories receive care in alcohol and other drug treatment programs. Affected women frequently suffer from sexual dysfunction, leading investigators to suggest self-medication may be one path to alcohol and other drug use disorders and relapse. This preliminary study examined sexual dysfunction and sexual assault in 71 women receiving treatment for addiction. Women with prior sexual assault scored higher than non-assaulted women on sexual dysfunction overall, a ...

  19. Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Website Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    disabilities . Last, does the website portray credibility such that users can trust the information or services offered? UX encompasses all of the...websites should provide access for disabled or special needs user (note: not included in the study)  Valuable—The website should provide a FAQ with...and post-sexual assault trauma. N17’s SAPR website also does not clearly convey survivor empathy or delineates repercussions for perpetrators

  20. Sexual Assault Simulation Course for Healthcare Providers: Enhancing Sexual Assault Education Using Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scannell, Meredith; Lewis-O'Connor, Annie; Barash, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Patients who have been sexually assaulted disproportionately experience gaps in healthcare delivery. Ensuring that healthcare providers who care for this population are adequately prepared is one way of addressing this gap. At the Brigham and Women's Hospital, a 4-hour long interprofessional Sexual Assault Simulation Course for Healthcare Providers (SASH) was developed and conducted at the hospital's Simulation, Training, Research, & Technology Utilization System Center. The SASH is offered using a variety of teaching methodologies including didactics, skill stations comprising how to collect forensic evidence, simulation experience with standardized patient, and debriefing. Using simulation as an educational method allows healthcare professionals to gain hands-on skills in a safe environment. Ultimately, the goal of the SASH is to enhance collaborative practice between healthcare professionals and to improve knowledge, with the purpose of improving care for patients who have been sexually assaulted.

  1. Male victims of sexual assault; 10 years' experience from a Danish Assault Center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mie-Louise; Hilden, Malene

    2016-01-01

    . Of the 62% of male victims who gave information on sexual orientation, 36% reported themselves as heterosexuals. A total of 45.5% had an alcohol intake of more than 5 units in the hours before the assault. Forty two percent reported the assault to the police. The male victims differed from female victims......This study aims to provide descriptive data regarding male victims of sexual assault seen at the Centre for Victims of Sexual Assault in Copenhagen, Denmark. All 55 male victims attending the center in the time period of March 2001 until December 2010 underwent a standardized data collection. Data...... included information on the victim and the sexual assault. Male victims accounted for less than 2% of the total number of visits to the center in this time period. Fifty three percent were between 15 and 24 years. In all cases the perpetrator was male, and 25% were assaulted by more than one perpetrator...

  2. Leading Change: Sexual Harassment/Assault Response and Prevention (SHARP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Officer Skill identifier (SI) 1B (Sexual Harassment/Assault Response & Prevention (SHARP)), Warrant Officer Additional Skill Identifier ( ASI ) ) 1B...Sexual Harassment/Assault Response & Prevention (SHARP)), and Enlisted ASI 1B ) 1B (Sexual Harassment/Assault Response & Prevention (SHARP...and Leadership, 4th ed. (San Francisco : Jossey- Bass Publishers, 2010), 236. 60 Ibid., 236. 61 Lisa Daniel, “Panetta, Dempsey Announce Initiatives to

  3. Detection of the antipsychotic drug quetiapine in the blood, urine and hair samples of the victim of a drug-facilitated sexual assault

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Sys Stybe

    2017-01-01

    A drug rape facilitated with the sedative antipsychotic drug quetiapine is presented here. A teenage girl and her girlfriend went to the home of an adult couple they had met at a bar. Here, the teenage girl (victim) felt tired after consuming some alcoholic drinks and fell asleep. While she...... was asleep, the others left her at the house alone and returned to the bar. Later, the girl woke up to witness the adult male having intercourse with her, but she was not able to resist the attack. She fell asleep again and slept through the next day and a half, after which she left the house. Forty...... negative. The low level of quetiapine in the hair segment and its absence in the other segments indicate that the victim had only consumed one or a few doses of quetiapine within that period and was not a regular user. This study describes the first drug-facilitated assault involving a single dose...

  4. Criminal justice processing of sexual assault cases. Highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, J V

    1994-03-01

    This article discusses the processing of criminal justice on sexual assault cases in Canada. To begin with, in 1983, Bill C-127 abolished the offense of rape and indecent assault and created three new crimes of sexual assault and three parallel offenses of assault. This legislation also introduced a number of important changes to the way crimes of sexual aggression are processed by the criminal justice system. In 1991, the Supreme Court struck down provisions of the sexual assault legislation preventing a defendant from introducing evidence regarding complainant's previous sexual conduct. As a result, Bill C-49 was introduced to provide a test to determine whether a complainant's sexual history could be admitted at trial. This bill also addresses the issue of consent and the defense of mistaken beliefs in consent. The focus of the Juristat is the criminal justice processing of the three levels of sexual assault, which are elaborated in this article. In order to distinguish between the different levels, body harm relates only to physical injury and does not include psychological harm. Drawing on the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey, the Sentence Study, the Adult Criminal Court Survey and the Youth Court Survey, the Juristat summarizes recent trends relating to the processing of sexual assault and assault by the police and the courts. Canada's Violence Against Women Survey provides a profile of sexual assault incidents among adult women in Canada.

  5. Sexual Assault Awareness Month 2012

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-04-02

    This podcast discusses the impact and prevalence of sexual violence and the importance of prevention.  Created: 4/2/2012 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).   Date Released: 4/2/2012.

  6. The new sexual assault law: the victim's experience in court.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahjpaul, S; Renner, K E

    1988-08-01

    The questions asked of victims of sexual and physical assault by the prosecutor and defense were recorded and coded by courtroom observers. The defense in comparison to the prosecution treated both types of victims in a negative way. Sexual assault victims were subjected to more negative questions and required to give a more personal form of testimony than physical assault victims due to the strategies used by both the prosecution and the defense. Sexual assault cases were convicted less often than physical assault cases. It was concluded that the new law in Canada which replaced the offense of rape with one of "sexual assault" has not had its intended effect of reducing the burden on a victim when she testifies in court.

  7. Sexual assault: the physician's role in prevention and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, D K

    1998-10-01

    Rape is a crime which occurs to over 12 million women. It has a substantial impact on the physical, psychological and social health of the victim. It is defined as the carnal knowledge of a person forcibly and against their will and includes successful and unsuccessful assaults. In this sense, the terms rape and sexual assault are used interchangeably. Physicians should responsibly counsel patients when appropriate concerning prevention of sexual assault and should be knowledgeable about the acute medical and psychological management of a sexual assault victim, including the collection of evidence. This article provides basic information regarding examination, evidence collection and treatment.

  8. Inmates' Cultural Beliefs about Sexual Violence and Their Relationship to Definitions of Sexual Assault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Shannon K.; Blackburn, Ashley G.; Marquart, James W.; Mullings, Janet L.

    2010-01-01

    Effective strategies aimed at prison sexual assault require inmates to possess the same definition of sexual assault as prison administrations. This article argues that prison culture is rape-supportive and inmates may not define sexual assault as such. After analyzing questionnaire responses given by male and female inmates in a large Southern…

  9. Inmates' Cultural Beliefs about Sexual Violence and Their Relationship to Definitions of Sexual Assault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Shannon K.; Blackburn, Ashley G.; Marquart, James W.; Mullings, Janet L.

    2010-01-01

    Effective strategies aimed at prison sexual assault require inmates to possess the same definition of sexual assault as prison administrations. This article argues that prison culture is rape-supportive and inmates may not define sexual assault as such. After analyzing questionnaire responses given by male and female inmates in a large Southern…

  10. Male Sexual Assault More Common Than Thought

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    温亮向

    2003-01-01

    选注者言:男性所受到的性骚扰比人们想象的要严重得多。这是最近在英国召开的英国心理学会的一次会议上透出的信息。而且被骚扰人基本孤立无援:…men, as well as women, are forced into having unwanted sexual contact but few services are provided to help them deal with the assault.

  11. Men's Alcohol Intoxication and Condom Use during Sexual Assault Perpetration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kelly Cue; Kiekel, Preston A.; Schraufnagel, Trevor J.; Norris, Jeanette; George, William H.; Kajumulo, Kelly F.

    2012-01-01

    We assessed the association between alcohol consumption and condom use during penetrative sexual assault acts perpetrated by young adult men. Men aged 21 to 35 who reported inconsistent condom use and heavy episodic drinking (N = 225) completed a questionnaire assessing their perpetration of sexual assault since the age of 15, their consumption of…

  12. Effectiveness of a Social Change Approach to Sexual Assault Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Keith E.

    2009-01-01

    The author examined the impact on resident assistants of a social change approach to sexual assault prevention. The interactive multi-media program focused on engaging men on sexual assault prevention, accurately defining rape for college men and women, identifying aspects of the rape culture in society and on-campus, and empowering college…

  13. Sexual Assault Characteristics Effects on PTSD and Psychosocial Mediators: A Cluster Analysis Approach to Sexual Assault Types

    OpenAIRE

    Peter-Hagene, Liana C.; Ullman, Sarah E.

    2014-01-01

    Using cluster analysis, we investigated the effects of assault characteristics (i.e., levels of violence, subjective distress, alcohol consumption, perpetrator identity) on PTSD symptoms, and whether these effects are mediated by post-assault social and psychological reactions. A large community sample of women sexual assault survivors completed two mail surveys at a one-year interval. In line with prior research, cluster analyses revealed the existence of three general categories of sexual a...

  14. 3 CFR 8359 - Proclamation 8359 of April 8, 2009. National Sexual Assault Awareness Month, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... are essential to this effort and work tirelessly to help victims cope with the trauma of sexual... Nurse Examiner (SANE) programs and multi-disciplinary Sexual Assault Response Teams (SART). The Violence... critical evidence is collected to facilitate a successful prosecution. To this end, VAWA mandates that all...

  15. Sexual Assault in Bisexual and Heterosexual Women Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurvinsdottir, Rannveig; Ullman, Sarah E

    Social support is related to sexual minority status and negative psychological impact among sexual assault survivors. We compared bisexual and heterosexual survivors on how different types of social support are connected to symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression. A community sample of bisexual and heterosexual (N = 905) women sexual assault survivors completed three annual surveys. Heterosexual women reported greater perceived social support and fewer negative reactions to disclosure of sexual assault than bisexual women, but there were no differences in frequency of social contact. Perceived social support and frequency of social contact were related to fewer psychological symptoms of PTSD and depression for all women. Heterosexual women had fewer psychological symptoms than bisexual women. Finally, perceived social support mediated the relationship of sexual orientation with depressive symptoms but not with PTSD symptoms. These findings suggest that social support and sexual orientation may explain women's post-assault adjustment.

  16. Task Force Report on Care for Victims of Sexual Assault

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-04-01

    is defined, as any sort of sexual activity in which one person is involved against his or her will, with or without physical force. Of the almost 3...deployed environment, is not currently a consideration in force planning. For example, Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners (SANE) exist in the active and...risks and actively engage in preventive measures xii DoD Care for Victims of Sexual Assault Task Force Report all responders treat victims with

  17. Emancipatory Sexuality Education and Sexual Assault Resistance: Does the Former Enhance the Latter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senn, Charlene Y.; Gee, Stephanie S.; Thake, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined whether adding emancipatory sexuality education, which encourages the exploration of women's own sexual values and desires, to a sexual assault resistance program would improve women's resistance to sexual assault by known men. The participants were 214 first-year university students. A randomized experimental design…

  18. Emancipatory Sexuality Education and Sexual Assault Resistance: Does the Former Enhance the Latter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senn, Charlene Y.; Gee, Stephanie S.; Thake, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined whether adding emancipatory sexuality education, which encourages the exploration of women's own sexual values and desires, to a sexual assault resistance program would improve women's resistance to sexual assault by known men. The participants were 214 first-year university students. A randomized experimental design…

  19. Sexual assault in Ile-Ife, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olusegun Olalekan Badejoko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sexual assault (SA is a shattering malevolence against women. This study determined the burden, periodicity, presentation and management of SA in Ile-Ife, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of the hospital records of 76 SA survivors managed over a 5-year period (2007-2011 in Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals complex (OAUTHC, Ile-Ife. Results: Sexual assault accounted for 0.69% of all female and 5.2% of all gynaecological emergencies in OAUTHC, Ile-Ife. The survivors′ ages ranged from 4 to 50 years (mean = 17.7 ± 8.8years and adolescents made up for 48%. The peak prevalence of SA was in February and December and among adults and under-16-year-old survivors, respectively. Daytime and weekday SA were significantly more common among the under-16-year-old survivors (P = 0.008. Majority of the survivors (62% knew their assailant(s. Neighbours were the commonest perpetrators identified (28.2% and the assailants′ house was the commonest location (39.4%. Weapons were involved in 29.6% of cases and various injuries were identified in 28.2% of the survivors. Hospital presentation was within 24 hours in majority (76.1% of the survivors, but rape kit examinations were not performed as the kits were not available. Although appropriate medical management was routinely commenced, only 12.7% of survivors returned for follow-up. Conclusions: Seasonal and diurnal patterns exist in the prevalence of SA in Ile-Ife and most survivors that reported in the hospital presented early. Rape kit examinations were, however, not executed, due to non-availability. Personnel training, protocol development, provision of rape kits and free treatment of SA survivors are, therefore, recommended. Public enlightenment on preventive strategies based on the observed periodicity and age patterns is also suggested.

  20. Sexual assault as a crime against young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felson, Richard B; Cundiff, Patrick R

    2014-02-01

    Evidence based on almost 300,000 sexual assaults from the National Incident-Based Reporting System showed that the modal age of victims was 15 years, regardless of the age of the offender, the gender of the offender, or the gender of the victim. We suggest that adolescents have the highest risk of victimization because of their sexual attractiveness, vulnerability, and exposure to motivated offenders. As a result of these factors, sexual assault is as much an offense against young people as it is against women. The sexual attractiveness of young people also has implications for the age of offenders. Older men have much higher rates of offending than one would expect, given the age-desistance relationship. Thus, we found that older men have much higher rates of sexual assault than physical assault. Finally, evidence suggested that homosexual men were at least as likely as heterosexual men to commit sexual assault. The pattern suggests that the tendency for sexual assaults to involve male offenders and female victims reflects male sexuality rather than attitudes toward women.

  1. Brief Communication: Public Perception of Sexual Assault - A Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cody R. Sebben

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Studies show that given the opportunity, most people would punish perpetrators of sexual assault more severely than those who commit other personal injury offences (Roberts, 1990. This study will attempt to explain why most people would prescribe harsher punishment to sexual offenders. It is hypothesized that specific factors play a role in the belief that sexual offenders are a greater threat to individual and public safety than other offenders. One hundred and two first, second, and third year Behavioural Science Technology (BST students at St. Lawrence College, (Kingston, Ontario, Canada were asked to fill out a questionnaire. Two questionnaires were created and handed out on an alternating basis (A, B, A, B. Each class was given a similar verbal introduction based on a set of guidelines created for the study. The data collected demonstrated consistency with previous findings in the literature, that sexual assault offences would be punished with longer sentences if the opportunity was given (Roberts, 1990. Sexual Assault with a threat to life was given the longest sentence more than any other offence. Sexual Assault received the longest sentence 58.8% of the time, followed by Assault with a threat to life and Assault, which received the longest sentence 47.1% and 43.1% of the time respectively. Perpetrators of sexual offences are perceived to have higher rates of recidivism and lower rates of responsivity. Further research should be conducted to determine other variables which play a role in public perception of sentencing and treatment of sexual offenders.

  2. A Program on Preventing Sexual Assault Directed toward Greek Leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Tamara; Boyd, Cynthia

    This paper discusses a program that uses the leadership and status of Greek system officers to prevent sexual assault at a large university. This program aims to prevent future assaults by altering the conditions of a rape-prone culture. The presentation comprises a definition and two examples of acquaintance rape situations, a discussion of…

  3. Capturing sexual assault data: An information system designed by forensic clinicians and healthcare researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhtar, S Aqif; Smith, Debbie A; Phillips, Maureen A; Kelly, Maire C; Zilkens, Renate R; Semmens, James B

    2017-01-01

    The Sexual Assault Resource Center (SARC) in Perth, Western Australia provides free 24-hour medical, forensic, and counseling services to persons aged over 13 years following sexual assault. The aim of this research was to design a data management system that maintains accurate quality information on all sexual assault cases referred to SARC, facilitating audit and peer-reviewed research. The work to develop SARC Medical Services Clinical Information System (SARC-MSCIS) took place during 2007-2009 as a collaboration between SARC and Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia. Patient demographics, assault details, including injury documentation, and counseling sessions were identified as core data sections. A user authentication system was set up for data security. Data quality checks were incorporated to ensure high-quality data. An SARC-MSCIS was developed containing three core data sections having 427 data elements to capture patient's data. Development of the SARC-MSCIS has resulted in comprehensive capacity to support sexual assault research. Four additional projects are underway to explore both the public health and criminal justice considerations in responding to sexual violence. The data showed that 1,933 sexual assault episodes had occurred among 1881 patients between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2015. Sexual assault patients knew the assailant as a friend, carer, acquaintance, relative, partner, or ex-partner in 70% of cases, with 16% assailants being a stranger to the patient. This project has resulted in the development of a high-quality data management system to maintain information for medical and forensic services offered by SARC. This system has also proven to be a reliable resource enabling research in the area of sexual violence.

  4. prevention of sexual assault in nigeria feature article

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It can be inferred that sexual assault, like other medical, social or legal anomalies ... responsibilities are imperative; some challenges must be anticipated; and ... the president of African Civil Society against Rape, a Civil. Society Organization ...

  5. Sexual Assault: The Dark Side of Military Hypermasculinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-16

    traits, then sexual assaults will continue leaving in its path a life time of personal psychological and physical pain, as well as damage to morale...AIR WAR COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY SEXUAL ASSAULT: THE DARK SIDE OF MILITARY HYPERMASCULINITY by Angie Robertson, Lt Col...Charleston Southern University in South Carolina with a Bachelor of Science degree in Psychology and Criminal Justice. Additionally, she has earned two

  6. An Evaluation of a Sexual Assault Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Angela P.

    2009-01-01

    Sexually aggressive behavior, especially on college campuses, is an issue of major concern. Previous research has found that 54% of college women report being sexually victimized (Koss, Gidycz, & Wisniewski, 1987). Given the scope of this problem, effective prevention strategies are necessary. Sexual assault prevention programs have included those…

  7. Dangerous liaisons?: A feminist and restorative approach to sexual assault

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pali Brunilda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The appropriateness of restorative justice (RJ for gendered violence offences such as domestic violence and sexual assault has always been and still is highly contested. This paper focuses on the appropriateness of RJ measures in addressing sexual assault, primarily with reference to experience of restorative dialogues as practiced at the Centre for Victims of Sexual Assault in Copenhagen, and it takes a feminist approach to the application of RJ measures to sexual assault. Within this framework, the paper tackles two issues in particular: the privacy element of RJ versus the public aspect of the criminal justice system (CJS, and the intersection of the CJS and RJ in cases of sexual assault. In relation to the relationship between CJS and RJ, the authors argue that RJ could be used for victims of sexual assault, not primarily as part of diversion programmes, but when offered apart from and/or parallel to the CJS. In relation to the private/public debate, the authors argue that while RJ encounters, by taking place in highly confidential settings, might have a negative impact on efforts by women’s movements to move violence against women out of the private and into the public realm, creating high standard alternatives for individual women who are in need of support and constantly generating public debate about gendered violence is a good feminist response to this complex issue.

  8. Sexual assault resistance education for university women: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial (SARE trial)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Senn, Charlene Y; Eliasziw, Misha; Barata, Paula C; Thurston, Wilfreda E; Newby-Clark, Ian R; Radtke, H Lorraine; Hobden, Karen L

    2013-01-01

    .... The aim of this randomized controlled trial is to determine whether a novel, small-group sexual assault resistance education program can reduce the incidence of sexual assault among university...

  9. Rape and Sexual Assault Victimization Among College-Age Females, 1995-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2014 Special Report NCJ 2484 71 Rape and Sexual Assault Victimization Among College-Age Females, 1995–2013 ... 24 had the highest rate of rape and sexual assault victimizations compared to females in all other ...

  10. 75 FR 73997 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Definition of Sexual Assault (DFARS Case 2010...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-30

    ..., entitled ``Efforts to Prevent Sexual Assault/Harassment Involving DoD Contractors During Contingency...; Definition of Sexual Assault (DFARS Case 2010-D023) AGENCY: Defense Acquisition Regulations System... are aware of the DoD definition of ``sexual assault'' as defined in DoD Directive 6495.01,...

  11. 76 FR 38051 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Definition of Sexual Assault (DFARS Case 2010...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    .... Background DoD Inspector General audit D-2010-052, entitled ``Efforts to Prevent Sexual Assault/Harassment... Regulation Supplement; Definition of Sexual Assault (DFARS Case 2010-D023) AGENCY: Defense Acquisition... accompanying U.S. Armed Forces are made aware of the DoD definition of sexual assault as defined in...

  12. Stifled Voices: Barriers to Help-Seeking Behavior for South African Childhood Sexual Assault Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kimberly; Bryant-Davis, Thema; Tillman, Shaquita; Marks, Alison

    2010-01-01

    In South Africa, females under the age of 18 comprise approximately 40% of the rapes and other forms of sexual assault that occur. However, South African girls face multiple barriers to seeking help in the aftermath of sexual assault. This literature review provides an overview of childhood sexual assault in South African girls and addresses…

  13. Stifled Voices: Barriers to Help-Seeking Behavior for South African Childhood Sexual Assault Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kimberly; Bryant-Davis, Thema; Tillman, Shaquita; Marks, Alison

    2010-01-01

    In South Africa, females under the age of 18 comprise approximately 40% of the rapes and other forms of sexual assault that occur. However, South African girls face multiple barriers to seeking help in the aftermath of sexual assault. This literature review provides an overview of childhood sexual assault in South African girls and addresses…

  14. 76 FR 18633 - National Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-05

    ..., and too many offenders elude justice. As we mark National Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention... will be sexually assaulted. Young women ages 16 to 24 are at greatest risk, and an alarming number of young women are sexually assaulted while in college. Too many men and boys are also affected. With...

  15. Presentation of the Western Danish Sexual Assault Center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ole Ingemann

    , the forensic scientists, the department of gynaecology, the county’s general practitioners and the university institutes of psychology and forensic medicine. The prevention of sexual assault is a difficult issue, but the fact that half the cases happens in privacy or at work, and that only 25......November 1999 the first Center for (adult) Victims of Sexual Assault in Denmark opened in the town of Aarhus in cooperation with the Aarhus County’s Health Service, Aarhus University Hospital, the police and the Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Aarhus. The Center is located...

  16. Sexual assault services coverage on Native American land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juraska, Ashley; Wood, Lindsey; Giroux, Jennifer; Wood, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Native American women experience higher rates of sexual assault than other women in the United States, yet there is limited information on the accessibility of forensic services for Native American victims of sexual violence. This study used geographic information systems technology to map known sexual assault examiner (SAE) and sexual assault response team (SART) programs in the United States (n = 873) in proximity to 650 census-designated Native American lands. Analysis was repeated for 29 Indian Health Service and tribal-operated facilities that self-identified that they provide sexual assault examinations. Network analysis showed that 30.7% of Native American land is within a 60-minute driving distance of a facility offering SAE or SART services. Indian Health Service and tribal-operated facilities increased accessibility to SAE services on 35 Native American lands. This study shows gaps in coverage for more than two thirds of Native American lands, including 381 lands with no coverage, highlighting the need for expanded SAE and SART services near or on Native American land.

  17. Predictors of Using Mental Health Services After Sexual Assault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Matthew; Davidson, Tatiana M.; Ruggiero, Kenneth J.; Acierno, Ron; Resnick, Heidi S.

    2014-01-01

    Sexual assault increases the risk for psychopathology. Despite the availability of effective interventions, relatively few victims who need treatment receive care in the months following an assault. Prior work identified several factors associated with utilizing care, including ethnicity, insurance, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. Few studies, however, have examined predictors of treatment utilization prospectively from the time of assault. The present study hypothesized that White racial status, younger age, being partnered, having health insurance, having previously received mental health treatment, and having more PTSD and depression symptoms would predict utilization of care in the 6 months postassault. This was examined in a sample of 266 female sexual assault victims with an average age of 26.2 years, of whom 62.0% were White and 38.0% were African American assessed at 1.5 and 6 months postassault. Available information on utilizing care varied across assessments (1.5 months, n = 214; 3 months, n = 126; 6 months, n = 204). Significant predictors included having previously received mental health treatment (OR = 4.09), 1 day depressive symptoms (OR = 1.06), and having private insurance (OR = 2.24) or Medicaid (OR = 2.19). Alcohol abuse and prior mental health care were associated with a substantial increase in treatment utilization (OR = 4.07). The findings highlight the need to help victims at risk obtain treatment after sexual assault. PMID:24852357

  18. Sexually assaulted victims are getting younger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scherer, Susanne; Hansen, Steen Holger; Lynnerup, Niels

    2014-01-01

    involves a higher risk of lesions and the possibility of many lesions. More than half of those exposed to manual strangulation or other kinds of violence against the neck were assaulted by a stranger or an ACQ. Half of the women knew the perpetrator and the perpetrator was an ACQ in 26% of the cases...... extracted and analysed focussing on age, relationship, lesions, violence, location and alcohol intoxication. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 184 girls and women over the age of 12 years were included in this retrospective study. RESULTS: The median age of the victims was 20 years (range 12-89 years). 75.......5% were under 30 years of age. 53% knew the perpetrator. More than one perpetrator was reported in 11%. 46% of the assaulted victims had a total number of 1-5 observed lesions and these were observed in all types of perpetrator relationship. Eight victims with more than 20 lesions were assaulted...

  19. Sexually assaulted victims are getting younger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scherer, Susanne; Hansen, Steen Holger; Lynnerup, Niels

    2014-01-01

    extracted and analysed focussing on age, relationship, lesions, violence, location and alcohol intoxication. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 184 girls and women over the age of 12 years were included in this retrospective study. RESULTS: The median age of the victims was 20 years (range 12-89 years). 75.......5% were under 30 years of age. 53% knew the perpetrator. More than one perpetrator was reported in 11%. 46% of the assaulted victims had a total number of 1-5 observed lesions and these were observed in all types of perpetrator relationship. Eight victims with more than 20 lesions were assaulted...

  20. Correlates of Serious Suicidal Ideation and Attempts in Female Adult Sexual Assault Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullman, Sarah E.; Najdowski, Cynthia J.

    2009-01-01

    Relations between (a) serious suicidal ideation and attempts and (b) demographics, trauma history, assault characteristics, post-assault outcomes, and psychosocial variables were examined among female adult sexual assault survivors. Younger, minority, and bisexual survivors reported greater ideation. More traumas, drug use, and assault disclosure…

  1. Sexual self-schemas of female child sexual abuse survivors: relationships with risky sexual behavior and sexual assault in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehaus, Ashley F; Jackson, Joan; Davies, Stephanie

    2010-12-01

    Childhood sexual trauma has been demonstrated to increase survivors' risk for engaging in unrestricted sexual behaviors and experiencing adolescent sexual assault. The current study used the sexual self-schema construct to examine cognitive representations of sexuality that might drive these behavioral patterns. In Study 1 (N = 774), we attempted to improve the content validity of the Sexual Self Schema Scale for child sexual abuse (CSA) survivors, introducing a fourth sexual self-schema factor titled the "immoral/irresponsible" factor. In Study 2 (N = 1150), the potential differences in sexual self-views, as assessed by the four sexual self-schema factors, between CSA survivors and non-victims were explored. In addition, Study 2 evaluated how these sexual self-schema differences may contribute to participation in unrestricted sexual behaviors and risk for sexual assault in adolescence. Results indicated that a history of CSA impacted the way women viewed themselves as a sexual person on each of the four factors. CSA survivors were found to view themselves as more open and possessing more immoral/irresponsible cognitions about sexuality as compared to women who did not have a CSA history. In addition, the CSA survivors endorsed less embarrassment and passionate/romantic views of their sexual selves. The interaction of CSA severity and the sexual self-schemas explained variance in adolescent sexual assault experiences above and beyond the severity of CSA history and participation in risky sexual behaviors. The findings suggest that sexual self-views may serve to moderate the relationship between CSA and adolescent sexual assault. Implications of these findings and directions for future research are discussed.

  2. Survivors on Campus: A Dialogue about Sexual Assault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray-Rosendale, Laura; Dierking, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    At a conference last fall, Kirsten Dierking came across "College Girl: A Memoir," a book by Laura Gray-Rosendale that tells the story of a brutal sexual assault she experienced as a college student. While she purchased a copy of the book, it sat unopened on her desk for a while; also a victim of brutal rape in college, she was not sure…

  3. Sexual Assaults in the Marine Corps: Really Increasing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-11

    34 - Gen James F. Amos, Commandant Introduction Sexual assault is a terrible crime...prosecutors. These regional offices also contain criminal investigators, a legal administrative officer, paralegal support, and Highly Qualified Experts...effect: (3) White Letters, (1) ALMAR, (12) MARADIMINS - Executive Off-Site Brief (Senior Leaders, LtGen- Gen ) - DON Strategic Plan - Indoctrination

  4. Victim Confidentiality on Sexual Assault Response Teams (SART)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine how professionals and paraprofessionals involved with a Sexual Assault Response Team (SART) understand and navigate different professional statutory requirements for victim confidentiality. Telephone surveys are conducted with 78 professionals: medical (27.8%), criminal justice (44.3%), and victim advocacy…

  5. Pediatricians Revise Guidelines for Teen Victims of Sexual Assault

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Latest Health News → Article URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163804.html Pediatricians Revise Guidelines for Teen Victims of Sexual Assault Physicians need to be comfortable screening for ...

  6. Prevalence and Predictors of Sexual Assault among a College Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, A. H.; Overstreet, C. M.; Hawn, S. E.; Kendler, K. S.; Dick, D. M.; Amstadter, A. B.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the prevalence and correlates of precollege, college-onset, and repeat sexual assault (SA) within a representative student sample. Participants: A representative sample of 7,603 students. Methods: Incoming first-year students completed a survey about their exposure to broad SA prior to college, prior trauma,…

  7. Military Personnel. Preliminary Observations on DOD’s and the Coast Guard’s Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-31

    sexual assault; and (3) exercise oversight over reports of sexual assault. This statement draws on GAO’s preliminary observations from an ongoing...would enable servicemembers to confidentially disclose an incident of sexual assault. Since 2005, active duty servicemembers have had two options...incidents involving servicemembers; • have visibility over reports of sexual assault involving servicemembers; and • exercise oversight over

  8. "Campus Craft": A Game for Sexual Assault Prevention in Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jozkowski, Kristen N; Ekbia, Hamid R

    2015-04-01

    Sexual assault is prevalent among college students. In response, universities have implemented prevention education initiatives. These interventions, however, often ignore the broader sociocultural context in which sexual violence occurs. This calls for innovative approaches in prevention education, which address the broader context. Computer games provide such an opportunity by providing simulated real-life scenarios, nonlinear narratives, and an interactive medium. We report the development and pilot testing of "Campus Craft," a game prototype that focuses, among other things, on sexual assault prevention. The prototype was developed through a participatory design process; students, educators, and subject matter experts helped design and develop scenarios, game mechanics, and learning objectives. The prototype was evaluated by college students (n=141) in a multi-method approach. The evaluation encompassed issues of usability, game mechanics, attitudes, and learning outcomes. Findings indicated that participants rated various aspects of the game positively. Additionally, use of "Campus Craft" contributed to differences in student learning of prevention concepts between the pre- and post-test such that students scored higher on the post-test. Findings demonstrate that, on average, students learned several core concepts related to sexual consent and rape culture through gameplay. Results suggest that computer-based gaming may be a viable avenue for sexual assault prevention education. Findings demonstrate that this approach could be effective in increasing student knowledge and understanding of factors that contribute to sexual assault in college. Future research is needed to corroborate findings and better understand the feasibility of using this approach among larger samples of college students.

  9. Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment in the U.S. Military: Highlights from the 2014 RAND Military Workplace Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    prevalence and nature of sexual harassment and gender discrimination in the military. Detailed results, including recommendations, are documented in four...assault, sexual harassment, and gender discrimination in the military. The resulting study, the RAND Military Workplace Study (RMWS), invited close to...takes a new approach to counting individuals in the military who experienced sexual assault, sexual harassment, and gender discrimination in the

  10. Physical examination of sexual assault victims in Belgrade area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alempijević Đorđe

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sexual crimes represent various forms of contact of perpetrator’s genitals, lips, tongue, and fingers with genitals, lips and/or anus of the victim, in order to achieve sexual satisfaction, without victim’s consent. Objective: The aim of this work was to analyze the type of medical institution in which victims of sexual assaults are being examined in Belgrade area, to assess the quality of these examinations and medical records, as well as to control whether standardized protocols are followed. Method: Data were obtained through analysis of 113 cases of sexual assaults prosecuted in the District Court of Belgrade. Results: All victims were females with mean age of 24.1 years. The majority of victims (85% were examined in one medical institution, most often in the Institute of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Clinical Center of Serbia, and only by one medical doctor (81.4%. Gynecologists were most frequently included in examination, while specialists of forensic medicine were engaged in only 9 cases (7.9%. In 84% of victims, the examination was performed during the first three days after the assault, and in 52% of cases on the first day. Standard techniques of clinical and gynecological examinations were applied only, without following any protocols, so the reports were made exclusively on individual basis. In no case an informed consent by victim was obtained before examination. Anamnestic data were collected in only 15.9% of cases, and they were generally incomplete. Conclusion: The results of investigation show that the quality of examination of sexual assault victims in Belgrade area is not adequate. Therefore, such negative practice should be changed in future through introduction of standardized protocols for examination of victims, as well as development of clinical forensic medicine.

  11. Sexual Assault: A Report on Human Immunodeficiency Virus Postexposure Prophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William F. Griffith

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this report is to describe an urban county hospital human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection prevention protocol offering prophylactic combination antiretroviral medications to female victims of sexual assault. A retrospective chart review was conducted from June, 2007 through June, 2008 of 151 women who were prescribed antiretroviral prophylaxis by protocol. All women receiving HIV prophylaxis initially screened HIV seronegative. Of the 58 women who reported taking any HIV prophylaxis, 36 (62% were HIV screened at 12 and/or 24 weeks and none had HIV seroconverted. Although the initiation of an HIV post exposure prophylaxis protocol for sexual assault in a county hospital population is feasible, patient follow-up for counseling and HIV serostatus evaluation is an identified barrier

  12. Enhancing Latinas' participation in research on sexual assault: cultural considerations in the design and implementation of research in the Latino community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Courtney E; Isas, Libier; Viveros, Monica

    2011-02-01

    To provide a more complete picture of the prevalence, impact, and treatment of sexual assault among Latinas, researchers must begin to develop and employ culturally competent recruitment and data-collection procedures that can facilitate participation and disclosure. In this article, we sought to synthesize recommendations from research with Latino populations, community-based and participatory action research, and research on sexual assault to provide a list of suggestions for conducting culturally competent research about sexual assault with Latino populations. Innovative examples from our own focus group study with Latinas are provided throughout.

  13. Impulsivity and sexual assault in college men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouilso, Emily R; Calhoun, Karen S; Rosenbloom, Thomas G

    2013-01-01

    Although impulsivity has been consistently linked to perpetration of sexual aggression, results lack clarity because they do not account for the substantial heterogeneity associated with the construct. The UPPS-P model (Lynam, Smith, Whiteside, & Cyders, 2006), which was proposed to clarify the multidimensional nature of impulsivity, has yet to be applied to sexual aggression. We measured UPPS-P Impulsivity in a sample of male college students who also self-reported on perpetration of sexual aggression. As predicted, impulsivity distinguished perpetrators from nonperpetrators. Perpetrators scored higher than non-perpetrators on Negative Urgency, Positive Urgency, and lack of Premeditation. Results suggest that the impulsivity traits most relevant to sexual aggression are the tendency to act impulsively when experiencing intense emotions (Positive and Negative Urgency) and lack of forethought and planning (lack of Premeditation).

  14. Drugs Used in Sexual Assaults: Features and Toxicological Investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinar Efeoglu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Drugs used in sexual assault, which are also called as date rape drugs, are common phenomenon of crime in many countries. In a typical scenario, a perpetrator adds a date-rape drug which has sedative effect into alcoholic or non-alcoholic beverage of an unsuspecting person. After drug administration, mostly amnesia and symptoms such as confussion, loss of memory, lack of muscle control, dizziness occur. The main drugs in sexual assaults are benzodiazepines such as γ-hydroxy butyrate and its analogs, clonazepam, alprazolam, flunitrazepam, oxazepam, ketamine, barbiturates, antidepressants, cocaine and stimulants. Most of these drugs are colorless, odorless and highly soluble in alcohol or other beverages quickly. They are rapidly absorbed and eliminated after oral administration. A victim may complain to police or other legal forces after several days due to emotional trauma as shame, fear, doubt and disbelief. For this reason, It is important to know what time the sample is taken from the victim to confirm the presence of the drug. In this study, we will present a general approach to date-rape drugs used in sexual assault. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(3.000: 418-425

  15. Sexual assault training in the military: evaluating efforts to end the "invisible war".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Kathryn J; Rabelo, Verónica Caridad; Cortina, Lilia M

    2014-12-01

    Sexual assault is an insidious problem in the United States military. In 2005 the Department of Defense (DoD) created the Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office, which centralizes responsibility for sexual assault training. However, this training initiative has undergone little evaluation by outside researchers. Addressing this need, we analyzed responses from over 24,000 active duty personnel who completed the 2010 DoD Workplace and Gender Relations Survey. We assessed whether sexual assault training exposure (None, Minimal, Partial, or Comprehensive) predicted accurate knowledge of sexual assault resources and protocols. Using a social-ecological framework, we investigated whether institutional and individual factors influenced Service members' training exposure and judgment of training effectiveness. According to our results, exposure to comprehensive training predicted lower sexual assault incidence and superior knowledge. However, comprehensive training differed as a function of military branch, rank, gender, and sexual assault history. Judgments of training effectiveness also varied across these dimensions. Our results highlight the importance of considering context, gender, and victimization history when evaluating institutional efforts to end sexual violence. The DoD's 2010 annual report on military sexual assault concluded that "most Active Duty members receive effective training on sexual assault" (p. 104). Our results cast doubt on that assertion.

  16. Emergency department management of the sexual assault victim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobernick, M E; Seifert, S; Sanders, A B

    1985-01-01

    The optimal management of the sexual assault victim involves a multidisciplinary effort on the part of all legal, police, medical, and support personnel who interface in the emergency department. History, general physical examination, and pelvic examination are performed methodically, keeping in mind that the primary goal is to tend to the patient's medical needs. The gathering of evidence proceeds simultaneously with the physical examination. Evidence to be obtained and techniques are reviewed. Treatment entails attention to physical injuries, potential venereal disease and pregnancy, and psychiatric intervention. Management of the male rape victim or child victim of sexual abuse requires special attention to the peculiarities of those problems.

  17. Evaluation of the Military Criminal Investigative Organizations’ Adult Sexual Assault Investigation Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-16

    sexual assault policies for inclusion in NCIS policy and commented that NCIS has an active and well-established relationship with the IACP. AFOSI...of evidence kits and any other property released to Provost Marshal (PM) activities in sexual assault cases involving restricted reporting. It does... physically . This may be an indicator of force or fear and should be documented. • Perpetrators of sexual assault generally use only as

  18. "Yes Means Yes:" A New Approach to Sexual Assault Prevention and Positive Sexuality Promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafrance, Dawn E.; Loe, Meika; Brown, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    "Yes Means Yes" (YMY) is an interdisciplinary, noncredit, five-week, positive sexuality seminar offered at a small liberal arts college as part of a campus-wide initiative to improve students' relationship skills and behaviors. Most university campuses employ some sort of sexual assault prevention program to help protect students from problematic…

  19. Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Identity as a Moderator of Relationship Functioning After Sexual Assault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemberling, Tess M; Cramer, Robert J; Miller, Rowland S; Stroud, Caroline H; Noland, Ramona M; Graham, James

    2015-12-01

    Sexual assault is unfortunately common, especially among lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) individuals. Yet, the associations of such victimization have not yet been extensively established in the areas of sexual identity and romantic relationship functioning. Accordingly, the present study examined the associations between lifetime sexual assault, LGB identity, and romantic relationship functioning in a sample of 336 LGB individuals. A history of sexual assault was associated with attachment anxiety and several sexual identity components (i.e., higher levels of acceptance concerns, identity uncertainty, internalized homonegativity, and identity superiority). Furthermore, an association of sexual assault and attachment avoidance was moderated by internalized homonegativity. Finally, a more secure LGB identity was associated with healthier romantic relationship functioning. Collectively, these findings are applicable to services for LGB sexual assault victims, suggesting the incorporation of treatment that bolsters LGB identity and couple functioning. Limitations and future directions are discussed.

  20. A Compendium of Sexual Assault Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    than for nonvictimized men. Lebowitz and Roth , 1994 Female rape victims 15 Interviews Examine how rape victims make sense of their experiences...differences between men and women in rates of instigating unwanted sexual contact. Lebowitz, Leslie, and Susan Roth , “‘I Felt Like a Slut’: The Cultural...April 1996, pp. 261–262. The authors investigated the rate of rape myth acceptance in Scotland and the United States. They hypothesized that there

  1. A Qualitative Analysis of Offenders' Emotional Responses to Perpetrating Sexual Assault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Carolyn L; Swartout, Kevin M; Cook, Sarah L; Parrott, Dominic J

    2016-09-02

    The purpose of this study was to understand sexual assault perpetrators' emotional responses to perpetration to facilitate treatment development and to better understand processes that may give rise to repeat perpetration. Sixty-one firsthand narratives of sexual assault perpetration, posted on Reddit.com, were analyzed using qualitative text analysis. The analysis revealed four primary emotional responses to perpetrating sexual assault: shame, guilt, depression, and anger. Each emotional response was associated with different contextual features that appeared in the narratives. Shame co-occurred with perpetrator alcohol use and consent confusion, guilt co-occurred with perpetrators' stated self-growth, anger co-occurred with denial of responsibility and hostility toward women, and depressed affect co-occurred with social isolation following perpetration. The findings indicate certain emotional responses may be more adaptive than others for protecting against repeat perpetration. This research has important implications for the treatment of perpetrators and supports the idea that self-image and perceived social context may be important treatment targets.

  2. Determining competency in the sexually assaulted patient: a decision algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sharolyn; Housley, Connie; Raup, Glenn

    2010-07-01

    The determination of competency for decisions regarding one's care is of great individual importance as it represents a basic human right. Often, in Emergency Nursing, we are presented with situations that require difficult decisions that must be made in a brief time frame. The role of the Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) in providing assessment and care to victims of assault is crucial to initiating the restoration of health and dignity of the patient in a tragic set of circumstances. Patients who present for SANE examination may have issues surrounding their capacity to make competent decisions regarding their assessment and care, further complicating an already tenuous situation. SANE nurses should be knowledgeable concerning competency and care issues and utilize a methodical process to guide their decision-making.

  3. Comparison of trauma on survivors of sexual assault and intimate partner violence in Limpopo

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    Mashudu Davhana-Maselesele

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background:Gender-based violence is a challenge in South Africa, despite available interventions. Caring for the survivors of both forms of violence is critical for ensuring their speedy recovery. Objectives:To compare the effects of trauma on female survivors of sexual assault versus those experienced by survivors of physical assault by their intimate partners. Method:A quantitative cross-sectional comparative study design was used to compare 30 sexually-assaulted women and 30 physically-assaulted women regarding depressive symptoms, posttraumatic stress disorder and coping styles three months after the incident. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with the survivors of both types of assault and the Beck Depression Inventory posttraumatic stress disorder checklist and Brief COPE Inventory were administered in order to obtain quantitative data. Both parametric and non-parametric statistics were employed. Ethical measures were adhered to throughout the research process. Results:A significantly-higher proportion of sexually-assaulted women disclosed the incident to family (p = 0.021. The majority of sexually- (90% and physically- (86% assaulted women were likely to recall the incident. Sexually-assaulted women had a significantly-higher mean for avoidance/numbness (p 0.051. About 41%of sexually-assaulted participants reported severe depression. Findings confirmed that sexual assault is more personal whilst physical assault is more interpersonal. If physically-assaulted women were removed from the perpetrators they recovered faster than sexually-assaulted women. Their stay with the perpetrators may perpetuate the violence. Conclusion:The need for counselling and support for the survivors of both traumas was recommended. All stakeholders should be educated to provide support to survivors of both traumas.

  4. Processes and patterns in gay, lesbian, and bisexual sexual assault: a multimethodological assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menning, Chadwick L; Holtzman, Mellisa

    2014-04-01

    Although prior research suggests that sexual minorities are at equivalent or greater risk of sexual assault compared with heterosexual women, few studies have examined simultaneously a broad array of assault types, the forms of force and pressure experienced, and the relative risks of experiencing different kinds of assault or force or pressure during an assault according to sex and sexual orientation. Moreover, very little is known about how subjective interpretations of assault may differ by sex and sexual orientation. We address these gaps using a multimethodological analysis of original survey data (N = 342) with a snowball oversample of sexual minority respondents. Quantitative results indicate that both sexual minority status and sex are predictive of increased assault risk of most assault types, but that most effects of sexual minority status are restricted to men. The probabilities of experiencing verbal pressure or physical force are largely uniform across categories. Qualitative analyses of open-ended questions suggest that men and women interpret the experience of assault differently, such that sexual minority men conceptualize their unwanted sexual experiences as "giving in" due to feelings of guilt or low self-worth, whereas women of all sexual orientations acquiesced because it was perceived to be easier or more practical than resisting. Theoretical implications and directions for future research are discussed.

