WorldWideScience

Sample records for facilitate user interaction

  1. Developing a service user facilitated, interactive case study--a reflective and evaluative account of a teaching method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Lisa J; Padgett, Kath

    2012-02-01

    This article describes the development and ongoing evaluation of a method of service user facilitated case study in health and social care education in a U.K. University. An action research approach (Norton 2009) has been used in which the aim of the work is to improve personal practice with the aim of enhancing the student experience. The paper is written from the perspective of the service user with support from an academic colleague. The paper describes how a narrative monologue, over time is developed into an interactive case study. In draws upon literature from service user involvement, case study and pedagogic action research. The research group are health and social care students both under and post-graduates. Analysis is via a session evaluation form. Thematic analysis draws out key themes. Firstly that first person accounts have a reasonance and interest with students. Secondly that the built in thinking time helps students to develop their reflection and critical thinking skills. Furthermore a theme emerges on how the technique supports students with their future careers. Finally the author reflects on how the approach enables the development of teaching practice and enhanced student learning.

  2. Interactive Office user's manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Edward E.; Lowers, Benjamin; Nabors, Terri L.

    1990-01-01

    Given here is a user's manual for Interactive Office (IO), an executive office tool for organization and planning, written specifically for Macintosh. IO is a paperless management tool to automate a related group of individuals into one productive system.

  3. Facilitative root interactions in intercrops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauggaard-Nielsen, H.; Jensen, E.S.

    2005-01-01

    Facilitation takes place when plants ameliorate the environment of their neighbours, and increase their growth and survival. Facilitation occurs in natural ecosystems as well as in agroecosystems. We discuss examples of facilitative root interactions in intercropped agroecosystems; including...... intensified cropping systems using chemical and mechanical inputs also show that facilitative interactions definitely can be of significance. It is concluded that a better understanding of the mechanisms behind facilitative interactions may allow us to benefit more from these phenomena in agriculture...

  4. A Randomized Trial Comparing Classical Participatory Design to VandAID, an Interactive CrowdSourcing Platform to Facilitate User-Centered Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufendach, Kevin R; Koch, Sabine; Unertl, Kim M; Lehmann, Christoph U

    2017-04-28

    Early involvement of stakeholders in the design of medical software is particularly important due to the need to incorporate complex knowledge and actions associated with clinical work. Standard user-centered design methods include focus groups and participatory design sessions with individual stakeholders, which generally limit user involvement to a small number of individuals due to the significant time investments from designers and end users. The goal of this project was to reduce the effort for end users to participate in co-design of a software user interface by developing an interactive web-based crowdsourcing platform. In a randomized trial, we compared a new web-based crowdsourcing platform to standard participatory design sessions. We developed an interactive, modular platform that allows responsive remote customization and design feedback on a visual user interface based on user preferences. The responsive canvas is a dynamic HTML template that responds in real time to user preference selections. Upon completion, the design team can view the user's interface creations through an administrator portal and download the structured selections through a REDCap interface. We have created a software platform that allows users to customize a user interface and see the results of that customization in real time, receiving immediate feedback on the impact of their design choices. Neonatal clinicians used the new platform to successfully design and customize a neonatal handoff tool. They received no specific instruction and yet were able to use the software easily and reported high usability. VandAID, a new web-based crowdsourcing platform, can involve multiple users in user-centered design simultaneously and provides means of obtaining design feedback remotely. The software can provide design feedback at any stage in the design process, but it will be of greatest utility for specifying user requirements and evaluating iterative designs with multiple options.

  5. User producer interaction in context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nahuis, R.; Moors, E.H.M.; Smits, R.E.H.M.

    2012-01-01

    User producer interaction (UPI) increases chances for successful innovations. It is not always clear, however, what type of interaction is necessary in a particular context. This article identifies seven different types of UPI: constructing linkages, broadening, characterizing users, upstream

  6. Flash Builder building user interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Rocchi, Cesare

    2010-01-01

    Develop a working understanding of events and components, and containers and states so you can build and deploy RIAs in Flex. Work through a demo implementation of a login panel that employs feedback from the server side, to hone your understanding. Use the validators and the debugger to inspect your code execution. Building User Interaction is the second of five articles that will be compiled in the book, Data Visualization with Flash Builder: Designing RIA and AIR Applications with Remote Data Sources. Each full-color article illustrates specific aspects of Flash Builder data visualization

  7. Interaction Patterns and Facilitation of Peer Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Marvin E.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Data show that giving information to members of a group is more important in determining the perception by others that the person is facilitating group performance. Asking for information and opinions is more important in actual facilitation of group learning. Social-emotional support becomes important after initial phases of group interaction.…

  8. Linked data and user interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Cervone, H Frank

    2015-01-01

    This collection of research papers provides extensive information on deploying services, concepts, and approaches for using open linked data from libraries and other cultural heritage institutions. With a special emphasis on how libraries and other cultural heritage institutions can create effective end user interfaces using open, linked data or other datasets. These papers are essential reading for any one interesting in user interface design or the semantic web.

  9. Barriers and Facilitators to Community Mobility for Assistive Technology Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Layton

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobility is frequently described in terms of individual body function and structures however contemporary views of disability also recognise the role of environment in creating disability. Aim. To identify consumer perspectives regarding barriers and facilitators to optimal mobility for a heterogeneous population of impaired Victorians who use assistive technology in their daily lives. Method. An accessible survey investigated the impact of supports or facilitators upon actual and desired life outcomes and health-related quality of life, from 100 AT users in Victoria, Australia. This paper reports upon data pertaining to community mobility. Results. A range of barriers and enablers to community mobility were identified including access to AT devices, environmental interventions, public transport, and inclusive community environs. Substantial levels of unmet need result in limited personal mobility and community participation. Outcomes fall short of many principles enshrined in current policy and human rights frameworks. Conclusion. AT devices as well as accessible and inclusive home and community environs are essential to maximizing mobility for many. Given the impact of the environment upon the capacity of individuals to realise community mobility, this raises the question as to whether rehabilitation practitioners, as well as prescribing AT devices, should work to build accessible communities via systemic advocacy.

  10. Social Television and User Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cesar Garcia, P.S.; Chorianopoulos, K.; Jensen, J.F.

    2008-01-01

    At first glance, the notion of social interactive television seems to be a tautology. Television watching has always been a social activity. People watch television together in their living rooms, and outside their homes they talk about last night's football match; and even call each other to recomm

  11. Facilitating Discourse Analysis with Interactive Visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian; Chevalier, F; Collins, C; Balakrishnan, R

    2012-12-01

    A discourse parser is a natural language processing system which can represent the organization of a document based on a rhetorical structure tree-one of the key data structures enabling applications such as text summarization, question answering and dialogue generation. Computational linguistics researchers currently rely on manually exploring and comparing the discourse structures to get intuitions for improving parsing algorithms. In this paper, we present DAViewer, an interactive visualization system for assisting computational linguistics researchers to explore, compare, evaluate and annotate the results of discourse parsers. An iterative user-centered design process with domain experts was conducted in the development of DAViewer. We report the results of an informal formative study of the system to better understand how the proposed visualization and interaction techniques are used in the real research environment.

  12. Designing Creative User Interactions for Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yi-Chun; Clinton, Gregory; Rieber, Lloyd P.

    2014-01-01

    Profitable creative ideas can emerge from within virtually any phase of the instructional design and development process. However, the design of user interactions is perhaps where learners can most directly experience the benefits of such ideas. In this article, the authors discuss principles of learner interaction as found in the instructional…

  13. User producer interaction in context: a classification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nahuis, Roel; Moors, Ellen; Smits, Ruud

    2009-01-01

    Science, Technology and Innovation Studies show that intensified user producer interaction (UPI) increases chances for successful innovations, especially in the case of emerging technology. It is not always clear, however, what type of interaction is necessary in a particular context. This paper pro

  14. Designing Creative User Interactions for Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yi-Chun; Clinton, Gregory; Rieber, Lloyd P.

    2014-01-01

    Profitable creative ideas can emerge from within virtually any phase of the instructional design and development process. However, the design of user interactions is perhaps where learners can most directly experience the benefits of such ideas. In this article, the authors discuss principles of learner interaction as found in the instructional…

  15. DockingApp: a user friendly interface for facilitated docking simulations with AutoDock Vina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Muzio, Elena; Toti, Daniele; Polticelli, Fabio

    2017-02-01

    Molecular docking is a powerful technique that helps uncover the structural and energetic bases of the interaction between macromolecules and substrates, endogenous and exogenous ligands, and inhibitors. Moreover, this technique plays a pivotal role in accelerating the screening of large libraries of compounds for drug development purposes. The need to promote community-driven drug development efforts, especially as far as neglected diseases are concerned, calls for user-friendly tools to allow non-expert users to exploit the full potential of molecular docking. Along this path, here is described the implementation of DockingApp, a freely available, extremely user-friendly, platform-independent application for performing docking simulations and virtual screening tasks using AutoDock Vina. DockingApp sports an intuitive graphical user interface which greatly facilitates both the input phase and the analysis of the results, which can be visualized in graphical form using the embedded JMol applet. The application comes with the DrugBank set of more than 1400 ready-to-dock, FDA-approved drugs, to facilitate virtual screening and drug repurposing initiatives. Furthermore, other databases of compounds such as ZINC, available also in AutoDock format, can be readily and easily plugged in.

  16. DockingApp: a user friendly interface for facilitated docking simulations with AutoDock Vina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Muzio, Elena; Toti, Daniele; Polticelli, Fabio

    2017-02-01

    Molecular docking is a powerful technique that helps uncover the structural and energetic bases of the interaction between macromolecules and substrates, endogenous and exogenous ligands, and inhibitors. Moreover, this technique plays a pivotal role in accelerating the screening of large libraries of compounds for drug development purposes. The need to promote community-driven drug development efforts, especially as far as neglected diseases are concerned, calls for user-friendly tools to allow non-expert users to exploit the full potential of molecular docking. Along this path, here is described the implementation of DockingApp, a freely available, extremely user-friendly, platform-independent application for performing docking simulations and virtual screening tasks using AutoDock Vina. DockingApp sports an intuitive graphical user interface which greatly facilitates both the input phase and the analysis of the results, which can be visualized in graphical form using the embedded JMol applet. The application comes with the DrugBank set of more than 1400 ready-to-dock, FDA-approved drugs, to facilitate virtual screening and drug repurposing initiatives. Furthermore, other databases of compounds such as ZINC, available also in AutoDock format, can be readily and easily plugged in.

  17. DockingApp: a user friendly interface for facilitated docking simulations with AutoDock Vina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Muzio, Elena; Toti, Daniele; Polticelli, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Molecular docking is a powerful technique that helps uncover the structural and energetic bases of the interaction between macromolecules and substrates, endogenous and exogenous ligands, and inhibitors. Moreover, this technique plays a pivotal role in accelerating the screening of large libraries of compounds for drug development purposes. The need to promote community-driven drug development efforts, especially as far as neglected diseases are concerned, calls for user-friendly tools to allow non-expert users to exploit the full potential of molecular docking. Along this path, here is described the implementation of DockingApp, a freely available, extremely user-friendly, platform-independent application for performing docking simulations and virtual screening tasks using AutoDock Vina. DockingApp sports an intuitive graphical user interface which greatly facilitates both the input phase and the analysis of the results, which can be visualized in graphical form using the embedded JMol applet. The application comes with the DrugBank set of more than 1400 ready-to-dock, FDA-approved drugs, to facilitate virtual screening and drug repurposing initiatives. Furthermore, other databases of compounds such as ZINC, available also in AutoDock format, can be readily and easily plugged in.

  18. User localization during human-robot interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Martín, F; Gorostiza, Javi F; Malfaz, María; Salichs, Miguel A

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a user localization system based on the fusion of visual information and sound source localization, implemented on a social robot called Maggie. One of the main requisites to obtain a natural interaction between human-human and human-robot is an adequate spatial situation between the interlocutors, that is, to be orientated and situated at the right distance during the conversation in order to have a satisfactory communicative process. Our social robot uses a complete multimodal dialog system which manages the user-robot interaction during the communicative process. One of its main components is the presented user localization system. To determine the most suitable allocation of the robot in relation to the user, a proxemic study of the human-robot interaction is required, which is described in this paper. The study has been made with two groups of users: children, aged between 8 and 17, and adults. Finally, at the end of the paper, experimental results with the proposed multimodal dialog system are presented.

  19. User Localization During Human-Robot Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A. Salichs

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a user localization system based on the fusion of visual information and sound source localization, implemented on a social robot called Maggie. One of the main requisites to obtain a natural interaction between human-human and human-robot is an adequate spatial situation between the interlocutors, that is, to be orientated and situated at the right distance during the conversation in order to have a satisfactory communicative process. Our social robot uses a complete multimodal dialog system which manages the user-robot interaction during the communicative process. One of its main components is the presented user localization system. To determine the most suitable allocation of the robot in relation to the user, a proxemic study of the human-robot interaction is required, which is described in this paper. The study has been made with two groups of users: children, aged between 8 and 17, and adults. Finally, at the end of the paper, experimental results with the proposed multimodal dialog system are presented.

  20. Modeling Users' Experiences with Interactive Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Karapanos, Evangelos

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade the field of Human-Computer Interaction has evolved from the study of the usability of interactive products towards a more holistic understanding of how they may mediate desired human experiences.  This book identifies the notion of diversity in usersʼ experiences with interactive products and proposes methods and tools for modeling this along two levels: (a) interpersonal diversity in usersʽ responses to early conceptual designs, and (b) the dynamics of usersʼ experiences over time. The Repertory Grid Technique is proposed as an alternative to standardized psychometric scales for modeling interpersonal diversity in usersʼ responses to early concepts in the design process, and new Multi-Dimensional Scaling procedures are introduced for modeling such complex quantitative data. iScale, a tool for the retrospective assessment of usersʼ experiences over time is proposed as an alternative to longitudinal field studies, and a semi-automated technique for the analysis of the elicited exper...

  1. Multimedia Interaction and Intelligent User Interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Shao, Ling; Luo, Jiebo; Etoh, Minoru

    2010-01-01

    Consumer electronics (CE) devices, providing multimedia entertainment and enabling communication, have become ubiquitous in daily life. However, consumer interaction with such equipment currently requires the use of devices such as remote controls and keyboards, which are often inconvenient, ambiguous and non-interactive. An important challenge for the modern CE industry is the design of user interfaces for CE products that enable interactions which are natural, intuitive and fun. As many CE products are supplied with microphones and cameras, the exploitation of both audio and visual informati

  2. 112 fadama users group characteristics that influence facilitators ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-03-01

    Mar 1, 2010 ... cultivation, mono cropping, mixed cropping ... Nigeria into three regions based on ecological .... realized by using the logit regression model. ... extension performance (Leonard, 1977). The .... This implies negative effect on effective role ..... Fadama users group variable. Estimated. Standard error. R-value.

  3. How Coursebook Teaching Materials Facilitate English Classroom Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王卉

    2013-01-01

    As classroom interaction forms the basis of any interactive language classroom, it is thus very important and valuable for language teacher to investigate. And This article attempts to account for how the teaching materials facilitate classroom interac-tion.

  4. Requirements for user interaction support in future CACE environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ole; Szymkat, M.

    1994-01-01

    Based on a review of user interaction modes and the specific needs of the CACE domain the paper describes requirements for user interaction in future CACE environments. Taking another look at the design process in CACE key areas in need of more user interaction support are pointed out. Three...

  5. Small Interactive Image Processing System (SMIPS) users manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moik, J. G.

    1973-01-01

    The Small Interactive Image Processing System (SMIP) is designed to facilitate the acquisition, digital processing and recording of image data as well as pattern recognition in an interactive mode. Objectives of the system are ease of communication with the computer by personnel who are not expert programmers, fast response to requests for information on pictures, complete error recovery as well as simplification of future programming efforts for extension of the system. The SMIP system is intended for operation under OS/MVT on an IBM 360/75 or 91 computer equipped with the IBM-2250 Model 1 display unit. This terminal is used as an interface between user and main computer. It has an alphanumeric keyboard, a programmed function keyboard and a light pen which are used for specification of input to the system. Output from the system is displayed on the screen as messages and pictures.

  6. Simulating heterogeneous user behaviors to interact with conversational interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David GRIOL

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Research in techniques to simulate users has a long history within the fields of language processing, speech technologies and conversational interfaces. In this paper, we describe a technique to develop heterogeneous user models that are able to interact with this kind of interfaces. By means of simulated users, it is possible not only to automatically evaluate the overall operation of a conversational interface, but also to assess the impact of the user responses on the decisions that are selected by the system. The selection of the user responses by the simulated user are based on a statistical model that considers the complete history of the interaction to carry out this selection. We describe this technique and its practical application to measure the influence of the most important user's features characteristics that affect the interaction of the simulated user with the a conversational interface.

  7. Interaction between libraries and library users on Facebook

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, DYT; Maxwell, W.; Li, WZS; Tang, LLC; Chu, SKW

    2011-01-01

    This study adopts the mixed method research design to investigate the interaction between libraries and library users on Facebook. The research objectives are: (1) To find out the performance of Facebook as a tool for interaction between libraries and library users; (2) To find out the differences in using Facebook to interact with library users between libraries in two regions: English-speaking countries and Greater China; (3) To find out the differences between academic and public libraries...

  8. Users' perspectives of barriers and facilitators to implementing EHR in Canada: A study protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Shaw, Nicola; Sicotte, Claude; Mathieu, Luc; Leduc, Yvan; Duplantie, Julie; Maclean, James; Légaré, France

    2009-01-01

    Background In Canada, federal, provincial, and territorial governments are developing an ambitious project to implement an interoperable electronic health record (EHR). Benefits for patients, healthcare professionals, organizations, and the public in general are expected. However, adoption of an interoperable EHR remains an important issue because many previous EHR projects have failed due to the lack of integration into practices and organizations. Furthermore, perceptions of the EHR vary between end-user groups, adding to the complexity of implementing this technology. Our aim is to produce a comprehensive synthesis of actual knowledge on the barriers and facilitators influencing the adoption of an interoperable EHR among its various users and beneficiaries. Methods First, we will conduct a comprehensive review of the scientific literature and other published documentation on the barriers and facilitators to the implementation of the EHR. Standardized literature search and data extraction methods will be used. Studies' quality and relevance to inform decisions on EHR implementation will be assessed. For each group of EHR users identified, barriers and facilitators will be categorized and compiled using narrative synthesis and meta-analytical techniques. The principal factors identified for each group of EHR users will then be validated for its applicability to various Canadian contexts through a two-round Delphi study, involving representatives from each end-user groups. Continuous exchanges with decision makers and periodic knowledge transfer activities are planned to facilitate the dissemination and utilization of research results in policies regarding the implementation of EHR in the Canadian healthcare system. Discussion Given the imminence of an interoperable EHR in Canada, knowledge and evidence are urgently needed to prepare this major shift in our healthcare system and to oversee the factors that could affect its adoption and integration by all its

  9. Users' perspectives of barriers and facilitators to implementing EHR in Canada: A study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duplantie Julie

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Canada, federal, provincial, and territorial governments are developing an ambitious project to implement an interoperable electronic health record (EHR. Benefits for patients, healthcare professionals, organizations, and the public in general are expected. However, adoption of an interoperable EHR remains an important issue because many previous EHR projects have failed due to the lack of integration into practices and organizations. Furthermore, perceptions of the EHR vary between end-user groups, adding to the complexity of implementing this technology. Our aim is to produce a comprehensive synthesis of actual knowledge on the barriers and facilitators influencing the adoption of an interoperable EHR among its various users and beneficiaries. Methods First, we will conduct a comprehensive review of the scientific literature and other published documentation on the barriers and facilitators to the implementation of the EHR. Standardized literature search and data extraction methods will be used. Studies' quality and relevance to inform decisions on EHR implementation will be assessed. For each group of EHR users identified, barriers and facilitators will be categorized and compiled using narrative synthesis and meta-analytical techniques. The principal factors identified for each group of EHR users will then be validated for its applicability to various Canadian contexts through a two-round Delphi study, involving representatives from each end-user groups. Continuous exchanges with decision makers and periodic knowledge transfer activities are planned to facilitate the dissemination and utilization of research results in policies regarding the implementation of EHR in the Canadian healthcare system. Discussion Given the imminence of an interoperable EHR in Canada, knowledge and evidence are urgently needed to prepare this major shift in our healthcare system and to oversee the factors that could affect its adoption and

  10. Finding Waldo: Learning about Users from their Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Eli T; Ottley, Alvitta; Zhao, Helen; Quan Lin; Souvenir, Richard; Endert, Alex; Chang, Remco

    2014-12-01

    Visual analytics is inherently a collaboration between human and computer. However, in current visual analytics systems, the computer has limited means of knowing about its users and their analysis processes. While existing research has shown that a user's interactions with a system reflect a large amount of the user's reasoning process, there has been limited advancement in developing automated, real-time techniques that mine interactions to learn about the user. In this paper, we demonstrate that we can accurately predict a user's task performance and infer some user personality traits by using machine learning techniques to analyze interaction data. Specifically, we conduct an experiment in which participants perform a visual search task, and apply well-known machine learning algorithms to three encodings of the users' interaction data. We achieve, depending on algorithm and encoding, between 62% and 83% accuracy at predicting whether each user will be fast or slow at completing the task. Beyond predicting performance, we demonstrate that using the same techniques, we can infer aspects of the user's personality factors, including locus of control, extraversion, and neuroticism. Further analyses show that strong results can be attained with limited observation time: in one case 95% of the final accuracy is gained after a quarter of the average task completion time. Overall, our findings show that interactions can provide information to the computer about its human collaborator, and establish a foundation for realizing mixed-initiative visual analytics systems.

  11. Recovery from mental illness: a service user perspective on facilitators and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Kirsten Schultz; Friis, Vivi Soegaard; Haxholm, Birthe Lodahl; Nielsen, Claus Vinther; Wind, Gitte

    2015-01-01

    Mental health services strive to implement a recovery-oriented approach to rehabilitation. Little is known about service users' perception of the recovery approach. The aim is to explore the service user's perspectives on facilitators and barriers associated with recovery. Twelve residents living in supported housing services are interviewed. The analysis is guided by a phenomenological-hermeneutic approach and the interpretation involves theories from critical theory, sociology, and learning. Learning, social relations, and willpower are identified as having an impact on recovery. Stigmatization and social barriers occurred. Social relations to peer residents and staff were reported as potentially having a positive and negative impact on recovery. Studies have explored the user's perspectives on recovery but this study contributes with knowledge on how recovery-oriented services have an impact on recovery.

  12. Identifying User Experience Goals for Interactive Climate Management Business Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents findings from interpretative phenomenological interviews about the user experience of interactive climate management with six growers and crop consultants. The focus of user experience research has been on quantitative studies of consumers’ initial usage experiences, for example...... of mobile phones or e-commerce websites. In contrast, this empirical paper provides an example of how to capture user experience in work contexts and with a qualitative methodology. We present a model of the essence of the emotional user experience of interactive climate management. Then we suggest...

  13. Facilitative and antagonistic interactions between plant viruses in mixed infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syller, Jerzy

    2012-02-01

    Mixed infections of plant viruses are common in nature, and a number of important virus diseases of plants are the outcomes of interactions between causative agents. Multiple infections lead to a variety of intrahost virus-virus interactions, many of which may result in the generation of variants showing novel genetic features, and thus change the genetic structure of the viral population. Hence, virus-virus interactions in plants may be of crucial significance for the understanding of viral pathogenesis and evolution, and consequently for the development of efficient and stable control strategies. The interactions between plant viruses in mixed infections are generally categorized as synergistic or antagonistic. Moreover, mixtures of synergistic and antagonistic interactions, creating usually unpredictable biological and epidemiological consequences, are likely to occur in plants. The mechanisms of some of these are still unknown. This review aims to bring together the current knowledge on the most commonly occurring facilitative and antagonistic interactions between related or unrelated viruses infecting the same host plant. The best characterized implications of these interactions for virus-vector-host relationships are included. The terms 'synergism' and 'helper dependence' for facilitative virus-virus interactions, and 'cross-protection' and 'mutual exclusion' for antagonistic interactions, are applied in this article.

  14. Aesthetics, Usefulness and Performance in User--Search-Engine Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Adi

    2010-01-01

    Issues of visual appeal have become an integral part of designing interactive systems. Interface aesthetics may form users' attitudes towards computer applications and information technology. Aesthetics can affect user satisfaction, and influence their willingness to buy or adopt a system. This study follows previous studies that found that users…

  15. ETP Modelling. Intuitive User interaction. Overview 2011-2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp, J.B.F. van; Maanen, P.P. van; Venrooij, W.; Calvert, S.C.; Beurden, M.H.P.H. van

    2014-01-01

    Intuitive User Interaction aims to develop the next generation user interfaces required to grant experts and laymen access to complex models and large amount of data in design and decision processes and therewith to contribute to the ambition to broaden the applicability of models. Important topics

  16. The user in interactive information retrieval evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingwersen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    ) Request types, test persons, task-based simulations of search situations and relevance or performance measures in IIR; 2) Ultra-Light Interactive IR experiments; 3) Interactive-Light IR studies; and 4) Naturalistic field investigations of IIR. The chapter concludes with a summary section, a reference list...

  17. Playful user interfaces interfaces that invite social and physical interaction

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    The book is about user interfaces to applications that have been designed for social and physical interaction. The interfaces are ‘playful’, that is, users feel challenged to engage in social and physical interaction because that will be fun. The topics that will be present in this book are interactive playgrounds, urban games using mobiles, sensor-equipped environments for playing, child-computer interaction, tangible game interfaces, interactive tabletop technology and applications, full-body interaction, exertion games, persuasion, engagement, evaluation, and user experience. Readers of the book will not only get a survey of state-of-the-art research in these areas, but the chapters in this book will also provide a vision of the future where playful interfaces will be ubiquitous, that is, present and integrated in home, office, recreational, sports and urban environments, emphasizing that in the future in these environments game elements will be integrated and welcomed.

  18. Public procurement of innovation; endogenous institutions in user producer interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjaltadóttir, Rannveig Edda

    2013-01-01

    and the participants in this interaction need a common code of communication to efficiently work together. The institutions that govern user-producer interaction have therefore been seen as a possible explanation for success or failure in public procurement of innovation. Endogenous institutions were found......This article sets out to explore endogenous institutions as the rules that govern the interaction between users and producers in public procurement of innovation in a regional context. It further aims to study how this interaction influences the results of the procurement process by investigating...... possible institutional barriers and what can be done to fence against them. The article addresses the question: How do endogenous institutions in the context of user-producer interaction affect performance in public procurement of innovation? Innovation is an interactive learning process...

  19. A taxonomy for user-healthcare robot interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bzura, Conrad; Im, Hosung; Liu, Tammy; Malehorn, Kevin; Padir, Taskin; Tulu, Bengisu

    2012-01-01

    This paper evaluates existing taxonomies aimed at characterizing the interaction between robots and their users and modifies them for health care applications. The modifications are based on existing robot technologies and user acceptance of robotics. Characterization of the user, or in this case the patient, is a primary focus of the paper, as they present a unique new role as robot users. While therapeutic and monitoring-related applications for robots are still relatively uncommon, we believe they will begin to grow and thus it is important that the spurring relationship between robot and patient is well understood.

  20. Utilizing Implicit User Feedback to Improve Interactive Video Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanos Vrochidis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an approach to exploit the implicit user feedback gathered during interactive video retrieval tasks. We propose a framework, where the video is first indexed according to temporal, textual, and visual features and then implicit user feedback analysis is realized using a graph-based methodology. The generated graph encodes the semantic relations between video segments based on past user interaction and is subsequently used to generate recommendations. Moreover, we combine the visual features and implicit feedback information by training a support vector machine classifier with examples generated from the aforementioned graph in order to optimize the query by visual example search. The proposed framework is evaluated by conducting real-user experiments. The results demonstrate that significant improvement in terms of precision and recall is reported after the exploitation of implicit user feedback, while an improved ranking is presented in most of the evaluated queries by visual example.

  1. Enhancing User Interaction on the Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulantelli, G.; Corrao, R.; Munna, G.

    This paper reports on the design strategies and technical solutions that the authors have adopted to increase interaction in a World Wide Web-Based Instruction (WBI) system aimed at supporting new didactic approaches to the subjects of urban planning and architecture through the activation of online modules at the university level. Specifically,…

  2. User-centered design and interactive health technologies for patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vito Dabbs, Annette; Myers, Brad A; Mc Curry, Kenneth R; Dunbar-Jacob, Jacqueline; Hawkins, Robert P; Begey, Alex; Dew, Mary Amanda

    2009-01-01

    Despite recommendations that patients be involved in the design and testing of health technologies, few reports describe how to involve patients in systematic and meaningful ways to ensure that applications are customized to meet their needs. User-centered design is an approach that involves end users throughout the development process so that technologies support tasks, are easy to operate, and are of value to users. In this article, we provide an overview of user-centered design and use the development of Pocket Personal Assistant for Tracking Health (Pocket PATH) to illustrate how these principles and techniques were applied to involve patients in the development of this interactive health technology. Involving patient-users in the design and testing ensured functionality and usability, therefore increasing the likelihood of promoting the intended health outcomes.

  3. Applying a User-Centered Approach to Interactive Visualisation Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassink, Ingo; Kulyk, Olga; van Dijk, Betsy; van der Veer, Gerrit; van der Vet, Paul

    Analysing users in their context of work and finding out how and why they use different information resources is essential to provide interactive visualisation systems that match their goals and needs. Designers should actively involve the intended users throughout the whole process. This chapter presents a user-centered approach for the design of interactive visualisation systems. We describe three phases of the iterative visualisation design process: the early envisioning phase, the global specification phase, and the detailed specification phase. The whole design cycle is repeated until some criterion of success is reached. We discuss different techniques for the analysis of users, their tasks and domain. Subsequently, the design of prototypes and evaluation methods in visualisation practice are presented. Finally, we discuss the practical challenges in design and evaluation of collaborative visualisation environments. Our own case studies and those of others are used throughout the whole chapter to illustrate various approaches.

  4. Finding Waldo: Learning about Users from their Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Eli T.; Ottley, Alvitta; Zhao, Helen; Lin, Quan; Souvenir, Richard; Endert, Alex; Chang, Remco

    2014-12-31

    Visual analytics is inherently a collaboration between human and computer. However, in current visual analytics systems, the computer has limited means of knowing about its users and their analysis processes. While existing research has shown that a user’s interactions with a system reflect a large amount of the user’s reasoning process, there has been limited advancement in developing automated, real-time techniques that mine interactions to learn about the user. In this paper, we demonstrate that we can accurately predict a user’s task performance and infer some user personality traits by using machine learning techniques to analyze interaction data. Specifically, we conduct an experiment in which participants perform a visual search task and we apply well-known machine learning algorithms to three encodings of the users interaction data. We achieve, depending on algorithm and encoding, between 62% and 96% accuracy at predicting whether each user will be fast or slow at completing the task. Beyond predicting performance, we demonstrate that using the same techniques, we can infer aspects of the user’s personality factors, including locus of control, extraversion, and neuroticism. Further analyses show that strong results can be attained with limited observation time, in some cases, 82% of the final accuracy is gained after a quarter of the average task completion time. Overall, our findings show that interactions can provide information to the computer about its human collaborator, and establish a foundation for realizing mixed- initiative visual analytics systems.

  5. Audiotactile interaction can change over time in cochlear implant users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Pierre Landry

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent results suggest that audiotactile interactions are disturbed in cochlear implant (CI users. However, further exploration regarding the factors responsible for such abnormal sensory processing is still required. Considering the temporal nature of a previously used multisensory task, it remains unclear whether any aberrant results were caused by the specificity of the interaction studied or rather if it reflects an overall abnormal interaction. Moreover, although duration of experience with a CI has often been linked with the recovery of auditory functions, its impact on multisensory performance remains uncertain. In the present study, we used the parchment-skin illusion, a robust illustration of sound-biased perception of touch based on changes in auditory frequencies, to investigate the specificities of audiotactile interactions in CI users. Whereas individuals with relatively little experience with the CI performed similarly to the control group, experienced CI users showed a significantly greater illusory percept. The overall results suggest that despite being able to ignore auditory distractors in a temporal audiotactile task, CI users develop to become greatly influenced by auditory input in a spectral audiotactile task. When considered with the existing body of research, these results confirm that normal sensory interaction processing can be compromised in CI users.

  6. Graphical User Interface Color Display Animation Interaction Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1999-10-05

    The Nuclear Plant Analyzer (NPA) is a highly flexible graphical user interface for displaying the results of a calculation, typically generated by RELAP5 or other code. This display consists of one or more picture, called masks, that mimic the host code input. This mask can be animated to display user-specified code output information mapped as colors, dials, moving arrows, etc., on the mask. The user can also interact with the control systems of the host input file as the execution progresses, thereby controlling aspects of the calculation. The Computer Visual System (CVS) creates, edits, and animates the the masks for use in the NPA.

  7. Data Mining to Facilitate Effective User Navigation and Improve Structure of a Website

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Mohod,

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Now a days for a company it is very important to have active presence on web to become successful in electronic market. This requirement is fulfilled by an interactive website of a company. Website can be used to sell goods, maintain customer relationships, promotion of goods. By looking at the customer's response towards website we can decide campaign for future products and services. So for this website should be interactive and must be used by user by the way designer wants to. So, it is very important to study navigational behavior of a customer. By analyzing the web logs which records the navigational activity of the customer we can get several sequential patterns which helps us to study whether user is pursuing site's goal or not. Sequences are analyzed with WUM (Web Utilization Miner which gives g-sequence (Generalized Sequence and aggregate tree as an output. On the basis of the structure that is given by WUM, conclusions are studied and it is decided whether site structure needs improvement; The improvements suggested should be minimum but at the same time site should satisfy business goal. A mathematical programming model is used which suggest minimum improvements to site. Improvements which tends to change structure of site are avoided as it may be confusing for old site user.

  8. Facilitating interaction, communication and collaboration in online courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Sara G.; Robin, Bernard R.; Miller, Robert M.

    2000-07-01

    As the Internet evolves into a truly world wide communications medium, the roles of faculty and students at institutions of higher learning are changing. Traditional face-to-face classes are being converted to an online setting, where materials from syllabi to lectures to assignments are available at the click of a mouse. New technological options are challenging and changing the very nature of teaching as faculty migrate from being deliverers of information to facilitators and mentors. Students are also undergoing a transformation from passive recipients to participants in an active learning environment. Interactions are at the heart of this revolution as students and faculty create new methodologies for the online classroom. New types of interactions are emerging between faculty and students, between students and other students and between students and the educational resources they are exploring. As the online teaching and learning environment expands and matures, new social and instructional interactions are replacing the traditional occurrences in face-to-face classrooms. New communication options are also evolving as a critical component of the online classroom. The shift from a synchronous to an asynchronous communication structure has also had a significant impact on the way students and faculty interact. The use of e-mail, listservs and web-based conferencing has given teachers and learners new flexibility and has fostered a climate where learning takes place wherever and whenever it is convenient. HyperGroups, a communication tool that was developed at the University of Houston, allows students and faculty to seamlessly participate in course-related discussions and easily share multimedia resources. This article explores the many issues associated with facilitating interaction, communication and collaboration in online courses.

  9. Effective user guidance in online interactive semantic segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Jens; Bendszus, Martin; Debus, Jürgen; Heiland, Sabine; Maier-Hein, Klaus H.

    2017-03-01

    With the recent success of machine learning based solutions for automatic image parsing, the availability of reference image annotations for algorithm training is one of the major bottlenecks in medical image segmentation. We are interested in interactive semantic segmentation methods that can be used in an online fashion to generate expert segmentations. These can be used to train automated segmentation techniques or, from an application perspective, for quick and accurate tumor progression monitoring. Using simulated user interactions in a MRI glioblastoma segmentation task, we show that if the user possesses knowledge of the correct segmentation it is significantly (p <= 0.009) better to present data and current segmentation to the user in such a manner that they can easily identify falsely classified regions compared to guiding the user to regions where the classifier exhibits high uncertainty, resulting in differences of mean Dice scores between +0.070 (Whole tumor) and +0.136 (Tumor Core) after 20 iterations. The annotation process should cover all classes equally, which results in a significant (p <= 0.002) improvement compared to completely random annotations anywhere in falsely classified regions for small tumor regions such as the necrotic tumor core (mean Dice +0.151 after 20 it.) and non-enhancing abnormalities (mean Dice +0.069 after 20 it.). These findings provide important insights for the development of efficient interactive segmentation systems and user interfaces.

  10. Analysis of User Requirements in Interactive 3D Video Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyue Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent development of three dimensional (3D display technologies has resulted in a proliferation of 3D video production and broadcasting, attracting a lot of research into capture, compression and delivery of stereoscopic content. However, the predominant design practice of interactions with 3D video content has failed to address its differences and possibilities in comparison to the existing 2D video interactions. This paper presents a study of user requirements related to interaction with the stereoscopic 3D video. The study suggests that the change of view, zoom in/out, dynamic video browsing, and textual information are the most relevant interactions with stereoscopic 3D video. In addition, we identified a strong demand for object selection that resulted in a follow-up study of user preferences in 3D selection using virtual-hand and ray-casting metaphors. These results indicate that interaction modality affects users’ decision of object selection in terms of chosen location in 3D, while user attitudes do not have significant impact. Furthermore, the ray-casting-based interaction modality using Wiimote can outperform the volume-based interaction modality using mouse and keyboard for object positioning accuracy.

  11. Does the type of event influence how user interactions evolve on Twitter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena del Val

    Full Text Available The number of people using on-line social networks as a new way of communication is continually increasing. The messages that a user writes in these networks and his/her interactions with other users leave a digital trace that is recorded. Thanks to this fact and the use of network theory, the analysis of messages, user interactions, and the complex structures that emerge is greatly facilitated. In addition, information generated in on-line social networks is labeled temporarily, which makes it possible to go a step further analyzing the dynamics of the interaction patterns. In this article, we present an analysis of the evolution of user interactions that take place in television, socio-political, conference, and keynote events on Twitter. Interactions have been modeled as networks that are annotated with the time markers. We study changes in the structural properties at both the network level and the node level. As a result of this analysis, we have detected patterns of network evolution and common structural features as well as differences among the events.

  12. Learning to Rank for Information Retrieval from User Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmann, K.; Whiteson, S.; Schuth, A.; de Rijke, M.

    2014-01-01

    In this article we give an overview of our recent work on online learning to rank for information retrieval (IR). This work addresses IR from a reinforcement learning (RL) point of view, with the aim to enable systems that can learn directly from interactions with their users. Learning directly from

  13. States and Sound: Modelling User Interactions with Musical Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jeppe Veirum; Knoche, Hendrik

    2017-01-01

    Musical instruments and musical user interfaces provide rich input and feedback through mostly tangible interactions, resulting in complex behavior. However, publications of novel interfaces often lack the required detail due to the complex- ity or the focus on a specific part of the interfaces...

  14. Monitoring User-System Performance in Interactive Retrieval Tasks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boldareva, L.; de Vries, A.P.; Hiemstra, Djoerd

    Monitoring user-system performance in interactive search is a challenging task. Traditional measures of retrieval evaluation, based on recall and precision, are not of any use in real time, for they require a priori knowledge of relevant documents. This paper shows how a Shannon entropy-based

  15. Monitoring user-system performance in interactive retrieval tasks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Boldareva; A.P. de Vries (Arjen); D. Hiemstra

    2004-01-01

    textabstractMonitoring user-system performance in interactive search is a challenging task. Traditional measures of retrieval evaluation, based on recall and precision, are not of any use in real time, for they require a priori knowledge of relevant documents. This paper shows how a Shannon

  16. Playful user interfaces: interfaces that invite social and physical interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Anton

    2014-01-01

    This book is about user interfaces to applications that can be considered as ‘playful’. The interfaces to such applications should be ‘playful’ as well. The application should be fun, and interacting with such an application should, of course, be fun as well. Maybe more. Why not expect that the inte

  17. Monitoring user-system performance in interactive retrieval tasks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boldareva, L.; Vries, A.P. de; Hiemstra, D.

    2004-01-01

    Monitoring user-system performance in interactive search is a challenging task. Traditional measures of retrieval evaluation, based on recall and precision, are not of any use in real time, for they require a priori knowledge of relevant documents. This paper shows how a Shannon entropy-based measur

  18. Interaction Junk: User Interaction-Based Evaluation of Visual Analytic Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endert, Alexander; North, Chris

    2012-10-14

    With the growing need for visualization to aid users in understanding large, complex datasets, the ability for users to interact and explore these datasets is critical. As visual analytic systems have advanced to leverage powerful computational models and data analytics capabilities, the modes by which users engage and interact with the information are limited. Often, users are taxed with directly manipulating parameters of these models through traditional GUIs (e.g., using sliders to directly manipulate the value of a parameter). However, the purpose of user interaction in visual analytic systems is to enable visual data exploration – where users can focus on their task, as opposed to the tool or system. As a result, users can engage freely in data exploration and decision-making, for the purpose of gaining insight. In this position paper, we discuss how evaluating visual analytic systems can be approached through user interaction analysis, where the goal is to minimize the cognitive translation between the visual metaphor and the mode of interaction (i.e., reducing the “Interactionjunk”). We motivate this concept through a discussion of traditional GUIs used in visual analytics for direct manipulation of model parameters, and the importance of designing interactions the support visual data exploration.

  19. Modulation of Cortical Interhemispheric Interactions by Motor Facilitation or Restraint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Vidal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cortical interhemispheric interactions in motor control are still poorly understood and it is important to clarify how these depend on inhibitory/facilitatory limb movements and motor expertise, as reflected by limb dominance. Here we addressed this problem using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and a task involving dominant/nondominant limb mobilization in the presence/absence of contralateral limb restraint. In this way we could modulate excitation/deactivation of the contralateral hemisphere. Blocks of arm elevation were alternated with absent/present restraint of the contralateral limb in 17 participants. We found the expected activation of contralateral sensorimotor cortex and ipsilateral cerebellum during arm elevation. In addition, only the dominant arm elevation (hold period was accompanied by deactivation of ipsilateral sensorimotor cortex, irrespective of presence/absence of contralateral restraint, although the latter increased deactivation. In contrast, the nondominant limb yielded absent deactivation and reduced area of contralateral activation upon restriction. Our results provide evidence for a difference in cortical communication during motor control (action facilitation/inhibition, depending on the “expertise” of the hemisphere that controls action (dominant versus nondominant. These results have relevant implications for the development of facilitation/inhibition strategies in neurorehabilitation, namely, in stroke, given that fMRI deactivations have recently been shown to reflect decreases in neural responses.

  20. Easyplot: An Interactive, User-Friendly Graphics Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-01

    AD-Ali58 779 EASYPLOT: AN INTERACTIVE USER-FRIENDLY GRPHICS PROGRAM 1/2 (U) NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CRRNWRN SP UNCLASSIFIED F/G 9/2 N...log) ar.J thzce-dime nsional (standard) .Graph correction and a-lteraticn dre possible with a ininimu~a oZ effort. The irogram was designed for the...thr-ougi, the design irocess to produce tie desired graph. The irograx is compieteiy int=r- act Ive. it prompts the user "or all ti’e necessary i;f

  1. User-Based Interaction for Content-Based Image Retrieval by Mining User Navigation Patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Srinagesh

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In Internet, Multimedia and Image Databases image searching is a necessity. Content-Based Image Retrieval (CBIR is an approach for image retrieval. With User interaction included in CBIR with Relevance Feedback (RF techniques, the results are obtained by giving more number of iterative feedbacks for large databases is not an efficient method for real- time applications. So, we propose a new approach which converges rapidly and can aptly be called as Navigation Pattern-Based Relevance Feedback (NPRF with User-based interaction mode. We combined NPRF with RF techniques with three concepts viz., query Re-weighting (QR, Query Expansion (QEX and Query Point Movement (QPM. By using, these three techniques efficient results are obtained by giving a small number of feedbacks. The efficiency of the proposed method with results is proved by calculating Precision, Recall and Evaluation measures.

  2. I-Interaction: An Intelligent In-Vehicle User Interaction Model

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Li; 10.5121/iju.2010.1305

    2010-01-01

    The automobile is always a point of interest where new technology has been deployed. Because of this interest, human-vehicle interaction has been an appealing area for much research in recent years. The current in-vehicle design has been improved but still possesses some of the design from the traditional interaction style. In this paper, we propose a new user-oriented model for in-vehicle interaction model known as i-Interaction. The i-Interaction model provides user with an intuitive approach to interact with the In-Vehicle Information System (IVIS) by the keypad entry. It is the intent that the proposed usability testing for this model will help improve the way research and development is implemented from this topic. This model does not only provide the user with a direct interaction in vehicles but also introduce a new prospective that other research has not addressed.

  3. How Good is Your User Experience? Measuring and Designing Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wildner Raimund

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Form and function are important dimensions of consumer choice, but there is more in our increasingly digital world. It is not only products per se that need to be designed but the whole interaction between consumers and brands. The whole UX or user experience is more important than ever before. Digitalism nowadays is everywhere, and even mundane products are becoming more digital (e.g. ovens, while others evolve that are purely digital (e.g. PayPal.

  4. I-Interaction: An Intelligent In-Vehicle User Interaction Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Liu

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The automobile is always a point of interest where new technology has been deployed. Because of thisinterest, human-vehicle interaction has been an appealing area for much research in recent years. Thecurrent in-vehicle design has been improved but still possesses some of the design from the traditionalinteraction style. In this paper, we propose a new user-oriented model for in-vehicle interaction modelknown as i-Interaction. The i-Interaction model provides user with an intuitive approach to interact withthe In-Vehicle Information System (IVIS by the keypad entry. It is the intent that the proposed usabilitytesting for this model will help improve the way research and development is implemented from this topic.This model does not only provide the user with a direct interaction in vehicles but also introduce a newprospective that other research has not addressed.

  5. Installed Base as a Facilitator for User-Driven Innovation: How Can User Innovation Challenge Existing Institutional Barriers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Synnøve Thomassen Andersen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper addresses an ICT-based, user-driven innovation process in the health sector in rural areas in Norway. The empirical base is the introduction of a new model for psychiatric health provision. This model is supported by a technical solution based on mobile phones that is aimed to help the communication between professional health personnel and patients. This innovation was made possible through the use of standard mobile technology rather than more sophisticated systems. The users were heavily involved in the development work. Our analysis shows that by thinking simple and small-scale solutions, including to take the user’s needs and premises as a point of departure rather than focusing on advanced technology, the implementation process was made possible. We show that by combining theory on information infrastructures, user-oriented system development, and innovation in a three-layered analytical framework, we can explain the interrelationship between technical, organizational, and health professional factors that made this innovation a success.

  6. Participation in clinical supervision (PACS): an evaluation of student nurse clinical supervision facilitated by mental health service users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maplethorpe, Fran; Dixon, Julie; Rush, Brenda

    2014-03-01

    This paper discusses an innovative learning approach in which people having experience of mental health services facilitated humanistic clinical supervision with groups of student nurses in the classroom. A four-day course of preparation for the role of supervisor is described and the results of subsequent clinical supervision sessions are analysed. Seven service users who had previous experience of teaching students in the classroom and fifty students on a Diploma/BSc in mental health nursing course participated in the project, which was evaluated through focus groups. The results indicated that the service user supervisors appreciated the skills they had gained on the course and felt that they were more appropriate than lecturers to facilitate clinical supervision sessions. Some students expressed initial uncertainty about the appropriateness of service users as supervisors but as changes to the pedagogical process of supervision were made and the supervisors gained more experience and confidence, students expressed greater satisfaction. The authors conclude that clinical supervision facilitated by service users who have preparation and continual support can add considerable value to the learning experience of student nurses.

  7. Facilitating User Driven Innovation – A Study of Methods and Tools at Herlev Hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fronczek-Munter, Aneta

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To present the preliminary research results of user driven innovation methods at healthcare facilities and their relevance to research and practice. Background/Approach: The paper is based on a case study conducted at the Gynaecologic Department at Herlev Hospital as part of Healthcare...... methods used in planning of new hospital facilities and the experiences with using them in practice to improve usability of the built environment. The study focuses on the initial stages of the design processes, specially ‘user driven innovation’ – the participatory design process in which users...... Innovation Lab, which is a public-private collaboration project testing the simulation and user-driven innovation between users and companies at Hospitals in the Danish Capital Region. The theories presented are user driven innovation, usability and boundary objects. Results: This article presents different...

  8. Facilitating User Driven Innovation – A Study of Methods and Tools at Herlev Hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fronczek-Munter, Aneta

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To present the preliminary research results of user driven innovation methods at healthcare facilities and their relevance to research and practice. Background/Approach: The paper is based on a case study conducted at the Gynaecologic Department at Herlev Hospital as part of Healthcare...... methods used in planning of new hospital facilities and the experiences with using them in practice to improve usability of the built environment. The study focuses on the initial stages of the design processes, specially ‘user driven innovation’ – the participatory design process in which users...... Innovation Lab, which is a public-private collaboration project testing the simulation and user-driven innovation between users and companies at Hospitals in the Danish Capital Region. The theories presented are user driven innovation, usability and boundary objects. Results: This article presents different...

  9. User-Centered Design, Experience, and Usability of an Electronic Consent User Interface to Facilitate Informed Decision-Making in a HIV Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, S Raquel

    2017-05-05

    Health information exchange is the electronic accessibility and transferability of patient medical records across various healthcare settings and providers. In some states, patients have to formally give consent to allow their medical records to be electronically shared. The purpose of this study was to apply a novel user-centered, multistep, multiframework approach to design and test an electronic consent user interface, so patients with HIV can make more informed decisions about electronically sharing their health information. This study consisted of two steps. Step 1 was a cross-sectional, descriptive, qualitative study that used user-centric design interviews to create the user interface. This informed Step 2. Step 2 consisted of a one group posttest to examine perceptions of usefulness, ease of use, preference, and comprehension of a health information exchange electronic consent user interface. More than half of the study population had college experience, but challenges remained with overall comprehension regarding consent. The user interface was not independently successful, suggesting that in addition to an electronic consent user interface, human interaction may also be necessary to address the complexities associated with consenting to electronically share medical records. Comprehension is key factor in the ability to make informed decisions.

  10. Interaction Control Protocols for Distributed Multi-user Multi-camera Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth W Daniel

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Video-centred communication (e.g., video conferencing, multimedia online learning, traffic monitoring, and surveillance is becoming a customary activity in our lives. The management of interactions in such an environment is a complicated HCI issue. In this paper, we present our study on a collection of interaction control protocols for distributed multiuser multi-camera environments. These protocols facilitate different approaches to managing a user's entitlement for controlling a particular camera. We describe a web-based system that allows multiple users to manipulate multiple cameras in varying remote locations. The system was developed using the Java framework, and all protocols discussed have been incorporated into the system. Experiments were designed and conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of these protocols, and to enable the identification of various human factors in a distributed multi-user and multi-camera environment. This work provides an insight into the complexity associated with the interaction management in video-centred communication. It can also serve as a conceptual and experimental framework for further research in this area.

  11. User-interactive electronic skin for instantaneous pressure visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuan; Hwang, David; Yu, Zhibin; Takei, Kuniharu; Park, Junwoo; Chen, Teresa; Ma, Biwu; Javey, Ali

    2013-10-01

    Electronic skin (e-skin) presents a network of mechanically flexible sensors that can conformally wrap irregular surfaces and spatially map and quantify various stimuli. Previous works on e-skin have focused on the optimization of pressure sensors interfaced with an electronic readout, whereas user interfaces based on a human-readable output were not explored. Here, we report the first user-interactive e-skin that not only spatially maps the applied pressure but also provides an instantaneous visual response through a built-in active-matrix organic light-emitting diode display with red, green and blue pixels. In this system, organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are turned on locally where the surface is touched, and the intensity of the emitted light quantifies the magnitude of the applied pressure. This work represents a system-on-plastic demonstration where three distinct electronic components—thin-film transistor, pressure sensor and OLED arrays—are monolithically integrated over large areas on a single plastic substrate. The reported e-skin may find a wide range of applications in interactive input/control devices, smart wallpapers, robotics and medical/health monitoring devices.

  12. A fuzzy method for improving the functionality of search engines based on user's web interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Kabirbeyk

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Web mining has been widely used to discover knowledge from various sources in the web. One of the important tools in web mining is mining of web user’s behavior that is considered as a way to discover the potential knowledge of web user’s interaction. Nowadays, Website personalization is regarded as a popular phenomenon among web users and it plays an important role in facilitating user access and provides information of users’ requirements based on their own interests. Extracting important features about web user behavior plays a significant role in web usage mining. Such features are page visit frequency in each session, visit duration, and dates of visiting a certain pages. This paper presents a method to predict user’s interest and to propose a list of pages based on their interests by identifying user’s behavior based on fuzzy techniques called fuzzy clustering method. Due to the user’s different interests and use of one or more interest at a time, user’s interest may belong to several clusters and fuzzy clustering provide a possible overlap. Using the resulted cluster helps extract fuzzy rules. This helps detecting user’s movement pattern and using neural network a list of suggested pages to the users is provided.