  5. Sexism, Sexual Harassment, and Sexual Assault: Comparing Data from 2002 and 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    SEXISM , SEXUAL HARASSMENT AND SEXUAL ASSAULT: COMPARING DATA FROM 2002 AND 2006 Dr. Richard J. Harris University of Texas at San... fighting force (Fiske & Glick, 1995; Schmidt, 1996). In turn, individuals who possess more negative attitudes toward women may be more tolerant of sexual...by others (Fitzgerald, Swan, & Fischer, 1995) Sexism Assumptions about how women and men differ with regard to work-related skills, attitudes and

  6. Social Reactions to Sexual Assault Disclosure and Problem Drinking: Mediating Effects of Perceived Control and PTSD

    OpenAIRE

    Peter-Hagene, Liana C.; Ullman, Sarah E.

    2013-01-01

    Sexual assault survivors receive various positive and negative social reactions to assault disclosures, yet little is known about mechanisms linking these social reactions to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and problem drinking. Data from a large, diverse sample of women who had experienced adult sexual assault was analyzed with structural equation modeling to test a theoretical model of the relationships between specific negative social reactions (e.g., controlling, infantilizi...

  7. The journalists’ obligation of protecting the victims of sexual assault

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Valeriu Voinea

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The most debated media story of 2015 in Romania was related to a case of sexual assualt. On the 19th of July 2015 seven teenagers were released from house arrest in the case where they were accused of collectively raping an 18-year-old high school student. The Romania media landscape was quickly overtaken by this story: we had in depth media reports about the alleged assailaints and their home town, scandal regarding a facebook group created by a parent of one of the former mentioned and even a TV appearance from the victim and her mother on live television. The present article will attempt an analysis of the responsabilities that journalists have in protecting victims of sexual assault, according to the European law, Romanian legislation and in the media code of ethics. The questions we are starting from are these: were the Romanian journalists really disgusted by the actions of the seven or was it just a race for larger readership and viewership? What did the journalists do wrong when reporting n this story? What could they and should they have done more in order to protect a victim of sexual assault? And why was this case so widely reported while other cases of rape are constantly ignored by the Romanian media and society?

  8. Sexual violence: an analysis of data related to indecent assault

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaella Queiroga Souto

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the profile of people submitted to the Indecent Assault Evaluation (IAE at the Nucleus for Legal Medicine and Dentistry (NUMOL in Campina Grande - PB, Brazil. Methods: This is a descriptive and documentary survey carried out with medical reports of incident assault performed against men and women of any age, who were evaluated at the Nucleus for Legal Medicine and Dentistry (NUMOL in Campina Grande - PB, Brasil, from 2005 to 2009. Data collection instrument was a specially designed form based on existing information in the IAE records. Data was recorded in SPSS, version 17, and analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results: Male individuals (n = 85; 62%, under the age of 20 (n = 112; 81.8% were the main victims. The notification of sexual violence was carried out by the parents (n = 34; 24.8%, mostly by the mother (n = 27; 19.7%, and the police stations were the most frequent location to express the complaint (n = 134; 97.8%. The violence was committed by a single perpetrator (n = 78; 56.9%, who was known by the victim (n = 88; 64.2%. The crime of rape was confirmed in (n = 48 35% of cases. Conclusion: The men, most of them young, are the main victims of indecent assault, and violence is committed by one individual, member of the victim’s social circle.

  9. 77 FR 20499 - National Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-05

    ... greatest toll on young people; women between the ages of 16 and 24 are at greatest risk of rape and sexual... realities of sexual assault; confront and change insensitive attitudes wherever they persist;...

  10. Sexual Assault Disclosure in Relation to Adolescent Mental Health: Results from the National Survey of Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broman-Fulks, Joshua J.; Ruggiero, Kenneth J.; Hanson, Rochelle F.; Smith, Daniel W.; Resnick, Heidi S.; Kilpatrick, Dean G.; Saunders, Benjamin E.

    2007-01-01

    Child sexual assault is a risk factor for a wide range of emotional and behavioral problems. Little is known about mental health functioning in relation to victims' decisions to tell someone (or not) about their assault. This study used data from a nationally representative sample of 4,023 adolescents to examine the relation between sexual assault…

  11. Talking to Children/Talking to Parents about Sexual Assault. Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loontjens, Lois

    This manual shares some of the experiences in parent and child education in sexual assault of a group dedicated to alleviating the trauma of sexual assault for victims and their families. The section of the manual about talking to children is arranged in four levels: kindergartners and first graders; second and third graders; fourth and fifth…

  12. Sexual Assault Disclosure in Relation to Adolescent Mental Health: Results from the National Survey of Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broman-Fulks, Joshua J.; Ruggiero, Kenneth J.; Hanson, Rochelle F.; Smith, Daniel W.; Resnick, Heidi S.; Kilpatrick, Dean G.; Saunders, Benjamin E.

    2007-01-01

    Child sexual assault is a risk factor for a wide range of emotional and behavioral problems. Little is known about mental health functioning in relation to victims' decisions to tell someone (or not) about their assault. This study used data from a nationally representative sample of 4,023 adolescents to examine the relation between sexual assault…

  13. Spirituality and Well-Being: The Relationship between Religious Coping and Recovery from Sexual Assault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Courtney E.; Abeling, Samantha; Ahmad, Sarah; Hinman, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    Despite a growing body of literature documenting beneficial outcomes of religious coping, there are virtually no studies examining sexual assault survivors' use of religious coping. To fill this gap in the literature, the current study examines predictors and outcomes of positive and negative religious coping among 100 sexual assault survivors who…

  14. Walking the Woods: The Lived Experience of Sexual Assault Survival for Women in College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan-Kreishman, Mollie M.

    2012-01-01

    This phenomenological study explores the lived experience of sexual assault survival for women in college. Through a grounding in the philosophy of hermeneutic phenomenology (Gadamer, 1960/2000; Heidegger, 1927/1962, 1968, 1928/1998, 1971/2001, 1950/2002), this work uncovers the lives of six sexual assault survivors who lived through rape during…

  15. Female Sexual Victimization Among College Students: Assault Severity, Health Risk Behaviors, and Sexual Functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchik, Jessica A; Hassija, Christina M

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship between college women's sexual victimization experiences, health risk behaviors, and sexual functioning. A sample of 309 college women at a mid-sized Midwestern university completed measures assessing sexual victimization, sexual risk taking, substance use behaviors, sexual desire, sexual functioning, prior sexual experiences, and social desirability. Severity of sexual victimization was measured using a multi-item, behaviorally specific, gender-neutral measure, which was divided into four categories based on severity (none, sexual contact, sexual coercion, rape). Within the sample, 72.8% (n = 225) of women reported at least one experience of sexual victimization since age 16. Results from MANCOVAs and a multinomial logistic regression, controlling for social desirability and prior sexual experience, revealed that sexual victimization among female students was related to increased drug use, problematic drinking behaviors, sexual risk taking, sexual dysfunction, and dyadic sexual desire. In addition, findings indicated that women exposed to more severe forms of sexual victimization (i.e., rape) were most likely to report these risk-taking behaviors and sexual functioning issues. Implications for sexual assault risk reduction programming and treatment are discussed.

  16. 78 FR 63454 - Response Systems to Adult Sexual Assault Crimes Panel; Notice of Federal Advisory Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ... of the Secretary Response Systems to Adult Sexual Assault Crimes Panel; Notice of Federal Advisory... Response Systems to Adult Sexual Assault Crimes Panel. DATES: A meeting of the Response Systems to Adult... adult sexual assault and related offenses under 10 U.S.C. 920 (article 120 of the Uniform Code...

  17. 78 FR 70023 - Response Systems to Adult Sexual Assault Crimes Panel; Notice of Federal Advisory Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-22

    ... of the Secretary Response Systems to Adult Sexual Assault Crimes Panel; Notice of Federal Advisory... Response Systems to Adult Sexual Assault Crimes Panel. This meeting is open to the public. DATES: A meeting of the Response Systems to Adult Sexual Assault Crimes Panel (``the Panel'') will be held December...

  18. Psychological Outcomes After a Sexual Assault Video Intervention: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Katherine E; Cranston, Christopher C; Davis, Joanne L; Newman, Elana; Resnick, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    Sexual assault survivors are at risk for a number of mental and physical health problems, including posttraumatic stress disorder and anxiety. Unfortunately, few seek physical or mental health services after a sexual assault (Price, Davidson, Ruggiero, Acierno, & Resnick, 2014). Mitigating the impact of sexual assault via early interventions is a growing and important area of research. This study adds to this literature by replicating and expanding previous studies (e.g., Resnick, Acierno, Amstadter, Self-Brown, & Kilpatrick, 2007) examining the efficacy of a brief video-based intervention that provides psychoeducation and modeling of coping strategies to survivors at the time of a sexual assault nurse examination. Female sexual assault survivors receiving forensic examinations were randomized to standard care or to the video intervention condition (N = 164). The participants completed mental health assessments 2 weeks (n = 69) and 2 months (n = 74) after the examination. Analyses of covariance revealed that women in the video condition had significantly fewer anxiety symptoms at the follow-up assessments. In addition, of those participants in the video condition, survivors reporting no previous sexual assault history reported significantly fewer posttraumatic stress symptoms 2 weeks after the examination than those with a prior assault history. Forensic nurses have the unique opportunity to intervene immediately after a sexual assault. This brief video intervention is a cost-effective tool to aid with that process.

  19. "There Were Rapes!": Sexual Assaults of African American Women and Children in Jim Crow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson-Miller, Ruth; Picca, Leslie H

    2016-07-03

    Using data from 92 interviews, this article examines the narratives of African Americans' experiences as children and young adults during Jim Crow in the Southeast and Southwest. It gives voice to the realities of sexual assaults committed by ordinary White men who systematically terrorized African American families with impunity after the post-Reconstruction south until the 1960s. The interviewees discuss the short- and long-term impact of physical, mental, emotional, and sexual assaults in their communities. We discuss the top four prevalent themes that emerged related to sexual assault, specifically (a) the normalization of sexual assaults, (b) protective measures to avoid White violence, (c) the morality of African American women, and (d) the long-term consequences of assaults on children. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Sexual assault in childhood: risk HIV and AIDS behaviours in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwandure, C

    2007-11-01

    This study examined the hypothesis that sexual assault in childhood is a risk factor in HIV and AIDS prevention and control in adulthood. It comprised 40 participants who were survivors of child sexual abuse and 40 participants who were not sexually abused. The sample had 20 sexually abused men, 20 non sexually abused men, 20 sexually abused women and 20 non sexually abused women. The group that had men and women who had a history of sexual assault reported higher HIV and AIDS risk behaviours than the non-abused comparison group. The survivors of sexual assault also had higher levels of post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, suicide ideation and external locus of control. They reported low self-esteem. This unhealthy psychological functioning was found to be a risk factor in HIV and AIDS prevention and control. Implications for future research are discussed.

  1. Department of Defense Annual Report on Sexual Assault in the Military: Fiscal Year 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-02

    and child abuse and neglect. Sexual abuse of spouses and intimate partners is a subset of domestic abuse . This year’s report is different from...investigators, judge advocates, paralegals, and victim witness assistance personnel to support victims of sexual assault, child abuse , and domestic violence...Appendix H: Summary of Changes to DoDI 6495.02 Appendix I: Domestic Abuse Related Sexual Assault Appendix J: Acronym List List of Enclosures Enclosure

  2. 2015 QuickCompass of Sexual Assault Prevention and Response-Related Responders (QSAPR). Overview Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    advocacy for survivors of sexual assault in gaining the medical, psychological , and legal services to which they are entitled. They are the responders...training and education in specific areas such as suicide and psychological effects of sexual assault, and their training be more comprehensive and...2160−2166. Martin, L., Rosen, L., Durand, D., Knudson, K., & Stretch, R. H. (2000). Psychological and physical health effects of sexual

  3. Physical and Psychological Health Following Military Sexual Assault: Recommendations for Care, Research, and Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    with less-severe injuries receive appropriate care for them, including treatment of wounds; antibiotics and a tetanus booster, if indicated; and...sexual assault vary considerably across treatment contexts and research samples. Sexual assault may be defined narrowly, by limit- ing the definition to...con- cur that the treatment of injuries and the assessment and management of sexually transmitted infections and pregnancy must come before forensic

  4. Military Personnel: DOD Needs to Take Further Actions to Prevent Sexual Assault During Initial Military Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    supervisory or command position who uses or condones any form of sexual behavior to control, influence , or affect the career, pay, or job of a military...in the armed forces must have signed parental consent prior to age 18. Page 37 GAO-14-806 Sexual Assault during Initial Training...MILITARY PERSONNEL DOD Needs to Take Further Actions to Prevent Sexual Assault during Initial Military Training

  5. A Randomized Controlled Trial Targeting Alcohol Use and Sexual Assault Risk among College Women at High Risk for Victimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Amanda K.; Lewis, Melissa A.; George, William H.

    2015-01-01

    Current sexual assault risk reduction programs do not target alcohol use despite the widespread knowledge that alcohol use is a risk factor for being victimized. The current study assessed the effectiveness of a web-based combined sexual assault risk and alcohol use reduction program using a randomized control trial. A total of 207 college women between the ages of 18 and 20 who engaged in heavy episodic drinking were randomized to one of five conditions: full assessment only control condition, sexual assault risk reduction condition, alcohol use reduction condition, combined sexual assault risk and alcohol use reduction condition, and a minimal assessment only condition. Participants completed a 3-month follow-up survey on alcohol-related sexual assault outcomes, sexual assault outcomes, and alcohol use outcomes. Significant interactions revealed that women with higher incidence and severity of sexual assault at baseline experienced less incapacitated attempted or completed rapes, less incidence/severity of sexual assaults, and engaged in less heavy episodic drinking compared to the control condition at the 3-month follow-up. Web-based risk reduction programs targeting both sexual assault and alcohol use may be the most effective way to target the highest risk sample of college students for sexual assault: those with a sexual assault history and those who engage in heavy episodic drinking. PMID:26408290

  6. Sexual Assault Victimization Among Female Undergraduates During Study Abroad: A Single Campus Survey Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flack, William F; Kimble, Matthew O; Campbell, Brooke E; Hopper, Allyson B; Petercă, Oana; Heller, Emily J

    2015-12-01

    Almost all research on sexual assault victimization among undergraduate university students pertains to incidents that occur on domestic college and university campuses. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of sexual assault victimization and related factors among undergraduates in the context of study-abroad programs. Two hundred eight female students (52% response rate) from a small university in the northeastern United States who had recently studied abroad responded to an online survey containing measures of sexual assault, posttraumatic stress responses (PSR), and alcohol consumption. Almost 19% of the respondents indicated one or more types of sexual assault victimization. Approximately 17% reported non-consensual sexual touching, 7% attempted rape, 4% rape, with 9% reporting attempted rape or rape. As in domestic studies, victimization in this sample was related positively to alcohol consumption and PSR. Use of force was the most frequently reported perpetrator tactic. In sum, the high rates of sexual assault victimization reported by this sample during study abroad replicate previous findings. This context requires further attention from sexual assault researchers, especially given the increasing numbers of university students engaging in study abroad, and from campus support personnel who may be unaware of the likelihood of assault in this context.

  7. Child Sexual Abuse, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, and Substance Use: Predictors of Revictimization in Adult Sexual Assault Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullman, Sarah E.; Najdowski, Cynthia J.; Filipas, Henrietta H.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the unique effects of child sexual abuse simultaneously with post-traumatic stress disorder symptom clusters, problem drinking, and illicit drug use in relation to sexual revictimization in a community sample of female adult sexual assault victims. Participants (N = 555) completed two surveys a year apart. Child sexual abuse…

  8. Child Sexual Abuse, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, and Substance Use: Predictors of Revictimization in Adult Sexual Assault Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullman, Sarah E.; Najdowski, Cynthia J.; Filipas, Henrietta H.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the unique effects of child sexual abuse simultaneously with post-traumatic stress disorder symptom clusters, problem drinking, and illicit drug use in relation to sexual revictimization in a community sample of female adult sexual assault victims. Participants (N = 555) completed two surveys a year apart. Child sexual abuse…

  9. Impact of gender on reactions to military sexual assault and harassment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Margret E; Turchik, Jessica A; Karpenko, Julie A

    2014-02-01

    Research has shown that experiences ofmilitary sexual assault and harassment can have a negative impact on veterans' health and functioning, even years or decades later, thus clearly identifying this as an important area of concern for social workers. In addition to understanding the scope and general impact of military sexual assault and harassment, social workers also must thoroughly understand how different cultural factors may intersect with veterans' experiences. To this end, this article reviews the current knowledge base on how veterans' life experiences related to gender can affect their experience of and recovery from military sexual assault and harassment, highlights common gender-specific issues, and discusses implications for practice.

  10. Sorority Affiliation and Sexual Assault Victimization: Assessing Vulnerability Using Path Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Cortney A

    2016-07-01

    The current research used survey data from 282 college women to investigate the relationship between female Greek membership and sexual assault victimization. Drawing from routine activity theory, low self-control, and social learning theory, this study tested a theoretical model that identified pertinent factors present among sorority environments to determine the relationships between Greek affiliation and sexual assault. Path analyses revealed that sorority women reported consuming more alcohol and with greater frequency, increased risk-taking behavior, delayed assessments of threat and responses to risk, and increased contact with fraternity men-all of which significantly predicted sexual assault. Future theory, research, and policy directions are proposed.

  11. Trauma Histories, Substance Use Coping, PTSD, and Problem Substance Use Among Sexual Assault Victims

    OpenAIRE

    Ullman, Sarah E.; Relyea, Mark; Peter-Hagene, Liana; Vasquez, Amanda L.

    2013-01-01

    Sexual assault history is associated with higher risk of problem drinking and drug use in women, yet little is known about mechanisms linking trauma histories in general to women’s drinking or drug use problems. This study examined how various types of trauma, substance use coping, and PTSD relate to past-year problem drinking and drug use in women who experienced sexual assault. Data from a large, diverse sample of women who had experienced adult sexual assault was analyzed with structural e...

  12. Disclosing sexual assault to parents: the influence of parental messages about sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sharon G; Cook, Sarah L

    2008-11-01

    Without frank discussion of what sex is, women may not learn what sex is not and what experiences constitute sexual assault. This qualitative study explores the relation between parental discussion and messages about sex and women's decisions of whether to disclose sexual assault to parents. Participants were 18 women from diverse ethnic backgrounds. Data were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Findings indicate that women more often disclosed sexual assault to parents who discussed sex with them in a frank and positive manner. In addition to the role of disclosure in recovery, implications for sex and parent education are discussed.

  13. Struggling to survive: sexual assault, poverty, and mental health outcomes of African American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant-Davis, Thema; Ullman, Sarah E; Tsong, Yuying; Tillman, Shaquita; Smith, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    A substantial body of research documents the mental health consequences of sexual assault including, but not limited to, depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, substance use, and suicidality. Far less attention has been given to the mental health effects of sexual assault for ethnic minority women or women living in poverty. Given African American women's increased risk for sexual assault and increased risk for persistent poverty, the current study explores the relationship between income and mental health effects within a sample of 413 African American sexual assault survivors. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that after controlling for childhood sexual abuse there were positive relationships between poverty and mental health outcomes of depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and illicit drug use. There was no significant relationship between poverty and suicidal ideation. Counseling and research implications are discussed.

  14. Community cooperatives combat sexual assault and domestic violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Marc D

    2003-02-01

    The effectiveness of the SANE program is borne out by the following testimonies: "The emotional support required by these victims is best rendered by a SANE. This frees the ED nurse to care for other patients, while sexual assault victims receive a high level of care," says Nancy Donel, RN manager at St. Thomas Hospital ED. "The DOVE program benefits not only the emergency physician, but the EMS system as well. It gives us a resource and a specifically identified program with well-trained, qualified providers. Through their training and knowledge, SANEs not only help victims, but also increase the number of legal convictions that take assailants off the streets. This improves the health and safety of the communities in which we live and serve," says Michael Mackan, MD, of the Summa Health System.

  15. Police interviews of sexual assault reporters: do attitudes matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Karen; Seffrin, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Sexual assault is underreported in the United States. Survivors are often reluctant to make police reports for various reasons; one is fear of revictimization by criminal justice professionals. Conversely, police officers often lack skills for interviewing crime victims. Posttraumatic stress reactions among victims can exacerbate the problem. Although some victims prefer female interviewers, it is not known whether they are more skilled. A sample of 429 police officers completed a written survey testing their rape myth acceptance and knowledge of how to interview rape reporters. A significant relationship between rape myth acceptance and interviewing skill was discovered. Although officer gender was related to interviewing skill, the effect was mediated by rape myth acceptance. Specific officer behaviors related to high rape myth acceptance were identified. Implications for selection of police to conduct victim interviews were discussed.

  16. 78 FR 20221 - National Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-04

    ..., and young women. Nearly one in five women will be a victim of sexual assault during college. For some... assault response teams, helping States deliver justice for survivors and hold offenders accountable. Just... this crime does take place, it cannot be tolerated; victims must have access to support, and...

  17. Somatic health of 2500 women examined at a sexual assault center over 10 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mie-Louise; Hilden, Malene; Skovlund, Charlotte W

    2016-01-01

    significantly after sexual assault. Likewise, the number of visits to a general practitioner was significantly higher in exposed women both before and after the assault (16 vs. 10/year). Complications associated with childbirth were not statistically different between the groups. CONCLUSIONS: Our results...

  18. Unique versus cumulative effects of physical and sexual assault on patterns of adolescent substance use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charak, R.; Koot, H. M.; Dvorak, R. D.

    2015-01-01

    strongly related to membership of polysubstance use classes. From the National Survey of Adolescents-1995 (N=4023) 918 adolescents (age range=12-17 years, M=14.92, 49.6% female) with reports of physical assault and/or sexual assault were selected. Using information on alcohol-use, cigarette...

  19. The ISSAS Model: Understanding the Information Needs of Sexual Assault Survivors on College Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Julia; Gross, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    Sexual assault is a prevalent, yet underreported and stigmatizing crime that disproportionately affects college-age students. The literature of Library & Information Studies does not currently address the ways in which survivors may seek information after an assault. Blending findings from Psychology and LIS, this study proposes the…

  20. Sexual assault within intimate partner violence: impact on helpseeking in a national sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Lauren Bennett; DeLoveh, Heidi L M; Zweig, Janine M

    2008-01-01

    Within intimate partner violence (IPV), sexual assault is often subsumed under the heading of physical abuse, but evidence suggests qualitative differences in outcomes when both types of abuse occur. This study explores the cumulative effect of sexual assault and physical abuse by a current or former intimate partner on helpseeking. Using a dataset of 1,072 IPV victims from 8 states, we found that women who had experienced sexual assault in addition to physical abuse (44%) used more help, but were also more likely to say that they did not seek help when they needed it. Among those who were aware of services, fear was the greatest obstacle to reaching out for help. Implications include the need for information on best practices in addressing the sequelae of both physical and sexual assault in victim service agencies.

  1. Reducing Sexual Assault on Campus: Lessons From the Movement to Prevent Drunk Driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Sharyn J

    2016-05-01

    I examined similarities and differences between the movement to prevent drunk driving of the 1980s, and current efforts to prevent and address campus sexual assault. As college and university administrators design policies and initiatives to reduce campus sexual assault in response to new federal legislation and regulation, they can apply lessons from successful public health initiatives to reduce drunk driving initiated more than 3 decades ago. I illustrate how interventions at the 5 levels of the social-ecological model, and messages that address entrenched cultural attitudes condoning sexual assault and blaming its victims can be used to combat campus sexual assault as a crime and a public health problem. I also show how efforts to promote community engagement can change behavioral norms and reduce offenses.

  2. The Laboratory Diagnosis of Sexually Transmitted Infections in Cases of Sexual Assault and Abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max A Chernesky

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory staff dealing with samples from victims must be aware that such patients have been psychologically traumatized and deserve special care. The help of a sexual assault care team should be sought if available, and appropriate specimens should be collected two to 10 days after an incident, preferably in a single visit. Specimens should be clearly labelled, and the laboratory should be informed. In the laboratory, all procedures need to be clearly documented. There are special requirements for the collection of forensic specimens and associated records, which may later be required for legal proceedings. The laboratory must know what the current legal status is for any test being used in that community. The present article serves as a guideline to more detailed practice standards for the investigation of individual sexually transmitted infections in assault and abuse situations.

  3. Men victim of sexual assault of concern into the first Emergency Medical Unit for Victims of Assaults in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiquet, J; Gromb-Monnoyeur, S

    2013-10-01

    Although it accounts for only a small part of activity in the field of victimology, the provision of support for male victims of sexual assault is regularly discussed in the literature. Authors, English-speaking for the most part, all agree that this phenomenon has been largely underestimated, owing to the stigmatization victims suffer after the facts have been disclosed. The same authors agree that this type of assault is far from being inconsequential, from both a physical and a psychological perspective. The following retrospective and descriptive study, conducted at the Bordeaux CHU (Bordeaux University Hospital), aims to draw a comparison between the distinctive characteristics of male sexual assault victims treated at the CAUVA (Centre d'Accueil en Urgence des Victimes d'Agression - Emergency Medical Unit for Victims of Assaults) on the one hand, and, on the other hand, those identified in the existing scientific literature. The victims are predominantly young men, unconnected with their attackers, and more often than not the attacks take place on the public highway. Forensic treatment is provided within the seven days following the assault, which raises the question of the assessment of infection risks, including HIV transmission. Most of the time, the victims will not undergo a full psychological appraisal, though authors are unanimous that such assaults do indeed have heavy repercussions. Improving our services for such victims will require suitable training for staff, covering initial reception, general assessment and the drafting of the forensic medical report, as well as encouragement to lodge a complaint. This process should give priority to multidisciplinary centers, especially dedicated to shelter-providing, information, counseling and victim support. This will also entail information and awareness campaigns for the general population, and the homosexual community in particular. Finally, we should not be afraid to envisage an investigation into this

  4. Development and Implementation of Sexual Assault Evidence and Criminal Records Retention Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-11

    No. DODIG-2014-082 J U LY 1 1 , 2 0 1 4 Development and Implementation of Sexual Assault Evidence and Criminal Records Retention Policy Report...Suite 1204, Arlington VA 22202-4302. Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law, no person shall be subject to a...REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Development and Implementation of Sexual Assault Evidence and

  5. Evaluation of Military Criminal Investigative Organizations’ Child Sexual Assault Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-09

    E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 4 Report No. DODIG-2014-105 Evaluation of Military Criminal Investigative Organizations’ Child Sexual Assault Investigations...Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington VA 22202-4302. Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law, no person shall be...Organizations’ Child Sexual Assault Investigations 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e

  6. Experiences of women who reported sexual assault at a provincial hospital, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanette M. Sebaeng

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sexual assault poses a serious health problem to both the survivor and the health system. Experiencing sexual assault requires women to seek medical and psychological assistance as part of their journey towards recovery. This study examined the experiences of women who received post-sexual assault services from a specialised care centre within a provincial hospital.Methods: A qualitative, exploratory and contextual design was used to explore and describe experiences of women. Data were obtained through individual in-depth interviews from a total of 18 women aged between 18 and 55 years. Interviews were supplemented by the researcher’s field notes and audiotape recordings.Results: Findings yielded two main themes: Women expressed their lived experiences of sexual assault characterised by different forms of trauma. The second theme was an expression of a need for safety and support.Conclusion: Women who experience sexual assault are left with devastating effects such as physical and psychological harm and social victimisation. There is also a need for safety and support towards the recovery of these women. This study recommends that professional practitioners involved in the management of sexual assault be sensitised regarding the ordeal experienced by women and stop perceiving survivors as crime scene ‘clients’ from whom only medico-legal evidence has to be collected. Professional practitioners and family members must be supportive, non-judgemental and considerate of the dignity of survivors. The establishment of sexual assault response teams (SART is also recommended. There should also be inter-professional education for better coordination of services rendered to sexually assaulted women.

  7. Military Sexual Assault: Chronology of Activity in Congress and Related Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    Announces Investigation at Fort Hood, Texas,” DOD News Release, May 14, 2013, at http://www.defense.gov/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=16005 12 Jim ...Personnel Policy, Subtitle E—Sexual Assault Prevention and Response and Military Justice. Websites (non-government) Service Women Action Network ( SWAN ...for women veterans and their families.” Included is information on a SWAN briefing paper on military sexual assault at http://servicewomen.org/wp

  8. Intimate Partner Violence and Drinking Among Victims of Adult Sexual Assault

    OpenAIRE

    Ullman, Sarah E.; Sigurvinsdottir, Rannveig

    2015-01-01

    Intimate partner violence is associated with problem drinking. Correlates of alcohol consumption frequency and problem drinking were examined among female sexual assault survivors (N = 1863). Data were analyzed with blockwise multiple regressions. Results show heavy alcohol consumption and problem drinking were associated with intimate partner violence history, sexual assault by strangers/acquaintances, and maladaptive coping. Physical Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) history and partner sexua...

  9. Department of Defense Annual Report on Sexual Assault in the Military, Fiscal Year 2012. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    auspices of the Chaplain Corps, possibly as part of the Chaplains Religious Enrichment Development Operation ( CREDO ) mission. Whether or not...programs. CREDO Facebook Page. FY 12 DoD Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Program Review: Department of the Navy 23 FY 2012 Professional...continue to provide CREDO SAPR support, and update SECNAVINST 1730.10 “Chaplain Advisement and FY 12 DoD Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Program

  10. Report of the Defense Task Force on Sexual Assault in the Military Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    that military separation physicals shall include an assessment of sexual trauma, previously disclosed or undisclosed, during active duty service...comply with these standards. Further, SAPRO must be actively engaged in prevention policy development and legislation. Defense Task Force on Sexual ...SAPRO develop training policies and exercise oversight over Military Service training programs. Sexual assault prevention and response training must

  11. Police Officer Schema of Sexual Assault Reports: Real Rape, Ambiguous Cases, and False Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venema, Rachel M

    2016-03-01

    While extensive research has studied sexual assault reporting behaviors and described negative experiences with the criminal justice system among victim-survivors, fewer studies have explored police officer attitudes, knowledge, and thought processes that may affect victims' perceptions of negative interactions and unsatisfactory outcomes within reported sexual assault cases. This study explores police officer understanding of the definition of sexual assault and characteristics that influence their perceptions and response. Ten police officers were interviewed within one police department in a midsized city in the Great Lakes region. The study uses a modified grounded theory approach. Findings suggest that officers employ distinct schema of reported sexual assaults. Case characteristics, perceived credibility of the victim, and types of evidence formed categorizations of false reports, ambiguous cases, and legitimate sexual assaults. Police officers describe the ways in which perceptions of the case may or may not influence the response and point to areas for improvement within police procedure. The study findings provide insight into recommendations for improved police interviewing and response to reported sexual assaults.

  12. On the Relationship Between Automatic Attitudes and Self-Reported Sexual Assault in Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widman, Laura; Olson, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Research and theory suggest rape supportive attitudes are important predictors of sexual assault; yet, to date, rape supportive attitudes have been assessed exclusively through self-report measures that are methodologically and theoretically limited. To address these limitations, the objectives of the current project were to: (1) develop a novel implicit rape attitude assessment that captures automatic attitudes about rape and does not rely on self-reports, and (2) examine the association between automatic rape attitudes and sexual assault perpetration. We predicted that automatic rape attitudes would be a significant unique predictor of sexual assault even when self-reported rape attitudes (i.e., rape myth acceptance and hostility toward women) were controlled. We tested the generalizability of this prediction in two independent samples: a sample of undergraduate college men (n = 75, M age = 19.3 years) and a sample of men from the community (n = 50, M age = 35.9 years). We found the novel implicit rape attitude assessment was significantly associated with the frequency of sexual assault perpetration in both samples and contributed unique variance in explaining sexual assault beyond rape myth acceptance and hostility toward women. We discuss the ways in which future research on automatic rape attitudes may significantly advance measurement and theory aimed at understanding and preventing sexual assault. PMID:22618119

  13. A Qualitative Analysis of the Effects of Victimization History and Sexual Attitudes on Women's Hypothetical Sexual Assault Scripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiting, Kari A; Yeater, Elizabeth A

    2017-01-01

    This study examined qualitatively the effects of a sexual victimization history and sexual attitudes on 247 undergraduate women's written accounts of a hypothetical sexual assault. More severe victimization history was associated with script characteristics of greater alcohol use, knowing the man longer, and the context of a party. Greater endorsement of positive attitudes toward casual sex was related to script characteristics of greater alcohol use, acquiescing to the man, and not knowing the man as long. Finally, a more recent sexual assault was associated with script characteristics of having just met the man, the context of a party or date, and acquiescing to the man.

  14. From rape to sexual assault: Legal provisions and mental health implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R C Jiloha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sexual assault in various forms has been recognized as a crime by almost all religions and cultures throughout the recorded history. It is a crime against basic human rights of an individual and a most common crime against women in India. In India, "rape laws" began with the enactment of Indian Penal Code in 1860. There have been subsequent amendments, and the main issue of focus remained the definition of rape which has been recently broadened to include a wide range of sexual activities. The inclusion of "marital rape" in the ambit of rape remains a matter of debate. With a long history, the sexual offence in the form of sexual assault has been discussed from legal and mental health perspective in this presentation. Social and psychological impact of sexual assault on the victim has also been discussed.

  15. Contested Discourses in Multidisciplinary Sexual Assault Response Teams (SARTs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moylan, Carrie A; Lindhorst, Taryn; Tajima, Emiko A

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative study explored how law enforcement officers, forensic nurses, and rape crisis advocates who are members of coordinated service delivery models such as Sexual Assault Response Teams (SARTs) describe their process of engaging with one another and managing their differences in professional orientation, statutory obligations, and power. Using semi-structured interviews with 24 SART responders including rape crisis center advocates, law enforcement, and medical personnel, we examined the ways that SART members discursively construct one another's role in the team and how this process points to unresolved tensions that can manifest in conflict. The findings in this study indicate that interdisciplinary power was negotiated through discursive processes of establishing and questioning the relative authority of team members to dictate the work of the team, expertise in terms of knowledge and experience working in the field of rape response, and the credibility of one another as qualified experts who reliably act in victims' and society's best interests. Implications of these findings for understanding and preventing the emergence of conflict in SARTs are discussed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Vicarious resilience in sexual assault and domestic violence advocates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Lisa L; Beesley, Denise; Abbott, Deah; Kendrick, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    There is little research related to sexual assault and domestic violence advocates' experiences, with the bulk of the literature focused on stressors and systemic barriers that negatively impact efforts to assist survivors. However, advocates participating in these studies have also emphasized the positive impact they experience consequent to their work. This study explores the positive impact. Vicarious resilience, personal trauma experiences, peer relational quality, and perceived organizational support in advocates (n = 222) are examined. Also, overlap among the conceptual components of vicarious resilience is explored. The first set of multiple regressions showed that personal trauma experiences and peer relational health predicted compassion satisfaction and vicarious posttraumatic growth, with organizational support predicting only compassion satisfaction. The second set of multiple regressions showed that (a) there was significant shared variance between vicarious posttraumatic growth and compassion satisfaction; (b) after accounting for vicarious posttraumatic growth, organizational support accounted for significant variance in compassion satisfaction; and (c) after accounting for compassion satisfaction, peer relational health accounted for significant variance in vicarious posttraumatic growth. Results suggest that it may be more meaningful to conceptualize advocates' personal growth related to their work through the lens of a multidimensional construct such as vicarious resilience. Organizational strategies promoting vicarious resilience (e.g., shared organizational power, training components) are offered, and the value to trauma-informed care of fostering advocates' vicarious resilience is discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Now We Know: Assessing Sexual Assault Criminal Justice Case Processing in an Urban Community Using the Sexual Assault Nurse Practitioner Evaluation Toolkit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Julie L; Shaw, Jessica; Lark, Alyssa; Campbell, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Campbell and colleagues developed an evaluation Toolkit for use by sexual assault nurse examiners (SANEs) to assess criminal case outcomes in adult sexual assault cases seen by SANE programs (Campbell, Townsend, Shaw, Karim, & Markowitz, 2014; Campbell, Bybee, et al., 2014). The Toolkit provides step-by-step directions and an easy-to-use statistical program. This study describes implementation of the Toolkit in Salt Lake County, the first site outside the pilot sites to utilize the program. The Toolkit revealed that, in Salt Lake County from 2003 to 2011, only 6% of adult sexual assault cases were successfully prosecuted. These findings prompted multiple community discussions, media attention, and a call to action to improve the investigation and prosecution of adult sexual assault cases. The primary purpose of this case report is to encourage other SANE teams and communities to use the Toolkit by sharing the successful experience of Salt Lake County in implementing the Toolkit.Video Abstract available for additional insights from Dr. Valentine (see Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JFN/A19).

  18. Fear of violent crime among men and women on campus: the impact of perceived risk and fear of sexual assault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Jodi; Gover, Angela R; Dahod, Sara

    2009-01-01

    Prior research has consistently shown that women are more afraid of crime than men despite the fact that men are much more likely to be victims of all crime except sexual assault and intimate partner violence. The "shadow of sexual assault" hypothesis argues that women's fear of sexual assault shadows their fear of other types of crime, particularly violent crime. Building on prior research by Ferraro (1996) and Fisher and Sloan (2003), this study examines the individual and combined impact of perceived risk and fear of sexual assault on fear of robbery and assault among college students. Findings indicate that fear of sexual assault is the stronger predictor of fear of crime for women and that perceived risk is the stronger predictor for men.

  19. Immunohistochemical staining of human sperm cells in smears from sexual assault cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, S.

    2011-01-01

    In the routine clinical examination of sexual assault victims, apart from documenting physical evidence of abuse, securing evidence, typically DNA from blood, semen, or saliva, is an important part of the process. Often the presence of semen is considered a most interesting piece of evidence....... Not only does it often contain enough DNA for DNA profiling, but it also strongly indicates that an actual sexual act has taken place. The examination of smear slides obtained in sexual assault cases is a time-consuming task especially for the less trained and in cases where the smear only contains few...

  20. Discrepancy between information reported by the victims of sexual assaults and clinical forensic findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scherer, Susanne; Hansen, Steen Holger; Lynnerup, Niels

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: From the clinical forensic examination reports made at the Department of Forensic Medicine, the University of Copenhagen, in 2007 concerning rape, attempted rape and sexual assault (RAS), information about the assault, including both violence and the perpetrator's line of sexual...... by slight, blunt force. Information on line of sexual action was present in 148 cases. A total of 123 victims reported penetration: 94% vaginal, 16% anal and 20% oral. Three were exposed to anal penetration only. Eleven perpetrators used a condom. 50% of the cases with vaginal and/or anal penetration had...

  1. Sexual assault support services and community systems: understanding critical issues and needs in the LGBTQ community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todahl, Jeffrey L; Linville, Deanna; Bustin, Amy; Wheeler, Jenna; Gau, Jeff

    2009-08-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) individuals encounter social conditions that create important considerations for LGBTQ sexual assault victims. This exploratory, mixed-methods study examines the relationship between community attitudes toward LGBTQ persons and associated community responses to LGBTQ sexual assault victims. An online and paper-and-pencil survey (n = 130) and four focus group interviews (n = 14) are analyzed using frequency distributions and grounded theory methods. The central theme that emerged in focus group interviews, titled "low community awareness and support for sexual violence in the LGBTQ community," was corroborated by survey participants. Participants' views of unique considerations for LGBTQ sexual assault victims are presented, including causal factors, consequences, and recommended strategies.

  2. Strengthening Our Suspect-Focus: How the Department of Defense Can Improve Its Approach to Sexual Assault Prevention and Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    Harned et al, “ Sexual Assault by Workplace Personnel and Other Types of Sexual Harassment: A Comparison of Antecedents and Consequences”, Journal of...and Nehama Babin. “ Sexual Harrassment and Sexual Assault: Research Reviews and Recommendations.” U.S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral... Workplace Personnel and Other Types of Sexual Harassment: A Comparison of Antecedents and Consequences.” Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 7

  3. Sexual Assault History and Suicidal Behavior in a National Sample of Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullman, Sarah E.; Brecklin, Leanne R.

    2002-01-01

    A national sample of women (N=627) with histories of sexual assault in both childhood and adulthood reported significantly greater odds of lifetime suicide attempts. As predicted, younger age, stressful events, depression, and alcohol dependency were all associated with suicide ideation. Discusses role of sexual trauma and other psychological…

  4. Sexual Assault and Rape Perpetration by College Men: The Role of the Big Five Personality Traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voller, Emily K.; Long, Patricia J.

    2010-01-01

    A sample of 521 college men completed the Revised NEO Personality Inventory and an expanded version of the Sexual Experiences Survey to examine whether variation in the Big Five personality traits in a normal, college population provides any insight into the nature of sexual assault and rape perpetrators. Rape perpetrators reported lower levels of…

  5. Sexual minority college students' perceptions on dating violence and sexual assault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollen, Elizabeth W; Ameral, Victoria E; Palm Reed, Kathleen; Hines, Denise A

    2017-01-01

    While the majority of research on dating violence (DV) and sexual assault (SA) in college students has focused on heterosexual students, victimization rates among sexual minority students are the same or higher than that of their heterosexual counterparts. The current study sought to explore sexual minority college students' perceptions of the prevalence of DV and SA, risk and protective factors, and barriers to seeking help, using focus groups. A total of 14 sexual minority students ranging in age from 18 to 24 participated across 2 focus groups. Findings suggest the majority of the students perceived DV and SA among sexual minority individuals to be less common compared to their heterosexual counterparts and to be less common on their campus compared to other colleges and universities. Students' reflections about risk and protective factors overlapped with those previously established among heterosexuals as well as factors unique to the sexual minority community. Students identified societal, community, and psychological-level barriers related to help-seeking. We provide recommendations for practice based on the current findings (e.g., colleges could expand current educational material about DV and SA to include more recognition of these issues for sexual minority students). (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Department of Defense Annual Report on Sexual Assault in the Military, Fiscal Year 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-22

    institutions of higher learning (all state colleges), Rape Crisis Centers (Day One), RICADV, Homeless Veterans Agencies, focus groups, etc., meet...assault crisis hotline for Service members;  Establish an easily remembered DoD Safe Helpline number similar to website name;  Continue training all...SEXUAL ASSAULT IN THE MILITARY 40 Sustained the DoD Safe Helpline The DoD Safe Helpline is a confidential, anonymous crisis support service for

  7. Three decade old cold case murder solved with evidence from a sexual assault kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connery, Sheila A

    2013-05-01

    Sexual assault occurs at alarming rates in America. The true incidence remains unknown as many victims fail to both report for immediate medical care and notify law enforcement of the crime committed. For those who do seek medical assistance, a Sexual Assault Kit is available in Emergency Departments with established protocols for the forwarding of collected specimens to law enforcement. A crime lab analyzes the evidence to identify the offender's DNA. A DNA profile is then created and archived into a database. This case involved a woman who not only endured a sexual assault, but also sustained multiple gun shot wounds, and witnessed the murder of her friend nearly three decades ago. At that time, she was treated for her injuries and evidence was collected and secured into a Sexual Assault Kit. A DNA profile was then created from a predetermined crime lab. In 2011, a Cold Case Investigator, who was reviewing all archived DNA profiles of currently incarcerated individuals in the city where the initial crime was committed, was able to match a current prisoner's DNA to that of the DNA profile created from specimens collected during the sexual assault exam nearly thirty years ago. The perpetrator subsequently was charged with murder by the criminal justice system and received a thirty year sentence without opportunity for parole.

  8. Sexual assault: review of a national model protocol for forensic and medical evaluation. New Hampshire Sexual Assault Medical Examination Protocol Project Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, W W; Bracken, A C; Goddard, M A; Matheson, S

    1992-11-01

    A national hospital/community model protocol was developed for the forensic and medical examination of victims of sexual assault. This review is designed to assist states in the development of sexual assault protocols. Controversial issues were addressed, including the collection of hair evidence, the importance of semen, mandatory reporting, pregnancy testing and prophylaxis, and sexually transmitted diseases including human immunodeficiency virus. The current role of DNA profiling is reviewed. These issues at the interface of medicine, forensic science, victim advocacy, and the law are analyzed. Representatives of the medical, legal, law enforcement, victim advocacy, and forensic science communities contributed to the development of the protocols at the national and state levels. The importance of a collaborative effort is emphasized. The broad protocol goals are to minimize the physical and psychological trauma to the victim while maximizing the probability of collecting and preserving physical evidence for potential use in the legal system.

  9. Depressive symptoms after a sexual assault among women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    assault among women: understanding victim-perpetrator ... Our findings point to the importance of understanding the socio-cultural ... It seems reasonable to expect that perceptions ..... and the instrument measured their feelings and emotions.

  10. Sexual assault and posttraumatic stress disorder: A review of the biological, psychological and sociological factors and treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Chivers-Wilson, Kaitlin A.

    2006-01-01

    Sexual assault occurs with alarming frequency in Canada. The prevalence of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in assault survivors is drastically higher than the national prevalence of the disorder, which is a strong indication that the current therapies for sexual-assault-related PTSD are in need of improvement. Increasing knowledge and understanding of the pathologies associated with rape trauma in biological, psychological and sociological domains will help to develop more effective trea...

  11. Relational caring: the use of the victim impact statement by sexually assaulted women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Karen-Lee

    2014-01-01

    The victim impact statement (VIS) is a written account of harms experienced as a result of crime. This study investigates VIS use by sexually assaulted women through interviews with Canadian victims, victim services workers, and feminist advocates (N = 35). Findings suggest that victims use the VIS to express relational caring. Relational caring is an ethic of care that prioritizes others through privileging the harms experienced by others because of witnessing the sexual assault or coping with the victim's postassault sequelae, protecting future or hypothetical victims, and promoting the interests of intimate partner offenders. Relational caring challenges traditional conceptions of victim agency and VIS use for instrumental purposes, as well as the targets and temporalities of sexual assault harms that are detailed in the statement. Relational caring has unique implications for victims who are mothers, especially those abused as minors, and for intimate partners. Legal, therapeutic, and social service consequences are discussed.

  12. The Western Danish Center for Prevention, Treatment and Research of Sexual Assault

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingemann-Hansen, Ole

    2006-01-01

    are under the circumstances of trust, safety and interdependence offered care, treatment and medical examination including a standardized forensic examination. From 1999 to 2004 the Center has received 523 victims, 338 (64%) of who were seen by the physician. 349 (67%) victims have reported the case......During the 1980’s and 1990’s several Sexual Assault Centers were established in the Nordic countries in order to counteract the health consequences of sexual assault. In Denmark the Western Danish Sexual Assault Center (WDSAC) was established in November 1999 in the town of Aarhus. The victims...... to the police. In the region of WDSAC, the prevalence of attending the Center was 45 per 100.000 females at risk. At the present moment several studies are in progress focusing on the basic epidemiology of rape and attempted rape - a way to measure the unknown incidence of rape (the “dark number”) - as well...

  13. Barriers to the effective use of medico-legal findings in sexual assault cases worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mont, Janice Du; White, Deborah

    2013-09-01

    Despite the increasing implementation of standardized rape kits across jurisdictions, the medico-legal findings generated by these tools are often not related to positive criminal justice outcomes. Given that there has been no global investigation of the factors that might impede their successful use in cases of sexual assault, we conducted a review of relevant scholarly and "grey" literature from industrialized and less-developed regions. One key theme to emerge from the analysis concerned certain problematic practices and behaviors of professional groups involved in the various stages of the post-sexual assault process. We found that a lack of competence in handling sexual assault cases, contempt for women who have been victimized, and corruption among some forensic examiners, police, scientists, and legal personnel often have shaped the collection, processing, analysis, and use of medico-legal evidence. We discuss recent initiatives and future directions for research that might serve to address these issues.

  14. Bystander education training for campus sexual assault prevention: an initial meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Jennifer; Moore, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    The present meta-analysis evaluated the effectiveness of bystander education programs for preventing sexual assault in college communities. Undergraduates trained in bystander education for sexual assault were expected to report more favorable attitudes, behavioral proclivities, and actual behaviors relative to untrained controls. Data from 12 studies of college students (N = 2,926) were used to calculate 32 effect sizes. Results suggested moderate effects of bystander education on both bystander efficacy and intentions to help others at risk. Smaller but significant effects were observed regarding self-reported bystander helping behaviors, (lower) rape-supportive attitudes, and (lower) rape proclivity, but not perpetration. These results provide initial support for the effectiveness of in-person bystander education training. Nonetheless, future longitudinal research evaluating behavioral outcomes and sexual assault incidence is needed.

  15. The Allure of the Freshman Girl: Peers, Partying, and the Sexual Assault of First-Year College Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Brian N.

    2011-01-01

    Although sexual assault has long been recognized as a problem among college students, little attention has been paid to why first-year women are the most likely to be assaulted. In this article the author drew on two studies of college students to analyze peer culture and the organization of gender and sexuality within a college party scene.…

  16. 78 FR 53429 - Response Systems to Adult Sexual Assault Crimes Panel (Response Systems Panel); Notice of Federal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-29

    ... of the Secretary Response Systems to Adult Sexual Assault Crimes Panel (Response Systems Panel... Floor, Washington, DC 20001. DATES: A meeting of the Response Systems to Adult Sexual Assault Crimes... and assessment of the systems used to investigate, prosecute, and adjudicate crimes involving...

  17. Health disparities in the forensic sexual assault examination related to skin color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommers, Marilyn S.; Fargo, Jamison D.; Baker, Rachel B.; Fisher, Bonnie S.; Buschur, Carol; Zink, Therese M.

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the role of skin color in the forensic sexual assault examination. The purpose of this study was to determine whether anogenital injury prevalence and frequency vary by skin color in women after consensual sexual intercourse. The sample consisted of 120 healthy (63 Black, 57 White) women who underwent a forensic sexual assault examination following consensual sexual intercourse. Experienced sexual assault forensic examiners using visual inspection, colposcopy technique with digital imaging, and toluidine blue application documented the number, type, and location of anogenital injuries. Although 55% of the total sample was observed to have at least one anogenital injury of any type following consensual intercourse, the percentages significantly differed for White (68%) and Black (43%) participants (p 0.02). When the presence of anogenital injury was analyzed by specific anatomical region, a significant difference between White and Black participants was only evident for the external genitalia (White = 56%, Black = 24%, p = .003), but not for the internal genitalia (White = 28%, Black = 19%, p = .20) or anus (White = 9%, Black = 10%, p = 0.99). A one standard deviation-unit increase in L* values (lightness) was related to a 150% to 250% increase in the odds of external genitalia injury prevalence (p dark skin color rather than race was a strong predictor for decreased injury prevalence. Sexual assault forensic examiners, therefore, may not be able to detect injury in women with dark skin as readily as women with light skin, leading to health disparities for women with dark skin. PMID:19947958

  18. Sexual assault victims in the emergency department: analysis by demographic and event characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avegno, Jennifer; Mills, Trevor J; Mills, Lisa D

    2009-10-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze demographic and event characteristics of patients presenting to the Emergency Department (ED) for evaluation after sexual assault, using a Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner standardized database. Data were prospectively collected as part of the Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner program at an urban teaching hospital. This study reviewed all ED patient records with a complaint of sexual assault between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2004. Data were collected on 1172 patients; 92.6% were women, with a mean age of 27 years. The sample was 59.1% black, 38.6% white, and 2.3% "Other." Black victims of sexual assault were significantly more likely to be young (25 years or less) than Whites. Over half (54%) reported involvement of drugs or alcohol during the event. Fifty-three percent knew their assailant(s), and black and young patients were significantly more likely to know the perpetrator(s). Threats of force were common (72.4% of sample), and multiple assailants were uncommon (18.1% of sample). Physical evidence of trauma was present in more than half (51.7%), with increased rates among Whites and older persons. Multivariate analysis showed that race, age, threats, and substance use during the event were independent risk factors for evident trauma on physical examination. Survivors of sexual assault who present to the ED are overwhelmingly female, relatively young, often know the perpetrator of the event, and are likely to be threatened and show signs of physical trauma. Differences between patients according to demographic and event characteristics may have important implications for ED management and treatment plans.

  19. Fear of acquaintance versus stranger rape as a "master status": towards refinement of the "shadow of sexual assault".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Pamela; Jordan, Carol E; Pritchard, Adam J

    2006-06-01

    Using a sample of 1010 women from a southeastern state university, we explore whether associations between fear of sexual assault and other crime-specific fears vary based on presumed victim-offender relationship. More specifically, we assess the extent to which fear of stranger- and acquaintance-perpetrated sexual assaults differ in the extent to which they are correlated with fear of other crime victimizations. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that both fear of stranger-perpetrated sexual assault and fear of acquaintance-perpetrated sexual assault were positively associated with nearly all other crime-specific fears under examination. However, associations were particularly strong between fear of sexual assault by a stranger and fear of other stranger-perpetrated crimes. Findings have significant implications for how academic institutions should comprehensively address direct and indirect negative influences of violence against college women.

  20. Sexual Assault Response Teams (SARTs): mapping a research agenda that incorporates an organizational perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moylan, Carrie A; Lindhorst, Taryn; Tajima, Emiko A

    2015-04-01

    Multidisciplinary coordinated Sexual Assault Response Teams (SARTs) are a growing model of providing health, legal, and emotional support services to victims of sexual assault. This article conceptualizes SARTs from an organizational perspective and explores three approaches to researching SARTs that have the potential of increasing our understanding of the benefits and challenges of multidisciplinary service delivery. These approaches attend to several levels of organizational behavior, including the organizational response to external legitimacy pressures, the inter-organizational networks of victim services, and the negotiation of power and disciplinary boundaries. Possible applications to organizational research on SARTs are explored. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. A self-defense program reduces the incidence of sexual assault in Kenyan adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Jake; Sinclair, Lee; Otieno, Evans; Mulinge, Munyae; Kapphahn, Cynthia; Golden, Neville H

    2013-09-01

    To determine the effect of a standardized 6-week self-defense program on the incidence of sexual assault in adolescent high school girls in an urban slum in Nairobi, Kenya. Population-based survey of 522 high school girls in the Korogocho-Kariobangi locations in Nairobi, Kenya, at baseline and 10 months later. Subjects were assigned by school attended to either a "No Means No Worldwide" self-defense course (eight schools; N = 402) or to a life-skills class (two schools; N = 120). Both the intervention and the life-skills classes were taught in the schools by trained instructors. Participants were administered the same survey at baseline and follow-up. A total of 522 girls (mean age, 16.7 ± 1.5 years; range, 14-21 years) completed surveys at baseline, and 489 at 10-month follow-up. At baseline, 24.5% reported sexual assault in the prior year, with the majority (90%) reporting assault by someone known to them (boyfriend, 52%; relative, 17%; neighbor, 15%; teacher or pastor, 6%). In the self-defense intervention group, the incidence of sexual assault decreased from 24.6% at baseline to 9.2% at follow-up (p < .001), in contrast to the control group, in which the incidence remained unchanged (24.2% at baseline and 23.1% at follow-up; p = .10). Over half the girls in the intervention group reported having used the self-defense skills to avert sexual assault in the year after the training. Rates of disclosure increased in the intervention group, but not in controls. A standardized 6-week self-defense program is effective in reducing the incidence of sexual assault in slum-dwelling high school girls in Nairobi, Kenya. Copyright © 2013 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Prevalence of sexually transmitted infections and mental health needs of female child and adolescent survivors of rape and sexual assault attending a specialist clinic

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kawsar, M; Anfield, A; Walters, E; McCabe, S; Forster, G E

    2004-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and the mental health needs of female child and adolescent survivors of rape and sexual assault who were referred to a specialist genitourinary medicine (GUM) clinic...

  3. Sexual Assault Victims' Acknowledgment Status and Revictimization Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littleton, Heather; Axsom, Danny; Grills-Taquechel, Amie

    2009-01-01

    How a victim of rape characterizes her assault has potential implications for her postassault experiences and revictimization risk. Prior research has identified several potential benefits to not conceptualizing one's experience as a form of victimization. The current study sought to identify whether there are costs to not acknowledging rape as…

  4. Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment in the U.S. Military: Volume 2. Estimates for Department of Defense Service Members from the 2014 RAND Military Workplace Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    restoring good order and discipline within the member’s unit. We believe it would be wise to assess service members’ sexual orientation in future studies...demographics, psychological state, command climate, attitudes and beliefs about sexual assault in the military and the nation, and other related issues. 2...for sexual assault that have been identified in prior research on civilian and military samples, with the exception of sexual orientation . We also

  5. Sexual assault prevention with college-aged women: a bibliotherapy approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeater, Elizabeth A; Naugle, Amy E; O'Donohue, William; Bradley, April R

    2004-10-01

    The present research evaluated the efficacy of a skills-based bibliotherapy approach to sexual assault prevention for college-aged women. One hundred and ten participants were followed prospectively for 16 weeks. A self-help book, written by the authors, was compared to a wait-list control on several self-report measures. Results revealed significant differences between groups, with bibliotherapy participants reporting decreased participation in risky dating behaviors and improvement in sexual communication strategies across a variety of dating situations. However, results suggested that the self-help book was no more effective than the wait-list control in reducing rates of sexual victimization. Limitations of the study and directions for future sexual assault prevention research with women are discussed.

  6. Disclosure of Sexual Assault Experiences among Undergraduate Women at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, Christine H.; Crosby, Carmen M.; Barrick, Kelle; Krebs, Christopher P.; Settles-Reaves, Beverlyn

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To document the sexual assault disclosure experiences of historically black college or university (HBCU) students. Participants: A total of 3,951 female, undergraduate students at 4 HBCUs. Methods: All women at the participating schools were recruited in November 2008 to participate in a Web-based survey including both closed- and…

  7. The healing power of reflective writing for a student victim of sexual assault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlowicz, Karen A; King, Leticia S

    2009-01-01

    The phenomenon of a caring relationship between a teacher and her student, a victim of sexual assault, is mediated through reflective writing assignments in a baccalaureate nursing program. Increased self-awareness, personal transformation, and healing results when the student is encouraged to openly write about her feelings.

  8. Effects of Clinician-Assisted Emotional Disclosure for Sexual Assault Survivors: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Timothy; Fende Guajardo, Jennifer; Luthra, Rohini; Edwards, Katie M.

    2010-01-01

    This study assessed the effects of clinician-assisted emotional disclosure (CAED), an integration of emotion focused therapy (Greenberg, Rice, & Elliott, 1993) and emotional disclosure, in ameliorating distress experienced by survivors of sexual assault. A total of 670 female university students were screened for both histories of sexual…

  9. Gender Difference or Indifference? Detective Decision Making in Sexual Assault Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderden, Megan A.; Ullman, Sarah E.

    2012-01-01

    Prior research examining sexual assault case decision making has failed to account for the demographic characteristics of the criminal justice practitioners charged with making case decisions. Inclusion of such information is important because it provides researchers with a greater understanding of how criminal justice practitioners' own gender,…

  10. R.U. Ready?: Peer Education and Bystander Intervention Sexual Assault Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweer, Jen Luettel; Heather, Katie; Kay, Kathryn; Stewart, K. Leigh; Kovach, Laura

    2012-01-01

    R.U. Ready? at Georgetown University is an annual sexual assault awareness event that incorporates peer education and resources with opportunities for students, staff, and faculty to dialogue about providing bystander intervention throughout the campus community. Beyond dialogue, participants learn about student activism and the resources and…

  11. The management of sexual assault victims at Odi District Hospital in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Division of Family Medicine and Primary Care, Faculty of Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University ... Setting: Odi District Hospital in the North-West Province, South Africa. ..... The lack of equipment was also frustrating to the examining doctors. If .... Sexual assault: the physician's role in prevention and treatment. J Miss.

  12. SPERM HY-LITER™ for the identification of spermatozoa from sexual assault evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westring, Christian Gustav; Wiuf, Morten; Nielsen, S Jock

    2014-01-01

    Accurate microscopic identification of human spermatozoa is important in sexual assault cases. We have compared the results of examinations with (1) a fluorescent microscopy method, SPERM HY-LITER™, and (2) Baecchi's method for identification of human spermatozoa. In 35 artificial, forensic type...

  13. R.U. Ready?: Peer Education and Bystander Intervention Sexual Assault Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweer, Jen Luettel; Heather, Katie; Kay, Kathryn; Stewart, K. Leigh; Kovach, Laura

    2012-01-01

    R.U. Ready? at Georgetown University is an annual sexual assault awareness event that incorporates peer education and resources with opportunities for students, staff, and faculty to dialogue about providing bystander intervention throughout the campus community. Beyond dialogue, participants learn about student activism and the resources and…

  14. Circumstances Surrounding Male Sexual Assault and Rape: Findings from the National Violence against Women Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, David; Monk-Turner, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Much work in the area of male sexual assault and rape relies on small clinical samples. From these samples, researchers reported that most male victims were physically injured during the attack and that penetration occurred. This work rests on a subsample of 219 men from the 1994-1996 Violence and Threats of Violence Against Women and Men in the…

  15. Elimination of Assaultive and Inappropriate Sexual Behavior by Reinforcement and Social-Restitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutzker, John R.; Polvinale, Robert A.

    1980-01-01

    Differential reinforcement of appropriate behavior was used in combination with a naturalistic restitution procedure utilizing victim participation to reduce the assaultive and interpersonal sexual behavior and genital self stimulation of an adolescent Down's syndrome male in a school setting. (Author/DLS)

  16. 32 CFR 635.28 - Procedures for restricted/unrestricted reporting in sexual assault cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... forensic evidence may be collected using the “Sexual Assault Evidence Collection Kit,” NSN 6640-01-423-9132, or a suitable substitute (hereafter, “evidence kit”). The evidence kit, other items such as clothing... chaplains to collect specific items (clothing, bedding, etc.) that may be later used as evidence, should...

  17. Gender Difference or Indifference? Detective Decision Making in Sexual Assault Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderden, Megan A.; Ullman, Sarah E.

    2012-01-01

    Prior research examining sexual assault case decision making has failed to account for the demographic characteristics of the criminal justice practitioners charged with making case decisions. Inclusion of such information is important because it provides researchers with a greater understanding of how criminal justice practitioners' own gender,…

  18. Enhancing Care and Advocacy for Sexual Assault Survivors on Canadian Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, Elizabeth; Clarke, Allyson; Miller, Natasha

    2016-01-01

    Recent media coverage of the rape chant at Saint Mary's University, the misogynist Facebook posts at Dalhousie's dental school, and the suspension of the University of Ottawa's hockey team have brought the topic of campus sexual assault under intense public scrutiny and the media accounts point to a widespread systemic rape culture on Canadian…

  19. Interpersonal Violence and Sexual Assault: Trauma-Informed Communication Approaches in University Counseling Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Christina Granato; Campbell, Kimberly Brown

    2016-01-01

    A university in the United States Mountain West utilized grant resources to track counseling services for students who were currently experiencing or who had historically experienced relationship violence, sexual assault and/or stalking. This report reflects on the first 2 years of this program, including an overview of prevalence and reporting…

  20. Middle School Youth: Satisfaction with and Responses to a Dating Violence and Sexual Assault Prevention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias-Lambert, Nada; Black, Beverly; Sharma, Yasoda

    2010-01-01

    This study examined how group composition influences students' level of satisfaction with a dating violence and sexual assault prevention program. A 10- to 12-session program was presented to 396 urban African American middle school students in mixed- and same-gender groups. Both males and females were significantly more satisfied with the…

  1. Management of child victims of acute sexual assault: Surgical repair and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minakshi Sham

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the outcome of definitive repair of anogenital injuries (AGI in child victims of acute sexual assault. settings and Design: It is a prospective study of emergency care provided to child victims of acute sexual assault at a tertiary care Pediatric Surgical Unit in Maharashtra, India. Material and Methods : Out of 25 children, who presented during January 2009-December 2010 with suspected sexual assault, five children (one male and four female, between 4-9 years of age, had incurred major AGI. These children underwent definitive repair and a diverting colostomy. Perineal pull-through was performed in the male child with major avulsion of rectum. One 4-year-old girl with intraperitoneal vaginal injury required exploratory laparotomy in addition. Results : The postoperative period and follow-up was uneventful in all our patients. Four out of five patients have excellent cosmetic and functional outcome with a follow-up of 2-4 years. Our continence results are 100%. Conclusion : Children with acute sexual assault need emergency care. To optimally restore the distorted anatomy, all major AGI in such children should be primarily repaired by an expert, conversant with a child′s local genital and perineal anatomy. Along with provision of comprehensive and compassionate medical care, prevention of secondary injuries should be the ultimate goal.

  2. Comparative studies of sexual assaults in Canada and in Hong Kong

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Carol K

    2011-01-01

    Although criminal law involving sexual offence has undergone many legal reforms in both Canada and Hong Kong, there remain numerous socio-cultural factors that maintain the difficulty of achieving successful prosecutions for these offences. This dissertation includes two comparative studies that explore complainant-specific factors that may affect the perception of adult female complainants in real (Study 1) and simulated (Study 2) sexual assault cases. Study 1 reviewed 220 archival rape case...

  3. Comparing Help-Seeking Behavior of Male and Female Survivors of Sexual Assault: A Content Analysis of a Hotline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Stephen M; Pruett, Jana A; Colvin, Marianna L

    2016-11-18

    This content analysis examines written documentation of telephone calls to a regional sexual assault hotline over a 5-year period. All male callers identified as primary victims were selected for analysis (n = 58) and a corresponding sample of female primary victims (n = 58) were randomly selected for comparison to better understand the help-seeking behavior of sexual assault survivors and inform services accordingly. A summative content analysis revealed significant contrasting themes between male and female victims, including females significantly receiving more referrals and males accessing the hotline to tell their experience of being sexually assaulted due to perceived limited support. Implications for training, practice, and future research are discussed.

  4. An Exploratory Case Study of a Sexual Assault Telephone Hotline: Training and Practice Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Marianna L; Pruett, Jana A; Young, Stephen M; Holosko, Michael J

    2016-06-29

    Using archival data, this case study systematically examines telephone calls received by a regional sexual assault hotline in the Southeastern United States over a 5-year period. A stratified random sample (n = 383) reveals that hotline staff require diversity and depth in knowledge and skills, demonstrated by the hotline's primary use as a crisis service, combined with notable use by long-term survivors. Findings include the utility of the hotline by survivors and community stakeholders, categories of assault, the time gap between incidents occurring and contacting the hotline, call severity and urgency, and services and referrals provided. Implications for training, practice, and future research are discussed.

  5. Sexual Harassment and Assault as Predictors of PTSD Symptomatology among U.S. Female Persian Gulf Military Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Jessica; Sharkansky, Erica J.; Read, Jennifer P.; Dawson, Ree; Ouimette, Paige Crosby; Martin, James A.

    1998-01-01

    Examines sexual harassment and assault of women in a wartime military example. Explores the impacts of these stressors and combat exposure on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptomatology. Harassment and assault were higher than in civilian and peacetime military samples. The number of postwar stressful life events mediated the relationship…

  6. Biological Evidence Management for DNA Analysis in Cases of Sexual Assault

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Magalhães

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological evidence with forensic interest may be found in several cases of assault, being particularly relevant if sexually related. Sexual assault cases are characterized by low rates of disclosure, reporting, prosecution, and conviction. Biological evidence is sometimes the only way to prove the occurrence of sexual contact and to identify the perpetrator. The major focus of this review is to propose practical approaches and guidelines to help health, forensic, and law enforcement professionals to deal with biological evidence for DNA analysis. Attention should be devoted to avoiding contamination, degradation, and loss of biological evidence, as well as respecting specific measures to properly handle evidence (i.e., selection, collection, packing, sealing, labeling, storage, preservation, transport, and guarantee of the chain custody. Biological evidence must be carefully managed since the relevance of any finding in Forensic Genetics is determined, in the first instance, by the integrity and quantity of the samples submitted for analysis.

  7. Biological Evidence Management for DNA Analysis in Cases of Sexual Assault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Teresa; Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge; Silva, Benedita; Corte-Real, Francisco; Nuno Vieira, Duarte

    2015-01-01

    Biological evidence with forensic interest may be found in several cases of assault, being particularly relevant if sexually related. Sexual assault cases are characterized by low rates of disclosure, reporting, prosecution, and conviction. Biological evidence is sometimes the only way to prove the occurrence of sexual contact and to identify the perpetrator. The major focus of this review is to propose practical approaches and guidelines to help health, forensic, and law enforcement professionals to deal with biological evidence for DNA analysis. Attention should be devoted to avoiding contamination, degradation, and loss of biological evidence, as well as respecting specific measures to properly handle evidence (i.e., selection, collection, packing, sealing, labeling, storage, preservation, transport, and guarantee of the chain custody). Biological evidence must be carefully managed since the relevance of any finding in Forensic Genetics is determined, in the first instance, by the integrity and quantity of the samples submitted for analysis.

  8. Biological Evidence Management for DNA Analysis in Cases of Sexual Assault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Teresa; Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge; Silva, Benedita; Corte-Real, Francisco; Nuno Vieira, Duarte

    2015-01-01

    Biological evidence with forensic interest may be found in several cases of assault, being particularly relevant if sexually related. Sexual assault cases are characterized by low rates of disclosure, reporting, prosecution, and conviction. Biological evidence is sometimes the only way to prove the occurrence of sexual contact and to identify the perpetrator. The major focus of this review is to propose practical approaches and guidelines to help health, forensic, and law enforcement professionals to deal with biological evidence for DNA analysis. Attention should be devoted to avoiding contamination, degradation, and loss of biological evidence, as well as respecting specific measures to properly handle evidence (i.e., selection, collection, packing, sealing, labeling, storage, preservation, transport, and guarantee of the chain custody). Biological evidence must be carefully managed since the relevance of any finding in Forensic Genetics is determined, in the first instance, by the integrity and quantity of the samples submitted for analysis. PMID:26587562

  9. Sperm elution: an improved two phase recovery method for sexual assault samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulme, Paul; Lewis, Jennie; Davidson, Geraldine

    2013-03-01

    This report describes the validation of a two phase cell recovery technique for the elution of two common cell types, epithelia and spermatozoa, from frequently examined items submitted as part of sexual assault casework. Furthermore, separation of cell types prior to microscopic examination of cell pellets improves the scientist's confidence in observing and scoring spermatozoa that may be present. During the validation, Orchid Cellmark's Sperm Elution© method consistently recovered a greater number of spermatozoa from simulated sexual assault items and swabs taken following consensual sexual intercourse compared to a water extraction technique. On average the Sperm Elution method recovered over twice the number of spermatozoa compared to the water method. The ability to separate the cell types present allows a rapid microscope slide search for spermatozoa and faster DNA extraction protocol in comparison to Cellmark's previous preferential method. Copyright © 2012 Forensic Science Society. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A Sexual Assault Primary Prevention Model with Diverse Urban Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smothers, Melissa Kraemer; Smothers, D. Brian

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a nonprofit community mental health clinic developed a socioecological model of sexual abuse prevention that was implemented in a public school. The goal of the program was to promote and create community change within individuals and the school community by reducing tolerance of sexual violence and sexual harassment. Participants…

  11. Descripción de las agresiones sexuales atendidas en el servicio de urgencias de un centro hospitalario de referencia Description of sexual assaults treated in the emergency department of a referral hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaume Grau Cano

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Describir los factores relacionados con las agresiones sexuales que se atienden en el hospital de referencia de la ciudad de Barcelona. Métodos: Estudio transversal de base individual de las agresiones sexuales atendidas en el servicio de urgencias entre los años 2005 y 2008. Resultados: Se atendieron 712 pacientes, con predominio femenino (95,5%. Las mujeres agredidas y atendidas presentan una edad mediana de 25 años, realizaron denuncia el 87,5% de los casos y fueron agredidas por un único agresor el 84,5%. El perfil de la agredida (pObjective: To describe the factors related to adult sexual assaults attended in a referral hospital in the city of Barcelona (Spain. Methods: We carried out an individual-based cross-sectional study of sexual assaults treated in the emergency department between 2005 and 2008. Results: A total of 712 patients (95.5% female were treated. The median age of assaulted women was 25 years. Complaints were made in 87.5% of cases and assaults were made by a single attacker in 84.5%. When the perpetrator was known, the profile of the victim (p<0.05 was as follows: the victim was assaulted at home (81.5%, the perpetrator acted alone (94.2%, the mechanism of aggression was penetration (89.3% and the attack took place during the week (63.3%. Conclusions: Analysis of sexual assaults allows for different risk groups to be established, which facilitates the development of specific protocols and guidelines for effective aid and full treatment.

  12. “Campus Craft”: A Game for Sexual Assault Prevention in Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekbia, Hamid R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Sexual assault is prevalent among college students. In response, universities have implemented prevention education initiatives. These interventions, however, often ignore the broader sociocultural context in which sexual violence occurs. This calls for innovative approaches in prevention education, which address the broader context. Computer games provide such an opportunity by providing simulated real-life scenarios, nonlinear narratives, and an interactive medium. We report the development and pilot testing of “Campus Craft,” a game prototype that focuses, among other things, on sexual assault prevention. Materials and Methods: The prototype was developed through a participatory design process; students, educators, and subject matter experts helped design and develop scenarios, game mechanics, and learning objectives. The prototype was evaluated by college students (n=141) in a multi-method approach. The evaluation encompassed issues of usability, game mechanics, attitudes, and learning outcomes. Results: Findings indicated that participants rated various aspects of the game positively. Additionally, use of “Campus Craft” contributed to differences in student learning of prevention concepts between the pre- and post-test such that students scored higher on the post-test. Conclusions: Findings demonstrate that, on average, students learned several core concepts related to sexual consent and rape culture through gameplay. Results suggest that computer-based gaming may be a viable avenue for sexual assault prevention education. Findings demonstrate that this approach could be effective in increasing student knowledge and understanding of factors that contribute to sexual assault in college. Future research is needed to corroborate findings and better understand the feasibility of using this approach among larger samples of college students. PMID:26181803

  13. Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment in the U.S. Military. Volume 2. Estimates for Department of Defense Service Members from the 2014 RAND Military Workplace Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    the legal definitions of sexual assault and sexual harassment, whether they know their obligations for investigat- ing and reporting such events...National Guard duty LGBT lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender MEO military equal opportunity NCOA National Change of Address NDRI RAND National Defense...unwanted experiences but that experience did not meet all of the UCMJ definitional criteria of sexual assault. Air Force rates of unwanted events are

  14. Mental health, sexual violence and the work of Sexual Assault Referral centres (SARCs) in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooker, Charlie; Durmaz, Emma

    2015-04-01

    There is a clear link between mental health status both before and after rape. It is known, for example, that approximately 40% of attendees to a Sexual Assault Referral centre (SARC) are already known to mental health services. Sexual Violence can also lead to the development of a mental illness. SARCs have been established, inter alia, to provide healthcare to the victims of rape where a mental health risk assessment should be undertaken. All 37 SARCs in England where asked to complete a short survey and a response rate of 68% was achieved. A high proportion (40%) of SACRs clients are already known to mental health services, however, only just under half of SARCs routinely assess mental health and when such an assessment is completed this is by an FME and substance misuse issues are not always included. Almost two-thirds of SARC services report problems in referring on to mental health services for a variety of reasons. More research is needed in this important area and NHS England should fully define the skills required to undertake a mental health risk assessment when someone has been the victim of rape.

  15. Sexual Harassment and Assault in the U.S. Military: A Review of Policy and Research Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stander, Valerie A; Thomsen, Cynthia J

    2016-01-01

    Recently, there has been increasing concern regarding the problem of sexual violence in the military. Because sexual harassment and assault are more closely intertwined in the military than in most civilian contexts, the military context affords a unique opportunity to study the interrelationships between these two types of sexual violence. In this review, we briefly summarize existing research on military sexual trauma prevalence rates, effects on victims, and risk factors, as well as prevention and response programs in the military context. In each of these topic areas, we emphasize issues unique to the complex interplay between sexual harassment and assault in the military and make recommendations for future research.

  16. Sexual assault and posttraumatic stress disorder: a review of the biological, psychological and sociological factors and treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivers-Wilson, Kaitlin A

    2006-07-01

    Sexual assault occurs with alarming frequency in Canada. The prevalence of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in assault survivors is drastically higher than the national prevalence of the disorder, which is a strong indication that the current therapies for sexual-assault-related PTSD are in need of improvement. Increasing knowledge and understanding of the pathologies associated with rape trauma in biological, psychological and sociological domains will help to develop more effective treatments for survivors. A dysregulation of the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA) axis is observed in survivors of sexual assault and this may be a fundamental cause of the structural and functional abnormalities contributing to PTSD symptoms. Pharmacotherapies are available to treat PTSD; however, they are often inadequate or unwanted by the survivor. Psychological health is compromised following interpersonal trauma and many psychological therapies are available, but with varying efficacy. A person's cognitions have a dramatic effect on the onset, severity, and progress of PTSD following sexual assault. Sociological impacts of assault influence the development of PTSD through victim-blaming attitudes and the perpetuation of rape myths. Perceived positive regard and early social support is shown to be important to successful recovery. Education is vital in rape prevention and to foster a supportive environment for survivors. The biological, psychological and sociological impacts and treatments should not remain mutually exclusive. A better appreciation of the biopsychosocial repercussions of sexual assault will aid in developing a more holistic and individualized therapy to help alleviate the physical and emotional pain following the trauma of rape.

  17. Sexual assault and other types of violence in intimate partner relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsaker, Kjersti; Morken, Tone; Baste, Valborg; Campos-Serna, Javier; Moen, Bente E

    2012-03-01

    To investigate whether sexual assaults are more likely to co-occur with some types of abuse rather than others in violent intimate relationships. Cross-sectional study. A self-administered questionnaire was sent to all Norwegian women's shelters. Women seeking refuge at Norwegian women's shelters in 2002 and 2003. Sexual assault and experiences of intimate partner violence were measured using the Severity of Violence against Women Scale (SVAWS) and psychological violence was measured using the Psychological Maltreatment of Women Inventory (PMWI). Student's t-test analyses were performed between the mean values of the different acts of reported violence, and linear regression analyses were used to examine the association between sexual violence and the other forms of violence reported. Sexual violence correlated significantly with the other eight categories in SVAWS, and with violence directed at the pregnant woman's abdomen and psychological violence in PMWI. When we adjusted all categories for each other by linear regression analysis, sexual intimate partner violence was significantly associated with hair pulling, arm twisting, spanking or biting, dominance and isolation abuse and violence directed at the pregnant woman's abdomen. Sexual assaults are more likely to co-occur with some types of physical and psychological violence than with others. This knowledge may be important for improving our understanding of sexual violence in intimate partner relationships and in the efforts to detect intimate partner violence. Bruises, loss of hair and bite marks may suggest that sexual acts were committed against the victim's will. © 2012 The Authors Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica© 2012 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  18. Sexual assault victimization and psychopathology: A review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, Emily R; Menon, Suvarna V; Bystrynski, Jonathan; Allen, Nicole E

    2017-08-01

    Sexual assault (SA) is a common and deleterious form of trauma. Over 40years of research on its impact has suggested that SA has particularly severe effects on a variety of forms of psychopathology, and has highlighted unique aspects of SA as a form of trauma that contribute to these outcomes. The goal of this meta-analytic review was to synthesize the empirical literature from 1970 to 2014 (reflecting 497 effect sizes) to understand the degree to which (a) SA confers general risk for psychological dysfunction rather than specific risk for posttraumatic stress, and (b) differences in studies and samples account for variation in observed effects. Results indicate that people who have been sexually assaulted report significantly worse psychopathology than unassaulted comparisons (average Hedges' g=0.61). SA was associated with increased risk for all forms of psychopathology assessed, and relatively stronger associations were observed for posttraumatic stress and suicidality. Effects endured across differences in sample demographics. The use of broader SA operationalizations (e.g., including incapacitated, coerced, or nonpenetrative SA) was not associated with differences in effects, although including attempted SA in operationalizations resulted in lower effects. Larger effects were observed in samples with more assaults involving stranger perpetrators, weapons, or physical injury. In the context of the broader literature, our findings provide evidence that experiencing SA is major risk factor for multiple forms of psychological dysfunction across populations and assault types. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Preventing Posttraumatic Stress Related to Sexual Assault Through Early Intervention: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, Emily R; Schumacher, Julie A

    2016-09-28

    Sexual assault survivors come into contact with a variety of community responders after assault, and these interactions may play an important role in mitigating distress. Given theoretical understandings of the importance of early experiences in the development of posttraumatic stress (PTS), early contact with formal systems (e.g., health care, criminal justice, social services) and informal responders (e.g., friends, family) might be particularly important in preventing PTS. However, the effectiveness of these early interventions is unclear. Understanding the key elements of early interventions, both formal and informal, that successfully prevent the development of PTS could help to improve community responses to sexual assault and ultimately promote survivor well-being. In this systematic review, we investigate the types of experiences with responders in the early aftermath of assault that are associated with PTS, the duration of effects on PTS, and the role of the timing of these responses in the development of PTS. Findings indicate that responder contact alone is not typically associated with significant differences in PTS, and there is insufficient evidence to indicate that the timing of seeking help is associated with PTS, but the quality of services provided and perceptions of interactions with certain responders appear to be associated with PTS. Although many effects were short-lived, interventions that were perceived positively may be associated with lower PTS up to a year postassault. These findings support the importance of offering best practice interventions that are perceived positively, rather than simply encouraging survivors to seek help.

  20. Prevalence of Past-Year Sexual Assault Victimization Among Undergraduate Students: Exploring Differences by and Intersections of Gender Identity, Sexual Identity, and Race/Ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulter, Robert W S; Mair, Christina; Miller, Elizabeth; Blosnich, John R; Matthews, Derrick D; McCauley, Heather L

    2017-02-17

    A critical step in developing sexual assault prevention and treatment is identifying groups at high risk for sexual assault. We explored the independent and interaction effects of sexual identity, gender identity, and race/ethnicity on past-year sexual assault among college students. From 2011 to 2013, 71,421 undergraduate students from 120 US post-secondary education institutions completed cross-sectional surveys. We fit multilevel logistic regression models to examine differences in past-year sexual assault. Compared to cisgender (i.e., non-transgender) men, cisgender women (adjusted odds ratios [AOR] = 2.47; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.29, 2.68) and transgender people (AOR = 3.93; 95% CI 2.68, 5.76) had higher odds of sexual assault. Among cisgender people, gays/lesbians had higher odds of sexual assault than heterosexuals for men (AOR = 3.50; 95% CI 2.81, 4.35) but not for women (AOR = 1.13; 95% CI 0.87, 1.46). People unsure of their sexual identity had higher odds of sexual assault than heterosexuals, but effects were larger among cisgender men (AOR = 2.92; 95% CI 2.10, 4.08) than cisgender women (AOR = 1.68; 95% CI 1.40, 2.02). Bisexuals had higher odds of sexual assault than heterosexuals with similar magnitude among cisgender men (AOR = 3.19; 95% CI 2.37, 4.27) and women (AOR = 2.31; 95% CI 2.05, 2.60). Among transgender people, Blacks had higher odds of sexual assault than Whites (AOR = 8.26; 95% CI 1.09, 62.82). Predicted probabilities of sexual assault ranged from 2.6 (API cisgender men) to 57.7% (Black transgender people). Epidemiologic research and interventions should consider intersections of gender identity, sexual identity, and race/ethnicity to better tailor sexual assault prevention and treatment for college students.

  1. Discrepancy between information reported by the victims of sexual assaults and clinical forensic findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scherer, Susanne; Hansen, Steen Holger; Lynnerup, Niels

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: From the clinical forensic examination reports made at the Department of Forensic Medicine, the University of Copenhagen, in 2007 concerning rape, attempted rape and sexual assault (RAS), information about the assault, including both violence and the perpetrator's line of sexual...... action was extracted, analysed and compared to the observed lesions (LE). MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 184 girls and women were included in this retrospective study. RESULTS: 75.5% of the victims were under 30 years of age. Observed LE: 79% had observed LE. 41% had body LE only, 19% genito-anal LE...... only, and 40% had both body and genito-anal LE. Half of the victims, who reported no exposure to violence, had body LE. Five victims also had LE of a self-inflicted character. Genito-anal LE: 47% had genito-anal LE, 64% of whom had one or two, commonest a tear. Body LE: 64% had body LE. 57% was caused...

  2. Does the punishment fit the crime? Judicial sentencing in adolescent and adult sexual assault cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Mont, Janice; Forte, Tania; Badgley, Robin F

    2008-06-01

    This is the first Canadian study to focus directly on whether factors commonly identified as reflecting the seriousness of a sexual assault are noted by judges, and in turn, related to the severity of the sentences they impose. We examined adolescent and adult female sexual assault cases heard in Ontario between 1993 and 2001. Two hundred twenty-one cases were identified using Quicklaw, Canada's most comprehensive on-line legal information system, with data extracted onto a coding instrument. In 201 (91%) of these cases, a perpetrator had been sentenced to prison or jail. Judges reported that in a substantial proportion of these women they had been penetrated (67%), forced (49%), coerced (50%), physically injured (33%), and psychologically harmed (65%). However, only two of the six offence seriousness factors examined were associated with a prison versus jail sentence: the occurrence of vaginal and/or anal penetration and the threat or use of a weapon(s).

  3. Department of Defense Annual Report on Sexual Assault in the Military. Fiscal Year 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Court-Martial Charge Preferred (Initiated) Conviction YES Female victim alleged Marine male subject met victim at gym , forced her to have oral sex ...Reports, FY11. Categories with zero values are not shown. Note: The category “Age 16–19” is used because the relevant UCMJ sex crimes apply to victims...ASSAULT In the Department, the term “sexual assault” does not refer to one specific crime; rather, it encompasses a range of sex crimes that

  4. Estimating the Organizational Cost of Sexual Assault in the U.S. Military

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    sexual-assault cases. Lastly, thank you my wonderful husband, Gregor, and our children , Connor and Kate. Without your support and blessing, I never...DoD under the DoD’s homosexual - conduct policy (United States Government Accountability Office, 2011). In an NPS thesis by Freddy A. Morales entitled...5,300 in 2008 (Dertouzosn & Garber, 2008). In the GAO’s report on costs associated with implementing the DoD’s homosexual conduct policy, the agency

  5. Plan to Prevent and Respond to Sexual Assault of Military Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    from our sexual assault prevention and response program. In recent years, the Department has taken important steps to enhance prevention efforts...males is limited. The Department is now working to increase research-informed, gender -specific prevention techniques that address male specific...Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs (OASD(HA)), Office of Diversity Management and Equal Opportunity (ODMEO), Public Affairs Officers) to work on the

  6. Investigating the medical forensic examination from the perspectives of sexually assaulted women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Mont, Janice; White, Deborah; McGregor, Margaret J

    2009-02-01

    Across many jurisdictions, a key institutional response to sexual assault is centred on the collection of medico-legal evidence through a medical forensic examination (MFE). Despite the increased routinization of this practice, such evidence often is not related to positive criminal justice outcomes. As there has been little systematic investigation of the perspectives of victims regarding the MFE, we conducted semi-structured, face-to-face interviews with 19 women aged 17-46 years who had been sexually assaulted and had undergone an MFE in the previous six months at one of four specialized hospital-based sexual assault centres in Ontario, Canada. Extracts from the transcribed interviews were coded into two broad themes, 'Expectations' and 'Experiences', from which a series of lower order constructs were derived. We found that most women went to a centre to have their physical and emotional needs addressed rather than medico-legal evidence collected and were overwhelmingly satisfied with their interactions with specially trained nurse examiners. However, some women were confused about the purpose of the MFE, believing that their access to treatment hinged upon undergoing this process. Moreover, though optional, several indicated that they had been instructed to have an MFE by the police and/or nurse examiner. Most women who chose to have evidence collected did so with the hope that it would hold the assailant accountable and generate social recognition of the harm done to them. While many stated that they were distressed during the MFE, some reported feeling simultaneously empowered by the fact that the experience fostered a "sense of doing something". These findings point to the value of collecting medico-legal evidence in settings staffed with supportive practitioners who also attend to women's health related concerns. Implications with respect to issues of informed consent, revictimization, and empowerment, as well as the relative weight given to the MFE in the

  7. Bringing Research Into Practice: An Evaluation of Michigan's Sexual Assault Kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Jessica; Campbell, Rebecca; Hagstrom, Julie; O'Reilly, Leslie; Kreiger, Gail; Cain, Debi; Nye, Jeff

    2016-05-01

    The importance of research-informed practice for the field of sexual assault has been stressed by academics and practitioners alike. However, there are few examples of researcher-practitioner partnerships in the literature, therefore providing minimal guidance for this process. This article describes a researcher-practitioner partnership that was successful in using evaluation data to guide practice and policy decisions regarding the development and implementation of a new sexual assault kit for the state of Michigan. Cousins's practical participatory evaluation theory was used as the guiding framework for the evaluation. Data collection methods included focus groups with practitioners from five, regionally dispersed health care settings in Michigan, and surveys with forensic scientists throughout the state's regional laboratory system. This case study highlights how researchers and practitioners worked together for data collection, analysis, and dissemination to support research-informed practice in this state. Lessons learned and future recommendations for forming researcher-practitioner partnerships to improve the response to sexual assault are discussed.

  8. Sperm Hy-Liter™: an effective tool for the detection of spermatozoa in sexual assault exhibits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Moors, Anick; Georgalis, Tina; Armstrong, Gail; Modler, Jeff; Frégeau, Chantal J

    2013-05-01

    A fluorescence-based assay specifically targeting human spermatozoa was tested and optimized for best staining results using a variety of mock sexual assault samples. Swab clippings versus whole swabs were evaluated for best sample preparation and to simplify workflow (direct application versus swab extraction). The practicality and sensitivity of Sperm Hy-Liter™ was compared to our current phase contrast microscopy protocol for searching for the presence of spermatozoa. Sperm Hy-Liter™ was more sensitive than phase contrast microscopy and was able to detect spermatozoa more effectively in actual sexual assault samples (recent [N=240] or 24 years old [N=4]) containing few spermatozoa. Correlations were drawn between the Sperm Hy-Liter™ spermatozoa counts and the AmpFlSTR(®) Profiler(®) Plus male profiles generated from the sperm cell DNA fractions of semen containing swabs and swab clippings. In addition, recovered spermatozoa from Sperm Hy-Liter™-stained slides with greater than 40 spermatozoa produced full STR male profiles in 20.3% of slides tested and partial STR male profiles in 52.8% of slides tested. The adoption of Sperm Hy-Liter™ offers a means to standardize and improve the efficiency of the microscopic screening of sexual assault evidence.