  13. The Holistic, Interactive and Persuasive Model to Facilitate Self-care of Patients with Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Lombard, Miguel; Jipsion, Armando; Vejarano, Rafael; Camargo, Ismael; Álvarez, Humberto; Mora, Elena Villalba; Menasalva Ruíz, Ernestina

    The patient, in his multiple facets of citizen and user of services of health, needs to acquire during, and later in his majority of age, favorable conditions of health to accentuate his quality of life and it is the responsibility of the health organizations to initiate the process of support for that patient during the process of mature life. The provision of services of health and the relation doctor-patient are undergoing important changes in the entire world, forced to a large extent by the indefensibility of the system itself. Nevertheless decision making requires previous information and, what more the necessity itself of being informed requires having a “culture” of health that generates pro activity and the capacity of searching for instruments that facilitate the awareness of the suffering and the self-care of the same. Therefore it is necessary to put into effect a ICT model (hiPAPD) that has the objective of causing Interaction, Motivation and Persuasion towards the surroundings of the diabetic Patient facilitating his self-care. As a result the patient himself individually manages his services through devices and AmI Systems (Ambient Intelligent).

  14. Facilitating Attuned Interactions: Using the FAN Approach to Family Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilkerson, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Erikson Institute's Fussy Baby Network® (FBN) is a national model prevention program known for its approach to family engagement called the FAN (Gilkerson & Gray, 2014; Gilkerson et al., 2012). The FAN is both a conceptual framework and a practical tool to facilitate attunement in helping relationships and promote reflective practice. This…

  15. Memory Facilitation effect in Interaction between Video Clips and Music

    OpenAIRE

    吉岡, 賢治; 岩永, 誠

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies examined memories of video clips under the condition of affects combination of pictures and music. Video clips, which were combined with music in same impressions, were easy to remember their contents. The present study aimed to examine the memory facilitation about pictures in two perspectives, the strength of affects and the distribution of the processing recourses. Participants were 39 undergraduate volunteers, who were divided into three experimental conditions randomly. ...

  16. Interactive Communication in Pharmacogenomics Innovations: User-producer interaction from an innovation and science communication perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeff, R.P.; Moors, E.H.M.; Osseweijer, P.

    2008-01-01

    Pharmacogenomics is a quickly evolving field of research that increasingly impacts individuals and society. As some innovations in biotechnology have experienced strong public opposition during the 1990s, interaction between producers and users of these innovations may help in increasing their succe

  17. Interactive Communication in Pharmacogenomics Innovations: User-producer interaction from an innovation and science communication perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeff, R.P.; Moors, E.H.M.; Osseweijer, P.

    2008-01-01

    Pharmacogenomics is a quickly evolving field of research that increasingly impacts individuals and society. As some innovations in biotechnology have experienced strong public opposition during the 1990s, interaction between producers and users of these innovations may help in increasing their

  18. User-producer Interaction and the Degree of Novelty of Innovations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harirchi, Gouya; Chaminade, Cristina

    User-producer interactions have been traditionally recognized as important for innovation. With the rapid growth of emerging economies’ markets, and an increasing degree of technological sophistication of both users and producers in those markets, user-producer interaction is becoming global...

  19. User-Centric Secure Cross-Site Interaction Framework for Online Social Networking Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Moo Nam

    2011-01-01

    Social networking service is one of major technological phenomena on Web 2.0. Hundreds of millions of users are posting message, photos, and videos on their profiles and interacting with other users, but the sharing and interaction are limited within the same social networking site. Although users can share some content on a social networking site…

  20. FACILITATORS' PERCEPTION OF INTERACTIONS IN AN ONLINE LEARNING PROGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan CALISKAN

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Schools and colleges all around the world have started making use of advanced technology to provide learners effective, efficient and adequate instruction. The use of Internet and Web for learning and teaching has caused many online courses to be offered when teaching-learning activities are required for both students and faculty. The Internet has shown a rapid and important growth in the extent of online education. This has created a new paradigm for teaching and learning that is different from the traditional classroom experience and also different from earlier technology-based attempts (Kearsley, 1998. One of the most important online course components has proven to be interaction, especially learner to learner interaction. Alexander C. lists the top ten ranking components of an optimal online environment, giving peer interaction the first place. Kearsley (1998 also states that discussions among learners are among the most important components. This is not surprising because one of the most important factors in learning appears to be interaction among learners and interaction between instructor and learners. No matter how learning takes place, interaction has always been of great importance so that an effective learning can occur. Especially when instruction is given to learners learning at a distance, this interaction component is of vital importance. Having the lack of social interaction, learners may feel alone and helpless at times they need to get help from someone, especially from their peers taking same course as in any traditional classrooms. Studies suggest that facilitators’ active interactions with students have significant effects on the quality of online distance learning (Thomas, Caswell, Price & Petre, 1998.

  1. Tips for Teachers Selecting Toys to Facilitate Social Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vail, Cynthia O.; Elmore, Shannon Renee

    2011-01-01

    Toy selection is an important role for early childhood teachers. This research-to-practice article describes what research tells us about how toys can affect the social interactions and communication of young children including those with developmental delays.

  2. Asymmetric interaction will facilitate the evolution of cooperation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Explaining the evolution of cooperation remains one of the greatest problems for both biology and social science. The classical theories of cooperation suggest that cooperation equilibrium or evolutionary stable strategy between partners can be maintained through genetic similarity or reciprocity relatedness. These classical theories are based on an assumption that partners interact symmetrically with equal payoffs in a game of cooperation interaction. However, the payoff between partners is usually not equal and therefore they often interact asymmetrically in real cooperative systems. With the Hawk–Dove model, we find that the probability of cooperation between cooperative partners will depend closely on the payoff ratio. The higher the payoff ratio between recipients and cooperative actors, the greater will be the probability of cooperation interaction between involved partners. The greatest probability of conflict between cooperative partners will occur when the payoff between partners is equal. The results show that this asymmetric relationship is one of the key dynamics of the evolution of cooperation, and that pure cooperation strategy (i.e., Nash equilibrium) does not exist in asymmetrical cooperation systems, which well explains the direct conflict observed in almost all of the well documented cooperation systems. The model developed here shows that the cost-to-benefit ratio of cooperation is also negatively correlated with the probability of cooperation interaction. A smaller cost-to-benefit ratio of cooperation might be created by the limited dispersal ability or exit cost of the partners involved, and it will make the punishment of the non-cooperative individuals by the recipient more credible, and therefore make it more possible to maintain stable cooperation interaction.

  3. Ecodriving in hybrid electric vehicles--Exploring challenges for user-energy interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Thomas; Arend, Matthias Georg; McIlroy, Rich C; Stanton, Neville A

    2016-07-01

    Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) can help to reduce transport emissions; however, user behaviour has a significant effect on the energy savings actually achieved in everyday usage. The present research aimed to advance understanding of HEV drivers' ecodriving strategies, and the challenges for optimal user-energy interaction. We conducted interviews with 39 HEV drivers who achieved above-average fuel efficiencies. Regression analyses showed that technical system knowledge and ecodriving motivation were both important predictors for ecodriving efficiency. Qualitative data analyses showed that drivers used a plethora of ecodriving strategies and had diverse conceptualisations of HEV energy efficiency regarding aspects such as the efficiency of actively utilizing electric energy or the efficiency of different acceleration strategies. Drivers also reported several false beliefs regarding HEV energy efficiency that could impair ecodriving efforts. Results indicate that ecodriving support systems should facilitate anticipatory driving and help users locate and maintain drivetrain states of maximum efficiency. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  4. How do users interact with photovoltaic-powered products? Investigating 100 'lead-users' and 6 PV products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apostolou, G.; Reinders, Angelina H.M.E.

    2016-01-01

    In order to better understand how 'lead-users' interact with PV-powered products, the behaviour of 100 people interacting with six different PV-powered products in their daily life was analysed. The sample of respondents to be observed consisted of 20 groups, each one formed by five students of Indu

  5. How do users interact with photovoltaic-powered products? Investigating 100 'lead-users' and 6 PV products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apostolou, G.; Reinders, A.H.M.E.

    2016-01-01

    In order to better understand how 'lead-users' interact with PV-powered products, the behaviour of 100 people interacting with six different PV-powered products in their daily life was analysed. The sample of respondents to be observed consisted of 20 groups, each one formed by five students of Indu

  6. Facilitating Interactivity in an Online Business Writing Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabrito, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Suggests ways of developing an online business writing course that uses technology to simulate features of the face-to-face classroom and that achieves an interactive learning experience for students. Uses the author's online business writing class as an example of one which manages to simulate, through the judicious use of software, the…

  7. Shared Cognition Facilitated by Teacher Use of Interactive Whiteboard Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redman, Christine; Vincent, John

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a study designed to examine the dialogic processes teachers used to sustain focused discussions, using questioning techniques and Interactive Whiteboards (IWBs). IWBs and their related technologies such as plasma touch screens and projected tablets have passed through several phases of implementation as classroom objects,…

  8. Facilitating access to biodiversity information: a survey of users' needs and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Miriam L E Steiner; Tenopir, Carol; Allard, Suzie; Frame, Michael T

    2014-03-01

    Biodiversity information is essential for understanding and managing the environment. However, identifying and providing the forms and types of biodiversity information most needed for research and decision-making is a significant challenge. While research needs and data gaps within particular topics or regions have received substantial attention, other information aspects such as data formats, sources, metadata, and information tools have received little. Focusing on the US southeast, a region of global biodiversity importance, this paper assesses the biodiversity information needs of environmental researchers, managers, and decision makers. Survey results of biodiversity information users' information needs, information-seeking behaviors and preferred information source attributes support previous conclusions that useful biodiversity information must be easily and quickly accessible, available in forms that allow integration and visualization and appropriately matched to users' needs. Survey results concerning additional information aspects suggest successful participation in both the creation and provision of biodiversity information include an increased focus on information search and other tools for data management, discovery, and description.

  9. Antenna-User Interaction in MIMO-Enabled Laptops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Rahmat-Samii

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The operation of wireless personal communication terminals very close to the user inherently faces the problem of electromagnetic (EM coupling between the device and the biological tissues. In this paper the effects of the electromagnetic antenna-human interaction is studied for a laptop MIMO antenna system, where four integrated antenna elements can operate simultaneously. Two points of view are considered: antenna performance and EM dosimetry. The first one addresses not only the degradation of the antenna performance but includes also the effect of the human proximity on the antenna characteristics, namely scattering matrix, Total Active Reflection Coefficient (TARC, radiation efficiency and envelope correlation between port signals. The exposure of the human tissues to EM radiation is expressed in terms of Specific Absorption Rate (SAR. These characteristics are evaluated as a function of the array excitation scheme (including phased array approach and MIMO-like signaling and compared to simple scenarios where all the power is radiated only by one antenna element.

  10. Towards a temporal network analysis of interactive WiFi users

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Yi-Qing; Li, Xiang; 10.1209/0295-5075/98/68002

    2012-01-01

    Complex networks are used to depict topological features of complex systems. The structure of a network characterizes the interactions among elements of the system, and facilitates the study of many dynamical processes taking place on it. In previous investigations, the topological infrastructure underlying dynamical systems is simplified as a static and invariable skeleton. However, this assumption cannot cover the temporal features of many time-evolution networks, whose components are evolving and mutating. In this letter, utilizing the log data of WiFi users in a Chinese university campus, we infuse the temporal dimension into the construction of dynamical human contact network. By quantitative comparison with the traditional aggregation approach, we find that the temporal contact network differs in many features, e.g., the reachability, the path length distribution. We conclude that the correlation between temporal path length and duration is not only determined by their definitions, but also influenced b...

  11. Data Quality Parameters and Web Services Facilitate User Access to Research-Ready Seismic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabant, C. M.; Templeton, M. E.; Van Fossen, M.; Weertman, B.; Ahern, T. K.; Casey, R. E.; Keyson, L.; Sharer, G.

    2016-12-01

    IRIS Data Services has the mission of providing efficient access to a wide variety of seismic and related geoscience data to the user community. With our vast archive of freely available data, we recognize that there is a constant challenge to provide data to scientists and students that are of a consistently useful level of quality. To address this issue, we began by undertaking a comprehensive survey of the data and generating metrics measurements that provide estimates of data quality. These measurements can inform the scientist of the level of suitability of a given set of data for their scientific investigation. They also serve as a quality assurance check for network operators, who can act on this information to improve their current recording or mitigate issues with already recorded data and metadata. Following this effort, IRIS Data Services is moving forward to focus on providing tools for the scientist that make it easier to access data of a quality and characteristic that suits their investigation. Data that fulfill this criterion are termed "research-ready". In addition to filtering data by type, geographic location, proximity to events, and specific time ranges, we will offer the ability to filter data based on specific quality assessments. These include signal-to-noise ratio measurements, data continuity, timing quality, absence of channel cross-talk, and potentially many other factors. Our goal is to ensure that the user receives only the data that meets their specifications and will not require extensive review and culling after delivery. We will present the latest developments of the MUSTANG automated data quality system and introduce the Research-Ready Data Sets (RRDS) service. Together these two technologies serve as a data quality assurance ecosystem that will provide benefit to the scientific community by aiding efforts to readily find appropriate and suitable data for use in any number of objectives.

  12. Learning in Alzheimer's disease is facilitated by social interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Melissa C; Gallegos, Diana R; Cohen, Neal J; Tranel, Daniel

    2013-12-15

    Seminal work in Gary Van Hoesen's laboratory at Iowa in the early 1980s established that the hallmark neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD; neurofibrillary tangles) had its first foothold in specific parts of the hippocampal formation and entorhinal cortex, effectively isolating the hippocampus from much of its input and output and causing the distinctive impairment of new learning that is the leading early characteristic of the disease (Hyman et al., 1984). The boundaries and conditions of the anterograde memory defect in patients with AD have been a topic of intense research interest ever since (e.g., Graham and Hodges, 1977; Nestor et al., 2006). For example, it has been shown that patients with AD may acquire some new semantic information through methods such as errorless learning, but learning under these conditions is typically slow and inefficient. Drawing on a learning paradigm (a collaborative referencing task) that was previously shown to induce robust and enduring learning in patients with hippocampal amnesia, we investigated whether this task would be effective in promoting new learning in patients with AD. We studied five women with early-stage AD and 10 demographically matched healthy comparison participants, each interacting with a familiar communication partner. AD pairs displayed significant and enduring learning across trials, with increased accuracy and decreased time to complete trials, in a manner indistinguishable from healthy comparison pairs, resulting in efficient and economical communication. The observed learning here most likely draws on neural resources outside the medial temporal lobes. These interactive communication sessions provide a potent learning environment with significant implications for memory intervention.

  13. Effective Levels of Adaptation to Different Types of Users in Interactive Museum Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterno, F.; Mancini, C.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses user interaction with museum application interfaces and emphasizes the importance of adaptable and adaptive interfaces to meet differing user needs. Considers levels of support that can be given to different users during navigation of museum hypermedia information, using examples from the Web site for the Marble Museum (Italy).…

  14. CORCON-MOD3: An integrated computer model for analysis of molten core-concrete interactions. User`s manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, D.R.; Gardner, D.R.; Brockmann, J.E.; Griffith, R.O. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-10-01

    The CORCON-Mod3 computer code was developed to mechanistically model the important core-concrete interaction phenomena, including those phenomena relevant to the assessment of containment failure and radionuclide release. The code can be applied to a wide range of severe accident scenarios and reactor plants. The code represents the current state of the art for simulating core debris interactions with concrete. This document comprises the user`s manual and gives a brief description of the models and the assumptions and limitations in the code. Also discussed are the input parameters and the code output. Two sample problems are also given.

  15. Developing and user-testing Decision boxes to facilitate shared decision making in primary care - a study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rousseau François

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Applying evidence is one of the most challenging steps of evidence-based clinical practice. Healthcare professionals have difficulty interpreting evidence and translating it to patients. Decision boxes are summaries of the most important benefits and harms of diagnostic, therapeutic, and preventive health interventions provided to healthcare professionals before they meet the patient. Our hypothesis is that Decision boxes will prepare clinicians to help patients make informed value-based decisions. By acting as primers, the boxes will enhance the application of evidence-based practices and increase shared decision making during the clinical encounter. The objectives of this study are to provide a framework for developing Decision boxes and testing their value to users. Methods/Design We will begin by developing Decision box prototypes for 10 clinical conditions or topics based on a review of the research on risk communication. We will present two prototypes to purposeful samples of 16 family physicians distributed in two focus groups, and 32 patients distributed in four focus groups. We will use the User Experience Model framework to explore users' perceptions of the content and format of each prototype. All discussions will be transcribed, and two researchers will independently perform a hybrid deductive/inductive thematic qualitative analysis of the data. The coding scheme will be developed a priori from the User Experience Model's seven themes (valuable, usable, credible, useful, desirable, accessible and findable, and will include new themes suggested by the data (inductive analysis. Key findings will be triangulated using additional publications on the design of tools to improve risk communication. All 10 Decision boxes will be modified in light of our findings. Discussion This study will produce a robust framework for developing and testing Decision boxes that will serve healthcare professionals and patients alike. It

  16. Mobile Health Apps to Facilitate Self-Care: A Qualitative Study of User Experiences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Anderson

    Full Text Available Consumers are living longer, creating more pressure on the health system and increasing their requirement for self-care of chronic conditions. Despite rapidly-increasing numbers of mobile health applications ('apps' for consumers' self-care, there is a paucity of research into consumer engagement with electronic self-monitoring. This paper presents a qualitative exploration of how health consumers use apps for health monitoring, their perceived benefits from use of health apps, and suggestions for improvement of health apps.'Health app' was defined as any commercially-available health or fitness app with capacity for self-monitoring. English-speaking consumers aged 18 years and older using any health app for self-monitoring were recruited for interview from the metropolitan area of Perth, Australia. The semi-structured interview guide comprised questions based on the Technology Acceptance Model, Health Information Technology Acceptance Model, and the Mobile Application Rating Scale, and is the only study to do so. These models also facilitated deductive thematic analysis of interview transcripts. Implicit and explicit responses not aligned to these models were analyzed inductively.Twenty-two consumers (15 female, seven male participated, 13 of whom were aged 26-35 years. Eighteen participants reported on apps used on iPhones. Apps were used to monitor diabetes, asthma, depression, celiac disease, blood pressure, chronic migraine, pain management, menstrual cycle irregularity, and fitness. Most were used approximately weekly for several minutes per session, and prior to meeting initial milestones, with significantly decreased usage thereafter. Deductive and inductive thematic analysis reduced the data to four dominant themes: engagement in use of the app; technical functionality of the app; ease of use and design features; and management of consumers' data.The semi-structured interviews provided insight into usage, benefits and challenges of

  17. Mobile Health Apps to Facilitate Self-Care: A Qualitative Study of User Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kevin; Burford, Oksana; Emmerton, Lynne

    2016-01-01

    Consumers are living longer, creating more pressure on the health system and increasing their requirement for self-care of chronic conditions. Despite rapidly-increasing numbers of mobile health applications ('apps') for consumers' self-care, there is a paucity of research into consumer engagement with electronic self-monitoring. This paper presents a qualitative exploration of how health consumers use apps for health monitoring, their perceived benefits from use of health apps, and suggestions for improvement of health apps. 'Health app' was defined as any commercially-available health or fitness app with capacity for self-monitoring. English-speaking consumers aged 18 years and older using any health app for self-monitoring were recruited for interview from the metropolitan area of Perth, Australia. The semi-structured interview guide comprised questions based on the Technology Acceptance Model, Health Information Technology Acceptance Model, and the Mobile Application Rating Scale, and is the only study to do so. These models also facilitated deductive thematic analysis of interview transcripts. Implicit and explicit responses not aligned to these models were analyzed inductively. Twenty-two consumers (15 female, seven male) participated, 13 of whom were aged 26-35 years. Eighteen participants reported on apps used on iPhones. Apps were used to monitor diabetes, asthma, depression, celiac disease, blood pressure, chronic migraine, pain management, menstrual cycle irregularity, and fitness. Most were used approximately weekly for several minutes per session, and prior to meeting initial milestones, with significantly decreased usage thereafter. Deductive and inductive thematic analysis reduced the data to four dominant themes: engagement in use of the app; technical functionality of the app; ease of use and design features; and management of consumers' data. The semi-structured interviews provided insight into usage, benefits and challenges of health monitoring

  18. An Improved User Interface for an Interactive Graphics Figure Illustrator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-06-01

    user to be knowledgeable of the local text editor on the computer system being used. Additionally, the user needs acceptable typing skills to reduce...rectanglexc draw smooth -line() smoothline.c() draw textO text.c duplicate() duplicatexc edit menu() edit-menuxc editobj() edit obj.c ellipse2list...es() edit objo( changefonto( changels() changelw() changetex- tao instructionso select font() select Iso select-Iwo select textO arc2list() file2list

  19. Amphetamine administration into the ventral striatum facilitates behavioral interaction with unconditioned visual signals in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rick Shin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Administration of psychomotor stimulants like amphetamine facilitates behavior in the presence of incentive distal stimuli, which have acquired the motivational properties of primary rewards through associative learning. This facilitation appears to be mediated by the mesolimbic dopamine system, which may also be involved in facilitating behavior in the presence of distal stimuli that have not been previously paired with primary rewards. However, it is unclear whether psychomotor stimulants facilitate behavioral interaction with unconditioned distal stimuli. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that noncontingent administration of amphetamine into subregions of the rat ventral striatum, particularly in the vicinity of the medial olfactory tubercle, facilitates lever pressing followed by visual signals that had not been paired with primary rewards. Noncontingent administration of amphetamine failed to facilitate lever pressing when it was followed by either tones or delayed presentation or absence of visual signals, suggesting that visual signals are key for enhanced behavioral interaction. Systemic administration of amphetamine markedly increased locomotor activity, but did not necessarily increase lever pressing rewarded by visual signals, suggesting that lever pressing is not a byproduct of heightened locomotor activity. Lever pressing facilitated by amphetamine was reduced by co-administration of the dopamine receptor antagonists SCH 23390 (D1 selective or sulpiride (D2 selective. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that amphetamine administration into the ventral striatum, particularly in the vicinity of the medial olfactory tubercle, activates dopaminergic mechanisms that strongly enhance behavioral interaction with unconditioned visual stimuli.

  20. Towards successful user interaction with systems: focusing on user-derived gestures for smart home systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eunjung; Kwon, Sunghyuk; Lee, Donghun; Lee, Hogin; Chung, Min K

    2014-07-01

    Various studies that derived gesture commands from users have used the frequency ratio to select popular gestures among the users. However, the users select only one gesture from a limited number of gestures that they could imagine during an experiment, and thus, the selected gesture may not always be the best gesture. Therefore, two experiments including the same participants were conducted to identify whether the participants maintain their own gestures after observing other gestures. As a result, 66% of the top gestures were different between the two experiments. Thus, to verify the changed gestures between the two experiments, a third experiment including another set of participants was conducted, which showed that the selected gestures were similar to those from the second experiment. This finding implies that the method of using the frequency in the first step does not necessarily guarantee the popularity of the gestures.

  1. MyProteinNet: build up-to-date protein interaction networks for organisms, tissues and user-defined contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basha, Omer; Flom, Dvir; Barshir, Ruth; Smoly, Ilan; Tirman, Shoval; Yeger-Lotem, Esti

    2015-07-01

    The identification of the molecular pathways active in specific contexts, such as disease states or drug responses, often requires an extensive view of the potential interactions between a subset of proteins. This view is not easily obtained: it requires the integration of context-specific protein list or expression data with up-to-date data of protein interactions that are typically spread across multiple databases. The MyProteinNet web server allows users to easily create such context-sensitive protein interaction networks. Users can automatically gather and consolidate data from up to 11 different databases to create a generic protein interaction network (interactome). They can score the interactions based on reliability and filter them by user-defined contexts including molecular expression and protein annotation. The output of MyProteinNet includes the generic and filtered interactome files, together with a summary of their network attributes. MyProteinNet is particularly geared toward building human tissue interactomes, by maintaining tissue expression profiles from multiple resources. The ability of MyProteinNet to facilitate the construction of up-to-date, context-specific interactomes and its applicability to 11 different organisms and to tens of human tissues, make it a powerful tool in meaningful analysis of protein networks. MyProteinNet is available at http://netbio.bgu.ac.il/myproteinnet. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. Facilitating Business to Government Interaction Using a Citizen-Centric Web 2.0 Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dais, Alexandros; Nikolaidou, Mara; Anagnostopoulos, Dimosthenis

    Modelling Business to Government (B2G) interaction is considered to be more complex than Citizen to Government (C2G) interaction, since the concept of authorized citizens, representing the Business while interacting with specific governmental organizations should be explored. Novel interaction models should be introduced, transforming the way Governmental services are delivered to Businesses. To this end, we propose a Web 2.0 citizen-centric model facilitating Business to Government interaction by establishing a social network between citizens and public agencies. All kinds of interactions (B2G, G2G) are expressed as C2G interactions establishing the citizen-centric nature of the proposed interaction model. The architecture of a Web 2.0 platform, named MyCCP, based on the suggested interaction model is also presented, along with a case study illustrating business-to-government interaction to indicate the potential of the suggested model.

  3. Faculty Library and Its Users (Interactively and Statistically

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozalija Marinković

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available According to popular opinion, statistics is the sum of incorrect data. However, much can be learned and concluded from statistical reports. In our example of recording statistics in the library of the Faculty of Economics in Osijek the following records are kept: user categories, the frequency of borrowing, the structure of borrowing, use of the reading room, use of the database, etc. Based on these data and statistical processing, the following can be analysed: the total number of users, the number of users by the year of study, by the content of used professional and scientific literature, by the use of serial publications in the reading room, or by the work on computers and database usage. All these data are precious for determining the procurement policy of the library, observing frequency of use of particular categories of professional and scientific literature (textbooks, handbooks, professional and scientific monographs, databases and determining operation guidelines for library staff.

  4. The closer the relationship, the more the interaction on facebook? Investigating the case of Taiwan users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chiung-Wen Julia; Wang, Ching-Chan; Tai, Yi-Ting

    2011-01-01

    This study argues for the necessity of applying offline contexts to social networking site research and the importance of distinguishing the relationship types of users' counterparts when studying Facebook users' behaviors. In an attempt to examine the relationship among users' behaviors, their counterparts' relationship types, and the users' perceived acquaintanceships after using Facebook, this study first investigated users' frequently used tools when interacting with different types of friends. Users tended to use less time- and effort-consuming and less privacy-concerned tools with newly acquired friends. This study further examined users' behaviors in terms of their closeness and intimacy and their perceived acquaintanceships toward four different types of friends. The study found that users gained more perceived acquaintanceships from less close friends with whom users have more frequent interaction but less intimate behaviors. As for closer friends, users tended to use more intimate activities to interact with them. However, these activities did not necessarily occur more frequently than the activities they employed with their less close friends. It was found that perceived acquaintanceships with closer friends were significantly lower than those with less close friends. This implies that Facebook is a mechanism for new friends, rather than close friends, to become more acquainted.

  5. An interactive web tool for facilitating shared decision-making in dementia-care networks: a field study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijke eSpan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAn interactive web tool has been developed for facilitating shared decision-making in dementia-care networks. The DecideGuide provides a chat function for easier communication between network members, a deciding together function for step-by-step decision-making, and an individual opinion function for eight dementia-related life domains. The aim of this study was to gain insight in the user friendliness of the DecideGuide, user acceptance and satisfaction, and participants’ opinion of the DecideGuide for making decisions.Materials and methodsA 5-month field study included four dementia-care networks (19 participants in total. The data derived from structured interviews, observations, and information that participants logged in the DecideGuide. Structured interviews took place at the start, middle, and end of the field study with people with dementia, informal caregivers, and case managers. Results1. The user friendliness of the chat and individual opinion functions was adequate for case managers and most informal caregivers. Older participants, with or without dementia, had some difficulties using a tablet and the DecideGuide. The deciding together function does not yet provide adequate instructions for all. The user interface needs simplification. 2. User acceptance and satisfaction: everybody liked the chat’s easy communication, handling difficult issues for discussion, and the option of individual opinions. 3. The DecideGuide helped participants structure their thoughts. They felt more involved and shared more information about daily issues than before. ConclusionParticipants found the DecideGuide valuable in decision-making. The chat function seems powerful in helping members engage with one another constructively. Such engagement is a prerequisite for making shared decisions. Regardless of participants’ use of the tool, they saw the DecideGuide's added value.

  6. Measuring User Performance during Interactions with Digital Video Collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Meng; Wildemuth, Barbara M.; Marchionini, Gary; Wilkens, Todd; Geisler, Gary; Hughes, Anthony; Gruss, Richard; Webster, Curtis

    2003-01-01

    Proposes two general classes of user tasks-recognition tasks and tasks requiring inference-for which performance measures were developed. The measures include graphical object recognition, textual object recognition, action recognition, free-text gist determination, multiple-choice gist determination and visual gist determination. Results from two…

  7. Converged Mobile Media: Evaluation of an Interactive User Experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleury, Alexandre

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a PhD thesis exploring various aspects of the end user experience with mobile rich media services. First, the author briefly introduces the background fields that frame the study. Three research questions are then formulated and their scientific contribution is justified...

  8. Alternative multi-user interaction screen: initial ergonomic test results

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smith, Adrew C

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The authors investigate a potentially low-cost multi-user computer pointing interface. Given a choice of four targets arranged on the screen, the authors looked at what the user’s preference is in visiting the targets with a hand-held light source...

  9. Elckerlyc goes mobile - Enabling natural interaction in mobile user interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, Randy; Hendrix, Jordi; Reidsma, Dennis; Akker, op den Rieks; Dijk, van Betsy; Akker, op den Harm

    2013-01-01

    The fast growth of computational resources and speech technology available on mobile devices makes it possible to entertain users of these devices in having a natural dialogue with service systems. These systems are sometimes perceived as social agents and this can be supported by presenting them on

  10. AxiSketcher: Interactive Nonlinear Axis Mapping of Visualizations through User Drawings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Bum Chul; Kim, Hannah; Wall, Emily; Choo, Jaegul; Park, Haesun; Endert, Alex

    2017-01-01

    Visual analytics techniques help users explore high-dimensional data. However, it is often challenging for users to express their domain knowledge in order to steer the underlying data model, especially when they have little attribute-level knowledge. Furthermore, users' complex, high-level domain knowledge, compared to low-level attributes, posits even greater challenges. To overcome these challenges, we introduce a technique to interpret a user's drawings with an interactive, nonlinear axis mapping approach called AxiSketcher. This technique enables users to impose their domain knowledge on a visualization by allowing interaction with data entries rather than with data attributes. The proposed interaction is performed through directly sketching lines over the visualization. Using this technique, users can draw lines over selected data points, and the system forms the axes that represent a nonlinear, weighted combination of multidimensional attributes. In this paper, we describe our techniques in three areas: 1) the design space of sketching methods for eliciting users' nonlinear domain knowledge; 2) the underlying model that translates users' input, extracts patterns behind the selected data points, and results in nonlinear axes reflecting users' complex intent; and 3) the interactive visualization for viewing, assessing, and reconstructing the newly formed, nonlinear axes.

  11. Understanding Motivations and User Interests as Antecedents for Different Interaction Forms in Online Communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Lina; Sørensen, Bjarne Taulo; Tudoran, Ana Alina

    This study contributes to the understanding of online user communities as a potential source of innovation. That would require an interest from users in interacting in such communities. In order to establish interaction, users must provide as well as consume information. However, depending...... on the innovation task, one may be more important than the other. It is therefore important to understand, how companies can increase user willingness to engage in these different interaction forms. This study investigates the influence of various motivation factors and user interests on intention to provide...... or consume information in online food communities. A survey was conducted among 1009 respondents followed by analysis based on Structural Equation Modelling. Results revealed the effect of motivation factors to be stronger than basic consumer interests indicating that companies can influence the intended...

  12. Guidelines Towards the Facilitation of Interactive Online Learning Programmes in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Mbati

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The creation of online platforms that establish new learning environments has led to the proliferation of institutions offering online learning programmes. However, the use of technologies for teaching and learning requires sound content specialization, as well as grounding in pedagogy. While gains made by constructivism and observational learning are well documented, research addressing online practices that best encourage constructivist and observational learning in Open and Distance Learning (ODL contexts is limited. Using a phenomenological methodological approach, this research explored the lived experiences of online learning programme facilitators at an Open and Distance Learning higher education institution. The findings of this research study revealed that facilitators did not use constructivist and observational learning pedagogies to a large extent in their interaction with students. It is concluded that during the curriculum planning phase, facilitators should decide on methods and media to arouse the students’ attention and stimulating constructivist and observational learning amongst students during online courses. This also implies a more reasonable facilitator-student ratio because large numbers of students per facilitator proves not feasible in online learning. The paper concludes by providing guidelines for the facilitation of interactive online learning programmes.

  13. Exploring Interaction Space as Abstraction Mechanism for Task-Based User Interface Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C. M.; Overgaard, M.; Pedersen, M. B.;

    2007-01-01

    , but there is considerable variation in the other models that are employed. This paper explores the extent to which the notion of interaction space is useful as an abstraction mechanism to reduce the complexity of creating and specifying a user interface design. We present how we designed a specific user interface through...

  14. Traveller: An Interactive Cultural Training System Controlled by User-Defined Body Gestures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kistler, F.; André, E.; Mascarenhas, S.; Silva, A.; Paiva, A.; Degens, D.M.; Hofstede, G.J.; Krumhuber, E.; Kappas, A.; Aylett, R.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a cultural training system based on an interactive storytelling approach and a culturally-adaptive agent architecture, for which a user-defined gesture set was created. 251 full body gestures by 22 users were analyzed to find intuitive gestures for the in-game actions in

  15. More playful user interfaces: interfaces that invite social and physical interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus; Unknown, [Unknown

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the latest advances in playful user interfaces – interfaces that invite social and physical interaction. These new developments include the use of audio, visual, tactile and physiological sensors to monitor, provide feedback and anticipate the behavior of human users. The decreasing

  16. Exploring user-producer interaction in an online community : The case of Habbo Hotel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slot, M.

    2009-01-01

    This article attempts to explore the user-producer interaction in the online community of Habbo Hotel. Based on desk research, interviews, an online survey among more than 3000 Habbo Hotel users in The Netherlands and online discussion groups with 45 Habbos, three specific issues that illustrate the

  17. More playful user interfaces: interfaces that invite social and physical interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Anton

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the latest advances in playful user interfaces – interfaces that invite social and physical interaction. These new developments include the use of audio, visual, tactile and physiological sensors to monitor, provide feedback and anticipate the behavior of human users. The decreasing

  18. Advancing user experience research to facilitate and enable patient-centered research: current state and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Philip R O

    2013-01-01

    Human-computer interaction and related areas of user experience (UX) research, such as human factors, workflow evaluation, and data visualization, are thus essential to presenting data in ways that can further the analysis of complex data sets such as those used in patient-centered research. However, a review of available data on the state of UX research as it relates to patient-centered research demonstrates a significant underinvestment and consequently a large gap in knowledge generation. In response, this report explores trends in funding and research productivity focused on UX and patient-centered research and then presents a set of recommendations to advance innovation at this important intersection point. Ultimately, the aim is to catalyze a community-wide dialogue concerning future directions for research and innovation in UX as it applies to patient-centered research.

  19. Interaction between users and IoT clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shinde, Gitanjali; Olesen, Henning

    2015-01-01

    The Internet of Things (IoT) is paving the way for a vast number of objects in our environment to react, respond and work autonomously as and when required and as per their capability, role and position. They will be able to announce and offer their services to the users, and together...... this will enable the vision of an "Internet of People, Things and Services" (IoPTS). Application areas for IoT include smart cities, smart homes, environmental control, security & emergency, retail, logistics, industrial control, smart farming, and e-Health. All the IoT objects are organized in clusters, which...

  20. Facilitating Peer Interaction--Support to Children with Down Syndrome in Mainstream Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolva, Anne-Stine; Gustavsson, Anders; Borell, Lena; Hemmingsson, Helena

    2011-01-01

    This study addresses the support provided by class staff in order to facilitate social participation of pupils with Down syndrome and peers in regular classes, and how they experience the interaction between the pupils. Data were collected through field observations of six pupils with Down syndrome in their class in mainstream schools, their six…

  1. More playful user interfaces interfaces that invite social and physical interaction

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the latest advances in playful user interfaces – interfaces that invite social and physical interaction. These new developments include the use of audio, visual, tactile and physiological sensors to monitor, provide feedback and anticipate the behavior of human users. The decreasing cost of sensor and actuator technology makes it possible to integrate physical behavior information in human-computer interactions. This leads to many new entertainment and game applications that allow or require social and physical interaction in sensor- and actuator-equipped smart environments. The topics discussed include: human-nature interaction, human-animal interaction and the interaction with tangibles that are naturally integrated in our smart environments. Digitally supported remote audience participation in artistic or sport events is also discussed. One important theme that emerges throughout the book is the involvement of users in the digital-entertainment design process or even design and implement...

  2. A Sorting Method of Meta-search Based on User Web Page Interactive Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zongli Jiang; Tengyu Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, there is a problem in most meta-search engines that many web pages searched have nothing to do with users' expectations. We introduce a new user web page interactive model under the framework ofmeta search, which analyzes users' action to get users' interests and storages them, and update these information with users' feedback. Meanwhile this model analyzes user records stored in web, attaches labels to the web page with statistics of user interest. We calculate the similarity about user and web page with the information from model and add similarity to scores of web pages. The experimental results reveal that this method can improve the relevance of the information retrieval.

  3. Cross-sensory facilitation reveals neural interactions between visual and tactile motion in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica eGori

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Many recent studies show that the human brain integrates information across the different senses and that stimuli of one sensory modality can enhance the perception of other modalities. Here we study the processes that mediate cross-modal facilitation and summation between visual and tactile motion. We find that while summation produced a generic, non-specific improvement of thresholds, probably reflecting higher-order interaction of decision signals, facilitation reveals a strong, direction-specific interaction, which we believe reflects sensory interactions. We measured visual and tactile velocity discrimination thresholds over a wide range of base velocities and conditions. Thresholds for both visual and tactile stimuli showed the characteristic dipper function, with the minimum thresholds occurring at a given pedestal speed. When visual and tactile coherent stimuli were combined (summation condition the thresholds for these multi-sensory stimuli also showed a dipper function with the minimum thresholds occurring in a similar range to that for unisensory signals. However, the improvement of multisensory thresholds was weak and not directionally specific, well predicted by the maximum likelihood estimation model (agreeing with previous research. A different technique (facilitation did, however, reveal direction-specific enhancement. Adding a non-informative pedestal motion stimulus in one sensory modality (vision or touch selectively lowered thresholds in the other, by the same amount as pedestals in the same modality. Facilitation did not occur for neutral stimuli like sounds (that would also have reduced temporal uncertainty, nor for motion in opposite direction, even in blocked trials where the subjects knew that the motion was in the opposite direction showing that the facilitation was not under subject control. Cross-sensory facilitation is strong evidence for functionally relevant cross-sensory integration at early levels of sensory

  4. An Evolving Assessment Strategy: Sustaining Interactions with Users to Inform Planning and Decisionmaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, R. H.

    2016-12-01

    Research indicates that in addition to reports, decision makers need to access climate science through a range of products such as scenarios, observed data, maps, technical guidelines, and other materials. This presentation will describe an evolving strategy for leveraging climate research and assessments conducted by the US Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) to provide usable climate information to build society's capacity to manage climate variability and change. The approach is called "sustained assessment" and is intended to be more interactive and to empower individuals and organizations to participate more fully and in an ongoing basis to evaluate the implications of climate change using state of the art scientific information. The speaker will describe the necessary conditions for sustained assessment, including mechanisms to facilitate ongoing communication between users and the climate science community in co-design and implementation of assessment activities. It will also review some of the needed scientific foundations for sustained assessment. The speaker is chair of the recently established Federal Advisory Committee. He has been involved in previous US National Climate Assessments (NCAs), including as a lead author of a special advisory report on establishing a sustained US national assessment process. He will speak in his personal capacity and provide publicly-available information on the role of the new Advisory Committee and steps towards establishing a sustained assessment process.

  5. Dynamic Spectrum Sharing Among Repeatedly Interacting Selfish Users With Imperfect Monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Yuanzhang

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a novel design framework for dynamic spectrum sharing among secondary users (SU) who adjust their power allocation while satisfying under interference temperature (IT) constraints imposed by primary users. The considered interaction among the secondary users is characterized by the following three unique features. First, SUs are selfish and aim to maximize their own long-term payoffs from utilizing the network rather than obeying the prescribed allocation of a centralized controller. Second, SUs are interacting with each other repeatedly and they can coexist in the system for a long time as long as the IT constraints are not violated. Third, SUs have imperfect and limited monitoring ability: they only observe whether the IT constraints are violated, and their observation is imperfect due to the erroneous measurements. To capture these unique features, we model the interaction of secondary users as a repeated game with imperfect monitoring. We first characterize the set of Pareto opti...

  6. User-Centered Design for Interactive Maps: A Case Study in Crime Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert E. Roth

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we address the topic of user-centered design (UCD for cartography, GIScience, and visual analytics. Interactive maps are ubiquitous in modern society, yet they often fail to “work” as they could or should. UCD describes the process of ensuring interface success—map-based or otherwise—by gathering input and feedback from target users throughout the design and development of the interface. We contribute to the expanding literature on UCD for interactive maps in two ways. First, we synthesize core concepts on UCD from cartography and related fields, as well as offer new ideas, in order to organize existing frameworks and recommendations regarding the UCD of interactive maps. Second, we report on a case study UCD process for GeoVISTA CrimeViz, an interactive and web-based mapping application supporting visual analytics of criminal activity in space and time. The GeoVISTA CrimeViz concept and interface were improved iteratively by working through a series of user→utility→usability loops in which target users provided input and feedback on needs and designs (user, prompting revisions to the conceptualization and functional requirements of the interface (utility, and ultimately leading to new mockups and prototypes of the interface (usability for additional evaluation by target users (user… and so on. Together, the background review and case study offer guidance for applying UCD to interactive mapping projects, and demonstrate the benefit of including target users throughout design and development.

  7. Whitebark pine facilitation at treeline: potential interactions for disruption by an invasive pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomback, Diana F; Blakeslee, Sarah C; Wagner, Aaron C; Wunder, Michael B; Resler, Lynn M; Pyatt, Jill C; Diaz, Soledad

    2016-08-01

    In stressful environments, facilitation often aids plant establishment, but invasive plant pathogens may potentially disrupt these interactions. In many treeline communities in the northern Rocky Mountains of the U.S. and Canada, Pinus albicaulis, a stress-tolerant pine, initiates tree islands at higher frequencies than other conifers - that is, leads to leeward tree establishment more frequently. The facilitation provided by a solitary (isolated) P. albicaulis leading to tree island initiation may be important for different life-history stages for leeward conifers, but it is not known which life-history stages are influenced and protection provided. However, P. albicaulis mortality from the non-native pathogen Cronartium ribicola potentially disrupts these facilitative interactions, reducing tree island initiation. In two Rocky Mountain eastern slope study areas, we experimentally examined fundamental plant-plant interactions which might facilitate tree island formation: the protection offered by P. albicaulis to leeward seed and seedling life-history stages, and to leeward krummholz conifers. In the latter case, we simulated mortality from C. ribicola for windward P. albicaulis to determine whether loss of P. albicaulis from C. ribicola impacts leeward conifers. Relative to other common solitary conifers at treeline, solitary P. albicaulis had higher abundance. More seeds germinated in leeward rock microsites than in conifer or exposed microsites, but the odds of cotyledon seedling survival during the growing season were highest in P. albicaulis microsites. Planted seedling survival was low among all microsites examined. Simulating death of windward P. albicaulis by C. ribicola reduced shoot growth of leeward trees. Loss of P. albicaulis to exotic disease may limit facilitation interactions and conifer community development at treeline and potentially impede upward movement as climate warms.

  8. Long-term human-robot interaction with young users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baxter, P.; Belpaeme, T.; Canamero, L.; Cosi, P.; Demiris, Y.; Enescu, V.; Et al.

    2011-01-01

    Artificial companion agents have the potential to combine novel means for effective health communication with young patients support and entertainment. However, the theory and practice of long-term child-robot interaction is currently an underdeveloped area of research. This paper introduces an appr

  9. Long-term human-robot interaction with young users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baxter, P.; Belpaeme, T.; Canamero, L.; Cosi, P.; Demiris, Y.; Enescu, V.; Et al.

    2011-01-01

    Artificial companion agents have the potential to combine novel means for effective health communication with young patients support and entertainment. However, the theory and practice of long-term child-robot interaction is currently an underdeveloped area of research. This paper introduces an appr

  10. Interactive methods to involve users into workspace design process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Souza da Conceição, Carolina; Broberg, Ole; Banke, Palle

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses the question of whether the use of a combination of interactive methods involving workers can lead to a useful input to the (re)design of their workspace. The workbook and the layout design game methods were tested, and a comparison between their use and the ergonomic analysis...

  11. Oxidative modification of caspase-9 facilitates its activation via disulfide-mediated interaction with Apaf-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Zuo; Binggang Xiang; Jie Yang; Xuxu Sun; Yumei Wang; Hui Cang; Jing Yi

    2009-01-01

    Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known to regulate apoptosis. Activation of caspase-9, the initial caspase in the mitochondrial apoptotic cascade, is closely associated with ROS, but it is unclear whether ROS regulate caspase-9 via direct oxidative modification. The present study aims to elucidate the molecular mechanisms by which ROS mediate caspase-9 activation. Our results show that the cellular oxidative state facilitates caspase-9 activation. Hydrogen peroxide treatment causes the activation of caspase-9 and apoptosis, and promotes an interaction between caspase-9 and apoptotic protease-activating factor 1 (Apaf-1) via disulfide formation. In addition, in an in vitro mitochondria-free system, the thiol-oxidant diamide promotes auto-cleavage of caspase-9 and the caspase-9/ Apaf-1 interaction by facilitating the formation of disulfide-linked complexes. Finally, a point mutation at C403 of caspase-9 impairs both H202-promoted caspase-9 activation and interaction with Apaf-1 through the abolition of disulfide formation. The association between cytochrome c and the C403S mutant is significantly weaker than that between cytochrome c and wild-type caspase-9, indicating that oxidative modification of caspase-9 contributes to apoptosome formation under oxidative stress. Taken together, oxidative modification of caspase-9 by ROS can mediate its interaction with Apaf-1, and can thus promote its auto-cleavage and activation. This mechanism may facilitate apoptosome formation and caspase-9 activation under oxidative stress.

  12. Interactivity and User Participation in the Television Lifecycle: Creating, Sharing, and Controlling Content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.S. Cesar Garcia (Pablo Santiago); K. Chorianopoulos

    2008-01-01

    htmlabstractInteractive TV research encompasses a rather diverse body of work (e.g. multimedia, HCI, CSCW, UIST, user modeling, media studies) that has accumulated over the past 20 years. In this article, we highlight the state-of-the-art and consider two basic issues: What is interactive TV researc

  13. Investigation of Users' Preferences in Interactive Multimedia Learning Systems: A Data Mining Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrysostomou, Kyriacos; Chen, Sherry Y.; Liu, Xiaohui

    2009-01-01

    With advances in information and communication technology, interactive multimedia learning systems are widely used to support teaching and learning. However, as human factors vary across users, they may prefer the design of interactive multimedia learning systems differently. To have a deep understanding of the influences of human factors, we…

  14. Interactivity and User Participation in the Television Lifecycle: Creating, Sharing, and Controlling Content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cesar Garcia, P.S.; Chorianopoulos, K.

    2008-01-01

    Interactive TV research encompasses a rather diverse body of work (e.g. multimedia, HCI, CSCW, UIST, user modeling, media studies) that has accumulated over the past 20 years. In this article, we highlight the state-of-the-art and consider two basic issues: What is interactive TV research? Can it he

  15. Interactivity and User Participation in the Television Lifecycle: Creating, Sharing, and Controlling Content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.S. Cesar Garcia (Pablo Santiago); K. Chorianopoulos

    2008-01-01

    htmlabstractInteractive TV research encompasses a rather diverse body of work (e.g. multimedia, HCI, CSCW, UIST, user modeling, media studies) that has accumulated over the past 20 years. In this article, we highlight the state-of-the-art and consider two basic issues: What is interactive TV

  16. Exploring Interaction Space as Abstraction Mechanism for Task-Based User Interface Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C. M.; Overgaard, M.; Pedersen, M. B.

    2007-01-01

    , but there is considerable variation in the other models that are employed. This paper explores the extent to which the notion of interaction space is useful as an abstraction mechanism to reduce the complexity of creating and specifying a user interface design. We present how we designed a specific user interface through...... use of design techniques and models that employ the notion of interaction space. This design effort departed from the task models in an object-oriented model of the users’ problem and application domains. The lessons learned emphasize that the notion of interactions spaces is a useful abstraction...

  17. Infant feeding: the interfaces between interaction design and cognitive ergonomics in user-centered design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Flavia; Araújo, Lilian Kely

    2012-01-01

    This text presents a discussion on the process of developing interactive products focused on infant behavior, which result was an interactive game for encouraging infant feeding. For that, it describes the use of cognitive psychology concepts added to interaction design methodology. Through this project, this article sustains how the cooperative use of these concepts provides adherent solutions to users' needs, whichever they are. Besides that, it verifies the closeness of those methodologies to boundary areas of knowledge, such as design focused on user and ergonomics.

  18. Positive interactions between desert granivores: localized facilitation of harvester ants by kangaroo rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Edelman

    Full Text Available Facilitation, when one species enhances the environment or performance of another species, can be highly localized in space. While facilitation in plant communities has been intensely studied, the role of facilitation in shaping animal communities is less well understood. In the Chihuahuan Desert, both kangaroo rats and harvester ants depend on the abundant seeds of annual plants. Kangaroo rats, however, are hypothesized to facilitate harvester ants through soil disturbance and selective seed predation rather than competing with them. I used a spatially explicit approach to examine whether a positive or negative interaction exists between banner-tailed kangaroo rat (Dipodomys spectabilis mounds and rough harvester ant (Pogonomyrmex rugosus colonies. The presence of a scale-dependent interaction between mounds and colonies was tested by comparing fitted spatial point process models with and without interspecific effects. Also, the effect of proximity to a mound on colony mortality and spatial patterns of surviving colonies was examined. The spatial pattern of kangaroo rat mounds and harvester ant colonies was consistent with a positive interspecific interaction at small scales (<10 m. Mortality risk of vulnerable, recently founded harvester ant colonies was lower when located close to a kangaroo rat mound and proximity to a mound partly predicted the spatial pattern of surviving colonies. My findings support localized facilitation of harvester ants by kangaroo rats, likely mediated through ecosystem engineering and foraging effects on plant cover and composition. The scale-dependent effect of kangaroo rats on abiotic and biotic factors appears to result in greater founding and survivorship of young colonies near mounds. These results suggest that soil disturbance and foraging by rodents can have subtle impacts on the distribution and demography of other species.

  19. Positive interactions between desert granivores: localized facilitation of harvester ants by kangaroo rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, Andrew J

    2012-01-01

    Facilitation, when one species enhances the environment or performance of another species, can be highly localized in space. While facilitation in plant communities has been intensely studied, the role of facilitation in shaping animal communities is less well understood. In the Chihuahuan Desert, both kangaroo rats and harvester ants depend on the abundant seeds of annual plants. Kangaroo rats, however, are hypothesized to facilitate harvester ants through soil disturbance and selective seed predation rather than competing with them. I used a spatially explicit approach to examine whether a positive or negative interaction exists between banner-tailed kangaroo rat (Dipodomys spectabilis) mounds and rough harvester ant (Pogonomyrmex rugosus) colonies. The presence of a scale-dependent interaction between mounds and colonies was tested by comparing fitted spatial point process models with and without interspecific effects. Also, the effect of proximity to a mound on colony mortality and spatial patterns of surviving colonies was examined. The spatial pattern of kangaroo rat mounds and harvester ant colonies was consistent with a positive interspecific interaction at small scales (ant colonies was lower when located close to a kangaroo rat mound and proximity to a mound partly predicted the spatial pattern of surviving colonies. My findings support localized facilitation of harvester ants by kangaroo rats, likely mediated through ecosystem engineering and foraging effects on plant cover and composition. The scale-dependent effect of kangaroo rats on abiotic and biotic factors appears to result in greater founding and survivorship of young colonies near mounds. These results suggest that soil disturbance and foraging by rodents can have subtle impacts on the distribution and demography of other species.

  20. Study of the Interaction User Head-Ultrawideband MIMO Antenna Array for Mobile Terminals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhekov, Stanislav Stefanov; Tatomirescu, Alexandru; Franek, Ondrej

    2016-01-01

    aspects of the interaction are considered: 1) the influence of the user head on the antenna operation, and 2) the exposure of the human head tissue to antenna electromagnetic radiation. The first aspect is related to the degradation of the antenna performance in a proximity to the user which is evaluated......This paper presents a numerical study of the interaction between the user head and MIMO antenna array for mobile phones. The antenna array is composed of two identical antennas and covers the frequency ranges 698-990 MHz and 1710-5530 MHz with a good radiation efficiency in free space. The two...... by the reduction of the antenna radiation efficiency. The second aspect refers to the antenna operation effect on the human and the exposure of the user head is studied by Specific Absorption Ratio (SAR)....