  9. Concurrent administration of sexual assault prevention and risk reduction programming: outcomes for women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidycz, Christine A; Orchowski, Lindsay M; Probst, Danielle R; Edwards, Katie M; Murphy, Megan; Tansill, Erin

    2015-06-01

    The present study describes the 4- and 7-month postintervention outcomes of a sexual assault risk reduction program for women, which was part of an evaluation that included a prevention program for men. Relative to the control group, participants evidenced more relational sexual assertiveness and self-protective behavior, and were more likely to indicate that they utilized active verbal and physical self-defense strategies. Whether or not women experienced subsequent victimization did not differ between groups. Relative to control group women who were victimized, program participants who were victimized between the 4- and 7-month follow-up blamed the perpetrator more and evidenced less self-blame.

  10. Measuring social reactions to female survivors of alcohol-involved sexual assault: The Social Reactions Questionnaire-Alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relyea, Mark; Ullman, Sarah E

    2015-07-01

    For women who disclose sexual assault, social reactions can affect post-assault adjustment. Approximately half of the sexual assaults of adult women involve alcohol use. Experimental studies indicate that people put more blame on women who were drinking before the assault, yet no studies have assessed how often actual survivors receive social reactions specific to their alcohol use. This study presents a new measure to assess alcohol-specific social reactions for survivors of sexual assault (The Social Reactions Questionnaire-Alcohol, SRQ-A). Factor analyses of a large community sample indicated that women often receive both positive and negative alcohol-specific reactions when disclosing assault. Discriminant validity confirmed that such reactions are distinct from other types of assault-related social reactions. Against predictions, alcohol-specific reactions were not associated with depression, posttraumatic stress symptoms, binge drinking, or intoxication. However, in support of the hypotheses, alcohol-specific reactions were related to increased characterological self-blame and alcohol problems. Notably, such reactions had both positive and negative relationships with self-blame, indicating a potential avenue for intervention. Implications for researchers and practitioners are discussed.

  11. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Worldviews and Cultural Safety Transforming Sexual Assault Service Provision for Children and Young People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Funston

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Child Sexual Assault (CSA in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities is a complex issue that cannot be understood in isolation from the ongoing impacts of colonial invasion, genocide, assimilation, institutionalised racism and severe socio-economic deprivation. Service responses to CSA are often experienced as racist, culturally, financially and/or geographically inaccessible. A two-day forum, National Yarn Up: Sharing the Wisdoms and Challenges of Young People and Sexual Abuse, was convened by sexual assault services to identify the main practice and policy concerns regarding working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people (C&YP, families and communities in the context of CSA. The forum also aimed to explore how services can become more accountable and better engaged with the communities they are designed to support. The forum was attended by eighty invited Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Aboriginal youth sexual assault managers and workers representing both “victim” and “those who sexually harm others” services. In keeping with Aboriginal Community-Based Research methods forum participants largely directed discussions and contributed to the analysis of key themes and recommendations reported in this article. The need for sexual assault services to prioritise cultural safety by meaningfully integrating Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Worldviews emerged as a key recommendation. It was also identified that collaboration between “victims” and “those who sexually harm” services are essential given Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander C&YP who sexually harm others may have also been victims of sexual assault or physical violence and intergenerational trauma. By working with the whole family and community, a collaborative approach is more likely than the current service model to develop cultural safety and thus increase the accessibility of sexual assault services.

  12. Reducing Alcohol-Related Sexual Assault in the Marine Corps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    to be pitted against one another within the confines of a military courtroom. I am convinced that these types of sexual assaults—those driven by...most compelling testimony came from Ms. T herself: She testified that she only drank about two to three alcoholic drinks of Red Bull mixed

  13. Disclosing Sexual Assault Within Social Networks: A Mixed-Method Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, Emily R; Pittenger, Samantha L; Allen, Nicole E

    2016-03-01

    Most survivors of sexual assault disclose their experiences within their social networks, and these disclosure decisions can have important implications for their entry into formal systems and well-being, but no research has directly examined these networks as a strategy to understand disclosure decisions. Using a mixed-method approach that combined survey data, social network analysis, and interview data, we investigate whom, among potential informal responders in the social networks of college students who have experienced sexual assault, survivors contact regarding their assault, and how survivors narrate the role of networks in their decisions about whom to contact. Quantitative results suggest that characteristics of survivors, their social networks, and members of these networks are associated with disclosure decisions. Using data from social network analysis, we identified that survivors tended to disclose to a smaller proportion of their network when many network members had relationships with each other or when the network had more subgroups. Our qualitative analysis helps to contextualize these findings.

  14. Predicting risky sexual behavior in emerging adulthood: examination of a moderated mediation model among child sexual abuse and adult sexual assault victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littleton, Heather L; Grills, Amie E; Drum, Katherine B

    2014-01-01

    Although having a sexual victimization history is associated with engaging in sexual risk behavior, the mechanisms whereby sexual victimization increases risk behavior are unclear. This study examined use of sex as an affect regulation strategy as a mediator of the relationship between depressive symptoms and sexual risk behavior among 1,616 sexually active college women as well as examined having a history of child sexual abuse (CSA), adolescent/adult sexual assault (ASA), or both (CSA/ASA) as moderators. Results supported the mediated model as well as moderated mediation, where depressive symptoms were more strongly associated with use of sex as an affect regulation strategy among ASA victims, and sex as an affect regulation strategy was more strongly related to sexual risk behavior for CSA/ASA victims.

  15. 78 FR 8987 - Standards To Prevent, Detect, and Respond to Sexual Abuse and Assault in Confinement Facilities...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-07

    ... Sexual Abuse and Assault in Confinement Facilities; Extension of Comment Period AGENCY: Department of..., DHS proposed to issue regulations setting standards to prevent, detect, and respond to sexual abuse... projected outages at the Federal eRulemaking Portal, http://www.regulations.gov , and the Federal Document...

  16. Heterogeneity of existing research relating to sexual violence, sexual assault and rape precludes meta-analysis of injury data.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kennedy, Kieran M

    2013-07-01

    In order for medical practitioners to adequately explain to the court the findings of their clinical examinations of victims of sexual violence, they must have access to research data which will place their findings in to context. Unfortunately, existing research has reported a very wide range of injury prevalence data. This papers aims to provide an explanation for this wide variation in results and, furthermore, this paper aims to establish if it is possible to carry out a meta-analysis of existing research data, pertaining to the prevalence of injury after sexual assault. It is suggested that pooling of individual study results may allow statistically robust determination of the true prevalence of injury in victims of sexual violence. It is concluded that heterogeneity in research methodology, between existing research studies, is responsible for the broad range of reported prevalence rates. Finally, this heterogeneity is seen to preclude robust meta-analysis.

  17. A Danish model for treating victims of rape and sexual assault: The multidisciplinary public approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bramsen, Rikke Holm; Elklit, Ask; Nielsen, Louise Hjort

    2009-01-01

    of and the framework behind these centers must be assessed and developed further to accommodate the growing need for rape trauma services in Europe and worldwide. This paper describes the experiences of a public Danish center for rape victims and proposes a management model for current and future rape victim centers.......Most centers for rape and sexual assault victims today build on the original principles proposed in Boston by Burgess and Holmstrom in the 1970s (Burgess & Holmstrom, 1973; Burgess, 2006). In line with technological advances, scientific developments, and societal changes, the standards...

  18. Sexual assault, domestic violence and HIV: promoting women's rights through legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearshouse, Richard

    2008-12-01

    General HIV laws seldom, if ever, address the human rights abuses that most affect women, particularly rape, sexual assault and domestic violence. In this article, which is based on his presentation at a concurrent session at the conference, Richard Pearshouse describes a Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network project to develop draft legislation covering certain areas of women's rights. The draft legislation is intended to be used as a practical resource for bringing about concrete law reform. This presentation won for Richard the International AIDS Society's Young Investigator Award for the conference's Track E (Policy and Political Sciences).

  19. Predicting women's perceptions of domestic violence and sexual assault agency helpfulness: what matters to program clients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweig, Janine M; Burt, Martha R

    2007-11-01

    Study goals were to assess if community agency interactions, the characteristics of services provided by staff, and the combinations of services received can predict women's perceptions of victim service helpfulness around domestic violence and sexual assault. Data were collected from agency representatives in 26 communities, and both women who used services and others living in the community (n = 1,509 women). Women found nonprofit victim services more helpful based on staff behavior in those agencies and the extent to which women felt control when working with staff; helpfulness of services was enhanced when agencies interacted with the legal system and other community agencies.

  20. SPERM HY-LITER™ for the identification of spermatozoa from sexual assault evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westring, Christian Gustav; Wiuf, Morten; Nielsen, S Jock;

    2014-01-01

    Accurate microscopic identification of human spermatozoa is important in sexual assault cases. We have compared the results of examinations with (1) a fluorescent microscopy method, SPERM HY-LITER™, and (2) Baecchi's method for identification of human spermatozoa. In 35 artificial, forensic type...... was non-selective. Data from forensic casework samples in Copenhagen from two years (2008 and 2009) are presented. The samples from 2008 were investigated using Baecchi's method, while those from 2009 were investigated using SPERM HY-LITER™. The frequencies of positive results were similar between the two...

  1. [The development of forensic nursing from the perspective of domestic violence and sexual assault preventive policies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Hsiu-Fen; Wang, Hsiu-Hung; Chang, Shu-Chen

    2013-12-01

    Forensic nursing is a new nursing specialty that provides forensic nursing service to domestic violence victims and offenders. Development of the role of forensic nurses has become urgent and necessary. The high rates of domestic violence and sexual assault in Taiwan suggest that forensic nurses have an important role to play in domestic healthcare. This article highlights the significance of forensic nursing in Taiwan in the future in terms of its origin, definitions, models, roles and functions, training and education, and previous studies. Through cooperation among academia, government, industry, and law enforcement agencies, it is expected that forensic nursing will be a positive and important area of expansion for professional nursing.

  2. Does Fear of Terrorism Differ From Fear of Crime and Sexual Assault: A Question of Geographical Location and Residential Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shechory-Bitton, Mally; Cohen-Louck, Keren

    2016-07-05

    The study describes an examination of three types of fear: crime, sexual assault, and terrorism. The sample consisted of 507 adults from three different geographical locations in Israel with different levels of crime and terror attacks. With regard to fear of crime and fear of sexual assault, the results were compatible with the findings of many studies that indicate the effect of residential area features on levels of fear. Fear of terrorism was found to be more complex. The theoretical framework used to assess fear of crime is not fully suitable for assessing and examining fear of terrorism. Other variables should be taken into consideration, such as religion and ideology.

  3. "I Believe What I See": College Students' Use of Media, Issue Engagement, and Perceived Responsibility Regarding Campus Sexual Assault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jo-Yun; Kim, Sei-Hill; O'Boyle, Jane

    2017-09-01

    The topic of campus sexual assault has received much media attention recently, prompting scholars to examine media effects on students' attitudes and behaviors. A survey of 567 American college students examined how their media exposure is related to issue engagement, perceived responsibility, and acceptance of rape myths. Results indicated that reading newspaper stories about campus sexual assault might contribute to college students' victim blaming. Among other media channels examined, social media were found to be highly correlated with students' engagement with the issue. We also found that victim blaming and acceptance of rape myths could be reduced by raising students' perceived importance of the issue. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed in detail.

  4. HIV/AIDS, psychiatric disorder and sexual assault in Transkei: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meel, B L

    2006-04-01

    HIV infection and psychiatric disorders have a complex relationship. HIV infection could lead to psychiatric disorders, and psychiatric patients are more vulnerable to HIV infection. HIV is not only an illness which is associated with stigmatization and discrimination, but also has several risks attached including physical and sexual abuse. There is a scarcity of literature on HIV, mental illness and sexual assault although they are a common trio. The author describes an HIV-positive woman with a psychiatric disorder. She suffered from AIDS and periodic psychotic epidsodes. On a day when she had such an episode she became a rape victim. The history, and physical and genital examination has been described. The need for further research in the area of HIV/AIDS and mental health has been discussed. Preventive strategies have been recommended for HIV-infected individuals in poor health resource settings.

  5. Sexual Assault and Justice for Older Women: A Critical Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fileborn, Bianca

    2016-03-31

    This article provides a critical review of current literature on the sexual assault of older women-including an exploration of the specific features and emotional and physical impacts of older women's experiences-and highlights current gaps and future directions for research, practice, and theory. A review of the literature indicates that older women constitute only a small proportion of victim/survivors. However, there is evidence to suggest that existing research underestimates the extent of this issue. Older women face particular barriers to disclosure and accessing the justice system, resulting in their experiences remaining hidden. Many of these barriers also contribute toward older women's experiences being ignored, dismissed, or downplayed by potential bystanders. These barriers are explored in depth in this article and include cultural context, ageism, cognitive and health impairments, and living in a residential care setting. Responding to, and preventing, the sexual assault of older women requires a tailored approach-and we currently lack sufficient insight to develop appropriate responses. In closing, this article considers how we might work toward achieving "justice" for older women victim/survivors. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. Co-morbidity of HIV, Hepatitis B, and Syphilis, among victims of sexual assaults in Transkei region, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banwari L. Meel

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS, hepatitis B and syphilis have a common mode of transmission, which is through sexual intercourse. These are also transmitted percutaneously and by blood transfusion. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of HIV, hepatitis B and syphilis among victims of sexual assault by analysing serology results.Method: This is a record review of victims of sexual assault who attended the Sinawe Centre (a clinic for victims of sexual assault between January and December 2004.Results: A total of 188 victims of sexual assault was reported. 35 (19.8% tested HIV sero-positive. Hepatitis B antibodies were detected in seven (7.6% and syphilis serology (RPR was positive in five (2.9%. All were under 50 years of age, except one victim. Of the 35 who tested positive, 30 were below 30 years of age. Of those who were 30 years and younger, 12 were between 21 and 30 years old, 16 were between 11 and 20 years old and two were younger than 10. None was positive for all three tests. Two were positive for hepatitis B and HIV and two were positive for RPR and HIV.Conclusion: No significant co-morbidity of HIV, hepatitis B or syphilis was observed in this study, even though these diseases have the same mode of transmission.

  7. Co-morbidity of HIV, Hepatitis B, and Syphilis, among victims of sexual assaults in Transkei region, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banwari L. Meel

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS, hepatitis B and syphilis have a common mode of transmission, which is through sexual intercourse. These are also transmitted percutaneously and by blood transfusion. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of HIV, hepatitis B and syphilis among victims of sexual assault by analysing serology results.Method: This is a record review of victims of sexual assault who attended the Sinawe Centre (a clinic for victims of sexual assault between January and December 2004.Results: A total of 188 victims of sexual assault was reported. 35 (19.8% tested HIV sero-positive. Hepatitis B antibodies were detected in seven (7.6% and syphilis serology (RPR was positive in five (2.9%. All were under 50 years of age, except one victim. Of the 35 who tested positive, 30 were below 30 years of age. Of those who were 30 years and younger, 12 were between 21 and 30 years old, 16 were between 11 and 20 years old and two were younger than 10. None was positive for all three tests. Two were positive for hepatitis B and HIV and two were positive for RPR and HIV.Conclusion: No significant co-morbidity of HIV, hepatitis B or syphilis was observed in this study, even though these diseases have the same mode of transmission.

  8. Development of a sexual assault evidence collection kit - the need for standardization in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökdoğan, M R; Bafra, J

    2010-05-01

    Sexual offences are recognized to be one of the most critical of crimes throughout the world. In Turkey, forcible rapes show, in the sexual crime rates, an increase of approximately 3% every year. It becomes even more critical, when realizing that less than half of all rapes, which are believed to occur, are reported to law enforcement, and of those few assailants who are arrested even fewer are convicted of rape. Often, little or no knowledge of the correct methods of locating, recovering, packaging, and preserving evidence specimens are the causes for compromising the forensic examination in court. This problem occurs when medical personnel are not adequately trained or properly advised in the evidentiary aspects and medical features of treating a victim. The current survey is aimed to increase the awareness of the need of an initial and continuing education by health care policies to cope with increasing professional demands for forensic practice sexual assault cases, to take judicial and social precautions, and medico-legal evidence. To determine the likelihood of obtaining corroborating evidence this paper presents the results of a study referring to this problem. An updated questionnaire has been applied at random to medical personnel, a total of 543 participants, throughout Turkey. Taking certain criteria into consideration the findings revealed a significant deficiency of knowledge regarding medical-legal examination. In comparison, a one-semester course of basic forensic sciences proved to be sufficient to recognize the amount of knowledge required to work as a forensic professional. Based on the results, recommendations are presented in the form of a sexual assault evidence collection kit (SAECK). A kit, which takes into consideration the needs of crime laboratories, law enforcement agencies, medical personnel, and above all the victim. This is the first step in building a responsible and successful evidence collection program that will survive the rigors

  9. Elaborations on sexual assault on dates among Israeli students: risk, detrimental effect, and resilience factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shechory Bitton, Mally; Ben-David, Sarah

    2014-12-01

    The current study of 668 Israeli male and female students examines the prevalence of gendered risk factors for sexual assault (SA) on dates, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as a detrimental effect of SA, and self-efficacy as resiliency to refuse unwanted sex following SA. Two different sets of risk factors that increased the likelihood of SA on dates emerged from the hierarchical regression. Sexual experience, use of drugs, and private location increased the risk of being SA victims among males, whereas sexual experience, perceived provocative behavior, and alcohol use increased the risk among females. In addition, PTSD and self-efficacy to refuse unwanted sex following SA on dates were predicted by the extent of coercive sexual victimization. PTSD was also predicted by subjective perception of sexual behavior and rape myths, whereas efficacy was predicted by private location. The findings contribute to the literature by showing the contribution of various risk factors to experiencing SA, and by showing SA effect on PTSD and self-efficacy.

  10. Unraveling the Determinants of Fear of Crime Among Men and Women in Istanbul: Examining the Impact of Perceived Risk and Fear of Sexual Assault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özaşçılar, Mine; Ziyalar, Neylan

    2015-10-29

    Studies have examined university students' fear of crime focusing on the relationship between the fear of sexual assault and fear of other crimes, termed the shadow of sexual assault hypothesis; however, no study to date has examined the shadow thesis in a Turkish context. Drawing on the shadow thesis, using a sample of 723 university students in Istanbul, this study focuses on the effect of fear of sexual assault and perceived risk of crime to general fear of crime among university students in Istanbul. Also, the predictors of fear of crime are explored to examine the relationship between lifestyle characteristics, constrained behaviors, and fear. The findings of the study supported the shadow thesis, indicating that fear of sexual assault shaped the nonsexual crimes, especially crimes involving face-to-face confrontations between the victim and offender. Furthermore, lifestyle characteristics are correlated with the men's fear of nonsexual crimes, particularly fear of robbery, aggravated assault, and burglary home.

  11. Genital and anal injuries: A cross-sectional Australian study of 1266 women alleging recent sexual assault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilkens, Renate R; Smith, Debbie A; Phillips, Maureen A; Mukhtar, S Aqif; Semmens, James B; Kelly, Maire C

    2017-06-01

    To describe the frequency of genital and anal injury and associated demographic and assault characteristics in women alleging sexual assault. Cross-sectional study. Sexual Assault Resource Centre (SARC), Western Australia. Total of 1266 women attending SARC from Jan-2009 to Mar-2015. Women underwent a standardised data collection procedure by forensically trained doctors. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed. (1) Frequency of genital and anal injuries by type of sexual assault. (2) Identification of independent factors associated with genital and anal injuries following, respectively, completed vaginal and anal penetration. Genital injury was observed in 24.5% of all women with reported completed vaginal penetration; in a subset with no prior sexual intercourse 52.1% had genital injury. Genital injury was more likely with no prior sexual intercourse (adjusted odds ratio [adj. OR] 4.4, 95% confidence interval [95%CI] 2.4-8.0), multiple types of penetrants (adj. OR 1.5, 95%CI 1.0-2.1), if general body injury present and less likely with sedative use and delayed examination. Anal injury, observed in 27.0% of reported completed anal penetrations, was more likely with multiple types of penetrants (adjusted OR 5.0, 95%CI 1.2-21.0), if general body injury present and less likely with delayed examination. This study separately quantifies the frequency of both genital and anal injuries in sexually assaulted women. Genital injuries were absent in a large proportion of women regardless of prior vaginal intercourse status. It is anticipated that findings will better inform the community, police and medico-legal evidence to the criminal justice system. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Sexual Assault

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by your browser. Please enable JavaScript for full functionality. ------------------------------------------------------------ Find a Health Center ------------------------------------------------------------ Share this page: Twitter MySpace Technorati Facebook StumbleUpon Delicious Email to friend Digg ------------------------------------------------------------ Embed this widget on your Web site Find a Health Center Near: Enter a ...

  13. Sexual Assault

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Recruiter Newsroom Announcements Congressional Testimony Contact Us Director's Speeches Fact Sheets IHS Blog Press Releases Reports to Congress Tribal Leader Letters Urban Leader Letters IHS Home for Patients ...

  14. Psychological Outcomes among Lesbian Sexual Assault Survivors: An Examination of the Roles of Internalized Homophobia and Experiential Avoidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Sari D.; Dickstein, Benjamin D.; Marx, Brian P.; Lexington, Jennifer M.

    2009-01-01

    This study explored the relations among internalized homophobia (IH), experiential avoidance, and psychological symptom severity in a community sample of 72 lesbian sexual assault survivors. Results indicated that IH is associated with both experiential avoidance and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity. In addition, experiential…

  15. Dating Violence and Sexual Assault Prevention with African American Middle Schoolers: Does Group Gender Composition Impact Dating Violence Attitudes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Beverly M.; Weisz, Arlene N.; Jayasundara, Dheeshana S.

    2012-01-01

    A dating violence and sexual assault prevention program was presented to 396, predominately African American, middle schoolers in two inner city schools in the United States. In one school the program was offered with a same-gender group composition; in the other school, the same program was offered with mixed-gender group composition. A…

  16. Psychological Outcomes among Lesbian Sexual Assault Survivors: An Examination of the Roles of Internalized Homophobia and Experiential Avoidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Sari D.; Dickstein, Benjamin D.; Marx, Brian P.; Lexington, Jennifer M.

    2009-01-01

    This study explored the relations among internalized homophobia (IH), experiential avoidance, and psychological symptom severity in a community sample of 72 lesbian sexual assault survivors. Results indicated that IH is associated with both experiential avoidance and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity. In addition, experiential…

  17. Bystander Interventions for Sexual Assault and Dating Violence on College Campuses: Are We Putting Bystanders in Harm's Way?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Tricia H.; Casper, Deborah M.; Hackman, Christine L.; Mulla, Mazheruddin M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The present study investigated the well-being of bystanders who witness and intervene in sexual assault and dating violence situations on campus. Participants: Participants were 321 young men and women from a large university in the southeastern United States. Methods: Participants completed a survey at the end of the Spring semester of…

  18. Dating Violence and Sexual Assault Prevention with African American Middle Schoolers: Does Group Gender Composition Impact Dating Violence Attitudes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Beverly M.; Weisz, Arlene N.; Jayasundara, Dheeshana S.

    2012-01-01

    A dating violence and sexual assault prevention program was presented to 396, predominately African American, middle schoolers in two inner city schools in the United States. In one school the program was offered with a same-gender group composition; in the other school, the same program was offered with mixed-gender group composition. A…

  19. Getting to the Left of Sharp: Lessons Learned from West Point’s Efforts to Combat Sexual Harassment and Assault

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    and the superintendent, who is dual -hatted as the president of the College, works directly for the Army’s Chief of Staff. Finally, the strategic...and children, and in both married and single adults. It involves pathological behaviors, illegal behaviors, and some behaviors that are both illegal...Intervention, Rape Myth Acceptance and Behavioral In- tent to Commit Sexual Assault,” Sexual Addiction & Compulsivity: The Journal of Treatment & Prevention

  20. Using a social marketing approach to advertise Sexual Assault Nurse Examination (SANE) services to college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konradi, Amanda; DeBruin, Patty L

    2003-01-01

    The authors report on an advertising campaign to communicate the availability and desirability of using Sexual Assault Nurse Examination (SANE) services. They used social marketing precepts to develop posters to educate college students about using SANE as a health service and as an arm of prosecution. After 2 advertising campaigns, they conducted an anonymous survey of 1,051 college students. The findings indicated that posters placed in residence halls and public bathrooms reached students, produced a statistically significant increase in students' understanding of SANE services, and were significantly associated with their hypothetical encouragement of others to use SANE. Gender mediated some results. Posters placed in private viewing spaces were found to be a viable way to communicate information about SANE. Funding to combat violence against women on campus should be aimed at increasing students' access to SANE and should include the costs of advertising the program.

  1. Differentiating between genuine damage and falsified damage to a garment following an alleged sexual assault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Graham; Haider, Imran

    2012-11-01

    An allegation of sexual assault was made in which a bra was torn off by the assailant causing extensive damage; however, it was observed that the hook and eye fastening was still intact. It was felt that it was not possible for a garment to receive such damage without damage to the hook and eye fastening, thus indicating that the complainant caused the damage to the bra herself to support a false allegation. Reconstruction experiments were conducted in which the conditions of the allegation were simulated utilizing a range of similar bras. Following the infliction of damage, the hook and eye fastenings were examined. In eight of nine experiments, the hook and eye fastening were intact, despite the application of enough force to cause separation of the bra cups in five of the experiments. This shows that bras may suffer extensive damage without damage to the hook and eye fastening.

  2. Evaluation of physical and mental health of sexual assault cases applied to forensic medicine department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Korkmaz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In the present study, to assess the sexual assault victims considering sociodemographic and forensic psychiatry who were examined by our Board of Physical and Mental Health was aimed. Methods: The cases who were examined in Board of Physical and Mental Health in Forensic medicine Department of Dicle University, Faculty of Medicine were assessed retrospectively in terms of age, gender, marital status, education level, relation of the victim with the accused, presence of penetration and disruption of physical and mental health. Results: Among 258 cases, who referred to our board, 196 were female and 62 were male. The age range of the victims was 2 to 50 and average age was detected as 13.1 ± 5.9 years. It was determined that 227 (88% cases were under 18 years and 31 cases (12% were above 18 years. Vaginal and anal penetration was claimed in 48 and 61 cases, respectively; oral + anal penetration was claimed in 11 cases; both vaginal and oral penetration was claimed in two cases. Among 258 cases, 144 cases had no physical and mental disruption; 49 cases were diagnosed with mental and physical health disruption and 65 cases were followed by issuing a preliminary report. Conclusion: As a result of our study any significant relation is not found between impairment in psychological health and sex, marital status, educational level of the victim, age groups, the age difference between the victim and the defendant. Therefore, it is understood that either men or women, married or single, educated or uneducated people are affected emotionally as bad as from sexual assault. This supports the idea that, especially in cases that any findings cannot be obtained with genital and physical examination, psychological evaluation may be important.

  3. Rural Location and Relative Location: Adding Community Context to the Study of Sexual Assault Survivor Time Until Presentation for Medical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ingrid Diane; Hiller, Matthew L

    2016-08-12

    Despite a strong empirical base linking community context and proximity to resources to individual health care access, studies examining predictors of sexual assault survivor time until presentation for medical care have not yet examined these relationships. This study addresses this gap. The data included retrospective records on a sample of 1,630 female survivors who reported their sexual assault to law enforcement and were subsequently seen by a sexual assault nurse examiner (SANE) in one of eight Alaskan communities between the years 1996 and 2006. Logistic regression models were used to determine whether delays in presentation (presentation 12 hr or more after assault) differed for women presenting in unique communities (rural location), and between those whose assault and exam occurred in different communities versus occurring in the same community (relative location). Although rural location did not seem to have a unique impact on time until presentation, differing locations (i.e., relative location) of assaults and exams increased the likelihood of delays in presentation. Non-American Indian/Alaska Native race/ethnicity and knowing one's assailant(s) also increased the likelihood of delays. These results indicate that in addition to a need for further research, there is a need for more appropriate and reliable sexual assault medical services across communities, and that survivors assaulted by known assailants should be targeted in efforts to reduce time until presentation.

  4. "They Talk Like That, But We Keep Working": Sexual Harassment and Sexual Assault Experiences Among Mexican Indigenous Farmworker Women in Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Jeanne; Samples, Julie; Morales, Mavel; Shadbeh, Nargess

    2015-12-01

    In order to examine the experiences of sexual harassment and sexual assault among indigenous and non-indigenous Mexican immigrant farmworkers in Oregon's Willamette Valley, a community-academic participatory research partnership initiated a study, which included focus groups, conducted and analyzed by skilled practitioners and researchers. The themes that emerged from the focus groups included direct and indirect effects of sexual harassment and sexual assault on women and risk factors associated with the farmworker workplace environment, and the increased vulnerability of non-Spanish-speaking indigenous women due to low social status, poverty, cultural and linguistic issues, and isolation. Recommendations for prevention and improved services for vulnerable women will be discussed as well as limitations and future research directions.

  5. An evaluation of nonassaultive, assaultive, and sexually assaultive adolescents at pretrial sentencing: a comparison on cognition, personality, aggression, and criminal sentiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valliant, Paul M; Clark, Lisa M

    2009-12-01

    This study evaluated male adolescents who were convicted of offenses. Test scores of 12 nonassaultive, 14 assaultive, and 13 sexual offenders were compared prior to sentencing. A battery of psychometric tests evaluating cognition, scholastic ability, personality, aggression, and criminal sentiments were administered. Significant differences were noted for the subtest Block Design of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children. Significant personality measures were also noted for Social Introversion and Addiction Acknowledgement of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent Form, and the Inhibited, Sexual Discomfort, Peer Insecurity, Substance Abuse Proneness, and Anxious Feelings of the Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory. There were significant differences noted for the State Anger, Feel Like Expressing Anger Verbally, Feel Like Expressing Anger Physically, Trait Anger, Angry Temperament, Angry Reaction, Anger Expression-Out, and Anger Expression Index of the Spielberger State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory. Discriminant analyses showed the three groups could be separated by stepwise procedure.

  6. The Shadow of Physical Harm? Examining the Unique and Gendered Relationship Between Fear of Murder Versus Fear of Sexual Assault on Fear of Violent Crime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, Samantha; Cook, Carrie L

    2015-09-01

    The shadow hypothesis regarding the impact of fear of sexual assault on fear of violent crime suggests that female fear of crime is characterized by concern about sexual assault as a contemporaneous victimization event during a violent crime event. Recent research has found that other types of crime, namely physical assault, may also be feared as a contemporaneous offense. We know of no research that has examined the unique impact of fear of murder versus fear of sexual assault on fear of violent crime. There is also a lack of research that explores how these two types of fear uniquely affect men and women. In addition to gender, we examine factors that have been suggested in previous research to correlate with fear of crime: race, victimization, vicarious victimization, and perceived risk. Through survey methodology, this research examines the unique relationship between both fear of murder and fear of sexual assault and fear of three types of violent crime for men and women. Results suggest differences in how fear of murder and fear of sexual assault are related to fear of other types of violence for men and women. Specifically, fear of murder is important in estimating male fear of robbery and aggravated assault. However, fear of sexual assault is almost as important as fear of murder for men in estimating fear of home invasion. Similarly, for women, fear of sexual assault and fear of murder both are significant factors associated with fear of violent crime, and differences between the levels of significance are marginal. This study is a first to examine whether murder may also be feared as a contemporaneous offense. The results are informative in identifying what drives fear of crime, particularly violent crime, for both men and women. Avenues for future research are discussed.

  7. Clinical care for sexual assault survivors multimedia training: a mixed-methods study of effect on healthcare providers’ attitudes, knowledge, confidence, and practice in humanitarian settings

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Janel R; Ho, Lara S; Langston, Anne; Mankani, Neha; Shivshanker, Anjuli; Perera, Dhammika

    2013-01-01

    Background Sexual assault is a threat to public health in refugee and conflict affected settings, placing survivors at risk for unintended pregnancy, unsafe abortion, STIs, HIV, psychological trauma, and social stigma. In response, the International Rescue Committee developed a multimedia training tool to encourage competent, compassionate, and confidential clinical care for sexual assault survivors in low-resource settings. This study evaluated the effect of the training on healthcare provid...

  8. Sexual Assault: Actions Needed to Improve DOD’s Prevention Strategy and to Help Ensure It Is Effectively Implemented

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    equity • High tolerance levels of crime and other forms of violence Source: GAO analysis of DOD data. | GAO-16-61 Note: Data are from DOD’s 2014...national (e.g., state, university), and coalition (e.g., United Kingdom and Canada ) sexual-assault prevention programs to identify best practices and...or employment decisions affecting that person; or such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s work

  9. Sexual Assault: Better Resource Management Needed to Improve Prevention and Response in the Army National Guard and Army Reserve

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    ensure it has the staff needed to complete investigations within 3 weeks, as required by OCI guidance. Eligibility for follow-up or long-term health ...long-term mental and medical health -care services. DOD’s sexual assault prevention and response instruction requires the commander of the Army...correct or mitigate the challenges of funding behavioral health care for Army Reserve soldiers, particularly those who require coverage for trauma

  10. The Liability of Churches for the Historical Sexual Assault of Children by Priests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Calitz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Could a church be held liable for the sexual assault of children by priests when the victims claim as adults only many years after the event? Complainants can claim damages on the basis that the church is either directly or vicariously liable for the alleged acts. If the victims rely on vicarious liability, they will have to prove that the wrongdoer was an employee of the defendant and will further have to prove that the assaults were committed within the course and scope of the wrongdoer's employment. The requirement that a priest must be an employee has in the past created a hurdle for victims, since courts in different countries have traditionally held that priests are not employees of the church as they are servants of God, subject to ecclesiastic law and not civil law. However, in John Doe v Bennet in Canada and JGE v Diocese of Portsmouth in the UK the courts have recently held that even a relationship akin to employment is sufficient to be a basis for vicarious liability. In Bazley v Curry the Canadian Supreme Court moreover extended the traditional meaning of the "course and scope of employment" by developing the "close connection" test. The court found that the acts of a warden of a children's home were so closely connected with his duties that it was fair that his employer (a charitable organisation should be held liable for his conduct. The close connection test was followed by the House of Lords in the United Kingdom and by the South African Constitutional Court in K v Minister of Safety and Security, although in another context. Adult complainants in cases such as these will further have to prove that their claim has not expired as a result of prescription. In Canada, the UK and South Africa courts have in different ways acknowledged the fact that victims of child sexual abuse are often not able to process their claims timeously, because of psychological factors. The victims are allowed to bring their claims often decades after

  11. Forensic medical examinations conducted on complainants of sexual assault in the Forensic Medicine Institute, Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, Nicolaus Copernicus University in Torun, between 2006 and 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelgardt, P; Cychowska, M; Bloch-Bogusławska, E

    2014-01-01

    A total of 46 cases of alleged sexual assault were analysed from the years 2006-2013 where forensic medical examinations were conducted. The material was compared with data from literature. All the victims were female. In 9 cases (20%) a sexual assault by sexual touching was alleged, 67% of complainants (31 cases) had alleged non-consensual sexual intercourse, 6 complainants (13%) had no recollection of events. Genital area injuries were reported in 26% of sexual assault victims. Injuries of other parts of the body were found in 73% of victims. None of the subjects were positive for severe injuries such as fractures, wounds, and head trauma with loss of consciousness. The majority of complainants (29 cases, 63%) were examined within 24 hours after the incident and 6 examinees (13%) were assessed between 24 and 48 hours after the alleged sexual assault. Eleven forensic medical examinations (24%) were conducted after the lapse of more than 48 hours since the alleged incident. Twenty nine complainants admitted that they had washed their genital area after the sexual assault. Forensic swabs were taken during all forensic medical examinations.

  12. SPERM HY-LITER™ for the identification of spermatozoa from sexual assault evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westring, Christian G; Wiuf, Morten; Nielsen, S Jock; Fogleman, James C; Old, Jennifer B; Lenz, Camilla; Reich, Karl A; Morling, Niels

    2014-09-01

    Accurate microscopic identification of human spermatozoa is important in sexual assault cases. We have compared the results of examinations with (1) a fluorescent microscopy method, SPERM HY-LITER™, and (2) Baecchi's method for identification of human spermatozoa. In 35 artificial, forensic type samples, spermatozoa were identified in 45.7% with SPERM HY-LITER™ in Copenhagen, in 54.3% in the laboratory of the manufacturer of SPERM HY-LITER™, and 40.0% of the samples with Baecchi's staining method. When differences occurred between the two methods, it was significantly more often that SPERM HY-LITER™ detected spermatozoa when Baecchi's method did not (ts=6.567, df=1, P=0.048). This trend was also seen in selected compromised or degraded samples and in selected adjudicative samples. The reactions with spermatozoa from dog, horse, pig and bull were negative with SPERM HY-LITER™, whereas Baecchi's method was non-selective. Data from forensic casework samples in Copenhagen from two years (2008 and 2009) are presented. The samples from 2008 were investigated using Baecchi's method, while those from 2009 were investigated using SPERM HY-LITER™. The frequencies of positive results were similar between the two methods for the two years (27.9% and 32.1% respectively). Analysis of acid phosphatase (ACP) activity for the positive results obtained for these two years does not support the use of a negative ACP result as a prescreen for microscopic analysis for spermatozoa.

  13. Military sexual assault and homeless women veterans: clinical correlates and treatment preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Suzanne E; Rosenheck, Robert A; Tsai, Jack; Hoff, Rani; Harpaz-Rotem, Ilan

    2013-01-01

    Both homeless women and women who have experienced military sexual assault (MSA) are at high risk of serious psychological sequelae. However, little is known about the combined impact of MSA and current homelessness on psychological distress, or about distinctive treatment preferences among homeless female veterans affected by MSA. This observational study compared clinical symptoms, pre-military experiences, and treatment preferences among 509 female veterans with and without MSA who enrolled in 11 VA Homeless Women Veterans Programs. Over one third of participants (41.1%) reported MSA. In multivariate analyses, homeless female veterans who reported MSA endorsed greater severity of PTSD and other psychiatric symptoms. Those who had experienced MSA were more likely to report interest in treatment, and treatment focused on safety was reported as especially attractive. Among homeless female veterans, MSA is associated with greater mental health symptoms and greater interest in safety-focused treatment. Services targeting the needs of homeless MSA survivors should be encouraged. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Evaluating the efficacy of DNA differential extraction methods for sexual assault evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Sonja B; Buoncristiani, Martin R

    2017-07-01

    Analysis of sexual assault evidence, often a mixture of spermatozoa and victim epithelial cells, represents a significant portion of a forensic DNA laboratory's case load. Successful genotyping of sperm DNA from these mixed cell samples, particularly with low amounts of sperm, depends on maximizing sperm DNA recovery and minimizing non-sperm DNA carryover. For evaluating the efficacy of the differential extraction, we present a method which uses a Separation Potential Ratio (SPRED) to consider both sperm DNA recovery and non-sperm DNA removal as variables for determining separation efficiency. In addition, we describe how the ratio of male-to-female DNA in the sperm fraction may be estimated by using the SPRED of the differential extraction method in conjunction with the estimated ratio of male-to-female DNA initially present on the mixed swab. This approach may be useful for evaluating or modifying differential extraction methods, as we demonstrate by comparing experimental results obtained from the traditional differential extraction and the Erase Sperm Isolation Kit (PTC(©)) procedures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Sexual Communication, Sexual Goals, and Students' Transition to College: Implications for Sexual Assault, Decision-Making, and Risky Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Kristen P.; Schacht, Rebecca L.; Pantalone, David W.; Blayney, Jessica A.; George, William H.

    2009-01-01

    A qualitative study was conducted to understand college students' experiences and perceptions of sexual communication and sexual goals, and how they were affected by the transition from high school to college. Participants were heterosexual college students (N = 29). Single-sex focus groups were conducted and analyzed for themes. Major themes…

  16. Sexual Communication, Sexual Goals, and Students' Transition to College: Implications for Sexual Assault, Decision-Making, and Risky Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Kristen P.; Schacht, Rebecca L.; Pantalone, David W.; Blayney, Jessica A.; George, William H.

    2009-01-01

    A qualitative study was conducted to understand college students' experiences and perceptions of sexual communication and sexual goals, and how they were affected by the transition from high school to college. Participants were heterosexual college students (N = 29). Single-sex focus groups were conducted and analyzed for themes. Major themes…

  17. A social ecological approach to understanding correlates of lifetime sexual assault among sexual minority women in Toronto, Canada: results from a cross-sectional internet-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logie, C H; Alaggia, R; Rwigema, M J

    2014-08-01

    Stigma, discrimination and violence contribute to health disparities among sexual minorities. Lesbian, bisexual and queer (LBQ) women experience sexual violence at similar or higher rates than heterosexual women. Most research with LBQ women, however, has focused on measuring prevalence of sexual violence rather than its association with health outcomes, individual, social and structural factors. We conducted a cross-sectional online survey with LBQ women in Toronto, Canada. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess correlates of lifetime sexual assault (LSA). Almost half (42%) of participants (n = 415) reported experiences of LSA. Participants identifying as queer were more likely to have experienced LSA than those identifying as lesbian. When controlling for socio-demographic characteristics, experiencing LSA was associated with higher rates of depression, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), receiving an STI test, belief that healthcare providers were not comfortable with their LBQ sexual orientation, and sexual stigma (overall, perceived and enacted). A history of sexual violence was associated with lower: self-rated health, overall social support, family social support and self-esteem. This research highlights the salience of a social ecological framework to inform interventions for health promotion among LBQ women and to challenge sexual stigma and sexual violence.

  18. Sexual violence: an analysis of data related to indecent assault - doi: 10.5020/18061230.2012.p235

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaella Queiroga Souto

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the profile of people submitted to the Indecent Assault Evaluation (IAE at the Nucleus for Legal Medicine and Dentistry (NUMOL in Campina Grande - PB, Brazil. Methods: This is a descriptive and documentary survey carried out with medical reports of incident assault performed against men and women of any age, who were evaluated at the Nucleus for Legal Medicine and Dentistry (NUMOL in Campina Grande - PB, Brasil, from 2005 to 2009. Data collection instrument was a specially designed form based on existing information in the IAE records. Data was recorded in SPSS, version 17, and analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results: Male individuals (n = 85; 62%, under the age of 20 (n = 112; 81.8% were the main victims. The notification of sexual violence was carried out by the parents (n = 34; 24.8%, mostly by the mother (n = 27; 19.7%, and the police stations were the most frequent location to express the complaint (n = 134; 97.8%. The violence was committed by a single perpetrator (n = 78; 56.9%, who was known by the victim (n = 88; 64.2%. The crime of rape was confirmed in (n = 48 35% of cases. Conclusion: The men, most of them young, are the main victims of indecent assault, and violence is committed by one individual, member of the victim’s social circle.

  19. A agressão sexual na adolescência: um destino da hiperatividade? Sexual assault in adolescence: a fate for hyperactivity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Yves Chagnon

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available O artigo apresenta os resultados de uma pesquisa sobre adolescentes autores de atos de agressão sexual, examinados no âmbito de perícias judiciárias. Esses sujeitos tinham sido crianças instáveis, agitadas ou, ainda, hiperativas. Procura-se, então, explicar de que maneira a hiperatividade infantil, dificuldade de tratar mentalmente as excitações pulsionais, constitui fator de risco de agressão sexual na adolescência. A noção de narcisismo fálico permite esclarecer os impasses identificatórios e a dificuldade de compor com a mutualidade dos desejos.This paper presents the results of a research about adolescents having perpetrated sexual assault, met in the precinct of judiciary expertise. These subjects had been instable children, agitated or yet hyperactive. The author tries then to explain how infantile hyperactivity, the difficulty to mentally deal with drive excitations, can be a risk factor of sexual assault in adolescence. The notion of phallic narcissism allows illuminating the identificatory deadlocks and the trouble to reconcile with the mutuality of desires.

  20. Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment in the U.S. Military: Annex to Volume 3. Tabular Results from the 2014 RAND Military Workplace Study for Coast Guard Service Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    punished or treated unfairly in the workplace if you did not do something sexual? (Follow-up questions established that target had direct evidence of an...from work made you feel like you would get punished or treated unfairly in the workplace if you did not do something sexual? (Follow-up questions...SEXUAL ASSAULT AND SEXUAL HARASSMENT IN THE U.S. MILITARY Annex to Volume 3. Tabular Results from the 2014 RAND Military Workplace Study for

  1. 农村留守女童性侵害的预防%Prevent sexual assault in left behind girls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龙玲; 陈世海

    2013-01-01

    Sexual assault is becoming a serious problem among countryside left-behind girls. It reflected the poor in education from family and school,unsafe in Community and Society,insufficient of protection from government.In order to prevent the sexual assault,the family should improve the ability about care and sex education,the school should improve teaching and Management,the community should Care girls in the Community ,the society should care girls by professional organization.%农村留守女童性侵害形势严峻,性侵害折射出家庭监护和教育不到位,学校教育和管理不善,社区照顾不足,社会风气不良和政府保护不力。留守女童性侵害的预防,需要提升家庭的监护和教育能力,改善学校的教育和管理,发挥社区的照顾功能,引入社会组织的专业服务,加强政府对女童的保护。

  2. Do Sexual Assault Bystander Interventions Change Men's Intentions? Applying the Theory of Normative Social Behavior to Predicting Bystander Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabry, Amanda; Turner, Monique Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    The high prevalence of sexual assault on college campuses has led to the implementation of health communication programs to prevent sexual assault. A few novel programs focus on primary prevention by targeting social norms related to gender and masculinity among men through bystander intervention. Guided by the theory of normative social behavior, this study sought to examine the relative effect of campaigns communicating positive versus negative injunctive norms and the interaction between exposure to such campaign messages and perceived descriptive norms and relevant cognitive moderators (e.g., outcome expectations, injunctive norms, group identity, ego involvement) among men. A 2 (high/low descriptive norms) × 2 (high/low moderator) × 3 (public service announcement) independent groups quasi-experimental design (N = 332) was used. Results indicated that messages communicating positive injunctive norms were most effective among men who were least likely to engage in bystander intervention. Furthermore, descriptive norms played a significant role in behavioral intentions, such that those with stronger norms were more likely to report intentions to engage in bystander behaviors in the future. Similarly, the moderators of aspiration, injunctive norms, social approval, and ego involvement had a significant positive effect on behavioral intentions. These findings have important implications for future message design strategy and audience segmentation.

  3. Understanding Support Providers' Views of "Helpful" Responses to Sexual Assault Disclosures: The Impacts of Self-Blame and Physical Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sit, Victoria; Schuller, Regina A

    2015-11-20

    Prior research on the factors associated with various disclosure responses has often been conducted on sexual assault victims and formal support providers, while informal helpers, who are the most common recipients of disclosures, have received far less attention. This experimental study examined potential informal helpers' views of disclosure reactions and their influence on the self-reported likelihoods of engaging in those responses. Undergraduate students at a large Canadian university (N = 239) received vignettes describing a hypothetical sexual assault disclosure that varied on victim's self-blame and physical resistance, and then rated common disclosure reactions. The results revealed that participants' perceptions of various responses were at odds with victims' experiences, with many negative responses, such as victim blame and egocentrism, viewed as equally or more helpful than positive responses, such as emotional support. Moreover, when the victim blamed herself and did not physically resist, positive responses were seen as less helpful whereas negative responses were seen as more helpful, with some notable gender differences. Regression analyses indicated that the perceived helpfulness of each response was the strongest predictor of the likelihood of providing that response. Practical implications of these findings are discussed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Development and Validation of a Video Measure for Assessing Women’s Risk Perception for Alcohol-Related Sexual Assault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Kathleen A.; Levonyan-Radloff, Kristine; Dearing, Ronda L.; Hequembourg, Amy; Testa, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objective Using an iterative process, a series of three video scenarios were developed for use as a standardized measure for assessing women’s perception of risks for alcohol-related sexual assault (SA). The videos included ambiguous and clear behavioral and environmental risk cues. Method Focus group discussions with young, female heavy drinkers (N = 42) were used to develop three videos at different risk levels (low, moderate, and high) in Study 1. Realism, reliability, and validity of the videos were assessed using multiple methods in Studies 2 and 3. One hundred-four women were used to compare differences in risk perception across the video risk level in Study 2. In Study 3 (N = 60), we assessed women’s perceptions of the low and high risk videos under conditions of no alcohol and alcohol. Results The realism and reliability of the videos were good. Women who viewed the low risk video compared to women who viewed the moderate and high risk videos perceived less risk for SA. We found an interaction between alcohol and risk perception such that, women in the alcohol condition were less likely to perceive risk when watching the high risk video. Conclusions As the video risk level increased, women’s perception of risk increased. These findings provide convergent evidence for the validity of the video measure. Given the limited number of standardized scenarios for assessing risk perception for sexual assault, our findings suggest that these videos may provide a needed standardized measure. PMID:27747131

  5. Experiences of health care providers managing sexual assault victims in the emergency unit Part 1: Background and methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca M. Skhosana

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available

    The objective of  this  study was  to  explore  and describe  the  experiences of health care providers managing sexual assault victims in the emergency unit of a community hospital in the Nkangala district in the  Mpumalanga Province. A qualitative, phenomenological design was applied. Purposeful sampling was used to select participants from health care providers who were working in the emergency unit and had managed more than four sexual assault victims. Data were collected by means of individual interviews and analysed according to the Tesch method of data analysis by the researcher and the independent co-coder.

    Main categories, subcategories and themes were identified. Participants expressed their emotions, challenges and police attitudes and behaviours as well as  inconsistencies in guidelines and needs identification. It was recommended that members of the multidisciplinary team engage in community activities and that the community participate  in matters pertaining to sexual assault. Government should develop  clear guidelines  that are applicable  to  rural and urban South Africa. Health  care sciences should aim to train more forensic nurses. All relevant departments should work together to alleviate the complications caused by sexual assault incidents.

     

    Opsomming:

    Die doel van hierdie studie was om die ervaringe van gesondheidsorgverskaffers wat slagoffers van seksuele aanranding in die

  6. Perceptions of interpersonal versus intergroup violence: the case of sexual assault.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Droogendyk

    Full Text Available The social identity approach makes a distinction between behavior motivated by intergroup versus interpersonal identities, which may be relevant to victim blaming in the case of rape. Using a mock jury paradigm, we examined the impact of defining rape as an act of interpersonal violence (personal assault versus intergroup violence (a "hate crime", crossed with a manipulation describing the attacker as either an acquaintance or stranger. Defining rape in intergroup terms led to less victim blame than when it was defined in interpersonal terms, and participants blamed the victim more when she was assaulted by an acquaintance than a stranger.

  7. Prevalence of HIV among victims of sexual assault who were mentally impaired children (5 to 18 years in the Mthatha area of South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banwari L. Meel

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Protection of children has been identified as a priority in South Africa. Despite a commitment to uphold children’s rights, much still needs to be done for the safety of mentally impaired children.Method: This is a record review of attendees at the Sinawe Centre from 2001 to 2005. It is the only centre in the Mthatha area that provides care for sexually assaulted persons and it is affiliated to the Nelson Mandela Academic Hospital. All mentally impaired victims of sexual assault were recorded on the register.Results: During the study period, 1,268 individuals, of whom 32 were profoundly mentally impaired, attended the Sinawe Centre following sexual assault. Of these mentally impaired individuals, 28 (87.5% were below the age of 18 years. Two were males while the rest were females, giving a male to female ratio of 1:15. A close relative was implicated in 29 (90.6% of the cases. Among the victims were six (18.7% epileptics who were on treatment. One was 13 years old and pregnant. Four were HIV positive on screening.Conclusion: Over 2% of the sexual assault victims attending the Sinawe Centre were mentally impaired. Of these, 12.5% were HIV seropositive.

  8. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Social Support in Female Victims of Sexual Assault: The Impact of Spousal Involvement on the Efficacy of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billette, Valerie; Guay, Stephane; Marchand, Andre

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this study is to enhance the efficacy of CBT with victims of sexual assault suffering from PTSD by getting the spouse involved. Thus, in addition to attempting to reduce PTSD symptoms, the therapy focuses on improving the support offered by the spouse and favors management of the impact of the traumatic event within the couple. A…

  9. College Students' Perceptions of the Importance of Sexual Assault Prevention Education: Suggestions for Targeting Recruitment for Peer-Based Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jozkowski, Kristen N.; Henry, Dayna S.; Sturm, Ashley A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Sexual assault continues to be a pervasive health issue among college students in the USA. Prevention education initiatives have been implemented to address this concern. However, little is known about college students' perceptions of such programming. The purpose of this study was to assess predictors of college students'…

  10. From Attire to Assault: Clothing, Objectification, and De-humanization – A Possible Prelude to Sexual Violence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Bhuvanesh

    2017-01-01

    In the context of objectification and violence, little attention has been paid to the perception neuroscience of how the human brain perceives bodies and objectifies them. Various studies point to how external cues such as appearance and attire could play a key role in encouraging objectification, dehumanization and the denial of agency. Reviewing new experimental findings across several areas of research, it seems that common threads run through issues of clothing, sexual objectification, body perception, dehumanization, and assault. Collating findings from several different lines of research, this article reviews additional evidence from cognitive and neural dynamics of person perception (body and face perception processes) that predict downstream social behavior. Specifically, new findings demonstrate cognitive processing of sexualized female bodies as object-like, a crucial aspect of dehumanized percept devoid of agency and personhood. Sexual violence is a consequence of a dehumanized perception of female bodies that aggressors acquire through their exposure and interpretation of objectified body images. Integrating these findings and identifying triggers for sexual violence may help develop remedial measures and inform law enforcement processes and policy makers alike. PMID:28344565

  11. Sexual Assault Supportive Attitudes: Rape Myth Acceptance and Token Resistance in Greek and Non-Greek College Students From Two University Samples in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canan, Sasha N; Jozkowski, Kristen N; Crawford, Brandon L

    2016-03-03

    Colleges are rape-prone cultures with high rates of sexual victimization. Fraternities' and sororities' relationships with sexual assault are consistent themes in literature focusing on sexual violence among college students. Previous research suggests that fraternity men are more likely to endorse rape-supportive attitudes compared with non-Greek men or sorority women. The present study examines rape-supportive attitudes as well as rape and sexual assault victimization in college students with a focus on gender and Greek-life (i.e., involvement in fraternities or sororities) status variables. College students (N = 1,002) completed a survey including the Token Resistance to Sex Scale (TRSS), Illinois Rape Myth Acceptance Scale-Short Form (IRMA-S), and items related to past experiences of nonconsensual sex. Two regression models tested predictors of token resistance and rape myth acceptance. Chi-square analyses tested between-group differences of experiencing rape and sexual assault. Gender (p rape myth acceptance than any other group. Chi-square analyses indicate women more frequently report experiences of rape (χ(2) = 25.57, df = 1, p rape myth acceptance and token resistance by Greeks, who influence college party culture, could be contributing to a culture conducive to rape. Findings demonstrate a continued need for interventions focused on shifting sociocultural dynamics (e.g., traditional roles and sexual scripting) on college campuses.

  12. Time series analysis of sexual assault case characteristics and the 2007-2008 period of post-election violence in Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Anastario

    Full Text Available Following the declaration that President Mwai Kibaki was the winner of the Kenyan presidential election held on December 27, 2007, a period of post-election violence (PEV took place. In this study, we aimed to identify whether the period of PEV in Kenya was associated with systematic changes in sexual assault case characteristics.Medical records of 1,615 patients diagnosed with sexual assault between 2007 and 2011 at healthcare facilities in Eldoret (n = 569, Naivasha (n = 534, and Nakuru (n = 512 were retrospectively reviewed to examine characteristics of sexual assault cases over time. Time series and linear regression were used to examine temporal variation in case characteristics relative to the period of post-election violence in Kenya. Key informant interviews with healthcare workers at the sites were employed to triangulate findings. The time series of sexual assault case characteristics at these facilities were examined, with a specific focus on the December 2007-February 2008 period of post-election violence. Prais-Winsten estimates indicated that the three-month period of post-election violence was associated with a 22 percentage-point increase in cases where survivors did not know the perpetrator, a 20 percentage-point increase in cases with more than one perpetrator, and a 4 percentage-point increase in cases that had evidence of abdominal injury. The post-election violence period was also associated with an 18 percentage-point increase in survivors waiting >1 month to report to a healthcare facility. Sensitivity analyses confirmed that these characteristics were specific to the post-election violence time period.These results demonstrate systematic patterns in sexual assault characteristics during the PEV period in Kenya.

  13. Department of Defense Annual Report on Sexual Assault in the Military. Fiscal Year 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    Health  Physical Health  Trauma Injuries  Types of Assault  Victim Emotions  Trauma Meanings  Biological System Responses  Mental...and (2) additional requirements for trial counsel. From 1 October 2009 to 30 September 2010, judge advocates and paralegals received training in a...office military justice system to those judge advocates and paralegals who are currently or soon will be either the chief of military justice or the

  14. Can People With Intellectual Disability Resist Implications of Fault When Police Question Their Allegations of Sexual Assault and Rape?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antaki, Charles; Richardson, Emma; Stokoe, Elizabeth; Willott, Sara

    2015-10-01

    When people alleging sexual assault are interviewed by police, their accounts are tested to see if they would stand up in court. Some tests are in the form of tendentious questions carrying implications (e.g., that the sex was consensual) damaging to the complainant's allegation. In a qualitative analysis of 19 English police interviews with people with intellectual disability (ID) defined in a variety of ways, we show how people with ID deal with the pragmatic complexity of such tendentious questions. We give examples in which the complainants detect and resist the questions' damaging implications; but we focus on occasions when the complainants do not do so. We discuss the use of tendentious questions in the light of national United Kingdom guidelines on the treatment of vulnerable witnesses.

  15. Sexual assault programming on college campuses: using social psychological belief and behavior change principles to improve outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Lisa A; Gray, Matt J

    2011-04-01

    Sexual assault programming is often delivered without a theoretical framework and does not typically utilize applicable research that could help to induce change among participants. Such interventions may target male and/or female students, although the focus of this review is on men. It is important to examine these programs in light of current theoretical knowledge and empirical findings from the social psychological attitudinal and behavioral change literatures. To this end, current programming efforts and their limitations are briefly reviewed. Three social psychological theories targeting belief and behavior change (i.e., social norms, hypocrisy salience, decision, and deterrents) are discussed and their application to such programming is elaborated. Given this information, recommendations for the research and practice of such interventions are provided.

  16. PTSD symptomatology and hazardous drinking as risk factors for sexual assault revictimization: examination in European American and African American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littleton, Heather; Ullman, Sarah E

    2013-06-01

    A sexual victimization history is a risk factor for experiencing further sexual victimization. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms have been posited as predictors of revictimization through multiple pathways, including through their association with risk recognition and alcohol use. There is, however, limited longitudinal research examining these revictimization risk factors, including the extent to which they predict risk for forcible rape (rape involving threat or force) and incapacitated rape (rape of a victim incapacitated by substances). Additionally, there is no research evaluating ethnic differences in revictimization risk pathways. The current study examined PTSD symptoms and hazardous drinking as predictors of new forcible and incapacitated rape over 1 year in a community sample of European American (n = 217) and African American (n = 272) sexual assault victims (M = 34 years; 84% high school education or above). We hypothesized that PTSD symptoms would predict both types of revictimization and hazardous drinking would predict incapacitated rape. Results supported that PTSD symptoms predicted both types of rape (forcible rape, β = .34; incapacitated rape, β = .20), and hazardous drinking predicted incapacitated rape (β = .24). PTSD symptoms predicted hazardous drinking in African American women only (β = .20). Thus, there is a need to evaluate risk pathways for specific types of victimization among diverse samples.

  17. Sexual Assertiveness Mediates the Associations Between Partner Facilitative Responses and Sexual Outcomes in Women With Provoked Vestibulodynia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNicoll, Gabrielle; Corsini-Munt, Serena; O Rosen, Natalie; McDuff, Pierre; Bergeron, Sophie

    2017-10-03

    Provoked vestibulodynia (PVD) is a recurrent idiopathic vulvo-vaginal pain associated with negative sexual and psychological consequences. Facilitative partner responses to pain are currently receiving empirical attention because they are positively associated with women's sexual outcomes. However, the mechanisms through which facilitative responses to pain are associated with these outcomes have not been examined. One potential mechanism is sexual assertiveness, which has been found to be associated with better sexual function and satisfaction in women with PVD. The present study examined whether women's sexual assertiveness mediated the association between women's perception of facilitative partner responses and women's sexual function and satisfaction. Women (N = 140) with PVD symptomatology completed self-reported questionnaires evaluating their perception of their partners' facilitative responses, and their own sexual assertiveness, sexual function, and sexual satisfaction. Dependent measures were sexual function measured by the Female Sexual Function Index and sexual satisfaction assessed by the Global Measure of Sexual Satisfaction Scale. Results indicated that women's higher sexual assertiveness mediated the association between their greater perceived facilitative partner responses and their improved sexual function and satisfaction. Findings suggest a potential mechanism through which partner responses may be associated with women's sexual outcomes.

  18. Forensic sexual assault examination and genital injury: is skin color a source of health disparity?⋆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommers, Marilyn S.; Zink, Therese M.; Fargo, Jamison D.; Baker, Rachel B.; Buschur, Carol; Shambley-Ebron, Donna Z.; Fisher, Bonnie S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The study objectives were to (1) estimate the frequency, prevalence, type, and location of anogenital injury in black and white women after consensual sex and (2) investigate the role of skin color in the detection of injury during the forensic sexual assault examination. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive design was used with 120 healthy volunteers who underwent a well-controlled forensic examination after consensual sexual intercourse. Results Fifty-five percent of the sample had at least 1 anogenital injury after consensual intercourse; percentages significantly differed between white (68%) and black (43%) participants (P = .02). Race/ethnicity was a significant predictor of injury prevalence and frequency in the external genitalia but not in the internal genitalia or anus. However, skin color variables—lightness/darkness–, redness/greenness–, and yellowness/blueness–confounded the original relationship between race/ethnicity and injury occurrence and frequency in the external genitalia, and 1 skin color variable—redness/greenness —was significantly associated with injury occurrence and frequency in the internal genitalia. Conclusions Although differences exist in anogenital injury frequency and prevalence between black and white women, such differences can be more fully explained by variations in skin color rather than race/ethnicity. Clinical recommendations and criminal justice implications are discussed. PMID:18926341

  19. An autopsy report case of rape victim by the application of PSA test kit as a new innovation for sexual assault investigation in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talthip, Jate; Chirachariyavej, Thamrong; Peonim, A V M Vichan; Atamasirikul, Kalayanee; Teerakamchai, Somsri

    2007-02-01

    The case of a 30 year-old Thai female found dead on the floor at the base of a small monument on Rajadumnern Road, Bangkok, Thailand with blood stains around the body and a naked bottom. The scene investigation and autopsy findings suggested a sexual assault and multiple sharp force injuries. The approach to the postmortem examination using different laboratory tests is reviewed. The specificity and sensitivity of prostate specific antigen (PSA) in specimens from rape victims is better than acid phosphatase test. The ELISA test for PSA was tested to confirm the PSA test kit. The present report suggests the PSA test kit in addition to conventional sperm smear and acid phosphatase test for sexual assault investigation in Thailand.

  20. The Persistence of Sperm and the Development of Time Since Intercourse (TSI) Guidelines in Sexual Assault Cases at Forensic Science Ireland, Dublin, Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, David G; Domijan, Katarina; MacNeill, Sarah; Rizet, Damien; O'Connell, Declan; Ryan, Jennifer

    2017-05-01

    The persistence of sperm using confirmatory microscopic analysis, the persistence of sperm with tails, time since intercourse (TSI) analysis, and results from the acid phosphatase (AP) reaction from approximately 5581 swabs taken from circa 1450 sexual assault cases are presented. The observed proportions of sperm in the vagina and anus declines significantly after 48 h TSI, and sperm on oral swabs were observed up to 15 h TSI. The AP reaction as a predictor of sperm on intimate swabs is questioned. All AP reaction times gave a low true positive rate; 23% of sperm-positive swabs gave a negative AP reaction time. We show the AP reaction is an unsafe and an unreliable predictor of sperm on intimate swabs. We propose that TSI not AP informs precase assessment and the evaluative approach for sexual assault cases. To help inform an evaluative approach, TSI guidelines are presented. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  1. Targeting Alcohol Misuse: A Promising Strategy for Reducing Military Sexual Assaults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Biopsychosocial Conceptualization,” Clinical Psychology Review , Vol. 17, No. 6, September 1997, 621–649. Combs-Lane, Amy M., and Daniel W. Smith, “Risk of Sexual...and the Misperception of Sexual Intent,” Clinical Psychology Review , Vol. 28, No. 1, January 2008, pp. 48–66. Fisher, Bonnie S., John J. Sloan, Francis...The Impact of Men’s Alcohol Consumption on Perpetration of Sexual Aggression,” Clinical Psychology Review , Vol. 22, No. 8, November 2002, pp. 1239

  2. Department of Defense Annual Report on Sexual Assault in the Military. Fiscal Year 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-16

    touched her breasts during a height/weight and body fat tape assessment. Administratively separated under Chapter 14- 12c with a General Discharge...room, Subject touched the victim on the breast and abdomen . Pending NJP and Administrative separation under Chapter 14-12c 50 Abusive Sexual...roommate), caressing his abdomen . NJP for Abusive Sexual Contact. Red E- 1, FF $758 per month for two months, 45 days Extra Duty, 45 days Restriction. 720

  3. Embodied harms: gender, shame, and technology-facilitated sexual violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Nicola; Powell, Anastasia

    2015-06-01

    Criminality in cyberspace has been the subject of much debate since the 1990s, yet comparatively little attention has been paid to technology-facilitated sexual violence and harassment (TFSV). The aim of this article is to explore the ways in which retraditionalized gender hierarchies and inequalities are manifested in online contexts, and to conceptualize the cause and effects of TFSV as "embodied harms." We argue that problematic mind/body and online/off-line dualisms result in a failure to grasp the unique nature of embodied harms, precluding an adequate understanding and theorization of TFSV. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Translating sexual assault prevention from a college campus to a United States military installation: piloting the know-your-power bystander social marketing campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Sharyn J; Stapleton, Jane G

    2012-05-01

    One population that shares both similar and different characteristics with traditional college-age students is the U.S. Military. Similarities include a high concentration of 18- to 26-year-olds dealing with new found independence, peer pressure, and the presence of social norms that support violence and hypermasculinity. Sexual violence is a major public health problem in the United States, and because of the similarities in the age group of college and military populations, the problems regarding sexual violence in both constituencies have been well-documented. In the current pilot study we seek to add to both current knowledge about and promising practices of translating prevention strategies from one target audience to another. We describe how we translated, administered, and evaluated a bystander intervention social marketing campaign focused on sexual assault prevention that had been found to significantly affect attitude change on a college campus for a U.S. Army installation in Europe. In addition to demonstrating the process of translating prevention strategies across target audiences, findings from this pilot study contribute to the evaluation data on the effectiveness of sexual violence prevention strategies implemented with members of the U.S. Military. From our analysis, we see that research participants indicate that the degree to which the images resonate with them and the familiarity of the context (i.e., social self-identification) significantly effect the participants' personal responsibility for reducing sexual assault, confidence in acting as a bystander, and reported engagement as a bystander.

  5. The Monetary Cost of Sexual Assault to Privately Insured US Women in 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennessee, Ashley M; Bradham, Tamala S; White, Brandi M; Simpson, Kit N

    2017-06-01

    To determine whether privately insured female rape victims were billed for charges associated with a specific rape in the United States. We examined 2013 de-identified patient data from Truven Analytics Health MarketScan database for an assault that occurred by using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, code E960.1. Analysis of insurance providers' payment patterns for 1355 incident events to female victims aged between 16 and 61 years revealed that victims remit, on average, 14% or $948 of the rape cost, whereas insurance providers pay 86% or $5789 of the total cost. Hospital billing procedures for privately insured victims of rape across the United States are not separate from billing procedures for privately insured nonrape patients. This standardized procedure leads hospitals to bill victims directly for services not paid under the victims' insurance policy. Public Health Implications. The Violence Against Women Act (passed in 1994, reauthorized in 2000, 2005, and 2013) must be amended to mandate that all costs incurred because of rape are not passed on to the victim.

  6. The effect of environmental conditions on the persistence of common lubricants on skin for cases of sexual assault investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonkin, Megan; Yeap, Li Foong; Bartle, Emma K; Reeder, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    The potential for lubricant trace evidence to be used as associative evidence is often overlooked in forensic investigations. Published studies in this area have focused on the identification of analytical techniques suitable for the detection of this evidence type. However, detection of trace lubricant is also dependent on the length of time it persists on skin and mucosal surfaces. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of environmental conditions on the persistence of oil- and glycerol-based lubricants on skin surfaces. Lubricated skin samples exposed to three different test environments were swabbed at regular intervals over a 24-h period. Compounds of interest were extracted from the swabs and analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The effect of glycerol derivatization prior to GC-MS analysis was also investigated. In general, oil-based lubricants persisted longer than glycerol-based. Persistence on skin was greatest in lower temperature conditions away from direct sunlight exposure. The results of this investigation are relevant in the context of sexual assault investigations given the possible detection of lubricant on the skin of the external genitalia.

  7. The Use of Laser Microdissection in Forensic Sexual Assault Casework: Pros and Cons Compared to Standard Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Sergio; Correia-de-Sá, Paulo; Porto, Maria J; Cainé, Laura

    2017-01-30

    Sexual assault samples are among the most frequently analyzed in a forensic laboratory. These account for almost half of all samples processed routinely, and a large portion of these cases remain unsolved. These samples often pose problems to traditional analytic methods of identification because they consist most frequently of cell mixtures from at least two contributors: the victim (usually female) and the perpetrator (usually male). In this study, we propose the use of current preliminary testing for sperm detection in order to determine the chances of success when faced with samples which can be good candidates to undergo analysis with the laser microdissection technology. Also, we used laser microdissection technology to capture fluorescently stained cells of interest differentiated by gender. Collected materials were then used for DNA genotyping with commercially available amplification kits such as Minifiler, Identifiler Plus, NGM, and Y-Filer. Both the methodology and the quality of the results were evaluated to assess the pros and cons of laser microdissection compared with standard methods. Overall, the combination of fluorescent staining combined with the Minifiler amplification kit provided the best results for autosomal markers, whereas the Y-Filer kit returned the expected results regardless of the used method.

  8. Report to the President of the United States on Sexual Assault Prevention and Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    program. This workshop will be provided through the Chaplain Religious Enrichment Development Operation ( CREDO ). ○ "Clean Conscience" is intended...developing "Survivors of Sexual Violence Resiliency Retreats" through the Chaplain Religious Enrichment Development Operation ( CREDO ) program. These

  9. Attitudinal and individual differences influence perceptions of mock child sexual assault cases involving gay defendants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Tisha R A; Bottoms, Bette L

    2013-01-01

    Many people hold negative attitudes and stereotypes about gay men, including the stereotype that gay men are likely to be child molesters. This article explored the implications of this stereotype for judgments made in a hypothetical legal case involving child sexual abuse accusations against a male teacher by either a male or female victim. Mock jurors who held the most anti-gay attitudes and those who endorsed the stereotype of gay men as child molesters made the most pro-prosecution judgments in scenarios involving gay defendants. A new scale (the Stereotypes about Gays and Child Abuse scale) was developed to assess the extent to which participants endorsed the stereotype of gay men as being likely to sexually abuse children. This scale was a stronger predictor of case judgments than existing, more general scales measuring biases against homosexuality.

  10. The parallels between undue influence, domestic violence, stalking, and sexual assault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandl, Bonnie; Heisler, Candace J; Stiegel, Lori A

    2005-01-01

    The dynamics of undue influence (UI) have many similarities with domestic violence, stalking, and grooming behavior used by some sexual predators. This article will help practitioners-particularly law enforcement investigators and prosecutors-better recognize UI as a pattern of behaviors, not an isolated incident. Understanding the dynamics of UI will enhance professionals' appreciation of the responses of victims and the manipulative nature of exploiters. Strategies that have been used effectively with domestic violence, stalking, and some sexual abuse cases may provide remedies for victims of UI and criminal justice options for holding perpetrators accountable. Enhanced awareness of these dynamics should lead to improved investigations, more effective strategies when interviewing and working with victims, and more successful prosecutions of perpetrators who use UI to financially exploit an older person.

  11. Department of Defense Annual Report on Sexual Assault in the Military. Fiscal Year 2012. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Angela Moore , Bernie Auchter, and Christine Crossland — in support of the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey. We would also like...Survey. We give special thanks to Kathleen C. Basile , Michele C. Black, Matthew J. Breiding, James A. Mercy, Linda E. Saltzman, and Sharon G. Smith...women and men aged 18 years or older in the United States (Black, Basile , Breiding, Smith, Walters, Merrick, Chen, & Stevens, 2011). NISVS provides

  12. Military Personnel: Actions Needed to Address Sexual Assaults of Male Servicemembers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    it would need to address the “unofficial” culture that is defined by exaggerated characteristics of stereotypical masculinity, among other things...Respondents’ Unit Have both Men and Women Assigned, by Rank Group 65 Table 8: Situations Presented to Respondent on Separate Cards for Question 6...DOD. At the same time, officials found that for fiscal year 2010, of those active-duty women estimated to have experienced unwanted sexual contact

  13. College students' social reactions to the victim in a hypothetical sexual assault scenario: the role of victim and perpetrator alcohol use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Untied, Amy S; Orchowski, Lindsay M; Mastroleo, Nadine; Gidycz, Christine A

    2012-01-01

    College students' responses to a hypothetical sexual assault scenario involving alcohol use by the victim and/or perpetrator were examined (N = 295). Participants reported on victim/perpetrator responsibility, the extent to which the scenario would be considered rape, and their likelihood of providing positive or negative responses to the victim. Compared to women, men indicated that they would provide more negative and less positive social reactions to the victim, were less likely to identify the scenario as rape, and endorsed less perpetrator responsibility. When the victim was drinking, participants endorsed greater victim responsibility and lower perpetrator responsibility for the assault. Participants indicated that they would provide the victim with less emotional support when only the perpetrator was drinking, compared to when both the individuals were drinking.

  14. The right to protection from sexual assault: the Indian anti-rape campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangoli, G

    1996-11-01

    This article reveals a viewpoint that emphasizes some dilemmas among Indian feminist practice, women's sexuality in legal terms, and case law in India. The Indian Women's Movement (IWM) was successful in 1983 in adding a legal amendment on rape and child abuse. The case that mobilized women to change the law occurred in 1980 when a court acquitted two policemen who were charged with raping and molesting a 16-year-old tribal girl. The Bombay High Court overturned the judgement and convicted both policemen. The case was appealed, and the policemen successfully argued that rape did not occur because the girl did not protest and was sexually experienced anyway. In 1980 the Forum Against Rape was formed to mobilize public support and to lobby the State for reform of the law on rape. The campaign focused on custodial rape and political repression, rape as civil rights issue, and rape as a women's issue. There was a distancing between the victim, who occupied a lower caste and class position, and her defenders in the women's groups. The campaign appealed to both the appropriate judgement of the State and the denial that the State was an effective vehicle for change. The campaign did not directly address incest and marital rape or domestic violence within families. The legislature debated the issue of legal change during 1982. The debate revealed deep divisions about sexuality and women's status. It was argued that chaste women were not rape victims, and unchaste women were of a socially inferior caste and class. It was argued that there should be a ban on child marriage rather than spousal rape laws. Child rape is a legal issue only when the perpetrator is outside the family. Rape was discussed as an act of lust and not violence. In 1992, a woman promoting an end to child marriage was raped and the men were acquitted. It was argued that the law was out-of-date and in need of revision.

  15. EtG/EtS in Serum by UHPLC-MS-MS in Suspected Sexual Assault Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegstad, Solfrid; Helland, Arne; Hagemann, Cecilie; Spigset, Olav

    2017-09-01

    A method including semi-automated extraction of ethyl glucuronide (EtG) and ethyl sulfate (EtS) from serum followed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS-MS) has been developed and validated. Sample preparation prior to UHPLC-MS-MS analysis consisted of protein precipitation and filtration through a phospholipid removal plate. Chromatography was achieved using an HSS T3 column and gradient elution with formic acid in water in combination with methanol. The mass spectrometer was monitored in the negative mode with multiple reaction monitoring. Two transitions were monitored for the analytes and one for the deuterated internal standards (ISs). The limits of quantification were 0.025 mg/L for EtG and 0.009 mg/L for EtS. The between-assay relative standard deviations were in the range of 3.8-9.1%, the recovery was 66-102% and matrix effects ranged from 88 to 97% (corrected with IS). Compared to previously published studies, the method presented is semi-automated, uses a simple method for phospholipid removal and has short run times and low limit of quantifications. We analyzed serum samples from 49 female patients presenting to the Sexual Assault Centre at St. Olav University Hospital in Trondheim, Norway, for ethanol, EtG and EtS. EtG and EtS were detected longer than ethanol itself after intake of ethanol, with estimated maximum detection times of >24 h. The ethanol, EtG and EtS concentrations were highly correlated (P EtS in serum or blood may complement ethanol analysis and shed light on the patient's recent ethanol intake after ethanol itself is no longer detectable. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Isolating DNA from sexual assault cases: a comparison of standard methods with a nuclease-based approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garvin Alex M

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Profiling sperm DNA present on vaginal swabs taken from rape victims often contributes to identifying and incarcerating rapists. Large amounts of the victim’s epithelial cells contaminate the sperm present on swabs, however, and complicate this process. The standard method for obtaining relatively pure sperm DNA from a vaginal swab is to digest the epithelial cells with Proteinase K in order to solubilize the victim’s DNA, and to then physically separate the soluble DNA from the intact sperm by pelleting the sperm, removing the victim’s fraction, and repeatedly washing the sperm pellet. An alternative approach that does not require washing steps is to digest with Proteinase K, pellet the sperm, remove the victim’s fraction, and then digest the residual victim’s DNA with a nuclease. Methods The nuclease approach has been commercialized in a product, the Erase Sperm Isolation Kit (PTC Labs, Columbia, MO, USA, and five crime laboratories have tested it on semen-spiked female buccal swabs in a direct comparison with their standard methods. Comparisons have also been performed on timed post-coital vaginal swabs and evidence collected from sexual assault cases. Results For the semen-spiked buccal swabs, Erase outperformed the standard methods in all five laboratories and in most cases was able to provide a clean male profile from buccal swabs spiked with only 1,500 sperm. The vaginal swabs taken after consensual sex and the evidence collected from rape victims showed a similar pattern of Erase providing superior profiles. Conclusions In all samples tested, STR profiles of the male DNA fractions obtained with Erase were as good as or better than those obtained using the standard methods.

  17. Prevalence and risk factors of sexual assault in urban females%城市女性遭遇性侵犯的风险因素

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    隋双戈; 陈柳月; 袁晓飞; 石美玉; 陈秋霞; 李凌江

    2011-01-01

    目的:探索城市女性遭遇性侵犯的发生率及风险因素.方法:采用方便取样,在广东省3城市随遇选取1023名17~45岁女性,匿名填写人口学信息统计表、艾森克人格问卷(EPQ)、特质应付方式问卷(TCSQ)、社会支持自评量表(SSRS)、应激史问卷(THQ).结果:在有效回应的946人中,报告有被性侵犯经历的有223人,占23.57%.创伤事件数量、受教育程度、神经质、消极应对方式、婚姻状况与性侵事件正相关(r=0.07 ~0.51,均P<0.05),而主观支持和支持利用度与性侵事件负相关(r=-0.12,-0.08,均P<0.05).Logistic多因素回归分析表明,较多的创伤事件数量(OR=1.85~ 2.80)、较多受教育年数(OR=1.11 -1.54)、主观支持水平较低(OR=0.86 -0.99)的女性有较高的被性侵犯风险,这3个因素可共同解释40.24%的城市女性被性侵风险.结论:较高的教育水平、较多经历创伤事件及较低的主观支持程度可能是城市女性遭遇性侵犯的风险因素.%Objective: To study the prevalence and risk factors among urban females suffering sexual assault in China. Methods: Quantitative analysis method was" used in this study. One thousand and twenty-three females, aged from 17 to 45 years old, from three cities (i.e. Shenzhen, Huizhou, and Guangzhou) in Guangdong were recruited by accidental sampling. They were asked to complete standardized anonymously questionnaires, including the Demographic Information Form, the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ), Trait Coping Style Questionnaire (TCSQ), Social Support Rating Scale (SSRS) and Trauma History Questionnaire (THQ). Results: Sexual assault exposure at least once was reported by 23.57% of respondents (n =223/946). Sexual assaults events were positively correlated with the frequency of trauma events, years of education, neuroticism, negative coping strategies and marital status (r = 0.07 - 0.51, P < 0.05), and were negatively correlated with the availabilities of

  18. Rehearsing for real life: the impact of the InterACT Sexual Assault Prevention Program on self-reported likelihood of engaging in bystander interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Courtney E; Rich, Marc D; Ullman, Jodie B

    2011-06-01

    The interACT Sexual Assault Prevention Program is an interactive, skill-building performance based on the pedagogy of Augusto Boal's Theatre of the Oppressed. A longitudinal evaluation of this program compared pretest, posttest, and 3-month follow-up data from 509 university student participants. Results suggested that the interACT performance was successful in increasing participants' beliefs about the effectiveness of bystander interventions and the self-rated likelihood that participants would engage in bystander interventions in the future. Differences in both overall ratings and rates of change were noted. Implications of these results for research and practice are discussed.

  19. Experiences of health care providers managing sexual assault victims in the emergency unit Part 2: Discussion of results and literature control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca M. Skhosana

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to explore and describe the experiences of health care providers managing sexual assault victims in the emergency unit of a community hospital in the Nkangala district in the Mpumalanga Province. A qualitative, phenomenological design was applied. Purposeful sampling was used to select participants from health care providers who were working in the emergency unit and had managed more than four sexual assault victims. Data were collected by means of individual interviews and analysed according to the Tesch method of data analysis by the researcher and the independent co-coder. Main categories, subcategories and themes were identified. Participants expressed their emotions, challenges and police attitudes and behaviours, as well as inconsistencies in guidelines and needs identification. It was recommended that members of the multidisciplinary team engage in community activities and that the community participate in matters pertaining to sexual assault. Government should develop clear guidelines that are applicable to rural and urban South Africa. Health care sciences should aim to train more forensic nurses. All relevant departments should work together to alleviate the complications caused by sexual assault incidents.

    Opsomming

    Die doel van hierdie studie was om die ervaringe van gesondheidsorgverskaffers wat slagoffers van seksuele aanranding in die ongevalle-eenheid van 'n gemeenskapshospitaal in die Nkangala-distrik in die provinsie van Mpumalanga hanteer, te ontgin en te beskryf. ’n Kwalitatiewe fenomenologiese ontwerp is toegepas. Doelbewuste steekproefneming is gebruik om deelnemers te selekteer uit die groep gesondheidsorgverskaffers wat in die ongevalle-eenheid werksaam was en meer as vier slagoffers van seksuele aanranding hanteer het. Data is by wyse van individuele onderhoude ingesamel en volgens die Tesch-metode van data-analise deur die navorser en die onafhanklike

  20. Sexual Assault against Females

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Us: ncptsd@va.gov Also see: VA Mental Health Connect with us return to top CONNECT Veterans Crisis Line: 1-800-273-8255 (Press 1) Social Media Complete Directory EMAIL UPDATES Email Address Required Button ...

  1. Combating Sexual Assault

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    agency. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 14(6), 562-573. Festinger, L. (1957). A theory of cognitive dissonance . Stanford, CA: Stanford...Others will negatively judge, betrayal Fear of retaliation Stress Not believed Shame, stigma Cognitive dissonance Fear add’l victimization from...Rubin, 2014). Cognitive Dissonance . According to Festinger (1957) dissonance is a psychological conflict resulting from incongruous beliefs and

  2. Sexual Assault against Females

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Apply Online Application Process Veteran Eligibility Active Duty Families of Veterans Women Veterans Determine Costs Copays ... Vets Performance Based Interviewing Clinical Trainees (Academic Affiliations) Employees & Contractors Talent Management System (TMS) VA Learning University ( ...

  3. The use and abuse of prescription medication to facilitate or enhance sexual behavior among adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apodaca, T R; Moser, N C

    2011-01-01

    Adolescents naturally experience an increased interest in sexual behavior, but they usually lack much experience. Thus, any prescription medication that holds the potential to ease or facilitate sexual matters holds a unique allure. Widespread cultural awareness of medications to treat erectile dysfunction (ED) has combined with a recent trend toward increased adolescent prescription drug abuse to create unique challenges for industry, clinicians, and researchers.

  4. The Influence of Misogynous Rap Music on Sexual Aggression against Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barongan, Christy; Hall, Gordon C. Nagayama

    1995-01-01

    Results from 54 college men who heard misogynous or neutral rap music and then selected neutral, sexual-violent, or assaultive film vignettes to show a female companion suggest that misogynous music facilitates sexually aggressive behavior and support a relationship between cognitive distortions concerning women and sexual aggression. (SLD)

  5. African-American Fathers' Perspectives on Facilitators and Barriers to Father-Son Sexual Health Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, Schenita D; Coakley, Tanya; Shears, Jeffrey; Thorpe, Roland J

    2017-02-21

    African-American males ages 13 through 24 are disproportionately affected by sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), accounting for over half of all HIV infections in this age group in the United States. Clear communication between African-American parents and their youth about sexual health is associated with higher rates of sexual abstinence, condom use, and intent to delay initiation of sexual intercourse. However, little is known about African-American fathers' perceptions of what facilitates and inhibits sexual health communication with their preadolescent and adolescent sons. We conducted focus groups with 29 African-American fathers of sons ages 10-15 to explore perceived facilitators and barriers for father-son communication about sexual health. Participants were recruited from barbershops in metropolitan and rural North Carolina communities highly affected by STIs and HIV, and data were analyzed using content analysis. Three factors facilitated father-son communication: (a) fathers' acceptance of their roles and responsibilities; (b) a positive father-son relationship; and (c) fathers' ability to speak directly to their sons about sex. We also identified three barriers: (a) fathers' difficulty in initiating sexual health discussions with their sons; (b) sons' developmental readiness for sexual health information; and (c) fathers' lack of experience in talking with their own fathers about sex. These findings have implications for father-focused prevention interventions aimed at reducing risky sexual behaviors in adolescent African-American males. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Accord of 14 April 1989 by which four special female agents of the Public Ministry are designated to deal with sexual crimes of rape and indecent assault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    This Accord designates 4 special female agents of the Mexican Public Ministry to deal with the sexual crimes of rape and indecent assault, with the objective, among others, of destroying the impunity with which these crimes are committed and strengthening the trust that necessarily must exist between the authorities constitutionally appointed to bring about justice and the women who require it. It also specifies that medical, psychological, gynecological, and other attention required by a victim will be provided by a woman with skill in the various areas. An Accord of 6 September 1989 (Diario Oficial, Vol. 432, No. 5, 7 September 1989, pp. 20-23), enlarges the responsibilities and competence of these female agents to cover all sexual offenses contained in the Criminal Code. It provides that the agents have the power to initiate, pursue, and bring to a conclusion inquiries relating to such crimes. Appended to the Accord are operative rules relating to the agents and a Technical Council that supervises them. The rules contain procedures to be followed in dealing with and attending to the victims of sexual crimes. Bases of collaboration between the Attorney General of the Federal District and the Secretary of Health with respect to the examination of women who have been the victims of sex crimes appear in the Diario Oficial, Vol. 433, No. 19, 27 October 1989, pp. 9-10).

  7. Technology-Facilitated Sexual Violence: A Literature Review of Empirical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Nicola; Powell, Anastasia

    2016-06-16

    Technology-facilitated sexual violence (TFSV) refers to a range of behaviors where digital technologies are used to facilitate both virtual and face-to-face sexually based harms. Such behaviors include online sexual harassment, gender- and sexuality-based harassment, cyberstalking, image-based sexual exploitation, and the use of a carriage service to coerce a victim into an unwanted sexual act. This article reviews the current state of knowledge on these different dimensions, drawing on existing empirical studies. While there is a growing body of research into technology-facilitated harms perpetrated against children and adolescents, there is a dearth of qualitative and quantitative research on TFSV against adults. Moreover, few of the existing studies provide reliable data on the nature, scope, and impacts of TFSV. Preliminary studies, however, indicate that some harms, much like sexual violence more broadly, may be predominantly gender-, sexuality-, and age-based, with young women being overrepresented as victims in some categories. This review collects the empirical evidence to date regarding the prevalence and gender-based nature of TFSV against adults and discusses the implications for policy and programs, as well as suggestions for future research.

  8. La historia Médico legal en casos de delitos sexuales en niños -un enfoque médico forense The medical-legal history in cases of sexual assault in children. A forensic medical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Édgar Alonso Madrigal Ramírez

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Se ha considerado al Interrogatorio Médico Forense en casos de Delitos Sexuales en Niños como revictimizante. La Historia Médico Legal en Delitos Sexuales recoge la información necesaria para orientar el Examen Físico y para la recolección de evidencias en la víctima y en su contexto. Existen técnicas médico forenses para interrogar al niño con el afán de evitar la revictimización, entendida esta como el sufrimiento que experimentan las víctimas al promoverse una actualización del evento traumático. La Historia Médico Legal persigue objetivos diferentes al resto de los interrogatorios dentro del proceso judicial y sigue las pautas del Arte y Ciencia de la Medicina y bien implementadas no produce la revictimización del paciente.The Forensic Medical interrogation has been considered as revictimizing in cases about Sexual Assaults on Children. The Medical Legal History in Sexual Assaults meets the necessary information to guide the two main procedures: the physical examination and the gathering of evidence on the victim as well as in its context. There are forensic techniques to avoid revictimization on children during interrogation, understanding the revictimization as the suffering the victim experiences, when remembering a traumatic event during the Medical Legal Examination. The medical-legal history pursues goals that are different from those of other interrogation procedures within the judicial process, and when following the guidelines of the art and science of medicine, it well established, do not produce revictimization of the patient.