  1. Study of the Interaction User Head-Ultrawideband MIMO Antenna Array for Mobile Terminals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhekov, Stanislav Stefanov; Tatomirescu, Alexandru; Franek, Ondrej;

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of the interaction between the user head and MIMO antenna array for mobile phones. The antenna array is composed of two identical antennas and covers the frequency ranges 698-990 MHz and 1710-5530 MHz with a good radiation efficiency in free space. The two...... aspects of the interaction are considered: 1) the influence of the user head on the antenna operation, and 2) the exposure of the human head tissue to antenna electromagnetic radiation. The first aspect is related to the degradation of the antenna performance in a proximity to the user which is evaluated...... by the reduction of the antenna radiation efficiency. The second aspect refers to the antenna operation effect on the human and the exposure of the user head is studied by Specific Absorption Ratio (SAR)....

  2. Service user and care giver involvement in mental health system strengthening in Nepal: a qualitative study on barriers and facilitating factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, Dristy; Upadhyaya, Nawaraj; Magar, Jananee; Giri, Nir Prakash; Hanlon, Charlotte; Jordans, Mark J D

    2017-01-01

    Service user and caregiver involvement has become an increasingly common strategy to enhance mental health outcomes, and has been incorporated in the mental healthpolicies of many developed nations. However, this practice is non-existent or fragmented in low and middle income countries (LMICs). Instances of service user and caregiver involvement have been rising slowly in a few LMICs, but are rarely described in the literature. Very little is known about the context of user and caregiver participation in mental health system strengthening processes in a low-income, disaster- and conflict-affected state such as Nepal. This study explores (a) the extent and experiences of service user and caregiver involvement in policy making, service planning, monitoring, and research in Nepal; (b) perceived barriers to such involvement; and (c) possible strategies to overcome barriers. Key Informant Interviews (n = 24) were conducted with service users and caregivers who were either affiliated to a mental health organization or receiving menta health care integrated within primary care. Purposive sampling was employed. Data collection was carried out in 2014 in Chitwan and Kathmandu districts of Nepal. Data analysis was carried out in NVivo10 using a framework approach. The involvement of service users affiliated to mental health organizations in policy development was reported to be 'tokenistic'. Involvement of caregivers was non-existent. Perceived barriers to greater involvement included lack of awareness, stigma and discrimination, poor economic conditions, the centralized health system, and lack of strong leadership and unity among user organizations. Increased focus on reducing public as well as self-stigma, improved policy frameworks and initiatives, and decentralization of care are some strategies that may facilitate service user and caregiver involvement. The study highlighted need for user and caregiver networks free from competing interests and priorities. Improved

  3. Perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, and perceived enjoyment as drivers for the user acceptance of interactive mobile maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Azham; Mkpojiogu, Emmanuel O. C.; Yusof, Muhammad Mat

    2016-08-01

    This study examines the user perception of usefulness, ease of use and enjoyment as drivers for the users' complex interaction with map on mobile devices. TAM model was used to evaluate users' intention to use and their acceptance of interactive mobile map using the above three beliefs as antecedents. Quantitative research (survey) methodology was employed and the analysis and findings showed that all the three explanatory variables used in this study, explain the variability in the user acceptance of interactive mobile map technology. Perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, and perceived enjoyment each have significant positive influence on user acceptance of interactive mobile maps. This study further validates the TAM model.

  4. Evaluating the Cognitive Aspects of User Interaction with 2D Visual Tagging Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Olugbenga King

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available There has been significant interest in thedevelopment and deployment of visual taggingapplications in recent times. But user perceptions aboutthe purpose and function of visual tagging systems havenot received much attention. This paper presents a userexperience study that investigates the cognitive modelsthat novice users have about interacting with visualtagging applications. The results of the study show thatalthough most users are unfamiliar with visual taggingtechnologies, they could accurately predict the purposeand mode of retrieval of data stored in visual tags. Thestudy concludes with suggestions on how to improve therecognition, ease of recall and design of visual tags.

  5. Delays and user performance in human-computer-network interaction tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Barrett S; Wang, Enlie

    2009-12-01

    This article describes a series of studies conducted to examine factors affecting user perceptions, responses, and tolerance for network-based computer delays affecting distributed human-computer-network interaction (HCNI) tasks. HCNI tasks, even with increasing computing and network bandwidth capabilities, are still affected by human perceptions of delay and appropriate waiting times for information flow latencies. Conducted were 6 laboratory studies with university participants in China (Preliminary Experiments 1 through 3) and the United States (Experiments 4 through 6) to examine users' perceptions of elapsed time, effect of perceived network task performance partners on delay tolerance, and expectations of appropriate delays based on task, situation, and network conditions. Results across the six experiments indicate that users' delay tolerance and estimated delay were affected by multiple task and expectation factors, including task complexity and importance, situation urgency and time availability, file size, and network bandwidth capacity. Results also suggest a range of user strategies for incorporating delay tolerance in task planning and performance. HCNI user experience is influenced by combinations of task requirements, constraints, and understandings of system performance; tolerance is a nonlinear function of time constraint ratios or decay. Appropriate user interface tools providing delay feedback information can help modify user expectations and delay tolerance. These tools are especially valuable when delay conditions exceed a few seconds or when task constraints and system demands are high. Interface designs for HCNI tasks should consider assistant-style presentations of delay feedback, information freshness, and network characteristics. Assistants should also gather awareness of user time constraints.

  6. Interactive genetic algorithm for user-centered design of distributed conservation practices in a watershed: An examination of user preferences in objective space and user behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piemonti, Adriana Debora; Babbar-Sebens, Meghna; Mukhopadhyay, Snehasis; Kleinberg, Austin

    2017-05-01

    Interactive Genetic Algorithms (IGA) are advanced human-in-the-loop optimization methods that enable humans to give feedback, based on their subjective and unquantified preferences and knowledge, during the algorithm's search process. While these methods are gaining popularity in multiple fields, there is a critical lack of data and analyses on (a) the nature of interactions of different humans with interfaces of decision support systems (DSS) that employ IGA in water resources planning problems and on (b) the effect of human feedback on the algorithm's ability to search for design alternatives desirable to end-users. In this paper, we present results and analyses of observational experiments in which different human participants (surrogates and stakeholders) interacted with an IGA-based, watershed DSS called WRESTORE to identify plans of conservation practices in a watershed. The main goal of this paper is to evaluate how the IGA adapts its search process in the objective space to a user's feedback, and identify whether any similarities exist in the objective space of plans found by different participants. Some participants focused on the entire watershed, while others focused only on specific local subbasins. Additionally, two different hydrology models were used to identify any potential differences in interactive search outcomes that could arise from differences in the numerical values of benefits displayed to participants. Results indicate that stakeholders, in comparison to their surrogates, were more likely to use multiple features of the DSS interface to collect information before giving feedback, and dissimilarities existed among participants in the objective space of design alternatives.

  7. A Study of User's Performance and Satisfaction on the Web Based Photo Annotation with Speech Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Ramlan, Siti Azura

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on empirical evaluation study of users' performance and satisfaction with prototype of Web Based speech photo annotation with speech interaction. Participants involved consist of Johor Bahru citizens from various background. They have completed two parts of annotation task; part A involving PhotoASys; photo annotation system with proposed speech interaction and part B involving Microsoft Microsoft Vista Speech Interaction style. They have completed eight tasks for each part including system login and selection of album and photos. Users' performance was recorded using computer screen recording software. Data were captured on the task completion time and subjective satisfaction. Participants need to complete a questionnaire on the subjective satisfaction when the task was completed. The performance data show the comparison between proposed speech interaction and Microsoft Vista Speech interaction applied in photo annotation system, PhotoASys. On average, the reduction in annotation performan...

  8. Interaction Design in the Built Environment: Designing for the 'Universal User'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    Concepts of responsive architecture have to date largely involved response to environmental context, in order to mediate ambient environmental factors and modify internal conditions for the comfort of users, with energy efficiency and sustainability as the main impetus. 'Smart' buildings often address little other than technically functional issues, with any ideas of 'design' as a unifying factor being disregarded. At the same time, music and performance art have been in the vanguard of creating digital interaction that intimately involves the user in aesthetic outcomes, in the creation of what Umberto Eco describes as an 'Open Work'. Environments made responsive through embedment of computational technologies can similarly extend usability and user-centred design towards universality, through careful consideration of the relationship between person, context and activity, and of the continuous and ultimately transactional nature of human occupation of built environment. Truly 'smart' environments will learn from and through usage, and can be conceived and designed so as to maximise environmental 'fit' for a wider variety of users, including people described as being 'neurodiverse'. Where user response becomes a significant component in managing a smart environment, the transactional relationship between user and environment is made explicit, and can ultimately be used to drive interaction that favours ease-of-use and personalisation. Inclusion of affective computing in human interaction with built environment offers significant potential for extending the boundaries of Universal Design to include people with autism, people with intellectual disability, and users with acquired cognitive impairment, including that arising from dementia. The same users frequently have issues with sensory-perceptual sensitivity and processing. The resulting mismatch between their individual needs and abilities, and the environments they typically occupy, can give rise to states of

  9. Digital Interactive Narrative Tools for Facilitating Communication with Children During Counseling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baceviciute, Sarune; Albæk, Katharina R.R.; Arsovski, Aleksandar

    2012-01-01

    In this article we explore the means by which state-of-the-art knowledge on children counseling techniques can be combined with digital interactive narrative tools to facilitate communication with children during counseling sessions. The field of “narrative play therapy” could profit from...... the reconciliation between free-play and narratives afforded by interactive digital tools in order to promote children‟s engagement. We present a digital interactive narrative application integrated with a “step-by-step” guide to the counselor, which could be adapted to many different situations and contexts where...... an adult professional counselor (or therapists) needs to establish a trustful and efficient communication with children. Furthermore, the tool was specifically customized to pediatric audiology counseling. Our evaluation shows that the tool maintains the centrality of the child‟s perspective thanks...

  10. Self-assembled monolayer facilitates epithelial-mesenchymal interactions mimicking odontogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muni, Tanvi; Mrksich, Milan; George, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Cell-cell interactions are vital for embryonic organ development and normal function of differentiated cells and tissues. In this study we have developed a self-assembled monolayer-based co-culture system to study tooth morphogenesis. Specifically, we designed a 2-D microenvironment present in the dental tissue by creating a well-structured, laterally organized epithelial and mesenchymal cell co-culture system by patterning the cell-attachment substrate. Chemical modifications were used to develop tunable surface patterns to facilitate epithelial-mesenchymal interactions mimicking the developing tooth. Such a design promoted interactions between monolayer's of the 2 cell types and provided signaling cues that resulted in cellular differentiation and mineralized matrix formation. Gene expression analysis showed that these co-cultures mimicked in-vivo conditions than monolayer cultures of a single cell type.

  11. The effect of user's perceived presence and promotion focus on usability for interacting in virtual environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huey-Min; Li, Shang-Phone; Zhu, Yu-Qian; Hsiao, Bo

    2015-09-01

    Technological advance in human-computer interaction has attracted increasing research attention, especially in the field of virtual reality (VR). Prior research has focused on examining the effects of VR on various outcomes, for example, learning and health. However, which factors affect the final outcomes? That is, what kind of VR system design will achieve higher usability? This question remains largely. Furthermore, when we look at VR system deployment from a human-computer interaction (HCI) lens, does user's attitude play a role in achieving the final outcome? This study aims to understand the effect of immersion and involvement, as well as users' regulatory focus on usability for a somatosensory VR learning system. This study hypothesized that regulatory focus and presence can effectively enhance user's perceived usability. Survey data from 78 students in Taiwan indicated that promotion focus is positively related to user's perceived efficiency, whereas involvement and promotion focus are positively related to user's perceived effectiveness. Promotion focus also predicts user satisfaction and overall usability perception.

  12. Better decision making in complex, dynamic tasks training with human-facilitated interactive learning environments

    CERN Document Server

    Qudrat-Ullah, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    This book describes interactive learning environments (ILEs) and their underlying concepts. It explains how ILEs can be used to improve the decision-making process and how these improvements can be empirically verified. The objective of this book is to enhance our understanding of and to gain insights into the process by which human facilitated ILEs are effectively designed and used in improving users’ decision making in complex, dynamic tasks. This book is divided into four major parts. Part I serves as an introduction to the importance and complexity of decision making in dynamic tasks. Part II provides background material, drawing upon relevant literature, for the development of an integrated process model on the effectiveness of human facilitated ILEs in improving decision making in dynamic tasks. Part III focuses on the design, development, and application of FishBankILE in laboratory experiments to gather empirical evidence for the validity of the process model. Finally, part IV presents a comprehensi...

  13. A New User Model based Interactive Product Retrieval Process for improved eBuying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oshadi Alahakoon

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available When searching for items online there are three common problems that e-buyers may encounter; null retrieval, retrieving unmanageable number of items, and retrieving unsatisfactory items. In the past information retrieval systems or recommender systems were used as solutions. With information retrieval systems, too rigorous filtering based on the user query to reduce unmanageable number of items result in either null retrieval or filtering out the items users prefer. Recommender systems on the other hand do not provide sufficient opportunity for users to communicate their needs. As a solution, this paper introduces a novel method combining a user model with an interactive product retrieval process. The new layered user model has the potential of being applied across multiple product and service domains and is able to adapt to changing user preferences. The new product retrieval algorithm is integrated with the user model and is able to successfully address null retrieval, retrieving unmanageable number of items, and retrieving unsatisfactory items. The process is demonstrated using a bench mark dataset and a case study. Finally the Product retrieval process is evaluated using a set of guidelines to illustrate its suitability to current eBuying environments.

  14. Generalized framework for a user-aware interactive texture segmentation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gururajan, Arunkumar; Sari-Sarraf, Hamed; Hequet, Eric

    2012-07-01

    We present a new framework for an interactive image delineation technique, which we term as interactive texture-snapping system (IT-SNAPS). One of the unique features of IT-SNAPS stems from the fact that it can effectively aid the user in accurately segmenting images with complex texture, without placing undue burden on the user. This is made possible through the formulation of IT-SNAPS, which enables it to be user-aware, i.e., it unobtrusively elicits information from the user during the segmentation process, and hence, adapts itself on-the-fly to the boundary being segmented. In addition to generating an accurate segmentation, it is shown that the framework of IT-SNAPS allows for extraction of useful information post-segmentation, which can potentially assist in the development of customized automatic segmentation algorithms. The afore mentioned features of IT-SNAPS are demonstrated on a set of texture images, as well as on a real-world biomedical application. Using appropriate segmentation protocols in conjunction with expert-provided ground truth, experiments are designed to quantitatively evaluate and compare the segmentation accuracy and user-friendliness of IT-SNAPS with another popular interactive segmentation technique. Promising results indicate the efficacy of IT-SNAPS and its potential to positively impact a broad spectrum of computer vision applications.

  15. Getting the point across: exploring the effects of dynamic virtual humans in an interactive museum exhibit on user perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Gutierrez, Diego; Ferdig, Rick; Li, Jian; Lok, Benjamin

    2014-04-01

    We have created “You, M.D.”, an interactive museum exhibit in which users learn about topics in public health literacy while interacting with virtual humans. You, M.D. is equipped with a weight sensor, a height sensor and a Microsoft Kinect that gather basic user information. Conceptually, You, M.D. could use this user information to dynamically select the appearance of the virtual humans in the interaction attempting to improve learning outcomes and user perception for each particular user. For this concept to be possible, a better understanding of how different elements of the visual appearance of a virtual human affects user perceptions is required. In this paper, we present the results of an initial user study with a large sample size (n =333) ran using You, M.D. The study measured users’ reactions based on the user’s gender and body-mass index (BMI) when facing virtual humans with BMI either concordant or discordant from the user’s BMI. The results of the study indicate that concordance between the users’ BMI and the virtual human’s BMI affects male and female users differently. The results also show that female users rate virtual humans as more knowledgeable than male users rate the same virtual humans.

  16. Interactive extraction of neural structures with user-guided morphological diffusion

    KAUST Repository

    Yong Wan,

    2012-10-01

    Extracting neural structures with their fine details from confocal volumes is essential to quantitative analysis in neurobiology research. Despite the abundance of various segmentation methods and tools, for complex neural structures, both manual and semi-automatic methods are ine ective either in full 3D or when user interactions are restricted to 2D slices. Novel interaction techniques and fast algorithms are demanded by neurobiologists to interactively and intuitively extract neural structures from confocal data. In this paper, we present such an algorithm-technique combination, which lets users interactively select desired structures from visualization results instead of 2D slices. By integrating the segmentation functions with a confocal visualization tool neurobiologists can easily extract complex neural structures within their typical visualization workflow.

  17. Digital Interactive Narrative Tools for Facilitating Communication with Children During Counseling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baceviciute, Sarune; Albæk, Katharina R.R.; Arsovski, Aleksandar

    2012-01-01

    In this article we explore the means by which state-of-the-art knowledge on children counseling techniques can be combined with digital interactive narrative tools to facilitate communication with children during counseling sessions. The field of “narrative play therapy” could profit from...... an adult professional counselor (or therapists) needs to establish a trustful and efficient communication with children. Furthermore, the tool was specifically customized to pediatric audiology counseling. Our evaluation shows that the tool maintains the centrality of the child‟s perspective thanks...

  18. The Effects of Website Information Utility on the Outcomes of User-Website Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasley, Joseph Paul

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the relationships between website information content utility and various outcomes of user interactions with e-tail websites. Although previous research has consistently identified high quality information content as a critical factor of successful e-commerce websites, those studies have not reported how to identify the…

  19. Optimal design method to minimize users' thinking mapping load in human-machine interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yanqun; Li, Xu; Zhang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    The discrepancy between human cognition and machine requirements/behaviors usually results in serious mental thinking mapping loads or even disasters in product operating. It is important to help people avoid human-machine interaction confusions and difficulties in today's mental work mastered society. Improving the usability of a product and minimizing user's thinking mapping and interpreting load in human-machine interactions. An optimal human-machine interface design method is introduced, which is based on the purpose of minimizing the mental load in thinking mapping process between users' intentions and affordance of product interface states. By analyzing the users' thinking mapping problem, an operating action model is constructed. According to human natural instincts and acquired knowledge, an expected ideal design with minimized thinking loads is uniquely determined at first. Then, creative alternatives, in terms of the way human obtains operational information, are provided as digital interface states datasets. In the last, using the cluster analysis method, an optimum solution is picked out from alternatives, by calculating the distances between two datasets. Considering multiple factors to minimize users' thinking mapping loads, a solution nearest to the ideal value is found in the human-car interaction design case. The clustering results show its effectiveness in finding an optimum solution to the mental load minimizing problems in human-machine interaction design.

  20. Adapting interaction environments to diverse users through online action set selection

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hassan Mahmud, MM

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Interactive interfaces are a common feature of many systems ranging from field robotics to video games. In most applications, these interfaces must be used by a heterogeneous set of users, with substantial variety in effectiveness with the same...

  1. User's guide to Sphere and Plate Interactive Display Routine (SPIDR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, Z.W.

    1984-05-29

    An interactive graphics display program capable of producing axonometric views of three-dimensional data is described. The mathematics of the projection transformation is given. Descriptions of the individual program modules are given, and a user's manual is provided.

  2. The Effects of Website Information Utility on the Outcomes of User-Website Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasley, Joseph Paul

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the relationships between website information content utility and various outcomes of user interactions with e-tail websites. Although previous research has consistently identified high quality information content as a critical factor of successful e-commerce websites, those studies have not reported how to identify the…

  3. Phase 1 user instruction manual. A geological formation - drill string dynamic interaction finite element program (GEODYN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinianow, M.A.; Rotelli, R.L. Jr.; Baird, J.A.

    1984-06-01

    User instructions for the GEODYN Interactive Finite Element Computer Program are presented. The program is capable of performing the analysis of the three-dimensional transient dynamic response of a Polycrystalline Diamond Compact Bit - Bit Sub arising from the intermittent contact of the bit with the downhole rock formations. The program accommodates non-linear, time dependent, loading and boundary conditions.

  4. A Framework and Implementation of User Interface and Human-Computer Interaction Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peslak, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Researchers have suggested that up to 50 % of the effort in development of information systems is devoted to user interface development (Douglas, Tremaine, Leventhal, Wills, & Manaris, 2002; Myers & Rosson, 1992). Yet little study has been performed on the inclusion of important interface and human-computer interaction topics into a current…

  5. User Experience of Mobile Interactivity: How Do Mobile Websites Affect Attitudes and Relational Outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Xue

    2013-01-01

    Mobile media offer new opportunities for fostering communications between individuals and companies. Corporate websites are being increasingly accessed via smart phones and companies are scrambling to offer a mobile-friendly user experience on their sites. However, very little is known about how interactivity in the mobile context affects user…

  6. Multimodal Adaptation and Enriched Interaction of Multimedia Content for Mobile Users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cesar Garcia, P.S.; Bulterman, D.C.A.; Kernchen, R.; Hesselman, C.; Boussard, M.; Spedalieri, A.; Vaishnavi, I.; Gao, B.

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduces an architecture, together with an implemented scenario, capable of dynamically adapt the way mobile users consume and interact with multimedia content. The architecture is based on a representative scenario identified by the European project SPICE, in which multimedia content i

  7. DEEP SPACE: High Resolution VR Platform for Multi-user Interactive Narratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuka, Daniela; Elias, Oliver; Martins, Ronald; Lindinger, Christopher; Pramböck, Andreas; Jalsovec, Andreas; Maresch, Pascal; Hörtner, Horst; Brandl, Peter

    DEEP SPACE is a large-scale platform for interactive, stereoscopic and high resolution content. The spatial and the system design of DEEP SPACE are facing constraints of CAVETM-like systems in respect to multi-user interactive storytelling. To be used as research platform and as public exhibition space for many people, DEEP SPACE is capable to process interactive, stereoscopic applications on two projection walls with a size of 16 by 9 meters and a resolution of four times 1080p (4K) each. The processed applications are ranging from Virtual Reality (VR)-environments to 3D-movies to computationally intensive 2D-productions. In this paper, we are describing DEEP SPACE as an experimental VR platform for multi-user interactive storytelling. We are focusing on the system design relevant for the platform, including the integration of the Apple iPod Touch technology as VR control, and a special case study that is demonstrating the research efforts in the field of multi-user interactive storytelling. The described case study, entitled "Papyrate's Island", provides a prototypical scenario of how physical drawings may impact on digital narratives. In this special case, DEEP SPACE helps us to explore the hypothesis that drawing, a primordial human creative skill, gives us access to entirely new creative possibilities in the domain of interactive storytelling.

  8. A Framework of Reference for Evaluating User Experience When Using High Definition Video to Video to Facilitate Public Services

    OpenAIRE

    Molnar, Andreea; Weerakkody, Vishanth; El-Haddadeh, Ramzi; Lee, Habin; Irani, Zahir

    2013-01-01

    Part 5: IT in the Public Sector; International audience; This paper proposes the use of high definition video to video as a means to facilitate the adoption of public services. High definition video can be delivered over the public Internet infrastructure by using a Right of Way platform that guarantees no interference from unwanted traffic. In this paper, we discuss the benefits of using high definition video to video communication in the public sector to facilitate services such as health, ...

  9. Interactive breast cancer segmentation based on relevance feedback: from user-centered design to evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouze, A.; Kieffer, S.; Van Brussel, C.; Moncarey, R.; Grivegnée, A.; Macq, B.

    2009-02-01

    Computer systems play an important role in medical imaging industry since radiologists depend on it for visualization, interpretation, communication and archiving. In particular, computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems help in lesion detection tasks. This paper presents the design and the development of an interactive segmentation tool for breast cancer screening and diagnosis. The tool conception is based upon a user-centered approach in order to ensure that the application is of real benefit to radiologists. The analysis of user expectations, workflow and decision-making practices give rise to the need for an interactive reporting system based on the BIRADS, that would not only include the numerical features extracted from the segmentation of the findings in a structured manner, but also support human relevance feedback as well. This way, the numerical results from segmentation can be either validated by end-users or enhanced thanks to domain-experts subjective interpretation. Such a domain-expert centered system requires the segmentation to be sufficiently accurate and locally adapted, and the features to be carefully selected in order to best suit user's knowledge and to be of use in enhancing segmentation. Improving segmentation accuracy with relevance feedback and providing radiologists with a user-friendly interface to support image analysis are the contributions of this work. The preliminary result is first the tool conception, and second the improvement of the segmentation precision.

  10. Impact of computer usage on the social interaction patterns of intense computer users and programmers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, T.J.

    1986-01-01

    This research is a qualitative analysis of the impact of intense computer use upon interpersonal relations. Through the use of a structured interview conducted through an interactive computer program called SIGMUND, data were collected from sixty subjects on: (1) the areas of the computer's attraction; (2) the intensity of the interaction with the computer; (3) the level, breadth and depth of the intense computer users' interpersonal relations; and (4) the impact of computer usage on interpersonal relationships. Additional personal interviews were conducted by the researcher with seven of these subjects for further clarification. The subjects were all extensive computer users. All but one were computer programmers and spent a mean of 5.13 hours per day at the computer. Conclusions are that intense computer users (1) seek the same qualities in interpersonal relations that are found with the computer; (2) due to this, they gradually narrow their social field to include primarily other intense computer users; (3) seek instant intensity in interpersonal relations, often without success; and (4) become gradually isolated from humans as this failure increases, reverting more to computer use. Computer use need not, however, have this negative impact. With awareness of the problems and a concerted effort on the computer user's part, the intensity of the computer relationship can be carried over to interpersonal relationships with some benefit.

  11. Efficient Video Indexing on the Web: A System that Leverages User Interactions with a Video Player

    CERN Document Server

    Leftheriotis, Ioannis; Chorianopoulos, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a user-based video indexing method, that automatically generates thumbnails of the most important scenes of an online video stream, by analyzing users' interactions with a web video player. As a test bench to verify our idea we have extended the YouTube video player into the VideoSkip system. In addition, VideoSkip uses a web-database (Google Application Engine) to keep a record of some important parameters, such as the timing of basic user actions (play, pause, skip). Moreover, we implemented an algorithm that selects representative thumbnails. Finally, we populated the system with data from an experiment with nine users. We found that the VideoSkip system indexes video content by leveraging implicit users interactions, such as pause and thirty seconds skip. Our early findings point toward improvements of the web video player and its thumbnail generation technique. The VideSkip system could compliment content-based algorithms, in order to achieve efficient video-indexing in difficul...

  12. POSA: a user-driven, interactive multiple protein structure alignment server.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhanwen; Natarajan, Padmaja; Ye, Yuzhen; Hrabe, Thomas; Godzik, Adam

    2014-07-01

    POSA (Partial Order Structure Alignment), available at http://posa.godziklab.org, is a server for multiple protein structure alignment introduced in 2005 (Ye,Y. and Godzik,A. (2005) Multiple flexible structure alignment using partial order graphs. Bioinformatics, 21, 2362-2369). It is free and open to all users, and there is no login requirement, albeit there is an option to register and store results in individual, password-protected directories. In the updated POSA server described here, we introduce two significant improvements. First is an interface allowing the user to provide additional information by defining segments that anchor the alignment in one or more input structures. This interface allows users to take advantage of their intuition and biological insights to improve the alignment and guide it toward a biologically relevant solution. The second improvement is an interactive visualization with options that allow the user to view all superposed structures in one window (a typical solution for visualizing results of multiple structure alignments) or view them individually in a series of synchronized windows with extensive, user-controlled visualization options. The user can rotate structure(s) in any of the windows and study similarities or differences between structures clearly visible in individual windows. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. Combining user logging with eye tracking for interactive and dynamic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooms, Kristien; Coltekin, Arzu; De Maeyer, Philippe; Dupont, Lien; Fabrikant, Sara; Incoul, Annelies; Kuhn, Matthias; Slabbinck, Hendrik; Vansteenkiste, Pieter; Van der Haegen, Lise

    2015-12-01

    User evaluations of interactive and dynamic applications face various challenges related to the active nature of these displays. For example, users can often zoom and pan on digital products, and these interactions cause changes in the extent and/or level of detail of the stimulus. Therefore, in eye tracking studies, when a user's gaze is at a particular screen position (gaze position) over a period of time, the information contained in this particular position may have changed. Such digital activities are commonplace in modern life, yet it has been difficult to automatically compare the changing information at the viewed position, especially across many participants. Existing solutions typically involve tedious and time-consuming manual work. In this article, we propose a methodology that can overcome this problem. By combining eye tracking with user logging (mouse and keyboard actions) with cartographic products, we are able to accurately reference screen coordinates to geographic coordinates. This referencing approach allows researchers to know which geographic object (location or attribute) corresponds to the gaze coordinates at all times. We tested the proposed approach through two case studies, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the applied methodology. Furthermore, the applicability of the proposed approach is discussed with respect to other fields of research that use eye tracking-namely, marketing, sports and movement sciences, and experimental psychology. From these case studies and discussions, we conclude that combining eye tracking and user-logging data is an essential step forward in efficiently studying user behavior with interactive and static stimuli in multiple research fields.

  14. Towards for Analyzing Alternatives of Interaction Design Based on Verbal Decision Analysis of User Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Soares Mendes

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In domains (as digital TV, smart home, and tangible interfaces that represent a new paradigm of interactivity, the decision of the most appropriate interaction design solution is a challenge. HCI researchers have promoted in their works the validation of design alternative solutions with users before producing the final solution. User experience with technology is a subject that has also gained ground in these works in order to analyze the appropriate solution(s. Following this concept, a study was accomplished under the objective of finding a better interaction solution for an application of mobile TV. Three executable applications of mobile TV prototypes were built. A Verbal Decision Analysis model was applied on the investigations for the favorite characteristics in each prototype based on the user’s experience and their intentions of use. This model led a performance of a qualitative analysis which objectified the design of a new prototype.

  15. Attitudes to Subtitle Duration and the Effect on User Responses in Speech Interactive Foreign Language Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazel Morton

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of subtitles in a Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL program can assist learners in the comprehension of the language input they are exposed to.  In an interactive CALL program, subtitles may also help learners in the formulation of their own responses. This paper describes the evaluation of a speech interactive CALL program that combines speech recognition technology, embodied animated agents and virtual worlds to create an environment in which learners can converse with virtual characters in the target language in real-time.  In particular, the research focuses on the use of subtitles as a help strategy; and the effects of subtitle duration on user attitudes and user responses in the system.  Two groups of users participated in the research: high school students learning Italian and high school students learning Japanese.  Empirical results are presented from an experiment that evaluated user attitudes towards the speech interactive program and in particular subtitle duration. 

  16. The Core Interaction of Platforms: How Startups Connect Users and Producers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi M. E. Korhonen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The platform economy is disrupting innovation while presenting both opportunities and challenges for startups. Platforms support value creation between multiple participant groups, and this operationalization of an ecosystem’s value co-creation represents the “core interaction” of a platform. This article focuses on that core interaction and studies how startups connect producers and users in value-creating core interaction through digital platforms. The study is based on an analysis of 29 cases of platform startups interviewed at a leading European startup event. The studied startups were envisioning even millions of users and hundreds or thousands of producers co-creating value on their platforms. In such platform businesses, our results highlight the importance of attracting a large user pool, providing novel services to those users, offering a new market for producers, supporting the core interaction in various ways, and utilizing elements of the platform canvas – an adaptation of the business model canvas, which we have accommodated for platform-based business models – to accomplish these goals.

  17. Experience of Adult Facilitators in a Virtual-Reality-Based Social Interaction Program for Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Fengfeng; Im, Tami; Xue, Xinrong; Xu, Xinhao; Kim, Namju; Lee, Sungwoong

    2015-01-01

    This phenomenological study explored and described the experiences and perceptions of adult facilitators who facilitated virtual-reality-based social interaction for children with autism. Extensive data were collected from iterative, in-depth interviews; online activities observation; and video analysis. Four salient themes emerged through the…

  18. Experience of Adult Facilitators in a Virtual-Reality-Based Social Interaction Program for Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Fengfeng; Im, Tami; Xue, Xinrong; Xu, Xinhao; Kim, Namju; Lee, Sungwoong

    2015-01-01

    This phenomenological study explored and described the experiences and perceptions of adult facilitators who facilitated virtual-reality-based social interaction for children with autism. Extensive data were collected from iterative, in-depth interviews; online activities observation; and video analysis. Four salient themes emerged through the…

  19. Facilitating participatory multilevel decision-making by using interactive mental maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Constanze; Glaser, Stephanie; Vencatesan, Jayshree; Schliermann-Kraus, Elke; Drescher, Axel; Glaser, Rüdiger

    2008-11-01

    Participation of citizens in political, economic or social decisions is increasingly recognized as a precondition to foster sustainable development processes. Since spatial information is often important during planning and decision making, participatory mapping gains in popularity. However, little attention has been paid to the fact that information must be presented in a useful way to reach city planners and policy makers. Above all, the importance of visualisation tools to support collaboration, analytical reasoning, problem solving and decision-making in analysing and planning processes has been underestimated. In this paper, we describe how an interactive mental map tool has been developed in a highly interdisciplinary disaster management project in Chennai, India. We moved from a hand drawn mental maps approach to an interactive mental map tool. This was achieved by merging socio-economic and geospatial data on infrastructure, local perceptions, coping and adaptation strategies with remote sensing data and modern technology of map making. This newly developed interactive mapping tool allowed for insights into different locally-constructed realities and facilitated the communication of results to the wider public and respective policy makers. It proved to be useful in visualising information and promoting participatory decision-making processes. We argue that the tool bears potential also for health research projects. The interactive mental map can be used to spatially and temporally assess key health themes such as availability of, and accessibility to, existing health care services, breeding sites of disease vectors, collection and storage of water, waste disposal, location of public toilets or defecation sites.

  20. Channel-facilitated molecular transport: The role of strength and spatial distribution of interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppulury, Karthik; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2016-12-01

    Molecular transport across channels and pores is critically important for multiple natural and industrial processes. Recent advances in single-molecule techniques have allowed researchers to probe translocation through nanopores with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. However, our understanding of the mechanisms of channel-facilitated molecular transport is still not complete. We present a theoretical approach that investigates the role of molecular interactions in the transport through channels. It is based on the discrete-state stochastic analysis that provides a fully analytical description of this complex process. It is found that a spatial distribution of the interactions strongly influences the translocation dynamics. We predict that there is the optimal distribution that leads to the maximal flux through the channel. It is also argued that the channel transport depends on the strength of the molecule-pore interactions, on the shape of interaction potentials and on the relative contributions of entrance and diffusion processes in the system. These observations are discussed using simple physical-chemical arguments.

  1. People with Profound and Multiple Intellectual Disabilities Using Symbols to Control a Computer: Exploration of User Engagement and Supporter Facilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunning, Karen; Kwiatkowska, Gosia; Weldin, Nick

    2012-01-01

    Computer usage features in everyday life for the majority of people in developed countries. Access is a problem for many users with intellectual disability. Action-research was conducted to develop and explore the potential of specially adapted, computer readable symbols for choosing and accessing media on a computer. Five people with profound and…

  2. Nurse practitioner perceptions of barriers and facilitators in providing health care for deaf American Sign Language users: A qualitative socio-ecological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendergrass, Kathy M; Nemeth, Lynne; Newman, Susan D; Jenkins, Carolyn M; Jones, Elaine G

    2017-06-01

    Nurse practitioners (NPs), as well as all healthcare clinicians, have a legal and ethical responsibility to provide health care for deaf American Sign Language (ASL) users equal to that of other patients, including effective communication, autonomy, and confidentiality. However, very little is known about the feasibility to provide equitable health care. The purpose of this study was to examine NP perceptions of barriers and facilitators in providing health care for deaf ASL users. Semistructured interviews in a qualitative design using a socio-ecological model (SEM). Barriers were identified at all levels of the SEM. NPs preferred interpreters to facilitate the visit, but were unaware of their role in assuring effective communication is achieved. A professional sign language interpreter was considered a last resort when all other means of communication failed. Gesturing, note-writing, lip-reading, and use of a familial interpreter were all considered facilitators. Interventions are needed at all levels of the SEM. Resources are needed to provide awareness of deaf communication issues and legal requirements for caring for deaf signers for practicing and student NPs. Protocols need to be developed and present in all healthcare facilities for hiring interpreters as well as quick access to contact information for these interpreters. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  3. Educational Group Practices in Primary Care: Interaction Between Professionals, Users and Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Flavia Gazzinelli

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To investigate the concept understood by Family Healthcare Strategy (ESF professionals of knowledge, education and subjects participating in learning activities. METHOD Qualitative study carried out with the ESF professionals with university degree, members of the healthcare staff who undertook educational health group activities at Basic Healthcare Units (UBS in Belo Horizonte. The following triangulation techniques were used: participant observation, photos and field notes; interviews with professionals; and document analysis. RESULTS We identified three interaction patterns that are different from each other. Firstly, the professional questions, listens and provides information to users, trusting in the transmission of knowledge; secondly, the professional questions and listens, trusting that users can learn from each other; thirdly, the professional questions, listens, discusses and produces knowledge with users, both teaching and learning from each other. CONCLUSION There are educational practices that include unique methods capable of creating a militant space for citizenship engagement.

  4. Getting Early Childhood Educators Up and Running: Creating Strong Technology Curators, Facilitators, Guides, and Users. Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugherty, Lindsay; Dossani, Rafiq; Johnson, Erin-Elizabeth; Wright, Cameron

    2014-01-01

    Providers of early childhood education (ECE) are well positioned to help ensure that technology is used effectively in ECE settings. Indeed, the successful integration of technology into ECE depends on providers who have the ability to curate the most appropriate devices and content, "facilitate" effective patterns of use, guide families…

  5. Getting Early Childhood Educators Up and Running: Creating Strong Technology Curators, Facilitators, Guides, and Users. Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugherty, Lindsay; Dossani, Rafiq; Johnson, Erin-Elizabeth; Wright, Cameron

    2014-01-01

    Providers of early childhood education (ECE) are well positioned to help ensure that technology is used effectively in ECE settings. Indeed, the successful integration of technology into ECE depends on providers who have the ability to curate the most appropriate devices and content, "facilitate" effective patterns of use, guide families…

  6. Relationship between channel interaction and spectral-ripple discrimination in cochlear implant users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gary L; Won, Jong Ho; Drennan, Ward R; Rubinstein, Jay T

    2013-01-01

    Cochlear implant (CI) users can achieve remarkable speech understanding, but there is great variability in outcomes that is only partially accounted for by age, residual hearing, and duration of deafness. Results might be improved with the use of psychophysical tests to predict which sound processing strategies offer the best potential outcomes. In particular, the spectral-ripple discrimination test offers a time-efficient, nonlinguistic measure that is correlated with perception of both speech and music by CI users. Features that make this "one-point" test time-efficient, and thus potentially clinically useful, are also connected to controversy within the CI field about what the test measures. The current work examined the relationship between thresholds in the one-point spectral-ripple test, in which stimuli are presented acoustically, and interaction indices measured under the controlled conditions afforded by direct stimulation with a research processor. Results of these studies include the following: (1) within individual subjects there were large variations in the interaction index along the electrode array, (2) interaction indices generally decreased with increasing electrode separation, and (3) spectral-ripple discrimination improved with decreasing mean interaction index at electrode separations of one, three, and five electrodes. These results indicate that spectral-ripple discrimination thresholds can provide a useful metric of the spectral resolution of CI users.

  7. Searching for a sustainable process of service user and health professional online discussions to facilitate the implementation of e-health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ray B; Ashurst, Emily J; Trappes-Lomax, Tessa

    2016-12-01

    Many e-health projects fail to be implemented. We aimed to find a sustainable process of service user and health professional online discussions about e-health to facilitate implementation and identification of needed research. A previously piloted course compared Mental Health participants' views with publications, identifying 'quick wins' and barriers to e-health implementation. This study explored this approach further in eight domains including Health Promotion, Mental Health, and Carers. Courses comprised webinar, 1-week closed discussion forum, and final webinar. Participants discussed 12 e-health topics. Course analysis identified that five out of eight domains 'worked'. Participation was appreciated and service users influenced health professional thinking. The principle of service user-health professional online discussions to prepare for e-health implementation works for most domains, but the work of participant recruitment and forum management may make other methods, such as Tweetchats or courses hosted by existing forums where service users predominate, easier to sustain in the long term.

  8. Interactive rhythmic cue facilitates gait relearning in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchitomi, Hirotaka; Ota, Leo; Ogawa, Ken-ichiro; Orimo, Satoshi; Miyake, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    To develop a method for cooperative human gait training, we investigated whether interactive rhythmic cues could improve the gait performance of Parkinson's disease patients. The interactive rhythmic cues ware generated based on the mutual entrainment between the patient's gait rhythms and the cue rhythms input to the patient while the patient walked. Previously, we found that the dynamic characteristics of stride interval fluctuation in Parkinson's disease patients were improved to a healthy 1/f fluctuation level using interactive rhythmic cues and that this effect was maintained in the short term. However, two problems remained in our previous study. First, it was not clear whether the key factor underpinning the effect was the mutual entrainment between the gait rhythms and the cue rhythms or the rhythmic cue fluctuation itself. Second, it was not clear whether or not the gait restoration was maintained longitudinally and was relearned after repeating the cue-based gait training. Thus, the present study clarified these issues using 32 patients who participated in a four-day experimental program. The patients were assigned randomly to one of four experimental groups with the following rhythmic cues: (a) interactive rhythmic cue, (b) fixed tempo cue, (c) 1/f fluctuating tempo cue, and (d) no cue. It has been reported that the 1/f fluctuation of stride interval in healthy gait is absent in Parkinson's disease patients. Therefore, we used this dynamic characteristic as an evaluation index to analyze gait relearning in the four different conditions. We observed a significant effect in condition (a) that the gait fluctuation of the patients gradually returned to a healthy 1/f fluctuation level, whereas this did not occur in the other conditions. This result suggests that the mutual entrainment can facilitate gait relearning effectively. It is expected that interactive rhythmic cues will be widely applicable in the fields of rehabilitation and assistive technology.

  9. UTOPIAN: user-driven topic modeling based on interactive nonnegative matrix factorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Jaegul; Lee, Changhyun; Reddy, Chandan K; Park, Haesun

    2013-12-01

    Topic modeling has been widely used for analyzing text document collections. Recently, there have been significant advancements in various topic modeling techniques, particularly in the form of probabilistic graphical modeling. State-of-the-art techniques such as Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) have been successfully applied in visual text analytics. However, most of the widely-used methods based on probabilistic modeling have drawbacks in terms of consistency from multiple runs and empirical convergence. Furthermore, due to the complicatedness in the formulation and the algorithm, LDA cannot easily incorporate various types of user feedback. To tackle this problem, we propose a reliable and flexible visual analytics system for topic modeling called UTOPIAN (User-driven Topic modeling based on Interactive Nonnegative Matrix Factorization). Centered around its semi-supervised formulation, UTOPIAN enables users to interact with the topic modeling method and steer the result in a user-driven manner. We demonstrate the capability of UTOPIAN via several usage scenarios with real-world document corpuses such as InfoVis/VAST paper data set and product review data sets.

  10. Activating Humans with Humor——A Dialogue System That Users Want to Interact with

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dybala, Pawel; Ptaszynski, Michal; Rzepka, Rafal; Araki, Kenji

    The topic of Human Computer Interaction (HCI) has been gathering more and more scientific attention of late. A very important, but often undervalued area in this field is human engagement. That is, a person's commitment to take part in and continue the interaction. In this paper we describe work on a humor-equipped casual conversational system (chatterbot) and investigate the effect of humor on a user's engagement in the conversation. A group of users was made to converse with two systems: one with and one without humor. The chat logs were then analyzed using an emotive analysis system to check user reactions and attitudes towards each system. Results were projected on Russell's two-dimensional emotiveness space to evaluate the positivity/negativity and activation/deactivation of these emotions. This analysis indicated emotions elicited by the humor-equipped system were more positively active and less negatively active than by the system without humor. The implications of results and relation between them and user engagement in the conversation are discussed. We also propose a distinction between positive and negative engagement.

  11. Neuropeptide S interacts with the basolateral amygdala noradrenergic system in facilitating object recognition memory consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ren-Wen; Xu, Hong-Jiao; Zhang, Rui-San; Wang, Pei; Chang, Min; Peng, Ya-Li; Deng, Ke-Yu; Wang, Rui

    2014-01-01

    The noradrenergic activity in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) was reported to be involved in the regulation of object recognition memory. As the BLA expresses high density of receptors for Neuropeptide S (NPS), we investigated whether the BLA is involved in mediating NPS's effects on object recognition memory consolidation and whether such effects require noradrenergic activity. Intracerebroventricular infusion of NPS (1nmol) post training facilitated 24-h memory in a mouse novel object recognition task. The memory-enhancing effect of NPS could be blocked by the β-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol. Furthermore, post-training intra-BLA infusions of NPS (0.5nmol/side) improved 24-h memory for objects, which was impaired by co-administration of propranolol (0.5μg/side). Taken together, these results indicate that NPS interacts with the BLA noradrenergic system in improving object recognition memory during consolidation.

  12. From User Interface Usability to the Overall Usability of Interactive Systems: Adding Usability in System Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taleb, Mohamed; Seffah, Ahmed; Engleberg, Daniel

    Traditional interactive system architectures such as MVC and PAC decompose the system into subsystems that are relatively independent, thereby allowing the design work to be partitioned between the user interfaces and underlying functionalities. Such architectures extend the independence assumption to usability, approaching the design of the user interface as a subsystem that can be designed and tested independently from the underlying functionality. This Cartesian dichotomy can be fallacious, as functionalities buried in the application’s logic can sometimes affect the usability of the system. Our investigations model the relationships between internal software attributes and externally visible usability factors. We propose a pattern-based approach for dealing with these relationships. We conclude by discussing how these patterns can lead to a methodological framework for improving interactive system architec-tures, and how these patterns can support the integration of usability in the software design process.

  13. Interaction Design and Usability of Learning Spaces in 3D Multi-user Virtual Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minocha, Shailey; Reeves, Ahmad John

    Three-dimensional virtual worlds are multimedia, simulated environments, often managed over the Web, which users can 'inhabit' and interact via their own graphical, self-representations known as 'avatars'. 3D virtual worlds are being used in many applications: education/training, gaming, social networking, marketing and commerce. Second Life is the most widely used 3D virtual world in education. However, problems associated with usability, navigation and way finding in 3D virtual worlds may impact on student learning and engagement. Based on empirical investigations of learning spaces in Second Life, this paper presents design guidelines to improve the usability and ease of navigation in 3D spaces. Methods of data collection include semi-structured interviews with Second Life students, educators and designers. The findings have revealed that design principles from the fields of urban planning, Human- Computer Interaction, Web usability, geography and psychology can influence the design of spaces in 3D multi-user virtual environments.

  14. How 3D Interaction Metaphors Affect User Experience in Collaborative Virtual Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Hrimech

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we presents the results of our experimental study which aims to understand the impact of three interaction 3D metaphors (ray casting, GoGo, and virtual hand on the user experience in a semi-immersive collaborative virtual environment (the Braccetto System. For each session, participants are grouped in twos to reconstruct a puzzle by an assemblage of cubes. The puzzle to reconstruct corresponds to a gradient of colors. We found that there is a significant difference in the user experience by changing the interaction metaphor on the copresence, awareness, involvement, collaborative effort, satisfaction usability, and preference. These findings provide a basis for designing 3D navigation techniques in a CVE.

  15. Program Facilitates Distributed Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Joseph

    1993-01-01

    KNET computer program facilitates distribution of computing between UNIX-compatible local host computer and remote host computer, which may or may not be UNIX-compatible. Capable of automatic remote log-in. User communicates interactively with remote host computer. Data output from remote host computer directed to local screen, to local file, and/or to local process. Conversely, data input from keyboard, local file, or local process directed to remote host computer. Written in ANSI standard C language.

  16. Interacting with Users in Social Networks: The Follow-back Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-02

    National Defense Motivation With its rapid growth, social media has gained the interst of national defense policy makers and strategists. In January of... Motivation Social networks have rapidly risen in size over the past decade and today represent one of the main platforms through which social interactions...occur. Current estimates are that 74% of adult Internet users are on social media and in many other parts of the world, including emerging markets, this

  17. User Interaction in Semi-Automatic Segmentation of Organs at Risk: a Case Study in Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramkumar, Anjana; Dolz, Jose; Kirisli, Hortense A; Adebahr, Sonja; Schimek-Jasch, Tanja; Nestle, Ursula; Massoptier, Laurent; Varga, Edit; Stappers, Pieter Jan; Niessen, Wiro J; Song, Yu

    2016-04-01

    Accurate segmentation of organs at risk is an important step in radiotherapy planning. Manual segmentation being a tedious procedure and prone to inter- and intra-observer variability, there is a growing interest in automated segmentation methods. However, automatic methods frequently fail to provide satisfactory result, and post-processing corrections are often needed. Semi-automatic segmentation methods are designed to overcome these problems by combining physicians' expertise and computers' potential. This study evaluates two semi-automatic segmentation methods with different types of user interactions, named the "strokes" and the "contour", to provide insights into the role and impact of human-computer interaction. Two physicians participated in the experiment. In total, 42 case studies were carried out on five different types of organs at risk. For each case study, both the human-computer interaction process and quality of the segmentation results were measured subjectively and objectively. Furthermore, different measures of the process and the results were correlated. A total of 36 quantifiable and ten non-quantifiable correlations were identified for each type of interaction. Among those pairs of measures, 20 of the contour method and 22 of the strokes method were strongly or moderately correlated, either directly or inversely. Based on those correlated measures, it is concluded that: (1) in the design of semi-automatic segmentation methods, user interactions need to be less cognitively challenging; (2) based on the observed workflows and preferences of physicians, there is a need for flexibility in the interface design; (3) the correlated measures provide insights that can be used in improving user interaction design.

  18. Simultaneous structure and geometry detail completion based on interactive user sketches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Shen; QI Yue; QIN Hong

    2012-01-01

    We articulate a novel approach to geometric model completion via interactive sketches in this paper.First,the initial incomplete model (with holes) is decomposed into a base model and a high-frequency component,which represents global rough shape and geometric details,respectively.We then repair the base model via smooth hole-filling,and compute the geometry detail image using high frequency information.One novel element of our approach is that we allow users to interactively sketch a few structural curves that span across hole regions,with a goal to repair both local geometric details and global structure.With the help of local parameterization,we convert detailed geometry into gradient-domain images which can propagate along user-specified sketches.By integrating recovered gradient-domain images and base shape,we can generate a complete model that faithfully recovers both global structure and local details.The salient contribution of this paper is the unified approach for user interaction,global structure,and geometry details towards high-fidelity model completion.We demonstrate our new approach using a number of examples that exhibit salient global structure as well as local geometry details.

  19. Facilitating participatory multilevel decision-making by using interactive mental maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constanze Pfeiffer

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Participation of citizens in political, economic or social decisions is increasingly recognized as a precondition to foster sustainable development processes. Since spatial information is often important during planning and decisionmaking, participatory mapping gains in popularity. However, little attention has been paid to the fact that information must be presented in a useful way to reach city planners and policy makers. Above all, the importance of visualisation tools to support collaboration, analytical reasoning, problem solving and decision-making in analysing and planning processes has been underestimated. In this paper, we describe how an interactive mental map tool has been developed in a highly interdisciplinary disaster management project in Chennai, India. We moved from a hand drawn mental maps approach to an interactive mental map tool. This was achieved by merging socio-economic and geospatial data on infrastructure, local perceptions, coping and adaptation strategies with remote sensing data and modern technology of map making. This newly developed interactive mapping tool allowed for insights into different locally-constructed realities and facilitated the communication of results to the wider public and respective policy makers. It proved to be useful in visualising information and promoting participatory decision-making processes. We argue that the tool bears potential also for health research projects. The interactive mental map can be used to spatially and temporally assess key health themes such as availability of, and accessibility to, existing health care services, breeding sites of disease vectors, collection and storage of water, waste disposal, location of public toilets or defecation sites.

  20. Integrated Fuel-Coolant Interaction (IFCI 7.0) Code User's Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Michael F.

    1999-05-01

    The integrated fuel-coolant interaction (IFCI) computer code is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories to investigate the fuel-coolant interaction (FCI) problem at large scale using a two-dimensional, three-field hydrodynamic framework and physically based models. IFCI will be capable of treating all major FCI processes in an integrated manner. This document is a description of IFCI 7.0. The user's manual describes the hydrodynamic method and physical models used in IFCI 7.0. Appendix A is an input manual provided for the creation of working decks.

  1. Public Procurement of Innovation; Endogenous Institutions in User-Producer Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjaltadóttir, Rannveig Edda

    2013-01-01

    Introduction 2010 government expenditure on works, goods and services in EU 19.7% of GDP - 2.406,98€ billion. Can be used to stimulate innovation Focus on public procurement of innovation in EU maintain competitive advantage and welfare Governments are important first users for high technology...... (Urban & von Hippel, 1988). Need interaction in public procurement of innovation (PPI). The aim of this research is to investigate the institutions that govern this interaction and how they influence performance in PPI. Institutions are “the rules of the game” (North, 1990)...