  9. Technology-Facilitated Sexual Violence Victimization: Results From an Online Survey of Australian Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Anastasia; Henry, Nicola

    2016-10-03

    Online forms of sexual harassment and abuse as experienced by adults represent an emerging yet under-researched set of behaviors, such that very few studies have sought to estimate the extent of the problem. This article presents the results of an online survey of 2,956 Australian adult (aged 18 to 54 years) experiences of technology-facilitated sexual violence (TFSV) victimization. The prevalence of TFSV was analyzed in relation to a 21-item scale developed in accordance with prior conceptual research identifying multiple dimensions of TFSV including digital sexual harassment, image-based sexual abuse, sexual aggression and/or coercion, and, gender and/or sexuality-based harassment (including virtual sexual violence). Results revealed significant differences in lifetime TFSV victimization for younger (18-24) and non-heterosexual identifying adults. Lifetime TFSV victimization for men and women was not significantly different, though women were more likely to report sexual harassment victimization and men were more likely to report victimization through the distribution of non-consensual images, as well as gender and/or sexuality-based harassment. The authors conclude that although women and men report experiencing similar overall prevalence of TFSV victimization, the nature and impacts of those experiences differ in particular gendered ways that reflect broader patterns in both gender relations and "offline" sexual harassment.

  10. Inhibition not facilitation of sexual behavior by PCPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorzalka, B B; Whalen, R E

    1975-01-01

    It has been proposed that estrous behavior in the female rat may be under tonic inhibition by a central serotonergi system. Studies conbining estrogen priming and the pharmacological depletion of serotonin have provided some support for this hypothesis. Some evidence, however, is not consistent with this hypothesis. In the present study estrogen primed ovariectomized-adrenalectomized rats were administered p-chlorophenylalanine and were tested for lordosis behavior 66 and 70 hr later. Lordosis was not facilitated. The animals were then administered progesterone and retested at hour 74. PCPA inhibited progesterone-induced lordosis behavior in a dose dependent manner.

  11. Barriers and facilitators for oncology nurses discussing sexual issues with men diagnosed with testicular cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moore, Annamarie

    2013-01-02

    PURPOSE: Testicular cancer occurs at a time in a man\\'s life when major social life changes are occurring and when body image, fertility, sexual desire and performance can be central issues. Oncology nurses, as members of the multidisciplinary team, are in an ideal position to address men\\'s concerns. The aim of this study was to investigate oncology nurses\\' self-perceived knowledge and comfort in relation to discussing sexuality concerns with men diagnosed with testicular cancer and to identify the barriers and facilitators to such discussions. METHODS: This study employed a self-completion, anonymous survey design with a sample of registered nurses working in five, randomly chosen, oncology centres in Ireland. RESULTS: In total, 89 questionnaires (45% response rate) were included for analysis. Findings suggest that although nurses were open to addressing concerns, few informed patients they were available to discuss sexual concerns. Nurses reported lacking knowledge of, and discomfort in, discussing the more intimate aspects of sexuality, including: ejaculatory difficulties, erectile dysfunction, impotence, prosthesis options and testicular self examination. CONCLUSIONS: Findings reinforce the need for more comprehensive education on sexuality issues and testicular cancer. Nurses need to take a more proactive approach to sexuality care, as opposed to the \\'passive waiting stance\\' that permeates the current culture of care. Education programmes need to include specific information on sexual issues associated with testicular cancer, and oncology nurses must subsume sexuality as an essential aspect of their role through changes in policies and nursing care planning.

  12. Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment in the U.S. Military: Volume 3. Estimates for Coast Guard Service Members from the 2014 RAND Military Workplace Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    sexual harassment violation if respondents indi- cated they had direct evidence that a workplace benefit or punishment was contingent on a sexual...behaviors (“take or share sexually suggestive pictures or videos of you” and “feel like you would get punished or treated unfairly in the workplace if...0.01–0.30) 1.0% (0.52–1.61) Made you feel like you would get punished or treated unfairly in the workplace if you did not do something sexual

  13. The Unique Associations of Sexual Assault and Intimate Partner Violence With PTSD Symptom Clusters in a Traumatized Substance-Abusing Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, Emily R; Mota, Natalie P; Schumacher, Julie A; Vinci, Christine; Coffey, Scott F

    2016-10-13

    Objective: There is a high occurrence of sexual assault (SA) and intimate partner violence (IPV) among people with substance use disorders and an established association between substance use and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but no research has examined associations between combinations of these traumas and PTSD symptom profiles among people who abuse substances. Thus, this study aimed to examine how combinations of SA and IPV histories contribute to the severity of symptoms within PTSD symptom clusters above and beyond the impact of exposure to other traumas in a substance abusing population. Method: Participants were men and women (N = 219) with trauma histories seeking treatment in a substance abuse facility. Multivariate analyses of covariance examined differences on Clinician Administrated PTSD Scale cluster scores in people with experiences of SA and/or IPV in comparison to people with other types of trauma, controlling for number of PTSD criterion A events. Results: SA was associated with increased symptom severity across all 3 PTSD symptom clusters, whereas IPV was not associated with differences in cluster scores. In addition, survivors of IPV had consistent levels of avoidance symptoms regardless of whether they had also experienced SA, but people who had not experienced IPV only evidenced increased avoidance symptoms when they had experienced SA. Follow-up analyses testing gender differences indicated that these findings were largely similar for men and women. Conclusions: SA should be assessed in people in substance use treatment settings to conceptualize their unique presentations of PTSD symptoms and inform treatment planning. (PsycINFO Database Record

  14. 77 FR 75299 - Standards To Prevent, Detect, and Respond to Sexual Abuse and Assault in Confinement Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-19

    ...) unaccompanied alien children placed in removal proceedings under section 240 of the Immigration and Nationality..., vulnerable men, women, and children continued to be sexually victimized by other prisoners and corrections... the DOJ BJS, and reports published by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees and the Inter...

  15. Chronic cocaine pretreatment facilitates Pavlovian sexual conditioning in male Japanese quail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levens, Neil; Akins, Chana K

    2004-11-01

    Repeated drug exposure that results in behavioral sensitization has been shown to enhance sex-seeking behaviors in rats as well as facilitate Pavlovian excitatory and inhibitory conditioning. In the present experiment, male Japanese quail were given repeated presentations of cocaine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) that resulted in increased locomotor activity relative to saline. After a 10-day withdrawal period, subjects received sexual conditioning trials that consisted of presentation of an object conditioned stimulus (CS) followed by sexual reinforcement. Results showed that birds that previously received chronic cocaine demonstrated more conditioned approach behavior to the CS object, a shorter latency to copulate with a female, and made more cloacal contacts (copulatory behavior) during sexual reinforcement than saline-treated birds. The findings suggest that chronic cocaine later facilitates Pavlovian conditioning in a sexual behavior paradigm. This may be the result of cocaine facilitating learning via the dopaminergic system. The findings are discussed in the context of the incentive sensitization theory and possible neuronal mechanisms.

  16. A novel method for GHB detection in urine and its application in drug-facilitated sexual assaults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elian, A A

    2000-04-10

    A confirmation procedure for the identification and quantification of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) in urine is presented. This method is unique in that it does not involve the conversion of GHB to the gamma-butyrolactone (GBL). The urine samples were extracted using ethyl acetate, evaporated and derivatized with N, O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) with 1% trimethylchlorosilane (TMCS), and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Quantification was performed using selective ion monitoring (SIM), using GHB-d(6) as the internal standard. This method is simple and provides excellent linearity and sensitivity for GHB in urine.

  17. Enhanced recovery of spermatozoa and comprehensive lysis of epithelial cells from sexual assault samples having a low cell counts or aged up to one year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lounsbury, Jenny A; Nambiar, Shanti M; Karlsson, Anne; Cunniffe, Helina; Norris, Jessica V; Ferrance, Jerome P; Landers, James P

    2014-01-01

    Differential extraction (DE) is the most common method for processing sexual assault samples, allowing for the simultaneous recovery of sperm and epithelial cells from the swab with the separation of sperm cells from epithelial cell DNA by exploiting the differences in the cell membrane susceptibility to detergents. However, sperm cell recovery when using DE is generally 40-50% [1], which can reduce the probability of obtaining a STR profile of the semen contributor, especially if the sample is aged or has a low number of sperm cells. Here, we present a novel buffer, containing SDS and ProK that, when used as an initial incubation buffer, enhances sperm cell recovery to as high as 90%, representing a 200-300% increase over conventional DE buffer. Adjusting the incubation time and temperature provided high, reproducible sperm cell yields. Sample vortexing and replacement of SDS with sodium octyl sulfate (SOS), another sulfate-based anionic detergent, did not provide any further enhancement of the sperm cell recoveries. Furthermore, the one-step buffer provided up to a 300% increase in recovery over the conventional DE buffer when used on samples aged up to one year. STR analysis of samples containing 500 or more sperm cells treated with this buffer showed comparable results (i.e., full STR profiles; 16 of 16 loci) to those obtained using a conventional DE buffer. Finally, when the sample contained only 400 sperm cells (recovered in 100μL volume, then extracted), substantially more STR loci (14 of 16) were generated using the novel buffer in comparison to the conventional DE buffer (4 of 16 loci). This work demonstrates that this buffer may be useful as an alternative for the initial sample incubation step in differential extraction, particularly for aged or samples known to have a low number of sperm cells.

  18. 破窗理论视角下的女性智障者性被害的研究%Research on Sexual Assault for Female with Mental Retardation Using Broken Windows Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊少波; 廖怀高

    2013-01-01

      运用破窗理论,从被害人角度分析女性智障者性侵害的原因,找出女性智障者成为性犯罪受害者的危险因素,包括智障者自身、家庭环境、社区环境、宏观社会环境等对智障者的不良影响。提出降低或杜绝智障者性侵害案件发生的对策与建议。%This paper, based on Broken Windows Theory, analyzes the reasons of sexual assault for female with mental retardation from the standpoint of victims. By reviewing related literatures, the author points out the risk factors and environmental factors to trigger a sexual crime and it is found that the female with mental retardation themselves, and an adverse complication from their families and the community are all likely to turn out to be these factors. On these grounds, the paper suggests some effective ways to prevent the female with mental retardation from being sexual assaulted.

  19. Pubertal pair-housing facilitates adult sexual behavior in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenda-Figueira, Heather A; Bell, Margaret R; De Lorme, Kayla C; Sisk, Cheryl L

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the effects of pubertal testosterone (T) and social housing manipulations on male sexual behavior in adult rats. Prepubertal rats were castrated at 21 days of age (P21) and implanted with either blank or T-releasing pellets. At the onset of puberty, P28, half the rats in each treatment group were either single- or pair-housed with a male of the same hormone condition through P56, at which time pellets were removed and all rats were single-housed. In adulthood (P84), all rats received T replacement and were tested for sexual behavior. Rats pair-housed during adolescence showed more sexual behavior and greater improvement of sexual performance over repeated tests than single-housed rats, regardless of pubertal T status. Pubertal T, however, did facilitate the frequency of anogenital investigation. Thus, in male rats, social interactions during adolescence are more important than exposure to pubertal T in enhancing adult sexual behavior. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Investigación médico forense de los delitos contra la libertad e indemnidad sexuales Medico-legal investigation of sexual assault crimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Castelló

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Los delitos contra la libertad e indemnidad sexuales siguen siendo un campo de extraordinaria importancia en la práctica diaria médico forense. En esta revisión se presenta cuál es el estado actual del problema, se apunta una posible estrategia para mejorar su estudio y se expone la literatura científica más reciente respecto a las distintas variedades con que se presentan.Sexual crimes remain an area of paramount importance in daily forensic practice. This review carries out what is the current state of the problem, it suggests a possible strategy for improving their study and presents the latest scientific literature regarding the different types from which they are presented.

  1. Acute corticosterone sexually dimorphically facilitates social learning and inhibits feeding in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choleris, Elena; Cazzin, Laura; Lymer, Jennifer M; Amor, Talya R; Lu, Ray; Kavaliers, Martin; Valsecchi, Paola

    2013-12-01

    In numerous species social learning is predominant and adaptive, yet, we know little of its neurobiological mechanisms. Social learning is modulated by motivations and emotions, in a manner that is often sexually dimorphic. Additionally, stress hormones acutely modulate the related social cognitive process of social recognition. Whether this is true even for social learning is currently unknown. We investigated the acute effects of the stress hormone corticosterone (CORT) on the social transmission of food preferences (STFP) in male and female mice. During a brief social interaction an observer (OBS) acquires a food preference from a same-sex demonstrator (DEM). CORT (1.0, 2.5, 5.0 mg/kg), its ethanol vehicle (0.1%), and saline solution (0.9%) were administered intraperitoneally to the OBS, 10 min before a 30-min social interaction. Levels of plasma CORT were assessed in other mice that had received the same doses of CORT and either had or had not gone through a 30 min social interaction 10 min post-treatment. Exogenous CORT elicited levels of plasma level comparable to those seen at the peak of the circadian cycle and facilitated the STFP with males responding more than females both in terms of the duration of the food preference and the minimum effective dose. CORT also sexually dimorphically inhibited feeding, with females showing a greater dose-response than males. Saline solution and ethanol vehicles also sexually dimorphically facilitated the STFP and reduced feeding, but less than CORT did. These results indicate that CORT facilitates social learning, like social recognition. Hence, CORT may generally increase social information processing.

  2. The power of discretion and the discretion of power: personal assistants and sexual facilitation in disability services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Bahner

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this article is to explore how personal assistants, working in state-funded services for mobility-disabled people in Sweden, perceive and experience their work, with special focus on sexual facilitation (assistance with sexual activities. Background: Personal assistance services are a legal right, aiming to give certain disabled people the possibility to live on equal terms in society with non-disabled citizens. The services are to be grounded on the principles of self-determination, autonomy, integrity, and user influence according to independent-living ideology. However, the legislation does not mention sexuality, and in addition, there are often no local policies; hence, it is unclear what service users can demand in terms of sexual facilitation, and on the assistants’ part, what is and what is not acceptable to assist with. Methods: The methods used to gather data were interviews with 15 personal assistants as well as observations in an online discussion forum for personal assistants. Findings: The analysis suggests that personal assistants may experience that there is a taboo against discussing sexual facilitation in the workplace. There are no predetermined policies, regulations, or ethical codes of conduct regarding sexual facilitation, and the personal assistants’ discretion is therefore strong. Different strategies for managing this discretion were identified, greatly influenced by personal values, as well as societal norms. Conclusion: The normative context of discretion is highly visible, suggesting the importance of uncovering the interplay between the power dimensions of sexuality, disability, gender, and professionalism.

  3. Factores que afectan al análisis biológico de las muestras de agresiones sexuales Factors that interfere the biological analysis of the samples of sexual assaults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Torres

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available El concepto multidisciplinar de Ciencias Forenses se ha consolidado en los últimos años integrando un amplio espectro de profesionales de distintas disciplinas que ha abierto nuevas áreas de trabajo, en la mayoría de las cuales la interpretación del resultado se basa en la comparación con un material de referencia. Este trabajo pretende exponer brevemente una revisión de la casuística de Delitos Contra la Libertad Sexual (DCLS estudiados en los laboratorios de Biología Forense y evaluar el rendimiento de la prueba de ADN a lo largo de los años en dos aspectos: uno en las situaciones inherentes a la metodología y otro en lo que respecta al cotejo de los vestigios analizados con las muestras de referencia de los implicados. En este segundo supuesto, el no disponer de una Base de Datos Nacional de Perfiles de ADN parece ser una de las razones en la no resolución de algunos de estos casos. Desde la denuncia del delito perpetrado hasta la obtención del ansiado perfil de ADN susceptible de cotejo intervienen múltiples factores, algunos de los cuales podrían ser controlados-consensuados desde instituciones como los Institutos de Medicina Legal (IMLs de quienes depende la toma, distribución y envío de las muestras y otros deberían ser previstos-consensuados en los propios laboratorios de análisis.The multidisciplinary concept of Forensic Sciences has been consolidated in the last years integrating a wide spectrum of professionals of different disciplines. New areas of work have been opened, in most of them the result should be interpreted by the comparison with reference samples. This work tries to briefly expose a review of the laboratory work in sexual assaults casework and to evaluate the efficiency of the applied methodology in two aspects, one in reference to the techniques itself and another one which concerns the comparison between the specimens analysed and the reference samples of suspects. The absence in Spain of a National

  4. Childhood Sexual Abuse and Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    AAS Childhood Sexual Abuse and Suicide 2014 One third of sexual assault victims were under the age of 12. 1 1 Lifetime prevalence of childhood sexual abuse in the U.S. is approximately 10% and also ...

  5. Enhanced DNA Profiling of the Semen Donor in Late Reported Sexual Assaults: Use of Y-Chromosome-Targeted Pre-amplification and Next Generation Y-STR Amplification Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Erin K; Ballantyne, Jack

    2016-01-01

    In some cases of sexual assault the victim may not report the assault for several days after the incident due to various factors. The ability to obtain an autosomal STR profile of the semen donor from a living victim rapidly diminishes as the post-coital interval is extended due to the presence of only a small amount of male DNA amidst an overwhelming amount of female DNA. Previously, we have utilized various technological tools to overcome the limitations of male DNA profiling in extended interval post-coital samples including the use of Y-chromosome STR profiling, cervical sample, and post-PCR purification permitting the recovery of Y-STR profiles of the male DNA from samples collected 5-6 days after intercourse. Despite this success, the reproductive biology literature reports the presence of spermatozoa in the human cervix up to 7-10 days post-coitus. Therefore, novel and improved methods for recovery of male profiles in extended interval post-coital samples were required. Here, we describe enhanced strategies, including Y-chromosome-targeted pre-amplification and next generation Y-STR amplification kits, that have resulted in the ability to obtain probative male profiles from samples collected 6-9 days after intercourse.

  6. The Internet's Multiple Roles in Facilitating the Sexual Orientation Identity Development of Gay and Bisexual Male Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Gary W; Serrano, Pedro A; Bruce, Douglas; Bauermeister, Jose A

    2016-09-01

    One emerging avenue for the exploration of adolescents' sexual orientation identity development is the Internet, since it allows for varying degrees of anonymity and exploration. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to examine the role of the Internet in facilitating the sexual orientation identity development process of gay and bisexual male adolescents. Qualitative interviews were conducted with an ethnically diverse sample of 63 gay/bisexual male adolescents (ages 15-23). Participants reported using a range of Internet applications as they explored and came to accept their sexual orientation identity, with the intended purpose and degree of anonymity desired determining which applications were used. Youth reported that the Internet provided a range of functions with regard to the exploration and acceptance of their sexual orientation identity, including (1) increasing self-awareness of sexual orientation identity, (2) learning about gay/bisexual community life, (3) communicating with other gay/bisexual people, (4) meeting other gay/bisexual people, (5) finding comfort and acceptance with sexual orientation, and (6) facilitating the coming out process. Future research and practice may explore the Internet as a platform for promoting the healthy development of gay and bisexual male adolescents by providing a developmentally and culturally appropriate venue for the exploration and subsequent commitment to an integrated sexual orientation identity.

  7. Silenced suffering: the need for a better understanding of partner sexual violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, T K; Walker, Robert; Cole, Jennifer

    2015-04-01

    This article has two overall goals. First, to examine the current state of sexual violence research to highlight several shortcomings in the knowledge on partner sexual violence. Second, to describe several factors to consider in future research to facilitate a more in-depth understanding of partner sexual violence. Shortcomings of the research on partner sexual violence include (1) overreliance on dichotomous yes/no representations of sexual violence experiences; (2) lack of, or inadequate documentation of the scope and nature of partner sexual violence; (3) inadequate ways to account for impairment of consent under different circumstances; (4) difficulties in discriminating unwanted from nonconsensual sexual activities; and (5) limited information about the role sexual violence plays in the larger context of coercive control. In order to facilitate a more in-depth understanding of partner sexual assault, there is a need (1) to better understand the scope and nature of partner sexual assault and (2) to better understand the role partner sexual violence plays in coercive control. By improving the measurement of this phenomenon, victims, researchers, practitioners, and those involved in the justice system might be better equipped to respond to sexual violence among intimate partners.

  8. Promoting Parent-Adolescent Communication To Facilitate Healthy Sexual Socialization of Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filomeno, Arlynn H.

    2002-01-01

    Reviews relevant research to identify strengths and weaknesses of parent-adolescent communication patterns relating to adolescent sexual behaviors. Studies show the positive effects of parent-adolescent communication patterns and adolescent sexuality, though man parents fail to address the most critical sexual risks faced by adolescents (sexually…

  9. Facilitating and Inhibiting Factors of Sexual Behavior among Migrants in Transition from Mexico to the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Alejandro Guerra-Ordoñez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionHuman immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS is one of the most prevalent infectious diseases in the border region of Mexico due to the flow of migrants under desperate conditions, encouraging casual and unprotected sex. Since this has become a binational public health problem, it is important to understand the factors that predict these sexual behaviors. The aim of the current study was to investigate the facilitators and inhibitors of transition in the sexual behavior of migrants from two border regions on the Mexico–United States (US border.MethodsThis was a predictive and cross-sectional study. A sample of 256 migrants in shelters for migrants on the border between Mexico and US were selected through systematic random sampling. Predictor variables investigated for effect on the safe sexual behavior (SSB of the migrant were reasons for having sex; sexual attitudes; sexual machismo; knowledge about HIV; access to health services; and social discrimination.ResultsThe sample was predominantly male (89.5%, with 46.1% reporting being single. The average age was 33.38 years (SD = 9.73 and the average number of years of education reported was 8.05 (SD = 3.37. A permissive sexual attitude and sexual machismo both correlated with condom use (rs = 0.130, p < 0.01 and rs = −0.174, p < 0.01, respectively. Regression analysis showed that a permissive sexual attitude decreased the practice of safe sex (β = 0.17, t = 4.16, p < 0.001, as did sexual machismo (β = −0.28, t = −4.83, p < 0.001 and HIV knowledge (β = −0.11, t = −2.62, p = 0.006.DiscussionIt was found that access to health services did not influence the SSB of migrants, as suggested by the literature. However, a permissive sexual attitude, sexual machismo, and HIV knowledge were all variables capable of predicting SSB. It is recommended that the study is extended to study migrant

  10. Facilitating and Inhibiting Factors of Sexual Behavior among Migrants in Transition from Mexico to the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Guerra-Ordoñez, Jesús Alejandro; Benavides-Torres, Raquel A.; Zapata-Garibay, Rogelio; Onofre-Rodríguez, Dora Julia; Márquez-Vega, María Aracely; Zamora-Carmona, Gabriela

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) is one of the most prevalent infectious diseases in the border region of Mexico due to the flow of migrants under desperate conditions, encouraging casual and unprotected sex. Since this has become a binational public health problem, it is important to understand the factors that predict these sexual behaviors. The aim of the current study was to investigate the facilitators and inhibitors of transitio...

  11. Facilitating and Inhibiting Factors of Sexual Behavior among Migrants in Transition from Mexico to the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Jesús Alejandro Guerra-Ordoñez; Benavides-Torres, Raquel A.; Rogelio Zapata-Garibay; Dora Julia Onofre-Rodríguez; María Aracely Márquez-Vega; Gabriela Zamora-Carmona

    2017-01-01

    IntroductionHuman immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) is one of the most prevalent infectious diseases in the border region of Mexico due to the flow of migrants under desperate conditions, encouraging casual and unprotected sex. Since this has become a binational public health problem, it is important to understand the factors that predict these sexual behaviors. The aim of the current study was to investigate the facilitators and inhibitors of transition in...

  12. Facilitating and Inhibiting Factors of Sexual Behavior among Migrants in Transition from Mexico to the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-Ordoñez, Jesús Alejandro; Benavides-Torres, Raquel A; Zapata-Garibay, Rogelio; Onofre-Rodríguez, Dora Julia; Márquez-Vega, María Aracely; Zamora-Carmona, Gabriela

    2017-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) is one of the most prevalent infectious diseases in the border region of Mexico due to the flow of migrants under desperate conditions, encouraging casual and unprotected sex. Since this has become a binational public health problem, it is important to understand the factors that predict these sexual behaviors. The aim of the current study was to investigate the facilitators and inhibitors of transition in the sexual behavior of migrants from two border regions on the Mexico-United States (US) border. This was a predictive and cross-sectional study. A sample of 256 migrants in shelters for migrants on the border between Mexico and US were selected through systematic random sampling. Predictor variables investigated for effect on the safe sexual behavior (SSB) of the migrant were reasons for having sex; sexual attitudes; sexual machismo; knowledge about HIV; access to health services; and social discrimination. The sample was predominantly male (89.5%), with 46.1% reporting being single. The average age was 33.38 years (SD = 9.73) and the average number of years of education reported was 8.05 (SD = 3.37). A permissive sexual attitude and sexual machismo both correlated with condom use (rs = 0.130, p machismo (β = -0.28, t = -4.83, p machismo, and HIV knowledge were all variables capable of predicting SSB. It is recommended that the study is extended to study migrant populations from other parts of the border, as well undertaking as a qualitative approach to explore new variables.

  13. Facilitating communication about sexual health between aging women and their health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Anne K; Lewinson, Terri D W

    2015-04-01

    Many women experience changes in sexual health as they age, and discussing these changes with health care providers is an essential component of optimal health management. The purpose of this study was to understand aging women's perspectives about communicating with providers about sexual health. We used the integrative model of behavioral prediction as a theoretical lens to explore women's attitudes, perceived norms, and perceived self-efficacy that promote or inhibit the likelihood of communicating about sexual health. In this theory-based qualitative study, we interviewed 28 community-dwelling older women in the Midwestern United States. Through thematic analysis, we identified both positive and negative attitudes about communicating with providers. Women seemed most inclined to discuss sexual health if they perceived that important patient-provider conditions, such as trust and rapport, were in place. Despite situational obstacles and perceived norms, these women held strong beliefs about their abilities to discuss sexual health topics with providers.

  14. A Hidden Crisis: Including the LGBT Community When Addressing Sexual Violence on College Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Zenen Jaimes; Hussey, Hannah

    2014-01-01

    Recently, sexual assault on college campuses has received increased national attention. In its first report, the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault highlighted steps colleges and universities can take to curb the number of sexual assaults on campuses. For the first time, the U.S. Department of Education has released the…

  15. The DSM-5 dissociative-PTSD subtype: can levels of depression, anxiety, hostility, and sleeping difficulties differentiate between dissociative-PTSD and PTSD in rape and sexual assault victims?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Cherie; Elklit, Ask; Lauterbach, Dean; Elhai, Jon D

    2014-05-01

    The DSM-5 currently includes a dissociative-PTSD subtype within its nomenclature. Several studies have confirmed the dissociative-PTSD subtype in both American Veteran and American civilian samples. Studies have begun to assess specific factors which differentiate between dissociative vs. non-dissociative PTSD. The current study takes a novel approach to investigating the presence of a dissociative-PTSD subtype in its use of European victims of sexual assault and rape (N=351). Utilizing Latent Profile Analyses, we hypothesized that a discrete group of individuals would represent a dissociative-PTSD subtype. We additionally hypothesized that levels of depression, anger, hostility, and sleeping difficulties would differentiate dissociative-PTSD from a similarly severe form of PTSD in the absence of dissociation. Results concluded that there were four discrete groups termed baseline, moderate PTSD, high PTSD, and dissociative-PTSD. The dissociative-PTSD group encompassed 13.1% of the sample and evidenced significantly higher mean scores on measures of depression, anxiety, hostility, and sleeping difficulties. Implications are discussed in relation to both treatment planning and the newly published DSM-5. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Translating Sexual Assault Prevention from a College Campus to a United States Military Installation: Piloting the Know-Your-Power Bystander Social Marketing Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Sharyn J.; Stapleton, Jane G.

    2012-01-01

    One population that shares both similar and different characteristics with traditional college-age students is the U.S. Military. Similarities include a high concentration of 18- to 26-year-olds dealing with new found independence, peer pressure, and the presence of social norms that support violence and hypermasculinity. Sexual violence is a…

  17. Translating Sexual Assault Prevention from a College Campus to a United States Military Installation: Piloting the Know-Your-Power Bystander Social Marketing Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Sharyn J.; Stapleton, Jane G.

    2012-01-01

    One population that shares both similar and different characteristics with traditional college-age students is the U.S. Military. Similarities include a high concentration of 18- to 26-year-olds dealing with new found independence, peer pressure, and the presence of social norms that support violence and hypermasculinity. Sexual violence is a…

  18. Military Personnel: DOD Has Taken Steps to Meet the Health Needs of Deployed Servicewomen, but Actions Are Needed to Enhance Care for Sexual Assault Victims

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    forcible sodomy ( oral or anal sex), and other unwanted sexual contact that is aggravated, abusive, or wrongful (including unwanted and...Gynecologists guidelines for cervical cytology screening. Additionally, we found that Navy guidelines require the provision of standbys—individuals who could

  19. Bringing X, Y, Z Generations Together to Facilitate School-Based Sexual and Reproductive Health Education

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Akbari Kamrani, Mahnaz; Yahya, Sharifah Syed

    2016-01-01

    This generic qualitative study explores the perspective of Malaysian teachers regarding the constraints of the current school-based sexual and reproductive health education in secondary schools of Klang-Valley Malaysia...

  20. Military Sexual Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Whistleblower Rights & Protections Transparency Media Room Inside the Media Room Public Affairs News Releases Speeches Videos Publications ... Massachusetts Veteran with PTSD turns his life around : Rich Adams was sexually assaulted while in the Navy ...

  1. Bringing X, Y, Z Generations Together to Facilitate School-Based Sexual and Reproductive Health Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamrani, Mahnaz Akbari; Yahya, Sharifah Syed

    2016-01-01

    This generic qualitative study explores the perspective of Malaysian teachers regarding the constraints of the current school-based sexual and reproductive health education in secondary schools of Klang-Valley Malaysia. For this study, in-depth interviews were conducted with twenty eight science teachers of government schools. The majority of participants named the teaching strategy and capacity of teachers, the lack of co-operation from the school and parents, limited resources in teaching and students themselves as some of the challenges. We concluded that if sexual health education is to be effective, it needs to be provided by people who have some specialized training. The teachers should be trained to teach sexual reproductive health education classes at the basic level, and in-service training for teachers already in the field should be intensified. Local adaptation to culture, language, religion, and so forth is often necessary.

  2. Bringing X, Y, Z Generations Together to Facilitate School-Based Sexual and Reproductive Health Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari Kamrani, Mahnaz; Yahya, Sharifah Syed

    2016-01-04

    This generic qualitative study explores the perspective of Malaysian teachers regarding the constraints of the current school-based sexual and reproductive health education in secondary schools of Klang-Valley Malaysia. For this study, in-depth interviews were conducted with twenty eight science teachers of government schools. The majority of participants named the teaching strategy and capacity of teachers, the lack of co-operation from the school and parents, limited resources in teaching and students themselves as some of the challenges. We concluded that if sexual health education is to be effective, it needs to be provided by people who have some specialized training. The teachers should be trained to teach sexual reproductive health education classes at the basic level, and in-service training for teachers already in the field should be intensified. Local adaptation to culture, language, religion, and so forth is often necessary.

  3. When a death apparently associated to sexual assault is instead a natural death due to idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome: The importance of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid analysis in vitreous humor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busardò, Francesco Paolo; Portelli, Francesca; Montana, Angelo; Rotolo, Maria Concetta; Pichini, Simona; Maresi, Emiliano

    2017-05-01

    We here report a case involving a 21-year-old female, found dead in a central square of a city in the south of Italy. Initial evidences and circumstances were suggestive of a death associated with a sexual assault. Two peripheral blood and two vitreous humor samples were collected for the purpose of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) testing from the dead body at two different post-mortem intervals (PMIs): approximately 2 (t0) and 36 (t1) hours. The obtained results showed that, between t0 and t1, there was an increase of GHB concentrations in peripheral blood and vitreous humor of 66.3% and 8.1%, respectively. This case was the first evidence of GHB post mortem production in a dead body and not in vitro, showing that vitreous humor is less affected than peripheral blood in GHB post-mortem production. The value detected at t1 in peripheral blood (53.4µg/mL) exceeded the proposed cut-off and if interpreted alone would have led to erroneous conclusions. This was not the case of vitreous humor GHB, whose post-mortem increase was minimal and it allowed to exclude a GHB exposure. Only after a broad forensic investigation including a complete autopsy, serological, histological, toxicological and haematology analyses, a diagnosis of idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome, a myeloproliferative disorder characterized by persistent eosinophilia associated with damage to multiple organs, was made and the cause of death was due to a pulmonary eosinophilic vasculitis responsible for an acute respiratory failure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Sexual Harassment at Work: A European Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Artan Çela

    2015-01-01

    Unwelcome sexual advances, proposition or pressure for sexual activity, offensive flirtations, leering, whistling, making sexually suggestive gestures, sexual jokes, unwanted sexual looks, unwanted letters, telephone call, or materials of a sexual nature, unwanted physical contact, actual or attempting rape or sexual assault, this and more of this conduct if took place in the workplace would amount to a sexual harassment. The sexual harassment at work has become a serious issue of our time. I...

  5. The Design of Group Counseling Scheme for the Preven-tion of Sexual Assault on Grade Four Girl Students of Rural Primary Schools%农村小学四年级女生预防性侵害团体辅导方案设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    揭康丽

    2015-01-01

    The group counseling scheme is mainly for Grade Four girl students of rural primary schools, playing the important role of schools in sexual education, especially the prevention of sexual assault. Based on child developmental psychology, group psy-chological counseling was implemented to help students correctly learn about the characteristics of boy and girl students, and the principles of relationship between boys and girls, and grasp the knowledge and skills of preventing sexual assault.%本团体辅导方案主要是针对农村四年级女生,发挥学校在性教育中特别是性侵害预防中的重要作用。以儿童发展心理学理论为根据,以团体心理辅导的形式展开,帮助学生正确认识男女生的特点,了解男女生交往的界限和原则,掌握儿童性侵害的防范知识和技巧。

  6. Longitudinal pathways of sexual victimization, sexual self-esteem, and depression in women and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahé, Barbara; Berger, Anja

    2017-03-01

    This article presents a longitudinal analysis of the links between sexual assault victimization, depression, and sexual self-esteem by examining their cross-lagged paths among both men and women. Male and female college students (N = 2,425) in Germany participated in the study that comprised 3 data waves in their first, second, and third year of university, separated by 12-month intervals. Sexual assault victimization was assessed at Time 1 (T1) since the age of 14 and at Time 2 (T2) and Time 3 (T3) for the last 12 months. Depression and sexual self-esteem were measured at each wave. Random-intercept cross-lagged panel analyses, controlling for individual differences in depression and sexual self-esteem, showed that sexual assault at T1 predicted depression and lower sexual self-esteem at T2, and depression and lower self-esteem at T2 predicted sexual assault victimization at T3. In addition, significant paths were found from T1 depression to T2 sexual assault victimization and from T2 sexual assault victimization to depression at T3. Sexual victimization at T1 was indirectly linked to sexual victimization at T3 via depression at T2. Both depression and sexual self-esteem at T1 were indirectly linked to sexual victimization at T3. The paths did not differ significantly between men and women. Sexual assault victimization was shown to be a risk factor for both depression as a general mental health indicator and lowered sexual self-esteem as a specific outcome in the domain of sexuality. Moreover, depression and sexual self-esteem increased the vulnerability for sexual assault victimization, which has implications for prevention and intervention efforts. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment in the U.S. Military: Annex to Volume 2. Tabular Results from the 2014 RAND Military Workplace Study for Department of Defense Service Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    you feel like you would get punished or treated unfairly in the workplace if you did not do something sexual? (Follow-up questions established that...get punished or treated unfairly in the workplace if you did not do something sexual? (Follow-up questions established that target had direct...0.37% (0.05–1.25) Has someone from work made you feel like you would get punished or treated unfairly in the workplace if you did not do

  8. Coming of age: how young women in the Northwest Territories understand the barriers and facilitators to positive, empowered, and safer sexual health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candice Lys

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Compared to other young Canadians, youth in the Northwest Territories (NWT suffer disproportionately from negative sexual health outcomes, including high rates of sexually transmitted infections and unintended pregnancies. This study aimed to identify the self-perceived barriers and facilitators to positive, empowered, and safer sexual health that impact female youth in the NWT. Study design and methods. A total of 12 females aged 15–19 who live in the NWT were recruited through purposive sampling to participate in semi-structured, face-to-face interviews. Inductive coding and thematic analysis of transcribed data occurred using Atlas.ti. Results. Overall 4 main themes influenced the sexual health of these women: sexual health knowledge, relationships with the self and others, access to quality sexual health resources, and alcohol use/abuse. Conclusion. Recommendations for future action include improving the content and delivery of sexual health education, enhancing parent–adolescent sexual health communication, providing workshops to empower young women to assert themselves within relationships, and supporting an environment that normalizes youth sexuality.

  9. Sexual Robbery: The Missing Concept in the Search for an Appropriate Legal Metaphor for Sexual Aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, K. Edward; Yurchesyn, Kathaleen A.

    Political efforts by feminists in the 1970s and early 1980s resulted in the redefinition of rape as physical assault in Canada's 1983 rape law in the Criminal Code. This paper argues that treating a woman's sexuality as "property," as did the rape law prior to 1983, was correct. Redefining rape as sexual assault, and measuring the…

  10. Facilitating the Implementation of Sexually Transmitted Infection Syndromic Management in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王千秋; 邵长庚

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To introduce the current status ofimplementing sexually transmitted infection (STIs)syndromic management in China. Methods: Data were collected and analyzed from the literature. Possiblesolutions were suggested for the obstacles encountered inthe implementation process. Results: Validation of revised flowcharts for themanagement of three syndromes (urethritis, vaginaldischarge, and genital ulcers) has been conducted in China.The feasibility, effectiveness and acceptance of using asyndromic STI approach were investigated in a large studyin Hainan, Zhejiang and Hubei Provinces. Chief obstaclesto implementation included the following: lack of supportfrom government authorities; negative reaction by hospitals;lack of critical thinking and innovation; perceivedover-emphasis on treatment at the expense of prevention;and lack of coverage for several important pathogens withintreatment algorithms. Possible solutions may include policyadvocacy, adopting syndromic management into a Chinesecontext, dissemination and promotion, training of providers,encouraging use of syndromic approach, and conductingoperational research. Conclusions: Syndromic STI management provides afeasible approach for the diagnosis and treatment of STIs inChina. Further efforts should be made for scaling up itsapplication in clinical settings.

  11. Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment in the U.S. Military: Top-Line Estimates for Active-Duty Coast Guard Members from the 2014 RAND Military Workplace Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    sexual behavior. These events are counted only if the respondent indicated that they had personal evidence that a workplace benefit or punishment was... Workplace Study C O R P O R A T I O N National Defense Research Institute Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden... Workplace Study 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT

  12. Assistência multiprofissional à vítima de violência sexual: a experiência da Universidade Federal de São Paulo Multidisciplinary care for victims of sexual assault: the experience at the Federal University in São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosiane Mattar

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo tem como objetivo discutir a importância da assistência multiprofissional às vítimas da violência sexual para redução dos agravos físicos, psíquicos e sociais que podem advir desta violência. Para tanto se faz uma breve descrição das atividades realizadas pelos diferentes profissionais que prestam assistência na Casa de Saúde da Mulher Professor Domingos Deláscio da Universidade Federal de São Paulo, e são apresentados alguns dos resultados deste trabalho nos seus cinco anos de existência. O artigo traça o perfil sócio-demográfico das mulheres vítimas de estupros que foram atendidas desde o início do serviço, detalhando quantas engravidaram e fizeram o aborto e o número de processos judiciais que foram abertos.This article discusses the importance of multidisciplinary care for victims of sexual assault in order to mitigate the respective physical, psychological, and social harm. The article begins with a brief description of the activities by various professionals involved in the care of victims treated at the Women's Health Center of the Federal University in São Paulo, and presents the outcome of some cases treated at this institution in its five years of experience. The article provides the socio-demographic profile of female rape victims since the beginning of this women's health service, with the number of women who became pregnant, those who underwent abortion, and the number of court suits filed.

  13. Dealing with Sexual Assault, Challenges, and Insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-11

    variety of reasons, such as fear of reprisal or getting the offender in trouble, believing that police would not or could not do anything to help, and...Most victims know their assailants. • The vast majority (nearly 98%) of perpetrators are male. • Young people are especially at risk: nearly...an Army 2-star, affirms that: “[Victims that step forward make] a courageous choice….To the offenders : We don’t care who you are or what rank you

  14. Civil Military Relations And Sexual Assault

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    linked to not questioning orders, plans , and ideas, especially thoughts from higher ranking members.”75 Good order and discipline is a significant...www.co.monterey.ca.us/personnel/documents/specifications/52A93.pdf. 120 Ibid. 121 Criminal Justice Planning , 6 CA Penal Code § 13823.93, (1995). 122 “California...Information About Conviction, Sentence, Incarceration, Release, and Escape 13. Restitution 14. The Prompt Return of Property 15. Notice of Parole

  15. Fostering Constructive Dialogue on Military Sexual Assault

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    military.html>. 10 “Members panels” in the military justice system take the place of a civilian “jury.” 11 United States v. Lamb, 2010 CCA LEXIS 334 (N...M. Ct. Crim. App. 2010). 12 United States v. Peterson, 2010 CCA LEXIS 336 (N-M. Ct. Crim. App. 2010). 13 The term black out refers to an alcohol

  16. Males Can Benefit from Sexual Cannibalism Facilitated by Self-Sacrifice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Steven K; Wagner, William E; Hebets, Eileen A

    2016-10-24

    In a number of species, males are cannibalized by females after mating (reviewed in [1, 2]), and some males actually appear to facilitate their own cannibalism (reviewed in [3]). Such self-sacrifice can evolve if being eaten sufficiently enhances either fertilization success (mating effort) or offspring number or fitness (paternal effort). While there is some support for the mating-effort hypothesis, few studies have found support for paternal effort. We used two experiments to test the paternal-effort hypothesis in the dark fishing spider, Dolomedes tenebrosus. Males of this species provide themselves as a material contribution: they spontaneously die during copulation and are subsequently eaten by females. In support of the paternal-effort predictions, when females were allowed to consume their mating partner, we found large and significant increases in (1) the number, (2) the size, and (3) the survivorship of the offspring. Similar benefits were not seen when females were allowed to consume a cricket in lieu of a male, suggesting that it is the consumption of the male's body per se that is responsible for these fitness benefits. Together, our results suggest that D. tenebrosus males can benefit from self-sacrifice behavior through paternal effort. Such behavior may be particularly likely to evolve when high rates of postcopulatory cannibalism trap males into investing in their first mate instead of investing in acquiring additional matings and/or if strong first-male sperm precedence reduces the benefits of both investing in additional matings and paternity protection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. An Analysis of Causative Factors in the Family and Countermeasures for Sexual Assault by “Brutish Teachers” of The Left-behind Girls in the Rural Areas%农村留守女童遭受“禽兽教师”性侵之家庭原因与防范对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟昭会; 常静

    2015-01-01

    据全国妇联2013年发布的数据显示,我国农村留守儿童已达6100多万,其中一半以上是农村留守女童。由于缺少家庭、学校、政府和社会的监管、教育、关心与呵护,近年来,农村留守女童遭受“禽兽教师”、亲戚、邻居、社会人员性侵伤害的事件时有发生,不但给留守女童本人及其家庭造成了巨大的伤害,而且严重地影响了农村的和谐与稳定。要保护农村留守女童的性安全,家庭、学校、政府、社会等方面都有着不可推卸的责任。本文基于家庭视角,从农村村留守女童遭受“禽兽教师”性侵伤害的系列事件入手,分析了这种恶性事件产生的家庭原因,并探讨了家庭的防范对策。%According to the statistics issued by ACWF (the All China Women’s Federation), today there are over 6 100 left-behind children in the rural areas in China, half of whom are girls. Lacking supervision, edu-cation, concern and care from families, schools, governments and the society, more and more sexual assaults by“brutish teachers”, relatives, neighbors and other people of these girls have occurred time and again recently, which has not only exerted tremendous injury on them and their families but also affected seriously rural harmony and stability. To protect these girls from sexual assaults, the family, school, government and society all shoulder undeniable obligations. The present paper, from family perspective, analyzes the causative factors in the family and puts forward certain countermeasures by the family based on a series of sexual assaults by“brutish teachers”of these girls in the rural areas in China.

  18. Assaults against psychiatrists in outpatient settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubin, W R; Wilson, S J; Mercer, C

    1988-09-01

    Questionnaires were sent to 3800 psychiatrists in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware to investigate assaults against psychiatrists in outpatient settings. Ninety-one questionnaires were returned: 32 psychiatrists reported serious assaults (gun or knife), and 59 reported less serious assaults (object or physical attack). Significantly more personal injury and property damage resulted from the less serious assaults. Coping strategy was significantly related to the type of assault; positive verbal intervention was the most effective. Thirty-one (36%) of 87 respondents stated that they had moderate to strong feelings before the attack that the patient was potentially violent. Experienced psychiatrists were as likely to be victims of assault as were inexperienced psychiatrists. Forty-eight (59%) of 81 psychiatrists continued to treat the patients who had assaulted them. Only 20 (23%) of 87 psychiatrists had security arrangements at the time of the assault. The authors present four case vignettes which typify the different types of assaults, interventions, and outcomes.

  19. Sexual violence; post-conflict; Sierra Leone

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    opperwjj

    including intimate partner violence, sexual assault, child sexual abuse, wife ... This study explored narratives of sexual violence and obstacles to the .... to affirm their masculinity through irresponsible sexual behaviour and domestic violence, .... Netherlands Institute of International Relations and the Social Science Research ...