  2. Cross-cultural human-computer interaction and user experience design a semiotic perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Brejcha, Jan

    2015-01-01

    This book describes patterns of language and culture in human-computer interaction (HCI). Through numerous examples, it shows why these patterns matter and how to exploit them to design a better user experience (UX) with computer systems. It provides scientific information on the theoretical and practical areas of the interaction and communication design for research experts and industry practitioners and covers the latest research in semiotics and cultural studies, bringing a set of tools and methods to benefit the process of designing with the cultural background in mind.

  3. A communicational framework for evaluating interaction with IT by analyzing user-reception of electronic texts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wentzer, Helle

    2006-01-01

    Interpreting IT as a medium for continuous communication across time and place of the communicators offers a way of analyzing the effect of IT in concrete practices. The users’ readings determine the actual communication with IT. A poetics of how meaning is translated from one person to another...... through semiotic texts is presented, termed the poetics of the e-text. The poetics of the e-text offers a meta-communicational framework for identifying user constraints in the possibilities of interacting with the system. Identifying communicational problems with ICT-mediated interactions again offer...

  4. Social interaction facilitates word learning in preverbal infants: Word-object mapping and word segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakuno, Yoko; Omori, Takahide; Yamamoto, Jun-Ichi; Minagawa, Yasuyo

    2017-08-01

    In natural settings, infants learn spoken language with the aid of a caregiver who explicitly provides social signals. Although previous studies have demonstrated that young infants are sensitive to these signals that facilitate language development, the impact of real-life interactions on early word segmentation and word-object mapping remains elusive. We tested whether infants aged 5-6 months and 9-10 months could segment a word from continuous speech and acquire a word-object relation in an ecologically valid setting. In Experiment 1, infants were exposed to a live tutor, while in Experiment 2, another group of infants were exposed to a televised tutor. Results indicate that both younger and older infants were capable of segmenting a word and learning a word-object association only when the stimuli were derived from a live tutor in a natural manner, suggesting that real-life interaction enhances the learning of spoken words in preverbal infants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Interaction of DDP with bovine serum albumin facilitates formation of the protein dimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belaya, I.; Chikhirzhina, E.; Polyanichko, A.

    2017-07-01

    Interaction of bovine serum albumin (BSA) with cis- and trans- isomers of diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (DDP) was studied using electrophoretic analysis and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The application of FTIR spectroscopy allowed us to study the DDP/BSA complexes in D2O solutions using protein concentrations close to the physiological level (30 mg/ml) with platinum to BSA molar ratios in the range of 1:1 to 150:1. Under these conditions we have observed formation of relatively weak non-covalent intermolecular protein complexes, which dominated over the BSA-Pt-BSA crosslinks. Analysis of the IR spectra in the region of amide I‧ band revealed that the fraction of the α-helical regions in the protein decreases from ∼65% to approximately 55% and 48% in the complexes with cis- and trans-DDP respectively, while the amount of extended β-structures increases from ∼15 to 20% in BSA to 20-30% in its complexes with cis-DDP and up to 35-40% in trans-DDP/BSA complexes. Based on the data obtained we conclude that multiple intermolecular interactions take place in the solution facilitated by the changes in the BSA secondary structure, induced by DDP binding.

  6. User-Appropriate Viewer for High Resolution Interactive Engagement with 3d Digital Cultural Artefacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, D.; La Pensée, A.; Cooper, M.

    2013-07-01

    presents results of research that aims to provide a methodology for museums and cultural institutions for prototyping a 3D viewer within a webpage, thereby not only allowing institutions to promote their collections via the internet but also providing a tool for users to engage in a meaningful way with cultural heritage datasets. The design process encompasses evaluation as the central part of the design methodology; focusing on how slight changes to navigation, object engagement and aesthetic appearance can influence the user's experience. The prototype used in this paper, was created using WebGL with the Three.Js (Three.JS, 2013) library and datasets were loaded as the OpenCTM (Geelnard, 2010) file format. The overall design is centred on creating an easy-tolearn interface allowing non-skilled users to interact with the datasets, and also providing tools allowing skilled users to discover more about the cultural heritage object. User testing was carried out, allowing users to interact with 3D datasets within the interactive viewer. The results are analysed and the insights learned are discussed in relation to an interface designed to interact with 3D content. The results will lead to the design of interfaces for interacting with 3D objects, which allow for both skilled and non skilled users to engage with 3D cultural heritage objects in a meaningful way.

  7. Method and Apparatus for Virtual Interactive Medical Imaging by Multiple Remotely-Located Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Muriel D. (Inventor); Twombly, Ian Alexander (Inventor); Senger, Steven O. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A virtual interactive imaging system allows the displaying of high-resolution, three-dimensional images of medical data to a user and allows the user to manipulate the images, including rotation of images in any of various axes. The system includes a mesh component that generates a mesh to represent a surface of an anatomical object, based on a set of data of the object, such as from a CT or MRI scan or the like. The mesh is generated so as to avoid tears, or holes, in the mesh, providing very high-quality representations of topographical features of the object, particularly at high- resolution. The system further includes a virtual surgical cutting tool that enables the user to simulate the removal of a piece or layer of a displayed object, such as a piece of skin or bone, view the interior of the object, manipulate the removed piece, and reattach the removed piece if desired. The system further includes a virtual collaborative clinic component, which allows the users of multiple, remotely-located computer systems to collaboratively and simultaneously view and manipulate the high-resolution, three-dimensional images of the object in real-time.

  8. The interaction of public-school teachers with student users of psychoactive substances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Castro Rossi L.C.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The increasing and early use of psychoactive substances by children and adolescents represents a challenge to public-health practice. To understand teachers' interactions with student users of drugs and develop a representative theoretical model of such experience this study was conducted. Qualitative study conducted in Sro Paulo, Brazil, with 32 teachers from public schools by means of focal groups and based on the Grounded Theory as its methodological framework. Progressively comprehensive categories converged to three phenomena: Identifying student's users; Feeling powerless in face the challenges of drugs use; Silencing to preserve oneself from a threatening scenario. These phenomena constructed the core category of the experience: Silencing to preserve oneself from a threatening scenario in face of the fragility of rescuing student's users of drugs. The clash between inducing and protective factors in the concrete situations of drugs use was revealed, thus pointing out that the lack of State and social support associated with the user's relation with drug trafficking and violence leads teachers to silence as they feel unprotected in face of a situation surrounded by stigma and prejudice. Coping strategies should include the educators, relatives, health care professionals and government institutions, thus providing ways to prevent and treat use, orientate and reconstruct lives in a process of active participation for all students

  9. Extraction of user's navigation commands from upper body force interaction in walker assisted gait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pons José L

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The advances in technology make possible the incorporation of sensors and actuators in rollators, building safer robots and extending the use of walkers to a more diverse population. This paper presents a new method for the extraction of navigation related components from upper-body force interaction data in walker assisted gait. A filtering architecture is designed to cancel: (i the high-frequency noise caused by vibrations on the walker's structure due to irregularities on the terrain or walker's wheels and (ii the cadence related force components caused by user's trunk oscillations during gait. As a result, a third component related to user's navigation commands is distinguished. Results For the cancelation of high-frequency noise, a Benedict-Bordner g-h filter was designed presenting very low values for Kinematic Tracking Error ((2.035 ± 0.358·10-2 kgf and delay ((1.897 ± 0.3697·101ms. A Fourier Linear Combiner filtering architecture was implemented for the adaptive attenuation of about 80% of the cadence related components' energy from force data. This was done without compromising the information contained in the frequencies close to such notch filters. Conclusions The presented methodology offers an effective cancelation of the undesired components from force data, allowing the system to extract in real-time voluntary user's navigation commands. Based on this real-time identification of voluntary user's commands, a classical approach to the control architecture of the robotic walker is being developed, in order to obtain stable and safe user assisted locomotion.

  10. COREMAP: Graphical user interface for displaying reactor core data in an interactive hexagon map

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muscat, F.L.; Derstine, K.L.

    1995-06-01

    COREMAP is a Graphical User Interface (GUI) designed to assist users read and check reactor core data from multidimensional neutronic simulation models in color and/or as text in an interactive 2D planar grid of hexagonal subassemblies. COREMAP is a complete GEODST/RUNDESC viewing tool which enables the user to access multi data set files (e.g. planes, moments, energy groups ,... ) and display up to two data sets simultaneously, one as color and the other as text. The user (1) controls color scale characteristics such as type (linear or logarithmic) and range limits, (2) controls the text display based upon conditional statements on data spelling, and value. (3) chooses zoom features such as core map size, number of rings and surrounding subassemblies, and (4) specifies the data selection for supplied popup subwindows which display a selection of data currently off-screen for a selected cell, as a list of data and/or as a graph. COREMAP includes a RUNDESC file editing tool which creates ``proposed`` Run-description files by point and click revisions to subassembly assignments in an existing EBRII Run-description file. COREMAP includes a fully automated printing option which creates high quality PostScript color or greyscale images of the core map independent of the monitor used, e.g. color prints can be generated with a session from a color or monochrome monitor. The automated PostScript output is an alternative to the xgrabsc based printing option. COREMAP includes a plotting option which creates graphs related to a selected cell. The user specifies the X and Y coordinates types (planes, moment, group, flux ,... ) and a parameter, P, when displaying several curves for the specified (X, Y) pair COREMAP supports hexagonal geometry reactor core configurations specified by: the GEODST file and binary Standard Interface Files and the RUNDESC ordering.

  11. Cannabis use vulnerability among socially anxious users: cannabis craving during a social interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckner, Julia D; Ecker, Anthony H; Vinci, Christine

    2013-03-01

    Socially anxious individuals appear especially vulnerable to cannabis-related problems. However, the nature of the social anxiety-cannabis relation remains unclear. The present study examined the timing and specificity of cannabis craving in response to a social anxiety induction task among 82 (71% female) cannabis users randomly assigned to either a social interaction or reading task. Participants completed ratings of substance (cannabis, alcohol, cigarette) craving at baseline (prior to being informed of task assignment), before, during, and after task. The Time × Condition interaction was significant such that cannabis craving increased from before to during the task among participants in the social interaction condition, but not among those in the reading condition. This effect was specific to cannabis craving and was not observed for craving for alcohol or cigarettes. Data suggest that increases in state social anxiety may play a role in cannabis use behaviors. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Interactive multi-objective path planning through a palette-based user interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Meher T.; Goodrich, Michael A.; Yi, Daqing; Hoehne, Joseph

    2016-05-01

    n a problem where a human uses supervisory control to manage robot path-planning, there are times when human does the path planning, and if satisfied commits those paths to be executed by the robot, and the robot executes that plan. In planning a path, the robot often uses an optimization algorithm that maximizes or minimizes an objective. When a human is assigned the task of path planning for robot, the human may care about multiple objectives. This work proposes a graphical user interface (GUI) designed for interactive robot path-planning when an operator may prefer one objective over others or care about how multiple objectives are traded off. The GUI represents multiple objectives using the metaphor of an artist's palette. A distinct color is used to represent each objective, and tradeoffs among objectives are balanced in a manner that an artist mixes colors to get the desired shade of color. Thus, human intent is analogous to the artist's shade of color. We call the GUI an "Adverb Palette" where the word "Adverb" represents a specific type of objective for the path, such as the adverbs "quickly" and "safely" in the commands: "travel the path quickly", "make the journey safely". The novel interactive interface provides the user an opportunity to evaluate various alternatives (that tradeoff between different objectives) by allowing her to visualize the instantaneous outcomes that result from her actions on the interface. In addition to assisting analysis of various solutions given by an optimization algorithm, the palette has additional feature of allowing the user to define and visualize her own paths, by means of waypoints (guiding locations) thereby spanning variety for planning. The goal of the Adverb Palette is thus to provide a way for the user and robot to find an acceptable solution even though they use very different representations of the problem. Subjective evaluations suggest that even non-experts in robotics can carry out the planning tasks with a

  13. Multiple male traits interact: attractive bower decorations facilitate attractive behavioural displays in satin bowerbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricelli, Gail L; Uy, J Albert C; Borgia, Gerald

    2003-11-22

    Sexually selected male courtship displays often involve multiple behavioural and physical traits, but little is known about the function of different traits in mate choice. Here, we examine female courtship behaviours to learn how male traits interact to influence female mating decisions. In satin bowerbirds (Ptilonorhynchus violaceus), successful males give highly aggressive, intense behavioural displays without startling females. Males do this by modulating their displays in response to female crouching, which signals the display intensity that females will tolerate without being startled. Females typically visit multiple males for multiple courtships before choosing a mate, and females show differing tolerance for intense displays during their first courtship with each male. We test three hypotheses that may explain this: (i) familiarity with the courting male; (ii) the order of the courtship in mate-searching; and (iii) the attractiveness of the courting male. We found that females are more tolerant of intense displays during first courtships with attractive males; this increased female tolerance may allow attractive males to give higher intensity courtship displays that further enhance their attractiveness. We then examined why this is so, finding evidence that females are less likely to be startled by males with better physical displays (bower decorations), and this reduced startling then contributes to male courtship success. This role of physical displays in facilitating behavioural displays suggests a novel mechanism by which multiple physical and behavioural traits may influence female choice.

  14. Pattern mining of user interaction logs for a post-deployment usability evaluation of a radiology PACS client

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jorritsma, Wiard; Cnossen, Fokie; Dierckx, Rudi A.; Oudkerk, Matthijs; van Ooijen, Peter M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To perform a post-deployment usability evaluation of a radiology Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) client based on pattern mining of user interaction log data, and to assess the usefulness of this approach compared to a field study. Methods: All user actions performed on

  15. Comparison of User Performance with Interactive and Static 3d Visualization - Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, L.; Stachoň, Z.

    2016-06-01

    Interactive 3D visualizations of spatial data are currently available and popular through various applications such as Google Earth, ArcScene, etc. Several scientific studies have focused on user performance with 3D visualization, but static perspective views are used as stimuli in most of the studies. The main objective of this paper is to try to identify potential differences in user performance with static perspective views and interactive visualizations. This research is an exploratory study. An experiment was designed as a between-subject study and a customized testing tool based on open web technologies was used for the experiment. The testing set consists of an initial questionnaire, a training task and four experimental tasks. Selection of the highest point and determination of visibility from the top of a mountain were used as the experimental tasks. Speed and accuracy of each task performance of participants were recorded. The movement and actions in the virtual environment were also recorded within the interactive variant. The results show that participants deal with the tasks faster when using static visualization. The average error rate was also higher in the static variant. The findings from this pilot study will be used for further testing, especially for formulating of hypotheses and designing of subsequent experiments.

  16. COMPARISON OF USER PERFORMANCE WITH INTERACTIVE AND STATIC 3D VISUALIZATION – PILOT STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Herman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Interactive 3D visualizations of spatial data are currently available and popular through various applications such as Google Earth, ArcScene, etc. Several scientific studies have focused on user performance with 3D visualization, but static perspective views are used as stimuli in most of the studies. The main objective of this paper is to try to identify potential differences in user performance with static perspective views and interactive visualizations. This research is an exploratory study. An experiment was designed as a between-subject study and a customized testing tool based on open web technologies was used for the experiment. The testing set consists of an initial questionnaire, a training task and four experimental tasks. Selection of the highest point and determination of visibility from the top of a mountain were used as the experimental tasks. Speed and accuracy of each task performance of participants were recorded. The movement and actions in the virtual environment were also recorded within the interactive variant. The results show that participants deal with the tasks faster when using static visualization. The average error rate was also higher in the static variant. The findings from this pilot study will be used for further testing, especially for formulating of hypotheses and designing of subsequent experiments.

  17. User Interaction with Inverted-F Antennas Integrated into Laptop PCMCIA Cards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Guterman

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates the overall laptop integration effects on the performance of commercial 2.4 GHz Inverted-F antennas built into PCMCIA cards. A generic laptop model is used to represent the antenna housing effects while an anatomical shape homogenous human model is used to estimate the electromagnetic interaction between the antenna and the user. The antenna performance is evaluated for different card locations in terms of reflection coefficient, far-field gain pattern and radiation efficiency. The human exposure to EM radiation is analyzed in terms of Specific Absorption Rate.

  18. Interactive, open source, travel time scenario modelling: tools to facilitate participation in health service access analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Rohan; Lassa, Jonatan

    2017-04-18

    Modelling travel time to services has become a common public health tool for planning service provision but the usefulness of these analyses is constrained by the availability of accurate input data and limitations inherent in the assumptions and parameterisation. This is particularly an issue in the developing world where access to basic data is limited and travel is often complex and multi-modal. Improving the accuracy and relevance in this context requires greater accessibility to, and flexibility in, travel time modelling tools to facilitate the incorporation of local knowledge and the rapid exploration of multiple travel scenarios. The aim of this work was to develop simple open source, adaptable, interactive travel time modelling tools to allow greater access to and participation in service access analysis. Described are three interconnected applications designed to reduce some of the barriers to the more wide-spread use of GIS analysis of service access and allow for complex spatial and temporal variations in service availability. These applications are an open source GIS tool-kit and two geo-simulation models. The development of these tools was guided by health service issues from a developing world context but they present a general approach to enabling greater access to and flexibility in health access modelling. The tools demonstrate a method that substantially simplifies the process for conducting travel time assessments and demonstrate a dynamic, interactive approach in an open source GIS format. In addition this paper provides examples from empirical experience where these tools have informed better policy and planning. Travel and health service access is complex and cannot be reduced to a few static modeled outputs. The approaches described in this paper use a unique set of tools to explore this complexity, promote discussion and build understanding with the goal of producing better planning outcomes. The accessible, flexible, interactive and

  19. MONITORING POTENTIAL DRUG INTERACTIONS AND REACTIONS VIA NETWORK ANALYSIS OF INSTAGRAM USER TIMELINES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Rion Brattig; Li, Lang; Rocha, Luis M

    2016-01-01

    Much recent research aims to identify evidence for Drug-Drug Interactions (DDI) and Adverse Drug reactions (ADR) from the biomedical scientific literature. In addition to this "Bibliome", the universe of social media provides a very promising source of large-scale data that can help identify DDI and ADR in ways that have not been hitherto possible. Given the large number of users, analysis of social media data may be useful to identify under-reported, population-level pathology associated with DDI, thus further contributing to improvements in population health. Moreover, tapping into this data allows us to infer drug interactions with natural products-including cannabis-which constitute an array of DDI very poorly explored by biomedical research thus far. Our goal is to determine the potential of Instagram for public health monitoring and surveillance for DDI, ADR, and behavioral pathology at large. Most social media analysis focuses on Twitter and Facebook, but Instagram is an increasingly important platform, especially among teens, with unrestricted access of public posts, high availability of posts with geolocation coordinates, and images to supplement textual analysis. Using drug, symptom, and natural product dictionaries for identification of the various types of DDI and ADR evidence, we have collected close to 7000 user timelines spanning from October 2010 to June 2015.We report on 1) the development of a monitoring tool to easily observe user-level timelines associated with drug and symptom terms of interest, and 2) population-level behavior via the analysis of co-occurrence networks computed from user timelines at three different scales: monthly, weekly, and daily occurrences. Analysis of these networks further reveals 3) drug and symptom direct and indirect associations with greater support in user timelines, as well as 4) clusters of symptoms and drugs revealed by the collective behavior of the observed population. This demonstrates that Instagram

  20. Social Media to Facilitate Public Participation in IA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naber, A.C.; Enserink, B.

    2012-01-01

    Social media are web-based and mobile technologies that facilitate interaction between organizations, communities and individuals. Important characteristics are that the technologies are ubiquitous, communication instantaneous and that they enable the creation and exchange of user-generated content.

  1. Social Media to Facilitate Public Participation in IA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naber, A.C.; Enserink, B.

    2012-01-01

    Social media are web-based and mobile technologies that facilitate interaction between organizations, communities and individuals. Important characteristics are that the technologies are ubiquitous, communication instantaneous and that they enable the creation and exchange of user-generated content.

  2. Rotor Wake/Stator Interaction Noise Prediction Code Technical Documentation and User's Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topol, David A.; Mathews, Douglas C.

    2010-01-01

    This report documents the improvements and enhancements made by Pratt & Whitney to two NASA programs which together will calculate noise from a rotor wake/stator interaction. The code is a combination of subroutines from two NASA programs with many new features added by Pratt & Whitney. To do a calculation V072 first uses a semi-empirical wake prediction to calculate the rotor wake characteristics at the stator leading edge. Results from the wake model are then automatically input into a rotor wake/stator interaction analytical noise prediction routine which calculates inlet aft sound power levels for the blade-passage-frequency tones and their harmonics, along with the complex radial mode amplitudes. The code allows for a noise calculation to be performed for a compressor rotor wake/stator interaction, a fan wake/FEGV interaction, or a fan wake/core stator interaction. This report is split into two parts, the first part discusses the technical documentation of the program as improved by Pratt & Whitney. The second part is a user's manual which describes how input files are created and how the code is run.

  3. Simulating the interaction of road users: A glance to complexity of Venezuelan traffic

    CERN Document Server

    Correa, Juan C; Bazzan, Ana L C; Jaffe, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Automotive traffic is a classical example of a complex system, being the simplest case the homogeneous traffic where all vehicles are of the same kind, and using different means of transportation increases complexity due to different driving rules and interactions between each vehicle type. In particular, when motorcyclists drive in between the lanes of stopped or slow-moving vehicles. This later driving mode is a Venezuelan pervasive practice of mobilization that clearly jeopardizes road safety. We developed a minimalist agent-based model to analyze the interaction of road users with and without motorcyclists on the way. The presence of motorcyclists dwindles significantly the frequency of lane changes of motorists while increasing their frequency of acceleration-deceleration maneuvers, without significantly affecting their average speed. That is, motorcyclist "corralled" motorists in their lanes limiting their ability to maneuver and increasing their acceleration noise. Comparison of the simulations with re...

  4. Justine user`s manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.R.

    1995-10-01

    Justine is the graphical user interface to the Los Alamos Radiation Modeling Interactive Environment (LARAMIE). It provides LARAMIE customers with a powerful, robust, easy-to-use, WYSIWYG interface that facilitates geometry construction and problem specification. It is assumed that the reader is familiar with LARAMIE, and the transport codes available, i.e., MCNPTM and DANTSYSTM. No attempt is made in this manual to describe these codes in detail. Information about LARAMIE, DANTSYS, and MCNP are available elsewhere. It i also assumed that the reader is familiar with the Unix operating system and with Motif widgets and their look and feel. However, a brief description of Motif and how one interacts with it can be found in Appendix A.

  5. Head Orientation Behavior of Users and Durations in Playful Open-Ended Interactions with an Android Robot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlachos, Evgenios; Jochum, Elizabeth Ann; Schärfe, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a field-experiment focused on the head orientation behavior of users in short-term dyadic interactions with an android (male) robot in a playful context, as well as on the duration of the interactions. The robotic trials took place in an art exhibition where...... subjects. The findings suggest that androids have the ability to maintain the focus of attention during short-term in-teractions within a playful context. This study provides an insight on how users communicate with an android robot, and on how to design meaningful human robot social interaction for real...

  6. Recontextualizing the Role of the Facilitator in Group Interaction in the Outdoor Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan, Ina

    2009-01-01

    The traditional role of the facilitator in outdoor education is frequently seen as outside the group of participants, either in a position of power over the participants or detached and passive. Following an ethnographic study at a residential outdoor centre, an in-depth analysis of the facilitation process was carried out, which revealed that the…

  7. Factors Which Facilitate or Impede Interpersonal Interactions and Relationships after Spinal Cord Injury: A Scoping Review with Suggestions for Rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Delena Amsters; Sarita Schuurs; Kiley Pershouse; Bettina Power; Yvonne Harestad; Melissa Kendall; Pim Kuipers

    2016-01-01

    Interpersonal interactions and relationships can influence an individual’s perceptions of health and quality of life in the presence of disability. In the case of people with spinal cord injury (SCI), positive interpersonal interactions and relationships have been shown to contribute to resilience and adaptability. Understanding factors which facilitate or impede the development and maintenance of relationships after SCI may form the basis for proactive relationship support for people with SC...

  8. Touch Interaction with 3D Geographical Visualization on Web: Selected Technological and User Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, L.; Stachoň, Z.; Stuchlík, R.; Hladík, J.; Kubíček, P.

    2016-10-01

    The use of both 3D visualization and devices with touch displays is increasing. In this paper, we focused on the Web technologies for 3D visualization of spatial data and its interaction via touch screen gestures. At the first stage, we compared the support of touch interaction in selected JavaScript libraries on different hardware (desktop PCs with touch screens, tablets, and smartphones) and software platforms. Afterward, we realized simple empiric test (within-subject design, 6 participants, 2 simple tasks, LCD touch monitor Acer and digital terrain models as stimuli) focusing on the ability of users to solve simple spatial tasks via touch screens. An in-house testing web tool was developed and used based on JavaScript, PHP, and X3DOM languages and Hammer.js libraries. The correctness of answers, speed of users' performances, used gestures, and a simple gesture metric was recorded and analysed. Preliminary results revealed that the pan gesture is most frequently used by test participants and it is also supported by the majority of 3D libraries. Possible gesture metrics and future developments including the interpersonal differences are discussed in the conclusion.

  9. An Interactive Web Tool for Facilitating Shared Decision-Making in Dementia-Care Networks: A Field Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Span, M.; Smits, C.; Jukema, J.; Groen-van de Ven, L.M.; Janssen, R.; Vernooij-Dassen, M.; Eefsting, J.; Hettinga, M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An interactive web tool has been developed for facilitating shared decision-making in dementia-care networks. The DecideGuide provides a chat function for easier communication between network members, a deciding together function for step-by-step decision-making, and an individual opinio

  10. An Interactive Web Tool for Facilitating Shared Decision-Making in Dementia-Care Networks: A Field Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Span, M.; Smits, C.; Jukema, J.; Groen-van de Ven, L.M.; Janssen, R.; Vernooij-Dassen, M.; Eefsting, J.; Hettinga, M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An interactive web tool has been developed for facilitating shared decision-making in dementia-care networks. The DecideGuide provides a chat function for easier communication between network members, a deciding together function for step-by-step decision-making, and an individual

  11. Pattern mining of user interaction logs for a post-deployment usability evaluation of a radiology PACS client.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorritsma, Wiard; Cnossen, Fokie; Dierckx, Rudi A; Oudkerk, Matthijs; van Ooijen, Peter M A

    2016-01-01

    To perform a post-deployment usability evaluation of a radiology Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) client based on pattern mining of user interaction log data, and to assess the usefulness of this approach compared to a field study. All user actions performed on the PACS client were logged for four months. A data mining technique called closed sequential pattern mining was used to automatically extract frequently occurring interaction patterns from the log data. These patterns were used to identify usability issues with the PACS. The results of this evaluation were compared to the results of a field study based usability evaluation of the same PACS client. The interaction patterns revealed four usability issues: (1) the display protocols do not function properly, (2) the line measurement tool stays active until another tool is selected, rather than being deactivated after one use, (3) the PACS's built-in 3D functionality does not allow users to effectively perform certain 3D-related tasks, (4) users underuse the PACS's customization possibilities. All usability issues identified based on the log data were also found in the field study, which identified 48 issues in total. Post-deployment usability evaluation based on pattern mining of user interaction log data provides useful insights into the way users interact with the radiology PACS client. However, it reveals few usability issues compared to a field study and should therefore not be used as the sole method of usability evaluation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Pinus monophylla establishment in an expanding Pinus-Juniperus woodland: Environmental conditions, facilitation and interacting factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, Jeanne C. [USDA Forest Service, Reno, NV (United States). Rocky Mountain Research Station

    2001-02-01

    The tree species comprising Pinus-Juniperus woodlands are rapidly expanding into shrub-grasslands throughout their range. Observational studies indicate that establishment is facilitated by nurse plants, but little information exists on the mechanisms involved. I examined both abiotic and biotic factors influencing Pinus monophylla establishment in Artemisia tridentata steppe with expanding populations of P. monophylla and Juniperus osteosperma. I also examined the effects of seed burial and predation on seedling establishment. Microhabitats under trees and shrubs had higher extractable P and K, higher organic matter, total nitrogen and cation exchange capacity than interspace microhabitats. Soil water contents (0-15 cm) were lower in interspaces than under shrubs or trees due to dry surface (0-5 cm) soils. Soil temperatures (at 1 and 15 cm) were lowest under trees, intermediate under shrubs, and highest in interspaces. Timing and rate of seedling emergence were temperature dependent with the order of emergence paralleling mean growing season temperatures: tree interspace = shrub interspace > under shrub > under Juniperus {>=} under Pinus. Seed burial was required for rooting and the highest emergence occurred from depths of 1 and 3 cm indicating that caching by birds and rodents is essential and that animals bury seeds at adequate if not optimal depths for emergence. Seedlings required micro-environmental modification for survival; all seedlings, including those that emerged from seeds and transplants, died within the first year in interspace microhabitats. Survival in under-tree or under-shrub microhabitats depended on soil water availability and corresponded closely to soil water contents over the 3-yr study. Under-shrub microhabitats had more favourable soil and micro-environmental characteristics than under-tree microhabitats and had the highest seedling life spans for the first-year seedling cohort. Predation of Pinus seedlings by rodents was a significant

  13. Exploring the Relation between the Degree of Novelty of Innovations and User-producer Interaction across Different Income Regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harirchi, Gouya; Chaminade, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    User–producer interactions have been recognized as important for innovation. With the rapid growth of emerging economies’ markets, and an increasing degree of technological sophistication of both users and producers in those markets, user–producer interaction is becoming global. Using original firm...

  14. Eye-Tracking Evolutionary Algorithm to minimize user's fatigue in IEC applied to Interactive One-Max problem

    CERN Document Server

    Pallez, Denis; Baccino, Thierry; Dumercy, Laurent

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a new algorithm that consists in combining an eye-tracker for minimizing the fatigue of a user during the evaluation process of Interactive Evolutionary Computation. The approach is then applied to the Interactive One-Max optimization problem.

  15. The CloudBoard Research Platform: an interactive whiteboard for corporate users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrus, John; Schwartz, Edward L.

    2013-03-01

    Over one million interactive whiteboards (IWBs) are sold annually worldwide, predominantly for classroom use with few sales for corporate use. Unmet needs for IWB corporate use were investigated and the CloudBoard Research Platform (CBRP) was developed to investigate and test technology for meeting these needs. The CBRP supports audio conferencing with shared remote drawing activity, casual capture of whiteboard activity for long-term storage and retrieval, use of standard formats such as PDF for easy import of documents via the web and email and easy export of documents. Company RFID badges and key fobs provide secure access to documents at the board and automatic logout occurs after a period of inactivity. Users manage their documents with a web browser. Analytics and remote device management is provided for administrators. The IWB hardware consists of off-the-shelf components (a Hitachi UST Projector, SMART Technologies, Inc. IWB hardware, Mac Mini, Polycom speakerphone, etc.) and a custom occupancy sensor. The three back-end servers provide the web interface, document storage, stroke and audio streaming. Ease of use, security, and robustness sufficient for internal adoption was achieved. Five of the 10 boards installed at various Ricoh sites have been in daily or weekly use for the past year and total system downtime was less than an hour in 2012. Since CBRP was installed, 65 registered users, 9 of whom use the system regularly, have created over 2600 documents.

  16. Weather effects on mobile social interactions: a case study of mobile phone users in Lisbon, Portugal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santi Phithakkitnukoon

    Full Text Available The effect of weather on social interactions has been explored through the analysis of a large mobile phone use dataset. Time spent on phone calls, numbers of connected social ties, and tie strength were used as proxies for social interactions; while weather conditions were characterized in terms of temperature, relative humidity, air pressure, and wind speed. Our results are based on the analysis of a full calendar year of data for 22,696 mobile phone users (53.2 million call logs in Lisbon, Portugal. The results suggest that different weather parameters have correlations to the level and character of social interactions. We found that although weather did not show much influence upon people's average call duration, the likelihood of longer calls was found to increase during periods of colder weather. During periods of weather that were generally considered to be uncomfortable (i.e., very cold/warm, very low/high air pressure, and windy, people were found to be more likely to communicate with fewer social ties. Despite this tendency, we found that people are more likely to maintain their connections with those they have strong ties with much more than those of weak ties. This study sheds new light on the influence of weather conditions on social relationships and how mobile phone data can be used to investigate the influence of environmental factors on social dynamics.

  17. Breaking Out of the Cell: On The Benefits of a New Spreadsheet User-Interaction Paradigm

    CERN Document Server

    Hellman, Ziv

    2008-01-01

    Contemporary spreadsheets are plagued by a profusion of errors, auditing difficulties, lack of uniform development methodologies, and barriers to easy comprehension of the underlying business models they represent. This paper presents a case that most of these difficulties stem from the fact that the standard spreadsheet user-interaction paradigm - the 'cell-matrix' approach - is appropriate for spreadsheet data presentation but has significant drawbacks with respect to spreadsheet creation, maintenance and comprehension when workbooks pass a minimal threshold of complexity. An alternative paradigm for the automated generation of spreadsheets directly from plain-language business model descriptions is presented along with its potential benefits. Sunsight Modeller (TM), a working software system implementing the suggested paradigm, is briefly described.

  18. DESIGNING OF COMPUTER AIDED AND USER INTERACTIVE CNC PART PROGRAMME FOR A MILLING MACHINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ali DÖNERTAŞ

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a user–interactive computer programme generating CNC part programme according to dialog method has been developed. The design of programme has been prepared like a CAM programme structure. The part programme was established by required parameters asking to the user with a specific order. Subsequently, this parameters are used to create M and G codes, and these codes are showed at a different page on the screen. In addition, these code pages can be stored with "txt" format. This program includes basic processes and the programme design has been prepared for milling machine working according to Fanuc system. The computer programme was written by using Delphi 6 programming language.

  19. A 'user friendly' geographic information system in a color interactive digital image processing system environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, W. J.; Goldberg, M.

    1982-01-01

    NASA's Eastern Regional Remote Sensing Applications Center (ERRSAC) has recognized the need to accommodate spatial analysis techniques in its remote sensing technology transfer program. A computerized Geographic Information System to incorporate remotely sensed data, specifically Landsat, with other relevant data was considered a realistic approach to address a given resource problem. Questions arose concerning the selection of a suitable available software system to demonstrate, train, and undertake demonstration projects with ERRSAC's user community. The very specific requirements for such a system are discussed. The solution found involved the addition of geographic information processing functions to the Interactive Digital Image Manipulation System (IDIMS). Details regarding the functions of the new integrated system are examined along with the characteristics of the software.

  20. A Web-based Multi-user Interactive Visualization System For Large-Scale Computing Using Google Web Toolkit Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, R. M.; McLane, J. C.; Yuen, D. A.; Wang, S.

    2009-12-01

    We have created a web-based, interactive system for multi-user collaborative visualization of large data sets (on the order of terabytes) that allows users in geographically disparate locations to simultaneous and collectively visualize large data sets over the Internet. By leveraging asynchronous java and XML (AJAX) web development paradigms via the Google Web Toolkit (http://code.google.com/webtoolkit/), we are able to provide remote, web-based users a web portal to LCSE's (http://www.lcse.umn.edu) large-scale interactive visualization system already in place at the University of Minnesota that provides high resolution visualizations to the order of 15 million pixels by Megan Damon. In the current version of our software, we have implemented a new, highly extensible back-end framework built around HTTP "server push" technology to provide a rich collaborative environment and a smooth end-user experience. Furthermore, the web application is accessible via a variety of devices including netbooks, iPhones, and other web- and javascript-enabled cell phones. New features in the current version include: the ability for (1) users to launch multiple visualizations, (2) a user to invite one or more other users to view their visualization in real-time (multiple observers), (3) users to delegate control aspects of the visualization to others (multiple controllers) , and (4) engage in collaborative chat and instant messaging with other users within the user interface of the web application. We will explain choices made regarding implementation, overall system architecture and method of operation, and the benefits of an extensible, modular design. We will also discuss future goals, features, and our plans for increasing scalability of the system which includes a discussion of the benefits potentially afforded us by a migration of server-side components to the Google Application Engine (http://code.google.com/appengine/).

  1. Facilitating age diversity in organizations – part II: managing perceptions and interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hertel, Guido; Heijden, van der Beatrice I.J.M.; Lange, de Annet H.; Deller, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – Due to demographic changes in most industrialized countries, the average age of working people is continuously increasing, and the workforce is becoming more age-diverse. This review, together with the earlier JMP Special Issue “Facilitating age diversity in organizations – part I: challen

  2. Order of arrival shifts endophyte-pathogen interactions in bean from resistance induction to disease facilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adame-Álvarez, Rosa-María; Mendiola-Soto, Jaime; Heil, Martin

    2014-06-01

    Endophytic fungi colonize plants without causing symptoms of disease and can enhance the resistance of their host to pathogens. We cultivated 53 fungal strains from wild lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus) and investigated their effects on pathogens using in vitro assays and experiments in planta. Most strains were annotated as Rhizopus, Fusarium, Penicillium, Cochliobolus, and Artomyces spp. by the sequence of their 18S rRNA gene. In vitro confrontation assays between endophytes and three pathogens (the bacteria Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae and Enterobacter sp. strain FCB1, and the fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum) revealed strong and mainly symmetric reciprocal effects: endophyte and pathogen either mutually inhibited (mainly Enterobacter FCB1 and Colletotrichum) or facilitated (P. syringae) the growth of each other. In planta, the endophytes had a strong inhibitory effect on P. syringae when they colonized the plant before the bacterium, whereas infection was facilitated when P. syringae colonized the plant before the endophyte. Infection with Enterobacter FCB1 was facilitated when the bacterium colonized the plant before or on the same day with the endophyte, but not when the endophyte was present before the bacterium. The order of arrival determines whether fungal endophytes enhance plant resistance to bacterial pathogens or facilitate disease.

  3. Facilitating age diversity in organizations – part II: managing perceptions and interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hertel, Guido; van der Heijden, Beatrice; de Lange, Annet H.; Deller, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – Due to demographic changes in most industrialized countries, the average age of working people is continuously increasing, and the workforce is becoming more age-diverse. This review, together with the earlier JMP Special Issue “Facilitating age diversity in organizations – part I: challen

  4. Facilitating age diversity in organizations ‐ part II: managing perceptions and interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beatrice van der Heijden; Guido Hertel; Annet de Lange; Jürgen Deller

    2013-01-01

    Purpose ‐ Due to demographic changes in most industrialized countries, the average age of working people is continuously increasing, and the workforce is becoming more age-diverse. This review, together with the earlier JMP Special Issue "Facilitating age diversity in organizations ‐ part I: challen

  5. Facilitating Spatial Perspective Taking through Animation: Evidence from an Aptitude-Treatment-Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munzer, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the facilitating function of animations for spatial perspective taking. The task demanded to estimate directions to memorized objects in a spatial scene from an imagined position and orientation within the scene. Static pictures which required imagined reorientation of the self were compared to animations showing the…

  6. Facilitating age diversity in organizations – part II: managing perceptions and interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hertel, Guido; van der Heijden, Beatrice; de Lange, Annet H.; Deller, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – Due to demographic changes in most industrialized countries, the average age of working people is continuously increasing, and the workforce is becoming more age-diverse. This review, together with the earlier JMP Special Issue “Facilitating age diversity in organizations – part I:

  7. Facilitating age diversity in organizations ‐ part II: managing perceptions and interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beatrice van der Heijden; Guido Hertel; Annet de Lange; Jürgen Deller

    2013-01-01

    Purpose ‐ Due to demographic changes in most industrialized countries, the average age of working people is continuously increasing, and the workforce is becoming more age-diverse. This review, together with the earlier JMP Special Issue "Facilitating age diversity in organizations ‐ part I:

  8. Facilitating Spatial Perspective Taking through Animation: Evidence from an Aptitude-Treatment-Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munzer, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the facilitating function of animations for spatial perspective taking. The task demanded to estimate directions to memorized objects in a spatial scene from an imagined position and orientation within the scene. Static pictures which required imagined reorientation of the self were compared to animations showing the…

  9. Facilitating age diversity in organizations ‐ part II: managing perceptions and interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hertel, Guido; Heijden, Beatrice van der; Lange, Annet de; Deller, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose ‐ Due to demographic changes in most industrialized countries, the average age of working people is continuously increasing, and the workforce is becoming more age-diverse. This review, together with the earlier JMP Special Issue "Facilitating age diversity in organizations ‐ part I: challen

  10. User engagement with and attitudes towards an interactive SMS reminder system for patients with tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Shama; Siddiqi, Osman; Ali, Owais; Habib, Ali; Haqqi, Faraz; Kausar, Maimoona; Khan, Aamir J

    2012-10-01

    We conducted a qualitative study to understand user perceptions, acceptability and engagement with an interactive SMS reminder system designed to improve treatment adherence for patients with tuberculosis (TB). Patients received daily reminders and were asked to respond after taking their medication. Non-responsive patients were sent up to three reminders a day. We enrolled 30 patients with TB who had access to a mobile phone and observed their engagement with the system for a one-month period. We also conducted semi-structured interviews with 24 patients to understand their experience with the system. Most patients found the reminders helpful and encouraging. The average response rate over the study period was 57%. However, it fell from a mean response rate of 62% during the first ten days to 49% during the last ten days. Response rates were higher amongst females, participants with some schooling, and participants who had sent an SMS message the week prior to enrolment. Non-responsiveness was associated with a lack of access to the owner of the mobile phone, problems with the mobile phone itself and literacy. Our pilot study suggests that interactive SMS reminders are an acceptable and appreciated method of supporting patients with TB in taking their medication.

  11. User Involvement And Entrepreneurial Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Heiskanen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Involving users in the innovation process is a subject of much research, experimentation, and debate. Less attention has been given to the limits to user involvement that ensue from specific organizational characteristics. This article explores barriers to the utilization of users’ input in two small companies developing interactive digital applications. We contrast our findings to earlier research involving large companies to identify features of entrepreneurial sensemaking and action that influence the utilization of users’ input. We find that the small companies follow a distinct action rationality, leading to rapid implementation of some user inputs, and defensiveness toward others. Both sets of data also reveal common features that are often overlooked in the literature. We reconceptualize user involvement as a form of interaction between users and innovating companies that is facilitated and constrained by micro-sociological processes, on the one hand, and the nature of the competitive environment, on the other.

  12. The Benefits of Sensorimotor Knowledge: Body-Object Interaction Facilitates Semantic Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siakaluk, Paul D.; Pexman, Penny M.; Sears, Christopher R.; Wilson, Kim; Locheed, Keri; Owen, William J.

    2008-01-01

    This article examined the effects of body-object interaction (BOI) on semantic processing. BOI measures perceptions of the ease with which a human body can physically interact with a word's referent. In Experiment 1, BOI effects were examined in 2 semantic categorization tasks (SCT) in which participants decided if words are easily imageable.…

  13. When the Macro Facilitates the Micro: A Study of Regimentation and Emergence in Spoken Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warriner, Doris S.

    2012-01-01

    In moments of "dispersion, diaspora, and reterritorialization" (Amy Shuman 2006), the personal, the interactional, and the improvised (the "micro") cannot be separated analytically from circulating ideologies, institutional norms, or cultural flows (the "macro"). With a focus on the emergence of identities within social interaction, specifically…

  14. When the Macro Facilitates the Micro: A Study of Regimentation and Emergence in Spoken Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warriner, Doris S.

    2012-01-01

    In moments of "dispersion, diaspora, and reterritorialization" (Amy Shuman 2006), the personal, the interactional, and the improvised (the "micro") cannot be separated analytically from circulating ideologies, institutional norms, or cultural flows (the "macro"). With a focus on the emergence of identities within social interaction, specifically…

  15. Potential job facilitation benefits of "water cooler" conversations: the importance of social interactions in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Iris Y; Kwantes, Catherine T

    2015-01-01

    This study looked at the extent to which personality and cultural factors predicted participants' perceptions of the importance private interactions played in the workplace. The 134 participants read a vignette (where a new employee socially interacted at low or high levels with co-workers) and completed the Big Five Inventory, Social Axioms Survey, and questions concerning expected workplace experiences. Results indicated employees who engaged in high levels of private interaction with co-workers were expected to be better liked, to receive better performance evaluations, were more likely to receive co-worker assistance, and were thought to be more likely chosen for future projects. However, the personality and social axiom variables studied did not significantly interact with social interaction to influence expectations of workplace outcomes.

  16. Procurement module for a MIS: user's manual. [PROQ, on-line interactive program for management information system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovin, J. K.; Clark, B. A.

    1977-03-01

    The FED-MIS Procurement Module (PROQ) is an on-line interactive computer program. It can be used to answer many questions pertinent to the status of outside procurements and their obligating costs. Even an inexperienced computer user should have little difficulty in learning to use PROO, as the module prompts the user on what requests it is expecting. If the user has doubts as to the response, or if the meaning of the response is not clear, the module will give a detailed list of the options available at that level. The user has control of what data are to be considered, how they are to be grouped, and what format the output will take. This user control is the result of the module's hierarchical arrangement. As the user selects the options available at a given level, the module proceeds to the next lower level until sufficient input has been supplied to provide him with the requested information. At the entry level the user can request one of two actions. At the next level specific options are available. Some of these options can lead to lower levels having additional options. 7 figures, 3 tables.

  17. Procurement module for a MIS: user's manual. [PROQ, on-line interactive program for management information system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovin, J.K.; Clark, B.A.

    1976-12-01

    The temporary Procurement Module (PROQ) is an on-line interactive computer program. It can be used to answer many questions pertinent to the status of outside procurements and their obligating costs. The module prompts the user on what requests it is expecting. If the user has doubts as to the response, or if the meaning of the response is not clear, the module will give a detailed list of the options available at that level. The user has control of what data are to be considered, how they are to be grouped, and what format the output will take. As the user selects the options available at a given level, the module proceeds to the next lower level until sufficient input has been supplied to provide him with the requested information.

  18. The child's perspective as a guiding principle: Young children as co-designers in the design of an interactive application meant to facilitate participation in healthcare situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stålberg, Anna; Sandberg, Anette; Söderbäck, Maja; Larsson, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    During the last decade, interactive technology has entered mainstream society. Its many users also include children, even the youngest ones, who use the technology in different situations for both fun and learning. When designing technology for children, it is crucial to involve children in the process in order to arrive at an age-appropriate end product. In this study we describe the specific iterative process by which an interactive application was developed. This application is intended to facilitate young children's, three-to five years old, participation in healthcare situations. We also describe the specific contributions of the children, who tested the prototypes in a preschool, a primary health care clinic and an outpatient unit at a hospital, during the development process. The iterative phases enabled the children to be involved at different stages of the process and to evaluate modifications and improvements made after each prior iteration. The children contributed their own perspectives (the child's perspective) on the usability, content and graphic design of the application, substantially improving the software and resulting in an age-appropriate product. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Factors Which Facilitate or Impede Interpersonal Interactions and Relationships after Spinal Cord Injury: A Scoping Review with Suggestions for Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delena Amsters

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Interpersonal interactions and relationships can influence an individual’s perceptions of health and quality of life in the presence of disability. In the case of people with spinal cord injury (SCI, positive interpersonal interactions and relationships have been shown to contribute to resilience and adaptability. Understanding factors which facilitate or impede the development and maintenance of relationships after SCI may form the basis for proactive relationship support for people with SCI. To gain a broad insight into these factors, a scoping review was undertaken. Databases were searched for English language studies published between 2000 and 2015 that informed the review question. Sixty-two (62 studies were identified. Thematic analysis was conducted on data extracted from the studies and 51 factors which may facilitate relationships and 38 factors which may impede relationships after SCI were noted. The majority of factors could be categorized as environmental or personal according to the domains of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF. The facilitating factors included partner and social support, reciprocity in relationships, and presenting oneself positively. Impeding factors included physical environmental barriers, real and perceived social biases, and poor self-image. Factors identified may inform the provision of supportive, holistic rehabilitation for people with SCI.

  20. Factors Which Facilitate or Impede Interpersonal Interactions and Relationships after Spinal Cord Injury: A Scoping Review with Suggestions for Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsters, Delena; Schuurs, Sarita; Pershouse, Kiley; Power, Bettina; Harestad, Yvonne; Kendall, Melissa; Kuipers, Pim

    2016-01-01

    Interpersonal interactions and relationships can influence an individual's perceptions of health and quality of life in the presence of disability. In the case of people with spinal cord injury (SCI), positive interpersonal interactions and relationships have been shown to contribute to resilience and adaptability. Understanding factors which facilitate or impede the development and maintenance of relationships after SCI may form the basis for proactive relationship support for people with SCI. To gain a broad insight into these factors, a scoping review was undertaken. Databases were searched for English language studies published between 2000 and 2015 that informed the review question. Sixty-two (62) studies were identified. Thematic analysis was conducted on data extracted from the studies and 51 factors which may facilitate relationships and 38 factors which may impede relationships after SCI were noted. The majority of factors could be categorized as environmental or personal according to the domains of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF). The facilitating factors included partner and social support, reciprocity in relationships, and presenting oneself positively. Impeding factors included physical environmental barriers, real and perceived social biases, and poor self-image. Factors identified may inform the provision of supportive, holistic rehabilitation for people with SCI.

  1. Mobile phone-based interactive voice response as a tool for improving access to healthcare in remote areas in Ghana - an evaluation of user experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkel, J; May, J; Krumkamp, R; Lamshöft, M; Kreuels, B; Owusu-Dabo, E; Mohammed, A; Bonacic Marinovic, A; Dako-Gyeke, P; Krämer, A; Fobil, J N

    2017-05-01

    To investigate and determine the factors that enhanced or constituted barriers to the acceptance of an mHealth system which was piloted in Asante-Akim North District of Ghana to support healthcare of children. Four semi-structured focus group discussions were conducted with a total of 37 mothers. Participants were selected from a study population of mothers who subscribed to a pilot mHealth system which used an interactive voice response (IVR) for its operations. Data were evaluated using qualitative content analysis methods. In addition, a short quantitative questionnaire assessed system's usability (SUS). Results revealed 10 categories of factors that facilitated user acceptance of the IVR system including quality-of-care experience, health education and empowerment of women. The eight categories of factors identified as barriers to user acceptance included the lack of human interaction, lack of update and training on the electronic advices provided and lack of social integration of the system into the community. The usability (SUS median: 79.3; range: 65-97.5) of the system was rated acceptable. The principles of the tested mHealth system could be of interest during infectious disease outbreaks, such as Ebola or Lassa fever, when there might be a special need for disease-specific health information within populations. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Interaction of hexa-His tag with acidic amino acids results in facilitated refolding of halophilic nucleoside diphosphate kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Matsujiro; Ida, Keiko; Tatsuda, Shuhei; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Tokunaga, Masao

    2011-11-01

    We have previously reported that amino-terminal extension sequence containing hexa-His facilitated refolding and assembly of hexameric nucleoside diphosphate kinase from extremely halophilic archaeon Halobacterium salinarum (NDK). In this study, we made various mutations in both the tag sequence and within NDK molecule. SerNDK, in which hexa-His was replaced with hexa-Ser, showed no facilitated folding. In addition, HisD58GD63G, in which both Asp58 and Asp63 in NDK were replaced with Gly, also showed no refolding enhancement. These results suggest that hexa-His in His-tag interact cooperatively with either Asp58 or Asp63 or both. Furthermore, G114D mutant, which formed a dimer in low salt solution, was strongly stabilized by His-tag to form a stable hexamer.

  3. Towards a responsive and interactive graphical user interface for neutron data reduction and visualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, Alok; Worlton, T.; Hammonds, J.; Loong, C.K. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Mikkelson, D.; Mikkelson, R. [Univ. of Wisconsin-Stout, Menomonie, WI (United States); Chen, D. [Neutron Scattering Laboratory, China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China)

    2001-03-01

    An Integrated Spectral Analysis Workbench, ISAW has been developed at IPNS with the goal of providing a flexible and powerful tool to visualize and analyze neutron scattering time-of-flight data. The software, written in Java, is platform independent, object oriented and modular, making it easier to maintain and add features. The graphical user interface (GUI) for ISAW allows intuitive and interactive loading and manipulation of multiple spectra from different 'runs'. ISAW provides multiple displays of the spectra in a Runfile' and most of the functions can be performed through the GUI menu bar as well as through command scripts. All displays are simultaneously updated when the data is changed using the Observable-observer object-model pattern. All displays are observers of the Dataset (observable) and respond to changes or selections in it simultaneously. A 'tree' display of the spectra in run files is provided for a detailed view of detector elements and easy selection of spectra. The operations menu is instrument sensitive so that it displays the appropriate set of operators accordingly. Automatic menu generation is made possible by the ability of the DataSet objects to furnish a list of operations contained in the particular DataSet selected at the time the menu bar is accessed. The transformed and corrected data can be saved to a disk in different file formats for further analyses (e.g., GSAS for structure refinement). (author)

  4. Interacting with notebook input devices: an analysis of motor performance and users' expertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Christine; Ziefle, Martina

    2005-01-01

    In the present study the usability of two different types of notebook input devices was examined. The independent variables were input device (touchpad vs. mini-joystick) and user expertise (expert vs. novice state). There were 30 participants, of whom 15 were touchpad experts and the other 15 were mini-joystick experts. The experimental tasks were a point-click task (Experiment 1) and a point-drag-drop task (Experiment 2). Dependent variables were the time and accuracy of cursor control. To assess carryover effects, we had the participants complete both experiments, using not only the input device for which they were experts but also the device for which they were novices. Results showed the touchpad performance to be clearly superior to mini-joystick performance. Overall, experts showed better performance than did novices. The significant interaction of input device and expertise showed that the use of an unknown device is difficult, but only for touchpad experts, who were remarkably slower and less accurate when using a mini-joystick. Actual and potential applications of this research include an evaluation of current notebook input devices. The outcomes allow ergonomic guidelines to be derived for optimized usage and design of the mini-joystick and touchpad devices.

  5. Interactive and scale invariant segmentation of the rectum/sigmoid via user-defined templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüddemann, Tobias; Egger, Jan

    2016-03-01

    Among all types of cancer, gynecological malignancies belong to the 4th most frequent type of cancer among women. Besides chemotherapy and external beam radiation, brachytherapy is the standard procedure for the treatment of these malignancies. In the progress of treatment planning, localization of the tumor as the target volume and adjacent organs of risks by segmentation is crucial to accomplish an optimal radiation distribution to the tumor while simultaneously preserving healthy tissue. Segmentation is performed manually and represents a time-consuming task in clinical daily routine. This study focuses on the segmentation of the rectum/sigmoid colon as an Organ-At-Risk in gynecological brachytherapy. The proposed segmentation method uses an interactive, graph-based segmentation scheme with a user-defined template. The scheme creates a directed two dimensional graph, followed by the minimal cost closed set computation on the graph, resulting in an outlining of the rectum. The graphs outline is dynamically adapted to the last calculated cut. Evaluation was performed by comparing manual segmentations of the rectum/sigmoid colon to results achieved with the proposed method. The comparison of the algorithmic to manual results yielded to a Dice Similarity Coefficient value of 83.85+/-4.08%, in comparison to 83.97+/-8.08% for the comparison of two manual segmentations of the same physician. Utilizing the proposed methodology resulted in a median time of 128 seconds per dataset, compared to 300 seconds needed for pure manual segmentation.

  6. Expressing and amplifying positive emotions facilitate goal attainment in workplace interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena eWong

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Expressing emotions has social functions; it provides information, affects social interactions, and shapes relationships with others. Expressing positive emotions could be a strategic tool for improving goal attainment during social interactions at work. Such effects have been found in research on social contagion, impression management, and emotion work. However, expressing emotions one does not feel entails the risk of being perceived as inauthentic. This risk may well be worth taking when the emotions felt are negative, as expressing negative emotions usually has negative effects. When experiencing positive emotions, however, expressing them authentically promises benefits, and the advantage of amplifying them is not so obvious. We postulated that expressing, and amplifying, positive emotions would foster goal attainment in social interactions at work, particularly when dealing with superiors. Analyses are based on 494 interactions involving the pursuit of a goal by 113 employees. Multilevel analyses, including polynomial analyses, show that authentic display of positive emotions supported goal attainment throughout. However, amplifying felt positive emotions promoted goal attainment only in interactions with superiors, but not with colleagues. Results are discussed with regard to the importance of hierarchy for detecting, and interpreting, signs of strategic display of positive emotions.

  7. Risk Issues in Developing Novel User Interfaces for Human-Computer Interaction

    KAUST Repository

    Klinker, Gudrun

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 Springer International Publishing Switzerland. All rights are reserved. When new user interfaces or information visualization schemes are developed for complex information processing systems, it is not readily clear how much they do, in fact, support and improve users\\' understanding and use of such systems. Is a new interface better than an older one? In what respect, and in which situations? To provide answers to such questions, user testing schemes are employed. This chapter reports on a range of risks pertaining to the design and implementation of user interfaces in general, and to newly emerging interfaces (3-dimensionally, immersive, mobile) in particular.

  8. Facilitating Grounded Online Interactions in Video-Case-Based Teacher Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemirovsky, Ricardo; Galvis, Alvaro

    2004-01-01

    The use of interactive video cases for teacher professional development is an emergent medium inspired by case study methods used extensively in law, management, and medicine, and by the advent of multimedia technology available to support online discussions. This paper focuses on Web-based "grounded" discussions--in which the participants base…

  9. Training Paraprofessionals to Facilitate Social Interactions between Children with Autism and Their Typically Developing Peers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Eileen Klein; Matos, Rosy

    2013-01-01

    To support children with autism in inclusive classrooms, schools are increasingly utilizing paraprofessionals. However, research suggests that paraprofessionals often lack sufficient training and may inadvertently hinder the social interactions between children with disabilities and their peers. This study used a multiple baseline across…

  10. Facilitation of peptide fibre formation by arginine-phosphate/carboxylate interactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Krishna Prasad; Sandeep Verma

    2008-01-01

    This study describes peptide fibre formation in a hexapeptide, derived from the V3 loop of HIV-1, mediated by the interactions between arginine residues and phosphate/carboxylate anions. This charge neutralization approach was further confirmed when the deletion of arginine residue from the hexapeptide sequence resulted in fibre formation, which was studied by a combination of microscopic techniques.

  11. Cholesterol facilitates interactions between α-synuclein oligomers and charge-neutral membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Maarschalkerweerd, Andreas; Vetri, Valeria; Vestergaard, Bente

    2015-01-01

    composed of anionic lipids, while the more physiologically relevant zwitterionic lipids remain intact. We present experimental evidence for significant morphological changes in zwitterionic membranes containing cholesterol, induced by α-synuclein oligomers. Depending on the lipid composition, model...... of cholesterol for mediating interactions between physiologically relevant membranes and α-synuclein....

  12. Utilizing Teaching Interactions to Facilitate Social Skills in the Natural Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassardjian, Alyne; Taubman, Mitchell; Rudrud, Eric; Leaf, Justin B.; Edwards, Andrew; McEachin, John; Leaf, Ron; Schulze, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder often display deficits in social skills. While research has shown behavioral interventions to be effective in teaching and/or increasing a variety of appropriate social skills, limited research has shown generalization of these skills to the natural setting. The Teaching Interaction procedure…

  13. Interfering and Resolving: How Tabletop Interaction Facilitates Co-Construction of Argumentative Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcao, Taciana Pontual; Price, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Tangible technologies and shared interfaces create new paradigms for mediating collaboration through dynamic, synchronous environments, where action is as important as speech for participating and contributing to the activity. However, interaction with shared interfaces has been shown to be inherently susceptible to peer interference, potentially…

  14. Plant competition, facilitation, and other overstory-understory interactions in longleaf pine ecosystems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imm, Donald; Blake, John I

    2006-07-01

    The Longleaf Pine Ecosystem - Ecology, Silviculture, and Restoration. Shibu Jose, Eric J. Jokela, and Deborah L. Miller, (eds.) Springer Series on Environmental Management. Springer Science and Business Media publisher. Box 10.2 Pp 330-333. An insert on overstory-understory interactions in longleaf pine ecosystems.

  15. Training Teaching Staff to Facilitate Spontaneous Communication in Children with Autism: Adult Interactive Style Intervention (AISI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossyvaki, Lila; Jones, Glenys; Guldberg, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that the way adults interact with children with autism can have a great impact on their spontaneous communication. However, to date, few studies have focused on modifying adults' behaviour and even fewer have been conducted in school settings which actively involve teaching staff in designing the intervention.…

  16. Automated Interactive Simulation Model (AISIM) VAX Version 5.0 User’s Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-29

    mind about changes made in the working database and to protect the user’s real database in case the computer crashes during a DUI session. The ATSIM DUI...TEK4105 terlminal, the curso appears where it was last positioned, or at the lower left coer if it was never moved. At this point, the user has two

  17. Do Parentese Prosody and Fathers' Involvement in Interacting Facilitate Social Interaction in Infants Who Later Develop Autism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, David; Cassel, Raquel S.; Saint-Georges, Catherine; Mahdhaoui, Ammar; Laznik, Marie-Christine; Apicella, Fabio; Muratori, Pietro; Maestro, Sandra; Muratori, Filippo; Chetouani, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Background Whether development of autism impacts the interactive process between an infant and his/her parents remains an unexplored issue. Methodology and Principal Findings Using computational analysis taking into account synchronic behaviors and emotional prosody (parentese), we assessed the course of infants' responses to parents' type of speech in home movies from typically developing (TD) infants and infants who will subsequently develop autism aged less than 18 months. Our findings indicate: that parentese was significantly associated with infant responses to parental vocalizations involving orientation towards other people and with infant receptive behaviours; that parents of infants developing autism displayed more intense solicitations that were rich in parentese; that fathers of infants developing autism spoke to their infants more than fathers of TD infants; and that fathers' vocalizations were significantly associated with intersubjective responses and active behaviours in infants who subsequently developed autism. Conclusion The parents of infants who will later develop autism change their interactive pattern of behaviour by both increasing parentese and father's involvement in interacting with infants; both are significantly associated with infant's social responses. We stress the possible therapeutic implications of these findings and its implication for Dean Falk's theory regarding pre-linguistic evolution in early hominins. PMID:23650498

  18. Interaction between Nurses and Hospitalized Drug Users in Somatic Hospital Wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kappel, Nanna

    drugs are inpatients in somatic hospital wards. Aim: The project wants to enlighten the meeting between the drug user and the nurse in the hospital. Which roles do the nurses and the users carry and what will the meaning be of former experiences of the drug users of the health care system in the meeting...... the understandings of the nurses which will contribute to the feeling of stigmatization of users of hard drugs when in contact with the health care system. By virtue of their profession and position nurses have a big influence on how citizens while admitted to hospital feel accepted and welcomed. Nurses are subdued...... rules and regulations when performing their task, but are also obliged to offer nursing of high quality to all patients. Drug users have high frequency of morbidity compared to other citizens. Due to their somewhat chaotic lifestyle they get severe infections, wounds, injection damages, and therefore...

  19. PACSIN1, a Tau-interacting protein, regulates axonal elongation and branching by facilitating microtubule instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yingying; Lv, Kaosheng; Li, Zenglong; Yu, Albert C H; Chen, Jianguo; Teng, Junlin

    2012-11-16

    Tau is a major member of the neuronal microtubule-associated proteins. It promotes tubulin assembly and stabilizes axonal microtubules. Previous studies have demonstrated that Tau forms cross-bridges between microtubules, with some particles located on cross-bridges, suggesting that some proteins interact with Tau and might be involved in regulating Tau-related microtubule dynamics. This study reports that PACSIN1 interacts with Tau in axon. PACSIN1 blockade results in impaired axonal elongation and a higher number of primary axonal branches in mouse dorsal root ganglia neurons, which is induced by increasing the binding ability of Tau to microtubules. In PACSIN1-blocked dorsal root ganglia neurons, a greater amount of Tau is inclined to accumulate in the central domain of growth cones, and it promotes the stability of the microtubule network. Taken together, these results suggest that PACSIN1 is an important Tau binding partner in regulating microtubule dynamics and forming axonal plasticity.

  20. Interaction of zwitterionic penicillins with the OmpF channel facilitates their translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danelon, Christophe; Nestorovich, Ekaterina M; Winterhalter, Mathias; Ceccarelli, Matteo; Bezrukov, Sergey M

    2006-03-01

    To study translocation of beta-lactam antibiotics of different size and charge across the outer bacterial membrane, we combine an analysis of ion currents through single trimeric outer membrane protein F (OmpF) porins in planar lipid bilayers with molecular dynamics simulations. Because the size of penicillin molecules is close to the size of the narrowest part of the OmpF pore, penicillins occlude the pore during their translocation. Favorably interacting penicillins cause time-resolvable transient blockages of the small-ion current through the channel and thereby provide information about their dynamics within the pore. Analyzing these random fluctuations, we find that ampicillin and amoxicillin have a relatively high affinity for OmpF. In contrast, no or only a weak interaction is detected for carbenicillin, azlocillin, and piperacillin. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest a possible pathway of these drugs through the OmpF channel and rationalize our experimental findings. For zwitterionic ampicillin and amoxicillin, we identify a region of binding sites near the narrowest part of the channel pore. Interactions with these sites partially compensate for the entropic cost of drug confinement by the channel. Whereas azlocillin and piperacillin are clearly too big to pass through the channel constriction, dianionic carbenicillin does not find an efficient binding region in the constriction zone. Carbenicillin's favorable interactions are limited to the extracellular vestibule. These observations confirm our earlier suggestion that a set of high-affinity sites at the narrowest part of the OmpF channel improves a drug's ability to cross the membrane via the pore.

  1. Insulin Biosynthetic Interaction Network Component, TMEM24, Facilitates Insulin Reserve Pool Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Pottekat

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Insulin homeostasis in pancreatic β cells is now recognized as a critical element in the progression of obesity and type II diabetes (T2D. Proteins that interact with insulin to direct its sequential synthesis, folding, trafficking, and packaging into reserve granules in order to manage release in response to elevated glucose remain largely unknown. Using a conformation-based approach combined with mass spectrometry, we have generated the insulin biosynthetic interaction network (insulin BIN, a proteomic roadmap in the β cell that describes the sequential interacting partners of insulin along the secretory axis. The insulin BIN revealed an abundant C2 domain-containing transmembrane protein 24 (TMEM24 that manages glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from a reserve pool of granules, a critical event impaired in patients with T2D. The identification of TMEM24 in the context of a comprehensive set of sequential insulin-binding partners provides a molecular description of the insulin secretory pathway in β cells.

  2. Protease inhibitor homologues from mamba venoms: facilitation of acetylcholine release and interactions with prejunctional blocking toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, A L; Karlsson, E

    1982-09-01

    1 Five polypeptides, which were isolated from elapid snake venoms and which are structurally related to protease inhibitors, were tested for action on isolated biventer cervicis nerve-muscle preparations of the chick. 2 Dendrotoxin from the Eastern green mamba (Dendroaspis angusticeps) and toxins K and I from the black mamba (Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis) increased to indirect stimulation without affecting responses to exogenous acetylcholine, carbachol of KCl. 3 The two other protease inhibitor homologues, HHV-II from Ringhals cobra (Hemachatus haemachatus) and NNV-II from Cape cobra (Naja nivea) did not increase responses to nerve stimulation. Trypsin inhibitor from bovine pancreas also had no facilitatory effects on neuromuscular transmission. 4 The facilitatory toxins from mamba venoms interacted with the prejunctional blocking toxins, beta-bungarotoxin, crotoxin and notexin, but not with taipoxin. The blocking effects of beta-bungarotoxin were reduced by pretreatment with the mamba toxins, whereas the blocking actions of crotoxin and notexin were enhanced. 5 The results indicate that protease inhibitor homologues from mamba venoms form a new class of neurotoxin, which acts to increase the release of acetylcholine in response to motor nerve stimulation. 6 From the interaction studies it is concluded that the facilitatory toxins bind to motor nerve terminals at sites related to those occupied by the prejunctional blocking toxins. However, differences in interactions with individual toxins suggest that there must be several related binding sites on the nerve terminals.

  3. Claudin-2 promotes breast cancer liver metastasis by facilitating tumor cell interactions with hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabariès, Sébastien; Dupuy, Fanny; Dong, Zhifeng; Monast, Anie; Annis, Matthew G; Spicer, Jonathan; Ferri, Lorenzo E; Omeroglu, Atilla; Basik, Mark; Amir, Eitan; Clemons, Mark; Siegel, Peter M

    2012-08-01

    We previously identified claudin-2 as a functional mediator of breast cancer liver metastasis. We now confirm that claudin-2 levels are elevated in liver metastases, but not in skin metastases, compared to levels in their matched primary tumors in patients with breast cancer. Moreover, claudin-2 is specifically expressed in liver-metastatic breast cancer cells compared to populations derived from bone or lung metastases. The increased liver tropism exhibited by claudin-2-expressing breast cancer cells requires claudin-2-mediated interactions between breast cancer cells and primary hepatocytes. Furthermore, the reduction of the claudin-2 expression level, either in cancer cells or in primary hepatocytes, diminishes these heterotypic cell-cell interactions. Finally, we demonstrate that the first claudin-2 extracellular loop is essential for mediating tumor cell-hepatocyte interactions and the ability of breast cancer cells to form liver metastases in vivo. Thus, during breast cancer liver metastasis, claudin-2 shifts from acting within tight-junctional complexes to functioning as an adhesion molecule between breast cancer cells and hepatocytes.

  4. TBP binding-induced folding of the glucocorticoid receptor AF1 domain facilitates its interaction with steroid receptor coactivator-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shagufta H Khan

    Full Text Available The precise mechanism by which glucocorticoid receptor (GR regulates the transcription of its target genes is largely unknown. This is, in part, due to the lack of structural and functional information about GR's N-terminal activation function domain, AF1. Like many steroid hormone receptors (SHRs, the GR AF1 exists in an intrinsically disordered (ID conformation or an ensemble of conformers that collectively appears to be unstructured. The GR AF1 is known to recruit several coregulatory proteins, including those from the basal transcriptional machinery, e.g., TATA box binding protein (TBP that forms the basis for the multiprotein transcription initiation complex. However, the precise mechanism of this process is unknown. We have earlier shown that conditional folding of the GR AF1 is the key for its interactions with critical coactivator proteins. We hypothesize that binding of TBP to AF1 results in the structural rearrangement of the ID AF1 domain such that its surfaces become easily accessible for interaction with other coactivators. To test this hypothesis, we determined whether TBP binding-induced structure formation in the GR AF1 facilitates its interaction with steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1, a critical coactivator that is important for GR-mediated transcriptional activity. Our data show that stoichiometric binding of TBP induces significantly higher helical content at the expense of random coil configuration in the GR AF1. Further, we found that this induced AF1 conformation facilitates its interaction with SRC-1, and subsequent AF1-mediated transcriptional activity. Our results may provide a potential mechanism through which GR and by large other SHRs may regulate the expression of the GR-target genes.

  5. Enhancing User Immersion and Virtual Presence in Interactive Multiuser Virtual Environments through the Development and Integration of a Gesture-Centric Natural User Interface Developed from Existing Virtual Reality Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Emma-Ogbangwo, C; Cope, N; Behringer, R.; Fabri, M

    2014-01-01

    Immersion, referring to the level of physical or psychological submergence of a user within a virtual space relative to that user's consciousness of the real-world environment, has predominantly been established as an indispensable part of interactive media designs. This is most prevalent in Virtual Reality (VR) platforms, as their applications are typically reliant on user believability. With a wide variation of possible methodologies for the enhancement of this feature, the collectively rec...

  6. Intra- And Inter-Monomer Interactions are Required to Synergistically Facilitate ATP Hydrolysis in HSP90

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, C.N.; Krukenberg, K.A.; Agard, D.A.

    2009-05-12

    Nucleotide-dependent conformational changes of the constitutively dimeric molecular chaperone Hsp90 are integral to its molecular mechanism. Recent full-length crystal structures (Protein Data Bank codes 2IOQ, 2CG9, AND 2IOP) of Hsp90 homologs reveal large scale quaternary domain rearrangements upon the addition of nucleotides. Although previous work has shown the importance of C-terminal domain dimerization for efficient ATP hydrolysis, which should imply cooperativity, other studies suggest that the two ATPases function independently. Using the crystal structures as a guide, we examined the role of intra- and intermonomer interactions in stabilizing the ATPase activity of a single active site within an intact dimer. This was accomplished by creating heterodimers that allow us to differentially mutate each monomer, probing the context in which particular residues are important for ATP hydrolysis. Although the ATPase activity of each monomer can function independently, we found that the activity of one monomer could be inhibited by the mutation of hydrophobic residues on the trans N-terminal domain (opposite monomer). Furthermore, these trans interactions are synergistically mediated by a loop on the cis middle domain. This loop contains hydrophobic residues as well as a critical arginine that provides a direct linkage to the {gamma}-phosphate of bound ATP. Small angle x-ray scattering demonstrates that deleterious mutations block domain closure in the presence of AMPPNP (5{prime}-adenylyl-{beta},{gamma}-imidodiphosphate), providing a direct linkage between structural changes and functional consequences. Together, these data indicate that both the cis monomer and the trans monomer and the intradomain and interdomain interactions cooperatively stabilize the active conformation of each active site and help explain the importance of dimer formation.

  7. Human DDX3 interacts with the HIV-1 Tat protein to facilitate viral mRNA translation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Chih Lai

    Full Text Available Nuclear export and translation of intron-containing viral mRNAs are required for HIV-1 gene expression and replication. In this report, we provide evidence to show that DDX3 regulates the translation of HIV-1 mRNAs. We found that knockdown of DDX3 expression effectively inhibited HIV-1 production. Translation of HIV-1 early regulatory proteins, Tat and rev, was impaired in DDX3-depleted cells. All HIV-1 transcripts share a highly structured 5' untranslated region (UTR with inhibitory elements on translation of viral mRNAs, yet DDX3 promoted translation of reporter mRNAs containing the HIV-1 5' UTR, especially with the transactivation response (TAR hairpin. Interestingly, DDX3 directly interacts with HIV-1 Tat, a well-characterized transcriptional activator bound to the TAR hairpin. HIV-1 Tat is partially targeted to cytoplasmic stress granules upon DDX3 overexpression or cell stress conditions, suggesting a potential role of Tat/DDX3 complex in translation. We further demonstrated that HIV-1 Tat remains associated with translating mRNAs and facilitates translation of mRNAs containing the HIV-1 5' UTR. Taken together, these findings indicate that DDX3 is recruited to the TAR hairpin by interaction with viral Tat to facilitate HIV-1 mRNA translation.

  8. Human DDX3 interacts with the HIV-1 Tat protein to facilitate viral mRNA translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ming-Chih; Wang, Shainn-Wei; Cheng, Lie; Tarn, Woan-Yuh; Tsai, Shaw-Jenq; Sun, H Sunny

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear export and translation of intron-containing viral mRNAs are required for HIV-1 gene expression and replication. In this report, we provide evidence to show that DDX3 regulates the translation of HIV-1 mRNAs. We found that knockdown of DDX3 expression effectively inhibited HIV-1 production. Translation of HIV-1 early regulatory proteins, Tat and rev, was impaired in DDX3-depleted cells. All HIV-1 transcripts share a highly structured 5' untranslated region (UTR) with inhibitory elements on translation of viral mRNAs, yet DDX3 promoted translation of reporter mRNAs containing the HIV-1 5' UTR, especially with the transactivation response (TAR) hairpin. Interestingly, DDX3 directly interacts with HIV-1 Tat, a well-characterized transcriptional activator bound to the TAR hairpin. HIV-1 Tat is partially targeted to cytoplasmic stress granules upon DDX3 overexpression or cell stress conditions, suggesting a potential role of Tat/DDX3 complex in translation. We further demonstrated that HIV-1 Tat remains associated with translating mRNAs and facilitates translation of mRNAs containing the HIV-1 5' UTR. Taken together, these findings indicate that DDX3 is recruited to the TAR hairpin by interaction with viral Tat to facilitate HIV-1 mRNA translation.

  9. HSF1-TPR interaction facilitates export of stress-induced HSP70 mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaggs, Hollie S; Xing, Hongyan; Wilkerson, Donald C; Murphy, Lynea A; Hong, Yiling; Mayhew, Christopher N; Sarge, Kevin D

    2007-11-23

    Stress conditions inhibit mRNA export, but mRNAs encoding heat shock proteins continue to be efficiently exported from the nucleus during stress. How HSP mRNAs bypass this stress-associated export inhibition was not known. Here, we show that HSF1, the transcription factor that binds HSP promoters after stress to induce their transcription, interacts with the nuclear pore-associating TPR protein in a stress-responsive manner. TPR is brought into proximity of the HSP70 promoter after stress and preferentially associates with mRNAs transcribed from this promoter. Disruption of the HSF1-TPR interaction inhibits the export of mRNAs expressed from the HSP70 promoter, both endogenous HSP70 mRNA and a luciferase reporter mRNA. These results suggest that HSP mRNA export escapes stress inhibition via HSF1-mediated recruitment of the nuclear pore-associating protein TPR to HSP genes, thereby functionally connecting the first and last nuclear steps of the gene expression pathway, transcription and mRNA export.

  10. A transition-state interaction shifts nucleobase ionization toward neutrality to facilitate small ribozyme catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberman, Joseph A; Guo, Man; Jenkins, Jermaine L; Krucinska, Jolanta; Chen, Yuanyuan; Carey, Paul R; Wedekind, Joseph E

    2012-10-17

    One mechanism by which ribozymes can accelerate biological reactions is by adopting folds that favorably perturb nucleobase ionization. Herein we used Raman crystallography to directly measure pK(a) values for the Ade38 N1 imino group of a hairpin ribozyme in distinct conformational states. A transition-state analogue gave a pK(a) value of 6.27 ± 0.05, which agrees strikingly well with values measured by pH-rate analyses. To identify the chemical attributes that contribute to the shifted pK(a), we determined crystal structures of hairpin ribozyme variants containing single-atom substitutions at the active site and measured their respective Ade38 N1 pK(a) values. This approach led to the identification of a single interaction in the transition-state conformation that elevates the base pK(a) > 0.8 log unit relative to the precatalytic state. The agreement of the microscopic and macroscopic pK(a) values and the accompanying structural analysis supports a mechanism in which Ade38 N1(H)+ functions as a general acid in phosphodiester bond cleavage. Overall the results quantify the contribution of a single electrostatic interaction to base ionization, which has broad relevance for understanding how RNA structure can control chemical reactivity.

  11. A Physical Interaction between the Dopamine Transporter and DJ-1 Facilitates Increased Dopamine Reuptake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beryl Luk

    Full Text Available The regulation of the dopamine transporter (DAT impacts extracellular dopamine levels after release from dopaminergic neurons. Furthermore, a variety of protein partners have been identified that can interact with and modulate DAT function. In this study we show that DJ-1 can potentially modulate DAT function. Co-expression of DAT and DJ-1 in HEK-293T cells leads to an increase in [3H] dopamine uptake that does not appear to be mediated by increased total DAT expression but rather through an increase in DAT cell surface localization. In addition, through a series of GST affinity purifications and co-immunoprecipitations, we provide evidence that the DAT can be found in a complex with DJ-1, which involve distinct regions within both DAT and DJ-1. Using in vitro binding experiments we also show that this complex can be formed in part by a direct interaction between DAT and DJ-1. Co-expression of a mini-gene that can disrupt the DAT/DJ-1 complex appears to block the increase in [3H] dopamine uptake by DJ-1. Mutations in DJ-1 have been linked to familial forms of Parkinson's disease, yet the normal physiological function of DJ-1 remains unclear. Our study suggests that DJ-1 may also play a role in regulating dopamine levels by modifying DAT activity.

  12. Facilitating guest transport in clathrate hydrates by tuning guest-host interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moudrakovski, Igor L.; Udachin, Konstantin A.; Ratcliffe, Christopher I. [National Research Council of Canada, 100 Sussex Dr., Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, John A., E-mail: John.Ripmeester@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [National Research Council of Canada, 100 Sussex Dr., Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z3 (Canada)

    2015-02-21

    The understanding and eventual control of guest molecule transport in gas hydrates is of central importance for the efficient synthesis and processing of these materials for applications in the storage, separation, and sequestration of gases and natural gas production. Previously, some links have been established between dynamics of the host water molecules and guest-host hydrogen bonding interactions, but direct observation of transport in the form of cage-to-cage guest diffusion is still lacking. Recent calculations have suggested that pairs of different guest molecules in neighboring cages can affect guest-host hydrogen bonding and, therefore, defect injection and water lattice motions. We have chosen two sets of hydrate guest pairs, tetrahydrofuran (THF)-CO{sub 2} and isobutane-CO{sub 2}, that are predicted to enhance or to diminish guest–host hydrogen bonding interactions as compared to those in pure CO{sub 2} hydrate and we have studied guest dynamics in each using {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods. In addition, we have obtained the crystal structure of the THF-CO{sub 2} sII hydrate using the combined single crystal X-ray diffraction and {sup 13}C NMR powder pattern data and have performed molecular dynamics-simulation of the CO{sub 2} dynamics. The NMR powder line shape studies confirm the enhanced and delayed dynamics for the THF and isobutane containing hydrates, respectively, as compared to those in the CO{sub 2} hydrate. In addition, from line shape studies and 2D exchange spectroscopy NMR, we observe cage-to-cage exchange of CO{sub 2} molecules in the THF-CO{sub 2} hydrate, but not in the other hydrates studied. We conclude that the relatively rapid intercage guest dynamics are the result of synergistic guest A–host water–guest B interactions, thus allowing tuning of the guest transport properties in the hydrates by choice of the appropriate guest molecules. Our experimental value for inter-cage hopping is slower by a factor of 10

  13. Aquatic flower-inspired cell culture platform with simplified medium exchange process for facilitating cell-surface interaction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hyeonjun; Park, Sung Jea; Han, Seon Jin; Lim, Jiwon; Kim, Dong Sung

    2016-02-01

    Establishing fundamentals for regulating cell behavior with engineered physical environments, such as topography and stiffness, requires a large number of cell culture experiments. However, cell culture experiments in cell-surface interaction studies are generally labor-intensive and time-consuming due to many experimental tasks, such as multiple fabrication processes in sample preparation and repetitive medium exchange in cell culture. In this work, a novel aquatic flower-inspired cell culture platform (AFIP) is presented. AFIP aims to facilitate the experiments on the cell-surface interaction studies, especially the medium exchange process. AFIP was devised to capture and dispense cell culture medium based on interactions between an elastic polymer substrate and a liquid medium. Thus, the medium exchange can be performed easily and without the need of other instruments, such as a vacuum suction and pipette. An appropriate design window of AFIP, based on scaling analysis, was identified to provide a criterion for achieving stability in medium exchange as well as various surface characteristics of the petal substrates. The developed AFIP, with physically engineered petal substrates, was also verified to exchange medium reliably and repeatedly. A closed structure capturing the medium was sustained stably during cell culture experiments. NIH3T3 proliferation results also demonstrated that AFIP can be applied to the cell-surface interaction studies as an alternative to the conventional method.

  14. The facilitation of social-emotional understanding and social interaction in high-functioning children with autism: intervention outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauminger, Nirit

    2002-08-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of a 7-month cognitive behavioral intervention for the facilitation of the social-emotional understanding and social interaction of 15 high-functioning children (8 to 17 years old) with autism. Intervention focused on teaching interpersonal problem solving, affective knowledge, and social interaction. Preintervention and postintervention measures included observations of social interaction, measures of problem solving and of emotion understanding, and teacher-rated social skills. Results demonstrated progress in three areas of intervention. Children were more likely to initiate positive social interaction with peers after treatment; in particular, they improved eye contact and their ability to share experiences with peers and to show interest in peers. In problem solving after treatment, children provided more relevant solutions and fewer nonsocial solutions to different social situations. In emotional knowledge, after treatment, children provided more examples of complex emotions, supplied more specific rather then general examples, and included an audience more often in the different emotions. Children also obtained higher teacher-rated social skills scores in assertion and cooperation after treatment. The implications of these findings are discussed in terms of the effectiveness of the current model of intervention for high-functioning children with autism.

  15. APP and APLP2 interact with the synaptic release machinery and facilitate transmitter release at hippocampal synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanutza, Tomas; Del Prete, Dolores; Ford, Michael J; Castillo, Pablo E; D’Adamio, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP), whose mutations cause familial Alzheimer’s disease, interacts with the synaptic release machinery, suggesting a role in neurotransmission. Here we mapped this interaction to the NH2-terminal region of the APP intracellular domain. A peptide encompassing this binding domain -named JCasp- is naturally produced by a γ-secretase/caspase double-cut of APP. JCasp interferes with the APP-presynaptic proteins interaction and, if linked to a cell-penetrating peptide, reduces glutamate release in acute hippocampal slices from wild-type but not APP deficient mice, indicating that JCasp inhibits APP function.The APP-like protein-2 (APLP2) also binds the synaptic release machinery. Deletion of APP and APLP2 produces synaptic deficits similar to those caused by JCasp. Our data support the notion that APP and APLP2 facilitate transmitter release, likely through the interaction with the neurotransmitter release machinery. Given the link of APP to Alzheimer’s disease, alterations of this synaptic role of APP could contribute to dementia. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09743.001 PMID:26551565

  16. APP and APLP2 interact with the synaptic release machinery and facilitate transmitter release at hippocampal synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanutza, Tomas; Del Prete, Dolores; Ford, Michael J; Castillo, Pablo E; D'Adamio, Luciano

    2015-11-09

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP), whose mutations cause familial Alzheimer's disease, interacts with the synaptic release machinery, suggesting a role in neurotransmission. Here we mapped this interaction to the NH2-terminal region of the APP intracellular domain. A peptide encompassing this binding domain -named JCasp- is naturally produced by a γ-secretase/caspase double-cut of APP. JCasp interferes with the APP-presynaptic proteins interaction and, if linked to a cell-penetrating peptide, reduces glutamate release in acute hippocampal slices from wild-type but not APP deficient mice, indicating that JCasp inhibits APP function.The APP-like protein-2 (APLP2) also binds the synaptic release machinery. Deletion of APP and APLP2 produces synaptic deficits similar to those caused by JCasp. Our data support the notion that APP and APLP2 facilitate transmitter release, likely through the interaction with the neurotransmitter release machinery. Given the link of APP to Alzheimer's disease, alterations of this synaptic role of APP could contribute to dementia.

  17. User-Centric Innovations in New Product Development – Systematic Identification of Lead Users Harnessing Interactive and Collaborative Online-Tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilgram, V.; Brem, Alexander; Voigt, K.-I.

    2008-01-01

    are trying to alleviate the risk of lacking user-acceptance through opening their innovation processes to external actors, particularly customers. The method of integrating lead users is determined by the effective and systematic identification of leading-edge customers, which is considered to be a critical...... for the online identification of lead users: being ahead of a market trend, high expected benefits, user expertise and motivation, extreme user needs as well as opinion leadership and an online commitment....

  18. User-programmer dialogue: Guidelines for designing menus and help files for interactive computer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, P. A.

    1983-01-01

    This document is a set of guidelines to aid a programmer in making the various decisions necessary for a clear user-programmer dialogue. Its goal is to promote an effective and efficient transfer of information between programmer and user. These guidelines are divided into four sections: (1) Format, (2) Sequence, (3) Audience, and (4) Aim. Format, in terms of this study, means the spatial and structural presentation of information. Sequence deals with the procedural aspects of multiple panel displays. This section looks at the issues of timelines of presentation, modularization of information, and patterns of user behavior. Audience looks at the relationship among programmer, user, and message. It covers the issues of analyzing the audience's knowledge, attitudes, and needs, anticipating the audience's inferences, and identifying textual ambiguities. The programmer's aim or intention shows up in everything from tone to format. Aim considers the programmer's purpose.

  19. Decreased spontaneous eye blink rates in chronic cannabis users: evidence for striatal cannabinoid-dopamine interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikael A Kowal

    Full Text Available Chronic cannabis use has been shown to block long-term depression of GABA-glutamate synapses in the striatum, which is likely to reduce the extent to which endogenous cannabinoids modulate GABA- and glutamate-related neuronal activity. The current study aimed at investigating the effect of this process on striatal dopamine levels by studying the spontaneous eye blink rate (EBR, a clinical marker of dopamine level in the striatum. 25 adult regular cannabis users and 25 non-user controls matched for age, gender, race, and IQ were compared. Results show a significant reduction in EBR in chronic users as compared to non-users, suggesting an indirect detrimental effect of chronic cannabis use on striatal dopaminergic functioning. Additionally, EBR correlated negatively with years of cannabis exposure, monthly peak cannabis consumption, and lifetime cannabis consumption, pointing to a relationship between the degree of impairment of striatal dopaminergic transmission and cannabis consumption history.

  20. Stem cell-paved biobridges facilitate stem transplant and host brain cell interactions for stroke therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Kelsey; Gonzales-Portillo, Gabriel S; Acosta, Sandra A; Kaneko, Yuji; Borlongan, Cesar V; Tajiri, Naoki

    2015-10-14

    Distinguished by an infarct core encased within a penumbra, stroke remains a primary source of mortality within the United States. While our scientific knowledge regarding the pathology of stroke continues to improve, clinical treatment options for patients suffering from stroke are extremely limited. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) remains the sole FDA-approved drug proven to be helpful following stroke. However, due to the need to administer the drug within 4.5h of stroke onset its usefulness is constrained to less than 5% of all patients suffering from ischemic stroke. One experimental therapy for the treatment of stroke involves the utilization of stem cells. Stem cell transplantation has been linked to therapeutic benefit by means of cell replacement and release of growth factors; however the precise means by which this is accomplished has not yet been clearly delineated. Using a traumatic brain injury model, we recently demonstrated the ability of transplanted mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to form a biobridge connecting the area of injury to the neurogenic niche within the brain. We hypothesize that MSCs may also have the capacity to create a similar biobridge following stroke; thereby forming a conduit between the neurogenic niche and the stroke core and peri-infarct area. We propose that this biobridge could assist and promote interaction of host brain cells with transplanted stem cells and offer more opportunities to enhance the effectiveness of stem cell therapy in stroke. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Cell Interactions In Stroke. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. arriba-lib: Analyses of user interactions with an electronic library of decision aids on the basis of log data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Oliver; Szabo, Elisabeth; Keller, Heidemarie; Kramer, Lena; Krones, Tanja; Donner-Banzhoff, Norbert

    2012-12-01

    Computerised log files are important for analysing user behaviour in health informatics to gain insight into processes that lead to suboptimal user patterns. This is important for software training programmes or for changes to improve usability. Technical user behaviour regarding decision aids has not so far been thoroughly investigated with log files. The aim of our study was to examine more detailed user interactions of primary-care physicians and their patients with arriba-lib, our multimodular electronic library of decision aids used during consultations, on the basis of log data. We analysed 184 consultation log files from 28 primary-care physicians. The average consultation time of our modules was about 8 min. Two-thirds of the consultation time were spent in the history information part of the programme. In this part, mainly bar charts were used to display risk information. Our electronic library of decision aids does not generate specific user behaviour based on physician characteristics such as age, gender, years in practice, or prior experience with decision aids. This supports the widespread use of our e-library in the primary-care sector and probably beyond.

  2. A Preliminary Study on the Use of Haptic Feedback to Assist Users with Impaired Arm Coordination During Mouse Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. G. Tsagarakis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Physical movement impairments caused by central nervous system dysfunction or by muscle spasms generated from other neurological damage or dysfunction can often make it difficult or impossible for affected individuals to interact with computer generated environments using the conventional mouse interfaces. This work investigates the use of a 2 dimensional haptic device as an assistive robotic aid to minimize the effects of the pathological absence of motor control on the upper limb in impaired users while using a mouse interface. The haptic system used in this research is a two degree of freedom (DOF Pantograph planar device. To detect the intended user motion, the device is equipped with force sensing allowing the monitoring of the user applied loads. Impedance based techniques are used to develop a “clumsy” motion suppression control system. The erratic motion suppression techniques and the experimental system setup are evaluated in two dimensional tracking tasks using a human subject with failure of the gross coordination of the upper limb muscle movements resulting from a disorder called ‘Muscle Ataxia’. The results presented demonstrate the ability of the system to improve the tracking performance of the impaired user while interacting with a simple computer generated 2D space.

  3. The Legionella pneumophila IcmSW complex interacts with multiple Dot/Icm effectors to facilitate type IV translocation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric D Cambronne

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Many gram-negative pathogens use a type IV secretion system (T4SS to deliver effector proteins into eukaryotic host cells. The fidelity of protein translocation depends on the efficient recognition of effector proteins by the T4SS. Legionella pneumophila delivers a large number of effector proteins into eukaryotic cells using the Dot/Icm T4SS. How the Dot/Icm system is able to recognize and control the delivery of effectors is poorly understood. Recent studies suggest that the IcmS and IcmW proteins interact to form a stable complex that facilitates translocation of effector proteins by the Dot/Icm system by an unknown mechanism. Here we demonstrate that the IcmSW complex is necessary for the productive translocation of multiple Dot/Icm effector proteins. Effector proteins that were able to bind IcmSW in vitro required icmS and icmW for efficient translocation into eukaryotic cells during L. pneumophila infection. We identified regions in the effector protein SidG involved in icmSW-dependent translocation. Although the full-length SidG protein was translocated by an icmSW-dependent mechanism, deletion of amino terminal regions in the SidG protein resulted in icmSW-independent translocation, indicating that the IcmSW complex is not contributing directly to recognition of effector proteins by the Dot/Icm system. Biochemical and genetic studies showed that the IcmSW complex interacts with a central region of the SidG protein. The IcmSW interaction resulted in a conformational change in the SidG protein as determined by differences in protease sensitivity in vitro. These data suggest that IcmSW binding to effectors could enhance effector protein delivery by mediating a conformational change that facilitates T4SS recognition of a translocation domain located in the carboxyl region of the effector protein.

  4. The Golgi protein ACBD3 facilitates Enterovirus 71 replication by interacting with 3A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Xiaobo; Xiao, Xia; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Ma, Yijie; Qi, Jianli; Wu, Chao; Xiao, Yan; Zhou, Zhuo; He, Bin; Wang, Jianwei

    2017-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a human pathogen that causes hand, foot, mouth disease and neurological complications. Although EV71, as well as other enteroviruses, initiates a remodeling of intracellular membrane for genomic replication, the regulatory mechanism remains elusive. By screening human cDNA library, we uncover that the Golgi resident protein acyl-coenzyme A binding domain-containing 3 (ACBD3) serves as a target of the 3A protein of EV71. This interaction occurs in cells expressing 3A or infected with EV71. Genetic inhibition or deletion of ACBD3 drastically impairs viral RNA replication and plaque formation. Such defects are corrected upon restoration of ACBD3. In infected cells, EV71 3A redirects ACBD3, to the replication sites. I44A or H54Y substitution in 3A interrupts the binding to ACBD3. As such, viral replication is impeded. These results reveal a mechanism of EV71 replication that involves host ACBD3 for viral replication. PMID:28303920

  5. The Influence of Interactivity Features of Databases on Scientific Behavior: A user perspective survey based on the Flow theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmatollah Fatthai

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We followed two aims: testing the effects of databases' user interface interactivity (UII on Scientific Behavior (SB and exploring the flow experience (FE as mediator between interface interactivity and SB, as well as self-efficacy (SE role as an interferer. We used mixed method in this research. We made a SB questionnaire via a comparative literature study, FE and user UII through literature review. Faculty members and PhD students participated as scholars. Structural Equation Modeling was used for quantitative data analysis and interpretative approach to analyze qualitative data. The role of typological variables, such as gender, area of study, academic degree and English language skill level on SE, UII, FE and SB means are investigated. Finally, we tested the effects of databases' UII on SB and mediator role of FE and interfering role of SE. We found that the more self-efficient participants, the more they experience user interface interactivity and scientific behavior changes/adaptations. In other words, self-efficacy is an important characteristic to establish interactive search session and to upgrade scientific behavior in scholars. Also, we found those participants who experience more flow, have more chance to experience SB changes and adaptation in UII environment. So UII may have effect on researchers' SB. Results may be used in: 1 distance education or researcher training, since these areas are interested in developing, changing and adapting SB; 2 Human-Computer Interaction field, because SB seems to be a new aspect of computer interaction effect on human; 3 The Flow theory will be supported by this new implementation. We proposed a new theoretical framework for research

  6. Intrusion of granitic magma into the continental crust facilitated by magma pulsing and dike-diapir interactions: Numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wenrong; Kaus, Boris J. P.; Paterson, Scott

    2016-06-01

    We conducted a 2-D thermomechanical modeling study of intrusion of granitic magma into the continental crust to explore the roles of multiple pulsing and dike-diapir interactions in the presence of visco-elasto-plastic rheology. Multiple pulsing is simulated by replenishing source regions with new pulses of magma at a certain temporal frequency. Parameterized "pseudo-dike zones" above magma pulses are included. Simulation results show that both diking and pulsing are crucial factors facilitating the magma ascent and emplacement. Multiple pulses keep the magmatic system from freezing and facilitate the initiation of pseudo-dike zones, which in turn heat the host rock roof, lower its viscosity, and create pathways for later ascending pulses of magma. Without diking, magma cannot penetrate the highly viscous upper crust. Without multiple pulsing, a single magma body solidifies quickly and it cannot ascent over a long distance. Our results shed light on the incremental growth of magma chambers, recycling of continental crust, and evolution of a continental arc such as the Sierra Nevada arc in California.

  7. The preferences of users of electronic medical records in hospitals: Quantifying the relative importance of barriers and facilitators of an innovation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Struik, Marjolijn; Koster, Ferry; Schuit, Jantine; Nugteren, S.K; Veldwijk, Jorien; Lambooij, A.C

    2014-01-01

    .... However the implementation processes are not unproblematic and are slower than needed. Many of the barriers and facilitators of the adoption of EMRs are identified, but the relative importance of these factors is still undetermined...

  8. Understanding Usefulness in Human-Computer Interaction to Enhance User Experience Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Craig Matthew

    2012-01-01

    The concept of usefulness has implicitly played a pivotal role in evaluation research, but the meaning of usefulness has changed over time from system reliability to user performance and learnability/ease of use for non-experts. Despite massive technical and social changes, usability remains the "gold standard" for system evaluation.…

  9. Separating business process from user interaction in web-based information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aberer, Karl; Datta, Anwitaman; Despotovic, Zoran; Wombacher, Andreas

    2003-01-01

    In Web-based information commerce it is diffcult to disentangle presentation from process logic, and sometimes even data is not separate from the presentation. Consequently, it becomes crucial to define an abstract model for business processes and their mapping into an active user interface presenta

  10. Users and unicorns: a discussion of mythical beasts in interactive science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shove, Elizabeth; Rip, Arie

    2000-01-01

    The UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) has placed considerable emphasis on the users of the research it supports. Researchers have in turn pointed to the potential uses of the work they do as a means of demonstrating relevance. However, to date, researchers and research funders have

  11. Browsing and Querying in Online Documentation:A Study of User Interfaces and the Interaction Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Frøkjær, Erik

    1996-01-01

    A user interface study concerning the usage effectiveness of selected retrieval modes was conducted using an experimental text retrieval system, TeSS, giving access to online documentation of certain programming tools. Four modes of TeSS were compared: (1) browsing, (2) conventional boolean...

  12. Materials in products selection: tools for including user-interaction in materials selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Kesteren, I.E.H.; Stappers, P.J.; De Bruijn, J.C.M.

    2007-01-01

    Products do not only discriminate from other products in functionality, but also in the way they please users. The sensorial properties of materials influence whether a product provides adequate feedback or gives a pleasant emotional experience. Designing a specific userinteraction involves selectin

  13. Separating business process from user interaction in web-based information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aberer, Karl; Datta, Anwitaman; Despotovic, Zoran; Wombacher, Andreas

    2003-01-01

    In Web-based information commerce it is diffcult to disentangle presentation from process logic, and sometimes even data is not separate from the presentation. Consequently, it becomes crucial to define an abstract model for business processes and their mapping into an active user interface presenta

  14. Materials in products selection: tools for including user-interaction in materials selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Kesteren, I.E.H.; Stappers, P.J.; De Bruijn, J.C.M.

    2007-01-01

    Products do not only discriminate from other products in functionality, but also in the way they please users. The sensorial properties of materials influence whether a product provides adequate feedback or gives a pleasant emotional experience. Designing a specific userinteraction involves selectin

  15. Inferring Learning Style from the Way Students Interact with a Computer User Interface and the WWW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, David Adrian; Bergasa-Suso, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    Recent significant advances in automatically predicting user learning styles are described. The system works with new client-based systems that filter Web pages and provide easy, structured, focused, and controlled access to the Internet. A first system called iLessons was embedded within Microsoft Internet Explorer 6 and provided teachers with…

  16. User-centered design improves the usability of drug-drug interaction alerts: Experimental comparison of interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Daniel R; Rizzato Lede, Daniel A; Otero, Carlos M; Risk, Marcelo R; González Bernaldo de Quirós, Fernán

    2017-02-01

    Clinical Decision Support Systems can alert health professionals about drug interactions when they prescribe medications. The Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires in Argentina developed an electronic health record with drug-drug interaction alerts, using traditional software engineering techniques and requirements. Despite enhancing the drug-drug interaction knowledge database, the alert override rate of this system was very high. We redesigned the alert system using user-centered design (UCD) and participatory design techniques to enhance the drug-drug interaction alert interface. This paper describes the methodology of our UCD. We used crossover method with realistic, clinical vignettes to compare usability of the standard and new software versions in terms of efficiency, effectiveness, and user satisfaction. Our study showed that, compared to the traditional alert system, the UCD alert system was more efficient (alerts faster resolution), more effective (tasks completed with fewer errors), and more satisfying. These results indicate that UCD techniques that follow ISO 9241-210 can generate more usable alerts than traditional design.

  17. Information Retention and Overload in First-Time Hearing Aid Users: An Interactive Multimedia Educational Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Melanie; Brandreth, Marian; Brassington, William; Wharrad, Heather

    2015-09-01

    An educational intervention to improve knowledge of hearing aids and communication in first-time hearing aid users was assessed. This intervention was based on the concept of reusable learning objects (RLOs). A randomized controlled trial was conducted. One group received the educational intervention, and the other acted as a control group. RLOs were delivered online and through DVD for television and personal computer. Knowledge of both practical and psychosocial aspects of hearing aids and communication was assessed using a free-recall method 6 weeks postfitting. Knowledge of both practical and psychosocial issues was significantly higher in the group that received the RLOs than in the control group. Moderate to large effect sizes indicated that these differences were clinically significant. An educational intervention that supplements clinical practice results in improved knowledge in first-time hearing aid users.

  18. Implementing IWRM: Delivering data and models with interactive dashboards and cyberinfrastructure to facilitate natural resource conflict resolution and valuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, S. A.; Figueroa B, E.

    2016-12-01

    Sound science and adequate models of systems are necessary for environmental decisions, yet frequently it is insufficient. This study documents the outcome of a co-design effort that was convened initially to explore the potential role that technology may have in supporting multi-stakeholder deliberation about sustainability transitions for a region. The project aims to create science-based deliberation among diverse stakeholders about water-energy-mineral use and choices in the Atacama Desert region of Chile. An interactive dashboard that pairs stakeholder preferences, concept maps with natural resource valuation models seeks to visualize useful information. The ultimate goal is to improve levels of understanding and open possibilities for collaborative problem solving by engaging industry, academics, and indigenous communities in a long- term participatory modeling process. Collaborative discussions build technical knowledge and bridge across sectors that are often at odds over management of earth resources. The project began in the shadow of marked conflict and tensions among participants. Methodologically, tensions have been reduced by combining social process with information delivery that leverages interactive touch screen applications. Models and information act as boundary objects among participants and the tenets of a conflict resolution process called sustained dialogue provide guidance for facilitating the group sessions. Early results indicate that the gesture-enabled touch screens are useful for establishing an accessible environment for deliberation because subject matter experts and laypeople can interact with information with equal ease. Social process has been critical for bridging scales, managing group expectations and relationships, and addressing differences in epistemological and cultural perspectives. Recent incorporation of economic and resource valuation highlights new aspects and alternative views of tradeoffs and potential impacts.

  19. An interactive end-user software application for a deep-sea photographic database

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jaisankar, S.; Sharma, R.

    programs and converts its instructions into command thatanoperatingsystemcanhandle.Itisalsoknownas JAVA interpreter. This does cause some performance issue as JAVA program executes more slowly than platform-dependent compiled languages. A JAVA pro- gram... JAVA is a robust language that can be used to developawiderangeofsoftware,supportinggraphical user interface and networking. JAVA is secure, in the sense that, it prevents hackers from writing programs thatwreakhavoconbrowser usersystems...

  20. Qualitative analysis of Camel Snus' website message board--users' product perceptions, insights and online interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wackowski, Olivia Ann; Lewis, M Jane; Delnevo, Cristine D

    2011-03-01

    In 2006, RJ Reynolds began test-marketing Camel Snus, a new smokeless tobacco (SLT) product. Promotion included use of a brand website, a relatively new marketing channel used by tobacco companies, which allowed visitors to learn about the product and discuss it with others on the website's message board. Our study aimed to examine early experiences with and perceptions of Camel Snus as described by board contributors and also to consider the use and benefits of the message board for both consumers and the company. We conducted a qualitative analysis, coding each message in Atlas.Ti and analysing it for emerging themes and patterns. Messages were also coded for demographic information where evident, such as tobacco use status and geographical location. Descriptive data and illustrative quotes are presented. Board participants described being introduced to Camel Snus through free samples. Favourable evaluations were posted by current smokers who had never tried SLT before as well as current users of other SLT brands. Messages indicated both initiation of dual product use among smokers and product substitution. Participants used the board to advise each other on how to use the product, where to get more, suggest ways RJ Reynolds could improve the product and to encourage RJ Reynolds to release it nationally. Camel Snus has appeal for at least some smokers and SLT users. Camel Snus' website message board may have been a doubly beneficial marketing feature in both connecting product users and providing product feedback to the company during test-marketing.