  20. Sexual violence in women's lives. Findings from the Women's Safety Project, a community-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, M; Haskell, L

    1995-03-01

    This paper presents a community-based study, which aims to determine the interconnections between women's experiences of sexual abuse in childhood, sexual assault in adulthood, and physical assault in intimate relationships in Toronto, Canada. An in-depth face-to-face interview was conducted with 420 women who comprised the random sample of the women living in Toronto, Canada. Findings on the prevalence and effects of various forms of sexual abuse and violence revealed that 97.6% of the woman interviewed reported that they personally experienced some form of sexual violation. Sexual abuse in childhood (including incest), sexual assault, sexual harassment, and physical assault in intimate relationships were documented. Among the findings were that one-fourth of the women in the sample were physically assaulted by a male intimate, one-half of the women reported being raped or almost raped, and nearly half of the respondents reported experiencing some kind of sexual abuse before reaching age 16.

  1. 78 FR 25972 - Establishment of the Response Systems to Adult Sexual Crimes Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-03

    ... of the Secretary Establishment of the Response Systems to Adult Sexual Crimes Panel AGENCY: DoD... charter for the Response Systems to Adult Sexual Assault Crimes Panel (``the Response Systems Panel... adjudication of crimes involving adult sexual assault and related offenses, under 10 U.S.C. 920 (Article 120 of...

  2. Internet-facilitated commercial sexual exploitation of children: findings from a nationally representative sample of law enforcement agencies in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Kimberly J; Jones, Lisa M; Finkelhor, David; Wolak, Janis

    2011-03-01

    This article explores the variety of ways in which the Internet is used to facilitate the commercial sexual exploitation of children (CSEC) and provides national incidence estimates for the number of arrests involving such technology-facilitated crimes in 2006. The National Juvenile Online Victimization Study is a nationally representative longitudinal study of more than 2,500 local, county, state, and federal law enforcement agencies across the United States. The current article utilizes Wave 2 data, which surveyed arrests in 2006 for Internet-related sex crimes against minors. Detailed data were collected via telephone interviews with investigators about 1,051 individual arrest cases. Findings show that an estimated 569 arrests for Internet-facilitated commercial sexual exploitation of children (IF-CSEC) occurred in the United States in 2006. Offenders in IF-CSEC cases fell into two main categories: (1) those who used the Internet to purchase or sell access to identified children for sexual purposes including child pornography (CP) production (36% of cases), and (2) those who used the Internet to purchase or sell CP images they possessed but did not produce (64% of cases). Offenders attempting to profit from child sexual exploitation were more likely than those who were purchasing to have (a) prior arrests for sexual and nonsexual offenses, (b) a history of violence, (c) produced CP, (d) joined forces with other offenders, and (e) involved female offenders. Although the number of arrests for IF-CSEC crimes is relatively small, the victims of these crimes are a high-risk subgroup of youth, and the offenders who try to profit from these crimes are particularly concerning from a child welfare perspective.

  3. Testing New Survey Questions of Sexual Harassment and Sexual Assault

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    have a low alpha, even when unidimensional , if there is high random error. Results The detailed results are shown in Appendix A, however, 7.1...McIver, J.P., & Carmines, E.G. (1981). Unidimensional scaling. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Nunnally, J.C., & Bernstein, I.H. (1994). Psychometric theory (3rd

  4. AIDS: 'A Disease of Mass Destruction' An Assault to our Shared ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AIDS: 'A Disease of Mass Destruction' An Assault to our Shared Humanity: Review. ... AIDS will take a heavy economic toll of robbing the country of many key ... Some of these include high prevalence of untreated sexually transmitted ... AIDs prevention and treatment as well as safer sex and prevention education programs.

  5. Do sex assault victims receive adequate care? If not, you risk fines, violations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-06-01

    Failure to collect evidence, inadequate care, and delays resulted in a New York City hospital being fined for providing inadequate care to a rape victim. These problems are common in the emergency department. Avoid asking sexual assault victims the same questions repeatedly. Determine the patient's primary concern and address it immediately. Examine patients in a private area with adequate space.

  6. Eliciting behavior change in a US sexual violence and intimate partner violence prevention program through utilization of Freire and discussion facilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Atiba; Lewy, Robin; Ricardo, Francine; Dovydaitis, Tiffany; Hunter, Amber; Mitchell, Ashley; Loe, Claire; Kugel, Candace

    2010-09-01

    Designed by Migrant Clinicians Network, the Hombres Unidos Contra La Violencia Familiar (Men United Against Family Violence) Project used facilitated discussion groups as the method to encourage self-reflection and behavior change. Male participants were not taught to rectify any past sexual or intimate partner violence (SV/IPV) 'tendencies', rather the discussion facilitation allowed them to reflect on the SV/IPV that was present in their lives and in the Hispanic community. Subsequently, the sessions and self-reflection, coupled with the discussions with other participating males, empowered several participants to have further interactions about SV/IPV with individuals in their community. The discussions led participants to realize that SV/IPV existed in their community, but that there were males within their community that wanted to change. The Hombres Unidos Contra La Violencia Familiar project demonstrated that behavior change does not need to be actively persuaded, but that self-reflection, which elicits behavior change, can be achieved through facilitated discussion and by permitting the facilitators to become participants. By creating sessions that allow participants to construct their own understanding of the perceived problem while reflecting on their past behavior, true behavior change that is initiated by the participant can be achieved. Through discussion facilitation, a targeted and structured behavior change intervention can assist participants in realizing that their past actions were damaging to themselves and their community, while aiding the participant in employing self-initiated responses, learned within the discussions, to alter their behaviors.

  7. Powerplays: How Teens Can Pull the Plug on Sexual Harassment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Harriet

    Noting that sexual harassment has more to do with making victims feel powerless than with sex, this book advises adolescents and their parents on how to identify, stop, and prevent sexual harassment. Chapter 1, "What is Sexual Harassment, Anyway?" defines sexual harassment and details how harassment becomes assault. Chapter 2, "Why is Reporting…

  8. Sexuality in transit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinskou, Marie Bruvik

    2015-01-01

    Through an investigation of a reported rape, this article suggests that we conceive sexuality as a transitional object that changes and transforms depending on space and temporality. This makes sexuality difficult to grasp within specific and stable frames of gender and power analysis. Applying...... such an approach, the complexities of sexual assault, changing power relations and unstable narratives of gender and sexuality are illuminated. The analysis shows that the traditional divide between public and private has dissolved and that public spaces of pop culture are drawn into spaces of intimacy and thereby...

  9. The Role of Alcohol Use during Sexual Situations in the Relationship between Sexual Revictimization and Women’s Intentions to Engage in Unprotected Sex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkhill, Michele R.; Norris, Jeanette; Cue Davi, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    Research has demonstrated relationships among childhood sexual abuse, adult sexual assault, and sexual risk taking. This study proposes that one mechanism through which the victimization-sexual risk taking relationship works is through an increased likelihood of drinking during sexual situations. Using path analysis, the current study explores this hypothesis in a sample of 230 women. The model illustrates that women with a history of child and adult sexual victimization reported greater intentions to engage in unprotected sex and that this relationship is in part accounted for by an increased likelihood of drinking in sexual situations. The results suggest that sexual risk reduction programs and sexual assault treatment programs should educate women about the alcohol-involved sexual risk taking that often follows sexual assault victimization. PMID:25069152

  10. The Decline of Air Assault Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-26

    criticality of mission focus to the success of air assaults . However, 31 1st Infantry Division, AAR—Operation Junction City for 22 February 1967 to 15...product life cycle theory is a great way to visualize the fifty-year life of air assault operations; however, its explanatory powers are limited. The 1962...The Decline of Air Assault Operations A Monograph by MAJ Jason S. Raub United States Army School of

  11. Labeling Sexual Victimization Experiences: The Role of Sexism, Rape Myth Acceptance, and Tolerance for Sexual Harassment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeMaire, Kelly L; Oswald, Debra L; Russell, Brenda L

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether attitudinal variables, such as benevolent and hostile sexism toward men and women, female rape myth acceptance, and tolerance of sexual harassment are related to women labeling their sexual assault experiences as rape. In a sample of 276 female college students, 71 (25.7%) reported at least one experience that met the operational definition of rape, although only 46.5% of those women labeled the experience "rape." Benevolent sexism, tolerance of sexual harassment, and rape myth acceptance, but not hostile sexism, significantly predicted labeling of previous sexual assault experiences by the victims. Specifically, those with more benevolent sexist attitudes toward both men and women, greater rape myth acceptance, and more tolerant attitudes of sexual harassment were less likely to label their past sexual assault experience as rape. The results are discussed for their clinical and theoretical implications.

  12. 25 CFR 11.400 - Assault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Criminal Offenses § 11.400 Assault. (a) A person is guilty of assault if he or she: (1) Attempts to cause or purposely, knowingly or recklessly causes bodily injury to another; or (2) Negligently causes bodily injury to another with a deadly weapon; or (3) Attempts by physical menace to put another in fear...

  13. Prosecuting Assaultive Forensic and Psychiatric Inpatients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, Kerri C.; Reddon, John R.; Chudleigh, Michele D.

    2008-01-01

    Inpatient assault of forensic and psychiatric staff is a complex and multifaceted issue. Hence, the consequences reported in the literature regarding prosecuting assaultive inpatients are quite variable. In this article, issues pertaining to the prosecution of violent inpatients are reviewed. Illustrative cases, challenges of prosecution,…

  14. Trapezoid fracture caused by assault

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malshikare V

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this report we describe an open fracture of trapezoid and break in anterior cortex of capitate due to assault in a young adult male. Direct impact force of a sharp object to the first web space caused the above fractures. Open reduction and internal fixation of the trapezoid was carried out using Kirschner wires. Cut extensor tendons, extensor retaniculum, capsule, adductor pollicis muscle, first dorsal interosseous muscle, soft tissue and overlying skin were sutured primarily. Three months after the operation the patient has made a complete recovery. There is no similar case reported in the literature.

  15. Test balloons? Small signs of big events: a qualitative study on circumstances facilitating adults' awareness of children's first signs of sexual abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flåm, Anna Margrete; Haugstvedt, Eli

    2013-09-01

    This research examined caregivers' awareness of children's first signs of sexual abuse. The aim was to explore circumstances that facilitate adults' awareness of first signs in everyday natural settings. Data were obtained from a Norwegian university hospital's outpatient specialty mental health clinic. Included were all cases (N=20) referred during a two-year period for treatment after the disclosure of sexual abuse that was reported to the police and child protective service. Nonabusing caregivers' awareness of first signs were recollected in hindsight as part of therapy. Qualitative analysis was conducted to capture caregivers' experiences. As identified by caregivers, all children gave signs. Thereafter, children either stopped, delayed, or immediately disclosed sexual abuse. At first signs, each child had time and attention from trusted adults, connection to the abuser, and exhibited signs of reservation against that person or related activities. Then, if met with closed answers, first signs were rebuffed as once-occurring events. If met with open answers and follow-up questions, children continued to tell. Unambiguous messages were prompted only in settings with intimate bodily activity or sexual abuse related content. In sum, when trusted adults provided door-openings, children used them; when carefully prompted, children talked; when thoughtfully asked, children told. The study suggests that children's signs of sexual abuse can be understood as "test balloons" to explore understanding and whether anything is to be done. A disclosing continuation hinges on the trusted adult's dialogical attunement and supplementary door-openings. Divergent from an idea of behavioural markers, or purposeful versus accidental disclosures, this study calls for a broader attention: Moments of first signs are embedded in dialogue. A uniqueness at moments of first signs appears: Both to form such moments and to transform them into moments of meeting for joint exploration and

  16. Attraction to sexual violence towards women, sexual abuse of children, and non-sexual criminal behavior: testing the specialist vs. generalist models in male college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voller, Emily K; Long, Patricia J; Aosved, Allison C

    2009-04-01

    A sample of 492 college men anonymously completed an expanded version of the Sexual Experiences Survey, the revised Attraction to Sexual Aggression Scale, and the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale Short Form to investigate the relations among perpetration of sexual violence (including rape and sexual assault), attraction to sexual violence, attraction to childhood sexual abuse, and attraction towards other crimes while controlling for the impact of social desirability. Analyses indicated that attractions towards sexual violence, general criminality, and childhood sexual abuse were all significantly interrelated. In addition, sexual assault perpetrators reported higher levels of all three types of attraction as compared to nonperpetrators whereas rape perpetrators reported higher levels of attraction to sexual aggression and criminality. Clinical and research implications are discussed.

  17. Measuring Sexual Violence on Campus: Climate Surveys and Vulnerable Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Heer, Brooke; Jones, Lynn

    2017-01-01

    Since the 2014 "Not Alone" report on campus sexual assault, the use of climate surveys to measure sexual violence on campuses across the United States has increased considerably. The current study utilizes a quasi meta-analysis approach to examine the utility of general campus climate surveys, which include a measure of sexual violence,…

  18. Was It Rape? An Examination of Sexual Abuse Statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Neil

    1994-01-01

    A careful review of research suggests that the problem of sexual assault has been magnified and the data misinterpreted, in part because the issue of sexual violence against women has become enmeshed in politics. The current trend in sexual-violence research is to redefine it according to the ideological preferences of advocates. (SLD)

  19. Neighborhood-Level LGBT Hate Crimes and Bullying Among Sexual Minority Youths: A Geospatial Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzenbuehler, Mark L; Duncan, Dustin; Johnson, Renee

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate a novel measure of environmental risk factors for bullying among sexual minority youths. Data on lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) assault hate crimes were obtained from police records, geocoded, and then linked to individual-level data on bullying and sexual orientation from the 2008 Boston Youth Survey Geospatial Dataset (N = 1,292; 108 sexual minorities). Results indicated that sexual minority youths who reported relational and electronic bullying were more likely to reside in neighborhoods with higher LGBT assault hate crime rates. There was no asso- ciation between LGBT assault hate crimes and bullying among heterosexual youths, pro- viding evidence for specificity to sexual minority youth. Moreover, no relationships were observed between sexual minority bullying and neighborhood-level violent and property crimes, indicating that the results were specific to LGBT assault hate crimes.

  20. The Influence of Parental Emotional Neglect on Assault Victims Seeking Treatment for Depressed Mood and Alcohol Misuse: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kylie A. Bailey

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the relationship between reported parental emotional neglect when a child, assault type experienced, posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS, depression, and alcohol consumption in treatment seekers for comorbid depressive symptoms and alcohol misuse. Participants (n = 220 with concurrent depression and alcohol misuse were recruited from the DAISI (Depression and Alcohol Integrated and Single-focussed Interventions project. Assault type and PTSS were retrospectively assessed by the Posttraumatic Stress Diagnostic Scale. The Measure of Parenting Style is a self-report measure that retrospectively assessed emotional neglect experienced as a child. An exploratory factor analysis using the tetrachoric correlation matrix (applying principal factor extraction with a varimax rotation identified the two assault factors of sexual assault (SA and physical assault (PA. A path analysis revealed that Maternal Emotional Neglect increased the impact of PTSS and depression. Paternal Emotional Neglect increased the impact of PA on PTSS and alcohol dependence symptoms. There appears to be differential effects of assault type and Maternal/Paternal emotional neglect on depression and alcohol misuse, suggesting that parenting roles serve distinct protective functions.

  1. Does self-defense training prevent sexual violence against women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollander, Jocelyn A

    2014-03-01

    Self-defense classes are offered across the nation as a strategy for reducing women's vulnerability to sexual assault. Yet there has been little systematic research assessing the effectiveness of these classes. In this article, I use data from a mixed methods study of a 10-week, university-based, feminist self-defense class to examine the effectiveness of self-defense training over a 1-year follow-up period. My analyses indicate that women who participate in self-defense training are less likely to experience sexual assault and are more confident in their ability to effectively resist assault than similar women who have not taken such a class.

  2. Comparing Sexual Assult Survey Prevalence Rates at Military Service Academies and U.S. Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-15

    donors and influencers ( parents , guardians, etc.) in the way other IHEs do. MSAs are military run, and the students are members of the military, having...December 15, 2015 SURVEY NOTE Note No. 2015-17 1 Comparing Sexual Assault Survey Prevalence Rates at Military Service Academies and U.S...Colleges Executive Summary The Association of American Universities (AAU) Campus Survey of Sexual Assault and Sexual Misconduct was designed to assess the

  3. Barriers and Facilitators of Screening for Sexually Transmitted Infections in Adolescent Girls and Young Women in Mombasa, Kenya: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avuvika, Ethel; Masese, Linnet N; Wanje, George; Wanyonyi, Juliet; Nyaribo, Benard; Omoni, Grace; Baghazal, Anisa; McClelland, R Scott

    2017-01-01

    Young women bear the greatest burden of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), so it is important to identify and address barriers to STI screening in this population. We conducted a qualitative study to explore the feasibility of STI screening among adolescent girls and young women in Mombasa, Kenya. We conducted 17 in-depth interviews (IDIs) (8 with adolescent girls and 9 with young women) and 6 focus group discussions (FGDs) (4 with adolescent girls and 2 with young women, total 55 participants). The audio recordings for the IDIs and FGDs were translated and transcribed into English. Transcripts were independently reviewed by two researchers, and a set of codes was designed to help analyze the data using the content analysis approach. Data content was then analyzed manually and digitally using ATLAS.ti, and consensus was reached on central and specific emergent themes discussed by the research team. Adolescent girls and young women in Mombasa, Kenya expressed willingness to participate in STI screening. A major incentive for screening was participants' desire to know their STI status, especially following perceived high-risk sexual behavior. Lack of symptoms and fear of positive test results were identified as barriers to STI screening at the individual level, while parental notification and stigmatization from parents, family members and the community were identified as barriers at the community level. Uncomfortable or embarrassing methods of specimen collection were an additional barrier. Thus, urine-based screening was felt to be the most acceptable. Kenyan adolescent girls and young women seem willing to participate in screening for STIs using urine testing. Addressing stigmatization by parents, health care workers and the community could further facilitate STI screening in this population.

  4. Survey of academic field experiences (SAFE: trainees report harassment and assault.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn B H Clancy

    Full Text Available Little is known about the climate of the scientific fieldwork setting as it relates to gendered experiences, sexual harassment, and sexual assault. We conducted an internet-based survey of field scientists (N = 666 to characterize these experiences. Codes of conduct and sexual harassment policies were not regularly encountered by respondents, while harassment and assault were commonly experienced by respondents during trainee career stages. Women trainees were the primary targets; their perpetrators were predominantly senior to them professionally within the research team. Male trainees were more often targeted by their peers at the research site. Few respondents were aware of mechanisms to report incidents; most who did report were unsatisfied with the outcome. These findings suggest that policies emphasizing safety, inclusivity, and collegiality have the potential to improve field experiences of a diversity of researchers, especially during early career stages. These include better awareness of mechanisms for direct and oblique reporting of harassment and assault and, the implementation of productive response mechanisms when such behaviors are reported. Principal investigators are particularly well positioned to influence workplace culture at their field sites.

  5. Sexual revictimization in a clinical sample of women reporting childhood sexual abuse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lau, Marianne; Kristensen, Ellids

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Child and adolescent sexual abuse (CSA) increases the risk for adult sexual assault (ASA), and psychological vulnerability as well as aspects of CSA and upbringing might influence the risk. AIMS: The aims of this study were to investigate whether women who reported both CSA and ASA: 1...

  6. Psychogenic Amnesia for Childhood Sexual Abuse and Risk for Sexual Revictimisation in Both Adolescence and Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wager, Nadia

    2012-01-01

    This study was an investigation of the additional risk conferred by the experience of psychogenic amnesia for memories of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) on the likelihood of becoming a victim of sexual assault in later life. A total of 210 community respondents completed a retrospective web-based trauma survey. The majority of respondents were…

  7. Crowdsourcing Sexual Objectification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carissima Mathen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the criminal offence of the non-consensual distribution of intimate images (what some call “revenge porn”. Focussing on the debate currently underway in Canada, it notes that such an offence would fill a grey area in that country’s criminal law. Arguing, more broadly, that the criminal law has an important expressive function, the paper posits that the offence targets the same general type of wrongdoing—sexual objectification—that undergirds sexual assault. While not all objectification merits criminal sanction, the paper explains why the non-consensual distribution of intimate images does and why a specific offence is legitimate.

  8. Factors Associated with Reports of Wife Assault in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fergusson, David M.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examined the frequency of wife assault among New Zealand mothers. Wife assault occurred at a rate of 2 percent to 3 percent per year. Rates of assault were related to length of marriage, type of marriage, planning of pregnancy, parental age, church attendance, and family socioeconomic status. (Author/BL)

  9. Sexual Harassment Victimization during Emerging Adulthood: A Test of Routine Activities Theory and a General Theory of Crime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clodfelter, Tammatha A.; Turner, Michael G.; Hartman, Jennifer L.; Kuhns, Joseph B.

    2010-01-01

    Sexual harassment of college students may lead to more serious forms of sexual assault. Few studies have investigated sexual harassment predictors framed within competing theoretical perspectives. In this study, the literature is extended by examining (a) three types of sexual harassment on a college campus, (b) the nature of reporting, and (c)…

  10. Peritajes psicológicos forenses en decisiones judiciales de primera instancia en delitos sexuales

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Milena Martínez Rudas; Stefany Baena Valencia; Ismael Pérez García

    2016-01-01

      It was analyzed the importance of forensic psychological reports on judicial decisions by first instance courts in sexual assaults in the city of Barranquilla, Colombia, this by using a quantitative...

  11. SITE OF ACCIDENTS FOR VICTIMS OF ASSAULT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KINGMA, J

    1994-01-01

    The preponderance of males in violence was observed in 82.1% of 2,822 victims of assault (treated for injuries at the emergency unit of a hospital). Sex differences were found for site of occurrence of the violent act. Women became victims of violence most frequently (34.6%) at home and men in the s

  12. Sexual abuse prevention training for preschoolers: Implications for moral development

    OpenAIRE

    Berrick, JD

    1991-01-01

    Child sexual abuse prevention education is taught to children of all ages. The youngest students are preschool age children. Many programs focus on the moral ramifications of a sexual assault. The limitations of children's moral development, however, may hinder their ability to understand the concepts presented. In some instances, education may unwittingly foster sentiments of guilt in these very young children. © 1991.

  13. Sexual Harassment at Work: A European Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artan Çela

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Unwelcome sexual advances, proposition or pressure for sexual activity, offensive flirtations, leering, whistling, making sexually suggestive gestures, sexual jokes, unwanted sexual looks, unwanted letters, telephone call, or materials of a sexual nature, unwanted physical contact, actual or attempting rape or sexual assault, this and more of this conduct if took place in the workplace would amount to a sexual harassment. The sexual harassment at work has become a serious issue of our time. It is an unjustified interference of integrity, dignity and well-being of workers, causing problems from headaches to depression, loss of confidence, panic attacks and perhaps suicide as the only way appearing to be the sole possible relief from the unremitting and frightening behavior. This article presents information concerning the sexual harassment at workplace, covering topics such as, the definitions for sexual harassment in both international and national context, a short history of sexual harassment, types of sexual harassment, effect of sexual harassment, measure to combat and prevent sexual harassment. It offers a short overview in sexual harassment legislation of some industrialized EU Member States and the legal remedies available against sexual harassment. The main purpose of this article is to provide a better understanding and prevention concerning the issue of sexual harassment in workplace.

  14. Associations between youth homelessness, sexual offenses, sexual victimization, and sexual risk behaviors: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heerde, Jessica A; Scholes-Balog, Kirsty E; Hemphill, Sheryl A

    2015-01-01

    Homeless youth commonly report engaging in sexual risk behaviors. These vulnerable young people also frequently report being sexually victimized. This systematic review collates, summarizes, and appraises published studies of youth investigating relationships between homelessness, perpetration of sexual offenses, experience of sexual victimization, and engagement in sexual risk behavior. A systematic search of seventeen psychology, health, and social science electronic databases was conducted. Search terms included "homeless*," "youth," "offend*," "victimization," "crime," "rape," "victim*," and "sex crimes." Thirty-eight studies were identified that met the inclusion criteria. Findings showed homeless youth commonly report being raped and sexually assaulted, fear being sexually victimized, and engage in street prostitution and survival sex. Rates of victimization and sexual risk behavior were generally higher for females. Given the paucity of longitudinal studies and limitations of current studies, it is unclear whether homelessness is prospectively associated with sexual victimization or engagement in sexual risk behavior, and whether such associations vary cross nationally and as a function of time and place. Future prospective research examining the influence of the situational context of homelessness is necessary to develop a better understanding of how homelessness influences the perpetration of sexual offenses, experience of sexual victimization, and engagement in sexual risk behavior among homeless youth.

  15. Child sexual abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymel, K P; Jenny, C

    1997-08-01

    Multiple obstacles can hinder the medical evaluation of suspected child sexual abuse in pediatric primary care. The need for diagnostic accuracy is high. Knowledge of sexual abuse risk factors, an understanding of the victimization process, and awareness of the varied clinical presentations of sexual abuse can be of assistance. Open-ended questioning of the suspected victim is the most critical component of the evaluation. Skillful medical interviewing requires time, training, patience, and practice. Pediatricians lacking any of these four requirements should defer interviewing in sexual abuse cases to other professionals. Abnormal physical findings from sexual abuse are uncommon. Colposcopy has assisted pediatricians greatly in reaching consensus regarding diagnostic physical findings. Cases of acute sexual assault require familiarity with the forensic rape examination, STD screening and prophylaxis, and pregnancy prevention. Victimization from sexual abuse continues long after the abusive acts end, often requiring long-term therapeutic intervention. An emerging standard of care for medical evaluations of suspected child sexual abuse recognizes the requirement for patience and compassion while retaining objectivity. The pediatrician's primary concern must be for the child's physical and emotional well-being.

  16. 75 FR 17845 - National Sexual Assault Awareness Month, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-07

    ... suicidal feelings, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder, only exacerbate victims' sense of hopelessness. No one should face this trauma alone, and as families, friends, and mentors, we can empower...

  17. Presentation of the Western Danish Sexual Assault Center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ole Ingemann

    a psychologist will contact the victim. At the moment the victims are offered follow-up by the psychologist, at the department of gynaecology or by their own general practitioner. The Center covers an area of 890.000 people. From 1999 to 2004 the Center received 523 victims. 330 (63%) were seen by the physician...... - the others were taken care of by the nurses and/or the psychologist. 256 victims examined by the physicians were reported to the police (78%). The Aarhus Center is now well established, and there is an excellent cooperation in the region between the Center and the affiliated partners: the police...

  18. 78 FR 20443 - Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ... not, if promulgated, have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities... 2010,'' October 28, 2009; (19) Joint Publication 1-02, ``Department of Defense Dictionary of Military...

  19. Evaluation of the Military Criminal Investigative Organizations Sexual Assault Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    scene photography , 3) crime scene sketches, and 4) evidence collection. Neither AFOSI nor NCIS consistently evaluated and/or documented crime scenes...The MCRTs conducted thorough and detailed crime scene examinations, which included photography and sketches of the scene. 15 The MCRT provides a 24...recommendation. AFOSI stated it has improved the interview training provided to its agents. AFOSI has taught the cognitive interview (CI) technique

  20. The role of ethnicity, sexual attitudes, and sexual behavior in sexual revictimization during the transition to emerging adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinehart, Jenny K; Yeater, Elizabeth A; Musci, Rashelle J; Letourneau, Elizabeth J; Lenberg, Kathryn L

    2014-01-01

    An experience of child sexual abuse (CSA) substantially increases women's risk of adult sexual assault (ASA), but the mechanisms underlying this relationship are unclear. Previous research often has not examined the full range of ASA experiences or included the influence of ethnicity, sexual behavior, and sexual attitudes on CSA and severity of ASA. The current study utilized path analysis to explore the relationships among ethnicity, sexual attitudes, number of lifetime sexual partners, CSA, and severity of ASA in emerging adult women. Results indicated a significant relationship between CSA and more severe ASA that was partially explained by having more lifetime sexual partners. Additionally, European American women, relative to Hispanic women, reported more severe victimization, which was fully explained by more positive attitudes toward casual sex and having more lifetime sexual partners. These results have implications in the design and implementation of universal and selective prevention programs aimed at reducing ASA and revictimization among emerging adult women. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Abused Sexuality- Experience of Sexuality Post Experiences of Sexual Abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunanda Jalote

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Sexual abuse has been happening from times immemorial and is that brutal aspect of society which also talk about spirituality, peace and harmony in the same breath. Youth gets irrevocably scarred by such childhood traumas which linger on in their adult life too. In the present study, an effort was made to study and understand how heterosexual and queer youth in contemporary middle class in Delhi explore the relationship sexual abuse survivors have with their own sexuality and how their negotiate their sexual selves. The secondary aim of the study was to investigate the function and effects of guilt, shame, desire, fantasies and gender roles in their lives and how, if at all, they connect to the experiences of sexual assault suffered by individuals within this socio-cultural group. The approach that frames this study is a discourse analytic approach and this is seen as central to the methodology of this study and the language used to talk about the findings and implications of this research.

  2. Severe metabolic acidosis following assault chemical burn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie De Roock

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Assault chemical burns are uncommon in northern Europe. Besides local toxicity, systemic manifestations are possible after strong acid exposure. A 40-year-old woman was admitted 1 h after a criminal assault with sulfuric acid. The total burned surface area was 35%, third degree. Injury was due to sulfuric acid (measured pH 0.9 obtained from a car battery. Immediate complications were obstructive dyspnea and metabolic acidosis. The admission arterial pH was 6.92, with total bicarbonate 8.6 mEq/l and base deficit 23.4 mEq/l. The correction of metabolic acidosis was achieved after several hours by the administration of bicarbonate and lactate buffers. The patient developed several burns-related complications (sepsis and acute renal failure. Cutaneous projections of strong acids may cause severe metabolic acidosis, particularly when copious irrigation and clothes removal cannot be immediately performed at the scene.

  3. Severe metabolic acidosis following assault chemical burn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roock, Sophie D; Deleuze, Jean-Paul; Rose, Thomas; Jennes, Serge; Hantson, Philippe

    2012-04-01

    Assault chemical burns are uncommon in northern Europe. Besides local toxicity, systemic manifestations are possible after strong acid exposure. A 40-year-old woman was admitted 1 h after a criminal assault with sulfuric acid. The total burned surface area was 35%, third degree. Injury was due to sulfuric acid (measured pH 0.9) obtained from a car battery. Immediate complications were obstructive dyspnea and metabolic acidosis. The admission arterial pH was 6.92, with total bicarbonate 8.6 mEq/l and base deficit 23.4 mEq/l. The correction of metabolic acidosis was achieved after several hours by the administration of bicarbonate and lactate buffers. The patient developed several burns-related complications (sepsis and acute renal failure). Cutaneous projections of strong acids may cause severe metabolic acidosis, particularly when copious irrigation and clothes removal cannot be immediately performed at the scene.

  4. Childhood Sexual Abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evrim Aktepe

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Sexual abuse is defined as use of child or adolescent by the adults for satisfying of sexual urges and needs with forcing, threatening or tricking. Sexual abuse can be in the form of sexual abuse without touch, sexual touch, interfemoral intercourse, sexual penetration, and sexual exploitation. The prevalence of sexual abuse is reported as 10-40%. It is seen in female four times more than in males. Abusers are frequently male, only 5-15% of them are female. The abuse by females is usually towards male child. Thirty-fifty percent of abuse cases among child and adolescent are outside the family including strangers or familiar person. Some features of abusers are introvert personality, pedophilic and antisocial personality. Most of the abusers have a history of sexual abuse or aggression during childhood. Sexual intercourse between two people who are not allowed to marry by law is called as incest. Family pattern of incest is defined globally as disorganized and dysfunctional. The most commonly reported familial pattern is rigid and patriarchal family pattern with a harsh father using force quite frequently. The clinical features and impacts of the sexual abuse on the child varies according to the relation between abusers and the child, form of abuse, duration of abuse, presence of physical assault, developmental phase, child age and psychological development before the abuse. Sexual abuse history may result in psychiatric disorders including anxiety, depression, substance dependence, suicide act, borderline personality disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder. Abuse negatively affects interpersonal relationships and self esteem of abused individuals. Several studies reported close association between risky sexual behaviors in adulthood and a history of of sexual abuse during childhood. Four traumatic dynamics including traumatic sexuality with abuse, feeling of betrayal, weakness, and stigmatization exist in childhood abuse. Trauma can cause

  5. Adolescents sexual practices

    OpenAIRE

    Frias, Ana; Chora, Antónia

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: If teens options are experimenting sexualized practices, we should facilitate their knowledge, make them aware of their choices and help them living their sexuality in a safer mode. Objectives: To identify adolescents sexual practices; characterize the attitudes of teenagers against the use of contraception. Methods: quantitative research with exploratory nature. We studied a convenience sample of 301 adolescents of both sexes whitch attend the 9th grade. Sexual practices and a...

  6. Sexual Dysfunction in Women

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Pamela

    1989-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction takes place in the context of women's lives and affects their sexuality and self-esteem. Awareness of these influences are vital to the management of the dysfunction and the promotion of positive sexuality. The family physician's contribution to both the prevention and management of sexual concerns includes an awareness of societal influences and facilitation of a woman's sense of her own power and control over her life.

  7. Questionnaire for the management of the victim of sexual abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iztok Takač

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Caring for victims of sexual assault demands of the physician a precise physical examination, provision of evidence, psychological support and appropriate treatment. Because the majority of victims of sexual violence are women, we usually encounter these patients in gynecological clinics. If the evidence is collected and stored properly, with special forensic methods we can distinguish between any two persons in the world, except identical twins. Therefore, patient’s history and taking evidence is of utmost importance. In the case of sexual assault, infection with sexually transmitted diseases is possible, so they should be diagnosed and treated in time. The victim should be offered the use of emergency contraception, which is only effective in the first days after sexual assault. To make sure that each step of the examination is completed and all samplings are done in the correct order, it is useful to have a written questionnaire or a routine protocol. We describe stepby- step management procedures for victims of sexual assault, taking into consideration the victim’s history, physical examination, different samplings, and different emergency treatments.

  8. The forensic aspects of sexual violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Mary

    2013-02-01

    Complainants of sexual assault may disclose to different agencies, the police and health professionals being the most likely. It is possible for certain evidence types to be collected before a clinical forensic assessment takes place that do not require the need for a Forensic Medical Practitioner. If the time frames after the incident and the nature of assault warrant the need for a forensic medical examination of either a complainant or a suspect, this should only be conducted by doctors and nurses who have received relevant, up-to-date specialist theoretical and practical training. Clear evidence shows that few other criminal offences require as extensive an examination and collection of forensic evidence as that of a sexual assault. The forensic evidence in a case may identify an assailant, eliminate a nominated suspect(s), and assist in the prosecution of a case. The elements of forensic medical examination, reviewed in this chapter, are those that are the most varied across jurisdictions around the world currently. Key focus points of this chapter are considerations for early evidence collection, utilising dedicated medical examination facilities for sample collection, contamination issues associated with evidence collection and certain practical aspects of forensic sampling methods which have evolved given results identified by Forensic Scientists processing evidential samples in sexual assault cases, Some of the problems encountered by the forensic science provider will also be discussed.

  9. Sexual Victimization and Subsequent Police Reporting by Gender Identity Among Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenderfer-Magruder, Lisa; Walls, N Eugene; Kattari, Shanna K; Whitfield, Darren L; Ramos, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Prevalence of sexual victimization among lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) persons is frequently found to be higher than the prevalence reported by their heterosexual peers. Transgender individuals are often included solely as part of larger LGBTQ research samples, potentially obfuscating differences between sexual orientation and gender identity. In this study, the authors examined sexual assault/rape in a large convenience sample of LGBTQ adults (N = 1,124) by respondents' gender identity (cisgender, transgender) to determine whether differences exist in lifetime prevalence of sexual assault/rape and subsequent police reporting. Findings indicate transgender individuals report having experienced sexual assault/rape more than twice as frequently as cisgender LGBQ individuals. Authors found no statistically significant difference in reporting sexual violence to police. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

  10. A Meta-Analysis of Disparities in Childhood Sexual Abuse, Parental Physical Abuse, and Peer Victimization Among Sexual Minority and Sexual Nonminority Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshal, Michael P.; Guadamuz, Thomas E.; Wei, Chongyi; Wong, Carolyn F.; Saewyc, Elizabeth; Stall, Ron

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. We compared the likelihood of childhood sexual abuse (under age 18), parental physical abuse, and peer victimization based on sexual orientation. Methods. We conducted a meta-analysis of adolescent school-based studies that compared the likelihood of childhood abuse among sexual minorities vs sexual nonminorities. Results. Sexual minority individuals were on average 3.8, 1.2, 1.7, and 2.4 times more likely to experience sexual abuse, parental physical abuse, or assault at school or to miss school through fear, respectively. Moderation analysis showed that disparities between sexual minority and sexual nonminority individuals were larger for (1) males than females for sexual abuse, (2) females than males for assault at school, and (3) bisexual than gay and lesbian for both parental physical abuse and missing school through fear. Disparities did not change between the 1990s and the 2000s. Conclusions. The higher rates of abuse experienced by sexual minority youths may be one of the driving mechanisms underlying higher rates of mental health problems, substance use, risky sexual behavior, and HIV reported by sexual minority adults. PMID:21680921

  11. Child sexual abuse, links to later sexual exploitation/high-risk sexual behavior, and prevention/treatment programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalor, Kevin; McElvaney, Rosaleen

    2010-10-01

    This paper reviews the literature on the nature and incidence of child sexual abuse, explores the link between child sexual abuse and later sexual exploitation, and reviews the literature on prevention strategies and effective interventions in child sexual abuse services. Our understanding of the international epidemiology of child sexual abuse is considerably greater than it was just 10 years ago, and studies from around the world are examined. Childhood sexual abuse can involve a wide number of psychological sequelae, including low self-esteem, anxiety, and depression. Numerous studies have noted that child sexual abuse victims are vulnerable to later sexual revictimization, as well as the link between child sexual abuse and later engagement in high-risk sexual behaviour. Survivors of child sexual abuse are more likely to have multiple sex partners, become pregnant as teenagers, and experience sexual assault as adults. Various models which attempt to account for this inter-relationship are presented; most invoke mediating variables such as low self-esteem, drug/alcohol use, PTSD and distorted sexual development. Prevention strategies for child sexual abuse are examined including media campaigns, school-based prevention programmes, and therapy with abusers. The results of a number of meta-analyses are examined. However, researchers have identified significant methodological limitations in the extant research literature that impede the making of recommendations for implementing existing therapeutic programmes unreservedly.

  12. The Seduction Script: Psychological and Cultural Norms of Interpersonal Approaches As Markers for Sexual Aggression and Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landgraf, Steffen; von Treskow, Isabella

    2017-01-01

    Hardly any subjects enjoy greater – public or private – interest than the art of flirtation and seduction. However, interpersonal approach behavior not only paves the way for sexual interaction and reproduction, but it simultaneously integrates non-sexual psychobiological and cultural standards regarding consensus and social norms. In the present paper, we use script theory, a concept that extends across psychological and cultural science, to assess behavioral options during interpersonal approaches. Specifically, we argue that approaches follow scripted event sequences that entail ambivalence as an essential communicative element. On the one hand, ambivalence may facilitate interpersonal approaches by maintaining and provoking situational uncertainty, so that the outcome of an action – even after several approaches and dates – remains ambiguous. On the other hand, ambivalence may increase the risk for sexual aggression or abuse, depending on the individual’s abilities, the circumstances, and the intentions of the interacting partners. Recognizing latent sequences of sexually aggressive behavior, in terms of their rigid structure and behavioral options, may thus enable individuals to use resources efficiently, avoid danger, and extricate themselves from assault situations. We conclude that interdisciplinary script knowledge about ambivalence as a core component of the seduction script may be helpful for counteracting subtly aggressive intentions and preventing sexual abuse. We discuss this with regard to the nature-nurture debate as well as phylogenetic and ontogenetic aspects of interpersonal approach behavior and its medial implementation. PMID:28119656

  13. Sexual Offender Laws and Prevention of Sexual Violence or Recidivism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Sexual violence is a significant public health problem in the United States. In an effort to decrease the incidence of sexual assault, legislators have passed regulatory laws aimed at reducing recidivism among convicted sexual offenders. As a result, sex offenders living in the United States are bound by multiple policies, including registration, community notification, monitoring via a global positioning system, civil commitment, and residency, loitering, and Internet restrictions. These policies have led to multiple collateral consequences, creating an ominous environment that inhibits successful reintegration and may contribute to an increasing risk for recidivism. In fact, evidence on the effectiveness of these laws suggests that they may not prevent recidivism or sexual violence and result in more harm than good. PMID:20075329

  14. Predictors of assault among urban female trauma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usha Periyanayagam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Assault is a common mechanism of injury among female trauma victims. This paper identifies risk factors for assault in female victims and explores the interplay between identified predictors of assault and their combined contribution to female violent victimization. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of all female trauma patients was performed using the Illinois Department of Public Health Trauma Registry from 1999-2003. Patients with assault listed as their mechanism of injury were compared to patients with other mechanisms of injury. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed using STATA statistical software to identify independent risk factors for assault. Finally, interaction affects were studied among these identified risk factors. Results: Female victims of assault were more likely to be African American (OR 1.32, P < 0.001, lack insurance (OR 1.79, P < 0.001, and to have tested positive for drugs (OR 1.32, P < 0.001 than women with other mechanisms of injury. In addition to the independent effects of these variables, patient drug use and lack of insurance demonstrated interaction effects (OR 1.67, P = 0.02. Conclusion: In this study, women of color, the uninsured, and those using drugs were disproportionately represented among assault victims, highlighting further evidence of trauma disparities. Most significantly, this study demonstrates that predictors of assault in women frequently coexist and both independently and in combination may increase the risk for female violent victimization.

  15. Assault Injury Rates, Social Capital, and Fear of Neighborhood Crime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Daniel J.; Hutchison, Peter; Monroe, Matthew G.; Reischl, Thomas; Morrel-Samuels, Susan

    2007-01-01

    This study develops an explanatory framework for fear of neighborhood crime based on respondents' social context and local rates of assault injuries. Rates of assault injuries within zip codes are based on hospital discharge records. We find that only four variables have a significant unique contribution to fear of crime: respondent's sex,…

  16. Neighborhood-level LGBT hate crimes and current illicit drug use among sexual minority youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Dustin T; Hatzenbuehler, Mark L; Johnson, Renee M

    2014-02-01

    To investigate whether past-30 day illicit drug use among sexual minority youth was more common in neighborhoods with a greater prevalence of hate crimes targeting lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT, or sexual minority) individuals. We used a population-based survey of public school youth in Boston, Massachusetts, consisting of 1292 9th-12th grade students from the 2008 Boston Youth Survey Geospatial Dataset (sexual minority n=108). Data on LGBT hate crimes involving assaults or assaults and battery between 2005 and 2008 were obtained from the Boston Police Department and linked to youths' residential address. Youth reported past-30 day use of marijuana and other illicit drugs. Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney tests and corresponding p-values were computed to assess differences in substance use by neighborhood-level LGBT assault hate crime rate among sexual minority youth (n=103). The LGBT assault hate crime rate in the neighborhoods of sexual minority youth who reported current marijuana use was 23.7 per 100,000, compared to 12.9 per 100,000 for sexual minority youth who reported no marijuana use (p=0.04). No associations between LGBT assault hate crimes and marijuana use among heterosexual youth (p>0.05) or between sexual minority marijuana use and overall neighborhood-level violent and property crimes (p>0.05) were detected, providing evidence for result specificity. We found a significantly greater prevalence of marijuana use among sexual minority youth in neighborhoods with a higher prevalence of LGBT assault hate crimes. These results suggest that neighborhood context (i.e., LGBT hate crimes) may contribute to sexual orientation disparities in marijuana use. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Collective Sexual Violence in Bosnia and Sierra Leone: A Comparative Case Study Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Bensel, Tusty; Sample, Lisa L

    2015-10-08

    Social scientists have long studied the patterns, motivations, and recidivism rates of sexual offenders; however, the majority of prior research has examined rape, where victims are assaulted by a single offender in isolated events. Often overlooked are sexually violent assaults committed during armed conflicts, which often exhibit group-level sexual offending. This oversight could be a result of perceived notions that sexual violence during conflict is a rare or regrettable event; however, it has been documented consistently throughout history. The purpose of this study was to improve our understanding of sexual violence during war by comparing and contrasting preconflict characteristics, conflict framing, and justifications for sexual violence in the Bosnian and Sierra Leone armed conflicts. This greater understanding can then be used to identify factors that may contribute to the collectivization of sexual violence during war.

  18. Sexual Victimization, Alcohol Intoxication, Sexual-Emotional Responding, and Sexual Risk in Heavy Episodic Drinking Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, William H.; Davis, Kelly Cue; Masters, N. Tatiana; Jacques-Tiura, Angela J.; Heiman, Julia R.; Norris, Jeanette; Gilmore, Amanda K.; Nguyen, Hong V.; Kajumulo, Kelly F.; Otto, Jacqueline M.; Andrasik, Michele P.