  1. Patchiness and co-existence of indigenous and invasive mussels at small spatial scales: the interaction of facilitation and competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlandsson, Johan; McQuaid, Christopher D; Sköld, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Ecological theory predicts that two species with similar requirements will fail to show long-term co-existence in situations where shared resources are limiting, especially at spatial scales that are small relative to the size of the organisms. Two species of intertidal mussels, the indigenous Perna perna and the invasive Mytilus galloprovincialis, form mixed beds on the south coast of South Africa in a situation that has been stable for several generations of these species, even though these populations are often limited by the availability of space. We examined the spatial structure of these species where they co-exist at small spatial scales in the absence of apparent environmental heterogeneity at two sites, testing: whether conspecific aggregation of mussels can occur (using spatial Monte-Carlo tests); the degree of patchiness (using Korcak B patchiness exponent), and whether there was a relationship between percent cover and patchiness. We found that under certain circumstances there is non-random conspecific aggregation, but that in other circumstances there may be random distribution (i.e. the two species are mixed), so that spatial patterns are context-dependent. The relative cover of the species differed between sites, and within each site, the species with higher cover showed low Korcak B values (indicating low patchiness, i.e. the existence of fewer, larger patches), while the less abundant species showed the reverse, i.e. high patchiness. This relationship did not hold for either species within sites. We conclude that co-existence between these mussels is possible, even at small spatial scales because each species is an ecological engineer and, while they have been shown to compete for space, this is preceded by initial facilitation. We suggest that a patchy pattern of co-existence is possible because of a balance between direct (competitive) and indirect (facilitative) interactions.

  2. Patchiness and co-existence of indigenous and invasive mussels at small spatial scales: the interaction of facilitation and competition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Erlandsson

    Full Text Available Ecological theory predicts that two species with similar requirements will fail to show long-term co-existence in situations where shared resources are limiting, especially at spatial scales that are small relative to the size of the organisms. Two species of intertidal mussels, the indigenous Perna perna and the invasive Mytilus galloprovincialis, form mixed beds on the south coast of South Africa in a situation that has been stable for several generations of these species, even though these populations are often limited by the availability of space. We examined the spatial structure of these species where they co-exist at small spatial scales in the absence of apparent environmental heterogeneity at two sites, testing: whether conspecific aggregation of mussels can occur (using spatial Monte-Carlo tests; the degree of patchiness (using Korcak B patchiness exponent, and whether there was a relationship between percent cover and patchiness. We found that under certain circumstances there is non-random conspecific aggregation, but that in other circumstances there may be random distribution (i.e. the two species are mixed, so that spatial patterns are context-dependent. The relative cover of the species differed between sites, and within each site, the species with higher cover showed low Korcak B values (indicating low patchiness, i.e. the existence of fewer, larger patches, while the less abundant species showed the reverse, i.e. high patchiness. This relationship did not hold for either species within sites. We conclude that co-existence between these mussels is possible, even at small spatial scales because each species is an ecological engineer and, while they have been shown to compete for space, this is preceded by initial facilitation. We suggest that a patchy pattern of co-existence is possible because of a balance between direct (competitive and indirect (facilitative interactions.

  3. Efficient Measurement of the User Experience of Interactive Products. How to use the User Experience Questionnaire (UEQ.Example: Spanish Language Version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rauschenberger

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Developer, manager and user feedback is needed to optimize products. Besides the basic Software qualities – usability and user experience are important properties for improving your product.Usability is well known and can be tested with e.g. a usability test or an expert review. In contrast user experience describes the whole impact a product has on the end-user. The timeline goes from before, while and after the use of a product. We present a tool that allows you to evaluate the user experience of a product with little effort. Furthermore the tool is available in different languages and we are using the new Spanish Version. We show how this tool can be used for a continuous user experience assessment.

  4. Measuring the intuitive response of users when faced with different interactive paradigms to control a gastroenterology CAD system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrantes, D; Gomes, P; Pereira, D; Coimbra, M

    2016-08-01

    The gastroenterology specialty could benefit from the introduction of Computer Assisted Decision (CAD) systems, since gastric cancer is a serious concern in which an accurate and early diagnosis usually leads to a good prognosis. Still, the way doctors interact with these systems is very important because it will often determine its embracement or rejection, as any gains in productivity will frequently hinge on how comfortable they are with it. Using other types of interaction paradigms such as voice and motion control, is important in a way that typical inputs such as keyboard and mouse are sometimes not the best choice for certain clinical scenarios. In order to ascertain how a doctor could control a hypothetical CAD system during a gastroenterology exam, we measured the natural response of users when faced with three different task requests, using three types of interaction paradigms: voice, gesture and endoscope. Results fit in what was expected, with gesture control being the most intuitive to use, and the endoscope being on the other edge. All the technologies are mature enough to cope with the response concepts the participants gave us. However, when having into account the scenario context, better natural response scores may not always be the best choice for implementation. That way, simplification or reduction of tasks, along with a well tought-out interface, or even mixing more oriented paradigms for particular requests, could allow for better system control with fewer inconveniences for the user.

  5. The preferences of users of electronic medical records in hospitals: Quantifying the relative importance of barriers and facilitators of an innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H.L. Struik (Marjolijn); F. Koster (Ferry); A.J. Schuit (Jantine); S.K. Nugteren; J. Veldwijk (Jorien); A.C. Lambooij (Antoinette)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Currently electronic medical records (EMRs) are implemented in hospitals, because of expected benefits for quality and safety of care. However the implementation processes are not unproblematic and are slower than needed. Many of the barriers and facilitators of the adoption

  6. Drug interactions in users of tablet vs. oral liquid levothyroxine formulations: a real-world evidence study in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglielmi, Valeria; Bellia, Alfonso; Bianchini, Elisa; Medea, Gerardo; Cricelli, Iacopo; Sbraccia, Paolo; Lauro, Davide; Cricelli, Claudio; Lapi, Francesco

    2017-09-14

    Several medications may interact with levothyroxine (LT4) intestinal absorption or metabolism, thus reducing its bioavailability. We investigated the variability of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels and prescribed daily dosages (PDDs) of LT4 before and during potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) in users of tablets vs. oral liquid LT4 formulations. By using the Italian general practice Health Search Database (HSD), we retrospectively selected adult patients with at least one LT4 prescription from 2012 to 2015 and at least 1 year of clinical history recorded. The incident prescription of interacting medications (e.g., proton pump inhibitors, calcium or iron salts) was the index date. Analysis was carried out using a self-controlled study design. Overall, 3965 users of LT4 formed the study cohort (84.1% women, mean age 56 ± 16.5 years). TSH variability on the entry date was greater among liquid LT4 users than in those prescribed with tablets as shown by the difference between 75th and 25th centile, which were 3.01 and 3.8, respectively. The incidence rate ratio (IRR) for TSH variability did not differ between groups, before and during exposure to DDIs. In contrast, PDDs less likely increased during the exposure to DDI with oral liquid LT4 compared with tablets (IRR = 0.84; 95% CI: 0.77-0.92), especially in patients with post-surgical hypothyroidism (IRR = 0.75; 95% CI: 0.64-0.85). In clinical practice, the use of oral liquid LT4 is not associated with increased PDDs, compared with tablets formulation, during exposure to DDIs. These results support the need for individualizing LT4 formulation to prescribe, especially in patients with various comorbidities and complex therapeutic regimens.

  7. Visual explorer facilitator's guide

    CERN Document Server

    Palus, Charles J

    2010-01-01

    Grounded in research and practice, the Visual Explorer™ Facilitator's Guide provides a method for supporting collaborative, creative conversations about complex issues through the power of images. The guide is available as a component in the Visual Explorer Facilitator's Letter-sized Set, Visual Explorer Facilitator's Post card-sized Set, Visual Explorer Playing Card-sized Set, and is also available as a stand-alone title for purchase to assist multiple tool users in an organization.

  8. User experience goals for interactive climate management systems in green houses

    OpenAIRE

    Clemmensen, Torkil; Barlow, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents findings from interpretative phenomenological interviews about the UX of interactive climate management with six growers and crop consultants. A model of UX of interactive climate management is presented. The findings are reported in a UX target table, which can be the basis for future research on UX at work in this domain.

  9. A User’s Manual for Interactive Linear Control Programs on IBM/3033.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    assistance in solving aDplications of linear control theory. The Linear Control Program ( LINCON ) and its user’s guide satisfy this need. A series of...Do 1473 DITION OF I’OV Of I OISOLRTE SIN 0102-014-4401 SECURITY CLASIPICATION OF To PAGE (WnT =e0 #~ LINCON consists of twu groups: matrix manipulation... LINCON ) was f.irst developed by Melsa [ 1] and adapted for batch use a- NPS by Desjardins C 2]. Alth:’agh the original intent of this thesis was simply

  10. PREREM: an interactive data preprocessing code for INREM II. Part I: user's manual. Part II: code structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, M.T.; Fields, D.E.

    1981-05-01

    PREREM is an interactive computer code developed as a data preprocessor for the INREM-II (Killough, Dunning, and Pleasant, 1978a) internal dose program. PREREM is intended to provide easy access to current and self-consistent nuclear decay and radionuclide-specific metabolic data sets. Provision is made for revision of metabolic data, and the code is intended for both production and research applications. Documentation for the code is in two parts. Part I is a user's manual which emphasizes interpretation of program prompts and choice of user input. Part II stresses internal structure and flow of program control and is intended to assist the researcher who wishes to revise or modify the code or add to its capabilities. PREREM is written for execution on a Digital Equipment Corporation PDP-10 System and much of the code will require revision before it can be run on other machines. The source program length is 950 lines (116 blocks) and computer core required for execution is 212 K bytes. The user must also have sufficient file space for metabolic and S-factor data sets. Further, 64 100 K byte blocks of computer storage space are required for the nuclear decay data file. Computer storage space must also be available for any output files produced during the PREREM execution. 9 refs., 8 tabs.

  11. Using Noninvasive Brain Measurement to Explore the Psychological Effects of Computer Malfunctions on Users during Human-Computer Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leanne M. Hirshfield

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In today’s technologically driven world, there is a need to better understand the ways that common computer malfunctions affect computer users. These malfunctions may have measurable influences on computer user’s cognitive, emotional, and behavioral responses. An experiment was conducted where participants conducted a series of web search tasks while wearing functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS and galvanic skin response sensors. Two computer malfunctions were introduced during the sessions which had the potential to influence correlates of user trust and suspicion. Surveys were given after each session to measure user’s perceived emotional state, cognitive load, and perceived trust. Results suggest that fNIRS can be used to measure the different cognitive and emotional responses associated with computer malfunctions. These cognitive and emotional changes were correlated with users’ self-report levels of suspicion and trust, and they in turn suggest future work that further explores the capability of fNIRS for the measurement of user experience during human-computer interactions.

  12. From Neophyte to Experienced Facilitator: an Interactive Blended-Learning Course for Graduate Teaching Assistants in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia F.K. Pun

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Faculty training in tertiary institutions around the world is receiving increasing attention as it plays a significant role to ensure high quality learning and teaching practices in constantly changing multi-cultural education backgrounds. In the case of Graduate Teaching Assistants (GTAs, designing an effective training course to help them deliver content interactively, using student-centered strategies and approaches in a second language (in this case English, becomes critical. Rather than training GTAs in procedural and declarative knowledge (knowledge of facts and processes, a shift in emphasis to functioning knowledge, e.g., classroom management techniques, course design, formative and summative peer review, presentation skills, is the focus of this intensive course, which is heavily supported by two educational e-technologies, Echo360 Lecture Capturing System and an asynchronous Discussion Board, hosted under the Blackboard (Bb Course Management System. Adopting an ethnographic approach in which all the researchers have co-taught this course for at least two years, this paper chronicles the effort of using Echo360 and Bb Discussion Board to support the delivery of course content and assessment tasks that yields reflective practices. Achievement of learning outcomes is evaluated through the use of multiple measures: reflections of course attendees, researchers’ direct observation, and statistics provided by the Learning Management System. Results are very encouraging in terms of significant improvement of graduate students’ presentation skills and self-reflective practices facilitated by Echo360 and Discussion Board.

  13. Asialoglycoprotein receptor facilitates infection of PLC/PRF/5 cells by HEV through interaction with ORF2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Tian, Yabin; Wen, Zhiheng; Zhang, Feng; Qi, Ying; Huang, Weijin; Zhang, Heqiu; Wang, Youchun

    2016-12-01

    Although the biological and epidemiological features of hepatitis E virus (HEV) have been studied extensively in recent years, the mechanism by which HEV infects cells is still poorly understood. In this study, coimmunoprecipitation, pull-down, and ELISA were used to show that the HEV ORF2 protein interacts directly with the ectodomain of both ASGR1 and ASGR2. Susceptibility to HEV correlated positively with the expression level of surface asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) in cell lines. ASGPR-directed small interfering RNA (siRNA) in HEV-infected PLC/PRF/5 cells had no significant effect on HEV release, suggesting that ASGPR mainly regulates the viral binding and entry steps. Both the purified ASGPR ectodomain and anti-ASGPR antibodies disturbed the binding of HEV to PLC/PRF/5 cells. The classic ASGPR ligands asialofetuin, asialoganglioside, and fibronectin competitively inhibited the binding of HEV to hepatocytes in the presence of calcium. HeLa cell lines stably expressing ASGPR displayed increased HEV-binding capacity, whereas ASGPR-knockout PLC/PRF/5 cell lines had lower HEV-binding capacity. Thus, our study demonstrates that ASGPR is involved in and facilitates HEV infection by binding to ORF2. J. Med. Virol. 88:2186-2195, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Evidence of horizontal transfer of non-autonomous Lep1 Helitrons facilitated by host-parasite interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xuezhu; Gao, Jingkun; Li, Fei; Wang, Jianjun

    2014-05-30

    Horizontal transfer (HT) of transposable elements has been recognized to be a major force driving genomic variation and biological innovation of eukaryotic organisms. However, the mechanisms of HT in eukaryotes remain poorly appreciated. The non-autonomous Helitron family, Lep1, has been found to be widespread in lepidopteran species, and showed little interspecific sequence similarity of acquired sequences at 3' end, which makes Lep1 a good candidate for the study of HT. In this study, we describe the Lep1-like elements in multiple non-lepidopteran species, including two aphids, Acyrthosiphon pisum and Aphis gossypii, two parasitoid wasps, Cotesia vestalis, and Copidosoma floridanum, one beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis, as well as two bracoviruses in parasitoid wasps, and one intracellular microsporidia parasite, Nosema bombycis. The patchy distribution and high sequence similarity of Lep1-like elements among distantly related lineages as well as incongruence of Lep1-like elements and host phylogeny suggest the occurrence of HT. Remarkably, the acquired sequences of both NbLep1 from N. bombycis and CfLep1 from C. floridanum showed over 90% identity with their lepidopteran host Lep1. Thus, our study provides evidence of HT facilitated by host-parasite interactions. Furthermore, in the context of these data, we discuss the putative directions and vectors of HT of Lep1 Helitrons.

  15. Evaluation and comparison of classical interatomic potentials through a user-friendly interactive web-interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Kamal; Congo, Faical Yannick P.; Liang, Tao; Becker, Chandler; Hennig, Richard G.; Tavazza, Francesca

    2017-01-01

    Classical empirical potentials/force-fields (FF) provide atomistic insights into material phenomena through molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations. Despite their wide applicability, a systematic evaluation of materials properties using such potentials and, especially, an easy-to-use user-interface for their comparison is still lacking. To address this deficiency, we computed energetics and elastic properties of variety of materials such as metals and ceramics using a wide range of empirical potentials and compared them to density functional theory (DFT) as well as to experimental data, where available. The database currently consists of 3248 entries including energetics and elastic property calculations, and it is still increasing. We also include computational tools for convex-hull plots for DFT and FF calculations. The data covers 1471 materials and 116 force-fields. In addition, both the complete database and the software coding used in the process have been released for public use online (presently at http://www.ctcms.nist.gov/∼knc6/periodic.html) in a user-friendly way designed to enable further material design and discovery.

  16. Evaluation and comparison of classical interatomic potentials through a user-friendly interactive web-interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Kamal; Congo, Faical Yannick P.; Liang, Tao; Becker, Chandler; Hennig, Richard G.; Tavazza, Francesca

    2017-01-01

    Classical empirical potentials/force-fields (FF) provide atomistic insights into material phenomena through molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations. Despite their wide applicability, a systematic evaluation of materials properties using such potentials and, especially, an easy-to-use user-interface for their comparison is still lacking. To address this deficiency, we computed energetics and elastic properties of variety of materials such as metals and ceramics using a wide range of empirical potentials and compared them to density functional theory (DFT) as well as to experimental data, where available. The database currently consists of 3248 entries including energetics and elastic property calculations, and it is still increasing. We also include computational tools for convex-hull plots for DFT and FF calculations. The data covers 1471 materials and 116 force-fields. In addition, both the complete database and the software coding used in the process have been released for public use online (presently at http://www.ctcms.nist.gov/∼knc6/periodic.html) in a user-friendly way designed to enable further material design and discovery. PMID:28140407

  17. Are we in a pickle? Rethinking the world of research and user interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Patricia J

    2011-01-01

    The lion's tail and knowledge boundaries are two analogies referred to in the lead essay by Lindstrom, MacLeod and Levy. These may be helpful but require slight readjustment. Grabbing onto the lion's tail implies one reality and one intersection point, whereas the old analogy of the blind men and the elephant shows that various perspectives are required. Integrated knowledge translation refers to user involvement throughout the research process. Participatory models are one form of integrated knowledge translation, but caution is required to help maintain the knowledge boundaries. There is the real danger of one group becoming "pickled," or having unbalanced osmotic pressure from another group, resulting in destroyed "cell wall" boundaries. Neither researchers nor users should morph into each other but should, rather, fulfill unique roles within a respectful, trusted research relationship. Lessons learned at the Manitoba Centre for Health Policy teach us that collaborative health services research takes time, money, mutual understanding and respect (including respect from academic institutions for this paradigm of research). This requires a dedicated centre of core group scientists willing to devote the necessary time. Diffused networks may not be stable enough to maintain the long-term relationship building required for the intersection of researchers and decision-makers.

  18. A Comparison of Avatar, Video, and Robot-Mediated Interaction on Users' Trust in Expertise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye ePan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Communication technologies are becoming increasingly diverse in form and functionality. A central concern is the ability to detect whether others are trustworthy. Judgments of trustworthiness rely, in part, on assessments of nonverbal cues, which are affected by media representations. In this research, we compared trust formation on three media representations. We presented 24 participants with advisors represented by two of three alternate formats: video, avatar, or robot. Unknown to the participants, one was an expert and the other was a non-expert. We observed participants' advice seeking behaviour under risk as an indicator of their trust in the advisor. We found that most participants preferred seeking advice from the expert, but we also found a tendency for seeking robot or video advice. Avatar advice, in contrast, was more rarely sought. Users' self-reports support these findings. These results suggest that when users make trust assessments the physical presence of the robot representation might compensate for the lack of identity cues.

  19. Low Cost Desktop Image Analysis Workstation With Enhanced Interactive User Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratib, Osman M.; Huang, H. K.

    1989-05-01

    A multimodality picture archiving and communication system (PACS) is in routine clinical use in the UCLA Radiology Department. Several types workstations are currently implemented for this PACS. Among them, the Apple Macintosh II personal computer was recently chosen to serve as a desktop workstation for display and analysis of radiological images. This personal computer was selected mainly because of its extremely friendly user-interface, its popularity among the academic and medical community and its low cost. In comparison to other microcomputer-based systems the Macintosh II offers the following advantages: the extreme standardization of its user interface, file system and networking, and the availability of a very large variety of commercial software packages. In the current configuration the Macintosh II operates as a stand-alone workstation where images are imported from a centralized PACS server through an Ethernet network using a standard TCP-IP protocol, and stored locally on magnetic disk. The use of high resolution screens (1024x768 pixels x 8bits) offer sufficient performance for image display and analysis. We focused our project on the design and implementation of a variety of image analysis algorithms ranging from automated structure and edge detection to sophisticated dynamic analysis of sequential images. Specific analysis programs were developed for ultrasound images, digitized angiograms, MRI and CT tomographic images and scintigraphic images.

  20. Human experience and product usability: principles to assist the design of user-product interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamorro-Koc, Marianella; Popovic, Vesna; Emmison, Michael

    2009-07-01

    This paper introduces research that investigates how human experience influences people's understandings of product usability. It describes an experiment that employs visual representation of concepts to elicit participants' ideas of a product's use. Results from the experiment lead to the identification of relationships between human experience, knowledge, and context-of-use--relationships that influence designers' and users' concepts of product usability. These relationships are translated into design principles that inform the design activity with respect to the aspects of experience that trigger people's understanding of a product's use. A design tool (ECEDT) is devised to aid designers in the application of these principles. This tool is then trialled in the context of a design task in order to verify applicability of the findings.

  1. Metals Processing Laboratory User Facility: Facilities capabilities; Interactive programs; Recent experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackiewicz-Ludtka, G.; Raschke, R.A. [eds.] [comps.

    1998-02-12

    MPLUS is a DOE designated User Facility providing extensive Technical Expertise and Specialized Facilities to assist Industrial and Academic Partners in becoming more Energy Efficient and enhancing US Competitiveness in the World market. MPLUS focusing on 7 major vision industries (aluminum, chemical, forest products, glass, metals castings, refineries, and steel) identified by DOE as being energy intensive, as well as cross-cutting industries such as welding and heat treating. MPLUS consists of four primary facilities: (1) Materials Processing, (2) Materials Joining, (3) Materials Characterization and Properties, and (4) Materials Process Modeling. Each facility provides rapid access to unique, state-of-the-art equipment, capabilities, and technical expertise necessary for solving materials processing issues that limit the development and implementation of emerging technologies. These capabilities include: (1) materials synthesis; (2) deformation processing; (3) materials characterization; (4) joining and mathematical modeling.

  2. Implementation and evaluation of an interactive user interface for a clinical image analysis workstation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratib, Osman M.; Huang, H. K.

    1990-05-01

    Recent developments in digital imaging and Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS) allow physicians and radiologists to assess radiographic images directly in digital form through imaging workstations. The development of medical workstations was primarily oriented toward the development of a convenient tool for rapid display of images. In this project our goal was to design and evaluate a personal desktop workstation that will provide a large number of clinically useful image analysis tools. The hardware used is a standard Macintosh II interfaced to our existing PACS network through an Ethernet interface using standard TCP/IP communication protocols. Special emphasis was placed on the design of the user interface to allow clinicians with minimal or no computer manipulation skills to use complex analysis tools.

  3. A new intelligent algorithm to create a profile for user based on web interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinab khademali

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method to classify the web user’s navigation patterns automatically. The proposed model of this paper classifies user’s navigation patterns and predicts his/her upcoming requirements. To create users’ profile, a new method is introduced by recording user’s settings active and user’s similarity measurement with neighboring users. The proposed model is capable of creating the profile implicitly. Besides, it updates the profile based on created changes. In fact, we try to improve the function of recommender engine using user’s navigation patterns and clustering. The method is based on user’s navigation patterns and is able to present the result of recommender engine based on user’s requirement and interest. In addition, this method has the ability to help customize websites, more efficiently.

  4. Multimodal interaction with W3C standards toward natural user interfaces to everything

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book presents new standards for multimodal interaction published by the W3C and other standards bodies in straightforward and accessible language, while also illustrating the standards in operation through case studies and chapters on innovative implementations. The book illustrates how, as smart technology becomes ubiquitous, and appears in more and more different shapes and sizes, vendor-specific approaches to multimodal interaction become impractical, motivating the need for standards. This book covers standards for voice, emotion, natural language understanding, dialog, and multimodal architectures. The book describes the standards in a practical manner, making them accessible to developers, students, and researchers. Comprehensive resource that explains the W3C standards for multimodal interaction clear and straightforward way; Includes case studies of the use of the standards on a wide variety of devices, including mobile devices, tablets, wearables and robots, in applications such as assisted livi...

  5. Barriers and facilitators to adoption of soft copy interpretation from the user perspective: Lessons learned from filmless radiology for slideless pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily S Patterson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adoption of digital images for pathological specimens has been slower than adoption of digital images in radiology, despite a number of anticipated advantages for digital images in pathology. In this paper, we explore the factors that might explain this slower rate of adoption. Materials and Method: Semi-structured interviews on barriers and facilitators to the adoption of digital images were conducted with two radiologists, three pathologists, and one pathologist′s assistant. Results: Barriers and facilitators to adoption of digital images were reported in the areas of performance, workflow-efficiency, infrastructure, integration with other software, and exposure to digital images. The primary difference between the settings was that performance with the use of digital images as compared to the traditional method was perceived to be higher in radiology and lower in pathology. Additionally, exposure to digital images was higher in radiology than pathology, with some radiologists exclusively having been trained and/or practicing with digital images. The integration of digital images both improved and reduced efficiency in routine and non-routine workflow patterns in both settings, and was variable across the different organizations. A comparison of these findings with prior research on adoption of other health information technologies suggests that the barriers to adoption of digital images in pathology are relatively tractable. Conclusions: Improving performance using digital images in pathology would likely accelerate adoption of innovative technologies that are facilitated by the use of digital images, such as electronic imaging databases, electronic health records, double reading for challenging cases, and computer-aided diagnostic systems.

  6. Designing interactive voice response (IVR) interfaces: localisation for low literacy users

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sharma Grover, A

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available -literate, and the impact of a different set of social-cultural, linguistic, and domestic challenges, amongst others, the authords advocate the enculturation of IVR interfaces different from the developed world. This requires the tailoring of functionalities and interactive...

  7. Analyzing User Interaction to Design an Intelligent e-Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Richa

    2011-01-01

    Building intelligent course designing systems adaptable to the learners' needs is one of the key goals of research in e-learning. This goal is all the more crucial as gaining knowledge in an e-learning environment depends solely on computer mediated interaction within the learner group and among the learners and instructors. The patterns generated…

  8. An interactive portal to empower cancer survivors: a qualitative study on user expectations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, W.; Groen, W.G.; Loos, R.; Oldenburg, H.S.A.; Wouters, M.W.J.M.; Aaronson, N.K.; van Harten, W.H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Portals are increasingly used to improve patient empowerment, but are still uncommon in oncology. In this study, we explored cancer survivors’ and health professionals’ expectations of possible features of an interactive portal. Methods: We conducted three focus groups with breast cancer su

  9. An interactive portal to empower cancer survivors: a qualitative study on user expectations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, Wilma; Groen, Wim G.; Loos, Romy; Oldenburg, Hester S.A.; Wouters, Michel W.J.M.; Aaronson, Neil K.; Harten, van W.H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Portals are increasingly used to improve patient empowerment, but are still uncommon in oncology. In this study, we explored cancer survivors’ and health professionals’ expectations of possible features of an interactive portal. Methods We conducted three focus groups with breast cancer sur

  10. An interactive portal to empower cancer survivors: a qualitative study on user expectations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, W.; Groen, W.G.; Loos, R.; Oldenburg, H.S.A.; Wouters, M.W.J.M.; Aaronson, N.K.; van Harten, W.H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Portals are increasingly used to improve patient empowerment, but are still uncommon in oncology. In this study, we explored cancer survivors’ and health professionals’ expectations of possible features of an interactive portal. Methods: We conducted three focus groups with breast cancer

  11. An interactive portal to empower cancer survivors: a qualitative study on user expectations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, Wilma; Groen, Wim G.; Loos, Romy; Oldenburg, Hester S.A.; Wouters, Michel W.J.M.; Aaronson, Neil K.; van Harten, Willem H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Portals are increasingly used to improve patient empowerment, but are still uncommon in oncology. In this study, we explored cancer survivors’ and health professionals’ expectations of possible features of an interactive portal. Methods We conducted three focus groups with breast cancer

  12. Comparative analyses of a small molecule/enzyme interaction by multiple users of Biacore technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cannon, M.J.; Papalia, G.A.; Navratilova, I.; Fisher, R.J.; Roberts, L.R.; Worthy, K.M.; Stephen, A.G.; Marchesini, G.R.; Collins, E.J.; Casper, D.; Qiu, H.; Satpaev, D.; Liparoto, S.F.; Rice, D.A.; Gorshkova, I.; Darling, R.J.; Bennett, D.B.; Sekar, M.; Hommema, E.; Liang, A.M.; Day, E.S.; Inman, J.; Karlicek, S.H.; Ullrich, S.J.; Hodges, D.; Chu, T.; Sullivan, E.; Simpson, J.; Rafique, A.; Luginbühl, B.; Nyholm Westin, S.; Bynum, M.; Cachia, P.; Li, Y.J.; Kao, D.; Neurauter, A.; Wong, M.

    2004-01-01

    To gauge the experimental variability associated with Biacore analysis, 36 different investigators analyzed a small molecule/enzyme interaction under similar conditions. Acetazolamide (222 g/mol) binding to carbonic anhydrase II (CAII; 30,000 Da) was chosen as a model system. Both reagents were stab

  13. Human-Computer Interaction for BCI Games: Usability and User Experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plass-Oude Bos, Danny; Reuderink, Boris; Laar, van de Bram; Gürkök, Hayrettin; Mühl, Christian; Poel, Mannes; Heylen, Dirk; Nijholt, Anton; Sourin, A.

    2010-01-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCI) come with a lot of issues, such as delays, bad recognition, long training times, and cumbersome hardware. Gamers are a large potential target group for this new interaction modality, but why would healthy subjects want to use it? BCI provides a combination of informat

  14. Virtual Savannah - Logging User Interaction in a Learning Visualization for Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Søren; Rodil, Kasper; Rehm, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    and the navigation. The test depicted how they managed to search the virtual world for answers in patterns related to restrictions in the system and using graphical points of interest as reference points. Collecting information about the complete interaction provides teachers with a tool to assess the individual...

  15. A Geo-Label for Geo-Referenced Information as a Service for Data Users and a Tool for Facilitating Societal Benefits of Earth Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plag, H.-P.

    2012-04-01

    Geo-referenced information is increasingly important for many scientific and societal applications. The availability of reliable and applicable spatial data and information is fundamental for addressing pressing problems such as food, water, and energy security; disaster risk reduction; climate change; environmental quality; pandemics; economic crises and wars; population migration; and, in a general sense, sustainability. Today, more than 70% of societal activities in developed countries depend directly or indirectly on geo-referenced information. The rapid development of analysis tools, such as Geographic Information Systems and web-based tools for viewing, accessing, and analyzing of geo-referenced information, and the growing abundance of openly available Earth observations (e.g., through the Global Earth Observation System of Systems, GEOSS) likely will increase the dependency of science and society on geo-referenced information. Increasingly, the tools allow the combination of data sets from various sources. Improvements of interoperability, promoted particularly by GEOSS, will strengthen this trend and lead to more tools for the combinations of data from different sources. What is currently lacking is a service-oriented infrastructure helping to ensure that data quality and applicability are not compromised through modifications and combinations. Most geo-referenced information comes without sufficient information on quality and applicability. The Group on Earth Observations (GEO) has embarked on establishing a so-called GEO Label that would provide easy-to-understand, globally available information on aspects of quality, user rating, relevance, and fit-for-usage of the products and services accessible through GEOSS (with the responsibility for the concept development delegated to Work Plan Task ID-03). In designing a service-oriented architecture that could support a GEO Label, it is important to understand the impact of the goals for the label on the

  16. The convergence of robotics, vision, and computer graphics for user interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollerback, J.M.; Thompson, W.B.; Shirley, P.

    1999-11-01

    Mechanical interfaces to virtual environments and the creation of virtual environments represent important and relatively new application areas for robotics. The creation of immersive interfaces will require codevelopment of visual displays that complement mechanical stimuli with appropriate visual cues, ultimately determined from human psychophysics. Advances in interactive rendering and geometric modeling form computer graphics will play a key role. Examples are drawn from haptic and locomotion interface projects.

  17. The Pendulum Swing of User Instruction and Interaction: The Resurrection of "How to Use" Technology to Learn in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, Judith; Terras, Melody M.

    2015-01-01

    The use of technology to support learning is well recognised. One generation ago a major strand of human--computer interaction research focussed on the development of forms of instruction in how to interact with computers. Today, however, the advanced usability of modern technologies has all but removed the presence of many user manuals. Learners,…

  18. Protective KIR-HLA interactions for HCV infection in intravenous drug users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zúñiga, Joaquin; Romero, Viviana; Azocar, José; Terreros, Daniel; Vargas-Rojas, María Inés; Torres-García, Diana; Jimenez-Alvarez, Luis; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Granados-Montiel, Julio; Husain, Zaheed; Chung, Raymond T.; Alper, Chester A.; Yunis, Edmond J.

    2009-01-01

    Intravenous drug use has become the principal route of hepatitis C virus (HCV) transmission due to the sharing of infected needles. In this study, we analyzed the distribution of HLA-KIR genotypes among 160 Puerto Rican intravenous drug users (IDUs) with HCV infection and 92 HCV-negative Puerto Rican IDUs. We found a significant association between the presence of different combinations of KIR inhibitory receptor genes (KIR2DL2 and/or KIR2DL3, pC = 0.01, OR = 0.07; KIR2DL2 and/or KIR2DL3+KIR2DS4, pC = 0.01, OR = 0.39) and HLA-C1 homozygous genotypes (HLA-C1+KIR2DS4, pC = 0.02, OR = 0.43; HLA-C1+KIR2DL2+KIR2DS4, pC = 0.02, OR = 0.40) together with the activating receptor KIR2DS4 (HLA-C1+KIR2DS4+KIR2DL3 and/or KIR2DL2, pC = 0.004, OR = 0.38) with protection from HCV infection. Our findings in HCV-infected and non-infected IDUs suggest an important role for KIRs (KIR2DL2 and KIR2DL3) with group HLA-C1 molecules, in the presence of activating KIR2DS4, in protection from HCV infection. These results support the hypothesis that activator signaling, mediated by KIR2DS4, is a determinant in the regulation of NK cell antiviral-activity. PMID:19552960

  19. The User Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    User experience (UX) is about arranging the elements of a product or service to optimize how people will interact with it. In this article, the author talks about the importance of user experience and discusses the design of user experiences in libraries. He first looks at what UX is. Then he describes three kinds of user experience design: (1)…

  20. The User Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    User experience (UX) is about arranging the elements of a product or service to optimize how people will interact with it. In this article, the author talks about the importance of user experience and discusses the design of user experiences in libraries. He first looks at what UX is. Then he describes three kinds of user experience design: (1)…

  1. Interactive voice response self-monitoring to assess risk behaviors in rural substance users living with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Jalie A; Blum, Elizabeth R; Xie, Lili; Roth, David L; Simpson, Cathy A

    2012-02-01

    Community-dwelling HIV/AIDS patients in rural Alabama self-monitored (SM) daily HIV risk behaviors using an Interactive Voice Response (IVR) system, which may enhance reporting, reduce monitored behaviors, and extend the reach of care. Sexually active substance users (35 men, 19 women) engaged in IVR SM of sex, substance use, and surrounding contexts for 4-10 weeks. Baseline predictors of IVR utilization were assessed, and longitudinal IVR SM effects on risk behaviors were examined. Frequent (n = 22), infrequent (n = 22), and non-caller (n = 10) groups were analyzed. Non-callers had shorter durations of HIV medical care and lower safer sex self-efficacy and tended to be older heterosexuals. Among callers, frequent callers had lost less social support. Longitudinal logistic regression models indicated reductions in risky sex and drug use with IVR SM over time. IVR systems appear to have utility for risk assessment and reduction for rural populations living with HIV disease.

  2. "We fear the police, and the police fear us": structural and individual barriers and facilitators to HIV medication adherence among injection drug users in Kiev, Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimiaga, Matthew J; Safren, Steven A; Dvoryak, Sergiy; Reisner, Sari L; Needle, Richard; Woody, George

    2010-11-01

    Ukraine has one of the most severe HIV/AIDS epidemics in Europe, with an estimated 1.63% of the population living with HIV/AIDS in 2007. Injection drug use (IDU) remains the predominant mode of transmission in Kiev - the capital and largest city. Prior reports suggest that the HIV infection rate among IDUs in Kiev reaches 33%, and many have poor and inequitable access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Among those with access to HAART, little is understood about barriers and facilitators to HAART medication adherence. In May 2009, two semi-structured focus groups were conducted with HIV-infected IDUs seeking treatment at the City AIDS Center, Kiev. The goal was to use this information to adapt and tailor, to Ukrainian culture, an evidence-based intervention for improving adherence to HAART. All 16 participants attributed HIV infection to IDU. Their average age was 31.6 (SD=7.0), average time with HIV 5.7 years (SD=4.0), average time on HAART 2.5 years (SD=1.7), average time as IDU 14.6 years (SD=6.8), and 88% were on opioid substitution therapy. The most salient themes related to adherence barriers included: (1) harassment and discrimination by police; (2) opioid dependence; (3) complexity of drug regimen; (4) side effects; (5) forgetting; (6) co-occurring mental health problems; and (7) HIV stigma. Facilitators of adherence included: (1) cues for pill taking; (2) support and reminders from family, significant other, and friends; (3) opioid substitution therapy; and (4) wanting improved health. Additional factors explored included: (1) knowledge about HAART; (2) storage of medications; and (3) IDU and sexual risk behaviors. Findings highlighted structural and individual barriers to adherence. At the structural level, police discrimination and harassment was reported to be a major barrier to adherence to opioid substitution therapy and HAART. Privacy and stigma were barriers at the individual level. Recommendations for adherence interventions included

  3. TIGGERC: Turbomachinery Interactive Grid Generator for 2-D Grid Applications and Users Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David P.

    1994-01-01

    A two-dimensional multi-block grid generator has been developed for a new design and analysis system for studying multiple blade-row turbomachinery problems. TIGGERC is a mouse driven, interactive grid generation program which can be used to modify boundary coordinates and grid packing and generates surface grids using a hyperbolic tangent or algebraic distribution of grid points on the block boundaries. The interior points of each block grid are distributed using a transfinite interpolation approach. TIGGERC can generate a blocked axisymmetric H-grid, C-grid, I-grid or O-grid for studying turbomachinery flow problems. TIGGERC was developed for operation on Silicon Graphics workstations. Detailed discussion of the grid generation methodology, menu options, operational features and sample grid geometries are presented.

  4. Evaluation of a Mixed Method Approach for Studying User Interaction with Novel Building Control Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Painter

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Energy-efficient building performance requires sophisticated control systems that are based on realistic occupant behaviour models. To provide robust data for the development of these models, research studies in real-world settings are needed. Yet, such studies are challenging and necessitate careful design in terms of data collection methods and procedures. This paper describes and critiques the design of a mixed methods approach for occupant behaviour research. It reviews the methodology developed for a longitudinal study in a real-world office environment where occupants’ experience with a novel facade technology (electrochromic glazing was investigated. The methodology integrates objective physical measurements, observational data and self-reported experience data. Using data from one day of the study, this paper illustrates how the different sources can be combined in order to derive an in-depth understanding of the interplay between external daylight conditions, characteristics of the facade technology, occupant interaction with the technology and the resulting occupant experience. It was found that whilst the individual methods may be affected by practical limitations, these can be partially offset by combining physical measurements and observations with self-reported data. The paper critically evaluates the individual techniques, as well as the benefits of their integration and makes recommendations for the design of future occupant behaviour studies in real-world settings.

  5. Drug-Drug Interactions and Diagnostics for Drug Users With HIV and HIV/HCV Coinfections: Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalsa, Jag H; Talal, Andrew H; Morse, Gene

    2017-03-01

    Substance use and pharmacologic treatment of co-occurring infections such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are associated with many adverse consequences including pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug-drug interactions (DDIs). The National Institute on Drug Abuse sponsored a 2-day conference on DDIs at which clinicians/scientists from government, academia, and the pharmaceutical industry presented the most current research findings to formulate a comprehensive overview of DDIs. Specific topics discussed included drug metabolism; drug interactions between medications used in the treatment of HIV, HCV, and substance use disorders; intrahepatic concentrations and methods of assessment of drugs in liver disease of varying etiologies and degrees of impairment; and minimally invasive sampling techniques for the assessment of intrahepatic drug concentrations, viral replication, and changes in gene expression in response to treatment. Finally, the speakers identified research targets and priorities on DDIs. Areas of emphasis included development of diagnostic assays for drug concentration assessment in different organs, an enhanced understanding of factors responsible for alterations in drug metabolism and excretion, and establishment of clinical trials and work groups to study DDIs. Our long-term objective is to broaden investigation in the field of DDIs in substance users.

  6. A User Interaction Model for Knowledge-based Recommender System%基于知识的推荐系统用户交互模型研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    艾磊; 赵辉

    2015-01-01

    In knowledge‐based recommender system ,make use of the interaction to elicit user’s personalized requirements and preferences ,in order to improve the experience of interact with users ,a user interaction model based on finite state machine was established .According to the features of the recommended items ,we established a user interaction model based on finite state machine .T hrough get the effective path of the finite state machine model ,generate the user's person‐alized requirements and preferences .According to the user's individual characteristics ,this model can show effective inter‐action questions by the conversational interactive approach ,and reduce their interaction burden .At the aspect of trust , satisfaction ,and quality of the recommended results ,this model can reached higher user perception .%在基于知识的推荐系统中,用户的个性化需求需要通过交互引导得出。为了提高用户的交互体验,建立了基于有限状态机(FSM )的用户交互模型。根据所推荐物品的特征建立用户交互行为的有限状态机模型,通过求解有限状态机模型的有效路径,生成用户的个性化需求和偏好。该模型通过会话式的交互方式,根据用户的个体特征,提供有效交互,减少了用户交互负担,提高了推荐结果的信任度、满意度。

  7. Evaluating the effects of pollinator-mediated interactions using pollen transfer networks: evidence of widespread facilitation in south Andean plant communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tur, C; Sáez, A; Traveset, A; Aizen, M A

    2016-05-01

    Information about the relative importance of competitive or facilitative pollinator-mediated interactions in a multi-species context is limited. We studied interspecific pollen transfer (IPT) networks to evaluate quantity and quality effects of pollinator sharing among plant species on three high-Andean communities at 1600, 1800 and 2000 m a.s.l. To estimate the sign of the effects (positive, neutral or negative), the relation between conspecific and heterospecific pollen deposited on stigmas was analysed with GLMMs. Network analyses showed that communities were characterised by the presence of pollen hub-donors and receptors. We inferred that facilitative and neutral pollinator-mediated interactions among plants prevailed over competition. Thus, the benefits from pollinator sharing seem to outweigh the costs (i.e. heterospecific deposition and conspecific pollen loss). The largest proportion of facilitated species was found at the highest elevation community, suggesting that under unfavourable conditions for the pollination service and at lower plant densities facilitation can be more common.

  8. Incorporating Collaborative, Interactive Experiences into a Technology-Facilitated Professional Learning Network for Pre-Service Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Seamus; Redman, Christine

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the utilisation of a technology-facilitated professional learning network (PLN) for pre-service teachers, centred on chemical demonstrations. The network provided direct experiences designed to extend their pedagogical content knowledge on demonstrations in Chemistry teaching. It provided scaffolded opportunities to…

  9. INTERACTIONS BETWEEN THE HERBACEOUS AND SHRUBBY-ARBOREAL COMPONENTS IN A SEMIARID REGION IN THE NORTHEAST OF BRAZIL: COMPETITION OR FACILITATION?

    OpenAIRE

    KLEBER ANDRADE DA SILVA; JOSIENE MARIA FALCÃO FRAGA DOS SANTOS; DANIELLE MELO DOS SANTOS; JULIANA RAMOS DE ANDRADE; ELBA MARIA NOGUEIRA FERRAZ; ELCIDA DE LIMA ARAÚJO

    2015-01-01

    Under conditions of high stress, interactions between species can be positive. Islands of perennial vegetation can improve the conditions of the understory and facilitate the establishment of herbaceous plants. The hypothesis of this study is that islands of perennial vegetation in an area of caatinga harbor, a greater richness, diversity and density of herbaceous plants, and that individuals reach a greater height and diameter than in open spaces. The study was conducted in Petrolândia, Pern...

  10. Exploring the Relationship Between Online Social Network Site Usage and the Impact on Quality of Life for Older and Younger Users: An Interaction Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Darren; Chen, Liming; Mulvenna, Maurice D; Bond, Raymond

    2016-09-29

    Analyzing content generated by users of social network sites has been shown to be beneficial across a number of disciplines. Such analysis has revealed the precise behavior of users that details their distinct patterns of engagement. An issue is evident whereby without direct engagement with end users, the reasoning for anomalies can only be the subject of conjecture. Furthermore, the impact of engaging in social network sites on quality of life is an area which has received little attention. Of particular interest is the impact of online social networking on older users, which is a demographic that is specifically vulnerable to social isolation. A review of the literature reveals a lack of knowledge concerning the impact of these technologies on such users and even less is known regarding how this impact varies across different demographics. The objective of our study was to analyze user interactions and to survey the attitudes of social network users directly, capturing data in four key areas: (1) functional usage, (2) behavioral patterns, (3) technology, and (4) quality of life. An online survey was constructed, comprising 32 questions. Each question directly related to a research question. Respondents were recruited through a variety of methods including email campaigns, Facebook advertisements, and promotion from related organizations. In total, data was collected from 919 users containing 446 younger and 473 older users. In comparison to younger users, a greater proportion of older users (289/473, 61.1% older vs 218/446, 48.9% younger) (PFacebook had either a positive or huge impact on their quality of life. Furthermore, a greater percentage of older users strongly agreed that Facebook strengthened their relationship with other people (64/473, 13.5% older vs 40/446, 9.0%younger) (P=.02). In comparison to younger users, a greater proportion of older users had more positive emotions-classified as slightly better or very good-during their engagement with

  11. Enhancing User Experience through Emotional Interaction: Determining Users' Interests in Online Art Collections Using AMARA (Affective Museum of Art Resource Agent)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S. Joon

    2013-01-01

    The need for emotional interaction has already influenced various disciplines and industries, and online museums represent a domain where providing emotional interactions could have a significant impact. Today, online museums lack the appropriate affective and hedonic values necessary to engage art enthusiasts on an emotional level. To address…

  12. Enhancing User Experience through Emotional Interaction: Determining Users' Interests in Online Art Collections Using AMARA (Affective Museum of Art Resource Agent)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S. Joon

    2013-01-01

    The need for emotional interaction has already influenced various disciplines and industries, and online museums represent a domain where providing emotional interactions could have a significant impact. Today, online museums lack the appropriate affective and hedonic values necessary to engage art enthusiasts on an emotional level. To address…

  13. A Cognitive Model of How Interactive Multimedia Authoring Facilitates Conceptual Understanding of Object-Oriented Programming in Novices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Timothy; Liu, Min

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a cognitive model of how interactive multimedia authoring (IMA) affect novices' cognition in object-oriented programming. This model was generated through an empirical study of first year computer science students at the university level being engaged in interactive multimedia authoring of a role-playing game. Clinical…

  14. Beetle (Coleoptera: Scirtidae) facilitation of larval mosquito growth in tree hole habitats is linked to multitrophic microbial interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelz-Stelinski, Kirsten; Kaufman, Michael G; Walker, Edward D

    2011-10-01

    Container-breeding mosquitoes, such as Aedes triseriatus, ingest biofilms and filter water column microorganisms directly to obtain the bulk of their nutrition. Scirtid beetles often co-occur with A. triseriatus and may facilitate the production of mosquito adults under low-resource conditions. Using molecular genetic techniques and quantitative assays, we observed changes in the dynamics and composition of bacterial and fungal communities present on leaf detritus and in the water column when scirtid beetles co-occur with A. triseriatus. Data from terminal restriction fragment polymorphism analysis indicated scirtid presence alters the structure of fungal communities in the water column but not leaf-associated fungal communities. Similar changes in leaf and water bacterial communities occurred in response to mosquito presence. In addition, we observed increased processing of leaf detritus, higher leaf-associated enzyme activity, higher bacterial productivity, and higher leaf-associated fungal biomass when scirtid beetles were present. Such shifts suggest beetle feeding facilitates mosquito production indirectly through the microbial community rather than directly through an increase in available fine particulate organic matter.

  15. Intelligent Graph Layout Using Many Users' Input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiaoru; Che, Limei; Hu, Yifan; Zhang, Xin

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a new strategy for graph drawing utilizing layouts of many sub-graphs supplied by a large group of people in a crowd sourcing manner. We developed an algorithm based on Laplacian constrained distance embedding to merge subgraphs submitted by different users, while attempting to maintain the topological information of the individual input layouts. To facilitate collection of layouts from many people, a light-weight interactive system has been designed to enable convenient dynamic viewing, modification and traversing between layouts. Compared with other existing graph layout algorithms, our approach can achieve more aesthetic and meaningful layouts with high user preference.

  16. A method for predicting errors when interacting with finite state systems. How implicit learning shapes the user's knowledge of a system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javaux, Denis

    2002-02-01

    This paper describes a method for predicting the errors that may appear when human operators or users interact with systems behaving as finite state systems. The method is a generalization of a method used for predicting errors when interacting with autopilot modes on modern, highly computerized airliners [Proc 17th Digital Avionics Sys Conf (DASC) (1998); Proc 10th Int Symp Aviat Psychol (1999)]. A cognitive model based on spreading activation networks is used for predicting the user's model of the system and its impact on the production of errors. The model strongly posits the importance of implicit learning in user-system interaction and its possible detrimental influence on users' knowledge of the system. An experiment conducted with Airbus Industrie and a major European airline on pilots' knowledge of autopilot behavior on the A340-200/300 confirms the model predictions, and in particular the impact of the frequencies with which specific state transitions and contexts are experienced.

  17. Is the interaction between Retama sphaerocarpa and its understorey herbaceous vegetation always reciprocally positive? Competition?facilitation shift during Retama establishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espigares, Tíscar; López-Pintor, Antonio; Rey Benayas, José M.

    2004-10-01

    Retama sphaerocarpa is a Mediterranean shrub that when adult, facilitates the establishment of herbaceous plants under its canopy. We test the hypothesis that during the establishment of R. sphaerocarpa seedlings, the interaction with the herbaceous plants is negative. We carried out a greenhouse experiment in which seedlings of R. sphaerocarpa were grown under different conditions of competition with herbs, watering and date of emergence. Measurements of seedling mortality, biomass and growth were taken during the first growing season. We found a significant relationship between R. sphaerocarpa seedling mortality and competition in early spring, presumably due to higher water demand of herbaceous plants. Generally, presence of herbaceous species, lower availability of water and late emergence had negative effects on biomass and growth of Retama seedlings. Additional water compensated for the negative effects of competition, except on leaves and cladodes of Retama seedlings, suggesting that other resources, such as light, could be the subject of competition. In contrast, Retama seedlings exerted a positive influence on the herbaceous plants by increasing their survival and biomass, probably as a consequence of the high availability of nutrients provided by the Rhizobia nodules in the roots of Retama seedlings. We concluded that, at the regeneration stage of the shrub, the interaction between the herbaceous vegetation and the shrub is negative for the shrub and positive for the herbs. This suggests a shift from competition to facilitation with age of Retama, as reciprocal positive interactions have been described between herbaceous plants and adult individuals of the shrub.

  18. An interactive web-based learning unit to facilitate and improve intrapartum nursing care of nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdprasert, Sailom; Pruksacheva, Tassanee; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Ruenwongsa, Pintip

    2011-07-01

    First clinical exposures are stressful situations for nursing students, especially, when practicing on the labour ward. The purpose of this study was to develop intrapartum nursing care web-based learning to facilitate students' acquisition of conceptual knowledge and performance skills. This web-based learning unit integrated the 5E-model and information technology with the lecture content. Eighty four nursing students were recruited in the study. The control group received traditional teaching, while the experimental group was supplemented with the web-based learning unit on intrapartum nursing care. The results showed that the students in the experimental group had significant higher scores in conceptual knowledge and performance skill. The students also had significant lower scores in ignorance - related stress when compared to those of the control group. The students supplemented with the web-based course showed a strong positive attitude toward the new learning method.

  19. Cooperative Weblog Learning in Higher Education: Its Facilitating Effects on Social Interaction, Time Lag, and Cognitive Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tien-Chi; Huang, Yueh-Min; Yu, Fu-Yun

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of using weblog technologies to support cooperative learning in higher education. The study focused on the effects of features embedded in weblogs on social interactions, time lags, and cognitive loads. A quasi-experimental control-group research design was adopted. The participants were 115 undergraduates who were…

  20. Facilitating Integration of Electron Beam Lithography Devices with Interactive Videodisc, Computer-Based Simulation and Job Aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Der Linn, Robert Christopher

    A needs assessment of the Grumman E-Beam Systems Group identified the requirement for additional skill mastery for the engineers who assemble, integrate, and maintain devices used to manufacture integrated circuits. Further analysis of the tasks involved led to the decision to develop interactive videodisc, computer-based job aids to enable…

  1. Cooperative Weblog Learning in Higher Education: Its Facilitating Effects on Social Interaction, Time Lag, and Cognitive Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tien-Chi; Huang, Yueh-Min; Yu, Fu-Yun

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of using weblog technologies to support cooperative learning in higher education. The study focused on the effects of features embedded in weblogs on social interactions, time lags, and cognitive loads. A quasi-experimental control-group research design was adopted. The participants were 115 undergraduates who were…

  2. Transparent User Authentication

    CERN Document Server

    Clarke, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    This groundbreaking text examines the problem of user authentication from a completely new viewpoint. Rather than describing the requirements, technologies and implementation issues of designing point-of-entry authentication, the book introduces and investigates the technological requirements of implementing transparent user authentication -- where authentication credentials are captured during a user's normal interaction with a system. This approach would transform user authentication from a binary point-of-entry decision to a continuous identity confidence measure. Topics and features: discu

  3. Facilitated Communication in Mainstream Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remington-Gurney, Jane; Crossley, Rosemary

    Facilitated communication is described as a method of training communication partners or facilitators to provide physical assistance to communication aid users, to help them overcome physical and emotional problems in using their aids. In Melbourne (Victoria, Australia), the DEAL (Dignity, Education and Language) Centre has identified 96 people…

  4. Personal vulnerability and work-home interaction: the effect of job performance-based self-esteem on work/home conflict and facilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innstrand, Siw Tone; Langballe, Ellen Melbye; Espnes, Geir Arild; Aasland, Olaf Gjerløw; Falkum, Erik

    2010-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the longitudinal relationship between job performance-based self-esteem (JPB-SE) and work-home interaction (WHI) in terms of the direction of the interaction (work-to-home vs. home-to-work) and the effect (conflict vs. facilitation). A sample of 3,475 respondents from eight different occupational groups (lawyers, physicians, nurses, teachers, church ministers, bus drivers, and people working in advertising and information technology) supplied data at two points of time with a two-year time interval. The two-wave, cross-lagged structural equations modeling (SEM) analysis demonstrated reciprocal relationships between these variables, i.e., job performance-based self-esteem may act as a precursor as well as an outcome of work-home interaction. The strongest association was between job performance-based self-esteem and work-to-home conflict. Previous research on work-home interaction has mainly focused on situational factors. This longitudinal study expands the work-home literature by demonstrating how individual vulnerability (job performance-based self-esteem) contributes to the explanation of work-home interactions.

  5. Protein Interaction between Ameloblastin and Proteasome Subunit α Type 3 Can Facilitate Redistribution of Ameloblastin Domains within Forming Enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Shuhui; White, Shane N; Paine, Michael L; Snead, Malcolm L

    2015-08-21

    Enamel is a bioceramic tissue composed of thousands of hydroxyapatite crystallites aligned in parallel within boundaries fabricated by a single ameloblast cell. Enamel is the hardest tissue in the vertebrate body; however, it starts development as a self-organizing assembly of matrix proteins that control crystallite habit. Here, we examine ameloblastin, a protein that is initially distributed uniformly across the cell boundary but redistributes to the lateral margins of the extracellular matrix following secretion thus producing cell-defined boundaries within the matrix and the mineral phase. The yeast two-hybrid assay identified that proteasome subunit α type 3 (Psma3) interacts with ameloblastin. Confocal microscopy confirmed Psma3 co-distribution with ameloblastin at the ameloblast secretory end piece. Co-immunoprecipitation assay of mouse ameloblast cell lysates with either ameloblastin or Psma3 antibody identified each reciprocal protein partner. Protein engineering demonstrated that only the ameloblastin C terminus interacts with Psma3. We show that 20S proteasome digestion of ameloblastin in vitro generates an N-terminal cleavage fragment consistent with the in vivo pattern of ameloblastin distribution. These findings suggest a novel pathway participating in control of protein distribution within the extracellular space that serves to regulate the protein-mineral interactions essential to biomineralization.

  6. [A Method for Protein Photo-cross-linking in Living Cells Facilitating Analysis of Physiological Interactions of Proteins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hino, Nobumasa

    2015-01-01

    In living cells, most proteins form complexes with other proteins to exert their functions. Since protein functions are regulated in response to changes in the cellular environment, the components of the complexes can vary; therefore, proteins often interact in a weak and transient manner. To capture such labile protein interactions, we have developed a method for photo-cross-linking of proteins directly interacting in mammalian cells; this method involves expansion of the genetic code and site-specific incorporation of photoreactive amino acids into proteins. Upon cross-linking, protein complexes are stabilized by a covalent bond and can be readily isolated from cell extracts without the problems usually associated with simple affinity purification methods such as co-immunoprecipitation. Photo-cross-linkers have another benefit: they react exclusively with molecules within a range defined by the linker length. This property becomes useful for determining the binding interface of two proteins because the linkers can be introduced in a site-directed manner with our method. In this review, we first describe the expansion of the genetic code of mammalian cells for the incorporation of non-natural amino acids into proteins. Then, we introduce our recent applications and developments of the cross-linking method: identification of intracellular binding partners of the signaling protein growth factor receptor binding protein 2; analysis of the binding between membrane proteins on the cell surface; and a novel photoreactive amino acid that enables wide-ranging photo-cross-linking.

  7. User Interface Technology for Formal Specification Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, Michael; Philpot, Andrew; Pressburger, Thomas; Underwood, Ian; Lum, Henry, Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Formal specification development and modification are an essential component of the knowledge-based software life cycle. User interface technology is needed to empower end-users to create their own formal specifications. This paper describes the advanced user interface for AMPHION1 a knowledge-based software engineering system that targets scientific subroutine libraries. AMPHION is a generic, domain-independent architecture that is specialized to an application domain through a declarative domain theory. Formal specification development and reuse is made accessible to end-users through an intuitive graphical interface that provides semantic guidance in creating diagrams denoting formal specifications in an application domain. The diagrams also serve to document the specifications. Automatic deductive program synthesis ensures that end-user specifications are correctly implemented. The tables that drive AMPHION's user interface are automatically compiled from a domain theory; portions of the interface can be customized by the end-user. The user interface facilitates formal specification development by hiding syntactic details, such as logical notation. It also turns some of the barriers for end-user specification development associated with strongly typed formal languages into active sources of guidance, without restricting advanced users. The interface is especially suited for specification modification. AMPHION has been applied to the domain of solar system kinematics through the development of a declarative domain theory. Testing over six months with planetary scientists indicates that AMPHION's interactive specification acquisition paradigm enables users to develop, modify, and reuse specifications at least an order of magnitude more rapidly than manual program development.

  8. Interactive 3D Visualization of the Great Lakes of the World (GLOW) as a Tool to Facilitate Informal Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yikilmaz, M.; Harwood, C. L.; Hsi, S.; Kellogg, L. H.; Kreylos, O.; McDermott, J.; Pellett, B.; Schladow, G.; Segale, H. M.; Yalowitz, S.

    2013-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) visualization is a powerful research tool that has been used to investigate complex scientific problems in various fields. It allows researchers to explore and understand processes and features that are not directly observable and help with building of new models. It has been shown that 3D visualization creates a more engaging environment for public audiences. Interactive 3D visualization can allow individuals to explore scientific concepts on their own. We present an NSF funded project developed in collaboration with UC Davis KeckCAVES, UC Davis Tahoe Environmental Research Center, ECHO Lake Aquarium & Science Center, and Lawrence Hall of Science. The Great Lakes of the World (GLOW) project aims to build interactive 3D visualization of some of the major lakes and reservoirs of the world to enhance public awareness and increase understanding and stewardship of freshwater lake ecosystems, habitats, and earth science processes. The project includes a collection of publicly available satellite imagery and digital elevation models at various resolutions for the 20 major lakes of the world as well as the bathymetry data for the 12 lakes. It also includes the vector based 'Global Lakes and Wetlands Database (GLWD)' by the World Wildlife Foundation (WWF) and the Center for Environmental System Research University of Kassel, Germany and the CIA World DataBank II data sets to show wetlands and water reservoirs at global scale. We use a custom virtual globe (Crusta) developed at the UC Davis KeckCAVES. Crusta is designed to specifically allow for visualization and mapping of features in very high spatial resolution (learn about the lake and watershed processes as well as geologic processes (e.g. faulting, landslide, glacial, volcanic) that have shaped these lakes. With the advances in 3D imaging technology, the hardware is becoming more affordable and accessible. Affordable 3D projectors, monitors and TVs will allow schools and informal science centers

  9. Molecular sled is an eleven-amino acid vehicle facilitating biochemical interactions via sliding components along DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangel, Walter F; McGrath, William J; Xiong, Kan; Graziano, Vito; Blainey, Paul C

    2016-02-02

    Recently, we showed the adenovirus proteinase interacts productively with its protein substrates in vitro and in vivo in nascent virus particles via one-dimensional diffusion along the viral DNA. The mechanism by which this occurs has heretofore been unknown. We show sliding of these proteins along DNA occurs on a new vehicle in molecular biology, a 'molecular sled' named pVIc. This 11-amino acid viral peptide binds to DNA independent of sequence. pVIc slides on DNA, exhibiting the fastest one-dimensional diffusion constant, 26±1.8 × 10(6) (bp)(2) s(-1). pVIc is a 'molecular sled,' because it can slide heterologous cargos along DNA, for example, a streptavidin tetramer. Similar peptides, for example, from the C terminus of β-actin or NLSIII of the p53 protein, slide along DNA. Characteristics of the 'molecular sled' in its milieu (virion, nucleus) have implications for how proteins in the nucleus of cells interact and imply a new form of biochemistry, one-dimensional biochemistry.

  10. Electrostatic similarities between protein and small molecule ligands facilitate the design of protein-protein interaction inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnout Voet

    Full Text Available One of the underlying principles in drug discovery is that a biologically active compound is complimentary in shape and molecular recognition features to its receptor. This principle infers that molecules binding to the same receptor may share some common features. Here, we have investigated whether the electrostatic similarity can be used for the discovery of small molecule protein-protein interaction inhibitors (SMPPIIs. We have developed a method that can be used to evaluate the similarity of electrostatic potentials between small molecules and known protein ligands. This method was implemented in a software called EleKit. Analyses of all available (at the time of research SMPPII structures indicate that SMPPIIs bear some similarities of electrostatic potential with the ligand proteins of the same receptor. This is especially true for the more polar SMPPIIs. Retrospective analysis of several successful SMPPIIs has shown the applicability of EleKit in the design of new SMPPIIs.

  11. Evidence that Teacher Interactions with Pedagogical Contexts Facilitate Chemistry-Content Learning in K-8 Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Duzor, Andrea Gay

    2012-08-01

    In many innovative science content professional development (PD) courses for teachers, science concepts are situated within pedagogical contexts, or in other words, science content is incorporated within contexts relevant to teaching and student learning. Pedagogical contexts are often used because they are believed to be engaging for teachers and to support content transfer to the classroom. However, few studies have investigated how pedagogical contexts serve to impact teacher engagement and science content learning. This qualitative case study examined K-8 in-service teachers' interactions with pedagogical contexts in a chemistry PD course. Findings indicate that teachers': (1) contribution of teaching experiences helped create a collegial learning environment, (2) sharing of concerns from classroom teaching directed content discussion and learning objectives, and (3) reflection on teacher and learner roles in the PD classroom led to persistence in chemistry-content learning. Implications for PD instructor use of pedagogical contexts in science content based PD are discussed.

  12. Social interaction with a cagemate in pain facilitates subsequent spinal nociception via activation of the medial prefrontal cortex in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Lu, Yun-Fei; Li, Chun-Li; Wang, Yan; Sun, Wei; He, Ting; Chen, Xue-Feng; Wang, Xiao-Liang; Chen, Jun

    2014-07-01

    Empathy for the pain experience of others can lead to the activation of pain-related brain areas and can even induce aberrant responses to pain in human observers. Recent evidence shows this high-level emotional and cognitive process also exists in lower animals; however, the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain unknown. In the present study we found that, after social interaction with a rat that had received subcutaneous injection of bee venom (BV), only the cagemate observer (CO) but not the noncagemate observer (NCO) showed bilateral mechanical hypersensitivity and an enhanced paw flinch reflex following BV injection. Moreover, neuronal activities labeled by c-Fos immunoreactivity in the spinal dorsal horn of CO rats were also significantly increased relative to the control 1 hour after BV injection. A stress-related response can be excluded because serum corticosterone concentration following social interaction with demonstrator rats in pain was not changed in CO rats relative to NCO and isolated control rats. Anxiety can also be excluded because anxiety-like behaviors could be seen in both the CO and NCO rats tested in the open-field test. Finally, bilateral lesions of the medial prefrontal cortex eliminated the enhancement of the BV-induced paw flinch reflex in CO rats, but bilateral lesions of either the amygdala or the entorhinal cortex failed. Together, we have provided another line of evidence for the existence of familiarity-dependent empathy for pain in rats and have demonstrated that the medial prefrontal cortex plays a critical role in processing the empathy-related enhancement of spinal nociception.

  13. Disentangling facilitation along the life cycle: impacts of plant-plant interactions at vegetative and reproductive stages in a Mediterranean forb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana I. García-Cervigón

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Facilitation enables plants to improve their fitness in stressful environments. The overall impact of plant-plant interactions on the population dynamics of protégées is the net result of both positive and negative effects that may act simultaneously along the plant life cycle, and depends on the environmental context. This study evaluates the impact of the nurse plant Juniperus sabina on different stages of the life cycle of the forb Helleborus foetidus. Growth, number of leaves, flowers, carpels and seeds per flower were compared for 240 individuals collected under nurse canopies and in open areas at two sites with contrasting stress levels. Spatial associations with nurse plants and age structures were also checked. A structural equation model was built to test the effect of facilitation on fecundity, accounting for sequential steps from flowering to seed production. The net impact of nurse plants depended on a combination of positive and negative effects on vegetative and reproductive variables. Although nurse plants caused a decrease in flower production at the low-stress site, their net impact there was neutral. In contrast, at the high-stress site the net outcome of plant-plant interactions was positive due to an increase in effective recruitment, plant density, number of viable carpels per flower and fruit set under nurse canopies. The naturally lower rates of secondary growth and flower production at the high-stress site were compensated by the net positive impact of nurse plants here. Our results emphasize the need to evaluate entire processes and not only final outcomes when studying plant-plant interactions.

  14. Disentangling Facilitation Along the Life Cycle: Impacts of Plant–Plant Interactions at Vegetative and Reproductive Stages in a Mediterranean Forb

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Cervigón, Ana I.; Iriondo, José M.; Linares, Juan C.; Olano, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Facilitation enables plants to improve their fitness in stressful environments. The overall impact of plant–plant interactions on the population dynamics of protégées is the net result of both positive and negative effects that may act simultaneously along the plant life cycle, and depends on the environmental context. This study evaluates the impact of the nurse plant Juniperus sabina on different stages of the life cycle of the forb Helleborus foetidus. Growth, number of leaves, flowers, carpels, and seeds per flower were compared for 240 individuals collected under nurse canopies and in open areas at two sites with contrasting stress levels. Spatial associations with nurse plants and age structures were also checked. A structural equation model was built to test the effect of facilitation on fecundity, accounting for sequential steps from flowering to seed production. The net impact of nurse plants depended on a combination of positive and negative effects on vegetative and reproductive variables. Although nurse plants caused a decrease in flower production at the low-stress site, their net impact there was neutral. In contrast, at the high-stress site the net outcome of plant–plant interactions was positive due to an increase in effective recruitment, plant density, number of viable carpels per flower, and fruit set under nurse canopies. The naturally lower rates of secondary growth and flower production at the high-stress site were compensated by the net positive impact of nurse plants here. Our results emphasize the need to evaluate entire processes and not only final outcomes when studying plant–plant interactions. PMID:26904086

  15. Disentangling Facilitation Along the Life Cycle: Impacts of Plant-Plant Interactions at Vegetative and Reproductive Stages in a Mediterranean Forb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Cervigón, Ana I; Iriondo, José M; Linares, Juan C; Olano, José M

    2016-01-01

    Facilitation enables plants to improve their fitness in stressful environments. The overall impact of plant-plant interactions on the population dynamics of protégées is the net result of both positive and negative effects that may act simultaneously along the plant life cycle, and depends on the environmental context. This study evaluates the impact of the nurse plant Juniperus sabina on different stages of the life cycle of the forb Helleborus foetidus. Growth, number of leaves, flowers, carpels, and seeds per flower were compared for 240 individuals collected under nurse canopies and in open areas at two sites with contrasting stress levels. Spatial associations with nurse plants and age structures were also checked. A structural equation model was built to test the effect of facilitation on fecundity, accounting for sequential steps from flowering to seed production. The net impact of nurse plants depended on a combination of positive and negative effects on vegetative and reproductive variables. Although nurse plants caused a decrease in flower production at the low-stress site, their net impact there was neutral. In contrast, at the high-stress site the net outcome of plant-plant interactions was positive due to an increase in effective recruitment, plant density, number of viable carpels per flower, and fruit set under nurse canopies. The naturally lower rates of secondary growth and flower production at the high-stress site were compensated by the net positive impact of nurse plants here. Our results emphasize the need to evaluate entire processes and not only final outcomes when studying plant-plant interactions.

  16. Pfh1 Is an Accessory Replicative Helicase that Interacts with the Replisome to Facilitate Fork Progression and Preserve Genome Integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin R McDonald

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Replicative DNA helicases expose the two strands of the double helix to the replication apparatus, but accessory helicases are often needed to help forks move past naturally occurring hard-to-replicate sites, such as tightly bound proteins, RNA/DNA hybrids, and DNA secondary structures. Although the Schizosaccharomyces pombe 5'-to-3' DNA helicase Pfh1 is known to promote fork progression, its genomic targets, dynamics, and mechanisms of action are largely unknown. Here we address these questions by integrating genome-wide identification of Pfh1 binding sites, comprehensive analysis of the effects of Pfh1 depletion on replication and DNA damage, and proteomic analysis of Pfh1 interaction partners by immunoaffinity purification mass spectrometry. Of the 621 high confidence Pfh1-binding sites in wild type cells, about 40% were sites of fork slowing (as marked by high DNA polymerase occupancy and/or DNA damage (as marked by high levels of phosphorylated H2A. The replication and integrity of tRNA and 5S rRNA genes, highly transcribed RNA polymerase II genes, and nucleosome depleted regions were particularly Pfh1-dependent. The association of Pfh1 with genomic integrity at highly transcribed genes was S phase dependent, and thus unlikely to be an artifact of high transcription rates. Although Pfh1 affected replication and suppressed DNA damage at discrete sites throughout the genome, Pfh1 and the replicative DNA polymerase bound to similar extents to both Pfh1-dependent and independent sites, suggesting that Pfh1 is proximal to the replication machinery during S phase. Consistent with this interpretation, Pfh1 co-purified with many key replisome components, including the hexameric MCM helicase, replicative DNA polymerases, RPA, and the processivity clamp PCNA in an S phase dependent manner. Thus, we conclude that Pfh1 is an accessory DNA helicase that interacts with the replisome and promotes replication and suppresses DNA damage at hard

  17. Drosophila myosin-XX functions as an actin-binding protein to facilitate the interaction between Zyx102 and actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yang; White, Howard D; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2014-01-21

    The class XX myosin is a member of the diverse myosin superfamily and exists in insects and several lower invertebrates. DmMyo20, the class XX myosin in Drosophila, is encoded by dachs, which functions as a crucial downstream component of the Fat signaling pathway, influencing growth, affinity, and gene expression during development. Sequence analysis shows that DmMyo20 contains a unique N-terminal extension, the motor domain, followed by one IQ motif, and a C-terminal tail. To investigate the biochemical properties of DmMyo20, we expressed several DmMyo20 truncated constructs containing the motor domain in the baculovirus/Sf9 system. We found that the motor domain of DmMyo20 had neither ATPase activity nor the ability to bind to ATP, suggesting that DmMyo20 does not function as a molecular motor. We found that the motor domain of DmMyo20 could specifically bind to actin filaments in an ATP-independent manner and enhance the interaction between actin filaments and Zyx102, a downstream component of DmMyo20 in the Fat signaling pathway. These results suggest that DmMyo20 functions as a scaffold protein, but not as a molecular motor, in a signaling pathway controlling cell differentiation.

  18. SIRT1 deacetylates SATB1 to facilitate MAR HS2-MAR ε interaction and promote ε-globin expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zheng; Lv, Xiang; Song, Wei; Wang, Xing; Zhao, Guang-Nian; Wang, Wen-Tian; Xiong, Jian; Mao, Bei-Bei; Yu, Wei; Yang, Ben; Wu, Jie; Zhou, Li-Quan; Hao, De-Long; Dong, Wen-Ji; Liu, De-Pei; Liang, Chih-Chuan

    2012-06-01

    The higher order chromatin structure has recently been revealed as a critical new layer of gene transcriptional control. Changes in higher order chromatin structures were shown to correlate with the availability of transcriptional factors and/or MAR (matrix attachment region) binding proteins, which tether genomic DNA to the nuclear matrix. How posttranslational modification to these protein organizers may affect higher order chromatin structure still pending experimental investigation. The type III histone deacetylase silent mating type information regulator 2, S. cerevisiae, homolog 1 (SIRT1) participates in many physiological processes through targeting both histone and transcriptional factors. We show that MAR binding protein SATB1, which mediates chromatin looping in cytokine, MHC-I and β-globin gene loci, as a new type of SIRT1 substrate. SIRT1 expression increased accompanying erythroid differentiation and the strengthening of β-globin cluster higher order chromatin structure, while knockdown of SIRT1 in erythroid k562 cells weakened the long-range interaction between two SATB1 binding sites in the β-globin locus, MAR(HS2) and MAR(ε). We also show that SIRT1 activity significantly affects ε-globin gene expression in a SATB1-dependent manner and that knockdown of SIRT1 largely blocks ε-globin gene activation during erythroid differentiation. Our work proposes that SIRT1 orchestrates changes in higher order chromatin structure during erythropoiesis, and reveals the dynamic higher order chromatin structure regulation at posttranslational modification level.

  19. Maize Elongin C interacts with the viral genome-linked protein, VPg, of Sugarcane mosaic virus and facilitates virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Min; Chen, Yuting; Ding, Xin Shun; Webb, Stephen L; Zhou, Tao; Nelson, Richard S; Fan, Zaifeng

    2014-09-01

    The viral genome-linked protein, VPg, of potyviruses is involved in viral genome replication and translation. To determine host proteins that interact with Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) VPg, a yeast two-hybrid screen was used and a maize (Zea mays) Elongin C (ZmElc) protein was identified. ZmELC transcript was observed in all maize organs, but most highly in leaves and pistil extracts, and ZmElc was present in the cytoplasm and nucleus of maize cells in the presence or absence of SCMV. ZmELC expression was increased in maize tissue at 4 and 6 d post SCMV inoculation. When ZmELC was transiently overexpressed in maize protoplasts the accumulation of SCMV RNA was approximately doubled compared with the amount of virus in control protoplasts. Silencing ZmELC expression using a Brome mosaic virus-based gene silencing vector (virus-induced gene silencing) did not influence maize plant growth and development, but did decrease RNA accumulation of two isolates of SCMV and host transcript encoding ZmeIF4E during SCMV infection. Interestingly, Maize chlorotic mottle virus, from outside the Potyviridae, was increased in accumulation after silencing ZmELC expression. Our results describe both the location of ZmElc expression in maize and a new activity associated with an Elc: support of potyvirus accumulation. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  20. Interactions of local climatic, biotic and hydrogeochemical processes facilitate phosphorus dynamics along an Everglades forest-marsh gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. G. Troxler

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Ecosystem nutrient cycling is often complex because nutrient dynamics within and between systems are mediated by the interaction of biological and geochemical conditions operating at different temporal and spatial scales. Vegetated patches in semiarid and wetland landscapes have been shown to exemplify some of these patterns and processes. We investigated biological and geochemical factors suggested to contribute to phosphorus (P movement and availability along a forest-marsh gradient in an Everglades tree island. Our study illustrated processes that are consistent with the chemohydrodynamic nutrient (CHNT hypothesis and the trigger-transfer, pulse-reserve (TTPR model developed for semiarid systems. Comparison with the TTRP model was constructive as it elaborated several significant patterns and processes of the tree island ecosystem including: (1 concentration of the limiting resource (P in the source patch [High Head which constitutes the reserve] compared with the resource-poor landscape, (2 soil zone calcite precipitation requiring strong seasonality for evapotranspiration to promote conditions for secondary soil development and calcium phosphate reprecipitation, (3 rewetting of previously dry soils by early wet season precipitation events, and (4 antecedent conditions of the source patch including landscape position that modulated the effect of the precipitation trigger. Thus, our study showed how water availability drives soil water P dynamics and potentially stability of mineral soil P in this tree island ecosystem. In landscapes with extensive water management, these processes can be asynchronous with the seasonality of hydrologic dynamics, tipping the balance between a sink and source of a limiting nutrient.

  1. Hepatitis C Virus Proteins Interact with the Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT Machinery via Ubiquitination To Facilitate Viral Envelopment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina Barouch-Bentov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Enveloped viruses commonly utilize late-domain motifs, sometimes cooperatively with ubiquitin, to hijack the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT machinery for budding at the plasma membrane. However, the mechanisms underlying budding of viruses lacking defined late-domain motifs and budding into intracellular compartments are poorly characterized. Here, we map a network of hepatitis C virus (HCV protein interactions with the ESCRT machinery using a mammalian-cell-based protein interaction screen and reveal nine novel interactions. We identify HRS (hepatocyte growth factor-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate, an ESCRT-0 complex component, as an important entry point for HCV into the ESCRT pathway and validate its interactions with the HCV nonstructural (NS proteins NS2 and NS5A in HCV-infected cells. Infectivity assays indicate that HRS is an important factor for efficient HCV assembly. Specifically, by integrating capsid oligomerization assays, biophysical analysis of intracellular viral particles by continuous gradient centrifugations, proteolytic digestion protection, and RNase digestion protection assays, we show that HCV co-opts HRS to mediate a late assembly step, namely, envelopment. In the absence of defined late-domain motifs, K63-linked polyubiquitinated lysine residues in the HCV NS2 protein bind the HRS ubiquitin-interacting motif to facilitate assembly. Finally, ESCRT-III and VPS/VTA1 components are also recruited by HCV proteins to mediate assembly. These data uncover involvement of ESCRT proteins in intracellular budding of a virus lacking defined late-domain motifs and a novel mechanism by which HCV gains entry into the ESCRT network, with potential implications for other viruses.

  2. Inventory of Federal energy-related environment and safety research for FY 1977. Volume III. Interactive terminal users guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shriner, C.R.; Peck, L.J.; Miller, C.E.

    1978-07-01

    This users guide was prepared to provide interested persons access to, via computer terminals, federally funded energy-related environment and safety research projects for FY 1977. Although this information is also available in hardbound volumes, this on-line searching capability is expected to reduce the time required to answer ad hoc questions and, at the same time, produce meaningful reports.

  3. Tower-Based Optical Sensing Architecture for Facilitating the Investigation of Fine Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Interactions via Optical-Flux Data Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Y.; Sankaran, R.; Bales, D. J.; Cook, D. R.; Herrera, R. L., Jr.; Weber, C. C.; Ferrier, N. J.

    2014-12-01

    Our ability to forecast ecosystem functions and climate at regional and global scales has significantly advanced. However, little is known about how local phenomena such as variations in water and carbon fluxes at a fine temporal scale relate to large scale phenomena and vice versa. The EcoSpec project aims to identify patterns and associations between high frequency optical data and meteorological and biological measurements for investigating near-surface biosphere-atmosphere interactions. To meet the data needs of this investigation, we are constructing a tower-based system that integrates multiple sensor types including a radiometer, thermal infrared sensor, shadowband direct-diffuse radiometer, albedometer, and a RGB camera. This optical tower will be a self-sufficient and easily deployable unit using solar power and cellular data communications for data transfer. Data flow, system architecture, and networking are designed to transmit data wirelessly to a remote location near real-time and maintain versatility to support anticipated upgrades. In this presentation, we will discuss this critical first step—a multi-sensor optical tower system—as a means of collecting optical data toward new investigations for biosphere-atmosphere interactions. This system will provide valuable insights into facilitating an optical sensor network for analyzing ecosystem fluxes across ecosystems.

  4. Mesothelin-MUC16 binding is a high affinity, N-glycan dependent interaction that facilitates peritoneal metastasis of ovarian tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathyanarayana Bangalore K

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mucin MUC16 and the glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchored glycoprotein mesothelin likely facilitate the peritoneal metastasis of ovarian tumors. The biochemical basis and the kinetics of the binding between these two glycoproteins are not clearly understood. Here we have addressed this deficit and provide further evidence supporting the role of the MUC16-mesothelin interaction in facilitating cell-cell binding under conditions that mimic the peritoneal environment. Results In this study we utilize recombinant-Fc tagged human mesothelin to measure the binding kinetics of this glycoprotein to MUC16 expressed on the ovarian tumor cell line OVCAR-3. OVCAR-3 derived sublines that did not express MUC16 showed no affinity for mesothelin. In a flow cytometry-based assay mesothelin binds with very high affinity to the MUC16 on the OVCAR-3 cells with an apparent Kd of 5–10 nM. Maximum interaction occurs within 5 mins of incubation of the recombinant mesothelin with the OVCAR-3 cells and significant binding is observed even after 10 sec. A five-fold molar excess of soluble MUC16 was unable to completely inhibit the binding of mesothelin to the OVCAR-3 cells. Oxidation of the MUC16 glycans, removal of its N-linked oligosaccharides, and treatment of the mucin with wheat germ agglutinin and erythroagglutinating phytohemagglutinin abrogates its binding to mesothelin. These observations suggest that at least a subset of the MUC16-asscociated N-glycans is required for binding to mesothelin. We also demonstrate that MUC16 positive ovarian tumor cells exhibit increased adherence to A431 cells transfected with mesothelin (A431-Meso+. Only minimal adhesion is observed between MUC16 knockdown cells and A431-Meso+ cells. The binding between the MUC16 expressing ovarian tumor cells and the A431-Meso+ cells occurs even in the presence of ascites from patients with ovarian cancer. Conclusion The strong binding kinetics of the mesothelin-MUC16

  5. Herpes simplex virus type 2 glycoprotein H interacts with integrin αvβ3 to facilitate viral entry and calcium signaling in human genital tract epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheshenko, Natalia; Trepanier, Janie B; González, Pablo A; Eugenin, Eliseo A; Jacobs, William R; Herold, Betsy C

    2014-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) entry requires multiple interactions at the cell surface and activation of a complex calcium signaling cascade. Previous studies demonstrated that integrins participate in this process, but their precise role has not been determined. These studies were designed to test the hypothesis that integrin αvβ3 signaling promotes the release of intracellular calcium (Ca2+) stores and contributes to viral entry and cell-to-cell spread. Transfection of cells with small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting integrin αvβ3, but not other integrin subunits, or treatment with cilengitide, an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) mimetic, impaired HSV-induced Ca2+ release, viral entry, plaque formation, and cell-to-cell spread of HSV-1 and HSV-2 in human cervical and primary genital tract epithelial cells. Coimmunoprecipitation studies and proximity ligation assays indicated that integrin αvβ3 interacts with glycoprotein H (gH). An HSV-2 gH-null virus was engineered to further assess the role of gH in the virus-induced signaling cascade. The gH-2-null virus bound to cells and activated Akt to induce a small Ca2+ response at the plasma membrane, but it failed to trigger the release of cytoplasmic Ca2+ stores and was impaired for entry and cell-to-cell spread. Silencing of integrin αvβ3 and deletion of gH prevented phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and the transport of viral capsids to the nuclear pore. Together, these findings demonstrate that integrin signaling is activated downstream of virus-induced Akt signaling and facilitates viral entry through interactions with gH by activating the release of intracellular Ca2+ and FAK phosphorylation. These findings suggest a new target for HSV treatment and suppression. Herpes simplex viruses are the leading cause of genital disease worldwide, the most common infection associated with neonatal encephalitis, and a major cofactor for HIV acquisition and transmission. There is no effective vaccine. These

  6. Research on the Interactive Retrieval Environment Based on User Experience%基于用户体验的交互式检索环境的分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏可

    2016-01-01

    人性化理念的普及推动了检索系统更加关注用户体验,更加关注与图书馆检索环境的融合。介绍了用户体验的特征,分析了交互设计与用户信息行为的关系,阐述了交互式检索环境的成分、功能,展望了未来交互式检索环境的发展趋势。%The popularization of the concept of humanity, which promotes retrieval system pay more attention to the user experience and the integration with library’s retrieval environment.This paper introduces the characteristics of the user experience,analyzes the relationship between interaction design and users’ information behavior, expounds the composition and function of interactive retrieval environment, and forecasts the development trend of the interactive retrieval environment in the future.

  7. A User-Centered Approach to Adaptive Hypertext Based on an Information Relevance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathe, Nathalie; Chen, James

    1994-01-01

    Rapid and effective to information in large electronic documentation systems can be facilitated if information relevant in an individual user's content can be automatically supplied to this user. However most of this knowledge on contextual relevance is not found within the contents of documents, it is rather established incrementally by users during information access. We propose a new model for interactively learning contextual relevance during information retrieval, and incrementally adapting retrieved information to individual user profiles. The model, called a relevance network, records the relevance of references based on user feedback for specific queries and user profiles. It also generalizes such knowledge to later derive relevant references for similar queries and profiles. The relevance network lets users filter information by context of relevance. Compared to other approaches, it does not require any prior knowledge nor training. More importantly, our approach to adaptivity is user-centered. It facilitates acceptance and understanding by users by giving them shared control over the adaptation without disturbing their primary task. Users easily control when to adapt and when to use the adapted system. Lastly, the model is independent of the particular application used to access information, and supports sharing of adaptations among users.

  8. INTERACTIONS BETWEEN THE HERBACEOUS AND SHRUBBY-ARBOREAL COMPONENTS IN A SEMIARID REGION IN THE NORTHEAST OF BRAZIL: COMPETITION OR FACILITATION?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KLEBER ANDRADE DA SILVA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Under conditions of high stress, interactions between species can be positive. Islands of perennial vegetation can improve the conditions of the understory and facilitate the establishment of herbaceous plants. The hypothesis of this study is that islands of perennial vegetation in an area of caatinga harbor, a greater richness, diversity and density of herbaceous plants, and that individuals reach a greater height and diameter than in open spaces. The study was conducted in Petrolândia, Pernambuco, Brazil. Twenty-seven plots were installed in the center of the islands, 38 at the edge of the islands (in a total of 38 islands and 35 in the open spaces. A total of 51 species were recorded in the center and 55 on the edge of the islands and 48 in the open spaces. The mean richness of the open spaces was lower than on the islands. The diversity was greater in the center of the island and became less on the edge of the island and in the open spaces. The mean density was lower in the open spaces than on the islands. The mean density at the edge of the islands was greater than in the center of the islands. There was no difference in mean diameter of herbaceous plants. The mean height of the individuals was higher in the center of the islands. The herbaceous community growing on the islands exhibited higher richness, diversity, density and height than in open spaces. Thus, islands of perennial vegetation facilitate the establishment of herbaceous species.

  9. User Control Problems and Taking User Empowerment Further

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Rowena

    User control in identity management is beset with a number of problems, as outlined in this paper. It is argued that akin to traditional contexts, greater user control will result in greater user liability, which is demonstrated with the help of digital and non-digital examples. In this context, there is a critical need for greater user empowerment. This could be achieved in two ways-first, facilitating user awareness of identity management technologies, their scope and effects and second, through the implementation of proposed control-liability notices.

  10. Measuring user engagement

    CERN Document Server

    Lalmas, Mounia; Yom-Tov, Elad

    2014-01-01

    User engagement refers to the quality of the user experience that emphasizes the positive aspects of interacting with an online application and, in particular, the desire to use that application longer and repeatedly. User engagement is a key concept in the design of online applications (whether for desktop, tablet or mobile), motivated by the observation that successful applications are not just used, but are engaged with. Users invest time, attention, and emotion in their use of technology, and seek to satisfy pragmatic and hedonic needs. Measurement is critical for evaluating whether online

  11. The PANTHER User Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coram, Jamie L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Morrow, James D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Perkins, David Nikolaus [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This document describes the PANTHER R&D Application, a proof-of-concept user interface application developed under the PANTHER Grand Challenge LDRD. The purpose of the application is to explore interaction models for graph analytics, drive algorithmic improvements from an end-user point of view, and support demonstration of PANTHER technologies to potential customers. The R&D Application implements a graph-centric interaction model that exposes analysts to the algorithms contained within the GeoGraphy graph analytics library. Users define geospatial-temporal semantic graph queries by constructing search templates based on nodes, edges, and the constraints among them. Users then analyze the results of the queries using both geo-spatial and temporal visualizations. Development of this application has made user experience an explicit driver for project and algorithmic level decisions that will affect how analysts one day make use of PANTHER technologies.

  12. Semiautomatic three-dimensional CT ventricular volumetry in patients with congenital heart disease: agreement between two methods with different user interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Park, Sang-Hyub

    2015-12-01

    To assess agreement between two semi-automatic, three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) ventricular volumetry methods with different user interactions in patients with congenital heart disease. In 30 patients with congenital heart disease (median age 8 years, range 5 days-33 years; 20 men), dual-source, multi-section, electrocardiography-synchronized cardiac CT was obtained at the end-systolic (n = 22) and/or end-diastolic (n = 28) phase. Nineteen left ventricle end-systolic (LV ESV), 28 left ventricle end-diastolic (LV EDV), 22 right ventricle end-systolic (RV ESV), and 28 right ventricle end-diastolic volumes (RV EDV) were successfully calculated using two semi-automatic, 3D segmentation methods with different user interactions (high in method 1, low in method 2). The calculated ventricular volumes of the two methods were compared and correlated. A P value volumetry shows good agreement and high correlation between the two methods, but method 2 tends to slightly underestimate LV ESV, LV EDV, and RV ESV.

  13. GURU v2.0: An interactive Graphical User interface to fit rheometer curves in Han’s model for rubber vulcanization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Milani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A GUI software (GURU for experimental data fitting of rheometer curves in Natural Rubber (NR vulcanized with sulphur at different curing temperatures is presented. Experimental data are automatically loaded in GURU from an Excel spreadsheet coming from the output of the experimental machine (moving die rheometer. To fit the experimental data, the general reaction scheme proposed by Han and co-workers for NR vulcanized with sulphur is considered. From the simplified kinetic scheme adopted, a closed form solution can be found for the crosslink density, with the only limitation that the induction period is excluded from computations. Three kinetic constants must be determined in such a way to minimize the absolute error between normalized experimental data and numerical prediction. Usually, this result is achieved by means of standard least-squares data fitting. On the contrary, GURU works interactively by means of a Graphical User Interface (GUI to minimize the error and allows an interactive calibration of the kinetic constants by means of sliders. A simple mouse click on the sliders allows the assignment of a value for each kinetic constant and a visual comparison between numerical and experimental curves. Users will thus find optimal values of the constants by means of a classic trial and error strategy. An experimental case of technical relevance is shown as benchmark.

  14. Game user experience evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    Bernhaupt, Regina

    2015-01-01

    Evaluating interactive systems for their user experience (UX) is a standard approach in industry and research today. This book explores the areas of game design and development and Human Computer Interaction (HCI) as ways to understand the various contributing aspects of the overall gaming experience. Fully updated, extended and revised this book is based upon the original publication Evaluating User Experience in Games, and provides updated methods and approaches ranging from user- orientated methods to game specific approaches. New and emerging methods and areas explored include physiologi

  15. Distributed User Interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Gallud, Jose A; Penichet, Victor M R

    2011-01-01

    The recent advances in display technologies and mobile devices is having an important effect on the way users interact with all kinds of devices (computers, mobile devices, laptops, tablets, and so on). These are opening up new possibilities for interaction, including the distribution of the UI (User Interface) amongst different devices, and implies that the UI can be split and composed, moved, copied or cloned among devices running the same or different operating systems. These new ways of manipulating the UI are considered under the emerging topic of Distributed User Interfaces (DUIs). DUIs

  16. Inventory of Federal Energy-Related Environment and Safety Research for FY 1978. Volume III, interactive terminal users guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, C. E.; Barker, Janice F.

    1979-12-01

    This users' guide was prepared to provide interested persons access to, via computer terminals, federally funded energy-related environmental and safety research projects for FY 1978. Although this information is also available in hardbound volumes, this on-line searching capability is expected to reduce the time required to answer ad hoc questions and, at the same time, produce meaningful reports. The data contained in this data base are not exhaustive and represent research reported by the following agencies: Department of Agriculture, Department of Commerce, Department of Defense, Department of Energy, Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Department of the Interior, Department of Transportation, Federal Energy Administration, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Science Foundation, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Tennessee Valley Authority, U.S. Coast Guard, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

  17. User's Manual for the Naval Interactive Data Analysis System-Climatologies (NIDAS-C), Version 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Clifton

    1996-01-01

    This technical note provides the user's manual for the NIDAS-C system developed for the naval oceanographic office. NIDAS-C operates using numerous oceanographic data categories stored in an installed version of the Naval Environmental Operational Nowcast System (NEONS), a relational database management system (rdbms) which employs the ORACLE proprietary rdbms engine. Data management, configuration, and control functions for the supporting rdbms are performed externally. NIDAS-C stores and retrieves data to/from the rdbms but exercises no direct internal control over the rdbms or its configuration. Data is also ingested into the rdbms, for use by NIDAS-C, by external data acquisition processes. The data categories employed by NIDAS-C are as follows: Bathymetry - ocean depth at

  18. Facilitative-competitive interactions in an old-growth forest: the importance of large-diameter trees as benefactors and stimulators for forest community assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Fichtner

    Full Text Available The role of competition in tree communities is increasingly well understood, while little is known about the patterns and mechanisms of the interplay between above- and belowground competition in tree communities. This knowledge, however, is crucial for a better understanding of community dynamics and developing adaptive near-natural management strategies. We assessed neighbourhood interactions in an unmanaged old-growth European beech (Fagus sylvatica forest by quantifying variation in the intensity of above- (shading and belowground competition (crowding among dominant and co-dominant canopy beech trees during tree maturation. Shading had on average a much larger impact on radial growth than crowding and the sensitivity to changes in competitive conditions was lowest for crowding effects. We found that each mode of competition reduced the effect of the other. Increasing crowding reduced the negative effect of shading, and at high levels of shading, crowding actually had a facilitative effect and increased growth. Our study demonstrates that complementarity in above- and belowground processes enable F. sylvatica to alter resource acquisition strategies, thus optimising tree radial growth. As a result, competition seemed to become less important in stands with a high growing stock and tree communities with a long continuity of anthropogenic undisturbed population dynamics. We suggest that growth rates do not exclusively depend on the density of potential competitors at the intraspecific level, but on the conspecific aggregation of large-diameter trees and their functional role for regulating biotic filtering processes. This finding highlights the potential importance of the rarely examined relationship between the spatial aggregation pattern of large-diameter trees and the outcome of neighbourhood interactions, which may be central to community dynamics and the related forest ecosystem services.

  19. An upstream Hfq binding site in the fhlA mRNA leader region facilitates the OxyS-fhlA interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilshad N Salim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To survive, bacteria must be able to adapt to environmental stresses. Small regulatory RNAs have been implicated as intermediates in a variety of stress-response pathways allowing dynamic gene regulation. The RNA binding protein Hfq facilitates this process in many cases, helping sRNAs base pair with their target mRNAs and initiate gene regulation. Although Hfq has been identified as a critical component in many RNPs, the manner by which Hfq controls these interactions is not known. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To test the requirement of Hfq in these mRNA-sRNA complexes, the OxyS-fhlA system was used as a model. OxyS is induced in response to oxidative stress and down regulates the translation of fhlA, a gene encoding a transcriptional activator for formate metabolism. Biophysical characterization of this system previously used a minimal construct of the fhlA mRNA which inadvertently removed a critical element within the leader sequence of this mRNA that effected thermodynamics and kinetics for the interaction with Hfq. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Herein, we report thermodynamic, kinetic and structural mapping studies during binary and ternary complex formation between Hfq, OxyS and fhlA mRNA. Hfq binds fhlA mRNA using both the proximal and distal surfaces and stimulates association kinetics between the sRNA and mRNA but remains bound to fhlA forming a ternary complex. The upstream Hfq binding element within fhlA is similar to (ARN(x elements recently identified in other mRNAs regulated by Hfq. This work leads to a kinetic model for the dynamics of these complexes and the regulation of gene expression by bacterial sRNAs.

  20. Libraries in Second Life: New Approaches to Education, Information Sharing, Learning Object Implementation, User Interactions and Collaborations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Smith Nash

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional virtual worlds such as Second Life continue to expand the way they provide information, learning activities, and educational applications. This paper explores the types of learning activities that take place in Second Life and discusses how learning takes place, with a view toward developing effective instructional strategies. As learning objects are being launched in Second Life, new approaches to collaboration, interactivity, and cognition are being developed. Many learning-centered islands appeal to individuals who benefit from interaction with peers and instructors, and who can access learning objects such as information repositories, simulations, and interactive animations. The key advantages that Second Life offers include engaging and meaningful interaction with fellow learners, media-rich learning environments with embedded video, graphics, and interactive quizzes and assessments, an engaging environment for simulations such as virtual labs, and culturally inclusive immersive environments. However, because of the steep learning curve, technical difficulties, and cultural diversity, learners may become frustrated in Second Life. Since Second Life is social learning environment that emphasizes the creation of a self, effective learning requires step-by-step empowerment of that new, constructed self.

  1. Libraries in Second Life: New Approaches to Education, Information Sharing, Learning Object Implementation, User Interactions and Collaborations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Smith Nash

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional virtual worlds such as Second Life continue to expand the way they provide information, learning activities, and educational applications. This paper explores the types of learning activities that take place in Second Life and discusses how learning takes place, with a view toward developing effective instructional strategies. As learning objects are being launched in Second Life, new approaches to collaboration, interactivity, and cognition are being developed. Many learning-centered islands appeal to individuals who benefit from interaction with peers and instructors, and who can access learning objects such as information repositories, simulations, and interactive animations. The key advantages that Second Life offers include engaging and meaningful interaction with fellow learners, media-rich learning environments with embedded video, graphics, and interactive quizzes and assessments, an engaging environment for simulations such as virtual labs, and culturally inclusive immersive environments. However, because of the steep learning curve, technical difficulties, and cultural diversity, learners may become frustrated in Second Life. Since Second Life is social learning environment that emphasizes the creation of a self, effective learning requires step-by-step empowerment of that new, constructed self.

  2. User 2020

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porras, Jari; Heikkinen, Kari; Kinnula, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    and environment, and each has had its effect on the development of technology. The closer we come to the current generation, the bigger is the effect of technology on the characteristics of that generation. User needs guide the technology and the technology shapes the users. This WWRF Outlook analyses......The User 2020 vision is of the changing needs and habits of a user in the future digital world. In order to understand the needs of the future users, we need to look at how users and technology have changed during recent years. The different generations of users are products of their own time...... determined by the era in which they were born. This is due to the fact that digital natives, born in an already “fully” digitalized world with a plethora of ICT services, have a much closer relationship to these solutions than generations before them. This has also shaped the users perspectives and had...

  3. Understanding users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Carl Gustav Viggo

    2014-01-01

    Segmentation of users can help libraries in the process of understanding user similarities and differences. Segmentation can also form the basis for selecting segments of target users and for developing tailored services for specific target segments. Several approaches and techniques have been...... segmentation project using computer-generated clusters. Compared to traditional marketing texts, this article also tries to identify user segments or images or metaphors by the library profession itself....

  4. Understanding users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Carl Gustav Viggo

    2014-01-01

    Segmentation of users can help libraries in the process of understanding user similarities and differences. Segmentation can also form the basis for selecting segments of target users and for developing tailored services for specific target segments. Several approaches and techniques have been te...... segmentation project using computer-generated clusters. Compared to traditional marketing texts, this article also tries to identify user segments or images or metaphors by the library profession itself....

  5. The DeepTree Exhibit: Visualizing the Tree of Life to Facilitate Informal Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, F; Horn, M S; Phillips, B C; Diamond, J; Evans, E M; Shen, Chia

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we present the DeepTree exhibit, a multi-user, multi-touch interactive visualization of the Tree of Life. We developed DeepTree to facilitate collaborative learning of evolutionary concepts. We will describe an iterative process in which a team of computer scientists, learning scientists, biologists, and museum curators worked together throughout design, development, and evaluation. We present the importance of designing the interactions and the visualization hand-in-hand in order to facilitate active learning. The outcome of this process is a fractal-based tree layout that reduces visual complexity while being able to capture all life on earth; a custom rendering and navigation engine that prioritizes visual appeal and smooth fly-through; and a multi-user interface that encourages collaborative exploration while offering guided discovery. We present an evaluation showing that the large dataset encouraged free exploration, triggers emotional responses, and facilitates visitor engagement and informal learning.

  6. Profiting from innovative user communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Lars Bo

    platforms. This article explains how manufacturers can profit from their abilities to organize and facilitate a process of innovation by user communities and capture the value of the innovations produced in such communities. When managed strategically, two distinct, but not mutually exclusive business......, a manufacturer can incorporate and commercialize the best complements found in the user communities. Keywords: innovation, modding, user communities, software platform, business model. JEL code(s): L21; L23; O31; O32...

  7. From Pen-and-Paper Sketches to Prototypes: The Advanced Interaction Design Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Störrle, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Pen and paper is still the best tool for sketching GUIs. How-ever, sketches cannot be executed, at best we have facilitated or animated scenarios. The Advanced User Interaction Environment facilitates turn-ing hand-drawn sketches into executable prototypes.......Pen and paper is still the best tool for sketching GUIs. How-ever, sketches cannot be executed, at best we have facilitated or animated scenarios. The Advanced User Interaction Environment facilitates turn-ing hand-drawn sketches into executable prototypes....

  8. Intergrating users in an interactive video education project: reframing the patient-centered strategy of a cystic fibrosis centre

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J.C. Aspria (Marcello); M. de Mul (Marleen); S.A. Adams (Samantha); R.A. Bal (Roland)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThis article reports on the formative evaluation of WebPEP (“Web-Based Patient Education Program”), an interactive video education project at ErasmusMC–Sophia Children’s Hospital (SCH) in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. Through monthly live webcasts, doctors, nurses, psychologists, and oth

  9. Advancing the Strategic Messages Affecting Robot Trust Effect: The Dynamic of User- and Robot-Generated Content on Human-Robot Trust and Interaction Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yuhua Jake; Lee, Seungcheol Austin

    2016-09-01

    Human-robot interaction (HRI) will soon transform and shift the communication landscape such that people exchange messages with robots. However, successful HRI requires people to trust robots, and, in turn, the trust affects the interaction. Although prior research has examined the determinants of human-robot trust (HRT) during HRI, no research has examined the messages that people received before interacting with robots and their effect on HRT. We conceptualize these messages as SMART (Strategic Messages Affecting Robot Trust). Moreover, we posit that SMART can ultimately affect actual HRI outcomes (i.e., robot evaluations, robot credibility, participant mood) by affording the persuasive influences from user-generated content (UGC) on participatory Web sites. In Study 1, participants were assigned to one of two conditions (UGC/control) in an original experiment of HRT. Compared with the control (descriptive information only), results showed that UGC moderated the correlation between HRT and interaction outcomes in a positive direction (average Δr = +0.39) for robots as media and robots as tools. In Study 2, we explored the effect of robot-generated content but did not find similar moderation effects. These findings point to an important empirical potential to employ SMART in future robot deployment.

  10. User constraints for reliable user-defined smart home scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Guilly, Thibaut; Nielsen, Michael Kvist; Pedersen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    of constraints restricting the control commands that can be used inside user-defined scenarios. The system is based on timed automata model checking abstracted by event condition action rules. A prototype was implemented, including a user interface to interact with the user. The usability of the system...

  11. Evaluation the Impact of Human Interaction/Debate on Online News to Improve User Interfaces for Debate Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrahman Alqahtani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The average of many people trust online comments for any news as much as personal recommendations [1], [2]. In this paper, we analyzed the impact of the online news’s comments to evaluating the threading models of electronic debates by using online surveys. In this paper, based on the results of our online survey of 500 participants, we evaluated whether forums with comments concerning online news are appropriate for the study of debates. In particular, we have to verify whether the nature of discussions around news is argumentative and whether the participating people expect to engage in multiple rounds of arguments. We presented DirectDemocracyP2P application as a user interface for decentralized debates. In this paper, we evaluated and analyzed the comments that were collected from online surveys to improve the DirectDemocracyP2P applications. Also we have to verify whether the actual comments commonly submitted around news do go beyond the simple advertisement of one own’s merchandise and attacks of competitors, into fair reviews of news features and quality.

  12. 基于用户体验的交互式包装设计探究%Exploration on Interactive Packaging Design Based on the User Experience

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐畅

    2016-01-01

    In today's rapid economic development of the society, the product packaging requirements on the function is not the focus of attention, interactive integrated experience is more important in the process of packaging. Through the analysis of the case, grasp modern product packaging design behavior level, relfection level, instinctive level of experience design. Based on the user experience of product packaging design, will produce a more reasonable product packaging, is a more pleasant experience for all users, and increase the sales and enhance the brand value.%在现今经济快速发展的社会,产品包装在功能上的需求已不是人们关注的重点,包装互动过程中综合感受才更为重要。文章通过案例分析,领会现代产品包装设计中行为层次、反思层次、本能层次的体验设计。基于用户体验的产品包装设计,将会生产出更为合理的产品包装,使用户获得更为愉悦的体验,进而加大销量并提升品牌价值。

  13. Feedback from Usability Evaluation to User Interface Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C. M.; Overgaard, M.; Pedersen, M. B.

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports from an exploratory study of means for providing feedback from a usability evaluation to the user interface designers. In this study, we conducted a usability evaluation of a mobile system that is used by craftsmen to register use of time and materials. The results...... of this evaluation were presented to the designers in different forms. First, the designers were presented with a traditional usability report. Second, we facilitated a dialogue where the results of the evaluation were discussed. During this process, we collected opinions from the designers on the main strengths...... and weaknesses of the system. The findings indicate that detailed descriptions of problems and log descriptions of the user's interaction with the system and of system interaction are useful for the designers when trying to understand the usability problems that the users have encountered....