    2013-01-01

    This study used an experimental paradigm to investigate the roles of sexual victimization history and alcohol intoxication in young women’s sexual-emotional responding and sexual risk taking. A nonclinical community sample of 436 young women, with both an instance of heavy episodic drinking and some HIV/STI risk exposure in the past year, completed childhood sexual abuse (CSA) and adolescent/adult sexual assault (ASA) measures. A majority of them reported CSA and/or ASA, including rape and attempted rape. After random assignment to a high alcohol dose (.10%) or control condition, participants read and projected themselves into an eroticized scenario of a sexual encounter involving a new partner. As the story protagonist, each participant rated her positive mood and her sexual arousal, sensation, and desire, and then indicated her likelihood of engaging in unprotected sex. Structural equation modeling analyses revealed that ASA and alcohol were directly associated with heightened risk taking, and alcohol’s effects were partially mediated by positive mood and sexual desire. ASA was associated with attenuated sexual-emotional responding and resulted in diminished risk taking via this suppression. These are the first findings indicating that, compared to non-victimized counterparts, sexually victimized women respond differently in alcohol-involved sexual encounters in terms of sexual-emotional responding and risk-taking intentions. Implications include assessing victimization history and drinking among women seeking treatment for either concern, particularly women at risk for HIV, and alerting them to ways their histories and behavior may combine to exacerbate their sexual risks. PMID:23857517

  19. Marmara University Medical Students' Perception on Sexual Violence against Women and Induced Abortion in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüleci, Nimet Emel; Kaya, Eda; Aslan, Ece; Şenkal, Ece Söylem; Çiçek, Zehra Nadide

    2016-03-01

    Historically, sexual assault is a common issue in Turkey. As doctors are one of the steps to help sexually assaulted women, medical students should have basic knowledge of and sensitivity regarding this subject. Another common women's public health issue is induced abortion. In countries where access to abortion is restricted, there is a tendency towards unhealthy abortion. The aims of this study are: (1) to determine the attitudes and opinions of Marmara University Medical Faculty students about sexual assault against women and induced abortion and (2) to propose an educational program for medical students about sexual assault and abortion. Cross-sectional study. The questionnaires were self-administered and the data were analyzed using SPSS v.15.0. First, the descriptive statistics were analyzed, followed by Chi-square for contingency tests assessing differences in attitudes toward sexual assault and induced abortion by factors such as gender and educational term. Differences were considered statistically significant at p0.05). Although there was no significant difference regarding the extent of punishment by victim's status as a virgin, 21.3% (n=63) agreed that punishment should be more severe when the victim was a virgin. About 40.7% (n=120) agreed that the legal period of abortion in Turkey (10 weeks) should be longer. The majority (86.1%, n=255) agreed that legally prohibiting abortions causes an increase in unhealthy abortions. An educational program on these issues should be developed for medical students.

  20. Sex trade workers' narratives of sexual violence: a field investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesel, Dorothee; Yuille, John C

    2012-01-01

    A total of 119 sex trade workers were interviewed about sexually violent experiences. Up to three narratives were elicited: a remarkable, positive (control) event (POS), a well-remembered sexual assault (WELL), and a poorly recalled sexual assault (POOR). The results demonstrated that WELL narratives contained more details than POS narratives despite the fact that the respective experiences were older. WELL narratives were also associated with higher intoxication and more rehearsal than POS narratives. POOR narratives were as detailed as POS narratives. WELL narratives were associated with more PTSD symptoms than POOR narratives. No weapon focus effect and no differences in peritraumatic dissociation were observed to explain this difference. This study was the first to demonstrate great within-participants variability of narrative details in accounts of sexual violence. The findings challenge common opinions in the eyewitness literature. Implications for expert testimony and credibility assessment are discussed.

  1. Friends of Survivors: The Community Impact of Unwanted Sexual Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banyard, Victoria L.; Moynihan, Mary M.; Walsh, Wendy A.; Cohn, Ellen S.; Ward, Sally

    2010-01-01

    Since sexual assault survivors are most likely to disclose their experiences to a friend; prevention efforts increasingly focus on friends as informal helpers. The current study examined friends' perceptions of the disclosure experience. Undergraduates (N = 1,241) at the University of New Hampshire completed a shortened version of the Ahrens and…

  2. Activating College Men to Prevent Sexual Violence: A Qualitative Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, M. Candace

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the experiences of male college students who participated in a theatre-based, peer-education, sexual assault prevention presentation. The program was established through the use of Pedagogy of the Oppressed and Theatre of the Oppressed, as well as multicultural feminist theory and approaches. These models emphasize subverting…

  3. "Yes Means Yes"? Sexual Consent Policy and College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jozkowski, Kristen N.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last few years, there have been some egregious examples of rape culture on college campuses that call into question the effectiveness of current sexual-assault policies. This article contains brief recaps of four recent events that took place at prominent American universities, drawn from a laundry list of contemporary examples. They…

  4. Military Sexual Trauma: Improvements Made, but VA Can Do More to Track and Improve the Consistency of Disability Claim Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    which in the judgment of a mental health professional employed by the Department, resulted from a physical assault of a sexual nature, battery of...a sexual nature, or sexual harassment which occurred while the veteran was serving on active duty or active duty for training.”12 While MST is not...MILITARY SEXUAL TRAUMA Improvements Made, but VA Can Do More to Track and Improve the Consistency of Disability

  5. Behavioral discriminators of sexual sadism and paraphilia nonconsent in a sample of civilly committed sexual offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Henry; Jackson, Rebecca L

    2011-04-01

    Sexual sadism continues to be a diagnosis fraught with controversy concerning its reliability and validity. The current study examined the offense behavior of 39 civilly committed sexual offenders diagnosed with sexual sadism compared to a group of similarly committed individual diagnoses with Paraphilia Not Otherwise Specified (NOS)- Nonconsent. In addition, offense elements common across studies of sadism were identified. Specifically, offense behaviors including victim abduction and confinement, beating the victim during a sexual assault, and using restraints were indicative of sexual sadism across studies. In addition, this study found the use of noncontingent threats as well as gestures of mutuality to be more common among sadists. Results overall suggest that sadistic acts may be more characterized by humiliation of the victim through the exercise of power and control than by the use of violence. Differential diagnosis between Sexual Sadism and Paraphilia NOS-Nonconsent, may be aided by close inspection of offense behavior.

  6. Detection of spermatozoa following consensual sexual intercourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astrup, Birgitte Schmidt; Thomsen, Jørgen Lange; Lauritsen, Jens; Ravn, Pernille

    2012-09-10

    In cases of sexual assault, the finding of semen can provide crucial evidence. The presence of spermatozoa serves as proof of a sexual act and may give the identity of the alleged perpetrator through DNA-profiling. In most western countries, there are guidelines for standardized examinations of sexual assault victims. For an objective evaluation of the findings, substantial knowledge of aspects regarding consensual sexual intercourse is crucial. The aim of this study was to examine detection frequencies and genital sampling sites of spermatozoa following consensual sexual intercourse. In a prospective setting, 60 women underwent forensic examination following consensual sexual intercourse. Specimens were obtained from the external genitalia, the posterior fornix and the cervical canal, and examined using the Papanicolau stain and standard light microscopy. We found that 88% of possible cases were positive for spermatozoa. The posterior fornix was significantly better than the other sites for detection of spermatozoa and the number of spermatozoa decreased significantly over time. In a large sub-group of women who reported that no intra-vaginal ejaculation had taken place during their latest intercourse, a significant number (14%) had spermatozoa in the vagina. Spermatozoa were best recovered from the posterior fornix, but spermatozoa were also present on swabs taken from the external genitalia. Detection of spermatozoa is thus possible in cases where a speculum examination is denied. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Victimisation and psychosocial difficulties associated with sexual orientation concerns: a school-based study of adolescents.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cotter, P

    2014-11-01

    This study examined victimisation, substance misuse, relationships, sexual activity, mental health difficulties and suicidal behaviour among adolescents with sexual orientation concerns in comparison to those without such concerns. 1112 Irish students (mean age 14 yrs) in 17 mixed-gender secondary schools completed a self-report questionnaire with standardised scales and measures of psychosocial difficulties. 58 students (5%) reported having concerns regarding their sexual orientation. Compared with their peers, they had higher levels of mental health difficulties and a markedly-increased prevalence of attempted suicide (29% vs. 2%), physical assault (40% vs. 8%), sexual assault (16%vs. 1%) and substance misuse. Almost all those (90%) with sexual orientation concerns reported having had sex compared to just 4% of their peers. These results highlight the significant difficulties associated with sexual orientation concerns in adolescents in Ireland. Early and targeted interventions are essential to address their needs.

  8. PTSD as a mediator of sexual revictimization: the role of reexperiencing, avoidance, and arousal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risser, Heather J; Hetzel-Riggin, Melanie D; Thomsen, Cynthia J; McCanne, Thomas R

    2006-10-01

    Theory and research suggest that posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may mediate the relationship between child sexual abuse and adult sexual assault. However, little empirical research has examined the mediational role of PTSD. In the present study, the authors use structural equation modeling to examine the degree to which the three symptom clusters that define PTSD (reexperiencing, avoidance, and hyperarousal) contribute to sexual revictimization. To assess PTSD symptomatology, undergraduate women completed questionnaires (N = 1,449), which detailed the history and severity of childhood and adult sexual assault experiences. Results indicated that PTSD mediated sexual revictimization. When PTSD symptom clusters were examined individually, only the hyperarousal cluster was a significant mediator. Results are discussed in terms of information-processing mechanisms that may underlie sexual revictimization.

  9. Brain and behavioral evidence for altered social learning mechanisms among women with assault-related posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisler, Josh M; Bush, Keith; Scott Steele, J; Lenow, Jennifer K; Smitherman, Sonet; Kilts, Clinton D

    2015-04-01

    Current neurocircuitry models of PTSD focus on the neural mechanisms that mediate hypervigilance for threat and fear inhibition/extinction learning. Less focus has been directed towards explaining social deficits and heightened risk of revictimization observed among individuals with PTSD related to physical or sexual assault. The purpose of the present study was to foster more comprehensive theoretical models of PTSD by testing the hypothesis that assault-related PTSD is associated with behavioral impairments in a social trust and reciprocity task and corresponding alterations in the neural encoding of social learning mechanisms. Adult women with assault-related PTSD (n = 25) and control women (n = 15) completed a multi-trial trust game outside of the MRI scanner. A subset of these participants (15 with PTSD and 14 controls) also completed a social and non-social reinforcement learning task during 3T fMRI. Brain regions that encoded the computationally modeled parameters of value expectation, prediction error, and volatility (i.e., uncertainty) were defined and compared between groups. The PTSD group demonstrated slower learning rates during the trust game and social prediction errors had a lesser impact on subsequent investment decisions. PTSD was also associated with greater encoding of negative expected social outcomes in perigenual anterior cingulate cortex and bilateral middle frontal gyri, and greater encoding of social prediction errors in the left temporoparietal junction. These data suggest mechanisms of PTSD-related deficits in social functioning and heightened risk for re-victimization in assault victims; however, comorbidity in the PTSD group and the lack of a trauma-exposed control group temper conclusions about PTSD specifically.

  10. Combat Deployment is Associated With Sexual Harassment or Sexual Assault in a Large, Female Military Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-11

    study of 140,000 military personnel. Military Medicine, 167(6), 483–488. Haskell, S. G., Gordon, K. S., Mattocks, K., Duggal, M., Erdos , J., Justice, A...report version of PRIME -MD: The PHQ Primary Care Study. Primary care evaluation of mental disorders. JAMA, 282(18), 1737–1744. Spitzer, R. L., Williams...J. B., Kroenke, K., Hornyak, R., & McMurray, J. (2000). Validity and utility of the PRIME -MD patient health questionnaire in assessment of 3000

  11. Understanding the Complexity of Child Sexual Abuse: A Review of the Literature with Implications for Family Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Sally V

    2006-01-01

    Working with families in which there have been incidences of child sexual abuse is one of the most challenging assignments for a family counselor. Beyond ethical and legal mandates for reporting such assaults, less is understood about the long-term effects on victims. After reviewing the literature on child sexual abuse and gender differences,…

  12. FXYD1, a modulator of Na+,K+-ATPase activity, facilitates female sexual development by maintaining GnRH neuronal excitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Rudaz, Cecilia; Deng, Vivianne; Matagne, Valerie; Ronnekleiv, Oline; Bosch, Martha; Han, Victor; Percy, Alan K.; Ojeda, Sergio R.

    2009-01-01

    The excitatory tone to GnRH neurones is a critical component underlying the pubertal increase in GnRH secretion. However, the homeostatic mechanisms modulating the response of GnRH neurones to excitatory inputs remain poorly understood. A basic mechanism of neuronal homeostasis is the Na+, K+-ATPase-dependent restoration of Na+ and K+ transmembrane gradients after neuronal excitation. This activity is reduced in a mouse model of Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder in which expression of FXYD1, a modulator of Na+, K+-ATPase activity, is increased. We now report that the initiation, but not the completion of puberty, is advanced in girls with RTT, and that in rodents FXYD1 may contribute to the neuroendocrine regulation of female puberty by modulating GnRH neuronal excitability. Fxyd1 mRNA abundance reaches maximal levels in the female rat hypothalamus by the fourth postnatal week of life, i.e., around the time when the mode of GnRH secretion acquires an adult pattern of release. Although Fxyd1 mRNA expression is low in the hypothalamus, about 50% of GnRH neurones contain Fxyd1 transcripts. Whole-cell patch recording of GnRH-EGFP neurones revealed that the neurones of Fxyd1-null female mice respond to somatic current injections with a lower number of action potentials than wild-type cells. Both the age at vaginal opening and at first oestrous were delayed in Fxyd1-/- mice, but adult reproductive capacity was normal. These results suggest that FXYD1 contributes to facilitating the advent of puberty by maintaining GnRH neuronal excitability to incoming transsynaptic stimulatory inputs. PMID:19187398

  13. Is the Sexual Murderer a Unique Type of Offender? A Typology of Violent Sexual Offenders Using Crime Scene Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healey, Jay; Beauregard, Eric; Beech, Anthony; Vettor, Shannon

    2016-09-01

    The empirical literature on sexual homicide has posited the sexual murderer as a unique type of offender who is qualitatively different from other types of offenders. However, recent research has suggested that sexual homicide is a dynamic crime and that sexual assaults can escalate to homicide when specific situational factors are present. This study simultaneously explored the utility of the sexual murderer as a unique type of offender hypothesis and sexual homicide as a differential outcome of sexual assaults hypothesis. This study is based on a sample of 342 males who were convicted of committing a violent sexual offense, which resulted in either physical injury or death of the victim. A series of latent class analyses were performed using crime scene indicators in an attempt to identify discrete groups of sexual offenders. In addition, the effects of modus operandi, situational factors, and offender characteristics on each group were investigated. Results suggest that both hypotheses are supported. A group of offenders was identified who almost exclusively killed their victims and demonstrated a lethal intent by the choice of their offending behavior. Moreover, three other groups of sex offenders were identified with a diverse lethality level, suggesting that these cases could end up as homicide when certain situational factors were present.

  14. Multifaceted Glance on Childhood Sexual Abuse and Incest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslihan Okan Ibiloglu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available An experience of domestic violence can lead to permanent physical, mental, and psychological harms, whether the child is a direct victim or a witness. Although having no standard definition, it is generally agreed that childhood sexual abuse and incest are underreported. The majority of sexual abuse happens in childhood, with incest being the most common form. Incest is a sexual activity or assault between family members or close relatives and can be defined as the sexual abuse of the child, as well. On the other hand, pedophilic disorder is defined as having recurrent, intense sexual urges or behaviors involving sexual activity with a preadolescent child, over a period of at least 6 months. In this article, clinical, social, and legal effects from the sexual abuse of results are investigated. Results of our research will be hopefully helpful in informing social policy and guiding mental health practice.

  15. Are pedophiles with aggressive tendencies more sexually violent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, D M; Bradford, J M; Curry, S

    1996-01-01

    Pedophiles use varying degrees of persuasion, coercion, and physical force in their sexual assaults. Pedophiles may also display aggressiveness and characteristics of hostility in nonsexual areas of their behavior. This study (N = 263) investigates the relationship between pedophiles with aggressive tendencies and the degree of sexual violence in their pedophilic acts. The degree of sexual violence was rated subjectively after a comprehensive psychiatric and psycho-sexual assessment and obtaining collateral information from police reports and witness statements. The degree of sexual violence was also rated more objectively using the penile plethysmography. Strict DSM-IV pedophilic disorder criteria were adopted for this study. The authors discuss whether sexual violence in a pedophilic population is focused to sexual areas or tends to be more generalized in other physically aggressive and hostile areas.

  16. Epidemiology of assaultive injuries in areas of Sichuan province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Zheng-hua; LI Lei-bo; ZHOU Xiao-rong; CHANG Yun-feng; CHEN Xiao-gang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To scrutinize the epidemiologicalcharacteristics of assaultive injuries in Sichuan province,China.Methods: A survey of all cases of assaultive injuries reported by police was performed during 8 years in eight counties of Sichuan province, China. A total of 2862victims and 2856 offenders were registered.Results: The majority of victims and offenders were young men at the age of 20-39 and only received an education at secondary school or primary school. The largest fraction of these cases took place at farm or by-place during 10. 00-11.00 o'clock, 16.00-17.00 o'clock and 20.00-21.00 o'clock. The tangles caused by trifles were the most common factors inducing assaultive injuries and accounted for 42.1 percent of the causes of assaults. Blunt injuries were mainly caused by punching (40%) and kicking ( 17. 2 %). About 37.3 % of the lesions seriously happened in the regions of face and head. Open wounds accounted for 40.3 % of these different injuries.Conclusions: It is valuable to take some specific measures to prevent and control assaultive injuries according to their territorial characteristics.

  17. Characteristics of female victims of assault attending a Scottish accident and emergency department.

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, J; Kariya, A

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the characteristics of female victims of assault with those of male victims and to see if there is a difference between female victims of domestic assault and females assaulted by strangers or acquaintances. DESIGN: A two month prospective study (June and July 1995) of all assault victims attending a Scottish accident and emergency (A&E) department. SETTING: A large district general A&E department (the Royal Alexandra Hospital in Paisley) seeing 60,000 new patients per y...

  18. Don't Forget the Good Stuff! Incorporating Positive Messages of Sexual Pleasure into Sexuality Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    deFur, Kirsten M.

    2012-01-01

    Sexuality professionals have long called for the inclusion of sexual pleasure in sexuality education programs, however, facilitators are often ill-equipped to do so. This lesson plan will help educators conceptualize the topic of sexual pleasure in order to successfully integrate it into their lessons. This lesson also reviews challenges of…

  19. Don't Forget the Good Stuff! Incorporating Positive Messages of Sexual Pleasure into Sexuality Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    deFur, Kirsten M.

    2012-01-01

    Sexuality professionals have long called for the inclusion of sexual pleasure in sexuality education programs, however, facilitators are often ill-equipped to do so. This lesson plan will help educators conceptualize the topic of sexual pleasure in order to successfully integrate it into their lessons. This lesson also reviews challenges of…

  20. Post-traumatic Stress Disorder After Sexual Abuse in Adolescent Girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, Bethany D; Kaul, Paritosh

    2016-12-01

    The sexual assault of girls and women in this country is estimated at approximately 20%. The development of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after sexual abuse and assault is one of the potential lingering aftereffects. In this article we describe PTSD after sexual abuse and its effect on presenting complaints, such as sexually transmitted infections, contraception, and chronic pain, for the pediatric and adolescent gynecology (PAG) clinician. Treatment approaches, including the use of antidepressants and anxiolytics, as well as evidenced-based psychotherapies, are highlighted. In addition, this article will assist the PAG clinician in identifying trauma-related concerns during clinic visits and will cover specific screening tools to aid in identification of PTSD. A better understanding of PTSD after sexual abuse will allow PAG providers to deliver better care to their patients.

  1. Preventing sexual aggression among college men: an evaluation of a social norms and bystander intervention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidycz, Christine A; Orchowski, Lindsay M; Berkowitz, Alan D

    2011-06-01

    Men and women living in randomly selected 1st-year dormitories participated in tailored single-sex sexual assault prevention or risk-reduction programs, respectively. An evaluation of the men's project is presented (N = 635). The program incorporated social norms and bystander intervention education and had an impact on self-reported sexual aggression and an effect on men's perceptions that their peers would intervene when they encountered inappropriate behavior in others. Relative to the control group, participants also reported less reinforcement for engaging in sexually aggressive behavior, reported fewer associations with sexually aggressive peers, and indicated less exposure to sexually explicit media.

  2. 27 CFR 478.40 - Manufacture, transfer, and possession of semiautomatic assault weapons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... possession of semiautomatic assault weapons. 478.40 Section 478.40 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms..., transfer, and possession of semiautomatic assault weapons. (a) Prohibition. No person shall manufacture, transfer, or possess a semiautomatic assault weapon. (b) Exceptions. The provisions of paragraph (a) of...

  3. 27 CFR 478.133 - Records of transactions in semiautomatic assault weapons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... semiautomatic assault weapons. 478.133 Section 478.133 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL... AMMUNITION Records § 478.133 Records of transactions in semiautomatic assault weapons. The evidence specified in § 478.40(c), relating to transactions in semiautomatic assault weapons, shall be retained in the...

  4. Detection of spermatozoa following consensual sexual intercourse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Birgitte Schmidt; Thomsen, Jørgen Lange; Lauritsen, Jens

    2012-01-01

    examinations of sexual assault victims. For an objective evaluation of the findings, substantial knowledge of aspects regarding consensual sexual intercourse is crucial. The aim of this study was to examine detection frequencies and genital sampling sites of spermatozoa following consensual sexual intercourse....... METHODS: In a prospective setting, 60 women underwent forensic examination following consensual sexual intercourse. Specimens were obtained from the external genitalia, the posterior fornix and the cervical canal, and examined using the Papanicolau stain and standard light microscopy. RESULTS: We found...... that 88% of possible cases were positive for spermatozoa. The posterior fornix was significantly better than the other sites for detection of spermatozoa and the number of spermatozoa decreased significantly over time. In a large sub-group of women who reported that no intra-vaginal ejaculation had taken...

  5. Preventing sexual violence instead of just responding to it: students' perceptions of sexual violence resources on campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Carolyn M; Lechner, Kate E; Frerich, Ellen A; Lust, Katherine A; Eisenberg, Marla E

    2012-06-01

    Rates of sexual assault of college students are higher than the national rates. Colleges are uniquely positioned to offer preventive education and support services to a high-risk group. This qualitative study examines students' perceptions of sexual violence resources and services. Seventy-eight female and male students, between 18 and 24 years old, belonging to various demographic groups, participated in one-to-one walking interviews on five diverse Midwest 2- and 4-year postsecondary campuses. Findings suggest that students are concerned with safety--students want more education regarding sexual violence--and they value services that offer protection from incidents of sexual violence on campus. Participants expressed mixed reactions to prevention education that combined sexual violence prevention with alcohol and drug use. Students shared positive views of the security measures on campus. They emphasized the importance of using varied mechanisms for sexual violence-related resource messaging and advised moving away from the pamphlet toward posters and online resources. Recommendations are offered to strengthen existing resources, such as prevention education and postassault interventions including sexual assault nurse examiner services, and to minimize barriers to access of sexual violence resources.

  6. Required Operational Capability (ROC) Number INS 211.3.1 for the Medium Assault/Antitank Weapon (MAAW) M47 Dragon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-14

    II AD-AI69 682 REQUIRED OPERATIONAL CAPASILITY (RRC) NUMSER INS 21131 lf FOR THE NEDIUM ASSAULT/ANTITANK HERPON CNAAN ) N4? DRAGON(U) NAINE CORPS...tracked vehicles over rough terrain and be capable of airdrop in resupply bundles. (8) Reliability, Availability, and Maintainability- Durability ( RAM -D...designed to facilitate use of automatic test equipment. The RAM -D requirements over the life of the system are: (a) Operational availability of the

  7. Gendered pathways from child sexual abuse to sexual aggression victimization and perpetration in adolescence and young adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahé, Barbara; Berger, Anja

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the pathways from child sexual abuse to sexual assault victimization and perpetration in adolescence and early adulthood, considering risky sexual behavior and lowered sexual self-esteem as mediator variables. In a two-wave longitudinal study with 2251 college students in Germany, male and female participants provided reports of sexual aggression victimization and perpetration since age 14 (T1) and again a year later (T2), covering the last 12 months. In addition, child sexual abuse (CSA; before the age of 14), risky sexual behavior, and sexual self-esteem were assessed at T1, and risky sexual behavior and sexual-self-esteem were assessed again at T2. Experience of CSA was significantly associated with greater likelihood of sexual aggression victimization and perpetration, lower sexual self-esteem, and more risky sexual behavior in both gender groups at T1 and was directly related to victimization at T2 among male participants. In both gender groups, CSA indirectly contributed to a higher probability of sexual victimization at T2 via its impact on victimization T1. In males, the indirect path from CSA to T2 perpetration via T1 perpetration was also significant. Through its negative impact on sexual self-esteem, CSA indirectly increased the probability of sexual victimization among women and the probability of sexual aggression perpetration among men. Risky sexual behavior mediated the pathway from CSA to sexual victimization at T2 for men and women and the pathway from CSA to sexual aggression perpetration for women. The findings contribute to the understanding of gendered effects of CSA on revictimization and the victim-to-perpetrator cycle. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Annual Report on Sexual Harassment and Violence at the Military Service Academies: Academic Program Year 2012-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    midshipmen, faculty, staff and coaches.  Chaplains delivered Interpersonal Relationship Training to the incoming class of Plebes . This training...Community Fair and Plebe Parent Week. Training: SARCs, SAPR VAs, Service Providers, CASH/A Cadets, EO Officers USMA has 34 personnel who have...lead to an incident of unwanted sexual contact. Plebes (freshmen) took four hours of sexual harassment and sexual assault training within their

  9. Pathways from Childhood Abuse to Prospective Revictimization: Depression, Sex to Reduce Negative Affect, and Forecasted Sexual Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Miron, Lynsey R.; Orcutt, Holly K.

    2014-01-01

    Research suggests that adverse events in childhood, such as childhood physical, sexual, and emotional abuse, confer risk for later sexual assault. Psychological distress, coping strategies, and sexual behavior may help explain the path from childhood abuse to revictimization. The present study explored how the use of sex to regulate negative affect (SRNA) operates independently, and in combination with other psychosocial factors to increase college women’s (N = 541) risk of experiencing prosp...

  10. Interpreting Survey Questions About Sexual Aggression in Cross-Cultural Research : A Qualitative Study with Young Adults from Nine European Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krahé, Barbara; de Haas, Stans; Vanwesenbeeck, Wilhelmina; Bianchi, Gabriel; Chliaoutakis, Joannes; Fuertes, Antonio; de Matos, Margarida Gaspar; Hadjigeorgiou, Eleni; Hellemans, Sabine; Kouta, Christiana; Meijnckens, Dwayne; Murauskiene, Liubove; Papadakaki, Maria; Ramiro, Lucia; Reis, Marta; Symons, Katrien; Tomaszewska, Paulina; Vicario-Molina, Isabel; Zygadlo, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Examining equivalence in the interpretation of survey items on sexual assault by participants from different cultures is an important step toward building a valid international knowledge base about the prevalence of sexual aggression among young adults. Referring to the theoretical framework of cont

  11. Survey of Threats and Assaults by Patients on Psychiatry Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvir, Yael; Moniwa, Emiko; Crisp-Han, Holly; Levy, Dana; Coverdale, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors sought to determine the prevalence of threats and assaults by patients on psychiatry residents, their consequences, and the perceived adequacy of supports and institutional responses. Method: Authors conducted an anonymous survey of 519 psychiatry residents in 13 psychiatry programs across the United States. The survey…

  12. The Global Crisis and the Assault on Democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juego, Bonn; Schmidt, Johannes Dragsbæk

    The paper argues that the current global capitalist crisis entails an assault on democracy. Since crisis connotes danger and opportunity, the recent crisis appears to be a danger to democracy but an opportunity to its antithetical ideals. At the international level, multilateral institutions have...

  13. Assessing Eli Broad's Assault on Public School System Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Fenwick W.; Crowder, Zan

    2012-01-01

    Eli Broad's approach to reforming urban public education does not recognize his own self-interest in promoting changes within such educational systems, a classic problem of misrecognition. The Broad agenda is an assault on the notion of the mission of public education as a service instead of a for-profit enterprise concerned with making money for…

  14. Rape as an Economic Crime: The Impact of Sexual Violence on Survivors' Employment and Economic Well-Being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loya, Rebecca M

    2015-10-01

    This article examines how isolated instances of sexual violence affect adult female survivors' employment and economic well-being. This study draws on data from 27 in-depth, qualitative interviews with sexual assault survivors and rape crisis service providers. The findings suggest that sexual assault and the related trauma response can disrupt survivors' employment in several ways, including time off, diminished performance, job loss, and inability to work. By disrupting income or reducing earning power, all of these employment consequences have implications for survivors' economic well-being in the months or years following the assault. In addition, I argue that for many survivors, these employment consequences compound one another and ultimately shift survivors' long-term economic trajectories. By highlighting survivors' lived experiences of the financial aftermath of sexual assault, these findings help to illuminate the processes by which sexual violence decreases survivors' income over the life course. Understanding the financial effects of sexual violence can help researchers better understand and predict the recovery process, while helping practitioners to design more effective interventions for survivors.

  15. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Hate Crimes and Suicidality Among a Population-Based Sample of Sexual-Minority Adolescents in Boston

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzenbuehler, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We examined whether past-year suicidality among sexual-minority adolescents was more common in neighborhoods with a higher prevalence of hate crimes targeting lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals. Methods. Participants’ data came from a racially/ethnically diverse population-based sample of 9th- through 12th-grade public school students in Boston, Massachusetts (n = 1292). Of these, 108 (8.36%) reported a minority sexual orientation. We obtained data on LGBT hate crimes involving assaults or assaults with battery between 2005 and 2008 from the Boston Police Department and linked the data to the adolescent’s residential address. Results. Sexual-minority youths residing in neighborhoods with higher rates of LGBT assault hate crimes were significantly more likely to report suicidal ideation (P = .013) and suicide attempts (P = .006), than were those residing in neighborhoods with lower LGBT assault hate crime rates. We observed no relationships between overall neighborhood-level violent and property crimes and suicidality among sexual-minority adolescents (P > .05), providing evidence for specificity of the results to LGBT assault hate crimes. Conclusions. Neighborhood context (i.e., LGBT hate crimes) may contribute to sexual-orientation disparities in adolescent suicidality, highlighting potential targets for community-level suicide-prevention programs. PMID:24328619

  16. Teenage Sexuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stages Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Teenage Sexuality Page Content Article Body Sex and sexuality ... have sexual intercourse? Will having sex help my relationship? If I am attracted to a same-sex ...

  17. Children at Risk: A Review of Sexual Abuse Incidents and Child Protection Issues in Jamaica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The right of children to be protected from abuse is grounded in international law. Children should be free to enjoy their childhoods and to engage with their physical environment without fear for their safety. In recent years, girls and women in Jamaica have been targeted by men who rape and/or otherwise sexually assault them. This is without…

  18. Enhancing Women's Resistance to Sexual Coercion: A Randomized Controlled Trial of the DATE Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson Rowe, Lorelei; Jouriles, Ernest N.; McDonald, Renee; Platt, Cora G.; Gomez, Gabriella S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Despite extensive efforts to develop sexual assault prevention programs for college women, few have been rigorously evaluated, and fewer have demonstrable effects on victimization. This study pilots the Dating Assertiveness Training Experience (DATE), designed to train young women in assertiveness skills for responding to sexual…

  19. What Would You Do? Strategies for Bystander Intervention to Prevent Sexual Violence by College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Sarah; Hoffman, Melanie Lowe; McMahon, Sheila M.; Zucker, Sharon; Koenick, Ruth Anne

    2013-01-01

    Bystander education is an increasingly utilized strategy for addressing sexual assault prevention and intervention on U.S. college campuses. Given the paramount importance of peers among college students, what types of pro-social bystander interventions do students themselves deem feasible in the campus context? Drawing on self-reports from…

  20. What Would You Do? Strategies for Bystander Intervention to Prevent Sexual Violence by College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Sarah; Hoffman, Melanie Lowe; McMahon, Sheila M.; Zucker, Sharon; Koenick, Ruth Anne

    2013-01-01

    Bystander education is an increasingly utilized strategy for addressing sexual assault prevention and intervention on U.S. college campuses. Given the paramount importance of peers among college students, what types of pro-social bystander interventions do students themselves deem feasible in the campus context? Drawing on self-reports from…

  1. 2015 QuickCompass of Sexual Assult-Related Responders: Statistical Methodology Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    AND RESPONSE-RELATED RESPONDERS: STATISTICAL METHODOLOGY REPORT Defense Research , Surveys, and Statistics Center Defense Manpower Data Center...2015 QuickCompass of Sexual Assault Prevention and Response- Related Responders Statistical Methodology Report Additional copies of this report...Defense Research , Surveys, and Statistics Center (RSSC) 4800 Mark Center Drive, Suite 04E25-01, Alexandria, VA 22350-4000 ii Acknowledgments

  2. Sexual Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Basic HIV/AIDS information and resources for prevention LGBT Health Information for lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) individuals Sexual Health News & Information Understanding Sexual Health ...

  3. Sexuality attitudes: the impact of trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broman, Clifford L

    2003-11-01

    This study examines the relationship between traumatic events and attitudes toward sexuality. Our results show that suffering trauma is related to more accepting attitudes concerning sexuality. Generally, people who suffer negative events, many of which are traumatic, are more likely to see both pornography and having a homosexual friend or family member as acceptable. Traumatic events that are sex-related or related to other physical assault proved to be most significant in the prediction of sexuality attitudes for women only. The results are specified by gender: Trauma predicts attitudes toward pornography for women but not for men, and traumatic events are associated with attitudes concerning homosexuality for women. These results are discussed in light of the previous research, and suggestions for future research made.

  4. Testing the Cuckoldry Risk Hypothesis of Partner Sexual Coercion in Community and Forensic Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph A. Camilleri

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary theory has informed the investigation of male sexual coercion but has seldom been applied to the analysis of sexual coercion within established couples. The cuckoldry risk hypothesis, that sexual coercion is a male tactic used to reduce the risk of extrapair paternity, was tested in two studies. In a community sample, indirect cues of infidelity predicted male propensity for sexual coaxing in the relationship, and direct cues predicted propensity for sexual coercion. In the forensic sample, we found that most partner rapists experienced cuckoldry risk prior to committing their offence and experienced more types of cuckoldry risk events than non-sexual partner assaulters. These findings suggest that cuckoldry risk influences male sexual coercion in established sexual relationships.

  5. Exploring a Contextual Model of Sexual Self-Disclosure and Sexual Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Randal D; Weigel, Daniel J

    2017-03-13

    Sexual self-disclosure is a critical component of relationship and sexual satisfaction, yet little is known about the mechanisms that facilitate a person's engagement in sexual self-disclosure. Individuals (N = 265) involved in romantic relationships participated in an online study testing a contextual model of sexual self-disclosure across three contexts: relationship context, sexual self-disclosure context, and outcome of sexual self-disclosure. Results suggest that sexual satisfaction was predicted by a positive relationship context and a positive sexual self-disclosure context. In addition, the sexual self-disclosure context was predicted by the relationship context. These findings emphasize the importance of examining contextual influences that determine whether an individual will engage in or avoid sexual self-disclosure and the consequences of this engagement or avoidance on sexual satisfaction.

  6. Mental health in violent crime victims: Does sexual orientation matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Robert J; McNiel, Dale E; Holley, Sarah R; Shumway, Martha; Boccellari, Alicia

    2012-04-01

    The present study investigates victim sexual orientation in a sample of 641 violent crime victims seeking emergency medical treatment at a public-sector hospital. Victim sexual orientation was examined as it: (a) varies by type of violent crime and demographic characteristics, (b) directly relates to psychological symptoms, and (c) moderates the relationship between victim and crime characteristics (i.e., victim gender, victim trauma history, and type of crime) and psychological symptoms (i.e., symptoms of acute stress, depression, panic, and general anxiety). Results showed that lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) victims were more likely to be victims of sexual assault. Heterosexual victims were more likely to be victims of general assault and shootings. LGBT victims demonstrated significantly higher levels of acute stress and general anxiety. Moreover, victim sexual orientation moderated the association of type of crime with experience of panic symptoms. Also, victim sexual orientation moderated the relation of victim trauma history and general anxiety symptoms. Results are discussed in relation to victimization prevalence rates, sexual prejudice theory, and assessment and treatment of violent crime victims.

  7. Sexual Harassment and Sexual Bulllying (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Can I Help Someone Who's Being Bullied? Volunteering Sexual Harassment and Sexual Bullying KidsHealth > For Teens > Sexual Harassment and Sexual ... is being sexually harassed or bullied. What Are Sexual Bullying and Harassment? Just like other kinds of ...

  8. A Unique Case of Intracranial Mucormycosis Following an Assault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Fadilah S

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial mucormycosis is a very unusual presentation of an infection after a depressed skull fracture due to an assault. Only sporadic cases have been reported in the literature previously. A 30-year-old male with a traumatic brain injury following an assault, status-post debridement and elevation of a depressed skull fracture, was discharged home several weeks postoperatively. A CT scan of the head with contrast was obtained due to mental status changes and revealed an enhancing ring-shaped lesion in the right frontal lobe consistent with a brain abscess. The patient was taken to the operating room for image-guided excisional biopsy of the lesion, with pathology revealing mucormycosis.  PMID:27672528

  9. Rape Myth Acceptance, Efficacy, and Heterosexual Scripts in Men's Magazines: Factors Associated With Intentions to Sexually Coerce or Intervene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hust, Stacey J T; Rodgers, Kathleen Boyce; Ebreo, Stephanie; Stefani, Whitney

    2016-06-12

    Sexual coercion has gained researchers' attention as an underreported form of sexual abuse or harm. The percentage of male and female college students who reported engaging in sexual coercion was as high as 82% for verbally coercive behaviors over the course of a year. Guided by heterosexual scripting theory and the integrated model of behavioral prediction, we examine potential factors associated with college students' intentions to sexually coerce or to intervene when friends plan to sexually coerce (bystander intention). Factors included young college students' beliefs about rape myth acceptance, perceived norms, efficacy to reduce sexual-assault risk, and exposure to men's and women's magazines. As predicted, results indicate rape myth acceptance was positively associated with intentions to sexually coerce, and negatively associated with bystander intentions to intervene. Students' efficacy to reduce sexual-assault risk was negatively associated with intentions to sexually coerce, and positively associated with bystander intentions. Exposure to the heterosexual scripts in men's magazines, which connect sexual prowess to masculinity, was associated with intentions to sexually coerce. Exposure to magazines was not associated with bystander intentions to intervene. Overall, an understanding of the independent contribution of these factors toward sexual coercion and intervention has implications for dating violence prevention programming. © The Author(s) 2016.

  10. [Training in preventing assaultive behaviors for psychiatric professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axer, A; Beckett, R

    1998-01-01

    Dangerous behaviors in psychiatric institutions constitute major clinical and administrative problems. Staff competency in dealing with assaultive patients is an important factor in reducing institutional violence. One of the training programs for mental health staff working with dangerous patients is called Professional Assault Response Training (PART). PART is a product of several years of experience accumulated by the group of California authors in their efforts at designing a safe and effective approach in responding to various dangerous behaviors. PART principles guide staff in 1) de-escalating dangerous incidents through verbal crisis interventions; 2) avoiding or minimizing the risk of minor physical injury through evasion; 3) preventing serious bodily harm through the use of manual restraint. The importance of maintaining self-control by staff is reinforced throughout the entire course as a crucial professional skill. Other PART principles include identifying realistic treatment expectations for assaultive patients, proper physical mobility and emotional balance of staff, recognizing warning signals of impeding danger, using reasonable force to match response to the level of dangerousness. The PART training explores various theoretical explanations of violence (legal model, stress model, environmental model, communication model, developmental model, basic needs model and common-sense model). Verbal interventions which are a cornerstone of the PART approach are matching specific motives of threatening behavior--fear, frustration, manipulation and intimidation. Physical interventions taught in the course (evasion and manual restraint) include only techniques which can be used safely and which are not pain inducing. Finally, the PART training also assists staff in properly documenting assaultive incidents.

  11. Sexual predators who target elders: findings from the first national study of sexual abuse in care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey-Klawsnik, Holly; Teaster, Pamela B; Mendiondo, Marta S; Marcum, Jennifer L; Abner, Erin L

    2008-01-01

    This article reports research findings concerning 119 alleged sexual perpetrators who were reported to state authorities for abusing elderly individuals residing in care facilities. The largest group of accused was employees of the facilities, followed by facility residents. Family members of the alleged victims and visitors to the facilities also were among those reported as sexually abusive. Investigation of the allegations by Adult Protective Services and regulatory staff resulted in 32 of these individuals being confirmed as sexual perpetrators against vulnerable elders. Male and female alleged and confirmed sexual perpetrators were identified as well as both male and female elderly sexual abuse victims. Perpetrator characteristics, victim vulnerabilities, abuse acts, locations of assaults, and available case outcomes are presented. Implications of the findings are discussed.

  12. Sadness, suicide, and sexual behavior in Arkansas: results from the youth risk behavior survey 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindrick, Clint; Gathright, Molly; Cisler, Josh M; Messias, Erick

    2013-12-01

    We used the 2011 Arkansas Youth Risk Behavior Survey to estimate the prevalence of risky sexual behavior and sexual assault and to measure its association with teen suicidality. In Arkansas, 50.3% of students reported ever having sexual intercourse, 26% onset at 14 or younger, 36 % having had more than one partner, and 10.2% having been physically forced to have sex. "Being forced to have sex" was a risk factor for depression and all components of the suicide continuum. Additionally, early onset of sexual activity and having more than one partner increased the risk for depression, suicidal ideation, plan, and attempt. Suicide is a grievous and preventable tragedy, sadly standing among the leading causes of death for teens.' In this series, we examine risk factors for suicidality among Arkansas high school students; in this installment, we examine sexual behavior. A previous study utilizing the Rhode Island Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) found an association between having forced sexual intercourse and suicide. Furthermore, an association between psychiatric disorders and risky sexual behaviors, including both early onset and number of partners was found in a birth cohort study revealed. We hypothesize that Arkansas' teens reporting risky sexual behavior and sexual assault are at higher risk of depression and suicidality as well.

  13. Infantile sexuality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeuthen, Katrine Egede; Gammelgård, Judy

    2010-01-01

    When first presented, Freud´s theory of infantile sexuality was a scandal. Not only was the claim that the small child sucking at the mother´s breast experiences a kind of pleasure that Freud without hesitation named sexual, the theory also turned the common understanding of human sexuality up...... vision of the sexual. Following a historic outline, we examine the theories that inspired by Laplanche, once more discuss infantile sexuality, and argue that infantile sexuality is clarified by combining the concept of the drive with what in effect is an inter-subjective point of view....

  14. Not a Big Deal? Examining Help-Seeking Behaviors of Sexually Victimized Women on the College Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, McKenzie; Stichman, Amy

    2016-12-01

    The sexual assault and coercion of women on university campuses continues to be an ongoing problem. It is estimated that more than 15% of women attending college experience some type of sexual assault or coercion each year. As universities and other social institutions begin to acknowledge the prevalence of sexual victimization, an increased emphasis has been placed on helping victims of sexual crimes. The current study uses results from 378 surveys completed by females at a midwestern university to examine the help-seeking behaviors of those who have been victimized. This study specifically focuses on formal and informal reporting, identifying help agents, and reasons for not reporting. Results reveal that 1% of women who were victimized reported their experience to a formal entity, whereas 45% told an informal agent, such as a friend or roommate. Reasons for not reporting included not identifying the experience as rape, wanting to keep the experience private, and feeling ashamed.

  15. Playing by the Rules: Researching, Teaching and Learning Sexual Ethics with Young Men in the Australian National Rugby League

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albury, Kath; Carmody, Moira; Evers, Clifton; Lumby, Catharine

    2011-01-01

    In 2004, the Australian National Rugby League (NRL) commissioned the Playing By The Rules research project in response to allegations of sexual assault by members of a professional rugby league team. This article offers an overview of the theoretical and methodological approaches adopted by the team, and the subsequent workplace education…

  16. Adolescent Sexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Thomasina H.

    2003-01-01

    This article offers a medical and psychosocial perspective of adolescent sexual development. Sub-types of sexual development are discussed as well as treatment implications for allied health providers. (Contains 38 references.) (Author)

  17. Sexual Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexual Violence Facts at a Glance 2012 Adults In a nationally representative survey of adults: 1 • Nearly ... men (5.6% and 5.3%, respectively) experienced sexual violence other than rape, such as being made ...

  18. Sexual Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... big part of being human. Love, affection and sexual intimacy all play a role in healthy relationships. ... both men and women. Factors that can affect sexual health include Fear of unplanned pregnancy Concerns about ...

  19. Female sexuality

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, T.S. Sathyanarana; Nagaraj, Anil Kumar M.

    2015-01-01

    Sex is a motive force bringing a man and a woman into intimate contact. Sexuality is a central aspect of being human throughout life and encompasses sex, gender identities and roles, sexual orientation, eroticism, pleasure, intimacy, and reproduction. Sexuality is experienced and expressed in thoughts, fantasies, desires, beliefs, attitudes, values, behaviors, practices, roles and relationships. Though generally, women are sexually active during adolescence, they reach their peak orgasmic fre...

  20. Cognitive Processing Therapy for Acute Stress Disorder Resulting from an Anti-Gay Assault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaysen, Debra; Lostutter, Ty W.; Goines, Marie A.

    2005-01-01

    This case study describes Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) with a 30-year-old gay man with symptoms of acute stress disorder (ASD) following a recent homophobic assault. Treatment addressed assault-related posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms and depressive symptoms. Also addressed were low self-esteem, helplessness, and high degrees of…