  14. Reactive Geochemical Transport Modeling of Concentrated AqueousSolutions: Supplement to TOUGHREACT User's Guide for the PitzerIon-Interaction Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guoxiang; Spycher, Nicolas; Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Steefel , Carl

    2006-12-15

    In this report, we present: -- The Pitzer ion-interactiontheory and models -- Input file requirements for using the TOUGHREACTPitzer ion-interaction model and associated databases -- Run-time errormessages -- Verification test cases and application examples. For themain code structure, features, overall solution methods, description ofinput/output files for parameters other than those specific to theimplemented Pitzer model, and error messages, see the TOUGHREACT User'sGuide (Xu et al., 2005). The TOUGHREACT Pitzer version runs on aDEC-alpha architecture CPU, under OSF1 V5.1, with Compaq Digital FortranCompiler. The compiler run-time libraries are required for execution aswell as compilation. The code also runs on Intel Pentium IV andhigher-version CPU-based machines with Compaq Visual Fortran Compiler orIntel Fortran Compiler (integrated with the Microsoft DevelopmentEnvironment). The minimum hardware configuration should include 1 GB RAMand 1 GB (2 GB recommended) of available disk space.

  15. The USEtox story: A survey of model developer visions and user requirements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westh, Torbjørn Bochsen; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky; Birkved, Morten

    2015-01-01

    , we analyzed user expectations and experiences and compared them with the developers’ visions. Methods We applied qualitative and quantitative data collection methods including an online questionnaire, semistructured user and developer interviews, and review of scientific literature. Questionnaire...... in LCA and to provide global guidance for practitioners. Model developers show different perceptions of some underlying aspects including model transparency and expected user expertise. Users from various sectors and geographic regions apply USEtox mostly in research and for consulting. Questionnaire...... that understanding interactions between USEtox and its users helps guiding model development and dissemination. USEtox-specific recommendations are to (1) respect the application context for different user types, (2) provide detailed guidance for interpreting model and factors, (3) facilitate consistent integration...

  16. Big-Five Personality Prediction Based on User Behaviors at Social Network Sites

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Shuotian; Cheng, Li

    2012-01-01

    Many customer services are already available at Social Network Sites (SNSs), including user recommendation and media interaction, to name a few. There are strong desires to provide online users more dedicated and personalized services that fit into individual's need, usually strongly depending on the inner personalities of the user. However, little has been done to conduct proper psychological analysis, crucial for explaining the user's outer behaviors from their inner personality. In this paper, we propose an approach that intends to facilitate this line of research by directly predicting the so called Big-Five Personality from user's SNS behaviors. Comparing to the conventional inventory-based psychological analysis, we demonstrate via experimental studies that users' personalities can be predicted with reasonable precision based on their online behaviors. Except for proving some former behavior-personality correlation results, our experiments show that extraversion is positively related to one's status rep...

  17. Lead User Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brem, Alexander; Larsen, Henry

    2015-01-01

    , deliver and capture the value of an innovatively new device together. From the perspective of the lead user, we show antecedents and effects of social interaction between organizational actors and the lead user on the development of social capital, especially trust and shared imagination. The second case......User innovation and especially the integration of lead users is a key topic in the innovation management literature of recent years. This paper contributes by providing a rare perspective into what easily could be seen as innovation failure, shown from two perspectives. We show how a lack of shared...... imagination hampers participation and kills innovation between interdependent stakeholders at the threshold between invention and innovation in practice. We present a first case in the fun-sport industry where an external lead user and diverse firm representatives in different functions fail to create...

  18. User participation in implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleron, Benedicte; Rasmussen, Rasmus; Simonsen, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    Systems development has been claimed to benefit from user participation, yet user participation in implementation activities may be more common and is a growing focus of participatory-design work. We investigate the effect of the extensive user participation in the implementation of a clinical...... system by empirically analyzing how management, participating staff, and non-participating staff view the implementation process with respect to areas that have previously been linked to user participation such as system quality, emergent interactions, and psychological buy-in. The participating staff...... experienced more uncertainty and frustration than management and non-participating staff, especially concerning how to run an implementation process and how to understand and utilize the configuration possibilities of the system. This suggests that user participation in implementation introduces a need...

  19. Facilitating biomedical researchers' interrogation of electronic health record data: Ideas from outside of biomedical informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruby, Gregory W; Matsoukas, Konstantina; Cimino, James J; Weng, Chunhua

    2016-04-01

    Electronic health records (EHR) are a vital data resource for research uses, including cohort identification, phenotyping, pharmacovigilance, and public health surveillance. To realize the promise of EHR data for accelerating clinical research, it is imperative to enable efficient and autonomous EHR data interrogation by end users such as biomedical researchers. This paper surveys state-of-art approaches and key methodological considerations to this purpose. We adapted a previously published conceptual framework for interactive information retrieval, which defines three entities: user, channel, and source, by elaborating on channels for query formulation in the context of facilitating end users to interrogate EHR data. We show the current progress in biomedical informatics mainly lies in support for query execution and information modeling, primarily due to emphases on infrastructure development for data integration and data access via self-service query tools, but has neglected user support needed during iteratively query formulation processes, which can be costly and error-prone. In contrast, the information science literature has offered elaborate theories and methods for user modeling and query formulation support. The two bodies of literature are complementary, implying opportunities for cross-disciplinary idea exchange. On this basis, we outline the directions for future informatics research to improve our understanding of user needs and requirements for facilitating autonomous interrogation of EHR data by biomedical researchers. We suggest that cross-disciplinary translational research between biomedical informatics and information science can benefit our research in facilitating efficient data access in life sciences.

  20. User-centered Technologies For Blind Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Sánchez

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to review, summarize, and illustrate research work involving four audio-based games created within a user-centered design methodology through successive usability tasks and evaluations. These games were designed by considering the mental model of blind children and their styles of interaction to perceive and process data and information. The goal of these games was to enhance the cognitive development of spatial structures, memory, haptic perception, mathematical skills, navigation and orientation, and problem solving of blind children. Findings indicate significant improvements in learning and cognition from using audio-based tools specially tailored for the blind. That is, technologies for blind children, carefully tailored through user-centered design approaches, can make a significant contribution to cognitive development of these children. This paper contributes new insight into the design and implementation of audio-based virtual environments to facilitate learning and cognition in blind children.

  1. User Interface History

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anker Helms; Myers, Brad A

    2008-01-01

    User Interfaces have been around as long as computers have existed, even well before the field of Human-Computer Interaction was established. Over the years, some papers on the history of Human-Computer Interaction and User Interfaces have appeared, primarily focusing on the graphical interface era...... and early visionaries such as Bush, Engelbart and Kay. With the User Interface being a decisive factor in the proliferation of computers in society and since it has become a cultural phenomenon, it is time to paint a more comprehensive picture of its history. This SIG will investigate the possibilities...... of  launching a concerted effort towards creating a History of User Interfaces. ...

  2. "Playing" with our users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Anthony Lewis

    2014-01-01

    was from the amazing Dr Anthony Lewis Brooks (aka Tony) who has conceived the concepts GameAbilitation, ArtAbilitation, and Ludic Engagement Designs for All. While presenting some of his work on GameAbilitation and ArtAbilitation he brought up the subject of conducting research with users with disabilities......, about what happens to our users when research is over, funds are gone and the curtain of experiments has fallen. Dr Brooks presented the case of a young user who while unable to move and communicate had to part with the test device that provided him with interactive playful experience. We’ve all been...... confined in a house. For researchers that work with people with disabilities and in my case with playful interactions and positive immersive experience, we might have to think harder when we write project proposals or sketch our methodology. Devices, software and experience should be available to the users...

  3. Application programming in C# environment with recorded user software interactions and its application in autopilot of VMAT/IMRT treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Henry; Xing, Lei

    2016-11-01

    An autopilot scheme of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT)/intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning with the guidance of prior knowledge is established with recorded interactions between a planner and a commercial treatment planning system (TPS). Microsoft (MS) Visual Studio Coded UI is applied to record some common planner-TPS interactions as subroutines. The TPS used in this study is a Windows-based Eclipse system. The interactions of our application program with Eclipse TPS are realized through a series of subroutines obtained by prerecording the mouse clicks or keyboard strokes of a planner in operating the TPS. A strategy to autopilot Eclipse VMAT/IMRT plan selection process is developed as a specific example of the proposed "scripting" method. The autopiloted planning is navigated by a decision function constructed with a reference plan that has the same prescription and similar anatomy with the case at hand. The calculation proceeds by alternating between the Eclipse optimization and the outer-loop optimization independent of the Eclipse. In the C# program, the dosimetric characteristics of a reference treatment plan are used to assess and modify the Eclipse planning parameters and to guide the search for a clinically sensible treatment plan. The approach is applied to plan a head and neck (HN) VMAT case and a prostate IMRT case. Our study demonstrated the feasibility of application programming method in C# environment with recorded interactions of planner-TPS. The process mimics a planner's planning process and automatically provides clinically sensible treatment plans that would otherwise require a large amount of manual trial and error of a planner. The proposed technique enables us to harness a commercial TPS by application programming via the use of recorded human computer interactions and provides an effective tool to greatly facilitate the treatment planning process. PACS number(s): 87.55.D-, 87.55.kd, 87.55.de. © 2016 The Authors.

  4. Application programming in C# environment with recorded user software interactions and its application in autopilot of VMAT/IMRT treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Henry; Xing, Lei

    2016-11-08

    An autopilot scheme of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT)/intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning with the guidance of prior knowl-edge is established with recorded interactions between a planner and a commercial treatment planning system (TPS). Microsoft (MS) Visual Studio Coded UI is applied to record some common planner-TPS interactions as subroutines. The TPS used in this study is a Windows-based Eclipse system. The interactions of our application program with Eclipse TPS are realized through a series of subrou-tines obtained by prerecording the mouse clicks or keyboard strokes of a planner in operating the TPS. A strategy to autopilot Eclipse VMAT/IMRT plan selection process is developed as a specific example of the proposed "scripting" method. The autopiloted planning is navigated by a decision function constructed with a reference plan that has the same prescription and similar anatomy with the case at hand. The calculation proceeds by alternating between the Eclipse optimization and the outer-loop optimization independent of the Eclipse. In the C# program, the dosimetric characteristics of a reference treatment plan are used to assess and modify the Eclipse planning parameters and to guide the search for a clinically sensible treatment plan. The approach is applied to plan a head and neck (HN) VMAT case and a prostate IMRT case. Our study demonstrated the feasibility of application programming method in C# environment with recorded interactions of planner-TPS. The process mimics a planner's planning process and automatically provides clinically sensible treatment plans that would otherwise require a large amount of manual trial and error of a planner. The proposed technique enables us to harness a commercial TPS by application programming via the use of recorded human computer interactions and provides an effective tool to greatly facilitate the treatment planning process.

  5. User design

    CERN Document Server

    Carr-Chellman, Alison A

    2012-01-01

    User Design offers a fresh perspective on how front-line learners (users) can participate in the design of learning environments. The author challenges the universal assumption that front-line users must be relegated to the role of offering input, and that the actual design activity of learning systems must still be conducted only by experts. The book presents a new set of methods and strategies that show how the tools of professional designers can be effectively shared with broad groups of users and other participants in the process of creating their own learning. Drawing

  6. Designing for user engagement

    CERN Document Server

    Geisler, Cheryl

    2013-01-01

    Designing for User Engagement on the Web: 10 Basic Principles is concerned with making user experience engaging. The cascade of social web applications we are now familiar with - blogs, consumer reviews, wikis, and social networking - are all engaging experiences. But engagement is an increasingly common goal in business and productivity environments as well. This book provides a foundation for all those seeking to design engaging user experiences rich in communication and interaction. Combining a handbook on basic principles with case studies, it provides readers with a ric

  7. MCSDSS: A Multi-Criteria Decision Support System for Merging Geoscience Information with Natural User Interfaces, Preference Ranking, and Interactive Data Utilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, S. A.; Gentle, J.

    2015-12-01

    The multi-criteria decision support system (MCSDSS) is a newly completed application for touch-enabled group decision support that uses D3 data visualization tools, a geojson conversion utility that we developed, and Paralelex to create an interactive tool. The MCSDSS is a prototype system intended to demonstrate the potential capabilities of a single page application (SPA) running atop a web and cloud based architecture utilizing open source technologies. The application is implemented on current web standards while supporting human interface design that targets both traditional mouse/keyboard interactions and modern touch/gesture enabled interactions. The technology stack for MCSDSS was selected with the goal of creating a robust and dynamic modular codebase that can be adjusted to fit many use cases and scale to support usage loads that range between simple data display to complex scientific simulation-based modelling and analytics. The application integrates current frameworks for highly performant agile development with unit testing, statistical analysis, data visualization, mapping technologies, geographic data manipulation, and cloud infrastructure while retaining support for traditional HTML5/CSS3 web standards. The software lifecylcle for MCSDSS has following best practices to develop, share, and document the codebase and application. Code is documented and shared via an online repository with the option for programmers to see, contribute, or fork the codebase. Example data files and tutorial documentation have been shared with clear descriptions and data object identifiers. And the metadata about the application has been incorporated into an OntoSoft entry to ensure that MCSDSS is searchable and clearly described. MCSDSS is a flexible platform that allows for data fusion and inclusion of large datasets in an interactive front-end application capable of connecting with other science-based applications and advanced computing resources. In addition, MCSDSS

  8. The interactive role of distress tolerance and borderline personality disorder in suicide attempts among substance users in residential treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anestis, Michael D; Gratz, Kim L; Bagge, Courtney L; Tull, Matthew T

    2012-11-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine the interactive effect of borderline personality disorder (BPD) and distress tolerance (DT) on suicidal behavior across levels of intent to die (clear vs ambiguous) and medical severity. One hundred seventy-six adult patients in residential substance use disorder treatment were administered a series of structured interviews, behavioral assessments, and self-report questionnaires. A series of analyses of covariance and multiple regression analyses were conducted to test hypotheses using both categorical and dimensional measures of BPD and DT. Analyses supported hypotheses, indicating that patients with BPD who exhibit high DT are at the greatest risk for engaging in chronic and medically serious suicidal behavior. Although high DT is unlikely to be inherently problematic, results suggest that within the context of severe psychopathology (eg, co-occurring BPD-substance use disorder), the ability to withstand aversive internal states in pursuit of a goal (eg, one's own death) may enable individuals to persist in otherwise unsustainable behavior. In this sense, DT may function in a manner consistent with the acquired capability for suicide (a component of the interpersonal-psychological theory of suicidal behavior defined by a diminished fear of death and enhanced tolerance for pain that, in the presence of suicidal desire, enables individuals to enact lethal self-injury). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Acceptability and user satisfaction of a smartphone-based, interactive blood glucose management system in women with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, Jane E; Mackillop, Lucy; Loerup, Lise; Kevat, Dev A; Bartlett, Katy; Gibson, Oliver; Kenworthy, Yvonne; Levy, Jonathan C; Tarassenko, Lionel; Farmer, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The increase in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is challenging maternity services. We have developed an interactive, smartphone-based, remote blood glucose (BG) monitoring system, GDm-health. The objective was to determine women's satisfaction with using the GDm-health system and their attitudes toward their diabetes care. In a service development program involving 52 pregnant women (September 2012 to June 2013), BG was monitored using GDm-health from diagnosis until delivery. Following birth, women completed a structured questionnaire assessing (1) general satisfaction, (2) equipment issues, and (3) relationship with the diabetes care team. Responses were scored on a 7-point Likert-type scale. Reliability and validity of the questionnaire were assessed using statistical methods. Of 52 women, 49 completed the questionnaire; 32 had glucose tolerance test confirmed GDM (gestation at recruitment 29 ± 4 weeks (mean ± SD), and 17 women previous GDM recommended for BG monitoring (18 ± 6 weeks). In all, 45 of 49 women agreed their care was satisfactory and the best for them, 47 of 49 and 43 of 49 agreed the equipment was convenient and reliable respectively, 42 of 49 agreed GDm-health fitted into their lifestyle, and 46 of 49 agreed they had a good relationship with their care team. Written comments supported these findings, with very positive reactions from the majority of women. Cronbach's alpha was .89 with factor analysis corresponding with question thematic trends. This pilot demonstrates that GDm-health is acceptable and convenient for a large proportion of women. Effects on clinical and economic outcomes are currently under investigation in a randomized trial (clinicaltrials.gov NCT01916694).

  10. PRIDEViewer: a novel user-friendly interface to visualize PRIDE XML files.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Aunon, J Alberto; Carazo, José M; Albar, Juan Pablo

    2011-01-01

    Current standardization initiatives have greatly contributed to share the information derived by proteomics experiments. One of these initiatives is the XML-based repository PRIDE (PRoteomics IDEntification database), although an XML-based document does not appear to present a user-friendly view at the first glance. PRIDEViewer is a novel Java-based application that presents the information available in a PRIDE XML file in a user-friendly manner, facilitating the interaction among end users as well as the understanding and evaluation of the compiled information. PRIDEViewer is freely available at: http://proteo.cnb.csic.es/prideviewer/.

  11. Managing User Experience – Managing Change

    OpenAIRE

    Mashapa, Job; Chelule, Edna; van Greunen, Darelle; Veldsman, Alida

    2013-01-01

    Part 14: Managing the UX; International audience; Interactive products with innovative user interfaces are being designed while the user interfaces of existing products are being improved. The changes in user interfaces are being prompted by the need to design products that are useful, usable and appealing for an enchanting user experience to the people using the products. It is harmoniously agreed within the user experience domain that a change in the user interface of a product consequently...

  12. Interaction design concepts for a mobile personal assistant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagata, S.F.; Oostendorp, H. van; Neerincx, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    The Personal Assistant for onLine Services (PALS) project aims to develop an intelligent interface that facilitates efficient user interaction through personalization and context awareness with commerce web sites on a handheld device. The types of assistance services and interaction support represen

  13. Interaction design concepts for a mobile personal assistant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagata, S.F.; Oostendorp, H. van; Neerincx, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    The Personal Assistant for onLine Services (PALS) project aims to develop an intelligent interface that facilitates efficient user interaction through personalization and context awareness with commerce web sites on a handheld device. The types of assistance services and interaction support

  14. Metals Processing Laboratory User Center (MPLUS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackiewicz-Ludtka, G.; Hayden, H.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The Metals Processing Laboratory User (MPLUS) Center was officially designated as a DOE User Facility in February, 1996. It`s primary purpose is to assist researchers in key U.S. industries, universities, and federal laboratories in improving energy efficiency and enhancing U.S. competitiveness in the world market. The MPLUS Center provides users the unique opportunity to address technology-related issues to solve metals-processing problems from a fully integrated approach. DOE facilitates the process and catalyzes industrial interactions that enables technical synergy and financial leveraging to take place between the industrial sector identifying and prioritizing their technological needs, and MPLUS, which provides access to the technical expertise and specialized facilities to address these needs. MPLUS is designed to provide U.S. industries with access to the specialized technical expertise and equipment needed to solve metals-processing issues that limit the development and implementation of emerging metals-processing technologies. As originated, MPLUS includes the following four primary user centers: Metals Processing, Metals Joining, Metals Characterization, and Metals Process Modeling. These centers are devoted to assisting U.S. industries in adjusting to rapid changes in the marketplace and in improving products and processes. This approach optimizes the complementary strengths of industry and government. Tremendous industrial response, has resulted in MPLUS expanding to meet the ever-growing technical needs and requests initiated by U.S. industry.

  15. Reconceptualizing the Pedagogical Value of Student Facilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztok, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Sustained discourse is critical to the learning potential of online courses. And, while research has surfaced many factors that mediate interaction, it further suggests that sustained interaction remains elusive. In this paper, I propose that student facilitation may have an impact on the quality of facilitators' interactions following a week of…

  16. FAST User Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Clucas, Jean; McCabe, R. Kevin; Plessel, Todd; Potter, R.; Cooper, D. M. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The Flow Analysis Software Toolkit, FAST, is a software environment for visualizing data. FAST is a collection of separate programs (modules) that run simultaneously and allow the user to examine the results of numerical and experimental simulations. The user can load data files, perform calculations on the data, visualize the results of these calculations, construct scenes of 3D graphical objects, and plot, animate and record the scenes. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) visualization is the primary intended use of FAST, but FAST can also assist in the analysis of other types of data. FAST combines the capabilities of such programs as PLOT3D, RIP, SURF, and GAS into one environment with modules that share data. Sharing data between modules eliminates the drudgery of transferring data between programs. All the modules in the FAST environment have a consistent, highly interactive graphical user interface. Most commands are entered by pointing and'clicking. The modular construction of FAST makes it flexible and extensible. The environment can be custom configured and new modules can be developed and added as needed. The following modules have been developed for FAST: VIEWER, FILE IO, CALCULATOR, SURFER, TOPOLOGY, PLOTTER, TITLER, TRACER, ARCGRAPH, GQ, SURFERU, SHOTET, and ISOLEVU. A utility is also included to make the inclusion of user defined modules in the FAST environment easy. The VIEWER module is the central control for the FAST environment. From VIEWER, the user can-change object attributes, interactively position objects in three-dimensional space, define and save scenes, create animations, spawn new FAST modules, add additional view windows, and save and execute command scripts. The FAST User Guide uses text and FAST MAPS (graphical representations of the entire user interface) to guide the user through the use of FAST. Chapters include: Maps, Overview, Tips, Getting Started Tutorial, a separate chapter for each module, file formats, and system

  17. Facilitating Collaboration through Design Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Eva; Messeter, Jørn

    2004-01-01

    In recent years both companies and research communities call for collaborative work practices and user-centered approaches in various design fields. There are several challenges and issues to take into consideration. For instance there is a need to find ways of collaborating across various...... in collaboration with industrial partners and potential users, and use of the games in three educational settings.The overall aim of the design games is to help facilitate a user-centered design process for cross-disciplinary design groups early in the design process. Framing collaborative design activities...... understanding of the development task. This paper presents a set of four design games, which offers solutions to the challenges mentioned. The design games have been developed in the Space Studio during several projects and years. Here experiences are discussed on the basis of two research projects carried out...

  18. FAIR 1.0 (Framework to Assess International Regimes for differentiation of commitments): An interactive model to explore options for differentiation of future commitments in international climate policy making. User documentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elzen MGJ den; Berk MM; Both S; Faber A; Oostenrijk R; CIM

    2001-01-01

    This report contains the model documentation and user instructions of the FAIR model (Framework to Assess International Regimes for differentiation of commitments). FAIR is an interactive - scanner-type - computer model to quantitatively explore a range of alternative climate policy options for inte

  19. FAIR 1.0 (Framework to Assess International Regimes for differentiation of commitments): An interactive model to explore options for differentiation of future commitments in international climate policy making. User documentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elzen MGJ den; Berk MM; Both S; Faber A; Oostenrijk R; CIM

    2001-01-01

    This report contains the model documentation and user instructions of the FAIR model (Framework to Assess International Regimes for differentiation of commitments). FAIR is an interactive - scanner-type - computer model to quantitatively explore a range of alternative climate policy options for inte

  20. Educating the Music User

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    To better serve students' evolving needs in music, music educators must connect classroom learning with how students use and interact with music in their daily lives. One way to accomplish this is by approaching classrooms with the music user in mind, which can open new possibilities for meaningful music making and remove students from the…

  1. Educating the Music User

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    To better serve students' evolving needs in music, music educators must connect classroom learning with how students use and interact with music in their daily lives. One way to accomplish this is by approaching classrooms with the music user in mind, which can open new possibilities for meaningful music making and remove students from the…

  2. Users, Bystanders and Agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krummheuer, Antonia Lina

    2015-01-01

    Human-agent interaction (HAI), especially in the field of embodied conversational agents (ECA), is mainly construed as dyadic communication between a human user and a virtual agent. This is despite the fact that many application scenarios for future ECAs involve the presence of others. This paper...

  3. Cross-functional interaction during the early phases of user-centered software new product development: reconsidering the common area of interest

    OpenAIRE

    Molin-Juustila, T. (Tonja)

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Applying the principles of user-centered development (UCD) in software development practice is not straightforward. In technology-push type software product development it is not clear how to match the new product innovation to the future needs of potential future users. Intensive collaboration between different organizational functions becomes essential. UCD provides valuable tools and practices as learning mechanisms both for users and for the company. The purpose of cross-funct...

  4. TargetVue: Visual Analysis of Anomalous User Behaviors in Online Communication Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Nan; Shi, Conglei; Lin, Sabrina; Lu, Jie; Lin, Yu-Ru; Lin, Ching-Yung

    2016-01-01

    Users with anomalous behaviors in online communication systems (e.g. email and social medial platforms) are potential threats to society. Automated anomaly detection based on advanced machine learning techniques has been developed to combat this issue; challenges remain, though, due to the difficulty of obtaining proper ground truth for model training and evaluation. Therefore, substantial human judgment on the automated analysis results is often required to better adjust the performance of anomaly detection. Unfortunately, techniques that allow users to understand the analysis results more efficiently, to make a confident judgment about anomalies, and to explore data in their context, are still lacking. In this paper, we propose a novel visual analysis system, TargetVue, which detects anomalous users via an unsupervised learning model and visualizes the behaviors of suspicious users in behavior-rich context through novel visualization designs and multiple coordinated contextual views. Particularly, TargetVue incorporates three new ego-centric glyphs to visually summarize a user's behaviors which effectively present the user's communication activities, features, and social interactions. An efficient layout method is proposed to place these glyphs on a triangle grid, which captures similarities among users and facilitates comparisons of behaviors of different users. We demonstrate the power of TargetVue through its application in a social bot detection challenge using Twitter data, a case study based on email records, and an interview with expert users. Our evaluation shows that TargetVue is beneficial to the detection of users with anomalous communication behaviors.

  5. The impact of usability reports and user test observations on developers understanding of usability data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høegh, Rune Thaarup; Nielsen, Christian Monrad; Pedersen, Michael Bach;

    2006-01-01

    of the system. This article presents results from an exploratory study of 2 ways of providing feedback from a usability evaluation: observation of user tests and reading usability reports. A case study and a field experiment were used to explore how observation and usability reports impact developers......' understanding of usability data. The results indicate that observation of user tests facilitated a rich understanding of usability problems and created empathy with the users and their work. The usability report had a strong impact on the developers' understanding of specific usability problems and supported......A usability evaluation provides a strong and rich basis for understanding and improving the design of user interaction with a software system. Exploiting this evaluation requires feedback that significantly impacts the developers' understanding of usability data about the interaction design...

  6. The impact of usability reports and user test observations on developers understanding of usability data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høegh, Rune Thaarup; Nielsen, Christian Monrad; Pedersen, Michael Bach

    2006-01-01

    of the system. This article presents results from an exploratory study of 2 ways of providing feedback from a usability evaluation: observation of user tests and reading usability reports. A case study and a field experiment were used to explore how observation and usability reports impact developers......A usability evaluation provides a strong and rich basis for understanding and improving the design of user interaction with a software system. Exploiting this evaluation requires feedback that significantly impacts the developers' understanding of usability data about the interaction design......' understanding of usability data. The results indicate that observation of user tests facilitated a rich understanding of usability problems and created empathy with the users and their work. The usability report had a strong impact on the developers' understanding of specific usability problems and supported...

  7. A Neural Network Approach to Intention Modeling for User-Adapted Conversational Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griol, David; Callejas, Zoraida

    2016-01-01

    Spoken dialogue systems have been proposed to enable a more natural and intuitive interaction with the environment and human-computer interfaces. In this contribution, we present a framework based on neural networks that allows modeling of the user's intention during the dialogue and uses this prediction to dynamically adapt the dialogue model of the system taking into consideration the user's needs and preferences. We have evaluated our proposal to develop a user-adapted spoken dialogue system that facilitates tourist information and services and provide a detailed discussion of the positive influence of our proposal in the success of the interaction, the information and services provided, and the quality perceived by the users.

  8. Measuring the influence of social abilities on acceptance of an interface robot and a screen agent by elderly users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerink, M.; Kröse, B.; Wielinga, B.; Evers, V.; Blackwell, A.F.

    2009-01-01

    Personal robots and screen agents can be equipped with social abilities to facilitate interaction. This paper describes our research on the influence of these abilities on elderly user's acceptance of such a system. Experiments were set up in eldercare institutions where a robotic and screen agent w

  9. Facilitering som styringsredskab

    OpenAIRE

    Jørgensen, Karen Overgaard

    2006-01-01

    #This thesis surveys facilitation as a new tool of steering within the public sector in Denmark. It is explored how facilitation is articulated and practiced among facilitators from the public, private and voluntary sector. Furthermore, the facilitator’s challenges by using facilitation are examined. The thesis is based on the presumption that facilitation is articulated by rationalities, which influence how facilitation is practiced and performed. Also, a facilitator is seen as a performer a...

  10. Fuzzy Tier-based User Experience Prediction Scheme

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ahmed A A Gad-ElRab; Kamal A ElDahshan; Mahmoud Embabi

    2015-01-01

    Building professional and efficient systems by using user experience became one of the important research activities that focus on the interactions between products, applications, designers, and users...

  11. The Users Office turns 20

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    20 years ago, in the summer of 1989, an office was created to assist the thousands of users who come to CERN each year, working over the broad range of projects and collaborations. Chris Onions (right), head of the Users’ Office, with Bryan Pattison (left), the Office’s founder.Before the inception of the Users Office, it was common for users to spend at least an entire day moving from office to office in search of necessary documentation and information in order to make their stay official. "Though the Office has undergone various changes throughout its lifetime, it has persisted in being a welcoming bridge to facilitate the installation of visitors coming from all over the world", says Chris Onions, head of the Users Office. This September, the Office will celebrate its 20-year anniversary with a drink offered to representatives of the User community, the CERN management and staff members from the services with whom the Office is involved. &...

  12. Evolution of metabolic divergence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa during long-term infection facilitates a proto-cooperative interspecies interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydenlund Michelsen, Charlotte; Khademi, Seyed Mohammad Hossein; Johansen, Helle Krogh;

    2016-01-01

    in polymicrobial human infections. However, we have previously shown that the interactions between these two bacterial species are strain dependent. Whereas P. aeruginosa PAO1, a commonly used laboratory strain, effectively suppressed S. aureus growth, we observed a commensal-like interaction between the human......1 and DK2-P2M24-2003, which comprised several virulence factors and signaling 4-hydroxy-2-alkylquinoline (HAQ) molecules. Strikingly, a further modulation of the HAQ profile was observed in DK2-P2M24-2003 during interaction with S. aureus, resulting in an area with thickened colony morphology...

  13. User-Centered Design Gymkhana

    OpenAIRE

    Garreta Domingo, Muriel; Almirall Hill, Magí; Mor Pera, Enric

    2007-01-01

    The User-centered design (UCD) Gymkhana is a tool for human-computer interaction practitioners to demonstrate through a game the key user-centered design methods and how they interrelate in the design process.The target audiences are other organizational departments unfamiliar with UCD but whose work is related to the definition, cretaion, and update of a product service.

  14. Scientific customer needs - NASA user

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, David C.

    1987-01-01

    Some requirements for scientific users of the Space Station are considered. The use of testbeds to evaluate design concepts for information systems, and for interfacing between designers and builders of systems is examined. The need for an information system that provides an effective interaction between ground-based users and their space-based equipment is discussed.

  15. Game Analytics for Game User Research, Part 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seif El-Nasr, Magy; Desurvire, Heather; Aghabeigi, Bardia;

    2013-01-01

    The emerging field of game user research (GUR) investigates interaction between players and games and the surrounding context of play. Game user researchers have explored methods from, for example, human-computer interaction, psychology, interaction design......The emerging field of game user research (GUR) investigates interaction between players and games and the surrounding context of play. Game user researchers have explored methods from, for example, human-computer interaction, psychology, interaction design...

  16. Game Analytics for Game User Research, Part 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seif El-Nasr, Magy; Desurvire, Heather; Aghabeigi, Bardia

    2013-01-01

    The emerging field of game user research (GUR) investigates interaction between players and games and the surrounding context of play. Game user researchers have explored methods from, for example, human-computer interaction, psychology, interaction design......The emerging field of game user research (GUR) investigates interaction between players and games and the surrounding context of play. Game user researchers have explored methods from, for example, human-computer interaction, psychology, interaction design...

  17. User Centered Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egbert, Maria; Matthews, Ben

    2012-01-01

    The interdisciplinary approach of User Centered Design is presented here with a focus on innovation in the design and use of hearing technologies as well as on the potential of innovation in interaction. This approach is geared towards developing new products, systems, technologies and practices...... based on an understanding of why so few persons with hearing loss use the highly advanced hearing technologies. In integrating Conversation Analysis (“CA”), audiology and User Centered Design, three disciplines which are collaborating together for the first time, we are addressing the following...

  18. User participation in district psychiatry. The social construction of 'users' in handovers and meetings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathisen, Vår; Obstfelder, Aud; Lorem, Geir F; Måseide, Per

    2016-06-01

    An ideal in mental health care is user participation. This implies inclusion and facilitation by clinicians to enable users to participate in decisions about themselves and in the design of suitable treatment. However, much of the work of clinicians consists of handovers and other meetings where patients are not present. It is therefore interesting to study how the patient perspective is handled in such meetings and whether it forms a basis for user participation. We conducted fieldwork in three different inpatient wards in Norwegian District Psychiatric Centres. We used an interactional perspective in our analysis, where speech acts, framing and footing were key concepts. The findings show that the talk in the handovers and meetings contained five main themes and that there was a clear correlation between what was said and how it was said, and whether clinicians related to the content in a decisive, person-centred or indecisive manner. We discuss potential participation statuses for patients and their limited opportunity to influence the talk and possible decisions about themselves. Our conclusion is that handover meetings primarily function as an aid in organising clinicians' work and could ultimately be seen as counteracting user participation.

  19. Trilinos users guide.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willenbring, James M.; Heroux, Michael Allen

    2003-08-01

    The Trilinos Project is an effort to facilitate the design, development, integration and ongoing support of mathematical software libraries. A new software capability is introduced into Trilinos as a package. A Trilinos package is an integral unit usually developed by a small team of experts in a particular algorithms area such as algebraic preconditioners, nonlinear solvers, etc. The Trilinos Users Guide is a resource for new and existing Trilinos users. Topics covered include how to configure and build Trilinos, what is required to integrate an existing package into Trilinos and examples of how those requirements can be met, as well as what tools and services are available to Trilinos packages. Also discussed are some common practices that are followed by many Trilinos package developers. Finally, a snapshot of current Trilinos packages and their interoperability status is provided, along with a list of supported computer platforms.

  20. NFC-Based User Interface for Smart Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Spinsante

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The physical support of a home automation system, joined with a simplified user-system interaction modality, may allow people affected by motor impairments or limitations, such as elderly and disabled people, to live safely and comfortably at home, by improving their autonomy and facilitating the execution of daily life tasks. The proposed solution takes advantage of the Near Field Communications technology, which is simple and intuitive to use, to enable advanced user interaction. The user can perform normal daily activities, such as lifting a gate or closing a window, through a device enabled to read NFC tags containing the commands for the home automation system. A passive Smart Panel is implemented, composed of multiple Near Field Communications tags properly programmed, to enable the execution of both individual commands and so-called scenarios. The work compares several versions of the proposed Smart Panel, differing for interrogation and composition of the single command, number of tags, and dynamic user interaction model, at a parity of the number of commands to issue. Main conclusions are drawn from the experimental results, about the effective adoption of Near Field Communications in smart assistive environments.

  1. User Ethnography as Theatre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torguet, Rosa; Friis, Preben; Buur, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the potential of using theatre with professional actors to convey the outcome of ethnographic user studies to industry or academia. Framed in the ongoing discussion within design ethnography of how representations can support the communication of ethnographic findings more...... effectively. The use of theatre within innovation processes can help facilitate the provoking role that an ethnography often plays when presented to organizations. Live performances were used as part of a participatory innovation project in the field of indoor climate with industry partners and academic...

  2. Designing for User Engagment Aesthetic and Attractive User Interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Sutcliffe, Alistair

    2009-01-01

    This book explores the design process for user experience and engagement, which expands the traditional concept of usability and utility in design to include aesthetics, fun and excitement. User experience has evolved as a new area of Human Computer Interaction research, motivated by non-work oriented applications such as games, education and emerging interactive Web 2.0. The chapter starts by examining the phenomena of user engagement and experience and setting them in the perspective of cognitive psychology, in particular motivation, emotion and mood. The perspective of aesthetics is expande

  3. User Experience Design in Webpage Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许钰伟

    2014-01-01

    User experience design is becoming more and more important. It originates from network as well as screen products interactive with users, whose scope is very wide. Although research orientations are different, their objective is the same, that is, to make users enjoy the simplest usage mode and reduce thinking in use; Although there is uncertainty, for some specific user group, the similarity of user experience can be recognized by excellent design;Although user experience is at the initial stage, with higher demand of comfort degree in surfing the internet, user experience design will be the core of future website design.

  4. Library user metaphors and services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Carl Gustav

    How do library professionals talk about and refer to library users, and how is this significant? In recent decades, the library profession has conceived of users in at least five different ways, viewing them alternatively as citizens, clients, customers, guests, or partners. This book argues...... that these user metaphors crucially inform librarians' interactions with the public, and, by extension, determine the quality and content of the services received. The ultimate aim of the book is to provide library professionals with insights and tools for avoiding common pitfalls associated with false...... or professionally inadequate conceptions of library users....

  5. Library user metaphors and services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Carl Gustav

    How do library professionals talk about and refer to library users, and how is this significant? In recent decades, the library profession has conceived of users in at least five different ways, viewing them alternatively as citizens, clients, customers, guests, or partners. This book argues...... that these user metaphors crucially inform librarians' interactions with the public, and, by extension, determine the quality and content of the services received. The ultimate aim of the book is to provide library professionals with insights and tools for avoiding common pitfalls associated with false...... or professionally inadequate conceptions of library users....

  6. GRSAC Users Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, S.J.; Nypaver, D.J.

    1999-02-01

    An interactive workstation-based simulation code (GRSAC) for studying postulated severe accidents in gas-cooled reactors has been developed to accommodate user-generated input with ''smart front-end'' checking. Code features includes on- and off-line plotting, on-line help and documentation, and an automated sensitivity study option. The code and its predecessors have been validated using comparisons with a variety of experimental data and similar codes. GRSAC model features include a three-dimensional representation of the core thermal hydraulics, and optional ATWS (anticipated transients without scram) capabilities. The user manual includes a detailed description of the code features, and includes four case studies which guide the user through four different examples of the major uses of GRSAC: an accident case; an initial conditions setup and run; a sensitivity study; and the setup of a new reactor model.

  7. End User Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, Caroline; Lunn, Darren; Michailidou, Eleni

    As new technologies emerge, and Web sites become increasingly sophisticated, ensuring they remain accessible to disabled and small-screen users is a major challenge. While guidelines and automated evaluation tools are useful for informing some aspects of Web site design, numerous studies have demonstrated that they provide no guarantee that the site is genuinely accessible. The only reliable way to evaluate the accessibility of a site is to study the intended users interacting with it. This chapter outlines the processes that can be used throughout the design life cycle to ensure Web accessibility, describing their strengths and weaknesses, and discussing the practical and ethical considerations that they entail. The chapter also considers an important emerging trend in user evaluations: combining data from studies of “standard” Web use with data describing existing accessibility issues, to drive accessibility solutions forward.

  8. The Human-Robot Interaction Operating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Terrence; Kunz, Clayton; Hiatt, Laura M.; Bugajska, Magda

    2006-01-01

    In order for humans and robots to work effectively together, they need to be able to converse about abilities, goals and achievements. Thus, we are developing an interaction infrastructure called the "Human-Robot Interaction Operating System" (HRI/OS). The HRI/OS provides a structured software framework for building human-robot teams, supports a variety of user interfaces, enables humans and robots to engage in task-oriented dialogue, and facilitates integration of robots through an extensible API.

  9. Facilitating Value Co-Creation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veith, Anne; Assaf, Albert; Josiassen, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    ) introduced a new dominant logic in the marketing literature, the Service-Dominant Logic (S-D Logic), in which service, interactions, and enhanced experiences help create value, and this potential for value is what attracts consumers. Therefore organizations must be customer-centric in order to facilitate...... unique, positive experiences. As the name indicates, both organizations and consumers (should) obtain value when co-creating, which is why both parties are willing to increase their degree of involvement, e.g. spending more resources, sharing tacit knowledge, etc., because a high degree of involvement....... Through an exploratory qualitative study, 9 facilitators for B2C value co-creation were uncovered. The study was set in the creative industries. The 9 facilitators are a combination of the main facilitators found in the literature review and the ones found through the empirical research. The 9...

  10. Mental models and user training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saša Zupanič

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the functions of the reference service is user training which means teaching users how to use the library and it's information sorces (nowadays mainly computerized systems. While the scientific understanding of teaching/learning process is shifting, changes also affect the methods of user training in libraries.Human-computer interaction (HCI is an interdisciplinary and a very active research area which studies how humans use computers - their mental and behavioral characteristics. The application of psychological theories to HCI are especially great on three areas: psychological (mental, conceptual models, individual differences, and error behavior.The mental models theory is powerful tool for understanding the ways in which users interact with an information system. Claims, based on this theory can affect the methods (conceptualization of user training and the overall design of information systems.

  11. Plant Translation Elongation Factor 1Bβ Facilitates Potato Virus X (PVX) Infection and Interacts with PVX Triple Gene Block Protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, JeeNa; Lee, Seonhee; Lee, Joung-Ho; Kang, Won-Hee; Kang, Jin-Ho; Kang, Min-Young; Oh, Chang-Sik; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl

    2015-01-01

    The eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1 (eEF1) has two components: the G-protein eEF1A and the nucleotide exchange factor eEF1B. In plants, eEF1B is itself composed of a structural protein (eEF1Bγ) and two nucleotide exchange subunits (eEF1Bα and eEF1Bβ). To test the effects of elongation factors on virus infection, we isolated eEF1A and eEF1B genes from pepper (Capsicum annuum) and suppressed their homologs in Nicotiana benthamiana using virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). The accumulation of a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged Potato virus X (PVX) was significantly reduced in the eEF1Bβ- or eEF1Bɣ-silenced plants as well as in eEF1A-silenced plants. Yeast two-hybrid and co-immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that eEF1Bα and eEF1Bβ interacted with eEF1A and that eEF1A and eEF1Bβ interacted with triple gene block protein 1 (TGBp1) of PVX. These results suggest that both eEF1A and eEF1Bβ play essential roles in the multiplication of PVX by physically interacting with TGBp1. Furthermore, using eEF1Bβ deletion constructs, we found that both N- (1-64 amino acids) and C-terminal (150-195 amino acids) domains of eEF1Bβ are important for the interaction with PVX TGBp1 and that the C-terminal domain of eEF1Bβ is involved in the interaction with eEF1A. These results suggest that eEF1Bβ could be a potential target for engineering virus-resistant plants.

  12. User Intent in Online Video Search

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kofler, C.

    2015-01-01

    Over the recent years, user expectations of the ability of video search engines have significantly risen. Users expect video search engines to be useful as an instrument that facilitates communication, education, entertainment and problem solving and, in relation to this, to satisfy diverse informat

  13. User Intent in Online Video Search

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kofler, C.

    2015-01-01

    Over the recent years, user expectations of the ability of video search engines have significantly risen. Users expect video search engines to be useful as an instrument that facilitates communication, education, entertainment and problem solving and, in relation to this, to satisfy diverse

  14. Slit-2 facilitates interaction of P-cadherin with Robo-3 and inhibits cell migration in an oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Karin; Dowejko, Albert; Bosserhoff, A-K; Reichert, T E; Bauer, Richard

    2011-06-01

    Slits are a group of secreted glycoproteins that act as molecular guidance cues in cellular migration. Recently, several studies demonstrated that Slit-2 can operate as candidate tumour suppressor protein in various tissues. In this study, we show Slit-2 expression in basal cell layers of normal oral mucosa colocalized with P-cadherin expression. In contrast, there is a loss of Slit-2 and P-cadherin expression in mucosa of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Our in vitro investigations reveal a correlation of P-cadherin and Slit-2 expression: OSCC cells with induced P-cadherin expression (PCI52_PC) display an increased Slit-2 expression. However, abrogating P-cadherin function with a function-blocking antibody decreases Slit-2 secretion confirming a direct link between P-cadherin and Slit-2. Moreover, experiments with OSCC cells show that Slit-2 interferes with a Wnt related signalling pathway, which in turn affects Slit-2 expression in a feedback loop. Functionally, transwell migration assays demonstrate a Slit-2 dose-dependent decrease of PCI52_PC cell migration. However, there is no influence on migration in mock control cells. Responsible for this migration block might be an interaction of P-cadherin with Roundabout (Robo)-3, a high affinity receptor of Slit-2. Indeed, proximity ligation assays exhibit P-cadherin/Robo-3 interactions on PCI52_PC cells. Additionally, we detect a modulation of this interaction by addition of recombinant Slit-2. Down-regulation of Robo-3 expression via small interfering RNA neutralizes Slit-2 induced migration block in PCI52_PC cells. In summary, our experiments show antitumorigenic effects of Slit-2 on P-cadherin expressing OSCC cells supposedly via modulation of Robo-3 interaction.

  15. WSV399, a viral tegument protein, interacts with the shrimp protein PmVRP15 to facilitate viral trafficking and assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaree, Phattarunda; Senapin, Saengchan; Hirono, Ikuo; Lo, Chu-Fang; Tassanakajon, Anchalee; Somboonwiwat, Kunlaya

    2016-06-01

    Viral responsive protein 15 (PmVRP15) has been identified as a highly up-regulated gene in the hemocyte of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV)-infected shrimp Penaeus monodon. However, the function of PmVRP15 in host-viral interaction was still unclear. To elucidate PmVRP15 function, the interacting partner of PmVRP15 from WSSV was screened by yeast two-hybrid assay and then confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP). Only WSV399 protein was identified as a PmVRP15 binding protein; however, the function of WSV399 has not been characterized. Localization of WSV399 on the WSSV virion was revealed by immunoblotting analysis (in vitro) and immunoelectron microscopy (in vivo). The results showed that WSV399 is a structural protein of the WSSV virion and is particularly located on the tegument. Gene silencing of wsv399 in WSSV-infected shrimp reduced the percentage of cumulative mortality by 74%, although the expression level of a viral replication marker gene, vp28, was not changed suggesting that WSV399 might not involved in viral replication but viral assembly. Because it has already been known that tegument proteins function in capsid transport during viral trafficking and assembly, interaction between PmVRP15 on hemocyte nuclear membrane and the WSV399 viral tegument protein suggests that PmVRP15 might be required for trafficking and assembly of WSSV during infection.

  16. A Study of Feature Interactions in Intelligent Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ Plain Old Telephone Services (POTS) are used to establish the voice connection between two telephone users; and supplementary services such as call waiting, call forwarding, and call completion to busy subscribers, provide additional functions to POTS. In order to facilitate the communication between users, telecommunication networks should provide new services to end users in a quick way. However, the introduction of new telecommunication services into the existing network may interfere with the existing services, thus causing feature interactions. In many cases, feature interactions bring the unwanted or undesired system behavior to end users, decreasing the service quality. Although new technology like Intelligent Networks (IN) enables the quick introduction of new telecommunication services, but owing to the feature interaction, and the vast effort has to be put into checking the compatibility between telecommunication services. Feature interactions has become the bottle-neck problem to the development of new telecommunication services.

  17. Status Quo of the Research on Users' Interactive Learning of SNS%SNS用户交互学习的研究现状与实践进展研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘高勇; 邓胜利

    2012-01-01

      基于社会网络的用户交互学习是国内外研究的热点领域。选取国内外有代表性的文献,从理论、实践方面对用户交互学习行为、学习共同体和社会化学习平台等进行文献调研与网络调研,介绍国外的研究与实践进展,在此基础上归纳用户交互学习方面的不足及推进的措施。%  User interactive learning based on the social network is the hot field at home and abroad. The paper selects representative litera-tures, conducts an investigation over user interactive learning behavior, learning community and social learning platform from both theory and practice, introduces the progress of research and practice, summarizes the deficiency of user interaction and finally proposes some measures based on this study.

  18. The Tip of the Four N-Terminal α-Helices of Clostridium sordellii Lethal Toxin Contains the Interaction Site with Membrane Phosphatidylserine Facilitating Small GTPases Glucosylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Varela Chavez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium sordellii lethal toxin (TcsL is a powerful virulence factor responsible for severe toxic shock in man and animals. TcsL belongs to the large clostridial glucosylating toxin (LCGT family which inactivates small GTPases by glucosylation with uridine-diphosphate (UDP-glucose as a cofactor. Notably, TcsL modifies Rac and Ras GTPases, leading to drastic alteration of the actin cytoskeleton and cell viability. TcsL enters cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis and delivers the N-terminal glucosylating domain (TcsL-cat into the cytosol. TcsL-cat was found to preferentially bind to phosphatidylserine (PS-containing membranes and to increase the glucosylation of Rac anchored to the lipid membrane. We have previously reported that the N-terminal four helical bundle structure (1–93 domain recognizes a broad range of lipids, but that TcsL-cat specifically binds to PS and phosphatidic acid. Here, we show using mutagenesis that the PS binding site is localized on the tip of the four-helix bundle which is rich in positively-charged amino acids. Residues Y14, V15, F17, and R18 on loop 1, between helices 1 and 2, in coordination with R68 from loop 3, between helices 3 and 4, form a pocket which accommodates L-serine. The functional PS-binding site is required for TcsL-cat binding to the plasma membrane and subsequent cytotoxicity. TcsL-cat binding to PS facilitates a high enzymatic activity towards membrane-anchored Ras by about three orders of magnitude as compared to Ras in solution. The PS-binding site is conserved in LCGTs, which likely retain a common mechanism of binding to the membrane for their full activity towards membrane-bound GTPases.

  19. The Tip of the Four N-Terminal α-Helices of Clostridium sordellii Lethal Toxin Contains the Interaction Site with Membrane Phosphatidylserine Facilitating Small GTPases Glucosylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela Chavez, Carolina; Haustant, Georges Michel; Baron, Bruno; England, Patrick; Chenal, Alexandre; Pauillac, Serge; Blondel, Arnaud; Popoff, Michel-Robert

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium sordellii lethal toxin (TcsL) is a powerful virulence factor responsible for severe toxic shock in man and animals. TcsL belongs to the large clostridial glucosylating toxin (LCGT) family which inactivates small GTPases by glucosylation with uridine-diphosphate (UDP)-glucose as a cofactor. Notably, TcsL modifies Rac and Ras GTPases, leading to drastic alteration of the actin cytoskeleton and cell viability. TcsL enters cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis and delivers the N-terminal glucosylating domain (TcsL-cat) into the cytosol. TcsL-cat was found to preferentially bind to phosphatidylserine (PS)-containing membranes and to increase the glucosylation of Rac anchored to the lipid membrane. We have previously reported that the N-terminal four helical bundle structure (1–93 domain) recognizes a broad range of lipids, but that TcsL-cat specifically binds to PS and phosphatidic acid. Here, we show using mutagenesis that the PS binding site is localized on the tip of the four-helix bundle which is rich in positively-charged amino acids. Residues Y14, V15, F17, and R18 on loop 1, between helices 1 and 2, in coordination with R68 from loop 3, between helices 3 and 4, form a pocket which accommodates L-serine. The functional PS-binding site is required for TcsL-cat binding to the plasma membrane and subsequent cytotoxicity. TcsL-cat binding to PS facilitates a high enzymatic activity towards membrane-anchored Ras by about three orders of magnitude as compared to Ras in solution. The PS-binding site is conserved in LCGTs, which likely retain a common mechanism of binding to the membrane for their full activity towards membrane-bound GTPases. PMID:27023605

  20. Establishment of in vitro soybean aphids, Aphis glycines (Hemiptera: Aphididae): a tool to facilitate studies of aphid symbionts, plant-insect interactions and insecticide efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunadi, Andika; Bansal, Raman; Finer, John J; Michel, Andy

    2017-06-01

    Studies on plant-insect interactions of the soybean aphid, Aphis glycines (Matsumura), can be influenced by environmental fluctuations, status of the host plant and variability in microbial populations. Maintenance of aphids on in vitro-grown plants minimizes environmental fluctuations, provides uniform host materials and permits the selective elimination of aphid-associated microbes for more standardized controls in aphid research. Aphids were reared on sterile, in vitro-grown soybean seedlings germinated on plant tissue culture media amended with a mixture of antimicrobials. For initiation and maintenance of in vitro aphid colonies, single aphids were inoculated onto single in vitro seedlings. After three rounds of transfer of 'clean' aphids to fresh in vitro seedlings, contamination was no longer observed, and aphids performed equally well when compared with those reared on detached leaves. The addition of the insecticides thiamethoxam and chlorantraniliprole to the culture medium confirmed uptake and caused significant mortality to the in vitro aphids. The use of the antimicrobial mixture removed the associated bacteria Arsenophonus but retained Buchnera and Wolbachia within the in vitro aphids. The in vitro aphid system is a novel and highly useful tool to understand insecticidal efficacy and expand our knowledge of tritrophic interactions among plants, insects and symbionts. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.